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Sample records for chemical vapour deposited

  1. Biocompatibility of chemical-vapour-deposited diamond.

    PubMed

    Tang, L; Tsai, C; Gerberich, W W; Kruckeberg, L; Kania, D R

    1995-04-01

    The biocompatibility of chemical-vapour-deposited (CVD) diamond surfaces has been assessed. Our results indicate that CVD diamond is as biocompatible as titanium (Ti) and 316 stainless steel (SS). First, the amount of adsorbed and 'denatured' fibrinogen on CVD diamond was very close to that of Ti and SS. Second, both in vitro and in vivo there appears to be less cellular adhesion and activation on the surface of CVD diamond surfaces compared to Ti and SS. This evident biocompatibility, coupled with the corrosion resistance and notable mechanical integrity of CVD diamond, suggests that diamond-coated surfaces may be highly desirable in a number of biomedical applications. PMID:7654876

  2. Chemical vapour deposition of zeolitic imidazolate framework thin films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stassen, Ivo; Styles, Mark; Grenci, Gianluca; Gorp, Hans Van; Vanderlinden, Willem; Feyter, Steven De; Falcaro, Paolo; Vos, Dirk De; Vereecken, Philippe; Ameloot, Rob

    2016-03-01

    Integrating metal-organic frameworks (MOFs) in microelectronics has disruptive potential because of the unique properties of these microporous crystalline materials. Suitable film deposition methods are crucial to leverage MOFs in this field. Conventional solvent-based procedures, typically adapted from powder preparation routes, are incompatible with nanofabrication because of corrosion and contamination risks. We demonstrate a chemical vapour deposition process (MOF-CVD) that enables high-quality films of ZIF-8, a prototypical MOF material, with a uniform and controlled thickness, even on high-aspect-ratio features. Furthermore, we demonstrate how MOF-CVD enables previously inaccessible routes such as lift-off patterning and depositing MOF films on fragile features. The compatibility of MOF-CVD with existing infrastructure, both in research and production facilities, will greatly facilitate MOF integration in microelectronics. MOF-CVD is the first vapour-phase deposition method for any type of microporous crystalline network solid and marks a milestone in processing such materials.

  3. Light-induced chemical vapour deposition painting with titanium dioxide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Halary-Wagner, E.; Bret, T.; Hoffmann, P.

    2003-03-01

    Light-induced chemical vapour deposits of titanium dioxide are obtained from titanium tetra-isopropoxide (TTIP) in an oxygen and nitrogen atmosphere with a long pulse (250 ns) 308 nm XeCl excimer laser using a mask projection set-up. The demonstrated advantages of this technique are: (i) selective area deposition, (ii) precise control of the deposited thickness and (iii) low temperature deposition, enabling to use a wide range of substrates. A revolving mask system enables, in a single reactor load, to deposit shapes of controlled heights, which overlap to build up a complex pattern. Interferential multi-coloured deposits are achieved, and the process limitations (available colours and resolution) are discussed.

  4. Nano structured carbon nitrides prepared by chemical vapour deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karuppannan, Ramesh; Prashantha, M.

    2010-08-01

    Nanostructured carbon nitride films were prepared by pyrolysis assisted chemical vapour deposition(CVD). A two zone furnace with a temperature profile having a uniform temperature over a length of 20 cm length has been designed and developed. The precursor Azabenzimidazole was taken in a quartz tube and evaporated at 400 0C. The dense vapours enter the pyrolysis zone kept at a desired temperature and deposit on the quartz substrates. The FTIR spectrum of the prepared samples shows peaks at 1272 cm-1 (C.N stretching) and 1600 cm-1 (C=N) confirms the bonding of nitrogen with carbon. Raman D and G peaks, are observed at 1360 cm-1 and 1576 cm-1 respectively. XPS core level spectra of C 1s and N 1s show the formation of π bonding between carbon and nitrogen atoms. The size of the nano crystals estimated from the SEM images and XRD is ~100 nm. In some regions of the sample a maximum of 57 atom % of nitrogen has been observed.

  5. Photo Initiated Chemical Vapour Deposition To Increase Polymer Hydrophobicity.

    PubMed

    Bérard, Ariane; Patience, Gregory S; Chouinard, Gérald; Tavares, Jason R

    2016-01-01

    Apple growers face new challenges to produce organic apples and now many cover orchards with high-density polyethylene (HDPE) nets to exclude insects, rather than spraying insecticides. However, rainwater- associated wetness favours the development of apple scabs, Venturia inaequalis, whose lesions accumulate on the leaves and fruit causing unsightly spots. Treating the nets with a superhydrophobic coating should reduce the amount of water that passes through the net. Here we treat HDPE and polyethylene terephthalate using photo-initiated chemical vapour deposition (PICVD). We placed polymer samples in a quartz tube and passed a mixture of H2 and CO through it while a UVC lamp (254 nm) illuminated the surface. After the treatment, the contact angle between water droplets and the surface increased by an average of 20°. The contact angle of samples placed 70 cm from the entrance of the tube was higher than those at 45 cm and 20 cm. The PICVD-treated HDPE achieved a contact angle of 124°. Nets spray coated with a solvent-based commercial product achieved 180° but water ingress was, surprisingly, higher than that for nets with a lower contact angle. PMID:27531048

  6. High crystalline quality single crystal chemical vapour deposition diamond

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martineau, P. M.; Gaukroger, M. P.; Guy, K. B.; Lawson, S. C.; Twitchen, D. J.; Friel, I.; Hansen, J. O.; Summerton, G. C.; Addison, T. P. G.; Burns, R.

    2009-09-01

    Homoepitaxial chemical vapour deposition (CVD) on high pressure, high temperature (HPHT) synthetic diamond substrates allows the production of diamond material with controlled point defect content. In order to minimize the extended defect content, however, it is necessary to minimize the number of substrate extended defects that reach the initial growth surface and the nucleation of dislocations at the interface between the CVD layer and its substrate. X-ray topography has indicated that when type IIa HPHT synthetic substrates are used, the density of dislocations nucleating at the interface can be less than 400 cm-2. X-ray topography, photoluminescence imaging and birefringence microscopy of HPHT grown synthetic type IIa diamond clearly show that the extended defect content is growth sector dependent. lang111rang sectors contain the highest concentration of both stacking faults and dislocations but lang100rang sectors are relatively free of both. It has been shown that HPHT treatment of such material can significantly reduce the area of stacking faults and cause dislocations to move. This knowledge, coupled with an understanding of how growth sectors develop during HPHT synthesis, has been used to guide selection and processing of substrates suitable for CVD synthesis of material with high crystalline perfection and controlled point defect content.

  7. Photo Initiated Chemical Vapour Deposition To Increase Polymer Hydrophobicity

    PubMed Central

    Bérard, Ariane; Patience, Gregory S.; Chouinard, Gérald; Tavares, Jason R.

    2016-01-01

    Apple growers face new challenges to produce organic apples and now many cover orchards with high-density polyethylene (HDPE) nets to exclude insects, rather than spraying insecticides. However, rainwater- associated wetness favours the development of apple scabs, Venturia inaequalis, whose lesions accumulate on the leaves and fruit causing unsightly spots. Treating the nets with a superhydrophobic coating should reduce the amount of water that passes through the net. Here we treat HDPE and polyethylene terephthalate using photo-initiated chemical vapour deposition (PICVD). We placed polymer samples in a quartz tube and passed a mixture of H2 and CO through it while a UVC lamp (254 nm) illuminated the surface. After the treatment, the contact angle between water droplets and the surface increased by an average of 20°. The contact angle of samples placed 70 cm from the entrance of the tube was higher than those at 45 cm and 20 cm. The PICVD-treated HDPE achieved a contact angle of 124°. Nets spray coated with a solvent-based commercial product achieved 180° but water ingress was, surprisingly, higher than that for nets with a lower contact angle. PMID:27531048

  8. Photo Initiated Chemical Vapour Deposition To Increase Polymer Hydrophobicity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bérard, Ariane; Patience, Gregory S.; Chouinard, Gérald; Tavares, Jason R.

    2016-08-01

    Apple growers face new challenges to produce organic apples and now many cover orchards with high-density polyethylene (HDPE) nets to exclude insects, rather than spraying insecticides. However, rainwater- associated wetness favours the development of apple scabs, Venturia inaequalis, whose lesions accumulate on the leaves and fruit causing unsightly spots. Treating the nets with a superhydrophobic coating should reduce the amount of water that passes through the net. Here we treat HDPE and polyethylene terephthalate using photo-initiated chemical vapour deposition (PICVD). We placed polymer samples in a quartz tube and passed a mixture of H2 and CO through it while a UVC lamp (254 nm) illuminated the surface. After the treatment, the contact angle between water droplets and the surface increased by an average of 20°. The contact angle of samples placed 70 cm from the entrance of the tube was higher than those at 45 cm and 20 cm. The PICVD-treated HDPE achieved a contact angle of 124°. Nets spray coated with a solvent-based commercial product achieved 180° but water ingress was, surprisingly, higher than that for nets with a lower contact angle.

  9. Long distance spin communication in chemical vapour deposited graphene

    PubMed Central

    Kamalakar, M. Venkata; Groenveld, Christiaan; Dankert, André; Dash, Saroj P.

    2015-01-01

    Graphene is an ideal medium for long-distance spin communication in future spintronic technologies. So far, the prospect is limited by the smaller sizes of exfoliated graphene flakes and lower spin transport properties of large-area chemical vapour-deposited (CVD) graphene. Here we demonstrate a high spintronic performance in CVD graphene on SiO2/Si substrate at room temperature. We show pure spin transport and precession over long channel lengths extending up to 16 μm with a spin lifetime of 1.2 ns and a spin diffusion length ∼6 μm at room temperature. These spin parameters are up to six times higher than previous reports and highest at room temperature for any form of pristine graphene on industrial standard SiO2/Si substrates. Our detailed investigation reinforces the observed performance in CVD graphene over wafer scale and opens up new prospects for the development of lateral spin-based memory and logic applications. PMID:25857650

  10. Aerosol assisted chemical vapour deposition control parameters for selective deposition of tungsten oxide nanostructures.

    PubMed

    Vallejos, S; Umek, P; Blackman, C

    2011-09-01

    Tungsten oxide films were deposited via Aerosol Assisted Chemical Vapour Deposition (AACVD) from the single-source precursor W(OPh)6. Film morphology and optimum deposition temperatures for formation of quasi-one-dimensional structures is influenced by the solvent 'carrier' used for deposition of the films with bulk porous films and nanostructured needles, hollow tubes and fibres obtained dependent on the solvent used and the deposition temperature. This influence of solvent could be exploited for the synthesis of other nanomaterials, and so provide a new and versatile route to develop and integrate nanostructured materials for device applications. PMID:22097557

  11. Carbon Nanotubes/Nanofibers by Plasma Enhanced Chemical Vapour Deposition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Teo, K. B. K.; Hash, D. B.; Bell, M. S.; Chhowalla, M.; Cruden, B. A.; Amaratunga, G. A. J.; Meyyappan, M.; Milne, W. I.

    2005-01-01

    Plasma enhanced chemical vapour deposition (PECVD) has been recently used for the production of vertically aligned carbon nanotubedfibers (CN) directly on substrates. These structures are potentially important technologically as electron field emitters (e.g. microguns, microwave amplifiers, displays), nanoelectrodes for sensors, filter media, superhydrophobic surfaces and thermal interface materials for microelectronics. A parametric study on the growth of CN grown by glow discharge dc-PECVD is presented. In this technique, a substrate containing thin film Ni catalyst is exposed to C2H2 and NH3 gases at 700 C. Without plasma, this process is essentially thermal CVD which produces curly spaghetti-like CN as seen in Fig. 1 (a). With the plasma generated by biasing the substrate at -6OOV, we observed that the CN align vertically during growth as shown in Fig. l(b), and that the magnitude of the applied substrate bias affects the degree of alignment. The thickness of the thin film Ni catalyst was found to determine the average diameter and inversely the length of the CN. The yield and density of the CN were controlled by the use of different diffusion barrier materials under the Ni catalyst. Patterned CN growth [Fig. l(c)], with la variation in CN diameter of 4.1% and 6.3% respectively, is achieved by lithographically defining the Ni thin film prior to growth. The shape of the structures could be varied from very straight nanotube-like to conical tip-like nanofibers by increasing the ratio of C2H2 in the gas flow. Due to the plasma decomposition of C2H2, amorphous carbon (a-C) is an undesirable byproduct which could coat the substrate during CN growth. Using a combination of depth profiled Auger electron spectroscopy to study the substrate and in-situ mass spectroscopy to examine gas phase neutrals and ions, the optimal conditions for a-C free growth of CN is determined.

  12. Characterisation of TiO 2 deposited by photo-induced chemical vapour deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaliwoh, Never; Zhang, Jun-Ying; Boyd, Ian W.

    2002-01-01

    We report the deposition of thin TiO 2 films on crystalline Si and quartz by photo-induced chemical vapour deposition (CVD) using UV excimer lamps employing a dielectric barrier discharge in krypton chloride (KrCl ∗) to provide intense narrow band radiation at λ=222 nm. The precursor used was titanium isopropoxide (TTIP). Films from around 20-510 nm in thickness with refractive indices from 2.20 to 2.54 were grown at temperatures between 50 and 350 °C. The higher refractive index values compare favourably with the value of 2.58 recorded for the bulk material. The measured deposition rate was around 50 nm/min at 350 °C. Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) revealed the presence of TiO 2 through the observation of a Ti-O absorption peak and the absence of OH in films deposited at 250-350 °C indicated relatively good quality films. The phase of films deposited at 200-350 °C was anatase as determined by X-ray diffraction.

  13. Chemical vapour deposition of thermochromic vanadium dioxide thin films for energy efficient glazing

    SciTech Connect

    Warwick, Michael E.A.; Binions, Russell

    2014-06-01

    Vanadium dioxide is a thermochromic material that undergoes a semiconductor to metal transitions at a critical temperature of 68 °C. This phase change from a low temperature monoclinic structure to a higher temperature rutile structure is accompanied by a marked change in infrared reflectivity and change in resistivity. This ability to have a temperature-modulated film that can limit solar heat gain makes vanadium dioxide an ideal candidate for thermochromic energy efficient glazing. In this review we detail the current challenges to such glazing becoming a commercial reality and describe the key chemical vapour deposition technologies being employed in the latest research. - Graphical abstract: Schematic demonstration of the effect of thermochromic glazing on solar radiation (red arrow represents IR radiation, black arrow represents all other solar radiation). - Highlights: • Vanadium dioxide thin films for energy efficient glazing. • Reviews chemical vapour deposition techniques. • Latest results for thin film deposition for vanadium dioxide.

  14. Light induced chemical vapour deposition of titanium oxide thin films at room temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Halary, E.; Benvenuti, G.; Wagner, F.; Hoffmann, P.

    2000-02-01

    High resolution patterned deposition of titania is achieved by light induced chemical vapour deposition (LICVD), by imaging a mask onto a glass substrate. A long pulse XeCl Excimer laser (308 nm) provides, by perpendicular irradiation, the energy to convert titanium tetraisopropoxide (TTIP) vapour into titanium dioxide films, in an oxygen atmosphere, on unheated glass substrates. The amorphous titania deposits contain about 6% carbon contamination according to X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) measurements. The deposition rate increases with increasing laser fluence until a maximum value is reached, then remains constant over a wide range, and finally decreases with further fluence increase due to titania ablation or thermal effects. The film thickness increases linearly with the number of pulses after a nucleation period. The strong influence of the laser pulse repetition rate on the growth rate and the thickness profile are reported.

  15. Chemical vapour deposition growth and Raman characterization of graphene layers and carbon nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lai, Y.-C.; Rafailov, P. M.; Vlaikova, E.; Marinova, V.; Lin, S. H.; Yu, P.; Yu, S.-C.; Chi, G. C.; Dimitrov, D.; Sveshtarov, P.; Mehandjiev, V.; Gospodinov, M. M.

    2016-02-01

    Single-layer graphene films were grown by chemical vapour deposition (CVD) on Cu foil. The CVD process was complemented by plasma enhancement to grow also vertically aligned multiwalled carbon nanotubes using Ni nanoparticles as catalyst. The obtained samples were characterized by Raman spectroscopy analysis. Nature of defects in the samples and optimal growth conditions leading to achieve high quality of graphene and carbon nanotubes are discussed.

  16. Mathematical and numerical models of CdTe deposition in a pre-cracking metalorganic chemical vapour deposition reactor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davis, T. J.; McAllister, T.; Maslen, V.; Wilkins, S. W.; Faith, M.; Leech, P.

    1993-10-01

    A mathematical model is used to calculate the deposition profile of CdTe in a horizontal pre-cracker metalorganic chemical vapour deposition (MOCVD) reactor. The model is solved numerically in two dimensions, yielding the temperature profile in the reactor and the concentrations of chemical species. The calculated deposition profiles are compared with growths of CdTe on glass. With appropriate approximations, the model is reduced to a simple form which is solved analytically. This model has enabled us to identify the cause of the non-uniformity in the deposition profile as a variation in the rate of supply of metal vapour. By optimizing the reactor temperature and the gas flow rates, high-uniformity CdTe films have been grown on GaAs substrates.

  17. TOPICAL REVIEW: A review of plasma enhanced chemical vapour deposition of carbon nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meyyappan, M.

    2009-11-01

    Plasma enhanced chemical vapour deposition (PECVD) has been widely discussed in the literature for the growth of carbon nanotubes (CNTs) and carbon nanofibres (CNFs) in recent years. Advantages claimed include lower growth temperatures relative to thermal CVD and the ability to grow individual, free-standing, vertical CNFs instead of tower-like structures or ensembles. This paper reviews the current status of the technology including equipment, plasma chemistry, diagnostics and modelling, and mechanisms. Recent accomplishments include PECVD of single-walled CNTs and growth at low temperatures for handling delicate substrates such as glass.

  18. Chemical vapour deposition of zeolitic imidazolate framework thin films.

    PubMed

    Stassen, Ivo; Styles, Mark; Grenci, Gianluca; Gorp, Hans Van; Vanderlinden, Willem; Feyter, Steven De; Falcaro, Paolo; Vos, Dirk De; Vereecken, Philippe; Ameloot, Rob

    2016-03-01

    Integrating metal-organic frameworks (MOFs) in microelectronics has disruptive potential because of the unique properties of these microporous crystalline materials. Suitable film deposition methods are crucial to leverage MOFs in this field. Conventional solvent-based procedures, typically adapted from powder preparation routes, are incompatible with nanofabrication because of corrosion and contamination risks. We demonstrate a chemical vapour deposition process (MOF-CVD) that enables high-quality films of ZIF-8, a prototypical MOF material, with a uniform and controlled thickness, even on high-aspect-ratio features. Furthermore, we demonstrate how MOF-CVD enables previously inaccessible routes such as lift-off patterning and depositing MOF films on fragile features. The compatibility of MOF-CVD with existing infrastructure, both in research and production facilities, will greatly facilitate MOF integration in microelectronics. MOF-CVD is the first vapour-phase deposition method for any type of microporous crystalline network solid and marks a milestone in processing such materials. PMID:26657328

  19. Hot-wire chemical vapour deposition at low substrate temperatures for optoelectronic applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bakker, R.

    2010-09-01

    The need for large quantities of rapidly and cheaply produced electronic devices has increased rapidly over the past decades. The transistors and diodes that are used to build these devices are predominantly made of crystalline silicon. Since crystalline silicon is very expensive to produce on a large scale and cannot be directly deposited on plastic substrates, much research is being done on thin film amorphous or nanocrystalline semiconductors and insulators. Hot-wire chemical vapour deposition (HWCVD) is a novel, low cost, and convenient way to deposit these materials. The process can be controlled in such a way that specific chemical reactions take place and unwanted side reactions are minimized. It can easily be scaled up to produce large-area thin film electronics. Conventionally, plasma enhanced chemical vapour deposition (PECVD) is used to deposit semiconductors and inorganic dielectrics. Recently, HWCVD has been explored for fast deposition of such materials. An adaptation of HWCVD, initiated chemical vapour deposition (iCVD), offers the unique possibility of producing organic materials and polymers in a vacuum reactor, without the use of solvents. This technique was originally proposed at the Massachusetts institute of technology (MIT) by Prof. Karen Gleason. The iCVD process involves the creation of radicals by dissociation of a peroxide (a molecule with a ~O-O~ bond) by a heated wire in a vacuum reactor. This radical initiates a polymerization reaction of a vinyl (a molecule with a double carbon-carbon bond, ~C=C~) monomer at a substrate held at room temperature. This thesis describes a dedicated iCVD reactor for polymer deposition, installed at Utrecht University, along with a reactor with a cooled substrate holder in an existing HWCVD multi-chamber setup for low-temperature silicon nitride (SiNx) depositions. The most important features of these reactors are described and the characterization techniques are explained. This thesis contains four new

  20. Comparison of laser-ablation and hot-wall chemical vapour deposition techniques for nanowire fabrication

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stern, E.; Cheng, G.; Guthrie, S.; Turner-Evans, D.; Broomfield, E.; Lei, B.; Li, C.; Zhang, D.; Zhou, C.; Reed, M. A.

    2006-06-01

    A comparison of the transport properties of populations of single-crystal, In2O3 nanowires (NWs) grown by unassisted hot-wall chemical vapour deposition (CVD) versus NWs grown by laser-ablation-assisted chemical vapour deposition (LA-CVD) is presented. For nominally identical growth conditions across the two systems, NWs fabricated at 850 °C with laser-ablation had significantly higher average mobilities at the 99.9% confidence level, 53.3 ± 5.8 cm2 V-1 s-1 versus 10.2 ± 1.9 cm2 V-1 s-1. It is also observed that increasing growth temperature decreases mobility for LA-CVD NWs. Transmission electron microscopy studies of CVD-fabricated samples indicate the presence of an amorphous In2O3 region surrounding the single-crystal core. Further, low-temperature measurements verify the presence of ionized impurity scattering in low-mobility CVD-grown NWs.

  1. Strain and structure heterogeneity in MoS2 atomic layers grown by chemical vapour deposition.

    PubMed

    Liu, Zheng; Amani, Matin; Najmaei, Sina; Xu, Quan; Zou, Xiaolong; Zhou, Wu; Yu, Ting; Qiu, Caiyu; Birdwell, A Glen; Crowne, Frank J; Vajtai, Robert; Yakobson, Boris I; Xia, Zhenhai; Dubey, Madan; Ajayan, Pulickel M; Lou, Jun

    2014-11-18

    Monolayer molybdenum disulfide (MoS2) has attracted tremendous attention due to its promising applications in high-performance field-effect transistors, phototransistors, spintronic devices and nonlinear optics. The enhanced photoluminescence effect in monolayer MoS2 was discovered and, as a strong tool, was employed for strain and defect analysis in MoS2. Recently, large-size monolayer MoS2 has been produced by chemical vapour deposition, but has not yet been fully explored. Here we systematically characterize chemical vapour deposition-grown MoS2 by photoluminescence spectroscopy and mapping and demonstrate non-uniform strain in single-crystalline monolayer MoS2 and strain-induced bandgap engineering. We also evaluate the effective strain transferred from polymer substrates to MoS2 by three-dimensional finite element analysis. Furthermore, our work demonstrates that photoluminescence mapping can be used as a non-contact approach for quick identification of grain boundaries in MoS2.

  2. Synthesis of Tin Nitride SnxNyNanowires by Chemical Vapour Deposition

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Tin nitride (SnxNy) nanowires have been grown for the first time by chemical vapour deposition on n-type Si(111) and in particular by nitridation of Sn containing NH4Cl at 450 °C under a steady flow of NH3. The SnxNynanowires have an average diameter of 200 nm and lengths ≥5 μm and were grown on Si(111) coated with a few nm’s of Au. Nitridation of Sn alone, under a flow of NH3is not effective and leads to the deposition of Sn droplets on the Au/Si(111) surface which impedes one-dimensional growth over a wide temperature range i.e. 300–800 °C. This was overcome by the addition of ammonium chloride (NH4Cl) which undergoes sublimation at 338 °C thereby releasing NH3and HCl which act as dispersants thereby enhancing the vapour pressure of Sn and the one-dimensional growth of SnxNynanowires. In addition to the action of dispersion, Sn reacts with HCl giving SnCl2which in turn reacts with NH3leading to the formation of SnxNyNWs. A first estimate of the band-gap of the SnxNynanowires grown on Si(111) was obtained from optical reflection measurements and found to be ≈2.6 eV. Finally, intricate assemblies of nanowires were also obtained at lower growth temperatures. PMID:20596341

  3. Single-source precursor for chemical vapour deposition of collapsed boron nitride nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, Chengchun; Bando, Yoshio; Shen, Guozhen; Zhi, Chunyi; Golberg, Dmitri

    2006-12-01

    Ammonium tetrafluoroborate, a cheap and commonly used chemical, was successfully utilized in this study to synthesize BN-coated MgF2 nanowires and collapsed BN nanotubes, although previous investigations have indicated that the compound cannot be used as a chemical vapour deposition (CVD) reaction precursor of amorphous or crystalline BN. Our study reveals that when MgCl2 is used as a promoter a crystalline BN phase can be obtained on a large scale. The MgCl2 also controls the product morphology, resulting in collapsed BN-coated MgF2 nanowires at the first stage of CVD. The detailed morphology of the composite nanowires also depends on the reaction temperature. Increase in temperature stimulates the nanowire formation. The MgF2 inclusions can be fully removed via a simple high-temperature evaporation procedure, forming collapsed BN nanotubes of high purity and yield.

  4. Photoluminescent Si/SiOx nanoparticle network by near atmospheric plasma-enhanced chemical vapour deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Q. Y.; Wang, D. X.; Guo, Y.; Ding, K.; Xu, J. Z.; Shi, J. J.; Zhang, J.

    2011-11-01

    A very fast and simple near atmospheric plasma-enhanced chemical vapour deposition method modulated by a pulsed negative bias voltage is newly developed to yield a Si/SiOx nanoparticle-linked network structure, which emitted enhanced 410 nm photoluminescence (PL) at room temperature. Hydrogen dissociation, oxidation and polarization of the silane plasma-generated active particles could be tuned by the magnitude of bias voltage. The porosity and oxidation of this network structure and the intensity of its PL spectrum at 410 nm were observed to increase with the bias voltage. The large surface area of the Si/SiOx nanoparticle-linked network intensified the radiative recombination centre effect and caused the PL emission enhancement.

  5. Graphene growth from reduced graphene oxide by chemical vapour deposition: seeded growth accompanied by restoration

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Sung-Jin; Hyun, Moon Seop; Myung, Sung; Kang, Min-A; Yoo, Jung Ho; Lee, Kyoung G.; Choi, Bong Gill; Cho, Youngji; Lee, Gaehang; Park, Tae Jung

    2016-01-01

    Understanding the underlying mechanisms involved in graphene growth via chemical vapour deposition (CVD) is critical for precise control of the characteristics of graphene. Despite much effort, the actual processes behind graphene synthesis still remain to be elucidated in a large number of aspects. Herein, we report the evolution of graphene properties during in-plane growth of graphene from reduced graphene oxide (RGO) on copper (Cu) via methane CVD. While graphene is laterally grown from RGO flakes on Cu foils up to a few hundred nanometres during CVD process, it shows appreciable improvement in structural quality. The monotonous enhancement of the structural quality of the graphene with increasing length of the graphene growth from RGO suggests that seeded CVD growth of graphene from RGO on Cu surface is accompanied by the restoration of graphitic structure. The finding provides insight into graphene growth and defect reconstruction useful for the production of tailored carbon nanostructures with required properties. PMID:26961409

  6. Electron field emission characteristics of nano-catkin carbon films deposited by electron cyclotron resonance microwave plasma chemical vapour deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gu, Guang-Rui; Wu, Bao-Jia; Jin, Zhe; Ito, Toshimichi

    2008-02-01

    This paper reported that the nano-catkin carbon films were prepared on Si substrates by means of electron cyclotron resonance microwave plasma chemical vapour deposition in a hydrogen and methane mixture. The surface morphology and the structure of the fabricated films were characterized by using scanning electron microscopes and Raman spectroscopy, respectively. The stable field emission properties with a low threshold field of 5V/μm corresponding to a current density of about 1μA/cm2 and a current density of 3.2mA/cm2 at an electric field of 10V/μm were obtained from the carbon film deposited at CH4 concentration of 8%. The mechanism that the threshold field decreased with the increase of the CH4 concentration and the high emission current appeared at the high CH4 concentration was explained by using the Fowler-Nordheim theory.

  7. Interface study between nanostructured tantalum nitride films and carbon nanotubes grown by chemical vapour deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bouchet-Fabre, B.; Pinault, M.; Foy, E.; Hugon, M. C.; Minéa, T.; Mayne-L'Hermite, M.

    2014-10-01

    We present the role of nitrogen content in tantalum nitride ultra-thin buffers, on the carbon nanotubes (CNTs) growth by chemical vapour deposition at 850 °C, assisted by ferrocene as catalyst source. Tantalum nitride (TaNx) films with a very large range of concentration x = [0, 1.8] and various nanostructures, from amorphous Ta(N) to Ta3N5, were deposited by Highly Pulsed Plasma Magnetron Sputtering. The buffer films are characterized after heat treatment at 850 °C, and after the CNT growth, by wide angle X-ray scattering in grazing incidence and scanning electron microscopy. The CNT diameter explored by transition electron microscopy shows an all-out value for under stoichiometric thin films (Ta1-N1-δ, Ta3-N5-δ) and a minimum value just above the stoichiometric phases (Ta1-N1+δ, Ta3-N5+δ). Firstly one shows that the buffer films under the heat treatment present surface modification highly dependent on their initial state, which influences the catalyst particles diffusion. Secondly at the stoichiometric TaN phase we show that a specific ternary phase FeTa2O6 is formed at the interface CNT/buffer, not present in the other cases, leading to a special CNT growth condition.

  8. The augmented saddle field discharge characteristics and its applications for plasma enhanced chemical vapour deposition

    SciTech Connect

    Wong, Johnson; Yeghikyan, Davit; Kherani, Nazir P.

    2013-04-07

    A high ion flux parallel electrode plasma is proposed and studied in its DC configuration. By cascading a diode source region which supplies electrons and a saddle field region where these seed electrons are energized and amplified, the energy of ion bombardment on the substrate can be decoupled from the plasma density. The sufficiently large density of electrons and holes in the vicinity of the substrate raises the possibility to perform plasma enhanced chemical vapour deposition on insulating materials, at low sheath voltages (around 40 V in the configuration studied), at low temperatures in which the surface mobility of film growth species may be provided by the bombardment of moderate energy ions. As a benchmarking exercise, experiments are carried out on silane discharge characteristics and deposition of hydrogenated amorphous silicon (a-Si:H) on both silicon wafer and glass. The films grown at low anode voltages have excellent microstructures with predominantly monohydride bonds, sharp band tails, but relatively high integrated defect density in the mid 10{sup 16}/cm{sup 3} range for the particular substrate temperature of 180 Degree-Sign C, indicating that further optimizations are necessary if the electrode configuration is to be used to create a-Si:H devices.

  9. In-line silicon epitaxy for photovoltaics using a continous chemical vapour deposition reactor.

    PubMed

    Keller, Martin; Reber, Stefan; Schillinger, Norbert; Pocza, David; Arnold, Martin

    2011-09-01

    Thin film solar cell techniques can effectively reduce the costs for photovoltaic solar power. However, most of these techniques still have the disadvantage of a comparatively low efficiency. One way to realize a thin film solar cell concept with high efficiency potential is the crystalline silicon thin-film (cSiTF) concept. Following the high-temperature approach, this concept is based on a silicon epitaxy process. This paper reports the current status of the development of a high throughput epitaxy tool at Fraunhofer ISE and presents first results. Also presented is the development of a simulation tool which is a virtual image of the real setup in order to forecast save deposition conditions. The presented epitaxy tool is the ConCVD (Continuous Chemical Vapour Deposition), in which an improved reactor setup has been installed, based on the experience gained so far. To provide insight into upcoming further advances, the industrial scale epitaxy tool ProConCVD is presented as well.

  10. Methyldichloroborane evidenced as an intermediate in the chemical vapour deposition synthesis of boron carbide.

    PubMed

    Reinisch, G; Patel, S; Chollon, G; Leyssale, J-M; Alotta, D; Bertrand, N; Vignoles, G L

    2011-09-01

    The most recent ceramic-matrix composites (CMC) considered for long-life applications as thermostructural parts in aerospace propulsion contain, among others, boron-rich phases like boron carbide. This compound is prepared by thermal Chemical Vapour Infiltration (CVI), starting from precursors like boron halides and hydrocarbons. We present a study aiming at a precise knowledge of the gas-phase composition in a hot-zone LPCVD reactor fed with BCl3, CH4 and H2, which combines experimental and theoretical approaches. This work has brought strong evidences of the presence of Methydichloroborane (MDB, BCl2CH3) in the process. It is demonstrated that this intermediate, the presence of which had never been formally proved before, appears for processing temperatures slightly lower than the deposition temperature of boron carbide. The study features quantum chemical computations, which provide several pieces of information like thermochemical and kinetic data, as well as vibration and rotation frequencies, reaction kinetics computations, and experimental gas-phase characterization of several species by FTIR, for several processing parameter sets. The main results are presented, and the place of MDB in the reaction scheme is discussed.

  11. Alumina coating on dense tungsten powder by fluidized bed metal organic chemical vapour deposition.

    PubMed

    Rodriguez, Philippe; Caussat, Brigitte; Ablitzer, Carine; Iltis, Xavière; Brothier, Meryl

    2011-09-01

    In order to study the feasibility of coating very dense powders by alumina using Fluidized Bed Metal Organic Chemical Vapour Deposition (FB-MOCVD), experiments were performed on a commercial tungsten powder, 75 microm in median volume diameter and 19,300 kg/m3 in grain density. The first part of the work was dedicated to the experimental study of the tungsten powder fluidization using argon as carrier gas at room temperature and at 400 degrees C. Due to the very high density of the tungsten powder, leading to low initial fixed bed heights and low bed expansions, different weights of powder were tested in order to reach satisfactory temperature profiles along the fluidized bed. Then, using argon as a fluidized bed former and aluminium acetylacetonate Al(C5O2H7)3 as a single source precursor, alumina thin films were deposited on tungsten particles at a low temperature range (e.g., 370-420 degrees C) by FB-MOCVD. The influence of the weight of powder, bed temperature and run duration was studied. Characterizations of the obtained samples were performed by various techniques including scanning electron microscopy (SEM) coupled with Energy Dispersive X-ray Spectroscopy (EDS) analyses, Field Emission Gun SEM (FEG-SEM) and Fourier Transform InfraRed (FT-IR) spectroscopy. The different analyses indicated that tungsten particles were uniformly coated by a continuous alumina thin film. The thickness of the film ranged between 25 and 80 nm, depending on the coating conditions. The alumina thin films were amorphous and contained carbon contamination. This latter may correspond to the adsorption of species resulting from incomplete decomposition of the precursor at so low deposition temperature. PMID:22097534

  12. Quantum Hall resistance standards from graphene grown by chemical vapour deposition on silicon carbide

    PubMed Central

    Lafont, F.; Ribeiro-Palau, R.; Kazazis, D.; Michon, A.; Couturaud, O.; Consejo, C.; Chassagne, T.; Zielinski, M.; Portail, M.; Jouault, B.; Schopfer, F.; Poirier, W.

    2015-01-01

    Replacing GaAs by graphene to realize more practical quantum Hall resistance standards (QHRS), accurate to within 10−9 in relative value, but operating at lower magnetic fields than 10 T, is an ongoing goal in metrology. To date, the required accuracy has been reported, only few times, in graphene grown on SiC by Si sublimation, under higher magnetic fields. Here, we report on a graphene device grown by chemical vapour deposition on SiC, which demonstrates such accuracies of the Hall resistance from 10 T up to 19 T at 1.4 K. This is explained by a quantum Hall effect with low dissipation, resulting from strongly localized bulk states at the magnetic length scale, over a wide magnetic field range. Our results show that graphene-based QHRS can replace their GaAs counterparts by operating in as-convenient cryomagnetic conditions, but over an extended magnetic field range. They rely on a promising hybrid and scalable growth method and a fabrication process achieving low-electron-density devices. PMID:25891533

  13. Nano sized bismuth oxy chloride by metal organic chemical vapour deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jagdale, Pravin; Castellino, Micaela; Marrec, Françoise; Rodil, Sandra E.; Tagliaferro, Alberto

    2014-06-01

    Metal organic chemical vapour deposition (MOCVD) method was used to prepare thin films of bismuth based nano particles starting from bismuth salts. Nano sized bismuth oxy chloride (BiOCl) crystals were synthesized from solution containing bismuth chloride (BiCl3) in acetone (CH3sbnd COsbnd CH3). Self-assembly of nano sized BiOCl crystals were observed on the surface of silicon, fused silica, copper, carbon nanotubes and aluminium substrates. Various synthesis parameters and their significant impact onto the formation of self-assembled nano-crystalline BiOCl were investigated. BiOCl nano particles were characterized by X-ray diffraction, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, field emission scanning electron microscopy, energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy and Micro-Raman spectroscopy. These analyses confirm that bismuth nanometer-sized crystal structures showing a single tetragonal phase were indeed bismuth oxy chloride (BiOCl) square platelets 18-250 nm thick and a few micrometres wide.

  14. Chemical Vapour Deposition of Graphene with Re-useable Pt and Cu substrates for Flexible Electronics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karamat, Shumaila; Sonusen, Selda; Celik, Umit; Uysalli, Yigit; Oral, Ahmet

    2015-03-01

    Graphene has gained the attention of scientific world due to its outstanding physical properties. The future demand of flexible electronics such as solar cells, light emitting diodes, photo-detectors and touch screen technology requires more exploration of graphene properties on flexible substrates. The most interesting application of graphene is in organic light emitting diodes (OLED) where efforts are in progress to replace brittle indium tin oxide (ITO) electrode with a flexible graphene electrode because ITO raw materials are becoming increasingly expensive, and its brittle nature makes it unsuitable for flexible devices. In this work, we grow graphene on Pt and Cu substrates using chemical vapour deposition (CVD) and transferred it to a polymer material (PVA) using lamination technique. We used hydrogen bubbling method for separating graphene from Pt and Cu catalyst to reuse the substrates many times. After successful transfer of graphene on polymer samples, we checked the resistivity values of the graphene sheet which varies with growth conditions. Furthermore, Raman, atomic force microscopy (AFM), I-V and Force-displacement measurements will be presented for these samples.

  15. The Role of Plasma in Plasma Enhanced Chemical Vapour Deposition of Nanostructure Growth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hash, David B.; Meyyappan, M.; Teo, Kenneth B. K.; Lacerda, Rodrigo G.; Rupesinghe, Nalin L.

    2004-01-01

    Chemical vapour deposition (CVD) has become the preferred process for high yield growth of carbon nanotubes and nanofibres because of its ability to pattern growth through lithographic positioning of transition metal catalysts on substrates. Many potential applications of nanotubes such as field emitters [1] require not only patterned growth but also vertical alignment. Some degree of ali,ment in thermal CVD processes can be obtained when carbon nanotubes are grown closely together as a result of van der Waals interactions. The ali,onment however is marginal, and the van der Waals prerequisite makes growth of freestanding nanofibres with thermal CVD unrealizable. The application of electric fields as a means of ali,onment has been shown to overcome this limitation [2-5], and highly aligned nanostructures can be grown if electric fields on the order of 0.5 V/microns are employed. Plasma enhanced CVD in various configurations including dc, rf, microwave, inductive and electron cyclotron resonance has been pursued as a means of enabling alignment in the CVD process. However, the sheath fields for the non-dc sources are in general not sufficient for a high degree of ali,pment and an additional dc bias is usually applied to the growth substrate. This begs the question as to the actual role of the plasma. It is clear that the plasma itself is not required for aligned growth as references [3] and [4] employed fields through small applied voltages (3-20 V) across very small electrode spacings (10-100 microns) and thus avoided striking a discharge.

  16. Nanoparticulate cerium dioxide and cerium dioxide-titanium dioxide composite thin films on glass by aerosol assisted chemical vapour deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qureshi, Uzma; Dunnill, Charles W.; Parkin, Ivan P.

    2009-11-01

    Two series of composite thin films were deposited on glass by aerosol assisted chemical vapour deposition (AACVD)—nanoparticulate cerium dioxide and nanoparticulate cerium dioxide embedded in a titanium dioxide matrix. The films were analysed by a range of techniques including UV-visible absorption spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy and energy dispersive analysis by X-rays. The AACVD prepared films showed the functional properties of photocatalysis and super-hydrophilicity. The CeO 2 nanoparticle thin films displaying photocatalysis and photo-induced hydrophilicity almost comparable to that of anatase titania.

  17. Chemical vapour deposition of tungsten oxide thin films from single-source precursors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cross, Warren Bradley

    This thesis describes the chemical vapour deposition (CVD) of tungsten oxide thin films on glass from a wide range of single-source precursors. Chapter 1 describes previous work that has motivated this research. Chapter 2 discusses the synthesis of conventional style candidates for single-source precursors. Reactions of WOCl4 with 3-methyl salicylic acid (MesaliH2) and 3,5-di-iso-propyl salicylic acid (di-i-PrsaliH2) yielded the ditungsten complexes [WO(Mesali)(MesaliH)2(mu-O)], 1, and [WO(di-i-Prsali)(di-i-PrsaliH)2(mu-O)], 2, and the monotungsten complex [WO(di-i-Pr sali)(di-i-PrsaliH)Cl], 3. Tungsten(VI) dioxo complexes were prepared by ligand exchange reactions of [WO2(acac)2], 4, yielding [WO2(catH)2], 5, and [WO2(malt)2], 6, (catH2 = 3,5-di-tert-butyl-catechol; maltH = maltol). Chapter 3 describes thermal analyses of the complexes 1 - 6 and tungsten hexaphenoxide, and consequently their suitability for CVD. The use of [W(OPh)6] and 2 - 6 in aerosol assisted CVD is reported in Chapter 4. Brown tungsten oxide was deposited from 2 and 3 at 600 °C; blue partially-reduced WO3-x thin films were deposited from [W(OPh)6] from 300 to 500 °C, from 4 at 600 °C and 6 at 620 °C. Sintering all of the coatings in air at 550 °C afforded yellow films of stoichiometric WO3. Raman spectroscopy and glancing angle XRD showed that coatings deposited from [W(OPh)6] at 300 °C were amorphous, whereas all the other films were the monoclinic phase gamma-tungsten oxide. Taking full advantage of the aerosol vaporisation technique led to the CVD of tungsten oxide films from polyoxometalate single-source precursors, as described in Chapter 5. The isopolyanion [nBu4N]2[W6O19], 7, afforded WO3 at 410 °C; the heteropolyanions [nBu4N]4H3[PW11O39], 8, and [nBu4N]4[PNbW11O40], 9, were used to deposit doped WO3 thin films in a highly-controlled manner at 480 °C. Thus, the unprecedented use of large, charged clusters for CVD was demonstrated. Chapter 6 describes investigations of the

  18. Fabrication of high density, adherent films of five-fold symmetric diamond crystals by hot filament chemical vapour deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wei, Qiuping; Ashfold, M. N. R.; Yu, Z. M.; Ma, Li; Yin, D. F.

    2011-12-01

    Five-fold symmetric diamond crystals (FSDCs) have been grown on a large variety of substrates by hot filament chemical vapour deposition (CVD) methods. High density, adherent films of FSDCs have been prepared on carbon steel with a thermal sprayed WC-Co interlayer, and their quality, adhesion and tribological behaviour were investigated. The diamond films show excellent adhesion under Rockwell indentation testing and when subjected to high-speed, high-load, long-time reciprocating dry sliding ball-on-flat wear tests against a Si 3N 4 counter-face in ambient air.

  19. Perfluorodecyltrichlorosilane-based seed-layer for improved chemical vapour deposition of ultrathin hafnium dioxide films on graphene.

    PubMed

    Kitzmann, Julia; Göritz, Alexander; Fraschke, Mirko; Lukosius, Mindaugas; Wenger, Christian; Wolff, Andre; Lupina, Grzegorz

    2016-07-06

    We investigate the use of perfluorodecyltrichlorosilane-based self-assembled monolayer as seeding layer for chemical vapour deposition of HfO2 on large area CVD graphene. The deposition and evolution of the FDTS-based seed layer is investigated by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, Auger electron spectroscopy, and transmission electron microscopy. Crystalline quality of graphene transferred from Cu is monitored during formation of the seed layer as well as the HfO2 growth using Raman spectroscopy. We demonstrate that FDTS-based seed layer significantly improves nucleation of HfO2 layers so that graphene can be coated in a conformal way with HfO2 layers as thin as 10 nm. Proof-of-concept experiments on 200 mm wafers presented here validate applicability of the proposed approach to wafer scale graphene device fabrication.

  20. Palm Oil as the Carbon Source for the Synthesis of Carbon Nanotubes using Floating Catalyst—Chemical Vapour Deposition Method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zobir, S. A. M.; Suriani, A. B.; Khusaimi, Z.; Mamat, H.; Zainal, Z.; Sarijo, S. H.; Rusop, M.

    2011-03-01

    CNTs were synthesized using floating catalyst by dual-furnace thermal chemical vapour deposition method at 800-1000° C. Cooking oil made of palm oil was used as the carbon precursor. Ferrocene in the presence of 0.05 M zinc nitrate and a p-type silicon wafer was used as a catalyst precursor and a sample target, respectively. The deposition temperature was varied from 800-1000° C. Nitrogen gas was used as a gas carrier with a constant flow rate of 150 sccm/min. Field emission scanning electron micrographs show the formation of CNTs together with other carbons formed on the silicon substrate. Raman spectroscopy studies were also supported the formation of CNTs.

  1. Perfluorodecyltrichlorosilane-based seed-layer for improved chemical vapour deposition of ultrathin hafnium dioxide films on graphene

    PubMed Central

    Kitzmann, Julia; Göritz, Alexander; Fraschke, Mirko; Lukosius, Mindaugas; Wenger, Christian; Wolff, Andre; Lupina, Grzegorz

    2016-01-01

    We investigate the use of perfluorodecyltrichlorosilane-based self-assembled monolayer as seeding layer for chemical vapour deposition of HfO2 on large area CVD graphene. The deposition and evolution of the FDTS-based seed layer is investigated by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, Auger electron spectroscopy, and transmission electron microscopy. Crystalline quality of graphene transferred from Cu is monitored during formation of the seed layer as well as the HfO2 growth using Raman spectroscopy. We demonstrate that FDTS-based seed layer significantly improves nucleation of HfO2 layers so that graphene can be coated in a conformal way with HfO2 layers as thin as 10 nm. Proof-of-concept experiments on 200 mm wafers presented here validate applicability of the proposed approach to wafer scale graphene device fabrication. PMID:27381715

  2. Perfluorodecyltrichlorosilane-based seed-layer for improved chemical vapour deposition of ultrathin hafnium dioxide films on graphene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kitzmann, Julia; Göritz, Alexander; Fraschke, Mirko; Lukosius, Mindaugas; Wenger, Christian; Wolff, Andre; Lupina, Grzegorz

    2016-07-01

    We investigate the use of perfluorodecyltrichlorosilane-based self-assembled monolayer as seeding layer for chemical vapour deposition of HfO2 on large area CVD graphene. The deposition and evolution of the FDTS-based seed layer is investigated by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, Auger electron spectroscopy, and transmission electron microscopy. Crystalline quality of graphene transferred from Cu is monitored during formation of the seed layer as well as the HfO2 growth using Raman spectroscopy. We demonstrate that FDTS-based seed layer significantly improves nucleation of HfO2 layers so that graphene can be coated in a conformal way with HfO2 layers as thin as 10 nm. Proof-of-concept experiments on 200 mm wafers presented here validate applicability of the proposed approach to wafer scale graphene device fabrication.

  3. Perfluorodecyltrichlorosilane-based seed-layer for improved chemical vapour deposition of ultrathin hafnium dioxide films on graphene.

    PubMed

    Kitzmann, Julia; Göritz, Alexander; Fraschke, Mirko; Lukosius, Mindaugas; Wenger, Christian; Wolff, Andre; Lupina, Grzegorz

    2016-01-01

    We investigate the use of perfluorodecyltrichlorosilane-based self-assembled monolayer as seeding layer for chemical vapour deposition of HfO2 on large area CVD graphene. The deposition and evolution of the FDTS-based seed layer is investigated by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, Auger electron spectroscopy, and transmission electron microscopy. Crystalline quality of graphene transferred from Cu is monitored during formation of the seed layer as well as the HfO2 growth using Raman spectroscopy. We demonstrate that FDTS-based seed layer significantly improves nucleation of HfO2 layers so that graphene can be coated in a conformal way with HfO2 layers as thin as 10 nm. Proof-of-concept experiments on 200 mm wafers presented here validate applicability of the proposed approach to wafer scale graphene device fabrication. PMID:27381715

  4. In situ growth rate measurements during plasma-enhanced chemical vapour deposition of vertically aligned multiwall carbon nanotube films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jönsson, M.; Nerushev, O. A.; Campbell, E. E. B.

    2007-08-01

    In situ laser reflectivity measurements are used to monitor the growth of multiwalled carbon nanotube (MWCNT) films grown by DC plasma-enhanced chemical vapour deposition (PECVD) from an iron catalyst film deposited on a silicon wafer. In contrast to thermal CVD growth, there is no initial increase in the growth rate; instead, the initial growth rate is high (as much as 10 µm min-1) and then drops off rapidly to reach a steady level (2 µm min-1) for times beyond 1 min. We show that a limiting factor for growing thick films of multiwalled nanotubes (MWNTs) using PECVD can be the formation of an amorphous carbon layer at the top of the growing nanotubes. In situ reflectivity measurements provide a convenient technique for detecting the onset of the growth of this layer.

  5. A novel three-jet microreactor for localized metal-organic chemical vapour deposition of gallium arsenide: design and simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Konakov, S. A.; Krzhizhanovskaya, V. V.

    2016-08-01

    We present a novel three-jet microreactor design for localized deposition of gallium arsenide (GaAs) by low-pressure Metal-Organic Chemical Vapour Deposition (MOCVD) for semiconductor devices, microelectronics and solar cells. Our approach is advantageous compared to the standard lithography and etching technology, since it preserves the nanostructure of the deposited material, it is less time-consuming and less expensive. We designed two versions of reactor geometry with a 10-micron central microchannel for precursor supply and with two side jets of a dilutant to control the deposition area. To aid future experiments, we performed computational modeling of a simplified-geometry (twodimensional axisymmetric) microreactor, based on Navier-Stokes equations for a laminar flow of chemically reacting gas mixture of Ga(CH3)3-AsH3-H2. Simulation results show that we can achieve a high-rate deposition (over 0.3 μm/min) on a small area (less than 30 μm diameter). This technology can be used in material production for microelectronics, optoelectronics, photovoltaics, solar cells, etc.

  6. Aerosol assisted chemical vapour deposition of gas sensitive SnO2 and Au-functionalised SnO2 nanorods via a non-catalysed vapour solid (VS) mechanism.

    PubMed

    Vallejos, Stella; Selina, Soultana; Annanouch, Fatima Ezahra; Gràcia, Isabel; Llobet, Eduard; Blackman, Chris

    2016-01-01

    Tin oxide nanorods (NRs) are vapour synthesised at relatively lower temperatures than previously reported and without the need for substrate pre-treatment, via a vapour-solid mechanism enabled using an aerosol-assisted chemical vapour deposition method. Results demonstrate that the growth of SnO2 NRs is promoted by a compression of the nucleation rate parallel to the substrate and a decrease of the energy barrier for growth perpendicular to the substrate, which are controlled via the deposition conditions. This method provides both single-step formation of the SnO2 NRs and their integration with silicon micromachined platforms, but also allows for in-situ functionalization of the NRs with gold nanoparticles via co-deposition with a gold precursor. The functional properties are demonstrated for gas sensing, with microsensors using functionalised NRs demonstrating enhanced sensing properties towards H2 compared to those based on non-functionalised NRs. PMID:27334232

  7. Aerosol assisted chemical vapour deposition of gas sensitive SnO2 and Au-functionalised SnO2 nanorods via a non-catalysed vapour solid (VS) mechanism.

    PubMed

    Vallejos, Stella; Selina, Soultana; Annanouch, Fatima Ezahra; Gràcia, Isabel; Llobet, Eduard; Blackman, Chris

    2016-06-23

    Tin oxide nanorods (NRs) are vapour synthesised at relatively lower temperatures than previously reported and without the need for substrate pre-treatment, via a vapour-solid mechanism enabled using an aerosol-assisted chemical vapour deposition method. Results demonstrate that the growth of SnO2 NRs is promoted by a compression of the nucleation rate parallel to the substrate and a decrease of the energy barrier for growth perpendicular to the substrate, which are controlled via the deposition conditions. This method provides both single-step formation of the SnO2 NRs and their integration with silicon micromachined platforms, but also allows for in-situ functionalization of the NRs with gold nanoparticles via co-deposition with a gold precursor. The functional properties are demonstrated for gas sensing, with microsensors using functionalised NRs demonstrating enhanced sensing properties towards H2 compared to those based on non-functionalised NRs.

  8. Aerosol assisted chemical vapour deposition of gas sensitive SnO2 and Au-functionalised SnO2 nanorods via a non-catalysed vapour solid (VS) mechanism

    PubMed Central

    Vallejos, Stella; Selina, Soultana; Annanouch, Fatima Ezahra; Gràcia, Isabel; Llobet, Eduard; Blackman, Chris

    2016-01-01

    Tin oxide nanorods (NRs) are vapour synthesised at relatively lower temperatures than previously reported and without the need for substrate pre-treatment, via a vapour-solid mechanism enabled using an aerosol-assisted chemical vapour deposition method. Results demonstrate that the growth of SnO2 NRs is promoted by a compression of the nucleation rate parallel to the substrate and a decrease of the energy barrier for growth perpendicular to the substrate, which are controlled via the deposition conditions. This method provides both single-step formation of the SnO2 NRs and their integration with silicon micromachined platforms, but also allows for in-situ functionalization of the NRs with gold nanoparticles via co-deposition with a gold precursor. The functional properties are demonstrated for gas sensing, with microsensors using functionalised NRs demonstrating enhanced sensing properties towards H2 compared to those based on non-functionalised NRs. PMID:27334232

  9. Aerosol assisted chemical vapour deposition of gas sensitive SnO2 and Au-functionalised SnO2 nanorods via a non-catalysed vapour solid (VS) mechanism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vallejos, Stella; Selina, Soultana; Annanouch, Fatima Ezahra; Gràcia, Isabel; Llobet, Eduard; Blackman, Chris

    2016-06-01

    Tin oxide nanorods (NRs) are vapour synthesised at relatively lower temperatures than previously reported and without the need for substrate pre-treatment, via a vapour-solid mechanism enabled using an aerosol-assisted chemical vapour deposition method. Results demonstrate that the growth of SnO2 NRs is promoted by a compression of the nucleation rate parallel to the substrate and a decrease of the energy barrier for growth perpendicular to the substrate, which are controlled via the deposition conditions. This method provides both single-step formation of the SnO2 NRs and their integration with silicon micromachined platforms, but also allows for in-situ functionalization of the NRs with gold nanoparticles via co-deposition with a gold precursor. The functional properties are demonstrated for gas sensing, with microsensors using functionalised NRs demonstrating enhanced sensing properties towards H2 compared to those based on non-functionalised NRs.

  10. Increasing the output power of single 808-nm laser diodes using diamond submounts produced by microwave plasma chemical vapour deposition

    SciTech Connect

    Ashkinazi, E E; Bezotosnyi, V V; Bondarev, Vadim Yu; Kovalenko, V I; Konov, Vitalii I; Krokhin, Oleg N; Oleshchenko, V A; Pevtsov, Valerii F; Popov, Yurii M; Popovich, A F; Ral'chenko, Viktor G; Cheshev, E A

    2012-11-30

    We have designed and fabricated submounts from synthetic diamond grown by microwave plasma chemical vapour deposition and developed an economical process for metallising such submounts. Laser diode chips having an 808-nm emission wavelength, 3-mm-long cavity and 130-mm-wide stripe contact were mounted on copper heat sinks with the use of diamond submounts differing in quality. The devices were tested for more than 150 h in continuous mode at an output power of 8 W on diamond with a thermal conductivity of 700 W m{sup -1} K{sup -1}, and no changes in their output power were detected. On diamond with a thermal conductivity of 1600 W m{sup -1} K{sup -1}, stable cw operation for 24 h at an output power of 12 W was demonstrated. (letters)

  11. Rational design of a binary metal alloy for chemical vapour deposition growth of uniform single-layer graphene.

    PubMed

    Dai, Boya; Fu, Lei; Zou, Zhiyu; Wang, Min; Xu, Haitao; Wang, Sheng; Liu, Zhongfan

    2011-01-01

    Controlled growth of high-quality graphene is still the bottleneck of practical applications. The widely used chemical vapour deposition process generally suffers from an uncontrollable carbon precipitation effect that leads to inhomogeneous growth and strong correlation to the growth conditions. Here we report the rational design of a binary metal alloy that effectively suppresses the carbon precipitation process and activates a self-limited growth mechanism for homogeneous monolayer graphene. As demonstrated by an Ni-Mo alloy, the designed binary alloy contains an active catalyst component for carbon source decomposition and graphene growth and a black hole counterpart for trapping the dissolved carbons and forming stable metal carbides. This type of process engineering has been used to grow strictly single-layer graphene with 100% surface coverage and excellent tolerance to variations in growth conditions. With simplicity, scalability and a very large growth window, the presented approach may facilitate graphene research and industrial applications. PMID:22045001

  12. Durability of silver nanoparticulate films within a silica matrix by flame assisted chemical vapour deposition for biocidal applications.

    PubMed

    Cook, Ian; Shee, David W; Foster, Howard A; Varghese, Sajnu

    2011-09-01

    Healthcare acquired infection (HCAI) rates have come under increasing scrutiny in recent years and been a major priority for health professionals in the UK and elsewhere. Of particular concern is the rise of so called 'superbugs', or those resistant to conventional antibiotics, such as Escherichia coli, Clostridium difficile and methicillin resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA). The reasons for this rise are many and complex, but one important factor is bacterial survival rates on wards and other hospital areas. In this respect, nanostructured biocidal surfaces offer a potentially powerful weapon in the fight against HCAI. In addition to providing a toxic environment to a range of infectious disease-causing bacteria (while remaining harmless to human health), any potential bioactive coated surface is required to be durable enough to withstand regular hospital cleaning methods without a reduction in biocidal activity over time and be economically viable to mass produce. The flame assisted chemical vapour deposition (FACVD) of silver and silver/silica films offer a means of producing such surfaces. In this work, we report investigations into a wide range of experimental factors and parameters affecting film durability, including burner head design and relative water vapour content in the flame environment. The produced films were assessed in terms of durability (by scratch testing) and relative silver content using glow discharge optical emission spectroscopy (GDOES). PMID:22097580

  13. Growth of ZnO Nanorods on Stainless Steel Wire Using Chemical Vapour Deposition and Their Photocatalytic Activity

    PubMed Central

    Abd Aziz, Siti Nor Qurratu Aini; Pung, Swee-Yong; Ramli, Nurul Najiah; Lockman, Zainovia

    2014-01-01

    The photodegradation efficiency of ZnO nanoparticles in removal of organic pollutants deteriorates over time as a high percentage of the nanoparticles can be drained away by water during the wastewater treatment. This problem can be solved by growing the ZnO nanorods on stainless steel wire. In this work, ZnO nanorods were successfully grown on stainless steel wire by chemical vapour deposition. The SAED analysis indicates that ZnO nanorod is a single crystal and is preferentially grown in [0001] direction. The deconvoluted O 1s peak at 531.5 eV in XPS analysis is associated with oxygen deficient, revealing that the ZnO nanorods contain many oxygen vacancies. This observation is further supported by the finding of the small Iuv/Ivis ratio, that is, ~1 in the photoluminescence analysis. The growth of ZnO nanorods on stainless steel wire was governed by vapour-solid mechanism as there were no Fe particles observed at the tips of the nanorods. The photodegradation of Rhodamine B solution by ZnO nanorods followed the first-order kinetics. PMID:24587716

  14. Titania Coated Mica via Chemical Vapour Deposition, Post N-doped by Liquid Ammonia Treatment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Powell, Michael J.; Parkin, Ivan P.

    TiO2 films were successfully grown on synthetic mica powders via Chemical Vapor Deposition (CVD). The CVD rig is a cold-walled design that allows surface coverage of a powder to be successfully achieved. The TiO2 was produced by the reaction between TiCl4 and Ethyl Acetate. The powder produced could be successfully N-doped using post liquid ammonia treatment. The TiO2 powder produced could have potential applications in self-cleaning surfaces or antimicrobial paints.

  15. Plasma enhanced chemical vapour deposition of silica onto Ti: Analysis of surface chemistry, morphology and functional hydroxyl groups

    PubMed Central

    Szili, Endre J.; Kumar, Sunil; Smart, Roger St. C.; Lowe, Rachel; Saiz, Eduardo; Voelcker, Nicolas H.

    2009-01-01

    Previously, we have developed and characterised a procedure for the deposition of thin silica films by a plasma enhanced chemical vapour deposition (PECVD) procedure using tetraethoxysilane (TEOS) as the main precursor. We have used the silica coatings for improving the corrosion resistance of metals and for enhancing the bioactivity of biomedical metallic implants. Recently, we have been fine-tuning the PECVD method for producing high quality and reproducible PECVD-silica (PECVD-Si) coatings on metals, primarily for biomaterial applications. In order to understand the interaction of the PECVD-Si coatings with biological species (such as proteins and cells), it is important to first analyse the properties of the silica films deposited using the optimised parameters. Therefore, this current investigation was carried out to analyse the characteristic features of PECVD-Si deposited on Ti substrates (PECVD-Si-Ti). We determined that the PECVD-Si coatings on Ti were conformal to the substrate surface, strongly adhered to the underlying substrate and were resistant to delamination. The PECVD-Si surface was composed of stoichiometric SiO2, showed a low carbon content (below 10 at.%) and was very hydrophilic (contact angle <10°). Finally, we also showed that the PECVD-Si coatings contain functional hydroxyl groups. PMID:19809536

  16. Osteoconductive Potential of Barrier NanoSiO2 PLGA Membranes Functionalized by Plasma Enhanced Chemical Vapour Deposition

    PubMed Central

    Terriza, Antonia; Vilches-Pérez, Jose I.; de la Orden, Emilio; Yubero, Francisco; Gonzalez-Caballero, Juan L.; González-Elipe, Agustin R.; Vilches, José; Salido, Mercedes

    2014-01-01

    The possibility of tailoring membrane surfaces with osteoconductive potential, in particular in biodegradable devices, to create modified biomaterials that stimulate osteoblast response should make them more suitable for clinical use, hopefully enhancing bone regeneration. Bioactive inorganic materials, such as silica, have been suggested to improve the bioactivity of synthetic biopolymers. An in vitro study on HOB human osteoblasts was performed to assess biocompatibility and bioactivity of SiO2 functionalized poly(lactide-co-glycolide) (PLGA) membranes, prior to clinical use. A 15 nm SiO2 layer was deposited by plasma enhanced chemical vapour deposition (PECVD), onto a resorbable PLGA membrane. Samples were characterized by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, atomic force microscopy, scanning electron microscopy, and infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR). HOB cells were seeded on sterilized test surfaces where cell morphology, spreading, actin cytoskeletal organization, and focal adhesion expression were assessed. As proved by the FT-IR analysis of samples, the deposition by PECVD of the SiO2 onto the PLGA membrane did not alter the composition and other characteristics of the organic membrane. A temporal and spatial reorganization of cytoskeleton and focal adhesions and morphological changes in response to SiO2 nanolayer were identified in our model. The novedous SiO2 deposition method is compatible with the standard sterilization protocols and reveals as a valuable tool to increase bioactivity of resorbable PLGA membranes. PMID:24883304

  17. Aerosol-assisted delivery of precursors for chemical vapour deposition: expanding the scope of CVD for materials fabrication.

    PubMed

    Marchand, Peter; Hassan, Iman A; Parkin, Ivan P; Carmalt, Claire J

    2013-07-14

    The production of thin films of materials has become the attention of a great deal of research throughout academia and industry worldwide owing to the array of applications which utilise them, including electronic devices, gas sensors, solar cells, window coatings and catalytic systems. Whilst a number of deposition techniques are in common use, chemical vapour deposition (CVD) is an attractive process for the production of a wide range of materials due to the control it offers over film composition, coverage and uniformity, even on large scales. Conventional CVD processes can be limited, however, by the need for suitably volatile precursors. Aerosol-assisted (AA)CVD is a solution-based process which relies on the solubility of the precursor, rather than its volatility and thus vastly extends the range of potentially applicable precursors. In addition, AACVD offers extra means to control film morphology and concurrently the properties of the deposited materials. In this perspective we discuss the AACVD process, the influence of deposition conditions on film characteristics and a number of materials and applications to which AACVD has been found beneficial. PMID:23629474

  18. Aerosol assisted chemical vapour deposition of Cu-ZnO composite from single source precursors.

    PubMed

    Shahid, Muhammad; Mazhar, Muhammad; Hamid, Mazhar; O'Brien, Paul; Malik, Mohammad A; Helliwell, Madeleine; Raftery, James

    2009-07-28

    Two heterobimetallic precursors [Zn(TFA)3(micro-OH)Cu3(dmae)3Cl].THF (1) and [Zn(TFA)4Cu3(dmae)4] (2) [dmae=N,N-dimethylaminoethanolate and TFA=trifluoroacetate], have been synthesized and characterized by their melting points, elemental analysis, FT-IR spectroscopy, mass spectrometry, TGA and single crystal X-ray diffraction methods. Both complexes were used to deposit thin films of Cu-ZnO composite on glass substrates by aerosol assisted chemical vapor deposition (AACVD) method. The films were characterized by "scotch tape" test for adhesion, thickness measurement as a function of temperature, EDX for composition, SEM for surface morphology and XRD for crystalline phases. Thin film deposition studies at 250, 325, 400, 475 degrees C indicated the increase in thickness with temperature reaching a maximum at 400 degrees C and then decreasing. EDX and PXRD results showed the uniform distribution of cubic metallic copper and hexagonal zinc oxide phases which make them useful for nanocatalysis on structured surfaces. PMID:19587992

  19. Strain and structure heterogeneity in MoS2 atomic layers grown by chemical vapour deposition

    DOE PAGES

    Liu, Zheng; Amani, Matin; Najmaei, Sina; Xu, Quan; Zou, Xiaolong; Zhou, Wu; Yu, Ting; Qiu, Caiyu; Birdwell, A. Glen; Crowne, Frank J.; et al

    2014-11-18

    Monolayer molybdenum disulfide (MoS2) has attracted tremendous attention due to its promising applications in high-performance field-effect transistors, phototransistors, spintronic devices, and nonlinear optics. The enhanced photoluminescence effect in monolayer MoS2 was discovered and, as a strong tool, was employed for strain and defect analysis in MoS2. Recently, large-size monolayer MoS2 has been produced by chemical vapor deposition but has not yet been fully explored. Here we systematically characterize chemical vapor deposition grown MoS2 by PL spectroscopy and mapping, and demonstrate non-uniform strain in single-crystalline monolayer MoS2 and strain-induced band gap engineering. We also evaluate the effective strain transferred from polymermore » substrates to MoS2 by three-dimensional finite element analysis. In addition, our work demonstrates that PL mapping can be used as a non-contact approach for quick identification of grain boundaries in MoS2.« less

  20. Refractive index dependence on optical gap in amorphous silicon—part II. Si prepared by chemical vapour deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ravindra, N. M.; Ance, C.; Ferraton, J. P.; Berger, J. M.; De Chelle, F.; Robin, S.

    1983-07-01

    In the present study, we essentially attempt to extrapolate our earlier studies (1) to amorphous silicon films prepared by chemical vapour deposition using a slightly different approach. This work assumes significance especially in view of a rather dangerous trend prevailing today to generalize model calculations without attributing any importance to the method of preparation of the films. (2-4) Here, we adopt a spectroscopic approach to analyse the various properties of the a-Si films. Some of these films are doped with boron and most of them have been subjected to post-hydrogenation. This study leads us to conclude that the Moss formula (5) is again a fairly good representative of the optical gap-refractive index variation. The scheme developed by Ravindra et al.(6) is shown to be valid for these CVD films. In the passing, we attempt to analyse the properties of films prepared at different temperatures and at different rates of deposition. The model of Revesz (7) is utilised to explain the variation in the density. Our study leads us to believe that for the CVD technique (a high temperature technique with temperatures close to that of crystallisation (8), the rate of deposition seems to be very important in determining the surface conditions of the films. Further, it is seen that on post-hydrogenation, the spectroscopic parameters as have been defined in the Wemple-Didomenico model (9) behave randomly. The study has been carried out on a large number of samples.

  1. Nanofabrication using home-made RF plasma coupled chemical vapour deposition system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ong, Si Ci; Ilyas, Usman; Rawat, Rajdeep Singh

    2014-08-01

    Zinc oxide, ZnO, a popular semiconductor material with a wide band gap (3.37 eV) and high binding energy of the exciton (60 meV), has numerous applications such as in optoelectronics, chemical/biological sensors, and drug delivery. This project aims to (i) optimize the operating conditions for growth of ZnO nanostructures using the chemical vapor deposition (CVD) method, and (ii) investigate the effects of coupling radiofrequency (RF) plasma to the CVD method on the quality of ZnO nanostructures. First, ZnO nanowires were synthesized using a home-made reaction setup on gold-coated and non-coated Si (100) substrates at 950 °C. XRD, SEM, EDX, and PL measurements were used for characterizations and it was found that a deposition duration of 10 minutes produced the most well-defined ZnO nanowires. SEM analysis revealed that the nanowires had diameters ranging from 30-100 mm and lengths ranging from 1-4 µm. In addition, PL analysis showed strong UV emission at 380 nm, making it suitable for UV lasing. Next, RF plasma was introduced for 30 minutes. Both remote and in situ RF plasma produced less satisfactory ZnO nanostructures with poorer crystalline structure, surface morphology, and optical properties due to etching effect of energetic ions produced from plasma. However, a reduction in plasma discharge duration to 10 minutes produced thicker and shorter ZnO nanostructures. Based on experimentation conducted, it is insufficient to conclude that RF plasma cannot aid in producing well-defined ZnO nanostructures. It can be deduced that the etching effect of energetic ions outweighed the increased oxygen radical production in RF plasma nanofabrication.

  2. Surface and Compositional Study of Graphene grown on Lithium Niobate (LiNbO3) substrates by Chemical Vapour Deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karamat, Shumaila; Celik, Umit; Oral, Ahmet

    The diversity required in the designing of electronic devices motivated the community to always attempt for new functional materials and device structures. Graphene is considered as one of the most promising candidate materials for future electronics and carbon based devices. It is very exciting to combine graphene with new dielectric materials which exhibit multifunctional properties. Lithium Niobate exhibits ferro-, pyro-, and piezoelectric properties with large electro-optic, acousto-optic, and photoelastic coefficients as well as strong photorefractive and photovoltaic effects which made it one of the most extensively studied materials over the last 50 years. We used ambient pressure chemical vapour deposition to grow graphene on LiNbO3 substrates without any catalyst. The growth was carried out in presence of methane, argon and hydrogen. AFM imaging showed very unique structures on the surface which contains triangular domains. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) was used to get information about the presence of necessary elements, their bonding with LiNbO3 substrates. Detailed characterization is under process which will be presented later.

  3. An investigation of plasma chemistry for dc plasma enhanced chemical vapour deposition of carbon nanotubes and nanofibres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hash, David B.; Bell, Martin S.; Teo, Kenneth B. K.; Cruden, Brett A.; Milne, William I.; Meyyappan, M.

    2005-06-01

    The role of plasma in plasma enhanced chemical vapour deposition of carbon nanotubes and nanofibres is investigated with both experimental and computational diagnostic techniques. A residual gas analysis (RGA) of a 12 mbar dc discharge with a C2H2/NH3 gas mixture is conducted near the Ni catalyst surface employed for carbon nanofibre growth. The results are corroborated with a 1D dc discharge model that solves for species densities, ion momentum, and ion, electron and neutral gas thermal energies. The effect of varying the plasma power from 0 to 200 W on the gas composition is studied. The dissociation efficiency of the plasma is demonstrated where over 50% of the feedstock is converted to a mixture of hydrogen, nitrogen and hydrogen cyanide at 200 W. Finally, the important role that endothermic ion-molecule reactions play in this conversion is, for the first time, established. Of these reactions, dissociative proton abstraction and collision-induced dissociation are of the greatest significance.

  4. Metal-organic chemical vapour deposition of polycrystalline tetragonal indium sulphide (InS) thin films

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Macinnes, Andrew N.; Cleaver, William M.; Barron, Andrew R.; Power, Michael B.; Hepp, Aloysius F.

    1992-01-01

    The dimeric indium thiolate /(t Bu)2In(mu-S sup t Bu)/2 has been used as a single-source precursor for the MOCVD of InS thin films. The dimeric In2S2 core is proposed to account for the formation of the nonequilibrium high-pressure tetragonal phase in the deposited films. Analysis of the deposited films has been obtained by TEM, with associated energy-dispersive X-ray analysis and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy.

  5. Chemical vapour deposition of nitrogen-doped titanium dioxide thin films.

    PubMed

    Alexandrov, S E; Baryshnikova, M V; Filatov, L A; Shahmin, A L; Andreeva, V D

    2011-09-01

    Nitrogen-doped titanium dioxide is often considered as a promising nanomaterial for photocatalytic applications. Here we report the first results of a study of APCVD of N-doped TiO2 thin films prepared with the use of ammonia as a source of nitrogen and titanium tetraisopropoxide (TTIP) as a source of Ti and O atoms. The obtained films were analyzed with X-ray diffraction, infrared spectroscopy, atomic force microscopy, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, UV-Vis spectroscopy, and ellipsometry. It was found that the film growth rate in the TTIP-NH3-Ar reaction system varied insignificantly with substrate temperature in the range of 450,..., 750 degrees C and did not exceed 4.4 nm/min. Yellow and orange layers with nitrogen content of about 7.6% were formed at the deposition temperature higher than 600 degrees C. The results of the structure analysis of the deposited films showed that addition of ammonia led to stabilization of the amorphous phase in the films. The effect of ammonia on optical and photocatalytic properties was also considered. PMID:22097568

  6. Biological properties of carbon powders synthesized using chemical vapour deposition and detonation methods.

    PubMed

    Batory, M; Batory, D; Grabarczyk, J; Kaczorowski, W; Kupcewicz, B; Mitura, K; Nasti, T H; Yusuf, N; Niedzielski, P

    2012-12-01

    Carbon powders can be synthesized using variety of CVD and detonation methods. Several interesting properties of carbon powder particles make them a very attractive material examined in many laboratories all over the world. However there is a lack of information discussing investigation of carbon powders directed to its application in pharmaceutical-cosmetic industry and medicine. Earlier investigation results proved that diamond powders present properties fighting free radicals. Presented work discusses the influence of carbon powder particles manufactured using MW/RF PACVD, RF PACVD and detonation methods onto hydro-lipid skin coat. Before the biological examinations physicochemical properties of carbon powders were determined. Grain size, shape and chemical composition of carbon powders were determined using the scanning electron microscopy. Surface functional groups were characterized by IR Fourier-transform spectroscopy and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. Structure and phase composition were investigated by means of the Raman spectroscopy. Results of allergy tests performed on laboratory mice proved that carbon powder particles synthesized using different methods do not cause allergy. In the following stage, the group of 20 patients applied the formula including carbon powder on their face skin. The influence of carbon powder onto hydro-lipid skin coat was determined by measurement of such parameters as: pH reaction, skin temperature, lipid fotometry and level of hydration. Additionally, macro pictures of places where the cream had been applied were registered. As the result of the investigation it was found that powders synthesized using various methods present different physicochemical properties which may individually affect the face skin parameters. The noticeable improvement of hydro-lipid skin coat kilter was observed. PMID:23447955

  7. Antimicrobial activity of novel nanostructured Cu-SiO2 coatings prepared by chemical vapour deposition against hospital related pathogens

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    There is increasing recognition that the healthcare environment acts as an important reservoir for transmission of healthcare acquired infections (HCAI). One method of reducing environmental contamination would be use of antimicrobial materials. The antimicrobial activity of thin silica-copper films prepared by chemical vapour deposition was evaluated against standard strains of bacteria used for disinfectant testing and bacteria of current interest in HCAI. The structure of the coatings was determined using Scanning Electron Microscopy and their hardness and adhesion to the substrate determined. Antimicrobial activity was tested using a method based on BS ISO 22196:2007. The coatings had a pale green-brown colour and had a similar hardness to steel. SEM showed nano-structured aggregates of Cu within a silica matrix. A log10 reduction in viability of >5 could be obtained within 4 h for the disinfectant test strains and within 6 h for producing Acinetobacter baumannii, Klebsiella pneumoniae and Stenotrophomonas maltophilia. Activity against the other hospital isolates was slower but still gave log10 reduction factors of >5 for extended spectrum β-lactamase producing Escherichia coli and >3 for vancomycin resistant Enterococcus faecium, methicillin resistant Staphylococcus aureus and Pseudomonas aeruginosa within 24 h. The results demonstrate the importance of testing antimicrobial materials destined for healthcare use against isolates of current interest in hospitals as well as standard test strains. The coatings used here can also be applied to substrates such as metals and ceramics and have potential applications where reduction of microbial environmental contamination is desirable. PMID:24007899

  8. a Study of Volatile Precursors for the Growth of Cadmium Sulphide and Cadmium Selenide by Metal Organic Chemical Vapour Deposition.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beer, Michael P.

    Available from UMI in association with The British Library. The wide-band-gap semiconductors, cadmium sulphide and cadmium selenide, may be grown by Metal Organic Chemical Vapour Deposition (MOCVD). This method typically involves the reaction of gaseous streams of Me_2 Cd and H_2Y (Y = S, Se) over a heated substrate (usually gallium arsenide) on which the desired compound is grown as an epitaxial layer. Unfortunately, the precursors start to react in the cold zone of the reactor, that is before they reach the heated substrate. This problem is known as prereaction. The problem of prereaction is partially reduced by the use of adducts of dimethyl cadmium in place of the free dialkyl compound although the mechanism by which such adducts block prereaction is unknown. Accordingly, a study of adducts of dimethyl cadmium was undertaken with a view to determining their properties in all phases. The adduct of Me_2Cd with 2,2^ '-bipyridyl was found to be monomeric in the solid state while that with 1,4-dioxane, a volatile compound used for prereaction reduction, was found to be polymeric. A study of adducts in the gas phase using mass spectrometry and gas phase Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy gave no evidence to suggest there is any gas phase association between 1,4-dioxane and dimethyl cadmium. With the 2,2 ^'-bipyridyl adduct some evidence for partial retention of coordinate bonds upon sublimation was obtained. The solid adduct of Me _2Cd with N,N,N^' ,N^'-tetramethylethylenediamine (TMEDA) was prepared as it was hoped that the flexibility of the aliphatic Lewis base would permit the formation of an adduct containing strong co-ordinate bonds which would remain intact upon sublimation. Using gas phase electron diffraction, the structure of the adduct of Me_2Cd and TMEDA was determined. It was shown to exist in the gas phase purely as the associated monomeric species. The adduct was then employed for the growth of CdS and CdSe in an industrial MOCVD apparatus. The

  9. Barrier properties to surrogates of hydrogenated carbon nano-films deposited on PET by plasma-enhanced chemical vapour deposition.

    PubMed

    Oliveira, Éder C; Echegoyen, Yolanda; Nerin, Cristina; Cruz, Sandra A

    2014-01-01

    Poly(ethylene terephthalate) resin was contaminated with a series of surrogates using a US Food and Drug Administration protocol. The contaminated samples were coated with two different kinds of hydrogenated amorphous carbon thin films (a-C:H): one with diamond-like hydrogenated amorphous carbon and another with polymer-like hydrogenated carbon (PLCH) phases. To evaluate the barrier properties of the a-C:H films, migration assays were performed using food simulants. After the tests, analysis by gas chromatography with different detectors was carried out. The appearance of the films before and after the migration experiments was studied by field emission scanning electron microscopy. The results showed that a-C:H films have good barrier properties for most of the evaluated compounds, mainly when they are deposited as PLCH phase. PMID:25254307

  10. Surface engineering of artificial heart valve disks using nanostructured thin films deposited by chemical vapour deposition and sol-gel methods.

    PubMed

    Jackson, M J; Robinson, G M; Ali, N; Kousar, Y; Mei, S; Gracio, J; Taylor, H; Ahmed, W

    2006-01-01

    Pyrolytic carbon (PyC) is widely used in manufacturing commercial artificial heart valve disks (HVD). Although PyC is commonly used in HVD, it is not the best material for this application since its blood compatibility is not ideal for prolonged clinical use. As a result thrombosis often occurs and the patients are required to take anti-coagulation drugs on a regular basis in order to minimize the formation of thrombosis. However, anti-coagulation therapy gives rise to some detrimental side effects in patients. Therefore, it is extremely urgent that newer and more technically advanced materials with better surface and bulk properties are developed. In this paper, we report the mechanical properties of PyC-HVD, i.e. strength, wear resistance and coefficient of friction. The strength of the material was assessed using Brinell indentation tests. Furthermore, wear resistance and coefficient of friction values were obtained from pin-on-disk testing. The micro-structural properties of PyC were characterized using XRD, Raman spectroscopy and SEM analysis. Also in this paper we report the preparation of freestanding nanocrystalline diamond films (FSND) using the time-modulated chemical vapour deposition (TMCVD) process. Furthermore, the sol-gel technique was used to uniformly coat PyC-HVD with dense, nanocrystalline-titanium oxide (nc-TiO2) coatings. The as-grown nc-TiO2 coatings were characterized for microstructure using SEM and XRD analysis.

  11. Ellipsometric and Rutherford Back scattering Spectrometry studies of SiO(X)N(Y) films elaborated by plasma-enhanced chemical vapour deposition technique.

    PubMed

    Mahamdi, R; Boulesbaa, M; Saci, L; Mansour, F; Molliet, C; Collet, M; Temple-Boyer, P

    2011-10-01

    Silicon oxynitride (SiO(X)N(Y)) thin films were deposited by plasma-enhanced chemical vapour deposition technique (PECVD) from silane (SiH4), nitrous oxide (N2O), ammonia (NH3) and nitrogen (N2) mixture. Spectroscopic ellipsometry (SE), in the range of wavelengths 450-900 nm, was used to define the film thickness and therefore the deposition rate, as well as the refractive index as a function of the N2O gaseous flow. While considering the (Si3N4, SiO2, H2 or void) heterogeneous mixture, Maxwell Garnett (MG) theory allows to fit the SE measurements and to define the volume fraction of the different phases. Finally, Rutherford Backscattering Spectrometry (RBS) results showed that x = O/Si ratio increases gradually with increasing the N2O flow, allowing the correlation of the SiO(X)N(Y) films main parameters. PMID:22400311

  12. Thin films of tin(II) sulphide (SnS) by aerosol-assisted chemical vapour deposition (AACVD) using tin(II) dithiocarbamates as single-source precursors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kevin, Punarja; Lewis, David J.; Raftery, James; Azad Malik, M.; O'Brien, Paul

    2015-04-01

    The synthesis of the asymmetric dithiocarbamates of tin(II) with the formula [Sn(S2CNRR')2] (where R=Et, R'=n-Bu (1); R=Me, R'=n-Bu (2); R=R'=Et (3)) and their use for the deposition of SnS thin films by aerosol-assisted chemical vapour deposition (AACVD) is described. The effects of temperature and the concentration of the precursors on deposition were investigated. The stoichiometry of SnS was best at higher concentrations of precursors (250 mM) and at 450 °C. The direct electronic band gap of the SnS produced by this method was estimated from optical absorbance measurements as 1.2 eV. The composition of films was confirmed by powder X-ray diffraction (p-XRD) and energy dispersive analysis of X-rays (EDAX) spectroscopy.

  13. A Comparative Study of the Dispersion of Multi-Wall Carbon Nanotubes Made by Arc-Discharge and Chemical Vapour Deposition.

    PubMed

    Frømyr, Tomas-Roll; Bourgeaux-Goget, Marie; Hansen, Finn Knut

    2015-05-01

    A method has been developed to characterize the dispersion of multi-wall carbon nanotubes in water using a disc centrifuge for the detection of individual carbon nanotubes, residual aggregates, and contaminants. Carbon nanotubes produced by arc-discharge have been measured and compared with carbon nanotubes produced by chemical vapour deposition. Studies performed on both pristine (see text) arc-discharge nanotubes is rather strong and that high ultra-sound intensity is required to achieve complete dispersion of carbon nanotube bundles. The logarithm of the mode of the particle size distribution of the arc-discharge carbon nanotubes was found to be a linear function of the logarithm of the total ultrasonic energy input in the dispersion process. PMID:26504969

  14. Fabrication of multiwalled carbon nanotubes in the channels of iron loaded three dimensional mesoporous material by catalytic chemical vapour deposition technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Somanathan, T.; Gokulakrishnan, N.; Chandrasekar, G.; Pandurangan, A.

    2011-01-01

    The growth of multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWNTs) was successfully achieved in the channels of three dimensional (3D) iron loaded mesoporous matrices (KIT-6) by employing catalytic chemical vapour deposition (CCVD) technique. The synthesised MWNTs, which were characterised by SEM, TEM and Raman spectroscopy, consist of thick graphene layers of about 10 nm composed of 29 graphene sheets with inner and outer diameter of ∼17 nm and ∼37 nm, respectively. The Raman spectrum showed the formation of well-graphitised MWNTs with significantly higher IG/ID ratio of 1.47 compared to commercial MWNTs. Comparatively, 2 wt% Fe loaded KIT-6 material produced a better yield of 91%, which is also highest compared with the report of MWNTs synthesis using mesoporous materials reported so far.

  15. Copper-Assisted Direct Growth of Vertical Graphene Nanosheets on Glass Substrates by Low-Temperature Plasma-Enhanced Chemical Vapour Deposition Process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Yifei; Jang, Haegyu; Kim, Sun Jung; Pang, Changhyun; Chae, Heeyeop

    2015-08-01

    Vertical graphene (VG) nanosheets are directly grown below 500 °C on glass substrates by a one-step copper-assisted plasma-enhanced chemical vapour deposition (PECVD) process. A piece of copper foil is located around a glass substrate as a catalyst in the process. The effect of the copper catalyst on the vertical graphene is evaluated in terms of film morphology, growth rate, carbon density in the plasma and film resistance. The growth rate of the vertical graphene is enhanced by a factor of 5.6 with the copper catalyst with denser vertical graphene. The analysis of optical emission spectra suggests that the carbon radical density is increased with the copper catalyst. Highly conductive VG films having 800 Ω/□ are grown on glass substrates with Cu catalyst at a relatively low temperature.

  16. A Comparative Study of the Dispersion of Multi-Wall Carbon Nanotubes Made by Arc-Discharge and Chemical Vapour Deposition.

    PubMed

    Frømyr, Tomas-Roll; Bourgeaux-Goget, Marie; Hansen, Finn Knut

    2015-05-01

    A method has been developed to characterize the dispersion of multi-wall carbon nanotubes in water using a disc centrifuge for the detection of individual carbon nanotubes, residual aggregates, and contaminants. Carbon nanotubes produced by arc-discharge have been measured and compared with carbon nanotubes produced by chemical vapour deposition. Studies performed on both pristine (see text) arc-discharge nanotubes is rather strong and that high ultra-sound intensity is required to achieve complete dispersion of carbon nanotube bundles. The logarithm of the mode of the particle size distribution of the arc-discharge carbon nanotubes was found to be a linear function of the logarithm of the total ultrasonic energy input in the dispersion process.

  17. Heterocyclic dithiocarbamato-iron(III) complexes: single-source precursors for aerosol-assisted chemical vapour deposition (AACVD) of iron sulfide thin films.

    PubMed

    Mlowe, Sixberth; Lewis, David J; Malik, Mohammad Azad; Raftery, James; Mubofu, Egid B; O'Brien, Paul; Revaprasadu, Neerish

    2016-02-14

    Tris-(piperidinedithiocarbamato)iron(III) (1) and tris-(tetrahydroquinolinedithiocarbamato)iron(iii) (2) complexes have been synthesized and their single-crystal X-ray structures were determined. Thermogravimetric analysis (TGA) of the complexes showed decomposition to iron sulfide. Both complexes were then used as single-source precursors for the deposition of iron sulfide thin films by aerosol-assisted chemical vapour deposition (AACVD). Energy-dispersive X-ray (EDX) spectroscopy confirmed the formation of iron sulfide films. The addition of tert-butyl thiol almost doubled the sulfur content in the deposited films. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) images of the iron sulfide films from both complexes showed flakes/leaves/sheets, spherical granules and nanofibres. The sizes and shapes of these crystallites depended on the nature of the precursor, temperature, solvent and the amount of tert-butyl thiol used. The observed optical properties are dependent upon the variation of reaction parameters such as temperature and solvent. Powder X-ray diffraction (p-XRD) studies revealed that pyrrhotite, hexagonal (Fe0.975S), marcasite and smythite (Fe3S4) phases were differently deposited. PMID:26732865

  18. Strain and structure heterogeneity in MoS2 atomic layers grown by chemical vapour deposition

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Zheng; Amani, Matin; Najmaei, Sina; Xu, Quan; Zou, Xiaolong; Zhou, Wu; Yu, Ting; Qiu, Caiyu; Birdwell, A. Glen; Crowne, Frank J.; Vajtai, Robert; Yakobson, Boris I.; Xia, Zhenhai; Dubey, Madan; Ajayan, Pulickel M.; Lou, Jun

    2014-11-18

    Monolayer molybdenum disulfide (MoS2) has attracted tremendous attention due to its promising applications in high-performance field-effect transistors, phototransistors, spintronic devices, and nonlinear optics. The enhanced photoluminescence effect in monolayer MoS2 was discovered and, as a strong tool, was employed for strain and defect analysis in MoS2. Recently, large-size monolayer MoS2 has been produced by chemical vapor deposition but has not yet been fully explored. Here we systematically characterize chemical vapor deposition grown MoS2 by PL spectroscopy and mapping, and demonstrate non-uniform strain in single-crystalline monolayer MoS2 and strain-induced band gap engineering. We also evaluate the effective strain transferred from polymer substrates to MoS2 by three-dimensional finite element analysis. In addition, our work demonstrates that PL mapping can be used as a non-contact approach for quick identification of grain boundaries in MoS2.

  19. Broadband antireflection for a high-index substrate using SiN x /SiO2 by inductively coupled plasma chemical vapour deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lim, Kim Peng; Ng, Doris K. T.; Wang, Qian

    2016-03-01

    This paper presents the development of broadband antireflection coating for a high-index substrate such as Si using SiN x /SiO2 by inductively coupled plasma chemical vapour deposition (ICP-CVD). The thin-film design employs a simulated annealing method for a minimal average reflectance over the wavelength range and incidence angles involved, which gives the optimized refractive index and thickness of each layer of the thin-film stack under different layer numbers. Using ICP-CVD, the SiN x material system is optimized by tuning the SiH4/N2 gas ratio. The corresponding thin-film characterization shows the precise refractive index/film thickness control in deposition, and the deposited film also has a low absorption coefficient and smooth surface. The double-layer SiN x /SiO2 coating with the optimized refractive index and thickness for broadband antireflection is demonstrated experimentally. The average reflectance of the Si surface is reduced from ~32% to ~3.17% at normal incidence for a wavelength range from 400 to 1100 nm.

  20. Direct observation of electron emission from the grain boundaries of chemical vapour deposition diamond films by tunneling atomic force microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Chatterjee, Vijay; Harniman, Robert; May, Paul W.; Barhai, P. K.

    2014-04-28

    The emission of electrons from diamond in vacuum occurs readily as a result of the negative electron affinity of the hydrogenated surface due to features with nanoscale dimensions, which can concentrate electric fields high enough to induce electron emission from them. Electrons can be emitted as a result of an applied electric field (field emission) with possible uses in displays or cold-cathode devices. Alternatively, electrons can be emitted simply by heating the diamond in vacuum to temperatures as low as 350 °C (thermionic emission), and this may find applications in solar energy generation or energy harvesting devices. Electron emission studies usually use doped polycrystalline diamond films deposited onto Si or metallic substrates by chemical vapor deposition, and these films have a rough, faceted morphology on the micron or nanometer scale. Electron emission is often improved by patterning the diamond surface into sharp points or needles, the idea being that the field lines concentrate at the points lowering the barrier for electron emission. However, there is little direct evidence that electrons are emitted from these sharp tips. The few reports in the literature that have studied the emission sites suggested that emission came from the grain boundaries and not the protruding regions. We now present direct observation of the emission sites over a large area of polycrystalline diamond using tunneling atomic force microscopy. We confirm that the emission current comes mostly from the grain boundaries, which is consistent with a model for emission in which the non-diamond phase is the source of electrons with a threshold that is determined by the surrounding hydrogenated diamond surface.

  1. Metalorganic chemical vapour deposition of GaN layers on ZnO substrates using α-Al2O3 as a transition layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Shen-Jie; Li, Nola; Yu, Hong Bo; Feng, Zhe Chuan; Summers, Christopher; Ferguson, Ian

    2009-12-01

    This work addresses the instability of a ZnO substrate during metalorganic chemical vapour deposition (MOCVD) growth of GaN by using Al2O3 films deposited by atomic layer deposition (ALD) as a stabilizing transition layer on the Zn face of ZnO (0 0 0 1) substrates. A systematic study of Al2O3 films of different thicknesses (2-90 nm) under different ALDs and post-annealing conditions was carried out. However, this paper focuses on as-deposited 20 and 50 nm Al2O3 films that were transformed to polycrystalline α-Al2O3 phases after optimal annealing at 1100 °C for 10 min and 20 min, respectively. GaN layers were grown on ZnO substrates with these α-Al2O3 transition layers by MOCVD using NH3 as a nitrogen source. Wurtzite GaN was observed by high resolution x-ray diffraction only on 20 nm Al2O3/ZnO substrates. Field-emission scanning electron microscopy showed a mirror-like surface, no etch pits and no film peeling in these samples. Room temperature photoluminescence showed a red-shift in the near band-edge emission of GaN, which may be related to oxygen incorporation forming a shallow donor-related level in GaN. Raman scattering also indicated the presence of a well-crystallized GaN layer on the 20 nm Al2O3/ZnO substrate.

  2. Effect of oxygen plasma on field emission characteristics of single-wall carbon nanotubes grown by plasma enhanced chemical vapour deposition system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, Avshish; Parveen, Shama; Husain, Samina; Ali, Javid; Zulfequar, Mohammad; Harsh; Husain, Mushahid

    2014-02-01

    Field emission properties of single wall carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) grown on iron catalyst film by plasma enhanced chemical vapour deposition system were studied in diode configuration. The results were analysed in the framework of Fowler-Nordheim theory. The grown SWCNTs were found to be excellent field emitters, having emission current density higher than 20 mA/cm2 at a turn-on field of 1.3 V/μm. The as grown SWCNTs were further treated with Oxygen (O2) plasma for 5 min and again field emission characteristics were measured. The O2 plasma treated SWCNTs have shown dramatic improvement in their field emission properties with emission current density of 111 mA/cm2 at a much lower turn on field of 0.8 V/μm. The as grown as well as plasma treated SWCNTs were also characterized by various techniques, such as scanning electron microscopy, high resolution transmission electron microscopy, Raman spectroscopy, and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy before and after O2 plasma treatment and the findings are being reported in this paper.

  3. Fine-tuning of catalytic tin nanoparticles by the reverse micelle method for direct deposition of silicon nanowires by a plasma-enhanced chemical vapour technique.

    PubMed

    Poinern, Gérrard E J; Ng, Yan-Jing; Fawcett, Derek

    2010-12-15

    The reverse micelle method was used for the reduction of a tin (Sn) salt solution to produce metallic Sn nanoparticles ranging from 85 nm to 140 nm in diameter. The reverse micellar system used in this process was hexane-butanol-cetyl trimethylammonium bromide (CTAB). The diameters of the Sn nanoparticles were proportional to the concentration of the aqueous Sn salt solution. Thus, the size of the Sn nanoparticles can easily be controlled, enabling a simple, reproducible mechanism for the growth of silicon nanowires (SiNWs) using plasma-enhanced chemical vapour deposition (PECVD). Both the Sn nanoparticles and silicon nanowires were characterised using field-emission scanning electron microscopy (FE-SEM). Further characterisations of the SiNW's were made using transmission electron microscopy (TEM), atomic force microscopy (AFM) and Raman spectroscopy. In addition, dynamic light scattering (DLS) was used to investigate particle size distributions. This procedure demonstrates an economical route for manufacturing reproducible silicon nanowires using fine-tuned Sn nanoparticles for possible solar cell applications.

  4. Effect of oxygen plasma on field emission characteristics of single-wall carbon nanotubes grown by plasma enhanced chemical vapour deposition system

    SciTech Connect

    Kumar, Avshish; Parveen, Shama; Husain, Samina; Ali, Javid; Zulfequar, Mohammad; Harsh; Husain, Mushahid

    2014-02-28

    Field emission properties of single wall carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) grown on iron catalyst film by plasma enhanced chemical vapour deposition system were studied in diode configuration. The results were analysed in the framework of Fowler-Nordheim theory. The grown SWCNTs were found to be excellent field emitters, having emission current density higher than 20 mA/cm{sup 2} at a turn-on field of 1.3 V/μm. The as grown SWCNTs were further treated with Oxygen (O{sub 2}) plasma for 5 min and again field emission characteristics were measured. The O{sub 2} plasma treated SWCNTs have shown dramatic improvement in their field emission properties with emission current density of 111 mA/cm{sup 2} at a much lower turn on field of 0.8 V/μm. The as grown as well as plasma treated SWCNTs were also characterized by various techniques, such as scanning electron microscopy, high resolution transmission electron microscopy, Raman spectroscopy, and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy before and after O{sub 2} plasma treatment and the findings are being reported in this paper.

  5. Aerosol assisted chemical vapour deposition of ZnO films on glass with noble metal and p-type dopants; use of dopants to influence preferred orientation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walters, G.; Parkin, I. P.

    2009-04-01

    The use of aerosol assisted chemical vapour deposition (AACVD) for the formation of zinc oxide and doped ZnO films with control of preferred orientation on glass is reported. Undoped and doped ZnO host matrix films were highly transparent with visible transmission >85%. The Cu (CuO/Cu 2O) doped ZnO thin films were highly coloured and opaque. Undoped and noble metal doped ZnO films had mainly spherical morphology. Aluminium oxide/ZnO composite films had a range of morphologies from spherical to cubic. The XRD patterns for both doped and undoped ZnO films grown at substrate temperatures less than 500 °C showed strong preferred (0 0 2) crystal lattice orientation. The undoped ZnO film at 500 °C exhibited a random crystal orientation pattern for hexagonal ZnO. The introduction of small amounts of Al 2O 3 within the ZnO to form a composite significantly altered the preferred crystal orientation to (1 0 1).

  6. Study of the catalyst evolution during annealing preceding the growth of carbon nanotubes by microwave plasma-enhanced chemical vapour deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malesevic, Alexander; Chen, Hong; Hauffman, Tom; Vanhulsel, Annick; Terryn, Herman; Van Haesendonck, Chris

    2007-11-01

    A two-step catalyst annealing process is developed in order to control the diameter of nickel catalyst particles for the growth of carbon nanotubes (CNTs) by microwave plasma-enhanced chemical vapour deposition (MW PECVD). Thermal annealing of a continuous nickel film in a hydrogen (H2) environment in a first step is found to be insufficient for the formation of nanometre-size, high-density catalyst particles. In a second step, a H2 MW plasma treatment decreases the catalyst diameter by a factor of two and increases the particle density by a factor of five. An x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy study of the catalyst after each step in the annealing process is presented. It is found that the catalyst particles interact with the substrate during thermal annealing, thereby forming a silicate, even if a buffer layer in between the catalyst and the substrate is intended to prevent silicate formation. The silicate formation and reduction is shown to be directly related to the CNT growth mechanism, determining whether the catalyst particles reside at the base or the tip of the growing CNTs. The catalyst particles are used for the growth of a high-density CNT coating by MW PECVD. CNTs are analysed with electron microscopy and Raman spectroscopy.

  7. Age and structure of a model vapour-deposited glass

    PubMed Central

    Reid, Daniel R.; Lyubimov, Ivan; Ediger, M. D.; de Pablo, Juan J.

    2016-01-01

    Glass films prepared by a process of physical vapour deposition have been shown to have thermodynamic and kinetic stability comparable to those of ordinary glasses aged for thousands of years. A central question in the study of vapour-deposited glasses, particularly in light of new knowledge regarding anisotropy in these materials, is whether the ultra-stable glassy films formed by vapour deposition are ever equivalent to those obtained by liquid cooling. Here we present a computational study of vapour deposition for a two-dimensional glass forming liquid using a methodology, which closely mimics experiment. We find that for the model considered here, structures that arise in vapour-deposited materials are statistically identical to those observed in ordinary glasses, provided the two are compared at the same inherent structure energy. We also find that newly deposited hot molecules produce cascades of hot particles that propagate far into the film, possibly influencing the relaxation of the material. PMID:27762262

  8. The aerosol assisted chemical vapour deposition of SnSe and Cu₂SnSe₃ thin films from molecular precursors.

    PubMed

    Kevin, Punarja; Malik, Sajid N; Malik, Mohammad A; O'Brien, Paul

    2014-11-28

    Tin selenide (SnSe) and copper tin selenide (Cu2SnSe3) thin films have been deposited onto glass substrates by AACVD using [Sn(Ph2PSe2)2] or a mixture of [Sn(Ph2PSe2)2] and [Cu(acac)2] respectively. PMID:25284472

  9. High-Quality Amorphous-Crystalline Silicon Heterostructures Using the Grid-Based Triode Radio-Frequency Plasma Enhanced Chemical Vapour Deposition Method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mahtani, Pratish

    The amorphous-crystalline silicon heterojunction (SHJ) represents a new paradigm in crystalline silicon (c-Si) photovoltaics (PV). To achieve the 27% efficiency target for SHJ PV, defects in the silicon heterointerface must be minimized by growing high-quality hydrogenated amorphous silicon (a-Si:H) onto the c-Si surfaces without deposition-related damage. Typically, a-Si:H is deposited using radio-frequency (RF) plasma enhanced chemical vapour deposition (PECVD), which in its conventional configuration directly exposes the c-Si growth surface to the ignited plasma. In this thesis, silicon heterostructures prepared by the grid-based triode RF PECVD method is investigated for the first time. The triode method allows for high-quality a-Si:H growth with the c-Si surfaces shielded from any potential plasma damage. Using a custom-built configurable PECVD facility, a systematic study was conducted and it was demonstrated that the triode method affords the preparation of a-Si:H with excellent bulk film quality and state-of-the-art passivation for c-Si surfaces. Using the triode method, an effective minority carrier lifetime (taueff) of 8.1 ms and an Auger-corrected surface recombination velocity (S) of 2.4 cm/s at an excess carrier density of 1015 cm-3 have been achieved for 1-2 ohm-cm n-type c-Si passivated with intrinsic a-Si:H. Further, using the triode method to deposit thin-layers of intrinsic and doped a-Si:H, a conventional SHJ solar cell structure was prepared and was found to exhibit an excellent implied Voc of 710 mV. Under all conditions scanned, samples prepared in the triode configuration showed improved passivation compared with samples prepared in the conventional diode configuration with the best triode prepared sample showing a nearly threefold increase in taueff and a twofold decrease in S compared with the best diode prepared sample. Furthermore, a-Si:H deposited using the triode method showed significantly improved bulk properties compared to diode

  10. The Use of Additives to Control the Morphology of Thin Films Synthesized Using Aerosol Assisted Chemical Vapour Deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaye, Karl; Turner, David; McKenna, David; Cackett, Adam; Hyett, Geoffrey

    This paper identifies and discusses the use of additives to control the morphology of nanoscale crystalline zinc oxide films, grown using AACVD, principally from a solution of zinc acetate in methanol. We will discuss the use of both positively charged additives such as tetramethylammonium bromide and cetyltrimethylammonium bromide as well as negatively charged additives like sodium dodecylsulphate. Additives such as these, combined with other experimental parameters such as deposition time, have allowed us to control the size of the particles (from 100 to 400 nm in diameter), their orientation, and the regularity of their shape, from rough edged plates to well defined hexagons. We will show that the additives can be used to control morphology consistently over a temperature range of 250-400 °C, and that this technique can be applied generally to a number of additives and solvents.

  11. Very low temperature epitaxy of Ge and Ge rich SiGe alloys with Ge2H6 in a Reduced Pressure - Chemical Vapour Deposition tool

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aubin, J.; Hartmann, J. M.; Bauer, M.; Moffatt, S.

    2016-07-01

    We have studied the very low temperature epitaxy of pure Ge and of Ge-rich SiGe alloys in a 200 mm industrial reduced pressure chemical vapour deposition tool. We have, first of all, benchmarked germane (GeH4) and digermane (Ge2H6) for the growth of pure Ge. Used Ge2H6 instead of GeH4 enabled us to dramatically increase the Ge growth rate at temperatures 425 °C and lower (5.6 nm min-1 compared to 0.14 nm min-1 at 350 °C with a Ge2H6 mass-flow one fourth that of GeH4). We have also evaluated at 400 °C, 100 Torr, the impact of the GeH4 or Ge2H6 mass-flow on the Ge growth rate. For a given Ge atomic flow, the higher surface reactivity of digermane yielded roughly five times higher growth rates than with germane. We have then combined digermane with disilane (Si2H6) or dichlorosilane (SiH2Cl2) in order to study the GeSi growth kinetics at 475 °C, 100 Torr. While the SiH2Cl2 mass-flow did not have any clear influence on the GeSi growth rate (with a 14 nm min-1 mean value, then), a Si2H6 mass-flow increase resulted in a slight GeSi growth rate increase (from 11 nm min-1 up to 14 nm min-1). Significantly higher Ge concentrations were otherwise accessed with dichlorosilane than with disilane, in the 77-82% range compared to the 39-53% range, respectively.

  12. A spectrometer on chemical vapour deposition-diamond basis for the measurement of the charge-state distribution of heavy ions in a laser-generated plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Cayzac, Witold; Frank, Alexander; Schumacher, Dennis; Roth, Markus; Blazevic, Abel; Wamers, Felix; Traeger, Michael; Berdermann, Eleni; Voss, Bernd; Hessling, Thomas

    2013-04-15

    This article reports on the development and the first applications of a new spectrometer which enables the precise and time-resolved measurement of both the energy loss and the charge-state distribution of ion beams with 10 < Z < 30 at energies of 4-8 MeV/u after their interaction with a laser-generated plasma. The spectrometer is based on five 20 Multiplication-Sign 7 mm{sup 2} large and 20 {mu}m thick polycrystalline diamond samples produced via the Chemical Vapour Deposition (CVD) process and was designed with the help of ion-optical simulations. First experiments with the spectrometer were successfully carried out at GSI using {sup 48}Ca ions at an energy of 4.8 MeV/u interacting with a carbon plasma generated by the laser irradiation of a thin foil target. Owing to the high rate capability and the short response time of the spectrometer, pulsed ion beams with 10{sup 3}-10{sup 4} ions per bunch at a bunch frequency of 108 MHz could be detected. The temporal evolution of the five main charge states of the calcium ion beams as well as the corresponding energy loss values could be measured simultaneously. Due to the outstanding properties of diamond as a particle detector, a beam energy resolution ({Delta}E/E) Almost-Equal-To 0.1% could be reached using the presented experimental method, while a precision of 10% in the energy loss and charge-state distribution data was obtained.

  13. Comparison of the Er,Cr:YSGG laser with a chemical vapour deposition bur and conventional techniques for cavity preparation: a microleakage study.

    PubMed

    Yazici, A Rüya; Yıldırım, Zeren; Antonson, Sibel A; Kilinc, Evren; Koch, Daniele; Antonson, Donald E; Dayangaç, Berrin; Ozgünaltay, Gül

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this study was to compare the effects of the Er,Cr:YSGG laser using chemical vapour deposition (CVD) bur cavity preparation with conventional preparation methods including a diamond bur and a carbide bur on the microleakage with two different adhesive systems. A total of 40 extracted human premolars were randomly assigned to four experimental groups according to the cavity preparation technique: group I diamond bur (Diatech); group II carbide bur (Diatech); group III Er,Cr:YSGG laser (Biolase Millennium II); and group IV CVD bur (CVDentUS). Using the different preparation techniques, Class V standardized preparations were performed on the buccal and lingual surfaces with gingival margins on the dentin and occlusal margins on the enamel. Each preparation group was randomly assigned to two subgroups (five teeth, ten preparations) according to the type of adhesive: an etch-and-rinse adhesive (Adper Single Bond), and a single-step self-etch adhesive (AdheSE One). All preparations were restored with a nanohybrid composite resin in a single increment. Following thermocycling (×500; 5-55°C), the teeth were immersed in basic fuchsin and sectioned in the orovestibular direction. Dye penetration was evaluated under a light microscope by two blinded examiners. Data were statistically analysed with the Kruskal-Wallis and Wilcoxon tests (p<0.05). There were no statistically significant differences between the preparation techniques with either of the two adhesive systems (p>0.05). Comparing the enamel and dentin leakage scores within each group, no statistically significant differences were found (p>0.05). The Er,Cr:YSGG laser cavity preparation did not differ from preparation with CVD, diamond or carbide bur in terms of microleakage with the different adhesive systems.

  14. Generation of continuous wave terahertz frequency radiation from metal-organic chemical vapour deposition grown Fe-doped InGaAs and InGaAsP

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohandas, Reshma A.; Freeman, Joshua R.; Rosamond, Mark C.; Hatem, Osama; Chowdhury, Siddhant; Ponnampalam, Lalitha; Fice, Martyn; Seeds, Alwyn J.; Cannard, Paul J.; Robertson, Michael J.; Moodie, David G.; Cunningham, John E.; Davies, A. Giles; Linfield, Edmund H.; Dean, Paul

    2016-04-01

    We demonstrate the generation of continuous wave terahertz (THz) frequency radiation from photomixers fabricated on both Fe-doped InGaAs and Fe-doped InGaAsP, grown by metal-organic chemical vapor deposition. The photomixers were excited using a pair of distributed Bragg reflector lasers with emission around 1550 nm, and THz radiation was emitted over a bandwidth of greater than 2.4 THz. Two InGaAs and four InGaAsP wafers with different Fe doping concentrations were investigated, with the InGaAs material found to outperform the InGaAsP in terms of emitted THz power. The dependencies of the emitted power on the photomixer applied bias, incident laser power, and material doping level were also studied.

  15. Resonant and nonresonant vibrational excitation of ammonia molecules in the growth of gallium nitride using laser-assisted metal organic chemical vapour deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Golgir, Hossein Rabiee; Zhou, Yun Shen; Li, Dawei; Keramatnejad, Kamran; Xiong, Wei; Wang, Mengmeng; Jiang, Li Jia; Huang, Xi; Jiang, Lan; Silvain, Jean Francois; Lu, Yong Feng

    2016-09-01

    The influence of exciting ammonia (NH3) molecular vibration in the growth of gallium nitride (GaN) was investigated by using an infrared laser-assisted metal organic chemical vapor deposition method. A wavelength tunable CO2 laser was used to selectively excite the individual vibrational modes. Resonantly exciting the NH-wagging mode (v2) of NH3 molecules at 9.219 μm led to a GaN growth rate of 84 μm/h, which is much higher than the reported results. The difference between the resonantly excited and conventional thermally populated vibrational states was studied via resonant and nonresonant vibrational excitations of NH3 molecules. Resonant excitation of various vibrational modes was achieved at 9.219, 10.35, and 10.719 μm, respectively. Nonresonant excitation was conducted at 9.201 and 10.591 μm, similar to conventional thermal heating. Compared to nonresonant excitation, resonant excitation noticeably promotes the GaN growth rate and crystalline quality. The full width at half maximum value of the XRD rocking curves of the GaN (0002) and GaN (10-12) diffraction peaks decreased at resonant depositions and reached its minimum value of 45 and 53 arcmin, respectively, at the laser wavelength of 9.219 μm. According to the optical emission spectroscopic studies, resonantly exciting the NH3 v2 mode leads to NH3 decomposition at room temperature, reduces the formation of the TMGa:NH3 adduct, promotes the supply of active species in GaN formation, and, therefore, results in the increased GaN growth rate.

  16. On the Concentration Unsteadiness of Chemical Vapour Deposition with a Precursor Sublimated from Packed Bed of Solid Source. Problems with Multicomponent Coatings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peev, Georgi; Tsibranska, Irene

    In some CVD processes the precursor is introduced into the reactor as vapor obtained by sublimation from particles of solid source forming packed bed in a column, where through a carrier gas passes. A typical example is the deposition of metal or metal oxide using its carbonyl compound. The study evaluates by mathematical modeling the effect of particle size reduction due to sublimation on the composition of the gas phase entering the reactor. A set of differential equations describing the convective solid to gas mass transfer process in the column is formulated. Equations for precursor equilibrium partial pressure, mass transfer coefficient, diffusivity and axial dispersion coefficient found from literature are added and the model is solved numerically by the method of finite differences. On the example of W(CO)6 the influence of the carrier gas flow rate, temperature and CVD duration on the change of the precursor concentration is revealed. The calculated alterations are significant and may spoil the running experiments. As to prevent this problem three approaches are suggested allowing the maintenance of the reactor inlet precursor concentration in reasonable limits: (i) to use a sufficiently high initial bed for saturation of the carrier gas during the entire particular experiment; (ii) to increase step-by- step in time the bed temperature; (iii) to increase step-by-step in time the carrier gas velocity in the column on the account of its stream by-passing the column. In all three approaches the model allows to calculate the necessary factors, i.e. the sufficient bed height, the temperature and velocity increment in time. Some numerical experiments employing the suggested approaches with approximately constant precursor concentrations are illustrated. Approaches how to proceed when multicomponent coating is to be deposited are discussed. The main conclusion is that the CVD processes should be carefully prepared accounting for a possible unsteadiness and the

  17. Growth of n-type polycrystalline pyrite (FeS 2) films by metalorganic chemical vapour deposition and their electrical characterization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oertel, J.; Ellmer, K.; Bohne, W.; Röhrich, J.; Tributsch, H.

    1999-03-01

    The compound semiconductor pyrite (FeS 2) has attracted attention as a possible absorber material for thin film solar cells. In this article it is shown for the first time that polycrystalline pyrite films which normally show p-type conductivity, can in situ be doped n-type by using cobalt as a dopant above a concentration of 0.3 at%. The chemical cobalt concentration - determined by high energy heavy ion Rutherford backscattering analysis - is proportional to the cobalt-to-iron ratio in the gas phase. The carrier concentrations are very high (>10 20 cm -3) and the Seebeck coefficients are low (<70 μV/K), pointing at degenerated semiconductor properties. The carrier transport in the films can be described by the grain barrier limited transport model described by Seto (1975). From the temperature dependence of the Hall mobility, barrier heights of 7-37 meV have been determined. The trap density in the grain barriers is about 2×10 13 cm -2, a value which is much higher than in polycrystalline silicon or CdS-films.

  18. Experimental and theoretical rationalization of the growth mechanism of silicon quantum dots in non-stoichiometric SiN x : role of chlorine in plasma enhanced chemical vapour deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mon-Pérez, E.; Salazar, J.; Ramos, E.; Santoyo Salazar, J.; López Suárez, A.; Dutt, A.; Santana, G.; Marel Monroy, B.

    2016-11-01

    Silicon quantum dots (Si-QDs) embedded in an insulator matrix are important from a technological and application point of view. Thus, being able to synthesize them in situ during the matrix growth process is technologically advantageous. The use of SiH2Cl2 as the silicon precursor in the plasma enhanced chemical vapour deposition (PECVD) process allows us to obtain Si-QDs without post-thermal annealing. Foremost in this work, is a theoretical rationalization of the mechanism responsible for Si-QD generation in a film including an analysis of the energy released by the extraction of HCl and the insertion of silylene species into the terminal surface bonds. From the results obtained using density functional theory (DFT), we propose an explanation of the mechanism responsible for the formation of Si-QDs in non-stoichiometric SiN x starting from chlorinated precursors in a PECVD system. Micrograph images obtained through transmission electron microscopy confirmed the presence of Si-QDs, even in nitrogen-rich (N-rich) samples. The film stoichiometry was controlled by varying the growth parameters, in particular the NH3/SiH2Cl2 ratio and hydrogen dilution. Experimental and theoretical results together show that using a PECVD system, along with chlorinated precursors it is possible to obtain Si-QDs at a low substrate temperature without annealing treatment. The optical property studies carried out in the present work highlight the prospects of these thin films for down shifting and as an antireflection coating in silicon solar cells.

  19. Low Temperature Growth of In2O3and InN Nanocrystals on Si(111) via Chemical Vapour Deposition Based on the Sublimation of NH4Cl in In

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Indium oxide (In2O3) nanocrystals (NCs) have been obtained via atmospheric pressure, chemical vapour deposition (APCVD) on Si(111) via the direct oxidation of In with Ar:10% O2at 1000 °C but also at temperatures as low as 500 °C by the sublimation of ammonium chloride (NH4Cl) which is incorporated into the In under a gas flow of nitrogen (N2). Similarly InN NCs have also been obtained using sublimation of NH4Cl in a gas flow of NH3. During oxidation of In under a flow of O2the transfer of In into the gas stream is inhibited by the formation of In2O3around the In powder which breaks up only at high temperatures, i.e.T > 900 °C, thereby releasing In into the gas stream which can then react with O2leading to a high yield formation of isolated 500 nm In2O3octahedrons but also chains of these nanostructures. No such NCs were obtained by direct oxidation forTG < 900 °C. The incorporation of NH4Cl in the In leads to the sublimation of NH4Cl into NH3and HCl at around 338 °C which in turn produces an efficient dispersion and transfer of the whole In into the gas stream of N2where it reacts with HCl forming primarily InCl. The latter adsorbs onto the Si(111) where it reacts with H2O and O2leading to the formation of In2O3nanopyramids on Si(111). The rest of the InCl is carried downstream, where it solidifies at lower temperatures, and rapidly breaks down into metallic In upon exposure to H2O in the air. Upon carrying out the reaction of In with NH4Cl at 600 °C under NH3as opposed to N2, we obtain InN nanoparticles on Si(111) with an average diameter of 300 nm. PMID:20596336

  20. The beauty of frost: nano-sulfur assembly via low pressure vapour deposition.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yu; Chen, Lu; Scudiero, Louis; Zhong, Wei-Hong

    2015-11-14

    A low pressure vapour deposition (LPVD) technique is proposed as an environmentally friendly, cost-effective and versatile strategy for fabrication of sulfur nanomaterials. By controlling the characteristics of the deposit substrate for the LPVD, various sulfur-based nanomaterials have been obtained through a substrate-induced self-assembly process.

  1. Chemical vapor deposition growth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ruth, R. P.; Manasevit, H. M.; Kenty, J. L.; Moudy, L. A.; Simpson, W. I.; Yang, J. J.

    1976-01-01

    A chemical vapor deposition (CVD) reactor system with a vertical deposition chamber was used for the growth of Si films on glass, glass-ceramic, and polycrystalline ceramic substrates. Silicon vapor was produced by pyrolysis of SiH4 in a H2 or He carrier gas. Preliminary deposition experiments with two of the available glasses were not encouraging. Moderately encouraging results, however, were obtained with fired polycrystalline alumina substrates, which were used for Si deposition at temperatures above 1,000 C. The surfaces of both the substrates and the films were characterized by X-ray diffraction, reflection electron diffraction, scanning electron microscopy optical microscopy, and surface profilometric techniques. Several experiments were conducted to establish baseline performance data for the reactor system, including temperature distributions on the sample pedestal, effects of carrier gas flow rate on temperature and film thickness, and Si film growth rate as a function of temperature.

  2. Synthesis of Pt nanowires with the participation of physical vapour deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dobrzański, Leszek A.; Szindler, Marek; Pawlyta, Mirosława; Szindler, Magdalena M.; Boryło, Paulina; Tomiczek, Błazej

    2016-05-01

    The following paper presents the possibility of formation of Pt nanowires, achieved by a three-step method consisting of conformal deposition of a carbon nanotube and conformal coverage with platinum by physical vapour deposition, followed by removal of the carbonaceous template. The characterization of this new nanostructure was carried out through scanning electron microscopy (SEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and X-ray diffraction (XRD).

  3. Chemical vapor deposition sciences

    SciTech Connect

    1992-12-31

    Chemical vapor deposition (CVD) is a widely used method for depositing thin films of a variety of materials. Applications of CVD range from the fabrication of microelectronic devices to the deposition of protective coatings. New CVD processes are increasingly complex, with stringent requirements that make it more difficult to commercialize them in a timely fashion. However, a clear understanding of the fundamental science underlying a CVD process, as expressed through computer models, can substantially shorten the time required for reactor and process development. Research scientists at Sandia use a wide range of experimental and theoretical techniques for investigating the science of CVD. Experimental tools include optical probes for gas-phase and surface processes, a range of surface analytic techniques, molecular beam methods for gas/surface kinetics, flow visualization techniques and state-of-the-art crystal growth reactors. The theoretical strategy uses a structured approach to describe the coupled gas-phase and gas-surface chemistry, fluid dynamics, heat and mass transfer of a CVD process. The software used to describe chemical reaction mechanisms is easily adapted to codes that model a variety of reactor geometries. Carefully chosen experiments provide critical information on the chemical species, gas temperatures and flows that are necessary for model development and validation. This brochure provides basic information on Sandia`s capabilities in the physical and chemical sciences of CVD and related materials processing technologies. It contains a brief description of the major scientific and technical capabilities of the CVD staff and facilities, and a brief discussion of the approach that the staff uses to advance the scientific understanding of CVD processes.

  4. Investigations of vapour-phase deposited transition metal dichalcogenide films for future electronic applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gatensby, Riley; Hallam, Toby; Lee, Kangho; McEvoy, Niall; Duesberg, Georg S.

    2016-11-01

    Two-dimensional (2D) transitional metal dichalcogenides (TMDs) are of major interest to the research and electrical engineering community. A number of TMDs are semiconducting and have a wide range of bandgaps, they can exhibit n- or p-type behaviour, and the electronic structure changes with the number of layers. These exceptional properties hold much promise for a host of electrical applications including low- or high power field-effect transistors, sensors and diodes. Moreover, the unique optical properties of TMDs make them attractive for optoelectronic applications such as light-emitting diodes, photodiodes, and photovoltaic cells. A prerequisite for all of these applications is a synthesis route which is well controlled, scalable, reproducible and compatible with semiconductor industry process flows. Thermally assisted conversion (TAC), a variant of chemical vapour deposition, shows much promise for meeting these requirements. Herein we review the current progress and challenges of research on 2D semiconducting materials for electronics with a special focus on TAC produced TMD thin films.

  5. Laser Plasma Vapour Deposition Of Photoconducting And High Tc Superconducting Films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Popescu, Mihai A.; Apostol, Ileana; Mihailescu, Ion N.; Botila, T.; Pentia, E.; Ciurea, M. L.; Dinescu, M.; Jaklovsky, J.; Aldica, Gheorghe V.; Miu, L.; Rusu, C.; Hening, Al. A.; Mihai, S.; Constantin, C.; Stoica, Mihaela; Pausescu, P.; Cruceanu, Eugen; Pompe, Wolfgang; Wuensch, R.; Richter, Asta; Scheibe, H. J.

    1989-05-01

    Device quality PbS photoconducting films were obtained by laser plasma vapour deposition on special glass substrates at room temperature and their structure was investigated by X-ray diffraction. High Tc superconducting films of composition Dy0.2Y0.8Ba2Cu3O~7 and YBa2Cu3O~7 were deposited on sapphire substrate. It was shown for laser deposited YBa2Cu3O~7 that a buffer layer of the same composition predeposited by rf sputtering allows for getting high quality superconducting films.

  6. Formation and Yield of Multi-Walled Carbon Nanotubes Synthesized via Chemical Vapour Deposition Routes Using Different Metal-Based Catalysts of FeCoNiAl, CoNiAl and FeNiAl-LDH

    PubMed Central

    Hussein, Mohd Zobir; Mohamad Jaafar, Adila; Hj. Yahaya, Asmah; Masarudin, Mas Jaffri; Zainal, Zulkarnain

    2014-01-01

    Multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) were prepared via chemical vapor deposition (CVD) using a series of different catalysts, derived from FeCoNiAl, CoNiAl and FeNiAl layered double hydroxides (LDHs). Catalyst-active particles were obtained by calcination of LDHs at 800 °C for 5 h. Nitrogen and hexane were used as the carrier gas and carbon source respectively, for preparation of MWCNTs using CVD methods at 800 °C. MWCNTs were allowed to grow for 30 min on the catalyst spread on an alumina boat in a quartz tube. The materials were subsequently characterized through X-ray diffraction, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, surface area analysis, field emission scanning electron microscopy and transmission electron microscopy. It was determined that size and yield of MWCNTs varied depending on the type of LDH catalyst precursor that is used during synthesis. MWCNTs obtained using CoNiAl-LDH as the catalyst precursor showed smaller diameter and higher yield compared to FeCoNiAl and FeNiAl LDHs. PMID:25380526

  7. Formation and yield of multi-walled carbon nanotubes synthesized via chemical vapour deposition routes using different metal-based catalysts of FeCoNiAl, CoNiAl and FeNiAl-LDH.

    PubMed

    Hussein, Mohd Zobir; Jaafar, Adila Mohamad; Yahaya, Asmah Hj; Masarudin, Mas Jaffri; Zainal, Zulkarnain

    2014-01-01

    Multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) were prepared via chemical vapor deposition (CVD) using a series of different catalysts, derived from FeCoNiAl, CoNiAl and FeNiAl layered double hydroxides (LDHs). Catalyst-active particles were obtained by calcination of LDHs at 800 °C for 5 h. Nitrogen and hexane were used as the carrier gas and carbon source respectively, for preparation of MWCNTs using CVD methods at 800 °C. MWCNTs were allowed to grow for 30 min on the catalyst spread on an alumina boat in a quartz tube. The materials were subsequently characterized through X-ray diffraction, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, surface area analysis, field emission scanning electron microscopy and transmission electron microscopy. It was determined that size and yield of MWCNTs varied depending on the type of LDH catalyst precursor that is used during synthesis. MWCNTs obtained using CoNiAl-LDH as the catalyst precursor showed smaller diameter and higher yield compared to FeCoNiAl and FeNiAl LDHs. PMID:25380526

  8. Chemical vapor deposition growth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ruth, R. P.; Manasevit, H. M.; Kenty, J. L.; Moudy, L. A.; Simpson, W. I.; Yang, J. J.

    1976-01-01

    The chemical vapor deposition (CVD) method for the growth of Si sheet on inexpensive substrate materials is investigated. The objective is to develop CVD techniques for producing large areas of Si sheet on inexpensive substrate materials, with sheet properties suitable for fabricating solar cells meeting the technical goals of the Low Cost Silicon Solar Array Project. Specific areas covered include: (1) modification and test of existing CVD reactor system; (2) identification and/or development of suitable inexpensive substrate materials; (3) experimental investigation of CVD process parameters using various candidate substrate materials; (4) preparation of Si sheet samples for various special studies, including solar cell fabrication; (5) evaluation of the properties of the Si sheet material produced by the CVD process; and (6) fabrication and evaluation of experimental solar cell structures, using standard and near-standard processing techniques.

  9. Chemical vapor deposition growth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ruth, R. P.; Manasevit, H. M.; Campbell, A. G.; Johnson, R. E.; Kenty, J. L.; Moudy, L. A.; Shaw, G. L.; Simpson, W. I.; Yang, J. J.

    1978-01-01

    The objective was to investigate and develop chemical vapor deposition (CVD) techniques for the growth of large areas of Si sheet on inexpensive substrate materials, with resulting sheet properties suitable for fabricating solar cells that would meet the technical goals of the Low Cost Silicon Solar Array Project. The program involved six main technical tasks: (1) modification and test of an existing vertical-chamber CVD reactor system; (2) identification and/or development of suitable inexpensive substrate materials; (3) experimental investigation of CVD process parameters using various candidate substrate materials; (4) preparation of Si sheet samples for various special studies, including solar cell fabrication; (5) evaluation of the properties of the Si sheet material produced by the CVD process; and (6) fabrication and evaluation of experimental solar cell structures, using impurity diffusion and other standard and near-standard processing techniques supplemented late in the program by the in situ CVD growth of n(+)/p/p(+) sheet structures subsequently processed into experimental cells.

  10. Crystal growth of HfS 2 by chemical vapour transport with halogen (Cl, Br, I)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fiechter, S.; Eckert, K.

    1988-05-01

    Single crystals of HfS 2 have been prepared by chemical vapour transport (CVT) with halogen. Depending on the transporting agent added, exergonic or endergonic transport was observed. Employing 0.5 mg/cm 3 chlorine or bromine in evacuated and sealed quartz ampoules, exergonic transport occurs. In a temperature gradient from 850 to 870 K transparent reddish-orange crystal platelets of pseudohexagonal shape (10×10×0.05 mm3) were obtained. Endergonic transport, found with iodine as transporting agent, first starts at higher temperatures (1270-1220 K). A thermochemical study of the vapour phase composition revealed that gaseous HfHal 4 and HfHal 3 ( Hal = Cl, Br) are responsible for the exergonic transport observed. Because of the higher stability of HfS 2 against iodine, CVT first starts at elevated temperatures. In the vapour phase Hfl and Hfl 2 dominate and effect a reversal of the transport direction.

  11. Deposited atmospheric chemicals

    SciTech Connect

    Schell, W.R.

    1986-09-01

    A mountaintop bog in western Pennsylvania serves as a reservoir for materials deposited from the atmosphere. Biological activity in the bog decomposes plant matter, which becomes humified and mineralized at increasing depths. Little or no mixing of elements occurs below the active root zone. Radionuclides produced by natural means and by nuclear weapons have been used to measure the ages of the layers deposited during the growing season of each year. The upper layers of the bog indicate that the deposition of total sulfur is at least 20 times and that of nitrogen is 45 times the value estimated prior to cutting the forest, with a doubling time for each of 25-35 yr. Bromine deposition also doubles every 35 yr. The pattern of mass and element deposition illustrates the changes in land use and industrial effluents that were sources for the material deposited on the bog. The decrease in atmospheric particle removal shows up in the 1960 and later layers. Compared with terrestrial abundances, the relative enrichments over time for chlorine, nitrogen, sulfur, and bromine are more than 100 times those calculated for 1817; lead, calcium, and antimony are 10 to 40 times greater.

  12. An investigation of the growth of bismuth whiskers and nanowires during physical vapour deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stanley, S. A.; Stuttle, C.; Caruana, A. J.; Cropper, M. D.; Walton, A. S. O.

    2012-10-01

    Bismuth thin films of thickness in the region of 500 nm have been prepared by planar magnetron sputtering onto glass, silicon and GaAs substrates. Electron microscopy of these films reveals that bismuth whiskers grow spontaneously when the substrate is heated to temperatures between 110 and 140 °C during deposition and the optimum temperature for such growth is largely independent of substrate. Depositing films under similar conditions using thermal evaporation does not, however, produce the whisker growth. X-ray diffraction has been employed to investigate film texture with temperature and it has been shown that the film crystallites are predominantly [1 1 0] and [1 1 1] oriented. The [1 1 0] orientation of the crystallites dominates at deposition temperatures above 110 °C for sputter deposition and the [1 1 1] at lower temperatures. The optimum temperature for whisker growth coincides with the temperature for the change between predominant orientations. While sputter deposition appears to favour films with crystallite orientation of [1 1 0], thermal evaporation favours [1 1 1] and has a higher change-over temperature. The whiskers that grow from the film emerge at off-normal angles between 43.3° and 69.2° with a mean of 54 ± 3°. The projected length of whiskers on a 500 nm film on a GaAs substrate shows a wide distribution to a maximum of more than 100 µm. The mean projected length for this sample was 16 ± 1 µm and the diameter is around 0.5 µm. Measurements of the electrical properties of the whiskers at room temperature reveals ohmic behaviour with an estimated resistivity of 2.2 ± 0.2 µΩ m. Detailed examination of scanning electron micrographs, eliminates all growth mechanisms except tip growth by a non-catalysed vapour-solid/vapour-liquid-solid method. By depositing thinner films it is shown that this spontaneous growth of whiskers offers a route to fabricate high quality bismuth nanowires of lengths exceeding 10 µm.

  13. Chemical vapor deposition growth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ruth, R. P.; Manasevit, H. M.; Johnson, R. E.; Kenty, J. L.; Moudy, L. A.; Simpson, W. I.; Yang, J. J.

    1976-01-01

    A laboratory type CVD reactor system with a vertical deposition chamber and sample pedestal heated by an external RF coil has been extensively modified by installation of mass flow controllers, automatic process sequence timers, and special bellows-sealed air-operated valves for overall improved performance. Various film characterization procedures, including classical metallography, SEM analyses, X ray diffraction analyses, surface profilometry, and electrical measurements (resistivity, carrier concentration, mobility, spreading resistance profiles, and minority-carrier lifetime by the C-V-t method) area used to correlate Si sheet properties with CVD parameters and substrate properties. Evaluation procedures and measurements are given. Experimental solar cell structures were made both in epitaxial Si sheet (on sapphire substrates) and in polycrystalline material on alumina substrates, the former to provide an indication of what might be an upper limit on performance of the latter. Preliminary results are given, as obtained in cell structures not specially designed to allow for the unique properties of the sheet material, and fabricated in material known to be far from optimum for photovoltaic performance. Low power conversion efficiencies have been obtained in the epitaxial as well as the polycrystalline Si sheet.

  14. Atmospheric pressure chemical vapour deposition of vanadium oxides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manning, Troy Darrell

    The APCVD of vanadium(IV) oxide thin films from halide precursors was investigated. It was found that the phase of vanadium oxide obtained could be controlled by the reactor temperature and precursor ratio. For vanadium(IV) chloride and water, reactor temperatures > 550 °C and an excess of water over VCI4 was required to produce VO2 thin films. For vanadium(V) oxytrichloride and water, reactor temperatures > 550 °C and an excess of water over VOCI3 also produced VO2 but required low total gas flow rates (< 1 L min 1) for complete coverage of the substrate. Vanadium(IV) oxide thin films doped with metal ions (W, Cr, Nb, Ti, Mo or Sn) were also prepared by the APCVD process in order to reduce the thermochromic transition temperature (TC) from 68 °C for the undoped material to < 30 °C. The most successful dopant was tungsten, introduced into the VOCl3, and water system as WCI6, which lowered T to 5 °C for a 3 atom% tungsten doped thin film. Tungsten (VI) ethoxide was introduced into the VCI4 and water system and reduced TC, of VO2, to 42 °C for a 1 atom% tungsten doped thin film. Chromium, introduced as CrCO2Cl2, formed a chromium vanadium oxide that did not display any thermochromic properties. Niobium, introduced as NbCl5 into the VOCl3 system, reduced TC of VO2, but the amount of niobium introduced could not be easily controlled. Molybdenum, introduced as MoCI5, also reduced TC of VO2, but the form of the molybdenum appeared to be different from that required for complete control of TC, Titanium, introduced as TiCl4, produced phase segregated films of VO2 and TiO2, with interesting multifunctional properties and a reduced TC. Tin, introduced as SnCl4, also formed a phase segregated material of VO2, and SnO2, with a slightly reduced TC.

  15. Simple Chemical Vapor Deposition Experiment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pedersen, Henrik

    2014-01-01

    Chemical vapor deposition (CVD) is a process commonly used for the synthesis of thin films for several important technological applications, for example, microelectronics, hard coatings, and smart windows. Unfortunately, the complexity and prohibitive cost of CVD equipment makes it seldom available for undergraduate chemistry students. Here, a…

  16. Controlled vapour-phase deposition synthesis and growth mechanism of Bi2Te3 nanostructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lei, W.; Madni, I.; Ren, Y. L.; Yuan, C. L.; Luo, G. Q.; Faraone, L.

    2016-08-01

    This work presents a study on the controlled growth and the growth mechanism of vapour-phase deposited two-dimensional Bi2Te3 nanostructures by investigating the influence of growth conditions on the morphology of Bi2Te3 nanostructures. The formation of a hexagonal plate geometry for Bi2Te3 nanostructures is a consequence of the large difference in growth rate between crystal facets along <0001> and <11 2 ¯ 0> directions. Under low Ar carrier gas flow rates (60-100 sccm), the growth of Bi2Te3 nanoplates occurs in the mass-transport limited regime, whereas under high carrier gas flow rates (130 sccm), the growth of Bi2Te3 nanoplates is in the surface-reaction limited regime. This leads to an increase in the lateral size of Bi2Te3 nanoplates with increasing the Ar carrier gas flow rate from 60 to 100 sccm, and a decrease in size for a flow rate of 130 sccm. In addition, the lateral size of Bi2Te3 nanoplates was found to increase with increasing growth time due to the kinetic characteristics of material growth. The proposed growth model provides an effective guide for achieving controlled growth of Bi2Te3 nanoplates, as well as other two dimensional nanomaterials.

  17. Chemical vapor deposition of sialon

    DOEpatents

    Landingham, R.L.; Casey, A.W.

    A laminated composite and a method for forming the composite by chemical vapor deposition are described. The composite includes a layer of sialon and a material to which the layer is bonded. The method includes the steps of exposing a surface of the material to an ammonia containing atmosphere; heating the surface to at least about 1200/sup 0/C; and impinging a gas containing N/sub 2/, SiCl/sub 4/, and AlCl/sub 3/ on the surface.

  18. Chemical vapor deposition of sialon

    DOEpatents

    Landingham, Richard L.; Casey, Alton W.

    1982-01-01

    A laminated composite and a method for forming the composite by chemical vapor deposition. The composite includes a layer of sialon and a material to which the layer is bonded. The method includes the steps of exposing a surface of the material to an ammonia containing atmosphere; heating the surface to at least about 1200.degree. C.; and impinging a gas containing in a flowing atmosphere of air N.sub.2, SiCl.sub.4, and AlCl.sub.3 on the surface.

  19. Chemical vapor deposition of epitaxial silicon

    DOEpatents

    Berkman, Samuel

    1984-01-01

    A single chamber continuous chemical vapor deposition (CVD) reactor is described for depositing continuously on flat substrates, for example, epitaxial layers of semiconductor materials. The single chamber reactor is formed into three separate zones by baffles or tubes carrying chemical source material and a carrier gas in one gas stream and hydrogen gas in the other stream without interaction while the wafers are heated to deposition temperature. Diffusion of the two gas streams on heated wafers effects the epitaxial deposition in the intermediate zone and the wafers are cooled in the final zone by coolant gases. A CVD reactor for batch processing is also described embodying the deposition principles of the continuous reactor.

  20. Atomic vapour deposition (AVD) of SrBi 2Ta 2O 9 using an all alkoxide precursor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chalker, Paul R.; Potter, Richard J.; Roberts, John L.; Jones, Anthony C.; Smith, Lesley M.; Schumacher, Marcus

    2004-12-01

    A "single-source" Sr-Ta heterometal alkoxide precursor, Sr[Ta(OEt) 5(dmae)] 2 (dmae=OCH 2CH 2NMe 2), has been used for atomic vapour deposition (AVD) of SrBi 2Ta 2O 9 (SBT). This single-source precursor is designed to alleviate the mismatch between conventional Sr and Ta sources. Strontium tantalate thin films were deposited on silicon using the Sr[Ta(OEt) 5(dmae)] 2, and the optimum temperatures for deposition of strontium tantalate with a Sr:Ta ratio of 0.5 was found to be ˜510 °C. Deposition of Bi-oxide films using Bi(mmp) 3 (mmp=OCMe 2CH 2OMe) indicates similar decomposition behaviour to the Sr-Ta alkoxide precursor, demonstrating its suitability as a complementary source of Bi for SBT. The co-incorporation of Bi and Sr within the SBT films is promoted through the deposition of bismuth oxide/strontium tantalate super lattices. After post-growth annealing the super lattices are converted to strontium bismuth tantalate thin films.

  1. Laser Induced Chemical Liquid Phase Deposition (LCLD)

    SciTech Connect

    Nanai, Laszlo; Balint, Agneta M.

    2012-08-17

    Laser induced chemical deposition (LCLD) of metals onto different substrates attracts growing attention during the last decade. Deposition of metals onto the surface of dielectrics and semiconductors with help of laser beam allows the creation of conducting metal of very complex architecture even in 3D. In the processes examined the deposition occurs from solutions containing metal ions and reducing agents. The deposition happens in the region of surface irradiated by laser beam (micro reactors). Physics -chemical reactions driven by laser beam will be discussed for different metal-substrate systems. The electrical, optical, mechanical properties of created interfaces will be demonstrated also including some practical-industrial applications.

  2. Spectroscopic investigation of different concentrations of the vapour deposited copper phthalocyanine as a "guest" in polyimide matrix.

    PubMed

    Georgiev, Anton; Yordanov, Dancho; Dimov, Dean; Assa, Jacob; Spassova, Erinche; Danev, Gencho

    2015-04-01

    Nanocomposite layers 250 nm copper phthalocyanine/polyimide prepared by simultaneous vapour deposition of three different sources were studied. Different concentrations of copper phthalocyanine as a "guest" in polyimide matrix as a function of conditions of the preparation have been determined by FTIR (Fourier Transform Infrared) and UV-VIS (Ultraviolet-Visible) spectroscopies. The aim was to estimate the possibility of the spectroscopic methods for quantitative determination of the "guest" and compare with the quality of the polyimide thin films in relation to the "guest" concentration. The band at 1334 cm(-1) has been used for quantitative estimation of "guest" in polyimide matrix. The concentrations of the copper phthalocyanine less than 20% require curve fitting techniques with Fourier self deconvolution. The relationship between "guest" concentrations and degree of imidization, as well as the electronic UV-VIS spectra are discussed in relation to the composition, imidization degree and the two crystallographic modification of the embedded chromophore.

  3. Spectroscopic investigation of different concentrations of the vapour deposited copper phthalocyanine as a "guest" in polyimide matrix.

    PubMed

    Georgiev, Anton; Yordanov, Dancho; Dimov, Dean; Assa, Jacob; Spassova, Erinche; Danev, Gencho

    2015-04-01

    Nanocomposite layers 250 nm copper phthalocyanine/polyimide prepared by simultaneous vapour deposition of three different sources were studied. Different concentrations of copper phthalocyanine as a "guest" in polyimide matrix as a function of conditions of the preparation have been determined by FTIR (Fourier Transform Infrared) and UV-VIS (Ultraviolet-Visible) spectroscopies. The aim was to estimate the possibility of the spectroscopic methods for quantitative determination of the "guest" and compare with the quality of the polyimide thin films in relation to the "guest" concentration. The band at 1334 cm(-1) has been used for quantitative estimation of "guest" in polyimide matrix. The concentrations of the copper phthalocyanine less than 20% require curve fitting techniques with Fourier self deconvolution. The relationship between "guest" concentrations and degree of imidization, as well as the electronic UV-VIS spectra are discussed in relation to the composition, imidization degree and the two crystallographic modification of the embedded chromophore. PMID:25638427

  4. Spectroscopic investigation of different concentrations of the vapour deposited copper phthalocyanine as a "guest" in polyimide matrix

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Georgiev, Anton; Yordanov, Dancho; Dimov, Dean; Assa, Jacob; Spassova, Erinche; Danev, Gencho

    2015-04-01

    Nanocomposite layers 250 nm copper phthalocyanine/polyimide prepared by simultaneous vapour deposition of three different sources were studied. Different concentrations of copper phthalocyanine as a "guest" in polyimide matrix as a function of conditions of the preparation have been determined by FTIR (Fourier Transform Infrared) and UV-VIS (Ultraviolet-Visible) spectroscopies. The aim was to estimate the possibility of the spectroscopic methods for quantitative determination of the "guest" and compare with the quality of the polyimide thin films in relation to the "guest" concentration. The band at 1334 cm-1 has been used for quantitative estimation of "guest" in polyimide matrix. The concentrations of the copper phthalocyanine less than 20% require curve fitting techniques with Fourier self deconvolution. The relationship between "guest" concentrations and degree of imidization, as well as the electronic UV-VIS spectra are discussed in relation to the composition, imidization degree and the two crystallographic modification of the embedded chromophore.

  5. Chemical enhancement of surface deposition

    DOEpatents

    Patch, Keith D.; Morgan, Dean T.

    1997-07-29

    A method and apparatus for increasing the deposition of ions onto a surface, such as the adsorption of uranium ions on the detecting surface of a radionuclide detector. The method includes the step of exposing the surface to a complexing agent, such as a phosphate ion solution, which has an affinity for the dissolved species to be deposited on the surface. This provides, for example, enhanced sensitivity of the radionuclide detector.

  6. Chemical enhancement of surface deposition

    DOEpatents

    Patch, K.D.; Morgan, D.T.

    1997-07-29

    A method and apparatus are disclosed for increasing the deposition of ions onto a surface, such as the adsorption of uranium ions on the detecting surface of a radionuclide detector. The method includes the step of exposing the surface to a complexing agent, such as a phosphate ion solution, which has an affinity for the dissolved species to be deposited on the surface. This provides, for example, enhanced sensitivity of the radionuclide detector. 16 figs.

  7. Chemical-vapor-deposition reactor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chern, S.

    1979-01-01

    Reactor utilizes multiple stacked trays compactly arranged in paths of horizontally channeled reactant gas streams. Design allows faster and more efficient deposits of film on substrates, and reduces gas and energy consumption. Lack of dead spots that trap reactive gases reduces reactor purge time.

  8. Chemical vapor deposition of mullite coatings

    DOEpatents

    Sarin, Vinod; Mulpuri, Rao

    1998-01-01

    This invention is directed to the creation of crystalline mullite coatings having uniform microstructure by chemical vapor deposition (CVD). The process comprises the steps of establishing a flow of reactants which will yield mullite in a CVD reactor, and depositing a crystalline coating from the reactant flow. The process will yield crystalline coatings which are dense and of uniform thickness.

  9. Numerical modeling tools for chemical vapor deposition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jasinski, Thomas J.; Childs, Edward P.

    1992-01-01

    Development of general numerical simulation tools for chemical vapor deposition (CVD) was the objective of this study. Physical models of important CVD phenomena were developed and implemented into the commercial computational fluid dynamics software FLUENT. The resulting software can address general geometries as well as the most important phenomena occurring with CVD reactors: fluid flow patterns, temperature and chemical species distribution, gas phase and surface deposition. The physical models are documented which are available and examples are provided of CVD simulation capabilities.

  10. Towards engineered branch placement: Unreal™ match between vapour-liquid-solid glancing angle deposition nanowire growth and simulation

    SciTech Connect

    Taschuk, M. T.; Tucker, R. T.; LaForge, J. M.; Beaudry, A. L.; Kupsta, M. R.; Brett, M. J.

    2013-12-28

    The vapour-liquid-solid glancing angle deposition (VLS-GLAD) process is capable of producing complex nanotree structures with control over azimuthal branch orientation and height. We have developed a thin film growth simulation including ballistic deposition, simplified surface diffusion, and droplet-mediated cubic crystal growth for the VLS-GLAD process using the Unreal{sup TM} Development Kit. The use of a commercial game engine has provided an interactive environment while allowing a custom physics implementation. Our simulation's output is verified against experimental data, including a volumetric film reconstruction produced using focused ion beam and scanning-electron microscopy (SEM), crystallographic texture, and morphological characteristics such as branch orientation. We achieve excellent morphological and texture agreement with experimental data, as well as qualitative agreement with SEM imagery. The simplified physics in our model reproduces the experimental films, indicating that the dominant role flux geometry plays in the VLS-GLAD competitive growth process responsible for azimuthally oriented branches and biaxial crystal texture evolution. The simulation's successful reproduction of experimental data indicates that it should have predictive power in designing novel VLS-GLAD structures.

  11. Occult chemical deposition to a Maritime forest

    SciTech Connect

    Vong, R.J.; Kowalski, A.S.

    1996-12-31

    Studies of chemical fluxes from the atmosphere to vegetated surfaces have suggested that, along with conventional wet and dry processes, an additional chemical input occurs when wind-blown cloud droplets are directly intercepted by vegetation. This cloud water deposition process has been sometimes termed {open_quote}occult deposition{close_quote} because the water fluxes cannot ordinarily be observed using rain gauges. Such occult deposition of cloud water has rarely been measured directly, in part because of the complexity of the governing turbulent transfer process. However, reviews by the National Acidic Precipitation Assessment Program (NAPAP SoS/T-2,6) have suggested that the chemical flux to be forest decline in the eastern USA. This paper presents direct field measurements occult chemical fluxes to a silver fir forest located in complex terrain on the Olympic Peninsula near the coast of Washington State, USA.

  12. Laser Velocimetry of Chemical Vapor Deposition Flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1993-01-01

    Laser velocimetry (LV) is being used to measure the gas flows in chemical vapor deposition (CVD) reactors. These gas flow measurements can be used to improve industrial processes in semiconductor and optical layer deposition and to validate numerical models. Visible in the center of the picture is the graphite susceptor glowing orange-hot at 600 degrees C. It is inductively heated via the copper cool surrounding the glass reactor.

  13. Chemical-Vapor-Deposited Diamond Film

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miyoshi, Kazuhisa

    1999-01-01

    This chapter describes the nature of clean and contaminated diamond surfaces, Chemical-vapor-deposited (CVD) diamond film deposition technology, analytical techniques and the results of research on CVD diamond films, and the general properties of CVD diamond films. Further, it describes the friction and wear properties of CVD diamond films in the atmosphere, in a controlled nitrogen environment, and in an ultra-high-vacuum environment.

  14. A difference in using atomic layer deposition or physical vapour deposition TiN as electrode material in metal-insulator-metal and metal-insulator-silicon capacitors.

    PubMed

    Groenland, A W; Wolters, R A M; Kovalgin, A Y; Schmitz, J

    2011-09-01

    In this work, metal-insulator-metal (MIM) and metal-insulator-silicon (MIS) capacitors are studied using titanium nitride (TiN) as the electrode material. The effect of structural defects on the electrical properties on MIS and MIM capacitors is studied for various electrode configurations. In the MIM capacitors the bottom electrode is a patterned 100 nm TiN layer (called BE type 1), deposited via sputtering, while MIS capacitors have a flat bottom electrode (called BE type 2-silicon substrate). A high quality 50-100 nm thick SiO2 layer, made by inductively-coupled plasma CVD at 150 degrees C, is deposited as a dielectric on top of both types of bottom electrodes. BE type 1 (MIM) capacitors have a varying from low to high concentration of structural defects in the SiO2 layer. BE type 2 (MIS) capacitors have a low concentration of structural defects and are used as a reference. Two sets of each capacitor design are fabricated with the TiN top electrode deposited either via physical vapour deposition (PVD, i.e., sputtering) or atomic layer deposition (ALD). The MIM and MIS capacitors are electrically characterized in terms of the leakage current at an electric field of 0.1 MV/cm (I leak) and for different structural defect concentrations. It is shown that the structural defects only show up in the electrical characteristics of BE type 1 capacitors with an ALD TiN-based top electrode. This is due to the excellent step coverage of the ALD process. This work clearly demonstrates the sensitivity to process-induced structural defects, when ALD is used as a step in process integration of conductors on insulation materials.

  15. Low temperature deposition of SiO 2 and PSG using SiH 4, N 2O and phosphorous vapour for damage-free passivation of InP-based PIN diodes by plasma- and photo-assisted LPCVD

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Riemenschneider, R.; DasGupta, N.; Schütz, R.; Hartnagel, H. L.; Kräutle, H.

    1993-05-01

    An improved deposition technique of phospho-silicate glass (PSG) for the passivation of InP has been developed using a low-temperature plasma-enhanced chemical vapour deposition (PECVD). Leakage-current measurements, capacitance-voltage analyses ( C-V curves) and deep-level transient spectroscopy (DLTS) have been employed to compare this passivation technique with a commonly applied plasma CVD and a photo-assisted CVD of silicon oxide. Improvements regarding interface states and deep-level traps have been achieved with a phosphorous vapour present during the insulator growth. The measurement of leakage on a semi-insulating InP surface, which is very relevant for the reliability and performance of InP-based PIN diodes, provides reliable results to detect surface damage and material degradation. The optimised plasma deposition of phospho-silicate glass at a temperature of 300°C with a low phosphorous concentration (<10 wt% P) prevents surface leakage and does not show plasma damage.

  16. Low-pressure, chemical vapor deposition polysilicon

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gallagher, B. D.; Crotty, G. C.

    1986-01-01

    The low-pressure chemical vapor deposition (LPCVD) of polycrystalline silicon was investigted. The physical system was described, as was the controlling process parameters and requirements for producing films for use as an integral portion of the solar cell contact system.

  17. Automated semiconductor vacuum chemical vapor deposition facility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1982-01-01

    A semiconductor vacuum chemical vapor deposition facility (totally automatic) was developed. Wafers arrived on an air track, automatically loaded into a furnace tube, processed, returned to the track, and sent on to the next operation. The entire process was controlled by a computer.

  18. Chemical effect on ozone deposition over seawater

    EPA Science Inventory

    Surface layer resistance plays an important role in determining ozone deposition velocity over seawater. Recent studies suggest that surface layer resistance over sea-water is influenced by wind-speed and chemical interaction at the air-water interface. Here, we investigate the e...

  19. Hair analysis as a useful procedure for detection of vapour exposure to chemical warfare agents: simulation of sulphur mustard with methyl salicylate.

    PubMed

    Spiandore, Marie; Piram, Anne; Lacoste, Alexandre; Josse, Denis; Doumenq, Pierre

    2014-06-01

    Chemical warfare agents (CWA) are highly toxic compounds which have been produced to kill or hurt people during conflicts or terrorist attacks. Despite the fact that their use is strictly prohibited according to international convention, populations' exposure still recently occurred. Development of markers of exposure to CWA is necessary to distinguish exposed victims from unexposed ones. We present the first study of hair usage as passive sampler to assess contamination by chemicals in vapour form. This work presents more particularly the hair adsorption capacity for methyl salicylate used as a surrogate of the vesicant sulphur mustard. Chemical vapours toxicity through the respiratory route has historically been defined through Haber's law's concentration-time (Ct) product, and vapour exposure of hair to methyl salicylate was conducted with various times or doses of exposure in the range of incapacitating and lethal Ct products corresponding to sulphur mustard. Following exposure, extraction of methyl salicylate from hair was conducted by simple soaking in dichloromethane. Methyl salicylate could be detected on hair for vapour concentration corresponding to about one fifth of the sulphur mustard concentration that would kill 50% of exposed individuals (LCt50). The amount of methyl salicylate recovered from hair increased with time or dose of exposure. It showed a good correlation with the concentration-time product, suggesting that hair could be used like a passive sampler to assess vapour exposure to chemical compounds. It introduces great perspectives concerning the use of hair as a marker of exposure to CWA.

  20. Chemical vapor deposition coating for micromachines

    SciTech Connect

    MANI,SEETHAMBAL S.; FLEMING,JAMES G.; SNIEGOWSKI,JEFFRY J.; DE BOER,MAARTEN P.; IRWIN,LAWRENCE W.; WALRAVEN,JEREMY A.; TANNER,DANELLE M.; DUGGER,MICHAEL T.

    2000-04-21

    Two major problems associated with Si-based MEMS devices are stiction and wear. Surface modifications are needed to reduce both adhesion and friction in micromechanical structures to solve these problems. In this paper, the authors will present a process used to selectively coat MEMS devices with tungsten using a CVD (Chemical Vapor Deposition) process. The selective W deposition process results in a very conformal coating and can potentially solve both stiction and wear problems confronting MEMS processing. The selective deposition of tungsten is accomplished through silicon reduction of WF{sub 6}, which results in a self-limiting reaction. The selective deposition of W only on polysilicon surfaces prevents electrical shorts. Further, the self-limiting nature of this selective W deposition process ensures the consistency necessary for process control. Selective tungsten is deposited after the removal of the sacrificial oxides to minimize process integration problems. This tungsten coating adheres well and is hard and conducting, requirements for device performance. Furthermore, since the deposited tungsten infiltrates under adhered silicon parts and the volume of W deposited is less than the amount of Si consumed, it appears to be possible to release stuck parts that are contacted over small areas such as dimples. Results from tungsten deposition on MEMS structures with dimples will be presented. The effect of wet and vapor phase cleanings prior to the deposition will be discussed along with other process details. The W coating improved wear by orders of magnitude compared to uncoated parts. Tungsten CVD is used in the integrated-circuit industry, which makes this approach manufacturable.

  1. Chemical vapor deposition of group IIIB metals

    DOEpatents

    Erbil, Ahmet

    1989-01-01

    Coatings of Group IIIB metals and compounds thereof are formed by chemical vapor deposition, in which a heat decomposable organometallic compound of the formula (I) ##STR1## where M is a Group IIIB metal, such as lanthanum or yttrium and R is a lower alkyl or alkenyl radical containing from 2 to about 6 carbon atoms, with a heated substrate which is above the decomposition temperature of the organometallic compound. The pure metal is obtained when the compound of the formula I is the sole heat decomposable compound present and deposition is carried out under nonoxidizing conditions. Intermetallic compounds such as lanthanum telluride can be deposited from a lanthanum compound of formula I and a heat decomposable tellurium compound under nonoxidizing conditions.

  2. Chemical vapor deposition of group IIIB metals

    DOEpatents

    Erbil, A.

    1989-11-21

    Coatings of Group IIIB metals and compounds thereof are formed by chemical vapor deposition, in which a heat decomposable organometallic compound of the formula given in the patent where M is a Group IIIB metal, such as lanthanum or yttrium and R is a lower alkyl or alkenyl radical containing from 2 to about 6 carbon atoms, with a heated substrate which is above the decomposition temperature of the organometallic compound. The pure metal is obtained when the compound of the formula 1 is the sole heat decomposable compound present and deposition is carried out under nonoxidizing conditions. Intermetallic compounds such as lanthanum telluride can be deposited from a lanthanum compound of formula 1 and a heat decomposable tellurium compound under nonoxidizing conditions.

  3. Liquid and vapour-phase antifungal activities of selected essential oils against candida albicans: microscopic observations and chemical characterization of cymbopogon citratus

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Use of essential oils for controlling Candida albicans growth has gained significance due to the resistance acquired by pathogens towards a number of widely-used drugs. The aim of this study was to test the antifungal activity of selected essential oils against Candida albicans in liquid and vapour phase and to determine the chemical composition and mechanism of action of most potent essential oil. Methods Minimum Inhibitory concentration (MIC) of different essential oils in liquid phase, assayed through agar plate dilution, broth dilution & 96-well micro plate dilution method and vapour phase activity evaluated through disc volatilization method. Reduction of C. albicans cells with vapour exposure was estimated by kill time assay. Morphological alteration in treated/untreated C. albicans cells was observed by the Scanning electron microscopy (SEM)/Atomic force microscopy (AFM) and chemical analysis of the strongest antifungal agent/essential oil has been done by GC, GC-MS. Results Lemon grass (Cymbopogon citratus) essential oil exhibited the strongest antifungal effect followed by mentha (Mentha piperita) and eucalyptus (Eucalyptus globulus) essential oil. The MIC of lemon grass essential oil in liquid phase (288 mg/l) was significantly higher than that in the vapour phase (32.7 mg/l) and a 4 h exposure was sufficient to cause 100% loss in viability of C. albicans cells. SEM/AFM of C. albicans cells treated with lemon grass essential oil at MIC level in liquid and vapour phase showed prominent shrinkage and partial degradation, respectively, confirming higher efficacy of vapour phase. GC-MS analysis revealed that lemon grass essential oil was dominated by oxygenated monoterpenes (78.2%); α-citral or geranial (36.2%) and β-citral or neral (26.5%), monoterpene hydrocarbons (7.9%) and sesquiterpene hydrocarbons (3.8%). Conclusion Lemon grass essential oil is highly effective in vapour phase against C. albicans, leading to deleterious morphological

  4. Construction of conductive multilayer films of biogenic triangular gold nanoparticles and their application in chemical vapour sensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, Amit; Chaudhari, Minakshi; Sastry, Murali

    2006-05-01

    Metal nanoparticles are interesting building blocks for realizing films for a number of applications that include bio- and chemical sensing. To date, spherical metal nanoparticles have been used to generate functional electrical coatings. In this paper we demonstrate the synthesis of electrically conductive coatings using biologically prepared gold nanotriangles as the building blocks. The gold nanotriangles are prepared by the reduction of aqueous chloroaurate ions using an extract of the lemongrass plant (Cymbopogon flexuosus) which are thereafter assembled onto a variety of substrates by simple solution casting. The conductivity of the film shows a drastic fall upon mild heat treatment, leading to the formation of electrically conductive thin films of nanoparticles. We have also investigated the possibility of using the gold nanotriangle films in vapour sensing. A large fall in film resistance is observed upon exposure to polar molecules such as methanol, while little change occurs upon exposure to weakly polar molecules such as chloroform.

  5. Chemical deposition methods using supercritical fluid solutions

    DOEpatents

    Sievers, Robert E.; Hansen, Brian N.

    1990-01-01

    A method for depositing a film of a desired material on a substrate comprises dissolving at least one reagent in a supercritical fluid comprising at least one solvent. Either the reagent is capable of reacting with or is a precursor of a compound capable of reacting with the solvent to form the desired product, or at least one additional reagent is included in the supercritical solution and is capable of reacting with or is a precursor of a compound capable of reacting with the first reagent or with a compound derived from the first reagent to form the desired material. The supercritical solution is expanded to produce a vapor or aerosol and a chemical reaction is induced in the vapor or aerosol so that a film of the desired material resulting from the chemical reaction is deposited on the substrate surface. In an alternate embodiment, the supercritical solution containing at least one reagent is expanded to produce a vapor or aerosol which is then mixed with a gas containing at least one additional reagent. A chemical reaction is induced in the resulting mixture so that a film of the desired material is deposited.

  6. Advanced deposition model for thermal activated chemical vapor deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cai, Dang

    Thermal Activated Chemical Vapor Deposition (TACVD) is defined as the formation of a stable solid product on a heated substrate surface from chemical reactions and/or dissociation of gaseous reactants in an activated environment. It has become an essential process for producing solid film, bulk material, coating, fibers, powders and monolithic components. Global market of CVD products has reached multi billions dollars for each year. In the recent years CVD process has been extensively used to manufacture semiconductors and other electronic components such as polysilicon, AlN and GaN. Extensive research effort has been directed to improve deposition quality and throughput. To obtain fast and high quality deposition, operational conditions such as temperature, pressure, fluid velocity and species concentration and geometry conditions such as source-substrate distance need to be well controlled in a CVD system. This thesis will focus on design of CVD processes through understanding the transport and reaction phenomena in the growth reactor. Since the in situ monitor is almost impossible for CVD reactor, many industrial resources have been expended to determine the optimum design by semi-empirical methods and trial-and-error procedures. This approach has allowed the achievement of improvements in the deposition sequence, but begins to show its limitations, as this method cannot always fulfill the more and more stringent specifications of the industry. To resolve this problem, numerical simulation is widely used in studying the growth techniques. The difficulty of numerical simulation of TACVD crystal growth process lies in the simulation of gas phase and surface reactions, especially the latter one, due to the fact that very limited kinetic information is available in the open literature. In this thesis, an advanced deposition model was developed to study the multi-component fluid flow, homogeneous gas phase reactions inside the reactor chamber, heterogeneous surface

  7. Origin and chemical composition of evaporite deposits

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Moore, George William

    1960-01-01

    A comparative study of marine evaporite deposits forming at the present time along the pacific coast of central Mexico and evaporite formations of Permian age in West Texas Basin was made in order to determine if the modern sediments provide a basis for understanding environmental conditions that existed during deposition of the older deposits. The field work was supplemented by investigations of artificial evaporite minerals precipitated in the laboratory and by study of the chemical composition of halite rock of different geologic ages. The environment of deposition of contemporaneous marine salt deposits in Mexico is acidic, is strongly reducing a few centimeters below the surface, and teems with microscopic life. Deposition of salt, unlike that of many other sediments, is not wholly a constructional phenomenon. Permanent deposits result only if a favorable balance exists between deposition in the dry season and dissolution in the wet season. Evaporite formations chosen for special study in the West Texas Basin are, in ascending order, the Castile, Salado, and Rustler formations, which have a combined thickness of 1200 meters. The Castile formation is largely composed of gypsum rock, the Salado, halite rock, and the Rustler, quartz and carbonate sandstone. The lower part of the Castile formation is bituminous and contains limestone laminae. The Castile and Rustler formations thicken to the south at the expense of salt of the intervening Salado formation. The clastic rocks of the Rustler formation are interpreted as the deposits of a series of barrier islands north of which halite rock of the Salado was deposited. The salt is believed to have formed in shallow water of uniform density that was mixed by the wind. Where water depth exceeded the depth of the wind mixing, density stratification developed, and gypsum was deposited. Dense water of high salinity below the density discontinuity was overlain by less dense, more normally saline water which was derived from

  8. Radiative transfer modeling of surface chemical deposits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reichardt, Thomas A.; Kulp, Thomas J.

    2016-05-01

    Remote detection of a surface-bound chemical relies on the recognition of a pattern, or "signature," that is distinct from the background. Such signatures are a function of a chemical's fundamental optical properties, but also depend upon its specific morphology. Importantly, the same chemical can exhibit vastly different signatures depending on the size of particles composing the deposit. We present a parameterized model to account for such morphological effects on surface-deposited chemical signatures. This model leverages computational tools developed within the planetary and atmospheric science communities, beginning with T-matrix and ray-tracing approaches for evaluating the scattering and extinction properties of individual particles based on their size and shape, and the complex refractive index of the material itself. These individual-particle properties then serve as input to the Ambartsumian invariant imbedding solution for the reflectance of a particulate surface composed of these particles. The inputs to the model include parameters associated with a functionalized form of the particle size distribution (PSD) as well as parameters associated with the particle packing density and surface roughness. The model is numerically inverted via Sandia's Dakota package, optimizing agreement between modeled and measured reflectance spectra, which we demonstrate on data acquired on five size-selected silica powders over the 4-16 μm wavelength range. Agreements between modeled and measured reflectance spectra are assessed, while the optimized PSDs resulting from the spectral fitting are then compared to PSD data acquired from independent particle size measurements.

  9. Physical-chemical conditions of ore deposition

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Barton, P.B.

    1981-01-01

    Ore deposits form under a wide range of physical and chemical conditions, but those precipitating from hot, aqueous fluids-i.e. the hydrothermal deposits-form generally below 700??C and at pressures of only 1 or 2 kbar or less. Natural aqueous fluids in rocks may extract metal and sulfur from a variety of rock types or may acquire them as a residual heritage from a crystallizing silicate magma. Ore-forming hydrothermal fluids never appear as hot springs (except in deep, submarine situations) because they boil, mix with surface waters, and cool, thereby losing their ore-bearing ability before reaching the surface. Mineral systems function as chemical buffers and indicators just as buffers and indicators function in a chemical laboratory. By reading the record written in the buffer/indicator assemblages of minerals one can reconstruct many aspects of the former chemical environment. By studying the record of changing conditions one may deduce information regarding the processes functioning to create the succession of chemical environments and the ore deposits they represent. The example of the OH vein at Creede, Colorado, shows a pH buffered by the K-feldspar + muscovite + quartz assemblage and the covariation of S2 and O2 buffered by the assemblage chlorite + pyrite + quartz. Boiling of the ore fluid led to its oxidation to hematite-bearing assemblages and simultaneously produced an intensely altered, sericitic capping over the vein in response to the condensation of vapors bearing acidic components. The solubility of metals as calculated from experimental and theoretical studies of mineral solubility appears too low by at least one or two powers of ten to explain the mineralization at Creede. In contrast to Creede where the mineral stabilities all point to a relatively consistent chemistry, the Mississippi Valley type deposits present a puzzle of conflicting chemical clues that are impossible to reconcile with any single equilibrium situation. Thus we must

  10. Physical-chemical conditions of ore deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barton, Paul B.

    Ore deposits form under a wide range of physical and chemical conditions, but those precipitating from hot, aqueous fluids-i.e. the hydrothermal deposits-form generally below 700°C and at pressures of only 1 or 2 kbar or less. Natural aqueous fluids in rocks may extract metal and sulfur from a variety of rock types or may acquire them as a residual heritage from a crystallizing silicate magma. Ore-forming hydrothermal fluids never appear as hot springs (except in deep, submarine situations) because they boil, mix with surface waters, and cool, thereby losing their ore-bearing ability before reaching the surface. Mineral systems function as chemical buffers and indicators just as buffers and indicators function in a chemical laboratory. By reading the record written in the buffer/indicator assemblages of minerals one can reconstruct many aspects of the former chemical environment. By studying the record of changing conditions one may deduce information regarding the processes functioning to create the succession of chemical environments and the ore deposits they represent. The example of the OH vein at Creede, Colorado, shows a pH buffered by the K-feldspar + muscovite + quartz assemblage and the covariation of S 2 and O 2 buffered by the assemblage chlorite + pyrite + quartz. Boiling of the ore fluid led to its oxidation to hematite-bearing assemblages and simultaneously produced an intensely altered, sericitic capping over the vein in response to the condensation of vapors bearing acidic components. The solubility of metals as calculated from experimental and theoretical studies of mineral solubility appears too low by at least one or two powers of ten to explain the mineralization at Creede. In contrast to Creede where the mineral stabilities all point to a relatively consistent chemistry, the Mississippi Valley type deposits present a puzzle of conflicting chemical clues that are impossible to reconcile with any single equilibrium situation. Thus we must

  11. Chemical weathering within high mountain depositional structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Emberson, R.; Hovius, N.; Hsieh, M.; Galy, A.

    2013-12-01

    Material eroded from active mountain belts can spend extended periods in depositional structures within the mountain catchments before reaching its final destination. This can be in the form of colluvial fills, debris fans, or alluvial valley fills and terraces. The existence of these landforms is testament to the catastrophic nature of the events that lead to their formation. Sourced by landslides or debris flows, the material that forms them is in many cases either unweathered or incompletely weathered (e.g. Hsieh and Chyi 2010). Due to their porosity and permeability, these deposits likely serve as locations for extensive chemical weathering within bedrock landscapes. Recent studies considering the weathering flux from active mountain belts (e.g. Calmels et al. 2011) have distinguished between shallow and deep groundwater in terms of the contribution to the solute budget from a catchment; in this study we have attempted to more tightly constrain the sources of these groundwater components in the context of the previously mentioned depositional structures. We have collected water samples from a large number of sites within the Chen-you-lan catchment (370 km2) in central west Taiwan to elucidate the location of chemical weathering as well as how the sourcing of weathering products varies depending on the meteorological conditions. Central Taiwan has good attributes for this work considering both the extremely active tectonics and tropical climate, (including extensive cyclonic activity) which stimulate both extensive physical erosion (Dadson et al. 2003) and chemical weathering (Calmels et al. 2011). The Chen-you-lan catchment in particular contains some of the largest alluvial deposits inside the Taiwan mountain belt (Hsieh and Chyi 2010). Our preliminary results suggest that weathering within intramontane deposits may be a significant source of solutes, with the hyporheic systems within mountain rivers of particular import. This input of solutes occurs over

  12. Chemical vapor deposition of copper films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borgharkar, Narendra Shamkant

    We have studied the kinetics of copper chemical vapor deposition (CVD) for interconnect metallization using hydrogen (Hsb2) reduction of the Cu(hfac)sb2 (copper(II) hexafluoroacetylacetonate) precursor. Steady-state deposition rates were measured using a hot-wall microbalance reactor. For base case conditions of 2 Torr Cu(hfac)sb2, 40 Torr Hsb2, and 300sp°C, a growth rate of 0.5 mg cmsp{-2} hrsp{-1} (ca. 10 nm minsp{-1}) is observed. Reaction order experiments suggest that the deposition rate passes through a maximum at partial pressure of 2 Torr of Cu(hfac)sb2. The deposition rate has an overall half-order dependence on Hsb2 partial pressure. A Langmuir-Hinshelwood rate expression is used to describe the observed kinetic dependencies on Cu(hfac)sb2, Hsb2, and H(hfac). Based on the rate expression a mechanism is proposed in which the overall rate is determined by the surface reaction of adsorbed Cu(hfac)sb2 and H species. Additionally, the role of alcohols in enhancing the deposition rate has been investigated. Addition of isopropanol results in a six fold enhancement to yield a deposition rate of 3.3 mg cmsp{-2} hrsp{-1} (ca. 60 nm minsp{-1}) at 5 Torr of isopropanol, 0.4 Torr Cu(hfac)sb2, 40 Torr Hsb2, and 300sp°C. Ethanol and methanol give lower enhancements of 1.75 and 1.1 mg cmsp{-2} hrsp{-1}, respectively. A mechanism based on the ordering of the aqueous pKsba values of the alcohols is proposed to explain the observed results. Lastly, we have built a warm-wall Pedestal reactor apparatus to demonstrate copper CVD on TiN/Si substrates. The apparatus includes a liquid injection system for transport of isopropanol-diluted precursor solutions. At optimized conditions of precursor and substrate pre-treatments, we have deposited uniform films of copper on TiN/Si substrates at an average deposition rate of 3.0 mg cmsp{-2} hrsp{-1} (ca. 60 nm minsp{-1}).

  13. Graphene sheets via microwave chemical vapor deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yuan, G. D.; Zhang, W. J.; Yang, Y.; Tang, Y. B.; Li, Y. Q.; Wang, J. X.; Meng, X. M.; He, Z. B.; Wu, C. M. L.; Bello, I.; Lee, C. S.; Lee, S. T.

    2009-01-01

    High-quality graphene sheets (GS) were synthesized on stainless steel substrates at ˜500 °C by microwave plasma chemical vapor deposition (CVD) in an atmosphere of methane/hydrogen mixture. The GS product was characterized to contain mostly 1- or 2-3-layers using scanning electron microscopy, transmission electron microscopy/selective area electron diffraction, atomic force microscopy, and Raman spectroscopy. The present CVD approach is capable of producing graphenes with high yield and high purity with no carbon impurities such as carbon nanotubes.

  14. Preventing Chemical-Vapor Deposition In Selected Areas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Keeley, Joseph T.; Goela, Jitendra Singh; Pickering, Michael A.; Taylor, Raymond L.

    1991-01-01

    Method for prevention of chemical-vapor deposition of material in selected areas developed. Gas shroud isolates specific area from rest of deposition system. Inert gas flowing from beneath substrate prevents deposition between substrate and outer ring. Method extremely successful in selective deposition of SiC in chemical-vapor-deposition reactor. Used in deposition of SiC mirror blanks in Large Mirror Substrate and Lidar Mirror programs. Critical element in overall chemical-vapor-deposition process for producing large, lightweight mirrors.

  15. Detection of chemical substances in water using an oxide nanowire transistor covered with a hydrophobic nanoparticle thin film as a liquid-vapour separation filter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lim, Taekyung; Lee, Jonghun; Ju, Sanghyun

    2016-08-01

    We have developed a method to detect the presence of small amounts of chemical substances in water, using a Al2O3 nanoparticle thin film covered with phosphonic acid (HDF-PA) self-assembled monolayer. The HDF-PA self-assembled Al2O3 nanoparticle thin film acts as a liquid-vapour separation filter, allowing the passage of chemical vapour while blocking liquids. Prevention of the liquid from contacting the SnO2 nanowire and source-drain electrodes is required in order to avoid abnormal operation. Using this characteristic, the concentration of chemical substances in water could be evaluated by measuring the current changes in the SnO2 nanowire transistor covered with the HDF-PA self-assembled Al2O3 nanoparticle thin film.

  16. Semiconductor and ceramic nanoparticle films deposited by chemical bath deposition.

    PubMed

    Hodes, Gary

    2007-06-14

    Chemical bath deposition (CBD) has been used to deposit films of metal sulfides, selenides and oxides, together with some miscellaneous compounds, beginning nearly 140 years ago. While it is a well-known technique in a few specific areas (notably photoconductive lead salt detectors, photoelectrodes and more recently, thin film solar cells), it is by and large an under-appreciated technique. The more recent interest in all things 'nano' has provided a boost for CBD: since it is a low temperature, solution (almost always aqueous) technique, crystal size is often very small. This is evidenced by the existence of size quantization commonly found in CBD semiconductor films. The intention of this review is to provide readers, many of whom may not even be aware of the CBD technique, with an overview of how the technique has been used to fabricate nanocrystalline semiconductor (this terminology also includes oxides often classified as ceramics) films and some properties of these films. The review begins, after a short introduction, with a general description of the CBD method, designed to give the reader a basic knowledge of the technique. The rest of the review then focuses on nanocrystalline (or, in the few cases of amorphous deposits, nanoparticle) films. The various factors which determine crystal size are first discussed. This is followed by some of the many examples of size quantization observed in the films. Since CBD films are usually porous, surface effects can be very important, and various surface-dependent properties (light emission and surface states) as well as surface modification, are treated: (although some properties, like emission, can be strongly dependent on both surface and 'bulk'). Because of the fact that many CBD films have been made specifically for use as photoelectrodes in photoelectrochemical cells, there is next a chapter on this topic with a few examples of such photoelectrodes. Film structure and morphology follows with examples of

  17. Chemical Vapor Deposition Of Silicon Carbide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Powell, J. Anthony; Larkin, David J.; Matus, Lawrence G.; Petit, Jeremy B.

    1993-01-01

    Large single-crystal SiC boules from which wafers of large area cut now being produced commerically. Availability of wafers opens door for development of SiC semiconductor devices. Recently developed chemical vapor deposition (CVD) process produces thin single-crystal SiC films on SiC wafers. Essential step in sequence of steps used to fabricate semiconductor devices. Further development required for specific devices. Some potential high-temperature applications include sensors and control electronics for advanced turbine engines and automobile engines, power electronics for electromechanical actuators for advanced aircraft and for space power systems, and equipment used in drilling of deep wells. High-frequency applications include communication systems, high-speed computers, and microwave power transistors. High-radiation applications include sensors and controls for nuclear reactors.

  18. Chemical Vapor Deposition of Polybenzoxazole Precursors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anthamatten, Mitchell

    2005-03-01

    Polybenzoxazoles are well known for their outstanding thermal and mechanical properties. We will describe a new solventless, chemical vapor deposition approach to fabricating films of high strength polybenzoxazoles. Advantages of such an approach are: 1) control of film thickness, 2) conformal coating onto substrates, and 3) potential improvement of in-plane mechanical properties. Our process involves the vacuum evaporation of two monomers: a hydroxyl-functionalized diamine (DHB) and a dianhydride (PMDA). The resulting films appear uniform and contain poly(amic acid) linkages. FTIR experiments show that the poly(amic acid) converts to a polyimide material upon curing at 150 to 200 degrees C. At higher temperatures there is evidence that benzoxazole linkages form, though, interestingly, we also observe a concomitant decrease in the film's mass. Our current studies aim at understanding these high-temperature processes and how they impact the polymer's crystallinity and mechanical properties.

  19. Characterization of Metalorganic Chemical Vapor Deposition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jesser, W. A.

    1998-01-01

    A series of experimental and numerical investigations to develop a more complete understanding of the reactive fluid dynamics of chemical vapor deposition were conducted. In the experimental phases of the effort, a horizontal CVD reactor configuration was used for the growth of InP at UVA and for laser velocimetry measurements of the flow fields in the reactor at LaRC. This horizontal reactor configuration was developed for the growth of III-V semiconductors and has been used by our research group in the past to study the deposition of both GaAs and InP. While the ultimate resolution of many of the heat and mass transport issues will require access to a reduced-gravity environment, the series of groundbased research makes direct contributions to this area while attempting to answer the design questions for future experiments of how low must gravity be reduced and for how long must this gravity level be maintained to make the necessary measurements. It is hoped that the terrestrial experiments will be useful for the design of future microgravity experiments which likely will be designed to employ a core set of measurements for applications in the microgravity environment such as HOLOC, the Fluid Physics/Dynamics Facility, or the Schlieren photography, the Laser Imaging Velocimetry and the Laser Doppler Velocimetry instruments under development for the Advanced Fluids Experiment Module.

  20. Surface chemical deposition of advanced electronic materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bjelkevig, Cameron

    The focus of this work was to examine the direct plating of Cu on Ru diffusion barriers for use in interconnect technology and the substrate mediated growth of graphene on boron nitride for use in advanced electronic applications. The electrodeposition of Cu on Ru(0001) and polycrystalline substrates (with and without pretreatment in an iodine containing solution) has been studied by cyclic voltammetry (CV), current--time transient measurements (CTT), in situ electrochemical atomic force microscopy (EC-AFM), and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). The EC-AFM data show that at potentials near the OPD/UPD threshold, Cu crystallites exhibit pronounced growth anisotropy, with lateral dimensions greatly exceeding vertical dimensions. XPS measurements confirmed the presence and stability of adsorbed I on the Ru surface following pre-treatment in a KI/H2SO4 solution and following polarization to at least -200 mV vs. Ag/AgCl. CV data of samples pre-reduced in I-containing electrolyte exhibited a narrow Cu deposition peak in the overpotential region and a UPD peak. The kinetics of the electrodeposited Cu films was investigated by CTT measurements and applied to theoretical models of nucleation. The data indicated that a protective I adlayer may be deposited on an airexposed Ru electrode as the oxide surface is electrochemically reduced, and that this layer will inhibit reformation of an oxide during the Cu electroplating process. A novel method for epitaxial graphene growth directly on a dielectric substrate of systematically variable thickness was studied. Mono/multilayers of BN(111) were grown on Ru(0001) by atomic layer deposition (ALD), exhibiting a flat (non-nanomesh) R30(✓3x✓3) structure. BN(111) was used as a template for growth of graphene by chemical vapor deposition (CVD) of C2H4 at 1000 K. Characterization by LEED, Auger, STM/STS and Raman indicate the graphene is in registry with the BN substrate, and exhibits a HOPG-like 0 eV bandgap density

  1. High-performance perovskite CH3NH3PbI3 thin films for solar cells prepared by single-source physical vapour deposition

    PubMed Central

    Fan, Ping; Gu, Di; Liang, Guang-Xing; Luo, Jing-Ting; Chen, Ju-Long; Zheng, Zhuang-Hao; Zhang, Dong-Ping

    2016-01-01

    In this work, an alternative route to fabricating high-quality CH3NH3PbI3 thin films is proposed. Single-source physical vapour deposition (SSPVD) without a post-heat-treating process was used to prepare CH3NH3PbI3 thin films at room temperature. This new process enabled complete surface coverage and moisture stability in a non-vacuum solution. Moreover, the challenges of simultaneously controlling evaporation processes of the organic and inorganic sources via dual-source vapour evaporation and the heating process required to obtain high crystallization were avoided. Excellent composition with stoichiometry transferred from the powder material, a high level of tetragonal phase-purity, full surface coverage, well-defined grain structure, high crystallization and reproducibility were obtained. A PCE of approximately 10.90% was obtained with a device based on SSPVD CH3NH3PbI3. These initial results suggest that SSPVD is a promising method to significantly optimize perovskite CH3NH3PbI3 solar cell efficiency. PMID:27426686

  2. High-performance perovskite CH3NH3PbI3 thin films for solar cells prepared by single-source physical vapour deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fan, Ping; Gu, Di; Liang, Guang-Xing; Luo, Jing-Ting; Chen, Ju-Long; Zheng, Zhuang-Hao; Zhang, Dong-Ping

    2016-07-01

    In this work, an alternative route to fabricating high-quality CH3NH3PbI3 thin films is proposed. Single-source physical vapour deposition (SSPVD) without a post-heat-treating process was used to prepare CH3NH3PbI3 thin films at room temperature. This new process enabled complete surface coverage and moisture stability in a non-vacuum solution. Moreover, the challenges of simultaneously controlling evaporation processes of the organic and inorganic sources via dual-source vapour evaporation and the heating process required to obtain high crystallization were avoided. Excellent composition with stoichiometry transferred from the powder material, a high level of tetragonal phase-purity, full surface coverage, well-defined grain structure, high crystallization and reproducibility were obtained. A PCE of approximately 10.90% was obtained with a device based on SSPVD CH3NH3PbI3. These initial results suggest that SSPVD is a promising method to significantly optimize perovskite CH3NH3PbI3 solar cell efficiency.

  3. High-performance perovskite CH3NH3PbI3 thin films for solar cells prepared by single-source physical vapour deposition.

    PubMed

    Fan, Ping; Gu, Di; Liang, Guang-Xing; Luo, Jing-Ting; Chen, Ju-Long; Zheng, Zhuang-Hao; Zhang, Dong-Ping

    2016-01-01

    In this work, an alternative route to fabricating high-quality CH3NH3PbI3 thin films is proposed. Single-source physical vapour deposition (SSPVD) without a post-heat-treating process was used to prepare CH3NH3PbI3 thin films at room temperature. This new process enabled complete surface coverage and moisture stability in a non-vacuum solution. Moreover, the challenges of simultaneously controlling evaporation processes of the organic and inorganic sources via dual-source vapour evaporation and the heating process required to obtain high crystallization were avoided. Excellent composition with stoichiometry transferred from the powder material, a high level of tetragonal phase-purity, full surface coverage, well-defined grain structure, high crystallization and reproducibility were obtained. A PCE of approximately 10.90% was obtained with a device based on SSPVD CH3NH3PbI3. These initial results suggest that SSPVD is a promising method to significantly optimize perovskite CH3NH3PbI3 solar cell efficiency. PMID:27426686

  4. Chemical vapor deposition of carbon nanomaterials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hussain, Ashfaq

    Developments in the field of nanotechnology are causing a revolution in the world of materials science and engineering. Carbon nanomaterial thin films like nanocrystalline diamond films and carbon nanotubes are among the most prominent materials at the forefront of the nanotechnology revolution. Chief methods for synthesizing these materials have involved chemical vapor deposition (CVD) growth by catalysis from substrates. So far, these methods of synthesis have presented problems of cost and scalability because they have either employed multi-step, extensive substrate surface preparation procedures or used expensive CVD methods to achieve the desired growth. This research work presents the successful results of achieving the synthesis of nanocrystalline diamond thin films and high quality carbon nanotubes by a method which is both low cost and scalable. Specifically, this research program has employed the low cost and scalable method of hot filament chemical vapor deposition (HFCVD) in combination with very simple substrate surface preparation procedures and the CVD variables method of shaping carbon nanostructures to achieve the desired growth of carbon nanomaterial thin films. The CVD variables method, uniquely refined as a carbon nanotube shaping tool in this research work, consists of variation of CVD parameters like precursor gas composition, pressure, and temperature to change nanostructure morphology. The precursor gas mixture used contained variable proportions of the gases methane, hydrogen, and argon. Using this methodology, synthesis of nanocrystalline diamond was achieved on polished silicon substrates at a CVD precursor gas mixture composition in which argon to hydrogen ratio played a decisive role. By the same approach, optimum conditions for growth of carbon nanotubes on Fe-Ni and ferric sulfate coated silicon substrates were determined, leading to the growth of high purity carbon nanotubes of random and vertical orientation. The structures of

  5. Piezoelectric effect in chemical vapour deposition-grown atomic-monolayer triangular molybdenum disulfide piezotronics.

    PubMed

    Qi, Junjie; Lan, Yann-Wen; Stieg, Adam Z; Chen, Jyun-Hong; Zhong, Yuan-Liang; Li, Lain-Jong; Chen, Chii-Dong; Zhang, Yue; Wang, Kang L

    2015-01-01

    High-performance piezoelectricity in monolayer semiconducting transition metal dichalcogenides is highly desirable for the development of nanosensors, piezotronics and photo-piezotransistors. Here we report the experimental study of the theoretically predicted piezoelectric effect in triangle monolayer MoS2 devices under isotropic mechanical deformation. The experimental observation indicates that the conductivity of MoS2 devices can be actively modulated by the piezoelectric charge polarization-induced built-in electric field under strain variation. These polarization charges alter the Schottky barrier height on both contacts, resulting in a barrier height increase with increasing compressive strain and decrease with increasing tensile strain. The underlying mechanism of strain-induced in-plane charge polarization is proposed and discussed using energy band diagrams. In addition, a new type of MoS2 strain/force sensor built using a monolayer MoS2 triangle is also demonstrated. Our results provide evidence for strain-gating monolayer MoS2 piezotronics, a promising avenue for achieving augmented functionalities in next-generation electronic and mechanical-electronic nanodevices. PMID:26109177

  6. Piezoelectric effect in chemical vapour deposition-grown atomic-monolayer triangular molybdenum disulfide piezotronics

    PubMed Central

    Qi, Junjie; Lan, Yann-Wen; Stieg, Adam Z.; Chen, Jyun-Hong; Zhong, Yuan-Liang; Li, Lain-Jong; Chen, Chii-Dong; Zhang, Yue; Wang, Kang L.

    2015-01-01

    High-performance piezoelectricity in monolayer semiconducting transition metal dichalcogenides is highly desirable for the development of nanosensors, piezotronics and photo-piezotransistors. Here we report the experimental study of the theoretically predicted piezoelectric effect in triangle monolayer MoS2 devices under isotropic mechanical deformation. The experimental observation indicates that the conductivity of MoS2 devices can be actively modulated by the piezoelectric charge polarization-induced built-in electric field under strain variation. These polarization charges alter the Schottky barrier height on both contacts, resulting in a barrier height increase with increasing compressive strain and decrease with increasing tensile strain. The underlying mechanism of strain-induced in-plane charge polarization is proposed and discussed using energy band diagrams. In addition, a new type of MoS2 strain/force sensor built using a monolayer MoS2 triangle is also demonstrated. Our results provide evidence for strain-gating monolayer MoS2 piezotronics, a promising avenue for achieving augmented functionalities in next-generation electronic and mechanical–electronic nanodevices. PMID:26109177

  7. Piezoelectric effect in chemical vapour deposition-grown atomic-monolayer triangular molybdenum disulfide piezotronics.

    PubMed

    Qi, Junjie; Lan, Yann-Wen; Stieg, Adam Z; Chen, Jyun-Hong; Zhong, Yuan-Liang; Li, Lain-Jong; Chen, Chii-Dong; Zhang, Yue; Wang, Kang L

    2015-06-25

    High-performance piezoelectricity in monolayer semiconducting transition metal dichalcogenides is highly desirable for the development of nanosensors, piezotronics and photo-piezotransistors. Here we report the experimental study of the theoretically predicted piezoelectric effect in triangle monolayer MoS2 devices under isotropic mechanical deformation. The experimental observation indicates that the conductivity of MoS2 devices can be actively modulated by the piezoelectric charge polarization-induced built-in electric field under strain variation. These polarization charges alter the Schottky barrier height on both contacts, resulting in a barrier height increase with increasing compressive strain and decrease with increasing tensile strain. The underlying mechanism of strain-induced in-plane charge polarization is proposed and discussed using energy band diagrams. In addition, a new type of MoS2 strain/force sensor built using a monolayer MoS2 triangle is also demonstrated. Our results provide evidence for strain-gating monolayer MoS2 piezotronics, a promising avenue for achieving augmented functionalities in next-generation electronic and mechanical-electronic nanodevices.

  8. Excitation mechanism and thermal emission quenching of Tb ions in silicon rich silicon oxide thin films grown by plasma-enhanced chemical vapour deposition—Do we need silicon nanoclusters?

    SciTech Connect

    Podhorodecki, A. Golacki, L. W.; Zatryb, G.; Misiewicz, J.; Wang, J.; Jadwisienczak, W.; Fedus, K.

    2014-04-14

    In this work, we will discuss the excitation and emission properties of Tb ions in a Silicon Rich Silicon Oxide (SRSO) matrix obtained at different technological conditions. By means of electron cyclotron resonance plasma-enhanced chemical vapour deposition, undoped and doped SRSO films have been obtained with different Si content (33, 35, 39, 50 at. %) and were annealed at different temperatures (600, 900, 1100 °C). The samples were characterized optically and structurally using photoluminescence (PL), PL excitation, time resolved PL, absorption, cathodoluminescence, temperature dependent PL, Rutherford backscattering spectrometry, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy and positron annihilation lifetime spectroscopy. Based on the obtained results, we discuss how the matrix modifications influence excitation and emission properties of Tb ions.

  9. Physical vapour deposition growth and transmission electron microscopy characterization of epitaxial thin metal films on single-crystal Si and Ge substrates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Westmacott, K. H.; Hinderberger, S.; Dahmen, U.

    2001-06-01

    Epitaxial fcc, bcc and hcp metal and alloy films were grown in high vacuum by physical vapour deposition at high rate ('flash' deposition) on the (111), (110) and (100) surfaces of Si and Ge at different deposition temperatures. The resulting epitaxial relationships and morphological features of these films were characterized by transmission electron microscopy and diffraction. Simple epitaxial relationships were found mainly for the fcc metals that form binary eutectic systems with Si and G e. Of these, Ag exhibited exceptional behaviour by forming in a single crystal cube-cube relationship on all six semiconductor surfaces. Al and Au both formed bicrystal films on (100) substrates but differed in their behaviours on (111) substrates. Silicide formers such as the fcc metals Cu and Ni, as well as all bcc and hcp metals investigated, did not adopt epitaxial relationships on most semiconductor substrates. However, epitaxial single-crystal, bicrystal and tricrystal films of several metals and alloys could be grown by using a Ag buffer layer. The factors controlling the epitaxial growth of metal films are discussed in the light of the observations and compared with the predictions of established models for epitaxial relationships. It is concluded that epitaxial films can be grown easily if the film forms a simple eutectic or monotectic system with the substrate. The epitaxial relationships of those films depend on crystallographic factors for metal-metal epitaxy and on the substrate surface structure for metal-semiconductor epitaxy.

  10. Variation in chemical wet deposition with meteorological conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raynor, Gilbert S.; Hayes, Janet V.

    Analysis of hourly sequential precipitation samples collected at Brookhaven National Laboratory over a 4-y period shows systematic relationships between amounts of chemicals deposited in precipitation and meteorological conditions. Samples were taken by an automatic, sequential sampler and measured for pH, conductivity and the concentrations of major ions. Concurrent measurements and observations were made of the synoptic situation, precipitation type and rate, wind speed and direction, and temperature. Deposition per unit area was computed for subsets of the data classified by meteorological and time parameters. Results demonstrate that precipitation amount alone is not an adequate predictor of chemical wet deposition because of the variability of concentration in precipitation which is a complex function of emission rates and atmospheric processes. Results, however, document those conditions under which most material is deposited and those circumstances in which deposition occurs at the greatest rate. When classified by season, hydrogen and sulfate ion deposition are greatest in the summer when precipitation is lowest and least in the winter when precipitation is greatest. Nitrogen in both nitrate and ammonium has a similar but less extreme pattern. By synoptic type, all chemicals are deposited most heavily in warm front precipitation but the fraction of hydrogen and sulfate deposited in cold front and squall line hours is greater than the fraction of precipitation. All chemicals are deposited most heavily in steady rain when examined by precipitation type but thundershowers deposit chemicals of anthropogenic origin in amounts disproportionate to precipitation amounts. Results are also presented from data classified by other parameters.

  11. Diameter and wall number control of carbon nanotubes by chemical vapor deposition

    SciTech Connect

    Xie, Rongsi; Zhong, Guofang Zhang, Can; Chen, Bingan; Santiago Esconjauregui, C.; Robertson, John

    2013-12-28

    We analyze the relationship between the average wall number (N) and the diameter (d) for carbon nanotubes (CNTs) grown by chemical vapour deposition. It is found that N depends linearly on d for diameters in the range of 2.5–10 nm, while single wall nanotubes predominate for diameters under about 2.1 nm. The linear relationship is found to depend somewhat on the growth conditions. It is also verified that the mean diameter depends on the diameter of the originating catalyst nanoparticle, and thus on the initial catalyst thickness where a thin film catalyst is used. This simplifies the characterisation of CNTs by electron microscopy. We also find a linear relationship between nanotube diameter and initial catalyst film thickness.

  12. Graphene decorated microelectrodes for simultaneous detection of ascorbic, dopamine, and folic acids by means of chemical vapor deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Namdar, N.; Hassanpour Amiri, M.; Dehghan Nayeri, F.; Gholizadeh, A.; Mohajerzadeh, S.

    2015-09-01

    In this paper, high quality and large area graphene layers were synthesized using thermal chemical vapour deposition on copper foil substrates. We use graphene incorporated electrodes to measure simultaneously ascorbic acid, dopamine and folic acid. Cyclic voltammetry and differential pulse voltammetry methods were used to evaluate electrochemical behaviour of the grown graphene layers. The graphene-modified electrode shows large electrochemical potential difference compared to bare gold electrodes with higher current responses. Also our fabricated electrodes configuration can be used easily for microfluidic analysis.

  13. Vapour breakthrough behaviour of carbon tetrachloride - A simulant for chemical warfare agent on ASZMT carbon: A comparative study with whetlerite carbon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Srivastava, Avanish Kumar; Shah, Dilip K.; Mahato, T. H.; Roy, A.; Yadav, S. S.; Srivas, S. K.; Singh, Beer

    2013-06-01

    ASZMT and whetlerite carbon was prepared by impregnation of active carbon with ammonical salts of Cu (II), Ag (I), Zn (II), Mo (VI), TEDA and Cu (II), Ag (I), Cr (VI), NaOH, C5H5N respectively using incipient wetness technique. Thereafter, impregnated carbon systems were characterized using scanning electron microscopy, energy dispersive X-ray, atomic absorption spectroscopy, thermogravimetry and surface characterization techniques. Impregnated carbon systems were evaluated under dynamic conditions against carbon tetrachloride (CCl4) vapour that was used as a simulant for the persistent chemical warfare agents for testing breakthrough times of filter cartridges and canisters of gas masks in the national approval test of respirators. The protective potential of ASZMT carbon was compared with the whetlerite carbon which is presently used in NBC filtration system. The effect of CCl4 concentration, test flow rate, temperature and relative humidity on the breakthrough behaviour of the impregnated carbon systems has also been studied. The study clearly indicated that the whetlerite carbon possessed breakthrough time greater than ASZMT carbon. However, ASZMT carbon provided adequate protection against CCl4 vapours and can be used as an alternative to whetlerite carbon that contain Cr(VI), which is reported to be carcinogenic and having lesser shelf life. The study indicated the breakthrough time of impregnated carbon systems were found to decrease with the increase of the CCl4 concentration and flow rate. The variation in temperature and relative humidity did not significantly affect the breakthrough behaviour of impregnated carbon systems at high vapour concentration of CCl4 whereasbreak through time of impregnated carbon systems reduced by an increase of relative humidity at low CCl4 vapour concentration.

  14. Combustion chemical vapor deposition: A novel thin-film deposition technique

    SciTech Connect

    Hunt, A.T.; Carter, W.B.; Cochran, J.K. Jr. )

    1993-07-12

    A new open-atmosphere chemical vapor deposition (CVD) technique has been developed that we term combustion chemical vapor deposition (CCVD). During CCVD a flame provides the necessary environment for the deposition of a dense film whose elemental constituents are derived from solution, vapor, or gas sources. Ag, YSZ, BaTiO[sub 3], YIG, YBa[sub 2]Cu[sub 3]O[sub [ital x

  15. Optical and surface morphological studies on CuPcOC8 thin films prepared by physical vapour deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vadakel, Vinu. T.; Menon, C. S.

    2013-08-01

    2,3,9,10,16,17,23,24-copper octakis (octyloxy) phthalocyanine (CuPcOC8) thin films deposited at room temperature have exhibited a change in their surface morphology with the post deposition annealing temperature under normal atmosphere.These films have been characterised by optical absorption also. SEM images have shown densely packed nano particles and nano-rod like structures on the substrates annealed at different temperatures. The optical transition was found to be direct allowed and the direct energy gap changed with the annealing temperature. The results of optical and surface morphological studies on CuPcOC8 have been discussed.

  16. Chemical vapor deposition of graphene single crystals.

    PubMed

    Yan, Zheng; Peng, Zhiwei; Tour, James M

    2014-04-15

    As a two-dimensional (2D) sp(2)-bonded carbon allotrope, graphene has attracted enormous interest over the past decade due to its unique properties, such as ultrahigh electron mobility, uniform broadband optical absorption and high tensile strength. In the initial research, graphene was isolated from natural graphite, and limited to small sizes and low yields. Recently developed chemical vapor deposition (CVD) techniques have emerged as an important method for the scalable production of large-size and high-quality graphene for various applications. However, CVD-derived graphene is polycrystalline and demonstrates degraded properties induced by grain boundaries. Thus, the next critical step of graphene growth relies on the synthesis of large graphene single crystals. In this Account, we first discuss graphene grain boundaries and their influence on graphene's properties. Mechanical and electrical behaviors of CVD-derived polycrystalline graphene are greatly reduced when compared to that of exfoliated graphene. We then review four representative pathways of pretreating Cu substrates to make millimeter-sized monolayer graphene grains: electrochemical polishing and high-pressure annealing of Cu substrate, adding of additional Cu enclosures, melting and resolidfying Cu substrates, and oxygen-rich Cu substrates. Due to these pretreatments, the nucleation site density on Cu substrates is greatly reduced, resulting in hexagonal-shaped graphene grains that show increased grain domain size and comparable electrical properties as to exfoliated graphene. Also, the properties of graphene can be engineered by its shape, thickness and spatial structure. Thus, we further discuss recently developed methods of making graphene grains with special spatial structures, including snowflakes, six-lobed flowers, pyramids and hexagonal graphene onion rings. The fundamental growth mechanism and practical applications of these well-shaped graphene structures should be interesting topics and

  17. Chemical Vapor Deposition Epitaxy an Patternless and Patterned Substrates.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Takoudis, Christos G.

    1990-01-01

    Discusses chemical vapor deposition epitaxy on patternless and patterned substrates for an electronic materials processing course. Describes the processs types and features of epitaxy. Presents some potential problems of epitaxy. Lists 38 references. (YP)

  18. Chemical vapor deposition of aluminum oxide

    DOEpatents

    Gordon, Roy; Kramer, Keith; Liu, Xinye

    2000-01-01

    An aluminum oxide film is deposited on a heated substrate by CVD from one or more alkylaluminum alkoxide compounds having composition R.sub.n Al.sub.2 (OR').sub.6-n, wherein R and R' are alkyl groups and n is in the range of 1 to 5.

  19. Chemical vapor deposition for automatic processing of integrated circuits

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kennedy, B. W.

    1980-01-01

    Chemical vapor deposition for automatic processing of integrated circuits including the wafer carrier and loading from a receiving air track into automatic furnaces and unloading on to a sending air track is discussed. Passivation using electron beam deposited quartz is also considered.

  20. Chemical Vapor Deposition of Silicon from Silane Pyrolysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Praturi, A. K.; Lutwack, R.; Hsu, G.

    1977-01-01

    The four basic elements in the chemical vapor deposition (CVD) of silicon from silane are analytically treated from a kinetic standpoint. These elements are mass transport of silane, pyrolysis of silane, nucleation of silicon, and silicon crystal growth. Rate expressions that describe the various steps involved in the chemical vapor deposition of silicon were derived from elementary principles. Applications of the rate expressions for modeling and simulation of the silicon CVD are discussed.

  1. Combustion chemical vapor deposition - A novel thin-film deposition technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hunt, A. T.; Carter, W. B.; Cochran, J. K., Jr.

    1993-07-01

    A new open-atmosphere chemical vapor deposition (CVD) technique has been developed that we term combustion chemical vapor deposition (CCVD). During CCVD a flame provides the necessary environment for the deposition of a dense film whose elemental constituents are derived from solution, vapor, or gas sources. Ag, YSZ, BaTiO3, YIG, YBa2Cu3O(x), and Y2BaCuO5 have been deposited via CCVD with the combustion of a sprayed, cation-containing, organic solution as the sole heat source. CCVD could, for some applications, be less expensive and more flexible than conventional CVD.

  2. Polycyclic organic material (POM) in urban air. Fractionation, chemical analysis and genotoxicity of particulate and vapour phases in an industrial town in Finland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pyysalo, Heikki; Tuominen, Jari; Wickström, Kim; Skyttä, Eija; Tikkanen, Leena; Salomaa, Sisko; Sorsa, Marja; Nurmela, Tuomo; Mattila, Tiina; Pohjola, Veijo

    Polycyclic organic material (POM) was collected by high-volume sampling on filter and on XAD-2 resin from the air of a small industrial town in Finland. Concurrent chemical analysis and the assays for genotoxic activity were performed on the particulate and the vapour phases of ambient air POM and their chemical fractions. Furthermore, correlations between seasonal meteorological parameters and POM concentrations were studied to reveal characteristic POM profiles for various emission sources. The range of total POM concentrations varied from 115 to 380 ng m -3 in late spring and from 17 to 83 ng m -3 in early winter. No direct correlation of ambient POM was seen with the temperature, but rather with the wind direction from various emission sources. Especially the low molecular weight compounds were associated with wind direction from industrial sources. Genotoxic activity, as detected by the Ames Salmonella/microsome test and the SCE assay in CHO cells, was found not only in the paniculate phase samples but also in the vapour phase. The polar fractions of some of the samples showed genotoxic activity, and also direct mutagenicity was observed with both the assay systems; these facts support the significance of compounds other than conventional polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH) in the samples.

  3. Atmospheric Transport and Deposition of Agricultural Chemicals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Majewski, M. S.; Vogel, J. R.; Capel, P. D.

    2006-05-01

    Concentrations of more than 80 pesticides and select transformation products were measured in atmospheric deposition during two growing seasons in five agricultural areas across the United States. Rainfall samples were collected at study areas in California, Indiana, Maryland, and Nebraska. In the arid Yakima Valley of Washington, dry deposition for the same compounds was estimated using air concentration measurements and depositional models. In the predominantly corn, soybean, and alfalfa growing region of Nebraska, Indiana, and Maryland, the herbicides acetochlor, alachlor, atrazine, and metolachlor where the predominant pesticides detected, and the highest concentrations ranged from 0.64 microgram per liter (ug/L) for metolachlor in a small, predominantly dairy use dominated watershed in Maryland to 6.6 ug/L and 19 ug/L for atrazine in Indiana and Nebraska, respectively. California showed a different seasonal occurrence pattern and suite of detected pesticides because the rainy season occurs during the winter months and a wide variety of crops are grown throughout the year. With the exception of metolachlor (0.23 ug/L, max.), the corn and soybean herbicides were not used to any great extent in the California study area and were not detected. The insecticides diazinon (1.21 ug/L, max.) and chlorpyrifos (0.12 ug/L, max.) were detected in nearly every sample taken in California. The Washington study area was similar to California in terms of the variety of crops grown and the pesticides use, but it receives very little rainfall. Dry deposition was estimated at this site from air concentrations and particle settling velocities. The results of these studies show the importance of the atmosphere as an additional source of pesticide loading to agricultural watersheds.

  4. Chemical deposition and characterization of copper indium disulphide thin films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pathan, H. M.; Lokhande, C. D.

    2004-12-01

    A simple chemical deposition method was used to prepare copper indium disulphide thin films. The method is based on sequential immersion of substrate into different cationic and anionic precursor solutions and rinsing before every immersion with double distilled water. In the present investigation, CuInS 2 films have been deposited using chemical deposition method. These films were characterized for their structural, surface morphological, compositional and electrical properties by using X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM), Rutherford back scattering (RBS), electrical resistivity and thermoemf measurement techniques.

  5. Structural and environmental dependence of superlow friction in ion vapour-deposited a-C : H : Si films for solid lubrication application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Xinchun; Kato, Takahisa; Kawaguchi, Masahiro; Nosaka, Masataka; Choi, Junho

    2013-06-01

    Understanding the tribochemical interaction of water molecules in humid environment with carbonaceous film surfaces, especially hydrophilic surface, is fundamental for applications in tribology and solid lubrication. This paper highlights some experimental evidence to elucidate the structural and environmental dependence of ultralow or even superlow friction in ion vapour-deposited a-C : H : Si films. The results indicate that both surface density of silicon hydroxyl group (Si-OH) and humidity level (RH) determine the frictional performance of a-C : H : Si films. Ultralow friction coefficient μ (˜0.01-0.055) is feasible in a wide range of RH. The dissociative formation of hydrophilic Si-OH surface and the following nanostructure of interfacial water molecules under contact pressure are the origin of ultralow friction for a-C : H : Si films in humid environment. The correlation between contact pressure and friction coefficient derived from Hertzian contact model is not valid in the present case. Under this nanoscale boundary lubrication, the friction coefficient tends to increase as the contact pressure increases. There even exists a contact pressure threshold for the transition from ultralow to superlow friction (μ ˜ 0.007). In comparison, when tribotested in dry N2, the observed superlow friction (μ ˜ 0.004) in the absence of water is correlated with the formation of a low shear strength tribolayer by wear-induced phase transformation.

  6. Chemical characterization of combustion deposits by TOF-SIMS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sjövall, P.; Lausmaa, J.; Tullin, C.; Högberg, J.

    2003-01-01

    We have investigated the potential usefulness of TOF-SIMS for chemical analysis of deposits formed in combustion reactors. By using TOF-SIMS, it was possible to (i) identify inorganic chemical compounds in the deposits, (ii) semi-quantitatively estimate the relative concentrations of the main constituents and (iii) obtain images showing the lateral distribution of the main constituents, on the surface and in cross-sections of deposit samples. It was found that the main components in the deposit samples were KCl and K 2SO 4, while K 2CO 3, NaCl, Na 2SO 4, Ca(OH) 2 and CaCl 2 were present in smaller concentrations. In addition, deposits from combustion of recycled wood chips contained considerable amounts of ZnCl 2, PbCl 2, ZnO and PbO. Large variations in the chemical composition were observed for different samples and throughout the cross-section of a single sample. The chlorides, in particular NaCl, were present mainly as particles, while the sulfates were more homogeneously distributed in the deposit. The results from this study show that TOF-SIMS analysis of combustion deposits can contribute significantly to an increased understanding of the formation and growth of deposits in combustion reactors.

  7. Chemical Vapor Deposition of Turbine Thermal Barrier Coatings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Haven, Victor E.

    1999-01-01

    Ceramic thermal barrier coatings extend the operating temperature range of actively cooled gas turbine components, therefore increasing thermal efficiency. Performance and lifetime of existing ceram ic coatings are limited by spallation during heating and cooling cycles. Spallation of the ceramic is a function of its microstructure, which is determined by the deposition method. This research is investigating metalorganic chemical vapor deposition (MOCVD) of yttria stabilized zirconia to improve performance and reduce costs relative to electron beam physical vapor deposition. Coatings are deposited in an induction-heated, low-pressure reactor at 10 microns per hour. The coating's composition, structure, and response to the turbine environment will be characterized.

  8. The chemical vapor deposition of zirconium carbide onto ceramic substrates

    SciTech Connect

    Glass, John A, Jr.; Palmisiano, Nick, Jr.; Welsh, R. Edward

    1999-07-01

    Zirconium carbide is an attractive ceramic material due to its unique properties such as high melting point, good thermal conductivity, and chemical resistance. The controlled preparation of zirconium carbide films of superstoichiometric, stoichiometric, and substoichiometric compositions has been achieved utilizing zirconium tetrachloride and methane precursor gases in an atmospheric pressure high temperature chemical vapor deposition system.

  9. Chemical vapor deposition reactor. [providing uniform film thickness

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chern, S. S.; Maserjian, J. (Inventor)

    1977-01-01

    An improved chemical vapor deposition reactor is characterized by a vapor deposition chamber configured to substantially eliminate non-uniformities in films deposited on substrates by control of gas flow and removing gas phase reaction materials from the chamber. Uniformity in the thickness of films is produced by having reactive gases injected through multiple jets which are placed at uniformally distributed locations. Gas phase reaction materials are removed through an exhaust chimney which is positioned above the centrally located, heated pad or platform on which substrates are placed. A baffle is situated above the heated platform below the mouth of the chimney to prevent downdraft dispersion and scattering of gas phase reactant materials.

  10. Synthesis of Diamond by Plasma-Enhanced Chemical Vapor Deposition.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, Jan-Jue

    Diamond possesses many desirable properties, e.g. high thermal conductivity, high electrical resistivity, high breakdown voltage, high resistance to chemical and radiation damage, high transparency over a wide range of optical spectrum, and extreme hardness. Thus diamond have high potential applicability in the fields of semiconductors, optical emitting materials, optical coating materials, abrasion, and high power and high frequency devices. To extend the range of applications, large-area uniformity and low temperature growth of diamond thin films has to be achieved. Low pressure deposition is one solution to the small area and nonuniformity problems of current diamond deposition methods. By decreasing the pressure, the mean free path of electrons becomes larger and the plasma covers a larger area. Low temperature deposition gives a smaller crystalline size of diamond, and hence improves the surface morphology of deposited films. To satisfy the supersaturation condition of diamond crystallization, low temperature growth should be performed at low pressure. This study experimentally investigates optimization of diamond growth at low pressure and low temperature by comparing three deposition systems (i.e. hot filament assisted, microwave induced plasma, and electron cyclotron resonance plasma chemical vapor deposition). The deposition system is designed to clearly show the effects of each experimental parameter on grown films. Thin diamond films were deposited on silicon substrates over a wide range of deposition parameters (e.g. CH _4 concentration 0-10%, substrate temperature 490-850^circC, total pressure 2-50 Torr, microwave power 0-1200 W). In addition, the effects of oxygen addition and substrate bias were studied. The diamond films were characterized by Raman spectroscopy and scanning electron microscopy, and the plasma was characterized by optical emission spectroscopy. Crystalline diamond was successfully deposited on silicon wafers at pressures as low as 2

  11. Metalorganic chemical vapor deposition of iron disulfide and its use for solar energy conversion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ennaoui, Ahmed; Fiechter, Sebastian; Vogel, Ralf; Giersig, M.; Weller, Horst; Tributsch, Helmut

    1992-12-01

    Thin polycrystalline films of iron disulfide have been grown on different substrates by chemical vapour deposition. The films were characterized using optical absorption and TEM. RBS and EDAX analysis has been used to explore the chemical stoichiometry. XRD and FTIR allowed the identification of both FeS2 phases pyrite and marcasite. A novel method for sensitization of highly porous Ti02 elecrodes with ultra thin (10-20 nm) polycrystalline films of FeS2 (pyrite) is presented. Photoelectrochemical solar cell using the above electrode generated high photovoltage of up to 600mV compared with single crystalline electrode (200 mV). In this device the semiconductor with a small band gap and high absorption coefficient (FeS2 pyrite; EG = 0.9 eV; a = 6 x 105 cm-1) absorbs the light and injects electrons into the conduction band the wide band gap semiconductor (Ti02 anatase; EG = 3.2 eV). Regeneration of holes is taking place by electron transfer from redox system in the electrolyte.

  12. Growth and properties of W-B-N diffusion barriers deposited by chemical vapor deposition

    SciTech Connect

    Fleming, J.G.; Roherty-Osmun, E.; Custer, J.; Smith, P.M.; Reid, J.S.; Nicolet, M.A.

    1995-10-01

    The authors have used chemical vapor deposition to grow ternary tungsten-based diffusion barriers to determine if they exhibit properties similar to those of sputter-deposited ternaries. A range of different W-B-N compositions in a band of compositions roughly between 20 and 40% W were produced. The deposition temperature was low, 350 C, and the precursors used are well accepted by the industry. Deposition rates are high for a diffusion barrier application. Resistivities range from 200 to 20,000 {micro}{Omega}-cm, the films with the best barrier properties having {approximately}1,000 {micro}{Omega}-cm resistivities. Adhesion to oxides is sufficient to allow these films to be used as the adhesion layer in a tungsten chemical mechanical polishing plug application. The films are x-ray amorphous as-deposited and have crystallization temperatures of up to 900 C. Barrier performance against Cu has been tested using diode test structures. A composition of W{sub .23}B{sub .49}N{sub .28} was able to prevent diode failure up to a 700 C, 30 minute anneal. These materials, deposited by CVD, display properties similar to those deposited by physical deposition techniques.

  13. Determination and characterization of phytochelatins by liquid chromatography coupled with on line chemical vapour generation and atomic fluorescence spectrometric detection.

    PubMed

    Bramanti, Emilia; Toncelli, Daniel; Morelli, Elisabetta; Lampugnani, Leonardo; Zamboni, Roberto; Miller, Keith E; Zemetra, Joseph; D'Ulivo, Alessandro

    2006-11-10

    Liquid chromatography (LC) coupled on line with UV/visible diode array detector (DAD) and cold vapour generation atomic fluorescence spectrometry (CVGAFS) has been developed for the speciation, determination and characterization of phytochelatins (PCs). The method is based on a bidimensional approach, e.g. on the analysis of synthetic PC solutions (apo-PCs and Cd(2+)-complexed PCs) (i) by size exclusion chromatography coupled to UV diode array detector (SEC-DAD); (ii) by the derivatization of PC -SH groups in SEC fractions by p-hydroxymercurybenzoate (PHMB) and the indirect detection of PC-PHMB complexes by reversed phase liquid chromatography coupled to atomic fluorescence detector (RPLC-CVGAFS). MALDI-TOF/MS (matrix assisted laser desorption ionization time of flight mass spectrometry) analysis of underivatized synthetic PC samples was performed in order have a qualitative information of their composition. Quantitative analysis of synthetic PC solutions has been performed on the basis of peak area of PC-PHMB complexes of the mercury specific chromatogram and calibration curve of standard solution of glutathione (GSH) complexed to PHMB (GS-PHMB). The limit of quantitation (LOQ) in terms of GS-PHMB complex was 90 nM (CV 5%) with an injection volume of 35 microL, corresponding to 3.2 pmol (0.97 ng) of GSH. The method has been applied to analysis of extracts of cell cultures from Phaeodactylum tricornutum grown in Cd-containing nutrient solutions, analysed by SEC-DAD-CVGAFS and RPLC-DAD-CVGAFS.

  14. Chemical Vapor Deposition of Aluminum Oxide Thin Films

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vohs, Jason K.; Bentz, Amy; Eleamos, Krystal; Poole, John; Fahlman, Bradley D.

    2010-01-01

    Chemical vapor deposition (CVD) is a process routinely used to produce thin films of materials via decomposition of volatile precursor molecules. Unfortunately, the equipment required for a conventional CVD experiment is not practical or affordable for many undergraduate chemistry laboratories, especially at smaller institutions. In an effort to…

  15. A novel induction heater for chemical vapor deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ong, C. W.; Wong, H. K.; Sin, K. S.; Yip, S. T.; Chik, K. P.

    1989-06-01

    We report how an induction cooker for household use can be modified for heating substrate or heating gases to high temperature in a chemical vapor deposition system. Only minor changes of the cooker are necessary. Stable substrate temperature as high as 900 °C was achieved with input power of about 1150 W.

  16. Chemical-vapor deposition of silicon from silane

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hsu, G. C.; Lutwack, R.; Praturi, A. K.

    1979-01-01

    Report lists tables of standard free-energy change, equilibrium constant, and heat of reaction for chemical vapor deposition (CVD) of silicon from silane over temperature range of 100 to 1000 K. Data indicates silicon CVD may be a commercially economical process for production of silicon for solar arrays and other applications.

  17. Modified chemical route for deposition of molybdenum disulphide thin films

    SciTech Connect

    Vyas, Akshay N. Sartale, S. D.

    2014-04-24

    Molybdenum disulphide (MoS{sub 2}) thin films were deposited on quartz substrates using a modified chemical route. Sodium molybdate and sodium sulphide were used as precursors for molybdenum and sulphur respectively. The route involves formation of tetrathiomolybdate ions (MoS{sub 4}{sup 2−}) and further reduction by sodium borohydride to form MoS{sub 2}. The deposition was performed at room temperature. The deposited films were annealed in argon atmosphere at 1073 K for 1 hour to improve its crystallinity. The deposited films were characterized using scanning electron microscopy (SEM) for morphology, UV-Vis absorption spectroscopy for optical studies and X-ray diffraction (XRD) for structure determination.

  18. SnS thin films deposited by chemical bath deposition, dip coating and SILAR techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chaki, Sunil H.; Chaudhary, Mahesh D.; Deshpande, M. P.

    2016-05-01

    The SnS thin films were synthesized by chemical bath deposition (CBD), dip coating and successive ionic layer adsorption and reaction (SILAR) techniques. In them, the CBD thin films were deposited at two temperatures: ambient and 70 °C. The energy dispersive analysis of X-rays (EDAX), X-ray diffraction (XRD), Raman spectroscopy, scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and optical spectroscopy techniques were used to characterize the thin films. The electrical transport properties studies on the as-deposited thin films were done by measuring the I-V characteristics, DC electrical resistivity variation with temperature and the room temperature Hall effect. The obtained results are deliberated in this paper.

  19. Chemical vapor deposition and atomic layer deposition of metal oxide and nitride thin films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barton, Jeffrey Thomas

    Processes for depositing thin films with various electronic, optical, mechanical, and chemical properties are indispensable in many industries today. Of the many deposition methods available, chemical vapor deposition (CVD) has proved over time to be one of the most flexible, efficient, and cost-effective. Atomic layer deposition (ALD) is a newer process that is gaining favor as a method for depositing films with excellent properties and unparalleled precision. This work describes the development of novel CVD and ALD processes to deposit a variety of materials. Hafnium oxide and zirconium oxide show promise as replacements for SiO 2 as gate dielectrics in future-generation transistors. These high-k materials would provide sufficient capacitance with layers thick enough to avoid leakage from tunneling. An ALD method is presented here for depositing conformal hafnium oxide from tetrakis-(diethylamido)hafnium and oxygen gas. A CVD method for depositing zirconium oxide from tetrakis-(dialkylamido)zirconium and either oxygen gas or water vapor is also described. The use of copper for interconnects in integrated circuits requires improved diffusion barrier materials, given its high diffusivity compared to the previously-used aluminum and tungsten. Tungsten nitride has a low resistivity among barrier materials, and can be deposited in amorphous films that are effective diffusion barriers in layers as thin as a few nanometers. Here we demonstrate CVD and plasma-enhanced CVD methods to deposit tungsten nitride films from bis-(dialkylamido)bis-( tert-butylimido)tungsten precursors and ammonia gas. Recent findings had shown uniform copper growth on tantalum silicate films, without the dewetting that usually occurs on oxide surfaces. Tantalum and tungsten silicates were deposited by a CVD reaction from the reaction of either tris-(diethylamido)ethylimido tantalum or bis-(ethylmethylamido)-bis-( tert-butylimido)tungsten with tris-(tert-butoxy)silanol. The ability of evaporated

  20. Chemically Deposited Thin-Film Solar Cell Materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Raffaelle, R.; Junek, W.; Gorse, J.; Thompson, T.; Harris, J.; Hehemann, D.; Hepp, A.; Rybicki, G.

    2005-01-01

    We have been working on the development of thin film photovoltaic solar cell materials that can be produced entirely by wet chemical methods on low-cost flexible substrates. P-type copper indium diselenide (CIS) absorber layers have been deposited via electrochemical deposition. Similar techniques have also allowed us to incorporate both Ga and S into the CIS structure, in order to increase its optical bandgap. The ability to deposit similar absorber layers with a variety of bandgaps is essential to our efforts to develop a multi-junction thin-film solar cell. Chemical bath deposition methods were used to deposit a cadmium sulfide (CdS) buffer layers on our CIS-based absorber layers. Window contacts were made to these CdS/CIS junctions by the electrodeposition of zinc oxide (ZnO). Structural and elemental determinations of the individual ZnO, CdS and CIS-based films via transmission spectroscopy, x-ray diffraction, x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and energy dispersive spectroscopy will be presented. The electrical characterization of the resulting devices will be discussed.

  1. Combustion chemical vapor deposited coatings for thermal barrier coating systems

    SciTech Connect

    Hampikian, J.M.; Carter, W.B.

    1995-12-31

    The new deposition process, combustion chemical vapor deposition, shows a great deal of promise in the area of thermal barrier coating systems. This technique produces dense, adherent coatings, and does not require a reaction chamber. Coatings can therefore be applied in the open atmosphere. The process is potentially suitable for producing high quality CVD coatings for use as interlayers between the bond coat and thermal barrier coating, and/or as overlayers, on top of thermal barrier coatings. In this report, the evaluation of alumina and ceria coatings on a nickel-chromium alloy is described.

  2. Chemical and Magnetic Order in Vapor-Deposited Metal Films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rooney, Peter Wiliam

    1995-01-01

    A stochastic Monte Carlo model of vapor deposition and growth of a crystalline, binary, A_3 B metallic alloy with a negative energy of mixing has been developed which incorporates deposition and surface diffusion in a physically correct manner and allows the simulation of deposition rates that are experimentally realizable. The effects of deposition rate and growth temperature on the development of short range order (SRO) in vapor-deposited films have been examined using this model. SRO in the simulated films increases with growth temperature up to the point at which the temperature corresponds to the energy of mixing, but we see no corresponding development of anisotropic SRO (preferential ordering of A-B pairs along the growth direction). Epitaxial (100) and (111) CoPt_3 films have been deposited over a range of growth temperatures from -50^circ C to 800^circC. Curie temperature (T_{rm c}) and saturation magnetization are dramatically enhanced in those films grown near 400^circ C over the values expected for the chemically homogeneous alloy. Magnetization data indicates that the high T _{rm c} films are inhomogeneous. These phenomena are interpreted as evidence of a previously unobserved magnetically driven miscibility gap in the Co-Pt phase diagram. Films grown near 400^circ C exhibit large uniaxial perpendicular magnetic anisotropy that cannot be accounted for by strain. The observed anisotropy coincides with the chemical phase separation and it seems likely that these two phenomena are related. Long range order (LRO) in the as-deposited films peaks at a growth temperature of 630^circC and then decreases with decreasing growth temperature. The decrease in LRO is either due to kinetic frustration or to competition from magnetically induced Co clustering. Theoretical phase diagrams based on the appropriate Blume-Emery-Griffiths Hamiltonian suggest the latter.

  3. Evaluation of water vapour assimilation in the tropical upper troposphere and lower stratosphere by a chemical transport model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Payra, Swagata; Ricaud, Philippe; Abida, Rachid; El Amraoui, Laaziz; Attié, Jean-Luc; Rivière, Emmanuel; Carminati, Fabien; von Clarmann, Thomas

    2016-09-01

    The present analysis deals with one of the most debated aspects of the studies on the upper troposphere/lower stratosphere (UTLS), namely the budget of water vapour (H2O) at the tropical tropopause. Within the French project "Multiscale water budget in the upper troposphere and lower stratosphere in the TROpics" (TRO-pico), a global-scale analysis has been set up based on space-borne observations, models and assimilation techniques. The MOCAGE-VALENTINA assimilation tool has been used to assimilate the Aura Microwave Limb Sounder (MLS) version 3.3 H2O measurements within the 316-5 hPa range from August 2011 to March 2013 with an assimilation window of 1 h. Diagnostics based on observations minus analysis and forecast are developed to assess the quality of the assimilated H2O fields. Comparison with an independent source of H2O measurements in the UTLS based on the space-borne Michelson Interferometer for Passive Atmospheric Sounding (MIPAS) observations and with meteorological ARPEGE analyses is also shown. Sensitivity studies of the analysed fields have been performed by (1) considering periods when no MLS measurements are available and (2) using H2O data from another MLS version (4.2). The studies have been performed within three different spaces in time and space coincidences with MLS (hereafter referred to as MLS space) and MIPAS (MIPAS space) observations and with the model (model space) outputs and at three different levels: 121 hPa (upper troposphere), 100 hPa (tropopause) and 68 hPa (lower stratosphere) in January and February 2012. In the MLS space, the analyses behave consistently with the MLS observations from the upper troposphere to the lower stratosphere. In the model space, the analyses are wetter than the reference atmosphere as represented by ARPEGE and MLS in the upper troposphere (121 hPa) and around the tropopause (100 hPa), but are consistent with MLS and MIPAS in the lower stratosphere (68 hPa). In the MIPAS space, the sensitivity and the

  4. Stress control of silicon nitride films deposited by plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Dong-ling; Feng, Xiao-fei; Wen, Zhi-yu; Shang, Zheng-guo; She, Yin

    2016-07-01

    Stress controllable silicon nitride (SiNx) films deposited by plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition (PECVD) are reported. Low stress SiNx films were deposited in both high frequency (HF) mode and dual frequency (HF/LF) mode. By optimizing process parameters, stress free (-0.27 MPa) SiNx films were obtained with the deposition rate of 45.5 nm/min and the refractive index of 2.06. Furthermore, at HF/LF mode, the stress is significantly influenced by LF ratio and LF power, and can be controlled to be 10 MPa with the LF ratio of 17% and LF power of 150 W. However, LF power has a little effect on the deposition rate due to the interaction between HF power and LF power. The deposited SiNx films have good mechanical and optical properties, low deposition temperature and controllable stress, and can be widely used in integrated circuit (IC), micro-electro-mechanical systems (MEMS) and bio-MEMS.

  5. Development and study of chemical vapor deposited tantalum base alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meier, G. H.; Bryant, W. A.

    1976-01-01

    A technique for the chemical vapor deposition of alloys was developed. The process, termed pulsing, involves the periodic injection of reactant gases into a previously-evacuated reaction chamber where they blanket the substrate almost instantaneously. Formation of alternating layers of the alloy components and subsequent homogenization allows the formation of an alloy of uniform composition with the composition being determined by the duration and relative numbers of the various cycles. The technique has been utilized to produce dense alloys of uniform thickness and composition (Ta- 10 wt % W) by depositing alternating layers of Ta and W by the hydrogen reduction of TaCl5 and WCl6. A similar attempt to deposit a Ta - 8 wt % W - 2 wt% Hf alloy was unsuccessful because of the difficulty in reducing HfCl4 at temperatures below those at which gas phase nucleation of Ta and W occurred.

  6. CHEMICAL SOLUTION DEPOSITION BASED OXIDE BUFFERS AND YBCO COATED CONDUCTORS

    SciTech Connect

    Paranthaman, Mariappan Parans

    2011-01-01

    We have reviewed briefly the growth of buffer and high temperature superconducting oxide thin films using a chemical solution deposition (CSD) method. In the Rolling-Assisted Biaxially Textured Substrates (RABiTS) process, developed at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, utilizes the thermo mechanical processing to obtain the flexible, biaxially oriented copper, nickel or nickel-alloy substrates. Buffers and Rare Earth Barium Copper Oxide (REBCO) superconductors have been deposited epitaxially on the textured nickel alloy substrates. The starting substrate serves as a template for the REBCO layer, which has substantially fewer weak links. Buffer layers play a major role in fabricating the second generation REBCO wire technology. The main purpose of the buffer layers is to provide a smooth, continuous and chemically inert surface for the growth of the REBCO film, while transferring the texture from the substrate to the superconductor layer. To achieve this, the buffer layers need to be epitaxial to the substrate, i.e. they have to nucleate and grow in the same bi-axial texture provided by the textured metal foil. The most commonly used RABiTS multi-layer architectures consist of a starting template of biaxially textured Ni-5 at.% W (Ni-W) substrate with a seed (first) layer of Yttrium Oxide (Y2O3), a barrier (second) layer of Yttria Stabilized Zirconia (YSZ), and a Cerium Oxide (CeO2) cap (third) layer. These three buffer layers are generally deposited using physical vapor deposition (PVD) techniques such as reactive sputtering. On top of the PVD template, REBCO film is then grown by a chemical solution deposition. This article reviews in detail about the list of oxide buffers and superconductor REBCO films grown epitaxially on single crystal and/or biaxially textured Ni-W substrates using a CSD method.

  7. Self-organization and nanostructure formation in chemical vapor deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walgraef, Daniel

    2013-10-01

    When thin films are grown on a substrate by chemical vapor deposition, the evolution of the first deposited layers may be described, on mesoscopic scales, by dynamical models of the reaction-diffusion type. For monatomic layers, such models describe the evolution of atomic coverage due to the combined effect of reaction terms representing adsorption-desorption and chemical processes and nonlinear diffusion terms that are of the Cahn-Hilliard type. This combination may lead, below a critical temperature, to the instability of uniform deposited layers. This instability triggers the formation of nanostructures corresponding to regular spatial variations of substrate coverage. Patterns wavelengths and symmetries are selected by dynamical variables and not by variational arguments. According to the balance between reaction- and diffusion-induced nonlinearities, a succession of nanostructures including hexagonal arrays of dots, stripes, and localized structures of various types may be obtained. These structures may initiate different growth mechanisms, including Volmer-Weber and Frank-Van der Merwe types of growth. The relevance of this approach to the study of deposited layers of different species is discussed.

  8. Self-organization and nanostructure formation in chemical vapor deposition.

    PubMed

    Walgraef, Daniel

    2013-10-01

    When thin films are grown on a substrate by chemical vapor deposition, the evolution of the first deposited layers may be described, on mesoscopic scales, by dynamical models of the reaction-diffusion type. For monatomic layers, such models describe the evolution of atomic coverage due to the combined effect of reaction terms representing adsorption-desorption and chemical processes and nonlinear diffusion terms that are of the Cahn-Hilliard type. This combination may lead, below a critical temperature, to the instability of uniform deposited layers. This instability triggers the formation of nanostructures corresponding to regular spatial variations of substrate coverage. Patterns wavelengths and symmetries are selected by dynamical variables and not by variational arguments. According to the balance between reaction- and diffusion-induced nonlinearities, a succession of nanostructures including hexagonal arrays of dots, stripes, and localized structures of various types may be obtained. These structures may initiate different growth mechanisms, including Volmer-Weber and Frank-Van der Merwe types of growth. The relevance of this approach to the study of deposited layers of different species is discussed. PMID:24229187

  9. Single nitrogen vacancy centers in chemical vapor deposited diamond nanocrystals.

    PubMed

    Rabeau, J R; Stacey, A; Rabeau, A; Prawer, S; Jelezko, F; Mirza, I; Wrachtrup, J

    2007-11-01

    Nanodiamond crystals containing single color centers have been grown by chemical vapor deposition (CVD). The fluorescence from individual crystallites was directly correlated with crystallite size using a combined atomic force and scanning confocal fluorescence microscope. Under the conditions employed, the optimal size for single optically active nitrogen-vacancy (NV) center incorporation was measured to be 60-70 nm. The findings highlight a strong dependence of NV incorporation on crystal size, particularly with crystals less than 50 nm in size.

  10. Research on chemical vapor deposition processes for advanced ceramic coatings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rosner, Daniel E.

    1993-01-01

    Our interdisciplinary background and fundamentally-oriented studies of the laws governing multi-component chemical vapor deposition (VD), particle deposition (PD), and their interactions, put the Yale University HTCRE Laboratory in a unique position to significantly advance the 'state-of-the-art' of chemical vapor deposition (CVD) R&D. With NASA-Lewis RC financial support, we initiated a program in March of 1988 that has led to the advances described in this report (Section 2) in predicting chemical vapor transport in high temperature systems relevant to the fabrication of refractory ceramic coatings for turbine engine components. This Final Report covers our principal results and activities for the total NASA grant of $190,000. over the 4.67 year period: 1 March 1988-1 November 1992. Since our methods and the technical details are contained in the publications listed (9 Abstracts are given as Appendices) our emphasis here is on broad conclusions/implications and administrative data, including personnel, talks, interactions with industry, and some known applications of our work.

  11. Modeling and Simulation of Plasma Enhanced Chemical Vapor Deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, Aaron; Bett, Dominic; Cunningham, Monisha; Sen, Sudip

    2015-04-01

    Plasma Enhanced Chemical Vapor Deposition (PECVD) is a process used to deposit thin films from a gas state (vapor) to a solid state on a substrate. Recent study from the X-ray diffraction spectra of SnO2 films deposited as a function of RF power apparently indicates that RF power is playing a stabilizing role and hence in the better deposition. The results show that the RF power results in smoother morphology, improved crystallinity, and lower sheet resistance value in the PECVD process. The PECVD processing allows deposition at lower temperatures, which is often critical in the manufacture of semiconductors. In this talk we will address two aspects of the problem, first to develop a model to study the mechanism of how the PECVD is effected by the RF power, and second to actually simulate the effect of RF power on PECVD. As the PECVD is a very important component of the plasma processing technology with many applications in the semiconductor technology and surface science, the research proposed here has the prospect to revolutionize the plasma processing technology through the stabilizing role of the RF power.

  12. A high temperature, plasma-assisted chemical vapor deposition system

    SciTech Connect

    Brusasco, R.M.; Britten, J.A.; Thorsness, C.B.; Scrivener, M.S.; Unites, W.G.; Campbell, J.H. ); Johnson, W.L. )

    1990-02-01

    We have designed and built a high-temperature, plasma-assisted, chemical vapor deposition system to deposit multilayer optical coatings of SiO{sub 2} and doped-SiO{sub 2} flat substrates. The coater concept and design is an outgrowth of our recent work with Schott Glasswerke demonstrating the use of plasma assisted CVD to prepare very high damage threshold optical coatings. The coater is designed to deposit up to several thousand alternating quarterwave layers of SiO{sub 2} and doped SiO{sub 2} substrate at deposition rates up to several microns per minute. The substrate is resistively heated to about 1000{degree}C during the deposition phase of the process. The plasma is driven by a 13.56 MHz RF unit capable of producing power densities of up to 140 W cm{sup {minus}3} in the reaction zone. The coater is designed to be adaptable to microwave generated plasmas, as well as RF. Reactant gas flow rates of up to 10 slm can be achieved at a 10 tar operating pressure. Reactants consist of O{sub 2}, SiCl{sub 4} and a volatile halogenated dopant. These gases react in the plasma volume producing SiO{sub 2} with dopant concentrations of up to a few percent. A variable dopant concentration is used to produce index differences between adjacent optical layers.

  13. Deposition of Silicon-Based Dielectrics by Remote Plasma-Enhanced Chemical Vapor Deposition.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsu, David Vincent

    1989-03-01

    This thesis discusses the deposition of amorphous silicon-based thin-film dielectrics, including silicon dioxide (SiO_2), silicon nitride (Si_3N_4) and silicon oxynitride (SiO_{rm x}N_{rm y} ), by the remote plasma-enhanced chemical vapor -deposition (Remote PECVD) technique. It is possible to deposit these films at low substrate temperatures (100 ^circC-500^ circC) without exposing the film and substrate to energetic plasma species. The oxides produced in this way have been shown to be of "gate" quality. Two issues are addressed, the atomic structure and composition of the deposited films, and the deposition mechanism. The thin films were analyzed by infrared and Auger electron spectroscopies, and the gas phase species during deposition were analyzed in a Deposition/Analysis System which includes mass spectrometry (MS) and optical emission spectroscopy (OES). A description of the deposition system is given as well as how this technique differs from the widely used Direct PECVD process. In the Direct process, all of the reactant gases are plasma excited and the substrate is exposed to the plasma. In the Remote process, the gases are selectively excited and the substrate is remote from the plasma region. We show that these differences in the Remote process, as compared to the Direct process, results in a significant increase in the ability to control both the film stoichiometry and the level of incorporated impurities, in particular bonded hydrogen. The Remote process is a four step process: (1) plasma excitation of a mixture of one of the reactant gases (e.g., either NH_3 or O _2, respectively, for nitrides and oxides) with He or Ar; (2) extraction of the activated species out of the plasma region into the deposition chamber; (3) mixing, or interacting, with the other reactant gas (SiH _4), which is injected into the chamber below the plasma region; and (4) deposition on a heated substrate. It had initially been proposed that in the mixing step, precursors were

  14. Lattice Matched Iii-V IV Semiconductor Heterostructures: Metalorganic Chemical Vapor Deposition and Remote Plasma Enhanced Chemical Vapor Deposition.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, Sungwoo

    1992-01-01

    This thesis describes the growth and characterization of wide gap III-V compound semiconductors such as aluminum gallium arsenide (Al_{rm x} Ga_{rm 1-x}As), gallium nitride (GaN), and gallium phosphide (GaP), deposited by the metalorganic chemical vapor deposition (MOCVD) and remote plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition (Remote PECVD). In the first part of the thesis, the optimization of GaAs and Al_{rm x}Ga _{rm 1-x}As hetero -epitaxial layers on Ge substrates is described in the context of the application in the construction of cascade solar cells. The emphasis on this study is on the trade-offs in the choice of the temperature related to increasing interdiffusion/autodoping and increasing perfection of the epilayer with increasing temperature. The structural, chemical, optical, and electrical properties of the heterostructures are characterized by x-ray rocking curve measurement, scanning electron microscopy (SEM), electron beam induced current (EBIC), cross-sectional transmission electron microscopy (X-TEM), Raman spectroscopy, secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS), and steady-state and time-resolved photoluminescence (PL). Based on the results of this work the optimum growth temperature is 720^circC. The second part of the thesis describes the growth of GaN and GaP layers on silicon and sapphire substrates and the homoepitaxy of GaP by remote PECVD. I have designed and built an ultra high vacuum (UHV) deposition system which includes: the gas supply system, the pumping system, the deposition chamber, the load-lock chamber, and the waste disposal system. The work on the deposition of GaN on Si and sapphire focuses onto the understanding of the growth kinetics. In addition, Auger electron spectroscopy (AES) for surface analysis, x-ray diffraction methods and microscopic analyses using SEM and TEM for structural characterization, infrared (IR) and ultraviolet (UV) absorption measurements for optical characterization, and electrical characterization results

  15. Passivation properties of aluminum oxide films deposited by mist chemical vapor deposition for solar cell applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miki, Shohei; Iguchi, Koji; Kitano, Sho; Hayakashi, Koki; Hotta, Yasushi; Yoshida, Haruhiko; Ogura, Atsushi; Satoh, Shin-ichi; Arafune, Koji

    2015-08-01

    Aluminum oxide (AlOx) films were deposited by mist chemical vapor deposition (MCVD) in air for p-type crystalline silicon, and the effects of the deposition temperature (Tdep) and AlOx film thickness on the maximum surface recombination velocities (Smax) were evaluated. It was found that Smax was improved with increasing Tdep. The AlOx film deposited at 400 °C exhibited the best Smax value of 2.8 cm/s, and the passivation quality was comparable to that of AlOx deposited by other vacuum-based techniques. Smax was also improved with increasing film thickness. When the film thickness was above 10 nm, Smax was approximately 10 cm/s. From the Fourier transform infrared spectra, it was found that the AlOx films deposited by MCVD consisted of an AlOx layer and a Si-diffused AlOx layer. In addition, it is important for the layers to be thick enough to obtain high-quality passivation.

  16. Modeling of InP metalorganic chemical vapor deposition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Black, Linda R.; Clark, Ivan O.; Kui, J.; Jesser, William A.

    1991-01-01

    The growth of InP by metalorganic chemical vapor deposition (MOCVD) in a horizontal reactor is being modeled with a commercially available computational fluid dynamics modeling code. The mathematical treatment of the MOCVD process has four primary areas of concern: 1) transport phenomena, 2) chemistry, 3) boundary conditions, and 4) numerical solution methods. The transport processes involved in CVD are described by conservation of total mass, momentum, energy, and atomic species. Momentum conservation is described by a generalized form of the Navier-Stokes equation for a Newtonian fluid and laminar flow. The effect of Soret diffusion on the transport of particular chemical species and on the predicted deposition rate is examined. Both gas-phase and surface chemical reactions are employed in the model. Boundary conditions are specified at the inlet and walls of the reactor for temperature, fluid flow and chemical species. The coupled set of equations described above is solved by a finite difference method over a nonuniform rectilinear grid in both two and three dimensions. The results of the 2-D computational model is presented for gravity levels of zero- and one-g. The predicted growth rates at one-g are compared to measured growth rates on fused silica substrates.

  17. Chemical vapor deposition modeling for high temperature materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goekoglu, Sueleyman

    1992-01-01

    The formalism for the accurate modeling of chemical vapor deposition (CVD) processes has matured based on the well established principles of transport phenomena and chemical kinetics in the gas phase and on surfaces. The utility and limitations of such models are discussed in practical applications for high temperature structural materials. Attention is drawn to the complexities and uncertainties in chemical kinetics. Traditional approaches based on only equilibrium thermochemistry and/or transport phenomena are defended as useful tools, within their validity, for engineering purposes. The role of modeling is discussed within the context of establishing the link between CVD process parameters and material microstructures/properties. It is argued that CVD modeling is an essential part of designing CVD equipment and controlling/optimizing CVD processes for the production and/or coating of high performance structural materials.

  18. Effect of gas flow rates on the anatase-rutile transformation temperature of nanocrystalline TiO2 synthesised by chemical vapour synthesis.

    PubMed

    Ahmad, Md Imteyaz; Bhattacharya, S S; Fasel, Claudia; Hahn, Horst

    2009-09-01

    Of the three crystallographic allotropes of nanocrystalline titania (rutile, anatase and brookite), anatase exhibits the greatest potential for a variety of applications, especially in the area of catalysis and sensors. However, with rutile being thermodynamically the most stable phase, anatase tends to transform into rutile on heating to temperatures in the range of 500 degrees C to 700 degrees C. Efforts made to stabilize the anatase phase at higher temperatures by doping with metal oxides suffer from the problems of having a large amorphous content on synthesis as well as the formation of secondary impurity phases on doping. Recent studies have suggested that the as-synthesised phase composition, crystallite size, initial surface area and processing conditions greatly influence the anatase to rutile transformation temperature. In this study nanocrystalline titania was synthesised in the anatase form bya chemical vapour synthesis (CVS) method using titanium tetra iso-propoxide (TTIP) as a precursor under varying flow rates of oxygen and helium. The anatase to rutile transformation was studied using high temperature X-ray diffraction (HTXRD) and simultaneous thermogravimetric analysis (STA), followed by transmission electron microscopy (TEM). It was demonstrated that the anatase-rutile transformation temperatures were dependent on the oxygen to helium flow rate ratio during CVS and the results are presented and discussed. PMID:19928267

  19. Characterization of nanocarbon deposited on insulator substrate by alcohol chemical vapor deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsujimoto, Marina; Murata, Hidenobu; Tachibana, Masaru

    2016-10-01

    Single-layer-graphene-like nanocarbon materials were directly deposited on c-plane sapphire substrates by thermal chemical vapor deposition with ethanol as a carbon source. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) images show that the deposited materials have sheetlike grains of around 100 nm diameter. Most of them have “hills” with 32 nm diameter on the grains. According to atomic force microscopy (AFM) observation, the height of the sheetlike grains is below 1 nm, which is comparable to that of single-layer graphene, while the hills have a height of several nm. Raman spectra show that the material is similar to graphitic nanocarbon, which has a strong D band. This result implies that there are a number of defects in the nanocarbon materials.

  20. Aerosol chemical vapor deposition of metal oxide films

    DOEpatents

    Ott, Kevin C.; Kodas, Toivo T.

    1994-01-01

    A process of preparing a film of a multicomponent metal oxide including: forming an aerosol from a solution comprised of a suitable solvent and at least two precursor compounds capable of volatilizing at temperatures lower than the decomposition temperature of said precursor compounds; passing said aerosol in combination with a suitable oxygen-containing carrier gas into a heated zone, said heated zone having a temperature sufficient to evaporate the solvent and volatilize said precursor compounds; and passing said volatilized precursor compounds against the surface of a substrate, said substrate having a sufficient temperature to decompose said volatilized precursor compounds whereby metal atoms contained within said volatilized precursor compounds are deposited as a metal oxide film upon the substrate is disclosed. In addition, a coated article comprising a multicomponent metal oxide film conforming to the surface of a substrate selected from the group consisting of silicon, magnesium oxide, yttrium-stabilized zirconium oxide, sapphire, or lanthanum gallate, said multicomponent metal oxide film characterized as having a substantially uniform thickness upon said FIELD OF THE INVENTION The present invention relates to the field of film coating deposition techniques, and more particularly to the deposition of multicomponent metal oxide films by aerosol chemical vapor deposition. This invention is the result of a contract with the Department of Energy (Contract No. W-7405-ENG-36).

  1. Deposition of thermal and hot-wire chemical vapor deposition copper thin films on patterned substrates.

    PubMed

    Papadimitropoulos, G; Davazoglou, D

    2011-09-01

    In this work we study the hot-wire chemical vapor deposition (HWCVD) of copper films on blanket and patterned substrates at high filament temperatures. A vertical chemical vapor deposition reactor was used in which the chemical reactions were assisted by a tungsten filament heated at 650 degrees C. Hexafluoroacetylacetonate Cu(I) trimethylvinylsilane (CupraSelect) vapors were used, directly injected into the reactor with the aid of a liquid injection system using N2 as carrier gas. Copper thin films grown also by thermal and hot-wire CVD. The substrates used were oxidized silicon wafers on which trenches with dimensions of the order of 500 nm were formed and subsequently covered with LPCVD W. HWCVD copper thin films grown at filament temperature of 650 degrees C showed higher growth rates compared to the thermally ones. They also exhibited higher resistivities than thermal and HWCVD films grown at lower filament temperatures. Thermally grown Cu films have very uniform deposition leading to full coverage of the patterned substrates while the HWCVD films exhibited a tendency to vertical growth, thereby creating gaps and incomplete step coverage. PMID:22097561

  2. Fabrication of tin-filled carbon nanofibres by microwave plasma vapour deposition and their in situ heating observation by environmental transmission electron microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tokunaga, Tomoharu; Kanematsu, Takumi; Ito, Takahumi; Ota, Takahisa; Hayashi, Yasuhiko; Sasaki, Katsuhiro; Yamamoto, Takahisa

    2013-06-01

    Sn-filled carbon nanofibres (CNFs) are fabricated by microwave plasma chemical deposition. Scanning electron microscopy observations revealed the existence of a Sn island under the CNFs. The structure of the CNFs is investigated, and the behaviour of Sn in the internal space of CNFs is revealed by performing in situ heating observations by environmental transmission electron microscopy (ETEM). ETEM observations reveal that they have low-crystallized carbon wall and Sn occupies not only the CNF's internal space but also its carbon wall. The Sn inside the CNF is completely covered by the carbon wall. Further, the in situ heating observations reveal that Sn within the internal space and the carbon wall of the CNFs diffused to the outside during heating. Moreover, it is found that higher membered carbon rings and defects in the graphite layer act as diffusion routes between disordered carbon layers.

  3. Fabrication of tin-filled carbon nanofibres by microwave plasma vapour deposition and their in situ heating observation by environmental transmission electron microscopy

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Sn-filled carbon nanofibres (CNFs) are fabricated by microwave plasma chemical deposition. Scanning electron microscopy observations revealed the existence of a Sn island under the CNFs. The structure of the CNFs is investigated, and the behaviour of Sn in the internal space of CNFs is revealed by performing in situ heating observations by environmental transmission electron microscopy (ETEM). ETEM observations reveal that they have low-crystallized carbon wall and Sn occupies not only the CNF’s internal space but also its carbon wall. The Sn inside the CNF is completely covered by the carbon wall. Further, the in situ heating observations reveal that Sn within the internal space and the carbon wall of the CNFs diffused to the outside during heating. Moreover, it is found that higher membered carbon rings and defects in the graphite layer act as diffusion routes between disordered carbon layers. PMID:23810032

  4. Deposition of nanocrystalline SiC films using helicon wave plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Wanbing; Yu, Wei; Ma, Luo; Wu, Liping; Fu, Guangsheng

    2008-11-01

    Hydrogenated nanocrystalline SiC films have been deposited by using helicon wave plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition (HW-PECVD) in H2, SiH4 and CH4 gas mixtures at different RF powers. Their structural and optical properties have been investigated by Fourier transform infrared absorption (FTIR), atomic force microscopy (AFM) and ultraviolet-visible (UV-VIS) transmission spectra. The results indicate that RF power has an important influence on properties of the deposited films. It is found that in a 300 °C low substrate temperature, only amorphous SiC can be deposited at the radio frequency (RF) power of lower than 400 W, while nanocrystalline SiC can be grown at the RF power of equal to or higher than 400 W. The analyses show that the high plasma density of helicon wave plasma source and the high hydrogen dilution condition are two key factors for depositing nanocrystalline SiC films at a low temperature.

  5. Electrical and chemical characterization of FIB-deposited insulators

    SciTech Connect

    Campbell, A.N.; Tanner, D.M.; Soden, J.M.; Adams, E.; Gibson, M.; Abramo, M.; Doyle, A.; Stewart, D.K.

    1997-10-01

    The electrical and chemical properties of insulators produced by codeposition of siloxane compounds or TEOS with oxygen in a focused ion beam (FIB) system were investigated. Metal-insulator-metal capacitor structures were fabricated and tested. Specifically, leakage current and breakdown voltage were measured and used to calculate the effective resistance and breakdown field. Capacitance measurements were performed on a subset of the structures. It was found that the siloxane-based FIB-insulators had superior electrical properties to those based on TEOS. Microbeam Rutherford backscattering spectrometry analysis and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy were used to characterize the films and to help understand the differences in electrical behavior as a function of gas chemistry and deposition conditions. Finally, a comparison is made between the results presented here, previous results for FIB-deposited insulators, and typical thermally-grown gate oxides and interlevel dielectric SiO{sub 2} insulators.

  6. Chemical vapor deposition of low reflective cobalt (II) oxide films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amin-Chalhoub, Eliane; Duguet, Thomas; Samélor, Diane; Debieu, Olivier; Ungureanu, Elisabeta; Vahlas, Constantin

    2016-01-01

    Low reflective CoO coatings are processed by chemical vapor deposition from Co2(CO)8 at temperatures between 120 °C and 190 °C without additional oxygen source. The optical reflectivity in the visible and near infrared regions stems from 2 to 35% depending on deposition temperature. The combination of specific microstructural features of the coatings, namely a fractal "cauliflower" morphology and a grain size distribution more or less covering the near UV and IR wavelength ranges enhance light scattering and gives rise to a low reflectivity. In addition, the columnar morphology results in a density gradient in the vertical direction that we interpret as a refractive index gradient lowering reflectivity further down. The coating formed at 180 °C shows the lowest average reflectivity (2.9%), and presents an interesting deep black diffuse aspect.

  7. Synthesis of mullite coatings by chemical vapor deposition

    SciTech Connect

    Mulpuri, R.P.; Auger, M.; Sarin, V.K.

    1996-08-01

    Formation of mullite on ceramic substrates via chemical vapor deposition was investigated. Mullite is a solid solution of Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} and SiO{sub 2} with a composition of 3Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}{circ}2SiO{sub 2}. Thermodynamic calculations performed on the AlCl{sub 3}-SiCl{sub 4}-CO{sub 2}-H{sub 2} system were used to construct equilibrium CVD phase diagrams. With the aid of these diagrams and consideration of kinetic rate limiting factors, initial process parameters were determined. Through process optimization, crystalline CVD mullite coatings have been successfully grown on SiC and Si{sub 3}N{sub 4} substrates. Results from the thermodynamic analysis, process optimization, and effect of various process parameters on deposition rate and coating morphology are discussed.

  8. Optimization of chemical displacement deposition of copper on porous silicon.

    PubMed

    Bandarenka, Hanna; Redko, Sergey; Nenzi, Paolo; Balucani, Marco; Bondarenko, Vitaly

    2012-11-01

    Copper (II) sulfate was used as a source of copper to achieve uniform distribution of Cu particles deposited on porous silicon. Layers of the porous silicon were formed by electrochemical anodization of Si wafers in a mixture of HF, C3H7OH and deionized water. The well-known chemical displacement technique was modified to grow the copper particles of specific sizes. SEM and XRD analysis revealed that the outer surface of the porous silicon was covered with copper particles of the crystal orientation inherited from the planes of porous silicon skeleton. The copper crystals were found to have the cubic face centering elementary cell. In addition, the traces of Cu2O cubic primitive crystalline phases were identified. The dimensions of Cu particles were determined by the Feret's analysis of the SEM images. The sizes of the particles varied widely from a few to hundreds of nanometers. A phenomenological model of copper deposition was proposed.

  9. Chemical Vapor Deposited Zinc Sulfide. SPIE Press Monograph

    SciTech Connect

    McCloy, John S.; Tustison, Randal W.

    2013-04-22

    Zinc sulfide has shown unequaled utility for infrared windows that require a combination of long-wavelength infrared transparency, mechanical durability, and elevated-temperature performance. This book reviews the physical properties of chemical vapor deposited ZnS and their relationship to the CVD process that produced them. An in-depth look at the material microstructure is included, along with a discussion of the material's optical properties. Finally, because the CVD process itself is central to the development of this material, a brief history is presented.

  10. Plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition of multiwalled carbon nanofibers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Matthews, Kristopher; Cruden, Brett A.; Chen, Bin; Meyyappan, M.; Delzeit, Lance

    2002-01-01

    Plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition is used to grow vertically aligned multiwalled carbon nanofibers (MWNFs). The graphite basal planes in these nanofibers are not parallel as in nanotubes; instead they exhibit a small angle resembling a stacked cone arrangement. A parametric study with varying process parameters such as growth temperature, feedstock composition, and substrate power has been conducted, and these parameters are found to influence the growth rate, diameter, and morphology. The well-aligned MWNFs are suitable for fabricating electrode systems in sensor and device development.

  11. Microwave transmission properties of chemical vapor deposition graphene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Yunqiu; Xu, Yuehang; Wang, Zegao; Xu, Cao; Tang, Zongxi; Chen, Yuanfu; Xu, Ruimin

    2012-07-01

    In this letter, the microwave transmission properties of graphene grown by the chemical vapor deposition are studied by using a multiple-layer coplanar-waveguide transmission-line based measurement method. Remarkable energy loss and phase shift have been observed in graphene from the measured scattering parameters through vector network analyzer. The effective permittivity is deduced by partial-capacitance technique, and the complex permittivity of graphene are extracted in the frequency range of 500 MHz to 6 GHz. Different from conventional dielectric material, the permittivity of graphene shows frequency-dependent below 4 GHz and has an magnitude larger than 104 for both real and imaginary parts.

  12. Direct fabrication of 3D graphene on nanoporous anodic alumina by plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition

    PubMed Central

    Zhan, Hualin; Garrett, David J.; Apollo, Nicholas V.; Ganesan, Kumaravelu; Lau, Desmond; Prawer, Steven; Cervenka, Jiri

    2016-01-01

    High surface area electrode materials are of interest for a wide range of potential applications such as super-capacitors and electrochemical cells. This paper describes a fabrication method of three-dimensional (3D) graphene conformally coated on nanoporous insulating substrate with uniform nanopore size. 3D graphene films were formed by controlled graphitization of diamond-like amorphous carbon precursor films, deposited by plasma-enhanced chemical vapour deposition (PECVD). Plasma-assisted graphitization was found to produce better quality graphene than a simple thermal graphitization process. The resulting 3D graphene/amorphous carbon/alumina structure has a very high surface area, good electrical conductivity and exhibits excellent chemically stability, providing a good material platform for electrochemical applications. Consequently very large electrochemical capacitance values, as high as 2.1 mF for a sample of 10 mm3, were achieved. The electrochemical capacitance of the material exhibits a dependence on bias voltage, a phenomenon observed by other groups when studying graphene quantum capacitance. The plasma-assisted graphitization, which dominates the graphitization process, is analyzed and discussed in detail. PMID:26805546

  13. Direct fabrication of 3D graphene on nanoporous anodic alumina by plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhan, Hualin; Garrett, David J.; Apollo, Nicholas V.; Ganesan, Kumaravelu; Lau, Desmond; Prawer, Steven; Cervenka, Jiri

    2016-01-01

    High surface area electrode materials are of interest for a wide range of potential applications such as super-capacitors and electrochemical cells. This paper describes a fabrication method of three-dimensional (3D) graphene conformally coated on nanoporous insulating substrate with uniform nanopore size. 3D graphene films were formed by controlled graphitization of diamond-like amorphous carbon precursor films, deposited by plasma-enhanced chemical vapour deposition (PECVD). Plasma-assisted graphitization was found to produce better quality graphene than a simple thermal graphitization process. The resulting 3D graphene/amorphous carbon/alumina structure has a very high surface area, good electrical conductivity and exhibits excellent chemically stability, providing a good material platform for electrochemical applications. Consequently very large electrochemical capacitance values, as high as 2.1 mF for a sample of 10 mm3, were achieved. The electrochemical capacitance of the material exhibits a dependence on bias voltage, a phenomenon observed by other groups when studying graphene quantum capacitance. The plasma-assisted graphitization, which dominates the graphitization process, is analyzed and discussed in detail.

  14. ZnS nanoflakes deposition by modified chemical method

    SciTech Connect

    Desai, Mangesh A. Sartale, S. D.

    2014-04-24

    We report deposition of zinc sulfide nanoflakes on glass substrates by modified chemical method. The modified chemical method involves adsorption of zinc–thiourea complex on the substrate and its dissociation in presence of hydroxide ions to release sulfur ions from thiourea which react with zinc ions present in the complex to form zinc sulfide nanoflakes at room temperature. Influence of zinc salt and thiourea concentrations ratios on the morphology of the films was investigated by scanning electron microscope (SEM). The ratio of zinc and thiourea in the zinc–thiourea complex significantly affect the size of the zinc sulfide nanoflakes, especially width and density of the nanoflakes. The X-ray diffraction analysis exhibits polycrystalline nature of the zinc sulfide nanoflakes with hexagonal phase.

  15. Optimized chemical vapor deposition of borophosphosilicate glass films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kern, W.; Kurylo, W. A.; Tino, C. J.

    1985-06-01

    The optimization of atmospheric-pressure chemical vapor deposition (APCVD) of borophosphosilicate glass (BPSG) to produce glass films with few particle containments is discussed. The tests that were conducted in order to determine the optimum deposition temperature and proper oxygen/hydride ratio are explained. A decrease in deposition temperature and an increase in the oxygen/hydride ratio maximized the APCVD reaction. The techniques used to analyze the composition of BPSG after densification are described; the tests revealed that the elemental composition of BPSG was not altered by APCVD. An explanation of the film profiling technique used to determine the stability of BPSG films during processing is provided; BPSG films remain stable if they are densified or fused prior to the application of wet treatments. A comparison of conventional tube-furnace heating with rapid isothermal heating for fusion flow of BPSG is presented; fusion tapering by rapid heating was attained in 30 seconds at 175 C versus 30 minutes for tube heating.

  16. Quantitative study on the chemical solution deposition of zinc oxysulfide

    DOE PAGES

    Reinisch, Michael; Perkins, Craig L.; Steirer, K. Xerxes

    2015-11-21

    Zinc Oxysulfide (ZnOS) has demonstrated potential in the last decade to replace CdS as a buffer layer material since it is a wide-band-gap semiconductor with performance advantages over CdS (Eg = 2.4 eV) in the near UV-range for solar energy conversion. However, questions remain on the growth mechanisms of chemical bath deposited ZnOS. In this study, a detailed model is employed to calculate solubility diagrams that describe simple conditions for complex speciation control using only ammonium hydroxide without additional base. For these conditions, ZnOS is deposited via aqueous solution deposition on a quartz crystal microbalance in a continuous flow cell.more » Data is used to analyze the growth rate dependence on temperature and also to elucidate the effects of dimethylsulfoxide (DMSO) when used as a co-solvent. Activation energies (EA) of ZnOS are calculated for different flow rates and solution compositions. As a result, the measured EA relationships are affected by changes in the primary growth mechanism when DMSO is included.« less

  17. Quantitative study on the chemical solution deposition of zinc oxysulfide

    SciTech Connect

    Reinisch, Michael; Perkins, Craig L.; Steirer, K. Xerxes

    2015-11-21

    Zinc Oxysulfide (ZnOS) has demonstrated potential in the last decade to replace CdS as a buffer layer material since it is a wide-band-gap semiconductor with performance advantages over CdS (Eg = 2.4 eV) in the near UV-range for solar energy conversion. However, questions remain on the growth mechanisms of chemical bath deposited ZnOS. In this study, a detailed model is employed to calculate solubility diagrams that describe simple conditions for complex speciation control using only ammonium hydroxide without additional base. For these conditions, ZnOS is deposited via aqueous solution deposition on a quartz crystal microbalance in a continuous flow cell. Data is used to analyze the growth rate dependence on temperature and also to elucidate the effects of dimethylsulfoxide (DMSO) when used as a co-solvent. Activation energies (EA) of ZnOS are calculated for different flow rates and solution compositions. As a result, the measured EA relationships are affected by changes in the primary growth mechanism when DMSO is included.

  18. Enhanced Deposition Efficiency of Epitaxial Si Film from SiHCl3 by Mesoplasma Chemical Vapor Deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Sudong; Kambara, Makoto; Yoshida, Toyonobu

    Epitaxial Si thick films have been deposited by mesoplasma chemical vapor deposition with SiHCl3-H2-Ar gas mixtures at high efficiency. Addition of hydrogen has been revealed to increase the deposition efficiency by removing Cl as a form of HCl. It also promotes the surface migration of deposition precursors for the attainment of epitaxial Si films. As a result, epitaxial Si films with a production yield of about 60% and a deposition rate of 430 nm/s were deposited at a H2/TCS ratio of 2-3.

  19. Conversion Coatings for Aluminum Alloys by Chemical Vapor Deposition Mechanisms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reye, John T.; McFadden, Lisa S.; Gatica, Jorge E.; Morales, Wilfredo

    2004-01-01

    With the rise of environmental awareness and the renewed importance of environmentally friendly processes, the United States Environmental Protection Agency has targeted surface pre-treatment processes based on chromates. Indeed, this process has been subject to regulations under the Clean Water Act as well as other environmental initiatives, and there is today a marked movement to phase the process out in the near future. Therefore, there is a clear need for new advances in coating technology that could provide practical options for replacing present industrial practices. Depending on the final application, such coatings might be required to be resistant to corrosion, act as chemically resistant coatings, or both. This research examined a chemical vapor deposition (CVD) mechanism to deposit uniform conversion coatings onto aluminum alloy substrates. Robust protocols based on solutions of aryl phosphate ester and multi-oxide conversion coating (submicron) films were successfully grown onto the aluminum alloy samples. These films were characterized by X-ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy (XPS). Preliminary results indicate the potential of this technology to replace aqueous-based chromate processes.

  20. Thin films of barium fluoride scintillator deposited by chemical vapor deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kirlin, P. S.; Binder, R.; Winn, D. R.; O'Hare, J.; LaPierre, C.; Whitmore, M.

    1990-04-01

    We have used metal-organic chemical vapor deposition (MOCVD) technology to coat optical substrates with thin (˜1-10 μm thick) films of inorganic BaF 2 scintillator. Scanning electron microscope (SEM) photographs indicate that high-quality epitaxial crystalline film growth was achieved, with surface defects typically smaller than optical wavelengths. The scintillation light created by the deposition of ionizing radiation in the scintillating films was measured with a photomultiplier and shown to be similar to bulk melt-grown crystals. The results demonstrate the potential of these composite optical materials for planar and fiber scintillation radiation detectors in high energy and nuclear physics, synchrotron radiation research, and in radiation and X-ray imaging and monitoring.

  1. NASA evaluation of Type 2 chemical depositions. [effects of deicer deposition on aircraft tire friction performance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yager, Thomas J.; Stubbs, Sandy M.; Howell, W. Edward; Webb, Granville L.

    1993-01-01

    Recent findings from NASA Langley tests to define effects of aircraft Type 2 chemical deicer depositions on aircraft tire friction performance are summarized. The Aircraft Landing Dynamics Facility (ALDF) is described together with the scope of the tire cornering and braking friction tests conducted up to 160 knots ground speed. Some lower speed 32 - 96 km/hr (20 - 60 mph) test run data obtained using an Instrumented Tire Test Vehicle (ITTV) to determine effects of tire bearing pressure and transverse grooving on cornering friction performance are also discussed. Recommendations are made concerning which parameters should be evaluated in future testing.

  2. The role of sulphur in the synthesis of carbon nanotubes by chemical vapour deposition at high temperatures.

    PubMed

    Motta, M S; Moisala, A; Kinloch, I A; Windle, A H

    2008-05-01

    Sulphur has been recognised as a growth promoter for carbon fibres and carbon nanotubes for over 30 years. Moreover, the Fe-C-S system, in particular, has been extensively studied for more than half a century in the fields of steelmaking and cast iron. In the present work we examine the role of sulphur in the iron-catalysed growth of carbon nanotubes during the process of direct spinning of fibres from the gas phase. A detailed microstructural characterisation of the reaction products was conducted by high resolution TEM and EELS composition mapping on a dedicated FEG STEM (VG HB 501) equipped with Cs aberration correctors. Our results agree with previous works in classical metallurgy, indicating that sulphur forms a layer on the surface of the catalyst particles that plays a role in encouraging nanotube growth by surface diffusion. PMID:18572661

  3. Amorphous Carbon Deposited by a Novel Aerosol-Assisted Chemical Vapor Deposition for Photovoltaic Solar Cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahmad, Nurfadzilah; Kamaruzzaman, Dayana; Rusop, Mohamad

    2012-06-01

    Amorphous carbon (a-C) solar cells were successfully prepared using a novel and self-designed aerosol-assisted chemical vapor deposition (AACVD) method using camphor oil as a precursor. The fabricated solar cell with the configuration of Au/p-C/n-Si/Au achieved an efficiency of 0.008% with a fill factor of 0.15 for the device deposited at 0.5 h. The current-voltage (I-V) graph emphasized on the linear graph (ohmic) for the a-C thin films, whereas for the p-n device structure, a rectifying curve was obtained. The rectifying curves signify the heterojunction between the p-type a-C film and the n-Si substrate and designate the generation of electron-hole pair of the samples under illumination. Photoresponse characteristics of the deposited a-C was highlighted when being illuminated (AM 1.5 illumination: 100 mW/cm2, 25 °C). Transmittance spectrum exhibit a large transmittance value (>85%) and absorption coefficient value of 103-104 cm-1 at the visible range of 390 to 790 nm. The atomization of a liquid precursor solution into fine sub-micrometre-sized aerosol droplets in AACVD induced the smooth surface of a-C films. To the best of our knowledge, fabrication of a-C solar cell using this AACVD method has not yet been reported.

  4. Design and implementation of a novel portable atomic layer deposition/chemical vapor deposition hybrid reactor.

    PubMed

    Selvaraj, Sathees Kannan; Jursich, Gregory; Takoudis, Christos G

    2013-09-01

    We report the development of a novel portable atomic layer deposition chemical vapor deposition (ALD/CVD) hybrid reactor setup. Unique feature of this reactor is the use of ALD/CVD mode in a single portable deposition system to fabricate multi-layer thin films over a broad range from "bulk-like" multi-micrometer to nanometer atomic dimensions. The precursor delivery system and control-architecture are designed so that continuous reactant flows for CVD and cyclic pulsating flows for ALD mode are facilitated. A custom-written LabVIEW program controls the valve sequencing to allow synthesis of different kinds of film structures under either ALD or CVD mode or both. The entire reactor setup weighs less than 40 lb and has a relatively small footprint of 8 × 9 in., making it compact and easy for transportation. The reactor is tested in the ALD mode with titanium oxide (TiO2) ALD using tetrakis(diethylamino)titanium and water vapor. The resulting growth rate of 0.04 nm/cycle and purity of the films are in good agreement with literature values. The ALD/CVD hybrid mode is demonstrated with ALD of TiO2 and CVD of tin oxide (SnOx). Transmission electron microscopy images of the resulting films confirm the formation of successive distinct TiO2-ALD and SnO(x)-CVD layers. PMID:24089868

  5. Design and implementation of a novel portable atomic layer deposition/chemical vapor deposition hybrid reactor.

    PubMed

    Selvaraj, Sathees Kannan; Jursich, Gregory; Takoudis, Christos G

    2013-09-01

    We report the development of a novel portable atomic layer deposition chemical vapor deposition (ALD/CVD) hybrid reactor setup. Unique feature of this reactor is the use of ALD/CVD mode in a single portable deposition system to fabricate multi-layer thin films over a broad range from "bulk-like" multi-micrometer to nanometer atomic dimensions. The precursor delivery system and control-architecture are designed so that continuous reactant flows for CVD and cyclic pulsating flows for ALD mode are facilitated. A custom-written LabVIEW program controls the valve sequencing to allow synthesis of different kinds of film structures under either ALD or CVD mode or both. The entire reactor setup weighs less than 40 lb and has a relatively small footprint of 8 × 9 in., making it compact and easy for transportation. The reactor is tested in the ALD mode with titanium oxide (TiO2) ALD using tetrakis(diethylamino)titanium and water vapor. The resulting growth rate of 0.04 nm/cycle and purity of the films are in good agreement with literature values. The ALD/CVD hybrid mode is demonstrated with ALD of TiO2 and CVD of tin oxide (SnOx). Transmission electron microscopy images of the resulting films confirm the formation of successive distinct TiO2-ALD and SnO(x)-CVD layers.

  6. Radio-frequency plasma chemical vapor deposition growth of diamond

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meyer, Duane E.; Dillon, Rodney O.; Woollam, John A.

    1989-01-01

    Plasma chemical vapor deposition (CVD) at 13.56 MHz has been used to produce diamond particles in two different inductively coupled systems with a mixture of methane and hydrogen. The effect of a diamondlike carbon (DLC) overcoating on silicon, niobium, and stainless-steel substrates has been investigated and in the case of silicon has been found to enhance particle formation as compared to uncoated polished silicon. In addition the use of carbon monoxide in hydrogen has been found to produce well-defined individual faceted particles as well as polycrystalline films on quartz and DLC coated silicon substrates. Plasma CVD is a competitive approach to production of diamond films. It has the advantage over microwave systems of being easily scaled to large volume and high power.

  7. Chemical Vapor Deposition at High Pressure in a Microgravity Environment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McCall, Sonya; Bachmann, Klaus; LeSure, Stacie; Sukidi, Nkadi; Wang, Fuchao

    1999-01-01

    In this paper we present an evaluation of critical requirements of organometallic chemical vapor deposition (OMCVD) at elevated pressure for a channel flow reactor in a microgravity environment. The objective of using high pressure is to maintain single-phase surface composition for materials that have high thermal decomposition pressure at their optimum growth temperature. Access to microgravity is needed to maintain conditions of laminar flow, which is essential for process analysis. Based on ground based observations we present an optimized reactor design for OMCVD at high pressure and reduced gravity. Also, we discuss non-intrusive real-time optical monitoring of flow dynamics coupled to homogeneous gas phase reactions, transport and surface processes. While suborbital flights may suffice for studies of initial stages of heteroepitaxy experiments in space are essential for a complete evaluation of steady-state growth.

  8. Creep of chemically vapor deposited SiC fibers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dicarlo, J. A.

    1984-01-01

    The creep, thermal expansion, and elastic modulus properties for chemically vapor deposited SiC fibers were measured between 1000 and 1500 C. Creep strain was observed to increase logarithmically with time, monotonically with temperature, and linearly with tensile stress up to 600 MPa. The controlling activation energy was 480 + or - 20 kJ/mole. Thermal pretreatments near 1200 and 1450 C were found to significantly reduce fiber creep. These results coupled with creep recovery observations indicate that below 1400 C fiber creep is anelastic with neglible plastic component. This allowed a simple predictive method to be developed for describing fiber total deformation as a function of time, temperature, and stress. Mechanistic analysis of the property data suggests that fiber creep is the result of beta-SiC grain boundary sliding controlled by a small percent of free silicon in the grain boundaries.

  9. Low Temperature Chemical Vapor Deposition Of Thin Film Magnets

    DOEpatents

    Miller, Joel S.; Pokhodnya, Kostyantyn I.

    2003-12-09

    A thin-film magnet formed from a gas-phase reaction of tetracyanoetheylene (TCNE) OR (TCNQ), 7,7,8,8-tetracyano-P-quinodimethane, and a vanadium-containing compound such as vanadium hexcarbonyl (V(CO).sub.6) and bis(benzene)vanalium (V(C.sub.6 H.sub.6).sub.2) and a process of forming a magnetic thin film upon at least one substrate by chemical vapor deposition (CVD) at a process temperature not exceeding approximately 90.degree. C. and in the absence of a solvent. The magnetic thin film is particularly suitable for being disposed upon rigid or flexible substrates at temperatures in the range of 40.degree. C. and 70.degree. C. The present invention exhibits air-stable characteristics and qualities and is particularly suitable for providing being disposed upon a wide variety of substrates.

  10. Chemical vapor deposition fluid flow simulation modelling tool

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bullister, Edward T.

    1992-01-01

    Accurate numerical simulation of chemical vapor deposition (CVD) processes requires a general purpose computational fluid dynamics package combined with specialized capabilities for high temperature chemistry. In this report, we describe the implementation of these specialized capabilities in the spectral element code NEKTON. The thermal expansion of the gases involved is shown to be accurately approximated by the low Mach number perturbation expansion of the incompressible Navier-Stokes equations. The radiative heat transfer between multiple interacting radiating surfaces is shown to be tractable using the method of Gebhart. The disparate rates of reaction and diffusion in CVD processes are calculated via a point-implicit time integration scheme. We demonstrate the use above capabilities on prototypical CVD applications.

  11. Advanced titania buffer layer architectures prepared by chemical solution deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kunert, J.; Bäcker, M.; Brunkahl, O.; Wesolowski, D.; Edney, C.; Clem, P.; Thomas, N.; Liersch, A.

    2011-08-01

    Chemical solution deposition (CSD) was used to grow high-quality (100) oriented films of SrTiO3 (STO) on CSD CaTiO3 (CTO), Ba0.1Ca0.9TiO3 (BCT) and STO seed and template layers. These template films bridge the lattice misfit between STO and the nickel-tungsten (NiW) substrate, assisting in dense growth of textured STO. Additional niobium (Nb) doping of the STO buffer layer reduces oxygen diffusion which is necessary to avoid undesired oxidation of the NiW. The investigated templates offer suitable alternatives to established standard buffer systems like La2Zr2O7 (LZO) and CeO2 for coated conductors.

  12. Characterization of Carbon Nanotubes Grown by Chemical Vapor Deposition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cochrane, J. C.; Zhu, Shen; Su, Ching-Hua; Lehoczky, S. L.; Rose, M. Franklin (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Since the superior properties of multi-wall carbon nanotubes (MWCNT) could improve numerous devices such as electronics and sensors, many efforts have been made in investigating the growth mechanism of MWCNT to synthesize high quality MWCNT. Chemical vapor deposition (CVD) is widely used for MWCNT synthesis, and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and energy dispersive x-ray spectroscopy (EDS) are useful methods for analyzing the structure, morphology and composition of MWCNT. Temperature and pressure are two important growth parameters for fabricating carbon nanotubes. In MWCNT growth by CVD, the plasma assisted method is normally used for low temperature growth. However a high temperature environment is required for thermal CVD. A systematic study of temperature and pressure-dependence is very helpful to understanding MWCNT growth. Transition metal particles are commonly used as catalysis in carbon nanotube growth. It is also interesting to know how temperature and pressure affect the interface of carbon species and catalyst particles

  13. Chemical vapor deposition coatings for oxidation protection of titanium alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cunnington, G. R.; Robinson, J. C.; Clark, R. K.

    1991-01-01

    Results of an experimental investigation of the oxidation protection afforded to Ti-14Al-21Nb and Ti-14Al-23Nb-2V titanium aluminides and Ti-17Mo-3Al-3Nb titanium alloy by aluminum-boron-silicon and boron-silicon coatings are presented. These coatings are applied by a combination of physical vapor deposition (PVD) and chemical vapor deposition (CVD) processes. The former is for the application of aluminum, and the latter is for codeposition of boron and silicon. Coating thickness is in the range of 2 to 7 microns, and coating weights are 0.6 to 2.0 mg/sq cm. Oxidation testing was performed in air at temperatures to 1255 K in both static and hypersonic flow environments. The degree of oxidation protection provided by the coatings is determined from weight change measurements made during the testing and post test compositional analyses. Temperature-dependent total normal emittance data are also presented for four coating/substrate combinations. Both types of coatings provided excellent oxidation protection for the exposure conditions of this investigation. Total normal emittances were greater than 0.80 in all cases.

  14. Thirty Gigahertz Optoelectronic Mixing in Chemical Vapor Deposited Graphene.

    PubMed

    Montanaro, Alberto; Mzali, Sana; Mazellier, Jean-Paul; Bezencenet, Odile; Larat, Christian; Molin, Stephanie; Morvan, Loïc; Legagneux, Pierre; Dolfi, Daniel; Dlubak, Bruno; Seneor, Pierre; Martin, Marie-Blandine; Hofmann, Stephan; Robertson, John; Centeno, Alba; Zurutuza, Amaia

    2016-05-11

    The remarkable properties of graphene, such as broadband optical absorption, high carrier mobility, and short photogenerated carrier lifetime, are particularly attractive for high-frequency optoelectronic devices operating at 1.55 μm telecom wavelength. Moreover, the possibility to transfer graphene on a silicon substrate using a complementary metal-oxide-semiconductor-compatible process opens the ability to integrate electronics and optics on a single cost-effective chip. Here, we report an optoelectronic mixer based on chemical vapor-deposited graphene transferred on an oxidized silicon substrate. Our device consists in a coplanar waveguide that integrates a graphene channel, passivated with an atomic layer-deposited Al2O3 film. With this new structure, 30 GHz optoelectronic mixing in commercially available graphene is demonstrated for the first time. In particular, using a 30 GHz intensity-modulated optical signal and a 29.9 GHz electrical signal, we show frequency downconversion to 100 MHz. These results open promising perspectives in the domain of optoelectronics for radar and radio-communication systems. PMID:27043922

  15. Chemical Vapor Deposition of an Organic Magnet, Vanadium Tetracyanoethylene.

    PubMed

    Harberts, Megan; Lu, Yu; Yu, Howard; Epstein, Arthur J; Johnston-Halperin, Ezekiel

    2015-07-03

    Recent progress in the field of organic materials has yielded devices such as organic light emitting diodes (OLEDs) which have advantages not found in traditional materials, including low cost and mechanical flexibility. In a similar vein, it would be advantageous to expand the use of organics into high frequency electronics and spin-based electronics. This work presents a synthetic process for the growth of thin films of the room temperature organic ferrimagnet, vanadium tetracyanoethylene (V[TCNE]x, x~2) by low temperature chemical vapor deposition (CVD). The thin film is grown at <60 °C, and can accommodate a wide variety of substrates including, but not limited to, silicon, glass, Teflon and flexible substrates. The conformal deposition is conducive to pre-patterned and three-dimensional structures as well. Additionally this technique can yield films with thicknesses ranging from 30 nm to several microns. Recent progress in optimization of film growth creates a film whose qualities, such as higher Curie temperature (600 K), improved magnetic homogeneity, and narrow ferromagnetic resonance line-width (1.5 G) show promise for a variety of applications in spintronics and microwave electronics.

  16. Thirty Gigahertz Optoelectronic Mixing in Chemical Vapor Deposited Graphene.

    PubMed

    Montanaro, Alberto; Mzali, Sana; Mazellier, Jean-Paul; Bezencenet, Odile; Larat, Christian; Molin, Stephanie; Morvan, Loïc; Legagneux, Pierre; Dolfi, Daniel; Dlubak, Bruno; Seneor, Pierre; Martin, Marie-Blandine; Hofmann, Stephan; Robertson, John; Centeno, Alba; Zurutuza, Amaia

    2016-05-11

    The remarkable properties of graphene, such as broadband optical absorption, high carrier mobility, and short photogenerated carrier lifetime, are particularly attractive for high-frequency optoelectronic devices operating at 1.55 μm telecom wavelength. Moreover, the possibility to transfer graphene on a silicon substrate using a complementary metal-oxide-semiconductor-compatible process opens the ability to integrate electronics and optics on a single cost-effective chip. Here, we report an optoelectronic mixer based on chemical vapor-deposited graphene transferred on an oxidized silicon substrate. Our device consists in a coplanar waveguide that integrates a graphene channel, passivated with an atomic layer-deposited Al2O3 film. With this new structure, 30 GHz optoelectronic mixing in commercially available graphene is demonstrated for the first time. In particular, using a 30 GHz intensity-modulated optical signal and a 29.9 GHz electrical signal, we show frequency downconversion to 100 MHz. These results open promising perspectives in the domain of optoelectronics for radar and radio-communication systems.

  17. Selected area chemical vapor deposition of thin films for conductometric microelectronic chemical sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Majoo, Sanjeev

    Recent advances in microelectronics and silicon processing have been exploited to fabricate miniaturized chemical sensors. Although the capability of chemical sensing technology has grown steadily, it has been outpaced by the increasing demands for more reliable, inexpensive, and selective sensors. The diversity of applications requires the deployment of different sensing materials that have rich interfacial chemistry. However, several promising sensor materials are often incompatible with silicon micromachining and their deposition requires complicated masking steps. The new approach described here is to first micromachine a generic, instrumented, conductometric, microelectronic sensor platform that is fully functional except for the front-end sensing element. This generic platform contains a thin dielectric membrane, an integrated boron-doped silicon heater, and conductance electrodes. The membrane has low thermal mass and excellent thermal isolation. A proprietary selected-area chemical vapor deposition (SACVD) process in a cold-wall reactor at low pressures was then used to achieve maskless, self-lithographic deposition of thin films. The temperature-programmable integrated microheater initiates localized thermal decomposition/reaction of suitable CVD precursors confined to a small heated area (500 mum in diameter), and this creates the active sensing element. Platinum and titania (TiOsb2) films were deposited from pyrolysis of organometallic precursors, tetrakistrifluorophosphine platinum Pt(PFsb3)sb4 and titanium tetraisopropoxide Ti(OCH(CHsb3)sb2rbrack sb4, respectively. Deposition of gold metal films from chlorotriethylphosphine gold (Csb2Hsb5)sb3PAuCl precursor was also attempted but without success. The conductance electrodes permit in situ monitoring of film growth. The as-deposited films were characterized in situ by conductance measurements and optical microscopy and ex situ by electron microscopy and spectroscopy methods. Devices equipped with

  18. Perovskite tungsten bronze-type crystals of Li{sub x}WO{sub 3} grown by chemical vapour transport and their characterisation

    SciTech Connect

    Ruescher, Claus H. Dey, Kalpana R.; Debnath, Tapas; Horn, Ingo; Glaum, Robert; Hussain, Altaf

    2008-01-15

    Crystals of Li{sub x}WO{sub 3} with nominal compositions, x=0.1, 0.25, 0.3, 0.35, 0.4 and 0.45 were grown by chemical vapour transport method using HgCl{sub 2} as transporting agent. A complete transport was achieved with a temperature gradient T{sub 1}/T{sub 2}=800/700 deg. C revealing bluish-black crystals of sizes up to a few 10th of a millimeter. X-ray powder diffraction and infrared (IR) absorption spectra show Perovskite tungsten bronze of cubic symmetry (PTB{sub c}) for x=0.45 and 0.4, mixed phase of PTB{sub c} and Perovskite tungsten bronze of tetragonal symmetry (PTB{sub t}) for x=0.35, 0.3 and 0.25 and of PTB{sub t} and Perovskite tungsten bronze of orthorhombic symmetry (PTB{sub o}) for x=0.1. The structure of PTB{sub t} is explained by the off centring of the W-ions along c and tilting of the WO{sub 6} octahedra around c. Crystal slices of mixed phase (i.e. PTB{sub c} and PTB{sub t}) reveal bright and dark areas on a sub-millimeter scale which are separated by sharp interfaces. Laser ablation inductively coupled plasma optical emission (LA ICP OES) analysis on small spot sizes show the separation into Li contents of x=0.18 (bright areas) and x=0.38 (dark areas) as threshold compositions of PTB{sub t} and PTB{sub c}, respectively. Polarized reflectivity using a microscope technique in the bright area of the crystals indicates strong anisotropic absorption effects with maximum between 1000 and 6000 cm{sup -1}, which are related to optical excitations of polarons. Crystals of composition x=0.4 and 0.45 appear optically homogeneous and show an effective 'free carrier-type plasma frequency' (w{sub p}) of about 12,900 and 13,700 cm{sup -1}, respectively. - Graphical abstract: Optical microscope image (reflection mode) of Li{sub x}WO{sub 3} crystals of nominal composition x=0.35. The separation into PTB{sub cubic} (dark areas) and PTB{sub tetragonal} (bright areas) were used to determine the miscibility gap and optical properties.

  19. Deposition of SiOx layer by plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition for the protection of silver (Ag) surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tarazi, Saad Al; Volpe, Luca; Antonelli, Luca; Jafer, Rashida; Batani, Dimitri; d'Esposito, Antonio; Vitobello, Marialuisa

    2014-03-01

    Silver surfaces have been treated with plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition to produce SiO2-like coatings for possible applications in the jewelry industry. Different experimental conditions have been tested in order to optimize the protective effectiveness of the deposited layers. Samples were analyzed with optical and scanning electron microscopy and energy-dispersive spectrometry.

  20. High growth rate homoepitaxial diamond film deposition at high temperatures by microwave plasma-assisted chemical vapor deposition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vohra, Yogesh K. (Inventor); McCauley, Thomas S. (Inventor)

    1997-01-01

    The deposition of high quality diamond films at high linear growth rates and substrate temperatures for microwave-plasma chemical vapor deposition is disclosed. The linear growth rate achieved for this process is generally greater than 50 .mu.m/hr for high quality films, as compared to rates of less than 5 .mu.m/hr generally reported for MPCVD processes.

  1. Chemical vapor deposited fiber coatings and chemical vapor infiltrated ceramic matrix composites

    SciTech Connect

    Kmetz, M.A.

    1992-01-01

    Conventional Chemical Vapor Deposition (CVD) and Organometallic Chemical Vapor Deposition (MOCVD) were employed to deposit a series of interfacial coatings on SiC and carbon yarn. Molybdenum, tungsten and chromium hexacarbonyls were utilized as precursors in a low temperature (350[degrees]C) MOCVD process to coat SiC yarn with Mo, W and Cr oxycarbides. Annealing studies performed on the MoOC and WOC coated SiC yarns in N[sub 2] to 1,000[degrees]C establish that further decomposition of the oxycarbides occurred, culminating in the formation of the metals. These metals were then found to react with Si to form Mo and W disilicide coatings. In the Cr system, heating in N[sub 2] above 800[degrees]C resulted in the formation of a mixture of carbides and oxides. Convention CVD was also employed to coat SiC and carbon yarn with C, Bn and a new interface designated BC (a carbon-boron alloy). The coated tows were then infiltrated with SiC, TiO[sub 2], SiO[sub 2] and B[sub 4]C by a chemical vapor infiltration process. The B-C coatings were found to provide advantageous interfacial properties over carbon and BN coatings in several different composite systems. The effectiveness of these different coatings to act as a chemically inert barrier layer and their relationship to the degree of interfacial debonding on the mechanical properties of the composites were examined. The effects of thermal stability and strength of the coated fibers and composites were also determined for several difference atmospheres. In addition, a new method for determining the tensile strength of the as-received and coated yarns was also developed. The coated fibers and composites were further characterized by AES, SEM, XPS, IR and X-ray diffraction analysis.

  2. Atomic layer deposition and chemical vapor deposition precursor selection method application to strontium and barium precursors.

    PubMed

    Holme, Timothy P; Prinz, Fritz B

    2007-08-23

    A new selection method for atomic layer deposition (ALD) or chemical vapor deposition (CVD) precursors is proposed and tested. Density functional theory was used to simulate Sr and Ba precursors, and several precursors were selected and used to grow films via ALD as test cases for the precursor selection method. The precursors studied were M(x)2 (M = Sr, Ba; x = tetramethylheptanedionate (tmhd), acetylacetonate (acac), hexafluoroacetylacetonate (hfac), cyclopentadienyl (H(5)C(5)), pentamethylcyclopentadienyl (Me(5)C(5)), n-propyltetramethylcyclopentadienyl (PrMe(4)C(5)), tris(isopropylcyclopentadienyl) (Pr(3)(i)H(2)C(5)), tris(isopropylcyclopentadienyl)(THF) (Pr(3)(i)H(2)C(5))(OC(4)H(8)), tris(isopropylcyclopentadienyl)(THF)2 (Pr(3)(i)H(2)C(5))(OC(4)H(8))2, tris(tert-butylcyclopentadienyl) (Bu(3)(t)H(2)C(5)), tris(tert-butylcyclopentadienyl)(THF) (Bu(3)(t)H(2)C(5))(OC(4)H(8)), heptafluoro-2,2-dimethyl-3,5-octanedionate (fod)). The energy required to break bonds between the metal atom and the ligands was calculated to find which precursors react most readily. In the case of tmhd and Cp precursors, the energy required to break bonds in the precursor ligand was studied to evaluate the most likely mechanism of carbon incorporation into the film. Trends for Ba and Sr followed each other closely, reflecting the similar chemistry among alkaline earth metals. The diketonate precursors have stronger bonds to the metals than the Cp precursors, but weaker bonds within the ligand, explaining the carbon contamination found in experimentally grown films. Atomic layer deposition of SrO was tested with Sr(tmhd)2 and Sr(PrMe(4)Cp)2 and oxygen, ozone, and water as oxygen sources. No deposition was measured with tmhd precursors, and SrO films were deposited with PrMe(4)Cp with a source temperature of 200 degrees C and at substrate temperatures between 250 and 350 degrees C with growth rates increasing for oxygen sources in this order: O2 < H2O < O2 + H2O. The experimental results

  3. Electrochromic Devices Deposited on Low-Temperature Plastics by Plasma-Enhanced Chemical Vapor Deposition

    SciTech Connect

    Robbins, Joshua; Seman, Michael

    2005-09-20

    Electrochromic windows have been identified by the Basic energy Sciences Advisory committee as an important technology for the reduction of energy spent on heating and cooling in residential and commercial buildings. Electrochromic devices have the ability to reversibly alter their optical properties in response to a small electric field. By blocking ultraviolet and infrared radiation, while modulating the incoming visible radiation, electrochromics could reduce energy consumption by several Quads per year. This amounts to several percent of the total annual national energy expenditures. The purpose of this project was to demonstrate proof of concept for using plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition (PECVD) for depositing all five layers necessary for full electrochromic devices, as an alternative to sputtering techniques. The overall goal is to produce electrochromic devices on flexible polymer substrates using PECVD to significantly reduce the cost of the final product. We have successfully deposited all of the films necessary for a complete electrochromic devices using PECVD. The electrochromic layer, WO3, displayed excellent change in visible transmission with good switching times. The storage layer, V2O5, exhibited a high storage capacity and good clear state transmission. The electrolyte, Ta2O5, was shown to functional with good electrical resistivity to go along with the ability to transfer Li ions. There were issues with leakage over larger areas, which can be address with further process development. We developed a process to deposit ZnO:Ga with a sheet resistance of < 50 W/sq. with > 90% transmission. Although we were not able to deposit on polymers due to the temperatures required in combination with the inverted position of our substrates. Two types of full devices were produced. Devices with Ta2O5 were shown to be functional using small aluminum dots as the top contact. The polymer electrolyte devices were shown to have a clear state transmission of

  4. Anomalously high thermal conductivity of amorphous Si deposited by hot-wire chemical vapor deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Ho-Soon; Cahill, David G.; Liu, X.; Feldman, J. L.; Crandall, R. S.; Sperling, B. A.; Abelson, J. R.

    2010-03-01

    The thermal conductivities of thin films of amorphous Si (a-Si) deposited by hot-wire chemical vapor deposition (HWCVD) are measured by time-domain thermoreflectance (TDTR). Amorphous Si samples prepared at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) show an anomalous enhancement in thermal conductivity compared to other forms of a-Si and compared to the prediction of the model of the minimum thermal conductivity. The thermal conductivity of the NREL HWCVD a-Si samples also decreases with increasing frequency of the temperature fields used in the experiment. This frequency dependence of the thermal conductivity is nearly identical to the results of our previous studies of crystalline semiconductor alloys; a comparison of the frequency dependence to a phonon-scattering model suggests that Rayleigh-type scattering controls the mean-free path of ˜5meV phonons in this material. Amorphous Si films prepared at University of Illinois (U. Illinois) do not show an enhanced thermal conductivity even though Raman vibrational spectra of the U. Illinois and NREL samples are nearly identical. Thus, the thermal conductivity of a-Si depends on details of the microstructure that are not revealed by vibrational spectroscopy and measurements by TDTR provide a convenient method of identifying novel microstructures in amorphous materials.

  5. Catalyst-free vapour-solid technique for deposition of Bi2Te3 and Bi2Se3 nanowires/nanobelts with topological insulator properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andzane, J.; Kunakova, G.; Charpentier, S.; Hrkac, V.; Kienle, L.; Baitimirova, M.; Bauch, T.; Lombardi, F.; Erts, D.

    2015-09-01

    We present a simple two-stage vapour-solid synthesis method for the growth of bismuth chalcogenide (Bi2Te3, Bi2Se3) topological insulator nanowires/nanobelts by using Bi2Se3 or Bi2Te3 powders as source materials. During the first stage of the synthesis process nanoplateteles, serving as ``catalysts'' for further nanowire/nanobelt growth, are formed. At a second stage of the synthesis, the introduction of a N2 flow at 35 Torr pressure in the chamber induces the formation of free standing nanowires/nanobelts. The synthesised nanostructures demonstrate a layered single-crystalline structure and Bi : Se and Bi : Te ratios 40 : 60 at% for both Bi2Se3 and Bi2Te3 nanowires/nanobelts. The presence of Shubnikov de Haas oscillations in the longitudinal magneto-resistance of the nanowires/nanobelts and their specific angular dependence confirms the existence of 2D topological surface states in the synthesised nanostructures.

  6. Catalyst-free vapour-solid technique for deposition of Bi2Te3 and Bi2Se3 nanowires/nanobelts with topological insulator properties.

    PubMed

    Andzane, J; Kunakova, G; Charpentier, S; Hrkac, V; Kienle, L; Baitimirova, M; Bauch, T; Lombardi, F; Erts, D

    2015-10-14

    We present a simple two-stage vapour-solid synthesis method for the growth of bismuth chalcogenide (Bi2Te3, Bi2Se3) topological insulator nanowires/nanobelts by using Bi2Se3 or Bi2Te3 powders as source materials. During the first stage of the synthesis process nanoplateteles, serving as "catalysts" for further nanowire/nanobelt growth, are formed. At a second stage of the synthesis, the introduction of a N2 flow at 35 Torr pressure in the chamber induces the formation of free standing nanowires/nanobelts. The synthesised nanostructures demonstrate a layered single-crystalline structure and Bi : Se and Bi : Te ratios 40 : 60 at% for both Bi2Se3 and Bi2Te3 nanowires/nanobelts. The presence of Shubnikov de Haas oscillations in the longitudinal magneto-resistance of the nanowires/nanobelts and their specific angular dependence confirms the existence of 2D topological surface states in the synthesised nanostructures. PMID:26365282

  7. Modified chemical deposition and physico-chemical properties of copper sulphide (Cu 2S) thin films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pathan, H. M.; Desai, J. D.; Lokhande, C. D.

    2002-12-01

    Semiconducting stoichiometric copper sulphide (Cu 2S) thin films were deposited using modified chemical deposition method. The preparative conditions such as concentration, pH of cationic and anionic precursors, adsorption, reaction and rinsing time durations, complextant, etc. were optimized to get stoichiometric Cu 2S thin films. The structural, surface morphological, compositional, optical and electrical characterization were carried out with the help of X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), high resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM), Rutherford back scattering (RBS), optical absorbance/transmittance, electrical resistivity and thermoemf studies. The films were found to be nanocrystalline. Absorbance of the film was high (10 4 cm -1) with optical band gap of 2.35 eV. The electrical resistivity was of the order of 10 -2 Ω cm with p-type electrical conductivity.

  8. Modified chemical deposition and physico-chemical properties of copper(I) selenide thin films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pathan, H. M.; Lokhande, C. D.; Amalnerkar, D. P.; Seth, T.

    2003-04-01

    Semiconducting stoichiometric copper(I) selenide (Cu 2Se) thin films were deposited onto glass substrate using a modified chemical method. The deposition conditions such as concentration and pH of cation and anionic precursor solutions, immersion and rinsing times and number of immersions, etc. were optimized for Cu 2Se films. The characterization of Cu 2Se films was carried out by using X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), energy dispersive X-ray analysis (EDAX), Rutherford back scattering (RBS), optical absorption/transmittance, electrical resistivity and thermoemf measurement techniques. The XRD shows the formation of copper(I) selenide with monoclinic crystal structure. Absorbance of the Cu 2Se thin film is found to be high (10 4 cm -1) with optical band gap of 2.35 eV. The electrical resistivity is of the order of 10 -1 Ω cm. Film exhibits p-type electrical conductivity.

  9. Formation of amorphous metal alloys by chemical vapor deposition

    DOEpatents

    Mullendore, Arthur W.

    1990-01-01

    Amorphous alloys are deposited by a process of thermal dissociation of mixtures or organometallic compounds and metalloid hydrides, e.g., transition metal carbonyl such as nickel carbonyl, and diborane. Various sizes and shapes of deposits can be achieved, including near-net-shape free standing articles, multilayer deposits, and the like. Manipulation or absence of a magnetic field affects the nature and the structure of the deposit.

  10. Formation of amorphous metal alloys by chemical vapor deposition

    DOEpatents

    Mullendore, A.W.

    1988-03-18

    Amorphous alloys are deposited by a process of thermal dissociation of mixtures of organometallic compounds and metalloid hydrides,e.g., transition metal carbonyl, such as nickel carbonyl and diborane. Various sizes and shapes of deposits can be achieved, including near-net-shape free standing articles, multilayer deposits, and the like. Manipulation or absence of a magnetic field affects the nature and the structure of the deposit. 1 fig.

  11. Model of carrier dynamics in chemical vapor deposition diamond detectors

    SciTech Connect

    Borchi, Emilio; Lagomarsino, Stefano; Mersi, Stefano; Sciortino, Silvio

    2005-03-01

    We propose a quantitative model of electronic transport on the basis of a conductivity characterization of diamond-based sensors exposed to {beta} radiation. Some of the investigated samples have been irradiated with neutron up to a fluence of 2x10{sup 15}/cm{sup 2}. Radiation-induced current measurements have been performed to study the trapping and recombination of deep defect levels in the diamond band gap. We present a quantitative analysis of the passivation of deep traps and the release of carriers during thermal fading between consecutive exposures. We determine the density of trap states per unit volume and per unit energy and their capture cross sections. We also evaluate the modification of these parameters after neutron irradiation. Our analysis gives the cross sections of the traps involved in our measurements with an accuracy of 20-50%, which is far better than that attainable with thermal spectroscopy. Our results on the capture cross section of the recombination centers agree with relevant works presented in literature on natural IIa diamond. We propose that some defects are of the same nature in chemical vapor deposition diamond, but their concentration is far lower in the state-of-the-art material. We also study a modification of the trap level distribution after neutron irradiation. Finally we propose a rationale for the improvement obtained in recent years in the performances of top quality polycrystalline diamond sensors.

  12. Chemical vapor deposition of high T sub c superconductors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Webb, G. W.; Engelhardt, J. J.

    1978-01-01

    The results are reported of an investigation into the synthesis and properties of high temperature superconducting materials. A chemical vapor deposition apparatus was designed and built which is suitable for the preparation of multicomponent metal films This apparatus was used to prepare a series of high T sub c A-15 structure superconducting films in the binary system Nb-Ge. The effect on T sub c of a variety of substrate materials was investigated. An extensive series of ternary alloys were also prepared. Conditions allowing the brittle high T sub c (approximately 18 K) A-15 structure superconductor Nb3A1 to be prepared in a low T sub c but ductile form were found. Some of the ways that the ductile (bcc) form can be cold worked or machined are described. Measurements of rate of transformation of cold worked bcc material to the high T sub c A-15 structure with low temperature annealing are given. Preliminary measurements indicate that this material has attractive high field critical current densities.

  13. Optical Characterization Of Chemically Deposited Nanostructured CdS Films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goswami, Y. C.; Kansal, Archana

    2009-06-01

    Newly modified hot chemical deposition method was used to grow Cadmium sulfide films. Substrates were kept at relatively higher temperature than the bath using local heating. The bath was consisting of aqueous solutions of Cadmium chloride, Thiourea and complexed by TEA. The Ph of the bath was maintained around 8-10 by adding ammonia solution. The soda lime glass slides were used as substrates. Good thick films were obtained few minutes. Air annealing was used to study the effect of heat treatment on quality of the films. All films were analyzed using optical spectrophotometer. The step like nature in transmission spectra and band gap curves could be due to discrete energy levels, which exist in nanomaterials. Blue shift is observed in samples. Band gap shift from higher value to lower value suggest that films are either of thickness of few nanometer range and/or grain size is of the nanometer range. This paper includes details about new modified dipping technique and optical, structural studies of these films.

  14. Chemical vapor deposition: Stable carbons from low-rank coals

    SciTech Connect

    Sharma, R.K.; Kulas, R.W.; Olson, E.S.

    1996-12-31

    A chemical vapor deposition (CVD) technique has been used to increase the oxidative stability of activated carbons. Activated carbons prepared from Gascoyne lignite (North Dakota) by thermal or potassium hydroxide activations were subjected to BCI, in helium at 727{degrees}C with or without benzene for a limited period of time, followed by annealing in helium at 900{degrees}C for three days. Untreated and acid-washed coal samples were used to assess the magnitude of the effect of mineral matter in the coal on the boron coating. The oxidative stability of the boron-modified carbons was determined from the decomposition curves obtained from the thermogravimetric analysis. Modification of the as-received, KOH-treated carbon yielded oxidatively stable carbons up to an initial temperature of 520{degrees}C, compared to about 350{degrees}C for the starting material. Similar results were obtained for the carbonized Gascoyne lignite. Sulfurous acid washing of the Gascoyne significantly enhanced the thermal stability (600{degrees}C) of the boron-modified carbon.

  15. Charged impurity-induced scatterings in chemical vapor deposited graphene

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Ming-Yang; Tang, Chiu-Chun; Ling, D. C.; Li, L. J.; Chi, C. C.; Chen, Jeng-Chung

    2013-12-21

    We investigate the effects of defect scatterings on the electric transport properties of chemical vapor deposited (CVD) graphene by measuring the carrier density dependence of the magneto-conductivity. To clarify the dominant scattering mechanism, we perform extensive measurements on large-area samples with different mobility to exclude the edge effect. We analyze our data with the major scattering mechanisms such as short-range static scatters, short-range screened Coulomb disorders, and weak-localization (WL). We establish that the charged impurities are the predominant scatters because there is a strong correlation between the mobility and the charge impurity density. Near the charge neutral point (CNP), the electron-hole puddles that are induced by the charged impurities enhance the inter-valley scattering, which is favorable for WL observations. Away from the CNP, the charged-impurity-induced scattering is weak because of the effective screening by the charge carriers. As a result, the local static structural defects govern the charge transport. Our findings provide compelling evidence for understanding the scattering mechanisms in graphene and pave the way for the improvement of fabrication techniques to achieve high-quality CVD graphene.

  16. Chemical vapor deposited silica coatings for solar mirror protection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gulino, Daniel A.; Dever, Therese M.; Banholzer, William F.

    1988-01-01

    A variety of techniques is available to apply protective coatings to oxidation susceptible spacecraft components, and each has associated advantages and disadvantages. Film applications by means of chemical vapor deposition (CVD) has the advantage of being able to be applied conformally to objects of irregular shape. For this reason, a study was made of the oxygen plasma durability of thin film (less than 5000 A) silicon dioxide coatings applied by CVD. In these experiments, such coatings were applied to silver mirrors, which are strongly subject to oxidation, and which are proposed for use on the space station solar dynamic power system. Results indicate that such coatings can provide adequate protection without affecting the reflectance of the mirror. Scanning electron micrographs indicated that oxidation of the silver layer did occur at stress crack locations, but this did not affect the measured solar reflectances. Oxidation of the silver did not proceed beyond the immediate location of the crack. Such stress cracks did not occur in thinner silica flims, and hence such films would be desirable for this application.

  17. Synthesis Single Layer Transition Metal Dichalcogenides with Chemical Vapor Deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Yi-Hsien; Wang, Han; Yu, Lili; Fang, Wenjing; Palacios, Tomas; Li, Lain-Jong; Kong, Jing

    2013-03-01

    Recently, monolayers of layered transition metal dichalcogenides (LTMD), such as MX2 (M =Mo, W and X =S, Se), have been reported to exhibit significant spin-valley coupling and optoelectronic performances because of the unique structural symmetry and band structures. Monolayers in this class of materials offered a burgeoning field in fundamental physics, energy harvesting, electronics and optoelectronics. However, most studies to date are hindered with great challenges on the synthesis and transfer of high quality LTMD monolayers. Hence, a feasible synthetic process to overcome the challenges is essential. Here, we demonstrate the growth of high-quality MS2 (M =Mo, W) monolayers using ambient-pressure-chemical-vapor-deposition (APCVD) with the seeding of aromatic molecules. Electronic transport and optical performances of the as-grown MS2 monolayers are comparable to those of exfoliated MS2 monolayers. The growth of MS2 monolayer is achieved on various surfaces. Growth mechanism on the novel synthetic process is investigated. Understanding and better control of seeds for the novel growth on the class of materials may stimulate the progress in the emerging filed.

  18. Temperature admittance spectroscopy of boron doped chemical vapor deposition diamond

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zubkov, V. I.; Kucherova, O. V.; Bogdanov, S. A.; Zubkova, A. V.; Butler, J. E.; Ilyin, V. A.; Afanas'ev, A. V.; Vikharev, A. L.

    2015-10-01

    Precision admittance spectroscopy measurements over wide temperature and frequency ranges were carried out for chemical vapor deposition epitaxial diamond samples doped with various concentrations of boron. It was found that the experimentally detected boron activation energy in the samples decreased from 314 meV down to 101 meV with an increase of B/C ratio from 600 to 18000 ppm in the gas reactants. For the heavily doped samples, a transition from thermally activated valence band conduction to hopping within the impurity band (with apparent activation energy 20 meV) was detected at temperatures 120-150 K. Numerical simulation was used to estimate the impurity DOS broadening. Accurate determination of continuously altering activation energy, which takes place during the transformation of conduction mechanisms, was proposed by numerical differentiation of the Arrhenius plot. With increase of boron doping level the gradual decreasing of capture cross section from 3 × 10-13 down to 2 × 10-17 cm2 was noticed. Moreover, for the hopping conduction the capture cross section becomes 4 orders of magnitude less (˜2 × 10-20 cm2). At T > Troom in doped samples the birth of the second conductance peak was observed. We attribute it to a defect, related to the boron doping of the material.

  19. Temperature admittance spectroscopy of boron doped chemical vapor deposition diamond

    SciTech Connect

    Zubkov, V. I. Kucherova, O. V.; Zubkova, A. V.; Ilyin, V. A.; Afanas'ev, A. V.; Bogdanov, S. A.; Vikharev, A. L.; Butler, J. E.

    2015-10-14

    Precision admittance spectroscopy measurements over wide temperature and frequency ranges were carried out for chemical vapor deposition epitaxial diamond samples doped with various concentrations of boron. It was found that the experimentally detected boron activation energy in the samples decreased from 314 meV down to 101 meV with an increase of B/C ratio from 600 to 18000 ppm in the gas reactants. For the heavily doped samples, a transition from thermally activated valence band conduction to hopping within the impurity band (with apparent activation energy 20 meV) was detected at temperatures 120–150 K. Numerical simulation was used to estimate the impurity DOS broadening. Accurate determination of continuously altering activation energy, which takes place during the transformation of conduction mechanisms, was proposed by numerical differentiation of the Arrhenius plot. With increase of boron doping level the gradual decreasing of capture cross section from 3 × 10{sup −13} down to 2 × 10{sup −17} cm{sup 2} was noticed. Moreover, for the hopping conduction the capture cross section becomes 4 orders of magnitude less (∼2 × 10{sup −20} cm{sup 2}). At T > T{sub room} in doped samples the birth of the second conductance peak was observed. We attribute it to a defect, related to the boron doping of the material.

  20. Growth of graphene underlayers by chemical vapor deposition

    SciTech Connect

    Fabiane, Mopeli; Khamlich, Saleh; Bello, Abdulhakeem; Dangbegnon, Julien; Momodu, Damilola; Manyala, Ncholu; Charlie Johnson, A. T.

    2013-11-15

    We present a simple and very convincing approach to visualizing that subsequent layers of graphene grow between the existing monolayer graphene and the copper catalyst in chemical vapor deposition (CVD). Graphene samples were grown by CVD and then transferred onto glass substrates by the bubbling method in two ways, either direct-transfer (DT) to yield poly (methyl methacrylate) (PMMA)/graphene/glass or (2) inverted transfer (IT) to yield graphene/PMMA/glass. Field emission scanning electron microscopy (FE-SEM) and atomic force microscopy (AFM) were used to reveal surface features for both the DT and IT samples. The results from FE-SEM and AFM topographic analyses of the surfaces revealed the underlayer growth of subsequent layers. The subsequent layers in the IT samples are visualized as 3D structures, where the smaller graphene layers lie above the larger layers stacked in a concentric manner. The results support the formation of the so-called “inverted wedding cake” stacking in multilayer graphene growth.

  1. Chemical vapor deposition of mesoporous graphene nanoballs for supercapacitor.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jung-Soo; Kim, Sun-I; Yoon, Jong-Chul; Jang, Ji-Hyun

    2013-07-23

    A mass-producible mesoporous graphene nanoball (MGB) was fabricated via a precursor-assisted chemical vapor deposition (CVD) technique for supercapacitor application. Polystyrene balls and reduced iron created under high temperature and a hydrogen gas environment provide a solid carbon source and a catalyst for graphene growth during the precursor-assisted CVD process, respectively. Carboxylic acid and sulfonic acid functionalization of the polystyrene ball facilitates homogeneous dispersion of the hydrophobic polymer template in the metal precursor solution, thus, resulting in a MGB with a uniform number of graphene layers. The MGB is shown to have a specific surface area of 508 m(2)/g and is mesoporous with a mean mesopore diameter of 4.27 nm. Mesopores are generated by the removal of agglomerated iron domains, permeating down through the soft polystyrene spheres and providing the surface for subsequent graphene growth during the heating process in a hydrogen environment. This technique requires only drop-casting of the precursor/polystyrene solution, allowing for mass-production of multilayer MGBs. The supercapacitor fabricated by the use of the MGB as an electrode demonstrates a specific capacitance of 206 F/g and more than 96% retention of capacitance after 10,000 cycles. The outstanding characteristics of the MGB as an electrode for supercapacitors verify the strong potential for use in energy-related areas. PMID:23782238

  2. Growth of graphene underlayers by chemical vapor deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fabiane, Mopeli; Khamlich, Saleh; Bello, Abdulhakeem; Dangbegnon, Julien; Momodu, Damilola; Charlie Johnson, A. T.; Manyala, Ncholu

    2013-11-01

    We present a simple and very convincing approach to visualizing that subsequent layers of graphene grow between the existing monolayer graphene and the copper catalyst in chemical vapor deposition (CVD). Graphene samples were grown by CVD and then transferred onto glass substrates by the bubbling method in two ways, either direct-transfer (DT) to yield poly (methyl methacrylate) (PMMA)/graphene/glass or (2) inverted transfer (IT) to yield graphene/PMMA/glass. Field emission scanning electron microscopy (FE-SEM) and atomic force microscopy (AFM) were used to reveal surface features for both the DT and IT samples. The results from FE-SEM and AFM topographic analyses of the surfaces revealed the underlayer growth of subsequent layers. The subsequent layers in the IT samples are visualized as 3D structures, where the smaller graphene layers lie above the larger layers stacked in a concentric manner. The results support the formation of the so-called "inverted wedding cake" stacking in multilayer graphene growth.

  3. Structure of chemical vapor deposition titania/silica gel

    SciTech Connect

    Leboda, R.; Gun'ko, V.M.; Marciniak, M.; Malygin, A.A.; Malkin, A.A.; Grzegorczyk, W.; Trznadel, B.J.; Pakhlov, E.M.; Voronin, E.F.

    1999-10-01

    The structure of porous silica gel/titania synthesized using chemical vapor deposition (CVD) of titania via repeated reactions of TiCl{sub 4} with the surface and subsequent hydrolysis of residual Ti-Cl bonds at different temperatures was investigated by means of low-temperature nitrogen adsorption-desorption, X-ray diffraction (XRD), IR spectroscopy, and theoretical methods. A globular model of porous solids with corpuscular structure was applied to estimate the porosity parameters of titania/silica gel adsorbents. The utilization of this model is useful, for example, to predict conditions for synthesis of titania/silica with a specified structure. Analysis of pore parameters and fractal dimension suggests that the porosity and fractality of samples decrease with increasing amount of TiO{sub 2} covering the silica gel surface in a nonuniform layer, which represents small particles embedded in pores and larger particles formed at the outer surface of silica globules. Theoretical simulation shows that the Si-O-Ti linkages between the cover and the substrate can be easily hydrolyzed, which is in agreement with the IR data corresponding to the absence of a band at 950 cm {sup {minus}1} (characteristic of Si-O-Ti bridges) independent of the concentration of CVD-titania.

  4. Y-Ba-Cu-O film deposition by metal organic chemical vapor deposition on buffered metal substrates.

    SciTech Connect

    Selvamanickam, V.; Galinski, G.; DeFrank, J.; Trautwein, C.; Haldar, P.; Balachandran, U.; Lanagan, M.; Chudzik, M.

    1999-10-12

    YBa{sub 2}Cu{sub 3}O{sub 2} (YBCO) films have been deposited on buffered metal substrates by Metal Organic Chemical Vapor Deposition (MOCVD). Cube-textured nickel substrates were fabricated by a thermomechanical process. Epitaxial CeO{sub 2}films were deposited on these substrates by thermal evaporation. Nickel alloy substrates with biaxially-textured Yttria-Stabilized Zirconia (YSZ) buffer layers deposited by Ion Beam Assisted Deposition were also prepared. Highly biaxially-textured YBCO films were deposited by MOCVD on both types of metal substrates. A critical current density greater than 10{sup 5} A/cm{sup 2} at 77 K has been achieved in YBCO films on metal substrates.

  5. All-Hot-Wire Chemical Vapor Deposition a-Si:H Solar Cells

    SciTech Connect

    Iwaniczko, E.; Wang, Q.; Xu, Y.; Nelson, B. P.; Mahan, A. H.; Crandall, R. S.; Branz, H. M.

    2000-01-01

    Efficient hydrogenated amorphous silicon (a-Si:H) nip solar cells have been fabricated with all doped and undoped a-Si:H layers deposited by hot-wire chemical vapor deposition (HWCVD). The total deposition time of all layers, except the top ITO-contact, is less than 4 minutes.

  6. Diagnostic for Plasma Enhanced Chemical Vapor Deposition and Etch Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cappelli, Mark A.

    1999-01-01

    In order to meet NASA's requirements for the rapid development and validation of future generation electronic devices as well as associated materials and processes, enabling technologies ion the processing of semiconductor materials arising from understanding etch chemistries are being developed through a research collaboration between Stanford University and NASA-Ames Research Center, Although a great deal of laboratory-scale research has been performed on many of materials processing plasmas, little is known about the gas-phase and surface chemical reactions that are critical in many etch and deposition processes, and how these reactions are influenced by the variation in operating conditions. In addition, many plasma-based processes suffer from stability and reliability problems leading to a compromise in performance and a potentially increased cost for the semiconductor manufacturing industry. Such a lack of understanding has hindered the development of process models that can aid in the scaling and improvement of plasma etch and deposition systems. The research described involves the study of plasmas used in semiconductor processes. An inductively coupled plasma (ICP) source in place of the standard upper electrode assembly of the Gaseous Electronics Conference (GEC) radio-frequency (RF) Reference Cell is used to investigate the discharge characteristics and chemistries. This ICP source generates plasmas with higher electron densities (approximately 10(exp 12)/cu cm) and lower operating pressures (approximately 7 mTorr) than obtainable with the original parallel-plate version of the GEC Cell. This expanded operating regime is more relevant to new generations of industrial plasma systems being used by the microelectronics industry. The motivation for this study is to develop an understanding of the physical phenomena involved in plasma processing and to measure much needed fundamental parameters, such as gas-phase and surface reaction rates. species

  7. Properties of chemical vapor infiltration diamond deposited in a diamond powder matrix

    SciTech Connect

    Panitz, J.K.G.; Tallant, D.R.; Hills, C.R.; Staley, D.J.

    1993-12-31

    Densifying non-mined diamond powder precursors with diamond produced by chemical vapor infiltration (CVI) is an attractive approach for forming thick diamond deposits that avoids many potential manufacturability problems associated with predominantly chemical vapor deposition (CVD) processes. The authors have developed two techniques: electrophoretic deposition and screen printing, to form nonmined diamond powder precursors on substrates. They then densify these precursors in a hot filament assisted reactor. Analysis indicated that a hot filament assisted chemical vapor infiltration process forms intergranular diamond deposits with properties that are to some degree different from predominantly hot-filament-assisted CVD material.

  8. A liquid crystalline chirality balance for vapours

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ohzono, Takuya; Yamamoto, Takahiro; Fukuda, Jun-Ichi

    2014-04-01

    Chiral discrimination of vapours plays an important role in olfactory perception of biological systems and its realization by artificial sensors has been an intriguing challenge. Here, we report a simple method that tangibly visualizes the chirality of a diverse variety of molecules dissolved from vapours with high sensitivity, by making use of a structural change in a periodic microstructure of a nematic liquid crystal confined in open microchannels. This microstructure is accompanied by a topological line defect of a zigzag form with equal lengths of ‘zig’ and ‘zag.’ We find that a tiny amount of vapour of chiral molecules injected onto the liquid crystal induces the imbalance of ‘zig’ and ‘zag’ depending on its enantiomeric excess within a few seconds. Our liquid-crystal-based ‘chirality balance’ offers a simple, quick and versatile chirality-sensing/-screening method for gas-phase analysis (for example, for odours, environmental chemicals or drugs).

  9. Chemical mediation of egg capsule deposition by mud snails.

    PubMed

    Rittschof, Dan; Sawardecker, Prasad; Petry, Caroline

    2002-11-01

    Mud snails (Ilyanassa obsoleta = Nassarius obsoletus = Nassa obsoleta) deposit eggs in protective capsules on hard substrata in soft bottom environments. We studied sites of egg capsule deposition and snail movement responses to odors to determine if chemoreception plays a role in deposition site selection. From results of field surveys, laboratory experiments, and field experiments, we conclude that mud snails use chemoreception for capsule deposition. Attractive odors originate from mud snail and whelk egg capsules and from living bivalves. Evidence for attractive odors from conspecifics is equivocal. Capsules are deposited on living odor sources and nearby hard substrates. We hypothesize that deposition of capsules on living substrates increases the likelihood that embryos will survive by decreasing the chance of smothering of embryos by sediments. PMID:12523566

  10. Single crystal diamond detectors grown by chemical vapor deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tuvè, C.; Angelone, M.; Bellini, V.; Balducci, A.; Donato, M. G.; Faggio, G.; Marinelli, M.; Messina, G.; Milani, E.; Morgada, M. E.; Pillon, M.; Potenza, R.; Pucella, G.; Russo, G.; Santangelo, S.; Scoccia, M.; Sutera, C.; Tucciarone, A.; Verona-Rinati, G.

    2007-01-01

    The detection properties of heteropitaxial (polycrystalline, pCVD) and homoepitaxial (single crystal, scCVD) diamond films grown by microwave chemical vapor deposition (CVD) in the Laboratories of Roma "Tor Vergata" University are reported. The pCVD diamond detectors were tested with α-particles from different sources and 12C ions produced by 15 MV Tandem accelerator at Southern National Laboratories (LNS) in Catania (Italy). pCVDs were also used to monitor 14 MeV neutrons produced by the D-T plasma at Joint European Torus (JET), Culham, U.K. The limit of pCVDs is the poor energy resolution. To overcome this problem, we developed scCVD diamonds using the same reactor parameters that optimized pCVD diamonds. scCVD were grown on a low cost (1 0 0) HPHT single crystal substrate. A detector 110 μm thick was tested under α-particles and under 14 MeV neutron irradiation. The charge collection efficiency spectrum measured under irradiation with a triple α-particle source shows three clearly resolved peaks, with an energy resolution of about 1.1%. The measured spectra under neutron irradiation show a well separated C(n,α0)9Be12 reaction peak with an energy spread of 0.5 MeV for 14.8 MeV neutrons and 0.3 MeV for 14.1 MeV neutrons, which are fully compatible with the energy spread of the incident neutron beams.

  11. Diamond deposition from fluorinated precursors using microwave-plasma chemical vapor deposition

    SciTech Connect

    Fox, C.A.; McMaster, M.C.; Hsu, W.L.; Kelly, M.A.; Hagstrom, S.B.

    1995-10-16

    Diamond thin films were grown using fluorinated precursors by microwave plasma-assisted chemical vapor deposition. Using CH{sub 4}/H{sub 2}, CH{sub 3}F/H{sub 2}, and CF{sub 4}/H{sub 2} gas mixtures, films were grown at surface temperatures in the range 600--900 {degree}C at constant microwave power, carbon mole fraction, and pressure. Growth activation energies for the CH{sub 4}/H{sub 2}, CH{sub 3}F/H{sub 2}, and CF{sub 4}/H{sub 2} mixtures were 12.6{plus_minus}1.8, 13.7{plus_minus}1.2, and 12.4{plus_minus}1.1 kcal/mole, respectively. Argon ion etching in conjunction with x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy indicated negligible fluorine incorporation into the films. These results are consistent with the hypothesis that diamond is grown from the same intermediates, namely methyl radicals and atomic hydrogen, for all of these mixtures. {copyright} {ital 1995} {ital American} {ital Institute} {ital of} {ital Physics}.

  12. Magnetorheological finishing of chemical-vapor deposited zinc sulfide via chemically and mechanically modified fluids

    DOE PAGES

    Salzman, Sivan; Romanofsky, Henry J.; Giannechini, Lucca J.; Jacobs, Stephen D.; Lambropoulos, John C.

    2016-02-19

    In this study, we describe the anisotropy in the material removal rate (MRR) of the polycrystalline, chemical-vapor deposited zinc sulfide (ZnS).We define the polycrystalline anisotropy via microhardness and chemical erosion tests for four crystallographic orientations of ZnS: (100), (110), (111), and (311). Anisotropy in the MRR was studied under magnetorheological finishing (MRF) conditions. Three chemically and mechanically modified magnetorheological (MR) fluids at pH values of 4, 5, and 6 were used to test the MRR variations among the four single-crystal planes. When polishing the single-crystal planes and the polycrystalline with pH 5 and pH 6MR fluids, variations were found inmore » the MRR among the four single-crystal planes and surface artifacts were observed on the polycrystalline material. When polishing the single-crystal planes and the polycrystalline with the modified MR fluid at pH 4, however, minimal variation was observed in the MRR among the four orientations and a reduction in surface artifacts was achieved on the polycrystalline material.« less

  13. High rate chemical vapor deposition of carbon films using fluorinated gases

    DOEpatents

    Stafford, Byron L.; Tracy, C. Edwin; Benson, David K.; Nelson, Arthur J.

    1993-01-01

    A high rate, low-temperature deposition of amorphous carbon films is produced by PE-CVD in the presence of a fluorinated or other halide gas. The deposition can be performed at less than 100.degree. C., including ambient room temperature, with a radio frequency plasma assisted chemical vapor deposition process. With less than 6.5 atomic percent fluorine incorporated into the amorphous carbon film, the characteristics of the carbon film, including index of refraction, mass density, optical clarity, and chemical resistance are within fifteen percent (15%) of those characteristics for pure amorphous carbon films, but the deposition rates are high.

  14. Solar-induced chemical vapor deposition of diamond-type carbon films

    DOEpatents

    Pitts, J. Roland; Tracy, C. Edwin; King, David E.; Stanley, James T.

    1994-01-01

    An improved chemical vapor deposition method for depositing transparent continuous coatings of sp.sup.3 -bonded diamond-type carbon films, comprising: a) providing a volatile hydrocarbon gas/H.sub.2 reactant mixture in a cold wall vacuum/chemical vapor deposition chamber containing a suitable substrate for said films, at pressure of about 1 to 50 Torr; and b) directing a concentrated solar flux of from about 40 to about 60 watts/cm.sup.2 through said reactant mixture to produce substrate temperatures of about 750.degree. C. to about 950.degree. C. to activate deposition of the film on said substrate.

  15. Solar-induced chemical vapor deposition of diamond-type carbon films

    DOEpatents

    Pitts, J.R.; Tracy, C.E.; King, D.E.; Stanley, J.T.

    1994-09-13

    An improved chemical vapor deposition method for depositing transparent continuous coatings of sp[sup 3]-bonded diamond-type carbon films, comprises: (a) providing a volatile hydrocarbon gas/H[sub 2] reactant mixture in a cold wall vacuum/chemical vapor deposition chamber containing a suitable substrate for said films, at pressure of about 1 to 50 Torr; and (b) directing a concentrated solar flux of from about 40 to about 60 watts/cm[sup 2] through said reactant mixture to produce substrate temperatures of about 750 C to about 950 C to activate deposition of the film on said substrate. 11 figs.

  16. Practical silicon deposition rules derived from silane monitoring during plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition

    SciTech Connect

    Bartlome, Richard De Wolf, Stefaan; Demaurex, Bénédicte; Ballif, Christophe; Amanatides, Eleftherios; Mataras, Dimitrios

    2015-05-28

    We clarify the difference between the SiH{sub 4} consumption efficiency η and the SiH{sub 4} depletion fraction D, as measured in the pumping line and the actual reactor of an industrial plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition system. In the absence of significant polysilane and powder formation, η is proportional to the film growth rate. Above a certain powder formation threshold, any additional amount of SiH{sub 4} consumed translates into increased powder formation rather than into a faster growing Si film. In order to discuss a zero-dimensional analytical model and a two-dimensional numerical model, we measure η as a function of the radio frequency (RF) power density coupled into the plasma, the total gas flow rate, the input SiH{sub 4} concentration, and the reactor pressure. The adjunction of a small trimethylboron flow rate increases η and reduces the formation of powder, while the adjunction of a small disilane flow rate decreases η and favors the formation of powder. Unlike η, D is a location-dependent quantity. It is related to the SiH{sub 4} concentration in the plasma c{sub p}, and to the phase of the growing Si film, whether the substrate is glass or a c-Si wafer. In order to investigate transient effects due to the RF matching, the precoating of reactor walls, or the introduction of a purifier in the gas line, we measure the gas residence time and acquire time-resolved SiH{sub 4} density measurements throughout the ignition and the termination of a plasma.

  17. Numerical modeling of chemical vapor deposition (CVD) in a horizontal reactor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sheikholeslami, M. Z.; Jasinski, T.; Fretz, K. W.

    1988-01-01

    In the present numerical prediction of the deposition rate of silicon from silane in a CVD process, the conservation equations for mass, momentum, energy, and chemical species are solved on a staggered grid using the SIMPLE algorithm, while the rate of chemical reactions in the gas phase and on the susceptor surface is obtained from an Arrhenius rate equation. Predicted deposition rates as a function of position along the susceptor with and without the gas phase chemical reaction are compared with the available experimental and numerical data; agreement is excellent except at the leading edge of the susceptor, where the deposition rate is overpredicted.

  18. Characteristics of epitaxial garnets grown by CVD using single metal alloy sources. [Chemical Vapor Deposition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Besser, P. J.; Hamilton, T. N.; Mee, J. E.; Stermer, R. L.

    1974-01-01

    Single metal alloys have been explored as the cation source in the chemical vapor deposition (CVD) of iron garnets. Growth of good quality single crystal garnet films containing as many as five different cations has been achieved over a wide range of deposition conditions. The relationship of film composition to alloy compositions and deposition conditions has been determined for several materials. By proper choice of the alloy composition and the deposition conditions, uncrazed deposits were grown on (111) gadolinium gallium garnet (GGG) substrates. Data on physical, magnetic and optical properties of representative films is presented and discussed.

  19. Effect of deposition temperature on boron-doped carbon coatings deposited from a BCl 3-C 3H 6-H 2 mixture using low pressure chemical vapor deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Yongsheng; Zhang, Litong; Cheng, Laifei; Yang, Wenbin; Xu, Yongdong

    2009-08-01

    A mixture of propylene, hydrogen and boron trichloride was used to fabricate boron-doped carbon coatings by using low pressure chemical vapor deposition ( LPCVD) technique. Effect of deposition temperature on deposition rate, morphologies, compositions and bonding states of boron-doped carbon coatings was investigated. Below 1273 K, the deposition rate is controlled by reaction dynamics. The deposition rate increases with increasing deposition temperature. The activation energy is 208.74 kJ/mol. Above 1273 K, the deposition rate decreases due to smaller critical radius rc and higher nuclei formation rate J with increasing temperature. Scanning electron microscopy shows that the structure changes from glass-like to nano-laminates with increasing deposition temperature. The boron concentration decreases with increasing deposition temperature, corresponding with increasing carbon concentration. The five types of bonding states are B-C, B-sub-C, BC 2O, BCO 2 and B-O. B-sub-C and BC 2O are the main bonding states. The reactions are dominant at all temperatures, in which the B-sub-C and PyC are formed.

  20. On-line chemical vapour generation of cadmium in the presence of hexacyanochromate(III) for determination by inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS)

    PubMed Central

    Yilmaz, Vedat; Rose, LaKeysha; Little, Maria D.

    2012-01-01

    A vapour generation (VG) procedure has been described for determination of Cd by ICP-MS. Volatile species of Cd were generated on-line by interacting acidic sample solution containing potassium hexacyanochromate(III), K3Cr(CN)6, with sodium borohydride (NaBH4). The hexacyanochromate(III) complex was generated on-line by reacting 0.04 mol L−1 chromium(III) nitrate and 0.16 mol L−1 potassium cyanide (KCN) solutions in water. The resulting suspension of chromium(III) hydroxide, Cr(OH)3, was fed continuously to acidic stream of sample solution in the presence of excess KCN. The experimental conditions were optimized for effective generation of volatile species of Cd. Optimum signals were obtained from reaction of sample solutions in 4% v/v HCl with 2% m/v NaBH4 solution. Presence of K3Cr(CN)6 improved the efficiency of Cd vapour generation substantially affording 15-fold higher sensitivity. This phenomenon was thought to occur through formation of reactive intermediates evolved from interaction of [Cr(CN)6]3− with NaBH4 that react with Cd(II) to increase the yield volatile Cd species. Under the optimum conditions, no significant interferences were observed from the transition metals, including Cu and Ni, up to 1.0 μg mL−1 levels. Among the hydride forming elements, Bi, Pb, Sb and Sn depressed the signals above 0.1 μg mL−1. The detection limits (3s) were 6.2 and 5.2 ng L−1 for 110Cd and 111Cd isotopes, respectively. The method was successfully applied to determination of Cd by ICP-MS in several certified reference materials, including Nearshore seawater (CASS-4), Bone ash (SRM 1400), Dogfish liver (DOLT-4) and Mussel tissue (SRM 2976). PMID:23997384

  1. Influence of the normalized ion flux on the constitution of alumina films deposited by plasma-assisted chemical vapor deposition

    SciTech Connect

    Kurapov, Denis; Reiss, Jennifer; Trinh, David H.; Hultman, Lars; Schneider, Jochen M.

    2007-07-15

    Alumina thin films were deposited onto tempered hot working steel substrates from an AlCl{sub 3}-O{sub 2}-Ar-H{sub 2} gas mixture by plasma-assisted chemical vapor deposition. The normalized ion flux was varied during deposition through changes in precursor content while keeping the cathode voltage and the total pressure constant. As the precursor content in the total gas mixture was increased from 0.8% to 5.8%, the deposition rate increased 12-fold, while the normalized ion flux decreased by approximately 90%. The constitution, morphology, impurity incorporation, and the elastic properties of the alumina thin films were found to depend on the normalized ion flux. These changes in structure, composition, and properties induced by normalized ion flux may be understood by considering mechanisms related to surface and bulk diffusion.

  2. Modeling free convective gravitational effects in chemical vapor deposition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stinespring, C. D.; Annen, K. D.

    1987-01-01

    In this paper, a combined fluid-mechanics, mass-transport, and chemistry model describing CVD in an open-tube atmospheric-pressure flow reactor is developed. The model allows gas-phase reactions to proceed to equilibrium and accounts for finite reaction rates at the surface of the deposition substrate. This model is a useful intermediate step toward a model employing fully rate-limited chemistry. The model is used to predict the effects of free convection on flow patterns, temperature and species-concentration profiles, and local deposition rates for silicon deposited by silane pyrolysis. These results are discussed in terms of implications for CVD of silicon and other compounds, microgravity studies, and techniques for testing and validating the model.

  3. Laser/Plasma/Chemical-Vapor Deposition Of Diamond

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hsu, George C.

    1989-01-01

    Proposed process for deposition of diamond films includes combination of plasma induced in hydrocarbon feed gas by microwave radiation and irradiation of plasma and substrate by lasers. Deposition of graphite suppressed. Reaction chamber irradiated at wavelength favoring polymerization of CH2 radical into powders filtered out of gas. CH3 radicals, having desired sp3 configuration, remains in gas to serve as precursors for deposition. Feed gas selected to favor formation of CH3 radicals; candidates include CH4, C2H4, C2H2, and C2H6. Plasma produced by applying sufficient power at frequency of 2.45 GHz and adjusting density of gas to obtain electron kinetic energies around 100 eV in low-pressure, low-temperature regime.

  4. Metalorganic chemical vapor deposition of gallium nitride on sacrificial substrates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fenwick, William Edward

    GaN-based light emitting diodes (LEDs) face several challenges if the technology is to continue to make a significant impact in general illumination, and on technology that has become known as solid state lighting (SSL). Two of the most pressing challenges for the continued penetration of SSL into traditional lighting applications are efficacy and total lumens from the device, and their related cost. The development of alternative substrate technologies is a promising avenue toward addressing both of these challenges, as both GaN-based device technology and the associated metalorganic chemical vapor deposition (MOCVD) technology are already relatively mature technologies with a well-understood cost base. Zinc oxide (ZnO) and silicon (Si) are among the most promising alternative substrates for GaN epitaxy. These substrates offer the ability to access both higher efficacy and lumen devices (ZnO) at a much reduced cost. This work focuses on the development of MOCVD growth processes to yield high quality GaN-based materials and devices on both ZnO and Si. ZnO is a promising substrate for growth of low defect-density GaN because of its similar lattice constant and thermal expansion coefficient. The major hurdles for GaN growth on ZnO are the instability of the substrate in a hydrogen atmosphere, which is typical of nitride growth conditions, and the inter-diffusion of zinc and oxygen from the substrate into the GaN-based epitaxial layer. A process was developed for the MOCVD growth of GaN and InxGa 1-xN on ZnO that attempted to address these issues. The structural and optical properties of these films were studied using various techniques. X-ray diffraction (XRD) showed the growth of wurtzite GaN on ZnO, and room-temperature photoluminescence (RT-PL) showed near band-edge luminescence from the GaN and InxGa1-xN layers. However, high zinc and oxygen concentrations due to interdiffusion near the ZnO substrate remained an issue; therefore, the diffusion of zinc and oxygen

  5. Compositional study of silicon oxynitride thin films deposited using electron cyclotron resonance plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition technique

    SciTech Connect

    Baumann, H.; Sah, R.E.

    2005-05-01

    We have used backscattering spectrometry and {sup 15}N({sup 1}H,{alpha},{gamma}){sup 12}C nuclear reaction analysis techniques to study in detail the variation in the composition of silicon oxynitride films with deposition parameters. The films were deposited using 2.45 GHz electron cyclotron resonance plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition (PECVD) technique from mixtures of precursors argon, nitrous oxide, and silane at deposition temperature 90 deg. C. The deposition pressure and nitrous oxide-to-silane gas flow rates ratio have been found to have a pronounced influence on the composition of the films. When the deposition pressure was varied for a given nitrous oxide-to-silane gas flow ratio, the amount of silicon and nitrogen increased with the deposition pressure, while the amount of oxygen decreased. For a given deposition pressure, the amount of incorporated nitrogen and hydrogen decreased while that of oxygen increased with increasing nitrous oxide-to-silane gas flow rates ratio. For nitrous oxide-to-silane gas flow ratio of 5, we obtained films which contained neither chemically bonded nor nonbonded nitrogen atoms as revealed by the results of infrared spectroscopy, backscattering spectrometry, and nuclear reaction analysis. Our results demonstrate the nitrogen-free nearly stoichiometric silicon dioxide films can be prepared from a mixture of precursors argon, nitrous oxide, and silane at low substrate temperature using high-density PECVD technique. This avoids the use of a hazardous and an often forbidden pair of silane and oxygen gases in a plasma reactor.

  6. Process for the preparation of fiber-reinforced ceramic composites by chemical vapor deposition

    DOEpatents

    Lackey, Jr., Walter J.; Caputo, Anthony J.

    1986-01-01

    A chemical vapor deposition (CVD) process for preparing fiber-reinforced ceramic composites. A specially designed apparatus provides a steep thermal gradient across the thickness of a fibrous preform. A flow of gaseous ceramic matrix material is directed into the fibrous preform at the cold surface. The deposition of the matrix occurs progressively from the hot surface of the fibrous preform toward the cold surface. Such deposition prevents the surface of the fibrous preform from becoming plugged. As a result thereof, the flow of reactant matrix gases into the uninfiltrated (undeposited) portion of the fibrous preform occurs throughout the deposition process. The progressive and continuous deposition of ceramic matrix within the fibrous preform provides for a significant reduction in process time over known chemical vapor deposition processes.

  7. Comparison of chemical and heating methods to enhance latent fingerprint deposits on thermal paper.

    PubMed

    Bond, John W

    2014-03-01

    A comparison is made of proprietary methods to develop latent fingerprint deposits on the inked side of thermal paper using either chemical treatment (Thermanin) or the application of heat to the paper (Hot Print System). Results with a trial of five donors show that the application of heat produces statistically significantly more fingerprint ridge detail than the chemical treatment for both fingerprint deposits aged up to 4 weeks and for a nine sequence depletion series. Subjecting the thermal paper to heat treatment with the Hot Print System did not inhibit subsequent ninhydrin chemical development of fingerprint deposits on the noninked side of the paper. A further benefit of the application of heat is the rapid development of fingerprint deposits (less than a minute) compared with up to 12 h for the Thermanin chemical treatment. PMID:24673413

  8. Comparison of chemical and heating methods to enhance latent fingerprint deposits on thermal paper.

    PubMed

    Bond, John W

    2014-03-01

    A comparison is made of proprietary methods to develop latent fingerprint deposits on the inked side of thermal paper using either chemical treatment (Thermanin) or the application of heat to the paper (Hot Print System). Results with a trial of five donors show that the application of heat produces statistically significantly more fingerprint ridge detail than the chemical treatment for both fingerprint deposits aged up to 4 weeks and for a nine sequence depletion series. Subjecting the thermal paper to heat treatment with the Hot Print System did not inhibit subsequent ninhydrin chemical development of fingerprint deposits on the noninked side of the paper. A further benefit of the application of heat is the rapid development of fingerprint deposits (less than a minute) compared with up to 12 h for the Thermanin chemical treatment.

  9. A kinetic and equilibrium analysis of silicon carbide chemical vapor deposition on monofilaments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gokoglu, S. A.; Kuczmarski, M. A.

    1993-01-01

    Chemical kinetics of atmospheric pressure silicon carbide (SiC) chemical vapor deposition (CVD) from dilute silane and propane source gases in hydrogen is numerically analyzed in a cylindrical upflow reactor designed for CVD on monofilaments. The chemical composition of the SiC deposit is assessed both from the calculated total fluxes of carbon and silicon and from chemical equilibrium considerations for the prevailing temperatures and species concentrations at and along the filament surface. The effects of gas and surface chemistry on the evolution of major gas phase species are considered in the analysis.

  10. Optical emission study of a doped diamond deposition process by plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rayar, M.; Supiot, P.; Veis, P.; Gicquel, A.

    2008-08-01

    Standard H2/CH4/B2H6 plasmas (99% of H2 and 1% of CH4, with 0-100ppm of B2H6 added) used for doped diamond film growth are studied by optical emission spectroscopy in order to gain a better understanding of the influence of boron species on the gas phase chemistry. Only two boron species are detected under our experimental conditions (9/15/23Wcm-3 average microwave power density values), and the emission spectra used for studies reported here are B(S1/22-P1/2,3/202) and BH [AΠ1-XΣ+1(0,0)]. Variations of their respective emission intensities as a function of the ratio B /C, the boron to carbon ratio in the gas mixture, are reported. We confirmed that the plasma parameters (Tg, Te, and ne) are not affected by the introduction of diborane, and the number densities of B atoms and BH radical species were estimated from experimental measurements. The results are compared to those obtained from a zero-dimensional chemical kinetic model where two groups of reactions are considered: (1) BHx+H ↔BHx -1+H2 (x=1-3) by analogy with the well-known equilibrium CHx+H set of reactions, which occurs, in particular, in diamond deposition reactors; and (2) from conventional organic chemistry, the set of reactions involving boron species: BHx+C2H2 (x =0-1). The results clearly show that the model based on hydrogen and boron hydrides reactions alone is not consistent with the experimental results, while it is so when taking into account both sets of reactions. Once an upper limit for the boron species number densities has been estimated, axial profiles are calculated on the basis of the plasma model results obtained previously in Laboratoire d'Ingénierie des Matériaux et des Hautes Pressions, and significant differences in trends for different boron species are found. At the plasma-to-substrate boundary, [BH] and [B] drop off in contrast to [BH2], which shows little decrease, and [BH3], which shows little increase, in this region.

  11. Fabrication of lightweight ceramic mirrors by means of a chemical vapor deposition process

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goela, Jitendra S. (Inventor); Taylor, Raymond L. (Inventor)

    1991-01-01

    A process to fabricate lightweigth ceramic mirrors, and in particular, silicon/silicon carbide mirrors, involves three chemical vapor deposition steps: one to produce the mirror faceplate, the second to form the lightweight backstructure which is deposited integral to the faceplate, and the third and final step which results in the deposition of a layer of optical grade material, for example, silicon, onto the front surface of the faceplate. The mirror figure and finish are fabricated into this latter material.

  12. Chemical vapor deposition of fluorine-doped zinc oxide

    DOEpatents

    Gordon, Roy G.; Kramer, Keith; Liang, Haifan

    2000-06-06

    Fims of fluorine-doped zinc oxide are deposited from vaporized precursor compounds comprising a chelate of a dialkylzinc, such as an amine chelate, an oxygen source, and a fluorine source. The coatings are highly electrically conductive, transparent to visible light, reflective to infrared radiation, absorbing to ultraviolet light, and free of carbon impurity.

  13. Direct chemical vapor deposition of graphene on dielectric surfaces

    DOEpatents

    Zhang, Yuegang; Ismach, Ariel

    2014-04-29

    A substrate is provided that has a metallic layer on a substrate surface of a substrate. A film made of a two dimensional (2-D) material, such as graphene, is deposited on a metallic surface of the metallic layer. The metallic layer is dewet and/or removed to provide the film on the substrate surface.

  14. Low temperature junction growth using hot-wire chemical vapor deposition

    DOEpatents

    Wang, Qi; Page, Matthew; Iwaniczko, Eugene; Wang, Tihu; Yan, Yanfa

    2014-02-04

    A system and a process for forming a semi-conductor device, and solar cells (10) formed thereby. The process includes preparing a substrate (12) for deposition of a junction layer (14); forming the junction layer (14) on the substrate (12) using hot wire chemical vapor deposition; and, finishing the semi-conductor device.

  15. High Pressure Chemical Vapor Deposition of Hydrogenated Amorphous Silicon Films and Solar Cells.

    PubMed

    He, Rongrui; Day, Todd D; Sparks, Justin R; Sullivan, Nichole F; Badding, John V

    2016-07-01

    Thin films of hydrogenated amorphous silicon can be produced at MPa pressures from silane without the use of plasma at temperatures as low as 345 °C. High pressure chemical vapor deposition may open a new way to low cost deposition of amorphous silicon solar cells and other thin film structures over very large areas in very compact, simple reactors. PMID:27174318

  16. Chemical vapor deposition of W-Si-N and W-B-N

    DOEpatents

    Fleming, J.G.; Roherty-Osmun, E.L.; Smith, P.M.; Custer, J.S.; Jones, R.V.; Nicolet, M.; Madar, R.; Bernard, C.

    1999-06-29

    A method of depositing a ternary, refractory based thin film on a substrate by chemical vapor deposition employing precursor sources of tungsten comprising WF[sub 6], either silicon or boron, and nitrogen. The result is a W-Si-N or W-B-N thin film useful for diffusion barrier and micromachining applications. 10 figs.

  17. Dopant gas effect on silicon chemical vapor depositions: A surface potential model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chang, C. A.

    1975-01-01

    A surface potential model is proposed to consistently explain the known dopant gas effects on silicon chemical vapor deposition. This model predicts that the effects of the same dopant gases on the diamond deposition rate using methane and carbon tetrachloride should be opposite and similar to those of silane, respectively. Available data are in agreement with this prediction.

  18. High Pressure Chemical Vapor Deposition of Hydrogenated Amorphous Silicon Films and Solar Cells.

    PubMed

    He, Rongrui; Day, Todd D; Sparks, Justin R; Sullivan, Nichole F; Badding, John V

    2016-07-01

    Thin films of hydrogenated amorphous silicon can be produced at MPa pressures from silane without the use of plasma at temperatures as low as 345 °C. High pressure chemical vapor deposition may open a new way to low cost deposition of amorphous silicon solar cells and other thin film structures over very large areas in very compact, simple reactors.

  19. Chemical vapor deposition of W-Si-N and W-B-N

    DOEpatents

    Fleming, James G.; Roherty-Osmun, Elizabeth Lynn; Smith, Paul M.; Custer, Jonathan S.; Jones, Ronald V.; Nicolet, Marc-A.; Madar, Roland; Bernard, Claude

    1999-01-01

    A method of depositing a ternary, refractory based thin film on a substrate by chemical vapor deposition employing precursor sources of tungsten comprising WF.sub.6, either silicon or boron, and nitrogen. The result is a W--Si--N or W--B--N thin film useful for diffusion barrier and micromachining applications.

  20. Cloud droplet deposition in subalpine balsam fir forests: hydrological and chemical inputs.

    PubMed

    Lovett, G M; Reiners, W A; Olson, R K

    1982-12-24

    Subalpine forests of the northern Appalachians are subject to significant deposition of water and chemicals via cloud droplet impaction. This deposition has been estimated by a method linking micrometeorological measures of turbulent transfer, a detailed representation of canopy structure, and experimentally derived capture efficiencies. Water inputs from clouds are about 46 percent, and chemical inputs range from 150 to 430 percent of the bulk precipitation.

  1. Reduced chemical warfare agent sorption in polyurethane-painted surfaces via plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition of perfluoroalkanes.

    PubMed

    Gordon, Wesley O; Peterson, Gregory W; Durke, Erin M

    2015-04-01

    Perfluoralkalation via plasma chemical vapor deposition has been used to improve hydrophobicity of surfaces. We have investigated this technique to improve the resistance of commercial polyurethane coatings to chemicals, such as chemical warfare agents. The reported results indicate the surface treatment minimizes the spread of agent droplets and the sorption of agent into the coating. The improvement in resistance is likely due to reduction of the coating's surface free energy via fluorine incorporation, but may also have contributing effects from surface morphology changes. The data indicates that plasma-based surface modifications may have utility in improving chemical resistance of commercial coatings.

  2. Chemical vapor deposition of silicon carbide for large area mirrors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gentilman, R. L.; Maguire, E. A.

    1982-05-01

    CVD-SiC has been identified as the leading mirror material for high energy synchrotron radiation because of its high K/alpha ratio and its ability to be super-polished to less than or equal to 10 A rms roughness. Technology already exists for depositing SiC over large areas (approximately 70 cm x 20 cm). The CVD process, substrate selection, and mirror design considerations are discussed.

  3. Synthesis of multifilament silicon carbide fibers by chemical vapor deposition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Revankar, Vithal; Hlavacek, Vladimir

    1991-01-01

    A process for development of clean silicon carbide fiber with a small diameter and high reliability is presented. An experimental evaluation of operating conditions for SiC fibers of good mechanical properties and devising an efficient technique which will prevent welding together of individual filaments are discussed. The thermodynamic analysis of a different precursor system was analyzed vigorously. Thermodynamically optimum conditions for stoichiometric SiC deposit were obtained.

  4. Metal organic chemical vapor deposition of environmental barrier coatings for the inhibition of solid deposit formation from heated jet fuel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohan, Arun Ram

    Solid deposit formation from jet fuel compromises the fuel handling system of an aviation turbine engine and increases the maintenance downtime of an aircraft. The deposit formation process depends upon the composition of the fuel, the nature of metal surfaces that come in contact with the heated fuel and the operating conditions of the engine. The objective of the study is to investigate the effect of substrate surfaces on the amount and nature of solid deposits in the intermediate regime where both autoxidation and pyrolysis play an important role in deposit formation. A particular focus has been directed to examining the effectiveness of barrier coatings produced by metal organic chemical vapor deposition (MOCVD) on metal surfaces for inhibiting the solid deposit formation from jet fuel degradation. In the first part of the experimental study, a commercial Jet-A sample was stressed in a flow reactor on seven different metal surfaces: AISI316, AISI 321, AISI 304, AISI 347, Inconel 600, Inconel 718, Inconel 750X and FecrAlloy. Examination of deposits by thermal and microscopic analysis shows that the solid deposit formation is influenced by the interaction of organosulfur compounds and autoxidation products with the metal surfaces. The nature of metal sulfides was predicted by Fe-Ni-S ternary phase diagram. Thermal stressing on uncoated surfaces produced coke deposits with varying degree of structural order. They are hydrogen-rich and structurally disordered deposits, spherulitic deposits, small carbon particles with relatively ordered structures and large platelets of ordered carbon structures formed by metal catalysis. In the second part of the study, environmental barrier coatings were deposited on tube surfaces to inhibit solid deposit formation from the heated fuel. A new CVD system was configured by the proper choice of components for mass flow, pressure and temperature control in the reactor. A bubbler was designed to deliver the precursor into the reactor

  5. CO2-fluxing collapses metal mobility in magmatic vapour

    DOE PAGES

    van Hinsberg, V. J.; Berlo, K.; Migdisov, A. A.; Williams-Jones, A. E.

    2016-05-18

    Magmatic systems host many types of ore deposits, including world-class deposits of copper and gold. Magmas are commonly an important source of metals and ore-forming fluids in these systems. In many magmatic-hydrothermal systems, low-density aqueous fluids, or vapours, are significant metal carriers. Such vapours are water-dominated shallowly, but fluxing of CO2-rich vapour exsolved from deeper magma is now recognised as ubiquitous during open-system magma degassing. Furthermore, we show that such CO2-fluxing leads to a sharp drop in element solubility, up to a factor of 10,000 for Cu, and thereby provides a highly efficient, but as yet unrecognised mechanism for metalmore » deposition.« less

  6. Chemical vapor deposition and characterization of titanium dioxide thin films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gilmer, David Christopher

    1998-12-01

    The continued drive to decrease the size and increase the speed of micro-electronic Metal-Oxide-Semiconductor (MOS) devices is hampered by some of the properties of the SiOsb2 gate dielectric. This research has focused on the CVD of TiOsb2 thin films to replace SiOsb2 as the gate dielectric in MOS capacitors and transistors. The relationship of CVD parameters and post-deposition anneal treatments to the physical and electrical properties of thin films of TiOsb2 has been studied. Structural and electrical characterization of TiOsb2 films grown from the CVD precursors tetraisopropoxotitanium (IV) (TTIP) and TTIP plus Hsb2O is described in Chapter 3. Both types of deposition produced stoichiometric TiOsb2 films comprised of polycrystalline anatase, but the interface properties were dramatically degraded when water vapor was added. Films grown with TTIP in the presence of Hsb2O contained greater than 50% more hydrogen than films grown using only TTIP and the hydrogen content of films deposited in both wet and dry TTIP environments decreased sharply with a post deposition Osb2 anneal. A significant thickness variation of the dielectric constant was observed which could be explained by an interfacial oxide and the finite accumulation thickness. Fabricated TiOsb2 capacitors exhibited electrically equivalent SiOsb2 gate dielectric thicknesses and leakage current densities as low as 38, and 1×10sp{-8} Amp/cmsp2 respectively. Chapter 4 discusses the low temperature CVD of crystalline TiOsb2 thin films deposited using the precursor tetranitratotitanium (IV), TNT, which produces crystalline TiOsb2 films of the anatase phase in UHV-CVD at temperatures as low as 184sp°C. Fabricated TiOsb2 capacitors exhibited electrically equivalent SiOsb2 gate dielectric thicknesses and leakage current densities as low as 17, and 1×10sp{-8} Amp/cmsp2 respectively. Chapter 5 describes the results of a comparison of physical and electrical properties between TiOsb2 films grown via LPCVD using

  7. Deposition of microcrystalline silicon prepared by hot-wire chemical-vapor deposition: The influence of the deposition parameters on the material properties and solar cell performance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klein, Stefan; Finger, Friedhelm; Carius, Reinhard; Stutzmann, Martin

    2005-07-01

    Microcrystalline silicon (μc-Si:H) of superior quality can be prepared using the hot-wire chemical-vapor deposition method (HWCVD). At a low substrate temperature (TS) of 185 °C excellent material properties and solar cell performance were obtained with spin densities of 6×1015cm-3 and solar cell efficiencies up to 9.4%, respectively. In this study we have systematically investigated the influence of various deposition parameters on the deposition rate and the material properties. For this purpose, thin films and solar cells were prepared at specific substrate and filament temperatures and deposition pressures (pD), covering the complete range from amorphous to highly crystalline material by adjusting the silane concentration. The influence of these deposition parameters on the chemical reactions at the filament and in the gas phase qualitatively explains the behavior of the structural composition and the formation of defects. In particular, we propose that the deposition rate is determined by the production of reactive species at the filament and a particular atomic-hydrogen-to-silicon ratio is found at the microcrystalline/amorphous transition. The structural, optical, and electronic properties were studied using Raman and infrared spectroscopies, optical-absorption measurements, electron-spin resonance, and dark and photoconductivities. These experiments show that higher TS and pD lead to a deterioration of the material quality, i.e., much higher defect densities, oxygen contaminations, and SiH absorption at 2100cm-1. Similar to plasma enhanced chemical-vapor deposition material, μc-Si:H solar cells prepared with HW i layers show increasing open circuit voltages (Voc) with increasing silane concentration and best performance is achieved near the transition to amorphous growth. Such solar cells prepared at low TS exhibit very high Voc up to 600 mV and fill factors above 70% with i layers prepared by HWCVD.

  8. Second harmonic generation in ZnO thin films fabricated by metalorganic chemical vapor deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, C. Y.; Zhang, B. P.; Binh, N. T.; Segawa, Y.

    2004-07-01

    Second harmonic generation (SHG) from ZnO thin films fabricated by metalorganic chemical vapor deposition (MOCVD) technique was carried out. By comparing the second harmonic signal generated in a series of ZnO films with different deposition temperatures, we conclude that a significant part of second harmonic signal is generated at the film deposited with appropriate temperature. The second-order susceptibility tensor χ(2)zzz=9.2 pm/V was deduced for a film deposited at 250 °C.

  9. Industrial Scale Synthesis of Carbon Nanotubes Via Fluidized Bed Chemical Vapor Deposition: A Senior Design Project

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, York R.; Fuchs, Alan; Meyyappan, M.

    2010-01-01

    Senior year chemical engineering students designed a process to produce 10 000 tonnes per annum of single wall carbon nanotubes (SWNT) and also conducted bench-top experiments to synthesize SWNTs via fluidized bed chemical vapor deposition techniques. This was an excellent pedagogical experience because it related to the type of real world design…

  10. Diverse Amorphous Carbonaceous Thin Films Obtained by Plasma Enhanced Chemical Vapor Deposition and Plasma Immersion Ion Implantation and Deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Santos, R. M.; Turri, R.; Rangel, E. C.; da Cruz, N. C.; Schreiner, W.; Davanzo, C. U.; Durrant, S. F.

    Diverse amorphous hydrogenated carbon and similar films containing additional elements were produced by Plasma Enhanced Chemical Vapor Deposition (PECVD) and by Plasma Immersion Ion Implantation and Deposition (PIIID). Thus a-C:H, a-C:H:F, a-C:H:N, a-C:H:Cl and a-C:H:O:Si were obtained, starting from the same feed gases, using both techniques. The same deposition system supplied with radiofrequency (RF) power was used to produce all the films. A cylindrical stainless steel chamber equipped with circular electrodes mounted horizontally was employed. RF power was fed to the upper electrode; substrates were placed on the lower electrode. For PIIID negative high tension pulses were also applied to the lower electrode. Raman spectroscopy confirmed that all the films are amorphous. Chemical characterization of each pair of films was undertaken using Infrared Reflection Absorption Spectroscopy and X-ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy. The former revealed the presence of specific structures, such as C-H, C-O, O-H. The latter allowed calculation of the ratio of hetero-atoms to carbon atoms in the films, e.g. F:C, N:C, and Si:C. Only relatively small differences in elemental composition were detected between films produced by the two methods. The deposition rate in PIIID is generally reduced in relation to that of PECVD; for a-C:H:Cl films the reduction factor is almost four.

  11. Chemical and physical sputtering effects on the surface morphology of carbon films grown by plasma chemical vapor deposition

    SciTech Connect

    Vazquez, Luis

    2009-08-01

    We have studied the influence of chemical and physical sputtering on the surface morphology of hydrogenated carbon films deposited on silicon substrates by bias-enhanced electron cyclotron resonance chemical vapor deposition. Atomic force microscopy based power spectrum density (PSD) and roughness analysis have been used to investigate the film morphology. This study has been possible due to the appropriate choice of the experimental variables, in particular, gas mixture, resulting in either nitrogen-free (a-C:H) or nitrogenated carbon (a-CN:H) films, and substrate bias (V{sub b}). Under these conditions, chemical sputtering is present for a-CN:H deposition but it is negligible for a-C:H film growth, while physical sputtering processes appear for both systems for V{sub b}<=-85 V. When physical sputtering does not operate, the film growth with simultaneous chemical sputtering leads to a characteristic a-CN:H granular surface morphology. Furthermore, PSD analysis reveals that a spatial correlation of the a-CN:H film surface roughness, up to distances approx300 nm, becomes a fingerprint of the coexistence of growth and chemical erosion processes on the film morphology. However, once physical sputtering takes place, the influence of chemical sputtering by reactive nitrogen species on the final surface morphology becomes negligible and both a-CN:H and a-C:H film morphologies are ultrasmooth.

  12. A new modular multichamber plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Madan, A.; Rava, P.; Schropp, R. E. I.; von Roedern, B.

    1993-06-01

    The present work reports on a new modular UHV multichamber PECVD system with characteristics which prevent both the incorporation of residual impurities and cross contamination between different layers. A wide range of intrinsic and doped hydrogenated amorphous silicon (a-Si:H) materials have been produced and single junction pin solar cells with an efficiency greater than 10% have been readily obtained with little optimization. The system contains three UHV modular process zones (MPZ's); the MPZ's and a load lock chamber are located around a central isolation and transfer zone which contains the transport mechanism consisting of an arm with radial and linear movement. This configuration allows for introduction of the substrate into the MPZ's in any sequence so that any type of multilayer device can be produced. The interelectrode distance in the MPZ's can be adjusted between 1 and 5 cm. This has been found to be an important parameter in the optimisation of the deposition rate and of the uniformity. The multichamber concept also allows individually optimized deposition temperatures and interelectrode distances for the various layers. The system installed in Utrecht will be employed for further optimization of single junction solar cells and for research and development of stable a-Si:H tandem cells.

  13. Prediction of Chemical Vapor Deposition Rates on Monofilaments and Its Implications for Fiber Properties

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gokoglu, S. A.; Kuczmarski, M.; Veitch, L. C.

    1992-01-01

    Deposition rates are predicted in a cylindrical upflow reactor designed for chemical vapor deposition (CVD) on monofilaments. Deposition of silicon from silane in a hydrogen carrier gas is chosen as a relevant example. The effects of gas and surface chemistry are studied in a two-dimensional axisymmetric flow field for this chemically well-studied system. Model predictions are compared to experimental CVD rate measurements. The differences in some physical and chemical phenomena between such small diameter (about 150 microns) fiber substrates and other typical CVD substrates are highlighted. The influence of the Soret mass transport mechanism is determined to be extraordinarily significant. The difficulties associated with the accurate measurement and control of the fiber temperature are discussed. Model prediction sensitivities are investigated with respect to fiber temperatures, fiber radii, Soret transport, and chemical kinetic parameters. The implications of the predicted instantaneous rates are discussed relative to the desired fiber properties for both the batch and the continuous processes.

  14. Si Passivation and Chemical Vapor Deposition of Silicon Nitride: Final Technical Report, March 18, 2007

    SciTech Connect

    Atwater, H. A.

    2007-11-01

    This report investigated chemical and physical methods for Si surface passivation for application in crystalline Si and thin Si film photovoltaic devices. Overall, our efforts during the project were focused in three areas: i) synthesis of silicon nitride thin films with high hydrogen content by hot-wire chemical vapor deposition; ii) investigation of the role of hydrogen passivation of defects in crystalline Si and Si solar cells by out diffusion from hydrogenated silicon nitride films; iii) investigation of the growth kinetics and passivation of hydrogenated polycrystalline. Silicon nitride films were grown by hot-wire chemical vapor deposition and film properties have been characterized as a function of SiH4/NH3 flow ratio. It was demonstrated that hot-wire chemical vapor deposition leads to growth of SiNx films with controllable stoichiometry and hydrogen.

  15. AFM investigation and optical band gap study of chemically deposited PbS thin films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zaman, S.; Mansoor, M.; Abubakar; Asim, M. M.

    2016-08-01

    The interest into deposition of nanocrystalline PbS thin films, the potential of designing and tailoring both the topographical features and the band gap energy (Eg) by controlling growth parameters, has significant technological importance. Nanocrystalline thin films of lead sulfide were grown onto glass substrates by chemical bath deposition (CBD) method. The experiments were carried out by varying deposition temperature. We report on the modification of structural and optical properties as a function of deposition temperature. The morphological changes of the films were analyzed by using SEM and AFM. AFM was also used to calculate average roughness of the films. XRD spectra indicated preferred growth of cubic phase of PbS films in (200) direction with increasing deposition time. Optical properties have been studied by UV-Spectrophotometer. From the diffused reflectance spectra we have calculated the optical Eg shift from 0.649-0.636 eV with increasing deposition time.

  16. Low temperature deposition of polycrystalline silicon thin films on a flexible polymer substrate by hot wire chemical vapor deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Sang-hoon; Jung, Jae-soo; Lee, Sung-soo; Lee, Sung-bo; Hwang, Nong-moon

    2016-11-01

    For the applications such as flexible displays and solar cells, the direct deposition of crystalline silicon films on a flexible polymer substrate has been a great issue. Here, we investigated the direct deposition of polycrystalline silicon films on a polyimide film at the substrate temperature of 200 °C. The low temperature deposition of crystalline silicon on a flexible substrate has been successfully made based on two ideas. One is that the Si-Cl-H system has a retrograde solubility of silicon in the gas phase near the substrate temperature. The other is the new concept of non-classical crystallization, where films grow by the building block of nanoparticles formed in the gas phase during hot-wire chemical vapor deposition (HWCVD). The total amount of precipitation of silicon nanoparticles decreased with increasing HCl concentration. By adding HCl, the amount and the size of silicon nanoparticles were reduced remarkably, which is related with the low temperature deposition of silicon films of highly crystalline fraction with a very thin amorphous incubation layer. The dark conductivity of the intrinsic film prepared at the flow rate ratio of RHCl=[HCl]/[SiH4]=3.61 was 1.84×10-6 Scm-1 at room temperature. The Hall mobility of the n-type silicon film prepared at RHCl=3.61 was 5.72 cm2 V-1s-1. These electrical properties of silicon films are high enough and could be used in flexible electric devices.

  17. Friction and Wear of Ion-Beam-Deposited Diamondlike Carbon on Chemical-Vapor-Deposited, Fine-Grain Diamond

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miyoshi, Kazuhisa; Wu, Richard L. C.; Lanter, William C.

    1996-01-01

    Friction and wear behavior of ion-beam-deposited diamondlike carbon (DLC) films coated on chemical-vapor-deposited (CVD), fine-grain diamond coatings were examined in ultrahigh vacuum, dry nitrogen, and humid air environments. The DLC films were produced by the direct impact of an ion beam (composed of a 3:17 mixture of Ar and CH4) at ion energies of 1500 and 700 eV and an RF power of 99 W. Sliding friction experiments were conducted with hemispherical CVD diamond pins sliding on four different carbon-base coating systems: DLC films on CVD diamond; DLC films on silicon; as-deposited, fine-grain CVD diamond; and carbon-ion-implanted, fine-grain CVD diamond on silicon. Results indicate that in ultrahigh vacuum the ion-beam-deposited DLC films on fine-grain CVD diamond (similar to the ion-implanted CVD diamond) greatly decrease both the friction and wear of fine-grain CVD diamond films and provide solid lubrication. In dry nitrogen and in humid air, ion-beam-deposited DLC films on fine-grain CVD diamond films also had a low steady-state coefficient of friction and a low wear rate. These tribological performance benefits, coupled with a wider range of coating thicknesses, led to longer endurance life and improved wear resistance for the DLC deposited on fine-grain CVD diamond in comparison to the ion-implanted diamond films. Thus, DLC deposited on fine-grain CVD diamond films can be an effective wear-resistant, lubricating coating regardless of environment.

  18. Deposition Technique For Chemical Free Black Coatings On Metals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carton, J. G.; Cobbe, N.; O'Donoghue, J.; Pambaguian, L.; Norman, A.; Liedtke, V.; McCaul, T.

    2012-07-01

    Coatings having specific thermo-optical properties are necessary to manage the temperature equilibrium in space hardware. Incumbent black body coatings have a need to extend their operating temperature as well as increase the range of substrate materials that can be coated; in addition, issues relating to outgassing can limit the application of black body coatings. In this paper a relatively new coating technology, CoBlast, is used to deposit material on to titanium substrates, to produce a black body surface; SolarBlack. CoBlast, replaces the oxide layer of reactive metals with a fused thin surface. The process is uniquely non-complex, requiring no thermal input, no wet chemistry and is performed in an ambient temperature and pressure environment. Thermo optical and micro-structure analysis of SolarBlack was completed and the characterisation results including thermo cycling, up to 700°C, are discussed.

  19. Preparation and analysis of chemically gradient functional bioceramic coating formed by pulsed laser deposition.

    PubMed

    Rajesh, P; Muraleedharan, C V; Sureshbabu, S; Komath, Manoj; Varma, Harikrishna

    2012-02-01

    Bioactive ceramic coatings based on calcium phosphates yield better functionality in the human body for a variety of metallic implant devices including orthopaedic and dental prostheses. In the present study chemically and hence functionally gradient bioceramic coating was obtained by pulsed laser deposition method. Calcium phosphate bioactive ceramic coatings based on hydroxyapatite (HA) and tricalcium phosphate (TCP) were deposited over titanium substrate to produce gradation in physico-chemical characteristics and in vitro dissolution behaviour. Sintered targets of HA and α-TCP were deposited in a multi target laser deposition system. The obtained deposits were characterized by X-ray diffraction, fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, scanning electron microscopy and energy dispersive X-ray analysis. Inductively coupled plasma spectroscopy was used to estimate the in vitro dissolution behaviour of coatings. The variation in mechanical property of the gradient layer was evaluated through scratch test and micro-indentation hardness. The bioactivity was examined in vitro with respect to the ability of HA layer to form on the surface as a result of contact with simulated body fluid. It could be inferred that chemically gradient functional bioceramic coating can be produced by laser deposition of multiple sintered targets with variable chemical composition.

  20. Preparation and analysis of chemically gradient functional bioceramic coating formed by pulsed laser deposition.

    PubMed

    Rajesh, P; Muraleedharan, C V; Sureshbabu, S; Komath, Manoj; Varma, Harikrishna

    2012-02-01

    Bioactive ceramic coatings based on calcium phosphates yield better functionality in the human body for a variety of metallic implant devices including orthopaedic and dental prostheses. In the present study chemically and hence functionally gradient bioceramic coating was obtained by pulsed laser deposition method. Calcium phosphate bioactive ceramic coatings based on hydroxyapatite (HA) and tricalcium phosphate (TCP) were deposited over titanium substrate to produce gradation in physico-chemical characteristics and in vitro dissolution behaviour. Sintered targets of HA and α-TCP were deposited in a multi target laser deposition system. The obtained deposits were characterized by X-ray diffraction, fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, scanning electron microscopy and energy dispersive X-ray analysis. Inductively coupled plasma spectroscopy was used to estimate the in vitro dissolution behaviour of coatings. The variation in mechanical property of the gradient layer was evaluated through scratch test and micro-indentation hardness. The bioactivity was examined in vitro with respect to the ability of HA layer to form on the surface as a result of contact with simulated body fluid. It could be inferred that chemically gradient functional bioceramic coating can be produced by laser deposition of multiple sintered targets with variable chemical composition. PMID:22105226

  1. Chemical Weathering of New Pyroclastic Deposits from Mt. Merapi (Java), Indonesia

    SciTech Connect

    Fiantis, Dian; Nelson, Malik; Van Ranst, Eric; Shamshudin, Josup; Qafoku, Nikolla

    2009-09-01

    Java Island, Indonesia with abundant amount of pyroclastic deposits is located in the very active and dynamic Pacific Ring of Fires. Studying the geochemical weathering indices of these pyroclastic deposits is important to get a clear picture about weathering profiles on deposits resulting from the eruption of Mt. Merapi. Immediately after the first phase of the eruption (March to June 2006), moist and leached pyroclastic deposits were collected. These pyroclastic deposits were found to be composed of volcanic glass, plagioclase feldspar in various proportions, orthopyroxene, clinopyroxene, olivine, amphibole, and titanomagnetite. Total elemental composition of the bulk samples (including trace elements and heavy metals) were determined by wet chemical methods and X-ray fluorescence (XRF) analyses. Weathering of the pyroclastic deposits was studied using various weathering indices. The Ruxton ratio, weathering index of Parker, Vought resudual index and chemical index of weathering of moist pyroclastic are lower than the leached sample but the alteration indices (chemical and plagioclase) are slightly higher in the moist compared to the leached pyroclastic deposits.

  2. Etching Effects During the Chemical Vapor Deposition of (100) Diamond

    SciTech Connect

    Battaile, C.C.; Srolovitz, D.J.; Oleinik, I.I.; Pettifor, D.G.; Sutton, A.P.; Harris, S.J.; Butler, J.E.

    1999-08-02

    Current theories of CVD growth on (100) diamond are unable to account for the numerous experimental observations of slow-growing, locally smooth (100)(2x1) films. In this paper they use quantum mechanical calculations of diamond surface thermochemistry and atomic-scale kinetic Monte Carlo simulations of deposition to investigate the efficacy of preferential etching as a mechanism that can help to reconcile this discrepancy. This etching mechanism allows for the removal of undercoordinated carbon atoms from the diamond surface. In the absence of etching, simulated growth on the (100)(2x1) surface is faster than growth on the (110) and (111) surfaces, and the (100) surface is atomically rough. When etching is included in the simulations, the (100) growth rates decrease to values near those observed experimentally, while the rates of growth on the other surfaces remain largely unaffected and similar to those observed experimentally. In addition, the etching mechanism promotes the growth of smooth (100) surface regions in agreement with numerous scanning probe studies.

  3. Aerosol chemical vapor deposition of metal oxide films

    DOEpatents

    Ott, K.C.; Kodas, T.T.

    1994-01-11

    A process of preparing a film of a multicomponent metal oxide including: forming an aerosol from a solution comprised of a suitable solvent and at least two precursor compounds capable of volatilizing at temperatures lower than the decomposition temperature of said precursor compounds; passing said aerosol in combination with a suitable oxygen-containing carrier gas into a heated zone, said heated zone having a temperature sufficient to evaporate the solvent and volatilize said precursor compounds; and passing said volatilized precursor compounds against the surface of a substrate, said substrate having a sufficient temperature to decompose said volatilized precursor compounds whereby metal atoms contained within said volatilized precursor compounds are deposited as a metal oxide film upon the substrate is disclosed. In addition, a coated article comprising a multicomponent metal oxide film conforming to the surface of a substrate selected from the group consisting of silicon, magnesium oxide, yttrium-stabilized zirconium oxide, sapphire, or lanthanum gallate, said multicomponent metal oxide film characterized as having a substantially uniform thickness upon said substrate.

  4. Chemical instrumentation for field studies of atmospheric wet deposition processes

    SciTech Connect

    Tanner, R.L.

    1986-04-01

    Field studies of wet deposition processes require the differentiation and determination of many trace reactive species in the atmosphere. The species may be present in clear-air-gaseous or aerosol phases, or they may be distributed between cloudwater or precipitation and interstitial gaseous phases. Analytical requirement on existing techniques have been extremely rigorous and, in several cases, have required development of new approaches to the sampling and determination of critical species. This paper views these developments with respect to airborne sampling in the following general areas: determination of sub-ppb levels of nitrogen oxides (NO, NO/sub x/, HNO/sub 3/) in real-time using ozone chemiluminescence; determination of sub-ppb levels of sulfur dioxide and aersol sulfate in real-time using the flame photometric detector; determination of oxidants (ozone, PAN, H/sub 2/O/sub 2/) in gaseous and aqueous phases; determination of organic species (hydrocarbons, aldehydes, acids in gaseous and aqueous phases; cloud/raindrop - free air sampling; collection of aqueous liquid and solid samples; direct measurement of particle size distributions (aerosols, cloud droplets, rain droplets.)

  5. Silicon epitaxy using tetrasilane at low temperatures in ultra-high vacuum chemical vapor deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hazbun, Ramsey; Hart, John; Hickey, Ryan; Ghosh, Ayana; Fernando, Nalin; Zollner, Stefan; Adam, Thomas N.; Kolodzey, James

    2016-06-01

    The deposition of silicon using tetrasilane as a vapor precursor is described for an ultra-high vacuum chemical vapor deposition tool. The growth rates and morphology of the Si epitaxial layers over a range of temperatures and pressures are presented. The layers were characterized using transmission electron microscopy, x-ray diffraction, spectroscopic ellipsometry, Atomic Force Microscopy, and secondary ion mass spectrometry. Based on this characterization, high quality single crystal silicon epitaxy was observed. Tetrasilane was found to produce higher growth rates relative to lower order silanes, with the ability to deposit crystalline Si at low temperatures (T=400 °C), with significant amorphous growth and reactivity measured as low as 325 °C, indicating the suitability of tetrasilane for low temperature chemical vapor deposition such as for SiGeSn alloys.

  6. Effects of Buffer Salt Concentration on the Dominated Deposition Mechanism and Optical Characteristics of Chemically Deposited Cadmium Sulfide Thin Films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kakhaki, Z. Makhdoumi; Youzbashi, A.; Sangpour, P.; Kazemzadeh, A.; Naderi, N.; Bazargan, A. M.

    2016-02-01

    Effects of buffer salt concentration on the rate of deposition, dominated deposition mechanism and subsequently the structural, morphological, and optical properties of cadmium sulfide (CdS) thin films deposited by chemical bath deposition (CBD) on glass substrate were investigated. The precursors were chosen to be cadmium chloride (CdCl2) as the cadmium source, thiourea (CS(NH2)2) as the sulfur source, ammonium nitrate (NH4NO3) as the buffer salt and ammonia as the complexing agent and the pH controller. The influence of the NH4NO3 concentration on the structure, morphology, film uniformity, stoichiometry and optical properties of CdS thin films was also studied by X-ray diffractometer (XRD), field emission scanning electron microscope (FE-SEM), energy dispersive X-ray (EDX) spectroscope, uv-visible and photoluminescence (PL) spectroscopes. The XRD studies revealed that all the deposited films exhibited a (002)h/(111)c preferred orientation. The crystallite size was increased from 20nm to 30nm by the increase of concentration of NH4NO3 from 0.5M to 2.5M. The morphology of CdS thin films were agglomerated spherical particles consisted of smaller particles. The surface of thin films deposited at the NH4NO3 concentration of 0.5M was compact and smooth. The increase of the concentration of NH4NO3 decreased the packing density of the films. The optical band gap was in the range of 2.25-2.4eV, which was decreased by the decrement of packing density. The PL spectra showed two peaks centered at 400nm and 500nm which are attributed to violet and band-to-band emissions, respectively.

  7. The development of chemically vapor deposited mullite coatings for the corrosion protection of SiC

    SciTech Connect

    Auger, M.; Hou, P.; Sengupta, A.; Basu, S.; Sarin, V.

    1998-05-01

    Crystalline mullite coatings have been chemically vapor deposited onto SiC substrates to enhance the corrosion and oxidation resistance of the substrate. Current research has been divided into three distinct areas: (1) Development of the deposition processing conditions for increased control over coating`s growth rate, microstructure, and morphology; (2) Analysis of the coating`s crystal structure and stability; (3) The corrosion resistance of the CVD mullite coating on SiC.

  8. CuInS2 Films Deposited by Aerosol-Assisted Chemical Vapor Deposition Using Ternary Single-Source Precursors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jin, Michael; Banger, Kal; Harris, Jerry; Hepp, Aloysius

    2003-01-01

    Polycrystalline CuInS2 films were deposited by aerosol-assisted chemical vapor deposition using both solid and liquid ternary single-source precursors (SSPs) which were prepared in-house. Films with either (112) or (204/220) preferred orientation, had a chalcopyrite structure, and (112)-oriented films contained more copper than (204/220)-oriented films. The preferred orientation of the film is likely related to the decomposition and reaction kinetics associated with the molecular structure of the precursors at the substrate. Interestingly, the (204/220)-oriented films were always In-rich and were accompanied by a secondary phase. From the results of post-growth annealing, etching experiments, and Raman spectroscopic data, the secondary phase was identified as an In-rich compound. On the contrary, (112)-oriented films were always obtained with a minimal amount of the secondary phase, and had a maximum grain size of about 0.5 micron. Electrical and optical properties of all the films grown were characterized. They all showed p-type conduction with an electrical resistivity between 0.1 and 30 Omega-cm, and an optical band gap of approximately 1.46 eV +/- 0.02, as deposited. The material properties of deposited films revealed this methodology of using SSPs for fabricating chalcopyrite-based solar cells to be highly promising.

  9. CuInS2 Films Deposited by Aerosol-Assisted Chemical Vapor Deposition Using Ternary Single-Source Precursors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jin, Michael H.-C.; Banger, Kulbinder K.; Harris, Jerry D.; Hepp, Aloysius F.

    2004-01-01

    Polycrystalline CuInS2 films were deposited by aerosol-assisted chemical vapor deposition using both solid and liquid ternary single-source precursors (SSPs) prepared in-house. Films with either (112) or (204/220) preferred orientation were obtained, and compositional analysis showed that (112)-oriented films contained more copper than (204/220)-oriented films. Using X-ray diffraction, the signature of chalcopyrite structure was often confirmed for (112)-oriented films. The preferred orientation of the film is likely related to the decomposition and reaction kinetics associated with the molecular structure of the precursors at the substrate. Interestingly, the (204/220)-oriented films were always accompanied by a secondary phase, which was identified as an unknown In-rich compound from the results of post-growth annealing, etching experiments, and Raman spectroscopic data. By increasing Cu to In ratio in the film, (112)-oriented films were obtained with a maximum grain size of about 0.5 micrometers, and their X-ray diffractions did not show any observable signature of the In secondary phase. Electrical and optical properties of all the films grown were characterized. They all showed p-type conduction with an electrical resistivity between 0.1 omega cm and 30 omega cm, and an optical band gap of 1.46eV +/- 0.02, as deposited. The material properties of deposited films revealed this methodology of using SSPs for fabricating chalcopyrite-based solar cells to be highly promising.

  10. Chemical-vapor deposition of complex oxides: materials and process development

    SciTech Connect

    Muenchausen, R.

    1996-11-01

    This is the final report of a six-month, Laboratory-Directed Research and Development (LDRD) project at the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) part of the Advanced Materials Laboratory (AML). The demand for higher performance and lower cost in electronics is driving the need for advanced materials and consequent process integration. Ceramic thin-film technology is becoming more important in the manufacture of microelectronic devices, photovoltaics, optoelectronics, magneto-optics, sensors, microwave, and radio frequency communication devices, and high-Tc superconducting tapes. A flexible processing approach for potential large-scale manufacturing of novel electronic ceramic thin films is desirable. Current thin- film deposition technologies based on physical vapor-deposition techniques are limited in scale potential and have limited control of processing parameters. The lack of control over multiple process parameters inhibits the versatility and reproducibility of the physical vapor deposition processes applied to complex oxides. Chemical vapor deposition is emerging as a viable approach for large- scale manufacturing of electronic materials. Specifically, the ability to control more processing parameters with chemical vapor deposition than with other processing techniques provides the reliability and material property reproducibility required by manufacturing. This project sought to investigate the chemical vapor deposition of complex oxides.

  11. Development of a Computational Chemical Vapor Deposition Model: Applications to Indium Nitride and Dicyanovinylaniline

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cardelino, Carlos

    1999-01-01

    A computational chemical vapor deposition (CVD) model is presented, that couples chemical reaction mechanisms with fluid dynamic simulations for vapor deposition experiments. The chemical properties of the systems under investigation are evaluated using quantum, molecular and statistical mechanics models. The fluid dynamic computations are performed using the CFD-ACE program, which can simulate multispecies transport, heat and mass transfer, gas phase chemistry, chemistry of adsorbed species, pulsed reactant flow and variable gravity conditions. Two experimental setups are being studied, in order to fabricate films of: (a) indium nitride (InN) from the gas or surface phase reaction of trimethylindium and ammonia; and (b) 4-(1,1)dicyanovinyl-dimethylaminoaniline (DCVA) by vapor deposition. Modeling of these setups requires knowledge of three groups of properties: thermodynamic properties (heat capacity), transport properties (diffusion, viscosity, and thermal conductivity), and kinetic properties (rate constants for all possible elementary chemical reactions). These properties are evaluated using computational methods whenever experimental data is not available for the species or for the elementary reactions. The chemical vapor deposition model is applied to InN and DCVA. Several possible InN mechanisms are proposed and analyzed. The CVD model simulations of InN show that the deposition rate of InN is more efficient when pulsing chemistry is used under conditions of high pressure and microgravity. An analysis of the chemical properties of DCVA show that DCVA dimers may form under certain conditions of physical vapor transport. CVD simulations of the DCVA system suggest that deposition of the DCVA dimer may play a small role in the film and crystal growth processes.

  12. Helicon wave plasma chemical vapor deposition of nanocrystalline silicon carbide films at low substrate temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Wei; Lu, Wanbing; Wang, Baozhu; Han, Li; Fu, Guangsheng

    2005-02-01

    Silicon carbide thin films have been deposited by helicon wave plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition (HW-PECVD) technique under the conditions of variant deposition temperatures from 300 to 600°C. Silane, methane and hydrogen are used as reactive gas. The structural properties of the deposited films are characterized using Fourier transform infrared (FTIR), scan electron microscopy (SEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and ultraviolet-visible optical absorption techniques. Detailed analysis of the FTIR spectra indicates that the onset of growing nanocrystalline SiC films at low substrate temperature is closed related with the high plasma ionization rate of helicon wave plasma and the condition of low working gas pressure and strong hydrogen dilution in experiment. The SEM and TEM measurements confirm that the structure of the deposited films is nanocrystalline SiC grains embedded in amorphous matrix and the size of the crystalline gains increases with substrate temperature.

  13. Nanocrystalline CuInSSe thin films by chemical bath deposition technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shrotriya, Vipin; Rajaram, P.

    2016-05-01

    Crystalline CuInSSe thin films have been deposited on glass substrate by chemical bath deposition technique. The CuCl2, InCl3, thiourea and SeO2 were used as source materials for the Cu2+, In3+, S2- and Se2- ions and the Cu/In ratio was kept at 1.0. EDC was used as a complexing agent. The XRD, Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM), Energy Dispersive Analysis of X-Ray (EDAX) and Optical transmission studies were used for structural analysis, surface morphology, elemental analysis and optical band gap, of the grown thin films respectively. The deposition parameters such as pH, deposition temperature and deposition time were optimized.

  14. Convection and mass-transport in laser-induced chemical vapor deposition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Patnaik, S.; Brown, R. A.

    1988-01-01

    Gas flow and energy and species transport in laser-induced chemical vapor deposition (LICVD) of amorphous silicon films by silane pyrolysis are analyzed by finite element analysis of a two-dimensional model for the process. Spatial nonuniformity of the deposited film is shown to result from diffusion controlled transport of products between the beam and substrate. Deposition profiles are affected by buoyancy-driven convection only at increased gas pressures. Horizontal orientation of the reactor with respect to gravity is optimal because the stagnation-like flow, that results adjacent to the substrate, enhances mixing, and smoothes the film profile.

  15. Microstructural modification of nc-Si/SiOx films during plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, X. W.

    2005-07-01

    Nanocrystalline-silicon embedded silicon oxide films are prepared by plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition (PECVD) at 300 °C without post-heat treatment. Measurements of XPS, IR, XRD, and HREM are performed. Microstructural modifications are found occurring throughout the film deposition. The silica network with a high oxide state is suggested to be formed directly under the abduction of the former deposited layer, rather than processing repeatedly from the original low-oxide state of silica. Nanocrystalline silicon particles with a size of 6-10 nm are embedded in the SiOx film matrix, indicating the potential application in Si-based optoelectronic integrity.

  16. Comparison of the chemical characteristics of the uranium deposits of the Morrison Formation in the Grants uranium region, New Mexico

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Spirakis, C.S.; Pierson, C.T.

    1983-01-01

    Statistical treatment of the chemical data of samples from the northeast Church Rock area, Ruby deposit, Mariano Lake deposit, and the Ambrosia Lake district indicates that primary ore-forming processes concentrated copper, iron, magnesium, manganese, molybdenum, selenium, vanadium, yttrium, arsenic, organic carbon, and sulfur, along with uranium. A barium halo that is associated with all of these deposits formed from secondary processes. Calcium and strontium were also enriched in the ores by secondary processes. Comparison of the chemical characteristics of the redistributed deposits in the Church Rock district to the primary deposits in the Grants uranium region indicates that calcium, manganese, strontium, yttrium, copper, iron, magnesium, molybdenum, lead, selenium, and vanadium are separated from uranium during redistribution of the deposits in the Church Rock area. Comparisons of the chemical characteristics of the Church Rock deposits and the secondary deposits at Ambrosia Lake suggest some differences in the processes that were involved in the genesis of the redistributed deposits in these two areas.

  17. The chemical evolution of a travertine-depositing stream: geochemical processes and mass transfer reactions

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lorah, M.M.; Herman, J.S.

    1988-01-01

    Focuses on quantiatively defining the chemical changes occurring in Falling Spring Creek, a travertine-depositing stream located in Alleghany County, Virgina. The processes of CO2 outgassing and calcite precipitation or dissolution control the chemical evolution of the stream. Physical evidence for calcite precipitation exists in the travertine deposits which are first observed immediately above the waterfall and extend for at least 1.0 km below the falls. Net calcite precipitation occurs at all times of the year but is greatest during low-flow conditions in the summer and early fall. -from Authors

  18. Enhanced Bactericidal Activity of Silver Thin Films Deposited via Aerosol-Assisted Chemical Vapor Deposition.

    PubMed

    Ponja, Sapna D; Sehmi, Sandeep K; Allan, Elaine; MacRobert, Alexander J; Parkin, Ivan P; Carmalt, Claire J

    2015-12-30

    Silver thin films were deposited on SiO2-barrier-coated float glass, fluorine-doped tin oxide (FTO) glass, Activ glass, and TiO2-coated float glass via AACVD using silver nitrate at 350 °C. The films were annealed at 600 °C and analyzed by X-ray powder diffraction, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, UV/vis/near-IR spectroscopy, and scanning electron microscopy. All the films were crystalline, and the silver was present in its elemental form and of nanometer dimension. The antibacterial activity of these samples was tested against Escherichia coli and Staphylococcus aureus in the dark and under UV light (365 nm). All Ag-deposited films reduced the numbers of E. coli by 99.9% within 6 h and the numbers of S. aureus by 99.9% within only 2 h. FTO/Ag reduced bacterial numbers of E. coli to below the detection limit after 60 min and caused a 99.9% reduction of S. aureus within only 15 min of UV irradiation. Activ/Ag reduced the numbers of S. aureus by 66.6% after 60 min and TiO2/Ag killed 99.9% of S. aureus within 60 min of UV exposure. More remarkably, we observed a 99.9% reduction in the numbers of E. coli within 6 h and the numbers of S. aureus within 4 h in the dark using our novel TiO2/Ag system. PMID:26632854

  19. Chemical composition and physical state of lipid deposits in atherosclerosis.

    PubMed

    Lundberg, B

    1985-07-01

    The composition, morphology, and physical properties of lipids in atherosclerotic lesions from human aortas were studied in order to elucidate the factors for the accumulation of cholesterol and its esters in the vessel wall. Lesions were classified histologically into 3 groups: fatty streak, fibrous plaque, and advanced plaque. The relative lipid composition of the lesions was plotted on the phase diagram of the 3 major lipids: cholesterol, cholesteryl ester, and phospholipid. Early fatty streaks had compositions within the 2-phase zone with a cholesterol-phospholipid liquid crystalline phase and a cholesteryl ester oily phase. Advanced fatty streaks and fibro-fatty plaques fell within the 3-phase zone with excess free cholesterol. Advanced plaques also had an average lipid composition within the 3-phase zone, but with a larger excess of free cholesterol. From the lipid-chemical point of view there is a continuous progression from early fatty streaks through advanced fatty streaks and fibro-fatty plaques to advanced plaques. In fatty streaks the cholesteryl esters accumulate in the form of isotropic and anisotropic droplets. The latter are in the smectic liquid crystalline state with the molecules arranged in layers and have surfaces that are spherical and smooth. Fibrous and advanced plaques showed beside droplets also amorphous lipids and cholesterol monohydrate crystals. Some of the amorphous lipids were solid up to about 45 degrees C and exhibited a smectic phase at cooling, indicating cholesteryl esters as the major component. The transition temperatures of high-melting cholesteryl esters, e.g. palmitate, are depressed by low-melting ones. Most of the triglycerides are present in the cholesteryl ester droplets and abolish the cholesteric liquid crystalline phase.

  20. Chemical vapor deposition of ceramic coatings on metals and ceramic fibers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nable, Jun Co

    2005-07-01

    The research presented in this study consists of two major parts. The first part is about the development of ceramic coatings on metals by chemical vapor deposition (CVD) and metal-organic chemical vapor deposition (MOCVD). Ceramics such as Al2O3 and Cr2O3, are used as protective coatings for materials used at elevated temperatures (>700°C). These metal oxides either exhibit oxidation resistance or have been used as environmental bond coats. Conventional methods of coating by chemical vapor deposition requires deposition temperatures of >950°C which could damage the substrate material during the coating process. Lower deposition temperatures (400 to 600°C) by MOCVD of these metal oxides were successful on Ni metal substrates. Surface modification such as pre-oxidation and etching were also investigated. In addition, a novel approach for the CVD of TiN on metals was developed. This new approach utilizes ambient pressure conditions which lead to deposition temperatures of 800°C or lower compared to conventional CVD of TiN at 1000°C. Titanium nitride can be used as an abrasive and wear coating on cutting and grinding tools. This nitride can also serve as a diffusion coating in metals. The second major part of this research involves the synthesis of interfacial coatings on ceramic reinforcing fibers for ceramic matrix composites. Aluminum and chromium oxides were deposited onto SiC, and Al2O3-SiO 2 fibers by MOCVD. The effects of the interface coatings on the tensile strength of ceramic fibers are also discussed. New duplex interface coatings consisting of BN or TiN together with Al2O3 or ZrO 2 were also successfully deposited and evaluated on SiC fibers.

  1. A liquid crystalline chirality balance for vapours

    PubMed Central

    Ohzono, Takuya; Yamamoto, Takahiro; Fukuda, Jun-ichi

    2014-01-01

    Chiral discrimination of vapours plays an important role in olfactory perception of biological systems and its realization by artificial sensors has been an intriguing challenge. Here, we report a simple method that tangibly visualizes the chirality of a diverse variety of molecules dissolved from vapours with high sensitivity, by making use of a structural change in a periodic microstructure of a nematic liquid crystal confined in open microchannels. This microstructure is accompanied by a topological line defect of a zigzag form with equal lengths of ‘zig’ and ‘zag.’ We find that a tiny amount of vapour of chiral molecules injected onto the liquid crystal induces the imbalance of ‘zig’ and ‘zag’ depending on its enantiomeric excess within a few seconds. Our liquid-crystal-based ‘chirality balance’ offers a simple, quick and versatile chirality-sensing/-screening method for gas-phase analysis (for example, for odours, environmental chemicals or drugs). PMID:24781531

  2. Physical and chemical characteristics and development of the Changuinola peat deposit of northwestern Panama

    SciTech Connect

    Cohen, A.D.; Raymond, R. Jr.; Thayer, G.; Ramirez, A.

    1987-08-01

    A peat deposit occupying over 80 square kilometers, and averaging 8 meters in thickness, was discovered on the Caribbean coast of northwestern Panama near the town of Changuinola. This deposit occurs inland (behind) the present beach-barrier shoreline. It is thickest in the center and thins toward all edges (as if domed). The surface vegetation in the central regions consists primarily of ombrotrophic plants (especially sedges, grasses, Sphagnum, Sagittaria, and various scattered shrubs). Toward the edges, the deposit has a surface cover of more minerotrophic plants (such as swamp-forest trees, ferns, and palms). Petrographic/botanical analysis of the deposit with depth reveals the presence of five peat types (swamp-forest, sedge-grass-fern, Sagittaria et al., Nymphaea et al., and Rhizophora). Typically peats of the thick, central portions of the deposit are very low in ash and sulfur (less than 2% ash and 0.3% sulfur). Ash contents tend to increase abruptly at the base and more gradually toward the edges of the deposit and sulfur contents increasing gradually toward the ocean and bay. Vertical and lateral variations in botanical, chemical, and physical properties of this deposit can be related to factors that have controlled: (1) the surrounding rocks and water chemistry; (2) the source vegetation; and (3) the environments in which these source ingredients were deposited. 3 refs., 10 figs.

  3. Growth of diamond by RF plasma-assisted chemical vapor deposition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meyer, Duane E.; Ianno, Natale J.; Woollam, John A.; Swartzlander, A. B.; Nelson, A. J.

    1988-01-01

    A system has been designed and constructed to produce diamond particles by inductively coupled radio-frequency, plasma-assisted chemical vapor deposition. This is a low-pressure, low-temperature process used in an attempt to deposit diamond on substrates of glass, quartz, silicon, nickel, and boron nitride. Several deposition parameters have been varied including substrate temperature, gas concentration, gas pressure, total gas flow rate, RF input power, and deposition time. Analytical methods employed to determine composition and structure of the deposits include scanning electron microscopy, absorption spectroscopy, scanning Auger microprobe spectroscopy, and Raman spectroscopy. Analysis indicates that particles having a thin graphite surface, as well as diamond particles with no surface coatings, have been deposited. Deposits on quartz have exhibited optical bandgaps as high as 4.5 eV. Scanning electron microscopy analysis shows that particles are deposited on a pedestal which Auger spectroscopy indicates to be graphite. This is a phenomenon that has not been previously reported in the literature.

  4. Aerosol assisted chemical vapor deposition of superconducting YBa 2Cu 3O 7-χ

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salazar, K. V.; Ott, K. C.; Dye, R. C.; Hubbard, K. M.; Peterson, E. J.; Coulter, J. Y.; Kodas, T. T.

    1992-08-01

    A hybrid process, aerosol-assisted chemical vapor deposotion (AACVD), is described for reproducible preparation of superconducting thin films of YBa 2Cu 3O 7-χ. The process consists of atomizing a toluene solution of the Y, Ba, and Cu tetramethylheptanedionato complexes using an aerosol generator. The aerosol is transported into a CVD reactor where solvent and precursor evaporation and deposition occur at atmospheric pressure on heated substrates. The process provides stable evaporation rates for all three precursors, yielding constant film stoichiometry throughout the deposition period and from film to film. Superconducting films may be deposited in-situ at substrate heater temperatures above 825°C, or may be formed at lower temperatures by deposition followed by post-deposition annealing at higher temperatures. The microstructure and quality of films are highly dependent on the conditions employed in deposition and in the case of films deposited below 825°C, the post-deposition annealing conditions. Superconducting films prepared by the AACVD/post-annealing process have a metallic normal state resistivity signature with a zero resistance temperature typically above 88K, and are highly c-axis oriented. Transport critical current densities measured at 75 K on polycrystalline films prepared by the AACVD process are 220 000 A/cm 2 and 84 000 A/cm 2 at self-field and 0.1 T, respectively.

  5. Chemical sputtering by H2+ and H3+ ions during silicon deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Landheer, K.; Goedheer, W. J.; Poulios, I.; Schropp, R. E. I.; Rath, J. K.

    2016-08-01

    We investigated chemical sputtering of silicon films by Hy+ ions (with y being 2 and 3) in an asymmetric VHF Plasma Enhanced Chemical Vapor Deposition (PECVD) discharge in detail. In experiments with discharges created with pure H2 inlet flows, we observed that more Si was etched from the powered than from the grounded electrode, and this resulted in a net deposition on the grounded electrode. With experimental input data from a power density series of discharges with pure H2 inlet flows, we were able to model this process with a chemical sputtering mechanism. The obtained chemical sputtering yields were (0.3-0.4) ± 0.1 Si atom per bombarding Hy+ ion at the grounded electrode and at the powered electrode the yield ranged from (0.4 to 0.65) ± 0.1. Subsequently, we investigated the role of chemical sputtering during PECVD deposition with a series of silane fractions SF (SF(%) = [SiH4]/[H2]*100) ranging from SF = 0% to 20%. We experimentally observed that the SiHy+ flux is not proportional to SF but decreasing from SF = 3.4% to 20%. This counterintuitive SiHy+ flux trend was partly explained by an increasing chemical sputtering rate with decreasing SF and partly by the reaction between H3+ and SiH4 that forms SiH3+.

  6. Vaporization of a mixed precursors in chemical vapor deposition for YBCO films

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zhou, Gang; Meng, Guangyao; Schneider, Roger L.; Sarma, Bimal K.; Levy, Moises

    1995-01-01

    Single phase YBa2Cu3O7-delta thin films with T(c) values around 90 K are readily obtained by using a single source chemical vapor deposition technique with a normal precursor mass transport. The quality of the films is controlled by adjusting the carrier gas flow rate and the precursor feed rate.

  7. Combinatorial Characterization of TiO2 Chemical Vapor Deposition Utilizing Titanium Isopropoxide.

    PubMed

    Reinke, Michael; Ponomarev, Evgeniy; Kuzminykh, Yury; Hoffmann, Patrik

    2015-07-13

    The combinatorial characterization of the growth kinetics in chemical vapor deposition processes is challenging because precise information about the local precursor flow is usually difficult to access. In consequence, combinatorial chemical vapor deposition techniques are utilized more to study functional properties of thin films as a function of chemical composition, growth rate or crystallinity than to study the growth process itself. We present an experimental procedure which allows the combinatorial study of precursor surface kinetics during the film growth using high vacuum chemical vapor deposition. As consequence of the high vacuum environment, the precursor transport takes place in the molecular flow regime, which allows predicting and modifying precursor impinging rates on the substrate with comparatively little experimental effort. In this contribution, we study the surface kinetics of titanium dioxide formation using titanium tetraisopropoxide as precursor molecule over a large parameter range. We discuss precursor flux and temperature dependent morphology, crystallinity, growth rates, and precursor deposition efficiency. We conclude that the surface reaction of the adsorbed precursor molecules comprises a higher order reaction component with respect to precursor surface coverage.

  8. Influence of krypton atoms on the structure of hydrogenated amorphous carbon deposited by plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oliveira, M. H.; Viana, G. A.; de Lima, M. M.; Cros, A.; Cantarero, A.; Marques, F. C.

    2010-12-01

    Hydrogenated amorphous carbon (a-C:H) films were prepared by plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition using methane (CH4) plus krypton (Kr) mixed atmosphere. The depositions were performed as function of the bias voltage and krypton partial pressure. The goal of this work was to study the influence of krypton gas on the physical properties of a-C:H films deposited on the cathode electrode. Krypton concentration up to 1.6 at. %, determined by Rutherford Back-Scattering, was obtained at high Kr partial pressure and bias of -120 V. The structure of the films was analyzed by means of optical transmission spectroscopy, multi-wavelength Raman scattering and Fourier Transform Infrared spectroscopy. It was verified that the structure of the films remains unchanged up to a concentration of Kr of about 1.0 at. %. A slight graphitization of the films occurs for higher concentration. The observed variation in the film structure, optical band gap, stress, and hydrogen concentration were associated mainly with the subplantation process of hydrocarbons radicals, rather than the krypton ion energy.

  9. Influence of krypton atoms on the structure of hydrogenated amorphous carbon deposited by plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition

    SciTech Connect

    Oliveira, M. H. Jr.; Viana, G. A.; Marques, F. C.; Lima, M. M. Jr. de; Cros, A.; Cantarero, A.

    2010-12-15

    Hydrogenated amorphous carbon (a-C:H) films were prepared by plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition using methane (CH{sub 4}) plus krypton (Kr) mixed atmosphere. The depositions were performed as function of the bias voltage and krypton partial pressure. The goal of this work was to study the influence of krypton gas on the physical properties of a-C:H films deposited on the cathode electrode. Krypton concentration up to 1.6 at. %, determined by Rutherford Back-Scattering, was obtained at high Kr partial pressure and bias of -120 V. The structure of the films was analyzed by means of optical transmission spectroscopy, multi-wavelength Raman scattering and Fourier Transform Infrared spectroscopy. It was verified that the structure of the films remains unchanged up to a concentration of Kr of about 1.0 at. %. A slight graphitization of the films occurs for higher concentration. The observed variation in the film structure, optical band gap, stress, and hydrogen concentration were associated mainly with the subplantation process of hydrocarbons radicals, rather than the krypton ion energy.

  10. Deposition kinetics and characterization of stable ionomers from hexamethyldisiloxane and methacrylic acid by plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Urstöger, Georg; Resel, Roland; Koller, Georg; Coclite, Anna Maria

    2016-04-01

    A novel ionomer of hexamethyldisiloxane and methacrylic acid was synthesized by plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition (PECVD). The PECVD process, being solventless, allows mixing of monomers with very different solubilities, and for polymers formed at high deposition rates and with high structural stability (due to the high number of cross-links and covalent bonding to the substrate) to be obtained. A kinetic study over a large set of parameters was run with the aim of determining the optimal conditions for high stability and proton conductivity of the polymer layer. Copolymers with good stability over 6 months' time in air and water were obtained, as demonstrated by ellipsometry, X-Ray reflectivity, and FT-IR spectroscopy. Stable coatings showed also proton conductivity as high as 1.1 ± 0.1 mS cm-1. Chemical analysis showed that due to the high molecular weight of the chosen precursors, it was possible to keep the plasma energy-input-per-mass low. This allowed limited precursor fragmentation and the functional groups of both monomers to be retained during the plasma polymerization.

  11. Chemical Alteration Pathways Resulting in High-Silica Deposits on Mars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yen, A. S.; Gellert, R.; Clark, B. C.; Ming, D. W.; Morris, R. V.; Mittlefehldt, D. W.

    2015-12-01

    The chemical compositions of nearly 1000 targets at the surface of Mars have been established by the cross-calibrated Alpha-Particle X-ray Spectrometers (APXS) onboard the Mars Science Laboratory (MSL) and the two Mars Exploration Rovers (MER). Comparing and contrasting these measurements provides greater insight into martian surface processes than the standalone use of data from an individual mission. For example, the combination of MER and MSL APXS data indicate two distinct pathways for silicate weathering: 1. Open system alteration at circumneutral pH. Fracture-filling deposits in impact breccias at the rim of Endeavour Crater analyzed by the Opportunity rover show the highest SiO2 concentrations at Meridiani Planum (62 wt%) with correlated Si and Al (Si:Al ~0.3). These Mg and Fe-depleted veins have chemical signatures consistent with an Al-rich smectite and likely formed as a precipitate from non-acidic aqueous solutions. Similar high Si and Al deposits found at the Gusev landing site by the Spirit rover were interpreted as montmorillonite. 2. Open system, acid-sulfate alteration. In sharp contrast to Si and Al-rich deposits, a group of high-Si targets have low concentrations of Al. Deposits in Gusev Crater near "Home Plate," a hydrothermal locale with nearby fumarolic deposits, fall into this category. Acid-sulfate processes are likely responsible for mobilizing most other elements, including Al, leaving behind a Si-rich, and generally Ti-rich, residue. Recent high-Si samples (up to 72 wt% SiO2) analyzed by the Curiosity rover exhibit similar chemical patterns, including elevated TiO2 concentrations, suggestive that acidic leaching may also have been an important process in the development of deposits found within Gale Crater. The framework of chemical analyses established through years of Mars surface operations provides the basis against which future measurements by Opportunity, Curiosity and the Mars 2020 rover can be compared.

  12. Relatively low temperature synthesis of graphene by radio frequency plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qi, J. L.; Zheng, W. T.; Zheng, X. H.; Wang, X.; Tian, H. W.

    2011-05-01

    We present a simple, low-cost and high-effective method for synthesizing high-quality, large-area graphene using radio frequency plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition (RF-PECVD) on SiO 2/Si substrate covered with Ni thin film at relatively low temperatures (650 °C). During deposition, the trace amount of carbon (CH 4 gas flow rate of 2 sccm) is introduced into PECVD chamber and the deposition time is only 30 s, in which the carbon atoms diffuse into the Ni film and then segregate on its surface, forming single-layer or few-layer graphene. After deposition, Ni is removed by wet etching, and the obtained single continuous graphene film can easily be transferred to other substrates. This investigation provides a large-area, low temperature and low-cost synthesis method for graphene as a practical electronic material.

  13. Template assisted synthesis of photocatalytic titanium dioxide nanotubes by hot filament chemical vapor deposition method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karaman, Mustafa; Sarıipek, Fatma; Köysüren, Özcan; Yıldız, H. Bekir

    2013-10-01

    Titanium dioxide thin films were deposited conformally over electrospun polymethyl methacrylate (PMMA) fibers by hot filament chemical vapor deposition method. Deposition rates were observed to be very high to allow for rapid coatings. Thermal annealing of as deposited materials leads the clean decomposition of the polymeric inner layer and formation of randomly distributed anatase TiO2 nanotubes. Nanotubular TiO2 structure was clearly identified by SEM and that structure is ideal for good photocatalytic activity because of its high surface area per unit volume ratio. FTIR and XPS results show the formation of stoichiometric TiO2, and the crystalline form of the final nanotubes was found to be anatase (1 0 1) after XRD analysis. High photocatalytic activity of TiO2 nanotubes under UV irradiation was observed with an apparent rate constant of 0.74 h-1 for methyl orange decomposition.

  14. The design, construction and three dimensional modeling of a high pressure organometallic chemical vapor deposition reactor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McCall, Sonya Denise

    Two high pressure reactors have been designed, built and tested, in order to extend Organometallic Chemical Vapor Deposition (OMCVD) to materials that exhibit large thermal decomposition pressures at their optimum growth temperature. The Differentially Pressure Controlled (DPC) Reactor System was designed and built for use at pressures ≤10 atm. A second generation reactor, the Compact Hard Shell (CHS) Reactor was built in order to extend pressures ≤100 atm. A physico-chemical model of the High Pressure Organometallic Chemical Vapor Deposition (HPOMCVD) process that describes three dimensional transport phenomena as well as gas-phase and surface reactions underlying the growth of compound semiconductors is presented. A reduced-order model of the Organometallic Chemical Vapor Deposition of InN from trimethylindium and ammonia at elevated pressures has been developed and tested. The model describes the flow dynamics coupled to chemical reactions and transport in the flow channel of the Compact Hard Shell Reactor, as a function of substrate temperature, total pressure and centerline flow velocity.

  15. Chemical Vapor Deposition of Nanocarbon on Electroless NiB Catalyst Using Ethanol Precursor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanaka, Toru; Sato, Tomomi; Karasawa, Yusuke; Ueno, Kazuyoshi

    2011-05-01

    Nanocarbon materials have been expected as post-Cu interconnect materials for large-scale integrated circuits (LSIs). In this paper, we present a nanocarbon deposition process using electroless plated NiB as the catalyst, which features conformal deposition on patterned dielectric surfaces. It was found that carbon nanotubes (CNTs) and graphitic films were deposited on the electroless NiB by atmospheric pressure chemical vapor deposition (CVD) using ethanol as the precursor. The graphitic quality estimated from the Raman spectra of the nanocarbon on the NiB catalyst was equivalent to that on a sputter-deposited pure Ni catalyst. The nanocarbon shape was dependent on NiB thickness, and CNTs were grown on 10-nm-thick NiB and graphitic films were grown on 30 nm or thicker NiB. The deposition temperature can be lowered to 505 °C, although the graphitic quality was degraded. It is considered that the electroless catalysts can be effective for nanocarbon deposition on patterned dielectric surfaces.

  16. Chemical vapor deposition of atomically thin materials for membrane dialysis applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kidambi, Piran; Mok, Alexander; Jang, Doojoon; Boutilier, Michael; Wang, Luda; Karnik, Rohit; Microfluidics; Nanofluidics Research Lab Team

    2015-11-01

    Atomically thin 2D materials like graphene and h-BN represent a new class of membranes materials. They offer the possibility of minimum theoretical membrane transport resistance along with the opportunity to tune pore sizes at the nanometer scale. Chemical vapor deposition has emerged as the preferable route towards scalable, cost effective synthesis of 2D materials. Here we show selective molecular transport through sub-nanometer diameter pores in graphene grown via chemical vapor deposition processes. A combination of pressure driven and diffusive transport measurements shows evidence for size selective transport behavior which can be used for separation by dialysis for applications such as desalting of biomolecular or chemical solutions. Principal Investigator

  17. Quantum Chemical Simulation of Carbon Nanotube Nucleation on Al2O3 Catalysts via CH4 Chemical Vapor Deposition.

    PubMed

    Page, Alister J; Saha, Supriya; Li, Hai-Bei; Irle, Stephan; Morokuma, Keiji

    2015-07-29

    We present quantum chemical simulations demonstrating how single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) form, or "nucleate", on the surface of Al2O3 nanoparticles during chemical vapor deposition (CVD) using CH4. SWCNT nucleation proceeds via the formation of extended polyyne chains that only interact with the catalyst surface at one or both ends. Consequently, SWCNT nucleation is not a surface-mediated process. We demonstrate that this unusual nucleation sequence is due to two factors. First, the π interaction between graphitic carbon and Al2O3 is extremely weak, such that graphitic carbon is expected to desorb at typical CVD temperatures. Second, hydrogen present at the catalyst surface actively passivates dangling carbon bonds, preventing a surface-mediated nucleation mechanism. The simulations reveal hydrogen's reactive chemical pathways during SWCNT nucleation and that the manner in which SWCNTs form on Al2O3 is fundamentally different from that observed using "traditional" transition metal catalysts. PMID:26148208

  18. Control of interface nanoscale structure created by plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition.

    PubMed

    Peri, Someswara R; Akgun, Bulent; Satija, Sushil K; Jiang, Hao; Enlow, Jesse; Bunning, Timothy J; Foster, Mark D

    2011-09-01

    Tailoring the structure of films deposited by plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition (PECVD) to specific applications requires a depth-resolved understanding of how the interface structures in such films are impacted by variations in deposition parameters such as feed position and plasma power. Analysis of complementary X-ray and neutron reflectivity (XR, NR) data provide a rich picture of changes in structure with feed position and plasma power, with those changes resolved on the nanoscale. For plasma-polymerized octafluorocyclobutane (PP-OFCB) films, a region of distinct chemical composition and lower cross-link density is found at the substrate interface for the range of processing conditions studied and a surface layer of lower cross-link density also appears when plasma power exceeds 40 W. Varying the distance of the feed from the plasma impacts the degree of cross-linking in the film center, thickness of the surface layer, and thickness of the transition region at the substrate. Deposition at the highest power, 65 W, both enhances cross-linking and creates loose fragments with fluorine content higher than the average. The thickness of the low cross-link density region at the air interface plays an important role in determining the width of the interface built with a layer subsequently deposited atop the first. PMID:21875044

  19. Control of interface nanoscale structure created by plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition.

    PubMed

    Peri, Someswara R; Akgun, Bulent; Satija, Sushil K; Jiang, Hao; Enlow, Jesse; Bunning, Timothy J; Foster, Mark D

    2011-09-01

    Tailoring the structure of films deposited by plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition (PECVD) to specific applications requires a depth-resolved understanding of how the interface structures in such films are impacted by variations in deposition parameters such as feed position and plasma power. Analysis of complementary X-ray and neutron reflectivity (XR, NR) data provide a rich picture of changes in structure with feed position and plasma power, with those changes resolved on the nanoscale. For plasma-polymerized octafluorocyclobutane (PP-OFCB) films, a region of distinct chemical composition and lower cross-link density is found at the substrate interface for the range of processing conditions studied and a surface layer of lower cross-link density also appears when plasma power exceeds 40 W. Varying the distance of the feed from the plasma impacts the degree of cross-linking in the film center, thickness of the surface layer, and thickness of the transition region at the substrate. Deposition at the highest power, 65 W, both enhances cross-linking and creates loose fragments with fluorine content higher than the average. The thickness of the low cross-link density region at the air interface plays an important role in determining the width of the interface built with a layer subsequently deposited atop the first.

  20. Measurements of Isotopic Composition of Vapour on the Antarctic Plateau

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Casado, M.; Landais, A.; Masson-Delmotte, V.; Genthon, C.; Prie, F.; Kerstel, E.; Kassi, S.; Arnaud, L.; Steen-Larsen, H. C.; Vignon, E.

    2015-12-01

    The oldest ice core records are obtained on the East Antarctic plateau. The composition in stable isotopes of water (δ18O, δD, δ17O) permits to reconstruct the past climatic conditions over the ice sheet and also at the evaporation source. Paleothermometer accuracy relies on good knowledge of processes affecting the isotopic composition of surface snow in Polar Regions. Both simple models such as Rayleigh distillation and global atmospheric models with isotopes provide good prediction of precipitation isotopic composition in East Antarctica but post deposition processes can alter isotopic composition on site, in particular exchanges with local vapour. To quantitatively interpret the isotopic composition of water archived in ice cores, it is thus essential to study the continuum water vapour - precipitation - surface snow - buried snow. While precipitation and snow sampling are routinely performed in Antarctica, climatic conditions in Concordia, very cold (-55°C in average) and very dry (less than 1000ppmv), impose difficult conditions to measure the water vapour isotopic composition. New developments in infrared spectroscopy enable now the measurement of isotopic composition in water vapour traces (down to 20ppmv). Here we present the results of a campaign of measurement of isotopic composition in Concordia in 2014/2015. Two infrared spectrometers have been deployed or the first time on top of the East Antarctic Plateau allowing a continuous vapour measurement for a month. Comparison of the results from infrared spectroscopy with cryogenic trapping validates the relevance of the method to measure isotopic composition in dry conditions. Identification of different behaviour of isotopic composition in the water vapour associated to turbulent or stratified regime indicates a strong impact of meteorological processes in local vapour/snow interaction.

  1. High rate, large area laser-assisted chemical vapor deposition of nickel from nickel carbonyl

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paserin, Vlad

    High-power diode lasers (HPDL) are being increasingly used in industrial applications. Deposition of nickel from nickel carbonyl (Ni(CO)4 ) precursor by laser-induced chemical vapor deposition (CVD) was studied with emphasis on achieving high deposition rates. An HPDL system was used to provide a novel energy source facilitating a simple and compact design of the energy delivery system. Nickel deposits on complex, 3-dimensional polyurethane foam substrates were prepared and characterized. The resulting "nickel foam" represents a novel material of high porosity (>95% by volume) finding uses, among others, in the production of rechargeable battery and fuel cell electrodes and as a specialty high-temperature filtration medium. Deposition rates up to ˜19 mum/min were achieved by optimizing the gas precursor flow pattern and energy delivery to the substrate surface using a 480W diode laser. Factors affecting the transition from purely heterogeneous decomposition to a combined hetero- and homogeneous decomposition of nickel carbonyl were studied. High quality, uniform 3-D deposits produced at a rate more than ten times higher than in commercial processes were obtained by careful balance of mass transport (gas flow) and energy delivery (laser power). Cross-flow of the gases through the porous substrate was found to be essential in facilitating mass transport and for obtaining uniform deposits at high rates. When controlling the process in a transient regime (near the onset of homogenous decomposition), unique morphology features formed as part of the deposits, including textured surface with pyramid-shape crystallites, spherical and non-spherical particles and filaments. Operating the laser in a pulsed mode produced smooth, nano-crystalline deposits with sub-100 nm grains. The effect of H2S, a commonly used additive in nickel carbonyl CVD, was studied using both polyurethane and nickel foam substrates. H2S was shown to improve the substrate coverage and deposit

  2. The Seasonal Cycle of Water Vapour on Mars from Assimilation of Thermal Emission Spectrometer Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Steele, Liam J.; Lewis, Stephen R.; Patel, Manish R.; Montmessin, Franck; Forget, Francois; Smith, Michael D.

    2014-01-01

    We present for the first time an assimilation of Thermal Emission Spectrometer (TES) water vapour column data into a Mars global climate model (MGCM). We discuss the seasonal cycle of water vapour, the processes responsible for the observed water vapour distribution, and the cross-hemispheric water transport. The assimilation scheme is shown to be robust in producing consistent reanalyses, and the global water vapour column error is reduced to around 2-4 pr micron depending on season. Wave activity is shown to play an important role in the water vapour distribution, with topographically steered flows around the Hellas and Argyre basins acting to increase transport in these regions in all seasons. At high northern latitudes, zonal wavenumber 1 and 2 stationary waves during northern summer are responsible for spreading the sublimed water vapour away from the pole. Transport by the zonal wavenumber 2 waves occurs primarily to the west of Tharsis and Arabia Terra and, combined with the effects of western boundary currents, this leads to peak water vapour column abundances here as observed by numerous spacecraft. A net transport of water to the northern hemisphere over the course of one Mars year is calculated, primarily because of the large northwards flux of water vapour which occurs during the local dust storm around L(sub S) = 240-260deg. Finally, outlying frost deposits that surround the north polar cap are shown to be important in creating the peak water vapour column abundances observed during northern summer.

  3. Metal organic chemical vapor deposition of phase change Ge1Sb2Te4 nanowires.

    PubMed

    Longo, Massimo; Fallica, Roberto; Wiemer, Claudia; Salicio, Olivier; Fanciulli, Marco; Rotunno, Enzo; Lazzarini, Laura

    2012-03-14

    The self-assembly of Ge(1)Sb(2)Te(4) nanowires (NWs) for phase change memories application was achieved by metal organic chemical vapor deposition, catalyzed by Au nanoislands in a narrow range of temperatures and deposition pressures. In the optimized conditions of 400 °C, 50 mbar, the NWs are Ge(1)Sb(2)Te(4) single hexagonal crystals. Phase change memory switching was reversibly induced by nanosecond current pulses through metal-contacted NWs with threshold voltage of about 1.35 V.

  4. Deposition of Hydrogenated Microcrystalline Films of CdTe by Chemical Sputtering in Hydrogen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saito, Koji; Nishibayashi, Yoshiki; Imura, Takeshi; Osaka, Yukio

    1988-07-01

    Films of CdTe are deposited by chemical sputtering of a CdTe target in hydrogen gas. X-ray diffraction patterns show that the films are composed of microcrystals of cubic CdTe with a grain size of 15˜30 nm. The films contain a trace amount of hydrogen in the form of the Cd-H (and presumably Te-H2) bonds. This hydrogen is evolved during the thermal treatment of the film above 100°C, as the grain size of the microcrystal grows. The deposition rate is also reduced when the substrate temperature increases up to 100°C or more.

  5. Oxygen and hydrogen effects on the chemical vapor deposition of aluminum nitride films

    SciTech Connect

    Aspar, B.; Armas, B.; Combescure, C. ); Figueras, A.; Rodriguez-Clemente, R. ); Mazel, A.; Kihn, Y.; Sevely, J. )

    1993-06-01

    Aluminum nitride has been obtained by chemical vapor deposition using AlCl[sub 3] and NH[sub 3] as precursors. Progressive introduction of N[sub 2]0 in the gas mixture has shown the possibility of inserting oxygen in the AlN lattice. This involves strong changes of surface morphology of the deposit and the formation of less-crystallized materials. When hydrogen is added to the gas mixture, these effects are reduced, Electron energy loss spectroscopy has shown that, in this case, oxygen is mainly concentrated on the external parts of AlN crystals, the structure of which has been found consistent with the wurtzite structure.

  6. Development of a polysilicon process based on chemical vapor deposition, phase 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Plahutnik, F.; Arvidson, A.; Sawyer, D.

    1982-01-01

    The goal of this program is to demonstrate that a dichlorosilane-based reductive chemical vapor deposition (CVD) process is capable of producing, at low cost, high quality polycrystalline silicon. Physical form and purity of this material will be consistent with LSA material requirements for use in the manufacture of high efficiency solar cells. Four polysilicon deposition runs were completed in an intermediate size reactor using dichlorosilane fed from 250 pound cylinders. Results from the intermediate size reactor are consistent with those obtained earlier with a small experimental reactor. Modifications of two intermediate size reactors were completed to interface with the dichlorosilane process demonstration unit (PDU).

  7. Thermodynamic Analysis and Growth of Zirconium Carbide by Chemical Vapor Deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wei, Sun; Hua, Hao Zheng; Xiang, Xiong

    Equilibrium calculations were used to optimize conditions for the chemical vapor deposition of zirconium carbide from zirconium halide + CxHy+H2+Ar system. The results show the CVD-ZrC phase diagram is divided into ZrC+C, ZrC and ZrC+Zr zones by C, Zr generating lines. For the same mole of ZrCl4 reactant, it needs higher concentration of CH4 to generate single ZrC phase than that of C3H6. Using these calculations as a guide, single-phase cubic zirconium carbide coatings were deposited onto graphite substrate.

  8. Boron coating on boron nitride coated nuclear fuels by chemical vapor deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Durmazuçar, Hasan H.; Gündüz, Güngör

    2000-12-01

    Uranium dioxide-only and uranium dioxide-gadolinium oxide (5% and 10%) ceramic nuclear fuel pellets which were already coated with boron nitride were coated with thin boron layer by chemical vapor deposition to increase the burn-up efficiency of the fuel during reactor operation. Coating was accomplished from the reaction of boron trichloride with hydrogen at 1250 K in a tube furnace, and then sintering at 1400 and 1525 K. The deposited boron was identified by infrared spectrum. The morphology of the coating was studied by using scanning electron microscope. The plate, grainy and string (fiber)-like boron structures were observed.

  9. Improvement of uniformity in chemical vapor deposition of silicon carbide by using CFD

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seo, Jin-Won; Kim, Jun-Woo; Choi, Kyoon; Lee, Jong-Heun

    2016-01-01

    The chemical vapor deposition (CVD) of silicon carbide (SiC) on carbon has been widely used as a general method to suppress dust generation on carbon surfaces. For a CH3SiCl3 (MTS) and hydrogen system, computational fluid dynamic simulations to predict the growth rate of the silicon carbide are performed. The results of the simulations are consistent with the experimental results where the deposition rate depends highly on the H/Si composition and the specimen's location. This simulation can provide guidance in optimizing the CVD process and improving the apparatus for CVD of SiC.

  10. Estimating Chemical Exchange between Atmospheric Deposition and Forest Canopy in Guizhou, China.

    PubMed

    Li, Wei; Gao, Fang; Liao, Xueqin

    2013-01-01

    To evaluate the effects of atmospheric deposition on forest ecosystems, wet-only precipitation and throughfall samples were collected in two forest types (Masson pine [ Lamb.] forests and mixed conifer and broadleaf forests) in the Longli forest in the Guizhou province of southwestern China for a period of 21 successive months from April 2007 to December 2008. The pH and chemical components of precipitation and throughfall were analyzed. In addition, the canopy budget model was applied to distinguish between in-canopy and atmospheric sources of chemical compounds. Canopy leaching and total potentially acidifying deposition fluxes were calculated. The results showed that the average pH and the concentration of ions in throughfall were higher than those in precipitation, with the exception of the NH concentration. Dry deposition of S and N accumulated more in Masson pine forests than in mixed conifer and broadleaf forests. Canopy leaching was the most significant source of base cations in forest throughfall, which was higher in the mixed forests than in the coniferous forests. Anions in throughfall deposition in Masson pine forests exceeded those in the mixed forests. Higher total potentially acidifying deposition fluxes reflected the more effective amounts of acid delivered to Masson pine forests compared with mixed conifer and broadleaf forests. In addition, acid deposition induced the leaching and loss of nutrient ions such as Mg, K, and Ca. Although the trees of the studied areas have not shown any symptoms of cation loss, a potentially harmful influence was engendered by atmospheric deposition in the two forest types in the Longli area.

  11. Estimating Chemical Exchange between Atmospheric Deposition and Forest Canopy in Guizhou, China.

    PubMed

    Li, Wei; Gao, Fang; Liao, Xueqin

    2013-01-01

    To evaluate the effects of atmospheric deposition on forest ecosystems, wet-only precipitation and throughfall samples were collected in two forest types (Masson pine [ Lamb.] forests and mixed conifer and broadleaf forests) in the Longli forest in the Guizhou province of southwestern China for a period of 21 successive months from April 2007 to December 2008. The pH and chemical components of precipitation and throughfall were analyzed. In addition, the canopy budget model was applied to distinguish between in-canopy and atmospheric sources of chemical compounds. Canopy leaching and total potentially acidifying deposition fluxes were calculated. The results showed that the average pH and the concentration of ions in throughfall were higher than those in precipitation, with the exception of the NH concentration. Dry deposition of S and N accumulated more in Masson pine forests than in mixed conifer and broadleaf forests. Canopy leaching was the most significant source of base cations in forest throughfall, which was higher in the mixed forests than in the coniferous forests. Anions in throughfall deposition in Masson pine forests exceeded those in the mixed forests. Higher total potentially acidifying deposition fluxes reflected the more effective amounts of acid delivered to Masson pine forests compared with mixed conifer and broadleaf forests. In addition, acid deposition induced the leaching and loss of nutrient ions such as Mg, K, and Ca. Although the trees of the studied areas have not shown any symptoms of cation loss, a potentially harmful influence was engendered by atmospheric deposition in the two forest types in the Longli area. PMID:23673825

  12. Chemical vapor deposited diamond-on-diamond powder composites (LDRD final report)

    SciTech Connect

    Panitz, J.K.; Hsu, W.L.; Tallant, D.R.; McMaster, M.; Fox, C.; Staley, D.

    1995-12-01

    Densifying non-mined diamond powder precursors with diamond produced by chemical vapor infiltration (CVI) is an attractive approach for forming thick diamond deposits that avoids many potential manufacturability problems associated with predominantly chemical vapor deposition (CVD) processes. The authors developed techniques for forming diamond powder precursors and densified these precursors in a hot filament-assisted reactor and a microwave plasma-assisted reactor. Densification conditions were varied following a fractional factorial statistical design. A number of conclusions can be drawn as a result of this study. High density diamond powder green bodies that contain a mixture of particle sizes solidify more readily than more porous diamond powder green bodies with narrow distributions of particle sizes. No composite was completely densified although all of the deposits were densified to some degree. The hot filament-assisted reactor deposited more material below the exterior surface, in the interior of the powder deposits; in contrast, the microwave-assisted reactor tended to deposit a CVD diamond skin over the top of the powder precursors which inhibited vapor phase diamond growth in the interior of the powder deposits. There were subtle variations in diamond quality as a function of the CVI process parameters. Diamond and glassy carbon tended to form at the exterior surface of the composites directly exposed to either the hot filament or the microwave plasma. However, in the interior, e.g. the powder/substrate interface, diamond plus diamond-like-carbon formed. All of the diamond composites produced were grey and relatively opaque because they contained flawed diamond, diamond-like-carbon and glassy carbon. A large amount of flawed and non-diamond material could be removed by post-CVI oxygen heat treatments. Heat treatments in oxygen changed the color of the composites to white.

  13. A mathematical model and simulation results of plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition of silicon nitride films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Konakov, S. A.; Krzhizhanovskaya, V. V.

    2015-01-01

    We developed a mathematical model of Plasma Enhanced Chemical Vapor Deposition (PECVD) of silicon nitride thin films from SiH4-NH3-N2-Ar mixture, an important application in modern materials science. Our multiphysics model describes gas dynamics, chemical physics, plasma physics and electrodynamics. The PECVD technology is inherently multiscale, from macroscale processes in the chemical reactor to atomic-scale surface chemistry. Our macroscale model is based on Navier-Stokes equations for a transient laminar flow of a compressible chemically reacting gas mixture, together with the mass transfer and energy balance equations, Poisson equation for electric potential, electrons and ions balance equations. The chemical kinetics model includes 24 species and 58 reactions: 37 in the gas phase and 21 on the surface. A deposition model consists of three stages: adsorption to the surface, diffusion along the surface and embedding of products into the substrate. A new model has been validated on experimental results obtained with the "Plasmalab System 100" reactor. We present the mathematical model and simulation results investigating the influence of flow rate and source gas proportion on silicon nitride film growth rate and chemical composition.

  14. Modeling chemical vapor deposition of silicon dioxide in microreactors at atmospheric pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Konakov, S. A.; Krzhizhanovskaya, V. V.

    2015-01-01

    We developed a multiphysics mathematical model for simulation of silicon dioxide Chemical Vapor Deposition (CVD) from tetraethyl orthosilicate (TEOS) and oxygen mixture in a microreactor at atmospheric pressure. Microfluidics is a promising technology with numerous applications in chemical synthesis due to its high heat and mass transfer efficiency and well-controlled flow parameters. Experimental studies of CVD microreactor technology are slow and expensive. Analytical solution of the governing equations is impossible due to the complexity of intertwined non-linear physical and chemical processes. Computer simulation is the most effective tool for design and optimization of microreactors. Our computational fluid dynamics model employs mass, momentum and energy balance equations for a laminar transient flow of a chemically reacting gas mixture at low Reynolds number. Simulation results show the influence of microreactor configuration and process parameters on SiO2 deposition rate and uniformity. We simulated three microreactors with the central channel diameter of 5, 10, 20 micrometers, varying gas flow rate in the range of 5-100 microliters per hour and temperature in the range of 300-800 °C. For each microchannel diameter we found an optimal set of process parameters providing the best quality of deposited material. The model will be used for optimization of the microreactor configuration and technological parameters to facilitate the experimental stage of this research.

  15. Facile synthesis 3D flexible core-shell graphene/glass fiber via chemical vapor deposition

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Direct deposition of graphene layers on the flexible glass fiber surface to form the three-dimensional (3D) core-shell structures is offered using a two-heating reactor chemical vapor deposition system. The two-heating reactor is utilized to offer sufficient, well-proportioned floating C atoms and provide a facile way for low-temperature deposition. Graphene layers, which are controlled by changing the growth time, can be grown on the surface of wire-type glass fiber with the diameter from 30 nm to 120 um. The core-shell graphene/glass fiber deposition mechanism is proposed, suggesting that the 3D graphene films can be deposited on any proper wire-type substrates. These results open a facile way for direct and high-efficiency deposition of the transfer-free graphene layers on the low-temperature dielectric wire-type substrates. PACS 81.05.U-; 81.07.-b; 81.15.Gh PMID:25170331

  16. Chemical response of lakes in the Adirondack Region of New York to declines in acidic deposition.

    PubMed

    Driscoll, Charles T; Driscoll, Kimberley M; Roy, Karen M; Mitchell, Myron J

    2003-05-15

    Long-term changes in the chemistry of wet deposition and lake water were investigated in the Adirondack Region of New York. Marked decreases in concentrations of SO4(2-) and H+ in wet deposition have occurred at two sites since the late 1970s. These decreases are consistent with long-term declines in emissions of sulfur dioxide (SO2) in the eastern United States. Changes in wet NO3- deposition and nitrogen oxides (NOx) emissions have been minor over the same interval. Virtually all Adirondack Lakes have shown marked decreases in concentrations of SO4(2-), which coincide with decreases in atmospheric S deposition. Concentrations of NO3- have also decreased in several Adirondack lakes. As atmospheric N deposition has not changed over this period, the mechanism contributing to this apparent increase in lake/watershed N retention is not evident. Decreases in concentrations of SO4(2-) + NO3- have resulted in increases in acid-neutralizing capacity (ANC) and pH and resulted in a shift in the speciation of monomeric Al from toxic inorganic species toward less toxic organic forms in some lakes. Nevertheless, many lakes continue to exhibit pH values and concentrations of inorganic monomeric Al that are critical to aquatic biota. Extrapolation of rates of ANC increase suggests that the time frame of chemical recovery of Adirondack Lakes will be several decades if current decreases in acidic deposition are maintained.

  17. Study of the morphology of ZnS thin films deposited on different substrates via chemical bath deposition.

    PubMed

    Gómez-Gutiérrez, Claudia M; Luque, P A; Castro-Beltran, A; Vilchis-Nestor, A R; Lugo-Medina, Eder; Carrillo-Castillo, A; Quevedo-Lopez, M A; Olivas, A

    2015-01-01

    In this work, the influence of substrate on the morphology of ZnS thin films by chemical bath deposition is studied. The materials used were zinc acetate, tri-sodium citrate, thiourea, and ammonium hydroxide/ammonium chloride solution. The growth of ZnS thin films on different substrates showed a large variation on the surface, presenting a poor growth on SiO2 and HfO2 substrates. The thin films on ITO substrate presented a uniform and compact growth without pinholes. The optical properties showed a transmittance of about 85% in the visible range of 300-800 nm with band gap of 3.7 eV.

  18. Study of the morphology of ZnS thin films deposited on different substrates via chemical bath deposition.

    PubMed

    Gómez-Gutiérrez, Claudia M; Luque, P A; Castro-Beltran, A; Vilchis-Nestor, A R; Lugo-Medina, Eder; Carrillo-Castillo, A; Quevedo-Lopez, M A; Olivas, A

    2015-01-01

    In this work, the influence of substrate on the morphology of ZnS thin films by chemical bath deposition is studied. The materials used were zinc acetate, tri-sodium citrate, thiourea, and ammonium hydroxide/ammonium chloride solution. The growth of ZnS thin films on different substrates showed a large variation on the surface, presenting a poor growth on SiO2 and HfO2 substrates. The thin films on ITO substrate presented a uniform and compact growth without pinholes. The optical properties showed a transmittance of about 85% in the visible range of 300-800 nm with band gap of 3.7 eV. PMID:26011683

  19. Process development for the manufacture of an integrated dispenser cathode assembly using laser chemical vapor deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, Ryan William

    2005-07-01

    Laser Chemical Vapor Deposition (LCVD) has been shown to have great potential for the manufacture of small, complex, two or three dimensional metal and ceramic parts. One of the most promising applications of the technology is in the fabrication of an integrated dispenser cathode assembly. This application requires the deposition of a boron nitride-molybdenum composite structure. In order to realize this structure, work was done to improve the control and understanding of the LCVD process and to determine experimental conditions conducive to the growth of the required materials. A series of carbon fiber and line deposition studies were used to characterize process-shape relationships and study the kinetics of carbon LCVD. These studies provided a foundation for the fabrication of the first high aspect ratio multi-layered LCVD wall structures. The kinetics studies enabled the formulation of an advanced computational model in the FLUENT CFD package for studying energy transport, mass and momentum transport, and species transport within a forced flow LCVD environment. The model was applied to two different material systems and used to quantify deposition rates and identify rate-limiting regimes. A computational thermal-structural model was also developed using the ANSYS software package to study the thermal stress state within an LCVD deposit during growth. Georgia Tech's LCVD system was modified and used to characterize both boron nitride and molybdenum deposition independently. The focus was on understanding the relations among process parameters and deposit shape. Boron nitride was deposited using a B3 N3H6-N2 mixture and growth was characterized by sporadic nucleation followed by rapid bulk growth. Molybdenum was deposited from the MoCl5-H2 system and showed slow, but stable growth. Each material was used to grow both fibers and lines. The fabrication of a boron nitride-molybdenum composite was also demonstrated. In sum, this work served to both advance the

  20. Synthesis of novel barium precursors and their use to deposit thin films by metal organic chemical vapor deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Studebaker, Daniel Bliss

    A new class of volatile compounds of barium were synthesized. These 'capsule' compounds were prepared to saturate the coordination sphere of barium with one ligand. The covalent bonding of the polyglyme ligand to the 2,2,6,6-tetramethyl-3,5-heptanedione or similar ligand also increased the chelate effect, making loss of the glyme ligand on sublimation less likely. Single crystal X-ray crystal diffraction studies were done on these complexes. One of the complexes was used to grow BaTiO3 thin films to display the ability for these complexes to be used as metal organic chemical vapor deposition (MOCVD) precursors. Thin films of the superconducting material YBa2Cu3O 7-x were deposited on silver substrates by MOCVD. These films were analyzed by microscopy, and the electrical properties are discussed. The first reported growth of beta-BaBLO4 thin films by MOCVD is given. These films were grown on platinum, fused silica, sapphire, and silicon. Second harmonic generation of light from a Nd:YAG laser is observed in optical measurements.

  1. Flexible Electronics: High Pressure Chemical Vapor Deposition of Hydrogenated Amorphous Silicon Films and Solar Cells (Adv. Mater. 28/2016).

    PubMed

    He, Rongrui; Day, Todd D; Sparks, Justin R; Sullivan, Nichole F; Badding, John V

    2016-07-01

    On page 5939, J. V. Badding and co-workers describe the unrolling of a flexible hydrogenated amorphous silicon solar cell, deposited by high-pressure chemical vapor deposition. The high-pressure deposition process is represented by the molecules of silane infiltrating the small voids between the rolled up substrate, facilitating plasma-free deposition over a very large area. The high-pressure approach is expected to also find application for 3D nanoarchitectures.

  2. Flexible Electronics: High Pressure Chemical Vapor Deposition of Hydrogenated Amorphous Silicon Films and Solar Cells (Adv. Mater. 28/2016).

    PubMed

    He, Rongrui; Day, Todd D; Sparks, Justin R; Sullivan, Nichole F; Badding, John V

    2016-07-01

    On page 5939, J. V. Badding and co-workers describe the unrolling of a flexible hydrogenated amorphous silicon solar cell, deposited by high-pressure chemical vapor deposition. The high-pressure deposition process is represented by the molecules of silane infiltrating the small voids between the rolled up substrate, facilitating plasma-free deposition over a very large area. The high-pressure approach is expected to also find application for 3D nanoarchitectures. PMID:27442970

  3. Field emission properties of porous diamond-like films produced by chemical vapor deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mammana, V. P.; Santos, T. E. A.; Mammana, A. P.; Baranauskas, V.; Ceragioli, Helder J.; Peterlevitz, A. C.

    2002-10-01

    The field emission properties of "porous diamond-like" carbon structures have been characterized. A hot filament chemical vapor deposition system fed with ethyl alcohol vapor diluted in helium was used to deposit the samples. Morphological analysis by field emission scanning electron microscopy revealed that they had a highly porous structure, which was attributed to the modification of the kinetics of the carbon deposition process due to the presence of helium as a buffer gas. Micro-Raman spectroscopy showed two peaks in the graphene and microcrystalline graphite frequencies and a new peak at 1620 cm-1. Low threshold fields (Et) and hysteresis in the current versus voltage characteristic have been observed, and a model to explain the hysteresis is proposed.

  4. Determination of chemical elements in deposition on the Western North Pacific

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hayashi, Kazuhiko; Dokiya, Yukiko; Ohyama, Jun-Ichi; Sagi, Takeshi; Maruta, Emiko; Fushimi, Katsuhiko; Kodama, Yukio; Tanaka, Shigeru

    Shipboard sampling was performed for the evaluation of the deposition amount of chemical species on the southwestern section of the North Pacific, utilizing simple plastic samplers fixed on the upper decks of research vessels of the Japan Meteorological Agency on their routine meteorological and oceanographical cruises from 1988 to 1990. The deposition of nss-sulfate (non-seasalt sulfate, calculated from the concentration of sodium) was found to be high in the western Japan Sea, East China Sea and southern sea adjacent to the Japanese Islands. In the Mariana Sea and the equatorial area, the lowest values were constantly observed in the summer of those 3 years. Values a little higher, but much lower than in the Japan Sea or East China Sea, were measured off the Philippine Islands. The deposition amounts of crustal elements such as silicon, aluminum and iron showed similar tendencies but with some difference in detail.

  5. Development of a polysilicon process based on chemical vapor deposition, phase 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mccormick, J.; Sharp, K.; Arvidson, A.; Sawyer, D.

    1981-01-01

    The development of a dichlorosilane-based reductive chemical vapor deposition process for the production of polycrystalline silicon is discussed. Experimental data indicate that the ease of ignition and explosion severity of dichlorosilane (DCS)/air mixtures is substantially attenuated if the DCS is diluted with hydrogen. Redesign of the process development unit to accommodate safety related information is described. Several different sources of trichlorosilane were used to generate a mixture of redistributed chlorosilanes via Dowex ion exchange resin. The unseparated mixtures were then fed to an experimental reactor in which silicon was deposited and the deposited silicon analyzed for electrically active impurities. At least one trichlorosilane source provided material of requisite purity. Silicon grown in the experimental reactor was converted to single crystal material and solar cells fabricated and tested.

  6. Diamond synthesis at atmospheric pressure by microwave capillary plasma chemical vapor deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hemawan, Kadek W.; Gou, Huiyang; Hemley, Russell J.

    2015-11-01

    Polycrystalline diamond has been synthesized on silicon substrates at atmospheric pressure, using a microwave capillary plasma chemical vapor deposition technique. The CH4/Ar plasma was generated inside of quartz capillary tubes using 2.45 GHz microwave excitation without adding H2 into the deposition gas chemistry. Electronically excited species of CN, C2, Ar, N2, CH, Hβ, and Hα were observed in the emission spectra. Raman measurements of deposited material indicate the formation of well-crystallized diamond, as evidenced by the sharp T2g phonon at 1333 cm-1 peak relative to the Raman features of graphitic carbon. Field emission scanning electron microscopy images reveal that, depending on the growth conditions, the carbon microstructures of grown films exhibit "coral" and "cauliflower-like" morphologies or well-facetted diamond crystals with grain sizes ranging from 100 nm to 10 μm.

  7. Annealing effect on structural and optical properties of chemical bath deposited MnS thin film

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ulutas, Cemal; Gumus, Cebrail

    2016-03-01

    MnS thin film was prepared by the chemical bath deposition (CBD) method on commercial microscope glass substrate deposited at 30 °C. The as-deposited film was given thermal annealing treatment in air atmosphere at various temperatures (150, 300 and 450 °C) for 1 h. The MnS thin film was characterized by using X-ray diffraction (XRD), UV-vis spectrophotometer and Hall effect measurement system. The effect of annealing temperature on the structural, electrical and optical properties such as optical constants of refractive index (n) and energy band gap (Eg) of the film was determined. XRD measurements reveal that the film is crystallized in the wurtzite phase and changed to tetragonal Mn3O4 phase after being annealed at 300 °C. The energy band gap of film decreased from 3.69 eV to 3.21 eV based on the annealing temperature.

  8. Synthesis and characterization of chemically deposited CdS thin films without toxic precursors.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fernández-Pérez, A.; Sandoval-Paz, M. G.

    2016-05-01

    Al doped and undoped CdS thin films (CdS:Al) were deposited on glass, copper and bronze substrates by chemical bath deposition technique in an ammonia-free cadmium-sodium citrate system. The structural and optical properties of the CdS films were determined by X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscope (SEM), and simultaneous transmission- reflection spectroscopy. It was found that the properties of the films depend on the amount of Al in the growth solutions and deposition time. The increase in Al content in the reaction solution led to a smaller crystallite size and higher energy band gap that varies in the range 2.42 eV - 2.59 eV depending on the Al content.

  9. QUALITY ASSURANCE PROGRAM FOR WET DEPOSITION SAMPLING AND CHEMICAL ANALYSES FOR THE NATIONAL TRENDS NETWORK.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Schroder, LeRoy J.; Malo, Bernard A.; ,

    1985-01-01

    The purpose of the National Trends Network is to delineate the major inorganic constituents in the wet deposition in the United States. The approach chosen to monitor the Nation's wet deposition is to install approximately 150 automatic sampling devices with at least one collector in each state. Samples are collected at one week intervals, removed from collectors, and transported to an analytical laboratory for chemical analysis. The quality assurance program has divided wet deposition monitoring into 5 parts: (1) Sampling site selection, (2) sampling device, (3) sample container, (4) sample handling, and (5) laboratory analysis. Each of these five components is being examined using existing designs or new designs. Each existing or proposed sampling site is visited and a criteria audit is performed.

  10. Nanosoldering carbon nanotube junctions by local chemical vapor deposition for improved device performance.

    PubMed

    Do, Jae-Won; Estrada, David; Xie, Xu; Chang, Noel N; Mallek, Justin; Girolami, Gregory S; Rogers, John A; Pop, Eric; Lyding, Joseph W

    2013-01-01

    The performance of carbon nanotube network (CNN) devices is usually limited by the high resistance of individual nanotube junctions (NJs). We present a novel method to reduce this resistance through a nanoscale chemical vapor deposition (CVD) process. By passing current through the devices in the presence of a gaseous CVD precursor, localized nanoscale Joule heating induced at the NJs stimulates the selective and self-limiting deposition of metallic nanosolder. The effectiveness of this nanosoldering process depends on the work function of the deposited metal (here Pd or HfB2), and it can improve the on/off current ratio of a CNN device by nearly an order of magnitude. This nanosoldering technique could also be applied to other device types where nanoscale resistance components limit overall device performance. PMID:24215439

  11. Room temperature synthesis and characterization of CdO nanowires by chemical bath deposition (CBD) method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dhawale, D. S.; More, A. M.; Latthe, S. S.; Rajpure, K. Y.; Lokhande, C. D.

    2008-03-01

    A chemical synthesis process for the fabrication of CdO nanowires is described. In the present work, transparent and conductive CdO films were synthesized on the glass substrate using chemical bath deposition (CBD) at room temperature. These films were annealed in air at 623 K and characterized for the structural, morphological, optical and electrical properties were studied by means of X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), optical and electrical resistivity. The XRD analysis showed that the as-deposited amorphous can be converted in to polycrystalline after annealing. Annealed CdO nanowires are 60-65 nm in diameter and length ranges typically from 2.5 to 3 μm. The optical properties revealed the presence of direct and indirect band gaps with energies 2.42 and 2.04 eV, respectively. Electrical resistivity measurement showed semiconducting behavior and thermoemf measurement showed n-type electrical conductivity.

  12. Development of Single Crystal Chemical Vapor Deposition Diamonds for Detector Applications

    SciTech Connect

    Rainer Wallny

    2012-10-15

    Diamond was studied as a possible radiation hard technology for use in future high radiation environments. With the commissioning of the LHC expected in 2010, and the LHC upgrades expected in 2015, all LHC experiments are planning for detector upgrades which require radiation hard technologies. Chemical Vapor Deposition (CVD) diamond has now been used extensively in beam conditions monitors as the innermost detectors in the highest radiation areas of BaBar, Belle and CDF and is installed and operational in all LHC experiments. As a result, this material is now being discussed as an alternative sensor material for tracking very close to the interaction region of the super-LHC where the most extreme radiation conditions will exist. Our work addressed the further development of the new material, single-crystal Chemical Vapor Deposition diamond, towards reliable industrial production of large pieces and new geometries needed for detector applications.

  13. Development of Single Crystal Chemical Vapor Deposition Diamonds for Detector Applications

    SciTech Connect

    Harris Kagan; K.K. Gan; Richard Kass

    2009-03-31

    Diamond was studied as a possible radiation hard technology for use in future high radiation environments. With the commissioning of the LHC expected in 2009, and the LHC upgrades expected in 2013, all LHC experiments are planning for detector upgrades which require radiation hard technologies. Chemical Vapor Deposition (CVD) diamond has now been used extensively in beam conditions monitors as the innermost detectors in the highest radiation areas of BaBar, Belle and CDF and is installed in all LHC experiments. As a result, this material is now being discussed as an alternative sensor material for tracking very close to the interaction region of the super-LHC where the most extreme radiation conditions will exist. Our work addressed the further development of the new material, single-crystal Chemical Vapor Deposition diamond, towards reliable industrial production of large pieces and new geometries needed for detector applications.

  14. Chemical patterns of octadecyltrimethoxysilane monolayers for the selective deposition of nanoparticles on silicon substrate.

    PubMed

    Ressier, L; Viallet, B; Grisolia, J; Peyrade, J P

    2007-10-01

    The use of nano-objects to make the active part of reproducible nanodevices requires their controlled assembling on specific areas of substrates. In this work, we propose to use van der Waals interactions to assemble selectively gold particles covered by alkyl-thiol ligands on hydrophobic OctadecylTriMethoxySilane (OTMS) patterns defined on SiO(2)/Si substrates by a process combining nano-imprint lithography (NIL) or high resolution electron beam lithography (HREBL) and atmospheric chemical vapor deposition (CVD) of silane. A study by atomic force microscopy (AFM) reveals that homogeneous patterns of OTMS self-assembled monolayers, extending on several square millimeters, have been made. These OTMS patterns, with a lateral dimension ranging from 2mum down to 50nm, can be located at a precise place of a nanodevice, for example, between nanoelectrodes. Preliminary results of selective nanoparticle deposition on these chemical patterns are presented.

  15. Characterization of chemical-vapor-deposited low-k thin films using x-ray porosimetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Hae-Jeong; Lin, Eric K.; Bauer, Barry J.; Wu, Wen-li; Hwang, Byung Keun; Gray, William D.

    2003-02-01

    Trimethylsilane-based carbon-doped silica films prepared with varying chemical-vapor-deposition process conditions were characterized using x-ray reflectivity and porosimetry to measure the film thickness, average film density, density depth profile, wall density, and porosity. Samples deposited under single or dual frequency conditions with either N2O or O2 as an oxidant were compared. The structural parameters were correlated with the chemical bond structure measured by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy. The density profiles of the porous films were uniform with a slight densification at the film surface. The distribution of pores was also uniform through the film. Films prepared under a single frequency and/or N2O atmosphere had the lowest film density, wall density, and dielectric constant. The porosities of the films were similar and the pore sizes were less than 10 Å.

  16. Synthesis of single-crystalline anisotropic gold nano-crystals via chemical vapor deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manna, Sohini; Kim, Jong Woo; Takahashi, Yukiko; Shpyrko, Oleg G.; Fullerton, Eric E.

    2016-05-01

    We report on a novel one-step catalyst-free, thermal chemical vapor deposition procedure to synthesize gold nanocrystals on silicon substrates. This approach yields single-crystal nanocrystals with various morphologies, such as prisms, icosahedrons, and five-fold twinned decahedrons. Our approach demonstrates that high-quality anisotropic crystals composed of fcc metals can be produced without the need for surfactants or templates. Compared with the traditional wet chemical synthesis processes, our method enables direct formation of highly pure and single crystalline nanocrystals on solid substrates which have applications in catalysis. We investigated the evolution of gold nanocrystals and established their formation mechanism.

  17. Monocrystalline molybdenum silicide based quantum dot superlattices grown by chemical vapor deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Savelli, Guillaume; Silveira Stein, Sergio; Bernard-Granger, Guillaume; Faucherand, Pascal; Montès, Laurent

    2016-09-01

    This paper presents the growth of doped monocrystalline molybdenum-silicide-based quantum dot superlattices (QDSL). This is the first time that such nanostructured materials integrating molybdenum silicide nanodots have been grown. QDSL are grown by reduced pressure chemical vapor deposition (RPCVD). We present here their crystallographic structures and chemical properties, as well as the influence of the nanostructuration on their thermal and electrical properties. Particularly, it will be shown some specific characteristics for these QDSL, such as a localization of nanodots between the layers, unlike other silicide based QDSL, an accumulation of doping atoms near the nanodots, and a strong decrease of the thermal conductivity obtained thanks to the nanostructuration.

  18. A kinetic model for the metallorganic chemical vapor deposition of CdTe

    SciTech Connect

    Cavallotti, C.; Bertani, V.; Masi, M.; Carra, S.

    1999-09-01

    The industrial application of cadmium telluride (CdTe) semiconducting layers is still limited by the large amount of defects contained in the films and by the problem of the reproducible control of the level and type of conductivity. Overcoming these difficulties requires a better understanding of the physical and chemical phenomena underlying the deposition process. In particular, in order to improve the quality of the films and to optimize the deposition processes, it is of great importance to understand the elementary kinetic mechanism governing the growth of CdTe. Epitaxial deposition of cadmium telluride through metallorganic chemical vapor deposition was investigated. A detailed elementary kinetic scheme of surface and gas-phase reactions occurring during the deposition process was developed and embedded in a one-dimensional fluid-dynamic model based on the boundary-layer theory. Kinetic constants of gas-phase reactions were either found in the literature or determined through quantum chemistry methods. The most important surface processes were identified and studied through quantum chemistry. Quantum chemistry calculations were performed through the three-parameter Becke-Lee-Yang-Parr hybrid (B3LYP) density functional theory using the 3-21G** basis set. Bond dissociation energies of adsorbed methyl groups were calculated, and according to these data, it was proposed that the growth process proceeds through the adsorption of dimethylcadmium, which successively loses a methyl group to give the adsorbed methylcadmium species. Adsorbed methylcadmium successively reacts with a dimethyltellurium gas-phase molecule to give ethane and methylcadmium telluride, which after the loss of the methyl group becomes part of the film. The effect of the carrier gas on the deposition chemistry was also investigated and a possible reason for the decrease in growth rate observed when the carrier gas is changed from hydrogen to helium was proposed. The productivity of the model

  19. On-line speciation of inorganic and methyl mercury in waters and fish tissues using polyaniline micro-column and flow injection-chemical vapour generation-inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (FI-CVG-ICPMS).

    PubMed

    Krishna, M V Balarama; Chandrasekaran, K; Karunasagar, D

    2010-04-15

    A simple and efficient method for the determination of ultra-trace amounts of inorganic mercury (iHg) and methylmercury (MeHg) in waters and fish tissues was developed using a micro-column filled with polyaniline (PANI) coupled online to flow injection-chemical vapour generation-inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (FI-CVG-ICPMS) system. Preliminary studies indicated that inorganic and methyl mercury species could be separated on PANI column in two different speciation approaches. At pH <3, only iHg could be sorbed and almost no adsorption of MeHg was found (speciation procedure 1). If the sample solution pH is approximately 7, both MeHg and iHg species could be sorbed on the PANI column. Subsequently both the Hg species were selectively eluted with 2% HCl and a mixture of 2% HCl and 0.02% thiourea respectively (speciation procedure 2). The adsorption percentage of iHg on the PANI column was unchanged even with acidity of the sample solution increased to 6 mol L(-1). Therefore, an acidic solution (5 mol L(-1) HCl), used for ultra-sound assisted extraction of the mercury species from biological samples, was used directly to separate MeHg from iHg in the fish tissues (tuna fish ERM-CE 463, ERM-CE 464 and IAEA-350) by PANI column using speciation procedure 1. The determined values were in good agreement with certified values. Under optimal conditions, the limits of detection (LODs) were 2.52 pg and 3.24 pg for iHg and MeHg (as Hg) respectively. The developed method was applied successfully to the direct determination of iHg and MeHg in various waters (tap water, lake water, ground water and sea-water) and the recoveries for the spiked samples were in the range of 96-102% for both the Hg species. PMID:20188947

  20. On-line speciation of inorganic and methyl mercury in waters and fish tissues using polyaniline micro-column and flow injection-chemical vapour generation-inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (FI-CVG-ICPMS).

    PubMed

    Krishna, M V Balarama; Chandrasekaran, K; Karunasagar, D

    2010-04-15

    A simple and efficient method for the determination of ultra-trace amounts of inorganic mercury (iHg) and methylmercury (MeHg) in waters and fish tissues was developed using a micro-column filled with polyaniline (PANI) coupled online to flow injection-chemical vapour generation-inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (FI-CVG-ICPMS) system. Preliminary studies indicated that inorganic and methyl mercury species could be separated on PANI column in two different speciation approaches. At pH <3, only iHg could be sorbed and almost no adsorption of MeHg was found (speciation procedure 1). If the sample solution pH is approximately 7, both MeHg and iHg species could be sorbed on the PANI column. Subsequently both the Hg species were selectively eluted with 2% HCl and a mixture of 2% HCl and 0.02% thiourea respectively (speciation procedure 2). The adsorption percentage of iHg on the PANI column was unchanged even with acidity of the sample solution increased to 6 mol L(-1). Therefore, an acidic solution (5 mol L(-1) HCl), used for ultra-sound assisted extraction of the mercury species from biological samples, was used directly to separate MeHg from iHg in the fish tissues (tuna fish ERM-CE 463, ERM-CE 464 and IAEA-350) by PANI column using speciation procedure 1. The determined values were in good agreement with certified values. Under optimal conditions, the limits of detection (LODs) were 2.52 pg and 3.24 pg for iHg and MeHg (as Hg) respectively. The developed method was applied successfully to the direct determination of iHg and MeHg in various waters (tap water, lake water, ground water and sea-water) and the recoveries for the spiked samples were in the range of 96-102% for both the Hg species.

  1. SYNTHESIS AND CHARACTERIZATION OF SMART FUNCTIONAL COATINGS BY CHEMICAL SOLUTION DEPOSITION METHODS

    SciTech Connect

    Mendez-Torres, A.

    2011-07-19

    New coating technology enables the fabrication of low cost structural health monitoring (SHM) and tamper indication devices that can be employed to strengthen national and international safeguards objectives. In particular, such innovations could serve the safeguards community by improving both the timeliness of detection and confidence in verification and monitoring. This work investigates the synthesis of functional surface coatings using chemical solutions deposition methods. Chemical solution deposition has recently received attention in the materials research community due to its unique advantages such as low temperature processing, high homogeneity of final products and the ability to fabricate materials with controlled surface properties and pore structures. The synthesis of functional coatings aimed at modifying the materials conductivity and optical properties was investigated by the incorporation of transition element (e.g. Cr{sup +3}) and rare earth (e.g. Er{sup +3}) serving as dopants in a polymer or gel matrix. The structural and morphological investigation of the as-deposited films was carried out using UV/Vis and photoluminescence (PL) spectroscopy. The as deposited coating was further investigated by scanning electron microscopy and energy dispersive x-ray microscopy.

  2. Large improvement of phosphorus incorporation efficiency in n-type chemical vapor deposition of diamond

    SciTech Connect

    Ohtani, Ryota; Yamamoto, Takashi; Janssens, Stoffel D.; Yamasaki, Satoshi

    2014-12-08

    Microwave plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition is a promising way to generate n-type, e.g., phosphorus-doped, diamond layers for the fabrication of electronic components, which can operate at extreme conditions. However, a deeper understanding of the doping process is lacking and low phosphorus incorporation efficiencies are generally observed. In this work, it is shown that systematically changing the internal design of a non-commercial chemical vapor deposition chamber, used to grow diamond layers, leads to a large increase of the phosphorus doping efficiency in diamond, produced in this device, without compromising its electronic properties. Compared to the initial reactor design, the doping efficiency is about 100 times higher, reaching 10%, and for a very broad doping range, the doping efficiency remains highly constant. It is hypothesized that redesigning the deposition chamber generates a higher flow of active phosphorus species towards the substrate, thereby increasing phosphorus incorporation in diamond and reducing deposition of phosphorus species at reactor walls, which additionally reduces undesirable memory effects.

  3. Aerosol-Assisted Chemical Vapor Deposited Thin Films for Space Photovoltaics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hepp, Aloysius F.; McNatt, Jeremiah; Dickman, John E.; Jin, Michael H.-C.; Banger, Kulbinder K.; Kelly, Christopher V.; AquinoGonzalez, Angel R.; Rockett, Angus A.

    2006-01-01

    Copper indium disulfide thin films were deposited via aerosol-assisted chemical vapor deposition using single source precursors. Processing and post-processing parameters were varied in order to modify morphology, stoichiometry, crystallography, electrical properties, and optical properties in order to optimize device-quality material. Growth at atmospheric pressure in a horizontal hot-wall reactor at 395 C yielded best device films. Placing the susceptor closer to the evaporation zone and flowing a more precursor-rich carrier gas through the reactor yielded shinier, smoother, denser-looking films. Growth of (112)-oriented films yielded more Cu-rich films with fewer secondary phases than growth of (204)/(220)-oriented films. Post-deposition sulfur-vapor annealing enhanced stoichiometry and crystallinity of the films. Photoluminescence studies revealed four major emission bands (1.45, 1.43, 1.37, and 1.32 eV) and a broad band associated with deep defects. The highest device efficiency for an aerosol-assisted chemical vapor deposited cell was 1.03 percent.

  4. Antimony sulphide thin film as an absorber in chemically deposited solar cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Messina, Sarah; Nair, M. T. S.; Nair, P. K.

    2008-05-01

    Antimony sulfide thin films (thickness, 500 nm) were deposited on chemically deposited CdS thin films (100 nm) obtained on 3 mm glass substrates coated with a transparent conductive coating of SnO2:F (TEC-15 with 15 Ω sheet resistance). Two different chemical formulations were used for depositing antimony sulfide films. These contained (i) antimony trichloride dissolved in acetone and sodium thiosulfate, and (ii) potassium antimony tartrate, triethanolamine, ammonia, thioacetamide and small concentrations of silicotungstic acid. The films were heated at 250 °C in nitrogen. The cell structure was completed by depositing a 200 nm p-type PbS thin film. Graphite paint applied on the PbS thin film and a subsequent layer of silver paint served as the p-side contact. The cell structure: SnO2:F/CdS/Sb2S3 (i or ii)/PbS showed open circuit voltage (Voc) of 640 mV and short circuit current density (Jsc) above 1 mA cm-2 under 1 kW m-2 tungsten-halogen radiation. Four cells, each of 1.7 cm2 area, were series-connected to give Voc of 1.6 V and a short circuit current of 4.1 mA under sunlight (1060 W m-2).

  5. Conductivity of Thin Films Based on Single-Walled Carbon Nanotubes Grown by Chemical Vapor Deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rybakov, M. S.; Kosobutsky, A. V.; Sevostyanov, O. G.; Russakov, D. M.; Lomakin, M. V.; Chirkova, I. M.; Shandakov, S. D.

    2015-03-01

    Electrical and optical properties of thin films of single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNT) obtained by aerosol chemical vapor deposition using ethanol, ferrocene, and sulfur are studied. Structural and geometrical characteristics of the synthesis products are determined by the methods of Raman spectroscopy and transmission electron microscopy. The effect of sulfur on the properties of the SWCNTs and thin films based on them is found.

  6. Magnetic nanostructures fabricated by scanning tunneling microscope-assisted chemical vapor deposition

    SciTech Connect

    Pai, W.W.; Zhang, J.; Wendelken, J.F.; Warmack, R.J.

    1997-07-01

    We have successfully used scanning tunneling microscope-assisted chemical vapor deposition to fabricate magnetic nanostructures as fine as 5 nm wide and {lt}2 nm high using ferrocene [Fe(C{sub 5}H{sub 5}){sub 2}] as the metal-organic source gas. The physical properties of these nanostructures were qualitatively characterized and {ital ex situ} magnetic force microscopy measurements indicate these features are strongly magnetic.

  7. Synthesis of Cobalt Oxides Thin Films Fractal Structures by Laser Chemical Vapor Deposition

    PubMed Central

    Haniam, P.; Kunsombat, C.; Chiangga, S.; Songsasen, A.

    2014-01-01

    Thin films of cobalt oxides (CoO and Co3O4) fractal structures have been synthesized by using laser chemical vapor deposition at room temperature and atmospheric pressure. Various factors which affect the density and crystallization of cobalt oxides fractal shapes have been examined. We show that the fractal structures can be described by diffusion-limited aggregation model and discuss a new possibility to control the fractal structures. PMID:24672354

  8. Synthesis of cobalt oxides thin films fractal structures by laser chemical vapor deposition.

    PubMed

    Haniam, P; Kunsombat, C; Chiangga, S; Songsasen, A

    2014-01-01

    Thin films of cobalt oxides (CoO and Co3O4) fractal structures have been synthesized by using laser chemical vapor deposition at room temperature and atmospheric pressure. Various factors which affect the density and crystallization of cobalt oxides fractal shapes have been examined. We show that the fractal structures can be described by diffusion-limited aggregation model and discuss a new possibility to control the fractal structures. PMID:24672354

  9. Gravity Effects in Carbon Nanotube Growth by Thermal Chemical Vapor Deposition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zhu, S.; Su, C. H.; Cochrane, J. C.; Lehoczky, S. L.; Cui, Y.; Burger, A.; Whitaker, Ann F. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Carbon nanotubes are synthesized using thermal chemical vapor deposition. The sizes of these carbon nanotubes (CNT) are quite uniform and the length of the tube is up to several tens of micrometers. With the substrate surface normal either along or against the gravity vector, different growth orientations of CNT are observed by scanning electron microscopy although the Raman spectra are similar for samples synthesized at different locations. These results suggest the gravitation effects in the growth of long and small diameter CNT.

  10. Electrochromic properties of molybdenum trioxide thin films prepared by chemical vapor deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maruyama, Toshiro; Kanagawa, Tetsuya

    1995-05-01

    Electrochromic molybdenum trioxide thin films were prepared by chemical vapor deposition. The source material was molybdenum carbonyl. Amorphous molybdenum trioxide thin films were produced at a substrate temperature 300 C. Reduction and oxidation of the films in a 0.3M LiClO4 propylene carbon ate solution caused desirable changes in optical absorption. Coulometry indicated that the coloration efficiency was 25.8 sq cm center-dot C(exp -1).

  11. Metal organic chemical vapor deposition of 111-v compounds on silicon

    DOEpatents

    Vernon, Stanley M.

    1986-01-01

    Expitaxial composite comprising thin films of a Group III-V compound semiconductor such as gallium arsenide (GaAs) or gallium aluminum arsenide (GaAlAs) on single crystal silicon substrates are disclosed. Also disclosed is a process for manufacturing, by chemical deposition from the vapor phase, epitaxial composites as above described, and to semiconductor devices based on such epitaxial composites. The composites have particular utility for use in making light sensitive solid state solar cells.

  12. GaN Stress Evolution During Metal-Organic Chemical Vapor Deposition

    SciTech Connect

    Amano, H.; Chason, E.; Figiel, J.; Floro, J.A.; Han, J.; Hearne, S.; Hunter, J.; Tsong, I.

    1998-10-14

    The evolution of stress in gallium nitride films on sapphire has been measured in real- time during metal organic chemical vapor deposition. In spite of the 161%0 compressive lattice mismatch of GaN to sapphire, we find that GaN consistently grows in tension at 1050"C. Furthermore, in-situ stress monitoring indicates that there is no measurable relaxation of the tensile growth stress during annealing or thermal cycling.

  13. Negative Electron Affinity Effect on the Surface of Chemical Vapor Deposited Diamond Polycrystalline Films

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Krainsky, I. L.; Asnin, V. M.; Mearini, G. T.; Dayton, J. A., Jr.

    1996-01-01

    Strong negative electron affinity effects have been observed on the surface of as-grown chemical vapor deposited diamond using Secondary Electron Emission. The test samples were randomly oriented and the surface was terminated with hydrogen. The effect appears as an intensive peak in the low energy part of the spectrum of the electron energy distribution and may be described in the model of effective negative electron affinity.

  14. Growth mechanism of Co:TiO2 thin film deposited by metal organic chemical vapor deposition technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saripudin, A.; Arifin, P.

    2016-04-01

    In this research, we investigated the growth mechanism of cobalt-doped titanium dioxide (Co:TiO2) films. Thi Co:TiO2 thin films were grown on the n-type silicon substrate. The films were grown by metal organic chemical vapor deposition method. The growth temperature was varied of 325°C - 450°C. The films were characterized by SEM. Using Arheniu’s equation, it is known that the activation energy value of film growth is positive in the range of temperature of 325°C - 400°C and negative in the range of temperature of 400°C - 450°C. These results show that the decomposition rate in the range of temperature of 325°C - 400°C is due to diffusion phase of precursor gas. On the other hand, the decomposition rate decreased in the range of temperature of 400°C - 450°C because the precursor gas decreased, and the surface chemical reaction was high.

  15. Preparation and structure of porous dielectrics by plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gates, S. M.; Neumayer, D. A.; Sherwood, M. H.; Grill, A.; Wang, X.; Sankarapandian, M.

    2007-05-01

    The preparation of ultralow dielectric constant porous silicon, carbon, oxygen, hydrogen alloy dielectrics, called "pSiCOH," using a production 200mm plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition tool and a thermal treatment is reported here. The effect of deposition temperature on the pSiCOH film is examined using Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy, dielectric constant (k), and film shrinkage measurements. For all deposition temperatures, carbon in the final porous film is shown to be predominantly Si -CH3 species, and lower k is shown to correlate with increased concentration of Si -CH3. NMR and FTIR spectroscopies clearly detect the loss of a removable, unstable, hydrocarbon (CHx) phase during the thermal treatment. Also detected are increased cross-linking of the Si-O skeleton, and concentration changes for three distinct structures of carbon. In the as deposited films, deposition temperature also affects the hydrocarbon (CHx) content and the presence of C O and C C functional groups.

  16. Differing morphologies of textured diamond films with electrical properties made with microwave plasma chemical vapor deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lai, Wen Chi; Wu, Yu-Shiang; Chang, Hou-Cheng; Lee, Yuan-Haun

    2010-12-01

    This study investigates the orientation of textured diamond films produced through microwave plasma chemical vapor deposition (MPCVD) at 1200 W, 110 Torr, CH 4/H 2 = 1/20, with depositions times of 0.5-4.0 h. After a growth period of 2.0-4.0 h, this particular morphology revealed a rectangular structure stacked regularly on the diamond film. The orientation on {1 1 1}-textured diamond films grew a preferred orientation of {1 1 0} on the surface, as measured by XRD. The formation of the diamond epitaxial film formed textured octahedrons in ball shaped (or cauliflower-like) diamonds in the early stages (0.5 h), and the surface of the diamond film extended to pile the rectangular structure at 4.0 h. The width of the tier was approximately 200 nm at the 3.0 h point of deposition, according to TEM images. The results revealed that the textured diamond films showed two different morphological structures (typical ball shaped and rectangular diamonds), at different stages of the deposition period. The I- V characteristics of the oriented diamond films after 4.0 h of deposition time showed good conformity with the ohmic contact.

  17. Application of Chlorine-Assisted Chemical Vapor Deposition of Diamond at Low Temperatures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pan, Chenyu; Altemir, David A.; Margrave, John L.; Hauge, Robert H.

    1994-01-01

    Low temperature deposition of diamond has been achieved by a chlorine-assisted diamond chemical vapor deposition (CA-CVD) process. This method begins with the thermal dissociation of molecular chlorine into atomic chlorine in a resistively heated graphite furnace at temperatures between 1300 and 1500 deg. C. The atomic chlorine, upon mixing, subsequently reacts with molecular hydrogen and hydrocarbons. The rapid exchange reactions between the atomic chlorine, molecular hydrogen, and hydrocarbons give rise to the atomic hydrogen and carbon precursors required for diamond deposition. Homoepitaxial diamond growth on diamond substrates has been studied over the substrate temperature range of 100-950 C. It was found that the diamond growth rates are approximately 0.2 microns/hr in the temperature range between 102 and 300 C and that the growth rates do not decrease significantly with a decrease in substrate temperature. This is unique because the traditional diamond deposition using H2/CH4 systems usually disappears at substrate temperatures below approx. 500 deg. C. This opens up a possible route to the deposition of diamond on low-melting point materials such as aluminum and its alloys.

  18. Chain Assemblies from Nanoparticles Synthesized by Atmospheric Pressure Plasma Enhanced Chemical Vapor Deposition: The Computational View.

    PubMed

    Mishin, Maxim V; Zamotin, Kirill Y; Protopopova, Vera S; Alexandrov, Sergey E

    2015-12-01

    This article refers to the computational study of nanoparticle self-organization on the solid-state substrate surface with consideration of the experimental results, when nanoparticles were synthesised during atmospheric pressure plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition (AP-PECVD). The experimental study of silicon dioxide nanoparticle synthesis by AP-PECVD demonstrated that all deposit volume consists of tangled chains of nanoparticles. In certain cases, micron-sized fractals are formed from tangled chains due to deposit rearrangement. This work is focused on the study of tangled chain formation only. In order to reveal their formation mechanism, a physico-mathematical model was developed. The suggested model was based on the motion equation solution for charged and neutral nanoparticles in the potential fields with the use of the empirical interaction potentials. In addition, the computational simulation was carried out based on the suggested model. As a result, the influence of such experimental parameters as deposition duration, particle charge, gas flow velocity, and angle of gas flow was found. It was demonstrated that electrical charges carried by nanoparticles from the discharge area are not responsible for the formation of tangled chains from nanoparticles, whereas nanoparticle kinetic energy plays a crucial role in deposit morphology and density. The computational results were consistent with experimental results. PMID:26682441

  19. Silica-titania composite aerogel photocatalysts by chemical liquid deposition of titania onto nanoporous silica scaffolds.

    PubMed

    Zu, Guoqing; Shen, Jun; Wang, Wenqin; Zou, Liping; Lian, Ya; Zhang, Zhihua

    2015-03-11

    Silica-titania composite aerogels were synthesized by chemical liquid deposition of titania onto nanoporous silica scaffolds. This novel deposition process was based on chemisorption of partially hydrolyzed titanium alkoxides from solution onto silica nanoparticle surfaces and subsequent hydrolysis and condensation to afford titania nanoparticles on the silica surface. The titania is homogeneously distributed in the silica-titania composite aerogels, and the titania content can be effectively controlled by regulating the deposition cycles. The resultant composite aerogel with 15 deposition cycles possessed a high specific surface area (SSA) of 425 m(2)/g, a small particle size of 5-14 nm, and a large pore volume and pore size of 2.41 cm(3)/g and 18.1 nm, respectively, after heat treatment at 600 °C and showed high photocatalytic activity in the photodegradation of methylene blue under UV-light irradiation. Its photocatalytic activity highly depends on the deposition cycles and heat treatment. The combination of small particle size, high SSA, and enhanced crystallinity after heat treatment at 600 °C contributes to the excellent photocatalytic property of the silica-titania composite aerogel. The higher SSAs compared to those of the reported titania aerogels (<200 m(2)/g at 600 °C) at high temperatures combined with the simple method makes the silica-titania aerogels promising candidates as photocatalysts.

  20. High-performance chemical sensing using Schottky-contacted chemical vapor deposition grown monolayer MoS2 transistors.

    PubMed

    Liu, Bilu; Chen, Liang; Liu, Gang; Abbas, Ahmad N; Fathi, Mohammad; Zhou, Chongwu

    2014-05-27

    Trace chemical detection is important for a wide range of practical applications. Recently emerged two-dimensional (2D) crystals offer unique advantages as potential sensing materials with high sensitivity, owing to their very high surface-to-bulk atom ratios and semiconducting properties. Here, we report the first use of Schottky-contacted chemical vapor deposition grown monolayer MoS2 as high-performance room temperature chemical sensors. The Schottky-contacted MoS2 transistors show current changes by 2-3 orders of magnitude upon exposure to very low concentrations of NO2 and NH3. Specifically, the MoS2 sensors show clear detection of NO2 and NH3 down to 20 ppb and 1 ppm, respectively. We attribute the observed high sensitivity to both well-known charger transfer mechanism and, more importantly, the Schottky barrier modulation upon analyte molecule adsorption, the latter of which is made possible by the Schottky contacts in the transistors and is not reported previously for MoS2 sensors. This study shows the potential of 2D semiconductors as high-performance sensors and also benefits the fundamental studies of interfacial phenomena and interactions between chemical species and monolayer 2D semiconductors.

  1. Low temperature atmospheric pressure chemical vapor deposition of group 14 oxide films

    SciTech Connect

    Hoffman, D.M.; Atagi, L.M. |; Chu, Wei-Kan; Liu, Jia-Rui; Zheng, Zongshuang; Rubiano, R.R.; Springer, R.W.; Smith, D.C.

    1994-06-01

    Depositions of high quality SiO{sub 2} and SnO{sub 2} films from the reaction of homoleptic amido precursors M(NMe{sub 2})4 (M = Si,Sn) and oxygen were carried out in an atmospheric pressure chemical vapor deposition r. The films were deposited on silicon, glass and quartz substrates at temperatures of 250 to 450C. The silicon dioxide films are stoichiometric (O/Si = 2.0) with less than 0.2 atom % C and 0.3 atom % N and have hydrogen contents of 9 {plus_minus} 5 atom %. They are deposited with growth rates from 380 to 900 {angstrom}/min. The refractive indexes of the SiO{sub 2} films are 1.46, and infrared spectra show a possible Si-OH peak at 950 cm{sup {minus}1}. X-Ray diffraction studies reveal that the SiO{sub 2} film deposited at 350C is amorphous. The tin oxide films are stoichiometric (O/Sn = 2.0) and contain less than 0.8 atom % carbon, and 0.3 atom % N. No hydrogen was detected by elastic recoil spectroscopy. The band gap for the SnO{sub 2} films, as estimated from transmission spectra, is 3.9 eV. The resistivities of the tin oxide films are in the range 10{sup {minus}2} to 10{sup {minus}3} {Omega}cm and do not vary significantly with deposition temperature. The tin oxide film deposited at 350C is cassitterite with some (101) orientation.

  2. Microstructural, chemical and textural characterization of ZnO nanorods synthesized by aerosol assisted chemical vapor deposition

    SciTech Connect

    Sáenz-Trevizo, A.; Amézaga-Madrid, P.; Fuentes-Cobas, L.; Pizá-Ruiz, P.; Antúnez-Flores, W.; Ornelas-Gutiérrez, C.; Pérez-García, S.A.; Miki-Yoshida, M.

    2014-12-15

    ZnO nanorods were synthesized by aerosol assisted chemical vapor deposition onto TiO{sub 2} covered borosilicate glass substrates. Deposition parameters were optimized and kept constant. Solely the effect of different nozzle velocities on the growth of ZnO nanorods was evaluated in order to develop a dense and uniform structure. The crystalline structure was characterized by conventional X-ray diffraction in grazing incidence and Bragg–Brentano configurations. In addition, two-dimensional grazing incidence synchrotron radiation diffraction was employed to determine the preferred growth direction of the nanorods. Morphology and growth characteristics analyzed by electron microscopy were correlated with diffraction outcomes. Chemical composition was established by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. X-ray diffraction results and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy showed the presence of wurtzite ZnO and anatase TiO{sub 2} phases. Morphological changes noticed when the deposition velocity was lowered to the minimum, indicated the formation of relatively vertically oriented nanorods evenly distributed onto the TiO{sub 2} buffer film. By coupling two-dimensional X-ray diffraction and computational modeling with ANAELU it was proved that a successful texture determination was achieved and confirmed by scanning electron microscopy analysis. Texture analysis led to the conclusion of a preferred growth direction in [001] having a distribution width Ω = 20° ± 2°. - Highlights: • Uniform and pure single-crystal ZnO nanorods were obtained by AACVD technique. • Longitudinal and transversal axis parallel to the [001] and [110] directions, respectively. • Texture was determined by 2D synchrotron diffraction and electron microscopy analysis. • Nanorods have its [001] direction distributed close to the normal of the substrate. • Angular spread about the preferred orientation is 20° ± 2°.

  3. Temporal and spatial trends of chemical composition of wet deposition samples collected in Austria

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schreiner, Elisabeth; Kasper-Giebl, Anne; Lohninger, Hans

    2016-04-01

    Triggered by the occurrence of acid rain a sampling network for the collection of wet deposition samples was initiated in Austria in the early 1980s. Now the data set covers a time period of slightly more than 30 years for the stations being operable since the beginning. Sampling of rain water and snow was and is performed with Wet and Dry Only Samplers (WADOS) on a daily basis. Chemical analysis of rain water and snow samples comprised anions (chloride, nitrate, sulfate) and cations (sodium, ammonium, potassium, calcium and magnesium) as well as pH and electrical conductivity. Here we evaluate and discuss temporal trends of both, ion concentrations and wet deposition data for twelve sampling stations, which were operable for most of the observation period of 30 years. As expected concentrations and wet deposition loads of sulfate and acidity decreased significantly during the last three decades - which is also reflected by a strong decrease of sulfur emissions in Austria and neighboring countries. Regarding nitrate the decrease of concentrations and wet deposition loads is less pronounced. Again this is in accordance with changes in emission data. In case of ammonium even less stations showed a significant decrease of annual average concentrations and depositions. Reasons for that might be twofold. On one hand emissions of ammonia did not decrease as strongly as e.g. sulfur emissions. Furthermore local sources will be more dominant and can influence the year to year variability. Seasonality of ion concentrations and deposition loads were investigated using Fourier analysis. Sulfate, nitrate, ammonium, acidity and also precipitation amount showed characteristic seasonal patterns for most of the sites and for concentrations as well as deposition loads. However the maxima in ion concentrations and deposition loads were observed during different times of the year. Concentrations of basic cations and chloride, on the contrary, hardly showed any seasonality. However, as

  4. Chemical vapor deposition of silicon, silicon dioxide, titanium and ferroelectric thin films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Feng

    Various silicon-based thin films (such as epitaxial, polycrystalline and amorphous silicon thin films, silicon dioxide thin films and silicon nitride thin films), titanium thin film and various ferroelectric thin films (such as BaTiO3 and PbTiO3 thin films) play critical roles in the manufacture of microelectronics circuits. For the past few years, there have been tremendous interests to search for cheap, safe and easy-to-use methods to develop those thin films with high quality and good step coverage. Silane is a critical chemical reagent widely used to deposit silicon-based thin films. Despite its wide use, silane is a dangerous material. It is pyrophoric, extremely flammable and may explode from heat, shock and/or friction. Because of the nature of silane, serious safety issues have been raised concerning the use, transportation, and storage of compressed gas cylinders of silane. Therefore it is desired to develop safer ways to deposit silicon-based films. In chapter III, I present the results of our research in the following fields: (1) Silane generator, (2) Substitutes of silane for deposition of silicon and silicon dioxide thin films, (3) Substitutes of silane for silicon dioxide thin film deposition. In chapter IV, hydropyridine is introduced as a new ligand for use in constructing precursors for chemical vapor deposition. Detachement of hydropyridine occurs by a low-temperature reaction leaving hydrogen in place of the hydropyridine ligands. Hydropyridine ligands can be attached to a variety of elements, including main group metals, such as aluminum and antimony, transition metals, such as titanium and tantalum, semiconductors such as silicon, and non-metals such as phosphorus and arsenic. In this study, hydropyridine-containing titanium compounds were synthesized and used as chemical vapor deposition precursors for deposition of titanium containing thin films. Some other titanium compounds were also studied for comparison. In chapter V, Chemical Vapor

  5. Physical Property Characterization of Pb2+-Doped CdS Nanofilms Deposited by Chemical-Bath Deposition at Low Temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Díaz-Reyes, J.; Contreras-Rascón, J. I.; Galván-Arellano, M.; Arias-Cerón, J. S.; Gutiérrez-Arias, J. E. M.; Flores-Mena, J. E.; Morín-Castillo, M. M.

    2016-08-01

    Pb2 +-doped CdS nanofilms are prepared using the growth technique chemical bath deposition (CBD) under optimum conditions lead acetate at the reservoir temperature of 20 ± 2 °C. The Pb2+ molar concentration was in the range 0.0 ≤ x ≤ 0.19.67, which was determined by energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS). The X-ray diffraction results show that the films are of PbS-CdS composites with individual CdS and PbS planes. The X-ray diffraction (XRD) analysis and Raman scattering reveal that CdS-deposited films showed the zincblende (ZB) crystalline phase. The average grain size of the CdS films ranged from 1.21 to 6.67 nm that was determined by the Debye-Scherrer equation from ZB (111) direction, and it was confirmed by high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM). Raman scattering shows that the lattice dynamics is characteristic of bimodal behaviour and the multipeaks adjust of the first optical longitudinal mode for the Pb2+-doped CdS denotes the Raman shift of the characteristic peak in the range of 305-298 cm-1 of the CdS crystals, which is associated with the lead ion incorporation. The films exhibit three direct bandgaps, ~2.44 eV attributed to CdS; the other varies continuously from 1.67 to 1.99 eV and another disappears as Pb2+ molar fraction increases.

  6. Comprehensive investigation of HgCdTe metalorganic chemical vapor deposition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Raupp, Gregory B.

    1993-01-01

    The principal objective of this experimental and theoretical research program was to explore the possibility of depositing high quality epitaxial CdTe and HgCdTe at very low pressures through metalorganic chemical vapor deposition (MOCVD). We explored two important aspects of this potential process: (1) the interaction of molecular flow transport and deposition in an MOCVD reactor with a commercial configuration, and (2) the kinetics of metal alkyl source gas adsorption, decomposition and desorption from the growing film surface using ultra high vacuum surface science reaction techniques. To explore the transport-reaction issue, we have developed a reaction engineering analysis of a multiple wafer-in-tube ultrahigh vacuum chemical vapor deposition (UHV/CVD) reactor which allows an estimate of wafer or substrate throughput for a reactor of fixed geometry and a given deposition chemistry with specified film thickness uniformity constraints. The model employs a description of ballistic transport and reaction based on the pseudo-steady approximation to the Boltzmann equation in the limit of pure molecular flow. The model representation takes the form of an integral equation for the flux of each reactant or intermediate species to the wafer surfaces. Expressions for the reactive sticking coefficients (RSC) for each species must be incorporated in the term which represents reemission from a wafer surface. The interactions of MOCVD precursors with Si and CdTe were investigated using temperature programmed desorption (TPD) in ultra high vacuum combined with Auger electron spectroscopy (AES). These studies revealed that diethyltellurium (DETe) and dimethylcadmium (DMCd) adsorb weakly on clean Si(100) and desorb upon heating without decomposing. These precursors adsorb both weakly and strongly on CdTe(111)A, with DMCd exhibiting the stronger interaction with the surface than DETe.

  7. Effects of digestion, chemical separation, and deposition on Po-210 quantitative analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Seiner, Brienne N.; Morley, Shannon M.; Beacham, Tere A.; Haney, Morgan M.; Gregory, Stephanie J.; Metz, Lori A.

    2014-10-01

    Polonium-210 is a radioactive isotope often used to study sedimentation processes, food chains, aerosol behavior, and atmospheric circulations related to environmental sciences. Materials for the analysis of Po-210 range from tobacco leaves or cotton fibers, to soils and sediments. The purpose of this work was to determine polonium losses from a variety of sample types (soil, cotton fiber, and air filter) due to digestion technique, chemical separation, and deposition method for alpha energy analysis. Results demonstrated that yields from a perchloric acid wet-ash were similar to that from a microwave digestion. Both were greater than the dry-ash procedure. The polonium yield from the perchloric acid wet ash was 87 ± 5%, the microwave digestion had a yield of 100 ± 7%, and the dry ash had a yield of 38 ± 5%. The chemical separation of polonium by an anion exchange resin was used only on the soil samples due to the complex nature of this sample. The yield of Po-209 tracer after chemical separation and deposition for alpha analysis was 83 ± 7% for the soil samples. Spontaneous deposition yields for the cotton and air filters were 87 ± 4% and 92 ± 6%, respectively. Based on the overall process yields for each sample type the amount of Po-210 was quantified using alpha energy analysis. The soil contained 0.18 ± 0.08 Bq/g, the cotton swipe contained 0.7 mBq/g, and the air filter contained 0.04 ± 0.02 mBq/g. High and robust yields of polonium are possible using a suitable digestion, separation, and deposition method.

  8. Graphene oxide thin films: influence of chemical structure and deposition methodology.

    PubMed

    Hidalgo, R S; López-Díaz, D; Velázquez, M Mercedes

    2015-03-10

    We synthesized graphene oxide sheets of different functionalization by oxidation of two different starting materials, graphite and GANF nanofibers, followed by purification based on alkaline washing. The chemical structure of graphene oxide materials was determined by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), and the nanoplatelets were characterized by ζ potential and dynamic light scattering (DLS) measurements. The XPS results indicated that the chemical structure depends on the starting material. Two different deposition methodologies, Langmuir-Blodgett (LB) and Langmuir-Schaefer (LS), were employed to build the graphene oxide thin films. The film morphology was analyzed by scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The SEM images allow us to conclude that the LB methodology provides the highest coverage. This coverage is almost independent of the chemical composition of sheets. Conversely, the coverage obtained by the LS methodology increases with the percentage of C-O groups attached to sheets. Surface-pressure isotherms of these materials were interpreted according to the Volmer model.

  9. Vapour Intrusion into Buildings - A Literature Review

    EPA Science Inventory

    This chapter provides a review of recent research on vapour intrusion of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) into buildings. The chapter builds on a report from Tillman and Weaver (2005) which reviewed the literature on vapour intrusion through 2005. Firstly, the term ‘vapour intru...

  10. MBMS studies of gas-phase kinetics in diamond chemical vapor deposition

    SciTech Connect

    Fox, C.A.; McMaster, M.C.; Tung, D.M.

    1995-03-01

    A molecular beam mass spectrometer system (MBMS) has been used to determine the near-surface gaseous composition involved in the low pressure chemical vapor deposition of diamond. With this system, radical and stable species can be detected with a sensitivity better than 10 ppm. Threshold ionization techniques have been employed to distinguish between radical species in the deposition environment from radical species generated by parent molecule cracking. An extensive calibration procedure was used to enable the quantitative determination of H-atom and CH{sub 3} radical mole fractions. Using the MBMS system, the gaseous composition involved in LPCVD of diamond has been measured for a wide variety of deposition conditions, including hot-filament gas activation, microwave-plasma gas activation, and a variety of precursor feed mixtures (ex: CH{sub 4}/H{sub 2}, C{sub 2}H{sub 2}/H{sub 2}). For microwave-plasma activation (MPCVD), the radical concentrations (H-atom and CH{sub 3} radicals) are independent of the identity of the precursor feed gas provided the input carbon mole fraction is constant. However, in hot-filament diamond deposition (HFCVD), the atomic hydrogen concentration decreased by an order of magnitude as the mole fraction of carbon in the precursor mixture is increased to .07; this sharp reduction has been attributed to filament poisoning of the catalytic tungsten surface via hydrocarbon deposition. Additionally, the authors find that the H-atom concentration is independent of the substrate temperature for both hot-filament and microwave plasma deposition; radial H-atom diffusion is invoked to explain this observation.

  11. Fabrication of ZnO nanorod using spray-pyrolysis and chemical bath deposition method

    SciTech Connect

    Ramadhani, Muhammad F. Pasaribu, Maruli A. H. Yuliarto, Brian Nugraha

    2014-02-24

    ZnO thin films with nanorod structure were deposited using Ultrasonic Spray Pyrolysis method for seed growth, and Chemical Bath Deposition (CBD) for nanorod growth. High purity Zn-hydrate and Urea are used to control Ph were dissolved in ethanol and aqua bidest in Ultrasonic Spray Pyrolysis process. Glass substrate was placed above the heater plate of reaction chamber, and subsequently sprayed with the range duration of 5, 10 and 20 minutes at the temperatures of 3500 C. As for the Chemical Bath Deposition, the glass substrate with ZnO seed on the surface was immerse to Zn-hydrate, HMTA (Hexa Methylene Tetra Amine) and deionized water solution for duration of 3, 5 and 7 hour and temperatures of 600 C, washed in distilled water, dried, and annealed at 3500 C for an hour. The characterization of samples was carried out to reveal the surface morphology using Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM). From the data, the combination of 5 minutes of Ultrasonic Spray Pyrolysis process and 3 hour of CBD has showed the best structure of nanorod. Meanwhile the longer Spraying process and CBD yield the bigger nanorod structure that have been made, and it makes the films more dense which make the nanorod collide each other and as a result produce unsymetric nanorod structure.

  12. Quantum chemical simulations of atomic layer deposition of metal oxides and metal nitrides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Ye

    Scaling of SiO2 gate dielectrics to extend the miniaturization of complementary metal oxide semiconductor (CMOS) devices in accordance with Moore's Law has resulted in unacceptable tunneling current leakage levels. The projection that this challenge could significantly limit CMOS performance has prompted the intense search for alternative gate dielectric materials that can achieve high capacitances with physically thicker films which minimize tunneling leakage current. Atomic layer deposition is an ideal deposition method for high-k films because it controls the film thickness with atomic layer precision and can achieve high film conformality and uniformity. We use density functional theory (DFT) to explore chemical reactions involved in ALD processes at the atomic level. We have investigated different metal precursors for ALD process. Compared to halides, metal alkylamides are more favorable on nitrided silicon surfaces and subsequent film growth. Likewise, hafnium alkylamide is more favorable than water to initiate the nucleation on hydrogen terminated silicon surfaces. For deposition on organic self-assembled monolayers, different end groups significantly affect the selectivity towards ALD reactions. The chemical mechanisms involved in ALD of hafnium nitride, aluminum nitride are developed which provide an understanding to the difficulty in producing oxygen free metal nitrides by ALD. By combining ALD of metal oxide and metal nitride, a new method for incorporating nitrogen into oxide films is proposed. In TMA and ozone reaction, it's found that by-product water can be a catalyzer for this reaction.

  13. Heat-Resistant Co-W Catalytic Metals for Multilayer Graphene Chemical Vapor Deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ueno, Kazuyoshi; Karasawa, Yusuke; Kuwahara, Satoru; Baba, Shotaro; Hanai, Hitoshi; Yamazaki, Yuichi; Sakuma, Naoshi; Kajita, Akihiro; Sakai, Tadashi

    2013-04-01

    Multilayer graphene (MLG) is expected to be a low-resistance and high-reliability interconnect material replacing copper (Cu) in nanoscale interconnects. Chemical vapor deposition (CVD) on catalytic metals is expected as a practical method for MLG deposition. To obtain high-quality MLG films without catalyst agglomeration by CVD, heat-resistant Co-W catalytic metals were investigated. The agglomeration of the Co-W catalytic metals was suppressed by increasing the W composition; however, MLG deposition was suppressed at the same time. The effects of W addition on the MLG growth were discussed from the viewpoints of the crystallographic change of the Co-W catalysts and chemical reactions. It was found that the Co grain size was reduced and the fcc Co formation was suppressed by W addition. In addition, graphite formation was supposed to be suppressed by W addition owing to the formation of phases other than fcc Co according to the Co-W-C phase diagram. With the optimum W concentration, MLG crystallinity was improved by high-temperature CVD using the heat-resistant Co-W catalytic metals (0.7 at. %) without agglomeration, compared with that in the case of using pure-Co catalysts.

  14. Optimization of silicon oxynitrides by plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition for an interferometric biosensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choo, Sung Joong; Lee, Byung-Chul; Lee, Sang-Myung; Park, Jung Ho; Shin, Hyun-Joon

    2009-09-01

    In this paper, silicon oxynitride layers deposited with different plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition (PECVD) conditions were fabricated and optimized, in order to make an interferometric sensor for detecting biochemical reactions. For the optimization of PECVD silicon oxynitride layers, the influence of the N2O/SiH4 gas flow ratio was investigated. RF power in the PEVCD process was also adjusted under the optimized N2O/SiH4 gas flow ratio. The optimized silicon oxynitride layer was deposited with 15 W in chamber under 25/150 sccm of N2O/SiH4 gas flow rates. The clad layer was deposited with 20 W in chamber under 400/150 sccm of N2O/SiH4 gas flow condition. An integrated Mach-Zehnder interferometric biosensor based on optical waveguide technology was fabricated under the optimized PECVD conditions. The adsorption reaction between bovine serum albumin (BSA) and the silicon oxynitride surface was performed and verified with this device.

  15. The organometallic chemical vapor deposition of transition metal carbides: The use of homoleptic alkyls

    SciTech Connect

    Healy, M.D.; Smith, D.C.; Springer, R.W.; Rubiano, R.R.; Springer, R.W.; Parmeter, J.E.

    1993-12-31

    The organometallic chemical vapor deposition of transition metal carbides (M = Ti, Zr, Hf, and Cr) from tetraneopentyl-metal precursors has been carried out. Metal carbides can be deposited on Si, Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}, and stainless steel substrates from M[CH{sub 2}C(CH{sub 3}){sub 3}]{sub 4} at temperatures in the range of 300 to 750 C and pressures from 10{sup {minus}2} to 10{sup {minus}4} Torr. Thin films have also been grown using a carrier gas (Ar, H{sub 2}). The effects of variation of the metal center, deposition conditions, and reactor design on the resulting material have been examined by SEM, XPS, XRD, ERD and AES. Hydrocarbon fragments generated in the deposition chamber have been studied in by in-situ mass spectrometry. Complementary studies examining the UHV surface decomposition of Zr[CH{sub 2}C(CH{sub 3}){sub 3}]{sub 4} have allowed for a better understanding of the mechanism leading to film growth.

  16. Catalytic conversion of biomass pyrolysis-derived compounds with chemical liquid deposition (CLD) modified ZSM-5.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Huiyan; Luo, Mengmeng; Xiao, Rui; Shao, Shanshan; Jin, Baosheng; Xiao, Guomin; Zhao, Ming; Liang, Junyu

    2014-03-01

    Chemical liquid deposition (CLD) with KH550, TEOS and methyl silicone oil as the modifiers was used to modify ZSM-5 and deposit its external acid sites. The characteristics of modified catalysts were tested by catalytic conversion of biomass pyrolysis-derived compounds. The effects of different modifying conditions (deposited amount, temperature, and time) on the product yields and selectivities were investigated. The results show KH550 modified ZSM-5 (deposited amount of 4%, temperature of 20°C and time of 6h) produced the maximum yields of aromatics (24.5%) and olefins (16.5%), which are much higher than that obtained with original ZSM-5 catalyst (18.8% aromatics and 9.8% olefins). The coke yield decreased from 44.1% with original ZSM-5 to 26.7% with KH550 modified ZSM-5. The selectivities of low-molecule-weight hydrocarbons (ethylene and benzene) decreased, while that of higher molecule-weight hydrocarbons (propylene, butylene, toluene, and naphthalene) increased comparing with original ZSM-5. PMID:24413482

  17. Hydrothermal Vents in Yellowstone Lake: Chemical Fluxes, Siliceous Deposits, and Collapse Structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shanks, W. P.; Morgan, L. A.; Balistrieri, L.; Alt, J.; Meeker, G.

    2002-12-01

    The geochemistry of Yellowstone Lake is strongly influenced by sublacustrine hydrothermal vent activity. The hydrothermal source fluid is identified using Cl and dD data on water column and sublacustrine hydrothermal vent fluid samples. Silica-rich hydrothermal deposits occur on the lake bottom near active and presently inactive hydrothermal vents. Pipe- and flange-like deposits contain cemented and recrystallized diatoms and represent pathways for hydrothermal fluid migration. Another major type of hydrothermal deposit comprises hard, porous siliceous spires up to 7 m tall that occur in 15 m of water in Bridge Bay. Bridge Bay spires are hydrothermal silica deposits formed in place by growth of chimney-like features from lake-bottom hydrothermal vents. The Cl concentrations indicate that Yellowstone Lake water is about 1 percent hydrothermal source fluid and 99 percent inflowing stream water and that the flux is about 10 percent of the total hydrothermal water flux in Yellowstone National Park. With recent swath-sonar mapping studies that show numerous new hydrothermal features, Yellowstone Lake should now be considered one of the most significant hydrothermal basins in the Park. Many lake-bottom hydrothermal vents occur in small depressions that are clearly imaged on multibeam sonar, some of which are interpreted as collapse structures based on seismic reflection data. Sediments collected from such vents show chemical evidence of leaching of 60-70 wt. percent SiO2, which may result in volume reductions up to 80 percent and provides a mechanism for vent structure formation.

  18. Decreased acid deposition and the chemical recovery of Killarney, Ontario, lakes.

    PubMed

    Keller, Wendel; Heneberry, Jocelyne H; Dixit, Sushil S

    2003-04-01

    Lakes in Killarney Park near Sudbury, Ontario, Canada, have shown dramatic water quality changes including general increases in pH and alkalinity, and decreases in SO4(2-), base cations and metals. While some lakes have recovered to pH > 6.0, many are still highly acidic despite decades of improvement. Very high historical S deposition related to emissions from the Sudbury metal smelters dominated the acidification process in this region. However, since the implementation of substantial S emission controls (90%) at the smelters, the Sudbury emissions are no longer the major source of S deposition in the Sudbury area. Wet deposition of SO4(2-) and SO4(2-) concentrations in lakewaters at Killarney now approach values in the Dorset, Ontario, area, about 200 km from Sudbury. This suggests that the S deposition to the Killarney area is now primarily from long-range transport, not from local sources. Studies of Killarney lakes are revealing the complex nature of the chemical recovery process. As lake acidity decreases, other changes including decreased Ca2+ concentrations, increased transparency, and altered thermal regimes may potentially affect some of these ecosystems. It is clear that continuing assessments of the recovery of Killarney lakes, within a multiple-stressor framework, are needed.

  19. Plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition of silicon oxide films with divinyldimethylsilane and tetravinylsilane

    SciTech Connect

    Park, Sung-Gyu; Rhee, Shi-Woo

    2006-03-15

    Carbon-doped silicon oxide (SiCOH) low-k films were deposited with plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition (PECVD) using divinyldimethylsilane (DVDMS) with two vinyl groups and tetravinylsilane (TVS) with four vinyl groups compared with vinyltrimethylsilane (VTMS) with one vinyl group. With more vinyl groups in the precursor, due to the crosslinking of the vinyl groups, the film contains more of an organic phase and organic phase became less volatile. It was confirmed that the deposition rate, refractive index, and k value increase with more vinyl groups in the precursor molecule. After annealing, the SiCOH films deposited with DVDMS and TVS showed a low dielectric constant of 2.2 and 2.4 at optimum conditions, respectively. In both cases, the annealed film had low leakage current density (J=6.7x10{sup -7} A/cm{sup 2} for SiCOH film of DVDMS and J=1.18x10{sup -8} A/cm{sup 2} for SiCOH film of TVS at 1 MV/cm) and relatively high breakdown field strength (E>4.0 MV/cm at 1 mA/cm{sup 2}), which is comparable to those of PECVD SiO{sub 2}.

  20. Photocatalytic Functional Coating of TiO2 Thin Film Deposited by Cyclic Plasma Chemical Vapor Deposition at Atmospheric Pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kwon, Jung-Dae; Rha, Jong-Joo; Nam, Kee-Seok; Park, Jin-Seong

    2011-08-01

    Photocatalytic TiO2 thin films were prepared with titanium tetraisopropoxide (TTIP) using cyclic plasma chemical vapor deposition (CPCVD) at atmospheric pressure. The CPCVD TiO2 films contain carbon-free impurities up to 100 °C and polycrystalline anatase phases up to 200 °C, due to the radicals and ion-bombardments. The CPCVD TiO2 films have high transparency in the visible wavelength region and absorb wavelengths below 400 nm (>3.2 eV). The photocatalytic effects of the CPCVD TiO2 and commercial sprayed TiO2 films were measured by decomposing methylene blue (MB) solution under UV irradiation. The smooth CPCVD TiO2 films showed a relatively lower photocatalytic efficiency, but superior catalyst-recycling efficiency, due to their high adhesion strength on the substrates. This CPCVD technique may provide the means to produce photocatalytic thin films with low cost and high efficiency, which would be a reasonable candidate for practical photocatalytic applications, because of the reliability and stability of their photocatalytic efficiency in a practical environment.

  1. Leidenfrost point and estimate of the vapour layer thickness

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gianino, Concetto

    2008-11-01

    In this article I describe an experiment involving the Leidenfrost phenomenon, which is the long lifetime of a water drop when it is deposited on a metal that is much hotter than the boiling point of water. The experiment was carried out with high-school students. The Leidenfrost point is measured and the heat laws are used to estimate the thickness of the vapour layer, d≈0.06 mm, which prevents the drop from touching the hotplate.

  2. Chemical Bath Deposition of Aluminum Oxide Buffer on Curved Surfaces for Growing Aligned Carbon Nanotube Arrays.

    PubMed

    Wang, Haitao; Na, Chongzheng

    2015-07-01

    Direct growth of vertically aligned carbon nanotube (CNT) arrays on substrates requires the deposition of an aluminum oxide buffer (AOB) layer to prevent the diffusion and coalescence of catalyst nanoparticles. Although AOB layers can be readily created on flat substrates using a variety of physical and chemical methods, the preparation of AOB layers on substrates with highly curved surfaces remains challenging. Here, we report a new solution-based method for preparing uniform layers of AOB on highly curved surfaces by the chemical bath deposition of basic aluminum sulfate and annealing. We show that the thickness of AOB layer can be increased by extending the immersion time of a substrate in the chemical bath, following the classical Johnson-Mehl-Avrami-Kolmogorov crystallization kinetics. The increase of AOB thickness in turn leads to the increase of CNT length and the reduction of CNT curviness. Using this method, we have successfully synthesized dense aligned CNT arrays of micrometers in length on substrates with highly curved surfaces including glass fibers, stainless steel mesh, and porous ceramic foam. PMID:26053766

  3. Synthesis of multiferroic Er-Fe-O thin films by atomic layer and chemical vapor deposition

    SciTech Connect

    Mantovan, R. Vangelista, S.; Wiemer, C.; Lamperti, A.; Tallarida, G.; Chikoidze, E.; Dumont, Y.; Fanciulli, M.

    2014-05-07

    R-Fe-O (R = rare earth) compounds have recently attracted high interest as potential new multiferroic materials. Here, we report a method based on the solid-state reaction between Er{sub 2}O{sub 3} and Fe layers, respectively grown by atomic layer deposition and chemical vapor deposition, to synthesize Er-Fe-O thin films. The reaction is induced by thermal annealing and evolution of the formed phases is followed by in situ grazing incidence X-ray diffraction. Dominant ErFeO{sub 3} and ErFe{sub 2}O{sub 4} phases develop following subsequent thermal annealing processes at 850 °C in air and N{sub 2}. Structural, chemical, and morphological characterization of the layers are conducted through X-ray diffraction and reflectivity, time-of-flight secondary ion-mass spectrometry, and atomic force microscopy. Magnetic properties are evaluated by magnetic force microscopy, conversion electron Mössbauer spectroscopy, and vibrating sample magnetometer, being consistent with the presence of the phases identified by X-ray diffraction. Our results constitute a first step toward the use of cost-effective chemical methods for the synthesis of this class of multiferroic thin films.

  4. Chemical solution deposition of ferroelectric yttrium-doped hafnium oxide films on platinum electrodes

    SciTech Connect

    Starschich, S.; Griesche, D.; Schneller, T.; Böttger, U.; Waser, R.

    2014-05-19

    Ferroelectric hafnium oxide films were fabricated by chemical solution deposition with a remnant polarization of >13 μC/cm{sup 2}. The samples were prepared with 5.2 mol. % yttrium-doping and the thickness varied from 18 nm to 70 nm. The hafnium oxide layer was integrated into a metal-insulator-metal capacitor using platinum electrodes. Due to the processing procedure, no thickness dependence of the ferroelectric properties was observed. To confirm the ferroelectric nature of the deposited samples, polarization, capacitance, and piezoelectric displacement measurements were performed. However, no evidence of the orthorhombic phase was found which has been proposed to be the non-centrosymmetric, ferroelectric phase in HfO{sub 2}.

  5. Bismuth oxide thin films prepared by chemical bath deposition (CBD) method: annealing effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gujar, T. P.; Shinde, V. R.; Lokhande, C. D.; Mane, R. S.; Han, Sung-Hwan

    2005-08-01

    Bismuth oxide thin films have been deposited by room temperature chemical bath deposition (CBD) method and annealed at 623 K in air. They were characterized for structural, surface morphological, optical and electrical properties. From the X-ray diffraction patterns, it was found that after annealing a non-stoichiometric phase, Bi 2O 2.33, was removed and phase pure monoclinic Bi 2O 3 was obtained. Surface morphology of Bi 2O 3 film at lower magnification SEM showed rod-like structure, however, higher magnification showed a rectangular slice-like structure perpendicular to substrate, giving rise to microrods on the surface. The optical studies showed the decrease in band gap by 0.3 eV after annealing. The electrical resistivity variation showed semiconductor behavior and from thermoemf measurements, the electrical conductivity was found to be of n-type.

  6. Nanoscale arrays of antimony telluride single crystals by selective chemical vapor deposition.

    PubMed

    Huang, Ruomeng; Benjamin, Sophie L; Gurnani, Chitra; Wang, Yudong; Hector, Andrew L; Levason, William; Reid, Gillian; De Groot, C H Kees

    2016-01-01

    Arrays of individual single nanocrystals of Sb2Te3 have been formed using selective chemical vapor deposition (CVD) from a single source precursor. Crystals are self-assembled reproducibly in confined spaces of 100 nm diameter with pitch down to 500 nm. The distribution of crystallite sizes across the arrays is very narrow (standard deviation of 15%) and is affected by both the hole diameter and the array pitch. The preferred growth of the crystals in the <1 1 0> orientation along the diagonal of the square holes strongly indicates that the diffusion of adatoms results in a near thermodynamic equilibrium growth mechanism of the nuclei. A clear relationship between electrical resistivity and selectivity is established across a range of metal selenides and tellurides, showing that conductive materials result in more selective growth and suggesting that electron donation is of critical importance for selective deposition. PMID:27283116

  7. Growth of well-oriented VACNTs using thermal chemical vapor deposition method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yousefi, Amin Termeh; Mahmood, Mohamad Rusop; Ikeda, Shoichiro

    2016-07-01

    The remarkable properties of carbon nanotubes (CNTs) make them attractive for biosensor applications, especially for medical detecting devices. In this paper, we describe a process to grow high oriented ratio CNT arrays to improve the electrical properties of the devices based on CNTs. Chemical vapor deposition (CVD) was used to grow highly oriented CNT using camphor as the carbon source, and argon and hydrogen as carrier gases to grow perpendicular CNTs on the surface of the silicon substrate in presence of ferrocene as a metallic catalyst. Images were revealed by FESEM indicates that the formation mechanism of oriented CNTs with high morphological purity nanotubes, which is depends significantly on deposition time and applied temperature to the furnaces. This method might be an effective method to produce oriented MWCNT in different length.

  8. Ultralow-k dielectrics prepared by plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grill, A.; Patel, V.

    2001-08-01

    Carbon-doped oxide materials (SiCOH films) with ultralow dielectric constants have been prepared by plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition (PECVD) from mixtures of SiCOH precursors with organic materials. The films have been characterized by Rutherford backscattering and forward recoil elastic scattering analysis, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy and index of refraction measurements, and measurement of step heights in the films. The electrical properties of the films have been measured on metal-insulator-silicon structures. By proper choice of the precursor and deposition conditions, the dielectric constants of the SiCOH films can be reduced to values below 2.1, demonstrating the extendibility of PECVD-prepared carbon-doped oxides as the interconnect dielectrics for future generation of very large scale integrated chips.

  9. Preparation of γ-Al2O3 films by laser chemical vapor deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Ming; Ito, Akihiko; Goto, Takashi

    2015-06-01

    γ- and α-Al2O3 films were prepared by chemical vapor deposition using CO2, Nd:YAG, and InGaAs lasers to investigate the effects of varying the laser wavelength and deposition conditions on the phase composition and microstructure. The CO2 laser was found to mostly produce α-Al2O3 films, whereas the Nd:YAG and InGaAs lasers produced γ-Al2O3 films when used at a high total pressure. γ-Al2O3 films had a cauliflower-like structure, while the α-Al2O3 films had a dense and columnar structure. Of the three lasers, it was the Nd:YAG laser that interacted most with intermediate gas species. This promoted γ-Al2O3 nucleation in the gas phase at high total pressure, which explains the cauliflower-like structure of nanoparticles observed.

  10. Growth of MoS2 Layers by Two-Step Chemical Vapor Deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sheu, An-Di

    Monolayer molybdenum disulfide (MoS2), a two-dimensional (2D) crystal with a direct bandgap, is a promising candidate for nano electronic devices, energy storage, and photocatalysts. People are researching for large-area single-layer MoS2 growth. In my work, I investigated the growth of monolayer MoS2 on SiO2/Si substrate by chemical vapor deposition (CVD). Using sulfur and molybdenum trioxide (MoO3) as precursors to grow 2D MoS2 in the tube furnace CVD system. As part of my thesis, I carried out several growth experiments while varying the deposition parameters. The as-grown samples are characterized using optical, scanning electron, and atomic force microscopes and Raman spectroscopy. I have also developed a two-step approach to grow MoS2 layers. This new approach has great potential to grow large-area single-layer MoS2.

  11. Continuous growth of single-wall carbon nanotubes using chemical vapor deposition

    DOEpatents

    Grigorian, Leonid; Hornyak, Louis; Dillon, Anne C; Heben, Michael J

    2014-09-23

    The invention relates to a chemical vapor deposition process for the continuous growth of a carbon single-wall nanotube where a carbon-containing gas composition is contacted with a porous membrane and decomposed in the presence of a catalyst to grow single-wall carbon nanotube material. A pressure differential exists across the porous membrane such that the pressure on one side of the membrane is less than that on the other side of the membrane. The single-wall carbon nanotube growth may occur predominately on the low-pressure side of the membrane or, in a different embodiment of the invention, may occur predominately in between the catalyst and the membrane. The invention also relates to an apparatus used with the carbon vapor deposition process.

  12. Continuous growth of single-wall carbon nanotubes using chemical vapor deposition

    DOEpatents

    Grigorian, Leonid; Hornyak, Louis; Dillon, Anne C; Heben, Michael J

    2008-10-07

    The invention relates to a chemical vapor deposition process for the continuous growth of a carbon single-wall nanotube where a carbon-containing gas composition is contacted with a porous membrane and decomposed in the presence of a catalyst to grow single-wall carbon nanotube material. A pressure differential exists across the porous membrane such that the pressure on one side of the membrane is less than that on the other side of the membrane. The single-wall carbon nanotube growth may occur predominately on the low-pressure side of the membrane or, in a different embodiment of the invention, may occur predominately in between the catalyst and the membrane. The invention also relates to an apparatus used with the carbon vapor deposition process.

  13. Chemical bath deposition of cadmium sulfide on graphene-coated flexible glass substrate

    SciTech Connect

    Seo, Won-Oh; Jung, Younghun; Kim, Jihyun; Kim, Jiwan; Kim, Donghwan

    2014-03-31

    We demonstrate a flexible structure of cadmium sulfide (CdS) on graphene-coated glass substrate, where CdS was deposited by the chemical bath deposition method on defective tri-layer graphene. The defects in graphene, confirmed by micro-Raman spectroscopy, were created by a ultra-violet treatment with varying exposure time from 10 to 60 min. The number of defect sites in the graphene as a seed layer was related to the quality of the CdS thin films determined from the results from X-ray diffraction, optical transmittance, scanning electron microscopy, and room temperature micro-photoluminescence. Our film-on-substrate structure of CdS-graphene-on-glass was maintained up to a tensile strain of 0.3%, where graphene with a high failure strain was employed as a transparent conductive layer.

  14. Silicon Chemical Vapor Deposition on macro and submicron powders in a fluidized bed

    SciTech Connect

    Cadoret, L.; Reuge, N; Pannala, Sreekanth; Syamlal, M; Rossignol, C; Dexpert-Ghys, J; Coufort, C; Caussat, B

    2009-01-01

    Titanium oxide (TiO2) submicron powders have been treated by Chemical Vapor Deposition (CVD) in a vibro-fluidized bed in order to deposit silicon layers of nanometer scale on each individual grain from silane (SiH4). Experimental results show that for the conditions tested, the original granular structure of the powders is preserved for 90% of the initial bed weight while the remaining 10% consisted of agglomerates in millimetre range found near the distributor of the reactor. A comparison between experimental and modelling results using the MFIX code shows that for Geldart's Group B alumina particles (Al2O3), the model represents both the bed hydrodynamics and silane conversion rates quite well. The future objective is to extend the simulation capability to cohesive submicron powders in order to achieve better predictability of the phenomena governing ultrafine particles.

  15. Selective charge doping of chemical vapor deposition-grown graphene by interface modification

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Shengnan Suzuki, Satoru; Furukawa, Kazuaki; Orofeo, Carlo M.; Takamura, Makoto; Hibino, Hiroki

    2013-12-16

    The doping and scattering effect of substrate on the electronic properties of chemical vapor deposition (CVD)-grown graphene are revealed. Wet etching the underlying SiO{sub 2} of graphene and depositing self-assembled monolayers (SAMs) of organosilane between graphene and SiO{sub 2} are used to modify various substrates for CVD graphene transistors. Comparing with the bare SiO{sub 2} substrate, the carrier mobility of CVD graphene on modified substrate is enhanced by almost 5-fold; consistently the residual carrier concentration is reduced down to 10{sup 11} cm{sup −2}. Moreover, scalable and reliable p- and n-type graphene and graphene p-n junction are achieved on various silane SAMs with different functional groups.

  16. Nanoscale arrays of antimony telluride single crystals by selective chemical vapor deposition

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Ruomeng; Benjamin, Sophie L.; Gurnani, Chitra; Wang, Yudong; Hector, Andrew L.; Levason, William; Reid, Gillian; De Groot, C. H. (Kees)

    2016-01-01

    Arrays of individual single nanocrystals of Sb2Te3 have been formed using selective chemical vapor deposition (CVD) from a single source precursor. Crystals are self-assembled reproducibly in confined spaces of 100 nm diameter with pitch down to 500 nm. The distribution of crystallite sizes across the arrays is very narrow (standard deviation of 15%) and is affected by both the hole diameter and the array pitch. The preferred growth of the crystals in the <1 1 0> orientation along the diagonal of the square holes strongly indicates that the diffusion of adatoms results in a near thermodynamic equilibrium growth mechanism of the nuclei. A clear relationship between electrical resistivity and selectivity is established across a range of metal selenides and tellurides, showing that conductive materials result in more selective growth and suggesting that electron donation is of critical importance for selective deposition. PMID:27283116

  17. High rate epitaxy of silicon thick films by medium pressure plasma chemical vapor deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kambara, M.; Yagi, H.; Sawayanagi, M.; Yoshida, T.

    2006-04-01

    Homoepitaxial silicon thick films have been produced by medium pressure plasma chemical vapor deposition at rates as fast as 60 nm/s and at a temperature of around 700 °C, with a silane gas partial pressure of 4 mTorr. The continuous transition of the film structures from agglomerated to faceted columnar and to epitaxial planar structure was observed with an increase in the plasma power. The calorimetric analysis during deposition has also confirmed that the thermal boundary layer thickness between the plasma and substrate reduced with the increasing power and became comparable to the mean free path of the vapors when epitaxy was achieved at high rates. In addition, the rate for epitaxial growth was observed to increase linearly with silane gas partial pressure. These potentially indicate that less coagulated silicon atom clusters formed in the reduced boundary thickness have contributed effectively to the high rate epitaxial growth.

  18. Hexagonal nanosized molybdenum diselenide thin film deposited at 333 K by chemical method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sathe, D. J.; Chate, P. A.

    2015-10-01

    Molybdenum diselenide thin films have been deposited on to stainless steel and glass substrates by the chemical process, using ammonium molybdate, sodium selenosulphite as a precursor sources and citric acid was used as a complexing agent. The structural and optical properties of the deposited films have been studied using X-ray diffraction and optical absorption techniques, respectively. XRD studies reveal that the films are polycrystalline with hexagonal crystal structure. Optical absorption study shows the presence of direct transition with band gap energy 1.51 eV. EDAX analysis shows that the films are nearly stoichiometry of Mo: Se: 1:2. The configuration of fabricated cell is n-MoSe2 | NaI (2 M) + I2 (1 M) | C (graphite) yielded a conversion efficiency of 1.08%.

  19. Growth of aligned carbon nanotubes on carbon microfibers by dc plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, L H.; AuBuchon, J F.; Chen, I C.; Daraio, C; Ye, X R.; Gapin, A; Jin, Sungho; Wang, Chong M.

    2006-01-16

    It is shown that unidirectionally aligned carbon nanotubes can be grown on electrically conductive network of carbon microfibers via control of buffer layer material and applied electric field during dc plasma chemical vapor deposition growth. Ni catalyst deposition on carbon microfiber produces relatively poorly aligned nanotubes with significantly varying diameters and lengths obtained. The insertion of Ti 5 nm thick underlayer between Ni catalyst layer and C microfiber substrate significantly alters the morphology of nanotubes, resulting in much better aligned, finer diameter, and longer array of nanotubes. This beneficial effect is attributed to the reduced reaction between Ni and carbon paper, as well as prevention of plasma etching of carbon paper by inserting a Ti buffer layer. Such a unidirectionally aligned nanotube structure on an open-pore conductive substrate structure may conveniently be utilized as a high-surface-area base electrodes for fuel cells, batteries, and other electrochemical and catalytic reactions.

  20. Plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition of amorphous Si on graphene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lupina, G.; Strobel, C.; Dabrowski, J.; Lippert, G.; Kitzmann, J.; Krause, H. M.; Wenger, Ch.; Lukosius, M.; Wolff, A.; Albert, M.; Bartha, J. W.

    2016-05-01

    Plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition of thin a-Si:H layers on transferred large area graphene is investigated. Radio frequency (RF, 13.56 MHz) and very high frequency (VHF, 140 MHz) plasma processes are compared. Both methods provide conformal coating of graphene with Si layers as thin as 20 nm without any additional seed layer. The RF plasma process results in amorphization of the graphene layer. In contrast, the VHF process keeps the high crystalline quality of the graphene layer almost intact. Correlation analysis of Raman 2D and G band positions indicates that Si deposition induces reduction of the initial doping in graphene and an increase of compressive strain. Upon rapid thermal annealing, the amorphous Si layer undergoes dehydrogenation and transformation into a polycrystalline film, whereby a high crystalline quality of graphene is preserved.

  1. The application of pulse modulated plasma to the plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition of dielectric materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qi, Yu

    This dissertation work applied the pulse modulated plasma to the plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition (PECVD) of two types of dielectric materials: SiO2-like coatings and Teflon-like coatings. SiO2-like coatings were firstly implemented with continuous plasma. It was proven that three different precursors: hexamethyldisiloxane (HMDSO), 1, 3, 5, 7-tetramethylcyclotetrasiloxane (TMCTS) and octamethylcyclotetrasiloxane (OMCTS) can be used to generate hard, clear and high density SiO2 deposition with coupled high growth rate and low processing temperature via PECVD. Under similar conditions, HMDSO has the lowest growth rate, lowest hardness and highest carbon content; TMCTS has the highest growth rate and hardness, and lowest carbon content; and OMCTS has moderate rates of these deposition qualities, but the best corrosion resistance. Substrate bias seems to have no effect on any deposition quality. High chamber pressure can significantly lower the carbon content in the thin films but does not affect any other qualities; the O2/precursor ratio is the most influential factor among all variables considered in this experiment. The deposition hardness and O:Si ratio always increase with this ratio while the carbon content always decreases. However, different precursors require different optimal ratios to achieve the highest growth rate. Pulse modulation was introduced into PECVD of SiO2-like coatings and OMCTS was selected as the precursor. It was demonstrated that pulse frequency, duty ratio and peak power have significant effects on deposition qualities. The proper combination of the pulse parameters and other traditional plasma parameters can significantly lower the processing temperature while retaining or even improving other deposition qualities, such as growth rate, corrosion resistance and elemental composition. Hardness is the only sacrifice of the lower time-average power caused by pulsing. Therefore, pulse modulation can effectively expand the possible

  2. Chemical vapor deposition and characterization of poly(p-phenylene vinylene) films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gedelilan, Cynthia Ann

    2008-10-01

    As a conducting, electroluminescent, and photoluminescent polymer, poly(p-phenylene vinylene) (PPV) is a material of much interest for electronic and optical applications. Although this polymer has traditionally been deposited using spin-on methods and soluble precursor polymers, the technique has several drawbacks including an increase in contamination and defects from the solvent, the need to convert the precursor into PPV without adding further impurities or damaging the film, and the processing restrictions when dealing with liquid depositions. Chemical vapor deposition (CVD), on the other hand, deposits the precursor polymer in the gas phase and therefore eliminates the need for a solvent and creates the capability for conformal deposition on many types of nanostructured substrates. However, PPV films deposited by CVD remain understudied. This work aims to investigate properties of those films including the removal of bromine left from the CVD precursor, the behavior and structure of PPV after heat treatment at elevated temperatures (>450°C), the usefulness of encapsulation materials for preventing photodegradation, and characteristics of films deposited on top of nanosize porous materials. Bromine from the precursor polymer is removed during the first thirty minutes of heating. Films annealed at 300°C in nitrogen gas consisted of 0.36% bromine; however, photoluminescence spectra comparing films annealed at 150 and 300°C showed more defects in the 300°C film. Heat treatment of PPV beyond the initial anneal showed that the film degrades at 500°C by emitting monomer fragments without crosslinking. Photodegradation of PPV films due to incorporation of oxygen during light exposure can be reduced from 80% to 30% under UV light and nearly prevented under blue light when encapsulated with 10 nm aluminum oxide. Encapsulation with organic Parylene shows no significant improvement. Use of the Stern-Volmer equation to examine self-quenching in films shows larger

  3. Behavior of incorporated nitrogen in plasma-nitrided silicon oxide formed by chemical vapor deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shinoda, Nao; Itokawa, Hiroshi; Fujitsuka, Ryota; Sekine, Katsuyuki; Onoue, Seiji; Tonotani, Junichi

    2016-04-01

    The behavior of nitrogen (N) atoms in plasma-nitrided silicon oxide (SiO2) formed by chemical vapor deposition (CVD) was characterized by physical analysis and from electrical properties. The changes in the chemical bonding and distribution of N in plasma-nitrided SiO2 were investigated for different subsequent processes. N-Si3, N-Si2O, and N2 are formed in a SiO2 film by plasma nitridation. N2 molecules diffuse out during annealing at temperatures higher than 900 °C. NH species are generated from N2 molecules and H in the SiO2 film with subsequent oxide deposition using O3 as an oxidant. The capacitance-voltage (C-V) curves of metal-oxide-semiconductor (MOS) capacitors are obtained. The negative shift of the C-V curve is caused by the increase in the density of positive fix charge traps in CVD-SiO2 induced by plasma nitridation. The C-V curve of plasma-nitrided SiO2 subjected to annealing shifts to the positive direction and that subjected to the subsequent oxide deposition shifts markedly to the negative direction. It is clarified that the density of positive charge fixed traps in plasma-nitrided SiO2 films decrease because the amount of N2 molecules is decreased by annealing, and that the density of traps increases because NH species are generated and move to the interface between SiO2 and the Si substrate with the subsequent oxide deposition.

  4. Inhable particulate matter from lime industries: Chemical composition and deposition in human respiratory tract

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Godoi, Ricardo H. M.; Braga, Darci M.; Makarovska, Yaroslava; Alfoldy, Balint; Carvalho Filho, Marco A. S.; Van Grieken, Réne; Godoi, Ana Flavia L.

    Air pollution caused by the lime production industry has become a serious problem with potential effects to human health, especially in developing countries. Colombo is a city included in the Metropolitan Region of Curitiba (capital of Paraná State) in South Brazil. In Colombo city, a correlation has been shown between the lime production and the number of persons who need respiratory treatment in a local hospital, indicating that the lime industry can cause deleterious health effects in the exposed workers and population. This research was conducted to deal firstly with the characterization of the size distribution and chemical compositions of particles emitted from lime manufacturing and subsequently to assess the deposition rate of inhaled dolomitic lime aerosol particles in the human respiratory tract. The elemental chemical composition and particle size of individual atmospheric particles was quantitatively elucidated, including low-Z components like C, N and O, as well as higher-Z elements, using automated electron probe microanalysis. Information concerning the bulk composition is provided by energy-dispersive X-ray detection. The majority of the respirable particulate matter identified was composed of aluminosilicates, Ca-Mg oxides, carbon-rich particles, mixtures of organic particles and Ca-Mg carbonates, soot and biogenic particles. In view of the chemical composition and size distribution of the aerosol particles, local deposition efficiencies in the human respiratory system were calculated, revealing the deposition of CaO·MgO at extrathoracic, tracheobronchial and pulmonary levels. The results of this study offer evidence to the threat of the fine and coarse particles emitted from dolomite lime manufacturing, allowing policy-makers to better focus their mitigation strategies in an effective way, as well as to the dolomite producers for the purpose of designing and/or implementing improved emission controls.

  5. Growth of 2D black phosphorus film from chemical vapor deposition.

    PubMed

    Smith, Joshua B; Hagaman, Daniel; Ji, Hai-Feng

    2016-05-27

    Phosphorene, a novel 2D material isolated from bulk black phosphorus (BP), is an intrinsic p-type material with a variable bandgap for a variety of applications. However, these applications are limited by the inability to isolate large films of phosphorene. Here we present an in situ chemical vapor deposition type approach that demonstrates progress towards growth of large area 2D BP with average areas >3 μm2 and thicknesses representing samples around four layers and thicker samples with average areas >100 μm2. Transmission electron microscopy and Raman spectroscopy have confirmed successful growth of 2D BP from red phosphorus. PMID:27087456

  6. Synthesize of N-doped Carbon nanotube according to gas flow rate by Chemical Vapor Deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, J. B.; Kim, C. D.; Kong, S. J.; Kim, J. H.; Min, B. K.; Jung, W. S.; Lee, H. R.

    2011-12-01

    Nitrogen-doped (N-doped) Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) have been prepared by Thermal Chemical Vapor Deposition (CVD). As doping accompanies with the recombination of carbon atoms into CNTs in the CVD process, N atoms can be substitutionally doped into the CNTs lattice, which is hard to realize by other synthetic methods. The synthesis technique and the characteristic analysis of N-doped CNT will move up the industrialization and the basic study of CNT. We will elucidate the basic properties of CNT such as the structural characteristics of the N-doped CNT material and study for the industrial application of the N-doped CNTs to the electrode of fuel cell.

  7. Microstructure and properties of multiphase and functionally graded materials prepared by chemical vapor deposition

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, W.Y.

    1996-05-01

    The synthesis of multiphase and functionally graded materials by chemical vapor deposition is discussed from a perspective of controlling their composition and microstructure at a nano-scale level, and ultimately, tailoring their material properties. Prior research is briefly reviewed to address the current state of this novel material concept. Recent experimental results relating to controlling the selected properties of two multiphase systems, TiN + MoS{sub 2} and NiAl + Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}, are described to illustrate this concept`s potential merits and challenges for use in realistic applications.

  8. Optical properties of epitaxial single-crystal chemical-vapor-deposited diamond

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Turri, Giorgio; Chen, Ying; Bass, Michael; Orchard, David; Butler, James E.; Magana, Sally; Feygelson, Tatayana; Thiel, Derrick; Fourspring, Kevin; Pentony, Joni; Hawkins, Samantha; Baronowski, Meghan; Dewees, Randle V.; Seltzer, Michael D.; Guenthner, Andrew; Harris, Daniel C.; Stickley, C. Martin

    2007-04-01

    Epitaxial single-crystal chemical-vapor-deposited diamond was obtained from Element Six Ltd. (Ascot, UK) and from Apollo Diamond (Boston, MA). Both companies provided 5 x 5 mm squares with thicknesses ranging from 0.5 to 1.5 mm. In addition, Element Six provided 10-mm-diameter disks with a thickness of 1.0 mm. The absorptance of all specimens at 1064 nm was measured by laser calorimetry, with good agreement between independent measurements at the University of Central Florida and at QinetiQ (Malvern, UK). Depolarization at 1064 nm and ultraviolet absorption properties are also reported.

  9. Templated growth of diamond optical resonators via plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, X.; Hu, E. L.

    2016-08-01

    We utilize plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition through a patterned silica mask for templated diamond growth to create optical resonators. The pyramid-shaped structures have quality factors Q up to 600, measured using confocal photoluminescence spectroscopy, and mode volumes V as small as 2.5 (λ/n) 3 for resonances at wavelengths λ between 550 and 650 nm, and refractive index n, obtained using finite-difference time-domain simulations. Bright luminescence from nitrogen-vacancy and silicon-vacancy centers in the grown diamond is observed. The resonator design and fabrication technique obviates any etching of diamond, which preserves emitter properties in a pristine host lattice.

  10. Single crystal chemical vapor deposit diamond detector for energetic plasma measurement in space

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ogasawara, K.; Broiles, T. W.; Coulter, K. E.; Dayeh, M. A.; Desai, M. I.; Livi, S. A.; McComas, D. J.; Walther, B. C.

    2015-03-01

    This study reports the performance of single crystal chemical vapor deposit diamond detectors for measuring space plasma and energetic particles: ~7 keV energy resolution for protons with a 14 keV threshold level, and good response linearity for ions and electrons as expected from Monte-Carlo calculations of primary particle energy loss. We investigated that these diamond detectors are able to operate at high temperature (> 70 ° C) and have fast response times (< 1 ns rise time). While silicon detectors have proven capability over this energy range for space plasma measurements, diamond detectors offer a faster response, higher temperature operation, greater radiation tolerance, and immunity to light.

  11. Spectroscopic signatures of AA' and AB stacking of chemical vapor deposited bilayer MoS2

    DOE PAGES

    Xia, Ming; Li, Bo; Yin, Kuibo; Capellini, Giovanni; Niu, Gang; Gong, Yongji; Zhou, Wu; Ajayan, Pulickel M.; Xie, Ya -Hong

    2015-11-04

    We discuss prominent resonance Raman and photoluminescence spectroscopic differences between AA'and AB stacked bilayer molybdenum disulfide (MoS2) grown by chemical vapor deposition are reported. Bilayer MoS2 islands consisting of the two stacking orders were obtained under identical growth conditions. Also, resonance Raman and photoluminescence spectra of AA' and AB stacked bilayer MoS2 were obtained on Au nanopyramid surfaces under strong plasmon resonance. Both resonance Raman and photoluminescence spectra show distinct features indicating clear differences in interlayer interaction between these two phases. The implication of these findings on device applications based on spin and valley degrees of freedom.

  12. Simulation of chemical-vapor-deposited silicon carbide for a cold wall vertical reactor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Y. L.; Sanchez, J. M.

    1997-07-01

    The growth rate of silicon carbide obtained by low-pressure chemical vapor deposition from tetramethylsilane is numerically simulated for a cold wall vertical reactor. The transport equations for momentum, heat, and mass transfer are simultaneously solved by employing the finite volume method. A model for reaction rate is also proposed in order to predict the measured growth rates [A. Figueras, S. Garelik, J. Santiso, R. Rodroguez-Clemente, B. Armas, C. Combescure, R. Berjoan, J.M. Saurel and R. Caplain, Mater. Sci. Eng. B 11 (1992) 83]. Finally, the effects of thermal diffusion on the growth rate are investigated.

  13. Observation of spin-charge conversion in chemical-vapor-deposition-grown single-layer graphene

    SciTech Connect

    Ohshima, Ryo; Sakai, Atsushi; Ando, Yuichiro; Shiraishi, Masashi; Shinjo, Teruya; Kawahara, Kenji; Ago, Hiroki

    2014-10-20

    Conversion of pure spin current to charge current in single-layer graphene (SLG) is investigated by using spin pumping. Large-area SLG grown by chemical vapor deposition is used for the conversion. Efficient spin accumulation in SLG by spin pumping enables observing an electromotive force produced by the inverse spin Hall effect (ISHE) of SLG. The spin Hall angle of SLG is estimated to be 6.1 × 10{sup −7}. The observed ISHE in SLG is ascribed to its non-negligible spin-orbit interaction in SLG.

  14. Multiwalled Carbon Nanotube Forest Grown via Chemical Vapor Deposition from Iron Catalyst Nanoparticles, by XPS

    SciTech Connect

    Jensen, David S.; Kanyal, Supriya S.; Madaan, Nitesh; Vail, Michael A.; Dadson, Andrew; Engelhard, Mark H.; Linford, Matthew R.

    2013-09-25

    Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) have unique chemical and physical properties. Herein, we report an XPS analysis of a forest of multiwalled CNTs using monochromatic Al Kα radiation. Survey scans show only one element: carbon. The carbon 1s peak is centered 284.5 eV. The C 1s envelope also shows the expected π → π* shake-up peak at ca. 291 eV. The valence band and carbon KVV Auger signals are presented. When patterned, the CNT forests can be used as a template for subsequent deposition of metal oxides to make thin layer chromatography plates.1-3

  15. Method of making AlInSb by metal-organic chemical vapor deposition

    DOEpatents

    Biefeld, Robert M.; Allerman, Andrew A.; Baucom, Kevin C.

    2000-01-01

    A method for producing aluminum-indium-antimony materials by metal-organic chemical vapor deposition (MOCVD). This invention provides a method of producing Al.sub.X In.sub.1-x Sb crystalline materials by MOCVD wherein an Al source material, an In source material and an Sb source material are supplied as a gas to a heated substrate in a chamber, said Al source material, In source material, and Sb source material decomposing at least partially below 525.degree. C. to produce Al.sub.x In.sub.1-x Sb crystalline materials wherein x is greater than 0.002 and less than one.

  16. Chemical vapor deposition of Ti-Si-N films for diffusion barrier applications

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, P.M.; Custer, J.S.; Jones, R.V.

    1995-11-01

    Structurally disordered refractory ternary films such as titanium silicon nitride (Ti-Si-N) have potential as advanced diffusion barriers in future ULSI metallization schemes. The authors demonstrate chemical vapor deposition (CVD) of Ti-Si-N-containing films in a commercially available single-wafer CVD system using two different Ti precursors, TiCl{sub 4} and tetrakis(diethylamino)titanium (TDEAT). In particular, the TDEAT-based films can be grown conformally with low impurity content, and are promising candidates for advanced diffusion barrier applications.

  17. Synthesis and Characterization of Tin(IV) Oxide Obtained by Chemical Vapor Deposition Method.

    PubMed

    Nagirnyak, Svitlana V; Lutz, Victoriya A; Dontsova, Tatiana A; Astrelin, Igor M

    2016-12-01

    The effect of precursors on the characteristics of tin oxide obtained by chemical vapor deposition (CVD) method was investigated. The synthesis of nanosized tin(IV) oxide was carried out with the use of two different precursors: tin(II) oxalate obtained using tin chloride(II) and oxalic acid; tin(II) oxalate obtained using tin chloride(II); and ammonium oxalate. The synthesized tin(IV) oxide samples were studied by electron microscopy, X-ray diffraction and optical spectra. The lattice parameters of tin(IV) oxide samples were defined, the bandgap of samples were calculated. PMID:27456501

  18. Studies on non-oxide coating on carbon fibers using plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patel, R. H.; Sharma, S.; Prajapati, K. K.; Vyas, M. M.; Batra, N. M.

    2016-05-01

    A new way of improving the oxidative behavior of carbon fibers coated with SiC through Plasma Enhanced Chemical Vapor Deposition technique. The complete study includes coating of SiC on glass slab and Stainless steel specimen as a starting test subjects but the major focus was to increase the oxidation temperature of carbon fibers by PECVD technique. This method uses relatively lower substrate temperature and guarantees better stoichiometry than other coating methods and hence the substrate shows higher resistance towards mechanical and thermal stresses along with increase in oxidation temperature.

  19. Spectroscopic Signatures of AA' and AB Stacking of Chemical Vapor Deposited Bilayer MoS2.

    PubMed

    Xia, Ming; Li, Bo; Yin, Kuibo; Capellini, Giovanni; Niu, Gang; Gong, Yongji; Zhou, Wu; Ajayan, Pulickel M; Xie, Ya-Hong

    2015-12-22

    Prominent resonance Raman and photoluminescence spectroscopic differences between AA' and AB stacked bilayer molybdenum disulfide (MoS2) grown by chemical vapor deposition are reported. Bilayer MoS2 islands consisting of the two stacking orders were obtained under identical growth conditions. Resonance Raman and photoluminescence spectra of AA' and AB stacked bilayer MoS2 were obtained on Au nanopyramid surfaces under strong plasmon resonance. Both resonance Raman and photoluminescence spectra show distinct features indicating clear differences in interlayer interaction between these two phases. The implication of these findings on device applications based on spin and valley degrees of freedom will be discussed. PMID:26536495

  20. MgB2 superconducting whiskers synthesized by using the hybrid physical-chemical vapor deposition.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yazhou; Zhuang, Chenggang; Gao, Jingyun; Shan, Xudong; Zhang, Jingmin; Liao, Zhimin; Xu, Hongjun; Yu, Dapeng; Feng, Qingrong

    2009-02-25

    In this work, MgB(2) whiskers were fabricated on a copper substrate by using the hybrid physical-chemical vapor deposition, which was one of the most effective ways to make high quality pure MgB(2) films, with the possible growth mechanism discussed. The whiskers are hexagonal and conelike and grow along the [0001] direction with a single-crystal structure. The onset transition temperature is approximately 39 K, which is among the best in the published nanostructure MgB(2) papers. Fabrication of nanoscale MgB(2) whiskers provides the fundamental understanding of the effect of dimensionality and size on superconductivity.