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Sample records for chemical society los

  1. American Chemical Society, Preprints symposia

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1987-01-01

    The Division of Petroleum Chemistry of the American Chemical Society met August 30-September 4, 1987, in New Orleans and presented symposia on advances in fluid cracking catalysts, advances in naphtha reforming, refinery waste cleanup, hydrocarbon oxidation, and methane conversion. Forty-two abstracts were prepared.

  2. Chemical society hosts biotech gathering

    SciTech Connect

    Stone, R.

    1992-08-28

    Last week more than 1,200 scientists attended the Ninth International Biotechnology Symposium sponsored by the American Chemical Society (ACS) in Crystal City, Virginia. The conference, held every 4 years, ranged from basic science topics (such as finding structural motifs in protein data banks) to applied work (including the latest advances in making human proteins in transgenic animals).

  3. Science Policy: World's Chemical Society Presidents Meet.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carpenter, Ernest L.

    1979-01-01

    Related are the results of the discussions at a meeting of the world's chemical society presidents in Washington, D.C. Members of the executive committee involved in formation of an international chemical society are listed. (SA)

  4. Chemical Case Studies: Science-Society "Bonding."

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hofstein, Avi; Nae, Nehemia

    1981-01-01

    Describes a unit designed to illustrate the "science-society-technology connection," in which three case studies of the chemical industry in Israel are presented to high school chemistry students. Chosen for the unit are case studies on copper production in Timna, on plastics, and on life from the Dead Sea. (CS)

  5. Symposium introduction: the first joint American Chemical Society Agricultural and Food Chemistry Division and the American Chemical Society International Chemical Sciences Chapter in Thailand

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The American Chemical Society (ACS) Agricultural and Food Chemistry Division (AGFD) and the ACS International Chemical Sciences Chapter in Thailand (ICSCT) worked together to stage the “1st Joint ACS AGFD - ACS ICSCT Symposium on Agricultural and Food Chemistry,” which was held in Bangkok, Thailand ...

  6. Endocrine-Disrupting Chemicals: An Endocrine Society Scientific Statement

    PubMed Central

    Diamanti-Kandarakis, Evanthia; Bourguignon, Jean-Pierre; Giudice, Linda C.; Hauser, Russ; Prins, Gail S.; Soto, Ana M.; Zoeller, R. Thomas; Gore, Andrea C.

    2009-01-01

    There is growing interest in the possible health threat posed by endocrine-disrupting chemicals (EDCs), which are substances in our environment, food, and consumer products that interfere with hormone biosynthesis, metabolism, or action resulting in a deviation from normal homeostatic control or reproduction. In this first Scientific Statement of The Endocrine Society, we present the evidence that endocrine disruptors have effects on male and female reproduction, breast development and cancer, prostate cancer, neuroendocrinology, thyroid, metabolism and obesity, and cardiovascular endocrinology. Results from animal models, human clinical observations, and epidemiological studies converge to implicate EDCs as a significant concern to public health. The mechanisms of EDCs involve divergent pathways including (but not limited to) estrogenic, antiandrogenic, thyroid, peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ, retinoid, and actions through other nuclear receptors; steroidogenic enzymes; neurotransmitter receptors and systems; and many other pathways that are highly conserved in wildlife and humans, and which can be modeled in laboratory in vitro and in vivo models. Furthermore, EDCs represent a broad class of molecules such as organochlorinated pesticides and industrial chemicals, plastics and plasticizers, fuels, and many other chemicals that are present in the environment or are in widespread use. We make a number of recommendations to increase understanding of effects of EDCs, including enhancing increased basic and clinical research, invoking the precautionary principle, and advocating involvement of individual and scientific society stakeholders in communicating and implementing changes in public policy and awareness. PMID:19502515

  7. Acquisition of chemical recognition cues facilitates integration into ant societies

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Social insects maintain the integrity of their societies by discriminating between colony members and foreigners through cuticular hydrocarbon (CHC) signatures. Nevertheless, parasites frequently get access to social resources, for example through mimicry of host CHCs among other mechanisms. The origin of mimetic compounds, however, remains unknown in the majority of studies (biosynthesis vs. acquisition). Additionally, direct evidence is scarce that chemical mimicry is indeed beneficial to the parasites (e.g., by improving social acceptance). Results In the present study we demonstrated that the kleptoparasitic silverfish Malayatelura ponerophila most likely acquires CHCs directly from its host ant Leptogenys distinguenda by evaluating the transfer of a stable-isotope label from the cuticle of workers to the silverfish. In a second experiment, we prevented CHC pilfering by separating silverfish from their host for six or nine days. Chemical host resemblance as well as aggressive rejection behaviour by host ants was then quantified for unmanipulated and previously separated individuals. Separated individuals showed reduced chemical host resemblance and they received significantly more aggressive rejection behaviour than unmanipulated individuals. Conclusion Our study clarifies the mechanism of chemical mimicry in a social insect parasite in great detail. It shows empirically for the first time that social insect parasites are able to acquire CHCs from their host. Furthermore, it demonstrates that the accuracy of chemical mimicry can be crucial for social insect parasites by enhancing social acceptance and, thus, allowing successful exploitation. We discuss the results in the light of coevolutionary arms races between parasites and hosts. PMID:22133503

  8. Proceedings of the frst joint american chemical society agricultural and food chemistry division – american chemical society international chemical sciences chapter in Thailand symposium on agricultural and food chemistry

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This Proceedings is a compilation of papers from contributed oral and poster presentations presented at the first joint symposium organized by the American Chemical Society Agricultural and Food Chemistry Division and the American Chemical Society International Chemical Sciences Chapter in Thailand ...

  9. Biopesticides: State of the Art and Future Opportunities by the American Chemical Society

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    This chapter from an American Chemical Society symposium reviews areas including how EPA views the benefits of biopesticides, related laws and legal requirements, biopesticide registration, and biopesticide data requirements.

  10. American Chemical Society division of fuel chemistry Henry H. Storch award.

    SciTech Connect

    Chemistry

    1998-05-01

    American Chemical Society Division of Fuel Chemistry Henry H. Storch Award ... The purpose of the Henry H. Storch Award is to recognize distinguished contributions worldwide to fundamental or engineering research on the chemistry and utilization of all hydrocarbon fuels, with the exception of petroleum. ... The award was established in 1964 by the American Chemical Society Division of Fuel Chemistry and administered by the Division until 1985.

  11. American Chemical Society: Twentieth northeast regional meeting. Program and Abstracts

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1990-01-01

    The proceedings contain papers on the following topics: preparation, characterization, and applications of fine particles; multinuclear NMR spectroscopy; chemical aspects of wine making; organic electrochemistry; chemical education; laboratory information management systems; laser-based processing and diagnostics of materials; modern liquid chromatography; high-temperature superconductivity; organic chemistry; chemometrics; colloid and surface science; biological chemistry; environmental sciences; drug analysis; and organometallic chemistry. Papers within the scope of the Energy Data Base have been processed separately.

  12. 1996 Central New Mexico Section [American Chemical Society] annual report

    SciTech Connect

    Cournoyer, M.E.

    1997-02-07

    The main goal of the Central New Mexico Section this year was to increase attendance at the local meetings. Throughout the course of the year attendance at the meeting more than doubled. This was brought on by several factors: having the meeting spread throughout the section (Albuquerque, Santa Fe, Las Vegas, Socorro, Los Alamos); supplementing the ACS National Tour speakers with interesting local sections speakers; and making full use of the newly formed Public Relations Committee. Activities during 1996 are summarized.

  13. Chemical and genetic defenses against disease in insect societies.

    PubMed

    Stow, Adam; Beattie, Andrew

    2008-10-01

    The colonies of ants, bees, wasps and termites, the social insects, consist of large numbers of closely related individuals; circumstances ideal for contagious diseases. Antimicrobial assays of these animals have demonstrated a wide variety of chemical defenses against both bacteria and fungi that can be broadly classified as either external antiseptic compounds or internal immune molecules. Reducing the disease risks inherent in colonies of social insects is also achieved by behaviors, such as multiple mating or dispersal, that lower genetic relatedness both within- and among colonies. The interactions between social insects and their pathogens are complex, as illustrated by some ants that require antimicrobial and behavioral defenses against highly specialized fungi, such as those in the genus Cordyceps that attack larvae and adults and species in the genus Escovopsis that attack their food supplies. Studies of these defenses, especially in ants, have revealed remarkably sophisticated immune systems, including peptides induced by, and specific to, individual bacterial strains. The latter may be the result of the recruitment by the ants of antibiotic-producing bacteria but the extent of such three-way interactions remains unknown. There is strong experimental evidence that the evolution of sociality required dramatic increases in antimicrobial defenses and that microbes have been powerful selective agents. The antimicrobial chemicals and the insect-killing fungi may be useful in medicine and agriculture, respectively.

  14. Chemically armed mercenary ants protect fungus-farming societies

    PubMed Central

    Adams, Rachelle M. M.; Liberti, Joanito; Illum, Anders A.; Jones, Tappey H.; Nash, David R.; Boomsma, Jacobus J.

    2013-01-01

    The ants are extraordinary in having evolved many lineages that exploit closely related ant societies as social parasites, but social parasitism by distantly related ants is rare. Here we document the interaction dynamics among a Sericomyrmex fungus-growing ant host, a permanently associated parasitic guest ant of the genus Megalomyrmex, and a raiding agro-predator of the genus Gnamptogenys. We show experimentally that the guest ants protect their host colonies against agro-predator raids using alkaloid venom that is much more potent than the biting defenses of the host ants. Relatively few guest ants are sufficient to kill raiders that invariably exterminate host nests without a cohabiting guest ant colony. We also show that the odor of guest ants discourages raider scouts from recruiting nestmates to host colonies. Our results imply that Sericomyrmex fungus-growers obtain a net benefit from their costly guest ants behaving as a functional soldier caste to meet lethal threats from agro-predator raiders. The fundamentally different life histories of the agro-predators and guest ants appear to facilitate their coexistence in a negative frequency-dependent manner. Because a guest ant colony is committed for life to a single host colony, the guests would harm their own interests by not defending the host that they continue to exploit. This conditional mutualism is analogous to chronic sickle cell anemia enhancing the resistance to malaria and to episodes in human history when mercenary city defenders offered either net benefits or imposed net costs, depending on the level of threat from invading armies. PMID:24019482

  15. Chemically armed mercenary ants protect fungus-farming societies.

    PubMed

    Adams, Rachelle M M; Liberti, Joanito; Illum, Anders A; Jones, Tappey H; Nash, David R; Boomsma, Jacobus J

    2013-09-24

    The ants are extraordinary in having evolved many lineages that exploit closely related ant societies as social parasites, but social parasitism by distantly related ants is rare. Here we document the interaction dynamics among a Sericomyrmex fungus-growing ant host, a permanently associated parasitic guest ant of the genus Megalomyrmex, and a raiding agro-predator of the genus Gnamptogenys. We show experimentally that the guest ants protect their host colonies against agro-predator raids using alkaloid venom that is much more potent than the biting defenses of the host ants. Relatively few guest ants are sufficient to kill raiders that invariably exterminate host nests without a cohabiting guest ant colony. We also show that the odor of guest ants discourages raider scouts from recruiting nestmates to host colonies. Our results imply that Sericomyrmex fungus-growers obtain a net benefit from their costly guest ants behaving as a functional soldier caste to meet lethal threats from agro-predator raiders. The fundamentally different life histories of the agro-predators and guest ants appear to facilitate their coexistence in a negative frequency-dependent manner. Because a guest ant colony is committed for life to a single host colony, the guests would harm their own interests by not defending the host that they continue to exploit. This conditional mutualism is analogous to chronic sickle cell anemia enhancing the resistance to malaria and to episodes in human history when mercenary city defenders offered either net benefits or imposed net costs, depending on the level of threat from invading armies.

  16. Polish Society of Endocrinology Position statement on endocrine disrupting chemicals (EDCs).

    PubMed

    Rutkowska, Aleksandra; Rachoń, Dominik; Milewicz, Andrzej; Ruchała, Marek; Bolanowski, Marek; Jędrzejuk, Diana; Bednarczuk, Tomasz; Górska, Maria; Hubalewska-Dydejczyk, Alicja; Kos-Kudła, Beata; Lewiński, Andrzej; Zgliczyński, Wojciech

    2015-01-01

    With the reference to the position statements of the Endocrine Society, the Paediatric Endocrine Society, and the European Society of Paediatric Endocrinology, the Polish Society of Endocrinology points out the adverse health effects caused by endocrine disrupting chemicals (EDCs) commonly used in daily life as components of plastics, food containers, pharmaceuticals, and cosmetics. The statement is based on the alarming data about the increase of the prevalence of many endocrine disorders such as: cryptorchidism, precocious puberty in girls and boys, and hormone-dependent cancers (endometrium, breast, prostate). In our opinion, it is of human benefit to conduct epidemiological studies that will enable the estimation of the risk factors of exposure to EDCs and the probability of endocrine disorders. Increasing consumerism and the industrial boom has led to severe pollution of the environment with a corresponding negative impact on human health; thus, there is great necessity for the biomonitoring of EDCs in Poland.

  17. Presidential Plenary Sessions: Report on Three American Chemical Society Presidential Events

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gettys, Nancy S.

    2000-06-01

    A marathon of plenary sessions was held at the 219th National Meeting of the American Chemical Society on Sunday March 26, 2000. The first session began at 1:20 p.m. and the third ended at 9:00 p.m., with 30-minute breaks between each session.

  18. Dialog and the American Chemical Society Play a High Stakes Game.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    O'Leary, Mick

    1991-01-01

    Discusses Dialog Information Service's lawsuit against the American Chemical Society (ACS) over online searching capabilities. Antitrust law is discussed, fair competition issues are raised, the user's point of view is considered, possible outcome scenarios are suggested, and a sidebar summarizes claims and counterclaims by Dialog, ACS, and…

  19. Challenges for Chemistry in the 21st Century: Report on the American Chemical Society Presidential Event

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gettys, Nancy S.

    1998-06-01

    On Sunday morning, March 29, 1998, during the 215th American Chemical Society National Meeting in Dallas, TX, a special Presidential Event, "Challenges for Chemistry in the 21st Century", was held. It was sponsored by the American Chemical Society Committee on Science and Chemical and Engineering News as part of its 75th Anniversary. Six outstanding scientists spoke on the future of their chosen fields of study to a standing-room-only audience. The intensity and enthusiasm of these men and women were inspiring. Several common themes emerged. According to these experts, the next century will require greater education in science and technology for the public and greater emphasis on interdisciplinary approaches to science by scientists. The completion of the human genome project and technological advances, including the development of nanotechnology, will be the driving forces of research in chemistry.

  20. How Linus Pauling Finally Got the Priestley Medal of the American Chemical Society

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davenport, Derek A.

    1998-10-01

    Late in 1981 I started firming up plans for a symposium marking the 250th anniversary of the birth of Joseph Priestley in 1733. The symposium was scheduled for the 1983 Fall Meeting of the American Chemical Society to be held in Washington D. C. Because of Priestley's wide-ranging interests and activities, the speakers were to include not only chemists and historians but also a political scientist, a grammarian, and a Unitarian minister. The closing session was to open with Melvin Calvin speaking on "Artificial Photosynthesis"-a phenomenon Priestley was the first to observe, albeit somewhat confusedly. Next came Fred Basolo, then president of the American Chemical Society, on "Synthetic Oxygen Carriers of Biological Interest"-Priestley had abeen among the first to remark on the role of dephlogisticated air (oxygen) in the interconversion of venous and arterial blood.

  1. Chemical decontamination technical resources at Los Alamos National Laboratory (2008)

    SciTech Connect

    Moore, Murray E

    2008-01-01

    This document supplies information resources for a person seeking to create planning or pre-planning documents for chemical decontamination operations. A building decontamination plan can be separated into four different sections: Pre-planning, Characterization, Decontamination (Initial response and also complete cleanup), and Clearance. Of the identified Los Alamos resources, they can be matched with these four sections: Pre-planning -- Dave Seidel, EO-EPP, Emergency Planning and Preparedness; David DeCroix and Bruce Letellier, D-3, Computational fluids modeling of structures; Murray E. Moore, RP-2, Aerosol sampling and ventilation engineering. Characterization (this can include development projects) -- Beth Perry, IAT-3, Nuclear Counterterrorism Response (SNIPER database); Fernando Garzon, MPA-11, Sensors and Electrochemical Devices (development); George Havrilla, C-CDE, Chemical Diagnostics and Engineering; Kristen McCabe, B-7, Biosecurity and Public Health. Decontamination -- Adam Stively, EO-ER, Emergency Response; Dina Matz, IHS-IP, Industrial hygiene; Don Hickmott, EES-6, Chemical cleanup. Clearance (validation) -- Larry Ticknor, CCS-6, Statistical Sciences.

  2. 150 Years of the German Chemical Society (GDCh), New Board Members, and More.

    PubMed

    Gölitz, Peter

    2017-01-02

    Should manuscripts by young authors with low H indices be directly rejected? Such crazy ideas can be extrapolated from the notion that lots of citations are a guarantee for high quality. Such flawed developments in scientific publishing are one theme of the Editorial by the Editor in Chief of Angewandte Chemie, as are far more positive aspects, such as the activities of the German Chemical Society (GDCh; Gesellschaft Deutscher Chemiker) in it anniversary year, 2017.

  3. The superiority of "chemical thinking" for understanding free human society according to Hegel.

    PubMed

    Nowacki, Mark R; Ver Eecke, Wilfried

    2003-05-01

    This paper examines the claim of G.W.F. Hegel (1770-1831) that "chemical thinking"-the method of thinking employed in chemistry-marks a significant advance upon (and hence is superior to) "mechanistic thinking"-the method of thinking characteristic of physics. This is done in the context of Mancur Olson's theory of collective action and public goods. The analogy between the efficiency of a catalyst in bringing about chemical transformation and the function of leaders in free human society in developing latent groups to provide public goods is explored.

  4. Chemicals in Society: Chemical Education for the Community and the Workplace.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Koker, Mark; Thier, Herbert D.

    1990-01-01

    Described is a program which provides materials and techniques for presenting information about chemicals, toxicity, groundwater, hazardous wastes in the home, risk, and understanding parts per million, to a nontechnically trained community and workplace groups. (KR)

  5. American Chemical Society Student Affiliates Chapters: More Than Just Chemistry Clubs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Montes, Ingrid; Collazo, Carmen

    2003-10-01

    Chemistry educators often examine and implement various instructional techniques, such as mentoring programs, to advance learning objectives and to equip students with analytical and technical skills, as well as the skills required of chemical science professionals. Student organizations, such as an American Chemical Society Student Affiliates (SA) chapter, can create a learning environment for undergraduates by engaging them in activities that develop communication, teamwork and inquiry, analysis, and problem-solving skills within a real-world setting. The environment is student-based, has personal meaning for the learner, emphasizes a process-and-product orientation, and emphasizes evaluation. Participation in SAs enhance the traditional chemistry curriculum, complementing the learning goals and meeting learning objectives that might not otherwise be addressed in the curriculum. In this article we discuss how SA chapters enhance the educational experience of undergraduate chemical science students, help develop new chemistry professionals, and shape enthusiastic and committed future chemical science leaders.

  6. Causes of genome instability: the effect of low dose chemical exposures in modern society

    PubMed Central

    Langie, Sabine A.S.; Koppen, Gudrun; Desaulniers, Daniel; Al-Mulla, Fahd; Al-Temaimi, Rabeah; Amedei, Amedeo; Azqueta, Amaya; Bisson, William H.; Brown, Dustin; Brunborg, Gunnar; Charles, Amelia K.; Chen, Tao; Colacci, Annamaria; Darroudi, Firouz; Forte, Stefano; Gonzalez, Laetitia; Hamid, Roslida A.; Knudsen, Lisbeth E.; Leyns, Luc; Lopez de Cerain Salsamendi, Adela; Memeo, Lorenzo; Mondello, Chiara; Mothersill, Carmel; Olsen, Ann-Karin; Pavanello, Sofia; Raju, Jayadev; Rojas, Emilio; Roy, Rabindra; Ryan, Elizabeth; Ostrosky-Wegman, Patricia; Salem, Hosni K.; Scovassi, Ivana; Singh, Neetu; Vaccari, Monica; Van Schooten, Frederik J.; Valverde, Mahara; Woodrick, Jordan; Zhang, Luoping; van Larebeke, Nik; Kirsch-Volders, Micheline; Collins, Andrew R.

    2015-01-01

    Genome instability is a prerequisite for the development of cancer. It occurs when genome maintenance systems fail to safeguard the genome’s integrity, whether as a consequence of inherited defects or induced via exposure to environmental agents (chemicals, biological agents and radiation). Thus, genome instability can be defined as an enhanced tendency for the genome to acquire mutations; ranging from changes to the nucleotide sequence to chromosomal gain, rearrangements or loss. This review raises the hypothesis that in addition to known human carcinogens, exposure to low dose of other chemicals present in our modern society could contribute to carcinogenesis by indirectly affecting genome stability. The selected chemicals with their mechanisms of action proposed to indirectly contribute to genome instability are: heavy metals (DNA repair, epigenetic modification, DNA damage signaling, telomere length), acrylamide (DNA repair, chromosome segregation), bisphenol A (epigenetic modification, DNA damage signaling, mitochondrial function, chromosome segregation), benomyl (chromosome segregation), quinones (epigenetic modification) and nano-sized particles (epigenetic pathways, mitochondrial function, chromosome segregation, telomere length). The purpose of this review is to describe the crucial aspects of genome instability, to outline the ways in which environmental chemicals can affect this cancer hallmark and to identify candidate chemicals for further study. The overall aim is to make scientists aware of the increasing need to unravel the underlying mechanisms via which chemicals at low doses can induce genome instability and thus promote carcinogenesis. PMID:26106144

  7. Causes of genome instability: the effect of low dose chemical exposures in modern society.

    PubMed

    Langie, Sabine A S; Koppen, Gudrun; Desaulniers, Daniel; Al-Mulla, Fahd; Al-Temaimi, Rabeah; Amedei, Amedeo; Azqueta, Amaya; Bisson, William H; Brown, Dustin G; Brunborg, Gunnar; Charles, Amelia K; Chen, Tao; Colacci, Annamaria; Darroudi, Firouz; Forte, Stefano; Gonzalez, Laetitia; Hamid, Roslida A; Knudsen, Lisbeth E; Leyns, Luc; Lopez de Cerain Salsamendi, Adela; Memeo, Lorenzo; Mondello, Chiara; Mothersill, Carmel; Olsen, Ann-Karin; Pavanello, Sofia; Raju, Jayadev; Rojas, Emilio; Roy, Rabindra; Ryan, Elizabeth P; Ostrosky-Wegman, Patricia; Salem, Hosni K; Scovassi, A Ivana; Singh, Neetu; Vaccari, Monica; Van Schooten, Frederik J; Valverde, Mahara; Woodrick, Jordan; Zhang, Luoping; van Larebeke, Nik; Kirsch-Volders, Micheline; Collins, Andrew R

    2015-06-01

    Genome instability is a prerequisite for the development of cancer. It occurs when genome maintenance systems fail to safeguard the genome's integrity, whether as a consequence of inherited defects or induced via exposure to environmental agents (chemicals, biological agents and radiation). Thus, genome instability can be defined as an enhanced tendency for the genome to acquire mutations; ranging from changes to the nucleotide sequence to chromosomal gain, rearrangements or loss. This review raises the hypothesis that in addition to known human carcinogens, exposure to low dose of other chemicals present in our modern society could contribute to carcinogenesis by indirectly affecting genome stability. The selected chemicals with their mechanisms of action proposed to indirectly contribute to genome instability are: heavy metals (DNA repair, epigenetic modification, DNA damage signaling, telomere length), acrylamide (DNA repair, chromosome segregation), bisphenol A (epigenetic modification, DNA damage signaling, mitochondrial function, chromosome segregation), benomyl (chromosome segregation), quinones (epigenetic modification) and nano-sized particles (epigenetic pathways, mitochondrial function, chromosome segregation, telomere length). The purpose of this review is to describe the crucial aspects of genome instability, to outline the ways in which environmental chemicals can affect this cancer hallmark and to identify candidate chemicals for further study. The overall aim is to make scientists aware of the increasing need to unravel the underlying mechanisms via which chemicals at low doses can induce genome instability and thus promote carcinogenesis.

  8. Symposium for Alfred Wolf's 75th birthday at American Chemical Society meeting

    SciTech Connect

    1998-04-02

    This report contains abstracts from the symposium presented by the Division of Nuclear Chemistry and Technology of the American Chemical Society. Sessions covered the following topics: Therapeutic radionuclides--Making the right choice; Aspects of nuclear science; Nuclear structure with large gamma-ray detector arrays and their auxiliary devices; Thirty years of research in nuclear dynamics--From fission to the quark-gluon plasma; Chelated metal ions for diagnosis and therapy; Radiochemistry--Basic and applied; and Applications of small accelerators in science and industry.

  9. Executive Summary to EDC-2: The Endocrine Society's Second Scientific Statement on Endocrine-Disrupting Chemicals

    PubMed Central

    Chappell, V. A.; Fenton, S. E.; Flaws, J. A.; Nadal, A.; Prins, G. S.; Toppari, J.; Zoeller, R. T.

    2015-01-01

    This Executive Summary to the Endocrine Society's second Scientific Statement on environmental endocrine-disrupting chemicals (EDCs) provides a synthesis of the key points of the complete statement. The full Scientific Statement represents a comprehensive review of the literature on seven topics for which there is strong mechanistic, experimental, animal, and epidemiological evidence for endocrine disruption, namely: obesity and diabetes, female reproduction, male reproduction, hormone-sensitive cancers in females, prostate cancer, thyroid, and neurodevelopment and neuroendocrine systems. EDCs such as bisphenol A, phthalates, pesticides, persistent organic pollutants such as polychlorinated biphenyls, polybrominated diethyl ethers, and dioxins were emphasized because these chemicals had the greatest depth and breadth of available information. The Statement also included thorough coverage of studies of developmental exposures to EDCs, especially in the fetus and infant, because these are critical life stages during which perturbations of hormones can increase the probability of a disease or dysfunction later in life. A conclusion of the Statement is that publications over the past 5 years have led to a much fuller understanding of the endocrine principles by which EDCs act, including nonmonotonic dose-responses, low-dose effects, and developmental vulnerability. These findings will prove useful to researchers, physicians, and other healthcare providers in translating the science of endocrine disruption to improved public health. PMID:26414233

  10. Reports from the award symposia hosted by the American Chemical Society, Division of Carbohydrate Chemistry at the 245th American Chemical Society National Meeting.

    PubMed

    Huang, Xuefei; Vocadlo, David J

    2013-07-19

    We would like to congratulate all of the award winners for the well deserved honor. The award symposia provided a snapshot of some of the state-of-the-art research at the interface between chemistry and biology in the glycoscience field. The presentations serve as prime examples of the increasing integration of chemical and biological research in the area of glycoscience and how tools of chemistry can be applied to answer interesting, important, and fundamental biological questions. We look forward to many more years of exciting developments in the chemistry and chemical biology of glycoscience and anticipate improved tools and approaches will drive major advances while also spurring interests in the wider field.

  11. EDC-2: The Endocrine Society's Second Scientific Statement on Endocrine-Disrupting Chemicals

    PubMed Central

    Chappell, V. A.; Fenton, S. E.; Flaws, J. A.; Nadal, A.; Prins, G. S.; Toppari, J.; Zoeller, R. T.

    2015-01-01

    The Endocrine Society's first Scientific Statement in 2009 provided a wake-up call to the scientific community about how environmental endocrine-disrupting chemicals (EDCs) affect health and disease. Five years later, a substantially larger body of literature has solidified our understanding of plausible mechanisms underlying EDC actions and how exposures in animals and humans—especially during development—may lay the foundations for disease later in life. At this point in history, we have much stronger knowledge about how EDCs alter gene-environment interactions via physiological, cellular, molecular, and epigenetic changes, thereby producing effects in exposed individuals as well as their descendants. Causal links between exposure and manifestation of disease are substantiated by experimental animal models and are consistent with correlative epidemiological data in humans. There are several caveats because differences in how experimental animal work is conducted can lead to difficulties in drawing broad conclusions, and we must continue to be cautious about inferring causality in humans. In this second Scientific Statement, we reviewed the literature on a subset of topics for which the translational evidence is strongest: 1) obesity and diabetes; 2) female reproduction; 3) male reproduction; 4) hormone-sensitive cancers in females; 5) prostate; 6) thyroid; and 7) neurodevelopment and neuroendocrine systems. Our inclusion criteria for studies were those conducted predominantly in the past 5 years deemed to be of high quality based on appropriate negative and positive control groups or populations, adequate sample size and experimental design, and mammalian animal studies with exposure levels in a range that was relevant to humans. We also focused on studies using the developmental origins of health and disease model. No report was excluded based on a positive or negative effect of the EDC exposure. The bulk of the results across the board strengthen the

  12. The Endocrine Society Centennial: No Longer a Surprise: Estrogenic Chemicals in a Multitude of Places.

    PubMed

    Rissman, Emilie F

    2016-08-01

    Nowadays, we are bombarded with information on a large number of endocrine-disrupting chemicals. We hear and read about endocrine-disrupting chemicals on blogs, the web, news stories, television specials, advertisements, and of course scientific articles. Reports claim these ubiquitous compounds are responsible for increased rates of cancer, autism, obesity, hypospadias, and infertility, just to name a few. But it was not always this way. In fact, the scientific study of endocrine-disrupting chemicals is relatively new: a recent PubMed search found a total of 6184 hits for the term, 739 articles in 2015 as compared with 4, 20 years ago in 1995.

  13. Endocrine-disrupting chemicals and public health protection: a statement of principles from The Endocrine Society.

    PubMed

    Zoeller, R Thomas; Brown, T R; Doan, L L; Gore, A C; Skakkebaek, N E; Soto, A M; Woodruff, T J; Vom Saal, F S

    2012-09-01

    An endocrine-disrupting chemical (EDC) is an exogenous chemical, or mixture of chemicals, that can interfere with any aspect of hormone action. The potential for deleterious effects of EDC must be considered relative to the regulation of hormone synthesis, secretion, and actions and the variability in regulation of these events across the life cycle. The developmental age at which EDC exposures occur is a critical consideration in understanding their effects. Because endocrine systems exhibit tissue-, cell-, and receptor-specific actions during the life cycle, EDC can produce complex, mosaic effects. This complexity causes difficulty when a static approach to toxicity through endocrine mechanisms driven by rigid guidelines is used to identify EDC and manage risk to human and wildlife populations. We propose that principles taken from fundamental endocrinology be employed to identify EDC and manage their risk to exposed populations. We emphasize the importance of developmental stage and, in particular, the realization that exposure to a presumptive "safe" dose of chemical may impact a life stage when there is normally no endogenous hormone exposure, thereby underscoring the potential for very low-dose EDC exposures to have potent and irreversible effects. Finally, with regard to the current program designed to detect putative EDC, namely, the Endocrine Disruptor Screening Program, we offer recommendations for strengthening this program through the incorporation of basic endocrine principles to promote further understanding of complex EDC effects, especially due to developmental exposures.

  14. Los Angeles and Its Influence on Professional and Popular Astronomy - A Hollywood Love Story, by Lewis Chilton, Past President, Optical Shop Director and Historian, Los Angeles Astronomical Society

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chilton, Lew

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this presentation is to show through visualizations how the Los Angeles, California milieu of the early 20th century benefited the advancement of astronomy and captured the public consciousness through popular press accounts of these advancements and of the scientists who made them. The thesis of this presentation purports that a symbiosis developed between astronomers of Los Angeles-area scientific and educational institutions and a local community of interested laypersons, and was the catalyst that sparked future generations to enter the fields of astronomy, the allied sciences, education and technology. This presentation attempts to highlight the importance of continued public outreach by the professional astronomical community, for the ultimate benefit to itself, in Los Angeles and beyond.

  15. 75 years of the Division of Analytical Chemistry of the American Chemical Society.

    PubMed

    Hirsch, Roland F

    2013-04-02

    The Division of Analytical Chemistry is celebrating the 75th anniversary of its founding in 1938. We celebrate the continuing high importance of our discipline for all aspects of chemical science and for its applications in so many aspects of everyday life. We especially celebrate the accomplishments of our fellow analytical chemists through the years, and the impact we have had on the profession. This article is a short history of the Division within the context of the parallel development of our profession and our science.

  16. Conference of the Society for Literature and Science. Proceedings (Los Angeles, California, November 2-5, 1995).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Labinger, Jay, Ed.

    The papers contained in this proceedings from the 1995 Society for Literature and Science Conference are organized into sections with the following themes: (1) Metaphor and Science; (2) The Technological Invasion of the Living Space; (3) Autobiographies and Biographies of Scientists; (4) Science and 19th Century Literature; (5) Visions of the…

  17. Amyloid fibril proteins and amyloidosis: chemical identification and clinical classification International Society of Amyloidosis 2016 Nomenclature Guidelines.

    PubMed

    Sipe, Jean D; Benson, Merrill D; Buxbaum, Joel N; Ikeda, Shu-Ichi; Merlini, Giampaolo; Saraiva, Maria J M; Westermark, Per

    2016-12-01

    The Nomenclature Committee of the International Society of Amyloidosis (ISA) met during the XVth Symposium of the Society, 3 July-7 July 2016, Uppsala, Sweden, to assess and formulate recommendations for nomenclature for amyloid fibril proteins and the clinical classification of the amyloidoses. An amyloid fibril must exhibit affinity for Congo red and with green, yellow or orange birefringence when the Congo red-stained deposits are viewed with polarized light. While congophilia and birefringence remain the gold standard for demonstration of amyloid deposits, new staining and imaging techniques are proving useful. To be included in the nomenclature list, in addition to congophilia and birefringence, the chemical identity of the protein must be unambiguously characterized by protein sequence analysis when possible. In general, it is insufficient to identify a mutation in the gene of a candidate amyloid protein without confirming the variant changes in the amyloid fibril protein. Each distinct form of amyloidosis is uniquely characterized by the chemical identity of the amyloid fibril protein that deposits in the extracellular spaces of tissues and organs and gives rise to the disease syndrome. The fibril proteins are designated as protein A followed by a suffix that is an abbreviation of the parent or precursor protein name. To date, there are 36 known extracellular fibril proteins in humans, 2 of which are iatrogenic in nature and 9 of which have also been identified in animals. Two newly recognized fibril proteins, AApoCII derived from apolipoprotein CII and AApoCIII derived from apolipoprotein CIII, have been added. AApoCII amyloidosis and AApoCIII amyloidosis are hereditary systemic amyloidoses. Intracellular protein inclusions displaying some of the properties of amyloid, "intracellular amyloid" have been reported. Two proteins which were previously characterized as intracellular inclusions, tau and α-synuclein, are now recognized to form extracellular

  18. INITIAL CHEMICAL AND RESERVOIR CONDITIONS AT LOS AZUFRES WELLHEAD POWER PLANT STARTUP

    SciTech Connect

    Kruger, P.; Semprini, L.; Verma, S.; Barragan, R.; Molinar, R.; Aragon, A.; Ortiz, J.; Miranda, C.

    1985-01-22

    One of the major concerns of electric utilities in installing geothermal power plants is not only the longevity of the steam supply, but also the potential for changes in thermodynamic properties of the resource that might reduce the conversion efficiency of the design plant equipment. Production was initiated at Los Azufres geothermal field with wellhead generators not only to obtain electric energy at a relatively early date, but also to acquire needed information about the resource so that plans for large central power plants could be finalized. Commercial electric energy production started at Los Azufres during the summer of 1982 with five 5-MWe wellhead turbine-generator units. The wells associated with these units had undergone extensive testing and have since been essentially in constant production. The Los Azufres geothermal reservoir is a complex structural and thermodynamic system, intersected by at least 4 major parallel faults and producing geothermal fluids from almost all water to all steam. The five wellhead generators are associated with wells of about 30%, 60%, and 100% steam fraction. A study to compile existing data on the chemical and reservoir conditions during the first two years of operation has been completed. Data have been compiled on mean values of wellhead and separator pressures, steam and liquid flowrates, steam fraction, enthalpy, and pertinent chemical components. The compilation serves both as a database of conditions during the start-up period and as an initial point to observe changes with continued and increased production. Current plans are to add additional wellhead generators in about two years followed by central power plants when the data have been sufficiently evaluated for optimum plant design. During the next two years, the data acquired at the five 5-MWe wellhead generator units can be compared to this database to observe any significant changes in reservoir behavior at constant production.

  19. Chemical and Isotopic Evidence of Steam Upflow and Partial Condensation in Los Azufres Reservoir

    SciTech Connect

    Nieva, D.; Verma, M.; Santoyo, E.; Barragan, R.M.; Portugal, E.; Ortiz, J.; Quijano, J.L.

    1987-01-20

    Data of chemical and isotopic composition of fluids from Los Azufres wells, collected over a two year period, provide evidence of a process of upward flow and partial condensation of steam in the reservoir, which explains part of the previously reported heterogeneity in isotopic composition of the liquid phase (Nieva et al, 1983). For the southern part of the field, a direct correlation is found between chloride and oxygen-18 concentrations, and an inverse correlation between these parameters and deuterium and carbon dioxide concentrations in the liquid phase of the reservoir. Chloride ion concentrations increase gradually from ca 660 ppm in the production zones of shallow wells to ca 1900 ppm in the case of deep wells. This observation agrees with predictions based on the well-known model for vapor dominated systems of White et al (1971). For the northern part of the field the same correlations are observed, except for the deuterium concentration which in this case correlates directly with oxygen-18. It is concluded that the same process of steam upflow occurs in the northern section but that some other process — perhaps a mixture with other hydrothermal fluid — is also occurring. 3 tabs., 16 refs., 8 figs.

  20. Probing the ToxCastTM Chemical Library for Predictive Signatures of Developmental Toxicity - Poster at Teratology Society Annual Meeting

    EPA Science Inventory

    EPA’s ToxCast™ project is profiling the in vitro bioactivity of chemical compounds to assess pathway-level and cell-based signatures that correlate with observed in vivo toxicity. We hypothesize that cell signaling pathways are primary targets for diverse environmental chemicals ...

  1. American Chemical Society-239th national meeting--Investigating new therapeutic candidates: part 2. 21-25 March 2010, San Francisco, CA, USA.

    PubMed

    Kirkham, Konrad

    2010-05-01

    The American Chemical Society 239th National Meeting, held in San Francisco, included topics covering developments related to the chemical optimization of therapeutics. This conference report highlights selected presentations on second-generation cholesterol absorption inhibitors (CAIs), CCK2 receptor antagonists to prevent acid rebound, HIF-PH inhibitors for anemia, the neonatal Fc receptor (FcRn) as a target for autoimmune disease, and GPR119 agonists and GLP-1 receptor agonists for the treatment of diabetes. Investigational drugs discussed include LPD-608 (Lipideon Biotechnology AG), a second-generation CAI series from Merck & Co Inc, JNJ-26070109 and JNJ-42041935 (both Johnson & Johnson), SYN-1436 (Syntonix Pharmaceuticals Inc), a series of GPR119 agonists from Roche Holding AG and Schering-Plough Research Institute, and a series of GLP-1 receptor agonists from Bristol-Myers Squibb Co.

  2. ["The Society for letters and natural science" The young Ole H. Mynster and the chemical revolution around 1800].

    PubMed

    Hansen, Sven Erik

    2015-01-01

    Ole H. Mynster (1772-1818) was a stepson of the leading physician at the Royal Frederik Hospital in Copenhagen. At an early age he became fond of zoology and mineralogy. He created "societies" in Enlightenment-style for boys and young people with lectures and collections. Later on a circle of talented young students, scientists and poets met in his small room at the hospital. Some of them with Ole Mynster as the head set up a modern scientific journal, Physicalsk, oeconomisk og medicochirurgisk Bibliotek for Danmark og Norge which encouraged the introduction of antiphlogistic chemistry. Ole Mynster became physician at the Royal Frederik Hospital and lecturer in clinical pharmacology. He wrote the first book in Danish on pharmacology based upon chemistry. In their memoirs, prominent members of his circle have told about him, and his son F.L. Mynster has written a draft for a biography. An overview of the activities within natural science and medicine of the young Ole Hieronymus Mynster is presented.

  3. Autism Society

    MedlinePlus

    ... and fun! Register Today Improving the lives of all affected by autism. The Autism Society is the ... and advocacy. Learn more Improving the lives of all affected by autism. The Autism Society is the ...

  4. Planetary Society

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murdin, P.

    2000-11-01

    Carl Sagan, Bruce Murray and Louis Friedman founded the non-profit Planetary Society in 1979 to advance the exploration of the solar system and to continue the search for extraterrestrial life. The Society has its headquarters in Pasadena, California, but is international in scope, with 100 000 members worldwide, making it the largest space interest group in the world. The Society funds a var...

  5. Chemical surety material decontamination and decommissioning of Los Alamos National Laboratory Chemical Surety Material Laboratory area TA-3, building SM-29, room 4009

    SciTech Connect

    Moore, T.E.; Smith, J.M.

    1994-04-01

    From 1982 through 1987, Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) performed surety laboratory operations for the U.S. Army Medical Research and Development Command (MRDC). Room 4009 in building SM-29, TA-3, was used as the laboratory for work with the following chemical surety material (CSM) agents: sarin (GB), soman (GD), lewisite (L), and distilled mustard (HD) radio-labelled with H{sup 3} or C{sup 14}. The work was confined to three CSM-certified fume hoods, located in room 4009 (see diagram in Appendix C). The laboratory ceased all active operations during the late 1986 and early 1987 period. From 1987 until 1993 the laboratory was secured and the ventilation system continued to operate. During late 1992, the decision was made to utilize this laboratory space for other operations, thus a decision was made to dismantle and reconfigure this room. LANL sub-contracted Battelle Memorial Institute (BMI) to draw upon the CSM experience of the technical staff from the Hazardous Materials Research Facility (HMRF) to assist in developing a decontamination and decommissioning plan. BMI was subcontracted to devise a CSM safety training course, and a sampling and air monitoring plan for CSM material to ensure personnel safety during all disassembly operations. LANL subcontracted Johnson Controls personnel to perform all disassembly operations. Beginning in early 1993 BMI personnel from the HMRF visited the laboratory to develop both the safety plan and the sample and air monitoring plan. Execution of that plan began in September 1993 and was completed in January 1994.

  6. A Study of the Stability and Characterization Plutonium Dioxide and Chemical Characterization [of] Rocky Flats and Los Alamos Plutonium-Containing Incinerator Ash

    SciTech Connect

    Ray, A.K.; Boettger, J.C.; Behrens, Robert G.

    1999-11-29

    In the presentation ''A Study of the Stability and Characterization of Plutonium Dioxide'', the authors discuss their recent work on actinide stabilities and characterization, in particular, plutonium dioxide PuO{sub 2}. Earlier studies have indicated that PuO{sub 2} has the fluorite structure of CaF{sub 2} and typical oxide semiconductor properties. However, detailed results on the bulk electronic structure of this important actinide oxide have not been available. The authors have used all-electron, full potential linear combinations Gaussian type orbitals fitting function (LCGTO-FF) method to study PuO{sub 2}. The LCGTO-FF technique characterized by its use of three independent GTO basis sets to expand the orbitals, charge density, and exchange-correlation integral kernels. Results will be presented on zero pressure using both the Hedin-Lundquist local density approximation (LDA) model or the Perdew-Wang generalized gradient approximation (GGA) model. Possibilities of different characterizations of PuO{sub 2} will be explored. The paper ''Chemical Characterization Rocky Flats and Los Alamos Plutonium-Containing Incinerator Ash'' describes the results of a comprehensive study of the chemical characteristics of virgin, calcined and fluorinated incinerator ash produced at the Rocky Flats Plant and at the Los Alamos National Laboratory prior to 1988. The Rocky Flats and Los Alamos virgin, calcined, and fluorinated ashes were also dissolved using standard nitrate dissolution chemistry. Corresponding chemical evaluations were preformed on the resultant ash heel and the results compared with those of the virgin ash. Fluorination studies using FT spectroscopy as a diagnostic tool were also performed to evaluate the chemistry of phosphorus, sulfur, carbon, and silicon containing species in the ash. The distribution of plutonium and other chemical elements with the virgin ash, ash heel, fluorinated ash, and fluorinated ash heel particulates were studied in detail using

  7. Eco-Driven Chemical Research in the Boundary Between Academia and Industry. PhD Students' Views on Science and Society

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sjöström, Jesper

    2013-10-01

    This paper examines and discusses the views on science and society held among PhD students working in two different industrially and environmentally driven research programmes in the broad area of green chemistry. It is based on thirteen in-depth interviews. The analysis shows three main ways of handling the situation as "post-academic" PhD student: (1) the student sees the PhD work mainly as a job and does not reflect about his/her research or the research funding, (2) the student is satisfied with the post-academic situation, accepts the established innovation policy discourse and is sceptical to traditional academic research, and (3) the student sees collaborative research programmes as a way to get funding, which can be used for secretly done basic research. Most PhD students either emphasise usefulness—in line with the dominating research policy discourse—or they adopt the positivistic view of science as objective and independent of the surrounding society. However, there are only a few signs of "double problematisation", that is a critical view where both disciplinary-oriented and industry-dependent research are problematised.

  8. Expansion of DSSTox: Leveraging public data to create a semantic cheminformatics resource with quality annotations for support of U.S. EPA applications. (American Chemical Society)

    EPA Science Inventory

    The expansion of chemical-bioassay data in the public domain is a boon to science; however, the difficulty in establishing accurate linkages from CAS registry number (CASRN) to structure, or for properly annotating names and synonyms for a particular structure is well known. DSS...

  9. Chemical Vapor Deposition of Refractory Metals and Ceramics 2. Materials Research Society Symposium Proceedings Held in Boston, Massachusetts on December 4-6, 1991. Volume 250

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1993-04-01

    gravitational body force term of the momentum conservation equation), the treatment of the dependence of the fluid transport and thermodynamic properties ...importance of in situ diagnostics and how this area is just now emerging. The chapter on microstructure-process- property relationships reveals the ability...of properties . Chemical vapor infiltration to produce composite materials in the subject of a chapter and includes considerable discussion of the

  10. The Pasadena Aerosol Characterization Observatory (PACO): chemical and physical analysis of the Western Los Angeles Basin aerosol

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hersey, S. P.; Craven, J. S.; Schilling, K. A.; Metcalf, A. R.; Sorooshian, A.; Chan, M. N.; Flagan, R. C.; Seinfeld, J. H.

    2011-02-01

    The Pasadena Aerosol Characterization Observatory (PACO) represents the first major aerosol characterization experiment centered in the Western/Central Los Angeles Basin. The sampling site, located on the campus of the California Institute of Technology in Pasadena, was positioned to sample a continuous afternoon influx of transported urban aerosol with a photochemical age of 1-2 h and generally free from major local contributions. Sampling spanned 5 months during the summer of 2009, which were broken into 3 regimes on the basis of distinct meteorological conditions. Regime I was characterized by a series of low pressure systems, resulting in high humidity and rainy periods with clean conditions. Regime II typified early summer meteorology, with significant morning marine layers and warm, sunny afternoons. Regime III was characterized by hot, dry conditions with little marine layer influence. Organic aerosol (OA) is the most significant constituent of Los Angeles aerosol (42, 43, and 55% of total submicron mass in regimes I, II, and III, respectively), and that the overall oxidation state remains relatively constant on timescales of days to weeks (O:C = 0.44 ± 0.08, 0.55 ± 0.05, and 0.48 ± 0.08 during regimes I, II, and III, respectively), with no difference in O:C between morning and afternoon periods. Periods characterized by significant morning marine layer influence followed by photochemically favorable afternoons displayed significantly higher aerosol mass and O:C ratio, suggesting that aqueous processes may be important in the generation of secondary aerosol and oxidized organic aerosol (OOA) in Los Angeles. Water soluble organic mass (WSOM) reaches maxima near 14:00-15:00 local time (LT), but the percentage of AMS organic mass contributed by WSOM remains relatively constant throughout the day. Sulfate and nitrate reside predominantly in accumulation mode aerosol, while afternoon SOA production coincides with the appearance of a distinct fine mode

  11. The Pasadena Aerosol Characterization Observatory (PACO): chemical and physical analysis of the Western Los Angeles basin aerosol

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hersey, S. P.; Craven, J. S.; Schilling, K. A.; Metcalf, A. R.; Sorooshian, A.; Chan, M. N.; Flagan, R. C.; Seinfeld, J. H.

    2011-08-01

    The Pasadena Aerosol Characterization Observatory (PACO) represents the first major aerosol characterization experiment centered in the Western/Central Los Angeles Basin. The sampling site, located on the campus of the California Institute of Technology in Pasadena, was positioned to sample a continuous afternoon influx of transported urban aerosol with a photochemical age of 1-2 h and generally free from major local contributions. Sampling spanned 5 months during the summer of 2009, which were broken into 3 regimes on the basis of distinct meteorological conditions. Regime I was characterized by a series of low pressure systems, resulting in high humidity and rainy periods with clean conditions. Regime II typified early summer meteorology, with significant morning marine layers and warm, sunny afternoons. Regime III was characterized by hot, dry conditions with little marine layer influence. Regardless of regime, organic aerosol (OA) is the most significant constituent of nonrefractory submicron Los Angeles aerosol (42, 43, and 55 % of total submicron mass in regimes I, II, and III, respectively). The overall oxidation state remains relatively constant on timescales of days to weeks (O:C = 0.44 ± 0.08, 0.55 ± 0.05, and 0.48 ± 0.08 during regimes I, II, and III, respectively), with no difference in O:C between morning and afternoon periods. Periods characterized by significant morning marine layer influence followed by photochemically favorable afternoons displayed significantly higher aerosol mass and O:C ratio, suggesting that aqueous processes may be important in the generation of secondary aerosol and oxidized organic aerosol (OOA) in Los Angeles. Online analysis of water soluble organic carbon (WSOC) indicates that water soluble organic mass (WSOM) reaches maxima near 14:00-15:00 local time (LT), but the percentage of AMS organic mass contributed by WSOM remains relatively constant throughout the day. Sulfate and nitrate reside predominantly in accumulation

  12. Society of Reproductive Surgeons

    MedlinePlus

    The Society of Reproductive Surgeons Home About Us About SRS Mission Statement Officers The Role of Reproductive Surgeons For ... Fact Sheets and Booklets SRS is an affiliated society to the American Society for Reproductive Medicine . Below ...

  13. Mineralogical-chemical composition and environmental risk potential of pond sediments at the geothermal field of Los Azufres, Mexico

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Birkle, P.; Merkel, B.

    2002-01-01

    Since 1982, estimated amounts of 9,400 t, 15,000 kg, 720 kg and 105 kg of Si, Fe, As and Cs respectively have accumulated at the bottom of 18 evaporation ponds as part of the geothermal production cycle at Los Azufres. This accumulation is caused by precipitation of brine solutes during the evaporation of 10% of the total pond water volume before its re-injection into the reservoir. Extraction experiments with pond precipitates and geochemical simulations with the PHREEQC program indicate the high solubility of most precipitates under natural environmental conditions. The comparisons with the primary brine composition indicate that less than 1% of most dissolved brine solutes, except for Co, Cu, Mn, Pb, Ag, Fe and Si, are accumulated at the pond bottom. Arsenic has maximum values of 160 mg/kg in the pond sediments, and Mo, Hg and Tl also exceed international environmental standards for contaminated soils. Elevated concentrations and the mobility potential of several metals and non-metals require the application of remediation techniques for the final disposal of the sediments in the future.

  14. An independent review and prioritization of past radionuclide and chemical releases from the Los Alamos National Laboratory--implications for future dose reconstruction studies.

    PubMed

    Le, Matthew H; Buddenbaum, John E; Burns, Robert E; Shonka, Joseph J; Gaffney, Shannon H; Donovan, Ellen P; Flack, Susan M; Widner, Thomas E

    2011-10-01

    From 1999 through 2010, a team of scientists and engineers systematically reviewed approximately eight million classified and unclassified documents at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) that describe historical off-site releases of radionuclides and chemicals in order to determine the extent to which a full-scale dose reconstruction for releases is warranted and/or feasible. As a part of this effort, a relative ranking of historical airborne and waterborne radionuclide releases from LANL was established using priority index (PI) values that were calculated from estimated annual quantities released and the maximum allowable effluent concentrations according to The U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (USNRC). Chemical releases were ranked based on annual usage estimates and U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (USEPA) toxicity values. PI results for airborne radionuclides indicate that early plutonium operations were of most concern between 1948 and 1961, in 1967, and again from 1970 through 1973. Airborne releases of uranium were found to be of most interest for 1968, from 1974 through 1978, and again in 1996. Mixed fission products yielded the highest PI value for 1969. Mixed activation product releases yielded the highest PI values from 1979 to 1995. For waterborne releases, results indicate that plutonium is of most concern for all years evaluated with the exception of 1956 when (90)Sr yielded the highest PI value. The prioritization of chemical releases indicate that four of the top five ranked chemicals were organic solvents that were commonly used in chemical processing and for cleaning. Trichloroethylene ranked highest, indicating highest relative potential for health effects, for both cancer and non-cancer effects. Documents also indicate that beryllium was used in significant quantities, which could have lead to residential exposures exceeding established environmental and occupational exposure limits, and warrants further consideration. In part because

  15. The 1995 Pharmacological Society of Canada Merck Frosst Award. Cellular and molecular targets in pulmonary chemical carcinogenesis: studies with aflatoxin B1.

    PubMed

    Massey, T E

    1996-06-01

    Although most notorious as a liver carcinogen, the mycotoxin aflatoxin B1 targets other tissues as well, including those of the respiratory system. Because the biotransformation of aflatoxin B1 to toxic and nontoxic metabolites has been fairly well characterized, it serves as a useful and relevant model carcinogen for studying the biochemical (i.e., balance between bioactivation and detoxification) and molecular (i.e., mutations in target genes) mechanisms of pulmonary chemical carcinogenesis. Because of the cellular diversity of the lung, it is of particular interest to assess these processes in different lung cell types, if we are to identify the target cells for carcinogen action. This review summarizes studies that have been aimed at identifying the basis for susceptibility of the lung to aflatoxin B1.

  16. Stratigraphy and Geologic Structure at the Chemical and Metallurgy (CMR) Building, Technical Area 3, Los Alamos National Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Alexis Lavine; Donathan Krier; Florie Caporuscio; Jamie Gardner

    1998-10-01

    Nine shallow (c70 ft), closely spaced core holes were continuously cored in the upper units of the 1.22 Ma Tshirege Member of the Bandelier Tuff at Technical Area (TA)-3 of the Los Alamos National Laboratory. The goal of the investigation was to identify faults that may have potential for earthquake-induced surface rupture at the site of the Chemistry and Metallurgy Research (CMR) building, a sensitive Laboratory facility that houses nuclear materials research functions. The holes were located from 25 ft to 115 ft from the building perimeter. Careful mapping of Lithologic sequences in cores, supplemented with focused sampling for geochemical analyses, yielded high confidence in the accuracy of delineating buried contacts within the Tshirege Member. Geologic analysis and investigation of the trends of surfaces interpolated from contacts in the core holes using commercially available software helped infer minor faulting in the strata beneath the building. Results show that gently north-northeast-dipping beds underlie the CMR building. The tilted beds are faulted by two small, closely spaced, parallel reverse faults with a combined vertical separation of approximately 8 ft. The faults are inferred from lithologically and geochemically repeated sections of core at about 55-ft depth in hole SHB-CMR-6. The data from nearby core holes SHB-CMR-2 and SHB-CMR-3 permit the extension of the faults, albeit with decreasing separation, toward the southwest beneath the CMR building. The fault trend is consistent with mapped lineaments from aerial photography and with nearby mapped structure, but direct evidence of the faults' orientations is lacking. No other faults were detected beneath the CMR building by this drilling and analysis method, which can detect faults with greater than about 2 ft separation.

  17. Chemical Concentrations in Field Mice from Open-Detonation Firing Sites TA-36 Minie and TA-39 Point 6 at Los Alamos National Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Fresquez, Philip R.

    2011-01-01

    Field mice (mostly Peromyscus spp.) were collected at two open-detonation (high explosive) firing sites - Minie at Technical Area (TA) 36 and Point 6 at TA-39 - at Los Alamos National Laboratory in August of 2010 and in February of 2011 for chemical analysis. Samples of whole body field mice from both sites were analyzed for target analyte list elements (mostly metals), dioxin/furans, polychlorinated biphenyl congeners, high explosives, and perchlorate. In addition, uranium isotopes were analyzed in a composite sample collected from TA-36 Minie. In general, all constituents, with the exception of lead at TA-39 Point 6, in whole body field mice samples collected from these two open-detonation firing sites were either not detected or they were detected below regional statistical reference levels (99% confidence level), biota dose screening levels, and/or soil ecological chemical screening levels. The amount of lead in field mice tissue collected from TA-39 Point 6 was higher than regional background, and some lead levels in the soil were higher than the ecological screening level for the field mouse; however, these levels are not expected to affect the viability of the populations over the site as a whole.

  18. Chemical characterization and source apportionment of indoor and outdoor fine particulate matter (PM(2.5)) in retirement communities of the Los Angeles Basin.

    PubMed

    Hasheminassab, Sina; Daher, Nancy; Shafer, Martin M; Schauer, James J; Delfino, Ralph J; Sioutas, Constantinos

    2014-08-15

    Concurrent indoor and outdoor measurements of fine particulate matter (PM2.5) were conducted at three retirement homes in the Los Angeles Basin during two separate phases (cold and warm) between 2005 and 2006. Indoor-to-outdoor relationships of PM2.5 chemical constituents were determined and sources of indoor and outdoor PM2.5 were evaluated using a molecular marker-based chemical mass balance (MM-CMB) model. Indoor levels of elemental carbon (EC) along with metals and trace elements were found to be significantly affected by outdoor sources. EC, in particular, displayed very high indoor-to-outdoor (I/O) mass ratios accompanied by strong I/O correlations, illustrating the significant impact of outdoor sources on indoor levels of EC. Similarly, indoor levels of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), hopanes, and steranes were strongly correlated with their outdoor components and displayed I/O ratios close to unity. On the other hand, concentrations of n-alkanes and organic acids inside the retirement communities were dominated by indoor sources (e.g. food cooking and consumer products), as indicated by their I/O ratios, which exceeded unity. Source apportionment results revealed that vehicular emissions were the major contributor to both indoor and outdoor PM2.5, accounting for 39 and 46% of total mass, respectively. Moreover, the contribution of vehicular sources to indoor levels was generally comparable to its corresponding outdoor estimate. Other water-insoluble organic matter (other WIOM), which accounts for emissions from uncharacterized primary biogenic sources, displayed a wider range of contributions, varying from 2 to 73% of PM2.5, across all sites and phases of the study. Lastly, higher indoor than outdoor contribution of other water-soluble organic matter (other WSOM) was evident at some of the sites, suggesting the production of secondary aerosols as well as direct emissions from primary sources (including cleaning or other consumer products) at the

  19. Chemical Characterization and Source Apportionment of Indoor and Outdoor Fine Particulate Matter (PM2.5) in Retirement Communities of the Los Angeles Basin

    PubMed Central

    Hasheminassab, Sina; Daher, Nancy; Shafer, Martin M.; Schauer, James J.; Delfino, Ralph J.; Sioutas, Constantinos

    2014-01-01

    Concurrent indoor and outdoor measurements of fine particulate matter (PM2.5) were conducted at three retirement homes in the Los Angeles Basin during two separate phases (cold and warm) between 2005 and 2006. Indoor-to-outdoor relationships of PM2.5 chemical constituents were determined and sources of indoor and outdoor PM2.5 were evaluated using a molecular marker-based chemical mass balance (MM-CMB) model. Indoor levels of elemental carbon (EC) along with metals and trace elements were found to be significantly affected by outdoor sources. EC, in particular, displayed very high indoor-to-outdoor (I/O) mass ratios accompanied by strong I/O correlations, illustrating the significant impact of outdoor sources on indoor levels of EC. Similarly, indoor levels of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), hopanes, and steranes were strongly correlated with their outdoor components and displayed I/O ratios close to unity. On the other hand, concentrations of n-alkanes and organic acids inside the retirement communities were dominated by indoor sources (e.g. food cooking and consumer products), as indicated by their I/O ratios, which exceeded unity. Source apportionment results revealed that vehicular emissions were the major contributor to both indoor and outdoor PM2.5, accounting for 39 and 46% of total mass, respectively. Moreover, the contribution of vehicular sources to indoor levels was generally comparable to its corresponding outdoor estimate. Other water-insoluble organic matter (other WIOM), which accounts for emissions from uncharacterized primary biogenic sources, displayed a wider range of contributions, varying from 2 to 73% of PM2.5, across all sites and phases of the study. Lastly, higher indoor than outdoor contribution of other water-soluble organic matter (other WSOM) was evident at some of the sites, suggesting the production of secondary aerosols as well as direct emissions from primary sources (including cleaning or other consumer products) at the

  20. Society for Vascular Medicine

    MedlinePlus

    ... Certification with this new online course from the Society for Vascular Medicine. Learn more. Looking for a ... jobs are listed right now. Copyright © 2016 The Society for Vascular Medicine. All Rights Reserved.

  1. American Cancer Society

    MedlinePlus

    ... your friends, your family, and the American Cancer Society help you take a step closer toward a ... DNA Offers Lung Cancer Clues An American Cancer Society grantee discovers a non-coding gene that may ...

  2. Ehlers-Danlos Society

    MedlinePlus

    ... Scientific Board Staff Volunteer Leaders The Ehlers-Danlos Society Center for EDS Research & Clinical Care Our History ... Message Boards Patient Resource Library The Ehlers-Danlos Society Center for EDS Research & Clinical Care Loose Connections ...

  3. American Rocket Society

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    In addition to Dr. Robert Goddard's pioneering work, American experimentation in rocketry prior to World War II grew, primarily in technical societies. This is an early rocket motor designed and developed by the American Rocket Society in 1932.

  4. Ehlers-Danlos Society

    MedlinePlus

    ... Patient Expert Panel Volunteer Leaders The Ehlers-Danlos Society Center for EDS Research & Clinical Care Our History ... Online Communities Patient Resource Library The Ehlers-Danlos Society Center for EDS Research & Clinical Care Loose Connections ...

  5. Society of Gynecologic Surgeons

    MedlinePlus

    ... Myers, MD SGS Mission The mission of the Society of Gynecologic Surgeons is to promote excellence in ... research, and professional and public education. Research The Society prides itself in mentoring young gynecologic surgeons and ...

  6. American Urogynecologic Society

    MedlinePlus

    ... Patient Site » PFD Registry » Contact Us American Urogynecologic Society 1100 Wayne Avenue, Suite 670 Silver Spring, MD ... Us | Privacy Policy | HONcode Accredited © 2017 American Urogynecologic Society. All rights reserved.

  7. Society for Ambulatory Anesthesia

    MedlinePlus

    ... We Represent Ambulatory and Office-Based Anesthesia The Society for Ambulatory Anesthesia provides educational opportunities, encourages research ... 6620 | E-mail: info@sambahq.org Copyright | 2017 Society for Ambulatory Anesthesia Home | Search | Terms | Privacy Policy | ...

  8. Scoliosis Research Society

    MedlinePlus

    Scoliosis Research Society Close Menu Member Login Become a Member Home Find a Specialist | Calendar Contact | Donate Patients and Families Professionals ... Find a Specialist Calendar Contact Donate Scoliosis Research Society Dedicated to the optimal care of patients with ...

  9. Society for Vascular Medicine

    MedlinePlus

    ... Journal Scientific Sessions Website FAQ Copyright © 2017 The Society for Vascular Medicine. All Rights Reserved. Phone: +1- ... page Videos Training Programs Journal Access the Journal Society Communications Patient Information Pages Vascular Medicine Journal CME ...

  10. Risk, society and system failure.

    PubMed

    Scalliet, Pierre

    2006-09-01

    Modern societies are risk societies. Together with the formidable development of complex technologies (chemical industry, energy production, mass transportation, etc), new hazards have emerged. Sharing danger is the hallmark of modernity, as large industrial accidents can now have countrywide, or even, worldwide consequences. The Chernobyl explosion for example, has smeared large European surfaces with radioactive materials, across borders and nations, without any regard for who was responsible and who was the victim. Complex technologies should therefore be managed with great foresightness, particularly focusing on preventive management. A sound understanding of the (minor) role of human errors of operators and the (major) role of process design is a pre-requisite for appropriate management. This also applies to the complex business of radiotherapy, as the same organisational principles apply than in the heavy industry: restrict the role of operators, expect their mistakes, design in a mistake-proof way, accept the burden of preventive maintenances, supervise maintenance carefully and, above all, invest in safety.

  11. Mexican Society of Bioelectromagnetism

    SciTech Connect

    Canedo, Luis

    2008-08-11

    In July 2007 physicians, biologists and physicists that have collaborated in previous meetings of the medical branch of the Mexican Physical Society constituted the Mexican Society of Bioelectromagnetism with the purpose of promote scientific study of the interaction of electromagnetic energy (at frequencies ranging from zero Hertz through those of visible light) and acoustic energy with biological systems. A second goal was to increase the contribution of medical and biological professionals in the meetings of the medical branch of the Mexican Physical Society. The following paragraphs summarize some objectives of the Mexican Society of Bioelectromagnetism for the next two years.

  12. Indian Vacuum Society: The Indian Vacuum Society

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saha, T. K.

    2008-03-01

    The Indian Vacuum Society (IVS) was established in 1970. It has over 800 members including many from Industry and R & D Institutions spread throughout India. The society has an active chapter at Kolkata. The society was formed with the main aim to promote, encourage and develop the growth of Vacuum Science, Techniques and Applications in India. In order to achieve this aim it has conducted a number of short term courses at graduate and technician levels on vacuum science and technology on topics ranging from low vacuum to ultrahigh vacuum So far it has conducted 39 such courses at different parts of the country and imparted training to more than 1200 persons in the field. Some of these courses were in-plant training courses conducted on the premises of the establishment and designed to take care of the special needs of the establishment. IVS also regularly conducts national and international seminars and symposia on vacuum science and technology with special emphasis on some theme related to applications of vacuum. A large number of delegates from all over India take part in the deliberations of such seminars and symposia and present their work. IVS also arranges technical visits to different industries and research institutes. The society also helped in the UNESCO sponsored post-graduate level courses in vacuum science, technology and applications conducted by Mumbai University. The society has also designed a certificate and diploma course for graduate level students studying vacuum science and technology and has submitted a syllabus to the academic council of the University of Mumbai for their approval, we hope that some colleges affiliated to the university will start this course from the coming academic year. IVS extended its support in standardizing many of the vacuum instruments and played a vital role in helping to set up a Regional Testing Centre along with BARC. As part of the development of vacuum education, the society arranges the participation of

  13. Towards the Learning Society.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ranson, Stewart

    1992-01-01

    Britain's education system is a beleaguered service accused of failing young people who leave school early without developing their potential. Education will always fail if youngsters' capacities are sectioned off to match a pyramidal, hierarchical society. The conditions for a learning society are basically political, requiring creation of a…

  14. Schools, Violence, and Society.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hoffman, Allan M., Ed.

    The seeming increase of violence in American society and its schools has become a pressing issue. Some researchers argue that the American education system mirrors the dynamics of society. The articles in this book address the following issues: the extent of violence in American schools; the forms that violence takes; its root causes; the effects…

  15. Geologists' Role in Society

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bally, A. W.; And Others

    1976-01-01

    At a meeting sponsored by the Geological Society of America, earth scientists examined their function in society. Participants concluded that earth scientists are not providing a rationale for value judgments concerning the use and limitations of the earth and a program aimed at understanding solid-Earth resource systems is needed. (BT)

  16. Thank you, Royal Society

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Toumey, Chris

    2015-04-01

    More than a decade after it was first published, Chris Toumey revisits a report from the Royal Society on the opportunities and uncertainties of nanotechnology, and finds that it still has plenty to offer.

  17. American Headache Society

    MedlinePlus

    ... NEWS VIEW ALL NEWS FIRST ANNUAL “MIGRAINE MOMENT” FILM CONTEST WINNERS The American Headache Society and American ... RT @mrobbinsmd : A7 See the recent @amfmigraine #MigraineMoment film competition & stories like @brainstorm83 to understand the gravity & ...

  18. American Epilepsy Society

    MedlinePlus

    ... Epilepsy Society CLINICAL RESOURCES FAQs GUIDELINES IOM EPILEPSY MEDICAL MARIJUANA SUDEP SURGERY DEVICES GENETICS TREATMENTS Drug Alerts and ... RESOURCES Navigation CLINICAL RESOURCES FAQs GUIDELINES IOM EPILEPSY MEDICAL MARIJUANA SUDEP SURGERY DEVICES GENETICS TREATMENTS Drug Alerts and ...

  19. North American Menopause Society

    MedlinePlus

    ... Advertisements NAMS in the News Press Room Assistance Society Overview Top 10 reasons why NAMS is your ... fully updated and referenced 5th edition of the Society’s leading professional resource, featuring the latest comprehensive clinical ...

  20. Society of Interventional Radiology

    MedlinePlus

    ... decoded SIR’s Health Policy and Economics team provides information on the varied activities the society engages in to ensure proper coding of interventional radiology services. SIR is committed to assisting you, your institution ...

  1. Radiation and Society

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shaw, Edward I.

    1974-01-01

    Presents a discussion of the risks, to society, from radiation-associated technologies and urges that science teachers help the public understand the decision-making process relative to nuclear power as well as the problems and alternatives. (PEB)

  2. Consumption in the Information Society

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zherebin, V. M.; Ermakova, N. A.; Makhrova, O. N.

    2010-01-01

    The current state of the economy in the developed countries make it possible to characterize them using concepts and terms such as the postindustrial society, the new economy, the service economy, the creative economy, the posteconomic society, the information society, the knowledge society, and the consumer society. Among these terms and…

  3. Advanced information society(2)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Masuyama, Keiichi

    Our modern life is full of information and information infiltrates into our daily life. Networking of the telecommunication is extended to society, company, and individual level. Although we have just entered the advanced information society, business world and our daily life have been steadily transformed by the advancement of information network. This advancement of information brings a big influence on economy, and will play they the main role in the expansion of domestic demands. This paper tries to view the image of coming advanced information society, focusing on the transforming businessman's life and the situation of our daily life, which became wealthy by the spread of daily life information and the visual information by satellite system, in the development of the intelligent city.

  4. Science and Society Colloquium

    SciTech Connect

    2008-03-10

    Mr. Randi will give an update of his lecture to the American Physical Society on the occasion of his award of the 1989 Forum Prize. The citation said: "for his unique defense of Science and the scientific method in many disciplines, including physics, against pseudoscience, frauds and charlatans. His use of scientific techniques has contributed to refuting suspicious and fraudulent claims of paranormal results. He has contributed significantly to public understanding of important issues where science and society interact". He is a professional magician and author of many books. He worked with John Maddox, the Editor of Nature to investigate the claims of "water with memory".

  5. Society's expectations of health

    PubMed Central

    Leach, Edmund

    1975-01-01

    Sir Edmund Leach argues that doctors in the modern world, fortified by the traditional concept that the life of the sick person must at all costs be preserved, are to some extent guilty of the false antitheses current today between youth and age. Moreover youth means health, age illness and senility. Until this imbalance is corrected society will be in danger of `a kind of civil war between the generations'. Society must be taught again that mortality cannot be avoided or conquered by medical science, and at the same time that `health' is not enshrined in the young alone. PMID:1177271

  6. Advanced information society(7)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chiba, Toshihiro

    Various threats are hiding in advanced informationalized society. As we see car accident problems in motorization society light aspects necessarily accompy shady ones. Under the changing circumstances of advanced informationalization added values of information has become much higher. It causes computer crime, hacker, computer virus to come to the surface. In addition it can be said that infringement of intellectual property and privacy are threats brought by advanced information. Against these threats legal, institutional and insurance measures have been progressed, and newly security industry has been established. However, they are not adequate individually or totally. The future vision should be clarified, and countermeasures according to the visions have to be considered.

  7. Science and Society Colloquium

    ScienceCinema

    None

    2016-07-12

    Mr. Randi will give an update of his lecture to the American Physical Society on the occasion of his award of the 1989 Forum Prize. The citation said: "for his unique defense of Science and the scientific method in many disciplines, including physics, against pseudoscience, frauds and charlatans. His use of scientific techniques has contributed to refuting suspicious and fraudulent claims of paranormal results. He has contributed significantly to public understanding of important issues where science and society interact". He is a professional magician and author of many books. He worked with John Maddox, the Editor of Nature to investigate the claims of "water with memory".

  8. Values and Society.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nelson, Jack L.

    The idea of a democratic society based on human rights and social justice is the social issue examined in this book which is one of a series on challenges and choices in American values. The format followed in the series includes the following for secondary students: case studies illustrating the issue by focusing on human institutions, factual…

  9. The School in Society.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tasmanian Education Dept., Hobart (Australia).

    This document is an English-language abstract (approximately 1,500 words) of the role of school in Tasmania as seen in a report by a committee appointed to determine that question. At present, Tasmanian children are required to attend school between the ages of 6 and 16. About 20% of children attend private schools. The demands of society for…

  10. Man--Society--Technology.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Taxis, Linda A., Ed.

    The 32nd annual American Industrial Arts Association (AIAA) Convention was held in Louisville in 1970. Topics for the AIAA general session addresses were: (1) "Industrial Arts--The Blender Between Social Form and Technical Function," (2) "Technology and Society: Present and Future Challenges," (3) "A Student-Oriented Industrial Arts," (4) "Man:…

  11. Teaching Global Society.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Peet, Richard

    2002-01-01

    Describes the course, "Global Society," for first-year International Studies students at a Massachusetts liberal arts college. The course, which takes a historical approach, informs students about the nature, history, and present characteristics of the global system, taking theoretical, historical, and critical approaches that stress the…

  12. Time and Society.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kazancigil, Ali, Ed.

    1986-01-01

    The articles in this issue review the history of the sociological study of different societies' conceptions of time. Social time is the way people regard and employ time dependent on economic conditions, the organization of daily life, the cultural setting, and religion. (JDH)

  13. Art, Society and Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Ralph A.

    1976-01-01

    In considering the relation of art with society the author comments on the ideas of the American philosopher, John Dewey, the art historian, Lord Kenneth Clark, a popular humanistic educator, Clifton Fadiman, and a major cultural critic, Jacques Barzun. (Author/RK)

  14. Education for Jobless Society

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sidorkin, Alexander M.

    2017-01-01

    The advent of societies with low employment rates will present a challenge to education. Education must move away from the discourse of skills and towards the discourse of meaning and motivation. The paper considers three kinds of non-waged optional labor that may form the basis of the future economy: prosumption, volunteering, and self-design.…

  15. The Learning Society.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    van der Zee, Hendrik

    1991-01-01

    Strategic issues in the development of a learning society are (1) broadening the definition of learning; (2) making the goal of learning growth toward completeness; (3) increasing collective competence; (4) fostering autonomy in learners; and (5) stressing a political approach to learning (the right to learn as a civil right). (SK)

  16. Big Society, Big Deal?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thomson, Alastair

    2011-01-01

    Political leaders like to put forward guiding ideas or themes which pull their individual decisions into a broader narrative. For John Major it was Back to Basics, for Tony Blair it was the Third Way and for David Cameron it is the Big Society. While Mr. Blair relied on Lord Giddens to add intellectual weight to his idea, Mr. Cameron's legacy idea…

  17. Air pollution and society

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brimblecombe, P.

    2010-12-01

    Air pollution is as much a product of our society as it is one of chemistry and meteorology. Social variables such as gender, age, health status and poverty are often linked with our exposure to air pollutants. Pollution can also affect our behaviour, while regulations to improve the environment can often challenge of freedom.

  18. Science Serves Society.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sneed, G. C.

    This book discusses how some of the topics taught in a conventional physics course have been used to solve interesting technical problems in industry, medicine, agriculture, transportation, and other areas of society. The topics include heat, optics, magnetism and electricity, nuclear physics, and sound. (MLH)

  19. Education, Change and Society.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Karmel, Peter, Ed.

    The conference papers in this publication focus on the interrelationship between change in the education sector and change in the wider society. The papers were generated by an invitational conference held in 1980 to mark the golden jubilee year of the Australian Council for Educational Research. While many of the papers have an Australian…

  20. The New Rural Society.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goldmark, Peter C.

    The New Rural Society project concerns itself with the deterioration of America through urban overcrowding and rural depletion. Coupled with experimentation and pilot testing, the study is designed to demonstrate that imaginative application of telecommunication will enable business and government departments to function effectively though their…

  1. Effects of the Cerro Grande Fire (Smoke and Fallout Ash) on Soil Chemical Properties Within and Around Los Alamos National Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Fresquez, P.R.; Velasquez, W.R.; Naranjo, L. Jr.

    2000-11-01

    Soil surface (0- to 2-in. depth) samples were collected from areas within and around Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) just after the Cerro Grande fire, analyzed for radionuclides, radioactivity, and trace elements (heavy metals), and compared to soil samples collected in 1999 from the same sites. In addition, many types of organic substances (volatile and semivolatile organic compounds, organochlorine pesticides, polychlorinated biphenyls, high explosives, and dioxin and dioxin-like compounds) were assessed in soils from LANL, perimeter, and regional sites after the fire. Results show that impacts to regional, perimeter, and on-site (mesa top) areas from smoke and fallout ash as a result of the Cerro Grande fire were minimal.

  2. The National Cardiac Societies of the European Society of Cardiology.

    PubMed

    Atar, Dan

    2015-06-01

    The National Cardiac Societies are one of the Constituent Bodies of the European Society of Cardiology (ESC). They are the backbone of the ESC and together form the "Cardiology of Europe" in 56 European and Mediterranean countries.

  3. Does gender bias influence awards given by societies?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holmes, Mary Anne; Asher, Pranoti; Farrington, John; Fine, Rana; Leinen, Margaret S.; LeBoy, Phoebe

    2011-11-01

    AGU is a participant in a U.S. National Science Foundation (NSF)-funded project called Advancing Ways of Awarding Recognition in Disciplinary Societies (AWARDS), which seeks to examine whether gender bias affects selection of recipients of society awards. AGU is interested in learning why there is a higher proportion of female recipients of service and education awards over the past 2 decades. Combined with a lower rate of receipt of research awards, these results suggest that implicit (subconscious) bias in favor of male candidates still influences awardee selection. Six other professional societies (American Chemical Society, American Mathematical Society, American Society of Anesthesiologists, Mathematical Association of America, Society for Neuroscience, and Society for Industrial and Applied Mathematics) are participating in the project. Volunteers from each participant society attended an Association for Women in Science (AWIS)-sponsored workshop in May 2010 to examine data and review literature on best practices for fair selection of society awardees. A draft proposal for implementing these practices will be brought before the AGU Council and the Honors and Recognition Committee at their upcoming meetings.

  4. Society for Assisted Reproductive Technology

    MedlinePlus

    The Society for Assisted Reproductive Technology PATIENTS Patient Information What Is SART? Risks of IVF Third Party Reproduction A ... Read Article View All News ©1996 - 2016 SART, Society for Assisted Reproductive Technology . All Rights Reserved. ASRM/ ...

  5. Heart Failure Society of America

    MedlinePlus

    ... hfsa.org Events Calendar>> Copyright © 2017 Heart Failure Society of America. All Rights Reserved 2017 Call for ... for Organ Sharing (UNOS) asks the Heart Failure Society of America (HFSA) members to comment on the ...

  6. Rethinking Cells to Society

    PubMed Central

    Antonucci, Toni C.; Webster, Noah J.

    2015-01-01

    It is an exciting time to be a developmental scientist. We have advanced theoretical frameworks and developed ground-breaking methods for addressing questions of interest, ranging literally from cells to society. We know more now than we have ever known about human development and the base of acquired knowledge is increasing exponentially. In this paper we share some thoughts about where we are in the science of human development, how we got there, what may be going wrong and what may be going right. Finally, we offer some thoughts about where we go from here to assure that in the future we achieve the best developmental science possible. PMID:25642155

  7. Advanced information society (9)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kamata, Hiroki

    This article discusses the U.S. and European national strategies and policies for information society. Coping with the declining competitiveness in high-tech products and Japanese technological advantages both have been trying hard to strengthen technology base and to deregulate the telecommunications services markets. The U.S. approach in 1980's, unlike its liberalist principle, has been characterized by technological protectlonism and defense-oriented policies. European Communities' approach has been more comprehensive and systematic, investing heavily telecommunication infrastructure, deregulating domestic market, and promoting cooperation of member countries. However, both of these approaches have, so far, been unable to achieve a considerable success.

  8. Great Lakes: Chemical Monitoring

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Delfino, Joseph J.

    1976-01-01

    The Tenth Great Lakes Regional Meeting of the American Chemical Society met to assess current Chemical Research activity in the Great Lakes Basin, and addressed to the various aspects of the theme, Chemistry of the Great Lakes. Research areas reviewed included watershed studies, atmospheric and aquatic studies, and sediment studies. (BT)

  9. Chemical carcinogenesis.

    PubMed

    Oliveira, Paula A; Colaço, Aura; Chaves, Raquel; Guedes-Pinto, Henrique; De-La-Cruz P, Luis F; Lopes, Carlos

    2007-12-01

    The use of chemical compounds benefits society in a number of ways. Pesticides, for instance, enable foodstuffs to be produced in sufficient quantities to satisfy the needs of millions of people, a condition that has led to an increase in levels of life expectancy. Yet, at times, these benefits are offset by certain disadvantages, notably the toxic side effects of the chemical compounds used. Exposure to these compounds can have varying effects, ranging from instant death to a gradual process of chemical carcinogenesis. There are three stages involved in chemical carcinogenesis. These are defined as initiation, promotion and progression. Each of these stages is characterised by morphological and biochemical modifications and result from genetic and/or epigenetic alterations. These genetic modifications include: mutations in genes that control cell proliferation, cell death and DNA repair--i.e. mutations in proto-oncogenes and tumour suppressing genes. The epigenetic factors, also considered as being non-genetic in character, can also contribute to carcinogenesis via epigenetic mechanisms which silence gene expression. The control of responses to carcinogenesis through the application of several chemical, biochemical and biological techniques facilitates the identification of those basic mechanisms involved in neoplasic development. Experimental assays with laboratory animals, epidemiological studies and quick tests enable the identification of carcinogenic compounds, the dissection of many aspects of carcinogenesis, and the establishment of effective strategies to prevent the cancer which results from exposure to chemicals.

  10. Communicating Science to Society

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Illingworth, Samuel; Muller, Jennifer; Leather, Kimberley; Morgan, William; O'Meara, Simon; Topping, David; Booth, Alastair; Llyod, Gary; Young, Dominique; Bannan, Thomas; Simpson, Emma; Percival, Carl; Allen, Grant; Clark, Elaine; Muller, Catherine; Graves, Rosemarie

    2014-05-01

    "Nothing in science has any value to society if it is not communicated." So goes the 1952 quote from Anne Roe, the noted twentieth century American psychologist and writer. She went on to say that "scientists are beginning to learn their social obligations", and now over 60 years later there is certainly evidence to support her assertions. As scientists, by communicating our research to the general public we not only better inform the tax payer where their money is being spent, but are also able to help put into context the topical environmental challenges and issues that society faces, as well as inspiring a whole new generation of future scientists. This process of communication is very much a two-way street; by presenting our work to people outside of our usual spheres of contemporaries, we expose ourselves to alternative thoughts and insights that can inspire us, as scientists, to take another look at our research from angles that we had never before considered. This work presents the results and experiences from a number of public engagement and outreach activities across the UK, in which geoscientists engaged and interacted with members of the general public. These include the design and implementation of Raspberry Pi based outreach activities for several hundred high school students; the process of running a successful podcast (http://thebarometer.podbean.com); hosting and participating in science events for thousands of members of the general public (e.g. http://www.manchestersciencefestival.com and http://sse.royalsociety.org/2013); and creating a citizen science activity that involved primary school children from across the UK. In communicating their research it is imperative that scientists interact with their audience in an effective and engaging manner, whether in an international conference, a classroom, or indeed down the pub. This work also presents a discussion of how these skills can be developed at an early stage in the careers of a research

  11. Advanced information society(5)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanizawa, Ippei

    Based on the advancement of information network technology information communication forms informationalized society giving significant impact on business activities and life style in it. The information network has been backed up technologically by development of computer technology and has got great contribution by enhanced computer technology and communication equipments. Information is transferred by digital and analog methods. Technical development which has brought out multifunctioned modems of communication equipments in analog mode, and construction of advanced information communication network which has come out by joint work of computer and communication under digital technique, are described. The trend in institutional matter and standardization of electrical communication is also described showing some examples of value-added network (VAN).

  12. Advanced information society (1)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ohira, Gosei

    In considering the relationship of informationization and industrial structure, this paper analize some factors such as information revolution, informationization of industries and industrialization of information as background of informationization of Japanese society. Next, some information indicators such as, information coefficient of household which is a share of information related expenditure, information coefficient of industry which is a share of information related cost to total cost of production, and information transmission census developed by Ministry of Post and Telecommunication are introduced. Then new information indicator by Economic Planning Agency, that is, electronic info-communication indicator is showed. In this study, the information activities are defined to produce message or to supply services on process, stores or sale of message using electronic information equipment. International comparisons of information labor force are also presented.

  13. Science, Technology and Society

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bridgstock, Martin; Burch, David; Forge, John; Laurent, John; Lowe, Ian

    1998-03-01

    This book provides a comprehensive introduction to the human, social and economic aspects of science and technology. It examines a broad range of issues from a variety of perspectives, using examples and experiences from around the world. The authors present complex issues, including the responsibilities of scientists, ethical dilemmas and controversies, the Industrial Revolution, economic issues, public policy, and science and technology in developing countries. The book ends with a thoughtful and provocative look toward the future. It features extensive guides to further reading, as well as a useful section on information searching skills. This book will provoke, engage, inform and stimulate thoughtful discussion about culture, society and science. Broad and interdisciplinary, it will be of considerable value to both students and teachers.

  14. Behaviorism and Society.

    PubMed

    Krapfl, Jon E

    2016-05-01

    A probable list of causes for the limited acceptance of behaviorism in our society is identified. This is followed by a summary review of the proposed solutions identified in other papers in this special issue of The Behavior Analyst, most of which relate to either better marketing of either the behavior analytic process or the results achieved as a consequence. One paper proposes a more broad conception of behavior analysis. This paper endorses the solutions identified in previous papers and then goes on to propose an even more broad conception of behavior analysis and makes the point that behavior analysis is unlikely to flourish unless behavior analysts understand a good deal more about the cultural and other contextual features of the environments in which they work.

  15. Dimensions of Literacy in a Multicultural Society. Conference Proceedings (Montreal, Quebec, Canada, 1992).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Heft, Riva, Ed.; Rovinescu, Olivia, Ed.

    The following papers from a conference on the dimensions of literacy in a multicultural society are included in this volume: "Literacy: Affirmation and Empowerment in a Multicultural Society" (Simms); "Literacy, Border Pedagogy, and Multiculturalism in the Aftermath of the Los Angeles Uprising" (Giroux); "Alphabetisme et…

  16. Royal Society offers funds for technology start-ups

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clery, Daniel

    2008-04-01

    Scientists with a good idea ripe for commercial exploitation will no longer have to hawk their wares to bankers and private investors to get financial backing: the Royal Society is also about to get into the venture-capital business. The society is planning to set up an enterprise fund to buy equity in start-up companies based on outstanding technology - covering everything from renewable energy and carbon capture to water purification. "If there are difficulties getting science into the marketplace, the society has a role helping with that," says chemical physicist Andrew Mackintosh, a former chief executive of Oxford Instruments who has been brought in to manage the fund.

  17. Modern Chemical Technology, Volume 8.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pecsok, Robert L.; Chapman, Kenneth

    This volume is one of a series for the Chemical Technician Curriculum Project (ChemTeC) of the American Chemical Society funded by the National Science Foundation. It consists of discussions, exercises, and experiments on the following topics: amino acids and proteins, carbohydrates, synthetic polymers, other natural products, chemical separations…

  18. Modern Chemical Technology, Volume 5.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pecsok, Robert L., Ed.; Chapman, Kenneth, Ed.

    This volume contains chapters 26-31 for the American Chemical Society (ACS) "Modern Chemical Technology" (ChemTeC) instructional material intended to prepare chemical technologists. Chapter 26 reviews oxidation and reduction, including applications in titrations with potassium permanganate and iodometry. Coordination compounds are…

  19. Modern Chemical Technology, Volume 6.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pecsok, Robert L., Ed.; Chapman, Kenneth, Ed.

    This volume contains chapters 32-39 for the American Chemical Society (ACS) "Modern Chemical Technology" (ChemTeC) instructional materials intended to prepare chemical technologists. The study of organic chemistry is continued as these major topics are considered: alcohols and phenols, alkyl and aryl halides, ethers, aldehydes and…

  20. Geomorphological Hazards in Los Angeles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hadley, Richard F.

    This is a topical book that deals with the geomorphological and geological engineering problems associated with hillslope processes and sediment transport in the Los Angeles metropolitan area. There are few large cities in the United States where the problems of urban growth include such a distinctive physical environment, as well as the potential hazards of brush fires, earthquakes, and floods that occur in Los Angeles. The research and data used in the book are restricted to Los Angeles County and cover the period 1914-1978. The author has done a commendable job of synthesizing a large mass of data from diverse sources, including federal, state, and local agency reports, plus data from private groups such as professional technical societies and consultants.

  1. Acupuncture in modern society.

    PubMed

    Vanderploeg, Kristin; Yi, Xiaobin

    2009-03-01

    For at least 2,500 years, acupuncture has been an integral part of traditional Chinese medicine. However, recently as more people in western countries are diagnosed with chronic disease poorly treated with modern medical therapies, many are turning to acupuncture and other forms of alternative medical treatments. Based on the theory of harmonious flowing qi being the basis of good health, acupuncture focuses on restoring qi by manipulation of the complementary and opposing elements of yin and yang. However, in the modern medical community we struggle to with the concept of qi, given a lack of anatomic and histological evidence supporting its existence. However, with the surge in public interest in acupuncture, the scientific community begun heavy investigation of acupuncture's efficacy, as well as the physiologic basis behind it. Thus far, evidence supports the use of acupuncture in post-operative nausea and vomiting, postoperative dental pain, chronic pain conditions such as lower back pain, and possibly also such psychologic conditions as addiction. It is possible that by affecting afferent nerve signaling, acupuncture may influence the release of endogenous opioids to promote pain relief. This effect may be augmented by release of ACTH and cortisol, as well as through down-regulation of signaling through pain fibers. When treating patients who may utilize alternative forms of medicine, it is important that medical practitioners be educated in regards to the basic fundamental beliefs behind acupuncture, as well as the scientific evidence supporting its use and revealing its efficacy. The purpose of this review is to give western trained physicians exposure to history, basic knowledge and its clinical applications of acupuncture to accommodate accelerating interests in acupuncture in modern society.

  2. Making the Good Society Work

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Field, John

    2010-01-01

    Everyone is talking about civil society. Perhaps it's the election, and the shock of seeing more voters at the polling booths than anyone had expected. Now David Cameron's idea of a "big society" is being translated into some early policy measures. Does today's debate have anything to do with adult learning? The author believes that the…

  3. The Learning Society: Two Justifications

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Su, Ya-hui

    2010-01-01

    This article examines the view that has long been fashionable in related policies and literature that the establishment of the learning society is a necessary response to changing times. This article suggests that the association between the learning society and current change may be defensible but is limited. The justification of the learning…

  4. Numeracy in Society and Environment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cooper, Cath; Dole, Shelley; Geiger, Vince; Goos, Merrilyn

    2012-01-01

    This article describes a project that focuses on how a Society and Environment unit could develop required numeracy. This is more of an integrated unit organised around a theme rather than a Society and Environment unit that required specific aspects of numeracy. Suggested data sources for examining students numeracy development included (1) a…

  5. American Society of Human Genetics

    MedlinePlus

    ... Deficiency October 20, 2016 Parents of Children with Cancer Value Sequencing Results, Even if Non-actionable October 20, 2016 The American Society of Human Genetics, Incorporated 9650 Rockville Pike • Bethesda, Maryland 20814 society@ashg.org • 1-866-HUM-GENE • (301) 634-7300 Privacy Policy

  6. Paperless or vanishing society

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Turner Luke, Joy

    2002-06-01

    In the 1940s color photography became available and within a few years, extremely popular. As people switched from black and white photographs made with the old metallic silver process to the new color films, pictures taken to record their lives and families began a slow disappearing act. The various color processes, coupled with the substrates they were printed on, affected their longevity, but many color photographs taken from the late 1950s through the 1970s, and even into the 1980s, faded not only when exposed to the light, but also when stored in the dark. Henry Wilhelm's excellent book 'The Permanence and Care of Color Photographs' documents this history in detail. Today we are making another transition in the storage of pictures and information. There are questions about the longevity of different types of digital storage, and also of the images printed by various types of inkjet printers, or by laser printers using colored toners. Very expensive and very beautiful works of art produced on Iris printers are appearing in art exhibitions. Some of these are referred to as Giclee prints and are offered on excellent papers. Artists are told the prints will last a lifetime; and if by change they don't it is only necessary to make another print. Henry Wilhelm has begun to test and rate these images for lightfastness; however, his test method was developed for examining longevity in colored photographs. It is of interest to find out how these prints will hold up in the tests required for fine art materials. Thus far companies producing digital inks and printers have not invested the time and money necessary to develop an American Society for Testing and Materials (ASTM) standard method for evaluating the lightfastness of digital prints. However, it is possible to use ASTM D 5383, Standard Practice for Visual Determination of the Lightfastness of Art Materials by Art Technologists, to pinpoint colors that will fade in a short time, even though the test is not as

  7. 2. ALABAMA GATES LOOKING SOUTHEAST ALONG LINED CHANNEL, NOTE CHEMICAL ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    2. ALABAMA GATES LOOKING SOUTHEAST ALONG LINED CHANNEL, NOTE CHEMICAL PURIFICATION TANK IN DISTANCE FOR KEEPING DOWN GROWTH OF ALGAE - Los Angeles Aqueduct, Alabama Gates, Los Angeles, Los Angeles County, CA

  8. Evaluation of the repeated-dose liver and gastrointestinal tract micronucleus assays with 22 chemicals using young adult rats: summary of the collaborative study by the Collaborative Study Group for the Micronucleus Test (CSGMT)/The Japanese Environmental Mutagen Society (JEMS) - Mammalian Mutagenicity Study Group (MMS).

    PubMed

    Hamada, Shuichi; Ohyama, Wakako; Takashima, Rie; Shimada, Keisuke; Matsumoto, Kazumi; Kawakami, Satoru; Uno, Fuyumi; Sui, Hajime; Shimada, Yasushi; Imamura, Tadashi; Matsumura, Shoji; Sanada, Hisakazu; Inoue, Kenji; Muto, Shigeharu; Ogawa, Izumi; Hayashi, Aya; Takayanagi, Tomomi; Ogiwara, Yosuke; Maeda, Akihisa; Okada, Emiko; Terashima, Yukari; Takasawa, Hironao; Narumi, Kazunori; Wako, Yumi; Kawasako, Kazufumi; Sano, Masaki; Ohashi, Nobuyuki; Morita, Takeshi; Kojima, Hajime; Honma, Masamitsu; Hayashi, Makoto

    2015-03-01

    The repeated-dose liver micronucleus (RDLMN) assay using young adult rats has the potential to detect hepatocarcinogens. We conducted a collaborative study to assess the performance of this assay and to evaluate the possibility of integrating it into general toxicological studies. Twenty-four testing laboratories belonging to the Mammalian Mutagenicity Study Group, a subgroup of the Japanese Environmental Mutagen Society, participated in this trial. Twenty-two model chemicals, including some hepatocarcinogens, were tested in 14- and/or 28-day RDLMN assays. As a result, 14 out of the 16 hepatocarcinogens were positive, including 9 genotoxic hepatocarcinogens, which were reported negative in the bone marrow/peripheral blood micronucleus (MN) assay by a single treatment. These outcomes show the high sensitivity of the RDLMN assay to hepatocarcinogens. Regarding the specificity, 4 out of the 6 non-liver targeted genotoxic carcinogens gave negative responses. This shows the high organ specificity of the RDLMN assay. In addition to the RDLMN assay, we simultaneously conducted gastrointestinal tract MN assays using 6 of the above carcinogens as an optional trial of the collaborative study. The MN assay using the glandular stomach, which is the first contact site of the test chemical when administered by oral gavage, was able to detect chromosomal aberrations with 3 test chemicals including a stomach-targeted carcinogen. The treatment regime was the 14- and/or 28-day repeated-dose, and the regime is sufficiently promising to incorporate these methods into repeated-dose toxicological studies. The outcomes of our collaborative study indicated that the new techniques to detect chromosomal aberrations in vivo in several tissues worked successfully.

  9. Phoenix Society for Burn Survivors

    MedlinePlus

    ... Medical Professionals Phoenix Society is the leader in connecting the burn recovery community and creating resources for survivors. Since 1977, we have partnered with survivors, families, health care professionals, burn centers, and the fire ...

  10. The Engineering Societies & Continuing Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Professional Engineer, 1979

    1979-01-01

    Gives a description of what the major engineering societies (ASCE, ASME, AICHE, and IEEE) are doing in the area of continuing education. The description includes the short courses, their costs, duration, type and scope of the content. (GA)

  11. American Society of Clinical Oncology

    MedlinePlus

    ... Conference Missouri Oncology Society State Affiliate View Event Neuroscience Update in Pediatric Neuro-Oncology Houston, Texas, United States April 22 Neuroscience Update in Pediatric Neuro-Oncology MD Anderson Informational; ...

  12. ISS Update: American Physical Society

    NASA Video Gallery

    NASA Public Affairs Officer Dan Huot talks with Becky Thompson, head of Public Outreach for the American Physical Society, a professional organization for physicists whose web site hosts astronaut ...

  13. New York Zoological Society Library.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnson, Steven P.

    1988-01-01

    Describes the institutional setting, history, and services of the New York Zoological Society Library. Topics covered include clientele; library collections and special collections; library staffing and organizational structure; computer applications; and relationships with other libraries. (11 references) (CLB)

  14. Society Membership 1980 Profile: Stability and Change.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Porter, Beverly Fearn; Czujko, Roman

    This 1980 profile provides an overview of employment stability and change among a small random sample of U.S. and Canadian members of The American Institute of Physics (AIP) member societies: The American Physical Society; Optical Society of America; Acoustical Society of America; The Society of Rheology; American Association of Physics Teachers;…

  15. XXXVI Polish Astronomical Society Meeting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Różańska, Agata; Bejger, Michał

    2014-12-01

    XXXVI meeting of Polish Astronomical Society was held in Warsaw on Sept. 11-14, 2013. The conference brought together 150 astronomers working in different institutes in Poland and abroad. The highlight of the Congress was the first awarding of the Paczynski's Medal. The first laureate of the Medal is Professor Martin Rees from University of Cambridge. Medal was given by the President of the Polish Astronomical Society prof. Bozena Czerny.

  16. Society for Reproductive Endocrinology and Infertility

    MedlinePlus

    The Society for Reproductive Endocrinology and Infertility SREI Members-only Forum Home About Us About SREI Vision and Mission ... Fact Sheets and Booklets SREI is an affiliated society to the American Society for Reproductive Medicine . Below ...

  17. Abortion in a just society.

    PubMed

    Hunt, M E

    1993-01-01

    A female Catholic theologian imagines a just society that does not judge women who decide to undergo an abortion. The Church, practitioners, and the courts must trust that women do make person-enhancing choices about the quality of life. In the last 15 years most progress in securing a woman's right to abortion has been limited to white, well-educated, and middle or upper middle class women. A just society would consider reproductive options a human right. Abortion providers are examples of a move to a just society; they are committed to women's well-being. There are some facts that make one pessimistic about achieving abortion in a just society. The US Supreme Court plans to review important decisions establishing abortion as a civil right. Further, some men insist on suing women who want to make their own reproductive decisions--an anti-choice tactic to wear away women's right to reproductive choice. Bombings of abortion clinics and harassment campaigns by anti-choice groups are common. These behaviors strain pro-choice proponents emotionally, psychically, and spiritually. Their tactics often lead to theologians practicing self-censorship because they fear backlash. Abortion providers also do this. Further, the reaction to AIDS is that sex is bad. Anti-abortion groups use AIDS to further their campaigns, claiming that AIDS is a punishment for sex. Strategies working towards abortion in a just society should be education and persuasion of policymakers and citizens about women's right to choose, since they are the ones most affected by abortion. Moreover, only women can secure their rights to abortion. In a just society, every health maintenance organization, insurance company, and group practice would consider abortion a normal service. A just society provides for the survival needs of the most marginalized.

  18. Modern Chemical Technology, Volume 7.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pecsok, Robert L.; Chapman, Kenneth

    This volume is one of the series for the Chemical Technician Curriculum Project (ChemTeC) of the American Chemical Society funded by the National Science Foundation. It consists of discussions, exercises, and experiments on the following topics: the nature of reversible processes, equilibrium constants, variable reaction tendencies, practical…

  19. Modern Chemical Technology, Volume 9.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pecsok, Robert L.; Chapman, Kenneth

    This volume is one of the series for the Chemical Technician Curriculum Project (ChemTeC) of the American Chemical Society funded by the National Science Foundation. It consists of discussions, exercises, and experiments on the following topics: ion exchange, electrphoresis, dialysis, electrochemistry, corrosion, electrolytic cells, coulometry,…

  20. American Society for Dermatologic Surgery

    MedlinePlus

    ... learning series Now available through the ASDS e-learning portal , the three-part Chemical Peel series provides a comprehensive review of superficial, medium and deep chemical peels including selection, application and complications. Each ...

  1. PREPRINTS, DIVISION OF PETROLEUM CHEMISTRY, AMERICAN CHEMICAL SOCIETY. (R824729)

    EPA Science Inventory

    The perspectives, information and conclusions conveyed in research project abstracts, progress reports, final reports, journal abstracts and journal publications convey the viewpoints of the principal investigator and may not represent the views and policies of ORD and EPA. Concl...

  2. Japan-Russia Pediatric Society.

    PubMed

    Nihei, K; Thunemathu, Y; Kobayashi, N

    1993-12-01

    In March 1990, medical interchange between Japan and the Soviet Union began with a letter from the local health bureau of Khabarovsk. We visited Khabarovsk three times and Kamchatka once, and saw many hospitals and patients. Russian doctors of pediatrics visited Japan. Medical information was exchanged and discussed. The Japan-Russia Pediatric Society was established to perform interchange of medical information, technology and staff such as doctors, nurses and technicians between Japan and Russia, especially the Far East district of Russia. The Society meeting has been held three times: Tokyo (1991), Khabarovsk (1992) and Niigata (1993). It is necessary to continue the interchange between the two countries.

  3. Molecular evolutionary analyses of insect societies.

    PubMed

    Fischman, Brielle J; Woodard, S Hollis; Robinson, Gene E

    2011-06-28

    The social insects live in extraordinarily complex and cohesive societies, where many individuals sacrifice their personal reproduction to become helpers in the colony. Identifying adaptive molecular changes involved in eusocial evolution in insects is important for understanding the mechanisms underlying transitions from solitary to social living, as well as the maintenance and elaboration of social life. Here, we review recent advances made in this area of research in several insect groups: the ants, bees, wasps, and termites. Drawing from whole-genome comparisons, candidate gene approaches, and a genome-scale comparative analysis of protein-coding sequence, we highlight novel insights gained for five major biological processes: chemical signaling, brain development and function, immunity, reproduction, and metabolism and nutrition. Lastly, we make comparisons across these diverse approaches and social insect lineages and discuss potential common themes of eusocial evolution, as well as challenges and prospects for future research in the field.

  4. Molecular evolutionary analyses of insect societies

    PubMed Central

    Fischman, Brielle J.; Woodard, S. Hollis; Robinson, Gene E.

    2011-01-01

    The social insects live in extraordinarily complex and cohesive societies, where many individuals sacrifice their personal reproduction to become helpers in the colony. Identifying adaptive molecular changes involved in eusocial evolution in insects is important for understanding the mechanisms underlying transitions from solitary to social living, as well as the maintenance and elaboration of social life. Here, we review recent advances made in this area of research in several insect groups: the ants, bees, wasps, and termites. Drawing from whole-genome comparisons, candidate gene approaches, and a genome-scale comparative analysis of protein-coding sequence, we highlight novel insights gained for five major biological processes: chemical signaling, brain development and function, immunity, reproduction, and metabolism and nutrition. Lastly, we make comparisons across these diverse approaches and social insect lineages and discuss potential common themes of eusocial evolution, as well as challenges and prospects for future research in the field. PMID:21690385

  5. International Ergonomics Association Activities and Constituent Societies

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1988-05-01

    Soci~t d’Ergonomie de Langue Francaise Hungary: IHungarian Society for Organization and Management Science Italy: Societa Italiana di Ergonomia ...Human Ergology Society Korea: Korean Ergonomics Society Mexico: Association Mexicana de Ergonomia New Zealand: New Zealand Ergonomics Soceity South...34.-, NATIONAL & REGIONAL ERGONOMICS SOCIETIES Association Mexicana de Ergonomia AC Javier Castellanos, Secretario Ejecutivo Periferico Sur 4271 - "Mexico 20

  6. Infectious Diseases Society of America

    MedlinePlus

    ... Walter E. Stamm Mentor Award Clinical Teacher Award World AIDS Day IDSA Recognizes World AIDS Day HIVMA Statement The Hill: Commemorating WAD ... Society of America welcomes the announcement from the World Health Organization of its “priority pathogens” list to ...

  7. Reconstructing Death in Postmodern Society.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kastenbaum, Robert

    1993-01-01

    Examines interaction between emerging thanatological movement and its sociohistorical context. Notes that thanatology will take on new shape as individuals and society attempt to cope with postmodernistic forces and deconstructive mentality. Considers prospect for authentic solidarity against distress in reconstructed death system. (Author/NB)

  8. Building a MicroSociety

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dunton, Sheryl

    2006-01-01

    Talbot Hill Elementary School in Renton, Washington, uses the MicroSociety model to make learning relevant and engaging for its diverse student population. Three afternoons each week, every student participates in a for-profit business, a governmental agency, or a nonprofit organization. Teachers prepare students to participate in the school's…

  9. Educating in a Postconventional Society

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kim, Hyun-Sook

    2006-01-01

    Today many people experience more frustration and confusion about many moral issues and norms than their ancestors. Traditional values and norms do not seem to serve Christian adults in today's situation. Christians are therefore challenged to develop Christian moral norms and values relevant to contemporary society and culture. In this article,…

  10. Society Membership Survey: 1986 Salaries.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Skelton, W. Keith; And Others

    The fourth in a series of reports produced by the Education and Employment Statistics division of the American Insititute of Physics (AIP) is presented. Data are based on a stratified random sample survey of one-sixth of the U.S. and Canadian membership of the AIP member societies. In the spring of 1986, every individual in the sample received a…

  11. White Resentment in Settler Society

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schick, Carol

    2014-01-01

    Teaching about the history and culture of aboriginal peoples in schools of white settler societies can serve as a counter to the dominant story that serves as the national narrative. Even though the actual teaching may well be among the least political and least disruptive type of curricular knowledge on offer, the inclusion of counter stories can…

  12. Science in Society, Teacher's Guide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Association for Science Education, Cambridge (England).

    This teacher's guide was designed for use in a course developed by The Science in Society Project. The aims of the project, course description and content, and suggestions for introducing the course are included in a general introduction. Objectives, content, commentary on supplementary reading materials developed specifically for the course,…

  13. Huntington's Disease Society of America

    MedlinePlus

    ... Andrews HDSA Researcher Spotlight- Dr. Amber Southwell Advocacy Huntington’s Disease Parity Act Affordable Care Act Social Security Administration ... Shop HDSA Events Donate Connect with us! News Huntington’s Disease Society of America AWARDS $930,000 to nine ...

  14. Socialization for the Knowledge Society

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Karpov, Alexander O.

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of the study is to give an overview and present special features of socialization of the research type that prepares young people for life in the knowledge society. Methods of cultural and historical epistemology, of hermeneutic and structural-functional analysis of social action have been used in the study, as well as elements of the…

  15. Marketing and Society. Study Guide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Welsh, Robert S.; Blake, Rowland S.

    This self-instructional study guide is part of the materials for a college-level programmed course entitled "Marketing and Society." The study guide is intended for use by students in conjunction with a related textbook, a workbook, a review guide, and a series of instructional tape casettes. The study guide contains a brief introductory section…

  16. Shapes of a Renewable Society.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Deudney, Daniel; Flavin, Christopher

    1983-01-01

    To rely on coal and nuclear power as sources of energy is to narrow society's future options and to present numerous problems. Renewable solar energy, on the other hand, can preserve rather than reduce options. More jobs, rising self-reliance, and new equalities between nations will be the result. (RM)

  17. Pluralism in a Democratic Society.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tumin, Melvin M., Ed.; Plotch, Walter, Ed.

    A conference on Pluralism in a Democratic Society: An Interdisciplinary Inquiry into its Meaning and Educational Uses, was held in April 1975 in New York. The goals of this conference were: (1) to clearly define cultural pluralism; and (2) to find the best ways of teaching and learning about cultural pluralism in the classroom. The papers that…

  18. Credentialism in Our Ignorant Society.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Marien, Michael

    All societies have procedures for selecting who will occupy important positions. The use of credentials characterizes our system of social selection, and our worship of them has created the following problems: an artificial demand for education, artificial restraints to learning, the overlooking of obsolescence, generational inversion (wherein the…

  19. The American Montessori Society, Inc.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Donahue, Gilbert E.

    2010-01-01

    This article offers a brief history of the establishment of the American Montessori Society (AMS) and takes a closer look at its structure. The history of AMS has essentially been a search for standards and a search for community in its efforts to further the welfare of children in America. It has been an indigenous effort by American parents, and…

  20. [History of the German Spine Society].

    PubMed

    Wilke, H-J; Carstens, C

    2015-12-01

    The objective of this article is to summarize the history of the German Spine Society (DWG). This society resulted in the year 2006 after several attempts from the fusion of two established German societies, which were dealing with topics around the spine, der "German Society for Spine Research" founded in the year 1958 and the "German Society for Spine Surgery" founded in the year 1987. This fusion was the beginning of a success story, as from this time on the annual membership increased so much that the DWG became the largest spine society in Europe and one of all spine societies worldwide.

  1. A Framework for Evaluating Chemical Hazards.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Coble, Charles R.; Hounshell, Paul B.

    1980-01-01

    Lists questions that teachers should ask relating to use of all chemicals in the school laboratory, as well as chemicals with known and suspected dangerous properties. Tables list Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA)-defined carcinogens, American Chemical Society-defined teratogens, suspected carcinogens, and other hazardous…

  2. Leadership in an egalitarian society.

    PubMed

    von Rueden, Christopher; Gurven, Michael; Kaplan, Hillard; Stieglitz, Jonathan

    2014-12-01

    Leadership is instrumental to resolution of collective action dilemmas, particularly in large, heterogeneous groups. Less is known about the characteristics or effectiveness of leadership in small-scale, homogeneous, and relatively egalitarian societies, in which humans have spent most of our existence. Among Tsimane' forager-horticulturalists of Bolivia, we (1) assess traits of elected leaders under experimental and naturalistic conditions and (2) test whether leaders impact or differentially benefit from collective action outcomes. We find that elected leaders are physically strong and have more kin and other exchange partners. Their ranks on physical dominance, kin support, and trustworthiness predict how well their groups perform, but only where group members have a history of collaborative interaction. Leaders do not take more of the spoils. We discuss why physically strong leaders can be compatible with egalitarianism, and we suggest that leaders in egalitarian societies may be more motivated by maintaining an altruistic reputation than by short-term rewards of collective action.

  3. Leadership in an Egalitarian Society

    PubMed Central

    von Rueden, Christopher; Gurven, Michael; Kaplan, Hillard; Stieglitz, Jonathan

    2014-01-01

    Leadership is instrumental to resolution of collective action dilemmas, particularly in large, heterogeneous groups. Less is known about the characteristics or effectiveness of leadership in small-scale, homogeneous, and relatively egalitarian societies, in which humans have spent most of our existence. Among Tsimane’ forager-horticulturalists of Bolivia, we (1) assess traits of elected leaders under experimental and naturalistic conditions and (2) test whether leaders impact collective action outcomes. We find that elected leaders are physically strong and have more kin and other exchange partners. Their ranks on physical dominance, kin support, and trustworthiness predict how well their groups perform, but only where group members have a history of collaborative interaction. Leaders do not take more of the spoils. We discuss why physically strong leaders can be compatible with egalitarianism, and we suggest that leaders in egalitarian societies may be more motivated by maintaining an altruistic reputation than by short-term rewards of collective action. PMID:25240393

  4. Human cloning and 'posthuman' society.

    PubMed

    Blackford, Russell

    2005-01-01

    Since early 1997, when the creation of Dolly the sheep by somatic cell nuclear transfer was announced in Nature, numerous government reports, essays, articles and books have considered the ethical problems and policy issues surrounding human reproductive cloning. In this article, I consider what response a modern liberal society should give to the prospect of human cloning, if it became safe and practical. Some opponents of human cloning have argued that permitting it would place us on a slippery slope to a repugnant future society, comparable to that portrayed in Aldous Huxley's novel, Brave New World. I conclude that, leaving aside concerns about safety, none of the psychological or social considerations discussed in this article provides an adequate policy justification for invoking the state's coercive powers to prevent human cloning.

  5. [Civil bioethics in pluralistics societies].

    PubMed

    Cortina, A

    2000-01-01

    The author examines how Bioethics should be approached in a pluralist society. She argues that through the gradual discovery of shared ethical values and principles for judging which practices are humanizing and which or not, ever-more dense civil Bioethics helps bring out--in contrast to relativism and subjectivism--an ethical intersubjectiveness, the fundaments of which should be addressed by moral philosophy if it hopes to fulfill one of its main tasks.

  6. Natural hazards society is born

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    El-Sabh, M. I.

    A new professional society for natural hazards is being founded. The objectives of the International Society for the Prevention and Mitigation of Natural Hazards (NHS) are to promote research in all aspects of natural hazards, the distribution of preparedness and emergency-response plans for all countries, and the formulation and implementation of education programs on hazards prevention and mitigation.The founding organizational meeting was held August 17, 1988 in Ensenada, Mexico. About 100 scientists from 14 countries were at this meeting. A constitution and bylaws for the society were adopted and the following officers were elected: President, M. I. El-Sabh, University of Quebec, Canada Vice-president, G. Pararas-Carayannis, International Tsunami Information Center, Honolulu, Hawaii Secretary, T. S. Murty, Institute of Ocean Sciences, Sidney, Canada Treasurer, S. Venkatesh, Atmospheric Environment Service, Downsview, Canada Representatives-at-Large, S. F. Farreras, CICESE, Ensenada, Mexico; S. K. Ghosh, Indian Meteorological Department, New Delhi, India; and F. S. Liu, Academic Sinica, Qindao, PRC.

  7. Inter-Society Research Committee

    SciTech Connect

    Akiyama, Mamoru; Higuchi, Masahisa

    1996-09-01

    World-wide tendencies and circumstances for nuclear power cannot be said to be moving full of sail with a favorable wind, due to nuclear power plant accidents and comparatively little economical benefit. The present Nuclear Power Plant situation is that some personnel understand a need for the development from the viewpoint of efficient energy usage in the world and environmental problems like global warming. At the same time others oppose future nuclear development from the viewpoint of safety problems and economic cost. These issues may end nuclear development worldwide. Nuclear development must be considered from an international viewpoint and other various aspects. Therefore, all countries concerned should cooperative in the adjustment of research carried out by each country. Nuclear power`s future must be efficient in the utilization of limited resources (money, manpower and facilities). It is concluded that the ISRC should only discuss technical matters on nuclear engineering, independent from political influence. Societies agreeing to this idea, provide the ISRC with money and/or manpower and/or facilities. The ISRC will consist of a research program committee and research task forces. Members of the Research Program Committee are the chairmen of the research task forces who are also society representatives. The Committee will discuss research programs and resources. The research task forces will consist of one society representative chairman and specialists on the program.

  8. From the Beginning: The "Journal of Chemical Education" and Secondary School Chemistry

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lagowski, Joseph J.

    2014-01-01

    The people, events, and issues that were involved in the beginning and the evolution of the "Journal of Chemical Education" and the Division of Chemical Education (DivCHED) are traced and discussed. The constitution of the American Chemical Society incorporates the roots of chemical education as an area of interest to the Society. Both…

  9. Safety Pharmacology Society: 9th Annual Meeting.

    PubMed

    Cavero, Icilio

    2010-03-01

    The keynote presentation of the Safety Pharmacology (SP) Society 9th Annual Meeting addressed the urgency, for pharmaceutical organizations, to implement strategies for effectively communicating drug risks to all concerned stakeholders and, in particular, the general public. The application of chronobiology to SP investigational protocols can improve the search of drug-induced adverse effects. The Distinguished Service Award Lecture reviewed a life-long journey through trials and tribulations in the quest of the ever-distant scientific truth. The revision process of Directive 86/609/EC for improving animal welfare should be conducted with the purpose of maintaining a fair balance among animal protection, human health and research imperatives in order to prevent the migration of pharmaceutical activities outside Europe. Additional topics of interest were the behavioral, metabolic and cardiovascular problems experienced by small animals housed at the standard laboratory temperature. A technology for the automated collection of blood and urine samples in rats implanted with telemetry sensors was presented. Non-clinical, clinical, regulatory and legal aspects of abuse liability were expertly reviewed. The 'degradability' of pharmaceuticals into environment-friendly chemicals should be an actively searched and optimized feature of future pharmaceuticals in order to prevent drug pollution of ecosystems. Transgenic and diseased animal models should be selected whenever they can facilitate the determination of drug-induced adverse effects. SP strategies to investigate the safety of drug combination products were exemplified and analyzed in depth. The future of SP was proposed to lie not in the performance of regulatory studies of pharmacodynamic nature but in developing and early applying an array of screening assays for clearing clinical candidates against known drug-induced organ function injuries. In conclusion, the 2009 SP Society annual meeting offered a wealth of

  10. Examining Technology's Impact on Society: Using Case Studies to Introduce Environmental and Economic Considerations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Karukstis, Kerry K.

    2003-01-01

    The general chemistry course at Harvey Mudd College presents chemical principles and addresses technology's impact on society. Students consider environmental and economic implications of chemical scenarios in real-world case studies created for team-based analysis and discussion. Case study design, implementation, and assessment are presented.…

  11. Science in Its Confrontation with Society.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Calvora, Robert G.

    1988-01-01

    Discusses the issue of society-controlled science. Analyzes the present state of science with respect to society, including moral issues, attitude differences between nineteenth century scientists and contemporary ones, risk management, and reductionism. (YP)

  12. Joseph Henry and the American Philosophical Society

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gross, Walter E.

    1972-01-01

    A study of the extent to which Henry was affiliated with the Society and its influence on his work including his evolving relationship with the Society in the scope of the changing nature of American scientific institutions. (DF)

  13. American Orthopaedic Foot and Ankle Society

    MedlinePlus

    ... education site of the American Orthopaedic Foot & Ankle Society. Patients Visit the official patient education site of the American Orthopaedic Foot & Ankle Society. Patients Visit the official patient education site of ...

  14. American Society for Colposcopy and Cervical Pathology

    MedlinePlus

    ... Join/Renew Member Resources Careers About History Bylaws Society Leadership Awards CME Mission and Goals Annual Report ... 7227 Toll-Free (240) 575-9880 Fax © American Society for Colposcopy and Cervical Pathology * Required * First Name: * ...

  15. Society for Cardiovascular Angiography and Interventions

    MedlinePlus

    ... jointly produced, collaborated with, or endorsed by the Society of Cardiovascular Angiography and Interventions. Press & News » Review ... SCAI Member? Create an Account Advertisement Advertisement The Society for Cardiovascular Angiography and Interventions Foundation, 1100 17th ...

  16. Society of NeuroInterventional Surgery

    MedlinePlus

    ... membership and to apply online. SNIS Mission The Society of NeuroInterventional Surgery is dedicated to excellence in ... 703-691-2272 Fax 703-537-0650 © 2016 Society of NeuroInterventional Surgery. All Rights Reserved.

  17. International Society for Magnetic Resonance in Medicine

    MedlinePlus

    ... Join the ISMRM Journals History & Mission Central Office Society Award Winners Strategic Plan Policies Corporate Members Contact ... E-Library Virtual Meetings Connect With Us International Society for Magnetic Resonance in Medicine 2300 Clayton Road, ...

  18. The Impact of Science on Society

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burke, J.; Bergman, J.; Asimov, I.

    1985-01-01

    Four speeches delivered as part of a public lecture series to assess the impact of science on society are presented. The computerization of society, space exploration and habitation, the mechanisms of technological change, and cultural responses are addressed.

  19. Material civilization: things and society.

    PubMed

    Dant, Tim

    2006-06-01

    This paper argues that although classical sociology has largely overlooked the importance of social relations with the material world in shaping the form of society, Braudel's concept of 'material civilization' is a useful way to begin to understand the sociological significance of this relationship. The limitations of Braudel's historical and general concept can be partially overcome with Elias's analysis of the connection between 'technization' and 'civilization' that allows for both a civilizing and a de-civilizing impact of emergent forms of material relation that both lengthen and shorten the chains of interdependence between the members of a society. It is suggested that the concept of the 'morality of things' employed by a number of commentators is useful in summarizing the civilizing effects of material objects and addressing their sociological significance. From the sociology of consumption the idea of materiality as a sign of social relationships can be drawn, and from the sociology of technology the idea of socio-technical systems and actor-networks can contribute to the understanding of material civilization. It is argued that the concept of 'material capital' can usefully summarize the variable social value of objects but to understand the complexity of material civilization as it unfolds in everyday life, an analysis of 'material interaction' is needed. Finally the paper suggests some initial themes and issues apparent in contemporary society that the sociological study of material civilization might address; the increased volume, functional complexity and material specificity of objects and the increased social complexity, autonomy and substitutability that is entailed. A theory of 'material civilization' is the first step in establishing a sociology of objects.

  20. Chemical Emergencies

    MedlinePlus

    When a hazardous chemical has been released, it may harm people's health. Chemical releases can be unintentional, as in the case of an ... the case of a terrorist attack with a chemical weapon. Some hazardous chemicals have been developed by ...

  1. Annual Meeting of International Neural Network Society

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1990-07-31

    by Session and Alphabetized by First Author Within Session Session: Pattern Recognition) 1 Network Analysis 63 Cognition and Learning, 155 Neurobiology...Nielsen Neurocomputer Corp. Cognition and Learning Session Vision Session James Anderson John Daugman Brown University Harvard University Geoffrey Hinton...this meeting. American Mathematical Society Association for Behavior Analysis Cognitive Science Society IEEE Computer Society IEEE Control Systems

  2. Allgemeinbildung: Readiness for Living in Risk Society

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Elmose, Steffen; Roth, Wolff-Michael

    2005-01-01

    Sociologists increasingly note that one lives in a risk society, characterized by the unpredictable consequences of techno-scientific innovation and production and by increasing complexity. Life in risk society, particularly in truly democratic societies, increasingly requires competencies not only to understand and change one's own circumstances…

  3. Languages in Contemporary Anglophone Caribbean Societies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Davids, Melva P.

    2013-01-01

    The paper Languages in Contemporary Anglophone Caribbean Societies examines how language is treated in Jamaica and other Anglophone Caribbean societies and the effects of a haphazard approach to language planning on the social dynamics of the society as well as the individual. It briefly explores how Language is handled in Francophone or…

  4. Civil Society Participation at CONFINTEA VI

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Haddad, Sergio

    2012-01-01

    This article analyzes the participation of civil society in the Sixth International Conference on Adult Education held in Belem do Para, Brazil, 1-4 December 2009. As a foundation, the discussion first illuminates the important role that civil society in general plays in democratic issues and the relation between the state and society followed by…

  5. 76 FR 47531 - Approval of Classification Societies

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-08-05

    ... SECURITY Coast Guard 46 CFR Part 2 RIN 1625-AB35 Approval of Classification Societies AGENCY: Coast Guard... comment period before issuing a final rule regarding the Approval of Classification Societies (USCG- 2007... and performance standards that classification societies must meet in order to obtain approval by...

  6. American Society of Gene & Cell Therapy

    MedlinePlus

    ... Join ASGCT! Job Bank Donate Media The American Society of Gene & Cell Therapy The American Society of Gene & Cell Therapy is the primary professional membership organization for gene and cell therapy. The Society's members are scientists, physicians, patient advocates, and other ...

  7. A Troubled Society: Children in Crisis.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fontana, Vincent J.

    America's children and their families are in trouble, trouble so deep as to constitute a serious threat to the future of our society. The major source of that threat is bureaucratic "benign neglect." We have failed to recognize that the problems of the multitroubled family in a changing society are the problems of the entire society in the midst…

  8. The Life of Learning. The Charles Homer Haskins Lectures of the American Council of Learned Societies.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Greenberg, Douglas, Ed.; Katz, Stanley N., Ed.

    Lectures from the Charles Homer Haskins Lecture Series of the American Council of Learned Societies are gathered here. They include the untitled lectures of: Maynard Mack (1983) of Yale University; Lawrence Stone (1985) of Princeton University; Milton V. Anastos (1986) of the University of California at Los Angeles; Carl E. Schorske (1987) of…

  9. Postmastectomy Radiotherapy: An American Society of Clinical Oncology, American Society for Radiation Oncology, and Society of Surgical Oncology Focused Guideline Update.

    PubMed

    Recht, Abram; Comen, Elizabeth A; Fine, Richard E; Fleming, Gini F; Hardenbergh, Patricia H; Ho, Alice Y; Hudis, Clifford A; Hwang, E Shelley; Kirshner, Jeffrey J; Morrow, Monica; Salerno, Kilian E; Sledge, George W; Solin, Lawrence J; Spears, Patricia A; Whelan, Timothy J; Somerfield, Mark R; Edge, Stephen B

    A joint American Society of Clinical Oncology, American Society for Radiation Oncology, and Society of Surgical Oncology panel convened to develop a focused update of the American Society of Clinical Oncology guideline concerning use of postmastectomy radiotherapy (PMRT).

  10. [International comparison of sensitizing chemical substances].

    PubMed

    Murakami, Tomoe; Oyma, Tsunehiro; Isse, Toyohi; Narai, Rie; Kanaoka, Maki; Pham, Thi-Thu-Phuong; Kawamoto, Toshihiro

    2007-09-01

    Some occupational and environmental chemicals cause allergic diseases. To prevent chemical allergies, it is essential to identify the chemical substances that cause sensitization and to eliminate such sensitizers from daily life. As an occupational countermeasure, information for evaluating sensitization of chemical substances is needed. The aims of this article are to compare the criteria for sensitizers among national organizations in various countries and international organizations, and to make out a list of these chemical substances. The definition of sensitizing chemicals and the designation of respective sensitizers according to the PRTR law, Japan Society for Occupational Health (JSHO), American Conference of Governmental Industrial Hygienists (ACGIH), European Union (EU), Deutsche Forschungsgemeinshaft (DFG) and Japanese Society of Occupational and Environmental Allergy were studied. There are 1,389 chemical substances which are designated as sensitizers by any of the laws and five organizations. We specify each chemical substance in the list.

  11. From Information Society to Knowledge Society: The Ontology Issue

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roche, Christophe

    2002-09-01

    Information society, virtual enterprise, e-business rely more and more on communication and knowledge sharing between heterogeneous actors. But, no communication is possible, and all the more so no co-operation or collaboration, if those actors do not share the same or at least a compatible meaning for the terms they use. Ontology, understood as an agreed vocabulary of common terms and meanings, is a solution to that problem. Nevertheless, although there is quite a lot of experience in using ontologies, several barriers remain which stand against a real use of ontology. As a matter of fact, it is very difficult to build, reuse and share ontologies. We claim that the ontology problem requires a multidisciplinary approach based on sound epistemological, logical and linguistic principles. This article presents the Ontological Knowledge Station (OK Station©), a software environment for building and using ontologies which relies on such principles. The OK Station is currently being used in several industrial applications.

  12. [Child health and chemical safety].

    PubMed

    Morita, Takeshi; Ishimitsu, Susumu; Morikawa, Kaoru

    2005-01-01

    Recently concern over the hazards posed by chemicals to children has become more active. Many chemicals have been introduced into the market within the past several decades. These chemicals are used widely in consumer products and dispersed in the environment. Children are at risk of exposure to such chemicals. Scientific understanding has also improved about the vulnerability of children to chemical hazards. As children represent the future of our societies, protecting their health is an important issue. Thus, many actions are being undertaken by international organizations, e.g., the World Health Organization and the United Nations, and regulatory bodies in Japan, the US and the EU, based on the probable vulnerability of infants and children to chemicals. In this paper, these efforts and state measures are summarized, the characteristics of children at risk assessed, and the list of chemicals concerning child health as well as future actions in Japan are presented.

  13. Drugs, Society, and Human Behavior.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ray, Oakley

    The varied aspects of drugs, their source, abuse, chemical composition, and physical, personal, and social effects are explored. Seven units cover the following areas: (1) an overview on drug use, a brief history of drugs and discussion of social implications; (2) the human nervous system and the actions of drugs; (3) "nondrug drugs" such as…

  14. Did Educational Expansion Trigger the Development of an Education Society? Chances and Risks of a New Model of Society

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Haunberger, Sigrid

    2010-01-01

    This article focuses on the question of whether educational expansion leads to a new type of society, the education society. Taking into consideration the combined elements of three models of society (the post-industrial society, the knowledge society and the information society)--the chances and risks of an educational society will be elicited…

  15. ACS Compiles Chemical Manpower Data

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chemical and Engineering News, 1975

    1975-01-01

    Describes a publication designed to serve as a statistical base from which various groups can develop policy recommendations on chemical manpower. This new series will be the first official effort by the society to compile, correlate, and present all data relevant to the economic status of chemists. (Author/GS)

  16. Chemical Peel

    MedlinePlus

    ... be done at different depths — light, medium or deep — depending on your desired results. Each type of ... chemical peel after 12 months to maintain results. Deep chemical peel. A deep chemical peel removes skin ...

  17. Mobilising Data in a Knowledge Society

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wessels, Bridgette; Finn, Rachel; Wadhwa, Kush; Bigagli, Lorenzo; Nativi, Stefano; Noorman, Merel

    2016-04-01

    We address how the open data movement is fostering change in institutions, in data, and in social participation in the mobilisation of knowledge society. The idea of a knowledge society has been raised over the last two decades but the transition to such as society has not been realised. Up to the present time, discussion about a knowledge society have largely focused on a knowledge economy and information society rather than a mobilisation to a knowledge society. These debates have, however, taken place before the rise of open data and big data and the development of an open data movement. We consider the role of the open data movement in fostering transformation to a knowledge society. The characteristics of the open data movement that include the strong conviction of the value of open data for society, the attention to the institutional aspects of making data open in an inclusive way, the practical focus on the technological infrastructure are key in mobilising a knowledge society. At the heart of any mobilisation is an emerging open data ecosystem and new ways of producing and using data - whether 'born digital' data, digitised data or big data - and how that data, when made openly available, can be used in a knowledgeable way by societal actors.

  18. [Pets, veterinarians, and multicultural society].

    PubMed

    Klumpers, M; Endenburg, N

    2009-01-15

    Dutch society comprises a growing percentage of non-Western ethnic minority groups. Little is known about pet ownership among these groups. This study explores some aspects of pet ownership, and the position of veterinarians, among the four largest non-Western ethnic minority groups in the Netherlands. Information was gathered through street interviews with people from a Moroccan, Turkish, Surinamese, or Antillean (including Aruban) background. Five hundred people where interviewed, including 41 pet owners. Results showed that people from non-Western ethnic minorities kept pets less often than Dutch people, with fish and birds being the most frequently kept pets. The number of visits to the veterinary clinic was comparable to that of Dutch pet owners; however, reasons given for the last visit were different. People from non-Western ethnic minorities mostly visited a veterinarian if their pet was ill whereas Dutch people visited the veterinarian if their pet needed to be vaccinated. People from non-Western ethnic minorities were positive about veterinarians, considering that they had sufficient knowledge about and concern for their pets. Moreover, veterinarians were trusted and provided understandable information--the respondents felt that they could go to their veterinarian with any question or problem regarding their pets. Although most respondents considered a visit to the veterinarian expensive, they were more than willing to invest in their pet's health.

  19. Science, Society, and Social Networking

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    White, K. S.; Lohwater, T.

    2009-12-01

    The increased use of social networking is changing the way that scientific societies interact with their members and others. The American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS) uses a variety of online networks to engage its members and the broader scientific community. AAAS members and non-members can interact with AAAS staff and each other on AAAS sites on Facebook, YouTube, and Twitter, as well as blogs and forums on the AAAS website (www.aaas.org). These tools allow scientists to more readily become engaged in policy by providing information on current science policy topics as well as methods of involvement. For example, members and the public can comment on policy-relevant stories from Science magazine’s ScienceInsider blog, download a weekly policy podcast, receive a weekly email update of policy issues affecting the scientific community, or watch a congressional hearing from their computer. AAAS resource websites and outreach programs, including Communicating Science (www.aaas.org/communicatingscience), Working with Congress (www.aaas.org/spp/cstc/) and Science Careers (http://sciencecareers.sciencemag.org) also provide tools for scientists to become more personally engaged in communicating their findings and involved in the policy process.

  20. Human identity and the evolution of societies.

    PubMed

    Moffett, Mark W

    2013-09-01

    Human societies are examined as distinct and coherent groups. This trait is most parsimoniously considered a deeply rooted part of our ancestry rather than a recent cultural invention. Our species is the only vertebrate with society memberships of significantly more than 200. We accomplish this by using society-specific labels to identify members, in what I call an anonymous society. I propose that the human brain has evolved to permit not only the close relationships described by the social brain hypothesis, but also, at little mental cost, the anonymous societies within which such alliances are built. The human compulsion to discover or invent labels to "mark" group memberships may originally have been expressed in hominins as vocally learned greetings only slightly different in function from chimpanzee pant hoots (now known to be society-specific). The weight of evidence suggests that at some point, conceivably early in the hominin line, the distinct groups composed of several bands that were typical of our ancestors came to be distinguished by their members on the basis of multiple labels that were socially acquired in this way, the earliest of which would leave no trace in the archaeological record. Often overlooked as research subjects, these sizable fission-fusion communities, in recent egalitarian hunter-gatherers sometimes 2,000 strong, should consistently be accorded the status of societies, in the same sense that this word is used to describe tribes, chiefdoms, and other cultures arising later in our history. The capacity of hunter-gatherer societies to grow sufficiently populous that not all members necessarily recognize one another would make the transition to larger agricultural societies straightforward. Humans differ from chimpanzees in that societal labels are essential to the maintenance of societies and the processes giving birth to new ones. I propose that anonymous societies of all kinds can expand only so far as their labels can remain

  1. Beyond the Learning Society: The Learning World?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Preece, Julia

    2006-01-01

    In today's post-modern world of difference, and amidst globalising forces of insidious convergence, this paper explores how far the concepts of lifelong learning and learning society embrace international worldviews. It conducts a brief excursion into literature that has explored learning society models. It also looks at an increasing number of…

  2. Naming and Address in Afghan Society.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Miran, M. Alam

    Forms of address in Afghan society reflect the relationships between the speakers as well as the society's structure. In Afghan Persian, or Dari, first, second, and last names have different semantic dimensions. Boys' first names usually consist of two parts or morphemes, of which one may be part of the father's name. Girls' names usually consist…

  3. Remaking Public Spaces for Civil Society

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ranson, Stewart

    2012-01-01

    The collective action predicaments of the time require citizens to participate in remaking the governance of civil society so that they can become engaged and cooperate together. Can citizens become makers of civil society? This article draws upon Hannah Arendt's "On Revolution" to provide a theory of remaking in which citizens come together to…

  4. Tolerance and Education in Multicultural Societies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wiater, Werner, Ed.; Manschke, Doris, Ed.

    2011-01-01

    This book examines the concepts of tolerance and education in multicultural societies. It focuses on different aspects of multiculturalism in these societies and considers possible conflicts and tensions as well as best-practice examples of co-existence among different cultural groups. Special emphasis is placed on educational issues and schools.…

  5. Universities, the Social Sciences, and Civil Society.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pesmazoglou, Stephanos

    1999-01-01

    Discussion of the university's role in contributing to a civil society offers examples from the recent history of Yugoslavia showing that universities have frequently contributed to chauvinism, intolerance, racism, and ethnic cleansing. Urges institutions of higher education to foster a civil society by emphasizing: (1) an understanding of the…

  6. The Black Man in American Society.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Framingham Public Schools, MA.

    GRADE OR AGES: Junior high school. SUBJECT MATTER: The black man in American society. ORGANIZATION AND PHYSICAL APPEARANCE: There are four major parts each with an overview. The four parts concern a) the African heritage of the black man, b) the American exploitation of the black man, c) the black man's contribution to American society, d) the…

  7. Asia Society's Ongoing Chinese Language Initiatives

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Livaccari, Chris; Wang, Jeff

    2009-01-01

    Asia Society remains committed to promoting the teaching and learning of Chinese in American schools as an integral part of the broader agenda of building students' global competency, the key goal of its Partnership for Global Learning. Under the leadership of Asia Society's new Vice President for Education Tony Jackson and with continuing…

  8. Recent Developments in Japan's Lifelong Learning Society.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Makino, Atsushi

    In the wake of economic and social change in Japan, several lifelong learning initiatives have been implemented. Structural changes such as internationalization, the coming of the information age, and the maturation of Japanese society caused the formerly homogeneous society to become more flexible, paving the way for lifelong learning. Additional…

  9. Just Say Know? Schooling the Knowledge Society

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Willinsky, John

    2005-01-01

    This review essay challenges the practice of rooting educational theory in the economic assumptions that underlie the current championing of a knowledge society. It examines the approaches of three recent works: one book, Andy Hargreaves's Teaching in a Knowledge Society, and two edited collections, Barry Smith's Liberal Education in a Knowledge…

  10. America's Scholarly Societies Raise Their Flags Abroad.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McMurtrie, Beth

    2000-01-01

    Reports that greater numbers of scholarly societies, though American in name, are increasingly international in membership and outlook. Suggests that this trend has been driven by the expanding global outlook of scholars, the collapse of communism, and growth of the Internet. Efforts to encourage local professional societies, fears of American…

  11. Introduction to Ageing: science, medicine, and society

    PubMed Central

    Klug, A.

    1997-01-01

    Introduction to Ageing: science, medicine, and society, the proceedings of a Discussion held at The Royal Society on 7 and 8 May 1997. Organized and edited by J. Grimley Evans, R. Holliday, T. B. L. Kirkwood, P. Laslett and L. Tyler.

  12. The Impact of Science on Society.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Burke, James; And Others

    The impact of science on society is examined in this publication's coverage of a series of public lectures that commemorated the 25th anniversary of the National Aeronautics and Space Administration. Edited versions of four speeches are presented which address the impact of science on society from the time of humanity's first significant…

  13. State or Society? We Need Both

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Taylor, Jane; Appleton, Victoria

    2011-01-01

    The concept of Big Society provides inspiration--working "bottom up" to promote "collective action, reciprocity and a new, more engaged relationship between local people and public services". With so much written about the theory of the Big Society, this seems like an ideal time to put a little more practical detail into the mix. The authors argue…

  14. Teacher Education in a Global Society

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jenlink, Patrick M.

    2008-01-01

    These are strange times for teacher education in a democratic society because globalization dominates economic, political, and technological interfaces among social institutions, nation-states, and the world. These are also dangerous times for teacher education in a democratic society because the expansion of neoliberalism as form of contemporary…

  15. Autonomy and Liberalism in a Multicultural Society

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jewell, Paul

    2005-01-01

    That children should be educated to be ideal citizens, capable of making rational and informed decisions, has been proposed in cultures ranging from Ancient Greece to current societies. In particular, societies that favour liberalism preach the primacy of the individual autonomous citizen and a concomitant tolerance for others. In modern…

  16. History of Tri-M Honor Society.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harley, Frances M.

    1984-01-01

    The Modern Music Masters Society had its origins during the Great Depression in the Maine Music Masters, formed to honor high school students who performed at school and on local church and civic programs. Incorporated in 1952, the society today has chapters in all states and in foreign countries. (RM)

  17. Behind the Banner: Whither the Learning Society?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Edwards, Richard

    1995-01-01

    Substantially different meanings are ascribed to the "learning society": (1) an educated society committed to citizenship and democracy; (2) a learning market preparing individuals for the competitive economy; and (3) a learning network supporting a lifelong approach. The learning market currently predominates, but it does not produce a…

  18. Knowledge Society Discourse and Higher Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Valimaa, Jussi; Hoffman, David

    2008-01-01

    The growing importance of knowledge, research and innovation are changing the social role of universities in the globalized world. One of the most popular concepts used to approach these changes in post-industrial and post-modern societies is the concept of "Knowledge Society". In this paper, we will analyse the roles higher education is expected…

  19. The Weeding of a Historical Society Library.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Drake, Cindy Steinhoff

    1992-01-01

    Describes a major deaccessioning (weeding) project begun in 1985 at the library of the Nebraska State Historical Society, including a brief history of the Society and the events leading to the decision to weed. Public controversy over the handling of the project, benefits of the weeding, and new acquisitions policies are also discussed. (MES)

  20. The Information Society, Schools, and the Media.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Balle, Francis

    This report begins by examining the transition from the industrial society to the informatics society which began in the 1960s, when the newspaper's monopoly on information was destroyed by radio and television, followed by the development of an information-based economy. The salient features of the new area are identified as: (1) the ever…

  1. Lessons from the United Kingdom's Royal Society

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Allen, Henry Lee

    2010-01-01

    Celebrating its 350th anniversary as a scholarly association devoted to scientific pursuits, the Royal Society (UK), in March 2010, published "The Scientific Century: Securing Our Future Prosperity." In its report, the Royal Society argues against both the notion of withdrawing public investment from its world-class universities and the…

  2. More Participation, Happier Society? A Comparative Study of Civil Society and the Quality of Life

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wallace, Claire; Pichler, Florian

    2009-01-01

    A "good society" has recently been portrayed as one in which citizens engage in voluntary associations to foster democratic processes. Arguably, such a good society is considered as one where people are content with their own lives as well as public life. We consider whether participation in civil society leads to more satisfied…

  3. Kansei Biosensor and IT Society

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Toko, Kiyoshi

    A taste sensor with global selectivity is composed of several kinds of lipid/polymer membranes for transforming information of taste substances into electric signal. The sensor output shows different patterns for chemical substances which have different taste qualities such as saltiness and sourness. Taste interactions such as suppression effect, which occurs between bitterness and sweetness, can be detected and quantified using the taste sensor. The taste and also smell of foodstuffs such as beer, coffee, mineral water, soup and milk can be discussed quantitatively. The taste sensor provides the objective scale for the human sensory expression. Multi-modal communication becomes possible using a taste/smell recognition microchip, which produces virtual taste. We are now standing at the beginning of a new age of communication using digitized taste.

  4. Los Alamos National Laboratory.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hammel, Edward F., Jr.

    1982-01-01

    Current and post World War II scientific research at the Los Alamos National Laboratory (New Mexico) is discussed. The operation of the laboratory, the Los Alamos consultant program, and continuation education, and continuing education activities at the laboratory are also discussed. (JN)

  5. Social Value Orientation and Capitalism in Societies

    PubMed Central

    Shahrier, Shibly; Kakinaka, Makoto

    2016-01-01

    Cooperation and competition are core issues in various fields, since they are claimed to affect the evolution of human societies and ecological organizations. A long-standing debate has existed on how social behaviors and preferences are shaped with culture. Considering the economic environment as part of culture, this study examines whether the ongoing modernization of competitive societies, called “capitalism,” affects the evolution of people’s social preferences and behaviors. To test this argument, we implemented field experiments of social value orientation and surveys with 1002 respondents for three different areas of Bangladesh: (i) rural, (ii) transitional and (iii) capitalistic societies. The main result reveals that with the evolution from rural to capitalistic societies, people are likely to be less prosocial and more likely to be competitive. In a transitional society, there is a considerable proportion of “unidentified” people, neither proself nor prosocial, implying the potential existence of unstable states during a transformation period from rural to capitalistic societies. We also find that people become more proself with increasing age, education and number of children. These results suggest that important environmental, climate change or sustainability problems, which require cooperation rather than competition, will pose more danger as societies become capitalistic. PMID:27792756

  6. Social Value Orientation and Capitalism in Societies.

    PubMed

    Shahrier, Shibly; Kotani, Koji; Kakinaka, Makoto

    2016-01-01

    Cooperation and competition are core issues in various fields, since they are claimed to affect the evolution of human societies and ecological organizations. A long-standing debate has existed on how social behaviors and preferences are shaped with culture. Considering the economic environment as part of culture, this study examines whether the ongoing modernization of competitive societies, called "capitalism," affects the evolution of people's social preferences and behaviors. To test this argument, we implemented field experiments of social value orientation and surveys with 1002 respondents for three different areas of Bangladesh: (i) rural, (ii) transitional and (iii) capitalistic societies. The main result reveals that with the evolution from rural to capitalistic societies, people are likely to be less prosocial and more likely to be competitive. In a transitional society, there is a considerable proportion of "unidentified" people, neither proself nor prosocial, implying the potential existence of unstable states during a transformation period from rural to capitalistic societies. We also find that people become more proself with increasing age, education and number of children. These results suggest that important environmental, climate change or sustainability problems, which require cooperation rather than competition, will pose more danger as societies become capitalistic.

  7. [Gender equality activity in the Bioimaging Society].

    PubMed

    Suzaki, Etsuko

    2013-09-01

    Gender equality activity in the Bioimaging Society was initiated in 2005 when it joined the Japan Inter-Society Liaison Association Committee for Promoting Equal Participation of Men and Women in Science and Engineering (EPMEWSE). The Gender Equality Committee of the Bioimaging Society is acting on this issue by following the policy of the EPMEWSE, and has also been planning and conducting lectures at annual meetings of the society to gain the understanding, consents, and cooperation of the members of the society to become conscious of gender equality. Women's participation in the society has been promoted through the activities of the Gender Equality Committee, and the number of women officers in the society has since increased from two women out of 40 members in 2005 to five out of 44 in 2013. The activities of the Gender Equality Committee of the Japanese Association of Anatomists (JAA) have just started. There are more than 400 women belonging to the JAA. When these women members join together and collaborate, women's participation in the JAA will increase.

  8. Chemicals in the Environment

    PubMed Central

    Rudd, Robert L.

    1970-01-01

    Synthetic chemicals are now being incorporated into the earth's ecosystems at a rate and in such manners as to alarm environmentalists. These chemicals are the uncontrolled waste products of a technological society. Most prominent among them at the present time are organochlorine, organomercurial and lead compounds. Persistent members of these groups disperse in water, air and animal tissues. Also they have the capacity for concentration in animal food chains, thereby reversing the historical expectation of the dilution and degradation of wastes. Examples of damage from environmental residues to man are at this stage speculative but documentation from effects on wild species is abundant. Already several species of birds seem on their way to extinction. These wild species constitute a gratuitous monitoring system which already has signaled clear warnings for the welfare of man. PMID:5485230

  9. [Ageing society and laboratory medicine].

    PubMed

    Okabe, H

    2000-09-01

    An interest in the ageing process has increased greatly with increasing the population of the aged. The goal of this interest is to improve the quality of life(QOL) in the aged. In this paper, the presidential address "Ageing Society and Laboratory Medicine" at the 46th annual meeting of JSCP in Kumamoto'99 was summarized on the important research for ageing in the past decades. The paper presented was age- and gene-related changes, the latent variation of serum constituents and lipids abnormality in the ageing process. Concerning to the definition of reference value of healthy populations and the subjects who had no combined ailments, the reference interval of individuals(intra-personal), followed 5 years categorized by age, sex, and social conditions, gave a narrow range of variation than did a larger mixed populations(inter-personal). The reference intervals set would be a more sensitive reference than is the customary "normal range" for values occurring in inter-personal. Concerning to the study of the relationship between laboratory test and activity of daily living(ADL), the higher serum levels for TP, Alb, Hb, Glu, TC were observed in the higher ADL. The basic research techniques were also evaluated in the paper. The serum lipoperoxides were correlated with serum lipoprotein free radicals which caused atherosclerosis. The higher frequency of cerebral- and myocardial-infarction in the aged were observed in the higher serum LDL-C and lower serum level of arachidonic acid(AA), eicosapentaenoic acid(EPA), and AA/EPA ratio were observed in AMI patients with lower HDL-C groups than the healthy aged. Although Alzheimer(AD)'s disease had a progressive memory loss and immobile dementia and was reported the decrease of acetyltransferase activity in the brain, decrease of serum level of free choline, lyso-phosphatidylcholine, phosphatidylcholine(PC) and sphingomyelin(SM)/PC ratio were observed in spite of keeping normal serum level of SM. The decreased serum levels of

  10. Education in an Information Society

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moore, John W.

    1999-04-01

    Last month's editorial pointed out that higher education may well change significantly as a result of the tremendous impact that information technologies are having on society. It quoted a white paper (1) by Russell Edgerton, Director of the Education Program of the Pew Charitable Trusts. Edgerton argued that higher education is currently failing to meet three challenges: to provide higher quality education; to reduce costs; and to regain its former stature as an important player in shaping public policy. Edgerton recommended that the Pew Trusts should encourage colleges and universities to set more ambitious goals for undergraduate education, to enter the public arena and play a major role in the reform of K-12 education, and to develop an academic profession interested in working toward these goals. Four new aims for undergraduate education were identified: "encouraging institutions to take learning seriously, encouraging faculty to take pedagogy seriously, demonstrating that technology can be used to reduce costs as well as to enhance learning, and developing new incentives for continuous quality improvement." One wonders why institutions of higher education should need to be encouraged toward goals that seem obviously congruent with their mission and self interest, but today's colleges and universities seem more likely to respond to outside offers of funding than to develop their own plans of action. As members of the faculty of such institutions, it behooves us to consider what some of those outside influences are likely to be and what effects they are likely to have on us, on our institutions, and on our students. Higher education is seen as a growth market by Michael Dolence and Donald Norris (2). In 1995 they projected that in five years there would be an increase of 20 million full-time equivalent enrollments in the U.S. and more than 100 million world wide. However, this growth was not projected to be traditional, on-campus students. Most was expected to

  11. Sexism and gender inequality across 57 societies.

    PubMed

    Brandt, Mark J

    2011-11-01

    Theory predicts that individuals' sexism serves to exacerbate inequality in their society's gender hierarchy. Past research, however, has provided only correlational evidence to support this hypothesis. In this study, I analyzed a large longitudinal data set that included representative data from 57 societies. Multilevel modeling showed that sexism directly predicted increases in gender inequality. This study provides the first evidence that sexist ideologies can create gender inequality within societies, and this finding suggests that sexism not only legitimizes the societal status quo, but also actively enhances the severity of the gender hierarchy. Three potential mechanisms for this effect are discussed briefly.

  12. Society of Mind project. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Minsky, M.

    1988-08-01

    This project was concerned with developing a theory of intelligent thinking and learning, based on the Society of Mind model of intelligence. The research was funded over a period of years by the Computer Science Office of the Office of Naval Research. The research included the following specific subjects: Connectionism of Parallel Computers, Exploiting Parallel Processing, Connectedness of Commonsense Knowledge Bases, Connectedness and Society of Mind, Advantages and Deficiencies of Connectionist Networks, Insulation and Interaction, Learning and Representation, Intermediate Units and Significance, Associations and Connections, Unifying Frames and K-lines, Clarifying Conceptual Dependency, Computational linguistics, Research tools for society of mind models, Discovery processes, and Bridges between symbolic and connectionist models.

  13. The first President of the Royal Society.

    PubMed

    Fara, Patricia

    2003-12-01

    Few people know the name of the Royal Society's first President, even though he features prominently in Thomas Sprat's famous allegorical frontispiece. In promotional images, his individual identity is irrelevant for proclaiming the Society's allegiance to Francis Bacon and commitment to experimental investigation. By contrast, William Brouncker's name does appear on Peter Lely's large portrait, which hung at the Royal Society. Brouncker was a gifted mathematician as well as a conscientious administrator, and Lely's portrait reproduces the diagram of one of his innovative algebraic proofs.

  14. Pediatric considerations in chemical exposures: are we prepared?

    PubMed

    Lynch, Elizabeth Lea; Thomas, Tamara L

    2004-03-01

    Manmade disasters have risen over the past decaFde. Specifically, chemical weapons used in acts of aggression pose an increasing threat to our society. These potential disaster situations raise concerns regarding preparedness for both adults and children. This article's purpose is to review general principles of chemical exposure and treatment of specific chemical agents, and to identify specific pediatric considerations involved.

  15. Less is Better. Laboratory Chemical Management for Waste Reduction.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    American Chemical Society, Washington, DC.

    An objective of the American Chemical Society is to promote alternatives to landfilling for the disposal of laboratory chemical wastes. One method is to reduce the amount of chemicals that become wastes. This is the basis for the "less is better" philosophy. This bulletin discusses various techniques involved in purchasing control,…

  16. Chemical sensor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rauh, R. David (Inventor)

    1990-01-01

    A sensor for detecting a chemical substance includes an insertion element having a structure which enables insertion of the chemical substance with a resulting change in the bulk electrical characteristics of the insertion element under conditions sufficient to permit effective insertion; the change in the bulk electrical characteristics of the insertion element is detected as an indication of the presence of the chemical substance.

  17. New Approach to Chemically Induced Silicon Oxidation

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1991-10-01

    Kim, C.H. Wolowodiuk, R.J. Jaccodine, F.A. Stevie , and P.M. Kohora, to be published in J. Electrochem. Society. 4. "Effect of NF3 Addition on Point...Defect Generation at the Oxidizing Interface", U.S. Kim, R.J. Jaccodine, F.A. Stevie , and T. Kook, to be published in J. Electrochem. Society. 5...Macfarlane, R.J. Jaccodine and F.A. Stevie , presented at the 180th Meeting of the Electro- chemical Society, Phoenix, AZ, October 13-18, 1991. 15

  18. Stockpile Stewardship: Los Alamos

    ScienceCinema

    McMillan, Charlie; Morgan, Nathanial; Goorley, Tom; Merrill, Frank; Funk, Dave; Korzekwa, Deniece; Laintz, Ken

    2016-07-12

    "Heritage of Science" is a short video that highlights the Stockpile Stewardship program at Los Alamos National Laboratory. Stockpile Stewardship was conceived in the early 1990s as a national science-based program that could assure the safety, security, and effectiveness of the U.S. nuclear deterrent without the need for full-scale underground nuclear testing. This video was produced by Los Alamos National Laboratory for screening at the Lab's Bradbury Science Museum in Los Alamos, NM and is narrated by science correspondent Miles O'Brien.

  19. "Science and Society" in the Planetarium.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Scott, Roger L.; And Others

    1986-01-01

    Planetarium presentations at Ball State University have been integrated into a science and society course titled Colloquium in Science and Mathematics. A brief description and educational objectives for six of the presentations are provided. (JN)

  20. The German Physical Society Under National Socialism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoffmann, Dieter; Walker, Mark

    2004-12-01

    The history of the German Physical Society from 1933 to 1945 is not the same as a comprehensive history of physics under Adolf Hitler, but it does reflect important aspects of physicists' work and life during the Third Reich.

  1. Henry Oldenburg - Shaping the Royal Society

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boas Hall, Marie

    2002-03-01

    Henry Oldenburg, born in 1619 in Bremen, Germany, first came to England as a diplomat on a mission to see Oliver Cromwell. He stayed on in England and in 1662 became the Secretary of the Royal Society, and its best known member to the entire learned world of his time. Through his extensive correspondence, now published, he disseminated the Society's ideals and methods at home and abroad. He fostered and encouraged the talents of many scientists later to be far more famous than he, including Newton, Flamsteed, Malpighi, and Leeuwenhoek with whom, as with many others, he developed real friendship. He founded and edited the Philosophical Transactions, the world's oldest scientific journal.His career sheds new light on the intellectual world of his time, especially its scientific aspects, and on the development of the Royal Society; his private life expands our knowledge of social mobility, the urban society, and the religious views of his time.

  2. Origins of the American Astronomical Society

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Berendzen, Richard

    1974-01-01

    Analyzes the historical context that led to the founding of the society. Relates the ideas and reactions of key figures of the time such as James Lick, George Hale, E.C. Pickering, and S. Newcomb. (GS)

  3. Fragmentation in Science and in Society

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bohm, David

    1971-01-01

    Fragmentation" is a general social condition. The author presents a case for wholeness and its dynamic, cyclic character. Science and society need not be fragmented. They should be considered part of a holocyclation." (LS)

  4. Professionalism and medicine's social contract with society.

    PubMed

    Cruess, Sylvia R

    2006-08-01

    Medicine's relationship with society has been described as a social contract: an "as if" contract with obligations and expectations on the part of both society and medicine, "each of the other". The term is often used without elaboration by those writing on professionalism in medicine. Based on the literature, society's expectations of medicine are: the services of the healer, assured competence, altruistic service, morality and integrity, accountability, transparency, objective advice, and promotion of the public good. Medicine's expectations of society are: trust, autonomy, self-regulation, a health care system that is value-driven and adequately funded, participation in public policy, shared responsibility for health, a monopoly, and both non-financial and financial rewards. The recognition of these expectations is important as they serve as the basis of a series of obligations which are necessary for the maintenance of medicine as a profession. Mutual trust and reasonable demands are required of both parties to the contract.

  5. New Groups Study Science's Effect on Society

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    O'Sullivan, Dermot A.

    1973-01-01

    Describes the chief aims of the Council for Science and Society in London and the International Institute for Applied Systems Analysis in Vienna. Indicates that both groups are planning to function as a multinational interdisciplinary organization. (CC)

  6. Civil Society in Nigeria: Reasons for Ineffectiveness

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-03-01

    why the Nigerian state, through its democratic system , has not been able to meet reasonable expectations of good governance. While the country suffers...argues that the state responds to civil society. Civil society, then, is the tool that shapes state behavior. Thus, the question is why Nigerian civil...number of theories are posited on the methods, tools , and elements required to engender good governance: parliamentary development, a free press

  7. Sustainable Society Formed by Unselfish Agents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kikuchi, Toshiko

    It has been pointed out that if the social configuration of the three relations (market, communal and obligatory relations) is not balanced, a market based society as a total system fails. Using multi-agent simulations, this paper shows that a sustainable society is formed when all three relations are integrated and function respectively. When agent trades are based on the market mechanism (i.e., agents act in their own interest and thus only market relations exist), weak agents who cannot perform transactions die. If a compulsory tax is imposed to enable all weak agents to survive (i.e., obligatory relations exist), then the fiscal deficit increases. On the other hand, if agents who have excess income undertake the unselfish action of distributing their surplus to the weak agents (i.e., communal relations exist), then trade volume increases. It is shown that the existence of unselfish agents is necessary for the realization of a sustainable society. However, the survival of all agents is difficult in a communal society. In an artificial society, for all agents survive and fiscal balance to be maintained, all three social relations need to be fully integrated. These results show that adjusting the balance of the three social relations well lead to the realization of a sustainable society.

  8. History of the Congenital Heart Surgeons' Society.

    PubMed

    Mavroudis, Constantine; Williams, William G

    2015-10-01

    The Congenital Heart Surgeons' Society is a group of over 100 pediatric heart surgeons representing 72 institutions that specialize in the treatment of patients with congenital heart defects. The Society began in 1972 and incorporated as a not-for-profit charitable organization in 2004. It has become the face and voice of congenital heart surgery in North America. In 1985, the Society established a data center for multicenter clinical research studies to encourage congenital heart professionals to participate in improving outcomes for our patients. The goals of the Congenital Heart Surgeons' Society are to stimulate the study of congenital cardiac physiology, pathology, and management options which are instantiated in data collection, multi-institutional studies, and scientific meetings. Honest and open discussion of problems with possible solutions to the challenges facing congenital heart professionals have been the strength of the Congenital Heart Surgeons' Society. It is imperative for the growth of an organization to know from where it came in order to know to where it is going. The purpose of this article is to review the history of the Congenital Heart Surgeons' Society.

  9. History of Japanese Society of Toxicology.

    PubMed

    Satoh, Tetsuo

    2016-01-01

    Founded in 1981, the Japanese Society of Toxicology (JSOT) has grown into an organization of nearly 3,000 members working together to advance the nation's scientific knowledge and understanding of toxicology through the implementation of planning that ensures a systematic and efficient expenditure of energies and resources, and is closely aligned with a strategy for accomplishing the Society's long-range plans. To promote public education in toxicology, the Society organizes public lectures during each year's annual meeting. Other activities include hosting scientific conferences, promoting continuing education, and facilitating international collaboration. Internally, the JSOT operates five standing committees: General Affairs, Educational, Editorial, Finance, and Science and Publicity to handle its necessary relationships. To bestow official recognition, the Society established its Toxicologist Certification Program in 1997, and has certified 536 members as Diplomat Toxicologists (DJSOT) as of May 1, 2016. Furthermore, on the same date, 43 JSOT members were certified as Emeritus Diplomats of the JSOT (EDJSOT). The Society has launched two official journals, the "Journal of Toxicological Sciences (JTS)" in 1981 and "Fundamental Toxicological Sciences (Fundam. Toxicol. Sci.)" in 2014. As for participation in the international organizations, the JSOT (then known as the Toxicological Research Group) joined the International Union of Toxicology as a charter member in 1980, and became a founding member of the Asian Society of Toxicology at its inauguration in 1994. Into the future, the JSOT will continue working diligently to advance knowledge and understanding of toxicology and secure its place among the interdisciplinary fields of science, humane studies, and ethics.

  10. [Board-certifying systems of the Japan Surgical Society and subspecialty surgical societies].

    PubMed

    Kondo, Satoshi

    2009-05-01

    In postgraduate training courses to develop superior surgeons with both general and subspecialty surgery competence, board-certifying systems play an important role as guideposts. The board-certified surgeon designation of the Japan Surgical Society as the first guidepost has provided the foundations for board-certified surgeon systems of subspecialty surgical societies as the second guidepost. A committee consisting of representatives from nine surgical societies has been working actively to make these board-certifying systems more reasonable and consistent.

  11. Chemical burns

    PubMed Central

    Cartotto, Robert C.; Peters, Walter J.; Neligan, Peter C.; Douglas, Leith G.; Beeston, Jeff

    1996-01-01

    Objectives To report a burn unit’s experience with chemical burns and to discuss the fundamental principles in managing chemical burns. Design A chart review. Setting A burn centre at a major university-affiliated hospital. Patients Twenty-four patients with chemical burns, representing 2.6% of all burn admissions over an 8-year period at the Ross Tilley Regional Adult Burn Centre. Seventy-five percent of the burn injuries were work-related accidents. Chemicals involved included hydrofluoric acid, sulfuric acid, black liquor, various lyes, potassium permanganate and phenol. Results Fourteen patients required excision and skin grafting. Complications were frequent and included ocular chemical contacts, wound infections, tendon exposures, toe amputation and systemic reactions from absorption of chemical. One patient died from a chemical scald burn to 98% of the body surface area. Conclusions The key principles in the management of chemical burns include removal of the chemical, copious irrigation, limited use of antidotes, correct estimation of the extent of injury, identification of systemic toxicity, treatment of ocular contacts and management of chemical inhalation injury. Individualized treatment is emphasized. PMID:8640619

  12. [Chemical weapons and chemical terrorism].

    PubMed

    Nakamura, Katsumi

    2005-10-01

    Chemical Weapons are kind of Weapons of Mass Destruction (WMD). They were used large quantities in WWI. Historically, large quantities usage like WWI was not recorded, but small usage has appeared now and then. Chemical weapons are so called "Nuclear weapon for poor countrys" because it's very easy to produce/possession being possible. They are categorized (1) Nerve Agents, (2) Blister Agents, (3) Cyanide (blood) Agents, (4) Pulmonary Agents, (5) Incapacitating Agents (6) Tear Agents from the viewpoint of human body interaction. In 1997 the Chemical Weapons Convention has taken effect. It prohibits chemical weapons development/production, and Organization for the Prohibition of Chemical Weapons (OPCW) verification regime contributes to the chemical weapons disposal. But possibility of possession/use of weapons of mass destruction by terrorist group represented in one by Matsumoto and Tokyo Subway Sarin Attack, So new chemical terrorism countermeasures are necessary.

  13. Chemical microsensors

    SciTech Connect

    Li, DeQuan; Swanson, Basil I.

    1995-01-01

    An article of manufacture is provided including a substrate having an oxide surface layer and a selective thin film of a cyclodextrin derivative chemically bound upon said substrate, said film is adapted for the inclusion of a selected organic compound therewith. Such an article can be either a chemical sensor capable of detecting a resultant mass change from inclusion of the selected organic compound or a chemical separator capable of reversibly selectively separating a selected organic compound.

  14. 3. Historic American Buildings Survey Photocopy, National Geographic Society Photograph, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    3. Historic American Buildings Survey Photocopy, National Geographic Society Photograph, 1971 Courtesy, National Geographic Society LIBRARY, 1971 - Townsend House, 2121 Massachusetts Avenue Northwest, Washington, District of Columbia, DC

  15. American Cancer Society Recommendations for Prostate Cancer Early Detection

    MedlinePlus

    ... Prostate Cancer Prevention and Early Detection American Cancer Society Recommendations for Prostate Cancer Early Detection The American Cancer Society (ACS) recommends that men have a chance to ...

  16. Coevolution of nutrigenomics and society: ethical considerations.

    PubMed

    Korthals, Michiel

    2011-12-01

    To optimize the coevolution of nutrigenomics and society (ie, the reciprocal stimulation of both developments), I analyzed chances for a fruitful match between normative concepts and strategies of both developments. Nutrigenomics embodies ≥ 3 normative concepts. First, food is exclusively interpreted in terms of disease prevention. Second, striving for health is interpreted as the quantification of risks and prevention of diseases through positive food-gene interactions. The third normative idea is that disease prevention by the minimization of risks is an individual's task. My thesis was that these concepts of nutrigenomics would not easily match with concepts of food and health of various food styles in Western societies, which, for instance, parents in the case of metabolic programming endorse and with a philosophical view of the relation between food, health, and the meaning of life. Next, I reflected on the nonsynchronized coevolution of nutrigenomics and society because of this mismatch and introduced the concept of the fair representation of food styles in nutrigenomic developments. To synchronize and optimize the coevolution of nutrigenomics and society, I propose that the research policy of nutrigenomics should change to a research partnership with society on the basis of fair representation.

  17. History of the Society for Invertebrate Pathology.

    PubMed

    Davidson, Elizabeth W; Burges, H Denis

    2005-05-01

    Scientists studying diseases of invertebrates in the USA, Europe, and Asia began to meet at international congresses in the 1950s and early 1960s, and soon recognized that they needed both a society and a journal where their common interests could be discussed and their findings presented. Edward A. Steinhaus played a major role in bringing together scientists from across the globe with common interests in these diseases. As a consequence, the Journal of Invertebrate Pathology (then Journal of Insect Pathology) was initiated in 1959 and Steinhaus became its first editor. Along with Albert Sparks he organized a meeting at Seattle, Washington in 1967 that led to the founding of the Society for Invertebrate Pathology with Steinhaus as its first President. The Society held its first meeting at Ohio State University in 1968, and has continued to meet annually. The Society has instituted a Founder's Lecture series, graduate student awards, and Divisions of Microbial Control, Microsporidia, Bacteriology, Fungi, Viruses, and Nematodes. Members enjoy several social functions at meetings as well as symposia, submitted papers, and poster sessions. The Society for Invertebrate Pathology is a truly international organization which to date has held meetings in 13 countries and 14 US states, usually attended by members from at least 20 countries.

  18. Teaching the Intersection of Climate and Society

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thomson, C.; Ting, M.; Orlove, B. S.

    2014-12-01

    As the first program of its kind, the M.A. in Climate and Society at Columbia University educates students on how climate affects society and vice versa. The 12-month interdisciplinary Master's program is designed to allow students from a wide variety of backgrounds to gain knowledge in climate science and a deep understanding of social sciences and how they related to climate. There are currently more than 250 alumni applying their skills in fields including energy, economics, disaster mitigation, journalism and climate research in more than a dozen countries worldwide. The presentation will highlight three key components of the program that have contributed to its growth and helped alumni become brokers that can effectively put climate science in the hands of the public and policymakers for the benefit of society. Those components include working with other academic departments at Columbia to successfully integrate social science classes into the curriculum; the development of the course Applications in Climate and Society to help students make an overt link between climate and its impacts on society; and providing students with hands-on activities with practitioners in climate-related fields.

  19. Swedish chemical regulation: an overview and analysis.

    PubMed

    Löfstedt, Ragnar E

    2003-04-01

    This article begins with a review of the regulation of chemicals in Sweden over the past 30 years, focusing particularly on the 1997 Government Environmental Quality Bill, which called for a toxic-free society by the year 2020. The second part of the article analyzes why Sweden has taken this route. The third and final section discusses Sweden's present role in formulating present EU chemical regulation, such as the recent EU Chemical White Paper, and hypothesizes future impacts of Swedish chemical regulations on the EU itself.

  20. Olympic and world sport: making transnational society?

    PubMed

    Giulianotti, Richard; Brownell, Susan

    2012-06-01

    This paper introduces the special issue of the British Journal of Sociology on the subject of the transnational aspects of Olympic and world sport. The special issue is underpinned by the perspective that because sport provides a space for the forging of transnational connections and global consciousness, it is increasingly significant within contemporary processes of globalization and the making of transnational society. In this article, we examine in turn eight social scientific themes or problems that are prominent within the special issue: globalization, glocalization, neo-liberal ideologies and policies, transnational society, securitization, global civil society, transnational/global public sphere, and fantasy/imagination. We conclude by highlighting five 'circles' of future research inquiry within world sport that should be explored by social scientists.

  1. Mineral resources of Peru's ancient societies

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Brooks, W.E.

    2003-01-01

    Northern Peru has an exceptionally rich archaeological heritage that includes metalwork, ceramics and textiles. The success of at least a half-dozen pre-Columbian societies dating back 3,000 years and subsequent Spanish colonization in the 1400s has rested on the effective use of northern Peru's abundant resources. In the summer of 2000, my son Matt and I learned about that connection firsthand by volunteering at the Santa Rita B archaeological site in the Chao Valley near Trujillo in northern Peru. Riding donkey-back through the Andes and talking with local people, we got our hands dirty in the rich archaeology and geology of the area. We were able to correlate mineral occurrences to their various roles in society - opening a window into the region's fascinating past. From construction to metallurgy, pre-Columbian societies flourished and advanced because of their understanding and use of the available mineral resources.

  2. Los Alamos offers Fellowships

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Los Alamos National Laboratory in New Mexico is calling for applications for postdoctoral appointments and research fellowships. The positions are available in geoscience as well as other scientific disciplines.The laboratory, which is operated by the University of California for the Department of Energy, awards J. Robert Oppenheimer Research Fellowships to scientists that either have or will soon complete doctoral degrees. The appointments are for two years, are renewable for a third year, and carry a stipend of $51,865 per year. Potential applicants should send a resume or employment application and a statement of research goals to Carol M. Rich, Div. 89, Human Resources Development Division, MS P290, Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico 87545 by mid-November.

  3. Chemical sensors

    DOEpatents

    Lowell, Jr., James R.; Edlund, David J.; Friesen, Dwayne T.; Rayfield, George W.

    1991-01-01

    Sensors responsive to small changes in the concentration of chemical species are disclosed, comprising (a) a mechanochemically responsive polymeric film capable of expansion or contraction in response to a change in its chemical environment, operatively coupled to (b) a transducer capable of directly converting said expansion or contraction to a measurable electrical response.

  4. Chemical preconcentrator

    DOEpatents

    Manginell, Ronald P.; Frye-Mason, Gregory C.

    2001-01-01

    A chemical preconcentrator is disclosed with applications to chemical sensing and analysis. The preconcentrator can be formed by depositing a resistive heating element (e.g. platinum) over a membrane (e.g. silicon nitride) suspended above a substrate. A coating of a sorptive material (e.g. a microporous hydrophobic sol-gel coating or a polymer coating) is formed on the suspended membrane proximate to the heating element to selective sorb one or more chemical species of interest over a time period, thereby concentrating the chemical species in the sorptive material. Upon heating the sorptive material with the resistive heating element, the sorbed chemical species are released for detection and analysis in a relatively high concentration and over a relatively short time period. The sorptive material can be made to selectively sorb particular chemical species of interest while not substantially sorbing other chemical species not of interest. The present invention has applications for use in forming high-sensitivity, rapid-response miniaturized chemical analysis systems (e.g. a "chem lab on a chip").

  5. Chemical pneumonitis

    MedlinePlus

    ... chemicals. Alternative Names Aspiration pneumonia - chemical Images Lungs Respiratory system References Blanc PD. Acute responses to toxic exposures. In: Broaddus VC, Mason RJ, Ernst JD, et al, eds. Murray and Nadel's Textbook of Respiratory Medicine . 6th ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier Saunders; 2016: ...

  6. [Medical safety and the Japan Surgical Society].

    PubMed

    Kokudo, Norihiro

    2013-03-01

    Medical safety has been one of the most important issues addressed by the Japan Surgical Society (JSS), and the topic has been discussed at every annual meeting of the JSS since 2004. In 2008, the Medical Safety Committee was established under the JSS. The JSS is one of the principal founding members of the Japan Council for Quality Health Care (JCQHR) and has placed many members on evaluation committees for a majority of malpractice cases. In cooperation with the Japanese Society of Internal Medicine and JCQHR, the JSS is trying to lead the Japanese medical community to create an official third-party organization for medical safety.

  7. Programs organized by the American Nuclear Society`s Public Information Committee

    SciTech Connect

    Swenson, L.; Price, J.; Kerrick, S.

    1994-12-31

    The American Nuclear Society (ANS) has consistently placed significant emphasis on the public communications role of the society. This has been translated into a significant effort in terms of providing teacher training and outreach. The importance of this effort is reflected in the formation of the Public Education Program, which has been chartered to raise funds from members and corporate sources to augment the society`s funding of the public communications program, especially as related to the educational outreach program. The ANS has a lengthy history of teacher training activities. In about 1975 it was realized that public education needed to become a significant focus of the society. This was further refined in 1980 to focus on teacher training, based on requests for assistance that were received at ANS headquarters. The teacher training program has consequently evolved as the top priority of the public communications activities.

  8. [A new identity for pharmacists: the Mexican Pharmaceutical Society at the turn of the century (1890-1919)].

    PubMed

    Martínez Solís, Sandra; Aceves Pastrana, Patricia; Morales Cosme, Alba

    2007-01-01

    The Mexican Pharmaceutical Society was founded in 1871. Pharmacists in this Society organized and supported activities to develop their profession, including the preparation of a Mexican pharmacopela, promotion of the interests of pharmacists and improvement of the profession, and the creation of a unified legal framework for its practice. This society played a central role in the institutionalization of pharmacy as a profession and in the expansion of pharmacists into new areas, especially in relation to the transfer of pharmacy training from the National School of Medicine to the School of Chemical Sciences in 1919. when they took on a new identity as chemists.

  9. Building the scholarly society infrastructure in physics in interwar America

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scheiding, Tom

    2013-11-01

    Starting in the interwar years both the quantity and quality of physics research conducted within the United States increased dramatically. To accommodate these increases there needed to be significant changes to the infrastructure within the scholarly society and particularly to the organization's ability to publish and distribute scholarly journals. Significant changes to the infrastructure in physics in the United States began with the formation of the American Institute of Physics as an umbrella organization for the major scholarly societies in American physics in 1931. The American Institute of Physics played a critical role in bringing about an expansion in the size of and breadth of coverage within scholarly journals in physics. The priority the American Institute of Physics placed on establishing a strong publication program and the creation of the American Institute of Physics itself were stimulated by extensive involvement and financial investments from the Chemical Foundation. It was journals of sufficient size and providing an appropriate level of coverage that were essential after World War II as physicists made use of increased patronage and public support to conduct even more research. The account offered here suggests that in important respects the significant government patronage that resulted from World War II accelerated changes that were already underway.

  10. 46 CFR 8.260 - Revocation of classification society recognition.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 1 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Revocation of classification society recognition. 8.260... VESSEL INSPECTION ALTERNATIVES Recognition of a Classification Society § 8.260 Revocation of classification society recognition. A recognized classification society which fails to maintain the...

  11. 46 CFR 8.330 - Termination of classification society authority.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 1 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Termination of classification society authority. 8.330... classification society authority. (a) The Coast Guard may terminate an authorization agreement with a classification society if: (1) The Commandant revokes the classification society's recognition, as specified...

  12. 46 CFR 8.220 - Recognition of a classification society.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 1 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Recognition of a classification society. 8.220 Section 8... INSPECTION ALTERNATIVES Recognition of a Classification Society § 8.220 Recognition of a classification society. (a) A classification society must be recognized by the Commandant before it may receive...

  13. 46 CFR 42.05-60 - Recognized classification society.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 2 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Recognized classification society. 42.05-60 Section 42... society. The term recognized classification society means the American Bureau of Shipping or other classification society recognized by the Commandant, as provided in 46 U.S.C. 5107, and who also may be...

  14. 46 CFR 8.330 - Termination of classification society authority.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 1 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Termination of classification society authority. 8.330... classification society authority. (a) The Coast Guard may terminate an authorization agreement with a classification society if: (1) The Commandant revokes the classification society's recognition, as specified...

  15. 46 CFR 8.220 - Recognition of a classification society.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Recognition of a classification society. 8.220 Section 8... INSPECTION ALTERNATIVES Recognition of a Classification Society § 8.220 Recognition of a classification society. (a) A classification society must be recognized by the Commandant before it may receive...

  16. 46 CFR 8.330 - Termination of classification society authority.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Termination of classification society authority. 8.330... classification society authority. (a) The Coast Guard may terminate an authorization agreement with a classification society if: (1) The Commandant revokes the classification society's recognition, as specified...

  17. 46 CFR 8.260 - Revocation of classification society recognition.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 1 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Revocation of classification society recognition. 8.260... VESSEL INSPECTION ALTERNATIVES Recognition of a Classification Society § 8.260 Revocation of classification society recognition. A recognized classification society which fails to maintain the...

  18. 46 CFR 8.260 - Revocation of classification society recognition.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 1 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Revocation of classification society recognition. 8.260... VESSEL INSPECTION ALTERNATIVES Recognition of a Classification Society § 8.260 Revocation of classification society recognition. A recognized classification society which fails to maintain the...

  19. 46 CFR 90.10-35 - Recognized classification society.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Recognized classification society. 90.10-35 Section 90... classification society. The term recognized classification society means the American Bureau of Shipping or other classification society recognized by the Commandant....

  20. 46 CFR 8.220 - Recognition of a classification society.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 1 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Recognition of a classification society. 8.220 Section 8... INSPECTION ALTERNATIVES Recognition of a Classification Society § 8.220 Recognition of a classification society. (a) A classification society must be recognized by the Commandant before it may receive...

  1. 46 CFR 90.10-35 - Recognized classification society.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Recognized classification society. 90.10-35 Section 90... classification society. The term recognized classification society means the American Bureau of Shipping or other classification society recognized by the Commandant....

  2. 46 CFR 90.10-35 - Recognized classification society.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Recognized classification society. 90.10-35 Section 90... classification society. The term recognized classification society means the American Bureau of Shipping or other classification society recognized by the Commandant....

  3. 46 CFR 42.05-60 - Recognized classification society.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 2 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Recognized classification society. 42.05-60 Section 42... society. The term recognized classification society means the American Bureau of Shipping or other classification society recognized by the Commandant, as provided in 46 U.S.C. 5107, and who also may be...

  4. 46 CFR 8.220 - Recognition of a classification society.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 1 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Recognition of a classification society. 8.220 Section 8... INSPECTION ALTERNATIVES Recognition of a Classification Society § 8.220 Recognition of a classification society. (a) A classification society must be recognized by the Commandant before it may receive...

  5. 46 CFR 8.330 - Termination of classification society authority.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 1 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Termination of classification society authority. 8.330... classification society authority. (a) The Coast Guard may terminate an authorization agreement with a classification society if: (1) The Commandant revokes the classification society's recognition, as specified...

  6. 46 CFR 90.10-35 - Recognized classification society.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Recognized classification society. 90.10-35 Section 90... classification society. The term recognized classification society means the American Bureau of Shipping or other classification society recognized by the Commandant....

  7. 46 CFR 8.260 - Revocation of classification society recognition.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 1 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Revocation of classification society recognition. 8.260... VESSEL INSPECTION ALTERNATIVES Recognition of a Classification Society § 8.260 Revocation of classification society recognition. A recognized classification society which fails to maintain the...

  8. 46 CFR 42.05-60 - Recognized classification society.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 2 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Recognized classification society. 42.05-60 Section 42... society. The term recognized classification society means the American Bureau of Shipping or other classification society recognized by the Commandant, as provided in 46 U.S.C. 5107, and who also may be...

  9. 46 CFR 90.10-35 - Recognized classification society.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Recognized classification society. 90.10-35 Section 90... classification society. The term recognized classification society means the American Bureau of Shipping or other classification society recognized by the Commandant....

  10. 46 CFR 8.220 - Recognition of a classification society.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 1 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Recognition of a classification society. 8.220 Section 8... INSPECTION ALTERNATIVES Recognition of a Classification Society § 8.220 Recognition of a classification society. (a) A classification society must be recognized by the Commandant before it may receive...

  11. 46 CFR 8.260 - Revocation of classification society recognition.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Revocation of classification society recognition. 8.260... VESSEL INSPECTION ALTERNATIVES Recognition of a Classification Society § 8.260 Revocation of classification society recognition. A recognized classification society which fails to maintain the...

  12. Is Society Capable of Learning? Beyond a Metaphysical Foundation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Su, Ya-hui

    2016-01-01

    There is an assumption that any contemporary society should become a learning society to maintain stability in the face of change. Although proponents and policymakers take for granted that a society has the ability to learn, can this idea be defended? There is a problem in determining exactly what is meant by a learning society that learns. One…

  13. 46 CFR 8.330 - Termination of classification society authority.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 1 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Termination of classification society authority. 8.330... classification society authority. (a) The Coast Guard may terminate an authorization agreement with a classification society if: (1) The Commandant revokes the classification society's recognition, as specified...

  14. 46 CFR 42.05-60 - Recognized classification society.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 2 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Recognized classification society. 42.05-60 Section 42... society. The term recognized classification society means the American Bureau of Shipping or other classification society recognized by the Commandant, as provided in 46 U.S.C. 5107, and who also may be...

  15. 46 CFR 42.05-60 - Recognized classification society.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Recognized classification society. 42.05-60 Section 42... society. The term recognized classification society means the American Bureau of Shipping or other classification society recognized by the Commandant, as provided in 46 U.S.C. 5107, and who also may be...

  16. Taxquake in Los Angeles

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Koltai, Leslie

    1978-01-01

    Outlines educational, personnel, legal, and political considerations facing the Los Angeles Community College District contingency planning committee in their efforts to develop plans to meet budgetary limitations foreseen in the passage of the Jarvis-Gann property tax limitation initiative. (TP)

  17. The Los Alamos primer

    SciTech Connect

    Serber, R.

    1992-01-01

    This book contains the 1943 lecture notes of Robert Serber. Serber was a protege of J. Robert Oppenheimer and member of the team that built the first atomic bomb - reveal what the Los Alamos scientists knew, and did not know, about the terrifying weapon they were building.

  18. Utopia, Technology, and the Evolution of Society.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lewis, Arthur O.

    1985-01-01

    Provides an overview of utopian writing and experimentation from Plato to the present, looking at the impact of technological advancement on the individual and the society and arguing that "appropriate technology" may well be an outcome of "evolution in action." (AYC)

  19. Moral Choices in Contemporary Society: Source Book.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hellman, Mary, Ed.

    One of several supplementary materials for a newspaper course on moral choices in contemporary society, this sourcebook contains program ideas and resources to help civic leaders and educators plan programs based on the course topics. There are four sections. The first section explains how the topics can be used in planning programs, identifies…

  20. Higher Education in American Society. Third Edition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Altbach, Philip G., Ed.; And Others

    This collection of 16 essays explore the effects and implications of the changing relationship between external societal influences and academic institutions in the United States. A foreword by Clark Kerr is entitled, "American Society Turns More Assertive: A New Century Approaches for Higher Education in the United States." The essays…

  1. Young People in the Information Society

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lebedeva, E. V.

    2011-01-01

    In the summer of 2007, the Laboratory for the Social Problems of the Development of the Information Society, Institute for Socioeconomic Studies of the Population, Russian Academy of Sciences, in collaboration with the Modern Academy of the Humanities, carried out a survey of the level of use of information and communication technologies (ICT) by…

  2. Measuring Religion in Global Civil Society

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bush, Evelyn L.

    2007-01-01

    This article illustrates two conceptual and methodological problems that interfere with the accurate identification and measurement of religious mobilization in global civil society. First, data used to study the organizational composition of global culture contain a selection bias that favors organizations within an elite stratum of the world…

  3. Computer Abuse: Vandalizing the Information Society.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Furnell, Steven M.; Warren, Matthew J.

    1997-01-01

    Computing and telecommunications, key to an information-based society, are increasingly targets for criminals and mischief makers. This article examines the effects of malicious computer abuse: hacking and viruses, highlights the apparent increase in incidents, and examines their effect on public perceptions of technology. Presents broad…

  4. Democracy and Education in Postsecular Society

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fischer, Shlomo; Hotam, Yotam; Wexler, Philip

    2012-01-01

    In this article, the authors attempt to show what it means to think about democracy and education "within" society, culture, and religion. They use the term religion to discuss both "religion" as a social phenomena and "religiosity" as a spiritual, aesthetic individual commitment to the transcendent, eternal, and…

  5. Man in a Changing Society--MIS.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Marklund, Inger, Ed.; Otter, Annica, Ed.

    1985-01-01

    Described is the Man in a Changing Society (MIS) project in which K-12 Swedish children use parish records to study and research local history. Church records in Sweden contain detailed information about individuals living during the 18th and 19th centuries. To make this information accessible to researchers, the Swedish church records are being…

  6. Preventing Youth Violence in a Multicultural Society

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Guerra, Nancy G., Ed.; Smith, Emilie Phillips, Ed.

    2005-01-01

    "Preventing Youth Violence in a Multicultural Society" highlights the importance of creating culturally compatible interventions to stop violence among the youngest members of diverse populations. Chapters explore how ethnicity and culture can increase or decrease risk for violence among youth depending on contextual factors such as a…

  7. Political Society and You: An Interactive Tutorial.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schick, James B. M.

    1991-01-01

    Describes the creation and use of an interactive tutorial for college students on the Declaration of Independence, called "Political Society and You." Activities that emphasize critical reading and historical interpretation are discussed, the computer software is explained, and the response form used for student feedback is described.…

  8. [On the Position of Women in Society.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lantz, Joanne B.

    This paper discusses discrimination against women in our society. Statements and sayings from all over the world which reflect historical discriminatory attitudes towards women are quoted and it is evident that such attitudes are still prevalent in contemporary times. Despite federal legislation and state laws banning sex discrimination, the need…

  9. Facing the Knowledge Society: Mexico's Public Universities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Varela-Petito, Gonzalo

    2010-01-01

    Public higher education in Mexico faces major challenges vis-a-vis its position within the modern knowledge society, sparking concern among educational authorities. In the second half of the 20th century Mexican universities ceased to be selective, elitist schools, becoming, instead, massive institutions that reflect social and intellectual…

  10. Guy Debord's "The Society of the Spectacle"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Trier, James

    2007-01-01

    This column discusses the 40th anniversary of Guy Debord's "The Society of the Spectacle" and the Situationist International group. The author juxtaposes a few brief historical snapshots with definitions of key terms and paraphrases some important ideas and events. The author also refers to selected texts and Internet sources by and about Debord…

  11. The Native American Fish & Wildlife Society.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Walsh, Patricia

    2002-01-01

    The Native American Fish & Wildlife Society helps over 200 tribes and Alaska Native villages implement best management practices, informs them about wildlife issues, provides hazardous materials training, trains game wardens, and conducts a summer practicum for Native youth on environmental issues and careers in natural resource fields.…

  12. Meaning Lag in the Information Society.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Klapp, Orrin E.

    1982-01-01

    Discusses the meaning crisis in modern society in terms of information overload. Points out reasons for meaning lag: (1) slowness of meaning formation; (2) sparseness of social networks; (3) substitution of meaning of a lower quality as a compensation for lost meaning; and (4) information becoming noiselike. (PD)

  13. Statistics and Politics in a "Knowledge Society"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Giovannini, Enrico

    2008-01-01

    The importance of information in economic and political processes is widely recognised by modern theories. This information, coupled with the advancements in Information and Communication Technologies (ICT) has changed the way in which markets and societies work. The availability of the Internet and other advanced forms of media have made…

  14. The War in Iraq: Scholarly Societies Respond

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Academic Questions, 2008

    2008-01-01

    The American Sociological Association, the Modern Language Association, the American Historical Society, the American Psychological Association, and the American Anthropological Association have taken official stands on questions pertaining to America's current military involvement in Iraq. Here are their resolutions. (Contains 2 footnotes.)

  15. Chicanas and Chicanos in Contemporary Society.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    De Anda, Roberto M., Ed.

    This anthology includes research and reviews about social issues and inequalities facing Chicanos and Chicanas and their struggle for equal participation in society. Four sections focus on demography and on economic inequality among beginning and mature workers; the Chicano family and its responses to acculturation and poverty; the Chicano…

  16. International Society for Technology in Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Knox-Quinn, Carolyn

    1992-01-01

    Provides information about the International Society for Technology in Education (ISTE), an organization dedicated to improving education throughout the world by facilitating communication among instructors, media specialists, computer coordinators, information resource managers (IRMs), and administrative users of technology. Publications and the…

  17. The German Interlinguistics Society Gesellschaft fur Interlinguistik.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    O Riain, Sean

    2003-01-01

    Describes the German interlinguistics society Gesellschaft fur Interlinguistik (GIL), which was founded to bring together interlinguistics and esperantology scholars. Highlights GIL's principal fields of activity and discusses its role in the fields of international linguistic communication, language planning, esperantolgy, and the teaching of…

  18. Transforming Curriculum for a Culturally Diverse Society.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hollins, Etta R., Ed.

    This book is primarily designed for graduate courses in curriculum development and theory, and aims to assist practitioners in facilitating the shift in public school curriculum to accommodate large-scale trends toward a more culturally diverse society. In Part 1, the ideologies and values that form the basis of school practices are examined from…

  19. Families and Schools in a Pluralistic Society.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chavkin, Nancy Feyl, Ed.

    This book provides information on the research into minority-parent involvement in education, focusing specifically on the involvement of parents who experience social and economic limitations to full participation in American society: racial and ethnic minority-group members, low-income families, poorly educated parents, and parents who do not…

  20. School Reform in a Global Society

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Segall, William E.

    2006-01-01

    School Reform in a Global Society is about how a silent, wealthy upper class in the United States waited until the end of the Twentieth Century to transform America into something it once was during the Age of the Robber Barons. Known today as neoliberals, this nostalgic elite, craving the return of the unregulated capitalism of the nineteenth…

  1. Schooling in a Post-Industrial Society.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Doll, William E., Jr.

    American social trends and the consequent developments in educational approach and philosophy from the time of the Civil War to the present day are examined. The transition from an agricultural to an industrialized society is discussed in relation to American definitions and conceptions of educational structures. The socioeconomic environment of a…

  2. Higher Education and the New Society

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Keller, George

    2008-01-01

    While he celebrated higher education as the engine of progress in every aspect of American life, George Keller also challenged academia's sacred cows and entrenched practices with provocative ideas designed to induce "creative discomfort." Completed shortly before his death in 2007, "Higher Education and the New Society" caps the career of one of…

  3. Teachers' Professional Development. Teachers in Society Series.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hughes, Phillip, Ed.

    This book is the first in a series on teachers and teaching, a result of the Australian Council for Educational Research program of research on teachers. The theme, teachers in society, has been constructed around three broad areas: the context of teaching, teacher education, and teachers' work. The book is divided into 8 chapters as follows: (l)…

  4. Academic Medicine's Changing Covenant with Society.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Colloton, John W.

    1989-01-01

    A creditable response to society's needs and expectations can be best undertaken by establishing a national agenda in academic medicine that places a high priority on health services research and the scientific analysis of the entire health care system. The expansion of the cadre of health service researchers is needed. (Author/MLW)

  5. AIP Member Societies Entering the 1980's.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Porter, Beverly Fearn

    1981-01-01

    Summarizes results of a survey conducted by the Manpower Statistics Division of the American Institute of Physics (AIP). Questions were asked of nine member societies of the AIP concerning demographic and employment data such as professional self-identification, type of employer by highest degree, primary work activity, and annual salary. (CS)

  6. Environmental Protest and Civil Society in China

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-09-01

    The leadership of the Chinese Communist Party (CCP) appears to have conceded that environmental issues are an area in which people may publicly...protested, and whether they have affected Chinese society and politics. Due to an inability to access primary sources on Chinese protests, this thesis

  7. Dreams and Realities of Rural Society.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Warner, W. Keith; England, J. Lynn

    1993-01-01

    Sketches some events in the life and career of Lowry Nelson, a rural sociologist, and relates these events to the development of rural sociology and the Rural Sociological Society. Asserts that the dream of using science to ameliorate social problems during the early development of rural sociology is still present today. (KS)

  8. The Study of Women in Ancient Society.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moscovich, M. James

    1982-01-01

    Presents ideas for teaching about the roles of women in ancient Greek and Roman societies for undergraduate history and sociology classes. The discussion covers the roots of misogyny in Western culture, parallels between mythologies and sociocultural patterns, and the legal status of women in antiquity. (AM)

  9. Program in Science, Technology, and Society.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Massachusetts Inst. of Tech., Cambridge.

    The Program in Science, Technology, and Society at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology is described. Two broad aims of the program are to explore the influence of social, political, and cultural forces on science and technology, and to examine the impact of technologies and scientific ideas on people's lives. Although based in the School of…

  10. Brussels and the Global Information Society.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Flesch, Colette

    1997-01-01

    New communication and information technology is transforming the structure and law governing information markets and the economic, social, cultural, and political patterns of societies. This article discusses the effects of information technology (telecommuting, job growth in rural areas, distance education) and the role of the European Commission…

  11. Peripherally inserted central catheters. Intravenous Nurses Society.

    PubMed

    1997-01-01

    The Intravenous Nurses Society (INS) recognizes the need for uniform terminology for peripherally inserted central catheters (PICCs) to encourage standardization for indications, care, and maintenance strategies for these devices. It also recognizes the need for recommendations regarding the choice, use, management, and discontinuation of PICCs to promote positive patient outcomes and enhance patient comfort, safety, and satisfaction.

  12. John Dewey's "School and Society" Revisited.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jackson, Philip W.

    1998-01-01

    Identifies truths and "partial truths" evident in Dewey's analysis of the relationship between social change and educational requirements expressed in "School and Society." Responds to Dewey's assertions that the educational system must be completely transformed, that democracy is in danger if the best is not sought for every…

  13. The Problem of Expertise in Knowledge Societies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Grundmann, Reiner

    2017-01-01

    This paper puts forward a theoretical framework for the analysis of expertise and experts in contemporary societies. It argues that while prevailing approaches have come to see expertise in various forms and functions, they tend to neglect the broader historical and societal context, and importantly the relational aspect of expertise. This will be…

  14. Building the future of our society

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    As the current CSSA President, it will be my great honor to serve the society and its members throughout 2016. I appreciate the vote of confidence that put me in this position and I look forward to the opportunity to help steer our organization and its resources in the coming year. Although I've wor...

  15. The School and Students in Society

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ediger, Marlow

    2008-01-01

    Students come from different socioeconomic levels in society. Thus, they do not come to school with equivalent background experiences. Students from upper and middle class socioeconomic communities do better in test results as compared to those who come from poverty homes. By viewing mandated test results, it is quite obvious that money assists in…

  16. Evolutionary Biology: Its Value to Society

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carson, Hampton L.

    1972-01-01

    Cites examples of the contribution of basic research in evolutionary biology to the solution of problems facing society (1) by dispelling myths about human origins, the nature of the individual, and the nature of race (2) by providing basic data concerning the effects of overpopulation, the production of improved sources of food, resistance of…

  17. Disability, Higher Education and the Inclusive Society

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barnes, Colin

    2007-01-01

    Much has changed over recent years with regard to disability and higher education. Until the 1990s, most British universities were virtually inaccessible to disabled students and staff. However, as society move ever further into the twenty-first century there are more disabled students in higher education, more support services for students with…

  18. Birth of the Angle Society of Europe.

    PubMed

    Jacquin, Michel

    2006-01-01

    The history of the Angle Society of Europe began in 1971 with the meeting of two men: Juan Canut from Spain and Ernst Hösl from Germany. They decided to launch the idea of an association to get ready for the emergence of a new wave of Orthodontics in Europe. The first step was the creation of a Society with small groups of fourteen Orthodontists. The very first principle to be followed was "the plaster on the table" demonstration together with presentations on clinical or general interest subjects. The First Official Meeting took place in Zurich. 32 initial members were in attendance trying to set up the requirements for the development of a high quality Society. The second meeting focused on a scientific program centered on Treatment Timing Topic and the emergence of a new set of Bylaws. The third meeting was devoted to the display of 215 treated cases presented by temporary members to be evaluated by a Scientific Committee under the presidency of Dr. Alton Moore as official representative of the USA Edward H. Angle Society of Orthodontists. The following meetings demonstrated a constant and well monitored increase of new candidates and active members motivated to reach the required excellence level.

  19. Science for Society: A Bibliography, Fifth Edition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    West, Felicia E.

    This bibliography is prepared for secondary school and college students and teachers in the natural and social sciences, for students in graduate seminars, and for lay groups interested in science-society issues. All references are annotated. There is a topic-author index, and references are coded indicating the interest group for which they might…

  20. Engineering Design for a Technological Dependent Society

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Parden, Robert J.

    1974-01-01

    Discusses a Sloan Foundation undergraduate project conducted at the University of California at Santa Clara, with emphases upon interdisciplinary design. Indicates that engineering should be seen as a broad education for a technology dependent society, rather than education leading to a specialized, dead-end career. (CC)

  1. Forum on Physics and Society Special Recognition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Post-Zwicker, Andrew

    2009-05-01

    This year we wish to use the FPS awards session to recognize those individuals who have made special contributions to issues at the interface of physics and society. Twelve years ago, Al Saperstein became the editor of Physics and Society, with Jeff Marque as the news editor. The two have been functioning as co-editors for the past five years. They have conscientiously brought us all a newsletter that informs and challenges. Thanks to the tireless efforts of these two men, the FPS ``newsletter'' is in reality a high-quality quarterly journal that is always thought-provoking and sometimes controversial. The typical issue contains a number of substantive articles, stimulating commentary and letters, informative news and interesting book reviews. The editors have had to exert considerable effort to assemble such interesting material on a range of relevant topics, often laboring with little additional help - and without benefit of a peer review system - to fill out the newsletter. With their retirement, the FPS Executive Committee wishes to express our deep appreciation to each of them for their many years of tireless service. Each year, the Forum on Physics and Society has the privilege of nominating APS members that have made outstanding contributions to the rank of Fellow. This year, we will introduce our newly elected Fellows during this Forum on Physics and Society Awards session.

  2. Course Syllabus: Science, Technology and Society.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Garner, Douglas

    1985-01-01

    Describes the aims, methods, project, and topics of a course designed so that students may explore the impact of science and technology on society. Units include: technology (pro and con); nuclear deterrence; politics and technical decisions; and computers. Includes a list of audiovisual resources (with title, source, and current cost). (DH)

  3. Alternative Educational Futures for a Knowledge Society

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Young, Michael

    2010-01-01

    This article offers a critical analysis of recent trends in educational policy with particular reference to their assumptions about the knowledge society. It examines the implications of the analysis for the issue of elitism and the promotion of greater educational equality. The article concludes by offering an alternative approach to educational…

  4. Professional Academic Societies: Stewards of the Future

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Estes, Steven G.; Germain, Jesse

    2016-01-01

    Academic disciplines are vulnerable in the 21st century to the forces Barnett called supercomplexity, and we argue that academic societies such as the National Association for Kinesiology in Higher Education are especially well positioned to prepare 21st century scholars to respond to contemporary changes in the disciplines and in institutions of…

  5. European Society for Clinical Virology - winter meeting.

    PubMed

    Westh, Henrik

    2004-02-01

    The European Society for Clinical Virology annual winter meeting mainly appeals to clinical virologists interested in human disease. Basic and clinical data were presented, highlighting a number of interesting findings. This report briefly describes options in HIV antiviral treatment, and focuses on fusion inhibitors, a new anti-HIV class of drugs. Recent improvements in experimental DNA vaccines are also presented.

  6. Alienation, Mass Society and Mass Culture.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dam, Hari N.

    This monograph examines the nature of alienation in mass society and mass culture. Conceptually based on the "Gemeinschaft-Gesellschaft" paradigm of sociologist Ferdinand Tonnies, discussion traces the concept of alienation as it appears in the philosophies of Hegel, Marx, Kierkegaard, Sartre, and others. Dwight Macdonald's "A Theory of Mass…

  7. Assessment of Capacity in an Aging Society

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moye, Jennifer; Marson, Daniel C.; Edelstein, Barry

    2013-01-01

    Over the past 40 years, the assessment and scientific study of capacity in older adults has emerged as a distinct field of clinical and research activity for psychologists. This new field reflects the convergence of several trends: the aging of American society, the growing incidence and prevalence of dementia, and the patient rights,…

  8. Flexible Learning in an Information Society

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Khan, Badrul, Ed.

    2007-01-01

    Flexible Learning in an Information Society uses a flexible learning framework to explain the best ways of creating a meaningful learning environment. This framework consists of eight factors--institutional, management, technological, pedagogical, ethical, interface design, resource support, and evaluation--and a systematic understanding of these…

  9. Knowledge to Manage the Knowledge Society

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Minati, Gianfranco

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this research is to make evident the inadequateness of concepts and language based on industrial knowledge still used in current practices by managers to cope with problems of the post-industrial societies characterised by non-linear process of emergence and acquisition of properties. The purpose is to allow management to…

  10. School & Society. Learning Content through Culture.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Trueba, Henry T., Ed.; Delgado-Gaitan, Concha, Ed.

    Over the last 30 years, educational anthropologists have been exploring the organizational structure of schools and their relationship to society in order to shed light on the complex processes of acquisition, organization, and transmission of cultural knowledge. This volume covers the need to provide a field-based, well-documented cultural…

  11. Simulations in a Science and Society Course.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Maier, Mark H.; Venanzi, Thomas

    1984-01-01

    Provides a course outline which includes simulation exercises designed as in-class activities related to science and society interactions. Simulations focus on the IQ debate, sociobiology, nuclear weapons and nulcear strategy, nuclear power and radiation, computer explosion, and cosmology. Indicates that learning improves when students take active…

  12. Teachers' Ethical Responsibilities in a Diverse Society

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Piquemal, Nathalie

    2004-01-01

    Recognizing that learning to teach cannot be separated from learning to inquire, I argue that teachers have specific relational and ethical responsibilities to their students, particularly in the context of a diverse society. Using my research experiences with Aboriginal people as examples, I propose an ethical framework based upon four underlying…

  13. Peace, The Old Order Amish, and Society.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ediger, Marlow

    Old Order Amish in modern society have retained definite customs and traditions. At the heart of their thinking is the belief that resolving conflicts peacefully within their own cultural group is a necessity. In times of conscription of young men, alternative service in governmental-approved civilian work is performed instead of military service.…

  14. Recollections and Reflections: The American Montessori Society

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gravel, Douglas

    2010-01-01

    In this article, the author shares some of his recollections around the birth of the American Montessori Society (AMS), beginning in the 1950s. He explains the way AMS evolved in its earliest days which reveals something of who its members are now and how they have been part of the 50-year journey. He adds that by recounting the past, members of…

  15. Art Works... The Artist's Role in Society

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Herberholz, Barbara

    2011-01-01

    In this article, the author discusses how the view society has taken in regard to the status and role of the artist has evolved over the centuries, and in different countries and cultures. In general, the public has sometimes lacked understanding and has not accepted some of the more avant-garde artworks, while some artists have achieved…

  16. Matrilocal residence is ancestral in Austronesian societies

    PubMed Central

    Jordan, Fiona M.; Gray, Russell D.; Greenhill, Simon J.; Mace, Ruth

    2009-01-01

    The nature of social life in human prehistory is elusive, yet knowing how kinship systems evolve is critical for understanding population history and cultural diversity. Post-marital residence rules specify sex-specific dispersal and kin association, influencing the pattern of genetic markers across populations. Cultural phylogenetics allows us to practise ‘virtual archaeology’ on these aspects of social life that leave no trace in the archaeological record. Here we show that early Austronesian societies practised matrilocal post-marital residence. Using a Markov-chain Monte Carlo comparative method implemented in a Bayesian phylogenetic framework, we estimated the type of residence at each ancestral node in a sample of Austronesian language trees spanning 135 Pacific societies. Matrilocal residence has been hypothesized for proto-Oceanic society (ca 3500 BP), but we find strong evidence that matrilocality was predominant in earlier Austronesian societies ca 5000–4500 BP, at the root of the language family and its early branches. Our results illuminate the divergent patterns of mtDNA and Y-chromosome markers seen in the Pacific. The analysis of present-day cross-cultural data in this way allows us to directly address cultural evolutionary and life-history processes in prehistory. PMID:19324748

  17. Curriculum and Civil Society in Afghanistan

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jones, Adele

    2009-01-01

    Although research has traditionally discussed the ways in which societies in conflict develop educational practices, only recently have scholars begun to examine the role of education in creating or sustaining conflict. In Afghanistan, changing regimes have had an impact on state-sanctioned curricula over the past fifty years, drastically altering…

  18. Implementing and Evaluating a Chemistry Course in Chemical Ethics and Civic Responsibility

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McClure, Craig P.; Lucius, Aaron L.

    2010-01-01

    An upper-level undergraduate course that explores ethics in chemistry and the impact of chemical innovations on society has been developed. Goals of this course were to promote student recognition of ethical considerations in chemical innovations and chemical research and demonstrate the link between the application of chemical innovations and the…

  19. Students' Chemical Information Project, October 1967 - September 1968. Final Report: Part I.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Callaghan, A.; And Others

    Since 1966 the Chemical Society Research Unit in Information Dissemination and Retrieval at the University of Nottingham has been evaluating the use of "Chemical Titles" (CT) and "Chemical-Biological Activities" (CBAC) as current awareness services. Early results of this evaluation led to the Students' Chemical Information…

  20. A Learned Society's Perspective on Publishing.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, Kunihiko; Edelson, Alan; Iversen, Leslie L; Hausmann, Laura; Schulz, Jörg B; Turner, Anthony J

    2016-10-01

    Scientific journals that are owned by a learned society, like the Journal of Neurochemistry (JNC), which is owned by the International Society for Neurochemistry (ISN), benefit the scientific community in that a large proportion of the income is returned to support the scientific mission of the Society. The income generated by the JNC enables the ISN to organize conferences as a platform for members and non-members alike to share their research, supporting researchers particularly in developing countries by travel grants and other funds, and promoting education in student schools. These direct benefits and initiatives for ISN members and non-members distinguish a society journal from pure commerce. However, the world of scholarly publishing is changing rapidly. Open access models have challenged the business model of traditional journal subscription and hence provided free access to publicly funded scientific research. In these models, the manuscript authors pay a publication cost after peer review and acceptance of the manuscript. Over the last decade, numerous new open access journals have been launched and traditional subscription journals have started to offer open access (hybrid journals). However, open access journals follow the general scheme that, of all participating parties, the publisher receives the highest financial benefit. The income is generated by researchers whose positions and research are mostly financed by taxpayers' or funders' money, and by reviewers and editors, who frequently are not reimbursed. Last but not least, the authors pay for the publication of their work after a rigorous and sometimes painful review process. JNC itself has an open access option, at a significantly reduced cost for Society members as an additional benefit. This article provides first-hand insights from two former Editors-in-Chief, Kunihiko Suzuki and Leslie Iversen, about the history of JNC's ownership and about the difficulties and battles fought along the way to

  1. The story of the Texas Pain Society: formation and function of a regional pain society.

    PubMed

    Raj, P Prithvi; Hill, C Stratton; Racz, Gabor; Heavner, James; Grabois, Martin; Neill, Lynn; Willis, William; Schade, C M; Rashbaum, Ralph; Calodney, Aaron; Burton, Allen W; Somerville, Judson

    2012-01-01

    The idea of forming a Texas Pain Society came to the Founders in 1987 due to disparity and deficiencies in the practice of pain management in the United States and, in particular, the State of Texas. The Founders considered very carefully the implication of forming such a society. They diligently mapped out the mission and goals of the Texas Pain Society in those early formative years. This report is the history of Texas Pain Society as the activities unfolded from 1989 to 2011. The reader may question why there is a need to tell such a story. We believe strongly that, with disparities of standards of practice in pain medicine and poor recognition of advances in pain management, this scenario is quite common in many states and countries. The practitioners of pain management in these regions certainly must have considered getting together and forming a consensus on the standards of practice in their communities. This historical report of the Texas Pain Society provides the relevant information necessary and the efforts to be made for a society's mission to achieve its goals and have an ongoing impact in its own region. We hope that we have shed some light on a process for the formation of a regional pain society such as ours. 

  2. Unnecessary Chemicals

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnson, Anita

    1978-01-01

    Discusses the health hazards resulting from chemical additions of many common products such as cough syrups, food dyes, and cosmetics. Steps being taken to protect consumers from these health hazards are included. (MDR)

  3. Professional dermatology societies in the USA: an overview.

    PubMed

    Al Aboud, Ahmad; Al Aboud, Khalid

    2015-11-18

    This is a concise overview in a table format for the current membership-based dermatology societies in the USA. The primary objective of these societies is to provide continuous medical education. These societies serve all health care providers in dermatology care, including physician assistants and nurses. There is a clear need for establishing more societies which focus on different aspect of dermatology. There is always a potential for improving the educational activities of these societies.

  4. Chemical sensors

    DOEpatents

    Lowell, J.R. Jr.; Edlund, D.J.; Friesen, D.T.; Rayfield, G.W.

    1992-06-09

    Sensors responsive to small changes in the concentration of chemical species are disclosed, comprising a mechanicochemically responsive polymeric film capable of expansion or contraction in response to a change in its chemical environment, either operatively coupled to a transducer capable of directly converting the expansion or contraction to a measurable electrical or optical response, or adhered to a second inert polymeric strip, or doped with a conductive material. 12 figs.

  5. Chemical sensors

    DOEpatents

    Lowell, Jr., James R.; Edlund, David J.; Friesen, Dwayne T.; Rayfield, George W.

    1992-01-01

    Sensors responsive to small changes in the concentration of chemical species are disclosed, comprising a mechanicochemically responsive polymeric film capable of expansion or contraction in response to a change in its chemical environment, either operatively coupled to a transducer capable of directly converting the expansion or contraction to a measurable electrical or optical response, or adhered to a second inert polymeric strip, or doped with a conductive material.

  6. [125 years' of the Serbian Medical Society].

    PubMed

    Sulović, V; Pavlović, B

    1998-01-01

    In the second half of the last century and under the influence of the European civilization, Serbia abandoned the conservative and patriarchal way of life and began to introduce a new, contemporary political, cultural and social spirit into the country. The development of these civilizing features was under the influence of young intelectuals who, as former scholarship holders of the Serbian government, were educated in many European countries. Among them, there was a group of physicians who returned to the country after having completed their education. They were carriers and holders of the contemporary medical science in Serbia and the neighbouring areas. On April 22, 1872 a group of 15 physicians founded the Serbian Medical Society with the intention to offer an organized medical help and care to the population. The first president was Dr. Aćim Medović and the first secretary Dr. Vladan Dordević. At the meeting held on May 15, 1872 the text of the Statute of the Society was accepted and immediately submitted for approval to the Ministry of Internal Affairs. In the letter addressed to the minister of internal affairs the following reasons were cited: "... The Belgrade physicians feeling a need for having the main office for their professional and scientific meetings, for which they will find the opportunity and the funds, and in spite of their hard medical labor which requires almost all their time, decided to establish the Serbian Medical Society because they wish to be in trend and follow-up the medical progress and exchange the latest medical information not only among them but also with other graduated doctors living in areas with the Serblan population as well as with all scientists who are willing to contribute to the development of medical science in Serbia...". In the first year of its existence the Serbian Medical Society had 9 regular members, 1 honorary member and 34 corresponding members from Serbia, Slavic and other foreign countries. On August 5

  7. Aesthetic problems in chemical peeling.

    PubMed

    Goldman, P M; Freed, M I

    1989-09-01

    Questionnaires were mailed to six physicians experienced in chemical peels regarding common problems encountered in the procedure. They are: Thomas H. Alt, M.D., Minneapolis, MN; Samuel J. Stegman, M.D., San Francisco, CA; James J. Stagnone, M.D., Albuquerque, NM; Robert Kotler, M.D., Los Angeles, CA; William H. Beeson, M.D., Indianapolis, IN; and Paul S. Collins, M.D., San Luis Obispo, CA. Their answers are presented in a panel format.

  8. Meningococcal group A lipooligosaccharides (LOS): preliminary structural studies and characterization of serotype-associated and conserved LOS epitopes.

    PubMed Central

    Kim, J J; Phillips, N J; Gibson, B W; Griffiss, J M; Yamasaki, R

    1994-01-01

    Structural studies indicate that the neisserial lipooligosaccharides (LOS) are composed of an oligosaccharide (OS) portion with a phosphorylated diheptose (Hep) core attached to the toxic lipid A moiety. A conserved meningococcal LOS epitope, defined by monoclonal antibody (MAb) D6A, is expressed on group A and many group B and C meningococci of different LOS serotypes (J. J. Kim, R. E. Mandrell, H. Zhen, M. A. Apicella, J. T. Poolman, and J. M. Griffiss, Infect. Immun. 56:2631-2638, 1988). This MAb-defined D6A epitope is immunogenic in humans (M. M. Estabrook, R. E. Mandrell, M. A. Apicella, and J. M. Griffiss, Infect. Immun. 58:2204-2213, 1990; M. M. Estabrook, C. J. Baker, and J. M. Griffiss, J. Infect. Dis. 197:966-970, 1993). In this study, we characterize this important MAb-defined LOS epitope. Serotype L10 and L11 group A meningococal LOS were chemically modified and used to investigate what portion of the LOS molecule is important for expression of the conserved (D6A) epitope and serotype-associated LOS epitopes by use of immunoblotting techniques and selected MAbs as probes. Preliminary structural characterization of the LOS was also accomplished by electrospray ionization-mass spectrometry. Our results indicate the following. (i) Antibodies that recognize the serotype-associated or conserved LOS epitopes recognize the OS portion of the LOS. (ii) The phosphorylated diheptose core region of the OS is essential for expression of the conserved D6A epitope. (iii) The lipid portion of the molecule is important for optimum expression of the LOS epitopes. (iv) The proposed compositions of the O-deacylated LOS are consistent with the presence of a phosphorylated diheptose core and are as follows: for O-deacylated L10 LOS, 3Hex (hexose), 1HexNAc (N-acetylhexosamine), 2KDO (2-keto-3-deoxy-D-manno-octulosonic acid), 2Hep (heptose), 1PEA or 2PEA (phosphoethanolamine), and O-deacylated lipid A; and for O-deacylated L11 LOS, 2Hex, 1HexNAc, 2KDO, 2Hep, 2PEA, and O

  9. Nuclear Forensics at Los Alamos National Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Podlesak, David W; Steiner, Robert E.; Burns, Carol J.; LaMont, Stephen P.; Tandon, Lav

    2012-08-09

    The overview of this presentation is: (1) Introduction to nonproliferation efforts; (2) Scope of activities at Los Alamos National Laboratory; (3) Facilities for radioanalytical work at LANL; (4) Radiochemical characterization capabilities; and (5) Bulk chemical and materials analysis capabilities. Some conclusions are: (1) Analytical chemistry measurements on plutonium and uranium matrices are critical to numerous defense and non-defense programs including safeguards accountancy verification measurements; (2) Los Alamos National Laboratory operates capable actinide analytical chemistry and material science laboratories suitable for nuclear material forensic characterization; (3) Actinide analytical chemistry uses numerous means to validate and independently verify that measurement data quality objectives are met; and (4) Numerous LANL nuclear facilities support the nuclear material handling, preparation, and analysis capabilities necessary to evaluate samples containing nearly any mass of an actinide (attogram to kilogram levels).

  10. Los Alamos Programming Models

    SciTech Connect

    Bergen, Benjamin Karl

    2016-07-07

    This is the PDF of a powerpoint presentation from a teleconference on Los Alamos programming models. It starts by listing their assumptions for the programming models and then details a hierarchical programming model at the System Level and Node Level. Then it details how to map this to their internal nomenclature. Finally, a list is given of what they are currently doing in this regard.

  11. Risk society and the distribution of bads: theorizing class in the risk society.

    PubMed

    Curran, Dean

    2013-03-01

    Ulrich Beck states in the Risk Society (1992) that the rise of the social production of risks in the risk society signals that class ceases to be of relevance; instead the hierarchical logic of class will be supplanted by the egalitarian logic of the distribution of risks. Several trenchant critiques of Beck's claim have justified the continued relevance of class to contemporary society. While these accounts have emphasized continuity, they have not attempted to chart, as this paper will, how the growing social production of risk increases the importance of class. This paper argues that it is Beck's undifferentiated, catastrophic account of risk that undergirds his rejection of class, and that by inserting an account of risk involving gradations in both damages and calculability into Beck's framework, his theory of risk society may be used to develop a critical theory of class. Such a theory can be used to reveal how wealth differentials associated with class relations actually increase in importance to individuals' life-chances in the risk society. With the growing production and distribution of bads, class inequalities gain added significance, since it will be relative wealth differentials that both enables the advantaged to minimize their risk exposure and imposes on others the necessity of facing the intensified risks of the risk society.

  12. Beyond strong and weak: rethinking postdictatorship civil societies.

    PubMed

    Riley, Dylan; Fernández, Juan J

    2014-09-01

    What is the impact of dictatorships on postdictatorial civil societies? Bottom-up theories suggest that totalitarian dictatorships destroy civil society while authoritarian ones allow for its development. Top-down theories of civil society suggest that totalitarianism can create civil societies while authoritarianism is unlikely to. This article argues that both these perspectives suffer from a one-dimensional understanding of civil society that conflates strength and autonomy. Accordingly we distinguish these two dimensions and argue that totalitarian dictatorships tend to create organizationally strong but heteronomous civil societies, while authoritarian ones tend to create relatively autonomous but organizationally weak civil societies. We then test this conceptualization by closely examining the historical connection between dictatorship and civil society development in Italy (a posttotalitarian case) and Spain (a postauthoritarian one). Our article concludes by reflecting on the implications of our argument for democratic theory, civil society theory, and theories of regime variation.

  13. Epigenetic Determinism in Science and Society

    PubMed Central

    Waggoner, Miranda R.; Uller, Tobias

    2015-01-01

    The epigenetic “revolution” in science cuts across many disciplines, and it is now one of the fastest growing research areas in biology. Increasingly, claims are made that epigenetics research represents a move away from the genetic determinism that has been prominent both in biological research and in understandings of the impact of biology on society. We discuss to what extent an epigenetic framework actually supports these claims. We show that, in contrast to the received view, epigenetics research is often couched in language as deterministic as genetics research in both science and the popular press. We engage the rapidly emerging conversation about the impact of epigenetics on public discourse and scientific practice, and we contend that the notion of epigenetic determinism – or the belief that epigenetic mechanisms determine the expression of human traits and behaviors – matters for understandings of the influence of biology and society on population health. PMID:26217167

  14. Genetic enhancement technologies and the new society.

    PubMed

    Smith, G P

    2000-01-01

    So long as procreation continues to remain a central driving force in a marital relationship, and the family the very core of progressive society, efforts will be undertaken to expand the period of fecundity and combat infertility. Genetic planning and eugenic programming are more rational and humane alternatives to population regulation than death by famine and war. Genetic enhancement technologies and the scientific research undertaken to advance them should be viewed as not only aiding (or, sometimes resolving) the tragedy of infertility in family planning, but as a tool for enhancing the health of a Nation's citizens by engineering man's genetic weaknesses out of the line of inheritance. Put simply, healthier and genetically sound individuals have a much better opportunity for pursuing and achieving the "good life" and making a significant contribution to society's greater well being.

  15. Epigenetic Determinism in Science and Society.

    PubMed

    Waggoner, Miranda R; Uller, Tobias

    2015-04-03

    The epigenetic "revolution" in science cuts across many disciplines, and it is now one of the fastest growing research areas in biology. Increasingly, claims are made that epigenetics research represents a move away from the genetic determinism that has been prominent both in biological research and in understandings of the impact of biology on society. We discuss to what extent an epigenetic framework actually supports these claims. We show that, in contrast to the received view, epigenetics research is often couched in language as deterministic as genetics research in both science and the popular press. We engage the rapidly emerging conversation about the impact of epigenetics on public discourse and scientific practice, and we contend that the notion of epigenetic determinism - or the belief that epigenetic mechanisms determine the expression of human traits and behaviors - matters for understandings of the influence of biology and society on population health.

  16. Nanotechnology, Society, and Freshman, Oh My!

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tahan, Charles; Crone, Wendy; Ellison, Karin; Leung, Ricky; Miller, Clark; Zenner, Greta

    2005-03-01

    Nanotechnology has emerged as a broad and exciting, yet ill-defined, field of scientific research and technological innovation. Important questions have arisen about the technology's potential economic, social, and environmental implications by prominent technology leaders, nanotechnology boosters, science fiction authors, policy officials, and environmental organizations. We have developed a freshman-level seminar course that offers an opportunity for students from a wide range of disciplines, including the natural and social sciences, humanities, and engineering, to learn about nanoscience and nanotechnology and to explore these questions and reflect on the broader place of technology in modern societies. The course is built around active learning methods and seeks to develop the students' critical thinking and research skills, written and verbal communication abilities, and general knowledge of nanotech. Continuous assessment is used to gain information about how effective the class discussions are and how well the overall course enhances students' understanding of the interaction between nanotechnology and society.

  17. Science, technology and the global society

    SciTech Connect

    1996-12-31

    This proceedings volume includes 20 papers presented at the forum plenary sessions. Speakers for the two-day conference included leaders in science, technology, industry, government, and the humanities from Russia, Germany, Japan, Canada, Mexico, and India, as well as the U.S. The major theme for the forum was new research approaches and new mechanisms of international cooperation required for the problems global society will face in the 21st century. Individual topics addressed include: the value of science; science and technology in society; the conquest of disease; research and development of long-term energy technologies; science in the Russian Federation; education and research issues; public-private partnerships; political issues; and science in developing countries.

  18. Materials and society -- Impacts and responsibilities

    SciTech Connect

    Westwood, A.R.C.

    1995-11-01

    The needs of today`s advanced societies have moved well beyond the requirements for food and shelter, etc., and now are focused on such concerns as international peace and domestic security, affordable health care, the swift and secure transmission of information, the conservation of resources, and a clean environment. Progress in materials science and engineering is impacting each of these concerns. This paper will present some examples of how this is occurring, and then comment on ethical dilemmas that can arise as a consequence of technological advances. The need for engineers to participate more fully in the development of public policies that help resolve such dilemmas, and so promote the benefits of advancing technology to society, will be discussed.

  19. The Impact of CLIVAR Science on Society

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goddard, L. M.

    2015-12-01

    U.S. CLIVAR has fostered coordination and leadership of climate research for over 15 years. That has led to improved observational systems, better dynamical models, climate diagnostics of variability and change, and innovative ways of focusing the efforts of the research community to tackle important challenges. This talk will overview some of the many ways in which U.S. CLIVAR research is making a difference to society through better understanding, modeling, and prediction at timescales of weeks to decades. Examples of these innovative mechanisms include Climate Process Teams, limited lifetime working groups that have taken on issues such as hurricanes, drought, and decadal variability, and a national postdoctoral program (PACE: http://vsp.ucar.edu/pace) that is building the leaders of tomorrow, who can work effectively with society to make climate science relevant to their decisions.

  20. Pave the way Towards Better Human Societies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perc, Matjaž

    In our societies, we invest a lot of resources to ensure technological progress, and to find out secrets about the deepest corners of our universe. As a result, we are experiencing technological breakthroughs at an unprecedented rate, and we invest billions into research that is as far away from everyday life as the east is from the west. While technology has the potential to improve the quality of life and the satisfaction of curiosity is rewarding, we must not fail to notice that, at the same time, many of our societies are falling apart. Inequality all over the world has become staggering, and we are seriously failing to meet the most basic needs of the majority of people that live on this planet. We have neglected adverse societal changes for far too long, and we have done very little in terms of research to understand, and more importantly, to reverse, or at least to impede, these very worrying trends...

  1. Biomedical engineering and society: policy and ethics.

    PubMed

    Flexman, J A; Lazareck, L

    2007-01-01

    Biomedical engineering impacts health care and contributes to fundamental knowledge in medicine and biology. Policy, such as through regulation and research funding, has the potential to dramatically affect biomedical engineering research and commercialization. New developments, in turn, may affect society in new ways. The intersection of biomedical engineering and society and related policy issues must be discussed between scientists and engineers, policy-makers and the public. As a student, there are many ways to become engaged in the issues surrounding science and technology policy. At the University of Washington in Seattle, the Forum on Science Ethics and Policy (FOSEP, www.fosep.org) was started by graduate students and post-doctoral fellows interested in improving the dialogue between scientists, policymakers and the public and has received support from upper-level administration. This is just one example of how students can start thinking about science policy and ethics early in their careers.

  2. Balinese women in a changing society.

    PubMed

    Suryani, Luh Ketut

    2004-01-01

    Balinese women face the dilemma of maintaining their vital role amid a rapidly changing society. In Bali, the primary female role is one of fostering balance and harmony within families. The Balinese people view women not from the vantage of career success but rather from the vantage of whether they can produce good quality children, and can work as part of a family team. Balinese men and women work together as partners. Indeed, men are not enemies; the genders help and need each other. Values underlying emancipation for women clash with traditional values, leading to frequent misunderstandings. Emancipation advocates neglect those elements necessary for complementing Balinese values. Applying educational and preventative methods, as well as therapeutic innovations to such problems, is helpful at all levels of society.

  3. Science and society: The troubled frontier

    SciTech Connect

    Drell, S.D.

    1995-12-31

    The author describes the past role of science and technology in support of the National security effort of the United States. This era is used to illustrate how society in general has come to have high and false expectations of science and technology. The acclaim for significant technology achievements have overshadowed the years of unrecognized effort required to make possible these advances. The result has been a short term view by society of the cost and benefit of basic research which has led to public pressures to reduce government investments in research facilities. Young researchers and students are expressing discouragement in research endeavors as government officials vascilate in funding decisions for advanced research facilities. Four prime candidates for serious concern are given and how these problems manifest themselves along with some ideas how to deal with them.

  4. Editorially Speaking: For High School Chemical Education: A New Agenda.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lippincott, W. T.

    1978-01-01

    Discusses the new plans for the American Chemical Society for high school chemistry teachers. Among the plans are the establishment of an office of High School Chemical Education, creation of a High School Chemistry Teachers Committee, and increasing journal articles and teaching materials in the journal. (HM)

  5. Safety Tips: The ACS Chemical Health and Safety Referral Service.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gallagher, Barbara

    1984-01-01

    Describes an American Chemical Society (ACS) service which helps individuals not familiar with the resources of safety information. The service, which provides referrals to literature, films, educational courses, or organizations that can provide answers, exists to help in complying with legislation and dealing with all aspects of chemical health…

  6. Sustainability Indicators for Chemical Processes : II. Data Needs

    EPA Science Inventory

    In order to begin repair of the environmental quality of the planet, there is a need to embrace sustainable development at many levels of the chemical industry and society. One way that the chemical industry is responding to this need is through sustainability evaluations, retrof...

  7. Role of Scientific Societies in International Collaboration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fucugauchi, J. U.

    2007-12-01

    Geophysical research increasingly requires global multidisciplinary approaches. Understanding how deeply interrelated are Earth components and processes, population growth, increased needs of mineral and energy resources, global impact of human activities, and view of our planet as an interconnected system emphasizes the need of international cooperation. International research collaboration has an immense potential and is needed for further development of Earth science research and education. The Union Session is planned to provide a forum for analysis and discussion of the status of research and education of geosciences in developing countries, international collaboration programs and new initiatives for promoting and strengthening scientific cooperation. A theme of particular relevance in the analyses and discussions is the role of scientific societies in international collaboration. Societies organize meetings, publish journals and books and promote cooperation through academic exchange activities. They may further assist communities in developing countries in providing and facilitating access to scientific literature, attendance to international meetings, short and long-term stays and student and young researcher mobility. What else can be done? This is a complex subject and scientific societies may not be seen independently from the many factors involved in research and education. Developing countries present additional challenges resulting from limited economic resources and social and political problems, while urgently requiring improved educational and research programs. Needed are in-depth analyses of infrastructure and human resources, and identification of major problems and needs. What are the major limitations and needs in research and postgraduate education in developing countries? What and how should international collaboration do? What are the roles of individuals, academic institutions, funding agencies, scientific societies? Here we attempt to

  8. Bridging current issues in science and society.

    PubMed

    Pierce, Robin L

    2013-08-01

    The challenges encountered in biotechnology research cannot be characterized solely by the scientific undertaking alone. Increasingly, scientists and policy-makers are actively seeking ways to address social responsibility in biotechnological innovation. The European Commission has taken a highly visible position on the importance of societal opinion in innovation programs. Initiatives are underway worldwide aiming to address the fundamental fact that science and technology do not exist separately from the rest of society.

  9. The Evolving Context for Science and Society

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leshner, Alan I.

    2012-01-01

    The relationship between science and the rest of society is critical both to the support it receives from the public and to the receptivity of the broader citizenry to science's explanations of the nature of the world and to its other outputs. Science's ultimate usefulness depends on a receptive public. For example, given that science and technology are imbedded in virtually every issue of modern life, either as a cause or a cure, it is critical that the relationship be strong and that the role of science is well appreciated by society, or the impacts of scientific advances will fall short of their great potential. Unfortunately, a variety of problems have been undermining the science-society relationship for over a decade. Some problems emerge from within the scientific enterprise - like scientific misconduct or conflicts of interest - and tarnish or weaken its image and credibility. Other problems and stresses come from outside the enterprise. The most obvious external pressure is that the world economic situation is undermining the financial support of both the conduct and infrastructure of science. Other examples of external pressures include conflicts between what science is revealing and political or economic expediency - e.g., global climate change - or instances where scientific advances encroach upon core human values or beliefs - e.g., scientific understanding of the origins and evolution of the universe as compared to biblical accounts of creation. Significant efforts - some dramatically non-traditional for many in the scientific community - are needed to restore balance to the science-society relationship.

  10. Nurse, legal society receive human rights award.

    PubMed

    2004-12-01

    The 2004 Canadian Awards for Action on HIV/AIDS and Human Rights have been presented to Megan Oleson, a Vancouver nurse who set up a temporary, unauthorized safe injection site (SIS) for intravenous drug users in the Downtown Eastside; and to the Pivot Legal Society (PLS), also of Vancouver. The PLS worked with Oleson to set up the temporary site while Canada's first legal SIS was still under construction.

  11. Interactions between astronomical ephemerides and society

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arlot, Jean-Eudes

    2011-06-01

    Ephemerides are regularly made by astronomers for their own uses. However, the general public is also interested, as well as official organisms, because of the interactions of ephemerides with society. Astronomers in charge of the making of calendars and keeping the time are of great importance every day. Their calculations are also required for the positioning of ships and airplanes. Some ephemerides are also requested by the general public.

  12. Structure and function in mammalian societies

    PubMed Central

    Clutton-Brock, Tim

    2009-01-01

    Traditional interpretations of the evolution of animal societies have suggested that their structure is a consequence of attempts by individuals to maximize their inclusive fitness within constraints imposed by their social and physical environments. In contrast, some recent re-interpretations have argued that many aspects of social organization should be interpreted as group-level adaptations maintained by selection operating between groups or populations. Here, I review our current understanding of the evolution of mammalian societies, focusing, in particular, on the evolution of reproductive strategies in societies where one dominant female monopolizes reproduction in each group and her offspring are reared by other group members. Recent studies of the life histories of females in these species show that dispersing females often have little chance of establishing new breeding groups and so are likely to maximize their inclusive fitness by helping related dominants to rear their offspring. As in eusocial insects, increasing group size can lead to a progressive divergence in the selection pressures operating on breeders and helpers and to increasing specialization in their behaviour and life histories. As yet, there is little need to invoke group-level adaptations in order to account for the behaviour of individuals or the structure of mammalian groups. PMID:19805430

  13. Cheating and punishment in cooperative animal societies.

    PubMed

    Riehl, Christina; Frederickson, Megan E

    2016-02-05

    Cheaters-genotypes that gain a selective advantage by taking the benefits of the social contributions of others while avoiding the costs of cooperating-are thought to pose a major threat to the evolutionary stability of cooperative societies. In order for cheaters to undermine cooperation, cheating must be an adaptive strategy: cheaters must have higher fitness than cooperators, and their behaviour must reduce the fitness of their cooperative partners. It is frequently suggested that cheating is not adaptive because cooperators have evolved mechanisms to punish these behaviours, thereby reducing the fitness of selfish individuals. However, a simpler hypothesis is that such societies arise precisely because cooperative strategies have been favoured over selfish ones-hence, behaviours that have been interpreted as 'cheating' may not actually result in increased fitness, even when they go unpunished. Here, we review the empirical evidence for cheating behaviours in animal societies, including cooperatively breeding vertebrates and social insects, and we ask whether such behaviours are primarily limited by punishment. Our review suggests that both cheating and punishment are probably rarer than often supposed. Uncooperative individuals typically have lower, not higher, fitness than cooperators; and when evidence suggests that cheating may be adaptive, it is often limited by frequency-dependent selection rather than by punishment. When apparently punitive behaviours do occur, it remains an open question whether they evolved in order to limit cheating, or whether they arose before the evolution of cooperation.

  14. Margaret Cavendish and the Royal Society

    PubMed Central

    Wilkins, Emma

    2014-01-01

    It is often claimed that Margaret Cavendish was an anti-experimentalist who was deeply hostile to the activities of the early Royal Society—particularly in relation to Robert Hooke's experiments with microscopes. Some scholars have argued that her views were odd or even childish, while others have claimed that they were shaped by her gender-based status as a scientific ‘outsider’. In this paper I examine Cavendish's views in contemporary context, arguing that her relationship with the Royal Society was more nuanced than previous accounts have suggested. This contextualized approach reveals two points: first, that Cavendish's views were not isolated or odd when compared with those of her contemporaries, and second, that the early Royal Society was less intellectually homogeneous than is sometimes thought. I also show that, although hostile to some aspects of experimentalism, Cavendish nevertheless shared many of the Royal Society's ambitions for natural philosophy, especially in relation to its usefulness and the importance of plain language as a means to disseminate new ideas. PMID:25254278

  15. Cheating and punishment in cooperative animal societies

    PubMed Central

    Riehl, Christina; Frederickson, Megan E.

    2016-01-01

    Cheaters—genotypes that gain a selective advantage by taking the benefits of the social contributions of others while avoiding the costs of cooperating—are thought to pose a major threat to the evolutionary stability of cooperative societies. In order for cheaters to undermine cooperation, cheating must be an adaptive strategy: cheaters must have higher fitness than cooperators, and their behaviour must reduce the fitness of their cooperative partners. It is frequently suggested that cheating is not adaptive because cooperators have evolved mechanisms to punish these behaviours, thereby reducing the fitness of selfish individuals. However, a simpler hypothesis is that such societies arise precisely because cooperative strategies have been favoured over selfish ones—hence, behaviours that have been interpreted as ‘cheating’ may not actually result in increased fitness, even when they go unpunished. Here, we review the empirical evidence for cheating behaviours in animal societies, including cooperatively breeding vertebrates and social insects, and we ask whether such behaviours are primarily limited by punishment. Our review suggests that both cheating and punishment are probably rarer than often supposed. Uncooperative individuals typically have lower, not higher, fitness than cooperators; and when evidence suggests that cheating may be adaptive, it is often limited by frequency-dependent selection rather than by punishment. When apparently punitive behaviours do occur, it remains an open question whether they evolved in order to limit cheating, or whether they arose before the evolution of cooperation. PMID:26729930

  16. Chemical Debridement of Burns

    PubMed Central

    Levenson, Stanley M.; Kan, Dorinne; Gruber, Charles; Crowley, Leo V.; Lent, Richard; Watford, Alvin; Seifter, Eli

    1974-01-01

    The development of effective, non-toxic (local and systemic) methods for the rapid chemical (enzymatic and non-enzymatic) debridement of third degree burns would dramatically reduce the morbidity and mortality of severely burned patients. Sepsis is still the major cause of death of patients with extensive deep burns. The removal of the devitalized tissue, without damage to unburned skin or skin only partially injured by burning, and in ways which would permit immediate (or very prompt) skin grafting, would lessen substantially the problems of sepsis, speed convalescence and the return of these individuals to society as effective human beings, and would decrease deaths. The usefulness and limitations of surgical excision for patients with extensive third degree burns are discussed. Chemical debridement lends itself to complementary use with surgical excision and has the potential advantage over surgical excision in not requiring anesthesia or a formal surgical operation. The authors' work with the chemical debridement of burns, in particular the use of Bromelain, indicates that this approach will likely achieve clinical usefulness. The experimental studies indicate that rapid controlled debridement, with minimal local and systemic toxicity, is possible, and that effective chemotherapeutic agents may be combined with the Bromelain without either interfering with the actions of the other. The authors believe that rapid (hours) debridement accomplished by the combined use of chemical debriding and chemotherapeutic agents will obviate the possibility of any increase in infection, caused by the use of chemical agents for debridement, as reported for Paraenzyme21 and Travase.39,48 It is possible that the short term use of systemic antibiotics begun just before and continued during, and for a short time after, the rapid chemical debridement may prove useful for the prevention of infection, as appears to be the case for abdominal operations of the clean-contaminated and

  17. Quest for the chemical synthesis of proteins.

    PubMed

    Engelhard, Martin

    2016-05-01

    The chemical synthesis of proteins has been the wish of chemists since the early 19th century. There were decisive methodological steps necessary to accomplish this aim. Cornerstones were the introduction of the Z-protecting group of Bergmann and Zervas, the development of Solid-phase Peptide Synthesis of Merrifield, and the establishment of Native Chemical Ligation by Kent. Chemical synthesis of proteins has now become generally applicable technique for the synthesis of proteins with tailor made properties which can be applied not only in vitro but also in vivo .Copyright © 2016 European Peptide Society and John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  18. Delicious Chemicals.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barry, Dana M.

    This paper presents an approach to chemistry and nutrition that focuses on food items that people consider delicious. Information is organized according to three categories of food chemicals that provide energy to the human body: (1) fats and oils; (2) carbohydrates; and (3) proteins. Minerals, vitamins, and additives are also discussed along with…

  19. Chemical Mahjong

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cossairt, Travis J.; Grubbs, W. Tandy

    2011-01-01

    An open-access, Web-based mnemonic game is described whereby introductory chemistry knowledge is tested using mahjong solitaire game play. Several tile sets and board layouts are included that are themed upon different chemical topics. Introductory tile sets can be selected that prompt the player to match element names to symbols and metric…

  20. Logical Positivism as a Tool to Analyse the Problem of Chemistry's Lack of Relevance in Secondary School Chemical Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Van Aalsvoort, Joke

    2004-01-01

    Secondary school chemical education has a problem: namely, the seeming irrelevance to the pupils of chemistry. Chemical education prepares pupils for participation in society. Therefore, it must imply a model of society, of chemistry, and of the relation between them. In this article it is hypothesized that logical positivism currently offers this…

  1. Environmental surveillance at Los Alamos during 1979

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1980-04-01

    This report documents the environmental surveillance program conducted by the Los Alamos Scientific Laboratory (LASL) in 1979. Routine monitoring for radiation and radioactive or chemical substances was conducted on the Laboratory site and in the surrounding region to determine compliance with appropriate standards and permit early identification of possible undesirable trends. Results and interpretation of the data for 1979 on penetrating radiation, chemical and radiochemical quality of ambient air, surface and ground water, municipal water supply, soils and sediments, food, and airborne and liquid effluents are included. Comparisons with appropriate standards and regulations or with background levels from natural or other non-LASL sources provide a basis for concluding that environmental effects attributable to LASL operations are minor and cannot be considered likely to result in any hazard to the population of the area. Results of several special studies provide documentation of some unique environmental conditions in the LASL environs.

  2. Environmental surveillance at Los Alamos during 1987

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1988-05-01

    This report describes the environmental surveillance program conducted by Los Alamos National Laboratory during 1987. Routine monitoring for radiation and radioactive or chemical materials is conducted on the Laboratory site as well as in the surrounding region. Monitoring results are used to determine compliance with appropriate standards and to permit early identification of potentially undesirable trends. Results and interpretation of data for 1987 cover: external penetrating radiation; quantities of airborne emissions and liquid effluents; concentrations of chemicals and radionuclides in ambient air, surface and ground waters, municipal water supply, soils and sediments, and foodstuffs; and environmental compliance. Comparisons with appropriate standards, regulations, and background levels provide the basis for concluding that environmental effects from Laboratory operations are insignificant and do not pose a threat to the public, Laboratory employees, or the environment. 113 refs., 33 figs., 120 tabs.

  3. Environmental surveillance at Los Alamos during 1989

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1990-12-01

    This report describes the environmental surveillance program conducted by Los Alamos National Laboratory during 1989. Routine monitoring for radiation and radioactive or chemical materials is conducted on the Laboratory site as well as in the surrounding region. Monitoring results are used to determine compliance with appropriate standards and to permit early identification of potentially undesirable trends. Results and interpretation of data for 1989 cover external penetrating radiation; quantities of airborne emissions and effluents; concentrations of chemicals and radionuclides in ambient air, surface and ground waters, municipal water supply, soils and sediments, and foodstuffs; and environmental compliance. Comparisons with appropriate standards, regulations, and background levels provide the basis for concluding that environmental effects from Laboratory operations are small and do not pose a threat to the public, Laboratory employees, or the environment. 58 refs., 31 figs., 39 tabs.

  4. Electronic Communities in an Information Society: Paradise, Mirage, or Malaise?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Komito, Lee

    2001-01-01

    Discusses communities in the information society and examines virtual communities and the relation between technology and social life. Topics include interaction; idealized community; proximate communities; normative community; virtual communities and fragmented society; and social change versus technological change. (LRW)

  5. North American Society for Pediatric and Adolescent Gynecology

    MedlinePlus

    ... removeClass('notactive'); autoPlay();}); }); About NASPAG The North American Society for Pediatric and Adolescent Gynecology (NASPAG), founded in ... Bayer/NASPAG Young Investigator Grant The North American Society for Pediatric and Adolescent Gynecology (NASPAG) has partnered ...

  6. The Society for Vascular Medicine: the first quarter century.

    PubMed

    Creager, Mark A; Hiatt, William R; Hirsch, Alan T; Olin, Jeffrey W; Jaff, Michael R; Cooke, John P; Rooke, Thom; Beckman, Joshua A; Froehlich, James B

    2015-02-01

    The Society for Vascular Medicine was founded in 1989. During the subsequent 25 years, the Society has grown to approximately 500 members and has achieved international recognition while making important contributions to vascular disease education, clinical vascular medicine and biology research, and patient care. In celebration of the Society's 25th anniversary, its past and current presidents reflect on the Society's history, challenges, and achievements, and emphasize the vital role of the SVM in the discipline of vascular medicine.

  7. A Contract Between Science and Society

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dowdeswell, Elizabeth

    2009-05-01

    Growing energy demand, global climate disruption and the prospect of a carbon-constrained world have opened the door for discussion of a potential nuclear renaissance. The fact that deployment of nuclear energy has not been fully embraced points to a number of challenges. These range from concerns about safety, security and proliferation of nuclear materials to questions of feasibiity and economics. Others cite the continuing quest for an acceptable approach to the management of long-lived wastes and uncertainty about risks to human health and the environment. Arguably public acceptance of nuclear energy will require policy makers to examine many social and ethical concerns, both real and perceived. Yet research suggests that public trust in governments and institutions is eroding while society's expectations to be involved in decision-making have become more intense and sophisticated. The recent Canadian experience of selecting an approach for the long-term management of used nuclear fuel illustrates the complexity of obtaining a ``social licence'' to proceed. A key objective was to gather and document the terms and conditions that would make such a project acceptable to society and to reflect a fundamental understanding and respect for these factors in the project's actual design and implementation. The underlying philosophy was that the analysis of scientific and technical evidence, while essential, could not be the sole determining factor. Ultimately it is society that will determine which risks it is prepared to accept. The mission of developing collaboratively with Canadians a management approach that would be socially acceptable, technically sound, environmentally responsible and economically feasible required the development of an integrated, systemic analytical framework and an interactive and transparent process of dialogue and deliberation. This investment in seeking diversity of perspectives resulted in the mergence of common ground among citizens and

  8. [The informed society--illusion or reality?].

    PubMed

    Noelle-Neumann, E

    1988-01-01

    Information about reality conveyed by electronic images leads to naiveté--"I saw it with my own eyes"--and thus to the special credibility of television. There is a lack of awareness of "a reduced perspective" (H. Imdahl), of the fact that the television camera selects images for inclusion. Selection is very much influenced by the journalists' attitudes. Since the views of the experts often diverge greatly from those of journalists on important contemporary questions and the media predominantly reflect the views of the journalists, this gives rise to the problem of a "well-informed society," which in many respects is an illusion.

  9. The Problem of Expertise in Knowledge Societies.

    PubMed

    Grundmann, Reiner

    2017-01-01

    This paper puts forward a theoretical framework for the analysis of expertise and experts in contemporary societies. It argues that while prevailing approaches have come to see expertise in various forms and functions, they tend to neglect the broader historical and societal context, and importantly the relational aspect of expertise. This will be discussed with regard to influential theoretical frameworks, such as laboratory studies, regulatory science, lay expertise, post-normal science, and honest brokers. An alternative framework of expertise is introduced, showing the limitations of existing frameworks and emphasizing one crucial element of all expertise, which is their role in guiding action.

  10. Abrupt climate change: can society cope?

    PubMed

    Hulme, Mike

    2003-09-15

    Consideration of abrupt climate change has generally been incorporated neither in analyses of climate-change impacts nor in the design of climate adaptation strategies. Yet the possibility of abrupt climate change triggered by human perturbation of the climate system is used to support the position of both those who urge stronger and earlier mitigative action than is currently being contemplated and those who argue that the unknowns in the Earth system are too large to justify such early action. This paper explores the question of abrupt climate change in terms of its potential implications for society, focusing on the UK and northwest Europe in particular. The nature of abrupt climate change and the different ways in which it has been defined and perceived are examined. Using the example of the collapse of the thermohaline circulation (THC), the suggested implications for society of abrupt climate change are reviewed; previous work has been largely speculative and has generally considered the implications only from economic and ecological perspectives. Some observations about the implications from a more social and behavioural science perspective are made. If abrupt climate change simply implies changes in the occurrence or intensity of extreme weather events, or an accelerated unidirectional change in climate, the design of adaptation to climate change can proceed within the existing paradigm, with appropriate adjustments. Limits to adaptation in some sectors or regions may be reached, and the costs of appropriate adaptive behaviour may be large, but strategy can develop on the basis of a predicted long-term unidirectional change in climate. It would be more challenging, however, if abrupt climate change implied a directional change in climate, as, for example, may well occur in northwest Europe following a collapse of the THC. There are two fundamental problems for society associated with such an outcome: first, the future changes in climate currently being

  11. Armenian Astronomical Society Annual Activities in 2014

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mickaelian, A. M.

    2015-07-01

    A report is given on the achievements of the Armenian astronomy during the last year and on the present activities of the Armenian Astronomical Society (ArAS). ArAS membership, ArAS electronic newsletters (ArASNews), ArAS webpage, annual meetings, Annual Prize for Young Astronomers (Yervant Terzian Prize) and other awards, international relations, presence in international organizations, summer schools, astronomical Olympiads and other events, matters related to astronomical education, astronomical heritage, astronomy outreach and ArAS further projects are discussed. The present meeting, BAO Science Camp, ArAS School lectures are among 2014 events as well.

  12. Armenian Astronomical Society (ArAS) activities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mickaelian, A. M.

    2016-09-01

    A review on the activities and achievements of Armenian Astronomical Society (ArAS) and Armenian astronomy in general during the last years is given. ArAS membership, ArAS electronic newsletters (ArASNews), ArAS webpage, Annual Meetings, Annual Prize for Young Astronomers (Yervant Terzian Prize) and other awards, international relations, presence in international organizations, local and international summer schools, science camps, astronomical Olympiads and other events, matters related to astronomical education, astronomical heritage, amateur astronomy, astronomy outreach and ArAS further projects are described and discussed.

  13. The Biocurator Society (GSC8 Meeting)

    ScienceCinema

    Gaudet, Pascal [Northwestern University

    2016-07-12

    The Genomic Standards Consortium was formed in September 2005. It is an international, open-membership working body which promotes standardization in the description of genomes and the exchange and integration of genomic data. The 2009 meeting was an activity of a five-year funding "Research Coordination Network" from the National Science Foundation and was organized held at the DOE Joint Genome Institute with organizational support provided by the JGI and by the University of California - San Diego. Pascal Gaudet of Northwestern University talks about "The Biocurator Society" at the Genomic Standards Consortium's 8th meeting at the DOE JGI in Walnut Creek, Calif. on Sept. 11, 2009

  14. Science and society in the years ahead

    SciTech Connect

    Press, F.

    1995-12-31

    The panel presentation provides the historical overview of American science and technology, industrial development and productivity and government policies for research and development. The panel addresses the transition from these historical aspects. Economic pressures are reducing investments in research and development while national and global pressure is increasing to deal with environmental issues, population growth, standards of living and health needs. The panel represented several sectors of American society that deal with science and technology: scientists and engineers who work in research and development, administrators and government policy makers. Questions raised by participants were addressed by panel members.

  15. Predicting recidivism in a communitarian society: China.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jianhong

    2005-08-01

    Research on the prediction of recidivism has largely been an enterprise of Western criminology. Therefore, the identification and selection of predictors has tended to follow the individualistic traditions of the West. Important advances in models and methods have not been extended to non-Western societies such as China. This article explores the implications of communitarian features of Chinese urban communities for prediction of recidivism. The article applies the perspective of social capital to the specification of predictors. Available community social-capital measures are included in the prediction model to capture the effects of communitarian cultural features. The results indicate that social capital variables generally have significant effects.

  16. Mediterranean Holocene climate, environment and human societies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holmgren, Karin; Gogou, Alexandra.; Izdebski, Adam.; Luterbacher, Juerg.; Sicre, Marie-Alexandrine; Xoplaki, Elena

    2016-03-01

    This paper introduces the reader to a special issue of articles that explores links and processes behind societal change, climate change and environmental change in a Holocene perspective in the Mediterranean region. All papers are, by purpose, co-authored by scientists representing different disciplines. The cross-cutting theme has been to reach beyond simple explanations of potential climate-society relationships and advance our understanding on how to improve research methods and theories in the field. The thirteen papers in this issue address these questions in three different ways, by i) conceptual/methodological approaches; ii) review papers; and iii) case studies.

  17. [A society for humans and animals].

    PubMed

    Porcher, Jocelyne

    2013-01-01

    In industrial societies, living with animals can no longer be taken for granted. The long-standing tradition of living with animals has been radically questioned by biotechnological developments in animal farming and by animal liberation theories. The goal seems to be to exclude domestic animals from our food chain and return them to the wild, a paradoxical development as, at the same time, there is a tendency to domesticate wild animals. The paradox may be explained by coming back to the issue of work: living with animals means that humans and animals not only live together but also work together, thus giving work a role to play in their mutual emancipation.

  18. [Ethics code of the Chilean Biological Society].

    PubMed

    de Etica, C; Valenzuela, C; Cruz-Coke, R; Ureta, T; Bull, R

    1997-01-01

    The Chilean Biological Society has approved an ethics code for researchers, elaborated by its Ethic Committee. The text, with 16 articles, undertakes the main ethical problems that researchers must solve, such as institutional, professional or societal ethics, scientific fraud, breaches in collaborative work, relationships between researchers, participation in juries and committees, ethical breaches in scientific publications, scientific responsibility and punishments. This code declares its respect and valorization of all life forms and adheres to international biomedical ethical codes. It declares that all knowledge, created or obtained by researchers is mankind's heritage.

  19. The Impact of Corrosion on Society

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hansson, C. M.

    2011-10-01

    Almost all metals and alloys are unstable in the Earth's atmosphere and will always be susceptible to corrosion. The basic principles of corrosion are briefly described in order to explain the observations of corrosion, which render our personal items as well as industrial machinery and public property dysfunctional, aesthetically displeasing, and potentially dangerous. This is followed by a discussion, with case study examples, of three aspects of the impact of corrosion on society: (1) direct effects resulting in injury or death, (2) contamination of the environment, and (3) the financial costs.

  20. Chemical warfare

    PubMed Central

    Samuels, Richard Ian; Mattoso, Thalles Cardoso; Moreira, Denise D.O.

    2013-01-01

    Leaf-cutting ants are well known for their highly complex social organization, which provides them with a strong defense against parasites invading their colonies. Besides this attribute, these insects have morphological, physiological and structural characteristics further reinforcing the defense of their colonies. With the discovery of symbiotic bacteria present on the integument of leaf-cutting ants, a new line of defense was proposed and considered to be specific for the control of a specialized fungal parasite of the ants’ fungus gardens (Escovopsis). However, recent studies have questioned the specificity of the integumental bacteria, as they were also found to inhibit a range of fungi, including entomopathogens. The microbiota associated with the leaf-cutting ant gardens has also been proposed as another level of chemical defense, protecting the garden from parasite invasion. Here we review the chemical defense weaponry deployed by leaf-cutting ants against parasites of their fungus gardens and of the ants themselves. PMID:23795235

  1. Strategy for Engaging the Society for Neuroscience in Science Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cameron, William E.; McNerney, Colleen D.

    2006-01-01

    The Society for Neuroscience (SfN) has more than 37,000 members and constitutes one of the largest single-theme scientific societies in the United States. Although many of its members are engaged in various activities that support their local science education programs, historically the society has not played a major role in shaping the national…

  2. The Age of Learning: Education and the Knowledge Society.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jarvis, Peter, Ed.

    This book's 18 chapters provide a multi-disciplinary analysis of lifelong learning and the learning society by doing the following: (1) examining the way that these phenomena have emerged; (2) analyzing the concepts; (3) discussing ways in which the learning society functions; (4) assessing the implications of the learning society for other…

  3. Digital Literacy: Tools and Methodologies for Information Society

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rivoltella, Pier Cesare, Ed.

    2008-01-01

    Currently in a state of cultural transition, global society is moving from a literary society to digital one, adopting widespread use of advanced technologies such as the Internet and mobile devices. Digital media has an extraordinary impact on society's formative processes, forcing a pragmatic shift in their management and organization. This…

  4. Environmental Design for a Structured Network Learning Society

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chang, Ben; Cheng, Nien-Heng; Deng, Yi-Chan; Chan, Tak-Wai

    2007-01-01

    Social interactions profoundly impact the learning processes of learners in traditional societies. The rapid rise of the Internet using population has been the establishment of numerous different styles of network communities. Network societies form when more Internet communities are established, but the basic form of a network society, especially…

  5. Possibilities for an Inclusive Society in Singapore: Becoming Inclusive within

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lim, Levan

    2009-01-01

    The envisioning of Singapore as an inclusive society has witnessed the most progressive systemic and policy developments concerning people with disabilities in recent years. The building of "heartware" in society (as in the will, values, and attitudes of its citizens) in order to realize the vision of an inclusive society, however,…

  6. 46 CFR 8.450 - Termination of classification society authority.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 1 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Termination of classification society authority. 8.450... VESSEL INSPECTION ALTERNATIVES Alternate Compliance Program § 8.450 Termination of classification society authority. (a) The Coast Guard may terminate an authorization agreement with a classification society...

  7. 46 CFR 8.450 - Termination of classification society authority.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 1 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Termination of classification society authority. 8.450... VESSEL INSPECTION ALTERNATIVES Alternate Compliance Program § 8.450 Termination of classification society authority. (a) The Coast Guard may terminate an authorization agreement with a classification society...

  8. 46 CFR 108.109 - Classification society standards.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Classification society standards. 108.109 Section 108... DESIGN AND EQUIPMENT General § 108.109 Classification society standards. (a) Any person who desires to use the rules of a classification society, other than the American Bureau of Shipping, to...

  9. Literature, Society and the Writer in Tripartite Unity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Anaso, George Nworah; Nwabudike, Christopher Eziafa

    2014-01-01

    The proactive unity of purpose between Literature, society and the writer is the main focus of this paper. Writers use Literature to address various important themes or the goings on in the society, with the purpose of edifying its virtues and condemning the vices so as to adulate the good deeds or correct the society where it goes wrong. However,…

  10. 33 CFR 157.04 - Authorization of classification societies.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... societies. 157.04 Section 157.04 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND... CARRYING OIL IN BULK General § 157.04 Authorization of classification societies. (a) The Coast Guard may authorize any classification society (CS) to perform certain plan reviews, certifications, and...

  11. 46 CFR 108.109 - Classification society standards.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Classification society standards. 108.109 Section 108... DESIGN AND EQUIPMENT General § 108.109 Classification society standards. (a) Any person who desires to use the rules of a classification society, other than the American Bureau of Shipping, to...

  12. 33 CFR 157.04 - Authorization of classification societies.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... societies. 157.04 Section 157.04 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND... CARRYING OIL IN BULK General § 157.04 Authorization of classification societies. (a) The Coast Guard may authorize any classification society (CS) to perform certain plan reviews, certifications, and...

  13. 46 CFR 8.450 - Termination of classification society authority.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 1 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Termination of classification society authority. 8.450... VESSEL INSPECTION ALTERNATIVES Alternate Compliance Program § 8.450 Termination of classification society authority. (a) The Coast Guard may terminate an authorization agreement with a classification society...

  14. 33 CFR 157.04 - Authorization of classification societies.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... societies. 157.04 Section 157.04 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND... CARRYING OIL IN BULK General § 157.04 Authorization of classification societies. (a) The Coast Guard may authorize any classification society (CS) to perform certain plan reviews, certifications, and...

  15. 46 CFR 108.109 - Classification society standards.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Classification society standards. 108.109 Section 108... DESIGN AND EQUIPMENT General § 108.109 Classification society standards. (a) Any person who desires to use the rules of a classification society, other than the American Bureau of Shipping, to...

  16. 46 CFR 127.200 - Classification society standards.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Classification society standards. 127.200 Section 127... CONSTRUCTION AND ARRANGEMENTS Particular Construction and Arrangements § 127.200 Classification society... requirements contained elsewhere in this subchapter, be classed by a classification society recognized...

  17. 46 CFR 8.450 - Termination of classification society authority.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Termination of classification society authority. 8.450... VESSEL INSPECTION ALTERNATIVES Alternate Compliance Program § 8.450 Termination of classification society authority. (a) The Coast Guard may terminate an authorization agreement with a classification society...

  18. 46 CFR 8.450 - Termination of classification society authority.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 1 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Termination of classification society authority. 8.450... VESSEL INSPECTION ALTERNATIVES Alternate Compliance Program § 8.450 Termination of classification society authority. (a) The Coast Guard may terminate an authorization agreement with a classification society...

  19. 46 CFR 108.109 - Classification society standards.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Classification society standards. 108.109 Section 108... DESIGN AND EQUIPMENT General § 108.109 Classification society standards. (a) Any person who desires to use the rules of a classification society, other than the American Bureau of Shipping, to...

  20. 33 CFR 157.04 - Authorization of classification societies.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... societies. 157.04 Section 157.04 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND... CARRYING OIL IN BULK General § 157.04 Authorization of classification societies. (a) The Coast Guard may authorize any classification society (CS) to perform certain plan reviews, certifications, and...

  1. 33 CFR 157.04 - Authorization of classification societies.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... societies. 157.04 Section 157.04 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND... CARRYING OIL IN BULK General § 157.04 Authorization of classification societies. (a) The Coast Guard may authorize any classification society (CS) to perform certain plan reviews, certifications, and...

  2. 46 CFR 108.109 - Classification society standards.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Classification society standards. 108.109 Section 108... DESIGN AND EQUIPMENT General § 108.109 Classification society standards. (a) Any person who desires to use the rules of a classification society, other than the American Bureau of Shipping, to...

  3. Bulk processing of radionuclide generator parents at the Los Alamos Hot Cell Facility

    SciTech Connect

    Fassbender, M. E.; Nortier, F. M.; Phillips, Dennis R.; Peterson, E. J.

    2004-01-01

    Bulk radionuclide processing at Los Alamos includes isotopes with short-lived radioactive daughter nuclides ('generator parents') for medical applications. The generator radionuclide parents {sup 68}Ge, {sup 82}Sr, {sup 88}Zr and {sup 109}Cd are regularly processed at the Los Alamos Hot Cell Facility. Nuclear chemical aspects related to the production and processing of these generator parents are briefly outlined.

  4. Society of Quality Assurance demographic and salary survey.

    PubMed

    Brodish, D; Bandoli, M; Smith, R

    1997-01-01

    A demographic and salary survey of the Society of Quality Assurance (SQA) was completed in early 1995. This survey was undertaken by the SQA Board of Publications and is the second to be commissioned by the Society. The SQA survey addressed demographic information, employer information, job description, and salary data. A total fo 399 responses were received--60% from women and 40% from men. The median age of respondents was between 36 and 40 years. Most respondents had at least a bachelor's degree and major fields of training were in the areas of biology and chemistry; however, nearly half responding listed other fields of expertise. Approximately 99% of respondents had at least some Good Laboratory Practices (GLP) experience; however, most had little or no Good Clinical Practice (GCP) or current Good Manufacturing Practice (cGMP) experience. A majority of respondents listed pharmaceuticals, contract research, industry, or chemicals/pesticides/petroleum as best describing their facility. Forty-one percent of respondents were auditors or inspectors (approximately half of all respondents did not supervise others) and 34% were managers or directors. Quality assurance (QA) responsibilities included performing inspections/audits, QA program development, reporting to upper management, and hosting outside auditors. Other activities, such as computer validation, budget management, and archive maintenance, were less frequent. Overall, annual salaries were approximately $20,000 or less (3.6%); $20-30,000 (9.8%); $30-40,000 (20.8%); $40-50,000 (22.6%); $50-60,000 (17.3%); $60-70,000 (10.5%); $70-80,000 (6.9%); and $80,000 or more (8.5%). The median annual salary for the survey was $45-50,000 per year. Salaries increased with education and years of experience. For example, annual salaries ranged from $25-30,000 for 2-5 years of experience to $50-60,000 for > 20 years of experience. Median annual salaries were substantially higher for pharmaceutical and chemical

  5. Dispelling superstitions in Nepalese society with astronomy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shah, Rishi

    2011-06-01

    Throughout human history, astronomy has played crucial rôle in the development of our civilization, culture and daily chores of lives that have been influenced by observations of Sun, moon, planets, stars and other cosmic entities. Our ancestors who were hunting and gathering and foraging food while living in caves learned to think logically by gazing at the twinkling stars in the heavens. Seasons for crops plantation were determined, time concept was introduced, entire sky was charted and the motions of celestial objects were meaningfully understood. With the advent of telescopes, the geocentric model of universe was replaced by the revolutionary heliocentric concept of our Solar System. Astronomy dispelled superstitious beliefs strongly prevailing in societies. Closely associated with numerous disciplines of science astronomy is still flourishing worldwide and is attempting to fly us away to those habitable cosmic bodies of our universe. By establishing well-equipped observational infrastructure local and international astronomy research and development could be enhanced. Introduction of astronomy in education system right from school would attract and encourage students to pursue higher studies for enabling them for participating in future international scientific and exploration programmes. Astronomy has helped our society to progress peacefully and efficiently.

  6. Space, ethics and society. A CMES study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arnould, Jacques

    2001-03-01

    Ethical issues have for long been limited to the fields of medicine and biotechnology, whereas to-day such matters encompass a growing number of engineering activities. 21 st century citizens are more equiring about technoscientific claims and accomplishments. Has their impact on society and the ecological environment been measured and quantified? With all this accumulated knowledge and progress do they have the ability and means to resolve these self-created difficulties? Or will a totally new approach have to be sought? The debates include space activity not only because of the public funding needed but also because of the possible consequences on humans as well as the terrestrial, orbital or outer environment. Since the fall of 1998, CNES has undertaken the study of the role played by space activities in to-day's society and that of the future, seeking to clarify the objectives of the former with the expectations of the latter, and how they converge. The purpose of this study is to determine precisely the ethical responsibility of the space agencies and to pursue more sociological and philosophical research on the ethical scope of space activities.

  7. Indian family systems, collectivistic society and psychotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Chadda, Rakesh K.; Deb, Koushik Sinha

    2013-01-01

    Indian society is collectivistic and promotes social cohesion and interdependence. The traditional Indian joint family, which follows the same principles of collectivism, has proved itself to be an excellent resource for the care of the mentally ill. However, the society is changing with one of the most significant alterations being the disintegration of the joint family and the rise of nuclear and extended family system. Although even in today's changed scenario, the family forms a resource for mental health that the country cannot neglect, yet utilization of family in management of mental disorders is minimal. Family focused psychotherapeutic interventions might be the right tool for greater involvement of families in management of their mentally ill and it may pave the path for a deeper community focused treatment in mental disorders. This paper elaborates the features of Indian family systems in the light of the Asian collectivistic culture that are pertinent in psychotherapy. Authors evaluate the scope and effectiveness of family focused psychotherapy for mental disorders in India, and debate the issues and concerns faced in the practice of family therapy in India. PMID:23858272

  8. Inducing Systems Thinking in Consumer Societies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Minati, Gianfranco; Magliocca, Larry A.

    We introduce some core principles related to systems thinking: interaction, establishment of systems through organization and self-organization (emergence), and the constructivist role of the observer including the use of language. It is not effective to deal with systemic properties in a non-systemic way, by adopting a reductionist way of thinking, i.e., when properties acquired by systems are considered as properties possessed by objects. We consider the reduced language adopted in consumer societies as functional to maintain consumerist attitude. In consumer societies, language is suitable for maintaining people in the role of consumers with a limited ability to design and create. In this context freedom is intended as freedom of choice. To counteract this reduced language, we propose the diffusion of suitable games, cartoons, comics and pictures, images, concepts and words which can enrich everyday language, especially that of young people, and provide an effective way for inducing some elementary aspects of systems thinking in everyday life. The purpose is to have a language to design and develop things and not merely to select from what is already available. We list a number of proposals for the design of such games, stories and pictures.

  9. The Conserver Society: Prospects For A Healthier Future

    PubMed Central

    Hancock, Trevor G.

    1980-01-01

    We live in an era of great change, and it is inevitable that the family physician will be caught up in this process. Many alternative futures are open to us; of these, the conserver society is perhaps the most attractive. Having briefly examined some of the major alternative futures for our society, and for medicine within that society, this paper defines the conserver society and describes some of its major health implications. The family physician needs to support and encourage the development of such a society for the sake of health, and should be prepared to accept new roles in community development. PMID:21293624

  10. Los Alamos National Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Dogliani, Harold O

    2011-01-19

    The purpose of the briefing is to describe general laboratory technical capabilities to be used for various groups such as military cadets or university faculty/students and post docs to recruit into a variety of Los Alamos programs. Discussed are: (1) development and application of high leverage science to enable effeictive, predictable and reliability outcomes; (2) deter, detect, characterize, reverse and prevent the proliferation of weapons of mass destruction and their use by adversaries and terrorists; (3) modeling and simulation to define complex processes, predict outcomes, and develop effective prevention, response, and remediation strategies; (4) energetic materials and hydrodynamic testing to develop materials for precise delivery of focused energy; (5) materials cience focused on fundamental understanding of materials behaviors, their quantum-molecular properties, and their dynamic responses, and (6) bio-science to rapidly detect and characterize pathogens, to develop vaccines and prophylactic remedies, and to develop attribution forensics.

  11. Society 3.0: How Technology Is Reshaping Education, Work and Society

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wilen-Daugenti, Tracey

    2012-01-01

    Higher education in the U.S. has traditionally prepared students for work and social success, but with families, work, and society itself undergoing revolutionary change, is this preparation sufficient to develop the 21st-century workforce? This book explores how evolving family structures, new ways of balancing work and personal lives, and rapid…

  12. Science-Technology-Society or Technology-Society-Science? Insights from an Ancient Technology

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lee, Yeung Chung

    2010-01-01

    Current approaches to science-technology-society (STS) education focus primarily on the controversial socio-scientific issues that arise from the application of science in modern technology. This paper argues for an interdisciplinary approach to STS education that embraces science, technology, history, and social and cultural studies. By employing…

  13. Pittsburgh Science Technology Society Project: Instruction Modules. Interrelationships Science--Technology--Society.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    O'Brien, George, Ed.

    This collection of instruction modules studies the interactions of science, technology, and society (STS) using five activity sets. The introduction module includes activities which show students the STS relationships in their world, develop good organizational skills, develop an understanding of who and what a scientist is, develop graphing…

  14. Safety in the Chemical Laboratory: Safety Concerns at the Local Laboratory.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Berry, Keith O.

    1989-01-01

    Discusses the presentations of chemical demonstrations, hands-on experiments, and magic shows. Presents 12 guidelines to follow when presenting chemical demonstrations. Points out the obligations of the presenters for the safety concerns of the general public. Notes information available from the American Chemical Society. (MVL)

  15. Safety in the Chemical Laboratory: Safety Appendix to the 1983 CPT Guidelines.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Renfrew, Malcolm M., Ed.

    1984-01-01

    Presents an appendix to the Committee on Professional Training (CPT) of the Division of Chemical Health and Safety of the American Chemical Society. The information is applicable to chemical health and safety policies and practices within the chemistry department of an academic institution. Includes lists of references with safety information. (JN)

  16. The contribution of the Estonian Soil Sciences Society to the science, society and education

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rossner, Helis; Reintam, Endla; Astover, Alar; Shanskiy, Merrit

    2015-04-01

    Predecessor of todays Estonian Soil Science Society was Estonian Branch of All-Union Soil Society of Soil Scientist which acted from 1957 to 1991. In 1957-1964 Estonian Branch was leaded by prof. Osvald Hallik and in 1964-1991 by prof. Loit Reintam. After re-independence of Estonia in 1991 the society acted in informal way and was leaded by prof. L. Reintam. Non-profit organization "Estonian Soil Science Society" was officially (re)established in 10.23.2009. Estonian Soil Science Society (ESSS) is aimed to: • coordinate collaboration between institutions and individuals intrested of soil science, conservation and sustainable use of soils; • promoting soil science education and research, raising awareness of publicity on topics relating to soils in Estonia; • cooperation between local and foreign unions and associations. In recent years the ESSS had managed to reunite the number of soil scientist from different research institutions of Estonia and of related institutions. Also, the ESSS had provided numerous of materials based on later scientific findings. One of most important activity leaded by ESSS is the organizing Soil Day in Estonia with relevant seminar, where the speakers are sharing latest information with target group (researchers, teachers, policy makers, farmers, students etc.). In a frames of Soil Day the Soil of the Year is selected for Estonia. In 2015, the soil of the year is Leptosol. For current, International Year of the Soil ESSS had planned numerous activities to introduce the importance of soils to wider audience. In current presentation we would like to share the soil science researchers experience through- out the decades of soil science research in Estonia, show our latest findings and designed activities for the International Year of SOIL.

  17. Informing future societies about nuclear waste repositories

    SciTech Connect

    Jensen, M.

    1994-04-01

    In 1990 a working group of the NKS (the Nordic nuclear safety program) was formed and give the task of established a basis for a common Nordic view of the need for information conservation for nuclear waste repositories. The Group investigated what tipy of information should be conserved; in what form the information should be kept; the quality of the information; and the problems of future retrieval of information, including retrieval after very long periods of time. Topics covered include the following: scientific aspects including social context of scientific solutions; information management; systems for conservation and retrieval of information including the problems of prediction; archives, markers, archives vs. markers, and continuing processes in society; Archive media including paper documents, microfilm, digital media, media lifetimes; and finally conclusions and recommendations.

  18. Scientific citizenship in a democratic society.

    PubMed

    Arnason, Vilhjálmur

    2013-11-01

    Using the example of the sociological analysis of biological citizenship and literacy, it is argued that a merely descriptive analysis of these phenomena does not capture their distinctive normative features. While such a description realistically demonstrates how citizens respond to and are shaped by biotechnology and biomedical discourse, it provides no critique of the forces moulding the citizen-consumer. Ideas of active citizenship fuel the search for forms of public engagement in the spirit of deliberative democracy. While these attempts are guided by an important vision of policy making in democratic society, they are beset with several practical difficulties. It is argued that the discussion of deliberative practices has focused too much on direct participation of citizens in various dialogical events and its impact on policy and decision making. This approach ignores other important aspects of deliberative democratic theory, emphasizing public accountability and trustworthiness of democratic institutions.

  19. Science with society in the anthropocene.

    PubMed

    Seidl, Roman; Brand, Fridolin Simon; Stauffacher, Michael; Krütli, Pius; Le, Quang Bao; Spörri, Andy; Meylan, Grégoire; Moser, Corinne; González, Monica Berger; Scholz, Roland Werner

    2013-02-01

    Interdisciplinary scientific knowledge is necessary but not sufficient when it comes to addressing sustainable transformations, as science increasingly has to deal with normative and value-related issues. A systems perspective on coupled human-environmental systems (HES) helps to address the inherent complexities. Additionally, a thorough interaction between science and society (i.e., transdisciplinarity = TD) is necessary, as sustainable transitions are sometimes contested and can cause conflicts. In order to navigate complexities regarding the delicate interaction of scientific research with societal decisions these processes must proceed in a structured and functional way. We thus propose HES-based TD processes to provide a basis for reorganizing science in coming decades.

  20. Suicide in a society in transition.

    PubMed

    Leineweber, M; Bjerregaard, P; Baerveldt, C; Voestermans, P

    2001-04-01

    In Greenland, the rapid socio-cultural change of the last 50 years has been paralleled by an increasing number of suicides. The suicide rates in Greenland are now among the highest in the world. Especially among men aged 15-24 suicide rates are dramatically high. In the present study, information on the psycho-social background of suicides is provided based on a review of death certificates and police reports for the period 1993-95. Dysfunctional social networks seem to play a predominant role among suicides. Being disconnected from community and family ties seems to increase the vulnerability of young people in Greenland. In addition, temporal trends of suicide rates are described for the different regions of Greenland. The findings are discussed in relation to the societal and cultural transition of the society.

  1. The Health Physics Society Science Teacher Workshops

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Evans, Albert E.

    2001-03-01

    The South Texas Chapter of the Health Physics Society (STC) maintains a program of education for science teachers, grades 4-12. This program, originally funded by the U.S. Department of Energy but now supported by STC, is intended to teach fundamentals of radiation and radiation safety at a level suitable for comprehension by lay persons. Course topics include Fundamentals of Radiation, Cellular Biology and Radiation Health Effects, Exposure to Radiation in Modern Life, Radioactive Waste, and Radiation Safety. The 8-hour course is usually given on Saturdays at locations in Texas as requested by educational or other groups. Classes of up to 25 teacher-students are ideal. Lesson plans, reference materials, a video tape, software, and a radiation detector are provided to each participant. To schedule a workshop in your area, contact alevans@swbell.net or David Fogle, david.fogle@tdh.state.tx.us.

  2. APS Activities with Other Professional Societies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Slakey, Francis

    2006-03-01

    In 1981, the APS Council issued a statement that opposed ``equal time'' presentation in public school science classes of creationism and evolution. The statement clarified that ``Scientific inquiry and religious beliefs are two distinct elements of the human experience. Attempts to present them in the same context can only lead to misunderstandings of both.'' The APS Council revisited the issue in 1999 when a school board in Kansas attempted to eliminate the Big Bang, among other issues, from the science curriculum. Since that time, the APS has been more directly involved in confronting efforts that would dilute the teaching of science in public school science classes. This talk will review the APS activities and describe a developing multi-science society activity.

  3. [ANOREXIA AND BULIMIA: IMPACT ON NETWORK SOCIETY].

    PubMed

    Alex Sánchez, María Dolores

    2015-01-01

    The Information and Communication Technologies (ICT) have an increasing influence on the way we relate and in shaping personal identity. The phenomenon of online social networking emerges strongly and contributes to the development of new spaces breaking with the official discourse that marks the scientific evidence on health. This paper analyzes the impact of ICT in relation to the identity of the digital natives and eating disorders (ED). Particular attention to how the network society determines the response of young people in situations of social tension is dedicated. To do this, provides a perspective on the concept of interaction from the analysis of the discourse on anorexia and bulimia in the network, and how to care nurses should consider these factors to improve efficiency and quality in clinical care and patient care.

  4. Detecting affiliation in colaughter across 24 societies

    PubMed Central

    Bryant, Gregory A.; Fessler, Daniel M. T.; Clint, Edward; Aarøe, Lene; Apicella, Coren L.; Petersen, Michael Bang; Bickham, Shaneikiah T.; Bolyanatz, Alexander; Chavez, Brenda; De Smet, Delphine; Díaz, Cinthya; Fančovičová, Jana; Fux, Michal; Giraldo-Perez, Paulina; Hu, Anning; Kamble, Shanmukh V.; Kameda, Tatsuya; Li, Norman P.; Luberti, Francesca R.; Prokop, Pavol; Quintelier, Katinka; Scelza, Brooke A.; Shin, Hyun Jung; Soler, Montserrat; Stieger, Stefan; van den Hende, Ellis A.; Viciana-Asensio, Hugo; Yildizhan, Saliha Elif; Yong, Jose C.; Yuditha, Tessa; Zhou, Yi

    2016-01-01

    Laughter is a nonverbal vocal expression that often communicates positive affect and cooperative intent in humans. Temporally coincident laughter occurring within groups is a potentially rich cue of affiliation to overhearers. We examined listeners’ judgments of affiliation based on brief, decontextualized instances of colaughter between either established friends or recently acquainted strangers. In a sample of 966 participants from 24 societies, people reliably distinguished friends from strangers with an accuracy of 53–67%. Acoustic analyses of the individual laughter segments revealed that, across cultures, listeners’ judgments were consistently predicted by voicing dynamics, suggesting perceptual sensitivity to emotionally triggered spontaneous production. Colaughter affords rapid and accurate appraisals of affiliation that transcend cultural and linguistic boundaries, and may constitute a universal means of signaling cooperative relationships. PMID:27071114

  5. Aerobots as a Ubiquitous Part of Society

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Young, Larry A.

    2006-01-01

    Small autonomous aerial robots (aerobots) have the potential to make significant positive contributions to modern society. Aerobots of various vehicle-types - CTOL, STOL, VTOL, and even possibly LTA - will be a part of a new paradigm for the distribution of goods and services. Aerobots as a class of vehicles may test the boundaries of aircraft design. New system analysis and design tools will be required in order to account for the new technologies and design parameters/constraints for such vehicles. The analysis tools also provide new approaches to defining/assessing technology goals and objectives and the technology portfolio necessary to accomplish those goals and objectives. Using the aerobot concept as an illustrative test case, key attributes of these analysis tools are discussed.

  6. Fatherhood, childism, and the creation of society.

    PubMed

    Wall, John

    2007-01-01

    This essay argues for a new religious ethical approach to fatherhood centered on children and their expanding capabilities for participation in society. Under the notion of "childism"—in analogy to feminism, womanism, humanism, and the like—it takes the perspective of the experiences and concerns of childhood as such. In contrast with a soft patriarchal argument for fatherhood that dominates much religious discourse today, it argues for a larger and more hopeful vision of fatherhood as directed toward the human social good. This requires, methodologically, a richer hermeneutical circle between religion and the social sciences. Substantively, it calls for Christian and other religious ethicists to re-imagine fatherhood as an integrated public–private responsibility that aims to cultivate children’s fully human social creativity as images of their Creator.

  7. Neurotechnology and society (2010-2060).

    PubMed

    Lynch, Zack

    2004-05-01

    To illuminate the societal implications of NBIC (nano-bio-info-cogno) technologies it is critical to place them within a broad historical context. By viewing recent human history as a series of techno-economic waves with accompanying socio-political responses, a framework emerges that can be used to understand how business, politics, and human culture will be affected by NBIC technologies. One important development that the NBIC convergence is making possible is neurotechnology, the set of tools that can influence the human central nervous system, especially the brain. The diffusion of neurotechnology will give rise to a new type of human society-a post-industrial, post-informational neurosociety.

  8. Extend a Helping Hand to Society

    PubMed Central

    Henry, Joseph L.

    1989-01-01

    This article is intended as an informational and inspirational message to graduating black health professionals, especially dentists and physicians. The author highlights the continuing and urgent need to practice and render first-rate care in the areas of greatest need where the population is primarily black. The importance of black health professionals providing leadership in community affairs, the political arena, civic affairs, and social interaction and development are stressed. Young black health professionals are urged to make a firm commitment to improving the quality of life for all by bridging the gap for equal opportunity, social justice, and unification of the health professions in a comprehensive health team for the greatest benefit to society.

  9. Tsunamis: bridging science, engineering and society.

    PubMed

    Kânoğlu, U; Titov, V; Bernard, E; Synolakis, C

    2015-10-28

    Tsunamis are high-impact, long-duration disasters that in most cases allow for only minutes of warning before impact. Since the 2004 Boxing Day tsunami, there have been significant advancements in warning methodology, pre-disaster preparedness and basic understanding of related phenomena. Yet, the trail of destruction of the 2011 Japan tsunami, broadcast live to a stunned world audience, underscored the difficulties of implementing advances in applied hazard mitigation. We describe state of the art methodologies, standards for warnings and summarize recent advances in basic understanding, and identify cross-disciplinary challenges. The stage is set to bridge science, engineering and society to help build up coastal resilience and reduce losses.

  10. Professions as the conscience of society.

    PubMed Central

    Sieghart, P

    1985-01-01

    Ethics is no less of a science than any other. It has its roots in conflicts of interest between human beings, and in their conflicting urges to behave either selfishly or altruistically. Resolving such conflicts leads to the specification of rules of conduct, often expressed in terms of rights and duties. In the special case of professional ethics, the paramount rule of conduct is altruism in the service of a 'noble' cause, and this distinguishes true professions from other trades or occupations. If professional ethics come into conflict with national laws, the professional today can test the legitimacy of such laws by reference to internationally agreed legal standards in the field of human rights, and so help to perform the role of 'professions as the conscience of society'. PMID:4057214

  11. Detecting affiliation in colaughter across 24 societies.

    PubMed

    Bryant, Gregory A; Fessler, Daniel M T; Fusaroli, Riccardo; Clint, Edward; Aarøe, Lene; Apicella, Coren L; Petersen, Michael Bang; Bickham, Shaneikiah T; Bolyanatz, Alexander; Chavez, Brenda; De Smet, Delphine; Díaz, Cinthya; Fančovičová, Jana; Fux, Michal; Giraldo-Perez, Paulina; Hu, Anning; Kamble, Shanmukh V; Kameda, Tatsuya; Li, Norman P; Luberti, Francesca R; Prokop, Pavol; Quintelier, Katinka; Scelza, Brooke A; Shin, Hyun Jung; Soler, Montserrat; Stieger, Stefan; Toyokawa, Wataru; van den Hende, Ellis A; Viciana-Asensio, Hugo; Yildizhan, Saliha Elif; Yong, Jose C; Yuditha, Tessa; Zhou, Yi

    2016-04-26

    Laughter is a nonverbal vocal expression that often communicates positive affect and cooperative intent in humans. Temporally coincident laughter occurring within groups is a potentially rich cue of affiliation to overhearers. We examined listeners' judgments of affiliation based on brief, decontextualized instances of colaughter between either established friends or recently acquainted strangers. In a sample of 966 participants from 24 societies, people reliably distinguished friends from strangers with an accuracy of 53-67%. Acoustic analyses of the individual laughter segments revealed that, across cultures, listeners' judgments were consistently predicted by voicing dynamics, suggesting perceptual sensitivity to emotionally triggered spontaneous production. Colaughter affords rapid and accurate appraisals of affiliation that transcend cultural and linguistic boundaries, and may constitute a universal means of signaling cooperative relationships.

  12. Presidential Citation for Science and Society

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2012-07-01

    AGU presented its Presidential Citation for Science and Society to three recipients at a reception on 1 May 2012 in the Rayburn House Office Building as part of the inaugural AGU Science Policy Conference. Google Earth, Jane Lubchenco, who is the under secretary of Commerce for oceans and atmosphere and administrator of the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, and Sen. Olympia Snowe (R-Maine) were recognized for their leadership and vision in shaping policy and heightening public awareness of the value of Earth and space science. “This is an important award because with it AGU brings to light the importance of cutting-edge use-inspired science that helps people, communities, and businesses adapt to climate change and sustainably manage our oceans and coasts,” Lubchenco said.

  13. Lattice defects as Lotka-Volterra societies

    SciTech Connect

    Yost, F.G.

    1995-07-01

    Since the early part of this century the Lotka-Volterra or predator-prey equations have been known to simulate the stability, instability, and persistent oscillations observed in many biological and ecological societies. These equations have been modified in many ways and have been used to model phenomena as varied as childhood epidemics, enzyme reactions, and conventional warfare. In the work to be described, similarities are drawn between various lattice defects and Lotka-Volterra (LV) societies. Indeed, grain boundaries are known to ``consume`` dislocations, inclusions ``infect`` grain boundaries, and dislocations ``annihilate`` dislocations. Several specific cases of lattice defect interaction kinetics models are drawn from the materials science literature to make these comparisons. Each model will be interpreted as if it were a description of a biological system. Various approaches to the modification of this class of interaction kinetics will be presented and discussed. The earliest example is the Damask-Dienes treatment of vacancy-divacancy annealing kinetics. This historical model will be modified to include the effects of an intermediate species and the results will be compared with the original model. The second example to be examined is the Clark-Alden model for deformation-enhanced grain growth. Dislocation kinetics will be added to this model and results will be discussed considering the original model. The third example to be presented is the Ananthakrishna-Sahoo model of the Portevin-Le Chatelier effect that was offered in 1985 as an extension of the classical Cottrell atmosphere explanation. Their treatment will be modified by inclusion of random interference from a pesky but peripheral species and by allowing a rate constant to be a function of time.

  14. Astronomical Society of the Pacific IYA Programs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manning, James G.

    2009-05-01

    The Astronomical Society of the Pacific is presently engaged in a series of initiatives for the International Year of Astronomy (IYA) with the aim of using public awareness and interest to create sustainable education programs and products for the longer term. The presenter will describe progress in its four signature IYA efforts: IYA Discovery Guides for the amateur astronomy community and others providing outreach activities and materials, keyed to NASA's monthly IYA calendar of themes and featured objects, supported by NASA and the NSF; adaptation of these materials to expand astronomy education capacity in the informal education community working in museums and science and nature centers, supported by NASA; the Galileo Teacher Training Program of planned pilot workshops for the professional development of K-12 classroom teachers, to develop a workshop model focusing on the process of science and the adaptation of tools and resources for the classroom; and the development of a Cosmic Clearinghouse web page associated with the IAU Portal to the Universe to provide links to a wide variety of education resources. The presenter will also relate progress in other IYA efforts, including supporting Interstellar Studios’ 400 Years of the Telescope PBS documentary film and its accompanying planetarium program and educational initiatives, promoting other IYA products and services to its networks and others, and plans for the Society's 121st annual meeting in September that will focus on IYA and the Year of Science_and especially on building on the momentum of these efforts to forge a future path for science and science education, nationally and globally.

  15. Chemical Dosimeter Tube With Coaxial Sensing Rod

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lueck, Dale E.

    1993-01-01

    Improved length-of-stain (LOS) chemical dosimeter indicates total dose of chemical vapor in air. Made with rods and tubes of various diameters to obtain various sensitivities and dynamic ranges. Sensitivity larger and dose range smaller when more room for diffusion in gap between tube and rod. Offers greater resistance to changing of color of exposed dye back to color of unexposed condition, greater sensitivity, and higher degree of repeatability. Developed to measure doses of gaseous HCI, dosimeter modified by use of other dyes to indicate doses of other chemical vapors.

  16. Los biocombustibles y el futuro

    NASA Video Gallery

    ¿Cómo podremos utilizar los biocombustibles en el futuro? La ingeniera aeroespacial de la NASA, Diana Centeno Gómez nos explica el futuro de los biocombustibles y cómo un día podrías trabajar con d...

  17. Asset Inequality and Economic Activity in Artificial Societies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kikuchi, Toshiko

    In this paper, using multi-agent simulations, the effect asset inequality has on an artificial society is analyzed. It is shown that it is possible for a sustainable society to decrease in asset inequality and at the same time increase economic activity. In sustainable societies, the asset inequality increases as the consumption tax rate is raised, and in artificial societies where the tax rate is the same, inequality increases in the society in which agents with even small a surplus undertake unselfish actions. In sustainable societies which employ both income and consumption tax, an increase in asset inequalities leads to an increase economic activity. But, in sustainable societies which levy only the income tax, this result does not necessarily hold. These results show that if economic activity is increased in sustainable societies where the consumption tax rate is raised for the fiscal stability, an inequality expansion is an acceptable consequence. However, the sustainable society with the highest economic activity is realized when only the income tax is levied. In sustainable societies which levy only the income tax, it is possible to decrease inequality while simultaneously increasing economic activity.

  18. Chemical Analyses

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bulluck, J. W.; Rushing, R. A.

    1994-01-01

    As a preliminary study on the effects of chemical aging of polymer materials MERL and TRI have examined two polymeric materials that are typically used for offshore umbilical applications. These two materials were Tefzel, a copolymer of ethylene and tetrafluoroethylene, and Coflon, polyvinylidene fluoride. The Coflon specimens were cut from pipe sections and exposed to H2S at various temperatures and pressures. One of these specimens was tested for methane permeation, and another for H2S permeation. The Tefzel specimens were cut from .05 mm sheet stock material and were exposed to methanol at elevated temperature and pressure. One of these specimens was exposed to methanol permeation for 2 days at 100 C and 2500 psi. An additional specimen was exposed to liquid methanol for 3 days at 150 C and 15 Bar. Virgin specimens of each material were similarly prepared and tested.

  19. American Cancer Society/American Society of Clinical Oncology Breast Cancer Survivorship Care Guideline.

    PubMed

    Runowicz, Carolyn D; Leach, Corinne R; Henry, N Lynn; Henry, Karen S; Mackey, Heather T; Cowens-Alvarado, Rebecca L; Cannady, Rachel S; Pratt-Chapman, Mandi L; Edge, Stephen B; Jacobs, Linda A; Hurria, Arti; Marks, Lawrence B; LaMonte, Samuel J; Warner, Ellen; Lyman, Gary H; Ganz, Patricia A

    2016-02-20

    The purpose of the American Cancer Society/American Society of Clinical Oncology Breast Cancer Survivorship Care Guideline is to provide recommendations to assist primary care and other clinicians in the care of female adult survivors of breast cancer. A systematic review of the literature was conducted using PubMed through April 2015. A multidisciplinary expert workgroup with expertise in primary care, gynecology, surgical oncology, medical oncology, radiation oncology, and nursing was formed and tasked with drafting the Breast Cancer Survivorship Care Guideline. A total of 1,073 articles met inclusion criteria; and, after full text review, 237 were included as the evidence base. Patients should undergo regular surveillance for breast cancer recurrence, including evaluation with a cancer-related history and physical examination, and should be screened for new primary breast cancer. Data do not support performing routine laboratory tests or imaging tests in asymptomatic patients to evaluate for breast cancer recurrence. Primary care clinicians should counsel patients about the importance of maintaining a healthy lifestyle, monitor for post-treatment symptoms that can adversely affect quality of life, and monitor for adherence to endocrine therapy. Recommendations provided in this guideline are based on current evidence in the literature and expert consensus opinion. Most of the evidence is not sufficient to warrant a strong evidence-based recommendation. Recommendations on surveillance for breast cancer recurrence, screening for second primary cancers, assessment and management of physical and psychosocial long-term and late effects of breast cancer and its treatment, health promotion, and care coordination/practice implications are made.This guideline was developed through a collaboration between the American Cancer Society and the American Society of Clinical Oncology and has been published jointly by invitation and consent in both CA: A Cancer Journal for

  20. Household Chemical Emergencies

    MedlinePlus

    ... Chemical Emergencies Hurricanes Landslides & Debris Flow Nuclear ... containing hazardous materials or chemicals. Although the risk of a chemical accident is slight, knowing how to handle these products ...

  1. Los Alamos low-level waste performance assessment status

    SciTech Connect

    Wenzel, W.J.; Purtymun, W.D.; Dewart, J.M.; Rodgers, J.E.

    1986-06-01

    This report reviews the documented Los Alamos studies done to assess the containment of buried hazardous wastes. Five sections logically present the environmental studies, operational source terms, transport pathways, environmental dosimetry, and computer model development and use. This review gives a general picture of the Los Alamos solid waste disposal and liquid effluent sites and is intended for technical readers with waste management and environmental science backgrounds but without a detailed familiarization with Los Alamos. The review begins with a wide perspective on environmental studies at Los Alamos. Hydrology, geology, and meteorology are described for the site and region. The ongoing Laboratory-wide environmental surveillance and waste management environmental studies are presented. The next section describes the waste disposal sites and summarizes the current source terms for these sites. Hazardous chemical wastes and liquid effluents are also addressed by describing the sites and canyons that are impacted. The review then focuses on the transport pathways addressed mainly in reports by Healy and Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program. Once the source terms and potential transport pathways are described, the dose assessment methods are addressed. Three major studies, the waste alternatives, Hansen and Rogers, and the Pantex Environmental Impact Statement, contributed to the current Los Alamos dose assessment methodology. Finally, the current Los Alamos groundwater, surface water, and environmental assessment models for these mesa top and canyon sites are described.

  2. Who's making global civil society: philanthropy and US empire in world society.

    PubMed

    Vogel, Ann

    2006-12-01

    Theories of US hegemony commonly ignore the role of American philanthropy in the contemporary transformations of world society and the globalization of capitalism. In this essay, I suggest that the philanthropic foundation, and with it the institution of philanthropy, is being invigorated by the expansion of its domestic role to foreign activities and to globally framed activities within the USA. I propose that US philanthropy exports American understandings of democracy and simultaneously organizes global reflexivity through citizenship education for the US populace. I offer a preliminary theoretical interpretation of the empirical patterns of international grant-making activities by US foundations, considering John W. Meyer's concept of 'instrumental culture' and some arguments made by Foucauldian 'governmentality' scholars. I emphasize the need to conceptualize the cultural-symbolic and organizational dimensions of hegemony and suggest further sociological analysis of philanthropic activities as integral to current politically and economically led transformations of societies around the globe.

  3. Implementation of the American Society of Clinical Oncology and Oncology Nursing Society chemotherapy safety standards.

    PubMed

    Vioral, Anna N; Kennihan, Heather K

    2012-12-01

    Chemotherapy involves an intricate, high-risk, multidisciplinary process of prescribing, dispensing, and administering complex multimedication regimens with narrow therapeutic indices. Chemotherapeutic agents also require safe-handling precautions for patients and healthcare providers. In addition, a number of chemotherapy and targeted therapies have expanded to nononcology populations. This complexity demands standardization of chemotherapy practice for all healthcare providers to ensure safe outcomes. This article describes one organization's multidisciplinary effort to standardize chemotherapy practice according to the American Society of Clinical Oncology and Oncology Nursing Society's 31 safety standards for chemotherapy administration. The article also describes how the organization integrated and developed standards of practice using interdisciplinary approaches. The educational processes used during implementation and the lessons learned are discussed to assist healthcare providers involved in standardizing chemotherapy administration. The article equips healthcare professionals with a multidisciplinary process for high-quality clinical standards of practice that may reduce errors and ensure safety.

  4. Institutions in modern society: caretakers and subjects.

    PubMed

    Romano, O I

    1974-02-22

    The problems that relate to the outermost limits of institutional care, if such limits exist, will certainly be among the most salient problems during the coming years-no matter whether such care proceeds on an inpatient or an outpatient basis. Whatever course may be taken will certainly affect the lives of every citizen in urbanized and industrialized society. At present in California there is considerable shifting of individuals from one care status or category to another, in efforts to find accommodations that will better reflect the realities of modern existence. However, such shifting of caseloads as the moving of individuals from nursing and convalescent homes to hospitals and back again does not constitute a change, either from the standpoint of the subjects involved or from the standpoint of significantly affecting the overall caseload. Most commonly, the shifting of caseloads has been merely jurisdictional. Much the same can be said of the transfers from a police agency to welfare, or vice versa. Similarly, a shift from inpatient status to outpatient status does not constitute a significant change. Such transfers from one jurisdiction to another reflect a reduction in caseload for one agency, but a corresponding increase in caseload for another. Thus, there has been no significant change in the subject population as such. Jurisdictional transfers are often merely caretaking actions that reflect bureaucratic decisions. Equally often, such decisions do not address themselves to the basic priorities that guide the functions of caretaking. Explicitly stated priorities must supersede jurisditional transfers if the concept of caretaking is to include better resources for human development and if the subject population is to participate in the managing of institutions. On any given day during 1969 in the state of California, virtually 8 million people from an estimated population of 19,800,000 were under some form of institutional care or in some institutional

  5. Civil society, health, and social exclusion in Bangladesh.

    PubMed

    Schurmann, Anna T; Mahmud, Simeen

    2009-08-01

    Civil society has the potential to have a positive impact on social exclusion and health equity through active monitoring and increased accountability. This paper examines the role of civil society in Bangladesh to understand why this potential has not been realized. Looking at two models of civil society action-participation in decentralized public-sector service provision and academic think-tank data analysis-this analysis examines the barriers to positive civil society input into public policy decision-making. The role of non-governmental organizations, political, cultural and economic factors, and the influence of foreign bilateral and multilateral donors are considered. The paper concludes that, with a few exceptions, civil society in Bangladesh replicates the structural inequalities of society at large.

  6. The beginnings of the Southern Child/Pediatric Neurology Society.

    PubMed

    Dyken, Paul Richard; Bodensteiner, John B

    2015-04-01

    The founding and early development of the Southern Pediatric Neurology Society was in many ways parallel to that of the Child Neurology Society. The organization started out as the Southern Child Neurology Society but the name was changed at the time of incorporation so as to avoid confusion of identity and purpose with the larger Child Neurology Society. Although there are archives of early days and the later development of the Southern Pediatric Neurology Society, the details have never been set down in a narrative explaining the events that led to the development of the organization. In this paper, we try to produce a written record of the history of the founding and early development of the Southern Pediatric Neurology Society.

  7. Animal Health Modeling & Simulation Society: a new society promoting model-based approaches in veterinary pharmacology.

    PubMed

    Mochel, J P; Gabrielsson, J; Collard, W; Fink, M; Gehring, R; Laffont, C; Liu, Y; Martin-Jimenez, T; Pelligand, L; Steimer, J-L; Toutain, P-L; Whittem, T; Riviere, J

    2013-05-29

    The Animal Health Modeling & Simulation Society (AHM&S) is a newly founded association (2012) that aims to promote the development, application, and dissemination of modeling and simulation techniques in the field of Veterinary Pharmacology and Toxicology. The association is co-chaired by Pr. Johan Gabrielsson (Europe), Pr. Jim Riviere (USA), and secretary Dr. Jonathan Mochel (Switzerland). This short communication aims at presenting the membership, rationale and objectives of this group.

  8. An official American Thoracic Society and European Respiratory Society policy statement: disparities in respiratory health.

    PubMed

    Schraufnagel, Dean E; Blasi, Francesco; Kraft, Monica; Gaga, Mina; Finn, Patricia; Rabe, Klaus F

    2013-10-01

    Health disparities, defined as a significant difference in health between populations, are more common for diseases of the respiratory system than for those of other organ systems, because of the environmental influence on breathing and the variation of the environment among different segments of the population. The lowest social groups are up to 14 times more likely to have respiratory diseases than are the highest. Tobacco smoke, air pollution, environmental exposures, and occupational hazards affect the lungs more than other organs and occur disproportionately in ethnic minorities and those with lower socioeconomic status. Lack of access to quality healthcare contributes to disparities. The executive committees of the American Thoracic Society (ATS) and European Respiratory Society (ERS) established a writing committee to develop a policy on health disparities. The document was reviewed, edited, and approved by their full executive committees and boards of directors of the societies. This document expresses a policy to address health disparities by promoting scientific inquiry and training, disseminating medical information and best practices, and monitoring and advocating for public respiratory health. The ERS and the ATS have strong international commitments and work with leaders from governments, academia, and other organisational bodies to address and reduce avoidable health inequalities. Their training initiatives improve the function of healthcare systems and health equality. Both the ATS and the ERS support all aspects of this document, confer regularly, and act together when possible, but the activities to bring about change may vary because of the differences in the continents where the two organisations carry out most of their activities. The ATS and ERS pledge to frame their actions to reduce respiratory health disparities. The vision of the ATS and ERS is that all persons attain better and sustained respiratory health. They call on all their members

  9. NRAO Astronomer Honored by American Astronomical Society

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2011-01-01

    Dr. Scott Ransom, an astronomer at the National Radio Astronomy Observatory (NRAO), received the American Astronomical Society's (AAS) Helen B. Warner Prize on January 11, at the society's meeting in Seattle, Washington. The prize is awarded annually for "a significant contribution to observational or theoretical astronomy during the five years preceding the award." Presented by AAS President Debra Elmegreen, the prize recognized Ransom "for his astrophysical insight and innovative technical leadership enabling the discovery of exotic, millisecond and young pulsars and their application for tests of fundamental physics." "Scott has made landmark contributions to our understanding of pulsars and to using them as elegant tools for investigating important areas of fundamental physics. We are very proud that his scientific colleagues have recognized his efforts with this prize," said NRAO Director Fred K.Y. Lo. A staff astronomer at the NRAO since 2004, Ransom has led efforts using the National Science Foundation's Green Bank Telescope and other facilities to study pulsars and use them to make advances in areas of frontier astrophysics such as gravitational waves and particle physics. In 2010, he was on a team that discovered the most massive pulsar yet known, a finding that had implications for the composition of pulsars and details of nuclear physics, gravitational waves, and gamma-ray bursts. Ransom also is a leader in efforts to find and analyze rapidly-rotating millisecond pulsars to make the first direct detection of the gravitational waves predicted by Albert Einstein. In other work, he has advanced observational capabilities for finding millisecond pulsars in globular clusters of stars and investigated how millisecond pulsars are formed. A graduate of the United States Military Academy at West Point, NY, Ransom served as an artillery officer in the U.S. Army. After leaving the Army, he earned a Ph.D. at Harvard University in 2001, and was a postdoctoral fellow

  10. An official American Thoracic Society workshop report: tobacco control initiatives within the American Thoracic Society.

    PubMed

    Wewers, Mary Ellen; Bailey, William C; Carlsen, Kai-Häkon; Eisner, Mark D; Folan, Patricia; Heath, Janie; Klinnert, Mary D; Kovesi, Tom; Pien, Grace W; Reichart, Virginia C; Talwar, Arunabh; Thompson, Katherine

    2010-02-01

    Cigarette smoking represents the single most preventable cause of premature morbidity and mortality in the United States and the burden of tobacco use is apparent world-wide. Cigarette smoking is a major risk factor for chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, the third leading cause of death in the United States in 2004. The American Thoracic Society (ATS) and its members have contributed significantly to an understanding of the biological and pathophysiologic mechanisms responsible for the development and management of tobacco-attributable disease and disability. The society's active involvement in tobacco control advocacy and policy-related initiatives are central to its mission. Within the ATS, there is also increased interest in accelerating the society's efforts to understand the mechanisms responsible for the uptake, persistence, and cessation of tobacco use. Scientific, clinical, and educational activities that include an examination of these underlying mechanisms are warranted. This paper describes findings from an ATS initiative that developed a preliminary strategy for enhancing scientific, clinical, educational, and policy-related tobacco control efforts that are consistent with the vision of the ATS. The specific aims of this project included the identification of existing mechanisms, as well as the current governance in place within the ATS infrastructure, to address tobacco control issues related to scientific inquiry, policy initiatives, and advocacy for tobacco control. This assessment generated recommendations to inform the ATS leadership with regard to the future development of relevant tobacco control initiatives.

  11. Washington DC Area Computer Aided Surgery Society Monthly Meetings

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-03-01

    05-1-0072 TITLE: Washington DC Area Computer Aided Surgery Society Monthly Meetings PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: Kevin R. Cleary, Ph.D...Feb 2005-21 Feb 2009 4. Title and Subtitle Washington DC Area Computer Aided Surgery Society Monthly Meetings 5. Award Number W81XWH-05-1-0072...Area Computer-Aided Surgery Society (WashCAS) has become the major vehicle in the Washington/Baltimore area for exploring the issues in the emerging

  12. Medicalisation and Overdiagnosis: What Society Does to Medicine.

    PubMed

    van Dijk, Wieteke; Faber, Marjan J; Tanke, Marit A C; Jeurissen, Patrick P T; Westert, Gert P

    2016-08-31

    The concept of overdiagnosis is a dominant topic in medical literature and discussions. In research that targets overdiagnosis, medicalisation is often presented as the societal and individual burden of unnecessary medical expansion. In this way, the focus lies on the influence of medicine on society, neglecting the possible influence of society on medicine. In this perspective, we aim to provide a novel insight into the influence of society and the societal context on medicine, in particularly with regard to medicalisation and overdiagnosis.

  13. 75 FR 26987 - Notice of Inventory Completion: Wisconsin Historical Society, Museum Division, Madison, WI

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-05-13

    ... National Park Service Notice of Inventory Completion: Wisconsin Historical Society, Museum Division... Wisconsin Historical Society, Museum Division (aka State Historical Society of Wisconsin), Madison, WI. The... of the human remains was made by the Wisconsin Historical Society professional staff in...

  14. Activities for the Promotion of Gender Equality in Japan—Japan Society of Applied Physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kodate, Kashiko; Tanaka, Kazuo

    2005-10-01

    Since 1946, the Japan Society of Applied Physics (JSAP) has strived to promote research and development in applied physics for benefits beyond national boundaries. Activities of JSAP involve multidisciplinary fields, from physics and engineering to life sciences. Of its 23,000 members, 48% are from industry, 29% from academia, and about 7% from semi-autonomous national research laboratories. Its large industrial membership is one of the distinctive features of JSAP. In preparation for the First IUPAP International Conference on Women in Physics (Paris, 2002), JSAP members took the first step under the strong leadership of then-JSAP President Toshio Goto, setting up the Committee for the Promotion Equal Participation of Men and Women in Science and Technology. Equality rather than women's advancement is highlighted to further development in science and technology. Attention is also paid to balancing the number of researchers from different age groups and affiliations. The committee has 22 members: 12 female and 10 male; 7 from corporations, 12 from universities, and 3 from semi-autonomous national research institutes. Its main activities are to organize symposia and meetings, conduct surveys among JSAP members, and provide child-care facilities at meetings and conferences. In 2002 the Japan Physics Society and the Chemical Society of Japan jointly created the Japan Inter-Society Liaison Association for the Promotion of Equal Participation of Men and Women in Science and Engineering. Membership has grown to 44 societies (of which 19 are observers) ranging from mathematics, information, and life sciences to civil engineering. Joint activities across sectors and empower the whole. The Gender Equality Bureau in the Cabinet Office recently launched a large-scale project called "Challenge Campaign" to encourage girls to major in natural science and engineering, which JSAP is co-sponsoring.

  15. [Medical societies in modern China-China Medical Missionary Association].

    PubMed

    Liu, Yuan-Ming

    2011-07-01

    In modern times, the development and exchange of scientific research were promoted greatly by establishments of scientific societies in the west. In the second half of the 17(th) century, medical societies such as the Berlin Royal Society of Medicine, the Paris Surgical Society, the Edinburgh Medical Society and the London Medical Society appeared in sequence, which promoted the progress of European medicine greatly by means of medical conferences and journals. At the end of the 19(th) century, in order to promote medical missions and education, western missionaries drew lessons from the medical society system and founded the China Medical Missionary Association (CMMA). The association was dedicated to work in four fields: terminology standardization, missionary hospitals, medical education and study on endemic disease. CMMA accelerated the development of medical missions and the spread of western medicine. As members of CMMA must be of religious orders, many scholars were not qualified to join in, which resulted in limitation of academic research and exchange. With the return of overseas students, Chinese scholars majoring in western medicine enhanced the awareness of medical knowledge. As a result, western medical societies were established one by one, including the Shanghai Medical Association, the Chinese Pharmaceutical Association, the Chinese Medical Association and the Society of Chinese Medicines of the Republic of China. Established in 1915, the Chinese Medical Association had members who also belonged to the CMMA, so the Chinese Medical Association made reference to the CMMA for its organization, function, operating mechanism, journals, etc..

  16. 6. Historic American Buildings Survey Courtesy of California Historical Society ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    6. Historic American Buildings Survey Courtesy of California Historical Society San Francisco, California Photo: ca. 1875 MIRROR PANELED BALLROOM - Ralston Hall, Ralston Avenue, Belmont, San Mateo County, CA

  17. 5. Historic American Buildings Survey Courtesy of California Historical Society ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    5. Historic American Buildings Survey Courtesy of California Historical Society San Francisco, California Photo: ca. 1885 MIRROR PANELED BALLROOM - Ralston Hall, Ralston Avenue, Belmont, San Mateo County, CA

  18. Sir Ronald A. Fisher and the International Biometric Society.

    PubMed

    Billard, Lynne

    2014-06-01

    The year 2012 marks the 50th anniversary of the death of Sir Ronald A. Fisher, one of the two Fathers of Statistics and a Founder of the International Biometric Society (the "Society"). To celebrate the extraordinary genius of Fisher and the far-sighted vision of Fisher and Chester Bliss in organizing and promoting the formation of the Society, this article looks at the origins and growth of the Society, some of the key players and events, and especially the roles played by Fisher himself as the First President. A fresh look at Fisher, the man rather than the scientific genius is also presented.

  19. 7. Photocopy of photograph (from Broome County Historical Society) showing ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    7. Photocopy of photograph (from Broome County Historical Society) showing SWIMMERS, PHOTOGRAPH TAKEN FACING NORTHEAST - Charles F. Johnson Pool, Charles F. Johnson Park, Johnson City, Broome County, NY

  20. 11. Historic American Buildings Survey, Photocopy: Credit: Nevada Historical Society ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    11. Historic American Buildings Survey, Photocopy: Credit: Nevada Historical Society FORMER COMPTROLLER'S OFFICE, JUNE 13, 1900 - Nevada State Capitol, Plaza at Carson Street, Carson City, Carson City, NV