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Sample records for chemical transfection reagents

  1. Optimizing Transfection of Primary Human Umbilical Vein Endothelial Cells Using Commercially Available Chemical Transfection Reagents

    PubMed Central

    Hunt, Michelle A.; Currie, Margaret J.; Robinson, Bridget A.; Dachs, Gabi U.

    2010-01-01

    Primary cells, such as HUVEC, are notoriously difficult to transfect and are susceptible to the toxic effects of transfection reagents. A transfection reagent with a high transfection efficiency and low cytotoxicity was sought to retain sufficient viability of transfected HUVEC for subsequent assays. Nine chemical transfection reagents, currently commercially available, were compared for their ability to transfect HUVEC in vitro. A plasmid expressing the enhanced GFP (EGFP) was used for transfection, followed by flow cytometry of transfected HUVEC to determine the proportion of EGFP-expressing cells as a measure of transfection efficiency. Lipofectamine 2000 and Lipofectamine LTX (Invitrogen, Carlsbad, CA, USA) gave the highest transfection efficiencies of the reagents tested. Lipofectamine LTX was identified as the optimal transfection reagent as a result of its higher transfection efficiency at shorter periods of time following transfection when cytotoxicity was limited, allowing sufficient yield of transfected HUVEC for use in subsequent assays. PMID:20592869

  2. Lipid-based transfection reagents can interfere with cholesterol biosynthesis.

    PubMed

    Danielli, Mauro; Marinelli, Raúl A

    2016-02-15

    Lipid-based transfection reagents are widely used for delivery of small interfering RNA into cells. We examined whether the commonly used commercial transfection reagents DharmaFECT-4 and Lipofectamine 2000 can interfere with lipid metabolism by studying cholesterogenesis. Cholesterol de novo synthesis from [(14)C]acetate was assessed in human hepatocyte-derived Huh-7 cells. The results revealed that DharmaFECT, but not Lipofectamine, markedly inhibited cholesterol biosynthesis by approximately 70%. Cell viability was not significantly altered. These findings suggest that caution is required in the choice of certain lipid-based transfection reagents for gene silencing experiments, particularly when assessing cholesterol metabolism.

  3. Optimization of Gene Transfection in Murine Myeloma Cell Lines using Different Transfection Reagents

    PubMed Central

    Shabani, Mahdi; Hemmati, Sheyda; Hadavi, Reza; Amirghofran, Zahra; Jeddi-Tehrani, Mahmood; Rabbani, Hodjatallah; Shokri, Fazel

    2010-01-01

    Purification and isolation of cellular target proteins for monoclonal antibody (MAb) production is a difficult and time-consuming process. Immunization of mice with murine cell lines stably transfected with genes coding for xenogenic target molecules is an alternative method for mouse immunization and MAb production. Here we present data on transfection efficiency of some commercial reagents used for transfection of murine myeloma cell lines. Little is known about transfectability of murine myeloma cell lines by different transfection reagents. Mouse myeloma cell lines (SP2/0, NS0, NS1, Ag8, and P3U1) were transfected with pEGFP-N1 vector using Lipofectamine 2000, jetPEI and LyoVec commercial transfection reagents in different combinations. The transfection permissible HEK293-FT cell line was used as a control in transfection procedure. Transfected cells, expressing the Enhanced Green Fluorescent Protein (EGFP), were analyzed by flow cytometry 48 hrs post transfection. Our results showed transfection efficiency of 71%, 57% and 22% for HEK293-FT, 5.5%, 3.4% and 1% for SP2/0, 55.7%, 21.1% and 9.3% for NS0, 8.2%, 6% and 5.5% for NS1, 22%, 49.2% and 5.5% for Ag8 and 6.3%, 21.5% and 4.6% for P3U1 cell lines after transfection with Lipofectamine 2000, jetPEI and LyoVec reagents, respectively. Our data indicate that NS0 and Ag8 are efficiently transfected by Lipofectamine 2000 and jetPEI reagents. Finally, we propose Ag8 and NS0 cell lines as suitable host cells for efficient expression of target genes which can be used for mouse immunization and MAb production. PMID:23408356

  4. Lipid-based Transfection Reagents Exhibit Cryo-induced Increase in Transfection Efficiency

    PubMed Central

    Sork, Helena; Nordin, Joel Z; Turunen, Janne J; Wiklander, Oscar PB; Bestas, Burcu; Zaghloul, Eman M; Margus, Helerin; Padari, Kärt; Duru, Adil D; Corso, Giulia; Bost, Jeremy; Vader, Pieter; Pooga, Margus; Smith, CI Edvard; Wood, Matthew JA; Schiffelers, Raymond M; Hällbrink, Mattias; Andaloussi, Samir EL

    2016-01-01

    The advantages of lipid-based transfection reagents have permitted their widespread use in molecular biology and gene therapy. This study outlines the effect of cryo-manipulation of a cationic lipid-based formulation, Lipofectamine 2000, which, after being frozen and thawed, showed orders of magnitude higher plasmid delivery efficiency throughout eight different cell lines, without compromising cell viability. Increased transfection efficiency with the freeze-thawed reagent was also seen with 2'-O-methyl phosphorothioate oligonucleotide delivery and in a splice-correction assay. Most importantly, a log-scale improvement in gene delivery using the freeze-thawed reagent was seen in vivo. Using three different methods, we detected considerable differences in the polydispersity of the different nucleic acid complexes as well as observed a clear difference in their surface spreading and sedimentation, with the freeze-thawed ones displaying substantially higher rate of dispersion and deposition on the glass surface. This hitherto overlooked elevated potency of the freeze-thawed reagent facilitates the targeting of hard-to-transfect cells, accomplishes higher transfection rates, and decreases the overall amount of reagent needed for delivery. Additionally, as we also saw a slight increase in plasmid delivery using other freeze-thawed transfection reagents, we postulate that freeze-thawing might prove to be useful for an even wider variety of transfection reagents. PMID:27111416

  5. [Comparison of efficiency and cytotoxicity of different transfection reagents in transfecting RIP140-siRNA into Kupffer cells].

    PubMed

    Li, Ji; Liu, Zuojin

    2015-12-01

    To compare the efficiency and cytotoxicity of different transfection reagents used in transfection of RIP140-siRNA into Kupffer cells to optimize the transfection conditions. Kupffer cells were transfected with RIP140-siRNA labeled with GFP as the reporter gene using lipofectamine 2000, Roche reagent (X-treme GENE siRNA Transfection Reagent) and puro screening lentivirus (1.0×10(8) TU/mL) as the transfection reagents. The transfection effect was observed under a fluorescent inverted microscope, and laser scanning confocal microscopy was used to analyze RIP140 expression in trasnfected Kupffer cells. Flow cytometry was performed to detect cell apoptosis, and CCK-8 test was used to evaluate the cell proliferation inhibition. RT-RCR and Western blotting were performed to detect the expressions of RIP140 mRNA and protein in the trasnfected cells. Puro screening lentivirus yielded the highest cell transfection efficiency, which exceeded 90%, followed by Roche reagent and then by lipofectamine 2000. Flow cytometry and CCK-8 test showed that the cytotoxicity was the mildest with Roche reagent, moderate with lentivirus, and severe with lipofectamine 2000. The cells trasnfected with lentivirus showed a significantly lower RIP140 expression than cells trasnfected with lipofectamine 2000 and Roche reagent (P<0.05). In Kupffer cells, lentivirus-mediated transfection, as compared with the other two trasnfection reagents, can achieve good transfection efficiency with a relativelty low cytotoxicity, and allows for better controllability and stability of the trasnfectiion conditions.

  6. Uptake of DNA by cancer cells without a transfection reagent.

    PubMed

    Kong, Yanping; Zhang, Xianbo; Zhao, Yongliang; Xue, Yanfang; Zhang, Ye

    2017-01-21

    Cancer cells exhibit elevated levels of glucose uptake and may obtain pre-formed, diet-derived fatty acids from the bloodstream to boost their rapid growth; they may also use nucleic acid from their microenvironment. The study of processing nucleic acid by cancer cells will help improve the understanding of the metabolism of cancer. DNA is commonly packaged into a viral or lipid particle to be transferred into cells; this process is called transfection in laboratory. Cancer cells are known for having gene mutations and the evolving ability of endocytosis. Their uptake of DNAs might be different from normal cells; they may take in DNAs directly from the environment. In this report, we studied the uptake of DNAs in cancer cells without a transfection reagent. A group of DNA fragments were prepared with PCR and labeled with isotope phosphorous-32 to test their uptake by Huh 7 (liver cancer) and THLE3 (normal liver cells) after incubation overnight by counting radioactivity of the cells' genomic DNA. Multiple cell lines including breast cancer and lung cancer were tested with the same method. DNA molecules were also labeled with fluorescence to test the location in the cells using a kit of "label it fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH)" from Mirus (USA). The data demonstrated that hepatocellular carcinoma cells possess the ability to take in large DNA fragments directly without a transfection reagent whereas normal liver cells cannot. Huh7 and MDA-MB231 cells displayed a significantly higher Rhodamine density in the cytoplasmic phagosomes and this suggests that the mechanism of uptake of large DNA by cancer cells is likely endocytosis. The efficacy of uptake is related to the DNA's size. Some cell lines of lung cancer and breast cancer also showed similar uptake of DNA. In the present study, we have revealed the evidence that some cancer cells, but not nontumorigenic cells, can take DNA fragments directly from the environment without the aid of the transfecting

  7. Volatile chemical reagent detector

    DOEpatents

    Chen, Liaohai; McBranch, Duncan; Wang, Rong; Whitten, David

    2004-08-24

    A device for detecting volatile chemical reagents based on fluorescence quenching analysis that is capable of detecting neutral electron acceptor molecules. The device includes a fluorescent material, a contact region, a light source, and an optical detector. The fluorescent material includes at least one polymer-surfactant complex. The polymer-surfactant complex is formed by combining a fluorescent ionic conjugated polymer with an oppositely charged surfactant. The polymer-surfactant complex may be formed in a polar solvent and included in the fluorescent material as a solution. Alternatively, the complex may be included in the fluorescent material as a thin film. The use of a polymer-surfactant complex in the fluorescent material allows the device to detect both neutral and ionic acceptor molecules. The use of a polymer-surfactant complex film allows the device and the fluorescent material to be reusable after exposing the fluorescent material to a vacuum for limited time.

  8. Delivery of episomal vectors into primary cells by means of commercial transfection reagents.

    PubMed

    Han, Na Rae; Lee, Hyun; Baek, Song; Yun, Jung Im; Park, Kyu Hyun; Lee, Seung Tae

    2015-05-29

    Although episomal vectors are commonly transported into cells by electroporation, a number of electroporation-derived problems have led to the search for alternative transfection protocols, such as the use of transfection reagents, which are inexpensive and easy to handle. Polyplex-mediated transport of episomal vectors into the cytoplasm has been conducted successfully in immortalized cell lines, but no report exists of successful transfection of primary cells using this method. Accordingly, we sought to optimize the conditions for polyplex-mediated transfection for effective delivery of episomal vectors into the cytoplasm of primary mouse embryonic fibroblasts. Episomal vectors were complexed with the commercially available transfection reagents Lipofectamine 2000, FuGEND HD and jetPEI. The ratio of transfection reagent to episomal vectors was varied, and the subsequent transfection efficiency and cytotoxicity of the complexes were analyzed using flow cytometry and trypan blue exclusion assay, respectively. No cytotoxicity and the highest transfection yield were observed when the ratio of transfection reagent to episomal vector was 4 (v/wt) in the cases of Lipofectamine 2000 and FuGENE HD, and 2 in the case of jetPEI. Of the three transfection reagents tested, jetPEI showed the highest transfection efficiency without any cytotoxicity. Thus, we confirmed that the transfection reagent jetPEI could be used to effectively deliver episomal vectors into primary cells without electroporation.

  9. Chemical Amplification with Encapsulated Reagents

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chen, Jian; Koemer, Steffi; Craig, Stephen; Lin, Shirley; Rudkevich, Dmitry M.; Rebek, Julius, Jr.

    2002-01-01

    Autocatalysis and chemical amplification are characteristic properties of living systems, and they give rise to behaviors such as increased sensitivity, responsiveness, and self-replication. Here we report a synthetic system in which a unique form of compartmentalization leads to nonlinear, autocatalytic behavior. The compartment is a reversibly formed capsule in which a reagent is sequestered. Reaction products displace the reagent from the capsule into solution and the reaction rate is accelerated. The resulting self-regulation is sensitive to the highly selective molecular recognition properties of the capsule.

  10. Chemical Amplification with Encapsulated Reagents

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chen, Jian; Koemer, Steffi; Craig, Stephen; Lin, Shirley; Rudkevich, Dmitry M.; Rebek, Julius, Jr.

    2002-01-01

    Autocatalysis and chemical amplification are characteristic properties of living systems, and they give rise to behaviors such as increased sensitivity, responsiveness, and self-replication. Here we report a synthetic system in which a unique form of compartmentalization leads to nonlinear, autocatalytic behavior. The compartment is a reversibly formed capsule in which a reagent is sequestered. Reaction products displace the reagent from the capsule into solution and the reaction rate is accelerated. The resulting self-regulation is sensitive to the highly selective molecular recognition properties of the capsule.

  11. Insulin receptor activation and down-regulation by cationic lipid transfection reagents.

    PubMed

    Pramfalk, Camilla; Lanner, Johanna; Andersson, Monica; Danielsson, Eva; Kaiser, Christina; Renström, Ing-Marie; Warolén, Malin; James, Stephen R

    2004-01-26

    Transfection agents comprised of cationic lipid preparations are widely used to transfect cell lines in culture with specific recombinant complementary DNA molecules. We have found that cells in culture are often resistant to stimulation with insulin subsequent to treatment with transfection agents such as LipofectAMINE 2000 and FuGENE-6. This is seen with a variety of different readouts, including insulin receptor signalling, glucose uptake into muscle cells, phosphorylation of protein kinase B and reporter gene activity in a variety of different cell types We now show that this is due in part to the fact that cationic lipid agents activate the insulin receptor fully during typical transfection experiments, which is then down-regulated. In attempts to circumvent this problem, we investigated the effects of increasing concentrations of LipofectAMINE 2000 on insulin receptor phosphorylation in Chinese hamster ovary cells expressing the human insulin receptor. In addition, the efficiency of transfection that is supported by the same concentrations of transfection reagent was studied by using a green fluorescent protein construct. Our data indicate that considerably lower concentrations of LipofectAMINE 2000 can be used than are recommended by the manufacturers. This is without sacrificing transfection efficiency markedly and avoids the problem of reducing insulin receptor expression in the cells. Widely-used cationic lipid transfection reagents cause a state of insulin unresponsiveness in cells in culture due to fully activating and subsequently reducing the expression of the receptor in cells. This phenomenon can be avoided by reducing the concentration of reagent used in the transfection process.

  12. DNA Transfer into Animal Cells Using Stearylated CPP Based Transfection Reagent.

    PubMed

    Karro, Kristiina; Männik, Tiiu; Männik, Andres; Ustav, Mart

    2015-01-01

    The efficient transfection of cloned genes into cells has a critical role in nucleic acid-based therapeutic applications, molecular and cell biology studies, and the production of recombinant proteins in cultured cells. Using a stearylated cell-penetrating peptide (CPP) NickFect51, we have generated an effective, universal, and convenient method for the delivery of DNA vectors into animal cells derived from different origins (mammalian, avian, insect). The CPP-mediated transfection described in detail herein is efficient for many regular cell lines commonly used for research purposes and it is especially suitable for transfection of protein production cell lines adapted for growth in chemically defined serum-free medium.

  13. The intracellular trafficking mechanism of Lipofectamine-based transfection reagents and its implication for gene delivery.

    PubMed

    Cardarelli, Francesco; Digiacomo, Luca; Marchini, Cristina; Amici, Augusto; Salomone, Fabrizio; Fiume, Giuseppe; Rossetta, Alessandro; Gratton, Enrico; Pozzi, Daniela; Caracciolo, Giulio

    2016-05-11

    Lipofectamine reagents are widely accepted as "gold-standard" for the safe delivery of exogenous DNA or RNA into cells. Despite this, a satisfactory mechanism-based explanation of their superior efficacy has remained mostly elusive thus far. Here we apply a straightforward combination of live cell imaging, single-particle tracking microscopy, and quantitative transfection-efficiency assays on live cells to unveil the intracellular trafficking mechanism of Lipofectamine/DNA complexes. We find that Lipofectamine, contrary to alternative formulations, is able to efficiently avoid active intracellular transport along microtubules, and the subsequent entrapment and degradation of the payload within acidic/digestive lysosomal compartments. This result is achieved by random Brownian motion of Lipofectamine-containing vesicles within the cytoplasm. We demonstrate here that Brownian diffusion is an efficient route for Lipofectamine/DNA complexes to avoid metabolic degradation, thus leading to optimal transfection. By contrast, active transport along microtubules results in DNA degradation and subsequent poor transfection. Intracellular trafficking, endosomal escape and lysosomal degradation appear therefore as highly interdependent phenomena, in such a way that they should be viewed as a single barrier on the route for efficient transfection. As a matter of fact, they should be evaluated in their entirety for the development of optimized non-viral gene delivery vectors.

  14. The intracellular trafficking mechanism of Lipofectamine-based transfection reagents and its implication for gene delivery

    PubMed Central

    Cardarelli, Francesco; Digiacomo, Luca; Marchini, Cristina; Amici, Augusto; Salomone, Fabrizio; Fiume, Giuseppe; Rossetta, Alessandro; Gratton, Enrico; Pozzi, Daniela; Caracciolo, Giulio

    2016-01-01

    Lipofectamine reagents are widely accepted as “gold-standard” for the safe delivery of exogenous DNA or RNA into cells. Despite this, a satisfactory mechanism-based explanation of their superior efficacy has remained mostly elusive thus far. Here we apply a straightforward combination of live cell imaging, single-particle tracking microscopy, and quantitative transfection-efficiency assays on live cells to unveil the intracellular trafficking mechanism of Lipofectamine/DNA complexes. We find that Lipofectamine, contrary to alternative formulations, is able to efficiently avoid active intracellular transport along microtubules, and the subsequent entrapment and degradation of the payload within acidic/digestive lysosomal compartments. This result is achieved by random Brownian motion of Lipofectamine-containing vesicles within the cytoplasm. We demonstrate here that Brownian diffusion is an efficient route for Lipofectamine/DNA complexes to avoid metabolic degradation, thus leading to optimal transfection. By contrast, active transport along microtubules results in DNA degradation and subsequent poor transfection. Intracellular trafficking, endosomal escape and lysosomal degradation appear therefore as highly interdependent phenomena, in such a way that they should be viewed as a single barrier on the route for efficient transfection. As a matter of fact, they should be evaluated in their entirety for the development of optimized non-viral gene delivery vectors. PMID:27165510

  15. Immune response of healthy horses to DNA constructs formulated with a cationic lipid transfection reagent.

    PubMed

    Schnabel, Christiane L; Steinig, P; Koy, M; Schuberth, H-J; Juhls, C; Oswald, D; Wittig, B; Willenbrock, S; Murua Escobar, H; Pfarrer, C; Wagner, B; Jaehnig, P; Moritz, A; Feige, K; Cavalleri, J-M V

    2015-06-23

    Deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) vaccines are used for experimental immunotherapy of equine melanoma. The injection of complexed linear DNA encoding interleukin (IL)-12/IL-18 induced partial tumour remission in a clinical study including 27 grey horses. To date, the detailed mechanism of the anti-tumour effect of this treatment is unknown. In the present study, the clinical and cellular responses of 24 healthy horses were monitored over 72 h after simultaneous intradermal and intramuscular application of equine IL-12/IL-18 DNA (complexed with a transfection reagent) or comparative substances (transfection reagent only, nonsense DNA, nonsense DNA depleted of CG). Although the strongest effect was observed in horses treated with expressing DNA, horses in all groups treated with DNA showed systemic responses. In these horses treated with DNA, rectal temperatures were elevated after treatment and serum amyloid A increased. Total leukocyte and neutrophil counts increased, while lymphocyte numbers decreased. The secretion of tumour necrosis factor alpha (TNFα) and interferon gamma (IFNγ) from peripheral mononuclear blood cells ex vivo increased after treatments with DNA, while IL-10 secretion decreased. Horses treated with DNA had significantly higher myeloid cell numbers and chemokine (C-X-C motif) ligand (CXCL)-10 expression in skin samples at the intradermal injection sites compared to horses treated with transfection reagent only, suggesting an inflammatory response to DNA treatment. In horses treated with expressing DNA, however, local CXCL-10 expression was highest and immunohistochemistry revealed more intradermal IL-12-positive cells when compared to the other treatment groups. In contrast to non-grey horses, grey horses showed fewer effects of DNA treatments on blood lymphocyte counts, TNFα secretion and myeloid cell infiltration in the dermis. Treatment with complexed linear DNA constructs induced an inflammatory response independent of the coding sequence and of

  16. Spatial and Temporal Control of Cavitation Allows High In Vitro Transfection Efficiency in the Absence of Transfection Reagents or Contrast Agents.

    PubMed

    Chettab, Kamel; Roux, Stéphanie; Mathé, Doriane; Cros-Perrial, Emeline; Lafond, Maxime; Lafon, Cyril; Dumontet, Charles; Mestas, Jean-Louis

    2015-01-01

    Sonoporation using low-frequency high-pressure ultrasound (US) is a non-viral approach for in vitro and in vivo gene delivery. In this study, we developed a new sonoporation device designed for spatial and temporal control of ultrasound cavitation. The regulation system incorporated in the device allowed a real-time control of the cavitation level during sonoporation. This device was evaluated for the in vitro transfection efficiency of a plasmid coding for Green Fluorescent Protein (pEGFP-C1) in adherent and non-adherent cell lines. The transfection efficiency of the device was compared to those observed with lipofection and nucleofection methods. In both adherent and non-adherent cell lines, the sonoporation device allowed high rate of transfection of pEGFP-C1 (40-80%), as determined by flow cytometry analysis of GFP expression, along with a low rate of mortality assessed by propidium iodide staining. The transfection efficiency and toxicity of sonoporation on the non-adherent cell lines Jurkat and K562 were similar to those of nucleofection, while these two cell lines were resistant to transfection by lipofection. Moreover, sonoporation was used to produce three stably transfected human lymphoma and leukemia lines. Significant transfection efficiency was also observed in two fresh samples of human acute myeloid leukemia cells. In conclusion, we developed a user-friendly and cost-effective ultrasound device, well adapted for routine in vitro high-yield transfection experiments and which does not require the use of any transfection reagent or gas micro-bubbles.

  17. Slow Release Of Reagent Chemicals From Gel Matrices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Debnam, William J.; Barber, Patrick G.; Coleman, James

    1988-01-01

    Procedure developed for slow release of reagent chemicals into solutions. Simple and inexpensive and not subject to failure of equipment. Use of toothpaste-type tube or pump dispenser conceivably provides more controlled technique for storage and dispensation of gel matrix. Possible uses include controlled, slow release of reagents in chemical reactions, crystal growth, space-flight experiments, and preformed gel medications from packets.

  18. [Effect of different transfection reagents and injection methods in mice testicular injection on the expression of exogenous gene].

    PubMed

    Dai, Jianjun; Li, Xiang; Wu, Caifeng; Zhang, Shushan; Zhang, Tingyu; Zhang, Defu

    2014-10-01

    The purpose of this study was to study the effect of three different transfection reagents (Lipofectamine™ LTX & PLUS™, Lipofectamine 2000 and Nano-PAMAM-D) and three different testicular injection methods (rete testicular injection, seminiferous tubules injection and testicular interstitial injection) on the efficiency of production transgenic mice. After the mixtures of plasmid DNA (pEFP-C1) and transfection reagent were injected with different testicular injection methods, the sperm density, vitality, positive sperm rates and PCR positive transgenic mice rate were examined 30 days after injection. The results showed that the damage degree from slight to serious of three transfection reagents was Lipofectamine™ LTX & PLUS™, Lipofectamine 2000, and PAMAM-D. The sperm positive rates with green fluorescence of these three groups were 35.65%±0.69%, 12.86%±0.35% and 10.04%±0.20%, respectively. The PCR positive rates of transgenic newborn mice were 29.17%, 13.70% and 5.88%, respectively. Among the groups of different testicular injection methods, the damage degree from slight to serious was rete testicular injection, seminiferous tubules injection, and testicular interstitial injection, whereas the sperm positive rates with green fluorescence were 35.13%, 15.13%, and 0%, respectively. The PCR positive rates of transgenic newborn mice among different testicular injection groups were 33.3%, 12.5%, and 0.0%. The combination of rete testicular injection and Lipofectamine™ LTX & PLUS™ had the lowest toxicity and highest transgenic efficiency in the production of transgenic mice.

  19. Stabilization of Transfected Cells Expressing Low-Incidence Blood Group Antigens: Novel Methods Facilitating Their Use as Reagent-Cells

    PubMed Central

    González, Cecilia; Esteban, Rosa; Canals, Carme; Muñiz-Díaz, Eduardo; Nogués, Núria

    2016-01-01

    Background The identification of erythrocyte antibodies in the serum of patients rely on panels of human red blood cells (RBCs), which coexpress many antigens and are not easily available for low-incidence blood group phenotypes. These problems have been addressed by generating cell lines expressing unique blood group antigens, which may be used as an alternative to human RBCs. However, the use of cell lines implies several drawbacks, like the requirement of cell culture facilities and the high cost of cryopreservation. The application of cell stabilization methods could facilitate their use as reagent cells in clinical laboratories. Methods We generated stably-transfected cells expressing low-incidence blood group antigens (Dia and Lua). High-expresser clones were used to assess the effect of TransFix® treatment and lyophilization as cell preservation methods. Cells were kept at 4°C and cell morphology, membrane permeability and antigenic properties were evaluated at several time-points after treatment. Results TransFix® addition to cell suspensions allows cell stabilization and proper antigen detection for at least 120 days, despite an increase in membrane permeability and a reduction in antigen expression levels. Lyophilized cells showed minor morphological changes and antigen expression levels were rather conserved at days 1, 15 and 120, indicating a high stability of the freeze-dried product. These stabilized cells have been proved to react specifically with human sera containing alloantibodies. Conclusions Both stabilization methods allow long-term preservation of the transfected cells antigenic properties and may facilitate their distribution and use as reagent-cells expressing low-incidence antigens, overcoming the limited availability of such rare RBCs. PMID:27603310

  20. Stabilization of Transfected Cells Expressing Low-Incidence Blood Group Antigens: Novel Methods Facilitating Their Use as Reagent-Cells.

    PubMed

    González, Cecilia; Esteban, Rosa; Canals, Carme; Muñiz-Díaz, Eduardo; Nogués, Núria

    2016-01-01

    The identification of erythrocyte antibodies in the serum of patients rely on panels of human red blood cells (RBCs), which coexpress many antigens and are not easily available for low-incidence blood group phenotypes. These problems have been addressed by generating cell lines expressing unique blood group antigens, which may be used as an alternative to human RBCs. However, the use of cell lines implies several drawbacks, like the requirement of cell culture facilities and the high cost of cryopreservation. The application of cell stabilization methods could facilitate their use as reagent cells in clinical laboratories. We generated stably-transfected cells expressing low-incidence blood group antigens (Dia and Lua). High-expresser clones were used to assess the effect of TransFix® treatment and lyophilization as cell preservation methods. Cells were kept at 4°C and cell morphology, membrane permeability and antigenic properties were evaluated at several time-points after treatment. TransFix® addition to cell suspensions allows cell stabilization and proper antigen detection for at least 120 days, despite an increase in membrane permeability and a reduction in antigen expression levels. Lyophilized cells showed minor morphological changes and antigen expression levels were rather conserved at days 1, 15 and 120, indicating a high stability of the freeze-dried product. These stabilized cells have been proved to react specifically with human sera containing alloantibodies. Both stabilization methods allow long-term preservation of the transfected cells antigenic properties and may facilitate their distribution and use as reagent-cells expressing low-incidence antigens, overcoming the limited availability of such rare RBCs.

  1. Peptide Dendrimer/Lipid Hybrid Systems Are Efficient DNA Transfection Reagents: Structure–Activity Relationships Highlight the Role of Charge Distribution Across Dendrimer Generations

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Efficient DNA delivery into cells is the prerequisite of the genetic manipulation of organisms in molecular and cellular biology as well as, ultimately, in nonviral gene therapy. Current reagents, however, are relatively inefficient, and structure–activity relationships to guide their improvement are hard to come by. We now explore peptide dendrimers as a new type of transfection reagent and provide a quantitative framework for their evaluation. A collection of dendrimers with cationic and hydrophobic amino acid motifs (such as KK, KA, KH, KL, and LL) distributed across three dendrimer generations was synthesized by a solid-phase protocol that provides ready access to dendrimers in milligram quantities. In conjunction with a lipid component (DOTMA/DOPE), the best reagent, G1,2,3-KL ((LysLeu)8(LysLysLeu)4(LysLysLeu)2LysGlySerCys-NH2), improves transfection by 6–10-fold over commercial reagents under their respective optimal conditions. Emerging structure–activity relationships show that dendrimers with cationic and hydrophobic residues distributed in each generation are transfecting most efficiently. The trigenerational dendritic structure has an advantage over a linear analogue worth up to an order of magnitude. The success of placing the decisive cationic charge patterns in inner shells rather than previously on the surface of macromolecules suggests that this class of dendrimers significantly differs from existing transfection reagents. In the future, this platform may be tuned further and coupled to cell-targeting moieties to enhance transfection and cell specificity. PMID:23682947

  2. Solid-water detoxifying reagents for chemical and biological agents

    DOEpatents

    Hoffman, Dennis M.; Chiu, Ing Lap

    2006-04-18

    Formation of solid-water detoxifying reagents for chemical and biological agents. Solutions of detoxifying reagent for chemical and biological agents are coated using small quantities of hydrophobic nanoparticles by vigorous agitation or by aerosolization of the solution in the presence of the hydrophobic nanoparticles to form a solid powder. For example, when hydrophobic fumed silica particles are shaken in the presence of IN oxone solution in approximately a 95:5-weight ratio, a dry powder results. The hydrophobic silica forms a porous coating of insoluble fine particles around the solution. Since the chemical or biological agent tends to be hydrophobic on contact with the weakly encapsulated detoxifying solution, the porous coating breaks down and the detoxifying reagent is delivered directly to the chemical or biological agent for maximum concentration at the point of need. The solid-water (coated) detoxifying solutions can be blown into contaminated ventilation ducting or other difficult to reach sites for detoxification of pools of chemical or biological agent. Once the agent has been detoxified, it can be removed by flushing the area with air or other techniques.

  3. RNAi in murine hepatocytes: the agony of choice--a study of the influence of lipid-based transfection reagents on hepatocyte metabolism.

    PubMed

    Böttger, Jan; Arnold, Katrin; Thiel, Carlo; Rennert, Christiane; Aleithe, Susanne; Hofmann, Ute; Vlaic, Sebastian; Sales, Susanne; Shevchenko, Andrej; Matz-Soja, Madlen

    2015-09-01

    Primary hepatocyte cell cultures are widely used for studying hepatic diseases with alterations in hepatic glucose and lipid metabolism, such as diabetes and non-alcoholic fatty liver disease. Therefore, small interfering RNAs (siRNAs) provide a potent and specific tool to elucidate the signaling pathways and gene functions involved in these pathologies. Although RNA interference (RNAi) in vitro is frequently used in these investigations, the metabolic alterations elucidated by different siRNA delivery strategies have hardly been investigated in transfected hepatocytes. To elucidate the influence of the most commonly used lipid-based transfection reagents on cultured primary hepatocytes, we studied the cytotoxic effects and transfection efficiencies of INTERFERin(®), Lipofectamine(®)RNAiMAX, and HiPerFect(®). All of these transfection agents displayed low cytotoxicity (5.6-9.0 ± 1.3-3.4%), normal cell viability, and high transfection efficiency (fold change 0.08-0.13 ± 0.03-0.05), and they also favored the satisfactory down-regulation of target gene expression. However, when effects on the metabolome and lipidome were studied, considerable differences were observed among the transfection reagents. Cellular triacylglycerides levels were either up- or down-regulated [maximum fold change: INTERFERin(®) (48 h) 2.55 ± 0.34, HiPerFect(®) (24 h) 0.79 ± 0.08, Lipofectamine(®)RNAiMAX (48 h) 1.48 ± 0.21], and mRNA levels of genes associated with lipid metabolism were differentially affected. Likewise, metabolic functions such as amino acid utilization from were perturbed (alanine, arginine, glycine, ornithine, and pyruvate). In conclusion, these findings demonstrate that the choice of non-viral siRNA delivery agent is critical in hepatocytes. This should be remembered, especially if RNA silencing is used for studying hepatic lipid homeostasis and its regulation.

  4. Culture time and reagent minimization in the chemical PCC assay.

    PubMed

    Romero, Ivonne; Lamadrid, Ana Ilsa; González, Jorge Ernesto; Mandina, Tania; García, Omar

    2016-10-01

    The possibility to reduce the culture time and volume of blood and reagents required for the chemical Premature Chromosome Condensation (PCC) assay is demonstrated in this work. Peripheral whole blood was exposed to gamma radiation (1-20 Gy). Lymphocytes were cultured for 40 h, using 50 μl of blood and 450 μl of culture medium. The dose-response curves were adjusted, using length ratio (LR) of the longest to the shortest chromosome piece, and the frequency of rings per cell. No statistical differences were found between the results obtained with this method and those reported with the classical PCC assay culture. The minimization of culture time and reagents in combination with the automatic measurement of the LR of the chromosome pieces, or the scoring of rings, can be a valuable biodosimetry tool in a mass casualty scenario.

  5. Transfection of infectious RNA and DNA/RNA layered vectors of semliki forest virus by the cell-penetrating peptide based reagent PepFect6.

    PubMed

    Pärn, Kalle; Viru, Liane; Lehto, Taavi; Oskolkov, Nikita; Langel, Ülo; Merits, Andres

    2013-01-01

    Viral vectors have a wide variety of applications ranging from fundamental studies of viruses to therapeutics. Recombinant viral vectors are usually constructed using methods of reverse genetics to obtain the genetic material of the viral vector. The physicochemical properties of DNA and RNA make them unable to access cells by themselves, and they require assistance to achieve intracellular delivery. Non-viral delivery vectors can be used for this purpose if they enable efficient intracellular delivery without interfering with the viral life cycle. In this report, we utilize Semliki Forest virus (genus alphavirus) based RNA and DNA vectors to study the transfection efficiency of the non-viral cell-penetrating peptide-based delivery vector PepFect6 in comparison with that of the cationic liposome-based Lipofectamine 2000, and assess their impact on viral replication. The optimal conditions for transfection were determined for both reagents. These results demonstrate, for the first time, the ability of PepFect6 to transport large (13-19 kbp) constructs across the cell membrane. Curiously, DNA molecules delivered using the PepFect6 reagent were found to be transported to the cell nucleus approximately 1.5 hours later than DNA molecules delivered using the Lipofectamine 2000 reagent. Finally, although both PepFect6 and Lipofectamine 2000 reagents can be used for alphavirus research, PepFect6 is preferred because it does not induce changes in the normal cellular phenotype and it does not affect the normal replication-infection cycle of viruses in previously transfected cells.

  6. Chemical reagents for investigating the major groove of DNA.

    PubMed

    Rokita, S E

    2001-08-01

    Chemical modification provides an inexpensive and rapid method for characterizing the structure of DNA and its association with drugs and proteins. Numerous conformation-specific probes are available, but most investigations rely on only the most common and readily available of these. The major groove of DNA is typically characterized by reaction with dimethyl sulfate, diethyl pyrocarbonate, potassium permanganate, osmium tetroxide, and, quite recently, bromide with monoperoxysulfate. This commentary discusses the specificity of these reagents and their applications in protection, interference, and missing contact experiments.

  7. Microcalibrator system for chemical signature and reagent delivery.

    SciTech Connect

    Staton, Alan W.; Simonson, Robert Joseph; Adkins, Douglas Ray; Rawlinson, Kim Scott; Robinson, Alex Lockwood; Hance, Bradley G.; Manginell, Ronald Paul; Sanchez, Lawrence James; Ellison, Jennifer Anne; Sokolowski, Sara Suzette

    2005-03-01

    Networked systems of low-cost, small, integrable chemical sensors will enable monitoring of Nonproliferation and Materials Control targets and chemical weapons threats. Sandia-designed prototype chemical sensor systems are undergoing extended field testing supported by DOE and other government agencies. A required surety component will be verification of microanalytical system performance, which can be achieved by providing a programmable source of chemical signature(s) for autonomous calibration of analytical systems. In addition, such a controlled chemical source could be used to dispense microaliquots of derivatization reagents, extending the analysis capability of chemical sensors to a wider range of targets. We have developed a microfabricated system for controlled release of selected compounds (calibrants) into the analytical stream of microsensor systems. To minimize pumping and valve requirements of microfluidic systems, and to avoid degradation issues associated with storage of dilute solutions, we have utilized thermally labile organic salts as solid-phase reservoir materials. Reproducible deposition of tetrapropyl ammonium hydroxide onto arrays of microfabricated heating elements can provide a pair of calibration marker compounds (one fast and one slow-eluting compound) for GC analyses. The use of this microaliquot gas source array for hydrogen generation is currently under further development. The goal of the latter effort will be to provide a source of high-pressure, low viscosity GC carrier gas for Sandia's next-generation microfabricated gas-phase chemical analysis systems.

  8. Synergistic effect of electrical and chemical factors on endocytosis in micro-discharge plasma gene transfection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jinno, M.; Ikeda, Y.; Motomura, H.; Isozaki, Y.; Kido, Y.; Satoh, S.

    2017-06-01

    We have developed a new micro-discharge plasma (MDP)-based gene transfection method, which transfers genes into cells with high efficiency and low cytotoxicity; however, the mechanism underlying the method is still unknown. Studies revealed that the N-acetylcysteine-mediated inhibition of reactive oxygen species (ROS) activity completely abolished gene transfer. In this study, we used laser-produced plasma to demonstrate that gene transfer does not occur in the absence of electrical factors. Our results show that both electrical and chemical factors are necessary for gene transfer inside cells by microplasma irradiation. This indicates that plasma-mediated gene transfection utilizes the synergy between electrical and chemical factors. The electric field threshold required for transfection was approximately 1 kV m-1 in our MDP system. This indicates that MDP irradiation supplies sufficient concentrations of ROS, and the stimulation intensity of the electric field determines the transfection efficiency in our system. Gene transfer by plasma irradiation depends mainly on endocytosis, which accounts for at least 80% of the transfer, and clathrin-mediated endocytosis is a dominant endocytosis. In plasma-mediated gene transfection, alterations in electrical and chemical factors can independently regulate plasmid DNA adhesion and triggering of endocytosis, respectively. This implies that plasma characteristics can be adjusted according to target cell requirements, and the transfection process can be optimized with minimum damage to cells and maximum efficiency. This may explain how MDP simultaneously achieves high transfection efficiency with minimal cell damage.

  9. Enhancement of immunotoxin activity using chemical and biological reagents.

    PubMed Central

    Wu, M.

    1997-01-01

    One of the major discoveries of effective therapeutics is the use of targeted treatment, such as antibody-directed toxins, i.e. immunotoxins; however, this medicine delivery strategy is still at a developmental stage. A number of problems need to be resolved; one is their inefficacy when applied in vivo. Research has stimulated interest in this area through the use of chemical reagents and other moieties to increase the activity of immunotoxins. In this article, reagents that can potentiate the cytotoxicity of immunotoxins are reviewed and the mechanisms that increase activity of immunotoxins are discussed. Lysosomotropic amines, especially ammonium chloride and chloroquine, may raise the pH value of the lysosome in which the conjugates enter. Carboxylic ionophores, e.g. monensin, can influence Golgi vacuolation, which may facilitate the routing of conjugates, augmenting activity. Calcium channel antagonists may increase immunotoxin killing through morphological or other mechanisms that are not yet well understood. Viral particles and surface structure can enhance the cytotoxicity of conjugates, probably through the mechanism of disrupting endosomes. In addition, cytokines, beta-adrenergic blockers, immunosuppressive agents (cyclosporin A) and some antibiotics (daunorubicin) can be used to increase the effect of immunotoxins. PMID:9155057

  10. The Synergistic Effect between Electrical and Chemical Factors in Plasma Gene/Molecule-Transfection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jinno, Masafumi

    2016-09-01

    This study has been done to know what kind of factors in plasma and processes on cells promote plasma gene/molecule transfection. We have discovered a new plasma source using a microcapillary electrode which enables high transfection efficiency and high cell survivability simultaneously. However, the mechanism of the transfection by plasma was not clear. To clarify the transfection mechanisms by micro plasma, we focused on the effects of electrical (current, charge, field, etc.) and chemical (radicals, RONS, etc.) factors generated by the micro plasma and evaluated the contribution weight of three groups of the effects and processes, i.e. electrical, chemical and biochemical ones. At first, the necessity of the electrical factors was estimated by the laser produced plasma (LPP). Mouse L-929 fibroblast cell was cultured on a 96-well plate or 12-well micro slide chamber. Plasmids pCX-EGFP in Tris-EDTA buffer was dropped on the cells and they were exposed to the capillary discharge plasma (CDP) or the LPP. In the case of the CDP, the plasma was generated between the tip of the capillary electrode and the cells so that both electrical and chemical factors were supplied to the cells. In this setup, about 20% of average transfection efficiency was obtained. In the case of the LPP, the plasma was generated apart from the cells so that electrical factors were not supplied to the cells. In this setup, no transfection was observed. These results show that the electrical factors are necessary for the plasma gene transfection. Next, the necessity of the chemical factors was estimated the effect of catalase to remove H2O2 in CDP. The transfection efficiency decreased to 0.4 by scavenging H2O2 with catalase. However, only the solution of H2O2 caused no gene transfection in cells. These results shows that H2O2 is important species to cause gene/molecule transfection but still needs a synergistic effect with electrical or other chemical factors. This work was partly supported by

  11. Intracellular delivery of proteins into mouse Müller glia cells in vitro and in vivo using Pep-1 transfection reagent.

    PubMed

    Wang, Minhua H; Frishman, Laura J; Otteson, Deborah C

    2009-03-15

    Direct protein transfection is a potentially valuable tool for studying protein function in basic and clinical research. A major challenge is to enable a sufficiently large amount of protein to penetrate the plasma membrane of the transfected cells. Pep-1, a protein transfection reagent, was evaluated for its ability and efficiency in delivering proteins and antibodies into mouse Müller cells in vitro and in vivo. Pep-1 delivered active beta-galactosidase enzyme and antibodies (non-specific IgG and Cy3-conjugated anti-vimentin) into cultured Müller cells with high efficiency. Transfection efficiency increased with increasing concentration of the protein in the complex and with incubation time. Following intravitreal injection of Pep-1/IgG complexes in vivo, retinal histology was preserved and immunostaining showed that the antibodies were distributed widely across the retinal surface, with the most intense staining located near the retino-vitreal border. For complexes using non-specific IgG, double staining with anti-glutamine synthetase identified many IgG-positive cells as Müller glia. IgG immunoreactivity was also detected in the cytoplasm and occasionally in the nuclei of inner retinal neurons. Dark-adapted flash electroretinogram (ERG) recordings from injected eyes were nearly identical to ERG recordings from control eyes, suggesting that injection of Pep-1/IgG complex has minimal effects on retinal function. Therefore, Pep-1 is a useful tool for intracellular delivery of antibodies to study the role of proteins in living cells.

  12. Intracellular Delivery of Proteins into Mouse Müller Glia Cells in vitro and in vivo Using Pep-1 Transfection Reagent

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Minhua H.; Frishman, Laura J.

    2009-01-01

    Direct protein transfection is a potentially valuable tool for studying protein function in basic and clinical research. A major challenge is to enable a sufficiently large amount of protein to penetrate the plasma membrane of the transfected cells. Pep-1, a protein transfection reagent, was evaluated for its ability and efficiency in delivering proteins and antibodies into mouse Müller cells in vitro and in vivo. Pep-1 delivered active beta-galactosidase enzyme and antibodies (non-specific IgG and Cy3 conjugated anti-vimentin) into cultured Müller cells with high efficiency. Transfection efficiency increased with increasing concentration of the protein in the complex and with incubation time. Following intravitreal injection of Pep-1/IgG complexes in vivo, retinal histology was preserved and immunostaining showed that the antibodies were distributed widely across the retinal surface, with the most intense staining located near the retino-vitreal border. For complexes using non-specific IgG, double staining with anti-glutamine synthetase identified many IgG-positive cells as Müller glia. IgG immunoreactivity was also detected in the cytoplasm and occasionally in the nuclei of inner retinal neurons. Dark-adapted flash electroretinogram (ERG) recordings from injected eyes were nearly identical to ERG recordings from control eyes, suggesting that injection of Pep-1/IgG complex has minimal effects on retinal function. Therefore, Pep-1 is a useful tool for intracellular delivery of antibodies to study the role of proteins in living cells. PMID:19056421

  13. Exploring the Potential for Using Inexpensive Natural Reagents Extracted from Plants to Teach Chemical Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hartwell, Supaporn Kradtap

    2012-01-01

    A number of scientific articles report on the use of natural extracts from plants as chemical reagents, where the main objective is to present the scientific applications of those natural plant extracts. The author suggests that natural reagents extracted from plants can be used as alternative low cost tools in teaching chemical analysis,…

  14. Exploring the Potential for Using Inexpensive Natural Reagents Extracted from Plants to Teach Chemical Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hartwell, Supaporn Kradtap

    2012-01-01

    A number of scientific articles report on the use of natural extracts from plants as chemical reagents, where the main objective is to present the scientific applications of those natural plant extracts. The author suggests that natural reagents extracted from plants can be used as alternative low cost tools in teaching chemical analysis,…

  15. Minimally-Invasive Gene Transfection by Chemical and Physical Interaction of Atmospheric Pressure Plasma Flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaneko, Toshiro

    2014-10-01

    Non-equilibrium atmospheric pressure plasma irradiated to the living-cell is investigated for medical applications such as gene transfection, which is expected to play an important role in molecular biology, gene therapy, and creation of induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cells. However, the conventional gene transfection using the plasma has some problems that the cell viability is low and the genes cannot be transferred into some specific lipid cells, which is attributed to the unknown mechanism of the gene transfection using the plasma. Therefore, the time-controlled atmospheric pressure plasma flow is generated and irradiated to the living-cell suspended solution for clarifying the transfection mechanism toward developing highly-efficient and minimally- invasive gene transfection system. In this experiment, fluorescent dye YOYO-1 is used as the simulated gene and LIVE/DEAD Stain is simultaneously used for cell viability assay. By the fluorescence image, the transfection efficiency is calculated as the ratio of the number of transferred and surviving cells to total cell count. It is clarified that the transfection efficiency is significantly increased by the short-time (<4 sec) and short-distance (<40 mm) plasma irradiation, and the high transfection efficiency of 53% is realized together with the high cell viability (>90%). This result indicates that the physical effects such as the electric field caused by the charged particles arriving at the surface of the cell membrane, and chemical effects associated with plasma-activated products in solution act synergistically to enhance the cell-membrane transport with low-damage. This work was supported by JSPS KAKENHI Grant Number 24108004.

  16. Poly-L-Lysine-Poly[HPMA] Block Copolymers Obtained by RAFT Polymerization as Polyplex-Transfection Reagents with Minimal Toxicity.

    PubMed

    Tappertzhofen, Kristof; Weiser, Franziska; Montermann, Evelyn; Reske-Kunz, Angelika; Bros, Matthias; Zentel, Rudolf

    2015-08-01

    Herein we describe the synthesis of poly-L-lysine-b-poly[N-(2-hydroxypropyl)-metha-crylamide)] (poly[HPMA]) block copolymers by combination of solid phase peptide synthesis or polymerization of α-amino acid-N-carboxy-anhydrides (NCA-polymerization) with the reversible addition-fragmentation chain transfer polymerization (RAFT). In the presence of p-DNA, these polymers form polyplex micelles with a size of 100-200 nm in diameter (monitored by SDS-PAGE and FCS). Primary in vitro studies with HEK-293T cells reveal their cellular uptake (FACS studies and CLSM) and proof successful transfection with efficiencies depending on the length of polylysine. Moreover, these polyplexes display minimal toxicity (MTT-assay and FACS-measurements) featuring a p[HPMA] corona for efficient extracellular shielding and the potential ligation with antibodies.

  17. Systematic trends in photonic reagent induced reactions in a homologous chemical family.

    PubMed

    Tibbetts, Katharine Moore; Xing, Xi; Rabitz, Herschel

    2013-08-29

    The growing use of ultrafast laser pulses to induce chemical reactions prompts consideration of these pulses as "photonic reagents" in analogy to chemical reagents. This work explores the prospect that photonic reagents may affect systematic trends in dissociative ionization reactions of a homologous family of halomethanes, much as systematic outcomes are often observed for reactions between homologous families of chemical reagents and chemical substrates. The experiments in this work with photonic reagents of varying pulse energy and linear spectral chirp reveal systematic correlations between observable ion yields and the following set of natural variables describing the substrate molecules: the ionization energy of the parent molecule, the appearance energy of each fragment ion, and the relative strength of carbon-halogen bonds in molecules containing two different halogens. The results suggest that reactions induced by photonic reagents exhibit systematic behavior analogous to that observed in reactions driven by chemical reagents, which provides a basis to consider empirical "rules" for predicting the outcomes of photonic reagent induced reactions.

  18. A versatile transfection assay system to evaluate the biological effects of diverse industrial chemicals.

    PubMed

    Koizumi, Shinji; Ohno, Shotaro; Otsuka, Fuminori

    2012-01-01

    Gene expression processes are now recognized as important targets of the toxic effects exerted by industrial chemicals. The transient transfection assay is a powerful tool to evaluate such effects. Thus, we developed a versatile assay system by constructing a basic reporter plasmid in which the regulatory DNA sequence to be studied can easily be substituted. To verify the performance of this system, reporter plasmids carrying any of the three distinct regulatory sequences, estrogen responsive element (ERE), glucocorticoid responsive element (GRE) and xenobiotic responsive element (XRE) were constructed. After transfection of human cells, these plasmids successfully expressed the relevant reporter genes in response to specific inducers, β-estradiol, dexamethasone and 3-methylcholanthrene, respectively. Several industrial chemicals were assayed using these reporter plasmids, and the ability of p-dimethylaminoazobenzene to elevate GRE- and XRE-mediated transcription was detected. α-Naphthylamine and o-tolidine were also observed to increase the XRE-mediated response. The transfection assay system established here will be useful to evaluate the effects of a wide variety of industrial chemicals.

  19. Use of Fenton reagent to improve organic chemical biodegradability.

    PubMed

    Chamarro, E; Marco, A; Esplugas, S

    2001-03-01

    Fenton reagent has been used to test the degradation of different organic compounds (formic acid, phenol, 4-chlorophenol, 2,4-dichlorophenol and nitrobenzene) in aqueous solution. A stoichiometric coefficient for the Fenton reaction was found to be 0.5 mol of organic compound/mol of hydrogen peroxide, except for the formic acid where a value of approximately one was obtained (due to the direct formation of carbon dioxide). The treatment eliminates the toxic substances and increases the biodegradability of the treated water (measured as the ratio BOD5/COD). Biodegradability is attained when the initial compound is removed.

  20. Reagent based DOS: a "Click, Click, Cyclize" strategy to probe chemical space.

    PubMed

    Rolfe, Alan; Lushington, Gerald H; Hanson, Paul R

    2010-05-07

    The synthesis of small organic molecules as probes for discovering new therapeutic agents has been an important aspect of chemical-biology. Herein we report a reagent-based, diversity-oriented synthetic (DOS) strategy to probe chemical and biological space via a "Click, Click, Cyclize" protocol. In this DOS approach, three sulfonamide linchpins underwent cyclization protocols with a variety of reagents to yield a collection of structurally diverse S-heterocycles. In silico analysis is utilized to evaluate the diversity of the compound collection against chemical space (PC analysis), shape space (PMI) and polar surface area (PSA) calculations.

  1. Restoration of obliterated engraved marks on steel surfaces by chemical etching reagent.

    PubMed

    Song, Qingfang

    2015-05-01

    Chemical etching technique is widely used for restoration of obliterated engraved marks on steel surface in the field of public security. The consumed thickness of steel surface during restoration process is considered as a major criterion for evaluating the efficiency of the chemical etching reagent. The thinner the consumed thickness, the higher the restoration efficiency. According to chemical principles, maintaining the continuous oxidative capabilities of etching reagents and increasing the kinetic rate difference of the reaction between the engraved and non-engraved area with the chemical etching reagent can effectively reduce the consumed steel thickness. The study employed steel surface from the engine case of motorcycle and the car frame of automobile. The chemical etching reagents are composed of nitric acid as the oxidizer, hydrofluoric acid as the coordination agent and mixed with glacial acetic acid or acetone as the solvents. Based on the performance evaluation of three different etching reagents, the one composed of HNO3, HF and acetone gave the best result.

  2. Boron nitride nanotubes chemically functionalized with glycol chitosan for gene transfection in eukaryotic cell lines.

    PubMed

    Ferreira, T H; Hollanda, L M; Lancellotti, M; de Sousa, E M B

    2015-06-01

    Nanostructured materials have been widely studied concerning their potential biomedical applications, primarily to selectively carry specific drugs or molecules within a tissue or organ. In this context, boron nitride nanotubes (BNNTs) have generated considerable interest in the scientific community because of their unique properties, presenting good chemical inertness and high thermal stability. Among the many applications proposed for BNNTs in the biomedical field in recent years, the most important include their use as biosensors, nanovectors for the delivery of proteins, drugs, and genes. In the present study, BNNTs were synthesized, purified, and functionalized with glycol chitosan through a chemical process, yielding the BNNT-GC. The size of BNNT-GC was reduced using an ultrasound probe. Two samples with different sizes were selected for in vitro assays. The nanostructures were characterized by transmission electron microscopy (TEM), Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), thermal analysis (TGA), and dynamic light scattering (DLS). The in vitro assays MTT and neutral red (NR) were performed with NIH-3T3 and A549 cell lines and demonstrated that this material is not cytotoxic. Furthermore, the BNNT-GC was applied in gene transfection of plasmid pIRES containing a gene region that express a green fluorescent protein (GFP) in NIH-3T3 and A549 cell lines. The gene transfection was characterized by fluorescent protein produced in the cells and pictured by fluorescent microscopy. Our results suggest that BNNT-GC has moderate stability and presents great potential as a gene carrier agent in nonviral-based therapy, with low cytotoxicity and good transfection efficiency.

  3. Qualitative Gas Chromatography-Mass Spectrometry Analyses Using Amines as Chemical Ionization Reagent Gases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Little, James L.; Howard, Adam S.

    2013-12-01

    Ammonia is a very useful chemical ionization (CI) reagent gas for the qualitative analyses of compounds by positive ion gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GCMS). The gas is readily available, inexpensive, and leaves no carbon contamination in the MS source. Compounds of interest to our laboratory typically yield abundant protonated or ammoniated species, which are indicative of a compound's molecular weight. Nevertheless, some labile compounds fragment extensively by substitution and elimination reactions and yield no molecular weight information. In these cases, a CI reagent gas mixture of methylamine in methane prepared dynamically was found to be very useful in obtaining molecular weight data. Likewise, deuterated ammonia and deuterated methylamine are useful CI reagent gases for determining the exchangeable protons in organic compounds. Deuterated methylamine CI reagent gas is conveniently prepared by dynamically mixing small amounts of methylamine with excess deuterated ammonia.

  4. Isobutane Made Practical as a Reagent Gas for Chemical Ionization Mass Spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Newsome, G Asher; Steinkamp, F Lucus; Giordano, Braden C

    2016-11-01

    As a reagent gas for positive- and negative-mode chemical ionization mass spectrometry (CI-MS), isobutane (i-C4H10) produces superior analyte signal abundance to methane. Isobutane has never been widely adopted for CI-MS because it fouls the ion source more rapidly and produces positive CI spectra that are more strongly dependent on reagent gas pressure compared with methane. Isobutane was diluted to various concentrations in argon for use as a reagent gas with an unmodified commercial gas chromatograph-mass spectrometer. Analyte spectra were directly compared using methane, isobutane, and isobutane/argon mixtures. A mixture of 10% i-C4H10 in argon produced twice the positive-mode analyte signal of methane, equal to pure isobutane, and reduced spectral dependence on reagent gas pressure. Electron capture negative chemical ionization using 1% i-C4H10 in argon tripled analyte signal compared with methane and was reproducible, unlike pure isobutane. The operative lifetime of the ion source using isobutane/argon mixtures was extended exponentially compared with pure isobutane, producing stable and reproducible CI signal throughout. By diluting the reagent gas in an inert buffer gas, isobutane CI-MS experiments were made as practical to use as methane CI-MS experiments but with superior analytical performance. Graphical Abstract ᅟ.

  5. Isobutane Made Practical as a Reagent Gas for Chemical Ionization Mass Spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Newsome, G. Asher; Steinkamp, F. Lucus; Giordano, Braden C.

    2016-11-01

    As a reagent gas for positive- and negative-mode chemical ionization mass spectrometry (CI-MS), isobutane ( i-C4H10) produces superior analyte signal abundance to methane. Isobutane has never been widely adopted for CI-MS because it fouls the ion source more rapidly and produces positive CI spectra that are more strongly dependent on reagent gas pressure compared with methane. Isobutane was diluted to various concentrations in argon for use as a reagent gas with an unmodified commercial gas chromatograph-mass spectrometer. Analyte spectra were directly compared using methane, isobutane, and isobutane/argon mixtures. A mixture of 10% i-C4H10 in argon produced twice the positive-mode analyte signal of methane, equal to pure isobutane, and reduced spectral dependence on reagent gas pressure. Electron capture negative chemical ionization using 1% i-C4H10 in argon tripled analyte signal compared with methane and was reproducible, unlike pure isobutane. The operative lifetime of the ion source using isobutane/argon mixtures was extended exponentially compared with pure isobutane, producing stable and reproducible CI signal throughout. By diluting the reagent gas in an inert buffer gas, isobutane CI-MS experiments were made as practical to use as methane CI-MS experiments but with superior analytical performance.

  6. Chemical degradation of cyanides by Fenton's reagent in aqueous and soil-containing systems

    SciTech Connect

    Aronstein, B.N. ); Lawal, R.A. ); Maka, A. )

    1994-11-01

    A study was conducted on the effects of pH of the medium, composition of Fenton's reagent, and the effect of soil's preequilibration with the chemical, on the degradation of [sup 14]C-labeled free and complex cyanide in aqueous and soil-containing systems. The application of Fenton's reagent resulted in degradation of 80% and 67% of potassium cyanide in aqueous systems at pH 7.2 and 10.0, respectively. No appreciable amount of K[sub 4][Fe(CN)[sub 6

  7. Chemical transfection of dye-conjugated microRNA precursors for microRNA functional analysis of M2 macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Ng, Yee Seng; Roca, Hernan; Fuller, David; Sud, Sudha

    2012-01-01

    Background MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are short non-coding ribonucleic acids known to affect gene expression at the translational level and there is mounting evidence that miRNAs play a role in the function of tumor-associated macrophages (TAMs). To aid the functional analyses of miRNAs in an in-vitro model of TAMs known as M2 macrophages, a transfection method to introduce artificial miRNA constructs or miRNA molecules into primary human monocytes is needed. Unlike differentiated macrophages or dendritic cells, undifferentiated primary human monocytes have been known to show resistance to lentiviral transduction. To circumvent this challenge, other techniques such as electroporation and chemical transfection have been used in other applications to deliver small gene constructs into human monocytes. To date, no studies have compared these two methods objectively to evaluate their suitability in the miRNA functional analysis of M2 macrophages. Results Of the methods tested, the electroporation of miRNA-construct containing plasmids and the chemical transfection of miRNA precursor molecules are the most efficient approaches. The use of a silencer siRNA labeling kit (Ambion) to conjugate Cy 3 fluorescence dyes to the precursor molecules allowed the isolation of successfully transfected cells with fluorescence-activated cell sorting. The chemical transfection of these dye-conjugated miRNA precursors yield an efficiency of 37.5 ± 0.6% and a cell viability of 74 ± 1%. RNA purified from the isolated cells demonstrated good quality, and was fit for subsequent mRNA expression qPCR analysis. While electroporation of plasmids containing miRNA constructs yield transfection efficiencies comparable to chemical transfection of miRNA precursors, these electroporated primary monocytes seemed to have lost their potential for differentiation. Conclusions Among the most common methods of transfection, the chemical transfection of dye-conjugated miRNA precursors was determined to be the best

  8. [Determination of blood constituents with dry reagent carriers. Comparison with wet chemical tests (author's transl)].

    PubMed

    Thomas, L; Appel, W; Storz, G; Plischke, W

    1981-08-28

    Quantitative measurement of blood constituents (glucose, uric acid, urea-N) on dry reagent carriers was compared with corresponding wet-chemical methods. There was a good correlation (r greater than 0.95) and excellent linear regression with small scatter between the two methods for the three constituents. The dry test has proved to be a precise, simple, rapid and economic method, especially suitable for the practitioner and emergency laboratory.

  9. Effects of molecular size and chemical factor on plasma gene transfection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ikeda, Yoshihisa; Motomura, Hideki; Kido, Yugo; Satoh, Susumu; Jinno, Masafumi

    2016-07-01

    In order to clarify the mechanism of plasma gene transfection, the relationship between transfection efficiency and transferred molecular size was investigated. Molecules with low molecular mass (less than 50 kDa; dye or dye-labeled oligonucleotide) and high molecular mass (more than 1 MDa; plasmid DNA or fragment of plasmid DNA) were transferred to L-929 cells. It was found that the transfection efficiency decreases with increasing in transferred molecular size and also depends on the tertiary structure of transferred molecules. Moreover, it was suggested the transfection mechanism is different between the molecules with low (less than 50 kDa) and high molecular mass (higher than 1 MDa). For the amount of gene transfection after plasma irradiation, which is comparable to that during plasma irradiation, it is shown that H2O2 molecules are the main contributor. The transfection efficiency decreased to 0.40 ± 0.22 upon scavenging the H2O2 generated by plasma irradiation using the catalase. On the other hand, when the H2O2 solution is dropped into the cell suspension without plasma irradiation, the transfection efficiency is almost 0%. In these results, it is also suggested that there is a synergetic effect of H2O2 with electrical factors or other reactive species generated by plasma irradiation.

  10. Combinatorial electrostatic collision-induced dissociative chemical cross-linking reagents for probing protein surface topology.

    PubMed

    Liu, Fan; Goshe, Michael B

    2010-07-15

    To ascertain more information on protein domain orientation and complex structure associations using chemical cross-linking, we have developed a combination of electrostatic collision-induced dissociative cross-linking reagents that differentially react with protein surfaces which are effectively analyzed by liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry using ion trap multistage collision-induced dissociation. Implementing our original design and methodology based on disuccinimidyl-succinamyl-aspartyl-proline (SuDP) (Soderblom, E. J.; Goshe, M. B. Anal. Chem 2006, 78, 8059-8068. Soderblom, E. J.; Bobay, B. G.; Cavanagh, J.; Goshe, M. B. Rapid Commun Mass Spectrom 2007, 21, 3395-3408.), disuccinimidyl-succinamyl-valyl-proline (SuVP) was synthesized. The SuDP and SuVP reagents are the same except for the valyl and aspartyl groups which provide a distinctive chemical feature to each reagent. When performing labeling reactions using various protein-to-cross-linker ratios at pH 7.5, the negatively charged SuDP and neutral SuVP were used to label bovine serum albumin and hemoglobin. After protein digestion, the resulting peptides were analyzed using four different ion trap LC/MS(3) acquisition methods incorporating multistage CID. The more polar BSA surface resulted in a number of unique interpeptide and intrapeptide cross-links for each reagent whereas the less polarized surface of hemoglobin produced similar results for both reagents. Based on the identification of dead-end products (i.e., a cross-link modification containing a hydrolyzed end) for each protein, the aminolysis reactivity of each modified lysyl side chain revealed a preference for reacting with each reagent according to its local electrostatic surface environment. Overall, combinatorial application of SuDP and SuVP chemical labeling produces a set of unique interpeptide, intrapeptide, and dead-end cross-linked products that provides protein structural information according to its electrostatic surface

  11. Chemical bonding and the equilibrium composition of Grignard reagents in ethereal solutions.

    PubMed

    Henriques, André M; Barbosa, André G H

    2011-11-10

    A thorough analysis of the electronic structure and thermodynamic aspects of Grignard reagents and its associated equilibrium composition in ethereal solutions is performed. Considering methylmagnesium halides containing fluorine, chlorine, and bromine, we studied the neutral, charged, and radical species associated with their chemical equilibrium in solution. The ethereal solvents considered, tetrahydrofuran (THF) and ethyl ether (Et(2)O), were modeled using the polarizable continuum model (PCM) and also by explicit coordination to the Mg atoms in a cluster. The chemical bonding of the species that constitute the Grignard reagent is analyzed in detail with generalized valence bond (GVB) wave functions. Equilibrium constants were calculated with the DFT/M06 functional and GVB wave functions, yielding similar results. According to our calculations and existing kinetic and electrochemical evidence, the species R(•), R(-), (•)MgX, and RMgX(2)(-) must be present in low concentration in the equilibrium. We conclude that depending on the halogen, a different route must be followed to produce the relevant equilibrium species in each case. Chloride and bromide must preferably follow a "radical-based" pathway, and fluoride must follow a "carbanionic-based" pathway. These different mechanisms are contrasted against the available experimental results and are proven to be consistent with the existing thermodynamic data on the Grignard reagent equilibria.

  12. DETERMINATION OF PHTHALATES IN WATER AND SOIL BY TANDEM MASS SPECTROMETRY UNDER CHEMICAL IONIZATION CONDITIONS WITH ISOBUTANE AS REAGENT GAS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Phthalate determination is important because phthalates often are major impurities in samples and can have significant health effects. Tandem mass spectrometry under chemical ionization mass spectrometry conditions with isobutane as the reagent gas was used to determine 11 phthal...

  13. Accurate dispensing of volatile reagents on demand for chemical reactions in EWOD chips

    PubMed Central

    Ding, Huijiang; Sadeghi, Saman; Shah, Gaurav J.; Chen, Supin; Keng, Pei Yuin; Kim, Chang-Jin “CJ”; van Dam, R. Michael

    2015-01-01

    Digital microfluidic chips provide a new platform for manipulating chemicals for multi-step chemical synthesis or assays at the microscale. The organic solvents and reagents needed for these applications are often volatile, sensitive to contamination, and wetting, i.e. have contact angles of < 90° even on the highly hydrophobic surfaces (e.g., Teflon® or Cytop®) typically used on digital microfluidic chips. Furthermore, often the applications dictate that the processes are performed in a gas environment, not allowing the use of a filler liquid (e.g., oil). These properties pose challenges for delivering controlled volumes of liquid to the chip. An automated, simple, accurate and reliable method of delivering reagents from sealed, off-chip reservoirs is presented here. This platform overcomes the issues of evaporative losses of volatile solvents, cross-contamination, and flooding of the chip by combining a syringe pump, a simple on-chip liquid detector and a robust interface design. The impedance-based liquid detection requires only minimal added hardware to provide a feedback signal to ensure accurate volumes of volatile solvents are introduced to the chip, independent of time delays between dispensing operations. On-demand dispensing of multiple droplets of acetonitrile, a frequently used but difficult to handle solvent due to its wetting properties and volatility, was demonstrated and used to synthesize the positron emission tomography (PET) probe [18F]FDG reliably. PMID:22825699

  14. In situ chemical ionization in ion trap mass spectrometry--the beneficial influence of isobutane as a reagent gas.

    PubMed

    Bouchonnet, Stéphane; Kinani, Saïd; Sablier, Michel; Pirnay, Stéphane

    2007-01-01

    We report a comparison of the ionization yields provided by the most common reagents (methane, ammonia, methanol, acetonitrile, isobutane) performing in situ chemical ionization with an ion trap mass spectrometer. Four molecules were chosen in the medical field to illustrate experimental results: alprazolam, diazepam, flunitrazepam and acetaminophen. Under usual operational conditions, relative abundances of protonated ions appreciably depend on the reagents. The greatest abundance of MH+ ions was obtained with isobutane while observed intensities for MH+ ions varied from 73% for methanol and ammonia to about 23% for acetonitrile and methane. Results were temptatively rationalized comparing energies of formation of the reagent ions and storage efficiency in the trapping field.

  15. Electroporation for Transfection and Differentiation of Dental Pulp Stem Cells

    PubMed Central

    Rabie, Bakr M.

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Target gene delivery is needed to induce cellular differentiation or a specific therapeutic effect. Electroporation is a relatively safe and simple technique to deliver nucleic acids to the cell that acts by rendering cells transiently permeable using short periods of high voltage. In stem cell research, human dental pulp stem cells (hDPSCS) are highly accessible, and they exhibit broad differentiation potential. Until now, no studies have attempted to optimize electroporation parameters for DPSCs with respect to transfection efficiency and viability. In this study, we aimed to optimize transfection of DPSCs through varying different electroporation parameters, including voltage, mode of pulsation, and the number of pulses. As positive control, we used commonly utilized the chemical transfection reagents Lipofectamine 2000 and FuGene 6. In addition, we used our newly optimized transfection conditions to transfect hDPSCs with a functional chondrogenic transgene. We obtained higher transfection efficiency and cell viability with these electroporation conditions compared to controls. The highest transfection efficiency (63.81±4.72%) was achieved with 100 V, 20 msec, one-pulse square-wave condition. Among chemical transfection groups, FuGene 6 showed the highest cell viability at all tested transfection ratios, while Lipofectamine 2000 showed the highest transfection efficiency (19.23±3.19%) using 1:1 DNA (μg):Lipofectamine (μL). Transfected DPSCs functionally expressed the transforming growth factor β-3 chondrogenic transgene on the mRNA level as detected by real-time polymerase chain reaction and on the protein level as detected by Western blot analysis. An increase in various chondrogenic markers was also found when studying mRNA expression in transfected cells. In conclusion, the results of our study demonstrate optimal electroporation and chemical transfection reagent conditions for hDPSCs, and, subsequently, we provide proof of concept for

  16. Treatment of textile effluent by chemical (Fenton's Reagent) and biological (sequencing batch reactor) oxidation.

    PubMed

    Rodrigues, Carmen S D; Madeira, Luis M; Boaventura, Rui A R

    2009-12-30

    The removal of organic compounds and colour from a synthetic effluent simulating a cotton dyeing wastewater was evaluated by using a combined process of Fenton's Reagent oxidation and biological degradation in a sequencing batch reactor (SBR). The experimental design methodology was first applied to the chemical oxidation process in order to determine the values of temperature, ferrous ion concentration and hydrogen peroxide concentration that maximize dissolved organic carbon (DOC) and colour removals and increase the effluent's biodegradability. Additional studies on the biological oxidation (SBR) of the raw and previously submitted to Fenton's oxidation effluent had been performed during 15 cycles (i.e., up to steady-state conditions), each one with the duration of 11.5h; Fenton's oxidation was performed either in conditions that maximize the colour removal or the increase in the biodegradability. The obtained results allowed concluding that the combination of the two treatment processes provides much better removals of DOC, BOD(5) and colour than the biological or chemical treatment alone. Moreover, the removal of organic matter in the integrated process is particularly effective when Fenton's pre-oxidation is carried out under conditions that promote the maximum increase in wastewater biodegradability.

  17. A combined photocatalytic determination system for chemical oxygen demand with a highly oxidative reagent.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Aiyong; Zhou, Minghua; Zhou, Qixing

    2011-02-07

    This study focuses on the proposal and validation of a combined photocatalytic (PC) system and a three-parameterized procedure for the determination of chemical oxygen demand (COD; PcCOD(combined)), with a highly oxidative reagent utilized as a photoelectron scavenger and signal indicator. The PcCOD(combined) was the functional combination of photon-efficient thin-layer photocatalytic oxidation, conventional bulk-phase photocatalytic oxidation and photocarrier-efficient high-activity photocatalytic reduction in one single photodigestion system, and consequently, this system possessed high photon-utilization efficiency, automatic stirring function and satisfactory determination characteristics. In comparison with the conventional one-parameterized procedure, the three-parameterized procedure introduces the blank and total photocatalytic reduction responses as two of the three significant analytical parameters. Under the optimized pH value of 3.0-4.5 and a rotating rate of 40 rpm, the representative KMnO(4) species was used for the PcCOD(combined) system as the combined high-activity oxidant, and a narrow and reliable analytical linear range of 0-260 mg L(-1) was achieved during the 10 min duration of the determinations. No observable interference of Cl(-) was found at concentration of the ion up to 2000 mg L(-1). A real sample analysis indicated that the measured values for the PcCOD(combined) were all within a relative deviation below 5% of COD(Cr) of the standard method, which further validates the practical feasibility of the proposed PcCOD(combined) system.

  18. CF3(+) and CF2H(+): new reagents for n-alkane determination in chemical ionisation reaction mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Blake, Robert S; Ouheda, Saleh A; Evans, Corey J; Monks, Paul S

    2016-11-28

    Alkanes provide a particular analytical challenge to commonly used chemical ionisation methods such as proton-transfer from water owing to their basicity. It is demonstrated that the fluorocarbon ions CF3(+) and CF2H(+), generated from CF4, as reagents provide an effective means of detecting light n-alkanes in the range C2-C6 using direct chemical ionisation mass spectrometry. The present work assesses the applicability of the reagents in Chemical Ionisation Mass Spectrometric (CI-TOF-MS) environments with factors such as high moisture content, operating pressures of 1-10 Torr, accelerating electric fields (E/N) and long-lived intermediate complex formation. Of the commonly used chemical ionisation reagents, H3O(+) and NO(+) only react with hexane and higher while O2(+) reacts with all the target samples, but creates significant fragmentation. By contrast, CF3(+) and CF2H(+) acting together were found to produce little or no fragmentation. In dry conditions with E/N = 100 Td or higher the relative intensity of CF2H(+) to CF3(+) was mostly less than 1% but always less than 3%, making CF3(+) the main reagent ion. Using O2(+) in a parallel series of experiments, a substantially greater degree of fragmentation was observed. The detection sensitivities of the alkanes with CF3(+) and CF2H(+), while relatively low, were found to be better than those observed with O2(+). Experiments using alkane mixtures in the ppm range have shown the ionisation technique based on CF3(+) and CF2H(+) to be particularly useful for measurements of alkane/air mixtures found in polluted environments. As a demonstration of the technique's effectiveness in complex mixtures, the detection of n-alkanes in a smoker's breath is demonstrated.

  19. Superhydrophilic-Superhydrophobic Patterned Surfaces as High-Density Cell Microarrays: Optimization of Reverse Transfection.

    PubMed

    Ueda, Erica; Feng, Wenqian; Levkin, Pavel A

    2016-10-01

    High-density microarrays can screen thousands of genetic and chemical probes at once in a miniaturized and parallelized manner, and thus are a cost-effective alternative to microwell plates. Here, high-density cell microarrays are fabricated by creating superhydrophilic-superhydrophobic micropatterns in thin, nanoporous polymer substrates such that the superhydrophobic barriers confine both aqueous solutions and adherent cells within each superhydrophilic microspot. The superhydrophobic barriers confine and prevent the mixing of larger droplet volumes, and also control the spreading of droplets independent of the volume, minimizing the variability that arises due to different liquid and surface properties. Using a novel liposomal transfection reagent, ScreenFect A, the method of reverse cell transfection is optimized on the patterned substrates and several factors that affect transfection efficiency and cytotoxicity are identified. Higher levels of transfection are achieved on HOOC- versus NH2 -functionalized superhydrophilic spots, as well as when gelatin and fibronectin are added to the transfection mixture, while minimizing the amount of transfection reagent improves cell viability. Almost no diffusion of the printed transfection mixtures to the neighboring microspots is detected. Thus, superhydrophilic-superhydrophobic patterned surfaces can be used as cell microarrays and for optimizing reverse cell transfection conditions before performing further cell screenings. © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  20. Students' Dilemmas in Reaction Stoichiometry Problem Solving: Deducing the Limiting Reagent in Chemical Reactions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chandrasegaran, A. L.; Treagust, David F.; Waldrip, Bruce G.; Chandrasegaran, Antonia

    2009-01-01

    A qualitative case study was conducted to investigate the understanding of the limiting reagent concept and the strategies used by five Year 11 students when solving four reaction stoichiometry problems. Students' written problem-solving strategies were studied using the think-aloud protocol during problem-solving, and retrospective verbalisations…

  1. Students' Dilemmas in Reaction Stoichiometry Problem Solving: Deducing the Limiting Reagent in Chemical Reactions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chandrasegaran, A. L.; Treagust, David F.; Waldrip, Bruce G.; Chandrasegaran, Antonia

    2009-01-01

    A qualitative case study was conducted to investigate the understanding of the limiting reagent concept and the strategies used by five Year 11 students when solving four reaction stoichiometry problems. Students' written problem-solving strategies were studied using the think-aloud protocol during problem-solving, and retrospective verbalisations…

  2. Single Molecule Source Reagents for Chemical Vapor Deposition of B- Silicon Carbide

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1992-12-10

    vapor deposition of stoichiometric Beta silicon carbide . Four single molecule sources were synthesized, their decomposition pathways studied, and their...utility in Beta- silicon carbide CVD investigated. Dramatic differences in the CVD process resulted from small changes in the reagent structure. A...strained cyclic molecule, 1,3-disilacyclobutane, allowed growth of a Beta- silicon carbide film at a temperature >300 deg C lower than was possible with a

  3. CROSS: an efficient workflow for reaction-driven rescaffolding and side-chain optimization using robust chemical reactions and available reagents.

    PubMed

    Evers, Andreas; Hessler, Gerhard; Wang, Li-hsing; Werrel, Simon; Monecke, Peter; Matter, Hans

    2013-06-13

    A novel procedure (CROSS: Computational Rescaffolding and Optimization using Synthetic Schemes) for in silico rescaffolding and side-chain optimization is reported with explicit consideration of the route of synthesis and availability of compatible chemical reagents. We have defined a set of retrosynthetic disconnections representing robust reactions, amenable for combinatorial chemistry. This rule set is used to generate virtual fragment databases from available reagents. Each reactive center is annotated with its compatibility with regard to the chemical reactions. The rule set is then applied to a new molecule to obtain separate query subunits for rescaffolding by 3D similarity searching in specific reagent-derived fragment databases. Thus, only fragments compatible with the chemistry and shape of the corresponding query moiety are investigated further. The identified fragment hits directly indicate (1) available chemical reagents that can replace the query moiety in the starting molecule and (2) the route for the synthesis of the proposed molecules.

  4. Suppression of sodium nuclear magnetic resonance double-quantum coherence by chemical shift and relaxation reagents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hutchison, Robert B.; Huntley, James J. A.; Jin, Haoran; Shapiro, Joseph I.

    1992-12-01

    An investigation into the signal suppression behavior of the paramagnetic shift and relaxation reagents, Dy(P3O10)27- and Gd(P3O10)27-, with regard to their use in the nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopic study of sodium has been performed. Measurements of T1 and T2 relaxation time constants of sodium in normal saline, Krebs-Henseleit buffer, and human blood serum, as a function of concentration of these reagents showed that, although closely coupled in the saline and K-H buffer environments, in plasma T1 and T2 become decoupled, transverse relaxation dominating in comparison to longitudinal relaxation. Linewidth measurements further suggest that relaxation in the plasma milieu is controlled primarily by inherent T2 relaxation, rather than by field inhomogeneity or diffusion effects. Quantitative single-quantum (1Q) and double-quantum (2Q) intensity measurements, biexponential T2 relaxation measurements, and parametric studies of the preparation time of the 2Q pulse sequence, were obtained in suspensions of bovine serum albumin and human erythrocytes. The observed suppression of sodium 2Q coherence by paramagnetic shift and relaxation reagents was found to exhibit a complex behavior in albumin solutions, involving the biexponential T2 decay to be expected during the preparation time of the 2Q filter pulse sequence, as well as the optimum preparation time for production of the double-quantum coherence itself. The controlling factor for both of these effects is the biexponential amplitude function in the expression for the transverse magnetization observed following application of the 2Q pulse sequence. This in turn is determined entirely by the values for the slow and fast components of biexponential relaxation in sodium, which themselves depend upon the concentration of the macromolecular binding sites for quadrupolar interaction. A similar behavior has been observed in suspensions of human erythrocytes.

  5. The First Step in the Final Shutdown of UP1 Plant: Rinsing with Chemical Reagents

    SciTech Connect

    Moulin, J.-P.; Hubert, N.; Huot, M.; Chany, P.; Oriol, C.; Vignau, B.

    2002-02-25

    The COGEMA UP1 reprocessing plant commissioned at Marcoule, France in 1958 handled roughly 20,000 metric tons of fuel from gas-cooled and research reactors. The commercial reprocessing activities of the UP1 plant ended in December 1997. CODEM , a joint venture created by the former users of the UP1 plant, including the utility Electricite de France (EDF), the French Atomic Energy Commission (CEA) and COGEMA, was established to fund and supervise decommissioning of the plant. COGEMA was selected as the industrial operator of the decommissioning project, which is scheduled to span a period of about 40 years. COGEMA, with its CODEM partners, had made the decision to proceed to a ''Final Shutdown'' of the plant within a few years after the end of commercial operation. Final shutdown is intended to remove remaining fissile matter and highly radioactive materials, as well as some equipment, from the plant to ease the plant monitoring requirements compared with those applied when the plant was in operation. A two-step approach has been devised, including first the rinsing of the equipment with selected reagents in order to decrease the radiation exposure rate and contamination risk enough to allow further mechanical decontamination operations, such as high-pressure water scrubbing and equipment cutting. The reagents to be used and the methods employed to optimize their use in terms of quantities and sequence of use were selected by leveraging available experience, and by setting up a large-scale R&D program to test reagents both for general decontamination and for hot spots. This program also included treatment of the decontamination waste to demonstrate that this waste could be made compatible with solidification facilities of the UP1 plant, i. e., vitrification in the AVM facility and bituminization. The R&D results are described, as well as the initial results of plant decontamination.

  6. Chemical enhancement of footwear impressions in blood on fabric - part 2: peroxidase reagents.

    PubMed

    Farrugia, Kevin J; Savage, Kathleen A; Bandey, Helen; Ciuksza, Tomasz; Nic Daéid, Niamh

    2011-09-01

    This study investigates the optimisation of peroxidase based enhancement techniques for footwear impressions made in blood on various fabric surfaces. Four different haem reagents: leuco crystal violet (LCV), leuco malachite green (LMG), fluorescein and luminol were used to enhance the blood contaminated impressions. The enhancement techniques in this study were used successfully to enhance the impressions in blood on light coloured surfaces, however, only fluorescent and/or chemiluminescent techniques allowed visualisation on dark coloured fabrics, denim and leather. Luminol was the only technique to enhance footwear impressions made in blood on all the fabrics investigated in this study. Copyright © 2010 Forensic Science Society. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Heavy Grignard Reagents: Synthesis, Physical and Structural Properties, Chemical Behavior, and Reactivity.

    PubMed

    Westerhausen, Matthias; Koch, Alexander; Görls, Helmar; Krieck, Sven

    2017-01-31

    The Grignard reaction offers a straight forward atom-economic synthesis of organomagnesium halides, which undergo redistribution reactions (Schlenk equilibrium) yielding diorganylmagnesium and magnesium dihalides. The homologous organocalcium complexes (heavy Grignard reagents) gained interest only quite recently owing to several reasons. The discrepancy between the inertness of this heavy alkaline earth metal and the enormous reactivity of its organometallics hampered a vast and timely development after the first investigation more than 100 years ago. In this overview the synthesis of organocalcium reagents is described as is the durability in ethereal solvents. Aryl-, alkenyl-, and alkylcalcium halides are prepared by direct synthesis. Characteristic structural features and NMR parameters are discussed. Ligand redistribution reactions can be performed by addition of potassium tert-butanolate to ethereal solutions of arylcalcium iodides yielding soluble diarylcalcium, whereas sparingly soluble potassium iodide and calcium bis(tert-butanolate) precipitate. Furthermore, reactivity studies with respect to metalation and addition to unsaturated organic compounds and metal-based Lewis acids, leading to the formation of heterobimetallic complexes, are presented.

  8. Kinetic-quantum chemical model for catalytic cycles: the Haber-Bosch process and the effect of reagent concentration.

    PubMed

    Kozuch, Sebastian; Shaik, Sason

    2008-07-03

    A combined kinetic-quantum chemical model is developed with the goal of estimating in a straightforward way the turnover frequency (TOF) of catalytic cycles, based on the state energies obtained by quantum chemical calculations. We describe how the apparent activation energy of the whole cycle, so-called energetic span (delta E), is influenced by the energy levels of two species: the TOF determining transition state (TDTS) and the TOF determining intermediate (TDI). Because these key species need not be adjoining states, we conclude that for catalysis there are no rate-determining steps, only rate determining states. In addition, we add here the influence of reactants concentrations. And, finally, the model is applied to the Haber-Bosch process of ammonia synthesis, for which we show how to calculate which catalyst will be the most effective under specific reagents conditions.

  9. Evaluation of FTA(®) card for the rescue of infectious foot-and-mouth disease virus by chemical transfection of extracted RNA in cultured cells.

    PubMed

    Biswal, Jitendra K; Subramaniam, Saravanan; Ranjan, Rajeev; Pattnaik, Bramhadev

    2016-08-01

    Foot-and-mouth disease (FMD) is a highly contagious epidemic disease of transboundary importance. Inadequate storage and shipment of suspected clinical samples can compromise the ability to detect and characterise FMD virus (FMDV) in endemic countries, thereby, leading to the loss of valuable virological and epidemiological data. This study, investigates the potential of using FTA(®) cards for dry transportation of clinical samples and subsequent recovery of infectious FMDV by chemical transfection of FTA(®) card fixed RNA as an alternative to the conventional cell culture based virus isolation method. A higher proportion of infectious FMDV was rescued from clinical samples (cell culture isolates, tongue epithelial suspension and impression smears) by the FTA(®) card fixed RNA transfection method (76%) compared to the conventional cell culture based virus isolation (56%), suggesting a better performance of the current RNA transfection procedure. Furthermore, it was possible to rescue live virus by the transfection of RNA extracted from FTA(®) card impregnated with clinical samples that had been stored at varying temperature (4-37 °C) up to a period of six weeks. The VP1 sequence data and antigenic relationships with the vaccine strains, between viruses rescued by FTA(®) card fixed RNA transfection and conventional cell culture, were comparable. Therefore, these results support the use of the FTA(®) card for the economic, dry, non-hazardous transport of FMD suspected clinical samples from the site of collection to national/international reference laboratories. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Facile hydrolysis-based chemical destruction of the warfare agents VX, GB, and HD by alumina-supported fluoride reagents.

    PubMed

    Gershonov, E; Columbus, I; Zafrani, Y

    2009-01-02

    A facile solvent-free hydrolysis (chemical destruction) of the warfare agents VX (O-ethyl S-2-(diisopropylamino)ethyl methylphosphonothioate), GB (O-isopropyl methylphosphonofluoridate or sarin), and HD (2,2'-dichloroethyl sulfide or sulfur mustard) upon reaction with various solid-supported fluoride reagents is described. These solid reagents include different alumina-based powders such as KF/Al(2)O(3), AgF/KF/Al(2)O(3), and KF/Al(2)O(3) enriched by so-called coordinatively unsaturated fluoride ions (termed by us as ECUF-KF/Al(2)O(3)). When adsorbed on these sorbents, the nerve agent VX quickly hydrolyzed (t(1/2) range between 0.1-6.3 h) to the corresponding nontoxic phosphonic acid EMPA as a major product (>90%) and to the relatively toxic desethyl-VX (<10%). The latter byproduct was further hydrolyzed to the nontoxic MPA product (t(1/2) range between 2.2-161 h). The reaction rates and the product distribution were found to be strongly dependent on the nature of the fluoride ions in the KF/Al(2)O(3) matrix and on its water content. All variations of the alumina-supported fluoride reagents studied caused an immediate hydrolysis of the highly toxic GB (t(1/2) < 10 min) to form the corresponding nontoxic phosphonic acid IMPA. A preliminary study of the detoxification of HD on these catalyst supports showed the formation of the nontoxic 1,4-thioxane as a major product together with minor amounts of TDG and vinylic compounds within a few days. The mechanisms and the efficiency of these processes were successfully studied by solid-state (31)P, (13)C, and (19)F MAS NMR.

  11. Use of Specific Chemical Reagents for Detection of Modified Nucleotides in RNA

    PubMed Central

    Behm-Ansmant, Isabelle; Helm, Mark; Motorin, Yuri

    2011-01-01

    Naturally occurring cellular RNAs contain an impressive number of chemically distinct modified residues which appear posttranscriptionally, as a result of specific action of the corresponding RNA modification enzymes. Over 100 different chemical modifications have been identified and characterized up to now. Identification of the chemical nature and exact position of these modifications is typically based on 2D-TLC analysis of nucleotide digests, on HPLC coupled with mass spectrometry, or on the use of primer extension by reverse transcriptase. However, many modified nucleotides are silent in reverse transcription, since the presence of additional chemical groups frequently does not change base-pairing properties. In this paper, we give a summary of various chemical approaches exploiting the specific reactivity of modified nucleotides in RNA for their detection. PMID:21716696

  12. Laboratory Reagents

    SciTech Connect

    CARLSON, D.D.

    1999-10-08

    Replaced by WMH-310, Section 4.17. This document outlined the basic methodology for preparing laboratory reagents used in the 222-S Standards Laboratory. Included were general guidelines for drying, weighing, transferring, dissolving, and diluting techniques common when preparing laboratory reagents and standards. Appendix A contained some of the reagents prepared by the laboratory.

  13. Novel reagents for chemical cleavage at abasic sites and UV photoproducts in DNA.

    PubMed Central

    McHugh, P J; Knowland, J

    1995-01-01

    Hot piperidine is often used to cleave abasic and UV-irradiated DNA at the sites of damage. It can inflict non-specific damage on DNA, probably because it is a strong base and creates significant concentrations of hydroxyl ions which can attack purines and pyrimidines. We show that several other amines can cleave abasic DNA at or near neutral pH without non-specific damage. One diamine, N,N'-dimethylethylenediamine, efficiently cleaves abasic DNA at pH 7.4 by either beta- or beta,delta-elimination, depending on temperature. Using end-labelled oligonucleotides we show that cleavage depends mainly on elimination reactions, but that 4',5'-cyclization is also significant. This reagent also cleaves at photoproducts induced by UVC and UVB, producing the same overall pattern as piperidine, but with no non-specific damage. It should prove valuable in locating low levels of photoproducts in DNA, such as those induced by natural sunlight. Images PMID:7784169

  14. Activation of soil and chemical reagents exposed to the neutrons released by the JCO criticality accident in Tokai-mura.

    PubMed

    Murata, Y; Muroyama, T; Kawabata, Y; Yamamoto, M; Komura, K

    2001-09-01

    Specific activities (Bq/g-element) of residual neutron-induced radionuclides by the JCO criticality accident were measured for soil, concrete block and chemical reagent samples collected in the JCO campus. Induced radionuclides such as 24Na, 46Sc, 54Mn, 59Fe, 60Co, 65Zn, 82Br, 122Sb, 134Cs and 140La were detected in the samples, depending on the ground distance from the accident point and the sampling date. Apparent thermal, epi-thermal and fast neutron fluences, which reached the sample at each point, were roughly estimated from the specific activities and cross sections of the target nuclides taken from a literature. The present data are believed to be important as validation data for a three-dimensional neutron transport model calculation.

  15. Fragmentation behavior of a thiourea-based reagent for protein structure analysis by collision-induced dissociative chemical cross-linking.

    PubMed

    Müller, Mathias Q; Dreiocker, Frank; Ihling, Christian H; Schäfer, Mathias; Sinz, Andrea

    2010-08-01

    The fragmentation behavior of a novel thiourea-based cross-linker molecule specifically designed for collision-induced dissociation (CID) MS/MS experiments is described. The development of this cross-linker is part of our ongoing efforts to synthesize novel reagents, which create either characteristic fragment ions or indicative constant neutral losses (CNLs) during tandem mass spectrometry allowing a selective and sensitive analysis of cross-linked products. The new derivatizing reagent for chemical cross-linking solely contains a thiourea moiety that is flanked by two amine-reactive N-hydroxy succinimide (NHS) ester moieties for reaction with lysines or free N-termini in proteins. The new reagent offers simple synthetic access and easy structural variation of either length or functionalities at both ends. The thiourea moiety exhibits specifically tailored CID fragmentation capabilities--a characteristic CNL of 85 u--ensuring a reliable detection of derivatized peptides by both electrospray ionization (ESI) and matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization (MALDI) tandem mass spectrometry and as such possesses a versatile applicability for chemical cross-linking studies. A detailed examination of the CID behavior of the presented thiourea-based reagent reveals that slight structural variations of the reagent will be necessary to ensure its comprehensive and efficient application for chemical cross-linking of proteins.

  16. The inactivating K+ current in GH3 pituitary cells and its modification by chemical reagents.

    PubMed Central

    Oxford, G S; Wagoner, P K

    1989-01-01

    1. Whole-cell and single-channel recording techniques were applied to the study of the permeability and gating of inactivating K+ channels from clonal pituitary cells. 2. The cation selectivity sequence (measured from reversal potentials) for the channels underlying the inactivating K+ current was Tl+ greater than K+ greater than Rb+ greater than NH4+. The conductance sequence (determined from current amplitudes) was K+ = Tl+ greater than Rb+ greater than NH4+. 3. The inactivating current (IK(i] which was blocked by 4-aminopyridine (4-AP), activated at voltages more positive than -40 mV and half-inactivated at that voltage. Inactivation proceeded as the sum of two exponentials with mean time constants of 21 and 82 ms. Deactivation followed a single-exponential time course. 4. Recovery from inactivation was slow, voltage dependent and multi-exponential, taking more than 50 s near the cell's resting potential. 5. The magnitudes of outward current and of slope conductance increased as the concentration of external K+ was increased. 6. On-cell and outside-out membrane patches revealed minicurrents with gating and pharmacological properties identical to whole-cell currents. Single channels with inactivating characteristics, while rarely observed, had an average slope conductance of 6-8 pS. 7. Intracellular application of the disulphonic stilbene derivative, SITS, and the protein-modifying reagent, N-bromoacetamide (NBA), at concentrations of 0.2-1 mM for several tens of minutes dramatically slowed the decay (inactivation) of K+ currents and caused coincident increases in the magnitude of outward IK(i). 8. Extracellular application of NBA at much lower concentrations (1-100 microM) and much shorter exposure times (1-30 s) also slowed inactivation. This effect was reversible for brief applications at low doses, but became irreversible after longer exposures. 9. Both internal and external NBA shifted the steady-state inactivation-voltage relation by +10 mV and reduced

  17. Effect of Fenton reagent dose on coexisting chemical and microbial oxidation in soil.

    PubMed

    Ndjou'ou, Anne-Clarisse; Bou-Nasr, Joseph; Cassidy, Daniel

    2006-04-15

    The ability of modified Fenton reactions to promote simultaneous chemical and biological oxidation in an artificially contaminated soil was studied in batch laboratory slurry reactors. Tetrachloroethene (PCE) and oxalate (OA) were used to distinguish chemical oxidation from aerobic heterotrophic metabolism. PCE was mineralized by Fenton reactions, but OA was not oxidized. Indigenous soil microorganisms did not degrade added PCE aerobically but readily assimilated OA. Fenton reactions were promoted at the natural soil pH (7.6) by adding H2O2 and Fe(III), with nitrilotriacetic acid (NTA) as a chelator, at a constant molar ratio of H2O2/Fe(III)/NTA of 50:1:1. The *OH-mediated mineralization of PCE was demonstrated by adding 2-propanol (an *OH scavenger), which inhibited PCE oxidation. In subsequent dosing studies, PCE oxidation served as an indicator of Fenton reactions, while OA assimilation, dissolved oxygen (DO) concentration, and heterotrophic plate counts were indicators of aerobic microbial activity. Increasing Fenton doses to 20 times that required to achieve 95% PCE oxidation only delayed OA assimilation by 500 min and reduced plate counts by 1.5 log units g(-1) soil. Results show that aerobic metabolism can coexist with Fenton oxidation in soils.

  18. Impact of the excess sludge modification with selected chemical reagents on the increase of dissolved organic substances concentration compounds transformations in activated sludge.

    PubMed

    Zawieja, Iwona; Lidia, Wolny; Marta, Próba

    2017-07-01

    Submission of excess sludge initial disintegration process significantly affects the efficiency of anaerobic stabilization process. Expression of increasing the concentration of organic matter in dissolved form is to increase sludge disintegration. As a result of chemical modification is an increase of the chemical oxygen demand and the concentration of volatile fatty acids. The aim of this study was to determine the impact of the disintegration process with selected chemical reagents to increase the concentration of organic substances in dissolved form. The process of chemical disintegration of excess sludge was treated using the following reagents: Mg(OH)2, Ca(OH)2, HCl, H2SO4, H2O2. The modification was carried out at ambient temperature for 2, 6 and 24h. During sludge disintegration it was noticed the growth of indicators values that confirmed the susceptibility of prepared sludge to biodegradation. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Small unilamellar vesicles as reagents: a chemically defined, quantitative assay for lectins

    SciTech Connect

    Rando, R.R.

    1981-01-01

    Samll unilamellar vesicles containing synthetic glycolipids can be prepared. These vesicles are aggregated by the appropriate lectin (Orr et al., 1979; Rando and Bangerter, 1979; Slama and Rando, 1980). It is shown here that extent of aggregation of these vesicles as measured by light scattering at 360 nm, is, under certain conditions, linear with amount of lectin added. This forms the basis of a rapid and simple quantitative assay for lectins using the modified vesicles as a defined chemical substrate. The assay is sensitive to lectin concentrations in the low ..mu..g range. The assay is applied here to studies on concanavalin A, Ricinus communis agglutinin and the ..cap alpha..-fucosyl binding lectin from Ulex europaeus (Type I).

  20. New uses for the Burgess reagent in chemical synthesis: methods for the facile and stereoselective formation of sulfamidates, glycosylamines, and sulfamides.

    PubMed

    Nicolaou, K C; Snyder, Scott A; Longbottom, Deborah A; Nalbandian, Annie Z; Huang, Xianhai

    2004-11-05

    Although the Burgess reagent (methoxycarbonylsulfamoyltriethylammonium hydroxide, inner salt) has found significant use in chemical synthesis as a dehydrating agent, almost no work has been directed towards its potential in other synthetic applications. As this article will detail, we have found that the Burgess reagent is remarkably effective at accomplishing a number of non-dehydrative synthetic tasks when applied to appropriate substrates, such as the formation of sulfamidates from 1,2-diols or epoxyalcohols, alpha- and beta-glycosylamines from carbohydrates, and cyclic sulfamides from 1,2-aminoalcohols. Beyond delineating the power of these new reaction manifolds, we also describe the construction of a group of alternative Burgess-type reagents that extends the scope of these new reactions even further.

  1. Trace analysis of ethosuximide in human plasma with a chemically removable derivatizing reagent and high-performance liquid chromatography.

    PubMed

    Chen, S H; Wu, H L; Shen, M C; Kou, H S

    1999-06-11

    A simple and sensitive liquid chromatographic method is described for the determination of ethosuximide in human plasma, as a highly sensitive derivative. Ethosuximide spiked in plasma was extracted with toluene and derivatized with a chemically removable derivatizing reagent, 2-(2-naphthoxy)ethyl 2-[1-(4-benzyl)piperazyl]ethanesulfonate, in a homogeneous system, using magnesium oxide as base catalyst. The resulting derivative was separated on a LiChrospher diol column with 1.2% isopropanol in n-hexane as the mobile phase and using coumarin as the internal standard. Several parameters affecting the extraction/derivatization of ethosuximide from spiked plasma were investigated. The linear range for the determination of ethosuximide in spiked plasma was over 30-700 nmol/ml. For ethosuximide in plasma, the detection limit (signal-to-noise ratio=3; sample size, 10 microl) was about 9 pmol; the relative standard deviation was 6.4% for intra-day assay (n=6) and 9.2% for inter-day assay (n=6) and the relative recovery was found greater than 94%.

  2. Spectrofluorometric determination and chemical speciation of trace concentrations of tungsten species in water using the ion pairing reagent procaine hydrochloride.

    PubMed

    El-Shahawi, M S; Al Khateeb, L A

    2012-01-15

    A highly selective and low cost extractive spectrofluorimetric method was developed for determination of trace concentrations of tungsten (VI) in water. The method was based upon solvent extraction of the developed ion associate [(PQH(+))(2)·WO(4)(2-)] of the fluorescent ion-pairing reagent [2-(diethylamino)ethyl 4 aminobenzoate] hydrochloride namely procaine hydrochloride, PQH(+)·Cl(-) and tungstate (WO(4)(2-)) in aqueous solution of pH 6-7 followed by measuring the resulting fluorescence enhancement in n-hexane at λ(ex/em)=270/320nm. The fluorescence intensity of PQH(+)·Cl(-) increased linearly on increasing tungstate concentration in the range 25-250μgL(-1). The limits of detection (LOD) and quantification (LOQ) of tungsten (VI) were found 7.51 and 24.75μgL(-1), respectively. Chemical composition of the developed ion associate and the molar absorptivity at 270nm were found to be [(PQH(+))(2)·WO(4)(2-)] and 2.7×10(4)Lmol(-1)cm(-1), respectively. Other oxidation states (III, IV, V) of tungsten species could also be determined after oxidation with H(2)O(2) in aqueous solution to tungsten (VI). The method was applied for analysis of tungsten in certified reference material (IAEA Soil-7) and wastewater samples. The results were compared successfully (>95%) with the data of inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry (ICP-MS).

  3. An improved reagent for determination of aliphatic amines with fluorescence and online atmospheric chemical ionization-mass spectrometry identification.

    PubMed

    You, Jinmao; Song, Cuihua; Yan, Tao; Sun, Zhiwei; Li, Yulin; Suo, Yourui

    2010-01-18

    An improved reagent named 2-[2-(dibenzocarbazole)-ethoxy] ethyl chloroformate (DBCEC-Cl) for the determination of aliphatic amines by high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) with fluorescence detection and post-column online atmospheric chemical ionization-mass spectrometry (APCI-MS) identification has been developed. DBCEC-Cl could easily and quickly label aliphatic amines. Derivatives were stable enough to be efficiently analyzed by HPLC and showed an intense protonated molecular ion corresponding m/z [M+H](+) under APCI-MS in positive-ion mode. The ratios for fluorescence responses were I(DBCEC-amine)/I(BCEC-amine)=1.02-1.60; I(DBCEC-amine)/I(BCEOC-amine)=1.30-2.57; and I(DBCEC-amine)/I(FMOC-amine)=2.20-4.12 (here, I was relative fluorescence intensity). The ratios for MS responses were IC(DBCEC-amine)/IC(BCEC-amine)=4.16-29.31 and IC(DBCEC-amine)/IC(BCEOC-amine)=1.23-2.47 (Here, IC: APCI-MS ion current intensity). Detection limits calculated from 0.0244 pmol injection, at a signal-to-noise ratio of 3, were 0.3-3.0 fmol. The relative standard deviations for within-day determination (n=6) were 0.045-0.081% for retention time and 0.86-1.03% for peak area for the tested aliphatic amines. The mean intra- and inter-assay precision for all amine levels were <3.64% and 4.67%, respectively. The mean recoveries ranged from 96.9% to 104.7% with their standard deviations in the range of 1.80-2.70 (RSDs%). Excellent linear responses were observed with coefficients of >0.9991. Copyright 2009 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Chemical cross-linking with thiol-cleavable reagents combined with differential mass spectrometric peptide mapping--a novel approach to assess intermolecular protein contacts.

    PubMed Central

    Bennett, K. L.; Kussmann, M.; Björk, P.; Godzwon, M.; Mikkelsen, M.; Sørensen, P.; Roepstorff, P.

    2000-01-01

    The intermolecular contact regions between monomers of the homodimeric DNA binding protein ParR and the interaction between the glycoproteins CD28 and CD80 were investigated using a strategy that combined chemical cross-linking with differential MALDI-MS analyses. ParR dimers were modified in vitro with the thiol-cleavable cross-linker 3,3'-dithio-bis(succinimidylproprionate) (DTSSP), proteolytically digested with trypsin and analyzed by MALDI-MS peptide mapping. Comparison of the peptide maps obtained from digested cross-linked ParR dimers in the presence and absence of a thiol reagent strongly supported a "head-to-tail" arrangement of the monomers in the dimeric complex. Glycoprotein fusion constructs CD28-IgG and CD80-Fab were cross-linked in vitro by DTSSP, characterized by nonreducing SDS-PAGE, digested in situ with trypsin and analyzed by MALDI-MS peptide mapping (+/- thiol reagent). The data revealed the presence of an intermolecular cross-link between the receptor regions of the glycoprotein constructs, as well as a number of unexpected but nonetheless specific interactions between the fusion domains of CD28-IgG and the receptor domain of CD80-Fab. The strategy of chemical cross-linking combined with differential MALDI-MS peptide mapping (+ thiol reagent) enabled localization of the interface region(s) of the complexes studied and clearly demonstrates the utility of such an approach to obtain structural information on interacting noncovalent complexes. PMID:10975572

  5. Degradation of a textile reactive Azo dye by a combined chemical-biological process: Fenton's reagent-yeast.

    PubMed

    Lucas, Marco S; Dias, Albino A; Sampaio, Ana; Amaral, Carla; Peres, José A

    2007-03-01

    This work presents the results of our studies on the decolorization of aqueous azo dye Reactive black 5 (RB5) solution combining an advanced oxidation process (Fenton's reagent) followed by an aerobic biological process (mediated by the yeast Candida oleophila). Under our conditions, initial experiments showed that Fenton's process alone, as well as aerobic treatment by C. oleophila alone, exhibited the capacity to significantly decolorize azo dye solutions up to 200 mg/L, within about 1 and 24h, respectively. By contrast, neither Fenton's reagent nor C. oleophila sole treatments showed acceptable decolorizing abilities for higher initial dye concentrations (300 and 500 mg/L). However, it was verified that Fenton's reagent process lowered these higher azo dye concentrations to a value less than 230 mg/L, which is apparently compatible with the yeast action. Therefore, to decolorize higher concentrations of RB5 and to reduce process costs the combination between the two processes was evaluated. The final decolorization obtained with Fenton's reagent process as primary treatment, at 1.0 x 10(-3)mol/L H(2)O(2) and 1.0 x 10(-4)mol/L Fe(2+), and growing yeast cells as a secondary treatment, achieves a color removal of about 91% for an initial RB5 concentration of 500 mg/L.

  6. Evaluation of pulsed laser ablation in liquids generated gold nanoparticles as novel transfection tools: efficiency and cytotoxicity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Willenbrock, Saskia; Durán, María. Carolina; Barchanski, Annette; Barcikowski, Stephan; Feige, Karsten; Nolte, Ingo; Murua Escobar, Hugo

    2014-03-01

    Varying transfection efficiencies and cytotoxicity are crucial aspects in cell manipulation. The utilization of gold nanoparticles (AuNP) has lately attracted special interest to enhance transfection efficiency. Conventional AuNP are usually generated by chemical reactions or gas pyrolysis requiring often cell-toxic stabilizers or coatings to conserve their characteristics. Alternatively, stabilizer- and coating-free, highly pure, colloidal AuNP can be generated by pulsed laser ablation in liquids (PLAL). Mammalian cells were transfected efficiently by addition of PLAL-AuNP, but data systematically evaluating the cell-toxic potential are lacking. Herein, the transfection efficiency and cytotoxicity of PLAL AuNP was evaluated by transfection of a mammalian cell line with a recombinant HMGB1/GFP DNA expression vector. Different methods were compared using two sizes of PLAL-AuNP, commercialized AuNP, two magnetic NP-based protocols and a conventional transfection reagent (FuGENE HD; FHD). PLAL-AuNP were generated using a Spitfire Pro femtosecond laser system delivering 120 fs laser pulses at a wavelength of 800 nm focusing the fs-laser beam on a 99.99% pure gold target placed in ddH2O. Transfection efficiencies were analyzed after 24h using fluorescence microscopy and flow cytometry. Toxicity was assessed measuring cell proliferation and percentage of necrotic, propidium iodide positive cells (PI %). The addition of PLAL-AuNP significantly enhanced transfection efficiencies (FHD: 31 %; PLAL-AuNP size-1: 46 %; size-2: 50 %) with increased PI% but no reduced cell proliferation. Commercial AuNP-transfection showed significantly lower efficiency (23 %), slightly increased PI % and reduced cell proliferation. Magnetic NP based methods were less effective but showing also lowest cytotoxicity. In conclusion, addition of PLAL-AuNP provides a novel tool for transfection efficiency enhancement with acceptable cytotoxic side-effects.

  7. Tandem mass spectrometry acquisition approaches to enhance identification of protein-protein interactions using low-energy collision-induced dissociative chemical crosslinking reagents.

    PubMed

    Soderblom, Erik J; Bobay, Benjamin G; Cavanagh, John; Goshe, Michael B

    2007-01-01

    Chemical crosslinking combined with mass spectrometry is a useful tool for studying the topological organization of multiprotein interactions, but it is technically challenging to identify peptides involved in a crosslink using tandem mass spectrometry (MS/MS) due to the presence of product ions originating from both peptides within the same crosslink. We have previously developed a novel set of collision-induced dissociative chemical crosslinking reagents (CID-CXL reagents) that incorporate a labile bond within the linker which readily dissociates at a single site under low-energy collision-induced dissociation (CID) to enable independent isolation and sequencing of the crosslinked peptides by traditional MS/MS and database searching. Alternative low-energy CID events were developed within the in-source region by increasing the multipole DC offset voltage (ISCID) or within the ion trap by increasing the collisional excitation (ITCID). Both dissociation events, each having their unique advantages, occur without significant backbone fragmentation to the peptides, thus permitting subsequent CID to be applied to these distinct peptide ions for generation of suitable product ion spectra for database searching. Each approach was developed and applied to a chemical crosslinking study involving the N-terminal DNA-binding domain of AbrB (AbrBN), a transition-state regulator in Bacillus subtilis. A total of thirteen unique crosslinks were identified using the ITCID approach which represented a significant improvement over the eight unique crosslinks identified using the ISCID approach. The ability to segregate intrapeptide and interpeptide crosslinks using ITCID represents the first step towards high-throughput analysis of protein-protein crosslinks using our CID-CXL reagents.

  8. Increased sensitivity of glioma cells to 5-fluorocytosine following photo-chemical internalization enhanced nonviral transfection of the cytosine deaminase suicide gene.

    PubMed

    Wang, Frederick; Zamora, Genesis; Sun, Chung-Ho; Trinidad, Anthony; Chun, Changho; Kwon, Young Jik; Berg, Kristian; Madsen, Steen J; Hirschberg, Henry

    2014-05-01

    Despite advances in surgery, chemotherapy and radiotherapy, the outcomes of patients with GBM have not significantly improved. Tumor recurrence in the resection margins occurs in more than 80% of cases indicating aggressive treatment modalities, such as gene therapy are warranted. We have examined photochemical internalization (PCI) as a method for the non-viral transfection of the cytosine deaminase (CD) suicide gene into glioma cells. The CD gene encodes an enzyme that can convert the nontoxic antifungal agent, 5-fluorocytosine, into the chemotherapeutic drug, 5-fluorouracil. Multicell tumor spheroids derived from established rat and human glioma cell lines were used as in vitro tumor models. Plasmids containing either the CD gene alone or together with the uracil phosphoribosyl transferase (UPRT) gene combined with the gene carrier protamine sulfate were employed in all experiments.PCI was performed with the photosensitizer AlPcS2a and 670 nm laser irradiance. Protamine sulfate/CD DNA polyplexes proved nontoxic but inefficient transfection agents due to endosomal entrapment. In contrast, PCI mediated CD gene transfection resulted in a significant inhibition of spheroid growth in the presence of, but not in the absence of, 5-FC. Repetitive PCI induced transfection was more efficient at low CD plasmid concentration than single treatment. The results clearly indicate that AlPcS2a-mediated PCI can be used to enhance transfection of a tumor suicide gene such as CD, in malignant glioma cells and cells transfected with both the CD and UPRT genes had a pronounced bystander effect.

  9. Electrokinetic remediation of a Cu contaminated red soil by conditioning catholyte pH with different enhancing chemical reagents.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Dong-Mei; Deng, Chang-Fen; Cang, Long

    2004-07-01

    The effect of enhancement reagents on the efficiency of electrokinetic remediation of Cu contaminated red soil is evaluated. The enhancement agents were a mix of organic acids, including lactic acid+NaOH, HAc-NaAc and HAc-NaAc+EDTA. The soil was prepared to an initial Cu concentration of 438 mgkg(-1) by incubating the soil with CuSO4 solution in a flooded condition for 1 month. Sequential extraction showed that Cu was partitioned in the soil as follows: 195 mgkg(-1) as water soluble and exchangeable, 71 mgkg(-1) as carbonate bound and 105 mgkg(-1) as Fe and Mn oxides. The results indicate that neutralizing the catholyte pH maintains a lower soil pH compared to that without electrokinetic treatment. The electric currents varied depending upon the conditioning solutions and increased with an increasing applied voltage potential. The electroosmotic flow rate changed significantly when different conditioning enhancing reagents were used. It was observed that lactic acid+NaOH treatments resulted in higher soil electric conductivities than HAc-NaAc and HAc-NaAc+EDTA treatments. Ultimately, enhancement by lactic acid+NaOH resulted in highest removal efficiency (81% Cu removal) from the red soil. The presence of EDTA did not enhance Cu removal efficiencies from the red soil, because EDTA complexed with Cu to form negatively charge complexes, which slowly migrated toward the anode chamber retarding Cu2+ transport towards the cathode.

  10. Chemical decomposition of 2,4,6-trichlorophenol by ozone, Fenton`s reagent, and UV radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Benitez, F.J.; Beltran-Heredia, J.; Acero, J.L.; Rubio, F.J.

    1999-04-01

    The kinetics of the decomposition of 2,4,6-trichlorophenol by ozonation, by Fenton`s reagent reaction, and by a polychromatic UV radiation is investigated from experiments performed in a batch reactor. In each oxidation system, the degree of removal of the organic compound from water is evaluated and the influence of the operating variables is established. The ozonation process is conducted at pH = 2 and in the presence of radical scavengers: In these conditions the kinetic constants and reaction orders for the direct reaction between ozone and that organic compound are deduced by using a model based in the film theory. The oxidation by Fenton`s reagent (Fe{sup 2+} ion and H{sub 2}O{sub 2}), a generating system of hydroxyl radicals, leads to the evaluation of pseudo-first-order rate constants for the global reaction and to the determination of the kinetic constant for the direct radical reaction. Finally, the quantum yields in the photodecomposition process are determined from the rate equation, with the radiation flow rates absorbed previously calculated by means of a radiation source emission model.

  11. Size matters for in vitro gene delivery: investigating the relationships among complexation protocol, transfection medium, size and sedimentation.

    PubMed

    Pezzoli, Daniele; Giupponi, Elisa; Mantovani, Diego; Candiani, Gabriele

    2017-03-08

    Although branched and linear polyethylenimines (bPEIs and lPEIs) are gold standard transfectants, a systematic analysis of the effects of the preparation protocol of polyplexes and the composition of the transfection medium on their physicochemical behaviour and effectiveness in vitro have been much neglected, undermining in some way the identification of precise structure-function relationships. This work aimed to address these issues. bPEI/DNA and lPEI/DNA, prepared using two different modes of addition of reagents, gave rise to polyplexes with exactly the same chemical composition but differing in dimensions. Upon dilution in serum-free medium, the size of any kind of polyplex promptly rose over time while remained invariably stable in complete DMEM. Of note, the bigger the dimension of polyplexes (in the nano- to micrometer range), the greater their efficiency in vitro. Besides, centrifugal sedimentation of polyplexes displaying different dimensions to speed up and enhance their settling onto cells boosted transfection efficiencies. Conversely, transgene expression was significantly blunted in cells held upside-down and transfected, definitively pointing out the impact of gravitational sedimentation of polyplexes on their transfection efficiency. Overall, much more attention must be paid to the actual polyplex size that relies on the complexation conditions and the transfection medium.

  12. Size matters for in vitro gene delivery: investigating the relationships among complexation protocol, transfection medium, size and sedimentation

    PubMed Central

    Pezzoli, Daniele; Giupponi, Elisa; Mantovani, Diego; Candiani, Gabriele

    2017-01-01

    Although branched and linear polyethylenimines (bPEIs and lPEIs) are gold standard transfectants, a systematic analysis of the effects of the preparation protocol of polyplexes and the composition of the transfection medium on their physicochemical behaviour and effectiveness in vitro have been much neglected, undermining in some way the identification of precise structure-function relationships. This work aimed to address these issues. bPEI/DNA and lPEI/DNA, prepared using two different modes of addition of reagents, gave rise to polyplexes with exactly the same chemical composition but differing in dimensions. Upon dilution in serum-free medium, the size of any kind of polyplex promptly rose over time while remained invariably stable in complete DMEM. Of note, the bigger the dimension of polyplexes (in the nano- to micrometer range), the greater their efficiency in vitro. Besides, centrifugal sedimentation of polyplexes displaying different dimensions to speed up and enhance their settling onto cells boosted transfection efficiencies. Conversely, transgene expression was significantly blunted in cells held upside-down and transfected, definitively pointing out the impact of gravitational sedimentation of polyplexes on their transfection efficiency. Overall, much more attention must be paid to the actual polyplex size that relies on the complexation conditions and the transfection medium. PMID:28272487

  13. Direct aqueous measurement of 25-hydroxyvitamin D levels in a cellular environment by LC-MS/MS using the novel chemical derivatization reagent MDBP.

    PubMed

    Müller, Miriam J; Bruns, Heiko; Volmer, Dietrich A

    2017-01-30

    Vitamin D measurements in biological fluids by mass spectrometry are challenging at very low concentration levels. As a result, chemical derivatization is often employed to enhance the ionization properties of low abundant vitamin D compounds. Cookson-type reagents such as 4-phenyl-1,2,4-triazoline-3,5-dione (PTAD) or similar derivatives work well but require careful, water-free experimental conditions, as traces of water inactivate the reagent and inhibit or stop the derivatization reactions, thus making quantitative measurements in aqueous samples impossible. We describe a novel electrospray liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) assay for determining 25-hydroxyvitamin D3 (25(OH)D3) directly in aqueous cellular systems using a new derivatization reagent, the ionic liquid 12-(maleimidyl)dodecyl-tri-n-butylphosphonium bromide (MDBP). The proof-of-concept for the MDBP assay was demonstrated by measuring the levels of 25(OH)D3 in four different human cell types, namely T cells, helper T cells, B cells, and macrophages. In addition to the ability to determine the levels of 25(OH)D3 directly in aqueous samples, the cellular integrity was maintained in our application. We show the time-dependent uptake of 25(OH)D3 into the investigated cells to demonstrate the applicability of the new label. Furthermore, the MDBP derivatization technique may be equally useful in imaging mass spectrometry, where it could be used for response enhancements of spatially localized vitamin D metabolites on wet tissue surfaces, without destroying the integrity of the tissue surface. Graphical Abstract MDBP labelling of 25-hydroxyvitamin D in the extracellular space.

  14. Non-Viral, Lipid-Mediated DNA and mRNA Gene Therapy of the Central Nervous System (CNS): Chemical-Based Transfection.

    PubMed

    Hecker, James G

    2016-01-01

    Appropriate gene delivery systems are essential for successful gene therapy in clinical medicine. Cationic lipid-mediated delivery is an alternative to viral vector-mediated gene delivery. Lipid-mediated delivery of DNA or mRNA is usually more rapid than viral-mediated delivery, offers a larger payload, and has a nearly zero risk of incorporation. Lipid-mediated delivery of DNA or RNA is therefore preferable to viral DNA delivery in those clinical applications that do not require long-term expression for chronic conditions. Delivery of RNA may be preferable to non-viral DNA delivery in some clinical applications, because transit across the nuclear membrane is not necessary and onset of expression with RNA is therefore even faster than with DNA, although both are faster than most viral vectors. Here, we describe techniques for cationic lipid-mediated delivery of nucleic acids encoding reporter genes in a variety of cell lines. We describe optimized formulations and transfection procedures that we previously assessed by bioluminescence and flow cytometry. RNA transfection demonstrates increased efficiency relative to DNA transfection in non-dividing cells. Delivery of mRNA results in onset of expression within 1 h after transfection and a peak in expression 5-7 h after transfection. Duration of expression in eukaryotic cells after mRNA transcript delivery depends on multiple factors, including transcript stability, protein turnover, and cell type. Delivery of DNA results in onset of expression within 5 h after transfection, a peak in expression 24-48 h after transfection, and a return to baseline that can be as long as several weeks after transfection. In vitro results are consistent with our in vivo delivery results, techniques for which are described as well. RNA delivery is suitable for short-term transient gene expression due to its rapid onset, short duration of expression and greater efficiency, particularly in non-dividing cells, while the longer duration and

  15. Recyclable Trifluoromethylation Reagents from Fluoroform.

    PubMed

    Geri, Jacob B; Szymczak, Nathaniel K

    2017-07-26

    We present a strategy to rationally prepare CF3(-) transfer reagents at ambient temperature from HCF3. We demonstrate that a highly reactive CF3(-) adduct can be synthesized from alkali metal hydride, HCF3, and borazine Lewis acids in quantitative yield at room temperature. These nucleophilic reagents transfer CF3(-) to substrates without additional chemical activation, and after CF3 transfer, the free borazine is quantitatively regenerated. These features enable syntheses of popular nucleophilic, radical, and electrophilic trifluoromethylation reagents with complete recycling of the borazine Lewis acid.

  16. Gas phase enantiomeric distinction of (R)- and (S)-aromatic hydroxy esters by negative ion chemical ionization mass spectrometry using a chiral reagent gas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mancel, Valérie; Sellier, Nicole; Lesage, Denis; Fournier, Françoise; Tabet, Jean-Claude

    2004-10-01

    Negative ion chemical ionization (NICI) using a chiral reagent gas such as (2S,3S) butanediol (GSS) allows the differentiation of chiral [alpha] hydroxy esters (MR or MS). The distinction is significantly enhanced by using CID on the deprotonated hetero dimer [M + (GSS-H)]-. The contribution of a non covalent [M + (GSS-H)]- competitive form is very minor. In fact, a covalent form appears favored. To produce a covalent adduct ion, an enantioselectivity of the alkoxide attack on the electrophilic ester site to form a tetravalent adduct is suggested by the product ion abundances. This observed steric control is consistent with the one observed in solution (Cram-Felkin addition/reduction orientation). The dissociations under collision conditions of the product deprotonated diastereomeric compounds show a stereospecific effect in the elimination of alcohol from the tetravalent adduct ions rather than a regeneration of the deprotonated diol reagent as expected from non-covalent heterodimer. This study shows an orientation with a chiral compound that allows, from an analytical point of view, the distinction of enantiomers and the attribution of chirality in the gas phase under NICI conditions.

  17. Fibre based cellular transfection.

    PubMed

    Tsampoula, X; Taguchi, K; Cizmár, T; Garces-Chavez, V; Ma, N; Mohanty, S; Mohanty, K; Gunn-Moore, F; Dholakia, K

    2008-10-13

    Optically assisted transfection is emerging as a powerful and versatile method for the delivery of foreign therapeutic agents to cells at will. In particular the use of ultrashort pulse lasers has proved an important route to transiently permeating the cell membrane through a multiphoton process. Though optical transfection has been gaining wider usage to date, all incarnations of this technique have employed free space light beams. In this paper we demonstrate the first system to use fibre delivery for the optical transfection of cells. We engineer a standard optical fibre to generate an axicon tip with an enhanced intensity of the remote output field that delivers ultrashort (~ 800 fs) pulses without requiring the fibre to be placed in very close proximity to the cell sample. A theoretical model is also developed in order to predict the light propagation from axicon tipped and bare fibres, in both air and water environments. The model proves to be in good agreement with the experimental findings and can be used to establish the optimum fibre parameters for successful cellular transfection. We readily obtain efficiencies of up to 57 % which are comparable with free space transfection. This advance paves the way for optical transfection of tissue samples and endoscopic embodiments of this technique.

  18. Enhanced gene transfection performance and biocompatibility of polyethylenimine through pseudopolyrotaxane formation with α-cyclodextrin.

    PubMed

    Hu, Li-Zhong; Wan, Ning; Ma, Xi-Xi; Jing, Zi-Wei; Zhang, Ya-Xuan; Li, Chen; Zhou, Si-Yuan; Zhang, Bang-Le

    2017-03-24

    Polyethylenimine (PEI), a commercially available gene transfection reagent, is a promising nonviral vector due to its inherent ability to efficiently condense genetic materials and its successful transfection performance in vitro. However, its low transfection efficiency in vivo, along with its high cytotoxicity, limit any further applications in gene therapy. To enhance the gene transfection performance and reduce the cytotoxicity of linear polyethylenimine, pseudopolyrotaxane PEI25k/CD and the polyrotaxanes PEI25k/CD-PA and PEI25k/CD-PB were prepared and their transfection efficiencies were then evaluated. The pseudopolyrotaxane PEI25k/CD exhibited better transfection efficiency and lower cytotoxicity than the transfection reagent linear PEI25k, even in the presence of serum. It also showed a remarkably higher cell viability, similar DNA protecting capability, and better DNA decondensation and release ability, and could be useful for the development of novel and safe nonviral gene delivery vectors for gene therapy.

  19. Enhanced gene transfection performance and biocompatibility of polyethylenimine through pseudopolyrotaxane formation with α-cyclodextrin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Li-Zhong; Wan, Ning; Ma, Xi-Xi; Jing, Zi-Wei; Zhang, Ya-Xuan; Li, Chen; Zhou, Si-Yuan; Zhang, Bang-Le

    2017-03-01

    Polyethylenimine (PEI), a commercially available gene transfection reagent, is a promising nonviral vector due to its inherent ability to efficiently condense genetic materials and its successful transfection performance in vitro. However, its low transfection efficiency in vivo, along with its high cytotoxicity, limit any further applications in gene therapy. To enhance the gene transfection performance and reduce the cytotoxicity of linear polyethylenimine, pseudopolyrotaxane PEI25k/CD and the polyrotaxanes PEI25k/CD-PA and PEI25k/CD-PB were prepared and their transfection efficiencies were then evaluated. The pseudopolyrotaxane PEI25k/CD exhibited better transfection efficiency and lower cytotoxicity than the transfection reagent linear PEI25k, even in the presence of serum. It also showed a remarkably higher cell viability, similar DNA protecting capability, and better DNA decondensation and release ability, and could be useful for the development of novel and safe nonviral gene delivery vectors for gene therapy.

  20. Characterizing a switching reagent ion chemical ionization high resolution time of flight mass spectrometer: Standard additions, External calibrations, and Inlet response during SOAS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brophy, P.; Farmer, D.

    2013-12-01

    A high-resolution time of flight chemical ionization mass spectrometer (HRToF-CIMS) with switching reagent ion source and low pressure, gas-phase inlet was deployed during the 2013 Southern Oxidant and Aerosol Study (SOAS) in Brent, Alabama. Acetate chemistry was employed for the detection of small acids and iodine chemistry for the detection of peroxy acids. Switching between the two ion sources was found to be possible on less than ten minute time scales with minimal artifacts observed. Online calibrations for formic acid on both the acetate and iodine sources were performed every hour using both standard addition techniques as well as external standard calibrations; offline formic acid calibrations were also conducted. Inlet responses were investigated though a number of experiments finding that the inlet has minimal hysteresis and rapid response times.

  1. Enhancement of the efficiency of femtosecond optical transfection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Praveen, Bavishna B.; Stevenson, David; Antkowiak, Maciej; Gunn-Moore, Frank J.; Dholakia, Kishan

    2010-12-01

    Cell transfection is the process in which extra cellular nucleic acids such as DNA, RNA, Si-RNA can be deliberately injected into the cytoplasm of the cell. This technique of cell transfection forms a central tool in the hands of a cell biologist to explore the mechanism within the cell. In optical transfection a well focused laser spot alters the permeability of the cell membrane so as to allow the entry of extra-nuclear materials into the cell. Femto-second optical transfection have proved to be better than other laser based cell transfection, owing to the three dimensionally confined multi-photon effects on the cell membrane thereby leaving the rest of the cell unaffected. Even though the femto-second optical transfection has proved to be sterile, non-invasive and highly selective, it has to improve in terms of efficiency, and throughput to address real life problems. We report here a method to achieve significant enhancement in the efficiency of femto-second optical transfection. The protocol of the transfection procedure is modified by adding a suitable biochemical reagent - Nupherin-neuron - into the cell medium during the transfection, which can assist the delivery of DNA into the nucleus once the DNA gets injected into the cytoplasm of the cell. We achieved a 3 fold enhancement in the transfection efficiency with this modified protocol. Also we report for the first time the transfection of recently trypsinised cells with a very high transfection efficiency, which would pave way to the development of high throughput microfluidic optical transfection devices.

  2. Enhancement of the efficiency of femtosecond optical transfection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Praveen, Bavishna B.; Stevenson, David; Antkowiak, Maciej; Gunn-Moore, Frank J.; Dholakia, Kishan

    2011-08-01

    Cell transfection is the process in which extra cellular nucleic acids such as DNA, RNA, Si-RNA can be deliberately injected into the cytoplasm of the cell. This technique of cell transfection forms a central tool in the hands of a cell biologist to explore the mechanism within the cell. In optical transfection a well focused laser spot alters the permeability of the cell membrane so as to allow the entry of extra-nuclear materials into the cell. Femto-second optical transfection have proved to be better than other laser based cell transfection, owing to the three dimensionally confined multi-photon effects on the cell membrane thereby leaving the rest of the cell unaffected. Even though the femto-second optical transfection has proved to be sterile, non-invasive and highly selective, it has to improve in terms of efficiency, and throughput to address real life problems. We report here a method to achieve significant enhancement in the efficiency of femto-second optical transfection. The protocol of the transfection procedure is modified by adding a suitable biochemical reagent - Nupherin-neuron - into the cell medium during the transfection, which can assist the delivery of DNA into the nucleus once the DNA gets injected into the cytoplasm of the cell. We achieved a 3 fold enhancement in the transfection efficiency with this modified protocol. Also we report for the first time the transfection of recently trypsinised cells with a very high transfection efficiency, which would pave way to the development of high throughput microfluidic optical transfection devices.

  3. Graphene based gene transfection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feng, Liangzhu; Zhang, Shuai; Liu, Zhuang

    2011-03-01

    Graphene as a star in materials research has been attracting tremendous attentions in the past few years in various fields including biomedicine. In this work, for the first time we successfully use graphene as a non-toxic nano-vehicle for efficient gene transfection. Graphene oxide (GO) is bound with cationic polymers, polyethyleneimine (PEI) with two different molecular weights at 1.2 kDa and 10 kDa, forming GO-PEI-1.2k and GO-PEG-10k complexes, respectively, both of which are stable in physiological solutions. Cellular toxicity tests reveal that our GO-PEI-10k complex exhibits significantly reduced toxicity to the treated cells compared to the bare PEI-10k polymer. The positively charged GO-PEI complexes are able to further bind with plasmid DNA (pDNA) for intracellular transfection of the enhanced green fluorescence protein (EGFP) gene in HeLa cells. While EGFP transfection with PEI-1.2k appears to be ineffective, high EGFP expression is observed using the corresponding GO-PEI-1.2k as the transfection agent. On the other hand, GO-PEI-10k shows similar EGFP transfection efficiency but lower toxicity compared with PEI-10k. Our results suggest graphene to be a novel gene delivery nano-vector with low cytotoxicity and high transfection efficiency, promising for future applications in non-viral based gene therapy.Graphene as a star in materials research has been attracting tremendous attentions in the past few years in various fields including biomedicine. In this work, for the first time we successfully use graphene as a non-toxic nano-vehicle for efficient gene transfection. Graphene oxide (GO) is bound with cationic polymers, polyethyleneimine (PEI) with two different molecular weights at 1.2 kDa and 10 kDa, forming GO-PEI-1.2k and GO-PEG-10k complexes, respectively, both of which are stable in physiological solutions. Cellular toxicity tests reveal that our GO-PEI-10k complex exhibits significantly reduced toxicity to the treated cells compared to the bare PEI

  4. Transfection using DEAE-dextran.

    PubMed

    Selden, R F

    2001-05-01

    Two protocols for DEAE-dextran transfection of cells are provided in this unit. The Basic Protocol describes a procedure used to transfect adherent cells and the first Alternate Protocol presents a method used to transfect suspension cells. If an increase in transfection efficiency is needed, cells can be treated with chloroquine as described in the second Alternate Protocol.

  5. A General RNA Motif for Cellular Transfection

    PubMed Central

    Magalhães, Maria LB; Byrom, Michelle; Yan, Amy; Kelly, Linsley; Li, Na; Furtado, Raquel; Palliser, Deborah; Ellington, Andrew D; Levy, Matthew

    2012-01-01

    We have developed a selection scheme to generate nucleic acid sequences that recognize and directly internalize into mammalian cells without the aid of conventional delivery methods. To demonstrate the generality of the technology, two independent selections with different starting pools were performed against distinct target cells. Each selection yielded a single highly functional sequence, both of which folded into a common core structure. This internalization signal can be adapted for use as a general purpose reagent for transfection into a wide variety of cell types including primary cells. PMID:22233578

  6. Chitosan-gelatin scaffolds for tissue engineering: physico-chemical properties and biological response of buffalo embryonic stem cells and transfectant of GFP-buffalo embryonic stem cells.

    PubMed

    Thein-Han, W W; Saikhun, J; Pholpramoo, C; Misra, R D K; Kitiyanant, Y

    2009-11-01

    The favorable cellular response of newly developed cell line, buffalo embryonic stem (ES) cells to three-dimensional biodegradable chitosan-gelatin composite scaffolds with regard to stem-cell-based tissue engineering is described. Chitosan-gelatin composites were characterized by a highly porous structure with interconnected pores, and the mechanical properties were significantly enhanced. Furthermore, X-ray diffraction study indicated increased amorphous content in the scaffold on the addition of gelatin to chitosan. To develop a transfectant of green fluorescence protein (GFP)-buffalo ES cell, transfection of GFP plasmid to the cell was carried out via the electroporation procedure. In comparison with pure chitosan, cell spreading and proliferation were greater in highly visualized GFP-expressing cell-chitosan-gelatin scaffold constructs. The relative comparison of biological response involving cell proliferation and viability on the scaffolds suggests that blending of gelatin in chitosan improved cellular efficiency. Studies involving scanning electron and fluorescence microscopy, histological observations and flow cytometer analysis of the constructs implied that the polygonal cells attached to and penetrated the pores, and proliferated well, while maintaining their pluripotency during the culture period for 28days. Chitosan-gelatin scaffolds were cytocompatible with respect to buffalo ES cells. The study underscores for the first time that chitosan-gelatin scaffolds are promising candidates for ES-cell-based tissue engineering.

  7. Trivalent manganese as an environmentally friendly oxidizing reagent for microwave- and ultrasound-assisted chemical oxygen demand determination.

    PubMed

    Domini, Claudia E; Vidal, Lorena; Canals, Antonio

    2009-06-01

    In the present work manganese(III) has been used as oxidant and microwave radiation and ultrasound energy have been assessed to speed up and to improve the efficiency of digestion step for the determination of chemical oxygen demand (COD). Microwave (MW) and ultrasound-assisted COD determination methods have been optimized by means of experimental design and the optimum conditions are: 40psi pressure, 855W power and 1min irradiation time; and 90% of maximum nominal power (180W), 0.9s (s(-1)) cycles and 1min irradiation time for microwaves and ultrasound, respectively. Chloride ion interference is removed as hydrochloric acid gas from acidified sample solutions at 150 degrees C in a closed reaction tube and captured by bismuth-based adsorbent suspended above the heated solution. Under optimum conditions, the evaluated assisted digestion methods have been successfully applied, with the exception of pyridine, to several pure organic compounds and two reference materials. COD recoveries obtained with MW and ultrasound-assisted digestion for five real wastewater samples were ranged between 86-97% and 68-91%, respectively, of the values obtained with the classical method (open reflux) used as reference, with relative standard deviation lower than 4% in most cases. Thus, the Mn(III) microwave-assisted digestion method seems to be an interesting and promising alternative to conventional COD digestion methods since it is faster and more environmentally friendly than the ones used for the same purpose.

  8. Sisal fibers: surface chemical modification using reagent obtained from a renewable source; characterization of hemicellulose and lignin as model study.

    PubMed

    Megiatto, Jackson D; Hoareau, William; Gardrat, Christian; Frollini, Elisabete; Castellan, Alain

    2007-10-17

    Sisal fibers have one of the greatest potentials among other lignocellulosic fibers to reinforce polymer matrices in composites. Sisal fibers have been modified to improve their compatibility with phenolic polymer matrices using furfuryl alcohol (FA) and polyfurfuryl alcohols (PFA) that can be obtained from renewable sources. The modification corresponded first to oxidation with ClO 2, which reacts mainly with guaiacyl and syringyl units of lignin, generating o- and p-quinones and muconic derivatives, followed by reaction with FA or PFA. The FA and PFA modified fibers presented a thin similar layer, indicating the polymer character of the coating. The untreated and treated sisal fibers were characterized by (13)C CP-MAS NMR spectrometry, thermal analysis, and scanning electron microscopy. Furthermore, for a better understanding of the reactions involved in the FA and PFA modifications, the sisal lignin previously extracted was also submitted to those reactions and characterized. The characterization of isolated lignin and hemicellulose provides some information on the chemical structure of the main constitutive macrocomponents of sisal fibers, such information being scarce in the literature.

  9. Uptake and transfection with polymeric nanoparticles are dependent on polymer end-group structure, but largely independent of nanoparticle physical and chemical properties.

    PubMed

    Sunshine, Joel C; Peng, Daniel Y; Green, Jordan J

    2012-11-05

    Development of nonviral particles for gene delivery requires a greater understanding of the properties that enable gene delivery particles to overcome the numerous barriers to intracellular DNA delivery. Linear poly(beta-amino) esters (PBAE) have shown substantial promise for gene delivery, but the mechanism behind their effectiveness is not well quantified with respect to these barriers. In this study, we synthesized, characterized, and evaluated for gene delivery an array of linear PBAEs that differed by small changes along the backbone, side chain, and end group of the polymers. We examined particle size and surface charge, polymer molecular weight, polymer degradation rate, buffering capacity, cellular uptake, transfection, and cytotoxicity of nanoparticles formulated with these polymers. Significantly, this is the first study that has quantified how small differential structural changes to polymers of this class modulate buffering capacity and polymer degradation rate and relates these findings to gene delivery efficacy. All polymers formed positively charged (zeta potential 21-29 mV) nanosized particles (∼150 nm). The polymers hydrolytically degraded quickly in physiological conditions, with half-lives ranging from 90 min to 6 h depending on polymer structure. The PBAE buffering capacities in the relevant pH range (pH 5.1-7.4) varied from 34% to 95% protonatable amines, and on a per mass basis, PBAEs buffered 1.4-4.6 mmol of H(+)/g. When compared to 25 kDa branched polyethyleneimine (PEI), PBAEs buffer significantly fewer protons/mass, as PEI buffers 6.2 mmol of H(+)/g over the same range. However, due to the relatively low cytotoxicity of PBAEs, higher polymer mass can be used to form particles than with PEI and total buffering capacity of PBAE-based particles significantly exceeds that of PEI. Uptake into COS-7 cells ranged from 0% to 95% of cells and transfection ranged from 0% to 93% of cells, depending on the base polymer structure and the end

  10. Uptake and transfection with polymeric nanoparticles are dependent on polymer end-group structure, but largely independent of nanoparticle physical and chemical properties

    PubMed Central

    Sunshine, Joel C.; Peng, Daniel Y.; Green, Jordan J.

    2012-01-01

    Development of non-viral particles for gene delivery requires a greater understanding of the properties that enable gene delivery particles to overcome the numerous barriers to intracellular DNA delivery. Linear poly(beta-amino) esters (PBAE) have shown substantial promise for gene delivery, but the mechanism behind their effectiveness is not well quantified with respect to these barriers. In this study, we synthesized, characterized, and evaluated for gene delivery an array of linear PBAEs that differed by small changes along the backbone, side chain, and end-group of the polymers. We examined particle size and surface charge, polymer molecular weight, polymer degradation rate, buffering capacity, cellular uptake, transfection, and cytotoxicity of nanoparticles formulated with these polymers. Significantly, this is the first study that has quantified how small differential structural changes to polymers of this class modulate buffering capacity and polymer degradation rate and relates these findings to gene delivery efficacy. All polymers formed positively charged (zeta potential 21–29 mV) nanosized articles (~ 150 nm). The polymers hydrolytically degraded quickly in physiological conditions, with half-lives ranging from 90 minutes to 6 hours depending on polymer structure. The PBAE buffering capacities in the relevant pH range (pH 5.1 – 7.4) varied from 34% to 95% protonable amines, and on a per mass basis, PBAEs buffered 1.4–4.6 mmol H+/g. When compared to 25 kDa branched polyethyleneimine (PEI), PBAEs buffer significantly fewer protons/mass, as PEI buffers 6.2 mmol H+/g over the same range. However, due to the relatively low cytotoxicity of PBAEs, higher polymer mass can be used to form particles than with PEI and total buffering capacity of PBAE-based particles significantly exceeds that of PEI. Uptake into COS-7 cells ranged from 0% to 95% of cells and transfection ranged from 0% to 93% of cells, depending on the base polymer structure and the end

  11. Spectrofluorometric determination and chemical speciation of trace concentrations of chromium (III & VI) species in water using the ion pairing reagent tetraphenyl-phosphonium bromide.

    PubMed

    El-Shahawi, M S; Al-Saidi, H M; Bashammakh, A S; Al-Sibaai, A A; Abdelfadeel, M A

    2011-03-15

    A highly selective, and low cost extractive spectrofluorometric method has been developed for determination of trace concentrations of chromium (III & VI) in water samples using the fluorescent reagent tetraphenylphosphonium bromide (TPP(+) · Br(-)). The method was based upon solvent extraction of the produced ion associate [TPP(+) · CrO(3)Cl(-)] of TPP(+) · Br(-) and halochromate in aqueous HCl and measuring the fluorescence quenching of TPP(+) · Br(-) in chloroform at λ(ex/em)=242/305 nm. The fluorescence intensity of TPP(+)Br(-) decreased linearly on increasing the chromium (VI) concentration in the range of 1-114 μg L(-1). The limits of detection (LOD) and quantification (LOQ) of chromium (VI) were 0.43 and 1.42 μg L(-1), respectively. Chromium (III) species after oxidation to chromium (VI) with H(2)O(2) in alkaline solution were also determined. Chemical speciation of chromium (III & VI) species at trace levels was achieved. The method was applied for analysis of chromium in certified reference material (IAEA Soil-7) and in tap- and wastewater samples and compared successfully (>95%) with the inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) results.

  12. Are clusters important in understanding the mechanisms in atmospheric pressure ionization? Part 1: Reagent ion generation and chemical control of ion populations.

    PubMed

    Klee, Sonja; Derpmann, Valerie; Wißdorf, Walter; Klopotowski, Sebastian; Kersten, Hendrik; Brockmann, Klaus J; Benter, Thorsten; Albrecht, Sascha; Bruins, Andries P; Dousty, Faezeh; Kauppila, Tiina J; Kostiainen, Risto; O'Brien, Rob; Robb, Damon B; Syage, Jack A

    2014-08-01

    It is well documented since the early days of the development of atmospheric pressure ionization methods, which operate in the gas phase, that cluster ions are ubiquitous. This holds true for atmospheric pressure chemical ionization, as well as for more recent techniques, such as atmospheric pressure photoionization, direct analysis in real time, and many more. In fact, it is well established that cluster ions are the primary carriers of the net charge generated. Nevertheless, cluster ion chemistry has only been sporadically included in the numerous proposed ionization mechanisms leading to charged target analytes, which are often protonated molecules. This paper series, consisting of two parts, attempts to highlight the role of cluster ion chemistry with regard to the generation of analyte ions. In addition, the impact of the changing reaction matrix and the non-thermal collisions of ions en route from the atmospheric pressure ion source to the high vacuum analyzer region are discussed. This work addresses such issues as extent of protonation versus deuteration, the extent of analyte fragmentation, as well as highly variable ionization efficiencies, among others. In Part 1, the nature of the reagent ion generation is examined, as well as the extent of thermodynamic versus kinetic control of the resulting ion population entering the analyzer region.

  13. Measurement of pernitric acid (HO2NO2) using chemical ionization mass spectrometry (CIMS) with I-·H2O as the reagent ions: instrumentation and observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, D.; Huey, L. G.; Tanner, D.; Ng, N. L.; Li, J.; Dibb, J. E.; Wang, Y.

    2015-12-01

    Peroxynitric acid (HO2NO2) is formed by the association reaction of HO2 and NO2, which couples both the HOx (HO2+OH) and NOx (=NO2+NO) families. The thermal decomposition at higher temperatures is sufficiently fast that HO2NO2 is in steady state with HO2 and NO2. This allows HO2 levels to be inferred from HO2NO2 observations. In Polar Regions and higher altitudes, significant levels of HO2NO2 can build up and influences local HOx and NOx photochemistry. Here, we present an in situ measurement technique of HO2NO2 based on chemical ionization mass spectrometry (CIMS) using the reagent ion I- and its hydrated form I-·H2O, together with our calibration technique for HO2NO2 measurements. We will also present observations of HO2NO2: (1) in a polar boundary layer on top of the Greenland Ice Sheet during summer 2011, and (2) in an urban boundary layer in metropolitan Atlanta during winter 2014. The local chemistry of HO2NO2 at Summit will be evaluated. The local HO2 in Atlanta will be inferred and assessed with models.

  14. Method to reduce chemical background interference in atmospheric pressure ionization liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry using exclusive reactions with the chemical reagent dimethyl disulfide.

    PubMed

    Guo, Xinghua; Bruins, Andries P; Covey, Thomas R

    2007-06-01

    The interference of chemical background ions (chemical noise) has been a problem since the inception of mass spectrometry. We present here a novel method to reduce the chemical noise in LC-MS based on exclusive gas-phase reactions with a reactive collision gas in a triple-quadrupole mass spectrometer. Combined with the zero neutral loss (ZNL) scan of a triple-quadrupole mass spectrometer, the reactive chemical noise ions can be removed because of shifts of mass-to-charge ratios from the original background ions. The test on various classes of compounds with different functional groups indicates a generic application of this technique in LC-MS. The preliminary results show that a reduction of the level of LC-MS base-peak chromatographic baseline by a factor up to 40 and an improvement of the signal-to-noise ratio by a factor up to 5-10 are achieved on both commercial and custom-modified triple-quadrupole LC-MS systems. Application is foreseen in both quantitative and qualitative trace analysis. It is expected that this chemical noise reduction technique can be optimized on a dedicated mass spectrometric instrumentation which incorporates both a chemical reaction cell for noise reduction and a collision stage for fragmentation.

  15. Nonmicrobial alternative to reagent quality control testing.

    PubMed Central

    Reynolds, S M

    1982-01-01

    The traditional approach to quality control in microbiology involves the routine testing of both media and reagents with live microbial cultures. This is expensive, time consuming, and subject to the variables associated with the use of live organisms. A system of reagent quality control based on the pure chemical form of the metabolic end products important to the identification of the Enterobacteriaceae was evaluated. The metabolite reagent control system is simple, reliable, and extremely cost effective, and it eliminates the need for live microbial cultures and media for reagent quality control. PMID:6759528

  16. Detection of atmospheric gaseous amines and amides by a high-resolution time-of-flight chemical ionization mass spectrometer with protonated ethanol reagent ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yao, Lei; Wang, Ming-Yi; Wang, Xin-Ke; Liu, Yi-Jun; Chen, Hang-Fei; Zheng, Jun; Nie, Wei; Ding, Ai-Jun; Geng, Fu-Hai; Wang, Dong-Fang; Chen, Jian-Min; Worsnop, Douglas R.; Wang, Lin

    2016-11-01

    Amines and amides are important atmospheric organic-nitrogen compounds but high time resolution, highly sensitive, and simultaneous ambient measurements of these species are rather sparse. Here, we present the development of a high-resolution time-of-flight chemical ionization mass spectrometer (HR-ToF-CIMS) method, utilizing protonated ethanol as reagent ions to simultaneously detect atmospheric gaseous amines (C1 to C6) and amides (C1 to C6). This method possesses sensitivities of 5.6-19.4 Hz pptv-1 for amines and 3.8-38.0 Hz pptv-1 for amides under total reagent ion signals of ˜ 0.32 MHz. Meanwhile, the detection limits were 0.10-0.50 pptv for amines and 0.29-1.95 pptv for amides at 3σ of the background signal for a 1 min integration time. Controlled characterization in the laboratory indicates that relative humidity has significant influences on the detection of amines and amides, whereas the presence of organics has no obvious effects. Ambient measurements of amines and amides utilizing this method were conducted from 25 July to 25 August 2015 in urban Shanghai, China. While the concentrations of amines ranged from a few parts per trillion by volume to hundreds of parts per trillion by volume, concentrations of amides varied from tens of parts per trillion by volume to a few parts per billion by volume. Among the C1- to C6-amines, the C2-amines were the dominant species with concentrations up to 130 pptv. For amides, the C3-amides (up to 8.7 ppb) were the most abundant species. The diurnal and backward trajectory analysis profiles of amides suggest that in addition to the secondary formation of amides in the atmosphere, industrial emissions could be important sources of amides in urban Shanghai. During the campaign, photo-oxidation of amines and amides might be a main loss pathway for them in daytime, and wet deposition was also an important sink.

  17. Renewable Reagent Fiber Optic Based Ammonia Sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berman, Richard J.; Burgess, Lloyd W.

    1990-02-01

    Many fiber optic based chemical sensors have been described which rely on a reagent chemistry fixed at the fiber endface to provide analyte specificity. In such systems, problems involving probe-to-probe reproducibility, reagent photolability and reagent leaching are frequently encountered. As a result, calibration and standardization of these sensors becomes difficult or impossible and thus inhibits their application for long term in situ chemical monitoring. Many of these problems can be addressed and several additional advantages gained by continuously renewing the reagent chemistry. To illustrate this concept, a fiber optic ammonia sensor is described in which the reagent is delivered under direct control to a sensing volume of approximately 400 nanoliters located at the probe tip. Using an acid-base indicator (bromothymol blue) as the reagent, the sample ammonia concentrations are related to modulations in light intensity with a lower limit of detection of 10 ppb. The sensor performance was studied with respect to reagent pH, concentration and reagent delivery rate. Compared with previous fiber optic ammonia sensors, the ability to reproducibly renew the reagent has resulted in improvements with respect to response and return times, probe-to-probe reproducibility, probe lifetime and flexibility of use.

  18. Toward Contactless Biology: Acoustophoretic DNA Transfection

    PubMed Central

    Vasileiou, Thomas; Foresti, Daniele; Bayram, Adem; Poulikakos, Dimos; Ferrari, Aldo

    2016-01-01

    Acoustophoresis revolutionized the field of container-less manipulation of liquids and solids by enabling mixing procedures which avoid contamination and loss of reagents due to the contact with the support. While its applications to chemistry and engineering are straightforward, additional developments are needed to obtain reliable biological protocols in a contactless environment. Here, we provide a first, fundamental step towards biological reactions in air by demonstrating the acoustophoretic DNA transfection of mammalian cells. We developed an original acoustophoretic design capable of levitating, moving and mixing biological suspensions of living mammalians cells and of DNA plasmids. The precise and sequential delivery of the mixed solutions into tissue culture plates is actuated by a novel mechanism based on the controlled actuation of the acoustophoretic force. The viability of the contactless procedure is tested using a cellular model sensitive to small perturbation of neuronal differentiation pathways. Additionally, the efficiency of the transfection procedure is compared to standard, container-based methods for both single and double DNA transfection and for different cell types including adherent growing HeLa cancer cells, and low adhesion neuron-like PC12 cells. In all, this work provides a proof of principle which paves the way to the development of high-throughput acoustophoretic biological reactors. PMID:26828312

  19. Toward Contactless Biology: Acoustophoretic DNA Transfection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vasileiou, Thomas; Foresti, Daniele; Bayram, Adem; Poulikakos, Dimos; Ferrari, Aldo

    2016-02-01

    Acoustophoresis revolutionized the field of container-less manipulation of liquids and solids by enabling mixing procedures which avoid contamination and loss of reagents due to the contact with the support. While its applications to chemistry and engineering are straightforward, additional developments are needed to obtain reliable biological protocols in a contactless environment. Here, we provide a first, fundamental step towards biological reactions in air by demonstrating the acoustophoretic DNA transfection of mammalian cells. We developed an original acoustophoretic design capable of levitating, moving and mixing biological suspensions of living mammalians cells and of DNA plasmids. The precise and sequential delivery of the mixed solutions into tissue culture plates is actuated by a novel mechanism based on the controlled actuation of the acoustophoretic force. The viability of the contactless procedure is tested using a cellular model sensitive to small perturbation of neuronal differentiation pathways. Additionally, the efficiency of the transfection procedure is compared to standard, container-based methods for both single and double DNA transfection and for different cell types including adherent growing HeLa cancer cells, and low adhesion neuron-like PC12 cells. In all, this work provides a proof of principle which paves the way to the development of high-throughput acoustophoretic biological reactors.

  20. Protein transfection study using multicellular tumor spheroids of human hepatoma Huh-7 cells.

    PubMed

    Kato, Takuma; Tanaka, Masakazu; Oba, Makoto

    2013-01-01

    Several protein transfection reagents are commercially available and are powerful tools for elucidating function of a protein in a cell. Here we described protein transfection studies of the commercially available reagents, Pro-DeliverIN, Xfect, and TuboFect, using Huh-7 multicellular tumor spheroid (MCTS) as a three-dimensional in vitro tumor model. A cellular uptake study using specific endocytosis inhibitors revealed that each reagent was internalized into Huh-7 MCTS by different mechanisms, which were the same as monolayer cultured Huh-7 cells. A certain amount of Pro-DeliverIN and Xfect was uptaken by Huh-7 cells through caveolae-mediated endocytosis, which may lead to transcytosis through the surface-first layered cells of MCTS. The results presented here will help in the choice and use of protein transfection reagents for evaluating anti-tumor therapeutic proteins against MCTS models.

  1. Handling Pyrophoric Reagents

    SciTech Connect

    Alnajjar, Mikhail S.; Haynie, Todd O.

    2009-08-14

    Pyrophoric reagents are extremely hazardous. Special handling techniques are required to prevent contact with air and the resulting fire. This document provides several methods for working with pyrophoric reagents outside of an inert atmosphere.

  2. Stearylated octaarginine and artificial virus-like particles for transfection of siRNA into primary rat neurons

    PubMed Central

    Tönges, Lars; Lingor, Paul; Egle, Roman; Dietz, Gunnar P.H.; Fahr, Alfred; Bähr, Mathias

    2006-01-01

    RNA interference (RNAi) provides a powerful experimental tool for sequence-specific gene silencing, allowing efficient analysis of gene function in a multitude of cell types. However, application of RNAi in primary mammalian neurons has been limited by low-transfection efficiency and considerable toxicity of conventional transfection methods. In this study, we evaluated a peptide-mediated and a polymer/lipid-based cellular delivery method for siRNA into rat primary neurons and compared the results with a commonly used liposomal transfection reagent. Stearylated octaarginine (Stearyl-R8) was used as polypeptide and artificial virus-like particles (AVPs) were used as a combined liposomal-polymeric vector, since both reagents have been previously shown to successfully transfect DNA into cell lines. Stearyl-R8 and AVPs both promoted siRNA transfection into primary hippocampal neurons via the endosomal pathway. SiRNA-mediated gene silencing could be effectively induced in primary neuron cultures. In comparison with the commonly used cationic liposome transfection agent, both novel reagents were less detrimental to cell metabolic activity. We conclude that these novel transfection methods yield performances comparable to cationic liposome-mediated transfection for siRNA, while being less cytotoxic in primary neurons. Stearyl-R8 and AVPs may therefore represent novel and more cost-efficient alternatives to conventional siRNA-transfection reagents. PMID:16699166

  3. Transfection using DEAE-dextran.

    PubMed

    Gulick, T

    2001-05-01

    Transfection of cultured mammalian cells using diethylaminoethyl (DEAE)-dextran/DNA can be an attractive alternative to other transfection methods in many circumstances. The major advantages of the technique are its relative simplicity and speed, limited expense, and remarkably reproducible interexperimental and intraexperimental transfection efficiency. Disadvantages include inhibition of cell growth and induction of heterogeneous morphological changes in cells. Furthermore, the concentration of serum in the culture medium must be transiently reduced during the transfection. In general, DEAE-dextran DNA transfection is ideal for transient transfections with promoter/reporter plasmids in analyses of promoter and enhancer functions, and is suitable for overexpression of recombinant protein in transient transfections or for generation of stable cell lines using vectors designed to exist in the cell as episomes. This unit presents a general description of DEAE-dextran transfection, as well as two more specific protocols for typical experimental applications. The basic protocol is suitable for transfection of anchorage-dependent (attached) cells. For cells that grow in suspension, electroporation or lipofection is usually preferred, although DEAE-dextran-mediated transfection can be used.

  4. Transfection using DEAE-dextran.

    PubMed

    Gulick, Tod

    2003-08-01

    Transfection of cultured mammalian cells using diethylaminoethyl (DEAE)-dextran/DNA can be an attractive alternative to other transfection methods in many circumstances. The major advantages of the technique are its relative simplicity and speed, limited expense, and remarkably reproducible interexperimental and intraexperimental transfection efficiency. Disadvantages include inhibition of cell growth and induction of heterogeneous morphological changes in cells. Furthermore, the concentration of serum in the culture medium must be transiently reduced during the transfection. In general, DEAE-dextran DNA transfection is ideal for transient transfections with promoter/reporter plasmids in analyses of promoter and enhancer functions, and is suitable for overexpression of recombinant protein in transient transfections or for generation of stable cell lines using vectors designed to exist in the cell as episomes. This unit presents a general description of DEAE-dextran transfection, as well as two more specific protocols for typical experimental applications. The basic protocol is suitable for transfection of anchorage-dependent (attached) cells. For cells that grow in suspension, electroporation or lipofection is usually preferred, although DEAE-dextran-mediated transfection can be used.

  5. Transfection using DEAE-dextran.

    PubMed

    Gulick, T

    2001-05-01

    Transfection of cultured mammalian cells using diethylaminoethyl (DEAE)-dextran/DNA can be an attractive alternative to other transfection methods in many circumstances. The major advantages of the technique are its relative simplicity and speed, limited expense, and remarkably reproducible interexperimental and intraexperimental transfection efficiency. Disadvantages include inhibition of cell growth and induction of heterogeneous morphological changes in cells. Furthermore, the concentration of serum in the culture medium must be transiently reduced during the transfection. In general, DEAE-dextran DNA transfection is ideal for transient transfections with promoter/reporter plasmids in analyses of promoter and enhancer functions, and is suitable for overexpression of recombinant protein in transient transfections or for generation of stable cell lines using vectors designed to exist in the cell as episomes. This unit presents a general description of DEAE-dextran transfection, as well as two more specific protocols for typical experimental applications. The Basic Protocol is suitable for transfection of anchorage-dependent (attached) cells. For cells that grow in suspension, electroporation or lipofection is usually preferred, although DEAE-dextran-mediated transfection can be used.

  6. Bio-Orthogonal Mediated Nucleic Acid Transfection of Cells via Cell Surface Engineering

    PubMed Central

    2017-01-01

    The efficient delivery of foreign nucleic acids (transfection) into cells is a critical tool for fundamental biomedical research and a pillar of several biotechnology industries. There are currently three main strategies for transfection including reagent, instrument, and viral based methods. Each technology has significantly advanced cell transfection; however, reagent based methods have captured the majority of the transfection market due to their relatively low cost and ease of use. This general method relies on the efficient packaging of a reagent with nucleic acids to form a stable complex that is subsequently associated and delivered to cells via nonspecific electrostatic targeting. Reagent transfection methods generally use various polyamine cationic type molecules to condense with negatively charged nucleic acids into a highly positively charged complex, which is subsequently delivered to negatively charged cells in culture for association, internalization, release, and expression. Although this appears to be a straightforward procedure, there are several major issues including toxicity, low efficiency, sorting of viable transfected from nontransfected cells, and limited scope of transfectable cell types. Herein, we report a new strategy (SnapFect) for nucleic acid transfection to cells that does not rely on electrostatic interactions but instead uses an integrated approach combining bio-orthogonal liposome fusion, click chemistry, and cell surface engineering. We show that a target cell population is rapidly and efficiently engineered to present a bio-orthogonal functional group on its cell surface through nanoparticle liposome delivery and fusion. A complementary bio-orthogonal nucleic acid complex is then formed and delivered to which chemoselective click chemistry induced transfection occurs to the primed cell. This new strategy requires minimal time, steps, and reagents and leads to superior transfection results for a broad range of cell types

  7. Bio-Orthogonal Mediated Nucleic Acid Transfection of Cells via Cell Surface Engineering.

    PubMed

    O'Brien, Paul J; Elahipanah, Sina; Rogozhnikov, Dmitry; Yousaf, Muhammad N

    2017-05-24

    The efficient delivery of foreign nucleic acids (transfection) into cells is a critical tool for fundamental biomedical research and a pillar of several biotechnology industries. There are currently three main strategies for transfection including reagent, instrument, and viral based methods. Each technology has significantly advanced cell transfection; however, reagent based methods have captured the majority of the transfection market due to their relatively low cost and ease of use. This general method relies on the efficient packaging of a reagent with nucleic acids to form a stable complex that is subsequently associated and delivered to cells via nonspecific electrostatic targeting. Reagent transfection methods generally use various polyamine cationic type molecules to condense with negatively charged nucleic acids into a highly positively charged complex, which is subsequently delivered to negatively charged cells in culture for association, internalization, release, and expression. Although this appears to be a straightforward procedure, there are several major issues including toxicity, low efficiency, sorting of viable transfected from nontransfected cells, and limited scope of transfectable cell types. Herein, we report a new strategy (SnapFect) for nucleic acid transfection to cells that does not rely on electrostatic interactions but instead uses an integrated approach combining bio-orthogonal liposome fusion, click chemistry, and cell surface engineering. We show that a target cell population is rapidly and efficiently engineered to present a bio-orthogonal functional group on its cell surface through nanoparticle liposome delivery and fusion. A complementary bio-orthogonal nucleic acid complex is then formed and delivered to which chemoselective click chemistry induced transfection occurs to the primed cell. This new strategy requires minimal time, steps, and reagents and leads to superior transfection results for a broad range of cell types

  8. 96-well electroporation method for transfection of mammalian central neurons.

    PubMed

    Buchser, William J; Pardinas, Jose R; Shi, Yan; Bixby, John L; Lemmon, Vance P

    2006-11-01

    Manipulating gene expression in primary neurons has been a goal for many scientists for over 20 years. Vertebrate central nervous system neurons are classically difficult to transfect. Most lipid reagents are inefficient and toxic to the cells, and time-consuming methods such as viral infections are often required to obtain better efficiencies. We have developed an efficient method for the transfection of cerebellar granule neurons and hippocampal neurons with standard plasmid vectors. Using 96-well electroporation plates, square-wave pulses can introduce 96 different plasmids into neurons in a single step. The procedure results in greater than 20% transfection efficiencies and requires only simple solutions of nominal cost. In addition to enabling the rapid optimization of experimental protocols with multiple parameters, this procedure enables the use of high content screening methods to characterize neuronal phenotypes.

  9. 96-Well electroporation method for transfection of mammalian central neurons

    PubMed Central

    Buchser, William J.; Pardinas, Jose R.; Shi, Yan; Bixby, John L.; Lemmon, Vance P.

    2008-01-01

    Manipulating gene expression in primary neurons has been a goal for many scientists for over 20 years. Vertebrate central nervous system neurons are classically difficult to transfect. Most lipid reagents are inefficient and toxic to the cells, and time-consuming methods such as viral infections are often required to obtain better efficiencies. We have developed an efficient method for the transfection of cerebellar granule neurons and hippocampal neurons with standard plasmid vectors. Using 96-well electroporation plates, square-wave pulses can introduce 96 different plasmids into neurons in a single step. The procedure results in greater than 20% transfection efficiencies and requires only simple solutions of nominal cost. In addition to enabling the rapid optimization of experimental protocols with multiple parameters, this procedure enables the use of high content screening methods to characterize neuronal phenotypes. PMID:17140120

  10. Transfection of Platyhelminthes.

    PubMed

    Moguel, Bárbara; Bobes, Raúl J; Carrero, Julio C; Laclette, Juan P

    2015-01-01

    Flatworms are one of the most diverse groups within Lophotrochozoa with more than 20,000 known species, distributed worldwide in different ecosystems, from the free-living organisms in the seas and lakes to highly specialized parasites living in a variety of hosts, including humans. Several infections caused by flatworms are considered major neglected diseases affecting countries in the Americas, Asia, and Africa. For several decades, a particular interest on free-living flatworms was due to their ability to regenerate considerable portions of the body, implying the presence of germ cells that could be important for medicine. The relevance of reverse genetics for this group is clear; understanding the phenotypic characteristics of specific genes will shed light on developmental traits of free-living and parasite worms. The genetic manipulation of flatworms will allow learning more about the mechanisms for tissue regeneration, designing new and more effective anthelmintic drugs, and explaining the host-parasite molecular crosstalk so far partially inaccessible for experimentation. In this review, availability of transfection techniques is analyzed across flatworms, from the initial transient achievements to the stable manipulations now developed for free-living and parasite species.

  11. Transfection of Platyhelminthes

    PubMed Central

    Moguel, Bárbara; Bobes, Raúl J.; Carrero, Julio C.; Laclette, Juan P.

    2015-01-01

    Flatworms are one of the most diverse groups within Lophotrochozoa with more than 20,000 known species, distributed worldwide in different ecosystems, from the free-living organisms in the seas and lakes to highly specialized parasites living in a variety of hosts, including humans. Several infections caused by flatworms are considered major neglected diseases affecting countries in the Americas, Asia, and Africa. For several decades, a particular interest on free-living flatworms was due to their ability to regenerate considerable portions of the body, implying the presence of germ cells that could be important for medicine. The relevance of reverse genetics for this group is clear; understanding the phenotypic characteristics of specific genes will shed light on developmental traits of free-living and parasite worms. The genetic manipulation of flatworms will allow learning more about the mechanisms for tissue regeneration, designing new and more effective anthelmintic drugs, and explaining the host-parasite molecular crosstalk so far partially inaccessible for experimentation. In this review, availability of transfection techniques is analyzed across flatworms, from the initial transient achievements to the stable manipulations now developed for free-living and parasite species. PMID:26090388

  12. Magnetic nanoparticles as gene delivery agents: enhanced transfection in the presence of oscillating magnet arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McBain, S. C.; Griesenbach, U.; Xenariou, S.; Keramane, A.; Batich, C. D.; Alton, E. W. F. W.; Dobson, J.

    2008-10-01

    Magnetic nanoparticle-based gene transfection has been shown to be effective in combination with both viral vectors and with non-viral agents. In these systems, therapeutic or reporter genes are attached to magnetic nanoparticles which are then focused to the target site/cells via high-field/high-gradient magnets. The technique has been shown to be efficient and rapid for in vitro transfection and compares well with cationic lipid-based reagents, producing good overall transfection levels with lower doses and shorter transfection times. In spite of its potential advantages (particularly for in vivo targeting), the overall transfection levels do not generally exceed those of other non-viral agents. In order to improve the overall transfection levels while maintaining the advantages inherent in this technique, we have developed a novel, oscillating magnet array system which adds lateral motion to the particle/gene complex in order to promote transfection. Experimental results indicate that the system significantly enhances overall in vitro transfection levels in human airway epithelial cells compared to both static field techniques (p<0.005) and the cationic lipids (p<0.001) tested. In addition, it has the previously demonstrated advantages of magnetofection—rapid transfection times and requiring lower levels of DNA than cationic lipid-based transfection agents. This method shows potential for non-viral gene delivery both in vitro and in vivo.

  13. Comparison of nanoparticle-mediated transfection methods for DNA expression plasmids: efficiency and cytotoxicity

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Reproducibly high transfection rates with low methodology-induced cytotoxic side effects are essential to attain the required effect on targeted cells when exogenous DNA is transfected. Different approaches and modifications such as the use of nanoparticles (NPs) are being evaluated to increase transfection efficiencies. Several studies have focused on the attained transfection efficiency after NP-mediated approaches. However, data comparing toxicity of these novel approaches with conventional methods is still rare. Transfection efficiency and methodology-induced cytotoxicity were analysed after transfection with different NP-mediated and conventional approaches. Two eukaryotic DNA-expression-plasmids were used to transfect the mammalian cell line MTH53A applying six different transfection protocols: conventional transfection reagent (FuGENE HD, FHD), FHD in combination with two different sizes of stabilizer-free laser-generated AuNPs (PLAL-AuNPs_S1,_S2), FHD and commercially available AuNPs (Plano-AuNP), and two magnetic transfection protocols. 24 h post transfection efficiency of each protocol was analysed using fluorescence microscopy and GFP-based flow cytometry. Toxicity was assessed measuring cell proliferation and percentage of propidium iodide (PI%) positive cells. Expression of the respective recombinant proteins was evaluated by immunofluorescence. Results The addition of AuNPs to the transfection protocols significantly increased transfection efficiency in the pIRES-hrGFPII-eIL-12 transfections (FHD: 16%; AuNPs mean: 28%), whereas the magnet-assisted protocols did not increase efficiency. Ligand-free PLAL-AuNPs had no significant cytotoxic effect, while the ligand-stabilized Plano-AuNPs induced a significant increase in the PI% and lower cell proliferation. For pIRES-hrGFPII-rHMGB1 transfections significantly higher transfection efficiency was observed with PLAL-AuNPs (FHD: 31%; PLAL-AuNPs_S1: 46%; PLAL-AuNPs_S2: 50%), while the magnet

  14. A reverse transfection technology to genetically engineer adult stem cells.

    PubMed

    Okazaki, Arimichi; Jo, Jun-Ichiro; Tabata, Yasuhiko

    2007-02-01

    A new non-viral method of gene transfection was designed to enhance the level of gene expression for rat mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs). Pullulan was cationized using chemical introduction of spermine to prepare cationized pullulan of non-viral carrier (spermine-pullulan). The spermine-pullulan was complexed with a plasmid deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) of luciferase and coated on the surface of culture substrate together with Pronectin of artificial cell adhesion protein. MSCs were cultured and transfected on the complex-coated substrate (reverse transfection), and the level and duration of gene expression were compared with those of MSCs transfected by culturing in the medium containing the plasmid DNA-spermine-pullulan complex (conventional method). The reverse transfection method enhanced and prolonged gene expression significantly more than did the conventional method. The reverse method permitted the transfection culture of MSCs in the presence of serum, in contrast to the conventional method, which gave cells a good culture condition to lower cytotoxicity. The reverse transfection was carried out for a non-woven fabric of polyethylene terephthalate (PET) coated with the complex and Pronectin using agitation and stirring culture methods. The two methods enhanced the level and duration of gene expression for MSCs significantly more than did the static method. It is possible that medium circulation improves the culture conditions of cells in terms of oxygen and nutrition supply and waste excretion, resulting in enhanced gene expression.

  15. New reagents for coal desulfurization. Final technical report, September 1, 1990--August 31, 1991

    SciTech Connect

    Buchanan, D.H.; Kalembasa, S.; Olson, D.; Wang, S.; Warfel, L.

    1991-12-31

    The primary goal of this project was development and exploration of potential new desulfurization reagents for the removal of ``organic sulfur`` from Illinois coals by mild chemical methods. Potential new desulfurization reagents were investigated using organic sulfur compounds of the types thought to be present in coals. Reagents included low-valent metal complexes based on nickel and on iron as well as possible Single Electron Transfer reagents. Soluble coal extracts served as second generation model compounds during this reagent development project.

  16. Integrated Electrowetting Nanoinjector for Single Cell Transfection

    PubMed Central

    Shekaramiz, Elaheh; Varadarajalu, Ganeshkumar; Day, Philip J.; Wickramasinghe, H. Kumar

    2016-01-01

    Single cell transfection techniques are essential to understand the heterogeneity between cells. We have developed an integrated electrowetting nanoinjector (INENI) to transfect single cells. The high transfection efficiency, controlled dosage delivery and ease of INENI fabrication promote the widespread application of the INENI in cell transfection assays. PMID:27374766

  17. DEGRADATION OF MTBE INTERMEDIATES USING FENTON'S REAGENT

    EPA Science Inventory

    In a previous study, the chemical oxidation of MTBE at low concentrations in water using the Fenton's reagent (FR) was investigated. At certain reaction conditions the process achieved 99.99% degradation of MTBE but it did not result in complete MTBE mineralization. In the pres...

  18. Reagent Selector: using Synthon Analysis to visualize reagent properties and assist in combinatorial library design.

    PubMed

    Mosley, Ralph T; Culberson, J Christopher; Kraker, Bryan; Feuston, Bradley P; Sheridan, Robert P; Conway, John F; Forbes, Joseph K; Chakravorty, Subhas J; Kearsley, Simon K

    2005-01-01

    Reagent Selector is an intranet-based tool that aids in the selection of reagents for use in combinatorial library construction. The user selects an appropriate reagent group as a query, for example, primary amines, and further refines it on the basis of various physicochemical properties, resulting in a list of potential reagents. The results of this selection process are, in turn, converted into synthons: the fragments or R-groups that are to be incorporated into the combinatorial library. The Synthon Analysis interface graphically depicts the chemical properties for each synthon as a function of the topological bond distance from the scaffold attachment point. Displayed in this fashion, the user is able to visualize the property space for the universe of synthons as well as that of the synthons selected. Ultimately, the reagent list that embodies the selected synthons is made available to the user for reagent procurement. Application of the approach to a sample reagent list for a G-protein coupled receptor targeted library is described.

  19. Combinatorial synthesis of new cationic lipids and high-throughput screening of their transfection properties.

    PubMed

    Lenssen, Karl; Jantscheff, Peter; von Kiedrowski, Günter; Massing, Ulrich

    2002-09-02

    Here we describe the first synthesis-screening approach for the identification and optimization of new cationic lipids for gene transfer in various cell lines. Combinatorial solid-phase chemistry was used to synthesize a library of new cationic lipids based on 3-methylamino-1,2-dihydroxypropane as the polar, cationic lipid part. As the nonpolar lipid part, different hydrocarbon chains were bound to the amino group of the scaffold and the amino group was further methylated to afford constantly cationic lipids. Lipids were synthesized in both configurations and as racemates, and the counter ions were also varied. By using a fully automated transfection screening method and COS-7 cells, the cationic lipid N,N-ditetradecyl-N-methyl-amino-2,3-propanediol (KL-1-14) was identified as a candidate lipid for the development of an improved transfection reagent. Screening the transfection properties of KL-1-14 in numerous combinations with the helper lipids dioleoylphosphatidylethanolamine (DOPE) and cholesterol (Chol) revealed that Chol is the most suitable helper lipid and the best KL-1-14/Chol ratio is 0.5-0.7. Compared to the standard transfection lipid N-[1-(2,3-dioleoyloxy)propyl]-N,N,N-trimethylammonium methyl sulfate (DOTAP), transfection efficiency was improved by a factor of about 40. Furthermore, by using R- and S-configured KL-1-14, it could be shown that the configuration of the lipids had no significant influence on its transfection efficiency. The highest transfection efficiencies were achieved with chloride as the counter ion. The new lipofection reagent was further tested to transfect the cell lines MDA-MB-468, MCF-7, MDCK-C7, and primary dentritic cells (DC), which are important for the development of new anticancer gene therapy strategies. Even in these cells, KL-1-14/Chol (1:0.6) had improved transfection efficiencies, which were about two to four times higher than for DOTAP.

  20. New reagents, new reactions: Computers in chemistry

    SciTech Connect

    Dessy, R.E.

    1996-12-31

    There is a new reagent in chemical reaction vessels-the computer. From data collection, through information processing, to knowledge creation the computer is an integral partner of today`s chemist. Despite its ability to be a Sorcerer`s Apprentice, it has become a leading weapon in overcoming some of the fiscal and technical demands placed upon research and development teams by global competition. In the process it is forcing changes in our work habits that arc, stressing both the Corporation and the individual, this article explores the uses, abuses, and possible future of the new reagent, and explores the meta-physics of the electronic web. 42 refs.

  1. Chemical speciation and recovery of gold(I, III) from wastewater and silver by liquid-liquid extraction with the ion-pair reagent amiloride mono hydrochloride and AAS determination.

    PubMed

    El-Shahawi, M S; Bashammakh, A S; Bahaffi, S O

    2007-06-15

    A novel and low cost liquid-liquid extraction procedure for the separation of gold(III) at trace level from aqueous medium of pH 5-9 has been developed. The method has been based upon the formation of a yellow colored ternary complex ion associate of tetrachloro gold(III) complex anion, AuCl(4)(-) with the ion-pair reagent 1-(3,5-diamino-6-chloropyrazinecarboxyl) guanidine hydrochloride monohydrate, namely amiloride, DPG(+).Cl(-). The effect of various parameters, e.g. pH, organic solvent, shaking time, etc. on the preconcentration of gold(III) from the aqueous media by the DPG(+).Cl(-) reagent has been investigated. The colored gold species was quantitatively extracted into 4-methyl pentan-2-one. The chemical composition of the ion associate of DPG(+).Cl(-) with AuCl(4)(-) in the organic solvent has been determined by the Job's method. The molar absorptivity (2.19x10(4)Lmol(-1)cm(-1)) of the associate DPG(+).AuCl(4)(-) at 362nm enabled a convenient application of the developed extraction procedure for the separation and AAS determination of traces of aurate ions. Mono-valence gold ions after oxidation to gold(III) with bromine water in HCl (1.0molL(-1)) media have been also extracted quantitatively from the aqueous media by the developed procedure. The chemical speciation of mono- and/or tri-valence gold species spiked to fresh and industrial wastewater samples has been achieved. The method has been also applied successfully from the separation of gold(I) and gold(III) species from metallic ions and silver. The developed method has also the advantage of freedom from most diverse ions.

  2. Shelf-stable electrophilic trifluoromethylating reagents: A brief historical perspective

    PubMed Central

    Matsnev, Andrej

    2010-01-01

    Summary Since the discovery by Yagupolskii and co-workers that S-trifluoromethyl diarylsulfonium salts are effective for the trifluoromethylation of thiophenolates, the design and synthesis of electrophilic trifluoromethylating reagents have been extensively researched in both academia and industry, due to the significant unique features that trifluoromethylated compounds have in pharmaceuticals, agricultural chemicals, and functional materials. Several effective reagents have been developed by the groups of Yagupolskii, Umemoto, Shreeve, Adachi, Magnier, Togni and Shibata. Due to the high stability and reactivity of these reagents, a series of Umemoto reagents, Togni reagent and Shibata reagent are now commercially available. In this review, we wish to briefly provide a historical perspective of the development of so-called “shelf-stable electrophilic trifluoromethylating reagents”, although this field is in constant development. PMID:20703379

  3. [Antioxidant and prooxidant properties of the ascorbic acid, dihydroquercetine and mexidol in the radical reactions induced by the ionizing radiation and chemical reagents].

    PubMed

    Riabchenko, N I; Riabchenko, V I; Ivannik, B P; Dzikovskaia, L A; Sin'kova, R V; Grosheva, I P; Degtiareva, E S; Ivanova, T I

    2010-01-01

    Antioxidant and prooxidant properties of dihydroquercetine, mexidol and an ascorbic acid in reactions with participation of radicals OH* and O2(-)*, induced by gamma-irradiation, iron-catalyzed decomposition of hydrogen peroxide and oxidation of reduced NADH by phenazine metosulfate are investigafed. The efficiency of scavenging of radicals OH* estimated by the results of the analysis of deoxyribose degradation, and the efficiency of scavenging of superoxide anion-radicals O2(-)* is estimated by the results of the analysis of occurrence the reduced nitrotetrazolium blue. The concentrations of analyzed compounds, scavenging on 50% (C50%) formation of radicals OH* and O2(-)* are certain. It is shown, that an ascorbic acid, dihydroquercetine and mexidol decrease the generating of superoxide anion-radicals O2(-)* in the gamma-irradiated solutions of sodium format and at oxidation of reduced NADH by phenazine metosulfate scavanged of superoxide anion-radicals O2(-)*. In the gamma-irradiated saline solutions an ascorbic acid, dihydroquercetine and mexidol protected deoxyribose from oxidizing action of hydroxyl radicals OH*. However at presence Fe(3+), EDTA and hydrogen peroxide addition of an ascorbic acid (0.1 mmol/l) increased generating of hydroxyl radicals OH* and in 2.8 times raised the maintenance of products of deoxyribose oxidation, reacting with thiobarbituric acid. Prooxidant action of an ascorbic acid is observed as well in absence of hydrogen peroxide. Obtained data testify that in various modelling systems reagents, in particular ions of iron, and the formed active intermediate products render significant influence on scavenging efficiency of investigated compounds.

  4. Use of Protein Folding Reagents.

    PubMed

    2016-04-01

    The reagents and methods for purification and use of the most commonly used denaturants, guanidine hydrochloride (guanidine-HCl) and urea, are described. Other protein denaturants and reagents used to fold proteins are briefly mentioned. Sulfhydryl reagents (reducing agents) and "oxido-shuffling" (or oxidative regeneration) systems are also described.

  5. Calcium Phosphate Transfection of Primary Hippocampal Neurons

    PubMed Central

    DiBona, Victoria L.; Wu, Qian; Zhang, Huaye

    2013-01-01

    Calcium phosphate precipitation is a convenient and economical method for transfection of cultured cells. With optimization, it is possible to use this method on hard-to-transfect cells like primary neurons. Here we describe our detailed protocol for calcium phosphate transfection of hippocampal neurons cocultured with astroglial cells. PMID:24300106

  6. ANALYSIS OF IN VITRO TRANSFECTION BY SONOPORATION USING CATIONIC AND NEUTRAL MICROBUBBLES

    PubMed Central

    Tlaxca, Jose L.; Anderson, Christopher R.; Klibanov, Alexander L.; Lowrey, Bryce; Hossack, John A.; Alexander, J. Steven; Lawrence, Michael B.; Rychak, Joshua J.

    2010-01-01

    The objective of the study was to examine the role of acoustic power intensity and microbubble and plasmid concentrations on transfection efficiency in HEK-293 cells using a sonoporator with a 1-MHz transducer. A green fluorescent protein (GFP) reporter plasmid was delivered in as much as 80% of treated cells, and expression of the GFP protein was observed in as much as 75% of cells, using a power intensity of 2 W/cm2 with a 25% duty cycle. In addition, the relative transfection abilities of a lipid noncationic and cationic microbubble platform were investigated. As a positive control, cells were transfected using Lipofectamine reagent. Cell survival and transfection efficiency were inversely proportional to acoustic power and microbubble concentration. Our results further demonstrated that high-efficiency transfection could be achieved, but at the expense of cell loss. Moreover, direct conjugation of plasmid to the microbubble did not appear to significantly enhance transfection efficiency under the examined conditions, although this strategy may be important for targeted transfection in vivo. PMID:20800945

  7. SEAP expression in transiently transfected mammalian cells grown in serum-free suspension culture.

    PubMed

    Schlaeger, Ernst-Jürgen; Kitas, Eric A; Dorn, Arnulf

    2003-05-01

    A transient transfection process was established using a novel 'in-house' developed transfection reagent, Ro-1539. It allows rapid production of large quantities of various recombinant proteins. Here we describe the transient expression of the secreted human placental alkaline phosphatase (SEAP) by HEK293EBNA and CHO cells in serum-free suspension culture. Unexpectedly, high expression levels of SEAP (150 mug/ml) were found 3-4 days post-transfection when placental alkaline phosphatase (AP) was used as the reference enzyme. To confirm these data, an SDS-PAGE analysis was performed and the visible SEAP protein band (MW of 65 kDa) was compared with co-migrated purified placental AP protein as reference. The scanning analysis of the gel showed that SEAP, a truncated form of AP, has a higher specific activity than the purified placental AP. A correction factor was introduced permitting a direct comparison of placental AP activity with the expression levels of SEAP. Scale-up of the transfection system from spinner flask to bioreactor was simple and straightforward, resulting in similar yields of SEAP. Finally, the effectiveness of Ro-1539 was compared to that of other transfection reagents.

  8. Co-transfection and tandem transfection of HEK293A cells for overexpression and RNAi experiments.

    PubMed

    Xie, Zhen-Li; Shao, Shu-Li; Lv, Jian-Wei; Wang, Chang-He; Yuan, Cheng-Zhi; Zhang, Wei-Wei; Xu, Xing-Jun

    2011-03-01

    pIRES2-EGFP was employed and a non-target shRNA expressing plasmid was constructed to simulate overexpression and RNAi (RNA interference) experiments. Transfection of pIRES2-EGFP into HEK293A cells by cationic lipids VigoFect demonstrated that transfection efficiency increased in a dose-dependent manner with amount of DNA plasmid used, and optimal transfection time and cell density should be identified to reach a compromise of higher transfection efficiency and lower toxicity. Co-transfection experiments indicated that the two co-transfected plasmids were equivalently delivered into the same cells, and the co-transfection efficiency was rarely affected by cell density and proportion of the two plasmids. However, plasmid-receipted cells seemed indisposed to accept plasmid again during the second transfection, and very low co-transfection efficiency was observed in tandem transfection.

  9. Evaluation of the α-phenylvinyl cation as a chemical ionization reagent for the differentiation of isomeric substituted phenols in an ITMS.

    PubMed

    Begala, Michela

    2015-04-01

    Ion-molecule reactions between the α-phenylvinyl cation and isomeric naturally occurring phenols were investigated using a quadruple ion trap mass spectrometer. The α-phenylvinyl cation m/z 103, generated by chemical ionization from phenylacetylene, reacts with neutral aromatic compounds to form the characteristic species: [M + 103](+) adduct ions and the trans-vinylating product ions [M + 25](+) , which correspond to [M + 103](+) adduct after the loss of benzene. Isomeric differentiation of several ring-substituted phenols was achieved by using collision-induced dissociation of the [M + 103](+) adduct ions. This method also showed to be effective in the differentiation of 4-ethylguaiacol from one of its structural isomers that displays identical EI and EI/MS/MS spectra. The effects of gas-phase alkylation with phenylvinyl cation on the dissociation behavior were examined using mass spectrometry(n) and labeled derivatives. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  10. (2-Naphthoxy)acetyl chloride, a simple fluorescent reagent.

    PubMed

    Duh, Tsai-Hui; Wu, Hsin-Lung; Kou, Hwang-Shang; Lu, Chi-Yu

    2003-02-14

    In continuing the search for fluorescent reagents for analytical derivatization in chromatography, we found a simple chemical, (2-naphthoxy)acetyl chloride, with potential fluorophore/chromophore characteristics for the highly sensitive detection of analytes with an amino function. The reagent has an auxochrome (a substituted alkoxy moiety) attached to the fluorophoric/chromophoric naphthalene system, resulting in favorable spectrophotometric properties. The reagent can be easily prepared from (2-naphthoxy)acetic acid and has been used in organic synthesis; it is initially introduced as a fluorescent reagent to derivatise amantadine and memantine (amino pharmaceuticals) as model analytes. The resulting naphthoxy derivatives of the drugs can be analyzed at sub-microM levels by HPLC with fluorimetric detection (excitation wavelength 227 nm, emission wavelength 348 nm). Application of the reagent to the fluorimetric derivatization of important biological amines for sensitive detection can be expected.

  11. Rational design of a structural framework with potential use to develop chemical reagents that target and modulate multiple facets of Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Lee, Sanghyun; Zheng, Xueyun; Krishnamoorthy, Janarthanan; Savelieff, Masha G; Park, Hyun Min; Brender, Jeffrey R; Kim, Jin Hoon; Derrick, Jeffrey S; Kochi, Akiko; Lee, Hyuck Jin; Kim, Cheal; Ramamoorthy, Ayyalusamy; Bowers, Michael T; Lim, Mi Hee

    2014-01-08

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is characterized by multiple, intertwined pathological features, including amyloid-β (Aβ) aggregation, metal ion dyshomeostasis, and oxidative stress. We report a novel compound (ML) prototype of a rationally designed molecule obtained by integrating structural elements for Aβ aggregation control, metal chelation, reactive oxygen species (ROS) regulation, and antioxidant activity within a single molecule. Chemical, biochemical, ion mobility mass spectrometric, and NMR studies indicate that the compound ML targets metal-free and metal-bound Aβ (metal-Aβ) species, suppresses Aβ aggregation in vitro, and diminishes toxicity induced by Aβ and metal-treated Aβ in living cells. Comparison of ML to its structural moieties (i.e., 4-(dimethylamino)phenol (DAP) and (8-aminoquinolin-2-yl)methanol (1)) for reactivity with Aβ and metal-Aβ suggests the synergy of incorporating structural components for both metal chelation and Aβ interaction. Moreover, ML is water-soluble and potentially brain permeable, as well as regulates the formation and presence of free radicals. Overall, we demonstrate that a rational structure-based design strategy can generate a small molecule that can target and modulate multiple factors, providing a new tool to uncover and address AD complexity.

  12. A switchable reagent ion high resolution time-of-flight chemical ionization mass spectrometer for real-time measurement of gas phase oxidized species: characterization from the 2013 Southern Oxidant and Aerosol Study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brophy, P.; Farmer, D. K.

    2015-03-01

    A novel configuration of the Aerodyne high resolution time-of-flight chemical ionization mass spectrometer (HR-TOF-CIMS) as a switchable reagent ion (SRI) HR-TOF-CIMS is presented and described along with data collected at the Southern Oxidant and Aerosol Study (SOAS) during the summer of 2013. The calibration system and reduced pressure gas-phase inlet are characterized. The average limit of detection and limit of quantification for formic acid during SOAS are 82 and 863 ppt, respectively, corresponding to an average sensitivity of 13 ± 5 Hz ppt-1. Hourly background determinations and calibrations are shown to be essential for tracking instrument performance and accurately quantifying formic acid. Maximum daytime formic acid concentrations of 10 ppb are reported during SOAS, and a strong diel cycle is observed leading to night time concentrations below the limit of quantification. Other species presented exhibit diel behavior similar to formic acid. The concept of the mass defect enhancement plot and the use of signal-to-noise are described in detail as a method for investigating HR-TOF-CIMS spectra in an effort to reduce data complexity.

  13. A switchable reagent ion high resolution time-of-flight chemical ionization mass spectrometer for real-time measurement of gas phase oxidized species: characterization from the 2013 southern oxidant and aerosol study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brophy, P.; Farmer, D. K.

    2015-07-01

    A novel configuration of the Aerodyne high resolution time-of-flight chemical ionization mass spectrometer (HR-TOF-CIMS) as a switchable reagent ion (SRI) HR-TOF-CIMS is presented and described along with data collected at the Southern Oxidant and Aerosol Study (SOAS) during the summer of 2013. The calibration system and reduced pressure gas phase inlet are characterized. The average limit of detection and limit of quantification for formic acid during SOAS are 82 and 863 ppt, respectively, corresponding to an average sensitivity of 13 ± 5 Hz ppt-1. Hourly background determinations and calibrations are shown to be essential for tracking instrument performance and accurately quantifying formic acid. Maximum daytime formic acid concentrations of 10 ppb are reported during SOAS, and a strong diel cycle is observed leading to nighttime concentrations below the limit of quantification. Other species presented exhibit diel behavior similar to formic acid. The concept of the mass defect enhancement plot and the use of signal-to-noise are described in detail as a method for investigating HR-TOF-CIMS spectra in an effort to reduce data complexity.

  14. Complex amine-based reagents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suslov, S. Yu.; Kirilina, A. V.; Sergeev, I. A.; Zezyulya, T. V.; Sokolova, E. A.; Eremina, E. V.; Timofeev, N. V.

    2017-03-01

    Amines for a long time have been applied to maintaining water chemistry conditions (WCC) at power plants. However, making use of complex reagents that are the mixture of neutralizing and the filmforming amines, which may also contain other organic components, causes many disputes. This is mainly due to lack of reliable information about these components. The protective properties of any amine with regard to metal surfaces depend on several factors, which are considered in this article. The results of applying complex reagents to the protection of heating surfaces in industrial conditions and estimated behavior forecasts for various reagents under maintaining WCC on heat-recovery boilers with different thermal circuits are presented. The case of a two-drum heat-recovery boiler with in-line drums was used as an example, for which we present the calculated pH values for various brands of reagents under the same conditions. Work with different reagent brands and its analysis enabled us to derive a composition best suitable for the conditions of their practical applications in heat-recovery boilers at different pressures. Testing the new amine reagent performed at a CCPP power unit shows that this reagent is an adequate base for further development of reagents based on amine compounds. An example of testing a complex reagent is shown created with the participation of the authors within the framework the program of import substitution and its possible use is demonstrated for maintaining WCC of power-generating units of combined-cycle power plants (CCPP) and TPP. The compliance of the employed reagents with the standards of water chemistry conditions and protection of heating surfaces were assessed. The application of amine-containing reagents at power-generating units of TPP makes it possible to solve complex problems aimed at ensuring the sparing cleaning of heating surfaces from deposits and the implementation of conservation and management of water chemistry condition

  15. Comparative nucleic acid transfection efficacy in primary hepatocytes for gene silencing and functional studies

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Primary hepatocytes are the best resource for in vitro studies directed at understanding hepatic processes at the cellular and molecular levels, necessary for novel drug development to treat highly prevalent diseases such as non-alcoholic steatohepatitis, cardiovascular disease and type 2 diabetes. There is a need to identify simple methods to genetically manipulate primary hepatocytes and conduct functional studies with plasmids, small interfering RNA (siRNA) or microRNA (miRNA). New lipofection reagents are available that have the potential to yield higher levels of transfection with reduced toxicity. Findings We have tested several liposome-based transfection reagents used in molecular biology research. We show that transfection efficiency with one of the most recently developed formulations, Metafectene Pro, is high with plasmid DNA (>45% cells) as well as double stranded RNA (>90% with siRNA or microRNA). In addition, negligible cytotoxicity was present with all of these nucleic acids, even if cells were incubated with the DNA:lipid complex for 16 hours. To provide the proof of concept that these conditions can be used not only for overexpression of a gene of interest, but also in RNA interference applications, we targeted two liver expressed genes, Sterol Regulatory Element-Binding Protein-1 and Fatty Acid Binding Protein 5 using plasmid-mediated short hairpin RNA expression. In addition, similar transfection conditions were used to optimally deliver siRNA and microRNA. Conclusions We have identified a lipid-based reagent for primary hepatocyte transfection of nucleic acids currently used in molecular biology laboratories. The conditions described here can be used to expedite a large variety of research applications, from gene function studies to microRNA target identification. PMID:21244687

  16. Cell Transfection with a β-Cyclodextrin-PEI-Propane-1,2,3-Triol Nanopolymer

    PubMed Central

    Lai, Wing-Fu; Jung, Han-Sung

    2014-01-01

    Successful gene therapy necessitates safe and efficient gene transfer. This article describes the use of a cationic polymer, which was synthesized by cross-linking low molecular weight branched poly(ethylenimine) (PEI) with both β-cyclodextrin and propane-1,2,3-triol, for efficient and safe non-viral gene delivery. Experimentation demonstrated that the polymer had a pH buffering capacity and DNA condensing ability comparable to those of PEI 25 kDa. In B16-F0 cells, the polymer increased the transfection efficiency of naked DNA by 700-fold and yielded better transfection efficiencies than Fugene HD (threefold higher) and PEI 25 kDa (fivefold higher). The high transfection efficiency of the polymer was not affected by the presence of serum during transfection. In addition to B16-F0 cells, the polymer enabled efficient transfection of HepG2 and U87 cells with low cytotoxicity. Our results indicated that our polymer is a safe and efficient transfection reagent that warrants further development for in vitro, in vivo and clinical applications. PMID:24956480

  17. CEA and AFP expression in human hepatoma cells transfected with antisense IGF-I gene

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Li; Li, Shu-Nong; Wang, Xiao-Ning

    1998-01-01

    AIM: To determine whether antisense insulin-like growth factor-I (IGF-I) gene can modulate CEA and AFP expression in human hepatoma cells (HepG2). METHODS: Transfection of HepG2 cells was accomplished using Lipofectin reagent. Northern blot analysis confirmed the antisense IGF-I RNA of the transfected cells. CEA and AFP levels were measured using radioimmunoassay. RESULTS: Human hepatoma cell lines (HepG2) were transfected with antisense IGF-I gene. Northern blot analysis confirmed that antisense IGF-I RNA was expressed in the transfected cells. The effect of antisense IGF-I gene on CEA and AFP expression was demonstrated by the fact that the CEA and AFP levels in the supernatant of transfected cell culture were significantly lower as compared with the parent cells, [CEA 7.0 μg/L ± 0.76 μg/L and 3.29 μg/L ± 1.80 μg/L (P < 0.05) and AFP 53.63 μg/L ± 6.02 μg/L and 9.0 μg/L ± 5.26 μg/L (P < 0.01), respectively]. CONCLUSION: The malignant potentiality of the transfected cells was partially suppressed.Antisense IGF-I gene can modulate the expression of CEA and AFP in human hepatoma cell lines (HepG2) PMID:11819225

  18. Efficient gene transfection using novel cationic polymers poly(hydroxyalkylene imines).

    PubMed

    Zaliauskiene, Lolita; Bernadisiute, Ula; Vareikis, Ausvydas; Makuska, Ricardas; Volungeviciene, Ieva; Petuskaite, Agne; Riauba, Laurynas; Lagunavicius, Arunas; Zigmantas, Sarunas

    2010-09-15

    A series of novel cationic polymers poly(hydroxyalkylene imines) were synthesized and tested for their ability to transfect cells in vitro and in vivo. Poly(hydroxyalkylene imines), in particular, poly(2-hydroxypropylene imine) (pHP), poly(2-hydroxypropylene imine ethylene imine) (pHPE), and poly(hydroxypropylene imine propylene imine) (pHPP) were synthesized by polycondensation reaction from 1,3-diamino-2-propanol and the appropriate dibromide. Electron microscopic examination demonstrated that the resulting polymers condensed DNA into toroid shape complexes of 100-150 nm in size. Transfection studies showed that all three polymers were able to deliver genetic material into the cell, with pHP being superior to pHPP and pHPE. pHP acted as an efficient gene delivery agent in a variety of different cell lines and outcompeted most of the widely used polymer or lipid based transfection reagents. Intravenous administration of pHP-DNA polyplexes in mice followed by the reporter gene analysis showed that the reagent was suitable for in vivo applications. In summary, the results indicate that pHP is a new efficient reagent for gene delivery in vitro and in vivo.

  19. Fluid Phase Endocytosis Contributes to Transfection of DNA by PEI-25

    PubMed Central

    Hufnagel, Hansjörg; Hakim, Parvez; Lima, Aline; Hollfelder, Florian

    2009-01-01

    The understanding of internalization pathways of lipo- or polyplexes is crucial for engineering successful reagents for nonviral gene transfection. A known inhibitor of fluid phase endocytosis (FPE), rottlerin, was used to quantify the contribution of this pathway by flow cytometric and fluorescence assays. Rottlerin was shown to be a specific inhibitor of transfection by polyethylene imine (PEI-25)/DNA complexes, leading to a decrease in the amount of transfected HeLa and CHO-K1 cells and a decrease in the expression of enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP) reporter gene by up to 50%. Experiments using fluorescently labeled polyplexes result in a decrease of uptake by up to 40%. Additionally, rottlerin does not cross-inhibit clathrin- and caveolin-mediated endocytotic pathways of internalization, consistent with direct uptake inhibition by rottlerin. Nonspecific effects as a result of toxicity were ruled out by control experiments at concentrations where rottlerin inhibition was specific. These findings suggest that for CHO-K1 and HeLa cells, internalization of PEI-25/DNA complexes by FPE plays a decisive role in gene transfection. The establishment of an additional pathway that is independent of clathrin- and caveolin-mediated endocytotic uptake may have an impact on the design of future reagents of nonviral gene therapy and investigations of the uptake pathways and intracellular trafficking involved. PMID:19532143

  20. A novel strategy for selective gene delivery by using the inhibitory effect of blue light on jetPRIME-mediated transfection.

    PubMed

    Dateki, Minori; Imamura, Osamu; Arai, Masaaki; Shimizu, Hidehisa; Takishima, Kunio

    2016-07-01

    Photodynamic control of gene delivery is a new technology with growing applications in gene therapy and basic cell research. Main approaches of light-selective gene delivery rely on the light-dependent enhancement of transfection efficiency. Studies focused on light-stimulated inhibitory regulation of transfection have rarely been reported. Here, we tried to establish a novel procedure of light-dependent inhibition of transfection. Our experiments, conducted with several types of commercial transfection reagents, revealed that jetPRIME-mediated transfection was strongly inhibited by blue light. Although the uptake of reagent-DNA complex was drastically reduced, preliminary exposure of cells or reagent-DNA complex to blue light had no inhibitory effect on the transfection efficiency. The inhibitory effect was wavelength-dependent and mediated by reactive oxygen species. Partial exposure of a culture vessel to blue light resulted in selective gene delivery into cells grown on the unexposed area of the vessel. By using this approach, different types of plasmid DNA were delivered into different areas in the culture vessel. This novel approach to the inhibitory control of transfection provides practical options for research and therapeutics. Biotechnol. Bioeng. 2016;113: 1560-1567. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  1. Evaluating the role of low-speed centrifugation towards transfecting human peripheral blood mononuclear cell culture.

    PubMed

    Majumdar, M; Ratho, R; Chawla, Y; Singh, M P

    2014-01-01

    The conventional method of transfection of suspension cells by chemical has proven to be very difficult. We present a new transfection protocol, wherein, low-speed centrifugation of cell culture plates immediately after adding the lipid: DNA complex significantly enhances the transfection efficiency. Peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) were transfected with BLOCK-iT™ Fluorescent Oligo (scrambled siRNA) and lipofectamine complex using conventional and low-speed centrifugation modified transfection protocols. The efficiency of transfection was determined using flowcytometer and cell viability was checked using MTT assay. Incorporation of low-speed centrifugation significantly enhances the transfection efficiency of BLOCK-iT™ in the suspension culture of PBMCs as compared to conventional transfection method (99.8% vs 28.3%; P < 0.0001), even at a low concentration of 40 picomoles without affecting the cell viability. Centrifugation enhanced transfection (CET) technique is simple, time-saving and novel application without compromising the cell viability in the context of recently popular RNA interference in suspension cultures of PBMCs. This undemanding modification might be applicable to a wide variety of cell lines and solve crucial problem of researchers working with RNA interference in suspension cultures.

  2. Structure-activity relationship in cationic lipid mediated gene transfection.

    PubMed

    Niculescu-Duvaz, Dan; Heyes, James; Springer, Caroline J

    2003-07-01

    Non-viral synthetic vectors for gene delivery represent a safer alternative to viral vectors. Their main drawback is the low transfection efficiency, especially in vivo. Among the non-viral vectors currently in use, the cationic liposomes composed of cationic lipids are the most common. This review discusses the physicochemical properties of cationic lipids, the formation, macrostructure and specific parameters of the corresponding formulated liposomes, and the effect of all these parameters on transfection efficiency. The optimisation of liposomal vectors requires both the understanding of the biological variables involved in the transfection process, and the effect of the structural elements of the cationic lipids on these biological variables. The biological barriers relevant for in vitro and in vivo transfection are identified, and solutions to overcome them based on rational design of the cationic lipids are discussed. The review focuses on the relationship between the structure of the cationic lipid and the transfection activity. The structure is analysed in a modular manner. The hydrophobic domain, the cationic head group, the backbone that acts as a scaffold for the other domains, the linkers between backbone, hydrophobic domain and cationic head group, the polyethyleneglycol chains and the targeting moiety are identified as distinct elements of the cationic lipids used in gene therapy. The main chemical functionalities used to built these domains, as well as overall molecular features such as architecture and geometry, are presented. Studies of structure-activity relationships of each cationic lipid domain, including the authors', and the trends identified by these studies, help furthering the understanding of the mechanism governing the formation and behaviour of cationic liposomes in gene delivery, and therefore the rational design of new improved cationic lipids vectors capable of achieving clinical significance.

  3. Design, synthesis, and transfection biology of novel cationic glycolipids for use in liposomal gene delivery.

    PubMed

    Banerjee, R; Mahidhar, Y V; Chaudhuri, A; Gopal, V; Rao, N M

    2001-11-22

    The molecular structure of the cationic lipids used in gene transfection strongly influences their transfection efficiency. High transfection efficiencies of non-glycerol-based simple monocationic transfection lipids with hydroxyethyl headgroups recently reported by us (Banerjee et al. J. Med. Chem. 1999, 42, 4292-4299) are consistent with the earlier observations that the presence of hydroxyl functionalities in the headgroup region of a cationic lipid contributes favorably in liposomal gene delivery. Using simple sugar molecules as the source of multiple hydroxyl functionalities in the headgroup region of the transfection lipids, we have synthesized four novel simple monocationic transfection lipids, namely, 1-deoxy-1-[dihexadecyl(methyl)ammonio]-D-xylitol (1), 1-deoxy-1-[methyl(ditetradecyl)ammonio]-D-arabinitol (2), 1-deoxy-1-[dihexadecyl(methyl)ammonio]-D-arabinitol (3) and 1-deoxy-1-[methyl(dioctadecyl)ammonio]-D-arabinitol (4), containing hydrophobic aliphatic tails and the hydrophilic arabinosyl or xylose sugar groups linked directly to the positively charged nitrogen atom. Syntheses, chemical characterizations, and the transfection biology of these novel transfection lipids 1-4 are described in this paper. Lipid 1, the xylosyl derivative, showed maximum transfection on COS-1 cells. All the lipids showed transfection with cholesterol as colipid and not with dioleoylphosphatidylethanolamine (DOPE). Radioactive quantitation of free and complexed DNA combined with ethidium bromide exclusion measurements suggest that though nearly 70% of the DNA exists as complexed DNA, the DNA may not have condensed as was observed with other cationic lipids. Presence of additional (more than two) hydroxyl functionalities in the headgroup of the cationic lipids appears to have improved the transfection efficiency and made these lipids less cytotoxic compared to two-hydroxyl derivatives.

  4. Methods and apparatuses for reagent delivery, reactive barrier formation, and pest control

    DOEpatents

    Gilmore, Tyler [Pasco, WA; Kaplan, Daniel I [Aiken, SC; Last, George [Richland, WA

    2002-07-09

    A reagent delivery method includes positioning reagent delivery tubes in contact with soil. The tubes can include a wall that is permeable to a soil-modifying reagent. The method further includes supplying the reagent in the tubes, diffusing the reagent through the permeable wall and into the soil, and chemically modifying a selected component of the soil using the reagent. The tubes can be in subsurface contact with soil, including groundwater, and can be placed with directional drilling equipment independent of groundwater well casings. The soil-modifying reagent includes a variety of gases, liquids, colloids, and adsorbents that may be reactive or non-reactive with soil components. The method may be used inter alia to form reactive barriers, control pests, and enhance soil nutrients for microbes and plants.

  5. Sustained high-yield production of recombinant proteins in transiently transfected COS-7 cells grown on trimethylamine-coated (hillex) microcarrier beads.

    PubMed

    Knibbs, Randall N; Dame, Michael; Allen, Melissa R; Ding, Yunhong; Hillegas, William J; Varani, James; Stoolman, Lloyd M

    2003-01-01

    The present study shows that COS-7 cells transiently transfected and maintained on positively charged (trimethylamine-coated) microcarrier beads synthesize recombinant protein at higher levels and for longer periods of time than cells transfected and maintained on polystyrene flasks in monolayer culture. Sustained, high-level synthesis was observed with secreted chimeric proteins (murine E-selectin- and P-selectin-human IgM chimeras) and a secreted hematopoietic growth factor (granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor). Studies with green fluorescent protein indicated that the transfected cells attached more firmly to the trimethylamine-coated microcarriers than to polystyrene flasks. After 10-14 days in culture, most of the transfected cells detached from the surface of the polystyrene flasks, whereas most transfected cells remained attached to the microcarriers. The transiently transfected microcarrier cultures produced higher levels of protein per transfected cell due to this prolonged attachment. The prolonged attachment and higher output of transfected cells on microcarriers resulted in a 5-fold increase in protein production from a single transfection over two weeks. Thus, microcarrier-based transient transfection yields quantities of recombinant proteins with a significant savings of time and reagents over monolayer culture.

  6. Optimization of in vitro vascular cell transfection with non-viral vectors for in vivo applications.

    PubMed

    Elmadbouh, Ibrahim; Rossignol, Patrick; Meilhac, Olivier; Vranckx, Roger; Pichon, Chantal; Pouzet, Bruno; Midoux, Patrick; Michel, Jean-Baptiste

    2004-10-01

    Syngeneic vascular cells are interesting tools for indirect gene therapy in the cardiovascular system. This study aims to optimize transfection conditions of primary cultures of vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs) using different non-viral vectors and zinc as an adjuvant and to implant these transfected cells in vivo. Non-liposomal cationic vectors (FuGene 6), polyethylenimines (ExGen 500), and histidylated polylysine (HPL) were used as non-viral vectors in vitro with secreted alkaline phosphatase (SEAP) as reporter gene. Transfection efficiency was compared in cultured rat, rabbit and human VSMCs and fibroblasts. Zinc chloride (ZnCl2) was added to optimize transfection of rat VSMCs in vitro which were then seeded in vivo. Much higher SEAP levels were obtained in rabbit cells with FuGene 6 (p <0.0001) at day 2 than in equivalent rat and human cells. Rat VSMCs transfected in vitro with FuGene 6 and ExGen 500 expressed higher SEAP levels than with HPL. In rat VSMCs, SEAP secretion was more than doubled by addition of 250 microM ZnCl2 (p <0.0001) for all vectors. Seeding of syngeneic VSMCs transfected under optimized conditions (FuGene 6/pcDNA3-SEAP +250 microM ZnCl2) into healthy Lewis rats using various routes or into post-infarct myocardial scar resulted in a peak of SEAP expression at day 2 and detectable activity in the plasma for at least 8 days. FuGene 6 is an efficient non-viral transfection reagent for gene transfer in somatic smooth muscle cells in vitro and ZnCl2 enhances its efficiency. This increased expression of the transgene product is maintained after seeding in vivo.

  7. Establishment of the cell line, HeLa-CD14, transfected with the human CD14 gene.

    PubMed

    Ning, Bo-Tao; Tang, Yong-Min

    2012-04-01

    CD14 is the pivotal molecule in the diagnosis and therapy of CD14-associated diseases, and is important in bacteremia. The HeLa cell line is regarded as immortal due to its prolific character. The HeLa cell line is derived from human cervical cancer cells and has been widely used in cancer research and gene transfection. In the present study, we established the expression plasmid pcDNA3.1(+)-CD14, and transfected it into the human cervical cancer cell line HeLa to establish a stable cell line (HeLa-CD14) expressing human CD14 antigen on the membrane. After the human CD14 gene was cloned and sequenced through RT-PCR and T-A cloning techniques, the eukaryotic expression vector pcDNA3.1(+)-CD14 was constructed by cleaving with double restriction endonucleases and ligating with T4 ligase. HeLa cells were transfected with the pcDNA3.1(+)-CD14 recombinant plasmid using Superfect transfection reagent. The cells were selected using G418 and the expression of human CD14 on the transfectant was confirmed by RT-PCR and immunohistochemistry. The expression of CD14 mRNA was significantly different between the blank pcDNA3.1(+)-transfected cell group and the pcDNA3.1(+)-CD14-transfected cell group (p<0.01). The fluorescence was significantly stronger on the established stable cell line than on the transiently transfected HeLa cells, and no visible fluorescence was observed in blank pcDNA3.1(+)-transfected cells. In this study, the human CD14 transfectant, stable cell line HeLa-CD14, was successfully established, which may be used to study CD14 and cervical cancer in vitro and in vivo.

  8. Ballistic transfection of mammalian cells in vivo

    SciTech Connect

    Kolesnikov, V.A.; Zelenin, A.V.; Zelenina, I.A.

    1995-11-01

    The method of ballistic transfection initially proposed for genetic transformation of plants was used for animal cells in vitro and in situ. The method consists in bombarding the transfected cells with microparticles of heavy metals carrying foreign DNA. Penetrating the cell nucleus, the microparticles transport the introduced gene. Successful genetic transformation of the cultured mouse cells and fish embryos was realized, and this allowed the study of mammalian cells in situ. The performed studies allowed us to demonstrate expression of the reporter genes of chloramphenicol acetyltransferase, galactosidase, and neomycin phosphotransferase in the mouse liver, mammary gland and kidney explants, in the liver and cross-striated muscle of mouse and rat in situ, and in developing mouse embryos at the stages of two-cell embryo, morula, and blastocyst. All these genes were introduced by ballistic transfection. In the liver and cross-striated muscle the transgene activity was detected within two to three months after transfection. Thus, the ballistic introduction of the foreign genes in the cells in situ was demonstrated, and this opens possibilities for the use of this method in gene therapy. Methodical aspects of the bombarding and transfection are considered in detail, and the published data on transfection and genetic transformation of mammalian cells are discussed. 41 refs., 13 figs., 1 tab.

  9. The Covalent Functionalization of Layered Black Phosphorus by Nucleophilic Reagents.

    PubMed

    Sofer, Zdeněk; Luxa, Jan; Bouša, Daniel; Sedmidubský, David; Lazar, Petr; Hartman, Tomáš; Hardtdegen, Hilde; Pumera, Martin

    2017-08-07

    Layered black phosphorus has been attracting great attention due to its interesting material properties which lead to a plethora of proposed applications. Several approaches are demonstrated here for covalent chemical modifications of layered black phosphorus in order to form P-C and P-O-C bonds. Nucleophilic reagents are highly effective for chemical modification of black phosphorus. Further derivatization approaches investigated were based on radical reactions. These reagents are not as effective as nucleophilic reagents for the surface covalent modification of black phosphorus. The influence of covalent modification on the electronic structure of black phosphorus was investigated using ab initio calculations. Covalent modification exerts a strong effect on the electronic structure including the change of band-gap width and spin polarization. © 2017 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  10. Targeted Diazotransfer Reagents Enable Selective Modification of Proteins with Azides

    PubMed Central

    2017-01-01

    In chemical biology, azides are used to chemically manipulate target structures in a bioorthogonal manner for a plethora of applications ranging from target identification to the synthesis of homogeneously modified protein conjugates. While a variety of methods have been established to introduce the azido group into recombinant proteins, a method that directly converts specific amino groups in endogenous proteins is lacking. Here, we report the first biotin-tethered diazotransfer reagent DtBio and demonstrate that it selectively modifies the model proteins streptavidin and avidin and the membrane protein BioY on cell surface. The reagent converts amines in the proximity of the binding pocket to azides and leaves the remaining amino groups in streptavidin untouched. Reagents of this novel class will find use in target identification as well as the selective functionalization and bioorthogonal protection of proteins. PMID:28355874

  11. Recent advances in development and application of derivatization reagents having a benzofurazan structure: a brief overview.

    PubMed

    Santa, Tomofumi

    2014-06-01

    Chemical derivatization is often used to improve the separation efficiency and to enhance the detectability of the target compounds in high-performance liquid chromatography and capillary electrophoresis. The derivatization reagents having a benzofurazan (2,1,3-benzoxadiazole) structure are one of the most often used reagent for this purpose. In this paper, the recent advances in the development and the application of benzofurazan derivatization reagents are reviewed.

  12. Optimization of renal transfection using a renal suction-mediated transfection method in mice.

    PubMed

    Taniguchi, Yota; Kawakami, Shigeru; Fuchigami, Yuki; Oyama, Natsuko; Yamashita, Fumiyoshi; Konishi, Satoshi; Shimizu, Kazunori; Hashida, Mitsuru

    2016-01-01

    We previously developed a suction-mediated transfection method in mice. The purpose of this study was to optimize the suction-mediated transfection conditions using a pressure-controlled computer system for efficient and safe kidney-targeted gene delivery in mice. Naked pCMV-Luc was injected into the tail vein in mice, and then the right kidney was suctioned by a device of the suction pressure-controlled system. The effects of renal transfection conditions, such as the suction pressure degree, suction pressure waveform and device area were evaluated by measuring luciferase expression. In addition, renal injury was examined. The renal suction-mediated transfection method at -30 kPa showed high transgene expression. The renal suction waveform did not affect the transfection activity. Under the optimized conditions, the high transgene expression was mostly observed at the renal suctioned site. The transfection conditions used did not induce histological defects or increases in two renal injury biomarkers (Kidney injury molecule-1 mRNA and Clusterin mRNA). We have clarified the transfection conditions for efficient and safe transfection in the kidney using the suction-mediated transfection method in mice.

  13. 21 CFR 1271.210 - Supplies and reagents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... supply or reagent, or by the vendor of the supply or reagent. (b) Reagents. Reagents used in processing... supply or reagent, including the type, quantity, manufacturer, lot number, date of receipt, and...

  14. Microfluidic chemical reaction circuits

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Chung-cheng; Sui, Guodong; Elizarov, Arkadij; Kolb, Hartmuth C; Huang, Jiang; Heath, James R; Phelps, Michael E; Quake, Stephen R; Tseng, Hsian-rong; Wyatt, Paul; Daridon, Antoine

    2012-06-26

    New microfluidic devices, useful for carrying out chemical reactions, are provided. The devices are adapted for on-chip solvent exchange, chemical processes requiring multiple chemical reactions, and rapid concentration of reagents.

  15. [Supplies: inventory control and reagents].

    PubMed

    Szymanowicz, A

    2013-06-01

    The main relevant features useful for the management of reagents and consumables as well as documents to be developed to meet the requirements of the accreditation standard ISO/FDIS 15189-2012 are listed. This article is intended to help the medical laboratory to get mandatory accreditation.

  16. Gene Transfection in High Serum Levels: Case Studies with New Cholesterol Based Cationic Gemini Lipids

    PubMed Central

    Misra, Santosh K.; Biswas, Joydeep; Kondaiah, Paturu; Bhattacharya, Santanu

    2013-01-01

    Background Six new cationic gemini lipids based on cholesterol possessing different positional combinations of hydroxyethyl (-CH2CH2OH) and oligo-oxyethylene -(CH2CH2O)n- moieties were synthesized. For comparison the corresponding monomeric lipid was also prepared. Each new cationic lipid was found to form stable, clear suspensions in aqueous media. Methodology/Principal Findings To understand the nature of the individual lipid aggregates, we have studied the aggregation properties using transmission electron microscopy (TEM), dynamic light scattering (DLS), zeta potential measurements and X-ray diffraction (XRD). We studied the lipid/DNA complex (lipoplex) formation and the release of the DNA from such lipoplexes using ethidium bromide. These gemini lipids in presence of a helper lipid, 1, 2-dioleoyl phophatidyl ethanol amine (DOPE) showed significant enhancements in the gene transfection compared to several commercially available transfection agents. Cholesterol based gemini having -CH2-CH2-OH groups at the head and one oxyethylene spacer was found to be the most effective lipid, which showed transfection activity even in presence of high serum levels (50%) greater than Effectene, one of the potent commercially available transfecting agents. Most of these geminis protected plasmid DNA remarkably against DNase I in serum, although the degree of stability was found to vary with their structural features. Conclusions/Significance -OH groups present on the cationic headgroups in combination with oxyethylene linkers on cholesterol based geminis, gave an optimized combination of new genera of gemini lipids possessing high transfection efficiency even in presence of very high percentage of serum. This property makes them preferential transfection reagents for possible in vivo studies. PMID:23861884

  17. Polymeric microspheres as protein transduction reagents.

    PubMed

    Nagel, David; Behrendt, Jonathan M; Chimonides, Gwen F; Torr, Elizabeth E; Devitt, Andrew; Sutherland, Andrew J; Hine, Anna V

    2014-06-01

    nucleic acids, and offers a useful alternative to commercial protein transfection reagents such as Chariot™. We also provide clear immunostaining evidence to resolve residual controversy surrounding FACS-based assessment of microsphere uptake. © 2014 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  18. Spot indole test: evaluation of four reagents.

    PubMed Central

    Miller, J M; Wright, J W

    1982-01-01

    Kovacs indole reagent, p-dimethylaminobenzaldehyde, Ehrlich indole reagent and p-dimethylaminocinnamaldehyde were used as spot indole reagents to test 359 strains of gram-negative rods growing on 5% sheep blood agar, Trypticase soy agar (BBL Microbiology Systems), and MacConkey agar. The p-dimethylaminocinnamaldehyde reagent was the most sensitive of those tested and provided results that were easiest to interpret. The p-dimethylaminocinnamaldehyde reagent was able to detect providencia alcalifaciens indole production because of the red-violet color unique to that organism. All reagents tested were accurate in detecting indole produced by members of the Enterobacteriaceae family, with the exception of P. alcalifaciens. PMID:7040458

  19. Quantification of plasmid DNA copies in the nucleus after lipoplex and polyplex transfection.

    PubMed

    Cohen, Richard N; van der Aa, Marieke A E M; Macaraeg, Nichole; Lee, Ai Ping; Szoka, Francis C

    2009-04-17

    Nuclear uptake of plasmid DNA is one of the many cellular barriers that limit the efficiency of non-viral gene delivery systems. We have determined the number of plasmids that reach the nucleus of a transfected cell using an internally standardized quantitative PCR (qPCR) assay. We isolated nuclei using two different protocols: a density gradient technique and a detergent-based method. The density gradient procedure yielded nuclei with substantially less adhering plasmids on the outside of the nuclei. Using the density gradient protocol we determined that cells transfected with Lipofectamine lipoplexes or polyethylenimine polyplexes contained between 75 and 50,000 plasmids/nucleus, depending on the applied plasmid dose. Any increase above 3000 plasmids/nucleus resulted in only marginal increases in transgene expression. Furthermore, lipoplex-delivered plasmids were more efficiently expressed, on the basis of protein expression per plasmid number in the nucleus, than polyplex-delivered plasmids. This indicates that polymer may remain bound to some plasmids in the nucleus. Lastly, by sorting transfected cells into high- and low-expressing sub-populations, we observe that a sub-population of cells contain 3x greater plasmids/nucleus but express nearly 100x more transgene than other cells within a single transfection reaction. Taken together these results suggest the importance of considering the processes downstream from nuclear entry for strategies to improve the efficiency of gene transfer reagents.

  20. Single-Cell-State Culture of Human Pluripotent Stem Cells Increases Transfection Efficiency

    PubMed Central

    Nii, Takenobu; Kohara, Hiroshi; Marumoto, Tomotoshi; Sakuma, Tetsushi; Yamamoto, Takashi; Tani, Kenzaburo

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Efficient gene transfer into human pluripotent stem cells (hPSCs) holds great promise for regenerative medicine and pharmaceutical development. In the past decade, various methods were developed for gene transfer into hPSCs; however, hPSCs form tightly packed colonies, making gene transfer difficult. In this study, we established a stable culture method of hPSCs at a single-cell state to reduce cell density and investigated gene transfection efficiency followed by gene editing efficiency. hPSCs cultured in a single-cell state were transfected using nonliposomal transfection reagents with plasmid DNA or mRNA encoding enhanced green fluorescent protein. We found that most cells (DNA > 90%; mRNA > 99%) were transfected without the loss of undifferentiated PSC marker expression or pluripotency. Moreover, we demonstrated an efficient gene editing method using transcription activator-like effector nucleases (TALENs) targeting the adenomatous polyposis coli (APC) gene. Our new method may improve hPSC gene transfer techniques, thus facilitating their use for human regenerative medicine. PMID:27257519

  1. [Establishment of murine cell line transfected with human CD14 gene].

    PubMed

    Ning, Bo-Tao; Tang, Yong-Min; Xu, Yan; Chen, Yan-Fei; Cao, Jiang

    2006-04-01

    This study was aimed to construct the CD14 eukaryotic expression vector, establish the transgeneic CD14 positive cell line in order to facilitate the establishment of a mouse model of antibody targeting therapy for human acute monocytic leukemia (AML-M(5)). Total RNA extracted from peripheral blood mononuclear cells was treated with RNAase-free DNAase, the human CD14 gene was cloned and sequenced through the RT-PCR and T-A clone techniques. Eukaryotic expressional vector pcDNA3.1(+)/CD14 was constructed by cleaving with double restriction endonuleases and ligating with T4 ligase. A murine melanoma cell line B16 was transfected with the pcDNA3.1(+)/CD14 recombinant with Superfect transfection reagent. Positive clones were selected by G418 and the expression of human CD14 on the transfectant was confirmed by flow cytometry (FCM). The results indicated that the sequence of the human CD14 cDNA cloned was exact to be same as the one from GenBank database. The recombinant pcDNA3.1(+)/CD14 was identified with double-enzyme cleaving. The expression of the human CD14 on the transfectant (B16/CD14) was confirmed by FCM. In conclusion, the murine cell line B16/CD14 fransfected with human CD14 gene has been established which can be used for the study of human AML-M(5) antibody targeting therapy with mouse model.

  2. Rigid aromatic linking moiety in cationic lipids for enhanced gene transfection efficiency.

    PubMed

    Wang, Bing; Zhao, Rui-Mo; Zhang, Ji; Liu, Yan-Hong; Huang, Zheng; Yu, Qing-Ying; Yu, Xiao-Qi

    2017-08-18

    Although numerous cationic lipids have been developed as non-viral gene vectors, the structure-activity relationship (SAR) of these materials remains unclear and needs further investigation. In this work, a series of lysine-derived cationic lipids containing linkages with different rigidity were designed and synthesized. SAR studies showed that lipids with rigid aromatic linkage could promote the formation of tight liposomes and enhance DNA condensation, which is essential for the gene delivery process. These lipids could give much higher transfection efficiency than those containing more flexible aliphatic linkage in various cell lines. Moreover, the rigid aromatic linkage also affords the material higher serum tolerance ability. Flow cytometry assay revealed that the target lipids have good cellular uptake, while confocal microscopy observation showed weaker endosome escape than Lipofectamine 2000. To solve such problem and further increase the transfection efficiency, some lysosomotropic reagents were used to improve the endosome escape of lipoplex. As expected, higher transfection efficiency than Lipofectamine 2000 could be obtained via this strategy. Cytotoxicity assay showed that these lipids have lower toxicity in various cell lines than Lipofectamine 2000, suggesting their potential for further application. This work demonstrates that a rigid aromatic linkage might distinctly improve the gene transfection abilities of cationic lipids and affords information to construct safe and efficient gene vector towards practical application. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  3. Large-Scale Transient Transfection of Suspension Mammalian Cells for VLP Production.

    PubMed

    Cervera, Laura; Kamen, Amine A

    2018-01-01

    Large-scale transient transfection of mammalian cell suspension cultures enables the production of biological products in sufficient quantity and under stringent quality attributes to perform accelerated in vitro evaluations and has the potential to support preclinical or even clinical studies. Here we describe the methodology to produce VLPs in a 3L bioreactor, using suspension HEK 293 cells and PEIPro as a transfection reagent. Cells are grown in the bioreactor to 1 × 10(6) cells/mL and transfected with a plasmid DNA-PEI complex at a ratio of 1:2. Dissolved oxygen and pH are controlled and are online monitored during the production phase and cell growth and viability can be measured off line taking samples from the bioreactor. If the product is labeled with a fluorescent marker, transfection efficiency can be also assessed using flow cytometry analysis. Typically, the production phase lasts between 48 and 96 h until the product is harvested.

  4. A cost-effective approach to microporate mammalian cells with the Neon Transfection System.

    PubMed

    Brees, Chantal; Fransen, Marc

    2014-12-01

    Electroporation is one of the most efficient nonviral methods for transferring exogenous DNA into mammalian cells. However, the relatively high costs of electroporation kits and reagents temper the routine use of this fast and easy to perform technique in many laboratories. Several years ago, a new flexible and easy to operate electroporation device was launched under the name Neon Transfection System. This device uses specialized pipette tips containing gold-plated electrodes as electroporation chamber. Here we report a protocol to regenerate these expensive tips as well as some other Neon kit accessories, thereby reducing the cost of electroporation at least 10-fold. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Transfectability of rough strains of Salmonella typhimurium.

    PubMed Central

    Bursztyn, H; Sgaramella, V; Ciferri, O; Lederberg, J

    1975-01-01

    Cells of rough (but not smooth) strains of Salmonella typhimurium become competent for transfection by phage P22 deoxyribonucleic acid after treatment with 0.1 M CaCl2. The yield of infectious centers is about 10(-8) per genome equivalent of deoxyribonucleic acid. However, different sorts of rough strains vary in their ability to become competent in a fashion that can be correlated with the level of the genetic block in cell wall lipopolysaccharide synthesis. The most amenable strains are blocked by defects in the addition of galactose units I and II of the lipopolysaccharide by the inability to synthesize uridine 5'-diphosphate-galactose (galE point mutants and gal deletion mutants). Strains blocked only in the addition of galactose I, glucose I, or heptose II have low levels of transfectability, whereas strains with either more complete or more deficient lipopolysaccharide core are not competent for transfection. When normal lipopolysaccharide synthesis is restored either genetically or by furnishing exogenous galactose (galE point mutants that can still use it), the cells are not longer competent for transfection. PMID:1104596

  6. Optimizacion of Babesia bovis transfection methods

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The tick borne Babesia parasites remain an important limitation for development of cattle industries worldwide. A stable transfection of Babesia bovis will be useful for functional analysis of the recently sequenced B. bovis genome and to design improved methods to control Babesia infections. In thi...

  7. LYSIS OF ESCHERICHIA COLI BY SULFHYDRYL-BINDING REAGENTS

    PubMed Central

    Schaechter, M.; Santomassino, Katherine A.

    1962-01-01

    Schaechter, M. (College of Medicine, University of Florida, Gainesville) and K. Santomassino. Lysis of Escherichia coli by sulfhydryl-binding reagents. J. Bacteriol. 84:318–325. 1962—Washed suspensions of gram-negative rods were lysed by low concentrations of some sulfhydryl-binding and oxidizing reagents, but not by reducing agents. Some kinetic aspects of this phenomenon were studied with p-chloromercuribenzoate and Escherichia coli B/r. Structures resulting from the action of this reagent consisted of impure cell walls. These could be purified by treatment with trypsin. Cell walls prepared mechanically and cell membranes obtained by lysing protoplasts were not overtly affected by this chemical. Images PMID:14497913

  8. Reagents for the preparation of two oligonucleotides per synthesis (TOPS).

    PubMed Central

    Hardy, P M; Holland, D; Scott, S; Garman, A J; Newton, C R; McLean, M J

    1994-01-01

    In order to increase the efficiency of use of automated DNA synthesizers (i.e. the number of oligomers prepared per day), we have devised and prepared novel phosphoramidite reagents that contain a linking group which, while stable under the normal synthesis conditions, is cleaved under basic conditions. When one of these linkers is introduced at the desired position in the synthesis of an oligonucleotide, subsequent detritylation enables the synthesis of a second oligonucleotides sequence upon the first. During deprotection of the oligonucleotide with ammonium hydroxide, the chain is cleaved at either side of the points of introduction of the novel reagent, generating two oligonucleotides free in solution. These reagents are of particular use in applications where oligomers are used in pairs (such as PCR, chemical synthesis of genes etc.) and means that an automated synthesis facility can be used more efficiently, without the need for operator intervention, after the working day is over. Images PMID:8065912

  9. Thionation using fluorous Lawesson's reagent.

    PubMed

    Kaleta, Zoltán; Makowski, Brian T; Soós, Tibor; Dembinski, Roman

    2006-04-13

    [reaction: see text] Thionation of amides, 1,4-diketones, N-(2-oxoalkyl)amides, N,N'-acylhydrazines, and acyl-protected uridines with the use of a fluorous analogue of the Lawesson's reagent leads to thioamides, thiophenes, 1,3-thiazoles, 1,3,4-thiadiazoles, and acyl-protected 4-thiouridines. The isolation of the final products in high yields is achieved in most cases by a simple filtration (fluorous solid-phase extraction).

  10. The transfection efficiency of calix[4]arene-based lipids: the role of the alkyl chain length.

    PubMed

    Mochizuki, Shinichi; Nishina, Koichi; Fujii, Shota; Sakurai, Kazuo

    2015-02-01

    The size, surface charge, and microstructure of lipoplexes comprising cationic lipids and nucleic acids are important factors for transfection efficiency. As these properties are largely determined by the cationic lipids used, a number of studies on the relationship between cationic lipids and the transfection efficiency have been reported. Among the many cationic lipids, lipids with multivalent cationic head groups are expected to be potent transfection reagents. Here, we prepared calix[4]arene-based lipids with different alkyl chain lengths from C3 to C15 and evaluated the relationship between the alkyl chain length and the transfection efficiency. C6 lipoplexes exhibited the highest transfection efficiency among all lipoplexes. The gene expression with C9 and C12 lipoplexes was slightly lower than that with C6 lipoplexes. C3 lipoplexes hardly induced gene expression, while C15 lipoplexes exhibited no complexation with plasmid DNA. Although all lipoplexes exhibited nearly identical characteristics, they exhibited different behaviours in terms of the interactions between the lipoplexes and anionic micelles comprising phosphatidylserine, a model of endosomal vehicle. After mixing with phosphatidylserine micelles, C6 lipoplexes released the bound plasmid DNA at pH 5 but not at pH 7, indicating that they can interact with the late endosomal membrane after being incorporated into cells. No plasmid DNA was released from C9 or C12 lipoplexes at either pH values. Thus, the alkyl chain length of cationic lipids is related to their interaction with the endosomal compartment and can provide a basis for the design of novel transfection reagents.

  11. Reagent removal of manganese from ground water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brayalovsky, G.; Migalaty, E.; Naschetnikova, O.

    2017-06-01

    The study is aimed at the technology development of treating drinking water from ground waters with high manganese content and oxidizability. Current technologies, physical/chemical mechanisms and factors affecting in ground treatment efficiency are reviewed. Research has been conducted on manganese compound removal from ground waters with high manganese content (5 ppm) and oxidizability. The studies were carried out on granular sorbent industrial ODM-2F filters (0.7-1.5 mm fraction). It was determined that conventional reagent oxidization technologies followed by filtration do not allow us to obtain the manganese content below 0.1 ppm when treating ground waters with high oxidizability. The innovative oxidation-based manganese removal technology with continuous introduction of reaction catalytic agent is suggested. This technology is effective in alkalization up to pH 8.8-9. Potassium permanganate was used as a catalytic agent, sodium hypochlorite was an oxidizer and cauistic soda served an alkalifying agent.

  12. Antibody production by in vivo RNA transfection.

    PubMed

    Romani, Bizhan; Kavyanifard, Amirarsalan; Allahbakhshi, Elham

    2017-09-07

    Monoclonal antibodies have a variety of applications in research and medicine. Here, we report development of a new method for production of monoclonal antibodies. Our method relies on in vivo RNA transfection rather than peptide vaccination. We took advantage of RNA transcripts complexed with DOTMA and DOPE lipids to transfect mice. Intravenous administration of our RNA vaccine to mice resulted in expression of the antigenic peptides by splenic dendritic cells and detection of the antigens in the serum. The RNA vaccine stimulated production of specific antibodies against the RNA-encoded peptides. We produced monoclonal antibodies against viral, bacterial, and human antigens. In addition, we showed that our RNA vaccine stimulated humoral immunity and rescued mice infected with influenza A virus. Our method could be used as an efficient tool to generate monoclonal antibodies and to stimulate humoral immunity for research and medical purposes.

  13. Cholesterol-based cationic lipids for gene delivery: contribution of molecular structure factors to physico-chemical and biological properties.

    PubMed

    Sheng, Ruilong; Luo, Ting; Li, Hui; Sun, Jingjing; Wang, Zhao; Cao, Amin

    2014-04-01

    In this work, we prepared a series of cholesterol-based cationic (Cho-cat) lipids bearing cholesterol hydrophobe, natural amino acid headgroups (lysine/histidine) and linkage (carbonate ester/ether) bonds. In which, the natural amino acid headgroups made dominant contribution to their physico-chemical and biological properties. Among the lipids, the l-lysine headgroup bearing lipids (Cho-es/et-Lys) showed higher pDNA binding affinity and were able to form larger sized and higher surface charged lipoplexes than that of l-histidine headgroup bearing lipids (Cho-es/et-His), they also demonstrated higher transfection efficacy and higher membrane disruption capacities than that of their l-histidine headgroup bearing counterparts. However, compared to the contributions of the headgroups, the (carbonate ester/ether) linkage bonds showed much less affects. Besides, it could be noted that, Cho-es/et-Lys lipids exhibited very high luciferase gene transfection efficiency that almost reached the transfection level of "gold standard" bPEI-25k, made them potential transfection reagents for practical application. Moreover, the results facilitated the understanding for the structure-activity relationship of the cholesterol-based cationic lipids, and also paved a simple and efficient way for achieving high transfection efficiency by modification of suitable headgroups on lipid gene carriers.

  14. Renewable-reagent electrochemical sensor

    DOEpatents

    Wang, Joseph; Olsen, Khris B.

    1999-01-01

    A new electrochemical probe(s) design allowing for continuous (renewable) reagent delivery. The probe comprises an integrated membrane-sampling/electrochemical sensor that prevents interferences from surface-active materials and greatly extends the linear range. The probe(s) is useful for remote or laboratory-based monitoring in connection with microdialysis sampling and electrochemical measurements of metals and organic compounds that are not readily detected in the absence of reacting with the compound. Also disclosed is a method of using the probe(s).

  15. Renewable-reagent electrochemical sensor

    DOEpatents

    Wang, J.; Olsen, K.B.

    1999-08-24

    A new electrochemical probe(s) design allowing for continuous (renewable) reagent delivery is described. The probe comprises an integrated membrane sampling/electrochemical sensor that prevents interferences from surface-active materials and greatly extends the linear range. The probe(s) is useful for remote or laboratory-based monitoring in connection with microdialysis sampling and electrochemical measurements of metals and organic compounds that are not readily detected in the absence of reacting with the compound. Also disclosed is a method of using the probe(s). 19 figs.

  16. A QSAR-modeling perspective on cationic transfection lipids. 1. Predicting efficiency and understanding mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Horobin, Richard W; Weissig, Volkmar

    2005-08-01

    As gene therapy using viral vectors involves clinical risks, limited DNA-carrying capacity, and manufacturing problems, non-viral vectors, including cationic lipids, have been investigated. Unfortunately, these agents have significantly lower transfectional ability and, due to the complexity of the transfectional pathway, no general schemes exist for correlating cationic lipid chemistry with transfectional efficacy. Quantitative structure-activity relationship (QSAR) analyses were carried out on sets of routinely used, experimental, and unsuccessful cationic lipid vectors taken from the literature. This approach described the amphipathic character, basicity, headgroup size, lipophilicity and shape of cationic lipids using numerical parameters. Compounds were plotted onto various parameter diagrams, and correlations were sought between numerical parameters and transfectional efficiency. Transfectionally effective cationic lipids fell into restricted zones in various parameter spaces, indicating that amphipathic character, lipid shape and lipophilicity were generally significant factors, whilst basicity and headgroup size were only important for certain compounds. The data supported the general significance of membrane mixing followed by induction of membrane curvature, and the more limited role of osmotic shock, as mechanisms of membrane disruption. QSAR descriptions of effective lipids permitted detailed chemical guidelines for optimizing cationic lipid structure to be given. Limitations of the approach and models are discussed. QSAR modeling indicated that induction of membrane curvature and osmotic shock are important mechanisms for membrane disruption by cationic lipids. The models also allowed specification of chemically detailed guidelines for selection or design of optimal cationic lipids. Copyright (c) 2005 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  17. DNA photo-oxidative damage hazard in transfection complexes.

    PubMed

    Rudiuk, Sergii; Franceschi-Messant, Sophie; Chouini-Lalanne, Nadia; Perez, Emile; Rico-Lattes, Isabelle

    2011-01-01

    Complexes of DNA with various cationic vectors have been largely used for nonviral transfection, and yet the photochemical stability of DNA in such complexes has never been considered. We studied, for the first time, the influence of DNA complexation by a cationic lipid and polymers on the amount of damage induced by benzophenone photosensitization. The localization of benzophenone inside the hydrophobic domains formed by a cationic lipid, DOTAP (N-[1-(2,3-dioleoyloxy)propyl]-N,N,N-trimethylammonium chloride), and close to DNA, locally increases the photoinduced cleavage by the reactive oxygen species generated. The same effect was found in the case of DNA complexation with an amphiphilic polymer (polynorbornenemethyleneammonium chloride). However, a decrease in DNA damage was observed in the case of complexation with a hydrophilic polymer (polyethylenimine). The DNA protection in this case was because of the absence of benzophenone hydrophobic incorporation into the complex, and to DNA compaction which decreased the probability of radical attack. These results underline the importance of the chemical structure of the nonviral transfection vector in limiting the risks of photo-oxidative damage of the complexed DNA. © 2010 The Authors. Photochemistry and Photobiology © 2010 The American Society of Photobiology.

  18. Co-transfection gene delivery of dendritic cells induced effective lymph node targeting and anti-tumor vaccination.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yu-Zhe; Ruan, Gui-Xin; Yao, Xing-Lei; Li, Li-Ming; Hu, Ying; Tabata, Yasuhiko; Gao, Jian-Qing

    2013-06-01

    Successful genetically engineered Dendritic Cell (DC) can enhance DC's antigen presentation and lymph node migration. The present study aims to genetically engineer a DC using an efficient non-viral gene delivery vector to induce a highly efficient antigen presentation and lymph node targeting in vivo. Spermine-dextran (SD), a cationic polysaccharide vector, was used to prepare a gene delivery system for DC engineering. Transfection efficiency, nuclear trafficking, and safety of the SD/DNA complex were evaluated. A vaccine prepared by engineering DC with SD/gp100, a plasmid encoding melanoma-associated antigen, was injected subcutaneously into mice to evaluate the tumor suppression. The migration of the engineered DCs was also evaluated in vitro and in vivo. SD/DNA complex has a better transfection behavior in vitro than commercially purchased reagents. The DC vaccine co-transfected with plasmid coding CCR7, a chemokine receptor essential for DC migration, and plasmid coding gp100 displayed superior tumor suppression than that with plasmid coding gp100 alone. Migration assay demonstrated that DC transfected with SD/CCR7 can promote DC migration capacity. The study is the first to report the application of nonviral vector SD to co-transfect DC with gp100 and CCR7-coding plasmid to induce both the capacity of antigen presentation and lymph node targeting.

  19. Structural mediation on polycation nanoparticles by sulfadiazine to enhance DNA transfection efficiency and reduce toxicity.

    PubMed

    Long, Xingwen; Zhang, Zhihui; Han, Shangcong; Tang, Minjie; Zhou, Junhui; Zhang, Jianhua; Xue, Zhenyi; Li, Yan; Zhang, Rongxin; Deng, Liandong; Dong, Anjie

    2015-04-15

    Reducing the toxicity while maintaining high transfection efficiency is an important issue for cationic polymers as gene carriers in clinical application. In this paper, a new zwitterionic copolymer, polycaprolactone-g-poly(dimethylaminoethyl methyacrylate-co-sulfadiazine methacrylate) (PC-SDZ) with unique pH-sensitivity, was designed and prepared. The incorporation of sulfadiazine into poly(dimethylaminoethyl methacrylate) (PDMAEMA) chains successfully mediates the surface properties including compacter shell structure, lower density of positive charges, stronger proton buffer capability, and enhanced hydrophobicity, which lead to reduction in toxicity and enhancements in stability, cellular uptake, endosome escape, and transfection efficiency for the PC-SDZ2 nanoparticles (NPs)/DNA complexes. Excellent transfection efficiency at the optimal N/P ratio of 10 was observed for PC-SDZ2 NPs/DNA complexes, which was higher than that of the commercial reagent-branched polyethylenimine (PEI). The cytotoxicity was evaluated by CCK8 measurement, and the results showed significant reduction in cytotoxicity even at high concentration of complexes after sulfadiazine modification. Therefore, this work may demonstrate a new way of structural mediation of cationic polymer carriers for gene delivery with high efficiency and low toxicity.

  20. Extended gene expression by medium exchange and repeated transient transfection for recombinant protein production enhancement.

    PubMed

    Cervera, Laura; Gutiérrez-Granados, Sonia; Berrow, Nicholas Simon; Segura, Maria Mercedes; Gòdia, Francesc

    2015-05-01

    Production of recombinant products in mammalian cell cultures can be achieved by stable gene expression (SGE) or transient gene expression (TGE). The former is based on the integration of a plasmid DNA into the host cell genome allowing continuous gene expression. The latter is based on episomal plasmid DNA expression. Conventional TGE is limited to a short production period of usually about 96 h, therefore limiting productivity. A novel gene expression approach termed extended gene expression (EGE) is explored in this study. The aim of EGE is to prolong the production period by the combination of medium exchange and repeated transfection of cell cultures with plasmid DNA to improve overall protein production. The benefit of this methodology was evaluated for the production of three model recombinant products: intracellular GFP, secreted GFP, and a Gag-GFP virus-like particles (VLPs). Productions were carried out in HEK 293 cell suspension cultures grown in animal-derived component free media using polyethylenimine (PEI) as transfection reagent. Transfections were repeated throughout the production process using different plasmid DNA concentrations, intervals of time, and culture feeding conditions in order to identify the best approach to achieve sustained high-level gene expression. Using this novel EGE strategy, the production period was prolonged between 192 and 240 h with a 4-12-fold increase in production levels, depending on the product type considered. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  1. Reagent Selection Methodology for a Novel Explosives Detection Platform

    ScienceCinema

    None

    2016-07-12

    This video describes research being conducted by Dr. Marvin Warner, a research scientist at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, in the individual pieces of antibodies used to set up a chemical reaction that will give off light just by mixing reagents together with a sample that contains an explosive molecule. This technology would help detect if explosives are present with just the use of a handheld system or container.

  2. Compartmentalization of incompatible reagents within Pickering emulsion droplets for one-pot cascade reactions.

    PubMed

    Yang, Hengquan; Fu, Luman; Wei, Lijuan; Liang, Jifen; Binks, Bernard P

    2015-01-28

    It is a dream that future synthetic chemistry can mimic living systems to process multistep cascade reactions in a one-pot fashion. One of the key challenges is the mutual destruction of incompatible or opposing reagents, for example, acid and base, oxidants and reductants. A conceptually novel strategy is developed here to address this challenge. This strategy is based on a layered Pickering emulsion system, which is obtained through lamination of Pickering emulsions. In this working Pickering emulsion, the dispersed phase can separately compartmentalize the incompatible reagents to avoid their mutual destruction, while the continuous phase allows other reagent molecules to diffuse freely to access the compartmentalized reagents for chemical reactions. The compartmentalization effects and molecular transport ability of the Pickering emulsion were investigated. The deacetalization-reduction, deacetalization-Knoevenagel, deacetalization-Henry and diazotization-iodization cascade reactions demonstrate well the versatility and flexibility of our strategy in processing the one-pot cascade reactions involving mutually destructive reagents.

  3. Stoichiometric and irreversible cysteine-selective protein modification using carbonylacrylic reagents

    PubMed Central

    Bernardim, Barbara; Cal, Pedro M.S.D.; Matos, Maria J.; Oliveira, Bruno L.; Martínez-Sáez, Nuria; Albuquerque, Inês S.; Perkins, Elizabeth; Corzana, Francisco; Burtoloso, Antonio C.B.; Jiménez-Osés, Gonzalo; Bernardes, Gonçalo J. L.

    2016-01-01

    Maleimides remain the reagents of choice for the preparation of therapeutic and imaging protein conjugates despite the known instability of the resulting products that undergo thiol-exchange reactions in vivo. Here we present the rational design of carbonylacrylic reagents for chemoselective cysteine bioconjugation. These reagents undergo rapid thiol Michael-addition under biocompatible conditions in stoichiometric amounts. When using carbonylacrylic reagents equipped with PEG or fluorophore moieties, this method enables access to protein and antibody conjugates precisely modified at pre-determined sites. Importantly, the conjugates formed are resistant to degradation in plasma and are biologically functional, as demonstrated by the selective imaging and detection of apoptotic and HER2+ cells, respectively. The straightforward preparation, stoichiometric use and exquisite cysteine selectivity of the carbonylacrylic reagents combined with the stability of the products and the availability of biologically relevant cysteine-tagged proteins make this method suitable for the routine preparation of chemically defined conjugates for in vivo applications. PMID:27782215

  4. Stoichiometric and irreversible cysteine-selective protein modification using carbonylacrylic reagents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bernardim, Barbara; Cal, Pedro M. S. D.; Matos, Maria J.; Oliveira, Bruno L.; Martínez-Sáez, Nuria; Albuquerque, Inês S.; Perkins, Elizabeth; Corzana, Francisco; Burtoloso, Antonio C. B.; Jiménez-Osés, Gonzalo; Bernardes, Gonçalo J. L.

    2016-10-01

    Maleimides remain the reagents of choice for the preparation of therapeutic and imaging protein conjugates despite the known instability of the resulting products that undergo thiol-exchange reactions in vivo. Here we present the rational design of carbonylacrylic reagents for chemoselective cysteine bioconjugation. These reagents undergo rapid thiol Michael-addition under biocompatible conditions in stoichiometric amounts. When using carbonylacrylic reagents equipped with PEG or fluorophore moieties, this method enables access to protein and antibody conjugates precisely modified at pre-determined sites. Importantly, the conjugates formed are resistant to degradation in plasma and are biologically functional, as demonstrated by the selective imaging and detection of apoptotic and HER2+ cells, respectively. The straightforward preparation, stoichiometric use and exquisite cysteine selectivity of the carbonylacrylic reagents combined with the stability of the products and the availability of biologically relevant cysteine-tagged proteins make this method suitable for the routine preparation of chemically defined conjugates for in vivo applications.

  5. Optimization of a nonviral transfection system to evaluate Cox-2 controlled interleukin-4 expression for osteoarthritis gene therapy in vitro.

    PubMed

    Lang, Annemarie; Neuhaus, Johannes; Pfeiffenberger, Moritz; Schröder, Erik; Ponomarev, Igor; Weber, Yvonne; Gaber, Timo; Schmidt, Michael F G

    2014-01-01

    Gene therapy appears to have the potential for achieving a long-term remedy for osteoarthritis (OA). However, there is a risk of adverse reactions, especially when using cytomegalovirus-controlled expression. To provide a safe application, we focused on the expression of therapeutic cytokines [e.g. interleukin (IL)-4] in a disease-responsive manner by use of the previously cloned Cox-2 promoter as 'genetic switch'. In the present study, we report the functionality of a controlled gene therapeutic system in an equine osteoarthritic cell model. Different nonviral transfection reagents were tested for their efficiency on equine chondrocytes stimulated with equine IL-1β or lipopolysaccharide to create an inflammatory environment. To optimize the transfection, we successfully redesigned the vector by excluding the internal ribosomal entry site (IRES). The functionality of our Cox-2 promoter construct with respect to expressing IL-4 was proven at the mRNA and protein levels and the anti-inflammatory potential of IL-4 was confirmed by analyzing the expression of IL-1β, IL-6, IL-8, matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-1, MMP-3 and tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α using a quantitative polymerase chain reaction. Nonviral transfection reagents yielded transfection rates from 21% to 44% with control vectors with and without IRES, respectively. Stimulation of equine chondrocytes resulted in a 20-fold increase of mRNA expression of IL-1β. Such exogenous stimulation of chondrocytes transfected with pNCox2-IL4 led to an increase of IL-4 mRNA expression, whereas expression of inflammatory mediators decreased. The timely link between these events confirms the anti-inflammatory potential of synthesized IL-4. We consider that this approach has significant potential for translation into a useful anti-inflammation therapy. Molecular tools such as the described therapeutic plasmid pave the way for a local-controlled, self-limiting gene therapy. Copyright © 2014 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  6. The Interchangeability of Viscoelastographic Instruments and Reagents

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-01-01

    each manufacturer. METHODS: We tested three sets of reagents as follows: (1) in-tem and ex-tem (Tem International GmbH); (2) kaolin and RapidTEG...parameter. Significant differences between the instruments were found in the > angle and maximum firmness of the clot for ex-tem and kaolin reagents as well... kaolin and RapidTEG (Haemonetics); (3) a well-characterized control recombinant tissue factorYphospholipid reagent. Blood was drawn from six healthy donors

  7. A Simple, Highly Efficient Method for Heterologous Expression in Mammalian Primary Neurons Using Cationic Lipid-mediated mRNA Transfection

    PubMed Central

    Williams, Damian J.; Puhl, Henry L.; Ikeda, Stephen R.

    2010-01-01

    Expression of heterologous proteins in adult mammalian neurons is a valuable technique for the study of neuronal function. The post-mitotic nature of mature neurons prevents effective DNA transfection using simple, cationic lipid-based methods. Adequate heterologous protein expression is often only achievable using complex techniques that, in many cases, are associated with substantial toxicity. Here, a simple method for high efficiency transfection of mammalian primary neurons using in vitro transcribed mRNA and the cationic lipid transfection reagent Lipofectamine™ 2000 is described. Optimal transfection conditions were established in adult mouse dissociated dorsal root ganglion (DRG) neurons using a 96-well based luciferase activity assay. Using these conditions, a transfection efficiency of 25% was achieved in DRG neurons transfected with EGFP mRNA. High transfection efficiencies were also obtained in dissociated rat superior cervical ganglion (SCG) neurons and mouse cortical and hippocampal cultures. Endogenous Ca2+ currents in EGFP mRNA-transfected SCG neurons were not significantly different from untransfected neurons, which suggested that this technique is well suited for heterologous expression in patch clamp recording experiments. Functional expression of a cannabinoid receptor (CB1R), a G protein inwardly rectifying K+ channel (GIRK4) and a dominant-negative G protein α-subunit mutant (GoA G203T) indicate that the levels of heterologous protein expression attainable using mRNA transfection are suitable for most functional protein studies. This study demonstrates that mRNA transfection is a straightforward and effective method for heterologous expression in neurons and is likely to have many applications in neuroscience research. PMID:21267423

  8. The relationship between terminal functionalization and molecular weight of a gene delivery polymer and transfection efficacy in mammary epithelial 2-D cultures and 3-D organotypic cultures

    PubMed Central

    Bhise, Nupura S.; Gray, Ryan S.; Sunshine, Joel C.; Htet, Soe; Ewald, Andrew J.

    2011-01-01

    Non-viral gene delivery vectors were developed for efficient gene transfer to hard to transfect mouse mammary epithelial cells. Ten modified versions of the same base poly(beta-amino ester), poly(1,4-butanediol diacrylate-co-5-amino-1-pentanol), were tested in both traditional 2-D monolayer and in 3-D organotypic cultures. The polymers self-assembled with plasmid DNA encoding enhanced green fluorescent protein to form nanoparticles (~100 nm) used to transfect the cells. Nanoparticle transfection efficacy was tuned by changes in synthesis and fabrication conditions and the transfection efficacy was analyzed using confocal microscopy and flow cytometry. The best performing polymeric nanoparticles transfected 57±6% of the cells in 2-D culture and 6±1% of the cells in 3-D culture. Small modifications to the polymer end-capping molecules and tuning of polymer molecular weight could either significantly enhance the transfection efficacy up to 6-fold or instead abolish efficacy completely. The efficacy of leading polymers was higher than that of the commercial transfection agent FuGENE® HD by a factor of 13 in 2-D and 2 in 3-D. These non-viral nanoparticles may be useful as delivery reagents or targeted therapeutics for breast cancer. This gene delivery strategy is also a promising approach for studying the normal development of the mammary gland. PMID:20674001

  9. Plasmid transfection in bovine cells: Optimization using a realtime monitoring of green fluorescent protein and effect on gene reporter assay.

    PubMed

    Osorio, Johan S; Bionaz, Massimo

    2017-08-30

    Gene reporter technology (GRT) has opened several new avenues for monitoring biological events including the activation of transcription factors, which are central to the study of nutrigenomics. However, this technology relies heavily on the insertion of foreign plasmid DNA into the nuclei of cells (i.e., transfection), which can be very challenging and highly variable among cell types. The objective of this study was to investigate the optimal conditions to generate reliable GRT assay data on bovine immortalized cell lines, Madin Darby Bovine Kidney (MDBK) and bovine mammary epithelial alveolar (MACT) cells. Results are reported for two experiments. In Experiment 1, using 96 well-plate and a robotic inverted fluorescent microscope, we compared transfection efficiency among commercially available transfection reagents (TR) Lipofectamine® 3000 (Lipo3), Lipofectamine® LTX (LipoLTX), and TransIT-X2® (TransX2), three doses of TR (i.e., 0.15, 0.3, and 0.4μL/well), and three doses of Green Fluorescent Protein plasmid DNA (i.e., 10, 25, and 50ng/well). Transfection efficiency and mortality rate were analyzed using CellProfiler software. Transfection efficiency increased until the end of the experiment (20h post-transfection) at which point MACT had greater transfection than MDBK cells (16.3% vs. 2.2%). It is unclear the reason for the low transfection in MDBK cells. Maximal transfection efficiency was obtained with 0.3μL/well of LipoLTX plus 25ng/well of plasmid DNA (ca. 29.5±1.9%) and 0.15μL/well of LipoLTX plus 25ng/well of plasmid DNA (ca. 4.0±0.4%) for MACT and MDBK cells, respectively. The higher amount of TR and DNA was generally associated with higher cell mortality. Using high, medium, and low transfection efficiency conditions determined in Experiment 1, we performed a GRT assay for peroxisome proliferator-activated response element (PPRE) luciferase in MACT and MDBK cells treated with 10nM or 100nM of synthetic Peroxisome Proliferator-activated Receptor

  10. Isolation, culture, and transfection of melanocytes.

    PubMed

    Godwin, Lauren S; Castle, Joanna T; Kohli, Jaskaren S; Goff, Philip S; Cairney, Claire J; Keith, W Nicol; Sviderskaya, Elena V; Bennett, Dorothy C

    2014-06-03

    Located in the basal epidermis and hair follicles, melanocytes of the integument are responsible for its coloration through production of melanin pigments. Melanin is produced in lysosomal-like organelles called melanosomes. In humans, this skin pigmentation acts as an ultraviolet radiation filter. Abnormalities in the division of melanocytes are quite common, with potentially oncogenic growth usually followed by cell senescence producing benign naevi (moles), or occasionally melanoma. Therefore, melanocytes are a useful model for studying melanoma, as well as pigmentation and organelle transport and the diseases affecting these mechanisms. This chapter focuses on the isolation, culture, and transfection of human and murine melanocytes. The first basic protocol describes the primary culture of melanocytes from human skin and the maintenance of growing cultures. The second basic protocol details the subculture and preparation of mouse keratinocyte feeder cells. The primary culture of melanocytes from mouse skin is described in the third basic protocol, and, lastly, the fourth basic protocol outlines a technique for transfecting melanocytes and melanoma cells.

  11. Interchangeability of rotational elastographic instruments and reagents.

    PubMed

    Aleshnick, Maya; Orfeo, Thomas; Brummel-Ziedins, Kathleen; Gissel, Matthew; Mann, Kenneth

    2014-01-01

    Viscoelastic measurements are frequently being used in clinical and research settings for a rapid assessment of the hemostatic processes of blood clot formation and degradation. These measurements are being performed on either of two instruments (TEG and ROTEM) using their proprietary reagents. Standardization between the instruments and the reagents has been lacking but is necessary to compare results across instruments. In this study, we perform a crossover analysis between the TEG and ROTEM instruments using proprietary reagents from each manufacturer. We tested three sets of reagents as follows: (1) in-tem and ex-tem (Tem International GmbH); (2) kaolin and RapidTEG (Haemonetics); (3) a well-characterized control recombinant tissue factor-phospholipid reagent. Blood was drawn from six healthy donors, and each reagent was run concurrently in the TEG and ROTEM instruments. The volume of commercial reagent and calcium used was adjusted for crossover measurements to maintain the same concentration of each reagent in the blood. The outputs of clot time, rate of clot formation, and maximum firmness of the clot of the ROTEM and the TEG tracings were evaluated. The in-tem and RapidTEG reagents showed no disparity between instruments for any parameter. Significant differences between the instruments were found in the α angle and maximum firmness of the clot for ex-tem and kaolin reagents as well as in the clot time and maximum firmness of the clot for the recombinant tissue factor-phospholipid reagent. Although significant differences were observed for some parameters, the magnitudes were small compared with the differences between tests or the normal range variation in parameter values observed for these tests. These findings indicate that the instruments are more interchangeable than previously reported.

  12. Optimization of conditions for transfection with the Sofast gene vector.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Lei; Liu, Fan; Qiao, Fang-Fang; Tong, Man-Li; Fu, Zuo-Gen; Dan, Bing; Yang, Tian-Ci; Zhang, Zhong-Ying

    2011-01-01

    We previously reported the synthesis and characterization of a novel cationic polymer gene vector. The present article further explored and optimized the working conditions of the Sofast gene vector both in vitro and in vivo, and improved its performance. The transfection conditions of Sofast, such as cell type, cell density, transfection time, N/P values and analysis time after transfection, were further explored. Moreover, the effects of the fusion peptide diINF-7 on transfection efficiency were examined. Sofast was successfully applied for the transfection of exogenous genes into more than 40 types of cell lines derived from humans, mice, monkeys and other species. When the cells were 50-80% confluent, Sofast possessed a better transfection efficiency. In most cases, Sofast also had a higher transfection efficiency when it was used to transfect cells that were seeded for several hours and had adhered to the substrate. The results from in vitro experiments indicate that the recommended Sofast to DNA mass ratio is 16:1, and the optimum analysis time after transfection is 48 h. The salt concentration in the Sofast working solution markedly affected the transfection efficiency. When conducting in vivo transfection, the working solution should be salt-free, whereas for in vitro transfection, it is more appropriate for the working solution to include certain salt concentrations. Finally, the results confirm that diINF-7 significantly promotes the transfection efficiency of Sofast. In conclusion, the present research not only established the optimal conditions for Sofast in the transfection of commonly used cells, but also built the foundations for in vivo and in vitro applications of Sofast, as well as its use in clinical practice.

  13. High efficiency, site-specific transfection of adherent cells with siRNA using microelectrode arrays (MEA).

    PubMed

    Patel, Chetan; Muthuswamy, Jit

    2012-09-13

    The discovery of RNAi pathway in eukaryotes and the subsequent development of RNAi agents, such as siRNA and shRNA, have achieved a potent method for silencing specific genes for functional genomics and therapeutics. A major challenge involved in RNAi based studies is the delivery of RNAi agents to targeted cells. Traditional non-viral delivery techniques, such as bulk electroporation and chemical transfection methods often lack the necessary spatial control over delivery and afford poor transfection efficiencies. Recent advances in chemical transfection methods such as cationic lipids, cationic polymers and nanoparticles have resulted in highly enhanced transfection efficiencies. However, these techniques still fail to offer precise spatial control over delivery that can immensely benefit miniaturized high-throughput technologies, single cell studies and investigation of cell-cell interactions. Recent technological advances in gene delivery have enabled high-throughput transfection of adherent cells, a majority of which use microscale electroporation. Microscale electroporation offers precise spatio-temporal control over delivery (up to single cells) and has been shown to achieve high efficiencies. Additionally, electroporation based approaches do not require a prolonged period of incubation (typically 4 hours) with siRNA and DNA complexes as necessary in chemical based transfection methods and lead to direct entry of naked siRNA and DNA molecules into the cell cytoplasm. As a consequence gene expression can be achieved as early as six hours after transfection. Our lab has previously demonstrated the use of microelectrode arrays (MEA) for site-specific transfection in adherent mammalian cell cultures. In the MEA based approach, delivery of genetic payload is achieved via localized micro-scale electroporation of cells. An application of electric pulse to selected electrodes generates local electric field that leads to electroporation of cells present in the region

  14. U. S. Veterinary Immune Reagents Network: Progress with poultry immune reagents development

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    A major obstacle to advances in veterinary immunology and disease research is the lack of sufficient immunological reagents specific for veterinary animal species. In 2006, U. S. Veterinary Immune Reagent Network (VIRN) Consortium (www.vetimm.org) was developed to develop immune reagents against ma...

  15. Application of metal-based reagents and catalysts in microstructured flow devices.

    PubMed

    Chinnusamy, Tamilselvi; Yudha, Salprima S; Hager, Markus; Kreitmeier, Peter; Reiser, Oliver

    2012-02-13

    Over the years, organic synthesis has witnessed several improvements through the development of new chemical transformations or more efficient reagents for known processes. Likewise, technological advances, aiming at speeding up reactions and facilitating their work-up, have established themselves in academic as well as in industrial laboratories. In this Minireview, we highlight very recent developments in flow chemistry, focusing on organometallic reagents and catalysts. First, we describe reactions with homogeneous catalysts immobilized on different support materials using the concept of packed bed reactors. In the last chapter, we will discuss applications that utilize organometallic reagents.

  16. 21 CFR 866.4100 - Complement reagent.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Complement reagent. 866.4100 Section 866.4100 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES IMMUNOLOGY AND MICROBIOLOGY DEVICES Immunology Laboratory Equipment and Reagents § 866.4100...

  17. 21 CFR 866.4100 - Complement reagent.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Complement reagent. 866.4100 Section 866.4100 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES IMMUNOLOGY AND MICROBIOLOGY DEVICES Immunology Laboratory Equipment and Reagents § 866.4100...

  18. 21 CFR 866.4100 - Complement reagent.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Complement reagent. 866.4100 Section 866.4100 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES IMMUNOLOGY AND MICROBIOLOGY DEVICES Immunology Laboratory Equipment and Reagents § 866.4100...

  19. 21 CFR 866.4100 - Complement reagent.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Complement reagent. 866.4100 Section 866.4100 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES IMMUNOLOGY AND MICROBIOLOGY DEVICES Immunology Laboratory Equipment and Reagents § 866.4100...

  20. 21 CFR 866.4100 - Complement reagent.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Complement reagent. 866.4100 Section 866.4100 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES IMMUNOLOGY AND MICROBIOLOGY DEVICES Immunology Laboratory Equipment and Reagents § 866.4100...

  1. Chemical modification of the RTEM-1 thiol beta-lactamase by thiol-selective reagents: evidence for activation of the primary nucleophile of the beta-lactamase active site by adjacent functional groups.

    PubMed

    Knap, A K; Pratt, R F

    1989-01-01

    The RTEM-1 thiol beta-lactamase (Sigal, I.S., Harwood, B.G., Arentzen, R., Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. U.S.A. 79:7157-7160, 1982) is inactivated by thiol-selective reagents such as iodoacetamide, methyl methanethiosulfonate, and 4,4'-dipyridyldisulfide, which modify the active site thiol group. The pH-rate profiles of these inactivation reactions show that there are two nucleophilic forms of the enzyme, EH2 and EH, both of which, by analogy with the situation with cysteine proteinases, probably contain the active site nucleophile in the thiolate form. The pKa of the active site thiol is therefore shown by the data to be below 4.0. This low pKa is thought to reflect the presence of adjacent functionality which stabilizes the thiolate anion. The low nucleophilicity of the thiolate in both EH2 and EH, with respect to that of cysteine proteinases and model compounds, suggests that the thiolate of the thiol beta-lactamase is stabilized by two hydrogen-bond donors. One of these, of pKa greater than 9.0, is suggested to be the conserved and essential Lys-73 ammonium group, while the identity of the other group, of pKa around 6.7, is less clear, but may be the conserved Glu-166 carboxylic acid. beta-Lactamase activity is associated with the EH2 form, and thus the beta-lactamase active site is proposed to contain one basic or nucleophilic group (the thiolate in the thiol beta-lactamase) and two acidic (hydrogen-bond donor) groups (one of which is likely to be the above-mentioned lysine ammonium group).

  2. Method of Generating Hydrocarbon Reagents from Diesel, Natural Gas and Other Logistical Fuels

    DOEpatents

    Herling, Darrell R [Richland, WA; Aardahl, Chris L [Richland, WA; Rozmiarek, Robert T [Middleton, WI; Rappe, Kenneth G [Richland, WA; Wang, Yong [Richland, WA; Holladay, Jamelyn D [Kennewick, WA

    2008-10-14

    The present invention provides a process for producing reagents for a chemical reaction by introducing a fuel containing hydrocarbons into a flash distillation process wherein the fuel is separated into a first component having a lower average molecular weight and a second component having a higher average molecular weight. The first component is then reformed to produce synthesis gas wherein the synthesis gas is reacted catalytically to produce the desire reagent.

  3. Method of generating hydrocarbon reagents from diesel, natural gas and other logistical fuels

    DOEpatents

    Herling, Darrell R [Richland, WA; Aardahl, Chris L [Richland, WA; Rozmiarek, Robert T [Middleton, WI; Rappe, Kenneth G [Richland, WA; Wang, Yong [Richland, WA; Holladay, Jamelyn D [Kennewick, WA

    2010-06-29

    The present invention provides a process for producing reagents for a chemical reaction by introducing a fuel containing hydrocarbons into a flash distillation process wherein the fuel is separated into a first component having a lower average molecular weight and a second component having a higher average molecular weight. The first component is then reformed to produce synthesis gas wherein the synthesis gas is reacted catalytically to produce the desire reagent.

  4. Plasma-mediated transfection of RPE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palanker, D.; Chalberg, T.; Vankov, A.; Huie, P.; Molnar, F. E.; Butterwick, A.; Calos, M.; Marmor, M.; Blumenkranz, M. S.

    2006-02-01

    A major obstacle in applying gene therapy to clinical practice is the lack of efficient and safe gene delivery techniques. Viral delivery has encountered a number of serious problems including immunological reactions and malignancy. Non-viral delivery methods (liposomes, sonoporation and electroporation) have either low efficiency in-vivo or produce severe collateral damage to ocular tissues. We discovered that tensile stress greatly increases the susceptibility of cellular membranes to electroporation. For synchronous application of electric field and mechanical stress, both are generated by the electric discharge itself. A pressure wave is produced by rapid vaporization of the medium. To prevent termination of electric current by the vapor cavity it is ionized thus restoring its electric conductivity. For in-vivo experiments with rabbits a plasmid DNA was injected into the subretinal space, and RPE was treated trans-sclerally with an array of microelectodes placed outside the eye. Application of 250-300V and 100-200 μs biphasic pulses via a microelectrode array resulted in efficient transfection of RPE without visible damage to the retina. Gene expression was quantified and monitored using bioluminescence (luciferase) and fluorescence (GFP) imaging. Transfection efficiency of RPE with this new technique exceeded that of standard electroporation by a factor 10,000. Safe and effective non-viral DNA delivery to the mammalian retina may help to materialize the enormous potential of the ocular gene therapy. Future experiments will focus on continued characterization of the safety and efficacy of this method and evaluation of long-term transgene expression in the presence of phiC31 integrase.

  5. Immunomicrospheres - Reagents for cell labeling and separation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rembaum, A.; Dreyer, W. J.

    1980-01-01

    Immunomicrospheres are specially designed microscopic particles that have antibodies or similar molecules chemically bound to their surfaces. The antibody-coated microspheres react in a highly specific way with target cells, viruses, or other antigenic agents. Immunomicrospheres may be synthesized so that they incorporate compounds that are highly radioactive, intensely fluorescent, magnetic, electron opaque, highly colored, or pharmacologically active. These various types of microspheres may be coated with pure, highly specific monoclonal antibodies obtained by the new hybridoma cell cloning techniques or with conventional antibody preparations. Some of the many present and potential applications for these new reagents are (1) new types of radioimmune or immunofluorescent assays, (2) improved fluorescence microscopy, (3) separation of cells on the basis of the fluorescent, electrophoretic, or magnetic properties of bound immunomicrospheres, (4) markers for use in several types of electron or standard light microscopy, and (5) delivery of lethal compouds to specific undesirable living cells. The combination of the various new types of synthetic microspheres and the newly available homogeneous antibodies offers new opportunities in research, diagnosis, and therapy.

  6. A Bioorthogonal Reaction of N-Oxide and Boron Reagents.

    PubMed

    Kim, Justin; Bertozzi, Carolyn R

    2015-12-21

    The development of bioorthogonal reactions has classically focused on bond-forming ligation reactions. In this report, we seek to expand the functional repertoire of such transformations by introducing a new bond-cleaving reaction between N-oxide and boron reagents. The reaction features a large dynamic range of reactivity, showcasing second-order rate constants as high as 2.3×10(3)  M(-1)  s(-1) using diboron reaction partners. Diboron reagents display minimal cell toxicity at millimolar concentrations, penetrate cell membranes, and effectively reduce N-oxides inside mammalian cells. This new bioorthogonal process based on miniscule components is thus well-suited for activating molecules within cells under chemical control. Furthermore, we demonstrate that the metabolic diversity of nature enables the use of naturally occurring functional groups that display inherent biocompatibility alongside abiotic components for organism-specific applications.

  7. Adapter Reagents for Protein Site Specific Dye Labeling

    PubMed Central

    Thompson, Darren A.; Evans, Eric G. B.; Kasza, Tomas; Millhauser, Glenn L.; Dawson, Philip E.

    2016-01-01

    Chemoselective protein labeling remains a significant challenge in chemical biology. Although many selective labeling chemistries have been reported, the practicalities of matching the reaction with appropriately functionalized proteins and labeling reagents is often a challenge. For example, we encountered the challenge of site specifically labeling the cellular form of the murine Prion protein with a fluorescent dye. To facilitate this labeling, a protein was expressed with site specific p-acetylphenylalanine. However, the utility of this aceto-phenone reactive group is hampered by the severe lack of commercially available aminooxy fluorophores. Here we outline a general strategy for the efficient solid phase synthesis of adapter reagents capable of converting maleimido-labels into aminooxy or azide functional groups that can be further tuned for desired length or solubility properties. The utility of the adapter strategy is demonstrated in the context of fluorescent labeling of the murine Prion protein through an adapted aminooxy-Alexa dye. PMID:24599728

  8. Critical ligand binding reagent preparation/selection: when specificity depends on reagents.

    PubMed

    Rup, Bonita; O'Hara, Denise

    2007-05-11

    Throughout the life cycle of biopharmaceutical products, bioanalytical support is provided using ligand binding assays to measure the drug product for pharmacokinetic, pharmacodynamic, and immunogenicity studies. The specificity and selectivity of these ligand binding assays are highly dependent on the ligand binding reagents. Thus the selection, characterization, and management processes for ligand binding reagents are crucial to successful assay development and application. This report describes process considerations for selection and characterization of ligand binding reagents that are integral parts of the different phases of assay development. Changes in expression, purification, modification, and storage of the ligand binding reagents may have a profound effect on the ligand binding assay performance. Thus long-term management of the critical ligand binding assay reagents is addressed including suggested characterization criteria that allow ligand binding reagents to be used in as consistent a manner as possible. Examples of challenges related to the selection, modification, and characterization of ligand binding reagents are included.

  9. In-house made nucleofection buffer for efficient and cost effective transfection of RAW 264.7 macrophages.

    PubMed

    Alamuru-Yellapragada, Neeraja P; Kapadia, Bandish; Parsa, Kishore V L

    2017-05-27

    Electroporation is the most widely employed method of gene transfer into macrophages which are hard to transfect. RAW 264.7 is a widely used cell line for studying macrophage responses. Electroporation of RAW 264.7 cells with commercial reagents although very efficient is expensive necessitating the development of cost effective alternatives. In this study, we have formulated an economical electroporation buffer for electroporation of RAW 264.7 cells compatible with commercial nucleofector apparatus. We observed that supplementation of membrane fusogenic agents such as Ficoll, PEG and membrane resealing agent, poloxamer P188, enhanced the transfection efficiency of macrophages to a level comparable to the commercially available solutions thereby providing us a cost effective solution for genetic manipulation of macrophages especially in large numbers. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. VSV-G envelope glycoprotein forms complexes with plasmid DNA and MLV retrovirus-like particles in cell-free conditions and enhances DNA transfection.

    PubMed

    Okimoto, T; Friedmann, T; Miyanohara, A

    2001-09-01

    We have previously shown that vesicles containing the spike glycoprotein of the vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV-G) can associate efficiently with immature, non-infectious, envelope-deficient retrovirus-like particles assembled by packaging cells to produce infectious, pseudotyped viruses in cell-free conditions in vitro. We have also previously reported that VSV-G can enhance DNA lipofection efficiency by interacting with liposomes to form fusogenic, serum-stable liposomes with enhanced transfection properties. Here, we report that VSV-G can form a complex directly with naked plasmid DNA in the absence of a lipofection reagent and can thereby enhance the transfection efficiency of the naked plasmid vector. Sucrose gradient sedimentation analysis demonstrated that VSV-G can also associate with plasmid DNA and murine leukemia virus (MLV) gag-pol particles to form ternary complexes that co-sediment with high DNA transfecting activity. The increased transfection efficiency with VSV-G was dependent on the presence of the polycation (Polybrene) in the culture medium during transfection. Enhanced transfection was abolished by a neutralizing antibody to VSV-G. These results may be useful in the study of retrovirus assembly, in the further design of hybrid DNA-based retrovirus-like vectors, and in the full in vitro, cell-free assembly of infectious virus-like particles from component parts.

  11. Transfection of microRNA Mimics Should Be Used with Caution

    PubMed Central

    Jin, Hyun Yong; Gonzalez-Martin, Alicia; Miletic, Ana V.; Lai, Maoyi; Knight, Sarah; Sabouri-Ghomi, Mohsen; Head, Steven R.; Macauley, Matthew S.; Rickert, Robert C.; Xiao, Changchun

    2015-01-01

    Transient transfection of chemically synthesized microRNA (miRNA) mimics is being used extensively to study the functions and mechanisms of endogenous miRNAs. However, it remains unclear whether transfected miRNAs behave similarly to endogenous miRNAs. Here we show that transient transfection of miRNA mimics into HeLa cells by a commonly used method led to the accumulation of high molecular weight RNA species and a few hundred fold increase in mature miRNA levels. In contrast, expression of the same miRNAs through lentiviral infection or plasmid transfection of HeLa cells, transgenic expression in primary lymphocytes, and endogenous overexpression in lymphoma and leukemia cell lines did not lead to the appearance of high molecular weight RNA species. The increase of mature miRNA levels in these cells was below 10-fold, which was sufficient to suppress target gene expression and to drive lymphoma development in mice. Moreover, transient transfection of miRNA mimics at high concentrations caused non-specific alterations in gene expression, while at low concentrations achieved expression levels comparable to other methods but failed to efficiently suppress target gene expression. Small RNA deep sequencing analysis revealed that the guide strands of miRNA mimics were frequently mutated, while unnatural passenger strands of some miRNA mimics accumulated to high levels. The high molecular weight RNA species were a heterogeneous mixture of several classes of RNA species generated by concatemerization, 5′- and 3′-end tailing of miRNA mimics. We speculate that the supraphysiological levels of mature miRNAs and these artifactual RNA species led to non-specific changes in gene expression. Our results have important implications for the design and interpretation of experiments primarily employing transient transfection of miRNA mimics. PMID:26697058

  12. Inactivation of rabies diagnostic reagents by gamma radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Gamble, W.C.; Chappell, W.A.; George, E.H.

    1980-11-01

    Treatment of CVS-11 rabies adsorbing suspensions and street rabies infected mouse brains with gamma radiation resulted in inactivated reagents that are safer to distribute and use. These irradiated reagents were as sensitive and reactive as the nonirradiated control reagents.

  13. 21 CFR 866.3740 - Streptococcus spp. serological reagents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES IMMUNOLOGY AND MICROBIOLOGY DEVICES Serological Reagents § 866.3740 Streptococcus spp. serological reagents. (a) Identification. Streptococcus spp. serological reagents are devices... streptococci are associated with infections, such as sore throat, impetigo (an infection characterized by...

  14. Transfection of mammalian cells using block copolypeptide vesicles.

    PubMed

    Sun, Victor Z; Choe, Uh-Joo; Rodriguez, April R; Dai, Howard; Deming, Timothy J; Kamei, Daniel T

    2013-05-01

    An arginine-leucine block copolypeptide (R60 L20 ) is synthesized, which is capable of forming vesicles with controllable sizes, able to transport hydrophilic cargo across the cell membrane, and exhibit relatively low cytotoxicity. The R60 L20 vesicles also possess the ability to deliver DNA into mammalian cells for transfection. Although the transfection efficiency is lower than that of the commercially available transfection agent Lipofectamine 2000, the R60 L20 vesicles are able to achieve transfection with significantly lower cytotoxicity and immunogenicity. This behavior is potentially due to its stronger interaction with DNA which subsequently provides better protection against anionic heparin.

  15. Effect of Thiol-Binding Reagents on the Metabolism of Thiosulfate and Tetrathionate by Thiobacillus neapolitanus

    PubMed Central

    Trudinger, P. A.

    1965-01-01

    Trudinger, P. A. (Division of Plant Industry, Canberra, Australia). Effect of thiol-binding reagents on the metabolism of thiosulfate and tetrathionate by Thiobacillus neapolitanus. J. Bacteriol. 89:617–625. 1965.—Iodoacetamide, N-ethyl maleimide (NEM), p-chloromercuribenzoate (CMB), Mercurochrome, and HgCl2 inhibited the oxidation of thiosulfate to sulfate by Thiobacillus neapolitanus; tetrathionate accumulated under these conditions. High concentrations of the thiol-binding reagents lowered the rate of oxidation of thiosulfate to tetrathionate; inhibition by CMB was reversed by high concentrations of thiosulfate. Relatively low concentrations of the thiol-binding reagents completely inhibited the oxidation and anaerobic metabolism of tetrathionate. Similar reagents had no effect on a soluble thiosulfate-oxidizing enzyme. Inhibition by thiol-binding reagents was overcome by washing the bacteria with Na2S or thioethanol after their exposure to the inhibitors. Under some conditions, the addition of thiosulfate or tetrathionate to bacterial suspensions before the addition of the thiol-binding reagents prevented the inhibition of thiosulfate and tetrathionate metabolism by these reagents. Thiosulfate catalyzed a rapid chemical breakdown of NEM and reacted with iodoacetamide. A complex between thiosulfate and mercuribenzoate was demonstrated. Three types of thiol group appear to be associated with the metabolism of thiosulfate and tetrathionate; one of these types may be located at the bacterial cell membrane. The results are consistent with the hypothesis that thiols (or disulfide groups) are binding sites for the substrates. PMID:14273636

  16. Evaluation of Two Spot-Indole Reagents

    PubMed Central

    Lowrance, B. L.; Reich, P.; Traub, W. H.

    1969-01-01

    Two spot-indole reagents, p-dimethylaminobenzaldehyde (DMABA) and p-dimethylaminocinnamaldehyde, were evaluated quantitatively. Although fourfold less sensitive, DMABA proved to be more stable and economical. PMID:4894726

  17. Iodine(III) Reagents in Radical Chemistry

    PubMed Central

    2017-01-01

    Conspectus The chemistry of hypervalent iodine(III) compounds has gained great interest over the past 30 years. Hypervalent iodine(III) compounds show valuable ionic reactivity due to their high electrophilicity but also express radical reactivity as single electron oxidants for carbon and heteroatom radical generation. Looking at ionic chemistry, these iodine(III) reagents can act as electrophiles to efficiently construct C–CF3, X–CF3 (X = heteroatom), C–Rf (Rf = perfluoroalkyl), X–Rf, C–N3, C–CN, S–CN, and C–X bonds. In some cases, a Lewis or a Bronsted acid is necessary to increase their electrophilicity. In these transformations, the iodine(III) compounds react as formal “CF3+”, “Rf+”, “N3+”, “Ar+”, “CN+”, and “X+” equivalents. On the other hand, one electron reduction of the I(III) reagents opens the door to the radical world, which is the topic of this Account that focuses on radical reactivity of hypervalent iodine(III) compounds such as the Togni reagent, Zhdankin reagent, diaryliodonium salts, aryliodonium ylides, aryl(cyano)iodonium triflates, and aryl(perfluoroalkyl)iodonium triflates. Radical generation starting with I(III) reagents can also occur via thermal or light mediated homolysis of the weak hypervalent bond in such reagents. This reactivity can be used for alkane C–H functionalization. We will address important pioneering work in the area but will mainly focus on studies that have been conducted by our group over the last 5 years. We entered the field by investigating transition metal free single electron reduction of Togni type reagents using the readily available sodium 2,2,6,6-tetramethylpiperidine-1-oxyl salt (TEMPONa) as an organic one electron reductant for clean generation of the trifluoromethyl radical and perfluoroalkyl radicals. That valuable approach was later successfully also applied to the generation of azidyl and aryl radicals starting with the corresponding benziodoxole (Zhdankin reagent

  18. Identification of mimotopes of Mycobacterium leprae as potential diagnostic reagents

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background An early diagnostic test for detecting infection in leprosy is fundamental for reducing patients’ sequelae. The currently used lepromin is not adequate for disease diagnosis and, so far, no antigen to be used in intradermoreaction has proved to be sensitive and specific for that purpose. Aiming at identifying new reagents to be used in skin tests, candidate antigens were investigated. Methods Random peptide phage display libraries were screened by using antibodies from leprosy patients in order to identify peptides as diagnostic reagents. Results Seven different phage clones were identified using purified antibodies pooled from sera of leprosy patients. When the clones were tested with serum samples by ELISA, three of them, 5A, 6A and 1B, allowed detecting a larger number of leprosy patients when compared to controls. The corresponding peptides expressed by selected phage clones were chemically synthesized. A pilot study was undertaken to assess the use of peptides in skin tests. The intradermal challenge with peptides in animals previously sensitized with Mycobacterium leprae induced a delayed-type hypersensitivity with peptide 5A (2/5) and peptide 1B (1/5). In positive controls, there was a 3/5 reactivity for lepromin and a 4/5 reactivity of the sensitized animals with soluble extract of M. leprae. Conclusions The preliminary data suggest that may be possible to develop reagents with diagnostic potential based on peptide mimotopes selected by phage display using polyclonal human antibodies. PMID:23351151

  19. Optimization and initial evaluation of 1,2-indandione as a reagent for fingerprint detection.

    PubMed

    Gardner, Sarah J; Hewlett, Dudley F

    2003-11-01

    1,2-Indandione has been used to develop fluorescent fingerprints on porous materials such as paper. The compound reacts with amino acid residues to produce highly fluorescent fingerprint ridges. An optimized formulation and treatment protocol for using the reagent is presented here. The reagent is applied as a solution in HFE7100 containing acetic acid and ethyl acetate. Treated articles are heated at 100 degrees C for 10 min at ambient humidity and stored in the dark before recording the fingerprints using fluorescence photography or digital imaging. Photodecomposition of the fluorescent fingerprints has been observed. Storage in the dark reduces degradation, extending the lifetime of the fingerprints. Other chemical methods to stabilize the fingerprints proved unsuccessful. Comparisons of the performance of 1,2-indandione with DFO in CFC113 performed on a limited range of substrates indicated that the reagent might be an effective method for the development of latent fingerprints despite the new reagent producing less intense fluorescence.

  20. Purification of transfection-grade plasmid DNA from bacterial cells with superparamagnetic nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chiang, Chen-Li; Sung, Ching-Shan

    2006-07-01

    The functionalized magnetic nanobeads were used to develop a rapid protocol for extracting and purifying transfection-grade plasmid DNA from bacterial culture. Nanosized superparamagnetic nanoparticles (Fe 3O 4) were prepared by chemical coprecipitation method using Fe 2+, Fe 3+ salt, and ammonium hydroxide under a nitrogen atmosphere. The surface of Fe 3O 4 nanoparticles was modified by coating with the multivalent cationic agent, polyethylenimine (PEI). The PEI-modified magnetic nanobeads were employed to simplify the purification of plasmid DNA from bacterial cells. We demonstrated a useful plasmid, pRSETB-EGFP, encoding the green fluorescent protein with T7 promoter, was amplified in DE3 strain of Escherichia coli. The loaded nanobeads are recovered by magnetically driven separation and regenerated by exposure to the elution buffer with optimal ionic strength (1.25 M) and pH (9.0). Up to approximately 819 μg of high-purity (A 260/A 280 ratio=1.86) plasmid DNA was isolated from 100 ml of overnight bacterial culture. The eluted plasmid DNA was used directly for restriction enzyme digestion, bacterial cell transformation and animal cell transfection applications with success. The PEI-modified magnetic nanobead delivers significant time-savings, overall higher yields and better transfection efficiencies compared to anion-exchange and other methods. The results presented in this report show that PEI-modified magnetic nanobeads are suitable for isolation and purification of transfection-grade plasmid DNA.

  1. In vitro transfection of plasmid DNA by cationized gelatin prepared from different amine compounds.

    PubMed

    Kushibiki, Toshihiro; Tomoshige, Ryuji; Iwanaga, Kazunori; Kakemi, Masawo; Tabata, Yasuhiko

    2006-01-01

    The objective of this paper is to compare the in vitro transfection efficiency of a luciferase plasmid DNA using cationized gelatin prepared from different amine compounds. The compounds used here were ethylenediamine, putrescine, spermidine and spermine, chemically introduced to the carboxyl group of gelatin for the cationization. Complexation of the cationized gelatin with the plasmid DNA was performed by simply mixing the two materials at various N+/P- mixing ratios (the molar number ratio of amino groups of gelatin to the phosphate groups of DNA) in aqueous solution. Gel retardation studies revealed that the formation of cationized-gelatin-plasmid DNA complexes depended on the N+/P- mixing ratio. The stronger interaction of plasmid DNA with the cationized gelatin of spermine compared to the other cationized gelatins was observed by an ethidium bromide intercalation assay and Scatchard binding analysis. When the transfection efficiency of plasmid DNA complexed with the various cationized gelatins at different N+/P- mixing ratios was evaluated for mouse L929 fibroblasts, the highest transfection efficiency was observed for the complex prepared from the cationized gelatin of spermine at a N+/P- mixing ratio of 2. The present study indicates that there is an optimal N+/P- mixing ratio and a type of amine compound or cationization extent of cationized gelatin to enhance the transfection efficiency of plasmid DNA.

  2. Enhanced operation of femtosecond lasers and applications in cell transfection.

    PubMed

    Brown, Christian T A; Stevenson, David J; Tsampoula, Xanthi; McDougall, Craig; Lagatsky, Alexander A; Sibbett, Wilson; Gunn-Moore, Frank J; Dholakia, Kishan

    2008-08-01

    In this work we present a review and discussion on the enhancement of femtosecond (fs) lasers for use within biophotonics with a particular focus on their use in optical transfection techniques. We describe the broad range of source options now available for the generation of femtosecond pulses before briefly reviewing the application of fs laser in optical transfection studies. We show that major performance enhancements may be obtained by optimising the spatial and temporal performance of the laser source before considering possible future directions in this field. In relation to optical transfection we describe how such laser sources initiate a multiphoton process to permeate the cell membrane in a transient fashion. We look at aspects of this technique including the ability to combine transfection with optical trapping. For future implementation of such transfection we explore the role of new sources and "nondiffracting" light fields.

  3. Inclusion of high molecular weight dextran in calcium phosphate-mediated transfection significantly improves gene transfer efficiency.

    PubMed

    Wu, C; Lu, Y

    2007-05-15

    Calcium phosphate-based mammalian cell transfection is a widely used gene transfer technology. To facilitate the efficiency of this gene transfer method, several polysaccharide compounds were tested and evaluated for their effectiveness in enhancing DNA transfection. Using a HIV-1-derived lentivirus vector plasmid as a gene transfer indicator, we demonstrated that the addition of high molecular weight dextran-500 at 0.6-1.2% in the 2x Hepes buffered saline (HBS) increased transfection efficiency by over 50% (as reflected by the number of GFP-positive cells) and increased the titer of resulting lentivirus vector particles even more (up to 4-fold). This enhancement of transfection efficiency was further increased when higher molecular weight dextran formulations were used in place of dextran-500, and also when dextran was used in combination with polybrene, another polycationic chemical compound. Examination of transfected cells showed that dextran had no apparent adverse effect on cell viability and growth. Our data represent the first report showing that dextran can be used to enhance calcium phosphate-mediated gene transfer; this may be useful in applications for the generation of high-titer virus vector stocks using transient transfection technology.

  4. A study of the effects of enhanced oil recovery agents on the quality of Strategic Petroleum Reserves crude oil. [Physical and chemical interactions of Enhanced Oil Recovery reagents with hydrocarbons present in petroleum

    SciTech Connect

    Kabadi, V.N.

    1992-10-01

    The project was initiated on September 1, 1990. The objective of the project was to carry out a literature search to estimate the types and extents of long time interactions of enhanced oil recovery (EOR) agents, such as surfactants, caustics and polymers, with crude oil. This information is necessary to make recommendations about mixing EOR crude oil with crude oils from primary and secondary recovery processes in the Strategic Petroleum Reserve (SPR). Data were sought on both adverse and beneficial effects of EOR agents that would impact handling, transportation and refining of crude oil. An extensive literature search has been completed, and the following informations has been compiled: (1) a listing of existing EOR test and field projects; (2) a listing of currently used EOR agents; and (3) evidence of short and long term physical and chemical interactions of these EOR-agents with hydrocarbons, and their effects on the quality of crude oil at long times. This information is presented in this report. Finally some conclusions are derived and recommendations are made. Although the conclusions are based mostly on extrapolations because of lack of specific data, it is recommended that the enhancement of the rates of biodegradation of oil catalyzed by the EOR agents needs to be further studied. There is no evidence of substantial long term effects on crude oil because of other interactions. Some recommendations are also made regarding the types of studies that would be necessary to determine the effect of certain EOR agents on the rates of biodegradation of crude oil.

  5. Modulated protonation of side chain aminoethylene repeats in N-substituted polyaspartamides promotes mRNA transfection.

    PubMed

    Uchida, Hirokuni; Itaka, Keiji; Nomoto, Takahiro; Ishii, Takehiko; Suma, Tomoya; Ikegami, Masaru; Miyata, Kanjiro; Oba, Makoto; Nishiyama, Nobuhiro; Kataoka, Kazunori

    2014-09-03

    Fine-tuning of chemical structures of polycation-based carriers (polyplexes) is an attractive strategy for safe and efficient mRNA transfaction. Here, mRNA polyplexes comprising N-substituted polyaspartamides with varied numbers of side chain aminoethylene repeats were constructed, and their transfection ability against human hepatoma cells was examined. Transfection efficacy clearly correlated with the number of aminoethylene repeats: polyplexes with odd number repeats (PA-Os) produced sustained increases in mRNA expression compared with those with even number repeats (PA-Es). This predominant efficacy of PA-Os over PA-Es was contradictory to our previous findings for pDNA polyplexes prepared from the same N-substituted polyaspartamides, that is, PA-Es revealed superior transfection efficacy of pDNA than PA-Os. Intracellular FRET analysis using flow cytometry and polyplex tracking under confocal laser scanning microscopy revealed that overall transfection efficacy was determined through the balance between endosomal escaping capability and stability of translocated mRNA in cytoplasm. PA-Es efficiently transported mRNA into the cytoplasm. However, their poor cytoplasmic stability led to facile degradation of mRNA, resulting in a less durable pattern of transfection. Alternatively, PA-Os with limited capability of endosomal escape eventually protect mRNA in the cytoplasm to induce sustainable mRNA expression. Higher cytoplasmic stability of pDNA compared to mRNA may shift the limiting step in transfection from cytoplasmic stability to endosomal escape capacity, thereby giving an opposite odd-even effect in transfection efficacy. Endosomal escaping capability and nuclease stability of polyplexes are correlated with the modulated protonation behavior in aminoethylene repeats responding to pH, appealing the substantial importance of chemistry to design polycation structures for promoted mRNA transfection.

  6. 21 CFR 660.30 - Reagent Red Blood Cells.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 7 2011-04-01 2010-04-01 true Reagent Red Blood Cells. 660.30 Section 660.30 Food... ADDITIONAL STANDARDS FOR DIAGNOSTIC SUBSTANCES FOR LABORATORY TESTS Reagent Red Blood Cells § 660.30 Reagent Red Blood Cells. (a) Proper name and definition. The proper name of the product shall be Reagent...

  7. 21 CFR 866.3120 - Chlamydia serological reagents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Chlamydia serological reagents. 866.3120 Section... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES IMMUNOLOGY AND MICROBIOLOGY DEVICES Serological Reagents § 866.3120 Chlamydia serological reagents. (a) Identification. Chlamydia serological reagents are devices that consist of antigens...

  8. 21 CFR 866.3120 - Chlamydia serological reagents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Chlamydia serological reagents. 866.3120 Section... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES IMMUNOLOGY AND MICROBIOLOGY DEVICES Serological Reagents § 866.3120 Chlamydia serological reagents. (a) Identification. Chlamydia serological reagents are devices that consist of antigens...

  9. 21 CFR 866.3120 - Chlamydia serological reagents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Chlamydia serological reagents. 866.3120 Section... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES IMMUNOLOGY AND MICROBIOLOGY DEVICES Serological Reagents § 866.3120 Chlamydia serological reagents. (a) Identification. Chlamydia serological reagents are devices that consist of antigens...

  10. 21 CFR 866.3380 - Mumps virus serological reagents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Mumps virus serological reagents. 866.3380 Section... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES IMMUNOLOGY AND MICROBIOLOGY DEVICES Serological Reagents § 866.3380 Mumps virus serological reagents. (a) Identification. Mumps virus serological reagents consist of antigens and antisera...

  11. 21 CFR 866.3510 - Rubella virus serological reagents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Rubella virus serological reagents. 866.3510... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES IMMUNOLOGY AND MICROBIOLOGY DEVICES Serological Reagents § 866.3510 Rubella virus serological reagents. (a) Identification. Rubella virus serological reagents are devices that consist of...

  12. 21 CFR 866.3380 - Mumps virus serological reagents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Mumps virus serological reagents. 866.3380 Section... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES IMMUNOLOGY AND MICROBIOLOGY DEVICES Serological Reagents § 866.3380 Mumps virus serological reagents. (a) Identification. Mumps virus serological reagents consist of antigens and antisera...

  13. 21 CFR 866.3510 - Rubella virus serological reagents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Rubella virus serological reagents. 866.3510... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES IMMUNOLOGY AND MICROBIOLOGY DEVICES Serological Reagents § 866.3510 Rubella virus serological reagents. (a) Identification. Rubella virus serological reagents are devices that consist of...

  14. 21 CFR 866.3510 - Rubella virus serological reagents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Rubella virus serological reagents. 866.3510... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES IMMUNOLOGY AND MICROBIOLOGY DEVICES Serological Reagents § 866.3510 Rubella virus serological reagents. (a) Identification. Rubella virus serological reagents are devices that consist of...

  15. 21 CFR 866.3380 - Mumps virus serological reagents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Mumps virus serological reagents. 866.3380 Section... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES IMMUNOLOGY AND MICROBIOLOGY DEVICES Serological Reagents § 866.3380 Mumps virus serological reagents. (a) Identification. Mumps virus serological reagents consist of antigens and antisera...

  16. 21 CFR 866.3510 - Rubella virus serological reagents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Rubella virus serological reagents. 866.3510... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES IMMUNOLOGY AND MICROBIOLOGY DEVICES Serological Reagents § 866.3510 Rubella virus serological reagents. (a) Identification. Rubella virus serological reagents are devices that consist of...

  17. 21 CFR 866.3380 - Mumps virus serological reagents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Mumps virus serological reagents. 866.3380 Section... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES IMMUNOLOGY AND MICROBIOLOGY DEVICES Serological Reagents § 866.3380 Mumps virus serological reagents. (a) Identification. Mumps virus serological reagents consist of antigens and antisera...

  18. 21 CFR 866.3510 - Rubella virus serological reagents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Rubella virus serological reagents. 866.3510... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES IMMUNOLOGY AND MICROBIOLOGY DEVICES Serological Reagents § 866.3510 Rubella virus serological reagents. (a) Identification. Rubella virus serological reagents are devices that consist of...

  19. 21 CFR 866.3380 - Mumps virus serological reagents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Mumps virus serological reagents. 866.3380 Section... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES IMMUNOLOGY AND MICROBIOLOGY DEVICES Serological Reagents § 866.3380 Mumps virus serological reagents. (a) Identification. Mumps virus serological reagents consist of antigens and antisera...

  20. 40 CFR 160.83 - Reagents and solutions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 23 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Reagents and solutions. 160.83 Section... LABORATORY PRACTICE STANDARDS Testing Facilities Operation § 160.83 Reagents and solutions. All reagents and... requirements, and expiration date. Deteriorated or outdated reagents and solutions shall not be used....

  1. 21 CFR 866.3940 - West Nile virus serological reagents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false West Nile virus serological reagents. 866.3940... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES IMMUNOLOGY AND MICROBIOLOGY DEVICES Serological Reagents § 866.3940 West Nile virus serological reagents. (a) Identification. West Nile virus serological reagents are devices that...

  2. 21 CFR 864.8540 - Red cell lysing reagent.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Red cell lysing reagent. 864.8540 Section 864.8540...) MEDICAL DEVICES HEMATOLOGY AND PATHOLOGY DEVICES Hematology Reagents § 864.8540 Red cell lysing reagent. (a) Identification. A red cell lysing reagent is a device used to lyse (destroy) red blood cells for...

  3. 21 CFR 864.8540 - Red cell lysing reagent.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Red cell lysing reagent. 864.8540 Section 864.8540...) MEDICAL DEVICES HEMATOLOGY AND PATHOLOGY DEVICES Hematology Reagents § 864.8540 Red cell lysing reagent. (a) Identification. A red cell lysing reagent is a device used to lyse (destroy) red blood cells for...

  4. 21 CFR 864.8540 - Red cell lysing reagent.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Red cell lysing reagent. 864.8540 Section 864.8540...) MEDICAL DEVICES HEMATOLOGY AND PATHOLOGY DEVICES Hematology Reagents § 864.8540 Red cell lysing reagent. (a) Identification. A red cell lysing reagent is a device used to lyse (destroy) red blood cells for...

  5. 21 CFR 864.8540 - Red cell lysing reagent.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Red cell lysing reagent. 864.8540 Section 864.8540...) MEDICAL DEVICES HEMATOLOGY AND PATHOLOGY DEVICES Hematology Reagents § 864.8540 Red cell lysing reagent. (a) Identification. A red cell lysing reagent is a device used to lyse (destroy) red blood cells for...

  6. 21 CFR 866.3110 - Campylobacter fetus serological reagents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Campylobacter fetus serological reagents. 866.3110... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES IMMUNOLOGY AND MICROBIOLOGY DEVICES Serological Reagents § 866.3110 Campylobacter fetus serological reagents. (a) Identification. Campylobacter fetus serological reagents are devices...

  7. 11-trifluoromethyl-phenyldiazirinyl neurosteroid analogues: potent general anesthetics and photolabeling reagents for GABAA receptors.

    PubMed

    Chen, Zi-Wei; Wang, Cunde; Krishnan, Kathiresan; Manion, Brad D; Hastings, Randy; Bracamontes, John; Taylor, Amanda; Eaton, Megan M; Zorumski, Charles F; Steinbach, Joseph H; Akk, Gustav; Mennerick, Steven; Covey, Douglas F; Evers, Alex S

    2014-09-01

    While neurosteroids are well-described positive allosteric modulators of gamma-aminobutyric acid type A (GABAA) receptors, the binding sites that mediate these actions have not been definitively identified. This study was conducted to synthesize neurosteroid analogue photolabeling reagents that closely mimic the biological effects of endogenous neurosteroids and have photochemical properties that will facilitate their use as tools for identifying the binding sites for neurosteroids on GABAA receptors. Two neurosteroid analogues containing a trifluromethyl-phenyldiazirine group linked to the steroid C11 position were synthesized. These reagents, CW12 and CW14, are analogues of allopregnanolone (5α-reduced steroid) and pregnanolone (5β-reduced steroid), respectively. Both reagents were shown to have favorable photochemical properties with efficient insertion into the C-H bonds of cyclohexane. They also effectively replicated the actions of allopregnanolone and pregnanolone on GABAA receptor functions: they potentiated GABA-induced currents in Xenopus laevis oocytes transfected with α1β2γ2L subunits, modulated [(35)S]t-butylbicyclophosphorothionate binding in rat brain membranes, and were effective anesthetics in Xenopus tadpoles. Studies using [(3)H]CW12 and [(3)H]CW14 showed that these reagents covalently label GABAA receptors in both rat brain membranes and in a transformed human embryonal kidney (TSA) cells expressing either α1 and β2 subunits or β3 subunits of the GABAA receptor. Photolabeling of rat brain GABAA receptors was shown to be both concentration-dependent and stereospecific. CW12 and CW14 have the appropriate photochemical and pharmacological properties for use as photolabeling reagents to identify specific neurosteroid-binding sites on GABAA receptors.

  8. Using synthetic small molecule reagents and antibodies to distinguish among PrP conformers: new uses for old antibodies

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The chemical environment of the amino acids present in PrP is conformation (PrP(Sc) or PrP(c)) dependent. This means that the same amino acid can react differently with the same chemical reagent, depending upon the conformation of that protein. Furthermore, if the site of chemical reaction is the ep...

  9. U.S. VETERINARY IMMUNE REAGENTS NETWORK: PROGRESS WITH POULTRY IMMUNE REAGENTS

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    A major obstacle to advances in veterinary immunology and disease control is the lack of sufficient immunological reagents specific for ruminants, swine, poultry, equine and aquaculture species. Sets of reagents, i.e., monoclonal (mAb) and polyclonal antibodies, that can identify the major leukocyt...

  10. Modern affinity reagents: Recombinant antibodies and aptamers.

    PubMed

    Groff, Katherine; Brown, Jeffrey; Clippinger, Amy J

    2015-12-01

    Affinity reagents are essential tools in both basic and applied research; however, there is a growing concern about the reproducibility of animal-derived monoclonal antibodies. The need for higher quality affinity reagents has prompted the development of methods that provide scientific, economic, and time-saving advantages and do not require the use of animals. This review describes two types of affinity reagents, recombinant antibodies and aptamers, which are non-animal technologies that can replace the use of animal-derived monoclonal antibodies. Recombinant antibodies are protein-based reagents, while aptamers are nucleic-acid-based. In light of the scientific advantages of these technologies, this review also discusses ways to gain momentum in the use of modern affinity reagents, including an update to the 1999 National Academy of Sciences monoclonal antibody production report and federal incentives for recombinant antibody and aptamer efforts. In the long-term, these efforts have the potential to improve the overall quality and decrease the cost of scientific research. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Unnatural Isotopic Composition of Lithium Reagents

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Qi, H.P.; Coplen, T.B.; Wang, Q. Zh; Wang, Y.-H.

    1997-01-01

    Isotopic analysis of 39 lithium reagents from several manufacturers indicates that seven were artificially depleted in 6Li significantly in excess of the variation found in terrestrial materials. The atomic weight of lithium in analyzed reagents ranged from 6.939 to 6.996, and ??7-Li, reported relative to L-SVEC lithium carbonate, ranged from -11 to +3013???. This investigation indicates that 6Li-depleted reagents are now found on chemists' shelves, and the labels of these 6Li-depleted reagents do not accurately reflect the atomic and (or) molecular weights of these reagents. In 1993, IUPAC issued the following statement: "Commercially available Li materials have atomic weights that range between 6.94 and 6.99; if a more accurate value is required, it must be determined for the specific material." This statement has been found to be incorrect In two of the 39 samples analyzed, the atomic weight of Li was in excess of 6.99.

  12. Validation of affinity reagents using antigen microarrays.

    PubMed

    Sjöberg, Ronald; Sundberg, Mårten; Gundberg, Anna; Sivertsson, Asa; Schwenk, Jochen M; Uhlén, Mathias; Nilsson, Peter

    2012-06-15

    There is a need for standardised validation of affinity reagents to determine their binding selectivity and specificity. This is of particular importance for systematic efforts that aim to cover the human proteome with different types of binding reagents. One such international program is the SH2-consortium, which was formed to generate a complete set of renewable affinity reagents to the SH2-domain containing human proteins. Here, we describe a microarray strategy to validate various affinity reagents, such as recombinant single-chain antibodies, mouse monoclonal antibodies and antigen-purified polyclonal antibodies using a highly multiplexed approach. An SH2-specific antigen microarray was designed and generated, containing more than 6000 spots displayed by 14 identical subarrays each with 406 antigens, where 105 of them represented SH2-domain containing proteins. Approximately 400 different affinity reagents of various types were analysed on these antigen microarrays carrying antigens of different types. The microarrays revealed not only very detailed specificity profiles for all the binders, but also showed that overlapping target sequences of spotted antigens were detected by off-target interactions. The presented study illustrates the feasibility of using antigen microarrays for integrative, high-throughput validation of various types of binders and antigens.

  13. Transfection of Lactobacillus bulgaricus protoplasts by bacteriophage DNA.

    PubMed

    Boizet, B; Flickinger, J L; Chassy, B M

    1988-12-01

    A protoplast transfection system has been developed for Lactobacillus bulgaricus. The procedure involves a polyethylene glycol-mediated fusion of bacteriophage DNA encapsulated in liposomes into mutanolysin-treated cells. With L. bulgaricus B004 and DNA isolated from the phage phi c5004, transfection reached a maximum when at least 95% of the cells were osmotically fragile. The incorporation of phage DNA into liposomes was essential; no transfectants were detected in the absence of liposomes. The largest number of transfectants was observed after longer periods (20 min) of fusion of mutanolysin-treated cells and liposomes with polyethylene glycol. The maximum efficiency of 5 x 10(7) PFU/microgram of DNA was reached after a 24-h incubation in growth media prior to plating transfected cells in an agar overlay to detect the appearance of plaques. A minimum of 4 h of incubation in growth medium after fusion was required to detect the production and release of virions. The possibility that the high frequencies observed were due to bursting of transfected cells and subsequent infection of additional cells was found not to be a factor. The number of transfectants observed was directly proportional to the quantity of DNA added. These results define conditions appropriate for the introduction of DNA into L. bulgaricus.

  14. [Transfection of HL-60 cells by Venus lentiviral vector].

    PubMed

    Li, Zheng; Hu, Shao-Yan; Cen, Jian-Nong; Chen, Zi-Xing

    2013-06-01

    In order to study the potential of Venus, lentiviral vector, applied to acute myeloid leukemia, the recombinant vector Venus-C3aR was transfected into 293T packing cells by DNA-calcium phosphate coprecipitation. All virus stocks were collected and transfected into HL-60, the GFP expression in HL-60 cells was measured by flow cytometry. The expression level of C3aR1 in transfected HL-60 cells was identified by RT-PCR and flow cytometry. The lentiviral toxicity on HL-60 was measured by using CCK-8 method and the ability of cell differentiation was observed. The results indicated that the transfection efficacy of lentiviral vector on HL-60 cells was more than 95%, which meets the needs for further study. C3aR1 expression on HL-60 cells increased after being transfected with recombinant lentiviral vector. Before and after transfection, the proliferation and differentiation of cells were not changed much. It is concluded that the lentiviral vector showed a high efficacy to transfect AML cells and can be integrated in genome of HL-60 cells to realize the stable expression of interest gene. Meanwhile, lentiviral vector can not affect HL-60 cell ability to proliferate and differentiate.

  15. Hydrophobic Moiety of Cationic Lipids Strongly Modulates Their Transfection Activity

    SciTech Connect

    Koynova, Rumiana; Tenchov, Boris; Wang, Li; MacDonald, Robert C.

    2010-01-18

    Synthetic cationic lipids are widely used components of nonviral gene carriers, and the factors regulating their transfection efficiency are the subject of considerable interest. In view of the important role that electrostatic interactions with the polyanionic nucleic acids play in formation of lipoplexes, a common empirical approach to improving transfection has been the synthesis and testing of amphiphiles with new versions of positively charged polar groups, while much less attention has been given to the role of the hydrophobic lipid moieties. On the basis of data for {approx}20 cationic phosphatidylcholine (PC) derivatives, here we demonstrate that hydrocarbon chain variations of these lipids modulate by over 2 orders of magnitude their transfection efficiency. The observed molecular structure-activity relationship manifests in well-expressed dependences of activity on two important molecular characteristics, chain unsaturation and total number of carbon atoms in the lipid chains, which is representative of the lipid hydrophobic volume and hydrophilic-lipophilic ratio. Transfection increases with decrease of chain length and increase of chain unsaturation. Maximum transfection was found for cationic PCs with monounsaturated 14:1 chains. It is of particular importance that the high-transfection lipids strongly promote cubic phase formation in zwitterionic membrane phosphatidylethanolamine (PE). These remarkable correlations point to an alternative, chain-dependent process in transfection, not related to the electrostatic cationic-anionic lipid interactions.

  16. Modification of the erythrocyte membrane by sulfhydryl group reagents.

    PubMed

    Godin, D V; Schrier, S L

    1972-12-01

    In this study, the consequences of modification of human erythrocyte membrane sulfhydryl groups by N-ethyl maleimide (NEM), 5,5'dithiobis-(2-nitrobenzoic acid) (DTNB) andp-hydroxymercuriphenyl sulfonate (PHMPS) were investigated. These reagents differ in chemical reactivity, membrane penetrability and charge characteristics.Results of sulfhydryl modification were analyzed in terms of inhibitory effects on activities of five membrane enzymes; Mg(++)- and Na(+), K(+)-ATPase, K(+)-dependent and independentp-nitrophenyl phosphatase (NPPase) and DPNase. Structural considerations involved in the sulfhydryl-mediated inhibition were evaluated by studying the changes in susceptibility to sulfhydryl alteration produced by shearing membranes into microvesicles and by the addition of the membrane modifiers, Mg(++) and ATP.Conclusions from the data suggest that the effects of NEM appeared to result from modification of a single class of sulfhydryls; DTNB interacted with two different sulfhydryl classes. Increasing concentrations of PHMPS resulted in the sequential modification of many types of sulfhydryls, presumably as a result of increasing membrane structural disruption. DTNB and PHMPS caused solubilization of about 15% of membrane protein at concentrations giving maximal enzyme inhibition.In contrast to the usually observed parallels between Na(+), K(+)-ATPase and K(+)-dependent NPPase, activities of Mg(++)-ATPase, Na(+), K(+)-ATPase and K(+)-dependent NPPase varied independently as a result of sulfhydryl modification. We suggest complex structural and functional relationships exist among these components of the membrane ATP-hydrolyzing system.Our studies indicate that the effects of sulfhydryl group reagents on these membrane systems should not be ascribed to sulfhydryl modificationper se, but rather to the resulting structural perturbations. These effects depend upon the structural characteristics of the particular membrane preparation studied and on the chemical

  17. [VEGF gene expression in transfected human multipotent stromal cells].

    PubMed

    Smirnikhina, S A; Lavrov, A V; Bochkov, N P

    2011-01-01

    Dynamics of VEGF gene expression in transfected multipotent stromal cells from adipose tissue was examined using electroporation and lipofection. Differences in the potency and dynamics of plasmid elimination (up to day 9) between cell cultures were observed. All cultures were divided into fast and slow plasmid-eliminating ones. Interculture differences in VEGF expression were detected. The possibility of a 5-6-fold increase of VEGF expression was shown. There were no differences in transfection potency, plasmid elimination dynamics, and VEGF expression after transfection by both nonviral methods.

  18. PEG grafting of polyethylenimine (PEI) exerts different effects on DNA transfection and siRNA-induced gene targeting efficacy.

    PubMed

    Malek, Anastasia; Czubayko, Frank; Aigner, Achim

    2008-02-01

    Gene targeting by RNA interference (RNAi) is mediated through small interfering RNA (siRNA), which, as plasmid DNA molecules, can be delivered into cells by polyethylenimines (PEI). Grafting with poly(ethylene glycol) has been introduced previously to improve PEI biocompatibility; however, data on the effects of PEGylation have been somewhat contradictory and various PEI(-PEG) need to be evaluated independently for DNA transfection and siRNA gene targeting efficacies. We directly compare plasmid DNA transfection and siRNA-mediated gene targeting efficacies, employing a larger set of polyethylenimine-graft-poly(ethylene glycol) (PEI-g-PEG; PEI(-PEG)) with different molecular weights and degrees of PEG substitution. We performed tissue culture-based bioassays on DNA transfection and siRNA-mediated targeting efficacies as well as on toxicity and cellular nucleic acid uptake, and, using sensitive assays based on radioactive labelling, physicochemically characterize the complexes regarding the degree of nucleic acid complexation and complex stabilities under various conditions. In contrast to the DNA transfection efficacy, siRNA-mediated gene targeting is much less dependent on the PEGylation of PEI or on the N/P ( = PEI nitrogen/nucleic acid phosphate) ratio. A more detailed analysis reveals that, in order to define optimal N/P ratios for DNA transfection, complex toxicities and nucleic acid uptake are the most critical parameters. In contrast, at optimal N/P ratios, complex stabilities and complexation efficacies determine PEI(-PEG)/DNA transfection efficacies and the major differences between various PEI(-PEG) are observed. All these parameters are less critical for PEI(-PEG)/siRNA gene targeting efficacy. Thus, our data lead to the distinction between three PEI(-PEG) groups, which relies on the differences in transfection rather than gene targeting efficacies, and which is correlated with the molecular weights and degrees of PEG substitution. In contrast to PEI

  19. Virus-Like Particles of mRNA with Artificial Minimal Coat Proteins: Particle Formation, Stability, and Transfection Efficiency.

    PubMed

    Jekhmane, Shehrazade; de Haas, Rob; Paulino da Silva Filho, Omar; van Asbeck, Alexander H; Favretto, Marco Emanuele; Hernandez Garcia, Armando; Brock, Roland; de Vries, Renko

    2017-06-01

    RNA has enormous potential as a therapeutic, yet, the successful application depends on efficient delivery strategies. In this study, we demonstrate that a designed artificial viral coat protein, which self-assembles with DNA to form rod-shaped virus-like particles (VLPs), also encapsulates and protects mRNA encoding enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP) and luciferase, and yields cellular expression of these proteins. The artificial viral coat protein consists of an oligolysine (K12) for binding to the oligonucleotide, a silk protein-like midblock S10 = (GAGAGAGQ)10 that self-assembles into stiff rods, and a long hydrophilic random coil block C that shields the nucleic acid cargo from its environment. With mRNA, the C-S10-K12 protein coassembles to form rod-shaped VLPs each encapsulating about one to five mRNA molecules. Inside the rod-shaped VLPs, the mRNAs are protected against degradation by RNAses, and VLPs also maintain their shape following incubation with serum. Despite the lack of cationic surface charge, the mRNA VLPs transfect cells with both EGFP and luciferase, although with a much lower efficiency than obtained by a lipoplex transfection reagent. The VLPs have a negligible toxicity and minimal hemolytic activity. Our results demonstrate that VLPs yield efficient packaging and shielding of mRNA and create the basis for implementation of additional virus-like functionalities to improve transfection and cell specificity, such as targeting functionalities.

  20. Magnetic Tweezers-based 3D Microchannel Electroporation for High-Throughput Gene Transfection in Living Cells

    PubMed Central

    Liao, Wei-Ching; Chiang, Chi-Ling; Gallego-Perez, Daniel; Yang, Zhaogang; Lu, Wu; Byrd, John C.; Muthusamy, Natarajan; Lee, L. James.; Sooryakumar, Ratnasingham

    2015-01-01

    We report a novel, high throughput magnetic-tweezers based 3D microchannel electroporation system capable of transfecting 40,000 cells/cm2 on a single-chip for gene therapy, regenerative medicine and intracellular detection of target mRNA for screening cellular heterogeneity. A single cell or an ordered array of individual cells are remotely guided by programmable magnetic fields to poration sites with high (> 90%) cell alignment efficiency to enable various transfection reagents to be delivered simultaneously into the cells. The present technique, in contrast to the conventional vacuum based approach, is significantly gentler on the cellular membrane yielding > 90% cell viability and, moreover, allows transfected cells to be transported for further analysis. Illustrating the versatility of the system, the GATA2 molecular beacon was delivered into leukemia cells to detect the regulation level of the GATA2 gene that is associated with the initiation of leukemia. The uniform delivery and a sharp contrast of fluorescence intensity between GATA2 positive and negative cells demonstrate key aspects of the platform for gene transfer, screening and detection of targeted intracellular markers in living cells. PMID:25469659

  1. Use of alumosilicic reagent for water purification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tikhonov, S. N.; Kurchatov, I. M.; Byrkin, V. A.; Feklistov, D. Y.; Laguntsov, N. I.

    2016-09-01

    Workability of the hybrid reagent based on aluminium salts and the use of active silicic acid for the purposes of water treatment was investigated in this paper. The research of the residual aluminium concentration in the water was conducted after the introduction of the reagent into the model solution. The optimum concentration ASFC and the pH value was determined at which the coagulation process is intensified. The approaches of the interaction of the dispersed particles, specified method for calculating the interaction potential of the dispersed particles in the circumstance were described.

  2. An improved transfection assay for evaluating the effects of heavy metals.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, Kaoru; Koizumi, Shinji

    2009-08-01

    The transfection assay is an important tool for evaluating the health effects of industrial chemicals, with the reporter gene expression as an indicator. However, heavy metals often influence the expression of the reference plasmids used to correct variations in transfection efficiency between assay plates, reducing the reliability of this assay. We found that the target of heavy metals is the reporter, rather than the promoter used in the reference plasmid. Of the reporters we tested, luciferase (Luc) enzyme activity was affected by heavy metals, whereas gene product levels of the chloramphenicol acetyltransferase (CAT) or beta-galactosidase (betaGal) gene were not. Neither heavy metals nor extracts from cells exposed to heavy metals showed an effect when directly added to the Luc enzyme, suggesting that heavy metals act through an indirect mechanism. These data indicate that the use of CAT or betaGal as a reporter is appropriate for a reliable assay of heavy metal effects.

  3. Inducible expression of G protein-coupled receptors in transfected cells.

    PubMed

    Koener, Beryl; Hermans, Emmanuel

    2011-01-01

    Biochemical or pharmacological studies of G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) are widely conducted in transfected mammalian cells. A variety of commercially available systems allow the generation of stable cell-lines in which expression of the recombinant receptor can be induced on addition of a defined chemical to the culture medium, which operates as a control switch for the transcription of the cloned sequence. Such systems offer the possibility to induce graded levels of receptor expression in the experimental model, or to induce an abrupt downregulation of receptor expression during the maintenance of the cell-line. This chapter provides an overview of the different systems available and provides methods for the generation and validation of stably transfected cell-lines expressing the GPCR of choice.

  4. Effects of Supercharging Reagents on Noncovalent Complex Structure in Electrospray Ionization from Aqueous Solutions

    PubMed Central

    Sterling, Harry J.; Daly, Michael P.; Feld, Geoffrey K.; Thoren, Katie L.; Kintzer, Alexander F.; Krantz, Bryan A.; Williams, Evan R.

    2011-01-01

    The effects of two supercharging reagents, m-nitrobenzyl alcohol (m-NBA) and sulfolane, on the charge-state distributions and conformations of myoglobin ions formed by electrospray ionization were investigated. Addition of 0.4% m-NBA to aqueous ammonium acetate solutions of myoglobin results in an increase in the maximum charge state from 9+ to 19+, and an increase in the average charge state from 7.9+ to 11.7+, compared to solutions without m-NBA. The extent of supercharging with sulfolane on a per mole basis is lower than that with m-NBA, but comparable charging was obtained at higher concentration. Arrival time distributions obtained from traveling wave ion mobility spectrometry show that the higher charge state ions that are formed with these supercharging reagents are significantly more unfolded than lower charge state ions. Results from circular dichroism spectroscopy show that sulfolane can act as chemical denaturant, destabilizing myoglobin by ~1.5 kcal/mol/M at 25 °C. Because these supercharging reagents have low vapor pressures, aqueous droplets are preferentially enriched in these reagents as evaporation occurs. Less evaporative cooling will occur after the droplets are substantially enriched in the low volatility supercharging reagent, and the droplet temperature should be higher compared to when these reagents are not present. Protein unfolding induced by chemical and/or thermal denaturation appears to be the primary origin of the enhanced charging observed for noncovalent protein complexes formed from aqueous solutions that contain these supercharging reagents, although other factors almost certainly influence the extent of charging as well. PMID:20673639

  5. Electrochemical generation of the Fenton's reagent: application to atrazine degradation.

    PubMed

    Ventura, A; Jacquet, G; Bermond, A; Camel, V

    2002-08-01

    The degradation of refractory chemicals in water requires chemical oxidation by hydroxyl radicals. Among the systems that may be used to generate OH(o), the Fenton's reagent consists of the mixing of ferrous iron and hydrogen peroxide. Even though this system is very simple, the oxidation of an organic compound is difficult to control and the ferrous iron regeneration is limited. Very recently, electrochemical systems have merged that allow the electrochemical production of ferrous iron and/or hydrogen peroxide, thereby allowing the generation of OH(o). So a simple electro-Fenton system has been used and tested for its efficiency in producing hydroxyl radicals. Atrazine was chosen as a model organic compound as its reaction with OH(o) has been extensively studied. Comparison with the classical Fenton system gives advantage to the electrochemical system, due to a more thorough oxidation of atrazine.

  6. Reverse transfected cell microarrays in infectious disease research.

    PubMed

    Konrad, Andreas; Jochmann, Ramona; Kuhn, Elisabeth; Naschberger, Elisabeth; Chudasama, Priya; Stürzl, Michael

    2011-01-01

    Several human pathogenic viruses encode large genomes with often more than 100 genes. Viral pathogenicity is determined by carefully orchestrated co-operative activities of several different viral genes which trigger the phenotypic functions of the infected cells. Systematic analyses of these complex interactions require high-throughput transfection technology. Here we have provided a laboratory manual for the reverse transfected cell microarray (RTCM; alternative name: cell chip) as a high-throughput transfection procedure, which has been successfully applied for the systematic analyses of single and combination effects of genes encoded by the human herpesvirus-8 on the NF-kappaB signal transduction pathway. In order to quantitatively determine the effects of viral genes in transfected cells, protocols for the use of GFP as an indicator gene and for indirect immunofluorescence staining of cellular target proteins have been included. RTCM provides a useful methodological approach to investigate systematically combination effects of viral genes on cellular functions.

  7. DyNAvectors: dynamic constitutional vectors for adaptive DNA transfection.

    PubMed

    Clima, Lilia; Peptanariu, Dragos; Pinteala, Mariana; Salic, Adrian; Barboiu, Mihail

    2015-12-25

    Dynamic constitutional frameworks, based on squalene, PEG and PEI components, reversibly connected to core centers, allow the efficient identification of adaptive vectors for good DNA transfection efficiency and are well tolerated by mammalian cells.

  8. Identification of valid reference genes for the normalization of RT-qPCR expression studies in human breast cancer cell lines treated with and without transient transfection.

    PubMed

    Liu, Lin-Lin; Zhao, Hui; Ma, Teng-Fei; Ge, Fei; Chen, Ce-Shi; Zhang, Ya-Ping

    2015-01-01

    Reverse transcription-quantitative polymerase chain reaction (RT-qPCR) is a powerful technique for examining gene expression changes during tumorigenesis. Target gene expression is generally normalized by a stably expressed endogenous reference gene; however, reference gene expression may differ among tissues under various circumstances. Because no valid reference genes have been documented for human breast cancer cell lines containing different cancer subtypes treated with transient transfection, we identified appropriate and reliable reference genes from thirteen candidates in a panel of 10 normal and cancerous human breast cell lines under experimental conditions with/without transfection treatments with two transfection reagents. Reference gene expression stability was calculated using four algorithms (geNorm, NormFinder, BestKeeper and comparative delta Ct), and the recommended comprehensive ranking was provided using geometric means of the ranking values using the RefFinder tool. GeNorm analysis revealed that two reference genes should be sufficient for all cases in this study. A stability analysis suggests that 18S rRNA-ACTB is the best reference gene combination across all cell lines; ACTB-GAPDH is best for basal breast cancer cell lines; and HSPCB-ACTB is best for ER+ breast cancer cells. After transfection, the stability ranking of the reference gene fluctuated, especially with Lipofectamine 2000 transfection reagent in two subtypes of basal and ER+ breast cell lines. Comparisons of relative target gene (HER2) expression revealed different expressional patterns depending on the reference genes used for normalization. We suggest that identifying the most stable and suitable reference genes is critical for studying specific cell lines under certain circumstances.

  9. Design, synthesis, and characterization of a protein sequencing reagent yielding amino acid derivatives with enhanced detectability by mass spectrometry.

    PubMed Central

    Aebersold, R.; Bures, E. J.; Namchuk, M.; Goghari, M. H.; Shushan, B.; Covey, T. C.

    1992-01-01

    We report the design, chemical synthesis, and structural and functional characterization of a novel reagent for protein sequence analysis by the Edman degradation, yielding amino acid derivatives rapidly detectable at high sensitivity by ion-evaporation mass spectrometry. We demonstrate that the reagent 3-[4'(ethylene-N,N,N-trimethylamino)phenyl]-2-isothiocyanate is chemically stable and shows coupling and cyclization/cleavage yields comparable to phenylisothiocyanate, the standard reagent in chemical sequence analysis, under conditions typically encountered in manual or automated sequence analysis. Amino acid derivatives generated with this reagent were detectable by ion-evaporation mass spectrometry at the subfemtomole sensitivity level at a pace of one sample per minute. Furthermore, derivatives were identified by their mass, thus permitting the rapid and highly sensitive determination of the molecular nature of modified amino acids. Derivatives of amino acids with acidic, basic, polar, or hydrophobic side chains were reproducibly detectable at comparable sensitivities. The polar nature of the reagent required covalent immobilization of polypeptides prior to automated sequence analysis. This reagent, used in automated sequence analysis, has the potential for overcoming the limitations in sensitivity, speed, and the ability to characterize modified amino acid residues inherent in the chemical sequencing methods that are currently used. PMID:1304351

  10. Controlled release of reagents in capillary-driven microfluidics using reagent integrators.

    PubMed

    Hitzbleck, Martina; Gervais, Luc; Delamarche, Emmanuel

    2011-08-21

    The integration and release of reagents in microfluidics as used for point-of-care testing is essential for an easy and accurate operation of these promising diagnostic devices. Here, we present microfluidic functional structures, which we call reagent integrators (RIs), for integrating and releasing small amounts of dried reagents (ng quantities and less) into microlitres of sample in a capillary-driven microfluidic chip. Typically, a RI is less than 1 mm(2) in area and has an inlet splitting into a central reagent channel, in which reagents can be loaded using an inkjet spotter, and two diluter channels. During filling of the microfluidic chip, spotted reagents reconstitute and exit the RI with a dilution factor that relates to the relative hydraulic resistance of the channels forming the RI. We exemplify the working principle of RIs by (i) distributing ∼100 pg of horseradish peroxidase (HRP) in different volume fractions of a 1 μL solution containing a fluorogenic substrate for HRP and (ii) performing an immunoassay for C-reactive protein (CRP) using 450 pg of fluorescently labeled detection antibodies (dAbs) that reconstitute in ∼5 to 30% of a 1 μL sample of human serum. RIs preserve the conceptual simplicity of lateral flow assays while providing a great degree of control over the integration and release of reagents in a stream of sample. We believe RIs to be broadly applicable to microfluidic devices as used for biological assays.

  11. Selective isolation of components from natural volatile oil by countercurrent chromatography with cyclodextrins as selective reagent.

    PubMed

    Tong, Shengqiang; Lu, Mengxia; Chu, Chu; Yan, Jizhong; Huang, Juan; Ying, Yongfei

    2016-04-29

    Selective separation of chemical components from seven kinds of volatile oil by countercurrent chromatography with three types of cyclodextrins as selective reagent was investigated in this work. Preparative separation of chemical components from volatile oil is generally quite challenging due to their extremely complexity of the composition. A biphasic solvent system n-hexane-0.10 mol L(-1) cyclodextrin (1:1, v/v) was selected for separation of components from volatile oil and three types of cyclodextrins were investigated, including β-cyclodexrin, methyl-β-cyclodexrin and hydroxypropyl-β-cyclodexrin. All kinds of volatile oils are from seven kinds of traditional Chinese herb. Results showed that some chemical components could be well separated with high purity from each kind of volatile oil using different type of cyclodextrin as selective reagent. For example, germacrone and curcumenone could be selectively separated from volatile oil of Curcumae Rhizoma with methyl-β-cyclodexrin and hydroxypropyl-β-cyclodexrin as selector respectively, and other five components were selectively separated from volatile oil of Chuanxiong Rhizoma, Myristicae Semen, Aucklandiae Radix and Angelicae Sinensis Radix by countercurrent chromatography with different cyclodexrin as selective reagent. Separation mechanism for separation of components from volatile oil by countercurrent chromatography with cyclodextrin as selective reagent was proposed. Peak resolution of the present separation method could be greatly influenced by the chemical compositions of volatile oil. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Microwave-Assisted Organic Synthesis Using Benign Reaction Medium and Reagents

    EPA Science Inventory

    Account of chemical reactions expedited by microwave (MW) exposure of neat reactants for the rapid one-pot assembly of heterocyclic compounds from in situ generated reactive intermediates via enamines or using hypervalent iodine reagents will be described that can be adapted for ...

  13. Microwave-Assisted Organic Synthesis Using Benign Reaction Medium and Reagents

    EPA Science Inventory

    Account of chemical reactions expedited by microwave (MW) exposure of neat reactants for the rapid one-pot assembly of heterocyclic compounds from in situ generated reactive intermediates via enamines or using hypervalent iodine reagents will be described that can be adapted for ...

  14. A Stopped-Flow Kinetics Experiment for the Physical Chemistry Laboratory Using Noncorrosive Reagents

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Prigodich, Richard V.

    2014-01-01

    Stopped-flow kinetics techniques are important to the study of rapid chemical and biochemical reactions. Incorporation of a stopped-flow kinetics experiment into the physical chemistry laboratory curriculum would therefore be an instructive addition. However, the usual reactions studied in such exercises employ a corrosive reagent that can over…

  15. A Stopped-Flow Kinetics Experiment for the Physical Chemistry Laboratory Using Noncorrosive Reagents

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Prigodich, Richard V.

    2014-01-01

    Stopped-flow kinetics techniques are important to the study of rapid chemical and biochemical reactions. Incorporation of a stopped-flow kinetics experiment into the physical chemistry laboratory curriculum would therefore be an instructive addition. However, the usual reactions studied in such exercises employ a corrosive reagent that can over…

  16. A toolbox facilitating stable transfection of Eimeria species.

    PubMed

    Clark, Julie D; Billington, Karen; Bumstead, Janene M; Oakes, Richard D; Soon, Puay Eng; Sopp, Paul; Tomley, Fiona M; Blake, Damer P

    2008-11-01

    Stable transfection of Eimeria species has been difficult to achieve because of the obligate requirement for in vivo amplification and selection of the parasites. Strategies to generate and stabilise populations of transfected Eimeria tenella are described here, together with the identification of optimal parameters for the transfection process. A series of plasmids expressing selectable markers, including a panel of fluorescent reporter genes and a mutant Toxoplasma gondii dihydrofolate reductase-thymidylate synthase (DHFR-TSm2m3) gene that confers resistance to pyrimethamine, were electroporated into sporozoites of the E. tenella Wisconsin strain and stabilised by selective passage through chickens. Very high transfection efficiencies of up to 25% sporozoites in transient transfection and up to 9% oocysts following a single round of in vivo selection were achieved. Crucial factors include the use of very freshly harvested parasites with the AMAXA nucleofection system (program U33 in a cytomix-buffered reaction) and linearised plasmid DNA. The use of a restriction enzyme mediated integration (REMI) protocol boosted overall efficiency and elevated insertion rate per genome. Successful development of methods to generate and isolate stable populations of transfected Eimeria parasites will now stimulate rapid expansion of reverse genetic studies in this important coccidian.

  17. Histone H2A significantly enhances in vitro DNA transfection.

    PubMed Central

    Balicki, D.; Beutler, E.

    1997-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Gene transfer is a potential treatment modality of genetic disease. Efficient, practical methods of DNA transfection are currently under investigation. MATERIALS AND METHODS: A beta-galactosidase reporter plasmid interacted electrostatically with histones, poly-L-Lys, poly-L-Arg, and a combination of poly-L-Lys and poly-L-Arg. This complex was then used to transfect COS-7 cells. beta-galactosidase activity was quantified and used to compare the efficiency of gene transfection in vitro. A comparison was also made of DNA transfection with the most active histone subclass, i.e., histone H2A, in the absence and presence of an anionic liposome. RESULTS: There was a marked increase in DNA transfection in the presence of histone H2A when compared with the control, whereas each of the other histones and polycations showed little, if any, effect. The extent of activation depends strongly on the DNA/histone ratio and is also a function of the molarity of the final Tris-acetate, pH 8, solution. The anionic liposomes used demonstrated an inhibitory effect. CONCLUSIONS: Histone H2A significantly enhances in vitro DNA transfection whereas other histones and anionic liposomes do not. A study of the difference between histone H2A and other histone subclasses may serve to clarify some of the mechanisms and the essential components of efficient gene delivery. PMID:9407553

  18. Tetramethyleneethane Equivalents: Recursive Reagents for Serialized Cycloadditions.

    PubMed

    Wender, Paul A; Jeffreys, Matthew S; Raub, Andrew G

    2015-07-22

    New reactions and reagents that allow for multiple bond-forming events per synthetic operation are required to achieve structural complexity and thus value with step-, time-, cost-, and waste-economy. Here we report a new class of reagents that function like tetramethyleneethane (TME), allowing for back-to-back [4 + 2] cycloadditions, thereby amplifying the complexity-increasing benefits of Diels-Alder and metal-catalyzed cycloadditions. The parent recursive reagent, 2,3-dimethylene-4-trimethylsilylbutan-1-ol (DMTB), is readily available from the metathesis of ethylene and THP-protected 4-trimethylsilylbutyn-1-ol. DMTB and related reagents engage diverse dienophiles in an initial Diels-Alder or metal-catalyzed [4 + 2] cycloaddition, triggering a subsequent vinylogous Peterson elimination that recursively generates a new diene for a second cycloaddition. Overall, this multicomponent catalytic cascade produces in one operation carbo- and heterobicyclic building blocks for the synthesis of a variety of natural products, therapeutic leads, imaging agents, and materials. Its application to the three step synthesis of a new solvatochromic fluorophore, N-ethyl(6-N,N-dimethylaminoanthracene-2,3-dicarboximide) (6-DMA), and the photophysical characterization of this fluorophore are described.

  19. Tetramethyleneethane Equivalents: Recursive Reagents for Serialized Cycloadditions

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    New reactions and reagents that allow for multiple bond-forming events per synthetic operation are required to achieve structural complexity and thus value with step-, time-, cost-, and waste-economy. Here we report a new class of reagents that function like tetramethyleneethane (TME), allowing for back-to-back [4 + 2] cycloadditions, thereby amplifying the complexity-increasing benefits of Diels–Alder and metal-catalyzed cycloadditions. The parent recursive reagent, 2,3-dimethylene-4-trimethylsilylbutan-1-ol (DMTB), is readily available from the metathesis of ethylene and THP-protected 4-trimethylsilylbutyn-1-ol. DMTB and related reagents engage diverse dienophiles in an initial Diels–Alder or metal-catalyzed [4 + 2] cycloaddition, triggering a subsequent vinylogous Peterson elimination that recursively generates a new diene for a second cycloaddition. Overall, this multicomponent catalytic cascade produces in one operation carbo- and heterobicyclic building blocks for the synthesis of a variety of natural products, therapeutic leads, imaging agents, and materials. Its application to the three step synthesis of a new solvatochromic fluorophore, N-ethyl(6-N,N-dimethylaminoanthracene-2,3-dicarboximide) (6-DMA), and the photophysical characterization of this fluorophore are described. PMID:25961416

  20. Remarks on preparation of indandione detection reagents

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stepan, J.; Kral, V.

    1985-01-01

    A modified Claisen condensation with sliced sodium at a higher temperature was recommended for the production of ungranulated charcoal. A new ninhydrin production method by oxidation of benzaldiketohydrinden using available reagents was tried and was unsuccessful. Triketohydrinden was obtained by boiling ninhydrin in acetic acid anhydrides.

  1. Chemistry Students' Erroneous Conceptions of Limiting Reagent.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mammen, K. J.

    1996-01-01

    Describes a study of 32 University of Transkei (South Africa) freshmen's conceptualization of "limiting reagent," a basic concept in chemistry, based on student responses to two written test questions and clinical interviews. Results indicated that a high percentage of students had misconceptions and could not apply the concept…

  2. Tritioacetylating reagents and processes for preparation thereof

    DOEpatents

    Saljoughian, Manoucher; Morimoto, Hiromi; Williams, Philip G.; Than, Chit

    2000-01-01

    Novel acetylating and tritioacetylating reagents suitable for preparation of nonlabelled and radiolabelled organic compounds. N-acetoxynaphthalimide, N-tritioacetoxyphthalimide, N-tritioacetoxysuccinimide, N-tritioacetoxynaphthalimide and processes of their preparation. The invention also concerns synthesis of nonlabelled acetylated and tritioacetylated organic compounds from precursors containing a free --NH.sub.2, --SH or --OH group.

  3. Desalting Protein Ions in Native Mass Spectrometry Using Supercharging Reagents

    PubMed Central

    Cassou, Catherine A.; Williams, Evan R.

    2014-01-01

    Effects of the supercharging reagents m-NBA and sulfolane on sodium ion adduction to protein ions formed using native mass spectrometry were investigated. There is extensive sodium adduction on protein ions formed by electrospray ionization from aqueous solutions containing millimolar concentrations of NaCl, which can lower sensitivity by distributing the signal of a given charge state over multiple adducted ions and can reduce mass measuring accuracy for large proteins and non-covalent complexes for which individual adducts cannot be resolved. The average number of sodium ions adducted to the most abundant ion formed from ten small (8.6–29 kDa) proteins for which adducts can be resolved is reduced by 58% or 80% on average, respectively, when 1.5% m-NBA or 2.5% sulfolane are added to aqueous solutions containing sodium compared to without the supercharging reagent. Sulfolane is more effective than m-NBA at reducing sodium ion adduction and at preserving non-covalent protein-ligand and protein-protein interactions. Desalting with 2.5% sulfolane enables detection of several glycosylated forms of 79.7 kDa holo-transferrin and NADH bound to the 146 kDa homotetramer LDH, which are otherwise unresolved due to peak broadening from extensive sodium adduction. Although sulfolane is more effective than m-NBA at protein ion desalting, m-NBA reduces salt clusters at high m/z and can increase the signal-to-noise ratios of protein ions by reducing chemical noise. Desalting is likely a result of these supercharging reagents binding sodium ions in solution, thereby reducing the sodium available to adduct to protein ions. PMID:25133273

  4. Desalting protein ions in native mass spectrometry using supercharging reagents.

    PubMed

    Cassou, Catherine A; Williams, Evan R

    2014-10-07

    Effects of the supercharging reagents m-NBA and sulfolane on sodium ion adduction to protein ions formed using native mass spectrometry were investigated. There is extensive sodium adduction on protein ions formed by electrospray ionization from aqueous solutions containing millimolar concentrations of NaCl, which can lower sensitivity by distributing the signal of a given charge state over multiple adducted ions and can reduce mass measuring accuracy for large proteins and non-covalent complexes for which individual adducts cannot be resolved. The average number of sodium ions adducted to the most abundant ion formed from ten small (8.6-29 kDa) proteins for which adducts can be resolved is reduced by 58% or 80% on average, respectively, when 1.5% m-NBA or 2.5% sulfolane are added to aqueous solutions containing sodium compared to without the supercharging reagent. Sulfolane is more effective than m-NBA at reducing sodium ion adduction and at preserving non-covalent protein-ligand and protein-protein interactions. Desalting with 2.5% sulfolane enables detection of several glycosylated forms of 79.7 kDa holo-transferrin and NADH bound to the 146 kDa homotetramer LDH, which are otherwise unresolved due to peak broadening from extensive sodium adduction. Although sulfolane is more effective than m-NBA at protein ion desalting, m-NBA reduces salt clusters at high m/z and can increase the signal-to-noise ratios of protein ions by reducing chemical noise. Desalting is likely a result of these supercharging reagents binding sodium ions in solution, thereby reducing the sodium available to adduct to protein ions.

  5. [Discussion about Management of In Vitro Diagnostic Reagent].

    PubMed

    Huang, Liang; Zhu, Jianghua; Gu, Haiyi; Geng, Yimin

    2015-03-01

    In order to adapt the rapid development of modern medicine, this paper is aimed to analyze the application of in vitro diagnostic reagents (IVD Reagents) in hospital management and improve the overall level of hospital management. By groping the management experience of IVD reagents, we discuss the internal hospital management mode of IVD reagents in reality. With the continuous improvements on the information platform of IVD reagents,we can realize benefit analysis of IVD reagents within the process of management. Reasonable management on IVD reagentscan improve the working efficiency in hospitals and provide swifter and better medical service for patients.

  6. Novel Reagents for Chemical Vapor Deposition of Intermetallic Alloys.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1994-10-31

    AlH3 :NMe3 yielded Al(CH2SiMe3)3. NMe3 and ’Hf(CH2SiMe3)H3’. Carbon blocks coated with this mixture produced a HfAlC2 coating which was effective in protecting the substrate from air oxidation at high temperatures. jg

  7. Safe use of hazardous chemicals.

    PubMed

    Lunn, George; Lawler, Gretchen

    2006-01-01

    This appendix provides protocols for some commonly used disposal and decontamination procedures along with analytical techniques that are used to verify that reagents have been decontaminated. Some of the specific reagents covered are diaminobenzidine, ethidium bromide, cyanogen bromide and chloromethylsilane. With modification, these assays may also be used to determine the concentration of a particular chemical.

  8. Safe use of hazardous chemicals.

    PubMed

    Lunn, George; Lawler, Gretchen

    2011-11-01

    This unit provides protocols for some commonly used disposal and decontamination procedures along with analytical techniques that are used to verify that reagents have been decontaminated. Some of the specific reagents covered are diaminobenzidine, ethidium bromide, cyanogen bromide, and chloromethylsilane. With modification, these assays may also be used to determine the concentration of a particular chemical.

  9. Influence of histidine incorporation on buffer capacity and gene transfection efficiency of HPMA-co-oligolysine brush polymers

    PubMed Central

    Shi, Julie; Schellinger, Joan G.; Johnson, Russell N.; Choi, Jennifer L.; Chou, Brian; Anghel, Ersilia L.; Pun, Suzie H.

    2013-01-01

    One of the major intracellular barriers to non-viral gene delivery is efficient endosomal escape. The incorporation of histidine residues into polymeric constructs has been found to increase endosomal escape via the proton sponge effect. Statistical and diblock copolymers of N-(2-hydroxypropyl)methacrylamide (HPMA), oligolysine, and oligohistidine were synthesized via reversible-addition fragmentation chain transfer (RAFT) polymerization, and tested for in vitro transfection efficiency, buffering ability, and polyplex uptake mechanism via the use of chemical endocytic inhibitors. Interestingly, histidine-containing statistical and diblock polymers exhibited increased buffer capacity in different endosomal pH ranges. Statistical copolymers transfected better than block copolymers that contained similar amounts of histidine. In addition, only the polymer containing the highest incorporation of oligohistidine residues led to increases in transfection efficiency over the HPMA-oligolysine base polymer. Thus, for these polymer architectures, high histidine incorporation may be required for efficient endosomal escape. Furthermore, uptake studies indicate that non-acidified caveolae-mediated endocytosis may be the primary route of transfection for these copolymers, suggesting that alternative approaches for increasing endosomal escape may be beneficial for enhancing transfection efficiency with these HPMA-oligolysine copolymers. PMID:23641942

  10. Schiff and pseudo-Schiff reagents: the reactions and reagents of Hugo Schiff, including a classification of various kinds of histochemical reagents used to detect aldehydes.

    PubMed

    Dapson, R W

    2016-11-01

    During the 1860's, Hugo Schiff studied many reactions between amines and aldehydes, some of which have been used in histochemistry, at times without credit to Schiff. Much controversy has surrounded the chemical structures and reaction mechanisms of the compounds involved, but modern analytical techniques have clarified the picture. I review these reactions here. I used molecular modeling software to investigate dyes that contain primary amines representing eight chemical families. All dyes were known to perform satisfactorily for detecting aldehydes in tissue sections. The models verified the correct chemical structures at various points in their reactions and also determined how decolorization occurred in those with "leuco" forms. Decolorization in the presence of sulfurous acid can occur by either adduction or reduction depending on the dye. The final condensation product with aldehyde was determined to be either a C-sulfonic acid adduct on the carbonyl carbon atom or an aminal at the same atom. Based on the various outcomes, I have placed the dyes and their reactions into five categories. Because Hugo Schiff studied the reactions between aldehydes and amines with and without various acids or alcohol, it is only proper to call each of them Schiff reactions that used various types of Schiff reagents.

  11. Kinetics of catalyzed hydrolysis of 4-methylumbelliferyl caprylate (MUCAP) salmonella reagent

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Al-Kady, Ahmed S.; Ahmed, El-Sadat I.; Gaber, M.; Hussein, Mohamed M.; Ebeid, El-Zeiny M.

    2011-09-01

    The kinetics of chemical hydrolysis including neutral, acid- and base-catalyzed hydrolysis of 4-methylumbelliferyl caprylate (MUCAP) salmonella reagent were studied at different temperatures. The rate constants and activation parameters were determined by following the build-up of fluorescence peak of the hydrolysis product 4-methylumbelliferone (4-MU). The time scale of esterase enzyme hydrolysis caused by salmonella was compared with chemical hydrolysis as a background process.

  12. Kinetics of catalyzed hydrolysis of 4-methylumbelliferyl caprylate (MUCAP) salmonella reagent.

    PubMed

    Al-Kady, Ahmed S; Ahmed, El-Sadat I; Gaber, M; Hussein, Mohamed M; Ebeid, El-Zeiny M

    2011-09-01

    The kinetics of chemical hydrolysis including neutral, acid- and base-catalyzed hydrolysis of 4-methylumbelliferyl caprylate (MUCAP) salmonella reagent were studied at different temperatures. The rate constants and activation parameters were determined by following the build-up of fluorescence peak of the hydrolysis product 4-methylumbelliferone (4-MU). The time scale of esterase enzyme hydrolysis caused by salmonella was compared with chemical hydrolysis as a background process.

  13. Degradation of ethylene glycol using Fenton's reagent and UV.

    PubMed

    McGinnis, B D; Adams, V D; Middlebrooks, E J

    2001-10-01

    Oxidation of ethylene glycol in aqueous solutions was found to occur with the addition of Fenton's reagent with further conversion observed upon UV irradiation. The pH range studied was 2.5-9.0 with initial H2O2 concentrations ranging from 100 to 1000 mg/l. Application of this method to airport storm-water could potentially result in reduction of chemical oxygen demand by conversion of ethylene glycol to oxalic and formic acids. Although the amount of H2O2 added follows the amount of ethylene glycol degraded, smaller H2O2 doses were associated with increases in the ratio of ethylene glycol removed per unit H2O2 added indicating the potential of pulsed doses or constant H2O2 feed systems. Ethylene glycol removal was enhanced by exposure to UV light after treatment with Fenton's reagent, with rates dependent on initial H2O2 concentration. In addition to ethylene glycol, the principle products of this reaction, oxalic and formic acids, have been shown to be mineralized in other HO generating systems presenting the potential for ethylene glycol mineralization in this system with increased HO* production.

  14. Optically transparent, superhydrophobic methyltrimethoxysilane based silica coatings without silylating reagent

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kavale, Mahendra S.; Mahadik, D. B.; Parale, V. G.; Wagh, P. B.; Gupta, Satish C.; Rao, A. Venkateswara; Barshilia, Harish C.

    2011-10-01

    The superhydrophobic surfaces have drawn lot of interest, in both academic and industries because of optically transparent, adherent and self-cleaning behavior. Surface chemical composition and morphology plays an important role in determining the superhydrophobic nature of coating surface. Such concert of non-wettability can be achieved, using surface modifying reagents or co-precursor method in sol-gel process. Attempts have been made to increase the hydrophobicity and optical transparency of methyltrimethoxysilane (MTMS) based silica coatings using polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA) instead of formal routes like surface modification using silylating reagents. The optically transparent, superhydrophobic uniform coatings were obtained by simple dip coating method. The molar ratio of MTMS:MeOH:H 2O was kept constant at 1:5.63:1.58, respectively with 0.5 M NH 4F as a catalyst and the weight percent of PMMA varied from 1 to 8. The hydrophobicity of silica coatings was analyzed by FTIR and contact angle measurements. These substrates exhibited 91% optical transmittance as compared to glass and water drop contact angle as high as 171 ± 1°. The effect of humidity on hydrophobic nature of coating has been studied by exposing these films at relative humidity of 90% at constant temperature of 30 °C for a period of 45 days. The micro-structural studies carried out by transmission electron microscopy (TEM).

  15. Catch-and-release reagents for broadscale quantitative proteomics analyses.

    PubMed

    Gartner, Carlos A; Elias, Joshua E; Bakalarski, Corey E; Gygi, Steven P

    2007-04-01

    The relative quantification of protein expression levels in different cell samples through the utilization of stable isotope dilution has become a standard method in the field of proteomics. We describe here the development of a new reductively cleavable reagent which facilitates the relative quantification of thousands of proteins from only tens of micrograms of starting protein. The ligand features a novel disulfide moiety that links biotin and a thiol-reactive entity. The disulfide is stable to reductive conditions employed during sample labeling but is readily cleaved under mild conditions using tris-(2-carboxyethyl) phosphine (TCEP). This unique chemical property allows for the facile use of immobilized avidin in a manner equivalent to the use of conventional reversible-binding affinity resins. Target peptides are bound to avidin resin, washed rigorously, then cleaved directly from the resin, resulting in simplified sample handling procedures and reduced nonspecific interactions. Here we demonstrate the stability of the linker under two different reducing conditions and show how this "catch-and-release (CAR)" reagent can be used to quantitatively compare protein abundances from two distinct cellular lysates. Starting with only 40 microg protein from each sample, 1840 individual proteins were identified in a single experiment. Using in-house software for automated peak integration, 1620 of these proteins were quantified for differential expression.

  16. Radiation resistance of biological reagents for in situ life detection.

    PubMed

    Carr, Christopher E; Rowedder, Holli; Vafadari, Cyrus; Lui, Clarissa S; Cascio, Ethan; Zuber, Maria T; Ruvkun, Gary

    2013-01-01

    Life on Mars, if it exists, may share a common ancestry with life on Earth derived from meteoritic transfer of microbes between the planets. One means to test this hypothesis is to isolate, detect, and sequence nucleic acids in situ on Mars, then search for similarities to known common features of life on Earth. Such an instrument would require biological and chemical components, such as polymerase and fluorescent dye molecules. We show that reagents necessary for detection and sequencing of DNA survive several analogues of the radiation expected during a 2-year mission to Mars, including proton (H-1), heavy ion (Fe-56, O-18), and neutron bombardment. Some reagents have reduced performance or fail at higher doses. Overall, our findings suggest it is feasible to utilize space instruments with biological components, particularly for mission durations of up to several years in environments without large accumulations of charged particles, such as the surface of Mars, and have implications for the meteoritic transfer of microbes between planets.

  17. Evaluation of an automated urine chemistry reagent-strip analyzer.

    PubMed

    Lott, J A; Johnson, W R; Luke, K E

    1995-01-01

    We evaluated the Miles Inc., Clinitek Atlas Automated Urine Chemistry Analyzer for 11 tests: bilirubin, color, glucose, ketones, leukocyte esterase, nitrite, occult blood, pH, protein, specific gravity, and urobilinogen. The instrument uses a roll of reagent strips affixed to a clear plastic support; urine specimens are automatically pipetted onto these strips. The instrument measures the pads' color using reflectance colorimetry. Specific gravity is measured using a fiberoptic refractive index method. Four hospitals participated in the evaluation, and tests were performed only on fresh urine samples. We found the instrument easy to use; it has walk-away capability with up to 40-specimen loading capacity plus spaces for STATs, calibrators and controls. We found good comparability with chemical tests and other nonreagent strip procedures, as well as good agreement with the Miles Inc. Clinitek 200+ urine chemistry analyzer and visual reading of the Miles Inc. Multistix Reagent Strips. The Clinitek Atlas is rugged and reliable, and is suitable for a high-volume urinalysis laboratory.

  18. Preparation, characterization and feasibility study of dialdehyde carboxymethyl cellulose as a novel crosslinking reagent.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Xiaolei; Yang, Zhao; Peng, Yanfei; Han, Baoqin; Li, Zhuoyue; Li, Xiuhua; Liu, Wanshun

    2016-02-10

    The natural biopolymers usually need to be chemically modified by crosslinking reagents to improve their mechanical properties. In the present research, the feasibility of using the dialdehyde carboxymethyl cellulose (DCMC) as a crosslinking reagent was systematically studied. DCMC was prepared by oxidizing carboxymethyl cellulose using sodium periodate. The formation of dialdehyde groups was confirmed by FTIR and the degree of oxidation was determined. The biocompatibility of DCMC was investigated by evaluating its cytotoxicity to L929 fibroblasts and histocompatibility in rat model via intramuscular and subcutaneous injection. DCMC-crosslinked carboxymethyl chitosan (DCMC-CMCTS) was prepared and characterized using the glutaraldehyde-crosslinked CMCTS (GA-CMCTS) as control. The result demonstrated that DCMC was non-cytotoxic, biodegradable and biocompatible. The DCMC-CMCTS displayed significantly better thermostability, swelling capacity and cyto-compatibility compared with GA-CMCTS. Our data provided experimental basis for the future application of DCMC as a novel crosslinking reagent.

  19. Organophosphorus reagents in actinide separations: Unique tools for production, cleanup and disposal

    SciTech Connect

    Nash, K. L.

    2000-01-12

    Interactions of actinide ions with phosphate and organophosphorus reagents have figured prominently in nuclear science and technology, particularly in the hydrometallurgical processing of irradiated nuclear fuel. Actinide interactions with phosphorus-containing species impact all aspects from the stability of naturally occurring actinides in phosphate mineral phases through the application of the bismuth phosphate and PUREX processes for large-scale production of transuranic elements to the development of analytical separation and environment restoration processes based on new organophosphorus reagents. In this report, an overview of the unique role of organophosphorus compounds in actinide production, disposal, and environment restoration is presented. The broad utility of these reagents and their unique chemical properties is emphasized.

  20. The Grignard Reagent: Preparation, Structure, and Some Reactions.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Orchin, Milton

    1989-01-01

    The Grignard reagent used in the laboratory synthesis of organic compounds is the product resulting from the reaction of an alkyl or aryl halide with elemental magnesium. Describes the structure, formation, and some reactions of the reagent. (YP)

  1. 21 CFR 866.3250 - Erysipelothrix rhusiopathiae serological reagents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Erysipelothrix rhusiopathiae serological reagents... Erysipelothrix rhusiopathiae serological reagents. (a) Identification. Erysipelothrix rhusiopathiae serological... Erysipelothrix rhusiopathiae from cultured isolates derived from clinical specimens. The identification aids...

  2. The Grignard Reagent: Preparation, Structure, and Some Reactions.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Orchin, Milton

    1989-01-01

    The Grignard reagent used in the laboratory synthesis of organic compounds is the product resulting from the reaction of an alkyl or aryl halide with elemental magnesium. Describes the structure, formation, and some reactions of the reagent. (YP)

  3. CLAY AND CLAY-SUPPORTED REAGENTS IN ORGANIC SYNTHESES

    EPA Science Inventory

    CLAY AND CLAY-SUPPORTED REAGENTS HAVE BEEN USED EXTENSIVELY FOR SYNTHETIC ORGANIC TRANSFORMATIONS. THIS OVERVIEW DESCRIBES THE SALIENT STRUCTURAL PROPERTIES OF VARIOUS CLAY MATERIALS AND EXTENDS THE DISCUSSION TO PILLARED CLAYS AND REAGENTS SUPPORTED ON CLAY MATERIALS. A VARIET...

  4. Femtosecond cellular transfection using a non-diffracting beam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsampoula, X.; Garcés-Chávez, V.; Comrie, M.; Stevenson, D. J.; Agate, B.; Brown, C. T. A.; Gunn-Moore, F.; Dholakia, K.

    2008-02-01

    Efficient DNA delivery into single living cells would be a very powerful capability for cell biologists for elucidating basic cellular functions but also in other fields such as applied drug discovery and gene therapy. The ability to gently permeate the cell membrane and introduce foreign DNA with the assistance of lasers is a powerful methodology but requires exact focusing due to the required two-photon power density. Here, we demonstrate a laser-mediated delivery method of the red fluorescent protein DS-RED into Chinese hamster Ovary (CHO) cells. We used an elongated beam of light created by a Bessel beam (BB) which obviates the need to locate precisely the cell membrane, permitting two-photon excitation along a line leading to cell transfection. Assuming a threshold for transfection of 20%, the BB gives us transfection over twenty times the axial distance compared to the Gaussian beam of equivalent core diameter. In addition, by exploiting the BB property of reconstruction, we demonstrate successful transfection of CHO cells which involves the BB passing through an obstructive layer and re forming itself prior to reaching the cell membrane. In the light of this exciting result, one can envisage the possibility of achieving transfection through multiple cell monolayer planes and tissues using this novel light field, eliminating this way the stringent requirements for tight focusing.

  5. Polyarginine Molecular Weight Determines Transfection Efficiency of Calcium Condensed Complexes

    PubMed Central

    Alhakamy, Nabil A.; Berkland, Cory J.

    2014-01-01

    Cell penetrating peptides (CPPs) have been extensively studied in polyelectrolyte complexes as a means to enhance the transfection efficiency of plasmid DNA (pDNA). Increasing the molecular weight of CPPs often enhances gene expression, but poses a risk of increased cytotoxicity and immunogenicity compared to low molecular weight CCPs. Conversely, low molecular weight CPPs typically have low transfection efficiency due to large complex size. Complexes made using low molecular weight CPPs were found to be condensed to a small size by adding calcium. In this study, complexes of low molecular weight polyarginine and pDNA were condensed with calcium. These complexes showed high transfection efficiency and low cytotoxicity in A549 carcinomic human alveolar basal epithelial cells. The relationship between transfection efficiency and polyarginine size (5, 7, 9 or 11 amino acids), polyarginine/pDNA charge ratios, and calcium concentrations were studied. Polyarginine 7 was significantly more effective than other polyarginines under most formulation conditions suggesting a link between cell penetration ability and transfection efficiency. PMID:23534410

  6. Thionation with the reagent combination of phosphorus pentasulfide and hexamethyldisiloxane.

    PubMed

    Curphey, Thomas J

    2002-09-06

    The combination of P4S10 and hexamethyldisiloxane efficiently converts esters, lactones, amides, lactams, and ketones to their corresponding thiono derivatives. In the presence of elemental sulfur, 3-oxoesters are converted to dithiolethiones by this reagent. Yields are comparable to or superior to those obtained with Lawesson's reagent. The method has the advantage that reagent-derived byproducts may be removed by a simple hydrolytic workup or by filtration through silica gel, rather than by chromatography, as required for Lawesson's reagent.

  7. Hydrazones as Singular Reagents in Asymmetric Organocatalysis.

    PubMed

    de Gracia Retamosa, María; Matador, Esteban; Monge, David; Lassaletta, José M; Fernández, Rosario

    2016-09-12

    This Minireview summarizes strategies and developments regarding the use of hydrazones as reagents in asymmetric organocatalysis, their distinct roles in nucleophile-electrophile, cycloaddition, and cyclization reactions. The key structural elements governing the reactivity of these reagents in a preferred pathway will be discussed, as well as their different interactions with organocatalysts, leading to diverse activation modes. Along these studies, the synthetic equivalence of N-monoalkyl, N,N-dialkyl, and N-acyl hydrazones with several synthons is also highlighted. Emphasis is also put on the mechanistic studies performed to understand the observed reactivities. Finally, the functional group transformations performed from the available products has also been analyzed, highlighting the synthetic value of these methodologies, which served to access numerous families of valuable multifunctional compounds and nitrogen-containing heterocycles.

  8. Monoclonal antibodies as blood grouping reagents.

    PubMed

    Voak, D

    1990-04-01

    The large volume requirements for high quality ABO and Rh(D) typing reagents can now be supplied by selected monoclonal antibodies. Superior anti-A and anti-B monoclonal reagents can be prepared, from blends of at least two antibodies, to optimize the intensity of agglutination for slide tests and the potency for the detection of the weaker sub-groups, including Ax and Bw, by tube techniques. New quality control steps have been described for some highly sensitive anti-A/anti-B antibodies to avoid the detection of traces of A on B cells or traces of B on A1 cells, which results from the non-specific activity of A and B transferases. Excellent anti-A,B reagents may also be made by blends of at least two antibodies to optimize both A and B reactions, but the need for their continued use is now debatable. The development of high titre IgM monoclonal anti-D reagents offers simple rapid saline Rh(D) typing of both patients and donors, but they cannot reliably detect weak D (Du) and some D variants, e.g. the epitopes on D category VI cells. However, this can be achieved by blending an IgM anti-D with IgG (polyclonal) anti-D which can detect these types after conversion of negative saline tests to an antiglobulin phase. In addition, high grade Du, D categories and variants can be reliably detected (for typing donors) by selected monoclonal IgM and IgG anti-Ds by use of suitably enhanced tests without the use of an antiglobulin test.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  9. 21 CFR 660.30 - Reagent Red Blood Cells.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 7 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Reagent Red Blood Cells. 660.30 Section 660.30...) BIOLOGICS ADDITIONAL STANDARDS FOR DIAGNOSTIC SUBSTANCES FOR LABORATORY TESTS Reagent Red Blood Cells § 660.30 Reagent Red Blood Cells. (a) Proper name and definition. The proper name of the product shall...

  10. 21 CFR 864.4010 - General purpose reagent.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... diagnostic test procedure or system constituting a finished in vitro diagnostic (IVD) test. General purpose reagents are appropriate for combining with one or more than one ASR in producing such systems and include... powered systems. General purpose reagents include cytological preservatives, decalcifying reagents...

  11. 21 CFR 864.8100 - Bothrops atrox reagent.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Bothrops atrox reagent. 864.8100 Section 864.8100 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES HEMATOLOGY AND PATHOLOGY DEVICES Hematology Reagents § 864.8100 Bothrops atrox reagent. (a...

  12. 21 CFR 864.8100 - Bothrops atrox reagent.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Bothrops atrox reagent. 864.8100 Section 864.8100 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES HEMATOLOGY AND PATHOLOGY DEVICES Hematology Reagents § 864.8100 Bothrops atrox reagent. (a...

  13. 21 CFR 864.8100 - Bothrops atrox reagent.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Bothrops atrox reagent. 864.8100 Section 864.8100 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES HEMATOLOGY AND PATHOLOGY DEVICES Hematology Reagents § 864.8100 Bothrops atrox reagent. (a...

  14. 21 CFR 864.8100 - Bothrops atrox reagent.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Bothrops atrox reagent. 864.8100 Section 864.8100 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES HEMATOLOGY AND PATHOLOGY DEVICES Hematology Reagents § 864.8100 Bothrops atrox reagent. (a...

  15. 21 CFR 866.3400 - Parainfluenza virus serological reagents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... respiratory illnesses ranging from the common cold to pneumonia. (b) Classification. Class I (general controls... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Parainfluenza virus serological reagents. 866.3400... virus serological reagents. (a) Identification. Parainfluenza virus serological reagents are devices...

  16. 21 CFR 866.3400 - Parainfluenza virus serological reagents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... respiratory illnesses ranging from the common cold to pneumonia. (b) Classification. Class I (general controls... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Parainfluenza virus serological reagents. 866.3400... virus serological reagents. (a) Identification. Parainfluenza virus serological reagents are devices...

  17. 21 CFR 866.3400 - Parainfluenza virus serological reagents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... respiratory illnesses ranging from the common cold to pneumonia. (b) Classification. Class I (general controls... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Parainfluenza virus serological reagents. 866.3400... virus serological reagents. (a) Identification. Parainfluenza virus serological reagents are devices...

  18. 21 CFR 866.3400 - Parainfluenza virus serological reagents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... respiratory illnesses ranging from the common cold to pneumonia. (b) Classification. Class I (general controls... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Parainfluenza virus serological reagents. 866.3400... virus serological reagents. (a) Identification. Parainfluenza virus serological reagents are devices...

  19. 21 CFR 866.3400 - Parainfluenza virus serological reagents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... respiratory illnesses ranging from the common cold to pneumonia. (b) Classification. Class I (general controls... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Parainfluenza virus serological reagents. 866.3400... virus serological reagents. (a) Identification. Parainfluenza virus serological reagents are devices...

  20. 21 CFR 660.20 - Blood Grouping Reagent.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 7 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Blood Grouping Reagent. 660.20 Section 660.20 Food... ADDITIONAL STANDARDS FOR DIAGNOSTIC SUBSTANCES FOR LABORATORY TESTS Blood Grouping Reagent § 660.20 Blood Grouping Reagent. (a) Proper name and definition. The proper name of this product shall be Blood...

  1. 21 CFR 866.3330 - Influenza virus serological reagents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Influenza virus serological reagents. 866.3330 Section 866.3330 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES... virus serological reagents. (a) Identification. Influenza virus serological reagents are devices that...

  2. 21 CFR 866.3330 - Influenza virus serological reagents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Influenza virus serological reagents. 866.3330 Section 866.3330 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES... virus serological reagents. (a) Identification. Influenza virus serological reagents are devices that...

  3. 21 CFR 866.3330 - Influenza virus serological reagents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Influenza virus serological reagents. 866.3330 Section 866.3330 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES... virus serological reagents. (a) Identification. Influenza virus serological reagents are devices that...

  4. 21 CFR 866.3940 - West Nile virus serological reagents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false West Nile virus serological reagents. 866.3940... virus serological reagents. (a) Identification. West Nile virus serological reagents are devices that consist of antigens and antisera for the detection of anti-West Nile virus IgM antibodies, in human serum...

  5. 21 CFR 866.3940 - West Nile virus serological reagents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false West Nile virus serological reagents. 866.3940... virus serological reagents. (a) Identification. West Nile virus serological reagents are devices that consist of antigens and antisera for the detection of anti-West Nile virus IgM antibodies, in human serum...

  6. 21 CFR 866.3330 - Influenza virus serological reagents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Influenza virus serological reagents. 866.3330 Section 866.3330 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES... virus serological reagents. (a) Identification. Influenza virus serological reagents are devices that...

  7. 21 CFR 866.3940 - West Nile virus serological reagents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false West Nile virus serological reagents. 866.3940... virus serological reagents. (a) Identification. West Nile virus serological reagents are devices that consist of antigens and antisera for the detection of anti-West Nile virus IgM antibodies, in human serum...

  8. 21 CFR 866.3940 - West Nile virus serological reagents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false West Nile virus serological reagents. 866.3940... virus serological reagents. (a) Identification. West Nile virus serological reagents are devices that consist of antigens and antisera for the detection of anti-West Nile virus IgM antibodies, in human serum...

  9. 21 CFR 866.3330 - Influenza virus serological reagents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Influenza virus serological reagents. 866.3330 Section 866.3330 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES... virus serological reagents. (a) Identification. Influenza virus serological reagents are devices that...

  10. 21 CFR 866.3085 - Brucella spp. serological reagents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Brucella spp. serological reagents. 866.3085 Section 866.3085 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES... these reagents consist of antisera conjugated with a fluorescent dye (immunofluorescent reagents)...

  11. 21 CFR 866.3085 - Brucella spp. serological reagents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Brucella spp. serological reagents. 866.3085 Section 866.3085 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES... these reagents consist of antisera conjugated with a fluorescent dye (immunofluorescent reagents)...

  12. 21 CFR 866.3085 - Brucella spp. serological reagents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Brucella spp. serological reagents. 866.3085 Section 866.3085 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES... these reagents consist of antisera conjugated with a fluorescent dye (immunofluorescent reagents)...

  13. 21 CFR 866.3930 - Vibrio cholerae serological reagents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Vibrio cholerae serological reagents. 866.3930... cholerae serological reagents. (a) Identification. Vibrio cholerae serological reagents are devices that are used in the agglutination (an antigen-antibody clumping reaction) test to identify Vibrio cholerae...

  14. 40 CFR 792.83 - Reagents and solutions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 true Reagents and solutions. 792.83 Section... ACT (CONTINUED) GOOD LABORATORY PRACTICE STANDARDS Testing Facilities Operation § 792.83 Reagents and solutions. All reagents and solutions in the laboratory areas shall be labeled to indicate identity,...

  15. 21 CFR 660.30 - Reagent Red Blood Cells.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 7 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Reagent Red Blood Cells. 660.30 Section 660.30...) BIOLOGICS ADDITIONAL STANDARDS FOR DIAGNOSTIC SUBSTANCES FOR LABORATORY TESTS Reagent Red Blood Cells § 660.30 Reagent Red Blood Cells. (a) Proper name and definition. The proper name of the product shall...

  16. 21 CFR 660.30 - Reagent Red Blood Cells.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 7 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Reagent Red Blood Cells. 660.30 Section 660.30...) BIOLOGICS ADDITIONAL STANDARDS FOR DIAGNOSTIC SUBSTANCES FOR LABORATORY TESTS Reagent Red Blood Cells § 660.30 Reagent Red Blood Cells. (a) Proper name and definition. The proper name of the product shall...

  17. 21 CFR 660.30 - Reagent Red Blood Cells.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 7 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Reagent Red Blood Cells. 660.30 Section 660.30...) BIOLOGICS ADDITIONAL STANDARDS FOR DIAGNOSTIC SUBSTANCES FOR LABORATORY TESTS Reagent Red Blood Cells § 660.30 Reagent Red Blood Cells. (a) Proper name and definition. The proper name of the product shall...

  18. 40 CFR 160.83 - Reagents and solutions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 25 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Reagents and solutions. 160.83 Section... LABORATORY PRACTICE STANDARDS Testing Facilities Operation § 160.83 Reagents and solutions. All reagents and solutions in the laboratory areas shall be labeled to indicate identity, titer or concentration,...

  19. 40 CFR 160.83 - Reagents and solutions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 25 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Reagents and solutions. 160.83 Section... LABORATORY PRACTICE STANDARDS Testing Facilities Operation § 160.83 Reagents and solutions. All reagents and solutions in the laboratory areas shall be labeled to indicate identity, titer or concentration,...

  20. 40 CFR 160.83 - Reagents and solutions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 24 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Reagents and solutions. 160.83 Section... LABORATORY PRACTICE STANDARDS Testing Facilities Operation § 160.83 Reagents and solutions. All reagents and solutions in the laboratory areas shall be labeled to indicate identity, titer or concentration,...

  1. 40 CFR 160.83 - Reagents and solutions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 24 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Reagents and solutions. 160.83 Section... LABORATORY PRACTICE STANDARDS Testing Facilities Operation § 160.83 Reagents and solutions. All reagents and solutions in the laboratory areas shall be labeled to indicate identity, titer or concentration,...

  2. 21 CFR 660.20 - Blood Grouping Reagent.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 7 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Blood Grouping Reagent. 660.20 Section 660.20 Food... ADDITIONAL STANDARDS FOR DIAGNOSTIC SUBSTANCES FOR LABORATORY TESTS Blood Grouping Reagent § 660.20 Blood Grouping Reagent. (a) Proper name and definition. The proper name of this product shall be Blood Grouping...

  3. 21 CFR 660.20 - Blood Grouping Reagent.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 7 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Blood Grouping Reagent. 660.20 Section 660.20 Food... ADDITIONAL STANDARDS FOR DIAGNOSTIC SUBSTANCES FOR LABORATORY TESTS Blood Grouping Reagent § 660.20 Blood Grouping Reagent. (a) Proper name and definition. The proper name of this product shall be Blood Grouping...

  4. 21 CFR 660.20 - Blood Grouping Reagent.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 7 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Blood Grouping Reagent. 660.20 Section 660.20 Food... ADDITIONAL STANDARDS FOR DIAGNOSTIC SUBSTANCES FOR LABORATORY TESTS Blood Grouping Reagent § 660.20 Blood Grouping Reagent. (a) Proper name and definition. The proper name of this product shall be Blood Grouping...

  5. 21 CFR 660.20 - Blood Grouping Reagent.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 7 2011-04-01 2010-04-01 true Blood Grouping Reagent. 660.20 Section 660.20 Food... ADDITIONAL STANDARDS FOR DIAGNOSTIC SUBSTANCES FOR LABORATORY TESTS Blood Grouping Reagent § 660.20 Blood Grouping Reagent. (a) Proper name and definition. The proper name of this product shall be Blood Grouping...

  6. 21 CFR 866.3255 - Escherichia coli serological reagents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Escherichia coli serological reagents. 866.3255... coli serological reagents. (a) Identification. Escherichia coli serological reagents are devices that consist of antigens and antisera used in serological tests to identify Escherichia coli from cultured...

  7. Synthesis of linear polyethylenimine derivatives for DNA transfection.

    PubMed

    Brissault, Blandine; Kichler, Antoine; Guis, Christine; Leborgne, Christian; Danos, Olivier; Cheradame, Hervé

    2003-01-01

    A series of linear polymers containing varying amounts of ethylenimine or N-propylethylenimine units were synthesized by hydrolysis and/or reduction of polyethyloxazolines. The pK(a)s of the polyamines were determined potentiometrically. Gel mobility shift assay showed that the efficiency of DNA complexation was related to the fraction of amino groups that are protonated at neutral pH. The effects of cationic charge density and molar weight of the polymers on the transfection efficiency were evaluated on HepG2 cells. The results obtained with different copolymers show that the transfection efficiency primarily depends on the fraction of ethylenimine units included in the polymer albeit the molar weight is also of importance. On the basis of the results obtained with poly(N-propylethylenimines), we also demonstrate that the high transfection efficiency of polyethylenimines does not solely rely on their capacity to capture protons which are transferred into the endo-lysosomes during acidification.

  8. Transient transfection of mammalian cells using a violet diode laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Torres-Mapa, Maria Leilani; Angus, Liselotte; Ploschner, Martin; Dholakia, Kishan; Gunn-Moore, Frank J.

    2010-07-01

    We demonstrate the first use of the violet diode laser for transient mammalian cell transfection. In contrast to previous studies, which showed the generation of stable cell lines over a few weeks, we develop a methodology to transiently transfect cells with an efficiency of up to ~40%. Chinese hamster ovary (CHO-K1) and human embryonic kidney (HEK293) cells are exposed to a tightly focused 405-nm laser in the presence of plasmid DNA encoding for a mitochondrial targeted red fluorescent protein. We report transfection efficiencies as a function of laser power and exposure time for our system. We also show, for the first time, that a continuous wave laser source can be successfully applied to selective gene silencing experiments using small interfering RNA. This work is a major step towards an inexpensive and portable phototransfection system.

  9. In trans promoter activation by enhancers in transient transfection.

    PubMed

    Smirnov, N A; Akopov, S B; Didych, D A; Nikolaev, L G

    2017-03-01

    Earlier, it was reported that the strong cytomegalovirus enhancer can activate the cytomegalovirus promoter in trans, i.e. as a separate plasmid co-transfected with a promoter-reporter gene construct. Here we demonstrate that the ability of enhancers to activate promoters in trans in transient transfection experiments is a property of not only viral regulatory elements but also of various genomic enhancers and promoters. Enhancer-promoter activation in trans is promoter- and cell type-specific, and accompanied by physical interaction between promoter and enhancer as revealed by chromosome conformation capture assays. Thus, promoter activation in transient co-transfection of promoters and enhancers shares a number of important traits with long-distance promoter activation by enhancers in living cells and may therefore serve as a model of this fundamental cellular process.

  10. Physicochemical and transfection properties of cationic Hydroxyethylcellulose/DNA nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Fayazpour, Farzaneh; Lucas, Bart; Alvarez-Lorenzo, Carmen; Sanders, Niek N; Demeester, Jo; De Smedt, Stefaan C

    2006-10-01

    In this study the physicochemical and transfection properties of cationic hydroxyethylcellulose/plasmid DNA (pDNA) nanoparticles were investigated and compared with the properties of DNA nanoparticles based on polyethylene imine (PEI), which is widely investigated as a gene carrier. The two types of cationic hydroxyethylcelluloses studied, polyquaternium-4 (PQ-4) and polyquaternium-10 (PQ-10), are already commonly used in cosmetic and topical drug delivery devices. Both PQ-4 and PQ-10 spontaneously interact with pDNA with the formation of nanoparticles approximately 200 nm in size. Gel electrophoresis and fluorescence dequenching experiments indicated that the interactions between pDNA and the cationic celluloses were stronger than those between pDNA and PEI. The cationic cellulose/pDNA nanoparticles transfected cells to a much lesser extent than the PEI-based pDNA nanoparticles. The low transfection property of the PQ-4/pDNA nanoparticles was attributed to their neutrally charged surface, which does not allow an optimal binding of PQ-4/pDNA nanoparticles to cellular membranes. Although the PQ-10/pDNA nanoparticles were positively charged and thus expected to be taken up by cells, they were also much less efficient in transfecting cells than were PEI/pDNA nanoparticles. Agents known to enhance the endosomal escape were not able to improve the transfection properties of PQ-10/pDNA nanoparticles, indicating that a poor endosomal escape is, most likely, not the major reason for the low transfection activity of PQ-10/pDNA nanoparticles. We hypothesized that the strong binding of pDNA to PQ-10 prohibits the release of pDNA from PQ-10 once the PQ-10/pDNA nanoparticles arrive in the cytosol of the cells. Tailoring the nature and extent of the cationic side chains on this type of cationic hydroxyethylcellulose may be promising to further enhance their DNA delivery properties.

  11. Oriented electric fields as future smart reagents in chemistry.

    PubMed

    Shaik, Sason; Mandal, Debasish; Ramanan, Rajeev

    2016-11-22

    Oriented external electric fields (OEEFs) as 'smart reagents' are no longer a theoretical dream. Here, we discuss the wide-ranging potential of using OEEFs to catalyse and control a variety of non-redox reactions and impart selectivity at will. An OEEF along the direction of electron reorganization (the so-called reaction axis) will catalyse nonpolar reactions by orders of magnitude, control regioselectivity and induce spin-state selectivity. Simply flipping the direction of the OEEF or orienting it off of the reaction axis, will control at will the endo/exo ratio in Diels-Alder reactions and steps in enzymatic cycles. This Perspective highlights these outcomes using theoretical results for hydrogen abstraction reactions, epoxidation of double bonds, C-C bond forming reactions, proton transfers and the cycle of the enzyme cytochrome P450, as well as recent experimental data. We postulate that, as experimental techniques mature, chemical syntheses may become an exercise in zapping oriented molecules with OEEFs.

  12. Production of latex agglutination reagents for pneumococcal serotyping

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The current ‘gold standard’ for serotyping pneumococci is the Quellung test. This technique is laborious and requires a certain level of training to correctly perform. Commercial pneumococcal latex agglutination serotyping reagents are available, but these are expensive. In-house production of latex agglutination reagents can be a cost-effective alternative to using commercially available reagents. This paper describes a method for the production and quality control (QC) of latex reagents, including problem solving recommendations, for pneumococcal serotyping. Results Here we describe a method for the production of latex agglutination reagents based on the passive adsorption of antibodies to latex particles. Sixty-five latex agglutination reagents were made using the PneuCarriage Project (PCP) method, of which 35 passed QC. The other 30 reagents failed QC due to auto-agglutination (n=2), no reactivity with target serotypes (n=8) or cross-reactivity with non-target serotypes (n=20). Dilution of antisera resulted in a further 27 reagents passing QC. The remaining three reagents passed QC when prepared without centrifugation and wash steps. Protein estimates indicated that latex reagents that failed QC when prepared using the PCP method passed when made with antiserum containing ≤ 500 μg/ml of protein. Sixty-one nasopharyngeal isolates were serotyped with our in-house latex agglutination reagents, with the results showing complete concordance with the Quellung reaction. Conclusions The method described here to produce latex agglutination reagents allows simple and efficient serotyping of pneumococci and may be applicable to latex agglutination reagents for typing or identification of other microorganisms. We recommend diluting antisera or removing centrifugation and wash steps for any latex reagents that fail QC. Our latex reagents are cost-effective, technically undemanding to prepare and remain stable for long periods of time, making them ideal for

  13. Production of latex agglutination reagents for pneumococcal serotyping.

    PubMed

    Ortika, Belinda D; Habib, Maha; Dunne, Eileen M; Porter, Barbara D; Satzke, Catherine

    2013-02-05

    The current 'gold standard' for serotyping pneumococci is the Quellung test. This technique is laborious and requires a certain level of training to correctly perform. Commercial pneumococcal latex agglutination serotyping reagents are available, but these are expensive. In-house production of latex agglutination reagents can be a cost-effective alternative to using commercially available reagents. This paper describes a method for the production and quality control (QC) of latex reagents, including problem solving recommendations, for pneumococcal serotyping. Here we describe a method for the production of latex agglutination reagents based on the passive adsorption of antibodies to latex particles. Sixty-five latex agglutination reagents were made using the PneuCarriage Project (PCP) method, of which 35 passed QC. The other 30 reagents failed QC due to auto-agglutination (n=2), no reactivity with target serotypes (n=8) or cross-reactivity with non-target serotypes (n=20). Dilution of antisera resulted in a further 27 reagents passing QC. The remaining three reagents passed QC when prepared without centrifugation and wash steps. Protein estimates indicated that latex reagents that failed QC when prepared using the PCP method passed when made with antiserum containing ≤ 500 μg/ml of protein. Sixty-one nasopharyngeal isolates were serotyped with our in-house latex agglutination reagents, with the results showing complete concordance with the Quellung reaction. The method described here to produce latex agglutination reagents allows simple and efficient serotyping of pneumococci and may be applicable to latex agglutination reagents for typing or identification of other microorganisms. We recommend diluting antisera or removing centrifugation and wash steps for any latex reagents that fail QC. Our latex reagents are cost-effective, technically undemanding to prepare and remain stable for long periods of time, making them ideal for use in low-income countries.

  14. CLEAN CHEMICAL SYNTHESIS IN WATER

    EPA Science Inventory

    Newer green chemistry approach to accomplish chemical synthesis in water is summarized. Recent global developments pertaining to C-C bond forming reactions using metallic reagents and direct use of the renewable materials such as carbohydrates without derivatization are described...

  15. CLEAN CHEMICAL SYNTHESIS IN WATER

    EPA Science Inventory

    Newer green chemistry approach to accomplish chemical synthesis in water is summarized. Recent global developments pertaining to C-C bond forming reactions using metallic reagents and direct use of the renewable materials such as carbohydrates without derivatization are described...

  16. New osmium-based reagent for the dihydroxylation of alkenes.

    PubMed

    Donohoe, Timothy J; Harris, Robert M; Butterworth, Sam; Burrows, Jeremy N; Cowley, Andrew; Parker, Jeremy S

    2006-06-09

    The cis dihydroxylation of alkenes is most efficiently accomplished by reaction with osmium tetroxide. Recently, the expense and toxicity of osmium tetroxide have led to a number of attempts to harness alternative osmium-based reagents, including microencapsulation and solid support techniques. We describe here the development of a new nonvolatile, stable, and recoverable osmium-based reagent devised for the stoichiometric cis dihydroxylation of alkenes. Although attempts to make this new dihydroxylation work with catalytic amounts of this reagent were unsuccessful, we did develop a sensitive test for free osmium tetroxide leached from the reagent in situ: this test may well have uses in probing future applications of derivatized osmium reagents.

  17. Addition of Ascorbic Acid to the Extracellular Environment Activates Lipoplexes of a Ferrocenyl Lipid and Promotes Cell Transfection

    PubMed Central

    Aytar, Burcu S.; Muller, John P. E.; Golan, Sharon; Hata, Shinichi; Takahashi, Hiro; Kondo, Yukishige; Talmon, Yeshayahu; Abbott, Nicholas L.; Lynn, David M.

    2011-01-01

    The level of cell transfection mediated by lipoplexes formed using the ferrocenyl lipid bis(11-ferrocenylundecyl)dimethylammonium bromide (BFDMA) depends strongly on the oxidation state of the two ferrocenyl groups of the lipid (reduced BFDMA generally mediates high levels of transfection, but oxidized BFDMA mediates very low levels of transfection). Here, we report that it is possible to chemically transform inactive lipoplexes (formed using oxidized BFMDA) to “active” lipoplexes that mediate high levels of transfection by treatment with the small-molecule reducing agent ascorbic acid (vitamin C). Our results demonstrate that this transformation can be conducted in cell culture media and in the presence of cells by addition of ascorbic acid to lipoplex-containing media in which cells are growing. Treatment of lipoplexes of oxidized BFDMA with ascorbic acid resulted in lipoplexes composed of reduced BFDMA, as characterized by UV/vis spectrophotometry, and lead to activated lipoplexes that mediated high levels of transgene expression in the COS-7, HEK 293T/17, HeLa, and NIH 3T3 cell lines. Characterization of internalization of DNA by confocal microscopy and measurements of the zeta potentials of lipoplexes suggested that these large differences in cell transfection result from (i) differences in the extents to which these lipoplexes are internalized by cells and (ii) changes in the oxidation state of BFDMA that occur in the extracellular environment (i.e., prior to internalization of lipoplexes by cells). Characterization of lipoplexes by small-angle neutron scattering (SANS) and by cryogenic transmission electron microscopy (cryo-TEM) revealed changes in the nanostructures of lipoplexes upon the addition of ascorbic acid, from aggregates that were generally amorphous, to aggregates with a more extensive multilamellar nanostructure. The results of this study provide guidance for the design of redox-active lipids that could lead to methods that enable spatial

  18. Exploiting green analytical procedures for acidity and iron assays employing flow analysis with simple natural reagent extracts.

    PubMed

    Grudpan, Kate; Hartwell, Supaporn Kradtap; Wongwilai, Wasin; Grudpan, Supara; Lapanantnoppakhun, Somchai

    2011-06-15

    Green analytical methods employing flow analysis with simple natural reagent extracts have been exploited. Various formats of flow based analysis systems including a single line FIA, a simple lab on chip with webcam camera detector, and a newly developed simple lab on chip system with reflective absorption detection and the simple extracts from some available local plants including butterfly pea flower, orchid flower, and beet root were investigated and shown to be useful as alternative self indicator reagents for acidity assay. Various tea drinks were explored to be used for chromogenic reagents in iron determination. The benefit of a flow based system, which allows standards and samples to go through the analysis process in exactly the same conditions, makes it possible to employ simple natural extracts with minimal or no pretreatment or purification. The combinations of non-synthetic natural reagents with minimal processed extracts and the low volume requirement flow based systems create some unique green chemical analyses.

  19. Femtosecond laser pulses for chemical-free embryonic and mesenchymal stem cell differentiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mthunzi, Patience; Dholakia, Kishan; Gunn-Moore, Frank

    2011-10-01

    Owing to their self renewal and pluripotency properties, stem cells can efficiently advance current therapies in tissue regeneration and/or engineering. Under appropriate culture conditions in vitro, pluripotent stem cells can be primed to differentiate into any cell type some examples including neural, cardiac and blood cells. However, there still remains a pressing necessity to answer the biological questions concerning how stem cell renewal and how differentiation programs are operated and regulated at the genetic level. In stem cell research, an urgent requirement on experimental procedures allowing non-invasive, marker-free observation of growth, proliferation and stability of living stem cells under physiological conditions exists. Femtosecond (fs) laser pulses have been reported to non-invasively deliver exogenous materials, including foreign genetic species into both multipotent and pluripotent stem cells successfully. Through this multi-photon facilitated technique, directly administering fs laser pulses onto the cell plasma membrane induces transient submicrometer holes, thereby promoting cytosolic uptake of the surrounding extracellular matter. To display a chemical-free cell transfection procedure that utilises micro-litre scale volumes of reagents, we report for the first time on 70 % transfection efficiency in ES-E14TG2a cells using the enhanced green fluorescing protein (EGFP) DNA plasmid. We also show how varying the average power output during optical transfection influences cell viability, proliferation and cytotoxicity in embryonic stem cells. The impact of utilizing objective lenses of different numerical aperture (NA) on the optical transfection efficiency in ES-E14TG2a cells is presented. Finally, we report on embryonic and mesenchymal stem cell differentiation. The produced specialized cell types could thereafter be characterized and used for cell based therapies.

  20. Investigation of benzoyloximes as benzoylating reagents: benzoyl-Oxyma as a selective benzoylating reagent.

    PubMed

    Burugupalli, Satvika; Shah, Sayali; van der Peet, Phillip L; Arora, Seep; White, Jonathan M; Williams, Spencer J

    2016-01-07

    Hydroxybenzotriazole (HOBt) and HOBt-derived reagents have been classified as Class I explosives, with restrictions on their transportation and storage. We explored a range of benzoylated oxime-based reagents as alternatives to benzoyloxybenzotriazole (BBTZ) for the selective benzoylation of carbohydrate polyols. Benzoylated oximes derived from 2-hydroximino-malononitrile, ethyl 2-hydroximino-2-cyanoacetate (Oxyma), and tert-butyl 2-hydroximino-2-cyanoacetate were most effective for benzoylation of a simple primary alcohol, with yields approaching that obtained for BBTZ. When applied to carbohydrate diols, the most effective reagent was identified as benzoyl-Oxyma. Benzoyl-Oxyma is a highly crystalline, readily prepared alternative to BBTZ, useful in the selective benzoylation of carbohydrate polyols.

  1. [Cashmere goat bacterial artificial chromosome recombination and cell transfection system].

    PubMed

    Huang, Tian; Cao, Zhongyang; Yang, Yaohui; Cao, Gengsheng

    2016-03-01

    The Cashmere goat is mainly used to produce cashmere, which is very popular for its delicate fiber, luscious softness and natural excellent warm property. Keratin associated protein (KAP) and bone morphogenetic protein (BMP) of the Cashmere goat play an important role in the proliferation and development of cashmere fiber follicle cells. Bacterial artificial chromosome containing kap6.3, kap8.1 and bmp4 genes were used to increase the production and quality of Cashmere. First, we constructed bacterial artificial chromosomes by homology recombination. Then Tol2 transposon was inserted into bacterial artificial chromosomes that were then transfected into Cashmere goat fibroblasts by Amaxa Nucleofector technology according to the manufacture's instructions. We successfully constructed the BAC-Tol2 vectors containing target genes. Each vector contained egfp report gene with UBC promoter, Neomycin resistant gene for cell screening and two loxp elements for resistance removing after transfected into cells. The bacterial artificial chromosome-Tol2 vectors showed a high efficiency of transfection that can reach 1% to 6% with a highest efficiency of 10%. We also obtained Cashmere goat fibroblasts integrated exogenous genes (kap6.3, kap8.1 and bmp4) preparing for the clone of Cashmere goat in the future. Our research demonstrates that the insertion of Tol2 transposons into bacterial artificial chromosomes improves the transfection efficiency and accuracy of bacterial artificial chromosome error-free recombination.

  2. Transfection of E. coli with lambda DNA by electroporation.

    PubMed

    Magistrelli, C; Colombo, E; Tognoni, A; Grandi, G

    1992-10-01

    In the ambit of the B. subtilis genoma sequencing and mapping project, we have set up an electroporation method to transfect E. coli cells with lambda DNA. This methodology presents features that make it preferable to traditional in vitro packaging for some purposes. Here we will illustrate the experimental procedure and the possible applications.

  3. Facile Oxidative Rearrangements Using Hypervalent Iodine Reagents

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Fateh V; Rehbein, Julia; Wirth, Thomas

    2012-01-01

    Aromatic substituents migrate in a novel oxidative cyclization mediated by iodine(III) reagents. 4-Arylbut-3-enoic acids are cyclized and rearranged to 4-arylfuran-2(5H)-ones by hypervalent iodine compounds in good to excellent yields under mild reaction conditions. Other ring sizes are also accessible. The mechanism of the reaction is described in detail, and calculations highlight the cationic nature of the intermediates in the rearrangement. The fast access to heavily substituted furanones is used for the synthesis of biologically active derivatives. PMID:24551514

  4. DIAZOPHTHALOCYANINS AS REAGENTS FOR FINE STRUCTURAL CYTOCHEMISTRY

    PubMed Central

    Tice, Lois Withrow; Barrnett, Russell J.

    1965-01-01

    This paper reports the synthesis of 14 diazophthalocyanins containing Mg, Cu, or Pb as the chelated metal. To assess the usefulness of these compounds for fine structural cytochemistry, the relative coupling rates with naphthols were tested as well as the solubility of the resulting azo dyes. Three of the diazotates were reacted with tissue proteins in aldehyde-fixed material, and the density increases thus produced were compared in the electron microscope with those produced by staining similarly fixed material with the phthalocyanin dye, Alcian Blue. Finally, one of the diazotates was used as a capture reagent for the demonstration of the sites of acid phosphatase activity with the electron microscope. PMID:14283629

  5. New supercharging reagents produce highly charged protein ions in native mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Going, Catherine C; Xia, Zijie; Williams, Evan R

    2015-11-07

    The effectiveness of two new supercharging reagents for producing highly charged ions by electrospray ionization (ESI) from aqueous solutions in which proteins have native structures and reactivities were investigated. In aqueous solution, 2-thiophenone and 4-hydroxymethyl-1,3-dioxolan-2-one (HD) at a concentration of 2% by volume can increase the average charge of cytochrome c and myoglobin by up to 163%, resulting in even higher charge states than those that are produced from water/methanol/acid solutions in which these proteins are denatured. The greatest extent of supercharging occurs in pure water, but these supercharging reagents are also highly effective in aqueous solutions containing 200 mM ammonium acetate buffer commonly used in native mass spectrometry (MS). These reagents are less effective supercharging reagents than m-nitrobenzyl alcohol (m-NBA) and propylene carbonate (PC) when ions are formed from water/methanol/acid. The extent to which loss of the heme group from myoglobin occurs is related to the extent of supercharging. Results from guanidine melts of cytochrome c monitored with tryptophan fluorescence show that the supercharging reagents PC, sulfolane and HD are effective chemical denaturants in solution. These results provide additional evidence for the role of protein structural changes in the electrospray droplet as the primary mechanism for supercharging with these reagents in native MS. These results also demonstrate that for at least some proteins, the formation of highly charged ions from native MS is no longer a significant barrier for obtaining structural information using conventional tandem MS methods.

  6. New Supercharging Reagents Produce Highly Charged Protein Ions in Native Mass Spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    Going, Catherine C.; Xia, Zijie; Williams, Evan R.

    2015-01-01

    The effectiveness of two new supercharging reagents for producing highly charged ions by electrospray ionization (ESI) from aqueous solutions in which proteins have native structures and reactivities were investigated. In aqueous solution, 2-thiophenone and 4-hydroxymethyl-1,3-dioxolan-2-one (HD) at a concentration of 2% by volume can increase the average charge of cytochrome c and myoglobin by up to 163%, resulting in even higher charge states than those that are produced from water/methanol/acid solutions in which proteins are denatured. The greatest extent of supercharging occurs in pure water, but these supercharging reagents are also highly effective in aqueous solutions containing 200 mM ammonium acetate buffer commonly used in native mass spectrometry (MS). These reagents are less effective supercharging reagents than m-nitrobenzyl alcohol (m-NBA) and propylene carbonate (PC) when ions are formed from water/methanol/acid. The extent to which loss of the heme group from myoglobin occurs is related to the extent of supercharging. Results from guanidine melts of cytochrome c monitored with tryptophan fluorescence show that the supercharging reagents PC, sulfolane and HD are effective chemical denaturants in solution. These results provide additional evidence for the role of protein structural changes in the electrospray droplet as the primary mechanism for supercharging with these reagents in native MS. These results also demonstrate that for at least some proteins, the formation of highly charged ions from native MS is no longer a significant barrier for obtaining structural information using conventional tandem MS methods. PMID:26421324

  7. RNA interference by osmotic lysis of pinosomes: liposome-independent transfection of siRNAs into mammalian cells.

    PubMed

    Gruber, Jens; Boese, Guido; Tuschl, Thomas; Osborn, Mary; Weber, Klaus

    2004-07-01

    The osmotic lysis of pinosomes procedure has been adapted to deliver small interfering RNAs (siRNAs) into cells in culture. Under hypertonic conditions, siRNAs were internalized into pinosomes. A subsequent osmotic shock in hypotonic buffer disrupted the pinosomes and caused the release of siRNAs into the cell cytoplasm. Both steps could be demonstrated directly using fluorescein-labeled siRNAs and confocal laser-scanning microscopy. Uptake by the pinocytosis/osmotic lysis procedure is concentration- and time-dependent. At an siRNA concentration of 0.4 microM, treatment for 40 or 80 min results in silencing efficiencies of 60% and 90%, respectively, after 44 h. A double treatment resulted in approximately equal silencing efficiencies but in reduced viability. This method has been used on a variety of human and murine cell lines including HEK293, HeLa SS6, and SW3T3 cells. Targets such as lamin A/C and Eg5 were effectively silenced. Novel silencing data are provided for Ki67, one of the few reliable prognostic markers for tumor patients. The new procedure avoids certain technical problems encountered with commercial transfection reagents while yielding silencing efficiencies that are comparable to those obtained with liposome-mediated siRNA transfection.

  8. Validation of Synthetic CRISPR Reagents as a Tool for Arrayed Functional Genomic Screening

    PubMed Central

    Tan, Jenille; Martin, Scott E.

    2016-01-01

    To date, lentiviral-based CRISPR-Cas9 screens have largely been conducted in pooled format. However, numerous assays are not amenable to pooled approaches, and lentiviral screening in arrayed format presents many challenges. We sought to examine synthetic CRISPR reagents in the context of arrayed screening. Experiments were performed using aberrant DNA replication as an assay. Using synthetic CRISPR RNAs targeting the known control gene GMNN in HCT-116 cells stably expressing Cas9, we observed statistically significant phenotype among the majority of transfected cells within 72 hours. Additional studies revealed near complete loss of GMNN protein and editing of GMNN DNA. We next conducted a screen of synthetic CRISPR RNAs directed against 640 ubiquitin-related genes. Screening identified known and novel DNA replication regulators that were also supported by siRNA gene knockdown. Notably, CRISPR screening identified more statistically significant hits than corresponding siRNA screens run in parallel. These results highlight the possibility of using synthetic CRISPR reagents as an arrayed screening tool. PMID:28030641

  9. Reaction of fluorogenic reagents with proteins

    PubMed Central

    Swearingen, Kristian E.; Dickerson, Jane A.; Turner, Emily H.; Ramsay, Lauren M.; Wojcik, Roza; Dovichi, Norman J.

    2009-01-01

    The fluorogenic reagent Chromeo P465 is considered for analysis of proteins by capillary electrophoresis with laser-induced fluorescence detection. The reagent was first used to label α-lactalbumin; the product was analyzed by capillary zone electrophoresis in a sub-micellar sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS) buffer. The product generated a set of equally spaced but poorly resolved peaks that formed a broad envelope with a net mobility of 4 × 10−4 cm2 V−1 s−1. The components of the envelope were presumably protein that had reacted with different numbers of labels. The mobility of these components decreased by roughly 1 % with the addition of each label. The signal increased linearly from 1.0 nM to 100 nM α-lactalbumin (r2 = 0.99), with a 3σ detection limit of 70 pM. We then considered the separation of a mixture of ovalbumin, α-chymotrypsinogen A, and αlactalbumin labeled with Chromeo P465; unfortunately, baseline resolution was not achieved with a borax/SDS buffer. Better resolution was achieved with N-cyclohexyl-2-aminoethanesulfonic acid/Tris/SDS/dextran capillary sieving electrophoresis; however, dye interactions with this buffer system produced a less than ideal blank. PMID:18479693

  10. International Standard Reagents for HPV Detection

    PubMed Central

    Pagliusi, Sonia R.; Garland, Suzanne M.

    2007-01-01

    Humam papillomavirus is the commonest genital viral infection in healthy sexually active subjects, and the presence of chronic or persistent HPV types in genital cells may constitute a prognostic marker of underlying, or predict future HPV-associated diseases. A variety of novel tests for detecting the presence of oncogenic HPV types in biological specimens have been reported. These are based on the various stages of infection and viral life cycle. HPV infects squamous epithelium with expression of various gene products intimately linked to epithelial cell differentiation. Hence, there are basically three classes of detectable markers directly derived from HPVs: molecular markers based on detection of nucleic acid sequences, serological markers based on detection of antibodies against viral proteins, and cellular markers based on detection of proteins expressed intracellularly, upon either infection or carcinogenesis. The nature of various assays and the development of international standard reagents for qualitative and quantitative assessment of assay performance are outlined. There is an increasing demand to develop standard tools to assess the quality of HPV detection systems, for regulatory and clinical management purposes. International standard reagents for HPV will help defining the analytical sensitivity and specificity of various detection methods, and will allow assuring that laboratory services used to evaluate disease burden, HPV vaccines, and cancer prevention strategies are accurate and comparable worldwide. The advancement of prophylactic vaccine candidates against HPV infections and related diseases stresses the increasing importance of HPV assays in monitoring the impact of HPV vaccination on disease burden. PMID:17627063

  11. Organometallic Palladium Reagents for Cysteine Bioconjugation

    PubMed Central

    Vinogradova, Ekaterina V.; Zhang, Chi; Spokoyny, Alexander M.; Pentelute, Bradley L.; Buchwald, Stephen L.

    2015-01-01

    Transition-metal based reactions have found wide use in organic synthesis and are used frequently to functionalize small molecules.1,2 However, there are very few reports of using transition-metal based reactions to modify complex biomolecules3,4, which is due to the need for stringent reaction conditions (for example, aqueous media, low temperature, and mild pH) and the existence of multiple, reactive functional groups found in biopolymers. Here we report that palladium(II) complexes can be used for efficient and highly selective cysteine conjugation reactions. The bioconjugation reaction is rapid and robust under a range of biocompatible reaction conditions. The straightforward synthesis of the palladium reagents from diverse and easily accessible aryl halide and trifluoromethanesulfonate precursors makes the method highly practical, providing access to a large structural space for protein modification. The resulting aryl bioconjugates are stable towards acids, bases, oxidants, and external thiol nucleophiles. The broad utility of the new bioconjugation platform was further corroborated by the synthesis of new classes of stapled peptides and antibody-drug conjugates. These palladium complexes show potential as a new set of benchtop reagents for diverse bioconjugation applications. PMID:26511579

  12. Organometallic palladium reagents for cysteine bioconjugation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vinogradova, Ekaterina V.; Zhang, Chi; Spokoyny, Alexander M.; Pentelute, Bradley L.; Buchwald, Stephen L.

    2015-10-01

    Reactions based on transition metals have found wide use in organic synthesis, in particular for the functionalization of small molecules. However, there are very few reports of using transition-metal-based reactions to modify complex biomolecules, which is due to the need for stringent reaction conditions (for example, aqueous media, low temperature and mild pH) and the existence of multiple reactive functional groups found in biomolecules. Here we report that palladium(II) complexes can be used for efficient and highly selective cysteine conjugation (bioconjugation) reactions that are rapid and robust under a range of bio-compatible reaction conditions. The straightforward synthesis of the palladium reagents from diverse and easily accessible aryl halide and trifluoromethanesulfonate precursors makes the method highly practical, providing access to a large structural space for protein modification. The resulting aryl bioconjugates are stable towards acids, bases, oxidants and external thiol nucleophiles. The broad utility of the bioconjugation platform was further corroborated by the synthesis of new classes of stapled peptides and antibody-drug conjugates. These palladium complexes show potential as benchtop reagents for diverse bioconjugation applications.

  13. Organometallic palladium reagents for cysteine bioconjugation.

    PubMed

    Vinogradova, Ekaterina V; Zhang, Chi; Spokoyny, Alexander M; Pentelute, Bradley L; Buchwald, Stephen L

    2015-10-29

    Reactions based on transition metals have found wide use in organic synthesis, in particular for the functionalization of small molecules. However, there are very few reports of using transition-metal-based reactions to modify complex biomolecules, which is due to the need for stringent reaction conditions (for example, aqueous media, low temperature and mild pH) and the existence of multiple reactive functional groups found in biomolecules. Here we report that palladium(II) complexes can be used for efficient and highly selective cysteine conjugation (bioconjugation) reactions that are rapid and robust under a range of bio-compatible reaction conditions. The straightforward synthesis of the palladium reagents from diverse and easily accessible aryl halide and trifluoromethanesulfonate precursors makes the method highly practical, providing access to a large structural space for protein modification. The resulting aryl bioconjugates are stable towards acids, bases, oxidants and external thiol nucleophiles. The broad utility of the bioconjugation platform was further corroborated by the synthesis of new classes of stapled peptides and antibody-drug conjugates. These palladium complexes show potential as benchtop reagents for diverse bioconjugation applications.

  14. U. S. VETERINARY IMMUNE REAGENTS NETWORK: PROGRESS WITH POULTRY IMMUNE REAGENTS

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    This poster will present a progress report on the CSREES-funded NRI grant to support a broad community approach to systematically address the immunological reagent gap for the US veterinary immunology research community including for the following groups: ruminants (concentrating on cattle but inclu...

  15. Application of Fenton's reagent as a pretreatment step in biological degradation of polyaromatic hydrocarbons

    SciTech Connect

    Kelley, R.L.; Gauger, W.K.; Srivastava, V.J.

    1990-01-01

    Fenton's reagent (H{sub 2}O{sub 2} and Fe{sup ++}) has been used for chemical oxidation of numerous organic compounds in water treatment schemes. In this study, the Institute of Gas Technology (IGT) applied Fenton's treatment to polynuclear aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) and PAH-contaminated soils. Fenton's treatment was very reactive with PAHs, causing rapid modification of the parental compounds to oxidized products and complete degradation to CO{sub 2}. This treatment was more effective on chemically reactive PAHs, such as benzo(a)pyrene and phenanthrene. Important parameters and conditions for Fenton's treatment of PAHs in solution and soil matrices have been identified. As much as 99% of the PAHs on soil matrices can be removed by treatment with Fenton's reagent. 28 refs., 13 figs., 1 tab.

  16. Effective gene delivery into adipose-derived stem cells: transfection of cells in suspension with the use of a nuclear localization signal peptide-conjugated polyethylenimine.

    PubMed

    Park, Eulsoon; Cho, Hong-Baek; Takimoto, Koichi

    2015-05-01

    Adipose-derived stem cells have the ability to turn into several clinically important cell types. However, it is difficult to transfect these cells with the use of conventional cationic lipid-based reagents. Polyethylenimine (PEI) is considered to be an inexpensive and effective tool for delivery of nucleic acids into mammalian cells. We used a linear PEI conjugated with the nuclear localization signal (NLS) peptide of Simian vacuolating virus 40 large T antigen (PEI-NLS) for transfection of plasmid DNA into adipose-derived cells. We also tested if transfection of cells in suspension might improve the degree and duration of exogenous gene expression. Transfection of cells in suspension with the use of a PEI conjugated with an NLS peptide resulted in high levels of reporter gene expression for an extended period of time in clonal 3T3-L1 preadipocytes and native human adipose-derived stem cells. The reporter gene expression increased for 3 days after the addition of the PEI-NLS peptide-DNA mixture in cell suspension and remained significant for at least 7 days. Cell density did not influence the level of reporter gene expression. Thus, the suspension method with the use of an NLS peptide-conjugated PEI leads to a robust and sustained expression of exogenous genes in adipose-derived cells. The devised transfection method may be useful for reprogramming of adipose-derived stem cells and cell-based therapy. Copyright © 2015 International Society for Cellular Therapy. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Repurposing Suzuki Coupling Reagents as a Directed Fragment Library Targeting Serine Hydrolases and Related Enzymes

    PubMed Central

    2017-01-01

    Serine hydrolases are susceptible to potent reversible inhibition by boronic acids. Large collections of chemically diverse boronic acid fragments are commercially available because of their utility in coupling chemistry. We repurposed the approximately 650 boronic acid reagents in our collection as a directed fragment library targeting serine hydrolases and related enzymes. Highly efficient hits (LE > 0.6) often result. The utility of the approach is illustrated with the results against autotaxin, a phospholipase implicated in cardiovascular disease. PMID:28564542

  18. Selective detection of 5-formyl-2'-deoxycytidine in DNA using a fluorogenic hydroxylamine reagent.

    PubMed

    Guo, Pu; Yan, Shengyong; Hu, Jianlin; Xing, Xiwen; Wang, Changcheng; Xu, Xiaowei; Qiu, Xiaoyu; Ma, Wen; Lu, Chunjiang; Weng, Xiaocheng; Zhou, Xiang

    2013-07-05

    Fluorogenic hydroxylamine reagents were used for detecting 5-fC through a labeling pathway. Chemical synthesis, HPLC, denaturing PAGE, and DNA MS were applied to testify that the probe reacted with 5-fC with oligodeoxynucleotide selectivity to achieve 5-fC detection conveniently and quantificationally with the method of fluorescence. The feasibility of fluorescently detecting 5-fC in a genome was also investigated.

  19. Life cycle management of critical ligand-binding reagents.

    PubMed

    O'Hara, Denise M; Theobald, Valerie

    2013-11-01

    Bioanalytical laboratories develop and validate ligand-binding assays (LBA) used to quantify the concentration of analytes of interest in various buffers and relevant biological matrices. The building blocks of LBA are reagents that recognize molecular and structural motifs on ligands, which are combined in various LBA formats to minimize biological matrix interferences and specifically detect and quantify the analyte of interest. The use of these LBA-requiring critical reagents, can span decades as programs mature to commercialization. Since critical reagents are generated mostly from biological systems, attention to their life cycle management, quality, characterization and sustainability are vital to the success of bioanalytical laboratories. Integrating de novo reagent generation, reagent biophysical characterization, LBA development, validation, and use, with reagent resupply processes leverages interdisciplinary activities and ensures smooth operations of a bioanalytical laboratory.

  20. Photoporation and cell transfection using a violet diode laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paterson, L.; Agate, B.; Comrie, M.; Ferguson, R.; Lake, T. K.; Morris, J. E.; Carruthers, A. E.; Brown, C. T. A.; Sibbett, W.; Bryant, P. E.; Gunn-Moore, F.; Riches, A. C.; Dholakia, Kishan

    2005-01-01

    The introduction and subsequent expression of foreign DNA inside living mammalian cells (transfection) is achieved by photoporation with a violet diode laser. We direct a compact 405 nm laser diode source into an inverted optical microscope configuration and expose cells to 0.3 mW for 40 ms. The localized optical power density of ~1200 MW/m2 is six orders of magnitude lower than that used in femtosecond photoporation (~104 TW/m2). The beam perforates the cell plasma membrane to allow uptake of plasmid DNA containing an antibiotic resistant gene as well as the green fluorescent protein (GFP) gene. Successfully transfected cells then expand into clonal groups which are used to create stable cell lines. The use of the violet diode laser offers a new and simple poration technique compatible with standard microscopes and is the simplest method of laser-assisted cell poration reported to date.

  1. Nanothermite-Based Microsystem for Drug Delivery and Cell Transfection

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-12-01

    presented. 2. EXPERIMENTAL 2.1 Nanothermite Preparation Nanothermite mixtures consisting of Bi2O3 nanoparticles and Al nanoparticles were used...for the transfection experiments reported herein. The Bi2O3 Report Documentation Page Form ApprovedOMB No. 0704-0188 Public reporting burden for the...particles were physically mixed in isopropanol (IPA) using ultrasonic agitation. Batches were mixed by dispersing 200mg of Bi2O3 in 1.5 mL of IPA by

  2. Enhanced transfection of brain tumor suppressor genes by photochemical internalization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chou, Chih H.; Sun, Chung-Ho; Zhou, Yi-Hong; Madsen, Steen J.; Hirschberg, Henry

    2011-03-01

    One of many limitations for cancer gene therapy is the inability of the therapeutic gene to transfect a sufficient number of tumor cells. Photochemical internalization (PCI) is a photodynamic therapy-based approach for improving the delivery of macromolecules and genes into the cell cytosol. The utility of PCI for the delivery of a tumor suppressor gene (PAX-6) was investigated in monolayers and spheroids consisting of F98 rat glioma cells.

  3. The Reagent-sorption Technology of Water Treatment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kurchatov, I. M.; Laguntsov, N. I.; Neschimenko, Y. P.; Feklistov, D. Y.

    The main purpose of this work is to intensify and to improve the efficiency of water treatment processes as well as to combine optimally modern techniques and technological devices in water treatment processes. Offered comprehensive hybrid water treatment developing technology of different origin is based on the combination of the treatment by reagent and membrane electro dialysis. In offered technology, of water treatment as a reagent is proposed to use alumino-silicic reagent, which simultaneously is coagulant, flocculant and adsorbent.

  4. Photochemical reactions of aromatic compounds and the concept of the photon as a traceless reagent.

    PubMed

    Hoffmann, Norbert

    2012-11-01

    Electronic excitation significantly changes the reactivity of chemical compounds. Compared to ground state reactions, photochemical reactions considerably enlarge the application spectrum of a particular functional group in organic synthesis. Multistep syntheses may be simplified and perspectives for target oriented synthesis (TOS) and diversity oriented synthesis (DOS) are developed. New compound families become available or may be obtained more easily. In contrast to common chemical reagents, photons don't generate side products resulting from the transformation of a chemical reagent. Therefore, they are considered as a traceless reagent. Consequently, photochemical reactions play a central role in the methodology of sustainable chemistry. This aspect has been recognized since the beginning of the 20th century. As with many other photochemical transformations, photochemical reactions of aromatic, benzene-like compounds illustrate well the advantages in this context. Photochemical cycloadditions of aromatic compounds have been investigated for a long time. Currently, they are applied in various fields of organic synthesis. They are also studied in supramolecular structures. The phenomena of reactivity and stereoselectivity are investigated. During recent years, photochemical electron transfer mediated reactions are particularly focused. Such transformations have likewise been performed with aromatic compounds. Reactivity and selectivity as well as application to organic synthesis are studied.

  5. Reduction of Huntington’s Disease RNA Foci by CAG Repeat-Targeting Reagents

    PubMed Central

    Urbanek, Martyna O.; Fiszer, Agnieszka; Krzyzosiak, Wlodzimierz J.

    2017-01-01

    In several human polyglutamine diseases caused by expansions of CAG repeats in the coding sequence of single genes, mutant transcripts are detained in nuclear RNA foci. In polyglutamine disorders, unlike other repeat-associated diseases, both RNA and proteins exert pathogenic effects; therefore, decreases of both RNA and protein toxicity need to be addressed in proposed treatments. A variety of oligonucleotide-based therapeutic approaches have been developed for polyglutamine diseases, but concomitant assays for RNA foci reduction are lacking. Here, we show that various types of oligonucleotide-based reagents affect RNA foci number in Huntington’s disease cells. We analyzed the effects of reagents targeting either CAG repeat tracts or specific HTT sequences in fibroblasts derived from patients. We tested reagents that either acted as translation blockers or triggered mRNA degradation via the RNA interference pathway or RNase H activation. We also analyzed the effect of chemical modifications of CAG repeat-targeting siRNAs on their efficiency in the foci decline. Our results suggest that the decrease of RNA foci number may be considered as a readout of treatment outcomes for oligonucleotide reagents. PMID:28400719

  6. Selective detection of alkanolamine vapors by ion mobility spectrometry with ketone reagent gases.

    PubMed

    Gan, T H; Corino, G

    2000-02-15

    The ion mobility (IMS) spectra of the alkanolamines, monoethanolamine (MEA), 3-amino-1-propanol (PRA), 4-amino-1-butanol (BUA), and 5-amino-1-pentanol (PEA) with acetone and 4-heptanone reagent gases have been measured using a hand-held spectrometer. Monomer and dimer peak patterns were observed for all the alkanolamines with acetone reagent gas. Drift times of monomer and dimer ion clusters for each alkanolamine increased linearly in order of size of alkyl group. Ammonia, Freon 22, and F76 diesel vapors, having similar or coincident mobilities, caused severe interference. Replacement of acetone with 4-heptanone reagent gas resulted in good separation by the altering drift times of product ions. The limit of detection was 0.005 ppm having a linear range of 0.005-0.7 ppm, and signal saturation occurred above 0.88 ppm. Detection was reversible, with a response time of 4 min and a slower recovery time of > 60 min, at vapor levels of 0.7 ppm and ambient nozzle and drift-region temperatures. In contrast to acetone chemistry, single-peak patterns were observed for the alkanolamines with the 4-heptanone reagent. Further, drift times unexpectedly remained stagnant with increasing alkyl-group size. From atmospheric pressure chemical ionization (APcI) tandem mass spectral identifications and collision induced studies, dynamic changes in product-ion equilibria in the IMS drift region compensated by differences in collision cross sections were suggested as the governing causes of the unusual mobility effect.

  7. A reagent-free tubular biofilm reactor for on-line determination of biochemical oxygen demand.

    PubMed

    Liu, Changyu; Zhao, Huijun; Gao, Shan; Jia, Jianbo; Zhao, Limin; Yong, Daming; Dong, Shaojun

    2013-07-15

    We reported a reagent-free tubular biofilm reactor (BFR) based analytical system for rapid online biochemical oxygen demand (BOD) determination. The BFR was cultivated using microbial seeds from activated sludge. It only needs tap water to operate and does not require any chemical reagent. The analytical performance of this reagent-free BFR system was found to be equal to or better than the BFR system operated using phosphate buffer saline (PBS) and high purity deionized water. The system can readily achieve a limit of detection of 0.25 mg O2 L(-1), possessing superior reproducibility, and long-term operational and storage stability. More importantly, we confirmed for the first time that the BFR system is capable of tolerating common toxicants found in wastewaters, such as 3,5-dichlorophenol and Zn(II), Cr(VI), Cd(II), Cu(II), Pb(II), Mn(II) and Ni(II), enabling the method to be applied to a wide range of wastewaters. The sloughing and clogging are the important attributes affecting the operational stability, hence, the reliability of most online wastewater monitoring systems, which can be effectively avoided, benefiting from the tubular geometry of the reactor and high flow rate conditions. These advantages, coupled with simplicity in device, convenience in operation and minimal maintenance, make such a reagent-free BFR analytical system promising for practical BOD online determination.

  8. Reduction of Huntington's Disease RNA Foci by CAG Repeat-Targeting Reagents.

    PubMed

    Urbanek, Martyna O; Fiszer, Agnieszka; Krzyzosiak, Wlodzimierz J

    2017-01-01

    In several human polyglutamine diseases caused by expansions of CAG repeats in the coding sequence of single genes, mutant transcripts are detained in nuclear RNA foci. In polyglutamine disorders, unlike other repeat-associated diseases, both RNA and proteins exert pathogenic effects; therefore, decreases of both RNA and protein toxicity need to be addressed in proposed treatments. A variety of oligonucleotide-based therapeutic approaches have been developed for polyglutamine diseases, but concomitant assays for RNA foci reduction are lacking. Here, we show that various types of oligonucleotide-based reagents affect RNA foci number in Huntington's disease cells. We analyzed the effects of reagents targeting either CAG repeat tracts or specific HTT sequences in fibroblasts derived from patients. We tested reagents that either acted as translation blockers or triggered mRNA degradation via the RNA interference pathway or RNase H activation. We also analyzed the effect of chemical modifications of CAG repeat-targeting siRNAs on their efficiency in the foci decline. Our results suggest that the decrease of RNA foci number may be considered as a readout of treatment outcomes for oligonucleotide reagents.

  9. Characterization of cell lines stably transfected with rubella virus replicons

    SciTech Connect

    Tzeng, Wen-Pin; Xu, Jie; Frey, Teryl K.

    2012-07-20

    Rubella virus (RUBV) replicons expressing a drug resistance gene and a gene of interest were used to select cell lines uniformly harboring the replicon. Replicons expressing GFP and a virus capsid protein GFP fusion (C-GFP) were compared. Vero or BHK cells transfected with either replicon survived drug selection and grew into a monolayer. However, survival was {approx}9-fold greater following transfection with the C-GFP-replicon than with the GFP-expressing replicon and while the C-GFP-replicon cells grew similarly to non-transfected cells, the GFP-replicon cells grew slower. Neither was due to the ability of the CP to enhance RNA synthesis but survival during drug selection was correlated with the ability of CP to inhibit apoptosis. Additionally, C-GFP-replicon cells were not cured of the replicon in the absence of drug selection. Interferon-alpha suppressed replicon RNA and protein synthesis, but did not cure the cells, explaining in part the ability of RUBV to establish persistent infections.

  10. Towards gene therapy based on femtosecond optical transfection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Antkowiak, M.; Torres-Mapa, M. L.; McGinty, J.; Chahine, M.; Bugeon, L.; Rose, A.; Finn, A.; Moleirinho, S.; Okuse, K.; Dallman, M.; French, P.; Harding, S. E.; Reynolds, P.; Gunn-Moore, F.; Dholakia, K.

    2012-06-01

    Gene therapy poses a great promise in treatment and prevention of a variety of diseases. However, crucial to studying and the development of this therapeutic approach is a reliable and efficient technique of gene and drug delivery into primary cell types. These cells, freshly derived from an organ or tissue, mimic more closely the in vivo state and present more physiologically relevant information compared to cultured cell lines. However, primary cells are known to be difficult to transfect and are typically transfected using viral methods, which are not only questionable in the context of an in vivo application but rely on time consuming vector construction and may also result in cell de-differentiation and loss of functionality. At the same time, well established non-viral methods do not guarantee satisfactory efficiency and viability. Recently, optical laser mediated poration of cell membrane has received interest as a viable gene and drug delivery technique. It has been shown to deliver a variety of biomolecules and genes into cultured mammalian cells; however, its applicability to primary cells remains to be proven. We demonstrate how optical transfection can be an enabling technique in research areas, such as neuropathic pain, neurodegenerative diseases, heart failure and immune or inflammatory-related diseases. Several primary cell types are used in this study, namely cardiomyocytes, dendritic cells, and neurons. We present our recent progress in optimizing this technique's efficiency and post-treatment cell viability for these types of cells and discuss future directions towards in vivo applications.

  11. Graphene and carbon nanotube nanocomposite for gene transfection.

    PubMed

    Hollanda, L M; Lobo, A O; Lancellotti, M; Berni, E; Corat, E J; Zanin, H

    2014-06-01

    Graphene and carbon nanotube nanocomposite (GCN) was synthesised and applied in gene transfection of pIRES plasmid conjugated with green fluorescent protein (GFP) in NIH-3T3 and NG97 cell lines. The tips of the multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) were exfoliated by oxygen plasma etching, which is also known to attach oxygen content groups on the MWCNT surfaces, changing their hydrophobicity. The nanocomposite was characterised by high resolution scanning electron microscopy; energy-dispersive X-ray, Fourier transform infrared and Raman spectroscopies, as well as zeta potential and particle size analyses using dynamic light scattering. BET adsorption isotherms showed the GCN to have an effective surface area of 38.5m(2)/g. The GCN and pIRES plasmid conjugated with the GFP gene, forming π-stacking when dispersed in water by magnetic stirring, resulting in a helical wrap. The measured zeta potential confirmed that the plasmid was connected to the nanocomposite. The NIH-3T3 and NG97 cell lines could phagocytize this wrap. The gene transfection was characterised by fluorescent protein produced in the cells and pictured by fluorescent microscopy. Before application, we studied GCN cell viability in NIH-3T3 and NG97 line cells using both MTT and Neutral Red uptake assays. Our results suggest that GCN has moderate stability behaviour as colloid solution and has great potential as a gene carrier agent in non-viral based therapy, with low cytotoxicity and good transfection efficiency.

  12. Application of nanostructured biochips for efficient cell transfection microarrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akkamsetty, Yamini; Hook, Andrew L.; Thissen, Helmut; Hayes, Jason P.; Voelcker, Nicolas H.

    2007-01-01

    Microarrays, high-throughput devices for genomic analysis, can be further improved by developing materials that are able to manipulate the interfacial behaviour of biomolecules. This is achieved both spatially and temporally by smart materials possessing both switchable and patterned surface properties. A system had been developed to spatially manipulate both DNA and cell growth based upon the surface modification of highly doped silicon by plasma polymerisation and polyethylene grafting followed by masked laser ablation for formation of a pattered surface with both bioactive and non-fouling regions. This platform has been successfully applied to transfected cell microarray applications with the parallel expression of genes by utilising its ability to direct and limit both DNA and cell attachment to specific sites. One of the greatest advantages of this system is its application to reverse transfection, whereupon by utilising the switchable adsorption and desorption of DNA using a voltage bias, the efficiency of cell transfection can be enhanced. However, it was shown that application of a voltage also reduces the viability of neuroblastoma cells grown on a plasma polymer surface, but not human embryonic kidney cells. This suggests that the application of a voltage may not only result in the desorption of bound DNA but may also affect attached cells. The characterisation of a DNA microarray by contact printing has also been investigated.

  13. 21 CFR 866.3360 - Lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus serological reagents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES IMMUNOLOGY AND MICROBIOLOGY DEVICES Serological Reagents... cerebral meningitis (inflammation of membranes that envelop the brain) and occasionally a mild...

  14. 21 CFR 866.3360 - Lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus serological reagents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES IMMUNOLOGY AND MICROBIOLOGY DEVICES Serological Reagents... cerebral meningitis (inflammation of membranes that envelop the brain) and occasionally a mild...

  15. 21 CFR 866.3360 - Lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus serological reagents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES IMMUNOLOGY AND MICROBIOLOGY DEVICES Serological Reagents... cerebral meningitis (inflammation of membranes that envelop the brain) and occasionally a mild...

  16. 21 CFR 866.3360 - Lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus serological reagents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES IMMUNOLOGY AND MICROBIOLOGY DEVICES Serological Reagents... cerebral meningitis (inflammation of membranes that envelop the brain) and occasionally a mild...

  17. 21 CFR 866.3360 - Lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus serological reagents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES IMMUNOLOGY AND MICROBIOLOGY DEVICES Serological Reagents... cerebral meningitis (inflammation of membranes that envelop the brain) and occasionally a mild...

  18. Advances in synthetic peptides reagent discovery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adams, Bryn L.; Sarkes, Deborah A.; Finch, Amethist S.; Stratis-Cullum, Dimitra N.

    2013-05-01

    Bacterial display technology offers a number of advantages over competing display technologies (e.g, phage) for the rapid discovery and development of peptides with interaction targeted to materials ranging from biological hazards through inorganic metals. We have previously shown that discovery of synthetic peptide reagents utilizing bacterial display technology is relatively simple and rapid to make laboratory automation possible. This included extensive study of the protective antigen system of Bacillus anthracis, including development of discovery, characterization, and computational biology capabilities for in-silico optimization. Although the benefits towards CBD goals are evident, the impact is far-reaching due to our ability to understand and harness peptide interactions that are ultimately extendable to the hybrid biomaterials of the future. In this paper, we describe advances in peptide discovery including, new target systems (e.g. non-biological materials), advanced library development and clone analysis including integrated reporting.

  19. Laboratory reagents and coagulation assay procedures*

    PubMed Central

    Loeliger, E. A.

    1973-01-01

    This paper reviews current methods of standardizing laboratory investigations in blood clotting, points out their shortcomings, and suggests ways of improving them. Procedures requiring standardization include the diagnosis of haemorrhagic diathesis and thrombotic tendency; the quantification of liver function; and monitoring of the effect of haemostatic replacement therapy and therapeutic anticoagulation. Care in collecting, storing, and handling blood for investigation is of primary importance. Achievements in the standardization of reagents are reviewed and examples of standardized methods are given. Although knowledge of the haemostatic process and experimental methods for its investigation have reached an advanced stage, their clinical application is still unsatisfactory owing to the inadequacy of national and international regulations. To improve the situation, one or more internationally approved laboratories for standardization and quality control, operating according to rules elaborated by experts in the field, should be designated in each country. The need for international reference laboratories is urgent. PMID:4544784

  20. Phenylethynyl endcapping reagents and reactive diluents

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jensen, Brian J. (Inventor); Bryant, Robert G. (Inventor); Hergenrother, Paul M. (Inventor)

    1994-01-01

    A phenylethynyl composition which can be used to endcap nucleophilic species is employed in the production of phenylethynyl terminated reactive oligomers exclusively. These phenylethynyl terminated reactive oligomers display unique thermal characteristics, as exemplified by the model compound, 4-phenoxy 4'-phenylethynylbenzophenone, which is relatively stable at 200 C, but reacts at 350 C. In addition, a reactive diluent was prepared which decreases the melt viscosity of the phenylethynyl terminated oligomers and subsequently reacts therewith to increase density of the resulting thermoset. The novelty of this invention resides in the phenylethynyl composition used to terminate a nucleophilic reagent, resulting in the exclusive production of phenylethynyl terminated reactive oligomers which display unique thermal characteristics. A reactive diluent was also employed to decrease the melt viscosity of a phenylethynyl terminated reactive oligomer and to subsequently react therewith to increase the crosslink density of the resulting thermoset. These materials have features which make them attractive candidates for use as composite matrices and adhesives.

  1. DNA Transfection of Mammalian Skeletal Muscles using In Vivo Electroporation

    PubMed Central

    DiFranco, Marino; Quinonez, Marbella; Capote, Joana; Vergara, Julio

    2009-01-01

    A growing interest in cell biology is to express transgenically modified forms of essential proteins (e.g. fluorescently tagged constructs and/or mutant variants) in order to investigate their endogenous distribution and functional relevance. An interesting approach that has been implemented to fulfill this objective in fully differentiated cells is the in vivo transfection of plasmids by various methods into specific tissues such as liver1, skeletal muscle2,3, and even the brain4. We present here a detailed description of the steps that must be followed in order to efficiently transfect genetic material into fibers of the flexor digitorum brevis (FDB) and interosseus (IO) muscles of adult mice using an in vivo electroporation approach. The experimental parameters have been optimized so as to maximize the number of muscle fibers transfected while minimizing tissue damages that may impair the quality and quantity of the proteins expressed in individual fibers. We have verified that the implementation of the methodology described in this paper results in a high yield of soluble proteins, i.e. EGFP and ECFP3, calpain, FKBP12, β2a-DHPR, etc. ; structural proteins, i.e. minidystrophin and α-actinin; and membrane proteins, i.e. α1s-DHPR, RyR1, cardiac Na/Ca2+ exchanger , NaV1.4 Na channel, SERCA1, etc., when applied to FDB, IO and other muscles of mice and rats. The efficient expression of some of these proteins has been verified with biochemical3 and functional evidence5. However, by far the most common confirmatory approach used by us are standard fluorescent microscopy and 2-photon laser scanning microscopy (TPLSM), which permit to identify not only the overall expression, but also the detailed intracellular localization, of fluorescently tagged protein constructs. The method could be equally used to transfect plasmids encoding for the expression of proteins of physiological relevance (as shown here), or for interference RNA (siRNA) aiming to suppress the

  2. DNA transfection of mammalian skeletal muscles using in vivo electroporation.

    PubMed

    DiFranco, Marino; Quinonez, Marbella; Capote, Joana; Vergara, Julio

    2009-10-19

    A growing interest in cell biology is to express transgenically modified forms of essential proteins (e.g. fluorescently tagged constructs and/or mutant variants) in order to investigate their endogenous distribution and functional relevance. An interesting approach that has been implemented to fulfill this objective in fully differentiated cells is the in vivo transfection of plasmids by various methods into specific tissues such as liver, skeletal muscle, and even the brain. We present here a detailed description of the steps that must be followed in order to efficiently transfect genetic material into fibers of the flexor digitorum brevis (FDB) and interosseus (IO) muscles of adult mice using an in vivo electroporation approach. The experimental parameters have been optimized so as to maximize the number of muscle fibers transfected while minimizing tissue damages that may impair the quality and quantity of the proteins expressed in individual fibers. We have verified that the implementation of the methodology described in this paper results in a high yield of soluble proteins, i.e. EGFP and ECFP, calpain, FKBP12, beta2a-DHPR, etc. ; structural proteins, i.e. minidystrophin and alpha-actinin; and membrane proteins, i.e. alpha1s-DHPR, RyR1, cardiac Na/Ca(2+) exchanger , NaV1.4 Na channel, SERCA1, etc., when applied to FDB, IO and other muscles of mice and rats. The efficient expression of some of these proteins has been verified with biochemical and functional evidence. However, by far the most common confirmatory approach used by us are standard fluorescent microscopy and 2-photon laser scanning microscopy (TPLSM), which permit to identify not only the overall expression, but also the detailed intracellular localization, of fluorescently tagged protein constructs. The method could be equally used to transfect plasmids encoding for the expression of proteins of physiological relevance (as shown here), or for interference RNA (siRNA) aiming to suppress the

  3. Transfection of normal human bronchial epithelial cells with the bcl-2 oncogene

    SciTech Connect

    Kennedy, C.H.; Kenyon, K.D.; Tesfaigzi, J.

    1995-12-01

    In vitro, studies examining the transformation of virus-immortalized human bronchial epithelial (HBE) cells after exposure to chemical and physical carcinogens have contributed to our understanding of the mechanisms that underlie the development of lung cancer. Virus-immortalized HBE cells have been used because of both the limited life span of normal human bronchial epithelial (NHBE) cells in culture (approximately 30-35 population doublins) and their resistance to in vitro malignant transformation. For example, human papillomavirus (HPV)-immortalized HBE cells have been used to study the genetic changes that occur after exposure to {alpha}-particles in vitro. Although this model may prove to be useful for studying the 18% or less of bronchogenic carcinomas found to contain HPV sequences, it is not an appropriate model for studying the majority of lung epithelial malignancies in which HPV DNA is not detected. This view is supported by the fact that HPV-immortalized cell lines commonly exhibit aneuploidy. This results of this study suggest that: (1) NHBE cells can be transiently transfected with the pCMV{Beta} vector; and (2) the antibiotic hygromycin-resistant transfected cells.

  4. Preparation of cationized polysaccharides as gene transfection carrier for bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells.

    PubMed

    Jo, Jun-ichiro; Okazaki, Arimichi; Nagane, Kentaro; Yamamoto, Masaya; Tabata, Yasuhiko

    2010-01-01

    The objective of this study is to prepare a non-viral carrier of gene transfection from various polysaccharides and evaluate the feasibility in gene expression for mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs). Various amounts of spermine were chemically introduced into pullulan, dextran and mannan with a molecular weight of around 40 000 or pullulan with different molecular weights to prepare cationized polysaccharides with different extents of spermine introduced (spermine-polysaccharide). Each cationized polysaccharide was complexed with a plasmid DNA at various ratios and in vitro gene transfection was investigated for rat bone marrow-derived MSCs. The level of gene expression depended on the type of cationized polysaccharide. The highest level was observed for the complex of spermine-pullulan and plasmid DNA. Additionally, the level also depended on the molecular weight of pullulan and the extent of spermine introduced to pullulan. Suppression of gene expression with chlorpromazine and methyl-beta-cyclodextrin of endocytosis inhibitors demonstrated that the cellular uptake of spermine-pullulan-plasmid DNA complexes was mediated by clathrin- and raft/caveolae-dependent endocytic pathways. The cationized pullulan is a promising non-viral carrier of plasmid DNA for MSCs.

  5. Improvement of transfection efficiency in cultured chicken primordial germ cells by percoll density gradient centrifugation.

    PubMed

    Oishi, Isao

    2010-01-01

    Chicken primordial germ cells (PGCs) differentiate into germ cells in gonads. Because PGCs can be cloned and cultured maintaining germline competency, they are a good means of modifying the chicken genome, but the efficiency of plasmid transfection into PGCs is very low. In this study, I attempted to improve the efficiency of PGC transfection. Cultured PGCs were purified by Percoll density gradient centrifugation, and were then transfected with plasmid DNA. For transient transfection, the transfection efficiency increased more than 7-fold by the Percoll method. The efficiency of stable transfection of PGCs also increased significantly. The stable transfectants that were isolated by this method accumulated in the developing gonads after microinjection into bloodstream of chick embryos, indicating that gene transfection by Percoll purification did not alter the function of PGCs in vivo.

  6. Collision of millimetre droplets induces DNA and protein transfection into cells

    PubMed Central

    Ikemoto, Kazuto; Sakata, Ichiro; Sakai, Takafumi

    2012-01-01

    Nonperturbing and simple transfection methods are important for modern techniques used in biotechnology. Recently, we reported that electrospraying can be applied to DNA transfection in cell lines, bacteria, and chicken embryos. However, the transfection efficiency was only about 2%. To improve the transfection rate, physical properties of the sprayed droplets were studied in different variations of the method. We describe a highly efficient technique (30–93%) for introduction of materials such as DNA and protein into living cells by electrospraying droplets of a high conductivity liquid onto cells incubated with the material for transfection. Electric conductivity has a sizable influence on the success of transfection. In contrast, molecular weight of the transfected material, types of ions in the electrospray solution, and the osmotic pressure do not influence transfection efficiency. The physical analysis revealed that collision of cells with millimetre-sized droplets activates intracellular uptake. PMID:22375250

  7. Waveguide-based optical chemical sensor

    SciTech Connect

    Grace, Karen M.; Swanson, Basil I.; Honkanen, Seppo

    2007-03-13

    The invention provides an apparatus and method for highly selective and sensitive chemical sensing. Two modes of laser light are transmitted through a waveguide, refracted by a thin film host reagent coating on the waveguide, and analyzed in a phase sensitive detector for changes in effective refractive index. Sensor specificity is based on the particular species selective thin films of host reagents which are attached to the surface of the planar optical waveguide. The thin film of host reagents refracts laser light at different refractive indices according to what species are forming inclusion complexes with the host reagents.

  8. Alkylation of pyridines at their 4-positions with styrenes plus yttrium reagent or benzyl Grignard reagents.

    PubMed

    Mizumori, Tomoya; Hata, Takeshi; Urabe, Hirokazu

    2015-01-02

    A new regioselective alkylation of pyridines at their 4-position was achieved with styrenes in the presence of yttrium trichloride, BuLi, and diisobutylaluminium hydride (DIBAL-H) in THF. Alternatively, similar products were more simply prepared from pyridines and benzyl Grignard reagents. These reactions are not only a useful preparation of 4-substituted pyridines but are also complementary to other relevant reactions usually giving 2-substituted pyridines.

  9. DNA Transfection to Mesenchymal Stem Cells Using a Novel Type of Pseudodendrimer Based on 2,2-Bis(hydroxymethyl)propionic Acid.

    PubMed

    Lancelot, Alexandre; González-Pastor, Rebeca; Concellón, Alberto; Sierra, Teresa; Martín-Duque, Pilar; Serrano, José L

    2017-04-19

    In the search for effective vehicles to carry genetic material into cells, we present here new pseudodendrimers that consist of a hyperbranched polyester core surrounded by amino-terminated 2,2-bis(hydroxymethyl)propionic acid (bis-MPA) dendrons. The pseudodendrimers are readily synthesized from commercial hyperbranched bis-MPA polyesters of the second, third, and fourth generations and third-generation bis-MPA dendrons, bearing eight peripheral glycine moieties, coupled by the copper(I)-catalyzed azide-alkyne cycloaddition (CuAAC). This approach provides globular macromolecular structures bearing 128, 256, and 512 terminal amino groups, and these can complex pDNA. The toxicity of the three pseudodendrimers was studied on two cell lines, mesenchymal stem cells, and HeLa, and it was demonstrated that these compounds do not affect negatively cell viability up to 72 h. The complexation with DNA was investigated in terms of N-to-P ratio and dendriplex stability. The three generations were found to promote internalizing of pDNA into mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs), and their transfection capacity was compared with two nonviral commercial transfection agents, Lipofectamine and TransIT-X2. The highest generations were able to transfect these cells at levels comparable to both commercial reagents.

  10. Coal froth flotation: effects of reagent adsorption on the froth structure

    SciTech Connect

    Meryem Ozmak; Zeki Aktas

    2006-05-15

    The amount and quality of concentrate obtained from froth flotation of a coal are very important to determine the efficiency of the separation process. The shape and size of the bubbles in the froth directly affect the amount and purity of the concentrate overflowed during the froth flotation of the coal. The froth structure is significantly dependent on parameters such as the size of the solid particles, the surface properties of the particles, the chemical structure of surface active agents, the reagents adsorbed onto solid particles, and the reagents remaining in water. This work was performed to determine the relationship between the reagents adsorbed on the solid particles, froth structure, and froth flotation performance. The -53 {mu}m size fraction of a bituminous coal was used to perform froth flotation experiments. The froth flotation of the coal used was performed in the presence of two nonionic surfactants, Triton x-100 (poly(ethylene glycol) tert-octylphenyl ether) and MIBC (methyl isobutyl carbinol), and an anionic surfactant, SDS (sodium dodecyl sulfate). The results showed that the adsorption of a high amount of reagent on the particles decreased the ability of separation, thus a substantial amount of mineral particles overflowed along with the hydrophobic coal particles. The use of MIBC with Triton x-100 or SDS as mixture increased solid recovery, and it was concluded that MIBC selectively adsorbed on solids acting as collector as well as a frother. Reagent adsorption has a crucial effect on the froth structure, which is strongly related to flotation performance. 33 refs., 18 figs.

  11. 21 CFR 58.83 - Reagents and solutions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 1 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Reagents and solutions. 58.83 Section 58.83 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES GENERAL GOOD LABORATORY PRACTICE FOR NONCLINICAL LABORATORY STUDIES Testing Facilities Operation § 58.83 Reagents...

  12. 21 CFR 58.83 - Reagents and solutions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 1 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Reagents and solutions. 58.83 Section 58.83 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES GENERAL GOOD LABORATORY PRACTICE FOR NONCLINICAL LABORATORY STUDIES Testing Facilities Operation § 58.83 Reagents...

  13. 21 CFR 58.83 - Reagents and solutions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 1 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Reagents and solutions. 58.83 Section 58.83 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES GENERAL GOOD LABORATORY PRACTICE FOR NONCLINICAL LABORATORY STUDIES Testing Facilities Operation § 58.83 Reagents...

  14. 21 CFR 58.83 - Reagents and solutions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 1 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Reagents and solutions. 58.83 Section 58.83 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES GENERAL GOOD LABORATORY PRACTICE FOR NONCLINICAL LABORATORY STUDIES Testing Facilities Operation § 58.83 Reagents...

  15. 21 CFR 58.83 - Reagents and solutions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Reagents and solutions. 58.83 Section 58.83 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES GENERAL GOOD LABORATORY PRACTICE FOR NONCLINICAL LABORATORY STUDIES Testing Facilities Operation § 58.83 Reagents...

  16. Dimethylmaleic anhydride, a specific reagent for protein amino groups.

    PubMed

    de la Escalera, S; Palacián, E

    1989-01-01

    The reagent dimethylmaleic anhydride does not cause a stable modification of thiol compounds under the conditions used for modification of protein amino groups, in contrast to maleic and monomethylmaleic anhydrides, which produce an irreversible modification of sulfhydryl groups. This behavior and the low reactivity toward hydroxyamino acid residues, shown in a previous work, make dimethylmaleic anhydride a specific reagent for protein amino groups.

  17. 21 CFR 864.8540 - Red cell lysing reagent.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Red cell lysing reagent. 864.8540 Section 864.8540 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES HEMATOLOGY AND PATHOLOGY DEVICES Hematology Reagents § 864.8540 Red cell lysing...

  18. 21 CFR 864.4020 - Analyte specific reagents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Analyte specific reagents. 864.4020 Section 864.4020 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES HEMATOLOGY AND PATHOLOGY DEVICES Specimen Preparation Reagents § 864.4020 Analyte...

  19. 21 CFR 864.8950 - Russell viper venom reagent.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Russell viper venom reagent. 864.8950 Section 864.8950 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES HEMATOLOGY AND PATHOLOGY DEVICES Hematology Reagents § 864.8950 Russell viper...

  20. 21 CFR 864.8950 - Russell viper venom reagent.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Russell viper venom reagent. 864.8950 Section 864.8950 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES HEMATOLOGY AND PATHOLOGY DEVICES Hematology Reagents § 864.8950 Russell viper venom...

  1. 21 CFR 864.8950 - Russell viper venom reagent.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Russell viper venom reagent. 864.8950 Section 864.8950 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES HEMATOLOGY AND PATHOLOGY DEVICES Hematology Reagents § 864.8950 Russell viper venom...

  2. 21 CFR 864.8950 - Russell viper venom reagent.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Russell viper venom reagent. 864.8950 Section 864.8950 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES HEMATOLOGY AND PATHOLOGY DEVICES Hematology Reagents § 864.8950 Russell viper venom...

  3. 21 CFR 864.8950 - Russell viper venom reagent.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Russell viper venom reagent. 864.8950 Section 864.8950 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES HEMATOLOGY AND PATHOLOGY DEVICES Hematology Reagents § 864.8950 Russell viper venom...

  4. Physically absorbable reagents-collectors in elementary flotation

    SciTech Connect

    S.A. Kondrat'ev; I.G. Bochkarev

    2007-09-15

    Based on the reviewed researches held at the Institute of Mining, Siberian Branch, Russian Academy of Sciences, the effect of physically absorbable reagents-collectors on formation of a flotation complex and its stability in turbulent pulp flows in flotation machines of basic types is considered. The basic requirements for physically absorbable reagents-collectors at different flotation stages are established.

  5. Redox mediation and hydrogen-generation with bipyridinium reagents

    DOEpatents

    Wrighton, Mark S.; Bookbinder, Dana C.; Bruce, James A.; Dominey, Raymond N.; Lewis, Nathan S.

    1984-03-27

    A variety of redox mediating agents employing bipyridinium reagents and such reagents in conjunction with dispersed noble metals, such as platinium, are disclosed as coatings for substrates and electrodes. The agents may be charged by an applied voltage or by photoelectric effects or may be equilibrated with hydrogen. The agents are useful in reducing biological materials and electrolytic hydrogen production.

  6. 21 CFR 866.3480 - Respiratory syncytial virus serological reagents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... respiratory tract infections, including the common cold, pharyngitis, and infantile bronchopneumonia. (b... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Respiratory syncytial virus serological reagents... Respiratory syncytial virus serological reagents. (a) Identification. Respiratory syncytial virus serological...

  7. 21 CFR 866.3480 - Respiratory syncytial virus serological reagents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... respiratory tract infections, including the common cold, pharyngitis, and infantile bronchopneumonia. (b... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Respiratory syncytial virus serological reagents... Respiratory syncytial virus serological reagents. (a) Identification. Respiratory syncytial virus serological...

  8. 21 CFR 866.3480 - Respiratory syncytial virus serological reagents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... respiratory tract infections, including the common cold, pharyngitis, and infantile bronchopneumonia. (b... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Respiratory syncytial virus serological reagents... Respiratory syncytial virus serological reagents. (a) Identification. Respiratory syncytial virus serological...

  9. 21 CFR 866.3480 - Respiratory syncytial virus serological reagents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... respiratory tract infections, including the common cold, pharyngitis, and infantile bronchopneumonia. (b... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Respiratory syncytial virus serological reagents... Respiratory syncytial virus serological reagents. (a) Identification. Respiratory syncytial virus serological...

  10. 21 CFR 866.3480 - Respiratory syncytial virus serological reagents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... respiratory tract infections, including the common cold, pharyngitis, and infantile bronchopneumonia. (b... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Respiratory syncytial virus serological reagents... Respiratory syncytial virus serological reagents. (a) Identification. Respiratory syncytial virus serological...

  11. IN-PLACE REGENERATION OF GAC USING FENTON'S REAGENTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    This paper evaluates the feasibility of using Fenton’s reagents for in-place recovery of spent granular activated carbon (GAC). Fenton’s reagents are cycled through spent GAC to degrade sorbed chlorinated hydrocarbons with little loss of carbon capacity. Seven chlorinated compou...

  12. 21 CFR 866.3600 - Schistosoma spp. serological reagents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Schistosoma spp. serological reagents. 866.3600 Section 866.3600 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES IMMUNOLOGY AND MICROBIOLOGY DEVICES Serological Reagents § 866.3600...

  13. 21 CFR 866.3680 - Sporothrix schenckii serological reagents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Sporothrix schenckii serological reagents. 866.3680 Section 866.3680 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES IMMUNOLOGY AND MICROBIOLOGY DEVICES Serological Reagents §...

  14. 21 CFR 866.3520 - Rubeola (measles) virus serological reagents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Rubeola (measles) virus serological reagents. 866... Rubeola (measles) virus serological reagents. (a) Identification. Rubeola (measles) virus serological... to rubeola virus in serum. The identification aids in the diagnosis of measles and provides...

  15. 21 CFR 866.3520 - Rubeola (measles) virus serological reagents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Rubeola (measles) virus serological reagents. 866... Rubeola (measles) virus serological reagents. (a) Identification. Rubeola (measles) virus serological... to rubeola virus in serum. The identification aids in the diagnosis of measles and provides...

  16. 21 CFR 866.3336 - John Cunningham Virus serological reagents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false John Cunningham Virus serological reagents. 866... John Cunningham Virus serological reagents. (a) Identification. John Cunningham Virus serological... antibodies to John Cunningham Virus in serum and plasma. The identification aids in the risk stratification...

  17. 21 CFR 866.3520 - Rubeola (measles) virus serological reagents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Rubeola (measles) virus serological reagents. 866... Rubeola (measles) virus serological reagents. (a) Identification. Rubeola (measles) virus serological... to rubeola virus in serum. The identification aids in the diagnosis of measles and provides...

  18. 21 CFR 866.3520 - Rubeola (measles) virus serological reagents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Rubeola (measles) virus serological reagents. 866... Rubeola (measles) virus serological reagents. (a) Identification. Rubeola (measles) virus serological... to rubeola virus in serum. The identification aids in the diagnosis of measles and provides...

  19. 21 CFR 866.3520 - Rubeola (measles) virus serological reagents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Rubeola (measles) virus serological reagents. 866... Rubeola (measles) virus serological reagents. (a) Identification. Rubeola (measles) virus serological... to rubeola virus in serum. The identification aids in the diagnosis of measles and provides...

  20. 21 CFR 866.3550 - Salmonella spp. serological reagents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Salmonella spp. serological reagents. 866.3550 Section 866.3550 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES... conjugated with a fluorescent dye (immunofluorescent reagents) used to identify Salmonella spp. directly...

  1. 21 CFR 866.3500 - Rickettsia serological reagents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Rickettsia serological reagents. 866.3500 Section 866.3500 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES..., some of these reagents consist of rickettsial antisera conjugated with a fluorescent...

  2. 21 CFR 866.3500 - Rickettsia serological reagents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Rickettsia serological reagents. 866.3500 Section 866.3500 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES..., some of these reagents consist of rickettsial antisera conjugated with a fluorescent...

  3. 21 CFR 866.3405 - Poliovirus serological reagents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Poliovirus serological reagents. 866.3405 Section 866.3405 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES..., some of these reagents consist of poliovirus antisera conjugated with a fluorescent...

  4. 21 CFR 866.3220 - Entamoeba histolytica serological reagents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Entamoeba histolytica serological reagents. 866.3220 Section 866.3220 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN... fluorescent dye (immunofluorescent reagents) used to identify Entamoeba histolytica directly from...

  5. 21 CFR 866.3405 - Poliovirus serological reagents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Poliovirus serological reagents. 866.3405 Section 866.3405 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES..., some of these reagents consist of poliovirus antisera conjugated with a fluorescent...

  6. 21 CFR 866.3220 - Entamoeba histolytica serological reagents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Entamoeba histolytica serological reagents. 866.3220 Section 866.3220 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN... fluorescent dye (immunofluorescent reagents) used to identify Entamoeba histolytica directly from...

  7. 21 CFR 866.3405 - Poliovirus serological reagents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Poliovirus serological reagents. 866.3405 Section 866.3405 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES..., some of these reagents consist of poliovirus antisera conjugated with a fluorescent...

  8. 21 CFR 866.3500 - Rickettsia serological reagents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Rickettsia serological reagents. 866.3500 Section 866.3500 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES..., some of these reagents consist of rickettsial antisera conjugated with a fluorescent...

  9. 21 CFR 866.3220 - Entamoeba histolytica serological reagents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Entamoeba histolytica serological reagents. 866.3220 Section 866.3220 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN... fluorescent dye (immunofluorescent reagents) used to identify Entamoeba histolytica directly from...

  10. 21 CFR 866.3550 - Salmonella spp. serological reagents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Salmonella spp. serological reagents. 866.3550 Section 866.3550 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES... conjugated with a fluorescent dye (immunofluorescent reagents) used to identify Salmonella spp. directly...

  11. 21 CFR 866.3280 - Francisella tularensis serological reagents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Francisella tularensis serological reagents. 866.3280 Section 866.3280 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN... dye (immunofluorescent reagents) used to identify Francisella tularensis directly from...

  12. 21 CFR 866.3550 - Salmonella spp. serological reagents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Salmonella spp. serological reagents. 866.3550 Section 866.3550 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES... conjugated with a fluorescent dye (immunofluorescent reagents) used to identify Salmonella spp. directly...

  13. 21 CFR 866.3350 - Leptospira spp. serological reagents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Leptospira spp. serological reagents. 866.3350 Section 866.3350 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES..., some of these antisera are conjugated with a fluorescent dye (immunofluorescent reagents) and used...

  14. 21 CFR 866.3350 - Leptospira spp. serological reagents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Leptospira spp. serological reagents. 866.3350 Section 866.3350 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES..., some of these antisera are conjugated with a fluorescent dye (immunofluorescent reagents) and used...

  15. 21 CFR 866.3350 - Leptospira spp. serological reagents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Leptospira spp. serological reagents. 866.3350 Section 866.3350 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES..., some of these antisera are conjugated with a fluorescent dye (immunofluorescent reagents) and used...

  16. 21 CFR 866.3405 - Poliovirus serological reagents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Poliovirus serological reagents. 866.3405 Section 866.3405 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES..., some of these reagents consist of poliovirus antisera conjugated with a fluorescent...

  17. 21 CFR 866.3220 - Entamoeba histolytica serological reagents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Entamoeba histolytica serological reagents. 866.3220 Section 866.3220 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN... fluorescent dye (immunofluorescent reagents) used to identify Entamoeba histolytica directly from...

  18. 21 CFR 866.3405 - Poliovirus serological reagents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Poliovirus serological reagents. 866.3405 Section 866.3405 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES..., some of these reagents consist of poliovirus antisera conjugated with a fluorescent...

  19. Protein-Protein Interaction Reagents | Office of Cancer Genomics

    Cancer.gov

    The CTD2 Center at Emory University has a library of genes used to study protein-protein interactions in mammalian cells. These genes are cloned in different mammalian expression vectors. A list of available cancer-associated genes can be accessed below. Emory_CTD^2_PPI_Reagents.xlsx Emory_CTD^2_PPI_Reagents.xlsx Contact: Haian Fu

  20. 21 CFR 866.3035 - Arizona spp. serological reagents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Arizona spp. serological reagents. 866.3035 Section 866.3035 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES IMMUNOLOGY AND MICROBIOLOGY DEVICES Serological Reagents § 866.3035 Arizona spp...

  1. 21 CFR 866.3125 - Citrobacter spp. serological reagents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Citrobacter spp. serological reagents. 866.3125 Section 866.3125 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES IMMUNOLOGY AND MICROBIOLOGY DEVICES Serological Reagents § 866.3125 Citrobacter...

  2. 21 CFR 866.3740 - Streptococcus spp. serological reagents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Streptococcus spp. serological reagents. 866.3740 Section 866.3740 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES IMMUNOLOGY AND MICROBIOLOGY DEVICES Serological Reagents § 866.3740 Streptococcus...

  3. 21 CFR 866.3490 - Rhinovirus serological reagents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Rhinovirus serological reagents. 866.3490 Section 866.3490 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES IMMUNOLOGY AND MICROBIOLOGY DEVICES Serological Reagents § 866.3490 Rhinovirus...

  4. 21 CFR 866.3600 - Schistosoma spp. serological reagents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Schistosoma spp. serological reagents. 866.3600 Section 866.3600 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES IMMUNOLOGY AND MICROBIOLOGY DEVICES Serological Reagents § 866.3600 Schistosoma...

  5. 21 CFR 866.3250 - Erysipelothrix rhusiopathiae serological reagents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Erysipelothrix rhusiopathiae serological reagents. 866.3250 Section 866.3250 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES IMMUNOLOGY AND MICROBIOLOGY DEVICES Serological Reagents § 866.3250...

  6. 21 CFR 866.3740 - Streptococcus spp. serological reagents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Streptococcus spp. serological reagents. 866.3740 Section 866.3740 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES IMMUNOLOGY AND MICROBIOLOGY DEVICES Serological Reagents § 866.3740 Streptococcus...

  7. 21 CFR 866.3040 - Aspergillus spp. serological reagents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Aspergillus spp. serological reagents. 866.3040 Section 866.3040 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES IMMUNOLOGY AND MICROBIOLOGY DEVICES Serological Reagents § 866.3040 Aspergillus...

  8. 21 CFR 866.3600 - Schistosoma spp. serological reagents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Schistosoma spp. serological reagents. 866.3600 Section 866.3600 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES IMMUNOLOGY AND MICROBIOLOGY DEVICES Serological Reagents § 866.3600 Schistosoma...

  9. 21 CFR 866.3175 - Cytomegalovirus serological reagents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Cytomegalovirus serological reagents. 866.3175 Section 866.3175 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES IMMUNOLOGY AND MICROBIOLOGY DEVICES Serological Reagents § 866.3175...

  10. 21 CFR 866.3680 - Sporothrix schenckii serological reagents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Sporothrix schenckii serological reagents. 866.3680 Section 866.3680 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES IMMUNOLOGY AND MICROBIOLOGY DEVICES Serological Reagents § 866.3680...

  11. 21 CFR 866.3470 - Reovirus serological reagents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Reovirus serological reagents. 866.3470 Section 866.3470 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES IMMUNOLOGY AND MICROBIOLOGY DEVICES Serological Reagents § 866.3470 Reovirus...

  12. 21 CFR 866.3135 - Coccidioides immitis serological reagents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Coccidioides immitis serological reagents. 866.3135 Section 866.3135 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES IMMUNOLOGY AND MICROBIOLOGY DEVICES Serological Reagents § 866.3135...

  13. 21 CFR 866.3125 - Citrobacter spp. serological reagents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Citrobacter spp. serological reagents. 866.3125 Section 866.3125 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES IMMUNOLOGY AND MICROBIOLOGY DEVICES Serological Reagents § 866.3125 Citrobacter...

  14. 21 CFR 866.3680 - Sporothrix schenckii serological reagents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Sporothrix schenckii serological reagents. 866.3680 Section 866.3680 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES IMMUNOLOGY AND MICROBIOLOGY DEVICES Serological Reagents § 866.3680...

  15. 21 CFR 866.3040 - Aspergillus spp. serological reagents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Aspergillus spp. serological reagents. 866.3040 Section 866.3040 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES IMMUNOLOGY AND MICROBIOLOGY DEVICES Serological Reagents § 866.3040 Aspergillus...

  16. 21 CFR 866.3250 - Erysipelothrix rhusiopathiae serological reagents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Erysipelothrix rhusiopathiae serological reagents. 866.3250 Section 866.3250 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES IMMUNOLOGY AND MICROBIOLOGY DEVICES Serological Reagents § 866.3250...

  17. 21 CFR 866.3740 - Streptococcus spp. serological reagents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Streptococcus spp. serological reagents. 866.3740 Section 866.3740 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES IMMUNOLOGY AND MICROBIOLOGY DEVICES Serological Reagents § 866.3740 Streptococcus...

  18. 21 CFR 866.3490 - Rhinovirus serological reagents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Rhinovirus serological reagents. 866.3490 Section 866.3490 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES IMMUNOLOGY AND MICROBIOLOGY DEVICES Serological Reagents § 866.3490 Rhinovirus...

  19. 21 CFR 866.3040 - Aspergillus spp. serological reagents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Aspergillus spp. serological reagents. 866.3040 Section 866.3040 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES IMMUNOLOGY AND MICROBIOLOGY DEVICES Serological Reagents § 866.3040 Aspergillus...

  20. 21 CFR 866.3630 - Serratia spp. serological reagents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Serratia spp. serological reagents. 866.3630 Section 866.3630 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES IMMUNOLOGY AND MICROBIOLOGY DEVICES Serological Reagents § 866.3630 Serratia spp...