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Sample records for chemical research organic

  1. BASIC CHEMICAL RESEARCH PROGRAM. ELECTRICAL PROPERTIES OF ORGANIC COMPOUNDS

    DTIC Science & Technology

    BENZENE, *CYANIDES, *HYDROXIDES, *ORGANIC COMPOUNDS, ACETYLENES, ALKYL RADICALS, AMIDES, ANILINES , BENZALDEHYDES, CHEMICAL REACTIONS , CONDENSATION... REACTIONS , ELECTRICAL CONDUCTIVITY, MATERIALS, MEASUREMENT, MONOCYCLIC COMPOUNDS, PHENOLS, PHENYL RADICALS, QUINONES, SOLID STATE PHYSICS, SYNTHESIS.

  2. Occupational exposure to chemicals and sensory organs: a neglected research field.

    PubMed

    Gobba, Fabriziomaria

    2003-08-01

    The effect of industrial chemicals on the sensory perception of exposed workers has received scant attention from the medical community to date, and the scientific literature is mainly limited to some case-reports or isolated studies. Possible explanations for this include the complexity of sensory perception, and the lack of agreement among researchers on methods for testing large groups of subjects. Nevertheless, some published studies showed that vision, hearing and olfactory function can be affected by various industrial metals and solvents, and some data exist also for touch and taste. This review discusses the main industrial chemicals involved. The pathogenesis of the toxicity of chemicals to sensory perception may be related to an action on receptors, nerve fibers, and/or the brain; probably, different pathogenetic mechanisms are involved. One of the main problems in this research field is that most of the studies to date evaluated the effect of a single industrial chemical on a single sense: as an example, we know that styrene exposure can impair smell and also hearing and vision but we have little idea whether different senses are impaired in the same worker, or whether each impairment is independent. In addition, workers are frequently exposed to different chemicals: co-exposure may have no effect, or result in both an increase or a decrease of the effect, as was observed for hearing loss, but studies on this aspect are largely insufficient. Research shows that both occupational and environmental exposure to industrial chemicals can affect sense organs, and suggests that the decline of perception with age may be, at least partly, related to this exposure. Nevertheless, available evidence is incomplete, and is largely inadequate for an estimation of a "safe" threshold of exposure. Good quality further research in this field is needed. This is certainly complex and demands adequate resources, but is justified by the ultimate result: the possibility to

  3. Research in the Field of Organic Photovoltaics at the Institute for Problems of Chemical Physics of Russian Academy of Sciences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Troshin, Pavel A.

    2015-08-01

    In the present review we highlight the main research activities in the field of organic photonics and photovoltaics at the Institute for Problems of Chemical Physics of Russian Academy of Sciences (IPCP RAS). Extensive investigation of optical and electrical properties of π-conjugated organic compounds performed at IPCP RAS since 1960's resulted in design of many exciting materials representing organic semiconductors, metals and superconductors. Organic Schottky barrier and p/n junction photovoltaic devices constructed at IPCP RAS in 1960's and 1970's were among the first examples of reasonably efficient organic solar cells at that time. These early discoveries inspired younger generations of the researchers to continue the work of their mentors and explore the world of organic materials and photonic devices such as molecular photonic switches, organic light emitting diodes, solar cells, photodetectors, photoswitchable organic field-effect transistors and memory elements.

  4. Organic chemical evolution

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chang, S.

    1981-01-01

    The course of organic chemical evolution preceding the emergence of life on earth is discussed based on evidence of processes occurring in interstellar space, the solar system and the primitive earth. Following a brief review of the equilibrium condensation model for the origin and evolution of the solar system, consideration is given to the nature and organic chemistry of interstellar clouds, comets, Jupiter, meteorites, Venus and Mars, and the prebiotic earth. Major issues to be resolved in the study of organic chemical evolution on earth are identified regarding condensation and accretion in the solar nebula, early geological evolution, the origin and evolution of the atmosphere, organic production rates, organic-inorganic interactions, environmental fluctuations, phase separation and molecular selectivity.

  5. Organic chemical evolution

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chang, S.

    1981-01-01

    The course of organic chemical evolution preceding the emergence of life on earth is discussed based on evidence of processes occurring in interstellar space, the solar system and the primitive earth. Following a brief review of the equilibrium condensation model for the origin and evolution of the solar system, consideration is given to the nature and organic chemistry of interstellar clouds, comets, Jupiter, meteorites, Venus and Mars, and the prebiotic earth. Major issues to be resolved in the study of organic chemical evolution on earth are identified regarding condensation and accretion in the solar nebula, early geological evolution, the origin and evolution of the atmosphere, organic production rates, organic-inorganic interactions, environmental fluctuations, phase separation and molecular selectivity.

  6. Safer Chemicals Research

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    EPA's Chemical Safety research protects human health and the environment by evaluating chemicals for potential risk and providing tools and guidance for improved chemical production that supports a sustainable environment.

  7. Research Update: Mechanical properties of metal-organic frameworks - Influence of structure and chemical bonding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Wei; Henke, Sebastian; Cheetham, Anthony K.

    2014-12-01

    Metal-organic frameworks (MOFs), a young family of functional materials, have been attracting considerable attention from the chemistry, materials science, and physics communities. In the light of their potential applications in industry and technology, the fundamental mechanical properties of MOFs, which are of critical importance for manufacturing, processing, and performance, need to be addressed and understood. It has been widely accepted that the framework topology, which describes the overall connectivity pattern of the MOF building units, is of vital importance for the mechanical properties. However, recent advances in the area of MOF mechanics reveal that chemistry plays a major role as well. From the viewpoint of materials science, a deep understanding of the influence of chemical effects on MOF mechanics is not only highly desirable for the development of novel functional materials with targeted mechanical response, but also for a better understanding of important properties such as structural flexibility and framework breathing. The present work discusses the intrinsic connection between chemical effects and the mechanical behavior of MOFs through a number of prototypical examples.

  8. Groundwater and organic chemicals

    SciTech Connect

    Dawson, H.E.

    1995-12-01

    Groundwater is a major source of drinking water for many communities. Unfortunately, organic chemicals such as dry cleaning fluids, solvent, fuels, and pesticides have contaminated groundwater in many areas, rendering the groundwater useless as a drinking water resource. In many cases, the groundwater cannot be cleaned up with current technologies, particularly if the groundwater has been contaminated with immiscible (low solubility) organic liquids. In this talk, I will describe the path I have followed from geologist to geochemist and finally to environmental engineer. As a geologist, I studied the chemistry of rock metamorphosis. As a geochemist, I explored for gold and other metals. Now as an environmental engineer, I investigate the behavior of organic liquids in the subsurface. While these fields all appear very different, in reality I have always focused on the interaction of rocks or sediments with the fluids with which they come in contact.

  9. Reproducibility in Chemical Research.

    PubMed

    Bergman, Robert G; Danheiser, Rick L

    2016-10-04

    "… To what extent is reproducibility a significant issue in chemical research? How can problems involving irreproducibility be minimized? … Researchers should be aware of the dangers of unconscious investigator bias, all papers should provide adequate experimental detail, and Reviewers have a responsibility to carefully examine papers for adequacy of experimental detail and support for the conclusions …" Read more in the Editorial by Robert G. Bergman and Rick L. Danheiser.

  10. Organic Chemicals: Angels or Goblins?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ferguson, Lloyd N.

    1978-01-01

    Discusses some of the controversial organic chemical substances such as DDT, Red Dye No. 2, DES, Tris, Laetrile, cyclamate, and saccharin. Concludes that the use of some has to be considered on a benefit/risk ratio. (GA)

  11. Organic Chemicals: Angels or Goblins?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ferguson, Lloyd N.

    1978-01-01

    Discusses some of the controversial organic chemical substances such as DDT, Red Dye No. 2, DES, Tris, Laetrile, cyclamate, and saccharin. Concludes that the use of some has to be considered on a benefit/risk ratio. (GA)

  12. Dryden Flight Research Center Chemical Pharmacy Program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davis, Bette

    1997-01-01

    The Dryden Flight Research Center (DFRC) Chemical Pharmacy "Crib" is a chemical sharing system which loans chemicals to users, rather than issuing them or having each individual organization or group purchasing the chemicals. This cooperative system of sharing chemicals eliminates multiple ownership of the same chemicals and also eliminates stockpiles. Chemical management duties are eliminated for each of the participating organizations. The chemical storage issues, hazards and responsibilities are eliminated. The system also ensures safe storage of chemicals and proper disposal practices. The purpose of this program is to reduce the total releases and transfers of toxic chemicals. The initial cost of the program to DFRC was $585,000. A savings of $69,000 per year has been estimated for the Center. This savings includes the reduced costs in purchasing, disposal and chemical inventory/storage responsibilities. DFRC has chemicals stored in 47 buildings and at 289 locations. When the program is fully implemented throughout the Center, there will be three chemical locations at this facility. The benefits of this program are the elimination of chemical management duties; elimination of the hazard associated with chemical storage; elimination of stockpiles; assurance of safe storage; assurance of proper disposal practices; assurance of a safer workplace; and more accurate emissions reports.

  13. Plant uptake of non ionic organic chemicals.

    PubMed

    Collins, Chris; Fryer, Mike; Grosso, Albania

    2006-01-01

    Plant uptake of organic chemicals is an important process when considering the risks associated with land contamination, the role of vegetation in the global cycling of persistent organic pollutants, and the potential for industrial discharges to contaminate the food chain. There have been some significant advances in our understanding of the processes of plant uptake of organic chemicals in recent years; most notably there is now a better understanding of the air to plant transfer pathway, which may be significant for a number of industrial chemicals. This review identifies the key processes involved in the plant uptake of organic chemicals including those for which there is currently little information, e.g., plant lipid content and plant metabolism. One of the principal findings is that although a number of predictive models exist using established relationships, these require further validation if they are to be considered sufficiently robust for the purposes of contaminated land risk assessment or for prediction of the global cycling of persistent organic pollutants. Finally, a number of processes are identified which should be the focus of future research.

  14. Concentrations of persistent organic pollutants in maternal and cord blood from the maternal-infant research on environmental chemicals (MIREC) cohort study.

    PubMed

    Fisher, Mandy; Arbuckle, Tye E; Liang, Chun Lei; LeBlanc, Alain; Gaudreau, Eric; Foster, Warren G; Haines, Douglas; Davis, Karelyn; Fraser, William D

    2016-05-04

    Pregnant women are an especially important population to monitor for environmental exposures given the vulnerability of the developing fetus. During pregnancy and lactation chemical body burdens may change due to the significant physiological changes that occur. Developmental exposures to some persistent organic pollutants (POPs) have been linked with adverse health outcomes. First trimester maternal and cord blood plasma concentrations of several POPs including polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), organochlorine pesticides (OCs), polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDE)s and perfluoroalkyl substances (PFASs) were measured in samples from 1983 pregnant women enrolled in the Maternal-Infant Research on Environmental Chemicals (MIREC) cohort. Predictors of exposure were also identified. In maternal plasma, there was >90 % detection for the perfluoroalkyl substances (PFASs) perfluorooctanoic acid (PFOA), perfluoroctane sulfonate (PFOS), perfluorohexane sulfonate (PFHxS), and dichlorodiphenyldichloroethylene (DDE), oxychlordane and PCB 138 and 153. Cord blood plasma had much lower detection rates with low or very limited detection for most PCBs and PBDEs. The PFASs were the most frequently detected (23-64 %) chemical class in cord plasma. In a subset of 1st and 3rd trimester paired samples, PFAS concentrations were found to be strongly correlated and had ICCs ranging from 0.64 (PFOA) to 0.83 (PFHxS). The cord:maternal plasma concentration ratios ranged from 0.14 (PFOS) to 0.87 (oxychlordane, lipid adjusted). Similar to other studies, we found parity, maternal age, income, education, smoking status, pre-pregnancy BMI and fish consumption to be significant predictors for most chemicals. Those participants who were foreign-born had significantly higher concentrations of organochlorinated pesticides and PCBs. In the MIREC study, multiple chemical contaminants were quantified in the plasma of pregnant women. In cord plasma PFOA had the highest detection rate. However, compared

  15. Organizing research data.

    PubMed

    Sestoft, Peter

    2011-01-01

    Research relies on ever larger amounts of data from experiments, automated production equipment, questionnaries, times series such as weather records, and so on. A major task in science is to combine, process and analyse such data to obtain evidence of patterns and correlations.Most research data are on digital form, which in principle ensures easy processing and analysis, easy long-term preservation, and easy reuse in future research, perhaps in entirely unanticipated ways. However, in practice, obstacles such as incompatible or undocumented data formats, poor data quality and lack of familiarity with current technology prevent researchers from making full use of available data.This paper argues that relational databases are excellent tools for veterinary research and animal production; provides a small example to introduce basic database concepts; and points out some concerns that must be addressed when organizing data for research purposes.

  16. Color Coding Organic Chemicals for Inventory Control.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wystrach, V. P.; George, Babu

    1985-01-01

    Describes a system in which organic chemicals are recoded for inventory control and reshelving purposes. The system works well in undergraduate organic chemistry or biology laboratories but can be expanded to handle a larger and more complicated inventory. (JN)

  17. Color Coding Organic Chemicals for Inventory Control.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wystrach, V. P.; George, Babu

    1985-01-01

    Describes a system in which organic chemicals are recoded for inventory control and reshelving purposes. The system works well in undergraduate organic chemistry or biology laboratories but can be expanded to handle a larger and more complicated inventory. (JN)

  18. Mineralogical, chemical, organic and microbial properties of subsurface soil cores from Mars Desert Research Station (Utah, USA): Phyllosilicate and sulfate analogues to Mars mission landing sites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stoker, Carol R.; Clarke, Jonathan; Direito, Susana O. L.; Blake, David; Martin, Kevin R.; Zavaleta, Jhony; Foing, Bernard

    2011-07-01

    We collected and analysed soil cores from four geologic units surrounding Mars Desert Research Station (MDRS) Utah, USA, including Mancos Shale, Dakota Sandstone, Morrison formation (Brushy Basin member) and Summerville formation. The area is an important geochemical and morphological analogue to terrains on Mars. Soils were analysed for mineralogy by a Terra X-ray diffractometer (XRD), a field version of the CheMin instrument on the Mars Science Laboratory (MSL) mission (2012 landing). Soluble ion chemistry, total organic content and identity and distribution of microbial populations were also determined. The Terra data reveal that Mancos and Morrison soils are rich in phyllosilicates similar to those observed on Mars from orbital measurements (montmorillonite, nontronite and illite). Evaporite minerals observed include gypsum, thenardite, polyhalite and calcite. Soil chemical analysis shows sulfate the dominant anion in all soils and SO4>>CO3, as on Mars. The cation pattern Na>Ca>Mg is seen in all soils except for the Summerville where Ca>Na. In all soils, SO4 correlates with Na, suggesting sodium sulfates are the dominant phase. Oxidizable organics are low in all soils and range from a high of 0.7% in the Mancos samples to undetectable at a detection limit of 0.1% in the Morrison soils. Minerals rich in chromium and vanadium were identified in Morrison soils that result from diagenetic replacement of organic compounds. Depositional environment, geologic history and mineralogy all affect the ability to preserve and detect organic compounds. Subsurface biosphere populations were revealed to contain organisms from all three domains (Archaea, Bacteria and Eukarya) with cell density between 3.0×106 and 1.8×107 cells ml-1 at the deepest depth. These measurements are analogous to data that could be obtained on future robotic or human Mars missions and results are relevant to the MSL mission that will investigate phyllosilicates on Mars.

  19. POLAR ORGANIC CHEMICAL INTEGRATIVE SAMPLING ...

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    The purpose of the research presented in this paper is two-fold: (1) to demonstrate the 4 coupling of two state-of-the-art techniques: a time-weighted polar organic integrative sampler (POCIS) and micro-liquid chromatography-electrospray/ion trap mass spectrometry (u-LC-6 ES/ITMS); and (2) the assessment of these methodologies in a real-world environment -wastewater effluent - for detecting six drugs (four prescription and two illicit). In the effluent from three wastewater treatment plants (WWTP), azithromycin was detected at concentrations ranging from 15ng/L to 66ng/L, equivalent to the total annual release of 0.4 -4 kg into the receiving waters. Detected and confirmed in the effluent from two WWTPs were two illicit drugs methamphetamine and methylenedioxymethamphetamine (MDMA), at 2ng/L and 0.5ng/L, respectively. While the ecotoxicological significance of drugs in environmental matrices, particularly water, has not been closely examined, it can only be surmised that these substances have the potential to adversely affect biota that are continuously exposed to them even at very low levels. The potential for chronic affects on human health is also unknown, but of increasing concern due to the multi use character of water, particularly in densely populated arid areas. The research focused on in the subtasks is the development and application of state-of the-art technologies to meet the needs of the public, Office of Water, and ORD in the area of Water Quality

  20. Adsorption mechanisms of organic chemicals on carbon nanotubes.

    PubMed

    Pan, Bo; Xing, Baoshan

    2008-12-15

    Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) have drawn special research attention because of their unique properties and potential applications. This review summarizes the research progress of organic chemical adsorption on CNTs, and will provide useful information for CNT application and risk assessment. Adsorption heterogeneity and hysteresis are two widely recognized features of organic chemical-CNT interactions. However, because different mechanisms may act simultaneously, mainly hydrophobic interactions, pi-pi bonds, electrostatic interactions, and hydrogen bonds, the prediction of organic chemical adsorption on CNTs is not straightforward. The dominant adsorption mechanism is different for different types of organic chemicals (such as polar and nonpolar), thus different models may be needed to predict organic chemical-CNT interaction. Adsorption mechanisms will be better understood by investigating the effects of properties of both CNTs and organic chemicals along with environmental conditions. Another majorfactor affecting adsorption by CNTs is their suspendability, which also strongly affects their mobility, exposure, and risk in the environment. Therefore, organic chemical-CNT interactions as affected by CNT dispersion and suspending merit further experimental research. In addition, CNTs have potential applications in water treatment due to their adsorption characteristics. Thus column and pilot studies are needed to evaluate their performance and operational cost.

  1. COSOLVENCY AND SOPRTION OF HYDROPHOBIC ORGANIC CHEMICALS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Sorption of hydrophobic organic chemicals (HOCs) by two soils was measured from mixed solvents containing water plus completely miscible organic solvents (CMOSs) and partially miscible organic solvents (PMOSs). The utility of the log-linear cosolvency model for predicting HOC sor...

  2. COSOLVENCY AND SOPRTION OF HYDROPHOBIC ORGANIC CHEMICALS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Sorption of hydrophobic organic chemicals (HOCs) by two soils was measured from mixed solvents containing water plus completely miscible organic solvents (CMOSs) and partially miscible organic solvents (PMOSs). The utility of the log-linear cosolvency model for predicting HOC sor...

  3. Philosophical Confusion in Chemical Education Research.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Scerri, Eric R.

    2003-01-01

    Presents the state of research in chemical education. Reviews the origins of chemical constructivism, behaviorism, and relativism. Discusses the differences between objectivism, realism, and positivism. Suggests remedies for chemical education research to become better acquainted with the philosophical position. (KHR)

  4. Philosophical Confusion in Chemical Education Research.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Scerri, Eric R.

    2003-01-01

    Presents the state of research in chemical education. Reviews the origins of chemical constructivism, behaviorism, and relativism. Discusses the differences between objectivism, realism, and positivism. Suggests remedies for chemical education research to become better acquainted with the philosophical position. (KHR)

  5. Subsurface flow and transport of organic chemicals: an assessment of current modeling capability and priority directions for future research (1987-1995)

    SciTech Connect

    Streile, G.P.; Simmons, C.S.

    1986-09-01

    Theoretical and computer modeling capability for assessing the subsurface movement and fate of organic contaminants in groundwater was examined. Hence, this study is particularly concerned with energy-related, organic compounds that could enter a subsurface environment and move as components of a liquid phase separate from groundwater. The migration of organic chemicals that exist in an aqueous dissolved state is certainly a part of this more general scenario. However, modeling of the transport of chemicals in aqueous solution has already been the subject of several reviews. Hence, this study emphasizes the multiphase scenario. This study was initiated to focus on the important physicochemical processes that control the behavior of organic substances in groundwater systems, to evaluate the theory describing these processes, and to search for and evaluate computer codes that implement models that correctly conceptualize the problem situation. This study is not a code inventory, and no effort was made to identify every available code capable of representing a particular process.

  6. Organic chemicals from bioprocesses in China.

    PubMed

    Huang, Jin; Huang, Lei; Lin, Jianping; Xu, Zhinan; Cen, Peilin

    2010-01-01

    Over the last 20 years, China has successfully established a modern biotechnology industry from almost nothing. Presently, China is a major producer of a vast array of products involving bioprocesses, for some China is even the world's top producer. The ever-increasing list of products includes organic acids, amino acids, antibiotics, solvents, chiral chemicals, biopesticides, and biopolymers. Herein, the research and development of bioprocesses in China will be reviewed briefly. We will concentrate on three categories of products: small molecules produced via fermentation, biopolymers produced via fermentation and small chemicals produced by enzyme-catalyzed reactions. In comparison with the traditional chemical process, in which, nonrenewable mineral resources are generally used, products in the first and second categories noted above can use renewable bioresources as raw materials. The bioprocesses are generally energy saving and environmentally benign. For products developed via the third category, although the raw materials still need to be obtained from mineral resources, the biocatalysts are more effective with higher selectivity and productivity, and the bioprocesses occur under ambient temperature and pressure, therefore, these are "green processes." Most of the products such as citric acid, xanthan and acrylamide etc., discussed in this paper have been in large-scale commercial production in China. Also introduced herein are three scientists, Prof. Shen Yinchu, Prof. Ouyang Pingkai and Prof. Chen Guoqiang, and six enterprises, Anhui Fengyuan Biochemical Co. Ltd., Shandong Hiland Biotechnology Co. Ltd., Shandong Fufeng Fermentation Co. Ltd., Shandong Bausch & Lomb-Freda Pharmaceutical Co. Ltd., Zhejiang Hangzhou Xinfu Pharmaceutical Co. Ltd., and Changzhou Changmao Biochemical Engineering Co. Ltd.; they have all contributed a great deal to research and development in the commercialization of bioprocesses.

  7. Organic Chemicals from Bioprocesses in China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Jin; Huang, Lei; Lin, Jianping; Xu, Zhinan; Cen, Peilin

    Over the last 20 years, China has successfully established a modern biotechnology industry from almost nothing. Presently, China is a major producer of a vast array of products involving bioprocesses, for some China is even the world's top producer. The ever-increasing list of products includes organic acids, amino acids, antibiotics, solvents, chiral chemicals, biopesticides, and biopolymers. Herein, the research and development of bioprocesses in China will be reviewed briefly. We will concentrate on three categories of products: small molecules produced via fermentation, biopolymers produced via fermentation and small chemicals produced by enzyme-catalyzed reactions. In comparison with the traditional chemical process, in which, nonrenewable mineral resources are generally used, products in the first and second categories noted above can use renewable bioresources as raw materials. The bioprocesses are generally energy saving and environmentally benign. For products developed via the third category, although the raw materials still need to be obtained from mineral resources, the biocatalysts are more effective with higher selectivity and productivity, and the bioprocesses occur under ambient temperature and pressure, therefore, these are "green processes." Most of the products such as citric acid, xanthan and acrylamide etc., discussed in this paper have been in large-scale commercial production in China. Also introduced herein are three scientists, Prof. Shen Yinchu, Prof. Ouyang Pingkai and Prof. Chen Guoqiang, and six enterprises, Anhui Fengyuan Biochemical Co. Ltd., Shandong Hiland Biotechnology Co. Ltd., Shandong Fufeng Fermentation Co. Ltd., Shandong Bausch & Lomb-Freda Pharmaceutical Co. Ltd., Zhejiang Hangzhou Xinfu Pharmaceutical Co. Ltd., and Changzhou Changmao Biochemical Engineering Co. Ltd.; they have all contributed a great deal to research and development in the commercialization of bioprocesses.

  8. Metal-organic frameworks for the removal of toxic industrial chemicals and chemical warfare agents.

    PubMed

    Bobbitt, N Scott; Mendonca, Matthew L; Howarth, Ashlee J; Islamoglu, Timur; Hupp, Joseph T; Farha, Omar K; Snurr, Randall Q

    2017-06-06

    Owing to the vast diversity of linkers, nodes, and topologies, metal-organic frameworks can be tailored for specific tasks, such as chemical separations or catalysis. Accordingly, these materials have attracted significant interest for capture and/or detoxification of toxic industrial chemicals and chemical warfare agents. In this paper, we review recent experimental and computational work pertaining to the capture of several industrially-relevant toxic chemicals, including NH3, SO2, NO2, H2S, and some volatile organic compounds, with particular emphasis on the challenging issue of designing materials that selectively adsorb these chemicals in the presence of water. We also examine recent research on the capture and catalytic degradation of chemical warfare agents such as sarin and sulfur mustard using metal-organic frameworks.

  9. EFFECT OF NON-TARGET ORGANICS ON ORGANIC CHEMICAL TRANSPORT

    EPA Science Inventory

    To improve our standard of living, man has synthesized organic compounds for use in products considered essential for life. These compounds are having and will continue to have a significant impact on the terrestrial environment. Understanding organic chemical transport through s...

  10. EFFECT OF NON-TARGET ORGANICS ON ORGANIC CHEMICAL TRANSPORT

    EPA Science Inventory

    To improve our standard of living, man has synthesized organic compounds for use in products considered essential for life. These compounds are having and will continue to have a significant impact on the terrestrial environment. Understanding organic chemical transport through s...

  11. ESTIMATING DISSOLVED ORGANIC CARBON PARTITION COEFFICIENTS FOR NONIONIC ORGANIC CHEMICALS

    EPA Science Inventory

    A literature search was performed for dissolved organic carbon/water partition coefficients for nonionic chemicals (Kdoc) and Kdoc data was taken from more than sixty references. The Kdoc data were evaluated as a function of the n-octanol/water partition coefficients (Kow). A pre...

  12. ESTIMATING DISSOLVED ORGANIC CARBON PARTITION COEFFICIENTS FOR NONIONIC ORGANIC CHEMICALS

    EPA Science Inventory

    A literature search was performed for dissolved organic carbon/water partition coefficients for nonionic chemicals (Kdoc) and Kdoc data was taken from more than sixty references. The Kdoc data were evaluated as a function of the n-octanol/water partition coefficients (Kow). A pre...

  13. Safer Chemicals Research Fact Sheets

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Chemical safety is a major priority of the U.S. EPA. Moving toward a healthier, more sustainable environment requires making safer, “greener” chemicals and producing new and existing chemicals in ways that are safer for humans and wildlife.

  14. Chemical Evolution of Presolar Organics in Astromaterials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nakamura-Messenger, K.; Clemett, S. J.; Messenger, Scott; Keller, L. P.

    2010-01-01

    Sub-micron, hollow organic globules reported from several carbonaceous chondrites, interplanetary dust particles, and comet Wild-2 samples returned by NASA?s Stardust mission are enriched in N-15/N-14 and D/H compared with terrestrial materials and the parent materials [1-4]. These anomalies are ascribed to the preservation of presolar cold molecular cloud material from where H, C, and N isotopic constraints point to chemical fractionation near 10 K [5]. An origin well beyond the planet forming region and their survival in meteorites suggests submicrometer organic globules were once prevalent throughout the solar nebula. The survival of the membrane structures indicates primitive meteorites and cometary dust particles would have delivered these organic precursors to the early Earth as well as other planets and satellites. The physical, chemical, and isotopic properties of the organic globules varies to its meteorite types and its lithologies. For example, organic globules in the Tagish Lake meteorite are always embedded in fined grained (poorly crystallized) saponite, and hardly encapsulated in coarse grained serpentine, even though saponite and serpentine are both main components of phyllosilicate matrix of the Tagish Lake meteorite. The organic globules are commonly observed in the carbonate-poor lithology but not in the carbonate-rich one. In Tagish Lake, isolated single globules are common, but in the Bells (CM2) meteorite, globules are mostly aggregated. We will review the evolutions of the organic globules from its birth to alteration in the parent bodies in terms of its own physical and chemical properties as well as its associated minerals.

  15. Trends in Research in Chemical Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kornhauser, Aleksandra

    1979-01-01

    Presents summaries and evaluations of some 250 recent researches and developmental studies in chemical education. Identifies existing trends in the various research areas, and suggests future research needs and priorities. (GA)

  16. Chemical Safety for Sustainability: Research Action Plan

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    The Strategic Research Action Plan for EPA’s Chemical Safety for Sustainability research program presents the purpose, design and themes of the Agency’s research efforts to ensure safety in the design, manufacture and use of existing and future chemicals.

  17. Self-templated chemically stable hollow spherical covalent organic framework.

    PubMed

    Kandambeth, Sharath; Venkatesh, V; Shinde, Digambar B; Kumari, Sushma; Halder, Arjun; Verma, Sandeep; Banerjee, Rahul

    2015-04-10

    Covalent organic frameworks are a family of crystalline porous materials with promising applications. Although active research on the design and synthesis of covalent organic frameworks has been ongoing for almost a decade, the mechanisms of formation of covalent organic frameworks crystallites remain poorly understood. Here we report the synthesis of a hollow spherical covalent organic framework with mesoporous walls in a single-step template-free method. A detailed time-dependent study of hollow sphere formation reveals that an inside-out Ostwald ripening process is responsible for the hollow sphere formation. The synthesized covalent organic framework hollow spheres are highly porous (surface area ∼1,500 m(2 )g(-1)), crystalline and chemically stable, due to the presence of strong intramolecular hydrogen bonding. These mesoporous hollow sphere covalent organic frameworks are used for a trypsin immobilization study, which shows an uptake of 15.5 μmol g(-1) of trypsin.

  18. Self-templated chemically stable hollow spherical covalent organic framework

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kandambeth, Sharath; Venkatesh, V.; Shinde, Digambar B.; Kumari, Sushma; Halder, Arjun; Verma, Sandeep; Banerjee, Rahul

    2015-04-01

    Covalent organic frameworks are a family of crystalline porous materials with promising applications. Although active research on the design and synthesis of covalent organic frameworks has been ongoing for almost a decade, the mechanisms of formation of covalent organic frameworks crystallites remain poorly understood. Here we report the synthesis of a hollow spherical covalent organic framework with mesoporous walls in a single-step template-free method. A detailed time-dependent study of hollow sphere formation reveals that an inside-out Ostwald ripening process is responsible for the hollow sphere formation. The synthesized covalent organic framework hollow spheres are highly porous (surface area ~1,500 m2 g-1), crystalline and chemically stable, due to the presence of strong intramolecular hydrogen bonding. These mesoporous hollow sphere covalent organic frameworks are used for a trypsin immobilization study, which shows an uptake of 15.5 μmol g-1 of trypsin.

  19. TMVOC, simulator for multiple volatile organic chemicals

    SciTech Connect

    Pruess, Karsten; Battistelli, Alfredo

    2003-03-25

    TMVOC is a numerical simulator for three-phase non-isothermal flow of water, soil gas, and a multicomponent mixture of volatile organic chemicals (VOCs) in multidimensional heterogeneous porous media. It is an extension of the TOUGH2 general-purpose simulation program developed at the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory. TMVOC is designed for applications to contamination problems that involve hydrocarbon fuel or organic solvent spills in saturated and unsaturated zones. It can model contaminant behavior under ''natural'' environmental conditions, as well as for engineered systems, such as soil vapor extraction, groundwater pumping, or steam-assisted source remediation. TMVOC is upwards compatible with T2VOC (Falta et al., 1995) and can be initialized from T2VOC-style initial conditions. The main enhancements in TMVOC relative to T2VOC are as follows: a multicomponent mixture of volatile organic chemicals can be modeled; any and all combinations of the three phases water-oil-gas are treated; several non-condensible gases may be present; diffusion is treated in all phases in a manner that is fully coupled with phase partitioning. This paper gives a brief summary of the methodology used in TMVOC as well as highlighting some implementation issues. Simulation of a NAPL spill and subsequent remediation is discussed for a 2-D vertical section of a saturated-unsaturated flow problem.

  20. Chemical Engineering Division research highlights, 1979

    SciTech Connect

    Burris, L.; Webster, D. S.; Barney, D. L.; Cafasso, F. A.; Steindler, M. J.

    1980-06-01

    In 1979, CEN conducted research and development in the following areas: (1) high-temperature, rechargeable lithium/iron sulfide batteries for electric vehicles and electric utility load leveling; (2) ambient-temperature batteries - improved lead-acid, nickel/zinc, and nickel/iron - for electric vehicles; (3) molten carbonate fuel cells for use by electric utilities; (4) coal technology - mainly fluidized-bed combustion of coal in the presence of SO/sub 2/ sorbent of limestone; (5) heat- and seed- recovery technology for open-cycle magnetohydrodynamic systems; (6) solar energy collectors and thermal energy storage; (7) fast breeder reactor chemistry research - chemical support of reactor safety studies, chemistry of irradiated fuels, and sodium technology; (8) fuel cycle technology - reprocessing of nuclear fuels, management of nuclear wastes, geologic migration studies, and proof-of-breeding studies for the Light Water Breeder Reactor; (9) magnetic fusion research - lithium processing technology and materials research; and (10) basic energy sciences - homogeneous catalysis, thermodynamics of inorganic and organic materials, environmental chemistry, electrochemistry, and physical properties of salt vapors. Separate abstracts were prepared for each of these areas.

  1. Metal-Organic Frameworks for CO2 Chemical Transformations.

    PubMed

    He, Hongming; Perman, Jason A; Zhu, Guangshan; Ma, Shengqian

    2016-12-01

    Carbon dioxide (CO2 ), as the primary greenhouse gas in the atmosphere, triggers a series of environmental and energy related problems in the world. Therefore, there is an urgent need to develop multiple methods to capture and convert CO2 into useful chemical products, which can significantly improve the environment and promote sustainable development. Over the past several decades, metal-organic frameworks (MOFs) have shown outstanding heterogeneous catalytic activity due in part to their high internal surface area and chemical functionalities. These properties and the ability to synthesize MOF platforms allow experiments to test structure-function relationships for transforming CO2 into useful chemicals. Herein, recent developments are highlighted for MOFs participating as catalysts for the chemical fixation and photochemical reduction of CO2 . Finally, opportunities and challenges facing MOF catalysts are discussed in this ongoing research area.

  2. 40 CFR Table 1 to Subpart F of... - Synthetic Organic Chemical Manufacturing Industry Chemicals

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... Manufacturing Industry Chemicals 1 Table 1 to Subpart F of Part 63 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL... Synthetic Organic Chemical Manufacturing Industry Pt. 63, Subpt. F, Table 1 Table 1 to Subpart F of Part 63—Synthetic Organic Chemical Manufacturing Industry Chemicals Chemical name a CAS No. b Group...

  3. 40 CFR Table 1 to Subpart F of... - Synthetic Organic Chemical Manufacturing Industry Chemicals

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... Manufacturing Industry Chemicals 1 Table 1 to Subpart F of Part 63 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL... Synthetic Organic Chemical Manufacturing Industry Pt. 63, Subpt. F, Table 1 Table 1 to Subpart F of Part 63—Synthetic Organic Chemical Manufacturing Industry Chemicals Chemical name a CAS No. b Group...

  4. 40 CFR Table 1 to Subpart F of... - Synthetic Organic Chemical Manufacturing Industry Chemicals

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... Manufacturing Industry Chemicals 1 Table 1 to Subpart F of Part 63 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL... Synthetic Organic Chemical Manufacturing Industry Pt. 63, Subpt. F, Table 1 Table 1 to Subpart F of Part 63—Synthetic Organic Chemical Manufacturing Industry Chemicals Chemical name a CAS No. b Group...

  5. 40 CFR Table 1 to Subpart F of... - Synthetic Organic Chemical Manufacturing Industry Chemicals

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... Manufacturing Industry Chemicals 1 Table 1 to Subpart F of Part 63 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL... Synthetic Organic Chemical Manufacturing Industry Pt. 63, Subpt. F, Table 1 Table 1 to Subpart F of Part 63—Synthetic Organic Chemical Manufacturing Industry Chemicals Chemical name a CAS No. b Group...

  6. 40 CFR Table 1 to Subpart F of... - Synthetic Organic Chemical Manufacturing Industry Chemicals

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... Manufacturing Industry Chemicals 1 Table 1 to Subpart F of Part 63 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL... Synthetic Organic Chemical Manufacturing Industry Pt. 63, Subpt. F, Table 1 Table 1 to Subpart F of Part 63—Synthetic Organic Chemical Manufacturing Industry Chemicals Chemical name a CAS No. b Group...

  7. Setting the Research Agenda on the Health Effects of Chemicals

    PubMed Central

    Fulcher, Keri; Herman, Gibb

    2014-01-01

    In 2011, World Health Organization (WHO) scientists reported that a significant percentage of global deaths and disability-adjusted life years (DALYs) in 2004 could be attributed to chemicals. The 2011 review focused only on certain chemicals, however, and concluded that the global burden of disease was underestimated because of serious data gaps. While various chemical assessment documents have identified research needs for individual chemicals, a systematic review of such documents to identify research themes that could be applied to the multitude of chemicals for which there is little information has not been done. Even for chemicals for which there are considerable data, the information is not sufficient to make an estimate of the chemical’s contribution to the burden of disease. The WHO Environmental Health Criteria (EHC) documents and Concise International Chemical Assessment Documents (CICADs) identify research needs or data gaps in our knowledge of chemicals. We identified several common themes in these documents and in documents prepared by WHO on 10 chemicals of major public health concern. These themes include biomarkers, longitudinal epidemiological studies, mechanisms of disease, reproductive and developmental effects and exposure assessment. Specific examples of data gaps culled from more than 300 WHO documents provide researchers with specific topics for further research. PMID:24424283

  8. REMOVAL OF ORGANIC CHEMICALS FROM WASTEWATER BY SURFACTANT SEPARATION

    SciTech Connect

    Unknown

    2002-01-01

    This research presents a novel hybrid process for removing organic chemicals from contaminated water. The process uses surfactant to carry out two unit operations (1) Extraction; (2) Foam flotation. In the first step, surfactant is used to extract most of the amounts of organic contaminants in the stream. In the second step, foam flotation is used to further reduce organic contaminants and recover surfactant from the stream. The process combines the advantages of extraction and foam flotation, which allows the process not only to handle a wide range of organic contaminants, but also to effectively treat a wide range of the concentration of organic contaminants in the stream and reduce it to a very low level. Surfactant regeneration can be done by conventional methods. This process is simple and low cost. The wastes are recoverable. The objective of this research is to develop an environmentally innocuous process for the wastewater or reclaimed water treatment with the ability to handle a wide range of organic contaminants, also to effectively treat a wide range of the concentration of organic contaminants in contaminated water and reduce it to a very low level, finally, provides simpler, less energy cost and economically-practical process design. Another purpose is to promote the environmental concern in minority students and encourage minority students to become more involved in environmental engineering research.

  9. A critical review and evaluation of bioproduction of organic chemicals

    SciTech Connect

    Leeper, S.A.; Andrews, G.F.

    1991-12-31

    Dependence on petroleum as the primary feedstock for production of chemicals cannot continue indefinitely. Bioconversion could provide an alternate route to production of organic chemicals. A wide range of commodity chemicals and potentially new chemicals can be produced via bioconversion of biomass. However, before large-scale bioproduction of organic chemicals become a reality issues related to economics, feedstock availability, environment, and energy requirements must be addressed. In this paper, these issues are discussed, and promising potential candidates for bioproduction are identified.

  10. Adsorption of organic chemicals in soils.

    PubMed Central

    Calvet, R

    1989-01-01

    This paper presents a review on adsorption of organic chemicals on soils sediments and their constituents. The first part of this review deals with adsorption from gas and liquid phases and gives a discussion on the physical meaning of the shape of adsorption isotherms. Results show that no general rules can be proposed to describe univocally the relation between the shape of isotherms and the nature of adsorbate-adsorbent system. Kinetics of adsorption is discussed through the description of various models. Theoretical developments exist both for the thermodynamics and the kinetics of adsorption, but there is a strong need for experimental results. Possible adsorption mechanisms are ion exchange, interaction with metallic cations, hydrogen bonds, charge transfers, and London-van der Waals dispersion forces/hydrophobic effect. However, direct proofs of a given mechanism are rare. Several factors influence adsorption behavior. Electronic structure of adsorbed molecules, properties of adsorbents, and characteristics of the liquid phase are discussed in relation to adsorption. Such properties as water solubility, organic carbon content of adsorbing materials, and the composition of the liquid phase are particularly important. Evaluation of adsorption can be obtained through either laboratory measurements or use of several correlations. Adsorption measurements must be interpreted, taking into account treatment of adsorbent materials, experimental conditions, and secondary phenomena such as degradations. Correlations between adsorption coefficients and water-octanol partition coefficient or water solubility are numerous. They may be useful tools for prediction purposes. Relations with transport, bioavailability, and degradation are described. PMID:2695323

  11. Chemical transport model simulations of organic aerosol in ...

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Gasoline- and diesel-fueled engines are ubiquitous sources of air pollution in urban environments. They emit both primary particulate matter and precursor gases that react to form secondary particulate matter in the atmosphere. In this work, we updated the organic aerosol module and organic emissions inventory of a three-dimensional chemical transport model, the Community Multiscale Air Quality Model (CMAQ), using recent, experimentally derived inputs and parameterizations for mobile sources. The updated model included a revised volatile organic compound (VOC) speciation for mobile sources and secondary organic aerosol (SOA) formation from unspeciated intermediate volatility organic compounds (IVOCs). The updated model was used to simulate air quality in southern California during May and June 2010, when the California Research at the Nexus of Air Quality and Climate Change (CalNex) study was conducted. Compared to the Traditional version of CMAQ, which is commonly used for regulatory applications, the updated model did not significantly alter the predicted organic aerosol (OA) mass concentrations but did substantially improve predictions of OA sources and composition (e.g., POA–SOA split), as well as ambient IVOC concentrations. The updated model, despite substantial differences in emissions and chemistry, performed similar to a recently released research version of CMAQ (Woody et al., 2016) that did not include the updated VOC and IVOC emissions and SOA data

  12. Chemical exposures in research laboratories in a university.

    PubMed

    Takada, Shiro; Okamoto, Satoru; Yamada, Chikahisa; Ukai, Hirohiko; Samoto, Hajime; Ohashi, Fumiko; Ikeda, Masayuki

    2008-04-01

    Research laboratories in a university were investigated for air-borne levels of legally designated organic solvents and specified chemical substances. Repeated surveys in 2004-5 (four times in the two years) of about 720 laboratories (thus 2,874 laboratories in total) revealed that the solvent concentrations were in excess of the Administrative Control Levels only in a few laboratories (the conditions improved shortly after the identification) and none with regard to specified chemicals. Thus, working environments were in Control Class 1 in almost all (99.5%) laboratories examined. Such conditions were achieved primarily by extensive installation and use of local exhaust systems. The survey further revealed that types of chemicals used in research laboratories were extremely various (only poorly covered by the regulation) whereas the amounts of each chemical to be consumed were quite limited. For protection of health of researchers (including post- and under-graduate students) in laboratories, therefore, it appeared more appropriate to make personal exposure assessment rather than evaluation of levels of chemicals in air of research laboratories. Considering unique characteristics of research activity, it is important to educate each researcher to make his/her own efforts to protect his/her health, through supply of knowledge on toxicity of chemicals as well as that on proper use of protective equipments including exhaust chambers.

  13. CHEMICAL DYNAMICS OF HYDROPHOBIC ORGANIC CONTAMINANTS DURING RESUSPENSION

    EPA Science Inventory

    Laboratory experiments were designed to study the chemical-particle dynamics of toxic hydrophobic organics during resuspension episodes using a particle entrainment simulator (PES). The purpose was to obtain insight into chemical transport mechanisms during resuspension. Informat...

  14. ECUT: Energy Conversion and utilization Technologies program biocatalysis research activity. Generation of chemical intermediates by catalytic oxidative decarboxylation of dilute organic acids

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Distefano, S.; Gupta, A.; Ingham, J. D.

    1983-01-01

    A rhodium-based catalyst was prepared and preliminary experiments were completed where the catalyst appeared to decarboxylate dilute acids at concentrations of 1 to 10 vol%. Electron spin resonance spectroscoy was used to characterize the catalyst as a first step leading toward modeling and optimization of rhodium catalysts. Also, a hybrid chemical/biological process for the production of hydrocarbons has been assessed. These types of catalysts could greatly increase energy efficiency of this process.

  15. Integrating Chemical Information Instruction into the Chemistry Curriculum on Borrowed Time: A Multiyear Case Study of a Capstone Research Report for Organic Chemistry

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jacobs, Danielle L.; Dalal, Heather A.; Dawson, Patricia H.

    2016-01-01

    To develop information literacy skills in chemistry and biochemistry majors at a primarily undergraduate institution, a multiyear collaboration between chemistry faculty and librarians has resulted in the establishment of a semester-long capstone project for Organic Chemistry II. Information literacy skills were instilled via a progressive…

  16. Integrating Chemical Information Instruction into the Chemistry Curriculum on Borrowed Time: A Multiyear Case Study of a Capstone Research Report for Organic Chemistry

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jacobs, Danielle L.; Dalal, Heather A.; Dawson, Patricia H.

    2016-01-01

    To develop information literacy skills in chemistry and biochemistry majors at a primarily undergraduate institution, a multiyear collaboration between chemistry faculty and librarians has resulted in the establishment of a semester-long capstone project for Organic Chemistry II. Information literacy skills were instilled via a progressive…

  17. Membrane-Organized Chemical Photoredox Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Hurst, James K.

    2014-09-18

    This project has three interrelated goals relevant to solar water photolysis, which are to develop: (1) vesicle-organized assemblies for H2 photoproduction that utilize pyrylium and structurally related compounds as combined photosensitizers and cyclic electroneutral transmembrane electron carriers; (2) transmembrane redox systems whose reaction rates can be modulated by light; and (3) homogeneous catalysts for water oxidation. . In area (1), initial efforts to photogenerate H2 from vectorially-organized vesicles containing occluded colloidal Pt and commonly available pyrylium ions as transmembrane redox mediators were unsuccessful. New pyrylium compounds with significantly lower reduction potentials have been synthesized to address this problem, their apparent redox potentials in functioning systems have been now evaluated by using a series of occluded viologens, and H2 photoproduction has been demonstrated in continuous illumination experiments. In area (2), spirooxazine-quinone dyads have been synthesized and their capacity to function as redox mediators across bilayer membranes has been evaluated through continuous photolysis and transient spectrophotometric measurements. Photoisomerization of the spiro moiety to the ring-open mero form caused net quantum yields to decrease significantly, providing a basis for photoregulation of transmembrane redox. Research on water oxidation (area 3) has been directed at understanding mechanisms of catalysis by cis,cis-[(bpy)2Ru(OH2)]2O4+ and related polyimine complexes. Using a variety of physical techniques, we have: (i) identified the redox state of the complex ion that is catalytically active; (ii) shown using 18O isotopic labeling that there are two reaction pathways, both of which involve participation of solvent H2O; and (iii) detected and characterized by EPR and resonance Raman spectroscopies new species which may be key intermediates in the catalytic cycle.

  18. Soviet chemical propellant research and development

    SciTech Connect

    deButts, E.H.; Baum, K.; Beckstead, M.W.; Christe, K.O.; Hartman, K.O.; Jeffrey, W.A.

    1991-12-01

    In the second half of the 1980s, the Soviet Union had a strong and continuing research effort devoted to understanding the behavior of chemical propellants suitable to support development of advanced propellants for practical applications. Recent Soviet work concentrated on solid propellants, though liquid propellants powered the largest and most advanced deployed Soviet rockets. This assessment summarizes the Soviet state of the art in chemical propellants in the late 1980s and projects the trends of that period into the next decade. It is based on a broad and deep review of Soviet literature published in 1985--1991 and is presented in an unclassified report. Speculation about or prediction of the effects of recent political and social events on chemical propellant research and development in the old Soviet Union is outside the scope of this assessment, though the effects are likely to be profound.

  19. Synthetic Organic Chemicals: United States Production and Sales, 1976.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Adams, Roger; And Others

    This is the sixth annual report of the U.S. Trade Commission on domestic production and sales of synthetic organic chemicals and the raw materials from which they are made. The report consists of 15 sections, each covering a specified group (based primarily on use) of organic chemicals as follows: tar and tar crudes; primary products from…

  20. LOSS OF ORGANIC CHEMICALS IN SOIL: PURE COMPOUND TREATABILITY STUDIES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Comprehensive screening data on the treatability of 32 organic chemicals in soil were developed. Of the evaluated chemicals, 22 were phenolic compounds. Aerobic batch laboratory microcosm experiments were conducted using two soils: an acidic clay soil with <1% organic matter and ...

  1. Synthetic Organic Chemicals: United States Production and Sales, 1976.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Adams, Roger; And Others

    This is the sixth annual report of the U.S. Trade Commission on domestic production and sales of synthetic organic chemicals and the raw materials from which they are made. The report consists of 15 sections, each covering a specified group (based primarily on use) of organic chemicals as follows: tar and tar crudes; primary products from…

  2. Chemically diverse and multifunctional hybrid organic-inorganic perovskites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Wei; Wang, Zheming; Deschler, Felix; Gao, Song; Friend, Richard H.; Cheetham, Anthony K.

    2017-02-01

    Hybrid organic-inorganic perovskites (HOIPs) can have a diverse range of compositions including halides, azides, formates, dicyanamides, cyanides and dicyanometallates. These materials have several common features, including their classical ABX3 perovskite architecture and the presence of organic amine cations that occupy the A-sites. Current research in HOIPs tends to focus on metal halide HOIPs, which show promise for use in solar cells and optoelectronic devices; however, the other subclasses also exhibit a diverse range of physical properties. In this Review, we summarize the chemical variability and structural diversity of all known HOIP subclasses. We also present a comprehensive account of their intriguing physical properties, including photovoltaic and optoelectronic properties, dielectricity, magnetism, ferroelectricity, ferroelasticity and multiferroicity. Moreover, we discuss the current challenges and future opportunities in this exciting field.

  3. Uptake, Metabolism, and Tissue Distribution of Chemicals in Organisms

    EPA Science Inventory

    This talk will explain how chemicals get into aquatic species, what tissues and organs the chemicals move into, and what can happen to the chemicals once they get there. This will be presented using examples from recent studies conducted using state-of-the-art microscopy with em...

  4. Uptake, Metabolism, and Tissue Distribution of Chemicals in Organisms

    EPA Science Inventory

    This talk will explain how chemicals get into aquatic species, what tissues and organs the chemicals move into, and what can happen to the chemicals once they get there. This will be presented using examples from recent studies conducted using state-of-the-art microscopy with em...

  5. COSOLVENCY OF PARTIALLY MISCIBLE ORGANIC SOLVENTS ON THE SOLUBILITY OF HYDROPHOBIC ORGANIC CHEMICALS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The cosolvency of completely miscible organic solvents (CMOSs) and partially miscible organic solvents (PMOSs) on the solubility of hydrophobic organic chemicals (HOCs) was examined, with an emphasis on PMOSs. Measured solubilities were compared with predictions from the log- lin...

  6. COSOLVENCY OF PARTIALLY MISCIBLE ORGANIC SOLVENTS ON THE SOLUBILITY OF HYDROPHOBIC ORGANIC CHEMICALS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The cosolvency of completely miscible organic solvents (CMOSs) and partially miscible organic solvents (PMOSs) on the solubility of hydrophobic organic chemicals (HOCs) was examined, with an emphasis on PMOSs. Measured solubilities were compared with predictions from the log- lin...

  7. 27 CFR 478.145 - Research organizations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 3 2012-04-01 2010-04-01 true Research organizations. 478..., Seizures, and Forfeitures § 478.145 Research organizations. The provisions of § 478.98 with respect to the... rifles shall not apply to the sale or delivery of such devices and weapons to any research organization...

  8. 27 CFR 478.145 - Research organizations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 3 2011-04-01 2010-04-01 true Research organizations. 478..., Seizures, and Forfeitures § 478.145 Research organizations. The provisions of § 478.98 with respect to the... rifles shall not apply to the sale or delivery of such devices and weapons to any research organization...

  9. USDA/ARS Organic Production Research

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    For much of its history, USDA/ARS had little to do with research on organic agriculture, however research in organic systems has made considerable gains at the agency over the past decade. In the 1980's and 1990's, as the organic food industry was taking off, ARS researchers who wanted to serve orga...

  10. Organic/Inorganic Hybrid Nanostructures for Chemical Plasmonic Sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, Sehoon

    2011-12-01

    depending on the exact location and orientation of decorated silver nanoparticles nearby silver nanowire crossbars. As an alternative approach for the template-assisted nanostructure design, porous alumina membrane (PAM) can be utilized as a sacrificial template for the fabrication of the nanotube structure. The study seeks to investigate the design aspects of polymeric/inorganic hybrid nanotube structures with plasmonic properties, which can be dynamically tuned by external stimuli such as pH. This research suggests several different organic/inorganic nanostructure assemblies by various template-assisted techniques. The polymeric/inorganic hybrid nanostructures including SERS property, pH responsive characteristics, and large surface area will enable us to understand and design the novel chemical plasmonic sensors.

  11. Chemical wastes, children's health, and the Superfund Basic Research Program.

    PubMed

    Landrigan, P J; Suk, W A; Amler, R W

    1999-06-01

    Three to 4 million children and adolescents in the United States live within 1 mile of a federally designated Superfund hazardous waste disposal site and are at risk of exposure to chemical toxicants released from these sites into air, groundwater, surface water, and surrounding communities. Because of their patterns of exposure and their biological vulnerability, children are uniquely susceptible to health injury resulting from exposures to chemical toxicants in the environment. The Superfund Basic Research Program, funded by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency and directed by the National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences, is extremely well positioned to organize multidisciplinary research that will assess patterns of children's exposures to hazardous chemicals from hazardous waste disposal sites; quantify children's vulnerability to environmental toxicants; assess causal associations between environmental exposures and pediatric disease; and elucidate the mechanisms of environmental disease in children at the cellular and molecular level.

  12. Research Leadership as Entrepreneurial Organizing for Research

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hansson, Finn; Monsted, Mette

    2008-01-01

    The paper discusses research leadership in public universities under change and the role of entrepreneurial strategies in research. Research leadership function today in situations where the New Public Management movement one the one hand have introduced management by accountability and control in the university while on the other hand open…

  13. Research Leadership as Entrepreneurial Organizing for Research

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hansson, Finn; Monsted, Mette

    2008-01-01

    The paper discusses research leadership in public universities under change and the role of entrepreneurial strategies in research. Research leadership function today in situations where the New Public Management movement one the one hand have introduced management by accountability and control in the university while on the other hand open…

  14. Philosophical Confusion in Chemical Education Research

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scerri, Eric R.

    2003-05-01

    The reputation of chemical education research among mainstream chemists is in need of improvement. This paper makes the claim that the present state of affairs is partly the result of the careless use of philosophical terms such as constructivism, behaviorism, and relativism. The relevance of these developments to the Science Wars debate is briefly examined, and some positive recommendations are proposed to remedy the situation.

  15. Conservative or reactive? Mechanistic chemical perspectives on organic matter stability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koch, Boris

    2016-04-01

    Carbon fixation by terrestrial and marine primary production has a fundamental seasonal effect on the atmospheric carbon content and it profoundly contributes to long-term carbon storage in form of organic matter (OM) in soils, water, and sediments. The efficacy of this sequestration process strongly depends on the degree of OM persistence. Therefore, one of the key issues in dissolved and particulate OM research is to assess the stability of reservoirs and to quantify their contribution to global carbon fluxes. Incubation experiments are helpful to assess OM stability during the first, early diagenetic turnover induced by sunlight or microbes. However, net carbon fluxes within the global carbon cycle also act on much longer time scales, which are not amenable in experiments. It is therefore critical to improve our mechanistic understanding to be able to assess potential future changes in the organic matter cycle. This session contribution highlights some achievements and open questions in the field. An improved mechanistic understanding of OM turnover particularly depends on the molecular characterization of biogeochemical processes and their kinetics: (i) in soils and sediments, aggregation/disaggregation of OM is primarily controlled by its molecular composition. Hence, the chemical composition determines the transfer of organic carbon from the large particulate to the small dissolved organic matter reservoir - an important substrate for microbial metabolism. (ii) In estuaries, dissolved organic carbon gradients usually suggest conservative behavior, whereas molecular-level studies reveal a substantial chemical modification of terrestrial DOM along the land-ocean interface. (iii) In the ocean, previous studies have shown that the recalcitrance of OM depends on bulk concentration and energy yield. However, ultrahigh resolution mass spectrometry in combination with radiocarbon analyses also emphasized that stability is tightly connected to molecular composition

  16. Safety in the Chemical Laboratory. Organic Peroxides.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shanley, Edward S.

    1990-01-01

    Discussed is the thermodynamic instability of organic peroxides. The process of autoxidation which results in peroxide formation is described. Precautions necessary to prevent autoxidation hazards associated with these reagents are suggested. (CW)

  17. Safety in the Chemical Laboratory. Organic Peroxides.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shanley, Edward S.

    1990-01-01

    Discussed is the thermodynamic instability of organic peroxides. The process of autoxidation which results in peroxide formation is described. Precautions necessary to prevent autoxidation hazards associated with these reagents are suggested. (CW)

  18. Booknotes: Chemical Research Faculties: An International Directory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kauffman, George B.

    1997-08-01

    American Chemical Society: Washington, DC, 1996. xlv + 1248 pp. 22.1x28.2 cm. ISBN 0-8412-3301-2. $199.95 (hb). This comprehensive source of information on research in chemistry and chemistry-related areas conducted by faculty members worldwide in institutions that grant advanced degrees gives the same type of information on an international scale that the ACS Directory of Graduate Research (DGR) (Kauffman, G. B. J. Chem. Educ. 1996, 73, A136) provides for United States and Canadian institutions. Designed to give users sufficient information to locate a colleague, whether known to them or not, by country, academic institution, or name, this new, updated, partially rearranged third edition of Chemical Research Faculties (CRF) contains more than an additional 75 percent of the volume of information in the second (1988) edition (Kauffman, G. B. J. Chem. Educ. 1989, 66, A48). It contains data on 17,370 faculty members (compared to 11,500 in the second edition), with one or two recent representative publications, from 2,182 institutions (compared to 1,922 in the second edition) in 113 countries arranged alphabetically from Afghanistan to Zimbabwe. A minor shortcoming compared to the last edition is the deletion of the index of faculty by research subjects, which, as a contributing editor to several journals, I found useful in locating possible referees with specific areas of expertise.

  19. COSOLVENT EFFECTS ON ORGANIC CHEMICAL PARTITIONING TO SEDIMENT ORGANIC CARBON

    EPA Science Inventory

    Sorption-desorption hysteresis, slow desorption kinetics and resultant bioavailability, and other nonideal phenomena have been attributed to the differing sorptive characteristics of the natural organic polymers associated with soils and sediments. The objectives of this study we...

  20. COSOLVENT EFFECTS ON ORGANIC CHEMICAL PARTITIONING TO SEDIMENT ORGANIC CARBON

    EPA Science Inventory

    Sorption-desorption hysteresis, slow desorption kinetics and resultant bioavailability, and other nonideal phenomena have been attributed to the differing sorptive characteristics of the natural organic polymers associated with soils and sediments. The objectives of this study we...

  1. 27 CFR 478.145 - Research organizations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 3 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Research organizations... Exemptions, Seizures, and Forfeitures § 478.145 Research organizations. The provisions of § 478.98 with...-barreled rifles shall not apply to the sale or delivery of such devices and weapons to any research...

  2. 27 CFR 478.145 - Research organizations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 3 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Research organizations... Exemptions, Seizures, and Forfeitures § 478.145 Research organizations. The provisions of § 478.98 with...-barreled rifles shall not apply to the sale or delivery of such devices and weapons to any research...

  3. 27 CFR 478.145 - Research organizations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 3 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Research organizations... Exemptions, Seizures, and Forfeitures § 478.145 Research organizations. The provisions of § 478.98 with...-barreled rifles shall not apply to the sale or delivery of such devices and weapons to any research...

  4. Organic solar cell exploratory research

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yalenty, S. J.

    1975-01-01

    Principles governing the photovoltaic effect in organic materials on the molecular level are studied and applied to the design and fabrication of laboratory devices having a photovoltaic organic polymer film as their key element. Progress to date has been in three areas: (1) materials synthesis; (2) apparatus development; and (3) ultra-thin film fabrication.

  5. Chemical reactions of organic compounds on clay surfaces.

    PubMed Central

    Soma, Y; Soma, M

    1989-01-01

    Chemical reactions of organic compounds including pesticides at the interlayer and exterior surfaces of clay minerals and with soil organic matter are reviewed. Representative reactions under moderate conditions possibly occurring in natural soils are described. Attempts have been made to clarify the importance of the chemical nature of molecules, their structures and their functional groups, and the Brönsted or Lewis acidity of clay minerals. PMID:2533556

  6. Distribution of volatile organic chemicals in outdoor and indoor air

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shah, Jitendra J.; Singh, Hanwant B.

    1988-01-01

    The EPA volatile organic chemistry (VOC) national ambient data base (Shah, 1988) is discussed. The 320 chemicals included in the VOC data base are listed. The methods used to obtain the data are reviewed and the availability, accessibility, and operation of the data base are examined. Tables of the daily outdoor concentrations for 66 chemicals and the daily indoor concentrations for 35 chemicals are presented.

  7. Distribution of volatile organic chemicals in outdoor and indoor air

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shah, Jitendra J.; Singh, Hanwant B.

    1988-01-01

    The EPA volatile organic chemistry (VOC) national ambient data base (Shah, 1988) is discussed. The 320 chemicals included in the VOC data base are listed. The methods used to obtain the data are reviewed and the availability, accessibility, and operation of the data base are examined. Tables of the daily outdoor concentrations for 66 chemicals and the daily indoor concentrations for 35 chemicals are presented.

  8. Biological and chemical technologies research. FY 1995 annual summary report

    SciTech Connect

    1996-03-01

    The annual summary report presents the fiscal year (FY) 1995 research activities and accomplishments for the United States Department of Energy (DOE) Biological and Chemical Technologies Research (BCTR) Program. This BCTR program resides within the Office of Industrial Technologies (OIT) of the Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EE). The annual summary report for 1995 (ASR 95) contains the following: program description (including BCTR program mission statement, historical background, relevance, goals and objectives); program structure and organization, selected technical and programmatic highlights for 1995; detailed descriptions of individual projects; a listing of program output, including a bibliography of published work; patents; and awards arising from work supported by the BCTR.

  9. CTEPP NC DATA ANALYTICAL RESULTS ORGANIZED BY CHEMICAL AND MEDIA

    EPA Science Inventory

    This data set contains the field sample data by chemical and matrix. The data are organized at the sample, chemical level.

    The Children’s Total Exposure to Persistent Pesticides and Other Persistent Pollutant (CTEPP) study was one of the largest aggregate exposure studies of y...

  10. CTEPP NC DATA ANALYTICAL RESULTS ORGANIZED BY CHEMICAL AND MEDIA

    EPA Science Inventory

    This data set contains the field sample data by chemical and matrix. The data are organized at the sample, chemical level.

    The Children’s Total Exposure to Persistent Pesticides and Other Persistent Pollutant (CTEPP) study was one of the largest aggregate exposure studies of y...

  11. Molecular Properties and Fate of Organic Chemicals

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1990-08-14

    Monsen, R.M. Water Sci. Technol. 1989, 21, ?????-????? (7) Haber, F .; Weiss, J.J. Proc. Roy. Soc. London, Ser. A 1934, 147, 332-???? (8) Lindsay Smith...366. (30) Tejedor , I., personal comm. Table 1: Products from oxidation of chlorobenzene with Fenton’s Reagent Concentrations, (mM) atmosphere Fe÷3...Complete mineralization of organic compounds was not observed dluring the oxidation o) f 4-chhorophenol is most observed because some of the ring-cleavage

  12. CHEMICAL TRANSPORT FACILITATED BY COLLOIDAL-SIZED ORGANIC MOLECULES

    EPA Science Inventory

    The fluid passing through the pores of soils and geologic materials is not just water with dissolved inorganic chemicals, but a complex mixture of organic and inorganic molecules. Large organic molecules such as humic and fulvic materials may impact the movement of contaminants. ...

  13. CHEMICAL TRANSPORT FACILITATED BY COLLOIDAL-SIZED ORGANIC MOLECULES

    EPA Science Inventory

    The fluid passing through the pores of soils and geologic materials is not just water with dissolved inorganic chemicals, but a complex mixture of organic and inorganic molecules. Large organic molecules such as humic and fulvic materials may impact the movement of contaminants. ...

  14. LANL organic analysis detection capabilities for chemical and biological warfare agents

    SciTech Connect

    Ansell, G.B.; Cournoyer, M.E.; Hollis, K.W.; Monagle, M.

    1996-12-31

    Organic analysis is the analytical arm for several Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) research programs and nuclear materials processes, including characterization and certification of nuclear and nonnuclear materials used in weapons, radioactive waste treatment and waste certification programs. Organic Analysis has an extensive repertoire of analytical technique within the group including headspace gas, PCBs/pesticides, volatile organics and semivolatile organic analysis. In addition organic analysis has mobile labs with analytic capabilities that include volatile organics, total petroleum hydrocarbon, PCBs, pesticides, polyaromatic hydrocarbons and high explosive screening. A natural extension of these capabilities can be applied to the detection of chemical and biological agents,

  15. Combined chemical and microbiological removal of organic sulfur from coal

    SciTech Connect

    Raphaelian, L.A.

    1991-01-01

    The objective of this work is to investigate techniques for chemically converting the sulfur containing organic compounds in coal to compounds that can be treated microbiologically to remove the organically bound sulfur. The goal is to achieve an economically feasible mild chemical oxidation of the organic sulfur in a representative Illinois Basin coal by converting the sulfur to sulfoxides and sulfones; the carbon sulfur bond in the sulfoxides and sulfones would then be broken microbiologically and the sulfur removed from the coal as sulfate.

  16. Organic chemical aging mechanisms: An annotated bibliography. Waste Tank Safety Program

    SciTech Connect

    Samuels, W.D.; Camaioni, D.M.; Nelson, D.A.

    1993-09-01

    An annotated bibliography has been compiled of the potential chemical and radiological aging mechanisms of the organic constituents (non-ferrocyanide) that would likely be found in the UST at Hanford. The majority of the work that has been conducted on the aging of organic chemicals used for extraction and processing of nuclear materials has been in conjunction with the acid or PUREX type processes. At Hanford the waste being stored in the UST has been stabilized with caustic. The aging factors that were used in this work were radiolysis, hydrolysis and nitrite/nitrate oxidation. The purpose of this work was two-fold: to determine whether or not research had been or is currently being conducted on the species associated with the Hanford UST waste, either as a mixture or as individual chemicals or chemical functionalities, and to determine what areas of chemical aging need to be addressed by further research.

  17. Chemical Safety for Sustainability Research Action Plan 2012-2016

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    EPA’s Chemical Safety for Sustainability (CSS) research program presents the purpose, design and themes of the Agency’s CSS research efforts to ensure safety in the design, manufacture and use of existing and future chemicals

  18. Organic thin-film transistors for chemical and biological sensing.

    PubMed

    Lin, Peng; Yan, Feng

    2012-01-03

    Organic thin-film transistors (OTFTs) show promising applications in various chemical and biological sensors. The advantages of OTFT-based sensors include high sensitivity, low cost, easy fabrication, flexibility and biocompatibility. In this paper, we review the chemical sensors and biosensors based on two types of OTFTs, including organic field-effect transistors (OFETs) and organic electrochemical transistors (OECTs), mainly focusing on the papers published in the past 10 years. Various types of OTFT-based sensors, including pH, ion, glucose, DNA, enzyme, antibody-antigen, cell-based sensors, dopamine sensor, etc., are classified and described in the paper in sequence. The sensing mechanisms and the detection limits of the devices are described in details. It is expected that OTFTs may have more important applications in chemical and biological sensing with the development of organic electronics.

  19. Space research with intact organisms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Phillips, Robert W.; Haddy, Francis J.

    1992-01-01

    Effects of space exposure on intact organisms are briefly reviewed, and examples of future experiments that might provide new information on the role of gravity in the evolution of life are suggested. It is noted that long term experiments with intact plant and animals for studying gravitational thresholds will provide important new insights.

  20. Leadership in research: organizing genius.

    PubMed

    Slavkin, Harold

    2004-01-01

    Science has become complex. Its success is increasingly becoming a matter of collaboration based on established infrastructures and professional norms in response to environmental challenges. Leadership in such situations means organizing the genius inherent in great groups. Three examples--the Manhattan Project, mapping the human genome, and rapidly understanding the nature of the SARS virus--are analyzed, showing a trend away from the individual scientist to a model based on simultaneous competition and collaboration.

  1. International energy: Research organizations, 1986--1990

    SciTech Connect

    Hendricks, P.; Jordan, S. )

    1991-03-01

    The International Energy: Research Organizations publication contains the standardized names of energy research organizations used in energy information databases. Involved in this cooperative task are (1) the technical staff of the USDOE Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI) in cooperation with the member countries of the Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDE) and (2) the International Nuclear Information System (INIS). This publication identifies current organizations doing research in all energy fields, standardizes the format for recording these organization names in bibliographic citations, assigns a numeric code to facilitate data entry, and identifies report number prefixes assigned by these organizations. These research organization names may be used in searching the databases Energy Science Technology'' on DIALOG and Energy'' on STN International. These organization names are also used in USDOE databases on the Integrated Technical Information System. Research organizations active in the past five years, as indicated by database records, were identified to form this publication. This directory includes approximately 34,000 organizations that reported energy-related literature from 1986 to 1990 and updates the DOE Energy Data Base: Corporate Author Entries.

  2. International energy: Research organizations, 1986 - 1990

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hendricks, P.; Jordan, S.

    1991-03-01

    The International Energy: Research Organizations publication contains the standardized names of energy research organizations used in energy information databases. Involved in this cooperative task are (1) the technical staff of the USDOE Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI) in cooperation with the member countries of the Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDE), and (2) the International Nuclear Information System (INIS). This publication identifies current organizations doing research in all energy fields, standardizes the format for recording these organization names in bibliographic citations, assigns a numeric code to facilitate data entry, and identifies report number prefixes assigned by these organizations. These research organization names may be used in searching the databases Energy Science and Technology on DIALOG and Energy on STN International. These organization names are also used in USDOE databases on the Integrated Technical Information System. Research organizations active in the past five years, as indicated by database records, were identified to form this publication. This directory includes approximately 34,000 organizations that reported energy-related literature from 1986 to 1990 and updates the DOE Energy Data Base: Corporate Author Entries.

  3. From Bioavailability Science to Regulation of Organic Chemicals.

    PubMed

    Ortega-Calvo, Jose-J; Harmsen, Joop; Parsons, John R; Semple, Kirk T; Aitken, Michael D; Ajao, Charmaine; Eadsforth, Charles; Galay-Burgos, Malyka; Naidu, Ravi; Oliver, Robin; Peijnenburg, Willie J G M; Römbke, Jörg; Streck, Georg; Versonnen, Bram

    2015-09-01

    The bioavailability of organic chemicals in soil and sediment is an important area of scientific investigation for environmental scientists, although this area of study remains only partially recognized by regulators and industries working in the environmental sector. Regulators have recently started to consider bioavailability within retrospective risk assessment frameworks for organic chemicals; by doing so, realistic decision-making with regard to polluted environments can be achieved, rather than relying on the traditional approach of using total-extractable concentrations. However, implementation remains difficult because scientific developments on bioavailability are not always translated into ready-to-use approaches for regulators. Similarly, bioavailability remains largely unexplored within prospective regulatory frameworks that address the approval and regulation of organic chemicals. This article discusses bioavailability concepts and methods, as well as possible pathways for the implementation of bioavailability into risk assessment and regulation; in addition, this article offers a simple, pragmatic and justifiable approach for use within retrospective and prospective risk assessment.

  4. Chemical Characterization of Organisms Isolated from Leprosy Patients

    PubMed Central

    Beaman, Blain L.; Kim, Kwang-Shin; Lanéelle, Marie A.; Barksdale, Lane

    1974-01-01

    Chemical analyses of the cell walls of organisms isolated in various parts of the world from cases of lepromatous and tuberculoid leprosy make possible their assignment to one of the three genera: Corynebacterium, Mycobacterium, or Propionibacterium. One, bacterium 22M, remains unassigned. The combined chemical and enzymatic properties attributed to leprosy bacilli freshly harvested from lepromata are found collectively, but not individually, in these three genera. Images PMID:4813897

  5. Encoding of Fundamental Chemical Entities of Organic Reactivity Interest using chemical ontology and XML.

    PubMed

    Durairaj, Vijayasarathi; Punnaivanam, Sankar

    2015-09-01

    Fundamental chemical entities are identified in the context of organic reactivity and classified as appropriate concept classes namely ElectronEntity, AtomEntity, AtomGroupEntity, FunctionalGroupEntity and MolecularEntity. The entity classes and their subclasses are organized into a chemical ontology named "ChemEnt" for the purpose of assertion, restriction and modification of properties through entity relations. Individual instances of entity classes are defined and encoded as a library of chemical entities in XML. The instances of entity classes are distinguished with a unique notation and identification values in order to map them with the ontology definitions. A model GUI named Entity Table is created to view graphical representations of all the entity instances. The detection of chemical entities in chemical structures is achieved through suitable algorithms. The possibility of asserting properties to the entities at different levels and the mechanism of property flow within the hierarchical entity levels is outlined.

  6. Chemical, thermal and mechanical stabilities of metal-organic frameworks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Howarth, Ashlee J.; Liu, Yangyang; Li, Peng; Li, Zhanyong; Wang, Timothy C.; Hupp, Joseph T.; Farha, Omar K.

    2016-03-01

    The construction of thousands of well-defined, porous, metal-organic framework (MOF) structures, spanning a broad range of topologies and an even broader range of pore sizes and chemical functionalities, has fuelled the exploration of many applications. Accompanying this applied focus has been a recognition of the need to engender MOFs with mechanical, thermal and/or chemical stability. Chemical stability in acidic, basic and neutral aqueous solutions is important. Advances over recent years have made it possible to design MOFs that possess different combinations of mechanical, thermal and chemical stability. Here, we review these advances and the associated design principles and synthesis strategies. We focus on how these advances may render MOFs effective as heterogeneous catalysts, both in chemically harsh condensed phases and in thermally challenging conditions relevant to gas-phase reactions. Finally, we briefly discuss future directions of study for the production of highly stable MOFs.

  7. Introduction: Self-organization in nonequilibrium chemical systems.

    PubMed

    Epstein, Irving R; Pojman, John A; Steinbock, Oliver

    2006-09-01

    The field of self-organization in nonequilibrium chemical systems comprises the study of dynamical phenomena in chemically reacting systems far from equilibrium. Systematic exploration of this area began with investigations of the temporal behavior of the Belousov-Zhabotinsky oscillating reaction, discovered accidentally in the former Soviet Union in the 1950s. The field soon advanced into chemical waves in excitable media and propagating fronts. With the systematic design of oscillating reactions in the 1980s and the discovery of Turing patterns in the 1990s, the scope of these studies expanded dramatically. The articles in this Focus Issue provide an overview of the development and current state of the field.

  8. Predicting the bioconcentration factor of highly hydrophobic organic chemicals.

    PubMed

    Garg, Rajni; Smith, Carr J

    2014-07-01

    Bioconcentration refers to the process of uptake and buildup of chemicals in living organisms. Experimental measurement of bioconcentration factor (BCF) is time-consuming and expensive, and is not feasible for a large number of chemicals of regulatory concern. Quantitative structure-activity relationship (QSAR) models are used for estimating BCF values to help in risk assessment of a chemical. This paper presents the results of a QSAR study conducted to address an important problem encountered in the prediction of the BCF of highly hydrophobic chemicals. A new QSAR model is derived using a dataset of diverse organic chemicals previously tested in a United States Environmental Protection Agency laboratory. It is noted that the linear relationship between the BCF and hydrophobic parameter, i.e., calculated octanol-water partition coefficient (ClogP), breaks down for highly hydrophobic chemicals. The parabolic QSAR equation, log BCF=3.036 ClogP-0.197 ClogP(2)-0.808 MgVol (n=28, r(2)=0.817, q(2)=0.761, s=0.558) (experimental log BCF range=0.44-5.29, ClogP range=3.16-11.27), suggests that a non-linear relationship between BCF and the hydrophobic parameter, along with inclusion of additional molecular size, weight and/or volume parameters, should be considered while developing a QSAR model for more reliable prediction of the BCF of highly hydrophobic chemicals.

  9. Rapid Chemical Exposure and Dose Research

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    EPA evaluates the potential risks of the manufacture and use of thousands of chemicals. To assist with this evaluation, EPA scientists developed a rapid, automated model using off the shelf technology that predicts exposures for thousands of chemicals.

  10. Toxic Industrial Chemical Removal by Isostructural Metal-Organic Frameworks

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-01-01

    distance between the MOF -74 metal and the adsorbed hydrogen molecule. In addition, the authors studied the methane storage capabilities of these MOFs and...industrial processes such as gas storage , separations, and catalysis [1-4]. MOFs self-assemble using combinations of metal clusters and organic linking...and organic linkers to achieve better selectivity and activity towards chemicals such as, hydrogen , carbon dioxide, and methane, for gas storage

  11. Chemical research projects office: An overview and bibliography, 1975-1980

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kourtides, D. A.; Heimbuch, A. H.; Parker, J. A.

    1980-01-01

    The activities of the Chemical Research Projects Office at Ames Research Center, Moffett Field, California are reported. The office conducts basic and applied research in the fields of polymer chemistry, computational chemistry, polymer physics, and physical and organic chemistry. It works to identify the chemical research and technology required for solutions to problems of national urgency, synchronous with the aeronautic and space effort. It conducts interdisciplinary research on chemical problems, mainly in areas of macromolecular science and fire research. The office also acts as liaison with the engineering community and assures that relevant technology is made available to other NASA centers, agencies, and industry. Recent accomplishments are listed in this report. Activities of the three research groups, Polymer Research, Aircraft Operating and Safety, and Engineering Testing, are summarized. A complete bibliography which lists all Chemical Research Projects Office publications, contracts, grants, patents, and presentations from 1975 to 1980 is included.

  12. Chemical Research Projects Office: Functions, accomplishments, and programs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kourtides, D. A.; Parker, J. A.

    1972-01-01

    The purpose, technical accomplishments, and related activities of the Chemical Research Project Group are outlined. Data cover efforts made to: (1) identify chemical research and technology required for solutions to problems of national urgency, synchronous with aeronautics and space effort; (2) conduct basic and applied interdisciplinary research on chemical problems in the areas of macromolecular science and fire research, and (3) provide productive liason with the engineering community and effective transfer of technology to other agencies and industry.

  13. Target organs in chronic bioassays of 533 chemical carcinogens.

    PubMed Central

    Gold, L S; Slone, T H; Manley, N B; Bernstein, L

    1991-01-01

    A compendium of carcinogenesis bioassay results organized by target organ is presented for 533 chemicals that are carcinogenic in at least one species. This compendium is based primarily on experiments in rats or mice; results in hamsters, nonhuman primates, and dogs are also reported. The compendium can be used to identify chemicals that induce tumors at particular sites, and to determine whether target sites are the same for chemicals positive in more than one species. The Carcinogenic Potency Database (CPDB), which includes results of 3969 experiments, is used in the analysis. The published CPDB includes details on each test, and literature references. Chemical carcinogens are reported for 35 different target organs in rats or mice. More than 80% of the carcinogens in each of these species are positive in at least one of the 8 most frequent target sites: liver, lung, mammary gland, stomach, vascular system, kidney, hematopoietic system, and urinary bladder. An analysis is presented of how well one can predict the carcinogenic response in mice from results in rats, or vice versa. Among chemicals tested in both species, 76% of rat carcinogens are positive in mice, and 71% of mouse carcinogens are positive in rats. Prediction is less accurate to the same target site: 52% of rat carcinogens are positive in the same site in mice, and 48% of mouse carcinogens are positive in the same site in rats. The liver is the most frequent site in common between rats and mice. PMID:1773795

  14. Dynamic exposure of organisms and passive samplers to hydrophobic chemicals.

    PubMed

    Bayen, Stéphane; Ter Laak, Thomas L; Buffle, Jacques; Hermens, Joop L M

    2009-04-01

    An insight into the dynamic aspects of the accumulation process is essential for understanding bioaccumulation as well as effect studies of hydrophobic organic chemicals. This review presents an overview of kinetic studies with organisms (fish, bivalve, crustacean, insect, worm, algae, and protozoan) as well as passive samplers (solid and liquid phase microextraction, semipermeable membrane device, polymer sheet, solid-phase extraction, Chemcatcher, etc.) for the uptake of neutral nonpolar chemicals from the aqueous phase. Information about uptake rates, elimination rates, and 95% equilibration times was collected and analyzed with diffusion based models. The present literature review suggests that the surface to volume ratio appears to be a critical parameter for the uptake rate of the more hydrophobic chemicals both for samplers and organisms. In addition, as a very first approximation, the combination of the first-order kinetic model with the assumption that diffusion through the aqueous boundary layers is rate limiting, gives a reasonable description of the experimental kinetic data. In this way, the presented model might be used to estimate uptake and elimination rate constants of chemicals by organisms or passive samplers.

  15. In Situ Chemical Reduction for Organic Explosives in Soil

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-05-01

    Amendment • Combines solid controlled-release carbon and nutrients (aerobic) or with micro-scale ZVI (anaerobic) • Stimulates indigenous bacteria by...herbicides • organic explosives • chlorinated solvents Aerobic • wood treatment chemicals ( PAHs & PCP) • manufactured gas plant PAHs • phthalates

  16. UPTAKE OF IONIZABLE ORGANIC CHEMICALS AT FISH GILLS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Uptake of organic acids by fish, and their toxicity, generally decrease with increasing pH above the pK, presumably due to neutral forms of such chemicals being more readily adsorbed than their ionized forms. However, uptake usually exceeds that expected based just on the concent...

  17. The first decade of organic spintronics research.

    PubMed

    Sun, Dali; Ehrenfreund, Eitan; Vardeny, Z Valy

    2014-02-21

    The first decade of organic spintronics research has benefitted from the analogy and previous experience of the inorganic spintronics field, coupled with the unlimited versatility of organic materials synthesis. At the same time, the field of organic spintronics has developed into an attractive and promising field of its own, with rich physics and promising unique potential applications. We review here a set of significant milestones achieved in organic spintronic devices such as organic spin valves, bipolar spin-valves, and hybrid organic/inorganic light emitting diodes in comparison with representative inorganic spintronic devices. We also point out acute problems that need to be resolved before the young field of organic spintronics can mature.

  18. Carotenoids Database: structures, chemical fingerprints and distribution among organisms.

    PubMed

    Yabuzaki, Junko

    2017-01-01

    To promote understanding of how organisms are related via carotenoids, either evolutionarily or symbiotically, or in food chains through natural histories, we built the Carotenoids Database. This provides chemical information on 1117 natural carotenoids with 683 source organisms. For extracting organisms closely related through the biosynthesis of carotenoids, we offer a new similarity search system 'Search similar carotenoids' using our original chemical fingerprint 'Carotenoid DB Chemical Fingerprints'. These Carotenoid DB Chemical Fingerprints describe the chemical substructure and the modification details based upon International Union of Pure and Applied Chemistry (IUPAC) semi-systematic names of the carotenoids. The fingerprints also allow (i) easier prediction of six biological functions of carotenoids: provitamin A, membrane stabilizers, odorous substances, allelochemicals, antiproliferative activity and reverse MDR activity against cancer cells, (ii) easier classification of carotenoid structures, (iii) partial and exact structure searching and (iv) easier extraction of structural isomers and stereoisomers. We believe this to be the first attempt to establish fingerprints using the IUPAC semi-systematic names. For extracting close profiled organisms, we provide a new tool 'Search similar profiled organisms'. Our current statistics show some insights into natural history: carotenoids seem to have been spread largely by bacteria, as they produce C30, C40, C45 and C50 carotenoids, with the widest range of end groups, and they share a small portion of C40 carotenoids with eukaryotes. Archaea share an even smaller portion with eukaryotes. Eukaryotes then have evolved a considerable variety of C40 carotenoids. Considering carotenoids, eukaryotes seem more closely related to bacteria than to archaea aside from 16S rRNA lineage analysis. : http://carotenoiddb.jp.

  19. Micropollutants and chemical residues in organic and conventional meat.

    PubMed

    Dervilly-Pinel, Gaud; Guérin, Thierry; Minvielle, Brice; Travel, Angélique; Normand, Jérôme; Bourin, Marie; Royer, Eric; Dubreil, Estelle; Mompelat, Sophie; Hommet, Frédéric; Nicolas, Marina; Hort, Vincent; Inthavong, Chanthadary; Saint-Hilaire, Mailie; Chafey, Claude; Parinet, Julien; Cariou, Ronan; Marchand, Philippe; Le Bizec, Bruno; Verdon, Eric; Engel, Erwan

    2017-10-01

    The chemical contamination levels of both conventional and organic meats were assessed. The objective was to provide occurrence data in a context of chronic exposure. Environmental contaminants (17 polychlorinated dibenzodioxins/dibenzofurans, 18 polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), 3 hexabromocyclododecane (HBCD) isomers, 6 mycotoxins, 6 inorganic compounds) together with chemical residues arising from production inputs (75 antimicrobials, 10 coccidiostats and 121 pesticides) have been selected as relevant compounds. A dedicated sampling strategy, representative of the French production allowed quantification of a large sample set (n=266) including both conventional (n=139) and organic (n=127) raw meat from three animal species (bovine, porcine, poultry). While contamination levels below regulatory limits were measured in all the samples, significant differences were observed between both species and types of farming. Several environmental contaminants (Dioxins, PCBs, HBCD, Zn, Cu, Cd, Pb, As) were measured at significantly higher levels in organic samples. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Approaches to Establishing the Chemical Structure of Extraterrestrial Organic Solids

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cody, G. D.; Alexander, C. M. OD.; Wirick, Susan

    2003-01-01

    The majority of extraterrestrial organic matter in carbonaceous chondrites resides in a chemically complex, insoluble and perhaps macromolecular phase. We have been applying a series of independent solid state NMR experiments that are designed to provide a self consistent chemical characterization of this complex material. To date we have thoroughly analyzed 8 organic residues from different meteorites, including a CR2 (EET92042), CIl(Orgueil), CM2 (Murchison), Tagish Lake, CM2 (AlH83100), CM2 (Cold Bokkefeld), CM2 (Mighei), CM3 (Y86720). In fig 1. (1)H to (13)C cross polarization NMR spectra of four of these are shown. Note that there exists an enormous range in chemistry exhibited in organic solid [evident by the breadth of the spectral features both in the aliphatic region (sp(sup 3)) and the aromatic region (sp(sup 2))]. There is also considerable differences in the carbon chemistry across the meteorite groups.

  1. Metal Organic-Chemical Vapor Deposition fabrication of semiconductor lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thomas, C.

    1980-08-01

    The metal organic chemical vapor deposition (MO-CVD) process was studied and implemented in detail. Single crystal GaAs, and Ga(x)Al(1-x)As films were grown on GaAs by depositing metal organic alkyl gallium compounds in the presence of an arsine mixture. The metal organic chemical vapor deposition process allowed formation of the semiconductor compound directly on the heated substrate in only one hot temperature zone. With MO-CVD, semiconductor films can be efficiently produced by a more economical, less complicated process which will lend itself more easily than past fabrication procedures, to high quantity, high quality reproduction techniques of semiconductor lasers. Clearly MO-CVD is of interest to the communication industry where semiconductor lasers are used extensively in fiber optic communication systems, and similarly to the solar energy business where GaAs substrates are used as photoelectric cells.

  2. 40 CFR 414.80 - Applicability; description of the specialty organic chemicals subcategory.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... specialty organic chemicals subcategory. 414.80 Section 414.80 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) EFFLUENT GUIDELINES AND STANDARDS ORGANIC CHEMICALS, PLASTICS, AND SYNTHETIC FIBERS Specialty Organic Chemicals § 414.80 Applicability; description of the specialty organic chemicals...

  3. Beyond Chemical Literature: Developing Skills for Chemical Research Literacy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jensen, Dell, Jr.; Narske, Richard; Ghinazzi, Connie

    2010-01-01

    With the growing availability of electronic databases, online journal publications, and open-access publishing, there is unprecedented access to research materials. Increasingly, these materials are being incorporated into chemistry curricula and being used by undergraduate students in literature research. Internet savvy students can effectively…

  4. Optical Detection of Organic Chemical Biosignatures at Hydrothermal Vents

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Conrad, P. G.; Lane, A. L.; Bhartia, R.; Hug, W. H.

    2004-01-01

    We have developed a non-contact, optical life detection instrument that can detect organic chemical biosignatures in a number of different environments, including dry land, shallow aqueous, deep marine or in ice. Hence, the instrument is appropriate as a biosignature survey tool both for Mars exploration or in situ experiments in an ice-covered ocean such as one might wish to explore on Europa. Here, we report the results we obtained on an expedition aboard the Russian oceanographic vessel Akademik Mstislav Keldysh to hydrothermal vent sites in the Pacific Ocean using our life detection instrument MCDUVE, a multichannel, deep ultraviolet excitation fluorescence detector. MCDUVE detected organic material distribution on rocks near the vent, as well as direct detection of organisms, both microbial and microscopic. We also were able to detect organic material issuing directly from vent chimneys, measure the organic signature of the water column as we ascended, and passively observe the emission of light directly from some vents.

  5. Optical Detection of Organic Chemical Biosignatures at Hydrothermal Vents

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Conrad, P. G.; Lane, A. L.; Bhartia, R.; Hug, W. H.

    2004-01-01

    We have developed a non-contact, optical life detection instrument that can detect organic chemical biosignatures in a number of different environments, including dry land, shallow aqueous, deep marine or in ice. Hence, the instrument is appropriate as a biosignature survey tool both for Mars exploration or in situ experiments in an ice-covered ocean such as one might wish to explore on Europa. Here, we report the results we obtained on an expedition aboard the Russian oceanographic vessel Akademik Mstislav Keldysh to hydrothermal vent sites in the Pacific Ocean using our life detection instrument MCDUVE, a multichannel, deep ultraviolet excitation fluorescence detector. MCDUVE detected organic material distribution on rocks near the vent, as well as direct detection of organisms, both microbial and microscopic. We also were able to detect organic material issuing directly from vent chimneys, measure the organic signature of the water column as we ascended, and passively observe the emission of light directly from some vents.

  6. BCTR: Biological and Chemical Technologies Research 1994 annual summary report

    SciTech Connect

    Petersen, G.

    1995-02-01

    The annual summary report presents the fiscal year (FY) 1994 research activities and accomplishments for the United States Department of Energy (DOE) Biological and Chemical Technologies Research (BCTR) Program of the Advanced Industrial Concepts Division (AICD). This AICD program resides within the Office of Industrial Technologies (OIT) of the Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EE). Although the OIT was reorganized in 1991 and AICD no longer exists, this document reports on efforts conducted under the former structure. The annual summary report for 1994 (ASR 94) contains the following: program description (including BCTR program mission statement, historical background, relevance, goals and objectives); program structure and organization, selected technical and programmatic highlights for 1994; detailed descriptions of individual projects; a listing of program output, including a bibliography of published work; patents, and awards arising from work supported by BCTR.

  7. Volatile Organic Compounds (VOCs) and Elevated Concentrations of Carbon Dioxide (CO2) in Unsaturated-Zone Vapors Near a Chemical and Low-Level Radioactivity Waste-Disposal Facility, Amargosa Desert Research Site, Nye County, Nevada

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baker, R. J.; Andraski, B. J.; Walvoord, M. A.; Stonestrom, D. A.; Prudic, D. E.; Luo, W.

    2003-12-01

    As part of its Toxic Substances Hydrology Program, the U.S. Geological Survey is studying contaminant-transport processes in an arid environment at the Amargosa Desert Research Site (http://nevada.usgs.gov/adrs/). The site is near waste-disposal facilities 20 kilometers east of Death Valley National Park. Low-level radioactive waste was buried in unlined trenches of varying depth during 1962-92. Hazardous chemical waste was buried in unlined trenches at an adjacent facility during 1970-88. Mean annual precipitation at the site from 1981 to 2000 was 108 millimeters. The unsaturated zone is aerobic down to the water table, which is about 110 m (meters) deep. Sampling infrastructure south and west of the facility includes a grid of vapor probes 1.5 m deep, a 23.8-m-deep background borehole (JFDB), and two approximately 100-m-deep boreholes (UZB-2 and UZB-3), which are 160 m and 100 m from the nearest trench, respectively, and are instrumented for multi-level sampling. Analytes detected in unsaturated-zone-vapor samples include elevated concentrations of tritium and carbon-14; three chlorofluorocarbon (CFC) compounds, eight chlorinated solvent compounds, and toluene, all at concentrations exceeding 1,000 parts per billion (ppb) in UZB-3, and at lower concentrations in UZB-2 and in the shallow-vapor-probe grid; and CO2 in concentrations up to 2% in UZB-3, whereas maximum CO2 concentrations in JFDB are less than 0.2%. With the notable exception of toluene, VOCs that are known to be highly biodegradable are generally absent or occur at low concentrations (<100 ppb). The trends in the CO2 concentration profiles approximately parallel those of CFCs and radionuclides. The following preliminary conclusions have been drawn from the radionuclide, VOC, and CO2 data: 1. Biodegradation of organic substances is a reasonable explanation for the presence of CO2 in UZB-3 at concentrations greater those in JFDB (background), which are attributed to near-surface natural biological

  8. Role of chemical and ecological factors in trophic transfer of organic chemicals in aquatic food webs

    SciTech Connect

    Russell, R.W.; Gobas, F.A.P.C. . School of Resource and Environmental Management); Haffner, G.D. )

    1999-06-01

    Trophic transfer of chlorinated organic contaminants was investigated in an aquatic community composed of zooplankton, benthic invertebrates, and fish. Biomagnification, measured as the increase in lipid-based chemical concentrations in predator over that in prey, was observed for high-K[sub OW] chemicals (log K[sub OW] > 6.3). Low-K[sub OW] chemicals (log K[sub OW] < 5.5) did not biomagnify in the food web, and chemicals with log K[sub OW] between 5.5 and 6.3 showed some evidence of biomagnification. Trophic level differences in chemical accumulation in the food web could not be attributed to bioconcentration into increasing trophic levels with increasing lipid levels, as no relationship was observed between trophic position and lipid content of organisms. Plots of contaminant-ordinated principal component scores in component space predicted the detailed diets of the species examined. It is concluded that (1) trophic interactions play a crucial role in the distribution of high-K[sub OW] chemicals but not for low-K[sub OW] chemicals and that (2) contaminant distributions provide a means to determine structure in aquatic communities.

  9. INFLUENCE OF ORGANIC COSOLVENTS ON THE SORPTION KINETICS OF HYDROPHOBIC ORGANIC CHEMICALS

    EPA Science Inventory

    A quantitative examination of the kinetics of sorption of hydrophobic organic chemicals by soils from mixed solvents reveals that the reverse sorption rate constant (k2) increases log-linearly with increasing volume fraction of organic cosolvent (fc). This relationship was expec...

  10. INFLUENCE OF ORGANIC COSOLVENTS ON THE SORPTION KINETICS OF HYDROPHOBIC ORGANIC CHEMICALS

    EPA Science Inventory

    A quantitative examination of the kinetics of sorption of hydrophobic organic chemicals by soils from mixed solvents reveals that the reverse sorption rate constant (k2) increases log-linearly with increasing volume fraction of organic cosolvent (fc). This relationship was expec...

  11. Chemical laser exhaust pipe design research

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Yunqiang; Huang, Zhilong; Chen, Zhiqiang; Ren, Zebin; Guo, Longde

    2016-10-01

    In order to weaken the chemical laser exhaust gas influence of the optical transmission, a vent pipe is advised to emissions gas to the outside of the optical transmission area. Based on a variety of exhaust pipe design, a flow field characteristic of the pipe is carried out by numerical simulation and analysis in detail. The research results show that for uniform deflating exhaust pipe, although the pipeline structure is cyclical and convenient for engineering implementation, but there is a phenomenon of air reflows at the pipeline entrance slit which can be deduced from the numerical simulation results. So, this type of pipeline structure does not guarantee seal. For the design scheme of putting the pipeline contract part at the end of the exhaust pipe, or using the method of local area or tail contraction, numerical simulation results show that backflow phenomenon still exists at the pipeline entrance slit. Preliminary analysis indicates that the contraction of pipe would result in higher static pressure near the wall for the low speed flow field, so as to produce counter pressure gradient at the entrance slit. In order to eliminate backflow phenomenon at the pipe entrance slit, concerned with the pipeline type of radial size increase gradually along the flow, flow field property in the pipe is analyzed in detail by numerical simulation methods. Numerical simulation results indicate that there is not reflow phenomenon at entrance slit of the dilated duct. However the cold air inhaled in the slit which makes the temperature of the channel wall is lower than the center temperature. Therefore, this kind of pipeline structure can not only prevent the leak of the gas, but also reduce the wall temperature. In addition, compared with the straight pipe connection way, dilated pipe structure also has periodic structure, which can facilitate system integration installation.

  12. Chemical evolution and the preservation of organic compounds on Mars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kanavarioti, Anastassia; Mancinelli, Rocco L.

    1989-01-01

    Several lines of evidence suggest that the environment on early Mars and early Earth were very similar. Since life is abundant on Earth, it seems likely that conditions on early Earth were conducive to chemical evolution and the origin of life. The similarity between early Mars and early Earth encourages the hypothesis that chemical evolution might have also occurred on Mars, but that decreasing temperatures and the loss of its atmosphere brought the evolution to a halt. The possibility of finding on Mars remnants of organic material dating back to this early clement period is addressed.

  13. Destruction of chemical warfare agents using metal-organic frameworks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mondloch, Joseph E.; Katz, Michael J.; Isley, William C., III; Ghosh, Pritha; Liao, Peilin; Bury, Wojciech; Wagner, George W.; Hall, Morgan G.; Decoste, Jared B.; Peterson, Gregory W.; Snurr, Randall Q.; Cramer, Christopher J.; Hupp, Joseph T.; Farha, Omar K.

    2015-05-01

    Chemical warfare agents containing phosphonate ester bonds are among the most toxic chemicals known to mankind. Recent global military events, such as the conflict and disarmament in Syria, have brought into focus the need to find effective strategies for the rapid destruction of these banned chemicals. Solutions are needed for immediate personal protection (for example, the filtration and catalytic destruction of airborne versions of agents), bulk destruction of chemical weapon stockpiles, protection (via coating) of clothing, equipment and buildings, and containment of agent spills. Solid heterogeneous materials such as modified activated carbon or metal oxides exhibit many desirable characteristics for the destruction of chemical warfare agents. However, low sorptive capacities, low effective active site loadings, deactivation of the active site, slow degradation kinetics, and/or a lack of tailorability offer significant room for improvement in these materials. Here, we report a carefully chosen metal-organic framework (MOF) material featuring high porosity and exceptional chemical stability that is extraordinarily effective for the degradation of nerve agents and their simulants. Experimental and computational evidence points to Lewis-acidic ZrIV ions as the active sites and to their superb accessibility as a defining element of their efficacy.

  14. Destruction of chemical warfare agents using metal-organic frameworks.

    PubMed

    Mondloch, Joseph E; Katz, Michael J; Isley, William C; Ghosh, Pritha; Liao, Peilin; Bury, Wojciech; Wagner, George W; Hall, Morgan G; DeCoste, Jared B; Peterson, Gregory W; Snurr, Randall Q; Cramer, Christopher J; Hupp, Joseph T; Farha, Omar K

    2015-05-01

    Chemical warfare agents containing phosphonate ester bonds are among the most toxic chemicals known to mankind. Recent global military events, such as the conflict and disarmament in Syria, have brought into focus the need to find effective strategies for the rapid destruction of these banned chemicals. Solutions are needed for immediate personal protection (for example, the filtration and catalytic destruction of airborne versions of agents), bulk destruction of chemical weapon stockpiles, protection (via coating) of clothing, equipment and buildings, and containment of agent spills. Solid heterogeneous materials such as modified activated carbon or metal oxides exhibit many desirable characteristics for the destruction of chemical warfare agents. However, low sorptive capacities, low effective active site loadings, deactivation of the active site, slow degradation kinetics, and/or a lack of tailorability offer significant room for improvement in these materials. Here, we report a carefully chosen metal-organic framework (MOF) material featuring high porosity and exceptional chemical stability that is extraordinarily effective for the degradation of nerve agents and their simulants. Experimental and computational evidence points to Lewis-acidic Zr(IV) ions as the active sites and to their superb accessibility as a defining element of their efficacy.

  15. Application of the Activity Framework for Assessing Aquatic Ecotoxicology Data for Organic Chemicals.

    PubMed

    Thomas, Paul; Dawick, James; Lampi, Mark; Lemaire, Philippe; Presow, Shaun; van Egmond, Roger; Arnot, Jon A; Mackay, Donald; Mayer, Philipp; Galay Burgos, Malyka

    2015-10-20

    Toxicological research in the 1930s gave the first indications of the link between narcotic toxicity and the chemical activity of organic chemicals. More recently, chemical activity has been proposed as a novel exposure parameter that describes the fraction of saturation and that quantifies the potential for partitioning and diffusive uptake. In the present study, more than 2000 acute and chronic algal, aquatic invertebrates and fish toxicity data, as well as water solubility and melting point values, were collected from a series of sources. The data were critically reviewed and grouped by mode of action (MoA). We considered 660 toxicity data to be of acceptable quality. The 328 data which applied to the 72 substances identified as MoA 1 were then evaluated within the activity-toxicity framework: EC50 and LC50 values for all three taxa correlated generally well with (subcooled) liquid solubilities. Acute toxicity was typically exerted within the chemical activity range of 0.01-0.1, whereas chronic toxicity was exerted in the range of 0.001-0.01. These results confirm that chemical activity has the potential to contribute to the determination, interpretation and prediction of toxicity to aquatic organisms. It also has the potential to enhance regulation of organic chemicals by linking results from laboratory tests, monitoring and modeling programs. The framework can provide an additional line of evidence for assessing aquatic toxicity, for improving the design of toxicity tests, reducing animal usage and addressing chemical mixtures.

  16. Research on Exposure to Perfluorinated Chemicals

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Certain PFCs have been linked to adverse health effects in laboratory animals that may reflect associations between exposure to these chemicals and some health problems in the general human population.

  17. Space research on organs and tissues

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tischler, Marc E.; Morey-Holton, Emily

    1992-01-01

    The effects of microgravity on various physiological systems are reviewed focusing on muscle, bone, cardiovascular, pulmonary, neurovestibular, liver, and endocrine systems. It is noted that certain alterations of organs and tissues caused by microgravity are not reproducible in earth-bound animal or human models. Thus space research on organs and tissues is essential for both validating the earth-bound models used in laboratories and studying the adaptations to weightlessness which cannot be mimicked on earth.

  18. Space research on organs and tissues

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tischler, Marc E.; Morey-Holton, Emily

    1992-01-01

    The effects of microgravity on various physiological systems are reviewed focusing on muscle, bone, cardiovascular, pulmonary, neurovestibular, liver, and endocrine systems. It is noted that certain alterations of organs and tissues caused by microgravity are not reproducible in earth-bound animal or human models. Thus space research on organs and tissues is essential for both validating the earth-bound models used in laboratories and studying the adaptations to weightlessness which cannot be mimicked on earth.

  19. A RESEARCH AGENDA FOR RISK MANAGEMENT OF ENDOCRINE DISRUPTING CHEMICALS

    EPA Science Inventory

    To date, research on suspected endocrine disrupting chemicals (EDCs) has focused on determining health effects in humans and wildlife and on occurrence of these chemicals in the environment. There is strong evidence that certain chemicals are causing endocrine-related effects in...

  20. Summaries of FY 1980 research in the chemical sciences

    SciTech Connect

    1980-09-01

    Brief summaries are given of research programs being pursued by DOE laboratories and offsite facilities in the fields of photochemical and radiation sciences, chemical physics, atomic physics, chemical energy, separations, analysis, and chemical engineering sciences. No actual data is given. Indexes of topics, offsite institutions, and investigators are included. (DLC)

  1. Gas uptake and chemical aging of semisolid organic aerosol particles.

    PubMed

    Shiraiwa, Manabu; Ammann, Markus; Koop, Thomas; Pöschl, Ulrich

    2011-07-05

    Organic substances can adopt an amorphous solid or semisolid state, influencing the rate of heterogeneous reactions and multiphase processes in atmospheric aerosols. Here we demonstrate how molecular diffusion in the condensed phase affects the gas uptake and chemical transformation of semisolid organic particles. Flow tube experiments show that the ozone uptake and oxidative aging of amorphous protein is kinetically limited by bulk diffusion. The reactive gas uptake exhibits a pronounced increase with relative humidity, which can be explained by a decrease of viscosity and increase of diffusivity due to hygroscopic water uptake transforming the amorphous organic matrix from a glassy to a semisolid state (moisture-induced phase transition). The reaction rate depends on the condensed phase diffusion coefficients of both the oxidant and the organic reactant molecules, which can be described by a kinetic multilayer flux model but not by the traditional resistor model approach of multiphase chemistry. The chemical lifetime of reactive compounds in atmospheric particles can increase from seconds to days as the rate of diffusion in semisolid phases can decrease by multiple orders of magnitude in response to low temperature or low relative humidity. The findings demonstrate that the occurrence and properties of amorphous semisolid phases challenge traditional views and require advanced formalisms for the description of organic particle formation and transformation in atmospheric models of aerosol effects on air quality, public health, and climate.

  2. Unraveling the chemical space of terrestrial and meteoritic organic matter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmitt-Kopplin, Philippe; Harir, Mourad; Hertkorn, Norbert; Kanawati, Basem; Ruf, Alexander; Quirico, Eric; Bonal, Lydie; Beck, Pierre; Gabelica, Zelimir

    2015-04-01

    In terrestrial environments natural organic matter (NOM) occurs in soils, freshwater and marine environments, in the atmosphere and represents an exceedingly complex mixture of organic compounds that collectively exhibits a nearly continuous range of properties (size-reactivity continuum). In these materials, the "classical" biogeosignatures of the (biogenic and geogenic) precursor molecules, like lipids, lignins, proteins and natural products have been attenuated, often beyond recognition, during a succession of biotic and abiotic (e.g. photo- and redox chemistry) reactions. Because of this loss of biochemical signature, these materials can be designated non-repetitive complex systems. The access to extra-terrestrial organic matter is given i.e. in the analysis of meteoritic materials. Numerous descriptions of organic molecules present in organic chondrites have improved our understanding of the early interstellar chemistry that operated at or just before the birth of our solar system. However, many molecular analyses are so far targeted toward selected classes of compounds with a particular emphasis on biologically active components in the context of prebiotic chemistry. Here we demonstrate that a non-targeted ultrahigh-resolution molecular analysis of the solvent-accessible organic fraction of meteorite extracted under mild conditions allows one to extend its indigenous chemical diversity to tens of thousands of different molecular compositions and likely millions of diverse structures. The description of the molecular complexity provides hints on heteroatoms chronological assembly, shock and thermal events and revealed recently new classes of thousands of novel organic, organometallic compounds uniquely found in extra-terrestrial materials and never described in terrestrial systems. This high polymolecularity suggests that the extraterrestrial chemodiversity is high compared to terrestrial relevant biological and biogeochemical-driven chemical space. (ultra

  3. Identification and chemical characterization of specific organic indicators in the effluents from chemical production sites.

    PubMed

    Botalova, Oxana; Schwarzbauer, Jan; al Sandouk, Nadia

    2011-06-01

    The structural diversity of the wastewater composition was described by the use of detailed non-target screening analyses of industrial effluents from chemical production sites. Determination of the indicative organic compounds acting as potential molecular indicators for industrial emissions from chemical production industries has been possible due to (i) detailed characterisation of industrial contaminants and identification of compounds with high source specificity, (ii) quantitative determination of the organic constituents in the industrial effluents and (iii) the review of their industrial applications. The determination of potential site-specific markers and industrial molecular indicators corresponding to certain production processes (production of starting materials for manufacturing paper and printing inks, powder coatings as well as epichlorohydrin production) was performed in this work. The results of this study allowed significant contributions to the chemical characterisation of industrial contaminants and isolation of indicators that can act as representatives of industrial effluents in the aquatic environment.

  4. Influence of Organic Chemicals on Water Molecule Bridges in Soil Organic Matter of a Sapric Histosol.

    PubMed

    Ondruch, Pavel; Kučerík, Jiri; Steinmetz, Zacharias; Schaumann, Gabriele E

    2017-03-02

    Water molecules in soil organic matter (SOM) can form clusters bridging neighboring molecular segments (water molecule bridges; WaMB). WaMB are hypothesized to enhance physical entrapment of organic chemicals and to control the rigidity of the SOM supramolecular structure. However, the understanding of WaMB dynamics in SOM is still limited. We investigated the relation between WaMB stability and the physicochemical properties of their environment by treating a sapric histosol with various solvents and organic chemicals. Based on predictions from molecular modeling, we hypothesized that the stability of WaMB, measured by differential scanning calorimetry, increases with decreasing ability of a chemical to interact with water molecules of the WaMB. The interaction ability between WaMB and the chemicals was characterized by linear solvation energy relationships. WaMB stability in solvent-treated samples was found to decrease with increasing ability of a solvent to undergo H-donor/acceptor interactions. Spiking with an organic chemical stabilized (naphthalene) or destabilized (phenol) the WaMB. WaMB stability and matrix rigidity were generally reduced strongly and fast when hydrophilic chemicals entered the soil. The physicochemical aging following this destabilization is slow, but leads to a successive WaMB stabilization and matrix stiffening.

  5. Apparatus for sensing volatile organic chemicals in fluids

    DOEpatents

    Hughes, Robert C.; Manginell, Ronald P.; Jenkins, Mark W.; Kottenstette, Richard; Patel, Sanjay V.

    2005-06-07

    A chemical-sensing apparatus is formed from the combination of a chemical preconcentrator which sorbs and concentrates particular volatile organic chemicals (VOCs) and one or more chemiresistors that sense the VOCs after the preconcentrator has been triggered to release them in concentrated form. Use of the preconcentrator and chemiresistor(s) in combination allows the VOCs to be detected at lower concentration than would be possible using the chemiresistor(s) alone and further allows measurements to be made in a variety of fluids, including liquids (e.g. groundwater). Additionally, the apparatus provides a new mode of operation for sensing VOCs based on the measurement of decay time constants, and a method for background correction to improve measurement precision.

  6. Organization of an undergraduate research group

    SciTech Connect

    Hill, J.; Noteboom, E.

    1995-04-01

    Traditionally, research groups consist of senior physicists, staff members, and graduate students. The physics department at Creighton University has formed a Relativistic Heavy Ion physics research group consisting primarily of undergraduate students. Although senior staff and graduate students are actively involved, undergraduate research and the education of undergraduates is the focus of the group. The presentation, given by two undergraduate members of the group, will outline progress made in the group`s organization, discuss the benefits to the undergraduate group members, and speak to the balance which must be struck between education concerns and research goals.

  7. High-Resolution Desorption Electrospray Ionization Mass Spectrometry for Chemical Characterization of Organic Aerosols

    SciTech Connect

    Laskin, Julia; Laskin, Alexander; Roach, Patrick J.; Slysz, Gordon W.; Anderson, Gordon A.; Nizkorodov, Serguei; Bones, David L.; Nguyen, Lucas

    2010-03-01

    Characterization of the chemical composition and chemical transformations of secondary organic aerosol (SOA) is both a major challenge and the area of greatest uncertainty in current aerosol research. This study presents the first application of desorption electrospray ionization combined with high-resolution mass spectrometry (DESI-MS) for detailed chemical characterization and studies of chemical aging of OA collected on Teflon substrates. DESI-MS offers unique advantages both for detailed characterization of chemically labile components in OA that cannot be detected using more traditional electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (ESI-MS) and for studying chemical aging of OA. DESI-MS enables rapid characterization of OA samples collected on substrates by eliminating the sample preparation stage. In addition, it enables detection and structural characterization of chemically labile molecules in OA samples by minimizing the residence time of analyte in the solvent. SOA produced by the ozonolysis of limonene (LSOA) was allowed to react with gaseous ammonia. Chemical aging resulted in measurable changes in the optical properties of LSOA observed using UV- visible spectroscopy. DESI-MS combined with tandem mass spectrometry experiments (MS/MS) enabled identification of species in aged LSOA responsible for absorption of the visible light. Detailed analysis of the experimental data allowed us to identify chemical changes induced by reactions of LSOA constituents with ammonia and distinguish between different mechanisms of chemical aging.

  8. Recent advances in organ microcirculation research.

    PubMed

    Tsuchiya, M; Oda, M

    1987-01-01

    This review article dealt with progress in the research of gastroenterological organ microcirculation in Japan. It must be emphasized that this remarkable progress particularly in intravital microcirculatory observations at organ level is attributable to great improvement of microscopic devices combined with computerized system, development of new techniques for measuring microcirculatory blood flow and pioneering of a variety of fluorescent and isotope-labelled tracers. Little attention has been directed toward the fact that microvascular manifestations are perhaps the earliest signs of "cells and tissues" dysfunction in disease processes. The microvasculature undergoes a substantial remodeling not only in vascular wall structures, but also in network characteristics themselves especially in chronic disease. Those microvascular alterations in an organ system, which primarily originate in adaptations to the microenvironmental changes, would lead to the chronicity and self-perpetuation of disease. As has been noted in the IVth World Congress for Microcirculation organized by the Japanese Society for Microcirculation, which was held in Tokyo, July 26-30, 1987, further progress has been made in the research of organ microcirculation in the gastroenterological and other fields. It is the cornerstone for better understanding of the pathogenesis of organ diseases to clarify the earliest alterations in the microvasculature of an organ system from a combined aspect of microhemo- and microlymphocirculation using the newly developed techniques for microcirculation study.

  9. Fan organs of crayfish enhance chemical information flow.

    PubMed

    Breithaupt, T

    2001-04-01

    Animals as well as autonomous robots need to acquire environmental signals in order to adjust their activity in time and space. Some information is accessible to the sensors only as a result of specific behaviors for stimulus acquisition. Due to the slow rate of molecular diffusion, dispersal of chemical stimuli depends on fluid flow. Aquatic crustaceans can generate directed water currents by specialized appendages. Here I describe the crayfish fan organs, which are feathered flagella of the mouthparts, and their activity in sending and receiving chemical signals in environments with stagnant flow conditions. During the power-stroke, the fan opens and displaces water; during the return stroke, it collapses and thereby minimizes drag. These organs can create a variety of flow fields including water jets, and in many different directions. Bilateral upward fanning draws water horizontally from all directions toward the anterior chemoreceptors. Unilateral upward fanning draws water from only one side towards the body. The versatility of the crayfish fan organ makes it a candidate for biomimetic reconstruction and use in autonomous robots that can search chemical sources.

  10. MSW incinerator ash research to investigate chemical stabilization

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1988-10-01

    The State University of New York (SUNY) at Stony Brook and a Texas company have teamed up to build huge tetrapods from garbage incineration ash. These concrete-like structures will be placed in Long Island Sound for a test of their stability. If proven successful, the test could lead to a new market for incinerator ash-shore protection devices for erosion control and artificial reefs. The New York State Center for Hazardous Waste Management SUNY at Buffalo approved a grant application submitted by the Waste Management Institute of the Marine Sciences Research Center for a two-year test of a chemical stabilization process currently being used for treatment of hazardous waste. The unique process, invented by HAZCON, Inc., Brookshire, Texas, chemically fixes heavy metals and produces a hardened, dense mass with extremely low permeabilities. Objectives of the research are to examine the leachate characteristic sand durability of the stabilized material. In addition, the work will evaluate the potential toxicity of the stabilized material to marine organisms.

  11. Summaries of FY 1993 research in the chemical sciences

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-08-01

    The summaries in photochemical and radiation sciences, chemical physics, atomic physics, chemical energy, separations and analysis, heavy element chemistry, chemical engineering sciences, and advanced battery technology are arranged according to national laboratories and offsite institutions. Small business innovation research projects are also listed. Special facilities supported wholly or partly by the Division of Chemical Sciences are described. Indexes are provided for selected topics of general interest, institutions, and investigators.

  12. Research in the chemical sciences: Summaries of FY 1994

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1994-12-01

    This summary book is published annually on research supported by DOE`s Division of Chemical Sciences in the Office of Energy Research. Research in photochemical and radiation sciences, chemical physics, atomic physics, chemical energy, separations and analysis, heavy element chemistry, chemical engineering sciences, and advanced batteries is arranged according to national laboratories, offsite institutions, and small businesses. Goal is to add to the knowledge base on which existing and future efficient and safe energy technologies can evolve. The special facilities used in DOE laboratories are described. Indexes are provided (topics, institution, investigator).

  13. 40 CFR 455.30 - Applicability; description of the metallo-organic pesticide chemicals manufacturing subcategory.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... metallo-organic pesticide chemicals manufacturing subcategory. 455.30 Section 455.30 Protection of...) PESTICIDE CHEMICALS Metallo-Organic Pesticide Chemicals Manufacturing Subcategory § 455.30 Applicability; description of the metallo-organic pesticide chemicals manufacturing subcategory. The provisions of...

  14. 40 CFR 455.30 - Applicability; description of the metallo-organic pesticide chemicals manufacturing subcategory.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... metallo-organic pesticide chemicals manufacturing subcategory. 455.30 Section 455.30 Protection of...) PESTICIDE CHEMICALS Metallo-Organic Pesticide Chemicals Manufacturing Subcategory § 455.30 Applicability; description of the metallo-organic pesticide chemicals manufacturing subcategory. The provisions of...

  15. 40 CFR 455.30 - Applicability; description of the metallo-organic pesticide chemicals manufacturing subcategory.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... metallo-organic pesticide chemicals manufacturing subcategory. 455.30 Section 455.30 Protection of...) PESTICIDE CHEMICALS Metallo-Organic Pesticide Chemicals Manufacturing Subcategory § 455.30 Applicability; description of the metallo-organic pesticide chemicals manufacturing subcategory. The provisions of...

  16. Self-organized nanoporous materials for chemical separations and chemical sensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pandey, Bipin

    Self-organized nanoporous materials have drawn a lot of attention because the uniform, highly dense, and ordered cylindrical nanopores in these materials provide a unique platform for chemical separations and chemical sensing applications. Here, we explore self-organized nanopores of PS-b-PMMA diblock copolymer thin films and anodic gallium oxide for chemical separations and sensing applications. In the first study, cyclic voltammograms of cytochrome c on recessed nanodisk-array electrodes (RNEs) based on nanoporous films (11, 14 or 24 nm in average pore diameter; 30 nm thick) derived from polystyrene-poly(methylmethacrylate) diblock copolymers were measured. The faradic current of cytochrome c was observed on RNEs, indicating the penetration of cytochrome c (hydrodynamic diameter ≈ 4 nm) through the nanopores to the underlying electrodes. Compared to the 24-nm pores, the diffusion of cytochrome c molecules through the 11- and 14-nm pores suffered significantly larger hindrance. The results reported in this study will provide guidance in designing RNEs for size-based chemical sensing and also for controlled immobilization of biomolecules within nanoporous media for biosensors and bioreactors. In another study, conditions for the formation of self-organized nanopores of a metal oxide film were investigated. Self-organized nanopores aligned perpendicular to the film surface were obtained upon anodization of gallium films in ice-cooled 4 and 6 M aqueous H2SO4 at 10 V and 15 V. The average pore diameter was in the range of 18 ~ 40 nm, and the anodic gallium oxide was ca. 2 microm thick. In addition, anodic formation of self-organized nanopores was demonstrated for a solid gallium monolith incorporated at the end of a glass capillary. Nanoporous anodic oxide monoliths formed from a fusible metal will lead to future development of unique devices for chemical sensing and catalysis. In the final study, surface chemical property of self-organized nanoporous anodic gallium

  17. Evaluating Capacity Building for Policy Research Organizations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Struyk, Raymond J.; Damon, Mawadda; Haddaway, Samuel R.

    2011-01-01

    The international community has identified a positive link between good governance and economic development. There is an increasing appreciation of the effective role that local policy research organizations (PROs) can play in providing evidence-based policy recommendations as the basis for sound legislation and in assessing the efficacy of…

  18. Evaluating Capacity Building for Policy Research Organizations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Struyk, Raymond J.; Damon, Mawadda; Haddaway, Samuel R.

    2011-01-01

    The international community has identified a positive link between good governance and economic development. There is an increasing appreciation of the effective role that local policy research organizations (PROs) can play in providing evidence-based policy recommendations as the basis for sound legislation and in assessing the efficacy of…

  19. Research proceedings on amphibian model organisms

    PubMed Central

    LIU, Lu-Sha; ZHAO, Lan-Ying; WANG, Shou-Hong; JIANG, Jian-Ping

    2016-01-01

    Model organisms have long been important in biology and medicine due to their specific characteristics. Amphibians, especially Xenopus, play key roles in answering fundamental questions on developmental biology, regeneration, genetics, and toxicology due to their large and abundant eggs, as well as their versatile embryos, which can be readily manipulated and developed in vivo. Furthermore, amphibians have also proven to be of considerable benefit in human disease research due to their conserved cellular developmental and genomic organization. This review gives a brief introduction on the progress and limitations of these animal models in biology and human disease research, and discusses the potential and challenge of Microhyla fissipes as a new model organism. PMID:27469255

  20. Model intercomparison for the uptake of organic chemicals by plants.

    PubMed

    Collins, Christopher D; Fryer, Mike E

    2003-04-15

    Currently, a variety of models are available for predicting the uptake, translocation, and elimination of organic contaminants by plants. These models range from simple deterministic risk assessment screening tools to more complex models that consider physical, chemical, and biological processes in a mechanistic manner. This study evaluates the performance of a range of such models and model types against experimental data sets. Three dynamic, three regression-based, and three steady-state and equilibrium models have been selected for evaluation. These models differ in terms of their scope, methodological approach, and complexity. Data from nine published experiments were used to create scenarios to test model performance. These experiments consider plant contamination via both soil and aerial exposure pathways. A total of 19 different organic chemicals were used in the experiments along with 7 different plant species. Model predictions of chemical concentrations in the relevant plant compartments were compared with the experimentally recorded values. The results indicate that dynamic models offer performance advantages for acute exposure durations and for rapidly changing environmental media. Equilibrium/steady-state and regression-based models perform better for chronic exposure durations, where stable conditions are more likely to exist. The selection of an appropriate plant uptake model will therefore be dependent on the requirements of the assessment, the nature of the environmental media, and the duration of the source term. The results generated by the regression-based models suggest that in their current form these models are unsuitable for evaluating the uptake of organic chemicals from the air into plants.

  1. 40 CFR 414.60 - Applicability; description of the commodity organic chemicals subcategory.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... commodity organic chemicals subcategory. 414.60 Section 414.60 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) EFFLUENT GUIDELINES AND STANDARDS ORGANIC CHEMICALS, PLASTICS, AND SYNTHETIC FIBERS Commodity Organic Chemicals § 414.60 Applicability; description of the commodity organic...

  2. 40 CFR 414.80 - Applicability; description of the specialty organic chemicals subcategory.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... specialty organic chemicals subcategory. 414.80 Section 414.80 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) EFFLUENT GUIDELINES AND STANDARDS ORGANIC CHEMICALS, PLASTICS, AND SYNTHETIC FIBERS Specialty Organic Chemicals § 414.80 Applicability; description of the specialty organic...

  3. 40 CFR 414.80 - Applicability; description of the specialty organic chemicals subcategory.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... specialty organic chemicals subcategory. 414.80 Section 414.80 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) EFFLUENT GUIDELINES AND STANDARDS ORGANIC CHEMICALS, PLASTICS, AND SYNTHETIC FIBERS Specialty Organic Chemicals § 414.80 Applicability; description of the specialty organic...

  4. 40 CFR 414.80 - Applicability; description of the specialty organic chemicals subcategory.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... specialty organic chemicals subcategory. 414.80 Section 414.80 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) EFFLUENT GUIDELINES AND STANDARDS ORGANIC CHEMICALS, PLASTICS, AND SYNTHETIC FIBERS Specialty Organic Chemicals § 414.80 Applicability; description of the specialty organic...

  5. 40 CFR 414.60 - Applicability; description of the commodity organic chemicals subcategory.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... commodity organic chemicals subcategory. 414.60 Section 414.60 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) EFFLUENT GUIDELINES AND STANDARDS ORGANIC CHEMICALS, PLASTICS, AND SYNTHETIC FIBERS Commodity Organic Chemicals § 414.60 Applicability; description of the commodity organic...

  6. 40 CFR 414.60 - Applicability; description of the commodity organic chemicals subcategory.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... commodity organic chemicals subcategory. 414.60 Section 414.60 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) EFFLUENT GUIDELINES AND STANDARDS ORGANIC CHEMICALS, PLASTICS, AND SYNTHETIC FIBERS Commodity Organic Chemicals § 414.60 Applicability; description of the commodity organic...

  7. 40 CFR 414.80 - Applicability; description of the specialty organic chemicals subcategory.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... specialty organic chemicals subcategory. 414.80 Section 414.80 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) EFFLUENT GUIDELINES AND STANDARDS ORGANIC CHEMICALS, PLASTICS, AND SYNTHETIC FIBERS Specialty Organic Chemicals § 414.80 Applicability; description of the specialty organic...

  8. 40 CFR 414.60 - Applicability; description of the commodity organic chemicals subcategory.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... commodity organic chemicals subcategory. 414.60 Section 414.60 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) EFFLUENT GUIDELINES AND STANDARDS ORGANIC CHEMICALS, PLASTICS, AND SYNTHETIC FIBERS Commodity Organic Chemicals § 414.60 Applicability; description of the commodity organic...

  9. Chemical alteration of extraterrestrial organics during atmospheric entry of micrometeorites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kress, M.; Brownlee, D.

    Most of the extraterrestrial carbon accreted by Earth is carried by the 40,000 tons of ~0.2 mm micrometeorites that enter the atmosphere every year. Particles in this size range would have supplied an enormous amount of carbon to the inchoate biosphere since the exogenous influx at ~4 Ga would have been much higher than today. However, these particles undergo strong drag heating to ~1500 K for several seconds upon atmospheric entry, ostensibly burning away all the organics as CO. Ironically, particles of this size seemed to contribute no organic carbon to Earth despite the fact that they constitute the bulk of the total incoming mass. Conventional wisdom has thus held that organics survive only in smaller cosmic dust grains and in >~cm-sized meteorites, which account for only a tiny fraction of the total exogenous mass flux. However, carbon has been found in several smaller, yet still strongly-heated particles in the form of a refractory, char-like material imbedded with tiny FeNi metal beads, motivating us to study the pyrolysis of complex organic matter. We will present results from experiments and chemical models of the transient drag heating of micrometeorites. We predict that small aromatics, light hydrocarbons, and other organics, as well as CO and char, are formed, indicating that strongly-heated micrometeorites may have indeed been a significant source of organic carbon during the origin of life on Earth.

  10. AN OVERVIEW OF PATHOGEN RESEARCH IN THE MICROBIOLOGICAL AND CHEMICAL EXPOSURE ASSESSMENT RESEARCH DIVISION

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Microbiological and Chemical Exposure Assessment Research Division of the EPA Office of Research and Development's National Exposure Research Laboratory has a robust in-house research program aimed at developing better occurrence and exposure methods for waterborne pathogens....

  11. Hydrophobic interaction of organic chemicals with microtubule assembly in vitro.

    PubMed

    Stoiber, Thomas; Unger, Eberhard; Dorn, Susanne B; Degen, Gisela H; Bolt, Hermann M

    2008-09-01

    A recent concept connecting the lipophilicity of organic chemicals with their genotoxicity on a chromosomal level implies that the lipophilic character of organic chemicals determines a certain background of chromosomal genotoxicity that can be addressed as "non-specific". This is opposed to compounds with more "specific" modes of action. Such mechanisms influence the processes of karyokinesis and cytokinesis. A critical partial process for the chromosomal segregation is the dynamics of assembly and disassembly of microtubules. To broaden the present database for such interactions, chemicals were selected based on their lipophilicity (log P between -1.5 and +1.0) and on hints from the literature pointing to possibilities of interaction with the tubulin-microtubule system. Thus, acetamide, acrylamide, methylmethane sulfonate, acetonitrile, acrylonitrile and cyclohexanone were assessed as to their potencies to influence the dynamic processes of microtubule assembly and disassembly in a cell-free system in vitro. These compounds covered a range of log P between -1.5 and 1.0, complementary to compounds investigated earlier. The entire body of data supports the general concept that hydrophobic interactions are connected with non-specific processes, which contribute to a background genotoxicity on a chromosomal level. It also points to the dynamics of microtubule assembly and disassembly as a decisive partial process involved.

  12. Hazardous organic chemicals in rubber recycled tire playgrounds and pavers.

    PubMed

    Llompart, Maria; Sanchez-Prado, Lucia; Pablo Lamas, J; Garcia-Jares, Carmen; Roca, Enrique; Dagnac, Thierry

    2013-01-01

    In this study, the presence of hazardous organic chemicals in surfaces containing recycled rubber tires is investigated. Direct material analyses using solvent extraction, as well as SPME analysis of the vapour phase above the sample, were carried out. Twenty-one rubber mulch samples were collected from nine different playgrounds. In addition, seven commercial samples of recycled rubber pavers were acquired in a local store of a multinational company. All samples were extracted by ultrasound energy, followed by analysis of the extract by GC-MS. The analysis confirmed the presence of a large number of hazardous substances including PAHs, phthalates, antioxidants (e.g. BHT, phenols), benzothiazole and derivatives, among other chemicals. The study evidences the high content of toxic chemicals in these recycled materials. The concentration of PAHs in the commercial pavers was extremely high, reaching values up to 1%. In addition, SPME studies of the vapour phase above the samples confirm the volatilisation of many of those organic compounds. Uses of recycled rubber tires, especially those targeting play areas and other facilities for children, should be a matter of regulatory concern. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Aqueous photolysis of the organic ultraviolet filter chemical octyl methoxycinnamate.

    PubMed

    MacManus-Spencer, Laura A; Tse, Monica L; Klein, Jacob L; Kracunas, Alison E

    2011-05-01

    Organic UV filter chemicals are the active ingredients in personal care products designed to protect the skin from UV radiation, and hundreds of tons are estimated to be produced annually. Despite their entrance into the aquatic environment by both direct and indirect routes and their detection in surface waters and fish, little is known about their environmental fate. UV filter chemicals are designed to be photostable, but some undergo transformation upon exposure to UV light. Octyl methoxycinnamate (OMC), a commonly used UV filter chemical, degrades rapidly by direct photolysis; previous studies have focused on its photoisomerization, and a few investigators have reported the formation of cyclodimers. Here, we present the kinetics and quantum efficiency of the direct photolysis of OMC and confirm that dimerization occurs as a result of direct photolysis in aqueous solution. Likely identities of the dimers are offered based on comparison to reported results for other cinnamate derivatives. We have identified additional products of direct photolysis that have not been previously reported and investigated their photostability, as well as the mechanism of product formation. There is also some evidence of indirect photolysis in the presence of dissolved natural organic matter.

  14. Trophic magnification of organic chemicals: A global synthesis

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Walters, David; Jardine, T.D.; Cade, Brian S.; Kidd, K.A.; Muir, D.C.G.; Leipzig-Scott, Peter C.

    2016-01-01

    Production of organic chemicals (OCs) is increasing exponentially, and some OCs biomagnify through food webs to potentially toxic levels. Biomagnification under field conditions is best described by trophic magnification factors (TMFs; per trophic level change in log-concentration of a chemical) which have been measured for more than two decades. Syntheses of TMF behavior relative to chemical traits and ecosystem properties are lacking. We analyzed >1500 TMFs to identify OCs predisposed to biomagnify and to assess ecosystem vulnerability. The highest TMFs were for OCs that are slowly metabolized by animals (metabolic rate kM < 0.01 day–1) and are moderately hydrophobic (log KOW 6–8). TMFs were more variable in marine than freshwaters, unrelated to latitude, and highest in food webs containing endotherms. We modeled the probability that any OC would biomagnify as a combined function of KOW and kM. Probability is greatest (∼100%) for slowly metabolized compounds, regardless of KOW, and lowest for chemicals with rapid transformation rates (kM > 0.2 day–1). This probabilistic model provides a new global tool for screening existing and new OCs for their biomagnification potential.

  15. Capacities of membrane lipids to accumulate neutral organic chemicals.

    PubMed

    Endo, Satoshi; Escher, Beate I; Goss, Kai-Uwe

    2011-07-15

    Lipids have been considered as the predominant components for bioaccumulation of organic chemicals. However, differences in accumulation properties between different types of lipid (e.g., storage and membrane lipids) have rarely been considered. Moreover, in view of toxic effects on organisms, chemical accumulation specifically in biological membranes is of particular importance. In this review article, partition coefficients of 240 neutral organic compounds between liposomes (phospholipid membrane vesicles) and water (K(lipw)), reported in the literature or measured additionally for this work, were evaluated. Values of log K(lipw) and log K(ow) (octanol-water partition coefficients) differ by 0.4 on average. Polyparameter linear free energy relationships (PP-LFERs) can describe the log K(lipw) data even better (standard deviations = 0.28-0.31) than the log K(ow) model. Recent experimental data for highly hydrophobic compounds fit well to the PP-LFERs and do not indicate the existence of a previously postulated "hydrophobicity cutoff". Predictive approaches based only on the molecular structure (KOWWIN, SPARC, COSMOthermX, COSMOmic) were also evaluated for K(lipw) prediction. The PP-LFERs revealed that partition coefficients into membrane lipids can be two log units higher than those into storage lipids for H-bond donor compounds, suggesting that distinguishing between the two lipids is necessary to account for the bioaccumulation of these compounds, and that tissues rich in membrane lipids (e.g., kidneys, liver) instead of fat tissue can be the primary phase for accumulation.

  16. Comparison of rapid screening assays using organic chemicals

    SciTech Connect

    Beach, S.A.; Robideau, R.R.

    1994-12-31

    In a continuation of a study presented last year using metals, the sensitivity of short term toxicity tests is examined using common organic chemicals. In toxicity testing, the focus has shifted from the traditional long-term studies utilizing the mortality of complex, multicellular eukaryotic organisms as the endpoint towards short-term studies in which transformation of biochemical pathways are monitored. The relative sensitivity of aquatic screening techniques are compared to the standardized 48-hr Daphnia magna and Ceriodaphnia dubia, 96-hr fathead minnow and 96-hr algal acute assays. The short-term test procedures investigated are: dehydrogenase enzyme activity assays utilizing triphenyltetrazolium chloride (TTC) and resazurin as the calorimetric indicators; TOXI-Chromotest, inhibition of {beta}-galactosidase; reduction in bioluminescence output utilizing the Microtox{reg_sign} test; nitrification inhibition assays with a commercial preparation of nitrifying bacteria (Nitroseed{trademark}) and municipal activated sludge; respiration inhibition assays with a commercial preparation of heterotrophic bacteria (Polytox{reg_sign}) and activated sludge; inhibition of root growth in terrestrial plants; and galactosidase inhibition through the use of a fluorometrically tagged substrate with the Daphnia magna IQ{trademark} test. Toxicity values generated by this laboratory on commonly used organic chemicals are compared.

  17. Measurement of volatile organic chemicals at selected sites in California

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Singh, Hanwant B.; Salas, L.; Viezee, W.; Sitton, B.; Ferek, R.

    1992-01-01

    Urban air concentrations of 24 selected volatile organic chemicals that may be potentially hazardous to human health and environment were measured during field experiments conducted at two California locations, at Houston, and at Denver. Chemicals measured included chlorofluorocarbons, halomethanes, haloethanes, halopropanes, chloroethylenes, and aromatic hydrocarbons. With emphasis on California sites, data from these studies are analyzed and interpreted with respect to variabilities in ambient air concentrations, diurnal changes, relation to prevailing meteorology, sources and trends. Except in a few instances, mean concentrations are typically between 0 and 5 ppb. Significant variabilities in atmospheric concentrations associated with intense sources and adverse meteorological conditions are shown to exist. In addition to short-term variability, there is evidence of systematic diurnal and seasonal trends. In some instances it is possible to detect declining trends resulting from the effectiveness of control strategies.

  18. Bibliography of Short Wavelength Chemical Laser Research

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1993-05-01

    shock tube dissociation of fluorine azide, (2) identify and characterize alternatives to BiF as the lasant in an excited NF driven laser , (3) develop...L.F. Phillips KINETICS OF 12 FOLLOWING ArF LASER EXCITATION: THERMAL DISSOCIATION OF THE A’(2u) STATE J. Phys. Chem., 88, 6084 (1984) 267. Tellinghuisen...VISIBLE WAVELENGTH CHEMICAL LASER SCHEMES BASED ON THERMAL DISSOCIATION OF CHLORINE AZIDE Proc. Int. Conf on.LASERS 󈨟, Eds. F.J. Duarte and D.G. Harris

  19. Geometrical optimization of organic microlasers for microfluidic chemical sensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lozenko, Sergey; Faye, Djibril; Zhang, Haitao; Lebental, Mélanie; Lautru, Joseph; Zyss, Joseph; Lefevre, Jean-Pierre; Leray, Isabelle

    2014-10-01

    We report the design, fabrication, and demonstration of a chemical sensor-based on the spectral shift of organic microcavity lasers. The shape of the cavity contour is used as a parameter and is optimized to improve the sensitivity. Analytical and numerical predictions are in good agreement with experiments performed in a microfluidic environment, showing sensitivities of up to 100 nm per refractive index unit for stadium-shaped microlasers on pedestal. Selective sensing of Hg2+ at a concentration down to 200 ppb is then demonstrated with cavities functionalized by ligands that are known to bind mercuric cations.

  20. Chemical coagulation-based processes for trace organic contaminant removal: current state and future potential.

    PubMed

    Alexander, Jonathan T; Hai, Faisal I; Al-Aboud, Turki M

    2012-11-30

    Trace organic contaminants have become an increasing cause of concern for governments and water authorities as they attempt to respond to the potential challenges posed by climate change by implementing sustainable water cycle management practices. The augmentation of potable water supplies through indirect potable water reuse is one such method currently being employed. Given the uncertainty surrounding the potential human health impacts of prolonged ingestion of trace organic contaminants, it is vital that effective and sustainable treatment methods are utilized. The purpose of this article is to provide a comprehensive literature review of the performance of the chemical coagulation process in removing trace organic contaminants from water. This study evaluated the removal data collated from recent research relating to various trace organic contaminants during the coagulation process. It was observed that there is limited research data relating to the removal of trace organic contaminants using coagulation. The findings of this study suggest that there is a gap in the current research investigating the potential of new types of coagulants and exploring coagulation-based hybrid processes to remove trace organic contaminants from water. The data analysed in this study regarding removal efficiency suggests that, even for the significantly hydrophobic compounds, hydrophobicity is not the sole factor governing removal of trace organic contaminants by coagulation. This has important implications in that the usual practice of screening coagulants based on turbidity (suspended solid) removal proves inadequate in the case of trace organic contaminant removal. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Chemical ions affect survival of avian cholera organisms in pondwater

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Price, J.I.; Yandell, B.S.; Porter, W.P.

    1992-01-01

    Avian cholera (Pasteurella multocida) is a major disease of wild waterfowl, but its epizootiology remains little understood. Consequently, we examined whether chemical ions affected survival of avian cholera organisms in water collected from the Nebraska Rainwater Basin where avian cholera is enzootic. We tested the response of P. multocida to ammonium (NH4), calcium (Ca), magnesium (Mg), nitrate (NO3), and ortho-phosphate (PO4) ions individually and in combination using a fractional factorial design divided into 4 blocks. High concentrations of Ca and Mg, singly or in combination, increased survival of P. multocida organisms (P < 0.001). We developed a survival index to predict whether or not specific ponds could be "problem" or "nonproblem" avian cholera sites based on concentrations of these ions in the water.

  2. Chemically Delaminated Free-Standing Ultrathin Covalent Organic Nanosheets.

    PubMed

    Khayum, M Abdul; Kandambeth, Sharath; Mitra, Shouvik; Nair, Sanoop B; Das, Anuja; Nagane, Samadhan S; Mukherjee, Rabibrata; Banerjee, Rahul

    2016-12-12

    Covalent organic nanosheets (CONs) are a new class of porous thin two-dimensional (2D) nanostructures that can be easily designed and functionalized and could be useful for separation applications. Poor dispersion, layer restacking, and difficult postsynthetic modifications are the major hurdles that need to be overcome to fabricate scalable CON thin films. Herein, we present a unique approach for the chemical exfoliation of an anthracene-based covalent organic framework (COF) to N-hexylmaleimide-functionalized CONs, to yield centimeter-sized free-standing thin films through layer-by-layer CON assembly at the air-water interface. The thin-layer fabrication technique presented here is simple, scalable, and does not require any surfactants or stabilizing agents.

  3. Chemical composition of dissolved organic matter draining permafrost soils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ward, Collin P.; Cory, Rose M.

    2015-10-01

    Northern circumpolar permafrost soils contain roughly twice the amount of carbon stored in the atmosphere today, but the majority of this soil organic carbon is perennially frozen. Climate warming in the arctic is thawing permafrost soils and mobilizing previously frozen dissolved organic matter (DOM) from deeper soil layers to nearby surface waters. Previous studies have reported that ancient DOM draining deeper layers of permafrost soils was more susceptible to degradation by aquatic bacteria compared to modern DOM draining the shallow active layer of permafrost soils, and have suggested that DOM chemical composition may be an important control for the lability of DOM to bacterial degradation. However, the compositional features that distinguish DOM drained from different depths in permafrost soils are poorly characterized. Thus, the objective of this study was to characterize the chemical composition of DOM drained from different depths in permafrost soils, and relate these compositional differences to its susceptibility to biological degradation. DOM was leached from the shallow organic mat and the deeper permafrost layer of soils within the Imnavait Creek watershed on the North Slope of Alaska. DOM draining both soil layers was characterized in triplicate by coupling ultra-high resolution mass spectrometry, 13C solid-state NMR, and optical spectroscopy methods with multi-variate statistical analyses. Reproducibility of replicate mass spectra was high, and compositional differences resulting from interfering species or isolation effects were significantly smaller than differences between DOM drained from each soil layer. All analyses indicated that DOM leached from the shallower organic mat contained higher molecular weight, more oxidized, and more unsaturated aromatic species compared to DOM leached from the deeper permafrost layer. Bacterial production rates and bacterial efficiencies were significantly higher for permafrost compared to organic mat DOM

  4. A New Investigative Sophomore Organic Laboratory Involving Individual Research Projects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kharas, Gregory B.

    1997-07-01

    The problem-solving approach calls for a laboratory curriculum that provides a greater intellectual challenge and the resemblance to a research experience. A curriculum was designed which involves individual research projects for the nine laboratories of the spring quarter of a three-quarter introductory organic chemistry course. These projects integrate the instructor's research and learning experiences for the students via interdisciplinary approaches of classical organic chemistry and polymer chemistry. The foundations for the individual research projects are laid out during the first and second quarters of laboratory instruction when students are introduced to classic synthetic, separation and purification techniques. In the third quarter of lab sequence, in carrying out the individual research projects, the emphasis is shifted towards obtaining and interpreting data for compounds that are not described in the laboratory manual rather than making representative compounds. The research is an open end laboratory project that includes an on-line and printed Chemical Abstracts literature search, molecular computer modeling, a microscale monomer synthesis and characterization, scale-up synthesis, polymer synthesis and characterization. By changing functional groups on the vinyl monomer molecule, the class can explore reactivity of one "family" of compounds and consequently polymers. This approach is based on the integration of genuine research experience with laboratory instruction in accessible but non-trivial manner.

  5. Chemical Vapor Deposition of an Organic Magnet, Vanadium Tetracyanoethylene

    PubMed Central

    Harberts, Megan; Lu, Yu; Yu, Howard; Epstein, Arthur J.; Johnston-Halperin, Ezekiel

    2015-01-01

    Recent progress in the field of organic materials has yielded devices such as organic light emitting diodes (OLEDs) which have advantages not found in traditional materials, including low cost and mechanical flexibility. In a similar vein, it would be advantageous to expand the use of organics into high frequency electronics and spin-based electronics. This work presents a synthetic process for the growth of thin films of the room temperature organic ferrimagnet, vanadium tetracyanoethylene (V[TCNE]x, x~2) by low temperature chemical vapor deposition (CVD). The thin film is grown at <60 °C, and can accommodate a wide variety of substrates including, but not limited to, silicon, glass, Teflon and flexible substrates. The conformal deposition is conducive to pre-patterned and three-dimensional structures as well. Additionally this technique can yield films with thicknesses ranging from 30 nm to several microns. Recent progress in optimization of film growth creates a film whose qualities, such as higher Curie temperature (600 K), improved magnetic homogeneity, and narrow ferromagnetic resonance line-width (1.5 G) show promise for a variety of applications in spintronics and microwave electronics. PMID:26168285

  6. Chemical Vapor Deposition of an Organic Magnet, Vanadium Tetracyanoethylene.

    PubMed

    Harberts, Megan; Lu, Yu; Yu, Howard; Epstein, Arthur J; Johnston-Halperin, Ezekiel

    2015-07-03

    Recent progress in the field of organic materials has yielded devices such as organic light emitting diodes (OLEDs) which have advantages not found in traditional materials, including low cost and mechanical flexibility. In a similar vein, it would be advantageous to expand the use of organics into high frequency electronics and spin-based electronics. This work presents a synthetic process for the growth of thin films of the room temperature organic ferrimagnet, vanadium tetracyanoethylene (V[TCNE]x, x~2) by low temperature chemical vapor deposition (CVD). The thin film is grown at <60 °C, and can accommodate a wide variety of substrates including, but not limited to, silicon, glass, Teflon and flexible substrates. The conformal deposition is conducive to pre-patterned and three-dimensional structures as well. Additionally this technique can yield films with thicknesses ranging from 30 nm to several microns. Recent progress in optimization of film growth creates a film whose qualities, such as higher Curie temperature (600 K), improved magnetic homogeneity, and narrow ferromagnetic resonance line-width (1.5 G) show promise for a variety of applications in spintronics and microwave electronics.

  7. Modeling regional secondary organic aerosol using the Master Chemical Mechanism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Jingyi; Cleveland, Meredith; Ziemba, Luke D.; Griffin, Robert J.; Barsanti, Kelley C.; Pankow, James F.; Ying, Qi

    2015-02-01

    A modified near-explicit Master Chemical Mechanism (MCM, version 3.2) with 5727 species and 16,930 reactions and an equilibrium partitioning module was incorporated into the Community Air Quality Model (CMAQ) to predict the regional concentrations of secondary organic aerosol (SOA) from volatile organic compounds (VOCs) in the eastern United States (US). In addition to the semi-volatile SOA from equilibrium partitioning, reactive surface uptake processes were used to simulate SOA formation due to isoprene epoxydiol, glyoxal and methylglyoxal. The CMAQ-MCM-SOA model was applied to simulate SOA formation during a two-week episode from August 28 to September 7, 2006. The southeastern US has the highest SOA, with a maximum episode-averaged concentration of ∼12 μg m-3. Primary organic aerosol (POA) and SOA concentrations predicted by CMAQ-MCM-SOA agree well with AMS-derived hydrocarbon-like organic aerosol (HOA) and oxygenated organic aerosol (OOA) urban concentrations at the Moody Tower at the University of Houston. Predicted molecular properties of SOA (O/C, H/C, N/C and OM/OC ratios) at the site are similar to those reported in other urban areas, and O/C values agree with measured O/C at the same site. Isoprene epoxydiol is predicted to be the largest contributor to total SOA concentration in the southeast US, followed by methylglyoxal and glyoxal. The semi-volatile SOA components are dominated by products from β-caryophyllene oxidation, but the major species and their concentrations are sensitive to errors in saturation vapor pressure estimation. A uniform decrease of saturation vapor pressure by a factor of 100 for all condensable compounds can lead to a 150% increase in total SOA. A sensitivity simulation with UNIFAC-calculated activity coefficients (ignoring phase separation and water molecule partitioning into the organic phase) led to a 10% change in the predicted semi-volatile SOA concentrations.

  8. Chemical research at Argonne National Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    1997-04-01

    Argonne National Laboratory is a research and development laboratory located 25 miles southwest of Chicago, Illinois. It has more than 200 programs in basic and applied sciences and an Industrial Technology Development Center to help move its technologies to the industrial sector. At Argonne, basic energy research is supported by applied research in diverse areas such as biology and biomedicine, energy conservation, fossil and nuclear fuels, environmental science, and parallel computer architectures. These capabilities translate into technological expertise in energy production and use, advanced materials and manufacturing processes, and waste minimization and environmental remediation, which can be shared with the industrial sector. The Laboratory`s technologies can be applied to help companies design products, substitute materials, devise innovative industrial processes, develop advanced quality control systems and instrumentation, and address environmental concerns. The latest techniques and facilities, including those involving modeling, simulation, and high-performance computing, are available to industry and academia. At Argonne, there are opportunities for industry to carry out cooperative research, license inventions, exchange technical personnel, use unique research facilities, and attend conferences and workshops. Technology transfer is one of the Laboratory`s major missions. High priority is given to strengthening U.S. technological competitiveness through research and development partnerships with industry that capitalize on Argonne`s expertise and facilities. The Laboratory is one of three DOE superconductivity technology centers, focusing on manufacturing technology for high-temperature superconducting wires, motors, bearings, and connecting leads. Argonne National Laboratory is operated by the University of Chicago for the U.S. Department of Energy.

  9. Education: Chemical Research Council Gains Solid Financial Footing.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kiefer, David

    1982-01-01

    Conceived three years ago, the Council for Chemical Research (CCR) is meeting its goal to expedite technological transfer between universities and industry. Although funding is still a problem, membership is growing (37 industries and 128 universities). CCR encourages industrial grants to chemistry/chemical engineering departments and the Chemical…

  10. Research and Development and the Chemical Industry: Implications for Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Aschbacher, Pam

    This paper describes the research and development (R & D) strategy employed in a major chemical manufacturing corporation and compares the strategy to that which is generally used in educational R & D efforts. The paper underscores development practices in the chemical industry as they relate to devleopment activities in education. Some of the…

  11. Research and Development and the Chemical Industry: Implications for Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Aschbacher, Pam

    This paper describes the research and development (R & D) strategy employed in a major chemical manufacturing corporation and compares the strategy to that which is generally used in educational R & D efforts. The paper underscores development practices in the chemical industry as they relate to devleopment activities in education. Some of the…

  12. Mechanical-chemical coupling and self-organization in mudstones.

    SciTech Connect

    Heath, Jason E.; Dewers, Thomas A.

    2010-06-01

    Shales and other mudstones are the most abundant rock types in sedimentary basins, yet have received comparatively little attention. Common as hydrocarbon seals, these are increasingly being targeted as unconventional gas reservoirs, caprocks for CO{sub 2} sequestration, and storage repositories for waste. The small pore and grain size, large specific surface areas, and clay mineral structures lend themselves to rapid reaction rates accompanying changes in stress, pressure, temperature and chemical conditions. Under far from equilibrium conditions, mudrocks display a variety of spatio-temporal self-organized phenomena arising from the nonlinear coupling of mechanics with chemistry. Beginning with a detailed examination of nano-scale pore network structures in mudstones, we discuss the dynamics behind such self-organized phenomena as pressure solitons, chemically-induced flow self focusing and permeability transients, localized compaction, time dependent well-bore failure, and oscillatory osmotic fluxes as they occur in clay-bearing sediments. Examples are draw from experiments, numerical simulation, and the field. These phenomena bear on the ability of these rocks to serve as containment barriers.

  13. The chemical ecology of soil organic matter molecular constituents.

    PubMed

    Simpson, Myrna J; Simpson, André J

    2012-06-01

    Soil organic matter (OM) contains vast stores of carbon, and directly supports microbial, plant, and animal life by retaining essential nutrients and water in the soil. Soil OM plays important roles in biological, chemical, and physical processes within the soil, and arguably plays a major role in maintaining long-term ecological stability in a changing world. Despite its importance, there is a great deal still unknown about soil OM chemical ecology. The development of sophisticated analytical methods have reshaped our understanding of soil OM composition, which is now believed to be comprised of plant and microbial products at various stages of decomposition. The methods also have recently been applied to study environmental change in various settings and have provided unique insight with respect to soil OM chemical ecology. The goal of this review is to highlight the methods used to characterize soil OM structure, source, and degradation that have enabled precise observations of OM and associated ecological shifts. Although the chemistry of soil OM is important in its overall fate in ecosystems, the studies conducted to date suggest that ecological function is not defined by soil OM chemistry alone. The long-standing questions regarding soil OM stability and recalcitrance will likely be answered when several molecular methods are used in tandem to closely examine structure, source, age, degradation stage, and interactions of specific OM components in soil.

  14. Chemical and Spatial Microscopy of Individual Organic Aerosols

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tivanski, Alexei V.; Hopkins, Rebecca J.; Gilles, Mary K.

    2008-03-01

    Carbonaceous particles originating from biomass burning can account for a large fraction of organic aerosols in a local environment. Presently, their composition, physical, and chemical properties as well as their environmental effects are largely unknown. A distinct type of biomass burn particles, called ``tar balls'', have been observed in a number of field campaigns, both in fresh and aged smoke. They are characterized by their spherical morphology, high carbon content and ability to efficiently scatter and absorb light. Here, a combination of scanning transmission x-ray microscopy and near edge x-ray absorption fine structure spectroscopy is used to determine the shape, structure and size-dependent chemical composition of 150 individual tar ball particles ranging in size from 0.15 to 1.2 μm. Oxygen is present primarily as carboxylic carbonyls and oxygen-substituted alkyl functional groups. The observed chemical composition is distinctly different from black carbon and more closely resembles high molecular weight humic-like substances. A detailed examination of the carbonyl intensity as a function of particle size reveals the presence of a thin oxygenated interface layer on the tar balls, indicative of atmospheric processing of biomass burn particles.

  15. Wildlife ecological screening levels for inhalation of volatile organic chemicals.

    PubMed

    Gallegos, Patricia; Lutz, Jill; Markwiese, James; Ryti, Randall; Mirenda, Rich

    2007-06-01

    For most chemicals, evaluation of ecological risk typically does not address inhalation because ingestion dominates exposure. However, burrowing ecological receptors have an increased exposure potential from inhalation at sites contaminated with volatile chemicals in the subsurface. Evaluation of ecological risk from contaminants like volatile organic chemicals (VOCs) is constrained by a lack of relevant ecological screening levels (ESLs). To address this need, inhalation ESLs were developed for 16 VOCs: Acetone, benzene, carbon tetrachloride, chloroform, chloromethane, dichlorodifluoromethane, 1,1-dichloroethane, 1,2-dichloroethane, 1,1-dichloroethene, methylene chloride, tetrachloroethene, toluene, 1,1,1-trichloroethane, trichloroethene, trichlorofluoromethane, and total xylene. These ESLs are based on Botta's pocket gopher (Thomomys bottae) as a representative fossorial receptor. The ESLs are presented with an emphasis on the process for developing inhalation toxicity reference values to illustrate the selection of suitable toxicity data and effect levels from the literature. The resulting ESLs provide a quantitative method for evaluating ecological risk of VOCs through comparison to relevant exposure data such as direct burrow-air measurements. The toxicity reference value development and ESL calculation processes and assumptions detailed here are provided as bases from which risk assessors can use or refine to suit site-specific needs with respect to toxicity and exposure inputs.

  16. 40 CFR 455.20 - Applicability; description of the organic pesticide chemicals manufacturing subcategory.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... organic pesticide chemicals manufacturing subcategory. 455.20 Section 455.20 Protection of Environment... Organic Pesticide Chemicals Manufacturing Subcategory § 455.20 Applicability; description of the organic pesticide chemicals manufacturing subcategory. (a) For the purpose of calculating and applying...

  17. 40 CFR 455.30 - Applicability; description of the metallo-organic pesticide chemicals manufacturing subcategory.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... metallo-organic pesticide chemicals manufacturing subcategory. 455.30 Section 455.30 Protection of... Metallo-Organic Pesticide Chemicals Manufacturing Subcategory § 455.30 Applicability; description of the metallo-organic pesticide chemicals manufacturing subcategory. The provisions of this subpart...

  18. 40 CFR 455.30 - Applicability; description of the metallo-organic pesticide chemicals manufacturing subcategory.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... metallo-organic pesticide chemicals manufacturing subcategory. 455.30 Section 455.30 Protection of... Metallo-Organic Pesticide Chemicals Manufacturing Subcategory § 455.30 Applicability; description of the metallo-organic pesticide chemicals manufacturing subcategory. The provisions of this subpart...

  19. 78 FR 37222 - Columbia Organic Chemical Company Site, Columbia, Richland County, South Carolina; Notice of...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-06-20

    ... AGENCY Columbia Organic Chemical Company Site, Columbia, Richland County, South Carolina; Notice of... Columbia Organic Chemical Company Superfund Site located in Columbia, Richland County, South Carolina. The.... Submit your comments by site name Columbia Organic Chemical Company by one of the following methods:...

  20. Research and Development Exemption for New Chemical Review under TSCA

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Section 5(h)(3) of TSCA allows EPA to exempt manufacturers of chemical substances from the notice requirements if they manufacture it in small quantities for the purposed of research and development. This page gives an overview of this exemption.

  1. ENDOCRINE DISRUPTING CHEMICAL RISK MANAGEMENT RESEARCH IN THE US EPA'S OFFICE OF RESEARCH AND DEVELOPMENT

    EPA Science Inventory

    Endocrine disrupting chemicals (EDCs) are receiving increasing media and scientific attention. Concerns about these chemicals stem from the possibility of serious human and wildlife effects and environmental persistence. The US EPA Office of Research and Development's National ...

  2. ENDOCRINE DISRUPTING CHEMICAL RISK MANAGEMENT RESEARCH IN THE US EPA'S OFFICE OF RESEARCH AND DEVELOPMENT

    EPA Science Inventory

    Endocrine disrupting chemicals (EDCs) are receiving increasing media and scientific attention. Concerns about these chemicals stem from the possibility of serious human and wildlife effects and environmental persistence. The US EPA Office of Research and Development's National ...

  3. Evaluation of Chemical and Atmospheric Sciences Research

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1984-09-09

    I Geil 48 Benesch 49 Niedenzu B/B+ 1 Marchand 26 El Batouay 9 Tuazon B 24 Maddou 33 Thompson23 Winefordner 21) Lauer 30) Me-’nzer 0’ SalK 7 Lin C 28...APOSR CHEMISTRY RESEARCH- EVALUATION CATE3GORY I CATEGORY TI A+36 Jonas 43 Field A 06 Hubbard 25 Williams 29 Bernstein 24 Smalley 19 Winograd * 14 Rice

  4. Summaries of FY 1979 research in the chemical sciences

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1980-05-01

    The purpose of this report is to help those interested in research supported by the Department of Energy's Division of Chemical Sciences, which is one of six Divisions of the Office of Basic Energy Sciences in the Office of Energy Research. Chemists, physicists, chemical engineers and others who are considering the possibility of proposing research for support by this Division wll find the booklet useful for gauging the scope of the program in basic research, and the relationship of their interests to the overall program. These smmaries are intended to provide a rapid means for becoming acquainted with the Chemical Sciences program for members of the scientific and technological public, and interested persons in the Legislative and Executive Branches of the Government, in order to indicate the areas of research supported by the Division and energy technologies which may be advanced by use of basic knowledge discovered in this program. Scientific excellence is a major criterion applied in the selection of research supported by Chemical Sciences. Another important consideration is the identifying of chemical, physical and chemical engineering subdisciplines which are advancing in ways which produce new information related to energy, needed data, or new ideas.

  5. Concept Maps as a Tool for Teaching Organic Chemical Reactions.

    PubMed

    Šket, Barbara; Aleksij Glažar, Saša; Vogrinc, Janez

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of the research was to establish the impact of the application of a concept map in chemistry lessons on the effective solving of tasks with organic reactions content. In the first phase of the research, a concept map was produced representing the reactions of hydrocarbons, organic halogenated compounds and organic oxygen compounds, and in the second phase the produced concept map was introduced in lessons. Its impact was tested on a sample consisting of 186 students (average age of 17.8 years), who were divided into a control group (88 students) and an experimental group (98 students). Prior to the experiment, the two groups were equalised in terms of their level of development of formal logical thinking and their average grade in chemistry. A knowledge test, consisting of five problem tasks comprising multiple parts, was used as a quantitative instrument for measuring the impact of the applied concept map. The content of the knowledge test was selected on the basis of the chemistry lesson plan (reactions of organic oxygen compounds) for general upper secondary schools (in Slovenian: gimnazije). An analysis of the task solving showed statistically significant differences in the responses of the experimental group members and the control group members (experimental group M = 15.9; SD = 6.33; control group M = 13.6; SD = 7.93; p = 0.03). The produced concept map contributed to the more effective interrelation of concepts and, consequently, to more effective problem task solving.

  6. Recent chemical research projects in pyrochemistry

    SciTech Connect

    Long, J L

    1985-04-29

    The purpose is to create, define parametric limits for, and transfer to the Pyrochemical Development group a pyrochemical (electrochemical) process for the recovery of spent anodes from plutonium electrorefining. The basis for this endeavor is the idea of modifying the character of spent anodes to obtain and maintain a liquid state during continued electrolytic depletion of plutonium. There are many alloying agents or combinations of alloying agents which could be added. The one chosen for the initial work was gallium because of its low melting point and low vapor pressure. From the Pu-Ga phase diagram, a composition of approximately 78 atomic percent gallium (50 weight percent) was chosen for the first solubilization experiment. One hundred grams each of spent anode and gallium were heated under 490 grams of NaCl-KCl-MGCl/sub 2/ to 740 C, held for one hour and stirred for one hour. Examination of the microstructure of the resultant cooled mixture indicated that 90% of the surface was a single phase containing near-equal concentrations of plutonium and gallium. The microstructure also contained inclusions of various impurities. The probability of anodically depleting the mixture of plutonium and gallium down to a very low level is high, based upon the electro-chemical potentials for plutonium and gallium in chloride systems. This work has the potential to provide a single step process for the removal of plutonium from spent anodes to the level where the remaining Ga-rich material can be discarded. Reuse of the Ga-rich material is also a possibility. The plutonium should be recoverable as a metal phase.

  7. Aqueous organic chemistry in the atmosphere: sources and chemical processing of organic aerosols.

    PubMed

    McNeill, V Faye

    2015-02-03

    Over the past decade, it has become clear that aqueous chemical processes occurring in cloud droplets and wet atmospheric particles are an important source of organic atmospheric particulate matter. Reactions of water-soluble volatile (or semivolatile) organic gases (VOCs or SVOCs) in these aqueous media lead to the formation of highly oxidized organic particulate matter (secondary organic aerosol; SOA) and key tracer species, such as organosulfates. These processes are often driven by a combination of anthropogenic and biogenic emissions, and therefore their accurate representation in models is important for effective air quality management. Despite considerable progress, mechanistic understanding of some key aqueous processes is still lacking, and these pathways are incompletely represented in 3D atmospheric chemistry and air quality models. In this article, the concepts, historical context, and current state of the science of aqueous pathways of SOA formation are discussed.

  8. Genotoxic activity of organic chemicals in drinking water.

    PubMed

    Meier, J R

    1988-11-01

    The information summarized in this review provides substantial evidence for the widespread presence of genotoxins in drinking water. In many, if not most cases, the genotoxic activity can be directly attributed to the chlorination stage of drinking water treatment. The genotoxic activity appears to originate primarily from reactions of chlorine with humic substances in the source waters. Genotoxic activity in drinking water concentrates has been most frequently demonstrated using bacterial mutagenicity tests but results with mammalian cell assay systems are generally consistent with the findings from the bacterial assays. There is currently no evidence for genotoxic damage following in vivo exposures to animals. In some locations genotoxic contaminants of probable industrial and/or agricultural origin occur in the source waters and contribute substantially to the genotoxic activity of finished drinking waters. The method used for sample concentration can have an important bearing on study results. In particular, organic acids account for most of the mutagenicity of chlorinated drinking water, and their recovery from water requires a sample acidification step prior to extraction or XAD resin adsorption. Considerable work has been done to determine the identity of the compounds responsible for the mutagenicity of organic concentrates of drinking water. Recently, one class of acidic compounds, the chlorinated hydroxyfuranones, has been shown to be responsible for a major part of the mutagenic activity. Strategies for drinking water treatment that have been evaluated with respect to reduction of genotoxins in drinking water include granular activated carbon (GAC) filtration, chemical destruction, and the use of alternative means of treatment (i.e., ozone, chlorine dioxide, and monochloramine). GAC treatment has been found to be effective for removal of mutagens from drinking water even after the GAC is beyond its normal use for organic carbon removal. All disinfectant

  9. Feasibility Study of the Development of a Specialized Computer System of Organic Chemical Signatures of Spectral Data.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Scholtz, R. G.; And Others

    This final report of a feasibility study describes the research performed in assessing the requirements for a chemical signature file and search scheme for organic compound identification and information retrieval. The research performed to determined feasibility of identifying an unknown compound involved screening the compound against a file of…

  10. INTEGRATED LABORATORY AND FIELD CHARACTERIZATION OF ORGANIC CARBON IN PM 2.5 FORMED THROUGH CHEMICAL REACTIONS

    EPA Science Inventory

    An integrated laboratory and field research program is underway at the National Exposure Research Laboratory (NERL) to characterize organic carbon in PM2.5 (particulate matter) formed through chemical reactions. Information from this study will provide critical data ne...

  11. The applications of chemical thermodynamics and chemical kinetics to planetary atmospheres research

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fegley, Bruce, Jr.

    1990-01-01

    A review of the applications of chemical thermodynamics and chemical kinetics to planetary atmospheres research during the past four decades is presented with an emphasis on chemical equilibrium models and thermochemical kinetics. Several current problems in planetary atmospheres research such as the origin of the atmospheres of the terrestrial planets, atmosphere-surface interactions on Venus and Mars, deep mixing in the atmospheres of the gas giant planets, and the origin of the atmospheres of outer planet satellites all require laboratory data on the kinetics of thermochemical reactions for their solution.

  12. The applications of chemical thermodynamics and chemical kinetics to planetary atmospheres research

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fegley, Bruce, Jr.

    1990-05-01

    A review of the applications of chemical thermodynamics and chemical kinetics to planetary atmospheres research during the past four decades is presented with an emphasis on chemical equilibrium models and thermochemical kinetics. Several current problems in planetary atmospheres research such as the origin of the atmospheres of the terrestrial planets, atmosphere-surface interactions on Venus and Mars, deep mixing in the atmospheres of the gas giant planets, and the origin of the atmospheres of outer planet satellites all require laboratory data on the kinetics of thermochemical reactions for their solution.

  13. Transferring Chemical Research to a Spin-Off Initiative in Health Care: The Lipidomic Approach

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ferreri, Carla; Chatgilialoglu, Chryssostomos; Ferreri, Rosaria

    2008-01-01

    Lipidomics is an emerging discipline in life sciences related to the lipid metabolism of living organisms. In the last decade chemical and biological research has attributed very important roles to membrane phospholipids in relationship to free radical stress and metabolic situations. An entrepreneurial initiative for diagnostic tools and health…

  14. Transferring Chemical Research to a Spin-Off Initiative in Health Care: The Lipidomic Approach

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ferreri, Carla; Chatgilialoglu, Chryssostomos; Ferreri, Rosaria

    2008-01-01

    Lipidomics is an emerging discipline in life sciences related to the lipid metabolism of living organisms. In the last decade chemical and biological research has attributed very important roles to membrane phospholipids in relationship to free radical stress and metabolic situations. An entrepreneurial initiative for diagnostic tools and health…

  15. Honeywell's organic air vehicle chemical-biological sensing platform

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cole, Barry E.; Krafthefer, Brian; Knee, Daniel; Fulton, Vaughn M.; Law, Kristen

    2004-12-01

    Unmanned air vehicles (UAVs) today are mostly used for reconnaissance and sometimes weapons delivery. Remote sensing of chemical-biological (CB) agents is another beneficial use of UAVs. While remote sensing of CB agents can be done by LIDAR spectroscopy, this technology is less spatially precise and less sensitive than actual measurements on a collected sample. One family of UAVs of particularly unique benefit for CB sampling and in-flight analysis is the Honeywell family of Organic Air Vehicles (OAVs). This vehicle with its ability to hover and stare has the unique ability among UAVs to collect and analyze chem-bio samples from a specific location over extended periods of time. Such collections are not possible with other micro-air-vehicles (MAVs) that only operate in fly-by mode. This paper describes some of the Honeywell OAV features that are conducive to CB detection.

  16. Characterization of volatile organic chemical emissions from carpet cushions

    SciTech Connect

    Schaeffer, V.H.; Bhooshan, B.; Chen, S.B.; Sonenthal, J.S.; Hodgson, A.T.

    1996-09-01

    The U.S. Consumer Product Safety Commission is investigating chemical emissions from carpet systems in order to determine whether the emissions may be responsible for the numerous health complaints associated with carpet installation. As part of this effort, a study was conducted to identify and quantify volatile organic compounds (VOCs) released into the air by five major product types of new carpet cushions. Cushion samples were tested in small-volume dynamic chambers over a six-hour exposure period. Airborne VOCs collected on multisorbent samplers were identified using sensitive gas chromatography/mass spectrometry. A separate chamber method was developed to screen polyurethane cushions for emissions of toluene diisocyanates (TDI). Over 100 VOCs, spanning a broad range of chemical classes, were emitted from 17 carpet cushions. The pattern of emitted VOCs varied between and among product types, which reflects probable differences in manufacturing processes and ingredients. No significant quantities of TDI or formaldehyde were released by any cushions. Emission profiles were characterized for total VOCs and for the predominant individual VOCs. As a group, the synthetic fiber cushion samples emitted the lowest quantities of VOCs. Cushion samples purchased from carpet retailers released lesser amounts of VOCs than samples of the same cushion types obtained directly from the manufacturing mills. 11 refs., 2 figs., 3 tabs.

  17. 2011 Chemical Reactions at Surfaces Gordon Research Conference

    SciTech Connect

    Peter Stair

    2011-02-11

    The Gordon Research Conference on Chemical Reactions at Surfaces is dedicated to promoting and advancing the fundamental science of interfacial chemistry and physics by providing surface scientists with the foremost venue for presentation and discussion of research occurring at the frontiers of their fields.

  18. Utilization of oil shales and basic research in organic geochemistry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burnham, A. K.

    1982-01-01

    Summarized are current research needs relating to oil shale utilization which might also provide new insight into the organic geochemistry of the Green River formation. There are two general topics which cross boundaries and are particularly worthy of emphasis. The first is a study of changes in the kerogen structure and biological markers with depth and location, and how these changes affect the pyrolysis products. This information would be particularly useful to the retort diagnostic methods. It might also lead to a better chemical reaction model of diagenesis and metagenesis. The second is a study of the heteroatom chemistry of the kerogen and how it relates to mineral matter and trace metals. This would be useful not only to present utilization methods, but also might suggest new nonthermal methods of organic material recovery.

  19. Contract research organizations in oncology clinical research: Challenges and opportunities.

    PubMed

    Roberts, Daniel A; Kantarjian, Hagop M; Steensma, David P

    2016-05-15

    Contract research organizations (CROs) represent a multibillion dollar industry that is firmly embedded in the contemporary clinical trial process. Over the past 30 years, and especially within the last decade, the reach of CROs has extended to service all phases of drug trials in an increasingly global research environment. The presence of CROs is particularly noticeable in medical oncology because of the large number of investigational compounds developed to treat cancer that are currently undergoing testing in human subjects. Although limited data are available with which to objectively define the effects that CROs have had on the clinical trial process, with the expansion of these organizations, several reports have called into question whether ethical and professional standards in research conduct are at times secondary to economic considerations. CROs can add considerable value to the clinical trial process, but difficulty communicating with CRO representatives and time spent answering trivial data queries generated by CROs are current obstacles for study site personnel interacting with CROs. Further study of the effect of the CRO industry on the clinical trial process is needed to ensure efficient data collection and patient safety while collaboratively developing novel therapies in an expedited fashion. Cancer 2016;122:1476-82. © 2016 American Cancer Society. © 2016 American Cancer Society.

  20. Modeling of the accumulation of organic lipophilic chemicals in earthworms

    SciTech Connect

    Belfroid, A.; Seinen, W.; Leeuwen, K. van; Hermens, J.; Gestel, K. van

    1994-12-31

    For aquatic and terrestrial species living in contaminated sediments and soils it is assumed that the major route of uptake of organic lipophilic compounds is by passive diffusion of the compound dissolved in the interstitial water. Dietary uptake will only be important for extremely lipophilic compounds with log K{sub ow} larger than 5--6. An accumulation study with earthworms in OECD artificial soil confirmed this hypothesis. However, the authors also observed dietary uptake in earthworms after feeding them with food contaminated with three chlorobenzenes, PCB153 and octachloronaphthalene. Still, the question remained whether dietary uptake is an important route of exposure. Therefore, a model was developed that, unlike for example the equilibrium partition theory, incorporates two routes of uptake. The model can be used to estimate the accumulation of inert organic chemicals with log Kow 2--7 in earthworms, but also to determine the relative contribution of the two routes of uptake to the total body burden. It will be shown that the relative contribution depends on the lipophilicity of the compound and also on the type of soil.

  1. Enhancing Research in the Chemical Sciences at Predominantly Undergraduate Institutions. Recommendations of a Recent Undergraduate Research Summit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karukstis, Kerry K.; Wenzel, Thomas J.

    2004-04-01

    A recent Undergraduate Research Summit supported by the National Science Foundation and held at Bates College focused on issues involved in undertaking and sustaining chemistry research at predominantly undergraduate institutions (PUIs). Topics from a series of white papers framed discussions of the definition of undergraduate research, assessment of undergraduate research, the value of diversity within the the chemical sciences, the design of research-supportive curriculum, the importance of research infrastructure, the value of collaborations, and sustaining research productivity throughout a career. The summit produced a report that provides recommendations on how to enhance the extent, quality, productivity, and visibility of chemistry research at PUIs. Recommendations in this report are intended for individuals, departments, academic institutions, funding agencies, and other organizations. Several key conclusions are described. Plans to disseminate these recommendations to the chemistry community are outlined, including several workshops at the Tenth National Conference of the Council of Undergraduate Research hosted by the University of Wisconsin La Crosse in June 2004.

  2. Research Progress on Chemical Constituents of Lonicerae japonicae flos

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Lingna; Jiang, Qiu; Hu, Jinghong; Zhang, Yongqing; Li, Jia

    2016-01-01

    Lonicerae japonicae flos is commonly used in traditional Chinese medicine for thousands of years with confirmed curative effects. Except for medicine, it is also used in healthy food, cosmetics, and soft beverages for its specific activities. Therefore, the chemical constituents, mainly including organic acids, flavonoids, iridoids, triterpenoids, and volatile oils, have been well studied by many scholars in recent years and a comprehensive and systematic review on chemical constituents of Lonicerae japonicae flos is indispensable. This paper aims at reviewing the chemical components of LJF in recent years through searching for the literatures both at home and abroad. Our results show that 212 components have been isolated from Lonicerae japonicae flos, including 27 flavonoids, 40 organic acids, 83 iridoids, 17 triterpenoids, and 45 other compounds, which could lay a foundation for the further application of Lonicerae japonicae flos. PMID:27403439

  3. Future research trends in the major chemical language of bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Venturi, Vittorio; Subramoni, Sujatha

    2009-01-01

    Microbiology was revolutionized in the 1990’s by the discovery that many different bacterial species coordinate their behavior when they form a group. In fact, bacteria are now considered multicellular organisms capable of communicating and changing behavior in relation to their cell-density; since 1994 this has been called quorum sensing. This group behavior ensures survival and propagation of the community in many natural environments. Bacterial intercellular communication is mediated by different chemical signals that are synthesized by bacteria which are then either secreted or diffused in the external environment. Bacteria are then able to detect the type and concentration of the signal resulting in regulation of gene expression and, consequently, a synchronized response by the community. The predominant signalling molecules produced by Gram-negative bacteria are N-acyl derivatives of homoserine lactone (AHLs) which have been shown to be produced by over seventy bacterial species. In this essay we discuss the importance of quorum sensing via AHLs and highlight current and future trends in this important field of research. PMID:19794815

  4. Future research trends in the major chemical language of bacteria.

    PubMed

    Venturi, Vittorio; Subramoni, Sujatha

    2009-01-01

    Microbiology was revolutionized in the 1990's by the discovery that many different bacterial species coordinate their behavior when they form a group. In fact, bacteria are now considered multicellular organisms capable of communicating and changing behavior in relation to their cell-density; since 1994 this has been called quorum sensing. This group behavior ensures survival and propagation of the community in many natural environments. Bacterial intercellular communication is mediated by different chemical signals that are synthesized by bacteria which are then either secreted or diffused in the external environment. Bacteria are then able to detect the type and concentration of the signal resulting in regulation of gene expression and, consequently, a synchronized response by the community. The predominant signalling molecules produced by Gram-negative bacteria are N-acyl derivatives of homoserine lactone (AHLs) which have been shown to be produced by over seventy bacterial species. In this essay we discuss the importance of quorum sensing via AHLs and highlight current and future trends in this important field of research.

  5. Research briefs of the Physical and Chemical Sciences Center

    SciTech Connect

    Vook, F.L.; Smith, W.L.

    1993-12-31

    As Sandia National Laboratories and the Physical and Chemical Sciences Center develop an increasingly diverse set of customers, research partners, and Cooperative Research and Development Agreements (CRADA`s) with industry, there is a need for providing more concise information describing their technical achievements and capabilities. This publication, Research Briefs, is designed to inform the present and potential partners in research and technology advancement. Their research emphasizes semiconductor physics, electronic materials, surface physics and chemistry, plasma and chemical processing sciences, lasers and optics, vision science, ion-solid interactions and defect physics, and advanced materials physics. The specific programs they pursue are driven by the research goals which are greatly influenced by interactions with the government and industrial customers.

  6. Organic chemical degradation by remote study of the redox conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fernandez, P. M.; Revil, A.; Binley, A. M.; Bloem, E.; French, H. K.

    2014-12-01

    Monitoring the natural (and enhanced) degradation of organic contaminants is essential for managing groundwater quality in many parts of the world. Contaminated sites often have limited access, hence non-intrusive methods for studying redox processes, which drive the degradation of organic compounds, are required. One example is the degradation of de-icing chemicals (glycols and organic salts) released to the soil near airport runways during winter. This issue has been broadly studied at Oslo airport, Gardermoen, Norway using intrusive and non-intrusive methods. Here, we report on laboratory experiments that aim to study the potential of using a self-potential, DCresistivity, and time-domain induced polarization for geochemical characterization of the degradation of Propylene Glycol (PG). PG is completely miscible in water, does not adsorb to soil particles and does not contribute to the electrical conductivity of the soil water. When the contaminant is in the unsaturated zone near the water table, the oxygen is quickly consumed and the gas exchange with the surface is insufficient to ensure aerobic degradation, which is faster than anaerobic degradation. Since biodegradation of PG is highly oxygen demanding, anaerobic pockets can exist causing iron and manganese reduction. It is hypothesised that nitrate would boost the degradation rate under such conditions. In our experiment, we study PG degradation in a sand tank. We provide the system with an electron highway to bridge zones with different redox potential. This geo-battery system is characterized by self-potential, resistivity and induced polarization anomalies. An example of preliminary results with self-potential at two different times of the experiment can be seen in the illustration. These will be supplemented with more direct information on the redox chemistry: in-situ water sampling, pH, redox potential and electrical conductivity measurements. In parallel, a series of batch experiments have been

  7. pH-Dependent sorption of acidic organic chemicals to soil organic matter.

    PubMed

    Tülp, Holger C; Fenner, Kathrin; Schwarzenbach, René P; Goss, Kai-Uwe

    2009-12-15

    Due to their increased polarity, many contemporary biologically active chemicals exhibit acid functions and may thus dissociate to their anionic conjugated base at pH values typically present in the environment. Despite its negative charge, soil organic matter (SOM) has been demonstrated to be the main sorbent in soils, even for the anionic species of organic acids. Nevertheless, few data exist that allow for a systematic interpretation of the sorption of organic acids into SOM. Therefore, in this study, the sorption of the neutral and anionic species of 32 diverse organic acids belonging to nine different chemical groups to SOM was investigated. Partition coefficients were determined from HPLC retention volumes on a column packed with peat, at three Ca(2+)-concentrations and over a pH range of 4.5-7.5. The influence of Ca(2+)-concentrations on anion sorption was small (factor 2 in the usual environmental Ca(2+)-concentration range) and independent of molecular structure. Generally, the organic carbon-water partition coefficients, K(oc), of both the neutral and anionic species increased with increasing molecular size and decreased with increasing polarity. At an environmentally relevant Ca(2+)-concentration of 10 mM, the investigated anions sorbed between a factor of 7-60 less than the corresponding neutral acid. This factor was more homogeneous within a group of structurally related compounds. These results indicate that while similar nonionic interactions seem to govern the partitioning of both the neutral and anionic species into SOM, the electrostatic interactions of the anionic species with SOM are a complex and currently not well understood function of the type of acidic functional group. The HPLC-based, flow through method presented in this study was shown to yield consistent results for a wide range of organic acids in a high-throughput manner. It should therefore prove highly useful in further investigating how different acidic functional groups affect

  8. Screening chemicals for the potential to be persistent organic pollutants: a case study of Arctic contaminants.

    PubMed

    Brown, Trevor N; Wania, Frank

    2008-07-15

    A large and ever-increasing number of chemicals are used in commerce, and researchers and regulators have struggled to ascertain that these chemicals do not threaten human health or cause environmental or ecological damage. The presence of persistent organic pollutants (POPs) in remote environments such as the Arctic is of special concern and has international regulatory implications. Responding to the need for a way to identify chemicals of high concern, a methodology has been developed which compares experimentally measured properties, or values predicted from chemical structure alone, to a set of screening criteria. These criteria include partitioning properties that allow for accumulation in the physical Arctic environment and in the Arctic human food chain, and resistance to atmospheric oxidation. Atthe same time we quantify the extent of structural resemblance to a group of known Arctic contaminants. Comparison of the substances that are identified by a mechanistic description of the processes that lead to Arctic contamination with those substances that are structurally similar to known Arctic contaminants reveals the strengths and limitations of either approach. Within a data set of more than 100,000 distinct industrial chemicals, the methodology identifies 120 high production volume chemicals which are structurally similarto known Arctic contaminants and/or have partitioning properties that suggest they are potential Arctic contaminants.

  9. 40 CFR 455.20 - Applicability; description of the organic pesticide chemicals manufacturing subcategory.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... organic pesticide chemicals manufacturing subcategory. 455.20 Section 455.20 Protection of Environment... Pesticide Chemicals Manufacturing Subcategory § 455.20 Applicability; description of the organic pesticide chemicals manufacturing subcategory. (a) For the purpose of calculating and applying effluent...

  10. 40 CFR 455.20 - Applicability; description of the organic pesticide chemicals manufacturing subcategory.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... organic pesticide chemicals manufacturing subcategory. 455.20 Section 455.20 Protection of Environment... Pesticide Chemicals Manufacturing Subcategory § 455.20 Applicability; description of the organic pesticide chemicals manufacturing subcategory. (a) For the purpose of calculating and applying effluent...

  11. Effects of water hardness and dissolved organic material on bioavailability of selected organic chemicals.

    PubMed

    Akkanen, J; Kukkonen, J V

    2001-10-01

    The influence of water hardness and dissolved organic matter (DOM) on bioavailability of organic chemicals to Daphnia magna was studied by using benzo[a]pyrene (BaP), pyrene, atrazine, and 3,3',4,4'-tetrachlorobiphenyl (TCB) as model compounds. Two types of DOM were used, namely Lake Kontiolampi, Joensuu, Finland water (KL) and Nordic reference fulvic acid (NoFA) dissolved in artificial freshwater. Binding of the four contaminants by KL DOM decreased with increasing water hardness. Furthermore, increasing hardness reduced the binding of BaP and pyrene to NoFA. The binding of atrazine and TCB by NoFA was low and was not significantly affected by water hardness. In the DOM-free samples, the bioconcentration of the four contaminants in D. magna usually was not affected by water hardness. In the presence of DOM, the bioconcentration factors (BCFs) were lower (except for atrazine) than in the DOM-free controls. In the presence of both types of DOM, increasing water hardness resulted in higher BCFs for BaP. The bioconcentration of pyrene and TCB increased with increasing water hardness in the presence of KL DOM. In conclusion, the effects of DOM and water hardness on bioavailability of hydrophobic chemicals depend on the type of chemical and on the properties of DOM.

  12. The energetic and chemical fingerprints of persistent soil organic carbon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barré, Pierre; Plante, Alain F.; Cécillon, Lauric; Lutfalla, Suzanne; Baudin, François; Bernard, Sylvain; Christensen, Bent T.; Fernandez, Jose M.; Houot, Sabine; Kätterer, Thomas; Macdonald, Andy; van Oort, Folkert; Le Guillou, Corentin; Chenu, Claire

    2016-04-01

    A better understanding of soil organic carbon (SOC) persistence is needed to better predict SOC vulnerability to global change. The absence of convincing physical or chemical procedures to define, characterize or isolate relatively labile versus persistent SOC pools makes the study of persistent SOC difficult. Long-term bare fallow (LTBF) experiments, in which C inputs have been stopped for several decades, provide a unique opportunity to study persistent SOC without the inherent artefacts induced by extraction procedures, the hypothesis being that SOC is gradually enriched in persistent C with time as labile components decompose. We determined the evolution of thermal and chemical characteristics of bulk SOC in five LTBF experiments across Europe: Askov (DK), Grignon (FR), Rothamsted (UK), Ultuna (SW) and Versailles (FR), using a multi-technique approach involving Rock-Eval pyrolysis, thermogravimetry and differential scanning calorimetry (TG-DSC), mid-infrared diffuse reflectance spectroscopy (DRIFT-MIRS), and Near Edge X-Ray Absorption Fine Structure (NEXAFS). Results of Rock-Eval and TG analyses showed that the temperature needed to combust the SOC increased with bare fallow duration at all sites. Conversely, SOC energy density (in mJ mg-1 C) measured by DSC decreased with bare fallow duration. Rock-Eval pyrolysis results showed that hydrogen index (HI) tended to decrease with bare fallow duration whereas the oxygen index (OI) did not show consistent trends across sites. NEXAFS signals presented little differences and were dominated by carboxyl peak. Nonetheless, NEXAFS results showed a trend of increasing carboxyl groups and decreasing ketone and amide groups with bare fallow duration. Due to the mineral matrix, only a reduced part of the DRIFT-MIRS signals has been used. We observed that the bulk chemistry of aliphatic SOC (CH3 vs. CH2 functional groups) showed different trends for the different sites. Our results showed that in spite of the heterogeneity of

  13. Federal agencies active in chemical industry-related research and development

    SciTech Connect

    1995-09-29

    The Energy Policy Act of 1992 calls for a program to further the commercialization of renewable energy and energy efficient technologies for the industrial sector.. The primary objective of the Office of Industrial Technologies Chemical Industry Team is to work in partnership with the US chemical industry to maximize economic, energy, and environmental benefits through research and development of innovative technologies. This document was developed to inventory organizations within the federal government on current chemical industry-related research and development. While an amount of funding or number of projects specifically relating to chemical industry research and development was not defined in all organizations, identified were about 60 distinct organizations representing 7 cabinet-level departments and 4 independent agencies, with research efforts exceeding $3.5 billion in fiscal year 1995. Effort were found to range from less than $500 thousand per year at the Departments of Agriculture and the Interior to over $100 million per year at the Departments of Commerce, Defense, Energy, and Health and Human Services and the National Aeronautics and Space Administration. The total number of projects in these programs exceeded 10,000. This document is complete to the extent that agencies volunteered information. Additions, corrections, and changes are encouraged and will be incorporated in future revisions.

  14. Disposition of xenobiotic chemicals and metabolites in marine organisms.

    PubMed Central

    Varanasi, U; Stein, J E

    1991-01-01

    Studies with several bottom fish species from urban waterways show that of the identified xenobiotic chemicals in bottom sediments, polycylic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) are the most strongly associated with the prevalence of liver lesions, including neoplasms. Accordingly, there is concern about the transfer of contaminants, such as PAHs, from aquatic species to humans. Because PAHs exert their toxicity only after being biotransformed, increasing attention has been focused on the ability of aquatic organisms to metabolize these chemicals. Overall, the results of both laboratory and field studies show that generally low levels (nanograms per gram wet weight) of a few low molecular weight PAHs may be present in edible tissue of fish from contaminated areas and that high molecular weight PAHs, such as the carcinogen benzo(a)pyrene, will rarely be detected because of extensive metabolism. Additionally, the results from a few studies suggest that even though interactions between xenobiotics can affect both biochemical and physiological systems to alter the disposition of PAHs in fish, these interactions do not markedly change the relative proportions of metabolites to parent PAH in tissues. Thus, these studies clearly demonstrate that to obtain some insight into the questions of whether there is any risk to human health from consuming fish and crustaceans from urban areas, techniques must be developed that measure metabolites of carcinogens, such as PAHs, in edible tissue. Initial attempts may focus on semiquantitative methods that permit rapid assessment of the level of metabolites in edible tissues of fish and crustaceans from many urban areas.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) Images FIGURE 4. FIGURE 4. FIGURE 4. PMID:2050086

  15. Disposition of xenobiotic chemicals and metabolites in marine organisms

    SciTech Connect

    Varanasi, U.; Stein, J.E. )

    1991-01-01

    Studies with several bottom fish species from urban waterways show that of the identified xenobiotic chemicals in bottom sediments, polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) are the most strongly associated with the prevalence of liver lesions, including neoplasms. Accordingly, there is concern about the transfer of contaminants, such as PAHs, from aquatic species to humans. Because PAHs exert their toxicity only after being biotransformed, increasing attention has been focused on the ability of aquatic organisms to metabolize these chemicals. Overall, the results of both laboratory and field studies show that generally low levels of a few low molecular weight PAHs may be present in edible tissue of fish from contaminated areas and that high molecular weight PAHs, such as the carcinogen benzo(a)pyrene, will rarely be detected because of extensive metabolism. Additionally, the results from a few studies suggest that even though interactions between xenobiotics can affect both biochemical and physiological systems to alter the disposition of PAHs in fish, these interactions do not markedly change the relative proportions of metabolites to parent PAH in tissues. Thus, these studies clearly demonstrate that to obtain some insight into the questions of whether there is any risk to human health from consuming fish and crustaceans from urban areas, techniques must be developed that measure metabolites of carcinogens, such as PAHs, in edible tissue. Initial attempts may focus on semiquantitative methods that permit rapid assessment of the level of metabolites in edible tissues of fish and crustaceans from many urban areas. Based on information from such screening studies, further refinement in methodology leading to identification of specific compounds may be needed because certain metabolites may not be as toxic or carcinogenic as others.

  16. Metal organic frameworks for the catalytic detoxification of chemical warfare nerve agents

    DOEpatents

    Hupp, Joseph T.; Farha, Omar K.; Katz, Michael J.; Mondloch, Joseph E.

    2017-04-18

    A method of using a metal organic framework (MOF) comprising a metal ion and an at least bidendate organic ligand to catalytically detoxify chemical warfare nerve agents including exposing the metal-organic-framework (MOF) to the chemical warfare nerve agent and catalytically decomposing the nerve agent with the MOF.

  17. Metal Organic Framework Research: High Throughput Discovery of Robust Metal Organic Framework for CO2 Capture

    SciTech Connect

    2010-08-01

    IMPACCT Project: LBNL is developing a method for identifying the best metal organic frameworks for use in capturing CO2 from the flue gas of coal-fired power plants. Metal organic frameworks are porous, crystalline compounds that, based on their chemical structure, vary considerably in terms of their capacity to grab hold of passing CO2 molecules and their ability to withstand the harsh conditions found in the gas exhaust of coal-fired power plants. Owing primarily to their high tunability, metal organic frameworks can have an incredibly wide range of different chemical and physical properties, so identifying the best to use for CO2 capture and storage can be a difficult task. LBNL uses high-throughput instrumentation to analyze nearly 100 materials at a time, screening them for the characteristics that optimize their ability to selectively adsorb CO2 from coal exhaust. Their work will identify the most promising frameworks and accelerate their large-scale commercial development to benefit further research into reducing the cost of CO2 capture and storage.

  18. Bioconcentration of organic chemicals: is a solid-phase microextraction fiber a good surrogate for biota?

    PubMed

    Leslie, Heather A; Ter Laak, Thomas L; Busser, Frans J M; Kraak, Michiel H S; Hermens, Joop L M

    2002-12-15

    When organic chemicals are extracted from a water sample with solid-phase microextraction (SPME) fibers, the resulting concentrations in exposed fibers are proportional to the hydrophobicity of the compounds. This fiber accumulation is analogous to the bioconcentration of chemicals observed in aquatic organisms. The objective of this study was to investigate the prospect of measuring the total concentration in SPME fibers to estimate the total body residue in biota for the purpose of risk assessment. Using larvae of the midge, Chironomus riparius and disposable 15-microm poly(dimethylsiloxane) fibers, we studied the accumulation and accumulation kinetics of a number of narcotic compounds with a range of log K(ow) between 3 and 6. The fibers, which have a larger surface area-to-volume ratio, had consistently higher uptake and elimination rate constants (k1 and k2, respectively) than midge larvae and accumulated the chemicals 5 times faster. Comparison of the relationships of the partition coefficients K(PDMS-water) and K(midge-water) (lipid-normalized) to log K(ow) for all compounds yielded a factor of 28 for translating fiber concentrations to biota concentrations. This factor can be used to estimate internal concentrations in biota for compounds structurally similar to the compounds in this study. The exact chemical domain to which this factor can be applied needs to be defined in future research.

  19. Detecting recalcitrant organic chemicals in water with microbial fuel cells and artificial neural networks.

    PubMed

    King, Scott T; Sylvander, Marc; Kheperu, Mekhakhem; Racz, LeeAnn; Harper, Willie F

    2014-11-01

    This study integrates artificial neural network (ANN) processing with microbial fuel cell (MFC)-based biosensing in the detection of three organic pollutants: aldicarb, dimethyl-methylphosphonate (DMMP), and bisphenol-A (BPA). Overall, the use of the ANN proved to be more reliable than direct correlations for the determination of both chemical concentration and type. The ANN output matched the appropriate chemical concentration and type for three different concentrations and throughout a wide range of stepwise tests. Additionally, chemicals dissolved in the acetate-based feed medium (FM) were accurately identified by the ANN even though the acetate masked the pollutants' effects on electrical current. The ANN also accurately revealed the identity of chemical mixtures. This study is the first to incorporate ANN modeling with MFC-based biosensing for the detection and quantification of organic pollutants that are not readily biodegradable. Furthermore, this work provides insight into the flexibility of MFC-based biosensing as it pertains to limits of detection and its applicability to scenarios where mixtures of pollutants and unique solvents are involved. This research effort is expected to serve as a guide for future MFC-based biosensing efforts.

  20. Short-term effects of different organic amendments on soil chemical, biochemical and biological indicators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mondelli, Donato; Aly, Adel; Yirga Dagnachew, Ababu; Piscitelli, Lea; Dumontet, Stefano; Miano, Teodoro

    2014-05-01

    The limited availability of animal manure and the high cost of good quality compost lead to difficult soil quality management under organic agriculture. Therefore, it is important to find out alternative organic soil amendments and more flexible strategies that are able to sustain crop productivity and maintain and enhance soil quality. A three years study was carried out in the experimental fields of the Mediterranean Agronomic Institute of Bari located in Valenzano, Italy. The main objective of this research is to investigate the effects of different fertility management strategies on soil quality in order to estimate the role of innovative matrices for their use in organic farming. The experiment consists of seven treatments applied to a common crop rotation. The treatments include alternative organic amendments (1- olive mill wastewater OMW, 2- residues of mushroom cultivation MUS, 3- coffee chaff COF), common soil amendments (4- compost COM, 5- faba bean intercropping LEG, 6- cow manure - MAN) and as a reference treatment (7- mineral fertilizer COV). The soil quality was assessed before and after the application of the treatments, through biological (microbial biomass carbon and nitrogen, soil respiration and metabolic quotient), biochemical (soil enzymatic activities: β-glucosidase, alkaline phospatase, urease, fluorescein diacetate (FDA) hydrolysis), and chemical (pH, soil organic carbon, soil organic matter, total nitrogen, available phosphorous, exchangeable potassium, dissolved organic carbon and total dissolved nitrogen) indicators. Based on the results obtained after the second year, all treatments were able to improve various soil chemical parameters as compared to mineral fertilizer. The incorporation of COF and OMW seemed to be more effective in improving soil total N and exchangeable K, while MAN significantly increased available P. All the amendments enhance dissolved organic C, soil respiration, microbial biomass and metabolic quotient as

  1. [Small compounds libraries: a research tool for chemical biology].

    PubMed

    Florent, Jean-Claude

    2013-01-01

    Obtaining and screening collections of small molecules remain a challenge for biologists. Recent advances in analytical techniques and instrumentation now make screening possible in academia. The history of the creation of such public or commercial collections and their accessibility is related. It shows that there is interest for an academic laboratory involved in medicinal chemistry, chemogenomics or "chemical biology" to organize its own collection and make it available through existing networks such as the French National chimiothèque or the European partner network "European Infrastructure of open screening platforms for Chemical Biology" EU-OpenScreen under construction. © Société de Biologie, 2013.

  2. Sources and Chemical Evolution of Atmospheric Organic Particulate Matter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murphy, Benjamin Neel

    Organic compounds make up a significant fraction of the total composition of atmospheric particles with a diameter of 2.5 mum or less (PM2.5 ) at location throughout the world and seasons throughout the entire year. An understanding of the entire atmospheric PM2.5 system is thus dependent on an adequate understanding of the sources, properties and fate of organic compounds. These species exist in equilibrium between the particulate- and gas-phase. The fraction of the total mass present in each phase is governed by the volatility of individual species. A variety of emission activities are responsible for injecting this organic mass into the atmosphere including vehicle use, biomass burning, energy generation, industrial processing and plat emissions among other sources. After this initial emission atmospheric oxidants may modify the properties of these compounds, especially their volatility, thereby shifting the equilibrium between the particulate- and gas-phase and causing condensation or evaporation. This thesis focuses on modeling these complex phenomena in a chemical transport model (CTM) of the atmosphere. We employ the volatility basis set (VBS) in the CTM, PMCAMx-2008, and evaluate it against ambient measurements. While taking into account recent findings about the volatility distribution of primary organic aerosol (POA) and the multigenerational OH oxidation of the vapors in equilibrium with primary as well as secondary organic aerosol (SOA), we find the model to perform reasonably well for a summertime simulation of the Eastern US (fractional error ≤ 52% and |fractional bias| ≤ 30%) for all sites compared. With this acceptably performing model, we explore the source-receptor relationships of organic aerosol (OA). A three US sites (Pittsburgh, PA; Duke Forest, NC; and New York, NY), and one European site (Paris, FR) the bulk OA behaves very much as a regional pollutant with average transport distances of about 100-500 km before arriving at the receptors

  3. 78 FR 26811 - Dow Chemical Company, Dow TRIGA Research Reactor; License Renewal for the Dow Chemical TRIGA...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-05-08

    ... COMMISSION Dow Chemical Company, Dow TRIGA Research Reactor; License Renewal for the Dow Chemical TRIGA Research Reactor; Supplemental Information and Correction AGENCY: Nuclear Regulatory Commission. ACTION... Chemical TRIGA Research Reactor,'' to inform the public that the NRC is considering issuance of a...

  4. Chemical and electrochemical oxidation of small organic molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smart, Marshall C.

    Direct oxidation fuel cells using proton-exchange membrane electrolytes have long been recognized as being an attractive mode of power generation. The current work addresses the electro-oxidation characteristics of a number of potential fuels on Pt-based electrodes which can be used in direct oxidation fuel cells, including hydrocarbons and oxygenated molecules, such as alcohols, formates, ethers, and acetals. Promising alternative fuels which were identified, such as trimethoxymethane and dimethoxymethane, were then investigated in liquid-feed PEM-based fuel cells. In addition to investigating the nature of the anodic electro-oxidation of organic fuels, effort was also devoted to developing novel polymer electrolyte membranes which have low permeability to organic molecules, such as methanol. This research was initiated with the expectation of reducing the extent of fuel crossover from the anode to the cathode in the liquid-feed design fuel cell which results in lower fuel efficiency and performance. Other work involving efforts to improve the performance of direct oxidation fuel cell includes research focused upon improving the kinetics of oxygen reduction. There is continued interest in the identification of new, safe, non-toxic, and inexpensive reagents which can be used in the oxidation of organic compounds. Urea-hydrogen peroxide (UHP), a hydrogen bonded adduct, has been shown to serve as a valuable source of hydrogen peroxide in a range of reactions. UHP has been shown to be ideal for the monohydroxylation of aromatics, including toluene, ethylbenzene, p-xylene, m-xylene, and mesitylene, as well as benzene, in the presence of trifluoromethanesulfonic acid. It was also found that aniline was converted to a mixture containing primarily azobenzene, azoxybenzene and nitrobenzene when reacted with UHP in glacial acetic acid. A number of aniline derivatives have been investigated and it was observed that the corresponding azoxybenzene derivatives could be

  5. Summaries of FY 1982 research in the chemical sciences

    SciTech Connect

    1982-09-01

    The purpose of this booklet is to help those interested in research supported by the Department of Energy's Division of Chemical Sciences, which is one of six Divisions of the Office of Basic Energy Sciences in the Office of Energy Research. These summaries are intended to provide a rapid means for becoming acquainted with the Chemical Sciences program to members of the scientific and technological public and interested persons in the Legislative and Executive Branches of the Government. Areas of research supported by the Division are to be seen in the section headings, the index and the summaries themselves. Energy technologies which may be advanced by use of the basic knowledge discovered in this program can be seen in the index and again (by reference) in the summaries. The table of contents lists the following: photochemical and radiation sciences; chemical physics; atomic physics; chemical energy; separation and analysis; chemical engineering sciences; offsite contracts; equipment funds; special facilities; topical index; institutional index for offsite contracts; investigator index.

  6. Chemiluminescent chemical sensors for inorganic and organic vapors

    SciTech Connect

    Collins, G.E.; Rose-Pehrsson, S.L.

    1995-12-31

    Chemiluminescent, chemical sensors for inorganic and organic vapors are being investigated via the immobilization of 3-aminophthalhydrazide (luminol) within hydrogels and polymeric, sorbent coatings. The films are supported behind a teflon membrane and positioned in front of a photomultiplier tube, permitting the sensitive detection of numerous toxic vapors. Some selectivity has been tailored into these devices by careful selection of the polymer type, pH and metal catalyst incorporated within the film. The incorporation of luminol and Fe(3) within a polyvinylalcohol hydrogel gave a film with superior sensitivity toward NO{sub 2} (detection limit of 0.46 ppb and a response time on the order of seconds). The use of the hydrogel matrix helped eliminate humidity problems associated with other polymeric films. Other chemiluminescent thin films prepared have demonstrated the detection of ppb levels of SO{sub 2}(g) and hydrazine, N{sub 2}H{sub 4}(g). Recently, the authors have begun investigating the incorporation of a heated Pt filament into the inlet line as a pre-oxidative step prior to passage of the gas stream across the teflon membrane. This has permitted the sensitive detection of ppm levels of CCl{sub 4}(g), CHCl{sub 3}(g) and CH{sub 2}Cl{sub 2}(g).

  7. Nanoenabled microelectromechanical sensor for volatile organic chemical detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zuniga, Chiara; Rinaldi, Matteo; Khamis, Samuel M.; Johnson, A. T.; Piazza, Gianluca

    2009-06-01

    A nanoenabled gravimetric chemical sensor prototype based on the large scale integration of single-stranded DNA (ss-DNA) decorated single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) as nanofunctionalization layer for aluminum nitride contour-mode resonant microelectromechanical (MEM) gravimetric sensors has been demonstrated. The capability of two distinct single strands of DNA bound to SWNTs to enhance differently the adsorption of volatile organic compounds such as dinitroluene (simulant for explosive vapor) and dymethyl-methylphosphonate (simulant for nerve agent sarin) has been verified experimentally. Different levels of sensitivity (17.3 and 28 KHz μm2/fg) due to separate frequencies of operation (287 and 450 MHz) on the same die have also been shown to prove the large dynamic range of sensitivity attainable with the sensor. The adsorption process in the ss-DNA decorated SWNTs does not occur in the bulk of the material, but solely involves the surface, which permits to achieve 50% recovery in less than 29 s.

  8. Mapping of volatile organic chemicals in New Jersey water systems.

    PubMed

    Cohn, P; Savrin, J; Fagliano, J

    1999-01-01

    To characterize volatile organic chemical (VOC) contamination in public water in New Jersey from 1978 through 1990, detailed GIS maps were developed, along with descriptive text and an associated contaminant database, broken into half-year periods. All water providers that served more than 500 service connections were mapped. Contamination status for nine VOCs, including total trihalomethanes (THMs), was estimated for about 90% of the state's population. Many water systems were partitioned into smaller subsystems in order to map service areas that were more homogeneous with regard to water quality in order to minimize exposure misclassification. Data used for this work included test results taken by the New Jersey Department of Environmental Protection or the water utilities (raw, plant, and distribution system samples), an analysis of probable water use and water flow (based on pumpage, population, system architecture, and advice from the water systems), and information on service area extensions during the period. Using GIS applications, these maps and databases were used to estimate the size of the population exposed to contaminants over time, demonstrating a dramatic decrease in exposed population after the New Jersey Safe Drinking Water Act was signed in 1984.

  9. Chemical and biological sensing with organic thin-film transistors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mabeck, Jeffrey Todd

    Organic thin-film transistors (OTFTs) offer a great deal of promise for applications in chemical and biological sensing where there is a demand for small, portable, and inexpensive sensors. OTFTs have many advantages over other types of sensors, including low-cost fabrication, straightforward miniaturization, simple instrumentation, and inherent signal amplification. This dissertation examines two distinct types of OTFTs: organic field-effect transistors (OFETs) based on pentacene, and organic electrochemical transistors (OECTs) based on poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene):poly(styrene sulfonate) (PEDOT:PSS). The bulk of the previous work on sensing with OFETs has focused on gas sensing, and this dissertation contributes to this body of work by briefly treating the large, reversible response of pentacene OFETs to humidity. However, there are many applications where the analyte of interest must be detected in an aqueous environment rather than a gaseous environment, and very little work has been done in this area for OFETs. Therefore, the integration of pentacene OFETs with microfluidics is treated in detail. Using poly(dimethylsiloxane) (PDMS) microfluidic channels to confine aqueous solutions over the active region of pentacene transistors, it is demonstrated that the current-voltage characteristics remain stable under aqueous flow with a decrease in mobility of ˜30% compared to its value when dry. The operation of PEDOT:PSS transistors is also treated in detail. It is demonstrated that their transistor behavior cannot be attributed solely to a field effect and that ion motion is key to the switching mechanism. It is also demonstrated that simple glucose sensors based on PEDOT:PSS OECTs are sensitive to low glucose concentrations below 1 mM, therefore showing promise for potential application in the field of noninvasive glucose monitoring for diabetic patients using saliva rather than blood samples. Furthermore, a novel microfluidic gating technique has been

  10. Isolation and chemical characterization of dissolved and colloidal organic matter

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Aiken, G.; Leenheer, J.

    1993-01-01

    Commonly used techniques for the concentration and isolation of organic matter from water, such as preparative chromatography, ultrafiltration and reverse osmosis, and the methods used to analyze the organic matter obtained by these methods are reviewed. The development of methods to obtain organic matter that is associated with fractions of the dissolved organic carbon other than humic substances, such as organic bases, hydrophilic organic acids and colloidal organic matter are discussed. Methods specifically used to study dissolved organic nitrogen and dissolved organic phosphorous are also discussed. -from Authors

  11. Comparison of InGaAs(100) Grown by Chemical Beam Epitaxy and Metal Organic Chemical Vapor Deposition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Williams, M. D.; Greene, A. L.; Daniels-Race, T.; Lum, R. M.

    2000-01-01

    Secondary ion mass spectrometry is used to study the effects of substrate temperature on the composition and growth rate of InGaAs/InP(100) multilayers grown by chemical beam epitaxy, metal-organic chemical vapor deposition and solid source molecular beam epitaxy. The growth kinetics of the material grown by the different techniques are analyzed and compared.

  12. Experts workshop on the ecotoxicological risk assessment of ionizable organic chemicals: Towards a science-based framework for chemical assessment

    EPA Science Inventory

    There is a growing need to develop analytical methods and tools that can be applied to assess the environmental risks associated with charged, polar, and ionisable organic chemicals, such as those used as active pharmaceutical ingredients, biocides, and surface active chemicals. ...

  13. Comparison of InGaAs(100) Grown by Chemical Beam Epitaxy and Metal Organic Chemical Vapor Deposition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Williams, M. D.; Greene, A. L.; Daniels-Race, T.; Lum, R. M.

    2000-01-01

    Secondary ion mass spectrometry is used to study the effects of substrate temperature on the composition and growth rate of InGaAs/InP(100) multilayers grown by chemical beam epitaxy, metal-organic chemical vapor deposition and solid source molecular beam epitaxy. The growth kinetics of the material grown by the different techniques are analyzed and compared.

  14. Experts workshop on the ecotoxicological risk assessment of ionizable organic chemicals: Towards a science-based framework for chemical assessment

    EPA Science Inventory

    There is a growing need to develop analytical methods and tools that can be applied to assess the environmental risks associated with charged, polar, and ionisable organic chemicals, such as those used as active pharmaceutical ingredients, biocides, and surface active chemicals. ...

  15. Methods in plant foliar volatile organic compounds research1

    PubMed Central

    Materić, Dušan; Bruhn, Dan; Turner, Claire; Morgan, Geraint; Mason, Nigel; Gauci, Vincent

    2015-01-01

    Plants are a major atmospheric source of volatile organic compounds (VOCs). These secondary metabolic products protect plants from high-temperature stress, mediate in plant–plant and plant–insect communication, and affect our climate globally. The main challenges in plant foliar VOC research are accurate sampling, the inherent reactivity of some VOC compounds that makes them hard to detect directly, and their low concentrations. Plant VOC research relies on analytical techniques for trace gas analysis, usually based on gas chromatography and soft chemical ionization mass spectrometry. Until now, these techniques (especially the latter one) have been developed and used primarily by physicists and analytical scientists, who have used them in a wide range of scientific research areas (e.g., aroma, disease biomarkers, hazardous compound detection, atmospheric chemistry). The interdisciplinary nature of plant foliar VOC research has recently attracted the attention of biologists, bringing them into the field of applied environmental analytical sciences. In this paper, we review the sampling methods and available analytical techniques used in plant foliar VOC research to provide a comprehensive resource that will allow biologists moving into the field to choose the most appropriate approach for their studies. PMID:26697273

  16. Methods in plant foliar volatile organic compounds research.

    PubMed

    Materić, Dušan; Bruhn, Dan; Turner, Claire; Morgan, Geraint; Mason, Nigel; Gauci, Vincent

    2015-12-01

    Plants are a major atmospheric source of volatile organic compounds (VOCs). These secondary metabolic products protect plants from high-temperature stress, mediate in plant-plant and plant-insect communication, and affect our climate globally. The main challenges in plant foliar VOC research are accurate sampling, the inherent reactivity of some VOC compounds that makes them hard to detect directly, and their low concentrations. Plant VOC research relies on analytical techniques for trace gas analysis, usually based on gas chromatography and soft chemical ionization mass spectrometry. Until now, these techniques (especially the latter one) have been developed and used primarily by physicists and analytical scientists, who have used them in a wide range of scientific research areas (e.g., aroma, disease biomarkers, hazardous compound detection, atmospheric chemistry). The interdisciplinary nature of plant foliar VOC research has recently attracted the attention of biologists, bringing them into the field of applied environmental analytical sciences. In this paper, we review the sampling methods and available analytical techniques used in plant foliar VOC research to provide a comprehensive resource that will allow biologists moving into the field to choose the most appropriate approach for their studies.

  17. Advanced physical-chemical life support systems research

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Evanich, Peggy L.

    1988-01-01

    A proposed NASA space research and technology development program will provide adequate data for designing closed loop life support systems for long-duration manned space missions. This program, referred to as the Pathfinder Physical-Chemical Closed Loop Life Support Program, is to identify and develop critical chemical engineering technologies for the closure of air and water loops within the spacecraft, surface habitats or mobility devices. Computerized simulation can be used both as a research and management tool. Validated models will guide the selection of the best known applicable processes and in the development of new processes. For the integration of the habitat system, a biological subsystem would be introduced to provide food production and to enhance the physical-chemical life support functions on an ever-increasing basis.

  18. Summer Research Institute Interfacial and Condensed Phase Chemical Physics

    SciTech Connect

    Barlow, Stephan E.

    2004-10-01

    Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) hosted its first annual Summer Research Institute in Interfacial and Condensed Phase Chemical Physics from May through September 2004. During this period, fourteen PNNL scientists hosted sixteen young scientists from eleven different universities. Of the sixteen participants, fourteen were graduate students; one was transitioning to graduate school; and one was a university faculty member.

  19. Chemical and Metallurgy Research (CMR) Sample Tracking System Design Document

    SciTech Connect

    Bargelski, C. J.; Berrett, D. E.

    1998-09-01

    The purpose of this document is to describe the system architecture of the Chemical and Metallurgy Research (CMR) Sample Tracking System at Los Alamos National Laboratory. During the course of the document observations are made concerning the objectives, constraints and limitations, technical approaches, and the technical deliverables.

  20. Facts and Figures for Chemical Research and Development.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chemical and Engineering News, 1983

    1983-01-01

    Discusses data on chemical research and development (R&D). Areas addressed include sources of R&D funds, R&D spending by the federal government and by industry, and sources of academic R&D funds. provides charts and tables and data on scientists/engineers, budgets, comparisons between applied/basic R&D, abstracts in chemical…

  1. Facts and Figures for Chemical Research and Development.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chemical and Engineering News, 1983

    1983-01-01

    Discusses data on chemical research and development (R&D). Areas addressed include sources of R&D funds, R&D spending by the federal government and by industry, and sources of academic R&D funds. provides charts and tables and data on scientists/engineers, budgets, comparisons between applied/basic R&D, abstracts in chemical…

  2. Research in the chemical sciences. Summaries of FY 1995

    SciTech Connect

    1995-09-01

    This summary book is published annually to provide information on research supported by the Department of Energy`s Division of Chemical Sciences, which is one of four Divisions of the Office of Basic Energy Sciences in the Office of Energy Research. These summaries provide the scientific and technical public, as well as the legislative and executive branches of the Government, information, either generally or in some depth, about the Chemical Sciences program. Scientists interested in proposing research for support will find the publication useful for gauging the scope of the present basic research program and it`s relationship to their interests. Proposals that expand this scope may also be considered or directed to more appropriate offices. The primary goal of the research summarized here is to add significantly to the knowledge base in which existing and future efficient and safe energy technologies can evolve. As a result, scientific excellence is a major criterion applied in the selection of research supported by the Division of Chemical Sciences, but another important consideration is emphasis on science that is advancing in ways that will produce new information related to energy.

  3. Sorption capacity of plastic debris for hydrophobic organic chemicals.

    PubMed

    Lee, Hwang; Shim, Won Joon; Kwon, Jung-Hwan

    2014-02-01

    The occurrence of microplastics (MPs) in the ocean is an emerging world-wide concern. Due to high sorption capacity of plastics for hydrophobic organic chemicals (HOCs), sorption may play an important role in the transport processes of HOCs. However, sorption capacity of various plastic materials is rarely documented except in the case of those used for environmental sampling purposes. In this study, we measured partition coefficients between MPs and seawater (KMPsw) for 8 polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), 4 hexachlorocyclohexanes (HCHs) and 2 chlorinated benzenes (CBs). Three surrogate polymers - polyethylene, polypropylene, and polystyrene - were used as model plastic debris because they are the major components of microplastic debris found. Due to the limited solubility of HOCs in seawater and their long equilibration time, a third-phase partitioning method was used for the determination of KMPsw. First, partition coefficients between polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) and seawater (KPDMSsw) were measured. For the determination of KMPsw, the distribution of HOCs between PDMS or plastics and solvent mixture (methanol:water=8:2 (v/v)) was determined after apparent equilibrium up to 12 weeks. Plastic debris was prepared in a laboratory by physical crushing; the median longest dimension was 320-440 μm. Partition coefficients between polyethylene and seawater obtained using the third-phase equilibrium method agreed well with experimental partition coefficients between low-density polyethylene and water in the literature. The values of KMPsw were generally in the order of polystyrene, polyethylene, and polypropylene for most of the chemicals tested. The ranges of log KMPsw were 2.04-7.87, 2.18-7.00, and 2.63-7.52 for polyethylene, polypropylene, and polystyrene, respectively. The partition coefficients of plastic debris can be as high as other frequently used partition coefficients, such as 1-octanol-water partition coefficients (Kow) and log KMPsw showed good linear

  4. Modeling multiphase migration of organic chemicals in groundwater systems--a review and assessment.

    PubMed Central

    Abriola, L M

    1989-01-01

    Over the past two decades, a number of models have been developed to describe the multiphase migration of organic chemicals in the subsurface. This paper presents the state-of-the-art with regard to such modeling efforts. The mathematical foundations of these models are explored and individual models are presented and discussed. Models are divided into three groups: a) those that assume a sharp interface between the migrating fluids; b) those that incorporate capillarity; and c) those that consider interphase transport of mass. Strengths and weaknesses of each approach are considered along with supporting data for model validation. Future research directions are also highlighted. PMID:2695322

  5. Publication Trends in Model Organism Research

    PubMed Central

    Dietrich, Michael R.; Ankeny, Rachel A.; Chen, Patrick M.

    2014-01-01

    In 1990, the National Institutes of Health (NIH) gave some organisms special status as designated model organisms. This article documents publication trends for these NIH-designated model organisms over the past 40 years. We find that being designated a model organism by the NIH does not guarantee an increasing publication trend. An analysis of model and nonmodel organisms included in GENETICS since 1960 does reveal a sharp decline in the number of publications using nonmodel organisms yet no decline in the overall species diversity. We suggest that organisms with successful publication records tend to share critical characteristics, such as being well developed as standardized, experimental systems and being used by well-organized communities with good networks of exchange and methods of communication. PMID:25381363

  6. Effects of dissolved organic matter (DOM) on the bioconcentration of organic chemicals in aquatic organisms--a review.

    PubMed

    Haitzer, M; Höss, S; Traunspurger, W; Steinberg, C

    1998-09-01

    Current knowledge on the effects of dissolved organic matter (DOM) on the bioconcentration of organic chemicals in aquatic animals (water fleas, mussels, amphipods and fish) is summarized. A graphical representation of the available data gives an overview of the magnitude of the observed effects. Most of the studies have shown decreases in bioconcentration in the presence of DOM (2 to 98% relative to DOM-free controls). However, at low DOM levels, up to 10 mg/L, also enhancements of bioconcentration due to DOM, ranging from 2 to 303% have been reported. Generally, the change in BCFW (Bioconcentration factor on a wet weight basis) per mg/L DOC was most pronounced at low levels of DOC. The data also show that DOM from different sources with different characteristics and quality can lead to substantial variations in the bioconcentration of organic compounds at comparable levels of DOC. While decreases in bioconcentration have generally been attributed to a lack of bioavailability of DOM-bound chemical, no mechanisms have been proposed to explain increased uptake of xenobiotics caused by DOM.

  7. Organic contaminants in Great Lakes tributaries: Identification of watersheds and chemicals of greatest concern

    EPA Science Inventory

    Trace organic contaminant concentrations in some Great Lakes tributaries indicate potential for adverse effects on aquatic organisms. Chemicals used in agriculture, industry, and households enter surface waters via variety of sources, including urban and agricultural runoff, sewa...

  8. TOOL FOR MONITORING HYDROPHILIC CONTAMINANTS IN WATER: POLAR ORGANIC CHEMICAL INTEGRATIVE SAMPLER (POCIS)

    EPA Science Inventory

    Global emissions of persistent bioconcentratable organic chemicals have resulted in a wide range of adverse ecological effects. Consequently, industry was led to develop less persistent, more water soluble, polar or hydrophilic organic compounds (HpOCs), which generally have low ...

  9. Organic contaminants in Great Lakes tributaries: Identification of watersheds and chemicals of greatest concern

    EPA Science Inventory

    Trace organic contaminant concentrations in some Great Lakes tributaries indicate potential for adverse effects on aquatic organisms. Chemicals used in agriculture, industry, and households enter surface waters via variety of sources, including urban and agricultural runoff, sewa...

  10. TOOL FOR MONITORING HYDROPHILIC CONTAMINANTS IN WATER: POLAR ORGANIC CHEMICAL INTEGRATIVE SAMPLER (POCIS)

    EPA Science Inventory

    Global emissions of persistent bioconcentratable organic chemicals have resulted in a wide range of adverse ecological effects. Consequently, industry was led to develop less persistent, more water soluble, polar or hydrophilic organic compounds (HpOCs), which generally have low ...

  11. Chemical and Biological Sensors Based on Organic Electrochemical Transistors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Peng

    Organic thin film transistors (OTFTs) have been explored for sensing applications for several decades due to their many advantages like easy fabrication, low cost, flexibility, and biocompatibility. Among these OTFTs, organic electrochemical transistors (OECTs) have attracted a great deal of interest in recent years since the devices can operate stably in aqueous environment with relatively low working voltages and are suitable for applications in chemical and biological sensing. In this thesis, ion-sensitive properties of OECTs based on poly(3,4- ethylenedioxythiophene):poly(styrene sulfonic acid) (PEDOT:PSS) have been systematically studied. It was found that the gate electrode played an important role on the ion-sensitive properties of OECTs. For the devices with Ag/AgCl gate electrode, Nernstian relationships between the shift of gate voltage and the concentrations of cations were obtained. For the devices with Pt and Au gate electrodes, the ion sensitivities were higher than that given by Nernst equation, which could be attributed to the interface between the metal gate electrode and the electrolyte. Moreover, OECTs based on PEDOT:PSS were integrated into flexible microfluidic systems. Then a novel label-free DNA sensor was developed, in which single-stranded DNA probes were immobilized on the surface of Au gate electrode. These devices successfully detected complementary DNA targets at concentrations as low as 1 nM. The detection limit was also extended to 10 pM by pulse-enhanced hybridization process of DNA. OECTs based on PEDOT:PSS were also exploited as cell-based biosensors. Human esophageal squamous epithelial cancer cell lines (KYSE30) and fibroblast cell lines (HFFI) were successfully grown on the surface of PEDOT:PSS film. Then the devices were used for in-vitro monitoring cell activities when the living cells were treated by trypsin and an anti-cancer drug, retinoic acid. It was found that the devices were sensitive to the change of surface charge

  12. [Recent results in research on oscillatory chemical reactions].

    PubMed

    Poros, Eszter; Kurin-Csörgei, Krisztina

    2014-01-01

    The mechanisms of the complicated periodical phenomenas in the nature (e.g. hearth beat, sleep cycle, circadian rhythms, etc) could be understood with using the laws of nonlinear chemical systems. In this article the newest result in the research of the subfield of nonlinear chemical dynamics aimed at constructing oscillatory chemical reactions, which are novel either in composition or in configuration, are presented. In the introductory part the concept of chemical periodicity is defined, then the forms as it can appear in time and space and the methods of their study are discussed. Detailed description of the experimental work that has resulted in two significant discoveries is provided. A method was developed to design pH-oscillators which are capable of operating under close conditions. The batch pH-oscillators are more convenient to use in some proposed applications than the equivalent CSTR variant. A redox oscillator that is new in composition was found. The permanganate oxidation of some amino acids was shown to take place according to oscillatory kinetics in a narrow range of the experimental parameters. The KMnO4 - glycine - Na2HPO4 system represents the first example in the family of manganese based oscillators where amino acids is involved. In the conclusion formal analogies between the simple chemical and some more complicated biological oscillatory phenomena are mentioned and the possibility of modeling periodic processes with the use of information gained from the studies of chemical oscillations is pointed out.

  13. Adsorption mechanism of different organic chemicals on fluorinated carbon nanotubes.

    PubMed

    Li, Hao; Zheng, Nan; Liang, Ni; Zhang, Di; Wu, Min; Pan, Bo

    2016-07-01

    Multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MC) were fluorinated by a solid-phase reaction method using polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE). The surface alteration of carbon nanotubes after fluorination (MC-F) was confirmed based on surface elemental analysis, TEM and SEM. The incorporation of F on MC surface was discussed as F incorporation on carbon defects, replacement of carboxyl groups, as well as surface coating of PTFE. The adsorption performance and mechanisms of MC-F for five kinds of representative organic compounds: sulfamethoxazole (SMX), ofloxacin (OFL), norfloxacin (NOR), bisphenol a (BPA) and phenanthrene (PHE) were investigated. Although BET-N2 surface area of the investigated CNTs decreased after fluorination, the adsorption of all five chemicals increased. Because of the glassification of MC-F surface coating during BET-N2 surface area measurement, the accessible surface area of MC-F was underestimated. Desorption hysteresis was generally observed in all the sorption systems in this study, and the desorption hysteresis of MC-F were stronger than the pristine CNTs. The enhanced adsorption of MC-F may be attributed the pores generated on the coated PTFE and the dispersed CNT aggregates due to the increased electrostatic repulsion after fluorination. The rearrangement of the bundles or diffusion of the adsorbates in MC-F inner pores were the likely reason for the strong desorption hysteresis of MC-F. The butterfly structure of BPA resulted in its high sorption and strong desorption hysteresis. The exothermic sorption character of OFL on CNTs resulted in its strong desorption hysteresis. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Organic matter in carbonaceous meteorites: past, present and future research.

    PubMed

    Sephton, Mark A

    2005-12-15

    Carbonaceous meteorites are fragments of ancient asteroids that have remained relatively unprocessed since the formation of the Solar System. These carbon-rich objects provide a record of prebiotic chemical evolution and a window on the early Solar System. Many compound classes are present reflecting a rich organic chemical environment during the formation of the planets. Recent theories suggest that similar extraterrestrial organic mixtures may have acted as the starting materials for life on Earth.

  15. An autonomous organic reaction search engine for chemical reactivity

    PubMed Central

    Dragone, Vincenza; Sans, Victor; Henson, Alon B.; Granda, Jaroslaw M.; Cronin, Leroy

    2017-01-01

    The exploration of chemical space for new reactivity, reactions and molecules is limited by the need for separate work-up-separation steps searching for molecules rather than reactivity. Herein we present a system that can autonomously evaluate chemical reactivity within a network of 64 possible reaction combinations and aims for new reactivity, rather than a predefined set of targets. The robotic system combines chemical handling, in-line spectroscopy and real-time feedback and analysis with an algorithm that is able to distinguish and select the most reactive pathways, generating a reaction selection index (RSI) without need for separate work-up or purification steps. This allows the automatic navigation of a chemical network, leading to previously unreported molecules while needing only to do a fraction of the total possible reactions without any prior knowledge of the chemistry. We show the RSI correlates with reactivity and is able to search chemical space using the most reactive pathways. PMID:28598440

  16. An autonomous organic reaction search engine for chemical reactivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dragone, Vincenza; Sans, Victor; Henson, Alon B.; Granda, Jaroslaw M.; Cronin, Leroy

    2017-06-01

    The exploration of chemical space for new reactivity, reactions and molecules is limited by the need for separate work-up-separation steps searching for molecules rather than reactivity. Herein we present a system that can autonomously evaluate chemical reactivity within a network of 64 possible reaction combinations and aims for new reactivity, rather than a predefined set of targets. The robotic system combines chemical handling, in-line spectroscopy and real-time feedback and analysis with an algorithm that is able to distinguish and select the most reactive pathways, generating a reaction selection index (RSI) without need for separate work-up or purification steps. This allows the automatic navigation of a chemical network, leading to previously unreported molecules while needing only to do a fraction of the total possible reactions without any prior knowledge of the chemistry. We show the RSI correlates with reactivity and is able to search chemical space using the most reactive pathways.

  17. An autonomous organic reaction search engine for chemical reactivity.

    PubMed

    Dragone, Vincenza; Sans, Victor; Henson, Alon B; Granda, Jaroslaw M; Cronin, Leroy

    2017-06-09

    The exploration of chemical space for new reactivity, reactions and molecules is limited by the need for separate work-up-separation steps searching for molecules rather than reactivity. Herein we present a system that can autonomously evaluate chemical reactivity within a network of 64 possible reaction combinations and aims for new reactivity, rather than a predefined set of targets. The robotic system combines chemical handling, in-line spectroscopy and real-time feedback and analysis with an algorithm that is able to distinguish and select the most reactive pathways, generating a reaction selection index (RSI) without need for separate work-up or purification steps. This allows the automatic navigation of a chemical network, leading to previously unreported molecules while needing only to do a fraction of the total possible reactions without any prior knowledge of the chemistry. We show the RSI correlates with reactivity and is able to search chemical space using the most reactive pathways.

  18. Identifying new persistent and bioaccumulative organics among chemicals in commerce.

    PubMed

    Howard, Philip H; Muir, Derek C G

    2010-04-01

    The goal of this study was to identify commercial chemicals that might be persistent and bioaccumulative (P&B) and that were not being considered in current Great Lakes, North American, and Arctic contaminant measurement programs. We combined the Canadian Domestic Substance List (DSL), a list of 3059 substances of "unknown or variable composition complex reaction products and biological materials" (UVCBs), and the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (U.S. EPA) Toxic Substances Control Act (TSCA) Inventory Update Rule (IUR) database for years 1986, 1990, 1994, 1998, 2002, and 2006 yielding a database of 22263 commercial chemicals. From that list, 610 chemicals were identified by estimates from U.S EPA EPISuite software and using expert judgment. This study has yielded some interesting and probable P&B chemicals that should be considered for further study. Recent studies, following up our initial reports and presentations on this work, have confirmed the presence of many of these chemicals in the environment.

  19. Chemical, green and organic manure effects on chemical properties on a savannah oxisol and on corn under conventional tillage and no-tillage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mannigel, Anny R.; Alves, Marlene C.; Valério Filho, Walter V.

    2015-04-01

    Modern agriculture, in general, has always been based on the concept that natural resources are endless; however, this concept is changing. Concern for the environment is increasingly becoming part of farming practices, either by the awareness of society, or because the high cost of fertilizers or even the exhaustion of soils. The objective of this research was to evaluate the effects of the green manure and mineral fertilizer and/or organic manure and, on the chemical properties of an Oxisol, on "Savannah" (cerrado) area in Mato Grosso do Sul-Brazil, cultivated with corn (Zea mays L.) on the following management conditions: no-tillage and conventional tillage, on area previously under pasture (Brachiaria decumbens). The experimental design was a randomized blocks and the tested treatments were: control (without organic manure or chemical fertilizer); chemical fertilizer, as recommended for the culture and based on the chemical soil analysis; organic manure (cow manure); organic manure + half of the mineral fertilizer recommended rate; and the green manure Crotalaria juncea and Pennisetum americanum. The chemical analyses were the soil chemical analysis to the intent of soil fertility. Corn yield was evaluated. The collect of soil samples were realized in depths of 0.00-0.05 m and 0.05-0.10 m and 0.10-0.20 m. The organic manure and the organic manure + half of the mineral recommended rate increased P, Ca, Mg, K and Organic Matter in the first depth (0.00 - 0.05 m). These treatments also increased K and Mg at the second depth analyzed (0.05 - 0.10 m) and K in the depth from 0.10 - 0.20 m. Under conventional tillage management presents better crop results with an average grain yield of 3649 kg ha-1 versus 2374 kg ha-1 obtained under no-tillage. The use of chemical fertilizer, organic manure + half of the mineral recommended rate, Crotalaria juncea, organic manure and Pennisetum americanum increased corn yield by 84, 79, 58, 44 and 41 %, respectively.

  20. Review of laboratory-based terrestrial bioaccumulation assessment approaches for organic chemicals: Current status and future possibilities.

    PubMed

    Hoke, Robert; Huggett, Duane; Brasfield, Sandra; Brown, Becky; Embry, Michelle; Fairbrother, Anne; Kivi, Michelle; Paumen, Miriam Leon; Prosser, Ryan; Salvito, Dan; Scroggins, Rick

    2016-01-01

    In the last decade, interest has been renewed in approaches for the assessment of the bioaccumulation potential of chemicals, principally driven by the need to evaluate large numbers of chemicals as part of new chemical legislation, while reducing vertebrate test organism use called for in animal welfare legislation. This renewed interest has inspired research activities and advances in bioaccumulation science for neutral organic chemicals in aquatic environments. In January 2013, ILSI Health and Environmental Sciences Institute convened experts to identify the state of the science and existing shortcomings in terrestrial bioaccumulation assessment of neutral organic chemicals. Potential modifications to existing laboratory methods were identified, including areas in which new laboratory approaches or test methods could be developed to address terrestrial bioaccumulation. The utility of "non-ecotoxicity" data (e.g., mammalian laboratory data) was also discussed. The highlights of the workshop discussions are presented along with potential modifications in laboratory approaches and new test guidelines that could be used for assessing the bioaccumulation of chemicals in terrestrial organisms.

  1. Volatile organic chemical emissions from carpets. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Hodgson, A.T.; Wooley, J.D.; Daisey, J.M.

    1992-04-01

    The primary objective of this research, was to measure the emission rates of selected individual VOC, including low molecular-weight aldehydes, released by samples of four new carpets that are typical of the major types of carpets used in residences, schools and offices. The carpet samples were collected directly from the manufacturers` mills and packaged to preserve their chemical integrity. The measurements of the concentrations and emission rates of these compounds were made under simulated indoor conditions in a 20-M{sup 3} environmental chamber designed specifically for investigations of VOC. The measurements were conducted over a period of one week following the installation of the carpet samples in the chamber. Duplicate experiments were conducted for one carpet. In addition, the concentrations and emission rates of VOC resulting from the installation of a new carpet in a residence were measured over a period of seven weeks. The stabilities of the week-long ventilation rates and temperatures were one percent relative standard deviation. The four carpets emitted a variety of VOC, 40 of which were positively identified. Eight of these were considered to be dominant. They were (in order of chromatographic retention time) formaldehyde, vinyl acetate, 2,2,4-trimethylpentane (isooctane), 1,2-propanediol (propylene glycol), styrene, 2-ethyl-l-hexanol, 4-phenylcyclohexene (4-PCH), and 2,6 di-tert-butyl-4-methylphenol (BHT). With the exception of formaldehyde, only limited data are available on the toxicity and irritancy of these compounds at low concentrations. Therefore, it is difficult to determine at this time the potential magnitude of the health and comfort effects that may occur among the population from exposures to emissions from new carpets. The concentrations and emission rates of most compounds decreased rapidly over the first 12 h of the experiments.

  2. Organic Research Activities of the USDA’s Agricultural Research Service

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Organic research is a vital and ongoing part of the overall ARS research portfolio and occurs at approximately 20 % of ARS research locations across the United States. The vision for ARS organic agriculture research is to help the organic industry overcome the challenges it faces related to producti...

  3. Soil and water losses on citrus orchards under Mediterranean Type Ecosystems. Organic against chemical farming

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cerdà, A.; Bodí, M. B.; García-Orenes, F.

    2012-04-01

    Soil erosion in Mediterranean Type Ecosystems is highly dependent on the land use and land management (Cerdà et al., 2010). This is due mainly to the impact of agriculture (Cerdà et al., 2009) as a consequence of tillage and the use of herbicides. Both strategies contribute to a reduction in the vegetation cover and the soil biological activities (García-Orenes et al., 2009). The impact of soil erosion on agronomic productivity and environmental quality is widely known (Lal, 1998), although little has been researched in the Mediterranean. The impact of agriculture on soil erosion and water losses in the Mediterranean basin has been studied in olive orchards (Gómez, 2004); vineyards (Ramos and Martínez Casasnovas, 2004), citrus (Cerdà et al., 2009), cereals (De Santisteban et al., (2005), and the high erosion rates were found to be related to the land management and land use (García Ruiz, 2010). The current Mediterranean agriculture is based on tillage and herbicides, which contribute to high soil and water losses. The development of sustainable agriculture practices is a challenge for farmers, technicians and politicians. Organic farming use strategies to reduce the soil losses and develop new strategies of soil conservation. Moreover organic farming recover the soil fertility and biodiversity (Maeder et al., 2002). Organic farming is growing in the Mediterranean but little is know about his effect on soil conservation. There is a lack in the knowledge of how organic farming affect the soil properties and, there is no information on his effect on soil and water losses. This paper aims to measure the impact of organic farming on soil and water losses. 10 plots of 1 x 0,5 m were selected in a chemically managed farm in Montesa (Eastern Spain) and 10 plots in a nearby organic farming managed farm. Both of them were cultivated with citrus. The ten paired plots were monitored. After earch rainfall event the sediment and water collected were measured and analized

  4. SEDIMENT TOXICITY EVALUATION OF EXTRACTS OF ORGANIC CHEMICALS FROM CONTAMINATED SEDIMENTS: EVALUATION OF AN EXPERIMENTAL APPROACH

    EPA Science Inventory

    Most solid-phase sediment TIE techniques for organic chemicals have been focused on the addition of sorbents, such as the carbonaceous resin, Ambersorb 1500. While these sorbents have shown some promise for indicating when non-polar organic chemicals may be contributing to toxici...

  5. Spatial and Temporal Trends of Persistent Organic Chemicals with Emphasis on Brominated Flame Retardants

    EPA Science Inventory

    Rapid growth in chemical and agrochemical industries during the past century have resulted in the release of large numbers of persistent organic chemicals (POCs) into the environment. Since POCs are prevalent in air, water, soil and tissue of organisms throughout the world and r...

  6. The Cooperation Between Poison Control Center and Organized Industrial District for Chemical Disaster Prevention

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2001-09-01

    BETWEEN POISON CONTROL CENTER AND ORGANIZED INDUSTRIAL DISTRICT FOR CHEMICAL DISASTER PREVENTION Ozyurt G. and Tokyay N. Uludag Poison Center; Uludag...UNCLASSIFIED Defense Technical Information Center Compilation Part Notice ADP013444 TITLE: The Cooperation Between Poison Control Center and...Organized Industrial District for Chemical Disaster Prevention DISTRIBUTION: Approved for public release, distribution unlimited This paper is part of the

  7. Spatial and Temporal Trends of Persistent Organic Chemicals with Emphasis on Brominated Flame Retardants

    EPA Science Inventory

    Rapid growth in chemical and agrochemical industries during the past century have resulted in the release of large numbers of persistent organic chemicals (POCs) into the environment. Since POCs are prevalent in air, water, soil and tissue of organisms throughout the world and r...

  8. PREDICTING SOIL SORPTION COEFFICIENTS OF ORGANIC CHEMICALS USING A NEURAL NETWORK MODEL

    EPA Science Inventory

    The soil/sediment adsorption partition coefficient normalized to organic carbon (Koc) is extensively used to assess the fate of organic chemicals in hazardous waste sites. Several attempts have been made to estimate the value of Koc from chemical structure ...

  9. 40 CFR 414.60 - Applicability; description of the commodity organic chemicals subcategory.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 30 2013-07-01 2012-07-01 true Applicability; description of the commodity organic chemicals subcategory. 414.60 Section 414.60 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) EFFLUENT GUIDELINES AND STANDARDS ORGANIC CHEMICALS, PLASTICS, AND...

  10. PREDICTING SOIL SORPTION COEFFICIENTS OF ORGANIC CHEMICALS USING A NEURAL NETWORK MODEL

    EPA Science Inventory

    The soil/sediment adsorption partition coefficient normalized to organic carbon (Koc) is extensively used to assess the fate of organic chemicals in hazardous waste sites. Several attempts have been made to estimate the value of Koc from chemical structure ...

  11. Retrospective exposure assessment in a chemical research and development facility.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yu-Cheng; Ramachandran, Gurumurthy; Alexander, Bruce H; Mandel, Jeffrey H

    2012-02-01

    The objective of this exposure assessment was to reconstruct cumulative historical exposures for workers who have been exposed to multiple chemicals and chemical groups to better understand a cluster of brain cancers within a research and development lab. Chemicals of interest, including acrylates, bis-chloromethyl ether (BCME), chloromethyl methyl ether (CMME), isothiazolones and nitrosoamines, were selected on the basis of the plausibility of penetrating the blood-brain barrier and the uniqueness of the chemical's biological activity. In a complicated exposure setting such as a chemical R&D facility, multiple exposure estimation methods were needed. First, similarly exposure groups (SEGs) were created for these materials based on department group, time period of the department's existence and function associated with job titles. A probabilistic framework for assessing exposures was developed using Bayesian analysis of historical monitoring data, mathematical exposure modeling and professional judgments of current and former industrial hygienists at the facility were used to reconstruct the exposure history for acrylates, BCME and CMME for each SEG over the time period of interest. Since sufficient measurement data for isothiazolones and nitrosoamines were not available, the exposure histories for each SEG for these chemicals were estimated. This was done using objective formaldehyde levels and subjective employee interviews. The interviews assessed workplace determinants of exposure as distinct surrogates for estimating inhalation and dermal exposures. The exposure assessments by these methods were compared against each other to estimate the potential for exposure misclassification. A job exposure matrix (JEM) was constructed that contained the exposures obtained from above multiple approaches for each of these chemical groups for each SEG for each year of interest. The combination of methods used in this work is a unique and potentially helpful framework that

  12. Students' Understanding of Chemical Formulae: A review of empirical research

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taskin, Vahide; Bernholt, Sascha

    2014-01-01

    The fluent use of the chemical language is a major tool for successfully passing chemistry courses at school or university as well as for working as a chemist, since chemical formulae are both a descriptive and a heuristic tool. However, numerous studies have revealed remarkable difficulties of students with chemical formulae both at school and at university. Although analysed for decades, current studies and practical experiences indicate that the misinterpretation of symbolic representations by students is still an ongoing problem. This review intends not only to summarize but also to categorize students' problems and difficulties when dealing with chemical formulae as reported in empirical studies. For this purpose, two categories of descriptive character were deduced from the empirical data: the type of chemical formulae and the operational activities that were required in the tasks of the studies. All in all, 38 articles were analysed on the basis of these categories. Students' problems and difficulties are then reflected based on three main problem areas: language-based problems, problems due to conceptual understanding, and problems due to inadequate selection and interpretation of formulae. These three areas call for a broader perspective in the interpretation of students' problems and thus lead to a discussion of implications for further research and changes in teaching practice.

  13. The role of chemical engineering in medicinal research including Alzheimer's.

    PubMed

    Kontogeorgis, Georgios M

    2015-01-01

    Various disciplines of chemical engineering, especially thermodynamics and kinetics, play an important role in medicinal research and this has been particularly recognized during the last 10-15 years (von Stockar and van der Wielen, J Biotechnol 59:25, 1997; Prausnitz, Fluid Phase Equilib 53:439, 1989; Prausnitz, Pure Appl Chem 79:1435, 2007; Dey and Prausnitz, Ind Eng Chem Res 50:3, 2011; Prausnitz, J Chem Thermodynamics 35:21, 2003; Tsivintzelis et al. AIChE J 55:756, 2009). It is expected that during the twenty-first century chemical engineering and especially thermodynamics can contribute as significantly to the life sciences development as it has been done with the oil and gas and chemical sectors in the twentieth century. Moreover, it has during the recent years recognized that thermodynamics can help in understanding diseases like human cataract, sickle-cell anemia, Creuzfeldt-Jacob ("mad cow" disease), and Alzheimer's which are connected to "protein aggregation." Several articles in the Perspectives section of prominent chemical engineering journals have addressed this issue (Hall, AIChE J 54:1956, 2008; Vekilov, AIChE J 54:2508, 2008). This work reviews recent applications of thermodynamics (and other areas of chemical engineering) first in drug development and then in the understanding of the mechanism of Alzheimer's and similar diseases.

  14. Activist Research and Organizing: Blurring the Boundaries, Challenging the Binaries

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Choudry, Aziz

    2014-01-01

    This article draws from ongoing research into the practices and processes of activist researchers. It discusses social relations of knowledge production located outside of academia with/in social movement milieus. Focusing on the politics of research in people's organizations and social movement organizations in the Philippines, it builds on…

  15. Activist Research and Organizing: Blurring the Boundaries, Challenging the Binaries

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Choudry, Aziz

    2014-01-01

    This article draws from ongoing research into the practices and processes of activist researchers. It discusses social relations of knowledge production located outside of academia with/in social movement milieus. Focusing on the politics of research in people's organizations and social movement organizations in the Philippines, it builds on…

  16. Role Relationships Using Formal Research and Organization Types.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Judd, Larry R.

    1987-01-01

    Argues that there are relationships among perceived public relations role, formal research, and organization type. Presents two lines of research, the studies of public relations roles focusing on the individual, and the approach emphasizing the organization as the principle unit of analysis; Describes three research hypotheses are and presents a…

  17. Organic Chemical Sorption Heterogeneity in a Sedimentary Framework

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kalinovich, I. K.; Allen-King, R. M.; George, S. S.; Dominic, D. F.; Ritzi, R. W.; Weissmann, G. S.

    2010-12-01

    Reactive mass transport models require spatial representation of both the hydraulic (permeability, k) and geochemical (sorption distribution coefficient, Kd) attributes within an aquifer. Current modeling methods and techniques adequately address spatial distribution of the former better than the latter, due to gaps in both data and knowledge of geochemical heterogeneity. In low-fraction organic carbon content aquifers, such as the well-known Borden Ont. aquifer, micro and grain-scale heterogeneity contribute to Kd spatial heterogeneity. These heterogeneities impact the fate and transport of organic contaminants at an aquifer scale. We posit here that hydrophobic organic contaminant (HOC) sorption heterogeneity can be predicted using a geologically realistic framework by evaluating the geochemical aspect of HOC sorption in terms of sedimentary architecture. Using Perchloroethene (PCE) as a probe solute, batch measurements and characterization was conducted at lithofacies, lithocomponent and grain scales for > 700 samples that were obtained from aquifer cores. Greater Kd magnitudes and variance were observed in the medium-grained, poorly sorted lithofacies compared to fine-grained, well-sorted lithofacies. Lithocomponent grains (> 2mm) were sieved from a bulk aquifer sample, characterized and analyzed for fOC and Kd. Compared to the background bulk aquifer Kd of 0.3 mL/g, very high Kd values (600 mL/g) were found for some of the darker sedimentary lithocomponents. Previous research has shown that a lower PCE Kd is associated with the sand-sized grain fraction compared to other grain-size fractions sieved from bulk aquifer samples. In this aquifer (and potentially other low-organic carbon aquifers), these highly-sorbing lithological components were identified as potential contributors to sorption heterogeneity and were subsequently investigated in core samples. Lithological analysis on grains > 0.84mm was performed prior to Kd analysis in a subsample of the 350

  18. Multispecies QSAR modeling for predicting the aquatic toxicity of diverse organic chemicals for regulatory toxicology.

    PubMed

    Singh, Kunwar P; Gupta, Shikha; Kumar, Anuj; Mohan, Dinesh

    2014-05-19

    The research aims to develop multispecies quantitative structure-activity relationships (QSARs) modeling tools capable of predicting the acute toxicity of diverse chemicals in various Organization for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD) recommended test species of different trophic levels for regulatory toxicology. Accordingly, the ensemble learning (EL) approach based classification and regression QSAR models, such as decision treeboost (DTB) and decision tree forest (DTF) implementing stochastic gradient boosting and bagging algorithms were developed using the algae (P. subcapitata) experimental toxicity data for chemicals. The EL-QSAR models were successfully applied to predict toxicities of wide groups of chemicals in other test species including algae (S. obliguue), daphnia, fish, and bacteria. Structural diversity of the selected chemicals and those of the end-point toxicity data of five different test species were tested using the Tanimoto similarity index and Kruskal-Wallis (K-W) statistics. Predictive and generalization abilities of the constructed QSAR models were compared using statistical parameters. The developed QSAR models (DTB and DTF) yielded a considerably high classification accuracy in complete data of model building (algae) species (97.82%, 99.01%) and ranged between 92.50%-94.26% and 92.14%-94.12% in four test species, respectively, whereas regression QSAR models (DTB and DTF) rendered high correlation (R(2)) between the measured and model predicted toxicity end-point values and low mean-squared error in model building (algae) species (0.918, 0.15; 0.905, 0.21) and ranged between 0.575 and 0.672, 0.18-0.51 and 0.605-0.689 and 0.20-0.45 in four different test species. The developed QSAR models exhibited good predictive and generalization abilities in different test species of varied trophic levels and can be used for predicting the toxicities of new chemicals for screening and prioritization of chemicals for regulation.

  19. Quarterly progress report for the Chemical and Energy Research Section of the Chemical Technology Division: January--March 1997

    SciTech Connect

    Jubin, R.T.

    1998-01-01

    This report summarizes the major activities conducted in the Chemical and Energy Research Section of the Chemical Technology Division (CTD) at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) during the period January--March 1997. Created in March 1997 when the CTD Chemical Development and Energy Research sections were combined, the Chemical and Energy Research Section conducts basic and applied research and development in chemical engineering, applied chemistry, and bioprocessing, with an emphasis on energy-driven technologies and advanced chemical separations for nuclear and waste applications. The report describes the various tasks performed within seven major areas of research: Hot Cell Operations, Process Chemistry and Thermodynamics, Molten Salt Reactor Experiment (MSRE) Remediation Studies, Chemistry Research, Separations and Materials Synthesis, Solution Thermodynamics, and Biotechnology Research. The name of a technical contact is included with each task described in the report, and readers are encouraged to contact these individuals if they need additional information.

  20. How disease advocacy organizations participate in clinical research: a survey of genetic organizations.

    PubMed

    Landy, David C; Brinich, Margaret A; Colten, Mary Ellen; Horn, Elizabeth J; Terry, Sharon F; Sharp, Richard R

    2012-02-01

    Disease advocacy organizations may assist in the conduct of research in a variety of ways. We sought to characterize how disease advocacy organizations participate in clinical research and perceive their contributions. Postal and electronic surveys administered to leaders of disease advocacy organizations for genetic conditions identified through the Genetic Alliance's Disease InfoSearch. Of the 201 disease advocacy organizations approached, 124 (62%) responded. In the past 2 years, 91% of these organizations had assisted in participant recruitment, 75% collected data, 60% provided a researcher with financial support, and 56% assisted with study design. Forty-five percent of these organizations also supported a research registry or biobank. Few disease advocacy organization leaders (12%) reported regrets about research studies they had supported. Most (68%) felt their involvement in clinical research had increased the amount of research on their condition and that researchers should consult organizations like theirs in deciding how to recruit participants (58%) and in selecting research topics (56%). In addition to providing financial support, disease advocacy organizations participate directly in multiple aspects of research, ranging from study design and patient recruitment to data collection and analysis. Leaders of these organizations feel strongly that scientists and research sponsors should engage them as partners in the conduct of clinical research.

  1. Chemical Inventory Management at NASA Lewis Research Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kraft, Shirley S.; Homan, Joseph R.; Bajorek, Michael J.; Dominguez, Manuel B.; Smith, Vanessa L.

    1997-01-01

    The Chemical Management System (CMS) is a client/server application developed with Power Builder and Sybase for the Lewis Research Center (LeRC). Power Builder is a client-server application development tool, Sybase is a Relational Database Management System. The entire LeRC community can access the CMS from any desktop environment. The multiple functions and benefits of the CMS are addressed.

  2. Chemical Inventory Management at NASA Lewis Research Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kraft, Shirley S.; Homan, Joseph R.; Bajorek, Michael J.; Dominguez, Manuel B.; Smith, Vanessa L.

    1997-01-01

    The Chemical Management System (CMS) is a client/server application developed with Power Builder and Sybase for the Lewis Research Center (LeRC). Power Builder is a client-server application development tool, Sybase is a Relational Database Management System. The entire LeRC community can access the CMS from any desktop environment. The multiple functions and benefits of the CMS are addressed.

  3. Sediment microbial fuel cell prefers to degrade organic chemicals with higher polarity.

    PubMed

    Xia, Chunyu; Xu, Meiying; Liu, Jin; Guo, Jun; Yang, Yonggang

    2015-08-01

    By operating a SMFC in heavily contaminated sediment and analyzing its global organic chemical degradation profile, this study showed a brief trend that SMFC prefers to stimulate the degradation of organic chemicals with higher polarity. As a comparison, adding nitrate as a microbial respiration-based sediment remediation strategy preferred lower polarity chemicals. Both SMFC and nitrate reactors showed high degradation capacity in benzene homologs. These results provide crucial information for the selective and proper application of SMFC in bioremediation.

  4. Quarterly Progress Report for the Chemical and Energy Research Section of the Chemical Technology Division: January-March 1998

    SciTech Connect

    Jubin, R.T.

    1999-03-01

    This report summarizes the major activities conducted in the Chemical and Energy Research Section of the Chemical Technology Division at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) during the period January-March 1998. The section conducts basic and applied research and development in chemical engineering, applied chemistry, and bioprocessing, with an emphasis on energy driven technologies and advanced chemical separations for nuclear and waste applications. The report describes the various tasks performed within nine major areas of research: Hot Cell Operations, Process Chemistry and Thermodynamics, Molten Salt Reactor Experiment (MSRE) Remediation Studies, Chemistry Research, Biotechnology, Separations and Materials Synthesis, Fluid Structure and Properties, Biotechnology Research, and Molecular Studies.

  5. Collaboration in a Multidisciplinary, Distributed Research Organization: A Case Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Duysburgh, Pieter; Naessens, Kris; Konings, Wim; Jacobs, An

    2012-01-01

    Collaboration has become a main characteristic of academic research today. New forms of research organizations, colaboratories, have come to the fore, with distributed research centres as their most complex example. In this study, we aim to provide some insight into the collaboration strategies of researchers in their daily researching activities…

  6. Collaboration in a Multidisciplinary, Distributed Research Organization: A Case Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Duysburgh, Pieter; Naessens, Kris; Konings, Wim; Jacobs, An

    2012-01-01

    Collaboration has become a main characteristic of academic research today. New forms of research organizations, colaboratories, have come to the fore, with distributed research centres as their most complex example. In this study, we aim to provide some insight into the collaboration strategies of researchers in their daily researching activities…

  7. Progress Report for the Chemical and Energy Research Section of the Chemical Technology Division: July-December 1998

    SciTech Connect

    Jubin, R.T.

    1999-06-01

    This report summarizes the major activities conducted in the Chemical and Energy Research Section of the Chemical Technology Division at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) during the period July-December 1998. The section conducts basic and applied research and development in chemical engineering, applied chemistry, and bioprocessing, with an emphasis on energy-driven technologies and advanced chemical separations for nuclear and waste applications.

  8. Quarterly Progress Report for the Chemical and Energy Research Section of the Chemical Technology Division: April-June 1998

    SciTech Connect

    Jubin, R.T.

    1999-04-01

    This report summarizes the major activities conducted in the Chemical and Energy Research Section of the Chemical Technology Division at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) during th eperiod April-June 1998. The section conducts basic and applied research and development in chemical engineering, applied chemistry, and bioprocessing, with an emphasis on energy-driven technologies and advanced chemical separations for nuclear and waste applications.

  9. Space Chemical Propulsion Test Facilities at NASA Lewis Research Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Urasek, Donald C.; Calfo, Frederick D.

    1993-01-01

    The NASA Lewis Research Center, located in Cleveland, Ohio, has a number of space chemical propulsion test facilities which constitute a significant national space testing resource. The purpose of this paper is to make more users aware of these test facilities and to encourage their use through cooperative agreements between the government, industry, and universities. Research which is of interest to the government is especially encouraged and often can be done in a cooperative manner that best uses the resources of all parties. An overview of the Lewis test facilities is presented.

  10. A Study of Organic Chemical Reactions in Microemulsions.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1984-10-24

    organic synthesis were investigated. The first involved a delineation of the ability of microemulsions to catalyze synthetically useful reactions of water...microemulsions in organic synthesis . We also began the design and synthesis of turnover catalysts for carbon and phosphorus ester hydrolysis. Originator...furnished key words include: microemulsions, organic synthesis , microemulsions, reactive site, microemulsion, destructible (cleavable) surfactant-based, destructible (cleavable) surfactants, turnover catalysts.

  11. Chemical characterization and physico-chemical properties of aerosols at Villum Research Station, Greenland during spring 2015

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Glasius, M.; Iversen, L. S.; Svendsen, S. B.; Hansen, A. M. K.; Nielsen, I. E.; Nøjgaard, J. K.; Zhang, H.; Goldstein, A. H.; Skov, H.; Massling, A.; Bilde, M.

    2015-12-01

    The effects of aerosols on the radiation balance and climate are of special concern in Arctic areas, which have experienced warming at twice the rate of the global average. As future scenarios include increased emissions of air pollution, including sulfate aerosols, from ship traffic and oil exploration in the Arctic, there is an urgent need to obtain the fundamental scientific knowledge to accurately assess the consequences of pollutants to environment and climate. In this work, we studied the chemistry of aerosols at the new Villum Research Station (81°36' N, 16°40' W) in north-east Greenland during the "inauguration campaign" in spring 2015. The chemical composition of sub-micrometer Arctic aerosols was investigated using a Soot Particle Time-of-Flight Aerosol Mass Spectrometer (SP-ToF-AMS). Aerosol samples were also collected on filters using both a high-volume sampler and a low-volume sampler equipped with a denuder for organic gases. Chemical analyses of filter samples include determination of inorganic anions and cations using ion-chromatography, and analysis of carboxylic acids and organosulfates of anthropogenic and biogenic origin using ultrahigh-performance liquid chromatography coupled to quadrupole time-of-flight mass spectrometry (UHPLC-QTOF-MS). Previous studies found that organosulfates constitute a surprisingly high fraction of organic aerosols during the Arctic Haze period in winter and spring. Investigation of organic molecular tracers provides useful information on aerosol sources and atmospheric processes. The physico-chemical properties of Arctic aerosols are also under investigation. These measurements include particle number size distribution, water activity and surface tension of aerosol samples in order to deduct information on their hygroscopicity and cloud-forming potential. The results of this study are relevant to understanding aerosol sources and processes as well as climate effects in the Arctic, especially during the Arctic haze

  12. Do Human Milk Concentrations of Persistent Organic Chemicals Really Decline During Lactation? Chemical Concentrations During Lactation and Milk/Serum Partitioning

    PubMed Central

    LaKind, Judy S.; Berlin, Cheston M.; Sjödin, Andreas; Turner, Wayman; Wang, Richard Y.; Needham, Larry L.; Paul, Ian M.; Stokes, Jennifer L.; Naiman, Daniel Q.; Patterson, Donald G.

    2009-01-01

    Background Conventional wisdom regarding exposures to persistent organic chemicals via breast-feeding assumes that concentrations decline over the course of lactation and that the mother’s body burden reflects her cumulative lifetime exposure. Two important implications stemming from these lines of thought are, first, that assessments of early childhood exposures should incorporate decreasing breast milk concentrations over lactation; and, second, that there is little a breast-feeding mother can do to reduce her infant’s exposures via breast-feeding because of the cumulative nature of these chemicals. Objectives We examined rates of elimination and milk/serum partition coefficients for several groups of persistent organic chemicals. Methods We collected simultaneous milk and blood samples of 10 women at two times postpartum and additional milk samples without matching blood samples. Results Contrary to earlier research, we found that lipid-adjusted concentrations of polybrominated diphenyl ethers, polychlorinated biphenyls, polychlorinated dibenzo-p-dioxins and furans, and organochlorine pesticides in serum and milk do not consistently decrease during lactation and can increase for some women. Published research has also suggested an approximate 1:1 milk/serum relationship (lipid adjusted) on a population basis for 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin; however, our results suggest a more complex relationship for persistent, lipophilic chemicals with the milk/serum relationship dependent on chemical class. Conclusions Decreases in concentration of lipophilic chemicals on a lipid-adjusted basis during lactation should no longer be assumed. Thus, the concept of pumping and discarding early milk as means of reducing infant exposure is not supported. The hypothesis that persistent lipophilic chemicals, on a lipid-adjusted basis, have consistent concentrations across matrices is likely too simplistic. PMID:20019916

  13. Chemical reactions catalyzed by metalloporphyrin-based metal-organic frameworks.

    PubMed

    Nakagaki, Shirley; Ferreira, Gabriel Kaetan Baio; Ucoski, Geani Maria; Dias de Freitas Castro, Kelly Aparecida

    2013-06-21

    The synthetic versatility and the potential application of metalloporphyrins (MP) in different fields have aroused researchers' interest in studying these complexes, in an attempt to mimic biological systems such as cytochrome P-450. Over the last 40 years, synthetic MPs have been mainly used as catalysts for homogeneous or heterogeneous chemical reactions. To employ them in heterogeneous catalysis, chemists have prepared new MP-based solids by immobilizing MP onto rigid inorganic supports, a strategy that affords hybrid inorganic-organic materials. More recently, materials obtained by supramolecular assembly processes and containing MPs as building blocks have been applied in a variety of areas, like gas storage, photonic devices, separation, molecular sensing, magnets, and heterogeneous catalysis, among others. These coordination polymers, known as metal-organic frameworks (MOFs), contain organic ligands or complexes connected by metal ions or clusters, which give rise to a 1-, 2- or 3-D network. These kinds of materials presents large surface areas, Brønsted or redox sites, and high porosity, all of which are desirable features in catalysts with potential use in heterogeneous phases. Building MOFs based on MP is a good way to obtain solid catalysts that offer the advantages of bioinspired systems and zeolitic materials. In this mini review, we will adopt a historical approach to present the most relevant MP-based MOFs applicable to catalytic reactions such as oxidation, reduction, insertion of functional groups, and exchange of organic functions.

  14. Characterization of organic chemical contaminants in sediments from Jobos Bay, Puerto Rico.

    PubMed

    Pait, Anthony S; Whitall, David R; Dieppa, Angel; Newton, Sarah E; Brune, Lia; Caldow, Chris; Mason, Andrew L; Apeti, Dennis A; Christensen, John D

    2012-08-01

    Jobos Bay, located on the southeastern coast of Puerto Rico, contains a variety of habitats including mangroves, seagrass meadows, and coral reefs. The watershed surrounding the bay includes a number of towns, agricultural areas, and the Jobos Bay National Estuarine Research Reserve (NERR). Jobos Bay and the surrounding watershed are part of a Conservation Effects Assessment Project (CEAP), involving the Jobos Bay NERR, the US Department of Agriculture, and the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) to assess the benefits of agricultural best management practices (BMPs) on the terrestrial and marine environments. As part of the Jobos Bay CEAP, NOAA collected sediment samples in May 2008 to characterize over 130 organic chemical contaminants. This paper presents the results of the organic contaminant analysis. The organic contaminants detected in the sediments included polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), polychlorinated biphenyls, and the pesticide DDT. PAHs at one site in the inner bay near a boat yard were significantly elevated; however, all organic contaminant classes measured were below NOAA sediment quality guidelines that would have indicated that impacts were likely. The results of this work provide an important baseline assessment of the marine environment that will assist in understanding the benefits of implementing BMPs on water quality in Jobos Bay.

  15. Integrating Qualitative and Quantitative Research in Organizations.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1981-07-01

    phenomenological approaches at the subjective end of the continuum. A few researchers have suggested ways in which quantitative and qualitative methods may be...Lofland, lq76), symbolic interactionism (Blumer, 1969), ethnomethodology (Turner, 1974), existentialism (Douglas & Johnson, 1977), and phenomenology ...orienting perspectives. Although most qualitative research will use some form of participant observation, those taking a phenomenological approach which

  16. Research on lunar materials. [optical, chemical, and electrical properties

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gold, T.

    1978-01-01

    Abstracts of 14 research reports relating to investigations of lunar samples are presented. The principal topics covered include: (1) optical properties of surface and core samples; (2) chemical composition of the surface layers of lunar grains: Auger electron spectroscopy of lunar soil and ground rock samples; (3) high frequency electrical properties of lunar soil and rock samples and their relevance for the interpretation of lunar radar observations; (4) the electrostatic dust transport process; (5) secondary electron emission characteristics of lunar soil samples and their relevance to the dust transportation process; (6) grain size distribution in surface soil and core samples; and (7) the optical and chemical effects of simulated solar wind (2keV proton and a particle radiation) on lunar material.

  17. Historical cohort study of mortality among chemical researchers

    SciTech Connect

    Maher, K.V.; Defonso, L.R.

    1986-03-01

    This historical cohort study examined mortality among 1,510 white male researchers employed from 1950-1959 who handled chemicals. During 1950-1979, 95 deaths were observed, significantly less than the 173.2 predicted by general population rates (SMR = 55). This was due to deficits in overall cancer deaths (SMR = 66), particularly respiratory cancer (SMR = 28), and reduced mortality from circulatory diseases and accidents. Those who had worked directly with chemicals for more than 5 yr and those who had the most hazardous exposures experienced similar low mortality for all causes, all cancers, and respiratory cancer. Although deaths due to digestive cancer were elevated among those with 1-5 yr of work experience, there was no excess among those working more than 5 yr as would be expected from occupational exposure.

  18. Temperature response of litter and soil organic matter decomposition is determined by chemical composition of organic material.

    PubMed

    Erhagen, Björn; Öquist, Mats; Sparrman, Tobias; Haei, Mahsa; Ilstedt, Ulrik; Hedenström, Mattias; Schleucher, Jürgen; Nilsson, Mats B

    2013-12-01

    The global soil carbon pool is approximately three times larger than the contemporary atmospheric pool, therefore even minor changes to its integrity may have major implications for atmospheric CO2 concentrations. While theory predicts that the chemical composition of organic matter should constitute a master control on the temperature response of its decomposition, this relationship has not yet been fully demonstrated. We used laboratory incubations of forest soil organic matter (SOM) and fresh litter material together with NMR spectroscopy to make this connection between organic chemical composition and temperature sensitivity of decomposition. Temperature response of decomposition in both fresh litter and SOM was directly related to the chemical composition of the constituent organic matter, explaining 90% and 70% of the variance in Q10 in litter and SOM, respectively. The Q10 of litter decreased with increasing proportions of aromatic and O-aromatic compounds, and increased with increased contents of alkyl- and O-alkyl carbons. In contrast, in SOM, decomposition was affected only by carbonyl compounds. To reveal why a certain group of organic chemical compounds affected the temperature sensitivity of organic matter decomposition in litter and SOM, a more detailed characterization of the (13) C aromatic region using Heteronuclear Single Quantum Coherence (HSQC) was conducted. The results revealed considerable differences in the aromatic region between litter and SOM. This suggests that the correlation between chemical composition of organic matter and the temperature response of decomposition differed between litter and SOM. The temperature response of soil decomposition processes can thus be described by the chemical composition of its constituent organic matter, this paves the way for improved ecosystem modeling of biosphere feedbacks under a changing climate.

  19. Chemical contaminants on DOE lands and selection of contaminant mixtures for subsurface science research

    SciTech Connect

    Riley, R.G.; Zachara, J.M.

    1992-04-01

    This report identifies individual contaminants and contaminant mixtures that have been measured in the ground at 91 waste sites at 18 US Department of Energy (DOE) facilities within the weapons complex. The inventory of chemicals and mixtures was used to identify generic chemical mixtures to be used by DOE`s Subsurface Science Program in basic research on the subsurface geochemical and microbiological behavior of mixed contaminants (DOE 1990a and b). The generic mixtures contain specific radionuclides, metals, organic ligands, organic solvents, fuel hydrocarbons, and polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) in various binary and ternary combinations. The mixtures are representative of in-ground contaminant associations at DOE facilities that are likely to exhibit complex geochemical behavior as a result of intercontaminant reactions and/or microbiologic activity stimulated by organic substances. Use of the generic mixtures will focus research on important mixed contaminants that are likely to be long-term problems at DOE sites and that will require cleanup or remediation. The report provides information on the frequency of associations among different chemicals and compound classes at DOE waste sites that require remediation.

  20. Chemical contaminants on DOE lands and selection of contaminant mixtures for subsurface science research

    SciTech Connect

    Riley, R.G.; Zachara, J.M. )

    1992-04-01

    This report identifies individual contaminants and contaminant mixtures that have been measured in the ground at 91 waste sites at 18 US Department of Energy (DOE) facilities within the weapons complex. The inventory of chemicals and mixtures was used to identify generic chemical mixtures to be used by DOE's Subsurface Science Program in basic research on the subsurface geochemical and microbiological behavior of mixed contaminants (DOE 1990a and b). The generic mixtures contain specific radionuclides, metals, organic ligands, organic solvents, fuel hydrocarbons, and polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) in various binary and ternary combinations. The mixtures are representative of in-ground contaminant associations at DOE facilities that are likely to exhibit complex geochemical behavior as a result of intercontaminant reactions and/or microbiologic activity stimulated by organic substances. Use of the generic mixtures will focus research on important mixed contaminants that are likely to be long-term problems at DOE sites and that will require cleanup or remediation. The report provides information on the frequency of associations among different chemicals and compound classes at DOE waste sites that require remediation.

  1. (CHINA) PERFLUORINATED ORGANIC COMPOUND EXPOSURE ASSESSMENT RESEARCH

    EPA Science Inventory

    A wide range of perfluorinated organic compounds (PFCs) has been used in a variety of industrial processes and consumer products. The most commonly studied PFCs include perfluorooctane sulfonate (PFOS) and perfluorooctanoic acid (PFOA), but there are many more compounds in this c...

  2. PERFLUORINATED ORGANIC COMPOUND EXPOSURE ASSESSMENT RESEARCH

    EPA Science Inventory

    A wide range of perfluorinated organic compounds (PFCs) has been used in a variety of industrial processes and consumer products. The most commonly studied PFCs include perfluorooctane sulfonate (PFOS) and perfluorooctanoic acid (PFOA), but there are many more compounds in this c...

  3. Research Summaries for Teachers, Organic Chemistry

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dolbier, William R., Jr.

    1970-01-01

    Proposes that the concept of neighboring group participation (NGP) be introduced in undergraduate organic chemistry. Discusses the requirements for NGP with respect to electron availability, kinetics, and steric factors. Finally, the author presents the controversy over bridged ions, particularly phenonium ions in the solvolyses of beta-pheylethyl…

  4. PERFLUORINATED ORGANIC COMPOUND EXPOSURE ASSESSMENT RESEARCH

    EPA Science Inventory

    A wide range of perfluorinated organic compounds (PFCs) has been used in a variety of industrial processes and consumer products. The most commonly studied PFCs include perfluorooctane sulfonate (PFOS) and perfluorooctanoic acid (PFOA), but there are many more compounds in this c...

  5. (CHINA) PERFLUORINATED ORGANIC COMPOUND EXPOSURE ASSESSMENT RESEARCH

    EPA Science Inventory

    A wide range of perfluorinated organic compounds (PFCs) has been used in a variety of industrial processes and consumer products. The most commonly studied PFCs include perfluorooctane sulfonate (PFOS) and perfluorooctanoic acid (PFOA), but there are many more compounds in this c...

  6. An Application of the Programmatic Organization Model to Applied Research.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Haring, Norris G.; Krug, David A.

    Presented is a programatic organization model which is applied to research needs in special education. Major advantages of the model are given to be that of providing for several research activities which focus on one common problem, reducing the duplication of research effort, providing greater efficiency in use of research personnel and…

  7. Prediction of the rodent carcinogenicity of organic compounds from their chemical structures using the FALS method.

    PubMed Central

    Moriguchi, I; Hirano, H; Hirono, S

    1996-01-01

    Fuzzy adaptive least-squares (FALS), a pattern recognition method recently developed in our laboratory for correlating structure with activity rating, was used to generate quantitative structure-activity relationship (QSAR) models on the carcinogenicity of organic compounds of several chemical classes. Using the predictive models obtained from the chemical class-based FALS QSAR approach, the rodent carcinogenicity or noncarcinogenicity of a group of organic chemicals currently being tested by the U.S. National Toxicology Program was estimated from their chemical structures. PMID:8933054

  8. Title III section 313 release reporting guidance: Estimating chemical releases from electrodeposition of organic coatings

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1988-01-01

    Appliers of organic coatings via electrodeposition (EDP) may be required to report annually any releases to the environment of certain chemicals regulated under Section 313, Title III, of the Superfund Amendments and Reauthorization Act (SARA) of 1986. The document has been developed to assist appliers of organic coatings in the completion of Part III (Chemical Specific Information) of the Toxic Chemical Release Inventory Reporting Form. Included herein is general information on toxic chemicals used and process wastes generated, along with several examples to demonstrate the types of data needed and various methodologies available for estimating releases.

  9. Title III section 313 release reporting guidance: Estimating chemical releases from spray application of organic coatings

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1988-01-01

    Spray applicators of organic coatings may be required to report annually any releases to the environment of certain chemicals regulated under Section 313, Title III, of the Superfund Amendments and Reauthorization Act (SARA) of 1986. The document has been developed to assist appliers of organic coatings in the completion of Part III (Chemical Specific Information) of the Toxic Chemical Release Inventory Reporting Form. Included herein is general information on toxic chemicals used and process wastes generated, along with several examples to demonstrate the types of data needed and various methodologies available for estimating releases.

  10. Prediction of organ toxicity endpoints by QSAR modeling based on precise chemical-histopathology annotations.

    PubMed

    Myshkin, Eugene; Brennan, Richard; Khasanova, Tatiana; Sitnik, Tatiana; Serebriyskaya, Tatiana; Litvinova, Elena; Guryanov, Alexey; Nikolsky, Yuri; Nikolskaya, Tatiana; Bureeva, Svetlana

    2012-09-01

    The ability to accurately predict the toxicity of drug candidates from their chemical structure is critical for guiding experimental drug discovery toward safer medicines. Under the guidance of the MetaTox consortium (Thomson Reuters, CA, USA), which comprised toxicologists from the pharmaceutical industry and government agencies, we created a comprehensive ontology of toxic pathologies for 19 organs, classifying pathology terms by pathology type and functional organ substructure. By manual annotation of full-text research articles, the ontology was populated with chemical compounds causing specific histopathologies. Annotated compound-toxicity associations defined histologically from rat and mouse experiments were used to build quantitative structure-activity relationship models predicting subcategories of liver and kidney toxicity: liver necrosis, liver relative weight gain, liver lipid accumulation, nephron injury, kidney relative weight gain, and kidney necrosis. All models were validated using two independent test sets and demonstrated overall good performance: initial validation showed 0.80-0.96 sensitivity (correctly predicted toxic compounds) and 0.85-1.00 specificity (correctly predicted non-toxic compounds). Later validation against a test set of compounds newly added to the database in the 2 years following initial model generation showed 75-87% sensitivity and 60-78% specificity. General hepatotoxicity and nephrotoxicity models were less accurate, as expected for more complex endpoints. © 2012 John Wiley & Sons A/S.

  11. Expatriate Training in International Nongovernmental Organizations: A Model for Research

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chang, Wei-Wen

    2005-01-01

    In light of the massive tsunami relief efforts that were still being carried out by humanitarian organizations around the world when this article went to press, this article points out a lack of human resources development research in international nongovernmental organizations (INGOs) and proposes a conceptual model for future empirical research.…

  12. Expatriate Training in International Nongovernmental Organizations: A Model for Research

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chang, Wei-Wen

    2005-01-01

    In light of the massive tsunami relief efforts that were still being carried out by humanitarian organizations around the world when this article went to press, this article points out a lack of human resources development research in international nongovernmental organizations (INGOs) and proposes a conceptual model for future empirical research.…

  13. Real-time monitoring of volatile organic compounds using chemical ionization mass spectroscopy: Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Thornberg, S.M.; Mowry, C.D.; Keenan, M.R.; Bender, S.F.A.; Owen, T.

    1997-04-01

    Volatile organic compound (VOC) emission to the atmosphere is of great concern to semiconductor manufacturing industries, research laboratories, the public, and regulatory agencies. Some industries are seeking ways to reduce emissions by reducing VOCs at the point of use (or generation). This paper discusses the requirements, design, calibration, and use of a sampling inlet/quadrupole mass spectrometer system for monitoring VOCs in a semiconductor manufacturing production line. The system uses chemical ionization to monitor compounds typically found in the lithography processes used to manufacture semiconductor devices (e.g., acetone, photoresist). The system was designed to be transportable from tool to tool in the production line and to give the operator real-time feedback so the process(es) can be adjusted to minimize VOC emissions. Detection limits ranging from the high ppb range for acetone to the low ppm range fore other lithography chemicals were achieved using chemical ionization mass spectroscopy at a data acquisition rate of approximately 1 mass spectral scan (30 to 200 daltons) per second. A demonstration of exhaust VOC monitoring was performed at a working semiconductor fabrication facility during actual wafer processing.

  14. Pesticide Chemical Research in Toxicology: Lessons from Nature.

    PubMed

    Casida, John E; Durkin, Kathleen A

    2017-01-17

    Pesticide researchers are students of nature, and each new compound and mechanism turns a page in the ever-expanding encyclopedia of life. Pesticides are both probes to learn about life processes and tools for pest management to facilitate food production and enhance health. In contrast to some household and industrial chemicals, pesticides are assumed to be hazardous to health and the environment until proven otherwise. About a thousand current pesticides working by more than 100 different mechanisms have helped understand many processes and coupled events. Pesticide chemical research is a major source of toxicology information on new natural products, novel targets or modes of action, resistance mechanisms, xenobiotic metabolism, selective toxicity, safety evaluations, and recommendations for safe and effective pest management. Target binding site models help define the effect of substituent changes and predict modifications for enhanced potency and safety and circumvention of resistance. The contribution of pesticide chemical research in toxicology is illustrated here with two each of the newer or most important insecticides, herbicides, and fungicides. The insecticides are imidacloprid and chlorantraniliprole acting on the nicotinic acetylcholine receptor and the ryanodine receptor Ca(2+) channel, respectively. The herbicides are glyphosate that inhibits aromatic amino acid biosynthesis and mesotrione that prevents plastoquinone and carotenoid formation. The fungicides are azoxystrobin inhibiting the Qo site of the cytochrome bc1 complex and prothioconazole inhibiting the 14α-demethylase in ergosterol biosynthesis. The two target sites involved for each type of pesticide account for 27-40% of worldwide sales for all insecticides, herbicides, and fungicides. In each case, selection for resistance involving a single amino acid change in the binding site or detoxifying enzyme circumvents the pesticide chemists's structure optimization and guarantees survival of

  15. Natural anthocyanins from phytoresources and their chemical researches.

    PubMed

    Li, Xinying; Ma, Hongyan; Huang, Huilian; Li, Defu; Yao, Shun

    2013-03-01

    Anthocyanins are a class of naturally occurring polyphenols which have been most widely studied in recent decades for the rapid development of relative techniques. This article first reviews the various anthocyanin resources including fruits, flowers, vegetables and beverages. Besides the direct extraction from natural resources, anthocyanins can also be obtained by semi- or total synthesis. After the introduction of new representative anthocyanins found in the past few years and the major relationships between structures and stability, modern separation and analysis technologies in related studies were summarised, which play an important role in chemical researches of anthocyanins.

  16. Quarterly progress report for the Chemical and Energy Research Section of the Chemical Technology Division: January-March 1999

    SciTech Connect

    Jubin, R.T.

    1999-11-01

    use in areas such as selective sorption, chemical sensing, and catalysis, as well as spectroscopic investigation into the fundamental interaction between ionic solvents and solutes in both low- and high-temperature ionic liquids. In the area of Separations and Materials Synthesis, fundamental studies explored the use of electromagnetic fields to enhance transport processes in multiphase separations; investigated nucleation and particle growth for the synthesis, characterization, application, and processing of ultrafine particles; and examined the use of electric fields to modify phase equilibria in multiphase separations processes. Other efforts involved enhanced oxidation of organic pollutants in aqueous solutions by applying electric fields to form microbubbles and the use of electric fields to improve distillation efficiency. Research was also directed toward the use of ozonation to treat water-soluble organics, the application of electrical and acoustic methods to remediate aerosol problems, and the development of improved means of decontamination using aqueous surfactant cleaners. Fluid Structure and Properties included molecular-based studies of systems with supercritical solvents, a multi-institutional initiative to develop a molecular understanding of reverse miscelles in supercritical carbon dioxide through experimentation and molecular simulation calculations, and molecular-based prediction of the structure and properties of long-chain molecules undergoing shear flow.

  17. Pharmaceuticals and other organic chemicals in selected north-central and northwestern Arkansas streams

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Haggard, B.E.; Galloway, J.M.; Green, W.R.; Meyer, M.T.

    2006-01-01

    Recently, our attention has focused on the low level detection of many antibiotics, pharmaceuticals, and other organic chemicals in water resources. The limited studies available suggest that urban or rural streams receiving wastewater effluent are more susceptible to contamination. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the occurrence of antibiotics, pharmaceuticals, and other organic chemicals at 18 sites on seven selected streams in Arkansas, USA, during March, April, and August 2004. Water samples were collected upstream and downstream from the influence of effluent discharges in northwestern Arkansas and at one site on a relatively undeveloped stream in north-central Arkansas. At least one antibiotic, pharmaceutical, or other organic chemical was detected at all sites, except at Spavinaw Creek near Mayesville, Arkansas. The greatest number of detections was observed at Mud Creek downstream from an effluent discharge, including 31 pharmaceuticals and other organic chemicals. The detection of these chemicals occurred in higher frequency at sites downstream from effluent discharges compared to those sites upstream from effluent discharges; total chemical concentration was also greater downstream. Wastewater effluent discharge increased the concentrations of detergent metabolites, fire retardants, fragrances and flavors, and steroids in these streams. Antibiotics and associated degradation products were only found at two streams downstream from effluent discharges. Overall, 42 of the 108 chemicals targeted in this study were found in water samples from at least one site, and the most frequently detected organic chemicals included caffeine, phenol, para-cresol, and acetyl hexamethyl tetrahydro naphthalene (AHTN). ?? ASA, CSSA, SSSA.

  18. Co-exposure with fullerene may strengthen health effects of organic industrial chemicals.

    PubMed

    Lehto, Maili; Karilainen, Topi; Róg, Tomasz; Cramariuc, Oana; Vanhala, Esa; Tornaeus, Jarkko; Taberman, Helena; Jänis, Janne; Alenius, Harri; Vattulainen, Ilpo; Laine, Olli

    2014-01-01

    In vitro toxicological studies together with atomistic molecular dynamics simulations show that occupational co-exposure with C60 fullerene may strengthen the health effects of organic industrial chemicals. The chemicals studied are acetophenone, benzaldehyde, benzyl alcohol, m-cresol, and toluene which can be used with fullerene as reagents or solvents in industrial processes. Potential co-exposure scenarios include a fullerene dust and organic chemical vapor, or a fullerene solution aerosolized in workplace air. Unfiltered and filtered mixtures of C60 and organic chemicals represent different co-exposure scenarios in in vitro studies where acute cytotoxicity and immunotoxicity of C60 and organic chemicals are tested together and alone by using human THP-1-derived macrophages. Statistically significant co-effects are observed for an unfiltered mixture of benzaldehyde and C60 that is more cytotoxic than benzaldehyde alone, and for a filtered mixture of m-cresol and C60 that is slightly less cytotoxic than m-cresol. Hydrophobicity of chemicals correlates with co-effects when secretion of pro-inflammatory cytokines IL-1β and TNF-α is considered. Complementary atomistic molecular dynamics simulations reveal that C60 co-aggregates with all chemicals in aqueous environment. Stable aggregates have a fullerene-rich core and a chemical-rich surface layer, and while essentially all C60 molecules aggregate together, a portion of organic molecules remains in water.

  19. Co-Exposure with Fullerene May Strengthen Health Effects of Organic Industrial Chemicals

    PubMed Central

    Róg, Tomasz; Cramariuc, Oana; Vanhala, Esa; Tornaeus, Jarkko; Taberman, Helena; Jänis, Janne; Alenius, Harri; Vattulainen, Ilpo; Laine, Olli

    2014-01-01

    In vitro toxicological studies together with atomistic molecular dynamics simulations show that occupational co-exposure with C60 fullerene may strengthen the health effects of organic industrial chemicals. The chemicals studied are acetophenone, benzaldehyde, benzyl alcohol, m-cresol, and toluene which can be used with fullerene as reagents or solvents in industrial processes. Potential co-exposure scenarios include a fullerene dust and organic chemical vapor, or a fullerene solution aerosolized in workplace air. Unfiltered and filtered mixtures of C60 and organic chemicals represent different co-exposure scenarios in in vitro studies where acute cytotoxicity and immunotoxicity of C60 and organic chemicals are tested together and alone by using human THP-1-derived macrophages. Statistically significant co-effects are observed for an unfiltered mixture of benzaldehyde and C60 that is more cytotoxic than benzaldehyde alone, and for a filtered mixture of m-cresol and C60 that is slightly less cytotoxic than m-cresol. Hydrophobicity of chemicals correlates with co-effects when secretion of pro-inflammatory cytokines IL-1β and TNF-α is considered. Complementary atomistic molecular dynamics simulations reveal that C60 co-aggregates with all chemicals in aqueous environment. Stable aggregates have a fullerene-rich core and a chemical-rich surface layer, and while essentially all C60 molecules aggregate together, a portion of organic molecules remains in water. PMID:25473947

  20. Spatiotemporal Data Organization and Application Research

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tan, C.; Yan, S.

    2017-09-01

    Organization and management of spatiotemporal data is a key support technology for intelligence in all fields of the smart city. The construction of a smart city cannot be realized without spatiotemporal data. Oriented to support intelligent applications this paper proposes an organizational model for spatiotemporal data, and details the construction of a spatiotemporal big data calculation, analysis, and service framework for highly efficient management and intelligent application of spatiotemporal data for the entire data life cycle.

  1. Space research on organs and tissues

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tischler, Marc E.; Morey-Holton, Emily

    1993-01-01

    Studies in space on various physiological systems have and will continue to provide valuable information on how they adapt to reduced gravitational conditions, and how living in a 1 g (gravity) environment has guided their development. Muscle and bone are the most notable tissues that respond to unweighting caused by lack of gravity. The function of specific muscles and bones relates directly to mechanical loading, so that removal of 'normal forces' in space, or in bedridden patients, causes dramatic loss of tissue mass. The cardiovascular system is also markedly affected by reduced gravity. Adaptation includes decreased blood flow to the lower extremities, thus decreasing the heart output requirement. Return to 1 g is associated with a period of reconditioning due to the deconditioning that occurs in space. Changes in the cardiovascular system are also related to responses of the kidney and certain endocrine (hormone-producing) organs. Changes in respiratory function may also occur, suggesting an effect on the lungs, though this adaptation is poorly understood. The neurovestibular system, including the brain and organs of the inner ear, must adapt to the disorientation caused by lack of gravity. Preliminary findings have been reported for liver. Additionally, endocrine organs responsible for release of hormones such as insulin, growth hormone, glucocorticoids, and thyroid hormone may respond to spaceflight.

  2. Sorption of organic chemicals to soil organic matter: influence of soil variability and pH dependence.

    PubMed

    Bronner, Guido; Goss, Kai-Uwe

    2011-02-15

    For modeling the sorption of organic compounds in soils it is typically assumed that the organic carbon/water partitioning coefficient (Koc) of neutral organic chemicals can be treated as a constant property that remains unaffected by the type of soil organic matter as well as pH in the soil solution. Here the validity of these assumptions is evaluated with a large and diverse experimental data set of our own and literature data. To this end sorption experiments with 3 different soils and one peat were carried out using a column method. Differences in log Koc at pH values of 4.5 and 7.2 were on average <0.06 log units for 60 chemicals on Pahokee Peat. This result indicates that protonation/deprotonation of carboxylic groups in humic matter has no significant influence on sorption. The soil-to-soil variability of Koc was within factor of 3 regardless of the type of chemicals. The Pahokee Peat standard from the International Humic Substances Society appears to represent Koc in solid soil organic matter from different origins with an accuracy of ±0.23 log units (root-mean-square error). The comparison of the sorption data in Pahokee Peat with literature sorption data from the air in hydrated humic and fulvic acids suggested that the thermodynamic cycle for converting sorption data between air and water is applicable provided that for small, highly polar chemicals an additional water phase in the hydrated organic matter is considered.

  3. Chemistry and the worm: Caenorhabditis elegans as a platform for integrating chemical and biological research.

    PubMed

    Hulme, S Elizabeth; Whitesides, George M

    2011-05-16

    This Review discusses the potential usefulness of the worm Caenorhabditis elegans as a model organism for chemists interested in studying living systems. C. elegans, a 1 mm long roundworm, is a popular model organism in almost all areas of modern biology. The worm has several features that make it attractive for biology: it is small (<1000 cells), transparent, and genetically tractable. Despite its simplicity, the worm exhibits complex phenotypes associated with multicellularity: the worm has differentiated cells and organs, it ages and has a well-defined lifespan, and it is capable of learning and remembering. This Review argues that the balance between simplicity and complexity in the worm will make it a useful tool in determining the relationship between molecular-scale phenomena and organism-level phenomena, such as aging, behavior, cognition, and disease. Following an introduction to worm biology, the Review provides examples of current research with C. elegans that is chemically relevant. It also describes tools-biological, chemical, and physical-that are available to researchers studying the worm.

  4. Activated persulfate for organic chemical degradation: A review.

    PubMed

    Matzek, Laura W; Carter, Kimberly E

    2016-05-01

    Activated persulfate reactions have widespread application for groundwater and environmental remediation, as many of these reactions involve destruction of environmental contaminants. Within the last five years, knowledge of activated persulfate degradation reactions has grown to include novel means of activating persulfate for enhanced removal of organic species. These current studies cover a long list of organic analytes, including pharmaceuticals, pesticides, halogenated compounds and dyes. An extensive review of recently published experimental parameters and results for the destruction of organic compounds via activated persulfate is presented. Focus is placed on emerging methodologies and manipulation of traditional activation techniques. Knowledge gaps are identified and discussed, as despite the number of publications on this subject, more broad-reaching guidelines are needed for optimizing applications of activated persulfate in water treatment. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Use of Fenton reagent to improve organic chemical biodegradability.

    PubMed

    Chamarro, E; Marco, A; Esplugas, S

    2001-03-01

    Fenton reagent has been used to test the degradation of different organic compounds (formic acid, phenol, 4-chlorophenol, 2,4-dichlorophenol and nitrobenzene) in aqueous solution. A stoichiometric coefficient for the Fenton reaction was found to be 0.5 mol of organic compound/mol of hydrogen peroxide, except for the formic acid where a value of approximately one was obtained (due to the direct formation of carbon dioxide). The treatment eliminates the toxic substances and increases the biodegradability of the treated water (measured as the ratio BOD5/COD). Biodegradability is attained when the initial compound is removed.

  6. Effects of organic solutes on chemical reactions of aluminum

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lind, Carol J.; Hem, John David

    1975-01-01

    Concentrations of organic matter in the general range of 1-10 milligrams per litre organic carbon are common in natural water, and many naturally occurrin7 organic compounds form aluminum complexes. The aluminum concentrations in near-neutral pH solutions may be 10-100 times higher than the values predicted from solubility data if formation of such organic complexes is ignored. The processes of polymerization of aluminum hydroxide and precipitation of gibbsite are inhibited by the presence of the organic flavone compound quercetin in concentrations as low as 10 x -5.3 mole per litre. Quercetin forms a complex, with a probable molar ratio of 1:2 aluminum to quercetin, that has a formation constant (f12) of about 10 12. A complex with a higher aluminum-quercetin ratio also was observed, but this material tends to evolve into a compound of low solubility that removes aluminum from solution. In the presence of both dissolved aluminum and aqueous silica, low concentrations of quercetin improved the yield of crystallized kaolinite and halloysite. Small amounts of well-shaped kaolinite and halloysite crystals were identified by electron microscopy in solutions with pH's in the range 6.5-8.5 after 155 days aging in one experimer t and 481 days aging in a repeated experiment. The bulk of the precipitated material was amorphous to X-rays, and crystalline material was too small a proportion of the total to give identifiable X-ray diffraction peaks. The precipitates had aluminum-silicon ratios near 1, and their solubility corresponded to that found by Hem, Roberson, Lind, and Polzer (1973) for similar aluminosilicate precipitated in the absence of organic solutes. The improved yield of crystalline material obtained in the presence of quercetin probably is the result of the influence of the organic compound on the aluminum hydroxide polymerization process. Natural water containing color imparted by organic material tends to be higher in aluminum than would be predicted by p

  7. Space chemical propulsion test facilities at NASA Lewis Research Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Urasek, Donald C.; Calfo, Frederick D.

    1993-01-01

    The NASA Lewis Research Center, located in Cleveland, Ohio has a number of space chemical propulsion test facilities which constitute a significant national space testing resource. The purpose of this paper is to make more users aware of these test facilities and to encourage their use through cooperative agreements between the government, industry, and universities. Research which is of interest to the government is especiallly encouraged and often can be done in a cooperative manner that best uses the resources of all parties. This paper presents an overview of the Lewis test facilities. These facilities are clustered into three test areas: the Rocket Engine Test Facilities (RETF), the Rocket Laboratory (RL), and the Cryogenic Components Laboratory (CCL).

  8. The 2010 Rankings of Chemical Education and Science Education Journals by Faculty Engaged in Chemical Education Research

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Towns, Marcy H.; Kraft, Adam

    2012-01-01

    Faculty active in chemical education research from around the world ranked 22 journals publishing research in chemical education and science education. The results of this survey can be used to supplement impact factors that are often used to compare the quality of journals in a field. Knowing which journals those in the field rank as top tier is…

  9. The 2010 Rankings of Chemical Education and Science Education Journals by Faculty Engaged in Chemical Education Research

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Towns, Marcy H.; Kraft, Adam

    2012-01-01

    Faculty active in chemical education research from around the world ranked 22 journals publishing research in chemical education and science education. The results of this survey can be used to supplement impact factors that are often used to compare the quality of journals in a field. Knowing which journals those in the field rank as top tier is…

  10. EVALUATION USING AN ORGANOPHILIC CLAY TO CHEMICALLY STABILIZE WASTE CONTAINING ORGANIC COMPOUNDS

    EPA Science Inventory

    A modified clay (organophilic) was utilized to evaluate the potential for chemically stabilizing a waste containing organic compounds. hemical bonding between the binder and the contaminants was indicated. eachate testing also indicated strong binding. Copy available at NTIS as ...

  11. Review of existing terrestrial bioaccumulation models and terrestrial bioaccumulation modeling needs for organic chemicals

    EPA Science Inventory

    Protocols for terrestrial bioaccumulation assessments are far less-developed than for aquatic systems. This manuscript reviews modeling approaches that can be used to assess the terrestrial bioaccumulation potential of commercial organic chemicals. Models exist for plant, inver...

  12. EVALUATION USING AN ORGANOPHILIC CLAY TO CHEMICALLY STABILIZE WASTE CONTAINING ORGANIC COMPOUNDS

    EPA Science Inventory

    A modified clay (organophilic) was utilized to evaluate the potential for chemically stabilizing a waste containing organic compounds. hemical bonding between the binder and the contaminants was indicated. eachate testing also indicated strong binding. Copy available at NTIS as ...

  13. PREDICTION OF CHEMICAL REACTIVITY PARAMETERS AND PHYSICAL PROPERTIES OF ORGANIC COMPOUNDS FROM MOLECULAR STRUCTURE USING SPARC

    EPA Science Inventory

    The computer program SPARC (SPARC Performs Automated Reasoning in Chemistry) has been under development for several years to estimate physical properties and chemical reactivity parameters of organic compounds strictly from molecular structure. SPARC uses computational algorithms...

  14. ESTIMATION OF PHYSICAL PROPERTIES AND CHEMICAL REACTIVITY PARAMETERS OF ORGANIC COMPOUNDS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The computer program SPARC (Sparc Performs Automated Reasoning in Chemistry)has been under development for several years to estimate physical properties and chemical reactivity parameters of organic compounds strictly from molecular structure. SPARC uses computational algorithms ...

  15. Review of existing terrestrial bioaccumulation models and terrestrial bioaccumulation modeling needs for organic chemicals

    EPA Science Inventory

    Protocols for terrestrial bioaccumulation assessments are far less-developed than for aquatic systems. This manuscript reviews modeling approaches that can be used to assess the terrestrial bioaccumulation potential of commercial organic chemicals. Models exist for plant, inver...

  16. PREDICTION OF CHEMICAL RESIDUES IN AQUATIC ORGANISMS FOR A FIELD DISCHARGE SITUATION.

    EPA Science Inventory

    A field study was performed which compared predicted and measured concentrations of chemicals in receiving water organisms from three sampling locations on Five Mile Creek, Birmingham, Al. Two point source discharges, both from coke manufacturing facilities, were included in the ...

  17. ESTIMATION OF PHYSICAL PROPERTIES AND CHEMICAL REACTIVITY PARAMETERS OF ORGANIC COMPOUNDS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The computer program SPARC (Sparc Performs Automated Reasoning in Chemistry)has been under development for several years to estimate physical properties and chemical reactivity parameters of organic compounds strictly from molecular structure. SPARC uses computational algorithms ...

  18. PREDICTION OF CHEMICAL REACTIVITY PARAMETERS AND PHYSICAL PROPERTIES OF ORGANIC COMPOUNDS FROM MOLECULAR STRUCTURE USING SPARC

    EPA Science Inventory

    The computer program SPARC (SPARC Performs Automated Reasoning in Chemistry) has been under development for several years to estimate physical properties and chemical reactivity parameters of organic compounds strictly from molecular structure. SPARC uses computational algorithms...

  19. PREDICTION OF CHEMICAL RESIDUES IN AQUATIC ORGANISMS FOR A FIELD DISCHARGE SITUATION.

    EPA Science Inventory

    A field study was performed which compared predicted and measured concentrations of chemicals in receiving water organisms from three sampling locations on Five Mile Creek, Birmingham, Al. Two point source discharges, both from coke manufacturing facilities, were included in the ...

  20. Real World of Industrial Chemistry: Ethylene: The Organic Chemical Industry's Most Important Building Block.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fernelius, W. Conrad, Ed.; And Others

    1979-01-01

    The value of ethylene, as the organic chemical industry's most important building block, is discussed. The discussion focuses on the source of ethylene, its various forms and functions, and the ways in which the forms are made. (SA)

  1. Real World of Industrial Chemistry: Ethylene: The Organic Chemical Industry's Most Important Building Block.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fernelius, W. Conrad, Ed.; And Others

    1979-01-01

    The value of ethylene, as the organic chemical industry's most important building block, is discussed. The discussion focuses on the source of ethylene, its various forms and functions, and the ways in which the forms are made. (SA)

  2. Prediction of Hydrolysis Products of Organic Chemicals under Environmental pH Conditions

    EPA Science Inventory

    Cheminformatics-based software tools can predict the molecular structure of transformation products using a library of transformation reaction schemes. This paper presents the development of such a library for abiotic hydrolysis of organic chemicals under environmentally relevant...

  3. Real World of Industrial Chemistry: Organic Chemicals from Carbon Monoxide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kolb, Kenneth E.; Kolb, Doris

    1983-01-01

    Carbon Monoxide obtained from coal may serve as the source for a wide variety of organic compounds. Several of these compounds are discussed, including phosgene, benzaldehyde, methanol, formic acid and its derivatives, oxo aldehydes, acrylic acids, and others. Commercial reactions of carbon monoxide are highlighted in a table. (JN)

  4. Real World of Industrial Chemistry: Organic Chemicals from Carbon Monoxide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kolb, Kenneth E.; Kolb, Doris

    1983-01-01

    Carbon Monoxide obtained from coal may serve as the source for a wide variety of organic compounds. Several of these compounds are discussed, including phosgene, benzaldehyde, methanol, formic acid and its derivatives, oxo aldehydes, acrylic acids, and others. Commercial reactions of carbon monoxide are highlighted in a table. (JN)

  5. International energy: Research organizations, 1988--1992. Revision 1

    SciTech Connect

    Hendricks, P.; Jordan, S.

    1993-06-01

    This publication contains the standardized names of energy research organizations used in energy information databases. Involved in this cooperative task are (1) the technical staff of the US DOE Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI) in cooperation with the member countries of the Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDE) and (2) the International Nuclear Information System (INIS). ETDE member countries are also members of the International Nuclear Information System (INIS). Nuclear organization names recorded for INIS by these ETDE member countries are also included in the ETDE Energy Database. Therefore, these organization names are cooperatively standardized for use in both information systems. This publication identifies current organizations doing research in all energy fields, standardizes the format for recording these organization names in bibliographic citations, assigns a numeric code to facilitate data entry, and identifies report number prefixes assigned by these organizations. These research organization names may be used in searching the databases ``Energy Science & Technology`` on DIALOG and ``Energy`` on STN International. These organization names are also used in USDOE databases on the Integrated Technical Information System. Research organizations active in the past five years, as indicated by database records, were identified to form this publication. This directory includes approximately 31,000 organizations that reported energy-related literature from 1988 to 1992 and updates the DOE Energy Data Base: Corporate Author Entries.

  6. Abiotic reduction reactions of anthropogenic organic chemicals in anaerobic systems: A critical review

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Macalady, Donald L.; Tratnyek, Paul G.; Grundl, Timothy J.

    1986-02-01

    This review is predicated upon the need for a detailed process-level understanding of factors influencing the reduction of anthropogenic organic chemicals in natural aquatic systems. In particular, abiotic reductions of anthropogenic organic chemicals are reviewed. The most important reductive reaction is alkyl dehalogenation (replacement of chloride with hydrogen) which occurs in organisms, sediments, sewage sludge, and reduced iron porphyrin model systems. An abiotic mechanism involving a free radical intermediate has been proposed. The abstraction of vicinal dihalides (also termed dehalogenation) is another reduction that may have an abiotic component in natural systems. Reductive dehalogenation of aryl halides has recently been reported and further study of this reaction is needed. Several other degradation reactions of organohalides that occur in anaerobic environments are mentioned, the most important of which is dehydrohalogenation. The reduction of nitro groups to amines has also been thoroughly studied. The reactions can occur abiotically, and are affected by the redox conditions of the experimental system. However, a relationship between nitro-reduction rate and measured redox potential has not been clearly established. Reductive dealkylation of the N- and O-heteroatom of hydrocarbon pollutants has been observed but not investigated in detail. Azo compounds can be reduced to their hydrazo derivatives and a thorough study of this reaction indicates that it can be caused by extracellular electron transfer agents. Quinone-hydroquinone couples are important reactive groups in humic materials and similar structures in resazurin and indigo carmine make them useful as models for environmental redox conditions. The interconversion of sulfones, sulfoxides, and sulfides is a redox process and is implicated in the degradation of several pesticides though the reactions need more study. Two reductive heterocyclic cleavage reactions are also mentioned. Finally, several

  7. MODELING MULTICOMPONENT ORGANIC CHEMICAL TRANSPORT IN THREE FLUID PHASE POROUS MEDIA

    EPA Science Inventory

    A two-dimensional finite-element model was developed to predict coupled transient flow and multicomponent transport of organic chemicals which can partition between nonaqueous phase liquid, water, gas and solid phases in porous media under the assumption of local chemical equilib...

  8. CTEPP-OH DATA ANALYTICAL RESULTS ORGANIZED BY CHEMICAL AND MEDIA

    EPA Science Inventory

    This data set contains the field sample data by chemical and matrix for CTEPP-OH. The data is organized at the sample, chemical level.

    The Children’s Total Exposure to Persistent Pesticides and Other Persistent Pollutant (CTEPP) study was one of the largest aggregate exposure ...

  9. MODELING MULTICOMPONENT ORGANIC CHEMICAL TRANSPORT IN THREE FLUID PHASE POROUS MEDIA

    EPA Science Inventory

    A two-dimensional finite-element model was developed to predict coupled transient flow and multicomponent transport of organic chemicals which can partition between nonaqueous phase liquid, water, gas and solid phases in porous media under the assumption of local chemical equilib...

  10. REVIEW OF VOLATILE ORGANIC COMPOUND SOURCE APPORTIONMENT BY CHEMICAL MASS BALANCE. (R826237)

    EPA Science Inventory

    The chemical mass balance (CMB) receptor model has apportioned volatile organic compounds (VOCs) in more than 20 urban areas, mostly in the United States. These applications differ in terms of the total fraction apportioned, the calculation method, the chemical compounds used ...

  11. REVIEW OF VOLATILE ORGANIC COMPOUND SOURCE APPORTIONMENT BY CHEMICAL MASS BALANCE. (R826237)

    EPA Science Inventory

    The chemical mass balance (CMB) receptor model has apportioned volatile organic compounds (VOCs) in more than 20 urban areas, mostly in the United States. These applications differ in terms of the total fraction apportioned, the calculation method, the chemical compounds used ...

  12. CTEPP-OH DATA ANALYTICAL RESULTS ORGANIZED BY CHEMICAL AND MEDIA

    EPA Science Inventory

    This data set contains the field sample data by chemical and matrix for CTEPP-OH. The data is organized at the sample, chemical level.

    The Children’s Total Exposure to Persistent Pesticides and Other Persistent Pollutant (CTEPP) study was one of the largest aggregate exposure ...

  13. Mechanical-chemical analyses and sub-chronic systemic toxicity of chemical treated organic bovine bone.

    PubMed

    Lee, Kwang-il; Lee, Jung-soo; Lee, Keun-soo; Jung, Hong-hee; Ahn, Chan-min; Kim, Young-sik; Shim, Young-bock; Jang, Ju-woong

    2015-12-01

    Sequentially chemical-treated bovine bone was not only evaluated by mechanical and chemical analyses but also implanted into the gluteal muscles of rats for 12 weeks to investigate potential local pathological effects and systemic toxicities. The test (chemical treated bone) and control (heat treated bone) materials were compared using scanning electron microscope (SEM), x-ray diffraction pattern, inductively coupled plasma analysis, and bending strength test. In the SEM images, the micro-porous structure of heat-treated bone was changed to sintered ceramic-like structure. The structure of bone mineral from test and control materials was analyzed as100% hydroxyapatite. The ratio of calcium (Ca) to potassium (P), the main inorganic elements, was same even though the Ca and P percentages of the control material was relatively higher than the test material. No death or critical symptoms arose from implantation of the test (chemical treated bone) and control (physiological saline) materials during 12 weeks. The implanted sites were macroscopically examined, with all the groups showing non-irritant results. Our results indicate that chemical processed bovine bone has a better mechanical property than the heat treated bone and the implantation of this material does not produce systemic or pathological toxicity.

  14. Chemical structure determines target organ carcinogenesis in rats

    PubMed Central

    Carrasquer, C. A.; Malik, N.; States, G.; Qamar, S.; Cunningham, S.L.; Cunningham, A.R.

    2012-01-01

    SAR models were developed for 12 rat tumour sites using data derived from the Carcinogenic Potency Database. Essentially, the models fall into two categories: Target Site Carcinogen – Non-Carcinogen (TSC-NC) and Target Site Carcinogen – Non-Target Site Carcinogen (TSC-NTSC). The TSC-NC models were composed of active chemicals that were carcinogenic to a specific target site and inactive ones that were whole animal non-carcinogens. On the other hand, the TSC-NTSC models used an inactive category also composed of carcinogens but to any/all other sites but the target site. Leave one out validations produced an overall average concordance value for all 12 models of 0.77 for the TSC-NC models and 0.73 for the TSC-NTSC models. Overall, these findings suggest that while the TSC-NC models are able to distinguish between carcinogens and non-carcinogens, the TSC-NTSC models are identifying structural attributes that associate carcinogens to specific tumour sites. Since the TSC-NTSC models are composed of active and inactive compounds that are genotoxic and non-genotoxic carcinogens, the TSC-NTSC models may be capable of deciphering non-genotoxic mechanisms of carcinogenesis. Together, models of this type may also prove useful in anticancer drug development since they essentially contain chemicals moieties that target specific tumour site. PMID:23066888

  15. Surface phenomena with organic coatings for chemical sensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Greibl, Wolfgang; Hayden, Oliver; Achatz, Paul; Fischerauer, G.; Scholl, G.; Dickert, Franz L.

    2002-02-01

    The surface modification of SAW (surface acoustic wave)- and QCM (quartz crystal microbalance)-devices proves very important in chemical sensing. Silanes on one hand are very useful for hydrophobizing of quartz-surfaces whereas on the other hand thiols are used to adsorb on gold. In this way the influence of humidity on the transducers, which originates in the hydrophilicity of the quartz is decreased. These monolayers not only reduce the cross-sensitivity to water but also enhance the sensor effects of solvent vapors. In order to obtain better selectivity molecular hollows, like calix[n]arenes can be attached to the spacers. Another way to improve the selectivity was found in the treatment of the device with mixtures of silanes and thiols, respectively. In this way cavities are produced in which analytes are incorporated and thus are detected in the lower ppm range. The surface of mass-sensitive devices was also modified in order to detect analytes in the nano- to micrometer range. Here a stamping process with cells yields patterns on polymer surfaces which favor the reinclusion of these microorganisms. These effects are due to geometrical effects and chemical interactions via an adapted polarity and hydrogen bonds of the chosen polymer. The sensor responses proved highly selective to the bacteria in respect to nutrient liquid and other microorganisms.

  16. Forest products research and development organizations : organization, governance, and measures of performance in a worldwide setting

    Treesearch

    Paul V. Ellefson; M.A. Kilgore; Kenneth E. Skog; Christopher D. Risbrudt

    2007-01-01

    The ability of forest products research and development organizations to contribute to a nation’s well-being requires that they be well organized, effectively managed, and held to high standards of performance. In order to obtain a better understanding of how such organizations are structured and administered, and how they judge organizational performance, a review of...

  17. Heteroepitaxial growth of 3-5 semiconductor compounds by metal-organic chemical vapor deposition for device applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Collis, Ward J.; Abul-Fadl, Ali

    1988-01-01

    The purpose of this research is to design, install and operate a metal-organic chemical vapor deposition system which is to be used for the epitaxial growth of 3-5 semiconductor binary compounds, and ternary and quaternary alloys. The long-term goal is to utilize this vapor phase deposition in conjunction with existing current controlled liquid phase epitaxy facilities to perform hybrid growth sequences for fabricating integrated optoelectronic devices.

  18. Organic chemicals jeopardize the health of freshwater ecosystems on the continental scale.

    PubMed

    Malaj, Egina; von der Ohe, Peter C; Grote, Matthias; Kühne, Ralph; Mondy, Cédric P; Usseglio-Polatera, Philippe; Brack, Werner; Schäfer, Ralf B

    2014-07-01

    Organic chemicals can contribute to local and regional losses of freshwater biodiversity and ecosystem services. However, their overall relevance regarding larger spatial scales remains unknown. Here, we present, to our knowledge, the first risk assessment of organic chemicals on the continental scale comprising 4,000 European monitoring sites. Organic chemicals were likely to exert acute lethal and chronic long-term effects on sensitive fish, invertebrate, or algae species in 14% and 42% of the sites, respectively. Of the 223 chemicals monitored, pesticides, tributyltin, polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, and brominated flame retardants were the major contributors to the chemical risk. Their presence was related to agricultural and urban areas in the upstream catchment. The risk of potential acute lethal and chronic long-term effects increased with the number of ecotoxicologically relevant chemicals analyzed at each site. As most monitoring programs considered in this study only included a subset of these chemicals, our assessment likely underestimates the actual risk. Increasing chemical risk was associated with deterioration in the quality status of fish and invertebrate communities. Our results clearly indicate that chemical pollution is a large-scale environmental problem and requires far-reaching, holistic mitigation measures to preserve and restore ecosystem health.

  19. Organic chemicals jeopardize the health of freshwater ecosystems on the continental scale

    PubMed Central

    Malaj, Egina; von der Ohe, Peter C.; Grote, Matthias; Kühne, Ralph; Mondy, Cédric P.; Usseglio-Polatera, Philippe; Brack, Werner; Schäfer, Ralf B.

    2014-01-01

    Organic chemicals can contribute to local and regional losses of freshwater biodiversity and ecosystem services. However, their overall relevance regarding larger spatial scales remains unknown. Here, we present, to our knowledge, the first risk assessment of organic chemicals on the continental scale comprising 4,000 European monitoring sites. Organic chemicals were likely to exert acute lethal and chronic long-term effects on sensitive fish, invertebrate, or algae species in 14% and 42% of the sites, respectively. Of the 223 chemicals monitored, pesticides, tributyltin, polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, and brominated flame retardants were the major contributors to the chemical risk. Their presence was related to agricultural and urban areas in the upstream catchment. The risk of potential acute lethal and chronic long-term effects increased with the number of ecotoxicologically relevant chemicals analyzed at each site. As most monitoring programs considered in this study only included a subset of these chemicals, our assessment likely underestimates the actual risk. Increasing chemical risk was associated with deterioration in the quality status of fish and invertebrate communities. Our results clearly indicate that chemical pollution is a large-scale environmental problem and requires far-reaching, holistic mitigation measures to preserve and restore ecosystem health. PMID:24979762

  20. Quarterly progress report for the Chemical and Energy Research Section of the Chemical Technology Division, April--June 1997

    SciTech Connect

    Jubin, R.T.

    1998-06-01

    The Chemical and Energy Research Section conducts basic and applied research and development in chemical engineering, applied chemistry, and bioprocessing, with an emphasis on energy-driven technologies and advanced chemical separations for nuclear and waste applications. The report describes the various tasks performed within six major areas of research: Hot Cell Operations, Process Chemistry and thermodynamics, Separations and Materials Synthesis, Solution Thermodynamics, biotechnology Research, and Molecular Studies. The name of a technical contact is included with each task described, and readers are encouraged to contact these individuals if they need additional information.

  1. A chemically stable europium metal-organic framework for bifunctional chemical sensor and recyclable on-off-on vapor response

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Dongbo; Liu, Jingjuan; Liu, Zhiliang

    2017-07-01

    A ratiometric luminescence sensing method is developed and makes the chemically stable Eu metal-organic framework to be the first bifunctional chemical sensor for Cd2+ and F- ions with naked-eye observation in the field of sensing applications utilizing luminescent Ln-MOFs. This is the first example of luminescent colorimetric sensor caused by the direct dual emissions of a single Ln-MOF. A recyclable vapoluminescent sensor for HCl and NH3 by the naked eye has also been realized.

  2. Visualising the equilibrium distribution and mobility of organic contaminants in soil using the chemical partitioning space.

    PubMed

    Wong, Fiona; Wania, Frank

    2011-06-01

    Assessing the behaviour of organic chemicals in soil is a complex task as it is governed by the physical chemical properties of the chemicals, the characteristics of the soil as well as the ambient conditions of the environment. The chemical partitioning space, defined by the air-water partition coefficient (K(AW)) and the soil organic carbon-water partition coefficient (K(OC)), was employed to visualize the equilibrium distribution of organic contaminants between the air-filled pores, the pore water and the solid phases of the bulk soil and the relative importance of the three transport processes removing contaminants from soil (evaporation, leaching and particle erosion). The partitioning properties of twenty neutral organic chemicals (i.e. herbicides, pharmaceuticals, polychlorinated biphenyls and volatile chemicals) were estimated using poly-parameter linear free energy relationships and superimposed onto these maps. This allows instantaneous estimation of the equilibrium phase distribution and mobility of neutral organic chemicals in soil. Although there is a link between the major phase and the dominant transport process, such that chemicals found in air-filled pore space are subject to evaporation, those in water-filled pore space undergo leaching and those in the sorbed phase are associated with particle erosion, the partitioning coefficient thresholds for distribution and mobility can often deviate by many orders of magnitude. In particular, even a small fraction of chemical in pore water or pore air allows for evaporation and leaching to dominate over solid phase transport. Multiple maps that represent soils that differ in the amount and type of soil organic matter, water saturation, temperature, depth of surface soil horizon, and mineral matters were evaluated.

  3. Accelerated Chemical Reactions and Organic Synthesis in Leidenfrost Droplets.

    PubMed

    Bain, Ryan M; Pulliam, Christopher J; Thery, Fabien; Cooks, R Graham

    2016-08-22

    Leidenfrost levitated droplets can be used to accelerate chemical reactions in processes that appear similar to reaction acceleration in charged microdroplets produced by electrospray ionization. Reaction acceleration in Leidenfrost droplets is demonstrated for a base-catalyzed Claisen-Schmidt condensation, hydrazone formation from precharged and neutral ketones, and for the Katritzky pyrylium into pyridinium conversion under various reaction conditions. Comparisons with bulk reactions gave intermediate acceleration factors (2-50). By keeping the volume of the Leidenfrost droplets constant, it was shown that interfacial effects contribute to acceleration; this was confirmed by decreased reaction rates in the presence of a surfactant. The ability to multiplex Leidenfrost microreactors, to extract product into an immiscible solvent during reaction, and to use Leidenfrost droplets as reaction vessels to synthesize milligram quantities of product is also demonstrated. © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  4. The destruction of halogenated organic chemicals by plasma pyrolysis.

    PubMed

    Barton, T G; Mordy, J A

    1984-08-01

    Very high destruction efficiencies for halogenated chemicals have been achieved by plasma pyrolysis. Destruction efficiencies exceeded 99.9999999% for tests with polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs). Preliminary tests with tetrachloromethane have obtained destruction efficiencies exceeding 99.99%. The plasma pyrolysis process involved the creation of a 250-kW plasma with a temperature in excess of 25 000 degrees C. The toxic material was injected into the plasma zone at a rate between 1 and 2 L/min. Thermochemical and photochemical dissociation of the toxic materials produced atoms and ions which recombined to form primarily H2, CO, HCl, and particulate carbon. The HCl was neutralized by NaOH. The flaring of the H2 and CO should destroy to a high degree any trace residuals. The application of plasma pyrolysis for the ultimate disposal of toxicological waste was also investigated. Rat carcasses containing mean lethal dosage of PCB were pyrolyzed.

  5. Catalyst accessibility to chemical reductants in metal-organic frameworks.

    PubMed

    Roy, Souvik; Pascanu, Vlad; Pullen, Sonja; González Miera, Greco; Martín-Matute, Belén; Ott, Sascha

    2017-03-18

    A molecular H2-evolving catalyst, [Fe2(cbdt)(CO)6] ([FeFe], cbdt = 3-carboxybenzene-1,2-dithiolate), has been attached covalently to an amino-functionalized MIL-101(Cr) through an amide bond. Chemical reduction experiments reveal that the MOF channels can be clogged by ion pairs that are formed between the oxidized reductant and the reduced catalyst. This effect is lessened in MIL-101-NH-[FeFe] with lower [FeFe] loadings. On longer timescales, it is shown that large proportions of the [FeFe] catalysts within the MOF engage in photochemical hydrogen production and the amount of produced hydrogen is proportional to the catalyst loading.

  6. Chemical transformations during ambient air sampling for organic vapors

    SciTech Connect

    Pellizzari, E.D.; Drost, K.J.

    1984-09-01

    Potential chemical transformations of olefins in the presence of ozone and high levels (ppm) of halogens (Cl/sub 2/, Br/sub 2/) were demonstrated when sampling ambient air with a sorbent cartridge. The use of stryene-d/sub 8/ and cyclohexene-d/sub 10/ spiked sampling devices and capillary gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (GC/MS) analysis allowed the detection and identification of several deuteriated oxidation and halogenated products. Dimethylamine-d/sub 6/ was converted in trace quantities (5-10 mg) to dimethylnitrosamine-d/sub 6/ when sampling was conducted in the presence of NO/sub x/. Oxidation reactions were prevented when filters (2.5 cm) employed for removing particulates were impregnated with 5-10 mg of sodium thiosulfate and placed in front of the sorbent cartridge. Halogenation reactions were also consideraly reduced.

  7. Conclusions, Research Needs, and Recommendations of the Expert Panel: Technical Workshop on Human Milk Surveillance and Research for Environmental Chemicals in the U.S.

    EPA Science Inventory

    Proceedings of "The Technical Workshop on Human Milk Surveillance and Research on Environmental Chemicals in the United States" was organized to develop state-of-the-science protocols describing the various aspects of such a program. The 2-day workshop was held at the Mi...

  8. Use of the Chemical Transformation Simulator as a Parameterization Tool for Modeling the Environmental Fate of Organic Chemicals and their Transformation Products

    EPA Science Inventory

    A Chemical Transformation Simulator is a web-based system for predicting transformation pathways and physicochemical properties of organic chemicals. Role in Environmental Modeling • Screening tool for identifying likely transformation products in the environment • Parameteri...

  9. Prediction of ecotoxicological behavior of chemicals: relationship between n-octanol/water partition coefficient and bioaccumulation of organic chemicals by alga Chlorella

    SciTech Connect

    Geyer, H.; Politzki, G.; Freitag, D.

    1984-01-01

    The bioaccumulation potential of organic chemicals by the green alga Chlorella fusca was determined. A quantitative relationship was found to exist between the lipophilicity (n-octanol/water partition coefficient) of the chemicals and the bioaccumulation factor.

  10. Use of the Chemical Transformation Simulator as a Parameterization Tool for Modeling the Environmental Fate of Organic Chemicals and their Transformation Products

    EPA Science Inventory

    A Chemical Transformation Simulator is a web-based system for predicting transformation pathways and physicochemical properties of organic chemicals. Role in Environmental Modeling • Screening tool for identifying likely transformation products in the environment • Parameteri...

  11. Identifying new persistent and bioaccumulative organics among chemicals in commerce. III: byproducts, impurities, and transformation products.

    PubMed

    Howard, Philip H; Muir, Derek C G

    2013-05-21

    The goal of this series of studies was to identify commercial chemicals that might be persistent and bioaccumulative (PB) and that were not being considered in current wastewater and aquatic environmental measurement programs. In this study, we focus on chemicals that are not on commercial chemical lists such as U.S. EPA's Inventory Update Rule but may be found as byproducts or impurities in commercial chemicals or are likely transformation products from commercial chemical use. We evaluated the 610 chemicals from our earlier publication as well as high production volume chemicals and identified 320 chemicals (39 byproducts and impurities, and 281 transformation products) that could be potential PB chemicals. Four examples are discussed in detail; these chemicals had a fair amount of information on the commercial synthesis and byproducts and impurities that might be found in the commercial product. Unfortunately for many of the 610 chemicals, as well as the transformation products, little or no information was available. Use of computer-aided software to predict the transformation pathways in combination with the biodegradation rules of thumb and some basic organic chemistry has allowed 281 potential PB transformation products to be suggested for some of the 610 commercial chemicals; more PB transformation products were not selected since microbial degradation often results in less persistent and less bioaccumulative metabolites.

  12. Research Mediation in Education: A Typology of Research Brokering Organizations that Exist across Canada

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cooper, Amanda Mae

    2013-01-01

    This paper explores the increasingly prominent role of research brokering organizations (RBOs) in strengthening connections between education research, policy and practice across Canada. This paper is organized in three sections. First, it provides a literature review of research mediation--exploring terminology, models and empirical work (albeit…

  13. Research Mediation in Education: A Typology of Research Brokering Organizations that Exist across Canada

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cooper, Amanda Mae

    2013-01-01

    This paper explores the increasingly prominent role of research brokering organizations (RBOs) in strengthening connections between education research, policy and practice across Canada. This paper is organized in three sections. First, it provides a literature review of research mediation--exploring terminology, models and empirical work (albeit…

  14. PHYSICOCHEMICAL PROPERTIES AS PREDICTORS OF ORGANIC CHEMICAL EFFECTS ON SOIL MICROBIAL RESPIRATION

    EPA Science Inventory

    Structure-activity analysis was used to evaluate the effects of 19 hazardous organic chemicals on microbial respiration in two slightly acidic soils (a Captina silt loam from Roane County Tennessee, and a McLaurin sandy loam from Stone County, Mississippi), both low in organic ca...

  15. PHYSICOCHEMICAL PROPERTIES AS PREDICTORS OF ORGANIC CHEMICAL EFFECTS ON SOIL MICROBIAL RESPIRATION

    EPA Science Inventory

    Structure-activity analysis was used to evaluate the effects of 19 hazardous organic chemicals on microbial respiration in two slightly acidic soils (a Captina silt loam from Roane County Tennessee, and a McLaurin sandy loam from Stone County, Mississippi), both low in organic ca...

  16. Organic fouling and chemical cleaning of nanofiltration membranes: measurements and mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Li, Qilin; Elimelech, Menachem

    2004-09-01

    Fouling and subsequent chemical cleaning of nanofiltration (NF) membranes used in water quality control applications are often inevitable. To unravel the mechanisms of organic fouling and chemical cleaning, it is critical to understand the foulant-membrane, foulant-foulant, and foulant-cleaning agent interactions at the molecular level. In this study, the adhesion forces between the foulant and the membrane surface and between the bulk foulant and the fouling layer were determined by atomic force microscopy (AFM). A carboxylate modified AFM colloid probe was used as a surrogate for humic acid, the major organic foulant in natural waters. The interfacial force data were combined with the NF membrane water flux measurements to elucidate the mechanisms of organic fouling and chemical cleaning. A remarkable correlation was obtained between the measured adhesion forces and the fouling and cleaning behavior of the membrane under various solution chemistries. The AFM measurements further confirmed that divalent calcium ions greatly enhance natural organic matter fouling by complexation and subsequent formation of intermolecular bridges among organic foulant molecules. Efficient chemical cleaning was achieved only when the calcium ion bridging was eliminated as a result of the interaction between the chemical cleaning agent and the fouling layer. The cleaning efficiency was highly dependent on solution pH and the concentration of the chemical cleaning agent.

  17. How useful are olfactometer experiments in chemical ecology research?

    PubMed

    Ballhorn, Daniel J; Kautz, Stefanie

    2013-07-01

    Olfactometer experiments, in which arthropods are given the choice between two or more odor sources to test behavioral preferences, are commonly used in chemical ecology research. Results of such often lead to conclusions on behavior in an ecologically relevant setting. However, it is widely unknown how well these experiments reflect actual behavior in nature. Recently, we used natural insect herbivores of wild lima bean plants to evaluate their behavior in Y-tube olfactometer experiments compared with feeding experiments. We demonstrated that depending on volatile concentration, insect sex significantly determined preference, and that independent of sex, the actual feeding choice of insects depended on defensive short-distance cues, which did not correlate with volatile cues emitted by the plants. Thus, our study shows that olfactory decisions do not reflect actual feeding choice and that olfactometer experiments may only provide a limited and simplified picture of actual decision making by insects.

  18. Modeling organic chemical fate in aquatic systems: Significance of bioaccumulation and relevant time-space scales

    SciTech Connect

    Thomann, R.V.

    1995-06-01

    The importance of aquatic food chain bioaccumulation of organic chemicals in contributing to human dose is derived. It is shown that for chemicals with log octanol water partition coefficients greater than about 3, the role of food chain transfer to fish consumed by humans becomes the more dominant route over drinking water. Modeling of aquatic food chain bioaccumulation then becomes necessary to accurately estimate dose of such chemicals to humans. The relevant time and space scales for groundwater and surface water also indicate a division of organic chemicals at a log octanol water partition coefficient of about 3. For chemicals greater than that level, groundwater transport is minimal, while for chemicals with log octanol water coefficients of less than about 3, detention times are long relative to surface water and biodegradation processes become more significant. An illustration is given of modeling the groundwater transport of two organic chemicals (BCEE and benzene) and a metal (chromium) at a Superfund site. The model indicates that after 10 years only a relatively small fraction of the chemicals had traveled in the groundwater about 300 m to the point of release from the site to surface water. On the other hand, steady state in the adjacent stream and lake is reached rapidly over a distance of 2000 m, illustrating the difference in spatial and temporal scales for the groundwater and surface water. 15 refs., 8 figs., 1 tab.

  19. EPA project-level research strategies for chemical mixtures: targeted research for meaningful results.

    PubMed

    Teuschler, Linda K; Hertzberg, Richard C; Rice, Glenn E; Simmons, Jane Ellen

    2004-12-01

    Project-level research strategies at the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency regarding chemical mixtures are impacted by administrative priorities, public interests, expert opinions, scientific advances, regulatory needs, and legislative actions, influencing the setting of priorities and goals. Perhaps, the most significant influence on conducting chemical mixtures research is the passage of laws requiring the EPA to investigate the potential toxicity of various mixtures, specifically the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act of 1980, the Food Quality Protection Act of 1996, and the Safe Drinking Water Act Amendments of 1996. Scarce resources are allocated to broadly defined issues for consideration by teams of scientists, who design and implement specific projects. Because resources are limited, projects may have several goals, e.g., filling specific data gaps to support a regulation and, simultaneously, producing data to evaluate a risk assessment method. Research areas of emphasis are shaped by risk assessment needs, data gap uncertainties, and experimental design considerations. This paper discusses factors shaping EPA research strategies for chemical mixtures and presents an example of efficient research planning to investigate potential toxicity from exposure to drinking water disinfection by-products.

  20. What Hydra can teach us about chemical ecology -how a simple, soft organism survives in a hostile aqueous environment.

    PubMed

    Rachamim, Tamar; Sher, Daniel

    2012-01-01

    Hydra and its fellow cnidarians - sea anemones, corals and jellyfish - are simple, mostly sessile animals that depend on bioactive chemicals for survival. In this review, we briefly describe what is known about the chemical armament of Hydra, and detail future research directions where Hydra can help illuminate major questions in chemical ecology, pharmacology, developmental biology and evolution. Focusing on two groups of putative toxins from Hydra - phospholipase A2s and proteins containing ShK and zinc metalloprotease domains, we ask: how do different venom components act together during prey paralysis? How is a venom arsenal created and how does it evolve? How is the chemical arsenal delivered to its target? To what extent does a chemical and biotic coupling exist between an organism and its environment? We propose a model whereby in Hydra and other cnidarians, bioactive compounds are secreted both as localized point sources (nematocyte discharges) and across extensive body surfaces, likely combining to create complex "chemical landscapes". We speculate that these cnidarian-derived chemical landscapes may affect the surrounding community on scales from microns to, in the case of coral reefs, hundreds of kilometers.

  1. Complex organic chemical balms of Pharaonic animal mummies.

    PubMed

    Buckley, Stephen A; Clark, Katherine A; Evershed, Richard P

    2004-09-16

    Millions of votive mummies of mammals, birds and reptiles were produced throughout ancient Egypt, with their popularity increasing during the reign of Amenhotep III (1400 bc) and thereafter. The scale of production has been taken to indicate that relatively little care and expense was involved in their preparation compared with human mummies. The accepted view is that animals were merely wrapped in coarse linen bandages and/or dipped in 'resin' before death. However, as with human mummification there was a range of qualities of treatments, and visual inspection of animal mummies suggests that the procedures used were often as complex as those used in humans (for example, evisceration and elaborate bandaging). Moreover, the ancient Egyptians treated animals with great respect, regarding them both as domestic pets and representatives of the gods; for example, the cat symbolized the goddess Bastet; the hawk, Horus; the ibis, Thoth, and so on. We report here the results of chemical investigations of tissues and wrappings from Pharaonic cat, hawk and ibis mummies using gas chromatography, gas chromatography-mass spectrometry, thermal desorption-gas chromatography-mass spectrometry and pyrolysis-gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. The analyses reveal the presence of highly complex mixtures of n-alkyl and cyclic biomarker components characteristic of fats, oils, beeswax, sugar gum, petroleum bitumen, and coniferous, Pistacia and possibly cedar resins. The mixture of balms is of comparable complexity to those used to mummify humans from the same period.

  2. Assessing mobility of household organic hazardous chemicals in landfill

    SciTech Connect

    Xie, R.; Zeiss, C.

    1995-11-01

    The principal components of these hazardous materials are motor oils, detergents, paints and pesticides. Occurrence of their ingredients in landfill leachate follows source release function that determines their discharge rate to groundwater. Five compounds were identified very mobile in the landfill based on mobility index calculations. They were phenolate for the motor oil group, ethylene oxide and thylene glycol from detergent group, and formaldehyde and methylethyl ketone (MEK) from the paint group. These five chemicals were used as tracing compounds for quantitative assessment of their emission to the groundwater. An analytical solution to a one dimensional convective-diffusion transport equation was used to model their transport in the landfill. The model into which the channeled flow was incorporated considered adsorption-desorption and degradation. Leachate from earlier stage of leaching had significantly higher concentrations of the tracing compounds in comparison to that produced later. Contaminant concentrations in leachate decreased with time and the decreases occurred in order of formaldehyde {ge} phenol > MEK {ge} ethylene glycol > ethylene oxide. Concentrations of phenol, formaldehyde, and ethylene glycol were less than 0.02 g/L, which is about 0.1% of initial concentration, after 11 weeks. It took 22 weeks for MEK to be reduced to the same concentration at a velocity of 6 pore volumes per year.

  3. Chemical equilibrium of minced turkey meat in organic acid solutions.

    PubMed

    Goli, T; Abi Nakhoul, P; Zakhia-Rozis, N; Trystram, G; Bohuon, P

    2007-02-01

    The distribution of acid (HA), anions (A(-)), free protons (H(3)O(+)) and bound protons (H(b)), in homogenized turkey meat was evaluated at various meat/water mass ratios of (1/4-1/10) during titration with acetic acid (0.25N) or lactic acid (0.2N). H(b) concentration was determined by titration with hydrochloric acid (0.075N) and a correlation for [H(b)]=f(pH) was proposed. A procedure was used to calculate the fractions of the various species in equilibrium, starting from an initial acid concentration in a meat/water system and assuming the accuracy of the pK(a) value of the pure weak acids despite the chemical complexity of meat. Calculated results were in very good agreement (±0.15) with experimental pH values, whatever the acid, meat batch or meat/water mass ratios used. Less than 1% of the total protons were free (H(3)O(+)) and determined the meat pH.

  4. Person-Organization Fit and Research on Instruction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Youngs, Peter; Pogodzinski, Ben; Grogan, Erin; Perrone, Frank

    2015-01-01

    Research from industrial and organizational (I-O) psychology indicates that outside of K-12 education, employees' sense of fit with their organizations is often associated with job satisfaction, performance, commitment, and retention. Person-organization (P-O) fit has been conceptualized as the degree of congruence between an…

  5. Person-Organization Fit and Research on Instruction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Youngs, Peter; Pogodzinski, Ben; Grogan, Erin; Perrone, Frank

    2015-01-01

    Research from industrial and organizational (I-O) psychology indicates that outside of K-12 education, employees' sense of fit with their organizations is often associated with job satisfaction, performance, commitment, and retention. Person-organization (P-O) fit has been conceptualized as the degree of congruence between an…

  6. Exploiting Diffusion Barrier and Chemical Affinity of Metal-Organic Frameworks for Efficient Hydrogen Isotope Separation.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jin Yeong; Balderas-Xicohténcatl, Rafael; Zhang, Linda; Kang, Sung Gu; Hirscher, Michael; Oh, Hyunchul; Moon, Hoi Ri

    2017-09-29

    Deuterium plays a pivotal role in industrial and scientific research, and is irreplaceable for various applications such as isotope tracing, neutron moderation, and neutron scattering. In addition, deuterium is a key energy source for fusion reactions. Thus, the isolation of deuterium from a physico-chemically almost identical isotopic mixture is a seminal challenge in modern separation technology. However, current commercial approaches suffer from extremely low separation efficiency (i.e., cryogenic distillation, selectivity of 1.5 at 24 K), requiring a cost-effective and large-scale separation technique. Herein, we report a highly effective hydrogen isotope separation system based on metal-organic frameworks (MOFs) having the highest reported separation factor as high as ∼26 at 77 K by maximizing synergistic effects of the chemical affinity quantum sieving (CAQS) and kinetic quantum sieving (KQS). For this purpose, the MOF-74 system having high hydrogen adsorption enthalpies due to strong open metal sites is chosen for CAQS functionality, and imidazole molecules (IM) are employed to the system for enhancing the KQS effect. To the best of our knowledge, this work is not only the first attempt to implement two quantum sieving effects, KQS and CAQS, in one system, but also provides experimental validation of the utility of this system for practical industrial usage by isolating high-purity D2 through direct selective separation studies using 1:1 D2/H2 mixtures.

  7. Self-organization of disc-like molecules: chemical aspects.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Sandeep

    2006-01-01

    The hierarchical self-assembly of disc-shaped molecules leads to the formation of discotic liquid crystals. These materials are of fundamental importance not only as models for the study of energy and charge migration in self-organized systems but also as functional materials for device applications such as, one-dimensional conductors, photoconductors, light emitting diodes, photovoltaic solar cells, field-effect transistors and gas sensors. The negative birefringence films formed by polymerized nematic discotic liquid crystals have been commercialized as compensation foils to enlarge the viewing angle of commonly used twisted nematic liquid crystal displays. To date the number of discotic liquid crystals derived from more than 50 different cores comes to about 3000. This critical review describes, after an in-depth introduction, recent advances in basic design principles and synthetic approaches towards the preparation of most frequently encountered discotic liquid crystals.

  8. Rapid destruction of organic chemicals in groundwater using sunlight

    SciTech Connect

    Tyner, C.E.; Haslund, C.A.; Pacheco, J.E.; Holmes, J.T.

    1989-01-01

    We are currently investigating a solar-driven photocatalytic process that promises to destroy low concentrations of hazardous organic molecules in large volumes of contaminated groundwater or industrial waste streams. Preliminary results of laboratory-scale screening tests using a model compound, salicylic acid, and titanium dioxide catalyst have shown that no measurable reaction occurs without both uv light and catalyst; no measurable volatilization of the salicylic acid occurs at room temperature; salicylic acid destruction rates depend on catalyst supplier and concentration and on uv light intensity; and some intermediates are being formed and subsequently destroyed. Observed reaction rates are consistent with those observed in an initial pilot-scale solar test of a falling-film reactor, although further testing will be required to quantify the comparison. 10 refs., 5 figs.

  9. Modeling the elution of organic chemicals from a melting homogeneous snow pack.

    PubMed

    Meyer, Torsten; Wania, Frank

    2011-06-01

    Organic chemicals are often released in peak concentrations from melting snow packs. A simple, mechanistic snowmelt model was developed to simulate and predict the elution of organic substances from melting, homogeneous snow, as influenced by chemical properties and snow pack characteristics. The model calculates stepwise the chemical transport along with the melt water flow in a multi-layered snow pack, based on chemical equilibrium partitioning between the individual bulk snow phases. The model succeeds in reproducing the elution behavior of several organic contaminants observed in previously conducted cold room experiments. The model aided in identifying four different types of enrichment of organic substances during snowmelt. Water soluble substances experience peak releases early during a melt period (type 1), whereas chemicals that strongly sorb to particulate matter (PM) or snow grain surfaces elute at the end of melting (type 2). Substances that are somewhat water soluble and at the same time have a high affinity for snow grain surfaces may exhibit increasing concentrations in the melt water (type 3). Finally, elution sequences involving peak loads both at the beginning and the end of melting are simulated for chemicals that are partially dissolved in the aqueous melt water phase and partially sorbed to PM (type 4). The extent of type 1 enrichment mainly depends on the snow depth, whereby deeper snow generates more pronounced concentration peaks. PM influences the elution behavior of organic chemicals strongly because of the very large natural variability in the type and amount of particles present in snow. Urban and road-side snow rich in PM can generate type 2 concentration peaks at the end of the melt period for even relatively water soluble substances. From a clean, melting snow pack typical for remote regions, even fairly hydrophobic chemicals can be released in type 1 mode while being almost completely dissolved in the aqueous melt water phase. The

  10. Chemically selective coated quartz-crystal-microbalance (QCM) array for detection of volatile organic chemicals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schneider, Thomas W.; Frye-Mason, Gregory C.; Martin, Stephen J.; Spates, James J.; Bohuszewicz, Teresa V.; Osbourn, Gordon C.; Bartholomew, John W.

    1998-12-01

    Liquid flow cells have been fabricated to prepare an array of QCMs operating simultaneously for detection and identification of VOCs in water. Two signals, a frequency response and a damping voltage response, were obtained per resonator. A blank QCM was used as a reference to account for changes in liquid density and viscosity. Nine different polymer coatings applied using a spin coat technique have been examined for VOC response under liquid flow conditions. A matrix of three classes of VOCs were examined for each coating with four chemicals in each class. The three classes of VOCs are polar, nonpolar and chlorinated. A pattern recognition technique, called visually empirical region of influence, was used to cluster the responses in n- dimensional space. Chemicals within a class varying by only one methyl group (e.g., toluene and xylene) are easily discriminated using only two different coatings with three different QCM responses. All chemicals were easily separated and detected with a total of 5 films and 6 responses with >99% accuracy.

  11. Quarterly progress report for the Chemical and Energy Research Section of the Chemical Technology Division: July--September 1997

    SciTech Connect

    Jubin, R.T.

    1998-07-01

    This report summarizes the major activities conducted in the Chemical and Energy Research Section of the Chemical Technology Division at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) during the period July--September 1997. The section conducts basic and applied research and development in chemical engineering, applied chemistry, and bioprocessing, with an emphasis on energy-driven technologies and advanced chemical separations for nuclear and waste applications. The report describes the various tasks performed within nine major areas of research: Hot Cell Operations, Process Chemistry and Thermodynamics, Molten Salt Reactor Experiment (MSRE) Remediation Studies, Chemistry Research, Biotechnology, Separations and Materials Synthesis, Fluid Structure and Properties, Biotechnology Research, and Molecular Studies. The name of a technical contact is included with each task described, and readers are encouraged to contact these individuals if they need additional information.

  12. Microbial metabolism fuels ecosystem-scale organic matter transformations: an integrated biological and chemical perspective

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wrighton, K. C.; Narrowe, A. B.; Angle, J.; Stefanik, K. S.; Daly, R. A.; Johnston, M.; Miller, C. S.

    2014-12-01

    Freshwater saturated sediments and soils represent vital ecosystems due to their nutrient cycling capacities and their prominent contribution to global greenhouse gas emissions. However, the diversity of microorganisms and metabolic pathways involved in carbon cycling, and the impacts of these processes on other biogeochemical cycles remain poorly understood. Major advances in DNA sequencing have helped forge linkages between the previously disconnected biological and chemical components of these systems. Here, we present data on the use of assembly-based metagenomics to generate hypotheses on microbial carbon degradation and biogeochemical cycling in waterlogged sediments and soils. DNA sequencing from a fresh water aquifer adjacent to the Colorado River in Rifle, CO yielded extensive genome recovery from multiple previously unknown bacterial lineages. Fermentative metabolisms encoded by these genomes drive nitrogen, hydrogen, and sulfur cycling in this subsurface system. We are also applying a similar approach to identify microbial processes in a freshwater wetland on Lake Erie, OH. Given the increased diversity (increased richness, decreased evenness, and strain variation) of wetland sediment microbial communities, we modified methods for specialized assembly of long taxonomic marker gene amplicons (EMIRGE) to create a biogeographical map of Fungi, Archaea, and Bacteria along depth and hydrological transects. This map reveals that the microbial community associated with the top two depths (>7 cm) is significantly different from bottom depths (7-40 cm). Dissolved organic matter (DOM) molecular weight and the presence of oxidized terminal electron acceptors best predict differences in microbial community structure. Laboratory mesocosms amended with pore-water DOM, in situ soil communities, and variable oxygen conditions link DOM composition and redox to microbial metabolic networks, biogeochemical cycles, and green house gas emission. Organism identities from

  13. Estimating the toxicities of organic chemicals to bioluminescent bacteria and activated sludge.

    PubMed

    Ren, Shijin; Frymier, Paul D

    2002-10-01

    Toxicity assays based on bioluminescent bacteria have several advantages including a quick response and an easily measured signal. The Shk1 assay is a procedure for wastewater toxicity testing based on the bioluminescent bacterium Shk1. Using the Shk1 assay, the toxicity of 98 organic chemicals were measured and EC50 values were obtained. Quantitative structure-activity relationship (QSAR) models based on the logarithm of the octanol-water partition coefficient (log(Kow)) were developed for individual groups of organic chemicals with different functional groups. The correlation coefficients for different groups of organic compounds varied between 0.69 and 0.99. An overall QSAR model without discriminating the functional groups, which can be used for a quick estimate of the toxicities of organic chemicals, was also developed and model predictions were compared to experimental data. The model accuracy was found to be one order of magnitude from the observed values.

  14. Mammalian models of chemically induced primary malignancies exploitable for imaging-based preclinical theragnostic research

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Yewei; Yin, Ting; Feng, Yuanbo; Cona, Marlein Miranda; Huang, Gang; Liu, Jianjun; Song, Shaoli; Jiang, Yansheng; Xia, Qian; Swinnen, Johannes V.; Bormans, Guy; Himmelreich, Uwe; Oyen, Raymond

    2015-01-01

    Compared with transplanted tumor models or genetically engineered cancer models, chemically induced primary malignancies in experimental animals can mimic the clinical cancer progress from the early stage on. Cancer caused by chemical carcinogens generally develops through three phases namely initiation, promotion and progression. Based on different mechanisms, chemical carcinogens can be divided into genotoxic and non-genotoxic ones, or complete and incomplete ones, usually with an organ-specific property. Chemical carcinogens can be classified upon their origins such as environmental pollutants, cooked meat derived carcinogens, N-nitroso compounds, food additives, antineoplastic agents, naturally occurring substances and synthetic carcinogens, etc. Carcinogen-induced models of primary cancers can be used to evaluate the diagnostic/therapeutic effects of candidate drugs, investigate the biological influential factors, explore preventive measures for carcinogenicity, and better understand molecular mechanisms involved in tumor initiation, promotion and progression. Among commonly adopted cancer models, chemically induced primary malignancies in mammals have several advantages including the easy procedures, fruitful tumor generation and high analogy to clinical human primary cancers. However, in addition to the time-consuming process, the major drawback of chemical carcinogenesis for translational research is the difficulty in noninvasive tumor burden assessment in small animals. Like human cancers, tumors occur unpredictably also among animals in terms of timing, location and the number of lesions. Thanks to the availability of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) with various advantages such as ionizing-free scanning, superb soft tissue contrast, multi-parametric information, and utility of diverse contrast agents, now a workable solution to this bottleneck problem is to apply MRI for noninvasive detection, diagnosis and therapeutic monitoring on those otherwise

  15. Experimental Determination of Chemical Diffusion within Secondary Organic Aerosol Particles

    SciTech Connect

    Abramson, Evan H.; Imre, D.; Beranek, Josef; Wilson, Jacqueline; Zelenyuk, Alla

    2013-02-28

    Formation, properties, transformations, and temporal evolution of secondary organic aerosols (SOA) particles strongly depend on particle phase. Recent experimental evidence from a number of groups indicates that SOA is in a semi-solid phase, the viscosity of which remained unknown. We find that when SOA is made in the presence of vapors of volatile hydrophobic molecules the SOA particles absorb and trap them. Here, we illustrate that it is possible to measure the evaporation rate of these molecules that is determined by their diffusion in SOA, which is then used to calculate a reasonably accurate value for the SOA viscosity. We use pyrene as a tracer molecule and a-pinene SOA as an illustrative case. It takes ~24 hours for half the pyrene to evaporate to yield a viscosity of 10^8 Pa s for a-pinene. This viscosity is consistent with measurements of particle bounce and evaporation rates. We show that viscosity of 10^8 Pa s implies coalescence times of minutes, consistent with the findings that SOA particles are spherical. Similar measurements on aged SOA particles doped with pyrene yield a viscosity of 10^9 Pa s, indicating that hardening occurs with time, which is consistent with observed decrease in water uptake and evaporation rate with aging.

  16. From consumption to harvest: Environmental fate prediction of excreted ionizable trace organic chemicals.

    PubMed

    Polesel, Fabio; Plósz, Benedek Gy; Trapp, Stefan

    2015-11-01

    Excreted trace organic chemicals, e.g., pharmaceuticals and biocides, typically undergo incomplete elimination in municipal wastewater treatment plants (WWTPs) and are released to surface water via treated effluents and to agricultural soils through sludge amendment and/or irrigation with freshwater or reclaimed wastewater. Recent research has shown the tendency for these substances to accumulate in food crops. In this study, we developed and applied a simulation tool to predict the fate of three ionizable trace chemicals (triclosan-TCS, furosemide-FUR, ciprofloxacin-CIP) from human consumption/excretion up to the accumulation in soil and plant, following field amendment with sewage sludge or irrigation with river water (assuming dilution of WWTP effluent). The simulation tool combines the SimpleTreat model modified for fate prediction of ionizable chemicals in a generic WWTP and a recently developed dynamic soil-plant uptake model. The simulation tool was tested using country-specific (e.g., consumption/emission rates, precipitation and temperature) input data. A Monte Carlo-based approach was adopted to account for the uncertainty associated to physico-chemical and biokinetic model parameters. Results obtained in this study suggest significant accumulation of TCS and CIP in sewage sludge (1.4-2.8 mg kgDW(-1)) as compared to FUR (0.02-0.11 mg kgDW(-1)). For the latter substance, more than half of the influent load (60.1%-72.5%) was estimated to be discharged via WWTP effluent. Specific emission rates (g ha(-1) a(-1)) of FUR to soil via either sludge application or irrigation were up to 300 times lower than for TCS and CIP. Nevertheless, high translocation potential to wheat was predicted for FUR, reaching concentrations up to 4.3 μg kgDW(-1) in grain. Irrigation was found to enhance the relative translocation of FUR to plant (45.3%-48.9% of emission to soil), as compared to sludge application (21.9%-27.6%). A comparison with peer-reviewed literature showed

  17. Improved exposure estimation in soil screening and clean-up criteria for volatile organic chemicals.

    PubMed

    DeVaull, George E

    2017-02-18

    Soil clean-up criteria define acceptable concentrations of organic chemical constituents for exposed humans. These criteria sum the estimated soil exposure over multiple pathways. Assumptions for ingestion, dermal contact, and dust exposure generally presume a chemical persists in surface soils at a constant concentration level for the entire exposure duration. For volatile chemicals this is an unrealistic assumption. A calculation method is presented for surficial soil criteria which include volatile depletion of chemical for these uptake pathways. The depletion estimates compare favorably with measured concentration profiles and with field measurements of soil concentration. Corresponding volatilization estimates compare favorably with measured data for a wide range of volatile and semi-volatile chemicals, including instances with and without the presence of a mixed-chemical residual phase. Selected examples show application of the revised factors in estimating screening levels for benzene in surficial soils. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  18. Access to organs and tissues for research from the organ donor pool within the UK.

    PubMed

    Fuller, Barry J

    2011-02-01

    The donor organ transplant scenario offers one potential route to access high-quality human organs and tissues for research. There are well-established networks for co-ordinating organ donation events across many countries, including the UK, which include robust mechanisms for obtaining consent for ethically-approved research. Within the UK, the challenge for the next few years is to facilitate this research donation with respect to regulatory pathways directed by the Human Tissue Act, which covers all aspects of access to human tissues.

  19. Passive Sampling in Regulatory Chemical Monitoring of Nonpolar Organic Compounds in the Aquatic Environment.

    PubMed

    Booij, Kees; Robinson, Craig D; Burgess, Robert M; Mayer, Philipp; Roberts, Cindy A; Ahrens, Lutz; Allan, Ian J; Brant, Jan; Jones, Lisa; Kraus, Uta R; Larsen, Martin M; Lepom, Peter; Petersen, Jördis; Pröfrock, Daniel; Roose, Patrick; Schäfer, Sabine; Smedes, Foppe; Tixier, Céline; Vorkamp, Katrin; Whitehouse, Paul

    2016-01-05

    We reviewed compliance monitoring requirements in the European Union, the United States, and the Oslo-Paris Convention for the protection of the marine environment of the North-East Atlantic, and evaluated if these are met by passive sampling methods for nonpolar compounds. The strengths and shortcomings of passive sampling are assessed for water, sediments, and biota. Passive water sampling is a suitable technique for measuring concentrations of freely dissolved compounds. This method yields results that are incompatible with the EU's quality standard definition in terms of total concentrations in water, but this definition has little scientific basis. Insufficient quality control is a present weakness of passive sampling in water. Laboratory performance studies and the development of standardized methods are needed to improve data quality and to encourage the use of passive sampling by commercial laboratories and monitoring agencies. Successful prediction of bioaccumulation based on passive sampling is well documented for organisms at the lower trophic levels, but requires more research for higher levels. Despite the existence of several knowledge gaps, passive sampling presently is the best available technology for chemical monitoring of nonpolar organic compounds. Key issues to be addressed by scientists and environmental managers are outlined.

  20. The status of soil contamination by semivolatile organic chemicals (SVOCs) in China: a review.

    PubMed

    Cai, Quan-Ying; Mo, Ce-Hui; Wu, Qi-Tang; Katsoyiannis, Athanasios; Zeng, Qiao-Yun

    2008-01-25

    This paper summarizes the published scientific data on the soil contamination by semivolatile organic chemicals (SVOCs) in China. Data has been found for more than 150 organic compounds which were grouped into six classes, namely, polychlorinated dibenzo-p-dioxins and dibenzofurans (PCDD/Fs), polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), organochlorine pesticides (OCPs), polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs) and phthalic acid esters (PAEs). An overview of data collected from the literature is presented in this paper. The Chinese regulation and/or other maximum acceptable values for SVOCs were used for the characterization of soils. In general, the compounds that are mostly studied in Chinese soils are OCPs, PAHs and PCBs. According to the studies reviewed here, the most abundant compounds were PAEs and PAHs (up to 46 and 28 mg kg(-1) dry weight, respectively); PCBs and OCPs occurred generally at concentrations lower than 100 microg kg(-1) dry weight. Nevertheless, quite high concentrations of PCDD/Fs, PCBs and PBDEs were observed in contaminated sites (e.g., the sites affected by electronic waste activities). The average concentrations of PAHs and OCPs in soils of North China were higher than those in South China. The principal component analysis demonstrated different distribution patterns for PAH, PCB and PCDD/F congeners and for the various sites/regions examined. The isomer ratios of DDTs and hexachlorocyclohexanes (HCHs) indicated different sources and residue levels in soils. Finally, this review has highlighted several areas where further research is considered necessary.

  1. Benchmarking biology research organizations using a new, dedicated tool.

    PubMed

    van Harten, Willem H; van Bokhorst, Leonard; van Luenen, Henri G A M

    2010-02-01

    International competition forces fundamental research organizations to assess their relative performance. We present a benchmark tool for scientific research organizations where, contrary to existing models, the group leader is placed in a central position within the organization. We used it in a pilot benchmark study involving six research institutions. Our study shows that data collection and data comparison based on this new tool can be achieved. It proved possible to compare relative performance and organizational characteristics and to generate suggestions for improvement for most participants. However, strict definitions of the parameters used for the benchmark and a thorough insight into the organization of each of the benchmark partners is required to produce comparable data and draw firm conclusions.

  2. Uptake and mobilization of organic chemicals with clouds: evidence from a hail sample.

    PubMed

    Ma, Jianmin; Sverko, Ed; Su, Yushan; Zhang, Junhua; Gao, Hong

    2013-09-03

    Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) and polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) were measured in hail samples collected during a storm that occurred on a spring morning in Toronto, Canada. The presence of these organic chemicals in hail suggests that clouds likely provide an atmospheric transport pathway for these substances in the free atmosphere. Results reported here may carry significant implications for atmospheric transport, mass balance, tropospheric cold trapping, and environmental fate of organic chemicals. Backward trajectories along with measured and modeled cloud cover show that clouds causing the hail event were formed and advected from the midwestern and southeastern United States. After being emitted to the atmosphere, the organic chemicals were likely lifted by atmospheric ascending motions to a higher atmospheric elevation and partitioned onto clouds. These clouds then carry the organic chemicals to a downwind location where they are deposited to the ground surface via precipitation. We found that the organic chemicals with high solubility and vapor pressure tend to partition into clouds through sorption to cloudwater droplets and ice particles. It was found that approximately 7-30% of pyrene could be sorbed into cloudwater droplets and ice particles in this hail event at the expense of reduced gas-phase concentrations.

  3. Chemically Selective Coated Quartz Crystal Microbalance (QCM) Array for Detection of Volatile Organic Chemicals

    SciTech Connect

    Bohuszewicz, T.V.; Frye-Mason, G.C.; Martin, S.J.; Osbourn, G.C. Bartholomew, J.W.; Schneider, T.W.; Spates, J.J.

    1998-11-04

    Liquid flow cells have been fabricated to prepare an array of QCMS operating simultaneously for detection and identification of VOCS in water. TWO signals, a tlequency response and a damping voltage response, were obtained per resonator. A blank QCM was used as a reference to account for changes in liquid density and viscosity. Nine different polymer coatings applied using a spin coat technique have been examined for VOC response under liquid flow conditions. A matrix of three classes of VOCS were examined for each coating with four chemicals in each class. The three classes of VOCS are polar, nonpolar and chlorinated. A pattern recognition technique, called visually empirical region of influence (VERI), was used to cluster the responses in n-dimensional space. Chemicals within a class varying by only one methyl group (e.g., toluene and xylene) are easily discriminated using only two different coatings with three different QCM responses. All chemicak were easily separated and detected with a total of 5 films and 6 responses with >99% accuracy.

  4. Sorption of hydrophobic organic chemicals to organic colloids in a freshwater wetland system: Temporal and spatial variations

    SciTech Connect

    Backhus, D.A.; Castellanos, E.; Fast, S.; Golini, C.

    1995-12-01

    Despite the fact that organic colloids are often found in wetland systems in greater abundance than in most other aquatic systems, little work has been done to examine their role in the cycling of organic pollutants. Heightened concern for the degradation of valuable wetland habitat and proposals to use constructed wetlands as treatment options for nonpoint sources of pollution provide a need for examination of organic pollutant:mobile organic colloid interactions in wetlands. A study is underway to determine the quantity, quality, and sorptive properties of colloidal organic matter collected from freshwater wetland systems. Surface water and porewater samples from a coastal freshwater wetland on the shores of Lake Erie (Old Woman Creek) were collected, stored, and analyzed using methods which allow for maintenance of in situ conditions. Sorption experiments were conducted. to the extent possible, on unaltered samples (e.g., examining whole water samples under in situ conditions rather than resuspending processed/concentrated/fractionated organic matter in artificial media). Fluorescence quenching methods were implemented to quantify sorption coefficients of appropriate organic chemical probes (e.g., perylene). To date, three locations within the wetland have been sampled at two time points (Summer and Fall). Initial results suggest that organic colloids in this wetland are present in lower quantities and in general exhibit lower sorption potential than humic and fulvic materials reported in the literature. Significant variations in the sorptive properties of organic colloids have been observed both temporally and spatially in this wetland.

  5. Effect of electric signal frequency and form on physical-chemical oxidation of organic wastes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morozov, Yegor; Tikhomirov, Alexander A.; Trifonov, Sergey V.; Kudenko, D.. Yurii A.

    The behavior conditions of physical-chemical reactions securing organic wastes’ oxidation in H _{2}O _{2} aqueous medium aimed at an increase of mass exchange processes in a life support system (LSS) for a space purpose have been under study. The character of dependence of organic wastes oxidation rate in H _{2}O _{2} aqueous medium, activated with alternating current of different frequency and form have been considered. Ways of those parameters optimization for the purpose to efficiently increase the physical-chemical decomposition of organic wastes in LSS have been proposed. Specifically, power consumption and reaction time of wastes mineralization have been determined to reduce more than twice. Involvement ways of mineralized organic wastes received in intrasystem mass exchange have been shown. Application feasibility of the obtained results both for space and terrestrial purpose has been discussed. Key words: life support sustem, mineralization, turnover, frequency, organic wastes

  6. Tooth matrix analysis for biomonitoring of organic chemical exposure: Current status, challenges, and opportunities.

    PubMed

    Andra, Syam S; Austin, Christine; Arora, Manish

    2015-10-01

    Epidemiological evidence supports associations between prenatal exposure to environmental organic chemicals and childhood health impairments. Unlike the common choice of biological matrices such as urine and blood that can be limited by short half-lives for some chemicals, teeth provide a stable repository for chemicals with half-life in the order of decades. Given the potential of the tooth bio-matrix to study long-term exposures to environmental organic chemicals in human biomonitoring programs, it is important to be aware of possible pitfalls and potential opportunities to improve on the current analytical method for tooth organics analysis. We critically review previous results of studies of this topic. The major drawbacks and challenges in currently practiced concepts and analytical methods in utilizing tooth bio-matrix are (i) no consideration of external (from outer surface) or internal contamination (from micro-odontoblast processes), (ii) the misleading assumption that whole ground teeth represent prenatal exposures (latest formed dentine is lipid rich and therefore would absorb and accumulate more organic chemicals), (iii) reverse causality in exposure assessment due to whole ground teeth, and (iv) teeth are a precious bio-matrix and grinding them raises ethical concerns about appropriate use of a very limited resource in exposure biology and epidemiology studies. These can be overcome by addressing the important limitations and possible improvements with the analytical approach associated at each of the following steps: (i) tooth sample preparation to retain exposure timing, (ii) organics extraction and pre-concentration to detect ultra-trace levels of analytes, (iii) chromatography separation, (iv) mass spectrometric detection to detect multi-class organics simultaneously, and (v) method validation, especially to exclude chance findings. To highlight the proposed improvements we present findings from a pilot study that utilizes tooth matrix biomarkers

  7. Tooth Matrix Analysis for Biomonitoring of Organic Chemical Exposure: Current Status, Challenges, and Opportunities

    PubMed Central

    Andra, Syam S.; Austin, Christine; Arora, Manish

    2015-01-01

    Epidemiological evidence supports associations between prenatal exposure to environmental organic chemicals and childhood health impairments. Unlike the common choice of biological matrices such as urine and blood that can be limited by short half-lives for some chemicals, teeth provide a stable repository for chemicals with half-life in the order of decades. Given the potential of the tooth bio-matrix to study long-term exposures to environmental organic chemicals in human biomonitoring programs, it is important to be aware of possible pitfalls and potential opportunities to improve on the current analytical method for tooth organics analysis. We critically review previous results of studies of this topic. The major drawbacks and challenges in currently practiced concepts and analytical methods in utilizing tooth bio-matrix are (i) no consideration of external (from outer surface) or internal contamination (from micro odontoblast processes), (ii) the misleading assumption that whole ground teeth represent prenatal exposures (latest formed dentine is lipid rich and therefore would absorb and accumulate more organic chemicals), (iii) reverse causality in exposure assessment due to whole ground teeth, and (iv) teeth are a precious bio-matrix and grinding them raises ethical concerns about appropriate use of a very limited resource in exposure biology and epidemiology studies. These can be overcome by addressing the important limitations and possible improvements with the analytical approach associated at each of the following steps (i) tooth sample preparation to retain exposure timing, (ii) organics extraction and pre-concentration to detect ultra-trace levels of analytes, (iii) chromatography separation, (iv) mass spectrometric detection to detect multi-class organics simultaneously, and (v) method validation, especially to exclude chance findings. To highlight the proposed improvements we present findings from a pilot study that utilizes tooth matrix biomarkers to

  8. OH-Radical initiated ageing of biogenic secondary organic aerosols - A detailed chemical analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Müller, L.; Reinnig, M.-C.; Mentel, Th. F.; Tillmann, R.; Schlosser, E.; Wahner, A.; Saathoff, H.; Donahue, N. M.; Hoffmann, T.

    2009-04-01

    The chemical ageing[1] of secondary organic aerosol (SOA) was investigated in two series of experiments using on-line mass spectrometry and off-line high performance liquid chromatography mass spectrometry (HPLC-MS). In a set of photochemical experiments, performed in the large outdoor reaction chamber SAPHIR (Jülich, Germany), SOA was generated from a boreal mixture including mono- and sesquiterpenes (α-pinene, β-pinene, Δ3-carene, limonene, caryophyllene). During a long time experiment (30h) the generated SOA was exposed to OH-radicals and the chemical composition was analyzed on-line using atmospheric pressure ionization mass spectrometry (API-MS). The on-line method provides highly time resolved chemical information and therefore a direct insight into the temporal changes of SOA-composition. In parallel, filter samples analysed by HPLC-MS allow the enrichment of trace compounds and finally an unambiguous identification of individual substances. In addition, filter samples allow a direct comparison to samples from field studies. The ageing experiments showed a clear change in SOA composition. The compounds observed can be divided into two groups: A group of first generation SOA-compounds, generated by the OH oxidation of the terpenes and a group of second generation compounds, generated by the reaction of OH with SOA compounds. Among the second generation products, especially a tricarboxylic acid (3-methyl-1,2,3-butanetricarboxylic acid, m/z 203)[2] was observed to be a good marker compound for BSOA ageing. A further set of experiments was carried out in another large aerosol chamber facility, the AIDA chamber of the Research Centre Karlsruhe. In this dark chamber, the experiments focused on the OH-induced ageing of α-pinene SOA and the influence of temperature. The results clearly show that the tricarboxylic acid is a distinctive marker for OH radical induced BSOA ageing and identify cis-pinonic acid as its precursor. To connect the results of the

  9. The contribution of organization theory to nursing health services research.

    PubMed

    Mick, Stephen S; Mark, Barbara A

    2005-01-01

    We review nursing and health services research on health care organizations over the period 1950 through 2004 to reveal the contribution of nursing to this field. Notwithstanding this rich tradition and the unique perspective of nursing researchers grounded in patient care production processes, the following gaps in nursing research remain: (1) the lack of theoretical frameworks about organizational factors relating to internal work processes; (2) the need for sophisticated methodologies to guide empirical investigations; (3) the difficulty in understanding how organizations adapt models for patient care delivery in response to market forces; (4) the paucity of attention to the impact of new technologies on the organization of patient care work processes. Given nurses' deep understanding of the inner workings of health care facilities, we hope to see an increasing number of research programs that tackle these deficiencies.

  10. Adult Education and Aging: Perspectives on Research at a Private Independent Research Organization.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Russ-Eft, Darlene

    As part of a symposium on challenges and problems of adult education researchers in different settings, recent research activities at one private independent research organization were examined. Three projects of the American Instituties for Research (AIR) were reviewed, all relating to adult development and aging. The first examined career…

  11. Pilot survey of methamphetamine in sewers using a Polar Organic Chemical Integrative Sampler.

    PubMed

    Boles, Tammy H; Wells, Martha J M

    2014-02-15

    A pilot study for the qualitative detection of methamphetamine at sites within a sewage collection system adjacent to locations suspected to harbor illegal drug activities was investigated and preliminary findings are reported. Sewage samples were collected over a time interval of four weeks using a Polar Organic Chemical Integrative Sampler (POCIS) deployed directly into the sewer line. The POCIS sorbent was extracted and analyzed via high-performance liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry (HPLC-MS/MS). Methamphetamine was found in sewage from one of three sampling sites at a concentration greater than the HPLC-MS/MS method detection limit (MDL) of 3 ng/mL. The goal of this research was to establish proof-of-concept of the feasibility for sampling and analysis using POCIS devices in the sewage collection system. The data encourage further testing and research. The ability to pinpoint the presence of methamphetamine in the sewer may in the future be used as a forensic tool in law enforcement.

  12. Measuring indigenous photosynthetic organisms to detect chemical warefare agents in water

    DOEpatents

    Greenbaum, Elias; Sanders, Charlene A.

    2005-11-15

    A method of testing water to detect the presence of a chemical or biological warfare agent is disclosed. The method is carried out by establishing control data by providing control water containing indigenous organisms but substantially free of a chemical and a biological warfare agent. Then measuring photosynthetic activity of the control water with a fluorometer to obtain control data to compare with test data to detect the presence of the chemical or agent. The test data is gathered by providing test water comprising the same indigenous organisms as contained in the control water. Further, the test water is suspected of containing the chemical or agent to be tested for. Photosynthetic activity is also measured by fluorescence induction in the test water using a fluorometer.

  13. The healthy organization construct: A review and research agenda

    PubMed Central

    Raya, Rampalli Prabhakara; Panneerselvam, Sivapragasam

    2013-01-01

    Work plays an important role in one's life for many reasons. It provides us with economic, social, and personal satisfaction and accounts for a substantial percentage of our waking hours. But in today's knowledge-driven economy, organization of work has been changing at a warp speed as a consequence of economic, social and technological aspects of changes brought down by globalization and liberalization worldwide. While this situation has eliminated some risks of the earlier industrial era, it is introducing others. In such a dynamic business environment, where can business leaders and managers find competitive advantage? It lies in balancing people and performance goals. This is the line of approach for healthy organization research that examines organizational context with regard to: People, work organization, management practices, employee wellbeing and performance. The healthy organization concept proposes that along with the profits, employee's well being should also be an important goal for organizations. In this paper, the researcher undertakes an extensive review of literature in the mainstream business literature and establishes the agenda for healthy organization research among other research paradigms. PMID:24872666

  14. The healthy organization construct: A review and research agenda.

    PubMed

    Raya, Rampalli Prabhakara; Panneerselvam, Sivapragasam

    2013-09-01

    Work plays an important role in one's life for many reasons. It provides us with economic, social, and personal satisfaction and accounts for a substantial percentage of our waking hours. But in today's knowledge-driven economy, organization of work has been changing at a warp speed as a consequence of economic, social and technological aspects of changes brought down by globalization and liberalization worldwide. While this situation has eliminated some risks of the earlier industrial era, it is introducing others. In such a dynamic business environment, where can business leaders and managers find competitive advantage? It lies in balancing people and performance goals. This is the line of approach for healthy organization research that examines organizational context with regard to: People, work organization, management practices, employee wellbeing and performance. The healthy organization concept proposes that along with the profits, employee's well being should also be an important goal for organizations. In this paper, the researcher undertakes an extensive review of literature in the mainstream business literature and establishes the agenda for healthy organization research among other research paradigms.

  15. Partitioning of polar and non-polar neutral organic chemicals into human and cow milk.

    PubMed

    Geisler, Anett; Endo, Satoshi; Goss, Kai-Uwe

    2011-10-01

    The aim of this work was to develop a predictive model for milk/water partition coefficients of neutral organic compounds. Batch experiments were performed for 119 diverse organic chemicals in human milk and raw and processed cow milk at 37°C. No differences (<0.3 log units) in the partition coefficients of these types of milk were observed. The polyparameter linear free energy relationship model fit the calibration data well (SD=0.22 log units). An experimental validation data set including hormones and hormone active compounds was predicted satisfactorily by the model. An alternative modelling approach based on log K(ow) revealed a poorer performance. The model presented here provides a significant improvement in predicting enrichment of potentially hazardous chemicals in milk. In combination with physiologically based pharmacokinetic modelling this improvement in the estimation of milk/water partitioning coefficients may allow a better risk assessment for a wide range of neutral organic chemicals.

  16. Toxicity testing of organic chemicals in groundwater polluted with landfill leachate

    SciTech Connect

    Baun, A.; Kloeft, L.; Bjerg, P.L.; Nyholm, N.

    1999-09-01

    A method for assessment of toxicity of nonvolatile organic chemicals contaminants in groundwater polluted with landfill leachate has been evaluated. The biotests utilized were composed of an algal growth inhibition test (Selenastrum capricornutum), a daphnia immobilization test (Daphnia magna), and a bacterial genotoxicity test (umuC, Salmonella typhimurium). The feasibility of the selected biotests was investigated for a series of groundwater samples collected along pollution gradients downstreams of two landfills in Jutland, Denmark. Two different approaches were used, direct toxicity testing of whole groundwater samples, and toxicity testing of concentrates obtained by solid-phase extraction. Direct testing of whole groundwater samples produced toxic responses, but the complex sample matrix masked the toxicity of the organic chemical contaminants of interest. Solid-phase extraction was used successfully as an on-site method that eliminated ion toxicity and produced biotest responses that reflected the toxicity of the nonvolatile organic chemical contaminants in the groundwater.

  17. Effects of chemical aging on global secondary organic aerosol using the volatility basis set approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jo, D. S.; Park, R. J.; Kim, M. J.; Spracklen, D. V.

    2013-12-01

    A global 3-D chemical transport model (GEOS-Chem) is used with the volatility basis set (VBS) approach to examine the effects of chemical aging on global secondary organic aerosol (SOA) concentrations and budgets. We present full-year simulations and their comparisons with the global aerosol mass spectrometer (AMS) dataset, the Interagency Monitoring of Protected Visual Environments (IMPROVE) dataset from the United States, the European Monitoring and Evaluation Programme (EMEP) dataset from Europe, and water-soluble organic carbon observation data collected over East Asia. Using different chemical aging constants, we find that the model results with 4 × 10-11 cm3 molecule-1 s-1 are in better agreement with all observations relative to the model results with other aging constants, without aging, and with the two-product approach. The model simulations are improved when chemical aging is considered, especially for rural regions. However, the simulations still underestimate observed oxygenated organic aerosol (OOA) in urban areas. Two sensitivity simulations including semi-volatile primary organic aerosol (POA) were conducted. We find that including semi-volatile POA improves the model in terms of the hydrogen-like organic aerosol (HOA) to OOA ratio. However, the total OA concentrations are not improved. The total SOA production is considerably increased by 53%, from 26.0 to 39.9 Tg yr-1, after considering chemical aging, remaining lower than top-down estimates of SOA production. Direct radiative forcing (DRF) increases by -0.07 W m-2 due to the chemical aging of SOA, which is comparable to the mean DRF (-0.13 W m-2) of OA from the AeroCom multi-model study. This result indicates considerable global and, more importantly, regional climate implications. For example, the regional DRF change due to chemical aging of SOA in the eastern US is -0.29 W m-2, which is 4 times greater in magnitude than the global mean value.

  18. Natural and active chemical remediation of toxic metals, organics, and radionuclides in the aquatic environment

    SciTech Connect

    McPherson, G.; Pintauro, P.; O`Connor, S.

    1996-05-02

    This project focuses on the chemical aspects of remediation, with the underlying theme that chemical remediation does occur naturally. Included are studies on the fate of heavy metal and organic contaminants discharged into aquatic environments; accurate assay metal contaminants partitioned into soils, water and tissue; development of novel polymeric membranes and microporous solids for the entrapment of heavy metals; and the development of hybrid chemo-enzymatic oxidative schemes for aromatics decontamination. 49 refs.

  19. 15 CFR Supplement No. 2 to Part 715 - Examples of Unscheduled Discrete Organic Chemicals (UDOCs) and UDOC Production

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... Organic Chemicals (UDOCs) and UDOC Production No. Supplement No. 2 to Part 715 Commerce and Foreign Trade... COMMERCE CHEMICAL WEAPONS CONVENTION REGULATIONS ACTIVITIES INVOLVING UNSCHEDULED DISCRETE ORGANIC CHEMICALS (UDOCs) Pt. 715, Supp. 2 Supplement No. 2 to Part 715—Examples of Unscheduled Discrete...

  20. 15 CFR Supplement No. 2 to Part 715 - Examples of Unscheduled Discrete Organic Chemicals (UDOCs) and UDOC Production

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... Organic Chemicals (UDOCs) and UDOC Production No. Supplement No. 2 to Part 715 Commerce and Foreign Trade... COMMERCE CHEMICAL WEAPONS CONVENTION REGULATIONS ACTIVITIES INVOLVING UNSCHEDULED DISCRETE ORGANIC CHEMICALS (UDOCs) Pt. 715, Supp. 2 Supplement No. 2 to Part 715—Examples of Unscheduled Discrete...

  1. 15 CFR Supplement No. 2 to Part 715 - Examples of Unscheduled Discrete Organic Chemicals (UDOCs) and UDOC Production

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... Organic Chemicals (UDOCs) and UDOC Production No. Supplement No. 2 to Part 715 Commerce and Foreign Trade... COMMERCE CHEMICAL WEAPONS CONVENTION REGULATIONS ACTIVITIES INVOLVING UNSCHEDULED DISCRETE ORGANIC CHEMICALS (UDOCs) Pt. 715, Supp. 2 Supplement No. 2 to Part 715—Examples of Unscheduled Discrete...

  2. 15 CFR Supplement No. 2 to Part 715 - Examples of Unscheduled Discrete Organic Chemicals (UDOCs) and UDOC Production

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... Organic Chemicals (UDOCs) and UDOC Production No. Supplement No. 2 to Part 715 Commerce and Foreign Trade... COMMERCE CHEMICAL WEAPONS CONVENTION REGULATIONS ACTIVITIES INVOLVING UNSCHEDULED DISCRETE ORGANIC CHEMICALS (UDOCs) Pt. 715, Supp. 2 Supplement No. 2 to Part 715—Examples of Unscheduled Discrete...

  3. Chemical evolution of volatile organic compounds in the outflow of the Mexico City Metropolitan area

    SciTech Connect

    Apel, E.; Springston, S.; Karl, T.; Emmons, L.; Flocke, F.; Hills, A. J.; Madronich, S.; Lee-Taylor, J.; Fried, A.; Weibring, P.; Walega, J.; Richter, D., Tie, X.; Mauldin, L.; Campos, T.; Sive, B.; Kleinman, L.; Springston, S., Zaveri, R.; deGouw, J.; Zheng, J.; Zhang, R.; Rudolph, J.; Junkermann, W.; Riemer, D. D.

    2009-11-01

    The volatile organic compound (VOC) distribution in the Mexico City Metropolitan Area (MCMA) and its evolution as it is uplifted and transported out of the MCMA basin was studied during the 2006 MILAGRO/MIRAGE-Mex field campaign. The results show that in the morning hours in the city center, the VOC distribution is dominated by non-methane hydrocarbons (NMHCs) but with a substantial contribution from oxygenated volatile organic compounds (OVOCs), predominantly from primary emissions. Alkanes account for a large part of the NMHC distribution in terms of mixing ratios. In terms of reactivity, NMHCs also dominate overall, especially in the morning hours. However, in the afternoon, as the boundary layer lifts and air is mixed and aged within the basin, the distribution changes as secondary products are formed. The WRF-Chem (Weather Research and Forecasting with Chemistry) model and MOZART (Model for Ozone and Related chemical Tracers) were able to reproduce the general features of the daytime cycle of the VOC OH reactivity distribution showing that NMHCs dominate the distribution except in the afternoon hours and that the VOC OH reactivity peaks in the early morning due to high morning emissions from the city into a shallow boundary layer. The WRF-Chem and MOZART models showed higher reactivity than the experimental data during the nighttime cycle, perhaps indicating problems with the modeled nighttime boundary layer height. In addition, a plume was studied in which air was advected out of the MCMA and intercepted downwind with the DOE G1 on 18 March and the NCAR C130 one day later on 19 March. A number of identical species measured aboard each aircraft gave insight into the chemical evolution of the plume as it aged and was transported as far as 1000 km downwind. Ozone and many OVOCs were photochemically produced in the plume. The WRF-Chem and MOZART models were used to examine the spatial and temporal extent of the 19 March plume and to help interpret the OH

  4. Chemical evolution of volatile organic compounds in the outflow of the Mexico City Metropolitan area

    SciTech Connect

    Apel, Eric; Emmons, L.; Karl, Thomas G.; Flocke, Frank M.; Hills, A. J.; Madronich, Sasha; Lee-Taylor, J.; Fried, Alan; Weibring, P.; Walega, J.; Richter, Dirk; Tie, X.; Mauldin, L.; Campos, Teresa; Weinheimer, Andrew J.; Knapp, David; Sive, B.; Kleinman, Lawrence I.; Springston, S.; Zaveri, Rahul A.; Ortega, John V.; Voss, Paul B.; Blake, D. R.; Baker, Angela K.; Warneke, Carsten; Welsh-Bon, Daniel; de Gouw, Joost A.; Zheng, J.; Zhang, Renyi; Rudolph, Jochen; Junkermann, W.; Riemer, D.

    2010-01-01

    The volatile organic compound (VOC) distribution in the Mexico City Metropolitan Area (MCMA) and its evolution as it is uplifted and transported out of the MCMA basin was studied during the 2006 MILAGRO/MIRAGE-Mex field campaign. The results show that in the morning hours in the city center, the VOC distribution is dominated by non-methane hydrocarbons (NMHCs) but with a substantial contribution from oxygenated volatile organic compounds (OVOCs), predominantly from primary emissions. Alkanes account for a large part of the NMHC distribution in terms of mixing ratios. In terms of reactivity, NMHCs also dominate overall, especially in the morning hours. However, in the afternoon, as the boundary layer lifts and air is mixed and aged within the basin, the distribution changes as secondary products are formed. The WRF-Chem (Weather Research and Forecasting with Chemistry) model and MOZART (Model for Ozone and Related chemical Tracers) were able to reproduce the general features of the daytime cycle of the VOC OH reactivity distribution showing that NMHCs dominate the distribution except in the afternoon hours and that the VOC OH reactivity peaks in the early morning due to high morning emissions from the city into a shallow boundary layer. The WRF-Chem and MOZART models showed higher reactivity than the experimental data during the nighttime cycle, perhaps indicating problems with the modeled nighttime boundary layer height. In addition, a plume was studied in which air was advected out of the MCMA and intercepted downwind with the DOE G1 on March 18 and the NCAR C130 one day later on March 19. A number of identical species measured aboard each aircraft gave insight into the chemical evolution of the plume as it aged and was transported as far as 1000 km downwind. Ozone and many OVOCs were photochemically produced in the plume. The WRF-Chem and MOZART models were used to examine the spatial and temporal extent of the March 19 plume and to help interpret the OH

  5. The effect of the indoor environment on the fate of organic chemicals in the urban landscape.

    PubMed

    Cousins, Anna Palm

    2012-11-01

    To assess the effect of the indoor environment on the urban fate of organic chemicals, an 8-compartment indoor-inclusive steady state multimedia chemical fate model was developed. The model includes typical urban compartments (air, soil, water, sediment, and urban film) and a novel module representing a generic indoor environment. The model was parameterized to the municipality of Stockholm, Sweden and applied to four organic chemicals with different physical-chemical characteristics and use patterns: formaldehyde, 2,4,6-tribromophenol, di-ethylhexylphthalate and decabromodiphenyl ether. The results show that emissions to indoor air may increase the steady state mass and residence time in the urban environment by a factor of 1.1 to 22 for the four chemicals, compared to if emissions are assigned to outdoor air. This is due to the nested nature of the indoor environment, which creates a physical barrier that prevents chemicals from leaving the urban system with outflowing air. For DEHP and BDE 209, the additional partitioning to indoor surfaces results in a greater importance of the indoor removal pathways from surfaces. The outdoor environmental concentrations of these chemicals are predicted to be lower if emitted to indoor air than if emitted to outdoor air because of the additional indoor removal pathways of dust and indoor film, leading to loss of chemical from the system. For formaldehyde and 2,4,6-TBP outdoor environmental concentrations are not affected by whether the release occurs indoors or outdoors because of the limited partitioning to indoor surfaces. A sensitivity analysis revealed that there appears to be a relationship between logK(OA) and the impact of the ventilation rate on the urban fate of organic chemicals.

  6. In vitro model systems for studying the impact of organic chemicals on the skin barrier lipids.

    PubMed

    Groen, Daniël; Berthaud, Fabienne; Bouwstra, Joke A; Chapuis, Christian; Gooris, Gert S; Boncheva, Mila

    2014-01-01

    This paper describes two synthetic lipid models designed to replace human stratum corneum (SC) in studies of the impact of volatile organic chemicals on the molecular organization of the skin barrier lipids. The models built upon previously developed self-assembled lipid membranes which have composition and 3D organization similar to those of the lipid matrix in SC. In one model the target chemicals were incorporated in the lipids before their self-assembly, and in the other one they were applied on top of a preformed lipid membrane. The chemicals could be incorporated within the model membranes in quantities close to those reached within human SC upon heavy surface loading. The dose-dependent effects of the chemicals on the lateral molecular organization in the models were qualitatively identical to those observed by infrared spectroscopy in human SC. The models facilitated the interpretation of X-ray diffraction profiles used to determine the nature of the interactions between the chemicals and the lipid lamellae and the position of the exogenous molecules within the unit cell of the lipid phases. These model systems are suitable for in vitro studies in the areas of skin biophysics, dermatology, transdermal drug delivery, and risk assessment.

  7. Chapter 8 Tool for monitoring hydrophilic contaminants in water: polar organic chemical integrative sampler (POCIS)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Alvarez, David A.; Huckins, James N.; Petty, Jimmie D.; Jones-Lepp, Tammy L.; Stuer-Lauridsen, Frank; Getting, Dominic T.; Goddard, Jon P.; Gravell, Anthony

    2007-01-01

    The development of the polar organic chemical integrative sampler (POCIS) provides environmental scientists and policy makers a tool for assessing the presence and potential impacts of the hydrophilic component of these organic contaminants. The POCIS provides a means for determining the time-weighted average (TWA) concentrations of targeted chemicals that can be used in risk assessments to determine the biological impact of hydrophilic organic compounds (HpOCs) on the health of the impacted ecosystem. Field studies have shown that the POCIS has advantages over traditional sampling methods in sequestering and concentrating ultra-trace to trace levels of chemicals over time resulting in increased method sensitivity, ability to detect chemicals with a relatively short residence time or variable concentrations in the water, and simplicity in use. POCIS extracts can be tested using bioassays and can be used in organism dosing experiments for determining toxicological significance of the complex mixture of chemicals sampled. The POCIS has been successfully used worldwide under various field conditions ranging from stagnant ponds to shallow creeks to major river systems in both fresh and brackish water.

  8. Clinical trials and contract research organizations in India.

    PubMed

    Mukherjee, Shoibal

    2012-06-01

    Economics and demography are driving drug development to the developing world. India needs this opportunity to build research skills required to combat its enormous disease burden. A variety of global and local contract research organizations (CROs) that specialize in the execution of research to develop health care products operate in India today. CROs assure quality and compliance to regulations while coordinating with tertiary providers such as a site management organization and the central laboratory. Back room operations to manage, analyze, and report data form a bulk of the employment generated by clinical research, absorbing programmers, data managers, biostatisticians,and medical writers. Despite rapid growth and strong potential, India remains a minor contributor to global pharmaceutical research because of policy stagnation, regulatory gaps, and misinformed controversies in the media.

  9. First reported fatalities associated with the 'research chemical' 2-methoxydiphenidine.

    PubMed

    Elliott, Simon P; Brandt, Simon D; Wallach, Jason; Morris, Hamilton; Kavanagh, Pierce V

    2015-05-01

    2-Methoxydiphenidine, i.e. 1-[1-(2-methoxyphenyl)-2-phenylethyl]piperidine, also known as 'MXP' or '2-MeO-diphenidine' (or 2-MXP), has been available as a 'research chemical' since 2013 as a purported alternative to the 'dissociative anesthetics' methoxetamine and ketamine. Three deaths which involved the detection of 2-MXP in post-mortem blood and urine were encountered in forensic casework. The 2-, 3- and 4-methoxyphenyl positional isomers were synthesized to confirm the identity and concentration of 2-MXP. The 2-MXP femoral blood concentrations in the cases were found to be 24.0, 2.0 and 1.36 mg/L (the latter with an alternative cause of death). Some additional prescription drugs were encountered at therapeutic concentrations in all three cases. Analysis of the biofluids allowed the detection and characterization of various metabolites, including the suggested presence of hydroxy-2-MXP as the main metabolite with the hydroxyl group located on the piperidine rather than the phenyl or benzyl moiety. Additional metabolites included O-desmethyl-2-MXP and hydroxylated O-desmethyl-2-MXP. Diphenidine and hydroxy-diphenidine, also showing the presence of the hydroxyl group on the piperidine ring, were also detected. It was not possible to identify whether these arose from 2-MXP biotransformation or whether they represented the presence of diphenidine as a separate substance. These are the first published fatalities involving 2-MXP and presents analytical data to assist analytical toxicologists with future casework.

  10. Evaluation of a multimedia model for predicting the environmental fate of organic chemicals in Canada

    SciTech Connect

    Kane, D.M.; Mackay, D.

    1995-12-31

    Health Canada is required to assess human health risks associated with the introduction of new chemicals for commercial use in Canada. An important initial step in this assessment process is the estimation of expected concentrations of a particular new chemical in various environmental media such as air, water, sail, and sediment. These concentrations can then form the basis for subsequent calculations of human exposure. A fugacity-based multimedia exposure model (CHEMCAN3) was developed for these assessments which describes the chemical`s fate in the environment based on its physical chemical properties, reactivity, transport characteristics and emissions. This paper presents the results of a validation exercise comparing the predictions of the model against measured data. CHEMCAN3 was applied to the prediction of the environmental fate of a set of 10 organic chemicals. The predictions were then compared to available environmental monitoring data for these chemicals, The test set included 5 industrial chemicals and 5 commonly used pesticides; benzene, chlorobenzene, hexachlorobenzene, toluene, dichloromethane, di(2-ethylhexyl) phthalate, atrazine, dinoseb, lindane, parathion, and 2,4-dichlorophenoxyacetic acid. The Southern Ontario region of Canada was used as the environment for the model predictions. The results show that the model successfully predicts the environmental behavior of the chemicals, with 82% agreement within one order of magnitude between predicted and measured values. This result lends confidence to the use of this model, and similar models, for prediction of environmental fate and as a basis for exposure assessment.

  11. A combined deuterium NMR and quantum chemical investigation of inequivalent hydrogen bonds in organic solids.

    PubMed

    Webber, Renee; Penner, Glenn H

    2012-01-01

    Deuterium magic angle spinning (MAS) NMR spectroscopy and quantum chemical calculations are used to investigate organic solids in which inequivalent hydrogen bonds are present. The use of (2)H MAS allows one to measure the chemical shift, δ, quadrupolar coupling constant, C(Q), and asymmetry in the quadrupolar interaction, η(Q), for each type of hydrogen bond present in the system. Quantum chemical calculations of the magnetic shielding (σ, which can be related to δ) and the electric field gradient (EFG, which can be related to C(Q)) are compared to the experimental results and are discussed with respect to the relative strengths of the hydrogen bonds within each system.

  12. Two chemically distinct pools of organic nitrogen accumulate in the ocean.

    PubMed

    Aluwihare, Lihini I; Repeta, Daniel J; Pantoja, Silvio; Johnson, Carl G

    2005-05-13

    The chemical dynamics of marine dissolved organic nitrogen (DON), a reservoir featuring surface accumulations even in areas where nitrogen limits productivity, have yet to be resolved. We exploited differences in the acid lability of amide bonds within high-molecular-weight (HMW) DON to show that vertical DON profiles result in part from the presence of two chemically distinct pools of amide. Half of HMWDON in surface waters is present as N-acetyl amino polysaccharides. In contrast, nearly all deep-sea HMWDON, and therefore, most HMWDON, is present in amides that resist both chemical hydrolysis and biological degradation.

  13. Effects of water temperature on the toxicity of chemicals to aquatic organisms

    SciTech Connect

    Mayer, F.; Brecken-Folse, J.; Howe, G.; Linton, T.

    1995-12-31

    Water temperatures fluctuate regularly in aquatic environments, producing physiological and ecological changes in resident biota. Temperature has been recognized as a critical factor affecting the toxicity of chemicals by altering the physiological condition of the biota and the interactions between organisms and toxicants. Temperature significantly affects respiration rates, chemical absorption, and chemical detoxification and excretion. Acute toxicity of most chemicals to aquatic organisms is positively correlated with temperature; however, the toxicity of some chemicals is negatively correlated with or not affected by temperature. Regression slopes of toxicity appear consistent among species within a chemical for temperature, indicating chemical rather than biological differences in toxicity. Temperature may not affect acute toxicity per se, but does affect bioavailability and, therefore, exposure. Octanol/water partition coefficients are altered by temperature and could replace some biological testing since the partition coefficient-acute toxicity relationship has been well established. Temperature may only alter the rate of intoxication in chronic exposures no-effect concentrations do not appear to be affected by temperature; only the time required to attain the same no-effect concentration varies.

  14. Detoxification and Disposal of Hazardous Organic Chemicals by Processing in Supercritical Water

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1985-11-06

    release; distribution unlimited. 4. PERFORMING ORGANIZATION REPORT 4UMIBER(S) S. MONITORING ORGANIZATION REPORT NUMBER(S) 66. NAME OF PERFOAM’NG...ORGANIZATION 6b. OFFICE SYMBOL 7a. NAME OF MONITORING ORGANIZATION MODAR, Inc. (if apoikJ600 U. S. Army Medical Bioengineering Research and I Development... monitored with type K thermocouples. There are a total of eight thermocouples: in-line in the water from SCW heater; in-line in the feed-water cross; in

  15. Research Integrity and Research Ethics in Professional Codes of Ethics: Survey of Terminology Used by Professional Organizations across Research Disciplines

    PubMed Central

    Komić, Dubravka; Marušić, Stjepan Ljudevit; Marušić, Ana

    2015-01-01

    Professional codes of ethics are social contracts among members of a professional group, which aim to instigate, encourage and nurture ethical behaviour and prevent professional misconduct, including research and publication. Despite the existence of codes of ethics, research misconduct remains a serious problem. A survey of codes of ethics from 795 professional organizations from the Illinois Institute of Technology’s Codes of Ethics Collection showed that 182 of them (23%) used research integrity and research ethics terminology in their codes, with differences across disciplines: while the terminology was common in professional organizations in social sciences (82%), mental health (71%), sciences (61%), other organizations had no statements (construction trades, fraternal social organizations, real estate) or a few of them (management, media, engineering). A subsample of 158 professional organizations we judged to be directly involved in research significantly more often had statements on research integrity/ethics terminology than the whole sample: an average of 10.4% of organizations with a statement (95% CI = 10.4-23-5%) on any of the 27 research integrity/ethics terms compared to 3.3% (95% CI = 2.1–4.6%), respectively (P<0.001). Overall, 62% of all statements addressing research integrity/ethics concepts used prescriptive language in describing the standard of practice. Professional organizations should define research integrity and research ethics issues in their ethics codes and collaborate within and across disciplines to adequately address responsible conduct of research and meet contemporary needs of their communities. PMID:26192805

  16. Research Integrity and Research Ethics in Professional Codes of Ethics: Survey of Terminology Used by Professional Organizations across Research Disciplines.

    PubMed

    Komić, Dubravka; Marušić, Stjepan Ljudevit; Marušić, Ana

    2015-01-01

    Professional codes of ethics are social contracts among members of a professional group, which aim to instigate, encourage and nurture ethical behaviour and prevent professional misconduct, including research and publication. Despite the existence of codes of ethics, research misconduct remains a serious problem. A survey of codes of ethics from 795 professional organizations from the Illinois Institute of Technology's Codes of Ethics Collection showed that 182 of them (23%) used research integrity and research ethics terminology in their codes, with differences across disciplines: while the terminology was common in professional organizations in social sciences (82%), mental health (71%), sciences (61%), other organizations had no statements (construction trades, fraternal social organizations, real estate) or a few of them (management, media, engineering). A subsample of 158 professional organizations we judged to be directly involved in research significantly more often had statements on research integrity/ethics terminology than the whole sample: an average of 10.4% of organizations with a statement (95% CI = 10.4-23-5%) on any of the 27 research integrity/ethics terms compared to 3.3% (95% CI = 2.1-4.6%), respectively (P<0.001). Overall, 62% of all statements addressing research integrity/ethics concepts used prescriptive language in describing the standard of practice. Professional organizations should define research integrity and research ethics issues in their ethics codes and collaborate within and across disciplines to adequately address responsible conduct of research and meet contemporary needs of their communities.

  17. Organic-Chemical Clues to the Theory of Impacts as a Cause of Mass Extinctions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sack, N. J.

    1988-11-01

    The reasons for the mass extinctions, which occur from time to time in Earth's history-as, e.g., the dinosaur extinction at the Cretaceous/Tertiary boundary 65 myr ago - are still not satisfactorily cleared up. A possible reason might be the impact of one or several comets of several kilometers in diameter. In this paper the astrophysical background of this hypothesis and organic-chemical processes during an impact will be discussed. Quantitative estimations are given, which show that the amount of organic substances brought to the Earth may be of the same order of magnitude as the normal biological production of organic material. Investigations are proposed to examine the organic-chemical composition of profiles of the Cretaceous/Tertiary boundary and other boundaries, at which mass extinction had occurred, in order to find anomalies as consequences of impacts.

  18. AICD: Advanced Industrial Concepts Division Biological and Chemical Technologies Research Program

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petersen, G.; Bair, K.; Ross, J.

    1994-03-01

    The annual summary report presents the fiscal year (FY) 1993 research activities and accomplishments for the United States Department of Energy (DOE) Biological and Chemical Technologies Research (BCTR) Program of the Advanced Industrial Concepts Division (AICD). This AICD program resides within the Office of Industrial Technologies (OIT) of the Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EE). The annual summary report for 1993 (ASR 93) contains the following: A program description (including BCTR program mission statement, historical background, relevance, goals and objectives), program structure and organization, selected technical and programmatic highlights for 1993, detailed descriptions of individual projects, and a listing of program output including a bibliography of published work, patents, and awards arising from work supported by BCTR.

  19. AICD -- Advanced Industrial Concepts Division Biological and Chemical Technologies Research Program. 1993 Annual summary report

    SciTech Connect

    Petersen, G.; Bair, K.; Ross, J.

    1994-03-01

    The annual summary report presents the fiscal year (FY) 1993 research activities and accomplishments for the United States Department of Energy (DOE) Biological and Chemical Technologies Research (BCTR) Program of the Advanced Industrial Concepts Division (AICD). This AICD program resides within the Office of Industrial Technologies (OIT) of the Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EE). The annual summary report for 1993 (ASR 93) contains the following: A program description (including BCTR program mission statement, historical background, relevance, goals and objectives), program structure and organization, selected technical and programmatic highlights for 1993, detailed descriptions of individual projects, a listing of program output, including a bibliography of published work, patents, and awards arising from work supported by BCTR.

  20. Biological and Chemical Technologies Research at OIT: Annual Summary Report, FY 1997

    SciTech Connect

    Peterson, G.

    1998-03-01

    The annual summary report presents the fiscal year (FY) 1 997 research activities and accomplishments for the United States Department of Energy (DOE) Biological and Chemical Technologies Research (BCTR) Program. This BCTR program resides within the Office of Industrial Technologies (OIT) of the Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EE). The annual summary report for 1997 (ASR 97) contains the following: program description (including BCTR program mission statement, historical background, relevance, goals and objectives); program structure and organization; selected technical and programmatic highlights for 1 997; detailed descriptions of individual projects; and a listing of program output, including a bibliography of published work, patents, and awards arising from work supported by the program.

  1. Detailed Chemical Characterization of Unresolved Complex Mixtures (UCM) inAtmospheric Organics: Insights into Emission Sources, Atmospheric Processing andSecondary Organic Aerosol Formation

    EPA Science Inventory

    Recent studies suggest that semivolatile organic compounds (SVOCs) are important precursors to secondary organic aerosol (SOA) in urban atmospheres. However, knowledge of the chemical composition of SVOCs is limited by current analytical techniques, which are typically unable to...

  2. Detailed Chemical Characterization of Unresolved Complex Mixtures (UCM) inAtmospheric Organics: Insights into Emission Sources, Atmospheric Processing andSecondary Organic Aerosol Formation

    EPA Science Inventory

    Recent studies suggest that semivolatile organic compounds (SVOCs) are important precursors to secondary organic aerosol (SOA) in urban atmospheres. However, knowledge of the chemical composition of SVOCs is limited by current analytical techniques, which are typically unable to...

  3. Bandgap tuning of mixed organic cation utilizing chemical vapor deposition process

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Jeongmo; Kim, Hyeong Pil; Teridi, Mohd Asri Mat; Yusoff, Abd. Rashid bin Mohd; Jang, Jin

    2016-01-01

    Bandgap tuning of a mixed organic cation perovskite is demonstrated via chemical vapor deposition process. The optical and electrical properties of the mixed organic cation perovskite can be manipulated by varying the growth time. A slight shift of the absorption band to shorter wavelengths is demonstrated with increasing growth time, which results in the increment of the current density. Hence, based on the optimized growth time, our device exhibits an efficiency of 15.86% with negligible current hysteresis. PMID:27874026

  4. Nanoscale chemical tomography of buried organic-inorganic interfaces in the chiton tooth.

    PubMed

    Gordon, Lyle M; Joester, Derk

    2011-01-13

    Biological organisms possess an unparalleled ability to control the structure and properties of mineralized tissues. They are able, for example, to guide the formation of smoothly curving single crystals or tough, lightweight, self-repairing skeletal elements. In many biominerals, an organic matrix interacts with the mineral as it forms, controls its morphology and polymorph, and is occluded during mineralization. The remarkable functional properties of the resulting composites-such as outstanding fracture toughness and wear resistance-can be attributed to buried organic-inorganic interfaces at multiple hierarchical levels. Analysing and controlling such interfaces at the nanometre length scale is critical also in emerging organic electronic and photovoltaic hybrid materials. However, elucidating the structural and chemical complexity of buried organic-inorganic interfaces presents a challenge to state-of-the-art imaging techniques. Here we show that pulsed-laser atom-probe tomography reveals three-dimensional chemical maps of organic fibres with a diameter of 5-10 nm in the surrounding nano-crystalline magnetite (Fe(3)O(4)) mineral in the tooth of a marine mollusc, the chiton Chaetopleura apiculata. Remarkably, most fibres co-localize with either sodium or magnesium. Furthermore, clustering of these cations in the fibre indicates a structural level of hierarchy previously undetected. Our results demonstrate that in the chiton tooth, individual organic fibres have different chemical compositions, and therefore probably different functional roles in controlling fibre formation and matrix-mineral interactions. Atom-probe tomography is able to detect this chemical/structural heterogeneity by virtue of its high three-dimensional spatial resolution and sensitivity across the periodic table. We anticipate that the quantitative analysis and visualization of nanometre-scale interfaces by laser-pulsed atom-probe tomography will contribute greatly to our understanding not

  5. Estimation of the annual yield of organic carbon released from carbonates and shales by chemical weathering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Di-Giovanni, Christian; Disnar, Jean Robert; Macaire, Jean Jacques

    2002-04-01

    The aim of this paper is to propose an initial estimation of the annual organic matter yield induced by chemical weathering of carbonates and shales, considering their global surface at outcrop and their organic matter content. The calculation also uses data on river fluxes resulting from carbonate rocks and shales weathering in major world watersheds, published by numerous authors. The results obtained from the studied watersheds have then been extrapolated to a global scale. Despite rather large uncertainty to such an approach, the calculated value of ca. 0.1 Gt implies that the annual organic carbon yield related to carbonates and shales chemical weathering might be a non-negligible component of the global carbon cycle. The individual contributions of different watersheds necessarily depend on the organic matter content of altered rocks. They are also obviously controlled by climatic parameters. The calculated yields do not constitute a direct supply to soils and rivers because of mineralisation when organic carbon is brought in contact with the atmosphere. Even so, the release of fossil organic matter would have implications for the global carbon cycle through the efficiency of the global chemical weathering as a carbon sink. Whatever the chosen hypothesis, the results of this study suggest that the recycled organic yield is a neglected component in the global organic carbon cycle assessment. Because it exists and, in addition, because it might represent a non-negligible carbon pool, fossil organic carbon deserves to be taken into account for a better evaluation of the organic stocks in soils and rivers presently only based on climatic data and current vegetal production.

  6. Building Research Relationships With Managed Care Organizations: Issues and Strategies

    PubMed Central

    LEIN, CATHERINE; COLLINS, CLARE; LYLES, JUDITH S.; HILLMAN, DONALD; SMITH, ROBERT C.

    2006-01-01

    Managed care is now the dominant form of healthcare in the United States. The need for clinical research about the organization, delivery, and outcomes of primary care services in managed care models is high, yet access to managed care organizations as sites for clinical research may be problematic. The purpose of this article is to describe issues involved in obtaining access to managed care settings for clinical research and practical strategies for successful collaboration using literature review and case description. Three steps for developing collaborative relationships with managed care organizations (MCOs) are presented: 1) assessment of organizational structure, history, and culture; 2) finding common ground; and 3) project implementation. These steps are discussed within the context of MCO systems issues and a relationship-centered approach to communication between researchers and individuals from the MCO. Successful relationships with MCOs for clinical research are possible when careful attention is paid to inclusion of MCOs as collaborators in the development of the research questions and design, and as partners in the research implementation process. PMID:17203136

  7. A Review of Research on the Teaching and Learning of Chemical Kinetics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bain, Kinsey; Towns, Marcy H.

    2016-01-01

    We review literature on the teaching and learning of chemical kinetics at both the secondary and tertiary levels. Our aim in doing so is to summarize research literature, synthesize recommendations for future research, and suggest implications for practitioners. Two main bodies of literature emerged from the chemical kinetics education research:…

  8. A Review of Research on the Teaching and Learning of Chemical Kinetics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bain, Kinsey; Towns, Marcy H.

    2016-01-01

    We review literature on the teaching and learning of chemical kinetics at both the secondary and tertiary levels. Our aim in doing so is to summarize research literature, synthesize recommendations for future research, and suggest implications for practitioners. Two main bodies of literature emerged from the chemical kinetics education research:…

  9. Screening organic chemicals in commerce for emissions in the context of environmental and human exposure.

    PubMed

    Breivik, Knut; Arnot, Jon A; Brown, Trevor N; McLachlan, Michael S; Wania, Frank

    2012-08-01

    Quantitative knowledge of organic chemical release into the environment is essential to understand and predict human exposure as well as to develop rational control strategies for any substances of concern. While significant efforts have been invested to characterize and screen organic chemicals for hazardous properties, relatively less effort has been directed toward estimating emissions and hence also risks. Here, a rapid throughput method to estimate emissions of discrete organic chemicals in commerce has been developed, applied and evaluated to support screening studies aimed at ranking and identifying chemicals of potential concern. The method builds upon information in the European Union Technical Guidance Document and utilizes information on quantities in commerce (production and/or import rates), chemical function (use patterns) and physical-chemical properties to estimate emissions to air, soil and water within the OECD for five stages of the chemical life-cycle. The method is applied to 16,029 discrete substances (identified by CAS numbers) from five national and international high production volume lists. As access to consistent input data remains fragmented or even impossible, particular attention is given to estimating, evaluating and discussing uncertainties in the resulting emission scenarios. The uncertainty for individual substances typically spans 3 to 4 orders of magnitude for this initial tier screening method. Information on uncertainties in emissions is useful as any screening or categorization methods which solely rely on threshold values are at risk of leading to a significant number of either false positives or false negatives. A limited evaluation of the screening method's estimates for a sub-set of about 100 substances, compared against independent and more detailed emission scenarios presented in various European Risk Assessment Reports, highlights that up-to-date and accurate information on quantities in commerce as well as a detailed

  10. Physico-Chemical Research on the Sounding Rocket Maser 13

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lockowandt, Christian; Kemi, Stig; Abrahamsson, Mattias; Florin, Gunnar

    MASER is a sounding rocket platform for short-duration microgravity experiments, providing the scientific community with an excellent microgravity tool. The MASER programme has been running by SSC from 1987 and has up to 2012 provided twelve successful flights for microgravity missions with 6-7 minutes of microgravity, the g-level is normally below 1x10-5 g. The MASER 13 is planned to be launched in spring 2015 from Esrange Space Center in Northern Sweden. The rocket will carry four ESA financed experiment modules. The MASER 13 vehicle will be propelled by the 2-stage solid fuel VSB-30 rocket motor, which provided the 390 kg payload with an apogee of 260 km and 6 and a half minutes of microgravity. Swedish Space Corporation carries out the MASER missions for ESA and the program is also available for other customers. The payload comprise four different experiment modules of which three could be defined as physic-chemical research; XRMON-SOL, CDIC-3, MEDI. It also comprises the Maser Service Module and the recovery system. The Service Module provided real-time 5 Mbps down-link of compressed experiment digital video data from the on-board cameras, as well as high-speed housekeeping telemetry data. XRMON-SOL In this experiment the influence of gravity on the formation of an equiaxed microstructure will be investigated. Special attention will be put on the aspect of nucleation, segregation and impingement. The experiment scope is to melt and solidify an AlCu-alloy sample in microgravity. The solidification will be performed in an isothermal environment. The solidification process will be monitored and recorded with X-ray image during the whole flight, images will also be down-linked to ground for real-time monitoring and possible interaction. CDIC-3 The goal is to study in migrogravity the spatio-temporal dynamics of a chemical front travelling in a thin solution layer open to the air and specifically the respective role of Marangoni and density-related hydrodynamic

  11. Research and Applications of Chemical Sciences in Forestry: Proceedings of the 4th Southern Station Chemical Sciences Meeting

    Treesearch

    J.A. Vozzo; [Compiler

    1994-01-01

    This proceedings is the result of 65 scientists representing 34 facilities reported in 28 presentations. As titled, Research and Applications of Chemical Sciences in Forestry, the contributors represent academic, basic, and applied researchers from universities and U.S. Department of Agriculture. Their presence and experience represent a significant showing toward...

  12. Frontiers in Chemical Engineering. Research Needs and Opportunities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Academy of Sciences - National Research Council, Washington, DC. Commission on Physical Sciences, Mathematics, and Resources.

    Chemical engineers play a key role in industries such as petroleum, food, artificial fibers, petrochemicals, plastics and many others. They are needed to tailor manufacturing technology to the requirements of products and to integrate product and process design. This report discusses how chemical engineers are continuing to address technological…

  13. Comparison of dermal and inhalation routes of entry for organic chemicals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jepson, Gary W.; Mcdougal, James N.; Clewell, Harvey J., III

    1992-01-01

    The quantitative comparison of the chemical concentration inside the body as the result of a dermal exposure versus an inhalation exposure is useful for assessing human health risks and deciding on an appropriate protective posture. In order to describe the relationship between dermal and inhalation routes of exposure, a variety of organic chemicals were evaluated. The types of chemicals chosen for the study were halogenated hydrocarbons, aromatic compounds, non-polar hydrocarbons and inhalation anesthetics. Both dermal and inhalation exposures were conducted in rats and the chemicals were in the form of vapors. Prior to the dermal exposure, rat fur was closely clipped and during the exposure rats were provided fresh breathing air through latex masks. Blood samples were taken during 4-hour exposures and analyzed for the chemical of interest. A physiologically based pharmacokinetic model was used to predict permeability constants (cm/hr) consistent with the observed blood concentrations of the chemical. The ratio of dermal exposure to inhalation exposure required to achieve the same internal dose of chemical was calculated for each test chemical. The calculated ratio in humans ranged from 18 for styrene to 1180 for isoflurane. This methodology can be used to estimate the dermal exposure required to reach the internal dose achieved by a specific inhalation exposure. Such extrapolation is important since allowable exposure standards are often set for inhalation exposures, but occupational exposures may be dermal.

  14. Chemical transport model simulations of organic aerosol in southern California: model evaluation and gasoline and diesel source contributions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jathar, Shantanu H.; Woody, Matthew; Pye, Havala O. T.; Baker, Kirk R.; Robinson, Allen L.

    2017-03-01

    Gasoline- and diesel-fueled engines are ubiquitous sources of air pollution in urban environments. They emit both primary particulate matter and precursor gases that react to form secondary particulate matter in the atmosphere. In this work, we updated the organic aerosol module and organic emissions inventory of a three-dimensional chemical transport model, the Community Multiscale Air Quality Model (CMAQ), using recent, experimentally derived inputs and parameterizations for mobile sources. The updated model included a revised volatile organic compound (VOC) speciation for mobile sources and secondary organic aerosol (SOA) formation from unspeciated intermediate volatility organic compounds (IVOCs). The updated model was used to simulate air quality in southern California during May and June 2010, when the California Research at the Nexus of Air Quality and Climate Change (CalNex) study was conducted. Compared to the Traditional version of CMAQ, which is commonly used for regulatory applications, the updated model did not significantly alter the predicted organic aerosol (OA) mass concentrations but did substantially improve predictions of OA sources and composition (e.g., POA-SOA split), as well as ambient IVOC concentrations. The updated model, despite substantial differences in emissions and chemistry, performed similar to a recently released research version of CMAQ (Woody et al., 2016) that did not include the updated VOC and IVOC emissions and SOA data. Mobile sources were predicted to contribute 30-40 % of the OA in southern California (half of which was SOA), making mobile sources the single largest source contributor to OA in southern California. The remainder of the OA was attributed to non-mobile anthropogenic sources (e.g., cooking, biomass burning) with biogenic sources contributing to less than 5 % to the total OA. Gasoline sources were predicted to contribute about 13 times more OA than diesel sources; this difference was driven by differences in

  15. Attenuation of total organic carbon and unregulated trace organic chemicals in U.S. riverbank filtration systems.

    PubMed

    Hoppe-Jones, Christiane; Oldham, Gretchen; Drewes, Jörg E

    2010-08-01

    There is increasing concern regarding the presence of unregulated trace organic chemicals in drinking water supplies that receive discharge from municipal wastewater treatment plants. In comparison to conventional and advanced drinking water treatment, riverbank filtration represents a low-cost and low-energy alternative that can attenuate total organic carbon (TOC) as well as trace organic chemicals (TOrC). This study examined the role of predominant redox conditions, retention time, biodegradable organic carbon, and temperature to achieve attenuation of TOC and TOrC through monitoring efforts at three full-scale RBF facilities in different geographic areas of the United States. The RBF systems investigated in this study were able to act as a reliable barrier for TOC, nitrogen, and certain TOrC. Temperature (seasonal) variation played an important role for the make-up of the river water quality and performance of the RBF systems. Temperatures of less than 10 degrees C did not affect TOC removal but resulted in diminished attenuation of nitrate and select TOrC.

  16. Predicting soil sorption coefficients of organic chemicals using a neural network model

    SciTech Connect

    Gao, C.; Govind, R.; Tabak, H.H.

    1996-07-01

    The soil/sediment adsorption partition coefficient normalized to organic carbon (K{sub oc}) is extensively used to assess the fate of organic chemicals in hazardous waste sites. Several attempts have been made to estimate the value of K{sub oc} from chemical structure or its parameters. The primary purpose of this study was to develop a nonlinear model for estimating K{sub oc} applicable to polar and nonpolar organics based on artificial neural networks using the octanol/water partition coefficient (K{sub ow}) and water solubility (S). An analytic equation was obtained by starting with a neural network, converging the bias and weight values using the available data on water solubility, octanol/water partition coefficient, and the normalized soil/sediment adsorption partition coefficient, and then combining the equations for each node in the final neural network. For the 119 chemicals in the training set, estimates using the neural network equation lie outside the 2{sigma} region (the standard deviation for the training set, {sigma} = 0.52) for only five chemicals, while all the chemicals in the test set lie within the 2{sigma} region. It was concluded that the neural network equation outperforms the linear models in fitting the K{sub oc} values for the training set and predicting them for the test set.

  17. Chemical and toxicologic assessment of organic contaminants in surface water using passive samplers

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Alvarez, D.A.; Cranor, W.L.; Perkins, S.D.; Clark, R.C.; Smith, S.B.

    2008-01-01

    Passive sampling methodologies were used to conduct a chemical and toxicologic assessment of organic contaminants in the surface waters of three geographically distinct agricultural watersheds. A selection of current-use agrochemicals and persistent organic pollutants, including polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, polychlorinated biphenyls, and organochlorine pesticides, were targeted using the polar organic chemical integrative sampler (POCIS) and the semipermeable membrane device passive samplers. In addition to the chemical analysis, the Microtox assay for acute toxicity and the yeast estrogen screen (YES) were conducted as potential assessment tools in combination with the passive samplers. During the spring of 2004, the passive samplers were deployed for 29 to 65 d at Leary Weber Ditch, IN; Morgan Creek, MD; and DR2 Drain, WA. Chemical analysis of the sampler extracts identified the agrochemicals predominantly used in those areas, including atrazine, simazine, acetochlor, and metolachlor. Other chemicals identified included deethylatrazine and deisopropylatrazine, trifluralin, fluoranthene, pyrene, cis- and trans-nonachlor, and pentachloroanisole. Screening using Microtox resulted in no acutely toxic samples. POCIS samples screened by the YES assay failed to elicit a positive estrogenic response. Copyright ?? 2008 by the American Society of Agronomy, Crop Science Society of America, and Soil Science Society of America. All rights reserved.

  18. Identifying Military Impacts on Archaeological Deposits Based on Differences in Soil Organic Carbon and Chemical Elements at Soil Horizon Interfaces

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-03-01

    Identifying Military Impacts on Archaeological Deposits Based on Differences in Soil Organic Carbon and Chemical Elements at Soil Horizon Interfaces Final...Archaeological Deposits Based on Differences in Soil Organic Carbon and Chemical Elements at Soil Horizon Interfaces Final Report on SERDP Project RC...TITLE AND SUBTITLE Identifying Military Impacts on Archaeological Deposits Based on Differences in Soil Organic Carbon and Chemical Elements at

  19. Incorporating Chemical Information Instruction and Environmental Science into the First-Year Organic Chemistry Laboratory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Landolt, R. G.

    2006-01-01

    The chemical information instruction and environmental science which is incorporated into a first-year organic chemistry laboratory is presented. The students are charged with devised search strategies, conducting online searches and limiting the project scope to ocean systems. The laboratory serves to provide for search strategy development…

  20. Dissolved organic carbon in Alaskan boreal forest: sources, chemical characteristics, and biodegradability

    Treesearch

    Kimberly P. Wickland; Jason C. Neff; George R. Aiken

    2007-01-01

    The fate of terrestrially-derived dissolved organic carbon (DOC) is important to carbon (C) cycling in both terrestrial and aquatic environments, and recent evidence suggests that climate warming is influencing DOC dynamics in northern ecosystems. To understand what determines the fate of terrestrial DOC, it is essential to quantify the chemical nature and potential...

  1. Interdisciplinary Learning for Chemical Engineering Students from Organic Chemistry Synthesis Lab to Reactor Design to Separation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Armstrong, Matt; Comitz, Richard L.; Biaglow, Andrew; Lachance, Russ; Sloop, Joseph

    2008-01-01

    A novel approach to the Chemical Engineering curriculum sequence of courses at West Point enabled our students to experience a much more realistic design process, which more closely replicated a real world scenario. Students conduct the synthesis in the organic chemistry lab, then conduct computer modeling of the reaction with ChemCad and…

  2. Pheromones, attractants and other chemical cues of aquatic organisms and amphibians.

    PubMed

    Cummins, Scott F; Bowie, John H

    2012-06-01

    This review covers the subject of pheromones, attractants and other chemical cues of aquatic invertebrates, fishes and amphibians (including salamanders and anurans). Major topics include the sex pheromones of gastropods, salamanders and a giant tree frog, and the conspecific attraction of sperm to ova of some of the organisms and animals described in this review.

  3. An efficient laboratory workflow for environmental risk assessment of organic chemicals.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Linyan; Santiago-Schübel, Beatrix; Xiao, Hongxia; Thiele, Björn; Zhu, Zhiliang; Qiu, Yanling; Hollert, Henner; Küppers, Stephan

    2015-07-01

    In this study, we demonstrate a fast and efficient workflow to investigate the transformation mechanism of organic chemicals and evaluate the toxicity of their transformation products (TPs) in laboratory scale. The transformation process of organic chemicals was first simulated by electrochemistry coupled online to mass spectrometry (EC-MS). The simulated reactions were scaled up in a batch EC reactor to receive larger amounts of a reaction mixture. The mixture sample was purified and concentrated by solid phase extraction (SPE) for the further ecotoxicological testing. The combined toxicity of the reaction mixture was evaluated in fish egg test (FET) (Danio rerio) compared to the parent compound. The workflow was verified with carbamazepine (CBZ). By using EC-MS seven primary TPs of CBZ were identified; the degradation mechanism was elucidated and confirmed by comparison to literature. The reaction mixture and one primary product (acridine) showed higher ecotoxicity in fish egg assay with 96 h EC50 values of 1.6 and 1.0 mg L(-1) than CBZ with the value of 60.8 mg L(-1). The results highlight the importance of transformation mechanism study and toxicological effect evaluation for organic chemicals brought into the environment since transformation of them may increase the toxicity. The developed process contributes a fast and efficient laboratory method for the risk assessment of organic chemicals and their TPs. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Separation of chemical groups from bio-oil aqueous phase via sequential organic solvent extraction

    DOE PAGES

    Ren, Shoujie; Ye, Philip; Borole, Abhijeet P

    2017-01-05

    Bio-oil aqueous phase contains a considerable amount of furans, alcohols, ketones, aldehydes and phenolics besides the major components of organic acids and anhydrosugars. The complexity of bio-oil aqueous phase limits its efficient utilization. To improve the efficiency of bio-oil biorefinery, this study focused on the separation of chemical groups from bio-oil aqueous phase via sequential organic solvent extractions. Due to their high recoverability and low solubility in water, four solvents (hexane, petroleum ether, chloroform, and ethyl acetate) with different polarities were evaluated, and the optimum process conditions for chemical extraction were determined. Chloroform had high extraction efficiency for furans, phenolics,more » and ketones. In addition to these chemical groups, ethyl acetate had high extraction efficiency for organic acids. The sequential extraction by using chloroform followed by ethyl acetate rendered that 62.2 wt.% of original furans, ketones, alcohols, and phenolics were extracted to chloroform, over 62 wt.% acetic acid was extracted to ethyl acetate, resulting in a high concentration of levoglucosan (~53.0 wt.%) in the final aqueous phase. Chemicals separated via the sequential extraction could be used as feedstocks in biorefinery using processes such as catalytic upgrading of furans and phenolics to hydrocarbons, fermentation of levoglucosan to produce alcohols and diols, and hydrogen production from organic acids via microbial electrolysis.« less

  5. Interdisciplinary Learning for Chemical Engineering Students from Organic Chemistry Synthesis Lab to Reactor Design to Separation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Armstrong, Matt; Comitz, Richard L.; Biaglow, Andrew; Lachance, Russ; Sloop, Joseph

    2008-01-01

    A novel approach to the Chemical Engineering curriculum sequence of courses at West Point enabled our students to experience a much more realistic design process, which more closely replicated a real world scenario. Students conduct the synthesis in the organic chemistry lab, then conduct computer modeling of the reaction with ChemCad and…

  6. Experts Workshop on the Ecotoxicological Risk Assessment of Ionizable Organic Chemicals: Bioaccumulation/ADME

    EPA Science Inventory

    The bioaccumulation potential of neutral organic chemicals (e.g., PCBs, DDT, brominated flame retardants) has received a great deal of attention from scientists in the field of environment toxicology and chemistry over the past four decades. Regulations based on our understanding...

  7. Organic contaminant release from melting snow. 1. Influence of chemical partitioning.

    PubMed

    Meyer, Torsten; Lei, Ying Duan; Muradi, Ibrahim; Wania, Frank

    2009-02-01

    A melting snowpack can deliver organic contaminants to terrestrial and aquatic ecosystems in the form of short and concentrated pulses. The mechanisms and kinetics of the underlying processes need to be understood to successfully integrate them into contaminant and water quality models. Controlled laboratory-based snowmelt experiments using artificially produced snow spiked with organic target contaminants reveal how chemical behavior during melting is dependent on the partitioning between the different phases within the bulk snow. Behaving similar to inorganic ions, water soluble organic chemicals, such as atrazine, are preferentially released at an early stage of melting, because such chemicals, accumulated at the snow grain surface, dissolve in the downward percolating meltwaterfront. Hydrophobic substances attached to particles, such as the larger polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, are often released at the very end of the melt period, because particle coagulation and snow densification render the melting snowpack an efficient filter trapping the particles. A notable fraction of volatile chemicals, such as naphthalene, will transfer from the melting snowpack to the lower atmosphere due to evaporation. Organic pollutants with intermediate partition properties, such as lindane, can easily switch between the bulk snow phases and their elution behavior is therefore more sensitive to varying snow and melt characteristics.

  8. Experts Workshop on the Ecotoxicological Risk Assessment of Ionizable Organic Chemicals: Bioaccumulation/ADME

    EPA Science Inventory

    The bioaccumulation potential of neutral organic chemicals (e.g., PCBs, DDT, brominated flame retardants) has received a great deal of attention from scientists in the field of environment toxicology and chemistry over the past four decades. Regulations based on our understanding...

  9. A polyoxometalate-organic supramolecular nanotube with high chemical stability and proton-conducting properties.

    PubMed

    Cao, Gao-Juan; Liu, Jing-Dong; Zhuang, Ting-Ting; Cai, Xiu-Hong; Zheng, Shou-Tian

    2015-02-07

    The use of 1H-1,2,4-triazole-3-thiol (H2trzS) has led to a rare inorganic-organic hybrid supramolecular nanotube built from novel Ni5-substituted polyoxotungstates, which presents interesting structural characteristics, high chemical stability, and proton-conducting properties.

  10. Incorporating Chemical Information Instruction and Environmental Science into the First-Year Organic Chemistry Laboratory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Landolt, R. G.

    2006-01-01

    The chemical information instruction and environmental science which is incorporated into a first-year organic chemistry laboratory is presented. The students are charged with devised search strategies, conducting online searches and limiting the project scope to ocean systems. The laboratory serves to provide for search strategy development…

  11. 15 CFR 740.11 - Governments, international organizations, international inspections under the Chemical Weapons...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 15 Commerce and Foreign Trade 2 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Governments, international organizations, international inspections under the Chemical Weapons Convention, and the International Space Station (GOV). 740.11 Section 740.11 Commerce and Foreign Trade Regulations Relating to Commerce and Foreign Trade (Continued) BUREAU OF INDUSTRY AND...

  12. 15 CFR 740.11 - Governments, international organizations, international inspections under the Chemical Weapons...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 15 Commerce and Foreign Trade 2 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Governments, international organizations, international inspections under the Chemical Weapons Convention, and the International Space Station (GOV). 740.11 Section 740.11 Commerce and Foreign Trade Regulations Relating to Commerce and Foreign Trade (Continued) BUREAU OF INDUSTRY AND...

  13. 15 CFR 740.11 - Governments, international organizations, international inspections under the Chemical Weapons...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 15 Commerce and Foreign Trade 2 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Governments, international organizations, international inspections under the Chemical Weapons Convention, and the International Space Station (GOV). 740.11 Section 740.11 Commerce and Foreign Trade Regulations Relating to Commerce and Foreign Trade (Continued) BUREAU OF INDUSTRY AND...

  14. 15 CFR 740.11 - Governments, international organizations, international inspections under the Chemical Weapons...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 15 Commerce and Foreign Trade 2 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Governments, international organizations, international inspections under the Chemical Weapons Convention, and the International Space Station (GOV). 740.11 Section 740.11 Commerce and Foreign Trade Regulations Relating to Commerce and Foreign Trade (Continued) BUREAU OF INDUSTRY AND...

  15. Prediction of the sorption capacities and affinities of organic chemicals by XAD-7.

    PubMed

    Yang, Kun; Qi, Long; Wei, Wei; Wu, Wenhao; Lin, Daohui

    2016-01-01

    Macro-porous resins are widely used as adsorbents for the treatment of organic contaminants in wastewater and for the pre-concentration of organic solutes from water. However, the sorption mechanisms for organic contaminants on such adsorbents have not been systematically investigated so far. Therefore, in this study, the sorption capacities and affinities of 24 organic chemicals by XAD-7 were investigated and the experimentally obtained sorption isotherms were fitted to the Dubinin-Ashtakhov model. Linear positive correlations were observed between the sorption capacities and the solubilities (SW) of the chemicals in water or octanol and between the sorption affinities and the solvatochromic parameters of the chemicals, indicating that the sorption of various organic compounds by XAD-7 occurred by non-linear partitioning into XAD-7, rather than by adsorption on XAD-7 surfaces. Both specific interactions (i.e., hydrogen-bonding interactions) as well as nonspecific interactions were considered to be responsible for the non-linear partitioning. The correlation equations obtained in this study allow the prediction of non-linear partitioning using well-known chemical parameters, namely SW, octanol-water partition coefficients (KOW), and the hydrogen-bonding donor parameter (αm). The effect of pH on the sorption of ionizable organic compounds (IOCs) could also be predicted by combining the correlation equations with additional equations developed from the estimation of IOC dissociation rates. The prediction equations developed in this study and the proposed non-linear partition mechanism shed new light on the selective removal and pre-concentration of organic solutes from water and on the regeneration of exhausted XAD-7 using solvent extraction.

  16. Evaluation of OECD guidelines for testing of chemicals with aquatic organisms

    SciTech Connect

    Blaylock, B.G.; McCarthy, J.F.; Frank, M.L.; Singley, P.T.

    1983-10-01

    The protocols in the OECD (Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development) guidelines for testing of chemicals with aquatic organisms were evaluated for the following tests: (1) Fish, Acute Toxicity Test, (2) Bioaccumulation: Flow-through Fish Test, (3) Daphnia sp., 14-day Reproduction Test (including an Acute Immobilization Test), and (4) Alga, Growth Inhibition Test. The protocols were evaluated by conducting the tests with different classes of chemicals (i.e., water soluble, less water soluble requiring a chemical carrier, and volatile chemical). Flow-through and semistatic Fish, Acute Toxicity Tests were conducted with cupric chloride and acridine. The Bioaccumulation Flow-Through Fish Test was conducted with naphthalene and DDE. Three chemicals - cupric chloride, acridine, and di-n-butyl phthalate - were used to evaluate the Daphnia sp., 14-day Reproduction Test. The Alga, Growth Inhibition Test was evaluated with three chemicals: cupric chloride, acridine, and paradichlorobenzene. By following the OECD guidelines in conducting these tests, results were obtained that are comparable with literature data obtained with other methods. An evaluation of each test protocol is given with recommendations for the guidelines for conducting the tests.

  17. Factors affecting the uptake of 14C-labeled organic chemicals by plants from soil

    SciTech Connect

    Topp, E.; Scheunert, I.; Attar, A.; Korte, F.

    1986-04-01

    The uptake of /sup 14/C from various /sup 14/C-labeled organic chemicals from different chemical classes by barley and cress seedlings from soil was studied for 7 days in a closed aerated laboratory apparatus. Uptake by roots and by leaves via the air was determined separately. Although comparative long-term outdoor studies showed that an equilibrium is not reached within a short time period, plant concentration factors after 7 days could be correlated to some physicochemical and structural substance properties. Barley root concentration factors due to root uptake, expressed as concentration in roots divided by concentration in soil, gave a fairly good negative correlation to adsorption coefficients based on soil organic carbon. Barley root concentration factors, expressed as concentration in roots divided by concentration in soil liquid, gave a positive correlation to the n-octanol/water partition coefficients. Uptake of chemicals by barley leaves via air was strongly positively correlated to volatilization of chemicals from soil. Both root and foliar uptake by barley could be correlated well to the molecular weight of 14 chemicals. Uptake of chemicals by cress differed from that by barley, and correlations to physicochemical substance properties mostly were poor.

  18. Direct conversion of radioactive and chemical waste containing metals, ceramics, amorphous solids, and organics to glass

    SciTech Connect

    Forsberg, C.W.; Beahm, E.C.; Parker, G.W.

    1994-05-02

    The Glass Material Oxidation and Dissolution System (CMODS) is a new process for direct conversion of radioactive, mixed, and chemical wastes to glass. The wastes can be in the chemical forms of metals, ceramics, amorphous solids, and organics. GMODS destroys organics and it incorporates heavy metals and radionuclides into a glass. Processable wastes may include miscellaneous spent fuels (SF), SF hulls and hardware, plutonium wastes in different forms, high-efficiency particulate air (HEPA) filters, ion-exchange resins, failed equipment, and laboratory wastes. Thermodynamic calculations indicate theoretical feasibility. Small-scale laboratory experiments (< 100 g per test) have demonstrated chemical laboratory feasibility for several metals. Additional work is needed to demonstrate engineering feasibility.

  19. Distribution of organic carbon and chemicals in agricultural soils (BET method)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schnitzler, F.; Séquaris, J.-M.; Berns, A. E.; Burauel, P.

    2009-04-01

    Modelling the dynamics of soil organic carbon and chemicals in soils requires compartmentalisation in pools or fractions. The determination of organic carbon and chemical concentration in all fractions is often time-consuming or not realisable due to low amount of soil fractions. Therefore, we developed an analytical method to calculate distributions of organic carbon and chemicals in soil without any chemical extraction method. Two sets of experiments were conducted with undisturbed soil columns under field-like conditions. In the first set, maize straw was incorporated into the topsoil and after three months incubation, the 14C-labelled chemicals benazolin or benzo[a]pyrene were applied. The second set was treated equally, but without maize addition. After a total incubation time of six months, the topsoil layers were fractionated with a physical aggregate size fractionation procedure[1]. The content of organic carbon and the distribution of the chemicals were detected in the gained soil fractions. Furthermore, the BET method was used to determine the specific surface area (SSA) of selected soil fractions. It can be shown that a fraction of organic carbon and chemicals is dependent on the SSA. The slopes of these linear relationships have been used for the estimation of the organic carbon[2] or chemicals associated to the clay fraction. Thus, mass concentrations of organic carbon or chemicals located in the clay and silt+sand fraction can be calculated. It has been found that the influence of the incorporated maize straw on the amount of organic carbon in the fractions is low due to strong mineralisation processes. In general, the amount of organic carbon in the silt+sand fraction is higher than in the clay fraction. In contrary, the 14C-activity of the chemicals is higher in the clay fraction than in the silt+sand fraction. However, the addition of maize straw increases the amount of 14C-activity in the silt+sand fraction. The calculated distribution

  20. Topological insulator Bi2Te3 films synthesized by metal organic chemical vapor deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cao, Helin; Venkatasubramanian, Rama; Liu, Chang; Pierce, Jonathan; Yang, Haoran; Zahid Hasan, M.; Wu, Yue; Chen, Yong P.

    2012-10-01

    Topological insulator (TI) materials such as Bi2Te3 and Bi2Se3 have attracted strong recent interests. Large scale, high quality TI thin films are important for developing TI-based device applications. In this work, structural and electronic properties of Bi2Te3 thin films deposited by metal organic chemical vapor deposition (MOCVD) on GaAs (001) substrates were characterized via x-ray diffraction (XRD), Raman spectroscopy, angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy (ARPES), and electronic transport measurements. The characteristic topological surface states with a single Dirac cone have been clearly revealed in the electronic band structure measured by ARPES, confirming the TI nature of the MOCVD Bi2Te3 films. Resistivity and Hall effect measurements have demonstrated relatively high bulk carrier mobility of ˜350 cm2/Vs at 300 K and ˜7400 cm2/Vs at 15 K. We have also measured the Seebeck coefficient of the films. Our demonstration of high quality topological insulator films grown by a simple and scalable method is of interests for both fundamental research and practical applications of thermoelectric and TI materials.