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Sample records for chemical oxygen-iodine laser

  1. Chemical kinetics of discharge-driven oxygen-iodine lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Azyazov, Valeriy N.; Kabir, Md. Humayun; Antonov, Ivan O.; Heaven, Michael C.

    2007-05-01

    Oxygen-iodine lasers that utilize electrical discharges to produce O II(a1Δ) are currently being developed. The discharge generators differ from those used in chemical oxygen-iodine lasers in that they produce significant amounts of atomic oxygen and traces of ozone. As a consequence of these differences, the chemical kinetics of the discharge laser are markedly different from those of a conventional chemical oxygen-iodine laser (COIL). The reactions of O with iodine include channels that are both beneficial and detrimental to the laser. The beneficial reactions result in the dissociation of I II while the detrimental processes cause direct and indirect removal of I(2P 1/2) (denoted I*, the upper level of the laser). We have examined kinetic processes relevant to the laser through studies of photo-initiated reactions in N IIO/CO II/I II mixtures. The reactions have been monitored using absorption spectroscopy, laser induced fluorescence and time-resolved emission spectroscopy. It has been established that deactivation of I* by O atoms is a critical energy loss process. We have determined a rate constant of (1.2+/-0.1)×10 -11 cm 3 s -1 for this reaction. As part of this effort the branching fraction for the formation of O II(a) from the reaction of O(1D) with N IIO was determined to be 0.38. This result has implications for lasers based on photolysis of O 3/N IIO/I II mixtures and the formation of O II(a) in the upper atmosphere.

  2. Solid-State Raman Converters for High-Average Power Chemical Oxygen Iodine Laser

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1998-01-01

    Converters for High-Average Power Chemical Oxygen Iodine Laser. (r7LEODF61708 97W0212 ) Moscow, 1998 j—SisfRSlJTION STA- IOTCQUAIITY INSPECTED 1 ~Z^ZTtop...Kc 1 Distribution Unlimited FINAL REPORT "Solid State Raman Converter for High-Average Power Chemical Oxygen Iodine Laser" Introduction...TITLE AND SUBTITLE Solid-State Raman Converters for High-Average Power Chemical Oxygen Iodine Laser 6. AUTHOR(S) Prof Tasoltan Tazretovich Basiev

  3. 20-Kw nitrogen diluent chemical oxygen-iodine laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Tientsai T.; Bhowmik, Anup; Burde, David H.; Clark, Roy; Carroll, S.; Dickerson, Robert A.; Eblen, J.; Gylys, Vytas T.; Hsia, Y. C.; Humphreys, Richard H., Jr.; Moon, L. F.; Hurlock, Steve C.; Tomassian, A.

    2002-09-01

    A new Chemical Oxygen-Iodine Laser (COIL) has been developed and demonstrated at chlorine flow rates up to 1 gmol/s. The laser employs a cross flow jet oxygen generator operating with no diluent. The generator product flow enters the laser cavity at Mach 1 and is accelerated by mixing with 5 gmol/s, Mach 5 nitrogen diluent in an ejector nozzle array. The nitrogen also serves as the carrier for iodine. Vortex mixing is achieved through the use of mixing tabs at the nitrogen nozzle exit. Mixing approach design and analysis, including CFD analysis, led to the preferred nozzle configuration. The selected mixing enhancement design was tested in cold flow and the results are in good agreement with the CFD predictions. Good mixing was achieved within the desired cavity flow length of 20 cm and pressure recovery about 90 Torr was measured at the cavity exit. Finally, the design was incorporated into the laser and power extraction as high as 20 kw was measured at the best operating condition of 0.9 gmol/s. Stable resonator mode footprints showed desieable intensity profiles, which none of the sugar scoop profiles characteristic of the conventional COIL designs.

  4. Development of a chemical oxygen - iodine laser with production of atomic iodine in a chemical reaction

    SciTech Connect

    Censky, M; Spalek, O; Jirasek, V; Kodymova, J; Jakubec, I

    2009-11-30

    The alternative method of atomic iodine generation for a chemical oxygen - iodine laser (COIL) in chemical reactions with gaseous reactants is investigated experimentally. The influence of the configuration of iodine atom injection into the laser cavity on the efficiency of the atomic iodine generation and small-signal gain is studied. (lasers)

  5. Experimental analysis of chemical oxygen-iodine lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bonnet, J.; David, D.; Georges, E.; Leporcq, B.; Pigache, D.; Verdier, C.

    The dissociation, excitation and quenching of iodine was examined in two lasers to build a data base for the kinetics of oxygen-iodine lasers. I2 mixed with Ar was pumped into a pyrex cavity in a small laser, and mixed with O2 in a larger laser. Measurements were made of the 1270 nm emission of O(2)1Delta in the larger laser. Excited I and I2 luminescence intensity profiles and the excited I emission profile in the presence of water vapor were obtained. Rising water vapor pressure decreased the luminescence and laser power by increasing the I2 dissociation time. In the larger laser, iodine, although injected, never reached the channel midplane, thus reducing the laser output to proportionally less than that of the smaller laser. A new injector will be tested in an attempt to achieve higher lasing powers.

  6. A pared-down gas-phase kinetics for the chemical oxygen-iodine laser medium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pichugin, S. Yu.; Heaven, M. C.

    2013-11-01

    Kinetic data obtained in the last decade has resulted in revisions of some mechanisms of excitation and deactivation of excited states in the chemical oxygen-iodine laser (COIL) medium. This review considers new kinetic data and presents analyses of the mechanisms of pumping and quenching of electronically and vibrationally excited states in the oxygen-iodine laser media. An effective three-level model of I2 molecule excitation and relaxation has been developed. The calculated effective rate constants for deactivation of I2(X,11 ⩽ υ ⩽ 24) by O2, N2, He and CO2 are presented. A simplified kinetic package for the COIL active medium is recommended. This model consists of a 30-reaction set with 14 species. The results of calculations utilizing simplified model are in good agreement with the experimental data.

  7. Performance characteristics of a chemical oxygen-iodine laser without a water vapor trap

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kikuchi, Toshio; Tsuruyama, Toru; Uchiyama, Taro

    1988-09-01

    The effect of water vapor on the operation of a chemical oxygen-iodine laser without a water vapor trap is described. The maximum CW laser power of 87 W was obtained without the water vapor trap at a Cl2 flow rate of 740 mmol/min. An alkaline H2O2 solution (90 wt pct H2O2, 50 wt pct KOH) was cooled down to about -30 C in order to control the saturated H2O2-H2O vapor pressure to less than 100 mTorr. Two porous pipes made of carbon were utilized as a singlet oxygen generator.

  8. Test bed for a high throughput supersonic chemical oxygen - iodine laser

    SciTech Connect

    Singhal, Gaurav; Mainuddin; Rajesh, R; Varshney, A K; Dohare, R K; Kumar, Sanjeev; Singh, V K; Kumar, Ashwani; Verma, Avinash C; Arora, B S; Chaturvedi, M K; Tyagi, R K; Dawar, A L

    2011-05-31

    The paper reports the development of a test bed for a chemical oxygen - iodine laser based on a high throughput jet flow singlet oxygen generator (JSOG). The system provides vertical singlet oxygen extraction followed by horizontal orientation of subsequent subsystems. This design enables the study of flow complexities and engineering aspects of a distributed weight system as an input for mobile and other platform-mounted systems developed for large scale power levels. The system under consideration is modular and consists of twin SOGs, plenum and supersonic nozzle modules, with the active medium produced in the laser cavity. The maximal chlorine flow rate for the laser is {approx}1.5 mole s{sup -1} achieving a typical chemical efficiency of about 18%. (lasers)

  9. Operational characteristics of high-pressure subsonic mode chemical oxygen-iodine lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Endo, Masamori; Sugimoto, Daichi; Tei, Kazuyoku; Takeda, Shuzaburo; Nanri, Kenzo; Fujioka, Tomoo

    2000-05-01

    High-pressure subsonic mode operation of chemical oxygen- iodine laser (COIL) is studied. In this mode, the singlet oxygen generated by the liquid-jet singlet oxygen generator (SOG) is directly utilized in the optical cavity without supersonic expansion. Drastic reduction of the required vacuum pump capacity, and iodine consumption was obtained. We have demonstrated a 25.0 percent of chemical efficiency with a small-scale device. The scale-up version of the COIL is developed and initial tests are conducted. The device is so designed that it will operate for 2 hours at 1kW laser output. Due to the inadequate heat exchanger of basic hydrogen peroxide (BHP), performance of the system was not yet satisfactory. However, a 30-minute continuous operation o the counter-flow type jet SOG with recirculation of BHP was demonstrated for the first time.

  10. Use of basic deuterium peroxide in the chemical oxygen-iodine laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vetrovec, John; Yang, Tientsai T.; Copeland, Drew A.

    2000-05-01

    The chemical oxygen-iodine laser (COIL) uses a reaction of gaseous chorine and aqueous solution of basic oxygen peroxide (BHP) to produce oxygen singlet delta molecules, O2(1(Delta) ). Quenching of O2(1(Delta) ) during its extraction from the BHP solution and quenching of excited atomic iodine I* by water vapor from the O2(1(Delta) ) production process are well-known parasitic effects in COIL. This paper shows that both of these effects can be significantly reduced by replacing the hydrogen 1H1 isotope atoms in BHP by the 1H2 isotope atoms. In addition to restoring laser power lost to parasitic quenching, use of basic deuterium peroxide (BDP) rather than BHP is expected to allow generation of O2(1(Delta) ) at elevated temperature. This approach promises to save refrigerant, reduce the risk of BDP freezing, and delay precipitation of salt form BDP solution. Methods for producing BDP are outlined.

  11. A computational fluid dynamics simulation of a supersonic chemical oxygen-iodine laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Waichman, K.; Rybalkin, V.; Katz, A.; Dahan, Z.; Barmashenko, B. D.; Rosenwaks, S.

    2007-05-01

    The dissociation of I II molecules at the optical axis of a supersonic chemical oxygen-iodine laser (COIL) was studied via detailed measurements and three dimensional computational fluid dynamics calculations. Comparing the measurements and the calculations enabled critical examination of previously proposed dissociation mechanisms and suggestion of a mechanism consistent with the experimental and theoretical results. The gain, I II dissociation fraction and temperature at the optical axis, calculated using Heidner's model (R.F. Heidner III et al., J. Phys. Chem. 87, 2348 (1983)), are much lower than those measured experimentally. Agreement with the experimental results was reached by using Heidner's model supplemented by Azyazov-Heaven's model (V.N. Azyazov and M.C. Heaven, AIAA J. 44, 1593 (2006)) where I II(A') and vibrationally excited O II(a1Δ) are significant dissociation intermediates.

  12. Regeneration of basic hydrogen peroxide for chemical oxygen-iodine laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hano, Masami; Wakita, Syuhei; Uno, Masaharu; Endo, Masamori; Nanri, Kenzo; Takeda, Shuzaburo; Fujioka, Tomoo

    2003-11-01

    Regeneration of Basic Hydrogen Peroxide (BHP) for Chemical Oxygen Iodine Laser (COIL) has been studied. The apparatus is an electrolyte H2O2 generator, which is composed of anode chamber, cathode chamber with gas diffusion electrode and cation exchange membrane. BHP containing 5 to 10 weight percent (wt%) of H2O2 is supplied to the apparatus and the change in the H2O2 concentration is measured for various operational conditions. A 5.11wt% BHP is regenerated with current efficiency of 92% and a 10.4wt% BHP is regenerated with current efficiency of 73%. It is found that the BHP flow rate and temperature of the BHP are critical to obtain high current efficiency.

  13. Chemical oxygen-iodine laser (COIL) for the dismantlement of nuclear facilities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hallada, Marc R.; Seiffert, Stephan L.; Walter, Robert F.; Vetrovec, John

    2000-05-01

    The dismantlement of obsolete nuclear facilities is a major challenge for both the US Department of Energy and nuclear power utilities. Recent demonstrations have shown that lasers can be highly effective for size reduction cutting, especially for the efficient storage and recycling of materials. However, the full benefits of lasers can only be realized with high average power beams that can be conveniently delivered, via fiber optics, to remote and/or confined areas. Industrial lasers that can meet these requirements are not available now or for the foreseeable future. However, a military weapon laser, a Chemical Oxygen Iodine Laser (COIL), which has been demonstrated at over a hundred kilo Watts, could be adapted to meet these needs and enable entirely new industrial applications. An 'industrialized' COIL would enable rapid sectioning of thick and complex structures, such as glove boxes, reactor vessels, and steam generators, accelerating dismantlement schedules and reducing worker hazards. The full advantages of lasers in dismantlement could finally be realized with a portable COIL which is integrated with sophisticated robotics. It could be built and deployed in less than two years, breaking the paradigm of labor-intensive dismantlement operations and cutting processing times and costs dramatically.

  14. Performance model for optical extraction from a pulsed chemical oxygen-iodine laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Copeland, D. A.; Bauer, A. H.; Jones, K. D.

    A comprehensive time-dependent gain model for pulsed optical extraction from a flowing oxygen-iodine laser medium is described. Gas flow is treated using an unsteady, premixed, quasi-one-dimensional model which accounts for gas motion and expansion as well as heat release in the cavity. The model uses a simplified, temperature-dependent, chemical kinetics package which consists of several reactions among the 3Sigma, 1Delta, and 1Sigma states of oxygen, atomic and molecular iodine, water, and helium. Hyperfine relaxation effects on the gain and optical extraction from the 3-4 line are treated using a simple four-level laser model. An efficient algorithm for solving the coupled medium and optical extraction equations is described. This gain model, in conjunction with a geometric model of an unstable confocal resonator, is used to examine energy extraction from the medium as a function of pulse repetition rate, duty cycle, and optical mode width. It is shown that the output power may exhibit flow-induced relaxation oscillations and the conditions under which these oscillations occur are discussed.

  15. Performance model for optical extraction from a Q-switched chemical oxygen-iodine laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Copeland, D. A.; Bauer, A. H.; Jones, K. D.

    1993-03-01

    A comprehensive time-dependent model for optical extraction from a Q-switched supersonic oxygen-iodine laser is described. Gas flow is treated by using an unsteady, premixed, quasi-1D model that accounts for gas motion and expansion as well as heat release in the cavity. The model uses a simplified, temperature-dependent, chemical kinetics package that consists of several reactions among the 3Sigma, 1Delta, and 1Sigma states of oxygen, atomic and molecular iodine, water, and helium. Hyperfine relaxation effects on the gain and optical extraction from the 3-4 transition line are treated by using a simple four-level laser model. An efficient algorithm for solving the coupled medium and optical extraction equations, in conjunction with a geometric model of an unstable confocal resonator, is used to examine optical extraction from the medium as a function of pulse repetition rate, duty cycle, and optical mode width. It is shown that the output power may exhibit flow-induced relaxation oscillations.

  16. Removal of Water Vapor in a Mist Singlet Oxygen Generator for Chemical Oxygen Iodine Laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muto, Shigeki; Endo, Masamori; Nanri, Kenzo; Fujioka, Tomoo

    2004-02-01

    The mist singlet oxygen generator (Mist-SOG) for a chemical oxygen iodine laser (COIL) has been developed in order to increase basic hydrogen peroxide (BHP) utilization. It was clarified that the Mist-SOG generated much more water vapor than conventional SOGs because the heat capacity of BHP is small. The water vapor deactivates the excited iodine and depresses the laser power. Therefore, a jet-cold trap was developed in order to remove the water vapor while maintaining a minimum deactivation of singlet oxygen. In this method, a nozzle was used to spray chilled H2O2 at 238 K as a thin layer directly to the gas flow to achieve a large specific surface area for water vapor. As a result, the water vapor mole fraction was reduced to 7% from 18% with the BHP utilization of 21% at the Cl2 consumption rate of 3.5 mmol/s (Cl2 input flow rate of 8.0 mmol/s) for 65-μm-diameter BHP droplets.

  17. Chemical oxygen-iodine laser with a centrifugal spray generator of singlet oxygen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Špalek, Otomar; Jirásek, Vít; Čenský, Miroslav; Kodymová, Jarmila

    2010-09-01

    A chemical oxygen-iodine laser driven by the centrifugal spray generator of singlet oxygen was developed and experimentally studied. Modeling and experimental studies showed that the designed generator can produce singlet oxygen, O2(1Δg), with a high efficiency (chlorine utilization 0.68 - 0.87 and O2(1Δg) yield 0.35 - 0.7) even at very high generator pressures (25 - 70 kPa), which cannot be attained by other O2(1Δg) generators. This high-pressure operation should be beneficial for a pressure recovery system of the laser. Another specific feature of the generator is a very high BHP utilization (0.24-0.6). The developed separator can effectively remove even small droplets (> 1 μm) from gas at the generator exit. Preliminary experiments on the COIL driven the centrifugal spray generator provided the small signal gain up to 0.5 % cm-1.

  18. Kinetic-fluid dynamics modeling of I2 dissociation in supersonic chemical oxygen-iodine lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Waichman, K.; Barmashenko, B. D.; Rosenwaks, S.

    2009-09-01

    The mechanism of I2 dissociation in supersonic chemical oxygen-iodine lasers (COILs) is studied applying kinetic-fluid dynamics modeling, where pathways involving the excited species I2(X Σ1g +,10≤v<25), I2(X Σ1g +,25≤v≤47), I2(A'Π32u), I2(AΠ31u), O2(X Σ3g -,v), O2(aΔ1g,v), O2(b Σ1g +,v), and I(P21/2) as intermediate reactants are included. The gist of the model is adding the first reactant and reducing the contribution of the second as compared to previous models. These changes, recently suggested by Azyazov, et al. [J. Chem. Phys. 130, 104306 (2009)], significantly improve the agreement with the measurements of the gain in a low pressure supersonic COIL for all I2 flow rates that have been tested in the experiments. In particular, the lack of agreement for high I2 flow rates, which was encountered in previous models, has been eliminated in the present model. It is suggested that future modeling of the COIL operation should take into account the proposed contribution of the above mentioned reactants.

  19. Parametric studies of a small-scale chemical oxygen-iodine laser/jet generator system: recent achievements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Furman, Dov; Barmashenko, Boris D.; Rosenwaks, Salman

    1998-05-01

    Recent results of parametric studies of an efficient supersonic chemical oxygen-iodine laser are presented. The laser is energized by a jet type singlet oxygen generator, operated without primary buffer gas and applies simple nozzle geometry and transonic mixing of iodine and oxygen. Output power of 190 W with chemical efficiency of 18% was obtained in a 5 cm gain length for Cl2 flow rate of 11.8 mmole/s. The power is studied as a function of the distance between the optical axis and the supersonic nozzle exit plane, the molar flow rates of various reagents, the BHP and gas pressures in the generator, the type of the secondary buffer gas (N2 or He) and the stagnation temperature of the gas. It is found that the power under the present operation conditions is almost unaffected by water vapor in the medium. The role of buffer gas under different conditions is discussed.

  20. Data acquisition and control system with a programmable logic controller (PLC) for a pulsed chemical oxygen-iodine laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Haijun; Li, Guofu; Duo, Liping; Jin, Yuqi; Wang, Jian; Sang, Fengting; Kang, Yuanfu; Li, Liucheng; Wang, Yuanhu; Tang, Shukai; Yu, Hongliang

    2015-02-01

    A user-friendly data acquisition and control system (DACS) for a pulsed chemical oxygen -iodine laser (PCOIL) has been developed. It is implemented by an industrial control computer,a PLC, and a distributed input/output (I/O) module, as well as the valve and transmitter. The system is capable of handling 200 analogue/digital channels for performing various operations such as on-line acquisition, display, safety measures and control of various valves. These operations are controlled either by control switches configured on a PC while not running or by a pre-determined sequence or timings during the run. The system is capable of real-time acquisition and on-line estimation of important diagnostic parameters for optimization of a PCOIL. The DACS system has been programmed using software programmable logic controller (PLC). Using this DACS, more than 200 runs were given performed successfully.

  1. Gain and temperature in a slit nozzle supersonic chemical oxygen-iodine laser with transonic and supersonic injection of iodine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rosenwaks, Salman; Barmashenko, Boris D.; Bruins, Esther; Furman, Dov; Rybalkin, Victor; Katz, Arje

    2002-05-01

    Spatial distributions of the gain and temperament across the flow were studied for transonic and supersonic schemes of the iodine injection in a slit nozzle supersonic chemical oxygen-iodine laser as a function of the iodine and secondary nitrogen flow rate, jet penetration parameter and gas pumping rate. The mixing efficiency for supersonic injection of iodine is found to be much larger than for transonic injection, the maximum values of the gain being approximately 0.65 percent/cm for both injection schemes. Measurements of the gain distribution as a function of the iodine molar flow rate nI2 were carried out. For transonic injection the optimal value of nI2 at the flow centerline is smaller than that at the off axis location. The temperature is distributed homogeneously across the flow, increasing only in the narrow boundary layers near the walls. Opening a leak downstream of the cavity in order to decease the Mach number results in a decrease of the gain and increase of the temperature. The mixing efficiency in this case is much larger than for closed leak.

  2. Dissociation of I II in chemical oxygen-iodine lasers: experiment, modeling, and pre-dissociation by electrical discharge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Katz, A.; Waichman, K.; Dahan, Z.; Rybalkin, V.; Barmashenko, B. D.; Rosenwaks, S.

    2007-06-01

    The dissociation of I II molecules at the optical axis of a supersonic chemical oxygen-iodine laser (COIL) was studied via detailed measurements and three dimensional computational fluid dynamics calculations. Comparing the measurements and the calculations enabled critical examination of previously proposed dissociation mechanisms and suggestion of a mechanism consistent with the experimental and theoretical results obtained in a supersonic COIL for the gain, temperature and I II dissociation fraction at the optical axis. The suggested mechanism combines the recent scheme of Azyazov and Heaven (AIAA J. 44, 1593 (2006)), where I II(A' 3Π 2u), I II(A 3Π 1u) and O II(a1Δ g, v) are significant dissociation intermediates, with the "standard" chain branching mechanism of Heidner et al. (J. Phys. Chem. 87, 2348 (1983)), involving I(2P 1/2) and I II(X1Σ + g, v). In addition, we examined a new method for enhancement of the gain and power in a COIL by applying DC corona/glow discharge in the transonic section of the secondary flow in the supersonic nozzle, dissociating I II prior to its mixing with O II(1Δ). The loss of O II(1Δ) consumed for dissociation was thus reduced and the consequent dissociation rate downstream of the discharge increased, resulting in up to 80% power enhancement. The implication of this method for COILs operating beyond the specific conditions reported here is assessed.

  3. Toward understanding the dissociation of I2 in chemical oxygen-iodine lasers: Combined experimental and theoretical studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Waichman, K.; Rybalkin, V.; Katz, A.; Dahan, Z.; Barmashenko, B. D.; Rosenwaks, S.

    2007-07-01

    The dissociation of I2 molecules at the optical axis of a supersonic chemical oxygen-iodine laser (COIL) was studied via detailed measurements and three-dimensional computational fluid dynamics calculations. The measurements, briefly reported in a recent paper [Rybalkin et al., Appl. Phys. Lett. 89, 021115 (2006)] and reanalyzed in detail here, revealed that the number N of consumed O2(aΔg1) molecules per dissociated I2 molecule depends on the experimental conditions: it is 4.5±0.4 for typical conditions and I2 densities applied for optimal operation of the COIL but increases at lower I2 densities. Comparing the measurements and the calculations enabled critical examination of previously proposed dissociation mechanisms and suggestion of a mechanism consistent with the experimental and theoretical results obtained in a supersonic COIL for the gain, temperature, I2 dissociation fraction, and N at the optical axis. The suggested mechanism combines the recent scheme of Azyazov and Heaven [AIAA J. 44, 1593 (2006)], where I2(A'Π2u3), I2(AΠ1u3), and O2(aΔg1,v) are significant dissociation intermediates, with the "standard" chain branching mechanism of Heidner III et al. [J. Phys. Chem. 87, 2348 (1983)], involving I(P1/22) and I2(XΣg +1,v).

  4. Optically (solar) pumped oxygen-iodine lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Danilov, O. B.; Zhevlakov, A. P.; Yur'ev, M. S.

    2014-07-01

    We present the results of theoretical and experimental studies demonstrating the possibility of developing an oxygen-iodine laser (OIL) with direct optical pumping of molecular oxygen involving inter-molecular interaction with charge transfer from donor molecule (buffer gas) to acceptor molecule (oxygen). This interaction lifts degeneracy of the lower energy states of molecular oxygen and increases its absorption cross section in the visible spectral region and the UV Herzberg band, where high quantum yield of singlet oxygen is achieved (QY ˜ 1 and QY ˜ 2, respectively) at the same time. A pulse-periodic optical pump sources with pulse energy of ˜50 kJ, pulse duration of ˜25 μs, and repetition rate of ˜10 Hz, which are synchronized with the mechanism of singlet oxygen generation, are developed. This allows implementation of a pulse-periodic oxygen-iodine laser with an efficiency of ˜25%, optical efficiency of ˜40%, and parameter L/ T ˜ 1/1.5, where T is the thermal energy released in the laser active medium upon generation of energy L. It is demonstrated that, under direct solar pumping of molecular oxygen, the efficiency parameter of the OIL can reach L/ T ˜ 1/0.8 in a wide range of scaling factors.

  5. Kinetic-fluid dynamics modeling of I{sub 2} dissociation in supersonic chemical oxygen-iodine lasers

    SciTech Connect

    Waichman, K.; Barmashenko, B. D.; Rosenwaks, S.

    2009-09-15

    The mechanism of I{sub 2} dissociation in supersonic chemical oxygen-iodine lasers (COILs) is studied applying kinetic-fluid dynamics modeling, where pathways involving the excited species I{sub 2}(X {sup 1}SIGMA{sub g}{sup +},10<=v<25), I{sub 2}(X {sup 1}SIGMA{sub g}{sup +},25<=v<=47), I{sub 2}(A{sup '} {sup 3}PI{sub 2u}), I{sub 2}(A {sup 3}PI{sub 1u}), O{sub 2}(X {sup 3}SIGMA{sub g}{sup -},v), O{sub 2}(a {sup 1}DELTA{sub g},v), O{sub 2}(b {sup 1}SIGMA{sub g}{sup +},v), and I({sup 2}P{sub 1/2}) as intermediate reactants are included. The gist of the model is adding the first reactant and reducing the contribution of the second as compared to previous models. These changes, recently suggested by Azyazov, et al. [J. Chem. Phys. 130, 104306 (2009)], significantly improve the agreement with the measurements of the gain in a low pressure supersonic COIL for all I{sub 2} flow rates that have been tested in the experiments. In particular, the lack of agreement for high I{sub 2} flow rates, which was encountered in previous models, has been eliminated in the present model. It is suggested that future modeling of the COIL operation should take into account the proposed contribution of the above mentioned reactants.

  6. Advanced Nozzle Concepts for the Chemical Oxygen-Iodine Laser (COIL)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-03-01

    Branch *) The objective of this project is to develop the optimal ejector nozzle bank (with additional nozzles for injection iodine vapor at low...gain (SSG) by employing of the Rigrod dependencies of the laser power. An application of an ejector -like nozzle bank to produce a gain medium in the...sonic/supersonic jets is very slow and it is necessary to use some kind of mixing enhancement schemes. Such mixing enhancement in the ejector

  7. Electric Oxygen Iodine Laser: A Study for Scaling

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-09-03

    active components in the flow is small, resulting in a low gain coefficient . To produce a high- power oxygen iodine laser system it will be necessary... iodine laser: A study for scaling Sb. GRANT NUMBER F A9550-07-l-0529 Sc. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6. AUTHOR(S) Sd. PROJECT NUMBER Michael C. Heaven Se...potentially limit scaling of the electric oxygen iodine laser (EOIL) were examined. Quenching of excited iodine atoms (I*) by atomic oxygen has been

  8. Effect of velocity cross-relaxation and mode separation upon the power spectrum of a chemical oxygen-iodine laser resonator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Copeland, Drew A.

    1990-06-01

    A gain model for optical extraction from the CW chemical oxygen-iodine laser medium is described. It uses a simplified, temperatuire-dependent, chemical kinetics package which consists of several reactions between molecular oxygen, atomic and molecular iodine, water, and helium. The Heidner I2 dissociation mechanism is included to allow for incomplete dissociation. Gas flow is treated using a premixed, one-dimensional stream-tube model which accounts for gas expansion and heat release in the cavity. Collisional cross-relaxation effects upon the Doppler-broadened line are treated using a Fokker-Planck diffusion model of the velocity distribution of the upper and lower laser levels. This model, in conjunction with geometric optics, multimode model of an unstable standing-wave confocal resonator, is used to examine the influence of incomplete velocity cross-relaxation and longitudinal mode separation upon the output power and mode spectrum of the laser. It is shown that lasing will occur on all available modes even when the mode separation is less than the collision linewidth.

  9. Development of the electric discharge oxygen-iodine laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carroll, David L.; Verdeyen, Joseph T.; King, Darren M.; Palla, Andrew D.; Laystrom, Julia K.; Benavides, Gabriel F.; Zimmerman, Joseph W.; Woodard, Brian S.; Solomon, Wayne C.

    2007-05-01

    In the hybrid electric discharge Oxygen-Iodine laser (ElectricOIL), the desired O II(a1Δ) is produced using a low-to-medium pressure electric discharge. The discharge production of atomic oxygen, ozone, and other excited species adds higher levels of complexity to the post-discharge kinetics which are not encountered in a classic purely chemical O II(a1Δ) generation system. Experimental studies over the past six years using electric discharges have demonstrated O II(a) yields greater than 20%, gain, and cw laser power. Several modeling studies have also been performed for ElectricOIL and similar systems. As the development of this type of iodine laser continues, the roles of oxygen atoms and NO/NO II are found to be very significant in both the discharge region and downstream of the discharge region. A series of O II(1Δ) emission, I* emission, O-atom titrations, gain, and O II(1Δ) yield, NO II* emission, and laser power measurements have been taken to explore the complex phenomena that are being observed. As the overall system is better understood improvements are being made in laser power and efficiency.

  10. Numerical study of He/CF{sub 3}I pulsed discharge used to produce iodine atom in chemical oxygen-iodine laser

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang Jiao; Wang Yanhui; Wang Dezhen; Duo Liping; Li Guofu

    2013-04-15

    The pulsed discharge for producing iodine atoms from the alkyl and perfluoroalky iodides (CH{sub 3}I, CF{sub 3}I, etc.) is the most efficient method for achieving the pulse operating mode of a chemical oxygen-iodine laser. In this paper, a one-dimensional fluid model is developed to study the characteristics of pulsed discharge in CF{sub 3}I-He mixture. By solving continuity equation, momentum equation, Poisson equation, Boltzmann equation, and an electric circuit equation, the temporal evolution of discharge current density and various discharge products, especially the atomic iodine, are investigated. The dependence of iodine atom density on discharge parameters is also studied. The results show that iodine atom density increases with the pulsed width and pulsed voltage amplitude. The mixture ratio of CF{sub 3}I and helium plays a more significant role in iodine atom production. For a constant voltage amplitude, there exists an optimal mixture ratio under which the maximum iodine atom concentration is achieved. The bigger the applied voltage amplitude is, the higher partial pressure of CF{sub 3}I is needed to obtain the maximum iodine atom concentration.

  11. Experimental verification of the Einstein A-coefficient used for evaluation of O2(1Δg) concentration in the chemical oxygen-iodine laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spalek, O.; Kodymová, J.; Stopka, P.; Micek, I.

    1999-04-01

    This paper is a contribution to the current discussion on the Einstein coefficient for spontaneous emission (A-coefficient) of singlet delta oxygen, O2(1Δg), that is often used for an evaluation of O2(1Δg) concentration in a chemical oxygen-iodine laser (COIL). The published values of the A-coefficient vary in a wide range, corresponding to a radiative lifetime of O2(1Δg), τ_Δ^rad, from ~53 to ~151 min. This could make an evaluation of COIL operation questionable. In this paper, the Einstein A-coefficient is estimated, based on the comparison of O2(1Δg) concentrations determined by two independent methods: electron paramagnetic resonance and emission spectroscopy. Within the accuracy of the experimental techniques used, the value of the A-coefficient resulting from our investigation is (2.24±0.40) × 10-4 s-1, corresponding to τ_Δ^rad of ~74 min. This result is more consistent with the value of 2.58 × 10-4 s-1 of Badger et al [1] than with the value of 1.47 × 10-4 s-1 reported recently by Mlynczak and Nesbitt [2], who raised doubt about the Badger et al value.

  12. Excited states in the active media of oxygen - iodine lasers

    SciTech Connect

    Azyazov, V N

    2009-11-30

    A review of investigations of kinetic processes in active media oxygen - iodine lasers (OILs) performed in the last decade is presented. The mechanisms of pumping and quenching of electronically and vibrationally excited O{sub 2} and I{sub 2} molecules are considered, and dissociation mechanisms of I{sub 2} in the active medium of the OIL are analysed. The values of kinetic constants of processes proceeding in the active media of OILs are recommended. (review)

  13. Overview of iodine generation for oxygen-iodine lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jirásek, Vít.

    2012-01-01

    A review of the methods for generation of iodine for oxygen-iodine lasers (OIL) is presented. The chemical and physical methods for production of both atomic (AI) and molecular (MI) iodine have been searched in order to improve the efficiency and/or technology of OILs. These trials were motivated by the estimations that a substantial part of singlet oxygen (SO) could be saved with these methods and the onset of the laser active medium will be accelerated. Vapour of MI can be generated by the evaporation of solid or pressurized liquid I2, or synthesized in situ by the reaction of Cl2 with either HI or CuI2. The chemical methods of generation of AI are based on the substitution of I atom in a molecule of HI or ICl by another halogen atom produced usually chemically. The discharge methods include the dissociation of various iodine compounds (organic iodides, I2, HI) in the RF, MW, DC-pulsed or DC-vortex stabilized discharge. Combined methods use discharge dissociation of molecules (H2, F2) to gain atoms which subsequently react to replace AI from the iodine compound. The chemical methods were quite successful in producing AI (up to the 100% yield), but the enhancement of the laser performance was not reported. The discharge methods had been subsequently improving and are today able to produce up to 0.4 mmol/s of AI at the RF power of 500 W. A substantial enhancement of the discharge- OIL performance (up to 40%) was reported. In the case of Chemical-OIL, the enhancement was reported only under the conditions of a low I2/O2 ratio, where the "standard" I2 dissociation by SO is slow. The small-signal gain up to 0.3 %/cm was achieved on the supersonic COIL using the HI dissociated in the RF discharge. Due to the complicated kinetics of the RI-I-I2-SO system and a strong coupling with the gas flow and mixing, the theoretical description of the problem is difficult. It, however, seems that we can expect the major improvement of the OIL performance for those systems, where

  14. Analytic study of the chain dark decomposition reaction of iodides - atomic iodine donors - in the active medium of a pulsed chemical oxygen-iodine laser: 2. Limiting parameters of the branching chain dark decomposition reaction of iodides

    SciTech Connect

    Andreeva, Tamara L; Kuznetsova, S V; Maslov, Aleksandr I; Sorokin, Vadim N

    2009-08-31

    The final stages in the development of a branching chain decomposition reaction of iodide in the active medium of a pulsed chemical oxygen-iodine laser (COIL) are analysed. Approximate expressions are derived to calculate the limiting parameters of the chain reaction: the final degree of iodide decomposition, the maximum concentration of excited iodine atoms, the time of its achievement, and concentrations of singlet oxygen and iodide at that moment. The limiting parameters, calculated by using these expressions for a typical composition of the active medium of a pulsed COIL, well coincide with the results of numerical calculations. (active media)

  15. Analytical evaluation of kinetics in oxygen-iodine laser nozzle flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Quan, Victor

    1997-05-01

    The reaction processes in chemical oxygen-iodine laser nozzle flows are investigated analytically. In the transport equations for the reacting species, order-of-magnitude arguments are applied to retain the dominant terms. The effects of local flow properties on the chemical kinetics are found in terms of a transformed coordinate which is a function of the nozzle shape and inlet flow conditions. Approximate closed-form solutions for the iodine dissociation, oxygen yield, and the dissociation cost are derived. The results indicate that the chemical processes occur predominantly in the subsonic section of the nozzle where the pressure is high and velocity is low.

  16. Fullurene-oxygen-iodine laser (FOIL): physical principles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Danilov, Oleg B.; Belousova, Inna M.; Mak, Artur A.; Belousov, Vlidilen P.; Grenishin, A. S.; Kiselev, V. M.; Krys'ko, A. V.; Murav'eva, T. D.; Ponomarev, Alexander N.; Sosnov, Eugene N.

    2005-03-01

    The paper considers the physical principles of developing the fullerene - oxygen - iodine laser (FOIL) with optical (sunlight in particular) pumping. Kinetic scheme of such a laser is considered. It is shown that the utmost efficiency of FOIL may exceed 40% of the energy, absorbed by fullerenes. Presented are the experimental results of singlet oxygen generation in liquid media (solutions and suspensions) and in solid-state structures, containing either fullerenes or fullerene-like nanopartickles (FNP). In experiment was shown the possibility of the singlet oxygen transfer to the gaseous phase by means of organizing of the solution (suspension) the boiling as well as of the gasodynamic wave of desorption from the solid-state structures, containing fullerenes or FNP. We present the preliminary experimental results of pulsed generation in optically pumped FOIL with the use of primary photodissociation of iodide for preparation of the atomic iodine in the generation zone. In the experiments on FOIL generation was implemented the principle of spectral separation of optical pumping.

  17. Fullerene-oxygen-iodine laser (FOIL): physical principles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Danilov, Oleg B.; Belousova, Inna M.; Mak, Artur A.; Belousov, Vlidilen P.; Grenishin, A. S.; Kiselev, V. M.; Krys'ko, A. V.; Murav'eva, T. D.; Ponomarev, Alexander N.; Sosnov, Eugene N.

    2004-06-01

    The paper considers the physical principles of developing the fullerene-oxygen-iodine laser (FOIL) with optical (sunlight in particular) pumping. Kinetic scheme of such a laser is considered. It is shown that the utmost efficiency of FOIL may exceed 40% of the energy, absorbed by fullerenes. Presented are the experimental results of singlet oxygen generation in liquid media (solutions and suspensions) and in solid-state structures, containing either fullerenes or fullerene-like nanoparticles (FNP). In experiment was shown the possibility of the singlet oxygen transfer to the gaseous phase by means of organizing of the solution (suspension) the boiling as well as of the gasodynamic wave of desorption from the solid-state structures, containing fullerenes or FNP. We present the preliminary experimental results of pulsed generation in optically pumped FOIL with the use of primary photodissociation of iodide for preparation of the atomic iodine in the generation zone. In the experiments on FOIL generation was implemented the principle of spectral separation of optical pumping.

  18. Fullerene-oxygen-iodine laser (FOIL): physical principles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Danilov, Oleg B.; Belousova, Inna M.; Mak, Artur A.; Belousov, Vlidilen P.; Grenishin, A. S.; Kiselev, V. M.; Krys'ko, A. V.; Murav'eva, T. D.; Ponomarev, Alexander N.; Sosnov, Eugene N.

    2004-09-01

    The paper considers the physical principles of developing the fullerene-oxygen-iodine laser (FOIL) with optical (sunlight in particular) pumping. Kinetic scheme of such a laser is considered. It is shown that the utmost efficiency of FOIL may exceed 40% of the energy, absorbed by fullerenes. Presented are the experimental results of singlet oxygen generation in liquid media (solutions and suspensions) and in solid-state structures, containing either fullerenes or fullerene-like nanoparticles (FNP). In experiment was shown the possibility of the singlet oxygen transfer to the gaseous phase by means of organizing of the solution (suspension) the boiling as well as of the gasodynamic wave of desorption from the solid-state structures, containing fullerenes or FNP. We present the preliminary experimental results of pulsed generation in optically pumped FOIL with the use of primary photodissociation of iodide for preparation of the atomic iodine in the generation zone. In the experiments on FOIL generation was implemented the principle of spectral separation of optical pumping.

  19. Results of experiments on iodine dissociation in active medium of oxygen-iodine laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zagidullin, Marsel V.; Khvatov, Nickolay A.; Malyshev, Mikhail S.

    2017-01-01

    Results of experiments on dissociation of iodine molecules in the presence of singlet oxygen molecules are presented for wide range of oxygen-iodine media composition. Rate constants values have been obtained: 4.3ṡ10-17cm3/s for the reaction O2(1Δ)+O2(1Δ)->O2(1Σ) +O2(3Σ) - (1), 2.8ṡ10-13 cm3/s for the reactionO2(1Δ)+I(2P1/2)->O2(1Σ)+I(2P3/2) - (4) and 8.3ṡ10-11 cm3/s for the reaction O2(1Σ) +I2->O2(3Σ)+2I - (2). Analysis of experiments shows that for the wide range of oxygen-iodine medium composition the dissociation occurs via the chain of reactions (1), (2), O2(1Δ)+I(2P3/2)->O2(3Σ)+I(2P1/2), (4) and via cascade process I2+I(2P1/2)->I2(v)+I(2P3/2), I2(v)+O2(1Δ)→2I+O2(3Σ). Contributions of each mechanism in the dissociation of the iodine are comparable for the typical composition of the active medium of the supersonic chemical oxygen-iodine laser. The experiments did not reveal the contribution of vibrationally excited oxygen molecules in the dissociation of iodine. Thus, the experiments and the following conclusions are fully confirmed iodine dissociation mechanism previously proposed by Heidner et al. (J. Phys. Chem., 87, 2348 (1983)).

  20. Mixing effects in postdischarge modeling of electric discharge oxygen-iodine laser experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palla, Andrew D.; Carroll, David L.; Verdeyen, Joseph T.; Solomon, Wayne C.

    2006-07-01

    In an electric discharge oxygen-iodine laser, laser action at 1315nm on the I(P1/22)→I(P3/22) transition of atomic iodine is obtained by a near resonant energy transfer from O2(aΔ1) which is produced using a low-pressure electric discharge. The discharge production of atomic oxygen, ozone, and other excited species adds higher levels of complexity to the postdischarge kinetics which are not encountered in a classic purely chemical O2(aΔ1) generation system. Mixing effects are also present. In this paper we present postdischarge modeling results obtained using a modified version of the BLAZE-II gas laser code. A 28 species, 105 reaction chemical kinetic reaction set for the postdischarge kinetics is presented. Calculations were performed to ascertain the impact of a two stream mixing mechanism on the numerical model and to study gain as a function of reactant mass flow rates. The calculations were compared with experimental data. Agreement with experimental data was improved with the addition of new kinetics and the mixing mechanism.

  1. Prediction of I2P 1/2-->2P 3/2 transition lineshapes from 3-D, time dependent simulations of chemical oxygen-iodine laser (COIL) flowfields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Madden, Timothy J.

    2008-02-01

    The lineshape of the I2P 1/2-->2P 3/2 transition provides a means to ascertain a variety of useful information regarding the performance of the chemical oxygen-iodine laser (COIL). The value at the center of the lineshape, commonly referred to as the 'line center,' is proportional to the laser amplification on the I2P 1/2-->2P 3/2 transition. The infinite integral of the lineshape is proportional to the number density of the ground and excited states of atomic iodine in the gas, indicating the degree of I II dissociation. And the width of the lineshape indicates the amount of broadening of the transition, both due to collisional and Doppler shift effects. As the Doppler shift is proportional to velocity, the width of the transition can be used to estimate the degree of random molecular motion in the gas, expressed in macroscopic terms as temperature. A Doppler shift to the frequencies in the transition can also occur through the straight-line, bulk motion of the gas, and this can be used to examine the velocity field of the gas. However, the flow may experience rotation through the presence of eddies carried within the gas, and these too may contribute to the Doppler shift of the lineshape frequencies. Given that eddies by virtue of their positive and negative velocity components can induce positive and negative Doppler shift, the widening of the lineshape is similar to thermal motion which also includes positive and negative velocities. Thus, when interpreting transition lineshapes, if some account is not made for both thermal and rotational motion, the effect of either physical process will be over-estimated. The work discussed here is oriented toward examining the interplay between the gas dynamics and the lineshape of the I2P 1/2-->2P 3/2 transition, and in turn determine the ramifications for the use of spectroscopic lineshape based diagnostics and interpretation of their data. These efforts in turn are directly linked to efforts improve the understanding of

  2. Micro Chemical Oxygen-Iodine Laser (COIL)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-10-01

    required to form a good o-ring seal. Steam generator design A pumping system based on steam ejectors was designed during the course of the previous HEL-JTO...options for the steam generator design . The first is to catalyze the decomposition of hydrogen peroxide through the use of a standard solid

  3. Mechanism of singlet oxygen deactivation in an electric discharge oxygen - iodine laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Azyazov, V. N.; Mikheyev, P. A.; Pershin, A. A.; Torbin, A. P.; Heaven, M. C.

    2014-12-01

    We have determined the influence of the reaction of molecular singlet oxygen with a vibrationally excited ozone molecule O2(a 1Δ) + O3(ν) → 2O2 + O on the removal rate of O2(a 1Δ) in an electric-discharge-driven oxygen - iodine laser. This reaction has been shown to be a major channel of O2(a 1Δ) loss at the output of an electric-discharge singlet oxygen generator. In addition, it can also contribute significantly to the loss of O2(a 1Δ) in the discharge region of the generator.

  4. Oxygen discharge and post-discharge kinetics experiments and modeling for the electric oxygen-iodine laser system.

    PubMed

    Palla, A D; Zimmerman, J W; Woodard, B S; Carroll, D L; Verdeyen, J T; Lim, T C; Solomon, W C

    2007-07-26

    Laser oscillation at 1315 nm on the I(2P1/2)-->I(2P3/2) transition of atomic iodine has been obtained by a near resonant energy transfer from O2(a1Delta) produced using a low-pressure oxygen/helium/nitric oxide discharge. In the electric discharge oxygen-iodine laser (ElectricOIL) the discharge production of atomic oxygen, ozone, and other excited species adds levels of complexity to the singlet oxygen generator (SOG) kinetics which are not encountered in a classic purely chemical O2(a1Delta) generation system. The advanced model BLAZE-IV has been introduced to study the energy-transfer laser system dynamics and kinetics. Levels of singlet oxygen, oxygen atoms, and ozone are measured experimentally and compared with calculations. The new BLAZE-IV model is in reasonable agreement with O3, O atom, and gas temperature measurements but is under-predicting the increase in O2(a1Delta) concentration resulting from the presence of NO in the discharge and under-predicting the O2(b1Sigma) concentrations. A key conclusion is that the removal of oxygen atoms by NOX species leads to a significant increase in O2(a1Delta) concentrations downstream of the discharge in part via a recycling process; however, there are still some important processes related to the NOX discharge kinetics that are missing from the present modeling. Further, the removal of oxygen atoms dramatically inhibits the production of ozone in the downstream kinetics.

  5. Electron-beam sustained discharge in oxygen gas mixtures: singlet delta oxygen production for oxygen-iodine laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frolov, Mikhail P.; Hager, Gordon D.; Ionin, Andrei A.; Klimachev, Yurii M.; Kochetov, Igor V.; Kotkov, Andrei A.; McIver, John K.; Napartovich, Anatolii P.; Podmar'kov, Yurii P.; Seleznev, Leonid V.; Sinitsyn, Dmitrii V.; Vagin, Nikolai P.; Yuryshev, Nikolay N.

    2004-09-01

    Electric properties and spectroscopy of an e-beam sustained discharge (EBSD) in oxygen and oxygen gas mixtures at gas pressure up to 100 Torr were experimentally studied. The pulsed discharge in pure oxygen and its mixtures with noble gases was shown to be very unstable and characterized by low input energy. When adding small amount of carbon monoxide or hydrogen, the electric stability of the discharge increases, specific input energy (SIE) per molecular component being more than order of magnitude higher and coming up to 6.5 kJ/(l atm) for gas mixture O2:Ar:CO = 1:1:0.1. The results of experiments on spectroscopy of the singlet delta oxygen O2(a1Δg)(SDO) and O2(b1Σg+) states in the EBSD are presented. The calibration of the optical scheme for measuring the SDO absolute concentration and yield using the detection of luminescence of the SDO going from a chemical SDO generator was done. The preliminary measurement of the SDO yield demonstrated that it was ~3% for the SIE of ~1 kJ/(l atm), which is close to the results of theoretical calculations for such a SIE. Theoretical calculations demonstrated that for the SIE of 6.5 kJ/(l atm) the SDO yield may reach ~20% exceeding its threshold value needed for oxygen-iodine laser operation at room temperature, although a part of the energy loaded into the EBSD goes into the vibrational energy of the molecular admixture, (which was experimentally demonstrated by launching a CO laser operating on an oxygen-rich mixture O2:Ar:CO = 1:1:0.1 and measuring its small-signal gain).

  6. Large-Eddy/Reynolds-Averaged Navier-Stokes Simulation of Shock-Train Development in a Coil-Laser Diffuser

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-09-06

    train formation and reactant mixing in a model Chemical Oxygen Iodine Laser (COIL) unit. The configuration consists of a converging-diverging nozzle, a...appear to influence the mixing process in the lasing cavity significantly. 15. SUBJECT TERMS Large-eddy simulation, chemical oxygen iodine lasers...model Chemical Oxygen Iodine Laser (COIL) unit. The configuration consists of a converging-diverging nozzle, a lasing cavity, and a diffuser. The

  7. Assessing Capabilities of the High Energy Liquid Laser Area Defense System through Combat Simulations

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-03-01

    Coast ............................................ 36 Figure 10. Extinction Coefficient vs Wavelength...significant cooling system. For example, the current Chemical Oxygen Iodine Laser (COIL) technology used in the ABL requires the Boeing 747 as a...HEL is a Chemical Oxygen Iodine Laser (COIL). The COIL, invented by the Air Force Research Laboratory (AFRL) in 1977, uses a mixture of chemicals

  8. Measuring the Yield of Singlet Oxygen in a Chemical Oxygen Iodine Laser (Postprint)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-08-01

    release; distribution is unlimited 13. SUPPLEMENTARY NOTES *Los Gatos Research, 67 East Evelyn Ave., Suite 3, Mountain View, CA 94041-1518...Kirtland AFB, NM 87117-5776 bLos Gatos Research, 67 East Evelyn Avenue, Suite 3, Mountain View, CA 94041-1518 ABSTRACT A critical parameter...oxygen to be measured. Ongoing work will enable researchers at AFRL and Los Gatos Research to more accurately measure the yield as additional

  9. Stabilized Iodine Flow for Long Run Time Chemical Oxygen-Iodine Lasers

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1992-10-01

    United States Government retains a nonexclusive royalty- free license to publish or reproduce the material contained herein, or allow others to do so, for...4 Flowchart of iodine control logic. 8 5 Variation of iodine flow on the RADICL device in the absence of active control. 11 6 Variation of iodine...flow on the RADICL device in the presence of active control. 11 7 The run helium purposely started low to observe the recovery of the control system. 13

  10. Electrochemical regeneration of basic hydrogen peroxide for chemical oxygen iodine laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Endo, Masamori; Hano, Masami; Wakita, Syuhei; Uno, Masaharu; Takeda, Shuzaburo

    2005-03-01

    A 3.6M basic hydrogen peroxide solution is electrochemically regenerated. The apparatus was originally developed for electrolytic H2O2 production, generating dilute (<0.2M) BHP for paper manufacturing. To suppress decomposition by various mechanisms, they are identified and quantified. Both caffeine and peracetic acid are found effective to suppress autodecomposition. Theoretical prediction of the current efficiency is made to find an optimum operational condition. A BHP of 3.614M is regenerated to 3.657M with a current efficiency of 67%.

  11. Development of a mist singlet oxygen generator for a chemical oxygen-iodine laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muto, Shigeki; Endo, Masamori; Nanri, Kenzo; Fujioka, Tomoo

    2003-11-01

    Mist singlet oxygen generator (Mist-SOG) has been developed in order to increase the BHP utilization. On the other hand, Mist-SOG generates much more water vapor than conventional SOG because the heat capacity of the BHP is small. It is well known that the water vapor deactivates the excited iodine. In order to remove the water vapor, we developed a jet-cold trap. In this method, a nozzle sprayed a chilled H2O2 at 238K with a thin layer form to the gas flow directly in order to get the large specific surface for the water vapor. As a result of experiment, Water vapor partial pressure reduced from 3.3 Torr at the BHP flow rate of 2.2 ml/s and Cl2 flow rate of 3.5 mmol/s for the 65μm BHP droplets.

  12. Airborne Laser (ABL): Issues for Congress

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-07-09

    bulbous turret on the front of the aircraft, but the COIL (Chemical Oxygen Iodine laser) is located in the aft section of the aircraft. System Overview...Chemical Oxygen Iodine Laser). COIL generates its energy through an onboard chemical reaction of oxygen and iodine molecules. Because this laser...The Air Force, and other Services, frequently complain about the onerous and disproportionate O&S (Operations and Support) costs of “high demand, low

  13. An experimental research on the mixing process of supersonic oxygen-iodine parallel streams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Zengqiang; Sang, Fengting; Zhang, Yuelong; Hui, Xiaokang; Xu, Mingxiu; Zhang, Peng; Zhao, Weili; Fang, Benjie; Duo, Liping; Jin, Yuqi

    2014-12-01

    The O2(1Δ)/I2 mixing process is one of the most important steps in chemical oxygen-iodine laser (COIL). Based on the chemical fluorescence method (CFM), a diagnostic system was set up to image electronically excited fluorescent I2(B3П0) by means of a high speed camera. An optimized data analysis approach was proposed to analyze the mixing process of supersonic oxygen-iodine parallel streams, employing a set of qualitative and quantitative parameters and a proper percentage boundary threshold of the fluorescence zone. A slit nozzle bank with supersonic parallel streams and a trip tab set for enhancing the mixing process were designed and fabricated. With the diagnostic system and the data analysis approach, the performance of the trip tab set was examined and is demonstrated in this work. With the mixing enhancement, the fluorescence zone area was enlarged 3.75 times. We have studied the mixing process under different flow conditions and demonstrated the mixing properties with different iodine buffer gases, including N2, Ar, He and CO2. It was found that, among the four tested gases, Ar had the best penetration ability, whilst He showed the best free diffusion ability, and both of them could be well used as the buffer gas in our experiments. These experimental results can be useful for designing and optimizing COIL systems.

  14. Optically pumped oxygen-iodine laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zagidullin, Marsel V.; Malyshev, Mikhail S.

    2017-01-01

    A novel optical pumping scheme considering a two-step irradiation by light at wavelengths near 500 nm and 1315 nm is proposed in this work. Radiation at 500 nm is used to dissociate about 1% of iodine molecules. The radiation at 1315 nm excites atomic iodine to the 2P1/2 state. Singlet oxygen molecules are produced via the energy exchange process I(2P1/2)+O2(X3Σ)-> I(2P3/2)+O2(a1Δ), while I(2P1/2)+O2(a1Δ) energy pooling produces b1Σ oxygen. I(2P3/2) and O2(1Σ) then accelerate the dissociation of I2. After gas dynamic cooling in supersonic nozzle, active medium may reach 100 W cm-2 and small signal gain of 0.01 cm-1.

  15. A Contribution of COIL Laboratory in Prague to the Chemical Oxygen-Iodine Laser Research and Development

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2002-01-24

    represented by the reverse reaction process with temperature dependent equilibrium constant 1(p3/2 ) + 02( 1 Ag) +_> I(2p 1 /2) + O2(Xg) Keq= k+k.= 0.75 exp...based on the mass balance for O2(’Ad) over a differential layer dy of the g-1 mixture following from the relation - NAn dq = r4f8Sdy (4) NA - the Avogadro ... constant , n - molar flow rate of chlorine or oxygen, 7 - 0 2(’A8) yield from layer dy (y - vertical coordinate specifying the distance from reactor

  16. Singlet oxygen generator for a solar powered chemically pumped iodine laser

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Busch, G. E.

    1984-01-01

    The potential of solid phase endoperoxides as a means to produce single-delta oxygen in the gas phase in concentrations useful to chemical oxygen-iodine lasers was investigated. The 1,4 - endoperoxide of ethyl 3- (4-methyl - 1-naphthyl) propanoate was deposited over an indium-oxide layer on a glass plate. Single-delta oxygen was released from the endoperoxide upon heating the organic film by means of an electrical discharge through the conductive indium oxide coating. The evolution of singlet-delta oxygen was determined by measuring the dimol emission signal at 634 nm. Comparison of the measured signal with an analytic model leads to two main conclusions: virtually all the oxygen being evolved is in the singlet-delta state and in the gas phase, and there is no significant quenching other than energy pooling on the time scale of the experiment (approximately 10 msec). The use of solid phase endoperoxide as a singlet-delta oxygen generator for an oxygen-iodine laser appears promising.

  17. Excimer laser chemical problems

    SciTech Connect

    Tennant, R.; Peterson, N.

    1982-01-01

    Techniques need to be developed to maintain XeF and XeCl laser performance over long periods of time without degradation resulting from chemical processes occurring within the laser. The dominant chemical issues include optical damage, corrosions of laser materials, gas contamination, and control of halogen concentration. Each of these issues are discussed and summarized. The methods of minimizing or controlling the chemical processes involved are presented.

  18. Kinetics of the Electric Discharge Pumped Oxygen-Iodine Laser

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-09-01

    p p dT k fPk Sh T T T dt P mVC P mVC = − − + (2.16) where kB is the Boltzmann constant; P is pressure; m is the mass of oxygen; and ’ 0 r...r r t g r t T eT t T e γ γ γ β α = + (2.18) where 0 B T p k Sh P mVC α = , βαγ += 0T , and 0 B in p k fP P mVC β = (2.19) If

  19. Proposal of a defense application for a chemical oxygen laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takehisa, K.

    2015-05-01

    Defense application for a chemical oxygen laser (COL) is explained. Although a COL has not yet been successful in lasing, the oscillator was estimated to produce a giant pulse with the full width at half maximum (FWHM) of ~0.05ms which makes the damage threshold for the mirrors several-order higher than that for a typical solid-state laser with a ~10ns pulse width. Therefore it has a potential to produce MJ class output considering the simple scalability of being a chemical laser. Since within 0.05ms a supersonic aircraft can move only a few centimeters which is roughly equal to the spot size of the focused beam at ~10km away using a large-diameter focusing mirror, a COL has a potential to make a damage to an enemy aircraft by a single shot without beam tracking. But since the extracted beam can propagate up to a few kilometers due to the absorption in the air, it may be suitable to use in space. While a chemical oxygen-iodine laser (COIL) can give a pulsed output with a width of ~2 ms using a high-pressure singlet oxygen generator (SOG). Therefore a pulsed COIL may also not require beam tracking if a target aircraft is approaching. Another advantage for these pulsed high-energy lasers (HELs) is that, in case of propagating in cloud or fog, much less energy is required for a laser for aerosol vaporization (LAV) than that of a LAV for a CW HEL. Considerations to use a COL as a directed energy weapon (DEW) in a point defense system are shown.

  20. Partial feedback unstable resonator on small scale supersonic large aperture chemical laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Hongyan; Wang, Rui; Li, Lei

    2015-05-01

    There is always a challenge on large aperture medium power laser's resonator design, stable resonator would supports significant higher order transverse modes, folded and telescope stable resonator are too complex and not preferred by engineers, unstable resonator need rather large round trip gain to compensate its high geometric out-coupling, which is difficult for this kind of laser since its gain length is limited due to the power level and large aperture. Partial feedback unstable resonator had been proposed to tackle this difficulty since the early days of laser development, however, the debates of its effect never stopped even with those distinguished optical resonator scientists such as Siegman, Anan'ev, and Weber. Recently integrated partial feedback unstable resonator design had been successfully demonstrated on a medium size chemical oxygen iodine laser. In this paper, we carry this resonator configuration on a small scale discharge driven supersonic nozzle array Hydrogen Fluoride chemical laser, a typical large aperture short gain length device. With magnification equals 4/3, we successfully get ten Watts level ring beam output.

  1. Multi-Disciplinary Research for High Energy Chemical Lasers, Closed-Cycle ElectricOIL Technology

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-10-31

    electrodynamic model predictions a laser system model was utilized to predict the scalability of the system; results indicate that theoretical electrical ...multidisciplinary research program for a high energy closed-cycle laser that is derived from the Electrically assisted Oxygen Iodine Laser (ElectricOlU (EOIL...flow iodine from one reservoir and trap it in another. The principal advantage of the hybrid EOIL system is trading a small fixed mass in electrical

  2. Kinetics of an oxygen - iodine active medium with iodine atoms optically pumped on the 2P1/2 - 2P3/2 transition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zagidullin, M. V.; Malyshev, M. S.; Azyazov, V. N.

    2015-08-01

    The kinetics of the processes occurring in an O2 - I2 - He - H2O gas flow in which photodissociation of molecular iodine at a wavelength close to 500 nm and excitation of atomic iodine on the 2P1/2 - 2P3/2 transition by narrow-band radiation near 1315 nm are implemented successively has been analysed. It is shown that implementation of these processes allows one to form an oxygen - iodine medium with a high degree of dissociation of molecular iodine and a relative content of singlet oxygen O2(a1Δ) exceeding 10%. Having formed a supersonic gas flow with a temperature ~100 K from this medium, one can reach a small-signal gain of about 10-2 cm-1 on the 2P1/2 - 2P3/2 transition in iodine atoms. The specific power per unit flow cross section in the oxygen - iodine laser with this active medium may reach ~100 W cm-2.

  3. High energy chemical laser system

    DOEpatents

    Gregg, D.W.; Pearson, R.K.

    1975-12-23

    A high energy chemical laser system is described wherein explosive gaseous mixtures of a reducing agent providing hydrogen isotopes and interhalogen compounds are uniformly ignited by means of an electrical discharge, flash- photolysis or an electron beam. The resulting chemical explosion pumps a lasing chemical species, hydrogen fluoride or deuterium fluoride which is formed in the chemical reaction. The generated lasing pulse has light frequencies in the 3- micron range. Suitable interhalogen compounds include bromine trifluoride (BrF$sub 3$), bromine pentafluoride (BrF$sub 5$), chlorine monofluoride (ClF), chlorine trifluoride (ClF$sub 3$), chlorine pentafluoride (ClF$sub 5$), iodine pentafluoride (IF$sub 5$), and iodine heptafluoride (IF$sub 7$); and suitable reducing agents include hydrogen (H$sub 2$), hydrocarbons such as methane (CH$sub 4$), deuterium (D$sub 2$), and diborane (B$sub 2$H$sub 6$), as well as combinations of the gaseous compound and/or molecular mixtures of the reducing agent.

  4. Chemically-Assisted Pulsed Laser-Ramjet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Horisawa, Hideyuki; Kaneko, Tomoki; Tamada, Kazunobu

    2010-10-01

    A preliminary study of a chemically-assisted pulsed laser-ramjet was conducted, in which chemical propellant such as a gaseous hydrogen/air mixture was utilized and detonated with a focused laser beam in order to obtain a higher impulse compared to the case only using lasers. CFD analysis of internal conical-nozzle flows and experimental measurements including impulse measurement were conducted to evaluate effects of chemical reaction on thrust performance improvement. From the results, a significant improvement in the thrust performances was confirmed with addition of a small amount of hydrogen to propellant air, or in chemically-augmented operation.

  5. Chemically-Assisted Pulsed Laser-Ramjet

    SciTech Connect

    Horisawa, Hideyuki; Kaneko, Tomoki; Tamada, Kazunobu

    2010-10-13

    A preliminary study of a chemically-assisted pulsed laser-ramjet was conducted, in which chemical propellant such as a gaseous hydrogen/air mixture was utilized and detonated with a focused laser beam in order to obtain a higher impulse compared to the case only using lasers. CFD analysis of internal conical-nozzle flows and experimental measurements including impulse measurement were conducted to evaluate effects of chemical reaction on thrust performance improvement. From the results, a significant improvement in the thrust performances was confirmed with addition of a small amount of hydrogen to propellant air, or in chemically-augmented operation.

  6. High Power 7-GHz Bandwidth External-Cavity Diode Laser Array and Its Use in Optically Pumping Singlet Delta Oxygen

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-10-11

    array,” Opt. Lett. 19, 1741 (1994). 2. Stuart MacCormack, Jack Feinberg, and M. H. Garrett , “Injection locking a laser-diode array with a phase...generate O2( 1∆) molecules, frequently called Singlet Delta Oxygen (SDO) molecules. High-power chemical oxygen-iodine lasers ( COIL ) use energy...45 A, thermal roll -over effect starts and output power drops due to high temperature (~30oC) of the DLA. The green data are the DLA’s free-running

  7. Laser Induced Chemical Liquid Phase Deposition (LCLD)

    SciTech Connect

    Nanai, Laszlo; Balint, Agneta M.

    2012-08-17

    Laser induced chemical deposition (LCLD) of metals onto different substrates attracts growing attention during the last decade. Deposition of metals onto the surface of dielectrics and semiconductors with help of laser beam allows the creation of conducting metal of very complex architecture even in 3D. In the processes examined the deposition occurs from solutions containing metal ions and reducing agents. The deposition happens in the region of surface irradiated by laser beam (micro reactors). Physics -chemical reactions driven by laser beam will be discussed for different metal-substrate systems. The electrical, optical, mechanical properties of created interfaces will be demonstrated also including some practical-industrial applications.

  8. Vibrationally Excited Molecules for Chemical Laser

    DTIC Science & Technology

    Briefly reported are studies on elementary, exothermic, atom-molecule reactions in the hopes of discovering basic features of chemical reaction into specific internal energy vibrational modes of the reaction products. The long- range goal of such studies would hopefully be the prediction of specific chemical reactions which might be promising candidates for chemical laser systems.

  9. Photodetachment neutralizer development: Laser window design study: Volume 1, Summary: Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1984-09-30

    Photodetachment neutralization (PDN) has been proposed as a major improvement to the gas cell neutralization utilized on current neutral beam heating systems for magnetic containment fusion devices. This PDN system will use a Chemical Oxygen Iodine Laser (COIL) to produce a light beam with photons of a near optimal wavelength which can be reflected back and forth across the path of the ion beam to create the necessary high density light ''cloud'' required for the photodetachment process. In a fusion device the neutral beam goes directly into the process vacuum chamber and therefore the oxygen iodine gas mixture in the laser must be isolated by a window from the neutral beam channel without loss of too much light or leakage of miniscule quantities of laser gas. The aerodynamic windows that have traditionally been used with chemical lasers are viewed as undesirable for the fusion application where any contamination of the fusion vacuum chamber by laser gas would be a big problem. It was concluded that the technological issues were uncertain enough that a verification by designing, fabricating, and testing of a demonstration window would be required before feasibility of such a window could be considered certain. The statement of work defined for this study consisted of two tasks: determination of the absorption characteristics of the proposed sapphire window material and the fluorocarbon coolant, and design and analysis of the proposed double disk heat exchanger window and demonstration test hardware.

  10. Bibliography of Short Wavelength Chemical Laser Research

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1993-05-01

    shock tube dissociation of fluorine azide, (2) identify and characterize alternatives to BiF as the lasant in an excited NF driven laser , (3) develop...L.F. Phillips KINETICS OF 12 FOLLOWING ArF LASER EXCITATION: THERMAL DISSOCIATION OF THE A’(2u) STATE J. Phys. Chem., 88, 6084 (1984) 267. Tellinghuisen...VISIBLE WAVELENGTH CHEMICAL LASER SCHEMES BASED ON THERMAL DISSOCIATION OF CHLORINE AZIDE Proc. Int. Conf on.LASERS 󈨟, Eds. F.J. Duarte and D.G. Harris

  11. Laser Induced Surface Chemical Epitaxy

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1990-03-01

    eV was observed in this study for DMTe adlay ,,;s annealed at 423 K, a condition which is likely to produce a metallic Te adlayer , the Cd 3d5 /2...processes were studied by irradiating the adlayer with ultraviolet photons produced by a Questek excimer laser. These were introduced into the deposition...binding energy observed for similarly annealed DMCd adlayers was 405.1 eV. Based on room temperature measurements and ligand shift and electronegativity

  12. Hydrogen peroxide sensor using laser grade dye Rhodamine B

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pattanaik, Amitansu; Sahare, P. D.; Nanda, Maitreyee

    2007-11-01

    Many chemical sensors based on fluorescence spectroscopy have been reported in applications, ranging from biomedical and environmental monitoring to industrial process control. In these diverse applications, the analyte can be probed directly, by measuring its intrinsic absorption, or by incorporating some transduction mechanism such as reagent chemistry to enhance sensitivity and selectivity. Hydrogen Peroxide is a colorless liquid. It is a common oxidizing and bleaching agent. It plays an important role in High Power Laser such as Chemical Oxygen Iodine Laser (COIL). As it is on the Hazardous substance list and on the special health hazard substance list, detection of Hydrogen Peroxide is of great importance. In the present study the detection of hydrogen Peroxide is by fluorescence quenching of laser grade dye Rhodamine B. Estimation of rate constant of the bimolecular quenching reaction is made.

  13. Chemical aerosol detection using femtosecond laser pulses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alexander, Dennis R.; Rohlfs, Mark L.; Stauffer, John C.

    1997-07-01

    Many chemical warfare agents are dispersed as small aerosol particles. In the past, most electro-optical excitation and detection schemes have used continuous or pulsed lasers with pulse lengths ranging from nanoseconds to microseconds. In this paper, we present interesting ongoing new results on femtosecond imaging and on the time dependent solutions to the scattering problem of a femtosecond laser pulse interacting with a single small aerosol particle. Results are presented for various incident pulse lengths. Experimental imaging results using femtosecond pulses indicate that the diffraction rings present when using nanosecond laser pulses for imaging are greatly reduced when femtosecond laser pulses are used. Results are presented in terms of the internal fields as a function of time and the optical size parameter.

  14. Laser-based detection of chemical contraband

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clemmer, Robert G.; Kelly, James F.; Martin, Steven W.; Mong, Gary M.; Sharpe, Steven W.

    1997-02-01

    The goal of our work is tow fold; 1) develop a portable and rapid laser based air sampler for detection of specific chemical contraband and 2) compile a spectral data base in both the near- and mid-IR of sufficiently high quality to be useful for gas phase spectroscopic identification of chemical contraband. During the synthesis or 'cooking' of many illicit chemical substances, relatively high concentrations of volatile solvents, chemical precursors and byproducts are unavoidably released to the atmosphere. In some instances, the final product may have sufficient vapor pressure to be detectable in the surrounding air. The detection of a single high-value effluent or the simultaneous detection of two or more low-value effluents can be used as reliable indicators of a nearby clandestine cooking operation. The designation of high- versus low-value effluent reflects both the commercial availability and legitimate usage of a specific chemical. This paper will describe PNNL's progress and efforts towards the development of a portable laser based air sampling system for the detection of clandestine manufacturing of methamphetamine. Although our current efforts ar focused on methamphetamine, we see no fundamental limitations on detection of other forms of chemical contraband manufacturing. This also includes the synthesis of certain classes of chemical weapons that have recently been deployed by terrorist groups.

  15. Laser Velocimetry of Chemical Vapor Deposition Flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1993-01-01

    Laser velocimetry (LV) is being used to measure the gas flows in chemical vapor deposition (CVD) reactors. These gas flow measurements can be used to improve industrial processes in semiconductor and optical layer deposition and to validate numerical models. Visible in the center of the picture is the graphite susceptor glowing orange-hot at 600 degrees C. It is inductively heated via the copper cool surrounding the glass reactor.

  16. Long pulse chemical laser. Final technical report

    SciTech Connect

    Bardon, R.L.; Breidenthal, R.E.; Buonadonna, V.R.

    1989-02-01

    This report covers the technical effort through February, 1989. This effort was directed towards the technology associated with the development of a large scale, long pulse DF-CO{sub 2} chemical laser. Optics damage studies performed under Task 1 assessed damage thresholds for diamond-turned salt windows. Task 2 is a multi-faceted task involving the use of PHOCL-50 for laser gain measurements, LTI experiments, and detector testing by LANL personnel. To support these latter tests, PHOCL-50 was upgraded with Boeing funding to incorporate a full aperture outcoupler that increased its energy output by over a factor of 3, to a full kilojoule. The PHOCL-50 carbon block calorimeter was also recalibrated and compared with the LANL Scientech meter. Cloud clearing studies under Task 3 initially concentrated on delivering a Boeing built Cloud Simulation Facility to LANL, and currently involves design of a Cold Cloud Simulation Facility. A Boeing IRAD funded theoretical study on cold cloud clearing revealed that ice clouds may be easier to clear then warm clouds. Task 4 involves the theoretical and experimental study of flow system design as related to laser beam quality. Present efforts on this task are concentrating on temperature gradients induced by the gas filling process. General support for the LPCL field effort is listed under Task 5, with heavy emphasis on assuring reliable operation of the Boeing built Large Slide Valve and other device related tests. The modification of the PHOCL-50 system for testing long pulse DF (4{mu}m only) chemical laser operation is being done under Task 6.

  17. Remote Chemical Sensing Using Quantum Cascade Lasers

    SciTech Connect

    Harper, Warren W.; Schultz, John F.

    2003-01-30

    Spectroscopic chemical sensing research at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) is focused on developing advanced sensors for detecting the production of nuclear, chemical, or biological weapons; use of chemical weapons; or the presence of explosives, firearms, narcotics, or other contraband of significance to homeland security in airports, cargo terminals, public buildings, or other sensitive locations. For most of these missions, the signature chemicals are expected to occur in very low concentrations, and in mixture with ambient air or airborne waste streams that contain large numbers of other species that may interfere with spectroscopic detection, or be mistaken for signatures of illicit activity. PNNL’s emphasis is therefore on developing remote and sampling sensors with extreme sensitivity, and resistance to interferents, or selectivity. PNNL’s research activities include: 1. Identification of signature chemicals and quantification of their spectral characteristics, 2. Identification and development of laser and other technologies that enable breakthroughs in sensitivity and selectivity, 3. Development of promising sensing techniques through experimentation and modeling the physical phenomenology and practical engineering limitations affecting their performance, and 4. Development and testing of data collection methods and analysis algorithms. Close coordination of all aspects of the research is important to ensure that all parts are focused on productive avenues of investigation. Close coordination of experimental development and numerical modeling is particularly important because the theoretical component provides understanding and predictive capability, while the experiments validate calculations and ensure that all phenomena and engineering limitations are considered.

  18. Mid-IR semiconductor lasers for chemical sensing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hill, C. J.; Yang, R. Q.

    2003-01-01

    The development of mid-IR semiconductor diode lasers based on type-II interband cascade structures is presented. How these diode lasers can be developed to meet the requirements in chemical sensing applications is discussed.

  19. PHYSICAL EFFECTS OCCURRING DURING GENERATION AND AMPLIFICATION OF LASER RADIATION: Efficient solutions for low-temperature singlet-oxygen generators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Igoshin, Valerii I.; Karyshev, V. D.; Katulin, V. A.; Kirilin, A. V.; Kisletsov, A. V.; Konnov, S. A.; Kupriyanov, N. L.; Medvedev, A. M.; Nadezhina, T. N.

    1989-02-01

    Experimental investigations were made of the physicochemical characteristics of the active solutions for a chemical generator in an oxygen-iodine laser. A strong temperature dependence of the viscosity of the solution was observed. The influence of this factor on the operation of the singlet-oxygen generator and the laser is discussed. The cyclic operation of a laser with efficient neutralization of the reagents and the addition of an alkali is simulated. It is shown that hydrogen peroxide may be 50% utilized when the temperature of the solution is no higher than - 30 °C. A method of preparing a solution for an iodine laser with a low freezing point (between - 30 °C and - 40 °C) is developed. It is shown that an aqueous solution of hydrogen peroxide with a concentration of 25-40% is suitable.

  20. Laser-based Sensors for Chemical Detection

    SciTech Connect

    Myers, Tanya L.; Phillips, Mark C.; Taubman, Matthew S.; Bernacki, Bruce E.; Schiffern, John T.; Cannon, Bret D.

    2010-05-10

    Stand-off detection of hazardous materials ensures that the responder is located at a safe distance from the suspected source. Remote detection and identification of hazardous materials can be accomplished using a highly sensitive and portable device, at significant distances downwind from the source or the threat. Optical sensing methods, in particular infrared absorption spectroscopy combined with quantum cascade lasers (QCLs), are highly suited for the detection of chemical substances since they enable rapid detection and are amenable for autonomous operation in a compact and rugged package. This talk will discuss the sensor systems developed at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory and will discuss the progress to reduce the size and power while maintaining sensitivity to enable stand-off detection of multiple chemicals.

  1. Chemically amplified laser direct-writing of aluminum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsao, J. Y.; Ehrlich, D. J.

    Laser microchemical direct writing has important advantages over other techniques for the deposition of thin-film patterns. Disadvantages, however, are lower throughput and the need to suppress competing processes such as gas phase nucleation of particles or substrate damage. Methods for increasing the overall speed of laser direct writing by microchemistry were investigated. A class of laser deposition techniques has emerged in which laser radiation is used only to enhance or to impede the initial nucleation of a thin film. In general, it is convenient to draw a distinction between nucleation barriers due to physical effects and those due to chemical effects. The first type of barrier is derived from surface tension. The laser deposits a pattern of heterogeneous catalyst to initiate a subsequent transformation that is chemically self-sustaining or autocatalytic. Experiments, in which the laser direct writing of patterned thin films of Al is chemically amplified by subsequent selective pyrolytic chemical vapor deposition are summarized.

  2. Atmospheric propagation properties of various laser systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pitz, Greg A.; Glass, Sara; Kamer, Brian; Klennert, Wade L.; Hostutler, David A.

    2012-06-01

    Atmospheric propagation properties of various laser systems, including diode pumped alkali lasers (DPALs) and the Chemical Oxygen Iodine Laser (COIL), are of importance. However, there appears to be a lack of highly accurate transmission characteristics of these systems associated with their operating conditions. In this study laser propagation of the rubidium-based DPAL and the COIL has been simulated utilizing integrated cavity output spectroscopy. This technique allowed for the simulation of laser propagation approaching distances of 3 kilometers on a test stand only 35 cm long. The spectral output from these simulations was compared to the HITRAN database with excellent agreement. The spectral prole and proximity of the laser line to the atmospheric absorbers is shown. These low pressure spectral proles were then extrapolated to higher pressures using an in-house hyperne model. These models allowed for the comparison of proposed systems and their output spectral prole. The diode pumped rubidium laser at pressures under an atmosphere has been shown to interact with only one water absorption feature, but at pressures approaching 7 atmospheres the D1 transition may interact with more than 6 water lines depending on resonator considerations. Additionally, a low pressure system may have some slight control of the overlap of the output prole with the water line by changing the buer gases.

  3. Laser-induced gas breakdown - Spectroscopic and chemical studies.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    De Montgolfier, PH.; Dumont, P.; Mille, Y.; Villermaux, J.

    1972-01-01

    Discussion of the results of several experimental investigations on laser-induced gas breakdown. The experiments included time-resolved spectroscopy, direct detection of H atoms with a TiO2 probe, and chemical reactions; each of them provided insight into the behavior of the medium at different times. Chemical reactions and explosions have been initiated by the laser beam when a plasma was created. No primary multiphotonic absorption and no macroscopic chemical reactions were observed below the breakdown threshold.

  4. Laser-based instrumentation for the detection of chemical agents

    SciTech Connect

    Hartford, A. Jr.; Sander, R.K.; Quigley, G.P.; Radziemski, L.J.; Cremers, D.A.

    1982-01-01

    Several laser-based techniques are being evaluated for the remote, point, and surface detection of chemical agents. Among the methods under investigation are optoacoustic spectroscopy, laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS), and synchronous detection of laser-induced fluorescence (SDLIF). Optoacoustic detection has already been shown to be capable of extremely sensitive point detection. Its application to remote sensing of chemical agents is currently being evaluated. Atomic emission from the region of a laser-generated plasma has been used to identify the characteristic elements contained in nerve (P and F) and blister (S and Cl) agents. Employing this LIBS approach, detection of chemical agent simulants dispersed in air and adsorbed on a variety of surfaces has been achieved. Synchronous detection of laser-induced fluorescence provides an attractive alternative to conventional LIF, in that an artificial narrowing of the fluorescence emission is obtained. The application of this technique to chemical agent simulants has been successfully demonstrated. 19 figures.

  5. Remote chemical sensing by laser optical pumping

    SciTech Connect

    Stevens, C.G.; Magnotta, F.

    1996-08-01

    We are exploring a new approach to remote chemical identification that promises higher precision than can be achieved by conventional DIAL approaches. This technique also addresses and potentially solves the problem of detecting a target gas in the presence of an interfering gas or gases. This new approach utilizes an eye-safe infrared optical pumping pulse to deplete the population of a specific rotational level(s) and then sends probe pulses at the same or different wavelengths to interrogate the bleaching of the absorption. We have experimentally measured optical saturation fluence level at atmospheric pressure for HCl, and find this level to be {approximately}1 mJ/cm{sup 2}, significantly below eye-safe limits in agreement with calculations. Calculations have been performed on other molecules of interest with similar results. In the laboratory, using time-delay-replicated pulses at a single frequency we have made absorption measurements with precision levels routinely approaching 0.1% after averaging 200 laser pulses. These results as well as those of two other pulse experiments will be presented. 5 refs., 9 figs., 1 tab.

  6. Chemical-free cleaning using excimer lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lizotte, Todd E.; O'Keeffe, Terence R.

    1996-04-01

    A critical requirement in many industrial processes is the cleaning of oils and grease, oxides, solvent residues, particles, thin films and other contaminants from surfaces. There is a particularly acute need in the electronics industry for cleaning semiconductor wafers and computer chips and in the metals industry for removing oxides and other contaminants. Cleaning traditionally is done by various wet chemical processes, almost all consuming large amounts of water and producing large amounts of hazardous wastes. To further complicate this, some of these cleaning agents and vast water consumption are undergoing stringent restrictions. The Radiance ProcessSM is a novel, patented Excimer Laser approach to dry surface cleaning. The process has removed particles from 80 microns to submicron sizes, paints, inks, oxides, fingerprints, hazes, parts of molecules and metallic ions in fingerprints. The process does not ablate, melt or damage the underlying surface. Micro-roughening on some Silicon and Gallium Arsenide is on the order of 1A or less. This paper will discuss the various applications with this process and the latest results from a beta wafer cleaning prototype test bed system that is being built under an EPA grant and joint partnership between Radiance Services Company, Neuman Micro Technologies, Inc. and the Microelectronics Research Laboratory.

  7. Laser cutting with chemical reaction assist

    DOEpatents

    Gettemy, Donald J.

    1992-01-01

    A method for cutting with a laser beam where an oxygen-hydrocarbon reaction is used to provide auxiliary energy to a metal workpiece to supplement the energy supplied by the laser. Oxygen is supplied to the laser focus point on the workpiece by a nozzle through which the laser beam also passes. A liquid hydrocarbon is supplied by coating the workpiece along the cutting path with the hydrocarbon prior to laser irradiation or by spraying a stream of hydrocarbon through a nozzle aimed at a point on the cutting path which is just ahead of the focus point during irradiation.

  8. Laser cutting with chemical reaction assist

    DOEpatents

    Gettemy, D.J.

    1992-11-17

    A method is described for cutting with a laser beam where an oxygen-hydrocarbon reaction is used to provide auxiliary energy to a metal workpiece to supplement the energy supplied by the laser. Oxygen is supplied to the laser focus point on the workpiece by a nozzle through which the laser beam also passes. A liquid hydrocarbon is supplied by coating the workpiece along the cutting path with the hydrocarbon prior to laser irradiation or by spraying a stream of hydrocarbon through a nozzle aimed at a point on the cutting path which is just ahead of the focus point during irradiation. 1 figure.

  9. Laser micromachining of chemically altered polymers

    SciTech Connect

    Lippert, T.

    1998-08-01

    During the last decade laser processing of polymers has become an important field of applied and fundamental research. One of the most promising proposals, to use laser ablation as dry etching technique in photolithography, has not yet become an industrial application. Many disadvantages of laser ablation, compared to conventional photolithography, are the result of the use of standard polymers. These polymers are designed for totally different applications, but are compared to the highly specialized photoresist. A new approach to laser polymer ablation will be described; the development of polymers, specially designed for high resolution laser ablation. These polymers have photolabile groups in the polymer backbone, which decompose upon laser irradiation or standard polymers are modified for ablation at a specific irradiation wavelength. The absorption maximum can be tailored for specific laser emissino lines, e.g. 351, 308 and 248 nm lines of excimer lasers. The authors show that with this approach many problems associated with the application of laser ablation for photolithography can be solved. The mechanism of ablation for these photopolymers is photochemical, whereas for most of the standard polymers this mechanism is photothermal. The photochemical decomposition mechanism results in high resolution ablation with no thermal damage at the edges of the etched structures. In addition there are no redeposited ablation products or surface modifications of the polymer after ablation.

  10. Chemical and Laser Sciences Division annual report 1989

    SciTech Connect

    Haines, N.

    1990-06-01

    The Chemical and Laser Sciences Division Annual Report includes articles describing representative research and development activities within the Division, as well as major programs to which the Division makes significant contributions.

  11. Chemical laser exhaust pipe design research

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Yunqiang; Huang, Zhilong; Chen, Zhiqiang; Ren, Zebin; Guo, Longde

    2016-10-01

    In order to weaken the chemical laser exhaust gas influence of the optical transmission, a vent pipe is advised to emissions gas to the outside of the optical transmission area. Based on a variety of exhaust pipe design, a flow field characteristic of the pipe is carried out by numerical simulation and analysis in detail. The research results show that for uniform deflating exhaust pipe, although the pipeline structure is cyclical and convenient for engineering implementation, but there is a phenomenon of air reflows at the pipeline entrance slit which can be deduced from the numerical simulation results. So, this type of pipeline structure does not guarantee seal. For the design scheme of putting the pipeline contract part at the end of the exhaust pipe, or using the method of local area or tail contraction, numerical simulation results show that backflow phenomenon still exists at the pipeline entrance slit. Preliminary analysis indicates that the contraction of pipe would result in higher static pressure near the wall for the low speed flow field, so as to produce counter pressure gradient at the entrance slit. In order to eliminate backflow phenomenon at the pipe entrance slit, concerned with the pipeline type of radial size increase gradually along the flow, flow field property in the pipe is analyzed in detail by numerical simulation methods. Numerical simulation results indicate that there is not reflow phenomenon at entrance slit of the dilated duct. However the cold air inhaled in the slit which makes the temperature of the channel wall is lower than the center temperature. Therefore, this kind of pipeline structure can not only prevent the leak of the gas, but also reduce the wall temperature. In addition, compared with the straight pipe connection way, dilated pipe structure also has periodic structure, which can facilitate system integration installation.

  12. Mid-infrared laser-spectroscopic sensing of chemical species

    PubMed Central

    Sigrist, Markus W.

    2014-01-01

    This letter reports on mid-infrared laser-based detection and analysis of chemical species. Emphasis is put on broadly tunable laser sources and sensitive detection schemes. Selected examples from our lab illustrate the performance and potential of such systems in various areas including environmental and medical sensing. PMID:26257952

  13. Chemical stabilization of the coumarin 1 dye laser

    SciTech Connect

    von Trebra, R.J.; Koch, T.H.

    1983-01-15

    The chemical stabilization of coumarin 1, 7-diethylamino-4-methylcoumarin, in a nitrogen laser pumped dye laser and coumarin 311, 7-dimethylamino-4-methylcoumarin, under cw conditions with sulfur-free radical chain transfer agents, are described. The mechanism for stabilization involves encounter of triplet coumarin and ground state coumarin with subsequent radical formation and radical disproportionation catalyzed by the chain transfer agents. The output of the coumarin 1 dye laser decreased 10% when the dye solution was stabilized with cysteine hydrochloride over a 12-h period. The output of the unstabilized dye laser decreased 50% during a similar period of operation.

  14. Application of laser Doppler velocimeter to chemical vapor laser system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gartrell, Luther R.; Hunter, William W., Jr.; Lee, Ja H.; Fletcher, Mark T.; Tabibi, Bagher M.

    1993-01-01

    A laser Doppler velocimeter (LDV) system was used to measure iodide vapor flow fields inside two different-sized tubes. Typical velocity profiles across the laser tubes were obtained with an estimated +/-1 percent bias and +/-0.3 to 0.5 percent random uncertainty in the mean values and +/-2.5 percent random uncertainty in the turbulence-intensity values. Centerline velocities and turbulence intensities for various longitudinal locations ranged from 13 to 17.5 m/sec and 6 to 20 percent, respectively. In view of these findings, the effects of turbulence should be considered for flow field modeling. The LDV system provided calibration data for pressure and mass flow systems used routinely to monitor the research laser gas flow velocity.

  15. Project LOCOST: Laser or Chemical Hybrid Orbital Space Transport

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dixon, Alan; Kost, Alicia; Lampshire, Gregory; Larsen, Rob; Monahan, Bob; Wright, Geoff

    1990-01-01

    A potential mission in the late 1990s is the servicing of spacecraft assets located in GEO. The Geosynchronous Operations Support Center (GeoShack) will be supported by a space transfer vehicle based at the Space Station (SS). The vehicle will transport cargo between the SS and the GeoShack. A proposed unmanned, laser or chemical hybrid orbital space transfer vehicle (LOCOST) can be used to efficiently transfer cargo between the two orbits. A preliminary design shows that an unmanned, laser/chemical hybrid vehicle results in the fuel savings needed while still providing fast trip times. The LOCOST vehicle receives a 12 MW laser beam from one Earth orbiting, solar pumped, iodide Laser Power Station (LPS). Two Energy Relay Units (ERU) provide laser beam support during periods of line-of-sight blockage by the Earth. The baseline mission specifies a 13 day round trip transfer time. The ship's configuration consist of an optical train, one hydrogen laser engine, two chemical engines, a 18 m by 29 m box truss, a mission-flexible payload module, and propellant tanks. Overall vehicle dry mass is 8,000 kg. Outbound cargo mass is 20,000 kg, and inbound cargo mass is 6,000 kg. The baseline mission needs 93,000 kg of propellants to complete the scenario. Fully fueled, outbound mission mass is 121,000 kg. A regeneratively cooled, single plasma, laser engine design producing a maximum of 768 N of thrust is utilized along with two traditional chemical engines. The payload module is designed to hold 40,000 kg of cargo, though the baseline mission specifies less. A proposed design of a laser/chemical hybrid vehicle provides a trip time and propellant efficient means to transport cargo from the SS to a GeoShack. Its unique, hybrid propulsion system provides safety through redundancy, allows baseline missions to be efficiently executed, while still allowing for the possibility of larger cargo transfers.

  16. Comparison of Laser Chemical Processing and LaserMicroJet for structuring and cutting silicon substrates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hopman, Sybille; Fell, Andreas; Mayer, Kuno; Mesec, Matthias; Rodofili, Andreas; Kray, Daniel

    2009-06-01

    This paper deals with the development of a new cutting method for thin silicon solar wafers with liquid-jet-guided lasers (LaserMicroJet®, LMJ, and Laser Chemical Processing, LCP). Several laser systems with different wavelengths were tested to find the optimum laser system and processing parameters in terms of efficient material removal and deep laser cutting. Water and potassium hydroxide were used as carrier liquids to enhance laser ablation. The ablation efficiency was defined as a target parameter and experimentally determined by performing single laser grooves. It is demonstrated that the ablation process of LMJ is mainly affected by silicon melting and then removing by the liquid-jet momentum for single laser grooves. Best result for deep laser grooves is achieved if evaporation dominates the ablation process. Better surface quality referred to laser-induced crystalline damage is presented for a cut wafer with LMJ in comparison to a standard multiwire slurry saw. This shows a great potential of wafering with liquid-jet-guided lasers although no optimal liquid media was used.

  17. Laser-chemical finishing of micro forming tools

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stephen, Andreas; Gerhard, Christoph; Vollertsen, Frank

    2011-03-01

    In this contribution, we report on a laser-chemical removal method for precise machining of micro forming tools. Thereby, a focused machining laser beam is guided coaxially to an etchant jet stream. Since the material removal is caused by laser-induced chemical reactions using this method, machining is achieved at low laser powers. Hence, material stressing involving micro cracks and further parasitic effects can be avoided. Due to these advantages, this method offers a suitable technique for the finishing of precision micro tools. Several experiments have been performed at rotary swaging jaws made of Stellite 21 in order to chamfer the edged transition section between the operating sphere and the tool flank. The influence of both different laser powers and work piece traverse speeds has been investigated. For this purpose, several parallel laser paths were applied along the edged transition section when varying the process parameters. Here, the incident laser beam is subjected to different angles of incidence. Due to reflection effects, the process parameters have to be matched with respect to the particular angle of incidence during the machining. In this vein, the edged transition section of rotary swaging jaws was chamfered at radii in the range of 120 μm.

  18. Laser studies of chemical reaction and collision processes

    SciTech Connect

    Flynn, G.

    1993-12-01

    This work has concentrated on several interrelated projects in the area of laser photochemistry and photophysics which impinge on a variety of questions in combustion chemistry and general chemical kinetics. Infrared diode laser probes of the quenching of molecules with {open_quotes}chemically significant{close_quotes} amounts of energy in which the energy transferred to the quencher has, for the first time, been separated into its vibrational, rotational, and translational components. Probes of quantum state distributions and velocity profiles for atomic fragments produced in photodissociation reactions have been explored for iodine chloride.

  19. Chemically pumped O2( a-X) laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Endo, M.; Kodama, K.; Handa, Y.; Uchiyama, T.

    1993-02-01

    A theoretical and experimental study was conducted aimed at achieving laser oscillation in the ( a-X) electronic transition of oxygen molecules. Although this transition is highly forbidden by rigorous selection rules, it may nevertheless concede stimulated emission, if the population inversion is high enough. The idea is based on a recently developed apparatus, namely, a porous pipe type high-pressure chemical singlet oxygen generator. A numerical model which describes the characteristics of this generator was developed to estimate the population inversion and small-signal gain achievable in a laser cavity using this source. The calculations showed that the small-signal gain ought to be sufficient to achieve laser oscillation. Preliminary experiments were conducted, but lasing was not yet observed. It is shown that the scattering losses caused by water droplet aerosols are mainly responsible for preventing our system from laser oscillation.

  20. Chemical Kinetic Modeling of HMX and TATB Laser Ignition Tests

    SciTech Connect

    Tarver, C M

    2004-03-02

    Recent laser ignition experiments on octahydro-1,3,5,7-tetranitro-1,3,5,7-terrazocine (HMX) and 1,3,5-triamino-2,4,6-trinitrobenzene (TATB) subjected to laser fluxes ranging from 10 to 800 W/cm{sup 2} produced ignition times from seconds to milliseconds. Global chemical kinetic thermal decomposition models for HMX and TATB have been developed to calculate times to thermal explosion for experiments in the seconds to days time frame. These models are applied to the laser ignition experimental data in this paper. Excellent agreement was obtained for TATB, while the calculated ignition times were longer than experiment for HMX at lower laser fluxes. At the temperatures produced in the laser experiments, HMX melts. Melting generally increases condensed phase reaction rates so faster rates were used for three of the HMX reaction rates. This improved agreement with experiments at the lower laser fluxes but yielded very fast ignition at high fluxes. The calculated times to ignition are in reasonable agreement with the laser ignition experiments, and this justifies the use of these models for estimating reaction times at impact and shock ''hot spot'' temperatures.

  1. New Electronic-Transition Laser Systems. Part 1. Electron Pumped Systems. Part 2. Chemically Pumped Systems

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1976-12-01

    laser development . There has not yet been a demonstration of gain in a visible chemical laser systems, and it appears unlikely that practical lasers of this type will be developed in the near future. Substantial progress has been made

  2. A tunable MWIR laser remote sensor for chemical vapor detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bunn, Thomas L.; Noblett, Patricia M.; Otting, William D.

    1998-01-01

    The Air Force vision for Global Virtual Presence suggests a need for active remote sensing systems that provide both global coverage and the ability to detect multiple gaseous chemical species at low concentration from a significant standoff distance. The system will need to have acceptable weight, volume, and power characteristics, as well as a long operating lifetime for integration with various surveillance platforms. Laser based remote sensing systems utilizing the differential absorption lidar (DIAL) technique are promising for long range chemical sensing applications. Recent advancements in pulsed, diode pumped solid state laser (DPSSL) technology and in tunable optical parametric oscillators (OPO) make broadly tunable laser transmitters possible for the DIAL system. Also the characteristic narrow spectral bandwidth of these laser devices provides high measurement sensitivity and spectral selectivity with the potential to avoid interfering species. Rocketdyne has built and tested a tunable, midwave infrared (MWIR) DIAL system using DPSSL/OPO technology. The key to the system is a novel tuning and line narrowing technology developed for the OPO. The tuning system can quickly adjust to the desired wavelength and precisely locate a narrow spectral feature of interest. Once the spectral feature is located, a rapid dither tuning technique is employed. The laser pulses are tuned ``on'' and ``off'' the spectral resonance of a molecule with precise and repeatable performance as required to make the DIAL measurement. To date, the breadboard system has been tested by measuring methane, ethane, and sulfur dioxide in a calibrated gas cell at a range of 60 meters.

  3. Molecular dispersion spectroscopy – new capabilities in laser chemical sensing

    PubMed Central

    Nikodem, Michal; Wysocki, Gerard

    2012-01-01

    Laser spectroscopic techniques suitable for molecular dispersion sensing enable new applications and strategies in chemical detection. This paper discusses the current state-of-the art and provides an overview of recently developed chirped laser dispersion spectroscopy (CLaDS) based techniques. CLaDS and its derivatives allow for quantitative spectroscopy of trace-gases and enable new capabilities such as extended dynamic range of concentration measurements, high immunity to photodetected intensity fluctuations, or capability of direct processing of spectroscopic signals in optical domain. Several experimental configurations based on quantum cascade lasers and examples of molecular spectroscopic data are presented to demonstrate capabilities of molecular dispersion spectroscopy in the mid-infrared spectral region. PMID:22809459

  4. Metal Organic-Chemical Vapor Deposition fabrication of semiconductor lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thomas, C.

    1980-08-01

    The metal organic chemical vapor deposition (MO-CVD) process was studied and implemented in detail. Single crystal GaAs, and Ga(x)Al(1-x)As films were grown on GaAs by depositing metal organic alkyl gallium compounds in the presence of an arsine mixture. The metal organic chemical vapor deposition process allowed formation of the semiconductor compound directly on the heated substrate in only one hot temperature zone. With MO-CVD, semiconductor films can be efficiently produced by a more economical, less complicated process which will lend itself more easily than past fabrication procedures, to high quantity, high quality reproduction techniques of semiconductor lasers. Clearly MO-CVD is of interest to the communication industry where semiconductor lasers are used extensively in fiber optic communication systems, and similarly to the solar energy business where GaAs substrates are used as photoelectric cells.

  5. Excimer laser chemical ammonia patterning on PET film.

    PubMed

    Wu, G; Paz, M D; Chiussi, S; Serra, J; González, P; Wang, Y J; Leon, B

    2009-02-01

    Laser is a promising technique used for biopolymer surface modification with micro and/or nano features. In this work, a 193 nm excimer laser was used for poly (ethylene terephthalate) (PET) surfaces chemical patterning. The ablation threshold of the PET film used in the experiments was 62 mJ/cm(2) measured before surface modification. Surface chemical patterning was performed by irradiating PET film in a vacuum chamber filled with ammonia at the flux of 10, 15, 20, 25 ml/min. Roughness of the surface characterized by profilometry showed that there were no significant observed change after modification comparing original film. But the hydrophilicity of the surface increased after patterning and a minimum water contact angle was obtained at the gas flux of 20 ml/min. FT-IR/ATR results showed the distinct amino absorption bands presented at 3352 cm(-1)and 1613 cm(-1) after modification and XPS binding energies of C(1s) at 285.5 eV and N(1s) at 399.0 eV verified the existence of C-N bond formation on the PET film surface. Tof-SIMS ions mapping used to identify the amine containing fragments corroborates that amino grafting mainly happened inside the laser irradiation area of the PET surface. A hypothesized radical reaction mechanism proposes that the collision between radicals in ammonia and on the PET surface caused by the incident laser provokes the grafting of amino groups.

  6. Laser-initiated chemical reactions in carbon suspensions.

    SciTech Connect

    McGrath, T. E.; Diebold, G. J.; Bartels, D. M.; Crowell, R. A.; Chemistry; Brown Univ.

    2002-10-31

    We report on laser-initiated chemical reactions in colloidal carbon suspensions. Irradiation of carbon particles ranging in size from 13 to 75 nm in diameter suspended in water, toluene, and benzene with high power nanosecond, picosecond, and femtosecond laser pulses leads to the formation of a number of gaseous hydrocarbons as well as a series of liquid-phase products. In the product gas above irradiated carbon suspensions in water, H{sub 2} and CO, the main reaction products of the carbon-steam reaction, and numerous hydrocarbons ranging from C{sub 1}-C{sub 4} were detected. Irradiation of particulate carbon in toluene and benzene gave H{sub 2} as the main gas product with small amounts of C{sub 1}-C{sub 3} hydrocarbons. Bibenzyl and biphenyl were found as the main liquid products produced in toluene and benzene suspensions, respectively, but with numerous polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in smaller concentrations. The amount of products generated by pulsed laser irradiation is shown to depend on particle size and concentration, as well as the laser fluence and pulse width. The chemical reactions reported take place under conditions characterized by extremely high temperatures and pressures of short duration.

  7. Laser-induced chemical changes in art materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abraham, Margaret H.; Scheerer, Stefanie; Madden, Odile; Adar, Fran

    2001-10-01

    Lasers can induce subtle and not so subtle changes in material structure. We have found that certain pigments can undergo chemical and crystallographic changes and concomitant color shifts. Minerals and the related pigments may experience a loss of hydroxyl groups or other chemical reordering. The organic component of skeletal, keratinaceous, and cellulosic materials can be pyrolized, ablated, or etched. Polymers can discolor, undergo structural weakening, or be volatilized. A few of these processes have been investigated with regards to changes on ivory and bone, selected pigments and the removal of dye-based pen ink from porous substrates.

  8. Inhomogeneous broadening effects in multimode CW chemical lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mirels, H.

    1981-01-01

    The performance of a multiple longitudinal mode CW chemical laser is investigated with reference to the effects of inhomogeneous broadening for the case where the longitudinal mode spacing is small compared with the characteristic Doppler and homogeneous widths of the lasing medium. Both a Fabry-Perot resonator and a saturated amplifier are considered, using a two-vibrational-level model. Closed form solutions are obtained which are shown to be in good agreement with the numerical results of Bullock and Lipkis (1979).

  9. Space-Based Chemical Lasers in strategic defense

    SciTech Connect

    Wildt, D. )

    1992-07-01

    The Strategic Defense Initiative Organization (SDIO) has made significant progress in developing Space-Based chemical Laser (SBL) technologies and in studying the SBLs global defense capability. In this mission, a constellation of several orbiting laser platforms provides continuous global defense by intercepting threatening missiles in their boost phase, including short range ballistic missiles (SRBMs). An optional smaller constellation provides defense against launches from the low and midlatitude regions. In addition, SBLs have utility in other important related missions such as surveillance, air defense and discrimination. The hardware necessary to build such a system has been developed to the point where it is mature and ready for demonstration in space. Advances have been made in each of the following major areas of the SBL: laser device; optics/beam control; beam pointing; ATP (acquisition, tracking and pointing); uncooled optics; and laser lethality. Integration of the key laser and beam control technologies is now occurring in the ground-based ALI experiment, and a space demonstration experiment, Star LITE, is in the planning and concept development phase.

  10. Laser interrogation of surface agents (LISA) for chemical agent reconnaissance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Higdon, N. S.; Chyba, Thomas H.; Richter, Dale A.; Ponsardin, Patrick L.; Armstrong, Wayne T.; Lobb, C. T.; Kelly, Brian T.; Babnick, Robert D.; Sedlacek, Arthur J., III

    2002-06-01

    Laser Interrogation of Surface Agents (LISA) is a new technique which exploits Raman scattering to provide standoff detection and identification of surface-deposited chemical agents. ITT Industries, Advanced Engineering and Sciences Division is developing the LISA technology under a cost-sharing arrangement with the US Army Soldier and Biological Chemical Command for incorporation on the Army's future reconnaissance vehicles. A field-engineered prototype LISA-Recon system is being designed to demonstrate on-the- move measurements of chemical contaminants. In this article, we will describe the LISA technique, data form proof-of- concept measurements, the LISA-Recon design, and some of the future realizations envisioned for military sensing applications.

  11. Distributed feedback quantum cascade laser arrays for chemical sensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Benjamin Guocian

    Quantum cascade lasers (QCLs) are unipolar semiconductor lasers based on intersubband transitions in heterostructures. The emission wavelengths of mid-infrared QCLs span from 3 to 24 mum and cover the "fingerprint" region of molecular absorption. This makes QCLs particularly interesting for spectroscopic applications. Single-mode emission is required for most spectroscopic applications. To achieve single-mode emission, QCLs can be made as distributed feedback (DFB) lasers or integrated with an external cavity (EC). EC-QCLs are widely tunable but are cumbersome and complex to build; they require high quality anti-reflection coatings, well-aligned external optical components including a grating for tuning, and piezoelectric controllers. DFB-QCLs are very compact and can be readily micro-fabricated, but a single DFB-QCL has limited tunability of ˜ 10 cm-1. In this thesis, I developed arrays of DFB-QCLs as widely-tunable, single-mode laser sources, and I demonstrated their applications to chemical sensing. I demonstrated a DFB-QCL array with 32 single-mode lasers on a single chip, emitting in a range over 85 cm-1 near 9mum wavelength, operated pulsed at room temperature. The DFB-QCL array can be continuously tuned, since the separation in nominal emission frequencies is small enough that we can use temperature tuning to span the frequency gaps between adjacent lasers in the array. To show the applications for chemical sensing, absorption spectroscopy was performed using the DFB-QCL array; the absorption spectra of several fluids were obtained, with results that were comparable to conventional Fourier transform infrared spectrometers. Achieving overlapped beams at extended distances can be important for a number of applications envisioned for DFB-QCL arrays, particularly remote sensing. Using the technique of spectral beam combining, the total angular divergence of the DFB-QCL array was reduced to less than 2 milliradians, which is 40 times better than without beam

  12. Physical and Chemical Changes of Polystyrene Nanospheres Irradiated with Laser

    SciTech Connect

    Mustafa, Mohd Ubaidillah; Juremi, Nor Rashidah Md.; Mohamad, Farizan; Wibawa, Pratama Jujur; Agam, Mohd Arif; Ali, Ahmad Hadi

    2011-05-25

    It has been reported that polymer resist such as PMMA (Poly(methyl methacrylate) which is a well known and commonly used polymer resist for fabrication of electronic devices can show zwitter characteristic due to over exposure to electron beam radiation. Overexposed PMMA tend to changes their molecular structure to either become negative or positive resist corresponded to electron beam irradiation doses. These characteristic was due to crosslinking and scissors of the PMMA molecular structures, but till now the understanding of crosslinking and scissors of the polymer resist molecular structure due to electron beam exposure were still unknown to researchers. Previously we have over exposed polystyrene nanospheres to various radiation sources, such as electron beam, solar radiation and laser, which is another compound that can act as polymer resist. We investigated the physical and chemical structures of the irradiated polystyrene nanospheres with FTIR analysis. It is found that the physical and chemical changes of the irradiated polystyrene were found to be corresponded with the radiation dosages. Later, combining Laser irradiation and Reactive Ion Etching manipulation, created a facile technique that we called as LARIEA NSL (Laser and Reactive Ion Etching Assisted Nanosphere Lithography) which can be a facile technique to fabricate controllable carbonaceous nanoparticles for applications such as lithographic mask, catalysts and heavy metal absorbers.

  13. Chemical kinetic performance losses for a hydrogen laser thermal thruster

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mccay, T. D.; Dexter, C. E.

    1985-01-01

    Projected requirements for efficient, economical, orbit-raising propulsion systems have generated investigations into several potentially high specific impulse, moderate thrust, advanced systems. One of these systems, laser thermal propulsion, utilizes a high temperature plasma as the enthalpy source. The plasma is sustained by a focused laser beam which maintains the plasma temperature at levels near 20,000 K. Since such temperature levels lead to total dissociation and high ionization, the plasma thruster system potentially has a high specific impulse decrement due to recombination losses. The nozzle flow is expected to be sufficiently nonequilibrium to warrant concern over the achievable specific impluse. This investigation was an attempt at evaluation of those losses. The One-Dimensional Kinetics (ODK) option of the Two-Dimensional Kinetics (TDK) Computer Program was used with a chemical kinetics rate set obtained from available literature to determine the chemical kinetic energy losses for typical plasma thruster conditions. The rates were varied about the nominal accepted values to band the possible losses. Kinetic losses were shown to be highly significant for a laser thermal thruster using hydrogen. A 30 percent reduction in specific impulse is possible simply due to the inability to completely extract the molecular recombination energy.

  14. Production of radioactive Ag ion beams with a chemically selective laser ion source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jading, Y.; Catherall, R.; Jokinen, A.; Jonsson, O. C.; Kugler, E.; Lettry, J.; Ravn, H. L.; Tengblad, O.; Kautzsch, T.; Klöckl, I.; Kratz, K.-L.; Scheerer, F.; Fedoseyev, V. N.; Mishin, V. I.; van Duppen, P.; Wöhr, A.; Walters, W. B.

    1996-04-01

    We have developed a chemically selective laser ion source at the CERN-ISOLDE facility in order to study neutron-rich Ag nuclides. A pulsed laser system with high repetition rate has been used based on high-power copper-vapour pump lasers and dye lasers. With this source significant reductions of the isobaric background has been achieved.

  15. Chemical analysis of surgical smoke by infrared laser spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gianella, Michele; Sigrist, Markus W.

    2012-11-01

    The chemical composition of surgical smoke, a gaseous by-product of some surgical devices—lasers, drills, vessel sealing devices—is of great interest due to the many toxic components that have been found to date. For the first time, surgical smoke samples collected during routine keyhole surgery were analyzed with infrared laser spectroscopy. Traces (ppm range) of methane, ethane, ethylene, carbon monoxide and sevoflurane were detected in the samples which consisted mostly of carbon dioxide and water vapor. Except for the anaesthetic sevoflurane, none of the compounds were present at dangerous concentrations. Negative effects on the health of operation room personnel can be excluded for many toxic compounds found in earlier studies, since their concentrations are below recommended exposure limits.

  16. Space-Based Chemical Lasers in Strategic Defense

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-11-02

    using <fJ*™’™ „, „,,„,,; rrÄr^ÄSXnceuea. MlRACL Chemical laser at White planned for 1995. ssssSS Sands New Mexico ^f Tit:*n s«ron»1 «>ta<J*’f...AsswnHY P«o Su<«y CS2 Secwios CaoaMitv LPE 10,412 OPE 12.323 S/C with Test Objects 12,382 Subtotal 35,117 Titan IVA Margin !32.7°.o

  17. Performance characteristics of a wave attenuation for pulsed chemical lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buonadonna, V.; Weisbach, M. F.; Tong, K.-O.; McClure, J. D.

    1981-06-01

    Parametric performance measurements are reported for a pulsed chemical laser wave attenuator. The attenuator utilizes the combined effects of flow channel area expansion, caustic water spray, and flow-through damping screens to suppress and control the pressure disturbances produced by the chemical heat release of the F2 + D2 chain reaction. Experimental results that illustrate the effects of different area expansion geometries, water spray configurations, and damping screen arrangements are presented. Capability to tune the attenuator system to provide short pressure wave clearing times is emphasized. An attenuator configuration is reported which gives a wave clearing time of 2 msec with a corresponding entropy-wave density nonuniformity of 0.001 for a 18.5/6/76.5 F2/O2/diluent gas mixture at a pulse repetition frequency of 100 Hz.

  18. Design and Operation of a Supersonic Flow Cavity for a Non-Self-Sustained Electric Discharge Pumped Oxygen-Iodine Laser

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-02-16

    quality. In the present experiments, the test section total pressure was in the range from P0 = 60 to 120 Torr and remained constant during the run. At...follows, Q̇SDO = ṅSDO · NA · εSDO, where NA is the Avogadro number and εSDO = 0.96 eV is the SDO energy. The results of table 1 show that at the flow

  19. Laser Cleaning of Undyed Silk: Indications of Chemical Change

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    von Lerber, K.; Strlic, M.; Kolar, J.; Krüger, J.; Pentzien, S.; Kennedy, C.; Wess, T.; Sokhan, M.; Kautek, Wolfgang

    Three different undyed, unweighed silk fabrics (new clean, new soiled, and naturally aged) were cleaned with a computer-controlled Q-switched Nd:YAG laser at 532nm in 30 combinations of fluence and pulse numbers. They were studied for chemical change by viscometry, X-ray diffraction, and FIB-SIMS in combination with temperature calculations. While physical changes only occurred above the tested parameters, chemical changes could be detected as low as 0.2 J cm?2 with four pulses. Yellowing was observed at lower and bleaching at higher fluence/pulse number combinations. Melting was observed in naturally aged silk cleaned with 64 pulses at 4.2 J cm?2. The temperature reached at 0.1 J cm?2 is sufficient to evaporate carbon. Excess energy is transferred into the silk substrate causing thermal degradation. Different chemical processes leading to chain scission and to crosslinking seem to occur simultaneously, even at low fluence and pulse number. An increase in pulse numbers also leads to increasing damage.

  20. Free-Electron Lasers, Thermal Diffusion, Chemical Kinetics, and Surgery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Edwards, Glenn; Hutson, M. Shane

    2001-11-01

    Experiments demonstrate that the Mark-III FEL is a particularly effective tool for etching soft matter with remarkably little damage surrounding the site when tuned to wavelengths near 6.45 microns. Based on these observatons, human neuorsurgical and ophthalmic procedures were developed and have been performed successfully. A thermodynamic model was proposed to account for the wavelength dependence; however, the dynamics have not been well understood. We have theoretically investigated thermal diffusion and chemical kinetics in a system of alternating layers of protein and water as heated by a Mark-III FEL. The model is representative of cornea and the exposure conditions are comparable to previous experimental FEL investigations. A substantial temperature enhancement develops in the surface layer on the ten-nanosecond time scale. We consider the onset of both the helix-coil transition and chemical bond breaking of collagen in terms of the thermal, chemical, and structural properties of the system as well as laser wavelength and pulse structure.

  1. Laser chemical etching of waveguides and quasi-optical devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Drouet D'Aubigny, Christian Yann Pierre

    2003-11-01

    The terahertz (THz) frequency domain, located at the frontier of radio and light, is the last unexplored region of the electromagnetic spectrum. As technology becomes available, THz systems are finding applications to fields ranging all the way from astronomical and atmospheric remote sensing to space telecommunications, medical imaging, and security. In Astronomy the THz and far infrared (IR) portion of the electromagnetic spectrum (λ = 300 to 10 μm) may hold the answers to countless questions regarding the origin and evolution of the Universe, galaxy, star and planet formation. Over the past decade, advances in telescope and detector technology have for the first time made this regime available to astronomers. Near THz frequencies, metallic hollow waveguide structures become so small, (typically much less than a millimeter), that conventional machining becomes extremely difficult, and in many cases, nearly impossible. Laser induced, micro-chemical etching is a promising new technology that can be used to fabricate three dimensional structures many millimeters across with micrometer accuracy. Laser micromachining of silicon possesses a significant edge over more conventional techniques. It does not require the use of masks and is not confined to crystal planes. A non-contact process, it eliminates tool wear and vibration problems associated with classical milling machines. At the University of Arizona we have constructed the first such laser micromachining system optimized for the fabrication of THz and far IR waveguide and quasi-optical components. The system can machine structures up to 50 mm in diameter, down to a few microns accuracy in a few minutes and with a remarkable surface finish. A variety of THz devices have been fabricated using this technique, their design, fabrication, assembly and theoretical performance is described in the chapters that follow.

  2. Annular resonators for high-power chemical lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wade, Richard C.

    1993-08-01

    Resonators capable of extracting highly coherent energy from DF and HF chemical laser annular gain media have been under investigation for weapon application since 1974. This survey article traces the background of interest in these devices, describes the various concepts that have been experimentally and analytically investigated, and discusses the issues associated with their operation. From the discussion of issues, preferred concepts are selected. Applicability of these concepts to high-power operation is addressed through discussions of past and ongoing high-power demonstration programs and the issues facing their application to weapon sized devices capable of strategic and tactical missions such as ballistic missile defense (BMD), theater missile defense (TMD), and anti satellite (ASAT).

  3. Laser-based instrumentation for detection of chemical-warfare agents

    SciTech Connect

    Quigley, G.P.; Radziemski, L.J.; Sander, R.K.; Hartford, A. Jr.

    1981-01-01

    Several laser-based techniques are being developed for remote, point, and surface contamination detection of chemical warfare agents. These techniques include optoacoustic spectroscopy, laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy, and synchronous detection of laser-induced fluorescence. Detection limits in the part-per-million to part-per-billion regime have been demonstrated.

  4. Metal film deposition by laser breakdown chemical vapor deposition

    SciTech Connect

    Jervis, T. R.; Newkirk, L. R.

    1986-06-01

    Dielectric breakdown of gas mixtures can be used to deposit thin films by chemical vapor deposition with appropriate control of flow and pressure conditions to suppress gas-phase nucleation and particle formation. Using a pulsed CO/sub 2/ laser operating at 10.6 ..mu.. where there is no significant resonant absorption in any of the source gases, homogeneous films from several gas-phase precursors have been sucessfully deposited by gas-phase laser pyrolysis. Nickel and molybdenum from the respective carbonyls representing decomposition chemistry and tungsten from the hexafluoride representing reduction chemistry have been demonstrated. In each case the gas precursor is buffered with argon to reduce the partial pressure of the reactants and to induce breakdown. Films have been characterized by Auger electron spectroscopy, x-ray diffraction, transmission electron microscopy, pull tests, and resistivity measurements. The highest quality films have resulted from the nickel depositions. Detailed x-ray diffraction analysis of these films yields a very small domain size consistent with the low temperature of the substrate and the formation of metastable nickel carbide. Transmission electron microscopy supports this analysis.

  5. Metal film deposition by laser breakdown chemical vapor deposition

    SciTech Connect

    Jervis, T.R.

    1985-01-01

    Dielectric breakdown of gas mixtures can be used to deposit homogeneous thin films by chemical vapor deposition with appropriate control of flow and pressure conditions to suppress gas phase nucleation and particle formation. Using a pulsed CO/sub 2/ laser operating at 10.6 microns where there is no significant resonant absorption in any of the source gases, we have succeeded in depositing homogeneous films from several gas phase precursors by gas phase laser pyrolysis. Nickel and molybdenum from the respective carbonyls and tungsten from the hexafluoride have been examined to date. In each case the gas precursor is buffered to reduce the partial pressure of the reactants and to induce breakdown. The films are spectrally reflective and uniform over a large area. Films have been characterized by Auger electron spectroscopy, x-ray diffraction, pull tests, and resistivity measurements. The highest quality films have resulted from the nickel depositions. Detailed x-ray diffraction analysis of these films yields a very small domain size (approx. 50 A) consistent with rapid quenching from the gas phase reaction zone. This analysis also shows nickel carbide formation consistent with the temperature of the reaction zone and the Auger electron spectroscopy results which show some carbon and oxygen incorporation (8% and 1% respectively). Gas phase transport and condensation of the molybdenum carbonyl results in substantial carbon and oxygen contamination of the molybdenum films requiring heated substrates, a requirement not consistent with the goals of the program to maximize the quench rate of the deposition. Results from tungsten deposition experiments representing a reduction chemistry instead of the decomposition chemistry involved in the carbonyl experiments are also reported.

  6. Metal film deposition by laser breakdown chemical vapor deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jervis, T. R.

    1985-01-01

    Dielectric breakdown of gas mixtures can be used to deposit homogeneous thin films by chemical vapor deposition with appropriate control of flow and pressure conditions to suppress gas phase nucleation and particle formation. Using a pulsed CO2 laser operating at 10.6 microns where there is no significant resonant absorption in any of the source gases, we have succeeded in depositing homogeneous films from several gas phase precursors by gas phase laser pyrolysis. Nickel and molybdenum from the respective carbonyls and tungsten from the hexafluoride have been examined to date. In each case the gas precursor is buffered to reduce the partial pressure of the reactants and to induce breakdown. The films are spectrally reflective and uniform over a large area. Films have been characterized by Auger electron spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction, pull tests, and resistivity measurements. The highest quality films have resulted from the nickel depositions. Detailed X-ray diffraction analysis of these films yields a very small domain size (approx. 50 A) consistent with rapid quenching from the gas phase reaction zone. This analysis also shows nickel carbide formation consistent with the temperature of the reaction zone and the Auger electron spectroscopy results which show some carbon and oxygen incorporation (8% and 1% respectively). Gas phase transport and condensation of the molybdenum carbonyl results in substantial carbon and oxygen contamination of the molybdenum films requiring heated substrates, a requirement not consistent with the goals of the program to maximize the quench rate of the deposition. Results from tungsten deposition experiments representing a reduction chemistry instead of the decomposition chemistry involved in the carbonyl experiments are also reported.

  7. Advanced Laser Chemical Processing For Microelectronics and Integrated Optics

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1992-08-15

    Barbara, CA (June 25-27, 1990). 15. R.M. Osgood, Jr., " Laser - Fabrication for Integrated Electronics and Optics," OITDA Conference, Tokyo, Japan, (July 5...Society Meeting, Boston, MA, November 26 - December 3, 1990. 20. R.M. Osgood, Jr., "Advances in Laser Fabrication for Solid-State Electronics and...Thin, Excimer Laser-Deposited Cd Interlayers," J. Elec. Mat. 12, 1239 (July, 1990). 14. R.M. Osgood, Jr., " Laser - Fabrication for Solid State

  8. EFFECT OF LASER LIGHT ON MATTER. LASER PLASMAS: Optical strength of mirrors on fluorite substrates subjected to cw radiation from a chemical CO laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dudkin, V. A.; Rukhin, V. B.

    1994-02-01

    Optimisation of the energy characteristics of a chemical CO laser revealed damage to the optical resonator mirrors. Estimates indicated that when the power density of the incident cw laser radiation was 2-2.5 kW cm-2 the induced thermoelastic stresses could reach the damage threshold of mirrors on fluorite substrates.

  9. Detection of chemical clouds using widely tunable quantum cascade lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goyal, Anish K.; Kotidis, Petros; Deutsch, Erik R.; Zhu, Ninghui; Norman, Mark; Ye, Jim; Zafiriou, Kostas; Mazurenko, Alexander

    2015-05-01

    Widely tunable quantum cascade lasers (QCLs) spanning the long-wave infrared (LWIR) atmospheric transmission window and an HgCdTe detector were incorporated into a transceiver having a 50-mm-diameter transmit/receive aperture. The transceiver was used in combination with a 50-mm-diameter hollow retro-reflector for the open-path detection of chemical clouds. Two rapidly tunable external-cavity QCLs spanned the wavelength range of 7.5 to 12.8 m. Open-path transmission measurements were made over round-trip path-lengths of up to 562 meters. Freon-132a and other gases were sprayed into the beam path and the concentration-length (CL) product was measured as a function of time. The system exhibited a noise-equivalent concentration (NEC) of 3 ppb for Freon-132a given a round-trip path of 310 meters. Algorithms based on correlation methods were used to both identify the gases and determine their CLproducts as a function of time.

  10. Laser applications to chemical analysis: an introduction by the feature editors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jeffries, Jay B.; Ramsey, J. Michael; Lucht, Robert P.

    1995-06-01

    This issue of Applied Optics features papers on the application of laser technology to chemical analysis. Many of the contributions, although not all, result from papers presented at the Fourth OSA Topical Meeting on Laser Applications to Chemical Analysis, which was held at Jackson Hole, Wyoming, March, 1994. This successful meeting, with nearly one hundred participants, continued the tradition of earlier LACA meetings to focus on the optical science of laser-based measurements of temperature and trace chemical assays in a wide variety of practical applications.

  11. CONTROL OF LASER RADIATION PARAMETERS: Computational and experimental study of a Q-switched cw chemical HF/DF laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aleksandrov, Boris S.; Kuprenyuk, V. I.; Maksimov, Yurii P.; Mashendzhinov, Viktor I.; Rodionov, A. Yu; Rotinyan, Mikhail A.; Sudarikov, V. V.; Tret'yakov, Nikolai E.; Fedorov, Igor'A.; Etsina, Alla L.

    2007-06-01

    The energy and temporal parameters of radiation from a cw chemical medium-size HF/DF laser mechanically Q-switched by a mirror rotating at a frequency of up to 1 kHz are calculated and studied experimentally. The peak power of laser pulses in the repetitively pulsed regime exceeds the cw output power of the HF laser at least by a factor of four. The average power in the repetitively pulses regime is lower than that in the cw regime, but it increases (approximately doubles) with increasing modulation frequency. The time of the complete recovery of the gain profile in the active medium is measured to be 6-7 μs. Two numerical models are developed which describe the dynamics of Q-switched HF and DF lasers. Some specific features of the operation of these lasers are analysed with the help of these models.

  12. Multiple Channel Laser Beam Combination and Phasing Using Stimulated Brillouin Scattering in Optical Fibers

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-12-01

    light in stimulated Mandel’shtam–Brillouin scattering,” JETP Lett ., 15, 109-112, 1972. 41 . Hellwarth, R. W., “Phase conjugation by stimulated...interferometry with wavefront-reversing mirrors,” Sov . Phys . JETP , 52, 847-851, 1980. 79. Valley, M., G. Lombardi, and R. Aprahamian, “Beam...discharge,” Appl. Phys . Lett ., 86, 111104, 2005. 13. Lange, Mathew A., “Kinetics of the electric discharge pumped oxygen-iodine laser,” Sixth

  13. Laser-induced chemical liquid phase deposition of copper from aqueous solutions without reducing agents

    SciTech Connect

    Kochemirovsky, V A; Tumkin, I I; Logunov, L S; Safonov, S V; Menchikov, Leonid G

    2012-08-31

    Laser-induced chemical liquid phase deposition of copper without a traditional reducing agent has been used for the first time to obtain conductive patterns on a dielectric surface having a reducing ability. It is shown that phenol-formaldehyde binder of the dielectric (glass fibre) can successfully play the role of a reducing agent in this process. The resulting copper sediments have low electrical resistance and good topology. (interaction of laser radiation with matter. laser plasmas)

  14. Fast infrared chemical imaging with a quantum cascade laser.

    PubMed

    Yeh, Kevin; Kenkel, Seth; Liu, Jui-Nung; Bhargava, Rohit

    2015-01-06

    Infrared (IR) spectroscopic imaging systems are a powerful tool for visualizing molecular microstructure of a sample without the need for dyes or stains. Table-top Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) imaging spectrometers, the current established technology, can record broadband spectral data efficiently but requires scanning the entire spectrum with a low throughput source. The advent of high-intensity, broadly tunable quantum cascade lasers (QCL) has now accelerated IR imaging but results in a fundamentally different type of instrument and approach, namely, discrete frequency IR (DF-IR) spectral imaging. While the higher intensity of the source provides a higher signal per channel, the absence of spectral multiplexing also provides new opportunities and challenges. Here, we couple a rapidly tunable QCL with a high performance microscope equipped with a cooled focal plane array (FPA) detector. Our optical system is conceptualized to provide optimal performance based on recent theory and design rules for high-definition (HD) IR imaging. Multiple QCL units are multiplexed together to provide spectral coverage across the fingerprint region (776.9 to 1904.4 cm(-1)) in our DF-IR microscope capable of broad spectral coverage, wide-field detection, and diffraction-limited spectral imaging. We demonstrate that the spectral and spatial fidelity of this system is at least as good as the best FT-IR imaging systems. Our configuration provides a speedup for equivalent spectral signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) compared to the best spectral quality from a high-performance linear array system that has 10-fold larger pixels. Compared to the fastest available HD FT-IR imaging system, we demonstrate scanning of large tissue microarrays (TMA) in 3-orders of magnitude smaller time per essential spectral frequency. These advances offer new opportunities for high throughput IR chemical imaging, especially for the measurement of cells and tissues.

  15. Fiber ring laser interrogated zeolite-coated singlemode-multimode-singlemode structure for trace chemical detection.

    PubMed

    Lan, X; Huang, J; Han, Q; Wei, T; Gao, Z; Jiang, H; Dong, J; Xiao, H

    2012-06-01

    Zeolite thin films were synthesized on the claddingless multimode portion of a singlemode-multimode-singlemode (SMS) fiber structure to construct a chemical vapor sensor. The zeolite-coated SMS structure was inserted into a fiber ring amplifier to produce a laser line. Combining the strong molecular adsorption capability of the nanoporous zeolite and the high signal-to-noise ratio of the fiber laser, the device was demonstrated for chemical vapor sensing with a low detection limit.

  16. Time and wavelength domain algorithms for chemical analysis by laser radar

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rosen, David L.; Gillespie, James B.

    1992-01-01

    Laser-induced fluorescence (LIF) is a promising technique for laser radar applications. Laser radar using LIF has already been applied to algae blooms and oil slicks. Laser radar using LIF has great potential for remote chemical analysis because LIF spectra are extremely sensitive to chemical composition. However, most samples in the real world contain mixtures of fluorescing components, not merely individual components. Multicomponent analysis of laser radar returns from mixtures is often difficult because LIF spectra from solids and liquids are very broad and devoid of line structure. Therefore, algorithms for interpreting LIF spectra from laser radar returns must be able to analyze spectra that overlap in multicomponent systems. This paper analyzes the possibility of using factor analysis-rank annihilation (FARA) to analyze emission-time matrices (ETM) from laser radar returns instead of excitation-emission matrices (EEM). The authors here define ETM as matrices where the rows (or columns) are emission spectra at fixed times and the columns (or rows) are temporal profiles for fixed emission wavelengths. Laser radar usually uses pulsed lasers for ranging purposes, which are suitable for measuring temporal profiles. Laser radar targets are hard instead of diffuse; that is, a definite surface emits the fluorescence instead of an extended volume. A hard target would not broaden the temporal profiles as would a diffuse target. Both fluorescence lifetimes and emission spectra are sensitive to chemical composition. Therefore, temporal profiles can be used instead of excitation spectra in FARA analysis of laser radar returns. The resulting laser radar returns would be ETM instead of EEM.

  17. Ultrafast laser induced breakdown spectroscopy for high spatial resolution chemical analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zorba, Vassilia; Mao, Xianglei; Russo, Richard E.

    2011-02-01

    Femtosecond laser induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) was used to identify the spatial resolution limitations and assess the minimal detectable mass restrictions in laser-ablation based chemical analysis. The atomic emission of sodium (Na) and potassium (K) dopants in transparent dielectric Mica matrices was studied, to find that both these elements could be detected from 450 nm diameter ablation craters, full-width-at-half-maximum (FWHM). Under optimal conditions, mass as low as 220 ag was measured, demonstrating the feasibility of using laser-ablation based chemical analysis to achieve high spatial resolution elemental analysis in real-time and at atmospheric pressure conditions.

  18. Simulation of a two-frequency cw chemical HF-HBr laser

    SciTech Connect

    Aleksandrov, B P; Katorgin, B I; Stepanov, A A

    2008-10-31

    An autonomous cw chemical HF-HBr laser emitting simultaneously at {approx}2.7 {mu}m (HF molecules) and {approx}4.2 {mu}m (HBr molecules) is studied numerically by using complete Navier-Stokes equations. It is shown that the output power of the HBr laser per unit area of the nozzle array can achieve {approx}20 W cm{sup -2} for the laser region length {approx}20 cm. The relation between the radiation intensities emitted by HF and HBr molecules is controlled by diluting the secondary fuel by bromine. (lasers)

  19. Surface chemical reaction of laser ablated aluminum sample for detonation initiation

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Chang-hwan; Yoh, Jack J.

    2011-05-01

    We explore the evolution of metal plasma generated by high laser irradiances and its effect on the surrounding air by using shadowgraph images after laser pulse termination; hence the formation of laser supported detonation and combustion processes has been investigated. The essence of the paper is in observing initiation of chemical reaction between ablated aluminum plasma and oxygen from air by inducing high power laser pulse (>1000 mJ/pulse) and conduct a quantitative comparison of chemically reactive laser initiated waves with the classical detonation of exploding aluminum (dust) cloud in air. Findings in this work may lead to a new method of initiating detonation from metal sample in its bulk form without the need of mixing nano-particles with oxygen for initiation.

  20. Tooth bleaching using three laser systems, halogen-light unit, and chemical action agents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dostalova, Tatjana; Jelinkova, Helena; Housova, Devana; Sulc, Jan; Nemec, Michal; Koranda, Petr; Miyagi, Mitsunobu; Shi, Yi-Wei; Matsuura, Yuji

    2004-09-01

    μThe study describes the preclinical experience with laser-activated bleaching agent for discolored teeth. Extracted human upper central incisors were selected, and in the bleaching experiment 35% hydrogen peroxide was used. Three various laser systems and halogen-light unit for activation of the bleaching agent were applied. They were Alexandrite laser (wavelength 750 nm and 375 nm - SHG), Nd:YAG laser (wavelength 1.064 m), and Er:YAG laser (wavelength 2.94 μm). The halogen-light unit was used in a standard regime. The enamel surface was analyzed in the scanning electron microscope. The method of chemical oxidation results in a 2-3 shade change in one treatment. The halogen-light units produced the same effect with shorter time of bleaching process (from 630 s to 300 s). The Alexandrite laser (750 nm) and bleaching agent helped to reach the desired color shade after a shorter time (400 s). Alexandrite laser (375 nm) and Nd:YAG laser had no effect on the longevity of the process of bleaching. Overheating of the chemical bleaching agent was visible after Er:YAG laser activation (195 s). Slight surface modification after bleaching process was detected in SEM.

  1. Study of Molecular Collision Dynamics for Chemical Laser Systems.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1982-03-01

    have concentrated our studies on photosensitive oxidizers such as chlorine dioxide (ClO 2) and hydrazoic acid (HN3) combined with carbon -containing fuel...resulting in intense emission throughout the visible spectrum. The emission was observed well downstream from the UV laser ignition region in an observation...sustaining by branched chain kinetics and no significant excitation by the initial UV laser pulse occurred. -- - - I a*- - - - . -a | .. nNI.. 6 As one

  2. IR LASER BASED CHEMICAL SENSOR FOR THE COOPERATIVE MONITORING PROGRAM

    SciTech Connect

    Edward A Whitaker

    2005-08-08

    The purpose of this project was to investigate the device properties of the quantum cascade laser (QCL), a type of laser invented at Bell Laboratories, Lucent Technologies in the device physics research lab of Dr. Federico Capasso and more specifically to determine the remote sensing capability of this device. The PI and Stevens Institute of Technology collaborated with Dr. Capasso and Bell Laboratories to carry out this research project. The QCL is a unique laser source capable of generating laser radiation in the middle-infrared spectral region that overlaps the most important molecular absorption bands. With appropriate modulation techniques it is possible to use the laser to measure the concentration of many molecules of interest to the remote sensing community. In addition, the mid-IR emission wavelength is well suited to atmospheric transmission as mid-IR experiences much less scattering due to dust and fog. At the onset of this project little was known about several key device performance parameters of this family of lasers and the NNSA supported research enabled them to determine values of several of these characteristics.

  3. Laser-machined components for microanalytical and chemical separation devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matson, Dean W.; Martin, Peter M.; Bennett, Wendy D.

    1998-10-01

    Excimer lasers have proven to be powerful tools for machining polymeric components used in microanalytical and microchemical separation devices. We report the use of laser machining methods to produce microfluidic channels and liquid/liquid contact membranes for a number of devices fabricated at our laboratory. Microchannels 50- to 100- micrometers -wide have been produced directly in bulk polycarbonate chips using a direct-write laser micromachining system. Wider microchannels have been produced by laser machining paths through sheets of polyimide film, then sandwiching the patterned piece between solid chips of polycarbonate stock. A comparison of direct-write and mask machining processes used to produce some of the microfluidic features is made. Examples of microanalytical devices produced using these methods are presented. Included are microdialysis units used to remove electrolytes from liquid samples and electrophoretic separation devices, both used for extremely low volume samples intended for mass spectrometric analysis. A multilayered microfluidic device designed to analyze low volume groundwater samples for hazardous metals and a fluidics motherboard are also described. Laser machining processes have also been explored for producing polymeric membranes suitable for use in liquid/liquid contactors used for removal of soluble hazardous components from waste streams. A step-and-repeat mask machining process was used to produce 0.5 X 8 cm membranes in 25- and 50-micrometers -thick polyimide. Pore diameters produced using this method were five and ten micrometers. The laser machined membranes were sputter coated with PTFE prior to use to improve fluid breakthrough characteristics.

  4. CO2 laser scribe of chemically strengthened glass with high surface compressive stress

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Xinghua; Vaddi, Butchi R.

    2011-03-01

    Chemically strengthened glass is finding increasing use in handheld, IT and TV cover glass applications. Chemically strengthened glass, particularly with high (>600MPa) compressive stress (CS) and deeper depth of layer (DOL), enable to retain higher strength after damage than non-strengthened glass when its surface is abraded. Corning Gorilla® Glass has particularly proven to be advantageous over competition in this attribute. However, due to high compressive stress (CS) and Central Tension (CT) cutting ion-exchanged glass is extremely difficult and often unmanageable where ever the applications require dicing the chemically strengthened mother glass into smaller parts. We at Corning have developed a CO2 laser scribe and break method (LSB) to separate a single chemically strengthened glass sheet into plurality of devices. Furthermore, CO2 laser scribe and break method enables debris-free separation of glass with high edge strength due to its mirror-like edge finish. We have investigated laser scribe and break of chemically strengthened glass with surface compressive stress greater than 600 MPa. In this paper we present the results of CO2 scribe and break method and underlying laser scribing mechanisms. We demonstrated cross-scribe repetitively on GEN 2 size chemically strengthened glass substrates. Specimens for edge strength measurements of different thickness and CS/DOL glass were prepared using the laser scribe and break technique. The specimens were tested using the standard 4-point bend method and the results are presented.

  5. Preparation of γ-Al2O3 films by laser chemical vapor deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Ming; Ito, Akihiko; Goto, Takashi

    2015-06-01

    γ- and α-Al2O3 films were prepared by chemical vapor deposition using CO2, Nd:YAG, and InGaAs lasers to investigate the effects of varying the laser wavelength and deposition conditions on the phase composition and microstructure. The CO2 laser was found to mostly produce α-Al2O3 films, whereas the Nd:YAG and InGaAs lasers produced γ-Al2O3 films when used at a high total pressure. γ-Al2O3 films had a cauliflower-like structure, while the α-Al2O3 films had a dense and columnar structure. Of the three lasers, it was the Nd:YAG laser that interacted most with intermediate gas species. This promoted γ-Al2O3 nucleation in the gas phase at high total pressure, which explains the cauliflower-like structure of nanoparticles observed.

  6. The effects of motive gas physical properties on the performance of ejector for chemical lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jin, Jungkun; Kim, Sehoon; Kwon, Hyuckmo; Kwon, Sejin

    2005-03-01

    Axi-symmetric annular type ejector has been developed as a pressure recovery system for HF/DF chemical laser. Ejector was tested using air as operating gases and low-pressure entrained flow was obtained. In this paper, we changed motive gas since operating gases for chemical laser system are products of chemical reaction. By selection of motive gas, physical properties of operating gas changes, therefore the performance of ejector is different for each motive gas, i.e., specific heat at constant pressure (CP) and average molecular weight (MW) on the effectiveness of ejection. The research was carried out by both numerical analysis using commercial CFD code, FLUENT and experiments.

  7. Ultrastructural evaluation of radicular dentin after Nd:YAG laser irradiation combined with different chemical substances.

    PubMed

    Faria, Maria Isabel Anastacio; Souza-Gabriel, Aline Evangelista; Marchesan, Melissa Andreia; Sousa-Neto, Manoel Damiao; Silva-Sousa, Yara Teresinha Correa

    2008-01-01

    This aticle sought to evaluate the dentin morphology after irradiation by a Neodymium:Yttrium-Aluminum-Garnet (Nd:YAG) laser, using different chemical substances to irrigate radicular canals: distilled water, 17% ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid plus Cetavlon (EDTAC), 1% sodium hypochlorite, and 2% chlorhexidine. Groups were subdivided according to the protocol of laser application (n=9). The specimens were analyzed by scanning electron microscopy (SEM). No differences were found in dentin morphology when different root thirds were examined. Regardless of the chemical substance used, alterations were more evident in groups in which the surfaces were dried before laser irradiation. Fusion areas, craters, carbonization, and partially exposed tubules were verified. When the irradiation was performed in water, the smear layer was incorporated into the laser-modified surface. Among the specimens irrigated with EDTAC and laser-treated, partial obliteration of dentin tubules due to the laser action was verified; in addition, there was no remaining smear layer on the surfaces. Samples irrigated with sodium hypochlorite followed by laser irradiation demonstrated similar morphology to the samples in the chlorhexidine group, with some fusion areas present and no exposed dentin tubules or fissures. The irradiation from an Nd:YAG laser in the presence of EDTAC solution provided a more favorable surface pattern compared to the other experimental conditions, due to the removal of the contaminated layer and the posterior sealing of dentin tubules.

  8. Chemical Bond Activation Observed with an X-ray Laser.

    PubMed

    Beye, Martin; Öberg, Henrik; Xin, Hongliang; Dakovski, Georgi L; Dell'Angela, Martina; Föhlisch, Alexander; Gladh, Jörgen; Hantschmann, Markus; Hieke, Florian; Kaya, Sarp; Kühn, Danilo; LaRue, Jerry; Mercurio, Giuseppe; Minitti, Michael P; Mitra, Ankush; Moeller, Stefan P; Ng, May Ling; Nilsson, Anders; Nordlund, Dennis; Nørskov, Jens; Öström, Henrik; Ogasawara, Hirohito; Persson, Mats; Schlotter, William F; Sellberg, Jonas A; Wolf, Martin; Abild-Pedersen, Frank; Pettersson, Lars G M; Wurth, Wilfried

    2016-09-15

    The concept of bonding and antibonding orbitals is fundamental in chemistry. The population of those orbitals and the energetic difference between the two reflect the strength of the bonding interaction. Weakening the bond is expected to reduce this energetic splitting, but the transient character of bond-activation has so far prohibited direct experimental access. Here we apply time-resolved soft X-ray spectroscopy at a free-electron laser to directly observe the decreased bonding-antibonding splitting following bond-activation using an ultrashort optical laser pulse.

  9. Chemical detection and laser wavelength stabilization employing spectroscopic absorption via laser compliance voltage sensing

    DOEpatents

    Taubman, Matthew S; Phillips, Mark C

    2014-03-18

    Systems and methods are disclosed that provide a direct indication of the presence and concentration of an analyte within the external cavity of a laser device that employ the compliance voltage across the laser device. The systems can provide stabilization of the laser wavelength. The systems and methods can obviate the need for an external optical detector, an external gas cell, or other sensing region and reduce the complexity and size of the sensing configuration.

  10. Chemical detection and laser wavelength stabilization employing spectroscopic absorption via laser compliance voltage sensing

    SciTech Connect

    Taubman, Matthew S.; Phillips, Mark C.

    2016-01-12

    Systems and methods are disclosed that provide a direct indication of the presence and concentration of an analyte within the external cavity of a laser device that employ the compliance voltage across the laser device. The systems can provide stabilization of the laser wavelength. The systems and methods can obviate the need for an external optical detector, an external gas cell, or other sensing region and reduce the complexity and size of the sensing configuration.

  11. The Status of Rotational Nonequilibrium in HF Chemical Lasers

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1986-05-01

    8217 -" II. EVIDENCE FOR ROTATIONAL NONEQUILIBRIU IN HF LASERS Since 1967 there has been a mounting body of evidence that the rotational populations within a...Physique C9 41, 17 (1980). 100. L. H. Sentman and W. Rushmore , ATAA 81-4272 19j 1323 (1981). 101. L. H. Sentman, W. 0. Mosebach, and P. Renzoni, A

  12. About possibilities of clearing near-Earth space from dangerous debris by a spaceborne laser system with an autonomous cw chemical HF laser

    SciTech Connect

    Avdeev, A V; Bashkin, A S; Katorgin, Boris I; Parfen'ev, M V

    2011-07-31

    The possibility of clearing hazardous near-Earth space debris using a spaceborne laser station with a large autonomous cw chemical HF laser is substantiated and the requirements to its characteristics (i.e., power and divergence of laser radiation, pulse duration in the repetitively pulsed regime, repetition rate and total time of laser action on space debris, necessary to remove them from the orbits of the protected spacecrafts) are determined. The possibility of launching the proposed spaceborne laser station to the orbit with the help of a 'Proton-M' carrier rocket is considered. (laser applications)

  13. Polygonal pits on silicon surfaces that are created by laser-assisted chemical etching

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saito, Mitsunori; Kimura, Saori

    2017-02-01

    Laser-assisted chemical etching was conducted for creating periodic textures on silicon surfaces. Silicon plates with the (111) surface orientation were immersed in an aqueous solution of potassium hydroxide, and a pulsed laser beam (532 nm wavelength, 5 ns duration, 10 pulse/s) was irradiated on their surface to promote anisotropic etching. The laser beam was patterned by using a glass capillary plate that contained a hexagonal array of micropores (10 μ m diameter, 12 m period). The focused beam projected the hexagonal image on the silicon surface, creating bright spots of 4 μ m period. During the laser irradiation process of 3 min, both laser-induced ablation and chemical etching took place at these bright spots. After stop of laser irradiation, the chemical etching progressed further, and consequently, a periodic array of triangular or hexagonal pits emerged on the silicon surface. The direction of the triangular pits changed by rotation of the silicon plate. When a silicon plate with the (100) surface orientation was used, diamond or rectangular pits were created on its surface. The mechanism of this polygonal texturing was explained by using the normal and intersecting vectors of the (100), (110), and (111) planes that exhibited different etching rates.

  14. Physico-Chemical Dynamics of Nanoparticle Formation during Laser Decontamination

    SciTech Connect

    Cheng, M.D.

    2005-06-01

    Laser-ablation based decontamination is a new and effective approach for simultaneous removal and characterization of contaminants from surfaces (e.g., building interior and exterior walls, ground floors, etc.). The scientific objectives of this research are to: (1) characterize particulate matter generated during the laser-ablation based decontamination, (2) develop a technique for simultaneous cleaning and spectroscopic verification, and (3) develop an empirical model for predicting particle generation for the size range from 10 nm to tens of micrometers. This research project provides fundamental data obtained through a systematic study on the particle generation mechanism, and also provides a working model for prediction of particle generation such that an effective operational strategy can be devised to facilitate worker protection.

  15. Sub-nanometrically resolved chemical mappings of quantum-cascade laser active regions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pantzas, Konstantinos; Beaudoin, Grégoire; Patriarche, Gilles; Largeau, Ludovic; Mauguin, Olivia; Pegolotti, Giulia; Vasanelli, Angela; Calvar, Ariane; Amanti, Maria; Sirtori, Carlo; Sagnes, Isabelle

    2016-05-01

    A procedure that produces sub-nanometrically resolved chemical mappings of MOCVD-grown InGaAs/InAlAs/InP quantum cascade lasers is presented. The chemical mappings reveal that, although the structure is lattice-matched to InP, the InAlAs barriers do not attain the nominal aluminum content—48%—and are, in fact, InGaAlAs quaternaries. This information is used to adjust the aluminum precursor flow and fine-tune the composition of the barriers, resulting in a significant improvement of the fabricated lasers.

  16. Antimony sulfide thin films prepared by laser assisted chemical bath deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shaji, S.; Garcia, L. V.; Loredo, S. L.; Krishnan, B.; Aguilar Martinez, J. A.; Das Roy, T. K.; Avellaneda, D. A.

    2017-01-01

    Antimony sulfide (Sb2S3) thin films were prepared by laser assisted chemical bath deposition (LACBD) technique. These thin films were deposited on glass substrates from a chemical bath containing antimony chloride, acetone and sodium thiosulfate under various conditions of normal chemical bath deposition (CBD) as well as in-situ irradiation of the chemical bath using a continuous laser of 532 nm wavelength. Structure, composition, morphology, optical and electrical properties of the Sb2S3 thin films produced by normal CBD and LACBD were analyzed by X-Ray diffraction (XRD), Raman Spectroscopy, Atomic force microscopy (AFM), X-Ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), UV-vis spectroscopy and Photoconductivity. The results showed that LACBD is an effective synthesis technique to obtain Sb2S3 thin films for optoelectronic applications.

  17. Summary of the Aerospace Corporation Chemical Laser Program, 1968 - 1980.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1980-04-01

    AsmttcTheory/ Ellinwood (PC) Unstable Resone~or with Continuous Medium Coupling 6. Quantum Theory Roehrs 1972 7. Nozzle Source Flow Mirels 1 9 80C Effect on...in Unstable Cavity, TR-0073(3240-0)-2, The Aerospace Corporation (September 1972); also, Appl. Opt. __, 2384 (1972). Roehrs , F. S., A Quantum Theory...R. A., H. Mirels, F. S. Roehrs , and R. J. Pedersen, "Application of a Single Frequency Unstable Cavity to a CW HF Laser," IEEE J. Quantum Electron. QE

  18. Chemical Changes Associated with Increased Acid Resistance of Er:YAG Laser Irradiated Enamel

    PubMed Central

    Olea-Mejía, Oscar Fernando; García-Fabila, María Magdalena; Rodríguez-Vilchis, Laura Emma; Sánchez-Flores, Ignacio; Centeno-Pedraza, Claudia

    2014-01-01

    Background. An increase in the acid resistance of dental enamel, as well as morphological and structural changes produced by Er:YAG laser irradiation, has been reported. Purpose. To evaluate the chemical changes associated with acid resistance of enamel treated with Er:YAG laser. Methods. Forty-eight enamel samples were divided into 4 groups (n = 12). Group I (control); Groups II, III, and IV were irradiated with Er:YAG at 100 mJ (12.7 J/cm2), 200 mJ (25.5 J/cm2), and 300 mJ (38.2 J/cm2), respectively. Results. There were significant differences in composition of irradiated groups (with the exception of chlorine) and in the amount of calcium released. Conclusions. Chemical changes associated with an increase in acid resistance of enamel treated with Er:YAG laser showed a clear postirradiation pattern characterized by a decrease in C at.% and an increase in O, P, and Ca at.% and no changes in Cl at.%. An increased Ca/P ratio after Er:YAG laser irradiation was associated with the use of higher laser energy densities. Chemical changes produced by acid dissolution showed a similar trend among experimental groups. Stable or increased Ca/P ratio after acid dissolution was observed in the irradiated groups, with reduction of Ca released into the acid solution. PMID:24600327

  19. Optically transparent glass micro-actuator fabricated by femtosecond laser exposure and chemical etching

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lenssen, Bo; Bellouard, Yves

    2012-09-01

    Femtosecond laser manufacturing combined with chemical etching has recently emerged as a flexible platform for fabricating three-dimensional devices and integrated optical elements in glass substrates. Here, we demonstrate an optically transparent micro-actuator fabricated out of a single piece of fused silica. This work paves the road for further functional integration in glass substrate and optically transparent microsystems.

  20. A New Energy Transfer Chemical Laser at 1.315 Microns

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-05-31

    characterized by cav- effort represented a significant milestone in the de- ity-ring-down spectroscopy (Los Gatos Research, Los velopment of a chemically...pumped, all gas phase Gatos , CA) which revealed a high reflectivity of iodine laser. In continuing our investigation into the 99.998 + 0.001% at 1.32 urm

  1. Laser-induced fluorescence: quantitative analysis of atherosclerotic plaque chemical content in human aorta

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dai, Erbin; Wishart, David; Khoury, Samir; Kay, Cyril M.; Jugdutt, Bodh I.; Tulip, John; Lucas, Alexandra

    1996-05-01

    We have been studying laser-induced fluorescence as a technique for identification of selected changes in the chemical composition of atherosclerotic plaque. Formulae for quantification of chemical changes have been developed based upon analysis of fluorescence emission spectra using multiple regression analysis and the principal of least squares. The intima of human aortic necropsy specimens was injected with chemical compounds present in atherosclerotic plaque. Spectra recorded after injection of selected chemical components found in plaque (collagen I, III, IV, elastin and cholesterol) at varying concentrations (0.01 - 1.0 mg) were compared with saline injection. A single fiber system was used for both fluorescence excitation (XeCl excimer laser, 308 nm, 1.5 - 2.0 mJ/ pulse, 5 Hz) and fluorescence emission detection. Average spectra for each chemical have been developed and the wavelengths of peak emission intensity identified. Curve fitting analysis as well as multiple regression analysis were used to develop formulae for assessment of chemical content. Distinctive identifying average curves were established for each chemical. Excellent correlations were identified for collagen I, III, and IV, elastin, and cholesterol (R2 equals 0.92 6- 0.997). Conclusions: (1) Fluorescence spectra of human aortas were significantly altered by collagen I, collagen III, elastin and cholesterol. (2) Fluorescence spectroscopic analysis may allow quantitative assessment of atherosclerotic plaque chemical content in situ.

  2. Laser Ablation/Ionisation Mass Spectrometry: Sensitive and Quantitative Chemical Depth Profiling of Solid Materials.

    PubMed

    Riedo, Andreas; Grimaudo, Valentine; Moreno-García, Pavel; Neuland, Maike B; Tulej, Marek; Broekmann, Peter; Wurz, Peter

    2016-01-01

    Direct quantitative and sensitive chemical analysis of solid materials with high spatial resolution, both in lateral and vertical direction is of high importance in various fields of analytical research, ranging from in situ space research to the semiconductor industry. Accurate knowledge of the chemical composition of solid materials allows a better understanding of physical and chemical processes that formed/altered the material and allows e.g. to further improve these processes. So far, state-of-the-art techniques such as SIMS, LA-ICP-MS or GD-MS have been applied for chemical analyses in these fields of research. In this report we review the current measurement capability and the applicability of our Laser Ablation/Ionisation Mass Spectrometer (instrument name LMS) for the chemical analysis of solids with high spatial resolution. The most recent chemical analyses conducted on various solid materials, including e.g. alloys, fossils and meteorites are discussed.

  3. Generation of cavitation luminescence by laser-induced exothermic chemical reaction

    SciTech Connect

    Jung Park, Han; Diebold, Gerald J.

    2013-08-14

    Absorption of high power laser radiation by aqueous carbon suspensions is known to result in the formation of highly compressed bubbles of hydrogen and carbon monoxide through the endothermic carbon-steam reaction. The bubbles expand rapidly, overreaching their equilibrium diameter, and then collapse tens to hundreds of microseconds after formation to give a flash of radiation. Here we report on the effects of laser-initiated exothermic chemical reaction on cavitation luminescence. Experiments with hydrogen peroxide added to colloidal carbon suspensions show that both the time of the light flash following the laser pulse and the intensity of luminescence increase with hydrogen peroxide concentration, indicating that large, highly energetic gas bubbles are produced. Additional experiments with colloidal carbon suspensions show the effects of high pressure on the luminescent intensity and its time of appearance following firing of the laser.

  4. Feasibility study of a novel pressure recovery system for CO2-COIL based on chemical absorption

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Qingwei; Jin, Yuqi; Geng, Zicai; Li, Yongzhao; Zhang, Yuelong; Sang, Fengting

    2015-02-01

    A chemical oxygen-iodine laser (COIL) is an electronic transition, low pressure, high throughput system. The use of this laser demands a suitable pressure recovery system. This paper proposed a novel pressure recovery system based on chemical absorption and the feasibility for COIL with CO2 as buffer gas (CO2-COIL) was investigated. The novel pressure recovery system works by chemisorbing the CO2-COIL effluents into two fixed-beds maintained at initial temperature of around 293-323K. Compared with the cryosorption system for N2-COIL based on physical absorption, the novel chemisorptions based pressure recovery system has a simpler logistics and a shorter run-to-run preparation time. Two kinds of solid chemo-sorbents were designed and synthesized. One was used for chemisorbing the oxidizing gases such as O2 ,Cl2 and I2, another was used for chemisorbing the acidic gas such as CO2. The capacities of the two sorbents were measured to be 3.12 mmol(O2)/g and 3.84 mmol (CO2) /g, respectively. It indicated that the synthesized sorbents could effectively chemosorb the CO2-COIL effluents. Secondly, analog test equipment was set up and used to study the feasibility of the novel pressure recovery system used for CO2-COIL. The test results showed that the novel pressure recovery system could maintain the pressure under 6 Torr for tens seconds under the continuous gas flow. It showed that the novel pressure recovery system for CO2-COIL based on chemical absorption is feasible.

  5. Excimer laser induced surface chemical modification of polytetrafluoroethylene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Révész, K.; Hopp, B.; Bor, Z.

    1997-02-01

    Polytetrafluoroethylene has a notoriously non adhesive and non reactive character. Its successful surface photochemical modification was performed by irradiating the polytetrafluoroethylene/liquid triethylamine interface with an ArF excimer laser (λ=193 nm). Due to the photochemical treatment the polytetrafluoroethylene surface became more hydrophilic. The water receding contact angle decreased from 94° to 43°. The reaction cross section was determined from the decrease of the contact angles. It was found to be as high as 6.4×10-18 cm2. XPS measurements evidenced the removal of fluorine from the polytetrafluoroethylene, incorporation of alkyl carbon and nitrogen. Photochemical dissociation path of the triethylamine makes probable that it bonded to the fluoropolymer backbone via the α-carbon atom of an ethyl group. A radical, or a photoinduced electron transfer mechanism was suggested to describe this reaction. A selective area electroless plating of silver was performed after pretreating the sample with patterned photomodification. The increased adhesion of the sample was proved by gluing with epoxy resin. As a result of the surface modification the tensile strength of gluing increased by 210× and reached 24% of the value characteristic for the bulk material.

  6. Laser Microdissection and Atmospheric Pressure Chemical Ionization Mass Spectrometry Coupled for Multimodal Imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Lorenz, Matthias; Ovchinnikova, Olga S; Kertesz, Vilmos; Van Berkel, Gary J

    2013-01-01

    This paper describes the coupling of ambient laser ablation surface sampling, accomplished using a laser capture microdissection system, with atmospheric pressure chemical ionization mass spectrometry for high spatial resolution multimodal imaging. A commercial laser capture microdissection system was placed in close proximity to a modified ion source of a mass spectrometer designed to allow for sampling of laser ablated material via a transfer tube directly into the ionization region. Rhodamine 6G dye of red sharpie ink in a laser etched pattern as well as cholesterol and phosphatidylcholine in a cerebellum mouse brain thin tissue section were identified and imaged from full scan mass spectra. A minimal spot diameter of 8 m was achieved using the 10X microscope cutting objective with a lateral oversampling pixel resolution of about 3.7 m. Distinguishing between features approximately 13 m apart in a cerebellum mouse brain thin tissue section was demonstrated in a multimodal fashion including co-registered optical and mass spectral chemical images.

  7. Duration of an intense laser pulse can determine the breakage of multiple chemical bonds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xie, Xinhua; Lötstedt, Erik; Roither, Stefan; Schöffler, Markus; Kartashov, Daniil; Midorikawa, Katsumi; Baltuška, Andrius; Yamanouchi, Kaoru; Kitzler, Markus

    2015-08-01

    Control over the breakage of a certain chemical bond in a molecule by an ultrashort laser pulse has been considered for decades. With the availability of intense non-resonant laser fields it became possible to pre-determine femtosecond to picosecond molecular bond breakage dynamics by controlled distortions of the electronic molecular system on sub-femtosecond time scales using field-sensitive processes such as strong-field ionization or excitation. So far, all successful demonstrations in this area considered only fragmentation reactions, where only one bond is broken and the molecule is split into merely two moieties. Here, using ethylene (C2H4) as an example, we experimentally investigate whether complex fragmentation reactions that involve the breakage of more than one chemical bond can be influenced by parameters of an ultrashort intense laser pulse. We show that the dynamics of removing three electrons by strong-field ionization determines the ratio of fragmentation of the molecular trication into two respectively three moieties. We observe a relative increase of two-body fragmentations with the laser pulse duration by almost an order of magnitude. Supported by quantum chemical simulations we explain our experimental results by the interplay between the dynamics of electron removal and nuclear motion.

  8. Duration of an intense laser pulse can determine the breakage of multiple chemical bonds

    PubMed Central

    Xie, Xinhua; Lötstedt, Erik; Roither, Stefan; Schöffler, Markus; Kartashov, Daniil; Midorikawa, Katsumi; Baltuška, Andrius; Yamanouchi, Kaoru; Kitzler, Markus

    2015-01-01

    Control over the breakage of a certain chemical bond in a molecule by an ultrashort laser pulse has been considered for decades. With the availability of intense non-resonant laser fields it became possible to pre-determine femtosecond to picosecond molecular bond breakage dynamics by controlled distortions of the electronic molecular system on sub-femtosecond time scales using field-sensitive processes such as strong-field ionization or excitation. So far, all successful demonstrations in this area considered only fragmentation reactions, where only one bond is broken and the molecule is split into merely two moieties. Here, using ethylene (C2H4) as an example, we experimentally investigate whether complex fragmentation reactions that involve the breakage of more than one chemical bond can be influenced by parameters of an ultrashort intense laser pulse. We show that the dynamics of removing three electrons by strong-field ionization determines the ratio of fragmentation of the molecular trication into two respectively three moieties. We observe a relative increase of two-body fragmentations with the laser pulse duration by almost an order of magnitude. Supported by quantum chemical simulations we explain our experimental results by the interplay between the dynamics of electron removal and nuclear motion. PMID:26271602

  9. Chemical imaging of latent fingerprints by mass spectrometry based on laser activated electron tunneling.

    PubMed

    Tang, Xuemei; Huang, Lulu; Zhang, Wenyang; Zhong, Hongying

    2015-03-03

    Identification of endogenous and exogenous chemicals contained in latent fingerprints is important for forensic science in order to acquire evidence of criminal identities and contacts with specific chemicals. Mass spectrometry has emerged as a powerful technique for such applications without any derivatization or fluorescent tags. Among these techniques, MALDI (Matrix Assisted Laser Desorption Ionization) provides small beam size but has interferences with MALDI matrix materials, which cause ion suppressions as well as limited spatial resolution resulting from uneven distribution of MALDI matrix crystals with different sizes. LAET (Laser Activated Electron Tunneling) described in this work offers capabilities for chemical imaging through electron-directed soft ionization. A special film of semiconductors has been designed for collection of fingerprints. Nanoparticles of bismuth cobalt zinc oxide were compressed on a conductive metal substrate (Al or Cu sticky tape) under 10 MPa pressure. Resultant uniform thin films provide tight and shining surfaces on which fingers are impressed. Irradiation of ultraviolet laser pulses (355 nm) on the thin film instantly generates photoelectrons that can be captured by adsorbed organic molecules and subsequently cause electron-directed ionization and fragmentation. Imaging of latent fingerprints is achieved by visualization of the spatial distribution of these molecular ions and structural information-rich fragment ions. Atomic electron emission together with finely tuned laser beam size improve spatial resolution. With the LAET technique, imaging analysis not only can identify physical shapes but also reveal endogenous metabolites present in females and males, detect contacts with prohibited substances, and resolve overlapped latent fingerprints.

  10. Duration of an intense laser pulse can determine the breakage of multiple chemical bonds.

    PubMed

    Xie, Xinhua; Lötstedt, Erik; Roither, Stefan; Schöffler, Markus; Kartashov, Daniil; Midorikawa, Katsumi; Baltuška, Andrius; Yamanouchi, Kaoru; Kitzler, Markus

    2015-08-14

    Control over the breakage of a certain chemical bond in a molecule by an ultrashort laser pulse has been considered for decades. With the availability of intense non-resonant laser fields it became possible to pre-determine femtosecond to picosecond molecular bond breakage dynamics by controlled distortions of the electronic molecular system on sub-femtosecond time scales using field-sensitive processes such as strong-field ionization or excitation. So far, all successful demonstrations in this area considered only fragmentation reactions, where only one bond is broken and the molecule is split into merely two moieties. Here, using ethylene (C2H4) as an example, we experimentally investigate whether complex fragmentation reactions that involve the breakage of more than one chemical bond can be influenced by parameters of an ultrashort intense laser pulse. We show that the dynamics of removing three electrons by strong-field ionization determines the ratio of fragmentation of the molecular trication into two respectively three moieties. We observe a relative increase of two-body fragmentations with the laser pulse duration by almost an order of magnitude. Supported by quantum chemical simulations we explain our experimental results by the interplay between the dynamics of electron removal and nuclear motion.

  11. Laser-induced chemical vapour deposition of conductive and insulating thin films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reisse, G.; Gaensicke, F.; Ebert, R.; Illmann, U.; Johansen, H.

    1992-01-01

    Investigations concerning the laser-induced chemical vapour deposition of Mo, W, Co and TiSi 2 conductive thin film structures from Mo(CO) 6, W(CO) 6, Co 2(CO) 8, TiCl 4 and SiH 4 using a direct writing method are presented. SiO 2 thin films were deposited from SiH 4 and N 2O in a large area deposition process stimulated by an excimer laser by using a parallel beam configuration.

  12. Physics of a ballistic missile defense - The chemical laser boost-phase defense

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grabbe, Crockett L.

    1988-01-01

    The basic physics involved in proposals to use a chemical laser based on satellites for a boost-phase defense are investigated. After a brief consideration of simple physical conditions for the defense, a calculation of an equation for the number of satellites needed for the defense is made along with some typical values of this for possible future conditions for the defense. Basic energy and power requirements for the defense are determined. A sumary is made of probable minimum conditions that must be achieved for laser power, targeting accuracy, number of satellites, and total sources for power needed.

  13. Preparation and analysis of chemically gradient functional bioceramic coating formed by pulsed laser deposition.

    PubMed

    Rajesh, P; Muraleedharan, C V; Sureshbabu, S; Komath, Manoj; Varma, Harikrishna

    2012-02-01

    Bioactive ceramic coatings based on calcium phosphates yield better functionality in the human body for a variety of metallic implant devices including orthopaedic and dental prostheses. In the present study chemically and hence functionally gradient bioceramic coating was obtained by pulsed laser deposition method. Calcium phosphate bioactive ceramic coatings based on hydroxyapatite (HA) and tricalcium phosphate (TCP) were deposited over titanium substrate to produce gradation in physico-chemical characteristics and in vitro dissolution behaviour. Sintered targets of HA and α-TCP were deposited in a multi target laser deposition system. The obtained deposits were characterized by X-ray diffraction, fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, scanning electron microscopy and energy dispersive X-ray analysis. Inductively coupled plasma spectroscopy was used to estimate the in vitro dissolution behaviour of coatings. The variation in mechanical property of the gradient layer was evaluated through scratch test and micro-indentation hardness. The bioactivity was examined in vitro with respect to the ability of HA layer to form on the surface as a result of contact with simulated body fluid. It could be inferred that chemically gradient functional bioceramic coating can be produced by laser deposition of multiple sintered targets with variable chemical composition.

  14. Middle infrared active coherent laser spectrometer for standoff detection of chemicals.

    PubMed

    Macleod, Neil A; Rose, Rebecca; Weidmann, Damien

    2013-10-01

    Using a quantum cascade laser emitting at 7.85 μm, a middle infrared active coherent laser spectrometer has been developed for the standoff detection of vapor phase chemicals. The first prototype has been tested using diffuse target backscattering at ranges up to ~30 m. Exploiting the continuous frequency tuning of the laser source, spectra of water vapor, methane, nitrous oxide, and hydrogen peroxide were recorded. A forward model of the instrument was used to perform spectral unmixing and retrieve line-of-sight integrated concentrations and their one-sigma uncertainties. Performance was found to be limited by speckle noise originating from topographic targets. For absorbers with large absorption cross sections such as nitrous oxide (>10(-19) cm(2)·molecule(-1)), normalized detection sensitivities range between 14 and 0.3 ppm·m·Hz(-1/2), depending on the efficiency of the speckle reduction scheme implemented.

  15. Optical properties and surface structure comparison of tooth whitening using four laser systems and chemical action agents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dostalova, Tatjana; Jelinkova, Helena; Koranda, Pavel; Nemec, Michal; Sulc, Jan; Housova, Devana; Miyagi, Mitsunobu; Kokta, Milan R.

    2003-06-01

    The purpose of the study is to evaluate the effect of various laser techniques for bleaching teeth in office vital whitening. Hydrogen peroxide (30% concentration) and carbamide peroxide (10% solution) were used for chemical activation of bleaching process. Extracted non-carcious upper central incisors were exposed to laser radiation. Four different laser systems (Nd:YAG laser SHG, wavelength 0.53 μm, CTE:YAG laser, wavelength 2.7 μm, Nd:YAG laser, wavelength 1.06 μm, and alexandrite laser, wavelength 0.75 μm) were applied to accelerate the speed of the process. The end of chemical exposition was verified by the change of bleaching agent color. The color change was determined by stereomicroscope (Nikon SMZ 2T, Japan), the quality of surface structure was checked by scanning electron microscope Joel, Japan). The speed of bleaching rnaged from 630 s (chemical methods only) to 250-340 s (chemicals + alexandrite laser radiation). The Alexandrite laser application was considered an elective process to decrease the time of bleaching without modifying the surface.

  16. Lasers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schewe, Phillip F.

    1981-01-01

    Examines the nature of laser light. Topics include: (1) production and characteristics of laser light; (2) nine types of lasers; (3) five laser techniques including holography; (4) laser spectroscopy; and (5) laser fusion and other applications. (SK)

  17. Influence of exothermic chemical reactions on laser-induced shock waves.

    PubMed

    Gottfried, Jennifer L

    2014-10-21

    Differences in the excitation of non-energetic and energetic residues with a 900 mJ, 6 ns laser pulse (1064 nm) have been investigated. Emission from the laser-induced plasma of energetic materials (e.g. triaminotrinitrobenzene [TATB], cyclotrimethylene trinitramine [RDX], and hexanitrohexaazaisowurtzitane [CL-20]) is significantly reduced compared to non-energetic materials (e.g. sugar, melamine, and l-glutamine). Expansion of the resulting laser-induced shock wave into the air above the sample surface was imaged on a microsecond timescale with a high-speed camera recording multiple frames from each laser shot; the excitation of energetic materials produces larger heat-affected zones in the surrounding atmosphere (facilitating deflagration of particles ejected from the sample surface), results in the formation of additional shock fronts, and generates faster external shock front velocities (>750 m s(-1)) compared to non-energetic materials (550-600 m s(-1)). Non-explosive materials that undergo exothermic chemical reactions in air at high temperatures such as ammonium nitrate and magnesium sulfate produce shock velocities which exceed those of the inert materials but are less than those generated by the exothermic reactions of explosive materials (650-700 m s(-1)). The most powerful explosives produced the highest shock velocities. A comparison to several existing shock models demonstrated that no single model describes the shock propagation for both non-energetic and energetic materials. The influence of the exothermic chemical reactions initiated by the pulsed laser on the velocity of the laser-induced shock waves has thus been demonstrated for the first time.

  18. Time evolution studies of laser induced chemical changes in InAs nanowire using Raman spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Pal, Suparna; Aggarwal, R.; Kumari Gupta, Vandna; Ingale, Alka

    2014-07-07

    We report the study of time evolution of chemical changes on the surface of an InAs nanowire (NW) on laser irradiation in different power density regime, using Raman spectroscopy for a time span of 8–16 min. Mixture of metastable oxides like InAsO{sub 4,} As{sub 2}O{sub 3} are formed upon oxidation, which are reflected as sharp Raman peaks at ∼240–254 and 180–200 cm{sup −1}. Evidence of removal of arsenic layer by layer is also observed at higher power density. Position controlled laser induced chemical modification on a nanometer scale, without changing the core of the NW, can be useful for NW based device fabrication.

  19. Chemical vapor synthesis of nanocrystalline perovskites using laser flash evaporation of low volatility solid precursors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Winterer, Markus; Srdic, Vladimir V.; Djenadic, Ruzica; Kompch, Alexander; Weirich, Thomas E.

    2007-12-01

    One key requirement for the production of multinary oxide films by chemical vapor deposition (CVD) or nanocrystalline multinary oxides particles by chemical vapor synthesis (CVS) is the availability of precursors with high vapor pressure. This is especially the case for CVS where much higher production rates are required compared to thin films prepared by CVD. However, elements, which form low valent cations such as alkaline earth metals, are typically only available as solid precursors of low volatility, e.g., in form of β-diketonates. This study describes laser flash evaporation as precursor delivery method for CVS of nanocrystalline perovskites. Laser flash evaporation exploits the nonequilibrium evaporation of solid metal organic precursors of low vapor pressure by absorption of the infrared radiation of a CO2 laser. It is shown that stoichiometric, nanocrystalline particles consisting of SrZrO3 and SrTiO3 can be formed from corresponding mixtures of β-diketonates which are evaporated nonselectively and with high rates by laser flash evaporation.

  20. Nanosecond laser textured superhydrophobic metallic surfaces and their chemical sensing applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ta, Duong V.; Dunn, Andrew; Wasley, Thomas J.; Kay, Robert W.; Stringer, Jonathan; Smith, Patrick J.; Connaughton, Colm; Shephard, Jonathan D.

    2015-12-01

    This work demonstrates superhydrophobic behavior on nanosecond laser patterned copper and brass surfaces. Compared with ultrafast laser systems previously used for such texturing, infrared nanosecond fiber lasers offer a lower cost and more robust system combined with potentially much higher processing rates. The wettability of the textured surfaces develops from hydrophilicity to superhydrophobicity over time when exposed to ambient conditions. The change in the wetting property is attributed to the partial deoxidation of oxides on the surface induced during laser texturing. Textures exhibiting steady state contact angles of up to ∼152° with contact angle hysteresis of around 3-4° have been achieved. Interestingly, the superhydrobobic surfaces have the self-cleaning ability and have potential for chemical sensing applications. The principle of these novel chemical sensors is based on the change in contact angle with the concentration of methanol in a solution. To demonstrate the principle of operation of such a sensor, it is found that the contact angle of methanol solution on the superhydrophobic surfaces exponentially decays with increasing concentration. A significant reduction, of 128°, in contact angle on superhydrophobic brass is observed, which is one order of magnitude greater than that for the untreated surface (12°), when percent composition of methanol reaches to 28%.

  1. Ultrahigh-spatial-resolution chemical and magnetic imaging by laser-based photoemission electron microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Taniuchi, Toshiyuki Kotani, Yoshinori; Shin, Shik

    2015-02-15

    We report the first experiments carried out on a new chemical and magnetic imaging system, which combines the high spatial resolution of a photoemission electron microscope (PEEM) with a continuous-wave deep-ultraviolet laser. Threshold photoemission is sensitive to the chemical and magnetic structures of the surface of materials. The spatial resolution of PEEM is limited by space charging when using pulsed photon sources as well as aberrations in the electron optics. We show that the use of a continuous-wave laser enabled us to overcome such a limit by suppressing the space-charge effect, allowing us to obtain a resolution of approximately 2.6 nm. With this system, we demonstrated the imaging of surface reconstruction domains on Si(001) by linear dichroism with normal incidence of the laser beam. We also succeeded in magnetic imaging of thin films with the use of magnetic circular dichroism near the Fermi level. The unique features of the ultraviolet laser will give us fast switching of the incident angles and polarizations of the photon source, which will be useful for the characterization of antiferromagnetic materials as well as ferromagnetic materials.

  2. Chemical vapor synthesis of nanocrystalline perovskites using laser flash evaporation of low volatility solid precursors.

    PubMed

    Winterer, Markus; Srdic, Vladimir V; Djenadic, Ruzica; Kompch, Alexander; Weirich, Thomas E

    2007-12-01

    One key requirement for the production of multinary oxide films by chemical vapor deposition (CVD) or nanocrystalline multinary oxides particles by chemical vapor synthesis (CVS) is the availability of precursors with high vapor pressure. This is especially the case for CVS where much higher production rates are required compared to thin films prepared by CVD. However, elements, which form low valent cations such as alkaline earth metals, are typically only available as solid precursors of low volatility, e.g., in form of beta-diketonates. This study describes laser flash evaporation as precursor delivery method for CVS of nanocrystalline perovskites. Laser flash evaporation exploits the nonequilibrium evaporation of solid metal organic precursors of low vapor pressure by absorption of the infrared radiation of a CO(2) laser. It is shown that stoichiometric, nanocrystalline particles consisting of SrZrO(3) and SrTiO(3) can be formed from corresponding mixtures of beta-diketonates which are evaporated nonselectively and with high rates by laser flash evaporation.

  3. Remote chemical monitoring in an industrial environment using eyesafe IR laser radar technologies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pasmanik, Guerman A.; Shklovsky, E. J.; Freidman, Gennady I.; Lozhkarev, Vladimir V.; Matveyev, Alexander Z.; Shilov, Alexander A.; Yakovlev, Ivan V.; Peterson, Darrel G.; Partin, Judy K.

    1997-07-01

    The brief description of new lidar prototype for remote chemical monitoring and profiling in the 8 - 12 micron range is given. The lidar includes a Nd:YAG laser (1 J per pulse) source, optical parametrical oscillator (0.2 J per pulse), and four-wave Raman emitter (20 mJ output per pulse). The receiver consists of the hydrogen SRS cells, pumped by an additional OPO pulse. Sensitivity of this receiver reaches approximately 1000 photons per pixel. The applications of this lidar for remote detection of chemicals in atmosphere will also be discussed.

  4. Synthesis of Cobalt Oxides Thin Films Fractal Structures by Laser Chemical Vapor Deposition

    PubMed Central

    Haniam, P.; Kunsombat, C.; Chiangga, S.; Songsasen, A.

    2014-01-01

    Thin films of cobalt oxides (CoO and Co3O4) fractal structures have been synthesized by using laser chemical vapor deposition at room temperature and atmospheric pressure. Various factors which affect the density and crystallization of cobalt oxides fractal shapes have been examined. We show that the fractal structures can be described by diffusion-limited aggregation model and discuss a new possibility to control the fractal structures. PMID:24672354

  5. Active coherent laser spectrometer for remote detection and identification of chemicals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    MacLeod, Neil A.; Weidmann, Damien

    2012-10-01

    Currently, there exists a capability gap for the remote detection and identification of threat chemicals. We report here on the development of an Active Coherent Laser Spectrometer (ACLaS) operating in the thermal infrared and capable of multi-species stand-off detection of chemicals at sub ppm.m levels. A bench top prototype of the instrument has been developed using distributed feedback mid-infrared quantum cascade lasers as spectroscopic sources. The instrument provides active eye-safe illumination of a topographic target and subsequent spectroscopic analysis through optical heterodyne detection of the diffuse backscattered field. Chemical selectivity is provided by the combination of the narrow laser spectral bandwidth (typically < 2 MHz) and frequency tunability that allows the recording of the full absorption spectrum of any species within the instrument line of sight. Stand-off detection at distances up to 12 m has been demonstrated on light molecules such as H2O, CH4 and N2O. A physical model of the stand-off detection scenario including ro-vibrational molecular absorption parameters was used in conjunction with a fitting algorithm to retrieve quantitative mixing ratio information on multiple absorbers.

  6. On the role of chemical reactions in initiating ultraviolet laser ablation in poly(methyl methacrylate)

    SciTech Connect

    Prasad, Manish; Conforti, Patrick F.; Garrison, Barbara J.

    2007-05-15

    The role of chemical reactions is investigated versus the thermal and mechanical processes occurring in a polymer substrate during irradiation by a laser pulse and subsequent ablation. Molecular dynamics simulations with an embedded Monte Carlo based reaction scheme were used to study ultraviolet ablation of poly(methyl methacrylate) at 157 nm. We discuss the onset of ablation, the mechanisms leading to ablation, and the role of stress relaxation of the polymer matrix during ablation. Laser induced heating and chemical decomposition of the polymer substrate are considered as ablation pathways. It is shown that heating the substrate can set off ablation via mechanical failure of the material only for very short laser pulses. For longer pulses, the mechanism of ejection is thermally driven limited by the critical number of bonds broken in the substrate. Alternatively, if the photon energy goes towards direct bond breaking, it initiates chemical reactions, polymer unzipping, and formation of gaseous products, leading to a nearly complete decomposition of the top layers of substrates. The ejection of small molecules has a hollowing out effect on the weakly connected substrates which can lead to lift-off of larger chunks. Excessive pressure buildup upon the creation of gaseous molecules does not lead to enhanced yield. The larger clusters are thermally ejected, and an entrainment of larger polymer fragments in gaseous molecules is not observed.

  7. Laser-based standoff detection of surface-bound explosive chemicals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huestis, David L.; Smith, Gregory P.; Oser, Harald

    2010-04-01

    Avoiding or minimizing potential damage from improvised explosive devices (IEDs) such as suicide, roadside, or vehicle bombs requires that the explosive device be detected and neutralized outside its effective blast radius. Only a few seconds may be available to both identify the device as hazardous and implement a response. As discussed in a study by the National Research Council, current technology is still far from capable of meeting these objectives. Conventional nitrocarbon explosive chemicals have very low vapor pressures, and any vapors are easily dispersed in air. Many pointdetection approaches rely on collecting trace solid residues from dust particles or surfaces. Practical approaches for standoff detection are yet to be developed. For the past 5 years, SRI International has been working toward development of a novel scheme for standoff detection of explosive chemicals that uses infrared (IR) laser evaporation of surfacebound explosive followed by ultraviolet (UV) laser photofragmentation of the explosive chemical vapor, and then UV laser-induced fluorescence (LIF) of nitric oxide. This method offers the potential of long standoff range (up to 100 m or more), high sensitivity (vaporized solid), simplicity (no spectrometer or library of reference spectra), and selectivity (only nitrocompounds).

  8. Photothermal laser fabrication of micro- and nanostructured chemical templates for directed protein immobilization.

    PubMed

    Schröter, Anja; Franzka, Steffen; Hartmann, Nils

    2014-12-16

    Photothermal patterning of poly(ethylene glycol) terminated organic monolayers on surface-oxidized silicon substrates is carried out using a microfocused beam of a CW laser operated at a wavelength of 532 nm. Trichlorosilane and trimethoxysilane precursors are used for coating. Monolayers from trimethoxysilane precursors show negligible unspecific protein adsorption in the background, i.e., provide platforms of superior protein repellency. Laser patterning results in decomposition of the monolayers and yields chemical templates for directed immobilization of proteins at predefined positions. Characterization is carried out via complementary analytical methods including fluorescence microscopy, atomic force microscopy, and scanning electron microscopy. Appropriate labeling techniques (fluorescent markers and gold clusters) and substrates (native and thermally oxidized silicon substrates) are chosen in order to facilitate identification of protein adsorption and ensure high sensitivity and selectivity. Variation of the laser parameters at a 1/e(2) spot diameter of 2.8 μm allows for fabrication of protein binding domains with diameters on the micrometer and nanometer length scale. Minimum domain sizes are about 300 nm. In addition to unspecific protein adsorption on as-patterned monolayers, biotin-streptavidin coupling chemistry is exploited for specific protein binding. This approach represents a novel facile laser-based means for fabrication of protein micro- and nanopatterns. The routine is readily applicable to femtosecond laser processing of glass substrates for the fabrication of transparent templates.

  9. Toward the realization of a compact chemical sensor platform using quantum cascade lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holthoff, Ellen L.; Marcus, Logan S.; Pellegrino, Paul M.

    2015-05-01

    The Army is investigating several spectroscopic techniques (e.g., infrared spectroscopy) that could allow for an adaptable sensor platform. Traditionally, chemical sensing platforms have been hampered by the opposing concerns of increasing sensor capability while maintaining a minimal package size. Current sensors, although reasonably sized, are geared to more classical chemical threats, and the ability to expand their capabilities to a broader range of emerging threats is uncertain. Recently, photoacoustic spectroscopy, employed in a sensor format, has shown enormous potential to address these ever-changing threats, while maintaining a compact sensor design. In order to realize the advantage of photoacoustic sensor miniaturization, light sources of comparable size are required. Recent research has employed quantum cascade lasers (QCLs) in combination with MEMS-scale photoacoustic cell designs. The continuous tuning capability of QCLs over a broad wavelength range in the mid-infrared spectral region greatly expands the number of compounds that can be identified. Results have demonstrated that utilizing a tunable QCL with a MEMS-scale photoacoustic cell produces favorable detection limits (ppb levels) for chemical targets (e.g., dimethyl methyl phosphonate (DMMP), vinyl acetate, 1,4-dioxane). Although our chemical sensing research has benefitted from the broad tuning capabilities of QCLs, the limitations of these sources must be considered. Current commercially available tunable systems are still expensive and obviously geared more toward laboratory operation, not fielding. Although the laser element itself is quite small, the packaging, power supply, and controller remain logistical burdens. Additionally, operational features such as continuous wave (CW) modulation and laser output powers while maintaining wide tunability are not yet ideal for a variety of sensing applications. In this paper, we will discuss our continuing evaluation of QCL technology as it matures

  10. Development of a new laser heating system for thin film growth by chemical vapor deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fujimoto, Eiji; Sumiya, Masatomo; Ohnishi, Tsuyoshi; Lippmaa, Mikk; Takeguchi, Masaki; Koinuma, Hideomi; Matsumoto, Yuji

    2012-09-01

    We have developed a new laser heating system for thin film growth by chemical vapor deposition (CVD). A collimated beam from a high-power continuous-wave 808 nm semiconductor laser was directly introduced into a CVD growth chamber without an optical fiber. The light path of the heating laser inside the chamber was isolated mechanically from the growth area by bellows to protect the optics from film coating. Three types of heat absorbers, (10 × 10 × 2 mm3) consisting of SiC, Ni/NiOx, or pyrolytic graphite covered with pyrolytic BN (PG/PBN), located at the backside of the substrate, were tested for heating performance. It was confirmed that the substrate temperature could reach higher than 1500 °C in vacuum when a PG/PBN absorber was used. A wide-range temperature response between 400 °C and 1000 °C was achieved at high heating and cooling rates. Although the thermal energy loss increased in a H2 gas ambient due to the higher thermal conductivity, temperatures up to 1000°C were achieved even in 200 Torr H2. We have demonstrated the capabilities of this laser heating system by growing ZnO films by metalorganic chemical vapor deposition. The growth mode of ZnO films was changed from columnar to lateral growth by repeated temperature modulation in this laser heating system, and consequently atomically smooth epitaxial ZnO films were successfully grown on an a-plane sapphire substrate.

  11. Photo-vibrational spectroscopy of solid and liquid chemicals using laser Doppler vibrometer.

    PubMed

    Hu, Qi; Lim, Jacob Song Kiat; Liu, Huan; Fu, Yu

    2016-08-22

    Photoacoustic/photothermal spectroscopy is an established technique for trace detection of chemicals and explosives. However, prior sample preparation is required and the analysis is conducted in a sealed space with a high-sensitivity microphone or a piezo sensor coupled with a lock-in amplifier, limiting the technique to applications in a laboratory environment. Due to the aforementioned requirements, traditionally this technique may not be suitable for defense and security applications where the detection of explosives or hazardous chemicals is required in an open environment at a safe standoff distance. In this study, chemicals in various forms (membrane, powder and liquid) were excited by an intensity-modulated quantum cascade laser (QCL), while a laser Doppler vibrometer (LDV) based on the Mach-Zehnder interferometer was applied to detect the vibration signal resulting from the photocoustic/photothermal effect. The photo-vibrational spectrum obtained by scanning the QCL's wavelength in MIR range, coincides well with the corresponding spectrum obtained using typical FTIR equipment. The experiment demonstrated that the LDV is a capable sensor for applications in photoacoustic/photothermal spectroscopy, with potential to enable the detection of chemicals in open environment at safe standoff distance.

  12. Chemical reactions at metallic and metal/semiconductor interfaces stimulated by pulsed laser annealing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petit, E. J.; Caudano, R.

    1992-01-01

    Multilayer Al/Sb thin films have been evaporated on GaSb single crystals in ultra-high vacuum and pulsed-laser irradiated in-situ above the energy density threshold for surface melting. Superficial and interfacial chemical reactions have been characterized in-situ by Auger electron spectroscopy; and later, by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy profiling, Rutherford backscattering spectrometry and scanning electron microscopy. The chemical reaction between the Al and Sb films is considered as a model reaction for laser-assisted synthesis of high-purity intermetallic compounds. The observation of a strong interfacial reaction between the melted film and the substrate is also a subject of great concern for optical data recording and laser alloying of ohmic contacts on semiconductors. We show that a suitable choice of the substrate and adding a low surface tension element into the metallic film can improve its stability during melting, and prevent inhomogeneous reaction and formation of holes, cracks and particles. Finally, other solutions are suggested to improve the control of these reactions.

  13. Chemical etching mechanism and properties of microstructures in sapphire modified by femtosecond laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Manyu; Hu, Youwang; Sun, Xiaoyan; Wang, Cong; Zhou, Jianying; Dong, Xinran; Yin, Kai; Chu, Dongkai; Duan, Ji'an

    2017-01-01

    Sapphire, with extremely high hardness, high-temperature stability and wear resistance, often corroded in molten KOH at 300 °C after processing. The fabrication of microstructures on sapphire substrate performed by femtosecond laser irradiation combined with KOH solution chemical etching at room temperature is presented. It is found that this method reduces the harsh requirements of sapphire corrosion. After femtosecond irradiation, the sapphire has a high corrosion speed at room temperature. Through the analysis of Raman spectrum and XRD spectrum, a novel insight of femtosecond laser interaction with sapphire (α-Al2O3) is proposed. Results indicated that grooves on sapphire surface were formed by the lasers ablation removal, and the groove surface was modified in a certain depth. The modified area of the groove surface was changed from α-Al2O3 to γ-Al2O3. In addition, the impacts of three experimental parameters, laser power, scanning velocities and etching time, on the width and depth of microstructures are investigated, respectively. The modified area dimension is about 2 μm within limits power and speed. This work could fabricate high-quality arbitrary microstructures and enhance the performance of sapphire processing.

  14. IR and UV laser-induced chemical vapor deposition: Chemical mechanism for a-Si:H and Cr (O,C) film formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hess, Peter

    The characteristic features of laser-induced chemical vapor deposition in the parallel and perpendicular laser beam/surface configurations are discussed. Low temperature chemical processing with directed and spatially localized energy deposition in the system is investigated. Results obtained for the deposition of hydrogenated amorphous silicon (a-Si:H) films in the parallel configuration employing CO 2 and KrFlasers and SiH 4 and Si 2H 6 as precursors are presented. As a second example, the growth of oxygen- and carbon-containing chromium films Cr(O,C) from chromium hexacarbonyl as the precursor using cw and pulse uv lasers is discussed. The chemical pathways leasing to film formation are investigated in detail.

  15. Laser chemistry’ synthesis, physicochemical properties, and chemical processing of nanostructured carbon foams

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Laser ablation of selected coordination complexes can lead to the production of metal-carbon hybrid materials, whose composition and structure can be tailored by suitably choosing the chemical composition of the irradiated targets. This ‘laser chemistry’ approach, initially applied by our group to the synthesis of P-containing nanostructured carbon foams (NCFs) from triphenylphosphine-based Au and Cu compounds, is broadened in this study to the production of other metal-NCFs and P-free NCFs. Thus, our results show that P-free coordination compounds and commercial organic precursors can act as efficient carbon source for the growth of NCFs. Physicochemical characterization reveals that NCFs are low-density mesoporous materials with relatively low specific surface areas and thermally stable in air up to around 600°C. Moreover, NCFs disperse well in a variety of solvents and can be successfully chemically processed to enable their handling and provide NCF-containing biocomposite fibers by a wet-chemical spinning process. These promising results may open new and interesting avenues toward the use of NCFs for technological applications. PMID:23679938

  16. Microstructures and Mechanical Properties of Laser Welding Joint of a CLAM Steel with Revised Chemical Compositions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Shuhai; Huang, Jihua; Lu, Qi; Zhao, Xingke

    2016-05-01

    To suppress the tendency to form delta ferrite in weld metal (WM) of China low activation martensitic (CLAM) steel joint, a CLAM steel with revised chemical compositions was designed. Laser welding of the CLAM steel was investigated. The microstructures of the WM and heat-affected zone were analyzed. The impact toughness of the WM was evaluated by a Charpy impact test method with three V notches. The influence of temper temperature on mechanical properties was analyzed. It was found that the delta ferrite was eliminated almost completely in laser WM of CLAM steel with revised chemical compositions which has lower tendency to form delta ferrite than original chemical compositions. The joint has higher tensile strength than the parent metal. With increasing the heat input, the impact toughness of the joint is approximatively equal with that of parent metal first and then decreases obviously. Temper treatment could effectively improve mechanical property of the joint. When the temper temperature exceeds 600 °C, the impact toughness of the joint is higher than that of the parent metal.

  17. Nonequilibrium population of the first vibrational level of O{sub 2}({sup 1{Sigma}}) molecules in O{sub 2} - O{sub 2}({sup 1{Delta}}) - H{sub 2}O gas flow at the output of chemical singlet-oxygen generator

    SciTech Connect

    Zagidullin, M V

    2010-11-13

    The concentrations of electron-excited particles have been determined by measuring the absolute spectral irradiance in the range of 600 - 800 nm of O{sub 2} - O{sub 2}({sup 1{Delta}}) - H{sub 2}O gas mixture at the output of a chemical singlet-oxygen generator (SOG). A nonequilibrium population of the first vibrational level of O{sub 2}({sup 1{Sigma}}) molecules has been clearly observed and found to depend on the water vapour content. In correspondence with the results of these measurements and according to the analysis of kinetics processes in the O{sub 2} - O{sub 2}({sup 1{Delta}}) - H{sub 2}O mixture, the maximum number of vibrational quanta generated in the O{sub 2}({sup 1{Delta}}) + O{sub 2}({sup 1{Delta}}) {yields} O{sub 2}({sup 1{Sigma}}) + O{sub 2}({sup 3{Sigma}}) reaction is 0.05 {+-} 0.03. It is concluded that the vibrational population of O{sub 2}({sup 1{Delta}}) at the output of the SOG used in a chemical oxygen-iodine laser is close to thermal equilibrium value. (active media)

  18. Initiation with an electron beam of chemical reactions of interest for visible wavelength lasers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Whittier, J. S.; Cool, T. A.

    1976-01-01

    A description is given of the first results obtained with a new shock tube-electron beam facility designed to provide a versatile means for the systematic search for laser operation among several candidate metal atom-oxidizer systems. According to the current experimental approach, metal atoms are obtained in the vapor phase by the dissociation of metal compounds. A shock tube is employed to provide a short duration flow through an array of 29 supersonic flow-mixing nozzles. A high energy electron accelerator is used for the rapid initiation of chemical reaction in a mixed flow of encapsulated metal and oxidizer.

  19. Optical cavity temperature measurement based on the first overtones spontaneous emission spectra for HF chemical laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, Shukai; Li, Liucheng; Duo, Liping; Wang, Yuanhu; Yu, Haijun; Jin, Yuqi; Sang, Fengting

    2015-02-01

    An optical cavity temperature test method has been established for the HF chemical laser. This method assumes that in HF optical cavity the rotational distribution of vibrationally excited HF molecules meets the statistical thermodynamic distribution, the first overtones (v = 3-1 and 2-0) spontaneous emission spectral intensity distribution is obtained by using OMA V, the optical cavity temperature is calculated by linear fitting the rotational thermal equilibrium distribution formula for each HF vibrationally excited state. This method is simple, reliable, and repeatable. This method can be used to test the optical cavity temperature not only without lasing, but also with lasing.

  20. Diesel combustion: an integrated view combining laser diagnostics, chemical kinetics, and empirical validation

    SciTech Connect

    Akinyami, O C; Dec, J E; Durrett, R P; Flynn, P F; Hunter, G L; Loye, A O; Westbrook, C

    1999-02-01

    This paper proposes a structure for the diesel combustion process based on a combination of previously published and new results. Processes are analyzed with proven chemical kinetic models and validated with data from production-like direct injection diesel engines. The analysis provides new insight into the ignition and particulate formation processes, which combined with laser diagnostics, delineates the two-stage nature of combustion in diesel engines. Data are presented to quantify events occurring during the ignition and initial combustion processes that form soot precursors. A framework is also proposed for understanding the heat release and emission formation processes.

  1. Fabrication of highly ultramicroporous carbon nanofoams by SF6-catalyzed laser-induced chemical vapor deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hattori, Yoshiyuki; Shuhara, Ai; Kondo, Atsushi; Utsumi, Shigenori; Tanaka, Hideki; Ohba, Tomonori; Kanoh, Hirofumi; Takahashi, Kunimitsu; Vallejos-Burgos, Fernando; Kaneko, Katsumi

    2016-05-01

    We have developed a laser-induced chemical vapor deposition (LCVD) method for preparing nanocarbons with the aid of SF6. This method would offer advantages for the production of aggregates of nanoscale foams (nanofoams) at high rates. Pyrolysis of the as-grown nanofoams induced the high surface area (1120 m2 g-1) and significantly enhanced the adsorption of supercritical H2 (16.6 mg g-1 at 77 K and 0.1 MPa). We also showed that the pyrolized nanofoams have highly ultramicroporous structures. The pyrolized nanofoams would be superior to highly microporous nanocarbons for the adsorption of supercritical gases.

  2. Composition analysis of oxide films formed on titanium surface under pulsed laser action by method of chemical thermodynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ageev, E. I.; Andreeva, Ya M.; Karlagina, Yu Yu; Kolobov, Yu R.; Manokhin, S. S.; Odintsova, G. V.; Slobodov, A. A.; Veiko, V. P.

    2017-04-01

    A pulsed fiber laser with a wavelength of 1.06 µm was used to treat a commercial pure titanium surface in the air at intensities below the ablation threshold to provide oxide formation. Laser oxidation results are predicted by the chemical thermodynamic method and confirmed by experimental techniques (x-ray diffraction, energy dispersive x-ray spectroscopy). For the first time, the chemical thermodynamic method was used for determining the qualitative and quantitative phase-chemical composition of the compounds formed by a pulsed laser heating of commercial titanium in the air, and its applicability is proven. The simulation shows that multilayered composite film appears on a surface, the lower layers of which consist of Ti2O3 and TiO oxides with the addition of titanium nitride; and the thin upper layer consists of transparent titanium dioxide. Also, the chemical composition of films remains unchanged within a temperature range of 881–2000 K.

  3. Fabrication of microchannels in single-crystal GaN by wet-chemical-assisted femtosecond-laser ablation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakashima, Seisuke; Sugioka, Koji; Midorikawa, Katsumi

    2009-09-01

    We investigated micro- and nano-fabrication of wide band-gap semiconductor gallium nitride (GaN) using a femtosecond (fs) laser. Nanoscale craters were successfully formed by wet-chemical-assisted fs-laser ablation, in which the laser beam is focused onto a single-crystal GaN substrate in a hydrochloric acid (HCl) solution. This allows efficient removal of ablation debris produced by chemical reactions during ablation, resulting in high-quality ablation. However, a two-step processing method involving irradiation by a fs-laser beam in air followed by wet etching, distorts the shape of the crater because of residual debris. The threshold fluence for wet-chemical-assisted fs-laser ablation is lower than that for fs-laser ablation in air, which is advantageous for improving fabrication resolution since it reduces thermal effects. We have fabricated craters as small as 510 nm by using a high numerical aperture (NA) objective lens with an NA of 0.73. Furthermore, we have formed three-dimensional hollow microchannels in GaN by fs-laser direct-writing in HCl solution.

  4. Removal of surface contaminants using a chemical-free laser-assisted process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Engelsberg, Audrey C.

    1994-10-01

    Contamination control is a critical issue to the manufacture and maintenance of optical components. Particulates and thin films (organic and inorganic) can degrade optical performance. Current cleaning methods are focusing on aqueous-based cleaning and super- critical fluids. Concurrently, environmentally-conscious manufacturing processes are becoming essential for industrial applications. These manufacturing processes emphasize the reduction of water and chemical consumption and hazardous waste production. In this paper, we will introduce a chemical-free laser assisted process that has demonstrated its capability of removing particulates and films from various surfaces including optical. Since this process works with energy flux and a flowing inert gas, it's readily adaptable and cost effective for many industrial applications.

  5. Laser Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy applications to meteorites: Chemical analysis and composition profiles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dell'Aglio, M.; De Giacomo, A.; Gaudiuso, R.; Pascale, O. De; Senesi, G. S.; Longo, S.

    2010-12-01

    A fast procedure for chemical analysis of different meteorites is presented, based on LIBS (Laser Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy). The technique is applied to several test cases (Dhofar 019, Dhofar 461, Sahara 98222, Toluca, Sikhote Alin and Campo del Cielo) and can be useful for rapid meteorite identification providing geologists with specific chemical information for meteorite classification. Concentration profiles of Fe, Ni and Co are simultaneously detected across the Widmanstätten structure of the iron meteorite Toluca with a view to determining cooling rates. The LIBS analysis of meteorites is also used as a laboratory test for analogous studies on the respective parent bodies (Mars, asteroids) in space exploration missions where one clear advantage of the proposed technique is that no direct contact with the sample is required.

  6. Chemical reactivity in matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization mass spectrometry

    PubMed

    Enjalbal; Sauvagnat; Lamaty; Lazaro; Martinez; Mouchet; Roux; Aubagnac

    1999-01-01

    During the control of a multistep organic synthesis on a soluble polymer (PEG) by matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization (MALDI) mass spectrometry, a chemical reactivity was encountered when the matrix was acidic, for the samples where the amino moiety of the anchored compounds was protected as a Schiff base. Such imine hydrolysis was proven to be solely mediated by the acidic matrix during analyses since the expected protected structures were detected when the experiments were duplicated with a non-acidic matrix. Even if MALDI mass spectrometry was found to be more convenient than electrospray ionization mass spectrometry for the monitoring of liquid phase organic syntheses, the chemical reactivity imparted by the use of a matrix must be taken into account to avoid erroneous spectra interpretations. Copyright 1999 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  7. Modeling of dual emission laser induced fluorescence for slurry thickness measurements in chemical mechanical polishing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gray, Caprice; Rogers, Chris B.; Manno, Vincent P.; White, Robert D.

    2011-07-01

    Dual emission laser induced fluorescence (DELIF) is a technique for measuring the instantaneous thin fluid film thickness in dynamic systems. Two fluorophores within the system produce laser induced emissions that are filtered and captured by two cameras. The ratio of the images from these cameras is used to cancel the effect of the laser beam profile on the image intensity. The resultant intensity ratio can be calibrated to a fluid film thickness. The utilization of a 2-dye system when applied to Chemical Mechanical Polishing (CMP) is complicated by the fluorescence of the polymeric polishing pad and the light scattering particles in the polishing slurry. We have developed a model of DELIF for CMP with 1-dye employing the polishing pad as the second fluorophore. While scattering particles in the slurry decrease the overall intensity of the individual images, the contrast in the image ratio increases. Using the 1-dye DELIF system to measure thin slurry films, our model results indicate that a cubic calibration may be needed. However, experimental results suggest a linear calibration is achieved for slurry films between 0 and 133 μm thick with scattering coefficients as high as 8.66 mm-1 at a wavelength equal to 410 nm.

  8. Microstructure of metastable metallic alloy films produced by laser breakdown chemical vapor deposition and ion implantation

    SciTech Connect

    Menon, S.K.; Jervis, T.R.; Nastasi, M.

    1986-01-01

    Thin films produced by laser breakdown chemical vapor deposition from nickel and iron carbonyls and by implanting Ni foils with varying levels of C have been characterized by transmission electron microscopy. Decomposition of Ni(CO)/sub 4/ produces polycrystalline films of fcc Ni and metastable ordered hexagonal Ni/sub 3/C. This metastable phase is identical to that produced by gas carburization, rapid solidification of Ni-C melts, and ion implantation of C into Ni at low concentrations. Increasing the H/sub 2/ content in the gas mixture during laser deposition reduces the grain size of the films significantly with grain sizes smaller than 10 nanometers produced. Laser decomposition of Fe(CO)/sub 5/ produces films with islands of fcc gamma-Fe and finely dispersed metastable Fe/sub 3/C (Cementite). In addition, the ferrous oxides Fe/sub 2/O/sub 3/ and Fe/sub 3/O/sub 4/ were found in these samples. Implants of C into pure Ni foils at 77/sup 0/K and at a concentration of 35 at. % produced amorphous layers. Implants at the same dose at room temperature did not produce amorphous layers.

  9. Laser-based mass spectrometry for in situ chemical composition analysis of planetary surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frey, Samira; Neuland, Maike B.; Grimaudo, Valentine; Moreno-García, Pavel; Riedo, Andreas; Tulej, Marek; Broekmann, Peter; Wurz, Peter

    2016-04-01

    Mass spectrometry is an important analytical technique in space research. The chemical composition of planetary surface material is a key scientific question on every space mission to a planet, moon or asteroid. Chemical composition measurements of rocky material on the surface are of great importance to understand the origin and evolution of the planetary body.[1] A miniature laser ablation/ionisation reflectron- type time-of-flight mass spectrometer (instrument name LMS) was designed and built at the University of Bern for planetary research.[2] Despite its small size and light weight, the LMS instrument still maintains the same capabilities as large laboratory systems, which makes it suitable for its application on planetary space missions.[3-5] The high dynamic range of about eight orders of magnitude, high lateral (μm-level) and vertical (sub-nm level) resolution and high detection sensitivity for almost all elements (10 ppb, atomic fraction) make LMS a versatile instrument for various applications. LMS is a suitable instrument for in situ measurements of elemental and isotope composition with high precision and accuracy. Measurements of Pb- isotope abundances can be used for dating of planetary material. Measurements of bio-relevant elements allow searching for past or present life on a planetary surface. The high spatial resolution, both in lateral and vertical direction, is of considerable interest, e.g. for analysis of inhomogeneous, extraterrestrial samples as well as weathering processes of planetary material. References [1] P. Wurz, D. Abplanalp, M. Tulej, M. Iakovleva, V.A. Fernandes, A. Chumikov, and G. Managadze, "Mass Spectrometric Analysis in Planetary Science: Investigation of the Surface and the Atmosphere", Sol. Sys. Res., 2012, 46, 408. [2] U. Rohner, J.A. Whitby, P. Wurz, "A miniature laser ablation time of flight mass spectrometer for in situ planetary exploration" Meas. Sci. Tch., 2003, 14, 2159. [3] M. Tulej, A. Riedo, M.B. Neuland, S

  10. Chemical and explosive detection with long-wave infrared laser induced breakdown spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jin, Feng; Trivedi, Sudhir B.; Yang, Clayton S.; Brown, Ei E.; Kumi-Barimah, Eric; Hommerich, Uwe H.; Samuels, Alan C.

    2016-05-01

    Conventional laser induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) mostly uses silicon-based detectors and measures the atomic emission in the UV-Vis-NIR (UVN) region of the spectrum. It can be used to detect the elements in the sample under test, such as the presence of lead in the solder for electronics during RoHS compliance verification. This wavelength region, however, does not provide sufficient information on the bonding between the elements, because the molecular vibration modes emit at longer wavelength region. Measuring long-wave infrared spectrum (LWIR) in a LIBS setup can instead reveal molecular composition of the sample, which is the information sought in applications including chemical and explosive detection and identification. This paper will present the work and results from the collaboration of several institutions to develop the methods of LWIR LIBS for chemical/explosive/pharmaceutical material detection/identification, such as DMMP and RDX, as fast as using a single excitation laser pulse. In our latest LIBS setup, both UVN and LWIR spectra can be collected at the same time, allowing more accurate detection and identification of materials.

  11. Chemical models for simulating single-walled nanotube production in arc vaporization and laser ablation processes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scott, Carl D.

    2004-01-01

    Chemical kinetic models for the nucleation and growth of clusters and single-walled carbon nanotube (SWNT) growth are developed for numerical simulations of the production of SWNTs. Two models that involve evaporation and condensation of carbon and metal catalysts, a full model involving all carbon clusters up to C80, and a reduced model are discussed. The full model is based on a fullerene model, but nickel and carbon/nickel cluster reactions are added to form SWNTs from soot and fullerenes. The full model has a large number of species--so large that to incorporate them into a flow field computation for simulating laser ablation and arc processes requires that they be simplified. The model is reduced by defining large clusters that represent many various sized clusters. Comparisons are given between these models for cases that may be applicable to arc and laser ablation production. Solutions to the system of chemical rate equations of these models for a ramped temperature profile show that production of various species, including SWNTs, agree to within about 50% for a fast ramp, and within 10% for a slower temperature decay time.

  12. Double-core-hole spectroscopy for chemical analysis with an intense X-ray femtosecond laser

    PubMed Central

    Berrah, Nora; Fang, Li; Murphy, Brendan; Osipov, Timur; Ueda, Kiyoshi; Kukk, Edwin; Feifel, Raimund; van der Meulen, Peter; Salen, Peter; Schmidt, Henning T.; Thomas, Richard D.; Larsson, Mats; Richter, Robert; Prince, Kevin C.; Bozek, John D.; Bostedt, Christoph; Wada, Shin-ichi; Piancastelli, Maria N.; Tashiro, Motomichi; Ehara, Masahiro

    2011-01-01

    Theory predicts that double-core-hole (DCH) spectroscopy can provide a new powerful means of differentiating between similar chemical systems with a sensitivity not hitherto possible. Although DCH ionization on a single site in molecules was recently measured with double- and single-photon absorption, double-core holes with single vacancies on two different sites, allowing unambiguous chemical analysis, have remained elusive. Here we report that direct observation of double-core holes with single vacancies on two different sites produced via sequential two-photon absorption, using short, intense X-ray pulses from the Linac Coherent Light Source free-electron laser and compare it with theoretical modeling. The observation of DCH states, which exhibit a unique signature, and agreement with theory proves the feasibility of the method. Our findings exploit the ultrashort pulse duration of the free-electron laser to eject two core electrons on a time scale comparable to that of Auger decay and demonstrate possible future X-ray control of physical inner-shell processes. PMID:21969540

  13. Noninvasive Facial Rejuvenation. Part 3: Physician-Directed-Lasers, Chemical Peels, and Other Noninvasive Modalities.

    PubMed

    Meaike, Jesse D; Agrawal, Nikhil; Chang, Daniel; Lee, Edward I; Nigro, Marjory G

    2016-08-01

    A proper knowledge of noninvasive facial rejuvenation is integral to the practice of a cosmetic surgeon. Noninvasive facial rejuvenation can be divided into patient- versus physician-directed modalities. Patient-directed facial rejuvenation combines the use of facial products such as sunscreen, moisturizers, retinoids, α-hydroxy acids, and various antioxidants to both maintain youthful skin and rejuvenate damaged skin. Physicians may recommend and often prescribe certain products, but patients are in control with this type of facial rejuvenation. On the other hand, physician-directed facial rejuvenation entails modalities that require direct physician involvement, such as neuromodulators, filler injections, laser resurfacing, microdermabrasion, and chemical peels. With the successful integration of each of these modalities, a complete facial regimen can be established and patient satisfaction can be maximized. This article is the last in a three-part series describing noninvasive facial rejuvenation. Here the authors review the mechanism, indications, and possible complications of lasers, chemical peels, and other commonly used noninvasive modalities.

  14. Laser-micromachined and laminated microfluidic components for miniaturized thermal, chemical, and biological systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martin, Peter M.; Matson, Dean W.; Bennett, Wendy D.; Stewart, Donald C.; Lin, Yuehe

    1999-03-01

    Microchannel microfluidic components are being developed for heat transfer, chemical reactor, chemical analysis, and biological analytical applications. Specific applications include chemical sensing, DNA replication, blood analysis, capillary electrophoresis, fuel cell reactors, high temperature chemical reactors, heat pumps, combustors, and fuel processors. Two general types of component architectures have been developed and the fabrication processes defined. All involve a lamination scheme using plastic, ceramic, or metal laminates, as opposed to planar components. The first type is a stacked architecture that utilizes functionality built in each layer, with fluid flow interconnects between layers. Each layer of the laminate has specific microchannel geometry, and performs a specific function. Polymeric materials are used primarily. Fabrication processes used are laser micromachining, wet and dry etching, and coating deposition. the laminates can also be micromolded plastics. The second architecture employs laminates to form internal microchannels and interconnects. Materials include ceramic tapes and high temperature metals. Catalysts can be placed in the microchannels. Fabrication processes used are diffusion bonding, ceramic bonding and firing, photochemical etching, and electrochemical micromachining. Bonding, thus sealing, the laminates is an important issue. Process conditions have been develop to reduce distortion of the laminates and to hermetically seal the components.

  15. Chemical-Assisted Femtosecond Laser Writing of Lab-in-Fiber Sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haque, Moez

    fringe contrast and peak resolution beyond that available with FPIs and offer a significant theoretical improvement in refractometer sensitivity. The advanced laser processes optimized here may provide a new base for photonics, microfluidics, and optofluidics fabrication in a LIF platform with multiplexed functionality and rapid prototyping capabilities of fully integrable 3D optofluidic systems. The proposed LIF devices define new micro-systems for temperature, strain, pressure, refractive index, and bend strain sensing that may find application in the acoustic, aerospace, automotive, biological, chemical, civil, or medical fields.

  16. In Situ Chemical Composition Measurements of Planetary Surfaces with a Laser Ablation Mass Spectrometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brigitte Neuland, Maike; Riedo, Andreas; Meyer, Stefan; Mezger, Klaus; Tulej, Marek; Wurz, Peter

    2013-04-01

    The knowledge of the chemical composition of moons, comets, asteroids or other planetary bodies is of particular importance for the investigation of the origin and evolution of the Solar System. For cosmochemistry, the elemental and isotopic composition of the surface material is essential information to investigate origin, differentiation and evolution processes of the body and therefore the history of our Solar System [1]. We show that the use of laser-based mass spectrometers is essential in such research because of their high sensitivity in the ppm range and their capability for quantitative elemental and isotopic analysis. A miniaturised Laser Ablation Time-of-Flight Mass Spectrometer (LMS) was developed in our group to study the elemental composition of solid samples [2]. The instrument's small size and light weight make it suitable for an application on a space mission to determine the elemental composition of a planetary surface for example [3]. Meteorites offer the excellent possibility to study extraterrestrial material in the laboratory. To demonstrate the sensitivity and functionality of the LMS instrument, a sample of the Allende meteorite has been investigated with a high spatial resolution. The LMS measurements allowed investigations of the elemental abundances in the Allende meteorite and detailed studies of the mineralogy and volatility [4]. These approaches can be of considerable interest for in situ investigation of grains and inhomogeneous materials with high sensitivity on a planetary surface. [1] Wurz, P., Whitby, J., Managadze, G., 2009, Laser Mass Spectrometry in Planetary Science, AIP Conf. Proc. CP1144, 70-75. [2] Tulej, M., Riedo, A., Iakovleva, M., Wurz, P., 2012, Int. J. Spec., On Applicability of a Miniaturized Laser Ablation Time of Flight Mass Spectrometer for Trace Element Measurements, article ID 234949. [3] Riedo, A., Bieler, A., Neuland, M., Tulej, M., Wurz, P., 2012, Performance evaluation of a miniature laser ablation time

  17. Kinetics of laser chemical vapor deposition of carbon and refractory metals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Feng

    2000-10-01

    Three-dimensional laser chemical vapor deposition (3D-LCVD) has been used to grow rods of carbon, tungsten, titanium, and hafnium from a variety of hydrocarbons and metal halide-based precursors. A novel computerized 3D-LCVD system was designed and successfully used in the experiments. A focused Nd:Yag laser beam (lambda = 1.06 mum) was utilized to locally heat up a substrate to deposition temperature. The rods, which grew along the axis of the laser beam, had a typical diameter of 30--80 mum and a length of about 1 mm. The precursors for carbon deposition were the alkynes: propyne, butyne, pentyne, hexyne, and octyne. Propyne gave the highest deposition rate, in excess 3 mm/s at high laser powers (0.45 W) and high partial pressures (3000 mbar). the temperature dependence and pressure dependence were both non-linear functions of the growth rate. the temperature dependence could be separated into two regions---the kinetically limited region, which obeys the Arrhenius relationship, and the transport limited region, which is explained by diffusion of the precursors to the reaction zone. The pressure dependence showed that the reaction order for the different precursors varied from 2.5 for propyne to 1.3 for octyne. The precursors used deposit the refractory metals were tungsten hexafloride, titanium tetraiodide and hafnium chloride. The only successful precursor was tungsten hexafluoride, which readily produced tungsten rods when mixed with hydrogen. Rod diameters typically ranged from 50 mum to 400 mum and the average length of the rods were about 1 mm. Much lower deposition rates, less than 4.5 mum/s were obtained in this case as compared to carbon deposition. By an optimization of the LCVD process, it was possible to deposit high-quality single crystal tungsten rods. They were all oriented in the <100> direction.

  18. Bioactive Ti metal analogous to human cancellous bone: Fabrication by selective laser melting and chemical treatments.

    PubMed

    Pattanayak, Deepak K; Fukuda, A; Matsushita, T; Takemoto, M; Fujibayashi, S; Sasaki, K; Nishida, N; Nakamura, T; Kokubo, T

    2011-03-01

    Selective laser melting (SLM) is a useful technique for preparing three-dimensional porous bodies with complicated internal structures directly from titanium (Ti) powders without any intermediate processing steps, with the products being expected to be useful as a bone substitute. In this study the necessary SLM processing conditions to obtain a dense product, such as the laser power, scanning speed, and hatching pattern, were investigated using a Ti powder of less than 45 μm particle size. The results show that a fully dense plate thinner than 1.8 mm was obtained when the laser power to scanning speed ratio was greater than 0.5 and the hatch spacing was less than the laser diameter, with a 30 μm thick powder layer. Porous Ti metals with structures analogous to human cancellous bone were fabricated and the compressive strength measured. The compressive strength was in the range 35-120 MPa when the porosity was in the range 75-55%. Porous Ti metals fabricated by SLM were heat-treated at 1300 °C for 1h in an argon gas atmosphere to smooth the surface. Such prepared specimens were subjected to NaOH, HCl, and heat treatment to provide bioactivity. Field emission scanning electron micrographs showed that fine networks of titanium oxide were formed over the whole surface of the porous body. These treated porous bodies formed bone-like apatite on their surfaces in a simulated body fluid within 3 days. In vivo studies showed that new bone penetrated into the pores and directly bonded to the walls within 12 weeks after implantation into the femur of Japanese white rabbits. The percentage bone affinity indices of the chemical- and heat-treated porous bodies were significantly higher than that of untreated implants.

  19. CONTROL OF LASER RADIATION PARAMETERS: Enhancement of the efficiency and control of emission parameters of an unstable-resonator chemical oxygen—iodine laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boreisho, A. S.; Lobachev, V. V.; Savin, A. V.; Strakhov, S. Yu; Trilis, A. V.

    2007-07-01

    The outlook is considered for the development of a high-power supersonic flowing chemical oxygen—iodine laser operating as an amplifier and controlled by radiation from a master oscillator by using an unstable resonator with a hole-coupled mirror. The influence of the seed radiation intensity, the coupling-hole diameter, the active-medium length, and the magnification factor on the parameters of laser radiation is analysed. It is shown that the use of such resonators is most advisable in medium-power oxygen—iodine lasers for which classical unstable resonators are inefficient because of their low magnification factors. The use of unstable resonators with a hole-coupled mirror and injection provides the control of radiation parameters and a considerable increase in the output power and brightness of laser radiation.

  20. A review of laser machining of composites and the chemical by-product formed by such processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Doyle, Daryl J.

    The laser-cutting of polymers and polymer-based composites is reviewed with emphasis placed on the chemical by-products formed by such processes. It has been reported that toxic and potentially carcinogenic materials are formed; therefore, appropriate control measures need to be incorporated into the engineering design of laser-cutting facilities to maintain air quality of the workplace within the guidelines established by governmental regulatory agencies.

  1. Rapid and Localized Synthesis of Single-Walled Carbon Nanotubes on Flat Surface by Laser-Assisted Chemical Vapor Deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kasuya, Keigo; Nagato, Keisuke; Jin, Yusuke; Morii, Hiroshi; Ooi, Takeshi; Nakao, Masayuki

    2007-04-01

    The synthesis of single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) at a controlled position on a flat surface was demonstrated by laser-assisted chemical vapor deposition (CVD). The developed multilayer substrate including an energy-confining layer (ECL) enabled the efficient heating of catalysts on the surface, resulting in the rapid and localized syntheses of SWNTs. Using a Nd:YAG laser as a heat source, we achieved the rapid synthesis with laser irradiation for 1 s and the localized synthesis in an area of approximately 1 μm diameter. In addition, the scanning of the laser irradiation spot at a rate of 1 μm/s enabled the line-patterned synthesis of SWNTs at a linewidth of 2 μm. The resulting synthesis of SWNTs on a flat surface by laser-assisted CVD will lead to the easy and controllable fabrication of SWNT-based nanodevices.

  2. An infrared free-electron laser for the Chemical Dynamics Research Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Vaughan, D.

    1992-04-01

    This document describes a free-electron laser (FEL) proposed as part of the Chemical Dynamics Research Laboratory (CDRL), a user facility that also incorporates several advanced lasers of conventional design and two beamlines for the ALS. The FEL itself addresses the needs of the chemical sciences community for a high-brightness, tunable source covering a broad region of the infrared spectrum -- from 3 to 50 {mu}m. All of these sources, together with a variety of sophisticated experimental stations, will be housed in a new building to be located adjacent to the ALS. The radiation sources can be synchronized to permit powerful two-color, pump-probe experiments that will further our fundamental understanding of chemical dynamics at the molecular level, especially those aspects relevant to practical issues in combustion chemistry. The technical approach adopted in this design makes use of superconducting radiofrequency (SCRF) accelerating structures. The primary motivation for adopting this approach was to meet the user requirement for wavelength stability equal to one part in 10{sup 4}. Previous studies concluded that a wavelength stability of only one part in 10{sup 3} could be achieved with currently available room-temperature technology. In addition, the superconducting design operates in a continuous-wave (cw) mode and hence offers considerably higher average optical output power. It also allows for various pulse-gating configurations that will permit simultaneous multiuser operations. A summary of the comparative performance attainable with room-temperature and superconducting designs is given. The FEL described in this report provides a continuous train of 30-ps micropulses, with 100{mu}J of optical energy per micropulse, at a repetition rate of 6.1 MHz. The device can also deliver pulses at a cw repetition rate of 12.2 MHz, with a peak power of 50 {mu}J per micropulse. 70 ref.

  3. An infrared free-electron laser for the Chemical Dynamics Research Laboratory. Design report

    SciTech Connect

    Vaughan, D.

    1992-04-01

    This document describes a free-electron laser (FEL) proposed as part of the Chemical Dynamics Research Laboratory (CDRL), a user facility that also incorporates several advanced lasers of conventional design and two beamlines for the ALS. The FEL itself addresses the needs of the chemical sciences community for a high-brightness, tunable source covering a broad region of the infrared spectrum -- from 3 to 50 {mu}m. All of these sources, together with a variety of sophisticated experimental stations, will be housed in a new building to be located adjacent to the ALS. The radiation sources can be synchronized to permit powerful two-color, pump-probe experiments that will further our fundamental understanding of chemical dynamics at the molecular level, especially those aspects relevant to practical issues in combustion chemistry. The technical approach adopted in this design makes use of superconducting radiofrequency (SCRF) accelerating structures. The primary motivation for adopting this approach was to meet the user requirement for wavelength stability equal to one part in 10{sup 4}. Previous studies concluded that a wavelength stability of only one part in 10{sup 3} could be achieved with currently available room-temperature technology. In addition, the superconducting design operates in a continuous-wave (cw) mode and hence offers considerably higher average optical output power. It also allows for various pulse-gating configurations that will permit simultaneous multiuser operations. A summary of the comparative performance attainable with room-temperature and superconducting designs is given. The FEL described in this report provides a continuous train of 30-ps micropulses, with 100{mu}J of optical energy per micropulse, at a repetition rate of 6.1 MHz. The device can also deliver pulses at a cw repetition rate of 12.2 MHz, with a peak power of 50 {mu}J per micropulse. 70 ref.

  4. Effect of sample compositions on chemical analysis using matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization mass spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schriemer, David; Dai, Yuqin; Li, Liang

    1996-11-01

    Matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization (MALDI) is an effective ionization technique for mass spectrometry. It take advantages of some unique properties of certain organic chemicals to provide entrapment, isolation, vaporization, and ionization of the analyte of interest. While the main application of the MALDI technique is currently in the area of biological molecule analysis, it is possible to use this technique for monitoring polymer chemistry such as degradation processes. This is potentially important for studying and developing environmentally degradable polymers. Direct analysis of the analyte in real-world samples is possible with MALDI. However, there is a significant effect of the overall composition of a sample on the detectability and performance of MALDI. Two examples are given to illustrate the positive and negative effects of buffers, salts, and additives on the MALDI sample preparation.

  5. Ultrasonic photoacoustic spectroscopy of trace hazardous chemicals using quantum cascade laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, Deepak; Ghai, Devinder Pal; Soni, R. K.

    2016-12-01

    We report an ultrasonic sensor based on open-cell photoacoustic spectroscopy method for the detection of explosive agents in traces. Experimentally, we recorded photoacoustic spectra of traces of hazardous explosives and molecules. Tunable mid-infrared quantum cascade lasers in the wavelength range 7.0-8.8 μm lying in the molecular fingerprint region are used as optical source. Samples of Pentaerylthirol Tetranitrate (PETN), Tetranitro-triazacyclohexane (RDX), Dinitrotoluene, p-Nitrobenzoic acid and other chemicals like Ibuprofen having quantity 1.0 mg were detected using a custom made photoacoustic cells in both open and closed configurations. The explosive traces were swiped using paper from contaminated surface and detected. Finite element mesh based simulation of photoacoustic cell is carried out for optimization of geometry at ultrasonic frequency (40 kHz). A point sensor based on above approach will be very effective for forensic applications and suspicious material screening.

  6. Direct measurement of chemical composition of SOx in impact vapor using a laser gun

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ohno, Sohsuke; Kadono, Toshihiko; Kurosawa, Kosuke; Hamura, Taiga; Sakaiya, Tatsuhiro; Sugita, Seiji; Shigemori, Keisuke; Hironaka, Yoichiro; Watari, Takeshi; Matsui, Takafumi

    2011-06-01

    The SO3/SO2 ratio of the impact vapor cloud is a key parameter for understanding the environmental perturbation caused by the impact-induced SOx and the killing mechanism of. the mass extinction at the K-Pg boundary. We conducted hypervelocity impact experiments using a high-speed laser gun (GEKKO XII-HIPER, ILE, Osaka University) and measured the chemical compositions of the SOx released from CaSO4. The experimental result indicates that SOx are dominated by SO3. It implies that the SOx generated by the K-Pg impact would have been also dominated by SO3, because the SO3/SO2 ratio of natural planetary scale impact vapor clouds would have been larger than that of the experimental result of this study.

  7. Ar+ and CuBr laser-assisted chemical bleaching of teeth: estimation of whiteness degree

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dimitrov, S.; Todorovska, Roumyana; Gizbrecht, Alexander I.; Raychev, L.; Petrov, Lyubomir P.

    2003-11-01

    In this work the results of adaptation of impartial methods for color determination aimed at developing of techniques for estimation of human teeth whiteness degree, sufficiently handy for common use in clinical practice are presented. For approbation and by the way of illustration of the techniques, standards of teeth colors were used as well as model and naturally discolored human teeth treated by two bleaching chemical compositions activated by three light sources each: Ar+ and CuBr lasers, and a standard halogen photopolymerization lamp. Typical reflection and fluorescence spectra of some samples are presented; the samples colors were estimated by a standard computer processing in RGB and B coordinates. The results of the applied spectral and colorimetric techniques are in a good agreement with those of the standard computer processing of the corresponding digital photographs and complies with the visually estimated degree of the teeth whiteness judged according to the standard reference scale commonly used in the aesthetic dentistry.

  8. Theoretical analysis of dynamic chemical imaging with lasers using high-order harmonic generation

    SciTech Connect

    Van-Hoang Le; Anh-Thu Le; Xie Ruihua; Lin, C. D.

    2007-07-15

    We report theoretical investigations of the tomographic procedure suggested by Itatani et al. [Nature (London) 432, 867 (2004)] for reconstructing highest occupied molecular orbitals (HOMOs) using high-order harmonic generation (HHG). Due to the limited range of harmonics from the plateau region, we found that even under the most favorable assumptions, it is still very difficult to obtain accurate HOMO wave functions using the tomographic procedure, but the symmetry of the HOMOs and the internuclear separation between the atoms can be accurately extracted, especially when lasers of longer wavelengths are used to generate the HHG. Since the tomographic procedure relies on approximating the continuum wave functions in the recombination process by plane waves, the method can no longer be applied upon the improvement of the theory. For future chemical imaging with lasers, we suggest that one may want to focus on how to extract the positions of atoms in molecules instead, by developing an iterative method such that the theoretically calculated macroscopic HHG spectra can best fit the experimental HHG data.

  9. Chemical, morphological and chromatic behavior of mural paintings under Er:YAG laser irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Striova, J.; Camaiti, M.; Castellucci, E. M.; Sansonetti, A.

    2011-08-01

    Several pigments (malachite CuCO3ṡCu(OH)2, azurite 2CuCO3ṡCu(OH)2, yellow ochre (goethite α-FeOOH, gypsum CaSO4ṡ2H2O), St. John's white CaCO3 formed from slaked lime) and respective mural paintings specimens were subjected to the free-running Er:YAG laser radiation in order to study their damage thresholds, in a broad range of laser fluences, both in dry and wet conditions. The specimens' damage thresholds were evaluated by spectroscopic methods, colorimetric measurements and microscopic observation. The pigments containing -OH groups were found to be more sensitive than St. John's white; hence the most sensitive paint layers in dry conditions are those containing malachite, azurite (both 1.3 J/cm2) and yellow ochre (2.5 J/cm2) as compared to the ones containing St. John's white (15.2 J/cm2). The presence of wetting agents (w.a.) attenuated the pigments chemical alteration. The damage thresholds of all the paint layers, in presence of w.a., were found to be around 2.5 J/cm2. The alteration was caused by thermo-mechanical damage and by binding medium ablation of a fresco and a secco prepared specimens, respectively.

  10. Colour and chemical changes of the lime wood surface due to CO2 laser thermal modification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kubovský, Ivan; Kačík, František

    2014-12-01

    We studied colour and main wood components changes of lime wood caused by CO2 laser beam irradiation. The dry surface of lime wood (Tilia vulgaris L.) was irradiated with the CO2 laser beam (wavelength of 10.6 μm) at different exposures (expressed as the irradiation dose). Colour changes were monitored by the spectrophotometer, chemical changes were observed by the ATR-FTIR spectroscopy and carbohydrates were analysed by the HPLC method. With the growth of the irradiation dose (from 8.1 to 28.7 J cm-2) lightness (ΔL*) decrease and increase of the total colour difference (ΔE*) were observed. Higher values of the input energy lead to accelerating the mutual reaction of the functional groups resulting in the subsequent condensation of lignin. The total decrease in saccharides at the highest irradiation dose reaches 27.39% of the initial amount of saccharides in the reference sample. We have observed degradation and loss of hemicelluloses.

  11. Effects of high-repetition-rate femtosecond laser micromachining on the physical and chemical properties of polylactide (PLA).

    PubMed

    Jia, Wei; Luo, Yiming; Yu, Jian; Liu, Bowen; Hu, Minglie; Chai, Lu; Wang, Chingyue

    2015-10-19

    The effects of femtosecond laser ablation, with 115 fs pulses at 1040 nm wavelength and 57 MHz repetition-rate, on the physical and chemical properties of polylactide (PLA) were studied in air and in water. The surface of the PLA sample ablated by high-repetition-rate femtosecond laser was analysed using field emission scanning electron microscopy, infrared spectroscopy, raman spectroscopy, as well as X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. Compared with the experiments in the air at ambient temperature, melting resolidification was negligible for the experiments conducted under water. Neither in air nor under water did oxidation and crystallization process take place in the laser ablated surface. In addition, the intensity of some oxygen related peaks increased for water experiments, probably due to the hydrolysis. Meantime, the chemical shift to higher energies appeared in C1s XPS spectrum of laser processing in water. Interestingly, a large amount of defects were observed after laser processing in air, while no significant change was shown under water experiments. This indicates that thermal and mechanical effects by high-repetition-rate femtosecond laser ablation in water are quite limited, which could be even ignored.

  12. Chemical vapor deposition of highly adherent diamond coatings onto co-cemented tungsten carbides irradiated by high power diode laser.

    PubMed

    Barletta, M; Rubino, G; Valle, R; Polini, R

    2012-02-01

    The present investigation deals with the definition of a new eco-friendly alternative to pretreat Co-cemented tungsten carbide (WC-Co) substrates before diamond deposition by hot filament chemical vapor deposition (HFCVD). In particular, WC-5.8 wt %Co substrates were submitted to a thermal treatment by a continuous wave-high power diode laser to reduce surface Co concentration and promote the reconstruction of the WC grains. Laser pretreatments were performed both in N(2) and Ar atmosphere to prevent substrate oxidation. Diamond coatings were deposited onto the laser pretreated substrates by HFCVD. For comparative purpose, diamond coatings were also deposited on WC-5.8 wt %Co substrates chemically etched by the well-known two-step pretreatment employing Murakami's reagent and Caro's acid. Surface morphology, microstructure, and chemical composition of the WC-5.8 wt %Co substrates after the different pretreatments and the deposition of diamond coatings were assessed by surface profiler, scanning electron microscopy, energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy, and X-ray diffraction analyses. Wear performance of the diamond coatings was checked by dry sliding linear reciprocating tribological tests. The worn volume of the diamond coatings deposited on the laser pretreated substrates was always found lower than the one measured on the chemically etched substrates, with the N(2) atmosphere being particularly promising.

  13. Use of external cavity quantum cascade laser compliance voltage in real-time trace gas sensing of multiple chemicals

    SciTech Connect

    Phillips, Mark C.; Taubman, Matthew S.; Kriesel, Jason M.

    2015-02-08

    We describe a prototype trace gas sensor designed for real-time detection of multiple chemicals. The sensor uses an external cavity quantum cascade laser (ECQCL) swept over its tuning range of 940-1075 cm-1 (9.30-10.7 µm) at a 10 Hz repetition rate.

  14. Chemical stabilization of laser dyes. Final report, 1 July 1981-1 October 1984

    SciTech Connect

    Koch, T.H.

    1984-11-01

    Coumarin laser dyes upon excitation degrade to produce products which absorb at the lasing wavelength. This results in attenuation of dye laser output. Modes of degradation of coumarin dye lasers under both anaerobic and aerobic conditions were determined and methods of stabilization of dye lasers were established.

  15. Current state of acne treatment: highlighting lasers, photodynamic therapy, and chemical peels.

    PubMed

    Kim, Randie H; Armstrong, April W

    2011-03-15

    Acne vulgaris continues to be a challenge to dermatologists and primary care physicians alike. The available treatments reflect the complex and multifactorial contributors to acne pathogenesis, with topical retinoids as first-line therapy for mild acne, topical retinoids in combination with anti-microbials for moderate acne, and isotretinoin for severe nodular acne. Unfortunately, these conventional therapies may not be effective against refractory acne, can lead to antibiotic resistance, and is associated with adverse effects. With the rise of new technologies and in-office procedures, light and laser therapy, photodynamic therapy, chemical peels, and comedo extraction are growing in popularity as adjunctive treatments and may offer alternatives to those who desire better efficacy, quicker onset of action, improved safety profile, reduced risk of antibiotic resistance, and non-systemic administration. Whereas adjunctive therapies are generally well-tolerated, the number of randomized controlled trials are few and limited by small sample sizes. Furthermore, results demonstrating efficacy of certain light therapies are mixed and studies involving photodynamic therapy and chemical peels have yet to standardize and optimize application, formulation, and exposure times. Nevertheless, adjunctive therapies, particularly blue light and photodynamic therapy, show promise as these treatments also target factors of acne pathogenesis and may potentially complement current conventional therapy.

  16. Joint Theater Missile Defense in Taiwan: Protecting United States Interests and Friends

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-11-02

    people in a disproportionately short period and where the consequences of its release overwhelms local responders. 67 APPENDIX A CHINESE BALLISTIC...2004, Ballistic Missile Defense. Airborne Laser The Airborne Laser (ABL) consists of a high-energy, chemical oxygen iodine laser (COIL) mounted

  17. Femtosecond laser pulses for chemical-free embryonic and mesenchymal stem cell differentiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mthunzi, Patience; Dholakia, Kishan; Gunn-Moore, Frank

    2011-10-01

    Owing to their self renewal and pluripotency properties, stem cells can efficiently advance current therapies in tissue regeneration and/or engineering. Under appropriate culture conditions in vitro, pluripotent stem cells can be primed to differentiate into any cell type some examples including neural, cardiac and blood cells. However, there still remains a pressing necessity to answer the biological questions concerning how stem cell renewal and how differentiation programs are operated and regulated at the genetic level. In stem cell research, an urgent requirement on experimental procedures allowing non-invasive, marker-free observation of growth, proliferation and stability of living stem cells under physiological conditions exists. Femtosecond (fs) laser pulses have been reported to non-invasively deliver exogenous materials, including foreign genetic species into both multipotent and pluripotent stem cells successfully. Through this multi-photon facilitated technique, directly administering fs laser pulses onto the cell plasma membrane induces transient submicrometer holes, thereby promoting cytosolic uptake of the surrounding extracellular matter. To display a chemical-free cell transfection procedure that utilises micro-litre scale volumes of reagents, we report for the first time on 70 % transfection efficiency in ES-E14TG2a cells using the enhanced green fluorescing protein (EGFP) DNA plasmid. We also show how varying the average power output during optical transfection influences cell viability, proliferation and cytotoxicity in embryonic stem cells. The impact of utilizing objective lenses of different numerical aperture (NA) on the optical transfection efficiency in ES-E14TG2a cells is presented. Finally, we report on embryonic and mesenchymal stem cell differentiation. The produced specialized cell types could thereafter be characterized and used for cell based therapies.

  18. Laser photoacoustic spectroscopy helps fight terrorism: High sensitivity detection of chemical Warfare Agent and explosives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patel, C. K. N.

    2008-01-01

    Tunable laser photoacoustic spectroscopy is maturing rapidly in its applications to real world problems. One of the burning problems of the current turbulent times is the threat of terrorist acts against civilian population. This threat appears in two distinct forms. The first is the potential release of chemical warfare agents (CWA), such as the nerve agents, in a crowded environment. An example of this is the release of Sarin by Aum Shinrikyo sect in a crowded Tokyo subway in 1995. An example of the second terrorist threat is the ever-present possible suicide bomber in crowded environment such as airports, markets and large buildings. Minimizing the impact of both of these threats requires early detection of the presence of the CWAs and explosives. Photoacoustic spectroscopy is an exquisitely sensitive technique for the detection of trace gaseous species, a property that Pranalytica has extensively exploited in its CO2 laser based commercial instrumentation for the sub-ppb level detection of a number of industrially important gases including ammonia, ethylene, acrolein, sulfur hexafluoride, phosphine, arsine, boron trichloride and boron trifluoride. In this presentation, I will focus, however, on our recent use of broadly tunable single frequency high power room temperature quantum cascade lasers (QCL) for the detection of the CWAs and explosives. Using external grating cavity geometry, we have developed room temperature QCLs that produce continuously tunable single frequency CW power output in excess of 300 mW at wavelengths covering 5 μm to 12 μm. I will present data that show a CWA detection capability at ppb levels with false alarm rates below 1:108. I will also show the capability of detecting a variety of explosives at a ppb level, again with very low false alarm rates. Among the explosives, we have demonstrated the capability of detecting homemade explosives such as triacetone triperoxide and its liquid precursor, acetone which is a common household

  19. X-Ray Laser Gets First Real-Time Snapshots of a Chemical Flipping a Biological Switch

    SciTech Connect

    2016-11-14

    Scientists have used the powerful X-ray laser at the Department of Energy’s SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory to make the first snapshots of a chemical interaction between two biomolecules – one that flips an RNA “switch” that regulates production of proteins, the workhorse molecules of life. The results, published in Nature, show the game-changing potential of X-ray free-electron lasers, or XFELs, for studying RNA, which guides protein manufacturing in the cell, serves as the primary genetic material in retroviruses such as HIV and also plays a role in most forms of cancer.

  20. Modeling of Flowing Plasmas and Pulse Power Schemes for O2(1Delta) Production for Chemical Lasers

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-01-19

    Redistribution subject to AlP license or copyright, see http:l/jap.aip.org/jap/copyright.jsp 113306-11 Babaeva, Arakoni, and Kushner J. Appi . Phys. 99...Babaeva, and M. J. Kushner, J. Appl. ’W. E. McDermott, N R. Pchelkin, D. J. Benard. and R. R. Bousek, AppI . Phys. 98. 073304 (2t005). Phys. Lett. 32. 469...8217A. Elior, B. D. Barm,tsheniko, E. Lebiush, and S. Rosenwaks. AppI . Phys. Gas Flost and Chemical Las,ers and lligh Power Laser Conference tyro- B

  1. Chemical stabilization of laser dyes. Final report, 1 April 1987-31 March 1990

    SciTech Connect

    Koch, T.H.

    1990-04-10

    Irradiation of ethanol solutions of coumarin laser dye lasers produces products which absorb at the lasing wavelength. This results in attenuation of dye laser output through interference of stimulated emission. A major photoprocess which produces material which absorbs at the lasing wavelength is dye sensitized solvent oxidative oligomerization, producing aldehydic and ketonic products. A dye laser stabilization technique is removal of these carbonyl compounds as they are formed by reduction with a polymer bound borohydride reducing agent.

  2. Laser speckle technique to study the effect of chemical pre-treatment on the quality of minimally processed apples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Minz, Preeti D.; Nirala, A. K.

    2016-04-01

    In the present study, the laser speckle technique has been used for the quality evaluation of chemically treated cut apples. Chemical pre-treatment includes 1% (w/v) solution of citric acid (CA), sodium chloride (SC), and a combination of CA and sodium chloride (CS). The variation in weight loss, respiration rate, total soluble solids (TSS), titratable acidity (TA), and absorbance of chemically treated cut apples stored at 5 °C was monitored for 11 d. The speckle grain size was calculated by an autocovariance method from the speckled images of freshly cut chemically treated apples. The effect of chemicals on TSS and the TA content variation of the cut apples were well correlated to the linear speckle grain size. Circular degree of polarization confirms the presence of a small scatterer and hence Rayleigh diffusion region. For all the treated cut apples, a decrease in the concentration of small particles nearly after the mid-period of storage results in the fast decay of circular degree of polarization. For non-invasive and fast analysis of the chemical constituent of fruits during minimal processing, the laser speckle can be practically used in the food industry.

  3. Laser-induced acoustic desorption/atmospheric pressure chemical ionization mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Gao, Jinshan; Borton, David J; Owen, Benjamin C; Jin, Zhicheng; Hurt, Matt; Amundson, Lucas M; Madden, Jeremy T; Qian, Kuangnan; Kenttämaa, Hilkka I

    2011-03-01

    Laser-induced acoustic desorption (LIAD) was successfully coupled to a conventional atmospheric pressure chemical ionization (APCI) source in a commercial linear quadrupole ion trap mass spectrometer (LQIT). Model compounds representing a wide variety of different types, including basic nitrogen and oxygen compounds, aromatic and aliphatic compounds, as well as unsaturated and saturated hydrocarbons, were tested separately and as a mixture. These model compounds were successfully evaporated into the gas phase by using LIAD and then ionized by using APCI with different reagents. From the four APCI reagent systems tested, neat carbon disulfide provided the best results. The mixture of methanol and water produced primarily protonated molecules, as expected. However, only the most basic compounds yielded ions under these conditions. In sharp contrast, using APCI with either neat benzene or neat carbon disulfide as the reagent resulted in the ionization of all the analytes studied to predominantly yield stable molecular ions. Benzene yielded a larger fraction of protonated molecules than carbon disulfide, which is a disadvantage. A similar but minor amount of fragmentation was observed for these two reagents. When the experiment was performed without a liquid reagent (nitrogen gas was the reagent), more fragmentation was observed. Analysis of a known mixture as well as a petroleum cut was also carried out. In summary, the new experiment presented here allows the evaporation of thermally labile compounds, both polar and nonpolar, without dissociation or aggregation, and their ionization to predominantly form stable molecular ions.

  4. Data Analysis of Multi-Laser Standoff Spectral identification of chemical and biological compounds

    SciTech Connect

    Farahi, R H; Zaharov, Viktor; Tetard, Laurene; Thundat, Thomas George; Passian, Ali

    2013-01-01

    With the availability of tunable broadband coherent sources that emit mid-infrared radiation with well-defined beam characteristics, spectroscopies that were traditionally not practical for standoff detection1 or for develop- ment of miniaturized infrared detectors2, 3 have renewed interest. While obtaining compositional information for objects from a distance remains a major challenge in chemical and biological sensing, recently we demonstrated that capitalizing on mid-infrared excitation of target molecules by using quantum cascade lasers and invoking a pump probe scheme can provide spectral fingerprints of substances from a variable standoff distance.3 However, the standoff data is typically associated with random fluctuations that can corrupt the fine spectral features and useful data. To process the data from standoff experiments toward better recognition we consider and apply two types of denoising techniques, namely, spectral analysis and Karhunen-Loeve Transform (KLT). Using these techniques, infrared spectral data have been effectively improved. The result of the analysis illustrates that KLT can be adapted as a powerful data denoising tool for the presented pump-probe infrared standoff spectroscopy.

  5. Laser-Induced Acoustic Desorption/Atmospheric Pressure Chemical Ionization Mass Spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Jinshan; Borton, David J.; Owen, Benjamin C.; Jin, Zhicheng; Hurt, Matt; Amundson, Lucas M.; Madden, Jeremy T.; Qian, Kuangnan; Kenttämaa, Hilkka I.

    2010-01-01

    Laser-induced acoustic desorption (LIAD) was successfully coupled to a conventional atmospheric pressure chemical ionization (APCI) source in a linear quadrupole ion trap mass spectrometer (LQIT). Model compounds representing a wide variety of different types, including basic nitrogen and oxygen compounds, aromatic and aliphatic compounds, as well as unsaturated and saturated hydrocarbons, were tested separately and as a mixture. These model compounds were successfully evaporated into the gas phase by using LIAD and then ionized by using APCI with different reagents. Four APCI reagent systems were tested: the traditionally used mixture of methanol and water, neat benzene, neat carbon disulfide, and nitrogen gas (no liquid reagent). The mixture of methanol and water produced primarily protonated molecules, as expected. However, only the most basic compounds yielded ions under these conditions. In sharp contrast, using APCI with either neat benzene or neat carbon disulfide as the reagent resulted in the ionization of all the analytes studied to predominantly yield stable molecular ions. Benzene yielded a larger fraction of protonated molecules than carbon disulfide, which is a disadvantage. A similar amount of fragmentation was observed for these reagents. When the experiment was performed without a liquid reagent(nitrogen gas was the reagent), more fragmentation was observed. Analysis of a known mixture as well as a petroleum cut was also carried out. In summary, the new experiment presented here allows the evaporation of thermally labile compounds, both polar and nonpolar, without dissociation or aggregation, and their ionization to form stable molecular ions. PMID:21472571

  6. Organic chemical analysis on a microscopic scale using two-step laser desorption/laser ionization mass spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kovalenko, L. J.; Philippoz, J.-M.; Bucenell, J. R.; Zenobi, R.; Zare, R. N.

    1991-04-01

    The distribution of PAHs in the Allende meteorite has been measured using two-step laser desorption and laser multiphoton-ionization mass spectrometry. This method enables in situ analysis (with a spatial resolution of 1 mm or better) of selected organic molecules. Results show that PAH concentrations are locally high compared to the average concentration found by analysis of pulverized samples, and are found primarily in the fine-grained matrix; no PAHs were detected in the interiors of individual chondrules at the detection limit (about 0.05 ppm).

  7. High sensitivity stand-off detection and quantification of chemical mixtures using an active coherent laser spectrometer (ACLaS)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    MacLeod, Neil A.; Weidmann, Damien

    2016-05-01

    High sensitivity detection, identification and quantification of chemicals in a stand-off configuration is a highly sought after capability across the security and defense sector. Specific applications include assessing the presence of explosive related materials, poisonous or toxic chemical agents, and narcotics. Real world field deployment of an operational stand-off system is challenging due to stringent requirements: high detection sensitivity, stand-off ranges from centimeters to hundreds of meters, eye-safe invisible light, near real-time response and a wide chemical versatility encompassing both vapor and condensed phase chemicals. Additionally, field deployment requires a compact, rugged, power efficient, and cost-effective design. To address these demanding requirements, we have developed the concept of Active Coherent Laser Spectrometer (ACLaS), which can be also described as a middle infrared hyperspectral coherent lidar. Combined with robust spectral unmixing algorithms, inherited from retrievals of information from high-resolution spectral data generated by satellitebased spectrometers, ACLaS has been demonstrated to fulfil the above-mentioned needs. ACLaS prototypes have been so far developed using quantum cascade lasers (QCL) and interband cascade lasers (ICL) to exploit the fast frequency tuning capability of these solid state sources. Using distributed feedback (DFB) QCL, demonstration and performance analysis were carried out on narrow-band absorbing chemicals (N2O, H2O, H2O2, CH4, C2H2 and C2H6) at stand-off distances up to 50 m using realistic non cooperative targets such as wood, painted metal, and bricks. Using more widely tunable external cavity QCL, ACLaS has also been demonstrated on broadband absorbing chemicals (dichloroethane, HFC134a, ethylene glycol dinitrate and 4-nitroacetanilide solid) and on complex samples mixing narrow-band and broadband absorbers together in a realistic atmospheric background.

  8. A Study on Fractional Erbium Glass Laser Therapy Versus Chemical Peeling for the Treatment of Melasma in Female Patients

    PubMed Central

    Puri, Neerja

    2013-01-01

    Introduction: Melasma is a commonly acquired hypermelanosis and a common dermatologic skin disease that occurs on sun-exposed areas of face. Aims: To assess the efficacy and safety of non-ablative 1,550 nm Erbium glass fractional laser therapy and compare results with those obtained with chemical peeling. Materials and Methods: We selected 30 patients of melasma aged between 20 years and 50 years for the study. The patients were divided into two groups of 15 patients each. Group I patients were subjected to four sessions of 1,550 nm Erbium glass non-ablative fractional laser at 3 weeks interval. In group II patients, four sessions of chemical peeling with 70% glycolic acid was performed. Results: After 12 weeks of treatment, percentage reduction in Melasma Area and Severity Index (MASI) score was seen in 62.9% in the laser group and 58.7% in the peels group. Conclusion: It was observed that 1,550 nm fractional laser is as effective as 70% glycolic acid peel in reducing MASI score in patients with melasma. PMID:24163531

  9. Coupled molecular dynamics-Monte Carlo model to study the role of chemical processes during laser ablation of polymeric materials.

    PubMed

    Prasad, Manish; Conforti, Patrick F; Garrison, Barbara J

    2007-08-28

    The coarse grained chemical reaction model is enhanced to build a molecular dynamics (MD) simulation framework with an embedded Monte Carlo (MC) based reaction scheme. The MC scheme utilizes predetermined reaction chemistry, energetics, and rate kinetics of materials to incorporate chemical reactions occurring in a substrate into the MD simulation. The kinetics information is utilized to set the probabilities for the types of reactions to perform based on radical survival times and reaction rates. Implementing a reaction involves changing the reactants species types which alters their interaction potentials and thus produces the required energy change. We discuss the application of this method to study the initiation of ultraviolet laser ablation in poly(methyl methacrylate). The use of this scheme enables the modeling of all possible photoexcitation pathways in the polymer. It also permits a direct study of the role of thermal, mechanical, and chemical processes that can set off ablation. We demonstrate that the role of laser induced heating, thermomechanical stresses, pressure wave formation and relaxation, and thermochemical decomposition of the polymer substrate can be investigated directly by suitably choosing the potential energy and chemical reaction energy landscape. The results highlight the usefulness of such a modeling approach by showing that various processes in polymer ablation are intricately linked leading to the transformation of the substrate and its ejection. The method, in principle, can be utilized to study systems where chemical reactions are expected to play a dominant role or interact strongly with other physical processes.

  10. A miniature laser ablation mass spectrometer for quantitative in situ chemical composition investigation of lunar surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brigitte Neuland, Maike; Grimaudo, Valentine; Mezger, Klaus; Moreno-García, Pavel; Riedo, Andreas; Tulej, Marek; Wurz, Peter

    2016-04-01

    The chemical composition of planetary bodies, moons, comets and asteroids is a key to understand their origin and evolution [Wurz,2009]. Measurements of the elemental and isotopic composition of rocks yield information about the formation of the planetary body, its evolution and following processes shaping the planetary surface. From the elemental composition, conclusions about modal mineralogy and petrology can be drawn. Isotope ratios are a sensitive indicator for past events on the planetary body and yield information about origin and transformation of the matter, back to events that occurred in the early solar system. Finally, measurements of radiogenic isotopes make it possible to carry out dating analyses. All these topics, particularly in situ dating analyses, quantitative elemental and highly accurate isotopic composition measurements, are top priority scientific questions for future lunar missions. An instrument for precise measurements of chemical composition will be a key element in scientific payloads of future landers or rovers on lunar surface. We present a miniature laser ablation mass spectrometer (LMS) designed for in situ research in planetary and space science and optimised for measurements of the chemical composition of rocks and soils on a planetary surface. By means of measurements of standard reference materials we demonstrate that LMS is a suitable instrument for in situ measurements of elemental and isotopic composition with high precision and accuracy. Measurements of soil standards are used to confirm known sensitivity coefficients of the instrument and to prove the power of LMS for quantitative elemental analyses [Neuland,2016]. For demonstration of the capability of LMS to measure the chemical composition of extraterrestrial material we use a sample of Allende meteorite [Neuland,2014]. Investigations of layered samples confirm the high spatial resolution in vertical direction of LMS [Grimaudo,2015], which allows in situ studying of past

  11. Effect of laser power on orientation and microstructure of Ba2TiO4 film prepared by laser chemical vapor deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Dongyun; Goto, Takashi; Wang, Chuanbin; Shen, Qiang; Zhang, Lianmeng

    2012-08-01

    Ba2TiO4 films were prepared on Pt/Ti/SiO2/Si substrates by laser chemical vapor deposition method. The effect of laser power (PL) on orientation and microstructure was investigated. With increasing PL from 52 to 93 W, the deposition temperature (Tdep) increased from 845 to 946 K. With increasing Tdep from 845 to 927 K, the preferred orientation of Ba2TiO4 films changed from (0 9 1) to (1 0 3), the surface morphologies changed from faceted to rectangular, and the columnar cross-section became thicker. The films prepared at high Tdep (931-946 K) had the porous cross-section consisted of powder-like grains. Ba2TiO4 film prepared at 881 K had high deposition rate (Rdep) of 51.4 μm h-1, which was advantageous to industrial production.

  12. Chemical-assisted femtosecond laser writing of lab-in-fibers.

    PubMed

    Haque, Moez; Lee, Kenneth K C; Ho, Stephen; Fernandes, Luís A; Herman, Peter R

    2014-10-07

    The lab-on-chip (LOC) platform has presented a powerful opportunity to improve functionalization, parallelization, and miniaturization on planar or multilevel geometries that has not been possible with fiber optic technology. A migration of such LOC devices into the optical fiber platform would therefore open the revolutionary prospect of creating novel lab-in-fiber (LIF) systems on the basis of an efficient optical transport highway for multifunctional sensing. For the LIF, the core optical waveguide inherently offers a facile means to interconnect numerous types of sensing elements along the optical fiber, presenting a radical opportunity for optimizing the packaging and densification of diverse components in convenient geometries beyond that available with conventional LOCs. In this paper, three-dimensional patterning inside the optical fiber by femtosecond laser writing, together with selective chemical etching, is presented as a powerful tool to form refractive index structures such as optical waveguides and gratings as well as to open buried microfluidic channels and optical resonators inside the flexible and robust glass fiber. In this approach, optically smooth surfaces (~12 nm rms) are introduced for the first time inside the fiber cladding that precisely conform to planar nanograting structures when formed by aberration-free focusing with an oil-immersion lens across the cylindrical fiber wall. This process has enabled optofluidic components to be precisely embedded within the fiber to be probed by either the single-mode fiber core waveguide or the laser-formed optical circuits. We establish cladding waveguides, X-couplers, fiber Bragg gratings, microholes, mirrors, optofluidic resonators, and microfluidic reservoirs that define the building blocks for facile interconnection of inline core-waveguide devices with cladding optofluidics. With these components, more advanced, integrated, and multiplexed fiber microsystems are presented demonstrating

  13. Standoff detection of explosives and chemical agents using broadly tuned external-cavity quantum cascade lasers (EC-QCLs)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takeuchi, Eric B.; Rayner, Timothy; Weida, Miles; Crivello, Salvatore; Day, Timothy

    2007-10-01

    Civilian soft targets such as transportation systems are being targeted by terrorists using IEDs and suicide bombers. Having the capability to remotely detect explosives, precursors and other chemicals would enable these assets to be protected with minimal interruption of the flow of commerce. Mid-IR laser technology offers the potential to detect explosives and other chemicals in real-time and from a safe standoff distance. While many of these agents possess "fingerprint" signatures in the mid-IR (i.e. in the 3-20 micron regime), their effective interrogation by a practical, field-deployable system has been limited by size, complexity, reliability and cost constraints of the base laser technology. Daylight Solutions has addressed these shortcomings by developing compact, portable, broadly tunable mid-IR laser sources based upon external-cavity quantum cascade technology. This technology is now being applied by Daylight in system level architectures for standoff and remote detection of explosives, precursors and chemical agents. Several of these architectures and predicted levels of performance will be presented.

  14. Design and development of a low pumping capacity, compact dc-discharge-excited cw HF chemical laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Theodoropoulos, P.; Tsikrikas, G. N.; Kollia, Z.; Androulakis, J.; Serafetinides, Alexander A.

    1999-05-01

    The design and development of a compact, low cost, subsonic cw HF chemical laser with expected output power of the order of approximately 100 mWatts that requires less than 5 lt/s pumping capacity is presented. A theoretical estimation of the minimum pumping capacity required in order to obtain an output power of 100 mWatts is given. The laser operates with a He/SF6/H2/O2 gas mixture at an overall pressure of 4 - 8 mbar. A dc electric discharge is used for the SF6 dissociation. In order to operate at such low gas flow rates the mixing channel dimensions were reduced down to a cross section of 0.2 cm height by 13 cm width. Hydrogen is transversely injected into the flow through approximately 285 holes of 0.03 cm diameter. This low cost compact laser system is suitable for a wide range of experimental requiring mid-infrared cw laser radiation such as laser-tissue interactions and environmental studies.

  15. Numerical analysis on the beam quality improvements of high power chemical laser system with water cooled mirrors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Kai; Li, Bin; Xu, Xiao-jun

    2011-06-01

    Chemical laser is one of the most widely used high power infrared sources. Thermal deformation of mirrors in a resonator is a key factor which hinders the improvement of the beam quality in high power chemical lasers, and it has been a matter of the utmost concern in the design of high power chemical laser systems. Water-cooled technique is one of the most widely methods employed in cooling mirrors in high power laser systems. Several kinds of water-cooled mirrors have been studied by researchers in the world. Research teams of the United States and Russia have done a lot of work and their water cooled mirrors behave very well. In China, the study of micro-channel water cooled silicon mirror has been carried out by Cheng Zuhai in detail and the research of water jet cooled mirror has been performed by Li Bin. Both the two types of water cooled mirrors show excellent capabilities in alleviating the thermal deformation of mirrors. However, the issues that how and to what extent the beam quality is improved when the water cooled mirrors are involved have not been analyzed so far. In this paper, through numerical simulations, the beam qualities of linear resonators with various types of water cooled mirrors are analyzed in detail, and the effects of the two types of water cooled mirrors are compared. The thermal distortion of uncooled Si mirrors is characterized by Zernike polynomials and the beam quality is characterized with Strehl ratio, β factor, and M2 factor, which degenerates as the beam oscillates in the distorted resonator. The aberrance of mirrors non-uniformly heated by high energy laser mainly distributes on the low-even-order Zernike polynomials. When the uncooled Si mirrors are replaced by water cooled mirrors, the distortion decreases greatly and the beam quality is improved a lot. Although the performance of the water jet cooled mirror on mitigating distortion is better than the micro-channel water cooled mirror, the resonator made up of two water jet

  16. Chemical ionization of neutral peptides produced by matrix-assisted laser desorption

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Belov, Mikhail E.; Myatt, Christopher P.; Derrick, Peter J.

    1998-03-01

    The cationization in the gas phase of neutral peptides formed under the conditions of matrix-assisted laser desorption (MALD) has been demonstrated. The beam of neutral peptides formed by MALD using one laser was intercepted several hundred micrometers above the sample surface by a beam of cations produced using a second laser. The intensity of cationized neutral gramicidin S formed in this way was comparable to the ion signal produced by conventional matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization (MALDI). The threshold fluences for MALD of neutral peptides have been shown to be lower than those for formation of ions from the same samples by MALDI.

  17. Remote Continuous Wave and Pulsed Laser Raman Detection of Chemical Warfare Agents Simulants and Toxic Industrial Compounds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ortiz-Rivera, William; Pacheco-Londoño, Leonardo C.; Hernández-Rivera, Samuel P.

    2010-09-01

    This study describes the design, assembly, testing and comparison of two Remote Raman Spectroscopy (RRS) systems intended for standoff detection of hazardous chemical liquids. Raman spectra of Chemical Warfare Agents Simulants (CWAS) and Toxic Industrial Compounds (TIC) were measured in the laboratory at a 6.6 m source-target distance using continuous wave (CW) laser detection. Standoff distances for pulsed measurements were 35 m for dimethyl methylphosphonate (DMMP) detection and 60, 90 and 140 m for cyclohexane detection. The prototype systems consisted of a Raman spectrometer equipped with a CCD detector (for CW measurements) and an I-CCD camera with time-gated electronics (for pulsed laser measurements), a reflecting telescope, a fiber optic assembly, a single-line CW laser source (514.5, 488.0, 351.1 and 363.8 nm) and a frequency-doubled single frequency Nd:YAG 532 nm laser (5 ns pulses at 10 Hz). The telescope was coupled to the spectrograph using an optical fiber, and filters were used to reject laser radiation and Rayleigh scattering. Two quartz convex lenses were used to collimate the light from the telescope from which the telescope-focusing eyepiece was removed, and direct it to the fiber optic assembly. To test the standoff sensing system, the Raman Telescope was used in the detection of liquid TIC: benzene, chlorobenzene, toluene, carbon tetrachloride, cyclohexane and carbon disulfide. Other compounds studied were CWAS: dimethylmethyl phosphonate, 2-chloroethyl ethyl sulfide and 2-(butylamino)-ethanethiol. Relative Raman scattering cross sections of liquid CWAS were measured using single-line sources at 532.0, 488.0, 363.8 and 351.1 nm. Samples were placed in glass and quartz vials at the standoff distances from the telescope for the Remote Raman measurements. The mass of DMMP present in water solutions was also quantified as part of the system performance tests.

  18. Electromagnetic launch, then lessening chemical thrust over time as laser beam powered ion thrust grows—to any orbit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morse, Thomas M.

    1996-03-01

    The ElectroMagnetic (EM) Launch Tube (LT), using High-Temp SuperConduction (HTSC) EM launch coils if developed, will be built in a tall building, or, if not, at a steep angle up the west slope of an extinct volcano. The Reusable Launch Vehicle (RLV) exits the LT at such high velocity that the otherwise violent entry into the atmosphere is made possible by Special-Laser-Launch-Assist (SLLA), which ionizes and expands the atmosphere immediately ahead of the RLV. At first a brief period of chemical thrust is followed by a long period of ion thrust during ascent to orbit. As decades pass and greater ion thrust is developed, the period of chemical thrust shortens until it is no longer needed. The RLV's ion thrusters are powered by laser/maser, beamed first from the launch site, then from two large Solar-Power-Satellites (SPS) 180° apart in Medium Earth Orbit (MEO) orbit. In orbit, the RLV is limited in where it can go only by the amount of propellant it carries or is stored in various orbits. The RLV can land at a launch site on Earth by using both chemical and ion thrust at first, and later by ion thrust alone as developments cause a far lighter RLV to carry no chemical engines/fuel/tanks.

  19. Fabrication of broadband antireflective black metal surfaces with ultra-light-trapping structures by picosecond laser texturing and chemical fluorination

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Buxiang; Wang, Wenjun; Jiang, Gedong; Mei, Xuesong

    2016-06-01

    A hybrid method consisting of ultrafast laser-assisted texturing and chemical fluorination treatment was applied for efficiently enhancing the surface broadband antireflection to fabricate black titanium alloy surface with ultra-light-trapping micro-nanostructure. Based on the theoretical analysis of surface antireflective principle of micro-nanostructures and fluoride film, the ultra-light-trapping micro-nanostructures have been processed using a picosecond pulsed ultrafast laser on titanium alloy surfaces. Then fluorination treatment has been performed by using fluoroalkyl silane solution. According to X-ray diffraction phase analysis of the surface compositions and measurement of the surface reflectance using spectrophotometer, the broadband antireflective properties of titanium alloy surface with micro-nano structural characteristics were investigated before and after fluorination treatment. The results show that the surface morphology of micro-nanostructures processed by picosecond laser has significant effects on the antireflection of light waves to reduce the surface reflectance, which can be further reduced using chemical fluorination treatment. The high antireflection of over 98 % in a broad spectral range from ultraviolet to infrared on the surface of metal material has been achieved for the surface structures, and the broadband antireflective black metal surfaces with an extremely low reflectance of ultra-light-trapping structures have been obtained in the wavelength range from ultraviolet-visible to near-infrared, middle-wave infrared. The average reflectance of microgroove groups structured surface reaches as low as 2.43 % over a broad wavelength range from 200 to 2600 nm. It indicates that the hybrid method comprising of picosecond laser texturing and chemical fluorination can effectively induce the broadband antireflective black metal surface. This method has a potential application for fabricating antireflective surface used to improve the

  20. Scaling effect for HF chain chemical laser initiated by a standing shock wave

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mel'nikov, Igor V.; Stepanov, A. A.; Shcheglov, V. A.

    1994-06-01

    The scaling theory is exploited for a cw chain HF laser initiated by a stationary detonation wave. This provides us with a fast and accurate method of estimating the output parameters of the laser at different compositions of the initial mixture. The comparative analysis to numerical simulation is performed and demonstrates a reasonable degree of accuracy using our method.

  1. Joint Counterair and Theater Missile Defense Doctrine to Defend against Unmanned Aerial Vehicles and Cruise Missiles in Asymmetric Warfare

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-02-12

    state lasers, and a megawatt-class Chemical Oxygen Iodine Laser (COIL) to detect, track, target, and destroy ballistic missiles shortly after launch... disproportionate cost tradeoff between threat weapon systems and the proposed interceptors. With a price tag of over $1M per interceptor such as Patriot

  2. System and method for laser assisted sample transfer to solution for chemical analysis

    DOEpatents

    Van Berkel, Gary J; Kertesz, Vilmos

    2014-01-28

    A system and method for laser desorption of an analyte from a specimen and capturing of the analyte in a suspended solvent to form a testing solution are described. The method can include providing a specimen supported by a desorption region of a specimen stage and desorbing an analyte from a target site of the specimen with a laser beam centered at a radiation wavelength (.lamda.). The desorption region is transparent to the radiation wavelength (.lamda.) and the sampling probe and a laser source emitting the laser beam are on opposite sides of a primary surface of the specimen stage. The system can also be arranged where the laser source and the sampling probe are on the same side of a primary surface of the specimen stage. The testing solution can then be analyzed using an analytical instrument or undergo further processing.

  3. Demonstration of a rapidly-swept external cavity quantum cascade laser for rapid and sensitive quantification of chemical mixtures

    SciTech Connect

    Brumfield, Brian E.; Taubman, Matthew S.; Phillips, Mark C.

    2016-02-13

    A rapidly-swept external cavity quantum cascade laser (ECQCL) system for fast open-path quantification of multiple chemicals and mixtures is presented. The ECQCL system is swept over its entire tuning range (>100 cm-1) at frequencies up to 200 Hz. At 200 Hz the wavelength tuning rate and spectral resolution are 2x104 cm-1/sec and < 0.2 cm-1, respectively. The capability of the current system to quantify changes in chemical concentrations on millesecond timescales is demonstrated at atmospheric pressure using an open-path multi-pass cell. The detection limits for chemicals ranged from ppb to ppm levels depending on the absorption cross-section.

  4. PHYSICAL PROCESSES IN LASER MEDIA: Influence of the chemical composition of the hydrogen-containing component in an RH active medium and of the initiation method on the parameters of a pulsed chemical SF6-RH laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gal', A. V.; Dodonov, A. A.; Rusanov, V. D.; Shiryaevskiĭ, V. L.; Sholin, G. V.

    1992-02-01

    The influence of the composition of the active medium on the lasing characteristics and energy deposition efficiency was studied under conditions of electron-beam and electric-discharge initiation in SF6-H2 and SF6-HI pulsed hydrogen fluoride chemical lasers.The best radiation energy characteristics were achieved for an SF6-HI active medium using electron-beam initiation and for an SF6-H2 active medium when the pump reaction was initiated by a self-sustained volume discharge. The following pulse parameters were obtained for an SF6-HI laser:energy 1.5 J, half-height pulse duration 60 ns,and leading edge duration 20 ns.

  5. Remote explosive and chemical agent detection using broadly tunable mid-infrared external cavity quantum cascade lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rayner, Timothy; Weida, Miles; Pushkarsky, Michael; Day, Timothy

    2007-04-01

    Terrorists both with IEDs and suicide bombers are targeting civilian infrastructures such as transportation systems. Although explosive detection technologies exist and are used effectively in aviation, these technologies do not lend themselves well to protecting open architecture soft targets, as they are focused on a checkpoint form factor that limits throughput. However, remote detection of explosives and other chemicals would enable these kinds of targets to be protected without interrupting the flow of commerce. Tunable mid-IR laser technology offers the opportunity to detect explosives and other chemicals remotely and quickly. Most chemical compounds, including explosives, have their fundamental vibrational modes in the mid-infrared region (3 to 15μm). There are a variety of techniques that focus on examining interactions that have proven effective in the laboratory but could never work in the field due to complexity, size, reliability and cost. Daylight Solutions has solved these problems by integrating quantum cascade gain media into external tunable cavities. This has resulted in miniaturized, broadly tunable mid-IR laser sources. The laser sources have a capability to tune to +/- 5% of their center wavelength, which means they can sweep through an entire absorption spectrum to ensure very good detection and false alarm performance compared with fixed wavelength devices. These devices are also highly portable, operate at room temperature, and generate 10's to 100's of mW in optical power, in pulsed and continuous wave configurations. Daylight Solutions is in the process of developing a variety of standoff explosive and chemical weapon detection systems using this technology.

  6. Injecting parameters design and performance test of the pre-igniter for continuous wave DF/HF chemical lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Bing; Yuan, Shengfu; Yang, Lijia; Fang, Xiaoting

    2014-11-01

    Combustion-driven continuous wave (CW) DF/HF chemical lasers cannot be inflamed successfully sometimes because the spark-plug-igniter is intolerant of ablation especially after long-time operation which deeply affected the reliability of the lasers. In this paper, a pre-igniter is designed as a new igniter system to produce F2 to solve the problem. Based on the engineering practices and the principle that high-intensity spontaneous combustion will happen when mixing F2 and H2. The results of NF3 and H2 reacting with different mole ratios were calculated by CEA software. The operation reliability of the pre-igniter, the mole concentration of F2 in the mixing gas, and the equilibrium temperature were validated by a series of experiments. The experimental results were consistent with the calculated data: with the mole ratio of NF3 to H2 increasing, the equilibrium temperature decreased gradually and finally leveled off; the mole concentration of F2 in the mixing gas first increased and then decreased, achieving the maximum of about 40% when the mole ratio of NF3 to H2 was about 3.2. Experimental results outlined that the pre-igniter performed reliability and could produce high output of F2. The ignition system with a pre-igniter and a spark plug could provide a new alternative for combustion-driven CW DF/HF chemical lasers.

  7. Fabrication of superhydrophilic or superhydrophobic self-cleaning metal surfaces using picosecond laser pulses and chemical fluorination

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Buxiang; Jiang, Gedong; Wang, Wenjun; Mei, Xuesong

    2016-05-01

    Bioinspired superhydrophilic/phobic self-cleaning surfaces have recently drawn a lot of interest in both fundamental and applied research. A hybrid method to produce the self-cleaning property of micro/nanostructured surface using ultra-fast laser pulses followed by chemical fluorination is proposed. The typical micro/nanocomposite structures that form from microporous arrays and microgroove groups have been processed by picosecond laser on titanium alloy surface. The surface hydrophilic/phobic and self-cleaning properties of micro/nanostructures before and after fluorination with fluoroalkyl-silane were investigated using surface contact angle measurements. The results indicate that surface properties change from hydrophilic to hydrophobic after fluorination, and the micro/nanostructured surface with increased roughness contributes to the improvement of surface hydrophobicity. The micro/nanomodification can make the original hydrophilic titanium alloy surface more hydrophilic or superhydrophilic. It also can make an originally hydrophobic fluorinated titanium alloy surface more hydrophobic or superhydrophobic. The produced micro/nanostructured titanium alloy surfaces show excellent self-cleaning properties regardless of the fluorination treatment, although the fluorinated surfaces have slightly better self-cleaning properties. It is found that surface treatment using ultra-fast laser pulses and subsequent chemical fluorination is an effective way to manipulate surface wettability and obtain self-cleaning properties.

  8. Fabrication of silicon nanowire arrays by near-field laser ablation and metal-assisted chemical etching

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brodoceanu, D.; Alhmoud, H. Z.; Elnathan, R.; Delalat, B.; Voelcker, N. H.; Kraus, T.

    2016-02-01

    We present an elegant route for the fabrication of ordered arrays of vertically-aligned silicon nanowires with tunable geometry at controlled locations on a silicon wafer. A monolayer of transparent microspheres convectively assembled onto a gold-coated silicon wafer acts as a microlens array. Irradiation with a single nanosecond laser pulse removes the gold beneath each focusing microsphere, leaving behind a hexagonal pattern of holes in the gold layer. Owing to the near-field effects, the diameter of the holes can be at least five times smaller than the laser wavelength. The patterned gold layer is used as catalyst in a metal-assisted chemical etching to produce an array of vertically-aligned silicon nanowires. This approach combines the advantages of direct laser writing with the benefits of parallel laser processing, yielding nanowire arrays with controlled geometry at predefined locations on the silicon surface. The fabricated VA-SiNW arrays can effectively transfect human cells with a plasmid encoding for green fluorescent protein.

  9. Optical properties of carbon nanostructures produced by laser irradiation on chemically modified multi-walled carbon nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Santiago, Enrique Vigueras; López, Susana Hernández; Camacho López, Marco A.; Contreras, Delfino Reyes; Farías-Mancilla, Rurik; Flores-Gallardo, Sergio G.; Hernández-Escobar, Claudia A.; Zaragoza-Contreras, E. Armando

    2016-10-01

    This research focused on the nanosecond (Nd: YAG-1064 nm) laser pulse effect on the optical and morphological properties of chemically modified multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNT). Two suspensions of MWCNT in tetrahydrofuran (THF) were prepared, one was submitted to laser pulses for 10 min while the other (blank) was only mechanically homogenized during the same time. Following the laser irradiation, the suspension acquired a yellow-amber color, in contrast to the black translucent appearance of the blank. UV-vis spectroscopy confirmed this observation, showing the blank a higher absorption. Additionally, photoluminescence measurements exhibited a broad blue-green emission band both in the blank and irradiated suspension when excited at 369 nm, showing the blank a lower intensity. However, a modification in the excitation wavelength produced a violet to green tuning in the irradiated suspension, which did not occur in the blank. Lastly, the electron microscopy analysis of the treated nanotubes showed the abundant formation of amorphous carbon, nanocages, and nanotube unzipping, exhibiting the intense surface modification produced by the laser pulse. Nanotube surface modification and the coexistence with the new carbon nanostructures were considered as the conductive conditions for optical properties modification.

  10. Detection of chemical changes in bone after irradiation with Er,Cr:YSGG laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benetti, Carolina; Santos, Moises O.; Rabelo, Jose S.; Ana, Patrícia A.; Correa, Paulo R.; Zezell, Denise M.

    2011-03-01

    The use of laser for bone cutting can be more advantageous than the use of drill. However, for a safe clinical application, it is necessary to know the effects of laser irradiation on bone tissues. In this study, the Fourier Transform Infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) was used to verify the molecular and compositional changes promoted by laser irradiation on bone tissue. Bone slabs were obtained from rabbit's tibia and analyzed using ATR-FTIR. After the initial analysis, the samples were irradiated using a pulsed Er,Cr:YSGG laser (2780nm), and analyzed one more time. In order to verify changes due to laser irradiation, the area under phosphate (1300-900cm-1), amides (1680-1200cm-1), water (3600-2400cm-1), and carbonate (around 870cm-1 and between 1600-1300cm-1) bands were calculated, and normalized by phosphate band area (1300-900cm-1). It was observed that Er,Cr:YSGG irradiation promoted a significant decrease in the content of water and amides I and III at irradiated bone, evidencing that laser procedure caused an evaporation of the organic content and changed the collagen structure, suggesting that these changes may interfere with the healing process. In this way, these changes should be considered in a clinical application of laser irradiation in surgeries.

  11. X-Ray Laser Gets First Real-Time Snapshots of a Chemical Flipping a Biological Switch

    ScienceCinema

    None

    2016-12-02

    Scientists have used the powerful X-ray laser at the Department of Energy’s SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory to make the first snapshots of a chemical interaction between two biomolecules – one that flips an RNA “switch” that regulates production of proteins, the workhorse molecules of life. The results, published in Nature, show the game-changing potential of X-ray free-electron lasers, or XFELs, for studying RNA, which guides protein manufacturing in the cell, serves as the primary genetic material in retroviruses such as HIV and also plays a role in most forms of cancer.

  12. Design and chemical synthesis of iodine-containing molecules for application to solar-pumped I* lasers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shiner, C. S.

    1985-01-01

    This work is directed toward the design and chemical synthesis of new media for solar-pumped I* lasers. In view of the desirability of preparing a perfluoroalkyl iodide absorbing strongly at 300 nm, the relationship betwen perfluoroalkyl iodide structure and the corresponding absorption wavelength was reexamined. Analysis of existing data suggests that, in this family of compounds, the absorption maximum shifts to longer wavelength, as desired, as the C-I bond in the lasant is progressively weakened. Weakening of the C-I bond correlates, in turn, with increasing stability of the perfluoroalkyl radical formed upon photodissociation of the iodide. The extremely promising absorption characteristics of perfluoro-tert-butyl iodide can be accounted for on this basis. A new technique of diode laser probing to obtain precise yields of I* atoms in photodissociation was also developed.

  13. Experimental study and chemical application of GaAs semiconductor laser treating trigeminal neuralgia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qiu, Ke-Qum; Cao, Shu-Chen; Wang, Hu-Zhong; Wang, Ke-Ning; Xiao, Ton-Ha; Shen, Ke-Wei

    1993-03-01

    GaAs semiconductor laser was used to treat trigeminal neuralgia with an effective rate of 91.1%, and no side effects were found in 67 cases. Changes in and the recovery of the trigeminal nerve cell were studied with light and electromicroscope. Discussed in this article are the time length and quantity of laser treatment with low power. Experimental study and clinical application of the GaAs semiconductor laser have been carried out in our department since 1987. One-hundred-fifteen patients with various diseases in the maxillofacial region (including 67 cases of trigeminal neuralgia) have been treated with satisfactory effects and without any side-effects. The wavelength of the laser is 904 mu, the largest pulse length is 200 mu, and the average power is 2000 HZ.

  14. SITE - EMERGING TECHNOLOGIES: LASER INDUCED PHOTO- CHEMICAL OXIDATIVE DESTRUCTION OF TOXIC ORGANICS IN LEACHATES AND GROUNDWATERS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The technology described in this report has been developed under the Emerging Technology Program of the Superfund Innovative Technology Evaluation (SITE) Program to photochemically oxidize organic compounds in wastewater by applying ultraviolet radiation using an excimer laser. T...

  15. Excimer laser ablation mass spectrometry of inorganic solids: Chemical, matrix, and sampling effects on polyatomic ion yields

    SciTech Connect

    Gibson, J.K.

    1995-07-01

    Positive ions formed directly by excimer laser ablation in vacuum of several lanthanide (Ln) and transition metal solid materials---including Ln{sub 2}O{sub 3}, Ln{sub 2}S{sub 3}, LnF{sub 3}, Ta{sub 2}O{sub 5}, ZrO{sub 2}, TiO, and TiO{sub 2}---were identified by time-of-flight mass spectrometry. Variations in ion yields were investigated as a function of the composition of the precursor material, laser irradiance, and ion sampling delay after ablation. The compositions of the observed polyatomic ions reflected the distinctive chemistries of the metal constituents, but the ion yield distributions were not generally indicative of the particular chemical/valence constitution of the target material. For example, the yield of CeO{sup +} relative to Ce{sup +} was substantially greater from the trivalent cerium oxide, Ce{sub 2}(WO{sub 4}){sub 3}(s), than from tetravalent CeO{sub 2}(s). Observed ion distributions apparently reflected the chemical composition of the ablation plume and the degree of gas-phase recombination therein. The observed abundances of polyatomic ions were found to correlate well with their estimated bond strengths. Further obscuring the chemical composition of the progenitor, minor changes in ablation, and sampling parameters---especially irradiance and sampling delay---were often manifested as significant variations in relative ion intensities. {copyright} {ital 1995} {ital American} {ital Vacuum} {ital Society}

  16. Microstructure, microhardness, phase analysis and chemical composition of laser remelted FeB-Fe2B surface layers produced on Vanadis-6 steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bartkowska, Aneta; Swadźba, Radosław; Popławski, Mikołaj; Bartkowski, Dariusz

    2016-12-01

    The paper presents the study results of the diffusion boronized layer and their laser modification. Diffusion boronized processes were carried out on Vanadis-6 steel at 900 °C for 5 h. Boronized layers were characterized by dual-phase microstructure consisting of iron borides having a microhardness in the range from 1800 to 1400 HV. The laser heat treatment was carried out using CO2 laser after diffusion boronizing process. The research goals of this paper was analysis of microstructure, microhardness as well as phase and chemical composition of boronized layers after laser modification. Microstructure of boronized layer after laser modification consisted of remelted zone, heat affected zone and substrate. Remelted zone was characterized by microstructure consisted of boron-martensite eutectic. In this zone, the phases of borides and carbides were detected. Boronized layers after laser modification were characterized by the mild gradient of microhardness from surface to the substrate.

  17. Identification of vapor-phase chemical warfare agent simulants and rocket fuels using laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Stearns, Jaime A.; McElman, Sarah E.; Dodd, James A.

    2010-05-01

    Application of laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) to the identification of security threats is a growing area of research. This work presents LIBS spectra of vapor-phase chemical warfare agent simulants and typical rocket fuels. A large dataset of spectra was acquired using a variety of gas mixtures and background pressures and processed using partial least squares analysis. The five compounds studied were identified with a 99% success rate by the best method. The temporal behavior of the emission lines as a function of chamber pressure and gas mixture was also investigated, revealing some interesting trends that merit further study.

  18. Ion Yields in the Coupled Chemical and Physical Dynamics Model of Matrix-Assisted Laser Desorption/Ionization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knochenmuss, Richard

    2015-08-01

    The Coupled Chemical and Physical Dynamics (CPCD) model of matrix assisted laser desorption ionization has been restricted to relative rather than absolute yield comparisons because the rate constant for one step in the model was not accurately known. Recent measurements are used to constrain this constant, leading to good agreement with experimental yield versus fluence data for 2,5-dihydroxybenzoic acid. Parameters for alpha-cyano-4-hydroxycinnamic acid are also estimated, including contributions from a possible triplet state. The results are compared with the polar fluid model, the CPCD is found to give better agreement with the data.

  19. Accumulation boundaries: codimension-two accumulation of accumulations in phase diagrams of semiconductor lasers, electric circuits, atmospheric and chemical oscillators.

    PubMed

    Bonatto, Cristian; Gallas, Jason Alfredo Carlson

    2008-02-28

    We report high-resolution phase diagrams for several familiar dynamical systems described by sets of ordinary differential equations: semiconductor lasers; electric circuits; Lorenz-84 low-order atmospheric circulation model; and Rössler and chemical oscillators. All these systems contain chaotic phases with highly complicated and interesting accumulation boundaries, curves where networks of stable islands of regular oscillations with ever-increasing periodicities accumulate systematically. The experimental exploration of such codimension-two boundaries characterized by the presence of infinite accumulation of accumulations is feasible with existing technology for some of these systems.

  20. Lasers.

    PubMed

    Passeron, T

    2012-12-01

    Lasers are a very effective approach for treating many hyperpigmented lesions. They are the gold standard treatment for actinic lentigos and dermal hypermelanocytosis, such as Ota nevus. Becker nevus, hyperpigmented mosaicisms, and lentigines can also be successfully treated with lasers, but they could be less effective and relapses can be observed. However, lasers cannot be proposed for all types of hyperpigmentation. Thus, freckles and café-au-lait macules should not be treated as the relapses are nearly constant. Due to its complex pathophysiology, melasma has a special place in hyperpigmented dermatoses. Q-switched lasers (using standard parameters or low fluency) should not be used because of consistent relapses and the high risk of post-inflammatory hyperpigmentation. Paradoxically, targeting the vascular component of the melasma lesion with lasers could have a beneficial effect. However, these results have yet to be confirmed. In all cases, a precise diagnosis of the type of hyperpigmentation is mandatory before any laser treatment, and the limits and the potential side effects of the treatment must be clearly explained to patients.

  1. [Lasers].

    PubMed

    Passeron, T

    2012-11-01

    Lasers are a very effective approach for treating many hyperpigmented lesions. They are the gold standard treatment for actinic lentigos and dermal hypermelanocytosis, such as Ota nevus. Becker nevus, hyperpigmented mosaicisms, and lentigines can also be successfully treated with lasers, but they could be less effective and relapses can be observed. However, lasers cannot be proposed for all types of hyperpigmentation. Thus, freckles and café-au-lait macules should not be treated as the relapses are nearly constant. Due to its complex pathophysiology, melasma has a special place in hyperpigmented dermatoses. Q-switched lasers (using standard parameters or low fluency) should not be used because of consistent relapses and the high risk of post-inflammatory hyperpigmentation. Paradoxically, targeting the vascular component of the melasma lesion with lasers could have a beneficial effect. However, these results have yet to be confirmed. In all cases, a precise diagnosis of the type of hyperpigmentation is mandatory before any laser treatment, and the limits and the potential side effects of the treatment must be clearly explained to patients.

  2. Chemical-free inactivated whole influenza virus vaccine prepared by ultrashort pulsed laser treatment

    PubMed Central

    Tsen, Shaw-Wei David; Donthi, Nisha; La, Victor; Hsieh, Wen-Han; Li, Yen-Der; Knoff, Jayne; Chen, Alexander; Wu, Tzyy-Choou; Hung, Chien-Fu; Achilefu, Samuel; Tsen, Kong-Thon

    2014-01-01

    Abstract. There is an urgent need for rapid methods to develop vaccines in response to emerging viral pathogens. Whole inactivated virus (WIV) vaccines represent an ideal strategy for this purpose; however, a universal method for producing safe and immunogenic inactivated vaccines is lacking. Conventional pathogen inactivation methods such as formalin, heat, ultraviolet light, and gamma rays cause structural alterations in vaccines that lead to reduced neutralizing antibody specificity, and in some cases, disastrous T helper type 2-mediated immune pathology. We have evaluated the potential of a visible ultrashort pulsed (USP) laser method to generate safe and immunogenic WIV vaccines without adjuvants. Specifically, we demonstrate that vaccination of mice with laser-inactivated H1N1 influenza virus at about a 10-fold lower dose than that required using conventional formalin-inactivated influenza vaccines results in protection against lethal H1N1 challenge in mice. The virus, inactivated by the USP laser irradiation, has been shown to retain its surface protein structure through hemagglutination assay. Unlike conventional inactivation methods, laser treatment did not generate carbonyl groups in protein, thereby reducing the risk of adverse vaccine-elicited T helper type 2 responses. Therefore, USP laser treatment is an attractive potential strategy to generate WIV vaccines with greater potency and safety than vaccines produced by current inactivation techniques. PMID:25423046

  3. Chemical-free inactivated whole influenza virus vaccine prepared by ultrashort pulsed laser treatment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsen, Shaw-Wei David; Donthi, Nisha; La, Victor; Hsieh, Wen-Han; Li, Yen-Der; Knoff, Jayne; Chen, Alexander; Wu, Tzyy-Choou; Hung, Chien-Fu; Achilefu, Samuel; Tsen, Kong-Thon

    2015-05-01

    There is an urgent need for rapid methods to develop vaccines in response to emerging viral pathogens. Whole inactivated virus (WIV) vaccines represent an ideal strategy for this purpose; however, a universal method for producing safe and immunogenic inactivated vaccines is lacking. Conventional pathogen inactivation methods such as formalin, heat, ultraviolet light, and gamma rays cause structural alterations in vaccines that lead to reduced neutralizing antibody specificity, and in some cases, disastrous T helper type 2-mediated immune pathology. We have evaluated the potential of a visible ultrashort pulsed (USP) laser method to generate safe and immunogenic WIV vaccines without adjuvants. Specifically, we demonstrate that vaccination of mice with laser-inactivated H1N1 influenza virus at about a 10-fold lower dose than that required using conventional formalin-inactivated influenza vaccines results in protection against lethal H1N1 challenge in mice. The virus, inactivated by the USP laser irradiation, has been shown to retain its surface protein structure through hemagglutination assay. Unlike conventional inactivation methods, laser treatment did not generate carbonyl groups in protein, thereby reducing the risk of adverse vaccine-elicited T helper type 2 responses. Therefore, USP laser treatment is an attractive potential strategy to generate WIV vaccines with greater potency and safety than vaccines produced by current inactivation techniques.

  4. Raman Spectroscopy Using a Green HeNe Laser: A Chemical Physics Laboratory Experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Atkinson, S. N.; Berger, B. K.; Dolson, D. A.; Engel, D. M.; Henderson, J. L.

    1999-10-01

    Although the green HeNe laser has been commercially available for about twenty years, it has been ignored in the development of laser experiments in college physics and physical chemistry laboratory courses. The green HeNe laser (543.365 nm) combines the wavelength advantage of the Ar+ and Nd:YAG lasers while retaining the cost advantage and ease of operation that has made the red HeNe a favorite in teaching laboratories. Raman spectroscopy is rarely explored in teaching laboratories, largely because of the belief that expensive equipment is required and that signals will be too low. Here we present the Raman spectra of several neat organic liquids and of aqueous ions that were obtained using a 2 mW green HeNe laser as the excitation source. The spectra are generally of high quality and dispel the myth of poor signal levels. Simple plastic film polarizers have performed adequately in obtaining polarized spectra. Suggestions for laboratory activities are presented.

  5. Development of Efficient Mid-IR Interband Cascade Lasers for Chemical Sensing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yang, Rui Q.; Hill, Cory J.; Yang, Baohua; Qiu, Yueming; Jan, Darrell

    2006-01-01

    Significant progress has been made: Above room temperature (up to 350K) pulsed operation has been demonstrated. CW operation temperature has been raised up to 237 K. DFB IC lasers have been applied for the detection of trace gases such as CH4, HCl, and H2CO. Devices have been operated continuously over several hundred hours without degradation. Main challenge remains for many potential applications of ICLs. CW operation at room temperature and above with significant output powers. There is still significant room for improvement: Laser design and material quality - many parameters have not been optimized. Device fabrication and thermal management (passivation, better mounting, etc.). Significantly higher output power can be achieved with laser arrays.

  6. Systems and methods for laser assisted sample transfer to solution for chemical analysis

    DOEpatents

    Van Berkel, Gary J.; Kertesz, Vilmos; Ovchinnikova, Olga S.

    2014-06-03

    Systems and methods are described for laser ablation of an analyte from a specimen and capturing of the analyte in a dispensed solvent to form a testing solution. A solvent dispensing and extraction system can form a liquid microjunction with the specimen. The solvent dispensing and extraction system can include a surface sampling probe. The laser beam can be directed through the surface sampling probe. The surface sampling probe can also serve as an atomic force microscopy probe. The surface sampling probe can form a seal with the specimen. The testing solution including the analyte can then be analyzed using an analytical instrument or undergo further processing.

  7. Systems and methods for laser assisted sample transfer to solution for chemical analysis

    DOEpatents

    Van Berkel, Gary J; Kertesz, Vilmos; Ovchinnikova, Olga S

    2013-08-27

    Systems and methods are described for laser ablation of an analyte from a specimen and capturing of the analyte in a dispensed solvent to form a testing solution. A solvent dispensing and extraction system can form a liquid microjunction with the specimen. The solvent dispensing and extraction system can include a surface sampling probe. The laser beam can be directed through the surface sampling probe. The surface sampling probe can also serve as an atomic force microscopy probe. The surface sampling probe can form a seal with the specimen. The testing solution including the analyte can then be analyzed using an analytical instrument or undergo further processing.

  8. Systems and methods for laser assisted sample transfer to solution for chemical analysis

    DOEpatents

    Van Berkel, Gary J.; Kertesz, Vilmos; Ovchinnikova, Olga S.

    2015-09-29

    Systems and methods are described for laser ablation of an analyte from a specimen and capturing of the analyte in a dispensed solvent to form a testing solution. A solvent dispensing and extraction system can form a liquid microjunction with the specimen. The solvent dispensing and extraction system can include a surface sampling probe. The laser beam can be directed through the surface sampling probe. The surface sampling probe can also serve as an atomic force microscopy probe. The surface sampling probe can form a seal with the specimen. The testing solution including the analyte can then be analyzed using an analytical instrument or undergo further processing.

  9. Simulations of Erosion/Corrosion Surface Chemical Reactions with a Laser Beam,

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1983-11-01

    wt% in alpha iron at 875°C,s and it may be SIMS and Metallographic Observations substantially lower.9 Consequently, the high sur- face concentration of...surfaces as a result of air contamina- is of the order of 0.004 wt% in alpha iron at tion than by laser-pulsing in nitrogen and ammo- 873°C, 0.025 wt% in...that may have occurred during laser-pulsing pre- and alpha iron .1 4 sented an interesting predicament. Evidence of 44 The extensive oxidation and

  10. Toward the Realization of a Compact Chemical Sensor Platform using Quantum Cascade Lasers

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-09-01

    integration of photoacoustic detection with a microfabricated chemical reactor system. JMEMS 10, 232 (2001). [9] S. L. Firebaugh, K. F. Jensen, M. A...ARL-RP-0550 ● SEP 2015 US Army Research Laboratory Toward the Realization of a Compact Chemical Sensor Platform using Quantum...ARL-RP-0550 ● SEP 2015 US Army Research Laboratory Toward the Realization of a Compact Chemical Sensor Platform using Quantum Cascade

  11. Chemically assisted ion beam etching of laser diode facets on nonpolar and semipolar orientations of GaN

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuritzky, L. Y.; Becerra, D. L.; Saud Abbas, A.; Nedy, J.; Nakamura, S.; DenBaars, S. P.; Cohen, D. A.

    2016-07-01

    We demonstrate a vertical (<1° departure) and smooth (2.0 nm root mean square line-edge roughness (LER)) etch by chemically assisted Ar ion beam etching (CAIBE) in Cl2 chemistry that is suitable for forming laser diode (LD) facets on nonpolar and semipolar oriented III-nitride devices. The etch profiles were achieved with photoresist masks and optimized CAIBE chamber conditions including the platen tilt angle and Cl2 flow rate. Co-loaded studies showed similar etch rates of ˜60 nm min-1 for (20\\bar{2}\\bar{1}),(20\\bar{2}1), and m-plane orientations. The etched surfaces of LD facets on these orientations are chemically dissimilar (Ga-rich versus N-rich), but were visually indistinguishable, thus confirming the negligible orientation dependence of the etch. Continuous-wave blue LDs were fabricated on the semipolar (20\\bar{2}\\bar{1}) plane to compare CAIBE and reactive ion etch (RIE) facet processes. The CAIBE process resulted in LDs with lower threshold current densities due to reduced parasitic mirror loss compared with the RIE process. The LER, degree of verticality, and model of the 1D vertical laser mode were used to calculate a maximum uncoated facet reflection of 17% (94% of the nominal) for the CAIBE facet. The results demonstrate the suitability of CAIBE for forming high quality facets for high performance nonpolar and semipolar III-N LDs.

  12. Selective Reactivity, Ultrafast Energy Transfer and the Development of Chemically Pumped Visible Lasers

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1992-11-01

    Wuppertal, Germany) using high resolution Fourier Transform spectroscopy. The two newly discovered states would appear to play a key role in the recent...Crestwind Drive Rancljo Pglos Verdle$. CA. 90274 References 1. (a) Electronic Transition Lasers I, edited by J. I. Steinfeld (MIT Press, Cambridge

  13. Highly uniform and reproducible vertical-cavity surface emitting lasers grown by metalorganic chemical vapor deposition

    SciTech Connect

    Hou, H.Q.; Chui, H.C.; Choquette, K.D.; Hammons, B.E.; Breiland, W.G.; Geib, K.M.

    1996-01-01

    We show that the uniformity of the lasing wavelength of vertical-cavity surface emitting lasers (VCSELs) can be as good as {plus_minus}0.3% across a entire 3 in. wafer in MOCVD growth with a similar run-to-run reproducibility.

  14. Relationship between the chemical and morphological characteristics of human dentin after Er:YAG laser irradiation.

    PubMed

    Soares, Luís Eduardo Silva; Martin, Ovídio César Lavesa; Moriyama, Lilian Tan; Kurachi, Cristina; Martin, Airton Abrahão

    2013-06-01

    The effects of laser etching on dentin are studied by microenergy-dispersive x-ray fluorescence spectrometry (μ-EDXRF) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) to establish the correlation of data obtained. Fifteen human third molars are prepared, baseline μ-EDXRF mappings are performed, and ten specimens are selected. Each specimen received four treatments: acid etching (control-CG) or erbium:yttrium-aluminum-garnet (Er:YAG) laser irradiation (I-100 mJ, II-160 mJ, and III-220 mJ), and maps are done again. The Ca and P content are significantly reduced after acid etching (p<0.0001) and increased after laser irradiation with 220 mJ (Ca: p<0.0153 and P: p=0.0005). The Ca/P ratio increased and decreased after CG (p=0.0052) and GI (p=0.0003) treatments, respectively. CG treatment resulted in lower inorganic content (GI: p<0.05, GII: p<0.01, and GIII: p<0.01) and higher Ca/P ratios than laser etching (GI: p<0.001, GII: p<0.01, and GIII: p<0.01). The SEM photomicrographies revealed open (CG) and partially open dentin tubules (GI, GII, and GIII). μ-EDXRF mappings illustrated that acid etching created homogeneous distribution of inorganic content over dentin. Er:YAG laser etching (220 mJ) produced irregular elemental distribution and changed the stoichiometric proportions of hydroxyapatite, as showed by an increase of mineral content. Decreases and increases of mineral content in the μ-EDXRF images are correlated to holes and mounds, respectively, as found in SEM images.

  15. Characterization of Nonpolar Lipids and Selected Steroids by Using Laser-Induced Acoustic Desorption/Chemical Ionization, Atmospheric Pressure Chemical Ionization, and Electrospray Ionization Mass Spectrometry†

    PubMed Central

    Jin, Zhicheng; Daiya, Shivani; Kenttämaa, Hilkka I.

    2011-01-01

    Laser-induced acoustic desorption (LIAD) combined with ClMn(H2O)+ chemical ionization (CI) was tested for the analysis of nonpolar lipids and selected steroids in a Fourier-transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometer (FT-ICR). The nonpolar lipids studied, cholesterol, 5α-cholestane, cholesta-3,5-diene, squalene, and β-carotene, were found to solely form the desired water replacement product (adduct-H2O) with the ClMn(H2O)+ ions. The steroids, androsterone, dehydroepiandrosterone (DHEA), estrone, estradiol, and estriol, also form abundant adduct-H2O ions, but less abundant adduct-2H2O ions were also observed. Neither (+)APCI nor (+)ESI can ionize the saturated hydrocarbon lipid, cholestane. APCI successfully ionizes the unsaturated hydrocarbon lipids to form exclusively the intact protonated analytes. However, it causes extensive fragmentation for cholesterol and the steroids. The worst case is cholesterol that does not produce any stable protonated molecules. On the other hand, ESI cannot ionize any of the hydrocarbon analytes, saturated or unsaturated. However, ESI can be used to protonate the oxygen-containing analytes with substantially less fragmentation than for APCI in all cases except for cholesterol and estrone. In conclusion, LIAD/ClMn(H2O)+ chemical ionization is superior over APCI and ESI for the mass spectrometric characterization of underivatized nonpolar lipids and steroids. PMID:21528012

  16. A mechanism for the formation of the active medium of a chemical laser in the presence of exploding wires in an oxygen atmosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barmashenko, B. D.; Kochelap, V. A.; Shvarchuk, E. A.; Shpak, M. T.

    1985-07-01

    The dynamic characteristics of chemical infrared lasers (IR-lasers) are analyzed, in connection with a new pumping mechanism, electrical wire explosion (EWE). The mechanism occurs during high speed spraying of molten metal droplets, and is followed by combustion in an oxygen atmosphere. Experimental results are presented for wire explosion of Li in a Cl2 atmosphere. Criteria are given which demonstrate the amplification of IR radiation due to the combustion of Li droplets in an oxygen atmosphere.

  17. Operating experience with a high-throughput jet generator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McDermott, William E.; Stephens, John C.; Vetrovec, John; Dickerson, Robert A.

    1997-04-01

    Over the last several years, Rocketdyne has conducted a number of experiments on advanced jet generators. Both cross flow jet generator and counter flow jet generators have been tested. We have made laser power measurements at our Continuous Wave Chemical Laser Facility (CWLL) and at the Air Force Phillips Laboratory RADICL test facility. A test there resulted in a measured chemical efficiency of 29.6%. This is the highest efficiency reported for a supersonic oxygen-iodine chemical laser.

  18. Study of the Characteristics of a Laser Based on the Cr2+-Ion Doped ZnS Polycrystal Obtained by the Method of Chemical Vapor Deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Egorov, A. S.; Savikin, A. P.; Eremeikin, O. N.; Ikonnikov, V. B.; Gavrishchuk, E. M.; Savin, D. V.

    2016-01-01

    We study the lasing characteristics of the Cr2+:ZnS-crystal laser pumped by the pulsed-periodic Tm3+:YLF laser, as well as the lasing polarization properties. The Cr2+:ZnS sample was obtained by chemical vapor deposition of zinc sulfide doped by the chrome ions in the hightemperature isostatic processing. Total efficiency of the pump-power conversion to lasing power at a level of 33% was reached, which corresponds to a laser differential efficiency of about 55% in terms of the absorbed power.

  19. Quantum cascade laser based active hyperspectral imaging for standoff detection of chemicals on surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hugger, S.; Fuchs, F.; Jarvis, J.; Yang, Q. K.; Rattunde, M.; Ostendorf, R.; Schilling, C.; Driad, R.; Bronner, W.; Aidam, R.; Wagner, J.; Tybussek, T.; Rieblinger, K.

    2016-02-01

    We employ active hyperspectral imaging using tunable mid-infrared (MIR) quantum cascade lasers for contactless identification of solid and liquid contaminations on surfaces. By collecting the backscattered laser radiation with a camera, a hyperspectral data cube, containing the spatially resolved spectral information of the scene is obtained. Data is analyzed using appropriate algorithms to find the target substances even on substrates with a priori unknown spectra. Eye-save standoff detection of residues of explosives and precursors over extended distances is demonstrated and the main purpose of our system. However, it can be applied to any substance with characteristic reflectance / absorbance spectrum. As an example, we present first results of monitoring food quality by distinguishing fresh and mold contaminated peanuts by their MIR backscattering spectrum.

  20. Advanced Phase Array Chemical Energy (APACHE) Laser Program; Final Report, Volume 2

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-11-02

    detrimental feedback along the beacon channel to the MO. The six elements indicated above were investigated initially under PALS, and subsequently became... feedback interference to the laser. The performance requirements for isolation are covered in detail in Section 2.11. 01-171-90 2.2-4 • 2.3 SYSTEM...performance curves (derived analytically and validated experimentally, see Section 6, Volume 1) for the oscillator with feedback , the amplifier power

  1. Laser based in-situ and standoff detection of chemical warfare agents and explosives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patel, C. Kumar N.

    2009-09-01

    Laser based detection of gaseous, liquid and solid residues and trace amounts has been developed ever since lasers were invented. However, the lack of availability of reasonably high power tunable lasers in the spectral regions where the relevant targets can be interrogated as well as appropriate techniques for high sensitivity, high selectivity detection has hampered the practical exploitation of techniques for the detection of targets important for homeland security and defense applications. Furthermore, emphasis has been on selectivity without particular attention being paid to the impact of interfering species on the quality of detection. Having high sensitivity is necessary but not a sufficient condition. High sensitivity assures a high probability of detection of the target species. However, it is only recently that the sensor community has come to recognize that any measure of probability of detection must be associated with a probability of false alarm, if it is to have any value as a measure of performance. This is especially true when one attempts to compare performance characteristics of different sensors based on different physical principles. In this paper, I will provide a methodology for characterizing the performance of sensors utilizing optical absorption measurement techniques. However, the underlying principles are equally application to all other sensors. While most of the current progress in high sensitivity, high selectivity detection of CWAs, TICs and explosives involve identifying and quantifying the target species in-situ, there is an urgent need for standoff detection of explosives from safe distances. I will describe our results on CO2 and quantum cascade laser (QCL) based photoacoustic sensors for the detection of CWAs, TICs and explosives as well the very new results on stand-off detection of explosives at distances up to 150 meters. The latter results are critically important for assuring safety of military personnel in battlefield

  2. Laser-Shot-Induced Chemical Reactions inside Nanotubes: a TDDFT investigation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Hong; Miyamoto, Yoshiyuki; Rubio, Angel

    2011-03-01

    We present the application of the time-dependent density functional theory (TDDFT) on ultrafast laser pulse which induces dynamics in molecules encapsulated by a nanotube. A strong laser pulse polarized perpendicular to the tube axis induces a giant bond-stretch of an HCl molecule inside both C and BN nanotubes. Depending on the initial orientation of the HCl molecule, the subsequent laser-induced dynamics is different. We also observed a radial motion of the nanotube and vacancies appear on the tube wall when the HCl is perpendicular to tube axis. Furthermore, the disintegration of HCl molecules took place when their molecular axis tilted to tube axis. These simulations are important to analyze light-induced nanochemistry and manipulation of nanostructures encapsulated in organic and inorganic nanotubes. The computational scheme used in present work was a combination of the molecular dynamics and real-time propagation of electron wave functions under presence of strong optical field [2,3]. The energy conservation rule was checked to monitor the numerical stability.

  3. Kr/sup +/ laser-induced chemical vapor deposition of W

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, G.Q.; Szoerenyi, T.; Baeuerle, D.

    1987-07-15

    Kr/sup +/ laser-induced pyrolytic direct writing of W stripes by H/sub 2/ reduction of WF/sub 6/ has been investigated. The reproducibility of the process and the morphology and electrical properties of deposits depend heavily on the partial pressures of both WF/sub 6/ and H/sub 2/; the best results have been obtained with p(WF/sub 6/) = 5 mbar and 100 mbarless than or equal top(H/sub 2/)less than or equal to800 mbar. For a laser focus of 2w/sub 0/ = 7 ..mu..m and laser powers between 30 and 200 mW, the widths of stripes varied between 1.5 and 15 ..mu..m with corresponding thicknesses between 0.1 to 3 ..mu..m. The width of stripes is independent of the scanning speed within the range 20 ..mu..m/sless than or equal toV/sub s/ less than or equal to400 ..mu..m/s. The electrical resistivities of these stripes were about a factor of 1.3--2.3 larger than the bulk value.

  4. Demonstration of a rapidly-swept external cavity quantum cascade laser for rapid and sensitive quantification of chemical mixtures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brumfield, B. E.; Taubman, M. S.; Phillips, M. C.

    2016-02-01

    A rapidly-swept external-cavity quantum cascade laser with an open-path Herriott cell is used to quantify gas-phase chemical mixtures of D2O and HDO at an update rate of 40 Hz (25 ms measurement time). The chemical mixtures were generated by evaporating D2O liquid near the open-path Herriott cell, allowing the H/D exchange reaction with ambient H2O to produce HDO. Fluctuations in the ratio of D2O and HDO on timescales of < 1 s due to the combined effects of plume transport and the H/D exchange chemical reaction are observed. Based on a noise equivalent concentration analysis of the current system, detection limits of 147.0 ppbv and 151.6 ppbv in a 25 ms measurement time are estimated for D2O and HDO respectively with a 127 m optical path. These detection limits are reduced to 23.0 and 24.0 ppbv with a 1 s averaging time for D2O and HDO respectively. Detection limits < 200 ppbv are also estimated for N2O, F134A, CH4, Acetone, and SO2 for a 25 ms measurement time.

  5. Analyzing the Chemical and Spectral Effects of Pulsed Laser Irradiation to Simulate Space Weathering of a Carbonaceous Chondrite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thompson, M. S.; Keller, L. P.; Christoffersen, R.; Loeffler, M. J.; Morris, R. V.; Graff, T. G.; Rahman, Z.

    2017-01-01

    Space weathering processes alter the chemical composition, microstructure, and spectral characteristics of material on the surfaces of airless bodies. The mechanisms driving space weathering include solar wind irradiation and the melting, vaporization and recondensation effects associated with micrometeorite impacts e.g., [1]. While much work has been done to understand space weathering of lunar and ordinary chondritic materials, the effects of these processes on hydrated carbonaceous chondrites is poorly understood. Analysis of space weathering of carbonaceous materials will be critical for understanding the nature of samples returned by upcoming missions targeting primitive, organic-rich bodies (e.g., OSIRIS-REx and Hayabusa 2). Recent experiments have shown the spectral properties of carbonaceous materials and associated minerals are altered by simulated weathering events e.g., [2-5]. However, the resulting type of alteration i.e., reddening vs. bluing of the reflectance spectrum, is not consistent across all experiments [2-5]. In addition, the microstructural and crystal chemical effects of many of these experiments have not been well characterized, making it difficult to attribute spectral changes to specific mineralogical or chemical changes in the samples. Here we report results of a pulsed laser irradiation experiment on a chip of the Murchison CM2 carbonaceous chondrite to simulate micrometeorite impact processing.

  6. 2035 Air Dominance Requirements for State-On-State Conflict

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-02-16

    within range).17 The US has successfully demonstrated a megawatt-class, Chemical Oxygen Iodine Laser.18 Current assessments reveal a 100 kilowatt...the precise, coordinated application of the various elements of air, space and surface power to bring disproportionate pressure on enemy leaders to

  7. Chemical and mineralogical analyses of planetary rocks using a laser ablation mass spectrometer for in situ space research

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brigitte Neuland, Maike; Mezger, Klaus; Riedo, Andreas; Tulej, Marek; Wurz, Peter

    2015-04-01

    The context chemical analysis is of considerable importance in space research. High resolution in situ studies of planetary materials can yield important information on surface heterogeneity, basic grain mineralogy and chemical composition of surface and subsurface. In turn, these data are the basis for our understanding of the physical and chemical processes which led to the formation and alteration of planetary material [1] [2]. A highly heterogeneous sample of Allende meteorite, representative for extraterrestrial material, is investigated by LMS, a miniature laser ablation mass spectrometer designed for space research [3]. In the current setup a fs-laser ablation ion source is applied, allowing chemical analysis with lateral resolution of about 10-15 μm and sub-micrometre depth resolution [4]. The reflectron TOF mass analyser is used to measure elemental and isotopic composition of the sampled surface. The LMS instrument supports mass resolution 400 and dynamic range of 108 [5]. In the current studies with the fs-ablation ion source significant improvements in the detection efficiency of several metals e.g., Ni, Co, and non-metals e.g., Si, P, S and O, was achieved comparing to our previous setup [6]. Also the values of sensitivity coefficients for these elements are determined to be close to one, which resulted in the substantial improvements of the quantitative element analysis of the sample. Since the ablation crater depth is expected to be about 1 nm/laser shot also the possible changes of the main element or isotope distribution in depth can be analysed to assess their influence on the mineralogical analysis [7]. Several areas on an Allende sample were investigated and the chemical composition across the surface was determined from the mass spectrometric analysis. Also accurate isotope analysis could be conducted for most of main elements with sufficiently high signal to noise ratio. Correlation of elements was conducted and yielded mineralogical maps

  8. Laser-induced Fluorescence Spectroscopy for applications in chemical sensing and optical refrigeration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumi Barimah, Eric

    Laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) is an innovative technique that has been used as a method for fast elemental analysis in real time. Conventional ultraviolet-visible (UV-VIS) LIBS has been applied to detect the elemental composition of different materials, including explosives, pharmaceutical drugs, and biological samples. The extension of conventional LIBS to the infrared region (˜1-12 mum) promises to provide additional information on molecular emission signatures due to rotational-vibrational transitions. In this research, a pulsed Nd: YAG laser operating at 1064 nm was focused onto several sodium compounds (NaCl, NaClO3, Na2CO3 and NaClO4) and potassium compounds (KCl, KClO3, K2CO3 and KClO4) to produce an intense plasma at the target surface. Several distinct infrared (IR) atomic emission signatures were observed from all sodium and potassium containing compounds. The atomic emission lines observed from the investigated samples matched assigned transitions of neutral sodium and potassium atoms published in the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) atomic database. In addition to the intense atomic lines, the rst evidence of molecular LIBS emission structures were observed at ˜10.0 m in KClO3 and NaClO3 for the chlorate anion (ClO3 --1), at ˜6.7 to 8.0 mum in KNO3 and NaNO 3 for the nitrate anion (NO3--1 ), ˜8.0 to 10.0 mum in KClO4 and NaClO4 for perchlorate anion (ClO4--1 ), and ˜6.88 mum and 11.53 mum in Na2CO3 for the carbonate anion (CO3--1 ). The observed molecular emission showed strong correlation with the conventional Fourier Transform Infrared Spectrometry (FTIR) absorption spectra of the investigated samples. IR LIBS was also applied to determine the limit of detection (LOD) for the perchlorate anion in KClO4 using the 8.0 -11.0 mum IR-LIBS emission band. The calibration curve of ClO4 in KClO4 was constructed using peak and integrated emission intensities for known concentrations of mixed KClO4/NH4NO3 samples. The

  9. Resonant laser ablation ion trap mass spectrometry -- Recent applications for chemical analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Gill, C.G.; Garrett, A.W.; Hemberger, P.H.; Nogar, N.S.

    1995-12-31

    Resonant Laser Ablation (RLA) is a useful ionization process for selectively producing gas phase ions from a solid sample. Recent use of RLA for mass spectrometry by this group and by others has produced a wealth of knowledge and useful analytical techniques. The method relies upon the focusing of modest intensity laser pulses ({le} 10{sup 7} W {center_dot} Cm{sup {minus}2}) upon a sample surface. A small quantity of material is vaporized, and atoms of desired analyte are subsequently ionized by (n + m) photon processes in the gas phase (where n = number of photons to a resonant transition and m = number of photons to exceed the ionization limit). The authors have been using (2 + 1) resonant ionization schemes for this work. Quadrupole ion trap mass spectrometry is realizing a very prominent role in current mass spectrometric research. Ion traps are versatile, powerful and extremely sensitive mass spectrometers, capable of a variety of ionization modes, MS{sup n} type experiments, high mass ranges and high resolution, all for a fraction of the cost of other instrumentation with similar capabilities. Quadrupole ion traps are ideally suited to pulsed ionization sources such as laser ionization methods, since their normal operational method (Mass Selective Instability) relies upon the storage of ions from a finite ionization period followed by ejection and detection of these ions based upon their mass to charge ratios. The paper describes selective ionization for trace atomic analysis, selective reagent ion source for ion chemistry investigations, and the analysis of ``difficult`` environmental contaminants, i.e., TBP.

  10. A thermo-chemical model of liquid iron oxidation during plasma arc or laser cutting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nemchinsky, Valerian

    2012-11-01

    It is suggested that if liquid iron is in contact with an atmosphere of gaseous oxygen, the chemical reaction of oxidation inside the liquid metal is of a homogeneous type, as opposed to the heterogeneous reaction of oxidation which takes place in a solid metal. A system of equations describing the inter-related chemical and heat processes is formulated and solved numerically. The obtained solution demonstrated the existence of a relatively narrow reaction zone that moves inwards through the metal. It was shown that the temperature in the reaction zone could be rather high as a result of the following sequence of events: a chemical reaction heats the metal, which boosts the oxygen diffusion and the oxygen supply to the reaction zone, which in turn increases the rate of oxidation. Thermal conductivity and depletion of the reagents stop this explosive-like process. Calculations showed that after some initial period, the reaction zone motion follows the parabolic law.

  11. Line-shape flattening resulting from hypersonic nozzle wedge flow in low-pressure chemical lasers.

    PubMed

    Livingston, P M; Bullock, D L

    1980-07-01

    The new hypersonic wedge nozzle (HYWN) supersonic wedge nozzle design produces a significant component of directed gas flow along the optical axis of a laser cavity comparable to thermal speeds. The gain-line-shape function is broadened and the refractive-index line shape is also spread as a function of wedge-flow half-angle. An analytical treatment as well as a numerical study is presented that evaluates the Doppler-directed-flow impact on the number of longitudinal modes and their frequencies as well as on gain and refractive-index saturation of those that lase in a Fabry-Perot cavity.

  12. Comparison of the structural and chemical composition of two unique micro/nanostructures produced by femtosecond laser interactions on nickel

    SciTech Connect

    Zuhlke, Craig A.; Anderson, Troy P.; Alexander, Dennis R.

    2013-09-16

    The structural and chemical composition of two unique microstructures formed on nickel, with nanoscale features, produced using femtosecond laser surface processing (FLSP) techniques is reported in this paper. These two surface morphologies, termed mounds and nanoparticle-covered pyramids, are part of a larger class of self-organized micro/nanostructured surfaces formed using FLSP. Cross-sections of the structures produced using focused ion beam milling techniques were analyzed with a transmission electron microscope. Both morphologies have a solid core with a layer of nanoparticles on the surface. Energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy by scanning transmission electron microscopy studies reveal that the nanoparticles are a nickel oxide, while the core material is pure nickel.

  13. Fundamental study on reaction mechanisms in chemically amplified extreme ultraviolet resists by using 61nm free-electron laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Okamoto, Kazumasa; Kozawa, Takahiro; Hatsui, Takaki; Tajima, Yasuharu; Oikawa, Keita; Nagasono, Mitsuru; Kameshima, Takashi; Togashi, Tadashi; Tono, Kensuke; Yabashi, Makina; Kimura, Hiroaki; Senba, Yasunori; Ohashi, Haruhiko; Sumiyoshi, Takashi

    2011-04-01

    For chemically amplified EUV resists, secondary electrons derived from ionization events play a critical role in the sensitization of acid generators. In this study, we show the dependence of acid generation efficiency on dose rate (fluence per pulse duration) by using 61 nm free-electron laser (FEL) light irradiation. The wavelength of 61 nm (20.3 eV) is applied because single incident photon induces only single ionization event, in contrast to the 13.4 nm EUV photon that induces 4.2 ionization events on average. The acid yield efficiency has enhances with decreasing the dose rate. It is suggested that high density ionization enhances the multiple spur effect.

  14. Laser fluorescence studies of the chemical interactions of sodium species with sulfur bearing fuels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Steinberg, M.; Schofield, K.

    1983-01-01

    By using a large matrix of fuel rich and fuel lean H2/O2/N2 and fuel rich C2H2/O2/N2 flames, the behavior of sodium and its interactions with sulfur at high temperatures was extensively characterized. OH concentrations were measured for each flame using the previously validated laser induced fluorescence technique. Sodium atomic concentrations were obtained by the saturated laser fluorescence method. Measurements were made in the absence and presence of up to 2% sulfur. In oxygen rich systems sodium is depleted by NaO2 and NaOH formation. The relative amounts of each are controlled by the degree of nonequilibration of the flame radicals and by the temperature. The bond strength of NaO2 was established. For the first time, a complete understanding of the complex behavior of sodium in fuel lean H2/O2 flames has emerged and computer modeling has permitted various rate constants of Na, NaO2 and NaOH reactions to be approximately fixed.

  15. Effects of texturization due to chemical etching and laser on the optical properties of multicrystalline silicon for applications in solar cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vera, D.; Mass, J.; Manotas, M.; Cabanzo, R.; Mejia, E.

    2016-02-01

    In this work we carried out the texturization of surfaces of multicrystalline silicon type-p in order to decrease the reflection of light on the surface, using the chemical etching method and then a treatment with laser. In the first method, it was immersed in solutions of HF:HNO3:H2O, HF:HNO3:CH3COOH, HF:HNO3:H3PO4, in the proportion 14:01:05, during 30 seconds, 1, 2 and 3 minutes. Subsequently with a laser (ND:YAG) grids were generated beginning with parallel lines separated 50μm. The samples were analyzed by means of diffuse spectroscopy (UV-VIS) and scanning electron micrograph (SEM) before and after the laser treatment. The lowest result of reflectance obtained by HF:HNO3:H2O during 30 seconds, was of 15.5%. However, after applying the treatment with laser the reflectance increased to 17.27%. On the other hand, the samples treated (30 seconds) with acetic acid and phosphoric acid as diluents gives as a result a decrease in the reflectance values after applying the laser treatment from 21.97% to 17.79% and from 27.73% to 20.03% respectively. The above indicates that in some cases it is possible to decrease the reflectance using jointly the method of chemical etching and then a laser treatment.

  16. CONTROL OF LASER RADIATION PARAMETERS: Two-coordinate control of the radiation pattern of a chemical non-chain electric-discharge DF laser by using space—time light modulators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alekseev, V. N.; Kotylev, V. N.; Liber, V. I.

    2008-07-01

    The results of studies of radiation parameters of a chemical non-chain DF laser (emitting in the range from 3.5 to 4.1 μm) with an intracavity control of the radiation pattern with the help of spatiotemporal modulators based on PLZT electrooptic ceramics are presented.

  17. Combining Transmission Geometry Laser Ablation and a Non Contact Continuous Flow Surface Sampling Probe/Electrospray Emitter for Mass Spectrometry-Based Chemical Imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Ovchinnikova, Olga S; Kertesz, Vilmos; Van Berkel, Gary J

    2011-01-01

    This paper describes the coupling of ambient pressure transmission geometry laser ablation with a liquid phase sample collection into a continuous flow surface sampling probe/electrospray emitter for mass spectrometry based chemical imaging. The flow probe/emitter device was placed in close proximity to the surface to collect the sample plume produced by laser ablation. The sample collected was immediately aspirated into the probe and on to the electrospray emitter, ionized and detected with the mass spectrometer. Freehand drawn ink lines and letters and an inked fingerprint on microscope slides were analyzed. The circular laser ablation area was about 210 m in diameter and under the conditions used in these experiments the spatial resolution, as determined by the size of the surface features distinguished in the chemical images, was about 100 m.

  18. Possibilities of improving the performance of an autonomous cw chemical DF laser by replacing the slot nozzles by the ramp ones in the nozzle array

    SciTech Connect

    Bashkin, A S; Gurov, L V; Kurdyukov, M V

    2011-08-31

    The results of a comparative numerical study of the performance of an autonomous cw chemical DF laser are obtained by simulating the processes in the nozzles and laser cavity where several configurations of slot and ramp nozzle arrays are employed. Three-dimensional Navier-Stokes equations solved with the Ansys CFX software are used to describe the reacting multicomponent flow in the nozzles and laser cavity. To investigate lasing characteristics, a supplementary code is developed and is used to calculate the radiation intensity in the Fabry-Perot resonator, taking into account its nonuniform distribution along the aperture width and height. It is shown that the use of the nozzle array consisting of ramp nozzles, which, in contrast to the slot nozzles, provide enhanced mixing of the reactants makes it possible to improve the laser performance in the case of a high-pressure (more than 15 Torr) active medium. (control of radiation parameters)

  19. Solution-Based Synthesis of Crystalline Silicon from Liquid Silane through Laser and Chemical Annealing

    DOE PAGES

    Iyer, Ganjigunte R. S.; Hobbie, Erik K.; Guruvenket, Srinivasan; ...

    2012-05-23

    We report a solution process for the synthesis of crystalline silicon from the liquid silane precursor cyclohexasilane (Si6H12). Polysilane films were crystallized through thermal and laser annealing, with plasma hydrogenation at atmospheric pressure generating further structural changes in the films. The evolution from amorphous to microcrystalline is characterized using scanning electron microscopy (SEM), atomic force microscopy (AFM), Raman spectroscopy and impedance spectroscopy. A four-decade enhancement in the electrical conductivity is attributed to a disorder-order transition in a bonded Si network. Lastly, our results demonstrate a potentially attractive approach that employs a solution process coupled with ambient post-processing to produce crystallinemore » silicon thin films.« less

  20. Forced convection and transport effects during hyperbaric laser chemical vapor deposition

    SciTech Connect

    Maxwell, James L; Chavez, Craig A; Espinoza, Miguel; Black, Marcie; Maskaly, Karlene; Boman, Mats

    2009-01-01

    This work explores mass transport processes during HP-LCYD, including the transverse forced-flow of precursor gases through a nozzle to enhance fiber growth rates. The use of laser trapping and suspension of nano-scale particles in the precursor flow is also described, providing insights into the nature of the gas flow, including jetting from the fiber tip and thermodiffusion processes near the reaction zone. The effects of differing molecular-weight buffer gases is also explored in conjunction with the Soret effect, and it is found that nucleation at the deposit surface (and homogeneous nucleation in the gas phase) can be enhanced/ retarded, depending on the buffer gas molecular weight. To demonstrate that extensive microstructures can be grown simultaneously, three-dimensional fiber arrays are also grown in-parallel using diffractive optics--without delatory effects from neighboring reaction sites.

  1. Solution-Based Synthesis of Crystalline Silicon from Liquid Silane through Laser and Chemical Annealing

    SciTech Connect

    Iyer, Ganjigunte R. S.; Hobbie, Erik K.; Guruvenket, Srinivasan; Hoey, Justin M.; Anderson, Kenneth J.; Lovaasen, John; Gette, Cody; Schulz, Douglas L.; Swenson, Orven F.; Elangovan, Arumugasamy; Boudjouk, P.

    2012-05-23

    We report a solution process for the synthesis of crystalline silicon from the liquid silane precursor cyclohexasilane (Si6H12). Polysilane films were crystallized through thermal and laser annealing, with plasma hydrogenation at atmospheric pressure generating further structural changes in the films. The evolution from amorphous to microcrystalline is characterized using scanning electron microscopy (SEM), atomic force microscopy (AFM), Raman spectroscopy and impedance spectroscopy. A four-decade enhancement in the electrical conductivity is attributed to a disorder-order transition in a bonded Si network. Lastly, our results demonstrate a potentially attractive approach that employs a solution process coupled with ambient post-processing to produce crystalline silicon thin films.

  2. Preparation, characterisation and optimisation of lithium battery anodes consisting of silicon synthesised using Laser assisted Chemical Vapour Pyrolysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Veliscek, Ziga; Perse, Lidija Slemenik; Dominko, Robert; Kelder, Erik; Gaberscek, Miran

    2015-01-01

    Suitability of silicon prepared using Laser assisted Chemical Vapour Pyrolysis (LaCVP) as a potential anode material in lithium batteries is systematically investigated. Its compositional, morphological, physical-chemical and electrochemical properties are compared to a current benchmark commercial silicon. Important differences in particle size and particle composition are found which, as shown, affect critically the rheological properties of the corresponding electrode slurries. In order to overcome the rheological problems of prepared nanosilicon, we introduce and optimise a spraying method instead of using the usual casting technique for slurry application. Interestingly, the optimised electrodes show similar electrochemical performance, regardless of the particle size or composition of nanosilicon. This unexpected result is explained by the unusually high resistance of electrochemical wiring in silicon-based electrodes (about 60 Ohm per 1 mg cm-2 of active material loading). Despite that, the optimised material still shows a capacity up to 1200 mA h g-1 at a relatively high loading of 1.6 mg cm-2 and after 20 cycles. On the other hand, by decreasing the loading to below ca. 0.9 mg cm-2 the wiring problems are effectively overcome and capacities close to theoretical values can be obtained.

  3. Probing of Fast Chemical Dynamics at High Pressures and Temperatures using Pulsed Laser Techniques

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-12-17

    and dissociation of ammonia at high pressure and high temperature, The Journal of Chemical Physics, (08 2012): 0. doi: 10.1063/1.4742340 Ross Howie...Alexander Goncharov, Mohammad F. Mahmood, Synthesis of Energetic Nitrogen and Hydrogen Compounds Using High Pressure and Multiphoton Absorption, Poster...27, 2014. Alexander Goncharov, High-pressure synthesis of novel materials with new bonding patterns and unusual stoichiometries, Invited talk

  4. Directed Energy Weapon System for Ballistic Missile Defense

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-02-15

    from rods of chemically laced glass, to energetic chemical reactions , to the wiggling of free elections. Beams can either be continuous or short...state lasers and a megawatt-class Chemical Oxygen Iodine Laser (COIL) housed onboard a modified Boeing 747-400 freighter aircraft to destroy missiles...commanded and controlled by a dedicated network of mission control centers. This enduring concept provides for around-the- clock threat assessment and

  5. Studies of Elementary Processes and Coupling Involved in the D2/F2 Chemical Laser.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1986-12-01

    number," -he performance of a H chemicll 1lser is a function of the nascent enerc.y disosl praetrs 2ort F + H D2) and H (0) + F2 chemical reactions...solution for approximately 18 hours followed by several washings with distilled water . The tube was then filled with a 10 M HNO 3 solution for...approximately 18 hours, washed several times with distilled water and dried. Detection System Infrared radiation from the reaction products is focused by a

  6. Mesoscale elucidation of laser-assisted chemical deposition of Sn nanostructured electrodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Zhixiao; Deng, Biwei; Cheng, Gary J.; Deng, Huiqiu; Mukherjee, Partha P.

    2015-06-01

    Nanostructured tin (Sn) is a promising high-capacity electrode for improved performance in lithium-ion batteries for electric vehicles. In this work, Sn nanoisland growth for nanostructured electrodes assisted by the pulse laser irradiation has been investigated based on a mesoscale modeling formalism. The influence of pertinent processing conditions, such as pulse duration, heating/cooling rates, and atom flux, on the Sn nanostructure formation is specifically considered. The interaction between the adsorbed atom and the substrate, represented by the adatom diffusion barrier, is carefully studied. It is found that the diffusion barrier predominantly affects the distribution of Sn atoms. For both α-Sn and β-Sn, the averaged coordination number is larger than 3 when the diffusion barrier equals to 0.15 eV. The averaged coordination number decreases as the diffusion barrier increases. The substrate temperature, which is determined by heating/cooling rates and pulse duration, can also affect the formation of Sn nanoislands. For α-Sn, when applied low heating/cooling rates, nanoislands cannot form if the diffusion barrier is larger than 0.35 eV.

  7. Chemical kinetic studies of atmospheric reactions using tunable diode laser spectroscopy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Worsnop, Douglas R.; Nelson, David D.; Zahniser, Mark S.

    1993-01-01

    IR absorption using tunable diode laser spectroscopy provides a sensitive and quantitative detection method for laboratory kinetic studies of atmospheric trace gases. Improvements in multipass cell design, real time signal processing, and computer controlled data acquisition and analysis have extended the applicability of the technique. We have developed several optical systems using off-axis resonator mirror designs which maximize path length while minimizing both the sample volume and the interference fringes inherent in conventional 'White' cells. Computerized signal processing using rapid scan (300 kHz), sweep integration with 100 percent duty cycle allows substantial noise reduction while retaining the advantages of using direct absorption for absolute absorbance measurements and simultaneous detection of multiple species. Peak heights and areas are determined by curve fitting using nonlinear least square methods. We have applied these techniques to measurements of: (1) heterogeneous uptake chemistry of atmospheric trace gases (HCl, H2O2, and N2O5) on aqueous and sulfuric acid droplets; (2) vapor pressure measurements of nitric acid and water over prototypical stratospheric aerosol (nitric acid trihydrate) surfaces; and (3) discharge flow tube kinetic studies of the HO2 radical using isotopic labeling for product channel and mechanistic analysis. Results from each of these areas demonstrate the versatility of TDL absorption spectroscopy for atmospheric chemistry applications.

  8. Chemical Production by Pulse-Laser Irradiation on Ices: Simulation of Impact Shock-Induced Chemistry on Icy Satellites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nna-Mvondo, Delphine; Khare, B. N.; Ishihara, T.; McKay, C. P.; Cruikshank, D. P.; Borucki, W. J.

    2007-12-01

    Several icy satellites of the outer planets show a variety of impact cratering features. The effect of impact by extraterrestrial objects into the surface is commonly related to physical changes. Most of the research applied to impacts on ices has been developed to study and understand the cratering formation process and their physical, geophysical characteristics. Chemical changes and synthesis occurring on icy planetary surfaces are generally explained by the influence of UV photons and high-energy charged particles on ices. Nonetheless, impact process onto ices could be a source of local or global endogenic process and could be especially advantageous as an efficient energy source for driving interesting chemistry. Upon impact on icy surface, the kinetic energy of the impacting body is transferred to the ground liberating a great deal of stress energy which could initiate in situ aqueous melts of the ice, hydrolysis and other chemical reactions in the fracture zone beneath the crater. Here we present a novel experimental method to study the chemistry in planetary ices induced by impact shocks. Impact shocks were simulated in laboratory using a powerful pulsed laser (Q-switched Nd-YAG laser, 1064 nm). We have irradiated at 77K icy mixtures of H2O / CO2, H2O / Na2CO3, H2O / CH3OH and finally H2O / CH3OH / (NH4)2SO4. GC-MS and FTIR analyses show that hydrogen peroxide, carbon monoxide and methanol are formed in irradiated H2O / CO2 ices. Ice containing sodium carbonate generates under simulated impact CO and CO2 which are also produced in impacted H2O / CH3OH and H2O / CH3OH / (NH4)2SO4 ices. But, in both latter icy mixtures, methane and more complex molecules are also formed. We have detected acetone, methyl formate and dimethyl formal. Adding ammonium sulfate to ice containing methanol induces the production of N2O, HCN and CH3CN.

  9. Field Tests of the Laser Interrogation of Surface Agents (Lisa) System for On-the-Move Standoff Sensing of Chemical Agents

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2003-07-01

    H. Fung, M. W. Ruckman, D. Harder, and A. J. Sedlacek, III, Applied Spectroscopy 54, 800 (2000). 3. “Raman cross sections of chemical agents and...simulants,” S. D. Christesen, Applied Spectroscopy 42 318 (1988). 4. “Raman spectroscopy for contamination monitoring,” S. D. Christesen, CRDEC-TR...intermediate ranges using low power cw lasers,” S. M. Angel, T. J. Kulp and T. M. Vess, Applied Spectroscopy 46, 1085 (1992). 6. “Remote pulsed laser Raman

  10. IV INTERNATIONAL CONFERENCE ON ATOM AND MOLECULAR PULSED LASERS (AMPL'99): Efficiency of an H2—SF6 laser with electron-beam initiation of chemical reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Erofeev, M. V.; Orlovskii, Viktor M.; Skakun, V. S.; Sosnin, E. A.; Tarasenko, Viktor F.

    2000-06-01

    The spectral and amplitude—time characteristics of HF lasers pumped by a nonchain chemical reaction and initiated by radially convergent and planar electron beams were investigated. The principal channels leading to the formation of vibrationally excited HF molecules were analysed. It was confirmed that high efficiencies (~10%) of a nonchain HF laser may be attained only as a result of the simultaneous formation of atomic and molecular fluorine when the active mixture is acted upon by an electron beam and of the participation of molecular fluorine in population inversion. It was shown that a laser pulse has a complex spectral—temporal profile caused by the successive generation of P-lines and the overlap during the radiation pulse of both the rotational lines of the same vibrational band and of individual vibrational bands.

  11. Periodic nanostructuring of Er/Yb-codoped IOG1 phosphate glass by using ultraviolet laser-assisted selective chemical etching

    SciTech Connect

    Pappas, C.; Pissadakis, S.

    2006-12-01

    The patterning of submicron period ({approx_equal}500 nm) Bragg reflectors in the Er/Yb-codoped IOG1 Schott, phosphate glass is demonstrated. A high yield patterning technique is presented, wherein high volume damage is induced into the glass matrix by exposure to intense ultraviolet 213 nm, 150 ps Nd:YAG laser radiation and, subsequently, a chemical development in potassium hydroxide (KOH)/ethylenediamine tetra-acetic acid (EDTA) aqueous solution selectively etches the exposed areas. The electronic changes induced by the 213 nm ultraviolet irradiation are examined by employing spectrophotometric measurements, while an estimation of the refractive index changes recorded is provided by applying Kramers-Kronig transformation to the absorption change data. In addition, real time diffraction efficiency measurements were obtained during the formation of the volume damage grating. After the exposure, the growth of the relief grating pattern in time was measured at fixed time intervals and the dependence of the grating depth on the etching time and exposure conditions is presented. The gratings fabricated are examined by atomic and scanning electron microscopies to reveal the relief topology of the structures. Gratings with average depth of 120 nm and excellent surface quality were fabricated by exposing the IOG1 phosphate glass to 36 000 pulses of 208 mJ/cm{sup 2} energy density, followed by developing in the KOH/EDTA agent for 6 min.

  12. A study of laser-induced blue emission with nanosecond decay of silicon nanoparticles synthesized by a chemical etching method.

    PubMed

    Bagabas, Abdulaziz A; Gondal, Mohammed A; Dastageer, Mohammed A; Al-Muhanna, Abdulrahman A; Alanazi, Thaar H; Ababtain, Moath A

    2009-09-02

    Silicon nanoparticles (Si NPs), exhibiting a strong visible photoluminescence (PL), have found many applications in optoelectronics devices, biomedical tags and flash memories. Chemical etching is a well-known method for synthesizing orange-luminescent, hydride-capped silicon nanoparticles (H/Si NPs). However, a blueshift in emission wavelength occurs when reducing the particle size to exciton Bohr radius or less. In this paper, we attempted to synthesize and characterize H/Si NPs that emit lower wavelengths at room temperature. We proved that our method succeeded in synthesizing H/Si NPs with emission in the blue region. The wavelength-resolved and time-resolved studies of the PL were executed for H/Si NPs in methanol (MeOH), pyridine (py) and furan, using the 355 nm pulsed radiation from a Nd:YAG laser. In addition, excitation wavelength-dependent and PL studies were executed using the spectrofluorometer with a xenon (Xe) broad band light source. We noticed solvent-dependent PL spectra with sharp peaks near 420 nm and a short lifetime less than 100 ns. The morphology and particle size were investigated by high resolution transmission electron microscope (HRTEM). Particles as small as one nanometer were observed in MeOH and py suspensions while two-nanometer particles were observed in the furan suspension.

  13. High Temperature Nanocomposites For Nuclear Thermal Propulsion and In-Space Fabrication by Hyperbaric Pressure Laser Chemical Vapor Deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maxwell, J. L.; Webb, N. D.; Espinoza, M.; Cook, S.; Houts, M.; Kim, T.

    Nuclear Thermal Propulsion (NTP) is an indispensable technology for the manned exploration of the solar system. By using Hyperbaric Pressure Laser Chemical Vapor Deposition (HP-LCVD), the authors propose to design and build a promising next-generation fuel element composed of uranium carbide UC embedded in a latticed matrix of highly refractory Ta4HfC5 for an NTP rocket capable of sustaining temperatures up to 4000 K, enabling an Isp of up to 1250 s. Furthermore, HP-LCVD technology can also be harnessed to enable 3D rapid prototyping of a variety of materials including metals, ceramics and composites, opening up the possibility of in-space fabrication of components, replacement parts, difficult-to-launch solar sails and panels and a variety of other space structures. Additionally, rapid prototyping with HP-LCVD makes a feasible "live off the land" strategy of interplanetary and interstellar exploration ­ the precursors commonly used in the technology are found, often in abundance, on other solar system bodies either as readily harvestable gas (e.g. methane) or as a raw material that could be converted into a suitable precursor (e.g. iron oxide into ferrocene on Mars).

  14. Growth of normally-immiscible materials (NIMs), binary alloys, and metallic fibers by hyperbaric laser chemical vapor deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maxwell, J. L.; Black, M. R.; Chavez, C. A.; Maskaly, K. R.; Espinoza, M.; Boman, M.; Landstrom, L.

    2008-06-01

    This work demonstrates that two or more elements of negligible solubility (and no known phase diagram) can be co-deposited in fiber form by hyperbaric-pressure laser chemical vapor deposition (HP-LCVD). For the first time, Hg-W alloys were grown as fibers from mixtures of tungsten hexafluoride, mercury vapor, and hydrogen. This new class of materials is termed normally-immiscible materials (NIMs), and includes not only immiscible materials, but also those elemental combinations that have liquid states at exclusive temperatures. This work also demonstrates that a wide variety of other binary and ternary alloys, intermetallics, and mixtures can be grown as fibers, e.g. silicon-tungsten, aluminum-silicon, boron-carbon-silicon, and titanium-carbon-nitride. In addition, pure metallic fibers of aluminum, titanium, and tungsten were deposited, demonstrating that materials of high thermal conductivity can indeed be grown in three-dimensions, provided sufficient vapor pressures are employed. A wide variety of fiber properties and microstructures resulted depending on process conditions; for example, single crystals, fine-grained alloys, and glassy metals could be deposited.

  15. First-Principles Simulations of Chemical Reactions in an HCl Molecule Embedded inside a C or BN Nanotube Induced by Ultrafast Laser Pulses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miyamoto, Yoshiyuki; Zhang, Hong; Rubio, Angel

    2010-12-01

    We show by first-principles simulations that ultrafast laser pulses induce different chemical reactions in a molecule trapped inside a nanotube. A strong laser pulse polarized perpendicular to the tube axis induces a giant bond stretch of an encapsulated HCl molecule in semiconducting carbon nanotube or in a BN nanotube. Depending on the initial orientation of the HCl molecule, the subsequent laser-induced dynamics is different: either complete disintegration or rebonding of the HCl molecule. Radial motion of the nanotube is always observed and a vacancy appears on the tube wall when the HCl is perpendicular to the tube axis. Those results are important to analyze confined nanochemistry and to manipulate molecules and nanostructures encapsulated in organic and inorganic nanotubes.

  16. First-principles simulations of chemical reactions in an HCl molecule embedded inside a C or BN nanotube induced by ultrafast laser pulses.

    PubMed

    Miyamoto, Yoshiyuki; Zhang, Hong; Rubio, Angel

    2010-12-10

    We show by first-principles simulations that ultrafast laser pulses induce different chemical reactions in a molecule trapped inside a nanotube. A strong laser pulse polarized perpendicular to the tube axis induces a giant bond stretch of an encapsulated HCl molecule in semiconducting carbon nanotube or in a BN nanotube. Depending on the initial orientation of the HCl molecule, the subsequent laser-induced dynamics is different: either complete disintegration or rebonding of the HCl molecule. Radial motion of the nanotube is always observed and a vacancy appears on the tube wall when the HCl is perpendicular to the tube axis. Those results are important to analyze confined nanochemistry and to manipulate molecules and nanostructures encapsulated in organic and inorganic nanotubes.

  17. Effect of the chemical composition of a hydrogen-containing RH component of the working medium and the initiation method on the parameters of a pulsed chemical SF6 RH laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gal', A. V.; Dodonov, A. A.; Rusanov, V. D.; Shiriaevskii, V. L.; Sholin, G. V.

    1992-02-01

    The effect of working-medium composition on the oscillation characteristics and energy-deposition efficiency for fluorohydrogen pulsed chemical SF6-H2 and SF6-HI lasers under electron beam and electric discharge initiation was investigated. It is shown that the best energy characteristics of the emission are achieved for a working medium of SF6-HI under electron-beam initiation and for SF6-H2 when the pump reaction is initiated by a bulk self-sustained discharge.

  18. Lasers '92; Proceedings of the International Conference on Lasers and Applications, 15th, Houston, TX, Dec. 7-10, 1992

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, Charles P. (Editor)

    1993-01-01

    Papers from the conference are presented, and the topics covered include the following: x-ray lasers, excimer lasers, chemical lasers, high power lasers, blue-green lasers, dye lasers, solid state lasers, semiconductor lasers, gas and discharge lasers, carbon dioxide lasers, ultrafast phenomena, nonlinear optics, quantum optics, dynamic gratings and wave mixing, laser radar, lasers in medicine, optical filters and laser communication, optical techniques and instruments, laser material interaction, and industrial and manufacturing applications.

  19. Laser thermal effect on silicon nitride ceramic based on thermo-chemical reaction with temperature-dependent thermo-physical parameters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pan, A. F.; Wang, W. J.; Mei, X. S.; Wang, K. D.; Zhao, W. Q.; Li, T. Q.

    2016-07-01

    In this study, a two-dimensional thermo-chemical reaction model with temperature-dependent thermo-physical parameters on Si3N4 with 10 ns laser was developed to investigate the ablated size, volume and surface morphology after single pulse. For model parameters, thermal conductivity and heat capacity of β-Si3N4 were obtained from first-principles calculations. Thermal-chemical reaction rate was fitted by collision theory, and then, reaction element length was deduced using the relationship between reaction rate and temperature distribution. Furthermore, plasma absorption related to energy loss was approximated as a function of electron concentration in Si3N4. It turned out that theoretical ablated volume and radius increased and then remained constant with increasing laser energy, and the maximum ablated depth was not in the center of the ablated zone. Moreover, the surface maximum temperature of Si3N4 was verified to be above 3000 K within pulse duration, and it was much higher than its thermal decomposition temperature of 1800 K, which indicated that Si3N4 was not ablated directly above the thermal decomposition temperature. Meanwhile, the single pulse ablation of Si3N4 was performed at different powers using a TEM00 10 ns pulse Nd:YAG laser to validate the model. The model showed a satisfactory consistence between the experimental data and numerical predictions, presenting a new modeling technology that may significantly increase the accuracy of the predicated results for laser ablation of materials undergoing thermo-chemical reactions.

  20. Investigation by laser induced breakdown spectroscopy, X-ray fluorescence and X-ray powder diffraction of the chemical composition of white clay ceramic tiles from Veliki Preslav

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blagoev, K.; Grozeva, M.; Malcheva, G.; Neykova, S.

    2013-01-01

    The paper presents the results of the application of laser induced breakdown spectroscopy, X-ray fluorescence spectrometry, and X-ray powder diffraction in assessing the chemical and phase composition of white clay decorative ceramic tiles from the medieval archaeological site of Veliki Preslav, a Bulgarian capital in the period 893-972 AC, well-known for its original ceramic production. Numerous white clay ceramic tiles with highly varied decoration, produced for wall decoration of city's churches and palaces, were found during the archaeological excavations in the old capital. The examination of fourteen ceramic tiles discovered in one of the city's monasteries is aimed at characterization of the chemical profile of the white-clay decorative ceramics produced in Veliki Preslav. Combining different methods and comparing the obtained results provides complementary information regarding the white-clay ceramic production in Veliki Preslav and complete chemical characterization of the examined artefacts.

  1. Handbook of molecular lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheo, Peter K.

    The technology and applications of molecular lasers (MLs) are examined in chapters contributed by leading experts. Topics addressed include ML emission spectra, CO2 TEA lasers, RF-discharge-excited CO2 lasers, high-energy short-pulse CO2 lasers, high-power electron-beam-controlled CO2 lasers, HF/DF chemical lasers, optically pumped FIR MLs, and transients and instabilities in FIR MLs. Extensive diagrams, drawings, graphs, photographs, and tables of numerical data are provided.

  2. Determination of metformin in mouse, rat, dog and human plasma samples by laser diode thermal desorption/atmospheric pressure chemical ionization tandem mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Swales, John G; Gallagher, Richard; Peter, Raimund M

    2010-11-02

    A simple, rapid and robust high-throughput assay for the quantitative analysis of metformin in plasma from different species using laser diode thermal desorption interfaced with atmospheric chemical pressure ionization tandem mass spectrometry (LDTD-APCI-MSMS) was developed for use in a pharmaceutical discovery environment. In order to minimize sample preparation a generic protein precipitation method was used to extract metformin from the plasma. Laser diode thermal desorption is a relatively new sample introduction method, the optimization of the instrumental parameters are presented. The method was successfully applied to spiked mouse, rat, dog and human plasma samples and was subsequently used to determine the oral pharmacokinetics of metformin after dosing to male rats in order to support drug discovery projects. The deviations for intra-assay accuracy and precision across the four species were less than 30% at all calibration and quality control levels.

  3. Effects of chemical etching on the surface quality and the laser induced damage threshold of fused silica optics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pfiffer, Mathilde; Cormont, Philippe; Néauport, Jérôme; Lambert, Sébastien; Fargin, Evelyne; Bousquet, Bruno; Dussauze, Marc

    2016-12-01

    Effects of deep wet etching on the surface quality and the laser induced damage probability have been studied on fused silica samples. Results obtained with a HF/HNO3 solution and a KOH solution were compared on both polished pristine surface and scratched surfaces. The hydrofluoric solution radically deteriorated the surface quality creating a haze on the whole surface and increasing considerably the roughness. For both solutions, neither improvement nor deterioration of the laser damage performances has been observed on the etched surfaces while the laser damage resistance of scratches has been increased to the level of the surface. We conclude that laser damage performances are equivalent with both solutions but an acid etching induces surface degradation that is not experienced with basic etching.

  4. Design of Laser Based Monitoring Systems for Compliance Management of Odorous and Hazardous Air Pollutants in Selected Chemical Industrial Estates at Hyderabad, India

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sudhakar, P.; Kalavathi, P.; Ramakrishna Rao, D.; Satyanarayna, M.

    2014-12-01

    Industrialization can no longer sustain without internalization of the concerns of the receiving environment and land-use. Increased awareness and public pressure, coupled with regulatory instruments and bodies exert constant pressure on industries to control their emissions to a level acceptable to the receiving environment. However, when a group of industries come-up together as an industrial estate, the cumulative impacts of all the industries together often challenges the expected/desired quality of receiving environment, requiring stringent pollution control and monitoring measures. Laser remote sensing techniques provide powerful tools for environmental monitoring. These methods provide range resolved measurements of concentrations of various gaseous pollutants and suspended particulate matter (SPM) not only in the path of the beam but over the entire area. A three dimensional mapping of the pollutants and their dispersal can be estimated using the laser remote sensing methods on a continuous basis. Laser Radar (Lidar) systems are the measurements technology used in the laser remote sensing methods. Differential absorption lidar (DIAL) and Raman Lidar technologies have proved to be very useful for remote sensing of air pollutants. DIAL and Raman lidar systems can be applied for range resolved measurements of molecules like SO2, NO2, O3 Hg, CO, C2H4, H2O, CH4, hydrocarbons etc. in real time on a continuous basis. This paper describes the design details of the DAIL and Raman lidar techniques for measurement of various hazardous air pollutants which are being released into the atmosphere by the chemical industries operating in the Bachupally industrial Estate area at Hyderabad, India. The relative merits of the two techniques have been studied and the minimum concentration of pollutants that can be measured using these systems are presented. A dispersion model of the air pollutants in the selected chemical industrial estates at Hyderabad has been developed.

  5. Characterization of Iodine Quenching and Energy Transfer Rate Constants for Supersonic Flow Visualization Applications

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-09-28

    SUBTITLE Sm. CONTRACTNUBER Characterization of iodine quenching and energy transfer rate FA9550-41-- o3G Sb. GRANT NUMBER constants for supersonic flow...in the nozzle from a chemical oxygen iodine laser (COIL). PLIF images are recorded using laser excitation of the I= B-X transition. Data for the...Preacolbed byANSI Sad Z30.16 20071015188 Final report for the project, "Characterization of iodine quenching and energy transfer rate constants for

  6. Quantitative measurement of the chemical composition of geological standards with a miniature laser ablation/ionization mass spectrometer designed for in situ application in space research

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neuland, M. B.; Grimaudo, V.; Mezger, K.; Moreno-García, P.; Riedo, A.; Tulej, M.; Wurz, P.

    2016-03-01

    A key interest of planetary space missions is the quantitative determination of the chemical composition of the planetary surface material. The chemical composition of surface material (minerals, rocks, soils) yields fundamental information that can be used to answer key scientific questions about the formation and evolution of the planetary body in particular and the Solar System in general. We present a miniature time-of-flight type laser ablation/ionization mass spectrometer (LMS) and demonstrate its capability in measuring the elemental and mineralogical composition of planetary surface samples quantitatively by using a femtosecond laser for ablation/ionization. The small size and weight of the LMS make it a remarkable tool for in situ chemical composition measurements in space research, convenient for operation on a lander or rover exploring a planetary surface. In the laboratory, we measured the chemical composition of four geological standard reference samples USGS AGV-2 Andesite, USGS SCo-l Cody Shale, NIST 97b Flint Clay and USGS QLO-1 Quartz Latite with LMS. These standard samples are used to determine the sensitivity factors of the instrument. One important result is that all sensitivity factors are close to 1. Additionally, it is observed that the sensitivity factor of an element depends on its electron configuration, hence on the electron work function and the elemental group in agreement with existing theory. Furthermore, the conformity of the sensitivity factors is supported by mineralogical analyses of the USGS SCo-l and the NIST 97b samples. With the four different reference samples, the consistency of the calibration factors can be demonstrated, which constitutes the fundamental basis for a standard-less measurement-technique for in situ quantitative chemical composition measurements on planetary surface.

  7. Lasers '87; Proceedings of the Tenth International Conference on Lasers and Applications, Lake Tahoe, NV, Dec. 7-11, 1987

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duarte, F. J.

    Various papers on lasers are presented. The general topics addressed include: laser physics and theory, VUV and X-ray lasers, excimer lasers, chemical lasers, nuclear pumped lasers, blue-green and metal-vapor lasers, dye lasers, solid-state lasers, semiconductor and diode lasers, CO2 lasers, FIR lasers, ultrafast phenomena, nonlinear phenomena, wave mixing and dynamic gratings, and phase conjugation. Also considered are: laser radars and remote sensing, adaptive optics and propagation, imaging, fiber optics, laser spectroscopy, laser dyes, lasers in medicine, optical devices and measuring technique, laser industrial applications, lasers in strategic defense.

  8. Tungsten-carbon multilayers for x-ray optics prepared by ArF excimer-laser-induced chemical vapor deposition

    SciTech Connect

    Mutoh, K.; Yamada, Y.; Iwabuchi, T.; Miyata, T. )

    1990-08-01

    The authors have studied the characteristics of tungsten (W) and carbon (C) thin films, and W/C multilayers prepared by ArF excimer-laser-induced chemical vapor deposition using tungsten hexafluoride and benzene gases. Amorphous W and C films with very smooth surfaces were obtained at substrate temperatures of 100--200 {degree}C and 100--300 {degree}C, respectively. In small-angle x-ray scattering measurements for the multilayers deposited at 200 {degree}C, a first order of multilayer reflections were clearly observed. Furthermore, Auger electron spectroscopy showed that W and C layers in the multilayers were periodically deposited.

  9. Tungsten-carbon multilayers for x-ray optics prepared by ArF excimer-laser-induced chemical vapor deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mutoh, Katsuhiko; Yamada, Yuka; Iwabuchi, Takashi; Miyata, Takeo

    1990-08-01

    The authors have studied the characteristics of tungsten (W) and carbon (C) thin films, and W/C multilayers prepared by ArF excimer-laser-induced chemical vapor deposition using tungsten hexafluoride and benzene gases. Amorphous W and C films with very smooth surfaces were obtained at substrate temperatures of 100-200 °C and 100-300 °C, respectively. In small-angle x-ray scattering measurements for the multilayers deposited at 200 °C, a first order of multilayer reflections were clearly observed. Furthermore, Auger electron spectroscopy showed that W and C layers in the multilayers were periodically deposited.

  10. Direct Chemical Analysis of Solids by Laser Ablation in an Ion-Storage Time-of-Flight Mass Spectrometer

    SciTech Connect

    Klunder, G L; Grant, P M; Andresen, B D; Russo, R E

    2003-09-29

    A laser ablation/ionization mass spectrometer system is described for the direct analysis of solids, particles, and fibers. The system uses a quadrupole ion trap operated in an ion-storage (IS) mode, coupled with a reflectron time-of-flight mass spectrometer (TOF-MS). The sample is inserted radially into the ring electrode and an imaging system allows direct viewing and selected analysis of the sample. Measurements identified trace contaminants of Ag, Sn, and Sb in a Pb target with single laser-shot experiments. Resolution (m/{micro}m) of 1500 and detection limits of approximately 10 pg have been achieved with a single laser pulse. The system configuration and related operating principles for accurately measuring low concentrations of isotopes are described.

  11. Production of Singlet Oxygen within a Flow Discharge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lange, Matthew; Pitz, Greg; Perram, Glen

    2008-10-01

    The Airborne laser program is an Air Force sponsored program to place a laser on the battle field for use as a tactical weapon. The chemical oxygen iodine laser offers the powers necessary for this weapons application, but it requires significant logistical support. The goal of this current research program is to demonstrate an oxygen-iodine laser with electrical discharge production of singlet oxygen. Optical diagnostics have been applied to microwave and radio frequency discharges within a pure oxygen flow. The O2(a) emissions within a discharge are complicated by atomic oxygen emission requiring care in determining gas concentrations from optically measured emissions. Thermal effects also complicate optical emissions. The inclusion of vibrationally excited oxygen as a quencher of the O2(a) state appears to be the limiting rate for production of O2(a) within the electric discharge conditions studied in this research.

  12. Pulsed laser photolysis and quantum chemical-statistical rate study of the reaction of the ethynyl radical with water vapor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carl, Shaun A.; Minh Thi Nguyen, Hue; Elsamra, Rehab M. I.; Tho Nguyen, Minh; Peeters, Jozef

    2005-03-01

    The rate coefficient of the gas-phase reaction C2H+H2O→products has been experimentally determined over the temperature range 500-825K using a pulsed laser photolysis-chemiluminescence (PLP-CL) technique. Ethynyl radicals (C2H) were generated by pulsed 193nm photolysis of C2H2 in the presence of H2O vapor and buffer gas N2 at 15Torr. The relative concentration of C2H radicals was monitored as a function of time using a CH * chemiluminescence method. The rate constant determinations for C2H+H2O were k1(550K)=(2.3±1.3)×10-13cm3s-1, k1(770cm3s-1, and k1(825cm3s-1. The error in the only other measurement of this rate constant is also discussed. We have also characterized the reaction theoretically using quantum chemical computations. The relevant portion of the potential energy surface of C2H3O in its doublet electronic ground state has been investigated using density functional theory B3LYP /6-311++G(3df,2p) and molecular orbital computations at the unrestricted coupled-cluster level of theory that incorporates all single and double excitations plus perturbative corrections for the triple excitations, along with the 6-311++G(3df,2p) basis set [(U)CCSD(T)/6-311++G(3df,2p)] and using UCCSD(T )/6-31G(d,p) optimized geometries. Five isomers, six dissociation products, and sixteen transition structures were characterized. The results confirm that the hydrogen abstraction producing C2H2+OH is the most facile reaction channel. For this channel, refined computations using (U)CCSD(T)/6-311++G(3df,2p)//(U)CCSD(T)/6-311++G(d,p) and complete-active-space second-order perturbation theory/complete-active-space self-consistent-field theory (CASPT2/CASSCF) [B. O. Roos, Adv. Chem. Phys. 69, 399 (1987)] using the contracted atomic natural orbitals basis set (ANO-L) [J. Almlöf and P. R. Taylor, J. Chem. Phys.86, 4070 (1987)] were performed, yielding zero-point energy-corrected potential energy barriers of 17kJmol-1 and 15kJmol-1, respectively. Transition-state theory rate constant

  13. Raman microprobe investigation of laser-assisted chemically-induced oxygen variation in the high T sub c superconductors YBa sub 2 Cu sub 3 O sub x

    SciTech Connect

    Roughani, B.; Sengupta, L.C.; Aubel, J.; Sundaram, S. )

    1990-01-25

    Effects of focused Ar{sup +} laser irradiation on YBa{sub 2}Cu{sub 3}O{sub {ital x}} in air, N{sub 2}, and O{sub 2} ambients were studied with a Raman microprobe. Drastic changes in the Cu-O stretching mode (A{sub g}) in our Raman spectra recorded in air ambient indicate an orthorhombic to tetragonal phase transformation in the YBa{sub 2}Cu{sub 3}O{sub {ital x}} sample. Laser irradiation of the sample in oxygen ambient shows a reversed behavior compared to that in air. When irradiated in nitrogen ambient, it shows additional Raman lines compared wot the spectra for the starting material. This may be due to formation of BaCuO{sub 2} and O(4) vacancies. The reversibility of oxygen exchange in nitrogen and oxygen ambient was also studied. The observed effects in the Raman spectra were interpreted as the chemically induced oxygen desorption and absorption assisted by Ar{sup +} laser irradiation.

  14. Optimization of chemical and instrumental parameters in hydride generation laser-induced breakdown spectrometry for the determination of arsenic, antimony, lead and germanium in aqueous samples.

    PubMed

    Yeşiller, Semira Unal; Yalçın, Serife

    2013-04-03

    A laser induced breakdown spectrometry hyphenated with on-line continuous flow hydride generation sample introduction system, HG-LIBS, has been used for the determination of arsenic, antimony, lead and germanium in aqueous environments. Optimum chemical and instrumental parameters governing chemical hydride generation, laser plasma formation and detection were investigated for each element under argon and nitrogen atmosphere. Arsenic, antimony and germanium have presented strong enhancement in signal strength under argon atmosphere while lead has shown no sensitivity to ambient gas type. Detection limits of 1.1 mg L(-1), 1.0 mg L(-1), 1.3 mg L(-1) and 0.2 mg L(-1) were obtained for As, Sb, Pb and Ge, respectively. Up to 77 times enhancement in detection limit of Pb were obtained, compared to the result obtained from the direct analysis of liquids by LIBS. Applicability of the technique to real water samples was tested through spiking experiments and recoveries higher than 80% were obtained. Results demonstrate that, HG-LIBS approach is suitable for quantitative analysis of toxic elements and sufficiently fast for real time continuous monitoring in aqueous environments.

  15. Treatment of Acne Vulgaris With Salicylic Acid Chemical Peel and Pulsed Dye Laser: A Split Face, Rater-Blinded, Randomized Controlled Trial

    PubMed Central

    Lekakh, Olga; Mahoney, Anne Marie; Novice, Karlee; Kamalpour, Julia; Sadeghian, Azeen; Mondo, Dana; Kalnicky, Cathy; Guo, Rong; Peterson, Anthony; Tung, Rebecca

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Pulsed dye laser (PDL) has been used to treat acne lesions and scar erythema by interrupting superficial vasculature. Salicylic acid chemical peels are employed chiefly due to their lipophilic, comedolytic, and anti-inflammatory properties. Although studies have looked at peels and laser therapy independently in acne management, we examined these treatments in combination. Our primary objective was to evaluate the safety and efficacy of concurrent use of salicylic acid peels with PDL versus salicylic acid peels alone in the treatment of moderate to severe acne vulgaris. Methods: Adult patients with moderate to severe acne were included. Subjects received a total of 3 treatments at 3-week intervals. Per randomized split-face treatment, at week 0, one half of the subject’s face was treated with PDL (595 nm) followed by whole face application of a 30% salicylic acid peel. At weeks 3 and 6, the treatments were repeated. At 0 and 9 weeks, patients were assessed with the Global Evaluation Acne (GEA) scale and Dermatology Life Quality Index (DLQI) questionnaire. Results: Nineteen subjects were enrolled, and 18 completed the study. Significant improvement in acne was seen in both the combined (laser and peel) and chemical peel alone treatment arms (P < .0005 and P = .001). Using the GEA scale score, compared to week 0, the mean difference in acne improvement at week 9 was -1.61 in the combination therapy group versus -1.11 in the peel only group. Based on the GEA scale scoring, a statistically significant greater difference in acne improvement was seen, from week 0 to week 9, in the combination treatment group compared with the peel only group (P = .003). Conclusion: While acne subjects had significant benefit from the salicylic acid peel alone, they experienced greater significant benefit from PDL treatment used in conjunction with salicylic acid peels. The adjunctive utilization of PDL to salicylic acid peel therapy can lead to better outcomes in acne

  16. Kinetics and Kinetic Spectroscopy of the Sn/N(sub 2)O Electronic Transition Chemical Laser Candidate Reaction.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1976-11-01

    coefficient, k1, and rate coefficients for quenching of SnO(a(3) sigma (+)) and (A(3)pi) were performed as were mechanistic studies and a determination of absolute photon yields. The results are evaluated in terms of laser development .

  17. Chemical and Isotopic Analysis of Trace Organic Matter on Meteorites and Interstellar Dust Using a Laser Microprobe Instrument

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zare, Richard N.; Boyce, Joseph M. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons (PAHs) are of considerable interest today because they are ubiquitous on Earth and in the interstellar medium (ISM). In fact, about 20% of cosmic carbon in the galaxy is estimated to be in the form of PAHs. Investigation of these species has obvious uses for determining the cosmochemistry of the solar system. Work in this laboratory has focused on four main areas: 1) Mapping the spatial distribution of PAHs in a variety of meteoritic samples and comparing this distribution with mineralogical features of the meteorite to determine whether a correlation exists between the two. 2) Developing a method for detection of fullerenes in extraterrestrial samples using microprobe Laser Desorption Ionization Mass Spectroscopy and utilizing this technique to investigate fullerene presence, while exploring the possibility of spatially mapping the fullerene distribution in these samples through in situ detection. 3) Investigating a possible formation pathway for meteoritic and ancient terrestrial kerogen involving the photochemical reactions of PAHs with alkanes under prebiotic and astrophysically relevant conditions. 4) Studying reaction pathways and identifying the photoproducts generated during the photochemical evolution of PAH-containing interstellar ice analogs as part of an ongoing collaboration with researchers at the Astrochemistry Lab at NASA Ames. All areas involve elucidation of the solar system formation and chemistry using microprobe Laser Desorption Laser Ionization Mass Spectrometry. A brief description of microprobe Laser Desorption Ionization Mass Spectroscopy, which allows selective investigation of subattomole levels of organic species on the surface of a sample at 10-40 micrometer spatial resolution, is given.

  18. Design and chemical synthesis of iodine-containing molecules for application to solar-pumped I* lasers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shiner, Christopher S.

    1986-01-01

    Research is directed toward the design and synthesis of new media for solar-pumped I* lasers. Since the most effective existing lasants are perfluoroalkyl iodides, a strategy was proposed for the development of improved materials of this type with absorption maxima at 300 nm. Absorption spectra were synthesized and measured for prototypical species containing iodine bound to boron, iron, and cobalt.

  19. Large-Area Optical Coatings with Uniform Thickness Grown by Surface Chemical Reactions for High-Power Laser Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zaitsu, Shin-ichi; Motokoshi, Shinji; Jitsuno, Takahisa; Nakatsuka, Masahiro; Yamanaka, Tatsuhiko

    2002-01-01

    We prepared optical thin films using an atomic layer deposition (ALD) procedure in order to apply this coating method to optical components for high-power and large-scale lasers. Film thickness shows a proportional relationship to the number of operation cycles even in the case of room-temperature growth, and the distribution is uniform with a thickness error of less than 1% over an area of 240 mm diameter. We examined the laser damage thresholds of the films with 1 ns laser pulses at 1.064 μm. The highest thresholds (TiO2: 5 J/cm2, Al2O3: 5.2 J/cm2) are obtained in the amorphous films grown at low growth temperatures (25-50°C). Results from the analysis of film structure and composition, and measurement of optical absorption reveal that the decrease in laser damage threshold as the growth temperature rises is caused by the crystallization of films.

  20. Influence of sintering conditions and laser radiation on the surface microstructure, chemical composition, and electrical conductivity of CuO/Ag ceramics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuzanyan, A. S.; Pashayan, S. T.; Kuzanyan, V. S.; Tatoyan, V. T.

    2014-04-01

    The influence of the third harmonic radiation of a YAG: Nd3+ laser on the microstructure, chemical composition, and electrical conductivity of CuO and CuO/Ag ceramic samples subjected to heat treatment under different conditions has been investigated. It has been found that the surface morphology is almost identical for all the samples sintered at the same temperatures. According to the X-ray microanalysis, the ratio of the copper and oxygen concentrations (Cu/O) increases with an increase in the sintering temperature and upon quenching cooling of the samples. It has been shown that laser irradiation changes the micro-structure of the samples, increases the concentration ratio Cu/O, and leads to the inclusion of silver atoms into the lattice of copper oxides. It has been revealed that the temperature dependence of electrical resistance of all the studied samples in the temperature range of 80-300 K has a semiconducting character, and the activation energy of electrical resistance varies in the range from 0.19 to 0.48 eV. The activation energy of electrical resistance decreases with an increase in the sintering temperature of the samples and increases upon their quenching, whereas the laser treatment leads to a weakening of the dependence of the activation energy on the sintering temperature. The deposition of a silver layer before the laser treatment has no noticeable influence on the activation energy. The obtained data can be used to purposefully change the physical properties of compounds formed in the Cu-O-Ag system.

  1. Facile and Chemically Pure Preparation of YVO4:Eu3+ Colloid with Novel Nanostructure via Laser Ablation in Water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Haohao; Odawara, Osamu; Wada, Hiroyuki

    2016-02-01

    A YVO4:Eu3+ colloid with an interesting nanostructure was formed by pulsed laser ablation in deionized water without any additives or surfactants. Analyses of particle morphology, composition and optical properties were accomplished by SEM, TEM, EDS PL and UV-vis. Ovoid-like particles formed by the agglomeration of numerous nanocrystals were observed by SEM and TEM, while EDS with area-mode analysis revealed that the content of dopant ion was well retained within the nanoparticles. In addition, the formation mechanism is deduced and discussed for the first time in this research. The findings of this study could provide new insights into the understanding of laser-induced oxide materials and offer an opportunity for other research groups to pursue red emitting nanophosphors with outstandingly purity.

  2. Photoexcitation of lasers and chemical reactions for NASA missions: A theoretical study. [optical pumping in high pressure gas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Javan, A.; Guerra, M.

    1981-01-01

    The possibility of obtaining CW laser oscillation by optical pumping in the infrared at an elevated gas pressure is reviewed. A specific example utilizing a mixture of CO and NO gases is included. The gas pressures considered are in excess of several atmospheres. Laser frequency tuning over a broad region becomes possible at such elevated gas pressures due to collisional broadening of the amplifying transitions. The prior-rate and surprisal analysis are applied to obtain detailed VV and VT rates for CO and NO molecules and the transfer rates in a CO-NO gas mixture. The analysis is capable of giving temperature dependence of the rate constants. Computer estimates of the rates are presented for vibrational levels up to v = 50. The results show that in the high-lying vibrational states the VV transfer rates with Delta nu = 2 become appreciable.

  3. Development of a deep-sea laser-induced breakdown spectrometer for in situ multi-element chemical analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thornton, Blair; Takahashi, Tomoko; Sato, Takumi; Sakka, Tetsuo; Tamura, Ayaka; Matsumoto, Ayumu; Nozaki, Tatsuo; Ohki, Toshihiko; Ohki, Koichi

    2015-01-01

    Spectroscopy is emerging as a technique that can expand the envelope of modern oceanographic sensors. The selectivity of spectroscopic techniques enables a single instrument to measure multiple components of the marine environment and can form the basis for versatile tools to perform in situ geochemical analysis. We have developed a deep-sea laser-induced breakdown spectrometer (ChemiCam) and successfully deployed the instrument from a remotely operated vehicle (ROV) to perform in situ multi-element analysis of both seawater and mineral deposits at depths of over 1000 m. The instrument consists of a long-nanosecond duration pulse-laser, a spectrometer and a high-speed camera. Power supply, instrument control and signal telemetry are provided through a ROV tether. The instrument has two modes of operation. In the first mode, the laser is focused directly into seawater and spectroscopic measurements of seawater composition are performed. In the second mode, a fiber-optic cable assembly is used to make spectroscopic measurements of mineral deposits. In this mode the laser is fired through a 4 m long fiber-optic cable and is focused onto the target's surface using an optical head and a linear stage that can be held by a ROV manipulator. In this paper, we describe the instrument and the methods developed to process its measurements. Exemplary measurements of both seawater and mineral deposits made during deployments of the device at an active hydrothermal vent field in the Okinawa trough are presented. Through integration with platforms such as underwater vehicles, drilling systems and subsea observatories, it is hoped that this technology can contribute to more efficient scientific surveys of the deep-sea environment.

  4. Tuning the size of aluminum oxide nanoparticles synthesized by laser ablation in water using physical and chemical approaches.

    PubMed

    Al-Mamun, Sharif Abdullah; Nakajima, Reiko; Ishigaki, Takamasa

    2013-02-15

    Colloidal solution of nano-sized spherical Al(2)O(3) particles were produced by nanosecond laser ablation upon irradiation on a corundum target in a distilled water environment. The effects of target inclination along the direction of laser irradiation and defocusing of the laser beam have been investigated in this study. The effect of the pH of the aqueous solution has also been studied. Synthesized particles were analyzed using transmission electron microscopy (TEM) to investigate particle shape and size distributions. Ablated nanoparticles (NPs) were spherical in shape, with the average particle size ranging from 8 to 18 nm in different operating conditions. Target inclination resulted in a decrease in the average particle size. Laser defocusing at the same power and thus with reduced fluence caused a decrease in the average size and standard deviation (SD), whereas defocusing that maintained the same fluence caused the reverse effect. Phase identification of NPs performed with high resolution TEM lattice images and fast Fourier transform indicated both a metastable γ-Al(2)O(3) phase and a stable α-Al(2)O(3) phase. X-ray diffraction analysis was also performed, which showed peaks of both α-Al(2)O(3) and γ-Al(2)O(3) with the presence of α- and γ-AlO(OH) polymorphs in acidic and alkaline solution, respectively. Surface conditions of the ablated particles representing the acidic and alkaline conditions were found to have a significant influence on both the size and crystallographic phase, which indicates it may be possible to induce size and phase transitions by changing the surface chemistry.

  5. Laser propulsion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rom, F. E.; Putre, H. A.

    1972-01-01

    The use of an earth-based high-power laser beam to provide energy for earth-launched rocket vehicle is investigated. The laser beam energy is absorbed in an opaque propellant gas and is converted to high-specific-impulse thrust by expanding the heated propellant to space by means of a nozzle. This laser propulsion scheme can produce specific impulses of several thousand seconds. Payload to gross-weight fractions about an order of magnitude higher than those for conventional chemical earth-launched vehicles appear possible. There is a potential for a significant reduction in cost per payload mass in earth orbit.

  6. Chemical characterization of single micro- and nano-particles by optical catapulting-optical trapping-laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fortes, Francisco J.; Fernández-Bravo, Angel; Javier Laserna, J.

    2014-10-01

    Spectral identification of individual micro- and nano-sized particles by the sequential intervention of optical catapulting, optical trapping and laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy is presented. The three techniques are used for different purposes. Optical catapulting (OC) serves to put the particulate material under inspection in aerosol form. Optical trapping (OT) permits the isolation and manipulation of individual particles from the aerosol, which are subsequently analyzed by laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS). Once catapulted, the dynamics of particle trapping depends both on the laser beam characteristics (power and intensity gradient) and on the particle properties (size, mass and shape). Particles are stably trapped in air at atmospheric pressure and can be conveniently manipulated for a precise positioning for LIBS analysis. The spectra acquired from the individually trapped particles permit a straightforward identification of the material inspected. Variability of LIBS signal for the inspection of Ni microspheres was 30% relative standard deviation. OC-OT-LIBS permits the separation of particles in a heterogeneous mixture and the subsequent analysis of the isolated particle of interest. In order to evaluate the sensitivity of the approach, the number of absolute photons emitted by a single trapped particle was calculated. The limit of detection (LOD) for Al2O3 particles was calculated to be 200 attograms aluminium.

  7. The chemical digestion of Ti6Al7Nb scaffolds produced by Selective Laser Melting reduces significantly ability of Pseudomonas aeruginosa to form biofilm.

    PubMed

    Junka, Adam F; Szymczyk, Patrycja; Secewicz, Anna; Pawlak, Andrzej; Smutnicka, Danuta; Ziółkowski, Grzegorz; Bartoszewicz, Marzenna; Chlebus, Edward

    2016-01-01

    In our previous work we reported the impact of hydrofluoric and nitric acid used for chemical polishing of Ti-6Al-7Nb scaffolds on decrease of the number of Staphylococcus aureus biofilm forming cells. Herein, we tested impact of the aforementioned substances on biofilm of Gram-negative microorganism, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, dangerous pathogen responsible for plethora of implant-related infections. The Ti-6Al-7Nb scaffolds were manufactured using Selective Laser Melting method. Scaffolds were subjected to chemical polishing using a mixture of nitric acid and fluoride or left intact (control group). Pseudomonal biofilm was allowed to form on scaffolds for 24 hours and was removed by mechanical vortex shaking. The number of pseudomonal cells was estimated by means of quantitative culture and Scanning Electron Microscopy. The presence of nitric acid and fluoride on scaffold surfaces was assessed by means of IR and rentgen spetorscopy. Quantitative data were analysed using the Mann-Whitney test (P ≤ 0.05). Our results indicate that application of chemical polishing correlates with significant drop of biofilm-forming pseudomonal cells on the manufactured Ti-6Al-7Nb scaffolds ( p = 0.0133, Mann-Whitney test) compared to the number of biofilm-forming cells on non-polished scaffolds. As X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy revealed the presence of fluoride and nitrogen on the surface of scaffold, we speculate that drop of biofilm forming cells may be caused by biofilm-supressing activity of these two elements.

  8. Use of multi-photon laser-scanning microscopy to describe the distribution of xenobiotic chemicals in fish early life stages.

    PubMed

    Hornung, Michael W; Cook, Philip M; Flynn, Kevin M; Lothenbach, Doug B; Johnson, Rodney D; Nichols, John W

    2004-03-30

    To better understand the mechanisms by which persistent bioaccumulative toxicants (PBTs) produce toxicity during fish early life stages (ELS), dose-response relationships need to be understood in relation to the dynamic distribution of chemicals in sensitive tissues. In this study, a multi-photon laser scanning microscope (MPLSM) was used to determine the multi-photon excitation spectra of several polyaromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) and to describe chemical distribution among tissues during fish ELS. The multi-photon excitation spectra revealed intense fluorescent signal from the model fluorophore, pentamethyl-difluoro-boro-indacene (BODIPY), less signal from benzo[a]pyrene and fluoranthene, and no detectable signal from pyrene. The imaging method was tested by exposing newly fertilized medaka (Oryzias latipes) eggs to BODIPY or fluoranthene for 6 h, followed by transfer to clean media. Embryos and larvae were then imaged through 5 days post-hatch. The two test chemicals partitioned similarly throughout development and differences in fluorescence intensity among tissues were evident to a depth of several hundred microns. Initially, the most intense signal was observed in the oil droplet within the yolk, while a moderate signal was seen in the portion of the yolk containing the yolk-platelets. As embryonic development progressed, the liver biliary system, gall bladder, and intestinal tract accumulated strong fluorescent signal. After hatch, once the gastrointestinal tract was completely developed, most of the fluorescent signal was cleared. The MPLSM is a useful tool to describe the tissue distribution of fluorescent PBTs during fish ELS.

  9. Rapid High Spatial Resolution Chemical Characterization of Soil Structure to Illuminate Nutrient Distribution Mechanisms Related to Carbon Cycling Using Laser Ablation Aerosol Mass Spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hicks, R. K.; Alexander, M. L. L.; Newburn, M. K.

    2015-12-01

    Soils contain approximately half of Earth's terrestrial carbon. As such, it is important to understand the factors that control the cycling of this soil organic carbon between the land and the atmosphere. Models that attribute the persistence of soil organic carbon to the intrinsic properties of the molecules themselves are inconsistent with recent observations— for example, materials that are more thermodynamically stable have been found to have a shorter lifetime in soils than ones that are less stable, and vice versa. A new explanation has therefore been posited that invokes ecosystem properties as a whole, and not just intrinsic molecular properties, as the kinetic factor controlling soil carbon dynamics. Because soil dynamics occur on a small scale, techniques with high spatial resolution are required for their study. Existing techniques such as TOF-SIMS require preparation of the sample and introduction into a high vacuum system, and do not address the need to examine large numbers of sample systems without perturbation of chemical and physical properties. To address this analytical challenge, we have coupled a laser ablation (LA) module to an Aerodyne aerosol mass spectrometer (AMS), thereby enabling sample introduction and subsequent measurement of small amounts of soil organic matter by the laser ablation aerosol mass spectrometer (LA-AMS). Due to the adjustable laser beam width, the LA-AMS can probe spot sizes ranging from 1-150 μm in diameter, liberating from 10-100 ng/pulse. With a detection limit of 1 pM, the AMS allows for chemical characterization of the ablated material in terms of elemental ratios, compound classes, and TOC/TOM ratios. Furthermore, the LA-AMS is capable of rapid, in-situ sampling under ambient conditions, thereby eliminating the need for sample processing or transport before analysis. Here, we will present the first results from systematic studies aimed at validating the LA-AMS method as well as results from initial measurements

  10. Laser satellite power systems

    SciTech Connect

    Walbridge, E.W.

    1980-01-01

    A laser satellite power system (SPS) converts solar power captured by earth-orbiting satellites into electrical power on the earth's surface, the satellite-to-ground transmission of power being effected by laser beam. The laser SPS may be an alternative to the microwave SPS. Microwaves easily penetrate clouds while laser radiation does not. Although there is this major disadvantage to a laser SPS, that system has four important advantages over the microwave alternative: (1) land requirements are much less, (2) radiation levels are low outside the laser ground stations, (3) laser beam sidelobes are not expected to interfere with electromagnetic systems, and (4) the laser system lends itself to small-scale demonstration. After describing lasers and how they work, the report discusses the five lasers that are candidates for application in a laser SPS: electric discharge lasers, direct and indirect solar pumped lasers, free electron lasers, and closed-cycle chemical lasers. The Lockheed laser SPS is examined in some detail. To determine whether a laser SPS will be worthy of future deployment, its capabilities need to be better understood and its attractiveness relative to other electric power options better assessed. First priority should be given to potential program stoppers, e.g., beam attenuation by clouds. If investigation shows these potential program stoppers to be resolvable, further research should investigate lasers that are particularly promising for SPS application.

  11. Time-Resolved O3 Chemical Chain Reaction Kinetics Via High-Resolution IR Laser Absorption Methods

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kulcke, Axel; Blackmon, Brad; Chapman, William B.; Kim, In Koo; Nesbitt, David J.

    1998-01-01

    Excimer laser photolysis in combination with time-resolved IR laser absorption detection of OH radicals has been used to study O3/OH(v = 0)/HO2 chain reaction kinetics at 298 K, (i.e.,(k(sub 1) is OH + 03 yields H02 + 02 and (k(sub 2) is H02 + 03 yields OH + 202). From time-resolved detection of OH radicals with high-resolution near IR laser absorption methods, the chain induction kinetics have been measured at up to an order of magnitude higher ozone concentrations ([03] less than or equal to 10(exp 17) molecules/cu cm) than accessible in previous studies. This greater dynamic range permits the full evolution of the chain induction, propagation, and termination process to be temporally isolated and measured in real time. An exact solution for time-dependent OH evolution under pseudo- first-order chain reaction conditions is presented, which correctly predicts new kinetic signatures not included in previous OH + 03 kinetic analyses. Specifically, the solutions predict an initial exponential loss (chain "induction") of the OH radical to a steady-state level ([OH](sub ss)), with this fast initial decay determined by the sum of both chain rate constants, k(sub ind) = k(sub 1) + k(sub 2). By monitoring the chain induction feature, this sum of the rate constants is determined to be k(sub ind) = 8.4(8) x 10(exp -14) cu cm/molecule/s for room temperature reagents. This is significantly higher than the values currently recommended for use in atmospheric models, but in excellent agreement with previous results from Ravishankara et al.

  12. Resonant and nonresonant vibrational excitation of ammonia molecules in the growth of gallium nitride using laser-assisted metal organic chemical vapour deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Golgir, Hossein Rabiee; Zhou, Yun Shen; Li, Dawei; Keramatnejad, Kamran; Xiong, Wei; Wang, Mengmeng; Jiang, Li Jia; Huang, Xi; Jiang, Lan; Silvain, Jean Francois; Lu, Yong Feng

    2016-09-01

    The influence of exciting ammonia (NH3) molecular vibration in the growth of gallium nitride (GaN) was investigated by using an infrared laser-assisted metal organic chemical vapor deposition method. A wavelength tunable CO2 laser was used to selectively excite the individual vibrational modes. Resonantly exciting the NH-wagging mode (v2) of NH3 molecules at 9.219 μm led to a GaN growth rate of 84 μm/h, which is much higher than the reported results. The difference between the resonantly excited and conventional thermally populated vibrational states was studied via resonant and nonresonant vibrational excitations of NH3 molecules. Resonant excitation of various vibrational modes was achieved at 9.219, 10.35, and 10.719 μm, respectively. Nonresonant excitation was conducted at 9.201 and 10.591 μm, similar to conventional thermal heating. Compared to nonresonant excitation, resonant excitation noticeably promotes the GaN growth rate and crystalline quality. The full width at half maximum value of the XRD rocking curves of the GaN (0002) and GaN (10-12) diffraction peaks decreased at resonant depositions and reached its minimum value of 45 and 53 arcmin, respectively, at the laser wavelength of 9.219 μm. According to the optical emission spectroscopic studies, resonantly exciting the NH3 v2 mode leads to NH3 decomposition at room temperature, reduces the formation of the TMGa:NH3 adduct, promotes the supply of active species in GaN formation, and, therefore, results in the increased GaN growth rate.

  13. Investigation of the chemical stability of the laser-induced fluorescence tracers acetone, diethylketone, and toluene under IC engine conditions using Raman spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Trost, Johannes; Zigan, Lars; Eichmann, Simone C; Seeger, Thomas; Leipertz, Alfred

    2013-09-01

    This paper reports on an investigation of the chemical stability of the common laser-induced fluorescence (LIF) tracers acetone, diethylketone, and toluene. Stability is analyzed using linear Raman spectroscopy inside a heated pressure cell with optical access, which is used for the LIF calibration of these tracers. The measurements examine the influence of temperature, pressure, and residence time on tracer oxidation, which occurs without a rise in temperature or pressure inside the cell, highlighting the need for optical detection. A comparison between the three different tracers shows large differences, with diethylketone having the lowest and toluene by far the highest stability. An analysis of the sensitivity of the measurement shows that the detection limit of the oxidized tracer is well below 3% molar fraction, which is typical for LIF applications in combustion devices such as internal combustion (IC) engines. Furthermore, the effect on the LIF signal intensity is examined in an isothermal turbulent mixing study.

  14. Laser synthesis, structure and chemical properties of colloidal nickel-molybdenum nanoparticles for the substitution of noble metals in heterogeneous catalysis.

    PubMed

    Marzun, Galina; Levish, Alexander; Mackert, Viktor; Kallio, Tanja; Barcikowski, Stephan; Wagener, Philipp

    2017-03-01

    Platinum and iridium are rare and expensive noble metals that are used as catalysts for different sectors including in heterogeneous chemical automotive emission catalysis and electrochemical energy conversion. Nickel and its alloys are promising materials to substitute noble metals. Nickel based materials are cost-effective with good availability and show comparable catalytic performances. The nickel-molybdenum system is a very interesting alternative to platinum in water electrolysis. We produced ligand-free nickel-molybdenum nanoparticles by laser ablation in water and acetone. Our results show that segregated particles were formed in water due to the oxidation of the metals. X-ray diffraction shows a significant change in the lattice parameter due to a diffusion of molybdenum atoms into the nickel lattice with increasing activity in the electrochemical oxygen evolution reaction. Even though the solubility of molecular oxygen in acetone is higher than in water, there were no oxides and a more homogeneous metal distribution in the particles in acetone as seen by TEM-EDX. This showed that dissolved molecular oxygen does not control oxide formation. Overall, the laser ablation of pressed micro particulate mixtures in liquids offers a combinational synthesis approach that allows the screening of alloy nanoparticles for catalytic testing and can convert micro-mixtures into nano-alloys.

  15. Ground state lasing at 1.30 microm from InAs/GaAs quantum dot lasers grown by metal-organic chemical vapor deposition.

    PubMed

    Guimard, Denis; Ishida, Mitsuru; Bordel, Damien; Li, Lin; Nishioka, Masao; Tanaka, Yu; Ekawa, Mitsuru; Sudo, Hisao; Yamamoto, Tsuyoshi; Kondo, Hayato; Sugawara, Mitsuru; Arakawa, Yasuhiko

    2010-03-12

    We investigated the effects of post-growth annealing on the photoluminescence (PL) characteristics of InAs/GaAs quantum dots (QDs) grown by metal-organic chemical vapor deposition (MOCVD). The onset temperature at which both the peak linewidth and the PL intensity degraded and the blueshift of the ground state emission wavelength occurred was found to depend on both the QD density and the In composition of the capping layer. This behavior is particularly important in view of QD integration in photonic devices. From the knowledge of the dependences of the PL characteristics after annealing on the QD and capping growth conditions, ground state lasing at 1.30 microm could be demonstrated from InAs/GaAs QDs grown by MOCVD. Finally, we compared the laser characteristics of InAs/GaAs QDs with those of InAs/Sb:GaAs QDs, grown according to the antimony-mediated growth technique, and showed that InAs/Sb:GaAs QDs are more appropriate for laser fabrication at 1.3 microm by MOCVD.

  16. Determining the order of deposition of natural latent fingerprints and laser printed ink using chemical mapping with secondary ion mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Attard Montalto, Nicola; Ojeda, Jesús J; Jones, Benjamin J

    2013-03-01

    Time-of-flight secondary ion mass spectrometry (ToF-SIMS) chemical mapping was used to investigate the order of deposition of natural latent fingerprints and laser printed ink on paper. This feasibility study shows that sodium, potassium and C(3)H(5) positive ions were particularly abundant endogenous components of the natural fingerprints and also present in the paper examined, but were mostly absent in the laser printed ink. Mapping of these ions enables the observation of friction ridges from latent prints on the ink surface, only when a fingerprint was deposited above the layer of ink. As a demonstration of proof of concept, blind testing of 21 samples from three donors resulted in a 100% success rate. The sensitivity of this technique was investigated within this trial through the examination of up to fifth depletion fingerprints and ageing of up to 28 days. Migration of fingerprint and paper components to the ink surface, although observed with increased ageing time, was not found to compromise determination of the deposition sequence.

  17. High-speed growth of YBa2Cu3O7 - δ film with high critical temperature on MgO single crystal substrate by laser chemical vapor deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Pei; Ito, Akihiko; Tu, Rong; Goto, Takashi

    2010-12-01

    a-axis- and c-axis-oriented YBa2Cu3O7 - δ films were prepared on a (100) MgO single crystal substrate by chemical vapor deposition enhanced by a continuous wave Nd:YAG laser. A c-axis-oriented YBCO film with a critical temperature of 89 K was prepared at a high deposition rate of 57 µm h - 1, about 2-600 times higher than that of conventional chemical vapor deposition.

  18. Chemical analysis of pharmaceuticals and explosives in fingermarks using matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization/time-of-flight mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Kaplan-Sandquist, Kimberly; LeBeau, Marc A; Miller, Mark L

    2014-02-01

    Chemical analysis of latent fingermarks, "touch chemistry," has the potential of providing intelligence or forensically relevant information. Matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization/time-of-flight mass spectrometry (MALDI/TOF MS) was used as an analytical platform for obtaining mass spectra and chemical images of target drugs and explosives in fingermark residues following conventional fingerprint development methods and MALDI matrix processing. There were two main purposes of this research: (1) develop effective laboratory methods for detecting drugs and explosives in fingermark residues and (2) determine the feasibility of detecting drugs and explosives after casual contact with pills, powders, and residues. Further, synthetic latent print reference pads were evaluated as mimics of natural fingermark residue to determine if the pads could be used for method development and quality control. The results suggest that artificial amino acid and sebaceous oil residue pads are not suitable to adequately simulate natural fingermark chemistry for MALDI/TOF MS analysis. However, the pads were useful for designing experiments and setting instrumental parameters. Based on the natural fingermark residue experiments, handling whole or broken pills did not transfer sufficient quantities of drugs to allow for definitive detection. Transferring drugs or explosives in the form of powders and residues was successful for preparing analytes for detection after contact with fingers and deposition of fingermark residue. One downfall to handling powders was that the analyte particles were easily spread beyond the original fingermark during development. Analyte particles were confined in the original fingermark when using transfer residues. The MALDI/TOF MS was able to detect procaine, pseudoephedrine, TNT, and RDX from contact residue under laboratory conditions with the integration of conventional fingerprint development methods and MALDI matrix. MALDI/TOF MS is a nondestructive

  19. Evaluation of the laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy technique for determination of the chemical composition of copper concentrates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Łazarek, Łukasz; Antończak, Arkadiusz J.; Wójcik, Michał R.; Drzymała, Jan; Abramski, Krzysztof M.

    2014-07-01

    Laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS), like many other spectroscopic techniques, is a comparative method. Typically, in qualitative analysis, synthetic certified standard with a well-known elemental composition is used to calibrate the system. Nevertheless, in all laser-induced techniques, such calibration can affect the accuracy through differences in the overall composition of the chosen standard. There are also some intermediate factors, which can cause imprecision in measurements, such as optical absorption, surface structure and thermal conductivity. In this work the calibration performed for the LIBS technique utilizes pellets made directly from the tested materials (old well-characterized samples). This choice produces a considerable improvement in the accuracy of the method. This technique was adopted for the determination of trace elements in industrial copper concentrates, standardized by conventional atomic absorption spectroscopy with a flame atomizer. A series of copper flotation concentrate samples was analyzed for three elements: silver, cobalt and vanadium. We also proposed a method of post-processing the measurement data to minimize matrix effects and permit reliable analysis. It has been shown that the described technique can be used in qualitative and quantitative analyses of complex inorganic materials, such as copper flotation concentrates. It was noted that the final validation of such methodology is limited mainly by the accuracy of the characterization of the standards.

  20. Optical pumping of chemical HF lasers on the basis of NF{sub 3}-H{sub 2} and ClF{sub 5}-H{sub 2} mixtures by an open surface discharge in the bleaching-wave mode

    SciTech Connect

    Artem'ev, Mikhail Yu; Mikheev, L D; Nesterov, V M; Cheremiskin, V I; Bashkin, A S; Sentis, M L

    2001-07-31

    Lasing on HF upon optical pumping by emission of an open discharge, using NF{sub 3} and ClF{sub 5} as donors of fluorine atoms, was obtained for the first time in a chemical laser and the bleaching-wave mode was realised in a chemical HF laser. An open surface discharge was used as a pump source. The velocity of the bleaching wave, which was formed under its action, reached {approx}8 km s{sup -1}. The formation of this wave leads to a rapid (with an ultrasonic velocity) replacement of the working medium in the lasing region, which provides a quantum laser efficiency close to unity. The optimum compo-sition of the working mixture was found to be NF{sub 3}:H{sub 2}:Kr =6:10:125 Torr. For this composition, the output laser energy in a 3.2-{mu}s pulse reached {approx}0.4 J and the specific output energy was 3.5 J litre{sup -1}. Approximately the same output characteristics of laser emission (0.35 J in a 3.5-{mu}s pulse in the ClF{sub 5}:H{sub 2}:Kr=3:20:50 Torr mixture) were obtained in the system using ClF{sub 5} as donors of fluorine atoms. (lasers, active media)

  1. LES/RANS Modeling of Aero-Optical Effects in a Supersonic Cavity Flow

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-06-13

    which focused on simulations of the effects of heat release due to lasing chemistry on shock-train formation within chemical oxygen iodine lasers...complete some of the work proposed under the original statement of work. 2.0 INTRODUCTION Externally-mounted optical systems (e.g. an aircraft... systems , it is important to be able to predict and model these aero-optical effects. Figure 1. Schematic of cavity flow with optical reflector at

  2. Tunable lasers- an overview

    SciTech Connect

    Guenther, B.D.; Buser, R.G.

    1982-08-01

    This overview of tunable lasers describes their applicability to spectroscopy in the ultraviolet and middle infrared ranges; to rapid on-line diagnostics by ultrashort cavity lasers; to exploration, by the free electron laser, for its wide tuning in the far infrared to submillimeter region; to remote detection, in areas such as portable pollution monitors, on-line chemical analyzers, auto exhaust analyzers, and production line controls; to photochemistry; and to other potential areas in diagnostics, communications, and medical and biological sciences. The following lasers are characterized by their tunability: solid state lasers, primarily alexandrite, with a tuning range of ca 1000 Angstroms; color center lasers; semiconductor lasers; dye lasers; gas lasers, where high-pressure CO/sub 2/ discharges are the best known example for a wide tunability range, and research is continuing in systems such as the alkali dimers; and, at wavelengths beyond 10 micrometers, the possibilities beyond Cerenkov and free electron lasers.

  3. Surface-pattern geometry, topography, and chemical modifications during KrF excimer laser micro-drilling of p-type Si (111) wafers in ambient environment of HCl fumes in air

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zakria Butt, Muhammad; Saher, Sobia; Waqas Khaliq, Muhammad; Siraj, Khurram

    2016-11-01

    Eight mirror-like polished p-type Si (111) wafers were irradiated with 100, 200, 300, 400, 800, 1200, 1600, and 2000 KrF excimer laser pulses in ambient environment of HCl fumes in air. The laser parameters were: wavelength = 248 nm, pulse width = 20 ns, pulse energy = 20 mJ, and repetition rate = 20 Hz. For each set of laser pulses, characterization of the rectangular etched patterns formed on target surface was done by optical/scanning electron microscopy, XRD, and EDX techniques. The average etched depth increased with the increase in number of laser pulses from 100 to 2000 in accord with Sigmoidal (Boltzmann) function, whereas the average etch rate followed an exponential decay with the increase in number of laser pulses. However, the etched area, maximum etched depth, and maximum etch rate were found to increase linearly with the number of laser pulses, but the rate of increase was faster for 100-400 laser pulses (region I) than that for 800-2000 laser pulses (region II). The elemental composition for each etched-pattern determined by EDX shows that both O and Cl contents increase progressively with the increase in the number of laser shots in region I. However, in region II both O and Cl contents attain saturation values of about 39.33 wt.% and 0.14 wt.%, respectively. Perforation of Si wafers was achieved on irradiation with 1200-2000 laser pulses. XRD analysis confirmed the formation of SiO2, SiCl2 and SiCl4 phases in Si (111) wafers due to chemical reaction of silicon with both HCl fumes and oxygen in air.

  4. Modification of the chemical composition, morphology, and antireflection properties of WSe x films formed by pulsed laser deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grigoriev, S. N.; Nevolin, V. N.; Fominski, V. Yu.; Romanov, R. I.; Volosova, M. A.

    2014-09-01

    We have studied the possibility of controlling important structural characteristics of WSe x films, which belong to the class of layered materials and have good prospects for application in modern nano- and optoelectronic devices. It is established that, by using thermal treatment and ion irradiation during pulsed laser deposition (PLD) in the shadow of an antidroplet shield, it is possible to vary the Se/W atomic ratio from 5 to 1.5, change the character of atomic packing, and obtain films with either smooth or rough surfaces. An increase in the height of parabolic protrusions on the surface up to 200-500 nm leads to a decrease in the optical reflection coefficient in a broad wavelength range from 30% (typical of smooth films) to 6%, which can favor a significant increase in the efficiency of solar cells based on semiconductor films of this type.

  5. Multivariate approach to the chemical mapping of uranium in sandstone-hosted uranium ores analyzed using double pulse Laser-Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klus, Jakub; Mikysek, Petr; Prochazka, David; Pořízka, Pavel; Prochazková, Petra; Novotný, Jan; Trojek, Tomáš; Novotný, Karel; Slobodník, Marek; Kaiser, Jozef

    2016-09-01

    The goal of this work is to provide high resolution mapping of uranium in sandstone-hosted uranium ores using Laser-Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy (LIBS) technique. In order to obtain chemical image with highest possible spatial resolution, LIBS system in orthogonal double pulse (DP LIBS) arrangement was employed. Owing to this experimental arrangement the spot size of 50 μm in diameter resulting in lateral resolution of 100 μm was reached. Despite the increase in signal intensity in DP LIBS modification, the detection of uranium is challenging. The main cause is the high density of uranium spectral lines, which together with broadening of LIBS spectral lines overreaches the resolution of commonly used spectrometers. It results in increased overall background radiation with only few distinguishable uranium lines. Three different approaches in the LIBS data treatment for the uranium detection were utilized: i) spectral line intensity, ii) region of apparent background and iii) multivariate data analysis. By utilizing multivariate statistical methods, a specific specimen features (in our case uranium content) were revealed by processing complete spectral information obtained from broadband echelle spectrograph. Our results are in a good agreement with conventional approaches such as line fitting and show new possibilities of processing spectral data in mapping. As a reference technique to LIBS was employed X-ray Fluorescence (XRF). The XRF chemical images used in this paper have lower resolution (approximately 1-2 mm per image point), nevertheless the elemental distribution is apparent and corresponds to presented LIBS experiments.

  6. Infrared Scattering Scanning Near-Field Optical Microscopy Using An External Cavity Quantum Cascade Laser For Nanoscale Chemical Imaging And Spectroscopy of Explosive Residues

    SciTech Connect

    Craig, Ian M.; Phillips, Mark C.; Taubman, Matthew S.; Josberger, Erik E.; Raschke, Markus Bernd

    2013-02-04

    Infrared scattering scanning near-field optical microscopy (s-SNOM) is an apertureless superfocusing technique that uses the antenna properties of a conducting atomic force microscope (AFM) tip to achieve infrared spatial resolution below the diffraction limit. The instrument can be used either in imaging mode, where a fixed wavelength light source is tuned to a molecular resonance and the AFM raster scans an image, or in spectroscopy mode where the AFM is held stationary over a feature of interest and the light frequency is varied to obtain a spectrum. In either case, a strong, stable, coherent infrared source is required. Here we demonstrate the integration of a broadly tunable external cavity quantum cascade laser (ECQCL) into an s-SNOM and use it to obtain infrared spectra of microcrystals of chemicals adsorbed onto gold substrates. Residues of the explosive compound tetryl was deposited onto gold substrates. s-SNOM experiments were performed in the 1260-1400 cm-1 tuning range of the ECQCL, corresponding to the NO2 symmetric stretch vibrational fingerprint region. Vibrational infrared spectra were collected on individual chemical domains with a collection area of *500nm2 and compared to ensemble averaged far-field reflection-absorption infrared spectroscopy (RAIRS) results.

  7. Kinetic Studies of Plasma Chemical Fuel Oxidation in Nanosecond Pulsed Discharges by Single and Two Photon Laser Induced Fluorescence

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-07-01

    kHz repetition rate in fuel lean hydrogen, methane , ethylene, and propane-air plasmas at P = 100 Torr is compared to predictions from a plasma...hydrogen, methane , ethylene, and propane-air plasmas at P = 100 Torr is compared to predictions from a plasma-chemical fuel oxidation code. It is found...3.0, USC, and Konnov mechanisms. 3. Atomic Oxygen Measurements Atomic oxygen (O) production and decay is studied in the diffuse single filament

  8. Optimal gain-to-loss ratio for COIL and EOIL

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mezhenin, A. V.

    2017-01-01

    The two-level generation model has been applied to analyze the dependence of power efficiency of chemical oxygen-iodine laser (COIL) and electric oxygen-iodine laser (EOIL) on three dimensionless similarity criteria: residence-to-extraction time ratio γd, gain-to-loss ratio Π and relaxation-to-excitation rate ratio Λ. Power efficiency is represented as the product of two factors - the medium extraction efficiency and the extraction efficiency of resonator - each being a function of the Π. The dependences of the similarity criteria γd and Π optimal values on the kinetic and optical losses have been found. At low kinetic and optical losses, it is expedient to work with high values of γd and Π respectively. It has been found that maximum power efficiency is achieved when Π=3-8 for COIL and Π=9-17 for EOIL at the typical γd and optical losses rate.

  9. Laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) technique for the determination of the chemical composition of complex inorganic materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Łazarek, Łukasz; Antończak, Arkadiusz J.; Wójcik, Michał R.; Kozioł, Paweł E.; Stepak, Bogusz; Abramski, Krzysztof M.

    2014-08-01

    Laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) is a fast, fully optical method, that needs little or no sample preparation. In this technique qualitative and quantitative analysis is based on comparison. The determination of composition is generally based on the construction of a calibration curve namely the LIBS signal versus the concentration of the analyte. Typically, to calibrate the system, certified reference materials with known elemental composition are used. Nevertheless, such samples due to differences in the overall composition with respect to the used complex inorganic materials can influence significantly on the accuracy. There are also some intermediate factors which can cause imprecision in measurements, such as optical absorption, surface structure, thermal conductivity etc. This paper presents the calibration procedure performed with especially prepared pellets from the tested materials, which composition was previously defined. We also proposed methods of post-processing which allowed for mitigation of the matrix effects and for a reliable and accurate analysis. This technique was implemented for determination of trace elements in industrial copper concentrates standardized by conventional atomic absorption spectroscopy with a flame atomizer. A series of copper flotation concentrate samples was analyzed for contents of three elements, that is silver, cobalt and vanadium. It has been shown that the described technique can be used to qualitative and quantitative analyses of complex inorganic materials, such as copper flotation concentrates.

  10. Confocal laser scanning microscopy elucidation of the micromorphology of the leaf cuticle and analysis of its chemical composition.

    PubMed

    Nadiminti, Pavani P; Rookes, James E; Boyd, Ben J; Cahill, David M

    2015-11-01

    Electron microscopy techniques such as transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) have been invaluable tools for the study of the micromorphology of plant cuticles. However, for electron microscopy, the preparation techniques required may invariably introduce artefacts in cuticle preservation. Further, there are a limited number of methods available for quantifying the image data obtained through electron microscopy. Therefore, in this study, optical microscopy techniques were coupled with staining procedures and, along with SEM were used to qualitatively and quantitatively assess the ultrastructure of plant leaf cuticles. Leaf cryosections of Triticum aestivum (wheat), Zea mays (maize), and Lupinus angustifolius (lupin) were stained with either fat-soluble azo stain Sudan IV or fluorescent, diarylmethane Auramine O and were observed under confocal laser scanning microscope (CLSM). For all the plant species tested, the cuticle on the leaf surfaces could be clearly resolved in many cases into cuticular proper (CP), external cuticular layer (ECL), and internal cuticular layer (ICL). Novel image data analysis procedures for quantifying the epicuticular wax micromorphology were developed, and epicuticular waxes of L. angustifolius were described here for the first time. Together, application of a multifaceted approach involving the use of a range of techniques to study the plant cuticle has led to a better understanding of cuticular structure and provides new insights into leaf surface architecture.

  11. Novel two-step laser ablation and ionization mass spectrometry (2S-LAIMS) of actor-spectator ice layers: Probing chemical composition of D{sub 2}O ice beneath a H{sub 2}O ice layer

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, Rui Gudipati, Murthy S.

    2014-03-14

    In this work, we report for the first time successful analysis of organic aromatic analytes imbedded in D{sub 2}O ices by novel infrared (IR) laser ablation of a layered non-absorbing D{sub 2}O ice (spectator) containing the analytes and an ablation-active IR-absorbing H{sub 2}O ice layer (actor) without the analyte. With these studies we have opened up a new method for the in situ analysis of solids containing analytes when covered with an IR laser-absorbing layer that can be resonantly ablated. This soft ejection method takes advantage of the tenability of two-step infrared laser ablation and ultraviolet laser ionization mass spectrometry, previously demonstrated in this lab to study chemical reactions of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) in cryogenic ices. The IR laser pulse tuned to resonantly excite only the upper H{sub 2}O ice layer (actor) generates a shockwave upon impact. This shockwave penetrates the lower analyte-containing D{sub 2}O ice layer (spectator, a non-absorbing ice that cannot be ablated directly with the wavelength of the IR laser employed) and is reflected back, ejecting the contents of the D{sub 2}O layer into the vacuum where they are intersected by a UV laser for ionization and detection by a time-of-flight mass spectrometer. Thus, energy is transmitted from the laser-absorbing actor layer into the non-absorbing spectator layer resulting its ablation. We found that isotope cross-contamination between layers was negligible. We also did not see any evidence for thermal or collisional chemistry of PAH molecules with H{sub 2}O molecules in the shockwave. We call this “shockwave mediated surface resonance enhanced subsurface ablation” technique as “two-step laser ablation and ionization mass spectrometry of actor-spectator ice layers.” This method has its roots in the well-established MALDI (matrix assisted laser desorption and ionization) method. Our method offers more flexibility to optimize both the processes—ablation and

  12. Novel two-step laser ablation and ionization mass spectrometry (2S-LAIMS) of actor-spectator ice layers: probing chemical composition of D2O ice beneath a H2O ice layer.

    PubMed

    Yang, Rui; Gudipati, Murthy S

    2014-03-14

    In this work, we report for the first time successful analysis of organic aromatic analytes imbedded in D2O ices by novel infrared (IR) laser ablation of a layered non-absorbing D2O ice (spectator) containing the analytes and an ablation-active IR-absorbing H2O ice layer (actor) without the analyte. With these studies we have opened up a new method for the in situ analysis of solids containing analytes when covered with an IR laser-absorbing layer that can be resonantly ablated. This soft ejection method takes advantage of the tenability of two-step infrared laser ablation and ultraviolet laser ionization mass spectrometry, previously demonstrated in this lab to study chemical reactions of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) in cryogenic ices. The IR laser pulse tuned to resonantly excite only the upper H2O ice layer (actor) generates a shockwave upon impact. This shockwave penetrates the lower analyte-containing D2O ice layer (spectator, a non-absorbing ice that cannot be ablated directly with the wavelength of the IR laser employed) and is reflected back, ejecting the contents of the D2O layer into the vacuum where they are intersected by a UV laser for ionization and detection by a time-of-flight mass spectrometer. Thus, energy is transmitted from the laser-absorbing actor layer into the non-absorbing spectator layer resulting its ablation. We found that isotope cross-contamination between layers was negligible. We also did not see any evidence for thermal or collisional chemistry of PAH molecules with H2O molecules in the shockwave. We call this "shockwave mediated surface resonance enhanced subsurface ablation" technique as "two-step laser ablation and ionization mass spectrometry of actor-spectator ice layers." This method has its roots in the well-established MALDI (matrix assisted laser desorption and ionization) method. Our method offers more flexibility to optimize both the processes--ablation and ionization. This new technique can thus be potentially

  13. Analysis of trimethoprim, lincomycin, sulfadoxin and tylosin in swine manure using laser diode thermal desorption-atmospheric pressure chemical ionization-tandem mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Solliec, Morgan; Massé, Daniel; Sauvé, Sébastien

    2014-10-01

    A new extraction method coupled to a high throughput sample analysis technique was developed for the determination of four veterinary antibiotics. The analytes belong to different groups of antibiotics such as chemotherapeutics, sulfonamides, lincosamides and macrolides. Trimethoprim (TMP), sulfadoxin (SFX), lincomycin (LCM) and tylosin (TYL) were extracted from lyophilized manure using a sonication extraction. McIlvaine buffer and methanol (MeOH) were used as extraction buffers, followed by cation-exchange solid phase extraction (SPE) for clean-up. Analysis was performed by laser diode thermal desorption-atmospheric pressure chemical-ionization (LDTD-APCI) tandem mass spectrometry (MS/MS) with selected reaction monitoring (SRM) detection. The LDTD is a high throughput sample introduction method that reduces total analysis time to less than 15s per sample, compared to minutes when using traditional liquid chromatography (LC). Various SPE parameters were optimized after sample extraction: the stationary phase, the extraction solvent composition, the quantity of sample extracted and sample pH. LDTD parameters were also optimized: solvent deposition, carrier gas, laser power and corona discharge. The method limit of detection (MLD) ranged from 2.5 to 8.3 µg kg(-1) while the method limit of quantification (MLQ) ranged from 8.3 to 28µgkg(-1). Calibration curves in the manure matrix showed good linearity (R(2)≥ 0.996) for all analytes and the interday and intraday coefficients of variation were below 14%. Recoveries of analytes from manure ranged from 53% to 69%. The method was successfully applied to real manure samples.

  14. Laser-assisted one-pot fabrication of calcium phosphate-based submicrospheres with internally crystallized magnetite nanoparticles through chemical precipitation.

    PubMed

    Nakamura, Maki; Oyane, Ayako; Sakamaki, Ikuko; Ishikawa, Yoshie; Shimizu, Yoshiki; Kawaguchi, Kenji

    2015-04-14

    In this paper, we have further developed our simple (one-pot) and rapid (short irradiation time) laser fabrication process of submicrometer spheres composed of amorphous calcium iron phosphate. In our previous process, laser irradiation was applied to a calcium phosphate (CaP) reaction mixture supplemented with ferric ions (Fe(3+)) as a light-absorbing agent. Because the intention of the present study was to fabricate magnetite-encapsulated CaP-based submicrometer spheres, ferrous ions (Fe(2+)) were used as a light-absorbing agent rather than ferric ions. The ferrous ions served as a light-absorbing agent and facilitated the fabrication of submicrometer and micrometer spheres of amorphous calcium iron phosphate. The sphere formation and growth were better promoted by the use of ferrous ions as compared with the use of ferric ions. The chemical composition of the spheres was controllable through adjustment of the experimental conditions. By the addition of sodium hydroxide to the CaP reaction mixture supplemented with ferrous ions, fabrication of CaP-based magnetic submicrometer spheres was successfully achieved. Numerous magnetite and wüstite nanoparticles were coprecipitated or segregated into the CaP-based spherical amorphous matrix via light-material interaction during the CaP precipitation process. The magnetic properties of the magnetite and wüstite formed in the CaP-based spheres were investigated by magnetization measurements. The present process and the resulting CaP-based spheres are expected to have great potential for biomedical applications.

  15. Morphological and chemical transformations of single silica-coated CdSe/CdS nanorods upon fs-laser excitation.

    PubMed

    Albrecht, Wiebke; Goris, Bart; Bals, Sara; Hutter, Eline M; Vanmaekelbergh, Daniel; van Huis, Marijn A; van Blaaderen, Alfons

    2017-03-29

    Radiation-induced modifications of nanostructures are of fundamental interest and constitute a viable out-of-equilibrium approach to the development of novel nanomaterials. Herein, we investigated the structural transformation of silica-coated CdSe/CdS nanorods (NRs) under femtosecond (fs) illumination. By comparing the same nanorods before and after illumination with different fluences we found that the silica-shell did not only enhance the stability of the NRs but that the confinement of the NRs also led to novel morphological and chemical transformations. Whereas uncoated CdSe/CdS nanorods were found to sublimate under such excitations the silica-coated nanorods broke into fragments which deformed towards a more spherical shape. Furthermore, CdS decomposed which led to the formation of metallic Cd, confirmed by high-resolution electron microscopy and energy dispersive X-ray spectrometry (EDX), whereby an epitaxial interface with the remaining CdS lattice was formed. Under electron beam exposure similar transformations were found to take place which we followed in situ.

  16. The influence of laser-induced nanosecond rise-time stress waves on the microstructure and surface chemical activity of single crystal Cu nanopillars.

    PubMed

    Youssef, G; Crum, R; Prikhodko, S V; Seif, D; Po, G; Ghoniem, N; Kodambaka, S; Gupta, V

    2013-02-28

    An apparatus and test procedure for fabrication and loading of single crystal metal nanopillars under extremely high pressures (>1 GPa) and strain rates (>10(7) s(-1)), using laser-generated stress waves, are presented. Single-crystalline Cu pillars (∼1.20 μm in tall and ∼0.45 μm in diameter) prepared via focused ion beam milling of Cu(001) substrates are shock-loaded using this approach with the dilatational stress waves propagating along the [001] axis of the pillars. Transmission electron microscopy observations of shock-loaded pillars show that dislocation density decreases and that their orientation changes with increasing stress wave amplitude, indicative of dislocation motion. The shock-loaded pillars exhibit enhanced chemical reactivity when submerged in oil and isopropyl alcohol solutions, due likely to the exposure of clean surfaces via surface spallation and formation of surface steps and nanoscale facets through dislocation motion to the surface of the pillars, resulting in growth of thin oxide films on the surfaces of the pillars.

  17. The influence of laser-induced nanosecond rise-time stress waves on the microstructure and surface chemical activity of single crystal Cu nanopillars

    SciTech Connect

    Youssef, G.; Crum, R.; Seif, D.; Po, G.; Prikhodko, S. V.; Kodambaka, S.; Ghoniem, N.; Gupta, V.

    2013-02-28

    An apparatus and test procedure for fabrication and loading of single crystal metal nanopillars under extremely high pressures (>1 GPa) and strain rates (>10{sup 7} s{sup -1}), using laser-generated stress waves, are presented. Single-crystalline Cu pillars ({approx}1.20 {mu}m in tall and {approx}0.45 {mu}m in diameter) prepared via focused ion beam milling of Cu(001) substrates are shock-loaded using this approach with the dilatational stress waves propagating along the [001] axis of the pillars. Transmission electron microscopy observations of shock-loaded pillars show that dislocation density decreases and that their orientation changes with increasing stress wave amplitude, indicative of dislocation motion. The shock-loaded pillars exhibit enhanced chemical reactivity when submerged in oil and isopropyl alcohol solutions, due likely to the exposure of clean surfaces via surface spallation and formation of surface steps and nanoscale facets through dislocation motion to the surface of the pillars, resulting in growth of thin oxide films on the surfaces of the pillars.

  18. The influence of laser-induced nanosecond rise-time stress waves on the microstructure and surface chemical activity of single crystal Cu nanopillars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Youssef, G.; Crum, R.; Prikhodko, S. V.; Seif, D.; Po, G.; Ghoniem, N.; Kodambaka, S.; Gupta, V.

    2013-02-01

    An apparatus and test procedure for fabrication and loading of single crystal metal nanopillars under extremely high pressures (>1 GPa) and strain rates (>107 s-1), using laser-generated stress waves, are presented. Single-crystalline Cu pillars (˜1.20 μm in tall and ˜0.45 μm in diameter) prepared via focused ion beam milling of Cu(001) substrates are shock-loaded using this approach with the dilatational stress waves propagating along the [001] axis of the pillars. Transmission electron microscopy observations of shock-loaded pillars show that dislocation density decreases and that their orientation changes with increasing stress wave amplitude, indicative of dislocation motion. The shock-loaded pillars exhibit enhanced chemical reactivity when submerged in oil and isopropyl alcohol solutions, due likely to the exposure of clean surfaces via surface spallation and formation of surface steps and nanoscale facets through dislocation motion to the surface of the pillars, resulting in growth of thin oxide films on the surfaces of the pillars.

  19. Determination of Os by isotope dilution-inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry with the combination of laser ablation to introduce chemically separated geological samples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Yali; Ren, Minghao; Xia, Xiaoping; Li, Congying; Sun, Weidong

    2015-11-01

    A method was developed for the determination of trace Os in geological samples by laser ablation-inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry (LA-ICP-MS) with the combination of chemical separation and preconcentration. Samples are digested using aqua regia in Carius tubes, and the Os analyte is converted into volatile OsO4, which is distilled and absorbed with HBr. The HBr solution is concentrated for further Os purification using the microdistillation technique. The purified Os is dissolved in 10 μl of 0.02% sucrose-0.005% H3PO4 solution and then evaporated on pieces of perfluoroalkoxy (PFA) film, resulting in the formation of a tiny object (< 3 × 104 μm2 superficial area). Using LA-ICP-MS measurements, the object can give Os signals at least 100 times higher than those provided by routine solution-ICP-MS while successfully avoiding the memory effect. The procedural blank and detection limit in the developed technique are 3.0 pg and 1.8 pg for Os, respectively when 1 g of samples is taken. Reference materials (RM) are analyzed, and their Os concentrations obtained by isotope dilution are comparable to reference or literature values. Based on the individual RM results, the precision is estimated within the range of 0.6 to 9.4% relative standard deviation (RSD), revealing that this method is applicable to the determination of trace Os in geological samples.

  20. Metallurgical and chemical characterization of copper alloy reference materials within laser ablation inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry: Method development for minimally-invasive analysis of ancient bronze objects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walaszek, Damian; Senn, Marianne; Faller, Markus; Philippe, Laetitia; Wagner, Barbara; Bulska, Ewa; Ulrich, Andrea

    2013-01-01

    The chemical composition of ancient metal objects provides important information for manufacturing studies and authenticity verification of ancient copper or bronze artifacts. Non- or minimal-destructive analytical methods are preferred to mitigate visible damage. Laser ablation inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (LA-ICPMS) enables the determination of major elements as well as impurities down to lower ppm-levels, however, accuracy and precision of analysis strongly depend on the homogeneity of reference materials used for calibration. Moreover, appropriate analytical procedures are required e.g. in terms of ablation strategies (scan mode, spot size, etc.). This study reviews available copper alloy (certified) reference materials — (C)RMs from different sources and contributes new metallurgical data on homogeneity and spatial elemental distribution. Investigations of the standards were performed by optical and scanning electron microscopy with X-ray spectrometry (SEM-EDX) for the following copper alloy and bronze (certified) reference materials: NIST 454, BAM 374, BAM 211, BAM 227, BAM 374, BAM 378, BAS 50.01-2, BAS 50.03-4, and BAS 50.04-4. Additionally, the influence of inhomogeneities on different ablation and calibration strategies is evaluated to define an optimum analytical strategy in terms of line scan versus single spot ablation, variation of spot size, selection of the most appropriate RMs or minimum number of calibration reference materials.

  1. The influence of laser-induced nanosecond rise-time stress waves on the microstructure and surface chemical activity of single crystal Cu nanopillars

    PubMed Central

    Youssef, G.; Crum, R.; Prikhodko, S. V.; Seif, D.; Po, G.; Ghoniem, N.; Kodambaka, S.; Gupta, V.

    2013-01-01

    An apparatus and test procedure for fabrication and loading of single crystal metal nanopillars under extremely high pressures (>1 GPa) and strain rates (>107 s−1), using laser-generated stress waves, are presented. Single-crystalline Cu pillars (∼1.20 μm in tall and ∼0.45 μm in diameter) prepared via focused ion beam milling of Cu(001) substrates are shock-loaded using this approach with the dilatational stress waves propagating along the [001] axis of the pillars. Transmission electron microscopy observations of shock-loaded pillars show that dislocation density decreases and that their orientation changes with increasing stress wave amplitude, indicative of dislocation motion. The shock-loaded pillars exhibit enhanced chemical reactivity when submerged in oil and isopropyl alcohol solutions, due likely to the exposure of clean surfaces via surface spallation and formation of surface steps and nanoscale facets through dislocation motion to the surface of the pillars, resulting in growth of thin oxide films on the surfaces of the pillars. PMID:23526837

  2. Carbamazepine in municipal wastewater and wastewater sludge: ultrafast quantification by laser diode thermal desorption-atmospheric pressure chemical ionization coupled with tandem mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Mohapatra, D P; Brar, S K; Tyagi, R D; Picard, P; Surampalli, R Y

    2012-09-15

    In this study, the distribution of the anti-epileptic drug carbamazepine (CBZ) in wastewater (WW) and aqueous and solid phases of wastewater sludge (WWS) was carried out. A rapid and reliable method enabling high-throughput sample analysis for quicker data generation, detection, and monitoring of CBZ in WW and WWS was developed and validated. The ultrafast method (15s per sample) is based on the laser diode thermal desorption-atmospheric pressure chemical ionization (LDTD-APCI) coupled to tandem mass spectrometry (MS/MS). The optimization of instrumental parameters and method application for environmental analysis are presented. The performance of the novel method was evaluated by estimation of extraction recovery, linearity, precision and detection limit. The method detection limits was 12 ng L(-1) in WW and 3.4 ng g(-1) in WWS. The intra- and inter-day precisions were 8% and 11% in WW and 6% and 9% in WWS, respectively. Furthermore, three extraction methods, ultrasonic extraction (USE), microwave-assisted extraction (MAE) and accelerated solvent extraction (ASE) with three different solvent condition such as methanol, acetone and acetonitrile:ethyle acetate (5:1, v/v) were compared on the basis of procedural blank and method recovery. Overall, ASE showed the best extraction efficiency with methanol as compared to USE and MAE. Furthermore, the quantification of CBZ in WW and WWS samples showed the presence of contaminant in all stages of the treatment plant.

  3. Influence of plasma density on the chemical composition and structural properties of pulsed laser deposited TiAlN thin films

    SciTech Connect

    Quiñones-Galván, J. G.; Camps, Enrique; Muhl, S.; Flores, M.; Campos-González, E.

    2014-05-15

    Incorporation of substitutional Al into the TiN lattice of the ternary alloy TiAlN results in a material with improved properties compared to TiN. In this work, TiAlN thin films were grown by the simultaneous ablation of Ti and Al targets in a nitrogen containing reactive atmosphere. The deposit was formed on silicon substrates at low deposition temperature (200 °C). The dependence of the Al content of the films was studied as a function of the ion density of the plasma produced by the laser ablation of the Al target. The plasma parameters were measured by means of a planar Langmuir probe and optical emission spectroscopy. The chemical composition of the films was measured by energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy. The results showed a strong dependence of the amount of aluminum incorporated in the films with the plasma density. The structural characterization of the deposits was carried out by Raman spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction, and transmission electron microscopy, where the substitutional incorporation of the Al into the TiN was demonstrated.

  4. Relation between crystallinity and chemical nature of surface on wettability: A study on pulsed laser deposited TiO{sub 2} thin films

    SciTech Connect

    Shirolkar, Mandar M.; Phase, Deodatta; Sathe, Vasant; Choudhary, Ram Janay; Rodriguez-Carvajal, J.

    2011-06-15

    Pure titania (TiO{sub 2}) polycrystalline thin films in rutile, anatase and mixed phase have been grown on amorphous glass substrates by pulsed laser deposition method at various oxygen gas pressure. Wettability investigations have been carried out on these films. Consistent with our previous report [J. Phys. D: Appl. Phys. 41, 155308 (2008)] it has been observed that for nearly same surface roughness large contact angle or superhydrophobicity is present when sample has a pure single phase and lower contact angle or hydrophobicity when mixed phases were present. Structural characterizations suggest that in addition to roughness, pure phase film surface associated with hydrophobic sites and mixed phase film surface show association of both hydrophobic and hydrophilic sites, which might be inducing specific wetting character. UV treatment induces superhydrophilicity in the films. It was observed that UV irradiation causes nonequilibrium state on the TiO{sub 2} surface, leading to changes in the electron density, which in turn produces decrement in the crystallinity and lattice expansion. Reversible changes in the wetting state on the pure phase surfaces were observed to be faster than those on the mixed phase surfaces. We tried to establish the possible relation between crystalline phases, chemical nature of surface on reversible wettability besides the main governing parameter viz. surface roughness.

  5. Combustion diagnostics by laser spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kitagawa, Kuniyuki; Morita, Shigeaki; Kodama, Kenji; Matsumoto, Kozo

    2009-03-01

    We have developed three different types of visualization methods for energy conversion systems by means of laser spectrometry. (1) Laser-induced fluorescence (LIF) spectroscopy and (2) laser ionization mass spectrometry (LIMS) have been applied to visualization of chemical species in combustion fields of flames. (3) Near-infrared laser absorption spectroscopy has been used for visualization of water in a polymer electrolyte fuel cell (PEFC). Complex physicochemical processes in the energy conversion systems have been revealed by laser spectrometry.

  6. Fast epitaxial growth of a-axis- and c-axis-oriented YBa 2Cu 3O 7- δ films on (1 0 0) LaAlO 3 substrate by laser chemical vapor deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Pei; Ito, Akihiko; Tu, Rong; Goto, Takashi

    2011-02-01

    a-axis- and c-axis-oriented YBa2Cu3O7-δ (YBCO) films were epitaxially grown on (1 0 0) LaAlO3 substrates by laser chemical vapor deposition. The preferred orientation in the YBCO film changed from the a-axis to the c-axis with increasing laser powers from 77 to 158 W (the deposition temperatures from 951 to 1087 K). The a-axis-oriented YBCO film showed in-plane epitaxial growth of YBCO [0 0 1]//LAO [0 0 1], and the c-axis-oriented YBCO film showed that of YBCO [0 1 0]//LAO [0 0 1]. A c-axis-oriented YBCO film with a high critical temperature of 90 K was prepared at a deposition rate of 90 μm h-1, about 2-1000 times higher than that of metalorganic chemical vapor deposition.

  7. Metastable alloy nanoparticles, metal-oxide nanocrescents and nanoshells generated by laser ablation in liquid solution: influence of the chemical environment on structure and composition.

    PubMed

    Scaramuzza, Stefano; Agnoli, Stefano; Amendola, Vincenzo

    2015-11-14

    Alloy nanoparticles are characterized by the combination of multiple interesting properties, which are attractive for technological and scientific purposes. A frontier topic of this field is nanoalloys with compositions not thermodynamically allowed at ordinary temperature and pressure (i.e. metastable), because they require out-of-equilibrium synthetic approaches. Recently, laser ablation synthesis in solution (LASiS) was successfully applied for the realization of metastable nanoalloys because of the fast kinetics of nanoparticle formation. However, the role played by the chemical environment on the final composition and structure of laser generated nanoalloys still has to be fully elucidated. Here, we investigated the influence of different synthetic conditions on the LASiS of metastable nanoalloys composed of Au and Fe, such as the use of water instead of ethanol, the bubbling of inert gases and the addition of a few vol% of H2O2 and H2O. The two elements showed different reactivity when LASiS was performed in water instead of ethanol, while minor effects were observed from bubbling pure gases such as N2, Ar and CO2 in the liquid solution. Moreover, the plasmonic response and the structure of the nanoalloys were sensibly modified by adding H2O2 to water. We also found that nanoparticle production is dramatically influenced just by adding 0.2% of H2O in ethanol. These results suggest that the formation of a cavitation bubble with long lifetime and large size during LASiS is useful for the preservation of the metastable alloy composition, whereas an oxidative environment hampers the formation of metastable alloy nanoparticles. Overall, by acting on the type of solvent and solutes, we were able to switch from a traditional synthetic approach for the composition of Au-Fe nanoalloys to one using a reactive environment, which gives unconventional structures such as metal@iron-oxide nanoshells and nanocrescents of oxide supported on metal nanospheres. These results

  8. Laser Photochemistry.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1981-07-01

    reaction due to decreased adsorption of the species on the catalytic surface. For example, i. . . 41 in the catalytic decomposition of formic acid ...over platinum (Ulmstead and Lin, 1978), the preexcitation of the gaseous formic acid molecules (by a 10 W/cm2 CW CO2 laser) resulted in a 50% increase...attention is given to selective and thermal excitation and the role of multiphonon couplings, heterogeneous catalysis , and chemical vapor deposition and

  9. Chemical Laser Solid Fuels Program

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1976-12-01

    or other data are used for any purpose other than a definitely related government procurement operation, the Government thereby incurs no...or conveying any rights or permission to manufacture, use, or sell any patented invention that may in any way be related thereto. FOREWORD This...34^■idmpin i^ »•••PV^V-MM«« ^■^■■^■^^WW 3LAH2 fonnulations (and the related 4LiAlH4: 1NH4C1 fomilations) pro- duced such highly cohesive clinkers that

  10. Advanced Fuels for Chemical Lasers

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1975-05-01

    necessary to deal with substances not adequately described by the perfect gas law , such as C3F6 and C4F8, and for which tables or charts are not...available, use of plotted correction factors to apply to the perfect gas law are required. For this task, reduced properties of pressure and temperature...the gas vis- I cosity. Once this adjustment has been determined, Eq. III-S and 111-6 can be used to relate v and p to the distance x for use ia

  11. Prediction of Chemical Laser Flow

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-04-14

    constant area duct extending from -2 <= DL <= 0. The structured grid was generated using Gridgen , commercial meshing software capable of generating 3D...2003-4121, 16th AIAA CFD Conference, June 23-26, 2003, Orlando, Florida. 13 [44] Pointwise, Inc., Fort Worth, Texas, Gridgen Version 15 User Manual

  12. Chemical Laser Computer Code Survey,

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1980-12-01

    DOCUMENTATION: Resonator Geometry Synthesis Code Requi rement NV. L. Gamiz); Incorporate General Resonator into Ray Trace Code (W. H. Southwell... Synthesis Code Development (L. R. Stidhm) CATEGRY ATIUEOPTICS KINETICS GASOYNAM41CS None * None *iNone J.LEVEL Simrple Fabry Perot Simple SaturatedGt... Synthesis Co2de Require- ment (V L. ami l ncor~orate General Resonatorn into Ray Trace Code (W. H. Southwel) Srace Optimization Algorithms and Equations (W

  13. Laser diode thermal desorption atmospheric pressure chemical ionization tandem mass spectrometry applied for the ultra-fast quantitative analysis of BKM120 in human plasma.

    PubMed

    Lanshoeft, Christian; Heudi, Olivier; Leuthold, Luc Alexis; Schlotterbeck, Götz; Elbast, Walid; Picard, Franck; Kretz, Olivier

    2014-09-01

    A sensitive and ultra-fast method utilizing the laser diode thermal desorption ion source using atmospheric pressure chemical ionization coupled to tandem mass spectrometry (LDTD-APCI-MS/MS) was developed for the quantitative analysis of BKM120, an investigational anticancer drug in human plasma. Samples originating from protein precipitation (PP) followed by salting-out assisted liquid-liquid extraction (SALLE) were spotted onto the LazWell™ plate prior to their thermal desorption and detection by tandem mass spectrometry in positive mode. The validated method described in this paper presents a high absolute extraction recovery (>90 %) for BKM120 and its internal standard (ISTD) [D8]BKM120, with precision and accuracy meeting the acceptance criteria. Standard curves were linear over the range of 5.00 to 2000 ng mL(-1) with a coefficient of determination (R (2)) >0.995. The method specificity was demonstrated in six different batches of human plasma. Intra- and inter-run precision as well as accuracy within ±20 % at the lower limit of quantification (LLOQ) and ±15 % (other levels) were achieved during a three-run validation for quality control (QC) samples. The post-preparative stability on the LazWell™ plate at room temperature was 72 h and a 200-fold dilution of spiked samples was demonstrated. The method was applied successfully to three clinical studies (n = 847) and cross-checked with the validated LC-ESI-MS/MS reference method. The sample analysis run time was 10 s as compared to 4.5 min for the current validated LC-ESI-MS/MS method. The resultant data were in agreement with the results obtained using the validated reference LC-ESI-MS/MS assay and the same pharmacokinetic (PK) parameters were calculated for both analytical assays. This work demonstrates that LDTD-APCI-MS/MS is a reliable method for the ultra-fast quantitative analysis of BKM120 which can be used to speed-up and support its bioanalysis in the frame of the clinical trials.

  14. Instabilities and structure formation in laser processing

    SciTech Connect

    Baeuerle, D.; Arenholz, E.; Arnold, N.; Heitz, J.; Kargl, P.B.

    1996-12-31

    This paper gives an overview on different types of instabilities and structure formation in various fields of laser processing. Among the examples discussed in detail are non-coherent structures observed in laser-induced chemical vapor deposition (LCVD), in laser-induced surface modifications, and in laser ablation of polymers.

  15. Direct chemical-analysis of uv laser-ablation products of organic polymers by using selective ion monitoring mode in gas-chromatography mass-spectrometry

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Cho, Yirang; Lee, H.W.; Fountain, S.T.; Lubman, D.M.

    1994-01-01

    Trace quantities of laser ablated organic polymers were analyzed by using commercial capillary column gas chromatography/mass spectrometry; the instrument was modified so that the laser ablation products could be introduced into the capillary column directly and the constituents of each peak in the chromatogram were identified by using a mass spectrometer. The present study takes advantage of the selective ion monitoring mode for significantly improving the sensitivity of the mass spectrometer as a detector, which is critical in analyzing the trace quantities and confirming the presence or absence of the species of interest in laser ablated polymers. The initial composition of the laser ablated polymers was obtained by using an electron impact reflectron time-of-flight mass spectrometer and the possible structure of the fragments observed in the spectra was proposed based on the structure of the polymers.

  16. Lasers '85; Proceedings of the Eighth International Conference, Las Vegas, NV, Dec. 2-6, 1985

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Charles P.

    The present conference on laser technology development encompasses issues in such areas as VUV and X-ray lasers; optical phase conjugation and nonlinear optics; laser applications in medicine; methods for optical processing; laser and nonlinear spectroscopy; ultrashort-pulse lasers and their applications; frequency selection in pulsed lasers; and interactions between laser beams, material surfaces, and material volumes. Also treated are laser applications in the Strategic Defense Initiative program, chemical laser design and performance, the lasing of biophysical materials, laser diagnostics in fluids and plasma, semiconductor laser diodes and arrays, solid state lasers, radiation- and solar-pumped lasers, laser cavities and propagation, remote sensing with lasers and fiber-optics, coupled resonators and diode lasers, industrial applications of lasers, excimer lasers, optoelectronics, CO2 lasers, fiber-optic sensors, alexandrite lasers, free electron lasers, and IR and visible wavelength lasers.

  17. Lasers '85; Proceedings of the Eighth International Conference, Las Vegas, NV, Dec. 2-6, 1985

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, C.P.

    1986-01-01

    The present conference on laser technology development encompasses issues in such areas as VUV and X-ray lasers; optical phase conjugation and nonlinear optics; laser applications in medicine; methods for optical processing; laser and nonlinear spectroscopy; ultrashort-pulse lasers and their applications; frequency selection in pulsed lasers; and interactions between laser beams, material surfaces, and material volumes. Also treated are laser applications in the Strategic Defense Initiative program, chemical laser design and performance, the lasing of biophysical materials, laser diagnostics in fluids and plasma, semiconductor laser diodes and arrays, solid state lasers, radiation- and solar-pumped lasers, laser cavities and propagation, remote sensing with lasers and fiber-optics, coupled resonators and diode lasers, industrial applications of lasers, excimer lasers, optoelectronics, CO/sub 2/ lasers, fiber-optic sensors, alexandrite lasers, free electron lasers, and IR and visible wavelength lasers.

  18. Bond Strength of Two Resin Cements to Dentin After Disinfection Pretreatment: Effects of Er,Cr:YSGG Laser Compared with Chemical Antibacterial Agent

    PubMed Central

    Shafiei, Fereshteh; Fekrazad, Reza; Shafiei, Ehsan

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Objective: This study compared the effects of two disinfection procedures (2% chlorhexidine [CHX] solution versus Er,Cr:YSGG laser irradiation) on the shear bond strength of ED primer II/Panavia F2.0 (ED/P) and Excite DSC/Variolink N (Ex/V). Background data: Different methods are used for cavity disinfection prior to adhesive cementation, which may influence the bonding ability of resin cements. Methods: Flat dentin surfaces were prepared on 100 extracted premolars and randomly divided into 10 groups. In the eight experimental groups, indirect composite samples were cemented with either ED/P or Ex/V under three disinfecting conditions on the dentin surface as follows: (1) CHX application before ED primer II/ after etching, (2) wet laser irradiation (Er,Cr:YSGG laser, 20 Hz, 0.75 W, 15% water +15% air), (3) dry laser irradiation with no water and air cooling. The control groups had no disinfectant application. After 24 h water storage, bond strength test was performed. The data (MPa) were analyzed using two way ANOVA and Tukey tests. Results: The lowest and highest bond strengths were obtained by dry laser and wet laser (10.18±2.67 and 17.36±2.94 for ED/P, 9.64±2.66 and 20.07±3.36 for Ex/V, respectively). For each cement, two-by-two comparisons of four groups revealed significant differences only for dry laser with others (p<0.001). Conclusions: The use of CHX and Er,Cr:YSGG laser at the low fluences with water/air cooling as the antibacterial agents does not adversely influence the bonding ability of the etch-and-rinse and the self-etch cements. PMID:23600378

  19. Laser apparatus

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Koepf, G. A. (Inventor)

    1979-01-01

    A laser apparatus having a pump laser device for producing pump laser energy upon being excited is disclosed. The pump laser device has a resonating cavity for oscillating and amplifying the pump laser energy. A source laser device is used for producing source laser energy upon being excited by the pump laser energy. The source laser device has a resonating cavity for oscillating and amplifying the source laser energy. The source laser's resonating cavity is coupled within a portion of the pump laser's resonating cavity.

  20. Lasers '86; Proceedings of the Ninth International Conference on Lasers and Applications, Orlando, FL, Nov. 3-7, 1986

    SciTech Connect

    Mcmillan, R.W.

    1987-01-01

    Laser physics, technology, and applications are examined in reviews and reports. Topics addressed include VUV and X-ray lasers, vibrational energy transfer and kinetics, medical applications, ultrashort lasers and spectroscopy, surface and material interactions, lasers in atmospheric physics, and fiber-optic systems. Consideration is given to alexandrite lasers, four-wave mixing and nonlinear optics, chemical lasers, semiconductor lasers, photothermal and photoacoustic spectroscopy, dye lasers, optical phase conjugation and SBS, excimer lasers, SDI laser applications, remote-sensing with lasers, FELs, and applications in chemistry. Diagrams, drawings, graphs, and photographs are provided.

  1. Laser rocket system analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, W. S.; Forsyth, J. B.; Skratt, J. P.

    1979-01-01

    The laser rocket systems investigated in this study were for orbital transportation using space-based, ground-based and airborne laser transmitters. The propulsion unit of these systems utilizes a continuous wave (CW) laser beam focused into a thrust chamber which initiates a plasma in the hydrogen propellant, thus heating the propellant and providing thrust through a suitably designed nozzle and expansion skirt. The specific impulse is limited only by the ability to adequately cool the thruster and the amount of laser energy entering the engine. The results of the study showed that, with advanced technology, laser rocket systems with either a space- or ground-based laser transmitter could reduce the national budget allocated to space transportation by 10 to 345 billion dollars over a 10-year life cycle when compared to advanced chemical propulsion systems (LO2-LH2) of equal capability. The variation in savings depends upon the projected mission model.

  2. Aluminum gallium arsenide-gallium arsenide-indium gallium arsenide-indium arsenide quantum dot coupled to quantum well heterostructure lasers by low-pressure metalorganic chemical vapor deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chung, Theodore

    mum in pulsed operation exhibits gain as high as ˜100 cm-1. The cw 300-K coupled InAs QD and InGaAs QW AlGaAs-GaAs-InGaA-InAs heterostructure lasers are grown by metalorganic chemical vapor deposition.

  3. Lasers '88; Proceedings of the International Conference, Lake Tahoe, NV, Dec. 4-9, 1988

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sze, R. C.; Duarte, F. J.

    Papers are presented on quantum optics and electronics, VUV and X-ray lasers, excimer lasers, free electron lasers, chemical lasers, nuclear-pumped lasers, directed energy technology for strategic defense, discharge lasers, and high power gas lasers. Also covered are CO2 and FIR lasers, ultrafast lasers and techniques, dye lasers, solid state lasers, semiconductor and diode lasers, and nonlinear effects in fibers and fiber lasers. Additional papers are also presented on dynamic gratings and wave mixing; laser radars, lidars, and remote sensing; diode laser applications; adaptive optics and propagation; ultrafast phenomena; laser spectroscopy and lasers in chemistry; laser dyes; and imaging techniques. Finally, papers covering optical devices and measuring instruments, lasers in medicine, lasers in industry, and lasers in education round out the proceedings.

  4. Mixed-layered bismuth-oxygen-iodine materials for capture and waste disposal of radioactive iodine

    SciTech Connect

    Krumhansl, James L; Nenoff, Tina M

    2013-02-26

    Materials and methods of synthesizing mixed-layered bismuth oxy-iodine materials, which can be synthesized in the presence of aqueous radioactive iodine species found in caustic solutions (e.g. NaOH or KOH). This technology provides a one-step process for both iodine sequestration and storage from nuclear fuel cycles. It results in materials that will be durable for repository conditions much like those found in Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) and estimated for Yucca Mountain (YMP). By controlled reactant concentrations, optimized compositions of these mixed-layered bismuth oxy-iodine inorganic materials are produced that have both a high iodine weight percentage and a low solubility in groundwater environments.

  5. Mixed-layered bismuth--oxygen--iodine materials for capture and waste disposal of radioactive iodine

    SciTech Connect

    Krumhansl, James L; Nenoff, Tina M

    2015-01-06

    Materials and methods of synthesizing mixed-layered bismuth oxy-iodine materials, which can be synthesized in the presence of aqueous radioactive iodine species found in caustic solutions (e.g. NaOH or KOH). This technology provides a one-step process for both iodine sequestration and storage from nuclear fuel cycles. It results in materials that will be durable for repository conditions much like those found in Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) and estimated for Yucca Mountain (YMP). By controlled reactant concentrations, optimized compositions of these mixed-layered bismuth oxy-iodine inorganic materials are produced that have both a high iodine weight percentage and a low solubility in groundwater environments.

  6. Large-energy, wavelength-tunable, all-fiber passively Q-switched Er:Yb-codoped double-clad fiber laser with mono-layer chemical vapor deposition graphene.

    PubMed

    Wu, Duanduan; Xiong, Fengfu; Zhang, Cankun; Chen, Shanshan; Xu, Huiying; Cai, Zhiping; Cai, Weiwei; Che, Kaijun; Luo, Zhengqian

    2014-07-01

    We demonstrate a large-energy, wavelength-tunable, all-fiber passively Q-switched Er:Yb-codoped laser using a mono-layer chemical vapor deposition (CVD) graphene saturable absorber (SA). By exploiting the large laser gain of Er:Yb double-clad fiber and optimizing the coupling ratio of the output coupler, not only can the mono-layer CVD graphene SA be protected from oversaturation and thermal damage, but also a large pulse energy up to 1.05 μJ (corresponding to the average output power of 25.6 mW) is thus achieved. Using a tunable fiber Fabry-Perot filter, stable Q-switched pulses can operate with a tunable range from 1530.97 to 1546.92 nm, covering a wavelength range of ∼16  nm. The Q-switching states at the different lasing wavelengths have been observed and recorded. The Q-switched repetition rate and the pulse duration (with the minimum one of 2.6 μs) have been characterized as well. This is, to the best of our knowledge, the largest pulse energy from an all-fiber graphene Q-switched laser.

  7. Quantitative chemical imaging of element diffusion into heterogeneous media using laser ablation inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry, synchrotron micro-X-ray fluorescence, and extended X-ray absorption fine structure spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Wang, H A O; Grolimund, D; Van Loon, L R; Barmettler, K; Borca, C N; Aeschlimann, B; Günther, D

    2011-08-15

    Quantitative chemical imaging of trace elements in heterogeneous media is important for the fundamental understanding of a broad range of chemical and physical processes. The primary aim of this study was to develop an analytical methodology for quantitative high spatial resolution chemical imaging based on the complementary use of independent microanalytical techniques. The selected scientific case study is focused on high spatially resolved quantitative imaging of major elements, minor elements, and a trace element (Cs) in Opalinus clay, which has been proposed as the host rock for high-level radioactive waste repositories. Laser ablation inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (LA-ICPMS), providing quantitative chemical information, and synchrotron radiation based micro-X-ray fluorescence (SR-microXRF), providing high spatial resolution images, were applied to study Cs migration into Opalinus clay rock. The results indicate that combining the outputs achievable by the two independent techniques enhances the imaging capabilities significantly. The qualitative high resolution image of SR-microXRF is in good agreement with the quantitative image recorded with lower spatial resolution by LA-ICPMS. Combining both techniques, it was possible to determine that the Opalinus clay sample contains two distinct domains: (i) a clay mineral rich domain and (ii) a calcium carbonate dominated domain. The two domains are separated by sharp boundaries. The spatial Cs distribution is highly correlated to the distribution of the clay. Furthermore, extended X-ray absorption fine structure analysis indicates that the trace element Cs preferentially migrates into clay interlayers rather than into the calcite domain, which complements the results acquired by LA-ICPMS and SR-microXRF. By using complementary techniques, the quantification robustness was improved to quantitative micrometer spatial resolution. Such quantitative, microscale chemical images allow a more detailed

  8. Advanced studies on powerful wide-aperture nonchain HF(DF) lasers with a self-sustained volume discharge to initiate chemical reaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Apollonov, Victor V.; Belevtsev, A. A.; Firsov, K. N.; Kazantsev, S. Y.; Saifulin, A. V.

    2003-11-01

    This paper reports on the physics of a self-sustained volume discharge without preionization, self-initiated volume discharge (SIVD), in working mixtures of nonchain HF(DF) lasers. Dynamics of SIVD in discharge gaps of different geometry is thoroughly described. The mechanisms of restricting current density in a diffuse channel in electric discharges in SF6 and SF6 based mixtures determining the possibility of the existence of SIVD were suggested and analyzed using simple models. It is shown that the most probable mechanisms are the electron impact dissociation of SF6 and other mixture components, electron-ion recombination and electron attachment to vibrationally excited SF6 molecules. Starting from a comparison analysis of the rate coefficients of these processes, it was found that the electron-ion recombination is capable of compensating for electron detachment from negative ions by electron impact. It is established that SIVD can be observed not only in SF6, but in other strongly electronegative gases, e.g., in C3F8 and C3HCl3. Analysis is given of the factors determining uniformity of active medium in nonchain HF(DF) lasers. Some special features of operating nonchain HF(DF) lasers with small, 2-6cm, apertures are carefully examined and the results of measuring the nonchain HF(DF) laser divergence are presented. Consideration is given to the problem increasing the aperture and discharge volume of nonchain HF(DF) lasers and, based from the experimental results, the possibility is shown of increasing their energy to a level of ~ 1kJ and above.

  9. Application of laser induced electron impact ionization to the deposition chemistry in the hot-wire chemical vapor deposition process with SiH4-NH3 gas mixtures.

    PubMed

    Eustergerling, Brett; Hèden, Martin; Shi, Yujun

    2007-11-01

    The application of a laser-induced electron impact (LIEI) ionization source in studying the gas-phase chemistry of the SiH(4)/NH(3) hot-wire chemical vapor deposition (HWCVD) system has been investigated. The LIEI source is achieved by directing an unfocused laser beam containing both 118 nm (10.5 eV) vacuum ultraviolet (VUV) and 355 nm UV radiations to the repeller plate in a time-of-flight mass spectrometer. Comparison of the LIEI source with the conventional 118 nm VUV single-photon ionization (SPI) method has demonstrated that the intensities of the chemical species with ionization potentials (IP) above 10.5 eV, e.g., H(2), N(2) and He, have been significantly enhanced with the incorporation of the LIEI source. It is found that the SPI source due to the 118 nm VUV light coexists in the LIEI source. This allows simultaneous observations of parent ions with enhanced intensity from VUV SPI and their "fingerprint" fragmentation ions from LIEI. It is, therefore, an effective tool to diagnose the gas-phase chemical species involved with both NH(3) and SiH(4) in the HWCVD reactor. In using the LIEI source to SiH(4), NH(3) and their mixtures, it has been shown that the NH(3) decomposition is suppressed with the addition of SiH(4) molecules. Examination of the NH(3) decomposition percentage and the time to reach the N(2) and H(2) steady-state intensities for various NH(3)/SiH(4) mixtures suggests that the extent of the suppression is enhanced with more SiH(4) content in the mixture. With increasing filament temperatures, the negative effect of SiH(4) becomes less important.

  10. A high-repetition rate scheme for synchrotron-based picosecond laser pump/x-ray probe experiments on chemical and biological systems in solution.

    PubMed

    Lima, Frederico A; Milne, Christopher J; Amarasinghe, Dimali C V; Rittmann-Frank, Mercedes Hannelore; van der Veen, Renske M; Reinhard, Marco; Pham, Van-Thai; Karlsson, Susanne; Johnson, Steven L; Grolimund, Daniel; Borca, Camelia; Huthwelker, Thomas; Janousch, Markus; van Mourik, Frank; Abela, Rafael; Chergui, Majed

    2011-06-01

    We present the extension of time-resolved optical pump/x-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) probe experiments towards data collection at MHz repetition rates. The use of a high-power picosecond laser operating at an integer fraction of the repetition rate of the storage ring allows exploitation of up to two orders of magnitude more x-ray photons than in previous schemes based on the use of kHz lasers. Consequently, we demonstrate an order of magnitude increase in the signal-to-noise of time-resolved XAS of molecular systems in solution. This makes it possible to investigate highly dilute samples at concentrations approaching physiological conditions for biological systems. The simplicity and compactness of the scheme allows for straightforward implementation at any synchrotron beamline and for a wide range of x-ray probe techniques, such as time-resolved diffraction or x-ray emission studies.

  11. A high-repetition rate scheme for synchrotron-based picosecond laser pump/x-ray probe experiments on chemical and biological systems in solution

    SciTech Connect

    Lima, Frederico A.; Milne, Christopher J.; Amarasinghe, Dimali C. V.; Rittmann-Frank, Mercedes Hannelore; Veen, Renske M. van der; Reinhard, Marco; Pham, Van-Thai; Karlsson, Susanne; Mourik, Frank van; Chergui, Majed; Johnson, Steven L.; Grolimund, Daniel; Borca, Camelia; Huthwelker, Thomas; Janousch, Markus; Abela, Rafael

    2011-06-15

    We present the extension of time-resolved optical pump/x-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) probe experiments towards data collection at MHz repetition rates. The use of a high-power picosecond laser operating at an integer fraction of the repetition rate of the storage ring allows exploitation of up to two orders of magnitude more x-ray photons than in previous schemes based on the use of kHz lasers. Consequently, we demonstrate an order of magnitude increase in the signal-to-noise of time-resolved XAS of molecular systems in solution. This makes it possible to investigate highly dilute samples at concentrations approaching physiological conditions for biological systems. The simplicity and compactness of the scheme allows for straightforward implementation at any synchrotron beamline and for a wide range of x-ray probe techniques, such as time-resolved diffraction or x-ray emission studies.

  12. USE OF MULTI-PHOTON LASER-SCANNING MICROSCOPY TO DESCRIBE THE DISTRIBUTION OF XENOBIOTIC CHEMICALS IN FISH EARLY LIFE STAGES

    EPA Science Inventory

    To better understand the mechanisms by which persistent bioaccumulative toxicants (PBTs) produce toxicity during fish early life stages (ELS), dose response relationships need to be determined in relation to the dynamic distribution of chemicals in sensitive tissues. In this stud...

  13. Engineering Light: Quantum Cascade Lasers

    ScienceCinema

    Claire Gmachl

    2016-07-12

    Quantum cascade lasers are ideal for environmental sensing and medical diagnostic applications. Gmachl discusses how these lasers work, and their applications, including their use as chemical trace gas sensors. As examples of these applications, she briefly presents results from her field campaign at the Beijing Olympics, and ongoing campaigns in Texas, Maryland, and Ghana.

  14. Modeling of thermal and chemical non-equilibrium in a laser-induced aluminum plasma by means of a Collisional-Radiative model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morel, V.; Bultel, A.; Chéron, B. G.

    2010-09-01

    A 0D numerical approach including a Collisional-Radiative model is elaborated in the purpose of describing the behavior of the nascent plasma resulting from the interaction between a 4 ns/65 mJ/532 nm Q-switched Nd:YAG laser pulse and an aluminum sample in vacuum. The heavy species considered are Al, Al +, Al 2+ and Al 3+ on their different excited states and free electrons. The translation temperatures of free electrons and heavy species are assumed different ( T e and TA respectively). Numerous elementary processes are accounted for as electron impact induced excitation and ionization, elastic collisions, multiphoton ionization and inverse Bremsstrahlung. Atoms passing from the sample to gas phase are described by using classical vaporization theory so that the surface temperature is arbitrarily limited to values less than the critical point one at 6700 K. The laser flux density considered in the study is therefore moderate with a fluence lower than 7 J cm - 2 . This model puts forward the major influence of multiphoton ionization in the plasma formation, whereas inverse Bremsstrahlung turns out to be quasi negligible. The increase of electron temperature is mainly due to multiphoton ionization and Te does not exceed 10,000 K. The electron induced collisions play an important role during the subsequent phase which corresponds to the relaxation of the excited states toward Boltzmann equilibrium. The electron density reaches its maximum during the laser pulse with a value ≈ 10 22, 10 23 m - 3 depending highly on the sample temperature. The ionization degree is of some percents in our conditions.

  15. Qualitative and quantitative spectro-chemical analysis of dates using UV-pulsed laser induced breakdown spectroscopy and inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Mehder, A O; Habibullah, Y B; Gondal, M A; Baig, Umair

    2016-08-01

    Laser Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy (LIBS) is demonstrated for the spectral analysis of nutritional and toxic elements present in several varieties of date fruit samples available in the Saudi Arabia market. The method analyzes the optical emission of a test sample when subjected to pulsed laser ablation. In this demonstration, our primary focus is on calcium (Ca) and magnesium (Mg), as nutritional elements, and on chromium (Cr), as a toxic element. The local thermodynamic equilibrium (LTE) condition was confirmed prior to the elemental characterization of date samples to ensure accuracy of the LIBS analysis. This was achieved by measuring parameters associated with the plasma, such as the electron temperature and the electron number density. These plasma parameters aid interpretation of processes such as ionization, dissociation, and excitation occurring in the plasma plume formed by ablating the date palm sample. The minimum detection limit was established from calibration curves that involved plotting the LIBS signal intensity as a function of standard date samples with known concentrations. The concentration of Ca and Mg detected in different varieties of date samples was between 187 and 515 and 35-196mgL(-1) respectively, while Cr concentration measured between 1.72 and 7.76mgL(-1). In order to optimize our LIBS system, we have studied how the LIBS signal intensity depends on the incident laser energy and the delay time. In order to validate our LIBS analysis results, standard techniques such as inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) were also applied on an identical (duplicate) date samples as those used for the LIBS analysis. The LIBS results exhibit remarkable agreement with those obtained from the ICP-MS analysis. In addition, the finger print wavelengths of other elements present in date samples were also identified and are reported here, which has not been previously reported, to the best of our knowledge.

  16. The fabrication of vertically aligned and periodically distributed carbon nanotube bundles and periodically porous carbon nanotube films through a combination of laser interference ablation and metal-catalyzed chemical vapor deposition.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Dajun; Lin, Wei; Guo, Rui; Wong, C P; Das, Suman

    2012-06-01

    Scalable fabrication of carbon nanotube (CNT) bundles is essential to future advances in several applications. Here, we report on the development of a simple, two-step method for fabricating vertically aligned and periodically distributed CNT bundles and periodically porous CNT films at the sub-micron scale. The method involves laser interference ablation (LIA) of an iron film followed by CNT growth via iron-catalyzed chemical vapor deposition. CNT bundles with square widths ranging from 0.5 to 1.5 µm in width, and 50-200 µm in length, are grown atop the patterned catalyst over areas spanning 8 cm(2). The CNT bundles exhibit a high degree of control over square width, orientation, uniformity, and periodicity. This simple scalable method of producing well-placed and oriented CNT bundles demonstrates a high application potential for wafer-scale integration of CNT structures into various device applications, including IC interconnects, field emitters, sensors, batteries, and optoelectronics, etc.

  17. USE OF WHOLE BODY CHEMICAL RESIDUE ANALYSIS AND LASER SCREENING CONFOCAL MICROSCOPY TO DESCRIBE DISTRIBUTION OF PBTS IN FISH EARLY LIFE STAGES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Fish early life stages (ELS) are more sensitive than juveniles or adults to many persistent bioaccumulative toxicants (PBTs). To better understand the mechanisms by which these chemicals produce toxicity during fish ELS, dose-response relationships need to be determined in relat...

  18. Method for laser induced isotope enrichment

    DOEpatents

    Pronko, Peter P.; Vanrompay, Paul A.; Zhang, Zhiyu

    2004-09-07

    Methods for separating isotopes or chemical species of an element and causing enrichment of a desired isotope or chemical species of an element utilizing laser ablation plasmas to modify or fabricate a material containing such isotopes or chemical species are provided. This invention may be used for a wide variety of materials which contain elements having different isotopes or chemical species.

  19. Chemical nature of colossal dielectric constant of CaCu3Ti4O12 thin film by pulsed laser deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deng, Guochu; Xanthopoulos, Nicolas; Muralt, Paul

    2008-04-01

    Epitaxial CaCu3Ti4O12 thin films grown by pulsed laser deposition were studied in the as-deposited and oxygen annealed state. The first one exhibited the usual transition from dielectric to colossal dielectric behavior upon increasing the temperature to above 100K. This transition disappeared after annealing at 900°C in air. The two states significantly differ in their x-ray photoelectron spectra. The state of colossal dielectric constant corresponds to a bulk material with considerable amounts of Cu + and Ti3+, combined with Cu species enrichment at the surface. The annealed state exhibited a nearly stoichiometric composition with no Cu+ and Ti3+. The previously observed p-type conduction in the as-deposited state is thus related to oxygen vacancies compensated by the point defects of Cu+ and Ti3+.

  20. Combustion-augmented laser ramjets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Horisawa, Hideyuki; Tamada, Kazunobu; Kimura, Itsuro

    2006-05-01

    A preliminary study of combustion-augmented laser-ramjets was conducted, in which chemical propellant such as a gaseous hydrogen/air mixture was utilized and detonated with a focused laser beam in order to obtain a higher impulse compared to the case only using lasers. CFD analysis of internal conical-nozzle flows and experimental measurements including impulse measurement were conducted to evaluate effects of chemical reaction on thrust performance improvement. From the results, a significant improvement in the thrust performances was confirmed with addition of a small amount of hydrogen to propellant air, or in combustion-augmented operation.

  1. Study of fundamental chemical processes in explosive decomposition by laser-powered homogeneous pyrolysis. Final report 1 jul 78-31 aug 81

    SciTech Connect

    McMillen, D.F.; Golden, D.M.

    1981-11-12

    Very Low-Pressure Pyrolysis studies of 2,4-dinitrotoluene decomposition resulted in decomposition rates consistent with log (ks) = 12.1 - 43.9/2.3 RT. These results support the conclusion that previously reported 'anomalously' low Arrhenius parameters for the homogeneous gas-phase decomposition of ortho-nitrotoluene actually represent surface-catalyzed reactions. Preliminary qualitative results for pyrolysis of ortho-nitrotouene in the absence of hot reactor walls, using the Laser-Powered Homogeneous Pyrolysis technique (LPHP), provide further support for this conclusion: only products resulting from Ph-NO2 bond scission were observed; no products indicating complex intramolecular oxidation-reduction or elimination processes could be detected. The LPHP technique was successfully modified to use a pulsed laser and a heated flow system, so that the technique becomes suitable for study of surface-sensitive, low vapor pressure substrates such as TNT. The validity and accuracy of the technique was demonstrated by applying it to the decomposition of substances whose Arrhenius parameters for decomposition were already well known. IR-fluorescence measurements show that the temperature-space-time behavior under the present LPHP conditions is in agreement with expectations and with requirements which must be met if the method is to have quantitative validity. LPHP studies of azoisopropane decomposition, chosen as a radical-forming test reaction, show the accepted literature parameters to be substantially in error and indicate that the correct values are in all probability much closer to those measured in this work: log (k/s) = 13.9 - 41.2/2.3 RT.

  2. Laser energy conversion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Billman, K. W.

    1975-01-01

    Laser radiation could possibly provide a feasible approach for the transmission of energy between stations and vehicles in space and on earth. The transmitted energy could be used for the operational requirements of the receiving space station, lunar base, or spacecraft. In addition, laser energy could also be employed to provide power for the propulsion of vehicles in space. The present status of development regarding the various technological areas involved in an implementation of these objectives is examined, taking into account the possibility of further advances needed to satisfy the technical requirements. Attention is given to laser-induced chemistry for converting the radiation energy into chemical energy. Other subjects considered are related to photovoltaics, optical diodes, thermo-electronics, laser rockets, and photon engines.

  3. Laser-heated thruster

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kemp, N. H.; Lewis, P. F.

    1980-01-01

    The development of a computer program for the design of the thrust chamber for a CW laser heated thruster was examined. Hydrodgen was employed as the propellant gas and high temperature absorber. The laser absorption coefficient of the mixture/laser radiation combination is given in temperature and species densities. Radiative and absorptive properties are given to determine radiation from such gas mixtures. A computer code for calculating the axisymmetric channel flow of a gas mixture in chemical equilibrium, and laser energy absorption and convective and radiative heating is described. It is concluded that: (1) small amounts of cesium seed substantially increase the absorption coefficient of hydrogen; (2) cesium is a strong radiator and contributes greatly to radiation of cesium seeded hydrogen; (3) water vapor is a poor absorber; and (4) for 5.3mcm radiation, both H2O/CO and NO/CO seeded hydrogen mixtures are good absorbers.

  4. Analysis of Laser Breakdown Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Becker, Roger

    2009-03-01

    Experiments on laser breakdown for ns pulses of 532 nm or 1064 nm light in water and dozens of simple hydrocarbon liquids are analyzed and compared to widely-used models and other laser breakdown experiments reported in the literature. Particular attention is given to the curve for the probability of breakdown as a function of the laser fluence at the beam focus. Criticism is made of the na"ive forms of both ``avalanche'' breakdown and multi-photon breakdown. It appears that the process is complex and is intimately tied to the chemical group of the material. Difficulties with developing an accurate model of laser breakdown in liquids are outlined.

  5. Advanced spray generator of singlet oxygen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spalek, Otomar; Hrubý, Jan; Jirásek, Vít; Čenský, Miroslav; Kodymová, Jarmila; Picková, Irena

    2007-05-01

    A spray type singlet oxygen generator (SOG) for chemical oxygen-iodine laser (COIL) was studied. Mathematical modeling has shown that a high O II(1Δ) yield can be attained with BHP (basic hydrogen peroxide) spray in the Cl II-He atmosphere. It was found experimentally that O II(1Δ) was produced with a >=50% yield at a total pressure up to 50 kPa (375 Torr). A rotating separator was developed that can segregate even very small droplets (>=0.5 μm) from O II(1Δ) flow.

  6. Laser removal of sludge from steam generators

    DOEpatents

    Nachbar, Henry D.

    1990-01-01

    A method of removing unwanted chemical deposits known as sludge from the metal surfaces of steam generators with laser energy is provided. Laser energy of a certain power density, of a critical wavelength and frequency, is intermittently focused on the sludge deposits to vaporize them so that the surfaces are cleaned without affecting the metal surface (sludge substrate). Fiberoptic tubes are utilized for laser beam transmission and beam direction. Fiberoptics are also utilized to monitor laser operation and sludge removal.

  7. Laser clock

    SciTech Connect

    Facklam, R.L.

    1983-05-26

    A laser clock includes a linear laser in one embodiment of the clock and a ring laser gyro in the other embodiment. The linear laser is frequency stabilized and utilizes a single active medium in the form of a low pressure gas, such as He-Ne, with a Doppler broadened gain curve. The ring laser gyro is a four frequency laser with a Faraday rotor. Detector and electronic circuitry associated with the laser of each embodiment detects a beat frequency and convert it to a clock signal.

  8. A borane laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cerdán, Luis; Braborec, Jakub; Garcia-Moreno, Inmaculada; Costela, Angel; Londesborough, Michael G. S.

    2015-01-01

    Emission from electronically excited species forms the basis for an important class of light sources—lasers. So far, commercially available solution-processed blue-emitting laser materials are based on organic compounds or semiconductor nanocrystals that have significant limitations: either low solubility, low chemical- and/or photo-stability and/or uncompetitive prices. Here we report a novel and competitive alternative to these existing laser materials that is based on boron hydrides, inorganic cluster compounds with a rich and diverse chemistry. We demonstrate that solutions of the borane anti-B18H22 show, under pulsed excitation, blue laser emission at 406 nm with an efficiency (ratio of output/input energies) of 9.5%, and a photostability superior to many of the commercially available state-of-the-art blue laser dyes. This demonstration opens the doors for the development of a whole new class of laser materials based on a previously untapped resource for laser technology—the boranes.

  9. Laser therapy of muscle injuries.

    PubMed

    Dawood, Munqith S; Al-Salihi, Anam Rasheed; Qasim, Amenah Wala'a

    2013-05-01

    Low-level lasers are used in general therapy and healing process due to their good photo-bio-stimulation effects. In this paper, the effects of diode laser and Nd:YAG laser on the healing process of practically managed skeletal muscle trauma has been successfully studied. Standard impact trauma was induced by using a specially designed mechanical device. The impacted muscle was left for 3 days for complete development of blunt trauma. After that it was irradiated by five laser sessions for 5 days. Two types of lasers were used; 785-nm diode laser and 1.064-nm Nd:YAG laser, both in continuous and pulsed modes. A special electronic circuit was designed and implemented to modulate the diode laser for this purpose. Tissue samples of crushed skeletal muscle have been dissected from the injured irradiated muscle then bio-chemically analyzed for the regeneration of contractile and collagenous proteins using Lowry assay for protein determination and Reddy and Enwemeka assay for hydroxyproline determination. The results showed that both lasers stimulate the regeneration capability of traumatized skeletal muscle. The diode laser in CW and pulsed modes showed better results than the Nd:YAG in accelerating the preservation of the normal tissue content of collagenous and contractile proteins beside controlling the regeneration of non-functional fibrous tissue. This study proved that the healing achieved by the laser treatment was faster than the control group by 15-20 days.

  10. Blue Laser.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1985-12-01

    HOLLOW CATHODE LASER FABRICATION 13 4. EXPERIENCE WITH THE BLUE LASER 18 4.1 Operational and Processing Experience 18 4.2 Performance Testing 20 5...34 -. - . •. SECTION 3 BLUE HOLLOW CATHODE LASER FABRICATION This section presents an overview of the steps taken in creating a HCL. There is...to the laser assembly. These steps can actually be considered as the final steps in laser fabrication because some of them involve adding various

  11. Study of foxing stains on paper by chemical methods, infrared spectroscopy, micro-X-ray fluorescence spectrometry and laser induced breakdown spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bicchieri, M.; Ronconi, S.; Romano, F. P.; Pappalardo, L.; Corsi, M.; Cristoforetti, G.; Legnaioli, S.; Palleschi, V.; Salvetti, A.; Tognoni, E.

    2002-07-01

    Foxing spots appear on the paper as stains of reddish-brown, brown or yellowish color, generally of small dimensions, with sharp or irregular edges, most of which, if excited with UV light, show fluorescence. The formation mechanisms of foxed areas have been studied since 1935, however, despite more recent intensive research there are still no conclusive results. Some authors found evidence of bacterial or fungal growth in some foxed areas sometimes associated with the presence of iron. We decided to focus our attention on the influence of the different iron valence in the formation of stains in the paper. For this reason we artificially induced the formation of foxing by adding to the paper small, known quantities of iron (III) and iron (II) ions. We prepared aqueous solutions of ferric chloride and ferrous sulfate at three different concentrations and we always used the same quantity of each solution (5 μl) to obtain a foxing stain. Part of the paper samples was artificially aged in a climatic chamber at 80 °C, 65% relative humidity for 15 days and part was submitted to aging for the same period at ambient temperatures under UV light at 240 nm. All papers were then analyzed for stain diameter, chromaticity coordinates, fluorescence under UV illumination, water content in the paper and in the spots, carbonyl content and then examined with infrared spectroscopy, X-ray fluorescence spectrometry and laser induced breakdown spectroscopy. Infrared spectra were collected in transmittance from potassium bromide pellets or directly in reflectance under microscope; X-ray fluorescence analysis were carried out using an X-ray microbeam (350 μm beam spot; W X-ray tube) and LIBS analysis with Nd:YAG laser coupled with a Czerny-Turner spectrometer. As a result it is stated that the foxing phenomenon is related to a strong oxidation of the cellulose chain. Concerning the color coordinates there are no great differences between samples treated with iron (III) and iron (II

  12. Singlet oxygen kinetics in a double microwave discharge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pitz, Greg A.; Lange, Matthew A.; Perram, Glen P.

    2004-09-01

    Chemical lasers offer the highest powers necessary for many weapons applications, but require significant logistical support in the delivery of specialized fuels to the battlefield. In the Chemical Oxygen-Iodine Laser (COIL), which is the weapon aboard the Airborne Laser (ABL), gaseous chlorine and liquid basic hydrogen peroxide are used to generate the singlet oxygen energy reservoir. The goal of the current multi-university research program is to demonstrate an oxygen-iodine laser with electrical discharge production of singlet oxygen. Typically, oxygen discharges are limited to about 15% yield for singlet oxygen. The electron excitation cross-sections as a function of E/N are well established. However, the kinetics for electron and singlet oxygen interactions is considerably more difficult to study. Optical diagnostics for O2(a, b), and O, have been applied to a double microwave discharge flow tube. By examining the difference in singlet oxygen kinetics between the two discharges in series, considerable information regarding the excited-state, excited-state interactions is obtained. Under certain discharge conditions, the O2(a) concentration significantly increases outside of the discharge, even after thermal effects are accounted.

  13. FT-IR, Laser-Raman spectra and quantum chemical calculations of methyl 4-(trifluoromethyl)-1H-pyrrole-3-carboxylate-A DFT approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sert, Yusuf; Sreenivasa, S.; Doğan, H.; Manojkumar, K. E.; Suchetan, P. A.; Ucun, Fatih

    2014-06-01

    In this study the experimental and theoretical vibrational frequencies of a newly synthesized anti-tumor and anti-inflammatory agent namely, methyl 4-(trifluoromethyl)-1H-pyrrole-3-carboxylate have been investigated. The experimental FT-IR (4000-400 cm-1) and Laser-Raman spectra (4000-100 cm-1) of the molecule in solid phase have been recorded. The theoretical vibrational frequencies and optimized geometric parameters (bond lengths, bond angles and torsion angles) have been calculated using density functional theory (DFT/B3LYP: Becke, 3-parameter, Lee-Yang-Parr and DFT/M06-2X: highly parameterized, empirical exchange correlation function) with 6-311++G(d,p) basis set by Gaussian 03 software, for the first time. The assignments of the vibrational frequencies have been done by potential energy distribution (PED) analysis using VEDA 4 software. The theoretical optimized geometric parameters and vibrational frequencies have been found to be in good agreement with the corresponding experimental data and results in the literature. In addition, the highest occupied molecular orbital (HOMO) energy, the lowest unoccupied molecular orbital (LUMO) energy and the other related molecular energy values of the compound have been investigated using the same theoretical calculations.

  14. FT-IR, Laser-Raman spectra and quantum chemical calculations of methyl 4-(trifluoromethyl)-1H-pyrrole-3-carboxylate-A DFT approach.

    PubMed

    Sert, Yusuf; Sreenivasa, S; Doğan, H; Manojkumar, K E; Suchetan, P A; Ucun, Fatih

    2014-06-05

    In this study the experimental and theoretical vibrational frequencies of a newly synthesized anti-tumor and anti-inflammatory agent namely, methyl 4-(trifluoromethyl)-1H-pyrrole-3-carboxylate have been investigated. The experimental FT-IR (4000-400cm(-1)) and Laser-Raman spectra (4000-100cm(-1)) of the molecule in solid phase have been recorded. The theoretical vibrational frequencies and optimized geometric parameters (bond lengths, bond angles and torsion angles) have been calculated using density functional theory (DFT/B3LYP: Becke, 3-parameter, Lee-Yang-Parr and DFT/M06-2X: highly parameterized, empirical exchange correlation function) with 6-311++G(d,p) basis set by Gaussian 03 software, for the first time. The assignments of the vibrational frequencies have been done by potential energy distribution (PED) analysis using VEDA 4 software. The theoretical optimized geometric parameters and vibrational frequencies have been found to be in good agreement with the corresponding experimental data and results in the literature. In addition, the highest occupied molecular orbital (HOMO) energy, the lowest unoccupied molecular orbital (LUMO) energy and the other related molecular energy values of the compound have been investigated using the same theoretical calculations.

  15. Chemical recognition software

    SciTech Connect

    Wagner, J.S.; Trahan, M.W.; Nelson, W.E.; Hargis, P.H. Jr.; Tisone, G.C.

    1994-06-01

    We have developed a capability to make real time concentration measurements of individual chemicals in a complex mixture using a multispectral laser remote sensing system. Our chemical recognition and analysis software consists of three parts: (1) a rigorous multivariate analysis package for quantitative concentration and uncertainty estimates, (2) a genetic optimizer which customizes and tailors the multivariate algorithm for a particular application, and (3) an intelligent neural net chemical filter which pre-selects from the chemical database to find the appropriate candidate chemicals for quantitative analyses by the multivariate algorithms, as well as providing a quick-look concentration estimate and consistency check. Detailed simulations using both laboratory fluorescence data and computer synthesized spectra indicate that our software can make accurate concentration estimates from complex multicomponent mixtures, even when the mixture is noisy and contaminated with unknowns.

  16. Chemical recognition software

    SciTech Connect

    Wagner, J.S.; Trahan, M.W.; Nelson, W.E.; Hargis, P.J. Jr.; Tisone, G.C.

    1994-12-01

    We have developed a capability to make real time concentration measurements of individual chemicals in a complex mixture using a multispectral laser remote sensing system. Our chemical recognition and analysis software consists of three parts: (1) a rigorous multivariate analysis package for quantitative concentration and uncertainty estimates, (2) a genetic optimizer which customizes and tailors the multivariate algorithm for a particular application, and (3) an intelligent neural net chemical filter which pre-selects from the chemical database to find the appropriate candidate chemicals for quantitative analyses by the multivariate algorithms, as well as providing a quick-look concentration estimate and consistency check. Detailed simulations using both laboratory fluorescence data and computer synthesized spectra indicate that our software can make accurate concentration estimates from complex multicomponent mixtures. even when the mixture is noisy and contaminated with unknowns.

  17. Remote sensing of chemical warfare agent by CO2 -lidar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Geiko, Pavel P.; Smirnov, Sergey S.

    2014-11-01

    The possibilities of remote sensing of chemical warfare agent by differential absorption method were analyzed. The CO2 - laser emission lines suitable for sounding of chemical warfare agent with provision for disturbing absorptions by water vapor were choose. The detection range of chemical warfare agents was estimated for a lidar based on CO2 - laser The other factors influencing upon echolocation range were analyzed.

  18. Classification of Laser Vaccine Adjuvants

    PubMed Central

    Kashiwagi, Satoshi; Brauns, Timothy; Poznansky, Mark C

    2016-01-01

    An immunologic adjuvant, which enhances the magnitude and quality of immune responses to vaccine antigens, has become an essential part of modern vaccine practice. Chemicals and biologicals have been typically used for this purpose, but there are an increasing number of studies that are being conducted on the vaccine adjuvant effect of laser light on the skin. Currently, four different types or classes of laser devices have been shown to systemically enhance immune responses to intradermal vaccination: ultra-short pulsed lasers, non-pulsed lasers, non-ablative fractional lasers and ablative fractional lasers. Aside from involving the application of laser light to the skin in a manner that minimizes discomfort and damage, each type of laser vaccine adjuvant involves emission parameters, modes of action and immunologic adjuvant effects that are quite distinct from each other. This review provides a summary of the four major classes of “laser vaccine adjuvant” and clarifies and resolves their characteristics as immunologic adjuvants. These aspects of each adjuvant’s properties will ultimately help define which laser would be most efficacious in delivering a specific clinical benefit with a specific vaccine. PMID:27104047

  19. Pulsed excimer laser processing for cost-effective solar cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wong, David C.

    1985-01-01

    The application of excimer laser in the fabrication of photovoltaic devices was investigated extensively. Processes included junction formation, laser assisted chemical vapor deposition metallization, and laser assisted chemical vapor deposition surface passivation. Results demonstrated that implementation of junction formation by laser annealing in production is feasible because of excellent control in junction depth and quality. Both metallization and surface passivation, however, were found impractical to be considered for manufacturing at this stage.

  20. Chemical Emergencies

    MedlinePlus

    When a hazardous chemical has been released, it may harm people's health. Chemical releases can be unintentional, as in the case of an ... the case of a terrorist attack with a chemical weapon. Some hazardous chemicals have been developed by ...

  1. Laser propulsion option

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Humes, Donald H.

    1989-01-01

    The use of laser thrusters with exhaust powers in the 25 MW to 250 MW range can reduce the fuel that would be needed to transport the lunar outpost equipment to low-lunar orbit with a chemical OTV by 57000 Kg to 105000 Kg with no significant penalty in trip time. This would save one or two launches of the heavy-load launch vehicle. Nuclear-electric OTVs would take 40 to 120 times as long to get to the moon and would spend 100 to 1700 times as long in the Van Allen radiation belts as OTVs that have laser thrusters.

  2. Lasers of All Sizes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balcou, Philippe; Forget, Sébastien Robert-Philip, Isabelle

    2015-10-01

    * Introduction * The Laser in All Its Forms * Gas lasers * Dye lasers * Solid-state lasers * Lasers for Every Taste * The rise of lasers * Lasers of all sizes * The colors of the rainbow... and beyond * Shorter and shorter lasers * Increasingly powerful lasers * Lasers: A Universal Tool? * Cutting, welding, and cleaning * Communicating * Treating illnesses * Measuring * Supplying energy? * Entertaining * Understanding * Conclusion

  3. Investigation of passive and active silica-tin oxide nanostructured optical fibers fabricated by "inverse dip-coating" and "powder in tube" method based on the chemical sol-gel process and laser emission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Granger, G.; Restoin, C.; Roy, P.; Jamier, R.; Rougier, S.; Duclere, J.-R.; Lecomte, A.; Dauliat, R.; Blondy, J.-M.

    2015-05-01

    This paper presents a study of original nanostructured optical fibers based on the SiO2-SnO2-(Yb3+) system. Two different processes have been developed and compared: the sol-gel chemical method associated to the "inverse dip-coating" (IDC) and the "powder in tube" (PIT). The microstructural and optical properties of the fibers are studied according to the concentration of SnO2. X-Ray Diffraction as well as Transmission Electron Microscopy studies show that the SnO2 crystallizes into the cassiterite phase as nanoparticles with a diameter ranging from 4 to 50 nm as a function of tin oxide concentration. A comparative study highlights a better conservation of SnO2 into the fiber core with the PIT approach according to the refractive index profile and energy dispersive X-Ray spectrometry measurement. The attenuation evaluated by the classic cut-back method gives respectively values higher than 3 dB/m and 0.2 dB/m in the visible (VIS) and infrared (IR) ranges for the PIT fibers whereas background losses reach 0.5 dB/m in the VIS range for IDC fibers. The introduction of ytterbium ions into the core of PIT fibers, directly in the first chemical step, leads to a laser emission (between 1050 and 1100 nm) according to the fiber length under 850 nm wavelength pumping. Luminescence studies have demonstrated the influence of the tin oxide on the rare earth optical properties especially by the modification of the absorption (850 to 1000 nm) and emission (950 to 1100 nm) by discretization of the bands, as well as on the IR emission lifetime evaluated to 10 μs.

  4. Evaluation of laser diode thermal desorption (LDTD) coupled with tandem mass spectrometry (MS/MS) for support of in vitro drug discovery assays: increasing scope, robustness and throughput of the LDTD technique for use with chemically diverse compound libraries.

    PubMed

    Beattie, Iain; Smith, Aaron; Weston, Daniel J; White, Peter; Szwandt, Simon; Sealey, Laura

    2012-02-05

    Within the drug discovery environment, the key process in optimising the chemistry of a structural series toward a potential drug candidate is the design, make and test cycle, in which the primary screens consist of a number of in vitro assays, including metabolic stability, cytochrome P450 inhibition, and time-dependent inhibition assays. These assays are often carried out using multiple drug compounds with chemically diverse structural features, often in a 96 well-plate format for maximum time-efficiency, and are supported using rapid liquid chromatographic (LC) sample introduction with a tandem mass spectrometry (MS/MS) selected reaction monitoring (SRM) endpoint, taking around 6.5 h per plate. To provide a faster time-to-decision at this critical point, there exists a requirement for higher sample throughput and a robust, well-characterized analytical alternative. This paper presents a detailed evaluation of laser diode thermal desorption (LDTD), a relatively new ambient sample ionization technique, for compound screening assays. By systematic modification of typical LDTD instrumentation and workflow, and providing deeper understanding around overcoming a number of key issues, this work establishes LDTD as a practical, rapid alternative to conventional LC-MS/MS in drug discovery, without need for extensive sample preparation or expensive, scope-limiting internal standards. Analysis of both the five and three cytochrome P450 competitive inhibition assay samples by LDTD gave improved sample throughput (0.75 h per plate) and provided comparable data quality as the IC₅₀ values obtained were within 3 fold of those calculated from the LC-MS/MS data. Additionally when applied generically to a chemically diverse library of over 250 proprietary compounds from the AstraZeneca design, make and test cycle, LDTD demonstrated a success rate of 98%.

  5. Laser microphone

    DOEpatents

    Veligdan, James T.

    2000-11-14

    A microphone for detecting sound pressure waves includes a laser resonator having a laser gain material aligned coaxially between a pair of first and second mirrors for producing a laser beam. A reference cell is disposed between the laser material and one of the mirrors for transmitting a reference portion of the laser beam between the mirrors. A sensing cell is disposed between the laser material and one of the mirrors, and is laterally displaced from the reference cell for transmitting a signal portion of the laser beam, with the sensing cell being open for receiving the sound waves. A photodetector is disposed in optical communication with the first mirror for receiving the laser beam, and produces an acoustic signal therefrom for the sound waves.

  6. Laser ignition

    DOEpatents

    Early, James W.; Lester, Charles S.

    2004-01-13

    Sequenced pulses of light from an excitation laser with at least two resonator cavities with separate output couplers are directed through a light modulator and a first polarzing analyzer. A portion of the light not rejected by the first polarizing analyzer is transported through a first optical fiber into a first ignitor laser rod in an ignitor laser. Another portion of the light is rejected by the first polarizing analyzer and directed through a halfwave plate into a second polarization analyzer. A first portion of the output of the second polarization analyzer passes through the second polarization analyzer to a second, oscillator, laser rod in the ignitor laser. A second portion of the output of the second polarization analyzer is redirected by the second polarization analyzer to a second optical fiber which delays the beam before the beam is combined with output of the first ignitor laser rod. Output of the second laser rod in the ignitor laser is directed into the first ignitor laser rod which was energized by light passing through the first polarizing analyzer. Combined output of the first ignitor laser rod and output of the second optical fiber is focused into a combustible fuel where the first short duration, high peak power pulse from the ignitor laser ignites the fuel and the second long duration, low peak power pulse directly from the excitation laser sustains the combustion.

  7. Laser sampling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gorbatenko, A. A.; Revina, E. I.

    2015-10-01

    The review is devoted to the major advances in laser sampling. The advantages and drawbacks of the technique are considered. Specific features of combinations of laser sampling with various instrumental analytical methods, primarily inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry, are discussed. Examples of practical implementation of hybrid methods involving laser sampling as well as corresponding analytical characteristics are presented. The bibliography includes 78 references.

  8. Laser space propulsion overview

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Phipps, Claude; Luke, James; Helgeson, Wesley

    2007-03-01

    In this paper, we review the history of laser space propulsion from its earliest theoretical conceptions to modern practical applicatons. Applications begin with the "Lightcraft" flights of Myrabo and include practical thrusters for satellites now completing development as well as proposals for space debris removal and direct launch of payloads into orbit. We consider laser space propulsion in the most general sense, in which laser radiation is used to propel a vehicle in space. In this sense, the topic includes early proposals for pure photon propulsion, laser ablation propulsion, as well as propulsion using lasers to detonate a gas, expel a liquid, heat and expel a gas, or even to propagate power to a remote conventional electric thruster. We also discuss the most recent advances in LSP. For the first time, it is possible to consider space propulsion engines which exhibit thrust of one to several newtons while simultaneously delivering 3,000 seconds, or greater, specific impulse. No other engine concept can do both in a compact format. These willl use onboard, rather than remote, lasers. We will review the concept of chemically augmented electric propulsion, which can provide overall thrust efficiency greater than unity while maintaining very low mass to power ratio, high mean time to failure and broad operating range. The main advantage of LSP is exhaust velocity which can be instantaneously varied from 2km/s to 30km/s, simply by varying laser pulsewidth and focal spot size on target. The laser element will probably be a diode-pumped, fiber master-oscillator-power-amplifier (MOPA) system. Liquid fuels are necessary for volumetric efficiency and reliable performance at the multi-kW optical power levels required for multi-N thrust.

  9. Research in Materials Science. 1. Optoelectronic Materials and Components: Miniaturized Thin Film Laser Sources and Modulators. 2. Superconducting Transition Metal Alloys. 3. Chemical Synthesis Using High Temperature Lithium Vapor Species

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1975-12-31

    the upper laser level in materials such as Er3+ or Yb3+ sensitized Ho3+ laser materials and Yb3+ sensitized Tm3 + laser materials. A model of energy...transfer in the Yb3+- Tm3 + system was anlayzed which showed the Importance of upconversion and how to minimize Its effects. The effects of...upconversion were experimentally demonstrated in the Er3+-Ho3+ system, including the reduction in the efficiency of the aB- YLF laser by 50%. Laser operation

  10. Development of mid-IR lasers for Laser Remote Sensing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Soibel, Alexander; Mansour, Kamjou; Spiers, Gary; Forouhar, Siamak

    2005-01-01

    There is an existing need in JPL and in NASA for development of mid-IR lasers, such as Quantum Cascade (QC) lasers, for in-situ and remote laser spectrometers. Mid-IR, compact, low power consumption laser spectrometers have a great potential for detection and measurements of planetary gases and biological important biomarker molecules such as H20, H202, CH4, and many additional chemical species on Mars and other Solar system planets. Another potential application of QC lasers for future NASA mission is in high power remote Laser Reflectance Spectrometers (LRS). In LSR instrument, mid-infrared lasers will act as the illumination source for conducting active mid-IR reflectance spectroscopy of solid-surfaced objects in the outer Solar System. These spectrometers have the potential to provide an incredible amount of information about the compositions of surfaces in the outer Solar System. In this work, we will discuss our current effort at JPL to advance QC lasers to a level that the laser performance, operational requirements and reliability be compatible with the instruments demands for space exploration applications.

  11. CW laser pumped emerald laser

    SciTech Connect

    Shand, M.L.; Lai, S.T.

    1984-02-01

    A CW laser-pumped emerald laser is reported. A 34 percent output power slope efficiency is observed with longitudinal pumping by a krypton laser in a nearly concentric cavity. The laser has been tuned from 728.8 to 809.0 nm. Losses in emerald are larger than those of alexandrite determined in a similar cavity. The present data also indicate that the excited state absorption minimum is shifted from that of alexandrite. 13 references.

  12. Fs-laser processing of polydimethylsiloxane

    SciTech Connect

    Atanasov, Petar A. Nedyalkov, Nikolay N.; Valova, Eugenia I.; Georgieva, Zhenya S.; Armyanov, Stefan A.; Kolev, Konstantin N.; Amoruso, Salvatore; Wang, Xuan; Bruzzese, Ricardo; Sawczak, Miroslaw; Śliwiński, Gerard

    2014-07-14

    We present an experimental analysis on surface structuring of polydimethylsiloxane films with UV (263 nm) femtosecond laser pulses, in air. Laser processed areas are analyzed by optical microscopy, SEM, and μ-Raman spectroscopy. The laser-treated sample shows the formation of a randomly nanostructured surface morphology. μ-Raman spectra, carried out at both 514 and 785 nm excitation wavelengths, prior and after laser treatment allow evidencing the changes in the sample structure. The influence of the laser fluence on the surface morphology is studied. Finally, successful electro-less metallization of the laser-processed sample is achieved, even after several months from the laser-treatment contrary to previous observation with nanosecond pulses. Our findings address the effectiveness of fs-laser treatment and chemical metallization of polydimethylsiloxane films with perspective technological interest in micro-fabrication devices for MEMS and nano-electromechanical systems.

  13. Laser polishing of niobium for SRF applications

    SciTech Connect

    Zhao, Liang; Klopf, J. Michael; Reece, Charles E.; Kelley, Michael

    2013-09-01

    Smooth interior surfaces are desired for niobium SRF cavities, now obtained by buffered chemical polish (BCP) and/or electropolish (EP). Laser polishing is a potential alternative, having advantages of speed, freedom from chemistry and in-process inspection. Here we show that laser polishing can produce smooth topography with Power Spectral Density (PSD) measurements similar to that obtained by EP. We studied the influence of the laser power density and laser beam raster rate on the surface topography. These two factors need to be combined carefully to smooth the surface without damaging it. Computational modeling was used to simulate the surface temperature and explain the mechanism of laser polishing.

  14. Laser device

    DOEpatents

    Scott, Jill R.; Tremblay, Paul L.

    2007-07-10

    A laser device includes a target position, an optical component separated a distance J from the target position, and a laser energy source separated a distance H from the optical component, distance H being greater than distance J. A laser source manipulation mechanism exhibits a mechanical resolution of positioning the laser source. The mechanical resolution is less than a spatial resolution of laser energy at the target position as directed through the optical component. A vertical and a lateral index that intersect at an origin can be defined for the optical component. The manipulation mechanism can auto align laser aim through the origin during laser source motion. The laser source manipulation mechanism can include a mechanical index. The mechanical index can include a pivot point for laser source lateral motion and a reference point for laser source vertical motion. The target position can be located within an adverse environment including at least one of a high magnetic field, a vacuum system, a high pressure system, and a hazardous zone. The laser source and an electro-mechanical part of the manipulation mechanism can be located outside the adverse environment. The manipulation mechanism can include a Peaucellier linkage.

  15. Laser device

    DOEpatents

    Scott, Jill R.; Tremblay, Paul L.

    2004-11-23

    A laser device includes a target position, an optical component separated a distance J from the target position, and a laser energy source separated a distance H from the optical component, distance H being greater than distance J. A laser source manipulation mechanism exhibits a mechanical resolution of positioning the laser source. The mechanical resolution is less than a spatial resolution of laser energy at the target position as directed through the optical component. A vertical and a lateral index that intersect at an origin can be defined for the optical component. The manipulation mechanism can auto align laser aim through the origin during laser source motion. The laser source manipulation mechanism can include a mechanical index. The mechanical index can include a pivot point for laser source lateral motion and a reference point for laser source vertical motion. The target position can be located within an adverse environment including at least one of a high magnetic field, a vacuum system, a high pressure system, and a hazardous zone. The laser source and an electro-mechanical part of the manipulation mechanism can be located outside the adverse environment. The manipulation mechanism can include a Peaucellier linkage.

  16. Laser ignition

    DOEpatents

    Early, James W.; Lester, Charles S.

    2003-01-01

    In the apparatus of the invention, a first excitation laser or other excitation light source is used in tandem with an ignitor laser to provide a compact, durable, engine deployable fuel ignition laser system. Reliable fuel ignition is provided over a wide range of fuel conditions by using a single remote excitation light source for one or more small lasers located proximate to one or more fuel combustion zones. In a third embodiment, alternating short and long pulses of light from the excitation light source are directed into the ignitor laser. Each of the embodiments of the invention can be multiplexed so as to provide laser light energy sequentially to more than one ignitor laser.

  17. Comparison of laser models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heinbockel, John H.

    1992-01-01

    The final phase of modeling solar pumped lasers considers the photodissociation of the perfloralkyl molecules n - C3F7I ,t - C4F9I, and i - C3F7I. Computer modeling was compared to laboratory data and good agreement between theory and experiment was achieved. The following is a summary of the modeling of solar pumped lasers. A perfloride gas enters a tube at a point z = 0 and travels a distance L at a velocity, W, and then exits at the point z = L. During the flow, the gas is solar pumped over the initial distance 0 less than or = z less than or = z sub 0, where z sub 0 is less than or equal to L. The perfloride gas interacts chemically with light and a chain of chemical reactions occur.

  18. Methods for determining optical power, for power-normalizing laser measurements, and for stabilizing power of lasers via compliance voltage sensing

    DOEpatents

    Taubman, Matthew S; Phillips, Mark C

    2015-04-07

    A method is disclosed for power normalization of spectroscopic signatures obtained from laser based chemical sensors that employs the compliance voltage across a quantum cascade laser device within an external cavity laser. The method obviates the need for a dedicated optical detector used specifically for power normalization purposes. A method is also disclosed that employs the compliance voltage developed across the laser device within an external cavity semiconductor laser to power-stabilize the laser mode of the semiconductor laser by adjusting drive current to the laser such that the output optical power from the external cavity semiconductor laser remains constant.

  19. Metal atom oxidation laser

    DOEpatents

    Jensen, R.J.; Rice, W.W.; Beattie, W.H.

    1975-10-28

    A chemical laser which operates by formation of metal or carbon atoms and reaction of such atoms with a gaseous oxidizer in an optical resonant cavity is described. The lasing species are diatomic or polyatomic in nature and are readily produced by exchange or other abstraction reactions between the metal or carbon atoms and the oxidizer. The lasing molecules may be metal or carbon monohalides or monoxides. (auth)

  20. Metal atom oxidation laser

    DOEpatents

    Jensen, R.J.; Rice, W.W.; Beattie, W.H.

    1975-10-28

    A chemical laser which operates by formation of metal or carbon atoms and reaction of such atoms with a gaseous oxidizer in an optical resonant cavity is described. The lasing species are diatomic or polyatomic in nature and are readily produced by exchange or other abstraction reactions between the metal or carbon atoms and the oxidizer. The lasing molecules may be metal or carbon monohalides or monoxides.

  1. Photodissociation Dye Laser

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1975-04-01

    Chemical Properties of Free Radicals 5 C. Criteria for the Selection of Photodissociation Dye Laser Molecules 6 III. EXPERIMENTAL EFFORT AND...nanoseconds. In radicl systems, however, there is evidence both theoretical and experimental, that the first doublet-doublet electronic tra-jitions are...Properties, of Free Radicals Recombination is only one of many possible reaction paths that can occur in a radical system. Because they are characterized

  2. Diode Pumped Fiber Laser.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1987-08-01

    mounting fixture beeame soft and gradually come out of the fixture. S)me chemical reaction was takin- place between the epoxy and the dye solvent , which...loose. The solvent apparenlly did no)t affect the bonding agent used to attach the fibers inside the capillarie,. \\lthmigh individual capillarv tubes...pure solvent . was added to the cavity laser oscillation ceased, and was onlv re, ,t()red after readjuisting the orientation of the output coupler, as

  3. Continuous wave laser irradiation of explosives

    SciTech Connect

    McGrane, Shawn D.; Moore, David S.

    2010-12-01

    Quantitative measurements of the levels of continuous wave (CW) laser light that can be safely applied to bare explosives during contact operations were obtained at 532 nm, 785 nm, and 1550 nm wavelengths. A thermal camera was used to record the temperature of explosive pressed pellets and single crystals while they were irradiated using a measured laser power and laser spot size. A visible light image of the sample surface was obtained before and after the laser irradiation. Laser irradiation thresholds were obtained for the onset of any visible change to the explosive sample and for the onset of any visible chemical reaction. Deflagration to detonation transitions were not observed using any of these CW laser wavelengths on single crystals or pressed pellets in the unconfined geometry tested. Except for the photochemistry of DAAF, TATB and PBX 9502, all reactions appeared to be thermal using a 532 nm wavelength laser. For a 1550 nm wavelength laser, no photochemistry was evident, but the laser power thresholds for thermal damage in some of the materials were significantly lower than for the 532 nm laser wavelength. No reactions were observed in any of the studied explosives using the available 300 mW laser at 785 nm wavelength. Tables of laser irradiance damage and reaction thresholds are presented for pressed pellets of PBX9501, PBX9502, Composition B, HMX, TATB, RDX, DAAF, PETN, and TNT and single crystals of RDX, HMX, and PETN for each of the laser wavelengths.

  4. Chemical Peel

    MedlinePlus

    ... be done at different depths — light, medium or deep — depending on your desired results. Each type of ... chemical peel after 12 months to maintain results. Deep chemical peel. A deep chemical peel removes skin ...

  5. Laser-supported detonation waves and pulsed laser propulsion

    SciTech Connect

    Kare, J.T.

    1989-01-01

    A laser thermal rocket uses the energy of a large remote laser, possibly ground-based, to heat an inert propellant and generate thrust. Use of a pulsed laser allows the design of extremely simple thrusters with very high performance compared to chemical rockets. The temperatures, pressures, and fluxes involved in such thrusters (10{sup 4} K, 10{sup 2} atmospheres, 10{sup 7} w/cm{sup 2}) typically result in the creation of laser-supported detonation (LSD) waves. The thrust cycle thus involves a complex set of transient shock phenomena, including laser-surface interactions in the ignition if the LSD wave, laser-plasma interactions in the LSD wave itself, and high-temperature nonequilibrium chemistry behind the LSD wave. The SDIO Laser Propulsion Program is investigating these phenomena as part of an overall effort to develop the technology for a low-cost Earth-to-orbit laser launch system. We will summarize the program's approach to developing a high performance thruster, the double-pulse planar thruster, and present an overview of some results obtained to date, along with a discussion of the many research questions still outstanding in this area. 16 refs., 7 figs.

  6. Laser-supported detonation waves and pulsed laser propulsion

    SciTech Connect

    Kare, J. )

    1990-07-30

    A laser thermal rocket uses the energy of a large remote laser, possibly ground-based, to heat an inert propellant and generate thrust. Use of a pulsed laser allows the design of extremely simple thrusters with very high performance compared to chemical rockets. The temperatures, pressures, and fluxes involved in such thrusters (10{sup 4} K, 10{sup 2} atmospheres, 10{sup 7} w/cm{sup 2}) typically result in the creation of laser-supported detonation (LSD) waves. The thrust cycle thus involves a complex set of transient shock phenomena, including laser-surface interactions in the ignition of the LSD wave, laser-plasma interactions in the LSD wave itself, and high-temperature nonequilibrium chemistry behind the LSD wave. The SDIO Laser Propulsion Program is investigating these phenomena as part of an overall effort to develop the technology for a low-cost Earth-to-orbit laser launch system. We will summarize the Program's approach to developing a high performance thruster, the double-pulse planar thruster, and present an overview of some results obtained to date, along with a discussion of the many research question still outstanding in this area.

  7. On laser-induced harpooning reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weiner, J.

    1980-05-01

    In the present paper, the switching of chemical reactivity by a nonresonant laser field in simple gas-phase collisions of the type A + BC to AB + C is discussed in terms of a second-order optical/collision perturbation. A simple expression relating laser-induced harpooning cross sections to the laser power density is derived and is applied to Hg/Cl2 collisions.

  8. Optical and Kinetic Processes in Excimer Lasers

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1993-03-01

    investigations of the spectroscopy and chemical kinetics of XeF and XeCl lasers using theoretical techniques , synchrotron radiation excitation, and laser... technique for characterizing potential SBS media. Our work is described in Appendices N and 0. 3 OTHER TOPICS IN LASERS AND NONLINEAR OPTICS The SRS and... technique described above for several fluorine and chlorine donors are shown in Table 1. The quanitities in parentheses indicate where the yields have

  9. Newer Trends in Laser Tattoo Removal

    PubMed Central

    Shah, Swapnil D; Aurangabadkar, Sanjeev J

    2015-01-01

    Q switched lasers are the current gold standard for laser tattoo removal. Though these systems are generally quite effective in clearing tattoos & have an established safety record, certain limitations exist while following the standard protocol. To overcome these limitation newer techniques such as multipass method, combination treatments with chemical agent and other laser have been introduced. These methods help in faster, less painful and complication free tattoo removal. PMID:25949019

  10. Using a novel sol-gel stir bar sorptive extraction method for the analysis of steroid hormones in water by laser diode thermal desorption/atmospheric chemical ionization tandem mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Vo Duy, S; Fayad, P B; Barbeau, B; Prévost, M; Sauvé, S

    2012-11-15

    A new coating material was used for a stir bar sorptive extraction (SBSE) method coupled to a high throughput sample analysis technique. This allowed for a simple procedure for fast determinations of eight steroid hormones (estriol, estradiol, ethynylestradiol, estrone, progesterone, medroxyprogesterone, levonorgestrel, northindrone) in water. Sample pre-treatment was performed using an in-house SBSE method based on a polydimethylsiloxane/phenyltrimethylsiloxane/β-cyclodextrin sol-gel material. The analytes were desorbed by liquid extraction prior to their analysis by laser diode thermal desorption/atmospheric pressure chemical ionization coupled to tandem mass spectrometry (LDTD-APCI-MS/MS). Several parameters, including ionic strength, volume and time of extraction as well as volume and time of desorption, were investigated to maximize extraction efficiency by SBSE in aqueous solutions. The in-house stir bar showed good reproducibility and could be used for at least 50 extractions without affecting analytical performance. The recoveries of the spiked steroid hormones ranged from 55% to 96% in all water matrices studied (HPLC grade water, tap water and raw wastewater). Only one compound showed poor recovery values (<2% for estriol) in all matrices. The method detection limits (MDLs) in real matrices were within the range of 0.1-0.3 μg L(-1) except for estriol at 48 μg L(-1). The extraction performance of the in-house SBSE for the eight selected hormones was also compared with that of a commercially-available stir bar coated with polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS). This novel stir bar coating could prove to be useful method for the detection and quantification of trace levels of steroid hormones.

  11. Mass spectrometry in the characterization of ambers. I. Studies of amber samples of different origin and ages by laser desorption ionization, atmospheric pressure chemical ionization and atmospheric pressure photoionization mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Tonidandel, Loris; Ragazzi, Eugenio; Roghi, Guido; Traldi, Pietro

    2008-01-01

    Amber is a fossil resin constituted of organic polymers derived through complex maturation processes of the original plant resin. A classification of eight samples of amber of different geological age (Miocene to Triassic) and geographical origin is here proposed using direct mass spectrometric techniques, i.e. laser desorption ionization (LDI), atmospheric pressure chemical ionization (APCI) and atmospheric pressure photoionization (APPI), in order to obtain a fingerprint related to the amber origin. Differences and similarities were detected among the spectra with the four methods, showing quite complex spectra, full of ionic species in the mass range investigated (up to m/z 2000). The evaluation required statistical analysis involving multivariate techniques. Cluster analysis or principal component analysis (PCA) generally did not show a clear clustering with respect to the age of samples, except for the APPI method, which allowed a satisfying clustering. Using the total ion current (TIC) obtained by the different analytical approaches on equal quantities of the different amber samples and plotted against the age, the only significant correlation appeared to be that involving APPI. To validate the method, four amber samples from Cretaceous of Spain were analyzed. Also in this case a significant correlation with age was found only with APPI data. PCA obtained with TIC values from all the MS methods showed a fair grouping of samples, according to their age. Three main clusters could be detected, belonging to younger, intermediate and older fossil resins, respectively. This MS analysis on crude amber, either solid or extract, followed by appropriate multivariate statistical evaluation, can provide useful information on amber age. The best results are those obtained by APPI, indicating that the quantity of amber soluble components that can be photoionized decreases with increasing age, in agreement with the formation of highly stable, insoluble polymers.

  12. Development of a new multi-residue laser diode thermal desorption atmospheric pressure chemical ionization tandem mass spectrometry method for the detection and quantification of pesticides and pharmaceuticals in wastewater samples.

    PubMed

    Boisvert, Michel; Fayad, Paul B; Sauvé, Sébastien

    2012-11-19

    A new solid phase extraction (SPE) method coupled to a high throughput sample analysis technique was developed for the simultaneous determination of nine selected emerging contaminants in wastewater (atrazine, desethylatrazine, 17β-estradiol, ethynylestradiol, norethindrone, caffeine, carbamazepine, diclofenac and sulfamethoxazole). We specifically included pharmaceutical compounds from multiple therapeutic classes, as well as pesticides. Sample pre-concentration and clean-up was performed using a mixed-mode SPE cartridge (Strata ABW) having both cation and anion exchange properties, followed by analysis by laser diode thermal desorption atmospheric pressure chemical ionization coupled to tandem mass spectrometry (LDTD-APCI-MS/MS). The LDTD interface is a new high-throughput sample introduction method, which reduces total analysis time to less than 15s per sample as compared to minutes with traditional liquid-chromatography coupled to tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS). Several SPE parameters were evaluated in order to optimize recovery efficiencies when extracting analytes from wastewater, such as the nature of the stationary phase, the loading flow rate, the extraction pH, the volume and composition of the washing solution and the initial sample volume. The method was successfully applied to real wastewater samples from the primary sedimentation tank of a municipal wastewater treatment plant. Recoveries of target compounds from wastewater ranged from 78% to 106%, the limit of detection ranged from 30 to 122ng L(-1) while the limit of quantification ranged from 90 to 370ng L(-1). Calibration curves in the wastewater matrix showed good linearity (R(2)≥0.991) for all target analytes and the intraday and interday coefficient of variation was below 15%, reflecting a good precision.

  13. Diclofenac in municipal wastewater treatment plant: quantification using laser diode thermal desorption--atmospheric pressure chemical ionization--tandem mass spectrometry approach in comparison with an established liquid chromatography-electrospray ionization-tandem mass spectrometry method.

    PubMed

    Lonappan, Linson; Pulicharla, Rama; Rouissi, Tarek; Brar, Satinder K; Verma, Mausam; Surampalli, Rao Y; Valero, José R

    2016-02-12

    Diclofenac (DCF), a prevalent non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID) is often detected in wastewater and surface water. Analysis of the pharmaceuticals in complex matrices is often laden with challenges. In this study a reliable, rapid and sensitive method based on laser diode thermal desorption/atmospheric pressure chemical ionization (LDTD/APCI) coupled with tandem mass spectrometry (MS/MS) has been developed for the quantification of DCF in wastewater and wastewater sludge. An established conventional LC-ESI-MS/MS (liquid chromatography-electrospray ionization-tandem mass spectrometry) method was compared with LDTD-APCI-MS/MS approach. The newly developed LDTD-APCI-MS/MS method reduced the analysis time to 12s in lieu of 12 min for LC-ESI-MS/MS method. The method detection limits for LDTD-APCI-MS/MS method were found to be 270 ng L(-1) (LOD) and 1000 ng L(-1) (LOQ). Furthermore, two extraction procedures, ultrasonic assisted extraction (USE) and accelerated solvent extraction (ASE) for the extraction of DCF from wastewater sludge were compared and ASE with 95.6 ± 7% recovery was effective over USE with 86 ± 4% recovery. The fate and partitioning of DCF in wastewater (WW) and wastewater sludge (WWS) in wastewater treatment plant was also monitored at various stages of treatment in Quebec Urban community wastewater treatment plant. DCF exhibited affinity towards WW than WWS with a presence about 60% of DCF in WW in contrary with theoretical prediction (LogKow=4.51).

  14. Chemical peeling of eyelids and periorbital area.

    PubMed

    Morrow, D M

    1992-02-01

    Chemical peeling promotes formation of new epidermis and new dermal collagen, resulting in skin shrinkage, reduction of wrinkling and crepe paper skin, softening of crow's feet, and, when desired, lightened eyelid color. Chemical peeling may be performed as the only eyelid procedure, simultaneously with CO2 laser surgical blepharoplasty, after healing of cold-steel-scalpel or CO2-laser blepharoplasty, and as a repeated procedure to achieve maximal results.

  15. Biocavity Lasers

    SciTech Connect

    Gourley, P.L.; Gourley, M.F.

    2000-10-05

    Laser technology has advanced dramatically and is an integral part of today's healthcare delivery system. Lasers are used in the laboratory analysis of human blood samples and serve as surgical tools that kill, burn or cut tissue. Recent semiconductor microtechnology has reduced the size o f a laser to the size of a biological cell or even a virus particle. By integrating these ultra small lasers with biological systems, it is possible to create micro-electrical mechanical systems that may revolutionize health care delivery.

  16. Laser apparatus

    DOEpatents

    Lewis, Owen; Stogran, Edmund M.

    1980-01-01

    Laser apparatus is described wherein an active laser element, such as the disc of a face-pumped laser, is mounted in a housing such that the weight of the element is supported by glass spheres which fill a chamber defined in the housing between the walls of the housing and the edges of the laser element. The uniform support provided by the spheres enable the chamber and the pump side of the laser element to be sealed without affecting the alignment or other optical properties of the laser element. Cooling fluid may be circulated through the sealed region by way of the interstices between the spheres. The spheres, and if desired also the cooling fluid may contain material which absorbs radiation at the wavelength of parasitic emissions from the laser element. These parasitic emissions enter the spheres through the interface along the edge surface of the laser element and it is desirable that the index of refraction of the spheres and cooling fluid be near the index of refraction of the laser element. Thus support, cooling, and parasitic suppression functions are all accomplished through the use of the arrangement.

  17. Laser ignition

    DOEpatents

    Early, James W.; Lester, Charles S.

    2002-01-01

    In the apparatus of the invention, a first excitation laser or other excitation light source capable of producing alternating beams of light having different wavelengths is used in tandem with one or more ignitor lasers to provide a compact, durable, engine deployable fuel ignition laser system. Reliable fuel ignition is provided over a wide range of fuel conditions by using the single remote excitation light source for pumping one or more small lasers located proximate to one or more fuel combustion zones with alternating wavelengths of light.

  18. An Integrated Approach to Laser Crystal Development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ries, Heidi R.

    1996-01-01

    Norfolk State University has developed an integrated research program in the area of laser crystal development, including crystal modeling, crystal growth, spectroscopy, and laser modeling. This research program supports a new graduate program in Chemical Physics, designed in part to address the shortage of minority scientists.

  19. Laser peening for reducing hydrogen embrittlement

    DOEpatents

    Hackel, Lloyd A.; Zaleski, Tania M.; Chen, Hao-Lin; Hill, Michael R.; Liu, Kevin K.

    2010-05-25

    A laser peening process for the densification of metal surfaces and sub-layers and for changing surface chemical activities provides retardation of the up-take and penetration of atoms and molecules, particularly Hydrogen, which improves the lifetime of such laser peened metals. Penetration of hydrogen into metals initiates an embrittlement that leaves the material susceptible to cracking.

  20. Laser cleaning on Roman coins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Drakaki, E.; Karydas, A. G.; Klinkenberg, B.; Kokkoris, M.; Serafetinides, A. A.; Stavrou, E.; Vlastou, R.; Zarkadas, C.

    Ancient metal objects react with moisture and environmental chemicals to form various corrosion products. Because of the unique character and high value of such objects, any cleaning procedure should guarantee minimum destructiveness. The most common treatment used is mechanical stripping, in which it is difficult to avoid surface damage when employed. Lasers are currently being tested for a wide range of conservation applications. Since they are highly controllable and can be selectively applied, lasers can be used to achieve more effective and safer cleaning of archaeological artifacts and protect their surface details. The basic criterion that motivated us to use lasers to clean Roman coins was the requirement of pulsed emission, in order to minimize heat-induced damages. In fact, the laser interaction with the coins has to be short enough, to produce a fast removal of the encrustation, avoiding heat conduction into the substrate. The cleaning effects of three lasers operating at different wavelengths, namely a TEA CO2 laser emitting at 10.6 μm, an Er:YAG laser at 2.94 μm, and a 2ω-Nd:YAG laser at 532 nm have been compared on corroded Romans coins and various atomic and nuclear techniques have also been applied to evaluate the efficiency of the applied procedure.