Science.gov

Sample records for chemolithoautotroph thiomicrospiracrunogena xcl-2

  1. The Genome of Deep-Sea Vent Chemolithoautotroph Thiomicrospiracrunogena XCL-2

    SciTech Connect

    Scott, Kathleen M.; Sievert, Stefan M.; Abril, Fereniki N.; Ball,Lois A.; Barrett, Chantell J.; Blake, Rodrigo A.; Boller, Amanda J.; Chain, Patrick S.G.; Clark, Justine A.; Davis, Carisa R.; Detter, Chris; Do, Kimberly F.; Dobrinski, Kimberly P.; Faza, BrandonI.; Fitzpatrick,Kelly A.; Freyermuth, Sharyn K.; Harmer, Tara L.; Hauser, Loren J.; Hugler, Michael; Kerfeld, Cheryl A.; Klotz, Martin G.; Kong, William W.; Land, Miriam; Lapidus, Alla; Larimer, Frank W.; Longo, Dana L.; Lucas,Susan; Malfatti, Stephanie A.; Massey, Steven E.; Martin, Darlene D.; McCuddin, Zoe; Meyer, Folker; Moore, Jessica L.; Ocampo, Luis H.; Paul,John H.; Paulsen, Ian T.; Reep, Douglas K.; Ren, Qinghu; Ross, Rachel L.; Sato, Priscila Y.; Thomas, Phaedra; Tinkham, Lance E.; Zeruth, Gary T.

    2006-08-23

    Presented here is the complete genome sequence ofThiomicrospira crunogena XCL-2, representative of ubiquitouschemolithoautotrophic sulfur-oxidizing bacteria isolated from deep-seahydrothermal vents. This gammaproteobacterium has a single chromosome(2,427,734 bp), and its genome illustrates many of the adaptations thathave enabled it to thrive at vents globally. It has 14 methyl-acceptingchemotaxis protein genes, including four that may assist in positioningit in the redoxcline. A relative abundance of CDSs encoding regulatoryproteins likely control the expression of genes encoding carboxysomes,multiple dissolved inorganic nitrogen and phosphate transporters, as wellas a phosphonate operon, which provide this species with a variety ofoptions for acquiring these substrates from the environment. T. crunogenaXCL-2 is unusual among obligate sulfur oxidizing bacteria in relying onthe Sox system for the oxidation of reduced sulfur compounds. A 38 kbprophage is present, and a high level of prophage induction was observed,which may play a role in keeping competing populations of close relativesin check. The genome has characteristics consistent with an obligatelychemolithoautotrophic lifestyle, including few transporters predicted tohave organic allocrits, and Calvin-Benson-Bassham cycle CDSs scatteredthroughout the genome.

  2. The genome of deep-sea vent chemolithoautotroph Thiomicrospira crunogena XCL-2.

    PubMed

    Scott, Kathleen M; Sievert, Stefan M; Abril, Fereniki N; Ball, Lois A; Barrett, Chantell J; Blake, Rodrigo A; Boller, Amanda J; Chain, Patrick S G; Clark, Justine A; Davis, Carisa R; Detter, Chris; Do, Kimberly F; Dobrinski, Kimberly P; Faza, Brandon I; Fitzpatrick, Kelly A; Freyermuth, Sharyn K; Harmer, Tara L; Hauser, Loren J; Hügler, Michael; Kerfeld, Cheryl A; Klotz, Martin G; Kong, William W; Land, Miriam; Lapidus, Alla; Larimer, Frank W; Longo, Dana L; Lucas, Susan; Malfatti, Stephanie A; Massey, Steven E; Martin, Darlene D; McCuddin, Zoe; Meyer, Folker; Moore, Jessica L; Ocampo, Luis H; Paul, John H; Paulsen, Ian T; Reep, Douglas K; Ren, Qinghu; Ross, Rachel L; Sato, Priscila Y; Thomas, Phaedra; Tinkham, Lance E; Zeruth, Gary T

    2006-11-01

    Presented here is the complete genome sequence of Thiomicrospira crunogena XCL-2, representative of ubiquitous chemolithoautotrophic sulfur-oxidizing bacteria isolated from deep-sea hydrothermal vents. This gammaproteobacterium has a single chromosome (2,427,734 base pairs), and its genome illustrates many of the adaptations that have enabled it to thrive at vents globally. It has 14 methyl-accepting chemotaxis protein genes, including four that may assist in positioning it in the redoxcline. A relative abundance of coding sequences (CDSs) encoding regulatory proteins likely control the expression of genes encoding carboxysomes, multiple dissolved inorganic nitrogen and phosphate transporters, as well as a phosphonate operon, which provide this species with a variety of options for acquiring these substrates from the environment. Thiom. crunogena XCL-2 is unusual among obligate sulfur-oxidizing bacteria in relying on the Sox system for the oxidation of reduced sulfur compounds. The genome has characteristics consistent with an obligately chemolithoautotrophic lifestyle, including few transporters predicted to have organic allocrits, and Calvin-Benson-Bassham cycle CDSs scattered throughout the genome.

  3. The Genome of Deep-Sea Vent Chemolithoautotroph Thiomicrospira crunogena XCL-2

    PubMed Central

    Scott, Kathleen M; Sievert, Stefan M; Abril, Fereniki N; Ball, Lois A; Barrett, Chantell J; Blake, Rodrigo A; Boller, Amanda J; Chain, Patrick S. G; Clark, Justine A; Davis, Carisa R; Detter, Chris; Do, Kimberly F; Dobrinski, Kimberly P; Faza, Brandon I; Fitzpatrick, Kelly A; Freyermuth, Sharyn K; Harmer, Tara L; Hauser, Loren J; Hügler, Michael; Kerfeld, Cheryl A; Klotz, Martin G; Kong, William W; Land, Miriam; Lapidus, Alla; Larimer, Frank W; Longo, Dana L; Lucas, Susan; Malfatti, Stephanie A; Massey, Steven E; Martin, Darlene D; McCuddin, Zoe; Meyer, Folker; Moore, Jessica L; Ocampo, Luis H; Paul, John H; Paulsen, Ian T; Reep, Douglas K; Ren, Qinghu; Ross, Rachel L; Sato, Priscila Y; Thomas, Phaedra; Tinkham, Lance E; Zeruth, Gary T

    2006-01-01

    Presented here is the complete genome sequence of Thiomicrospira crunogena XCL-2, representative of ubiquitous chemolithoautotrophic sulfur-oxidizing bacteria isolated from deep-sea hydrothermal vents. This gammaproteobacterium has a single chromosome (2,427,734 base pairs), and its genome illustrates many of the adaptations that have enabled it to thrive at vents globally. It has 14 methyl-accepting chemotaxis protein genes, including four that may assist in positioning it in the redoxcline. A relative abundance of coding sequences (CDSs) encoding regulatory proteins likely control the expression of genes encoding carboxysomes, multiple dissolved inorganic nitrogen and phosphate transporters, as well as a phosphonate operon, which provide this species with a variety of options for acquiring these substrates from the environment. Thiom. crunogena XCL-2 is unusual among obligate sulfur-oxidizing bacteria in relying on the Sox system for the oxidation of reduced sulfur compounds. The genome has characteristics consistent with an obligately chemolithoautotrophic lifestyle, including few transporters predicted to have organic allocrits, and Calvin-Benson-Bassham cycle CDSs scattered throughout the genome. PMID:17105352

  4. The Genome of Deep-Sea Vent Chemolithoautotroph Thiomicrospira crunogena XCL-2

    SciTech Connect

    Scott, K M; Sievert, S M; Abril, F N; Ball, L A; Barrett, C J; Blake, R A; Boller, A J; Chain, P G; Clark, J A; Davis, C R; Detter, C; Do, K F; Dobrinski, K P; Faza, B I; Fitzpatrick, K A; Freyermuth, S K; Harmer, T L; Hauser, L J; Hugler, M; Kerfeld, C A; Klotz, M G; Kong, W W; Land, M; Lapidus, A; Larimer, F W; Longo, D L; Lucas, S; Malfatti, S A; Massey, S E; Martin, D D; McCuddin, Z; Meyer, F; Moore, J L; Ocampo Jr., L H; Paul, J H; Paulsen, I T; Reep, D K; Ren, Q; Ross, R L; Sato, P Y; Thomas, P; Tinkham, L E; Zerugh, G T

    2007-01-10

    Presented here is the complete genome sequence of Thiomicrospira crunogena XCL-2, representative of ubiquitous chemolithoautotrophic sulfur-oxidizing bacteria isolated from deep-sea hydrothermal vents. This gammaproteobacterium has a single chromosome (2,427,734 bp), and its genome illustrates many of the adaptations that have enabled it to thrive at vents globally. It has 14 methyl-accepting chemotaxis protein genes, including four that may assist in positioning it in the redoxcline. A relative abundance of CDSs encoding regulatory proteins likely control the expression of genes encoding carboxysomes, multiple dissolved inorganic nitrogen and phosphate transporters, as well as a phosphonate operon, which provide this species with a variety of options for acquiring these substrates from the environment. T. crunogena XCL-2 is unusual among obligate sulfur oxidizing bacteria in relying on the Sox system for the oxidation of reduced sulfur compounds. A 38 kb prophage is present, and a high level of prophage induction was observed, which may play a role in keeping competing populations of close relatives in check. The genome has characteristics consistent with an obligately chemolithoautotrophic lifestyle, including few transporters predicted to have organic allocrits, and Calvin-Benson-Bassham cycle CDSs scattered throughout the genome.

  5. Preliminary X-ray crystallographic analysis of α-carbonic anhydrase from Thiomicrospira crunogena XCL-2.

    PubMed

    Díaz Torres, Natalia; González, Guillermo; Biswas, Shyamasri; Scott, Kathleen M; McKenna, Robert

    2012-09-01

    Thiomicrospira crunogena XCL-2 is a novel sulfur-oxidizing chemolithoautotroph that plays a significant role in the sustainability of deep-sea hydrothermal vent communities. This recently discovered gammaproteobacterium encodes and expresses four carbonic anhydrases (CAs) from three evolutionarily and structurally distinct CA families: an α-CA, two β-CAs and a γ-CA. In order to characterize and elucidate the physiological roles of these CAs, X-ray crystallographic structural studies have been initiated on the α-CA. The α-CA crystallized in space group C2. The crystals diffracted to a maximum resolution of 2.6 Å, with unit-cell parameters a = 127.1, b = 102.2, c = 105.0 Å, β = 127.3°, and a calculated Matthews coefficient of 2.04 Å(3) Da(-1) with four identical protein molecules in the crystallographic asymmetric unit. A preliminary solution was determined by molecular replacement with the PHENIX AutoMR wizard, which had an initial TFZ score of 17.9. Refinement of the structure is currently in progress.

  6. Dissolved inorganic carbon uptake in Thiomicrospira crunogena XCL-2 is Δp- and ATP-sensitive and enhances RubisCO-mediated carbon fixation.

    PubMed

    Menning, Kristy J; Menon, Balaraj B; Fox, Gordon; Scott, Kathleen M

    2016-03-01

    The gammaproteobacterium Thiomicrospira crunogena XCL-2 is an aerobic sulfur-oxidizing hydrothermal vent chemolithoautotroph that has a CO2 concentrating mechanism (CCM), which generates intracellular dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC) concentrations much higher than extracellular, thereby providing substrate for carbon fixation at sufficient rate. This CCM presumably requires at least one active DIC transporter to generate the elevated intracellular concentrations of DIC measured in this organism. In this study, the half-saturation constant (K CO2) for purified carboxysomal RubisCO was measured (276 ± 18 µM) which was much greater than the K CO2 of whole cells (1.03 µM), highlighting the degree to which the CCM facilitates CO2 fixation under low CO2 conditions. To clarify the bioenergetics powering active DIC uptake, cells were incubated in the presence of inhibitors targeting ATP synthesis (DCCD) or proton potential (CCCP). Incubations with each of these inhibitors resulted in diminished intracellular ATP, DIC, and fixed carbon, despite an absence of an inhibitory effect on proton potential in the DCCD-incubated cells. Electron transport complexes NADH dehydrogenase and the bc 1 complex were found to be insensitive to DCCD, suggesting that ATP synthase was the primary target of DCCD. Given the correlation of DIC uptake to the intracellular ATP concentration, the ABC transporter genes were targeted by qRT-PCR, but were not upregulated under low-DIC conditions. As the T. crunogena genome does not include orthologs of any genes encoding known DIC uptake systems, these data suggest that a novel, yet to be identified, ATP- and proton potential-dependent DIC transporter is active in this bacterium. This transporter serves to facilitate growth by T. crunogena and other Thiomicrospiras in the many habitats where they are found.

  7. Activity and anion inhibition studies of the α-carbonic anhydrase from Thiomicrospira crunogena XCL-2 Gammaproteobacterium.

    PubMed

    Mahon, Brian P; Díaz-Torres, Natalia A; Pinard, Melissa A; Tu, Chingkuang; Silverman, David N; Scott, Kathleen M; McKenna, Robert

    2015-11-01

    Thiomicrospira crunogena XCL-2 expresses an α-carbonic anhydrase (TcruCA). Sequence alignments reveal that TcruCA displays a high sequence identity (>30%) relative to other α-CAs. This includes three conserved histidines that coordinate the active site zinc, a histidine proton shuttling residue, and opposing hydrophilic and hydrophobic sides that line the active site. The catalytic efficiency of TcruCA is considered moderate relative to other α-CAs (k(cat)/K(M)=1.1×10(7) M(-1) s(-1)), being a factor of ten less efficient than the most active α-CAs. TcruCA is also inhibited by anions with Cl(-), Br(-), and I(-), all showing Ki values in the millimolar range (53-361 mM). Hydrogen sulfide (HS(-)) revealed the highest affinity for TcruCA with a Ki of 1.1 μM. It is predicted that inhibition of TcruCA by HS(-) (an anion commonly found in the environment where Thiomicrospira crunogena is located) is a way for Thiomicrospira crunogena to regulate its carbon-concentrating mechanism (CCM) and thus the organism's metabolic functions. Results from this study provide preliminary insights into the role of TcruCA in the general metabolism of Thiomicrospira crunogena.

  8. Astrobiological Significance of Chemolithoautotrophic Acidophiles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pikuta, Elena V.; Hoover, Richard B.

    2003-01-01

    For more than a century (since Winogradsky discovered lithoautotrophic bacteria) a dilemma in microbiology has concerned life that first inhabited the Earth. Which types of life forms first appeared in the primordial oceans during the earliest geological period on Earth as the primary ancestors of modem biological diversity? How did a metabolism of ancestors evolve: from lithoautotrophic to lithohetherotrophic and organoheterotrophic or from organoheterotrophic to organoautotrophic and lithomixotrophic types? At the present time, it is known that chemolithoheterotrophic and chemolithoautotrophic metabolizing bacteria are wide spread in different ecosystems. On Earth the acidic ecosystems are associated with geysers, volcanic fumaroles, hot springs, deep sea hydrothermal vents, caves, acid mine drainage and other technogenic ecosystems. Bioleaching played a significant role on a global geological scale during the Earth's formation. This important feature of bacteria has been successfully applied in industry. The lithoautotrophs include Bacteria and Archaea belonging to diverse genera containing thermophilic and mesophilic species. In this paper we discuss the lithotrophic microbial acidophiles and present some data with a description of new acidophilic iron- and sulfur- oxidizing bacterium isolated from the Chena Hot Springs in Alaska. We also consider the possible relevance of microbial acidophiles to Venus, Io, and acidic inclusions in glaciers and icy moons.

  9. Astrobiological Significance of Chemolithoautotrophic Acidophiles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pikuta, Elena V.; Hoover, Richard B.

    2003-01-01

    For more than a century (since Winogradsky discovered lithoautotrophic bacteria) a dilemma in microbiology has concerned life that first inhabited the Earth. Which types of life forms first appeared in the primordial oceans during the earliest geological period on Earth as the primary ancestors of modem biological diversity? How did a metabolism of ancestors evolve: from lithoautotrophic to lithohetherotrophic and organoheterotrophic or from organoheterotrophic to organoautotrophic and lithomixotrophic types? At the present time, it is known that chemolithoheterotrophic and chemolithoautotrophic metabolizing bacteria are wide spread in different ecosystems. On Earth the acidic ecosystems are associated with geysers, volcanic fumaroles, hot springs, deep sea hydrothermal vents, caves, acid mine drainage and other technogenic ecosystems. Bioleaching played a significant role on a global geological scale during the Earth's formation. This important feature of bacteria has been successfully applied in industry. The lithoautotrophs include Bacteria and Archaea belonging to diverse genera containing thermophilic and mesophilic species. In this paper we discuss the lithotrophic microbial acidophiles and present some data with a description of new acidophilic iron- and sulfur- oxidizing bacterium isolated from the Chena Hot Springs in Alaska. We also consider the possible relevance of microbial acidophiles to Venus, Io, and acidic inclusions in glaciers and icy moons.

  10. Structural and biophysical characterization of the α-carbonic anhydrase from the gammaproteobacterium Thiomicrospira crunogena XCL-2: insights into engineering thermostable enzymes for CO2 sequestration.

    PubMed

    Díaz-Torres, Natalia A; Mahon, Brian P; Boone, Christopher D; Pinard, Melissa A; Tu, Chingkuang; Ng, Robert; Agbandje-McKenna, Mavis; Silverman, David; Scott, Kathleen; McKenna, Robert

    2015-08-01

    Biocatalytic CO2 sequestration to reduce greenhouse-gas emissions from industrial processes is an active area of research. Carbonic anhydrases (CAs) are attractive enzymes for this process. However, the most active CAs display limited thermal and pH stability, making them less than ideal. As a result, there is an ongoing effort to engineer and/or find a thermostable CA to fulfill these needs. Here, the kinetic and thermal characterization is presented of an α-CA recently discovered in the mesophilic hydrothermal vent-isolate extremophile Thiomicrospira crunogena XCL-2 (TcruCA), which has a significantly higher thermostability compared with human CA II (melting temperature of 71.9°C versus 59.5°C, respectively) but with a tenfold decrease in the catalytic efficiency. The X-ray crystallographic structure of the dimeric TcruCA shows that it has a highly conserved yet compact structure compared with other α-CAs. In addition, TcruCA contains an intramolecular disulfide bond that stabilizes the enzyme. These features are thought to contribute significantly to the thermostability and pH stability of the enzyme and may be exploited to engineer α-CAs for applications in industrial CO2 sequestration.

  11. Structural and biophysical characterization of the α-carbonic anhydrase from the gammaproteobacterium Thiomicrospira crunogena XCL-2: insights into engineering thermostable enzymes for CO2 sequestration

    PubMed Central

    Díaz-Torres, Natalia A.; Mahon, Brian P.; Boone, Christopher D.; Pinard, Melissa A.; Tu, Chingkuang; Ng, Robert; Agbandje-McKenna, Mavis; Silverman, David; Scott, Kathleen; McKenna, Robert

    2015-01-01

    Biocatalytic CO2 sequestration to reduce greenhouse-gas emissions from industrial processes is an active area of research. Carbonic anhydrases (CAs) are attractive enzymes for this process. However, the most active CAs display limited thermal and pH stability, making them less than ideal. As a result, there is an ongoing effort to engineer and/or find a thermostable CA to fulfill these needs. Here, the kinetic and thermal characterization is presented of an α-CA recently discovered in the mesophilic hydrothermal vent-isolate extremophile Thiomicrospira crunogena XCL-2 (TcruCA), which has a significantly higher thermostability compared with human CA II (melting temperature of 71.9°C versus 59.5°C, respectively) but with a tenfold decrease in the catalytic efficiency. The X-ray crystallographic structure of the dimeric TcruCA shows that it has a highly conserved yet compact structure compared with other α-CAs. In addition, TcruCA contains an intramolecular disulfide bond that stabilizes the enzyme. These features are thought to contribute significantly to the thermostability and pH stability of the enzyme and may be exploited to engineer α-CAs for applications in industrial CO2 sequestration. PMID:26249355

  12. Oxidation of Molecular Hydrogen by a Chemolithoautotrophic Beggiatoa Strain

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT A chemolithoautotrophic strain of the family Beggiatoaceae, Beggiatoa sp. strain 35Flor, was found to oxidize molecular hydrogen when grown in a medium with diffusional gradients of oxygen, sulfide, and hydrogen. Microsensor profiles and rate measurements suggested that the strain oxidized hydrogen aerobically when oxygen was available, while hydrogen consumption under anoxic conditions was presumably driven by sulfur respiration. Beggiatoa sp. 35Flor reached significantly higher biomass in hydrogen-supplemented oxygen-sulfide gradient media, but hydrogen did not support growth of the strain in the absence of reduced sulfur compounds. Nevertheless, hydrogen oxidation can provide Beggiatoa sp. 35Flor with energy for maintenance and assimilatory purposes and may support the disposal of internally stored sulfur to prevent physical damage resulting from excessive sulfur accumulation. Our knowledge about the exposure of natural populations of Beggiatoaceae to hydrogen is very limited, but significant amounts of hydrogen could be provided by nitrogen fixation, fermentation, and geochemical processes in several of their typical habitats such as photosynthetic microbial mats and submarine sites of hydrothermal fluid flow. IMPORTANCE Reduced sulfur compounds are certainly the main electron donors for chemolithoautotrophic Beggiatoaceae, but the traditional focus on this topic has left other possible inorganic electron donors largely unexplored. In this paper, we provide evidence that hydrogen oxidation has the potential to strengthen the ecophysiological plasticity of Beggiatoaceae in several ways. Moreover, we show that hydrogen oxidation by members of this family can significantly influence biogeochemical gradients and therefore should be considered in environmental studies. PMID:26896131

  13. Genetic manipulation of the obligate chemolithoautotrophic bacterium Thiobacillus denitrificans

    SciTech Connect

    Beller, H.R.; Legler, T.C.; Kane, S.R.

    2011-07-15

    Chemolithoautotrophic bacteria can be of industrial and environmental importance, but they present a challenge for systems biology studies, as their central metabolism deviates from that of model organisms and there is a much less extensive experimental basis for their gene annotation than for typical organoheterotrophs. For microbes with sequenced genomes but unconventional metabolism, the ability to create knockout mutations can be a powerful tool for functional genomics and thereby render an organism more amenable to systems biology approaches. In this chapter, we describe a genetic system for Thiobacillus denitrificans, with which insertion mutations can be introduced by homologous recombination and complemented in trans. Insertion mutations are generated by in vitro transposition, the mutated genes are amplified by the PCR, and the amplicons are introduced into T. denitrificans by electroporation. Use of a complementation vector, pTL2, based on the IncP plasmid pRR10 is also addressed.

  14. Oxidation of Molecular Hydrogen by a Chemolithoautotrophic Beggiatoa Strain.

    PubMed

    Kreutzmann, Anne-Christin; Schulz-Vogt, Heide N

    2016-04-01

    A chemolithoautotrophic strain of the family Beggiatoaceae, Beggiatoa sp. strain 35Flor, was found to oxidize molecular hydrogen when grown in a medium with diffusional gradients of oxygen, sulfide, and hydrogen. Microsensor profiles and rate measurements suggested that the strain oxidized hydrogen aerobically when oxygen was available, while hydrogen consumption under anoxic conditions was presumably driven by sulfur respiration.Beggiatoa sp. 35Flor reached significantly higher biomass in hydrogen-supplemented oxygen-sulfide gradient media, but hydrogen did not support growth of the strain in the absence of reduced sulfur compounds. Nevertheless, hydrogen oxidation can provide Beggiatoa sp. 35Flor with energy for maintenance and assimilatory purposes and may support the disposal of internally stored sulfur to prevent physical damage resulting from excessive sulfur accumulation. Our knowledge about the exposure of natural populations of Beggiatoa ceae to hydrogen is very limited, but significant amounts of hydrogen could be provided by nitrogen fixation, fermentation, and geochemical processes in several of their typical habitats such as photosynthetic microbial mats and submarine sites of hydrothermal fluid flow. Reduced sulfur compounds are certainly the main electron donors for chemolithoautotrophic Beggiatoa ceae, but the traditional focus on this topic has left other possible inorganic electron donors largely unexplored. In this paper, we provide evidence that hydrogen oxidation has the potential to strengthen the ecophysiological plasticity of Beggiatoa ceaein several ways. Moreover, we show that hydrogen oxidation by members of this family can significantly influence biogeochemical gradients and therefore should be considered in environmental studies. Copyright © 2016 Kreutzmann and Schulz-Vogt.

  15. High cell density cultivation of the chemolithoautotrophic bacterium Nitrosomonas europaea.

    PubMed

    Papp, Benedek; Török, Tibor; Sándor, Erzsébet; Fekete, Erzsébet; Flipphi, Michel; Karaffa, Levente

    2016-05-01

    Nitrosomonas europaea is a chemolithoautotrophic nitrifier, a gram-negative bacterium that can obtain all energy required for growth from the oxidation of ammonia to nitrite, and this may be beneficial for various biotechnological and environmental applications. However, compared to other bacteria, growth of ammonia oxidizing bacteria is very slow. A prerequisite to produce high cell density N. europaea cultures is to minimize the concentrations of inhibitory metabolic by-products. During growth on ammonia nitrite accumulates, as a consequence, N. europaea cannot grow to high cell concentrations under conventional batch conditions. Here, we show that single-vessel dialysis membrane bioreactors can be used to obtain substantially increased N. europaea biomasses and substantially reduced nitrite levels in media initially containing high amounts of the substrate. Dialysis membrane bioreactor fermentations were run in batch as well as in continuous mode. Growth was monitored with cell concentration determinations, by assessing dry cell mass and by monitoring ammonium consumption as well as nitrite formation. In addition, metabolic activity was probed with in vivo acridine orange staining. Under continuous substrate feed, the maximal cell concentration (2.79 × 10(12)/L) and maximal dry cell mass (0.895 g/L) achieved more than doubled the highest values reported for N. europaea cultivations to date.

  16. Geochemical constraints on chemolithoautotrophic reactions in hydrothermal systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shock, Everett L.; Mccollom, Thomas; Schulte, Mithell D.

    1995-01-01

    Thermodynamic calculations provide the means to quantify the chemical disequilibrium inherent in the mixing of reduced hydrothermal fluids with seawater. The chemical energy available for metabolic processes in these environments can be evaluated by taking into account the pressure and temperature dependence of the apparent standard Gibbs free energies of reactions in the S-H2-H2O system together with geochemical constraints on pH, activities of aqueous sulfur species and fugacities of H2 and/or O2. Using present-day mixing of hydrothermal fluids and seawater as a starting point, it is shown that each mole of H2S entering seawater from hydrothermal fluids represents about 200,000 calories of chemical energy for metabolic systems able to catalyze H2S oxidation. Extrapolating to the early Earth, which was likely to have had an atmosphere more reduced than at present, shows that this chemical energy may have been a factor of two or so less. Nevertheless, mixing of hydrothermal fluids with seawater would have been an abundant source of chemical energy, and an inevitable consequence of the presence of an ocean on an initially hot Earth. The amount of energy available was more than enough for organic synthesis from CO2 or CO, and/or polymer formation, indicating that the vicinity of hydrothermal systems at the sea floor was an ideal location for the emergence of the first chemolithoautotrophic metabolic systems.

  17. Geochemical constraints on chemolithoautotrophic reactions in hydrothermal systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shock, Everett L.; Mccollom, Thomas; Schulte, Mithell D.

    1995-01-01

    Thermodynamic calculations provide the means to quantify the chemical disequilibrium inherent in the mixing of reduced hydrothermal fluids with seawater. The chemical energy available for metabolic processes in these environments can be evaluated by taking into account the pressure and temperature dependence of the apparent standard Gibbs free energies of reactions in the S-H2-H2O system together with geochemical constraints on pH, activities of aqueous sulfur species and fugacities of H2 and/or O2. Using present-day mixing of hydrothermal fluids and seawater as a starting point, it is shown that each mole of H2S entering seawater from hydrothermal fluids represents about 200,000 calories of chemical energy for metabolic systems able to catalyze H2S oxidation. Extrapolating to the early Earth, which was likely to have had an atmosphere more reduced than at present, shows that this chemical energy may have been a factor of two or so less. Nevertheless, mixing of hydrothermal fluids with seawater would have been an abundant source of chemical energy, and an inevitable consequence of the presence of an ocean on an initially hot Earth. The amount of energy available was more than enough for organic synthesis from CO2 or CO, and/or polymer formation, indicating that the vicinity of hydrothermal systems at the sea floor was an ideal location for the emergence of the first chemolithoautotrophic metabolic systems.

  18. Geochemical constraints on chemolithoautotrophic reactions in hydrothermal systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shock, Everett L.; McCollom, Thomas; Schulte, Mitchell D.

    1995-06-01

    Thermodynamic calculations provide the means to quantify the chemical disequilibrium inherent in the mixing of redeuced hydrothermal fluids with seawater. The chemical energy available for metabolic processes in these environments can be evaluated by taking into account the pressure and temperature dependence of the apparent standard Gibbs free energies of reactions in the S-H2-H2O system together with geochemical constraints on pH, activities of aqueous sulfur species and fugacities of H2 and/or O2. Using present-day mixing of hydrothermal fluids and seawater as a starting point, it is shown that each mole of H2S entering seawater from hydrothermal fluids represents about 200,000 calories of chemical energy for metabolic systems able to catalyze H2S oxidation. Extrapolating to the early Earth, which was likely to have had an atmosphere more reduced than at present, shows that this chemical energy may have been a factor of two or so less. Nevertheless, mixing of hydrothermal fluids with seawater would have been an abundant source of chemical energy, and an inevitable consequence of the presence of an ocean on an initially hot Earth. The amount of energy available was more than enough for organic synthesis from CO2 or CO, and/or polymer formation, indicating that the vicinity of hydrothermal systems at the sea floor was an ideal location for the emergence of the first chemolithoautotrophic metabolic systems.

  19. Metabolic engineering in chemolithoautotrophic hosts for the production of fuels and chemicals.

    PubMed

    Nybo, S Eric; Khan, Nymul E; Woolston, Benjamin M; Curtis, Wayne R

    2015-07-01

    The ability of autotrophic organisms to fix CO2 presents an opportunity to utilize this 'greenhouse gas' as an inexpensive substrate for biochemical production. Unlike conventional heterotrophic microorganisms that consume carbohydrates and amino acids, prokaryotic chemolithoautotrophs have evolved the capacity to utilize reduced chemical compounds to fix CO2 and drive metabolic processes. The use of chemolithoautotrophic hosts as production platforms has been renewed by the prospect of metabolically engineered commodity chemicals and fuels. Efforts such as the ARPA-E electrofuels program highlight both the potential and obstacles that chemolithoautotrophic biosynthetic platforms provide. This review surveys the numerous advances that have been made in chemolithoautotrophic metabolic engineering with a focus on hydrogen oxidizing bacteria such as the model chemolithoautotrophic organism (Ralstonia), the purple photosynthetic bacteria (Rhodobacter), and anaerobic acetogens. Two alternative strategies of microbial chassis development are considered: (1) introducing or enhancing autotrophic capabilities (carbon fixation, hydrogen utilization) in model heterotrophic organisms, or (2) improving tools for pathway engineering (transformation methods, promoters, vectors etc.) in native autotrophic organisms. Unique characteristics of autotrophic growth as they relate to bioreactor design and process development are also discussed in the context of challenges and opportunities for genetic manipulation of organisms as production platforms. Copyright © 2015 International Metabolic Engineering Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Comparative molecular analysis of chemolithoautotrophic bacterial diversity and community structure from coastal saline soils, Gujarat, India

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Soils harbour high diversity of obligate as well as facultative chemolithoautotrophic bacteria that contribute significantly to CO2 dynamics in soil. In this study, we used culture dependent and independent methods to assess the community structure and diversity of chemolithoautotrophs in agricultural and coastal barren saline soils (low and high salinity). We studied the composition and distribution of chemolithoautotrophs by means of functional marker gene cbbL encoding large subunit of ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase and a phylogenetic marker 16S rRNA gene. The cbbL form IA and IC genes associated with carbon fixation were analyzed to gain insight into metabolic potential of chemolithoautotrophs in three soil types of coastal ecosystems which had a very different salt load and sulphur content. Results In cbbL libraries, the cbbL form IA was retrieved only from high saline soil whereas form IC was found in all three soil types. The form IC cbbL was also amplified from bacterial isolates obtained from all soil types. A number of novel monophyletic lineages affiliated with form IA and IC phylogenetic trees were found. These were distantly related to the known cbbL sequences from agroecosystem, volcanic ashes and marine environments. In 16S rRNA clone libraries, the agricultural soil was dominated by chemolithoautotrophs (Betaproteobacteria) whereas photoautotrophic Chloroflexi and sulphide oxidizers dominated saline ecosystems. Environmental specificity was apparently visible at both higher taxonomic levels (phylum) and lower taxonomic levels (genus and species). The differentiation in community structure and diversity in three soil ecosystems was supported by LIBSHUFF (P = 0.001) and UniFrac. Conclusion This study may provide fundamentally new insights into the role of chemolithoautotrophic and photoautotrophic bacterial diversity in biochemical carbon cycling in barren saline soils. The bacterial communities varied greatly among the

  1. Engineering the iron-oxidizing chemolithoautotroph Acidithiobacillus ferrooxidans for biochemical production.

    PubMed

    Kernan, Timothy; Majumdar, Sudipta; Li, Xiaozheng; Guan, Jingyang; West, Alan C; Banta, Scott

    2016-01-01

    There is growing interest in developing non-photosynthetic routes for the conversion of CO2 to fuels and chemicals. One underexplored approach is the transfer of energy to the metabolism of genetically modified chemolithoautotrophic bacteria. Acidithiobacillus ferrooxidans is an obligate chemolithoautotroph that derives its metabolic energy from the oxidation of iron or sulfur at low pH. Two heterologous biosynthetic pathways have been expressed in A. ferrooxidans to produce either isobutyric acid or heptadecane from CO2 and the oxidation of Fe(2+). A sevenfold improvement in productivity of isobutyric acid was obtained through improved media formulations in batch cultures. Steady-state efficiencies were lower in continuous cultures, likely due to ferric inhibition. If coupled to solar panels, the photon-to-fuel efficiency of this proof-of-principle process approaches estimates for agriculture-derived biofuels. These efforts lay the foundation for the utilization of this organism in the exploitation of electrical energy for biochemical synthesis.

  2. Enhanced fatty acid production in engineered chemolithoautotrophic bacteria using reduced sulfur compounds as energy sources

    DOE PAGES

    Beller, HR; Zhou, P; Jewell, TNM; ...

    2016-12-01

    © 2016 International Metabolic Engineering Society. Chemolithoautotrophic bacteria that oxidize reduced sulfur compounds, such as H 2 S, while fixing CO 2 are an untapped source of renewable bioproducts from sulfide-laden waste, such as municipal wastewater. In this study, we report engineering of the chemolithoautotrophic bacterium Thiobacillus denitrificans to produce up to 52-fold more fatty acids than the wild-type strain when grown with thiosulfate and CO 2 . A modified thioesterase gene from E. coli ('tesA) was integrated into the T. denitrificans chromosome under the control of P kan or one of two native T. denitrificans promoters. The relative strengthmore » of the two native promoters as assessed by fatty acid production in engineered strains was very similar to that assessed by expression of the cognate genes in the wild-type strain. This proof-of-principle study suggests that engineering sulfide-oxidizing chemolithoautotrophic bacteria to overproduce fatty acid-derived products merits consideration as a technology that could simultaneously produce renewable fuels/chemicals as well as cost-effectively remediate sulfide-contaminated wastewater.« less

  3. Enhanced fatty acid production in engineered chemolithoautotrophic bacteria using reduced sulfur compounds as energy sources

    SciTech Connect

    Beller, HR; Zhou, P; Jewell, TNM; Goh, EB; Keasling, JD

    2016-12-01

    © 2016 International Metabolic Engineering Society. Chemolithoautotrophic bacteria that oxidize reduced sulfur compounds, such as H 2 S, while fixing CO 2 are an untapped source of renewable bioproducts from sulfide-laden waste, such as municipal wastewater. In this study, we report engineering of the chemolithoautotrophic bacterium Thiobacillus denitrificans to produce up to 52-fold more fatty acids than the wild-type strain when grown with thiosulfate and CO 2 . A modified thioesterase gene from E. coli ('tesA) was integrated into the T. denitrificans chromosome under the control of P kan or one of two native T. denitrificans promoters. The relative strength of the two native promoters as assessed by fatty acid production in engineered strains was very similar to that assessed by expression of the cognate genes in the wild-type strain. This proof-of-principle study suggests that engineering sulfide-oxidizing chemolithoautotrophic bacteria to overproduce fatty acid-derived products merits consideration as a technology that could simultaneously produce renewable fuels/chemicals as well as cost-effectively remediate sulfide-contaminated wastewater.

  4. Mycobacteria Isolated from Angkor Monument Sandstones Grow Chemolithoautotrophically by Oxidizing Elemental Sulfur

    PubMed Central

    Kusumi, Asako; Li, Xian Shu; Katayama, Yoko

    2011-01-01

    To characterize sulfate-producing microorganisms from the deteriorated sandstones of Angkor monuments in Cambodia, strains of Mycobacterium spp. were isolated from most probable number-positive cultures. All five strains isolated were able to use both elemental sulfur (S0) for chemolithoautotrophic growth and organic substances for chemoorganoheterotrophic growth. Results of phylogenetic and phenotypic analyses indicated that all five isolates were rapid growers of the genus Mycobacterium and were most similar to Mycobacterium cosmeticum and Mycobacterium pallens. Chemolithoautotrophic growth was further examined in the representative strain THI503. When grown in mineral salts medium, strain THI503 oxidized S0 to thiosulfate and sulfate; oxidation was accompanied by a decrease in the pH of the medium from 4.7 to 3.6. The link between sulfur oxidation and energy metabolism was confirmed by an increase in ATP. Fluorescence microscopy of DAPI-stained cells revealed that strain THI503 adheres to and proliferates on the surface of sulfur particles. The flexible metabolic ability of facultative chemolithoautotrophs enables their survival in nutrient-limited sandstone environments. PMID:21747806

  5. Impact of Different In Vitro Electron Donor/Acceptor Conditions on Potential Chemolithoautotrophic Communities from Marine Pelagic Redoxclines

    PubMed Central

    Labrenz, Matthias; Jost, Günter; Pohl, Christa; Beckmann, Sabrina; Martens-Habbena, Willm; Jürgens, Klaus

    2005-01-01

    Anaerobic or microaerophilic chemolithoautotrophic bacteria have been considered to be responsible for CO2 dark fixation in different pelagic redoxclines worldwide, but their involvement in redox processes is still not fully resolved. We investigated the impact of 17 different electron donor/acceptor combinations in water of pelagic redoxclines from the central Baltic Sea on the stimulation of bacterial CO2 dark fixation as well as on the development of chemolithoautotrophic populations. In situ, the highest CO2 dark fixation rates, ranging from 0.7 to 1.4 μmol liter−1 day−1, were measured directly below the redoxcline. In enrichment experiments, chemolithoautotrophic CO2 dark fixation was maximally stimulated by the addition of thiosulfate, reaching values of up to 9.7 μmol liter−1 CO2 day−1. Chemolithoautotrophic nitrate reduction proved to be an important process, with rates of up to 33.5 μmol liter−1 NO3− day−1. Reduction of Fe(III) or Mn(IV) was not detected; nevertheless, the presence of these potential electron acceptors influenced the development of stimulated microbial assemblages. Potential chemolithoautotrophic bacteria in the enrichment experiments were displayed on 16S ribosomal complementary DNA single-strand-conformation polymorphism fingerprints and identified by sequencing of excised bands. Sequences were closely related to chemolithoautotrophic Thiomicrospira psychrophila and Maorithyas hadalis gill symbiont (both Gammaproteobacteria) and to an uncultured nitrate-reducing Helicobacteraceae bacterium (Epsilonproteobacteria). Our data indicate that this Helicobacteraceae bacterium could be of general importance or even a key organism for autotrophic nitrate reduction in pelagic redoxclines. PMID:16269695

  6. Thermothrix azorensis sp. nov., an obligately chemolithoautotrophic, sulfur-oxidizing, thermophilic bacterium.

    PubMed

    Odintsova, E V; Jannasch, H W; Mamone, J A; Langworthy, T A

    1996-04-01

    A new aerobic, obligately chemolithoautotrophic, thermophilic, sulfur-oxidizing bacterium, Thermothrix azorensis, was isolated from a hot spring on Sao Miguel Island in the Azores. The cells of this organism are gram negative, nonsporulating, and rod shaped. Filament formation appears to occur as a response to nonoptimal growth conditions. Growth occurs at 63 to 86 degrees C, and the optimum temperature is 76 to 78 degrees C. The optimum pH range for growth is 7.0 to 7.5. The G+C content of the DNA of our isolate is 39.7 mol%. This isolate uses thiosulfate, tetrathionate, hydrogen sulfide, and elemental sulfur as energy sources. Of particular interest are the absence of Calvin cycle enzymes and the initial appearance of sulfide during the lag phase of growth of aerobic cultures grown on elemental sulfur. The subsequent formation of thiosulfate is followed by oxidation of the thiosulfate to sulfate. T. azorensis differs from the only other Thermothrix species that has been described, Thermothrix thiopara, by having higher optimum and maximum growth temperatures, by being an obligate chemolithoautotroph, and by its close but separate position on a 16S rRNA sequence-based phylogenetic tree. Our T. azorensis isolate has been deposited in the American Type Culture Collection as strain ATCC 51754T (T = type strain).

  7. Importance of Chemolithoautotrophic Production to Mobile Benthic Predators in the Gulf of Mexico

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morgan, E.; Macavoy, S.; Carney, R.

    2005-05-01

    The continental slope of the Gulf of Mexico is characterized by substantial hydrocarbon seepage which provides reduced energy sources, both CH4 and H2S, for chemolithoautotrophs existing as endosymbionts within mussels and tubeworms found in dense colonies that provide habitat for an array of endemic and colonial fauna. The extent of trophic export of chemosynthetic biomass to the seep communities and the surrounding benthic communities in the Gulf, however, remains an open question. To elucidate the nutritional associations between seep residents and the surrounding benthos the carbon, nitrogen and sulfur stable isotope values of the hagfish Eptatretus sp., the giant isopod Bathynomus giganteus and the predatory snail Phymorhyncus sp. were interpreted through a three source, dual isotope mixing model. The model was able to assess the contributions of different isotopic signals to a mixture and thus could distinguish between photosynthetic/phytodetritus based sources, methanotrophic sources and thiotrophic sources. Incorporation of chemosynthetic based food sources was minimal on the whole and species specific; however some of the organisms considered in this study did incorporate nutrition from chemolithoautotrophic sources.

  8. Complete Genome Sequence of the Thermophilic and Facultatively Chemolithoautotrophic Sulfate Reducer Archaeoglobus sulfaticallidus Strain PM70-1T

    PubMed Central

    Stokke, Runar; Hocking, William Peter; Steinsbu, Bjørn Olav

    2013-01-01

    Dissimilatory sulfate-reducing archaea of the genus Archaeoglobus display divergent preferences in the use of energy sources and electron acceptors. Here we present the complete genome sequence of the thermophilic Archaeoglobus sulfaticallidus strain PM70-1T, which distinctly couples chemolithoautotrophic growth on H2/CO2 to sulfate reduction in addition to heterotrophic growth. PMID:23833130

  9. Population structure of deep-sea chemolithoautotrophs: identification of phenotypic and genotypic correlations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mino, S.; Nakagawa, S.; Sawabe, T.; Miyazaki, J.; Makita, H.; Nunoura, T.; Yamamoto, M.; Takai, K.

    2012-12-01

    Deep-sea hydrothermal fields are areas on the seafloor of high biological productivity fueled primarily by microbial chemosynthesis. Chemolithoautotrophic Epsilonproteobacteria and Persephonella with an ability to utilize inorganic substrates such as elemental sulfur and hydrogen are important members in wide range of temperature conditions in deep-sea hydrothermal vents. However, little is known about their population genetic structure such as intraspecific genetic diversity, distribution pattern, and phenotypic characteristics. Previously, using genetic approach based on multi-locus sequence analysis (MLSA), we clarified that Epsilonproteobacteria Group A, B, F, and Persephonella populations were geographically separated, and Epsilonproteobacteria appeared to diverge by mutation rather than recombination. Contrary to genetic evidence for allopatric segregation in deep-sea chemoautotrophs, however, phenotypic evidence has never been found. In addition, analyzing such a phenotypic characteristic may lead to a better understanding of the interactions microbes have with their environment. In this study, we present a metabolomic approach based on matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization-time of flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS) to reveal phenotypic biogeographical discrimination. We demonstrated the whole-cell MALDI-TOF MS method on Epsilonproteobacteria and Persephonella populations. These chemoautotrophic strains used in this study were isolated from chimney structures, vent fluids, and hydrothermal sediments. These hydrothermal samples were collected from geographically separated hydrothermal areas of the South Mariana Trough, Okinawa Trough and Central Indian Ridge. Based on mass peaks (signal/noise >10) within the m/z range of 2000-14000, phenotypic analysis was carried out by cluster analysis. The result of phenotypic analysis was compared with the genotypic clusters. The whole-cell MALDI-TOF MS revealed that Persephonella population was identified to

  10. Carbon Fixation Driven by Molecular Hydrogen Results in Chemolithoautotrophically Enhanced Growth of Helicobacter pylori

    PubMed Central

    Kuhns, Lisa G.; Benoit, Stéphane L.; Bayyareddy, Krishnareddy; Johnson, Darryl; Orlando, Ron; Evans, Alexandra L.; Waldrop, Grover L.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT A molecular hydrogen (H2)-stimulated, chemolithoautotrophic growth mode for the gastric pathogen Helicobacter pylori is reported. In a culture medium containing peptides and amino acids, H2-supplied cells consistently achieved 40 to 60% greater growth yield in 16 h and accumulated 3-fold more carbon from [14C]bicarbonate (on a per cell basis) in a 10-h period than cells without H2. Global proteomic comparisons of cells supplied with different atmospheric conditions revealed that addition of H2 led to increased amounts of hydrogenase and the biotin carboxylase subunit of acetyl coenzyme A (acetyl-CoA) carboxylase (ACC), as well as other proteins involved in various cellular functions, including amino acid metabolism, heme synthesis, or protein degradation. In agreement with this result, H2-supplied cells contained 3-fold more ACC activity than cells without H2. Other possible carbon dioxide (CO2) fixation enzymes were not up-expressed under the H2-containing atmosphere. As the gastric mucus is limited in carbon and energy sources and the bacterium lacks mucinase, this new growth mode may contribute to the persistence of the pathogen in vivo. This is the first time that chemolithoautotrophic growth is described for a pathogen. IMPORTANCE Many pathogens must survive within host areas that are poorly supplied with carbon and energy sources, and the gastric pathogen Helicobacter pylori resides almost exclusively in the nutritionally stringent mucus barrier of its host. Although this bacterium is already known to be highly adaptable to gastric niches, a new aspect of its metabolic flexibility, whereby molecular hydrogen use (energy) is coupled to carbon dioxide fixation (carbon acquisition) via a described carbon fixation enzyme, is shown here. This growth mode, which supplements heterotrophy, is termed chemolithoautotrophy and has not been previously reported for a pathogen. PMID:26929299

  11. Anaerobic, Nitrate-Dependent Oxidation of U(IV) Oxide Minerals by the Chemolithoautotrophic Bacterium Thiobacillus denitrificans

    PubMed Central

    Beller, Harry R.

    2005-01-01

    Under anaerobic conditions and at circumneutral pH, cells of the widely distributed, obligate chemolithoautotrophic bacterium Thiobacillus denitrificans oxidatively dissolved synthetic and biogenic U(IV) oxides (uraninite) in nitrate-dependent fashion: U(IV) oxidation required the presence of nitrate and was strongly correlated with nitrate consumption. This is the first report of anaerobic U(IV) oxidation by an autotrophic bacterium. PMID:15812053

  12. Anaerobic, Nitrate-Dependent Oxidation of U(IV) Oxide Minerals by the Chemolithoautotrophic Bacterium Thiobacillus denitrificans

    SciTech Connect

    Beller, H R

    2004-06-25

    Under anaerobic conditions and at circumneutral pH, cells of the widely-distributed, obligate chemolithoautotrophic bacterium Thiobacillus denitrificans oxidatively dissolved synthetic and biogenic U(IV) oxides (uraninite) in nitrate-dependent fashion: U(IV) oxidation required the presence of nitrate and was strongly correlated to nitrate consumption. This is the first report of anaerobic U(IV) oxidation by an autotrophic bacterium.

  13. Comparing chemolithoautotrophic subseafloor communities across geochemical gradients using meta-omics and RNA-SIP

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fortunato, C. S.; Huber, J. A.

    2015-12-01

    The chemolithoautotrophic microbial community of the rocky subseafloor potentially provides a large amount of organic carbon to the deep ocean, yet our understanding of the activity and metabolic complexity of subseafloor organisms remains poorly described. Past studies have shown that the taxonomic structure of subseafloor communities differs based on the geochemical signatures of individual vents. In this study, we expanded beyond phylogeny and used a combination of metagenomic, metatranscriptomic, and RNA-based stable isotope probing (RNA-SIP) analyses to identify the metabolic potential, expression patterns, and the active autotrophic players and genomic pathways present in venting fluids from Axial Seamount, an active submarine volcano off the coast of Oregon, USA. Low-temperature diffuse vent fluids from three hydrothermal vents, Marker 113, Marker 33, and Anemone, were filtered and preserved on the seafloor for metagenome and metatranscriptome analyses. Fluid for RNA-SIP was also collected and incubated shipboard with 13C-labeled sodium bicarbonate at 30ºC, 55ºC, and 80ºC for each vent. Taxonomically, Epsilonproteobacteria comprised a significant proportion of the community at all three vents, but each vent also had distinct groups that were abundant including SUP05 at Anemone and Methanococcus at Marker 113. Functionally, vents shared many metabolic processes including genes for denitrification, sulfur reduction and sulfur, hydrogen, and ammonium oxidation, which were present and expressed in similar abundance across all three vents. One metabolic difference between vents was the presence and expression of genes for methanogenesis, which were highly abundant and expressed at Marker 113, in lower abundance and expression at Marker 33, and not present at Anemone. RNA-SIP analysis is ongoing but initial results from Marker 113 revealed that at mesophilic, thermophilic, or hyperthemophilic temperatures, different genera and autotrophic metabolisms dominated

  14. Proteomic and Mutant Analysis of the CO2 Concentrating Mechanism of Hydrothermal Vent Chemolithoautotroph Thiomicrospira crunogena

    PubMed Central

    Mangiapia, Mary; Brown, Terry-René W.; Chaput, Dale; Haller, Edward; Harmer, Tara L.; Hashemy, Zahra; Keeley, Ryan; Leonard, Juliana; Mancera, Paola; Nicholson, David; Stevens, Stanley; Wanjugi, Pauline; Zabinski, Tania; Pan, Chongle

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT Many autotrophic microorganisms are likely to adapt to scarcity in dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC; CO2 + HCO3− + CO32−) with CO2 concentrating mechanisms (CCM) that actively transport DIC across the cell membrane to facilitate carbon fixation. Surprisingly, DIC transport has been well studied among cyanobacteria and microalgae only. The deep-sea vent gammaproteobacterial chemolithoautotroph Thiomicrospira crunogena has a low-DIC inducible CCM, though the mechanism for uptake is unclear, as homologs to cyanobacterial transporters are absent. To identify the components of this CCM, proteomes of T. crunogena cultivated under low- and high-DIC conditions were compared. Fourteen proteins, including those comprising carboxysomes, were at least 4-fold more abundant under low-DIC conditions. One of these proteins was encoded by Tcr_0854; strains carrying mutated copies of this gene, as well as the adjacent Tcr_0853, required elevated DIC for growth. Strains carrying mutated copies of Tcr_0853 and Tcr_0854 overexpressed carboxysomes and had diminished ability to accumulate intracellular DIC. Based on reverse transcription (RT)-PCR, Tcr_0853 and Tcr_0854 were cotranscribed and upregulated under low-DIC conditions. The Tcr_0853-encoded protein was predicted to have 13 transmembrane helices. Given the mutant phenotypes described above, Tcr_0853 and Tcr_0854 may encode a two-subunit DIC transporter that belongs to a previously undescribed transporter family, though it is widespread among autotrophs from multiple phyla. IMPORTANCE DIC uptake and fixation by autotrophs are the primary input of inorganic carbon into the biosphere. The mechanism for dissolved inorganic carbon uptake has been characterized only for cyanobacteria despite the importance of DIC uptake by autotrophic microorganisms from many phyla among the Bacteria and Archaea. In this work, proteins necessary for dissolved inorganic carbon utilization in the deep-sea vent chemolithoautotroph T. crunogena

  15. Complete genome sequence of the ammonia-oxidizing bacterium and obligate chemolithoautotroph Nitrosomonas europaea.

    PubMed

    Chain, Patrick; Lamerdin, Jane; Larimer, Frank; Regala, Warren; Lao, Victoria; Land, Miriam; Hauser, Loren; Hooper, Alan; Klotz, Martin; Norton, Jeanette; Sayavedra-Soto, Luis; Arciero, Dave; Hommes, Norman; Whittaker, Mark; Arp, Daniel

    2003-05-01

    Nitrosomonas europaea (ATCC 19718) is a gram-negative obligate chemolithoautotroph that can derive all its energy and reductant for growth from the oxidation of ammonia to nitrite. Nitrosomonas europaea participates in the biogeochemical N cycle in the process of nitrification. Its genome consists of a single circular chromosome of 2,812,094 bp. The GC skew analysis indicates that the genome is divided into two unequal replichores. Genes are distributed evenly around the genome, with approximately 47% transcribed from one strand and approximately 53% transcribed from the complementary strand. A total of 2,460 protein-encoding genes emerged from the modeling effort, averaging 1,011 bp in length, with intergenic regions averaging 117 bp. Genes necessary for the catabolism of ammonia, energy and reductant generation, biosynthesis, and CO(2) and NH(3) assimilation were identified. In contrast, genes for catabolism of organic compounds are limited. Genes encoding transporters for inorganic ions were plentiful, whereas genes encoding transporters for organic molecules were scant. Complex repetitive elements constitute ca. 5% of the genome. Among these are 85 predicted insertion sequence elements in eight different families. The strategy of N. europaea to accumulate Fe from the environment involves several classes of Fe receptors with more than 20 genes devoted to these receptors. However, genes for the synthesis of only one siderophore, citrate, were identified in the genome. This genome has provided new insights into the growth and metabolism of ammonia-oxidizing bacteria.

  16. Complete Genome Sequence of the Ammonia-Oxidizing Bacterium and Obligate Chemolithoautotroph Nitrosomonas europaea†

    PubMed Central

    Chain, Patrick; Lamerdin, Jane; Larimer, Frank; Regala, Warren; Lao, Victoria; Land, Miriam; Hauser, Loren; Hooper, Alan; Klotz, Martin; Norton, Jeanette; Sayavedra-Soto, Luis; Arciero, Dave; Hommes, Norman; Whittaker, Mark; Arp, Daniel

    2003-01-01

    Nitrosomonas europaea (ATCC 19718) is a gram-negative obligate chemolithoautotroph that can derive all its energy and reductant for growth from the oxidation of ammonia to nitrite. Nitrosomonas europaea participates in the biogeochemical N cycle in the process of nitrification. Its genome consists of a single circular chromosome of 2,812,094 bp. The GC skew analysis indicates that the genome is divided into two unequal replichores. Genes are distributed evenly around the genome, with ∼47% transcribed from one strand and ∼53% transcribed from the complementary strand. A total of 2,460 protein-encoding genes emerged from the modeling effort, averaging 1,011 bp in length, with intergenic regions averaging 117 bp. Genes necessary for the catabolism of ammonia, energy and reductant generation, biosynthesis, and CO2 and NH3 assimilation were identified. In contrast, genes for catabolism of organic compounds are limited. Genes encoding transporters for inorganic ions were plentiful, whereas genes encoding transporters for organic molecules were scant. Complex repetitive elements constitute ca. 5% of the genome. Among these are 85 predicted insertion sequence elements in eight different families. The strategy of N. europaea to accumulate Fe from the environment involves several classes of Fe receptors with more than 20 genes devoted to these receptors. However, genes for the synthesis of only one siderophore, citrate, were identified in the genome. This genome has provided new insights into the growth and metabolism of ammonia-oxidizing bacteria. PMID:12700255

  17. Complete genome sequence of the hyperthermophilic chemolithoautotroph Pyrolobus fumarii type strain (1AT)

    PubMed Central

    Anderson, Iain; Göker, Markus; Nolan, Matt; Lucas, Susan; Hammon, Nancy; Deshpande, Shweta; Cheng, Jan-Fang; Tapia, Roxanne; Han, Cliff; Goodwin, Lynne; Pitluck, Sam; Huntemann, Marcel; Liolios, Konstantinos; Ivanova, Natalia; Pagani, Ioanna; Mavromatis, Konstantinos; Ovchinikova, Galina; Pati, Amrita; Chen, Amy; Palaniappan, Krishna; Land, Miriam; Hauser, Loren; Brambilla, Evelyne-Marie; Huber, Harald; Yasawong, Montri; Rohde, Manfred; Spring, Stefan; Abt, Birte; Sikorski, Johannes; Wirth, Reinhard; Detter, John C.; Woyke, Tanja; Bristow, James; Eisen, Jonathan A.; Markowitz, Victor; Hugenholtz, Philip; Kyrpides, Nikos C.; Klenk, Hans-Peter; Lapidus, Alla

    2011-01-01

    Pyrolobus fumarii Blöchl et al. 1997 is the type species of the genus Pyrolobus, which belongs to the crenarchaeal family Pyrodictiaceae. The species is a facultatively microaerophilic non-motile crenarchaeon. It is of interest because of its isolated phylogenetic location in the tree of life and because it is a hyperthermophilic chemolithoautotroph known as the primary producer of organic matter at deep-sea hydrothermal vents. P. fumarii exhibits currently the highest optimal growth temperature of all life forms on earth (106°C). This is the first completed genome sequence of a member of the genus Pyrolobus to be published and only the second genome sequence from a member of the family Pyrodictiaceae. Although Diversa Corporation announced the completion of sequencing of the P. fumarii genome on September 25, 2001, this sequence was never released to the public. The 1,843,267 bp long genome with its 1,986 protein-coding and 52 RNA genes is a part of the Genomic Encyclopedia of Bacteria and Archaea project. PMID:21886865

  18. The Complete Genome Sequence of the Marine, Chemolithoautotrophic, Ammonia-Oxidizing Bacterium Nitrosococcus oceani ATCC19707

    SciTech Connect

    Klotz, M G; Arp, D J; Chain, P S; El-Sheikh, A F; Hauser, L J; Hommes, N G; Larimer, F W; Malfatti, S A; Norton, J M; Poret-Peterson, A T; Vergez, L M; Ward, B B

    2006-08-03

    The Gammaproteobacterium, Nitrosococcus oceani (ATCC 19707), is a Gram-negative obligate chemolithoautotroph capable of extracting energy and reducing power from the oxidation of ammonia to nitrite. Sequencing and annotation of the genome revealed a single circular chromosome (3,481,691 bp; 50.4% G+C) and a plasmid (40,420 bp) that contain 3052 and 41 candidate protein-encoding genes, respectively. The genes encoding proteins necessary for the function of known modes of lithotrophy and autotrophy were identified. In contrast to betaproteobacterial nitrifier genomes, the N. oceani genome contained two complete rrn operons. In contrast, only one copy of the genes needed to synthesize functional ammonia monooxygenase and hydroxylamine oxidoreductase, as well as the proteins that relay the extracted electrons to a terminal electron acceptor were identified. The N. oceani genome contained genes for 13 complete two-component systems. The genome also contained all the genes needed to reconstruct complete central pathways, the tricarboxylic acid cycle and the Embden-Meyerhof-Parnass and pentose phosphate pathways. The N. oceani genome contains the genes required to store and utilize energy from glycogen inclusion bodies and sucrose. Polyphosphate and pyrophosphate appear to be integrated in this bacterium's energy metabolism, stress tolerance and the ability to assimilate carbon via gluconeogenesis. One set of genes for type I RuBisCO was identified, while genes necessary for methanotrophy and for carboxysome formation were not identified. The N. oceani genome contains two copies each of the genes or operons necessary to assemble functional complexes I and IV as well as ATP synthase (one H{sup +}-dependent F{sub 0}F{sub 1}-type, one Na{sup +}-dependent V-type).

  19. Complete Genome Sequence of the Marine, Chemolithoautotrophic, Ammonia-Oxidizing Bacterium Nitrosococcus oceani ATCC 19707

    SciTech Connect

    Klots, Martin G.; Arp, D J; Chain, Patrick S; El-Sheikh, Amal F.; Hauser, Loren John; Hommes, Norman G.; Larimer, Frank W; Malfatti, Stephanie; Norton, Jeanette M.; Poret-Peterson, Amisha T.; Vergez, Lisa; Ward, Bess B.

    2006-01-01

    The gammaproteobacterium Nitrosococcus oceani (ATCC 19707) is a gram-negative obligate chemolithoautotroph capable of extracting energy and reducing power from the oxidation of ammonia to nitrite. Sequencing and annotation of the genome revealed a single circular chromosome (3,481,691 bp; G+C content of 50.4%) and a plasmid (40,420 bp) that contain 3,052 and 41 candidate protein-encoding genes, respectively. The genes encoding proteins necessary for the function of known modes of lithotrophy and autotrophy were identified. Contrary to betaproteobacterial nitrifier genomes, the N. oceani genome contained two complete rrn operons. In contrast, only one copy of the genes needed to synthesize functional ammonia monooxygenase and hydroxylamine oxidoreductase, as well as the proteins that relay the extracted electrons to a terminal electron acceptor, were identified. The N. oceani genome contained genes for 13 complete two-component systems. The genome also contained all the genes needed to reconstruct complete central pathways, the tricarboxylic acid cycle, and the Embden-Meyerhof-Parnass and pentose phosphate pathways. The N. oceani genome contains the genes required to store and utilize energy from glycogen inclusion bodies and sucrose. Polyphosphate and pyrophosphate appear to be integrated in this bacterium's energy metabolism, stress tolerance, and ability to assimilate carbon via gluconeogenesis. One set of genes for type I ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase was identified, while genes necessary for methanotrophy and for carboxysome formation were not identified. The N. oceani genome contains two copies each of the genes or operons necessary to assemble functional complexes I and IV as well as ATP synthase (one H+-dependent F0F1 type, one Na+-dependent V type).

  20. Genome sequence of the chemolithoautotrophic nitrite-oxidizing bacterium Nitrobacter winogradskyi Nb-255

    SciTech Connect

    Hauser, Loren John; Land, Miriam L; Larimer, Frank W; Arp, D J; Hickey, W J

    2006-03-01

    The alphaproteobacterium Nitrobacter winogradskyi (ATCC 25391) is a gram-negative facultative chemolithoautotroph capable of extracting energy from the oxidation of nitrite to nitrate. Sequencing and analysis of its genome revealed a single circular chromosome of 3,402,093 bp encoding 3,143 predicted proteins. There were extensive similarities to genes in two alphaproteobacteria, Bradyrhizobium japonicum USDA110 (1,300 genes) and Rhodopseudomonas palustris CGA009 CG (815 genes). Genes encoding pathways for known modes of chemolithotrophic and chemoorganotrophic growth were identified. Genes encoding multiple enzymes involved in anapleurotic reactions centered on C2 to C4 metabolism, including a glyoxylate bypass, were annotated. The inability of N. winogradskyi to grow on C6 molecules is consistent with the genome sequence, which lacks genes for complete Embden-Meyerhof and Entner-Doudoroff pathways, and active uptake of sugars. Two gene copies of the nitrite oxidoreductase, type I ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase, cytochrome c oxidase, and gene homologs encoding an aerobic-type carbon monoxide dehydrogenase were present. Similarity of nitrite oxidoreductases to respiratory nitrate reductases was confirmed. Approximately 10% of the N. winogradskyi genome codes for genes involved in transport and secretion, including the presence of transporters for various organic-nitrogen molecules. The N. winogradskyi genome provides new insight into the phylogenetic identity and physiological capabilities of nitrite-oxidizing bacteria. The genome will serve as a model to study the cellular and molecular processes that control nitrite oxidation and its interaction with other nitrogen-cycling processes.

  1. Streptomyces thermoautotrophicus sp. nov., a Thermophilic CO- and H2-Oxidizing Obligate Chemolithoautotroph

    PubMed Central

    Gadkari, Dilip; Schricker, Karl; Acker, Georg; Kroppenstedt, Reiner M.; Meyer, Ortwin

    1990-01-01

    The novel thermophilic CO- and H2-oxidizing bacterium UBT1 has been isolated from the covering soil of a burning charcoal pile. The isolate is gram positive and obligately chemolithoautotrophic and has been named Streptomyces thermoautotrophicus on the basis of G+C content (70.6 ± 0.19 mol%), a phospholipid pattern of type II, MK-9(H4) as the major quinone, and other chemotaxonomic and morphological properties. S. thermoautotrophicus could grow with CO (td = 8 h), H2 plus CO2 (td = 6 h), car exhaust, or gas produced by the incomplete combustion of wood. Complex media or heterotrophic substrates such as sugars, organic acids, amino acids, and alcohols did not support growth. Molybdenum was required for CO-autotrophic growth. For growth with H2, nickel was not necessary. The optimum growth temperature was 65°C; no growth was observed below 40°C. However, CO-grown cells were able to oxidize CO at temperatures of 10 to 70°C. Temperature profiles of burning charcoal piles revealed that, up to a depth of about 10 to 25 cm, the entire covering soil provides a suitable habitat for S. thermoautotrophicus. The Km was 88 μl of CO liter−1 and Vmax was 20.2 μl of CO h−1 mg of protein−1. The threshold value of S. thermoautotrophicus of 0.2 μl of CO liter−1 was similar to those of various soils. The specific CO-oxidizing activity in extracts with phenazinemethosulfate plus 2,6-dichlorophenolindophenol as electron acceptors was 246 μmol min−1 mg of protein−1. In exception to other carboxydotrophic bacteria, S. thermoautotrophicus CO dehydrogenase was able to reduce low potential electron acceptors such as methyl and benzyl viologens. Images PMID:16348374

  2. Permanent draft genome of Thiobacillus thioparus DSM 505(T), an obligately chemolithoautotrophic member of the Betaproteobacteria.

    PubMed

    Hutt, Lee P; Huntemann, Marcel; Clum, Alicia; Pillay, Manoj; Palaniappan, Krishnaveni; Varghese, Neha; Mikhailova, Natalia; Stamatis, Dimitrios; Reddy, Tatiparthi; Daum, Chris; Shapiro, Nicole; Ivanova, Natalia; Kyrpides, Nikos; Woyke, Tanja; Boden, Rich

    2017-01-01

    Thiobacillus thioparus DSM 505(T) is one of first two isolated strains of inorganic sulfur-oxidising Bacteria. The original strain of T. thioparus was lost almost 100 years ago and the working type strain is Culture C(T) (=DSM 505(T) = ATCC 8158(T)) isolated by Starkey in 1934 from agricultural soil at Rutgers University, New Jersey, USA. It is an obligate chemolithoautotroph that conserves energy from the oxidation of reduced inorganic sulfur compounds using the Kelly-Trudinger pathway and uses it to fix carbon dioxide It is not capable of heterotrophic or mixotrophic growth. The strain has a genome size of 3,201,518 bp. Here we report the genome sequence, annotation and characteristics. The genome contains 3,135 protein coding and 62 RNA coding genes. Genes encoding the transaldolase variant of the Calvin-Benson-Bassham cycle were also identified and an operon encoding carboxysomes, along with Smith's biosynthetic horseshoe in lieu of Krebs' cycle sensu stricto. Terminal oxidases were identified, viz. cytochrome c oxidase (cbb3, EC 1.9.3.1) and ubiquinol oxidase (bd, EC 1.10.3.10). There is a partial sox operon of the Kelly-Friedrich pathway of inorganic sulfur-oxidation that contains soxXYZAB genes but lacking soxCDEF, there is also a lack of the DUF302 gene previously noted in the sox operon of other members of the 'Proteobacteria' that can use trithionate as an energy source. In spite of apparently not growing anaerobically with denitrification, the nar, nir, nor and nos operons encoding enzymes of denitrification are found in the T. thioparus genome, in the same arrangements as in the true denitrifier T. denitrificans.

  3. Complete Genome Sequence of the Marine, Chemolithoautotrophic, Ammonia-Oxidizing Bacterium Nitrosococcus oceani ATCC 19707†

    PubMed Central

    Klotz, Martin G.; Arp, Daniel J.; Chain, Patrick S. G.; El-Sheikh, Amal F.; Hauser, Loren J.; Hommes, Norman G.; Larimer, Frank W.; Malfatti, Stephanie A.; Norton, Jeanette M.; Poret-Peterson, Amisha T.; Vergez, Lisa M.; Ward, Bess B.

    2006-01-01

    The gammaproteobacterium Nitrosococcus oceani (ATCC 19707) is a gram-negative obligate chemolithoautotroph capable of extracting energy and reducing power from the oxidation of ammonia to nitrite. Sequencing and annotation of the genome revealed a single circular chromosome (3,481,691 bp; G+C content of 50.4%) and a plasmid (40,420 bp) that contain 3,052 and 41 candidate protein-encoding genes, respectively. The genes encoding proteins necessary for the function of known modes of lithotrophy and autotrophy were identified. Contrary to betaproteobacterial nitrifier genomes, the N. oceani genome contained two complete rrn operons. In contrast, only one copy of the genes needed to synthesize functional ammonia monooxygenase and hydroxylamine oxidoreductase, as well as the proteins that relay the extracted electrons to a terminal electron acceptor, were identified. The N. oceani genome contained genes for 13 complete two-component systems. The genome also contained all the genes needed to reconstruct complete central pathways, the tricarboxylic acid cycle, and the Embden-Meyerhof-Parnass and pentose phosphate pathways. The N. oceani genome contains the genes required to store and utilize energy from glycogen inclusion bodies and sucrose. Polyphosphate and pyrophosphate appear to be integrated in this bacterium's energy metabolism, stress tolerance, and ability to assimilate carbon via gluconeogenesis. One set of genes for type I ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase was identified, while genes necessary for methanotrophy and for carboxysome formation were not identified. The N. oceani genome contains two copies each of the genes or operons necessary to assemble functional complexes I and IV as well as ATP synthase (one H+-dependent F0F1 type, one Na+-dependent V type). PMID:16957257

  4. Permanent draft genome of Thiobacillus thioparus DSM 505T, an obligately chemolithoautotrophic member of the Betaproteobacteria

    DOE PAGES

    Hutt, Lee P.; Huntemann, Marcel; Clum, Alicia; ...

    2017-01-19

    Thiobacillus thioparus DSM 505 T is one of first two isolated strains of inorganic sulfur-oxidising Bacteria. The original strain of T. thioparus was lost almost 100 years ago and the working type strain is Culture C T (=DSM 505 T = ATCC 8158 T ) isolated by Starkey in 1934 from agricultural soil at Rutgers University, New Jersey, USA. It is an obligate chemolithoautotroph that conserves energy from the oxidation of reduced inorganic sulfur compounds using the Kelly-Trudinger pathway and uses it to fix carbon dioxide It is not capable of heterotrophic or mixotrophic growth. The strain has a genomemore » size of 3,201,518 bp. Here we report the genome sequence, annotation and characteristics. The genome contains 3,135 protein coding and 62 RNA coding genes. Genes encoding the transaldolase variant of the Calvin-Benson-Bassham cycle were also identified and an operon encoding carboxysomes, along with Smith's biosynthetic horseshoe in lieu of Krebs' cycle sensu stricto. Terminal oxidases were identified, viz. cytochrome c oxidase (cbb3, EC 1.9.3.1) and ubiquinol oxidase (bd, EC 1.10.3.10). There is a partial sox operon of the Kelly-Friedrich pathway of inorganic sulfur-oxidation that contains soxXYZAB genes but lacking soxCDEF, there is also a lack of the DUF302 gene previously noted in the sox operon of other members of the 'Proteobacteria' that can use trithionate as an energy source. In spite of apparently not growing anaerobically with denitrification, the nar, nir, nor and nos operons encoding enzymes of denitrification are found in the T. thioparus genome, in the same arrangements as in the true denitrifier T. denitrificans.« less

  5. The genome sequence of the obligately chemolithoautotrophic, facultatively anaerobic bacterium Thiobacillus denitfificans.

    SciTech Connect

    Beller, H R; Larimer, Frank W

    2006-02-01

    The complete genome sequence of Thiobacillus denitrificans ATCC 25259 is the first to become available for an obligately chemolithoautotrophic, sulfur-compound-oxidizing, {beta}-proteobacterium. Analysis of the 2,909,809-bp genome will facilitate our molecular and biochemical understanding of the unusual metabolic repertoire of this bacterium, including its ability to couple denitrification to sulfur-compound oxidation, to catalyze anaerobic, nitrate-dependent oxidation of Fe(II) and U(IV), and to oxidize mineral electron donors. Notable genomic features include (i) genes encoding c-type cytochromes totaling 1 to 2 percent of the genome, which is a proportion greater than for almost all bacterial and archaeal species sequenced to date, (ii) genes encoding two [NiFe]hydrogenases, which is particularly significant because no information on hydrogenases has previously been reported for T. denitrificans and hydrogen oxidation appears to be critical for anaerobic U(IV) oxidation by this species, (iii) a diverse complement of more than 50 genes associated with sulfur-compound oxidation (including sox genes, dsr genes, and genes associated with the AMP-dependent oxidation of sulfite to sulfate), some of which occur in multiple (up to eight) copies, (iv) a relatively large number of genes associated with inorganic ion transport and heavy metal resistance, and (v) a paucity of genes encoding organic-compound transporters, commensurate with obligate chemolithoautotrophy. Ultimately, the genome sequence of T. denitrificans will enable elucidation of the mechanisms of aerobic and anaerobic sulfur-compound oxidation by {beta}-proteobacteria and will help reveal the molecular basis of this organism's role in major biogeochemical cycles (i.e., those involving sulfur, nitrogen, and carbon) and groundwater restoration.

  6. Genome Sequence of the Chemolithoautotrophic Nitrite-Oxidizing Bacterium Nitrobacter winogradskyi Nb-255

    PubMed Central

    Starkenburg, Shawn R.; Chain, Patrick S. G.; Sayavedra-Soto, Luis A.; Hauser, Loren; Land, Miriam L.; Larimer, Frank W.; Malfatti, Stephanie A.; Klotz, Martin G.; Bottomley, Peter J.; Arp, Daniel J.; Hickey, William J.

    2006-01-01

    The alphaproteobacterium Nitrobacter winogradskyi (ATCC 25391) is a gram-negative facultative chemolithoautotroph capable of extracting energy from the oxidation of nitrite to nitrate. Sequencing and analysis of its genome revealed a single circular chromosome of 3,402,093 bp encoding 3,143 predicted proteins. There were extensive similarities to genes in two alphaproteobacteria, Bradyrhizobium japonicum USDA110 (1,300 genes) and Rhodopseudomonas palustris CGA009 CG (815 genes). Genes encoding pathways for known modes of chemolithotrophic and chemoorganotrophic growth were identified. Genes encoding multiple enzymes involved in anapleurotic reactions centered on C2 to C4 metabolism, including a glyoxylate bypass, were annotated. The inability of N. winogradskyi to grow on C6 molecules is consistent with the genome sequence, which lacks genes for complete Embden-Meyerhof and Entner-Doudoroff pathways, and active uptake of sugars. Two gene copies of the nitrite oxidoreductase, type I ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase, cytochrome c oxidase, and gene homologs encoding an aerobic-type carbon monoxide dehydrogenase were present. Similarity of nitrite oxidoreductases to respiratory nitrate reductases was confirmed. Approximately 10% of the N. winogradskyi genome codes for genes involved in transport and secretion, including the presence of transporters for various organic-nitrogen molecules. The N. winogradskyi genome provides new insight into the phylogenetic identity and physiological capabilities of nitrite-oxidizing bacteria. The genome will serve as a model to study the cellular and molecular processes that control nitrite oxidation and its interaction with other nitrogen-cycling processes. PMID:16517654

  7. Erratum to: Permanent draft genome of Thermithiobacillus tepidarius DSM 3134T, a moderately thermophilic, obligately chemolithoautotrophic member of the Acidithiobacillia

    SciTech Connect

    Boden, Rich; Hutt, Lee P.; Huntemann, Marcel; Clum, Alicia; Pillay, Manoj; Palaniappan, Krishnaveni; Varghese, Neha; Mikhailova, Natalia; Stamatis, Dimitrios; Reddy, Tatiparthi; Ngan, Chew Yee; Daum, Chris; Shapiro, Nicole; Markowitz, Victor; Ivanova, Natalia; Woyke, Tanja; Kyrpides, Nikos

    2016-10-11

    The errors and associated corrections described in this document concerning the original manuscript were accountable to the production department handling this manuscript, and thus are no fault of the authors of this paper. Additionally, the online manuscript has now been updated with these corrections accordingly. In the original publication of this article, the title was displayed incorrectly as "Permanent draft genome of Thermithiobaclillus tepidarius DSM 3134T, a moderately thermophilic, obligately chemolithoautotrophic member of the Acidithiobacillia". The genus name "Thermithiobacillus" was misspelt as "Thermithiobaclillus". This has now been corrected in the original article.

  8. Isolation and characterization of an obligately chemolithoautotrophic Halothiobacillus strain capable of growth on thiocyanate as an energy source.

    PubMed

    Sorokin, Dimitry Y; Abbas, Ben; van Zessen, Erik; Muyzer, Gerard

    2014-05-01

    Molecular and microbiological analysis of a laboratory bioreactor biomass oxidizing thiocyanate at autotrophic conditions and at 1 M NaCl showed a domination of a single chemolithoautotrophic sulfur-oxidizing bacterium (SOB) capable of using thiocyanate as an energy source. The bacterium was isolated in pure cultures and identified as a member of the Halothiobacillus halophilus/hydrothermalis clade. This clade includes moderately halophilic chemolithoautotrophic SOB from marine and hypersaline habitats for which the ability to utilize thiocyanate as an electron donor has not been previously demonstrated. Halothiobacillus sp. strain SCN-R1 grew with thiocyanate as the sole energy and nitrogen source oxidizing it to sulfate and ammonium via the cyanate pathway. The pH range for thiocyanate oxidation was within a neutral region between 7 and 8 and the range of salinity was from 0.2 to 1.5 M NaCl, with an optimum at 0.5 M. Despite the close phylogenetic relatedness, none of the tested type strains and other isolates from the H. halophilus/hydrothermalis group exhibited thiocyanate-oxidizing capacity. © 2014 Federation of European Microbiological Societies. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Coupled RNA-SIP and metatranscriptomics of active chemolithoautotrophic communities at a deep-sea hydrothermal vent

    PubMed Central

    Fortunato, Caroline S; Huber, Julie A

    2016-01-01

    The chemolithoautotrophic microbial community of the rocky subseafloor potentially provides a large amount of organic carbon to the deep ocean, yet our understanding of the activity and metabolic complexity of subseafloor organisms remains poorly described. A combination of metagenomic, metatranscriptomic, and RNA stable isotope probing (RNA-SIP) analyses were used to identify the metabolic potential, expression patterns, and active autotrophic bacteria and archaea and their pathways present in low-temperature hydrothermal fluids from Axial Seamount, an active submarine volcano. Metagenomic and metatranscriptomic results showed the presence of genes and transcripts for sulfur, hydrogen, and ammonium oxidation, oxygen respiration, denitrification, and methanogenesis, as well as multiple carbon fixation pathways. In RNA-SIP experiments across a range of temperatures under reducing conditions, the enriched 13C fractions showed differences in taxonomic and functional diversity. At 30 °C and 55 °C, Epsilonproteobacteria were dominant, oxidizing hydrogen and primarily reducing nitrate. Methanogenic archaea were also present at 55 °C, and were the only autotrophs present at 80 °C. Correspondingly, the predominant CO2 fixation pathways changed from the reductive tricarboxylic acid (rTCA) cycle to the reductive acetyl-CoA pathway with increasing temperature. By coupling RNA-SIP with meta-omics, this study demonstrates the presence and activity of distinct chemolithoautotrophic communities across a thermal gradient of a deep-sea hydrothermal vent. PMID:26872039

  10. Coupled RNA-SIP and metatranscriptomics of active chemolithoautotrophic communities at a deep-sea hydrothermal vent.

    PubMed

    Fortunato, Caroline S; Huber, Julie A

    2016-08-01

    The chemolithoautotrophic microbial community of the rocky subseafloor potentially provides a large amount of organic carbon to the deep ocean, yet our understanding of the activity and metabolic complexity of subseafloor organisms remains poorly described. A combination of metagenomic, metatranscriptomic, and RNA stable isotope probing (RNA-SIP) analyses were used to identify the metabolic potential, expression patterns, and active autotrophic bacteria and archaea and their pathways present in low-temperature hydrothermal fluids from Axial Seamount, an active submarine volcano. Metagenomic and metatranscriptomic results showed the presence of genes and transcripts for sulfur, hydrogen, and ammonium oxidation, oxygen respiration, denitrification, and methanogenesis, as well as multiple carbon fixation pathways. In RNA-SIP experiments across a range of temperatures under reducing conditions, the enriched (13)C fractions showed differences in taxonomic and functional diversity. At 30 °C and 55 °C, Epsilonproteobacteria were dominant, oxidizing hydrogen and primarily reducing nitrate. Methanogenic archaea were also present at 55 °C, and were the only autotrophs present at 80 °C. Correspondingly, the predominant CO2 fixation pathways changed from the reductive tricarboxylic acid (rTCA) cycle to the reductive acetyl-CoA pathway with increasing temperature. By coupling RNA-SIP with meta-omics, this study demonstrates the presence and activity of distinct chemolithoautotrophic communities across a thermal gradient of a deep-sea hydrothermal vent.

  11. Whole-Genome Transcriptional Analysis of Chemolithoautotrophic Thiosulfate Oxidation by Thiobacillus denitrificans Under Aerobic vs. Denitrifying Conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Beller, H R; Letain, T E; Chakicherla, A; Kane, S R; Legler, T C; Coleman, M A

    2006-04-22

    Thiobacillus denitrificans is one of the few known obligate chemolithoautotrophic bacteria capable of energetically coupling thiosulfate oxidation to denitrification as well as aerobic respiration. As very little is known about the differential expression of genes associated with ke chemolithoautotrophic functions (such as sulfur-compound oxidation and CO2 fixation) under aerobic versus denitrifying conditions, we conducted whole-genome, cDNA microarray studies to explore this topic systematically. The microarrays identified 277 genes (approximately ten percent of the genome) as differentially expressed using Robust Multi-array Average statistical analysis and a 2-fold cutoff. Genes upregulated (ca. 6- to 150-fold) under aerobic conditions included a cluster of genes associated with iron acquisition (e.g., siderophore-related genes), a cluster of cytochrome cbb3 oxidase genes, cbbL and cbbS (encoding the large and small subunits of form I ribulose 1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase, or RubisCO), and multiple molecular chaperone genes. Genes upregulated (ca. 4- to 95-fold) under denitrifying conditions included nar, nir, and nor genes (associated respectively with nitrate reductase, nitrite reductase, and nitric oxide reductase, which catalyze successive steps of denitrification), cbbM (encoding form II RubisCO), and genes involved with sulfur-compound oxidation (including two physically separated but highly similar copies of sulfide:quinone oxidoreductase and of dsrC, associated with dissimilatory sulfite reductase). Among genes associated with denitrification, relative expression levels (i.e., degree of upregulation with nitrate) tended to decrease in the order nar > nir > nor > nos. Reverse transcription, quantitative PCR analysis was used to validate these trends.

  12. The Importance of CO2 Utilizing Chemolithoautotrophic Microorganisms for Carbon Sequestration and Isotope Signatures of SOM in Tropical Rainforest Soils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nowak, M. E.; Behrendt, T.; Quesada, B.; Yanez Serrano, A. M.; Trumbore, S.

    2015-12-01

    Soil organic matter (SOM) is a major compartment of the tropical carbon cycle with up to 26 % of global carbon stocks stored in tropical soils. Understanding factors and processes driving SOM dynamics under changing climate conditions is crucial for predicting the role of tropical forest ecosystems to act as a carbon sink or source. Soil microorganisms are major drivers of the belowground carbon cycle by releasing CO2 by soil respiration but also by stabilizing and storing SOM, as indicated by recent research. Our investigations focus on chemolithoautotrophic microorganisms, a group that relies on CO2 as their carbon source. Chemolithoautotrophic microorganisms have been shown to be highly abundant in soils, whereas their role in SOM sequestration is still poorly understood. In tropical soils, the activity of chemolithoautotropic microbes might be important for generating and stabilizing carbon, especially in the deeper soil, which is rich in CO2 and reduced energy sources like Fe2+. They further might impact carbon isotope signatures (13C and 14C) of SOM, because of enzymatic fractionation during carboxylation and the use of carbon, which has a distinct isotopic composition than other carbon sources at the same depth. In order to study the activity of chemolithoautotropic microbes and their importance for SOM, we conducted isotope and isotope-labelling studies, gas measurements as well as molecular analyses at soils from the Atto site from 0 to 1 meter depth. These soils are classified as Ferralsols and Alisols and represent the most abundant soil types in the Amazon. With this we will be able to gain knowledge about the function and identity of an important group of microorganisms and their contribution to crucial biogeochemical cycles in the world`s most important ecosystem.

  13. 13C-isotope analyses reveal that chemolithoautotrophic Gamma- and Epsilonproteobacteria feed a microbial food web in a pelagic redoxcline of the central Baltic Sea.

    PubMed

    Glaubitz, Sabine; Lueders, Tillmann; Abraham, Wolf-Rainer; Jost, Günter; Jürgens, Klaus; Labrenz, Matthias

    2009-02-01

    Marine pelagic redoxclines are zones of high dark CO(2) fixation rates, which can correspond up to 30% of the surface primary production. However, despite this significant contribution to the pelagic carbon cycle, the identity of most chemolithoautotrophic organisms is still unknown. Therefore, the aim of this study was to directly link the dark CO(2) fixation capacity of a pelagic redoxcline in the central Baltic Sea (Landsort Deep) with the identity of the main chemolithoautotrophs involved. Our approach was based on the analysis of natural carbon isotope signatures in fatty acid methyl esters (FAMEs) and on measurements of CO(2) incorporation in (13)C-bicarbonate pulse experiments. The incorporation of (13)C into chemolithoautotrophic cells was investigated by rRNA-based stable isotope probing (RNA-SIP) and FAME analysis after incubation for 24 and 72 h under in situ conditions. Our results demonstrated that fatty acids indicative of Proteobacteria were significantly enriched in (13)C slightly below the chemocline. RNA-SIP analyses revealed that two different Gammaproteobacteria and three closely related Epsilonproteobacteria of the Sulfurimonas cluster were active dark CO(2)-fixing microorganisms, with a time-dependent community shift between these groups. Labelling of Archaea was not detectable, but after 72 h of incubation the (13)C-label had been transferred to a potentially bacterivorous ciliate related to Euplotes sp. Thus, RNA-SIP provided direct evidence for the contribution of chemolithoautotrophic production to the microbial food web in this marine pelagic redoxcline, emphasizing the importance of dark CO(2)-fixing Proteobacteria within this habitat.

  14. Chemolithoautotrophic production mediating the cycling of the greenhouses gases N2O and CH4 in an upwelling ecosystem

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farías, L.; Fernández, C.; Faúndez, J.; Cornejo, M.; Alcaman, M. E.

    2009-06-01

    Coastal upwelling ecosystems with marked oxyclines (redoxclines) present high availability of electron donors that favour chemoautotrophy, leading in turn to high N2O and CH4 cycling associated with aerobic NH4+ (AAO) and CH4 oxidation (AMO). This is the case of the highly productive coastal upwelling area off Central Chile (36° S), where we evaluated the importance of total chemolithoautotrophic vs. photoautotrophic production, the specific contributions of AAO and AMO to chemosynthesis and their role in gas cycling. Chemoautotrophy (involving bacteria and archaea) was studied at a time-series station during monthly (2002-2009) and seasonal cruises (January 2008, September 2008, January 2009) and was assessed in terms of dark carbon assimilation (CA), N2O and CH4 cycling, and the natural C isotopic ratio of particulate organic carbon (δ13POC). Total Integrated dark CA fluctuated between 19.4 and 2.924 mg C m-2 d-1. It was higher during active upwelling and represented on average 27% of the integrated photoautotrophic production (from 135 to 7.626 mg C m-2d-1). At the oxycline, δ13POC averaged -22.209‰ this was significantly lighter compared to the surface (-19.674‰) and bottom layers (-20.716‰). This pattern, along with low NH4+ content and high accumulations of N2O, NO2- and NO3- within the oxycline indicates that chemolithoautotrophs and specifically AA oxydisers were active. Dark CA was reduced from 27 to 48% after addition of a specific AAO inhibitor (ATU) and from 24 to 76% with GC7, a specific archaea inhibitor, indicating that AAO and maybe AMO microbes (most of them archaea) were performing dark CA through oxidation of NH4+ and CH4. AAO produced N2O at rates from 8.88 to 43 nM d-1 and a fraction of it was effluxed into the atmosphere (up to 42.85 μmol m-2 d-1). AMO on the other hand consumed CH4 at rates between 0.41 and 26.8 nM d-1 therefore preventing its efflux to the atmosphere (up to 18.69 μmol m-2 d-1). These findings show that chemically

  15. Peculiar citric acid cycle of hydrothermal vent chemolithoautotroph Hydrogenovibrio crunogenus, and insights into carbon metabolism by obligate autotrophs.

    PubMed

    Quasem, Ishtiaque; Achille, Alexandra N; Caddick, Brittany A; Carter, Travis A; Daniels, Camille; Delaney, Jennifer A; Delic, Vedad; Denton, Kimberly A; Duran, Martina C; Fatica, Marianne K; Ference, Christopher M; Galkiewicz, Julie P; Garcia, Ana M; Hendrick, Jacqueline D; Horton, Steven A; Kun, Mey S; Koch, Phoebe W; Lee, Tien Min; McCabe, Christie R; McHale, Sean; McDaniel, Lauren D; Menning, Damian M; Menning, Kristy J; Mirzaei-Souderjani, Hamed; Mostajabian, Salina; Nicholson, David A; Nugent, Courtney K; Osman, Nicholas P; Pappas, Desiree I; Rocha, Andrea M; Rosario, Karyna; Rubelmann, Haydn; Schwartz, Julie A; Seeley, Kent W; Staley, Christopher M; Wallace, Elizabeth M; Wong, Terianne M; Zielinski, Brian L; Hanson, Thomas E; Scott, Kathleen M

    2017-08-01

    The genome sequence of the obligate chemolithoautotroph Hydrogenovibrio crunogenus paradoxically predicts a complete oxidative citric acid cycle (CAC). This prediction was tested by multiple approaches including whole cell carbon assimilation to verify obligate autotrophy, phylogenetic analysis of CAC enzyme sequences and enzyme assays. Hydrogenovibrio crunogenus did not assimilate any of the organic compounds provided (acetate, succinate, glucose, yeast extract, tryptone). Enzyme activities confirmed that its CAC is mostly uncoupled from the NADH pool. 2-Oxoglutarate:ferredoxin oxidoreductase activity is absent, though pyruvate:ferredoxin oxidoreductase is present, indicating that sequence-based predictions of substrate for this oxidoreductase were incorrect, and that H. crunogenus may have an incomplete CAC. Though the H. crunogenus CAC genes encode uncommon enzymes, the taxonomic distribution of their top matches suggests that they were not horizontally acquired. Comparison of H. crunogenus CAC genes to those present in other 'Proteobacteria' reveals that H. crunogenus and other obligate autotrophs lack the functional redundancy for the steps of the CAC typical for facultative autotrophs and heterotrophs, providing another possible mechanism for obligate autotrophy. © FEMS 2017. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  16. Paracoccus bengalensis sp. nov., a novel sulfur-oxidizing chemolithoautotroph from the rhizospheric soil of an Indian tropical leguminous plant.

    PubMed

    Ghosh, Wriddhiman; Mandal, Sukhendu; Roy, Pradosh

    2006-07-01

    Paracoccus versutus-like isolates from the rhizosphere of Clitoria ternatea, a slender leguminous herb (family--Papilionaceae), found ubiquitously in waste places and village forests of the Lower Gangetic plains of India, presented a case of graduated infraspecific variation that was capped by the identification of a new species Paracoccus bengalensis (type strain JJJ(T) = LMG 22700(T) = MTCC 7003(T)). The diverged phenetic and genetic structure of these sulfur-oxidizing chemolithoautotrophs presented a case of apparent nonconformity of 16S rRNA gene sequence similarities with results of DNA-DNA hybridization. Despite high 16S rRNA gene sequence similarity with P. versutus one of the newly isolated strains, viz., JJJ(T) was identified as a new species of Paracoccus by virtue of its explicitly low DNA-DNA hybridization (42-45%) with the type strain of the closest species P. versutus (), distinct G + C content (65.3 mol%), physiological and biochemical differences amounting to <60% phenetic similarity with strains of P. versutus as well as new isolates akin to the species. The newly described species also had a unique fatty acid profile that was distinguished by the absence of 18:1 omega9c, unique possession of Summed feature 3 (16:1omega7c & 15:0 iso 2-OH), 19:0 10 methyl, and a much higher concentration of 19:0 cycloomega8c.

  17. Mesorhizobium thiogangeticum sp. nov., a novel sulfur-oxidizing chemolithoautotroph from rhizosphere soil of an Indian tropical leguminous plant.

    PubMed

    Ghosh, Wriddhiman; Roy, Pradosh

    2006-01-01

    The bacterial strain SJT(T), along with 15 other mesophilic, neutrophilic and facultatively sulfur-oxidizing chemolithotrophic isolates, was isolated by enrichment on reduced sulfur compounds as the sole energy and electron source from soils immediately adjacent to the roots of Clitoria ternatea, a slender leguminous herb of the Lower Gangetic plains of India. Strain SJT(T) was able to oxidize thiosulfate and elemental sulfur for chemolithoautotrophic growth. 16S rRNA and recA gene sequence-based phylogenetic analyses showed that the Gram-negative rod-shaped bacterium belonged to the genus Mesorhizobium and was most closely related to Mesorhizobium loti, Mesorhizobium plurifarium, Mesorhizobium amorphae and Mesorhizobium chacoense. Unequivocally low 16S rRNA (<97 %) and recA (< or =88 %) gene sequence similarities to all existing species of the most closely related genera, a unique fatty acid profile, a distinct G+C content (59.6 mol%) and phenotypic characteristics all suggested that strain SJT(T) represents a novel species. DNA-DNA hybridization and SDS-PAGE analysis of whole-cell proteins also confirmed the taxonomic uniqueness of SJT(T). It is therefore proposed that isolate SJT(T) (= LMG 22697T = MTCC 7001T) be classified as the type strain of a novel species, Mesorhizobium thiogangeticum sp. nov.

  18. New Insight into Microbial Iron Oxidation as Revealed by the Proteomic Profile of an Obligate Iron-Oxidizing Chemolithoautotroph

    PubMed Central

    Emerson, David; Sylvan, Jason B.; Orcutt, Beth N.; Jacobson Meyers, Myrna E.; Ramírez, Gustavo A.; Zhong, John D.; Edwards, Katrina J.

    2015-01-01

    Microaerophilic, neutrophilic, iron-oxidizing bacteria (FeOB) grow via the oxidation of reduced Fe(II) at or near neutral pH, in the presence of oxygen, making them relevant in numerous environments with elevated Fe(II) concentrations. However, the biochemical mechanisms for Fe(II) oxidation by these neutrophilic FeOB are unknown, and genetic markers for this process are unavailable. In the ocean, microaerophilic microorganisms in the genus Mariprofundus of the class Zetaproteobacteria are the only organisms known to chemolithoautotrophically oxidize Fe and concurrently biomineralize it in the form of twisted stalks of iron oxyhydroxides. The aim of this study was to identify highly expressed proteins associated with the electron transport chain of microaerophilic, neutrophilic FeOB. To this end, Mariprofundus ferrooxydans PV-1 was cultivated, and its proteins were extracted, assayed for redox activity, and analyzed via liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry for identification of peptides. The results indicate that a cytochrome c4, cbb3-type cytochrome oxidase subunits, and an outer membrane cytochrome c were among the most highly expressed proteins and suggest an involvement in the process of aerobic, neutrophilic bacterial Fe oxidation. Proteins associated with alternative complex III, phosphate transport, carbon fixation, and biofilm formation were abundant, consistent with the lifestyle of Mariprofundus. PMID:26092463

  19. New Insight into Microbial Iron Oxidation as Revealed by the Proteomic Profile of an Obligate Iron-Oxidizing Chemolithoautotroph.

    PubMed

    Barco, Roman A; Emerson, David; Sylvan, Jason B; Orcutt, Beth N; Jacobson Meyers, Myrna E; Ramírez, Gustavo A; Zhong, John D; Edwards, Katrina J

    2015-09-01

    Microaerophilic, neutrophilic, iron-oxidizing bacteria (FeOB) grow via the oxidation of reduced Fe(II) at or near neutral pH, in the presence of oxygen, making them relevant in numerous environments with elevated Fe(II) concentrations. However, the biochemical mechanisms for Fe(II) oxidation by these neutrophilic FeOB are unknown, and genetic markers for this process are unavailable. In the ocean, microaerophilic microorganisms in the genus Mariprofundus of the class Zetaproteobacteria are the only organisms known to chemolithoautotrophically oxidize Fe and concurrently biomineralize it in the form of twisted stalks of iron oxyhydroxides. The aim of this study was to identify highly expressed proteins associated with the electron transport chain of microaerophilic, neutrophilic FeOB. To this end, Mariprofundus ferrooxydans PV-1 was cultivated, and its proteins were extracted, assayed for redox activity, and analyzed via liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry for identification of peptides. The results indicate that a cytochrome c4, cbb3-type cytochrome oxidase subunits, and an outer membrane cytochrome c were among the most highly expressed proteins and suggest an involvement in the process of aerobic, neutrophilic bacterial Fe oxidation. Proteins associated with alternative complex III, phosphate transport, carbon fixation, and biofilm formation were abundant, consistent with the lifestyle of Mariprofundus.

  20. Apparent redundancy of electron transfer pathways via bc(1) complexes and terminal oxidases in the extremophilic chemolithoautotrophic Acidithiobacillus ferrooxidans.

    PubMed

    Brasseur, G; Levican, G; Bonnefoy, V; Holmes, D; Jedlicki, E; Lemesle-Meunier, D

    2004-06-07

    Acidithiobacillus ferrooxidans is an acidophilic chemolithoautotrophic bacterium that can grow in the presence of either the weak reductant Fe(2+), or reducing sulfur compounds that provide more energy for growth than Fe(2+). We have previously shown that the uphill electron transfer pathway between Fe(2+) and NAD(+) involved a bc(1) complex that functions only in the reverse direction [J. Bacteriol. 182, (2000) 3602]. In the present work, we demonstrate both the existence of a bc(1) complex functioning in the forward direction, expressed when the cells are grown on sulfur, and the presence of two terminal oxidases, a bd and a ba(3) type oxidase expressed more in sulfur than in iron-grown cells, besides the cytochrome aa(3) that was found to be expressed only in iron-grown cells. Sulfur-grown cells exhibit a branching point for electron flow at the level of the quinol pool leading on the one hand to a bd type oxidase, and on the other hand to a bc(1)-->ba(3) pathway. We have also demonstrated the presence in the genome of transcriptionally active genes potentially encoding the subunits of a bo(3) type oxidase. A scheme for the electron transfer chains has been established that shows the existence of multiple respiratory routes to a single electron acceptor O(2). Possible reasons for these apparently redundant pathways are discussed.

  1. Nautilia abyssi sp. nov., a thermophilic, chemolithoautotrophic, sulfur-reducing bacterium isolated from an East Pacific Rise hydrothermal vent.

    PubMed

    Alain, Karine; Callac, Nolwenn; Guégan, Marianne; Lesongeur, Françoise; Crassous, Philippe; Cambon-Bonavita, Marie-Anne; Querellou, Joël; Prieur, Daniel

    2009-06-01

    A novel strictly anaerobic, thermophilic, sulfur-reducing bacterium, designated PH1209(T), was isolated from an East Pacific Rise hydrothermal vent (1 degrees N) sample and studied using a polyphasic taxonomic approach. Cells were Gram-negative, motile rods (approx. 1.60 x 0.40 microm) with a single polar flagellum. Strain PH1209(T) grew at temperatures between 33 and 65 degrees C (optimum 60 degrees C), from pH 5.0 to 8.0 (optimum 6.0-6.5), and between 2 and 4 % (w/v) NaCl (optimum 3 %). Cells grew chemolithoautotrophically with H(2) as an energy source, S(0) as an electron acceptor and CO(2) as a carbon source. Strain PH1209(T) was also able to use peptone and yeast extract as carbon sources. The G+C content of the genomic DNA was 35 mol%. Phylogenetic analyses based on 16S rRNA gene sequencing showed that strain PH1209(T) fell within the order Nautiliales, in the class Epsilonproteobacteria. Comparative 16S rRNA gene sequence analysis indicated that strain PH1209(T) belonged to the genus Nautilia and shared 97.2 and 98.7 % 16S rRNA gene sequence identity, respectively, with the type strains of Nautilia lithotrophica and Nautilia profundicola. It is proposed, from the polyphasic evidence, that the strain represents a novel species, Nautilia abyssi sp. nov.; the type strain is PH1209(T) (=DSM 21157(T)=JCM 15390(T)).

  2. Ecological Energetic Perspectives on Responses of Nitrogen-Transforming Chemolithoautotrophic Microbiota to Changes in the Marine Environment

    PubMed Central

    Dang, Hongyue; Chen, Chen-Tung A.

    2017-01-01

    Transformation and mobilization of bioessential elements in the biosphere, lithosphere, atmosphere, and hydrosphere constitute the Earth’s biogeochemical cycles, which are driven mainly by microorganisms through their energy and material metabolic processes. Without microbial energy harvesting from sources of light and inorganic chemical bonds for autotrophic fixation of inorganic carbon, there would not be sustainable ecosystems in the vast ocean. Although ecological energetics (eco-energetics) has been emphasized as a core aspect of ecosystem analyses and microorganisms largely control the flow of matter and energy in marine ecosystems, marine microbial communities are rarely studied from the eco-energetic perspective. The diverse bioenergetic pathways and eco-energetic strategies of the microorganisms are essentially the outcome of biosphere-geosphere interactions over evolutionary times. The biogeochemical cycles are intimately interconnected with energy fluxes across the biosphere and the capacity of the ocean to fix inorganic carbon is generally constrained by the availability of nutrients and energy. The understanding of how microbial eco-energetic processes influence the structure and function of marine ecosystems and how they interact with the changing environment is thus fundamental to a mechanistic and predictive understanding of the marine carbon and nitrogen cycles and the trends in global change. By using major groups of chemolithoautotrophic microorganisms that participate in the marine nitrogen cycle as examples, this article examines their eco-energetic strategies, contributions to carbon cycling, and putative responses to and impacts on the various global change processes associated with global warming, ocean acidification, eutrophication, deoxygenation, and pollution. We conclude that knowledge gaps remain despite decades of tremendous research efforts. The advent of new techniques may bring the dawn to scientific breakthroughs that necessitate

  3. Genome-enabled studies of anaerobic, nitrate-dependent iron oxidation in the chemolithoautotrophic bacterium Thiobacillus denitrificans

    PubMed Central

    Beller, Harry R.; Zhou, Peng; Legler, Tina C.; Chakicherla, Anu; Kane, Staci; Letain, Tracy E.; A. O’Day, Peggy

    2013-01-01

    Thiobacillus denitrificans is a chemolithoautotrophic bacterium capable of anaerobic, nitrate-dependent U(IV) and Fe(II) oxidation, both of which can strongly influence the long-term efficacy of in situ reductive immobilization of uranium in contaminated aquifers. We previously identified two c-type cytochromes involved in nitrate-dependent U(IV) oxidation in T. denitrificans and hypothesized that c-type cytochromes would also catalyze Fe(II) oxidation, as they have been found to play this role in anaerobic phototrophic Fe(II)-oxidizing bacteria. Here we report on efforts to identify genes associated with nitrate-dependent Fe(II) oxidation, namely (a) whole-genome transcriptional studies [using FeCO3, Fe2+, and U(IV) oxides as electron donors under denitrifying conditions], (b) Fe(II) oxidation assays performed with knockout mutants targeting primarily highly expressed or upregulated c-type cytochromes, and (c) random transposon-mutagenesis studies with screening for Fe(II) oxidation. Assays of mutants for 26 target genes, most of which were c-type cytochromes, indicated that none of the mutants tested were significantly defective in nitrate-dependent Fe(II) oxidation. The non-defective mutants included the c1-cytochrome subunit of the cytochrome bc1 complex (complex III), which has relevance to a previously proposed role for this complex in nitrate-dependent Fe(II) oxidation and to current concepts of reverse electron transfer. A transposon mutant with a disrupted gene associated with NADH:ubiquinone oxidoreductase (complex I) was ~35% defective relative to the wild-type strain; this strain was similarly defective in nitrate reduction with thiosulfate as the electron donor. Overall, our results indicate that nitrate-dependent Fe(II) oxidation in T. denitrificans is not catalyzed by the same c-type cytochromes involved in U(IV) oxidation, nor have other c-type cytochromes yet been implicated in the process. PMID:24065960

  4. Ecological Energetic Perspectives on Responses of Nitrogen-Transforming Chemolithoautotrophic Microbiota to Changes in the Marine Environment.

    PubMed

    Dang, Hongyue; Chen, Chen-Tung A

    2017-01-01

    Transformation and mobilization of bioessential elements in the biosphere, lithosphere, atmosphere, and hydrosphere constitute the Earth's biogeochemical cycles, which are driven mainly by microorganisms through their energy and material metabolic processes. Without microbial energy harvesting from sources of light and inorganic chemical bonds for autotrophic fixation of inorganic carbon, there would not be sustainable ecosystems in the vast ocean. Although ecological energetics (eco-energetics) has been emphasized as a core aspect of ecosystem analyses and microorganisms largely control the flow of matter and energy in marine ecosystems, marine microbial communities are rarely studied from the eco-energetic perspective. The diverse bioenergetic pathways and eco-energetic strategies of the microorganisms are essentially the outcome of biosphere-geosphere interactions over evolutionary times. The biogeochemical cycles are intimately interconnected with energy fluxes across the biosphere and the capacity of the ocean to fix inorganic carbon is generally constrained by the availability of nutrients and energy. The understanding of how microbial eco-energetic processes influence the structure and function of marine ecosystems and how they interact with the changing environment is thus fundamental to a mechanistic and predictive understanding of the marine carbon and nitrogen cycles and the trends in global change. By using major groups of chemolithoautotrophic microorganisms that participate in the marine nitrogen cycle as examples, this article examines their eco-energetic strategies, contributions to carbon cycling, and putative responses to and impacts on the various global change processes associated with global warming, ocean acidification, eutrophication, deoxygenation, and pollution. We conclude that knowledge gaps remain despite decades of tremendous research efforts. The advent of new techniques may bring the dawn to scientific breakthroughs that necessitate

  5. Permanent draft genome of Thermithiobacillus tepidarius DSM 3134T, a moderately thermophilic, obligately chemolithoautotrophic member of the Acidithiobacillia

    DOE PAGES

    Boden, Rich; Hutt, Lee P.; Huntemann, Marcel; ...

    2016-09-26

    Thermithiobacillus tepidarius DSM 3134T was originally isolated (1983) from the waters of a sulfidic spring entering the Roman Baths (Temple of Sulis-Minerva) at Bath, United Kingdom and is an obligate chemolithoautotroph growing at the expense of reduced sulfur species. This strain has a genome size of 2,958,498 bp. Here we report the genome sequence, annotation and characteristics. The genome comprises 2,902 protein coding and 66 RNA coding genes. Genes responsible for the transaldolase variant of the Calvin-Benson-Bassham cycle were identified along with a biosynthetic horseshoe in lieu of Krebs' cycle sensu stricto. Terminal oxidases were identified, viz. cytochrome c oxidasemore » (cbb3 , EC 1.9.3.1) and ubiquinol oxidase (bd, EC 1.10.3.10). Metalloresistance genes involved in pathways of arsenic and cadmium resistance were found. Evidence of horizontal gene transfer accounting for 5.9 % of the protein-coding genes was found, including transfer from Thiobacillus spp. and Methylococcus capsulatus Bath, isolated from the same spring. A sox gene cluster was found, similar in structure to those from other Acidithiobacillia - by comparison with Thiobacillus thioparus and Paracoccus denitrificans, an additional gene between soxA and soxB was found, annotated as a DUF302-family protein of unknown function. As the Kelly-Friedrich pathway of thiosulfate oxidation (encoded by sox) is not used in Thermithiobacillus spp., the role of the operon (if any) in this species remains unknown. We speculate that DUF302 and sox genes may have a role in periplasmic trithionate oxidation.« less

  6. Thermodesulfatator atlanticus sp. nov., a thermophilic, chemolithoautotrophic, sulfate-reducing bacterium isolated from a Mid-Atlantic Ridge hydrothermal vent.

    PubMed

    Alain, Karine; Postec, Anne; Grinsard, Elodie; Lesongeur, Françoise; Prieur, Daniel; Godfroy, Anne

    2010-01-01

    A novel, strictly anaerobic, thermophilic, sulfate-reducing bacterium, designated strain AT1325(T), was isolated from a deep-sea hydrothermal vent at the Rainbow site on the Mid-Atlantic Ridge. This strain was subjected to a polyphasic taxonomic analysis. Cells were Gram-negative motile rods (approximately 2.4 x 0.6 microm) with a single polar flagellum. Strain AT1325(T) grew at 55-75 degrees C (optimum, 65-70 degrees C), at pH 5.5-8.0 (optimum, 6.5-7.5) and in the presence of 1.5-4.5 % (w/v) NaCl (optimum, 2.5 %). Cells grew chemolithoautotrophically with H2 as an energy source and SO4(2-) as an electron acceptor. Alternatively, the novel isolate was able to use methylamine, peptone or yeast extract as carbon sources. The dominant fatty acids (>5 % of the total) were C(16 : 0), C(18 : 1)omega7c, C(18 : 0) and C(19 : 0) cyclo omega8c. The G+C content of the genomic DNA of strain AT1325(T) was 45.6 mol%. Phylogenetic analyses based on 16S rRNA gene sequences placed strain AT1325(T) within the family Thermodesulfobacteriaceae, in the bacterial domain. Comparative 16S rRNA gene sequence analysis indicated that strain AT1325(T) belonged to the genus Thermodesulfatator, sharing 97.8 % similarity with the type strain of Thermodesulfatator indicus, the unique representative species of this genus. On the basis of the data presented, it is suggested that strain AT1325(T) represents a novel species of the genus Thermodesulfatator, for which the name Thermodesulfatator atlanticus sp. nov. is proposed. The type strain is AT1325(T) (=DSM 21156(T)=JCM 15391(T)).

  7. Thermosulfuriphilus ammonigenes gen. nov., sp. nov., a thermophilic, chemolithoautotrophic bacterium capable of respiratory ammonification of nitrate with elemental sulfur.

    PubMed

    Slobodkina, Galina B; Reysenbach, Anna-Louise; Kolganova, Tatyana V; Novikov, Andrei A; Bonch-Osmolovskaya, Elizaveta A; Slobodkin, Alexander I

    2017-09-01

    An extremely thermophilic, anaerobic, chemolithoautotrophic bacterium (strain ST65T) was isolated from a deep-sea hydrothermal vent chimney located on the Eastern Lau Spreading Centre in the south-western Pacific Ocean, at a depth of 1870 m. Cells of strain ST65T were non-motile straight or slightly curved short rods, 0.5-0.6 µm in diameter and 0.8-1.5 µm in length. The temperature range for growth was 47-75 °C, with an optimum at 65 °C. The pH range for growth was 5.5-7.5, with an optimum at pH 6.5. Growth of strain ST65T was observed at NaCl concentrations ranging from 1.5 to 4.5 % (w/v), with an optimum at 2.0-2.5 %. Strain ST65T grew anaerobically with inorganic carbon as a carbon source and with elemental sulfur as an electron donor and nitrate as an electron acceptor producing sulfate and ammonium. It was also able to grow by disproportionation of elemental sulfur, thiosulfate and sulfite. Sulfate was not utilized as an electron acceptor. Analysis of the 16S rRNA gene sequence revealed that the isolate belongs to a deep lineage in the phylum Thermodesulfobacteria. On the basis of its physiological properties and results of phylogenetic analyses, it is proposed that the isolate represents a novel species of a new genus, Thermosulfuriphilus ammonigenes gen. nov., sp. nov. ST65T (=DSM 102941T=VKM B-2855T) is the type strain of the type species.

  8. Permanent draft genome of Thermithiobaclillus tepidarius DSM 3134(T), a moderately thermophilic, obligately chemolithoautotrophic member of the Acidithiobacillia.

    PubMed

    Boden, Rich; Hutt, Lee P; Huntemann, Marcel; Clum, Alicia; Pillay, Manoj; Palaniappan, Krishnaveni; Varghese, Neha; Mikhailova, Natalia; Stamatis, Dimitrios; Reddy, Tatiparthi; Ngan, Chew Yee; Daum, Chris; Shapiro, Nicole; Markowitz, Victor; Ivanova, Natalia; Woyke, Tanja; Kyrpides, Nikos

    2016-01-01

    Thermithiobacillus tepidarius DSM 3134(T) was originally isolated (1983) from the waters of a sulfidic spring entering the Roman Baths (Temple of Sulis-Minerva) at Bath, United Kingdom and is an obligate chemolithoautotroph growing at the expense of reduced sulfur species. This strain has a genome size of 2,958,498 bp. Here we report the genome sequence, annotation and characteristics. The genome comprises 2,902 protein coding and 66 RNA coding genes. Genes responsible for the transaldolase variant of the Calvin-Benson-Bassham cycle were identified along with a biosynthetic horseshoe in lieu of Krebs' cycle sensu stricto. Terminal oxidases were identified, viz. cytochrome c oxidase (cbb3, EC 1.9.3.1) and ubiquinol oxidase (bd, EC 1.10.3.10). Metalloresistance genes involved in pathways of arsenic and cadmium resistance were found. Evidence of horizontal gene transfer accounting for 5.9 % of the protein-coding genes was found, including transfer from Thiobacillus spp. and Methylococcus capsulatus Bath, isolated from the same spring. A sox gene cluster was found, similar in structure to those from other Acidithiobacillia - by comparison with Thiobacillus thioparus and Paracoccus denitrificans, an additional gene between soxA and soxB was found, annotated as a DUF302-family protein of unknown function. As the Kelly-Friedrich pathway of thiosulfate oxidation (encoded by sox) is not used in Thermithiobacillus spp., the role of the operon (if any) in this species remains unknown. We speculate that DUF302 and sox genes may have a role in periplasmic trithionate oxidation.

  9. Varunaivibrio sulfuroxidans gen. nov., sp. nov., a facultatively chemolithoautotrophic, mesophilic alphaproteobacterium from a shallow-water gas vent at Tor Caldara, Tyrrhenian Sea.

    PubMed

    Patwardhan, Sushmita; Vetriani, Costantino

    2016-09-01

    A mesophilic, facultatively anaerobic, facultatively chemolithoautotrophic bacterium, designated strain TC8T, was isolated from a sulfidic shallow-water marine gas vent located at Tor Caldara, in the Tyrrhenian Sea, Italy. Cells were Gram-stain-negative curved rods with one or more polar flagella. Cells were approximately 1-1.5 µm in length and 0.6 µm in width. Strain TC8T grew between 20 and 35 °C (optimum 30 °C), with between 5 and 45 g NaCl l-1 (optimum 15-20 g l-1) and between pH 4.5 and 8.5 (optimum pH 6.0-7.0). The generation time under optimal conditions was 8 h. Strain TC8T was a facultative chemolithoautotroph also capable of using organic substrates as electron donors and carbon sources. Chemolithoautotrophic growth occurred with sulfur and thiosulfate as the electron donors, CO2 as the carbon source, and nitrate, oxygen (5 %, v/v) and ferric iron as the electron acceptors. Chemoorganoheterotrophic growth occurred with tryptone, peptone, Casamino acids, pyruvate and glycerol as substrates, while chemolithoherotrophic growth occurred with d(+)-glucose, sucrose, yeast extract, acetate, lactate, citrate and l-glutamine. The G+C content of the genomic DNA was 59.9 mol%. Phylogenetic analysis of the 16S rRNA gene sequence of strain TC8T showed that this organism formed a lineage within the family Rhodospirillaceae, which branched separately from the two closest relatives, Magnetovibrio blakemoreiMV1T (91.25 % similarity) and Magnetospira thiophilaMMS-1T (90.13 %). Based on phylogenetic, physiological and chemotaxonomic characteristics, it is proposed that the organism represents a novel species of a new genus within the family Rhodospirillaceae,Varunaivibrio sulfuroxidans gen. nov., sp. nov. The type strain of Varunaivibrio sulfuroxidans is TC8T (=DSM 101688T=JCM 31027T).

  10. Complete genome sequence of Thioalkalivibrio paradoxus type strain ARh 1T, an obligately chemolithoautotrophic haloalkaliphilic sulfur-oxidizing bacterium isolated from a Kenyan soda lake

    DOE PAGES

    Berben, Tom; Sorokin, Dimitry Y.; Ivanova, Natalia; ...

    2015-11-19

    Thioalkalivibrio paradoxus strain ARh 1T is a chemolithoautotrophic, non-motile, Gram-negative bacterium belonging to the Gammaproteobacteria that was isolated from samples of haloalkaline soda lakes. It derives energy from the oxidation of reduced sulfur compounds and is notable for its ability to grow on thiocyanate as its sole source of electrons, sulfur and nitrogen. The full genome consists of 3,756,729 bp and comprises 3,500 protein-coding and 57 RNA-coding genes. Moreover, this organism was sequenced as part of the community science program at the DOE Joint Genome Institute.

  11. Partial genome sequence of Thioalkalivibrio thiocyanodenitrificans ARhD 1T, a chemolithoautotrophic haloalkaliphilic sulfur-oxidizing bacterium capable of complete denitrification

    DOE PAGES

    Berben, Tom; Sorokin, Dimitry Y.; Ivanova, Natalia; ...

    2015-10-26

    Thioalkalivibrio thiocyanodenitrificans strain ARhD 1T is a motile, Gram-negative bacterium isolated from soda lakes that belongs to the Gammaproteobacteria. It derives energy for growth and carbon fixation from the oxidation of sulfur compounds, most notably thiocyanate, and so is a chemolithoautotroph. It is capable of complete denitrification under anaerobic conditions. In addition, the draft genome sequence consists of 3,746,647 bp in 3 scaffolds, containing 3558 protein-coding and 121 RNA genes. T. thiocyanodenitrificans ARhD 1T was sequenced as part of the DOE Joint Genome Institute Community Science Program.

  12. Partial genome sequence of Thioalkalivibrio thiocyanodenitrificans ARhD 1(T), a chemolithoautotrophic haloalkaliphilic sulfur-oxidizing bacterium capable of complete denitrification.

    PubMed

    Berben, Tom; Sorokin, Dimitry Y; Ivanova, Natalia; Pati, Amrita; Kyrpides, Nikos; Goodwin, Lynne A; Woyke, Tanja; Muyzer, Gerard

    2015-01-01

    Thioalkalivibrio thiocyanodenitrificans strain ARhD 1(T) is a motile, Gram-negative bacterium isolated from soda lakes that belongs to the Gammaproteobacteria. It derives energy for growth and carbon fixation from the oxidation of sulfur compounds, most notably thiocyanate, and so is a chemolithoautotroph. It is capable of complete denitrification under anaerobic conditions. The draft genome sequence consists of 3,746,647 bp in 3 scaffolds, containing 3558 protein-coding and 121 RNA genes. T. thiocyanodenitrificans ARhD 1(T) was sequenced as part of the DOE Joint Genome Institute Community Science Program.

  13. From chemolithoautotrophs to electrolithoautotrophs: CO2 fixation by Fe(II)-oxidizing bacteria coupled with direct uptake of electrons from solid electron sources.

    PubMed

    Ishii, Takumi; Kawaichi, Satoshi; Nakagawa, Hirotaka; Hashimoto, Kazuhito; Nakamura, Ryuhei

    2015-01-01

    At deep-sea vent systems, hydrothermal emissions rich in reductive chemicals replace solar energy as fuels to support microbial carbon assimilation. Until recently, all the microbial components at vent systems have been assumed to be fostered by the primary production of chemolithoautotrophs; however, both the laboratory and on-site studies demonstrated electrical current generation at vent systems and have suggested that a portion of microbial carbon assimilation is stimulated by the direct uptake of electrons from electrically conductive minerals. Here we show that chemolithoautotrophic Fe(II)-oxidizing bacterium, Acidithiobacillus ferrooxidans, switches the electron source for carbon assimilation from diffusible Fe(2+) ions to an electrode under the condition that electrical current is the only source of energy and electrons. Site-specific marking of a cytochrome aa3 complex (aa3 complex) and a cytochrome bc1 complex (bc1 complex) in viable cells demonstrated that the electrons taken directly from an electrode are used for O2 reduction via a down-hill pathway, which generates proton motive force that is used for pushing the electrons to NAD(+) through a bc1 complex. Activation of carbon dioxide fixation by a direct electron uptake was also confirmed by the clear potential dependency of cell growth. These results reveal a previously unknown bioenergetic versatility of Fe(II)-oxidizing bacteria to use solid electron sources and will help with understanding carbon assimilation of microbial components living in electronically conductive chimney habitats.

  14. From chemolithoautotrophs to electrolithoautotrophs: CO2 fixation by Fe(II)-oxidizing bacteria coupled with direct uptake of electrons from solid electron sources

    PubMed Central

    Ishii, Takumi; Kawaichi, Satoshi; Nakagawa, Hirotaka; Hashimoto, Kazuhito; Nakamura, Ryuhei

    2015-01-01

    At deep-sea vent systems, hydrothermal emissions rich in reductive chemicals replace solar energy as fuels to support microbial carbon assimilation. Until recently, all the microbial components at vent systems have been assumed to be fostered by the primary production of chemolithoautotrophs; however, both the laboratory and on-site studies demonstrated electrical current generation at vent systems and have suggested that a portion of microbial carbon assimilation is stimulated by the direct uptake of electrons from electrically conductive minerals. Here we show that chemolithoautotrophic Fe(II)-oxidizing bacterium, Acidithiobacillus ferrooxidans, switches the electron source for carbon assimilation from diffusible Fe2+ ions to an electrode under the condition that electrical current is the only source of energy and electrons. Site-specific marking of a cytochrome aa3 complex (aa3 complex) and a cytochrome bc1 complex (bc1 complex) in viable cells demonstrated that the electrons taken directly from an electrode are used for O2 reduction via a down-hill pathway, which generates proton motive force that is used for pushing the electrons to NAD+ through a bc1 complex. Activation of carbon dioxide fixation by a direct electron uptake was also confirmed by the clear potential dependency of cell growth. These results reveal a previously unknown bioenergetic versatility of Fe(II)-oxidizing bacteria to use solid electron sources and will help with understanding carbon assimilation of microbial components living in electronically conductive chimney habitats. PMID:26500609

  15. Chemolithoautotrophic arsenite oxidation by a thermophilic Anoxybacillus flavithermus strain TCC9-4 from a hot spring in Tengchong of Yunnan, China

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Dawei; Li, Ping; Jiang, Zhou; Dai, Xinyue; Zhang, Rui; Wang, Yanhong; Guo, Qinghai; Wang, Yanxin

    2015-01-01

    A new facultative chemolithoautotrophic arsenite (AsIII)-oxidizing bacterium TCC9-4 was isolated from a hot spring microbial mat in Tengchong of Yunnan, China. This strain could grow with AsIII as an energy source, CO2–HCO3- as a carbon source and oxygen as the electron acceptor in a minimal salts medium. Under chemolithoautotrophic conditions, more than 90% of 100 mg/L AsIII could be oxidized by the strain TCC9-4 in 36 h. Temperature was an important environmental factor that strongly influenced the AsIII oxidation rate and AsIII oxidase (Aio) activity; the highest Aio activity was found at the temperature of 40∘C. Addition of 0.01% yeast extract enhanced the growth significantly, but delayed the AsIII oxidation. On the basis of 16S rRNA phylogenetic sequence analysis, strain TCC9-4 was identified as Anoxybacillus flavithermus. To our best knowledge, this is the first report of arsenic (As) oxidation by A. flavithermus. The Aio gene in TCC9-4 might be quite novel relative to currently known gene sequences. The results of this study expand our current understanding of microbially mediated As oxidation in hot springs. PMID:25999920

  16. Catabolic and anabolic energy for chemolithoautotrophs in deep-sea hydrothermal systems hosted in different rock types

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amend, Jan P.; McCollom, Thomas M.; Hentscher, Michael; Bach, Wolfgang

    2011-10-01

    Active deep-sea hydrothermal vents are hosted by a range of different rock types, including basalt, peridotite, and felsic rocks. The associated hydrothermal fluids exhibit substantial chemical variability, which is largely attributable to compositional differences among the underlying host rocks. Numerical models were used to evaluate the energetics of seven inorganic redox reactions (potential catabolisms of chemolithoautotrophs) and numerous biomolecule synthesis reactions (anabolism) in a representative sampling of these systems, where chemical gradients are established by mixing hydrothermal fluid with seawater. The wide ranging fluid compositions dictate demonstrable differences in Gibbs energies (Δ G r) of these catabolic and anabolic reactions in three peridotite-hosted, six basalt-hosted, one troctolite-basalt hybrid, and two felsic rock-hosted systems. In peridotite-hosted systems at low to moderate temperatures (<˜45 °C) and high seawater:hydrothermal fluid (SW:HF) mixing ratios (>10), hydrogen oxidation yields the most catabolic energy, but the oxidation of methane, ferrous iron, and sulfide can also be moderately exergonic. At higher temperatures, and consequent SW:HF mixing ratios <10, anaerobic processes dominate the energy landscape; sulfate reduction and methanogenesis are more exergonic than any of the aerobic respiration reactions. By comparison, in the basalt-hosted and felsic rock-hosted systems, sulfide oxidation was the predominant catabolic energy source at all temperatures (and SW:HF ratios) considered. The energetics of catabolism at the troctolite-basalt hybrid system were intermediate to these extremes. Reaction energetics for anabolism in chemolithoautotrophs—represented here by the synthesis of amino acids, nucleotides, fatty acids, saccharides, and amines—were generally most favorable at moderate temperatures (22-32 °C) and corresponding SW:HF mixing ratios (˜15). In peridotite-hosted and the troctolite-basalt hybrid systems

  17. Chemolithoautotrophic production mediating the cycling of the greenhouse gases N2O and CH4 in an upwelling ecosystem

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farías, L.; Fernández, C.; Faúndez, J.; Cornejo, M.; Alcaman, M. E.

    2009-12-01

    The high availability of electron donors occurring in coastal upwelling ecosystems with marked oxyclines favours chemoautotrophy, in turn leading to high N2O and CH4 cycling associated with aerobic NH4+ (AAO) and CH4 oxidation (AMO). This is the case of the highly productive coastal upwelling area off central Chile (36° S), where we evaluated the importance of total chemolithoautotrophic vs. photoautotrophic production, the specific contributions of AAO and AMO to chemosynthesis and their role in gas cycling. Chemolithoautotrophy was studied at a time-series station during monthly (2007-2009) and seasonal cruises (January 2008, September 2008, January 2009) and was assessed in terms of the natural C isotopic ratio of particulate organic carbon (δ13POC), total and specific (associated with AAO and AMO) dark carbon assimilation (CA), and N2O and CH4 cycling experiments. At the oxycline, δ13POC averaged -22.2‰; this was significantly lighter compared to the surface (-19.7‰) and bottom layers (-20.7‰). Total integrated dark CA in the whole water column fluctuated between 19.4 and 2.924 mg C m-2 d-1, was higher during active upwelling, and contributed 0.7 to 49.7% of the total integrated autotrophic CA (photo plus chemoautotrophy), which ranged from 135 to 7.626 mg C m-2 d-1, and averaged 20.3% for the whole sampling period. Dark CA was reduced by 27 to 48% after adding a specific AAO inhibitor (ATU) and by 24 to 76% with GC7, a specific archaea inhibitor. This indicates that AAO and AMO microbes (most of them archaea) were performing dark CA through the oxidation of NH4+ and CH4. Net N2O cycling rates varied between 8.88 and 43 nM d-1, whereas net CH4 cycling rates ranged from -0.41 to -26.8 nM d-1. The addition of both ATU and GC7 reduced N2O accumulation and increased CH4 consumption, suggesting that AAO and AMO were responsible, in part, for the cycling of these gases. These findings show that chemically driven chemolithoautotrophy (with NH4+ and CH4 acting

  18. Genome-Enabled Studies of Anaerobic, Nitrate-Dependent Iron Oxidation in the Chemolithoautotrophic Bacterium Thiobacillus denitrificans

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beller, H. R.; Zhou, P.; Legler, T. C.; Chakicherla, A.; O'Day, P. A.

    2013-12-01

    Thiobacillus denitrificans is a chemolithoautotrophic bacterium capable of anaerobic, nitrate-dependent U(IV) and Fe(II) oxidation, both of which can strongly influence the long-term efficacy of in situ reductive immobilization of uranium in contaminated aquifers. We previously identified two c-type cytochromes involved in nitrate-dependent U(IV) oxidation in T. denitrificans and hypothesized that c-type cytochromes would also catalyze Fe(II) oxidation, as they have been found to play this role in anaerobic phototrophic Fe(II)-oxidizing bacteria. Here we report on efforts to identify genes associated with nitrate-dependent Fe(II) oxidation, namely (a) whole-genome transcriptional studies [using FeCO3, Fe2+, and U(IV) oxides as electron donors under denitrifying conditions], (b) Fe(II) oxidation assays performed with knockout mutants targeting primarily highly expressed or upregulated c-type cytochromes, and (c) random transposon-mutagenesis studies with screening for Fe(II) oxidation. Assays of mutants for 26 target genes, most of which were c-type cytochromes, indicated that none of the mutants tested were significantly defective in nitrate-dependent Fe(II) oxidation. The non-defective mutants included the c1-cytochrome subunit of the cytochrome bc1 complex (complex III), which has relevance to a previously proposed role for this complex in nitrate-dependent Fe(II) oxidation and to current concepts of reverse electron transfer. Of the transposon mutants defective in Fe(II) oxidation, one mutant with a disrupted gene associated with NADH:ubiquinone oxidoreductase (complex I) was ~35% defective relative to the wild-type strain; this strain was similarly defective in nitrate reduction with thiosulfate as the electron donor. Overall, our results indicate that nitrate-dependent Fe(II) oxidation in T. denitrificans is not catalyzed by the same c-type cytochromes involved in U(IV) oxidation, nor have other c-type cytochromes yet been implicated in the process.

  19. Long term performance of an AMD treatment bioreactor using chemolithoautotrophic sulfate reduction and ferrous iron precipitation under in situ groundwater conditions.

    PubMed

    Bilek, F; Wagner, S

    2012-01-01

    Chemolithoautotrophic sulfate reduction (CSR) was tested to treat natural acid mine drainage influenced groundwaters. The long term behavior was studied for more than 3 years under groundwater conditions (10 °C, autochthonous sulfate reducing bacteria (SRB)) without biomass replenishment in a 190 L bench scale reactor. The process produces water with alkalinity >10 mM. pH can be controlled by p(CO(2)) for all expectable water qualities. SRB were immobilized using an expanded clay bed. After 1.3 years of operation, a constant biomass content and sulfate reduction rate of 0.25-0.30 mmol(so)₄(Lh)⁻¹ were established. The sulfate reduction rate was limited by biomass content. Most of the electrons were used for sulfate reduction (98%). The hydrogen turn over in competing processes like methanogenesis and homoacetogenesis was successfully suppressed by adjusting the sulfate concentration to be >2 mM in the runoff.

  20. Complete genome sequence of Thermovibrio ammonificans HB-1T, a thermophilic, chemolithoautotrophic bacterium isolated from a deep-sea hydrothermal vent

    SciTech Connect

    Giovannelli, Donato; Ricci, Jessica; Perez-Rodriguez, Ileana; Hugler, Michael; O'Brien, Charles; Keddis, Ramaydalis; Grosche, Ashley; Goodwin, Lynne A.; Bruce, David; Davenport, Karen W.; Detter, J. Chris; Han, James; Han, Cliff; Ivanova, N; Land, Miriam L; Mikhailova, Natalia; Nolan, Matt; Pitluck, Sam; Tapia, Roxanne; Woyke, Tanja; Vetriani, Costantino

    2012-01-01

    Thermovibrio ammonificans type strain HB-1T is a thermophilic (Topt: 75 C), strictly anaero- bic, chemolithoautotrophic bacterium that was isolated from an active, high temperature deep-sea hydrothermal vent on the East Pacific Rise. This organism grows on mineral salts medium in the presence of CO2/H2, using NO3- or S0 as electron acceptors, which are re- duced to ammonium or hydrogen sulfide, respectively. T. ammonificans is one of only three species within the genus Thermovibrio, a member of the family Desulfurobacteriaceae, and it forms a deep branch within the phylum Aquificae. Here we report the main features of the genome of T. ammonificans strain HB-1T (DSM 15698T).

  1. Desulfurobacterium crinifex sp. nov., a novel thermophilic, pinkish-streamer forming, chemolithoautotrophic bacterium isolated from a Juan de Fuca Ridge hydrothermal vent and amendment of the genus Desulfurobacterium.

    PubMed

    Alain, Karine; Rolland, Sophie; Crassous, Philippe; Lesongeur, Françoise; Zbinden, Magali; le Gall, Christian; Godfroy, Anne; Page, Antoine; Juniper, S Kim; Cambon-Bonavita, Marie-Anne; Duchiron, Francis; Querellou, Joël

    2003-10-01

    A novel thermophilic, chemolithoautotrophic bacterium, designated as NE1206(T), was isolated from a Juan de Fuca Ridge hydrothermal vent sample (tubes of the annelid polychaete Paralvinella sulfincola attached to small pieces of hydrothermal chimney). The cells were rod-shaped (1.2-3.5 x 0.4-0.7 microm), occurring as single motile rods or forming macroscopic aggregates visible as pinkish to brownish streamers. The new isolate was anaerobic. It grew between 50 and 70 degrees C (optimum 60-65 degrees C; doubling time approximately 1 h 15 min at 60 degrees C), between pH 5.0 and 7.5 (optimum pH around 6.0-6.5) and at sea salts concentrations between 20 and 40 g l(-1 )(optimum 30 g l(-1)). Cells grew chemolithoautotrophically in an H(2)/CO(2) atmosphere (80/20, v/v; 200 kPa). Molecular hydrogen was the sole electron donor used by the strain. Nitrate and elemental sulfur served as electron acceptors, yielding ammonia and hydrogen sulfide, respectively (nitrate reduction supported higher growth rates than sulfur reduction). The G+C content of the genomic DNA was 36.7+/-0.8 mol%. Phylogenetic analyses of the 16S rRNA gene located the strain within the genus Desulfurobacterium. However, the novel isolate possesses physiological and biochemical characteristics that differ from the previously described species of this genus. We propose that the isolate represents a novel species, Desulfurobacterium crinifex sp. nov. The type strain is NE1206(T) (DSM 15218(T), CIP 107649(T)). An amendment of the genus Desulfurobacterium description is proposed, based on the phenotypic characteristics of the novel species.

  2. Caminibacter mediatlanticus sp. nov., a thermophilic, chemolithoautotrophic, nitrate-ammonifying bacterium isolated from a deep-sea hydrothermal vent on the Mid-Atlantic Ridge.

    PubMed

    Voordeckers, James W; Starovoytov, Valentin; Vetriani, Costantino

    2005-03-01

    A thermophilic, anaerobic, chemolithoautotrophic bacterium, designated strain TB-2(T), was isolated from the walls of an active deep-sea hydrothermal vent chimney on the Mid-Atlantic Ridge at 36 degrees 14' N 33 degrees 54' W. The cells were Gram-negative rods approximately 1.5 microm in length and 0.75 microm in width. Strain TB-2(T) grew between 45 and 70 degrees C (optimum 55 degrees C), 10 and 40 g NaCl l(-1) (optimum 30 g l(-1)) and pH 4.5 and 7.5 (optimum pH 5.5). Generation time under optimal conditions was 50 min. Growth occurred under chemolithoautotrophic conditions with H(2) as the energy source and CO(2) as the carbon source. Nitrate or sulfur was used as the electron acceptor, with resulting production of ammonium and hydrogen sulfide, respectively. Oxygen, thiosulfate, sulfite, selenate and arsenate were not used as electron acceptors. Growth was inhibited by the presence of acetate, lactate, formate and peptone. The G+C content of the genomic DNA was 25.6 mol%. Phylogenetic analysis of the 16S rRNA gene sequence indicated that this organism is closely related to Caminibacter hydrogeniphilus and Caminibacter profundus (95.9 and 96.3 % similarity, respectively). On the basis of phylogenetic, physiological and genetic considerations, it is proposed that the organism represents a novel species within the genus Caminibacter, Caminibacter mediatlanticus sp. nov. The type strain is TB-2(T) (=DSM 16658(T)=JCM 12641(T)).

  3. Sulfurihydrogenibium rodmanii sp. nov., a sulfur-oxidizing chemolithoautotroph from the Uzon Caldera, Kamchatka Peninsula, Russia, and emended description of the genus Sulfurihydrogenibium.

    PubMed

    O'Neill, Andrew H; Liu, Yitai; Ferrera, Isabel; Beveridge, Terry J; Reysenbach, Anna-Louise

    2008-05-01

    Four thermophilic, sulfur-oxidizing, chemolithoautotrophic strains with >99 % 16S rRNA gene sequence similarity were isolated from terrestrial hot springs in the Geyser Valley and the Uzon Caldera, Kamchatka, Russia. One strain, designated UZ3-5T, was characterized fully. Cells of UZ3-5T were Gram-negative, motile, slightly oval rods (about 0.7 microm wide and 1.0 microm long) with multiple polar flagella. All four strains were obligately microaerophilic chemolithoautotrophs and could use elemental sulfur or thiosulfate as electron donors and oxygen (1-14 %, v/v) as the electron acceptor. Strain UZ3-5T grew at temperatures between 55 and 80 degrees C (optimally at 75 degrees C; 1.1 h doubling time), at pH 5.0-7.2 (optimally at pH 6.0-6.3) and at 0-0.9 % NaCl (optimally in the absence of NaCl). The G+C content of the genomic DNA of strain UZ3-5T was 35 mol%. Phylogenetic analysis revealed that strain UZ3-5T was a member of the genus Sulfurihydrogenibium, its closest relative in culture being Sulfurihydrogenibium azorense Az-Fu1T (98.3 % 16S rRNA gene sequence similarity). On the basis of its physiological and molecular characteristics, strain UZ3-5T represents a novel species of the genus Sulfurihydrogenibium, for which the name Sulfurihydrogenibium rodmanii sp. nov. is proposed. The type strain is UZ3-5T (=OCM 900T =ATCC BAA-1536T =DSM 19533T).

  4. Success of chemolithoautotrophic SUP05 and Sulfurimonas GD17 cells in pelagic Baltic Sea redox zones is facilitated by their lifestyles as K- and r-strategists.

    PubMed

    Rogge, Andreas; Vogts, Angela; Voss, Maren; Jürgens, Klaus; Jost, Günter; Labrenz, Matthias

    2017-06-01

    Chemolithoautotrophic sulfur-oxidizing and denitrifying Gamma- (particularly the SUP05 cluster) and Epsilonproteobacteria (predominantly Sulfurimonas subgroup GD17) are assumed to compete for substrates (electron donors and acceptors) in marine pelagic redox gradients. To elucidate their ecological niche separation we performed (34) S(0) , (15) NO3- and H(13) CO3- stable-isotope incubations with water samples from Baltic Sea suboxic, chemocline and sulfidic zones followed by combined phylogenetic staining and high-resolution secondary ion mass spectrometry of single cells. SUP05 cells were small-sized (0.06-0.09 µm(3) ) and most abundant in low-sulfidic to suboxic zones, whereas Sulfurimonas GD17 cells were significantly larger (0.26-0.61 µm(3) ) and most abundant at the chemocline and below. Together, SUP05 and GD17 cells accumulated up to 48% of the labelled substrates but calculation of cell volume-specific rates revealed that GD17 cells incorporated labelled substrates significantly faster throughout the redox zone, thereby potentially outcompeting SUP05 especially at high substrate concentrations. Thus, in synopsis with earlier described features of SUP05/GD17 we conclude that their spatially overlapping association in stratified sulfidic zones is facilitated by their different lifestyles: whereas SUP05 cells are streamlined, non-motile K-strategists adapted to low substrate concentrations, GD17 cells are motile r-strategists well adapted to fluctuating substrate and redox conditions. © 2017 Society for Applied Microbiology and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  5. Denitrification in a binary culture and thiocyanate metabolism in Thiohalophilus thiocyanoxidans gen. nov. sp. nov. - a moderately halophilic chemolithoautotrophic sulfur-oxidizing Gammaproteobacterium from hypersaline lakes.

    PubMed

    Sorokin, Dimitry Y; Tourova, Tatjana P; Bezsoudnova, Ekatherina Y; Pol, Arjan; Muyzer, Gerard

    2007-06-01

    Anaerobic enrichment culture with thiocyanate as electron donor and nitrate as electron acceptor at 2 M NaCl inoculated with a mixture of sediments from hypersaline lakes in Kulunda Steppe (Altai, Russia) resulted in a selection of a binary consortium of moderately halophilic, obligately chemolithoautotrophic sulfur-oxidizing bacteria (SOB) capable of complete denitrification of nitrate with thiosulfate as the electron donor. One consortium member, strain HRhD 3sp, was isolated into pure culture with nitrate and thiosulfate using a density gradient. This strain was responsible for the reduction of nitrate to nitrite in the consortium, while a second strain, HRhD 2, isolated under microoxic conditions with thiosulfate as substrate, was capable of anaerobic growth with nitrite and thiosulfate. Nitrite, either as substrate or as product, was already toxic at very low concentrations for both strains. As a result, optimal growth under anaerobic conditions could only be achieved within the consortium. On the basis of phylogenetic analysis, both organisms were identified as new lineages within the Gammaproteobacteria. As well as thiosulfate, strain HRhD 2 can also use thiocyanate as electron donor, representing a first halophilic SOB capable of growth with thiocyanate at 2-4 M NaCl. Product and enzymatic analysis identified the "carbonyl sulfide (COS) pathway" of primary thiocyanate degradation in this new species. On the basis of phenotypic and genetic analysis, strain HRhD 2 is proposed to be assigned to a new genus and species Thiohalophilus thiocyanoxidans.

  6. Thiomicrospira hydrogeniphila sp. nov., an aerobic, hydrogen- and sulfur-oxidizing chemolithoautotroph isolated from a seawater tank containing a block of beef tallow.

    PubMed

    Watsuji, Tomo-O; Hada, Emi; Miyazaki, Masayuki; Ichimura, Masako; Takai, Ken

    2016-09-01

    A moderately psychrophilic, aerobic, hydrogen- and sulfur-oxidizing bacterium, designated strain MAS2T, was isolated from a tank containing coastal seawater from Tokyo Bay and a block of beef tallow added as organic material. Growth occurred under aerobic chemolithoautotrophic conditions in the presence of molecular hydrogen, thiosulfate, tetrathionate, elemental sulfur or sulfide as the sole energy source and bicarbonate as a carbon source. The isolate represented a Gram-staining-negative rod with a single polar flagellum and grew in artificial seawater medium with thiosulfate at 2-40 °C (optimum 30 °C). The isolate grew in media with thiosulfate at Na+ concentrations between 30 and 1380 mM (optimum 270 mM). MAS2T possessed C16 : 0, C16 : 1 and C18 : 1 as the major fatty acids. The G+C content of the genomic DNA was 39.6 mol%. The 16S rRNA gene sequence similarity analysis showed that the isolate represented a member of the genus Thiomicrospira within the class Gammaproteobacteria and was most closely related to Thiomicrospira frisia JB-A2T. On the basis of phenotypic and molecular properties, the isolate represents a novel species of the genus Thiomicrospira, for which the name Thiomicrospira hydrogeniphila sp. nov. is proposed (type strain, MAS2T=JCM 30760T=DSM 100274T).

  7. Sulfuricurvum kujiense gen. nov., sp. nov., a facultatively anaerobic, chemolithoautotrophic, sulfur-oxidizing bacterium isolated from an underground crude-oil storage cavity.

    PubMed

    Kodama, Yumiko; Watanabe, Kazuya

    2004-11-01

    A facultatively anaerobic, chemolithoautotrophic, sulfur-oxidizing bacterium, strain YK-1(T), was isolated from an underground crude-oil storage cavity at Kuji in Iwate, Japan. The cells were motile, curved rods and had a single polar flagellum. Optimum growth occurred in a low-strength salt medium at pH 7.0 and 25 degrees C. It utilized sulfide, elemental sulfur, thiosulfate and hydrogen as the electron donors and nitrate as the electron acceptor under anaerobic conditions, but it did not use nitrite. Oxygen also served as the electron acceptor under the microaerobic condition (O(2) in the head space 1 %). It did not grow on sugars, organic acids or hydrocarbons as carbon and energy sources. The DNA G+C content of strain YK-1(T) was 45 mol%. Phylogenetic analysis, based on the 16S rRNA gene sequence, showed that its closest relative was Thiomicrospira denitrificans in the 'Epsilonproteobacteria', albeit with low homology (90 %). On the basis of physiological and phylogenetic data, strain YK-1(T) should be classified into a novel genus and species, for which the name Sulfuricurvum kujiense gen. nov., sp. nov. is proposed. The type strain is YK-1(T) (=JCM 11577(T)=MBIC 06352(T)=ATCC BAA-921(T)).

  8. Complete genome sequence of the facultatively chemolithoautotrophic and methylotrophic alpha Proteobacterium Starkeya novella type strain (ATCC 8093T)

    SciTech Connect

    Kappler, Ulrike; Davenport, Karen W.; Beatson, Scott; Lucas, Susan; Lapidus, Alla L.; Copeland, Alex; Berry, Kerrie W.; Glavina Del Rio, Tijana; Hammon, Nancy; Dalin, Eileen; Tice, Hope; Pitluck, Sam; Richardson, Paul M.; Bruce, David; Goodwin, Lynne A.; Han, Cliff; Tapia, Roxanne; Detter, John Chris; Chang, Yun -Juan; Jeffries, Cynthia D.; Land, Miriam L.; Hauser, Loren John; Kyrpides, Nikos C.; Goker, Markus; Ivanova, Natalia; Klenk, Hans -Peter; Woyke, Tanja

    2012-10-10

    Starkeya novella (Starkey 1934) Kelly et al. 2000 is a member of the family Xanthobacteraceae in the order Rhizobiales, which is thus far poorly characterized at the genome level. Cultures from this spe- cies are most interesting due to their facultatively chemolithoautotrophic lifestyle, which allows them to both consume carbon dioxide and to produce it. This feature makes S. novella an interesting model organism for studying the genomic basis of regulatory networks required for the switch between consumption and production of carbon dioxide, a key component of the global carbon cycle. In addition, S. novella is of interest for its ability to grow on various inorganic sulfur compounds and several C1- compounds such as methanol. Besides Azorhizobium caulinodans, S. novella is only the second species in the family Xanthobacteraceae with a completely sequenced genome of a type strain. The cur- rent taxonomic classification of this group is in significant conflict with the 16S rRNA data. The genomic data indicate that the physiological capabilities of the organism might have been underestimated. Here, the 4,765,023 bp long chromosome with its 4,511 protein-coding and 52 RNA genes was sequenced as part of the DOE Joint Genome Institute Community Sequencing Program (CSP) 2008.

  9. Non-contiguous finished genome sequence and description of Sulfurimonas hongkongensis sp. nov., a strictly anaerobic denitrifying, hydrogen- and sulfur-oxidizing chemolithoautotroph isolated from marine sediment.

    PubMed

    Cai, Lin; Shao, Ming-Fei; Zhang, Tong

    2014-06-15

    Here, we report a type strain AST-10 representing a novel species Sulfurimonas hongkongensis within Epsilonproteobacteria, which is involved in marine sedimentary sulfur oxidation and denitrification. Strain AST-10(T) (= DSM 22096(T) = JCM 18418(T)) was isolated from the coastal sediment at the Kai Tak Approach Channel connected to Victoria Harbour in Hong Kong. It grew chemolithoautotrophically using thiosulfate, sulfide or hydrogen as the sole electron donor and nitrate as the electron acceptor under anoxic conditions. It was rod-shaped and grew at 15-35°C (optimum at 30°C), pH 6.5-8.5 (optimum at 7.0-7.5), and 10-60 g L(-1) NaCl (optimum at 30 g L(-1)). Genome sequencing and annotation of strain AST-10(T) showed a 2,302,023 bp genome size, with 34.9% GC content, 2,290 protein-coding genes, and 42 RNA genes, including 3 rRNA genes.

  10. [Effect of temperature on the rate of oxidation of pyrrhotite-rich sulfide ore flotation concentrate and the structure of the acidophilic chemolithoautotrophic microbial community].

    PubMed

    Moshchanetskii, P V; Pivovarova, T A; Belyi, A V; Kondrat'eva, T F

    2014-01-01

    Oxidation of flotation concentrate of a pyrrhotite-rich sulfide ore by acidophilic chemolithoautotrophic microbial communities at 35, 40, and 45 degrees C was investigated. According to the physicochemical parameters of the liquid phase of the pulp, as well as the results of analysis of the solid residue after biooxidation and cyanidation, the community developed at 40 degrees C exhibited the highest rate of oxidation. The degree of gold recovery at 35, 40, and 45 degrees C was 89.34, 94.59, and 83.25%, respectively. At 40 degrees C, the highest number of microbial cells (6.01 x 10(9) cells/mL) was observed. While temperature had very little effect on the species composition of microbial communities, except for the absence of Leptospirillum ferriphilum at 35 degrees C, the shares of individual species in the communities varied with temperature. Relatively high numbers of Sulfobacillus thermosulfidooxidans, the organism oxidizing iron and elemental sulfur at higher rates than other acidophilic chemolithotrophic species, were observed at 40 degrees C.

  11. Insights into glycogen metabolism in chemolithoautotrophic bacteria from distinctive kinetic and regulatory properties of ADP-glucose pyrophosphorylase from Nitrosomonas europaea.

    PubMed

    Machtey, Matías; Kuhn, Misty L; Flasch, Diane A; Aleanzi, Mabel; Ballicora, Miguel A; Iglesias, Alberto A

    2012-11-01

    Nitrosomonas europaea is a chemolithoautotroph that obtains energy by oxidizing ammonia in the presence of oxygen and fixes CO(2) via the Benson-Calvin cycle. Despite its environmental and evolutionary importance, very little is known about the regulation and metabolism of glycogen, a source of carbon and energy storage. Here, we cloned and heterologously expressed the genes coding for two major putative enzymes of the glycogen synthetic pathway in N. europaea, ADP-glucose pyrophosphorylase and glycogen synthase. In other bacteria, ADP-glucose pyrophosphorylase catalyzes the regulatory step of the synthetic pathway and glycogen synthase elongates the polymer. In starch synthesis in plants, homologous enzymes play similar roles. We purified to homogeneity the recombinant ADP-glucose pyrophosphorylase from N. europaea and characterized its kinetic, regulatory, and oligomeric properties. The enzyme was allosterically activated by pyruvate, oxaloacetate, and phosphoenolpyruvate and inhibited by AMP. It had a broad thermal and pH stability and used different divalent metal ions as cofactors. Depending on the cofactor, the enzyme was able to accept different nucleotides and sugar phosphates as alternative substrates. However, characterization of the recombinant glycogen synthase showed that only ADP-Glc elongates the polysaccharide, indicating that ATP and glucose-1-phosphate are the physiological substrates of the ADP-glucose pyrophosphorylase. The distinctive properties with respect to selectivity for substrates and activators of the ADP-glucose pyrophosphorylase were in good agreement with the metabolic routes operating in N. europaea, indicating an evolutionary adaptation. These unique properties place the enzyme in a category of its own within the family, highlighting the unique regulation in these organisms.

  12. Permanent draft genome of Thermithiobacillus tepidarius DSM 3134T, a moderately thermophilic, obligately chemolithoautotrophic member of the Acidithiobacillia

    SciTech Connect

    Boden, Rich; Hutt, Lee P.; Huntemann, Marcel; Clum, Alicia; Pillay, Manoj; Palaniappan, Krishnaveni; Varghese, Neha; Mikhailova, Natalia; Stamatis, Dimitrios; Reddy, Tatiparthi; Ngan, Chew Yee; Daum, Chris; Shapiro, Nicole; Markowitz, Victor; Ivanova, Natalia; Woyke, Tanja; Kyrpides, Nikos

    2016-09-26

    Thermithiobacillus tepidarius DSM 3134T was originally isolated (1983) from the waters of a sulfidic spring entering the Roman Baths (Temple of Sulis-Minerva) at Bath, United Kingdom and is an obligate chemolithoautotroph growing at the expense of reduced sulfur species. This strain has a genome size of 2,958,498 bp. Here we report the genome sequence, annotation and characteristics. The genome comprises 2,902 protein coding and 66 RNA coding genes. Genes responsible for the transaldolase variant of the Calvin-Benson-Bassham cycle were identified along with a biosynthetic horseshoe in lieu of Krebs' cycle sensu stricto. Terminal oxidases were identified, viz. cytochrome c oxidase (cbb3 , EC 1.9.3.1) and ubiquinol oxidase (bd, EC 1.10.3.10). Metalloresistance genes involved in pathways of arsenic and cadmium resistance were found. Evidence of horizontal gene transfer accounting for 5.9 % of the protein-coding genes was found, including transfer from Thiobacillus spp. and Methylococcus capsulatus Bath, isolated from the same spring. A sox gene cluster was found, similar in structure to those from other Acidithiobacillia - by comparison with Thiobacillus thioparus and Paracoccus denitrificans, an additional gene between soxA and soxB was found, annotated as a DUF302-family protein of unknown function. As the Kelly-Friedrich pathway of thiosulfate oxidation (encoded by sox) is not used in Thermithiobacillus spp., the role of the operon (if any) in this species remains unknown. We speculate that DUF302 and sox genes may have a role in periplasmic trithionate oxidation.

  13. Ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase genes as a functional marker for chemolithoautotrophic halophilic sulfur-oxidizing bacteria in hypersaline habitats.

    PubMed

    Tourova, Tatjana P; Kovaleva, Olga L; Sorokin, Dimitry Yu; Muyzer, Gerard

    2010-07-01

    The presence and diversity of the cbb genes encoding the large subunit of ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase (RuBisCO) (a key enzyme of the Calvin-Benson cycle of autotrophic CO(2) assimilation) were investigated in pure cultures of seven genera of halophilic chemolithoautotrophic sulfur-oxidizing bacteria (SOB) and in sediments from a hypersaline lake in which such bacteria have been recently discovered. All of the halophilic SOB strains (with the exception of Thiohalomonas nitratireducens) possessed the cbbL gene encoding RuBisCO form I, while the cbbM gene encoding RuBisCO form II was detected only in some of the pure cultures. The general topologies of the CbbL/CbbM trees and the 16S rRNA gene tree were different, but both markers showed that the halophilic SOB genera formed independent lineages in the Gammaproteobacteria. In some cases, such as with several strains of the genus Thiohalospira and with Thioalkalibacter halophilus, the cbbL clustering was incongruent with the positions of these strains on the ribosomal tree. In the cbbM tree, the clustering of Thiohalospira and Thiohalorhabdus strains was incongruent with their branching in both cbbL and 16S rRNA gene trees. cbbL and cbbM genes related to those found in the analysed halophilic SOB were also detected in a sediment from a hypersaline lake in Kulunda Steppe (Russia). Most of the cbbL and cbbM genes belonged to members of the genus Thiohalorhabdus. In the cbbL clone library, sequences related to those of Halothiobacillus and Thiohalospira were detected as minor components. Some of the environmental cbbM sequences belonged to as yet unknown phylotypes, representing deep lineages of halophilic autotrophs.

  14. Balnearium lithotrophicum gen. nov., sp. nov., a novel thermophilic, strictly anaerobic, hydrogen-oxidizing chemolithoautotroph isolated from a black smoker chimney in the Suiyo Seamount hydrothermal system.

    PubMed

    Takai, Ken; Nakagawa, Satoshi; Sako, Yoshihiko; Horikoshi, Koki

    2003-11-01

    A novel, extremely thermophilic bacterium, designated strain 17S(T), was isolated from a deep-sea hydrothermal vent chimney at the Suiyo Seamount in the Izu-Bonin Arc, Japan. The cells were rods with no apparent motility, most of which were narrow in the middle in the exponential-growth phase and had several polar flagella at both ends. Growth was observed between 45 and 80 degrees C (optimum temperature, 70-75 degrees C; doubling time, 80 min) and between pH 5.0 and 7.0 (optimum pH, 5.4). The isolate was a strictly anaerobic chemolithoautotroph that was capable of using molecular hydrogen as its sole energy source and carbon dioxide as its sole carbon source. Elemental sulfur (S(0)) was required for growth as an electron acceptor. The G+C content of the genomic DNA was 34.6 mol%. Phylogenetic analysis based on 16S rDNA sequences indicated that the isolate was related to Thermovibrio ruber ED11/3LLK(T) and Desulfurobacterium thermolithotrophum BSA(T), whilst it appeared to be a novel lineage prior to the divergence of these genera. This isolate could also be differentiated from both T. ruber ED11/3LLK(T) and D. thermolithotrophum BSA(T) on the basis of physiological properties. The name Balnearium lithotrophicum gen. nov., sp. nov. is proposed for this isolate (type strain, 17S(T)=JCM 11970(T)=ATCC BAA-736(T)).

  15. Differential expression of two bc1 complexes in the strict acidophilic chemolithoautotrophic bacterium Acidithiobacillus ferrooxidans suggests a model for their respective roles in iron or sulfur oxidation.

    PubMed

    Bruscella, Patrice; Appia-Ayme, Corinne; Levicán, Gloria; Ratouchniak, Jeanine; Jedlicki, Eugenia; Holmes, David S; Bonnefoy, Violaine

    2007-01-01

    Three strains of the strict acidophilic chemolithoautotrophic Acidithiobacillus ferrooxidans, including the type strain ATCC 23270, contain a petIIABC gene cluster that encodes the three proteins, cytochrome c1, cytochrome b and a Rieske protein, that constitute a bc1 electron-transfer complex. RT-PCR and Northern blotting show that the petIIABC cluster is co-transcribed with cycA, encoding a cytochrome c belonging to the c4 family, sdrA, encoding a putative short-chain dehydrogenase, and hip, encoding a high potential iron-sulfur protein, suggesting that the six genes constitute an operon, termed the petII operon. Previous results indicated that A. ferrooxidans contains a second pet operon, termed the petI operon, which contains a gene cluster that is similarly organized except that it lacks hip. Real-time PCR and Northern blot experiments demonstrate that petI is transcribed mainly in cells grown in medium containing iron, whereas petII is transcribed in cells grown in media containing sulfur or iron. Primer extension experiments revealed possible transcription initiation sites for the petI and petII operons. A model is presented in which petI is proposed to encode the bc1 complex, functioning in the uphill flow of electrons from iron to NAD(P), whereas petII is suggested to be involved in electron transfer from sulfur (or formate) to oxygen (or ferric iron). A. ferrooxidans is the only organism, to date, to exhibit two functional bc1 complexes.

  16. Insights into Glycogen Metabolism in Chemolithoautotrophic Bacteria from Distinctive Kinetic and Regulatory Properties of ADP-Glucose Pyrophosphorylase from Nitrosomonas europaea

    PubMed Central

    Machtey, Matías; Kuhn, Misty L.; Flasch, Diane A.; Aleanzi, Mabel; Ballicora, Miguel A.

    2012-01-01

    Nitrosomonas europaea is a chemolithoautotroph that obtains energy by oxidizing ammonia in the presence of oxygen and fixes CO2 via the Benson-Calvin cycle. Despite its environmental and evolutionary importance, very little is known about the regulation and metabolism of glycogen, a source of carbon and energy storage. Here, we cloned and heterologously expressed the genes coding for two major putative enzymes of the glycogen synthetic pathway in N. europaea, ADP-glucose pyrophosphorylase and glycogen synthase. In other bacteria, ADP-glucose pyrophosphorylase catalyzes the regulatory step of the synthetic pathway and glycogen synthase elongates the polymer. In starch synthesis in plants, homologous enzymes play similar roles. We purified to homogeneity the recombinant ADP-glucose pyrophosphorylase from N. europaea and characterized its kinetic, regulatory, and oligomeric properties. The enzyme was allosterically activated by pyruvate, oxaloacetate, and phosphoenolpyruvate and inhibited by AMP. It had a broad thermal and pH stability and used different divalent metal ions as cofactors. Depending on the cofactor, the enzyme was able to accept different nucleotides and sugar phosphates as alternative substrates. However, characterization of the recombinant glycogen synthase showed that only ADP-Glc elongates the polysaccharide, indicating that ATP and glucose-1-phosphate are the physiological substrates of the ADP-glucose pyrophosphorylase. The distinctive properties with respect to selectivity for substrates and activators of the ADP-glucose pyrophosphorylase were in good agreement with the metabolic routes operating in N. europaea, indicating an evolutionary adaptation. These unique properties place the enzyme in a category of its own within the family, highlighting the unique regulation in these organisms. PMID:22961847

  17. Complete genome sequence of Thioalkalivibrio paradoxus type strain ARh 1T, an obligately chemolithoautotrophic haloalkaliphilic sulfur-oxidizing bacterium isolated from a Kenyan soda lake

    SciTech Connect

    Berben, Tom; Sorokin, Dimitry Y.; Ivanova, Natalia; Pati, Amrita; Kyrpides, Nikos; Goodwin, Lynne A.; Woyke, Tanja; Muyzer, Gerard

    2015-11-19

    Thioalkalivibrio paradoxus strain ARh 1T is a chemolithoautotrophic, non-motile, Gram-negative bacterium belonging to the Gammaproteobacteria that was isolated from samples of haloalkaline soda lakes. It derives energy from the oxidation of reduced sulfur compounds and is notable for its ability to grow on thiocyanate as its sole source of electrons, sulfur and nitrogen. The full genome consists of 3,756,729 bp and comprises 3,500 protein-coding and 57 RNA-coding genes. Moreover, this organism was sequenced as part of the community science program at the DOE Joint Genome Institute.

  18. Influence of salts and pH on growth and activity of a novel facultatively alkaliphilic, extremely salt-tolerant, obligately chemolithoautotrophic sufur-oxidizing Gammaproteobacterium Thioalkalibacter halophilus gen. nov., sp. nov. from South-Western Siberian soda lakes.

    PubMed

    Banciu, Horia L; Sorokin, Dimitry Y; Tourova, Tatyana P; Galinski, Erwin A; Muntyan, Maria S; Kuenen, J Gijs; Muyzer, Gerard

    2008-05-01

    A chemolithoautotrophic sulfur-oxidizing bacterium (SOB) strain ALCO 1 capable of growing at both near-neutral and extremely alkaline pH was isolated from hypersaline soda lakes in S-W Siberia (Altai, Russia). Strain ALCO 1 represents a novel separate branch within the halothiobacilli in the Gammaproteobacteria, which, so far, contained only neutro-halophilic SOB. On the basis of its unique phenotypic properties and distant phylogeny, strain ALCO 1 is proposed as a new genus and species Thioalkalibacter halophilus gen. nov. sp. nov. ALCO 1 was able to grow within a broad range of salinity (0.5-3.5 M of total sodium) with an optimum at around 1 M Na+, and pH (7.2-10.2, pHopt at around 8.5). Na+ was required for sulfur-dependent respiration in ALCO 1. The neutral (NaCl)-grown chemostat culture had a much lower maximum growth rate (micromax), respiratory activity and total cytochrome c content than its alkaline-grown counterpart. The specific concentration of osmolytes (ectoine and glycine-betaine) produced at neutral pH and 3 M NaCl was roughly two times higher than at pH 10 in soda. Altogether, strain ALCO 1 represents an interesting chemolithoautotrophic model organism for comparative investigations of bacterial adaptations to high salinity and pH.

  19. Partial genome sequence of Thioalkalivibrio thiocyanodenitrificans ARhD 1T, a chemolithoautotrophic haloalkaliphilic sulfur-oxidizing bacterium capable of complete denitrification

    SciTech Connect

    Berben, Tom; Sorokin, Dimitry Y.; Ivanova, Natalia; Pati, Amrita; Kyrpides, Nikos; Goodwin, Lynne A.; Woyke, Tanja; Muyzer, Gerard

    2015-10-26

    Thioalkalivibrio thiocyanodenitrificans strain ARhD 1T is a motile, Gram-negative bacterium isolated from soda lakes that belongs to the Gammaproteobacteria. It derives energy for growth and carbon fixation from the oxidation of sulfur compounds, most notably thiocyanate, and so is a chemolithoautotroph. It is capable of complete denitrification under anaerobic conditions. In addition, the draft genome sequence consists of 3,746,647 bp in 3 scaffolds, containing 3558 protein-coding and 121 RNA genes. T. thiocyanodenitrificans ARhD 1T was sequenced as part of the DOE Joint Genome Institute Community Science Program.

  20. Thioprofundum hispidum sp. nov., an obligately chemolithoautotrophic sulfur-oxidizing gammaproteobacterium isolated from the hydrothermal field on Suiyo Seamount, and proposal of Thioalkalispiraceae fam. nov. in the order Chromatiales.

    PubMed

    Mori, Koji; Suzuki, Ken-ichiro; Urabe, Tetsuro; Sugihara, Maki; Tanaka, Kenji; Hamada, Moriyuki; Hanada, Satoshi

    2011-10-01

    A novel mesophilic, facultatively anaerobic, sulfur-oxidizing bacterial strain, designated gps61(T), was isolated from a surface rock sample collected from the hydrothermal field of Suiyo Seamount on the Izu-Bonin Arc in the Western Pacific Ocean. Cells of the isolate were rod-shaped with a single sheathed polar flagellum. Neither extensive internal membranes nor storage materials were present in the cells. In a 20 % CO(2) atmosphere, strain gps61(T) grew using thiosulfate, sulfur or tetrathionate as electron donors and oxygen or nitrate as electron acceptors. Other substrates, including organic acids and sugars, did not support growth, indicating that strain gps61(T) was an obligate chemolithoautotroph. 16S rRNA gene sequence analysis revealed that strain gps61(T) was closely related to Thioprofundum lithotrophicum 106(T) (98.5 % sequence similarity) in the order Chromatiales. Phylogenetic trees grouped strain gps61(T) and Thioprofundum lithotrophicum in the same cluster along with Thioalkalispira microaerophila and Thiohalophilus thiocyanoxidans, but it was apparent from the analysis that the novel strain had definitely departed from the family lineage. On the basis of its phylogenetic position along with its morphological and physiological characteristics, strain gps61(T) ( = NBRC 101261(T)  = DSM 18546(T)) represents a novel species of the genus Thioprofundum, for which the name Thioprofundum hispidum sp. nov. is proposed. In addition, we propose a novel family name, Thioalkalispiraceae, in the order Chromatiales, to accommodate the genera Thioalkalispira, Thiohalophilus and Thioprofundum.

  1. Thiogranum longum gen. nov., sp. nov., an obligately chemolithoautotrophic, sulfur-oxidizing bacterium of the family Ectothiorhodospiraceae isolated from a deep-sea hydrothermal field, and an emended description of the genus Thiohalomonas.

    PubMed

    Mori, Koji; Suzuki, Ken-ichiro; Yamaguchi, Kaoru; Urabe, Tetsuro; Hanada, Satoshi

    2015-01-01

    A novel, obligately chemolithoautotrophic, sulfur-oxidizing bacterial strain, designated strain gps52(T), was isolated from a rock sample collected near the hydrothermal vents of the Suiyo Seamount in the Pacific Ocean. The cells possessed a Gram-stain-negative-type cell wall and contained menaquinone-8(H4) and menaquinone-9(H4) as respiratory quinones, and C16 : 1ω7c, C16 : 0 and C18 : 1ω7c as major cellular fatty acids. Neither storage compounds nor extensive internal membranes were observed in the cells. Strain gps52(T) grew using carbon dioxide fixation and oxidation of inorganic sulfur compounds with oxygen as electron acceptor. Optimal growth was observed at 32 °C, pH 6.5 and with 3 % (w/v) NaCl. Phylogenetic analyses based on 16S rRNA gene sequences indicated that strain gps52(T) belongs to the family Ectothiorhodospiraceae and is different from any other known bacteria, with sequence similarities of less than 93 %. Based on phenotypic and phylogenetic findings, the isolate is considered to represent a novel genus and species in the family Ectothiorhodospiraceae, and the name Thiogranum longum gen. nov., sp. nov. is proposed. The type strain is gps52(T) ( = NBRC 101260(T) = DSM 19610(T)). An emended description of the genus Thiohalomonas is also proposed.

  2. Hydrogenimonas thermophila gen. nov., sp. nov., a novel thermophilic, hydrogen-oxidizing chemolithoautotroph within the epsilon-Proteobacteria, isolated from a black smoker in a Central Indian Ridge hydrothermal field.

    PubMed

    Takai, Ken; Nealson, Kenneth H; Horikoshi, Koki

    2004-01-01

    A novel thermophilic bacterium, strain EP1-55-1%T, was isolated from an in-situ colonization system deployed in a superheated, deep-sea, hydrothermal vent emission at the Kairei Field on the Central Indian Ridge in the Indian Ocean. The cells were highly motile rods, each possessing a single polar flagellum. Growth was observed between 35 and 65 degrees C (optimum temperature, 55 degrees C; 70 min doubling time) and between pH 4.9 and 7.2 (optimum, pH 5.9). The isolate was a microaerobic-to-anaerobic chemolithoautotroph capable of using molecular hydrogen as the sole energy source and carbon dioxide as the sole carbon source. Molecular oxygen, nitrate or elemental sulfur (S0) could serve as electron acceptors to support growth. The G+C content of the genomic DNA was 34.6 mol%. Phylogenetic analysis based on 16S rDNA sequences indicated that strain EP1-55-1%T represents the first strain for which taxonomic properties have been characterized within the previously uncultivated phylogroup classified as belonging to the uncultivated epsilon-Proteobacteria group A; the name Hydrogenimonas thermophila gen. nov., sp. nov. is proposed, with strain EP1-55-1%T (=JCM 11971T=ATCC BAA-737T) as the type strain.

  3. Genome of the epsilonproteobacterial chemolithoautotroph Sulfurimonas denitrificans

    SciTech Connect

    Sievert, Stefan M; Scott, Kathleen M; Klotz, Martin G; Chain, Patrick S. G.; Hauser, Loren John; Hemp, James; Hugler, Michael; Land, Miriam L; Lapidus, Alla L.; Larimer, Frank W; Lucas, Susan; Malfatti, Stephanie; Meyer, Folker; Paulsen, Ian T; Ren, Qinghu; Simon, Jorg

    2008-01-01

    Sulfur-oxidizing epsilonproteobacteria are common in a variety of sulfidogenic environments. These autotrophic and mixotrophic sulfur-oxidizing bacteria are believed to contribute substantially to the oxidative portion of the global sulfur cycle. In order to better understand the ecology and roles of sulfur-oxidizing epsilonproteobacteria, in particular those of the widespread genus Sulfurimonas, in biogeochemical cycles, the genome of Sulfurimonas denitrificans DSM1251 was sequenced. This genome has many features, including a larger size (2.2 Mbp), that suggest a greater degree of metabolic versatility or responsiveness to the environment than seen for most of the other sequenced epsilonproteobacteria. A branched electron transport chain is apparent, with genes encoding complexes for the oxidation of hydrogen, reduced sulfur compounds, and formate and the reduction of nitrate and oxygen. Genes are present for a complete, autotrophic reductive citric acid cycle. Many genes are present that could facilitate growth in the spatially and temporally heterogeneous sediment habitat from where Sulfurimonas denitrificans was originally isolated. Many resistance-nodulation-development family transporter genes (10 total) are present; of these, several are predicted to encode heavy metal efflux transporters. An elaborate arsenal of sensory and regulatory protein-encoding genes is in place, as are genes necessary to prevent and respond to oxidative stress.

  4. Metagenome of a Versatile Chemolithoautotroph from Expanding Oceanic Dead Zones

    SciTech Connect

    Walsh, David A.; Zaikova, Elena; Howes, Charles L.; Song, Young; Wright, Jody; Tringe, Susannah G.; Tortell, Philippe D.; Hallam, Steven J.

    2009-07-15

    Oxygen minimum zones (OMZs), also known as oceanic"dead zones", are widespread oceanographic features currently expanding due to global warming and coastal eutrophication. Although inhospitable to metazoan life, OMZs support a thriving but cryptic microbiota whose combined metabolic activity is intimately connected to nutrient and trace gas cycling within the global ocean. Here we report time-resolved metagenomic analyses of a ubiquitous and abundant but uncultivated OMZ microbe (SUP05) closely related to chemoautotrophic gill symbionts of deep-sea clams and mussels. The SUP05 metagenome harbors a versatile repertoire of genes mediating autotrophic carbon assimilation, sulfur-oxidation and nitrate respiration responsive to a wide range of water column redox states. Thus, SUP05 plays integral roles in shaping nutrient and energy flow within oxygen-deficient oceanic waters via carbon sequestration, sulfide detoxification and biological nitrogen loss with important implications for marine productivity and atmospheric greenhouse control.

  5. Isolation and characterization of alkaliphilic, chemolithoautotrophic, sulphur-oxidizing bacteria.

    PubMed

    Sorokin, D Y; Robertson, L A; Kuenen, J G

    2000-04-01

    Alkaliphilic sulphur-oxidizing bacteria were isolated from samples from alkaline environments including soda soil and soda lakes. Two isolates, currently known as strains AL 2 and AL 3, were characterized. They grew over a pH range 8.0-10.4 with an optimum at 9.5-9.8. Both strains could oxidize thiosulphate, sulphide, polysulphide, elemental sulphur and tetrathionate. Strain AL 3 more actively oxidized thiosulphate and sulphide, while isolate AL 2 had higher activity with elemental sulphur and tetrathionate. Isolate AL 2 was also able to oxidize trithionate. The pH optimum for thiosulphate and sulphide oxidation was between 9-10. Some activity remained at pH 11, but was negligible at pH 7. Metabolism of tetrathionate by isolate AL 2 involved initial anaerobic hydrolysis to form sulphur, thiosulphate and sulphate in a sequence similar to that in other colourless sulphur-oxidizing bacteria. Sulphate was produced by both strains. During batch growth on thiosulphate, elemental sulphur and sulphite transiently accumulated in cultures of isolates AL 2 and AL 3, respectively. At lower pH values, both strains accumulated sulphur during sulphide and thiosulphate oxidation. Both strains contained ribulose bisphosphate carboxylase. Thiosulphate oxidation in isolate AL 3 appeared to be sodium ion-dependent. Isolate AL 2 differed from AL 3 by its high GC mol % value (65.5 and 49.5, respectively), sulphur deposition in its periplasm, the absence of carboxysomes, lower sulphur-oxidizing capacity, growth kinetics (lower growth rate and higher growth yield) and cytochrome composition.

  6. Iron Meteorites Can Support the Growth of Acidophilic Chemolithoautotrophic Microorganisms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    González-Toril, Elena; Martínez-Frías, Jesús; Gómez, José María; Rull, Fernando; Amils, Ricardo

    2005-06-01

    Chemolithoautotrophy based on reduced inorganic minerals is considered a primitive energy transduction system. Evidence that a high number of meteorites crashed into the planet during the early period of Earth history led us to test the ability of iron-oxidizing bacteria to grow using iron meteorites as their source of energy. Here we report the growth of two acidophilic iron-oxidizing bacteria, Leptospirillum ferrooxidans and Acidithiobacillus ferrooxidans, on a piece of the Toluca meteorite as the only source of energy. The alteration of the surface of the exposed piece of meteorite, the solubilization of its oxidized metal constituents, mainly ferric iron, and the formation of goethite precipitates all clearly indicate that iron-meteoritebased chemolithotrophic metabolism is viable.

  7. Protection of chemolithoautotrophic bacteria exposed to simulated Mars environmental conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gómez, Felipe; Mateo-Martí, Eva; Prieto-Ballesteros, Olga; Martín-Gago, Jose; Amils, Ricardo

    2010-10-01

    Current surface conditions (strong oxidative atmosphere, UV radiation, low temperatures and xeric conditions) on Mars are considered extremely challenging for life. The question is whether there are any features on Mars that could exert a protective effect against the sterilizing conditions detected on its surface. Potential habitability in the subsurface would increase if the overlaying material played a protective role. With the aim of evaluating this possibility we studied the viability of two microorganisms under different conditions in a Mars simulation chamber. An acidophilic chemolithotroph isolated from Río Tinto belonging to the Acidithiobacillus genus and Deinococcus radiodurans, a radiation resistant microorganism, were exposed to simulated Mars conditions under the protection of a layer of ferric oxides and hydroxides, a Mars regolith analogue. Samples of these microorganisms were exposed to UV radiation in Mars atmospheric conditions at different time intervals under the protection of 2 and 5 mm layers of oxidized iron minerals. Viability was evaluated by inoculation on fresh media and characterization of their growth cultures. Here we report the survival capability of both bacteria to simulated Mars environmental conditions.

  8. The Genome of the Epsilonproteobacterial Chemolithoautotroph Sulfurimonas dentrificans

    SciTech Connect

    USF Genomics Class; Sievert, Stefan M.; Scott, Kathleen M.; Klotz, Martin G.; Chain, Patrick S.G.; Hauser, Loren J.; Hemp, James; Hugler, Michael; Land, Miriam; Lapidus, Alla; Larimer, Frank W.; Lucas, Susan; Malfatti, Stephanie A.; Meyer, Folker; Paulsen, Ian T.; Ren, Qinghu; Simon, Jorg

    2007-08-08

    Sulfur-oxidizing epsilonproteobacteria are common in a variety of sulfidogenic environments. These autotrophic and mixotrophic sulfur-oxidizing bacteria are believed to contribute substantially to the oxidative portion of the global sulfur cycle. In order to better understand the ecology and roles of sulfur-oxidizing epsilonproteobacteria, in particular those of the widespread genus Sulfurimonas, in biogeochemical cycles, the genome of Sulfurimonas denitrificans DSM1251 was sequenced. This genome has many features, including a larger size (2.2 Mbp), that suggest a greater degree of metabolic versatility or responsiveness to the environment than seen for most of the other sequenced epsilonproteobacteria. A branched electron transport chain is apparent, with genes encoding complexes for the oxidation of hydrogen, reduced sulfur compounds, and formate and the reduction of nitrate and oxygen. Genes are present for a complete, autotrophic reductive citric acid cycle. Many genes are present that could facilitate growth in the spatially and temporally heterogeneous sediment habitat from where Sulfurimonas denitrificans was originally isolated. Many resistance-nodulation-development family transporter genes (10 total) are present; of these, several are predicted to encode heavy metal efflux transporters. An elaborate arsenal of sensory and regulatory protein-encoding genes is in place, as are genes necessary to prevent and respond to oxidative stress.

  9. Metagenome of a versatile chemolithoautotroph from expanding oceanic dead zones.

    PubMed

    Walsh, David A; Zaikova, Elena; Howes, Charles G; Song, Young C; Wright, Jody J; Tringe, Susannah G; Tortell, Philippe D; Hallam, Steven J

    2009-10-23

    Oxygen minimum zones, also known as oceanic "dead zones," are widespread oceanographic features currently expanding because of global warming. Although inhospitable to metazoan life, they support a cryptic microbiota whose metabolic activities affect nutrient and trace gas cycling within the global ocean. Here, we report metagenomic analyses of a ubiquitous and abundant but uncultivated oxygen minimum zone microbe (SUP05) related to chemoautotrophic gill symbionts of deep-sea clams and mussels. The SUP05 metagenome harbors a versatile repertoire of genes mediating autotrophic carbon assimilation, sulfur oxidation, and nitrate respiration responsive to a wide range of water-column redox states. Our analysis provides a genomic foundation for understanding the ecological and biogeochemical role of pelagic SUP05 in oxygen-deficient oceanic waters and its potential sensitivity to environmental changes.

  10. Iron meteorites can support the growth of acidophilic chemolithoautotrophic microorganisms.

    PubMed

    González-Toril, Elena; Martínez-Frías, Jesús; Gómez Gómez, José María; Rull, Fernando; Amils, Ricardo

    2005-06-01

    Chemolithoautotrophy based on reduced inorganic minerals is considered a primitive energy transduction system. Evidence that a high number of meteorites crashed into the planet during the early period of Earth history led us to test the ability of iron-oxidizing bacteria to grow using iron meteorites as their source of energy. Here we report the growth of two acidophilic iron-oxidizing bacteria, Leptospirillum ferrooxidans and Acidithiobacillus ferrooxidans, on a piece of the Toluca meteorite as the only source of energy. The alteration of the surface of the exposed piece of meteorite, the solubilization of its oxidized metal constituents, mainly ferric iron, and the formation of goethite precipitates all clearly indicate that iron-meteorite-based chemolithotrophic metabolism is viable.

  11. Complete genome sequence of the chemolithoautotrophic marine magnetotactic coccus strain MC-1.

    PubMed

    Schübbe, Sabrina; Williams, Timothy J; Xie, Gary; Kiss, Hajnalka E; Brettin, Thomas S; Martinez, Diego; Ross, Christian A; Schüler, Dirk; Cox, B Lea; Nealson, Kenneth H; Bazylinski, Dennis A

    2009-07-01

    The marine bacterium strain MC-1 is a member of the alpha subgroup of the proteobacteria that contains the magnetotactic cocci and was the first member of this group to be cultured axenically. The magnetotactic cocci are not closely related to any other known alphaproteobacteria and are only distantly related to other magnetotactic bacteria. The genome of MC-1 contains an extensive (102 kb) magnetosome island that includes numerous genes that are conserved among all known magnetotactic bacteria, as well as some genes that are unique. Interestingly, certain genes that encode proteins considered to be important in magnetosome assembly (mamJ and mamW) are absent from the genome of MC-1. Magnetotactic cocci exhibit polar magneto-aerotaxis, and the MC-1 genome contains a relatively large number of identified chemotaxis genes. Although MC-1 is capable of both autotrophic and heterotrophic growth, it does not appear to be metabolically versatile, with heterotrophic growth confined to the utilization of acetate. Central carbon metabolism is encoded by genes for the citric acid cycle (oxidative and reductive), glycolysis, and gluconeogenesis. The genome also reveals the presence or absence of specific genes involved in the nitrogen, sulfur, iron, and phosphate metabolism of MC-1, allowing us to infer the presence or absence of specific biochemical pathways in strain MC-1. The pathways inferred from the MC-1 genome provide important information regarding central metabolism in this strain that could provide insights useful for the isolation and cultivation of new magnetotactic bacterial strains, in particular strains of other magnetotactic cocci.

  12. Growth physiology and competitive interaction of obligately chemolithoautotrophic, haloalkaliphilic, sulfur-oxidizing bacteria from soda lakes.

    PubMed

    Sorokin, Dimitry Y; Banciu, Horia; van Loosdrecht, Mark; Kuenen, J Gijs

    2003-06-01

    Two different groups of haloalkaliphilic, obligately autotrophic, sulfur-oxidizing bacteria belonging to the genera Thioalkalimicrobium and Thioalkalivibrio have recently been discovered in highly alkaline and saline soda lakes. To understand response to their extreme environment and different occurrence in soda lakes, the growth kinetics and competitive behavior of several representatives have been characterized in detail using batch and pH-controlled continuous cultivation. The bacteria belong to the true alkaliphiles, growing within the pH range 7.5-10.6 with maximum growth rate and maximum growth yield at pH 9.5-10. On the basis of their response to salt content, three groups can be identified. All the Thioalkalimicrobium strains and some of the Thioalkalivibrio strains belonged to the moderate halophiles. Some of the Thioalkalivibrio strains from hypersaline soda lakes were extremely salt-tolerant and capable of growth in saturated soda brines. The Thioalkalimicrobium strains demonstrated relatively high specific growth rates, low growth yield, high maintenance, and extremely high rates of thiosulfate and sulfide oxidation. In contrast, the Thioalkalivibrio strains, in general, were slow-growing, high-yield organisms with lower maintenance and much lower rates of oxidation of sulfide and thiosulfate. Moreover, the latter survived starvation much better than Thioalkalimicrobium. Different growth characteristics and salt resistance appear to determine the outcome of the enrichment cultures from different soda lakes: Thioalkalimicrobium dominated in the enrichments with freshly obtained samples from diluted soda lakes at low-medium salinity, while Thioalkalivibrio was the predominant organism in enrichments from aged samples and at hypersaline conditions. In mixed thiosulfate-limited chemostat cultures at low salinity, Thioalkalimicrobium strains (mu(max)=0.33 h(-1)) out-competed Thioalkalivibrio strains (mu(max)=0.15 h(-1)) at D>0.02 h(-1). The overall results suggest that Thioalkalimicrobium and Thioalkalivibrio represent two different ecological strategies.

  13. Endemicity of the cosmopolitan mesophilic chemolithoautotroph Sulfurimonas at deep-sea hydrothermal vents.

    PubMed

    Mino, Sayaka; Nakagawa, Satoshi; Makita, Hiroko; Toki, Tomohiro; Miyazaki, Junichi; Sievert, Stefan M; Polz, Martin F; Inagaki, Fumio; Godfroy, Anne; Kato, Shingo; Watanabe, Hiromi; Nunoura, Takuro; Nakamura, Koichi; Imachi, Hiroyuki; Watsuji, Tomo-O; Kojima, Shigeaki; Takai, Ken; Sawabe, Tomoo

    2017-04-01

    Rich animal and microbial communities have been found at deep-sea hydrothermal vents. Although the biogeography of vent macrofauna is well understood, the corresponding knowledge about vent microbial biogeography is lacking. Here, we apply the multilocus sequence analysis (MLSA) to assess the genetic variation of 109 Sulfurimonas strains with ⩾98% 16S rRNA gene sequence similarity, which were isolated from four different geographical regions (Okinawa Trough (OT), Mariana Volcanic Arc and Trough (MVAT), Central Indian Ridge (CIR) and Mid-Atlantic Ridge (MAR)). Sequence typing based on 11 protein-coding genes revealed high genetic variation, including some allele types that are widespread within regions, resulting in 102 nucleotide sequence types (STs). This genetic variation was predominantly due to mutation rather than recombination. Phylogenetic analysis of the 11 concatenated genes showed a clear geographical isolation corresponding to the hydrothermal regions they originated from, suggesting limited dispersal. Genetic differentiation among Sulfurimonas populations was primarily influenced by geographical distance rather than gas composition of vent fluid or habitat, although in situ environmental conditions of each microhabitat could not be examined. Nevertheless, Sulfurimonas may possess a higher dispersal capability compared with deep-sea hydrothermal vent thermophiles. This is the first report on MLSA of deep-sea hydrothermal vent Epsilonproteobacteria, which is indicative of allopatric speciation.

  14. Complete genome sequence of the sulfur compounds oxidizing chemolithoautotroph Sulfuricurvum kujiense type strain (YK-1T)

    SciTech Connect

    Han, Cliff; Kotsyurbenko, Oleg; Chertkov, Olga; Held, Brittany; Lapidus, Alla L.; Nolan, Matt; Lucas, Susan; Hammon, Nancy; Deshpande, Shweta; Cheng, Jan-Fang; Tapia, Roxanne; Goodwin, Lynne A.; Pitluck, Sam; Liolios, Konstantinos; Pagani, Ioanna; Ivanova, N; Mavromatis, K; Mikhailova, Natalia; Pati, Amrita; Chen, Amy; Palaniappan, Krishna; Land, Miriam L; Hauser, Loren John; Chang, Yun-Juan; Jeffries, Cynthia; Brambilla, Evelyne-Marie; Rohde, Manfred; Spring, Stefan; Sikorski, Johannes; Goker, Markus; Woyke, Tanja; Bristow, James; Eisen, Jonathan; Markowitz, Victor; Hugenholtz, Philip; Kyrpides, Nikos C; Klenk, Hans-Peter; Detter, J. Chris

    2012-01-01

    Sulfuricurvum kujiense Kodama and Watanabe 2004 is the type species of the monotypic genus Sulfuricurvum, which belongs to the family Helicobacteriaceae in the class Epsilonproteobacteria. The species is of interest because it is frequently found in crude oil and oil sands where it utilizes various reduced sulfur compounds such as elemental sulfur, sulfide and thiosulfate as electron donors. Members of the species do not utilize sugars, organic acids and hydrocarbons as carbon and energy sources. This is the first completed genome sequence of a member of the genus Sulfuricurvum. The genome, which consists of a circular chromosome of 2,574,824 bp length and four plasmids of 118,585 bp, 71,513 bp, 51,014 bp, and 3,421 bp length, respectively, harboring a total of 2,879 protein-coding and 61 RNA genes and is a part of the Genomic Encyclopedia of Bacteria and Archaea project.

  15. Complete genome sequences of the chemolithoautotrophic Oligotropha carboxidovorans strains OM4 and OM5.

    PubMed

    Volland, Sonja; Rachinger, Michael; Strittmatter, Axel; Daniel, Rolf; Gottschalk, Gerhard; Meyer, Ortwin

    2011-09-01

    We report on genome sequencing of Oligotropha carboxidovorans strain OM4 and resequencing of strain OM5. The genomes of both are composed of one chromosome and two plasmids. The presence of two plasmids in the OM5 genome is inconsistent with the previously published sequence, for which only one plasmid was described (D. Paul, S. Bridges, S. Burgess, Y. Dandass, and M. Lawrence, BMC Genomics 11:511, 2010). Copyright © 2011, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  16. Quantitative proteomic analysis of the chemolithoautotrophic bacterium Nitrosomonas europaea: comparison of growing- and energy-starved cells.

    PubMed

    Pellitteri-Hahn, Molly C; Halligan, Brian D; Scalf, Mark; Smith, Lloyd; Hickey, William J

    2011-04-01

    Obligately aerobic ammonia-oxidizing bacteria (AOB) like Nitrosomonas europaea play a pivotal role in the global nitrogen cycle. Although starvation tolerance is a key environmental adaptation, little is known about this response in AOB. The goal of these studies was to compare the composition of the N. europaea proteome in growing- and energy-starved cells using ¹⁵N labeling and HPLC-ESI-MS/MS. More than 6500 peptides were sequenced with high confidence, and matched to 876 proteins (34% of the protein coding genes). Of these, 126 proteins had two or more peptide forms identified by 10 or more scans, and were used in quantitative analysis and 27 were found to be significantly different in abundance between growing and starved cells. Proteins showing greater abundance in growing cells are geared toward biosynthesis, particularly DNA replication. Energy-starved cells were shifted away from biosynthesis and toward survival functions that included: cell envelope modification, protein protection/degradation, detoxification, and implementation of alternative energy generation mechanisms. Most of these activities have not previously been reported as associated with energy-starvation stress in N. europaea. This study provides insights into the potential effects of fluctuating environmental conditions on the regulation of physiological networks in N. europaea.

  17. Purification and characterization of 2-oxoglutarate:ferredoxin oxidoreductase from a thermophilic, obligately chemolithoautotrophic bacterium, Hydrogenobacter thermophilus TK-6.

    PubMed Central

    Yoon, K S; Ishii, M; Igarashi, Y; Kodama, T

    1996-01-01

    2-Oxoglutarate:ferredoxin oxidoreductase from a thermophilic, obligately autotrophic, hydrogen-oxidizing bacterium, Hydrogenobacter thermophilus TK-6, was purified to homogeneity by precipitation with ammonium sulfate and by fractionation by DEAE-Sepharose CL-6B, polyacrylate-quaternary amine, hydroxyapatite, and Superdex-200 chromatography. The purified enzyme had a molecular mass of about 105 kDa and comprised two subunits (70 kDa and 35 kDa). The activity of the 2-oxoglutarate:ferredoxin oxidoreductase was detected by the use of 2-oxoglutarate, coenzyme A, and one of several electron acceptors in substrate amounts (ferredoxin isolated from H. thermophilus, flavin adenine dinucleotide, flavin mononucleotide, or methyl viologen). NAD, NADP, and ferredoxins from Chlorella spp. and Clostridium pasteurianum were ineffective. The enzyme was extremely thermostable; the temperature optimum for 2-oxoglutarate oxidation was above 80 degrees C, and the time for a 50% loss of activity at 70 degrees C under anaerobic conditions was 22 h. The optimum pH for a 2-oxoglutarate oxidation reaction was 7.6 to 7.8. The apparent Km values for 2-oxoglutarate and coenzyme A at 70 degrees C were 1.42 mM and 80 microM, respectively. PMID:8655524

  18. Metagenomic analysis of a high carbon dioxide subsurface microbial community populated by chemolithoautotrophs and bacteria and archaea from candidate phyla.

    PubMed

    Emerson, Joanne B; Thomas, Brian C; Alvarez, Walter; Banfield, Jillian F

    2016-06-01

    Research on geologic carbon sequestration raises questions about potential impacts of subsurface microbiota on carbon cycling and biogeochemistry. Subsurface, high-CO2 systems are poorly biologically characterized, partly because of difficulty accessing high-volume, uncontaminated samples. CO2 -driven Crystal Geyser (CG, Utah, USA), an established geologic carbon sequestration analogue, provides high volumes of deep (∼ 200-500 m) subsurface fluids. We explored microbial diversity and metabolic potential in this high-CO2 environment by assembly and analysis of metagenomes recovered from geyser water filtrate. The system is dominated by neutrophilic, iron-oxidizing bacteria, including 'marine' Mariprofundus (Zetaproteobacteria) and 'freshwater' Gallionellales, sulfur-oxidizing Thiomicrospira crunogena and Thiobacillus-like Hydrogenophilales. Near-complete genomes were reconstructed for these bacteria. CG is notably populated by a wide diversity of bacteria and archaea from phyla lacking isolated representatives (candidate phyla) and from as-yet undefined lineages. Many bacteria affiliate with OD1, OP3, OP9, PER, ACD58, WWE3, BD1-5, OP11, TM7 and ZB2. The recovery of nearly 100 genes encoding ribulose-1,5 bisphosphate carboxylase-oxygenase subunit proteins of the Calvin cycle and AMP salvage pathways suggests a strong biological role in high-CO2 subsurface carbon cycling. Overall, we predict microbial impacts on subsurface biogeochemistry via iron, sulfur, and complex carbon oxidation, carbon and nitrogen fixation, fermentation, hydrogen metabolism, and aerobic and anaerobic respiration.

  19. Formation of ammonium from nitrate during chemolithoautotrophic growth of the extremely thermophilic bacterium ammonifex degensii gen. nov. sp. nov.

    PubMed

    Huber, R; Rossnagel, P; Woese, C R; Rachel, R; Langworthy, T A; Stetter, K O

    1996-03-01

    A novel, extremely thermophilic bacterium has been isolated from a neutral volcanic hot spring. The gram-negative, rod-shaped cells were motile and exhibited a complex cell wall composed of murein and a surface protein layer covered by a surface coat. The core lipids consisted of non-phytanyl mono- and diethers and of fatty acid esters. Growth occurred between 57 and 77 degrees C (opt.: 70 degrees C), pH 5.0 and 8.0 (opt.: 7.5) and 0 to 1.5% NaCl (opt.: 0.1% NaCl). The new isolate was a strict anaerobe, growing autotrophically by oxidation of hydrogen or formate, reducing nitrate to ammonium. Instead of nitrate, sulfate or sulfur were used as electron acceptors and H2S was formed as final product. Pyruvate was fermented to acetate, CO2, and hydrogen. The GC-content of the DNA was 54 mol%. On the basis of its 16S rRNA sequence, the new isolate represents a new genus, belonging to the "low G+C" subgroup of the gram-positive bacteria. Strain KC4 (DSM 10501) is described as the type strain of a new genus and species, which we name Ammonifex degensii.

  20. Isolation and properties of obligately chemolithoautotrophic and extremely alkali-tolerant ammonia-oxidizing bacteria from Mongolian soda lakes.

    PubMed

    Sorokin, D; Tourova, T; Schmid, M C; Wagner, M; Koops, H P; Kuenen, J G; Jetten, M

    2001-09-01

    Five mixed samples prepared from the surface sediments of 20 north-east Mongolian soda lakes with total salt contents from 5 to 360 g/l and pH values from 9.7 to 10.5 were used to enrich for alkaliphilic ammonia-oxidizing bacteria. Successful enrichments at pH 10 were achieved on carbonate mineral medium containing 0.6 M total Na(+) and < or =4 mM NH(4)Cl. Five isolates (ANs1-ANs5) of ammonia-oxidizing bacteria capable of growth at pH 10 were obtained from the colonies developed on bilayered gradient plates. The cells were motile and coccoid, with well-developed intracytoplasmic membranes (ICPM) and carboxysomes. At pH 10.0, ammonia was toxic for growth at concentrations higher than 5 mM NH(4)Cl. The bacteria were able to grow within the salinity range of 0.1-1.0 M of total Na+ (optimum 0.3 M). In media containing 0.3-0.6 M total Na(+), optimal growth in batch cultures occurred in the presence of a bicarbonate/carbonate buffer system within the pH range 8.5-9.5, with the highest pH limit at pH 10.5. At pH lower than 8.0, growth was slower, most probably due to decreasing free ammonia. The pH profile of the respiratory activity was broader, with limits at 6.5-7.0 and 11.0 and an optimum at 9.5-10.0. In pH-controlled, NH(3)-limited continuous culture, isolate ANs5 grew up to pH 11.3, which is the highest pH limit known for ammonia-oxidizing bacteria so far. This showed the existence of extremely alkali-tolerant ammonia-oxidizing bacteria in the soda lakes. Comparative 16S rDNA sequence analysis of the five isolates demonstrated that they possess identical 16S rDNA genes and that they are closely related to Nitrosomonas halophila (sequence similarity 99.3%), a member of the beta-subclass of the Proteobacteria. This affiliation was confirmed by comparative sequence analysis of the amoA gene, encoding the active-site subunit of the ammonia-monoxygenase, of one of the isolates. DNA-DNA hybridization data further supported that the soda lake isolates are very similar to each other and represent an alkali-tolerant subpopulation of N. halophila whose species description is herewith amended.

  1. In-situ incubation of iron-sulfur mineral reveals a diverse chemolithoautotrophic community and a new biogeochemical role for Thiomicrospira.

    PubMed

    Barco, Roman A; Hoffman, Colleen L; Ramírez, Gustavo A; Toner, Brandy M; Edwards, Katrina J; Sylvan, Jason B

    2017-03-01

    Sulfide mineral precipitation occurs at mid-ocean ridge (MOR) spreading centers, both in the form of plume particles and seafloor massive sulfide structures. A common constituent of MOR is the iron-bearing sulfide mineral pyrrhotite, which was chosen as a substrate for in-situ incubation studies in shallow waters of Catalina Island, CA to investigate the colonization of iron-oxidizing bacteria. Microbial community datasets were obtained from in-situ incubated pyrrhotite, allowing for direct comparison to microbial communities of iron-sulfides from active and inactive chimneys in deep-sea environments. Unclassified Gammaproteobacteria and Alphaproteobacteria (Magnetovibrio) largely dominated the bacterial community on pyrrhotite samples incubated in the water column while samples incubated at the surface sediment showed more even dominance by Deltaproteobacteria (Desulfobulbus), Gammaproteobacteria (Piscirickettsiaceae), Alphaproteobacteria (Rhodobacteraceae), and Bacteroidetes (Flavobacteriia). Cultivations that originated from pyrrhotite samples resulted in the enrichment of both, sheath-forming and stalk-forming Zetaproteobacteria. Additionally, a putative novel species of Thiomicrospira was isolated and shown to grow autotrophically with iron, indicating a new biogeochemical role for this ubiquitous microorganism.

  2. Complete genome sequence of the haloalkaliphilic, obligately chemolithoautotrophic thiosulfate and sulfide-oxidizing γ-proteobacterium Thioalkalimicrobium cyclicum type strain ALM 1 (DSM 14477T)

    DOE PAGES

    Kappler, Ulrike; Davenport, Karen W.; Beatson, Scott; ...

    2016-06-03

    Thioalkalimicrobium cyclicum (Sorokin et al. 2002) is a member of the family Piscirickettsiaceae in the order Thiotrichales. The -proteobacterium belongs to the colourless sulfur-oxidizing bacteria isolated from saline soda lakes with stable alkaline pH, such as Lake Mono (California) and Soap Lake (Washington State). Strain ALM 1T is characterized by its adaptation to life in the oxic/anoxic interface towards the less saline aerobic waters (mixolimnion) of the stable stratified alkaline salt lakes. Strain ALM 1T is the first representative of the genus Thioalkalimicrobium whose genome sequence has been deciphered and the fourth genome sequence of a type strain of themore » Piscirickettsiaceae to be published. As a result, the 1,932,455 bp long chromosome with its 1,684 protein-coding and 50 RNA genes was sequenced as part of the DOE Joint Genome Institute Community Sequencing Program (CSP) 2008.« less

  3. Isolation, Characterization, and In Situ Detection of a Novel Chemolithoautotrophic Sulfur-Oxidizing Bacterium in Wastewater Biofilms Growing under Microaerophilic Conditions

    PubMed Central

    Ito, Tsukasa; Sugita, Kenichi; Okabe, Satoshi

    2004-01-01

    We successfully isolated a novel aerobic chemolithotrophic sulfur-oxidizing bacterium, designated strain SO07, from wastewater biofilms growing under microaerophilic conditions. For isolation, the use of elemental sulfur (S0), which is the most abundant sulfur pool in the wastewater biofilms, as the electron donor was an effective measure to establish an enrichment culture of strain SO07 and further isolation. 16S rRNA gene sequence analysis revealed that newly isolated strain SO07 was affiliated with members of the genus Halothiobacillus, but it was only distantly related to previously isolated species (89% identity). Strain SO07 oxidized elemental sulfur, thiosulfate, and sulfide to sulfate under oxic conditions. Strain SO07 could not grow on nitrate. Organic carbons, including acetate, propionate, and formate, could not serve as carbon and energy sources. Unlike other aerobic sulfur-oxidizing bacteria, this bacterium was sensitive to NaCl; growth in medium containing more than 150 mM was negligible. In situ hybridization combined with confocal laser scanning microscopy revealed that a number of rod-shaped cells hybridized with a probe specific for strain SO07 were mainly present in the oxic biofilm strata (ca. 0 to 100 μm) and that they often coexisted with sulfate-reducing bacteria in this zone. These results demonstrated that strain SO07 was one of the important sulfur-oxidizing populations involved in the sulfur cycle occurring in the wastewater biofilm and was primarily responsible for the oxidation of H2S and S0 to SO42− under oxic conditions. PMID:15128575

  4. Sulfuriferula thiophila sp. nov., a chemolithoautotrophic sulfur-oxidizing bacterium, and correction of the name Sulfuriferula plumbophilusWatanabe, Kojima and Fukui 2015 to Sulfuriferula plumbiphila corrig.

    PubMed

    Watanabe, Tomohiro; Kojima, Hisaya; Fukui, Manabu

    2016-05-01

    A novel sulfur-oxidizing bacterium designated strain mst6T was isolated from spring water of Masutomi hot spring in Japan. The cells were rod-shaped (1.2-4.0 × 0.5-0.7 μm) and Gram-stain-negative. The G+C content of genomic DNA was around 52.6 mol%. The isolate possessed summed feature 3 (C16 : 1ω7c and/or C16 : 1ω6c), C16 : 0 and C12 : 0 as major cellular fatty acids. Strain mst6T grew by inorganic carbon fixation and oxidation of inorganic sulfur compounds with oxygen as an electron acceptor. The isolate grew over a temperature range of 5-34 °C, a NaCl concentration range of 0-110 mM and a pH range of 4.6-8.1. Optimum growth occurred at 32 °C, in the absence of NaCl and at pH 5.9-6.2. Phylogenetic analysis based on 16S rRNA gene sequences indicated that strain mst6T belongs to the family Sulfuricellaceae in the class Betaproteobacteria. The closest cultured relative was Sulfuriferula multivorans TTNT with a 16S rRNA gene sequence similarity of 97.0 %. On the basis of the data obtained in this study, strain mst6T represents a novel species of the genus Sulfuriferula, for which the name Sulfuriferula thiophila sp. nov. is proposed. The type strain is mst6T ( = NBRC 111150T = DSM 101871T). In addition, we propose correcting the name Sulfuriferula plumbophilus Watanabe, Kojima and Fukui 2015 to Sulfuriferula plumbiphila corrig. based on Rule 12c, Rule 61 and Appendix 9 of the International Code of Nomenclature of Prokaryotes.

  5. Thioalkalimicrobium cyclicum sp. nov. and Thioalkalivibrio jannaschii sp. nov., novel species of haloalkaliphilic, obligately chemolithoautotrophic sulfur-oxidizing bacteria from hypersaline alkaline Mono Lake (California).

    PubMed

    Sorokin, Dimitry Yu; Gorlenko, Vladimir M; Tourova, Tat'yana P; Tsapin, Alexandre I; Nealson, Kenneth H; Kuenen, Gijs J

    2002-05-01

    Two strains of haloalkaliphilic, obligately autotrophic, sulfur-oxidizing bacteria were isolated from the oxygen-sulfide interface water layer of stratified alkaline and saline Mono Lake, California, USA. Strain ALM 1T was a dominant species in enrichment on moderate-saline, carbonate-buffered medium (0.6 M total Na+, pH 10) with thiosulfate as an energy source and nitrate as a nitrogen source. Cells of ALM 1T are open ring-shaped and are non-motile. It has a high growth rate and activity of thiosulfate and sulfide oxidation and very low sulfur-oxidizing activity. Genetic comparison and phylogenetic analysis suggested that ALM 1T (= DSM 14477T = JCM 11371T) represents a new species of the genus Thioalkalimicrobium in the gamma-Proteobacteria, for which the name Thioalkalimicrobium cyclicum sp. nov. is proposed. Another Mono Lake isolate, strain ALM 2T, dominated in enrichment on a medium containing 2 M total Na+ (pH 10). It is a motile vibrio which tolerates up to 4 M Na+ and produces a membrane-bound yellow pigment. Phylogenetic analysis placed ALM 2T as a member of genus Thioalkalivibrio in the gamma-Proteobacteria, although its DNA hybridization with the representative strains of this genus was only about 30%. On the basis of genetic and phenotypic properties, strain ALM 2T (= DSM 14478T = JCM 11372T) is proposed as Thioalkalivibrio jannaschii sp. nov..

  6. Complete genome sequence of the haloalkaliphilic, obligately chemolithoautotrophic thiosulfate and sulfide-oxidizing γ-proteobacterium Thioalkalimicrobium cyclicum type strain ALM 1 (DSM 14477(T)).

    PubMed

    Kappler, Ulrike; Davenport, Karen; Beatson, Scott; Lapidus, Alla; Pan, Chongle; Han, Cliff; Montero-Calasanz, Maria Del Carmen; Land, Miriam; Hauser, Loren; Rohde, Manfred; Göker, Markus; Ivanova, Natalia; Woyke, Tanja; Klenk, Hans-Peter; Kyrpides, Nikos C

    2016-01-01

    Thioalkalimicrobium cyclicum Sorokin et al. 2002 is a member of the family Piscirickettsiaceae in the order Thiotrichales. The γ-proteobacterium belongs to the colourless sulfur-oxidizing bacteria isolated from saline soda lakes with stable alkaline pH, such as Lake Mono (California) and Soap Lake (Washington State). Strain ALM 1(T) is characterized by its adaptation to life in the oxic/anoxic interface towards the less saline aerobic waters (mixolimnion) of the stable stratified alkaline salt lakes. Strain ALM 1(T) is the first representative of the genus Thioalkalimicrobium whose genome sequence has been deciphered and the fourth genome sequence of a type strain of the Piscirickettsiaceae to be published. The 1,932,455 bp long chromosome with its 1,684 protein-coding and 50 RNA genes was sequenced as part of the DOE Joint Genome Institute Community Sequencing Program (CSP) 2008.

  7. Insights into Nitrate-Reducing Fe(II) Oxidation Mechanisms through Analysis of Cell-Mineral Associations, Cell Encrustation, and Mineralogy in the Chemolithoautotrophic Enrichment Culture KS.

    PubMed

    Nordhoff, M; Tominski, C; Halama, M; Byrne, J M; Obst, M; Kleindienst, S; Behrens, S; Kappler, A

    2017-07-01

    Most described nitrate-reducing Fe(II)-oxidizing bacteria (NRFeOB) are mixotrophic and depend on organic cosubstrates for growth. Encrustation of cells in Fe(III) minerals has been observed for mixotrophic NRFeOB but not for autotrophic phototrophic and microaerophilic Fe(II) oxidizers. So far, little is known about cell-mineral associations in the few existing autotrophic NRFeOB. Here, we investigate whether the designated autotrophic Fe(II)-oxidizing strain (closely related to Gallionella and Sideroxydans) or the heterotrophic nitrate reducers that are present in the autotrophic nitrate-reducing Fe(II)-oxidizing enrichment culture KS form mineral crusts during Fe(II) oxidation under autotrophic and mixotrophic conditions. In the mixed culture, we found no significant encrustation of any of the cells both during autotrophic oxidation of 8 to 10 mM Fe(II) coupled to nitrate reduction and during cultivation under mixotrophic conditions with 8 to 10 mM Fe(II), 5 mM acetate, and 4 mM nitrate, where higher numbers of heterotrophic nitrate reducers were present. Two pure cultures of heterotrophic nitrate reducers (Nocardioides and Rhodanobacter) isolated from culture KS were analyzed under mixotrophic growth conditions. We found green rust formation, no cell encrustation, and only a few mineral particles on some cell surfaces with 5 mM Fe(II) and some encrustation with 10 mM Fe(II). Our findings suggest that enzymatic, autotrophic Fe(II) oxidation coupled to nitrate reduction forms poorly crystalline Fe(III) oxyhydroxides and proceeds without cellular encrustation while indirect Fe(II) oxidation via heterotrophic nitrate-reduction-derived nitrite can lead to green rust as an intermediate mineral and significant cell encrustation. The extent of encrustation caused by indirect Fe(II) oxidation by reactive nitrogen species depends on Fe(II) concentrations and is probably negligible under environmental conditions in most habitats.IMPORTANCE Most described nitrate-reducing Fe(II)-oxidizing bacteria (NRFeOB) are mixotrophic (their growth depends on organic cosubstrates) and can become encrusted in Fe(III) minerals. Encrustation is expected to be harmful and poses a threat to cells if it also occurs under environmentally relevant conditions. Nitrite produced during heterotrophic denitrification reacts with Fe(II) abiotically and is probably the reason for encrustation in mixotrophic NRFeOB. Little is known about cell-mineral associations in autotrophic NRFeOB such as the enrichment culture KS. Here, we show that no encrustation occurs in culture KS under autotrophic and mixotrophic conditions while heterotrophic nitrate-reducing isolates from culture KS become encrusted. These findings support the hypothesis that encrustation in mixotrophic cultures is caused by the abiotic reaction of Fe(II) with nitrite and provide evidence that Fe(II) oxidation in culture KS is enzymatic. Furthermore, we show that the extent of encrustation caused by indirect Fe(II) oxidation by reactive nitrogen species depends on Fe(II) concentrations and is probably negligible in most environmental habitats. Copyright © 2017 American Society for Microbiology.

  8. Complete genome sequence of the haloalkaliphilic, obligately chemolithoautotrophic thiosulfate and sulfide-oxidizing γ-proteobacterium Thioalkalimicrobium cyclicum type strain ALM 1 (DSM 14477T)

    SciTech Connect

    Kappler, Ulrike; Davenport, Karen W.; Beatson, Scott; Lapidus, Alla L.; Pan, Chongle; Han, Cliff; Montero-Calasanz, Maria del Carmen; Land, Miriam L.; Hauser, Loren John; Rohde, Manfred; Goker, Markus; Ivanova, Natalia; Woyke, Tanja; Klenk, Hans -Peter; Kyrpides, Nikos C.

    2016-06-03

    Thioalkalimicrobium cyclicum (Sorokin et al. 2002) is a member of the family Piscirickettsiaceae in the order Thiotrichales. The -proteobacterium belongs to the colourless sulfur-oxidizing bacteria isolated from saline soda lakes with stable alkaline pH, such as Lake Mono (California) and Soap Lake (Washington State). Strain ALM 1T is characterized by its adaptation to life in the oxic/anoxic interface towards the less saline aerobic waters (mixolimnion) of the stable stratified alkaline salt lakes. Strain ALM 1T is the first representative of the genus Thioalkalimicrobium whose genome sequence has been deciphered and the fourth genome sequence of a type strain of the Piscirickettsiaceae to be published. As a result, the 1,932,455 bp long chromosome with its 1,684 protein-coding and 50 RNA genes was sequenced as part of the DOE Joint Genome Institute Community Sequencing Program (CSP) 2008.

  9. Guest-, Light- and Thermally-Modulated Spin Crossover in [Fe(II) 2 ] Supramolecular Helicates.

    PubMed

    Darawsheh, Mohanad; Barrios, Leoni A; Roubeau, Olivier; Teat, Simon J; Aromí, Guillem

    2016-06-13

    A new bis(pyrazolylpyridine) ligand (H2 L) has been prepared to form functional [Fe2 (H2 L)3 ](4+) metallohelicates. Changes to the synthesis yield six derivatives, X@[Fe2 (H2 L)3 ]X(PF6 )2 ⋅xCH3 OH (1, x=5.7 and X=Cl; 2, x=4 and X=Br), X@[Fe2 (H2 L)3 ]X(PF6 )2 ⋅yCH3 OH⋅H2 O (1 a, y=3 and X=Cl; 2 a, y=1 and X=Br) and X@[Fe2 (H2 L)3 ](I3 )2 ⋅3 Et2 O (1 b, X=Cl; 2 b, X=Br). Their structure and functional properties are described in detail by single-crystal X-ray diffraction experiments at several temperatures. Helicates 1 a and 2 a are obtained from 1 and 2, respectively, by a single-crystal-to-single-crystal mechanism. The three possible magnetic states, [LS-LS], [LS-HS], and [HS-HS] can be accessed over large temperature ranges as a result of the structural nonequivalence of the Fe(II) centers. The nature of the guest (Cl(-) vs. Br(-) ) shifts the spin crossover (SCO) temperature by roughly 40 K. Also, metastable [LS-HS] or [HS-HS] states are generated through irradiation. All helicates (X@[Fe2 (H2 L)3 ])(3+) persist in solution.

  10. Barium borohydride chlorides: synthesis, crystal structures and thermal properties.

    PubMed

    Grube, Elisabeth; Olesen, Cathrine H; Ravnsbæk, Dorthe B; Jensen, Torben R

    2016-05-10

    Here we report the synthesis, mechanism of formation, characterization and thermal decomposition of new barium borohydride chlorides prepared by mechanochemistry and thermal treatment of MBH4-BaCl2, M = Li, Na or K in ratios 1 : 1 and 1 : 2. Initially, orthorhombic barium chloride, o-BaCl2 transforms into o-Ba(BH4)xCl2-x, x ∼ 0.15. Excess LiBH4 leads to continued anion substitution and a phase transformation into hexagonal barium borohydride chloride h-Ba(BH4)xCl2-x, which accommodates higher amounts of borohydride, possibly x ∼ 0.85 and resembles h-BaCl2. Thus, two solid solutions are in equilibrium during mechano-chemical treatment of LiBH4-BaCl2 (1 : 1) whereas LiBH4-BaCl2 (2 : 1) converts to h-Ba(BH4)0.85Cl1.15. Upon thermal treatment at T > ∼200 °C, h-Ba(BH4)0.85Cl1.15 transforms into another orthorhombic barium borohydride chloride compound, o-Ba(BH4)0.85Cl1.15, which is structurally similar to o-BaBr2. The samples with M = Na and K have lower reactivity and form o-Ba(BH4)xCl2-x, x ∼ 0.1 and a solid solution of sodium chloride dissolved in solid sodium borohydride, Na(BH4)1-xClx, x = 0.07. The new compounds and reaction mechanisms are investigated by in situ synchrotron radiation powder X-ray diffraction (SR-PXD), Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR) and simultaneous thermogravimetric analysis (TGA), differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), mass spectroscopy (MS) and temperature programmed photographic analysis (TPPA).

  11. Matrix reaction of the oxygen atom with the CBrCl 3 molecule Identification of phosgene complexes with Cl 2 and Br 2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abdelaoui, O.; Schriver, L.; Schriver, A.

    1992-05-01

    Ft-IR spectroscopy has been coupled with the matrix isolation technique to investigate the mechanism of the CBrCl 3 photooxidation by ozone at 12 K by UV light. COCl 2 is observed as the only primary product and CO as a secondary photolysis product. A 35 K warm up after photolysis generated phosgene complexes with Cl 2 and Br 2. Identification of these molecular complexes was performed with mixtures of laboratory synthesized phosgene with X (X=Cl 2, Br 2) trapped in argon matrices.

  12. Co-doped sodium chloride crystals exposed to different irradiation temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ortiz-Morales, A.; Cruz-Zaragoza, E.; Furetta, C.; Kitis, G.; Flores J., C.; Hernández A., J.; Murrieta S., H.

    2013-07-01

    Monocrystals of NaCl:XCl2:MnCl2(X = Ca,Cd) at four different concentrations have been analyzed. The crystals were exposed to different irradiation temperature, such as at room temperature (RT), solid water (SW), dry ice (DI) and liquid nitrogen (LN). The samples were irradiated with photon from 60Co irradiators. The co-doped sodium chloride crystals show a complex structure of glow curves that can be related to different distribution of traps. The linearity response was analyzed with the F(D) index. The F(D) value was less than unity indicating a sub-linear response was obtained from the TL response on the function of the dose. The glow curves were deconvoluted by using the CGCD program based on the first, second and general order kinetics.

  13. Does an increased body mass index affect endometrial gene expression patterns in infertile patients? A functional genomics analysis.

    PubMed

    Comstock, Ioanna A; Diaz-Gimeno, Patricia; Cabanillas, Sergio; Bellver, Jose; Sebastian-Leon, Patricia; Shah, Meera; Schutt, Amy; Valdes, Cecilia T; Ruiz-Alonso, Maria; Valbuena, Diana; Simon, Carlos; Lathi, Ruth B

    2017-03-01

    To analyze the transcriptomic profile of endometrial gene alterations during the window of implantation in infertile obese patients. Multicenter, prospective, case-control study. Three academic medical centers for reproductive medicine. Infertile patients, stratified into body mass index (BMI) categories according to the World Health Organization guidelines, were included in the study. Endometrial samples were obtained from women undergoing standardized estrogen and P replacement cycles after 5 days of vaginal P supplementation. To identify endometrial gene expression alterations that occur during the window of implantation in infertile obese patients as compared with infertile normal-weight controls using a microarray analysis. XCL1, XCL2, HMHA1, S100A1, KLRC1, COTL1, COL16A1, KRT7, and MFAP5 are significantly dysregulated during the window of implantation in the receptive endometrium of obese patients. COL16A1, COTL1, HMHA1, KRCL1, XCL1, and XCL2 were down-regulated and KRT7, MFAP5, and S100A1 were up-regulated in the endometrium of obese patients. These genes are mainly involved in chemokine, cytokine, and immune system activity and in the structural extracellular matrix and protein-binding molecular functions. Obesity is associated with significant endometrial transcriptomic differences as compared with non-obese subjects. Altered endometrial gene expression in obese patients may contribute to the lower implantation rates and increased miscarriage rates seen in obese infertile patients. NCT02205866. Copyright © 2016 American Society for Reproductive Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Complete Genome Sequence of Nitrosomonas cryotolerans ATCC 49181, a Phylogenetically Distinct Ammonia-Oxidizing Bacterium Isolated from Arctic Waters

    PubMed Central

    Rice, Marlen C.; Stein, Lisa Y.; Kozlowski, Jessica; Bollmann, Annette; Sayavedra-Soto, Luis; Shapiro, Nicole; Goodwin, Lynne A.; Huntemann, Marcel; Clum, Alicia; Pillay, Manoj; Varghese, Neha; Mikhailova, Natalia; Palaniappan, Krishna; Ivanova, Natalia; Mukherjee, Supratim; Reddy, T. B. K.; Yee Ngan, Chew; Daum, Chris; Kyrpides, Nikos; Woyke, Tanja

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT Nitrosomonas cryotolerans ATCC 49181 is a cold-tolerant marine ammonia-oxidizing bacterium isolated from seawater collected in the Gulf of Alaska. The high-quality complete genome contains a 2.87-Mbp chromosome and a 56.6-kbp plasmid. Chemolithoautotrophic modules encoding ammonia oxidation and CO2 fixation were identified. PMID:28302769

  15. Complete Genome Sequence of Nitrosomonas cryotolerans ATCC 49181, a Phylogenetically Distinct Ammonia-Oxidizing Bacterium Isolated from Arctic Waters

    DOE PAGES

    Rice, Marlen C.; Norton, Jeanette M.; Stein, Lisa Y.; ...

    2017-03-16

    Nitrosomonas cryotoleransATCC 49181 is a cold-tolerant marine ammonia-oxidizing bacterium isolated from seawater collected in the Gulf of Alaska. The high-quality complete genome contains a 2.87-Mbp chromosome and a 56.6-kbp plasmid. Chemolithoautotrophic modules encoding ammonia oxidation and CO2 fixation were identified.

  16. Evidence of form II RubisCO (cbbM) in a perennially ice-covered Antarctic lake.

    PubMed

    Kong, Weidong; Dolhi, Jenna M; Chiuchiolo, Amy; Priscu, John; Morgan-Kiss, Rachael M

    2012-11-01

    The permanently ice-covered lakes of the McMurdo Dry Valleys, Antarctica, harbor microbially dominated food webs. These organisms are adapted to a variety of unusual environmental extremes, including low temperature, low light, and permanently stratified water columns with strong chemo- and oxy-clines. Owing to the low light levels during summer caused by thick ice cover as well as 6 months of darkness during the polar winter, chemolithoautotrophic microorganisms could play a key role in the production of new carbon for the lake ecosystems. We used clone library sequencing and real-time quantitative PCR of the gene encoding form II Ribulose 1, 5-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase to determine spatial and seasonal changes in the chemolithoautotrophic community in Lake Bonney, a 40-m-deep lake covered by c. 4 m of permanent ice. Our results revealed that chemolithoautotrophs harboring the cbbM gene are restricted to layers just above the chemo- and oxi-cline (≤ 15 m) in the west lobe of Lake Bonney (WLB). Our data reveal that the WLB is inhabited by a unique chemolithoautotrophic community that resides in the suboxic layers of the lake where there are ample sources of alternative electron sources such as ammonium, reduced iron and reduced biogenic sulfur species. © 2012 Federation of European Microbiological Societies. Published by Blackwell Publishing Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Complete Genome Sequence of Nitrosomonas cryotolerans ATCC 49181, a Phylogenetically Distinct Ammonia-Oxidizing Bacterium Isolated from Arctic Waters.

    PubMed

    Rice, Marlen C; Norton, Jeanette M; Stein, Lisa Y; Kozlowski, Jessica; Bollmann, Annette; Klotz, Martin G; Sayavedra-Soto, Luis; Shapiro, Nicole; Goodwin, Lynne A; Huntemann, Marcel; Clum, Alicia; Pillay, Manoj; Varghese, Neha; Mikhailova, Natalia; Palaniappan, Krishna; Ivanova, Natalia; Mukherjee, Supratim; Reddy, T B K; Yee Ngan, Chew; Daum, Chris; Kyrpides, Nikos; Woyke, Tanja

    2017-03-16

    Nitrosomonas cryotolerans ATCC 49181 is a cold-tolerant marine ammonia-oxidizing bacterium isolated from seawater collected in the Gulf of Alaska. The high-quality complete genome contains a 2.87-Mbp chromosome and a 56.6-kbp plasmid. Chemolithoautotrophic modules encoding ammonia oxidation and CO2 fixation were identified.

  18. Heterotrophic Proteobacteria in the vicinity of diffuse hydrothermal venting.

    PubMed

    Meier, Dimitri V; Bach, Wolfgang; Girguis, Peter R; Gruber-Vodicka, Harald R; Reeves, Eoghan P; Richter, Michael; Vidoudez, Charles; Amann, Rudolf; Meyerdierks, Anke

    2016-12-01

    Deep-sea hydrothermal vents are highly dynamic habitats characterized by steep temperature and chemical gradients. The oxidation of reduced compounds dissolved in the venting fluids fuels primary production providing the basis for extensive life. Until recently studies of microbial vent communities have focused primarily on chemolithoautotrophic organisms. In our study, we targeted the change of microbial community compositions along mixing gradients, focusing on distribution and capabilities of heterotrophic microorganisms. Samples were retrieved from different venting areas within the Menez Gwen hydrothermal field, taken along mixing gradients, including diffuse fluid discharge points, their immediate surroundings and the buoyant parts of hydrothermal plumes. High throughput 16S rRNA gene amplicon sequencing, fluorescence in situ hybridization, and targeted metagenome analysis were combined with geochemical analyses. Close to diffuse venting orifices dominated by chemolithoautotrophic Epsilonproteobacteria, in areas where environmental conditions still supported chemolithoautotrophic processes, we detected microbial communities enriched for versatile heterotrophic Alpha- and Gammaproteobacteria. The potential for alkane degradation could be shown for several genera and yet uncultured clades. We propose that hotspots of chemolithoautotrophic life support a 'belt' of heterotrophic bacteria significantly different from the dominating oligotrophic microbiota of the deep sea. © 2016 Society for Applied Microbiology and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  19. Complete nitrification by Nitrospira bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Daims, Holger; Lebedeva, Elena V.; Pjevac, Petra; Han, Ping; Herbold, Craig; Albertsen, Mads; Jehmlich, Nico; Palatinszky, Marton; Vierheilig, Julia; Bulaev, Alexandr; Kirkegaard, Rasmus H.; von Bergen, Martin; Rattei, Thomas; Bendinger, Bernd; Nielsen, Per H.; Wagner, Michael

    2016-01-01

    Nitrification, the oxidation of ammonia via nitrite to nitrate, has always been considered as a two-step process catalyzed by chemolithoautotrophic microorganisms oxidizing either ammonia or nitrite. No known nitrifier carries out both steps, although complete nitrification should be energetically advantageous. This functional separation has puzzled microbiologists for a century. Here we report on the discovery and cultivation of a completely nitrifying bacterium from the genus Nitrospira, a globally distributed group of nitrite oxidizers. The genome of this chemolithoautotrophic organism encodes both the pathways for ammonia and nitrite oxidation, which are concomitantly expressed during growth by ammonia oxidation to nitrate. Genes affiliated with the phylogenetically distinct ammonia monooxygenase and hydroxylamine dehydrogenase genes of Nitrospira are present in many environments and were retrieved on Nitrospira-contigs in new metagenomes from engineered systems. These findings fundamentally change our picture of nitrification and point to completely nitrifying Nitrospira as key components of nitrogen-cycling microbial communities. PMID:26610024

  20. Respiratory arsenate reductase as a bidirectional enzyme

    SciTech Connect

    Richey, Christine; Chovanec, Peter; Hoeft, Shelley E.; Oremland, Ronald S.; Basu, Partha; Stolz, John F.

    2009-05-01

    The haloalkaliphilic bacterium Alkalilimnicola ehrlichii is capable of anaerobic chemolithoautotrophic growth by coupling the oxidation of arsenite (As(III)) to the reduction of nitrate and carbon dioxide. Analysis of its complete genome indicates that it lacks a conventional arsenite oxidase (Aox), but instead possesses two operons that each encode a putative respiratory arsenate reductase (Arr). Here we show that one homolog is expressed under chemolithoautotrophic conditions and exhibits both arsenite oxidase and arsenate reductase activity. We also demonstrate that Arr from two arsenate respiring bacteria, Alkaliphilus oremlandii and Shewanella sp. strain ANA-3, is also biochemically reversible. Thus Arr can function as a reductase or oxidase. Its physiological role in a specific organism, however, may depend on the electron potentials of the molybdenum center and [Fe-S] clusters, additional subunits, or constitution of the electron transfer chain. This versatility further underscores the ubiquity and antiquity of microbial arsenic metabolism.

  1. Draft genome sequence of Caminibacter mediatlanticus strain TB-2, an epsilonproteobacterium isolated from a deep-sea hydrothermal vent.

    PubMed

    Giovannelli, Donato; Ferriera, Steven; Johnson, Justin; Kravitz, Saul; Pérez-Rodríguez, Ileana; Ricci, Jessica; O'Brien, Charles; Voordeckers, James W; Bini, Elisabetta; Vetriani, Costantino

    2011-10-15

    Caminibacter mediatlanticus strain TB-2(T) [1], is a thermophilic, anaerobic, chemolithoautotrophic bacterium, isolated from the walls of an active deep-sea hydrothermal vent chimney on the Mid-Atlantic Ridge and the type strain of the species. C. mediatlanticus is a Gram-negative member of the Epsilonproteobacteria (order Nautiliales) that grows chemolithoautotrophically with H(2) as the energy source and CO(2) as the carbon source. Nitrate or sulfur is used as the terminal electron acceptor, with resulting production of ammonium and hydrogen sulfide, respectively. In view of the widespread distribution, importance and physiological characteristics of thermophilic Epsilonproteobacteria in deep-sea geothermal environments, it is likely that these organisms provide a relevant contribution to both primary productivity and the biogeochemical cycling of carbon, nitrogen and sulfur at hydrothermal vents. Here we report the main features of the genome of C. mediatlanticus strain TB-2(T).

  2. Respiratory arsenate reductase as a bidirectional enzyme

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Richey, C.; Chovanec, P.; Hoeft, S.E.; Oremland, R.S.; Basu, P.; Stolz, J.F.

    2009-01-01

    The haloalkaliphilic bacterium Alkalilimnicola ehrlichii is capable of anaerobic chemolithoautotrophic growth by coupling the oxidation of arsenite (As(III)) to the reduction of nitrate and carbon dioxide. Analysis of its complete genome indicates that it lacks a conventional arsenite oxidase (Aox), but instead possesses two operons that each encode a putative respiratory arsenate reductase (Arr). Here we show that one homolog is expressed under chemolithoautotrophic conditions and exhibits both arsenite oxidase and arsenate reductase activity. We also demonstrate that Arr from two arsenate respiring bacteria, Alkaliphilus oremlandii and Shewanella sp. strain ANA-3, is also biochemically reversible. Thus Arr can function as a reductase or oxidase. Its physiological role in a specific organism, however, may depend on the electron potentials of the molybdenum center and [Fe–S] clusters, additional subunits, or constitution of the electron transfer chain. This versatility further underscores the ubiquity and antiquity of microbial arsenic metabolism.

  3. Complete genome sequence of "Thioalkalivibrio sulfidophilus" HL-EbGr7.

    PubMed

    Muyzer, Gerard; Sorokin, Dimitry Yu; Mavromatis, Konstantinos; Lapidus, Alla; Clum, Alicia; Ivanova, Natalia; Pati, Amrita; d'Haeseleer, Patrick; Woyke, Tanja; Kyrpides, Nikos C

    2011-02-14

    "Thioalkalivibrio sulfidophilus" HL-EbGr7 is an obligately chemolithoautotrophic, haloalkaliphilic sulfur-oxidizing bacterium (SOB) belonging to the Gammaproteobacteria. The strain was found to predominate a full-scale bioreactor, removing sulfide from biogas. Here we report the complete genome sequence of strain HL-EbGr7 and its annotation. The genome was sequenced within the Joint Genome Institute Community Sequencing Program, because of its relevance to the sustainable removal of sulfide from bio- and industrial waste gases.

  4. Giant Hydrogen Sulfide Plume in the Oxygen Minimum Zone off Peru Supports Chemolithoautotrophy

    PubMed Central

    Großkopf, Tobias; Kalvelage, Tim; Löscher, Carolin R.; Paulmier, Aurélien; Contreras, Sergio; Siegel, Herbert; Holtappels, Moritz; Rosenstiel, Philip; Schilhabel, Markus B.; Graco, Michelle; Schmitz, Ruth A.; Kuypers, Marcel M. M.; LaRoche, Julie

    2013-01-01

    In Eastern Boundary Upwelling Systems nutrient-rich waters are transported to the ocean surface, fuelling high photoautotrophic primary production. Subsequent heterotrophic decomposition of the produced biomass increases the oxygen-depletion at intermediate water depths, which can result in the formation of oxygen minimum zones (OMZ). OMZs can sporadically accumulate hydrogen sulfide (H2S), which is toxic to most multicellular organisms and has been implicated in massive fish kills. During a cruise to the OMZ off Peru in January 2009 we found a sulfidic plume in continental shelf waters, covering an area >5500 km2, which contained ∼2.2×104 tons of H2S. This was the first time that H2S was measured in the Peruvian OMZ and with ∼440 km3 the largest plume ever reported for oceanic waters. We assessed the phylogenetic and functional diversity of the inhabiting microbial community by high-throughput sequencing of DNA and RNA, while its metabolic activity was determined with rate measurements of carbon fixation and nitrogen transformation processes. The waters were dominated by several distinct γ-, δ- and ε-proteobacterial taxa associated with either sulfur oxidation or sulfate reduction. Our results suggest that these chemolithoautotrophic bacteria utilized several oxidants (oxygen, nitrate, nitrite, nitric oxide and nitrous oxide) to detoxify the sulfidic waters well below the oxic surface. The chemolithoautotrophic activity at our sampling site led to high rates of dark carbon fixation. Assuming that these chemolithoautotrophic rates were maintained throughout the sulfidic waters, they could be representing as much as ∼30% of the photoautotrophic carbon fixation. Postulated changes such as eutrophication and global warming, which lead to an expansion and intensification of OMZs, might also increase the frequency of sulfidic waters. We suggest that the chemolithoautotrophically fixed carbon may be involved in a negative feedback loop that could fuel further

  5. Medusa Sea Floor Monitoring System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Flynn, Michael

    2004-01-01

    The objective of the research described in this poster presentation is to develop technologies to enable fundamental research into understanding the potential for and limits to chemolithoautotrophic life. The Medusa Isosampler (isobaric sampler), for sampling fluids eminating from deep sea hydrothermal vents and cold seep sites analogous to extraterrestrial environments, is described by the presentation. The following instruments are integrated with the isosampler, and also described: in situ flow-through chemical sensor, intrinsic fluorescent-based microbial detector, isotope ratio spectral detector.

  6. Metatranscriptomic evidence of pervasive and diverse chemolithoautotrophy relevant to C, S, N and Fe cycling in a shallow alluvial aquifer

    SciTech Connect

    Jewell, Talia N. M.; Karaoz, Ulas; Brodie, Eoin L.; Williams, Kenneth H.; Beller, Harry R.

    2016-03-04

    Groundwater ecosystems are conventionally thought to be fueled by surface-derived allochthonous organic matter and dominated by heterotrophic microbes living under often-oligotrophic conditions. However, in a 2-month study of nitrate amendment to a perennially suboxic aquifer in Rifle (CO), strain-resolved metatranscriptomic analysis revealed pervasive and diverse chemolithoautotrophic bacterial activity relevant to C, S, N and Fe cycling. Before nitrate injection, anaerobic ammonia-oxidizing (anammox) bacteria accounted for 16% of overall microbial community gene expression, whereas during the nitrate injection, two other groups of chemolithoautotrophic bacteria collectively accounted for 80% of the metatranscriptome: (1) members of the Fe(II)-oxidizing Gallionellaceae family and (2) strains of the S-oxidizing species, Sulfurimonas denitrificans. Notably, the proportion of the metatranscriptome accounted for by these three groups was considerably greater than the proportion of the metagenome coverage that they represented. Transcriptional analysis revealed some unexpected metabolic couplings, in particular, putative nitrate-dependent Fe(II) and S oxidation among nominally microaerophilic Gallionellaceae strains, including expression of periplasmic (NapAB) and membrane-bound (NarGHI) nitrate reductases. The three most active groups of chemolithoautotrophic bacteria in this study had overlapping metabolisms that allowed them to occupy different yet related metabolic niches throughout the study. Overall, these results highlight the important role that chemolithoautotrophy can have in aquifer biogeochemical cycling, a finding that has broad implications for understanding terrestrial carbon cycling and is supported by recent studies of geochemically diverse aquifers.

  7. Metatranscriptomic evidence of pervasive and diverse chemolithoautotrophy relevant to C, S, N and Fe cycling in a shallow alluvial aquifer

    PubMed Central

    Jewell, Talia N M; Karaoz, Ulas; Brodie, Eoin L; Williams, Kenneth H; Beller, Harry R

    2016-01-01

    Groundwater ecosystems are conventionally thought to be fueled by surface-derived allochthonous organic matter and dominated by heterotrophic microbes living under often-oligotrophic conditions. However, in a 2-month study of nitrate amendment to a perennially suboxic aquifer in Rifle (CO), strain-resolved metatranscriptomic analysis revealed pervasive and diverse chemolithoautotrophic bacterial activity relevant to C, S, N and Fe cycling. Before nitrate injection, anaerobic ammonia-oxidizing (anammox) bacteria accounted for 16% of overall microbial community gene expression, whereas during the nitrate injection, two other groups of chemolithoautotrophic bacteria collectively accounted for 80% of the metatranscriptome: (1) members of the Fe(II)-oxidizing Gallionellaceae family and (2) strains of the S-oxidizing species, Sulfurimonas denitrificans. Notably, the proportion of the metatranscriptome accounted for by these three groups was considerably greater than the proportion of the metagenome coverage that they represented. Transcriptional analysis revealed some unexpected metabolic couplings, in particular, putative nitrate-dependent Fe(II) and S oxidation among nominally microaerophilic Gallionellaceae strains, including expression of periplasmic (NapAB) and membrane-bound (NarGHI) nitrate reductases. The three most active groups of chemolithoautotrophic bacteria in this study had overlapping metabolisms that allowed them to occupy different yet related metabolic niches throughout the study. Overall, these results highlight the important role that chemolithoautotrophy can have in aquifer biogeochemical cycling, a finding that has broad implications for understanding terrestrial carbon cycling and is supported by recent studies of geochemically diverse aquifers. PMID:26943628

  8. Role of humic substances in promoting autotrophic growth in nitrate-dependent iron-oxidizing bacteria.

    PubMed

    Kanaparthi, Dheeraj; Conrad, Ralf

    2015-05-01

    Nitrate-dependent iron oxidation was discovered in 1996 and has been reported from various environments ever since. To date, despite the widespread nature of this process, all attempts to cultivate chemolithoautotrophic nitrate-dependent iron oxidizers have been unsuccessful. The present study was focused on understanding the influence of natural chelating agents of iron, like humic substances, on the culturability, activity, and enumeration, of these microorganisms. Pure culture studies conducted with Thiobacillus denitrificans showed a constant increase in cell mass with a corresponding nitrate-dependent iron oxidation activity only when Fe(II) was provided together with humic substances, compared to no growth in control incubations without humic substances. The presence of a relatively strong chelating agent, such as EDTA, inhibited the growth of Thiobacillus denitrificans. It was concluded that complex formation between humic substances and iron was required for chemolithoautotrophic nitrate-dependent iron oxidation. Most probable number enumerations showed that numbers of chemolithoautotrophic nitrate-dependent iron-oxidizing bacteria were one to three orders of magnitude higher in the presence of humic substances compared to media without. Similar results were obtained when potential nitrate-dependent iron oxidation activity was determined in soil samples. In summary, this study showed that humic substances significantly enhanced the growth and activity of autotrophic nitrate-dependent iron-oxidizing microorganisms, probably by chelation of iron. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  9. Metatranscriptomic evidence of pervasive and diverse chemolithoautotrophy relevant to C, S, N and Fe cycling in a shallow alluvial aquifer

    DOE PAGES

    Jewell, Talia N. M.; Karaoz, Ulas; Brodie, Eoin L.; ...

    2016-03-04

    Groundwater ecosystems are conventionally thought to be fueled by surface-derived allochthonous organic matter and dominated by heterotrophic microbes living under often-oligotrophic conditions. However, in a 2-month study of nitrate amendment to a perennially suboxic aquifer in Rifle (CO), strain-resolved metatranscriptomic analysis revealed pervasive and diverse chemolithoautotrophic bacterial activity relevant to C, S, N and Fe cycling. Before nitrate injection, anaerobic ammonia-oxidizing (anammox) bacteria accounted for 16% of overall microbial community gene expression, whereas during the nitrate injection, two other groups of chemolithoautotrophic bacteria collectively accounted for 80% of the metatranscriptome: (1) members of the Fe(II)-oxidizing Gallionellaceae family and (2) strainsmore » of the S-oxidizing species, Sulfurimonas denitrificans. Notably, the proportion of the metatranscriptome accounted for by these three groups was considerably greater than the proportion of the metagenome coverage that they represented. Transcriptional analysis revealed some unexpected metabolic couplings, in particular, putative nitrate-dependent Fe(II) and S oxidation among nominally microaerophilic Gallionellaceae strains, including expression of periplasmic (NapAB) and membrane-bound (NarGHI) nitrate reductases. The three most active groups of chemolithoautotrophic bacteria in this study had overlapping metabolisms that allowed them to occupy different yet related metabolic niches throughout the study. Overall, these results highlight the important role that chemolithoautotrophy can have in aquifer biogeochemical cycling, a finding that has broad implications for understanding terrestrial carbon cycling and is supported by recent studies of geochemically diverse aquifers.« less

  10. Exchange equilibria between bicarbonate, carbonate, chloride and bromide on dowex 1 x 8.

    PubMed

    Lundström, U; Olin, A

    1984-07-01

    The exchange reaction 2R(+)HCO(3)(2-) + CO(3)(2-) right harpoon over left harpoon R(2)(+) CO(3)(2-) + 2HCO(3)(2-) has been studied on Dowex 1 x 8 in the presence of bicarbonate solution in equilibrium with atmospheric carbon dioxide (open system). The experiments showed, as theory predicts, that the composition of the resin phase is independent of the concentration of the bicarbonate solution. The mole fraction of carbonate at equilibrium is about 0.4 and the equilibrium constant is 0.15M at 20 degrees . With this value of the constant, the composition of the ion-exchanger for various bicarbonate concentrations has been calculated for a closed system. At [HCO(3)(-)] < 0.01M a substantial part of the resin is in the carbonate form, whereas for [HCO(3)(-)] 0.05M the resin is present almost exclusively in bicarbonate form. The exchange constants of bromide at trace level have been determined for the bicarbonate and mixed carbonate forms of the ion-exchanger. The exchange constant K(Cl)(HCO(3)) has been determined over the whole composition range and the results can be represented by K(Cl)(HCO(3))= 0.428 -0.063x(Cl) -0.115x(Cl)(2), where X(Cl) is the mole fraction of chloride in the resin. The constants are used to discuss the conditions for the Chromatographie enrichment of bromide from fresh water.

  11. Stoichiometry and local bond configuration of In2S3:Cl thin films by Rutherford backscattering spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Juma, Albert O.

    2016-10-01

    In2S3 thin films deposited using chemical methods always contain residual elements from the precursors, which modify their properties. As buffer layers in solar cells, the residual elements in the In2S3 layer affect the performance of these devices. The stoichiometry of In2S3 thin films deposited by spray ion layer gas reaction (ILGAR) was studied as a function of the residual Cl from InCl3 precursor by varying the deposition parameters. The chemical formula was deduced from the elemental composition determined using Rutherford backscattering (RBS). Incomplete sulfurization of the precursor implies that residual Cl- remains bonded to the In3+ ions while some occupy interstitial and/or antisite positions in the In2S3 matrix. This results in thin films with different stoichiometry, described by the formula In4S6-xCl2x+2y. This changes the local bond configuration and geometry and underpins the influence of residual Cl on the physical properties of In2S3 thin films.

  12. Thiohalorhabdus denitrificans gen. nov., sp. nov., an extremely halophilic, sulfur-oxidizing, deep-lineage gammaproteobacterium from hypersaline habitats.

    PubMed

    Sorokin, Dimitry Yu; Tourova, Tatjana P; Galinski, Erwin A; Muyzer, Gerard; Kuenen, J Gijs

    2008-12-01

    Seven strains of extremely halophilic and obligately chemolithoautotrophic sulfur-oxidizing bacteria (SOB) were enriched and isolated at 4 M NaCl from sediments of hypersaline inland lakes in south-eastern Siberia and a Mediterranean sea solar saltern. Cells of the novel isolates were spindle-like, long and non-motile rods with a Gram-negative type of cell wall. They were obligately chemolithoautotrophic SOB using thiosulfate and tetrathionate as electron donors and represent the first example of extremely halophilic chemolithoautotrophs that are able to grow anaerobically with nitrate as electron acceptor. The characteristic feature of the group was the production of large amounts of tetrathionate as an intermediate during the oxidation of thiosulfate to sulfate. With thiosulfate, the novel strains grew within the pH range from 6.5 to 8.2 (optimum at pH 7.5-7.8) and at NaCl concentrations from 1.5 to 4.0 M (optimum at 3.0 M). Cells grown at 4 M NaCl accumulated extremely high concentrations of glycine betaine as a compatible solute. The dominant cellular fatty acids were 10MeC(16 : 0) and C(16 : 0). Based on the DNA-DNA relatedness values, the isolates consisted of a single genomic species and had a similar phenotype. Phylogenetic analysis placed the novel bacteria in the class Gammaproteobacteria as an independent lineage with no significant relationship to any other genera in this class. On the basis of phenotypic and genotypic analysis, the group is proposed to represent a new genus, Thiohalorhabdus gen. nov., with Thiohalorhabdus denitrificans gen. nov., sp. nov. as the type species (type strain HL 19(T)=DSM 15699(T)=UNIQEM U223(T)).

  13. A novel soxO gene, encoding a glutathione disulfide reductase, is essential for tetrathionate oxidation in Advenella kashmirensis.

    PubMed

    Pyne, Prosenjit; Alam, Masrure; Ghosh, Wriddhiman

    2017-12-01

    Molecular mechanisms of chemolithotrophic tetrathionate oxidation are not clearly understood. Here we used transposon(Tn5-mob)-insertion mutagenesis to search for novel tetrathionate oxidation genes in the facultatively chemolithoautotrophic betaproteobacterium Advenella kashmirensis that not only oxidizes tetrathionate, but also produces the same as an intermediate during thiosulfate oxidation. Genome-wide random insertion of Tn5-mob occurred at a frequency of one per 10(4) donor E. coli cells. A library of 8000 transconjugants yielded five tetrathionate-oxidation-impaired mutants, of which, the one named Ak_Tn_16 was studied here in detail. When grown chemolithoautotrophically on thiosulfate, Ak_Tn_16 converted the total thiosulfate supplied to equivalent amount of tetrathionate, exactly in the same way as the wild type. It could not, however, oxidize the intermediary tetrathionate to sulfate; Ak_Tn_16 could not also oxidize tetrathionate when it was supplied as the starting chemolithotrophic substrate. In the Ak_Tn_16 genome, Tn5-mob was found to have transposed in a novel soxO gene, located just-upstream of soxB, within the sox gene cluster. SoxO was predicted, via iterative threading assembly simulation, to be a glutathione-disulfide (GSSG) reductase. When Ak_Tn_16 was grown in tetrathionate-based chemolithoautotrophic medium supplemented with reduced glutathione (GSH) its tetrathionate-oxidation deficiency, remarkably, was ameliorated. Implications for a key role of GSH in tetrathionate oxidation are discussed in the light of other molecular evidences available for A. kashmirensis. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  14. Methanococcus igneus sp. nov., a novel hyperthermophilic methanogen from a shallow submarine hydrothermal system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burggraf, S.; Fricke, H.; Neuner, A.; Kristjansson, J.; Rouvier, P.; Mandelco, L.; Woese, C. R.; Stetter, K. O.

    1990-01-01

    A novel hyperthermophilic strictly chemolithoautotrophic member of the genus Methanococcus was isolated from a shallow (depth: 106 m) submarine vent system at the Kolbeinsey ridge, Iceland. The isolate grew between 45 and 91 degrees C with an optimum around 88 degrees C (doubling time: 25 min). It differs from Methanococcus jannaschii in its 16S rRNA sequence, its non-hybridizing DNA, and its selenium-independent growth. Therefore, the isolate represents a new species which we name Methanococcus igneus. Type strain is isolate "Kol 5" (DSM 5666).

  15. Methanococcus igneus sp. nov., a novel hyperthermophilic methanogen from a shallow submarine hydrothermal system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burggraf, S.; Fricke, H.; Neuner, A.; Kristjansson, J.; Rouvier, P.; Mandelco, L.; Woese, C. R.; Stetter, K. O.

    1990-01-01

    A novel hyperthermophilic strictly chemolithoautotrophic member of the genus Methanococcus was isolated from a shallow (depth: 106 m) submarine vent system at the Kolbeinsey ridge, Iceland. The isolate grew between 45 and 91 degrees C with an optimum around 88 degrees C (doubling time: 25 min). It differs from Methanococcus jannaschii in its 16S rRNA sequence, its non-hybridizing DNA, and its selenium-independent growth. Therefore, the isolate represents a new species which we name Methanococcus igneus. Type strain is isolate "Kol 5" (DSM 5666).

  16. Complete genome sequence of Nitrosomonas sp. Is79, an ammonia oxidizing bacterium adapted to low ammonium concentrations

    PubMed Central

    Bollmann, Annette; Sedlacek, Christopher J.; Norton, Jeanette; Laanbroek, Hendrikus J.; Suwa, Yuichi; Stein, Lisa Y.; Klotz, Martin G.; Arp, Daniel; Sayavedra-Soto, Luis; Lu, Megan; Bruce, David; Detter, Chris; Tapia, Roxanne; Han, James; Woyke, Tanja; Lucas, Susan M.; Pitluck, Sam; Pennacchio, Len; Nolan, Matt; Land, Miriam L.; Huntemann, Marcel; Deshpande, Shweta; Han, Cliff; Chen, Amy; Kyrpides, Nikos; Mavromatis, Konstantinos; Markowitz, Victor; Szeto, Ernest; Ivanova, Natalia; Mikhailova, Natalia; Pagani, Ioanna; Pati, Amrita; Peters, Lin; Ovchinnikova, Galina; Goodwin, Lynne A.

    2013-01-01

    Nitrosomonas sp. Is79 is a chemolithoautotrophic ammonia-oxidizing bacterium that belongs to the family Nitrosomonadaceae within the phylum Proteobacteria. Ammonia oxidation is the first step of nitrification, an important process in the global nitrogen cycle ultimately resulting in the production of nitrate. Nitrosomonas sp. Is79 is an ammonia oxidizer of high interest because it is adapted to low ammonium and can be found in freshwater environments around the world. The 3,783,444-bp chromosome with a total of 3,553 protein coding genes and 44 RNA genes was sequenced by the DOE-Joint Genome Institute Program CSP 2006. PMID:24019993

  17. Ammonia-oxidising Crenarchaeota: important players in the nitrogen cycle?

    PubMed

    Nicol, Graeme W; Schleper, Christa

    2006-05-01

    Cultivation-independent molecular surveys show that members of the kingdom Crenarchaeota within the domain Archaea represent a substantial component of microbial communities in aquatic and terrestrial environments. Recently, metagenomic studies have revealed that such Crenarchaeota contain and express genes related to those of bacterial ammonia monooxygenases. Furthermore, a marine chemolithoautotrophic strain was isolated that uses ammonia as a sole energy source. Considering the ubiquity and abundance of Crenarchaeota, these findings considerably challenge the accepted view of the microbial communities involved in global nitrogen cycling. However, the quantitative contribution of Archaea to nitrification in marine and terrestrial environments still remains to be elucidated.

  18. Arsenite-oxidizing Hydrogenobaculum strain isolated from an acid-sulfate-chloride geothermal spring in Yellowstone National Park.

    PubMed

    Donahoe-Christiansen, Jessica; D'Imperio, Seth; Jackson, Colin R; Inskeep, William P; McDermott, Timothy R

    2004-03-01

    An arsenite-oxidizing Hydrogenobaculum strain was isolated from a geothermal spring in Yellowstone National Park, Wyo., that was previously shown to contain microbial populations engaged in arsenite oxidation. The isolate was sensitive to both arsenite and arsenate and behaved as an obligate chemolithoautotroph that used H(2) as its sole energy source and had an optimum temperature of 55 to 60 degrees C and an optimum pH of 3.0. The arsenite oxidation in this organism displayed saturation kinetics and was strongly inhibited by H(2)S.

  19. Genome sequence of the thermophilic sulfate-reducing ocean bacterium Thermodesulfatator indicus type strain (CIR29812T)

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, Iain; Saunders, Elizabeth H; Lapidus, Alla L.; Nolan, Matt; Lucas, Susan; Tice, Hope; Glavina Del Rio, Tijana; Cheng, Jan-Fang; Han, Cliff; Tapia, Roxanne; Goodwin, Lynne A.; Pitluck, Sam; Liolios, Konstantinos; Mavromatis, K; Pagani, Ioanna; Ivanova, N; Mikhailova, Natalia; Pati, Amrita; Chen, Amy; Palaniappan, Krishna; Land, Miriam L; Hauser, Loren John; Jeffries, Cynthia; Chang, Yun-Juan; Brambilla, Evelyne-Marie; Rohde, Manfred; Spring, Stefan; Goker, Markus; Detter, J. Chris; Woyke, Tanja; Bristow, James; Eisen, Jonathan; Markowitz, Victor; Hugenholtz, Philip; Kyrpides, Nikos C; Klenk, Hans-Peter

    2012-01-01

    Thermodesulfatator indicus Moussard et al. 2004 is a member of the genomically so far poorly characterized family Thermodesulfobacteriaceae in the phylum Thermodesulfobacteria. Members of this phylum are of interest because they represent a distinct, deep-branching, Gram-negative lineage. T. indicus is an anaerobic, thermophilic, chemolithoautotrophic sulfate reducer isolated from a deep-sea hydrothermal vent. Here we describe the features of this organism, together with the complete genome sequence, and annotation. The 2,322,224 bp long chromosome with its 2,233 protein-coding and 58 RNA genes is a part of the Genomic Encyclopedia of Bacteria and Archaea project.

  20. In Situ Gene Expression Responsible for Sulfide Oxidation and CO2 Fixation of an Uncultured Large Sausage-Shaped Aquificae Bacterium in a Sulfidic Hot Spring

    PubMed Central

    Tamazawa, Satoshi; Yamamoto, Kyosuke; Takasaki, Kazuto; Mitani, Yasuo; Hanada, Satoshi; Kamagata, Yoichi; Tamaki, Hideyuki

    2016-01-01

    We investigated the in situ gene expression profile of sulfur-turf microbial mats dominated by an uncultured large sausage-shaped Aquificae bacterium, a key metabolic player in sulfur-turfs in sulfidic hot springs. A reverse transcription-PCR analysis revealed that the genes responsible for sulfide, sulfite, and thiosulfate oxidation and carbon fixation via the reductive TCA cycle were continuously expressed in sulfur-turf mats taken at different sampling points, seasons, and years. These results suggest that the uncultured large sausage-shaped bacterium has the ability to grow chemolithoautotrophically and plays key roles as a primary producer in the sulfidic hot spring ecosystem in situ. PMID:27297893

  1. Draft genome sequence of an ammonia-oxidizing archaeon, "Candidatus Nitrosopumilus sediminis" AR2, from Svalbard in the Arctic Circle.

    PubMed

    Park, Soo-Je; Kim, Jong-Geol; Jung, Man-Young; Kim, So-Jeong; Cha, In-Tae; Ghai, Rohit; Martín-Cuadrado, Ana-Belén; Rodríguez-Valera, Francisco; Rhee, Sung-Keun

    2012-12-01

    Ammonia-oxidizing archaea (AOA) typically predominate over ammonia-oxidizing bacteria in marine sediments. We herein present the draft genome sequence of an ammonia-oxidizing archaeon, "Candidatus Nitrosopumilus sediminis" AR2, which was enriched in culture from a marine sediment obtained off Svalbard, within the Arctic Circle. The typical genes involved in archaeal ammonia oxidation and carbon fixation necessary for chemolithoautotrophic growth were observed. Interestingly, the AR2 genome sequence was revealed to possess, uniquely among cultivated AOA from marine environments, a capability for urea utilization.

  2. Sulfide Ameliorates Metal Toxicity for Deep-Sea Hydrothermal Vent Archaea†

    PubMed Central

    Edgcomb, Virginia P.; Molyneaux, Stephen J.; Saito, Mak A.; Lloyd, Karen; Böer, Simone; Wirsen, Carl O.; Atkins, Michael S.; Teske, Andreas

    2004-01-01

    The chemical stress factors for microbial life at deep-sea hydrothermal vents include high concentrations of heavy metals and sulfide. Three hyperthermophilic vent archaea, the sulfur-reducing heterotrophs Thermococcus fumicolans and Pyrococcus strain GB-D and the chemolithoautotrophic methanogen Methanocaldococcus jannaschii, were tested for survival tolerance to heavy metals (Zn, Co, and Cu) and sulfide. The sulfide addition consistently ameliorated the high toxicity of free metal cations by the formation of dissolved metal-sulfide complexes as well as solid precipitates. Thus, chemical speciation of heavy metals with sulfide allows hydrothermal vent archaea to tolerate otherwise toxic metal concentrations in their natural environment. PMID:15066859

  3. Sulfide ameliorates metal toxicity for deep-sea hydrothermal vent archaea.

    PubMed

    Edgcomb, Virginia P; Molyneaux, Stephen J; Saito, Mak A; Lloyd, Karen; Böer, Simone; Wirsen, Carl O; Atkins, Michael S; Teske, Andreas

    2004-04-01

    The chemical stress factors for microbial life at deep-sea hydrothermal vents include high concentrations of heavy metals and sulfide. Three hyperthermophilic vent archaea, the sulfur-reducing heterotrophs Thermococcus fumicolans and Pyrococcus strain GB-D and the chemolithoautotrophic methanogen Methanocaldococcus jannaschii, were tested for survival tolerance to heavy metals (Zn, Co, and Cu) and sulfide. The sulfide addition consistently ameliorated the high toxicity of free metal cations by the formation of dissolved metal-sulfide complexes as well as solid precipitates. Thus, chemical speciation of heavy metals with sulfide allows hydrothermal vent archaea to tolerate otherwise toxic metal concentrations in their natural environment.

  4. Extremophiles and their adaptation to hot environments.

    PubMed

    Stetter, K O

    1999-06-04

    Water-containing terrestrial, subterranean and submarine high temperature areas harbor a variety of hyperthermophilic bacteria and archaea which are able to grow optimally above 80 degrees C. Hyperthermophiles are adapted to hot environments by their physiological and nutritional requirements. As a consequence, cell components like proteins, nucleic acids and membranes have to be stable and even function best at temperatures around 100 degrees C. The chemolithoautotrophic archaeon Pyrolobus fumarii is able to grow at 113 degrees C and, therefore, represents the upper temperature border of life. For the first time, (vegetative) cultures of Pyrolobus and Pyrodictium are able to survive autoclaving.

  5. Arsenite-Oxidizing Hydrogenobaculum Strain Isolated from an Acid-Sulfate-Chloride Geothermal Spring in Yellowstone National Park

    PubMed Central

    Donahoe-Christiansen, Jessica; D'Imperio, Seth; Jackson, Colin R.; Inskeep, William P.; McDermott, Timothy R.

    2004-01-01

    An arsenite-oxidizing Hydrogenobaculum strain was isolated from a geothermal spring in Yellowstone National Park, Wyo., that was previously shown to contain microbial populations engaged in arsenite oxidation. The isolate was sensitive to both arsenite and arsenate and behaved as an obligate chemolithoautotroph that used H2 as its sole energy source and had an optimum temperature of 55 to 60°C and an optimum pH of 3.0. The arsenite oxidation in this organism displayed saturation kinetics and was strongly inhibited by H2S. PMID:15006819

  6. Complete genome sequence of Nitrosomonas sp. Is79, an ammonia oxidizing bacterium adapted to low ammonium concentrations

    SciTech Connect

    Bollmann, Annette; Sedlacek, Christopher J; Laanbroek, Hendrikus J; Suwa, Yuichi; Stein, Lisa Y; Klotz, Martin G; Arp, D J; Sayavedra-Soto, LA; Lu, Megan; Bruce, David; Detter, J. Chris; Tapia, Roxanne; Han, James; Woyke, Tanja; Lucas, Susan; Pitluck, Sam; Pennacchio, Len; Nolan, Matt; Land, Miriam L; Huntemann, Marcel; Deshpande, Shweta; Han, Cliff; Chen, Amy; Kyrpides, Nikos C; Mavromatis, K; Markowitz, Victor; Szeto, Ernest; Ivanova, N; Mikhailova, Natalia; Pagani, Ioanna; Pati, Amrita; Peters, Lin; Ovchinnikova, Galina; Goodwin, Lynne A.

    2013-01-01

    Nitrosomonas sp. Is79 is a chemolithoautotrophic ammonia-oxidizing bacterium that belongs to the family Nitrosomonadaceae within the phylum Proteobacteria. Ammonia oxidation is the first step of nitrification, an important process in the global nitrogen cycle ultimately resulting in the production of nitrate. Nitrosomonas sp. Is79 is an ammonia oxidizer of high interest because it is adapted to low ammonium and can be found in freshwater environments around the world. The 3,783,444-bp chromosome with a total of 3,553 protein coding genes and 44 RNA genes was sequenced by the DOE-Joint Genome Institute Program CSP 2006.

  7. In Situ Gene Expression Responsible for Sulfide Oxidation and CO2 Fixation of an Uncultured Large Sausage-Shaped Aquificae Bacterium in a Sulfidic Hot Spring.

    PubMed

    Tamazawa, Satoshi; Yamamoto, Kyosuke; Takasaki, Kazuto; Mitani, Yasuo; Hanada, Satoshi; Kamagata, Yoichi; Tamaki, Hideyuki

    2016-06-25

    We investigated the in situ gene expression profile of sulfur-turf microbial mats dominated by an uncultured large sausage-shaped Aquificae bacterium, a key metabolic player in sulfur-turfs in sulfidic hot springs. A reverse transcription-PCR analysis revealed that the genes responsible for sulfide, sulfite, and thiosulfate oxidation and carbon fixation via the reductive TCA cycle were continuously expressed in sulfur-turf mats taken at different sampling points, seasons, and years. These results suggest that the uncultured large sausage-shaped bacterium has the ability to grow chemolithoautotrophically and plays key roles as a primary producer in the sulfidic hot spring ecosystem in situ.

  8. Metatranscriptomic Evidence of Chemolithoautotrophy in the Rifle (CO) Subsurface Relevant to C, S, N, and Fe Cycling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beller, H. R.; Jewell, T. N. M.; Karaoz, U.; Thomas, B. C.; Banfield, J. F.; Brodie, E.; Williams, K. H.

    2014-12-01

    Although there is a limited understanding of the chemolithoautotrophic activity of aquifer microorganisms, such subsurface microbial activity could greatly influence the cycling of elements such as C, S, N, and Fe. Here, we present transcriptional (RNA-Seq) evidence of the emergence of such chemolithoautotrophic activities in groundwater filter samples from a 2-month experiment in which up to 1.5 mM nitrate (a native electron acceptor) was injected into a perennially suboxic/anoxic aquifer (Rifle, CO) containing a large reservoir of reduced Fe- and S-containing compounds. Illumina sequence data from rRNA-subtracted cDNA libraries was assembled and mapped to phylogenetically binned Rifle metagenome data. Indicative of the activity of Fe(II)-oxidizing bacteria, many high-abundance transcripts mapped to the Gallionellaceae family, whose known members are chemolithoautotrophic bacteria that catalyze Fe(II) oxidation. For example, included among the most abundant transcripts were a cold-shock protein and an acyl carrier protein with 96-98% protein sequence identity to Gallionella capsiferriformans and a nitrite reductase (nirS) gene likely belonging to a Sideroxydans relative. The apparent activity of Gallionellaceae members is consistent with 16S rRNA iTag analyses of these samples, which indicated that Gallionella-related taxa accounted for up to ~50% of these communities. Evidence of sulfide oxidation also was apparent in these samples. For example, highly expressed subunits of APS reductase were very similar to those of the obligately chemolithoautotrophic S- and Fe(II)-oxidizing Thiobacillus denitrificans in terms of sequence identity (98-99%) and synteny of the mapped scaffold. Also highly expressed were a ß-Proteobacterial Form II RubisCO gene and a hydrazine oxidoreductase gene (93% identity to the planctomycete KSU-1), the latter strongly indicative of anaerobic ammonia oxidation (anammox) activity, which has seldom been reported in aquifer environments. Such

  9. Complete genome sequence of the thermophilic sulfate-reducing ocean bacterium Thermodesulfatator indicus type strain (CIR29812T)

    PubMed Central

    Anderson, Iain; Saunders, Elizabeth; Lapidus, Alla; Nolan, Matt; Lucas, Susan; Tice, Hope; Del Rio, Tijana Glavina; Cheng, Jan-Fang; Han, Cliff; Tapia, Roxanne; Goodwin, Lynne A.; Pitluck, Sam; Liolios, Konstantinos; Mavromatis, Konstantinos; Pagani, Ioanna; Ivanova, Natalia; Mikhailova, Natalia; Pati, Amrita; Chen, Amy; Palaniappan, Krishna; Land, Miriam; Hauser, Loren; Jeffries, Cynthia D.; Chang, Yun-juan; Brambilla, Evelyne-Marie; Rohde, Manfred; Spring, Stefan; Göker, Markus; Detter, John C.; Woyke, Tanja; Bristow, James; Eisen, Jonathan A.; Markowitz, Victor; Hugenholtz, Philip; Kyrpides, Nikos C.; Klenk, Hans-Peter

    2012-01-01

    Thermodesulfatator indicus Moussard et al. 2004 is a member of the Thermodesulfobacteriaceae, a family in the phylum Thermodesulfobacteria that is currently poorly characterized at the genome level. Members of this phylum are of interest because they represent a distinct, deep-branching, Gram-negative lineage. T. indicus is an anaerobic, thermophilic, chemolithoautotrophic sulfate reducer isolated from a deep-sea hydrothermal vent. Here we describe the features of this organism, together with the complete genome sequence, and annotation. The 2,322,224 bp long chromosome with its 2,233 protein-coding and 58 RNA genes is a part of the Genomic Encyclopedia of Bacteria and Archaea project. PMID:22768359

  10. Comparative analysis of transcriptional profiling of CD3+, CD4+ and CD8+ T cells identifies novel immune response players in T-Cell activation

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Min; Windgassen, Dirk; Papoutsakis, Eleftherios T

    2008-01-01

    Background T-cell activation is an essential step of the immune response and relies on the tightly controlled orchestration of hundreds of genes/proteins, yet the cellular and molecular events underlying this complex process are not fully understood, especially at the genome-scale. Significantly, a comparative genome-scale transcriptional analysis of two T-cell subsets (CD4+ and CD8+) against each other and against the naturally mixed population (CD3+ cells) remains unexplored. Results Comparison of the microarray-based gene expression patterns between CD3+ T cells, and the CD4+ and CD8+ subsets revealed largely conserved, but not identical, transcriptional patterns. We employed a Gene-Ontology-driven transcriptional analysis coupled with protein abundance assays in order to identify novel T-cell activation genes and cell-type-specific genes associated with the immune response. We identified potential genes involved in the communication between the two subsets (including IL23A, NR4A2, CD83, PSMB2, -8, MIF, IFI16, TNFAIP1, POU2AF1, and OTUB1) and would-be effector-function-specific genes (XCL2, SLAMF7, TNFSF4, -5, -9, CSF3, CD48 and CD244). Chemokines induced during T-cell activation, but not previously identified in T cells, include CCL20, CXCL9, -10, -11 (in all three populations), and XCL2 (preferentially in CD8+ T cells). Increased expression of other unexpected cytokines (GPI, OSM and MIF) suggests their involvement in T-cell activation with their functions yet to be examined. Differential expression of many receptors, not previously reported in the context of T-cell activation, including CCR5, CCR7, IL1R2, IL1RAP, IL6R, TNFRSF25 and TNFRSF1A, suggests their role in this immune process. Several receptors involved in TCR activation (CD3D, CD3G, TRAT1, ITGAL, ITGB1, ITGB2, CD8A and B (CD8+ T-cell specific) along with LCK, ZAP70 and TYROBP were synchronously downregulated. Members of cell-surface receptors (HLA-Ds and KLRs), none previously identified in the

  11. Comparative analysis of transcriptional profiling of CD3+, CD4+ and CD8+ T cells identifies novel immune response players in T-cell activation.

    PubMed

    Wang, Min; Windgassen, Dirk; Papoutsakis, Eleftherios T

    2008-05-16

    T-cell activation is an essential step of the immune response and relies on the tightly controlled orchestration of hundreds of genes/proteins, yet the cellular and molecular events underlying this complex process are not fully understood, especially at the genome-scale. Significantly, a comparative genome-scale transcriptional analysis of two T-cell subsets (CD4+ and CD8+) against each other and against the naturally mixed population (CD3+ cells) remains unexplored. Comparison of the microarray-based gene expression patterns between CD3+ T cells, and the CD4+ and CD8+ subsets revealed largely conserved, but not identical, transcriptional patterns. We employed a Gene-Ontology-driven transcriptional analysis coupled with protein abundance assays in order to identify novel T-cell activation genes and cell-type-specific genes associated with the immune response. We identified potential genes involved in the communication between the two subsets (including IL23A, NR4A2, CD83, PSMB2, -8, MIF, IFI16, TNFAIP1, POU2AF1, and OTUB1) and would-be effector-function-specific genes (XCL2, SLAMF7, TNFSF4, -5, -9, CSF3, CD48 and CD244). Chemokines induced during T-cell activation, but not previously identified in T cells, include CCL20, CXCL9, -10, -11 (in all three populations), and XCL2 (preferentially in CD8+ T cells). Increased expression of other unexpected cytokines (GPI, OSM and MIF) suggests their involvement in T-cell activation with their functions yet to be examined. Differential expression of many receptors, not previously reported in the context of T-cell activation, including CCR5, CCR7, IL1R2, IL1RAP, IL6R, TNFRSF25 and TNFRSF1A, suggests their role in this immune process. Several receptors involved in TCR activation (CD3D, CD3G, TRAT1, ITGAL, ITGB1, ITGB2, CD8A and B (CD8+ T-cell specific) along with LCK, ZAP70 and TYROBP were synchronously downregulated. Members of cell-surface receptors (HLA-Ds and KLRs), none previously identified in the context of T

  12. Cyclopalladated and cycloplatinated benzophenone imines: antitumor, antibacterial and antioxidant activities, DNA interaction and cathepsin B inhibition.

    PubMed

    Albert, Joan; D'Andrea, Lucía; Granell, Jaume; Pla-Vilanova, Pepita; Quirante, Josefina; Khosa, Muhammad Kaleem; Calvis, Carme; Messeguer, Ramon; Badía, Josefa; Baldomà, Laura; Font-Bardia, Mercè; Calvet, Teresa

    2014-11-01

    The antitumor, antibacterial and antioxidant activity, DNA interaction and cathepsin B inhibition of cyclo-ortho-palladated and -platinated compounds [Pd(C,N)]2(μ-X)2 [X=OAc (1), X=Cl (2)] and trans-N,P-[M(C,N)X(PPh3)] [M=Pd, X=OAc (3), M=Pd, X=Cl (4), M=Pt, X=Cl (5)] are discussed [(C,N)=cyclo-ortho-metallated benzophenone imine]. The cytotoxicity of compound 5 has been evaluated towards human breast (MDA-MB-231 and MCF-7) and colon (HCT-116) cancer cell lines and that of compounds 1-4 towards the HCT-116 human colon cancer cell line. These cytotoxicities have been compared with those previously reported for compounds 1-4 towards MDA-MB-231 and MCF-7 cancer cell lines. Compound 3 and 4 were approximately four times more active than cisplatin against the MDA-MB-231 and MCF-7 cancer cell lines, and compound 5, was approximately four times more potent than cisplatin against the HCT-116 cancer cell line. The antibacterial activity of compounds 1-5 was in between the ranges of activity of the commercial antibiotic compounds cefixime and roxithromycin. Complexes 1-2 and 4-5 presented also antioxidant activity. Compounds 1-5 alter the DNA tertiary structure in a similar way to cisplatin, but at higher concentration, and do not present a high efficiency as cathepsin B inhibitors. Compound 5 has not been previously described, and its preparation, characterization, and X-ray crystal structure are reported. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Selenoquinones stabilized by ruthenium(II) arene complexes: synthesis, structure, and cytotoxicity.

    PubMed

    Dubarle-Offner, Julien; Clavel, Catherine M; Gontard, Geoffrey; Dyson, Paul J; Amouri, Hani

    2014-05-05

    A new series of monoselenoquinone and diselenoquinone π complexes, [(η(6) -p-cymene)Ru(η(4) -C6 R4 SeE)] (R=H, E=Se (6); R=CH3 , E=Se (7); R=H, E=O (8)), as well as selenolate π complexes [(η(6) -p-cymene)Ru(η(5) -C6 H3 R2 Se)][SbF6 ] (R=H (9); R=CH3 (10)), stabilized by arene ruthenium moieties were prepared in good yields through nucleophilic substitution reactions from dichlorinated-arene and hydroxymonochlorinated-arene ruthenium complexes [(η(6) -p-cymene)Ru(C6 R4 XCl)][SbF6 ]2 (R=H, X=Cl (1); R=CH3 , X=Cl (2); R=H, X=OH (3)) as well as the monochlorinated π complexes [(η(6) -p-cymene)Ru(η(5) -C6 H3 R2 Cl)][SbF6 ]2 (R=H (4); R=CH3 (5)). The X-ray crystallographic structures of two of the compounds, [(η(6) -p-cymene)Ru(η(4) -C6 Me4 Se2 )] (7) and [(η(6) -p-cymene)Ru(η(4) -C6 H4 SeO)] (8), were determined. The structures confirm the identity of the target compounds and ascertain the coordination mode of these unprecedented ruthenium π complexes of selenoquinones. Furthermore, these new compounds display relevant cytotoxic properties towards human ovarian cancer cells.

  14. The chemotaxis of M1 and M2 macrophages is regulated by different chemokines.

    PubMed

    Xuan, Wenjuan; Qu, Qing; Zheng, Biao; Xiong, Sidong; Fan, Guo-Huang

    2015-01-01

    The homing of proinflammatory (M1) and the "alternatively activated" anti-inflammatory (M2) macrophages plays a different role in the process of inflammation. Chemokines are the major mediators of macrophage chemotaxis, but how they differentially regulate M1 and M2 macrophages remains largely unclear. In the present study, we attempted to screen chemokines that differentially induce chemotaxis of M1 and M2 macrophages and to explore the underlying mechanism. Among the 41 chemokines that specifically bind to 20 chemokine receptors, CCL19, CCL21, CCL24, CCL25, CXCL8, CXCL10, and XCL2 specifically induced M1 macrophage chemotaxis, whereas CCL7 induced chemotaxis of both M1 and M2 macrophages. Whereas the differential effects of these chemokines on M1/M2 macrophage chemotaxis could be attributable to the predominant expression of their cognate receptors on the macrophage subsets, CCR7, the receptor for CCL19/CCL21, appeared to be an exception. Immunoblot analysis indicated an equivalent level of CCR7 in the whole cell lysate of M1 and M2 macrophages, but CCL19 and CCL21 only induced M1 macrophage chemotaxis. Both immunoblot and confocal microscopy analyses demonstrated that CCR7 was predominantly expressed on the cell surface of M1 but in the cytosol of M2 macrophages before ligand stimulation. As a result, CCL19 or CCL21 induced activation of both MEK1-ERK1/2 and PI3K-AKT cascades in M1 but not in M2 macrophages. Intriguingly, CCL19/CCL21-mediated M1 macrophage chemotaxis was blocked by specific inhibition of PI3K rather than MEK1. Together, these findings suggest that recruitment of M1 and M2 macrophages is fine tuned by different chemokines with the involvement of specific signaling pathways. © Society for Leukocyte Biology.

  15. Cell proliferation at 122°C and isotopically heavy CH4 production by a hyperthermophilic methanogen under high-pressure cultivation

    PubMed Central

    Takai, Ken; Nakamura, Kentaro; Toki, Tomohiro; Tsunogai, Urumu; Miyazaki, Masayuki; Miyazaki, Junichi; Hirayama, Hisako; Nakagawa, Satoshi; Nunoura, Takuro; Horikoshi, Koki

    2008-01-01

    We have developed a technique for cultivation of chemolithoautotrophs under high hydrostatic pressures that is successfully applicable to various types of deep-sea chemolithoautotrophs, including methanogens. It is based on a glass-syringe-sealing liquid medium and gas mixture used in conjunction with a butyl rubber piston and a metallic needle stuck into butyl rubber. By using this technique, growth, survival, and methane production of a newly isolated, hyperthermophilic methanogen Methanopyrus kandleri strain 116 are characterized under high temperatures and hydrostatic pressures. Elevated hydrostatic pressures extend the temperature maximum for possible cell proliferation from 116°C at 0.4 MPa to 122°C at 20 MPa, providing the potential for growth even at 122°C under an in situ high pressure. In addition, piezophilic growth significantly affected stable carbon isotope fractionation of methanogenesis from CO2. Under conventional growth conditions, the isotope fractionation of methanogenesis by M. kandleri strain 116 was similar to values (−34‰ to−27‰) previously reported for other hydrogenotrophic methanogens. However, under high hydrostatic pressures, the isotope fractionation effect became much smaller (<−12‰), and the kinetic isotope effect at 122°C and 40 MPa was −9.4‰, which is one of the smallest effects ever reported. This observation will shed light on the sources and production mechanisms of deep-sea methane. PMID:18664583

  16. Abundance and diversity of microbial life in ocean crust.

    PubMed

    Santelli, Cara M; Orcutt, Beth N; Banning, Erin; Bach, Wolfgang; Moyer, Craig L; Sogin, Mitchell L; Staudigel, Hubert; Edwards, Katrina J

    2008-05-29

    Oceanic lithosphere exposed at the sea floor undergoes seawater-rock alteration reactions involving the oxidation and hydration of glassy basalt. Basalt alteration reactions are theoretically capable of supplying sufficient energy for chemolithoautotrophic growth. Such reactions have been shown to generate microbial biomass in the laboratory, but field-based support for the existence of microbes that are supported by basalt alteration is lacking. Here, using quantitative polymerase chain reaction, in situ hybridization and microscopy, we demonstrate that prokaryotic cell abundances on seafloor-exposed basalts are 3-4 orders of magnitude greater than in overlying deep sea water. Phylogenetic analyses of basaltic lavas from the East Pacific Rise (9 degrees N) and around Hawaii reveal that the basalt-hosted biosphere harbours high bacterial community richness and that community membership is shared between these sites. We hypothesize that alteration reactions fuel chemolithoautotrophic microorganisms, which constitute a trophic base of the basalt habitat, with important implications for deep-sea carbon cycling and chemical exchange between basalt and sea water.

  17. Streptomyces thermoautotrophicus does not fix nitrogen

    PubMed Central

    MacKellar, Drew; Lieber, Lucas; Norman, Jeffrey S.; Bolger, Anthony; Tobin, Cory; Murray, James W.; Oksaksin, Mehtap; Chang, Roger L.; Ford, Tyler J.; Nguyen, Peter Q.; Woodward, Jimmy; Permingeat, Hugo R.; Joshi, Neel S.; Silver, Pamela A.; Usadel, Björn; Rutherford, Alfred W.; Friesen, Maren L.; Prell, Jürgen

    2016-01-01

    Streptomyces thermoautotrophicus UBT1 has been described as a moderately thermophilic chemolithoautotroph with a novel nitrogenase enzyme that is oxygen-insensitive. We have cultured the UBT1 strain, and have isolated two new strains (H1 and P1-2) of very similar phenotypic and genetic characters. These strains show minimal growth on ammonium-free media, and fail to incorporate isotopically labeled N2 gas into biomass in multiple independent assays. The sdn genes previously published as the putative nitrogenase of S. thermoautotrophicus have little similarity to anything found in draft genome sequences, published here, for strains H1 and UBT1, but share >99% nucleotide identity with genes from Hydrogenibacillus schlegelii, a draft genome for which is also presented here. H. schlegelii similarly lacks nitrogenase genes and is a non-diazotroph. We propose reclassification of the species containing strains UBT1, H1, and P1-2 as a non-Streptomycete, non-diazotrophic, facultative chemolithoautotroph and conclude that the existence of the previously proposed oxygen-tolerant nitrogenase is extremely unlikely. PMID:26833023

  18. Genomic and Transcriptomic Resolution of Organic Matter Utilization Among Deep-Sea Bacteria in Guaymas Basin Hydrothermal Plumes.

    PubMed

    Li, Meng; Jain, Sunit; Dick, Gregory J

    2016-01-01

    Microbial chemosynthesis within deep-sea hydrothermal vent plumes is a regionally important source of organic carbon to the deep ocean. Although chemolithoautotrophs within hydrothermal plumes have attracted much attention, a gap remains in understanding the fate of organic carbon produced via chemosynthesis. In the present study, we conducted shotgun metagenomic and metatranscriptomic sequencing on samples from deep-sea hydrothermal vent plumes and surrounding background seawaters at Guaymas Basin (GB) in the Gulf of California. De novo assembly of metagenomic reads and binning by tetranucleotide signatures using emergent self-organizing maps (ESOM) revealed 66 partial and nearly complete bacterial genomes. These bacterial genomes belong to 10 different phyla: Actinobacteria, Bacteroidetes, Chloroflexi, Deferribacteres, Firmicutes, Gemmatimonadetes, Nitrospirae, Planctomycetes, Proteobacteria, Verrucomicrobia. Although several major transcriptionally active bacterial groups (Methylococcaceae, Methylomicrobium, SUP05, and SAR324) displayed methanotrophic and chemolithoautotrophic metabolisms, most other bacterial groups contain genes encoding extracellular peptidases and carbohydrate metabolizing enzymes with significantly higher transcripts in the plume than in background, indicating they are involved in degrading organic carbon derived from hydrothermal chemosynthesis. Among the most abundant and active heterotrophic bacteria in deep-sea hydrothermal plumes are Planctomycetes, which accounted for seven genomes with distinct functional and transcriptional activities. The Gemmatimonadetes and Verrucomicrobia also had abundant transcripts involved in organic carbon utilization. These results extend our knowledge of heterotrophic metabolism of bacterial communities in deep-sea hydrothermal plumes.

  19. Engineering of Ralstonia eutropha H16 for Autotrophic and Heterotrophic Production of Methyl Ketones

    PubMed Central

    Müller, Jana; MacEachran, Daniel; Burd, Helcio; Sathitsuksanoh, Noppadon; Bi, Changhao; Yeh, Yi-Chun; Lee, Taek Soon; Hillson, Nathan J.; Chhabra, Swapnil R.; Singer, Steven W.

    2013-01-01

    Ralstonia eutropha is a facultatively chemolithoautotrophic bacterium able to grow with organic substrates or H2 and CO2 under aerobic conditions. Under conditions of nutrient imbalance, R. eutropha produces copious amounts of poly[(R)-3-hydroxybutyrate] (PHB). Its ability to utilize CO2 as a sole carbon source renders it an interesting new candidate host for the production of renewable liquid transportation fuels. We engineered R. eutropha for the production of fatty acid-derived, diesel-range methyl ketones. Modifications engineered in R. eutropha included overexpression of a cytoplasmic version of the TesA thioesterase, which led to a substantial (>150-fold) increase in fatty acid titer under certain conditions. In addition, deletion of two putative β-oxidation operons and heterologous expression of three genes (the acyl coenzyme A oxidase gene from Micrococcus luteus and fadB and fadM from Escherichia coli) led to the production of 50 to 65 mg/liter of diesel-range methyl ketones under heterotrophic growth conditions and 50 to 180 mg/liter under chemolithoautotrophic growth conditions (with CO2 and H2 as the sole carbon source and electron donor, respectively). Induction of the methyl ketone pathway diverted substantial carbon flux away from PHB biosynthesis and appeared to enhance carbon flux through the pathway for biosynthesis of fatty acids, which are the precursors of methyl ketones. PMID:23686271

  20. Genomic and Transcriptomic Resolution of Organic Matter Utilization Among Deep-Sea Bacteria in Guaymas Basin Hydrothermal Plumes

    PubMed Central

    Li, Meng; Jain, Sunit; Dick, Gregory J.

    2016-01-01

    Microbial chemosynthesis within deep-sea hydrothermal vent plumes is a regionally important source of organic carbon to the deep ocean. Although chemolithoautotrophs within hydrothermal plumes have attracted much attention, a gap remains in understanding the fate of organic carbon produced via chemosynthesis. In the present study, we conducted shotgun metagenomic and metatranscriptomic sequencing on samples from deep-sea hydrothermal vent plumes and surrounding background seawaters at Guaymas Basin (GB) in the Gulf of California. De novo assembly of metagenomic reads and binning by tetranucleotide signatures using emergent self-organizing maps (ESOM) revealed 66 partial and nearly complete bacterial genomes. These bacterial genomes belong to 10 different phyla: Actinobacteria, Bacteroidetes, Chloroflexi, Deferribacteres, Firmicutes, Gemmatimonadetes, Nitrospirae, Planctomycetes, Proteobacteria, Verrucomicrobia. Although several major transcriptionally active bacterial groups (Methylococcaceae, Methylomicrobium, SUP05, and SAR324) displayed methanotrophic and chemolithoautotrophic metabolisms, most other bacterial groups contain genes encoding extracellular peptidases and carbohydrate metabolizing enzymes with significantly higher transcripts in the plume than in background, indicating they are involved in degrading organic carbon derived from hydrothermal chemosynthesis. Among the most abundant and active heterotrophic bacteria in deep-sea hydrothermal plumes are Planctomycetes, which accounted for seven genomes with distinct functional and transcriptional activities. The Gemmatimonadetes and Verrucomicrobia also had abundant transcripts involved in organic carbon utilization. These results extend our knowledge of heterotrophic metabolism of bacterial communities in deep-sea hydrothermal plumes. PMID:27512389

  1. Propionate Oxidation by and Methanol Inhibition of Anaerobic Ammonium-Oxidizing Bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Güven, Didem; Dapena, Ana; Kartal, Boran; Schmid, Markus C.; Maas, Bart; van de Pas-Schoonen, Katinka; Sozen, Seval; Mendez, Ramon; Op den Camp, Huub J. M.; Jetten, Mike S. M.; Strous, Marc; Schmidt, Ingo

    2005-01-01

    Anaerobic ammonium oxidation (anammox) is a recently discovered microbial pathway and a cost-effective way to remove ammonium from wastewater. Anammox bacteria have been described as obligate chemolithoautotrophs. However, many chemolithoautotrophs (i.e., nitrifiers) can use organic compounds as a supplementary carbon source. In this study, the effect of organic compounds on anammox bacteria was investigated. It was shown that alcohols inhibited anammox bacteria, while organic acids were converted by them. Methanol was the most potent inhibitor, leading to complete and irreversible loss of activity at concentrations as low as 0.5 mM. Of the organic acids acetate and propionate, propionate was consumed at a higher rate (0.8 nmol min−1 mg of protein−1) by Percoll-purified anammox cells. Glucose, formate, and alanine had no effect on the anammox process. It was shown that propionate was oxidized mainly to CO2, with nitrate and/or nitrite as the electron acceptor. The anammox bacteria carried out propionate oxidation simultaneously with anaerobic ammonium oxidation. In an anammox enrichment culture fed with propionate for 150 days, the relative amounts of anammox cells and denitrifiers did not change significantly over time, indicating that anammox bacteria could compete successfully with heterotrophic denitrifiers for propionate. In conclusion, this study shows that anammox bacteria have a more versatile metabolism than previously assumed. PMID:15691967

  2. The role of Acidithiobacillus ferrooxidans in alleviating the inhibitory effect of thiosulfate on the growth of acidophilic Acidiphilium species isolated from acid mine drainage samples from Garubathan, India.

    PubMed

    Gurung, Anirudra; Chakraborty, Ranadhir

    2009-09-01

    Several acidophilic chemolithoautotrophic and heterotrophic strains were isolated from acid mine drainage samples from Garubathan, West Bengal, India. The strains, chemolithoautotrophic DK6.1 and heterotrophic DKAP1.1, used in this study were assigned to the species Acidithiobacillus ferrooxidans and Acidiphilium cryptum, respectively. Unamended filtered and subsequently autoclaved elemental sulfur spent medium of A. ferrooxidans was used as the medium to study heterotrophic growth of A. cryptum DKAP1.1. While characterizing the heterotrophic strain, an inhibitory effect of thiosulfate on A. cryptum DKAP1.1 was identified. The lethality of thiosulfate broth was directly related to the concentration of thiosulfate in the medium. Nonviability of A. cryptum DKAP1.1 in the presence of thiosulfate was alleviated by A. ferrooxidans DK6.1 in co-culture. Microbiological data on a positive growth effect for A. ferrooxidans DK6.1 caused by co-culturing in solid media in the presence of A. cryptum DKAP1.1 is also presented.

  3. Metals and minerals as a biotechnology feedstock: engineering biomining microbiology for bioenergy applications.

    PubMed

    Banerjee, Indrani; Burrell, Brittany; Reed, Cara; West, Alan C; Banta, Scott

    2017-06-01

    Developing new feedstocks for the efficient production of biochemicals and biofuels will be a critical challenge as we diversify away from petrochemicals. One possible opportunity is the utilization of sulfide-based minerals in the Earth's crust. Non-photosynthetic chemolithoautotrophic bacteria are starting to be developed to produce biochemicals from CO2 using energy obtained from the oxidation of inorganic feedstocks. Biomining of metals like gold and copper already exploit the native metabolism of these bacteria and these represent perhaps the largest-scale bioprocesses ever developed. The metabolic engineering of these bacteria could be a desirable alternative to classical heterotrophic bioproduction. In this review, we discuss biomining operations and the challenges and advances in the engineering of associated chemolithoautotrophic bacteria for biofuel production. The co-generation of biofuels integrated with mining operations is a largely unexplored opportunity that will require advances in fundamental microbiology and the development of new genetic tools and techniques for these organisms. Although this approach is presently in its infancy, the production of biochemicals using energy from non-petroleum mineral resources is an exciting new biotechnology opportunity. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Cell proliferation at 122 degrees C and isotopically heavy CH4 production by a hyperthermophilic methanogen under high-pressure cultivation.

    PubMed

    Takai, Ken; Nakamura, Kentaro; Toki, Tomohiro; Tsunogai, Urumu; Miyazaki, Masayuki; Miyazaki, Junichi; Hirayama, Hisako; Nakagawa, Satoshi; Nunoura, Takuro; Horikoshi, Koki

    2008-08-05

    We have developed a technique for cultivation of chemolithoautotrophs under high hydrostatic pressures that is successfully applicable to various types of deep-sea chemolithoautotrophs, including methanogens. It is based on a glass-syringe-sealing liquid medium and gas mixture used in conjunction with a butyl rubber piston and a metallic needle stuck into butyl rubber. By using this technique, growth, survival, and methane production of a newly isolated, hyperthermophilic methanogen Methanopyrus kandleri strain 116 are characterized under high temperatures and hydrostatic pressures. Elevated hydrostatic pressures extend the temperature maximum for possible cell proliferation from 116 degrees C at 0.4 MPa to 122 degrees C at 20 MPa, providing the potential for growth even at 122 degrees C under an in situ high pressure. In addition, piezophilic growth significantly affected stable carbon isotope fractionation of methanogenesis from CO(2). Under conventional growth conditions, the isotope fractionation of methanogenesis by M. kandleri strain 116 was similar to values (-34 per thousand to -27 per thousand) previously reported for other hydrogenotrophic methanogens. However, under high hydrostatic pressures, the isotope fractionation effect became much smaller (< -12 per thousand), and the kinetic isotope effect at 122 degrees C and 40 MPa was -9.4 per thousand, which is one of the smallest effects ever reported. This observation will shed light on the sources and production mechanisms of deep-sea methane.

  5. Biogeochemical N signatures from rate-yield trade-offs during in vitro chemosynthetic NO3- reduction by deep-sea vent ε-Proteobacteria and Aquificae growing at different temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pérez-Rodríguez, Ileana; Sievert, Stefan M.; Fogel, Marilyn L.; Foustoukos, Dionysis I.

    2017-08-01

    NO3- reduction is a metabolism that is widespread among ε-Proteobacteria and Aquificae, two abundant classes of microorganisms found at deep-sea vents. In this study, we used Sulfurovum lithotrophicum, Caminibacter mediatlanticus and Thermovibrio ammonificans as representatives of these groups to study ecophysiological, metabolic and biogeochemical parameters associated with chemolithoautotrophic NO3- reduction under different temperature regimes. We observed that while S. lithotrophicum and C. mediatlanticus achieved higher cell densities than T. ammonificans, the overall NO3- consumption by the latter was on average ∼9 and ∼5 times faster on a per cell basis, respectively. Comparison with previously published data from other cultured vent ε-Proteobacteria and Aquificae suggests that the rate-yield trade-offs observed in our experiments are generally conserved between these two groups in line with their ecophysiologies. Kinetic isotope effects of N from NO3- reduction were 9.6 ± 2.7‰ for S. lithotrophicum, 6.4 ± 0.7‰ for C. mediatlanticus and 8.8 ± 0.6‰ for T. ammonificans. Our results help evaluate how metabolic partitioning between growth efficiency and reaction kinetics during chemolithoautotrophic NO3- reduction affect the concentration and isotope composition of N compounds at deep-sea hydrothermal vents.

  6. Chemolithoautotrophy supports macroinvertebrate food webs and affects diversity and stability in groundwater communities.

    PubMed

    Hutchins, Benjamin T; Engel, Annette Summers; Nowlin, Weston H; Schwartz, Benjamin F

    2016-06-01

    The prevailing paradigm in subterranean ecology is that below-ground food webs are simple, limited to one or two trophic levels, and composed of generalist species because of spatio-temporally patchy food resources and pervasive energy limitation. This paradigm is based on relatively few studies of easily accessible, air-filled caves. However, in some subterranean ecosystems, chemolithoautotrophy can subsidize or replace surface-based allochthonous inputs of photosynthetically derived organic matter (OM) as a basal food resource and promote niche specialization and evolution of higher trophic levels. Consequently, the current subterranean trophic paradigm fails to account for variation in resources, trophic specialization, and food chain length in some subterranean ecosystems. We reevaluated the subterranean food web paradigm by examining spatial variation in the isotopic composition of basal food resources and consumers, food web structure, stygobiont species diversity, and chromophoric organic matter (CDOM), across a geochemical gradient in a large and complex groundwater system, the Edwards Aquifer in Central Texas (USA). Mean δ13C values of stygobiont communities become increasingly more negative along the gradient of photosynthetic OM sources near the aquifer recharge zone to chemolithoautotrophic OM sources closer to the freshwater-saline water interface (FWSWI) between oxygenated freshwater and anoxic, sulfide-rich saline water. Stygobiont community species richness declined with increasing distance from the FWSWI. Bayesian mixing models were used to estimate the relative importance of photosynthetic OM and chemolithoautorophic OM for stygobiont communities at three biogeochemically distinct sites. The contribution of chemolithoautotrophic OM to consumers at these sites ranged between 25% and 69% of total OM utilized and comprised as much as 88% of the diet for one species. In addition, the food web adjacent to the FWSWI had greater trophic diversity when

  7. Dissecting iron uptake and homeostasis in Nitrosomonas europaea.

    PubMed

    Sayavedra-Soto, Luis A; Vajrala, Neeraja; Arp, Daniel J

    2011-01-01

    The chemolithoautotroph Nitrosomonas europaea oxidizes about 25 mol of NH(3) for each mole of CO(2) that is converted to biomass using an array of heme and nonheme Fe-containing proteins. Hence mechanisms of efficient iron (Fe) uptake and homeostasis are particularly important for this Betaproteobacterium. Among nitrifiers, N.europaea has been the most studied to date. Characteristics that make N.europaea a suitable model to study Fe uptake and homeostasis are as follows: (a) its sequenced genome, (b) its capability to grow relatively well in 0.2 μM Fe in the absence of heterologous siderophores, and (c) its amenability to mutagenesis. In this chapter, we describe the methodology we use in our laboratory to dissect Fe uptake and homeostasis in the ammonia oxidizer N. europaea.

  8. Bacteria, hypertolerant to arsenic in the rocks of an ancient gold mine, and their potential role in dissemination of arsenic pollution.

    PubMed

    Drewniak, Lukasz; Styczek, Aleksandra; Majder-Lopatka, Malgorzata; Sklodowska, Aleksandra

    2008-12-01

    The aim of the present study was to find out if bacteria present in ancient gold mine could transform immobilized arsenic into its mobile form and increase its dissemination in the environment. Twenty-two arsenic-hypertolerant cultivable bacterial strains were isolated. No chemolithoautotrophs, which could use arsenite as an electron donor as well as arsenate as an electron acceptor, were identified. Five isolates exhibited hypertolerance to arsenic: up to 500mM of arsenate. A correlation between the presence of siderophores and high resistance to arsenic was found. The results of this study show that detoxification processes based on arsenate reductase activity might be significant in dissemination of arsenic pollution. It was concluded that the activity of the described heterotrophic bacteria contributes to the mobilization of arsenic in the more toxic As(III) form and a new mechanism of arsenic mobilization from a scorodite was proposed.

  9. Ferredoxin-NADP reductase from the thermophilic hydrogen-oxidizing bacterium, Hydrogenobacter thermophilus TK-6.

    PubMed

    Ikeda, Takeshi; Nakamura, Miyuki; Arai, Hiroyuki; Ishii, Masaharu; Igarashi, Yasuo

    2009-08-01

    The thermophilic, obligately chemolithoautotrophic hydrogen-oxidizing bacterium, Hydrogenobacter thermophilus TK-6, assimilates carbon dioxide via the reductive tricarboxylic acid cycle. Small iron-sulfur proteins, ferredoxins, play a central role as low-potential electron donors for this cycle. The fpr gene of this bacterium, encoding a putative ferredoxin-NADP(+) reductase (FNR, EC 1.18.1.2), was expressed in Escherichia coli, and the recombinant protein was purified to homogeneity. Unexpectedly, the monomeric Fpr protein contained one molecule of FMN as a prosthetic group, although FNRs from other organisms are known to contain FAD. The FMN-containing Fpr was shown to be a bona fide FNR that catalyzes a reversible redox reaction between NADP(+)/NADPH and ferredoxins.

  10. Identification and characterization of multiple rubisco activases in chemoautotrophic bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Tsai, Yi-Chin Candace; Lapina, Maria Claribel; Bhushan, Shashi; Mueller-Cajar, Oliver

    2015-01-01

    Ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase (rubisco) is responsible for almost all biological CO2 assimilation, but forms inhibited complexes with its substrate ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate (RuBP) and other sugar phosphates. The distantly related AAA+ proteins rubisco activase and CbbX remodel inhibited rubisco complexes to effect inhibitor release in plants and α-proteobacteria, respectively. Here we characterize a third class of rubisco activase in the chemolithoautotroph Acidithiobacillus ferrooxidans. Two sets of isoforms of CbbQ and CbbO form hetero-oligomers that function as specific activases for two structurally diverse rubisco forms. Mutational analysis supports a model wherein the AAA+ protein CbbQ functions as motor and CbbO is a substrate adaptor that binds rubisco via a von Willebrand factor A domain. Understanding the mechanisms employed by nature to overcome rubisco's shortcomings will increase our toolbox for engineering photosynthetic carbon dioxide fixation. PMID:26567524

  11. Identification and characterization of multiple rubisco activases in chemoautotrophic bacteria.

    PubMed

    Tsai, Yi-Chin Candace; Lapina, Maria Claribel; Bhushan, Shashi; Mueller-Cajar, Oliver

    2015-11-16

    Ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase (rubisco) is responsible for almost all biological CO2 assimilation, but forms inhibited complexes with its substrate ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate (RuBP) and other sugar phosphates. The distantly related AAA+ proteins rubisco activase and CbbX remodel inhibited rubisco complexes to effect inhibitor release in plants and α-proteobacteria, respectively. Here we characterize a third class of rubisco activase in the chemolithoautotroph Acidithiobacillus ferrooxidans. Two sets of isoforms of CbbQ and CbbO form hetero-oligomers that function as specific activases for two structurally diverse rubisco forms. Mutational analysis supports a model wherein the AAA+ protein CbbQ functions as motor and CbbO is a substrate adaptor that binds rubisco via a von Willebrand factor A domain. Understanding the mechanisms employed by nature to overcome rubisco's shortcomings will increase our toolbox for engineering photosynthetic carbon dioxide fixation.

  12. Reconstructing a hydrogen-driven microbial metabolic network in Opalinus Clay rock.

    PubMed

    Bagnoud, Alexandre; Chourey, Karuna; Hettich, Robert L; de Bruijn, Ino; Andersson, Anders F; Leupin, Olivier X; Schwyn, Bernhard; Bernier-Latmani, Rizlan

    2016-10-14

    The Opalinus Clay formation will host geological nuclear waste repositories in Switzerland. It is expected that gas pressure will build-up due to hydrogen production from steel corrosion, jeopardizing the integrity of the engineered barriers. In an in situ experiment located in the Mont Terri Underground Rock Laboratory, we demonstrate that hydrogen is consumed by microorganisms, fuelling a microbial community. Metagenomic binning and metaproteomic analysis of this deep subsurface community reveals a carbon cycle driven by autotrophic hydrogen oxidizers belonging to novel genera. Necromass is then processed by fermenters, followed by complete oxidation to carbon dioxide by heterotrophic sulfate-reducing bacteria, which closes the cycle. This microbial metabolic web can be integrated in the design of geological repositories to reduce pressure build-up. This study shows that Opalinus Clay harbours the potential for chemolithoautotrophic-based system, and provides a model of microbial carbon cycle in deep subsurface environments where hydrogen and sulfate are present.

  13. [Thermophilic prokaryotes from deep subterranean habitats].

    PubMed

    Slobodkin, A I; Slobodkina, G B

    2014-01-01

    The deep continental biosphere consists of geologically isolated ecosystems differing in their physicochemical, geological, and trophic parameters. Most of the deep ecosystems exist at elevated temperatures (50-120 degrees C), which favor the development of thermophilic microorganisms. In many cases, indigenous nature of subsurface microorganisms is questionable due to problems of collecting representative and non-contaminated samples. In spite of the numerous studies on the deep biosphere microbial communities, the number of cultivated thermophiles isolated from subsurface environments not associated with petroleum deposits does not exceed 30 species. More than half of the thermophilic species isolated from deep subsurface belong to the Firmicutes. Majority of the underground thermophiles are subsurface strict or facultative anaerobes, with capacity for sulfate and iron reduction are notably widespread. Most thermophilic subsurface microorganisms are organotrophs, although chemolithoautotrophic thermophiles also have been reported. This review deals with the phylogenetic diversity and physiological properties of the cultivated thermophilic prokaryotes isolated from various deep subterranean habitats.

  14. Reconstructing a hydrogen-driven microbial metabolic network in Opalinus Clay rock

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bagnoud, Alexandre; Chourey, Karuna; Hettich, Robert L.; de Bruijn, Ino; Andersson, Anders F.; Leupin, Olivier X.; Schwyn, Bernhard; Bernier-Latmani, Rizlan

    2016-10-01

    The Opalinus Clay formation will host geological nuclear waste repositories in Switzerland. It is expected that gas pressure will build-up due to hydrogen production from steel corrosion, jeopardizing the integrity of the engineered barriers. In an in situ experiment located in the Mont Terri Underground Rock Laboratory, we demonstrate that hydrogen is consumed by microorganisms, fuelling a microbial community. Metagenomic binning and metaproteomic analysis of this deep subsurface community reveals a carbon cycle driven by autotrophic hydrogen oxidizers belonging to novel genera. Necromass is then processed by fermenters, followed by complete oxidation to carbon dioxide by heterotrophic sulfate-reducing bacteria, which closes the cycle. This microbial metabolic web can be integrated in the design of geological repositories to reduce pressure build-up. This study shows that Opalinus Clay harbours the potential for chemolithoautotrophic-based system, and provides a model of microbial carbon cycle in deep subsurface environments where hydrogen and sulfate are present.

  15. Adaptive strategies in the double-extremophilic prokaryotes inhabiting soda lakes.

    PubMed

    Banciu, Horia Leonard; Muntyan, Maria S

    2015-06-01

    Haloalkaliphiles are double extremophilic organisms thriving both at high salinity and alkaline pH. Although numerous haloalkaliphilic representatives have been identified among Archaea and Bacteria over the past 15 years, the adaptations underlying their prosperity at haloalkaline conditions are scarcely known. A multi-level adaptive strategy was proposed to occur in haloalkaliphilic organisms isolated from saline alkaline and soda environments including adjustments in the cell wall structure, plasma membrane lipid composition, membrane transport systems, bioenergetics, and osmoregulation. Isolation of chemolithoautotrophic sulfur-oxidizing γ-Proteobacteria from soda lakes allowed the elucidation of the structural and physiological differences between haloalkaliphilic (prefer NaCl) and natronophilic (prefer NaHCO3/Na2CO3, i.e. soda) microbes.

  16. Metal-containing residues from industry and in the environment: geobiotechnological urban mining.

    PubMed

    Glombitza, Franz; Reichel, Susan

    2014-01-01

    This chapter explains the manifold geobiotechnological possibilities to separate industrial valuable metals from various industrial residues and stored waste products of the past. In addition to an overview of the different microbially catalyzed chemical reactions applicable for a separation of metals and details of published studies, results of many individual investigations from various research projects are described. These concern the separation of rare earth elements from phosphorous production slags, the attempts of tin leaching from mining flotation residues, the separation of metals from spent catalysts, or the treatment of ashes as valuable metal-containing material. The residues of environmental technologies are integrated into this overview as well. The description of the different known microbial processes offers starting points for suitable and new technologies. In addition to the application of chemolithoautotrophic microorganisms the use of heterotrophic microorganisms is explained.

  17. The genome sequence of Desulfatibacillum alkenivorans AK-01: a blueprint for anaerobic alkane oxidation.

    PubMed

    Callaghan, A V; Morris, B E L; Pereira, I A C; McInerney, M J; Austin, R N; Groves, J T; Kukor, J J; Suflita, J M; Young, L Y; Zylstra, G J; Wawrik, B

    2012-01-01

    Desulfatibacillum alkenivorans AK-01 serves as a model organism for anaerobic alkane biodegradation because of its distinctive biochemistry and metabolic versatility. The D. alkenivorans genome provides a blueprint for understanding the genetic systems involved in alkane metabolism including substrate activation, CoA ligation, carbon-skeleton rearrangement and decarboxylation. Genomic analysis suggested a route to regenerate the fumarate needed for alkane activation via methylmalonyl-CoA and predicted the capability for syntrophic alkane metabolism, which was experimentally verified. Pathways involved in the oxidation of alkanes, alcohols, organic acids and n-saturated fatty acids coupled to sulfate reduction and the ability to grow chemolithoautotrophically were predicted. A complement of genes for motility and oxygen detoxification suggests that D. alkenivorans may be physiologically adapted to a wide range of environmental conditions. The D. alkenivorans genome serves as a platform for further study of anaerobic, hydrocarbon-oxidizing microorganisms and their roles in bioremediation, energy recovery and global carbon cycling.

  18. Marine Group II Archaea, potentially important players in the global ocean carbon cycle

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Chuanlun L.; Xie, Wei; Martin-Cuadrado, Ana-Belen; Rodriguez-Valera, Francisco

    2015-01-01

    Marine Group (MG) I (currently known as Thaumarchaeota) and MG II Archaea were first reported over two decades ago. While significant progress has been made on MG I microbiology and ecology, the progress on MG II has been noticeably slower. The common understanding is that while MG I mainly function as chemolithoautotrophs and occur predominantly in the deep ocean, MG II reside mostly in the photic zone and live heterotrophically. Studies to date have shown that MG II are abundant in the marine aquatic environment and display great seasonal and spatial variation and phylogenetic diversity. They also show unique patterns of organic carbon degradation and their energy requirements may be augmented by light in the photic zone. However, no pure culture of MG II has been obtained and thus their precise ecological role remains elusive. PMID:26528260

  19. Exploration of deep intraterrestrial microbial life: current perspectives.

    PubMed

    Pedersen, K

    2000-04-01

    Intraterrestrial life has been found at depths of several thousand metres in deep sub-sea floor sediments and in the basement crust beneath the sediments. It has also been found at up to 2800-m depth in continental sedimentary rocks, 5300-m depth in igneous rock aquifers and in fluid inclusions in ancient salt deposits from salt mines. The biomass of these intraterrestrial organisms may be equal to the total weight of all marine and terrestrial plants. The intraterrestrial microbes generally seem to be active at very low but significant rates and several investigations indicate chemolithoautotrophs to form a chemosynthetic base. Hydrogen, methane and carbon dioxide gases are continuously generated in the interior of our planet and probably constitute sustainable sources of carbon and energy for deep intraterrestrial biosphere ecosystems. Several prospective research areas are foreseen to focus on the importance of microbial communities for metabolic processes such as anaerobic utilisation of hydrocarbons and anaerobic methane oxidation.

  20. Isolation, Characterization, and Ecology of Cold-Active, Chemolithotrophic, Sulfur-Oxidizing Bacteria from Perennially Ice-Covered Lake Fryxell, Antarctica

    PubMed Central

    Sattley, W. Matthew; Madigan, Michael T.

    2006-01-01

    Novel strains of obligately chemolithoautotrophic, sulfur-oxidizing bacteria have been isolated from various depths of Lake Fryxell, Antarctica. Physiological, morphological, and phylogenetic analyses showed these strains to be related to mesophilic Thiobacillus species, such as T. thioparus. However, the psychrotolerant Antarctic isolates showed an adaptation to cold temperatures and thus should be active in the nearly freezing waters of the lake. Enumeration by most-probable-number analysis in an oxic, thiosulfate-containing medium revealed that the sulfur-oxidizing chemolithotroph population peaks precisely at the oxycline (9.5 m), although viable cells exist well into the anoxic, sulfidic waters of the lake. The sulfur-oxidizing bacteria described here likely play a key role in the biogeochemical cycling of carbon and sulfur in Lake Fryxell. PMID:16885310

  1. A novel hydrogen oxidizer amidst the sulfur-oxidizing Thiomicrospira lineage

    PubMed Central

    Hansen, Moritz; Perner, Mirjam

    2015-01-01

    Thiomicrospira species are ubiquitously found in various marine environments and appear particularly common in hydrothermal vent systems. Members of this lineage are commonly classified as sulfur-oxidizing chemolithoautotrophs. Although sequencing of Thiomicrospira crunogena's genome has revealed genes that encode enzymes for hydrogen uptake activity and for hydrogenase maturation and assembly, hydrogen uptake ability has so far not been reported for any Thiomicrospira species. We isolated a Thiomicrospira species (SP-41) from a deep sea hydrothermal vent and demonstrated that it can oxidize hydrogen. We show in vivo hydrogen consumption, hydrogen uptake activity in partially purified protein extracts and transcript abundance of hydrogenases during different growth stages. The ability of this strain to oxidize hydrogen opens up new perspectives with respect to the physiology of Thiomicrospira species that have been detected in hydrothermal vents and that have so far been exclusively associated with sulfur oxidation. PMID:25226028

  2. The influence of ultramafic rocks on microbial communities at the Logatchev hydrothermal field, located 15 degrees N on the Mid-Atlantic Ridge.

    PubMed

    Perner, Mirjam; Kuever, Jan; Seifert, Richard; Pape, Thomas; Koschinsky, Andrea; Schmidt, Katja; Strauss, Harald; Imhoff, Johannes F

    2007-07-01

    The ultramafic-hosted Logatchev hydrothermal field (LHF) on the Mid-Atlantic Ridge is characterized by high hydrogen and methane contents in the subseafloor, which support a specialized microbial community of phylogenetically diverse, hydrogen-oxidizing chemolithoautotrophs. We compared the prokaryotic communities of three sites located in the LHF and encountered a predominance of archaeal sequences affiliated with methanogenic Methanococcales at all three. However, the bacterial composition varied in accordance with differences in fluid chemistry between the three sites investigated. An increase in hydrogen seemed to coincide with the diversification of hydrogen-oxidizing bacteria. This might indicate that the host rock indirectly selects this specific group of bacteria. However, next to hydrogen availability further factors are evident (e.g. mixing of hot reduced hydrothermal fluids with cold oxygenated seawater), which have a significant impact on the distribution of microorganisms.

  3. Growth of nitrite-oxidizing bacteria by aerobic hydrogen oxidation.

    PubMed

    Koch, Hanna; Galushko, Alexander; Albertsen, Mads; Schintlmeister, Arno; Gruber-Dorninger, Christiane; Lücker, Sebastian; Pelletier, Eric; Le Paslier, Denis; Spieck, Eva; Richter, Andreas; Nielsen, Per H; Wagner, Michael; Daims, Holger

    2014-08-29

    The bacterial oxidation of nitrite to nitrate is a key process of the biogeochemical nitrogen cycle. Nitrite-oxidizing bacteria are considered a highly specialized functional group, which depends on the supply of nitrite from other microorganisms and whose distribution strictly correlates with nitrification in the environment and in wastewater treatment plants. On the basis of genomics, physiological experiments, and single-cell analyses, we show that Nitrospira moscoviensis, which represents a widely distributed lineage of nitrite-oxidizing bacteria, has the genetic inventory to utilize hydrogen (H2) as an alternative energy source for aerobic respiration and grows on H2 without nitrite. CO2 fixation occurred with H2 as the sole electron donor. Our results demonstrate a chemolithoautotrophic lifestyle of nitrite-oxidizing bacteria outside the nitrogen cycle, suggesting greater ecological flexibility than previously assumed.

  4. Isolation, characterization, and ecology of cold-active, chemolithotrophic, sulfur-oxidizing bacteria from perennially ice-covered Lake Fryxell, Antarctica.

    PubMed

    Sattley, W Matthew; Madigan, Michael T

    2006-08-01

    Novel strains of obligately chemolithoautotrophic, sulfur-oxidizing bacteria have been isolated from various depths of Lake Fryxell, Antarctica. Physiological, morphological, and phylogenetic analyses showed these strains to be related to mesophilic Thiobacillus species, such as T. thioparus. However, the psychrotolerant Antarctic isolates showed an adaptation to cold temperatures and thus should be active in the nearly freezing waters of the lake. Enumeration by most-probable-number analysis in an oxic, thiosulfate-containing medium revealed that the sulfur-oxidizing chemolithotroph population peaks precisely at the oxycline (9.5 m), although viable cells exist well into the anoxic, sulfidic waters of the lake. The sulfur-oxidizing bacteria described here likely play a key role in the biogeochemical cycling of carbon and sulfur in Lake Fryxell.

  5. Reconstructing a hydrogen-driven microbial metabolic network in Opalinus Clay rock

    PubMed Central

    Bagnoud, Alexandre; Chourey, Karuna; Hettich, Robert L.; de Bruijn, Ino; Andersson, Anders F.; Leupin, Olivier X.; Schwyn, Bernhard; Bernier-Latmani, Rizlan

    2016-01-01

    The Opalinus Clay formation will host geological nuclear waste repositories in Switzerland. It is expected that gas pressure will build-up due to hydrogen production from steel corrosion, jeopardizing the integrity of the engineered barriers. In an in situ experiment located in the Mont Terri Underground Rock Laboratory, we demonstrate that hydrogen is consumed by microorganisms, fuelling a microbial community. Metagenomic binning and metaproteomic analysis of this deep subsurface community reveals a carbon cycle driven by autotrophic hydrogen oxidizers belonging to novel genera. Necromass is then processed by fermenters, followed by complete oxidation to carbon dioxide by heterotrophic sulfate-reducing bacteria, which closes the cycle. This microbial metabolic web can be integrated in the design of geological repositories to reduce pressure build-up. This study shows that Opalinus Clay harbours the potential for chemolithoautotrophic-based system, and provides a model of microbial carbon cycle in deep subsurface environments where hydrogen and sulfate are present. PMID:27739431

  6. Methanogenesis in the hot and deep: implication for the deep biosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takai, K.; Nakamura, K.; Toki, T.; Tsunogai, U.

    2008-12-01

    Microbial methanogenesis in the deep-sea and deep subseafloor is a key process in the carbon cycle of Earth. Hyperthermophilic methanogens are important primary producers in the deep, hot ecosystem and may represent the most ancient type of life flourishing in the early Earth. Nevertheless, the biogeochemical function and impact of methanogens in deep sea and deep subseafloor are poorly understood, in part because it is difficult to replicate the high temperatures and hydrostatic pressures in the laboratory. We develop a new technique for cultivation of chemolithoautotrophs under high hydrostatic pressures. Using this technique, growth, survival and methane production of a newly isolated, hyperthermophilic methanogen Methanopyrus kandleri strain 116 are characterized under high temperatures and hydrostatic pressures. The results renewed the previous record of upper temperature limit (UTL) for life and the stable carbon isotopic fractionation of the microbiological methane production. These new findings are of great implication for the limits of life and function in the deep biosphere.

  7. Microbial life in the Lake Medee, the largest deep-sea salt-saturated formation.

    PubMed

    Yakimov, Michail M; La Cono, Violetta; Slepak, Vladlen Z; La Spada, Gina; Arcadi, Erika; Messina, Enzo; Borghini, Mireno; Monticelli, Luis S; Rojo, David; Barbas, Coral; Golyshina, Olga V; Ferrer, Manuel; Golyshin, Peter N; Giuliano, Laura

    2013-12-19

    Deep-sea hypersaline anoxic lakes (DHALs) of the Eastern Mediterranean represent some of the most hostile environments on our planet. We investigated microbial life in the recently discovered Lake Medee, the largest DHAL found to-date. Medee has two unique features: a complex geobiochemical stratification and an absence of chemolithoautotrophic Epsilonproteobacteria, which usually play the primary role in dark bicarbonate assimilation in DHALs interfaces. Presumably because of these features, Medee is less productive and exhibits reduced diversity of autochthonous prokaryotes in its interior. Indeed, the brine community almost exclusively consists of the members of euryarchaeal MSBL1 and bacterial KB1 candidate divisions. Our experiments utilizing cultivation and [(14)C]-assimilation, showed that these organisms at least partially rely on reductive cleavage of osmoprotectant glycine betaine and are engaged in trophic cooperation. These findings provide novel insights into how prokaryotic communities can adapt to salt-saturated conditions and sustain active metabolism at the thermodynamic edge of life.

  8. Arsenite-Dependent Anoxygenic Photosynthesis by Bacteria from Mono Lake, California

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hollibaugh, J. T.; Budinoff, C. R.

    2007-12-01

    Chemolithoautotrophic growth of bacteria capable of using inorganic arsenic compounds is well documented. Energy conservation and carbon fixation have been demonstrated in both arsenite oxidizers and arsenate reducers from many bacterial lineages under both aerobic and anaerobic conditions. However, phototrophic growth using reduced arsenic as an electron donor has not been described. Here we report the light-dependent oxidation of arsenite to arsenate, coupled with autotrophic growth, by an enrichment culture of bacteria from Mono Lake, California. The culture is dominated by a phototrophic member of the Ectothiorhodospiraceae that is >99% similar to Ectothiorhodospira sp. (strain Borgoria Red). It also contains an uncultured member of the Bacteriodetes and another member of the Ectothiorhodospiraceae that is 96% similar to Alkalilimnicola erhlichii. The bacteria grow more slowly and clump when grown on arsenite versus sulfide or thiosulfate. Scanning electron micrographs reveal that they are closely associated and enmeshed in an organic matrix.

  9. Isolation and Metabolic Characteristics of Previously Uncultured Members of the Order Aquificales in a Subsurface Gold Mine

    PubMed Central

    Takai, Ken; Hirayama, Hisako; Sakihama, Yuri; Inagaki, Fumio; Yamato, Yu; Horikoshi, Koki

    2002-01-01

    Culture-dependent and -independent techniques were combined to characterize the physiological properties and the ecological impacts of culture-resistant phylotypes of thermophiles within the order Aquificales from a subsurface hot aquifer of a Japanese gold mine. Thermophilic bacteria phylogenetically associated with previously uncultured phylotypes of Aquificales were successfully isolated. 16S ribosomal DNA clone analysis of the entire microbial DNA assemblage and fluorescence in situ whole-cell hybridization analysis indicated that the isolates dominated the microbial population in the subsurface aquifer. The isolates were facultatively anaerobic, hydrogen- or sulfur/thiosulfate-oxidizing, thermophilic chemolithoautotrophs utilizing molecular oxygen, nitrate, ferric iron, arsenate, selenate, and selenite as electron acceptors. Their versatile energy-generating systems may reflect the geochemical conditions of their habitat in the geothermally active subsurface gold mine. PMID:12039766

  10. Microbial life in the Lake Medee, the largest deep-sea salt-saturated formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yakimov, Michail M.; La Cono, Violetta; Slepak, Vladlen Z.; La Spada, Gina; Arcadi, Erika; Messina, Enzo; Borghini, Mireno; Monticelli, Luis S.; Rojo, David; Barbas, Coral; Golyshina, Olga V.; Ferrer, Manuel; Golyshin, Peter N.; Giuliano, Laura

    2013-12-01

    Deep-sea hypersaline anoxic lakes (DHALs) of the Eastern Mediterranean represent some of the most hostile environments on our planet. We investigated microbial life in the recently discovered Lake Medee, the largest DHAL found to-date. Medee has two unique features: a complex geobiochemical stratification and an absence of chemolithoautotrophic Epsilonproteobacteria, which usually play the primary role in dark bicarbonate assimilation in DHALs interfaces. Presumably because of these features, Medee is less productive and exhibits reduced diversity of autochthonous prokaryotes in its interior. Indeed, the brine community almost exclusively consists of the members of euryarchaeal MSBL1 and bacterial KB1 candidate divisions. Our experiments utilizing cultivation and [14C]-assimilation, showed that these organisms at least partially rely on reductive cleavage of osmoprotectant glycine betaine and are engaged in trophic cooperation. These findings provide novel insights into how prokaryotic communities can adapt to salt-saturated conditions and sustain active metabolism at the thermodynamic edge of life.

  11. Characterization of the petI and res Operons of Acidithiobacillus ferrooxidans

    PubMed Central

    Levicán, Gloria; Bruscella, Patrice; Guacunano, Maritza; Inostroza, Carolina; Bonnefoy, Violaine; Holmes, David S.; Jedlicki, Eugenia

    2002-01-01

    DNA sequence analysis and bioinformatic interpretations have identified two adjacent clusters of genes potentially involved in the formation of a bc1 complex and in the maturation of a cytochrome c-type protein in two strains (ATCC 19859 and ATCC 33020) of the acidophilic, chemolithoautotrophic bacterium Acidithiobacillus ferrooxidans (formerly Thiobacillus ferrooxidans). Reverse transcriptase-PCR experiments suggest that the two clusters are organized as operons, and +1 start sites of transcription for the operons have been determined by primer extension experiments. Potential promoters have been identified. The presence of these operons lends support to a recent model of reverse electron flow and is consistent with previous reports of phenotypic switching in this bacterium. PMID:11844787

  12. Cultivation of a chemoautotroph from the SUP05 clade of marine bacteria that produces nitrite and consumes ammonium

    PubMed Central

    Shah, Vega; Chang, Bonnie X; Morris, Robert M

    2017-01-01

    Marine oxygen minimum zones (OMZs) are expanding regions of intense nitrogen cycling. Up to half of the nitrogen available for marine organisms is removed from the ocean in these regions. Metagenomic studies have identified an abundant group of sulfur-oxidizing bacteria (SUP05) with the genetic potential for nitrogen cycling and loss in OMZs. However, SUP05 have defied cultivation and their physiology remains untested. We cultured, sequenced and tested the physiology of an isolate from the SUP05 clade. We describe a facultatively anaerobic sulfur-oxidizing chemolithoautotroph that produces nitrite and consumes ammonium under anaerobic conditions. Genetic evidence that closely related strains are abundant at nitrite maxima in OMZs suggests that sulfur-oxidizing chemoautotrophs from the SUP05 clade are a potential source of nitrite, fueling competing nitrogen removal processes in the ocean. PMID:27434424

  13. Active ammonia oxidizers in an acidic soil are phylogenetically closely related to neutrophilic archaeon.

    PubMed

    Wang, Baozhan; Zheng, Yan; Huang, Rong; Zhou, Xue; Wang, Dongmei; He, Yuanqiu; Jia, Zhongjun

    2014-03-01

    All cultivated ammonia-oxidizing archaea (AOA) within the Nitrososphaera cluster (former soil group 1.1b) are neutrophilic. Molecular surveys also indicate the existence of Nitrososphaera-like phylotypes in acidic soil, but their ecological roles are poorly understood. In this study, we present molecular evidence for the chemolithoautotrophic growth of Nitrososphaera-like AOA in an acidic soil with pH 4.92 using DNA-based stable isotope probing (SIP). Soil microcosm incubations demonstrated that nitrification was stimulated by urea fertilization and accompanied by a significant increase in the abundance of AOA rather than ammonia-oxidizing bacteria (AOB). Real-time PCR analysis of amoA genes as a function of the buoyant density of the DNA gradient following the ultracentrifugation of the total DNA extracted from SIP microcosms indicated a substantial growth of soil AOA during nitrification. Pyrosequencing of the total 16S rRNA genes in the "heavy" DNA fractions suggested that archaeal communities were labeled to a much greater extent than soil AOB. Acetylene inhibition further showed that (13)CO2 assimilation by nitrifying communities depended solely on ammonia oxidation activity, suggesting a chemolithoautotrophic lifestyle. Phylogenetic analysis of both (13)C-labeled amoA and 16S rRNA genes revealed that most of the active AOA were phylogenetically closely related to the neutrophilic strains Nitrososphaera viennensis EN76 and JG1 within the Nitrososphaera cluster. Our results provide strong evidence for the adaptive growth of Nitrososphaera-like AOA in acidic soil, suggesting a greater metabolic versatility of soil AOA than previously appreciated.

  14. Active Ammonia Oxidizers in an Acidic Soil Are Phylogenetically Closely Related to Neutrophilic Archaeon

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Baozhan; Zheng, Yan; Huang, Rong; Zhou, Xue; Wang, Dongmei; He, Yuanqiu

    2014-01-01

    All cultivated ammonia-oxidizing archaea (AOA) within the Nitrososphaera cluster (former soil group 1.1b) are neutrophilic. Molecular surveys also indicate the existence of Nitrososphaera-like phylotypes in acidic soil, but their ecological roles are poorly understood. In this study, we present molecular evidence for the chemolithoautotrophic growth of Nitrososphaera-like AOA in an acidic soil with pH 4.92 using DNA-based stable isotope probing (SIP). Soil microcosm incubations demonstrated that nitrification was stimulated by urea fertilization and accompanied by a significant increase in the abundance of AOA rather than ammonia-oxidizing bacteria (AOB). Real-time PCR analysis of amoA genes as a function of the buoyant density of the DNA gradient following the ultracentrifugation of the total DNA extracted from SIP microcosms indicated a substantial growth of soil AOA during nitrification. Pyrosequencing of the total 16S rRNA genes in the “heavy” DNA fractions suggested that archaeal communities were labeled to a much greater extent than soil AOB. Acetylene inhibition further showed that 13CO2 assimilation by nitrifying communities depended solely on ammonia oxidation activity, suggesting a chemolithoautotrophic lifestyle. Phylogenetic analysis of both 13C-labeled amoA and 16S rRNA genes revealed that most of the active AOA were phylogenetically closely related to the neutrophilic strains Nitrososphaera viennensis EN76 and JG1 within the Nitrososphaera cluster. Our results provide strong evidence for the adaptive growth of Nitrososphaera-like AOA in acidic soil, suggesting a greater metabolic versatility of soil AOA than previously appreciated. PMID:24375137

  15. A Mesophilic, Autotrophic, Ammonia-Oxidizing Archaeon of Thaumarchaeal Group I.1a Cultivated from a Deep Oligotrophic Soil Horizon

    PubMed Central

    Jung, Man-Young; Park, Soo-Je; Kim, So-Jeong; Kim, Jong-Geol; Sinninghe Damsté, Jaap S.

    2014-01-01

    Soil nitrification plays an important role in the reduction of soil fertility and in nitrate enrichment of groundwater. Various ammonia-oxidizing archaea (AOA) are considered to be members of the pool of ammonia-oxidizing microorganisms in soil. This study reports the discovery of a chemolithoautotrophic ammonia oxidizer that belongs to a distinct clade of nonmarine thaumarchaeal group I.1a, which is widespread in terrestrial environments. The archaeal strain MY2 was cultivated from a deep oligotrophic soil horizon. The similarity of the 16S rRNA gene sequence of strain MY2 to those of other cultivated group I.1a thaumarchaeota members, i.e., Nitrosopumilus maritimus and “Candidatus Nitrosoarchaeum koreensis,” is 92.9% for both species. Extensive growth assays showed that strain MY2 is chemolithoautotrophic, mesophilic (optimum temperature, 30°C), and neutrophilic (optimum pH, 7 to 7.5). The accumulation of nitrite above 1 mM inhibited ammonia oxidation, while ammonia oxidation itself was not inhibited in the presence of up to 5 mM ammonia. The genome size of strain MY2 was 1.76 Mb, similar to those of N. maritimus and “Ca. Nitrosoarchaeum koreensis,” and the repertoire of genes required for ammonia oxidation and carbon fixation in thaumarchaeal group I.1a was conserved. A high level of representation of conserved orthologous genes for signal transduction and motility in the noncore genome might be implicated in niche adaptation by strain MY2. On the basis of phenotypic, phylogenetic, and genomic characteristics, we propose the name “Candidatus Nitrosotenuis chungbukensis” for the ammonia-oxidizing archaeal strain MY2. PMID:24705324

  16. Fluid mixing and the deep biosphere of a fossil Lost City-type hydrothermal system at the Iberia Margin

    PubMed Central

    Klein, Frieder; Humphris, Susan E.; Guo, Weifu; Schubotz, Florence; Schwarzenbach, Esther M.; Orsi, William D.

    2015-01-01

    Subseafloor mixing of reduced hydrothermal fluids with seawater is believed to provide the energy and substrates needed to support deep chemolithoautotrophic life in the hydrated oceanic mantle (i.e., serpentinite). However, geosphere-biosphere interactions in serpentinite-hosted subseafloor mixing zones remain poorly constrained. Here we examine fossil microbial communities and fluid mixing processes in the subseafloor of a Cretaceous Lost City-type hydrothermal system at the magma-poor passive Iberia Margin (Ocean Drilling Program Leg 149, Hole 897D). Brucite−calcite mineral assemblages precipitated from mixed fluids ca. 65 m below the Cretaceous paleo-seafloor at temperatures of 31.7 ± 4.3 °C within steep chemical gradients between weathered, carbonate-rich serpentinite breccia and serpentinite. Mixing of oxidized seawater and strongly reducing hydrothermal fluid at moderate temperatures created conditions capable of supporting microbial activity. Dense microbial colonies are fossilized in brucite−calcite veins that are strongly enriched in organic carbon (up to 0.5 wt.% of the total carbon) but depleted in 13C (δ13CTOC = −19.4‰). We detected a combination of bacterial diether lipid biomarkers, archaeol, and archaeal tetraethers analogous to those found in carbonate chimneys at the active Lost City hydrothermal field. The exposure of mantle rocks to seawater during the breakup of Pangaea fueled chemolithoautotrophic microbial communities at the Iberia Margin, possibly before the onset of seafloor spreading. Lost City-type serpentinization systems have been discovered at midocean ridges, in forearc settings of subduction zones, and at continental margins. It appears that, wherever they occur, they can support microbial life, even in deep subseafloor environments. PMID:26324888

  17. Deferribacter autotrophicus sp. nov., an iron(III)-reducing bacterium from a deep-sea hydrothermal vent.

    PubMed

    Slobodkina, G B; Kolganova, T V; Chernyh, N A; Querellou, J; Bonch-Osmolovskaya, E A; Slobodkin, A I

    2009-06-01

    A thermophilic, anaerobic, chemolithoautotrophic bacterium (designated strain SL50(T)) was isolated from a hydrothermal sample collected at the Mid-Atlantic Ridge from the deepest of the known World ocean hydrothermal fields, Ashadze field (1 degrees 58' 21'' N 4 degrees 51' 47'' W) at a depth of 4100 m. Cells of strain SL50(T) were motile, straight to bent rods with one polar flagellum, 0.5-0.6 mum in width and 3.0-3.5 mum in length. The temperature range for growth was 25-75 degrees C, with an optimum at 60 degrees C. The pH range for growth was 5.0-7.5, with an optimum at pH 6.5. Growth of strain SL50(T) was observed at NaCl concentrations ranging from 1.0 to 6.0 % (w/v) with an optimum at 2.5 % (w/v). The generation time under optimal growth conditions for strain SL50(T) was 60 min. Strain SL50(T) used molecular hydrogen, acetate, lactate, succinate, pyruvate and complex proteinaceous compounds as electron donors, and Fe(III), Mn(IV), nitrate or elemental sulfur as electron acceptors. The G+C content of the DNA of strain SL50(T) was 28.7 mol%. 16S rRNA gene sequence analysis revealed that the closest relative of strain SL50(T) was Deferribacter abyssi JR(T) (95.5 % similarity). On the basis of its physiological properties and phylogenetic analyses, the isolate is considered to represent a novel species, for which the name Deferribacter autotrophicus sp. nov. is proposed. The type strain is SL50(T) (=DSM 21529(T)=VKPM B-10097(T)). Deferribacter autotrophicus sp. nov. is the first described deep-sea bacterium capable of chemolithoautotrophic growth using molecular hydrogen as an electron donor and ferric iron as electron acceptor and CO(2) as the carbon source.

  18. Fluid mixing and the deep biosphere of a fossil Lost City-type hydrothermal system at the Iberia Margin.

    PubMed

    Klein, Frieder; Humphris, Susan E; Guo, Weifu; Schubotz, Florence; Schwarzenbach, Esther M; Orsi, William D

    2015-09-29

    Subseafloor mixing of reduced hydrothermal fluids with seawater is believed to provide the energy and substrates needed to support deep chemolithoautotrophic life in the hydrated oceanic mantle (i.e., serpentinite). However, geosphere-biosphere interactions in serpentinite-hosted subseafloor mixing zones remain poorly constrained. Here we examine fossil microbial communities and fluid mixing processes in the subseafloor of a Cretaceous Lost City-type hydrothermal system at the magma-poor passive Iberia Margin (Ocean Drilling Program Leg 149, Hole 897D). Brucite-calcite mineral assemblages precipitated from mixed fluids ca. 65 m below the Cretaceous paleo-seafloor at temperatures of 31.7 ± 4.3 °C within steep chemical gradients between weathered, carbonate-rich serpentinite breccia and serpentinite. Mixing of oxidized seawater and strongly reducing hydrothermal fluid at moderate temperatures created conditions capable of supporting microbial activity. Dense microbial colonies are fossilized in brucite-calcite veins that are strongly enriched in organic carbon (up to 0.5 wt.% of the total carbon) but depleted in (13)C (δ(13)C(TOC) = -19.4‰). We detected a combination of bacterial diether lipid biomarkers, archaeol, and archaeal tetraethers analogous to those found in carbonate chimneys at the active Lost City hydrothermal field. The exposure of mantle rocks to seawater during the breakup of Pangaea fueled chemolithoautotrophic microbial communities at the Iberia Margin, possibly before the onset of seafloor spreading. Lost City-type serpentinization systems have been discovered at midocean ridges, in forearc settings of subduction zones, and at continental margins. It appears that, wherever they occur, they can support microbial life, even in deep subseafloor environments.

  19. Periplasmic Proteins of the Extremophile Acidithiobacillus ferrooxidans

    PubMed Central

    Chi, An; Valenzuela, Lissette; Beard, Simon; Mackey, Aaron J.; Shabanowitz, Jeffrey; Hunt, Donald F.; Jerez, Carlos A.

    2015-01-01

    Acidithiobacillus ferrooxidans is a chemolithoautotrophic acidophile capable of obtaining energy by oxidizing ferrous iron or sulfur compounds such as metal sulfides. Some of the proteins involved in these oxidations have been described as forming part of the periplasm of this extremophile. The detailed study of the periplasmic components constitutes an important area to understand the physiology and environmental interactions of microorganisms. Proteomics analysis of the periplasmic fraction of A. ferrooxidans ATCC 23270 was performed by using high resolution linear ion trap-FT MS. We identified a total of 131 proteins in the periplasm of the microorganism grown in thiosulfate. When possible, functional categories were assigned to the proteins: 13.8% were transport and binding proteins, 14.6% were several kinds of cell envelope proteins, 10.8% were involved in energy metabolism, 10% were related to protein fate and folding, 10% were proteins with unknown functions, and 26.1% were proteins without homologues in databases. These last proteins are most likely characteristic of A. ferrooxidans and may have important roles yet to be assigned. The majority of the periplasmic proteins from A. ferrooxidans were very basic compared with those of neutrophilic microorganisms such as Escherichia coli, suggesting a special adaptation of the chemolithoautotrophic bacterium to its very acidic environment. The high throughput proteomics approach used here not only helps to understand the physiology of this extreme acidophile but also offers an important contribution to the functional annotation for the available genomes of biomining microorganisms such as A. ferrooxidans for which no efficient genetic systems are available to disrupt genes by procedures such as homologous recombination. PMID:17911085

  20. Sources of organic nitrogen at the serpentinite-hosted Lost City hydrothermal field.

    PubMed

    Lang, S Q; Früh-Green, G L; Bernasconi, S M; Butterfield, D A

    2013-03-01

    The reaction of ultramafic rocks with water during serpentinization at moderate temperatures results in alkaline fluids with high concentrations of reduced chemical compounds such as hydrogen and methane. Such environments provide unique habitats for microbial communities capable of utilizing these reduced compounds in present-day and, possibly, early Earth environments. However, these systems present challenges to microbial communities as well, particularly due to high fluid pH and possibly the availability of essential nutrients such as nitrogen. Here we investigate the source and cycling of organic nitrogen at an oceanic serpentinizing environment, the Lost City hydrothermal field (30°N, Mid-Atlantic Ridge). Total hydrolizable amino acid (THAA) concentrations in the fluids range from 736 to 2300 nm and constitute a large fraction of the dissolved organic carbon (2.5-15.1%). The amino acid distributions, and the relative concentrations of these compounds across the hydrothermal field, indicate they most likely derived from chemolithoautotrophic production. Previous studies have identified the presence of numerous nitrogen fixation genes in the fluids and the chimneys. Organic nitrogen in actively venting chimneys has δ(15) N values as low as 0.1‰ which is compatible with biological nitrogen fixation. Total hydrolizable amino acids in the chimneys are enriched in (13) C by 2-7‰ compared to bulk organic matter. The distribution and absolute δ(13) C(THAA) values are compatible with a chemolithoautotrophic source, an attribution also supported by molar organic C/N ratios in most active chimneys (4.1-5.5) which are similar to those expected for microbial communities. In total, these data indicate nitrogen is readily available to microbial communities at Lost City.

  1. SUP05 dominates the Gammaproteobacterial sulfur oxidizer assemblages in pelagic redoxclines of the central Baltic and Black Seas.

    PubMed

    Glaubitz, Sabine; Kießlich, Katrin; Meeske, Christian; Labrenz, Matthias; Jürgens, Klaus

    2013-04-01

    Gammaproteobacterial sulfur oxidizers (GSOs), particularly SUP05-related sequences, have been found worldwide in numerous oxygen-deficient marine environments. However, knowledge regarding their abundance, distribution, and ecological role is scarce. In this study, on the basis of phylogenetic analyses of 16S rRNA gene sequences originating from a Baltic Sea pelagic redoxcline, the in situ abundances of different GSO subgroups were quantified by CARD-FISH (catalyzed reporter fluorescence in situ hybridization) with oligonucleotide probes developed specifically for this purpose. Additionally, ribulose bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase form II (cbbM) gene transcript clone libraries were used to detect potential active chemolithoautotrophic GSOs in the Baltic Sea. Taken together, the results obtained by these two approaches demonstrated the existence of two major phylogenetic subclusters embedded within the GSO, one of them affiliated with sequences of the previously described SUP05 subgroup. CARD-FISH analyses revealed that only SUP05 occurred in relatively high numbers, reaching 10 to 30% of the total prokaryotes around the oxic-anoxic interface, where oxygen and sulfide concentrations are minimal. The applicability of the oligonucleotide probes was confirmed with samples from the Black Sea redoxcline, in which the SUP05 subgroup accounted for 10 to 13% of the total prokaryotic abundance. The cbbM transcripts presumably originating from SUP05 cells support previous evidence for the chemolithoautotrophic activity of this phylogenetic group. Our findings on the vertical distribution and high abundance of SUP05 suggest that this group plays an important role in marine redoxcline biogeochemistry, probably as anaerobic or aerobic sulfur oxidizers.

  2. Thioalkalivibrio sulfidiphilus sp. nov., a haloalkaliphilic, sulfur-oxidizing gammaproteobacterium from alkaline habitats.

    PubMed

    Sorokin, Dimitry Y; Muntyan, Maria S; Panteleeva, Anzhela N; Muyzer, Gerard

    2012-08-01

    A moderately salt-tolerant and obligately alkaliphilic, chemolithoautotrophic sulfur-oxidizing bacterium, strain HL-EbGr7(T), was isolated from a full-scale bioreactor removing H(2)S from biogas under oxygen-limited conditions. Another strain, ALJ17, closely related to HL-EbGr7(T), was isolated from a Kenyan soda lake. Cells of the isolates were relatively long, slender rods, motile by a polar flagellum. Although both strains were obligately aerobic, micro-oxic conditions were preferred, especially at the beginning of growth. Chemolithoautotrophic growth was observed with sulfide and thiosulfate in a pH range of 8.0-10.5 (optimum at pH 10.0) and a salinity range of 0.2-1.5 M total Na(+) (optimum at 0.4 M). The genome sequence of strain HL-EbGr7(T) demonstrated the presence of genes encoding the reverse Dsr pathway and a truncated Sox pathway for sulfur oxidation and enzymes of the Calvin-Benson cycle of autotrophic CO(2) assimilation with ribulose-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase (RuBisCO) type I. The dominant cellular fatty acids were C(18:1)ω7, C(16:0) and C(19:0) cyclo. Based on 16S rRNA gene sequencing, the two strains belonged to a single phylotype within the genus Thioalkalivibrio in the Gammaproteobacteria. Despite being related most closely to Thioalkalivibrio denitrificans, the isolates were unable to grow by denitrification. On the basis of phenotypic and phylogenetic analysis, the novel isolates are proposed to represent a novel species, Thioalkalivibrio sulfidiphilus sp. nov., with the type strain HL-EbGr7(T) ( = NCCB 100376(T)  = UNIQEM U246(T)).

  3. Intra-field variability in microbial community associated with phase-separation-controlled hydrothermal fluid chemistry in the Mariner field, the southern Lau Basin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takai, K.; Ishibashi, J.; Lupton, J.; Ueno, Y.; Nunoura, T.; Hirayama, H.; Horikoshi, K.; Suzuki, R.; Hamasaki, H.; Suzuki, Y.

    2006-12-01

    A newly discovered hydrothermal field called the Mariner field at the northernmost central Valu Fa Ridge (VFR) in the Lau Basin was explored and characterized by geochemical and microbiological surveys. The hydrothermal fluid (max. 365 u^C) emitting from the most vigorous vent site (Snow chimney) was boiling just beneath the seafloor at a water depth of 1908 m and two end-members of hydrothermal fluid were identified. Mineral and fluid chemistry of typical brine-rich (Snow chimney and Monk chimney) and vapor-rich (Crab Restaurant chimney) hydrothermal fluids and the host chimney structures were analyzed. Microbial community structures in three chimney structures were also investigated by culture-dependent and - independent analyses. The 16S rRNA gene clone analysis revealed that both bacterial and archaeal rRNA gene communities at the chimney surface zones were different among three chimneys. The bacterial and archaeal rRNA gene communities of the Snow chimney surface were very similar with those in the dead chimneys, suggesting concurrence of metal sulfide deposition at the inside and weathering at the surface potentially due to its large structure and size. Cultivation analysis demonstrated the significant variation in culturability of various microbial components, particularly of thermophilic H2- and/or S-oxidizing chemolithoautotrophs such as the genera Aquifex and Persephonella, among the chimney sites. The culturability of these chemolithoautotrophs might be associated with the input of gaseous energy and carbon sources like H2S, H2 and CH4 from the hydrothermal fluids, and might be affected by phase-separation- controlled fluid chemistry. In addition, inter-fields comparison of microbial community structures determined by cultivation analysis revealed novel characteristics of the microbial communities in the Mariner field of the Lau Basin among the global deep-sea hydrothermal systems.

  4. Metagenomic Analyses of the Autotrophic Fe(II)-Oxidizing, Nitrate-Reducing Enrichment Culture KS

    PubMed Central

    Tominski, Claudia; Kappler, Andreas; Behrens, Sebastian

    2016-01-01

    Nitrate-dependent ferrous iron [Fe(II)] oxidation (NDFO) is a well-recognized chemolithotrophic pathway in anoxic sediments. The neutrophilic chemolithoautotrophic enrichment culture KS originally obtained from a freshwater sediment (K. L. Straub, M. Benz, B. Schink, and F. Widdel, Appl Environ Microbiol 62:1458–1460, 1996) has been used as a model system to study NDFO. However, the primary Fe(II) oxidizer in this culture has not been isolated, despite extensive efforts to do so. Here, we present a metagenomic analysis of this enrichment culture in order to gain insight into electron transfer pathways and the roles of different bacteria in the culture. We obtained a near-complete genome of the primary Fe(II) oxidizer, a species in the family Gallionellaceae, and draft genomes from its flanking community members. A search of the putative extracellular electron transfer pathways in these genomes led to the identification of a homolog of the MtoAB complex [a porin-multiheme cytochrome c system identified in neutrophilic microaerobic Fe(II)-oxidizing Sideroxydans lithotrophicus ES-1] in a Gallionellaceae sp., and findings of other putative genes involving cytochrome c and multicopper oxidases, such as Cyc2 and OmpB. Genome-enabled metabolic reconstruction revealed that this Gallionellaceae sp. lacks nitric oxide and nitrous oxide reductase genes and may partner with flanking populations capable of complete denitrification to avoid toxic metabolite accumulation, which may explain its resistance to growth in pure culture. This and other revealed interspecies interactions and metabolic interdependencies in nitrogen and carbon metabolisms may allow these organisms to cooperate effectively to achieve robust chemolithoautotrophic NDFO. Overall, the results significantly expand our knowledge of NDFO and suggest a range of genetic targets for further exploration. PMID:26896135

  5. High abundance of heterotrophic prokaryotes in hydrothermal springs of the Azores as revealed by a network of 16S rRNA gene-based methods.

    PubMed

    Sahm, Kerstin; John, Patrick; Nacke, Heiko; Wemheuer, Bernd; Grote, Ralf; Daniel, Rolf; Antranikian, Garabed

    2013-07-01

    Two hydrothermal springs (AI: 51 °C, pH 3; AIV: 92 °C, pH 8) were analysed to determine prokaryotic community composition. Using pyrosequencing, 93,576 partial 16S rRNA gene sequences amplified with V2/V3-specific primers for Bacteria and Archaea were investigated and compared to 16S rRNA gene sequences from direct metagenome sequencing without prior amplification. The results were evaluated by fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH). While in site AIV Bacteria and Archaea were detected in similar relative abundances (Bacteria 40 %, Archaea 35 %), the acidic spring AI was dominated by Bacteria (68 %). In spring AIV the combination of 16S rRNA gene sequence analysis and FISH revealed high abundance (>50 %) of heterotrophic bacterial genera like Caldicellulosiruptor, Dictyoglomus, and Fervidobacterium. In addition, chemolithoautotrophic Aquificales were detected in the bacterial community with Sulfurihydrogenibium being the dominant genus. Regarding Archaea, only Crenarchaeota, were detected, dominated by the family Desulfurococcaceae (>50 %). In addition, Thermoproteaceae made up almost 25 %. In the acidic spring (AI) prokaryotic diversity was lower than in the hot, slightly alkaline spring AIV. The bacterial community of site AI was dominated by organisms related to the chemolithoautotrophic genus Acidithiobacillus (43 %), to the heterotrophic Acidicaldus (38 %) and to Anoxybacillus (7.8 %). This study reveals differences in the relative abundance of heterotrophic versus autotrophic microorganisms as compared to other hydrothermal habitats. Furthermore, it shows how different methods to analyse prokaryotic communities in complex ecosystems can complement each other to obtain an in-depth picture of the taxonomic composition and diversity within these hydrothermal springs.

  6. Mariprofundus micogutta sp. nov., a novel iron-oxidizing zetaproteobacterium isolated from a deep-sea hydrothermal field at the Bayonnaise knoll of the Izu-Ogasawara arc, and a description of Mariprofundales ord. nov. and Zetaproteobacteria classis nov.

    PubMed

    Makita, Hiroko; Tanaka, Emiko; Mitsunobu, Satoshi; Miyazaki, Masayuki; Nunoura, Takuro; Uematsu, Katsuyuki; Takaki, Yoshihiro; Nishi, Shinro; Shimamura, Shigeru; Takai, Ken

    2017-03-01

    A novel iron-oxidizing chemolithoautotrophic bacterium, strain ET2(T), was isolated from a deep-sea sediment in a hydrothermal field of the Bayonnaise knoll of the Izu-Ogasawara arc. Cells were bean-shaped, curved short rods. Growth was observed at a temperature range of 15-30 °C (optimum 25 °C, doubling time 24 h) and a pH range of 5.8-7.0 (optimum pH 6.4) in the presence of NaCl at a range of 1.0-4.0 % (optimum 2.75 %). The isolate was a microaerophilic, strict chemolithoautotroph capable of growing using ferrous iron and molecular oxygen (O2) as the sole electron donor and acceptor, respectively; carbon dioxide as the sole carbon source; and either ammonium or nitrate as the sole nitrogen source. Phylogenetic analysis based on the 16S rRNA gene sequence indicated that the new isolate was related to the only previously isolated Mariprofundus species, M. ferrooxydans. Although relatively high 16S rRNA gene similarity (95 %) was found between the new isolate and M. ferrooxydans, the isolate was distinct in terms of cellular fatty acid composition, genomic DNA G+C content and cell morphology. Furthermore, genomic comparison between ET2(T) and M. ferrooxydans PV-1 indicated that the genomic dissimilarity of these strains met the standard for species-level differentiation. On the basis of its physiological and molecular characteristics, strain ET2(T) (= KCTC 15556(T) = JCM 30585 (T)) represents a novel species of Mariprofundus, for which the name Mariprofundus micogutta is proposed. We also propose the subordinate taxa Mariprofundales ord. nov. and Zetaproteobacteria classis nov. in the phylum Proteobacteria.

  7. Active and Restricted Phylotypes of Bacteria in Suiyo Seamount Hydrothermal Plume

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sunamura, M.; Higashi, Y.; Miyako, C.; Ishibashi, J.; Maruyama, A.

    2002-12-01

    Hydrothermal plume contains several orders of magnitude higher concentration of reduced chemicals, such as methane, hydrogen, reduced sulfur compounds and so on, than surrounding seawater. These chemicals are delivered from magmatic activity through hydrothermal venting and provide good energy sources for chemolithoautotrophic microbes. Activity or population of each chemolithoautotrophic group of microbes has been examined using various incubation techniques. However, there is little information about the population in the species level, even the phylogenetic type. In this study, microbial community structure in the hydrothermal plume inside a Suiyo Seamount caldera was investigated both qualitatively (16S rDNA phylogenetic analysis) and quantitatively (16S rRNA targeted fluorescent in situ hybridization: FISH). From transmissivity data, hydrothermal plume was detected in the depth layer of 1100m to 1250m. In this plume layer, more than 90% of Bacteria-probable cells belonged to only one phylotype (SUP05) of the gamma-Proteobacteria, which were strongly related with sulfur utilizing symbiontes of mytilids and mussels in hydrothermal areas. A vertical profile of SUP05 cell numbers corresponded well with that of some chemicals, as well as transmissivity. However, cell morphology analysis revealed that there was an obvious boundary at the depth of 1200m, suggesting that plume history may be different between above and below this depth. Another representative Bacteria-probable cells were specified to a group within the epsilon-Proteobacteria (SUP01), showing a close relationship with environmental clones from deep-sea sediments. In addition, the both SUP05 and SUP01 phylotypes of Bacteria were strongly stainable, i.e., very active, in FISH analysis. These microbes may be not negligible in both primary production and sulfur cycling in this deep-sea hydrothermal system.

  8. An optimized five-gene multi-platform predictor of hormone receptor negative and triple negative breast cancer metastatic risk.

    PubMed

    Yau, Christina; Sninsky, John; Kwok, Shirley; Wang, Alice; Degnim, Amy; Ingle, James N; Gillett, Cheryl; Tutt, Andrew; Waldman, Fred; Moore, Dan; Esserman, Laura; Benz, Christopher C

    2013-01-01

    Outcome predictors in use today are prognostic only for hormone receptor-positive (HRpos) breast cancer. Although microarray-derived multigene predictors of hormone receptor-negative (HRneg) and/or triple negative (Tneg) breast cancer recurrence risk are emerging, to date none have been transferred to clinically suitable assay platforms (for example, RT-PCR) or validated against formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded (FFPE) HRneg/Tneg samples. Multiplexed RT-PCR was used to assay two microarray-derived HRneg/Tneg prognostic signatures IR-7 and Buck-4) in a pooled FFPE collection of 139 chemotherapy-naïve HRneg breast cancers. The prognostic value of the RTPCR measured gene signatures were evaluated as continuous and dichotomous variables, and in conditional risk models incorporating clinical parameters. An optimized five-gene index was derived by evaluating gene combinations from both signatures. RT-PCR measured IR-7 and Buck-4 signatures proved prognostic as continuous variables; and conditional risk modeling chose nodal status, the IR-7 signature, and tumor grade as significant predictors of distant recurrence (DR). From the Buck-4 and IR-7 signatures, an optimized five-gene (TNFRSF17, CLIC5, HLA-F, CXCL13, XCL2) predictor was generated, referred to as the Integrated Cytokine Score (ICS) based on its functional pathway linkage through interferon-γ and IL-10. Across all FFPE cases, the ICS was prognostic as either a continuous or dichotomous variable, and conditional risk modeling selected nodal status and ICS as DR predictors. Further dichotomization of node-negative/ICS-low FFPE cases identified a subset of low-grade HRneg tumors with <10% 5-year DR risk. The prognostic value of ICS was reaffirmed in two previously studied microarray assayed cohorts containing 274 node-negative and chemotherapy naive HRneg breast cancers, including 95 Tneg cases where it proved prognostically independent of Tneg molecular subtyping. In additional HRneg/Tneg microarray assayed

  9. Impact of Zn, Mg, Ni and Co elements on glass alteration: Additive effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aréna, H.; Godon, N.; Rébiscoul, D.; Podor, R.; Garcès, E.; Cabie, M.; Mestre, J.-P.

    2016-03-01

    The minor elements present in the nuclear glass composition or coming from the groundwater of the future repository may impact glass alteration. In this study, the effects of Zn, Mg, Ni and Co on the International Simple Glass (ISG) alteration were studied throughout 511 days of aqueous leaching experiments. The aim was to determine their additive or competitive effect on glass alteration and the nature of the alteration products. The four elements were introduced separately or altogether in solution as XCl2 chloride salts (X = Zn, Mg, Ni or Co) with monthly additions to compensate for their consumption. The alteration kinetics were determined by leachate analyses (ICP-AES) and alteration products were characterized in terms of composition, morphology and microstructure (SEM, TEM-EDX, ToF-SIMS and XRD). Results indicate that when they are introduced separately, Zn, Mg, Ni and Co have the same qualitative and quantitative effect on glass alteration kinetics and on pH: they form secondary phases leading to a pH decrease and a significant increase in glass alteration. The secondary phases were identified as silicates of the added X element: trioctahedral smectites with a stoichiometry of[(Si(4-a) Ala) (X(3-b) Alb) O10 (OH)2](a+b)- [Xc Nad Cae] (2c+d+2e) + with a = 0.11 to 0.45, b = 0.00 to 0.29, c = 0, d = 0.19 to 0.74 and e = 0.10 to 0.14. . It was shown that as pH stabilizes at a minimum value, X-silicates no longer precipitate, thus leading to a significant drop in the glass alteration rate. This pH value depends on X and it has been identified as being 8 for Mg-silicates, probably around 7.3 for Ni and Co-silicates and less than 6.2 for Zn-silicates. When tested together, the effects of these four elements on glass alteration are additive and lead to the formation of a mix of X-silicates that precipitate as long as their constitutive elements are available and the pH is above their respective minimum value. This study brings new quantitative information about the

  10. Microbiological production and ecological flux of northwestern subduction hydrothermal systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sunamura, M.; Okamura, K.; Noguchi, T.; Yamamoto, H.; Fukuba, T.; Yanagawa, K.

    2012-12-01

    Deep-sea hydrothermal system is one of the most important sources for heat and chemical flux from the oceanic crust to the global ocean. The rich biological community around the hydrothermal vent shows chemolithoautotrophic microbial production are important in deep sea ecosystems. More than 99% of microbiological available chemical components in hydrothermal vent fluid, e.g. sulfide, methane, hydrogen, Fe2+, and Mn2+, is released into surrounding seawater to construct hydrothermal plume, suggesting that the chemolithoautotrophic-microbial primary production in the hydrothermal plume is huge and important in the whole hydrothermal ecosystems. To understand the impact of hydrothermal plume to a microbial ecosystem and a connectivity with zooplankton, we targeted and investigated a total of 16 hydrothermal fileds (7 sites in Okinawa trough, 3 sites in Ogasawara arc, and 6 sites in Mariana arc and back arc) and investigated in several cruises under the TAIGA project in Japan. Hydrothermal fluids in the subduction system are rich in sulfide. The hydrothermal fluids in the Okinawa trough, Ogasawara arc. and Mariana trough are characterized by rich in methane, poor in other reduced chemicals, and rich in iron, respectively. The major microbial composition was a potential sulfur oxidizing microbes SUP05 in the plume ecosystems, while an aerobic methanotrophic bacteria was secondary major member in methane-rich hydrothermal systems in Okinawa trough. Microbial quantitative and spatial distribution analyses of each plume site showed that the microbial population size and community structures are influenced by original chemical components of hydrothermal fluid, e.g. sulfide, methane and iron concentration. Microbial quantitative data indicated the removal/sedimentation of microbial cells from the plume and effect of phase separation in a same vent field through construction of gas-rich or gas-poor plumes. After the correlation of plume mixing effect, we estimates that the

  11. The Microbiome and Occurrence of Methanotrophy in Carnivorous Sponges.

    PubMed

    Hestetun, Jon T; Dahle, Håkon; Jørgensen, Steffen L; Olsen, Bernt R; Rapp, Hans T

    2016-01-01

    As shown by recent studies, filter-feeding sponges are known to host a wide variety of microorganisms. However, the microbial community of the non-filtering carnivorous sponges (Porifera, Cladorhizidae) has been the subject of less scrutiny. Here, we present the results from a comparative study of the methanotrophic carnivorous sponge Cladorhiza methanophila from a mud volcano-rich area at the Barbados Accretionary Prism, and five carnivorous species from the Jan Mayen Vent Field (JMVF) at the Arctic Mid-Ocean Ridge. Results from 16S rRNA microbiome data indicate the presence of a diverse assemblage of associated microorganisms in carnivorous sponges mainly from the Gamma- and Alphaproteobacteria, Flavobacteriaceae, and Thaumarchaeota. While the abundance of particular groups varied throughout the dataset, we found interesting similarities to previous microbiome results from non-carnivorous deep sea sponges, suggesting that the carnivorous sponges share characteristics of a previously hypothesized putative deep-sea sponge microbial community. Chemolithoautotrophic symbiosis was confirmed for C. methanophila through a microbial community with a high abundance of Methylococcales and very light isotopic δ(13)C and δ(15)N ratios (-60 to -66‰/3.5 to 5.2‰) compared to the other cladorhizid species (-22 to -24‰/8.5 to 10.5‰). We provide evidence for the presence of putative sulfur-oxidizing Gammaproteobacteria in the arctic cladorhizids; however, δ(13)C and δ(15)N signatures did not provide evidence for significant chemoautotrophic symbiosis in this case, and the slightly higher abundance of cladorhizids at the JMVF site compared to the nearby deep sea likely stem from an increased abundance of prey rather than a more direct vent association. The phylogenetic position of C. methanophila in relation to other carnivorous sponges was established using a three-gene phylogenetic analysis, and it was found to be closely related to other non-methanotrophic Cladorhiza

  12. Modeling the Biogeochemical Response of a Flood Plain Aquifer Impacted By Seasonal Temperature and Water Table Variations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arora, B.; Spycher, N.; Molins, S.; Steefel, C. I.

    2014-12-01

    With the overarching goal of understanding the impacts of climate and land use changes on carbon and nutrient cycles, we are developing a reactive transport model that couples hydrologic and biogeochemical processes to microbial functional distributions inferred from site-specific 'omic' data. The objective of the modeling approach is to simulate changes in carbon and nutrient fluxes and aquifer biogeochemistry over longer time periods due to changes in climate and/or land use, while also considering shorter time periods in which water table fluctuations and temperature variations are important. A 2-D reactive transport model has been developed for the unsaturated-saturated zone of the Rifle site, CO, an alluvial aquifer bordering the Colorado River. Modeling efforts focus on the April through September 2013 time frame that corresponds to the spring snow melt event that lead to an approximately 1 meter rise in the water table followed by a gradual lowering over 3 months. Temperature variations of as much as 10ºC are observed at shallow depths (< 1m), while at least some temperature variation (1ºC) occurs as deep as about 7m. A field survey of the microbial populations indicates the presence and activity of chemo(litho)autotrophic bacteria within the saturated zone of the alluvial aquifer. Model simulations are used to quantify the release of carbon dioxide and consumption of oxygen via abiotic pathways and heterotrophic microbial oxidation of reduced species (Fe(II), S(-2)) and minerals (pyrite). Results indicate that the observed oxygen profiles and/or carbon fluxes cannot be matched by considering abiotic reactions alone. The importance of including microbial contributions from chemo(litho)autotrophic processes (e.g., ammonia, sulfur and iron oxidation) is supported by both field observations and model simulations. Important conclusions from the study are to: (1) include microbially-mediated processes and contributions from the unsaturated zone, and (2) account

  13. Comparative Analysis of Microbial Communities in Iron-Dominated Flocculent Mats in Deep-Sea Hydrothermal Environments

    PubMed Central

    Kikuchi, Sakiko; Mitsunobu, Satoshi; Takaki, Yoshihiro; Yamanaka, Toshiro; Toki, Tomohiro; Noguchi, Takuroh; Nakamura, Kentaro; Abe, Mariko; Hirai, Miho; Yamamoto, Masahiro; Uematsu, Katsuyuki; Miyazaki, Junichi; Nunoura, Takuro; Takahashi, Yoshio; Takai, Ken

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT It has been suggested that iron is one of the most important energy sources for photosynthesis-independent microbial ecosystems in the ocean crust. Iron-metabolizing chemolithoautotrophs play a key role as primary producers, but little is known about their distribution and diversity and their ecological role as submarine iron-metabolizing chemolithotrophs, particularly the iron oxidizers. In this study, we investigated the microbial communities in several iron-dominated flocculent mats found in deep-sea hydrothermal fields in the Mariana Volcanic Arc and Trough and the Okinawa Trough by culture-independent molecular techniques and X-ray mineralogical analyses. The abundance and composition of the 16S rRNA gene phylotypes demonstrated the ubiquity of zetaproteobacterial phylotypes in iron-dominated mat communities affected by hydrothermal fluid input. Electron microscopy with energy-dispersive X-ray microanalysis and X-ray absorption fine structure (XAFS) analysis revealed the chemical and mineralogical signatures of biogenic Fe-(oxy)hydroxide species and the potential contribution of Zetaproteobacteria to the in situ generation. These results suggest that putative iron-oxidizing chemolithoautotrophs play a significant ecological role in producing iron-dominated flocculent mats and that they are important for iron and carbon cycles in deep-sea low-temperature hydrothermal environments. IMPORTANCE We report novel aspects of microbiology from iron-dominated flocculent mats in various deep-sea environments. In this study, we examined the relationship between Zetaproteobacteria and iron oxides across several hydrothermally influenced sites in the deep sea. We analyzed iron-dominated mats using culture-independent molecular techniques and X-ray mineralogical analyses. The scanning electron microscopy–energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy SEM-EDS analysis and X-ray absorption fine structure (XAFS) analysis revealed chemical and mineralogical signatures of

  14. Modeling the Impact of Biogeochemical Hotspots and Hot Moments on Subsurface Carbon Fluxes from a Flood Plain Site

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arora, B.; Spycher, N.; Steefel, C. I.; King, E.; Conrad, M. E.

    2015-12-01

    Biogeochemical hotspots and hot moments are known to account for a high percentage of carbon and nutrient cycling within flood plain environments. To quantify the impact of these hotspots and hot moments on the carbon cycle, a 2D reactive transport model was developed for the saturated-unsaturated zone of a flood plain site in Rifle, CO. Previous studies have identified naturally reduced zones (NRZs) in the saturated zone of the Rifle site to be hotspots and important regions for subsurface biogeochemical cycling. Wavelet analysis of geochemical concentrations at the site suggested that hydrologic and temperature variations are hot moments and exert an important control on biogeochemical conditions in the Rifle aquifer. Here, we describe the development of a reactive transport model that couples hydrologic and biogeochemical processes to microbial functional distributions inferred from site-specific 'omic' data. The model includes microbial contributions from heterotrophic and chemolithoautotrophic processes. We use Monod based formulations to represent biomass formation and consider energy partitioning between catabolic and anabolic processes. We use this model to explore community emergence at the Rifle site and further constrain the extent and rates of nutrient uptake as well as abiotic and biotic reactions using stable carbon isotopes. Results from 2D model simulations with only abiotic reactions predict lower CO2 partial pressures in the unsaturated zone and severely underpredict (~200%) carbon fluxes to the river compared to simulations with chemolithoautotrophic pathways. δ13C-CO2 profiles also point to biotic sources for the locally observed high CO2 concentrations above NRZs. Results further indicate that groundwater carbon fluxes from the Rifle site to the river are underestimated by almost 180% (to 3.3 g m-2 d-1) when temperature fluctuations are ignored in the simulations. Preliminary results demonstrate the emergence of denitrifiers at specific depths

  15. Hematite-coated microfossils: primary ecological fingerprint or taphonomic oddity of the Paleoproterozoic?

    PubMed

    Shapiro, R S; Konhauser, K O

    2015-05-01

    Microfossils belonging to the 1.88-billion-year-old 'Gunflint-biota' are preserved as carbonaceous and hematitic filaments and spheres that are believed to represent ancient chemolithoautotrophic Fe(II) oxidizing bacteria that grew above a chemocline where ferruginous seawater upwelled into shallow, oxygenated waters. This 'biological' model posits that hematite formed during burial from dewatering of the precursor ferric oxyhydroxides that encrusted Fe(II)-oxidizing bacteria. Here, we present an alternate 'taphonomic' model in which iron-rich groundwaters discharged into buried stromatolites; thus, the mineralization reactions are more informative of diagenetic processes than they are for primary marine conditions. We sampled centimeter-scale columnar stromatolites from both the lower and upper stromatolite horizons of the Biwabik and Gunflint formations, across a range of metamorphic gradients including unaltered to prehnite-pumpellyite taconite, supergene altered ore, and amphibolite-pyroxene grade contact-metamorphic zones. Fossils are rare to very rare and comprise curved filaments that exist in clusters with similar orientations. The filaments from throughout the Biwabik are similar to well-preserved carbonaceous Gunflintia from Ontario. Spheres of Huroniospora are also found in both formations. Microfossils from the least altered sections are preserved as carbon. Prehnite-pumpellyite samples are composed of either carbon or hematite (Fe2 O3 ). Within the contact aureole, filaments are densely coated by magnetite (Fe3 O4 ); the highest grade samples are secondarily oxidized to martite. The consistency in stromatolite microstructure and lithofacies throughout the metamorphic grades suggests they formed under similar environmental conditions. Post-depositional alteration led to replacement of the carbon by iron oxide. The facies association, filament distribution, and lack of branching and attached spherical cells argue against Gunflintia being a direct

  16. Phosphoserine phosphatase is required for serine and one-carbon unit synthesis in Hydrogenobacter thermophilus.

    PubMed

    Kim, Keugtae; Chiba, Yoko; Kobayashi, Azusa; Arai, Hiroyuki; Ishii, Masaharu

    2017-08-07

    Hydrogenobacter thermophilus is an obligate chemolithoautotrophic bacterium of the phylum Aquificae and is capable of fixing carbon dioxide through the reductive TCA cycle. The recent discovery of two novel-type phosphoserine phosphatases (PSPs) in H. thermophilus suggests the presence of a phosphorylated serine biosynthetic pathway; however, the physiological role of these novel-type, metal-independent PSPs (iPSPs) in H. thermophilus has not been confirmed. In the present study, a deletion mutant of pspA, the catalytic subunit of iPSPs, was constructed and characterized. The generated mutant was a serine auxotroph, suggesting that the novel-type PSPs and phosphorylated serine synthetic pathway are essential for serine anabolism in H. thermophilus. As an autotrophic medium supplemented with glycine did not support the growth of the mutant, the reversible enzyme serine hydroxymethyltransferase does not appear to synthesize serine from glycine, and may therefore generate glycine and 5,10-CH2-tetrahydrofolate (5,10-CH2-THF) from serine. This speculation is supported by the lack of glycine cleavage activity, which is needed to generate 5,10-CH2-THF, in H. thermophilus Determining the mechanism of 5,10-CH2-THF synthesis is important for understanding the fundamental anabolic pathways of organisms, because 5,10-CH2-THF is a major one-carbon donor that is used for the synthesis of various essential compounds, including nucleic and amino acids. The findings from the present experiments using a pspA-deletion mutant have confirmed the physiological role of iPSPs as serine producers, and also show that serine is a major donor of one-carbon units in H. thermophilusImportance Serine biosynthetic and catabolic pathways are intimately related with the metabolism of 5,10-CH2-tetrahydrofolate (5,10-CH2-THF), a one-carbon donor that is utilized for the biosynthesis of various essential compounds. For this reason, determining the mechanism of serine synthesis is important for

  17. Genome Analysis of the Biotechnologically Relevant Acidophilic Iron Oxidising Strain JA12 Indicates Phylogenetic and Metabolic Diversity within the Novel Genus “Ferrovum”

    PubMed Central

    Ullrich, Sophie R.; Poehlein, Anja; Tischler, Judith S.; González, Carolina; Ossandon, Francisco J.; Daniel, Rolf; Holmes, David S.; Schlömann, Michael; Mühling, Martin

    2016-01-01

    Background Members of the genus “Ferrovum” are ubiquitously distributed in acid mine drainage (AMD) waters which are characterised by their high metal and sulfate loads. So far isolation and microbiological characterisation have only been successful for the designated type strain “Ferrovum myxofaciens” P3G. Thus, knowledge about physiological characteristics and the phylogeny of the genus “Ferrovum” is extremely scarce. Objective In order to access the wider genetic pool of the genus “Ferrovum” we sequenced the genome of a “Ferrovum”-containing mixed culture and successfully assembled the almost complete genome sequence of the novel “Ferrovum” strain JA12. Phylogeny and Lifestyle The genome-based phylogenetic analysis indicates that strain JA12 and the type strain represent two distinct “Ferrovum” species. “Ferrovum” strain JA12 is characterised by an unusually small genome in comparison to the type strain and other iron oxidising bacteria. The prediction of nutrient assimilation pathways suggests that “Ferrovum” strain JA12 maintains a chemolithoautotrophic lifestyle utilising carbon dioxide and bicarbonate, ammonium and urea, sulfate, phosphate and ferrous iron as carbon, nitrogen, sulfur, phosphorous and energy sources, respectively. Unique Metabolic Features The potential utilisation of urea by “Ferrovum” strain JA12 is moreover remarkable since it may furthermore represent a strategy among extreme acidophiles to cope with the acidic environment. Unlike other acidophilic chemolithoautotrophs “Ferrovum” strain JA12 exhibits a complete tricarboxylic acid cycle, a metabolic feature shared with the closer related neutrophilic iron oxidisers among the Betaproteobacteria including Sideroxydans lithotrophicus and Thiobacillus denitrificans. Furthermore, the absence of characteristic redox proteins involved in iron oxidation in the well-studied acidophiles Acidithiobacillus ferrooxidans (rusticyanin) and Acidithiobacillus

  18. The Microbiome and Occurrence of Methanotrophy in Carnivorous Sponges

    PubMed Central

    Hestetun, Jon T.; Dahle, Håkon; Jørgensen, Steffen L.; Olsen, Bernt R.; Rapp, Hans T.

    2016-01-01

    As shown by recent studies, filter-feeding sponges are known to host a wide variety of microorganisms. However, the microbial community of the non-filtering carnivorous sponges (Porifera, Cladorhizidae) has been the subject of less scrutiny. Here, we present the results from a comparative study of the methanotrophic carnivorous sponge Cladorhiza methanophila from a mud volcano-rich area at the Barbados Accretionary Prism, and five carnivorous species from the Jan Mayen Vent Field (JMVF) at the Arctic Mid-Ocean Ridge. Results from 16S rRNA microbiome data indicate the presence of a diverse assemblage of associated microorganisms in carnivorous sponges mainly from the Gamma- and Alphaproteobacteria, Flavobacteriaceae, and Thaumarchaeota. While the abundance of particular groups varied throughout the dataset, we found interesting similarities to previous microbiome results from non-carnivorous deep sea sponges, suggesting that the carnivorous sponges share characteristics of a previously hypothesized putative deep-sea sponge microbial community. Chemolithoautotrophic symbiosis was confirmed for C. methanophila through a microbial community with a high abundance of Methylococcales and very light isotopic δ13C and δ15N ratios (-60 to -66‰/3.5 to 5.2‰) compared to the other cladorhizid species (-22 to -24‰/8.5 to 10.5‰). We provide evidence for the presence of putative sulfur-oxidizing Gammaproteobacteria in the arctic cladorhizids; however, δ13C and δ15N signatures did not provide evidence for significant chemoautotrophic symbiosis in this case, and the slightly higher abundance of cladorhizids at the JMVF site compared to the nearby deep sea likely stem from an increased abundance of prey rather than a more direct vent association. The phylogenetic position of C. methanophila in relation to other carnivorous sponges was established using a three-gene phylogenetic analysis, and it was found to be closely related to other non-methanotrophic Cladorhiza species

  19. The isotopic composition of dissolved inorganic nitrogen in hydrothermal vent fluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lehmann, M. F.; Bourbonnais, A.; Butterfield, D. A.

    2006-12-01

    Hydrothermal vent systems at mid-ocean ridges are sites with rapid rates of biomass production, sustained by chemolithoautotrophic bacteria at the base of the vent community food chains. The exact metabolic pathways, in particular those that involve nitrogen (N), and the rates at which the metabolic reactions take place are poorly constrained. In previous studies, very low 15N/14N ratios have been attributed to strong N isotope fractionation during chemosynthetic assimilation of ammonium. However, actual data on the N isotopic composition of dissolved inorganic N in vent systems, which could provide coherent information on the sources of N during chemolithoautotrophic biosynthesis, do not exist. Furthermore, the fate of hydrothermally discharged ammonium as well as that of nitrate that is mixed in from the ocean water column have not been the focus of much attention. As a consequence, little is known about N-cycle reactions within hydrothermal vent systems. We will present nitrate isotope (15N/14N and 18O/16O) data from various sites at Axial Volcano on the Juan de Fuca ridge. Their integration with nitrate concentration data suggests non-conservative behavior of nitrate along temperature gradients. Highest N and O isotope ratios (7.6 permil and 21.0 permil, respectively) are found in average diffuse fluids (17°C). Elevated N and O isotope ratios were associated with decreased nitrate concentrations and indicate a nitrate consuming process that fractionates both N and O isotopes. The ratio of 15N versus 18O enrichment in residual nitrate is, however, not consistent with previous reports on nitrate N versus O isotope fractionation during denitrification in the suboxic ocean water column, implying anomalous N and O isotope fractionation during denitrification in hydrothermal vent fluids and/or the presence of additional microbially mediated N transformations that affect the N and O isotope composition of the nitrate pool in the Axial hydrothermal vent system in a

  20. Potential biomass in deep-sea hydrothermal vent ecosystem

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakamura, K.; Takai, K.

    2012-12-01

    Since the first discovery of black smoker vents hosting chemosynthetic macrofaunal communities (Spiess et al., 1980), submarine hydrothermal systems and associated biota have attracted interest of many researchers (e.g., Humphris et al., 1995; Van Dover, 2000; Wilcock et al., 2004). In the past couple of decades, particular attention has been paid to chemolithoautotrophic microorganisms that sustain the hydrothermal vent-endemic animal communities as the primary producer. This type of microorganisms obtains energy from inorganic substances (e.g., sulfur, hydrogen, and methane) derived from hydrothermal vent fluids, and is often considered as an important modern analogue to the early ecosystems of the Earth as well as the extraterrestrial life in other planets and moons (e.g., Jannasch and Mottl, 1985; Nealson et al., 2005; Takai et al., 2006). Even today, however, the size of this type of chemosynthetic deep-sea hydrothermal vent ecosystem is largely unknown. Here, we present geophysical and geochemical constraints on potential biomass in the deep-sea hydrothermal vent ecosystem. The estimation of the potential biomass in the deep-sea hydrothermal vent ecosystem is based on hydrothermal fluid flux calculated from heat flux (Elderfield and Schltz, 1996), maximum chemical energy available from metabolic reactions during mixing between hydrothermal vent fluids and seawater (McCollom, 2007), and maintenance energy requirements of the chemolithoautotrophic microorganisms (Hoehler, 2004). The result shows that the most of metabolic energy sustaining the deep-sea hydrothermal vent ecosystem is produced by oxidation reaction of reduced sulfur, although some parts of the energy are derived from hydrogenotrophic and methanotrophic reactions. The overall total of the potential biomass in deep-sea hydrothermal vent ecosystem is calculated to be much smaller than that in terrestrial ecosystems including terrestrial plants. The big difference in biomass between the

  1. Thermophiles Microbe Signature in Lake Vostok, Antarctica

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bulat, S. A.; Alekhina, I. A.; Blot, M.; Petit, J.; Waggenbach, D.; Lipenkov, V. Y.; Raynaud, D.; Lukin, V. V.

    2002-05-01

    Molecular biology studies by PCR-based analyses of 16S rDNA in Vostok ice showed that glacier ice, accreted ice and thus likely the lake water itself are incredibly pure in regard to microbes. Very low DOC (Dissolved Organic Carbon) content is at range 0.0-24.7 ppb in accreted and glacier ice along, suggesting together with the DNA content for an autotrophic rather than heterotrophic life in the lake. The bacterial biomass in both accreted and glacier ice is expected to be less than 10 to 50 cells/mL of meltwater, a value close to detection limits of PCR (Polymerase Chain Reaction) implemented (2-8 cells/mL). In addition, prospect for glacier-released microbes to be active in the lake seems to be rather questionable due to possible DNA degradation through oxidation within oxygen-rich glacier ice during its long (1000 kyr) transit from the surface to the base of the ice sheet. This may explain our failure with confident microbial DNA findings in glacier ice. The glacier-released microbes that may be alive or decayed would represent a very low input to lake biota and to DOC content. Also, the postulated excess of oxygen released into the lake by glacier melting is unlikely to be consumed much microbiologically. By comparing glacier and accreted ice cores facilitated by analysis the external (contaminated) part of the iced cores vs. the internal uncontaminated region from accreted ice samples, we detected so far three bacteria as clone assortment that are believed indigenous in the lake Vostok. They all by closely related database DNA signatures represent (expected to be) thermophiles. One of them is known extant species identified in hot springs and capable to grow as a chemolithoautotroph oxidizing H2 and reducing CO2 at reduced O2 tensions. Two other taxa are not identified in the current databases, but showed relatedness to bacteria associated to hydrothermal vents and surface sediments nearby. Among them are thiosulfate-oxidizers and anaerobic methanotrophs (96

  2. Trichloroethene and tetrachloroethene: tropospheric probes for Cl- and Br-atom reactions during the polar sunrise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ariya, P. A.; Catoire, V.; Sander, R.; Niki, H.; Harris, G. W.

    1997-11-01

    We report the results of laboratory and modeling investigations of the atmospheric fate of chlorinated ethenes and their rôle as indicators of halogen reactions in the springtime Arctic troposphere. The kinetics and mechanism of the gas-phase reactions of Cl- and Br-atoms with tetrachloroethene were studied using a Fourier transform infrared spectrometer (FTIR) in 93.3kPa air and T = 296± 2 K. Along with our previous study on Cl and Br atom reactions of trichloroethene, using the known rate of the Cl + ethane reaction as reference, the values of 7.2±0.2×10-11 and 3.8±0.2×10-11 cm3 molecule-1 s-1 were obtained for the Cl-atom reaction rate constants of tri- and tetrachloroethene, respectively. For the Br-atom reactions, using ethene and propane as the reference molecules, we report the absolute values of 1.1±0.1×10-13 and 9.0±0.1×10-17 cm3 molecule-1 s-1 for the rates of Br attack on tri- and tetrachloroethene. The major products were XCl2C-C(O)Cl (X = H in trichloroethene and X = Cl in tetrachloroethene) and XBrClC-C(O)Cl in Cl-atom and Br-atom initiated reactions, respectively. We also observed phosgene and formyl chloride in the reactions of trichloroethene and phosgene in the tetrachloroethene reactions and report the branching ratios for these

  3. Characterization of the ferrioxamine uptake system of Nitrosomonas europaea.

    PubMed

    Wei, Xueming; Sayavedra-Soto, Luis A; Arp, Daniel J

    2007-12-01

    The chemolithoautotroph Nitrosomonas europaea has two genes predicted to encode outer-membrane (OM) ferrioxamine transporters. Expression of the ferrioxamine uptake system required induction, as shown by the shorter lag phase in ferrioxamine-containing cultures when ferrioxamine-exposed cells were used as an inoculum. The two OM ferrioxamine siderophore transporters encoded by foxA(1) (NE1097) and foxA(2) (NE1088) were produced only in cells grown in Fe-limited ferrioxamine-containing medium. The inactivation of foxA(1), singly or in combination with foxA(2), prevented growth in Fe-limited medium containing excess desferrioxamine (DFX). The foxA(2)-disrupted single mutant grew poorly in the regular Fe-limited (0.2 microM) medium with 10 microM DFX, but grew well when the Fe level was raised to 1.0 microM with 10 microM DFX. For efficient acquisition of Fe-loaded ferrioxamine, N. europaea needs both ferrioxamine transporters FoxA(1) and FoxA(2). FoxA(1) probably regulates its own production, and it controls the production of FoxA(2) as well.

  4. Genome-wide transcriptional responses of Nitrosomonas europaea to zinc.

    PubMed

    Park, Sunhwa; Ely, Roger L

    2008-06-01

    Nitrosomonas europaea, a Gram-negative obligate chemolithoautotroph, participates in global nitrogen cycling by carrying out nitrification and derives energy for growth through oxidation of ammonia. In this work, the physiological, proteomic, and transcriptional responses of N. europaea to zinc stress were studied. The nitrite production rate and ammonia-dependent oxygen uptake rate of the cells exposed to 3.4 microM ZnCl2 decreased about 61 and 69% within 30 min, respectively. Two proteins were notably up regulated in zinc treatment and the mRNA levels of their encoding genes started to increase by 1 h after the addition of zinc. A total of 27 genes were up regulated and 30 genes were down regulated. Up-regulated genes included mercury resistance genes (merTPCAD), inorganic ion transport genes, oxidative stress genes, toxin-antitoxin genes, and two-component signal transduction systems genes. merTPCAD was the highest up-regulated operon (46-fold). Down-regulated genes included the RubisCO operon (cbbO), biosynthesis (mrsA), and amino acid transporter.

  5. Sulfur-oxidizing bacteria in Soap Lake (Washington State), a meromictic, haloalkaline lake with an unprecedented high sulfide content.

    PubMed

    Sorokin, Dimitry Y; Foti, Mirjam; Pinkart, Holly C; Muyzer, Gerard

    2007-01-01

    Culture-dependent and -independent techniques were used to study the diversity of chemolithoautotrophic sulfur-oxidizing bacteria in Soap Lake (Washington State), a meromictic, haloalkaline lake containing an unprecedentedly high sulfide concentration in the anoxic monimolimnion. Both approaches revealed the dominance of bacteria belonging to the genus Thioalkalimicrobium, which are common inhabitants of soda lakes. A dense population of Thioalkalimicrobium (up to 10(7) cells/ml) was found at the chemocline, which is characterized by a steep oxygen-sulfide gradient. Twelve Thioalkalimicrobium strains exhibiting three different phenotypes were isolated in pure culture from various locations in Soap Lake. The isolates fell into two groups according to 16S rRNA gene sequence analysis. One of the groups was closely related to T. cyclicum, which was isolated from Mono Lake (California), a transiently meromictic, haloalkaline lake. The second group, consisting of four isolates, was phylogenetically and phenotypically distinct from known Thioalkalimicrobium species and unique to Soap Lake. It represented a new species, for which we suggest the name Thioalkalimicrobium microaerophilum sp. nov.

  6. Interactions of the metal tolerant heterotrophic microorganisms and iron oxidizing autotrophic bacteria from sulphidic mine environment during bioleaching experiments.

    PubMed

    Jeremic, Sanja; Beškoski, Vladimir P; Djokic, Lidija; Vasiljevic, Branka; Vrvić, Miroslav M; Avdalović, Jelena; Gojgić Cvijović, Gordana; Beškoski, Latinka Slavković; Nikodinovic-Runic, Jasmina

    2016-05-01

    Iron and sulfur oxidizing chemolithoautotrophic acidophilic bacteria, such as Acidithiobacillus species, hold the dominant role in mine environments characterized by low pH values and high concentrations of reduced sulfur and iron compounds, such as ores, rocks and acid drainage waters from mines. On the other hand, heterotrophic microorganisms, especially their biofilms, from these specific niches are receiving increased attention, but their potential eco-physiological roles have not been fully understood. Biofilms are considered a threat to human health, but biofilms also have beneficial properties as they are deployed in waste recycling and bioremediation systems. We have analyzed interactions of the metal tolerant heterotrophic microorganisms in biofilms with iron oxidizing autotrophic bacteria both from the sulphidic mine environment (copper mine Bor, Serbia). High tolerance to Cu(2+), Cd(2+) and Cr(6+) and the presence of genetic determinants for the respective metal tolerance and biofilm-forming ability was shown for indigenous heterotrophic bacteria that included strains of Staphylococcus and Rhodococcus. Two well characterized bacteria- Pseudomonas aeruginosa PAO1 (known biofilm former) and Cupriavidus metallidurans CH34 (known metal resistant representative) were also included in the study. The interaction and survivability of autotrophic iron oxidizing Acidithiobacillus bacteria and biofilms of heterotrophic bacteria during co-cultivation was revealed. Finally, the effect of heterotrophic biofilms on bioleaching process with indigenous iron oxidizing Acidithiobacillus species was shown not to be inhibitory under in vitro conditions.

  7. Characterization of Chemosynthetic Microbial Mats Associated with Intertidal Hydrothermal Sulfur Vents in White Point, San Pedro, CA, USA

    PubMed Central

    Miranda, Priscilla J.; McLain, Nathan K.; Hatzenpichler, Roland; Orphan, Victoria J.; Dillon, Jesse G.

    2016-01-01

    The shallow-sea hydrothermal vents at White Point (WP) in Palos Verdes on the southern California coast support microbial mats and provide easily accessed settings in which to study chemolithoautotrophic sulfur cycling. Previous studies have cultured sulfur-oxidizing bacteria from the WP mats; however, almost nothing is known about the in situ diversity and activity of the microorganisms in these habitats. We studied the diversity, micron-scale spatial associations and metabolic activity of the mat community via sequence analysis of 16S rRNA and aprA genes, fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) microscopy and sulfate reduction rate (SRR) measurements. Sequence analysis revealed a diverse group of bacteria, dominated by sulfur cycling gamma-, epsilon-, and deltaproteobacterial lineages such as Marithrix, Sulfurovum, and Desulfuromusa. FISH microscopy suggests a close physical association between sulfur-oxidizing and sulfur-reducing genotypes, while radiotracer studies showed low, but detectable, SRR. Comparative 16S rRNA gene sequence analyses indicate the WP sulfur vent microbial mat community is similar, but distinct from other hydrothermal vent communities representing a range of biotopes and lithologic settings. These findings suggest a complete biological sulfur cycle is operating in the WP mat ecosystem mediated by diverse bacterial lineages, with some similarity with deep-sea hydrothermal vent communities. PMID:27512390

  8. Effects of chloride acclimation on iron oxyhydroxides and cell morphology during cultivation of Acidithiobacillus ferrooxidans.

    PubMed

    Xiong, Huixin; Guo, Rong

    2011-01-01

    Iron oxyhydroxides as the efficient scavengers for heavy metals have been extensively investigated in iron-rich acid sulfate waters in the presence of Acidithiobacillus ferrooxidans (A. ferrooxidans, an especially important chemolithoautotroph for bioleaching and desulfurization of coal). In this study, we observed the morphology and elemental composition of cells in stationary phase and examined the dynamic variation of iron oxyhydroxides produced in cultures of A. ferrooxidans incubated in modified 9K medium initially including 0.15 M of ferrous iron, in the absence/presence of 0.2 M of chloride (NaCl/FeCl(2)). Results showed that chloride acclimation had little effect on cellular morphology and elemental uptake that was mainly related to culture medium. Furthermore, schwertmannite with the typical morphology of aggregated spheres covered by some "pincushions" was precipitated first in bacterial cultures in the favorable pH range of 2.9 ± 0.1 to 2.6 ± 0.1. Some of schwertmannite could be transformed to lozenge-shaped jarosite, due to a successively decreasing of pH values. However, the jarosite transformation represented a lag period of 5 and 4 days in the chloride-rich cultures with sulfate at a low level, compared to the cultures with sulfate at a high level, which could be attributed to the influence of sulfate requirement and chloride acclimation.

  9. Nitrososphaera viennensis, an ammonia oxidizing archaeon from soil

    PubMed Central

    Tourna, Maria; Stieglmeier, Michaela; Spang, Anja; Könneke, Martin; Schintlmeister, Arno; Urich, Tim; Engel, Marion; Schloter, Michael; Wagner, Michael; Richter, Andreas; Schleper, Christa

    2011-01-01

    Genes of archaea encoding homologues of ammonia monooxygenases have been found on a widespread basis and in large amounts in almost all terrestrial and marine environments, indicating that ammonia oxidizing archaea (AOA) might play a major role in nitrification on Earth. However, only one pure isolate of this group from a marine environment has so far been obtained, demonstrating archaeal ammonia oxidation coupled with autotrophic growth similar to the bacterial counterparts. Here we describe the cultivation and isolation of an AOA from soil. It grows on ammonia or urea as an energy source and is capable of using higher ammonia concentrations than the marine isolate, Nitrosopumilus maritimus. Surprisingly, although it is able to grow chemolithoautotrophically, considerable growth rates of this strain are obtained only upon addition of low amounts of pyruvate or when grown in coculture with bacteria. Our findings expand the recognized metabolic spectrum of AOA and help explain controversial results obtained in the past on the activity and carbon assimilation of these globally distributed organisms. PMID:21525411

  10. Single-cell genomics of uncultivated deep-branching magnetotactic bacteria reveals a conserved set of magnetosome genes.

    PubMed

    Kolinko, Sebastian; Richter, Michael; Glöckner, Frank-Oliver; Brachmann, Andreas; Schüler, Dirk

    2016-01-01

    While magnetosome biosynthesis within the magnetotactic Proteobacteria is increasingly well understood, much less is known about the genetic control within deep-branching phyla, which have a unique ultrastructure and biosynthesize up to several hundreds of bullet-shaped magnetite magnetosomes arranged in multiple bundles of chains, but have no cultured representatives. Recent metagenomic analysis identified magnetosome genes in the genus 'Candidatus Magnetobacterium' homologous to those in Proteobacteria. However, metagenomic analysis has been limited to highly abundant members of the community, and therefore only little is known about the magnetosome biosynthesis, ecophysiology and metabolic capacity in deep-branching MTB. Here we report the analysis of single-cell derived draft genomes of three deep-branching uncultivated MTB. Single-cell sorting followed by whole genome amplification generated draft genomes of Candidatus Magnetobacterium bavaricum and Candidatus Magnetoovum chiemensis CS-04 of the Nitrospirae phylum. Furthermore, we present the first, nearly complete draft genome of a magnetotactic representative from the candidate phylum Omnitrophica, tentatively named Candidatus Omnitrophus magneticus SKK-01. Besides key metabolic features consistent with a common chemolithoautotrophic lifestyle, we identified numerous, partly novel genes most likely involved in magnetosome biosynthesis of bullet-shaped magnetosomes and their arrangement in multiple bundles of chains.

  11. Pathways of carbon assimilation and ammonia oxidation suggested by environmental genomic analyses of marine Crenarchaeota.

    PubMed

    Hallam, Steven J; Mincer, Tracy J; Schleper, Christa; Preston, Christina M; Roberts, Katie; Richardson, Paul M; DeLong, Edward F

    2006-04-01

    Marine Crenarchaeota represent an abundant component of oceanic microbiota with potential to significantly influence biogeochemical cycling in marine ecosystems. Prior studies using specific archaeal lipid biomarkers and isotopic analyses indicated that planktonic Crenarchaeota have the capacity for autotrophic growth, and more recent cultivation studies support an ammonia-based chemolithoautotrophic energy metabolism. We report here analysis of fosmid sequences derived from the uncultivated marine crenarchaeote, Cenarchaeum symbiosum, focused on the reconstruction of carbon and energy metabolism. Genes predicted to encode multiple components of a modified 3-hydroxypropionate cycle of autotrophic carbon assimilation were identified, consistent with utilization of carbon dioxide as a carbon source. Additionally, genes predicted to encode a near complete oxidative tricarboxylic acid cycle were also identified, consistent with the consumption of organic carbon and in the production of intermediates for amino acid and cofactor biosynthesis. Therefore, C. symbiosum has the potential to function either as a strict autotroph, or as a mixotroph utilizing both carbon dioxide and organic material as carbon sources. From the standpoint of energy metabolism, genes predicted to encode ammonia monooxygenase subunits, ammonia permease, urease, and urea transporters were identified, consistent with the use of reduced nitrogen compounds as energy sources fueling autotrophic metabolism. Homologues of these genes, recovered from ocean waters worldwide, demonstrate the conservation and ubiquity of crenarchaeal pathways for carbon assimilation and ammonia oxidation. These findings further substantiate the likely global metabolic importance of Crenarchaeota with respect to key steps in the biogeochemical transformation of carbon and nitrogen in marine ecosystems.

  12. Isolation of an autotrophic ammonia-oxidizing marine archaeon.

    PubMed

    Könneke, Martin; Bernhard, Anne E; de la Torre, José R; Walker, Christopher B; Waterbury, John B; Stahl, David A

    2005-09-22

    For years, microbiologists characterized the Archaea as obligate extremophiles that thrive in environments too harsh for other organisms. The limited physiological diversity among cultivated Archaea suggested that these organisms were metabolically constrained to a few environmental niches. For instance, all Crenarchaeota that are currently cultivated are sulphur-metabolizing thermophiles. However, landmark studies using cultivation-independent methods uncovered vast numbers of Crenarchaeota in cold oxic ocean waters. Subsequent molecular surveys demonstrated the ubiquity of these low-temperature Crenarchaeota in aquatic and terrestrial environments. The numerical dominance of marine Crenarchaeota--estimated at 10(28) cells in the world's oceans--suggests that they have a major role in global biogeochemical cycles. Indeed, isotopic analyses of marine crenarchaeal lipids suggest that these planktonic Archaea fix inorganic carbon. Here we report the isolation of a marine crenarchaeote that grows chemolithoautotrophically by aerobically oxidizing ammonia to nitrite--the first observation of nitrification in the Archaea. The autotrophic metabolism of this isolate, and its close phylogenetic relationship to environmental marine crenarchaeal sequences, suggests that nitrifying marine Crenarchaeota may be important to global carbon and nitrogen cycles.

  13. Linking autotrophic activity in environmental samples with specific bacterial taxa by detection of 13C-labelled fatty acids.

    PubMed

    Knief, Claudia; Altendorf, Karlheinz; Lipski, André

    2003-11-01

    A method for the detection of physiologically active autotrophic bacteria in complex microbial communities was developed based on labelling with the stable isotope 13C. Labelling of autotrophic nitrifying, sulphur-oxidizing and iron-oxidizing populations was performed in situ by incubation with NaH[13C]O3. Incorporated label into fatty acid methyl esters (FAMEs) was detected and quantified using gas chromatography-mass spectrometry in single ion monitoring mode. Before the analyses of different environmental samples, the protocol was evaluated in pure culture experiments. In different environmental samples a selective labelling of fatty acids demonstrated which microbial taxa were responsible for the respective chemolithoautotrophic activity. The most strongly labelled fatty acids of a sample from a sulphide treating biofilter from an animal rendering plant were cis-7-hexadecenoic acid (16:1 cis7) and 11-methyl hexadecanoic acid (16:0 11methyl), which are as-yet not known for any sulphide-oxidizing autotroph. The fatty acid labelling pattern of an experimental biotrickling filter sample supplied with dimethyl disulphide clearly indicated the presence and activity of sulphide-oxidizing bacteria of the genus Thiobacillus. For a third environmental sample from an acid mining lake sediment, the assignment of autotrophic activity to bacteria of the genus Leptospirillum but not to Acidithiobacillus could be made by this method, as the fatty acid patterns of these bacteria show clear differences.

  14. Bacterial and archaeal diversity in an iron-rich coastal hydrothermal field in Yamagawa, Kagoshima, Japan.

    PubMed

    Kawaichi, Satoshi; Ito, Norihiro; Yoshida, Takashi; Sako, Yoshihiko

    2013-01-01

    Physicochemical characteristics and archaeal and bacterial community structures in an iron-rich coastal hydrothermal field, where the temperature of the most active hot spot reaches above 100 °C, were investigated to obtain fundamental information on microbes inhabiting a coastal hydrothermal field. The environmental settings of the coastal hydrothermal field were similar in some degree to those of deep-sea hydrothermal environments because of its emission of H2, CO2, and sulfide from the bottom of the hot spot. The results of clone analyses based on the 16S rRNA gene led us to speculate the presence of a chemo-synthetic microbial ecosystem, where chemolithoautotrophic thermophiles, primarily the bacterial order Aquificales, function as primary producers using H2 or sulfur compounds as their energy source and CO2 as their carbon source, and the organic compounds synthesized by them support the growth of chemoheterotrophic thermophiles, such as members of the order Thermales and the family Desulfurococcaceae. In addition, the dominance of members of the bacterial genus Herbaspirillum in the high temperature bottom layer led us to speculate the temporal formation of mesophilic zones where they can also function as primary producing or nitrogen-fixing bacteria.

  15. Metal mobilization by iron- and sulfur-oxidizing bacteria in a multiple extreme mine tailings in the Atacama Desert, Chile.

    PubMed

    Korehi, H; Blöthe, M; Sitnikova, M A; Dold, B; Schippers, A

    2013-03-05

    The marine shore sulfidic mine tailings dump at the Chañaral Bay in the Atacama Desert, northern Chile, is characterized by extreme acidity, high salinity, and high heavy metals concentrations. Due to pyrite oxidation, metals (especially copper) are mobilized under acidic conditions and transported toward the tailings surface and precipitate as secondary minerals (Dold, Environ. Sci. Technol. 2006, 40, 752-758.). Depth profiles of total cell counts in this almost organic-carbon free multiple extreme environment showed variable numbers with up to 10(8) cells g(-1) dry weight for 50 samples at four sites. Real-time PCR quantification and bacterial 16S rRNA gene diversity analysis via clone libraries revealed a dominance of Bacteria over Archaea and the frequent occurrence of the acidophilic iron(II)- and sulfur-oxidizing and iron(III)-reducing genera Acidithiobacillus, Alicyclobacillus, and Sulfobacillus. Acidophilic chemolithoautotrophic iron(II)-oxidizing bacteria were also frequently found via most-probable-number (MPN) cultivation. Halotolerant iron(II)-oxidizers in enrichment cultures were active at NaCl concentrations up to 1 M. Maximal microcalorimetrically determined pyrite oxidation rates coincided with maxima of the pyrite content, total cell counts, and MPN of iron(II)-oxidizers. These findings indicate that microbial pyrite oxidation and metal mobilization preferentially occur in distinct tailings layers at high salinity. Microorganisms for biomining with seawater salt concentrations obviously exist in nature.

  16. Microbial CO2 fixation potential in a tar-oil-contaminated porous aquifer.

    PubMed

    Kellermann, Claudia; Selesi, Draženka; Lee, Natuschka; Hügler, Michael; Esperschütz, Jürgen; Hartmann, Anton; Griebler, Christian

    2012-07-01

    CO(2) fixation is one of the most important processes on the Earth's surface, but our current understanding of the occurrence and importance of chemolithoautotrophy in the terrestrial subsurface is poor. Groundwater ecosystems, especially at organically polluted sites, have all the requirements for autotrophic growth processes, and CO(2) fixation is thus suggested to contribute significantly to carbon flux in these environments. We explored the potential for autotrophic CO(2) fixation in microbial communities of a petroleum hydrocarbon-contaminated aquifer by detection of functional marker genes (cbbL, cbbM), encoding different forms of the key enzyme RubisCO of the Calvin-Benson-Bassham cycle. Quantification of (red-like) cbbL genes revealed highest numbers at the upper fringe of the contaminant plume and the capillary fringe where reduced sulphur and iron species are regularly oxidized in the course of groundwater table changes. Functional gene sequences retrieved from this area were most closely related to sequences of different thiobacilli. Moreover, several cultures could be enriched from fresh aquifer material, all of which are able to grow under chemolithoautotrophic conditions. A novel, nitrate-reducing, thiosulfate-oxidizing bacterial strain, recently described as Thiobacillus thiophilus D24TN(T) sp. nov., was shown to carry and transcribe RubisCO large-subunit genes of form I and II. Enzyme tests proved the actual activity of RubisCO in this strain.

  17. A phylogenetic approach to the early evolution of autotrophy: the case of the reverse TCA and the reductive acetyl-CoA pathways.

    PubMed

    Becerra, Arturo; Rivas, Mario; García-Ferris, Carlos; Lazcano, Antonio; Peretó, Juli

    2014-06-01

    In recent decades, a number of hypotheses on the autotrophic origin of life have been presented. These proposals invoke the emergence of reaction networks leading from CO or CO₂ to the organic molecules required for life. It has also been suggested that the last (universal) common ancestor (LCA or LUCA) of all extant cell lineages was a chemolitho-autotrophic thermophilic anaerobe. The antiquity of some carbon fixation pathways, the phylogenetic basal distribution of some autotrophic organisms, and the catalytic properties of iron-sulfur minerals have been advanced in support of these ideas. Here we critically examine the phylogenetic distribution and evolution of enzymes that are essential for two of the most ancient autotrophic means of metabolism: the reductive tricarboxylic acid (rTCA) cycle and the reductive acetyl-CoA pathway. Phylogenetic analysis of citryl-CoA synthetase and of citryl-CoA lyase, key enzymatic components of the rTCA cycle, and of CO dehydrogenase/acetyl-CoA synthase, a key enzyme in the reductive acetyl-CoA pathway, revealed that all three enzymes have undergone major lateral transfer events and therefore cannot be used as proof of the LCA's metabolic abilities nor as evidence of an autotrophic origin of life.

  18. Isolation, cultivation and genomic analysis of magnetosome biomineralization genes of a new genus of South-seeking magnetotactic cocci within the Alphaproteobacteria

    SciTech Connect

    Morillo, Viviana; Abreu, Fernanda; Araujo, Ana C; de Almeida, Luiz G; Enrich-Prast, Alex; Farina, Marcos; de Vasconcelos, Ana T; Bazylinski, Dennis A; Lins, Ulysses

    2014-01-01

    Although magnetotactic bacteria (MTB) are ubiquitous in aquatic habitats, they are still considered fastidious microorganisms with regard to growth and cultivation with only a relatively low number of axenic cultures available to date. Here, we report the first axenic culture of an MTB isolated in the Southern Hemisphere (Itaipu Lagoon in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil). Cells of this new isolate are coccoid to ovoid in morphology and grow microaerophilically in semi-solid medium containing an oxygen concentration ([O2]) gradient either under chemoorganoheterotrophic or chemolithoautotrophic conditions. Each cell contains a single chain of approximately 10 elongated cuboctahedral magnetite (Fe3O4) magnetosomes. Phylogenetic analysis based on the 16S rRNA gene sequence shows that the coccoid MTB isolated in this study represents a new genus in the Alphaproteobacteria; the name Magnetofaba australis strain IT-1 is proposed. Preliminary genomic data obtained by pyrosequencing shows that M. australis strain IT-1 contains a genomic region with genes involved in biomineralization similar to those found in the most closely related magnetotactic cocci Magnetococcus marinus strain MC-1. However, organization of the magnetosome genes differs from M. marinus.

  19. Purification of three aminotransferases from Hydrogenobacter thermophilus TK-6--novel types of alanine or glycine aminotransferase: enzymes and catalysis.

    PubMed

    Kameya, Masafumi; Arai, Hiroyuki; Ishii, Masaharu; Igarashi, Yasuo

    2010-04-01

    Aminotransferases catalyse synthetic and degradative reactions of amino acids, and serve as a key linkage between central carbon and nitrogen metabolism in most organisms. In this study, three aminotransferases (AT1, AT2 and AT3) were purified and characterized from Hydrogenobacter thermophilus, a hydrogen-oxidizing chemolithoautotrophic bacterium, which has been reported to possess unique features in its carbon and nitrogen anabolism. AT1, AT2 and AT3 exhibited glutamate:oxaloacetate aminotransferase, glutamate:pyruvate aminotransferase and alanine:glyoxylate aminotransferase activities, respectively. In addition, both AT1 and AT2 catalysed a glutamate:glyoxylate aminotransferase reaction. Interestingly, phylogenetic analysis showed that AT2 belongs to aminotransferase family IV, whereas known glutamate:pyruvate aminotransferases and glutamate:glyoxylate aminotransferases are members of family Igamma. In contrast, AT3 was classified into family I, distant from eukaryotic alanine:glyoxylate aminotransferases which belong to family IV. Although Thermococcus litoralis alanine:glyoxylate aminotransferase is the sole known example of family I alanine:glyoxylate aminotransferases, it is indicated that this alanine:glyoxylate aminotransferase and AT3 are derived from distinct lineages within family I, because neither high sequence similarity nor putative substrate-binding residues are shared by these two enzymes. To our knowledge, this study is the first report of the primary structure of bacterial glutamate:glyoxylate aminotransferase and alanine:glyoxylate aminotransferase, and demonstrates the presence of novel types of aminotransferase phylogenetically distinct from known eukaryotic and archaeal isozymes.

  20. A gene complex coding for the membrane-bound hydrogenase of Alcaligenes eutrophus H16.

    PubMed Central

    Kortlüke, C; Horstmann, K; Schwartz, E; Rohde, M; Binsack, R; Friedrich, B

    1992-01-01

    One of the key enzymes in the chemolithoautotrophic metabolism of Alcaligenes eutrophus H16 is a dimeric, membrane-associated hydrogenase. The genetic determinants of this enzyme are located on the endogenous megaplasmid pHG1 (G. Eberz, C. Hogrefe, C. Kortlüke, A. Kamienski, and B. Friedrich, J. Bacteriol. 168:636-641, 1986). Complementation studies showed that the information required for the formation of active membrane-bound hydrogenase occupies more than 7.5 kb of megaplasmid DNA. We cloned and sequenced this region and identified the genes encoding the two hydrogenase subunits (hoxK and hoxG). The nucleotide sequence contains nine additional closely spaced open reading frames. Immunoelectron microscopy showed that the gene product of one of these open reading frames (hoxM) is involved in the process leading to the attachment of hydrogenase to the membrane. Other open reading frames may encode additional processing functions and components of a hydrogenase-linked electron transport chain. Analysis of Tn5-B21-mediated transcriptional fusions provided evidence that the structural genes and accessory functions belong to at least three coordinately regulated transcriptional units. Images PMID:1383192

  1. The Sulfur Oxygenase Reductase from the Mesophilic Bacterium Halothiobacillus neapolitanus Is a Highly Active Thermozyme

    PubMed Central

    Veith, Andreas; Botelho, Hugo M.; Kindinger, Florian; Gomes, Cláudio M.

    2012-01-01

    A biochemical, biophysical, and phylogenetic study of the sulfur oxygenase reductase (SOR) from the mesophilic gammaproteobacterium Halothiobacillus neapolitanus (HnSOR) was performed in order to determine the structural and biochemical properties of the enzyme. SOR proteins from 14 predominantly chemolithoautotrophic bacterial and archaeal species are currently available in public databases. Sequence alignment and phylogenetic analysis showed that they form a coherent protein family. The HnSOR purified from Escherichia coli after heterologous gene expression had a temperature range of activity of 10 to 99°C with an optimum at 80°C (42 U/mg protein). Sulfite, thiosulfate, and hydrogen sulfide were formed at various stoichiometries in a range between pH 5.4 and 11 (optimum pH 8.4). Circular dichroism (CD) spectroscopy and dynamic light scattering showed that the HnSOR adopts secondary and quaternary structures similar to those of the 24-subunit enzyme from the hyperthermophile Acidianus ambivalens (AaSOR). The melting point of the HnSOR was ≈20°C lower than that of the AaSOR, when analyzed with CD-monitored thermal unfolding. Homology modeling showed that the secondary structure elements of single subunits are conserved. Subtle changes in the pores of the outer shell and increased flexibility might contribute to activity at low temperature. We concluded that the thermostability was the result of a rigid protein core together with the stabilizing effect of the 24-subunit hollow sphere. PMID:22139503

  2. Water Table Dynamics and Biogeochemical Cycling in a Shallow, Variably-Saturated Floodplain.

    PubMed

    Yabusaki, Steven B; Wilkins, Michael J; Fang, Yilin; Williams, Kenneth H; Arora, Bhavna; Bargar, John; Beller, Harry R; Bouskill, Nicholas J; Brodie, Eoin L; Christensen, John N; Conrad, Mark E; Danczak, Robert E; King, Eric; Soltanian, Mohamad R; Spycher, Nicolas F; Steefel, Carl I; Tokunaga, Tetsu K; Versteeg, Roelof; Waichler, Scott R; Wainwright, Haruko M

    2017-03-07

    Three-dimensional variably saturated flow and multicomponent biogeochemical reactive transport modeling, based on published and newly generated data, is used to better understand the interplay of hydrology, geochemistry, and biology controlling the cycling of carbon, nitrogen, oxygen, iron, sulfur, and uranium in a shallow floodplain. In this system, aerobic respiration generally maintains anoxic groundwater below an oxic vadose zone until seasonal snowmelt-driven water table peaking transports dissolved oxygen (DO) and nitrate from the vadose zone into the alluvial aquifer. The response to this perturbation is localized due to distinct physico-biogeochemical environments and relatively long time scales for transport through the floodplain aquifer and vadose zone. Naturally reduced zones (NRZs) containing sediments higher in organic matter, iron sulfides, and non-crystalline U(IV) rapidly consume DO and nitrate to maintain anoxic conditions, yielding Fe(II) from FeS oxidative dissolution, nitrite from denitrification, and U(VI) from nitrite-promoted U(IV) oxidation. Redox cycling is a key factor for sustaining the observed aquifer behaviors despite continuous oxygen influx and the annual hydrologically induced oxidation event. Depth-dependent activity of fermenters, aerobes, nitrate reducers, sulfate reducers, and chemolithoautotrophs (e.g., oxidizing Fe(II), S compounds, and ammonium) is linked to the presence of DO, which has higher concentrations near the water table.

  3. On the instability and evolutionary age of deep-sea chemosynthetic communities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vrijenhoek, Robert C.

    2013-08-01

    Though not directly dependent on photosynthesis, deep-sea chemosynthetic communities have not been sheltered from catastrophic changes affecting Earth's photic zone. Instead, the constituent animals may be particularly vulnerable to large climatic changes that have historically affected ocean temperatures and circulation patterns. Chemosynthetic animals occupy narrow redox zones, mostly at hydrothermal vents, hydrocarbon seeps, or sites of organic deposition where subsurface fluids laden with reduced gases (e.g., sulfides, methane, hydrogen) meet oxygenated seawater. Dependence on chemolithoautotrophic bacteria as primary producers may render these deep-sea communities particularly susceptible to climatic changes that alter the breadth of the oxic/anoxic interface. The fossil record clearly reveals major transitions of chemosynthetic faunas during the middle to late Mesozoic, failing to support prior hypotheses that these environments harbor an extraordinary number of ancient relics and living fossils. The molecular phylogenetic analyses summarized herein support Cenozoic (<65 Myr old) radiations for most of the dominant invertebrate taxa now occupying these habitats. Although stem ancestors for many of the mollusks, annelids and crustaceans found at vents and seeps survived the Cretaceous/Tertiary (K/T) extinction event, their contemporary crown taxa radiated mostly after the Paleocene/Eocene thermal maximum (PETM), which led to a widespread anoxic/dysoxic event in the world's deep-ocean basins.

  4. Post-eruption colonization and community succession of hydrothermal microbial mats

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moyer, C. L.; Hager, K. W.; Fullerton, H.

    2015-12-01

    T-RFLP fingerprint cluster analysis and qPCR of microbial mat communities from hydrothermal vent habitats among recent post-eruption sites exhibit similar communities containing Epsilonproteobacteria that are phylogenetically similar and capable of hydrogen-oxidation (e.g., Nitratiruptor, Caminibacter, Nautilia, Thioreductor, and/or Lebetimonas). This community is the first (Group I) of three community types that represent different stages in the transition from vapor-dominated to brine-dominated water-rock interactions (i.e., vent effluent geochemistry). We have now observed this similar transition from four hydrothermal regions from across the Pacific Ocean. The second type of mat community (Group II) that has been observed is characterized by the presence of another group of Epsilonproteobacteria; however, these are mostly sulfur-oxidizing phylotypes (e.g., Sulfurimonas, Sulfurovum, and/or Sulfuricurvum). Finally, once the transition from sulfur to iron is complete, then the third type (Group III) cluster together by the presence of Zetaproteobacteria, which are known to use iron-oxidation. Each of these community types are dominated by groups of microorganisms characterized by cultured isolates, all of which are strict chemolithoautotrophs capable of carbon fixation and are hypothesized as both ecosystem engineers and primary producers in these energy-rich ecosystems. We also consider the thermodynamic implications towards carbon fixation for each of the three groups of mat communities.

  5. Arsenic speciation in food chains from mid-Atlantic hydrothermal vents

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Taylor, Vivien F.; Jackson, Brian P.; Siegfried, Matthew R.; Navratilova, Jana; Francesconi, Kevin A.; Kirshtein, Julie; Voytek, Mary

    2012-01-01

    Arsenic concentration and speciation were determined in benthic fauna collected from the Mid-Atlantic Ridge hydrothermal vents. The shrimp species, Rimicaris exoculata, the vent chimney-dwelling mussel, Bathymodiolus azoricus, Branchipolynoe seepensis, a commensal worm of B. azoricus and the gastropod Peltospira smaragdina showed variations in As concentration and in stable isotope (δ13C and δ15N) signature between species, suggesting different sources of As uptake. Arsenic speciation showed arsenobetaine to be the dominant species in R. exoculata, whereas in B. azoricus and B. seepensis arsenosugars were most abundant, although arsenobetaine, dimethylarsinate and inorganic arsenic were also observed, along with several unidentified species. Scrape samples from outside the vent chimneys covered with microbial mat, which is a presumed food source for many vent organisms, contained high levels of total As, but organic species were not detectable. The formation of arsenosugars in pelagic environments is typically attributed to marine algae, and the pathway to arsenobetaine is still unknown. The occurrence of arsenosugars and arsenobetaine in these deep sea organisms, where primary production is chemolithoautotrophic and stable isotope analyses indicate food sources are of vent origin, suggests that organic arsenicals can occur in a foodweb without algae or other photosynthetic life.

  6. Sulfur-Oxidizing Bacteria in Soap Lake (Washington State), a Meromictic, Haloalkaline Lake with an Unprecedented High Sulfide Content▿

    PubMed Central

    Sorokin, Dimitry Y.; Foti, Mirjam; Pinkart, Holly C.; Muyzer, Gerard

    2007-01-01

    Culture-dependent and -independent techniques were used to study the diversity of chemolithoautotrophic sulfur-oxidizing bacteria in Soap Lake (Washington State), a meromictic, haloalkaline lake containing an unprecedentedly high sulfide concentration in the anoxic monimolimnion. Both approaches revealed the dominance of bacteria belonging to the genus Thioalkalimicrobium, which are common inhabitants of soda lakes. A dense population of Thioalkalimicrobium (up to 107 cells/ml) was found at the chemocline, which is characterized by a steep oxygen-sulfide gradient. Twelve Thioalkalimicrobium strains exhibiting three different phenotypes were isolated in pure culture from various locations in Soap Lake. The isolates fell into two groups according to 16S rRNA gene sequence analysis. One of the groups was closely related to T. cyclicum, which was isolated from Mono Lake (California), a transiently meromictic, haloalkaline lake. The second group, consisting of four isolates, was phylogenetically and phenotypically distinct from known Thioalkalimicrobium species and unique to Soap Lake. It represented a new species, for which we suggest the name Thioalkalimicrobium microaerophilum sp. nov. PMID:17114324

  7. Niche partitioning of diverse sulfur-oxidizing bacteria at hydrothermal vents.

    PubMed

    Meier, Dimitri V; Pjevac, Petra; Bach, Wolfgang; Hourdez, Stephane; Girguis, Peter R; Vidoudez, Charles; Amann, Rudolf; Meyerdierks, Anke

    2017-07-01

    At deep-sea hydrothermal vents, primary production is carried out by chemolithoautotrophic microorganisms, with the oxidation of reduced sulfur compounds being a major driver for microbial carbon fixation. Dense and highly diverse assemblies of sulfur-oxidizing bacteria (SOB) are observed, yet the principles of niche differentiation between the different SOB across geochemical gradients remain poorly understood. In this study niche differentiation of the key SOB was addressed by extensive sampling of active sulfidic vents at six different hydrothermal venting sites in the Manus Basin, off Papua New Guinea. We subjected 33 diffuse fluid and water column samples and 23 samples from surfaces of chimneys, rocks and fauna to a combined analysis of 16S rRNA gene sequences, metagenomes and real-time in situ measured geochemical parameters. We found Sulfurovum Epsilonproteobacteria mainly attached to surfaces exposed to diffuse venting, while the SUP05-clade dominated the bacterioplankton in highly diluted mixtures of vent fluids and seawater. We propose that the high diversity within Sulfurimonas- and Sulfurovum-related Epsilonproteobacteria observed in this study derives from the high variation of environmental parameters such as oxygen and sulfide concentrations across small spatial and temporal scales.

  8. Haloalkaliphilic sulfur-oxidizing bacteria in soda lakes.

    PubMed

    Sorokin, Dimitry Yu; Kuenen, Johannes Gijs

    2005-09-01

    The existence of chemolithoautotrophic sulfur-oxidizing bacteria (SOB) capable of growth in an extremely alkaline and saline environment has not been recognized until recently. Extensive studies of saline, alkaline (soda) lakes located in Central Asia, Africa and North America have now revealed the presence, at relatively high numbers, of a new branch of obligately autotrophic SOB in these doubly extreme environments. Overall more than 100 strains were isolated in pure culture. All of them have the potential to grow optimally at around pH 10 in media strongly buffered with sodium carbonate/bicarbonate and cannot grow at pH<7.5 and Na(+) concentration <0.2 M. The majority of the isolates fell into two distinct groups with differing phylogeny and physiology, that have been described as two new genera in the Gammaproteobacteria; Thioalkalimicrobium and Thioalkalivibrio. The third genus, Thioalkalispira, contains a single obligate microaerophilic species T. microaerophila. The Thioalkalimicrobium group represents a typical opportunistic strategy, including highly specialized, relatively fast-growing and low salt-tolerant bacteria, dominating in hyposaline steppe soda lakes of Central Asia. The genus Thioalkalivibrio includes mostly slowly growing species better adapted to life in hypersaline conditions and with a more versatile metabolism. It includes denitrifying, thiocyanate-utilizing and facultatively alkaliphilic species.

  9. Assessment of the stoichiometry and efficiency of CO2 fixation coupled to reduced sulfur oxidation.

    PubMed

    Klatt, Judith M; Polerecky, Lubos

    2015-01-01

    Chemolithoautotrophic sulfur oxidizing bacteria (SOB) couple the oxidation of reduced sulfur compounds to the production of biomass. Their role in the cycling of carbon, sulfur, oxygen, and nitrogen is, however, difficult to quantify due to the complexity of sulfur oxidation pathways. We describe a generic theoretical framework for linking the stoichiometry and energy conservation efficiency of autotrophic sulfur oxidation while accounting for the partitioning of the reduced sulfur pool between the energy generating and energy conserving steps as well as between the main possible products (sulfate vs. zero-valent sulfur). Using this framework, we show that the energy conservation efficiency varies widely among SOB with no apparent relationship to their phylogeny. Aerobic SOB equipped with reverse dissimilatory sulfite reductase tend to have higher efficiency than those relying on the complete Sox pathway, whereas for anaerobic SOB the presence of membrane-bound, as opposed to periplasmic, nitrate reductase systems appears to be linked to higher efficiency. We employ the framework to also show how limited rate measurements can be used to estimate the primary productivity of SOB without the knowledge of the sulfate-to-zero-valent-sulfur production ratio. Finally, we discuss how the framework can help researchers gain new insights into the activity of SOB and their niches.

  10. Snowmelt induced hydrologic perturbations drive dynamic microbiological and geochemical behaviors across a shallow riparian aquifer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Danczak, Robert; Yabusaki, Steven; Williams, Kenneth; Fang, Yilin; Hobson, Chad; Wilkins, Michael

    2016-05-01

    Shallow riparian aquifers represent hotspots of biogeochemical activity in the arid western US. While these environments provide extensive ecosystem services, little is known of how natural environmental perturbations influence subsurface microbial communities and associated biogeochemical processes. Over a six-month period we tracked the annual snowmelt-driven incursion of groundwater into the vadose zone of an aquifer adjacent to the Colorado River, leading to increased dissolved oxygen (DO) concentrations in the normally suboxic saturated zone. Strong biogeochemical heterogeneity was measured across the site, with abiotic reactions between DO and sulfide minerals driving rapid DO consumption and mobilization of redox active species in reduced aquifer regions. Conversely, extensive DO increases were detected in less reduced sediments. 16S rRNA gene surveys tracked microbial community composition within the aquifer, revealing strong correlations between increases in putative oxygen-utilizing chemolithoautotrophs and heterotrophs and rising DO concentrations. The gradual return to suboxic aquifer conditions favored increasing abundances of 16S rRNA sequences matching members of the Microgenomates (OP11) and Parcubacteria (OD1) that have been strongly implicated in fermentative processes. Microbial community stability measurements indicated that deeper aquifer locations were relatively less affected by geochemical perturbations, while communities in shallower locations exhibited the greatest change. Reactive transport modeling of the geochemical and microbiological results supported field observations, suggesting that a predictive framework can be applied to develop a greater understanding of such environments.

  11. Tn5-induced mutations affecting sulfur-oxidizing ability (Sox) of Thiosphaera pantotropha

    SciTech Connect

    Chandra, T.S.; Friedrich, C.G.

    1986-05-01

    Mutants of Thiosphaera pantotropha defective in chemolithoautotrophic growth were obtained by transpositional mutagenesis with Tn5 coding for kanamycin resistance. The suicide vehicle for introducing Tn5 to T. pantotropha was pSUP5011 harbored by Escherichia coli. Kanamycin-resistant isolates were screened for the inability to grow with reduced sulfur compounds (Sox/sup -/). Four classes of Sox/sup -/ mutants were obtained. Three were of different pleiotropic phenotypes: (i) unable to grow with formate, nitrate, and xanthine; (this class strongly suggested the involvement of a molybdenum cofactor in inorganic sulfur-oxidizing ability); (ii) no growth with hydrogen; (iii) slight growth with hydrogen and formate. Two plasmids, pHG41 (about 450 kilobase pairs) and pHG42 (110 kilobases), were identified in lysates of T. pantotropha. In one Sox/sup -/ mutant pHG41 could not be detected. Revertant analysis suggested that pHG41 and pHG42 were not involved in the Sox character.

  12. Integration of Metagenomic and Stable Carbon Isotope Evidence Reveals the Extent and Mechanisms of Carbon Dioxide Fixation in High-Temperature Microbial Communities.

    PubMed

    Jennings, Ryan de Montmollin; Moran, James J; Jay, Zackary J; Beam, Jacob P; Whitmore, Laura M; Kozubal, Mark A; Kreuzer, Helen W; Inskeep, William P

    2017-01-01

    Although the biological fixation of CO2 by chemolithoautotrophs provides a diverse suite of organic compounds utilized by chemoorganoheterotrophs as a carbon and energy source, the relative amounts of autotrophic C in chemotrophic microbial communities are not well-established. The extent and mechanisms of CO2 fixation were evaluated across a comprehensive set of high-temperature, chemotrophic microbial communities in Yellowstone National Park by combining metagenomic and stable (13)C isotope analyses. Fifteen geothermal sites representing three distinct habitat types (iron-oxide mats, anoxic sulfur sediments, and filamentous "streamer" communities) were investigated. Genes of the 3-hydroxypropionate/4-hydroxybutyrate, dicarboxylate/4-hydroxybutyrate, and reverse tricarboxylic acid CO2 fixation pathways were identified in assembled genome sequence corresponding to the predominant Crenarchaeota and Aquificales observed across this habitat range. Stable (13)C analyses of dissolved inorganic and organic C (DIC, DOC), and possible landscape C sources were used to interpret the (13)C content of microbial community samples. Isotope mixing models showed that the minimum fractions of autotrophic C in microbial biomass were >50% in the majority of communities analyzed. The significance of CO2 as a C source in these communities provides a foundation for understanding community assembly and succession, and metabolic linkages among early-branching thermophilic autotrophs and heterotrophs.

  13. Arsenic speciation in food chains from mid-Atlantic hydrothermal vents

    PubMed Central

    Taylor, Vivien F.; Jackson, Brian P.; Siegfried, Matthew; Navratilova, Jana; Francesconi, Kevin A.; Kirshtein, Julie; Voytek, Mary

    2012-01-01

    Arsenic concentration and speciation were determined in benthic fauna collected from the Mid-Atlantic Ridge hydrothermal vents. The shrimp species, Rimicaris exoculata, the vent chimney-dwelling mussel, Bathymodiolus azoricus, Branchipolynoe seepensis, a commensal worm of B. azoricus, and the gastropod Peltospira smaragdina showed variations in As concentration and in stable isotope (δ13C and δ15N) signature between species, suggesting different sources of As uptake. Arsenic speciation showed arsenobetaine to be the dominant species in R. exoculata, whereas in B. azoricus and B. seepensis arsenosugars were most abundant, although arsenobetaine, dimethylarsinate, and inorganic arsenic were also observed, along with several unidentified species. Scrape samples from outside the vent chimneys, covered with microbial mat, which is a presumed food source for many vent organisms, contained high levels of total As, but organic species were not detectable. The formation of arsenosugars in pelagic environments is typically attributed to marine algae, and the pathway to arsenobetaine is still unknown. The occurrence of arsenosugars and arsenobetaine in these deep sea organisms, where primary production is chemolithoautotrophic and stable isotope analyses indicate food sources are of vent origin, suggests that organic arsenicals can occur in a food web without algae or other photosynthetic life. PMID:23741175

  14. Microbial Communities on Seafloor Basalts at Dorado Outcrop Reflect Level of Alteration and Highlight Global Lithic Clades

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Michael D.; Walworth, Nathan G.; Sylvan, Jason B.; Edwards, Katrina J.; Orcutt, Beth N.

    2015-01-01

    Areas of exposed basalt along mid-ocean ridges and at seafloor outcrops serve as conduits of fluid flux into and out of a subsurface ocean, and microbe–mineral interactions can influence alteration reactions at the rock–water interface. Located on the eastern flank of the East Pacific Rise, Dorado Outcrop is a site of low-temperature (<20°C) hydrothermal venting and represents a new end-member in the current survey of seafloor basalt biomes. Consistent with prior studies, a survey of 16S rRNA gene sequence diversity using universal primers targeting the V4 hypervariable region revealed much greater richness and diversity on the seafloor rocks than in surrounding seawater. Overall, Gamma-, Alpha-, and Deltaproteobacteria, and Thaumarchaeota dominated the sequenced communities, together making up over half of the observed diversity, though bacterial sequences were more abundant than archaeal in all samples. The most abundant bacterial reads were closely related to the obligate chemolithoautotrophic, sulfur-oxidizing Thioprofundum lithotrophicum, suggesting carbon and sulfur cycling as dominant metabolic pathways in this system. Representatives of Thaumarchaeota were detected in relatively high abundance on the basalts in comparison to bottom water, possibly indicating ammonia oxidation. In comparison to other sequence datasets from globally distributed seafloor basalts, this study reveals many overlapping and cosmopolitan phylogenetic groups and also suggests that substrate age correlates with community structure. PMID:26779122

  15. Metagenomic analysis of nitrogen metabolism genes in the surface of marine sediments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reyes, Carolina; Schneider, Dominik; Thürmer, Andrea; Dellwig, Olaf; Lipka, Marko; Daniel, Rolf; Böttcher, Michael E.; Friedrich, Michael W.

    2016-04-01

    In this study, we analysed metagenomes along with biogeochemical profiles from Skagerrak (North Sea) and Bothnian Bay (Baltic Sea) sediments, to trace the prevailing nitrogen pathways. NO3- was present in the top 5 cm below the sediment-water interface at both sites. NH4+ increased with depth below 5 cm where it overlapped with the NO3- zone. Steady state modelling of NO3- and NH4+ porewater profiles indicates zones of net nitrogen species transformations. Protease, peptidase, urease and deaminase ammonification genes were detected in metagenomes. Genes involved in ammonia oxidation (amo, hao), nitrite oxidation (nxr), denitrification (nar, nir, nor) and dissimilatory NO3- reduction to NH4+ (nap, nfr and otr) were also present. 16S rRNA gene analysis showed that the nitrifying group Nitrosopumilales and other groups involved in nitrification and denitrification (Nitrobacter, Nitrosomonas, Nitrospira, Nitrosococcus, and Nitrosonomas) appeared less abundant in Skagerrak sediments compared to Bothnian Bay sediments. Beggiatoa and Thiothrix 16S rRNA genes were also present suggesting chemolithoautotrophic NO3- reduction to NO2- or NH4+ as a possible pathway. Although anammox planctomycetes 16S rRNA genes were present in metagenomes, anammox protein-coding genes were not detected. Our results show the metabolic potential for ammonification, nitrification, NO3- reduction, and denitrification activities in Skagerrak and Bothnian Bay sediments.

  16. Comparison of Optimal Thermodynamic Models of the Tricarboxylic Acid Cycle from Heterotrophs, Cyanobacteria, and Green Sulfur Bacteria

    SciTech Connect

    Thomas, Dennis G.; Jaramillo Riveri, Sebastian I.; Baxter, Douglas J.; Cannon, William R.

    2014-12-15

    We have applied a new stochastic simulation approach to predict the metabolite levels, energy flow, and material flux in the different oxidative TCA cycles found in E. coli and Synechococcus sp. PCC 7002, and in the reductive TCA cycle typical of chemolithoautotrophs and phototrophic green sulfur bacteria such as Chlorobaculum tepidum. The simulation approach is based on equations of state and employs an assumption similar to that used in transition state theory. The ability to evaluate the thermodynamics of metabolic pathways allows one to understand the relationship between coupling of energy and material gradients in the environment and the selforganization of stable biological systems, and it is shown that each cycle operates in the direction expected due to its environmental niche. The simulations predict changes in metabolite levels and flux in response to changes in cofactor concentrations that would be hard to predict without an elaborate model based on the law of mass action. In fact, we show that a thermodynamically unfavorable reaction can still have flux in the forward direction when it is part of a reaction network. The ability to predict metabolite levels, energy flow and material flux should be significant for understanding the dynamics of natural systems and for understanding principles for engineering organisms for production of specialty chemicals, such as biofuels.

  17. Nitrogen Metabolism Genes from Temperate Marine Sediments.

    PubMed

    Reyes, Carolina; Schneider, Dominik; Lipka, Marko; Thürmer, Andrea; Böttcher, Michael E; Friedrich, Michael W

    2017-03-10

    In this study, we analysed metagenomes along with biogeochemical profiles from Skagerrak (SK) and Bothnian Bay (BB) sediments, to trace the prevailing nitrogen pathways. NO3(-) was present in the top 5 cm below the sediment-water interface at both sites. NH4(+) increased with depth below 5 cm where it overlapped with the NO3(-) zone. Steady-state modelling of NO3(-) and NH4(+) porewater profiles indicates zones of net nitrogen species transformations. Bacterial protease and hydratase genes appeared to make up the bulk of total ammonification genes. Genes involved in ammonia oxidation (amo, hao), denitrification (nir, nor), dissimilatory NO3(-) reduction to NH4(+) (nfr and otr) and in both of the latter two pathways (nar, nap) were also present. Results show ammonia-oxidizing bacteria (AOB) and ammonia-oxidizing archaea (AOA) are similarly abundant in both sediments. Also, denitrification genes appeared more abundant than DNRA genes. 16S rRNA gene analysis showed that the relative abundance of the nitrifying group Nitrosopumilales and other groups involved in nitrification and denitrification (Nitrobacter, Nitrosomonas, Nitrospira, Nitrosococcus and Nitrosomonas) appeared less abundant in SK sediments compared to BB sediments. Beggiatoa and Thiothrix 16S rRNA genes were also present, suggesting chemolithoautotrophic NO3(-) reduction to NO2(-) or NH4(+) as a possible pathway. Our results show the metabolic potential for ammonification, nitrification, DNRA and denitrification activities in North Sea and Baltic Sea sediments.

  18. Magnetosome-containing bacteria living as symbionts of bivalves.

    PubMed

    Dufour, Suzanne C; Laurich, Jason R; Batstone, Rebecca T; McCuaig, Bonita; Elliott, Alexander; Poduska, Kristin M

    2014-12-01

    Bacteria containing magnetosomes (protein-bound nanoparticles of magnetite or greigite) are common to many sedimentary habitats, but have never been found before to live within another organism. Here, we show that octahedral inclusions in the extracellular symbionts of the marine bivalve Thyasira cf. gouldi contain iron, can exhibit magnetic contrast and are most likely magnetosomes. Based on 16S rRNA sequence analysis, T. cf. gouldi symbionts group with symbiotic and free-living sulfur-oxidizing, chemolithoautotrophic gammaproteobacteria, including the symbionts of other thyasirids. T. cf. gouldi symbionts occur both among the microvilli of gill epithelial cells and in sediments surrounding the bivalves, and are therefore facultative. We propose that free-living T. cf. gouldi symbionts use magnetotaxis as a means of locating the oxic-anoxic interface, an optimal microhabitat for chemolithoautotrophy. T. cf. gouldi could acquire their symbionts from near-burrow sediments (where oxic-anoxic interfaces likely develop due to the host's bioirrigating behavior) using their superextensile feet, which could transfer symbionts to gill surfaces upon retraction into the mantle cavity. Once associated with their host, however, symbionts need not maintain structures for magnetotaxis as the host makes oxygen and reduced sulfur available via bioirrigation and sulfur-mining behaviors. Indeed, we show that within the host, symbionts lose the integrity of their magnetosome chain (and possibly their flagellum). Symbionts are eventually endocytosed and digested in host epithelial cells, and magnetosomes accumulate in host cytoplasm. Both host and symbiont behaviors appear important to symbiosis establishment in thyasirids.

  19. Limestone Corrosion and Sulfur Cycling by Biofilms in the Frasassi Caves, Italy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jones, D. S.; Macalady, J. L.; Druschel, G. K.; Eastman, D. D.; Albertson, L. K.

    2006-12-01

    In the Frasassi cave system, central Italy, a microbial-based ecosystem thrives on chemolithoautotrophic energy derived from hydrogen sulfide oxidation. Microbial life is prolific near the watertable, and biofilms cover nearly all subaerial and subaqueous surfaces. Subaerial biofilms are dominated by acidophilic members of the archaeal lineage Thermoplasmales and bacterial genus Acidithiobacillus. Subaqueous biofilms are diverse and are dominated by sulfide oxidizing, sulfate reducing, and sulfur disproportionating Proteobacteria. The morphology, abundance, and distribution of biofilms is controlled by physical and chemical factors such as seasonal changes in the cave hydrologic regime. In situ microelectrode voltammetry has revealed that stream biofilms speciate sulfur in diverse ways, with implications for acid production and limestone dissolution rates. Hydrogen sulfide loss from the streams cannot be accounted for solely by volatilization. Based on degassing measurements and abiotic sulfide oxidation rate calculations, stream biofilms are responsible for the majority of sulfide disappearance in streams. Rates of limestone corrosion are comparable in subaerial and subaqueous cave regions, indicating that subaerial microbial communities also have an important role in speleogenesis. Metagenomic studies targeting subaerial biofilms have confirmed that they have extremely low diversity, and offer glimpses into the physiology and biogeochemistry of extreme acidophiles in sulfidic cave communities.

  20. Structural units important for activity of a novel-type phosphoserine phosphatase from Hydrogenobacter thermophilus TK-6 revealed by crystal structure analysis.

    PubMed

    Chiba, Yoko; Horita, Shoichiro; Ohtsuka, Jun; Arai, Hiroyuki; Nagata, Koji; Igarashi, Yasuo; Tanokura, Masaru; Ishii, Masaharu

    2013-04-19

    Novel-type serine-synthesizing enzymes, termed metal-independent phosphoserine phosphatases (iPSPs), were recently identified and characterized from Hydrogenobacter thermophilus, a chemolithoautotrophic bacterium belonging to the order Aquificales. iPSPs are cofactor-dependent phosphoglycerate mutase (dPGM)-like phosphatases that have significant amino acid sequence similarity to dPGMs but lack phosphoglycerate mutase activity. Genes coding dPGM-like phosphatases have been identified in a broad range of organisms; however, predicting the function of the corresponding proteins based on sequence information alone is difficult due to their diverse substrate preferences. Here, we determined the crystal structure of iPSP1 from H. thermophilus in the apo-form and in complex with its substrate L-phosphoserine to find structural units important for its phosphatase activity toward L-phosphoserine. Structural and biochemical characterization of iPSP1 revealed that the side chains of His(85) and C-terminal region characteristic of iPSP1 are responsible for the PSP activity. The importance of these structural units for PSP activity was confirmed by high PSP activity observed in two novel dPGM-like proteins from Cyanobacteria and Chloroflexus in which the two structural units were conserved. We anticipate that our present findings will facilitate understanding of the serine biosynthesis pathways of organisms that lack gene(s) encoding conventional PSPs, as the structural information revealed here will help to identify iPSP from sequence databases.

  1. Assessment of the stoichiometry and efficiency of CO2 fixation coupled to reduced sulfur oxidation

    PubMed Central

    Klatt, Judith M.; Polerecky, Lubos

    2015-01-01

    Chemolithoautotrophic sulfur oxidizing bacteria (SOB) couple the oxidation of reduced sulfur compounds to the production of biomass. Their role in the cycling of carbon, sulfur, oxygen, and nitrogen is, however, difficult to quantify due to the complexity of sulfur oxidation pathways. We describe a generic theoretical framework for linking the stoichiometry and energy conservation efficiency of autotrophic sulfur oxidation while accounting for the partitioning of the reduced sulfur pool between the energy generating and energy conserving steps as well as between the main possible products (sulfate vs. zero-valent sulfur). Using this framework, we show that the energy conservation efficiency varies widely among SOB with no apparent relationship to their phylogeny. Aerobic SOB equipped with reverse dissimilatory sulfite reductase tend to have higher efficiency than those relying on the complete Sox pathway, whereas for anaerobic SOB the presence of membrane-bound, as opposed to periplasmic, nitrate reductase systems appears to be linked to higher efficiency. We employ the framework to also show how limited rate measurements can be used to estimate the primary productivity of SOB without the knowledge of the sulfate-to-zero-valent-sulfur production ratio. Finally, we discuss how the framework can help researchers gain new insights into the activity of SOB and their niches. PMID:26052315

  2. Microbial diversity in shallow-water hydrothermal sediments of Kueishan Island, Taiwan as revealed by pyrosequencing.

    PubMed

    Wang, Li; Cheung, Man Kit; Kwan, Hoi Shan; Hwang, Jiang-Shiou; Wong, Chong Kim

    2015-11-01

    Kueishan Island is a young volcanic island in the southernmost edge of the Okinawa Trough in the northeastern part of Taiwan. A cluster of hydrothermal vents is located off the southeastern tip of the Island at water depths between 10 and 80 m. This paper presents the results of the first study on the microbial communities in bottom sediments collected from the shallow-water hydrothermal vents of Kueishan Island. Small-subunit ribosomal RNA gene-based high-throughput 454 pyrosequencing was used to characterize the assemblages of bacteria, archaea, and small eukaryotes in sediment samples collected at various distances from the hydrothermal vents. Sediment from the vent area contained the highest diversity of archaea and the lowest diversity of bacteria and small eukaryotes. Epsilonproteobacteria were the most abundant group in the vent sediment, but their abundance decreased with increasing distance from the vent area. Most Epsilonproteobacteria belonged to the mesophilic chemolithoautotrophic genera Sulfurovum and Sulfurimonas. Recent reports on these two genera have come from deep-sea hydrothermal vents. Conversely, the relative contribution of Gammaproteobacteria to the bacterial community increased with increasing distance from the vent area. Our study revealed the contrasting effects of venting on the benthic bacterial and archaeal communities, and showed that the sediments of the shallow-waters hydrothermal vents were dominated by chemoautotrophic bacteria. The present work broadens our knowledge on microbial diversity in shallow-water hydrothermal vent habitats. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  3. Effects of methanethiol on the biological oxidation of sulfide at natron-alkaline conditions.

    PubMed

    van den Bosch, Pim L F; Fortuny-Picornell, Marc; Janssen, Albert J H

    2009-01-15

    The effects of methanethiol (MT) on biological sulfide oxidation were studied in a continuously operated bioreactor, in which chemolithoautotrophic bacteria belonging to the genus Thioalkalivibrio convert hydrogen sulfide (H2S) at natron-alkaline conditions. Previous bioreactor experiments have shown that always a fraction of the H2S is oxidized to sulfate and thiosulfate. This is unwanted, as it leads to caustic requirements for pH control and the formation of a bleed stream to discharge these compounds from the process. The current research shows that due to the addition of MT, sulfate formation is prevented. As a result, all supplied H2S is completely converted into elemental sulfur. Treatment of a continuous supply of 51.0 mM day(-1) H2S and 79 microM day(-1) MT was feasible for a prolonged period, with 99 mol% selectivity for sulfur formation. A part of the MT reacts with the freshly produced sulfur particles to form dimethyl disulfide (DMDS) and dimethyl trisulfide (DMTS). Results indicate that MT, DMDS, and DMTS partly adsorb onto the biosulfur particles. At concentrations above 10 microM, these volatile organic sulfur compounds induce biomass decay.

  4. Enhancing isobutyric acid production from engineered Acidithiobacillus ferrooxidans cells via media optimization.

    PubMed

    Li, Xiaozheng; West, Alan C; Banta, Scott

    2016-04-01

    The chemolithoautotrophic bacterium Acidithiobacillus ferrooxidans has previously been genetically modified to produce isobutyric acid (IBA) from carbon dioxide while obtaining energy from the oxidation of ferrous iron. Here, a combinatorial approach was used to explore the influence of medium composition in both batch and chemostat cultures in order to improve IBA yields (g IBA/mol Fe(2+)) and productivities (g IBA/L/d). Medium pH, ferrous concentration (Fe(2+)), and inclusion of iron chelators all had positive impact on the IBA yield. In batch experiments, gluconate was found to be a superior iron chelator because its use resulted in smaller excursions in pH. In batch cultures, IBA yields decreased linearly with increases in the final effective Fe(3+) concentrations. Chemostat cultures followed similar trends as observed in batch cultures. Specific cellular productivities were found to be a function of the steady state ORP (Oxidation-reduction potential) of the growth medium, which is primarily determined by the Fe(3+) to Fe(2+) ratio. By operating at low ORP, chemostat cultures were able to achieve volumetric productivities as high as 3.8 ± 0.2 mg IBA/L/d which is a 14-fold increase over the previously reported value.

  5. Biomass production from electricity using ammonia as an electron carrier in a reverse microbial fuel cell.

    PubMed

    Khunjar, Wendell O; Sahin, Asli; West, Alan C; Chandran, Kartik; Banta, Scott

    2012-01-01

    The storage of renewable electrical energy within chemical bonds of biofuels and other chemicals is a route to decreasing petroleum usage. A critical challenge is the efficient transfer of electrons into a biological host that can covert this energy into high energy organic compounds. In this paper, we describe an approach whereby biomass is grown using energy obtained from a soluble mediator that is regenerated electrochemically. The net result is a separate-stage reverse microbial fuel cell (rMFC) that fixes CO₂ into biomass using electrical energy. We selected ammonia as a low cost, abundant, safe, and soluble redox mediator that facilitated energy transfer to biomass. Nitrosomonas europaea, a chemolithoautotroph, was used as the biocatalyst due to its inherent capability to utilize ammonia as its sole energy source for growth. An electrochemical reactor was designed for the regeneration of ammonia from nitrite, and current efficiencies of 100% were achieved. Calculations indicated that overall bioproduction efficiency could approach 2.7±0.2% under optimal electrolysis conditions. The application of chemolithoautotrophy for industrial bioproduction has been largely unexplored, and results suggest that this and related rMFC platforms may enable biofuel and related biochemical production.

  6. New Insight into the Role of the Calvin Cycle: Reutilization of CO2 Emitted through Sugar Degradation.

    PubMed

    Shimizu, Rie; Dempo, Yudai; Nakayama, Yasumune; Nakamura, Satoshi; Bamba, Takeshi; Fukusaki, Eiichiro; Fukui, Toshiaki

    2015-07-01

    Ralstonia eutropha is a facultative chemolithoautotrophic bacterium that uses the Calvin-Benson-Bassham (CBB) cycle for CO2 fixation. This study showed that R. eutropha strain H16G incorporated (13)CO2, emitted by the oxidative decarboxylation of [1-(13)C1]-glucose, into key metabolites of the CBB cycle and finally into poly(3-hydroxybutyrate) [P(3HB)] with up to 5.6% (13)C abundance. The carbon yield of P(3HB) produced from glucose by the strain H16G was 1.2 times higher than that by the CBB cycle-inactivated mutants, in agreement with the possible fixation of CO2 estimated from the balance of energy and reducing equivalents through sugar degradation integrated with the CBB cycle. The results proved that the 'gratuitously' functional CBB cycle in R. eutropha under aerobic heterotrophic conditions participated in the reutilization of CO2 emitted during sugar degradation, leading to an advantage expressed as increased carbon yield of the storage compound. This is a new insight into the role of the CBB cycle, and may be applicable for more efficient utilization of biomass resources.

  7. Pandoraea thiooxydans sp. nov., a facultatively chemolithotrophic, thiosulfate-oxidizing bacterium isolated from rhizosphere soils of sesame (Sesamum indicum L.).

    PubMed

    Anandham, Rangasamy; Indiragandhi, Pandiyan; Kwon, Soon Wo; Sa, Tong Min; Jeon, Che Ok; Kim, Yong Ki; Jee, Hyeong Jin

    2010-01-01

    A facultatively chemolithoautotrophic, thiosulfate-oxidizing, Gram-negative, aerobic, motile, rod-shaped bacterial strain, designated ATSB16(T), was isolated from rhizosphere soils of sesame (Sesamum indicum L.). 16S rRNA gene sequence analysis demonstrated that this strain was closely related to Pandoraea pnomenusa LMG 18087(T) (96.7 % similarity), P. pulmonicola LMG 18016(T) (96.5 %), P. apista LMG 16407(T) (96.2 %), P. norimbergensis LMG 18379(T) (96.1 %) and P. sputorum LMG 18819(T) (96.0 %). Strain ATSB16(T) shared 96.0-96.4 % sequence similarity with four unnamed genomospecies of Pandoraea. The major cellular fatty acids of the strain ATSB16(T) were C(17 : 0) cyclo (33.0 %) and C(16 : 0) (30.6 %). Q-8 was the predominant respiratory quinone. The major polar lipids were phosphatidylmethylethanolamine, diphosphatidylglycerol, phosphatidylethanolamine and two unidentified aminophospholipids. Hydroxyputrescine and putrescine were the predominant polyamines. The genomic DNA G+C content of the strain was 64.0 mol%. On the basis of the results obtained from this study, strain ATSB16(T) represents a novel species of the genus Pandoraea, for which the name Pandoraea thiooxydans sp. nov. is proposed. The type strain is ATSB16(T) (=KACC 12757(T) =LMG 24779(T)).

  8. Candidatus Desulfofervidus auxilii, a hydrogenotrophic sulfate-reducing bacterium involved in the thermophilic anaerobic oxidation of methane.

    PubMed

    Krukenberg, Viola; Harding, Katie; Richter, Michael; Glöckner, Frank Oliver; Gruber-Vodicka, Harald R; Adam, Birgit; Berg, Jasmine S; Knittel, Katrin; Tegetmeyer, Halina E; Boetius, Antje; Wegener, Gunter

    2016-09-01

    The anaerobic oxidation of methane (AOM) is mediated by consortia of anaerobic methane-oxidizing archaea (ANME) and their specific partner bacteria. In thermophilic AOM consortia enriched from Guaymas Basin, members of the ANME-1 clade are associated with bacteria of the HotSeep-1 cluster, which likely perform direct electron exchange via nanowires. The partner bacterium was enriched with hydrogen as sole electron donor and sulfate as electron acceptor. Based on phylogenetic, genomic and metabolic characteristics we propose to name this chemolithoautotrophic sulfate reducer Candidatus Desulfofervidus auxilii. Ca. D. auxilii grows on hydrogen at temperatures between 50°C and 70°C with an activity optimum at 60°C and doubling time of 4-6 days. Its genome draft encodes for canonical sulfate reduction, periplasmic and soluble hydrogenases and autotrophic carbon fixation via the reductive tricarboxylic acid cycle. The presence of genes for pili formation and cytochromes, and their similarity to genes of Geobacter spp., indicate a potential for syntrophic growth via direct interspecies electron transfer when the organism grows in consortia with ANME. This first ANME-free enrichment of an AOM partner bacterium and its characterization opens the perspective for a deeper understanding of syntrophy in anaerobic methane oxidation.

  9. Isolation and characterization of strains CVO and FWKO B, two novel nitrate-reducing, sulfide-oxidizing bacteria isolated from oil field brine.

    PubMed

    Gevertz, D; Telang, A J; Voordouw, G; Jenneman, G E

    2000-06-01

    Bacterial strains CVO and FWKO B were isolated from produced brine at the Coleville oil field in Saskatchewan, Canada. Both strains are obligate chemolithotrophs, with hydrogen, formate, and sulfide serving as the only known energy sources for FWKO B, whereas sulfide and elemental sulfur are the only known electron donors for CVO. Neither strain uses thiosulfate as an energy source. Both strains are microaerophiles (1% O(2)). In addition, CVO grows by denitrification of nitrate or nitrite whereas FWKO B reduces nitrate only to nitrite. Elemental sulfur is the sole product of sulfide oxidation by FWKO B, while CVO produces either elemental sulfur or sulfate, depending on the initial concentration of sulfide. Both strains are capable of growth under strictly autotrophic conditions, but CVO uses acetate as well as CO(2) as its sole carbon source. Neither strain reduces sulfate; however, FWKO B reduces sulfur and displays chemolithoautotrophic growth in the presence of elemental sulfur, hydrogen, and CO(2). Both strains grow at temperatures between 5 and 40 degrees C. CVO is capable of growth at NaCl concentrations as high as 7%. The present 16s rRNA analysis suggests that both strains are members of the epsilon subdivision of the division Proteobacteria, with CVO most closely related to Thiomicrospira denitrifcans and FWKO B most closely related to members of the genus Arcobacter. The isolation of these two novel chemolithotrophic sulfur bacteria from oil field brine suggests the presence of a subterranean sulfur cycle driven entirely by hydrogen, carbon dioxide, and nitrate.

  10. Genome and physiology of a model Epsilonproteobacterium responsible for sulfide detoxification in marine oxygen depletion zones.

    PubMed

    Grote, Jana; Schott, Thomas; Bruckner, Christian G; Glöckner, Frank Oliver; Jost, Günter; Teeling, Hanno; Labrenz, Matthias; Jürgens, Klaus

    2012-01-10

    Eutrophication and global climate change lead to expansion of hypoxia in the ocean, often accompanied by the production of hydrogen sulfide, which is toxic to higher organisms. Chemoautotrophic bacteria are thought to buffer against increased sulfide concentrations by oxidizing hydrogen sulfide before its diffusion to oxygenated surface waters. Model organisms from such environments have not been readily available, which has contributed to a poor understanding of these microbes. We present here a detailed study of "Sulfurimonas gotlandica" str. GD1, an Epsilonproteobacterium isolated from the Baltic Sea oxic-anoxic interface, where it plays a key role in nitrogen and sulfur cycling. Whole-genome analysis and laboratory experiments revealed a high metabolic flexibility, suggesting a considerable capacity for adaptation to variable redox conditions. S. gotlandica str. GD1 was shown to grow chemolithoautotrophically by coupling denitrification with oxidation of reduced sulfur compounds and dark CO(2) fixation. Metabolic versatility was further suggested by the use of a range of different electron donors and acceptors and organic carbon sources. The number of genes involved in signal transduction and metabolic pathways exceeds those of other Epsilonproteobacteria. Oxygen tolerance and environmental-sensing systems combined with chemotactic responses enable this organism to thrive successfully in marine oxygen-depletion zones. We propose that S. gotlandica str. GD1 will serve as a model organism in investigations that will lead to a better understanding how members of the Epsilonproteobacteria are able to cope with water column anoxia and the role these microorganisms play in the detoxification of sulfidic waters.

  11. Molecular and Kinetic Characterization of Planktonic Nitrospira spp. Selectively Enriched from Activated Sludge.

    PubMed

    Park, Mee-Rye; Park, Hongkeun; Chandran, Kartik

    2017-03-07

    Nitrospira spp. are chemolithoautotrophic nitrite-oxidizing bacteria (NOB), which are ubiquitous in natural and engineered environments. However, there exist few independent biokinetic studies on Nitrospira spp., likely because their isolation and selective enrichment from environmental consortia such as activated sludge can be challenging. Herein, planktonic Nitrospira spp. cultures closely related to Candidatus Nitrospira defluvii (Nitrospira lineage I) were successfully enriched from activated sludge in a sequencing batch reactor by maintaining sustained limiting extant nitrite and dissolved oxygen concentrations. Morphologically, the enrichment consisted largely of planktonic cells with an average characteristic diameter of 1.3 ± 0.6 μm. On the basis of respirometric assays, estimated maximum specific growth rate (μmax), nitrite half saturation coefficient (KS), oxygen half saturation coefficient (KO), and biomass yield coefficient (Y) of the enriched cultures were 0.69 ± 0.10 d(-1), 0.52 ± 0.14 mg-N/L, 0.33 ± 0.14 mg-O2/L, and 0.14 ± 0.02 mg-COD/mg-N, respectively. These parameters collectively reflect not just higher affinities of this enrichment for nitrite and oxygen, respectively, but also a higher biomass yield and energy transfer efficiency relative to Nitrobacter spp. Used in combination, these kinetic and thermodynamic parameters can help toward the development and application of energy-efficient biological nutrient removal processes through effective Nitrospira out-selection.

  12. Degradation of carbonyl sulfide by Actinomycetes and detection of clade D of β-class carbonic anhydrase.

    PubMed

    Ogawa, Takahiro; Kato, Hiromi; Higashide, Mitsuru; Nishimiya, Mami; Katayama, Yoko

    2016-09-25

    Carbonyl sulfide (COS) is an atmospheric trace gas and one of the sources of stratospheric aerosol contributing to climate change. Although one of the major sinks of COS is soil, the distribution of COS degradation ability among bacteria remains unclear. Seventeen out of 20 named bacteria belonging to Actinomycetales had COS degradation activity at mole fractions of 30 parts per million by volume (ppmv) COS. Dietzia maris NBRC 15801(T) and Mycobacterium sp. THI405 had the activity comparable to a chemolithoautotroph Thiobacillus thioparus THI115 that degrade COS by COS hydrolase for energy production. Among 12 bacteria manifesting rapid degradation at 30 ppmv COS, Dietzia maris NBRC 15801(T) and Streptomyces ambofaciens NBRC 12836(T) degraded ambient COS (∼500 parts per trillion by volume). Geodermatophilus obscurus NBRC 13315(T) and Amycolatopsis orientalis NBRC 12806(T) increased COS concentrations. Moreover, six of eight COS degrading bacteria isolated from soils had partial nucleotide sequences similar to that of the gene encoding clade D of β-class carbonic anhydrase, which included COS hydrolase. These results indicate the potential importance of Actinomycetes in the role of soils as sinks of atmospheric COS. © FEMS 2016. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  13. Carbon Monoxide Dehydrogenase Activity in Bradyrhizobium japonicum

    PubMed Central

    Lorite, María J.; Tachil, Jörg; Sanjuán, Juán; Meyer, Ortwin; Bedmar, Eulogio J.

    2000-01-01

    Bradyrhizobium japonicum strain 110spc4 was capable of chemolithoautotrophic growth with carbon monoxide (CO) as a sole energy and carbon source under aerobic conditions. The enzyme carbon monoxide dehydrogenase (CODH; EC 1.2.99.2) has been purified 21-fold, with a yield of 16% and a specific activity of 58 nmol of CO oxidized/min/mg of protein, by a procedure that involved differential ultracentrifugation, anion-exchange chromatography, hydrophobic interaction chromatography, and gel filtration. The purified enzyme gave a single protein and activity band on nondenaturing polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis and had a molecular mass of 230,000 Da. The 230-kDa enzyme was composed of large (L; 75-kDa), medium (M; 28.4-kDa), and small (S; 17.2-kDa) subunits occurring in heterohexameric (LMS)2 subunit composition. The 75-kDa polypeptide exhibited immunological cross-reactivity with the large subunit of the CODH of Oligotropha carboxidovorans. The B. japonicum enzyme contained, per mole, 2.29 atoms of Mo, 7.96 atoms of Fe, 7.60 atoms of labile S, and 1.99 mol of flavin. Treatment of the enzyme with iodoacetamide yielded di(carboxamidomethyl)molybdopterin cytosine dinucleotide, identifying molybdopterin cytosine dinucleotide as the organic portion of the B. japonicum CODH molybdenum cofactor. The absorption spectrum of the purified enzyme was characteristic of a molybdenum-containing iron-sulfur flavoprotein. PMID:10788353

  14. A Nitrospira metagenome illuminates the physiology and evolution of globally important nitrite-oxidizing bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Lücker, Sebastian; Wagner, Michael; Maixner, Frank; Pelletier, Eric; Koch, Hanna; Vacherie, Benoit; Rattei, Thomas; Damsté, Jaap S. Sinninghe; Spieck, Eva; Le Paslier, Denis; Daims, Holger

    2010-01-01

    Nitrospira are barely studied and mostly uncultured nitrite-oxidizing bacteria, which are, according to molecular data, among the most diverse and widespread nitrifiers in natural ecosystems and biological wastewater treatment. Here, environmental genomics was used to reconstruct the complete genome of “Candidatus Nitrospira defluvii” from an activated sludge enrichment culture. On the basis of this first-deciphered Nitrospira genome and of experimental data, we show that Ca. N. defluvii differs dramatically from other known nitrite oxidizers in the key enzyme nitrite oxidoreductase (NXR), in the composition of the respiratory chain, and in the pathway used for autotrophic carbon fixation, suggesting multiple independent evolution of chemolithoautotrophic nitrite oxidation. Adaptations of Ca. N. defluvii to substrate-limited conditions include an unusual periplasmic NXR, which is constitutively expressed, and pathways for the transport, oxidation, and assimilation of simple organic compounds that allow a mixotrophic lifestyle. The reverse tricarboxylic acid cycle as the pathway for CO2 fixation and the lack of most classical defense mechanisms against oxidative stress suggest that Nitrospira evolved from microaerophilic or even anaerobic ancestors. Unexpectedly, comparative genomic analyses indicate functionally significant lateral gene-transfer events between the genus Nitrospira and anaerobic ammonium-oxidizing planctomycetes, which share highly similar forms of NXR and other proteins reflecting that two key processes of the nitrogen cycle are evolutionarily connected. PMID:20624973

  15. Genomic insights into metabolic versatility of a lithotrophic sulfur-oxidizing diazotrophic Alphaproteobacterium Azospirillum thiophilum.

    PubMed

    Orlova, Maria V; Tarlachkov, Sergey V; Dubinina, Galina A; Belousova, Elena V; Tutukina, Maria N; Grabovich, Margarita Y

    2016-12-01

    Diazotrophic Alphaproteobacteria of the genus Azospirillum are usually organotrophs, although some strains of Azospirillum lipoferum are capable of hydrogen-dependent autotrophic growth. Azospirillum thiophilum strain was isolated from a mineral sulfide spring, a biotope highly unusual for azospirilla. Here, the metabolic pathways utilized by A. thiophilum were revealed based on comprehensive analysis of its genomic organization, together with physiological and biochemical approaches. The A. thiophilum genome contained all the genes encoding the enzymes of carbon metabolism via glycolysis, tricarboxylic acid cycle and glyoxylate cycle. Genes for a complete set of enzymes responsible for autotrophic growth, with an active Calvin-Benson-Bassham cycle, were also revealed, and activity of the key enzymes was determined. Microaerobic chemolithoautotrophic growth of A. thiophilum was detected in the presence of thiosulfate and molecular hydrogen, being in line with the discovery of the genes encoding the two enzymes involved in dissimilatory thiosulfate oxidation, the Sox-complex and thiosulfate dehydrogenase and Ni-Fe hydrogenases. Azospirillum thiophilum utilizes methanol and formate, producing CO2 that can further be metabolized via the Calvin cycle. Finally, it is capable of anaerobic respiration, using tetrathionate as a terminal electron acceptor. Such metabolic versatility is of great importance for adaptation of A. thiophilum to constantly changing physicochemical environment. © FEMS 2016. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  16. Physiological and Genomic Features of a Novel Sulfur-Oxidizing Gammaproteobacterium Belonging to a Previously Uncultivated Symbiotic Lineage Isolated from a Hydrothermal Vent

    PubMed Central

    Nunoura, Takuro; Takaki, Yoshihiro; Kazama, Hiromi; Kakuta, Jungo; Shimamura, Shigeru; Makita, Hiroko; Hirai, Miho; Miyazaki, Masayuki; Takai, Ken

    2014-01-01

    Strain Hiromi 1, a sulfur-oxidizing gammaproteobacterium was isolated from a hydrothermal vent chimney in the Okinawa Trough and represents a novel genus that may include a phylogenetic group found as endosymbionts of deep-sea gastropods. The SSU rRNA gene sequence similarity between strain Hiromi 1 and the gastropod endosymbionts was approximately 97%. The strain was shown to grow both chemolithoautotrophically and chemolithoheterotrophically with an energy metabolism of sulfur oxidation and O2 or nitrate reduction. Under chemolithoheterotrophic growth conditions, the strain utilized organic acids and proteinaceous compounds as the carbon and/or nitrogen sources but not the energy source. Various sugars did not support growth as a sole carbon source. The observation of chemolithoheterotrophy in this strain is in line with metagenomic analyses of endosymbionts suggesting the occurrence of chemolithoheterotrophy in gammaproteobacterial symbionts. Chemolithoheterotrophy and the presence of homologous genes for virulence- and quorum sensing-related functions suggest that the sulfur-oxidizing chomolithotrophic microbes seek animal bodies and microbial biofilm formation to obtain supplemental organic carbons in hydrothermal ecosystems. PMID:25133584

  17. Continental smokers couple mantle degassing and distinctive microbiology within continents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crossey, Laura J.; Karlstrom, Karl E.; Schmandt, Brandon; Crow, Ryan R.; Colman, Daniel R.; Cron, Brandi; Takacs-Vesbach, Cristina D.; Dahm, Clifford N.; Northup, Diana E.; Hilton, David R.; Ricketts, Jason W.; Lowry, Anthony R.

    2016-02-01

    The discovery of oceanic black (and white) smokers revolutionized our understanding of mid-ocean ridges and led to the recognition of new organisms and ecosystems. Continental smokers, defined here to include a broad range of carbonic springs, hot springs, and fumaroles that vent mantle-derived fluids in continental settings, exhibit many of the same processes of heat and mass transfer and ecosystem niche differentiation. Helium isotope (3He/4He) analyses indicate that widespread mantle degassing is taking place in the western U.S.A., and that variations in mantle helium values correlate best with low seismic-velocity domains in the mantle and lateral contrasts in mantle velocity rather than crustal parameters such as GPS, proximity to volcanoes, crustal velocity, or composition. Microbial community analyses indicate that these springs can host novel microorganisms. A targeted analysis of four springs in New Mexico yield the first published occurrence of chemolithoautotrophic Zetaproteobacteria in a continental setting. These observations lead to two linked hypotheses: that mantle-derived volatiles transit through conduits in extending continental lithosphere preferentially above and at the edges of mantle low velocity domains. High CO2 and other constituents ultimately derived from mantle volatiles drive water-rock interactions and heterogeneous fluid mixing that help structure diverse and distinctive microbial communities.

  18. Biomass Production from Electricity Using Ammonia as an Electron Carrier in a Reverse Microbial Fuel Cell

    PubMed Central

    West, Alan C.; Chandran, Kartik; Banta, Scott

    2012-01-01

    The storage of renewable electrical energy within chemical bonds of biofuels and other chemicals is a route to decreasing petroleum usage. A critical challenge is the efficient transfer of electrons into a biological host that can covert this energy into high energy organic compounds. In this paper, we describe an approach whereby biomass is grown using energy obtained from a soluble mediator that is regenerated electrochemically. The net result is a separate-stage reverse microbial fuel cell (rMFC) that fixes CO2 into biomass using electrical energy. We selected ammonia as a low cost, abundant, safe, and soluble redox mediator that facilitated energy transfer to biomass. Nitrosomonas europaea, a chemolithoautotroph, was used as the biocatalyst due to its inherent capability to utilize ammonia as its sole energy source for growth. An electrochemical reactor was designed for the regeneration of ammonia from nitrite, and current efficiencies of 100% were achieved. Calculations indicated that overall bioproduction efficiency could approach 2.7±0.2% under optimal electrolysis conditions. The application of chemolithoautotrophy for industrial bioproduction has been largely unexplored, and results suggest that this and related rMFC platforms may enable biofuel and related biochemical production. PMID:23028643

  19. Linking phylogenetic and functional diversity to nutrient spiraling in microbial mats from Lower Kane Cave (USA).

    PubMed

    Engel, Annette Summers; Meisinger, Daniela B; Porter, Megan L; Payn, Robert A; Schmid, Michael; Stern, Libby A; Schleifer, K H; Lee, Natuschka M

    2010-01-01

    Microbial mats in sulfidic cave streams offer unique opportunities to study redox-based biogeochemical nutrient cycles. Previous work from Lower Kane Cave, Wyoming, USA, focused on the aerobic portion of microbial mats, dominated by putative chemolithoautotrophic, sulfur-oxidizing groups within the Epsilonproteobacteria and Gammaproteobacteria. To evaluate nutrient cycling and turnover within the whole mat system, a multidisciplinary strategy was used to characterize the anaerobic portion of the mats, including application of the full-cycle rRNA approach, the most probable number method, and geochemical and isotopic analyses. Seventeen major taxonomic bacterial groups and one archaeal group were retrieved from the anaerobic portions of the mats, dominated by Deltaproteobacteria and uncultured members of the Chloroflexi phylum. A nutrient spiraling model was applied to evaluate upstream to downstream changes in microbial diversity based on carbon and sulfur nutrient concentrations. Variability in dissolved sulfide concentrations was attributed to changes in the abundance of sulfide-oxidizing microbial groups and shifts in the occurrence and abundance of sulfate-reducing microbes. Gradients in carbon and sulfur isotopic composition indicated that released and recycled byproduct compounds from upstream microbial activities were incorporated by downstream communities. On the basis of the type of available chemical energy, the variability of nutrient species in a spiraling model may explain observed differences in microbial taxonomic affiliations and metabolic functions, thereby spatially linking microbial diversity to nutrient spiraling in the cave stream ecosystem.

  20. Sulfurihydrogenibium subterraneum gen. nov., sp. nov., from a subsurface hot aquifer.

    PubMed

    Takai, Ken; Kobayashi, Hideki; Nealson, Kenneth H; Horikoshi, Koki

    2003-05-01

    A polyphasic taxonomic study was performed on a novel facultatively anaerobic, hydrogen- or sulfur/thiosulfate-oxidizing, thermophilic chemolithoautotroph recently isolated from subsurface hot aquifer water in a Japanese gold mine. The cells were straight to slightly curved rods, with a single polar flagellum. Growth was observed at 40-70 degrees C (optimum 60-65 degrees C; 80 min doubling time) and at pH 6.4-8.8 (optimum pH 7.5). The isolate was unable to use complex organic compounds, carbohydrates, amino acids or organic acids as sole energy and carbon sources. The G + C content of the genomic DNA was 31.3 mol%. Phylogenetic analysis based on 16S rDNA sequences indicated that the isolate was closely related to an uncultivated group of micro-organisms within the order Aquificales obtained from Icelandic and Japanese hot spring microbial mats, but distantly related to previously identified genera of the Aquificales such as Persephonella, Aquifex and Hydrogenobacter. The name Sulfurihydrogenibium subterraneum gen. nov., sp. nov. is proposed for this novel species; the type strain is HGMK1(T) (= JCM 11477(T) = ATCC BAA-562(T) = DSM 15120(T)).

  1. Isolation and characterization of a moderately thermophilic nitrite-oxidizing bacterium from a geothermal spring.

    PubMed

    Lebedeva, Elena V; Off, Sandra; Zumbrägel, Sabine; Kruse, Myriam; Shagzhina, Ayvi; Lücker, Sebastian; Maixner, Frank; Lipski, André; Daims, Holger; Spieck, Eva

    2011-02-01

    Geothermal environments are a suitable habitat for nitrifying microorganisms. Conventional and molecular techniques indicated that chemolithoautotrophic nitrite-oxidizing bacteria affiliated with the genus Nitrospira are widespread in environments with elevated temperatures up to 55 °C in Asia, Europe, and Australia. However, until now, no thermophilic pure cultures of Nitrospira were available, and the physiology of these bacteria was mostly uncharacterized. Here, we report on the isolation and characterization of a novel thermophilic Nitrospira strain from a microbial mat of the terrestrial geothermal spring Gorjachinsk (pH 8.6; temperature 48 °C) from the Baikal rift zone (Russia). Based on phenotypic properties, chemotaxonomic data, and 16S rRNA gene phylogeny, the isolate was assigned to the genus Nitrospira as a representative of a novel species, for which the name Nitrospira calida is proposed. A highly similar 16S rRNA gene sequence (99.6% similarity) was detected in a Garga spring enrichment grown at 46 °C, whereas three further thermophilic Nitrospira enrichments from the Garga spring and from a Kamchatka Peninsula (Russia) terrestrial hot spring could be clearly distinguished from N. calida (93.6-96.1% 16S rRNA gene sequence similarity). The findings confirmed that Nitrospira drive nitrite oxidation in moderate thermophilic habitats and also indicated an unexpected diversity of heat-adapted Nitrospira in geothermal hot springs. © 2010 Federation of European Microbiological Societies. Published by Blackwell Publishing Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Thermophilic prokaryotic communities inhabiting the biofilm and well water of a thermal karst system located in Budapest (Hungary).

    PubMed

    Anda, Dóra; Makk, Judit; Krett, Gergely; Jurecska, Laura; Márialigeti, Károly; Mádl-Szőnyi, Judit; Borsodi, Andrea K

    2015-07-01

    In this study, scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and 16S rRNA gene-based phylogenetic approach were applied to reveal the morphological structure and genetic diversity of thermophilic prokaryotic communities of a thermal karst well located in Budapest (Hungary). Bacterial and archaeal diversity of the well water (73.7 °C) and the biofilm developed on the inner surface of an outflow pipeline of the well were studied by molecular cloning method. According to the SEM images calcium carbonate minerals serve as a surface for colonization of bacterial aggregates. The vast majority of the bacterial and archaeal clones showed the highest sequence similarities to chemolithoautotrophic species. The bacterial clone libraries were dominated by sulfur oxidizer Thiobacillus (Betaproteobacteria) in the water and Sulfurihydrogenibium (Aquificae) in the biofilm. A relatively high proportion of molecular clones represented genera Thermus and Bellilinea in the biofilm library. The most abundant phylotypes both in water and biofilm archaeal clone libraries were closely related to thermophilic ammonia oxidizer Nitrosocaldus and Nitrososphaera but phylotypes belonging to methanogens were also detected. The results show that in addition to the bacterial sulfur and hydrogen oxidation, mainly archaeal ammonia oxidation may play a decisive role in the studied thermal karst system.

  3. Pristine but metal-rich Río Sucio (Dirty River) is dominated by Gallionella and other iron-sulfur oxidizing microbes.

    PubMed

    Arce-Rodríguez, Alejandro; Puente-Sánchez, Fernando; Avendaño, Roberto; Libby, Eduardo; Rojas, Leonardo; Cambronero, Juan Carlos; Pieper, Dietmar H; Timmis, Kenneth N; Chavarría, Max

    2017-03-01

    Whether the extreme conditions of acidity and heavy metal pollution of streams and rivers originating in pyritic formations are caused primarily by mining activities or by natural activities of metal-oxidizing microbes living within the geological formations is a subject of considerable controversy. Most microbiological studies of such waters have so far focused on acid mine drainage sites, which are heavily human-impacted environments, so it has been problematic to eliminate the human factor in the question of the origin of the key metal compounds. We have studied the physico-chemistry and microbiology of the Río Sucio in the Braulio Carrillo National Park of Costa Rica, 22 km from its volcanic rock origin. Neither the remote origin, nor the length of the river to the sampling site, have experienced human activity and are thus pristine. The river water had a characteristic brownish-yellow color due to high iron-dominated minerals, was slightly acidic, and rich in chemolithoautotrophic iron- and sulfur-oxidizing bacteria, dominated by Gallionella spp. Río Sucio is thus a natural acid-rock drainage system whose metal-containing components are derived primarily from microbial activities.

  4. Isolation, cultivation and genomic analysis of magnetosome biomineralization genes of a new genus of South-seeking magnetotactic cocci within the Alphaproteobacteria

    PubMed Central

    Morillo, Viviana; Abreu, Fernanda; Araujo, Ana C.; de Almeida, Luiz G. P.; Enrich-Prast, Alex; Farina, Marcos; de Vasconcelos, Ana T. R.; Bazylinski, Dennis A.; Lins, Ulysses

    2014-01-01

    Although magnetotactic bacteria (MTB) are ubiquitous in aquatic habitats, they are still considered fastidious microorganisms with regard to growth and cultivation with only a relatively low number of axenic cultures available to date. Here, we report the first axenic culture of an MTB isolated in the Southern Hemisphere (Itaipu Lagoon in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil). Cells of this new isolate are coccoid to ovoid in morphology and grow microaerophilically in semi-solid medium containing an oxygen concentration ([O2]) gradient either under chemoorganoheterotrophic or chemolithoautotrophic conditions. Each cell contains a single chain of approximately 10 elongated cuboctahedral magnetite (Fe3O4) magnetosomes. Phylogenetic analysis based on the 16S rRNA gene sequence shows that the coccoid MTB isolated in this study represents a new genus in the Alphaproteobacteria; the name Magnetofaba australis strain IT-1 is proposed. Preliminary genomic data obtained by pyrosequencing shows that M. australis strain IT-1 contains a genomic region with genes involved in biomineralization similar to those found in the most closely related magnetotactic cocci Magnetococcus marinus strain MC-1. However, organization of the magnetosome genes differs from M. marinus. PMID:24616719

  5. Pathways of Carbon Assimilation and Ammonia Oxidation Suggested by Environmental Genomic Analyses of Marine Crenarchaeota

    PubMed Central

    Hallam, Steven J; Mincer, Tracy J; Schleper, Christa; Preston, Christina M; Roberts, Katie; Richardson, Paul M

    2006-01-01

    Marine Crenarchaeota represent an abundant component of oceanic microbiota with potential to significantly influence biogeochemical cycling in marine ecosystems. Prior studies using specific archaeal lipid biomarkers and isotopic analyses indicated that planktonic Crenarchaeota have the capacity for autotrophic growth, and more recent cultivation studies support an ammonia-based chemolithoautotrophic energy metabolism. We report here analysis of fosmid sequences derived from the uncultivated marine crenarchaeote, Cenarchaeum symbiosum, focused on the reconstruction of carbon and energy metabolism. Genes predicted to encode multiple components of a modified 3-hydroxypropionate cycle of autotrophic carbon assimilation were identified, consistent with utilization of carbon dioxide as a carbon source. Additionally, genes predicted to encode a near complete oxidative tricarboxylic acid cycle were also identified, consistent with the consumption of organic carbon and in the production of intermediates for amino acid and cofactor biosynthesis. Therefore, C. symbiosum has the potential to function either as a strict autotroph, or as a mixotroph utilizing both carbon dioxide and organic material as carbon sources. From the standpoint of energy metabolism, genes predicted to encode ammonia monooxygenase subunits, ammonia permease, urease, and urea transporters were identified, consistent with the use of reduced nitrogen compounds as energy sources fueling autotrophic metabolism. Homologues of these genes, recovered from ocean waters worldwide, demonstrate the conservation and ubiquity of crenarchaeal pathways for carbon assimilation and ammonia oxidation. These findings further substantiate the likely global metabolic importance of Crenarchaeota with respect to key steps in the biogeochemical transformation of carbon and nitrogen in marine ecosystems. PMID:16533068

  6. Biomining Microorganisms: Molecular Aspects and Applications in Biotechnology and Bioremediation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jerez, Carlos A.

    The microbial solubilization of metals using chemolithoautotrophic microorganisms has successfully been used in industrial processes called biomining to extract metals such as copper, gold, uranium and others. The most studied leaching bacteria are from the genus Acidithiobacillus belonging to the Gram-negative γ-proteobacteria. Acidithiobacillus spp. obtain their energy from the oxidation of ferrous iron, elemental sulfur, or partially oxidized sulfur compounds. Other thermophilic archaeons capable of oxidizing sulfur and iron (II) have also been known for many years, and they are mainly from the genera Sulfolobus, Acidianus, Metallosphaera and Sulfurisphaera. Recently, some mesophilic iron (II)-oxidizing archaeons such as Ferroplasma acidiphilium and F. acidarmanus belonging to the Thermoplasmales have also been isolated and characterized. Recent studies of microorganisms consider them in their consortia, integrating fundamental biological knowledge with metagenomics, metaproteomics, and other data to obtain a global picture of how a microbial community functions. The understanding of microbial growth and activities in oxidizing metal ions will be useful for improving applied microbial biotechnologies such as biomining, bioshrouding, biomonitoring and bioremediation of metals in acidic environments.

  7. Metabolic energy from arsenite oxidation in Alcaligenes faecalis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anderson, G. L.; Love, M.; Zeider, B. K.

    2003-05-01

    The aerobic soil bacterium, Alcaligenes faecalis, survives in cultures containing greater than 10 g/L of aqueous arsenic. Toleration of arsenite occurs by the enzymatic oxidation of arsenite (As^III), to the less toxic arsenate (As^V). In defined media, the bacterium grows faster in the presence of arsenite than in its absence. This suggests that the bacterium uses the redox potential of arsenite oxidation as metabolic energy. The oxidation occurs via periplasmic arsenite oxidase, azurin, and cytochrome c [11] which presumably pass electron equivalents through an electron transport chain involving cytochrome c oxidase aud oxygen as the terminal electron acceptor. The associated proton translocation would allow synthesis of ATP and provide a useful means of harnessing the redox potential of arsenite oxidation. Arsenite and arsenate assays of the media during bacterial growth indicate that arsenite is depleted during the exponential growth phase and occurs concomitantly with the expression of arsenite oxidase. These results suggest that arsenite is detoxified to arsenate during bacterial growth and are inconsistent with previous reported interpretations of growth data. Alcaligenes faecalis is dependent on organic carbon sources and is therefore not chemolithoautotrophic. The relationship between succinate and arsenite utilisation provides evidence for the use of arsenite as a supplemental energy source. Because Alcaligenes faecalis not only tolerates, but thrives, in very high concentrations of arsenic has important implications in bioremediation of environments contaminated by aqueous arsenic.

  8. Arsenic speciation in food chains from mid-Atlantic hydrothermal vents.

    PubMed

    Taylor, Vivien F; Jackson, Brian P; Siegfried, Matthew; Navratilova, Jana; Francesconi, Kevin A; Kirshtein, Julie; Voytek, Mary

    2012-05-04

    Arsenic concentration and speciation were determined in benthic fauna collected from the Mid-Atlantic Ridge hydrothermal vents. The shrimp species, Rimicaris exoculata, the vent chimney-dwelling mussel, Bathymodiolus azoricus, Branchipolynoe seepensis, a commensal worm of B. azoricus, and the gastropod Peltospira smaragdina showed variations in As concentration and in stable isotope (δ(13)C and δ(15)N) signature between species, suggesting different sources of As uptake. Arsenic speciation showed arsenobetaine to be the dominant species in R. exoculata, whereas in B. azoricus and B. seepensis arsenosugars were most abundant, although arsenobetaine, dimethylarsinate, and inorganic arsenic were also observed, along with several unidentified species. Scrape samples from outside the vent chimneys, covered with microbial mat, which is a presumed food source for many vent organisms, contained high levels of total As, but organic species were not detectable. The formation of arsenosugars in pelagic environments is typically attributed to marine algae, and the pathway to arsenobetaine is still unknown. The occurrence of arsenosugars and arsenobetaine in these deep sea organisms, where primary production is chemolithoautotrophic and stable isotope analyses indicate food sources are of vent origin, suggests that organic arsenicals can occur in a food web without algae or other photosynthetic life.

  9. Complete genome sequence of Pyrolobus fumarii type strain (1AT)

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, Iain; Goker, Markus; Nolan, Matt; Lucas, Susan; Hammon, Nancy; Deshpande, Shweta; Cheng, Jan-Fang; Tapia, Roxanne; Han, Cliff; Goodwin, Lynne A.; Pitluck, Sam; Huntemann, Marcel; Liolios, Konstantinos; Ivanova, N; Pagani, Ioanna; Mavromatis, K; Ovchinnikova, Galina; Pati, Amrita; Chen, Amy; Palaniappan, Krishna; Land, Miriam L; Hauser, Loren John; Brambilla, Evelyne-Marie; Huber, Harald; Yasawong, Montri; Rohde, Manfred; Spring, Stefan; Abt, Birte; Sikorski, Johannes; Wirth, Reinhard; Detter, J. Chris; Woyke, Tanja; Bristow, James; Eisen, Jonathan; Markowitz, Victor; Hugenholtz, Philip; Kyrpides, Nikos C; Klenk, Hans-Peter; Lapidus, Alla L.

    2011-01-01

    Pyrolobus fumarii Bl chl et al. 1997 is the type species of the genus Pyrolobus, which be- longs to the crenarchaeal family Pyrodictiaceae. The species is a facultatively microaerophilic non-motile crenarchaeon. It is of interest because of its isolated phylogenetic location in the tree of life and because it is a hyperthermophilic chemolithoautotroph known as the primary producer of organic matter at deep-sea hydrothermal vents. P. fumarii exhibits currently the highest optimal growth temperature of all life forms on earth (106 C). This is the first com- pleted genome sequence of a member of the genus Pyrolobus to be published and only the second genome sequence from a member of the family Pyrodictiaceae. Although Diversa Corporation announced the completion of sequencing of the P. fumarii genome on Septem- ber 25, 2001, this sequence was never released to the public. The 1,843,267 bp long genome with its 1,986 protein-coding and 52 RNA genes is a part of the Genomic Encyclopedia of Bacteria and Archaea project.

  10. Characterization of Chemosynthetic Microbial Mats Associated with Intertidal Hydrothermal Sulfur Vents in White Point, San Pedro, CA, USA.

    PubMed

    Miranda, Priscilla J; McLain, Nathan K; Hatzenpichler, Roland; Orphan, Victoria J; Dillon, Jesse G

    2016-01-01

    The shallow-sea hydrothermal vents at White Point (WP) in Palos Verdes on the southern California coast support microbial mats and provide easily accessed settings in which to study chemolithoautotrophic sulfur cycling. Previous studies have cultured sulfur-oxidizing bacteria from the WP mats; however, almost nothing is known about the in situ diversity and activity of the microorganisms in these habitats. We studied the diversity, micron-scale spatial associations and metabolic activity of the mat community via sequence analysis of 16S rRNA and aprA genes, fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) microscopy and sulfate reduction rate (SRR) measurements. Sequence analysis revealed a diverse group of bacteria, dominated by sulfur cycling gamma-, epsilon-, and deltaproteobacterial lineages such as Marithrix, Sulfurovum, and Desulfuromusa. FISH microscopy suggests a close physical association between sulfur-oxidizing and sulfur-reducing genotypes, while radiotracer studies showed low, but detectable, SRR. Comparative 16S rRNA gene sequence analyses indicate the WP sulfur vent microbial mat community is similar, but distinct from other hydrothermal vent communities representing a range of biotopes and lithologic settings. These findings suggest a complete biological sulfur cycle is operating in the WP mat ecosystem mediated by diverse bacterial lineages, with some similarity with deep-sea hydrothermal vent communities.

  11. Functional genes as markers for sulfur cycling and CO2 fixation in microbial communities of hydrothermal vents of the Logatchev field.

    PubMed

    Hügler, Michael; Gärtner, Andrea; Imhoff, Johannes F

    2010-09-01

    Life at deep-sea hydrothermal vents depends on chemolithoautotrophic microorganisms as primary producers mediating the transfer of energy from hydrothermal fluids to higher trophic levels. A comprehensive molecular survey was performed with microbial communities in a mussel patch at the Irina II site of the Logatchev hydrothermal field by combining the analysis of 16S rRNA gene sequences with studies of functional key genes involved in biochemical pathways of sulfur oxidation-reduction (soxB, aprA) and autotrophic carbon fixation (aclB, cbbM, cbbL). Most significantly, major groups of chemoautotrophic sulfur oxidizers in the diffuse fluids differed in their biosynthetic pathways of both carbon fixation and sulfur oxidation. One important component of the community, the Epsilonproteobacteria, has the potential to grow chemoautotrophically by means of the reductive tricarboxylic acid cycle and to gain energy through the oxidation of reduced sulfur compounds using the Sox pathway. The majority of soxB and all retrieved aclB gene sequences were assigned to this group. Another important group in this habitat, the Gammaproteobacteria, may use the adenosine 5'-phosphosulfate pathway and the Calvin-Benson-Bassham cycle, deduced from the presence of aprA and cbbM genes. Hence, two important groups of primary producers at the investigated site might use different pathways for sulfur oxidation and carbon fixation.

  12. Distribution and diversity of autotrophic bacteria in groundwater systems based on the analysis of RubisCO genotypes.

    PubMed

    Alfreider, Albin; Vogt, Carsten; Geiger-Kaiser, Margot; Psenner, Roland

    2009-04-01

    A molecular approach, based on the detection of ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase (RubisCO) large subunit genes, was applied to investigate the distribution and diversity of autotrophic bacteria in groundwater systems. DNA extracts from 48 sampling stations, including a variety of pristine and polluted, shallow and deep-subsurface groundwater samples obtained from Germany and Austria, served as a template for the PCR amplification of form I (cbbL) and form II (cbbM) large subunit RubisCO genes. The majority of the samples (>80%) contained two different forms of RubisCO. In 17 samples, all three forms of RubisCO were identified. PCR products from four selected groundwater habitats containing all three forms of RubisCO were used to construct clone libraries. Based on restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) analysis, 109 RubisCO-clone-inserts were subjected to sequencing and phylogenetic analysis. With the exception of a form IA RubisCO sequence cluster obtained from deep subsurface samples, which was identical to the RubisCO genes described for Ralstonia metallidurans CH34, most sequences were distantly related to a variety of RubisCO species in chemolithoautotrophic Proteobacteria. Several sequences occurred in isolated lineages. These findings suggest that autotrophic bacteria with the capability to assimilate CO2 via the Calvin Cycle pathway are widespread inhabitants of groundwater systems.

  13. Metagenomic investigation of the geologically unique Hellenic Volcanic Arc reveals a distinctive ecosystem with unexpected physiology: Metagenomic investigation of the Hellenic Volcanic Arc

    DOE PAGES

    Oulas, Anastasis; Polymenakou, Paraskevi N.; Seshadri, Rekha; ...

    2015-12-21

    Hydrothermal vents represent a deep, hot, aphotic biosphere where chemosynthetic primary producers, fuelled by chemicals from Earth's subsurface, form the basis of life. In this study, we examined microbial mats from two distinct volcanic sites within the Hellenic Volcanic Arc (HVA). The HVA is geologically and ecologically unique, with reported emissions of CO2-saturated fluids at temperatures up to 220°C and a notable absence of macrofauna. Metagenomic data reveals highly complex prokaryotic communities composed of chemolithoautotrophs, some methanotrophs, and to our surprise, heterotrophs capable of anaerobic degradation of aromatic hydrocarbons. Our data suggest that aromatic hydrocarbons may indeed be a significantmore » source of carbon in these sites, and instigate additional research into the nature and origin of these compounds in the HVA. Novel physiology was assigned to several uncultured prokaryotic lineages; most notably, a SAR406 representative is attributed with a role in anaerobic hydrocarbon degradation. This dataset, the largest to date from submarine volcanic ecosystems, constitutes a significant resource of novel genes and pathways with potential biotechnological applications.« less

  14. Metagenomic investigation of the geologically unique Hellenic Volcanic Arc reveals a distinctive ecosystem with unexpected physiology: Metagenomic investigation of the Hellenic Volcanic Arc

    SciTech Connect

    Oulas, Anastasis; Polymenakou, Paraskevi N.; Seshadri, Rekha; Tripp, H. James; Mandalakis, Manolis; Paez-Espino, A. David; Pati, Amrita; Chain, Patrick; Nomikou, Paraskevi; Carey, Steven; Kilias, Stephanos; Christakis, Christos; Kotoulas, Georgios; Magoulas, Antonios; Ivanova, Natalia N.; Kyrpides, Nikos C.

    2015-12-21

    Hydrothermal vents represent a deep, hot, aphotic biosphere where chemosynthetic primary producers, fuelled by chemicals from Earth's subsurface, form the basis of life. In this study, we examined microbial mats from two distinct volcanic sites within the Hellenic Volcanic Arc (HVA). The HVA is geologically and ecologically unique, with reported emissions of CO2-saturated fluids at temperatures up to 220°C and a notable absence of macrofauna. Metagenomic data reveals highly complex prokaryotic communities composed of chemolithoautotrophs, some methanotrophs, and to our surprise, heterotrophs capable of anaerobic degradation of aromatic hydrocarbons. Our data suggest that aromatic hydrocarbons may indeed be a significant source of carbon in these sites, and instigate additional research into the nature and origin of these compounds in the HVA. Novel physiology was assigned to several uncultured prokaryotic lineages; most notably, a SAR406 representative is attributed with a role in anaerobic hydrocarbon degradation. This dataset, the largest to date from submarine volcanic ecosystems, constitutes a significant resource of novel genes and pathways with potential biotechnological applications.

  15. Serpentinization and its implications for life on the early Earth and Mars.

    PubMed

    Schulte, Mitch; Blake, David; Hoehler, Tori; McCollom, Thomas

    2006-04-01

    Ophiolites, sections of ocean crust tectonically displaced onto land, offer significant potential to support chemolithoautotrophic life through the provision of energy and reducing power during aqueous alteration of their highly reduced mineralogies. There is substantial chemical disequilibrium between the primary olivine and pyroxene mineralogy of these ophiolites and the fluids circulating through them. This disequilibrium represents a potential source of chemical energy that could sustain life. Moreover, E (h)-pH conditions resulting from rock- water interactions in ultrabasic rocks are conducive to important abiotic processes antecedent to the origin of life. Serpentinization--the reaction of olivine- and pyroxene-rich rocks with water--produces magnetite, hydroxide, and serpentine minerals, and liberates molecular hydrogen, a source of energy and electrons that can be readily utilized by a broad array of chemosynthetic organisms. These systems are viewed as important analogs for potential early ecosystems on both Earth and Mars, where highly reducing mineralogy was likely widespread in an undifferentiated crust. Secondary phases precipitated during serpentinization have the capability to preserve organic or mineral biosignatures. We describe the petrology and mineral chemistry of an ophiolite-hosted cold spring in northern California and propose criteria to aid in the identification of serpentinizing terranes on Mars that have the potential to harbor chemosynthetic life.

  16. Deep-sea hydrothermal vent Epsilonproteobacteria encode a conserved and widespread nitrate reduction pathway (Nap)

    PubMed Central

    Vetriani, Costantino; Voordeckers, James W; Crespo-Medina, Melitza; O'Brien, Charles E; Giovannelli, Donato; Lutz, Richard A

    2014-01-01

    Despite the frequent isolation of nitrate-respiring Epsilonproteobacteria from deep-sea hydrothermal vents, the genes coding for the nitrate reduction pathway in these organisms have not been investigated in depth. In this study we have shown that the gene cluster coding for the periplasmic nitrate reductase complex (nap) is highly conserved in chemolithoautotrophic, nitrate-reducing Epsilonproteobacteria from deep-sea hydrothermal vents. Furthermore, we have shown that the napA gene is expressed in pure cultures of vent Epsilonproteobacteria and it is highly conserved in microbial communities collected from deep-sea vents characterized by different temperature and redox regimes. The diversity of nitrate-reducing Epsilonproteobacteria was found to be higher in moderate temperature, diffuse flow vents than in high temperature black smokers or in low temperatures, substrate-associated communities. As NapA has a high affinity for nitrate compared with the membrane-bound enzyme, its occurrence in vent Epsilonproteobacteria may represent an adaptation of these organisms to the low nitrate concentrations typically found in vent fluids. Taken together, our findings indicate that nitrate reduction is widespread in vent Epsilonproteobacteria and provide insight on alternative energy metabolism in vent microorganisms. The occurrence of the nap cluster in vent, commensal and pathogenic Epsilonproteobacteria suggests that the ability of these bacteria to respire nitrate is important in habitats as different as the deep-sea vents and the human body. PMID:24430487

  17. Hydrogenase Gene Distribution and H2 Consumption Ability within the Thiomicrospira Lineage

    PubMed Central

    Hansen, Moritz; Perner, Mirjam

    2016-01-01

    Thiomicrospira were originally characterized as sulfur-oxidizing chemolithoautotrophs. Attempts to grow them on hydrogen failed for many years. Only recently we demonstrated hydrogen consumption among two of three tested Thiomicrospira and posited that hydrogen consumption may be more widespread among Thiomicrospira than previously assumed. Here, we investigate and compare the hydrogen consumption ability and the presence of group 1 [NiFe]-hydrogenase genes (enzyme catalyzes H2↔2H+ + 2e-) for sixteen different Thiomicrospira species. Seven of these Thiomicrospira species encoded group 1 [NiFe]-hydrogenase genes and five of these species could also consume hydrogen. All Thiomicrospira species exhibiting hydrogen consumption were from hydrothermal vents along the Mid-Atlantic ridge or Eastern Pacific ridges. The tested Thiomicrospira from Mediterranean and Western Pacific vents could not consume hydrogen. The [NiFe]-hydrogenase genes were categorized into two clusters: those resembling the hydrogenase from Hydrogenovibrio are in cluster I and are related to those from Alpha- and other Gammaproteobacteria. In cluster II, hydrogenases found exclusively in Thiomicrospira crunogena strains are combined and form a monophyletic group with those from Epsilonproteobacteria suggesting they were acquired through horizontal gene transfer. Hydrogen consumption appears to be common among some Thiomicrospira, given that five of the tested sixteen strains carried this trait. The hydrogen consumption ability expands their competitiveness within an environment. PMID:26903978

  18. Development of reactor configurations for an electrofuels platform utilizing genetically modified iron oxidizing bacteria for the reduction of CO2 to biochemicals.

    PubMed

    Guan, Jingyang; Berlinger, Sarah A; Li, Xiaozheng; Chao, Zhongmou; Sousa E Silva, Victor; Banta, Scott; West, Alan C

    2017-03-10

    Electrofuels processes are potentially promising platforms for biochemical production from CO2 using renewable energy. When coupled to solar panels, this approach could avoid the inefficiencies of photosynthesis and there is no competition with food agriculture. In addition, these systems could potentially be used to store intermittent or stranded electricity generated from other renewable sources. Here we develop reactor configurations for continuous electrofuels processes to convert electricity and CO2 to isobutyric acid (IBA) using genetically modified (GM) chemolithoautotrophic Acidithiobacillus ferrooxidans. These cells oxidize ferrous iron which can be electrochemically reduced. During two weeks of cultivation on ferrous iron, stable cell growth and continuous IBA production from CO2 were achieved in a process where media was circulated between electrochemical and biochemical rectors. An alternative process with an additional electrochemical cell for accelerated ferrous production was developed, and this system achieved an almost three-fold increase in steady state cell densities, and an almost 4-fold increase in the ferrous iron oxidation rate. Combined, this led to an almost 8-fold increase in the steady state volumetric productivity of IBA up to 0.063±0.012mg/L/h, without a decline in energy efficiency from previous work. Continued development of reactor configurations which can increase the delivery of energy to the genetically modified cells will be required to increase product titers and volumetric productivities. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Thaumarchaeotes abundant in refinery nitrifying sludges express amoA but are not obligate autotrophic ammonia oxidizers

    PubMed Central

    Mußmann, Marc; Brito, Ivana; Pitcher, Angela; Sinninghe Damsté, Jaap S.; Hatzenpichler, Roland; Richter, Andreas; Nielsen, Jeppe L.; Nielsen, Per Halkjær; Müller, Anneliese; Daims, Holger; Wagner, Michael; Head, Ian M.

    2011-01-01

    Nitrification is a core process in the global nitrogen cycle that is essential for the functioning of many ecosystems. The discovery of autotrophic ammonia-oxidizing archaea (AOA) within the phylum Thaumarchaeota has changed our perception of the microbiology of nitrification, in particular since their numerical dominance over ammonia-oxidizing bacteria (AOB) in many environments has been revealed. These and other data have led to a widely held assumption that all amoA-encoding members of the Thaumarchaeota (AEA) are autotrophic nitrifiers. In this study, 52 municipal and industrial wastewater treatment plants were screened for the presence of AEA and AOB. Thaumarchaeota carrying amoA were detected in high abundance only in four industrial plants. In one plant, thaumarchaeotes closely related to soil group I.1b outnumbered AOB up to 10,000-fold, and their numbers, which can only be explained by active growth in this continuous culture system, were two to three orders of magnitude higher than could be sustained by autotrophic ammonia oxidation. Consistently, 14CO2 fixation could only be detected in AOB but not in AEA in actively nitrifying sludge from this plant via FISH combined with microautoradiography. Furthermore, in situ transcription of archaeal amoA, and very weak in situ labeling of crenarchaeol after addition of 13CO2, was independent of the addition of ammonium. These data demonstrate that some amoA-carrying group I.1b Thaumarchaeota are not obligate chemolithoautotrophs. PMID:21930919

  20. Mineral respiration under extreme acidic conditions: from a supramolecular organization to a molecular adaptation in Acidithiobacillus ferrooxidans.

    PubMed

    Roger, Magali; Castelle, Cindy; Guiral, Marianne; Infossi, Pascale; Lojou, Elisabeth; Giudici-Orticoni, Marie-Thérèse; Ilbert, Marianne

    2012-12-01

    Acidithiobacillus ferrooxidans is an acidophilic chemolithoautotrophic Gram-negative bacterium that can derive energy from the oxidation of ferrous iron at pH 2 using oxygen as electron acceptor. The study of this bacterium has economic and fundamental biological interest because of its use in the industrial extraction of copper and uranium from ores. For this reason, its respiratory chain has been analysed in detail in recent years. Studies have shown the presence of a functional supercomplex that spans the outer and the inner membranes and allows a direct electron transfer from the extracellular Fe2+ ions to the inner membrane cytochrome c oxidase. Iron induces the expression of two operons encoding proteins implicated in this complex as well as in the regeneration of the reducing power. Most of these are metalloproteins that have been characterized biochemically, structurally and biophysically. For some of them, the molecular basis of their adaptation to the periplasmic acidic environment has been described. Modifications in the metal surroundings have been highlighted for cytochrome c and rusticyanin, whereas, for the cytochrome c oxidase, an additional partner that maintains its stability and activity has been demonstrated recently.

  1. Water table dynamics and biogeochemical cycling in a shallow, variably-saturated floodplain

    DOE PAGES

    Yabusaki, Steven B.; Wilkins, Michael J.; Fang, Yilin; ...

    2017-02-20

    Three-dimensional variably saturated flow and multicomponent biogeochemical reactive transport modeling, based on published and newly generated data, is used to better understand the interplay of hydrology, geochemistry, and biology controlling the cycling of carbon, nitrogen, oxygen, iron, sulfur, and uranium in a shallow floodplain. In this system, aerobic respiration generally maintains anoxic groundwater below an oxic vadose zone until seasonal snowmelt-driven water table peaking transports dissolved oxygen (DO) and nitrate from the vadose zone into the alluvial aquifer. The response to this perturbation is localized due to distinct physico-biogeochemical environments and relatively long time scales for transport through the floodplainmore » aquifer and vadose zone. Naturally reduced zones (NRZs) containing sediments higher in organic matter, iron sulfides, and non-crystalline U(IV) rapidly consume DO and nitrate to maintain anoxic conditions, yielding Fe(II) from FeS oxidative dissolution, nitrite from denitrification, and U(VI) from nitrite-promoted U(IV) oxidation. Redox cycling is a key factor for sustaining the observed aquifer behaviors despite continuous oxygen influx and the annual hydrologically induced oxidation event. Furthermore, depth-dependent activity of fermenters, aerobes, nitrate reducers, sulfate reducers, and chemolithoautotrophs (e.g., oxidizing Fe(II), S compounds, and ammonium) is linked to the presence of DO, which has higher concentrations near the water table.« less

  2. Identification and Activities In Situ of Nitrosospira and Nitrospira spp. as Dominant Populations in a Nitrifying Fluidized Bed Reactor

    PubMed Central

    Schramm, Andreas; de Beer, Dirk; Wagner, Michael; Amann, Rudolf

    1998-01-01

    Bacterial aggregates from a chemolithoautotrophic, nitrifying fluidized bed reactor were investigated with microsensors and rRNA-based molecular techniques. The microprofiles of O2, NH4+, NO2−, and NO3− demonstrated the occurrence of complete nitrification in the outer 125 μm of the aggregates. The ammonia oxidizers were identified as members of the Nitrosospira group by fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH). No ammonia- or nitrite-oxidizing bacteria of the genus Nitrosomonas or Nitrobacter, respectively, could be detected by FISH. To identify the nitrite oxidizers, a 16S ribosomal DNA clone library was constructed and screened by denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis and selected clones were sequenced. The organisms represented by these sequences formed two phylogenetically distinct clusters affiliated with the nitrite oxidizer Nitrospira moscoviensis. 16S rRNA-targeted oligonucleotide probes were designed for in situ detection of these organisms. FISH analysis showed that the dominant populations of Nitrospira spp. and Nitrosospira spp. formed separate, dense clusters which were in contact with each other and occurred throughout the aggregate. A second, smaller, morphologically and genetically different population of Nitrospira spp. was restricted to the outer nitrifying zones. PMID:9726900

  3. Ecological succession leads to chemosynthesis in mats colonizing wood in sea water.

    PubMed

    Kalenitchenko, Dimitri; Dupraz, Marlène; Le Bris, Nadine; Petetin, Carole; Rose, Christophe; West, Nyree J; Galand, Pierre E

    2016-09-01

    Chemosynthetic mats involved in cycling sulfur compounds are often found in hydrothermal vents, cold seeps and whale falls. However, there are only few records of wood fall mats, even though the presence of hydrogen sulfide at the wood surface should create a perfect niche for sulfide-oxidizing bacteria. Here we report the growth of microbial mats on wood incubated under conditions that simulate the Mediterranean deep-sea temperature and darkness. We used amplicon and metagenomic sequencing combined with fluorescence in situ hybridization to test whether a microbial succession occurs during mat formation and whether the wood fall mats present chemosynthetic features. We show that the wood surface was first colonized by sulfide-oxidizing bacteria belonging to the Arcobacter genus after only 30 days of immersion. Subsequently, the number of sulfate reducers increased and the dominant Arcobacter phylotype changed. The ecological succession was reflected by a change in the metabolic potential of the community from chemolithoheterotrophs to potential chemolithoautotrophs. Our work provides clear evidence for the chemosynthetic nature of wood fall ecosystems and demonstrates the utility to develop experimental incubation in the laboratory to study deep-sea chemosynthetic mats.

  4. Unexpected Diversity of Chlorite Dismutases: a Catalytically Efficient Dimeric Enzyme from Nitrobacter winogradskyi ▿ †

    PubMed Central

    Mlynek, Georg; Sjöblom, Björn; Kostan, Julius; Füreder, Stephanie; Maixner, Frank; Gysel, Kira; Furtmüller, Paul Georg; Obinger, Christian; Wagner, Michael; Daims, Holger; Djinović-Carugo, Kristina

    2011-01-01

    Chlorite dismutase (Cld) is a unique heme enzyme catalyzing the conversion of ClO2− to Cl− and O2. Cld is usually found in perchlorate- or chlorate-reducing bacteria but was also recently identified in a nitrite-oxidizing bacterium of the genus Nitrospira. Here we characterized a novel Cld-like protein from the chemolithoautotrophic nitrite oxidizer Nitrobacter winogradskyi which is significantly smaller than all previously known chlorite dismutases. Its three-dimensional (3D) crystal structure revealed a dimer of two identical subunits, which sharply contrasts with the penta- or hexameric structures of other chlorite dismutases. Despite a truncated N-terminal domain in each subunit, this novel enzyme turned out to be a highly efficient chlorite dismutase (Km = 90 μM; kcat = 190 s−1; kcat/Km = 2.1 × 106 M−1 s−1), demonstrating a greater structural and phylogenetic diversity of these enzymes than was previously known. Based on comparative analyses of Cld sequences and 3D structures, signature amino acid residues that can be employed to assess whether uncharacterized Cld-like proteins may have a high chlorite-dismutating activity were identified. Interestingly, proteins that contain all these signatures and are phylogenetically closely related to the novel-type Cld of N. winogradskyi exist in a large number of other microbes, including other nitrite oxidizers. PMID:21441524

  5. Cultivation of a novel cold-adapted nitrite oxidizing betaproteobacterium from the Siberian Arctic.

    PubMed

    Alawi, Mashal; Lipski, André; Sanders, Tina; Pfeiffer, Eva Maria; Spieck, Eva

    2007-07-01

    Permafrost-affected soils of the Siberian Arctic were investigated with regard to identification of nitrite oxidizing bacteria active at low temperature. Analysis of the fatty acid profiles of enrichment cultures grown at 4 degrees C, 10 degrees C and 17 degrees C revealed a pattern that was different from that of known nitrite oxidizers but was similar to fatty acid profiles of Betaproteobacteria. Electron microscopy of two enrichment cultures grown at 10 degrees C showed prevalent cells with a conspicuous ultrastructure. Sequence analysis of the 16S rRNA genes allocated the organisms to a so far uncultivated cluster of the Betaproteobacteria, with Gallionella ferruginea as next related taxonomically described organism. The results demonstrate that a novel genus of chemolithoautotrophic nitrite oxidizing bacteria is present in polygonal tundra soils and can be enriched at low temperatures up to 17 degrees C. Cloned sequences with high sequence similarities were previously reported from mesophilic habitats like activated sludge and therefore an involvement of this taxon in nitrite oxidation in nonarctic habitats is suggested. The presented culture will provide an opportunity to correlate nitrification with nonidentified environmental clones in moderate habitats and give insights into mechanisms of cold adaptation. We propose provisional classification of the novel nitrite oxidizing bacterium as 'Candidatus Nitrotoga arctica'.

  6. High nitrogen removal rate using ANAMMOX process at short hydraulic retention time.

    PubMed

    Casagrande, C G; Kunz, A; De Prá, M C; Bressan, C R; Soares, H M

    2013-01-01

    The anaerobic ammonium oxidation (ANAMMOX) is a chemolithoautotrophic process, which converts NH(4)(+) to N(2) using nitrite (NO(2)(-)) as the electron acceptor. This process has very high nitrogen removal rates (NRRs) and is an alternative to classical nitrification/denitrification wastewater treatment. In the present work, a strategy for nitrogen removal using ANAMMOX process was tested evaluating their performance when submitted to high loading rates and very short hydraulic retention times (HRTs). An up-flow ANAMMOX column reactor was inoculated with 30% biomass (v v(-1)) fed from 100 to 200 mg L(-1) of total N (NO(2)(-)-N + NH(4)(+)-N) at 35 °C. After start-up and process stability the maximum NRR in the up-flow anaerobic sludge blanket (UASB) reactor was 18.3 g-N L(-1) d(-1) operated at 0.2 h of HRT. FISH (fluorescence in situ hybridization) analysis and process stoichiometry confirmed that ANAMMOX was the prevalent process for nitrogen removal during the experiments. The results point out that high NRRs can be obtained at very short HRTs using up-flow ANAMMOX column reactor configuration.

  7. Sulfuriflexusmobilis gen. nov., sp. nov., a sulfur-oxidizing bacterium isolated from a brackish lake sediment.

    PubMed

    Kojima, Hisaya; Fukui, Manabu

    2016-09-01

    A chemolithotrophic sulfur-oxidizing bacterium, strain aks1T, was isolated from sediment of a brackish lake in Japan. The cells were curved rod-shaped and Gram-stain-negative. The G+C content of the genomic DNA was 53 mol%. The major components in the cellular fatty acid profile were C16 : 0 and summed feature 3 (C16 : 1ω7c and/or C16 : 1ω6c). As electron donor for chemolithoautotrophic growth, strain aks1T oxidized thiosulfate, sulfide, and elemental sulfur. The strain could utilize oxygen and nitrate as an electron acceptor for thiosulfate oxidation. Growth was observed at a temperature range of 5-34 °C, with optimum growth at 30-32 °C. Growth of the strain was observed at a pH range of 6.4-8.7. Phylogenetic analysis based on 16S rRNA gene sequences indicated that the strain is related to members of the family Granulosicoccaceae within the order Chromatiales, with sequence similarities around 92 %. On the basis of phylogenetic and phenotypic properties, strain aks1T represents a novel species of a new genus, for which the name Sulfuriflexus mobilis gen. nov., sp. nov. is proposed. The type strain of the type species is aks1T (=DSM 102939T=NBRC 111889T).

  8. Sulfurivermis fontis gen. nov., sp. nov., a sulfur-oxidizing autotroph, and proposal of Thioprofundaceae fam. nov.

    PubMed

    Kojima, Hisaya; Watanabe, Miho; Fukui, Manabu

    2017-09-01

    A novel Gram-stain-negative, chemolithoautotrophic sulfur oxidizer, strain JG42T, was isolated from a hot spring microbial mat. As an electron donor for autotrophic growth, strain JG42T utilized sulfide, thiosulfate, tetrathionate and elemental sulfur. Cells of strain JG42T were oxidase-positive and catalase-negative. The G+C content of the genomic DNA was 65 mol%. The predominant cellular fatty acid was C16 : 0. Phylogenetic analysis of the 16S rRNA gene indicated that strain JG42T belonged to the order Chromatiales, but sequence similarities to the known species were less than 94 %. On the basis of its properties, strain JG42T (=DSM 104776T=NBRC 112696T) is proposed as the type strain of a novel species of a new genus, Sulfurivermis fontis gen. nov., sp. nov., which belongs to the family Thioalkalispiraceae. A new family, Thioprofundaceae fam. nov., is also proposed to accommodate the genus Thioprofundum, transferred from the family Thioalkalispiraceae.

  9. Metagenomic investigation of the geologically unique Hellenic Volcanic Arc reveals a distinctive ecosystem with unexpected physiology.

    PubMed

    Oulas, Anastasis; Polymenakou, Paraskevi N; Seshadri, Rekha; Tripp, H James; Mandalakis, Manolis; Paez-Espino, A David; Pati, Amrita; Chain, Patrick; Nomikou, Paraskevi; Carey, Steven; Kilias, Stephanos; Christakis, Christos; Kotoulas, Georgios; Magoulas, Antonios; Ivanova, Natalia N; Kyrpides, Nikos C

    2016-04-01

    Hydrothermal vents represent a deep, hot, aphotic biosphere where chemosynthetic primary producers, fuelled by chemicals from Earth's subsurface, form the basis of life. In this study, we examined microbial mats from two distinct volcanic sites within the Hellenic Volcanic Arc (HVA). The HVA is geologically and ecologically unique, with reported emissions of CO2 -saturated fluids at temperatures up to 220°C and a notable absence of macrofauna. Metagenomic data reveals highly complex prokaryotic communities composed of chemolithoautotrophs, some methanotrophs, and to our surprise, heterotrophs capable of anaerobic degradation of aromatic hydrocarbons. Our data suggest that aromatic hydrocarbons may indeed be a significant source of carbon in these sites, and instigate additional research into the nature and origin of these compounds in the HVA. Novel physiology was assigned to several uncultured prokaryotic lineages; most notably, a SAR406 representative is attributed with a role in anaerobic hydrocarbon degradation. This dataset, the largest to date from submarine volcanic ecosystems, constitutes a significant resource of novel genes and pathways with potential biotechnological applications.

  10. Tracing iron-fueled microbial carbon production within the hydrothermal plume at the Loihi seamount

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bennett, Sarah A.; Hansman, Roberta L.; Sessions, Alex L.; Nakamura, Ko-ichi.; Edwards, Katrina J.

    2011-10-01

    The Loihi hydrothermal plume provides an opportunity to investigate iron (Fe) oxidation and microbial processes in a system that is truly Fe dominated and distinct from mid-ocean ridge spreading centers. The lack of hydrogen sulfide within the Loihi hydrothermal fluids and the presence of an oxygen minimum zone at this submarine volcano's summit, results in a prolonged presence of reduced Fe within the dispersing non-buoyant plume. In this study, we have investigated the potential for microbial carbon fixation within the Loihi plume. We sampled for both particulate and dissolved organic carbon in hydrothermal fluids, microbial mats growing around vents, and the dispersing plume, and carried out stable carbon isotope analysis on the particulate fraction. The δ13C values of the microbial mats ranged from -23‰ to -28‰, and are distinct from those of deep-ocean particulate organic carbon (POC). The mats and hydrothermal fluids were also elevated in dissolved organic carbon (DOC) compared to background seawater. Within the hydrothermal plume, DOC and POC concentrations were elevated and the isotopic composition of POC within the plume suggests mixing between background seawater POC and a 13C-depleted hydrothermal component. The combination of both DOC and POC increasing in the dispersing plume that cannot solely be the result of entrainment and DOC adsorption, provides strong evidence for in-situ microbial productivity by chemolithoautotrophs, including a likelihood for iron-oxidizing microorganisms.

  11. Bacterial and Archaeal Diversity in an Iron-Rich Coastal Hydrothermal Field in Yamagawa, Kagoshima, Japan

    PubMed Central

    Kawaichi, Satoshi; Ito, Norihiro; Yoshida, Takashi; Sako, Yoshihiko

    2013-01-01

    Physicochemical characteristics and archaeal and bacterial community structures in an iron-rich coastal hydrothermal field, where the temperature of the most active hot spot reaches above 100°C, were investigated to obtain fundamental information on microbes inhabiting a coastal hydrothermal field. The environmental settings of the coastal hydrothermal field were similar in some degree to those of deep-sea hydrothermal environments because of its emission of H2, CO2, and sulfide from the bottom of the hot spot. The results of clone analyses based on the 16S rRNA gene led us to speculate the presence of a chemo-synthetic microbial ecosystem, where chemolithoautotrophic thermophiles, primarily the bacterial order Aquificales, function as primary producers using H2 or sulfur compounds as their energy source and CO2 as their carbon source, and the organic compounds synthesized by them support the growth of chemoheterotrophic thermophiles, such as members of the order Thermales and the family Desulfurococcaceae. In addition, the dominance of members of the bacterial genus Herbaspirillum in the high temperature bottom layer led us to speculate the temporal formation of mesophilic zones where they can also function as primary producing or nitrogen-fixing bacteria. PMID:24256999

  12. ADP-dependent phosphofructokinases in mesophilic and thermophilic methanogenic archaea.

    PubMed

    Verhees, C H; Tuininga, J E; Kengen, S W; Stams, A J; van der Oost, J; de Vos, W M

    2001-12-01

    Phosphofructokinase (PFK) is a key enzyme of the glycolytic pathway in all domains of life. Two related PFKs, ATP-dependent and PP(i)-dependent PFK, have been distinguished in bacteria and eucarya, as well as in some archaea. Hyperthermophilic archaea of the order Thermococcales, including Pyrococcus and Thermococcus spp., have recently been demonstrated to possess a unique ADP-dependent PFK (ADP-PFK) that appears to be phylogenetically distinct. Here, we report the presence of ADP-PFKs in glycogen-producing members of the orders Methanococcales and Methanosarcinales, including both mesophilic and thermophilic representatives. To verify the substrate specificities of the methanogenic kinases, the gene encoding the ADP-PFK from Methanococcus jannaschii was functionally expressed in Escherichia coli, and the produced enzyme was purified and characterized in detail. Compared to its counterparts from the two members of the order Thermococcales, the M. jannaschii ADP-PFK has an extremely low K(m) for fructose 6-phosphate (9.6 microM), and it accepts both ADP and acetyl-phosphate as phosphoryl donors. Phylogenetic analysis of the ADP-PFK reveals it to be a key enzyme of the modified Embden-Meyerhof pathway of heterotrophic and chemolithoautotrophic archaea. Interestingly, uncharacterized homologs of this unusual kinase are present in several eucarya.

  13. Microbial arsenite oxidation with oxygen, nitrate, or an electrode as the sole electron acceptor.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Van Khanh; Tran, Huong T; Park, Younghyun; Yu, Jaecheul; Lee, Taeho

    2017-02-09

    The purpose of this study was to identify bacteria that can perform As(III) oxidation for environmental bioremediation. Two bacterial strains, named JHS3 and JHW3, which can autotrophically oxidize As(III)-As(V) with oxygen as an electron acceptor, were isolated from soil and water samples collected in the vicinity of an arsenic-contaminated site. According to 16S ribosomal RNA sequence analysis, both strains belong to the ɤ-Proteobacteria class and share 99% sequence identity with previously described strains. JHS3 appears to be a new strain of the Acinetobacter genus, whereas JHW3 is likely to be a novel strain of the Klebsiella genus. Both strains possess the aioA gene encoding an arsenite oxidase and are capable of chemolithoautotrophic growth in the presence of As(III) up to 10 mM as a primary electron donor. Cell growth and As(III) oxidation rate of both strains were significantly enhanced during cultivation under heterotrophic conditions. Under anaerobic conditions, only strain JHW3 oxidized As(III) using nitrate or a solid-state electrode of a bioelectrochemical system as a terminal electron acceptor. Kinetic studies of As(III) oxidation under aerobic condition demonstrated a higher V max and K m from strain JHW3 than strain JHS3. This study indicated the potential application of strain JHW3 for remediation of subsurface environments contaminated with arsenic.

  14. Identification of a membrane cytochrome c from neutrophilic, iron-oxidizing Mariprofundus ferrooxydans, strain PV-1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barco, R. A.; Zhong, J.; Ramirez, G. A.; Reese, B. K.; Edwards, K. J.

    2012-12-01

    Neutrophilic-iron oxidizing bacteria (FeOB) are a group of bacteria that can oxidize iron at -or near neutral pH, making them relevant in habitats with naturally high levels of reduced iron (i.e. Fe2+) such as hydrothermal vents. In the ocean, microorganisms in the Mariprofundus genus (zeta- Proteobacteria) are the only known organisms to chemolithoautotrophically oxidize iron. In order to identify the active bacterial oxidation of iron in the environment (i.e. in the deep biosphere), biomarkers for this functionality are needed. The aim of this study is to confirm the expression of potential functional biomarkers that are diagnostic of neutrophilic bacterial iron-oxidation. To this end, Mariprofundus ferrooxydans, strain PV-1 was cultivated in large batches and its proteins extracted via a methodology to circumvent protein binding to filamentous material. Proteins were assayed for redox-activity and for iron-oxidation activity. The bands of the gel that showed activity were analyzed via LC-MS/MS for identification of peptides and subsequently protein-matched to the M. ferrooxydans proteome database. The results indicate that a membrane cytochrome c with homology to the iron-oxidizing Cyt572 from Leptospirillum Group II is expressed in M. ferrooxydans when it is active. Other proteins associated with the electron transport chain of M. ferroxydans such as cbb3-type cytochrome oxidase subunits were identified and validated separately through reverse transcription followed by PCR amplification.

  15. Rock weathering creates oases of life in a high Arctic desert.

    PubMed

    Borin, Sara; Ventura, Stefano; Tambone, Fulvia; Mapelli, Francesca; Schubotz, Florence; Brusetti, Lorenzo; Scaglia, Barbara; D'Acqui, Luigi P; Solheim, Bjørn; Turicchia, Silvia; Marasco, Ramona; Hinrichs, Kai-Uwe; Baldi, Franco; Adani, Fabrizio; Daffonchio, Daniele

    2010-02-01

    During primary colonization of rock substrates by plants, mineral weathering is strongly accelerated under plant roots, but little is known on how it affects soil ecosystem development before plant establishment. Here we show that rock mineral weathering mediated by chemolithoautotrophic bacteria is associated to plant community formation in sites recently released by permanent glacier ice cover in the Midtre Lovénbreen glacier moraine (78 degrees 53'N), Svalbard. Increased soil fertility fosters growth of prokaryotes and plants at the boundary between sites of intense bacterial mediated chemolithotrophic iron-sulfur oxidation and pH decrease, and the common moraine substrate where carbon and nitrogen are fixed by cyanobacteria. Microbial iron oxidizing activity determines acidity and corresponding fertility gradients, where water retention, cation exchange capacity and nutrient availability are increased. This fertilization is enabled by abundant mineral nutrients and reduced forms of iron and sulfur in pyrite minerals within a conglomerate type of moraine rock. Such an interaction between microorganisms and moraine minerals determines a peculiar, not yet described model for soil genesis and plant ecosystem formation with potential past and present analogues in other harsh environments with similar geochemical settings.

  16. Major phylum-level differences between porefluid and host rock bacterial communities in the terrestrial deep subsurface.

    PubMed

    Momper, Lily; Kiel Reese, Brandi; Zinke, Laura; Wanger, Greg; Osburn, Magdalena R; Moser, Duane; Amend, Jan P

    2017-07-05

    Earth's deep subsurface biosphere (DSB) is home to a vast number and wide variety of microorganisms. Although difficult to access and sample, deep subsurface environments have been probed through drilling programs, exploration of mines and sampling of deeply sourced vents and springs. In an effort to understand the ecology of deep terrestrial habitats, we examined bacterial diversity in the Sanford Underground Research Facility (SURF), the former Homestake gold mine, in South Dakota, USA. Whole genomic DNA was extracted from deeply circulating groundwater and corresponding host rock (at a depth of 1.45 km below ground surface). Pyrotag DNA sequencing of the 16S rRNA gene revealed diverse communities of putative chemolithoautotrophs, aerobic and anaerobic heterotrophs, numerous candidate phyla and unique rock-associated microbial assemblage. There was a clear and near-total separation of communities between SURF deeply circulating fracture fluids and SURF host-rocks. Sequencing data from SURF compared against five similarly sequenced terrestrial subsurface sites in Europe and North America revealed classes Clostridia and Betaproteobacteria were dominant in terrestrial fluids. This study presents a unique analysis showing differences in terrestrial subsurface microbial communities between fracture fluids and host rock through which those fluids permeate. © 2017 Society for Applied Microbiology and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  17. Sulfuritortus calidifontis gen. nov., sp. nov., a novel sulfur oxidizer isolated from a hot spring microbial mat.

    PubMed

    Kojima, Hisaya; Watanabe, Miho; Fukui, Manabu

    2017-01-21

    A novel sulfur-oxidizing autotrophic bacterium, strain J1AT was isolated from a hot spring microbial mat. The cells were Gram-stain-negative, catalase-negative and oxidase-positive. As sole electron donor for chemolithoautotrophic growth, strain J1AT utilized sulfide, thiosulfate, elemental sulfur, and tetrathionate. The G+C content of genomic DNA was 66 mol%. Major cellular fatty acids (>40% of total) were C16 : 0 and summed feature 3 (C16 : 17c and/or C16 : 16c). The predominant quinone was Q-8. Phylogenetic analysis of the 16S rRNA gene indicated that strain J1AT is a relative of Thiobacillus species, but share with them only 93% or lower sequence similarities. On the basis of its properties, strain J1AT (= DSM 103923T = NBRC 112474T) is proposed as type strain of a new species of a novel genus, Sulfuritortus calidifontis gen. nov., sp.

  18. Mechanoradical H2 generation during simulated faulting: Implications for an earthquake-driven subsurface biosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hirose, Takehiro; Kawagucci, Shinsuke; Suzuki, Katsuhiko

    2011-09-01

    Molecular hydrogen, H2, is the key component to link the inorganic lithosphere with the subsurface biosphere. Geochemical and microbiological characterizations of natural hydrothermal fields strongly suggested that H2 is an important energy source in subsurface microbial ecosystems because of its metabolic versatility. One of the possible sources of H2 has been considered as earthquakes: mechanoradical reactions on fault surfaces generate H2 during earthquake faulting. However it is unclear whether faulting can generate abundant H2 to sustain subsurface chemolithoautotrophic microorganisms, such as methanogens. Here we present the result of high velocity friction experiments aimed to estimate the amount of H2 generated during earthquakes. Our results show that H2 generation increases with frictional work (i.e., earthquake magnitude) and that a H2 concentration of more than 1.1 mol/kg of fluid can be achieved in a fault zone after earthquakes of even small magnitudes. The estimated earthquake-derived H2 concentration is sufficiently high to sustain a H2-based subsurface lithoautotrophic microbial ecosystem. Furthermore, earthquakes have initiated on the Earth at least since tectonic plate movement began ˜3.8 Ga, implying the possible existence of ancient earthquake-driven ecosystems. Seismic H2 based subsurface ecosystems might exist not only over the Earth but also other planets.

  19. Ecological succession leads to chemosynthesis in mats colonizing wood in sea water

    PubMed Central

    Kalenitchenko, Dimitri; Dupraz, Marlène; Le Bris, Nadine; Petetin, Carole; Rose, Christophe; West, Nyree J; Galand, Pierre E

    2016-01-01

    Chemosynthetic mats involved in cycling sulfur compounds are often found in hydrothermal vents, cold seeps and whale falls. However, there are only few records of wood fall mats, even though the presence of hydrogen sulfide at the wood surface should create a perfect niche for sulfide-oxidizing bacteria. Here we report the growth of microbial mats on wood incubated under conditions that simulate the Mediterranean deep-sea temperature and darkness. We used amplicon and metagenomic sequencing combined with fluorescence in situ hybridization to test whether a microbial succession occurs during mat formation and whether the wood fall mats present chemosynthetic features. We show that the wood surface was first colonized by sulfide-oxidizing bacteria belonging to the Arcobacter genus after only 30 days of immersion. Subsequently, the number of sulfate reducers increased and the dominant Arcobacter phylotype changed. The ecological succession was reflected by a change in the metabolic potential of the community from chemolithoheterotrophs to potential chemolithoautotrophs. Our work provides clear evidence for the chemosynthetic nature of wood fall ecosystems and demonstrates the utility to develop experimental incubation in the laboratory to study deep-sea chemosynthetic mats. PMID:26905628

  20. Carbon monoxide dehydrogenase activity in Bradyrhizobium japonicum.

    PubMed

    Lorite, M J; Tachil, J; Sanjuán, J; Meyer, O; Bedmar, E J

    2000-05-01

    Bradyrhizobium japonicum strain 110spc4 was capable of chemolithoautotrophic growth with carbon monoxide (CO) as a sole energy and carbon source under aerobic conditions. The enzyme carbon monoxide dehydrogenase (CODH; EC 1.2.99.2) has been purified 21-fold, with a yield of 16% and a specific activity of 58 nmol of CO oxidized/min/mg of protein, by a procedure that involved differential ultracentrifugation, anion-exchange chromatography, hydrophobic interaction chromatography, and gel filtration. The purified enzyme gave a single protein and activity band on nondenaturing polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis and had a molecular mass of 230,000 Da. The 230-kDa enzyme was composed of large (L; 75-kDa), medium (M; 28.4-kDa), and small (S; 17.2-kDa) subunits occurring in heterohexameric (LMS)(2) subunit composition. The 75-kDa polypeptide exhibited immunological cross-reactivity with the large subunit of the CODH of Oligotropha carboxidovorans. The B. japonicum enzyme contained, per mole, 2.29 atoms of Mo, 7.96 atoms of Fe, 7.60 atoms of labile S, and 1.99 mol of flavin. Treatment of the enzyme with iodoacetamide yielded di(carboxamidomethyl)molybdopterin cytosine dinucleotide, identifying molybdopterin cytosine dinucleotide as the organic portion of the B. japonicum CODH molybdenum cofactor. The absorption spectrum of the purified enzyme was characteristic of a molybdenum-containing iron-sulfur flavoprotein.

  1. Microarray and bioinformatic analyses suggest models for carbon metabolism in the autotroph Acidithiobacillus ferrooxidans

    SciTech Connect

    C. Appia-ayme; R. Quatrini; Y. Denis; F. Denizot; S. Silver; F. Roberto; F. Veloso; J. Valdes; J. P. Cardenas; M. Esparza; O. Orellana; E. Jedlicki; V. Bonnefoy; D. Holmes

    2006-09-01

    Acidithiobacillus ferrooxidans is a chemolithoautotrophic bacterium that uses iron or sulfur as an energy and electron source. Bioinformatic analysis was used to identify putative genes and potential metabolic pathways involved in CO2 fixation, 2P-glycolate detoxification, carboxysome formation and glycogen utilization in At. ferrooxidans. Microarray transcript profiling was carried out to compare the relative expression of the predicted genes of these pathways when the microorganism was grown in the presence of iron versus sulfur. Several gene expression patterns were confirmed by real-time PCR. Genes for each of the above predicted pathways were found to be organized into discrete clusters. Clusters exhibited differential gene expression depending on the presence of iron or sulfur in the medium. Concordance of gene expression within each cluster, suggested that they are operons Most notably, clusters of genes predicted to be involved in CO2 fixation, carboxysome formation, 2P-glycolate detoxification and glycogen biosynthesis were up-regulated in sulfur medium, whereas genes involved in glycogen utilization were preferentially expressed in iron medium. These results can be explained in terms of models of gene regulation that suggest how A. ferrooxidans can adjust its central carbon management to respond to changing environmental conditions.

  2. Enrichment and genome sequence of the group I.1a ammonia-oxidizing Archaeon "Ca. Nitrosotenuis uzonensis" representing a clade globally distributed in thermal habitats.

    PubMed

    Lebedeva, Elena V; Hatzenpichler, Roland; Pelletier, Eric; Schuster, Nathalie; Hauzmayer, Sandra; Bulaev, Aleksandr; Grigor'eva, Nadezhda V; Galushko, Alexander; Schmid, Markus; Palatinszky, Marton; Le Paslier, Denis; Daims, Holger; Wagner, Michael

    2013-01-01

    The discovery of ammonia-oxidizing archaea (AOA) of the phylum Thaumarchaeota and the high abundance of archaeal ammonia monooxygenase subunit A encoding gene sequences in many environments have extended our perception of nitrifying microbial communities. Moreover, AOA are the only aerobic ammonia oxidizers known to be active in geothermal environments. Molecular data indicate that in many globally distributed terrestrial high-temperature habits a thaumarchaeotal lineage within the Nitrosopumilus cluster (also called "marine" group I.1a) thrives, but these microbes have neither been isolated from these systems nor functionally characterized in situ yet. In this study, we report on the enrichment and genomic characterization of a representative of this lineage from a thermal spring in Kamchatka. This thaumarchaeote, provisionally classified as "Candidatus Nitrosotenuis uzonensis", is a moderately thermophilic, non-halophilic, chemolithoautotrophic ammonia oxidizer. The nearly complete genome sequence (assembled into a single scaffold) of this AOA confirmed the presence of the typical thaumarchaeotal pathways for ammonia oxidation and carbon fixation, and indicated its ability to produce coenzyme F420 and to chemotactically react to its environment. Interestingly, like members of the genus Nitrosoarchaeum, "Candidatus N. uzonensis" also possesses a putative artubulin-encoding gene. Genome comparisons to related AOA with available genome sequences confirmed that the newly cultured AOA has an average nucleotide identity far below the species threshold and revealed a substantial degree of genomic plasticity with unique genomic regions in "Ca. N. uzonensis", which potentially include genetic determinants of ecological niche differentiation.

  3. Geomicrobiological exploration and characterization of a novel deep-sea hydrothermal system at the TOTO caldera in the Mariana Volcanic Arc.

    PubMed

    Nakagawa, Tatsunori; Takai, Ken; Suzuki, Yohey; Hirayama, Hisako; Konno, Uta; Tsunogai, Urumu; Horikoshi, Koki

    2006-01-01

    Novel hydrothermal activities accompanying effluent white smokers and elemental sulfur chimney structures at the north-east lava dome of the TOTO caldera depression in the Mariana Volcanic Arc have been explored and characterized by geochemical and microbiological surveys. White smoker hydrothermal fluids were observed in the potential hydrothermal activity centre of the field and represented the maximal temperature of 170 degrees C and the lowest pH of 1.6. The chimney structures, all consisting of elemental sulfur (sulfur chimney), were also unique to the TOTO caldera hydrothermal field. Microbial community structures in a sulfur chimney and its formation hydrothermal fluid with a high concentration of hydrogen sulfide (15 mM) have been investigated by culture-dependent and -independent analyses. 16S rRNA gene clone analysis and fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) analysis revealed that epsilon-Proteobacteria dominated the microbial communities in the sulfur chimney structure and formed a dense microbial mat covering the sulfur chimney surface. Archaeal phylotypes were consistently minor components in the communities and related to the genera Thermococcus, Pyrodictium, Aeropyrum, and the uncultivated archaeal group of 'deep-sea hydrothermal vent euryarchaeotal group'. Cultivation analysis suggested that the chemolithoautotrophs might play a significant ecological role as primary producers utilizing gas and sulfur compounds provided from hydrothermal fluids.

  4. Caldimicrobium rimae gen. nov., sp. nov., an extremely thermophilic, facultatively lithoautotrophic, anaerobic bacterium from the Uzon Caldera, Kamchatka.

    PubMed

    Miroshnichenko, Margarita L; Lebedinsky, Alexander V; Chernyh, N A; Tourova, Tatyana P; Kolganova, Tatyana V; Spring, Stefan; Bonch-Osmolovskaya, Elizaveta A

    2009-05-01

    An extremely thermophilic, strictly anaerobic, facultatively chemolithoautotrophic bacterium designated strain DS(T) was isolated from Treshchinnyi Spring, one of the hottest springs of the Uzon Caldera (Kamchatka, Russia). Cells of the novel organism were Gram-negative rods, about 1.0-1.2 microm long and 0.5 microm wide. The temperature range for growth was 52-82 degrees C, with an optimum at 75 degrees C. Growth was observed at pH 6.8-7.4, and the optimum pH was 7.0-7.2. Strain DS(T) was able to grow lithoautotrophically with hydrogen in the presence of CO(2) as a carbon source and thiosulfate or elemental sulfur as an electron acceptor. It also grew well with ethanol, fumarate, succinate or malate in the presence of thiosulfate. Yeast extract was not required for growth and did not stimulate growth. The genomic DNA G+C content was 35.2 mol%. Phylogenetic analysis of the 16S rRNA gene sequence indicated that the novel organism was a member of the family Thermodesulfobacteriaceae. On the basis of phylogenetic and physiological considerations, it is proposed that strain DS(T) represents a new genus and species, Caldimicrobium rimae gen. nov., sp. nov. The type strain of Caldimicrobium rimae is DS(T) (=DSM 19393(T) =VKM B-2460(T)).

  5. Sulfolobus hakonensis sp. nov., a novel species of acidothermophilic archaeon.

    PubMed

    Takayanagi, S; Kawasaki, H; Sugimori, K; Yamada, T; Sugai, A; Ito, T; Yamasato, K; Shioda, M

    1996-04-01

    We characterized a microbial strain that was isolated from a hot spring at a geothermal area in Hakone, Japan. This isolate, whose lobed-shaped cells were about 1.0 micron in diameter, was a facultative chemolitho-autotroph that required aerobic conditions for growth. The optimum pH was 3.0 (pH range, 1.0 to 4.0), and the optimum temperature was 70 degrees C (temperature range, 50 to 80 degrees C). Lithotrophically, this strain grew on elemental sulfur and reduced sulfur compounds. The G+C content of the genomic DNA was 38.4 mol%. This organism contained calditoglycerocaldarchaeol, which is characteristic of members of the Sulfolobaceae. The levels of 16S rRNA sequence similarity between the new isolate and Sulfolobus acidocaldarius, Sulfolobus solfataricus, and Sulfolobus shibatae were less than 89.8%. Unlike S. acidocaldarius, S. solfataricus, and S. shibatae, the new isolate utilized sugars and amino acids poorly as sole carbon sources, and the levels of DNA-DNA hybridization between the new isolate and these Sulfolobus species were very low. Phenotypically, the new isolate was also distinct from the obligately lithotrophic organism Sulfolobus metallicus. We concluded that the new organism belongs to a new Sulfolobus species, for which we propose the name Sulfolobus hakonensis.

  6. Electrofuels: A New Paradigm for Renewable Fuels

    SciTech Connect

    Conrado, Robert J.; Haynes, Chad A.; Haendler, Brenda E.; Toone, Eric J.

    2013-01-01

    Biofuels are by now a well-established component of the liquid fuels market and will continue to grow in importance for both economic and environmental reasons. To date, all commercial approaches to biofuels involve photosynthetic capture of solar radiation and conversion to reduced carbon; however, the low efficiency inherent to photosynthetic systems presents significant challenges to scaling. In 2009, the US Department of Energy (DOE) Advanced Research Projects Agency-Energy (ARPA-E) created the Electrofuels program to explore the potential of nonphotosynthetic autotrophic organisms for the conversion of durable forms of energy to energy-dense, infrastructure-compatible liquid fuels. The Electrofuels approach expands the boundaries of traditional biofuels and could offer dramatically higher conversion efficiencies while providing significant reductions in requirements for both arable land and water relative to photosynthetic approaches. The projects funded under the Electrofuels program tap the enormous and largely unexplored diversity of the natural world, and may offer routes to advanced biofuels that are significantly more efficient, scalable and feedstock-flexible than routes based on photosynthesis. Here, we describe the rationale for the creation of the Electrofuels program, and outline the challenges and opportunities afforded by chemolithoautotrophic approaches to liquid fuels.

  7. New Insight into the Role of the Calvin Cycle: Reutilization of CO2 Emitted through Sugar Degradation

    PubMed Central

    Shimizu, Rie; Dempo, Yudai; Nakayama, Yasumune; Nakamura, Satoshi; Bamba, Takeshi; Fukusaki, Eiichiro; Fukui, Toshiaki

    2015-01-01

    Ralstonia eutropha is a facultative chemolithoautotrophic bacterium that uses the Calvin–Benson–Bassham (CBB) cycle for CO2 fixation. This study showed that R. eutropha strain H16G incorporated 13CO2, emitted by the oxidative decarboxylation of [1-13C1]-glucose, into key metabolites of the CBB cycle and finally into poly(3-hydroxybutyrate) [P(3HB)] with up to 5.6% 13C abundance. The carbon yield of P(3HB) produced from glucose by the strain H16G was 1.2 times higher than that by the CBB cycle-inactivated mutants, in agreement with the possible fixation of CO2 estimated from the balance of energy and reducing equivalents through sugar degradation integrated with the CBB cycle. The results proved that the ‘gratuitously’ functional CBB cycle in R. eutropha under aerobic heterotrophic conditions participated in the reutilization of CO2 emitted during sugar degradation, leading to an advantage expressed as increased carbon yield of the storage compound. This is a new insight into the role of the CBB cycle, and may be applicable for more efficient utilization of biomass resources. PMID:26130086

  8. Expression and activity of the Calvin-Benson-Bassham cycle transcriptional regulator CbbR from Acidithiobacillus ferrooxidans in Ralstonia eutropha.

    PubMed

    Esparza, Mario; Jedlicki, Eugenia; Dopson, Mark; Holmes, David S

    2015-08-01

    Autotrophic fixation of carbon dioxide into cellular carbon occurs via several pathways but quantitatively, the Calvin-Benson-Bassham cycle is the most important. CbbR regulates the expression of the cbb genes involved in CO2 fixation via the Calvin-Benson-Bassham cycle in a number of autotrophic bacteria. A gene potentially encoding CbbR (cbbR(AF)) has been predicted in the genome of the chemolithoautotrophic, extreme acidophile Acidithiobacillus ferrooxidans. However, this microorganism is recalcitrant to genetic manipulation impeding the experimental validation of bioinformatic predictions. Two novel functional assays were devised to advance our understanding of cbbR(AF) function using the mutated facultative autotroph Ralstonia eutropha H14 ΔcbbR as a surrogate host to test gene function: (i) cbbR(AF) was expressed in R. eutropha and was able to complement ΔcbbR; and (ii) CbbR(AF) was able to regulate the in vivo activity of four A. ferrooxidans cbb operon promoters in R. eutropha. These results open up the use of R. eutropha as a surrogate host to explore cbbR(AF) activity. © FEMS 2015. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  9. Nitrous oxide production by lithotrophic ammonia-oxidizing bacteria and implications for engineered nitrogen-removal systems.

    PubMed

    Chandran, Kartik; Stein, Lisa Y; Klotz, Martin G; van Loosdrecht, Mark C M

    2011-12-01

    Chemolithoautotrophic AOB (ammonia-oxidizing bacteria) form a crucial component in microbial nitrogen cycling in both natural and engineered systems. Under specific conditions, including transitions from anoxic to oxic conditions and/or excessive ammonia loading, and the presence of high nitrite (NO₂⁻) concentrations, these bacteria are also documented to produce nitric oxide (NO) and nitrous oxide (N₂O) gases. Essentially, ammonia oxidation in the presence of non-limiting substrate concentrations (ammonia and O₂) is associated with N₂O production. An exceptional scenario that leads to such conditions is the periodical switch between anoxic and oxic conditions, which is rather common in engineered nitrogen-removal systems. In particular, the recovery from, rather than imposition of, anoxic conditions has been demonstrated to result in N₂O production. However, applied engineering perspectives, so far, have largely ignored the contribution of nitrification to N₂O emissions in greenhouse gas inventories from wastewater-treatment plants. Recent field-scale measurements have revealed that nitrification-related N₂O emissions are generally far higher than emissions assigned to heterotrophic denitrification. In the present paper, the metabolic pathways, which could potentially contribute to NO and N₂O production by AOB have been conceptually reconstructed under conditions especially relevant to engineered nitrogen-removal systems. Taken together, the reconstructed pathways, field- and laboratory-scale results suggest that engineering designs that achieve low effluent aqueous nitrogen concentrations also minimize gaseous nitrogen emissions.

  10. Molecular characterization of the sor gene, which encodes the sulfur oxygenase/reductase of the thermoacidophilic Archaeum Desulfurolobus ambivalens.

    PubMed Central

    Kletzin, A

    1992-01-01

    A 5.8-kbp HindIII fragment containing the sor gene which encodes the aerobically induced sulfur oxygenase/reductase of the thermoacidophilic, chemolithoautotrophic, and facultatively anaerobic archaeum Desulfurolobus ambivalens, was cloned in pUC18 by using an oligonucleotide derived from the N-terminal amino acid sequence for identification (pSOR-1/17). The native enzyme is a 550,000-molecular-weight oligomer composed of single 40,000-molecular-weight subunits; this oligomer is capable of the simultaneous oxidation and reduction of sulfur (A. Kletzin, J. Bacteriol. 171:1638-1643, 1989). From the fragment, 3,025 bp that contained the entire sor gene were sequenced. The sor gene encoded a protein with 309 amino acid residues (molecular weight, 35,317). The transcript length was determined by Northern RNA hybridization to be 960 to 1,020 nucleotides, and the transcriptional start site was mapped by primer extension analysis. The transcript of the sor gene in aerobically grown cells was amplified 38- to 42-fold relative to that in anaerobically grown cells. An initial transcriptional characterization of three neighboring genes of unknown function is also reported. Images PMID:1522063

  11. Denitrifying SUP05 Require Exogenous Nitrogen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shah, V.; Chang, B. X.; Morris, R. M.

    2016-02-01

    Members of the SUP05 clade of gamma-proteobacteria are among the most abundant chemoautotrophs in the ocean. Environmental sequencing studies suggest that they have critical roles in mediating carbon fixation, denitrification, and sulfur oxidation in oxygen minimum zones (OMZs). They have evaded cultivation and little is known about the specific growth requirements or substrate ranges that determine their abundance, distribution and impact on marine biogeochemical cycles. We evaluated the genetic potential of an isolate from the SUP05 clade "Ca. Thioglobus autotrophica strain EF1" to fix carbon, reduce nitrogen and oxidize sulfur under anaerobic growth conditions. Growth experiments support genomic predictions, indicating that strain EF1 is a facultatively anaerobic sulfur-oxidizing chemolithoautotroph that reduces nitrate to nitrite and nitric oxide to nitrous oxide. These experiments also revealed that strain EF1 is limited for growth by ammonium, which indicates that it requires an exogenous source of nitrogen for biosynthesis. Evidence that SUP05 cells produce nitrite and nitrous oxide and require exogenous nitrogen suggests that they have important roles in nitrogen cycling and that their growth is ultimately limited by the degradation of sinking organic matter.

  12. Evidence of atmospheric sulphur in the martian regolith from sulphur isotopes in meteorites.

    PubMed

    Farquhar, J; Savarino, J; Jackson, T L; Thiemens, M H

    2000-03-02

    Sulphur is abundant at the martian surface, yet its origin and evolution over time remain poorly constrained. This sulphur is likely to have originated in atmospheric chemical reactions, and so should provide records of the evolution of the martian atmosphere, the cycling of sulphur between the atmosphere and crust, and the mobility of sulphur in the martian regolith. Moreover, the atmospheric deposition of oxidized sulphur species could establish chemical potential gradients in the martian near-surface environment, and so provide a potential energy source for chemolithoautotrophic organisms. Here we present measurements of sulphur isotopes in oxidized and reduced phases from the SNC meteorites--the group of related achondrite meteorites believed to have originated on Mars--together with the results of laboratory photolysis studies of two important martian atmospheric sulphur species (SO2 and H2S). The photolysis experiments can account for the observed sulphur-isotope compositions in the SNC meteorites, and so identify a mechanism for producing large abiogenic 34S fractionations in the surface sulphur reservoirs. We conclude that the sulphur data from the SNC meteorites reflects deposition of oxidized sulphur species produced by atmospheric chemical reactions, followed by incorporation, reaction and mobilization of the sulphur within the regolith.

  13. Sulfur-oxidizing chemolithotrophic proteobacteria dominate the microbiota in high arctic thermal springs on Svalbard.

    PubMed

    Reigstad, Laila Johanne; Jorgensen, Steffen Leth; Lauritzen, Stein-Erik; Schleper, Christa; Urich, Tim

    2011-09-01

    The thermal springs Trollosen and Fisosen, located on the High Arctic archipelago Svalbard, discharge saline groundwaters rich in hydrogen sulfide and ammonium through a thick layer of permafrost. Large amounts of biomass that consist of filamentous microorganisms containing sulfur granules, as analyzed with energy dispersive X-ray analysis, were found in the outflow. Prokaryotic 16S rRNA gene libraries and quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR) analyses reported bacteria of the γ- and ɛ-proteobacterial classes as the dominant organisms in the filaments and the planktonic fractions, closely related to known chemolithoautotrophic sulfur oxidizers (Thiotrix and Sulfurovum). Archaea comprised ∼1% of the microbial community, with the majority of sequences affiliated with the Thaumarchaeota. Archaeal and bacterial genes coding for a subunit of the enzyme ammonia monooxygenase (amoA) were detected, as well as 16S rRNA genes of Nitrospira, all of which is indicative of potential complete nitrification in both springs. 16S rRNA sequences related to methanogens and methanotrophs were detected as well. This study provides evidence that the microbial communities in Trollosen and Fisosen are sustained by chemolithotrophy, mainly through the oxidation of reduced sulfur compounds, and that ammonium and methane might be minor, additional sources of energy and carbon.

  14. Integration of Metagenomic and Stable Carbon Isotope Evidence Reveals the Extent and Mechanisms of Carbon Dioxide Fixation in High-Temperature Microbial Communities

    PubMed Central

    Jennings, Ryan de Montmollin; Moran, James J.; Jay, Zackary J.; Beam, Jacob P.; Whitmore, Laura M.; Kozubal, Mark A.; Kreuzer, Helen W.; Inskeep, William P.

    2017-01-01

    Although the biological fixation of CO2 by chemolithoautotrophs provides a diverse suite of organic compounds utilized by chemoorganoheterotrophs as a carbon and energy source, the relative amounts of autotrophic C in chemotrophic microbial communities are not well-established. The extent and mechanisms of CO2 fixation were evaluated across a comprehensive set of high-temperature, chemotrophic microbial communities in Yellowstone National Park by combining metagenomic and stable 13C isotope analyses. Fifteen geothermal sites representing three distinct habitat types (iron-oxide mats, anoxic sulfur sediments, and filamentous “streamer” communities) were investigated. Genes of the 3-hydroxypropionate/4-hydroxybutyrate, dicarboxylate/4-hydroxybutyrate, and reverse tricarboxylic acid CO2 fixation pathways were identified in assembled genome sequence corresponding to the predominant Crenarchaeota and Aquificales observed across this habitat range. Stable 13C analyses of dissolved inorganic and organic C (DIC, DOC), and possible landscape C sources were used to interpret the 13C content of microbial community samples. Isotope mixing models showed that the minimum fractions of autotrophic C in microbial biomass were >50% in the majority of communities analyzed. The significance of CO2 as a C source in these communities provides a foundation for understanding community assembly and succession, and metabolic linkages among early-branching thermophilic autotrophs and heterotrophs. PMID:28217111

  15. Methylated sulfur compounds in microbial mats: In situ concentrations and metabolism by a colorless sulfur bacterium

    SciTech Connect

    Visscher, P.T. Netherlands Inst. for Sea Research, Den Burg ); Quist, P.; vanGemerden, H. )

    1991-06-01

    The concentrations of the volatile organic sulfur compounds methanethiol, dimethyl disulfide, and dimethyl sulfide (DMS) and the viable population capable of DMS utilization in laminated microbial ecosystems were evaluated. Significant levels of DMS and dimethyl disulfide (maximum concentrations of 220 and 24 nmol cm{sup 3} of sediment{sup {minus}1}, respectively) could be detected only at the top 20 mm of the microbial mat, whereas methanethiol was found only at depth horizons from 20 to 50 mm (maximum concentrations of 42 nmol cm{sup 3} of sediment{sup {minus}1}). DMS concentrations in the surface layer doubled after cold hydrolysis of its precursor, dimethylsulfoniopropioinate. Most-probable-number counts revealed 2.2 {times} 10{sup 5} cells cm{sup 3} of sediment{sup {minus}1}, in the 0- to 5-mm depth horizon, capable of growth on DMS as the sole source of energy. An obligately chemolithoautotrophic bacillus designated strain T5 was isolated from the top layer of the marine sediment. Continuous culture studies in which DMS was the growth-limiting substrate revealed a maximum specific growth rate of 0.10 h{sup {minus}1} and a saturation constant of 90 {mu}mol liter{sup {minus}1} for aerobic growth on this substrate.

  16. Microbial Communities on Seafloor Basalts at Dorado Outcrop Reflect Level of Alteration and Highlight Global Lithic Clades.

    PubMed

    Lee, Michael D; Walworth, Nathan G; Sylvan, Jason B; Edwards, Katrina J; Orcutt, Beth N

    2015-01-01

    Areas of exposed basalt along mid-ocean ridges and at seafloor outcrops serve as conduits of fluid flux into and out of a subsurface ocean, and microbe-mineral interactions can influence alteration reactions at the rock-water interface. Located on the eastern flank of the East Pacific Rise, Dorado Outcrop is a site of low-temperature (<20°C) hydrothermal venting and represents a new end-member in the current survey of seafloor basalt biomes. Consistent with prior studies, a survey of 16S rRNA gene sequence diversity using universal primers targeting the V4 hypervariable region revealed much greater richness and diversity on the seafloor rocks than in surrounding seawater. Overall, Gamma-, Alpha-, and Deltaproteobacteria, and Thaumarchaeota dominated the sequenced communities, together making up over half of the observed diversity, though bacterial sequences were more abundant than archaeal in all samples. The most abundant bacterial reads were closely related to the obligate chemolithoautotrophic, sulfur-oxidizing Thioprofundum lithotrophicum, suggesting carbon and sulfur cycling as dominant metabolic pathways in this system. Representatives of Thaumarchaeota were detected in relatively high abundance on the basalts in comparison to bottom water, possibly indicating ammonia oxidation. In comparison to other sequence datasets from globally distributed seafloor basalts, this study reveals many overlapping and cosmopolitan phylogenetic groups and also suggests that substrate age correlates with community structure.

  17. Complete genome sequence of the thermophilic, hydrogen-oxidizing Bacillus tusciae type strain (T2T) and reclassification in the new genus, Kyrpidia gen. nov. as Kyrpidia tusciae comb. nov. and emendation of the family Alicyclobacillaceae da Costa and Rainey, 2010.

    PubMed Central

    Klenk, Hans-Peter; Lapidus, Alla; Chertkov, Olga; Copeland, Alex; Del Rio, Tijana Glavina; Nolan, Matt; Lucas, Susan; Chen, Feng; Tice, Hope; Cheng, Jan-Fang; Han, Cliff; Bruce, David; Goodwin, Lynne; Pitluck, Sam; Pati, Amrita; Ivanova, Natalia; Mavromatis, Konstantinos; Daum, Chris; Chen, Amy; Palaniappan, Krishna; Chang, Yun-juan; Land, Miriam; Hauser, Loren; Jeffries, Cynthia D.; Detter, John C.; Rohde, Manfred; Abt, Birte; Pukall, Rüdiger; Göker, Markus; Bristow, James; Markowitz, Victor; Hugenholtz, Philip; Eisen, Jonathan A.

    2011-01-01

    Bacillus tusciae Bonjour & Aragno 1994 is a hydrogen-oxidizing, thermoacidophilic spore former that lives as a facultative chemolithoautotroph in solfataras. Although 16S rRNA gene sequencing was well established at the time of the initial description of the organism, 16S sequence data were not available and the strain was placed into the genus Bacillus based on limited chemotaxonomic information. Despite the now obvious misplacement of strain T2 as a member of the genus Bacillus in 16S rRNA-based phylogenetic trees, the misclassification remained uncorrected for many years, which was likely due to the extremely difficult, analysis-hampering cultivation conditions and poor growth rate of the strain. Here we provide a taxonomic re-evaluation of strain T2T (= DSM 2912 = NBRC 15312) and propose its reclassification as the type strain of a new species, Kyrpidia tusciae, and the type species of the new genus Kyrpidia, which is a sister-group of Alicyclobacillus. The family Alicyclobacillaceae da Costa and Rainey, 2010 is emended. The 3,384,766 bp genome with its 3,323 protein-coding and 78 RNA genes is part of the Genomic Encyclopedia of Bacteria and Archaea project. PMID:22180816

  18. Comparison of Optimal Thermodynamic Models of the Tricarboxylic Acid Cycle from Heterotrophs, Cyanobacteria, and Green Sulfur Bacteria.

    PubMed

    Thomas, Dennis G; Jaramillo-Riveri, Sebastian; Baxter, Douglas J; Cannon, William R

    2014-12-26

    We have applied a new stochastic simulation approach to predict the metabolite levels, material flux, and thermodynamic profiles of the oxidative TCA cycles found in E. coli and Synechococcus sp. PCC 7002, and in the reductive TCA cycle typical of chemolithoautotrophs and phototrophic green sulfur bacteria such as Chlorobaculum tepidum. The simulation approach is based on modeling states using statistical thermodynamics and employs an assumption similar to that used in transition state theory. The ability to evaluate the thermodynamics of metabolic pathways allows one to understand the relationship between coupling of energy and material gradients in the environment and the self-organization of stable biological systems, and it is shown that each cycle operates in the direction expected due to its environmental niche. The simulations predict changes in metabolite levels and flux in response to changes in cofactor concentrations that would be hard to predict without an elaborate model based on the law of mass action. In fact, we show that a thermodynamically unfavorable reaction can still have flux in the forward direction when it is part of a reaction network. The ability to predict metabolite levels, energy flow, and material flux should be significant for understanding the dynamics of natural systems and for understanding principles for engineering organisms for production of specialty chemicals.

  19. AMP-Forming Acetyl Coenzyme A Synthetase in the Outermost Membrane of the Hyperthermophilic Crenarchaeon Ignicoccus hospitalis

    PubMed Central

    Mayer, Florian; Küper, Ulf; Meyer, Carolin; Daxer, Stefanie; Müller, Volker; Rachel, Reinhard

    2012-01-01

    Ignicoccus hospitalis, a hyperthermophilic, chemolithoautotrophic crenarchaeon was found to possess a new CO2 fixation pathway, the dicarboxylate/4-hydroxybutyrate cycle. The primary acceptor molecule for this pathway is acetyl coenzyme A (acetyl-CoA), which is regenerated in the cycle via the characteristic intermediate 4-hydroxybutyrate. In the presence of acetate, acetyl-CoA can alternatively be formed in a one-step mechanism via an AMP-forming acetyl-CoA synthetase (ACS). This enzyme was identified after membrane preparation by two-dimensional native PAGE/SDS-PAGE, followed by matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization–time of flight tandem mass spectrometry and N-terminal sequencing. The ACS of I. hospitalis exhibits a molecular mass of ∼690 kDa with a monomeric molecular mass of 77 kDa. Activity tests on isolated membranes and bioinformatic analyses indicated that the ACS is a constitutive membrane-associated (but not an integral) protein complex. Unexpectedly, immunolabeling on cells of I. hospitalis and other described Ignicoccus species revealed that the ACS is localized at the outermost membrane. This perfectly coincides with recent results that the ATP synthase and the H2:sulfur oxidoreductase complexes are also located in the outermost membrane of I. hospitalis. These results imply that the intermembrane compartment of I. hospitalis is not only the site of ATP synthesis but may also be involved in the primary steps of CO2 fixation. PMID:22247508

  20. Steady-State Growth under Inorganic Carbon Limitation Conditions Increases Energy Consumption for Maintenance and Enhances Nitrous Oxide Production in Nitrosomonas europaea

    PubMed Central

    Giguere, Andrew; Chaplen, Frank; Bottomley, Peter J.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Nitrosomonas europaea is a chemolithoautotrophic bacterium that oxidizes ammonia (NH3) to obtain energy for growth on carbon dioxide (CO2) and can also produce nitrous oxide (N2O), a greenhouse gas. We interrogated the growth, physiological, and transcriptome responses of N. europaea to conditions of replete (>5.2 mM) and limited inorganic carbon (IC) provided by either 1.0 mM or 0.2 mM sodium carbonate (Na2CO3) supplemented with atmospheric CO2. IC-limited cultures oxidized 25 to 58% of available NH3 to nitrite, depending on the dilution rate and Na2CO3 concentration. IC limitation resulted in a 2.3-fold increase in cellular maintenance energy requirements compared to those for NH3-limited cultures. Rates of N2O production increased 2.5- and 6.3-fold under the two IC-limited conditions, increasing the percentage of oxidized NH3-N that was transformed to N2O-N from 0.5% (replete) up to 4.4% (0.2 mM Na2CO3). Transcriptome analysis showed differential expression (P ≤ 0.05) of 488 genes (20% of inventory) between replete and IC-limited conditions, but few differences were detected between the two IC-limiting treatments. IC-limited conditions resulted in a decreased expression of ammonium/ammonia transporter and ammonia monooxygenase subunits and increased the expression of genes involved in C1 metabolism, including the genes for RuBisCO (cbb gene cluster), carbonic anhydrase, folate-linked metabolism of C1 moieties, and putative C salvage due to oxygenase activity of RuBisCO. Increased expression of nitrite reductase (gene cluster NE0924 to NE0927) correlated with increased production of N2O. Together, these data suggest that N. europaea adapts physiologically during IC-limited steady-state growth, which leads to the uncoupling of NH3 oxidation from growth and increased N2O production. IMPORTANCE Nitrification, the aerobic oxidation of ammonia to nitrate via nitrite, is an important process in the global nitrogen cycle. This process is generally dependent

  1. Evidence for a diverse microbial community in a 3.46 Ga ocean from ABDP#1 core

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Watanabe, Y.; Bevacqua, D. C.; Ohmoto, H.

    2010-12-01

    from 3.7 to 0.01 wt%; (4) increasing δ13Ccarb values from -2.4 to +5.8‰; and (5) increasing Δ13Ccarb-org values from ~30 to 15‰. These data suggest that: (A) Organic matter accumulated on the seafloor during the anoxic stage with siderite precipitation was mostly remnant of cyanobacteria (δ13Corg = -27±5‰); and (B) During oxic (and intensive hydrothermal) stage of hematite precipitation, remnants of cyanobacteria were decomposed within unconsolidated sediments to CO2 and CH4 by chemolithoheterotrophic methanogens; and this CO2 together with H2 from hydrothermal fluids were used by chemolithoautotrophic methanogens to produce isotopically heavy organic matter. A variety of organisms that thrived in different chemical and thermal conditions (aerobes and anaerobes; photoautotrophs and chemolithoautotrophs; mesophylic and thermophylic) already existed in an ocean 3.46 Ga ago.

  2. The Microbial Sulfur Cycle at Extremely Haloalkaline Conditions of Soda Lakes

    PubMed Central

    Sorokin, Dimitry Y.; Kuenen, J. Gijs; Muyzer, Gerard

    2011-01-01

    Soda lakes represent a unique ecosystem with extremely high pH (up to 11) and salinity (up to saturation) due to the presence of high concentrations of sodium carbonate in brines. Despite these double extreme conditions, most of the lakes are highly productive and contain a fully functional microbial system. The microbial sulfur cycle is among the most active in soda lakes. One of the explanations for that is high-energy efficiency of dissimilatory conversions of inorganic sulfur compounds, both oxidative and reductive, sufficient to cope with costly life at double extreme conditions. The oxidative part of the sulfur cycle is driven by chemolithoautotrophic haloalkaliphilic sulfur-oxidizing bacteria (SOB), which are unique for soda lakes. The haloalkaliphilic SOB are present in the surface sediment layer of various soda lakes at high numbers of up to 106 viable cells/cm3. The culturable forms are so far represented by four novel genera within the Gammaproteobacteria, including the genera Thioalkalivibrio, Thioalkalimicrobium, Thioalkalispira, and Thioalkalibacter. The latter two were only found occasionally and each includes a single species, while the former two are widely distributed in various soda lakes over the world. The genus Thioalkalivibrio is the most physiologically diverse and covers the whole spectrum of salt/pH conditions present in soda lakes. Most importantly, the dominant subgroup of this genus is able to grow in saturated soda brines containing 4 M total Na+ – a so far unique property for any known aerobic chemolithoautotroph. Furthermore, some species can use thiocyanate as a sole energy source and three out of nine species can grow anaerobically with nitrogen oxides as electron acceptor. The reductive part of the sulfur cycle is active in the anoxic layers of the sediments of soda lakes. The in situ measurements of sulfate reduction rates and laboratory experiments with sediment slurries using sulfate, thiosulfate, or elemental sulfur as

  3. Microbial Response to a Deep-Sea Volcanic Eruption at 9N on the East Pacific Rise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sievert, S. M.; Gulmann, L. K.; Hugler, M.; Taylor, C. D.; Molyneaux, S. J.; Sylva, S. P.; Beaulieu, S. E.; Shank, T. M.; Summons, R. E.; Wirsen, C. O.

    2006-12-01

    sulfidicus, a chemolithoautotrophic sulfur oxidizing bacterium that forms filamentous sulfur, dominating. Arcobacter related sequences were not observed on the basalt samples, indicating that these organisms might be early colonizers, which subsequently get replaced by other bacteria. This supports our hypothesis that autotrophic epsilon- proteobacteria, such as Arcobacter, will be the first colonizers, followed by increasing numbers of heterotrophic microorganisms over time. These autotrophic microbes appear to predominantly live in the subsurface at vents, allowing the rapid colonization of newly exposed surfaces. To confirm this hypothesis we also filtered large volumes of water in situ to access the composition of the microbial communities associated with the expelled fluids. Shipboard incubations with 13C-labeled bicarbonate were further carried out to identify chemolithoautotrophic microbes. The data obtained in this study will further be compared with recent colonization experiments that were carried out at 9 ° N EPR prior to the eruption. Overall, our studies show that microorganisms rapidly colonize newly exposed surfaces at sites where warm water emanates from the sub-seafloor. Furthermore there appears to be a succession of microbes, with epsilon-proteobacteria and in particular Arcobacter species as primary colonizers, possibly triggering the settlement of larvae. Finally, the data obtained during this cruise will serve as a benchmark for future cruises and analyses to document the changes in the microbial communities occurring over time.

  4. The microbial sulfur cycle at extremely haloalkaline conditions of soda lakes.

    PubMed

    Sorokin, Dimitry Y; Kuenen, J Gijs; Muyzer, Gerard

    2011-01-01

    Soda lakes represent a unique ecosystem with extremely high pH (up to 11) and salinity (up to saturation) due to the presence of high concentrations of sodium carbonate in brines. Despite these double extreme conditions, most of the lakes are highly productive and contain a fully functional microbial system. The microbial sulfur cycle is among the most active in soda lakes. One of the explanations for that is high-energy efficiency of dissimilatory conversions of inorganic sulfur compounds, both oxidative and reductive, sufficient to cope with costly life at double extreme conditions. The oxidative part of the sulfur cycle is driven by chemolithoautotrophic haloalkaliphilic sulfur-oxidizing bacteria (SOB), which are unique for soda lakes. The haloalkaliphilic SOB are present in the surface sediment layer of various soda lakes at high numbers of up to 10(6) viable cells/cm(3). The culturable forms are so far represented by four novel genera within the Gammaproteobacteria, including the genera Thioalkalivibrio, Thioalkalimicrobium, Thioalkalispira, and Thioalkalibacter. The latter two were only found occasionally and each includes a single species, while the former two are widely distributed in various soda lakes over the world. The genus Thioalkalivibrio is the most physiologically diverse and covers the whole spectrum of salt/pH conditions present in soda lakes. Most importantly, the dominant subgroup of this genus is able to grow in saturated soda brines containing 4 M total Na(+) - a so far unique property for any known aerobic chemolithoautotroph. Furthermore, some species can use thiocyanate as a sole energy source and three out of nine species can grow anaerobically with nitrogen oxides as electron acceptor. The reductive part of the sulfur cycle is active in the anoxic layers of the sediments of soda lakes. The in situ measurements of sulfate reduction rates and laboratory experiments with sediment slurries using sulfate, thiosulfate, or elemental sulfur as

  5. From industrial sites to environmental applications with Cupriavidus metallidurans.

    PubMed

    Diels, Ludo; Van Roy, Sandra; Taghavi, Safyih; Van Houdt, Rob

    2009-08-01

    Cupriavidus metallidurans CH34 and related strains are adapted to metal contaminated environments. A strong resistance to environmental stressors and adaptation make it ideal strains for survival in decreasing biodiversity conditions and for bioaugmentation purposes in environmental applications. The soil bacterium C. metallidurans is able to grow chemolithoautotrophically on hydrogen and carbon dioxide allowing a strong resilience under conditions lacking organic matter. The biofilm growth on soil particles allows coping with starvation or bad conditions of pH, temperature and pollutants. Its genomic capacity of two megaplasmids encoding several heavy metal resistance operons allowed growth in heavy metal contaminated habitats. In addition its specific siderophores seem to play a role in heavy metal sequestration besides their role in the management of bioavailable iron. Efflux ATPases and RND systems pump the metal cations to the membrane surface where polysaccharides serve as heavy metal binding and nucleation sites for crystallisation of metal carbonates. These polysaccharides contribute also to flotation under specific conditions in a soil-heavy metals-bacteria suspension mixture. An inoculated moving bed sand filter was constructed to treat heavy metal contaminated water and to remove the metals in the form of biomass mixed with metal carbonates. A membrane based contactor allowed to use the bacteria as well in a versatile wastewater treatment system and to grow homogeneously formed heavy metal carbonates. Its behaviour toward heavy metal binding and flotation was combined in a biometal sludge reactor to extract and separate heavy metals from metal contaminated soils. Finally its metal-induced heavy metal resistance allowed constructing whole cell heavy metal biosensors which, after contact with contaminated soil, waste, solids, minerals and ashes, were induced in function of the bioavailable concentration (Cd, Zn, Cu, Cr, Co, Ni, Tl, Pb and Hg) in the solids

  6. Transcription of genes coding for metabolic key functions in Nitrosomonas europaea during aerobic and anaerobic growth.

    PubMed

    Beyer, Sonja; Gilch, Stefan; Meyer, Ortwin; Schmidt, Ingo

    2009-01-01

    Nitrosomonas europaea can grow under conditions of chemolithoautotrophic aerobic (oxygen as oxidant) as well as anaerobic [nitrogen dioxide (NO(2)) as oxidant] nitrification or chemoorganotrophic anaerobic pyruvate-dependent denitrification. In this study, the adaptation of the transcription (mRNA synthesis/concentration) of N. europaea to aerobic and anaerobic growth conditions was evaluated and the transcription of genes coding for metabolic key functions was analyzed: nitrogen and energy metabolism (amoA, hao, rh1, nirK, norB, nsc, aceE, ldhA, ppc, gltA, odhA, coxA), carbon dioxide fixation (cbbL), gluconeogenesis (ppsA), cell growth (ftsZ), and oxidative stress (sodB). During aerobic ammonia oxidation the specific activities of ammonia oxidation, nitrite reduction, and the growth rates correlated with the transcription level of the corresponding genes amoA/hao, nirK/norB/nsc, and cbbL/ftsZ. In anaerobically ammonia-oxidizing cells of N. europaea, the cellular mRNA concentrations of amoA, hao, rh1,coxA, cbbL, ftsZ, and sodB were reduced compared with aerobically nitrifying cells, but the mRNA levels of nirK, norB, and nsc were significantly increased. During anaerobic pyruvate-dependent denitrification, the mRNA abundance of nirK, norB, nsc, aceE, gltA, and odhA was increased, while the concentrations of amoA,hao, rh1, coxAcbbL, ftsZ, and sodB were significantly reduced. Temperature, pH value, and NH(4)(+), O(2), NO, and NO(2) concentrations had comparatively small effects on the transcription of the studied genes.

  7. Insights into the Quorum Sensing Regulon of the Acidophilic Acidithiobacillus ferrooxidans Revealed by Transcriptomic in the Presence of an Acyl Homoserine Lactone Superagonist Analog.

    PubMed

    Mamani, Sigde; Moinier, Danielle; Denis, Yann; Soulère, Laurent; Queneau, Yves; Talla, Emmanuel; Bonnefoy, Violaine; Guiliani, Nicolas

    2016-01-01

    While a functional quorum sensing system has been identified in the acidophilic chemolithoautotrophic Acidithiobacillus ferrooxidans ATCC 23270(T) and shown to modulate cell adhesion to solid substrates, nothing is known about the genes it regulates. To address the question of how quorum sensing controls biofilm formation in A. ferrooxidans (T), the transcriptome of this organism in conditions in which quorum sensing response is stimulated by a synthetic superagonist AHL (N-acyl homoserine lactones) analog has been studied. First, the effect on biofilm formation of a synthetic AHL tetrazolic analog, tetrazole 9c, known for its agonistic QS activity, was assessed by fluorescence and electron microscopy. A fast adherence of A. ferrooxidans (T) cells on sulfur coupons was observed. Then, tetrazole 9c was used in DNA microarray experiments that allowed the identification of genes regulated by quorum sensing signaling, and more particularly, those involved in early biofilm formation. Interestingly, afeI gene, encoding the AHL synthase, but not the A. ferrooxidans quorum sensing transcriptional regulator AfeR encoding gene, was shown to be regulated by quorum sensing. Data indicated that quorum sensing network represents at least 4.5% (141 genes) of the ATCC 23270(T) genome of which 42.5% (60 genes) are related to biofilm formation. Finally, AfeR was shown to bind specifically to the regulatory region of the afeI gene at the level of the palindromic sequence predicted to be the AfeR binding site. Our results give new insights on the response of A. ferrooxidans to quorum sensing and on biofilm biogenesis.

  8. Carbon flow from volcanic CO2 into soil microbial communities of a wetland mofette

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Beulig, Felix; Heuer, Verena B.; Akob, Denise M.; Viehweger, Bernhard; Elvert, Marcus; Herrmann, Martina; Hinrichs, Kai-Uwe; Küsel, Kirsten

    2015-01-01

    Effects of extremely high carbon dioxide (CO2) concentrations on soil microbial communities and associated processes are largely unknown. We studied a wetland area affected by spots of subcrustal CO2 degassing (mofettes) with focus on anaerobic autotrophic methanogenesis and acetogenesis because the pore gas phase was largely hypoxic. Compared with a reference soil, the mofette was more acidic (ΔpH ~0.8), strongly enriched in organic carbon (up to 10 times), and exhibited lower prokaryotic diversity. It was dominated by methanogens and subdivision 1Acidobacteria, which likely thrived under stable hypoxia and acidic pH. Anoxic incubations revealed enhanced formation of acetate and methane (CH4) from hydrogen (H2) and CO2 consistent with elevated CH4 and acetate levels in the mofette soil. 13CO2 mofette soil incubations showed high label incorporations with ~512 ng13C g (dry weight (dw)) soil−1 d−1 into the bulk soil and up to 10.7 ng 13C g (dw) soil−1 d−1 into almost all analyzed bacterial lipids. Incorporation of CO2-derived carbon into archaeal lipids was much lower and restricted to the first 10 cm of the soil. DNA-SIP analysis revealed that acidophilic methanogens affiliated withMethanoregulaceae and hitherto unknown acetogens appeared to be involved in the chemolithoautotrophic utilization of 13CO2. Subdivision 1 Acidobacteriaceae assimilated 13CO2 likely via anaplerotic reactions because Acidobacteriaceae are not known to harbor enzymatic pathways for autotrophic CO2 assimilation. We conclude that CO2-induced geochemical changes promoted anaerobic and acidophilic organisms and altered carbon turnover in affected soils.

  9. Sulfur metabolizing microbes dominate microbial communities in Andesite-hosted shallow-sea hydrothermal systems.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yao; Zhao, Zihao; Chen, Chen-Tung Arthur; Tang, Kai; Su, Jianqiang; Jiao, Nianzhi

    2012-01-01

    To determine microbial community composition, community spatial structure and possible key microbial processes in the shallow-sea hydrothermal vent systems off NE Taiwan's coast, we examined the bacterial and archaeal communities of four samples collected from the water column extending over a redoxocline gradient of a yellow and four from a white hydrothermal vent. Ribosomal tag pyrosequencing based on DNA and RNA showed statistically significant differences between the bacterial and archaeal communities of the different hydrothermal plumes. The bacterial and archaeal communities from the white hydrothermal plume were dominated by sulfur-reducing Nautilia and Thermococcus, whereas the yellow hydrothermal plume and the surface water were dominated by sulfide-oxidizing Thiomicrospira and Euryarchaeota Marine Group II, respectively. Canonical correspondence analyses indicate that methane (CH(4)) concentration was the only statistically significant variable that explains all community cluster patterns. However, the results of pyrosequencing showed an essential absence of methanogens and methanotrophs at the two vent fields, suggesting that CH(4) was less tied to microbial processes in this shallow-sea hydrothermal system. We speculated that mixing between hydrothermal fluids and the sea or meteoric water leads to distinctly different CH(4) concentrations and redox niches between the yellow and white vents, consequently influencing the distribution patterns of the free-living Bacteria and Archaea. We concluded that sulfur-reducing and sulfide-oxidizing chemolithoautotrophs accounted for most of the primary biomass synthesis and that microbial sulfur metabolism fueled microbial energy flow and element cycling in the shallow hydrothermal systems off the coast of NE Taiwan.

  10. Deferrisoma paleochoriense sp. nov., a thermophilic, iron(III)-reducing bacterium from a shallow-water hydrothermal vent in the Mediterranean Sea

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Perez-Rodriguez, Ileana M.; Rawls, Matthew; Coykendall, Dolly K.; Foustoukos, Dionysis I.

    2016-01-01

    A novel thermophilic, anaerobic, mixotrophic bacterium, designated strain MAG-PB1T, was isolated from a shallow-water hydrothermal vent system in Palaeochori Bay off the coast of the island of Milos, Greece. The cells were Gram-negative, rugose, short rods, approximately 1.0 μm long and 0.5 μm wide. Strain MAG-PB1T grew at 30–70 °C (optimum 60 °C), 0–50 g NaCl l− 1 (optimum 15–20 g l− 1) and pH 5.5–8.0 (optimum pH 6.0). Generation time under optimal conditions was 2.5 h. Optimal growth occurred under chemolithoautotrophic conditions with H2 as the energy source and CO2 as the carbon source. Fe(III), Mn(IV), arsenate and selenate were used as electron acceptors. Peptone, tryptone, Casamino acids, sucrose, yeast extract, d-fructose, α-d-glucose and ( − )-d-arabinose also served as electron donors. No growth occurred in the presence of lactate or formate. The G+C content of the genomic DNA was 66.7 mol%. Phylogenetic analysis of the 16S rRNA gene sequence indicated that this organism is closely related to Deferrisoma camini, the first species of a recently described genus in the Deltaproteobacteria. Based on the 16S rRNA gene phylogenetic analysis and on physiological, biochemical and structural characteristics, the strain was found to represent a novel species, for which the name Deferrisoma palaeochoriense sp. nov. is proposed. The type strain is MAG-PB1T ( = JCM 30394T = DSM 29363T). 

  11. Nitrification expanded: discovery, physiology and genomics of a nitrite-oxidizing bacterium from the phylum Chloroflexi

    PubMed Central

    Sorokin, Dimitry Y; Lücker, Sebastian; Vejmelkova, Dana; Kostrikina, Nadezhda A; Kleerebezem, Robbert; Rijpstra, W Irene C; Damsté, Jaap S Sinninghe; Le Paslier, Denis; Muyzer, Gerard; Wagner, Michael; van Loosdrecht, Mark C M; Daims, Holger

    2012-01-01

    Nitrite-oxidizing bacteria (NOB) catalyze the second step of nitrification, a major process of the biogeochemical nitrogen cycle, but the recognized diversity of this guild is surprisingly low and only two bacterial phyla contain known NOB. Here, we report on the discovery of a chemolithoautotrophic nitrite oxidizer that belongs to the widespread phylum Chloroflexi not previously known to contain any nitrifying organism. This organism, named Nitrolancetus hollandicus, was isolated from a nitrifying reactor. Its tolerance to a broad temperature range (25–63 °C) and low affinity for nitrite (Ks=1 mℳ), a complex layered cell envelope that stains Gram positive, and uncommon membrane lipids composed of 1,2-diols distinguish N. hollandicus from all other known nitrite oxidizers. N. hollandicus grows on nitrite and CO2, and is able to use formate as a source of energy and carbon. Genome sequencing and analysis of N. hollandicus revealed the presence of all genes required for CO2 fixation by the Calvin cycle and a nitrite oxidoreductase (NXR) similar to the NXR forms of the proteobacterial nitrite oxidizers, Nitrobacter and Nitrococcus. Comparative genomic analysis of the nxr loci unexpectedly indicated functionally important lateral gene transfer events between Nitrolancetus and other NOB carrying a cytoplasmic NXR, suggesting that horizontal transfer of the NXR module was a major driver for the spread of the capability to gain energy from nitrite oxidation during bacterial evolution. The surprising discovery of N. hollandicus significantly extends the known diversity of nitrifying organisms and likely will have implications for future research on nitrification in natural and engineered ecosystems. PMID:22763649

  12. Sulfur Metabolizing Microbes Dominate Microbial Communities in Andesite-Hosted Shallow-Sea Hydrothermal Systems

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yao; Zhao, Zihao; Chen, Chen-Tung Arthur; Tang, Kai; Su, Jianqiang; Jiao, Nianzhi

    2012-01-01

    To determine microbial community composition, community spatial structure and possible key microbial processes in the shallow-sea hydrothermal vent systems off NE Taiwan’s coast, we examined the bacterial and archaeal communities of four samples collected from the water column extending over a redoxocline gradient of a yellow and four from a white hydrothermal vent. Ribosomal tag pyrosequencing based on DNA and RNA showed statistically significant differences between the bacterial and archaeal communities of the different hydrothermal plumes. The bacterial and archaeal communities from the white hydrothermal plume were dominated by sulfur-reducing Nautilia and Thermococcus, whereas the yellow hydrothermal plume and the surface water were dominated by sulfide-oxidizing Thiomicrospira and Euryarchaeota Marine Group II, respectively. Canonical correspondence analyses indicate that methane (CH4) concentration was the only statistically significant variable that explains all community cluster patterns. However, the results of pyrosequencing showed an essential absence of methanogens and methanotrophs at the two vent fields, suggesting that CH4 was less tied to microbial processes in this shallow-sea hydrothermal system. We speculated that mixing between hydrothermal fluids and the sea or meteoric water leads to distinctly different CH4 concentrations and redox niches between the yellow and white vents, consequently influencing the distribution patterns of the free-living Bacteria and Archaea. We concluded that sulfur-reducing and sulfide-oxidizing chemolithoautotrophs accounted for most of the primary biomass synthesis and that microbial sulfur metabolism fueled microbial energy flow and element cycling in the shallow hydrothermal systems off the coast of NE Taiwan. PMID:22970260

  13. Ammonia-oxidizing Crenarchaeota and nitrification inside the tissue of a colonial ascidian.

    PubMed

    Martínez-García, Manuel; Stief, Peter; Díaz-Valdés, Marta; Wanner, Gerhard; Ramos-Esplá, Alfonso; Dubilier, Nicole; Antón, Josefa

    2008-11-01

    Marine Crenarchaeota represent an abundant component of the oceanic microbiota that play an important role in the global nitrogen cycle. Here we report the association of the colonial ascidian Cystodytes dellechiajei with putative ammonia-oxidizing Crenarchaeota that could actively be involved in nitrification inside the animal tissue. As shown by 16S rRNA gene analysis, the ascidian-associated Crenarchaeota were phylogenetically related to Nitrosopumilus maritimus, the first marine archaeon isolated in pure culture that grows chemolithoautotrophically oxidizing ammonia to nitrite aerobically. Catalysed reporter deposition (CARD)-FISH revealed that the Crenarchaeota were specifically located inside the tunic tissue of the colony, where moreover the expression of amoA gene was detected. The amoA gene encodes the alpha-subunit of ammonia monooxygenase, which is involved in the first step of nitrification, the oxidation of ammonia to nitrite. Sequencing of amoA gene showed that they were phylogenetically related to amoA genes of N. maritimus and other putative ammonia-oxidizing marine Crenarchaeota. In order to track the suspected nitrification activity inside the ascidian colony under in vivo conditions, microsensor profiles were measured through the tunic tissue. Net NO(x) production was detected in the tunic layer 1200-1800 microm with rates of 58-90 nmol cm(-3) h(-1). Oxygen and pH microsensor profiles showed that the layer of net NO(x) production coincided with O(2) concentrations of 103-116 microM and pH value of 5.2. Together, molecular and microsensor data indicate that Crenarchaeota could oxidize ammonia to nitrite aerobically, and thus be involved in nitrification inside the ascidian tissue.

  14. The complete genome sequence of Thermoproteus tenax: a physiologically versatile member of the Crenarchaeota.

    PubMed

    Siebers, Bettina; Zaparty, Melanie; Raddatz, Guenter; Tjaden, Britta; Albers, Sonja-Verena; Bell, Steve D; Blombach, Fabian; Kletzin, Arnulf; Kyrpides, Nikos; Lanz, Christa; Plagens, André; Rampp, Markus; Rosinus, Andrea; von Jan, Mathias; Makarova, Kira S; Klenk, Hans-Peter; Schuster, Stephan C; Hensel, Reinhard

    2011-01-01

    Here, we report on the complete genome sequence of the hyperthermophilic Crenarchaeum Thermoproteus tenax (strain Kra1, DSM 2078(T)) a type strain of the crenarchaeotal order Thermoproteales. Its circular 1.84-megabase genome harbors no extrachromosomal elements and 2,051 open reading frames are identified, covering 90.6% of the complete sequence, which represents a high coding density. Derived from the gene content, T. tenax is a representative member of the Crenarchaeota. The organism is strictly anaerobic and sulfur-dependent with optimal growth at 86°C and pH 5.6. One particular feature is the great metabolic versatility, which is not accompanied by a distinct increase of genome size or information density as compared to other Crenarchaeota. T. tenax is able to grow chemolithoautotrophically (CO₂/H₂) as well as chemoorganoheterotrophically in presence of various organic substrates. All pathways for synthesizing the 20 proteinogenic amino acids are present. In addition, two presumably complete gene sets for NADH:quinone oxidoreductase (complex I) were identified in the genome and there is evidence that either NADH or reduced ferredoxin might serve as electron donor. Beside the typical archaeal A₀A₁-ATP synthase, a membrane-bound pyrophosphatase is found, which might contribute to energy conservation. Surprisingly, all genes required for dissimilatory sulfate reduction are present, which is confirmed by growth experiments. Mentionable is furthermore, the presence of two proteins (ParA family ATPase, actin-like protein) that might be involved in cell division in Thermoproteales, where the ESCRT system is absent, and of genes involved in genetic competence (DprA, ComF) that is so far unique within Archaea.

  15. The Crystal Structure of Nitrosomonas europaea Sucrose Synthase Reveals Critical Conformational Changes and Insights into Sucrose Metabolism in Prokaryotes

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Rui; Asención Diez, Matías D.; Figueroa, Carlos M.; Machtey, Matías; Iglesias, Alberto A.; Ballicora, Miguel A.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT In this paper we report the first crystal structure of a prokaryotic sucrose synthase from the nonphotosynthetic bacterium Nitrosomonas europaea. The obtained structure was in an open form, whereas the only other available structure, from the plant Arabidopsis thaliana, was in a closed conformation. Comparative structural analysis revealed a “hinge-latch” combination, which is critical to transition between the open and closed forms of the enzyme. The N. europaea sucrose synthase shares the same fold as the GT-B family of the retaining glycosyltransferases. In addition, a triad of conserved homologous catalytic residues in the family was shown to be functionally critical in the N. europaea sucrose synthase (Arg567, Lys572, and Glu663). This implies that sucrose synthase shares not only a common origin with the GT-B family but also a similar catalytic mechanism. The enzyme preferred transferring glucose from ADP-glucose rather than UDP-glucose like the eukaryotic counterparts. This predicts that these prokaryotic organisms have a different sucrose metabolic scenario from plants. Nucleotide preference determines where the glucose moiety is targeted after sucrose is degraded. IMPORTANCE We obtained biochemical and structural evidence of sucrose metabolism in nonphotosynthetic bacteria. Until now, only sucrose synthases from photosynthetic organisms have been characterized. Here, we provide the crystal structure of the sucrose synthase from the chemolithoautotroph N. europaea. The structure supported that the enzyme functions with an open/close induced fit mechanism. The enzyme prefers as the substrate adenine-based nucleotides rather than uridine-based like the eukaryotic counterparts, implying a strong connection between sucrose and glycogen metabolism in these bacteria. Mutagenesis data showed that the catalytic mechanism must be conserved not only in sucrose synthases but also in all other retaining GT-B glycosyltransferases. PMID:26013491

  16. Autotrophic ammonia oxidation in a deep-sea hydrothermal plume.

    PubMed

    Lam, Phyllis; Cowen, James P; Jones, Ronald D

    2004-02-01

    Direct evidence for autotrophic ammonia oxidation is documented for the first time in a deep-sea hydrothermal plume. Elevated NH(4) (+) concentrations of up to 341+/-136 nM were recorded in the plume core at Main Endeavour Field, Juan de Fuca Ridge. This fueled autotrophic ammonia oxidation rates as high as 91 nM day(-1), or 92% of the total net NH(4) (+) removal. High abundance of ammonia-oxidizing bacteria was detected using fluorescence in situ hybridization. Ammonia-oxidizing bacteria within the plume core (1.0-1.4x10(4) cells ml(-1)) accounted for 7.0-7.5% of the total microbial community, and were at least as abundant as methanotrophs. Ammonia-oxidizing bacteria were a substantial component of the particle-associated communities (up to 51%), with a predominance of the r-strategist Nitrosomonas-like cells. In situ chemolithoautotrophic organic carbon production via ammonia oxidation may yield 3.9-18 mg C m(-2) day(-1) within the plume directly over Main Endeavour Field. This rate was comparable to that determined for methane oxidation in a previous study, or at least four-fold greater than the flux of photosynthetic carbon reaching plume depths measured in another study. Hence, autotrophic ammonia oxidation in the neutrally buoyant hydrothermal plume is significant to both carbon and nitrogen cycling in the deep-sea water column at Endeavour, and represents another important link between seafloor hydrothermal systems and deep-sea biogeochemistry.

  17. Desulfonauticus autotrophicus sp. nov., a novel thermophilic sulfate-reducing bacterium isolated from oil-production water and emended description of the genus Desulfonauticus.

    PubMed

    Mayilraj, Shanmugam; Kaksonen, Anna H; Cord-Ruwisch, Ralf; Schumann, Peter; Spröer, Cathrin; Tindall, Brian J; Spring, Stefan

    2009-03-01

    A novel moderately thermophilic and halophilic sulfate-reducing bacterium, strain TeSt(T), was isolated from production water of an oil field in Northern Germany near Hamburg. The cells were Gram-negative, straight to slightly curved rods and motile by a single polar flagellum. Only hydrogen and formate served as electron donors, whereas a wide variety of organic substrates and CO(2) could be used as carbon sources. Sulfate, sulfite, thiosulfate and sulfur were used as electron acceptors, but not nitrate or ferric iron. The novel isolate was negative for oxidase, catalase and desulfoviridin enzyme activity. Cytochromes were present and predominantly of the c-type. Whole-cells fatty acid patterns were dominated by the branched-chain fatty acids anteiso-C(15:0), iso-C(15:0), iso-C(17:0) and anteiso-C(17:0). As major respiratory lipoquinones partially saturated derivates of menaquinone 6 [MK-6(H(2)) and probably MK-6(H(4))] were identified. The G + C content of the genomic DNA was 41.3 mol% (HPLC method). An analysis of the 16S rRNA gene sequence indicated that strain TeSt(T) belongs to the family Desulfohalobiaceae within the class Deltaproteobacteria. The most closely related species with a sequence similarity of 95.0% was Desulfonauticus submarinus suggesting an affiliation of TeSt(T) to the genus Desulfonauticus. The novel isolate could be clearly distinguished from Desulfonauticus submarinus by its ability to grow chemolithoautotrophically and hence should be assigned to a novel species for which the name Desulfonauticus autotrophicus sp. nov. is proposed. The type strain is TeSt(T) (=DSM 4206(T)=JCM 13028(T)).

  18. Thermosulfurimonas dismutans gen. nov., sp. nov., an extremely thermophilic sulfur-disproportionating bacterium from a deep-sea hydrothermal vent.

    PubMed

    Slobodkin, A I; Reysenbach, A-L; Slobodkina, G B; Baslerov, R V; Kostrikina, N A; Wagner, I D; Bonch-Osmolovskaya, E A

    2012-11-01

    An extremely thermophilic, anaerobic, chemolithoautotrophic bacterium (strain S95(T)) was isolated from a deep-sea hydrothermal vent chimney located on the Eastern Lau Spreading Center, Pacific Ocean, at a depth of 1910 m. Cells of strain S95(T) were oval to short Gram-negative rods, 0.5-0.6 µm in diameter and 1.0-1.5 µm in length, growing singly or in pairs. Cells were motile with a single polar flagellum. The temperature range for growth was 50-92 °C, with an optimum at 74 °C. The pH range for growth was 5.5-8.0, with an optimum at pH 7.0. Growth of strain S95(T) was observed at NaCl concentrations ranging from 1.5 to 3.5% (w/v). Strain S95(T) grew anaerobically with elemental sulfur as an energy source and bicarbonate/CO(2) as a carbon source. Elemental sulfur was disproportionated to sulfide and sulfate. Growth was enhanced in the presence of poorly crystalline iron(III) oxide (ferrihydrite) as a sulfide-scavenging agent. Strain S95(T) was also able to grow by disproportionation of thiosulfate and sulfite. Sulfate was not used as an electron acceptor. Analysis of the 16S rRNA gene sequence revealed that the isolate belongs to the phylum Thermodesulfobacteria. On the basis of its physiological properties and results of phylogenetic analyses, it is proposed that the isolate represents the sole species of a new genus, Thermosulfurimonas dismutans gen. nov., sp. nov.; S95(T) (=DSM 24515(T)=VKM B-2683(T)) is the type strain of the type species. This is the first description of a thermophilic micro-organism that disproportionates elemental sulfur.

  19. Novel magnetite-producing magnetotactic bacteria belonging to the Gammaproteobacteria.

    PubMed

    Lefèvre, Christopher T; Viloria, Nathan; Schmidt, Marian L; Pósfai, Mihály; Frankel, Richard B; Bazylinski, Dennis A

    2012-02-01

    Two novel magnetotactic bacteria (MTB) were isolated from sediment and water collected from the Badwater Basin, Death Valley National Park and southeastern shore of the Salton Sea, respectively, and were designated as strains BW-2 and SS-5, respectively. Both organisms are rod-shaped, biomineralize magnetite, and are motile by means of flagella. The strains grow chemolithoautotrophically oxidizing thiosulfate and sulfide microaerobically as electron donors, with thiosulfate oxidized stoichiometrically to sulfate. They appear to utilize the Calvin-Benson-Bassham cycle for autotrophy based on ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase (RubisCO) activity and the presence of partial sequences of RubisCO genes. Strains BW-2 and SS-5 biomineralize chains of octahedral magnetite crystals, although the crystals of SS-5 are elongated. Based on 16S rRNA gene sequences, both strains are phylogenetically affiliated with the Gammaproteobacteria class. Strain SS-5 belongs to the order Chromatiales; the cultured bacterium with the highest 16S rRNA gene sequence identity to SS-5 is Thiohalocapsa marina (93.0%). Strain BW-2 clearly belongs to the Thiotrichales; interestingly, the organism with the highest 16S rRNA gene sequence identity to this strain is Thiohalospira alkaliphila (90.2%), which belongs to the Chromatiales. Each strain represents a new genus. This is the first report of magnetite-producing MTB phylogenetically associated with the Gammaproteobacteria. This finding is important in that it significantly expands the phylogenetic diversity of the MTB. Physiology of these strains is similar to other MTB and continues to demonstrate their potential in nitrogen, iron, carbon and sulfur cycling in natural environments.

  20. Carboxydothermus pertinax sp. nov., a thermophilic, hydrogenogenic, Fe(III)-reducing, sulfur-reducing carboxydotrophic bacterium from an acidic hot spring.

    PubMed

    Yoneda, Yasuko; Yoshida, Takashi; Kawaichi, Satoshi; Daifuku, Takashi; Takabe, Keiji; Sako, Yoshihiko

    2012-07-01

    A novel anaerobic, Fe(III)-reducing, hydrogenogenic, carboxydotrophic bacterium, designated strain Ug1(T), was isolated from a volcanic acidic hot spring in southern Kyushu Island, Japan. Cells of the isolate were rod-shaped (1.0-3.0 µm long) and motile due to peritrichous flagella. Strain Ug1(T) grew chemolithoautotrophically on CO (100% in the gas phase) with reduction of ferric citrate, amorphous iron (III) oxide, 9,10-anthraquinone 2,6-disulfonate, thiosulfate or elemental sulfur. No carboxydotrophic growth occurred with sulfate, sulfite, nitrate or fumarate as electron acceptor. During growth on CO, H(2) and CO(2) were produced. Growth occurred on molecular hydrogen as an energy source and carbon dioxide as a sole carbon source. Growth was observed on various organic compounds under an N(2) atmosphere with the reduction of ferric iron. The temperature range for carboxydotrophic growth was 50-70 °C, with an optimum at 65 °C. The pH(25 °C) range for growth was 4.6-8.6, with an optimum between 6.0 and 6.5. The doubling time under optimum conditions using CO with ferric citrate was 1.5 h. The DNA G+C content was 42.2 mol%. Analysis of 16S rRNA gene sequences demonstrated that this strain belongs to the thermophilic carboxydotrophic bacterial genus Carboxydothermus, with sequence similarities of 94.1-96.6% to members of this genus. The isolate can be distinguished from other members of the genus Carboxydothermus by its ability to grow with elemental sulfur or thiosulfate coupled to CO oxidation. On the basis of phylogenetic analysis and unique physiological features, the isolate represents a novel species of the genus Carboxydothermus for which the name Carboxydothermus pertinax sp. nov. is proposed; the type strain of the novel species is Ug1(T) (=DSM 23698(T)=NBRC 107576(T)).

  1. Subduction zone forearc serpentinites as incubators for deep microbial life

    PubMed Central

    Plümper, Oliver; Geisler, Thorsten; Liu, Yang; Pabst, Sonja; Savov, Ivan P.; Rost, Detlef; Zack, Thomas

    2017-01-01

    Serpentinization-fueled systems in the cool, hydrated forearc mantle of subduction zones may provide an environment that supports deep chemolithoautotrophic life. Here, we examine serpentinite clasts expelled from mud volcanoes above the Izu–Bonin–Mariana subduction zone forearc (Pacific Ocean) that contain complex organic matter and nanosized Ni–Fe alloys. Using time-of-flight secondary ion mass spectrometry and Raman spectroscopy, we determined that the organic matter consists of a mixture of aliphatic and aromatic compounds and functional groups such as amides. Although an abiotic or subduction slab-derived fluid origin cannot be excluded, the similarities between the molecular signatures identified in the clasts and those of bacteria-derived biopolymers from other serpentinizing systems hint at the possibility of deep microbial life within the forearc. To test this hypothesis, we coupled the currently known temperature limit for life, 122 °C, with a heat conduction model that predicts a potential depth limit for life within the forearc at ∼10,000 m below the seafloor. This is deeper than the 122 °C isotherm in known oceanic serpentinizing regions and an order of magnitude deeper than the downhole temperature at the serpentinized Atlantis Massif oceanic core complex, Mid-Atlantic Ridge. We suggest that the organic-rich serpentinites may be indicators for microbial life deep within or below the mud volcano. Thus, the hydrated forearc mantle may represent one of Earth’s largest hidden microbial ecosystems. These types of protected ecosystems may have allowed the deep biosphere to thrive, despite violent phases during Earth’s history such as the late heavy bombardment and global mass extinctions. PMID:28396389

  2. Anaerobic methanotrophic community of a 5346-m-deep vesicomyid clam colony in the Japan Trench

    PubMed Central

    Felden, J; Ruff, S E; Ertefai, T; Inagaki, F; Hinrichs, K-U; Wenzhöfer, F

    2014-01-01

    Vesicomyidae clams harbor sulfide-oxidizing endosymbionts and are typical members of cold seep communities where active venting of fluids and gases takes place. We investigated the central biogeochemical processes that supported a vesicomyid clam colony as part of a locally restricted seep community in the Japan Trench at 5346 m water depth, one of the deepest seep settings studied to date. An integrated approach of biogeochemical and molecular ecological techniques was used combining in situ and ex situ measurements. In sediment of the clam colony, low sulfate reduction rates (maximum 128 nmol mL−1 day−1) were coupled to the anaerobic oxidation of methane. They were observed over a depth range of 15 cm, caused by active transport of sulfate due to bioturbation of the vesicomyid clams. A distinct separation between the seep and the surrounding seafloor was shown by steep horizontal geochemical gradients and pronounced microbial community shifts. The sediment below the clam colony was dominated by anaerobic methanotrophic archaea (ANME-2c) and sulfate-reducing Desulfobulbaceae (SEEP-SRB-3, SEEP-SRB-4). Aerobic methanotrophic bacteria were not detected in the sediment, and the oxidation of sulfide seemed to be carried out chemolithoautotrophically by Sulfurovum species. Thus, major redox processes were mediated by distinct subgroups of seep-related microorganisms that might have been selected by this specific abyssal seep environment. Fluid flow and microbial activity were low but sufficient to support the clam community over decades and to build up high biomasses. Hence, the clams and their microbial communities adapted successfully to a low-energy regime and may represent widespread chemosynthetic communities in the Japan Trench. In this regard, they contributed to the restricted deep-sea trench biodiversity as well as to the organic carbon availability, also for non-seep organisms, in such oligotrophic benthic environment of the dark deep ocean. PMID

  3. The Ecology of Acidophilic Microorganisms in the Corroding Concrete Sewer Environment

    PubMed Central

    Li, Xuan; Kappler, Ulrike; Jiang, Guangming; Bond, Philip L.

    2017-01-01

    Concrete corrosion is one of the most significant problems affecting valuable sewer infrastructure on a global scale. This problem occurs in the aerobic zone of the sewer, where a layer of surface corrosion develops on the exposed concrete and the surface pH is typically lowered from around 11–10 (pristine concrete) to pH 2–4. Acidophilic microorganisms become established as biofilms within the concrete corrosion layer and enhance the loss of concrete mass. Until recently, the acidophilic community was considered to comprise relatively few species of microorganisms, however, the biodiversity of the corrosion community is now recognized as being extensive and varying from different sewer environmental conditions. The diversity of acidophiles in the corrosion communities includes chemolithoautotrophs, chemolithoheterotrophs, and chemoorganoheterotrophs. The activity of these microorganisms is strongly affected by H2S levels in the sewer gas phase, although CO2, organic matter, and iron in the corrosion layer influence this acidic ecosystem. This paper briefly presents the conditions within the sewer that lead to the development of concrete corrosion in that environment. The review focuses on the acidophilic microorganisms detected in sewer corrosion environments, and then summarizes their proposed functions and physiology, especially in relation to the corrosion process. To our knowledge, this is the first review of acidophilic corrosion microbial communities, in which, the ecology and the environmental conditions (when available) are considered. Ecological studies of sewer corrosion are limited, however, where possible, we summarize the important metabolic functions of the different acidophilic species detected in sewer concrete corrosion layers. It is evident that microbial functions in the acidic sewer corrosion environment can be linked to those occurring in the analogous acidic environments of acid mine drainage and bioleaching. PMID:28473816

  4. Assembly and Succession of Iron Oxide Microbial Mat Communities in Acidic Geothermal Springs

    SciTech Connect

    Beam, Jake; Bernstein, Hans C.; Jay, Z.; Kozubal, Mark; Jennings, Ryan; Tringe, Susannah G.; Inskeep, William P.

    2016-02-15

    Iron oxide microbial mats are ubiquitous geobiological features on Earth and occur in extant acidic hot springs of Yellowstone National Park (YNP), WY, USA, and form as a result of microbial processes. The relative contribution of different organisms to the development of these mat ecosystems is of specific interest. We hypothesized that chemolithoautotrophic organisms contribute to the early development and production of Fe(III)-oxide mats, which could support later-colonizing heterotrophic microorganisms. Sterile glass slides were incubated in the outflow channels of two acidic geothermal springs in YNP, and spatiotemporal changes in Fe(III)-oxide accretion and abundance of relevant community members were measured. Lithoautotrophic Hydrogenobaculum spp. were first colonizers and the most abundant taxa identified during early successional stages (7 – 40 days). Populations of M. yellowstonensis colonized after ~ 7 days, corresponding to visible Fe(III)-oxide accretion. Heterotrophic archaea colonized after 30 days, and emerge as the dominant functional guild in mature iron oxide mats (1 – 2 cm thick) that form after 70 – 120 days. First-order rate constants of iron oxide accretion ranged from 0.05 – 0.046 day-1, and reflected the absolute amount of iron accreted. Micro- and macroscale microterracettes were identified during iron oxide mat development, and suggest that the mass transfer of oxygen limits microbial growth. This was also demonstrated using microelectrode measurements of oxygen as a function of mat depth, which showed steep gradients in oxygen from the aqueous mat interface to ~ 1 mm. The formation and succession of amorphous Fe(III)-oxide mat communities follows a predictable pattern of distinct stages and growth. The successional stages and microbial signatures observed in these extant Fe(III)-oxide mat communities may be relevant to other past or present Fe(III)-oxide mineralizing systems.

  5. The Genome of Nitrospina gracilis Illuminates the Metabolism and Evolution of the Major Marine Nitrite Oxidizer.

    PubMed

    Lücker, Sebastian; Nowka, Boris; Rattei, Thomas; Spieck, Eva; Daims, Holger

    2013-01-01

    In marine systems, nitrate is the major reservoir of inorganic fixed nitrogen. The only known biological nitrate-forming reaction is nitrite oxidation, but despite its importance, our knowledge of the organisms catalyzing this key process in the marine N-cycle is very limited. The most frequently encountered marine NOB are related to Nitrospina gracilis, an aerobic chemolithoautotrophic bacterium isolated from ocean surface waters. To date, limited physiological and genomic data for this organism were available and its phylogenetic affiliation was uncertain. In this study, the draft genome sequence of N. gracilis strain 3/211 was obtained. Unexpectedly for an aerobic organism, N. gracilis lacks classical reactive oxygen defense mechanisms and uses the reductive tricarboxylic acid cycle for carbon fixation. These features indicate microaerophilic ancestry and are consistent with the presence of Nitrospina in marine oxygen minimum zones. Fixed carbon is stored intracellularly as glycogen, but genes for utilizing external organic carbon sources were not identified. N. gracilis also contains a full gene set for oxidative phosphorylation with oxygen as terminal electron acceptor and for reverse electron transport from nitrite to NADH. A novel variation of complex I may catalyze the required reverse electron flow to low-potential ferredoxin. Interestingly, comparative genomics indicated a strong evolutionary link between Nitrospina, the nitrite-oxidizing genus Nitrospira, and anaerobic ammonium oxidizers, apparently including the horizontal transfer of a periplasmically oriented nitrite oxidoreductase and other key genes for nitrite oxidation at an early evolutionary stage. Further, detailed phylogenetic analyses using concatenated marker genes provided evidence that Nitrospina forms a novel bacterial phylum, for which we propose the name Nitrospinae.

  6. Microbial Response to High Temperature Hydrothermal Forcing: AISICS Vent (Lucky Strike, 37°N, MAR) and Prokaryote Community as Example.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Henri, P. A.; Rommevaux, C.; Chavagnac, V.; Degboe, J.; Destrigneville, C.; Boulart, C.; Lesongeur, F.; Castillo, A.; Goodfroy, A.

    2015-12-01

    To study the hydrothermal forcing on microbial colonization, and impacts on the oceanic crust alteration, an integrated study was led at the Tour Eiffel hydrothermal site (Lucky Strike hydrothermal field, 37°N, MAR). We benefited from an annual survey between 2009 and 2011 of temperatures, along with sampling of focused and diffused fluids for chemical analysis, and chimney sampling and samples from microbial colonization experiments analyzed for prokaryotic composition and rock alteration study. The chemical composition of the fluids show an important increase in the CO2 concentration at the Eiffel Tower site between 2009 and 2010 followed by a decrease between 2010 and 2011. In 2011, several fluid samples show an important depletion in Si, suggesting that some Si was removed by interaction with the stockwork before emission. Our observations, regarding the previous studies of chemical fluid affected by a magmatic event lead us to suppose that a magmatic/tectonic event occurred under the Lucky Strike hydrothermal field between 2009 and 2010. The results of the prokaryotic communities' analysis show that a shift occurred in the dominant microbial metabolisms present in the colonizer retrieved in 2010 and the one retrieved in 2011. Archaeal communities shifted from chemolithoautotropic sulfite/thiosulfate reducers-dominated in 2010 to ammonia oxidizers-dominated in 2011. The bacterial communities also undergo a shift, from a community with diversified metabolisms in 2010 to a community strongly dominated by chemolithoautotrophic sulfide or hydrogen oxidation in 2011. Moreover, in terms of ecological preferendum, the Archaeal communities shifted from thermophilic-dominated to mesophilic-dominated. The present study underline the influence of modifications in gases compositions of hydrothermal fluids subsequently to a degassing of the magma chamber and their impact on the microbial communities living in the vicinity of hydrothermal vents at the Eiffel Tower site.

  7. Genomic diversity within the haloalkaliphilic genus Thioalkalivibrio

    PubMed Central

    Ahn, Anne-Catherine; Meier-Kolthoff, Jan P.; Overmars, Lex; Richter, Michael; Woyke, Tanja; Sorokin, Dimitry Y.

    2017-01-01

    Thioalkalivibrio is a genus of obligate chemolithoautotrophic haloalkaliphilic sulfur-oxidizing bacteria. Their habitat are soda lakes which are dual extreme environments with a pH range from 9.5 to 11 and salt concentrations up to saturation. More than 100 strains of this genus have been isolated from various soda lakes all over the world, but only ten species have been effectively described yet. Therefore, the assignment of the remaining strains to either existing or novel species is important and will further elucidate their genomic diversity as well as give a better general understanding of this genus. Recently, the genomes of 76 Thioalkalivibrio strains were sequenced. On these, we applied different methods including (i) 16S rRNA gene sequence analysis, (ii) Multilocus Sequence Analysis (MLSA) based on eight housekeeping genes, (iii) Average Nucleotide Identity based on BLAST (ANIb) and MUMmer (ANIm), (iv) Tetranucleotide frequency correlation coefficients (TETRA), (v) digital DNA:DNA hybridization (dDDH) as well as (vi) nucleotide- and amino acid-based Genome BLAST Distance Phylogeny (GBDP) analyses. We detected a high genomic diversity by revealing 15 new “genomic” species and 16 new “genomic” subspecies in addition to the ten already described species. Phylogenetic and phylogenomic analyses showed that the genus is not monophyletic, because four strains were clearly separated from the other Thioalkalivibrio by type strains from other genera. Therefore, it is recommended to classify the latter group as a novel genus. The biogeographic distribution of Thioalkalivibrio suggested that the different “genomic” species can be classified as candidate disjunct or candidate endemic species. This study is a detailed genome-based classification and identification of members within the genus Thioalkalivibrio. However, future phenotypical and chemotaxonomical studies will be needed for a full species description of this genus. PMID:28282461

  8. Identification of mutation points in Cupriavidus necator NCIMB 11599 and genetic reconstitution of glucose-utilization ability in wild strain H16 for polyhydroxyalkanoate production.

    PubMed

    Orita, Izumi; Iwazawa, Reiko; Nakamura, Satoshi; Fukui, Toshiaki

    2012-01-01

    Although the facultative chemolithoautotrophic Cupriavidus necator (formerly Ralstonia eutropha) wild strain H16 is potentially useful as a host for metabolic engineering aimed at polyhydroxyalkanoate production, this organism is deficient in assimilating glucose, a major sugar in non-edible cellulosic resources. Growth properties of C. necator H16 harboring heterologous glf (encoding glucose-facilitated diffusion transporter) and glk (encoding glucokinase) from Zymomonas mobilis strongly suggested that the lack of glucose-utilization ability of C. necator H16 was caused by deficiency of both glucose-uptake and phosphorylation abilities. Next examination focused on previously unknown mutation points in a glucose-utilizing mutant of C. necator NCIMB 11599. Direct sequencing of a region of genes for putative N-acetylglucosamine-specific phosphoenolpyruvate-dependent phosphotransferase system and its upstream region identified a missense mutation in nagE corresponding to Gly265Arg in the EIIC-EIIB component, and a nonsense mutation in nagR encoding a putative GntR-type transcriptional regulator. Further analyses demonstrated that the glucose-utilization ability of C. necator NCIMB 11599 is attributed to extended sugar specificity of the mutated NagE and derepression of nagFE expression by inactivation of NagR. The mutation in nagE and disruption of nagR were then introduced onto chromosome 1 of wild strain H16 by homologous recombination. The resulting engineered strain C. necator nagE_G265R∆nagR exhibited comparable growth and poly(3-hydroxybutyrate) accumulation on glucose to those of the wild strain on fructose, demonstrating successful reconstitution of functional glucose-uptake and phosphorylation system. This recombinant strain is expected to be useful in further engineering for efficient production of PHAs from inexpensive biomass resources. Copyright © 2011 The Society for Biotechnology, Japan. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Diversity of culturable halophilic sulfur-oxidizing bacteria in hypersaline habitats.

    PubMed

    Sorokin, Dimitry Yu; Tourova, Tatjana P; Lysenko, Anatoly M; Muyzer, Gerard

    2006-10-01

    Unexpectedly high culturable diversity of moderately and extremely halophilic obligately chemolithoautotrophic sulfur-oxidizing bacteria (SOB) was discovered in the sediments of various hypersaline habitats, including chloride-sulfate lakes in Mongolia, Russia and Ukraine, a sea saltern in Slovenia and a deep-sea salt brine from the Mediterranean. Six different groups of halophilic SOB, including four new genera, all belonging to the Gammaproteobacteria, were found. Two groups of moderately halophilic strictly aerobic SOB dominated at 2 M NaCl, including representatives of the genus Halothiobacillus (in fully aerobic conditions) and Thiomicrospira (in micro-oxic conditions). Under denitrifying conditions at 2 M NaCl, a group of moderately halophilic and facultatively anaerobic SOB was selected, capable of complete denitrification of nitrate. The group represents a new genus with closest relatives among as yet undescribed marine thiodenitrifying isolates. With thiocyanate as a substrate, an enrichment culture at 2 M NaCl yielded a pure culture of moderately halophilic SOB capable of aerobic growth with thiocyanate and thiosulfate at up to 4 M NaCl. Furthermore, this bacterium also grew anaerobically using nitrite as electron acceptor. It formed a new lineage distantly related to the genus Thiomicrospira. Enrichments at 4 M NaCl resulted in the domination of two different, previously unknown, groups of extremely halophilic SOB. Under oxic conditions, they were represented by strictly aerobic spiral-shaped bacteria, related to the Ectothiorhodospiraceae, while under denitrifying conditions a group of facultatively anaerobic nitrate-reducing bacteria with long rod-shaped cells was selected, distantly related to the genus Acidithiobacillus.

  10. Spatial Heterogeneity of Bacterial Populations along an Environmental Gradient at a Shallow Submarine Hydrothermal Vent near Milos Island (Greece)

    PubMed Central

    Sievert, Stefan M.; Brinkhoff, Thorsten; Muyzer, Gerard; Ziebis, Wiebke; Kuever, Jan

    1999-01-01

    The spatial heterogeneity of bacterial populations at a shallow-water hydrothermal vent in the Aegean Sea close to the island of Milos (Greece) was examined at two different times by using acridine orange staining for total cell counts, cultivation-based techniques, and denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE) analysis of PCR-amplified 16S rRNA gene fragments. Concurrent with measurements of geochemical parameters, samples were taken along a transect from the center of the vent to the surrounding area. Most-probable-number (MPN) counts of metabolically defined subpopulations generally constituted a minor fraction of the total cell counts; both counting procedures revealed the highest cell numbers in a transition zone from the strongly hydrothermally influenced sediments to normal sedimentary conditions. Total cell counts ranged from 3.2 × 105 cells ml−1 in the water overlying the sediments to 6.4 × 108 cells g (wet weight) of sediment−1. MPN counts of chemolithoautotrophic sulfur-oxidizing bacteria varied between undetectable and 1.4 × 106 cells g−1. MPN counts for sulfate-reducing bacteria and dissimilatory iron-reducing bacteria ranged from 8 to 1.4 × 105 cells g−1 and from undetectable to 1.4 × 106 cells g−1, respectively. DGGE revealed a trend from a diverse range of bacterial populations which were present in approximately equal abundance in the transition zone to a community dominated by few populations close to the center of the vent. Temperature was found to be an important parameter in determining this trend. However, at one sampling time this trend was not discernible, possibly due to storm-induced disturbance of the upper sediment layers. PMID:10473383

  11. Molecular Analysis of the Diversity of Sulfate-Reducing and Sulfur-Oxidizing Prokaryotes in the Environment, Using aprA as Functional Marker Gene▿ †

    PubMed Central

    Meyer, Birte; Kuever, Jan

    2007-01-01

    The dissimilatory adenosine-5′-phosposulfate reductase is a key enzyme of the microbial sulfate reduction and sulfur oxidation processes. Because the alpha- and beta-subunit-encoding genes, aprBA, are highly conserved among sulfate-reducing and sulfur-oxidizing prokaryotes, they are most suitable for molecular profiling of the microbial community structure of the sulfur cycle in environment. In this study, a new aprA gene-targeting assay using a combination of PCR and denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis is presented. The screening of sulfate-reducing and sulfur-oxidizing reference strains as well as the analyses of environmental DNA from diverse habitats (e.g., microbial mats, invertebrate tissue, marine and estuarine sediments, and filtered hydrothermal water) by the new primer pair revealed an improved microbial diversity coverage and less-pronounced template-to-PCR product bias in direct comparison to those of the previously published primer set (B. Deplancke, K. R. Hristova, H. A. Oakley, V. J. McCracken, R. Aminov, R. I. Mackie, and H. R. Gaskins, Appl. Environ. Microbiol. 66:2166-2174, 2000). The concomitant molecular detection of sulfate-reducing and sulfur-oxidizing prokaryotes was confirmed. The new assay was applied in comparison with the 16S rRNA gene-based analysis to investigate the microbial diversity of the sulfur cycle in sediment, seawater, and manganese crust samples from four study sites in the area of the Lesser Antilles volcanic arc, Caribbean Sea (Caribflux project). The aprA gene-based approach revealed putative sulfur-oxidizing Alphaproteobacteria of chemolithoheterotrophic lifestyle to have been abundant in the nonhydrothermal sediment and water column. In contrast, the sulfur-based microbial community that inhabited the surface of the volcanic manganese crust was more complex, consisting predominantly of putative chemolithoautotrophic sulfur oxidizers of the Betaproteobacteria and Gammaproteobacteria. PMID:17921272

  12. Distribution and Diversity of Sulfur-Oxidizing Thiomicrospira spp. at a Shallow-Water Hydrothermal Vent in the Aegean Sea (Milos, Greece)

    PubMed Central

    Brinkhoff, Thorsten; Sievert, Stefan M.; Kuever, Jan; Muyzer, Gerard

    1999-01-01

    A shallow-water hydrothermal vent system in the Aegean Sea close to the island of Milos (Greece) was chosen to study the diversity and distribution of the chemolithoautotrophic sulfur-oxidizing bacterium Thiomicrospira. Cell numbers in samples from different regions around a solitary vent decreased toward the center of the vent (horizontal distribution), as well as with depth (vertical distribution), corresponding to an increase in temperature (from ca. 25 to 60°C) and a decrease in pH (from ca. pH 7 to 5). Thiomicrospira was one of the most abundant culturable sulfur oxidizers and was even dominant in one region. Phylogenetic analysis of Thiomicrospira spp. present in the highest most-probable-number (MPN) dilutions revealed that most of the obtained sequences grouped in two new closely related clusters within the Thiomicrospira branch. Two different new isolates, i.e., Milos-T1 and Milos-T2, were obtained from high-dilution (10−5) enrichments. Phylogenetic analysis indicated that isolate Milos-T1 is related to the recently described Thiomicrospira kuenenii and Hydrogenovibrio marinus, whereas isolate Milos-T2 grouped with the MPN sequences of cluster 2. The predominance of strain Milos-T2 was indicated by its identification in several environmental samples by hybridization analysis of denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE) patterns and by sequencing of one of the corresponding bands, i.e., ML-1, from the DGGE gel. The results shown in this paper support earlier indications that Thiomicrospira species are important members of hydrothermal vent communities. PMID:10473384

  13. Metagenomic analysis of microbial consortium from natural crude oil that seeps into the marine ecosystem offshore Southern California

    SciTech Connect

    Hawley, Erik R.; Piao, Hailan; Scott, Nicole M.; Malfatti, Stephanie; Pagani, Ioanna; Huntemann, Marcel; Chen, Amy; del Rio, Tijana G.; Foster, Brian; Copeland, A.; Jansson, Janet K.; Pati, Amrita; Gilbert, Jack A.; Tringe, Susannah G.; Lorenson, Thomas D.; Hess, Matthias

    2014-01-02

    Crude oils can be major contaminants of the marine ecosystem and microorganisms play a significant role in the degradation of the main constituents of crude oil. To increase our understanding of the microbial hydrocarbon degradation process in the marine ecosystem, we collected crude oil from an active seep area located in the Santa Barbara Channel (SBC) and generated a total of about 52 Gb of raw metagenomic sequence data. The assembled data comprised ~500 Mb, representing ~1.1 million genes derived primarily from chemolithoautotrophic bacteria. Members of Oceanospirillales, a bacterial order belonging to the Deltaproteobacteria, recruited less than 2% of the assembled genes within the SBC metagenome. In contrast, the microbial community associated with the oil plume that developed in the aftermath of the Deepwater Horizon (DWH) blowout in 2010, was dominated by Oceanospirillales, which comprised more than 60% of the metagenomic data generated from the DWH oil plume. This suggests that Oceanospirillales might play a less significant role in the microbially mediated hydrocarbon conversion within the SBC seep oil compared to the DWH plume oil. We hypothesize that this difference results from the SBC oil seep being mostly anaerobic, while the DWH oil plume is aerobic. Within the Archaea, the phylum Euryarchaeota, recruited more than 95% of the assembled archaeal sequences from the SBC oil seep metagenome, with more than 50% of the sequences assigned to members of the orders Methanomicrobiales and Methanosarcinales. These orders contain organisms capable of anaerobic methanogenesis and methane oxidation (AOM) and we hypothesize that these orders and their metabolic capabilities may be fundamental to the ecology of the SBC oil seep.

  14. Microbial Community Structure of Subglacial Lake Whillans, West Antarctica

    PubMed Central

    Achberger, Amanda M.; Christner, Brent C.; Michaud, Alexander B.; Priscu, John C.; Skidmore, Mark L.; Vick-Majors, Trista J.; Adkins, W.

    2016-01-01

    Subglacial Lake Whillans (SLW) is located beneath ∼800 m of ice on the Whillans Ice Stream in West Antarctica and was sampled in January of 2013, providing the first opportunity to directly examine water and sediments from an Antarctic subglacial lake. To minimize the introduction of surface contaminants to SLW during its exploration, an access borehole was created using a microbiologically clean hot water drill designed to reduce the number and viability of microorganisms in the drilling water. Analysis of 16S rRNA genes (rDNA) amplified from samples of the drilling and borehole water allowed an evaluation of the efficacy of this approach and enabled a confident assessment of the SLW ecosystem inhabitants. Based on an analysis of 16S rDNA and rRNA (i.e., reverse-transcribed rRNA molecules) data, the SLW community was found to be bacterially dominated and compositionally distinct from the assemblages identified in the drill system. The abundance of bacteria (e.g., Candidatus Nitrotoga, Sideroxydans, Thiobacillus, and Albidiferax) and archaea (Candidatus Nitrosoarchaeum) related to chemolithoautotrophs was consistent with the oxidation of reduced iron, sulfur, and nitrogen compounds having important roles as pathways for primary production in this permanently dark ecosystem. Further, the prevalence of Methylobacter in surficial lake sediments combined with the detection of methanogenic taxa in the deepest sediment horizons analyzed (34–36 cm) supported the hypothesis that methane cycling occurs beneath the West Antarctic Ice Sheet. Large ratios of rRNA to rDNA were observed for several operational taxonomic units abundant in the water column and sediments (e.g., Albidiferax, Methylobacter, Candidatus Nitrotoga, Sideroxydans, and Smithella), suggesting a potentially active role for these taxa in the SLW ecosystem. Our findings are consistent with chemosynthetic microorganisms serving as the ecological foundation in this dark subsurface environment, providing new

  15. Metatranscriptome Analysis of Aquifer Samples Reveals Unexpected Metabolic Lifestyles Relevant to Active Biogeochemical Cycling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beller, H. R.; Jewell, T. N. M.; Karaoz, U.; Banfield, J. F.; Brodie, E.; Williams, K. H.

    2015-12-01

    Modern molecular ecology techniques are revealing the metabolic potential of uncultivated microorganisms, but there is still much to be learned about the actual biogeochemical roles of microbes that have cultivated relatives. Here, we present metatranscriptomic and metagenomic data from a field study that provides evidence of coupled redox processes that have not been documented in cultivated relatives and, indeed, represent strains with metabolic traits that are novel with respect to closely related isolates. The data come from omics analysis of groundwater samples collected during an experiment in which nitrate (a native electron acceptor) was injected into a perennially suboxic aquifer in Rifle (CO). Transcriptional data indicated that just two groups of chemolithoautotrophic bacteria accounted for a very large portion (~80%) of overall community gene expression: (1) members of the Fe(II)-oxidizing Gallionellaceae family and (2) strains of the S-oxidizing species, Sulfurimonas denitrificans. Metabolic lifestyles for Gallionellaceae strains that were novel compared to cultivated representatives included nitrate-dependent Fe(II) oxidation and S oxidation. Evidence for these metabolisms included highly correlated temporal expression in binned data of nitrate reductase (e.g., narGHI) genes (which have never been reported in Gallionellaceae genomes) and Fe(II) oxidation genes (e.g., mtoA) or S oxidation genes (e.g., dsrE, aprA). Of the two most active strains of S. denitrificans, only one showed strong expression of S oxidation genes, whereas the other was apparently using an unexpected (as-yet unidentified) primary electron donor. Transcriptional data added considerable interpretive value to this study, as (1) metagenomic data would not have highlighted these organisms, which had a disproportionately large role in community metabolism relative to their populations, and (2) co-expression of coupled pathway genes could not be predicted based solely on metagenomic data.

  16. Methanogens in the Solar System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taubner, Ruth-Sophie; Schleper, Christa; Firneis, Maria G.; Rittmann, Simon

    2015-04-01

    The last decade of space science revealed that potential habitats in the Solar System may not be limited to the classical habitable zone supporting life as we know it. These microorganisms were shown to thrive under extremophilic growth conditions. Here, we outline the main eco-physiological characteristics of methanogens like their response on temperature, pressure, or pH changes or their resistance against radiation or desiccation. They can withstand extreme environmental conditions which makes them intriguing organisms for astrobiological studies. On Earth, they are found for example in wetlands, in arctic and antarctic subglacial environments, in ruminants, and even in the environment surrounding the Mars Desert Research Station in Utah. These obligate anaerobic chemolithoautotrophs or chemolithoheterotrophs are able to use e.g. hydrogen and C1 compounds like CO2, formate, or methanol as energy source and carbon source, respectively. We point out their capability to be able to habitat potential extraterrestrial biospheres all over the planetary system. We will give an overview about these possible environments on Mars, icy moons like Europa or Enceladus, and minor planets. We present an overview about studies of methanogens with an astrobiological relevance and we show our conclusions about the role of methanogens for the search for extraterrestrial life in the Solar System. We will present first results of our study about the possibility to cultivate methanogens under Enceladus-like conditions. For that, based on the observations obtained by the Cassini spacecraft concerning the plume compounds, we produce a medium with a composition similar to the ocean composition of this icy moon which is far more Enceladus-like than in any (published) experiment before. Eventually, we give an outlook on the feasibility and the necessity of future astrobiological studies with these microbes. We point out the importance of future in-situ or even sample and return missions to

  17. Complete genome sequence of Nitrobacter hamburgensis X14 and comparative genomic analysis of species within the genus Nitrobacter.

    SciTech Connect

    Starkenburg, Shawn R; Larimer, Frank W; Stein, Lisa Y; Klotz, Martin G; Chain, Patrick S. G.; Sayavedra-Soto, LA; Poret-Peterson, Amisha T.; Gentry, ME; Arp, D J; Ward, Bess B.; Bottomley, Peter J

    2008-05-01

    The alphaproteobacterium Nitrobacter hamburgensis X14 is a gram-negative facultative chemolithoautotroph that conserves energy from the oxidation of nitrite to nitrate. Sequencing and analysis of the Nitrobacter hamburgensis X14 genome revealed four replicons comprised of one chromosome (4.4 Mbp) and three plasmids (294, 188, and 121 kbp). Over 20% of the genome is composed of pseudogenes and paralogs. Whole-genome comparisons were conducted between N. hamburgensis and the finished and draft genome sequences of Nitrobacter winogradskyi and Nitrobacter sp. strain Nb-311A, respectively. Most of the plasmid-borne genes were unique to N. hamburgensis and encode a variety of functions (central metabolism, energy conservation, conjugation, and heavy metal resistance), yet approximately 21 kb of a approximately 28-kb "autotrophic" island on the largest plasmid was conserved in the chromosomes of Nitrobacter winogradskyi Nb-255 and Nitrobacter sp. strain Nb-311A. The N. hamburgensis chromosome also harbors many unique genes, including those for heme-copper oxidases, cytochrome b(561), and putative pathways for the catabolism of aromatic, organic, and one-carbon compounds, which help verify and extend its mixotrophic potential. A Nitrobacter "subcore" genome was also constructed by removing homologs found in strains of the closest evolutionary relatives, Bradyrhizobium japonicum and Rhodopseudomonas palustris. Among the Nitrobacter subcore inventory (116 genes), copies of genes or gene clusters for nitrite oxidoreductase (NXR), cytochromes associated with a dissimilatory nitrite reductase (NirK), PII-like regulators, and polysaccharide formation were identified. Many of the subcore genes have diverged significantly from, or have origins outside, the alphaproteobacterial lineage and may indicate some of the unique genetic requirements for nitrite oxidation in Nitrobacter.

  18. Complete Genome Sequence of Nitrobacter hamburgensis X14 and Comparative Genomic Analysis of Species within the Genus Nitrobacter▿ †

    PubMed Central

    Starkenburg, Shawn R.; Larimer, Frank W.; Stein, Lisa Y.; Klotz, Martin G.; Chain, Patrick S. G.; Sayavedra-Soto, Luis A.; Poret-Peterson, Amisha T.; Gentry, Mira E.; Arp, Daniel J.; Ward, Bess; Bottomley, Peter J.

    2008-01-01

    The alphaproteobacterium Nitrobacter hamburgensis X14 is a gram-negative facultative chemolithoautotroph that conserves energy from the oxidation of nitrite to nitrate. Sequencing and analysis of the Nitrobacter hamburgensis X14 genome revealed four replicons comprised of one chromosome (4.4 Mbp) and three plasmids (294, 188, and 121 kbp). Over 20% of the genome is composed of pseudogenes and paralogs. Whole-genome comparisons were conducted between N. hamburgensis and the finished and draft genome sequences of Nitrobacter winogradskyi and Nitrobacter sp. strain Nb-311A, respectively. Most of the plasmid-borne genes were unique to N. hamburgensis and encode a variety of functions (central metabolism, energy conservation, conjugation, and heavy metal resistance), yet ∼21 kb of a ∼28-kb “autotrophic” island on the largest plasmid was conserved in the chromosomes of Nitrobacter winogradskyi Nb-255 and Nitrobacter sp. strain Nb-311A. The N. hamburgensis chromosome also harbors many unique genes, including those for heme-copper oxidases, cytochrome b561, and putative pathways for the catabolism of aromatic, organic, and one-carbon compounds, which help verify and extend its mixotrophic potential. A Nitrobacter “subcore” genome was also constructed by removing homologs found in strains of the closest evolutionary relatives, Bradyrhizobium japonicum and Rhodopseudomonas palustris. Among the Nitrobacter subcore inventory (116 genes), copies of genes or gene clusters for nitrite oxidoreductase (NXR), cytochromes associated with a dissimilatory nitrite reductase (NirK), PII-like regulators, and polysaccharide formation were identified. Many of the subcore genes have diverged significantly from, or have origins outside, the alphaproteobacterial lineage and may indicate some of the unique genetic requirements for nitrite oxidation in Nitrobacter. PMID:18326675

  19. Diffuse flow environments within basalt- and sediment-based hydrothermal vent ecosystems harbor specialized microbial communities.

    PubMed

    Campbell, Barbara J; Polson, Shawn W; Zeigler Allen, Lisa; Williamson, Shannon J; Lee, Charles K; Wommack, K Eric; Cary, S Craig

    2013-01-01

    Hydrothermal vents differ both in surface input and subsurface geochemistry. The effects of these differences on their microbial communities are not clear. Here, we investigated both alpha and beta diversity of diffuse flow-associated microbial communities emanating from vents at a basalt-based hydrothermal system along the East Pacific Rise (EPR) and a sediment-based hydrothermal system, Guaymas Basin. Both Bacteria and Archaea were targeted using high throughput 16S rRNA gene pyrosequencing analyses. A unique aspect of this study was the use of a universal set of 16S rRNA gene primers to characterize total and diffuse flow-specific microbial communities from varied deep-sea hydrothermal environments. Both surrounding seawater and diffuse flow water samples contained large numbers of Marine Group I (MGI) Thaumarchaea and Gammaproteobacteria taxa previously observed in deep-sea systems. However, these taxa were geographically distinct and segregated according to type of spreading center. Diffuse flow microbial community profiles were highly differentiated. In particular, EPR dominant diffuse flow taxa were most closely associated with chemolithoautotrophs, and off axis water was dominated by heterotrophic-related taxa, whereas the opposite was true for Guaymas Basin. The diversity and richness of diffuse flow-specific microbial communities were strongly correlated to the relative abundance of Epsilonproteobacteria, proximity to macrofauna, and hydrothermal system type. Archaeal diversity was higher than or equivalent to bacterial diversity in about one third of the samples. Most diffuse flow-specific communities were dominated by OTUs associated with Epsilonproteobacteria, but many of the Guaymas Basin diffuse flow samples were dominated by either OTUs within the Planctomycetes or hyperthermophilic Archaea. This study emphasizes the unique microbial communities associated with geochemically and geographically distinct hydrothermal diffuse flow environments.

  20. Palagonitization of Basalt Glass in the Flanks of Mid-Ocean Ridges: Implications for the Bioenergetics of Oceanic Intracrustal Ecosystems.

    PubMed

    Türke, Andreas; Nakamura, Kentaro; Bach, Wolfgang

    2015-10-01

    When basalt is exposed to oxygenated aqueous solutions, rims of palagonite form along fractures at the expense of glass. We employed electron microprobe and laser ablation inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (LA-ICP-MS) analyses of fresh glass and adjacent palagonite crusts to determine the geochemical changes involved in palagonite formation. Samples were retrieved from drill cores taken in the North Pond Area, located on the western flank of the Mid-Atlantic Ridge at 22°45'N and 46°05'W. We also analyzed whole rock powders to determine the overall crust-seawater exchange in a young ridge flank. Radioactive elements are enriched in palagonite relative to fresh glass, reaching concentrations where radiolytic production of molecular hydrogen (H2) may be a significant energy source. Based on these results, we hypothesize that microbial ecosystems in ridge flank habitats undergo a transition in the principal energy carrier, fueling carbon fixation from Fe oxidation in very young crust to H2 consumption in older crust. Unless the H2 is swept away by rapid fluid flow (i.e., in young flanks), it may easily accumulate to levels high enough to support chemolithoautotrophic life. In older flanks, crustal sealing and sediment accumulation have slowed down seawater circulation, and the significance of radiolytically produced H2 for catalytic energy supply is expected to increase greatly. Similar habitats on other planetary surfaces are theoretically possible, as accumulation of radiolytically produced hydrogen merely requires the presence of H2O molecules and a porous medium, from which the hydrogen is not lost.

  1. Metagenomic Reconstruction of a Microbial Community from a CO2-driven Geyser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Emerson, J. B.; Banfield, J. F.; Thomas, B. C.

    2012-12-01

    Given that only ~1% of microorganisms are cultivable, and because microbes naturally exist in interactive consortia, it is important to include culture-independent analyses of microbial communities as we evaluate the role that microbes may play in geologic carbon sequestration. Through metagenomics, we report near-complete genomes from a microbial community dominated by iron-oxidizing Zetaproteobacteria from a CO2-driven geyser. Our study site, Crystal Geyser (Green River, Utah), is a cold (17 °C), iron-rich geyser that erupts due to pressure from soluble and free-phase CO2 accumulation in an aquifer ~500 m below the surface, and it is an established natural analog for geologic carbon sequestration. We collected 65 L of geyser water as it precipitated during an eruption in November 2009, and we sequentially filtered the water through 3.0 and 0.2 μm. DNA was extracted from the 0.2 μm filter, from which we generated 13 million 150 bp paired-end Illumina sequencing reads. We assembled near-complete genomes of neutrophilic, iron-oxidizing Mariprofundus ferrooxydans and sulfur-oxidizing Thiomicrospira crunogena. Significant genomic reconstruction was also achieved for other chemolithoautotrophic bacteria, for representatives of Candidate Division TM7 (an as yet uncultivable bacterial phylum), and for a small number of low-abundance archaea. We see evidence for a variety of metabolisms, including iron, sulfur, and complex carbon oxidation, carbon and nitrogen fixation, hydrogen metabolism, aerobic and anaerobic respiration (e.g., of sulfate and nitrate), and methanogenesis. Although the geyser community contains only ~20 populations at 0.5% or higher abundance, our results demonstrate that a CO2-saturated solution can be conducive to a thriving microbial community of diverse phylogeny and broad metabolic potential.

  2. The Genome of Nitrospina gracilis Illuminates the Metabolism and Evolution of the Major Marine Nitrite Oxidizer

    PubMed Central

    Lücker, Sebastian; Nowka, Boris; Rattei, Thomas; Spieck, Eva; Daims, Holger

    2012-01-01

    In marine systems, nitrate is the major reservoir of inorganic fixed nitrogen. The only known biological nitrate-forming reaction is nitrite oxidation, but despite its importance, our knowledge of the organisms catalyzing this key process in the marine N-cycle is very limited. The most frequently encountered marine NOB are related to Nitrospina gracilis, an aerobic chemolithoautotrophic bacterium isolated from ocean surface waters. To date, limited physiological and genomic data for this organism were available and its phylogenetic affiliation was uncertain. In this study, the draft genome sequence of N. gracilis strain 3/211 was obtained. Unexpectedly for an aerobic organism, N. gracilis lacks classical reactive oxygen defense mechanisms and uses the reductive tricarboxylic acid cycle for carbon fixation. These features indicate microaerophilic ancestry and are consistent with the presence of Nitrospina in marine oxygen minimum zones. Fixed carbon is stored intracellularly as glycogen, but genes for utilizing external organic carbon sources were not identified. N. gracilis also contains a full gene set for oxidative phosphorylation with oxygen as terminal electron acceptor and for reverse electron transport from nitrite to NADH. A novel variation of complex I may catalyze the required reverse electron flow to low-potential ferredoxin. Interestingly, comparative genomics indicated a strong evolutionary link between Nitrospina, the nitrite-oxidizing genus Nitrospira, and anaerobic ammonium oxidizers, apparently including the horizontal transfer of a periplasmically oriented nitrite oxidoreductase and other key genes for nitrite oxidation at an early evolutionary stage. Further, detailed phylogenetic analyses using concatenated marker genes provided evidence that Nitrospina forms a novel bacterial phylum, for which we propose the name Nitrospinae. PMID:23439773

  3. Role of Thiobacillus thioparus in the biodegradation of carbon disulfide in a biofilter packed with a recycled organic pelletized material.

    PubMed

    Prenafeta-Boldú, Francesc X; Rojo, Naiara; Gallastegui, Gorka; Guivernau, Miriam; Viñas, Marc; Elías, Ana

    2014-07-01

    This study reports the biodegradation of carbon disulfide (CS2) in air biofilters packed with a pelletized mixture of composted manure and sawdust. Experiments were carried out in two lab-scale (1.2 L) biofiltration units. Biofilter B was seeded with activated sludge enriched previously on CS2-degrading biomass under batch conditions, while biofilter A was left as a negative inoculation control. This inoculum was characterized by an acidic pH and sulfate accumulation, and contained Achromobacter xylosoxidans as the main putative CS2 biodegrading bacterium. Biofilter operation start-up was unsuccessfully attempted under xerophilic conditions and significant CS2 elimination was only achieved in biofilter A upon the implementation of an intermittent irrigation regime. Sustained removal efficiencies of 90-100 % at an inlet load of up to 12 g CS2 m(-3) h(-1) were reached. The CS2 removal in this biofilter was linked to the presence of the chemolithoautotrophic bacterium Thiobacillus thioparus, known among the relatively small number of species with a reported capacity of growing on CS2 as the sole energy source. DGGE molecular profiles confirmed that this microbe had become dominant in biofilter A while it was not detected in samples from biofilter B. Conventional biofilters packed with inexpensive organic materials are suited for the treatment of low-strength CS2 polluted gases (IL <12 g CS2 m(-3) h(-1)), provided that the development of the adequate microorganisms is favored, either upon enrichment or by inoculation. The importance of applying culture-independent techniques for microbial community analysis as a diagnostic tool in the biofiltration of recalcitrant compounds has been highlighted.

  4. Maricoccus atlantica gen. nov. sp. nov., isolated from deep sea sediment of the Atlantic Ocean.

    PubMed

    Li, Guizhen; Lai, Qiliang; Liu, Xiupian; Sun, Fengqin; Du, Yaping; Li, Guangyu; Shao, Zongze

    2013-12-01

    A taxonomic study was carried out on strain 22II-S10r2(T), which was isolated from the deep sea sediment of the Atlantic Ocean using oil-degrading enrichment. The bacterium was Gram-negative, oxidase positive and catalase negative, spherical in shape, and motile by polar flagella. Growth was observed at salinities of 0.5-7 % and at temperatures of 10-41 °C. The isolate was capable of aesculin hydrolysis, but unable to reduce nitrate to nitrite or degrade Tween 80 or gelatine. Phylogenetic analysis based on 16S rRNA gene sequences indicated that strain 22II-S10r2(T) belonged to the family Ectothiorhodospiraceae, with highest sequence similarity to Thioalkalivibrio sulfidiphilus HL-EbGR7(T) (90.9 % similarity). The principal fatty acids were Sum In Feature 8 (C18:1 ω7c/ω6c (29.9 %), C18:1 ω9c (13.5 %), C16:1 ω5c (12.3 %), C12:03OH (6.8 %), C18:1 ω5c (5.7 %) and C16:0 (5.3 %). The G+C content of the chromosomal DNA was 60.7 mol%. The respiratory quinone was determined to be Q-7 (25 %) and Q-8 (75 %). Phosphatidylethanolamine, phosphatidylglycerol, aminophospholipid, glycolipid, three phospholipids and lipid were present. The strain was aerobic, non-phototrophic and non-chemolithoautotrophic. The combined genotypic and phenotypic data show that strain 22II-S10r2(T) represents a novel species within a novel genus, for which the name Maricoccus atlantica gen. nov. sp. nov. is proposed, with the type strain 22II-S10r2(T) (=CGMCC NO.1.12317(T) = LMG 27155(T) = MCCC 1A09384(T)).

  5. Application of RNA Stable Isotope Probing (SIP) to Link Community Activity with Microorganisms Responsible for Autotrophy in the Subseafloor at Axial Seamount

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huber, J. A.; Fortunato, C. S.

    2014-12-01

    The global ocean comprises the Earth's largest biome, with microorganisms playing a dominant biogeochemical role. However, the potential for production of new microbial biomass within the subseafloor is rarely considered in traditional oceanographic paradigms of carbon cycling or microbial food webs. In this study, we used RNA Stable Isotope Probing (RNA SIP) to determine the microbial community composition and genetic repertoire of active subseafloor autotrophs in warm venting fluids from Axial Seamount. RNA is a responsive biomarker because it is a reflection of cellular activity independent of replication, and RNA SIP thus provides access to both the function of a microbial community and the phylogeny of the organisms accountable for key functions. Diffuse fluids were incubated shipboard at 30°C, 55°C, and 80°C with 13DIC and H2. Metatranscriptomic sequencing of both the enriched and non-enriched RNA was carried out from 13C and 12C controls. In addition, filtered fluid samples were preserved in situ for comparative meta -transcriptomic and -genomic analyses. Diverse lineages of bacteria and archaea and accompanying metabolisms were detected in situ, but RNA SIP results show dominance of three different groups of autotrophs active under each experimental condition. At 30°C, members of the Sulfurimonas genus dominated, with genes for hydrogen oxidation, nitrate reduction, and carbon fixation via the rTCA cycle highly expressed. At 55°C, both Caminibacter and Nautilia transcripts were detected for rTCA cycle, hydrogen oxidation, and nitrate reduction. At 80°C, transcripts for hydrogenotrophic methanogenesis mediated by members of Methanocaldococcus were detected. These results suggest the subseafloor hosts various anaerobic chemolithoautotrophs that span a wide temperature range, with hydrogen playing a key role in microbial metabolism. Complementary experiments are currently being carried out on the seafloor with a novel in situ incubator unit to provide

  6. Carbon flow from volcanic CO2 into soil microbial communities of a wetland mofette.

    PubMed

    Beulig, Felix; Heuer, Verena B; Akob, Denise M; Viehweger, Bernhard; Elvert, Marcus; Herrmann, Martina; Hinrichs, Kai-Uwe; Küsel, Kirsten

    2015-03-01

    Effects of extremely high carbon dioxide (CO2) concentrations on soil microbial communities and associated processes are largely unknown. We studied a wetland area affected by spots of subcrustal CO2 degassing (mofettes) with focus on anaerobic autotrophic methanogenesis and acetogenesis because the pore gas phase was largely hypoxic. Compared with a reference soil, the mofette was more acidic (ΔpH ∼0.8), strongly enriched in organic carbon (up to 10 times), and exhibited lower prokaryotic diversity. It was dominated by methanogens and subdivision 1 Acidobacteria, which likely thrived under stable hypoxia and acidic pH. Anoxic incubations revealed enhanced formation of acetate and methane (CH4) from hydrogen (H2) and CO2 consistent with elevated CH4 and acetate levels in the mofette soil. (13)CO2 mofette soil incubations showed high label incorporations with ∼512 ng (13)C g (dry weight (dw)) soil(-1) d(-1) into the bulk soil and up to 10.7 ng (13)C g (dw) soil(-1) d(-1) into almost all analyzed bacterial lipids. Incorporation of CO2-derived carbon into archaeal lipids was much lower and restricted to the first 10 cm of the soil. DNA-SIP analysis revealed that acidophilic methanogens affiliated with Methanoregulaceae and hitherto unknown acetogens appeared to be involved in the chemolithoautotrophic utilization of (13)CO2. Subdivision 1 Acidobacteriaceae assimilated (13)CO2 likely via anaplerotic reactions because Acidobacteriaceae are not known to harbor enzymatic pathways for autotrophic CO2 assimilation. We conclude that CO2-induced geochemical changes promoted anaerobic and acidophilic organisms and altered carbon turnover in affected soils.

  7. Tabrizicola aquatica gen. nov. sp. nov., a novel alphaproteobacterium isolated from Qurugöl Lake nearby Tabriz city, Iran.

    PubMed

    Tarhriz, Vahideh; Thiel, Vera; Nematzadeh, Ghorbanali; Hejazi, Mohammad Amin; Imhoff, Johannes F; Hejazi, Mohammad Saeid

    2013-12-01

    A novel Gram-negative, aerobic, non-motile and rod-shaped bacterium was isolated from Qurugöl Lake near Tabriz city. The bacterium grew chemoorganolheterotrophically and chemolithoautotrophically. However, photo-organoheterotrophic, photo-lithoautotrophic and fermentative growth could not be demonstrated. The presence of photosynthesis genes pufL and pufM was not shown and photosynthesis pigments were not formed. Strain RCRI19(T) grew without NaCl and tolerated up to 3 % NaCl. Growth occurred at pH 6-9 (optimum, pH 7) and 15-55 °C (optimum 40-45 °C). Vitamins were not required for growth. The major fatty acids are C18:1 ω7C, 11-methyl C18:1 ω7C, C18:0 3-OH. The predominant respiratory quinone is ubiquinone Q-10. The G+C content of genomic DNA is 65.9 mol%. Analysis of 16S rRNA sequences showed that strain RCRI19(T) has the highest similarities with uncultured environmental sequences followed by members of the genera Rhodobacter (≤95.75 %), Haematobacter (≤95.53 %), Gemmobacter (≤95.17 %) and Falsirhodobacter (94.60 %) in the family Rhodobacteraceae. DNA-DNA relatedness between strain RCRI19(T) and the closest phylogenetically related strain, Rhodobacter blasticus LMG 4305(T), was 20 %. Based on its phenotypic and chemotaxonomic characteristics and considering that it does not form photosynthetic pigments and is unable to grow phototrophically, it is concluded that strain RCRI19(T) cannot be included into the genus Rhodobacter and any of the other related genera. Therefore, we propose to place the new bacterium into a new genus and species for which the name Tabrizicola aquatica gen. nov. and sp. nov. is proposed. The type strain is RCRI19(T) (=BCCM/LMG 25773(T )= JCM 17277(T )= KCTC 23724(T)).

  8. Genome-Enabled Modeling of Biogeochemical Processes Predicts Metabolic Dependencies that Connect the Relative Fitness of Microbial Functional Guilds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brodie, E.; King, E.; Molins, S.; Karaoz, U.; Steefel, C. I.; Banfield, J. F.; Beller, H. R.; Anantharaman, K.; Ligocki, T. J.; Trebotich, D.

    2015-12-01

    Pore-scale processes mediated by microorganisms underlie a range of critical ecosystem services, regulating carbon stability, nutrient flux, and the purification of water. Advances in cultivation-independent approaches now provide us with the ability to reconstruct thousands of genomes from microbial populations from which functional roles may be assigned. With this capability to reveal microbial metabolic potential, the next step is to put these microbes back where they belong to interact with their natural environment, i.e. the pore scale. At this scale, microorganisms communicate, cooperate and compete across their fitness landscapes with communities emerging that feedback on the physical and chemical properties of their environment, ultimately altering the fitness landscape and selecting for new microbial communities with new properties and so on. We have developed a trait-based model of microbial activity that simulates coupled functional guilds that are parameterized with unique combinations of traits that govern fitness under dynamic conditions. Using a reactive transport framework, we simulate the thermodynamics of coupled electron donor-acceptor reactions to predict energy available for cellular maintenance, respiration, biomass development, and enzyme production. From metagenomics, we directly estimate some trait values related to growth and identify the linkage of key traits associated with respiration and fermentation, macromolecule depolymerizing enzymes, and other key functions such as nitrogen fixation. Our simulations were carried out to explore abiotic controls on community emergence such as seasonally fluctuating water table regimes across floodplain organic matter hotspots. Simulations and metagenomic/metatranscriptomic observations highlighted the many dependencies connecting the relative fitness of functional guilds and the importance of chemolithoautotrophic lifestyles. Using an X-Ray microCT-derived soil microaggregate physical model combined

  9. Life detection strategy for Jovian's icy moons: Lessons from subglacial Lake Vostok exploration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bulat, Sergey; Alekhina, Irina; Marie, Dominique; Petit, Jean-Robert

    2010-05-01

    The objective was to estimate the microbial content of accretion ice originating from the subglacial Lake Vostok buried beneath 4-km thick East Antarctic ice sheet with the ultimate goal to discover microbial life in this extreme icy environment. The DNA study constrained by Ancient DNA research criteria was used as a main approach. The flow cytometry was implemented in cell enumerating. As a result, both approaches showed that the accretion ice contains the very low unevenly distributed biomass indicating that the water body should also be hosting a highly sparse life. Up to now, the only accretion ice featured by mica-clay sediments presence allowed the recovery a pair of bacterial phylotypes. This unexpectedly included the chemolithoautotrophic thermophile Hydrogenophilus thermoluteolus and one more unclassified phylotype both passing numerous contaminant controls. In contrast, the deeper and cleaner accretion ice with no sediments presence and near detection limit gas content gave no reliable signals. Thus, the results obtained testify that the search for life in the Lake Vostok is constrained by a high chance of forward-contamination. The subglacial Lake Vostok seems to represent the only extremely clean giant aquatic system on the Earth providing a unique test area for searching for life on icy worlds. The life detection strategy for (sub)glacial environments elsewhere (e.g., Jovian's Europa) should be based on stringent decontamination procedures in clean-room facilities, establishment of on-site contaminant library, implementation of appropriate methods to reach detection level for signal as low as possible, verification of findings through ecological settings of a given environment and repetition at an independent laboratory within the specialized laboratory network.

  10. Influence of hydrological, biogeochemical and temperature transients on subsurface carbon fluxes in a flood plain environment

    SciTech Connect

    Arora, Bhavna; Spycher, Nicolas F.; Steefel, Carl I.; Molins, Sergi; Bill, Markus; Conrad, Mark E.; Dong, Wenming; Faybishenko, Boris; Tokunaga, Tetsu K.; Wan, Jiamin; Williams, Kenneth H.; Yabusaki, Steven B.

    2016-02-01

    Flood plains play a potentially important role in the global carbon cycle. The accumulation of organic matter in flood plains often induces the formation of chemically reduced groundwater and sediments along riverbanks. In this study, our objective is to evaluate the cumulative impact of such reduced zones, water table fluctuations, and temperature gradients on subsurface carbon fluxes in a flood plain at Rifle, Colorado located along the Colorado River. 2-D coupled variably-saturated, non-isothermal flow and biogeochemical reactive transport modeling was applied to improve our understanding of the abiotic and microbially mediated reactions controlling carbon dynamics at the Rifle site. Model simulations considering only abiotic reactions (thus ignoring microbial reactions) underestimated CO2 partial pressures observed in the unsaturated zone and severely underestimated inorganic (and overestimated organic) carbon fluxes to the river compared to simulations with biotic pathways. Both model simulations and field observations highlighted the need to include microbial contributions from chemolithoautotrophic processes (e.g., Fe?2 and S-2 oxidation) to match locally-observed high CO2 concentrations above reduced zones. Observed seasonal variations in CO2 concentrations in the unsaturated zone could not be reproduced without incorporating temperature gradients in the simulations. Incorporating temperature fluctuations resulted in an increase in the annual groundwater carbon fluxes to the river by 170 % to 3.3 g m-2 d-1, while including water table variations resulted in an overall decrease in the simulated fluxes. We conclude that spatial microbial and redox zonation as well as temporal fluctuations of temperature and water table depth contribute significantly to subsurface carbon fluxes in flood plains and need to be represented appropriately in model simulations.

  11. Development of a markerless gene replacement system for Acidithiobacillus ferrooxidans and construction of a pfkB mutant.

    PubMed

    Wang, Huiyan; Liu, Xiangmei; Liu, Shuangshuang; Yu, Yangyang; Lin, Jianqun; Lin, Jianqiang; Pang, Xin; Zhao, Jian

    2012-03-01

    The extremely acidophilic, chemolithoautotrophic Acidithiobacillus ferrooxidans is an important bioleaching bacterium of great value in the metallurgical industry and environmental protection. In this report, a mutagenesis system based on the homing endonuclease I-SceI was developed to produce targeted, unmarked gene deletions in the strain A. ferrooxidans ATCC 23270. A targeted phosphofructokinase (PFK) gene (pfkB) mutant of A. ferrooxidans ATCC 23270 was constructed by homologous recombination and identified by PCR with specific primers as well as Southern blot analysis. This potential pfkB gene (AFE_1807) was also characterized by expression in PFK-deficient Escherichia coli cells, and heteroexpression of the PFKB protein demonstrated that it had functional PFK activity, though it was significantly lower (about 800-fold) than that of phosphofructokinase-2 (PFK-B) expressed by the pfkB gene from E. coli K-12. The function of the potential PFKB protein in A. ferrooxidans was demonstrated by comparing the properties of the pfkB mutant with those of the wild type. The pfkB mutant strain displayed a relatively reduced growth capacity in S(0) medium (0.5% [wt/vol] elemental sulfur in 9K basal salts solution adjusted to pH 3.0 with H(2)SO(4)), but the mutation did not completely prevent A. ferrooxidans from assimilating exogenous glucose. The transcriptional analysis of some related genes in central carbohydrate metabolism in the wild-type and mutant strains with or without supplementation of glucose was carried out by quantitative reverse transcription-PCR. This report suggests that the markerless mutagenesis strategy could serve as a model for functional studies of other genes of interest from A. ferrooxidans and multiple mutations could be made in a single A. ferrooxidans strain.

  12. Desulfoconvexum algidum gen. nov., sp. nov., a psychrophilic sulfate-reducing bacterium isolated from a permanently cold marine sediment.

    PubMed

    Könneke, Martin; Kuever, Jan; Galushko, Alexander; Jørgensen, Bo Barker

    2013-03-01

    A sulfate-reducing bacterium, designated JHA1(T), was isolated from a permanently cold marine sediment sampled in an Artic fjord on the north-west coast of Svalbard. The isolate was originally enriched at 4 °C in a highly diluted liquid culture amended with hydrogen and sulfate. Strain JHA1(T) was a psychrophile, growing fastest between 14 and 16 °C and not growing above 20 °C. Fastest growth was found at neutral pH (pH 7.2-7.4) and at marine concentrations of NaCl (20-30 g l(-1)). Phylogenetic analysis of 16S rRNA gene sequences revealed that strain JHA1(T) was a member of the family Desulfobacteraceae in the Deltaproteobacteria. The isolate shared 99 % 16S rRNA gene sequence similarity with an environmental sequence obtained from permanently cold Antarctic sediment. The closest recognized relatives were Desulfobacula phenolica DSM 3384(T) and Desulfobacula toluolica DSM 7467(T) (both <95 % sequence similarity). In contrast to its closest phylogenetic relatives, strain JHA1(T) grew chemolithoautotrophically with hydrogen as an electron donor. CO dehydrogenase activity indicated the operation of the reductive acetyl-CoA pathway for inorganic carbon assimilation. Beside differences in physiology and morphology, strain JHA1(T) could be distinguished chemotaxonomically from the genus Desulfobacula by the absence of the cellular fatty acid C16 : 0 10-methyl. Phylogenetic differentiation from other genera was further supported by DsrAB and AprBA sequence analysis. Based on the described phylogenetic and phenotypic differences between strain JHA1(T) and its closest relatives, the establishment of a novel genus and a novel species, Desulfoconvexum algidum gen. nov., sp. nov. is proposed. The type strain is JHA1(T) ( = DSM 21856(T)  = JCM 16085(T)).

  13. Kinetic Enrichment of 34S during Proteobacterial Thiosulfate Oxidation and the Conserved Role of SoxB in S-S Bond Breaking

    PubMed Central

    Alam, Masrure; Pyne, Prosenjit; Mazumdar, Aninda; Peketi, Aditya

    2013-01-01

    During chemolithoautotrophic thiosulfate oxidation, the phylogenetically diverged proteobacteria Paracoccus pantotrophus, Tetrathiobacter kashmirensis, and Thiomicrospira crunogena rendered steady enrichment of 34S in the end product sulfate, with overall fractionation ranging between −4.6‰ and +5.8‰. The fractionation kinetics of T. crunogena was essentially similar to that of P. pantotrophus, albeit the former had a slightly higher magnitude and rate of 34S enrichment. In the case of T. kashmirensis, the only significant departure of its fractionation curve from that of P. pantotrophus was observed during the first 36 h of thiosulfate-dependent growth, in the course of which tetrathionate intermediate formation is completed and sulfate production starts. The almost-identical 34S enrichment rates observed during the peak sulfate-producing stage of all three processes indicated the potential involvement of identical S-S bond-breaking enzymes. Concurrent proteomic analyses detected the hydrolase SoxB (which is known to cleave terminal sulfone groups from SoxYZ-bound cysteine S-thiosulfonates, as well as cysteine S-sulfonates, in P. pantotrophus) in the actively sulfate-producing cells of all three species. The inducible expression of soxB during tetrathionate oxidation, as well as the second leg of thiosulfate oxidation, by T. kashmirensis is significant because the current Sox pathway does not accommodate tetrathionate as one of its substrates. Notably, however, no other Sox protein except SoxB could be detected upon matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization mass spectrometry analysis of all such T. kashmirensis proteins as appeared to be thiosulfate inducible in 2-dimensional gel electrophoresis. Instead, several other redox proteins were found to be at least 2-fold overexpressed during thiosulfate- or tetrathionate-dependent growth, thereby indicating that there is more to tetrathionate oxidation than SoxB alone. PMID:23686269

  14. Enrichment and Genome Sequence of the Group I.1a Ammonia-Oxidizing Archaeon “Ca. Nitrosotenuis uzonensis” Representing a Clade Globally Distributed in Thermal Habitats

    PubMed Central

    Pelletier, Eric; Schuster, Nathalie; Hauzmayer, Sandra; Bulaev, Aleksandr; Grigor’eva, Nadezhda V.; Galushko, Alexander; Schmid, Markus; Palatinszky, Marton; Le Paslier, Denis; Daims, Holger; Wagner, Michael

    2013-01-01

    The discovery of ammonia-oxidizing archaea (AOA) of the phylum Thaumarchaeota and the high abundance of archaeal ammonia monooxygenase subunit A encoding gene sequences in many environments have extended our perception of nitrifying microbial communities. Moreover, AOA are the only aerobic ammonia oxidizers known to be active in geothermal environments. Molecular data indicate that in many globally distributed terrestrial high-temperature habits a thaumarchaeotal lineage within the Nitrosopumilus cluster (also called “marine” group I.1a) thrives, but these microbes have neither been isolated from these systems nor functionally characterized in situ yet. In this study, we report on the enrichment and genomic characterization of a representative of this lineage from a thermal spring in Kamchatka. This thaumarchaeote, provisionally classified as “Candidatus Nitrosotenuis uzonensis”, is a moderately thermophilic, non-halophilic, chemolithoautotrophic ammonia oxidizer. The nearly complete genome sequence (assembled into a single scaffold) of this AOA confirmed the presence of the typical thaumarchaeotal pathways for ammonia oxidation and carbon fixation, and indicated its ability to produce coenzyme F420 and to chemotactically react to its environment. Interestingly, like members of the genus Nitrosoarchaeum, “Candidatus N. uzonensis” also possesses a putative artubulin-encoding gene. Genome comparisons to related AOA with available genome sequences confirmed that the newly cultured AOA has an average nucleotide identity far below the species threshold and revealed a substantial degree of genomic plasticity with unique genomic regions in “Ca. N. uzonensis”, which potentially include genetic determinants of ecological niche differentiation. PMID:24278328

  15. Rates and environmental controls of sediment N and S cycles in diverse aquatic ecosystems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gu, C.; Pallud, C. E.

    2010-12-01

    Chuanhui Gu and Celine Pallud Recent studies of coupled NO3- driven SO42- production found chemolithoautotrophic bacterial metabolism may remove NO3- by coupling its reduction with the oxidation of reduced S to SO42-. The objectives of this study were to investigate the magnitude and interaction of NO3- and SO42- metabolic rates (e.g. nitrate reduction rate, ammonium production rate, sulfate production rate, and sulfate reduction rate, etc) across diverse freshwater, saline, and hypersaline water systems. Metabolic rates of major N and S cycles were measured on intact sediment cores using flow through reactors. Single TEA (i.e.NO3- or SO42-) addition and simultaneous TEAs addition caused a variety of responses in the N and S metabolic rates. We used a multivariate statistics tool, redundancy analysis, to access how environmental factors might control the variability of these metabolic rates. Our analysis showed pH, overlying water SO42- concentration, and salinity were three dominant environmental factors that control the N and S metabolic rates. The three factors combined explained 62% of variance of the metabolic rates. When NO3- and SO42- were both present, however, sediment As content, grain size, and N content determined the variability of the metabolic rates. These three factors together accounted for 58% of total variance of the metabolic rates. The different sets of environmental controls over the N and S metabolic rates under single TEA vs. two TEA conditions indicate the interior coupling between N and S cycles. These results showed there is no single set of environmental variables that can be used to predict the spatial variability of N and S metabolic rates, and controls on N processing in landscape subject to S and N pollution are more complex than previously appreciated.

  16. Genomic diversity within the haloalkaliphilic genus Thioalkalivibrio.

    PubMed

    Ahn, Anne-Catherine; Meier-Kolthoff, Jan P; Overmars, Lex; Richter, Michael; Woyke, Tanja; Sorokin, Dimitry Y; Muyzer, Gerard

    2017-01-01

    Thioalkalivibrio is a genus of obligate chemolithoautotrophic haloalkaliphilic sulfur-oxidizing bacteria. Their habitat are soda lakes which are dual extreme environments with a pH range from 9.5 to 11 and salt concentrations up to saturation. More than 100 strains of this genus have been isolated from various soda lakes all over the world, but only ten species have been effectively described yet. Therefore, the assignment of the remaining strains to either existing or novel species is important and will further elucidate their genomic diversity as well as give a better general understanding of this genus. Recently, the genomes of 76 Thioalkalivibrio strains were sequenced. On these, we applied different methods including (i) 16S rRNA gene sequence analysis, (ii) Multilocus Sequence Analysis (MLSA) based on eight housekeeping genes, (iii) Average Nucleotide Identity based on BLAST (ANIb) and MUMmer (ANIm), (iv) Tetranucleotide frequency correlation coefficients (TETRA), (v) digital DNA:DNA hybridization (dDDH) as well as (vi) nucleotide- and amino acid-based Genome BLAST Distance Phylogeny (GBDP) analyses. We detected a high genomic diversity by revealing 15 new "genomic" species and 16 new "genomic" subspecies in addition to the ten already described species. Phylogenetic and phylogenomic analyses showed that the genus is not monophyletic, because four strains were clearly separated from the other Thioalkalivibrio by type strains from other genera. Therefore, it is recommended to classify the latter group as a novel genus. The biogeographic distribution of Thioalkalivibrio suggested that the different "genomic" species can be classified as candidate disjunct or candidate endemic species. This study is a detailed genome-based classification and identification of members within the genus Thioalkalivibrio. However, future phenotypical and chemotaxonomical studies will be needed for a full species description of this genus.

  17. Contribution of crenarchaeal autotrophic ammonia oxidizers to the dark primary production in Tyrrhenian deep waters (Central Mediterranean Sea).

    PubMed

    Yakimov, Michail M; Cono, Violetta La; Smedile, Francesco; DeLuca, Thomas H; Juárez, Silvia; Ciordia, Sergio; Fernández, Marisol; Albar, Juan Pablo; Ferrer, Manuel; Golyshin, Peter N; Giuliano, Laura

    2011-06-01

    Mesophilic Crenarchaeota have recently been thought to be significant contributors to nitrogen (N) and carbon (C) cycling. In this study, we examined the vertical distribution of ammonia-oxidizing Crenarchaeota at offshore site in Southern Tyrrhenian Sea. The median value of the crenachaeal cell to amoA gene ratio was close to one suggesting that virtually all deep-sea Crenarchaeota possess the capacity to oxidize ammonia. Crenarchaea-specific genes, nirK and ureC, for nitrite reductase and urease were identified and their affiliation demonstrated the presence of 'deep-sea' clades distinct from 'shallow' representatives. Measured deep-sea dark CO(2) fixation estimates were comparable to the median value of photosynthetic biomass production calculated for this area of Tyrrhenian Sea, pointing to the significance of this process in the C cycle of aphotic marine ecosystems. To elucidate the pivotal organisms in this process, we targeted known marine crenarchaeal autotrophy-related genes, coding for acetyl-CoA carboxylase (accA) and 4-hydroxybutyryl-CoA dehydratase (4-hbd). As in case of nirK and ureC, these genes are grouped with deep-sea sequences being distantly related to those retrieved from the epipelagic zone. To pair the molecular data with specific functional attributes we performed [(14)C]HCO(3) incorporation experiments followed by analyses of radiolabeled proteins using shotgun proteomics approach. More than 100 oligopeptides were attributed to 40 marine crenarchaeal-specific proteins that are involved in 10 different metabolic processes, including autotrophy. Obtained results provided a clear proof of chemolithoautotrophic physiology of bathypelagic crenarchaeota and indicated that this numerically predominant group of microorganisms facilitate a hitherto unrecognized sink for inorganic C of a global importance.

  18. The metatranscriptome of a deep-sea hydrothermal plume is dominated by water column methanotrophs and lithotrophs

    PubMed Central

    Lesniewski, Ryan A; Jain, Sunit; Anantharaman, Karthik; Schloss, Patrick D; Dick, Gregory J

    2012-01-01

    Microorganisms mediate geochemical processes in deep-sea hydrothermal vent plumes, which are a conduit for transfer of elements and energy from the subsurface to the oceans. Despite this important microbial influence on marine geochemistry, the ecology and activity of microbial communities in hydrothermal plumes is largely unexplored. Here, we use a coordinated metagenomic and metatranscriptomic approach to compare microbial communities in Guaymas Basin hydrothermal plumes to background waters above the plume and in the adjacent Carmen Basin. Despite marked increases in plume total RNA concentrations (3–4 times) and microbially mediated manganese oxidation rates (15–125 times), plume and background metatranscriptomes were dominated by the same groups of methanotrophs and chemolithoautotrophs. Abundant community members of Guaymas Basin seafloor environments (hydrothermal sediments and chimneys) were not prevalent in the plume metatranscriptome. De novo metagenomic assembly was used to reconstruct genomes of abundant populations, including Marine Group I archaea, Methylococcaceae, SAR324 Deltaproteobacteria and SUP05 Gammaproteobacteria. Mapping transcripts to these genomes revealed abundant expression of genes involved in the chemolithotrophic oxidation of ammonia (amo), methane (pmo) and sulfur (sox). Whereas amo and pmo gene transcripts were abundant in both plume and background, transcripts of sox genes for sulfur oxidation from SUP05 groups displayed a 10–20-fold increase in plumes. We conclude that the biogeochemistry of Guaymas Basin hydrothermal plumes is mediated by microorganisms that are derived from seawater rather than from seafloor hydrothermal environments such as chimneys or sediments, and that hydrothermal inputs serve as important electron donors for primary production in the deep Gulf of California. PMID:22695860

  19. CO(2) uptake and fixation by a thermoacidophilic microbial community attached to precipitated sulfur in a geothermal spring.

    PubMed

    Boyd, Eric S; Leavitt, William D; Geesey, Gill G

    2009-07-01

    Carbon fixation at temperatures above 73 degrees C, the upper limit for photosynthesis, is carried out by chemosynthetic thermophiles. Yellowstone National Park (YNP), Wyoming possesses many thermal features that, while too hot for photosynthesis, presumably support chemosynthetic-based carbon fixation. To our knowledge, in situ rates of chemosynthetic reactions at these high temperatures in YNP or other high-temperature terrestrial geothermal springs have not yet been reported. A microbial community attached to precipitated elemental sulfur (S(o) floc) at the source of Dragon Spring (73 degrees C, pH 3.1) in Norris Geyser Basin, YNP, exhibited a maximum rate of CO(2) uptake of 21.3 +/- 11.9 microg of C 10(7) cells(-1) h(-1). When extrapolated over the estimated total quantity of S(o) floc at the spring's source, the S(o) floc-associated microbial community accounted for the uptake of 121 mg of C h(-1) at this site. On a per-cell basis, the rate was higher than that calculated for a photosynthetic mat microbial community dominated by Synechococcus spp. in alkaline springs at comparable temperatures. A portion of the carbon taken up as CO(2) by the S(o) floc-associated biomass was recovered in the cellular nucleic acid pool, demonstrating that uptake was coupled to fixation. The most abundant sequences in a 16S rRNA clone library of the S(o) floc-associated community were related to chemolithoautotrophic Hydrogenobaculum strains previously isolated from springs in the Norris Geyser Basin. These microorganisms likely contributed to the uptake and fixation of CO(2) in this geothermal habitat.

  20. Microbial Community Structure of Subglacial Lake Whillans, West Antarctica.

    PubMed

    Achberger, Amanda M; Christner, Brent C; Michaud, Alexander B; Priscu, John C; Skidmore, Mark L; Vick-Majors, Trista J

    2016-01-01

    Subglacial Lake Whillans (SLW) is located beneath ∼800 m of ice on the Whillans Ice Stream in West Antarctica and was sampled in January of 2013, providing the first opportunity to directly examine water and sediments from an Antarctic subglacial lake. To minimize the introduction of surface contaminants to SLW during its exploration, an access borehole was created using a microbiologically clean hot water drill designed to reduce the number and viability of microorganisms in the drilling water. Analysis of 16S rRNA genes (rDNA) amplified from samples of the drilling and borehole water allowed an evaluation of the efficacy of this approach and enabled a confident assessment of the SLW ecosystem inhabitants. Based on an analysis of 16S rDNA and rRNA (i.e., reverse-transcribed rRNA molecules) data, the SLW community was found to be bacterially dominated and compositionally distinct from the assemblages identified in the drill system. The abundance of bacteria (e.g., Candidatus Nitrotoga, Sideroxydans, Thiobacillus, and Albidiferax) and archaea (Candidatus Nitrosoarchaeum) related to chemolithoautotrophs was consistent with the oxidation of reduced iron, sulfur, and nitrogen compounds having important roles as pathways for primary production in this permanently dark ecosystem. Further, the prevalence of Methylobacter in surficial lake sediments combined with the detection of methanogenic taxa in the deepest sediment horizons analyzed (34-36 cm) supported the hypothesis that methane cycling occurs beneath the West Antarctic Ice Sheet. Large ratios of rRNA to rDNA were observed for several operational taxonomic units abundant in the water column and sediments (e.g., Albidiferax, Methylobacter, Candidatus Nitrotoga, Sideroxydans, and Smithella), suggesting a potentially active role for these taxa in the SLW ecosystem. Our findings are consistent with chemosynthetic microorganisms serving as the ecological foundation in this dark subsurface environment, providing new

  1. Nitrate reduction mechanisms and rates in an unconfined eogenetic karst aquifer in two sites with different redox potential

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Henson, Wesley; Huang, Laibin; Graham, Wendy D.; Ogram, Andrew

    2017-01-01

    This study integrates push-pull tracer tests (PPTT) with microbial characterization of extracted water via quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR) and reverse transcriptase qPCR (RT-qPCR) of selected functional N transformation genes to quantify nitrate reduction mechanisms and rates in sites with different redox potential in a karst aquifer. PPTT treatments with nitrate (AN) and nitrate-fumarate (ANC) were executed in two wells representing anoxic and oxic geochemical end-members. Oxic aquifer zero-order nitrate loss rates (mmol L−1 h−1) were similar for AN and ANC treatment, ranging from 0.03 ± 0.01 to 0.05 ± 0.01. Anoxic aquifer zero-order nitrate loss rates ranged from 0.03 ± 0.02 (AN) to 0.13 ± 0.02 (ANC). Microbial characterization indicates mechanisms influencing these rates were dissimilatory nitrate reduction to ammonium (DNRA) at the anoxic site with AN treatment, assimilatory reduction of nitrate to ammonium (ANRA) with ANC treatment in the water column at both sites, and additional documented nitrate reduction that occurred in unsampled biofilms. With carbon treatment, total numbers of microbes (16S rRNA genes) significantly increased (fourteenfold to thirtyfold), supporting stimulated growth with resulting ANRA. Decreased DNRA gene concentrations (nrfA DNA) and increased DNRA activity ratio (nrfA-cDNA/DNA) supported the assertion that DNRA occurred in the anoxic zone with AN and ANC treatment. Furthermore, decreased DNRA gene copy numbers at the anoxic site with ANC treatment suggests that DNRA microbes in the anoxic site are chemolithoautotrophic. Increased RT-qPCR denitrification gene expression (nirK and nirS) was not observed in water samples, supporting that any observed NO3-N loss due to denitrification may be occurring in unsampled microbial biofilms.

  2. Strain-level genomic variation in natural populations of Lebetimonas from an erupting deep-sea volcano

    PubMed Central

    Meyer, Julie L; Huber, Julie A

    2014-01-01

    Chemolithoautotrophic Epsilonproteobacteria are ubiquitous in sulfidic, oxygen-poor habitats, including hydrothermal vents, marine oxygen minimum zones, marine sediments and sulfidic caves and have a significant role in cycling carbon, hydrogen, nitrogen and sulfur in these environments. The isolation of diverse strains of Epsilonproteobacteria and the sequencing of their genomes have revealed that this group has the metabolic potential to occupy a wide range of niches, particularly at dynamic deep-sea hydrothermal vents. We expand on this body of work by examining the population genomics of six strains of Lebetimonas, a vent-endemic, thermophilic, hydrogen-oxidizing Epsilonproteobacterium, from a single seamount in the Mariana Arc. Using Lebetimonas as a model for anaerobic, moderately thermophilic organisms in the warm, anoxic subseafloor environment, we show that genomic content is highly conserved and that recombination is limited between closely related strains. The Lebetimonas genomes are shaped by mobile genetic elements and gene loss as well as the acquisition of novel functional genes by horizontal gene transfer, which provide the potential for adaptation and microbial speciation in the deep sea. In addition, these Lebetimonas genomes contain two operons of nitrogenase genes with different evolutionary origins. Lebetimonas expressed nifH during growth with nitrogen gas as the sole nitrogen source, thus providing the first evidence of nitrogen fixation in any Epsilonproteobacteria from deep-sea hydrothermal vents. In this study, we provide a comparative overview of the genomic potential within the Nautiliaceae as well as among more distantly related hydrothermal vent Epsilonproteobacteria to broaden our understanding of microbial adaptation and diversity in the deep sea. PMID:24257443

  3. Bacteria, fungi and biokarst in Lechuguilla Cave, Carlsbad Caverns National Park, New Mexico

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cunningham, K. I.; Northup, D. E.; Pollastro, R. M.; Wright, W. G.; Larock, E. J.

    1995-02-01

    Lechuguilla Cave is a deep, extensive, gypsumand sulfur-bearing hypogenic cave in Carlsbad Caverns National Park, New Mexico, most of which (>90%) lies more than 300 m beneath the entrance. Located in the arid Guadalupe Mountains, Lechuguilla's remarkable state of preservation is partially due to the locally continuous Yates Formation siltstone that has effectively diverted most vadose water away from the cave. Allocthonous organic input to the cave is therefore very limited, but bacterial and fungal colonization is relatively extensive: (1) Aspergillus sp. fungi and unidentified bacteria are associated with iron-, manganese-, and sulfur-rich encrustations on calcitic folia near the suspected water table 466 m below the entrance; (2) 92 species of fungi in 19 genera have been identified throughout the cave in oligotrophic (nutrient-poor) “soils” and pools; (3) cave-air condensate contains unidentified microbes; (4) indigenous chemoheterotrophic Seliberius and Caulobacter bacteria are known from remote pool sites; and (5) at least four genera of heterotrophic bacteria with population densities near 5×105 colony-forming units (CFU) per gram are present in ceiling-bound deposits of supposedly abiogenic condensation-corrosion residues. Various lines of evidence suggest that autotrophic bacteria are present in the ceiling-bound residues and could act as primary producers in a unique subterranean microbial food chain. The suspected autotrophic bacteria are probably chemolithoautotrophic (CLA), utilizing trace iron, manganese, or sulfur in the limestone and dolomitic bedrock to mechanically (and possibly biochemically) erode the substrate to produce residual floor deposits. Because other major sources of organic matter have not been detected, we suggest that these CLA bacteria are providing requisite organic matter to the known heterotrophic bacteria and fungi in the residues. The cavewide bacterial and fungal distribution, the large volumes of corrosion residues

  4. Assessing microbial processes in deep-sea hydrothermal systems by incubation at in situ temperature and pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McNichol, Jesse; Sylva, Sean P.; Thomas, François; Taylor, Craig D.; Sievert, Stefan M.; Seewald, Jeffrey S.

    2016-09-01

    At deep-sea hydrothermal vents, a large source of potential chemical energy is created when reducing vent fluid and oxidizing seawater mix. In this environment, chemolithoautotrophic microbes catalyze exergonic redox reactions which in turn provide the energy needed to fuel their growth and the fixation of CO2 into biomass. In addition to producing new organic matter, this process also consumes compounds contained both in vent fluid and entrained seawater (e.g. H2, NO3-). Despite their biogeochemical importance, such reactions have remained difficult to quantify due to methodological limitations. To address this knowledge gap, this study reports a novel application of isobaric gas-tight fluid samplers for conducting incubations of hydrothermal vent fluids at in situ temperature and pressure. Eighteen 24 h incubations were carried out, representing seven distinct conditions that examine amendments consisting of different electron donors and acceptors. Microbial activity was observed in all treatments, and time series chemical measurements showed that activity was limited by electron acceptor supply, confirming predictions based on geochemical data. Also consistent with these predictions, the presence of nitrate increased rates of hydrogen consumption and yielded ammonium as a product of nitrate respiration. The stoichiometry of predicted redox reactions was also determined, revealing that the sulfur and nitrogen cycles are incompletely understood at deep-sea vents, and likely involve unknown intermediate redox species. Finally, the measured rates of redox processes were either equal to or far greater than what has been reported in previous studies where in situ conditions were not maintained. In addition to providing insights into deep-sea hydrothermal vent biogeochemistry, the methods described herein also offer a practical approach for the incubation of any deep-sea pelagic sample under in situ conditions.

  5. Isolation and Characterization of Strains CVO and FWKO B, Two Novel Nitrate-Reducing, Sulfide-Oxidizing Bacteria Isolated from Oil Field Brine

    PubMed Central

    Gevertz, Diane; Telang, Anita J.; Voordouw, Gerrit; Jenneman, Gary E.

    2000-01-01

    Bacterial strains CVO and FWKO B were isolated from produced brine at the Coleville oil field in Saskatchewan, Canada. Both strains are obligate chemolithotrophs, with hydrogen, formate, and sulfide serving as the only known energy sources for FWKO B, whereas sulfide and elemental sulfur are the only known electron donors for CVO. Neither strain uses thiosulfate as an energy source. Both strains are microaerophiles (1% O2). In addition, CVO grows by denitrification of nitrate or nitrite whereas FWKO B reduces nitrate only to nitrite. Elemental sulfur is the sole product of sulfide oxidation by FWKO B, while CVO produces either elemental sulfur or sulfate, depending on the initial concentration of sulfide. Both strains are capable of growth under strictly autotrophic conditions, but CVO uses acetate as well as CO2 as its sole carbon source. Neither strain reduces sulfate; however, FWKO B reduces sulfur and displays chemolithoautotrophic growth in the presence of elemental sulfur, hydrogen, and CO2. Both strains grow at temperatures between 5 and 40°C. CVO is capable of growth at NaCl concentrations as high as 7%. The present 16s rRNA analysis suggests that both strains are members of the epsilon subdivision of the division Proteobacteria, with CVO most closely related to Thiomicrospira denitrifcans and FWKO B most closely related to members of the genus Arcobacter. The isolation of these two novel chemolithotrophic sulfur bacteria from oil field brine suggests the presence of a subterranean sulfur cycle driven entirely by hydrogen, carbon dioxide, and nitrate. PMID:10831429

  6. Nitrate reduction mechanisms and rates in an unconfined eogenetic karst aquifer in two sites with different redox potential

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Henson, W. R.; Huang, L.; Graham, W. D.; Ogram, A.

    2017-05-01

    This study integrates push-pull tracer tests (PPTT) with microbial characterization of extracted water via quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR) and reverse transcriptase qPCR (RT-qPCR) of selected functional N transformation genes to quantify nitrate reduction mechanisms and rates in sites with different redox potential in a karst aquifer. PPTT treatments with nitrate (AN) and nitrate-fumarate (ANC) were executed in two wells representing anoxic and oxic geochemical end-members. Oxic aquifer zero-order nitrate loss rates (mmol L-1 h-1) were similar for AN and ANC treatment, ranging from 0.03 ± 0.01 to 0.05 ± 0.01. Anoxic aquifer zero-order nitrate loss rates ranged from 0.03 ± 0.02 (AN) to 0.13 ± 0.02 (ANC). Microbial characterization indicates mechanisms influencing these rates were dissimilatory nitrate reduction to ammonium (DNRA) at the anoxic site with AN treatment, assimilatory reduction of nitrate to ammonium (ANRA) with ANC treatment in the water column at both sites, and additional documented nitrate reduction that occurred in unsampled biofilms. With carbon treatment, total numbers of microbes (16S rRNA genes) significantly increased (fourteenfold to thirtyfold), supporting stimulated growth with resulting ANRA. Decreased DNRA gene concentrations (nrfA DNA) and increased DNRA activity ratio (nrfA-cDNA/DNA) supported the assertion that DNRA occurred in the anoxic zone with AN and ANC treatment. Furthermore, decreased DNRA gene copy numbers at the anoxic site with ANC treatment suggests that DNRA microbes in the anoxic site are chemolithoautotrophic. Increased RT-qPCR denitrification gene expression (nirK and nirS) was not observed in water samples, supporting that any observed NO3-N loss due to denitrification may be occurring in unsampled microbial biofilms.

  7. Subduction zone forearc serpentinites as incubators for deep microbial life

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Plümper, Oliver; King, Helen E.; Geisler, Thorsten; Liu, Yang; Pabst, Sonja; Savov, Ivan P.; Rost, Detlef; Zack, Thomas

    2017-04-01

    Serpentinization-fueled systems in the cool, hydrated forearc mantle of subduction zones may provide an environment that supports deep chemolithoautotrophic life. Here, we examine serpentinite clasts expelled from mud volcanoes above the Izu-Bonin-Mariana subduction zone forearc (Pacific Ocean) that contain complex organic matter and nanosized Ni-Fe alloys. Using time-of-flight secondary ion mass spectrometry and Raman spectroscopy, we determined that the organic matter consists of a mixture of aliphatic and aromatic compounds and functional groups such as amides. Although an abiotic or subduction slab-derived fluid origin cannot be excluded, the similarities between the molecular signatures identified in the clasts and those of bacteria-derived biopolymers from other serpentinizing systems hint at the possibility of deep microbial life within the forearc. To test this hypothesis, we coupled the currently known temperature limit for life, 122 °C, with a heat conduction model that predicts a potential depth limit for life within the forearc at ˜10,000 m below the seafloor. This is deeper than the 122 °C isotherm in known oceanic serpentinizing regions and an order of magnitude deeper than the downhole temperature at the serpentinized Atlantis Massif oceanic core complex, Mid-Atlantic Ridge. We suggest that the organic-rich serpentinites may be indicators for microbial life deep within or below the mud volcano. Thus, the hydrated forearc mantle may represent one of Earth’s largest hidden microbial ecosystems. These types of protected ecosystems may have allowed the deep biosphere to thrive, despite violent phases during Earth’s history such as the late heavy bombardment and global mass extinctions.

  8. Metagenomic analysis of microbial consortium from natural crude oil that seeps into the marine ecosystem offshore Southern California.

    PubMed

    Hawley, Erik R; Piao, Hailan; Scott, Nicole M; Malfatti, Stephanie; Pagani, Ioanna; Huntemann, Marcel; Chen, Amy; Glavina Del Rio, Tijana; Foster, Brian; Copeland, Alex; Jansson, Janet; Pati, Amrita; Tringe, Susannah; Gilbert, Jack A; Lorenson, Thomas D; Hess, Matthias

    2014-06-15

    Crude oils can be major contaminants of the marine ecosystem and microorganisms play a significant role in the degradation of its main constituents. To increase our understanding of the microbial hydrocarbon degradation process in the marine ecosystem, we collected crude oil from an active seep area located in the Santa Barbara Channel (SBC) and generated a total of about 52 Gb of raw metagenomic sequence data. The assembled data comprised ~500 Mb, representing ~1.1 million genes derived primarily from chemolithoautotrophic bacteria. Members of Oceanospirillales, a bacterial order belonging to the Deltaproteobacteria, recruited less than 2% of the assembled genes within the SBC metagenome. In contrast, the microbial community associated with the oil plume that developed in the aftermath of the Deepwater Horizon (DWH) blowout in 2010, was dominated by Oceanospirillales, which comprised more than 60% of the metagenomic data generated from the DWH oil plume. This suggests that Oceanospirillales might play a less significant role in the microbially mediated hydrocarbon conversion within the SBC seep oil compared to the DWH plume oil. We hypothesize that this difference results from the SBC oil seep being mostly anaerobic, while the DWH oil plume is aerobic. Within the Archaea, the phylum Euryarchaeota, recruited more than 95% of the assembled archaeal sequences from the SBC oil seep metagenome, with more than 50% of the sequences assigned to members of the orders Methanomicrobiales and Methanosarcinales. These orders contain organisms capable of anaerobic methanogenesis and methane oxidation (AOM) and we hypothesize that these orders - and their metabolic capabilities - may be fundamental to the ecology of the SBC oil seep.

  9. Carbon dioxide fixation by Metallosphaera yellowstonensis and acidothermophilic iron-oxidizing microbial communities from Yellowstone National Park

    SciTech Connect

    Jennings, Ryan; Whitmore, Laura M.; Moran, James J.; Kreuzer, Helen W.; Inskeep, William P.

    2014-05-01

    The fixation of inorganic carbon (as carbon dioxide) has been documented in all three domains of life and results in the biosynthesis of a diverse suite of organic compounds that support the growth of heterotrophic organisms. The primary aim of this study was to assess the importance of carbon dioxide fixation in high-temperature Fe(III)-oxide mat communities and in pure cultures of one of the dominant Fe(II)-oxidizing organisms (Metallosphaera yellowstonensis strain MK1) present in situ. Protein-encoding genes of the complete 3-hydroxypropionate/4-hydroxybutyrate (3-HP/4-HB) carbon fixation pathway were identified in pure-cultures of M. yellowstonensis strain MK1. Metagenome sequencing from the same environments also revealed genes for the 3-HP/4-HB pathway belonging to M. yellowstonensis populations, as well as genes for a complete reductive TCA cycle from Hydrogenobaculum spp. (Aquificales). Stable isotope (13CO2) labeling was used to measure the fixation of CO2 by M. yellowstonensis strain MK1, and in ex situ assays containing live Fe(III)-oxide microbial mats. Results showed that M. yellowstonensis strain MK1 fixes CO2 via the 3-HP/4-HB pathway with a fractionation factor of ~ 2.5 ‰. Direct analysis of the 13C composition of dissolved inorganic C (DIC), dissolved organic C (DOC), landscape C and microbial mat C showed that mat C is comprised of both DIC and non-DIC sources. The estimated contribution of DIC carbon to biomass C (> ~ 35%) is reasonably consistent with the relative abundance of known chemolithoautotrophs and corresponding CO2 fixation pathways detected in metagenome sequence. The significance of DIC as a major source of carbon for Fe-oxide mat communities provides a foundation for examining microbial interactions in these systems that are dependent on the activity of autotrophic organisms such as Hydrogenobaculum and Metallosphaera spp.

  10. Functionally relevant diversity of closely related Nitrospira in activated sludge

    PubMed Central

    Gruber-Dorninger, Christiane; Pester, Michael; Kitzinger, Katharina; Savio, Domenico F; Loy, Alexander; Rattei, Thomas; Wagner, Michael; Daims, Holger

    2015-01-01

    Nitrospira are chemolithoautotrophic nitrite-oxidizing bacteria that catalyze the second step of nitrification in most oxic habitats and are important for excess nitrogen removal from sewage in wastewater treatment plants (WWTPs). To date, little is known about their diversity and ecological niche partitioning within complex communities. In this study, the fine-scale community structure and function of Nitrospira was analyzed in two full-scale WWTPs as model ecosystems. In Nitrospira-specific 16S rRNA clone libraries retrieved from each plant, closely related phylogenetic clusters (16S rRNA identities between clusters ranged from 95.8% to 99.6%) within Nitrospira lineages I and II were found. Newly designed probes for fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) allowed the specific detection of several of these clusters, whose coexistence in the WWTPs was shown for prolonged periods of several years. In situ ecophysiological analyses based on FISH, relative abundance and spatial arrangement quantification, as well as microautoradiography revealed functional differences of these Nitrospira clusters regarding the preferred nitrite concentration, the utilization of formate as substrate and the spatial coaggregation with ammonia-oxidizing bacteria as symbiotic partners. Amplicon pyrosequencing of the nxrB gene, which encodes subunit beta of nitrite oxidoreductase of Nitrospira, revealed in one of the WWTPs as many as 121 species-level nxrB operational taxonomic units with highly uneven relative abundances in the amplicon library. These results show a previously unrecognized high diversity of Nitrospira in engineered systems, which is at least partially linked to niche differentiation and may have important implications for process stability. PMID:25148481

  11. Iodidimonas muriae gen. nov., sp. nov., an aerobic iodide-oxidizing bacterium isolated from brine of a natural gas and iodine recovery facility, and proposals of Iodidimonadaceae fam. nov., Iodidimonadales ord. nov., Emcibacteraceae fam. nov. and Emcibacterales ord. nov.

    PubMed

    Iino, Takao; Ohkuma, Moriya; Kamagata, Yoichi; Amachi, Seigo

    2016-12-01

    A chemo-organotrophic iodide (I-)-oxidizing bacterial strain, C-3T, isolated from natural gas brine of an iodine recovery facility in Kujukuri, Chiba, Japan, was characterized for representation of a novel species in the class Alphaproteobacteria. Phylogenetic analysis based on the 16S rRNA gene sequence revealed that the nearest neighbours of strain C-3T were members of the genera Eilatimonas, Kordiimonas, Rhodothalassium and Temperatibacter with 88-91 % sequence similarity. Cells of strain C-3T were aerobic, Gram-staining-negative, non-sporulating and rod-shaped (1.3-3.6 µm in length). Strain C-3T grew optimally at 30 °C, pH 7.5 and with 3 % NaCl (w/v). Iodide oxidation to form molecular iodine (I2) was a unique trait for strain C-3T, whereas the strain did not utilize iodide as a sole electron donor for chemolithoautotrophic growth. The major isoprenoid quinone was Q-10. The major cellular fatty acids were C18 : 1ω7c and C16 : 1ω5c. The major polar lipids were phosphatidylethanolamine, phosphatidylglycerol, diphosphatidylglycerol and unidentified aminolipids. The G+C content of the genomic DNA was 58.5 mol%. Iodide oxidation and the major cellular fatty acids composition distinguished strain C-3T from phylogenetically related bacteria. On the basis of the phenotypic features and the phylogenetic position, a novel genus and species are proposed for strain C-3T (=JCM 17843T=LMG 28660T), to be named Iodidimonas muriae gen. nov., sp. nov. We also propose to place the distinct sublineages of the genera Iodidimonasgen. nov. and Emcibacter in the orders Iodidimonadales ord. nov. and Emcibacterales ord. nov., respectively, because these genera are located far apart from the order Kordiimonadales and form the distinct lineage in the class Alphaproteobacteria.

  12. Subseafloor fluid mixing and fossilized microbial life in a Cretaceous 'Lost City'-type hydrothermal system at the Iberian Margin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klein, F.; Humphris, S. E.; Guo, W.; Schubotz, F.; Schwarzenbach, E. M.; Orsi, W.

    2015-12-01

    Subseafloor mixing of reduced hydrothermal fluids with seawater is believed to provide the energy and substrates needed to support autotrophic microorganisms in the hydrated oceanic mantle (serpentinite). Despite the potentially significant implications for the distribution of microbial life on Earth and other water-bearing planetary bodies, our understanding of such environments remains elusive. In the present study we examined fossilized microbial communities and fluid mixing processes in the subseafloor of a Cretaceous 'Lost City'-type hydrothermal system at the passive Iberia Margin (ODP Leg 149, Hole 897D). Brucite and calcite co-precipitated from mixed fluids ca. 65m below the Cretaceous palaeo-seafloor at temperatures of 32±4°C within steep chemical gradients (fO2, pH, CH4, SO4, ΣCO2, etc) between weathered, carbonate-rich serpentinite breccia and serpentinite. Mixing of oxidized seawater and strongly reducing hydrothermal fluid at moderate temperatures created conditions capable of supporting microbial activity within the oceanic basement. Dense microbial colonies are fossilized in brucite-calcite veins that are strongly enriched in organic carbon but depleted in 13C. We detected a combination of bacterial diether lipid biomarkers, archaeol and archaeal tetraethers analogous to those found in brucite-carbonate chimneys at the active Lost City hydrothermal field. The exposure of mantle rocks to seawater during the breakup of Pangaea fueled chemolithoautotrophic microbial communities at the Iberia Margin during the Cretaceous, possibly before the onset of seafloor spreading in the Atlantic. 'Lost City'-type serpentinization systems have been discovered at mid-ocean ridges, in forearc settings of subduction zones and at continental margins. It appears that, wherever they occur, they can support microbial life, even in deep subseafloor environments as demonstrated in the present study. Because equivalent systems have likely existed throughout most of Earth

  13. Subseafloor fluid mixing and fossilized microbial life in a Cretaceous 'Lost City'-type hydrothermal system at the Iberian Margin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klein, F.; Humphris, S. E.; Guo, W.; Schubotz, F.; Schwarzenbach, E. M.; Orsi, W.

    2014-12-01

    Subseafloor mixing of reduced hydrothermal fluids with seawater is believed to provide the energy and substrates needed to support autotrophic microorganisms in the hydrated oceanic mantle (serpentinite). Despite the potentially significant implications for the distribution of microbial life on Earth and other water-bearing planetary bodies, our understanding of such environments remains elusive. In the present study we examined fossilized microbial communities and fluid mixing processes in the subseafloor of a Cretaceous 'Lost City'-type hydrothermal system at the passive Iberia Margin (ODP Leg 149, Hole 897D). Brucite and calcite co-precipitated from mixed fluids ca. 65m below the Cretaceous palaeo-seafloor at temperatures of 32±4°C within steep chemical gradients (fO2, pH, CH4, SO4, ΣCO2, etc) between weathered, carbonate-rich serpentinite breccia and serpentinite. Mixing of oxidized seawater and strongly reducing hydrothermal fluid at moderate temperatures created conditions capable of supporting microbial activity within the oceanic basement. Dense microbial colonies are fossilized in brucite-calcite veins that are strongly enriched in organic carbon but depleted in 13C. We detected a combination of bacterial diether lipid biomarkers, archaeol and archaeal tetraethers analogous to those found in brucite-carbonate chimneys at the active Lost City hydrothermal field. The exposure of mantle rocks to seawater during the breakup of Pangaea fueled chemolithoautotrophic microbial communities at the Iberia Margin during the Cretaceous, possibly before the onset of seafloor spreading in the Atlantic. 'Lost City'-type serpentinization systems have been discovered at mid-ocean ridges, in forearc settings of subduction zones and at continental margins. It appears that, wherever they occur, they can support microbial life, even in deep subseafloor environments as demonstrated in the present study. Because equivalent systems have likely existed throughout most of Earth

  14. Genome and physiology of a model Epsilonproteobacterium responsible for sulfide detoxification in marine oxygen depletion zones

    PubMed Central

    Grote, Jana; Schott, Thomas; Bruckner, Christian G.; Glöckner, Frank Oliver; Jost, Günter; Teeling, Hanno; Labrenz, Matthias; Jürgens, Klaus

    2012-01-01

    Eutrophication and global climate change lead to expansion of hypoxia in the ocean, often accompanied by the production of hydrogen sulfide, which is toxic to higher organisms. Chemoautotrophic bacteria are thought to buffer against increased sulfide concentrations by oxidizing hydrogen sulfide before its diffusion to oxygenated surface waters. Model organisms from such environments have not been readily available, which has contributed to a poor understanding of these microbes. We present here a detailed study of “Sulfurimonas gotlandica” str. GD1, an Epsilonproteobacterium isolated from the Baltic Sea oxic-anoxic interface, where it plays a key role in nitrogen and sulfur cycling. Whole-genome analysis and laboratory experiments revealed a high metabolic flexibility, suggesting a considerable capacity for adaptation to variable redox conditions. S. gotlandica str. GD1 was shown to grow chemolithoautotrophically by coupling denitrification with oxidation of reduced sulfur compounds and dark CO2 fixation. Metabolic versatility was further suggested by the use of a range of different electron donors and acceptors and organic carbon sources. The number of genes involved in signal transduction and metabolic pathways exceeds those of other Epsilonproteobacteria. Oxygen tolerance and environmental-sensing systems combined with chemotactic responses enable this organism to thrive successfully in marine oxygen-depletion zones. We propose that S. gotlandica str. GD1 will serve as a model organism in investigations that will lead to a better understanding how members of the Epsilonproteobacteria are able to cope with water column anoxia and the role these microorganisms play in the detoxification of sulfidic waters. PMID:22203982

  15. Novel sulfur-oxidizing streamers thriving in perennial cold saline springs of the Canadian high Arctic.

    PubMed

    Niederberger, Thomas D; Perreault, Nancy N; Lawrence, John R; Nadeau, Jay L; Mielke, Randall E; Greer, Charles W; Andersen, Dale T; Whyte, Lyle G

    2009-03-01

    The perennial springs at Gypsum Hill (GH) and Colour Peak (CP), situated at nearly 80 degrees N on Axel Heiberg Island in the Canadian high Arctic, are one of the few known examples of cold springs in thick permafrost on Earth. The springs emanate from deep saline aquifers and discharge cold anoxic brines rich in both sulfide and sulfate. Grey-coloured microbial streamers form during the winter months in snow-covered regions of the GH spring run-off channels (-1.3 degrees C to 6.9 degrees C, approximately 7.5% NaCl, 0-20 p.p.m. dissolved sulfide, 1 p.p.m. dissolved oxygen) but disappear during the Arctic summer. Culture- and molecular-based analyses of the 16S rRNA gene (FISH, DGGE and clone libraries) indicated that the streamers were uniquely dominated by chemolithoautotrophic sulfur-oxidizing Thiomicrospira species. The streamers oxidized both sulfide and thiosulfate and fixed CO(2) under in situ conditions and a Thiomicrospira strain isolated from the streamers also actively oxidized sulfide and thiosulfate and fixed CO(2) under cold, saline conditions. Overall, the snow-covered spring channels appear to represent a unique polar saline microhabitat that protects and allows Thiomicrospira streamers to form and flourish via chemolithoautrophic, phototrophic-independent metabolism in a high Arctic winter environment characterized by air temperatures commonly below -40 degrees C and with an annual average air temperature of -15 degrees C. These results broaden our knowledge of the physical and chemical boundaries that define life on Earth and have astrobiological implications for the possibility of life existing under similar Martian conditions.

  16. The Chromosomal Arsenic Resistance Genes of Thiobacillus ferrooxidans Have an Unusual Arrangement and Confer Increased Arsenic and Antimony Resistance to Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    Butcher, Bronwyn G.; Deane, Shelly M.; Rawlings, Douglas E.

    2000-01-01

    The chromosomal arsenic resistance genes of the acidophilic, chemolithoautotrophic, biomining bacterium Thiobacillus ferrooxidans were cloned and sequenced. Homologues of four arsenic resistance genes, arsB, arsC, arsH, and a putative arsR gene, were identified. The T. ferrooxidans arsB (arsenite export) and arsC (arsenate reductase) gene products were functional when they were cloned in an Escherichia coli ars deletion mutant and conferred increased resistance to arsenite, arsenate, and antimony. Therefore, despite the fact that the ars genes originated from an obligately acidophilic bacterium, they were functional in E. coli. Although T. ferrooxidans is gram negative, its ArsC was more closely related to the ArsC molecules of gram-positive bacteria. Furthermore, a functional trxA (thioredoxin) gene was required for ArsC-mediated arsenate resistance in E. coli; this finding confirmed the gram-positive ArsC-like status of this resistance and indicated that the division of ArsC molecules based on Gram staining results is artificial. Although arsH was expressed in an E. coli-derived in vitro transcription-translation system, ArsH was not required for and did not enhance arsenic resistance in E. coli. The T. ferrooxidans ars genes were arranged in an unusual manner, and the putative arsR and arsC genes and the arsBH genes were translated in opposite directions. This divergent orientation was conserved in the four T. ferrooxidans strains investigated. PMID:10788346

  17. The CoxD protein of Oligotropha carboxidovorans is a predicted AAA+ ATPase chaperone involved in the biogenesis of the CO dehydrogenase [CuSMoO2] cluster.

    PubMed

    Pelzmann, Astrid; Ferner, Marion; Gnida, Manuel; Meyer-Klaucke, Wolfram; Maisel, Tobias; Meyer, Ortwin

    2009-04-03

    CO dehydrogenase from the Gram-negative chemolithoautotrophic eubacterium Oligotropha carboxidovorans OM5 is a structurally characterized molybdenum-containing iron-sulfur flavoenzyme, which catalyzes the oxidation of CO (CO + H(2)O --> CO(2) + 2e(-) + 2H(+)). It accommodates in its active site a unique bimetallic [CuSMoO(2)] cluster, which is subject to post-translational maturation. Insertional mutagenesis of coxD has established its requirement for the assembly of the [CuSMoO(2)] cluster. Disruption of coxD led to a phenotype of the corresponding mutant OM5 D::km with the following characteristics: (i) It was impaired in the utilization of CO, whereas the utilization of H(2) plus CO(2) was not affected; (ii) Under appropriate induction conditions bacteria synthesized a fully assembled apo-CO dehydrogenase, which could not oxidize CO; (iii) Apo-CO dehydrogenase contained a [MoO(3)] site in place of the [CuSMoO(2)] cluster; and (iv) Employing sodium sulfide first and then the Cu(I)-(thiourea)(3) complex, the non-catalytic [MoO(3)] site could be reconstituted in vitro to a [CuSMoO(2)] cluster capable of oxidizing CO. Sequence information suggests that CoxD is a MoxR-like AAA+ ATPase chaperone related to the hexameric, ring-shaped BchI component of Mg(2+)-chelatases. Recombinant CoxD, which appeared in Escherichia coli in inclusion bodies, occurs exclusively in cytoplasmic membranes of O. carboxidovorans grown in the presence of CO, and its occurrence coincided with GTPase activity upon sucrose density gradient centrifugation of cell extracts. The presumed function of CoxD is the partial unfolding of apo-CO dehydrogenase to assist in the stepwise introduction of sulfur and copper in the [MoO(3)] center of the enzyme.

  18. Culture dependent and independent analyses of 16S rRNA and ATP citrate lyase genes: a comparison of microbial communities from different black smoker chimneys on the Mid-Atlantic Ridge.

    PubMed

    Voordeckers, James W; Do, My H; Hügler, Michael; Ko, Vivian; Sievert, Stefan M; Vetriani, Costantino

    2008-09-01

    The bacterial and archaeal communities of three deep-sea hydrothermal vent systems located on the Mid-Atlantic Ridge (MAR; Rainbow, Logatchev and Broken Spur) were investigated using an integrated culture-dependent and independent approach. Comparative molecular phylogenetic analyses, using the 16S rRNA gene and the deduced amino acid sequences of the alpha and beta subunits of the ATP citrate lyase encoding genes were carried out on natural microbial communities, on an enrichment culture obtained from the Broken Spur chimney, and on novel chemolithoautotrophic bacteria and reference strains originally isolated from several different deep-sea vents. Our data showed that the three MAR hydrothermal vent chimneys investigated in this study host very different microbial assemblages. The microbial community of the Rainbow chimney was dominated by thermophilic, autotrophic, hydrogen-oxidizing, sulfur- and nitrate-reducing Epsilonproteobacteria related to the genus Caminibacter. The detection of sequences related to sulfur-reducing bacteria and archaea (Archaeoglobus) indicated that thermophilic sulfate reduction might also be occurring at this site. The Logatchev bacterial community included several sequences related to mesophilic sulfur-oxidizing bacteria, while the archaeal component of this chimney was dominated by sequences related to the ANME-2 lineage, suggesting that anaerobic oxidation of methane may be occurring at this site. Comparative analyses of the ATP citrate lyase encoding genes from natural microbial communities suggested that Epsilonproteobacteria were the dominant primary producers using the reverse TCA cycle (rTCA) at Rainbow, while Aquificales of the genera Desulfurobacterium and Persephonella were prevalent in the Broken Spur chimney.

  19. Deferribacter abyssi sp. nov., an anaerobic thermophile from deep-sea hydrothermal vents of the Mid-Atlantic Ridge.

    PubMed

    Miroshnichenko, M L; Slobodkin, A I; Kostrikina, N A; L'Haridon, S; Nercessian, O; Spring, S; Stackebrandt, E; Bonch-Osmolovskaya, E A; Jeanthon, C

    2003-09-01

    Two strains of thermophilic, anaerobic, chemolithoautotrophic bacteria, designated JR(T) and DR, were isolated from hydrothermal samples collected on the Mid-Atlantic Ridge from the Rainbow (36 degrees 16' N, 33 degrees 54' W) and Menez Gwen (37 degrees 50' N, 31 degrees 50' W) vent fields, respectively. Cells of both isolates were short, straight- to vibrio-shaped, motile rods with one polar flagellum, and were Gram-negative and non-sporulating. Strain JR(T) was characterized in detail. It was found to grow optimally at pH 6.5-6.7, at 60 degrees C and in the presence of 30 g NaCl l(-1). Strain JR(T) could use molecular hydrogen, acetate, succinate, pyruvate and proteinaceous compounds as electron donors, and elemental sulfur, nitrate or Fe(III) as electron acceptors. No fermentation of organic substrates occurred. The G+C content of the DNA of strain JR(T) was 30.8 mol%. Strain DR (=DSM 14927) possessed the same morphology and pH, temperature and salinity optima and ranges, and used the same electron acceptors as strain JR(T). On the basis of their 16S rDNA sequences (1517 nucleotides), strains JR(T) and DR were identical and distantly related to Deferribacter thermophilus and Deferribacter desulfuricans (95.3 and 95.2 % sequence similarity, respectively). Based on their phenotypic and phylogenetic characteristics, it is proposed that both strains are members of a new species of the genus Deferribacter, for which the name Deferribacter abyssi (type strain JR(T)=DSM 14873(T)=JCM 11955(T)) is proposed.

  20. Transition of microbiological and sedimentological features associated with the geochemical gradient in a travertine mound in northern Sumatra, Indonesia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sugihara, Chiya; Yanagawa, Katsunori; Okumura, Tomoyo; Takashima, Chizuru; Harijoko, Agung; Kano, Akihiro

    2016-08-01

    Modern travertines, carbonate deposits in Ca-rich hydrothermal water with high pCO2, often display a changing environment along the water path, with corresponding variability in the microbial communities. We investigated a travertine-bearing hot spring at the Blue Pool in northern Sumatra, Indonesia. The thermal water of 62 °C with high H2S (200 μM) and pCO2 ( 1 atm) developed a travertine mound 70 m wide. The concentrations of the gas components H2S and CO2, decrease immediately after the water is discharged, while the dissolved oxygen, pH, and aragonite saturation increase in the downstream direction. Responding to the geochemical gradient in the water, the surface biofilms change color from white to pink, light-green, dark-green, and brown as the water flows from the vent; this corresponds to microbial communities characterized by chemolithoautotrophs (Halothiobacillaceae), purple sulfur bacteria (Chromatiaceae), Anaerolineaceae, and co-occurrence of green non-sulfur bacteria (Chloroflexales)-Cyanobacteria, and green sulfur bacteria (Chlorobiales), respectively. In an environment with a certain level of H2S (> 1 μM), sulfur digestion and anoxygenic photosynthesis can be more profitable than oxygenic photosynthesis by Cyanobacteria. The precipitated carbonate mineral consists of aragonite and calcite, with the proportion of aragonite increasing downstream due to the larger Mg2 +/Ca2 + ratio in the water or the development of thicker biofilm. Where the biofilm is well developed, the aragonite travertines often exhibit laminated structures that were likely associated with the daily metabolism of these bacteria. The microbiological and sedimentological features at the Blue Pool may be the modern analogs of geomicrobiological products in the early Earth. Biofilm of anoxygenic photosynthetic bacteria had the potential to form ancient stromatolites that existed before the appearance of cyanobacteria.

  1. The Complete Genome Sequence of Thermoproteus tenax: A Physiologically Versatile Member of the Crenarchaeota

    PubMed Central

    Siebers, Bettina; Zaparty, Melanie; Raddatz, Guenter; Tjaden, Britta; Albers, Sonja-Verena; Bell, Steve D.; Blombach, Fabian; Kletzin, Arnulf; Kyrpides, Nikos; Lanz, Christa; Plagens, André; Rampp, Markus; Rosinus, Andrea; von Jan, Mathias; Makarova, Kira S.; Klenk, Hans-Peter; Schuster, Stephan C.; Hensel, Reinhard

    2011-01-01

    Here, we report on the complete genome sequence of the hyperthermophilic Crenarchaeum Thermoproteus tenax (strain Kra1, DSM 2078T) a type strain of the crenarchaeotal order Thermoproteales. Its circular 1.84-megabase genome harbors no extrachromosomal elements and 2,051 open reading frames are identified, covering 90.6% of the complete sequence, which represents a high coding density. Derived from the gene content, T. tenax is a representative member of the Crenarchaeota. The organism is strictly anaerobic and sulfur-dependent with optimal growth at 86°C and pH 5.6. One particular feature is the great metabolic versatility, which is not accompanied by a distinct increase of genome size or information density as compared to other Crenarchaeota. T. tenax is able to grow chemolithoautotrophically (CO2/H2) as well as chemoorganoheterotrophically in presence of various organic substrates. All pathways for synthesizing the 20 proteinogenic amino acids are present. In addition, two presumably complete gene sets for NADH:quinone oxidoreductase (complex I) were identified in the genome and there is evidence that either NADH or reduced ferredoxin might serve as electron donor. Beside the typical archaeal A0A1-ATP synthase, a membrane-bound pyrophosphatase is found, which might contribute to energy conservation. Surprisingly, all genes required for dissimilatory sulfate reduction are present, which is confirmed by growth experiments. Mentionable is furthermore, the presence of two proteins (ParA family ATPase, actin-like protein) that might be involved in cell division in Thermoproteales, where the ESCRT system is absent, and of genes involved in genetic competence (DprA, ComF) that is so far unique within Archaea. PMID:22003381

  2. Identification of a Novel Arsenite Oxidase Gene, arxA, in the Haloalkaliphilic, Arsenite-Oxidizing Bacterium Alkalilimnicola ehrlichii Strain MLHE-1 ▿

    PubMed Central

    Zargar, Kamrun; Hoeft, Shelley; Oremland, Ronald; Saltikov, Chad W.

    2010-01-01

    Although arsenic is highly toxic to most organisms, certain prokaryotes are known to grow on and respire toxic metalloids of arsenic (i.e., arsenate and arsenite). Two enzymes are known to be required for this arsenic-based metabolism: (i) the arsenate respiratory reductase (ArrA) and (ii) arsenite oxidase (AoxB). Both catalytic enzymes contain molybdopterin cofactors and form distinct phylogenetic clades (ArrA and AoxB) within the dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO) reductase family of enzymes. Here we report on the genetic identification of a “new” type of arsenite oxidase that fills a phylogenetic gap between the ArrA and AoxB clades of arsenic metabolic enzymes. This “new” arsenite oxidase is referred to as ArxA and was identified in the genome sequence of the Mono Lake isolate Alkalilimnicola ehrlichii MLHE-1, a chemolithoautotroph that can couple arsenite oxidation to nitrate reduction. A genetic system was developed for MLHE-1 and used to show that arxA (gene locus ID mlg_0216) was required for chemoautotrophic arsenite oxidation. Transcription analysis also showed that mlg_0216 was only expressed under anaerobic conditions in the presence of arsenite. The mlg_0216 gene is referred to as arxA because of its greater homology to arrA relative to aoxB and previous reports that implicated Mlg_0216 (ArxA) of MLHE-1 in reversible arsenite oxidation and arsenate reduction in vitro. Our results and past observations support the position that ArxA is a distinct clade within the DMSO reductase family of proteins. These results raise further questions about the evolutionary relationships between arsenite oxidases (AoxB) and arsenate respiratory reductases (ArrA). PMID:20453090

  3. Discovery and analysis of cofactor-dependent phosphoglycerate mutase homologs as novel phosphoserine phosphatases in Hydrogenobacter thermophilus.

    PubMed

    Chiba, Yoko; Oshima, Kenro; Arai, Hiroyuki; Ishii, Masaharu; Igarashi, Yasuo

    2012-04-06

    Phosphoserine phosphatase (PSP) catalyzes the dephosphorylation of phosphoserine to serine and inorganic phosphate. PSPs, which have been found in all three domains of life, belong to the haloacid dehalogenase-like hydrolase superfamily. However, certain organisms, particularly bacteria, lack a classical PSP gene, although they appear to possess a functional phosphoserine synthetic pathway. The apparent lack of a PSP ortholog in Hydrogenobacter thermophilus, an obligately chemolithoautotrophic and thermophilic bacterium, represented a missing link in serine anabolism because our previous study suggested that serine should be synthesized from phosphoserine. Here, we detected PSP activity in cell-free extracts of H. thermophilus and purified two proteins with PSP activity. Surprisingly, these proteins belonged to the histidine phosphatase superfamily and had been annotated as cofactor-dependent phosphoglycerate mutase (dPGM). However, because they possessed neither mutase activity nor the residues important for the activity, we defined these proteins as novel-type PSPs. Considering the strict substrate specificity toward l-phosphoserine, kinetic parameters, and PSP activity levels in cell-free extracts, these proteins were strongly suggested to function as PSPs in vivo. We also detected PSP activity from "dPGM-like" proteins of Thermus thermophilus and Arabidopsis thaliana, suggesting that PSP activity catalyzed by dPGM-like proteins may be distributed among a broad range of organisms. In fact, a number of bacterial genera, including Firmicutes and Cyanobacteria, were proposed to be strong candidates for possessing this novel type of PSP. These findings will help to identify the missing link in serine anabolism.

  4. <