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Sample records for chemopreventive agent sulforaphane

  1. Frugal Chemoprevention: Targeting Nrf2 with Foods Rich in Sulforaphane

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Li; Palliyaguru, Dushani L.; Kensler, Thomas W.

    2015-01-01

    With the properties of efficacy, safety, tolerability, practicability and low cost, foods containing bioactive phytochemicals are gaining significant attention as elements of chemoprevention strategies against cancer. Sulforaphane [1-isothiocyanato-4-(methylsulfinyl)butane], a naturally occurring isothiocyanate produced by cruciferous vegetables such as broccoli, is found to be a highly promising chemoprevention agent against not only variety of cancers such as breast, prostate, colon, skin, lung, stomach or bladder carcinogenesis, but also cardiovascular disease, neurodegenerative diseases, and diabetes. For reasons of experimental exigency, pre-clinical studies have focused principally on sulforaphane itself, while clinical studies have relied on broccoli sprout preparations rich in either sulforaphane or its biogenic precursor, glucoraphanin. Substantive subsequent evaluation of sulforaphane pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics has been undertaken using either pure compound or food matrices. Sulforaphane affects multiple targets in cells. One key molecular mechanism of action for sulforaphane entails activation of the Nrf2- Keap1 signaling pathway although other actions contribute to the broad spectrum of efficacy in different animal models. This review summarizes the current status of pre-clinical chemoprevention studies with sulforaphane and highlights the progress and challenges for the application of foods rich in sulforaphane and/or glucoraphanin in the arena of clinical chemoprevention. PMID:26970133

  2. Sulforaphane, a cancer chemopreventive agent, induces pathways associated with membrane biosynthesis in response to tissue damage by aflatoxin B{sub 1}

    SciTech Connect

    Techapiesancharoenkij, Nirachara; Fiala, Jeannette L.A.; Navasumrit, Panida; Croy, Robert G.; Wogan, Gerald N.; Groopman, John D.; Ruchirawat, Mathuros; Essigmann, John M.

    2015-01-01

    Aflatoxin B{sub 1} (AFB{sub 1}) is one of the major risk factors for liver cancer globally. A recent study showed that sulforaphane (SF), a potent inducer of phase II enzymes that occurs naturally in widely consumed vegetables, effectively induces hepatic glutathione S-transferases (GSTs) and reduces levels of hepatic AFB{sub 1}-DNA adducts in AFB{sub 1}-exposed Sprague Dawley rats. The present study characterized the effects of SF pre-treatment on global gene expression in the livers of similarly treated male rats. Combined treatment with AFB{sub 1} and SF caused reprogramming of a network of genes involved in signal transduction and transcription. Changes in gene regulation were observable 4 h after AFB{sub 1} administration in SF-pretreated animals and may reflect regeneration of cells in the wake of AFB{sub 1}-induced hepatotoxicity. At 24 h after AFB{sub 1} administration, significant induction of genes that play roles in cellular lipid metabolism and acetyl-CoA biosynthesis was detected in SF-pretreated AFB{sub 1}-dosed rats. Induction of this group of genes may indicate a metabolic shift toward glycolysis and fatty acid synthesis to generate and maintain pools of intermediate molecules required for tissue repair, cell growth and compensatory hepatic cell proliferation. Collectively, gene expression data from this study provide insights into molecular mechanisms underlying the protective effects of SF against AFB{sub 1} hepatotoxicity and hepatocarcinogenicity, in addition to the chemopreventive activity of this compound as a GST inducer. - Highlights: • This study revealed sulforaphane (SF)-deregulated gene sets in aflatoxin B{sub 1} (AFB{sub 1})-treated rat livers. • SF redirects biochemical networks toward lipid biosynthesis in AFB{sub 1}-dosed rats. • SF enhanced gene sets that would be expected to favor cell repair and regeneration.

  3. Dietary Sulforaphane in Cancer Chemoprevention: The Role of Epigenetic Regulation and HDAC Inhibition

    PubMed Central

    Tortorella, Stephanie M.; Royce, Simon G.; Licciardi, Paul V.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Significance: Sulforaphane, produced by the hydrolytic conversion of glucoraphanin after ingestion of cruciferous vegetables, particularly broccoli and broccoli sprouts, has been extensively studied due to its apparent health-promoting properties in disease and limited toxicity in normal tissue. Recent Studies: Recent identification of a sub-population of tumor cells with stem cell-like self-renewal capacity that may be responsible for relapse, metastasis, and resistance, as a potential target of the dietary compound, may be an important aspect of sulforaphane chemoprevention. Evidence also suggests that sulforaphane may target the epigenetic alterations observed in specific cancers, reversing aberrant changes in gene transcription through mechanisms of histone deacetylase inhibition, global demethylation, and microRNA modulation. Critical Issues: In this review, we discuss the biochemical and biological properties of sulforaphane with a particular emphasis on the anticancer properties of the dietary compound. Sulforaphane possesses the capacity to intervene in multistage carcinogenesis through the modulation and/or regulation of important cellular mechanisms. The inhibition of phase I enzymes that are responsible for the activation of pro-carcinogens, and the induction of phase II enzymes that are critical in mutagen elimination are well-characterized chemopreventive properties. Furthermore, sulforaphane mediates a number of anticancer pathways, including the activation of apoptosis, induction of cell cycle arrest, and inhibition of NFκB. Future Directions: Further characterization of the chemopreventive properties of sulforaphane and its capacity to be selectively toxic to malignant cells are warranted to potentially establish the clinical utility of the dietary compound as an anti-cancer compound alone, and in combination with clinically relevant therapeutic and management strategies. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 22, 1382–1424. PMID:25364882

  4. Sulforaphane bioavailability and chemopreventive activity in women scheduled for breast biopsy

    PubMed Central

    Mori, Motomi; Farris, Paige; Vetto, John T.; Naik, Arpana M.; Oh, Karen Y.; Thuillier, Philippe; Ho, Emily; Shannon, Jackilen

    2015-01-01

    Epidemiological studies suggest a protective effect of cruciferous vegetables on breast cancer. Sulforaphane (SFN), an active food component derived from crucifers, has been shown to be effective in breast cancer chemoprevention. This study evaluated the chemopreventive effect of SFN on selective biomarkers from blood and breast tissues. In a 2-8-week double-blinded, randomized controlled trial, 54 women with abnormal mammograms and scheduled for breast biopsy were randomized to consume a placebo or a glucoraphanin (GFN) supplement providing SFN (n = 27). Plasma and urinary SFN metabolites, peripheral blood mononuclear cell (PBMC) histone deacetylase (HDAC) activity, and tissue biomarkers (H3K18ac, H3K9ac, HDAC3, HDAC6, Ki-67, p21) were measured before and after the intervention in benign, ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS), or invasive ductal carcinoma (IDC) breast tissues. Within the supplement group, Ki-67 (p = 0.003) and HDAC3 (p = 0.044) levels significantly decreased in benign tissue. Pre-to-post-intervention changes in these biomarkers were not significantly different between treatment groups after multiple comparison adjustment. GFN supplementation was associated with a significant decrease in PBMC HDAC activity (p = 0.04). No significant associations were observed between SFN and examined tissue biomarkers when comparing treatment groups. This study provides evidence that GFN supplementation for a few weeks is safe but may not be sufficient for producing changes in breast tissue tumor biomarkers. Future studies employing larger sample sizes should evaluate alternative dosing and duration regimens to inform dietary SFN strategies in breast cancer chemoprevention. PMID:26511489

  5. Polyphenols as cancer chemopreventive agents.

    PubMed

    Stoner, G D; Mukhtar, H

    1995-01-01

    This article summarizes available data on the chemopreventive efficacies of tea polyphenols, curcumin and ellagic acid in various model systems. Emphasis is placed upon the anticarcinogenic activity of these polyphenols and their proposed mechanism(s) of action. Tea is grown in about 30 countries and, next to water, is the most widely consumed beverage in the world. Tea is manufactured as either green, black, or oolong; black tea represents approximately 80% of tea products. Epidemiological studies, though inconclusive, suggest a protective effect of tea consumption on human cancer. Experimental studies of the antimutagenic and anticarcinogenic effects of tea have been conducted principally with green tea polyphenols (GTPs). GTPs exhibit antimutagenic activity in vitro, and they inhibit carcinogen-induced skin, lung, forestomach, esophagus, duodenum and colon tumors in rodents. In addition, GTPs inhibit TPA-induced skin tumor promotion in mice. Although several GTPs possess anticarcinogenic activity, the most active is (-)-epigallocatechin-3-gallate (EGCG), the major constituent in the GTP fraction. Several mechanisms appear to be responsible for the tumor-inhibitory properties of GTPs, including enhancement of antioxidant (glutathione peroxidase, catalase and quinone reductase) and phase II (glutathione-S-transferase) enzyme activities; inhibition of chemically induced lipid peroxidation; inhibition of irradiation- and TPA-induced epidermal ornithine decarboxylase (ODC) and cyclooxygenase activities; inhibition of protein kinase C and cellular proliferation; antiinflammatory activity; and enhancement of gap junction intercellular communication. Curcumin is the yellow coloring agent in the spice tumeric. It exhibits antimutagenic activity in the Ames Salmonella test and has anticarcinogenic activity, inhibiting chemically induced preneoplastic lesions in the breast and colon and neoplastic lesions in the skin, forestomach, duodenum and colon of rodents. In addition

  6. Chemopreventive Agent Development | Division of Cancer Prevention

    Cancer.gov

    [[{"fid":"174","view_mode":"default","fields":{"format":"default","field_file_image_alt_text[und][0][value]":"Chemoprevenentive Agent Development Research Group Homepage Logo","field_file_image_title_text[und][0][value]":"Chemoprevenentive Agent Development Research Group Homepage Logo","field_folder[und]":"15"},"type":"media","attributes":{"alt":"Chemoprevenentive Agent Development Research Group Homepage Logo","title":"Chemoprevenentive Agent Development Research Group Homepage Logo","heigh | Research on early chemopreventive agent development, from preclinical studies to phase I clinical trials.

  7. Chemoprevention of oxidative stress-associated oral carcinogenesis by sulforaphane depends on NRF2 and the isothiocyanate moiety.

    PubMed

    Lan, Aixian; Li, Wenjun; Liu, Yao; Xiong, Zhaohui; Zhang, Xinyan; Zhou, Shanshan; Palko, Olesya; Chen, Hao; Kapita, Mayanga; Prigge, Justin R; Schmidt, Edward E; Chen, Xin; Sun, Zheng; Chen, Xiaoxin Luke

    2016-08-16

    Oxidative stress is known to play an important role in oral cancer development. In this study we aimed to examine whether a chemical activator of NRF2, sulforaphane (SFN), may have chemopreventive effects on oxidative stress-associated oral carcinogenesis. We first showed that Nrf2 activation and oxidative damage were commonly seen in human samples of oral leukoplakia. With gene microarray and immunostaining, we found 4-nitroquinoline 1-oxide (4NQO) in drink activated the Nrf2 pathway and produced oxidative damage in mouse tongue. Meanwhile whole exome sequencing of mouse tongue identified mutations consistent with 4NQO's mutagenic profile. Using cultured human oral keratinocytes and 4NQO-treated mouse tongue, we found that SFN pre-treatment activated the NRF2 pathway and inhibited oxidative damage both in vitro and in vivo. On the contrary, a structural analogue of SFN without the isothiocyanate moiety did not have such effects. In a long-term chemoprevention study using wild-type and Nrf2-/- mice, we showed that topical application of SFN activated the NRF2 pathway, inhibited oxidative damage, and prevented 4NQO-induced oral carcinogenesis in an Nrf2-dependent manner. Our data clearly demonstrate that SFN has chemopreventive effects on oxidative stress-associated oral carcinogenesis, and such effects depend on Nrf2 and the isothiocyanate moiety.

  8. Chemoprevention of oxidative stress-associated oral carcinogenesis by sulforaphane depends on NRF2 and the isothiocyanate moiety

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Yao; Xiong, Zhaohui; Zhang, Xinyan; Zhou, Shanshan; Palko, Olesya; Chen, Hao; Kapita, Mayanga; Prigge, Justin R.; Schmidt, Edward E.; Chen, Xin; Sun, Zheng; Chen, Xiaoxin Luke

    2016-01-01

    Oxidative stress is known to play an important role in oral cancer development. In this study we aimed to examine whether a chemical activator of NRF2, sulforaphane (SFN), may have chemopreventive effects on oxidative stress-associated oral carcinogenesis. We first showed that Nrf2 activation and oxidative damage were commonly seen in human samples of oral leukoplakia. With gene microarray and immunostaining, we found 4-nitroquinoline 1-oxide (4NQO) in drink activated the Nrf2 pathway and produced oxidative damage in mouse tongue. Meanwhile whole exome sequencing of mouse tongue identified mutations consistent with 4NQO's mutagenic profile. Using cultured human oral keratinocytes and 4NQO-treated mouse tongue, we found that SFN pre-treatment activated the NRF2 pathway and inhibited oxidative damage both in vitro and in vivo. On the contrary, a structural analogue of SFN without the isothiocyanate moiety did not have such effects. In a long-term chemoprevention study using wild-type and Nrf2-/- mice, we showed that topical application of SFN activated the NRF2 pathway, inhibited oxidative damage, and prevented 4NQO-induced oral carcinogenesis in an Nrf2-dependent manner. Our data clearly demonstrate that SFN has chemopreventive effects on oxidative stress-associated oral carcinogenesis, and such effects depend on Nrf2 and the isothiocyanate moiety. PMID:27447968

  9. Modulation of apoptosis by cancer chemopreventive agents.

    PubMed

    D'Agostini, Francesco; Izzotti, Alberto; Balansky, Roumen M; Bennicelli, Carlo; De Flora, Silvio

    2005-12-11

    A review of almost 2000 studies showed that the large majority of 39 putative cancer chemopreventive agents induced "spontaneous" apoptosis. Inhibition of the programmed cell death triggered by a variety of stimuli was consistently reported only with ascorbic acid, alpha-tocopherol, and N-acetylcysteine (NAC). We performed experimental studies in rodents exposed to cigarette smoke, either mainstream (MCS) or environmental (ECS), and UV-A/B-containing light. The nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug sulindac did not affect the apoptotic process in the skin of light-exposed mice and in the lungs of ECS-exposed mice. Likewise, 5,6-benzoflavone, indole-3-carbinol, 1,2-dithiole-3-thione and oltipraz failed to modulate apoptosis in the respiratory tract of ECS-exposed rats. Phenethyl isothiocyanate further enhanced the frequency of apoptosis in pulmonary alveolar macrophages and bronchial epithelial cells, and upregulated several genes in the lung of ECS-exposed rats. Both individually and in combination with oltipraz, NAC inhibited apoptosis in the respiratory tract of rats exposed either to MCS or ECS. Moreover, NAC attenuated the ECS-related overexpression of proapoptotic genes and normalized the levels of proapoptotic proteins in rat lung. The transplacental administration of NAC to mice considerably attenuated gene overexpression in the liver of fetuses exposed to ECS throughout pregnancy. Inhibition of apoptosis by chemopreventive agents reflects their ability to counteract certain upstream signals, such as genotoxic damage, redox imbalances, and other forms of cellular stress that trigger apoptosis. On the other hand, enhancement of apoptosis is a double-edged sword, since it represents a protective mechanism in carcinogenesis but may contribute to the pathogenesis of other degenerative diseases. We suggest that stimulation of apoptosis by so many chemopreventive agents, as reported in the literature, may often reflect the occurrence of toxic effects at high doses.

  10. The molecular mechanism of action of aspirin, curcumin and sulforaphane combinations in the chemoprevention of pancreatic cancer.

    PubMed

    Thakkar, Arvind; Sutaria, Dhruvitkumar; Grandhi, B Karthik; Wang, Jeffrey; Prabhu, Sunil

    2013-04-01

    Pancreatic cancer ranks as the fourth most deadly form of cancer in the United States with ~37,000 deaths each year. The present study evaluated the chemopreventive potential of a combination of aspirin (ASP), curcumin (CUR) and sulforaphane (SFN) in low doses to human pancreatic cancer cells, MIA PaCa-2 and Panc-1. Results demonstrated that low doses of ASP (1 mM), CUR (10 µM) and SFN (5 µM) (ACS) combination reduced cell viability by ~70% (P<0.001), and also induced cell apoptosis by ~51% (P<0.001) accompanied by activation of caspase-3 and Poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase (PARP) proteins. The NF-κB DNA binding activity was inhi-bited by ~45% (P<0.01) and ~75% (P<0.001) in MIA PaCa-2 and Panc-1 cells, respectively. Mechanistic studies revealed that ACS promoted increase expression of phospho extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1/2 (P-ERK1/2), c-Jun, p38 MAPK and p53 proteins. Furthermore, the cells pretreated with U0126 (ERK1/2 inhibitor) partially abolished the effect of ACS on cell viability. Data from this study demonstrate that a low-dose ACS combination inhibits cell growth by inducing cell apoptosis, and proposes sustained activation of the ERK1/2 signaling pathway as one of the possible mechanisms.

  11. Hereditary cancer syndromes as model systems for chemopreventive agent development.

    PubMed

    Walcott, Farzana L; Patel, Jigar; Lubet, Ronald; Rodriguez, Luz; Calzone, Kathleen A

    2016-02-01

    Research in chemoprevention has undergone a shift in emphasis for pragmatic reasons from large, phase III randomized studies to earlier phase studies focused on safety, mechanisms, and utilization of surrogate endpoints such as biomarkers instead of cancer incidence. This transition permits trials to be conducted in smaller populations and at substantially reduced costs while still yielding valuable information. This article will summarize some of the current chemoprevention challenges and the justification for the use of animal models to facilitate identification and testing of chemopreventive agents as illustrated though four inherited cancer syndromes. Preclinical models of inherited cancer syndromes serve as prototypical systems in which chemopreventive agents can be developed for ultimate application to both the sporadic and inherited cancer settings.

  12. Sulforaphane plays common and different roles in tumorigenic and nontumorigenic colon cell growth

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Sulforaphane (SFN) is a naturally occurring member of the isothiocyanate family of chemopreventive agents and the induction of cell cycle arrest and apoptosis is a key mechanism by which SFN exerts its colon cancer prevention. However, little is known about the differential effects of SFN on colon c...

  13. Chain elongation analog of resveratrol as potent cancer chemoprevention agent.

    PubMed

    Kang, Yan-Fei; Qiao, Hai-Xia; Xin, Long-Zuo; Ge, Li-Ping

    2016-09-01

    Resveratrol is identified as a natural cancer chemoprevention agent. There has been a lot of interest in designing and developing resveratrol analogs with cancer chemoprevention activity superior to that of parent molecule and exploring their action mechanism in the past several decades. In this study, we have synthesized resveratrol analogs of compounds A-C via conjugated chain elongation based on isoprene unit retention strategy. Remarkably, cytotoxic activity analysis results indicated that compound B possesses the best proliferation inhibition activity for NCI-H460 cells in all the test compounds. Intriguingly, compound B displayed a higher cytotoxicity against human non-small cell lung cancer cells (NCI-H460) compared to normal human embryonic lung fibroblasts (MRC-5). Afterward, flow cytometry analysis showed that compound B would induce cell apoptosis. We further researched the action mechanism. When NCI-H460 cells were incubated by compound B for 6 or 9 h, respectively, the intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) level was enhanced obviously. With elevation of intracellular ROS level, flow cytometry measurement verified mitochondrial transmembrane potential collapse, which was accompanied by the up-regulation of Bax and down-regulation of Bcl-2. More interestingly, compound B increased the expression of caspase-9 and caspase-3, which induced cell apoptosis. Moreover, compound B arrested cell cycle in G0/G1 phase. These are all to provide useful information for designing resveratrol-based chemoprevention agent and understanding the action mechanism.

  14. Transcription factor Nrf2 mediates an adaptive response to sulforaphane that protects fibroblasts in vitro against the cytotoxic effects of electrophiles, peroxides and redox-cycling agents

    SciTech Connect

    Higgins, Larry G.; Kelleher, Michael O.; Eggleston, Ian M.; Itoh, Ken; Yamamoto, Masayuki; Hayes, John D.

    2009-06-15

    Sulforaphane can stimulate cellular adaptation to redox stressors through transcription factor Nrf2. Using mouse embryonic fibroblasts (MEFs) as a model, we show herein that the normal homeostatic level of glutathione in Nrf2{sup -/-} MEFs was only 20% of that in their wild-type counterparts. Furthermore, the rate of glutathione synthesis following its acute depletion upon treatment with 3 {mu}mol/l sulforaphane was very substantially lower in Nrf2{sup -/-} MEFs than in wild-type cells, and the rebound leading to a {approx} 1.9-fold increase in glutathione that occurred 12-24 h after Nrf2{sup +/+} MEFs were treated with sulforaphane was not observed in Nrf2{sup -/-} fibroblasts. Wild-type MEFs that had been pre-treated for 24 h with 3 {mu}mol/l sulforaphane exhibited between 1.4- and 3.2-fold resistance against thiol-reactive electrophiles, including isothiocyanates, {alpha},{beta}-unsaturated carbonyl compounds (e.g. acrolein), aryl halides and alkene epoxides. Pre-treatment of Nrf2{sup +/+} MEFs with sulforaphane also protected against hydroperoxides (e.g. cumene hydroperoxide, CuOOH), free radical-generating compounds (e.g. menadione), and genotoxic electrophiles (e.g. chlorambucil). By contrast, Nrf2{sup -/-} MEFs were typically {approx} 50% less tolerant of these agents than wild-type fibroblasts, and sulforaphane pre-treatment did not protect the mutant cells against xenobiotics. To test whether Nrf2-mediated up-regulation of glutathione represents the major cytoprotective mechanism stimulated by sulforaphane, 5 {mu}mol/l buthionine sulfoximine (BSO) was used to inhibit glutathione synthesis. In Nrf2{sup +/+} MEFs pre-treated with sulforaphane, BSO diminished intrinsic resistance and abolished inducible resistance to acrolein, CuOOH and chlorambucil, but not menadione. Thus Nrf2-dependent up-regulation of GSH is the principal mechanism by which sulforaphane pre-treatment induced resistance to acrolein, CuOOH and chlorambucil, but not menadione.

  15. What do we know about sulforaphane protection against photoaging?

    PubMed

    Sikdar, Sohely; Papadopoulou, Maria; Dubois, Jacques

    2016-03-01

    Sulforaphane (SFN), a natural compound occurring in cruciferous vegetables, has been known for years as a chemopreventive agent against many types of cancer. Recently, it has been investigated as an antioxidant and anti-aging agent, and interesting conclusions have been made over the last decade. SFN demonstrated protective effects against ultraviolet (UV)-induced skin damage through several mechanisms of action, for example, decrease of reactive oxygen species production, inhibition of matrix metalloproteinase expression, and induction of phase 2 enzymes. SFN used as a protective agent against UV damage is a whole new matter, and it seems to be a very promising ingredient in upcoming anti-aging drugs and cosmetics.

  16. Kinetics of Sulforaphane in Mice after Consumption of Sulforaphane-Enriched Broccoli Sprout Preparation

    PubMed Central

    Li, Yanyan; Zhang, Tao; Li, Xiaoqin; Zou, Peng; Schwartz, Steven J.; Sun, Duxin

    2013-01-01

    Scope Sulforaphane is a natural isothiocyanate in broccoli sprouts with cancer chemopreventive activity. This study is aimed to to use different methods to develop broccoli sprout preparations to compare their ability to deliver sulforaphane to the mice and to evaluate the kinetics and biodistribution of sulforaphane. Methods and Results The sulforaphane-enriched sprout preparation generated by two-step procedure (quick-steaming followed by myrosinase treatment) contained the highest level of sulforaphane, which was 11 and 5 times higher than the freeze-dried fresh broccoli sprouts and the quick-steamed, freeze-dried broccoli sprouts, respectively. After oral administration of 2.5 mg/g body weight of the broccoli sprout preparations, sulforaphane was quickly absorbed and distributed throughout the tissues. The sulforaphane-rich preparation resulted in the highest exposure, with peak plasma sulforaphane concentration of 337 ng/ml, which is 6.0 times and 2.6 times higher compared to the other two preparations. A whole body physiologically-based pharmacokinetic model (developed with ADAPT 5 software) suggests that distribution of sulforaphane is perfusion-limited in all organs. Conclusion This study provides a broccoli sprout preparation that can serve as a good source of sulforaphane, and the model can be utilized to guide the dose design for the use of broccoli sprout preparation in chemoprevention. PMID:23929742

  17. Prolonged sulforaphane treatment activates survival signaling in nontumorigenic NCM460 colon cells but apoptotic signaling in tumorigenic HCT116 colon cells

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Sulforaphane (SFN) is a naturally occurring member of the isothiocyanate family of chemopreventive agents and the induction of cell cycle arrest and apoptosis is a key mechanism by which SFN exerts its colon cancer prevention. However, little is known about the differential effects of SFN on colon c...

  18. Prolonged Sulforaphane Treatment Activates Extracellular-Regulated Kinase 1/2 Signaling in Nontumorigenic Colon Cells but not Colon Cancer Cells

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Sulforaphane (SFN) is a naturally occurring member of the isothiocyanate family of chemopreventive agents and the induction of cell cycle arrest and apoptosis is a key mechanism by which SFN exerts its colon cancer prevention. However, little is known about the differential effects of SFN on colon c...

  19. About the Chemopreventive Agent Development Research Group | Division of Cancer Prevention

    Cancer.gov

    The Chemopreventive Agent Development Research Group promotes and supports research on early chemopreventive agent development, from preclinical studies to phase I clinical trials. The group’s projects aim to identify and develop prevention agents with the potential to block, reverse, or delay the early stages of cancer. The overarching goal is to determine positive and negative predictive values of preclinical models for clinical development. |

  20. Targeting HER2 Positive Breast Cancer with Chemopreventive Agents

    PubMed Central

    Wahler, Joseph; Suh, Nanjoo

    2015-01-01

    Human epidermal growth factor receptor 2-positive (HER2+) breast cancer is a subtype of breast cancer that is exhibited in approximately 20-30% of breast cancer cases. The overexpression of HER2 is typically associated with a more aggressive disease and poor prognosis. Currently, the therapeutic drugs trastuzumab and lapatinib are the most commonly used to combat HER2+ breast cancer. However, tumors can develop resistance to these drugs. A better understanding of the mechanism of how HER2+ breast cancer works will help aid the development for new therapeutic approaches which more closely target the source of the signaling dysfunction. This review summarizes four major points in the context of HER2 over-expressing breast cancer (i) HER2 as a molecular target in breast cancer therapy, (ii) current treatment options as well as ongoing clinical studies, (iii) animal and cellular models for the study of HER2 over-expressing breast cancer, and (iv) future therapies and chemopreventive agents used to target HER2+ breast cancer. PMID:26442201

  1. Pharmacokinetics and Pharmacodynamics of Phase II Drug Metabolizing/Antioxidant Enzymes Gene Response by Anti-cancer Agent Sulforaphane in Rat Lymphocytes

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Hu; Khor, Tin Oo; Yang, Qian; Huang, Ying; Wu, Tien-yuan; Saw, Constance Lay-Lay; Lin, Wen; Androulakis, Ioannis P.; Kong, Ah-Ng Tony

    2012-01-01

    PURPOSE This study assesses the pharmacokinetics (PK) and pharmacodynamics (PD) of Nrf2-mediated increased expression of Phase II drug metabolizing enzyme (DME) and antioxidant enzymes which represents an important component of cancer chemoprevention in rat lymphocytes following intravenous (i.v.) administration of an anti-cancer phytochemical sulforaphane (SFN) METHODS SFN was administered intravenously to four groups of male Sprague-Dawley JVC rats each group comprising four animals. Blood samples were drawn at selected time points. Plasma were obtained from half of the blood samples and analyzed using a validated LC-MS/MS method. Lymphocytes were collected from the remaining blood samples using Ficoll-Paque™ Plus centrifuge medium. Lymphocyte RNAs were extracted, converted to cDNA, and quantitative real-time PCR analyses were performed and fold changes were calculated against those at time zero for the relative expression of Nrf2-target genes of phase II DME/antioxidant enzymes. PK-PD modeling was conducted based on Jusko’s indirect response model (IDR) using GastroPlus™ and Bootstrap Method. RESULTS SFN plasma concentration declined biexponentially and the pharmacokinetic parameters were generated. Rat lymphocyte mRNA expression levels showed no change for GSTM1, SOD, NF-κB, UGT1A1, or UGT1A6. Moderate increases (2-5 folds) over the time zero were seen for HO-1, Nrf2, and NQO1, and significant increase (> 5 folds) for GSTT1, GPx1, and Maf. PK-PD analyses using GastroPlus™ and Bootstrap method provided reasonable fitting for the PK and PD profiles and parameter estimates. CONCLUSION Our present study shows that SFN could induce Nrf2-mediated phase II DME/antioxidant mRNA expression for NQO1, GSTT1, Nrf2, GPx, Maf, and HO-1 in rat lymphocytes after i.v. administration, suggesting that Nrf2-mediated mRNA expression in lymphocytes may serve as surrogate biomarkers. The PK-PD IDR model simultaneously linking the plasma concentrations of SFN and the PD

  2. Plant Polyphenols as Chemopreventive Agents for Lung Cancer.

    PubMed

    Amararathna, Madumani; Johnston, Michael R; Rupasinghe, H P Vasantha

    2016-08-19

    Lung cancer may be prevented by a diet rich in fruits and vegetables as they are enriched with dietary antioxidant polyphenols, such as flavonoids, proanthocyanidins, lignans, stilbenes, and phenolic acids. Dietary polyphenols exert a wide range of beneficial biological functions beyond their antioxidative properties and are involved in regulation of cell survival pathways leading to anticarcinogenic and antimutagenic functions. There are sufficient evidence from in vitro, in vivo, and epidemiological studies to suggest that the dietary intervention of polyphenols in cancer prevention, including the chemopreventive ability of dietary polyphenols, act against lung carcinogens. Cohort and epidemiological studies in selected risk populations have evaluated clinical effects of polyphenols. Polyphenols have demonstrated three major actions: antioxidative activity, regulation of phase I and II enzymes, and regulation of cell survival pathways against lung carcinogenesis. They have also shown an inverse association of lung cancer occurrences among high risk populations who consumed considerable amounts of fruits and vegetables in their daily diet. In in vitro cell culture experimental models, polyphenols bind with electrophilic metabolites from carcinogens, inactivate cellular oxygen radicals, prevent membrane lipid peroxidation and DNA oxidative damage, and adduct formation. Further, polyphenols enhance the detoxifying enzymes such as the phase II enzymes, glutathione transferases and glucuronosyl transferases.

  3. Plant Polyphenols as Chemopreventive Agents for Lung Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Amararathna, Madumani; Johnston, Michael R.; Rupasinghe, H. P. Vasantha

    2016-01-01

    Lung cancer may be prevented by a diet rich in fruits and vegetables as they are enriched with dietary antioxidant polyphenols, such as flavonoids, proanthocyanidins, lignans, stilbenes, and phenolic acids. Dietary polyphenols exert a wide range of beneficial biological functions beyond their antioxidative properties and are involved in regulation of cell survival pathways leading to anticarcinogenic and antimutagenic functions. There are sufficient evidence from in vitro, in vivo, and epidemiological studies to suggest that the dietary intervention of polyphenols in cancer prevention, including the chemopreventive ability of dietary polyphenols, act against lung carcinogens. Cohort and epidemiological studies in selected risk populations have evaluated clinical effects of polyphenols. Polyphenols have demonstrated three major actions: antioxidative activity, regulation of phase I and II enzymes, and regulation of cell survival pathways against lung carcinogenesis. They have also shown an inverse association of lung cancer occurrences among high risk populations who consumed considerable amounts of fruits and vegetables in their daily diet. In in vitro cell culture experimental models, polyphenols bind with electrophilic metabolites from carcinogens, inactivate cellular oxygen radicals, prevent membrane lipid peroxidation and DNA oxidative damage, and adduct formation. Further, polyphenols enhance the detoxifying enzymes such as the phase II enzymes, glutathione transferases and glucuronosyl transferases. PMID:27548149

  4. Chemopreventive Agents from Physalis minima Function as Michael Reaction Acceptors

    PubMed Central

    Men, Ruizhi; Li, Ning; Ding, Chihong; Tang, Yingzhan; Xing, Yachao; Ding, Wanjing; Ma, Zhongjun

    2016-01-01

    Background: The fruits of some varieties of genus Physalis have been used as delicious fruits and functional food in the Northeast of China. Materials and Methods: To reveal the functional material basis, we performed bioactivity-guided phytochemical research and chemopreventive effect assay of the constituents from Physalis minima. Results: It was demonstrated that the ethyl acetate extract of P. minima L. (EEPM) had potential quinone reductase (QR) inducing activity with induction ratio (IR, QR induction activity) value of 1.47 ± 0.24, and glutathione binding property as potential Michael reaction acceptors (with an α, β-unsaturated ketone moiety). Furthermore, bioactivity-guided phytochemical research led eight compounds (1–8), which were elucidated as 3-isopropyl-5-acetoxycyclohexene-2-one-1 (1), isophysalin B (2), physalin G (3), physalin D (4), physalin I (5), physordinose B (6), stigmasterol-3-O-β-D-glucopyranoside (7) and 5α-6β-dihydroxyphysalin R (8) on the basis of nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy analyses and HRESIMS. Then, isophysalin B (2) and physordinose B (6) showed significant QR inducing activity with IR value of 2.80 ± 0.19 and 2.38 ± 0.46, respectively. SUMMARY An ultra-performance liquid chromatographic method with glutathione as the substrate was used to detect the Michael reaction acceptors in extracts of Physalis minima (EPM)We investigated the chemical constituents of EPM guided by biological activity methodIsophysalin B (1) and physordinose B (6) showed strong quinone reductase inducing activity with induction ratio values of 2.80 ± 0.19 and 2.38 ± 0.46This study generated useful information for consumers and many encourage researchers to utilize edible fruits from Physalis as a source of phytochemicals Abbreviations used: EPM: Extracts of Physalis minima, EEPM: Ethyl acetate extract of Physalis minima L., GSH: Glutathione, MRAs: Michael reaction acceptors, QR: Quinone reductase. PMID:27279713

  5. Natural products as a source of potential cancer chemotherapeutic and chemopreventive agents.

    PubMed

    Cassady, J M; Baird, W M; Chang, C J

    1990-01-01

    Recent advances in the chemistry of novel bioactive natural products are reported. This research is directed to the exploration of plants with confirmed activity in bioassays designed to detect potential cancer chemotherapeutic and chemopreventive agents. Structural work and chemical studies are reported for several cytotoxic agents from the plants Annona densicoma, Annona reticulata, Claopodium crispifolium, Polytrichum obioense, and Psorospermum febrifugum. Studies are also reported based on development of a mammalian cell culture benzo[a]pyrene metabolism assay for the detection of potential anticarcinogenic agents from natural products. In this study a number of isoflavonoids and flavonoids with antimutagenic activity have been discovered.

  6. In Vivo Testing of Chemopreventive Agents Using the Dog Model of Spontaneous Prostate Carcinogenesis

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2001-03-01

    Pitti-Ferrandi, C. Trivalle, 0. de Lacharriere, S . Nouveau, B. Rakoto-Arison, J.C. Souberbielle, J. Raison, Y. Le Bouc, A. Raynaud , X. Girerd, F...Approved for Public Release; Distribution Unlimited The views, opinions and/or findings contained in this report are those of the author( s ) and...FUNDING NUMBERS In Vivo Testing of Chemopreventive Agents Using the Dog Model of Spontaneous DAMD1 7-98-1-8550 Prostate Carcinogenesis 6. AUTHOR( S

  7. Design, synthesis and experimental validation of novel potential chemopreventive agents using random forest and support vector machine binary classifiers.

    PubMed

    Sprague, Brienne; Shi, Qian; Kim, Marlene T; Zhang, Liying; Sedykh, Alexander; Ichiishi, Eiichiro; Tokuda, Harukuni; Lee, Kuo-Hsiung; Zhu, Hao

    2014-06-01

    Compared to the current knowledge on cancer chemotherapeutic agents, only limited information is available on the ability of organic compounds, such as drugs and/or natural products, to prevent or delay the onset of cancer. In order to evaluate chemical chemopreventive potentials and design novel chemopreventive agents with low to no toxicity, we developed predictive computational models for chemopreventive agents in this study. First, we curated a database containing over 400 organic compounds with known chemoprevention activities. Based on this database, various random forest and support vector machine binary classifiers were developed. All of the resulting models were validated by cross validation procedures. Then, the validated models were applied to virtually screen a chemical library containing around 23,000 natural products and derivatives. We selected a list of 148 novel chemopreventive compounds based on the consensus prediction of all validated models. We further analyzed the predicted active compounds by their ease of organic synthesis. Finally, 18 compounds were synthesized and experimentally validated for their chemopreventive activity. The experimental validation results paralleled the cross validation results, demonstrating the utility of the developed models. The predictive models developed in this study can be applied to virtually screen other chemical libraries to identify novel lead compounds for the chemoprevention of cancers.

  8. Design, synthesis and experimental validation of novel potential chemopreventive agents using random forest and support vector machine binary classifiers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sprague, Brienne; Shi, Qian; Kim, Marlene T.; Zhang, Liying; Sedykh, Alexander; Ichiishi, Eiichiro; Tokuda, Harukuni; Lee, Kuo-Hsiung; Zhu, Hao

    2014-06-01

    Compared to the current knowledge on cancer chemotherapeutic agents, only limited information is available on the ability of organic compounds, such as drugs and/or natural products, to prevent or delay the onset of cancer. In order to evaluate chemical chemopreventive potentials and design novel chemopreventive agents with low to no toxicity, we developed predictive computational models for chemopreventive agents in this study. First, we curated a database containing over 400 organic compounds with known chemoprevention activities. Based on this database, various random forest and support vector machine binary classifiers were developed. All of the resulting models were validated by cross validation procedures. Then, the validated models were applied to virtually screen a chemical library containing around 23,000 natural products and derivatives. We selected a list of 148 novel chemopreventive compounds based on the consensus prediction of all validated models. We further analyzed the predicted active compounds by their ease of organic synthesis. Finally, 18 compounds were synthesized and experimentally validated for their chemopreventive activity. The experimental validation results paralleled the cross validation results, demonstrating the utility of the developed models. The predictive models developed in this study can be applied to virtually screen other chemical libraries to identify novel lead compounds for the chemoprevention of cancers.

  9. Progress in Nanotechnology Based Approaches to Enhance the Potential of Chemopreventive Agents

    PubMed Central

    Muqbil, Irfana; Masood, Ashiq; Sarkar, Fazlul H.; Mohammad, Ramzi M.; Azmi, Asfar S.

    2011-01-01

    Cancer chemoprevention is defined as the use of natural agents to suppress, reverse or prevent the carcinogenic process from turning into aggressive cancer. Over the last two decades, multiple natural dietary compounds with diverse chemical structures such flavonoids, tannins, curcumins and polyphenols have been proposed as chemopreventive agents. These agents have proven excellent anticancer potential in the laboratory setting, however, the observed effects in vitro do not translate in clinic where they fail to live up to their expectations. Among the various reasons for this discrepancy include inefficient systemic delivery and robust bioavailability. To overcome this barrier, researchers have focused towards coupling these agents with nano based encapsulation technology that in principle will enhance bioavailability and ultimately benefit clinical outcome. The last decade has witnessed rapid advancement in the development of nanochemopreventive technology with emergence of many nano encapsulated formulations of different dietary anticancer agents. This review summarizes the most up-to-date knowledge on the studies performed in nanochemoprevention, their proposed use in the clinic and future directions in which this field is heading. As the knowledge of the dynamics of nano encapsulation evolves, it is expected that researchers will bring forward newer and far more superior nanochemopreventive agents that may become standard drugs for different cancers. PMID:24212623

  10. Targeting NRF2 signaling for cancer chemoprevention

    SciTech Connect

    Kwak, Mi-Kyoung; Kensler, Thomas W.

    2010-04-01

    Modulation of the metabolism and disposition of carcinogens through induction of cytoprotective enzymes is one of several promising strategies to prevent cancer. Chemopreventive efficacies of inducers such as dithiolethiones and sulforaphane have been extensively studied in animals as well as in humans. The KEAP1-NRF2 system is a key, but not unilateral, molecular target for these chemopreventive agents. The transcription factor NRF2 (NF-E2-related factor 2) is a master regulator of the expression of a subset of genes, which produce proteins responsible for the detoxication of electrophiles and reactive oxygen species as well as the removal or repair of some of their damage products. It is believed that chemopreventive enzyme inducers affect the interaction between KEAP1 and NRF2 through either mediating conformational changes of the KEAP1 protein or activating phosphorylation cascades targeting the KEAP1-NRF2 complex. These events in turn affect NRF2 stability and trafficking. Recent advances elucidating the underlying structural biology of KEAP1-NRF2 signaling and identification of the gene clusters under the transcriptional control of NRF2 are facilitating understanding of the potential pleiotropic effects of NRF2 activators and discovery of novel classes of potent chemopreventive agents such as the triterpenoids. Although there is appropriately a concern regarding a deleterious role of the KEAP1-NRF2 system in cancer cell biology, especially as the pathway affects cell survival and drug resistance, the development and the use of NRF2 activators as chemopreventive agents still holds a great promise for protection of normal cells from a diversity of environmental stresses that contribute to the burden of cancer and other chronic, degenerative diseases.

  11. Feasibility of using lower doses of chemopreventive agents in a combination regimen for cancer protection.

    PubMed

    Ip, C

    1988-04-01

    In experimental cancer chemoprevention studies, the doses of the agent used to produce an inhibitory response are generally very high, sometimes bordering on levels that will result in toxicity to the test animals. The present study was designed to test the hypothesis that low doses of two or more agents may be just as effective as high doses of a single agent. An earlier report from our laboratory showed that vitamin E, although ineffective by itself, potentiates the anti-carcinogenic potency of selenite. Our objective was to complete a comprehensive set of dose titration experiments in the quantitative analysis of the synergism between selenium (Se) and vitamin E. Results indicated that the minimal amount of vitamin E required was around 500 ppm, which when combined with as little as 1 ppm Se, produced a significant protective effect in the 7,12-dimethylbenz[a]anthracene (DMBA)-induced rat mammary tumor model. This level of Se is 5 times below the marginal toxicity level of 5 ppm observed in our previous experience. With a 3-agent combination protocol involving Se (1 ppm), vitamin E (500 ppm) and vitamin A (66 ppm), it was found that vitamin A at this particular dose did not contribute any further chemoprevention than that provided by the Se/vitamin E duo. Both Se and vitamin E were present at a concentration 10 times, while vitamin A was present at 30 times their respective nutritional requirement. Our findings thus suggest that the minimum effective dose has to be systematically established for each micronutrient, and that it is feasible to use lower doses of a combination of agents if the threshold level of each agent can be determined under a prescribed set of conditions.

  12. Metapristone (RU486 derivative) inhibits cell proliferation and migration as melanoma metastatic chemopreventive agent.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Ning; Chen, Jiahang; Liu, Weiqun; Wang, Jichuang; Liu, Jian; Jia, Lee

    2017-04-01

    Uncontrolled cell proliferation and metastasis are the two well-known manifestations of melanoma. We hypothesized that metapristone, a potential cancer metastatic chemopreventive agent derived from mifepristone (RU486), had a dual function to fight cancer. In the present study, our findings clearly demonstrated that metapristone had modest cytostatic effect in melanoma cells. Metapristone inhibited cell viability and induced both early and late apoptosis in B16F10 and A375 cells in a time- and concentrate-dependent manner. Metapristone-treatment caused the cell arrest at the G0/G1 stage, and the inhibition of colony formation in B16F10 cells. Western blot analysis further revealed that metapristone treatment elicited a decline of Akt and ERK phosphorylation and Bcl-2, and facilitated expression of total P53 and Bax in A375 cells. In addition, cell migration and invasion were significantly suppressed by metapristone through down-regulating the expression of MMP-2, MMP-9, N-cadherin and vimentin, whereas up-regulating E-cadherin expression. Notably, metapristone exhibited anti-metastatic activity in melanoma B16F10 cells in vivo. Our results reveal metapristone, having the dual function of anti-proliferation and anti-migration for melanoma cell lines, may be a useful chemopreventive agent to reduce the risk of melanoma cancer metastasis.

  13. Prevalence of chemopreventive agent use among hospitalised women at high risk for breast cancer: a cross-sectional study

    PubMed Central

    Khaliq, Waseem; Jelovac, Danijela; Wright, Scott M

    2016-01-01

    Objective To characterise the current usage of chemoprevention agents among hospitalised women who are at higher risk for breast cancer. Study design A cross-sectional study. Setting Academic hospital at Baltimore. Participants A bedside survey of 250 women aged 50–75 years was conducted who were cancer-free at the time of study enrolment and hospitalised to a general medicine service. Reproductive history, family history for breast cancer, chemopreventive agents use and medical comorbidities data was collected for all patients. χ2 and t-tests were used to analyse population characteristics. Primary outcome measures Prevalence of women at high risk for developing breast cancer (5-year Gail risk score ≥1.7) and their chemopreventive agent use. Results Mean age for the study population was 61.5 years (SD 7.5), and mean 5-year Gail risk score was 1.67 (SD 0.88). A third of study population was at high risk for breast cancer. None of the high-risk women (0%) were taking chemoprevention for breast cancer risk reduction, and 23% were at very high risk with 5-year Gail score ≥3%. These women were not recognised as being high risk by their hospital providers and none were referred to the high-risk breast cancer clinics following discharge. Conclusions Many hospitalised women are at high risk for breast cancer and we could not identify even a single woman who was using chemoprevention for risk reduction. Current chemoprevention guidelines may be falling short in their dissemination and implementation. Since women at high risk for breast cancer may only interface with the healthcare system at select points, all healthcare providers must be willing and able to do risk assessment. For those identified to be at high risk, providers must then either engage in chemopreventive counselling or refer patients to providers who are more comfortable working with patients on this critical decision. PMID:27852714

  14. Stability of Sulforaphane for Topical Formulation

    PubMed Central

    Franklin, Stephen J.; Dickinson, Sally E.; Karlage, Kelly L.; Bowden, G Tim.; Myrdal, Paul B.

    2013-01-01

    Sulforaphane (SFN) is a natural compound that has been investigated as a chemopreventive agent. SFN has been shown to inhibit the activator-protein-1 (AP-1) transcription factor and may be effective for inhibition of ultraviolet (UV) induced skin carcinogenesis. This study was designed to investigate the stability of SFN as a function of pH, temperature and in various solvents and formulations. SFN was determined to undergo apparent first order degradation kinetics for the conditions explored. It was observed that SFN undergoes base catalyzed degradation. Buffer species and solvent type impacts stability as well. SFN was found to be very sensitive to temperature with degradation rate changing by a factor of nearly 3.1 for every 10°C change in temperature (at pH 4.0). SFN completely degraded after 30 days in a conventional pharmaceutical cream formulation. Improved stability was observed in organic formulation components. Stability studies were conducted on two non-aqueous topical formulations, a polyethylene glycol (PEG) ointment base and an organic oleaginous base. Topically applied SFN in the PEG base formulation significantly reduced AP-1 activation after UV stimulation in the skin of a transgenic mouse model, indicating that SFN in this formulation retains efficacy in vivo. PMID:23611476

  15. Chemopreventive Agents Attenuate Rapid Inhibition of Gap Junctional Intercellular Communication Induced by Environmental Toxicants.

    PubMed

    Babica, Pavel; Čtveráčková, Lucie; Lenčešová, Zuzana; Trosko, James E; Upham, Brad L

    2016-07-01

    Altered gap junctional intercellular communication (GJIC) has been associated with chemical carcinogenesis, where both chemical tumor promoters and chemopreventive agents (CPAs) are known to conversely modulate GJIC. The aim of this study was to investigate whether attenuation of chemically inhibited GJIC represents a common outcome induced by different CPAs, which could be effectively evaluated using in vitro methods. Rat liver epithelial cells WB-F344 were pretreated with a CPA for either 30 min or 24 h, and then exposed to GJIC-inhibiting concentration of a selected tumor promoter or environmental toxicant [12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate (TPA), lindane, fluoranthene, 1,1,1-trichloro-2,2-bis(4-chlorophenyl)ethane (DDT), perfluorooctanoic acid (PFOA), or pentachlorophenol]. Out of nine CPAs tested, quercetin and silibinin elicited the most pronounced effects, preventing the dysregulation of GJIC by all the GJIC inhibitors, but DDT. Metformin and curcumin attenuated the effects of three GJIC inhibitors, whereas the other CPAs prevented the effects of two (diallyl sulfide, emodin) or one (indole-3-carbinol, thymoquinone) GJIC inhibitor. Significant attenuation of chemically induced inhibition of GJIC was observed in 27 (50%) out of 54 possible combinations of nine CPAs and six GJIC inhibitors. Our data demonstrate that in vitro evaluation of GJIC can be used as an effective screening tool for identification of chemicals with potential chemopreventive activity.

  16. Chemopreventive agents alters global gene expression pattern: predicting their mode of action and targets.

    PubMed

    Narayanan, Bhagavathi A

    2006-12-01

    Chemoprevention has the potential to be a major component of colon, breast, prostate and lung cancer control. Epidemiological, experimental, and clinical studies provide evidence that antioxidants, anti-inflammatory agents, n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids and several other phytochemicals possess unique modes of action against cancer growth. However, the mode of action of several of these agents at the gene transcription level is not completely understood. Completion of the human genome sequence and the advent of DNA microarrays using cDNAs enhanced the detection and identification of hundreds of differentially expressed genes in response to anticancer drugs or chemopreventive agents. In this review, we are presenting an extensive analysis of the key findings from studies using potential chemopreventive agents on global gene expression patterns, which lead to the identification of cancer drug targets. The summary of the study reports discussed in this review explains the extent of gene alterations mediated by more than 20 compounds including antioxidants, fatty acids, NSAIDs, phytochemicals, retinoids, selenium, vitamins, aromatase inhibitor, lovastatin, oltipraz, salvicine, and zinc. The findings from these studies further reveal the utility of DNA microarray in characterizing and quantifying the differentially expressed genes that are possibly reprogrammed by the above agents against colon, breast, prostate, lung, liver, pancreatic and other cancer types. Phenolic antioxidant resveratrol found in berries and grapes inhibits the formation of prostate tumors by acting on the regulatory genes such as p53 while activating a cascade of genes involved in cell cycle and apoptosis including p300, Apaf-1, cdk inhibitor p21, p57 (KIP2), p53 induced Pig 7, Pig 8, Pig 10, cyclin D, DNA fragmentation factor 45. The group of genes significantly altered by selenium includes cyclin D1, cdk5, cdk4, cdk2, cdc25A and GADD 153. Vitamine D shows impact on p21(Waf1/Cip1) p27 cyclin B

  17. Dietary Supplement 4-Methylumbelliferone: An Effective Chemopreventive and Therapeutic Agent for Prostate Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Yates, Travis J.; Lopez, Luis E.; Lokeshwar, Soum D.; Ortiz, Nicolas; Kallifatidis, Georgios; Jordan, Andre; Hoye, Kelly; Altman, Norman

    2015-01-01

    Background: Prevention and treatment of advanced prostate cancer (PCa) by a nontoxic agent can improve outcome, while maintaining quality of life. 4-methylumbelliferone (4-MU) is a dietary supplement that inhibits hyaluronic acid (HA) synthesis. We evaluated the chemopreventive and therapeutic efficacy and mechanism of action of 4-MU. Methods: TRAMP mice (7–28 per group) were gavaged with 4-MU (450mg/kg/day) in a stage-specific treatment design (8–28, 12–28, 22–28 weeks). Efficacy of 4-MU (200–450mg/kg/day) was also evaluated in the PC3-ML/Luc+ intracardiac injection and DU145 subcutaneous models. PCa cells and tissues were analyzed for HA and Phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI-3K)/Akt signaling and apoptosis effectors. HA add-back and myristoylated Akt (mAkt) overexpression studies evaluated the mechanism of action of 4-MU. Data were analyzed with one-way analysis of variance and unpaired t test or Tukey’s multiple comparison test. All statistical tests were two-sided. Results: While vehicle-treated transgenic adenocarcinoma of the prostate (TRAMP) mice developed prostate tumors and metastases at 28 weeks, both were abrogated in treatment groups, without serum/organ toxicity or weight loss; no tumors developed at one year, even after stopping the treatment at 28 weeks. 4-MU did not alter the transgene or neuroendocrine marker expression but downregulated HA levels. However, 4-MU decreased microvessel density and proliferative index (P < .0001,). 4-MU completely prevented/inhibited skeletal metastasis in the PC3-ML/Luc+ model and DU145-tumor growth (85–90% inhibition, P = .002). 4-MU also statistically significantly downregulated HA receptors, PI-3K/CD44 complex and activity, Akt signaling, and β-catenin levels/activation, but upregulated GSK-3 function, E-cadherin, and apoptosis effectors (P < .001); HA addition or mAkt overexpression rescued these effects. Conclusion: 4-MU is an effective nontoxic, oral chemopreventive, and therapeutic agent that

  18. Phytochemical Modulators of Mitochondria: The Search for Chemopreventive Agents and Supportive Therapeutics

    PubMed Central

    Grabacka, Maja M.; Gawin, Malgorzata; Pierzchalska, Malgorzata

    2014-01-01

    Mitochondria are crucially important for maintaining not only the energy homeostasis, but the proper cellular functions in a general sense. Impairment of mitochondrial functions is observed in a broad variety of pathological states such as neoplastic transformations and cancer, neurodegenerative diseases, metabolic disorders and chronic inflammation. Currently, in parallel to the classical drug design approaches, there is an increasing interest in the screening for natural bioactive substances, mainly phytochemicals, in order to develop new therapeutic solutions for the mentioned pathologies. Dietary phytochemicals such as resveratrol, curcumin and sulforaphane are very well tolerated and can effectively complement classical pharmacological therapeutic regimens. In this paper we disscuss the effect of the chosen phytochemicals (e.g., resveratrol, curcumin, sulforaphane) on various aspects of mitochondrial biology, namely mitochondrial biogenesis, membrane potential and reactive oxygen species production, signaling to and from the nucleus and unfolded protein response. PMID:25192192

  19. Salvianolic Acid B, a Potential Chemopreventive Agent, for Head and Neck Squamous Cell Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Yuan; Guo, Yinhan; Gu, Xinbin

    2011-01-01

    Head and neck squamous cell cancer (HNSCC) is one of the top ten cancers in the United States. The survival rate of HNSCC has only marginally improved over the last two decades. In addition, African-American men bear a disproportionate burden of this preventable disease. Therefore, a critical challenge of preventive health approaches is warranted. Salvianolic acid B (Sal-B) isolated from Salvia miltiorrhiza Bge, which is a well-know Chinese medicines has been safely used to treat and prevent aging diseases for thousand of years. Recently, the anticancer properties of Sal-B have received more attention. Sal-B significantly inhibits or delays the growth of HNSCC in both cultured HNSCC cells and HNSCC xenograft animal models. The following anticancer mechanisms have been proposed: the inhibition of COX-2/PGE-2 pathway, the promotion of apoptosis, and the modulation of angiogenesis. In conclusion, Sal-B is a potential HNSCC chemopreventive agent working through antioxidation and anti-inflammation mechanisms. PMID:21209716

  20. Dietary Glucosinolates Sulforaphane, Phenethyl Isothiocyanate, Indole-3-Carbinol/3,3'-Diindolylmethane: Anti-Oxidative Stress/Inflammation, Nrf2, Epigenetics/Epigenomics and In Vivo Cancer Chemopreventive Efficacy.

    PubMed

    Fuentes, Francisco; Paredes-Gonzalez, Ximena; Kong, Ah-Ng Tony

    2015-05-01

    Glucosinolates are a group of sulfur-containing glycosides found in many plant species, including cruciferous vegetables such as broccoli, cabbage, brussels sprouts, and cauliflower. Accumulating evidence increasingly supports the beneficial effects of dietary glucosinolates on overall health, including as potential anti-cancer agents, because of their role in the prevention of the initiation of carcinogenesis via the induction of cellular defense detoxifying/antioxidant enzymes and their epigenetic mechanisms, including modification of the CpG methylation of cancer-related genes, histone modification regulation and changes in the expression of miRNAs. In this context, the defense mechanism mediated by Nrf2-antioxidative stress and anti-inflammatory signaling pathways can contribute to cellular protection against oxidative stress and reactive metabolites of carcinogens. In this review, we summarize the cancer chemopreventive role of naturally occurring glucosinolate derivatives as inhibitors of carcinogenesis, with particular emphasis on specific molecular targets and epigenetic alterations in in vitro and in vivo human cancer animal models.

  1. RNA-Sequencing studies identify genes differentially regulated during inflammation-driven lung tumorigenesis and targeted by chemopreventive agents

    PubMed Central

    Qian, Xuemin; Khammanivong, Ali; Song, Jung Min; Teferi, Fitsum; Upadhyaya, Pramod; Dickerson, Erin; Kassie, Fekadu

    2016-01-01

    Chronic pulmonary inflammation has been consistently shown to increase the risk of lung cancer. Therefore, assessing the molecular links between the two diseases and identification of chemopreventive agents that inhibit inflammation-driven lung tumorigenesis is indispensable. Recently, we found that 4-(methylnitro-samino)-1-(3-pyridyl)-1-butanone (NNK)-induced mouse lung tumorigenesis was significantly enhanced by chronic treatment with the inflammatory agents lipopolysaccharide (LPS) and combinatory treatment with the chemoprevenitve agents silibinin (Sil) and indole-3-carbinol (I3C) significantly inhibited the burden of inflammation-driven lung tumors. In this report, we described gene expression profiling of lung tissues derived from these studies to determine the gene expression signature in inflammation-driven lung tumors and modulation of this signature by the chemopreventive agents Sil and I3C. We found that 330, 2,957, and 1,143 genes were differentially regulated in mice treated with NNK, LPS, and NNK + LPS, respectively. The inflammatory response of lung tumors to LPS, as determined by the number of proinflammatory genes with altered gene expression or the level of alteration, was markedly less than that of normal lungs. Among 1,143 genes differentially regulated in the NNK + LPS group, the expression of 162 genes and associated signaling pathways were significantly modulated by I3C and/or Sil + I3C. These genes include cytokines, chemokines, putative oncogenes and tumor suppressor genes and Ros1, AREG, EREG, Cyp1a1, Arntl, and Npas2. To our knowledge, this is the first report that provides insight into genes that are differentially expressed during inflammation-driven lung tumorigenesis and the modulation of these genes by chemopreventive agents. PMID:25795230

  2. Cancer preventive agents 9. Betulinic acid derivatives as potent cancer chemopreventive agents.

    PubMed

    Nakagawa-Goto, Kyoko; Yamada, Koji; Taniguchi, Masahiko; Tokuda, Harukuni; Lee, Kuo-Hsiung

    2009-07-01

    C-3 esterifications of betulinic acid (BA, 1) and its A-ring homolog, ceanothic acid (CA, 2), were carried out to provide sixteen terpenoids, 4-19, including nine new compounds (4-12). All synthesized compounds were evaluated in an in vitro antitumor-promoting assay using the Epstein-Barr virus early antigen (EBV-EA) activation induced by 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate (TPA) in Raji cells. Among them, compounds 4-6, 11-14, 16, and 17 displayed remarkable inhibitory effects of EBV-EA activation. BA analog 6, which contains a prenyl-like group, showed the most potent inhibitory effect (100%, 76%, 37%, and 11% inhibition of EBA activation at 1000, 500, 100, and 10mol ratio/TPA, respectively, with IC(50) value of 285mol ratio/32pmol TPA). Compound 6 merits further development as a cancer preventive agent.

  3. In vitro and in vivo efficacy and safety evaluation of metapristone and mifepristone as cancer metastatic chemopreventive agents.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jichuang; Chen, Jianzhong; Zhu, Yewei; Zheng, Ning; Liu, Jian; Xiao, Yingying; Lu, Yusheng; Dong, Haiyan; Xie, Jingjing; Yu, Suhong; Shao, Jingwei; Jia, Lee

    2016-03-01

    Malignant melanoma, the most deadly form of skin cancer, has a high propensity for metastatic spread and is notoriously chemotherapy-resistant. Metapristone is the primary metabolite of mifepristone (RU486) and shows biological activities similar to RU486. In the present study, we comprehensively investigated the efficacy of metapristone as a metastatic chemopreventive against melanoma B16F10 cells in vitro and in vivo, and evaluated the safety profile of both drugs in mice. Metapristone showed less cytostatic effect in vitro and in vivo in comparison with mifepristone. However, metapristone interfered the adhesion of B16F10 cells to fibronectin by down-regulating cellular expression of integrin α4. Chemopreventive pretreatment followed by oral administration of metapristone and mifepristone (2.5, 10, 50 mg/kg/day for 35 days) to melanoma C57BL/6 mouse model showed significant attenuation of pulmonary metastatic development. Oral administration of high doses of metapristone and mifepristone to normal mice for 35 days (25, 100, 250 mg/kg/day) resulted in a dose-dependent increase in mouse liver weight that was more severe with mifepristone than metapristone. The long-term toxicity study revealed more changes by mifepristone in counts of erythrocytes, leukocytes and platelets than by metapristone. In conclusion, metapristone may fit into a new class of cancer metastatic chemopreventive agents. It showed a safety and efficacy profile better than mifepristone.

  4. Perspectives in cancer chemoprevention.

    PubMed Central

    Stoner, G D; Morse, M A; Kelloff, G J

    1997-01-01

    Cancer chemoprevention can be defined as prevention of cancer by the administration of one or more chemical entities, either as individual drugs or as naturally occurring constituents of the diet. Based largely on the time period that chemopreventive agents exhibit activity in animal models of carcinogenesis, they can be classified as inhibitors of carcinogen formation, blocking agents, and suppressing agents. The majority of compounds that inhibit the formation of carcinogens prevent the formation of nitrosamines from secondary amines and nitrite in an acidic environment. Blocking agents are inhibitors of tumor initiation, while suppressing agents are inhibitors of tumor promotion/progression. Many well-characterized chemopreventive agents act at one or more steps in both tumor initiation and promotion/progression. The objective of this paper is to provide a general discussion of the mechanisms through which chemopreventive agents inhibit carcinogenesis. Examples of agents that act through these mechanisms are given; however, a complete listing of effective chemopreventive agents is not possible within the context of this paper. At the conclusion is a brief discussion of future prospects in cancer chemoprevention and obstacles to overcome. PMID:9255586

  5. Dietary Pterostilbene is a novel MTA1-targeted chemopreventive and therapeutic agent in prostate cancer

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Dietary nutrients with ability to reverse adverse epigenetic events have great potential for cancer chemoprevention. Overexpression of the epigenetic modifier metastasis-associated protein 1 (MTA1) is associated with aggressive human prostate cancer. The purpose of this study was to determine MTA1-d...

  6. Efficacy of the potential chemopreventive agent, hesperetin (citrus flavanone), on 1,2-dimethylhydrazine induced colon carcinogenesis.

    PubMed

    Aranganathan, S; Nalini, N

    2009-10-01

    Our current study is an effort to identify a potent chemopreventive agent against colon cancer. Here we have investigated the efficacy of hesperetin on tissue lipid peroxidation, antioxidant defense system and colonic histoarchitecture in male Wistar rats in colon carcinogenesis. Rats in groups 3, 4, 5 and 6 were treated with DMH (20 mg kg body weight s.c.) once a week for 15 weeks. Group 1 rats received modified pellet diet and served as control; group 2 received modified pellet diet along with hesperetin (20mg/kg body weight, p.o., every day); and hesperetin was given to the rats as in-group 2 during the initiation, post-initiation and entire period stages of colon carcinogenesis. Lipid peroxidation was studied by measuring the formation of thiobarbituric acid reactive substances (TBARS), lipid hydroperoxides (LOOH) and conjugated dienes (CD), and superoxide dismutase (SOD), catalase (CAT), glutathione peroxidase (GPX), glutathione reductase (GR), reduced glutathione (GSH), in the liver and colonic tissues of DMH administered rats. (1) Decreased levels of lipid peroxidation in the colonic tissues; (2) decreased activities of antioxidant enzymes SOD, CAT, GPX, GR and GSH levels in the tissues on DMH treatment. Hesperetin supplementation during the initiation, post-initiation and entire period stages of carcinogenesis significantly reversed these activities. These results indicate that hesperetin may be a potential chemopreventive agent against DMH-induced colon cancer.

  7. Clove (Syzygium aromaticum L.), a potential chemopreventive agent for lung cancer.

    PubMed

    Banerjee, Sarmistha; Panda, Chinmay Kr; Das, Sukta

    2006-08-01

    Spices and flavoring plants part rich in supposedly health-promoting phytochemicals are currently receiving much attention as a possible source of cancer chemopreventive compounds. Clove, the sun-dried unopened flower bud from the plant Syzygium aromaticum L. is a commonly used spice and food flavor. In the present work we assess the chemopreventive potential of aqueous infusion of clove during benzo[a]pyrene (BP)-induced lung carcinogenesis in strain A mice. Incidence of hyperplasia, dysplasia and carcinoma in situ evident in the carcinogen control group on the 8th, 17th and 26th weeks, respectively, were effectively reduced after treatment with clove infusion. Significant reduction in the number of proliferating cells and an increased number of apoptotic cells was also noted in these BP-induced lung lesions following clove treatment. Western blotting analysis revealed that clove infusion upregulates the expression of pro-apoptotic proteins p53 and Bax, and downregulates the expression of anti-apoptotic protein Bcl-2 in the precancerous stages. Expression of caspase 3 and its activation by clove infusion were evident from a very early stage of carcinogenesis (eighth week). Clove infusion was also found to downregulate the expression of some growth-promoting proteins, viz, COX-2, cMyc, Hras. The observations signify the chemopreventive potential of clove in view of its apoptogenic and anti-proliferative properties.

  8. Dietary chemoprevention strategies for induction of phase II xenobiotic-metabolizing enzymes in lung carcinogenesis: A review

    PubMed Central

    Tan, Xiang-Lin; Spivack, Simon D.

    2013-01-01

    Lung cancer is the leading cause of cancer mortality for men and women in the United States and is a growing worldwide problem. Protection against lung cancer is associated with higher dietary intake of fruits and vegetables, according to recent large epidemiologic studies. One strategy for lung cancer chemoprevention focuses on the use of agents to modulate the metabolism and disposition of tobacco, environmental and endogenous carcinogens through upregulation of detoxifying phase II enzymes. We summarize the substantial evidence that suggests that induction of phase II enzymes, particularly the glutathione S-transferases, plays a direct role in chemoprotection against lung carcinogenesis. The engagement of the Keap1–Nrf2 complex regulating the antioxidant response element (ARE) signaling pathway has been identified as a key molecular target of chemopreventive phase II inducers in several systems. Monitoring of phase II enzyme induction has led to identification of novel chemopreventive agents such as the isothiocyanate sulforaphane, and the 1,2-dithiole-3-thiones. However, no agents have yet demonstrated clear benefit in human cell systems, or in clinical trials. Alternative strategies include: (a) using intermediate cancer biomarkers for the endpoint in human trials; (b) high-throughput small molecule discovery approaches for induced expression of human phase II genes; and (c) integrative approaches that consider pharmacogenetics, along with pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics in target lung tissue. These approaches may lead to a more effective strategy of tailored chemoprevention efforts using compounds with proven human activity. PMID:19185948

  9. Dietary chemoprevention strategies for induction of phase II xenobiotic-metabolizing enzymes in lung carcinogenesis: A review.

    PubMed

    Tan, Xiang-Lin; Spivack, Simon D

    2009-08-01

    Lung cancer is the leading cause of cancer mortality for men and women in the United States and is a growing worldwide problem. Protection against lung cancer is associated with higher dietary intake of fruits and vegetables, according to recent large epidemiologic studies. One strategy for lung cancer chemoprevention focuses on the use of agents to modulate the metabolism and disposition of tobacco, environmental and endogenous carcinogens through upregulation of detoxifying phase II enzymes. We summarize the substantial evidence that suggests that induction of phase II enzymes, particularly the glutathione S-transferases, plays a direct role in chemoprotection against lung carcinogenesis. The engagement of the Keap1-Nrf2 complex regulating the antioxidant response element (ARE) signaling pathway has been identified as a key molecular target of chemopreventive phase II inducers in several systems. Monitoring of phase II enzyme induction has led to identification of novel chemopreventive agents such as the isothiocyanate sulforaphane, and the 1,2-dithiole-3-thiones. However, no agents have yet demonstrated clear benefit in human cell systems, or in clinical trials. Alternative strategies include: (a) using intermediate cancer biomarkers for the endpoint in human trials; (b) high-throughput small molecule discovery approaches for induced expression of human phase II genes; and (c) integrative approaches that consider pharmacogenetics, along with pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics in target lung tissue. These approaches may lead to a more effective strategy of tailored chemoprevention efforts using compounds with proven human activity.

  10. Elemental selenium at nano size (Nano-Se) as a potential chemopreventive agent with reduced risk of selenium toxicity: comparison with se-methylselenocysteine in mice.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jinsong; Wang, Xufang; Xu, Tongwen

    2008-01-01

    Selenium (Se) is an essential trace element with a narrow margin between beneficial and toxic effects. As a promising chemopreventive agent, its use requires consumption over the long term, so the toxicity of Se is always a crucial concern. Based on clinical findings and recent studies in selenoprotein gene-modified mice, it is likely that the antioxidant function of one or more selenoproteins is responsible for the chemopreventive effect of Se. Furthermore, upregulation of phase 2 enzymes by Se has been implicated as a possible chemopreventive mechanism at supranutritional dietary levels. Se-methylselenocysteine (SeMSC), a naturally occurring organic Se product, is considered as one of the most effective chemopreventive selenocompounds. The present study revealed that, as compared with SeMSC, elemental Se at nano size (Nano-Se) possessed equal efficacy in increasing the activities of glutathione peroxidase, thioredoxin reductase, and glutathione S-transferase, but had much lower toxicity as indicated by median lethal dose, acute liver injury, survival rate, and short-term toxicity. Our results suggest that Nano-Se can serve as a potential chemopreventive agent with reduced risk of Se toxicity.

  11. Anti-genotoxicity of galangin as a cancer chemopreventive agent candidate.

    PubMed

    Heo, M Y; Sohn, S J; Au, W W

    2001-05-01

    Flavonoids are polyphenolic compounds that are present in plants. They have been shown to possess a variety of biological activities at non-toxic concentrations in organisms. Galangin, a member of the flavonol class of flavonoid, is present in high concentrations in medicinal plants (e.g. Alpinia officinarum) and propolis, a natural beehive product. Results from in vitro and in vivo studies indicate that galangin with anti-oxidative and free radical scavenging activities is capable of modulating enzyme activities and suppressing the genotoxicity of chemicals. These activities will be discussed in this review. Based on our review, galangin may be a promising candidate for cancer chemoprevention.

  12. Sulforaphane, a Dietary Component of Broccoli/Broccoli Sprouts, Inhibits Breast Cancer Stem Cells

    PubMed Central

    Li, Yanyan; Zhang, Tao; Korkaya, Hasan; Liu, Suling; Lee, Hsiu-Fang; Newman, Bryan; Yu, Yanke; Clouthier, Shawn G.; Schwartz, Steven J.; Wicha, Max S.; Sun, Duxin

    2010-01-01

    Purpose The existence of cancer stem cells (CSCs) in breast cancer has profound implications for cancer prevention. In this study, we evaluated sulforaphane, a natural compound derived from broccoli/broccoli sprouts, for its efficacy to inhibit breast CSCs and its potential mechanism. Experimental Design Aldefluor assay and mammosphere formation assay were used to evaluate the effect of sulforaphane on breast CSCs in vitro. A NOD/SCID xenograft model was employed to determine whether sulforaphane could target breast CSCs in vivo, as assessed by Aldefluor assay and tumor growth upon cell re-implantation in secondary mice. The potential mechanism was investigated utilizing Western blotting analysis and β-catenin reporter assay. Results Sulforaphane (1~5 μM) decreased aldehyde dehydrogenase (ALDH)-positive cell population by 65%~80% in human breast cancer cells (P < 0.01), and reduced the size and number of primary mammospheres by 8~125-fold and 45%~75% (P < 0.01), respectively. Daily injection with 50 mg/kg sulforaphane for two weeks reduced ALDH-positive cells by more than 50% in NOD/SCID xenograft tumors (P = 0.003). Sulforaphane eliminated breast CSCs in vivo, thereby abrogating tumor growth after re-implantation of primary tumor cells into the secondary mice (P < 0.01). Western blotting analysis and β-catenin reporter assay showed that sulforaphane down-regulated Wnt/β-catenin self-renewal pathway. Conclusions Sulforaphane inhibits breast CSCs and down-regulates Wnt/β-catenin self-renewal pathway. These findings support the use of sulforaphane for chemoprevention of breast cancer stem cells and warrant further clinical evaluation. PMID:20388854

  13. When Anti-Aging Studies Meet Cancer Chemoprevention: Can Anti-Aging Agent Kill Two Birds with One Blow?

    PubMed

    Yokoyama, Noriko N; Denmon, Andria; Uchio, Edward M; Jordan, Mark; Mercola, Dan; Zi, Xiaolin

    2015-12-01

    Recent evidence has strongly supported that the rate of aging is controlled, at least to some extent, by evolutionarily conserved nutrient sensing pathways (e.g. the insulin/IGF-1-signaling, mTOR, AMPK, and sirtuins) from worms to humans. These pathways are also commonly involved in carcinogenesis and cancer metabolism. Agents (e.g. metformin, resveratrol, and Rhodiola) that target these nutrient sensing pathways often have both anti-aging and anti-cancer efficacy. These agents not only reprogram energy metabolism of malignant cells, but also target normal postmitotic cells by suppressing their conversion into senescent cells, which confers systematic metabolism benefits. These agents are fundamentally different from chemotherapy (e.g. paclitaxel and doxorubicin) or radiation therapy that causes molecular damage (e.g. DNA and protein damages) and thereby no selection resistance may be expected. By reviewing molecular mechanisms of action, epidemiological evidence, experimental data in tumor models, and early clinical study results, this review provides information supporting the promising use of agents with both anti-aging and anti-cancer efficacy for cancer chemoprevention.

  14. Kaiware Daikon (Raphanus sativus L.) extract: a naturally multipotent chemopreventive agent.

    PubMed

    Barillari, Jessica; Iori, Renato; Papi, Alessio; Orlandi, Marina; Bartolini, Giovanna; Gabbanini, Simone; Pedulli, Gian Franco; Valgimigli, Luca

    2008-09-10

    Brassica vegetables are attracting major attention as healthy foods because of their content of glucosinolates (GLs) that release the corresponding isothiocyanates (ITCs) upon myrosinase hydrolysis. A number of studies have so far documented the chemopreventive properties of some ITCs. On the other hand, single nutrients detached from the food itself risk being somewhat "reductive", since plants contain several classes of compounds endowed with a polyhedral mechanism of action. Our recent finding that 4-methylthio-3-butenyl isothiocyanate (GRH-ITC) and 4-methylsulfinyl-3-butenyl isothiocyanate (GRE-ITC), released by the GLs purified from Japanese (Kaiware) Daikon (Raphanus sativus L.) seeds and sprouts, had selective cytotoxic/apoptotic activity on three human colon carcinoma cell lines prompted further research on the potential chemopreventive role of a standardized Kaiware Daikon extract (KDE), containing 10.5% w/w GRH and 3.8% w/w GRE, compared to its isolated components. KDE administered in combination with myrosinase at doses corresponding to 50 microM GRH-ITC plus 15 microM GRE-ITC (50 microM KDE-ITC) to three human cancer cell lines (LoVo, HCT-116 and HT-29) significantly reduced cell growth by 94-96% of control in six days (p < 0.05), outperforming pure GRH-ITC or GRE-ITC at the same dose. On the other hand, the same treatment had no significant toxicity on normal human T-lymphocytes. A 50 microM concentration of KDE-ITC had relevant apoptosis induction in all tested cancer cell lines, as confirmed by annexin V assay (e.g., 33% induction in LoVo compared to control, p < 0.05), Bax protein induction (e.g., +20% in HT-29, p < 0.05), and Bcl2 downregulation (e.g.-20% in HT-29, p < 0.05), and induced caspase-1 and PARP-1 activation in all cancer cells as shown by Western blot analysis. Unlike pure GRH or GRH-ITC, KDE also had significant chain-breaking antioxidant activity, retarding the AAPH-initiated autoxidation of methyl linoleate in SDS micelles at

  15. Erucin, a new promising cancer chemopreventive agent from rocket salads, shows anti-proliferative activity on human lung carcinoma A549 cells.

    PubMed

    Melchini, A; Costa, C; Traka, M; Miceli, N; Mithen, R; De Pasquale, R; Trovato, A

    2009-07-01

    Erucin (ER) is a dietary isothiocyanate present in cruciferous vegetables, such as rocket salads (Erucasativa Mill., Diplotaxis sp.), that has been recently considered a promising cancer chemopreventive phytochemical. Biological activity of ER was investigated on human lung adenocarcinoma A549 cells, analyzing its effects on molecular pathways involved in apoptosis and cell cycle arrest, such as PARP-1 cleavage, p53 and p21 protein expression. Our results show that ER affects the A549 cell proliferation, enhancing significantly p53 and p21 protein expression in a dose-dependent manner (p<0.001). PARP-1 cleavage occurs only after exposure to high concentrations of ER (50 microM), in accordance to previous studies showing similar bioactivity of other isothiocyanates (ITCs). Our study reports for the first time that the induction of p53, p21 and PARP-1 cleavage may participate in the anti-proliferative activity of ER in human lung adenocarcinoma A549 cells. Comparison of data with those obtained with the isothiocyanate sulforaphane (SF), structurally related to ER, underlines the strong relationship between structural analogy of ITCs and their biological activity. The ability of dietary compounds to modulate molecular mechanisms that affect cancer cell proliferation is certainly a key point of the cancer prevention potential by functional foods.

  16. Stimulation of phagocytosis by sulforaphane

    SciTech Connect

    Suganuma, Hiroyuki; Fahey, Jed W.; Bryan, Kelley E.; Healy, Zachary R.; Talalay, Paul

    2011-02-04

    Research highlights: {yields} Sulforaphane stimulates the phagocytosis of RAW 264.7 macrophages under conditions of serum deprivation. {yields} This effect does not require Nrf2-dependent induction of phase 2 genes. {yields} Inactivation of macrophage migration inhibitory factor (MIF) by sulforaphane may be involved in stimulation of phagocytosis by sulforaphane. -- Abstract: Sulforaphane, a major isothiocyanate derived from cruciferous vegetables, protects living systems against electrophile toxicity, oxidative stress, inflammation, and radiation. A major protective mechanism is the induction of a network of endogenous cytoprotective (phase 2) genes that are regulated by transcription factor Nrf2. To obtain a more detailed understanding of the anti-inflammatory and immunomodulatory effects of sulforaphane, we evaluated its effect on the phagocytosis activity of RAW 264.7 murine macrophage-like cells by measuring the uptake of 2-{mu}m diameter polystyrene beads. Sulforaphane raised the phagocytosis activity of RAW 264.7 cells but only in the absence or presence of low concentrations (1%) of fetal bovine serum. Higher serum concentrations depressed phagocytosis and abolished its stimulation by sulforaphane. This stimulation did not depend on the induction of Nrf2-regulated genes since it occurred in peritoneal macrophages of nrf2{sup -/-} mice. Moreover, a potent triterpenoid inducer of Nrf2-dependent genes did not stimulate phagocytosis, whereas sulforaphane and another isothiocyanate (benzyl isothiocyanate) had comparable inducer potencies. It has been shown recently that sulforaphane is a potent and direct inactivator of macrophage migration inhibitory factor (MIF), an inflammatory cytokine. Moreover, the addition of recombinant MIF to RAW 264.7 cells attenuated phagocytosis, but sulforaphane-inactivated MIF did not affect phagocytosis. The inactivation of MIF may therefore be involved in the phagocytosis-enhancing activity of sulforaphane.

  17. α-Santalol, a skin cancer chemopreventive agent with potential to target various pathways involved in photocarcinogenesis.

    PubMed

    Santha, Sreevidya; Dwivedi, Chandradhar

    2013-01-01

    This study is designed to investigate the chemopreventive effect and molecular mechanisms of α-santalol on UVB-induced skin tumor development in SKH-1 hairless mouse, a widely used model for human photocarcinogenesis. A dose of UVB radiation (30 mJ cm(-2) day(-1)) that is in the range of human sunlight exposure was used for the initiation and promotion of tumor. Topical treatment of mice with α-santalol (10%, wt/vol in acetone) caused reduction in tumor incidence, multiplicity and volume. In our study, the anticarcinogenic action of α-santalol against UVB-induced photocarcinogenesis was found to be associated with inhibition of inflammation and epidermal cell proliferation, cell cycle arrest and induction of apoptosis. α-Santalol pretreatment strongly inhibited UVB-induced epidermal hyperplasia and thickness of the epidermis, expression of proliferation and inflammation markers proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA), Ki-67 and cyclooxygenase 2 (Cox-2). Significant decrease in the expression of cyclins A, B1, D1 and D2 and cyclin-dependent kinases (Cdk)s Cdk1 (Cdc2), Cdk2, Cdk4 and Cdk6 and an upregulated expression of cyclin-dependent kinase (CDK) inhibitor Cip1/p21 were found in α-santalol pretreated group. Furthermore, an elevated level of cleaved caspase 3 and cleaved poly (ADP-ribose) polymerase (PARP) were observed in α-santalol-treated group. Our data suggested that α-santalol is a safer and promising skin cancer chemopreventive agent with potential to target various pathways involved in photocarcinogenesis.

  18. Endoscopic spectral domain optical coherence tomography of murine colonic morphology to determine effectiveness of chemopreventive and chemotherapeutic agents in colorectal cancer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    LeGendre-McGhee, Susan; Rice, Photini F. S.; Wall, R. Andrew; Klein, Justin; Luttman, Amber; Sprute, Kyle; Gerner, Eugene; Barton, Jennifer K.

    2012-02-01

    Optical coherence tomography (OCT) is a minimally-invasive imaging modality capable of tracking the development of individual colonic adenomas. As such, OCT can be used to evaluate the mechanisms and effectiveness of chemopreventive and chemotherapeutic agents in colorectal cancer models. The data presented here represent part of a larger study evaluating α-difluoromethylornithine (DFMO) and Sulindac as chemopreventive and chemotherapeutic agents using mice treated with the carcinogen azoxymethane (AOM). 27 A/J mice were included in the chemoprevention study, subdivided into four treatment groups (No Drug, DFMO, Sulindac, DFMO/Sulindac). 30 mm lateral images of each colon at eight different rotations were obtained at five different time points using a 2 mm diameter spectral domain OCT endoscopy system centered at 890 nm with 3.5 μm axial resolution in air and 5 μm lateral resolution. Images were visually analyzed to determine number and size of adenomas. Gross photos of the excised colons and histology provided gold standard confirmation of the final imaging time point. Preliminary results show that 100% of mice in the No Drug group developed adenomas over the course of the chemoprevention study. Incidence was reduced to 71.43% in mice given DFMO, 85.71% for Sulindac and 0% for DFMO/Sulindac. Discrete adenoma size did not vary significantly between experimental groups. Additional experiments are currently under way to verify these results and evaluate DFMO and Sulindac for chemotherapeutic applications.

  19. Microencapsulation of sulforaphane from broccoli seed extracts by gelatin/gum arabic and gelatin/pectin complexes.

    PubMed

    García-Saldaña, Jesús S; Campas-Baypoli, Olga N; López-Cervantes, Jaime; Sánchez-Machado, Dalia I; Cantú-Soto, Ernesto U; Rodríguez-Ramírez, Roberto

    2016-06-15

    Sulforaphane is a phytochemical that has received attention in recent years due to its chemopreventive properties. However, the uses and applications of this compound are very limited, because is an unstable molecule that is degraded mainly by changes in temperature and pH. In this research, the use of food grade polymers for microencapsulation of sulforaphane was studied by a complex coacervation method using the interaction of oppositely charged polymers as gelatin/gum arabic and gelatin/pectin. The polymers used were previously characterized in moisture content, ash and nitrogen. The encapsulation yield was over 80%. The gelatin/pectin complex had highest encapsulation efficiency with 17.91%. The presence of sulforaphane in the complexes was confirmed by FTIR and UV/visible spectroscopy. The materials used in this work could be a new and attractive option for the protection of sulforaphane.

  20. Isolation and Characterization of Chemopreventive Agent from Sphaeranthus amaranthoides Burm F

    PubMed Central

    Gayatri, S.; Suresh, R.; Reddy, C. Uma Maheswara; Chitra, K.

    2016-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the in vitro cytotoxic effect and to isolate and characterize a chemopreventive secondary metabolite from Sphaeranthus amaranthoides Burm F (sivakaranthai). Materials and Methods: In vitro cytotoxic effect was carried out by 3 (4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl) 2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide assay. Different concentrations of the extracts were tested on three different cell lines namely A549, HT29, and MCF7. The chloroform extract was subjected to column chromatography, and the isolated compound was characterized by various spectral methods and by single crystal X-ray crystallography. Results: The concentration that cause 50% growth inhibition value of chloroform extract was found to be 0.9 and 19 μg/mL against MCF7 and A549 cell lines, respectively. Chloroform extract was subjected to column chromatography for the isolation of phytoconstituent. The structure of the isolated compound was identified by spectroscopic techniques such as infrared, nuclear magnetic resonance, XRD, and mass spectroscopy. On comparison of complete spectral detail of the compound, the proposed structure was identified as chrysosplenol D (a flavonoid). Chrysosplenol D was isolated for the first time from this plant. Conclusion: The chloroform extract had higher cytotoxic effect, and the isolated chrysosplenol D may be responsible for the anti-proliferative effect of the plant. SUMMARY The plant Sphaeranthus amaranthoides Burm F was extracted with solvents of increasing polarity. The chloroform extract was found to have cell inhibition towards MCF 7 and HT 29 cell lines. This was subjected to fractionation. Chrysosplenol D was isolated from the chloroform extract PMID:26941538

  1. The failure of cancer chemoprevention.

    PubMed

    Potter, John D

    2014-05-01

    Chemoprevention is proposed as a clinical analogue of population prevention, aimed at reducing likelihood of disease progression, not across the population, but in identified high-risk individuals and not by behavioral or lifestyle modification, but by the use of pharmaceutical agents. Cardiovascular chemoprevention is successful via control of hyperlipidemias and hypertension. However, chemoprevention of cancer is an almost universal failure: not only are some results null; even more frequently, there is an excess of disease, including disease that the agents were chosen specifically to reduce. A brief introduction is followed by the evidence for a wide variety of agents and their largely deleterious, sometimes null, and in one case, largely beneficial, consequences as possible chemopreventives. The agents include (i) those that are food derived and their synthetic analogues: β-carotene, folic acid, retinol and retinoids, vitamin E, multivitamin supplements, vitamin C, calcium and selenium and (ii) agents targeted at metabolic and hormonal pathways: statins, estrogen and antagonists, 5α-reductase inhibitors. There are two agents for which there is good evidence of benefit when the strategy is focused on those at defined high risk but where wider application is much more problematic: aspirin and tamoxifen. The major problems with cancer chemoprevention are presented. This is followed by a hypothesis to explain the failure of cancer chemoprevention as an enterprise, arguing that the central tenets that underpin it are flawed and showing why, far from doing good, cancer chemoprevention causes harm.

  2. Pro-oxidant activity of dietary chemopreventive agents: an under-appreciated anti-cancer property.

    PubMed

    Azmi, Asfar S; Sarkar, Fazlul H; Hadi, S M

    2013-01-01

    " Let food be thy medicine and medicine be thy food" was quoted by Hippocrates more than two thousand years ago and since ancient times the health benefits of different natural agents have been exploited. In modern research, the disease preventive benefits of many such natural agents, particularly dietary compounds and their derivatives, has been attributed to their well recognized activity as the regulators of redox state of the cell. Nevertheless, most of these studies have focused on their antioxidant activity. A large body of evidence indicates that a major fraction of these agents can elicit pro-oxidant (radical generating) behavior which has been linked to their anti-cancer effects. This editorial provides an overview of the under-appreciated pro-oxidant activity of natural products, with a special focus on their ability to generate reactive oxygen species in the presence of transition metal ions, and discusses their possible use as cancer chemotherapeutic agents.

  3. 25-Hydroxyvitamin D3 is a natural chemopreventive agent against carcinogen induced precancerous lesions in mouse mammary gland organ culture

    PubMed Central

    Peng, Xinjian; Hawthorne, Michael; Vaishnav, Avani; St-Arnaud, René

    2009-01-01

    chemopreventive agent for further development for breast cancer prevention. PMID:18205042

  4. 25-Hydroxyvitamin D3 is a natural chemopreventive agent against carcinogen induced precancerous lesions in mouse mammary gland organ culture.

    PubMed

    Peng, Xinjian; Hawthorne, Michael; Vaishnav, Avani; St-Arnaud, René; Mehta, Rajendra G

    2009-01-01

    (OH)D(3) could serve as a non-toxic natural chemopreventive agent for further development for breast cancer prevention.

  5. Most effective colon cancer chemopreventive agents in rats: a systematic review of aberrant crypt foci and tumor data, ranked by potency

    PubMed Central

    Corpet, Denis E.; Taché, Sylviane

    2002-01-01

    Potential chemopreventive agents for colorectal cancer are assessed in rodents. We speculated that the magnitude of the effect is meaningful, and ranked all published agents according to their potency. Data were gathered systematically from 137 articles with the aberrant crypt foci (ACF) endpoint, and 146 articles with the tumor endpoint. A table was built containing potency of each agent to reduce the number of ACF. Another table was built with potency of each agent to reduce the tumor incidence. Both tables are shown in the present paper, and on a website with sorting abilities (http://www.inra.fr/reseau-nacre/sci-memb/corpet/indexan.html). Potency was estimated by the ratio of value in control rats divided by value in treated rats. From each article, only the most potent agent was kept, except from articles reporting the effect of more than 7 agents. Among the 186 agents in the ACF table, the median agent halved the number of ACF. The most potent agents to reduce azoxymethane-induced ACF were pluronic, polyethylene glycol, perilla oil with beta-carotene, and sulindac sulfide. Among the 160 agents in the tumor table, the median agent halved the tumor incidence in rats. The most potent agents to reduce the incidence of azoxymethane-induced tumors were celecoxib, a protease inhibitor from soy, difluoromethylornithine with piroxicam, polyethylene glycol, and a thiosulfonate. For the 57 agents present in both tables, a significant correlation was found between the potencies against ACF and tumors (r=0.45, p<0.001). Without celecoxib, a major outlying point in the correlation, it reached r=0.68 (p<0.001, N=56). In conclusion, this review gathers almost all known chemopreventive agents, ranks the most promising ones against colon carcinogenesis in rats or mice, and further supports the use of ACF as surrogate endpoint for tumors in rats. PMID:12467130

  6. Relationships between pulmonary micro-RNA and proteome profiles, systemic cytogenetic damage and lung tumors in cigarette smoke-exposed mice treated with chemopreventive agents.

    PubMed

    Izzotti, Alberto; Balansky, Roumen; D'Agostini, Francesco; Longobardi, Mariagrazia; Cartiglia, Cristina; La Maestra, Sebastiano; Micale, Rosanna T; Camoirano, Anna; Ganchev, Gancho; Iltcheva, Marietta; Steele, Vernon E; De Flora, Silvio

    2013-10-01

    Assessing the correlation between molecular endpoints and cancer induction or prevention aims at validating the use of intermediate biomarkers. We previously developed murine models that are suitable to detect both the carcinogenicity of mainstream cigarette smoke (MCS) and the induction of molecular alterations. In this study, we used 931 Swiss mice in two parallel experiments and in a preliminary toxicity study. The chemopreventive agents included vorinostat, myo-inositol, bexarotene, pioglitazone and a combination of bexarotene and pioglitazone. Pulmonary micro-RNAs and proteins were evaluated by microarray analyses at 10 weeks of age in male and female mice, either unexposed or exposed to MCS since birth, and either untreated or receiving each one of the five chemopreventive regimens with the diet after weaning. At 4 months of age, the frequency of micronucleated normochromatic erythrocytes was evaluated. At 7 months, the lungs were subjected to standard histopathological analysis. The results showed that exposure to MCS significantly downregulated the expression of 79 of 694 lung micro-RNAs (11.4%) and upregulated 66 of 1164 proteins (5.7%). Administration of chemopreventive agents modulated the baseline micro-RNA and proteome profiles and reversed several MCS-induced alterations, with some intergender differences. The stronger protective effects were produced by the combination of bexarotene and pioglitazone, which also inhibited the MCS-induced clastogenic damage and the yield of malignant tumors. Pioglitazone alone increased the yield of lung adenomas. Thus, micro-RNAs, proteins, cytogenetic damage and lung tumors were closely related. The molecular biomarkers contributed to evaluate both protective and adverse effects of chemopreventive agents and highlighted the mechanisms involved.

  7. Effect of Sulforaphane in Men with Biochemical Recurrence after Radical Prostatectomy.

    PubMed

    Cipolla, Bernard G; Mandron, Eric; Lefort, Jean Marc; Coadou, Yves; Della Negra, Emmanuel; Corbel, Luc; Le Scodan, Ronan; Azzouzi, Abdel Rahmene; Mottet, Nicolas

    2015-08-01

    Increases in serum levels of prostate-specific antigen (PSA) occur commonly in prostate cancer after radical prostatectomy and are designated "biochemical recurrence." Because the phytochemical sulforaphane has been studied extensively as an anticancer agent, we performed a double-blinded, randomized, placebo-controlled multicenter trial with sulforaphane in 78 patients (mean age, 69 ± 6 years) with increasing PSA levels after radical prostatectomy. Treatment comprised daily oral administration of 60 mg of a stabilized free sulforaphane for 6 months (M0-M6) followed by 2 months without treatment (M6-M8). The study was designed to detect a 0.012 log (ng/mL)/month decrease in the log PSA slope in the sulforaphane group from M0 to M6. The primary endpoint was not reached. For secondary endpoints, median log PSA slopes were consistently lower in sulforaphane-treated men. Mean changes in PSA levels between M6 and M0 were significantly lower in the sulforaphane group (+0.099 ± 0.341 ng/mL) than in placebo (+0.620 ± 1.417 ng/mL; P = 0.0433). PSA doubling time was 86% longer in the sulforaphane than in the placebo group (28.9 and 15.5 months, respectively). PSA increases >20% at M6 were significantly greater in the placebo group (71.8%) than in the sulforaphane group (44.4%); P = 0.0163. Compliance and tolerance were very good. Sulforaphane effects were prominent after 3 months of intervention (M3-M6). After treatment, PSA slopes from M6 to M8 remained the same in the 2 arms. Daily administration of free sulforaphane shows promise in managing biochemical recurrences in prostate cancer after radical prostatectomy.

  8. Evaluation of skin cancer chemoprevention potential of sunscreen agents using the Epstein-Barr virus early antigen activation in vitro assay.

    PubMed

    Kapadia, G J; Rao, G S; Takayasu, J; Takasaki, M; Iida, A; Suzuki, N; Konoshima, T; Tokuda, H

    2013-04-01

    In our continuing search for novel cancer chemopreventive compounds of natural and synthetic origin, we have evaluated 14 commonly used ultraviolet (UV) sunscreen agents (designated UV-1 to UV-14) for their skin cancer chemoprevention potential. They belong to 8 different chemical categories: aminobenzoate (UV-5, UV-7, UV-8 and UV-14), benzophenone (UV-1, UV-2, UV-3 and UV-13), benzotriazole (UV-10), benzyloxyphenol (UV-9), cinnamate (UV-6), quinolone (UV-4), salicylate (UV-11) and xanthone (UV-12). In the in vitro assay employed, the sunscreens were assessed by their inhibition of the Epstein-Barr virus early antigen (EBV-EA) activation induced by the tumour promoter 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate (TPA) in human lymphoblastoid Raji cells. All sunscreens tested were found to exhibit anti-tumour promoting activity: listed in decreasing order, moderate (UV-11, UV-2, UV-7, UV-12, UV-3, UV-9 and UV-14) to weak (UV-1, UV-6, UV-8, UV-16, UV-5, UV-4 and UV-10) with octyl salicylate (UV-11) as the most potent and drometrizole (UV-10) as the least potent among the compounds evaluated. A plausible relationship between the antioxidant property of sunscreens and their ability to promote anti-tumour activity was noted. The results call for a comprehensive analysis of skin cancer chemoprevention potential of currently used UV sunscreen agents around the globe to identify those with the best clinical profile.

  9. Sulforaphane and Other Nutrigenomic Nrf2 Activators: Can the Clinician's Expectation Be Matched by the Reality?

    PubMed Central

    Houghton, Christine A.; Fassett, Robert G.; Coombes, Jeff S.

    2016-01-01

    The recognition that food-derived nonnutrient molecules can modulate gene expression to influence intracellular molecular mechanisms has seen the emergence of the fields of nutrigenomics and nutrigenetics. The aim of this review is to describe the properties of nutrigenomic activators of transcription factor Nrf2 (nuclear factor erythroid 2-related factor 2), comparing the potential for sulforaphane and other phytochemicals to demonstrate clinical efficacy as complementary medicines. Broccoli-derived sulforaphane emerges as a phytochemical with this capability, with oral doses capable of favourably modifying genes associated with chemoprevention. Compared with widely used phytochemical-based supplements like curcumin, silymarin, and resveratrol, sulforaphane more potently activates Nrf2 to induce the expression of a battery of cytoprotective genes. By virtue of its lipophilic nature and low molecular weight, sulforaphane displays significantly higher bioavailability than the polyphenol-based dietary supplements that also activate Nrf2. Nrf2 activation induces cytoprotective genes such as those playing key roles in cellular defense mechanisms including redox status and detoxification. Both its high bioavailability and significant Nrf2 inducer capacity contribute to the therapeutic potential of sulforaphane-yielding supplements. PMID:26881038

  10. The Inactivation of Human CYP2E1 by Phenethyl Isothiocyanate, a Naturally Occurring Chemopreventive Agent, and Its Oxidative Bioactivation

    PubMed Central

    Yoshigae, Yasushi; Sridar, Chitra; Kent, Ute M.

    2013-01-01

    Phenethylisothiocyanate (PEITC), a naturally occurring isothiocyanate and potent cancer chemopreventive agent, works by multiple mechanisms, including the inhibition of cytochrome P450 (P450) enzymes, such as CYP2E1, that are involved in the bioactivation of carcinogens. PEITC has been reported to be a mechanism-based inactivator of some P450s. We describe here the possible mechanism for the inactivation of human CYP2E1 by PEITC, as well as the putative intermediate that might be involved in the bioactivation of PEITC. PEITC inactivated recombinant CYP2E1 with a partition ratio of 12, and the inactivation was not inhibited in the presence of glutathione (GSH) and not fully recovered by dialysis. The inactivation of CYP2E1 by PEITC is due to both heme destruction and protein modification, with the latter being the major pathway for inactivation. GSH-adducts of phenethyl isocyanate (PIC) and phenethylamine were detected during the metabolism by CYP2E1, indicating formation of PIC as a reactive intermediate following P450-catalyzed desulfurization of PEITC. Surprisingly, PIC bound covalently to CYP2E1 to form protein adducts but did not inactivate the enzyme. Liquid chromatography mass spectroscopy analysis of the inactivated CYP2E1 apo-protein suggests that a reactive sulfur atom generated during desulfurization of PEITC is involved in the inactivation of CYP2E1. Our data suggest that the metabolism of PEITC by CYP2E1 that results in the inactivation of CYP2E1 may occur by a mechanism similar to that observed with other sulfur-containing compounds, such as parathion. Digestion of the inactivated enzyme and analysis by SEQUEST showed that Cys 268 may be the residue modified by PIC. PMID:23371965

  11. Chemopreventive Agents and Inhibitors of Cancer Hallmarks: May Citrus Offer New Perspectives?

    PubMed

    Cirmi, Santa; Ferlazzo, Nadia; Lombardo, Giovanni E; Maugeri, Alessandro; Calapai, Gioacchino; Gangemi, Sebastiano; Navarra, Michele

    2016-11-04

    Fruits and vegetables have long been recognized as potentially important in the prevention of cancer risk. Thus, scientific interest in nutrition and cancer has grown over time, as shown by increasing number of experimental studies about the relationship between diet and cancer development. This review attempts to provide an insight into the anti-cancer effects of Citrus fruits, with a focus on their bioactive compounds, elucidating the main cellular and molecular mechanisms through which they may protect against cancer. Scientific literature was selected for this review with the aim of collecting the relevant experimental evidence for the anti-cancer effects of Citrus fruits and their flavonoids. The findings discussed in this review strongly support their potential as anti-cancer agents, and may represent a scientific basis to develop nutraceuticals, food supplements, or complementary and alternative drugs in a context of a multi-target pharmacological strategy in the oncology.

  12. Chemopreventive Agents and Inhibitors of Cancer Hallmarks: May Citrus Offer New Perspectives?

    PubMed Central

    Cirmi, Santa; Ferlazzo, Nadia; Lombardo, Giovanni E.; Maugeri, Alessandro; Calapai, Gioacchino; Gangemi, Sebastiano; Navarra, Michele

    2016-01-01

    Fruits and vegetables have long been recognized as potentially important in the prevention of cancer risk. Thus, scientific interest in nutrition and cancer has grown over time, as shown by increasing number of experimental studies about the relationship between diet and cancer development. This review attempts to provide an insight into the anti-cancer effects of Citrus fruits, with a focus on their bioactive compounds, elucidating the main cellular and molecular mechanisms through which they may protect against cancer. Scientific literature was selected for this review with the aim of collecting the relevant experimental evidence for the anti-cancer effects of Citrus fruits and their flavonoids. The findings discussed in this review strongly support their potential as anti-cancer agents, and may represent a scientific basis to develop nutraceuticals, food supplements, or complementary and alternative drugs in a context of a multi-target pharmacological strategy in the oncology. PMID:27827912

  13. The potential to intensify sulforaphane formation in cooked broccoli (Brassica oleracea var. italica) using mustard seeds (Sinapis alba).

    PubMed

    Ghawi, Sameer Khalil; Methven, Lisa; Niranjan, Keshavan

    2013-06-01

    Sulforaphane, a naturally occurring cancer chemopreventive, is the hydrolysis product of glucoraphanin, the main glucosinolate in broccoli. The hydrolysis requires myrosinase isoenzyme to be present in sufficient activity; however, processing leads to its denaturation and hence reduced hydrolysis. In this study, the effect of adding mustard seeds, which contain a more resilient isoform of myrosinase, to processed broccoli was investigated with a view to intensify the formation of sulforaphane. Thermal inactivation of myrosinase from both broccoli and mustard seeds was studied. Thermal degradation of broccoli glucoraphanin was investigated in addition to the effects of thermal processing on the formation of sulforaphane and sulforaphane nitrile. Limited thermal degradation of glucoraphanin (less than 12%) was observed when broccoli was placed in vacuum sealed bag (sous vide) and cooked in a water bath at 100°C for 8 and 12 min. Boiling broccoli in water prevented the formation of any significant levels of sulforaphane due to inactivated myrosinase. However, addition of powdered mustard seeds to the heat processed broccoli significantly increased the formation of sulforaphane.

  14. Proceedings of the Indo-U.S. bilateral workshop on accelerating botanicals/biologics agent development research for cancer chemoprevention, treatment, and survival

    PubMed Central

    B. Kumar, Nagi; Dhurandhar, Medha; Aggarwal, Bharat; Anant, Shrikant; Daniel, Kenyon; Deng, Gary; Djeu, Julie; Dou, Jinhui; Hawk, Ernest; Jayaram, B.; Jia, Libin; Joshi, Rajendra; Kararala, Madhuri; Karunagaran, Devarajan; Kucuk, Omer; Kumar, Lalit; Malafa, Mokenge; Samathanam, G. J.; Sarkar, Fazlul; Siddiqi, Maqsood; Singh, Rana P.; Srivastava, Anil; White, Jeffrey D.

    2013-01-01

    With the evolving evidence of the promise of botanicals/biologics for cancer chemoprevention and treatment, an Indo-U.S. collaborative Workshop focusing on “Accelerating Botanicals Agent Development Research for Cancer Chemoprevention and Treatment” was conducted at the Moffitt Cancer Center, 29–31 May 2012. Funded by the Indo-U.S. Science and Technology Forum, a joint initiative of Governments of India and the United States of America and the Moffitt Cancer Center, the overall goals of this workshop were to enhance the knowledge (agents, molecular targets, biomarkers, approaches, target populations, regulatory standards, priorities, resources) of a multinational, multidisciplinary team of researcher's to systematically accelerate the design, to conduct a successful clinical trials to evaluate botanicals/biologics for cancer chemoprevention and treatment, and to achieve efficient translation of these discoveries into the standards for clinical practice that will ultimately impact cancer morbidity and mortality. Expert panelists were drawn from a diverse group of stakeholders, representing the leadership from the National Cancer Institute's Office of Cancer Complementary and Alternative Medicine (OCCAM), NCI Experimental Therapeutics (NExT), Food and Drug Administration, national scientific leadership from India, and a distinguished group of population, basic and clinical scientists from the two countries, including leaders in bioinformatics, social sciences, and biostatisticians. At the end of the workshop, we established four Indo-U.S. working research collaborative teams focused on identifying and prioritizing agents targeting four cancers that are of priority to both countries. Presented are some of the key proceedings and future goals discussed in the proceedings of this workshop. PMID:24279005

  15. Sulforaphane induces DNA double strand breaks predominantly repaired by homologous recombination pathway in human cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Sekine-Suzuki, Emiko; Yu, Dong; Kubota, Nobuo; Okayasu, Ryuichi; Anzai, Kazunori

    2008-12-12

    Cytotoxicity and DNA double strand breaks (DSBs) were studied in HeLa cells treated with sulforaphane (SFN), a well-known chemo-preventive agent. Cell survival was impaired by SFN in a concentration and treatment time-dependent manner. Both constant field gel electrophoresis (CFGE) and gamma-H2AX assay unambiguously indicated formation of DSBs by SFN, reflecting the cell survival data. These DSBs were predominantly processed by homologous recombination repair (HRR), judging from the SFN concentration-dependent manner of Rad51 foci formation. On the other hand, the phosphorylation of DNA-PKcs, a key non-homologous end joining (NHEJ) protein, was not observed by SFN treatment, suggesting that NHEJ may not be involved in DSBs induced by this chemical. G2/M arrest by SFN, a typical response for cells exposed to ionizing radiation was also observed. Our new data indicate the clear induction of DSBs by SFN and a useful anti-tumor aspect of SFN through the induction of DNA DSBs.

  16. Sulforaphane induces DNA double strand breaks predominantly repaired by homologous recombination pathway in human cancer cells

    SciTech Connect

    Sekine-Suzuki, Emiko; Yu, Dong; Kubota, Nobuo; Okayasu, Ryuichi; Anzai, Kazunori

    2008-12-12

    Cytotoxicity and DNA double strand breaks (DSBs) were studied in HeLa cells treated with sulforaphane (SFN), a well-known chemo-preventive agent. Cell survival was impaired by SFN in a concentration and treatment time-dependent manner. Both constant field gel electrophoresis (CFGE) and {gamma}-H2AX assay unambiguously indicated formation of DSBs by SFN, reflecting the cell survival data. These DSBs were predominantly processed by homologous recombination repair (HRR), judging from the SFN concentration-dependent manner of Rad51 foci formation. On the other hand, the phosphorylation of DNA-PKcs, a key non-homologous end joining (NHEJ) protein, was not observed by SFN treatment, suggesting that NHEJ may not be involved in DSBs induced by this chemical. G2/M arrest by SFN, a typical response for cells exposed to ionizing radiation was also observed. Our new data indicate the clear induction of DSBs by SFN and a useful anti-tumor aspect of SFN through the induction of DNA DSBs.

  17. Nitric oxide-releasing sulindac is a novel skin cancer chemopreventive agent for UVB-induced photocarcinogenesis

    SciTech Connect

    Chaudhary, Sandeep C.; Singh, Tripti; Kapur, Puneet; Weng, Zhiping; Arumugam, Aadithya; Elmets, Craig A.; Kopelovich, Levy; Athar, Mohammad

    2013-05-01

    Nitric oxide (NO)-releasing non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NO-NSAIDs) which have been synthesized to reduce gastro-intestinal and cardiovascular toxicities of NSAIDs, possess anti-proliferative, pro-apoptotic and anti-cancer activities. Here, we show that NO-sulindac inhibited UVB-induced skin tumorigenesis in SKH-1 hairless mice. Topical application of NO-sulindac reduced tumor incidence, number (p < 0.05) and volume (p < 0.005) as compared to UVB (alone)-irradiated vehicle-treated mice. An increase in TUNEL-positive cells in skin lesions was accompanied by the enhanced Bax:Bcl-2 ratio. The expression of pro-apoptotic Bax was increased whereas anti-apoptotic Bcl-2 reduced. However, proliferation was identified as the major target of NO-sulindac in this study. A reduced expression of PCNA and cyclin D1 associated with the dampening of cell cycle progression was observed. The mechanism of this inhibition was related to the reduction in UVB-induced Notch signaling pathway. UVB-induced inflammatory responses were diminished by NO-sulindac as observed by a remarkable reduction in the levels of phosphorylated MAP Kinases Erk1/2, p38 and JNK1/2. In this regard, NO-sulindac also inhibited NFκB by enhancing IκBα as evidenced by the reduced expression of iNOS and COX-2, the direct NFκB transcription target proteins. NO-sulindac significantly diminished the progression of benign lesions to invasive carcinomas by suppressing the tumor aggressiveness and retarding epithelial–mesenchymal transition. A marked decrease in the expression of mesenchymal markers such as Fibronectin, N-cadherin, SNAI, Slug and Twist and an increase in epithelial cell polarity marker E-cadherin were noted in NO-sulindac-treated tumors. Our data suggest that NO-sulindac is a potent inhibitor of UVB-induced skin carcinogenesis and acts by targeting proliferation-regulatory pathways. - Highlights: ► NO-sulindac is a potent chemopreventive agent for UVB-induced skin cancer. ► NO

  18. Sulforaphane induces phase II detoxication enzymes in mouse skin and prevents mutagenesis induced by a mustard gas analog

    SciTech Connect

    Abel, E.L.; Boulware, S.; Fields, T.; McIvor, E.; Powell, K.L.; DiGiovanni, J.; Vasquez, K.M.; MacLeod, M.C.

    2013-02-01

    Mustard gas, used in chemical warfare since 1917, is a mutagenic and carcinogenic agent that produces severe dermal lesions for which there are no effective therapeutics; it is currently seen as a potential terrorist threat to civilian populations. Sulforaphane, found in cruciferous vegetables, is known to induce enzymes that detoxify compounds such as the sulfur mustards that react through electrophilic intermediates. Here, we observe that a single topical treatment with sulforaphane induces mouse epidermal levels of the regulatory subunit of glutamate-cysteine ligase, the rate-limiting enzyme in glutathione biosynthesis, and also increases epidermal levels of reduced glutathione. Furthermore, a glutathione S-transferase, GSTA4, is also induced in mouse skin by sulforaphane. In an in vivo model in which mice are given a single mutagenic application of the sulfur mustard analog 2-(chloroethyl) ethyl sulfide (CEES), we now show that therapeutic treatment with sulforaphane abolishes the CEES-induced increase in mutation frequency in the skin, measured four days after exposure. Sulforaphane, a natural product currently in clinical trials, shows promise as an effective therapeutic against mustard gas. -- Highlights: ► Sulforaphane induces increased levels of glutathione in mouse skin. ► Sulforaphane induces increased levels of GSTA4 in mouse skin. ► Sulforaphane, applied after CEES-treatment, completely abolishes CEES-mutagenesis. ► The therapeutic effect may suggest a long biological half-life for CEES in vivo.

  19. [6]-gingerol as a cancer chemopreventive agent: a review of its activity on different steps of the metastatic process.

    PubMed

    Poltronieri, Juliana; Becceneri, Amanda B; Fuzer, Angelina M; Filho, Julio Cesar C; Martin, Ana Carolina B M; Vieira, Paulo Cezar; Pouliot, Normand; Cominetti, Márcia R

    2014-04-01

    For many years, ginger or ginger root, the rhizome of the plant Zingiber officinale, has been consumed as a delicacy, medicine, or spice. Several studies have been conducted on the medicinal properties of ginger against various disorders, including cancer. Cancer is the second leading cause of death, and chemoprevention is defined as the use of natural or synthetic substances to prevent cancer initiation or progression. Evidence that ginger-derived compounds have inhibitory effects on various cancer cell types is increasingly being reported in the scientific literature. In this review we focused on the cancer chemopreventive effects of [6]-gingerol, the major pungent component of ginger, and its impact on different steps of the metastatic process.

  20. Chemopreventive Effects of the p53-Modulating Agents CP-31398 and Prima-1 in Tobacco Carcinogen-Induced Lung Tumorigenesis in A/J Mice1

    PubMed Central

    Rao, Chinthalapally V; Patlolla, Jagan Mohan R; Qian, Li; Zhang, Yuting; Brewer, Misty; Mohammed, Altaf; Desai, Dhimant; Amin, Shantu; Lightfoot, Stan; Kopelovich, Levy

    2013-01-01

    Lung cancer is the leading cause of cancer deaths worldwide. Expression of the p53 tumor suppressor protein is frequently altered in tobacco-associated lung cancers. We studied chemopreventive effects of p53-modulating agents, namely, CP-31398 and Prima-1, on 4-(methylnitrosamino)-1-(3-pyridyl)-1-butanone (NNK)-induced lung adenoma and adenocarcinoma formation in female A/J mice. Seven-week-old mice were treated with a single dose of NNK (10 µmol/mouse) by intraperitoneal injection and, 3 weeks later, were randomized to mice fed a control diet or experimental diets containing 50 or 100 ppm CP-31398 or 150 or 300 ppm Prima-1 for either 17 weeks (10 mice/group) or 34 weeks (15 mice/group) to assess the efficacy against lung adenoma and adenocarcinoma. Dietary feeding of 50 or 100 ppm CP-31398 significantly suppressed (P < .0001) lung adenocarcinoma by 64% and 73%, respectively, after 17 weeks and by 47% and 56%, respectively, after 34 weeks. Similarly, 150 or 300 ppm Prima-1 significantly suppressed (P < .0001) lung adenocarcinoma formation by 56% and 62%, respectively, after 17 weeks and 39% and 56%, respectively, after 34 weeks. Importantly, these results suggest that both p53 modulators cause a delay in the progression of adenoma to adenocarcinoma. Immunohistochemical analysis of lung tumors from mice exposed to p53-modulating agents showed a significantly reduced tumor cell proliferation and increased accumulation of wild-type p53 in the nucleus. An increase in p21- and apoptotic-positive cells was also observed in lung tumors of mice exposed to p53-modulating agents. These results support a chemopreventive role of p53-modulating agents in tobacco carcinogen-induced lung adenocarcinoma formation. PMID:24027427

  1. Potential of olive oil phenols as chemopreventive and therapeutic agents against cancer: a review of in vitro studies.

    PubMed

    Casaburi, Ivan; Puoci, Francesco; Chimento, Adele; Sirianni, Rosa; Ruggiero, Carmen; Avena, Paola; Pezzi, Vincenzo

    2013-01-01

    Olive oil is a common component of Mediterranean dietary habits. Epidemiological studies have shown how the incidence of various diseases, including certain cancers, is relatively low in the Mediterranean basin compared to that of other European or North America countries. Current knowledge indicates that the phenolic fraction of olive oil has antitumor effects. In addition to the ability to be chemopreventive, with its high antioxidant activity, the antitumor effects of olive oil phenols (OO-phenols) has been studied because of their capacity to inhibit proliferation and promote apoptosis in several tumor cell lines, by diverse mechanisms. This review will summarize and discuss the most recent relevant results on the antitumor effect of OO-phenols on leukemia tumor cells, colorectal carcinoma cells, and breast cancer (BC) cells. In particular, very recent data will be reported and discussed showing the molecular signaling pathways activated by OO-phenols in different histopathological BC cell types, suggesting the potential use of OO-phenols as adjuvant treatment against several subsets of BC. Data summarized here represent a good starting point for more extensive studies for better insight into the molecular mechanisms induced by OO-phenols and to increase the availability of chemopreventive or therapeutic drugs to fight cancer.

  2. Study on the interaction of sulforaphane with human and bovine serum albumins.

    PubMed

    Abassi, Parvane; Abassi, Farzane; Yari, Faramarz; Hashemi, Mehrdad; Nafisi, Shohreh

    2013-05-05

    Sulforaphane; [1-isothiocyanato-4-(methylsulfinyl) butane], (SFN) is an isothiocyanate derived from glucoraphanin present in cruciferous vegetables and has a variety of potential chemopreventive actions. This study was designed to examine the interaction of sulforaphane with HSA and BSA. FTIR, UV-Vis spectroscopic methods as well as molecular modeling were used to determine the drug binding mode, binding constant and the effect of drug complexation on serum albumins stability and conformation. Structural analysis showed that SFN bind HSA and BSA via polypeptide polar groups with overall binding constants of KSFN-HSA=6.54×10(4) and KSFN-BSA=8.55×10(4) M(-1). HSA and BSA conformations were altered by a major reduction of α-helix upon SFN interaction. These results suggest that serum albumins might act as carrier proteins for SFN in delivering them to target tissues.

  3. Plant Extracts of the Family Lauraceae: A Potential Resource for Chemopreventive Agents that Activate the Nuclear Factor-Erythroid 2-Related Factor 2/Antioxidant Response Element Pathway

    PubMed Central

    Shen, Tao; Chen, Xue-Mei; Harder, Bryan; Long, Min; Wang, Xiao-Ning; Lou, Hong-Xiang; Wondrak, Georg T.; Ren, Dong-Mei; Zhang, Donna D.

    2015-01-01

    Cells and tissues counteract insults from exogenous or endogenous carcinogens through the expression of genes encoding antioxidants and phase II detoxifying enzymes regulated by antioxidant response element promoter regions. Nuclear factor-erythroid 2-related factor 2 plays a key role in regulating the antioxidant response elements-target gene expression. Hence, the Nrf2/ARE pathway represents a vital cellular defense mechanism against damage caused by oxidative stress and xenobiotics, and is recognized as a potential molecular target for discovering chemo-preventive agents. Using a stable antioxidant response element luciferase reporter cell line derived from human breast cancer MDA-MB-231 cells combined with a 96-well high-throughput screening system, we have identified a series of plant extracts from the family Lauraceae that harbor Nrf2-inducing effects. These extracts, including Litsea garrettii (ZK-08), Cinnamomum chartophyllum (ZK-02), C. mollifolium (ZK-04), C. camphora var. linaloolifera (ZK-05), and C. burmannii (ZK-10), promoted nuclear translocation of Nrf2, enhanced protein expression of Nrf2 and its target genes, and augmented intracellular glutathione levels. Cytoprotective activity of these extracts against two electrophilic toxicants, sodium arsenite and H2O2, was investigated. Treatment of human bronchial epithelial cells with extracts of ZK-02, ZK-05, and ZK-10 significantly improved cell survival in response to sodium arsenite and H2O2, while ZK-08 showed a protective effect against only H2O2. Importantly, their protective effects against insults from both sodium arsenite and H2O2 were Nrf2-dependent. Therefore, our data provide evidence that the selected plants from the family Lauraceae are potential sources for chemopreventive agents targeting the Nrf2/ARE pathway. PMID:24585092

  4. Cancer Chemoprevention: Current State of the Art

    PubMed Central

    Landis-Piwowar, Kristin R; Iyer, Neena R

    2014-01-01

    The aim of cancer chemoprevention is disruption or delay of the molecular pathways that lead to carcinogenesis. Chemopreventive blocking and/or suppressing agents disrupt the molecular mechanisms that drive carcinogenesis such as DNA damage by reactive oxygen species, increased signal transduction to NF-κB, epigenomic deregulation, and the epithelial mesenchymal transition that leads to metastatic progression. Numerous dietary phytochemicals have been observed to inhibit the initiation phase of carcinogenesis, and therefore are useful in primary chemoprevention. Moreover, phytochemicals are capable of interfering with the molecular mechanisms of metastasis. Likewise, numerous synthetic compounds are relevant and clinically viable as chemopreventive agents during the fundamental stages of carcinogenesis. While molecularly targeted anti-cancer therapies are in constant stages of development, superior patient outcomes are observed if carcinogenic processes are prevented altogether. This article reviews the role of chemopreventive compounds in inhibition of cancer initiation and their ability to reduce cancer progression. PMID:24987270

  5. d,l-Sulforaphane Induces ROS-Dependent Apoptosis in Human Gliomablastoma Cells by Inactivating STAT3 Signaling Pathway

    PubMed Central

    Miao, Ziwei; Yu, Fei; Ren, Yahao; Yang, Jun

    2017-01-01

    d,l-Sulforaphane (SFN), a synthetic analogue of broccoli-derived isomer l-SFN, exerts cytotoxic effects on multiple tumor cell types through different mechanisms and is more potent than the l-isomer at inhibiting cancer growth. However, the means by which SFN impairs glioblastoma (GBM) cells remains poorly understood. In this study, we investigated the anti-cancer effect of SFN in GBM cells and determined the underlying molecular mechanisms. Cell viability assays, flow cytometry, immunofluorescence, and Western blot results revealed that SFN could induced apoptosis of GBM cells in a dose- and time-dependent manner, via up-regulation of caspase-3 and Bax, and down-regulation of Bcl-2. Mechanistically, SFN treatment led to increase the intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) level in GBM cells. Meanwhile, SFN also suppressed both constitutive and IL-6-induced phosphorylation of STAT3, and the activation of upstream JAK2 and Src tyrosine kinases, dose- and time-dependently. Moreover, blockage of ROS production by using the ROS inhibitor N-acetyl-l-cysteine totally reversed SFN-mediated down-regulation of JAK2/Src-STAT3 signaling activation and the subsequent effects on apoptosis by blocking the induction of apoptosis-related genes in GBM cells. Taken together, our data suggests that SFN induces apoptosis in GBM cells via ROS-dependent inactivation of STAT3 phosphorylation. These findings motivate further evaluation of SFN as a cancer chemopreventive agent in GBM treatment. PMID:28054986

  6. Linking genomic responses of gonads with reproductive impairment in marine medaka (Oryzias melastigma) exposed chronically to the chemopreventive and antifouling agent, 3,3'-diindolylmethane (DIM).

    PubMed

    Chen, Lianguo; Au, Doris W T; Hu, Chenyan; Zhang, Weipeng; Zhou, Bingsheng; Cai, Lin; Giesy, John P; Qian, Pei-Yuan

    2017-02-01

    3,3'-Diindolylmethane (DIM) has been promoted as an effective chemopreventive and antifouling additive. However, the concurrent risks or side effects of DIM are not fully understood, especially on tissues responsive to estrogen. Therefore, this study employed marine medaka (Oryzias melastigma) as a test model to evaluate relative safety and explore mechanisms of toxic action of DIM on development and function of gonad after chronic (28days) aqueous exposure to relatively low doses (0μg/L or 8.5μg/L). Integration of comprehensive toxicogenomic analysis at the transcriptome and proteome levels with apical endpoints, such as production of eggs and swimming performance of larvae, elucidated the molecular linkage in gonad from bottom up along the reproductive adverse outcome pathway. A series of sequential changes at the transcript and protein levels were linked to lesser fecundity and viability of larvae exposed to DIM. Anomalous production of vitellogenin (VTG) and eggshell proteins in testis confirmed the estrogenic potency of DIM. In the ovary, although storage of VTG was greater, lesser expressions of cathepsin enzymes blocked cleavage and incorporation of VTG into oocytes as yolk, which acted together with lower eggshell proteins to inhibit maturation of primary oocyte and thus contributed to impairment of fecundity. Overall, this study demonstrated that exposure to DIM impaired reproductive fitness. Diverse molecular initiating changes in gonads were linked to apical endpoints that could be used in assessment of risks posed by DIM on gametogenesis. In combination with chemical stability and potent endocrine disruption, the results of this study can inform decisions about the use of DIM either as chemopreventive or antifouling agent.

  7. Chemoprevention of cancer: current evidence and future prospects

    PubMed Central

    Benetou, Vassiliki; Lagiou, Areti; Lagiou, Pagona

    2015-01-01

    Cancer chemoprevention refers to the use of agents for the inhibition, delay, or reversal of carcinogenesis before invasion. In the present review, agents examined in the context of cancer chemoprevention are classified in four major categories—hormonal, medications, diet-related agents, and vaccines—and the main representatives of each category are presented. Although there are serious constraints in the documentation of effectiveness of chemopreventive agents, mainly stemming from the long latency of the condition they are addressing and the frequent lack of intermediate biomarkers, there is little disagreement about the role of aspirin, whereas a diet rich in vegetables and fruits appears to convey more protection than individual micronutrients. Among categories of cancer chemopreventive agents, hormonal ones and vaccines might hold more promise for the future. Also, the identification of individuals who would benefit most from chemopreventive interventions on the basis of their genetic profiles could open new prospects for cancer chemoprevention. PMID:27006756

  8. Modifying the processing and handling of frozen broccoli for increased sulforaphane formation.

    PubMed

    Dosz, Edward B; Jeffery, Elizabeth H

    2013-09-01

    Frozen broccoli can provide a cheaper product, with a longer shelf life and less preparation time than fresh broccoli. We previously showed that several commercially available frozen broccoli products do not retain the ability to generate the cancer-preventative agent sulforaphane. We hypothesized that this was because the necessary hydrolyzing enzyme myrosinase was destroyed during blanching, as part of the processing that frozen broccoli undergoes. This study was carried out to determine a way to overcome loss of hydrolyzing activity. Industrial blanching usually aims to inactivate peroxidase, although lipoxygenase plays a greater role in product degradation during frozen storage of broccoli. Blanching at 86 °C or higher inactivated peroxidase, lipoxygenase, and myrosinase. Blanching at 76 °C inactivated 92% of lipoxygenase activity, whereas there was only an 18% loss in myrosinase-dependent sulforaphane formation. We considered that thawing frozen broccoli might disrupt membrane integrity, allowing myrosinase and glucoraphanin to come into contact. Thawing frozen broccoli for 9 h did not support sulforaphane formation unless an exogenous source of myrosinase was added. Thermal stability studies showed that broccoli root, as a source of myrosinase, was not more heat stable than broccoli floret. Daikon radish root supported some sulforaphane formation even when heated at 125 °C for 10 min, a time and temperature comparable to or greater than microwave cooking. Daikon radish (0.25%) added to frozen broccoli that was then allowed to thaw supported sulforaphane formation without any visual alteration to that of untreated broccoli.

  9. Modulation of the metabolism of airborne pollutants by glucoraphanin-rich and sulforaphane-rich broccoli sprout beverages in Qidong, China

    PubMed Central

    Kensler, Thomas W.; Ng, Derek; Carmella, Steven G.; Chen, Menglan; Jacobson, Lisa P.; Muñoz, Alvaro; Egner, Patricia A.; Chen, Jian Guo; Qian, Geng Sun; Chen, Tao Yang; Fahey, Jed W.; Talalay, Paul; Groopman, John D.; Yuan, Jian-Min; Hecht, Stephen S.

    2012-01-01

    Epidemiological evidence has suggested that consumption of a diet rich in cruciferous vegetables reduces the risk of several types of cancers and chronic degenerative diseases. In particular, broccoli sprouts are a convenient and rich source of the glucosinolate, glucoraphanin, which can release the chemopreventive agent, sulforaphane, an inducer of glutathione S-transferases. Two broccoli sprout-derived beverages, one sulforaphane-rich (SFR) and the other glucoraphanin-rich (GRR), were evaluated for pharmacodynamic action in a crossover clinical trial design. Study participants were recruited from the farming community of He Zuo Township, Qidong, China, previously documented to have a high incidence of hepatocellular carcinoma with concomitant exposures to aflatoxin and more recently characterized with exposures to substantive levels of airborne pollutants. Fifty healthy participants were randomized into two treatment arms. The study protocol was as follows: a 5 days run-in period, a 7 days administration of beverage, a 5 days washout period and a 7 days administration of the opposite beverage. Urinary excretion of the mercapturic acids of acrolein, crotonaldehyde, ethylene oxide and benzene were measured both pre- and postinterventions using liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry. Statistically significant increases of 20–50% in the levels of excretion of glutathione-derived conjugates of acrolein, crotonaldehyde and benzene were seen in individuals receiving SFR, GRR or both compared with their preintervention baseline values. No significant differences were seen between the effects of SFR versus GRR. Intervention with broccoli sprouts may enhance detoxication of airborne pollutants and attenuate their associated health risks. PMID:22045030

  10. Chemoprevention by WR-2721

    SciTech Connect

    Grdina, D.J. Chicago Univ., IL . Dept. of Radiation and Cellular Oncology); Carnes, B.A. )

    1993-01-01

    WR-2721 [S-2-(3-aminopropylamino)ethylphosphorothioic acid] is an effective chemopreventive agent. C57BL [times] BALB/c F[sub 1] female mice, were exposed to a single whole-body dose of 206 cGy from a [sup 60]Co photon source. Those groups treated with VATR-2721 (400 mg/kg) were administered the agent i.p. 30 min prior to irradiation. Over 90% of deaths were determined to be due to tumor involvement. WR-2721 afforded significant protection against life shortening due to radiation-induced tumors of connective tissue and epithelial tissue origins. Subsequent survival time in WR-2721-treated and irradiated animals as compared to matched irradiated-only controls was extended up to 59 days. A single exposure of animals to VVR-2721 did not affect the cumulative survival curves for unirradiated mice. WR-2721 possesses chemopreventive properties which can be clinically exploited to reduce the risk to therapy-induced secondary cancers in patients who otherwise would have an excellent prognosis for cure and long-term survival.

  11. Chemoprevention by WR-2721

    SciTech Connect

    Grdina, D.J. |; Carnes, B.A.

    1993-05-01

    WR-2721 [S-2-(3-aminopropylamino)ethylphosphorothioic acid] is an effective chemopreventive agent. C57BL {times} BALB/c F{sub 1} female mice, were exposed to a single whole-body dose of 206 cGy from a {sup 60}Co photon source. Those groups treated with VATR-2721 (400 mg/kg) were administered the agent i.p. 30 min prior to irradiation. Over 90% of deaths were determined to be due to tumor involvement. WR-2721 afforded significant protection against life shortening due to radiation-induced tumors of connective tissue and epithelial tissue origins. Subsequent survival time in WR-2721-treated and irradiated animals as compared to matched irradiated-only controls was extended up to 59 days. A single exposure of animals to VVR-2721 did not affect the cumulative survival curves for unirradiated mice. WR-2721 possesses chemopreventive properties which can be clinically exploited to reduce the risk to therapy-induced secondary cancers in patients who otherwise would have an excellent prognosis for cure and long-term survival.

  12. Chemoprevention of premalignant and malignant lesions of oral cavity: Recent trends

    PubMed Central

    Bodhade, Ashish S.; Dive, Alka M.

    2013-01-01

    The word chemoprevention includes prevention of initiation, promotion, and progression of carcinogenesis to cancer. This article is an attempt to review the dietary chemopreventive agents and their mode of action in chemoprevention of oral premalignant lesions and oral cancer using a systematic approach. Selected chemoprevention trials are discussed with a focus on strategies of trial design and clinical outcome. Future in the field of chemoprevention will be more promising than the recently available therapeutic alternatives. PMID:24883036

  13. Phase I clinical trial of curcumin, a chemopreventive agent, in patients with high-risk or pre-malignant lesions.

    PubMed

    Cheng, A L; Hsu, C H; Lin, J K; Hsu, M M; Ho, Y F; Shen, T S; Ko, J Y; Lin, J T; Lin, B R; Ming-Shiang, W; Yu, H S; Jee, S H; Chen, G S; Chen, T M; Chen, C A; Lai, M K; Pu, Y S; Pan, M H; Wang, Y J; Tsai, C C; Hsieh, C Y

    2001-01-01

    of 6 patients of intestinal metaplasia of the stomach, I out of 4 patients with CIN and 2 out of 6 patients with Bowen's disease. In conclusion, this study demonstrated that curcumin is not toxic to humans up to 8,000 mg/day when taken by mouth for 3 months. Our results also suggest a biologic effect of curcumin in the chemoprevention of cancer.

  14. 2-(Allylthio)pyrazine, a cancer chemopreventive agent, inhibits liver fibrosis induced by dimethylnitrosamine in rats: role of inhibition of transforming growth factor-beta1 expression.

    PubMed

    Kang, K W; Ha, J R; Kim, C W; Kim, N D; Kim, S G

    2001-07-01

    Exposure to nitrosamines may be the occupational risk factor for liver cirrhosis. 2-(Allylthio)pyrazine, a chemopreventive agent, inhibits CYP2E1 and induces phase II enzymes. We examined the effects of 2-(allylthio)pyrazine on hepatic fibrosis, a prepathologic state of cirrhosis, and on the expression of transforming growth factor-beta1 induced by dimethylnitrosamine. Treatment of rats with dimethylnitrosamine for 4 weeks increased plasma alanine/aspartate amino-transferase and y-glutamyl transpeptidase activities, and bilirubin content, whereas the total plasma protein and albumin levels were decreased. 2-(Allylthio)pyrazine inhibited dimethylnitrosamine-induced increases in the enzyme activities and bilirubin, and restored the plasma protein and albumin contents. Masson's trichrome staining showed that dimethylnitrosamine induced liver fibrosis, the extent of which was reduced by 2-(allylthio)pyrazine treatments. Reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction analysis revealed that 2-(allylthio)pyrazine inhibited production of transforming growth factor-beta1 mRNA by dimethylnitrosamine. These results demonstrated that 2-(allylthio)pyrazine might inhibit dimethylnitrosamine-induced liver fibrosis due to suppression of CYP2E1 expression and transforming growth factor-beta1 production.

  15. Neuroprotective effect of sulforaphane against methylglyoxal cytotoxicity.

    PubMed

    Angeloni, Cristina; Malaguti, Marco; Rizzo, Benedetta; Barbalace, Maria Cristina; Fabbri, Daniele; Hrelia, Silvana

    2015-06-15

    Glycation, an endogenous process that leads to the production of advanced glycation end products (AGEs), plays a role in the etiopathogenesis of different neurodegenerative diseases, such as Alzheimer's disease (AD). Methylglyoxal is the most potent precursor of AGEs, and high levels of methylglyoxal have been found in the cerebrospinal fluid of AD patients. Methylglyoxal may contribute to AD both inducing extensive protein cross-linking and mediating oxidative stress. The aim of this study was to investigate the role of sulforaphane, an isothiocyanate found in cruciferous vegetables, in counteracting methylglyoxal-induced damage in SH-SY5Y neuroblastoma cells. The data demonstrated that sulforaphane protects cells against glycative damage by inhibiting activation of the caspase-3 enzyme, reducing the phosphorylation of MAPK signaling pathways (ERK1/2, JNK, and p38), reducing oxidative stress, and increasing intracellular glutathione levels. For the first time, we demonstrate that sulforaphane enhances the methylglyoxal detoxifying system, increasing the expression and activity of glyoxalase 1. Sulforaphane modulated brain-derived neurotrophic factor and its pathway, whose dysregulation is related to AD development. Moreover, sulforaphane was able to revert the reduction of glucose uptake caused by methylglyoxal. In conclusion, sulforaphane demonstrates pleiotropic behavior thanks to its ability to act on different cellular targets, suggesting a potential role in preventing/counteracting multifactorial neurodegenerative diseases such as Alzheimer's.

  16. Nutritional aspects regarding lung cancer chemoprevention.

    PubMed

    Thanopoulou, E; Baltayiannis, N; Lykogianni, V

    2006-01-01

    Lung cancer is still one of the major causes of cancer-related deaths and its mortality figures argue powerfully for new approaches to control this leading cancer threat. Chemoprevention can be defined as the use of specific agents to reverse, or prevent premalignancy from progressing to invasive cancer. The use of foods and dietary supplements present a safe chemopreventive strategy. Data for this review were identified by searches of PubMed and references from relevant articles. Articles were identified by use of the search terms "lung cancer", "chemoprevention", "carcinogenesis", and "retinoids". Only papers published in English were included. Trials in lung cancer chemoprevention have so far produced either neutral or harmful primary endpoint results, whether in the primary, secondary, or tertiary settings. Lung cancer was not prevented by beta-carotene, alpha-tocopherol, retinol, retinyl palmitate, N-acetylcysteine, or isotretinoin in smokers. Ongoing trials may help define new avenues for chemoprevention. The concept of chemoprevention in lung cancer is still in its infancy, but in the future it may have a significant impact on the incidence and mortality of lung cancer. In addition to epidemiologic studies, basic science research to detect mechanisms and evaluate the chemopreventive potential of food components is necessary. The overwhelming evidence of a major role of nutrition in carcinogenesis, the many leads that nutritional intervention may reduce cancer incidence, and the growth and increasing sophistication of clinical trials networks point to a very promising future for nutritional intervention trials leading to substantial public benefit.

  17. A phase II study of sulforaphane-rich broccoli sprout extracts in men with recurrent prostate cancer

    PubMed Central

    Alumkal, Joshi J.; Slottke, Rachel; Schwartzman, Jacob; Cherala, Ganesh; Munar, Myrna; Graff, Julie N.; Beer, Tomasz M.; Ryan, Christopher W.; Koop, Dennis R.; Gibbs, Angela; Gao, Lina; Flamiatos, Jason F.; Tucker, Erin; Kleinschmidt, Richard; Mori, Motomi

    2014-01-01

    Diets high in cruciferous vegetables are associated with lower risk of incidence of prostate cancer, including aggressive forms of this disease. Human intervention studies with cruciferous vegetable-rich diets also demonstrate modulation of gene expression in important pathways in prostate cells. Sulforaphane is a constituent of these foods postulated to harbor the anti-neoplastic activity based on multiple tumor models. Our own work demonstrates that sulforaphane inhibits AR signaling in prostate cancer cells. Here, we report results from the first clinical trial of sulforaphane-rich extracts in men with prostate cancer. We treated 20 patients who had recurrent prostate cancer with 200μmoles/day of sulforaphane-rich extracts for a maximum period of 20 weeks and determined the proportion of patients with ≥50% PSA declines, the primary endpoint. Only one subject experienced a ≥50% PSA decline. Thus, the primary endpoint was not achieved. Seven patients experienced smaller PSA declines (<50%). There was also a significant lengthening of the on-treatment PSA doubling time (PSADT) compared with the pre-treatment PSADT [6.1 months pre-treatment vs. 9.6 months on-treatment (p=0.044)]. Finally, treatment with sulforaphane-rich extracts was safe with no Grade 3 adverse events. Treatment with 200μmoles/day of sulforaphane-rich extracts did not lead to ≥50% PSA declines in the majority of patients. However, because of the safety of treatment and the effects on PSADT modulation, further studies, including those with higher doses, may be warranted to clarify the role of sulforaphane as a prevention agent or treatment agent. PMID:25431127

  18. Sulforaphane Regulates NFE2L2/Nrf2-Dependent Xenobiotic Metabolism Phase II and Phase III Enzymes Differently in Human Colorectal Cancer and Untransformed Epithelial Colon Cells.

    PubMed

    Lubelska, Katarzyna; Wiktorska, Katarzyna; Mielczarek, Lidia; Milczarek, Małgorzata; Zbroińska-Bregisz, Ilona; Chilmonczyk, Zdzisław

    2016-01-01

    Sulforaphane (SFN), a naturally occurring chemopreventive and anticancer agent, is a nuclear factor, erythroid 2-like 2 (NFE2L2/Nrf2) inducer. Nrf2 plays a critical role in coordinating the cell defense system by initiating the transcription of cytoprotective genes, including detoxification enzymes such as NAD(P)H quinone dehydrogenase 1 (NQO1) and transport proteins such as ATP-binding cassette, subfamily C (CFTR/MRP). Recently, the essential role of Nrf2 in tumor development and progression and in the development of multidrug resistance in cancer cells has been highlighted. The aim of this study was to compare the effect of SFN on the Nrf2 system and the Nrf2-target enzymes NQO1 and MRP in human untransformed epithelial colon CRL-1790 cells and in HT-29 and Caco-2 colorectal cancer cells to elucidate the role of SFN in cancer prevention and treatment. We have demonstrated that SFN has excellent cytoprotective properties in CRL-1790 cells, as it induced Nrf2-dependent expression of MRP1 and NQO1. SFN induced Nrf2 target enzyme activity in HT-29 and Caco-2 cancer cells but regulated the Nrf2/ARE signaling pathway differently in cancer and untransformed cells.

  19. Chemoprevention of bladder cancer.

    PubMed

    Kamat, Ashish M; Lamm, Donald L

    2002-02-01

    The data presented herein, although highly supportive for a protective role of various nutrients against bladder cancer, are far from definitive. Many authorities question the validity of current recommendations for nutritional chemoprevention against bladder cancer. The reason for the wide variations reported in epidemiologic studies lies in the nature of observational studies. Dietary studies are limited in their conclusions because the protection afforded by the consumption of a particular nutrient may be multifactorial, with different components of the food exerting potential chemopreventive effects. Furthermore, measuring levels of nutrients in the food intake of populations is confounded by factors that might affect these levels and also the incidence of cancer. For example, vitamin A can come from animal or vegetarian sources. Because animal fat has been identified as a potential carcinogen in man, depending on the source of the vitamin, varying levels of protection might be deduced. In addition, chemoprevention studies using dietary supplements are expected to have mild effects, and large studies would be required to confirm statistical significance. Even with agents such as intravesical chemotherapy, only half the studies achieve statistical significance [29]. Prospective randomized trials with a large sample size, longer follow-up, and an extended duration of treatment are needed to clarify the association between micronutrients and cancer protection. With these caveats in mind, several recommendations can be made. Simple measures, such as drinking more fluids (especially water), can have a profound impact on the incidence of bladder cancer. Vitamins are being extensively studied in chemopreventive trials for different cancers. There is strong evidence for a chemoprotective effect of vitamin A in bladder cancer. The authors recommend 32,000 IU/day of vitamin A initially, with lower doses (24,000 IU) for persons less than 50 kg. Because liver toxicity is a

  20. Chemoprevention for advanced CR neoplasia.

    PubMed

    Moshkowitz, Menachem; Shapira, Shiran; Arber, Nadir

    2011-08-01

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) is a major health concern worldwide. In 2011 1,200,000 new cases are predicted and half of them are going to die from the disease. CRC carcinogenesis is a multi-step process that spans over 10-20 years, providing a window of opportunity for effective intervention. CRC can be prevented by life style modification and screening program. However, although these strategies are standard clinical practice, their impact is limited due to low adherence. The number of deaths due to CRC remains alarming high, and makes CRC prevention a paramount. Chemoprevention interferes with the carcinogenesis process by targeting key molecular pathways. It involves the use of a variety of natural or chemical compounds that can delay, prevent or even reverse the adenoma to carcinoma sequence. Numerous chemopreventive agents have been studied but the most efficient are the NSAID group of agents. Much of their efficacy and toxicity has been attributed to their potent inhibition of the cyclooxygenase (COX) enzymes. Chemoprevention has the potential to represent a cost-effective intervention, particularly when targeted at intermediate-risk populations, ages 61-70, following polypectomy. Chemoprevention in this setting is as very important as polyp recurrence in this population can be as high as 50%, even with surveillance colonoscopy every 1-3 years. The most challenging task is to find the proper place for these interventions in the entire effort of general wellbeing. Subjects are likely to be more adherent to prescribed regimens if cancer prevention may be combined with a cardiovascular and Alzheimer prophylaxis. Subjects with a normal colon or non advanced adenomas can be safely monitored with surveillance colonoscopy every 5-10 years. The ideal chemopreventive agent remains to be discovered with great emphasis on the need not to harm. Possibly, combinations of agents will maximize effectiveness while limiting drug toxicity. Finally, personalized approaches would

  1. Dietary derived compounds in cancer chemoprevention

    PubMed Central

    Rzeski, Wojciech

    2012-01-01

    Cancer chemoprevention is defined as the application of natural or synthetic agents to suppress or reverse cancer development and progression. In this field especially diet derived compounds have recently attracted researchers’ attention as potential therapeutics generally exerting low toxicity compared with regular drugs. This review presents a survey of recent findings concerning the most promising dietary chemopreventive agents such as green tea polyphenols (i.e. catechins), long-chain polyunsaturated fatty acids, carotenoids, glucosinolates/isothiocyanates, vitamins (i.e. vitamin D and folate) and minerals (i.e. calcium and selenium). Molecular targets involved in intrinsic pathways affected by these natural compounds are also shortly discussed. PMID:23788916

  2. Sulforaphane induces phase II detoxication enzymes in mouse skin and prevents mutagenesis induced by a mustard gas analog.

    PubMed

    Abel, E L; Boulware, S; Fields, T; McIvor, E; Powell, K L; DiGiovanni, J; Vasquez, K M; MacLeod, M C

    2013-02-01

    Mustard gas, used in chemical warfare since 1917, is a mutagenic and carcinogenic agent that produces severe dermal lesions for which there are no effective therapeutics; it is currently seen as a potential terrorist threat to civilian populations. Sulforaphane, found in cruciferous vegetables, is known to induce enzymes that detoxify compounds such as the sulfur mustards that react through electrophilic intermediates. Here, we observe that a single topical treatment with sulforaphane induces mouse epidermal levels of the regulatory subunit of glutamate-cysteine ligase, the rate-limiting enzyme in glutathione biosynthesis, and also increases epidermal levels of reduced glutathione. Furthermore, a glutathione S-transferase, GSTA4, is also induced in mouse skin by sulforaphane. In an in vivo model in which mice are given a single mutagenic application of the sulfur mustard analog 2-(chloroethyl) ethyl sulfide (CEES), we now show that therapeutic treatment with sulforaphane abolishes the CEES-induced increase in mutation frequency in the skin, measured four days after exposure. Sulforaphane, a natural product currently in clinical trials, shows promise as an effective therapeutic against mustard gas.

  3. Sulforaphane enhances the anticancer activity of taxanes against triple negative breast cancer by killing cancer stem cells.

    PubMed

    Burnett, Joseph P; Lim, Gi; Li, Yanyan; Shah, Ronak B; Lim, Rebekah; Paholak, Hayley J; McDermott, Sean P; Sun, Lichao; Tsume, Yasuhiro; Bai, Shuhua; Wicha, Max S; Sun, Duxin; Zhang, Tao

    2017-05-28

    Triple negative breast cancer (TNBC) typically exhibits rapid progression, high mortality and faster relapse rates relative to other breast cancer subtypes. In this report we examine the combination of taxanes (paclitaxel or docetaxel) with a breast cancer stem cell (CSC)-targeting agent sulforaphane for use against TNBC. We demonstrate that paclitaxel or docetaxel treatment induces IL-6 secretion and results in expansion of CSCs in TNBC cell lines. Conversely, sulforaphane is capable of preferentially eliminating CSCs, by inhibiting NF-κB p65 subunit translocation, downregulating p52 and consequent downstream transcriptional activity. Sulforaphane also reverses taxane-induced aldehyde dehydrogenase-positive (ALDH+) cell enrichment, and dramatically reduces the size and number of primary and secondary mammospheres formed. In vivo in an advanced treatment orthotopic mouse xenograft model together with extreme limiting dilution analysis (ELDA), the combination of docetaxel and sulforaphane exhibits a greater reduction in primary tumor volume and significantly reduces secondary tumor formation relative to either treatment alone. These results suggest that treatment of TNBCs with cytotoxic chemotherapy would be greatly benefited by the addition of sulforaphane to prevent expansion of and eliminate breast CSCs.

  4. Resveratrol analogs: promising chemopreventive agents.

    PubMed

    Ogas, Talysa; Kondratyuk, Tamara P; Pezzuto, John M

    2013-07-01

    Although resveratrol can modulate multiple stages of carcinogenesis, by most common standards it is not a good drug candidate. Resveratrol lacks potency, high efficacy, and target specificity; it is rapidly metabolized and serum concentrations are low. Using resveratrol as a scaffold, we produced over 100 derivatives, some of which have target specificity in the nanomolar range. Aromatase inhibition was enhanced over 6000-fold by using 1,3-thiazole as the central ring of resveratrol. Optimizing the substitution pattern of the two phenyl rings and the central heterocyclic linker led to selective QR1 induction with a CD value of 87 nM. Several derivatives have been selected for evaluation of synergistic effects. Preliminary results with pairs of compounds are promising and further experiments, in a constant multidrug manner, will allow us to create polygonograms for larger combinations of derivatives. The objective is to develop a highly efficacious cocktail of derivatives based on the structure of resveratrol.

  5. Nrf2 and NF-κB modulation by sulforaphane counteracts multiple manifestations of diabetic neuropathy in rats and high glucose-induced changes.

    PubMed

    Negi, Geeta; Kumar, Ashutosh; Sharma, Shyam S

    2011-11-01

    High glucose driven reactive oxygen intermediates production and inflammatory damage are recognized contributors of nerve dysfunction and subsequent damage in diabetic neuropathy. Sulforaphane, a known chemotherapeutic agent holds a promise for diabetic neuropathy because of its dual antioxidant and anti-inflammatory activities. The present study investigated the effect of sulforaphane in streptozotocin (STZ) induced diabetic neuropathy in rats. For in vitro experiments neuro2a cells were incubated with sulforaphane in the presence of normal (5.5 mM) and high glucose (30 mM). For in vivo studies, sulforaphane (0.5 and 1 mg/kg) was administered six weeks post diabetes induction for two weeks. Motor nerve conduction velocity (MNCV), nerve blood flow (NBF) and pain behavior were improved and malondialdehyde (MDA) level was reduced by sulforaphane. Antioxidant effect of sulforaphane is derived from nuclear erythroid 2-related factor 2 (Nrf2) activation as demonstrated by increased expression of Nrf2 and downstream targets hemeoxygenase-1 (HO-1) and NAD(P)H:quinone oxidoreductase 1 (NQO-1) in neuro2a cells and sciatic nerve of diabetic animals. Nuclear factor-kappa B (NF-κB) inhibition seemed to be responsible for antiinflammatory activity of sulforaphane as there was reduction in NF-κB expression and IκB kinase (IKK) phosphorylation along with abrogation of inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) and cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) expression and tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) and interleukine-6 (IL-6) levels. Here in this study we provide an evidence that sulforaphane is effective in reversing the various deficits in experimental diabetic neuropathy. This study supports the defensive role of Nrf2 in neurons under conditions of oxidative stress and also suggests that the NF-κB pathway is an important modulator of inflammatory damage in diabetic neuropathy.

  6. Spectroscopic characterization of lycopene extract from Lycopersicum esculentum (Tomato) and its evaluation as a chemopreventive agent against experimental hepatocarcinogenesis in mice.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Prachi; Bansal, Mohinder Pal; Koul, Ashwani

    2013-03-01

    The present study was designed to characterize the lycopene extract (LycT) prepared from tomatoes (Lycopersicum esculentum) and then to evaluate its chemopreventive efficacy in N-diethylnitrosamine (NDEA)-induced experimental hepatocarcinogenesis in female Balb/c mice. The extraction of lycopene was carried out using hexane/acetone/ethanol as an extracting medium and then characterized by ultraviolet-visible, nuclear magnetic resonance and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy. Chemopreventive efficacy of characterized LycT in vivo was evaluated in terms of hepatic tumour incidence, multiplicity, burden, hepatosomatic index and animal survival rate. Results indicated that average lycopene content of the tomato was 11.6-14 mg/kg tomato weight. Spectroscopic data confirmed the structural characteristics of lycopene in the extract. In the animal study, reduction in tumour incidence (42.05%), tumour burden (1.39) and tumour multiplicity (3.42) was observed upon LycT pretreatment to NDEA-treated animals. Histopathological analysis unravelled that the increased survival rate in LycT + NDEA-treated animals was due to the delay in the formation of aggressive tumour nodules. These observations indicate that lycopene seems to be an able candidate for chemoprevention in hepatocarcinogenesis resulting from NDEA insults.

  7. Effects of co-treatment with sulforaphane and autophagy modulators on uridine 5′-diphospho-glucuronosyltransferase 1A isoforms and cytochrome P450 3A4 expression in Caco-2 human colon cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    WANG, MIN; ZHU, JING-YU; CHEN, SHUO; QING, YING; WU, DONG; LIN, YING-MIN; LUO, JI-ZHUANG; HAN, WEI; LI, YAN-QING

    2014-01-01

    Sulforaphane (SFN), which is highly enriched in cruciferous vegetables, has been investigated for its cancer chemopreventive properties and ability to induce autophagy. Uridine 5′-diphospho (UDP)-glucuronosyltransferase (UGT)1A induction is one of the mechanisms that is responsible for the cancer chemopreventive activity of SFN. The current study demonstrates that rapamycin may enhance the chemopreventive effects of SFN on Caco-2 cells; this may be partially attributed to nuclear translocation of nuclear factor erythroid 2-related factor 2 (Nrf2)- and human pregnane X receptor (hPXR)-mediated UGT1A1, UGT1A8 and UGT1A10 induction. These results indicate that targeting autophagy modulation may be a promising strategy for increasing the chemopreventive effects of SFN in cases of colon cancer. PMID:25364403

  8. Toward the development of chemoprevention agents. Part II: Chemo-enzymatic synthesis and anti-inflammatory activities of a new class of 5-amino-2-substitutedphenyl-1,3-dioxacycloalkanes.

    PubMed

    Gu, Keli; Bi, Lanrong; Zhao, Ming; Wang, Chao; Ju, Jingfang; Peng, Shiqi

    2007-09-15

    A new series of optically pure 5-amino-2-substitutedphenyl-1,3-dioxacycloalkanes were designed and synthesized via a chemo-enzymatic combined method to develop new chemoprevention agents. Twenty-four of newly synthesized compounds significantly inhibited xylene-induced rat ear edema and exhibited comparable or better anti-inflammatory activities than the reference drug aspirin. Treatment of these anti-inflammatory agents did not prolong the tail bleeding time in rat. In addition, 5-amino-2-substitutedphenyl-1,3-dioxacycloalkanes exhibited good membrane permeability based on in vitro Caco-2 cell monolayer permeability assay. Furthermore, some preliminary structure-activity relationships were further analyzed among these compounds. Taken together, 5-amino-2-substitutedphenyl-1,3-dioxacycloalkanes may represent a new class of anti-inflammatory drugs with safer pharmacological profile.

  9. Implications of cancer stem cell theory for cancer chemoprevention by natural dietary compounds.

    PubMed

    Li, Yanyan; Wicha, Max S; Schwartz, Steven J; Sun, Duxin

    2011-09-01

    The emergence of cancer stem cell theory has profound implications for cancer chemoprevention and therapy. Cancer stem cells give rise to the tumor bulk through continuous self-renewal and differentiation. Understanding the mechanisms that regulate self-renewal is of greatest importance for discovery of anticancer drugs targeting cancer stem cells. Naturally occurring dietary compounds have received increasing attention in cancer chemoprevention. The anticancer effects of many dietary components have been reported for both in vitro and in vivo studies. Recently, a number of studies have found that several dietary compounds can directly or indirectly affect cancer stem cell self-renewal pathways. Herein we review the current knowledge of most common natural dietary compounds for their impact on self-renewal pathways and potential effect against cancer stem cells. Three pathways (Wnt/β-catenin, Hedgehog and Notch) are summarized for their functions in self-renewal of cancer stem cells. The dietary compounds, including curcumin, sulforaphane, soy isoflavone, epigallocatechin-3-gallate, resveratrol, lycopene, piperine and vitamin D(3), are discussed for their direct or indirect effect on these self-renewal pathways. Curcumin and piperine have been demonstrated to target breast cancer stem cells. Sulforaphane has been reported to inhibit pancreatic tumor-initiating cells and breast cancer stem cells. These studies provide a basis for preclinical and clinical evaluation of dietary compounds for chemoprevention of cancer stem cells. This may enable us to discover more preventive strategies for cancer management by reducing cancer resistance and recurrence and improving patient survival.

  10. Natural Products for Chemoprevention of Breast Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Ko, Eun-Yi; Moon, Aree

    2015-01-01

    Breast cancer is the primary cause of cancer death in women. Although current therapies have shown some promise against breast cancer, there is still no effective cure for the majority of patients in the advanced stages of breast cancer. Development of effective agents to slow, reduce, or reverse the incidence of breast cancer in high-risk women is necessary. Chemoprevention of breast cancer by natural products is advantageous, as these compounds have few side effects and low toxicity compared to synthetic compounds. In the present review, we summarize natural products which exert chemopreventive activities against breast cancer, such as curcumin, sauchinone, lycopene, denbinobin, genipin, capsaicin, and ursolic acid. This review examines the current knowledge about natural compounds and their mechanisms that underlie breast cancer chemopreventive activity both in vitro and in vivo. The present review may provide information on the use of these compounds for the prevention of breast cancer. PMID:26734584

  11. Breast Cancer Profile among Patients with a History of Chemoprevention

    PubMed Central

    Pivo, Sarah; Refinetti, Ana Paula; Guth, Amber

    2016-01-01

    Purpose. This study identifies women with breast cancer who utilized chemoprevention agents prior to diagnosis and describes their patterns of disease. Methods. Our database was queried retrospectively for patients with breast cancer who reported prior use of chemoprevention. Patients were divided into primary (no history of breast cancer) and secondary (previous history of breast cancer) groups and compared to patients who never took chemoprevention. Results. 135 (6%) of 2430 women used chemoprevention. In the primary chemoprevention group (n = 18, 1%), 39% had completed >5 years of treatment, and fully 50% were on treatment at time of diagnosis. These patients were overwhelmingly diagnosed with ER/PR positive cancers (88%/65%) and were diagnosed with equal percentages (44%) of IDC and DCIS. 117 (87%) used secondary chemoprevention. Patients in this group were diagnosed with earlier stage disease and had lower rates of ER/PR-positivity (73%/65%) than the nonchemoprevention group (84%/72%). In the secondary group, 24% were on chemoprevention at time of diagnosis; 73% had completed >5 years of treatment. Conclusions. The majority of patients who used primary chemoprevention had not completed treatment prior to diagnosis, suggesting that the timing of initiation and compliance to prevention strategies are important in defining the pattern of disease in these patients. PMID:28078143

  12. Sulforaphane inhibits CYP1A1 activity and promotes genotoxicity induced by 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin in vitro

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, Fangxing; Zhuang, Shulin; Zhang, Chao; Dai, Heping; Liu, Weiping

    2013-06-15

    Increasing environmental pollution by carcinogens such as some of persistent organic pollutants (POPs) has prompted growing interest in searching for chemopreventive compounds which are readily obtainable. Sulforaphane (SFN) is isolated from cruciferous vegetables and has the potentials to reduce carcinogenesis through various pathways. In this study, we studied the effects of SFN on CYP1A1 activity and genotoxicity induced by 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD). The results showed that SFN inhibited TCDD-induced CYP1A1 activity in H4IIE cells by directly inhibiting CYP1A1 activity, probably through binding to aryl hydrocarbon receptor and/or CYP1A1 revealed by molecular docking. However, SFN promoted TCDD-induced DNA damage in yeast cells and reduced the viability of initiated yeast cells. Besides, it is surprising that SFN also failed to reduce genotoxicity induced by other genotoxic reagents which possess different mechanisms to lead to DNA damage. Currently, it is difficult to predict whether SFN has the potentials to reduce the risk of TCDD based on the conflicting observations in the study. Therefore, further studies should be urgent to reveal the function and mechanism of SFN in the stress of such POPs on human health. - Highlights: • Sulforaphane inhibited TCDD-induced CYP1A1 activity in H4IIE cells. • Sulforaphane may bind to aryl hydrocarbon receptor and/or CYP1A1. • Sulforaphane promoted TCDD-induced DNA damage in yeast cells. • Sulforaphane may promote DNA damage by DNA strand breaks or DNA alkylation.

  13. Sarcophine-Diol, a Skin Cancer Chemopreventive Agent, Inhibits Proliferation and Stimulates Apoptosis in Mouse Melanoma B16F10 Cell Line

    PubMed Central

    Szymanski, Pawel T.; Kuppast, Bhimanna; Ahmed, Safwat A.; Khalifa, Sherief; Fahmy, Hesham

    2011-01-01

    Sarcodiol (SD) is a semi-synthetic derivative of sarcophine, a marine natural product. In our previous work, we reported the significant chemopreventive effects of SD against non-melanoma skin cancer both in vitro and in vivo mouse models. In this investigation, we extended this work to study the effect of sarcodiol on melanoma development, the more deadly form of skin cancer, using the mouse melanoma B16F10 cell line. In this study we report that SD inhibits the de novo DNA synthesis and enhances fragmentation of DNA. We also evaluated the antitumor effect of SD on melanoma cell viability using several biomarkers for cell proliferation and apoptosis. SD inhibits the expression levels of signal transducers and activators of transcription protein (STAT-3) and cyclin D1, an activator of cyclin-dependent kinase 4 (Cdk4). SD treatment also enhances cellular level of tumor suppressor protein 53 (p53) and stimulates cleavage of the nuclear poly (ADP-ribose) polymerase (cleaved-PARP). SD also enhances cellular levels of cleaved Caspase-3, -8, -9 and stimulates enzymatic activities of Caspase-3, -8 and -9. These results, in addition to inhibition of cell viability, suggest that SD inhibits melanoma cell proliferation by arresting the cell-division cycle in a Go quiescent phase and activates programmed cell death (apoptosis) via extrinsic and intrinsic pathways. Finally, these studies demonstrate that SD shows a very promising chemopreventive effect in melanoma B16F10 tumor cells. PMID:22363217

  14. Sarcophine-diol, a skin cancer chemopreventive agent, inhibits proliferation and stimulates apoptosis in mouse melanoma B₁₆F₁₀ cell line.

    PubMed

    Szymanski, Pawel T; Kuppast, Bhimanna; Ahmed, Safwat A; Khalifa, Sherief; Fahmy, Hesham

    2012-01-01

    Sarcodiol (SD) is a semi-synthetic derivative of sarcophine, a marine natural product. In our previous work, we reported the significant chemopreventive effects of SD against non-melanoma skin cancer both in vitro and in vivo mouse models. In this investigation, we extended this work to study the effect of sarcodiol on melanoma development, the more deadly form of skin cancer, using the mouse melanoma B₁₆F₁₀ cell line. In this study we report that SD inhibits the de novo DNA synthesis and enhances fragmentation of DNA. We also evaluated the antitumor effect of SD on melanoma cell viability using several biomarkers for cell proliferation and apoptosis. SD inhibits the expression levels of signal transducers and activators of transcription protein (STAT-3) and cyclin D1, an activator of cyclin-dependent kinase 4 (Cdk4). SD treatment also enhances cellular level of tumor suppressor protein 53 (p53) and stimulates cleavage of the nuclear poly (ADP-ribose) polymerase (cleaved-PARP). SD also enhances cellular levels of cleaved Caspase-3, -8, -9 and stimulates enzymatic activities of Caspase-3, -8 and -9. These results, in addition to inhibition of cell viability, suggest that SD inhibits melanoma cell proliferation by arresting the cell-division cycle in a Go quiescent phase and activates programmed cell death (apoptosis) via extrinsic and intrinsic pathways. Finally, these studies demonstrate that SD shows a very promising chemopreventive effect in melanoma B₁₆F₁₀ tumor cells.

  15. Pancreatic Cancer Chemoprevention Translational Workshop: Meeting Report.

    PubMed

    Miller, Mark Steven; Allen, Peter; Brentnall, Teresa A; Goggins, Michael; Hruban, Ralph H; Petersen, Gloria M; Rao, Chinthalapally V; Whitcomb, David C; Brand, Randall E; Chari, Suresh T; Klein, Alison P; Lubman, David M; Rhim, Andrew D; Simeone, Diane M; Wolpin, Brian M; Umar, Asad; Srivastava, Sudhir; Steele, Vernon E; Rinaudo, Jo Ann S

    2016-09-01

    Pancreatic cancer is the fourth leading cause of cancer related deaths in the United States with a 5-year survival rate of less than 10%. The Division of Cancer Prevention of the National Cancer Institute sponsored the Pancreatic Cancer Chemoprevention Translational Workshop on September 10 to 11, 2015. The goal of the workshop was to obtain information regarding the current state of the science and future scientific areas that should be prioritized for pancreatic cancer prevention research, including early detection and intervention for high-risk precancerous lesions. The workshop addressed the molecular/genetic landscape of pancreatic cancer and precursor lesions, high-risk populations and criteria to identify a high-risk population for potential chemoprevention trials, identification of chemopreventative/immunopreventative agents, and use of potential biomarkers and imaging for assessing short-term efficacy of a preventative agent. The field of chemoprevention for pancreatic cancer is emerging, and this workshop was organized to begin to address these important issues and promote multi-institutional efforts in this area. The meeting participants recommended the development of an National Cancer Institute working group to coordinate efforts, provide a framework, and identify opportunities for chemoprevention of pancreatic cancer.

  16. Optimizing thiadiazole analogues of resveratrol versus three chemopreventive targets.

    PubMed

    Mayhoub, Abdelrahman S; Marler, Laura; Kondratyuk, Tamara P; Park, Eun-Jung; Pezzuto, John M; Cushman, Mark

    2012-01-01

    Chemoprevention is an approach to decrease cancer morbidity and mortality through inhibition of carcinogenesis and prevention of disease progression. Although the trans stilbene derivative resveratrol has chemopreventive properties, its action is compromised by weak non-specific effects on many biological targets. Replacement of the stilbene ethylenic bridge of resveratrol with a 1,2,4-thiadiazole heterocycle and modification of the substituents on the two aromatic rings afforded potential chemopreventive agents with enhanced potencies and selectivities when evaluated as inhibitors of aromatase and NF-κB and inducers of quinone reductase 1 (QR1).

  17. The Role of Sulforaphane in Epigenetic Mechanisms, Including Interdependence between Histone Modification and DNA Methylation

    PubMed Central

    Kaufman-Szymczyk, Agnieszka; Majewski, Grzegorz; Lubecka-Pietruszewska, Katarzyna; Fabianowska-Majewska, Krystyna

    2015-01-01

    Carcinogenesis as well as cancer progression result from genetic and epigenetic changes of the genome that leads to dysregulation of transcriptional activity of genes. Epigenetic mechanisms in cancer cells comprise (i) post-translation histone modification (i.e., deacetylation and methylation); (ii) DNA global hypomethylation; (iii) promoter hypermethylation of tumour suppressor genes and genes important for cell cycle regulation, cell differentiation and apoptosis; and (iv) posttranscriptional regulation of gene expression by noncoding microRNA. These epigenetic aberrations can be readily reversible and responsive to both synthetic agents and natural components of diet. A source of one of such diet components are cruciferous vegetables, which contain high levels of a number of glucosinolates and deliver, after enzymatic hydrolysis, sulforaphane and other bioactive isothiocyanates, that are involved in effective up-regulation of transcriptional activity of certain genes and also in restoration of active chromatin structure. Thus a consumption of cruciferous vegetables, treated as a source of isothiocyanates, seems to be potentially useful as an effective cancer preventive factor or as a source of nutrients improving efficacy of standard chemotherapies. In this review an attempt is made to elucidate the role of sulforaphane in regulation of gene promoter activity through a direct down-regulation of histone deacetylase activity and alteration of gene promoter methylation in indirect ways, but the sulforaphane influence on non-coding micro-RNA will not be a subject of this review. PMID:26703571

  18. Sulforaphane synergistically enhances the cytotoxicity of arsenic trioxide in multiple myeloma cells via stress-mediated pathways

    PubMed Central

    DOUDICAN, NICOLE A.; WEN, SHIH YA; MAZUMDER, AMITABHA; ORLOW, SETH J.

    2012-01-01

    Persistent paraprotein production in plasma cells necessitates a highly developed rough endoplasmic reticulum (ER) that is unusually susceptible to perturbations in protein synthesis. This biology is believed to account for the exquisite sensitivity of multiple myeloma (MM) to the proteasomal inhibitor bortezomib (BTZ). Despite remarkable response rates to BTZ in MM, BTZ carries the potential for serious side-effects and development of resistance. We, therefore, sought to identify therapeutic combinations that effectively disrupt proteostasis in order to provide new potential treatments for MM. We found that sulforaphane, a dietary isothiocyanate found in cruciferous vegetables, inhibits TNFα-induced Iκβ proteasomal degradation in a manner similar to BTZ. Like BTZ, sulforaphane synergistically enhances the cytotoxicity of arsenic trioxide (ATO), an agent with clinical activity in MM. ATO and sulforaphane co-treatment augmented apoptotic induction as demonstrated by cleavage of caspase-3, -4 and PARP. The enhanced apoptotic response was dependent upon production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) as demonstrated by glutathione depletion and partial inhibition of the apoptotic cascade after pretreatment with the radical scavenger N-acetyl-cysteine (NAC). Combination treatment resulted in enhanced ER stress signaling and activation of the unfolded protein response (UPR), indicative of perturbation of proteostasis. Specifically, combination treatment caused elevated expression of the molecular chaperone HSP90 (heat shock protein 90) along with increased PERK (protein kinase RNA-like endoplasmic reticulum kinase) and eIF2α phosphorylation and XBP1 (X-box binding protein 1) splicing, key indicators of UPR activation. Moreover, increased splicing of XBP1 was apparent upon combination treatment compared to treatment with either agent alone. Sulforaphane in combination with ATO effectively disrupts protein homeostasis through ROS generation and induction of ER stress to

  19. Comet Assay in Cancer Chemoprevention.

    PubMed

    Santoro, Raffaela; Ferraiuolo, Maria; Morgano, Gian Paolo; Muti, Paola; Strano, Sabrina

    2016-01-01

    The comet assay can be useful in monitoring DNA damage in single cells caused by exposure to genotoxic agents, such as those causing air, water, and soil pollution (e.g., pesticides, dioxins, electromagnetic fields) and chemo- and radiotherapy in cancer patients, or in the assessment of genoprotective effects of chemopreventive molecules. Therefore, it has particular importance in the fields of pharmacology and toxicology, and in both environmental and human biomonitoring. It allows the detection of single strand breaks as well as double-strand breaks and can be used in both normal and cancer cells. Here we describe the alkali method for comet assay, which allows to detect both single- and double-strand DNA breaks.

  20. D, L-Sulforaphane Loaded Fe3O4@ Gold Core Shell Nanoparticles: A Potential Sulforaphane Delivery System

    PubMed Central

    Kheiri Manjili, Hamidreza; Ma’mani, Leila; Tavaddod, Sharareh; Mashhadikhan, Maedeh; Shafiee, Abbas; Naderi-Manesh, Hossein

    2016-01-01

    A novel design of gold-coated iron oxide nanoparticles was fabricated as a potential delivery system to improve the efficiency and stability of d, l-sulforaphane as an anticancer drug. To this purpose, the surface of gold-coated iron oxide nanoparticles was modified for sulforaphane delivery via furnishing its surface with thiolated polyethylene glycol-folic acid and thiolated polyethylene glycol-FITC. The synthesized nanoparticles were characterized by different techniques such as FTIR, energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy, UV-visible spectroscopy, scanning and transmission electron microscopy. The average diameters of the synthesized nanoparticles before and after sulforaphane loading were obtained ∼ 33 nm and ∼ 38 nm, respectively, when ∼ 2.8 mmol/g of sulforaphane was loaded. The result of cell viability assay which was confirmed by apoptosis assay on the human breast cancer cells (MCF-7 line) as a model of in vitro-cancerous cells, proved that the bare nanoparticles showed little inherent cytotoxicity, whereas the sulforaphane-loaded nanoparticles were cytotoxic. The expression rate of the anti-apoptotic genes (bcl-2 and bcl-xL), and the pro-apoptotic genes (bax and bak) were quantified, and it was found that the expression rate of bcl-2 and bcl-xL genes significantly were decreased when MCF-7 cells were incubated by sulforaphane-loaded nanoparticles. The sulforaphane-loaded into the designed gold-coated iron oxide nanoparticles, acceptably induced apoptosis in MCF-7 cells. PMID:26982588

  1. Sulforaphane suppresses EMT and metastasis in human lung cancer through miR-616-5p-mediated GSK3β/β-catenin signaling pathways

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Da-xuan; Zou, Yu-jiao; Zhuang, Xi-bin; Chen, Shu-xing; Lin, Yong; Li, Wen-lan; Lin, Jun-jin; Lin, Zhi-qiang

    2017-01-01

    Sulforaphane is a common antioxidant selectively abundant in cruciferous plants, which exhibits effective anti-cancer actions in control of tumorigenesis or progression of various cancers. A recent study has shown that sulforaphane attenuates the EGFR signaling pathway in non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC), suggesting its potential anti-metastatic effects. In this study we assessed the involvement of sulforaphane and miR-616-5p in epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) and NSCLC metastasis. Sulforaphane suppressed the cell proliferation in human NSCLC cell lines H1299, 95C and 95D with IC50 values of 9.52±1.23, 9.04±1.90 and 17.35±2.03 μmol/L, respectively. At low concentrations (1–5 μmol/L), sulforaphane dose-dependently inhibited the migration and invasion of 95D and H1299 cells with relatively high metastatic potential. The anti-metastatic action of sulforaphane was confirmed in 95D and H1299 cell xenografts in vivo. In fresh NSCLC tissue samples from 179 patients, miR-616-5p levels were upregulated in late-stage NSCLCs, and strongly correlated with risk of NSCLC recurrence and metastasis. Consistent with the clinic observation, miR-616-5p levels in the 3 NSCLC cell lines were correlated with their metastatic ability, and were decreased by sulforaphane treatment. Silencing miR-616-5p markedly suppressed the migration and invasion of 95D cells in vitro and NSCLC metastasis in vivo. Further studies revealed that miR-616-5p directly targeted GSK3β and decreased its expression, whereas sulforaphane decreased miR-616-5p levels by histone modification, and followed by inactivation of the GSK3β/β-catenin signaling pathway and inhibition of EMT, which was characterized by loss of epithelial markers and acquisition of a mesenchymal phenotype in NSCLC cells. Our findings suggest that sulforaphane is a potential adjuvant chemotherapeutic agent for the prevention of NSCLC recurrence and metastasis, and miR-616-5p can be clinically utilized as a biomarker or

  2. Chemoprevention of Gastrointestinal Cancer: The Reality and the Dream

    PubMed Central

    Chun, Kyung-Soo; Kim, Eun-Hee; Lee, Sooyeon

    2013-01-01

    Despite substantial progress in screening, early diagnosis, and the development of noninvasive technology, gastrointestinal (GI) cancer remains a major cause of cancer-associated mortality. Chemoprevention is thought to be a realistic approach for reducing the global burden of GI cancer, and efforts have been made to search for chemopreventive agents that suppress acid reflux, GI inflammation and the eradication of Helicobacter pylori. Thus, proton pump inhibitors, statins, monoclonal antibodies targeting tumor necrosis factor-alpha, and nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory agents have been investigated for their potential to prevent GI cancer. Besides the development of these synthetic agents, a wide variety of the natural products present in a plant-based diet, which are commonly called phytoceuticals, have also sparked hope for the chemoprevention of GI cancer. To perform successful searches of chemopreventive agents for GI cancer, it is of the utmost importance to understand the factors contributing to GI carcinogenesis. Emerging evidence has highlighted the role of chronic inflammation in inducing genomic instability and telomere shortening and affecting polyamine metabolism and DNA repair, which may help in the search for new chemopreventive agents for GI cancer. PMID:23560148

  3. Cancer chemoprevention using natural vitamin D and synthetic analogs.

    PubMed

    Guyton, K Z; Kensler, T W; Posner, G H

    2001-01-01

    Substantial epidemiologic data support a role for vitamin D in cancer prevention. However, dose-limiting hypercalcemic effects have proved a major obstacle to the development of natural vitamin D as a cancer chemopreventive. Structure-activity studies have sought to disassociate the toxicities and chemopreventive activities of vitamin D, and a number of synthetic deltanoids (vitamin D analogs) have shown considerable promise in this regard. Several such compounds have chemopreventive efficacy in preclinical studies, as does natural vitamin D. Data supporting further development of agents of this class include in vitro and in vivo evidence of antiproliferative, proapoptotic, prodifferentiating and antiangiogenic activities. Ongoing studies are aimed at further defining the molecular mechanisms through which vitamin D and synthetic deltanoids affect gene expression and cellular fate. Additional efforts are focused on establishing the chemopreventive index (efficacy vs toxicity) of each synthetic deltanoid.

  4. Endoplasmic reticulum stress mediates sulforaphane-induced apoptosis of HepG2 human hepatocellular carcinoma cells.

    PubMed

    Zou, Xiang; Qu, Zhongyuan; Fang, Yueni; Shi, Xin; Ji, Yubin

    2017-01-01

    Sulforaphane (SFN) is a naturally occurring chemopreventive agent, which effectively inhibits proliferation of HepG2 human hepatocellular carcinoma cells via mitochondria‑mediated apoptosis. Endoplasmic reticulum stress is considered the most important cause of cell apoptosis; therefore, the present study aimed to determine whether the endoplasmic reticulum pathway was involved in SFN-induced apoptosis of HepG2 cells. An MTT assay was used to detect the inhibitory effects of SFN on HepG2 cells. Fluorescence microscopy was used to observe the morphological changes in apoptotic cells, and western blot analysis was conducted to detect the expression of binding immunoglobulin protein (Bip)/glucose-regulated protein 78 (GRP78), X‑box binding protein‑1 (XBP‑1) and BH3 interacting domain death agonist (Bid). Furthermore, flow cytometry was used to determine the apoptotic rate of HepG2 cells, and the protein expression of C/EBP homologous protein (CHOP)/growth arrest‑ and DNA damage‑inducible gene 153 (GADD153) and caspase-12 in HepG2 cells. The results indicated that SFN significantly inhibited the proliferation of HepG2 cells; the half maximal inhibitory concentration values were 32.03±0.96, 20.90±1.96 and 13.87±0.44 µmol/l, following treatment with SFN for 24, 48 and 72 h, respectively. Following 48 h of SFN treatment (10, 20 and 40 µmol/l), the apoptotic rates of HepG2 cells were 31.8, 61.3 and 77.1%, respectively. Furthermore, after 48 h of exposure to SFN, the cells presented typical morphological alterations of apoptosis, as detected under fluorescence microscopy. Treatment with SFN for 48 h also significantly upregulated the protein expression levels of Bip/GRP78, XBP‑1, caspase‑12, CHOP/GADD153 and Bid in HepG2 cells. In conclusion, endoplasmic reticulum stress may be considered the most important mechanism underlying SFN-induced apoptosis in HepG2 cells.

  5. 17β-Estradiol enhances sulforaphane cardioprotection against oxidative stress.

    PubMed

    Angeloni, Cristina; Teti, Gabriella; Barbalace, Maria Cristina; Malaguti, Marco; Falconi, Mirella; Hrelia, Silvana

    2017-01-12

    The lower incidence of ischemic heart disease in female with respect to male gender suggests the possibility that female sex hormones could have specific effects in cardiovascular protection. 17β-Estradiol is the predominant premenopausal circulating form of estrogen and has a protective role on the cardiovascular system. Recent evidences suggest that gender can influence the response to cardiovascular medications; therefore, we hypothesized that sex hormones could also modulate the cardioprotective effects of nutraceutical compounds, such as the isothiocyanate sulforaphane, present in Brassica vegetables. This study was designed to explore the protective effects of sulforaphane in the presence of 17β-estradiol against H2O2-induced oxidative stress in primary cultures of rat cardiomyocytes. Interestingly, 17β-estradiol enhanced sulforaphane protective activity against H2O2-induced cell death with respect to sulforaphane or 17β-estradiol alone as measured by 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5diphenyl-tetrazolium bromide and lactate dehydrogenase assays. Moreover, 17β-estradiol boosted sulforaphane ability to counteract oxidative stress, reducing intracellular reactive oxygen species and 8-hydroxy-2'-deoxyguanosine levels and increasing the expression of phase II enzymes. Using specific antagonists of estrogen receptor α and β, we observed that these effects are not mediated by estrogen receptors. Otherwise, ERK1/2 and Akt signaling pathways seem to be involved, as the presence of specific inhibitors of these kinases reduced the protective effect of sulforaphane in the presence of 17β-estradiol. Sulforaphane and 17β-estradiol co-treatment counteracted cell morphology alterations induced by H2O2 as evidenced by transmission electron microscopy. Our results demonstrated, for the first time, that estrogens could enhance sulforaphane protective effects, suggesting that nutraceutical efficacy might be modulated by sex hormones.

  6. Intermediate endpoint biomarkers for lung cancer chemoprevention

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    MacAulay, Calum E.; Lam, Stephen; Klein-Parker, Helga; Gazdar, Adi; Guillaud, Martial; Payne, Peter W.; Le Riche, Jean C.; Dawe, Chris; Band, Pierre; Palcic, Branko

    1998-04-01

    Given the demographics of current and ex-smoking populations in North America, lung cancer will be a major problem in the foreseeable future. Early detection and treatment of lung cancer holds great promise for the management of this disease. Unlike cervical cancer, the physical, complete removal/destruction of all dysplastic lesions in the bronchial tree is not possible; however, treatment of the lesions using a chemopreventive agent is. Intermediate biomarkers have been used to screen promising chemopreventive agents for larger population studies. We have examined the natural history of lung cancer development by following a group of subjects at high risk of developing lung cancer using fluorescence endoscopy to identify the areas of abnormality for biopsy. Approximately 900 biopsies have been collected in this fashion and graded by at least two experienced, expert pathologists. Using an interactive version of the Cyto-Savant (Oncometrics Imaging Corp.), cytometric and tissue architectural data were collected from these biopsies. Using only the data from the normal and invasive cancer biopsies, quantitative morphometric and architectural indices were generated and calculated for all the collected biopsies. These indices were compared with Loss of Heterozygosity (LOH) of ten sites commonly associated with cancer. These results and the application of these quantitative measures to two small chemoprevention studies will be reported.

  7. Chemoprevention in gastrointestinal physiology and disease. Anti-inflammatory approaches for colorectal cancer chemoprevention

    PubMed Central

    Piazza, Gary A.

    2015-01-01

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) is one of the most common human malignancies and a leading cause of cancer-related deaths in developed countries. Identifying effective preventive strategies aimed at inhibiting the development and progression of CRC is critical for reducing the incidence and mortality of this malignancy. The prevention of carcinogenesis by anti-inflammatory agents including nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs), selective cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) inhibitors, and natural products is an area of considerable interest and research. Numerous anti-inflammatory agents have been identified as potential CRC chemopreventive agents but vary in their mechanism of action. This review will discuss the molecular mechanisms being studied for the CRC chemopreventive activity of NSAIDs (i.e., aspirin, sulindac, and ibuprofen), COX-2 inhibitors (i.e., celecoxib), natural products (i.e., curcumin, resveratrol, EGCG, genistein, and baicalein), and metformin. A deeper understanding of how these anti-inflammatory agents inhibit CRC will provide insight into the development of potentially safer and more effective chemopreventive drugs. PMID:26021807

  8. Tea as a potential chemopreventive agent in PhIP carcinogenesis: effects of green tea and black tea on PhIP-DNA adduct formation in female F-344 rats.

    PubMed

    Schut, H A; Yao, R

    2000-01-01

    chemopreventive agents in PhIP-induced tumorigenesis in the F-344 rat.

  9. Implications of Cancer Stem Cell Theory for Cancer Chemoprevention by Natural Dietary Compounds

    PubMed Central

    Li, Yanyan; Wicha, Max S.; Schwartz, Steven J.; Sun, Duxin

    2011-01-01

    The emergence of cancer stem cell theory has profound implications for cancer chemoprevention and therapy. Cancer stem cells give rise to the tumor bulk through continuous self-renewal and differentiation. Understanding the mechanisms that regulate self-renewal is of greatest importance for discovery of anti-cancer drugs targeting cancer stem cells. Naturally-occurring dietary compounds have received increasing attention in cancer chemoprevention. The anti-cancer effects of many dietary components have been reported for both in vitro and in vivo studies. Recently, a number of studies have found that several dietary compounds can directly or indirectly affect cancer stem cell self-renewal pathways. Herein we review the current knowledge of most common natural dietary compounds for their impact on self-renewal pathways and potential effect against cancer stem cells. Three pathways (Wnt/β-catenin, Hedgehog, and Notch) are summarized for their functions in self-renewal of cancer stem cells. The dietary compounds, including curcumin, sulforaphane, soy isoflavone, epigallocatechin-3-gallate, resveratrol, lycopene, piperine, and vitamin D3, are discussed for their direct or indirect effect on these self-renewal pathways. Curcumin and piperine have been demonstrated to target breast cancer stem cells. Sulforaphane has been reported to inhibit pancreatic tumor initiating cells and breast cancer stem cells. These studies provide a basis for preclinical and clinical evaluation of dietary compounds for chemoprevention of cancer stem cells. This may enable us to discover more preventive strategies for cancer management by reducing cancer resistance and recurrence and improving patient survival. PMID:21295962

  10. Prostate cancer chemoprevention: Current status and future prospects

    SciTech Connect

    Gupta, Sanjay

    2007-11-01

    Chemoprevention is a strategy that aims to reduce the incidence and burden of cancer through the development of agents to prevent, reverse or delay the carcinogenic process. Prostate cancer is a suitable target for prevention because it has a high incidence and prevalence, as well as a long latency and disease-related mortality, and furthermore it is a disease in which lifestyle and environmental factors may play critical roles. The development of chemoprevention strategies against prostate cancer will have a huge impact, both medically and economically. Large-scale clinical trials suggest that some agents such as selenium, lycopene, soy, green tea, vitamins D and E, anti-inflammatory and inhibitors of 5{alpha}-reductase are effective in preventing prostate cancer. Although each agent has the potential to affect the natural history of the disease, it is important to develop strategies to strategically proceed for the design and selection of test agents in order to demonstrate clinical benefit with the minimum of adverse effects. Appropriate selection of agent(s), disease stage, trial design and endpoints is critical in selecting the most promising regimens to accomplish these goals. This review highlights the present status of prostate cancer chemoprevention and discusses future prospects for chemopreventive strategies that are safe and clinically beneficial.

  11. Chemoprevention of esophageal squamous cell carcinoma

    SciTech Connect

    Stoner, Gary D. Wang Lishu; Chen Tong

    2007-11-01

    Esophageal squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) is responsible for approximately one-sixth of all cancer-related mortality worldwide. This malignancy has a multifactorial etiology involving several environmental, dietary and genetic factors. Since esophageal cancer has often metastasized at the time of diagnosis, current treatment modalities offer poor survival and cure rates. Chemoprevention offers a viable alternative that could well be effective against the disease. Clinical investigations have shown that primary chemoprevention of this disease is feasible if potent inhibitory agents are identified. The Fischer 344 (F-344) rat model of esophageal SCC has been used extensively to investigate the biology of the disease, and to identify chemopreventive agents that could be useful in human trials. Multiple compounds that inhibit tumor initiation by esophageal carcinogens have been identified using this model. These include several isothiocyanates, diallyl sulfide and polyphenolic compounds. These compounds influence the metabolic activation of esophageal carcinogens resulting in reduced genetic (DNA) damage. Recently, a few agents have been shown to inhibit the progression of preneoplastic lesions in the rat esophagus into tumors. These agents include inhibitors of inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS), cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2), vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) and c-Jun [a component of activator protein-1 (AP-1)]. Using a food-based approach to cancer prevention, we have shown that freeze-dried berry preparations inhibit both the initiation and promotion/progression stages of esophageal SCC in F-344 rats. These observations have led to a clinical trial in China to evaluate the ability of freeze-dried strawberries to influence the progression of esophageal dysplasia to SCC.

  12. Cancer chemoprevention by nuts: evidence and promises.

    PubMed

    Falasca, Marco; Casari, Ilaria

    2012-01-01

    Chemoprevention is the use of chemical compounds to interfere with the early precancerous stages of carcinogenesis and thereby reverse tumor formation. Many chemopreventive agents, either natural or synthetic, have been identified. Some of the most promising compounds are found in vegetables and fruits. There are numerous mechanisms of action by which these components can intervene in the prevention of cancer, although they have not been fully elucidated. It is worth to note that some foods contain different bioactive compounds. Therefore the possibility exists that combinations of compounds, naturally occurring in those foods, may have a cumulative or even synergistic effect. Nuts are very rich in different bioactive compounds whose anti-cancer properties have already been described. Epidemiologic studies have already suggested that nuts consumption may be potentially beneficial in the incidence of other diseases, such as coronary heart disease and diabetes. Although the results are not conclusive, recent studies show possible cancer protective effects of nuts. This review will focus on the laboratory and clinical evidence of nuts chemopreventive and therapeutic properties.

  13. Sulforaphane modulates telomerase activity via epigenetic regulation in prostate cancer cell lines.

    PubMed

    Abbas, Ata; Hall, J Adam; Patterson, William L; Ho, Emily; Hsu, Anna; Al-Mulla, Fahd; Georgel, Philippe T

    2016-02-01

    Epidemiologic studies have revealed that diets rich in sulforaphane (SFN), an isothiocyanate present in cruciferous vegetables, are associated with a marked decrease in prostate cancer incidence. The chemo-preventive role of SFN is associated with its histone de-acetylase inhibitor activity. However, the effect of SFN on chromatin composition and dynamic folding, especially in relation to HDAC inhibitor activity, remains poorly understood. In this study, we found that SFN can inhibit the expression and activity of human telomerase reverse transcriptase (hTERT), the catalytic subunit of telomerase, in 2 prostate cancer cell lines. This decrease in gene expression is correlated with SFN-induced changes in chromatin structure and composition. The SFN-mediated changes in levels of histone post-translational modifications, more specifically acetylation of histone H3 lysine 18 and di-methylation of histone H3 lysine 4, 2 modifications linked with high risk of prostate cancer recurrence, were associated with regulatory elements within the hTERT promoter region. Chromatin condensation may also play a role in SFN-mediated hTERT repression, since expression and recruitment of MeCP2, a known chromatin compactor, were altered in SFN treated prostate cancer cells. Chromatin immuno-precipitation (ChIP) of MeCP2 showed enrichment over regions of the hTERT promoter with increased nucleosome density. These combined results strongly support a role for SFN in the mediation of epigenetic events leading to the repression of hTERT in prostate cancer cells. This ability of SFN to modify chromatin composition and structure associated with target gene expression provides a new model by which dietary phytochemicals may exert their chemoprevention activity.

  14. Differential responses of skin cancer-chemopreventive agents silibinin, quercetin, and epigallocatechin 3-gallate on mitogenic signaling and cell cycle regulators in human epidermoid carcinoma A431 cells.

    PubMed

    Bhatia, N; Agarwal, C; Agarwal, R

    2001-01-01

    Silibinin, quercetin, and epigallocatechin 3-gallate (EGCG) have been shown to be skin cancer-preventive agents, albeit by several different mechanisms. Here, we assessed whether these agents show their cancer-preventive potential by a differential effect on mitogenic signaling molecules and cell cycle regulators. Treatment of human epidermoid carcinoma A431 cells with these agents inhibited the activation of the epidermal growth factor receptor and the downstream adapter protein Shc, but only silibinin showed a marked inhibition of mitogen-activated protein kinase-extracellular signal-regulated kinase-1 and -2 activation. In terms of cell cycle regulators, silibinin treatment showed an induction of Cip1/p21 and Kip1/p27 together with a significant decrease in cyclin-dependent kinase (CDK)-4, CDK2, and cyclin D1. Quercetin treatment, however, resulted in a moderate increase in Cip1/p21 with no change in Kip1/p27 and a decrease in CDK4 and cyclin D1. EGCG treatment also led to an induction of Cip1/p21 but no change in Kip1/27, CDK2, and cyclin D1 and a decrease in CDK4 only at low doses. Treatment of cells with these agents resulted in a strong dose- and time-dependent cell growth inhibition. A high dose of silibinin and low and high doses of quercetin and EGCG also led to cell death by apoptosis, suggesting that a lack of their inhibitory effect on mitogen-activated protein kinase-extracellular signal-regulated kinase-1 and -2 activation possibly "turns on" an apoptotic cell death response associated with their cancer-preventive and anticarcinogenic effects. Together, these results suggest that silibinin, quercetin, and EGCG exert their cancer-preventive effects by differential responses on mitogenic signaling and cell cycle regulators.

  15. Retinoids in lung cancer chemoprevention and treatment.

    PubMed

    Toma, S; Raffo, P; Isnardi, L; Palumbo, R

    1999-01-01

    In this review, we aim to synthesize the emerging picture of retinoids in lung cancer through a summary of ongoing investigations in biology, chemoprevention and therapy settings, in an attempt to clarify the possible role of these agents in such a disease. Early work in head and neck cancer has evidenced the capability of retinoids to interrupt field carcinogenesis by reversing premalignant lesions and decreasing the incidence of second primary tumors (SPTs). At this time, the completed randomized trials in lung cancer have failed to demonstrate an evident chemopreventive effect of the tested agents on different study end points, although both a marginally significant benefit of retinol palmitate in time-to-development rates for smoke-related SPTs and a potential preventive effect of retinol supplementation against mesothelioma in selected populations of asbestos-exposed workers have been recently reported. Concerning the role of retinoids in lung cancer treatment, a moderate activity of 13-cis-retinoic acid (13cRA) or all-transretinoic acid (ATRA) as single agents has been reported in small series of advanced, mostly pretreated lung cancer patients. More encouraging findings derive from combination studies, in which retinoids, especially ATRA, are added to either alpha-interferon or chemotherapy and radiotherapy. Major recent advances have been made towards the understanding of retinoids mechanisms of action; at this regard, the role of RAR-beta basal or treatment-induced levels seems to be of particular interest as intermediate end point and/or independent prognostic factor, besides their known importance in lung carcinogenesis. Future research for chemopreventive and therapeutic programs with retinoids in lung cancer should be focused on the investigation of new generation compounds with a specificity for individual retinoid nuclear receptors. Such selective molecules may have a greater activity against lung cancer, with a more favourable toxicity profile, as

  16. Sulforaphane retards the growth of UM-UC-3 xenographs, induces apoptosis, and reduces survivin in athymic mice.

    PubMed

    Wang, Fengqian; Shan, Yujuan

    2012-05-01

    Sulforaphane (SFN), an isothiocyanate that exists exclusively in cruciferous vegetables, may be the most promising preventive agent for bladder cancer (BC) to date. We previously observed that SFN dramatically inhibits human BC T24 cells in vitro. Our hypothesis is that SFN may attenuate BC growth. To test our hypothesis, we investigated the effect of SFN on human BC UM-UC-3 cell xenografts implanted into athymic mice. Sulforaphane extract was routinely prepared in our laboratory, and its content was measured with high-performance liquid chromatography. Athymic mice were injected subcutaneously with a UM-UC-3 cell suspension (2.0×10(6) cells/200 μL per mouse) and randomly divided into 2 groups. The positive control group was orally gavaged with water, and the treatment group was orally administered SFN from broccoli sprout (12 mg/kg body weight) for 5 weeks. At the end of the experiment, tumor tissues were harvested and processed for hematoxylin and eosin staining and immunohistochemistry. The average tumor volume decreased from 4.1±1.67 cm(3) in the positive control mice to 1.5±0.72 cm(3) in the SFN-treated mice, evidencing an inhibitory rate of 63%. The SFN extract also reduced the appearance of tumors, including karyopyknosis and angiogenesis. Sulforaphane extract induced caspase 3 and cytochrome c expression but reduced the expression of survivin. Sulforaphane extract retards the growth of UM-UC-3 xenografts in vivo, confirming its future potential in BC therapy.

  17. Sulforaphane as a potential protective phytochemical against neurodegenerative diseases.

    PubMed

    Tarozzi, Andrea; Angeloni, Cristina; Malaguti, Marco; Morroni, Fabiana; Hrelia, Silvana; Hrelia, Patrizia

    2013-01-01

    A wide variety of acute and chronic neurodegenerative diseases, including ischemic/traumatic brain injury, Alzheimer's disease, and Parkinson's disease, share common characteristics such as oxidative stress, misfolded proteins, excitotoxicity, inflammation, and neuronal loss. As no drugs are available to prevent the progression of these neurological disorders, intervention strategies using phytochemicals have been proposed as an alternative form of treatment. Among phytochemicals, isothiocyanate sulforaphane, derived from the hydrolysis of the glucosinolate glucoraphanin mainly present in Brassica vegetables, has demonstrated neuroprotective effects in several in vitro and in vivo studies. In particular, evidence suggests that sulforaphane beneficial effects could be mainly ascribed to its peculiar ability to activate the Nrf2/ARE pathway. Therefore, sulforaphane appears to be a promising compound with neuroprotective properties that may play an important role in preventing neurodegeneration.

  18. Sulforaphane as a Potential Protective Phytochemical against Neurodegenerative Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Tarozzi, Andrea; Angeloni, Cristina; Malaguti, Marco; Morroni, Fabiana; Hrelia, Silvana; Hrelia, Patrizia

    2013-01-01

    A wide variety of acute and chronic neurodegenerative diseases, including ischemic/traumatic brain injury, Alzheimer's disease, and Parkinson's disease, share common characteristics such as oxidative stress, misfolded proteins, excitotoxicity, inflammation, and neuronal loss. As no drugs are available to prevent the progression of these neurological disorders, intervention strategies using phytochemicals have been proposed as an alternative form of treatment. Among phytochemicals, isothiocyanate sulforaphane, derived from the hydrolysis of the glucosinolate glucoraphanin mainly present in Brassica vegetables, has demonstrated neuroprotective effects in several in vitro and in vivo studies. In particular, evidence suggests that sulforaphane beneficial effects could be mainly ascribed to its peculiar ability to activate the Nrf2/ARE pathway. Therefore, sulforaphane appears to be a promising compound with neuroprotective properties that may play an important role in preventing neurodegeneration. PMID:23983898

  19. Modulating Polo-Like Kinase 1 as a Means for Cancer Chemoprevention

    PubMed Central

    Schmit, Travis L.; Ledesma, Mark C.; Ahmad, Nihal

    2010-01-01

    Naturally occurring agents have always been appreciated for their medicinal value for both their chemopreventive and therapeutic effects against cancer. In fact, the majority of the drugs we use today, including the anti-cancer agents, were originally derived from natural compounds, either in their native form or modified to enhance their bioavailability or specificity. It is believed that for maximum effectiveness, it will useful to design novel target-based agents for chemoprevention as well as the treatment of cancer. Recent studies have shown that the serine/threonine kinase polo-like kinase (Plk) 1 is widely overexpressed in a variety of cancers and is being increasingly appreciated as a target for cancer management. Additionally, several chemopreventive agents have been shown to inhibit Plk1 in cancer cells. In this review, we will discuss if Plk1 could also be a target for designing novel strategies for cancer chemoprevention. PMID:20107874

  20. Study of post-natal effect of chemopreventive agents on ethylnitrosourea-induced transplacental carcinogenesis in rats. III. Inhibitory action of indomethacin, voltaren, theophylline and epsilon-aminocaproic acid.

    PubMed

    Alexandrov, V A; Bespalov, V G; Petrov, A S; Troyan, D N; Lidaks MYu

    1996-09-01

    The influence of the arachidonic acid metabolism inhibitors, indomethacin and voltaren; an inhibitor of phosphodiesterase activity, theophylline and the protease inhibitor epsilonaminocaproic acid (EACA) on N-ethyl-N-nitrosourea (ENU)-induced transplacental carcinogenesis was studied in rats. ENU was given to pregnant rats as a single i.v. exposure at a dose of 75 mg/kg body weight on the 21st day after conception. Indomethacin and voltaren (20 p.p.m. in drinking water), theophylline (0.01% in diet) and EACA (1000 p.p.m. in drinking water) were given to the offspring throughout their post-natal life until all survivors were killed at 12 months. In the ENU-only control groups, 100% of the offspring developed tumors of brain, spinal cord, peripheral nervous system or kidneys, with a total average number of 3.1 tumors per rat. The most marked inhibitory effect was exerted by theophylline, which significantly decreased the incidence and multiplicity of total tumors, and at all main sites selectively (brain, spinal cord, peripheral nerves and kidneys). It also prolonged average survival time of the offspring. Indomethacin and voltaren significantly decreased total tumor incidence and multiplicity and brain tumor incidence and multiplicity. Indomethacin also decreased kidney tumor multiplicity and voltaren diminished spinal cord tumor multiplicity. EACA decreased multiplicities of total, brain, peripheral nerve and kidney tumors, and diminished the incidence of brain tumors. These chemopreventive agents decreased tumor incidences 20-33% and tumor multiplicities 1.4-2.7 times, compared with the ENU-only controls.

  1. Organofluorine Isoselenocyanate Analogues of Sulforaphane: Synthesis and Anticancer Activity.

    PubMed

    Cierpiał, Tomasz; Łuczak, Jerzy; Kwiatkowska, Małgorzata; Kiełbasiński, Piotr; Mielczarek, Lidia; Wiktorska, Katarzyna; Chilmonczyk, Zdzisław; Milczarek, Małgorzata; Karwowska, Katarzyna

    2016-10-07

    A series of previously unknown sulforaphane analogues with organofluorine substituents bonded to the sulfinyl sulfur atom, an isoselenocyanate moiety in place of the isothiocyanate group, the central sulfur atom in various oxidation states, and different numbers of methylene groups in the central alkyl chain were synthesized and fully characterized. All new compounds were tested for their biological properties in vitro and demonstrated much higher anticancer activity against two breast cancer cell lines than that shown by native sulforaphane; at the same time, the compounds were less toxic for normal cells. The influence of the particular structural changes in the molecules on the cytotoxicity is discussed.

  2. Sulforaphane, quercetin and catechins complement each other in elimination of advanced pancreatic cancer by miR-let-7 induction and K-ras inhibition

    PubMed Central

    APPARI, MAHESH; BABU, KAMESH R.; KACZOROWSKI, ADAM; GROSS, WOLFGANG; HERR, INGRID

    2014-01-01

    Pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDA) has the worst prognosis of all malignancies, and current therapeutic options do not target cancer stem cells (CSCs), which may be the reason for the extreme aggressiveness. The dietary agents sulforaphane and quercetin enriched e.g., in broccoli, and the main and best studied green tea catechin EGCG hold promise as anti-CSC agents in PDA. We examined the efficacy of additional catechins and the combination of these bioactive agents to stem cell features and miRNA signaling. Two established and one primary PDA cell line and non-malignant pancreatic ductal cells were used. Whereas each agent strongly inhibited colony formation, the catechins ECG and CG were more effective than EGCG. A mixture of green tea catechins (GTCs) significantly inhibited viability, migration, expression of MMP-2 and -9, ALDH1 activity, colony and spheroid formation and induced apoptosis, but the combination of GTCs with sulforaphane or quercetin was superior. Following treatment with bioactive agents, the expression of miR-let7-a was specifically induced in cancer cells but not in normal cells and it was associated with K-ras inhibition. These data demonstrate that sulforaphane, quercetin and GTC complement each other in inhibition of PDA progression by induction of miR-let7-a and inhibition of K-ras. PMID:25017900

  3. Sulforaphane protects against acetaminophen-induced hepatotoxicity.

    PubMed

    Noh, Jung-Ran; Kim, Yong-Hoon; Hwang, Jung Hwan; Choi, Dong-Hee; Kim, Kyoung-Shim; Oh, Won-Keun; Lee, Chul-Ho

    2015-06-01

    Oxidative stress is closely associated with acetaminophen (APAP)-induced toxicity. Heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1), an antioxidant defense enzyme, has been shown to protect against oxidant-induced tissue injury. This study investigated whether sulforaphane (SFN), as a HO-1 inducer, plays a protective role against APAP hepatotoxicity in vitro and in vivo. Pretreatment of primary hepatocyte with SFN induced nuclear factor E2-factor related factor (Nrf2) target gene expression, especially HO-1 mRNA and protein expression, and suppressed APAP-induced glutathione (GSH) depletion and lipid peroxidation, which eventually leads to hepatocyte cell death. A comparable effect was observed in mice treated with APAP. Mice were treated with 300 mg/kg APAP 30 min after SFN (5 mg/kg) administration and were then sacrificed after 6 h. APAP alone caused severe liver injuries as characterized by increased plasma AST and ALT levels, GSH depletion, apoptosis, and 4-hydroxynonenal (4-HNE) formations. This APAP-induced liver damage was significantly attenuated by pretreatment with SFN. Furthermore, while hepatic reactive oxygen species (ROS) levels were increased by APAP exposure, pretreatment with SFN completely blocked ROS formation. These results suggest that SFN plays a protective role against APAP-mediated hepatotoxicity through antioxidant effects mediated by HO-1 induction. SFN has preventive action in oxidative stress-mediated liver injury.

  4. Chemoprevention in familial adenomatous polyposis.

    PubMed

    Kim, Brian; Giardiello, Francis M

    2011-08-01

    Familial adenomatous polyposis (FAP) predictably leads to adenomas and eventual adenocarcinomas in the lower gastrointestinal tract and less frequently, the upper gastrointestinal tract. Chemopreventive strategies have been studied in FAP patients to delay the development of adenomas in the upper and lower gastrointestinal tract, as well as to prevent recurrence of adenomas in the retained rectum of patients after prophylactic surgery with colectomy and ileorectal anastamosis (IRA). The nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID) sulindac and selective cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) inhibitor celecoxib reduce polyposis of the retained rectum after colectomy with IRA. Reports of cardiovascular risks of some NSAIDs and selective COX-2 inhibitors have led to promising studies of lower doses in combination with ursodeoxycholic acid, statin, and difluoromethylornithine. Curcumin and eicosapentaenoic acid show efficacy in small clinical trials of FAP chemoprevention. This article will review the concept of chemoprevention and the current clinical literature in FAP chemoprevention.

  5. Sulforaphane protects the heart from doxorubicin-induced toxicity

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Preeti; Sharma, Rajendra; McElhanon, Kevin; Allen, Charles D.; Megyesi, Judit K.; Beneš, Helen; Singh, Sharda P.

    2015-01-01

    Cardiotoxicity is one of the major side effects encountered during cancer chemotherapy with doxorubicin (DOX) and other anthracyclines. Previous studies have shown that oxidative stress caused by DOX is one of the primary mechanisms for its toxic effects on the heart. Since the redox-sensitive transcription factor, Nrf2, plays a major role in protecting cells from the toxic metabolites generated during oxidative stress, we examined the effects of the phytochemical sulforaphane (SFN), a potent Nrf2-activating agent, on DOX-induced cardiotoxicity. These studies were carried out both in vitro and in vivo using rat H9c2 cardiomyoblast cells and wild type 129/sv mice, and involved SFN pretreatment followed by SFN administration during DOX exposure. SFN treatment protected H9c2 cells from DOX cytotoxicity and also resulted in restored cardiac function and a significant reduction in DOX-induced cardiomyopathy and mortality in mice. Specificity of SFN induction of Nrf2 and protection of H9c2 cells was demonstrated in Nrf2 knockdown experiments. Cardiac accumulation of 4-hydroxynonenal (4-HNE) protein adducts, due to lipid peroxidation following DOX-induced oxidative stress, was significantly attenuated by SFN treatment. The respiratory function of cardiac mitochondria isolated from mice exposed to DOX alone was repressed, while SFN treatment with DOX significantly elevated mitochondrial respiratory complex activities. Co-administration of SFN reversed the DOX-associated reduction in nuclear Nrf2 binding activity and restored cardiac expression of Nrf2-regulated genes, at both the RNA and protein levels. Together, our results demonstrate for the first time that the Nrf2 inducer, SFN, has the potential to provide protection against DOX-mediated cardiotoxicity. PMID:26025579

  6. Oxidative Stress: A Promising Target for Chemoprevention

    PubMed Central

    John, AM Sashi Papu; Ankem, Murali K; Damodaran, Chendil

    2016-01-01

    Cancer is a leading cause of death worldwide, and treating advanced stages of cancer remains clinically challenging. Epidemiological studies have shown that oxidants and free radicals induced DNA damage is one of the predominant causative factors for cancer pathogenesis. Hence, oxidants are attractive targets for chemoprevention as well as therapy. Dietary agents are known to exert an anti-oxidant property which is one of the most efficient preventive strategy in cancer progression. In this article, we highlight dietary agents can potentially target oxidative stress, in turn delaying, preventing, or treating cancer development. Some of these agents are currently in use in basic research, while some have been launched successfully into clinical trials. PMID:27088073

  7. Cancer chemoprevention and chemotherapy: dietary polyphenols and signalling pathways.

    PubMed

    Ramos, Sonia

    2008-05-01

    Prevention of cancer through dietary intervention recently has received an increasing interest, and dietary polyphenols have become not only important potential chemopreventive, but also therapeutic, natural agents. Polyphenols have been reported to interfere at the initiation, promotion and progression of cancer. They might lead to the modulation of proteins in diverse pathways and require the integration of different signals for the final chemopreventive or therapeutic effect. Polyphenols have been demonstrated to act on multiple key elements in signal transduction pathways related to cellular proliferation, differentiation, apoptosis, inflammation, angiogenesis and metastasis; however, these molecular mechanisms of action are not completely characterized and many features remain to be elucidated. The aim of this review is to provide insights into the molecular basis of potential chemopreventive and therapeutic activities of dietary polyphenols with emphasis in their ability to control intracellular signalling cascades considered as relevant targets in a cancer preventive approach.

  8. In vitro absorption and metabolism of a citrus chemopreventive agent, auraptene, and its modifying effects on xenobiotic enzyme activities in mouse livers.

    PubMed

    Murakami, A; Wada, K; Ueda, N; Sasaki, K; Haga, M; Kuki, W; Takahashi, Y; Yonei, H; Koshimizu, K; Ohigashi, H

    2000-01-01

    We previously reported that auraptene (7-geranyloxycoumarin, AUR), widely occurring in citrus fruit, is a structurally novel type of effective cancer-preventive agent, as manifested in several rodent models. However, its bio-availability and metabolism in biological systems have yet to be investigated. In the present study, we examined the chemical stability of AUR at pH 1.57 and 37 degrees C (as a stomach digestion model) and observed its stoichiometric conversion to umbelliferone [7-hydroxycoumarin, UMB; half-life (t1/2) = 15 h; 7-ethoxycoumarin (ETC) was stable for 24 h]. Differentiated Caco-2 cells, a human colorectal adenocarcinoma cell line, were used as a small intestine model. ETC permeated the basolateral (portal vein) side of Caco-2 cells in a time-dependent manner; AUR slightly permeated the cells, but with an intracellular accumulation. Epoxyauraptene and UMB were detected when AUR was treated with the rat liver S-9 mixture. ETC was also converted to UMB, but its t1/2 of two hours was much shorter than that of AUR (> 24 h). This suggests that AUR, bearing a geranyloxyl side chain, is a relatively metabolism-resistant substrate for cytochrome P-450 enzymes and, thus, is stable in the liver compared with ETC. Oral administration of AUR by gavage at 50-200 mg/kg body wt dose dependently induced glutathione S-transferase (GST) activity in mouse livers without affecting cytochrome P-450 activity. Using 10 coumarin-related compounds, we found that only those coumarins having a 7-alkyloxyl group induced GST, but not cytochrome P-450, activity. The present study presumes that AUR accumulates in the epithelial cells of the small intestine and then gradually permeates into the portal vein. Stable localizability of AUR in the colon and liver may be associated with the induction of GST activity, which is important as the action mechanism for suppression of rodent chemical carcinogenesis.

  9. Heating decreases epithiospecifier protein activity and increases sulforaphane formation in broccoli.

    PubMed

    Matusheski, Nathan V; Juvik, John A; Jeffery, Elizabeth H

    2004-05-01

    Sulforaphane, an isothiocyanate from broccoli, is one of the most potent food-derived anticarcinogens. This compound is not present in the intact vegetable, rather it is formed from its glucosinolate precursor, glucoraphanin, by the action of myrosinase, a thioglucosidase enzyme, when broccoli tissue is crushed or chewed. However, a number of studies have demonstrated that sulforaphane yield from glucoraphanin is low, and that a non-bioactive nitrile analog, sulforaphane nitrile, is the primary hydrolysis product when plant tissue is crushed at room temperature. Recent evidence suggests that in Arabidopsis, nitrile formation from glucosinolates is controlled by a heat-sensitive protein, epithiospecifier protein (ESP), a non-catalytic cofactor of myrosinase. Our objectives were to examine the effects of heating broccoli florets and sprouts on sulforaphane and sulforaphane nitrile formation, to determine if broccoli contains ESP activity, then to correlate heat-dependent changes in ESP activity, sulforaphane content and bioactivity, as measured by induction of the phase II detoxification enzyme quinone reductase (QR) in cell culture. Heating fresh broccoli florets or broccoli sprouts to 60 degrees C prior to homogenization simultaneously increased sulforaphane formation and decreased sulforaphane nitrile formation. A significant loss of ESP activity paralleled the decrease in sulforaphane nitrile formation. Heating to 70 degrees C and above decreased the formation of both products in broccoli florets, but not in broccoli sprouts. The induction of QR in cultured mouse hepatoma Hepa lclc7 cells paralleled increases in sulforaphane formation.

  10. Repeated Nrf2 stimulation using sulforaphane protects fibroblasts from ionizing radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Mathew, Sherin T.; Bergström, Petra; Hammarsten, Ola

    2014-05-01

    Most of the cytotoxicity induced by ionizing radiation is mediated by radical-induced DNA double-strand breaks. Cellular protection from free radicals can be stimulated several fold by sulforaphane-mediated activation of the transcription factor Nrf2 that regulates more than 50 genes involved in the detoxification of reactive substances and radicals. Here, we report that repeated sulforaphane treatment increases radioresistance in primary human skin fibroblasts. Cells were either treated with sulforaphane for four hours once or with four-hour treatments repeatedly for three consecutive days prior to radiation exposure. Fibroblasts exposed to repeated-sulforaphane treatment showed a more pronounced dose-dependent induction of Nrf2-regulated mRNA and reduced amount of radiation-induced free radicals compared with cells treated once with sulforaphane. In addition, radiation- induced DNA double-strand breaks measured by gamma-H2AX foci were attenuated following repeated sulforaphane treatment. As a result, cellular protection from ionizing radiation measured by the 5-ethynyl-2′-deoxyuridine (EdU) assay was increased, specifically in cells exposed to repeated sulforaphane treatment. Sulforaphane treatment was unable to protect Nrf2 knockout mouse embryonic fibroblasts, indicating that the sulforaphane-induced radioprotection was Nrf2-dependent. Moreover, radioprotection by repeated sulforaphane treatment was dose-dependent with an optimal effect at 10 uM, whereas both lower and higher concentrations resulted in lower levels of radioprotection. Our data indicate that the Nrf2 system can be trained to provide further protection from radical damage. - Highlights: • Repeated treatment with sulforaphane protects fibroblasts from ionizing radiation • Repeated sulforaphane treatment attenuates radiation induced ROS and DNA damage • Sulforaphane mediated protection is Nrf2 dependent.

  11. A Perspective on Prostate Carcinogenesis and Chemoprevention

    PubMed Central

    Bosland, Maarten C.; Ozten, Nur; Eskra, Jillian N.; Mahmoud, Abeer M.

    2015-01-01

    In this perspective, modifiable carcinogenic factors for the prostate are summarized. This is followed by a discussion of how current knowledge about causation of prostate cancer and chemoprevention of prostate cancer can be used to develop preventive strategies. Prostate cancer is a slowly developing cancer which offers opportunities for preventive interventions. Only a few randomized clinical trials of prostate cancer prevention have been completed. The SELECT study with selenium and vitamin E did not find protective effects, but in two trials with 5α-reductase inhibitors risk was reduced about 25%, showing that chemoprevention is possible and indicating that the androgen receptor is a suitable target. Besides smoking cessation and reduction of obesity, there are no known dietary or life style interventions that will have a major impact on prostate cancer risk. Inflammation of the prostate is an attractive target and aspirin may be a promising candidate agent, but has not been addressed yet in preclinical and clinical studies. Antioxidants other than selenium and vitamin E are unlikely to be very effective and data on several dietary supplements are not encouraging. More candidate agents need to be identified and tested in relevant and adequate preclinical models and Phase II trials that have predictive value for outcome of Phase III randomized studies. Doing this will require a systematic approach comparing preclinical and clinical study outcomes to determine their predictive value of preventive efficacy. PMID:26442200

  12. Moringa oleifera Lam: Targeting Chemoprevention.

    PubMed

    Karim, Nurul Ashikin Abd; Ibrahim, Muhammad Din; Kntayya, Saie Brindha; Rukayadi, Yaya; Hamid, Hazrulizawati Abd; Razis, Ahmad Faizal Abdull

    2016-01-01

    Moringa oleifera Lam, family Moringaceae, is a perennial plant which is called various names, but is locally known in Malaysia as "murungai" or "kelor". Glucomoringin, a glucosinolate with from M. oleifera is a major secondary metabolite compound. The seeds and leaves of the plant are reported to have the highest amount of glucosinolates. M. oleifera is well known for its many uses health and benefits. It is claimed to have nutritional, medicinal and chemopreventive potentials. Chemopreventive effects of M. oleifera are expected due to the existence of glucosinolate which it is reported to have the ability to induce apoptosis in anticancer studies. Furthermore, chemopreventive value of M. oleifera has been demonstrated in studies utilizing its leaf extract to inhibit the growth of human cancer cell lines. This review highlights the advantages of M. oleifera targeting chemoprevention where glucosinolates could help to slow the process of carcinogenesis through several molecular targets. It is also includes inhibition of carcinogen activation and induction of carcinogen detoxification, anti-inflammatory, anti-tumor cell proliferation, induction of apoptosis and inhibition of tumor angiogenesis. Finally, for synergistic effects of M. oleifera with other drugs and safety, essential for chemoprevention, it is important that it safe to be consumed by human body and works well. Although there is promising evidence about M. oleifera in chemoprevention, extensive research needs to be done due to the expected rise of cancer in coming years and to gain more information about the mechanisms involved in M. oleifera influence, which could be a good source to inhibit several major mechanisms involved in cancer development.

  13. Chemoprevention, chemotherapy, and chemoresistance in colorectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Marin, Jose J G; Sanchez de Medina, Fermin; Castaño, Beatriz; Bujanda, Luis; Romero, Marta R; Martinez-Augustin, Olga; Moral-Avila, Rosario Del; Briz, Oscar

    2012-05-01

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) is the third most common cancer and the second leading cause of cancer-related death in industrialized countries. Chemoprevention is a promising approach, but studies demonstrating their usefulness in large populations are still needed. Among several compounds with chemopreventive ability, cyclooxygenase inhibitors have received particular attention. However, these agents are not without side effects, which must be weighed against their beneficial actions. Early diagnosis is critical in the management of CRC patients, because, in early stages, surgery is curative in >90% of cases. If diagnosis occurs at stages II and III, which is often the case, neoadjuvant chemotherapy and radiotherapy before surgery are, in a few cases, recommended. Because of the high risk of recurrence in advanced cancers, chemotherapy is maintained after tumor resection. Chemotherapy is also indicated when the patient has metastases and in advanced cancer located in the rectum. In the last decade, the use of anticancer drugs in monotherapy or in combined regimens has markedly increased the survival of patients with CRC at stages III and IV. Although the rate of success is higher than in other gastrointestinal tumors, adverse effects and development of chemoresistance are important limitations to pharmacological therapy. Genetic profiling regarding mechanisms of chemoresistance are needed to carry out individualized prediction of the lack of effectiveness of pharmacological regimens. This would minimize side effects and prevent the selection of aggressive, cross-resistant clones, as well as avoiding undesirable delays in the use of the most efficient therapeutic approaches to treat these patients.

  14. Nigerian foodstuffs with prostate cancer chemopreventive polyphenols

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Dietary polyphenols are antioxidants that can scavenge biological free radicals, and chemoprevent diseases with biological oxidation as their main etiological factor. In this paper, we review our laboratory data vis-ὰ-vis available literature on prostate cancer chemopreventive substances in Nigerian foodstuffs. Dacryodes edulis fruit, Moringa oleifera and Syzygium aromaticum contained prostate active polyphenols like ellagic acid, gallate, methylgallate, catechol, kaempferol quercetin and their derivatives. Also Canarium schweinfurthii Engl oil contained ten phenolic compounds and lignans, namely; catechol, p-hydroxybenzaldehyde, dihydroxyphenylacetic acid, tyrosol, p-hydroxybenzoic acid, dihydroxybenzoic acid, vanillic acid, phloretic acid, pinoresinol, secoisolariciresinol. In addition, tomatoes (Lycopersicon esculentum Mill) which contains the powerful antioxidant and anti-prostate cancer agent, lycopene; cabbage (Brassica oleracea) containing indole-3-carbinol; citrus fruits containing pectin; Soursop (Annona muricata) containing annonaceous acetogenins; soya beans (Glycine max) containing isoflavones; chilli pepper (Capsicum annuum) containing capsaicin, and green tea (Camellia sinensis) containing (-) epigallocatechin gallate (EGCG), (-) epicatechin, (-) epicatechin-3-gallate and (-) epigallocatechin -3-gallate which are widely reported to posses prostate cancer chemopreventive compounds are also grown in Nigeria and other African countries. Thus, the high incidence of prostate cancer among males of African extraction can be dramatically reduced, and the age of onset drastically increased, if the population at risk consumes the right kinds of foods in the right proportion, beginning early in life, especially as prostate cancer has a latency period of about 50 years. PMID:21992488

  15. Nigerian foodstuffs with prostate cancer chemopreventive polyphenols.

    PubMed

    Atawodi, Sunday Eneojo

    2011-09-23

    Dietary polyphenols are antioxidants that can scavenge biological free radicals, and chemoprevent diseases with biological oxidation as their main etiological factor. In this paper, we review our laboratory data vis-ὰ-vis available literature on prostate cancer chemopreventive substances in Nigerian foodstuffs. Dacryodes edulis fruit, Moringa oleifera and Syzygium aromaticum contained prostate active polyphenols like ellagic acid, gallate, methylgallate, catechol, kaempferol quercetin and their derivatives. Also Canarium schweinfurthii Engl oil contained ten phenolic compounds and lignans, namely; catechol, p-hydroxybenzaldehyde, dihydroxyphenylacetic acid, tyrosol, p-hydroxybenzoic acid, dihydroxybenzoic acid, vanillic acid, phloretic acid, pinoresinol, secoisolariciresinol. In addition, tomatoes (Lycopersicon esculentum Mill) which contains the powerful antioxidant and anti-prostate cancer agent, lycopene; cabbage (Brassica oleracea) containing indole-3-carbinol; citrus fruits containing pectin; Soursop (Annona muricata) containing annonaceous acetogenins; soya beans (Glycine max) containing isoflavones; chilli pepper (Capsicum annuum) containing capsaicin, and green tea (Camellia sinensis) containing (-) epigallocatechin gallate (EGCG), (-) epicatechin, (-) epicatechin-3-gallate and (-) epigallocatechin -3-gallate which are widely reported to posses prostate cancer chemopreventive compounds are also grown in Nigeria and other African countries. Thus, the high incidence of prostate cancer among males of African extraction can be dramatically reduced, and the age of onset drastically increased, if the population at risk consumes the right kinds of foods in the right proportion, beginning early in life, especially as prostate cancer has a latency period of about 50 years.

  16. Adlay (薏苡 yì yĭ; “soft-shelled job's tears”; the seeds of Coix lachryma-jobi L. var. ma-yuen Stapf) is a Potential Cancer Chemopreventive Agent toward Multistage Carcinogenesis Processes

    PubMed Central

    Kuo, Ching-Chuan; Chen, Huang-Hui; Chiang, Wenchang

    2012-01-01

    Adlay (薏苡 yì yĭ “soft-shelled job's tears”, the seeds of Coix lachryma-jobi L. var. ma-yuen Stapf) is a grass crop that has long been used in traditional Chinese medicine (TCM) and as a nourishing food in China for the treatment of warts, chapped skin, rheumatism, neuralgia, inflammatory, and neoplastic diseases. In addition, adlay also has been said to have stomachic, diuretic, antipholgistic, anodynic, and antispasmodic effects. Carcinogenesis is a multistage process that begins with exposure of viruses or chemicals that are found in the environment. Chemoprevention refers to the use of natural or synthetic, non-toxic chemical substances to reverse, repress, or prevent carcinogenesis. In this review, we summarize recent research attempting to study the chemopreventive blocking and suppressing potential of adlay and its active components in scavenging electrophiles and reactive oxygen species, antimutagenicity, enhancing Nrf2-mediated detoxification and antioxidant effect, altering carcinogen metabolism, suppressing proliferation, decreasing inflammation, and enhancing antitumor immunity. In addition, several active components with diverse chemopreventive properties have been also mentioned in this review article. PMID:24716141

  17. Adlay ( yì yĭ; "soft-shelled job's tears"; the seeds of Coix lachryma-jobi L. var. ma-yuen Stapf) is a Potential Cancer Chemopreventive Agent toward Multistage Carcinogenesis Processes.

    PubMed

    Kuo, Ching-Chuan; Chen, Huang-Hui; Chiang, Wenchang

    2012-10-01

    Adlay ( yì yĭ "soft-shelled job's tears", the seeds of Coix lachryma-jobi L. var. ma-yuen Stapf) is a grass crop that has long been used in traditional Chinese medicine (TCM) and as a nourishing food in China for the treatment of warts, chapped skin, rheumatism, neuralgia, inflammatory, and neoplastic diseases. In addition, adlay also has been said to have stomachic, diuretic, antipholgistic, anodynic, and antispasmodic effects. Carcinogenesis is a multistage process that begins with exposure of viruses or chemicals that are found in the environment. Chemoprevention refers to the use of natural or synthetic, non-toxic chemical substances to reverse, repress, or prevent carcinogenesis. In this review, we summarize recent research attempting to study the chemopreventive blocking and suppressing potential of adlay and its active components in scavenging electrophiles and reactive oxygen species, antimutagenicity, enhancing Nrf2-mediated detoxification and antioxidant effect, altering carcinogen metabolism, suppressing proliferation, decreasing inflammation, and enhancing antitumor immunity. In addition, several active components with diverse chemopreventive properties have been also mentioned in this review article.

  18. Sulforaphane treatment protects skeletal muscle against damage induced by exhaustive exercise in rats.

    PubMed

    Malaguti, Marco; Angeloni, Cristina; Garatachea, Nuria; Baldini, Marta; Leoncini, Emanuela; Collado, Pilar S; Teti, Gabriella; Falconi, Mirella; Gonzalez-Gallego, Javier; Hrelia, Silvana

    2009-10-01

    Sulforaphane (SF), one of the most important isothiocyanates in the human diet, present in cruciferous vegetables, is known to have chemopreventive activities in different tissues. No data are available on its effects in the prevention of skeletal muscle damage. In this study, we investigated the potential protective effects of SF treatment on muscle damage and oxidative stress induced by an acute bout of exhaustive exercise in rats. Male Wistar rats were treated with SF (25 mg/kg body wt ip) for 3 days before undergoing an acute exhaustive exercise protocol in a treadmill (+7% slope and 24 m/min). Acute exercise resulted in a significant increase in plasma lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) and creatine phosphokinase (CPK) activities. It also resulted in a significant increase in thiobarbituric acid-reactive substances, in a significant decrease in tissue total antioxidant capacity, and in a significant decrease in NAD(P)H:quinone oxidoreductase 1 (NQO1) expression and activity in vastus lateralis muscle. SF treatment significantly increased muscle NQO1, glutathione-S-transferase, and glutathione reductase expression and activity, with no effect on glutathione peroxidase and thioredoxin reductase. The observed SF-induced upregulation of phase II enzymes was accompanied by a significant increase in nuclear erythroid 2 p45-related factor 2 expression and correlated with a significant increase in total antioxidant capacity and a decrease in plasma LDH and CPK activities. Our data demonstrate that SF acts as an indirect antioxidant in skeletal muscle and could play a critical role in the modulation of the muscle redox environment, leading to the prevention of exhaustive exercise-induced muscle damage.

  19. Sulforaphane alleviates muscular dystrophy in mdx mice by activation of Nrf2.

    PubMed

    Sun, Chengcao; Yang, Cuili; Xue, Ruilin; Li, Shujun; Zhang, Ting; Pan, Lei; Ma, Xuejiao; Wang, Liang; Li, Dejia

    2015-01-15

    Sulforaphane (SFN), one of the most important isothiocyanates in the human diet, is known to have chemo-preventive and antioxidant activities in different tissues via activation of nuclear factor erythroid 2-related factor 2 (Nrf2)-mediated induction of antioxidant/phase II enzymes, such as heme oxygenase-1 and NAD(P)H quinone oxidoreductase 1. However, its effects on muscular dystrophy remain unknown. This work was undertaken to evaluate the effects of SFN on Duchenne muscular dystrophy. Four-week-old mdx mice were treated with SFN by gavage (2 mg·kg body wt(-1)·day(-1) for 8 wk), and our results demonstrated that SFN treatment increased the expression and activity of muscle phase II enzymes NAD(P)H quinone oxidoreductase 1 and heme oxygenase-1 with a Nrf2-dependent manner. SFN significantly increased skeletal muscle mass, muscle force (∼30%), running distance (∼20%), and GSH-to-GSSG ratio (∼3.2-fold) of mdx mice and decreased the activities of plasma creatine phosphokinase (∼45%) and lactate dehydrogenase (∼40%), gastrocnemius hypertrophy (∼25%), myocardial hypertrophy (∼20%), and malondialdehyde levels (∼60%). Furthermore, SFN treatment also reduced the central nucleation (∼40%), fiber size variability, and inflammation and improved the sarcolemmal integrity of mdx mice. Collectively, these results show that SFN can improve muscle function and pathology and protect dystrophic muscle from oxidative damage in mdx mice associated with Nrf2 signaling pathway, which indicate Nrf2 may have clinical implications for the treatment of patients with muscular dystrophy.

  20. Polyphenols and Prostate Cancer Chemoprevention

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-03-01

    prostate chemoprevention are the soy isoflavone, genistein, and the tea catechin , (-)- epigallocatechin-3-gallate (EGCG). Another polyphenol that has...diet high in soy products have reduced incidence of clinically manifested prostate cancers. Likewise, Asians have a long history of drinking tea

  1. Evaluation of Brazilian plants on cancer chemoprevention targets in vitro.

    PubMed

    Endringer, Denise C; Valadares, Ydia M; Campana, Priscilla R V; Campos, Jussara J; Guimarães, Keller G; Pezzuto, John M; Braga, Fernão C

    2010-06-01

    Cancer is a leading cause of death worldwide. Cancer chemoprevention is one of the promising strategies to decrease its incidence and both plant extracts and natural products may constitute sources of new chemoprevention agents. Some Brazilian species popularly used to treat inflammatory conditions were selected for evaluation for cancer chemoprevention. A total of 32 extracts/fractions from Hancornia speciosa, Davilla elliptica, Jacaranda caroba, Mansoa hirsuta, Remija ferrugina, Solanum paniculatum and Xyris pterygoblephara, along with a mixture of ursolic and oleanolic acids obtained from J. caroba and a dihydroisocoumarin isolated from aerial parts of X. pterygoblephara were tested for their cancer chemoprevention activity [inhibition of 12-O-tetradecanoyl-13-acetate (TPA)-mediated NF-kappaB activation, ornithine decarboxylase (ODC) and cyclooxygenase-1 (COX-1); induction of antioxidant response element (ARE)]. Several extracts/fractions were active in more than one assay and those from H. speciosa, M. hirsuta and J. caroba mediated strong responses with NF-kappaB, COX-1 and ARE, respectively.

  2. Screening of new chemopreventive compounds from Digitalis purpurea.

    PubMed

    Lee, J Y; Woo, E; Kang, K W

    2006-04-01

    Chemopreventive agents induce a battery of genes whose protein products can protect cells from chemical-induced carcinogenesis. In this study, we isolated four different glycosides (1 acteoside; 2 purpureaside A; 3 calceolarioside B; and 4, plantainoside D) from the leaves of Digitalis purpurea and studied their abilities to induce glutathione S-transferase (GST) and their protective efficiencies against aflatoxin B1-induced cytotoxicity in H4IIE cells. Of these four glycosides, acteoside significantly inhibited the cytotoxicity induced by aflatoxin B1 (AFB1) and also selectively increased GSTalpha protein levels. Reporter gene analysis using an antioxidant response element (ARE) containing construct and subcellular fractionation assays, revealed that GSTalpha induction by acteoside might be associated with Nrf2/ARE activation. The results suggest that acteoside possesses a potent hepatoprotective effect against AFB1 and that it can be applied as a potential chemopreventive agent.

  3. Impact of thermal processing on sulforaphane yield from broccoli ( Brassica oleracea L. ssp. italica).

    PubMed

    Wang, Grace C; Farnham, Mark; Jeffery, Elizabeth H

    2012-07-11

    In broccoli, sulforaphane forms when the glucosinolate glucoraphanin is hydrolyzed by the endogenous plant thiohydrolase myrosinase. A myrosinase cofactor directs hydrolysis away from the formation of bioactive sulforaphane and toward an inactive product, sulforaphane nitrile. The cofactor is more heat sensitive than myrosinase, presenting an opportunity to preferentially direct hydrolysis toward sulforaphane formation through regulation of thermal processing. Four broccoli cultivars were microwave heated, boiled, or steamed for various lengths of time. Production of nitrile during hydrolysis of unheated broccoli varied among cultivars from 91 to 52% of hydrolysis products (Pinnacle > Marathon > Patriot > Brigadier). Boiling and microwave heating caused an initial loss of nitrile, with a concomitant increase in sulforaphane, followed by loss of sulforaphane, all within 1 min. In contrast, steaming enhanced sulforaphane yield between 1.0 and 3.0 min in all but Brigadier. These data are proof of concept that steaming for 1.0-3.0 min provides less nitrile and more sulforaphane yield from a broccoli meal.

  4. Analysis of autophagic flux in response to sulforaphane in metastatic prostate cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Watson, Gregory W; Wickramasekara, Samanthi; Fang, Yufeng; Palomera-Sanchez, Zoraya; Maier, Claudia S; Williams, David E; Dashwood, Roderick H; Perez, Viviana I; Ho, Emily

    2015-01-01

    Scope The phytochemical sulforaphane has been shown to decrease prostate cancer metastases in a genetic mouse model of prostate carcinogenesis, though the mechanism of action is not fully known. Sulforaphane has been reported to stimulate autophagy, and modulation of autophagy has been proposed to influence sulforaphane cytotoxicity; however, no conclusions about autophagy can be drawn without assessing autophagic flux, which has not been characterized in prostate cancer cells following sulforaphane treatment. Methods and Results We conducted an investigation to assess the impact of sulforaphane on autophagic flux in two metastatic prostate cancer cell lines at a concentration shown to decrease metastasis in vivo. Autophagic flux was assessed by multiple autophagy related proteins and substrates. We found that sulforaphane can stimulate autophagic flux and cell death only at high concentrations, above what has been observed in vivo. Conclusion These results suggest that sulforaphane does not directly stimulate autophagy or cell death in metastatic prostate cancer cells under physiologically relevant conditions, but instead supports the involvement of in vivo factors as important effectors of sulforaphane- mediated prostate cancer suppression. PMID:26108801

  5. The Potential Role of Nitric Oxide in Halting Cancer Progression Through Chemoprevention

    PubMed Central

    Vahora, Huzefa; Khan, Munawwar Ali; Alalami, Usama; Hussain, Arif

    2016-01-01

    Nitric oxide (NO) in general plays a beneficial physiological role as a vasorelaxant and the role of NO is decided by its concentration present in physiological environments. NO either facilitates cancer-promoting characters or act as an anti-cancer agent. The dilemma in this regard still remains unanswered. This review summarizes the recent information on NO and its role in carcinogenesis and tumor progression, as well as dietary chemopreventive agents which have NO-modulating properties with safe cytotoxic profile. Understanding the molecular mechanisms and cross-talk modulating NO effect by these chemopreventive agents can allow us to develop better therapeutic strategies for cancer treatment. PMID:27051643

  6. Chemoprevention of Ovarian Cancer

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-10-01

    coupled device camera . The interrogated tissue area was 2 mm in diameter. Fluorescence emission spectra ranging from 320 to 850 nm were collected...properties of normal and neoplastic human cervical tissue," Laser Surg. Med. 13, 646-655 (1993). 48. K. T. Schomacker, J. K. Frisoli, C. C. Compton , T. J...undergo apoptosis in response to certain physio- in mitochondrial finction in both normal and cancer cells. In logical stimuli and cytotoxic agents

  7. Nicotinamide for skin cancer chemoprevention.

    PubMed

    Damian, Diona L

    2017-03-20

    Nicotinamide (vitamin B3 ) has a range of photoprotective effects in vitro and in vivo; it enhances DNA repair, reduces UV radiation-induced suppression of skin immune responses, modulates inflammatory cytokine production and skin barrier function and restores cellular energy levels after UV exposure. Pharmacological doses of nicotinamide have been shown to reduce actinic keratoses and nonmelanoma skin cancer incidence in high-risk individuals, making this a nontoxic and accessible option for skin cancer chemoprevention in this population.

  8. Methoxylated flavones, a superior cancer chemopreventive flavonoid subclass?

    PubMed Central

    Walle, Thomas

    2007-01-01

    Dietary flavonoids and other polyphenols show great potential as cancer chemopreventive agents in cell culture studies. This does not translate well into in vivo activity, because of extensive conjugative metabolism of these compounds in the intestine and liver. This paper presents a review of a flavonoid subclass in which all hydroxyl groups are capped by methylation. This results in dramatically increased metabolic stability and membrane transport in the intestine/liver, thus improving oral bioavailability. The methoxyflavones also show increased cancer chemopreventive properties. At the cancer initiation stage, bioactivation of polyaromatic hydrocarbon carcinogens and binding to DNA are markedly diminished through effects on CYP1A1/1B1 transcription but also through direct interactions with the proteins. At the cancer promotion stage, the proliferation of cancer cells, but not normal cells, is inhibited with greater potency than with the unmethylated flavones. Limited mechanistic experiments, such as of effects on cell cycle regulation, indicate that the mechanisms of methoxyflavone activities are unique, including aromatase inhibition. The cancer preventive effects and mechanisms of the polymethoxyflavones, such as tangeretin and nobiletin, are discussed in comparison. It is concluded that the methoxyflavones have properties that may make them particularly useful as cancer chemopreventive agents. PMID:17574860

  9. Green tea polyphenols for prostate cancer chemoprevention: A translational perspective

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, J.J.; Bailey, H.H.; Mukhtar, H.

    2009-01-01

    Every year nearly 200,000 men in the United States are diagnosed with prostate cancer (PCa), and another 29,000 men succumb to the disease. Within certain regions of the world population based studies have identified a possible role for green tea in the prevention of certain cancers, especially PCa. One constituent in particular, epigallocatechin-3-gallate also known as EGCG has been shown in cell culture models to decrease cell viability and promote apoptosis in multiple cancer cell lines including PCa with no effect on non-cancerous cell lines. In addition, animal models have consistently shown that standardized green tea polyphenols when administered in drinking water delay the development and progression of PCa. Altogether, three clinical trials have been performed in PCa patients and suggest that green tea may have a distinct role as a chemopreventive agent. This review will present the available data for standardized green tea polyphenols in regard to PCa chemoprevention that will include epidemiological, mechanism based studies, safety, pharmacokinetics, and applicable clinical trials. The data that has been collected so far suggests that green tea may be a promising agent for PCa chemoprevention and further clinical trials of participants at risk of PCa or early stage PCa are warranted. PMID:19959000

  10. Chemoprevention of prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Brand, Timothy C; Canby-Hagino, Edith D; Pratap Kumar, A; Ghosh, Rita; Leach, Robin J; Thompson, Ian M

    2006-08-01

    Prostate cancer is a common malignancy with multiple potential opportunities for cancer prevention. As the genetic basis of this malignancy is further understood, prevention strategies will be developed for individual patients based on specific risk factors and pathways of carcinogenesis. The PCPT has conclusively proven that prostate cancer prevention is possible. The results of the SELECT should be available within several years. An enormous challenge for the medical community will be the development of an efficient strategy to evaluate the substantial number of dietary, behavioral, and pharmacologic prevention opportunities. Ultimately, the goal of prostate can-cer prevention is to (1) identify men who are destined to develop clinically significant prostate cancer, and (2) provide individualized agents to prevent disease development.

  11. Evidence supporting the conceptual framework of cancer chemoprevention in canines

    PubMed Central

    Kondratyuk, Tamara P.; Adrian, Julie Ann Luiz; Wright, Brian; Park, Eun-Jung; van Breemen, Richard B.; Morris, Kenneth R.; Pezzuto, John M.

    2016-01-01

    As with human beings, dogs suffer from the consequences of cancer. We investigated the potential of a formulation comprised of resveratrol, ellagic acid, genistein, curcumin and quercetin to modulate biomarkers indicative of disease prevention. Dog biscuits were evaluated for palatability and ability to deliver the chemopreventive agents. The extent of endogenous DNA damage in peripheral blood lymphocytes from dogs given the dietary supplement or placebo showed no change. However, H2O2-inducible DNA damage was significantly decreased after consumption of the supplement. The expression of 11 of 84 genes related to oxidative stress was altered. Hematological parameters remained in the reference range. The concept of chemoprevention for the explicit benefit of the canine is compelling since dogs are an important part of our culture. Our results establish a proof-of-principle and provide a framework for improving the health and well-being of “man’s best friend”. PMID:27216246

  12. Evidence supporting the conceptual framework of cancer chemoprevention in canines.

    PubMed

    Kondratyuk, Tamara P; Adrian, Julie Ann Luiz; Wright, Brian; Park, Eun-Jung; van Breemen, Richard B; Morris, Kenneth R; Pezzuto, John M

    2016-05-24

    As with human beings, dogs suffer from the consequences of cancer. We investigated the potential of a formulation comprised of resveratrol, ellagic acid, genistein, curcumin and quercetin to modulate biomarkers indicative of disease prevention. Dog biscuits were evaluated for palatability and ability to deliver the chemopreventive agents. The extent of endogenous DNA damage in peripheral blood lymphocytes from dogs given the dietary supplement or placebo showed no change. However, H2O2-inducible DNA damage was significantly decreased after consumption of the supplement. The expression of 11 of 84 genes related to oxidative stress was altered. Hematological parameters remained in the reference range. The concept of chemoprevention for the explicit benefit of the canine is compelling since dogs are an important part of our culture. Our results establish a proof-of-principle and provide a framework for improving the health and well-being of "man's best friend".

  13. Genetic and epigenetic studies for determining molecular targets of natural product anticancer agents.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yujiong; Li, Yong; Liu, Xiaoming; Cho, William C S

    2013-06-01

    Cancer is a disease caused by a series of genetic and epigenetic alterations. Therefore, agents targeting the genetic and/or epigenetic machinery offer potential for the development of anticancer drugs. Accumulating evidence has demonstrated that some common natural products [such as epigallocatechin-3-gallate (EGCG), curcumin, genistein, sulforaphane (SFN) and resveratrol] have anticancer properties through the mechanisms of altering epigenetic processes [including DNA methylation, histone modification, chromatin remodeling, microRNA (miRNA) regulation] and targeting cancer stem cells (CSCs). These bioactive compounds are able to revert epigenetic alterations in a variety of cancers in vitro and in vivo. They exert anticancer effects by targeting various signaling pathways related to the initiation, progression and metastasis of cancer. It appears that natural products hold great promise for cancer prevention and treatment by altering various epigenetic modifications. This review aims to discuss our current understanding of genetic and epigenetic targets of natural products and the effects of some common natural products on cancer chemoprevention and treatment.

  14. Sulforaphane Bioavailability from Glucoraphanin-Rich Broccoli: Control by Active Endogenous Myrosinase

    PubMed Central

    Fahey, Jed W.; Holtzclaw, W. David; Wehage, Scott L.; Wade, Kristina L.; Stephenson, Katherine K.; Talalay, Paul

    2015-01-01

    Glucoraphanin from broccoli and its sprouts and seeds is a water soluble and relatively inert precursor of sulforaphane, the reactive isothiocyanate that potently inhibits neoplastic cellular processes and prevents a number of disease states. Sulforaphane is difficult to deliver in an enriched and stable form for purposes of direct human consumption. We have focused upon evaluating the bioavailability of sulforaphane, either by direct administration of glucoraphanin (a glucosinolate, or β-thioglucoside-N-hydroxysulfate), or by co-administering glucoraphanin and the enzyme myrosinase to catalyze its conversion to sulforaphane at economic, reproducible and sustainable yields. We show that following administration of glucoraphanin in a commercially prepared dietary supplement to a small number of human volunteers, the volunteers had equivalent output of sulforaphane metabolites in their urine to that which they produced when given an equimolar dose of glucoraphanin in a simple boiled and lyophilized extract of broccoli sprouts. Furthermore, when either broccoli sprouts or seeds are administered directly to subjects without prior extraction and consequent inactivation of endogenous myrosinase, regardless of the delivery matrix or dose, the sulforaphane in those preparations is 3- to 4-fold more bioavailable than sulforaphane from glucoraphanin delivered without active plant myrosinase. These data expand upon earlier reports of inter- and intra-individual variability, when glucoraphanin was delivered in either teas, juices, or gelatin capsules, and they confirm that a variety of delivery matrices may be equally suitable for glucoraphanin supplementation (e.g. fruit juices, water, or various types of capsules and tablets). PMID:26524341

  15. Immunomodulatory activity of Sulforaphane, a naturally occurring isothiocyanate from broccoli (Brassica oleracea).

    PubMed

    Thejass, P; Kuttan, G

    2007-08-01

    The effect of Sulforaphane on the immune system was studied using BALB/c mice. Intraperitoneal administration of five doses of Sulforaphane (500 microg/dose/animal/day) was found to enhance the total WBC count (12,950 cells/mm3) on 9th day. Bone marrow cellularity (23 x 10(6) cells/femur) and number of alpha-esterase positive cells (1346.66/4000 cells) were also increased by the administration of Sulforaphane. Treatment with Sulforaphane along with the antigen, sheep red blood cells (SRBC), produced an enhancement in the circulating antibody titre and the number of plaque forming cells (PFC) in the spleen. Maximum number of PFC (315.83 PFC/10(6) spleen cells) was obtained on the 6th day. Administration of Sulforaphane also showed an enhancement in the phagocytic activity of peritoneal macrophages. Moreover administration of Sulforaphane significantly reduced the elevated level of TNF-alpha production by LPS stimulated macrophages. These results indicate the immunomodulatory activity of Sulforaphane.

  16. Chemoprevention of Lung Carcinogenesis in Addicted Smokers and Ex-Smokers

    PubMed Central

    Hecht, Stephen S.; Kassie, Fekadu; Hatsukami, Dorothy K.

    2013-01-01

    Chemoprevention of lung carcinogenesis is one approach to controlling the epidemic of lung cancer caused by cigarette smoking. The target for chemoprevention should be the activities of the multiple carcinogens, toxicants, co-carcinogens, tumor promoters and inflammatory compounds in cigarette smoke. There are presently many agents both synthetic and naturally occurring that prevent lung tumor development in well established animal models. It seems likely that logically constructed mixtures of these agents, developed from the ground up, will be necessary for prevention of lung carcinogenesis PMID:19550424

  17. Chemoprevention of colorectal cancer

    PubMed Central

    LANGMAN, M; BOYLE, P

    1998-01-01

    Department of Medicine, Queen Elizabeth Hospital, Birmingham B15 2TH, UK P BOYLE Colorectal cancer is the fourth commonest form of cancer in men with 678 000 estimated new cases per year worldwide, representing 8.9% of all new cancers. The disease is most frequent in Occidental countries and particularly so in North America, Australia, New Zealand, and parts of Europe. Prospects for colorectal cancer control are bright and a number of possible approaches could prove fruitful. Among these, pharmaceutical measures seem to be valid and logical approaches to the prevention of colorectal cancer and diminishing its impact. Such approaches could concentrate in primary prevention in at-risk subjects or be applied in altering the course of precursor or established disease. Treatments used must fulfil basic requirements of biological plausibility and safety in continued use in large numbers of subjects. Those available include vitamins and minerals, and other drugs with potential as antioxidants, immune modulators or promoters of cell differentiation or apoptosis. Of the various regimens suggested, vitamin A supplementation may even predispose to adverse outcomes, and antioxidant vitamins in general have no coherent body of evidence to support their use. N-acetylcysteine and ursodeoxycholic acid have promising characteristics but there are as yet no clinical data to support the use of the former in gut epithelial cancer, and formal dose ranging studies must be carried out before the latter is submitted to large scale trial. Folate shows promising characteristics but non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs and vitamin D seem the most promising agents. Both seem to reduce the incidence of disease, and to reduce growth rates and/or induce differentiation or apoptosis in gut epithelial cancer cells. Both are also well understood pharmacologically. They may be preferred to newer selective compounds in the same class until these newer compounds are confirmed as safe for widespread

  18. Tea in chemoprevention of cancer.

    PubMed

    Katiyar, S; Mukhtar, H

    1996-02-01

    This review summarizes available information on epidemiological and experimental data showing an association of tea consumption with cancer prevention. Studies showing cancer risk associated with tea consumption are also summarized. Tea is grown in about 30 countries and, next to water, is the most widely consumed beverage in the world. Experimental studies demonstrating the chemopreventive effects of tea have been conducted principally with green tea; limited studies have also assessed the usefulness of black tea. Majority of these studies have been carried out in skin tumor model system where consumption through drinking water of water extracts of tea or a polyphenolic fraction isolated from tea has been shown to afford protection against chemical carcinogen- or ultraviolet radiation-induced skin tumorigenesis. Tea consumption has also been shown to afford protection against chemical carcinogen-induced lung, forestomach, esophagus, duodenum, pancreas, liver, breast and colon carcinogenesis in specific bioassay models. Evidence has also accumulated showing that tea polyphenols prevent tumor promoter- and ultraviolet B-induced inflammatory responses in murine skin. The species and strains of animals, dose, route, frequency and duration of carcinogen administration, as well as types, route of administration and duration of tea or its polyphenolic component(s) treatment are described in detail. A brief description regarding mechanism(s) responsible for the broad chemopreventive effects of tea is provided. Epidemiologic studies, though inconclusive, in general suggest a possible preventive effect of tea consumption on human cancer. On the basis of available information, epidemiologic and experimental studies are ongoing to draw the possible relationship between tea consumption and cancer causation and prevention. Appropriate strategies for future clinical chemoprevention trials to translate animal data to human cancer risk are warranted.

  19. Natural compounds as anticancer agents: Experimental evidence

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Jiao; Jiang, Yang-Fu

    2012-01-01

    Cancer prevention research has drawn much attention worldwide. It is believed that some types of cancer can be prevented by following a healthy life style. Cancer chemoprevention by either natural or synthetic agents is a promising route towards lowering cancer incidence. In recent years, the concept of cancer chemoprevention has evolved greatly. Experimental studies in animal models demonstrate that the reversal or suppression of premalignant lesions by chemopreventive agents is achievable. Natural occurring agents such as dietary phytochemicals, tea polyphenols and resveratrol show chemopreventive activity in animal models. Moreover, clinical trials for testing the safety and efficacy of a variety of natural agents in preventing or treating human malignancy have been ongoing. Here, we summarize experimental data on the chemopreventive or tumor suppressive effects of several natural compounds including curcumin, (-)-epigallocatechin-3-gallate, resveratrol, indole-3-carbinol, and vitamin D. PMID:24520533

  20. Cancer Chemoprevention by Dietary Polyphenols: Promising Role for Epigenetics

    PubMed Central

    Link, Alexander; Balaguer, Francesc; Goel, Ajay

    2010-01-01

    Epigenetics refers to heritable changes that are not encoded in the DNA sequence itself, but play an important role in the control of gene expression. In mammals, epigenetic mechanisms include changes in DNA methylation, histone modifications and non-coding RNAs. Although epigenetic changes are heritable in somatic cells, these modifications are also potentially reversible, which makes them attractive and promising avenues for tailoring cancer preventive and therapeutic strategies. Burgeoning evidence in the last decade has provided unprecedented clues that diet and environmental factors directly influence epigenetic mechanisms in humans. Dietary polyphenols from green tea, turmeric, soybeans, broccoli and others have shown to possess multiple cell-regulatory activities within cancer cells. More recently, we have begun to understand that some of the dietary polyphenols may exert their chemopreventive effects in part by modulating various components of the epigenetic machinery in humans. In this article, we first discuss the contribution of diet and environmental factors on epigenetic alterations; subsequently, we provide a comprehensive review of literature on the role of various dietary polyphenols. In particular, we summarize the current knowledge on a large number of dietary agents and their effects on DNA methylation, histone modifications and regulation of expression of non-coding miRNAs in various in vitro and in vivo models. We emphasize how increased understanding of the chemopreventive effects of dietary polyphenols on specific epigenetic alterations may provide unique and yet unexplored novel and highly effective chemopreventive strategies for reducing the health burden of cancer and other diseases in humans. PMID:20599773

  1. A Chemoprevention Trial to Study the Effects of High Tea Consumption on Smoking-Related Oxidative Stress

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-02-01

    conducting a 6-month randomized, controlled, double-blinded chemopreventive trial in a group of COPD subjects who are being randomized to green or...pulmonary disease ( COPD ) [1,2]. Changes in dietary habits with the intake of more cancer-chemopreventive agents appear to be a practical approach...for cancer prevention in subjects with increased oxidative stress as is the case of subjects with COPD and ≥ 25 pack/year of smoking history. The

  2. A Chemoprevention Trial to Study the Effects of High Tea Consumption on Smoking-Related Oxidative Stress

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-02-01

    We completed c a 6-month randomized, controlled, double-blinded chemopreventive trial in a group of COPD subjects who are being randomized to green...disease ( COPD ) [1,2]. Changes in dietary habits with the intake of more cancer-chemopreventive agents appear to be a practical approach for cancer...prevention in subjects with increased oxidative stress as is the case of subjects with COPD and ≥ 25 pack/year of smoking history. The present

  3. The Role of Nutraceuticals in Chemoprevention and Chemotherapy and Their Clinical Outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Saldanha, Sabita N.; Tollefsbol, Trygve O.

    2012-01-01

    The genesis of cancer is often a slow process and the risk of developing cancer increases with age. Altering a diet that includes consumption of beneficial phytochemicals can influence the balance and availability of dietary chemopreventive agents. In chemopreventive approaches, foods containing chemicals that have anticancer properties can be supplemented in diets to prevent precancerous lesions from occurring. This necessitates further understanding of how phytochemicals can potently maintain healthy cells. Fortunately there is a plethora of plant-based phytochemicals although few of them are well studied in terms of their application as cancer chemopreventive and therapeutic agents. In this analysis we will examine phytochemicals that have strong chemopreventive and therapeutic properties in vitro as well as the design and modification of these bioactive compounds for preclinical and clinical applications. The increasing potential of combinational approaches using more than one bioactive dietary compound in chemoprevention or cancer therapy will also be evaluated. Many novel approaches to cancer prevention are on the horizon, several of which are showing great promise in saving lives in a cost-effective manner. PMID:22187555

  4. New enantiomeric fluorine-containing derivatives of sulforaphane: synthesis, absolute configurations and biological activity.

    PubMed

    Kiełbasiński, Piotr; Łuczak, Jerzy; Cierpiał, Tomasz; Błaszczyk, Jarosław; Sieroń, Lesław; Wiktorska, Katarzyna; Lubelska, Katarzyna; Milczarek, Małgorzata; Chilmończyk, Zdzisław

    2014-04-09

    Three pairs of enantiomers of the unknown sulforaphane analogs bearing organofluorine substituents bonded to the sulfinyl sulfur atom and having different number of methylene groups in the central carbon chain were synthesized and fully characterized, including determination of their absolute configurations. All the new compounds were tested in vitro for their cytotoxicity against melanoma cells to show increased activity in comparison with the natural sulforaphane. The influence of the particular structural changes in the molecule on the cytotoxicity is discussed.

  5. Sulforaphane protects against rotenone-induced neurotoxicity in vivo: Involvement of the mTOR, Nrf2, and autophagy pathways

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Qian; Chen, Bin; Wang, Xindong; Wu, Lixin; Yang, Yang; Cheng, Xiaolan; Hu, Zhengli; Cai, Xueting; Yang, Jie; Sun, Xiaoyan; Lu, Wuguang; Yan, Huaijiang; Chen, Jiao; Ye, Juan; Shen, Jianping; Cao, Peng

    2016-01-01

    Sulforaphane, a naturally occurring compound found in cruciferous vegetables, has been shown to be neuroprotective in several neurological disorders. In this study, we sought to investigate the potential protective effects and associated molecular mechanisms of sulforaphane in an in vivo Parkinson’s disease (PD) model, based on rotenone-mediated neurotoxicity. Our results showed that sulforaphane inhibited rotenone-induced locomotor activity deficiency and dopaminergic neuronal loss. Additionally, sulforaphane treatment inhibited the rotenone-induced reactive oxygen species production, malondialdehyde (MDA) accumulation, and resulted in an increased level of total glutathione and reduced glutathione (GSH): oxidized glutathione (GSSG) in the brain. Western blot analysis illustrated that sulforaphane increased the expression of nuclear factor (erythroid-derived 2)-like 2 (Nrf2), heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1), and NAD(P)H quinone oxidoreductase (NQO1), the latter two of which are anti-oxidative enzymes. Moreover, sulforaphane treatment significantly attenuated rotenone-inhibited mTOR-mediated p70S6K and 4E-BP1 signalling pathway, as well as neuronal apoptosis. In addition, sulforaphane rescued rotenone-inhibited autophagy, as detected by LC3-II. Collectively, these findings demonstrated that sulforaphane exert neuroprotective effect involving Nrf2-dependent reductions in oxidative stress, mTOR-dependent inhibition of neuronal apoptosis, and the restoration of normal autophagy. Sulforaphane appears to be a promising compound with neuroprotective properties that may play an important role in preventing PD. PMID:27553905

  6. Neuroprotective Effects of Sulforaphane on Cholinergic Neurons in Mice with Alzheimer’s Disease-Like Lesions

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Rui; Zhang, Jingzhu; Fang, Lingduo; Li, Xi; Zhao, Yue; Shi, Wanying; An, Li

    2014-01-01

    Alzheimer’s disease (AD) is a common neurodegenerative disease in elderly individuals, and effective therapies are unavailable. This study was designed to investigate the neuroprotective effects of sulforaphane (an activator of NF-E2-related factor 2) on mice with AD-like lesions induced by combined administration of aluminum and d-galactose. Step-down-type passive avoidance tests showed sulforaphane ameliorated cognitive impairment in AD-like mice. Immunohistochemistry results indicated sulforaphane attenuated cholinergic neuron loss in the medial septal and hippocampal CA1 regions in AD-like mice. However, spectrophotometry revealed no significant difference in acetylcholine level or the activity of choline acetyltransferase or acetylcholinesterase in the cerebral cortex among groups of control and AD-like mice with and without sulforaphane treatment. Sulforaphane significantly increased the numbers of 5-bromo-2'-deoxyuridine-positive neurons in the subventricular and subgranular zones in AD-like mice which were significantly augmented compared with controls. Atomic absorption spectrometry revealed significantly lower aluminum levels in the brains of sulforaphane-treated AD-like mice than in those that did not receive sulforaphane treatment. In conclusion, sulforaphane ameliorates neurobehavioral deficits by reducing cholinergic neuron loss in the brains of AD-like mice, and the mechanism may be associated with neurogenesis and aluminum load reduction. These findings suggest that phytochemical sulforaphane has potential application in AD therapeutics. PMID:25196440

  7. Sulforaphane induces differential modulation of mitochondrial biogenesis and dynamics in normal cells and tumor cells.

    PubMed

    Negrette-Guzmán, Mario; Huerta-Yepez, Sara; Vega, Mario I; León-Contreras, Juan Carlos; Hernández-Pando, Rogelio; Medina-Campos, Omar Noel; Rodríguez, Esteban; Tapia, Edilia; Pedraza-Chaverri, José

    2017-02-01

    Antioxidant-based chemotherapy has been intensely debated. Herein, we show that sulforaphane (SFN) induced mitochondrial biogenesis followed by mitochondrial fusion in a kidney cell line commonly used in nephroprotective models. At the same concentration and exposure time, SFN induced cell death in prostate cancer cells accompanied by mitochondrial biogenesis and fragmentation. Stabilization of the nuclear factor E2-related factor-2 (Nrf2) could be associated with these effects in the tumor cell line. An increase in the peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-γ co-activator-1α (PGC1α) level and a decrease in the hypoxia-inducible factor-1α (HIF1α) level would suggest a possible metabolic shift. The knockdown in the nuclear respiratory factor-1 (NRF1) attenuated the SFN-induced effect on prostate cancer cells demonstrating that mitochondrial biogenesis plays an important role in cell death for this kind of tumor cells. This evidence supports SFN as a potential antineoplastic agent that could inhibit tumor development and could protect normal tissues by modulating common processes.

  8. Sulforaphane Inhibits Prostaglandin E2 Synthesis by Suppressing Microsomal Prostaglandin E Synthase 1

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Jiping; Joplin, Denise G.; Cross, Janet V.; Templeton, Dennis J.

    2012-01-01

    Sulforaphane (SFN) is a dietary cancer preventive with incompletely characterized mechanism(s) of cancer prevention. Since prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) promotes cancer progression, we hypothesized that SFN may block PGE2 synthesis in cancer cells. We found that SFN indeed blocked PGE2 production in human A549 cancer cells not by inhibiting COX-2, but rather by suppressing the expression of microsomal prostaglandin E synthase (mPGES-1), the enzyme that directly synthesizes PGE2. We identified the Hypoxia Inducible Factor 1 alpha (HIF-1α) as the target of SFN-mediated mPGES-1 suppression. SFN suppressed HIF-1α protein expression and the presence of HIF-1α at the mPGES-1 promoter, resulting in reduced transcription of mPGES-1. Finally, SFN also reduced expression of mPGES-1 and PGE2 production in A549 xenograft tumors in mice. Together, these results point to the HIF-1α, mPGES-1 and PGE2 axis as a potential mediator of the anti-cancer effects of SFN, and illustrate the potential of SFN for therapeutic control of cancer and inflammation. Harmful side effects in patients taking agents that target the more upstream COX-2 enzyme render the downstream target mPGES-1 a significant target for anti-inflammatory therapy. Thus, SFN could prove to be an important therapeutic approach to both cancer and inflammation. PMID:23166763

  9. Resveratrol and aspirin eliminate tetraploid cells for anticancer chemoprevention.

    PubMed

    Lissa, Delphine; Senovilla, Laura; Rello-Varona, Santiago; Vitale, Ilio; Michaud, Mickaël; Pietrocola, Federico; Boilève, Alice; Obrist, Florine; Bordenave, Chloé; Garcia, Pauline; Michels, Judith; Jemaà, Mohamed; Kepp, Oliver; Castedo, Maria; Kroemer, Guido

    2014-02-25

    Tetraploidy constitutes a genomically metastable state that can lead to aneuploidy and genomic instability. Tetraploid cells are frequently found in preneoplastic lesions, including intestinal cancers arising due to the inactivation of the tumor suppressor adenomatous polyposis coli (APC). Using a phenotypic screen, we identified resveratrol as an agent that selectively reduces the fitness of tetraploid cells by slowing down their cell cycle progression and by stimulating the intrinsic pathway of apoptosis. Selective killing of tetraploid cells was observed for a series of additional agents that indirectly or directly stimulate AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) including salicylate, whose chemopreventive action has been established by epidemiological studies and clinical trials. Both resveratrol and salicylate reduced the formation of tetraploid or higher-order polyploid cells resulting from the culture of human colon carcinoma cell lines or primary mouse epithelial cells lacking tumor protein p53 (TP53, best known as p53) in the presence of antimitotic agents, as determined by cytofluorometric and videomicroscopic assays. Moreover, oral treatment with either resveratrol or aspirin, the prodrug of salicylate, repressed the accumulation of tetraploid intestinal epithelial cells in the Apc(Min/+) mouse model of colon cancer. Collectively, our results suggest that the chemopreventive action of resveratrol and aspirin involves the elimination of tetraploid cancer cell precursors.

  10. The Chemopreventive Phytochemical Moringin Isolated from Moringa oleifera Seeds Inhibits JAK/STAT Signaling

    PubMed Central

    Weigl, Julia; De Nicola, Gina Rosalinda; Canistro, Donatella; Paolini, Moreno; Iori, Renato; Rascle, Anne

    2016-01-01

    Sulforaphane (SFN) and moringin (GMG-ITC) are edible isothiocyanates present as glucosinolate precursors in cruciferous vegetables and in the plant Moringa oleifera respectively, and recognized for their chemopreventive and medicinal properties. In contrast to the well-studied SFN, little is known about the molecular pathways targeted by GMG-ITC. We investigated the ability of GMG-ITC to inhibit essential signaling pathways that are frequently upregulated in cancer and immune disorders, such as JAK/STAT and NF-κB. We report for the first time that, similarly to SFN, GMG-ITC in the nanomolar range suppresses IL-3-induced expression of STAT5 target genes. GMG-ITC, like SFN, does not inhibit STAT5 phosphorylation, suggesting a downstream inhibitory event. Interestingly, treatment with GMG-ITC or SFN had a limited inhibitory effect on IFNα-induced STAT1 and STAT2 activity, indicating that both isothiocyanates differentially target JAK/STAT signaling pathways. Furthermore, we showed that GMG-ITC in the micromolar range is a more potent inhibitor of TNF-induced NF-κB activity than SFN. Finally, using a cellular system mimicking constitutive active STAT5-induced cell transformation, we demonstrated that SFN can reverse the survival and growth advantage mediated by oncogenic STAT5 and triggers cell death, therefore providing experimental evidence of a cancer chemopreventive activity of SFN. This work thus identified STAT5, and to a lesser extent STAT1/STAT2, as novel targets of moringin. It also contributes to a better understanding of the biological activities of the dietary isothiocyanates GMG-ITC and SFN and further supports their apparent beneficial role in the prevention of chronic illnesses such as cancer, inflammatory diseases and immune disorders. PMID:27304884

  11. The Chemopreventive Phytochemical Moringin Isolated from Moringa oleifera Seeds Inhibits JAK/STAT Signaling.

    PubMed

    Michl, Carina; Vivarelli, Fabio; Weigl, Julia; De Nicola, Gina Rosalinda; Canistro, Donatella; Paolini, Moreno; Iori, Renato; Rascle, Anne

    2016-01-01

    Sulforaphane (SFN) and moringin (GMG-ITC) are edible isothiocyanates present as glucosinolate precursors in cruciferous vegetables and in the plant Moringa oleifera respectively, and recognized for their chemopreventive and medicinal properties. In contrast to the well-studied SFN, little is known about the molecular pathways targeted by GMG-ITC. We investigated the ability of GMG-ITC to inhibit essential signaling pathways that are frequently upregulated in cancer and immune disorders, such as JAK/STAT and NF-κB. We report for the first time that, similarly to SFN, GMG-ITC in the nanomolar range suppresses IL-3-induced expression of STAT5 target genes. GMG-ITC, like SFN, does not inhibit STAT5 phosphorylation, suggesting a downstream inhibitory event. Interestingly, treatment with GMG-ITC or SFN had a limited inhibitory effect on IFNα-induced STAT1 and STAT2 activity, indicating that both isothiocyanates differentially target JAK/STAT signaling pathways. Furthermore, we showed that GMG-ITC in the micromolar range is a more potent inhibitor of TNF-induced NF-κB activity than SFN. Finally, using a cellular system mimicking constitutive active STAT5-induced cell transformation, we demonstrated that SFN can reverse the survival and growth advantage mediated by oncogenic STAT5 and triggers cell death, therefore providing experimental evidence of a cancer chemopreventive activity of SFN. This work thus identified STAT5, and to a lesser extent STAT1/STAT2, as novel targets of moringin. It also contributes to a better understanding of the biological activities of the dietary isothiocyanates GMG-ITC and SFN and further supports their apparent beneficial role in the prevention of chronic illnesses such as cancer, inflammatory diseases and immune disorders.

  12. Kinetic and thermodynamic studies of sulforaphane adsorption on macroporous resin.

    PubMed

    Yuanfeng, Wu; Lei, Zhang; Jianwei, Mao; Shiwang, Liu; Jun, Huang; Yuru, You; Lehe, Mei

    2016-08-15

    The adsorption equilibrium, kinetic and thermodynamic of sulforaphane (SF) adsorption onto macroporous resin in aqueous phase were studied. The SP850 resin was screened as the appropriate resin for SF purification. From the equilibrium studies, the Redlich-Peterson model was found to be the best for description of the adsorption behavior of SF onto SP850 resin, followed by the Freundlich model and the Langmuir model. Batch equilibrium experiments demonstrated that, in the examined temperature range, the equilibrium adsorption capacity of SP850 resin decreased with increasing adsorption temperature. Thermodynamics studies indicated that the adsorption of SF was a physical, exothermic, and spontaneous process. The adsorption kinetics revealed that the pseudo-second-order kinetic model was suitable to characterize the kinetics of adsorption of SF onto SP850. Finally, the intra-particle diffusion model demonstrated that SF diffused quickly into macropores, and that diffusion slowed down in the meso- and micropores.

  13. Differential effects of phenethyl isothiocyanate and D,L-sulforaphane on Toll-like receptor 3 signaling

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Jianzhong; Ghosh, Arundhati; Coyle, Elizabeth M.; Lee, Joomin; Hahm, Eun-Ryeong; Singh, Shivendra V.; Sarkar, Saumendra N.

    2013-01-01

    Naturally occurring isothiocyanates (ITC) from cruciferous vegetables are widely studied for their cancer chemopreventive effects. Here we investigated the effects of ITC on Toll-like receptor (TLR) signaling, and found that two most promising ITCs, phenethyl isothiocyanate (PEITC) and D,L-sulforaphane (SFN), have differential effects on dsRNA mediated innate immune signaling through TLR3. PEITC preferentially inhibited TLR3 mediated IRF3 signaling and downstream gene expression in vivo and in vitro, whereas SFN caused inhibition of TLR3 mediated NF-κB signaling and downstream gene expression. Mechanistically, PEITC inhibited ligand (dsRNA) dependent dimerization of TLR3 resulting in inhibition of signaling through IRF3. On the other hand, SFN did not disrupt TLR3 dimerization indicating that it affects further downstream pathway resulting in NF-κB inhibition. In order to examine the biological significance of these findings in the context of anti-tumor activities of these compounds, we used two approaches: (a) first, we showed that dsRNA mediated apoptosis of tumor cells via TLR3 was inhibited in the presence of PEITC, whereas this response was augmented by SFN treatment; (b) second, in a separate assay measuring anchorage independent growth and colony formation by immortalized fibroblasts we made similar observations. Here again, PEITC antagonized dsRNA mediated inhibition of colony formation while SFN enhanced the inhibition. These results indicate biologically relevant functional differences between two structurally similar ITC and may provide important insights in therapeutic development of these compounds targeted to specific cancer. PMID:23509350

  14. Complementary medicine, chemoprevention, and staging of prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Crawford, E David

    2003-01-01

    The 13th International Prostate Cancer Update was held in Vail, Colorado, in February 2003. This article provides an overview of the high points in the areas of complementary medicine, chemoprevention, and staging that were discussed at this meeting. M. Scott Lucia, MD, addressed the use of various hormonal agents, antiproliferative or differentiating agents, antiinflammatory agents, and antioxidants in patients with prostate cancer. Wael A. Sakr, MD, provided an overview of prognostic markers for this disease. Arturo Mendoza-Valdes, MD, explored the potential role of exercise for patients with prostate cancer, and Bruce Sodee, MD, described some exciting new developments in prostate imaging. E. David Crawford, MD, discussed the ongoing Prostate Cancer Prevention Trial.

  15. Prostate cancer chemoprevention in men of African descent: current state of the art and opportunities for future research.

    PubMed

    Chornokur, Ganna; Kumar, Nagi B

    2013-08-01

    Prostate cancer is the most frequently diagnosed malignancy in men. However, African American/Black men are 60 % more likely to be diagnosed with and 2.4 times more likely to die from prostate cancer, compared to Non-Hispanic White men. Despite the increased burden of this malignancy, no evidence-based recommendation regarding prostate cancer screening exists for the high-risk population. Moreover, in addition to screening and detection, African American men may constitute a prime population for chemoprevention. Early detection and chemoprevention may thus represent an integral part of prostate cancer control in this population. Importantly, recent research has elucidated biological differences in the prostate tumors of African American compared to European American men. The latter may enable a more favorable response in African American men to specific chemopreventive agents that target relevant signal transduction pathways. Based on this evolving evidence, the aims of this review are threefold. First, we aim to summarize the biological differences that were reported in the prostate tumors of African American and European American men. Second, we will review the single- and multi-target chemopreventive agents placing specific emphasis on the pathways implicated in prostate carcinogenesis. And lastly, we will discuss the most promising nutraceutical chemopreventive compounds. Our review underscores the promise of chemoprevention in prostate cancer control, as well as provides justification for further investment in this filed to ultimately reduce prostate cancer morbidity and mortality in this high-risk population of African American men.

  16. Biological Basis for Chemoprevention of Ovarian Cancer

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2000-10-01

    Since reduction of ovulation is protective against ovarian cancer, prevention may represent a feasible approach to decreasing mortality . To achieve a...potent apoptotic effect on ovarian epithelial cells, the use of levonorgestrel in chemoprevention of ovarian cancer is being explored in chickens and women...A chemoprevention trial is ongoing in chickens and we will begin a trial to determine whether levonorgestrel induces apoptosis in the ovarian epithelium of women undergoing oophorectomy.

  17. Prognostic factors, predictive markers and cancer biology: the triad for successful oral cancer chemoprevention.

    PubMed

    Monteiro de Oliveira Novaes, Jose Augusto; William, William N

    2016-10-01

    Oral squamous cell carcinomas represent a significant cancer burden worldwide. Unfortunately, chemoprevention strategies investigated to date have failed to produce an agent considered standard of care to prevent oral cancers. Nonetheless, recent advances in clinical trial design may streamline drug development in this setting. In this manuscript, we review some of these improvements, including risk prediction tools based on molecular markers that help select patients most suitable for chemoprevention. We also discuss the opportunities that novel preclinical models and modern molecular profiling techniques will bring to the prevention field in the near future, and propose a clinical trials framework that incorporates molecular prognostic factors, predictive markers and cancer biology as a roadmap to improve chemoprevention strategies for oral cancers.

  18. The strategies to control prostate cancer by chemoprevention approaches

    PubMed Central

    Ting, Harold; Deep, Gagan; Agarwal, Chapla; Agarwal, Rajesh

    2014-01-01

    Prostate cancer (PCA) is the most commonly diagnosed cancer in men in the United States with growing worldwide incidence. Despite intensive investment in improving early detection, PCA often escapes timely detection and mortality remains high; this malignancy being the second highest cancer-associated mortality in American men. Collectively, health care costs of PCA results in an immense financial burden that is only expected to grow. Additionally, even in cases of successful treatment, PCA is associated with long-term and pervasive effects on patients. A proactive alternative to treating PCA is to prevent its occurrence and progression prior to symptomatic malignancy. This may serve to address the issue of burgeoning healthcare costs and increasing number of sufferers. One potential regimen in service of this alternative is PCA chemoprevention. Here, chemical compounds with cancer preventive efficacy are identified on the basis of their potential in a host of categories: their historical medicinal use, correlation with reduced risk in population studies, non-toxicity, their unique chemical properties, or their role in biological systems. PCA chemopreventive agents are drawn from multiple broad classes of chemicals, themselves further subdivided based on source or potential effect, with most derived from natural products. Many such compounds have shown efficacy, varying from inhibiting deregulated PCA cell signaling, proliferation, epithelial to mesenchymal transition (EMT), invasion, metastasis, tumor growth and angiogenesis and inducing apoptosis. Overall, these chemopreventive agents show great promise in PCA pre-clinical models, though additional work remains to be done in effectively translating these findings into clinical use. PMID:24389535

  19. Hedera nepalensis K. Koch: A Novel Source of Natural Cancer Chemopreventive and Anticancerous Compounds.

    PubMed

    Jafri, Laila; Saleem, Samreen; Kondrytuk, Tamara P; Haq, Ihsan-ul; Ullah, Nazif; Pezzuto, John M; Mirza, Bushra

    2016-03-01

    Traditional medicinal plants are often used for both the prevention and the treatment of local diseases. Taking into consideration the medicinal importance of Hedera nepalensis within local Pakistani traditions, the present study was undertaken to analyze the in vitro cancer chemopreventive and cytotoxic properties of the plant. The in vitro cancer chemopreventive testing was performed using nitrite assay, NFκB assay, aromatase assay, and quinone reductase 1 (QR1) assay. The cytotoxic potential was evaluated on three cancer-cell lines: MCF-7, MDA-MB-231, and HeLa using sulforhodamine B (SRB) assay. The results of cancer chemopreventive assays show that n-hexane and ethyl acetate fractions of tested plant have promising cancer chemopreventive potential. Lupeol isolated from n-hexane as well as ethyl acetate fraction showed lowest IC50 (0.20 ± 1.9 μM) in NFκB assay. Crude extract and its fractions inhibited the growth of three cancer cell lines by more than 60%, IC50 value of lupeol varied from 2.32 to 10.2 μM. HPLC-DAD-based quantification of lupeol in different plant tissues demonstrated that leaves of H. nepalensis are a rich source of lupeol (0.196 mg/100 mg dry weight). Our data have shown that H. nepalensis harbors cancer chemopreventive and cytotoxic agents.

  20. Novel targets of sulforaphane in primary cardiomyocytes identified by proteomic analysis.

    PubMed

    Angeloni, Cristina; Turroni, Silvia; Bianchi, Laura; Fabbri, Daniele; Motori, Elisa; Malaguti, Marco; Leoncini, Emanuela; Maraldi, Tullia; Bini, Luca; Brigidi, Patrizia; Hrelia, Silvana

    2013-01-01

    Cardiovascular diseases represent the main cause of mortality in the industrialized world and the identification of effective preventive strategies is of fundamental importance. Sulforaphane, an isothiocyanate from cruciferous vegetables, has been shown to up-regulate phase II enzymes in cardiomyocytes and counteract oxidative stress-induced apoptosis. Aim of the present study was the identification and characterization of novel sulforaphane targets in cardiomyocytes applying a proteomic approach. Two-dimensional gel electrophoresis and mass spectrometry were used to generate protein profiles of primary neonatal rat cardiomyocytes treated and untreated with 5 µM sulforaphane for 1-48 h. According to image analysis, 64 protein spots were found as differentially expressed and their functional correlations were investigated using the MetaCore program. We mainly focused on 3 proteins: macrophage migration inhibitory factor (MIF), CLP36 or Elfin, and glyoxalase 1, due to their possible involvement in cardioprotection. Validation of the time-dependent differential expression of these proteins was performed by western blotting. In particular, to gain insight into the cardioprotective role of the modulation of glyoxalase 1 by sulforaphane, further experiments were performed using methylglyoxal to mimic glycative stress. Sulforaphane was able to counteract methylglyoxal-induced apoptosis, ROS production, and glycative stress, likely through glyoxalase 1 up-regulation. In this study, we reported for the first time new molecular targets of sulforaphane, such as MIF, CLP36 and glyoxalase 1. In particular, we gave new insights into the anti-glycative role of sulforaphane in cardiomyocytes, confirming its pleiotropic behavior in counteracting cardiovascular diseases.

  1. Novel Targets of Sulforaphane in Primary Cardiomyocytes Identified by Proteomic Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Angeloni, Cristina; Turroni, Silvia; Bianchi, Laura; Fabbri, Daniele; Motori, Elisa; Malaguti, Marco; Leoncini, Emanuela; Maraldi, Tullia; Bini, Luca; Brigidi, Patrizia; Hrelia, Silvana

    2013-01-01

    Cardiovascular diseases represent the main cause of mortality in the industrialized world and the identification of effective preventive strategies is of fundamental importance. Sulforaphane, an isothiocyanate from cruciferous vegetables, has been shown to up-regulate phase II enzymes in cardiomyocytes and counteract oxidative stress-induced apoptosis. Aim of the present study was the identification and characterization of novel sulforaphane targets in cardiomyocytes applying a proteomic approach. Two-dimensional gel electrophoresis and mass spectrometry were used to generate protein profiles of primary neonatal rat cardiomyocytes treated and untreated with 5 µM sulforaphane for 1-48 h. According to image analysis, 64 protein spots were found as differentially expressed and their functional correlations were investigated using the MetaCore program. We mainly focused on 3 proteins: macrophage migration inhibitory factor (MIF), CLP36 or Elfin, and glyoxalase 1, due to their possible involvement in cardioprotection. Validation of the time-dependent differential expression of these proteins was performed by western blotting. In particular, to gain insight into the cardioprotective role of the modulation of glyoxalase 1 by sulforaphane, further experiments were performed using methylglyoxal to mimic glycative stress. Sulforaphane was able to counteract methylglyoxal-induced apoptosis, ROS production, and glycative stress, likely through glyoxalase 1 up-regulation. In this study, we reported for the first time new molecular targets of sulforaphane, such as MIF, CLP36 and glyoxalase 1. In particular, we gave new insights into the anti-glycative role of sulforaphane in cardiomyocytes, confirming its pleiotropic behavior in counteracting cardiovascular diseases. PMID:24349480

  2. Chemoprevention Trial Feasibility Using Botanicals in Exceptionally High Risk Populations for Lung Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Nagi B; Quinn, Gwendolyn P; Alexandrow, Mark G; Gray, Jhanelle; Schell, Michael; Sutton, Steve; Haura, Eric B

    2015-01-01

    While chemoprevention with botanicals shows promise in reducing cancer risk, recruitment and retention of participants for trials continues to be costly and presents unique challenges. Knowledge of interest, willingness of target populations and evaluation of design challenges are critical to improve accrual in these chemoprevention trials. Objective The study assessed interest and willingness of former smokers to participate in a chemoprevention trial using a botanical agent. Methods An introductory letter and survey instrument were mailed to 609 consecutive, former heavy smokers, with no cancer, from a database of 826 subjects at the Moffitt Cancer Center. Results 202 (40.4%) subjects returned completed surveys. 92-96% reported interest in receiving free lung exams and knowing their lung cancer risk. 88% were interested in participating in a trial evaluating a botanical agent for lung cancer prevention. Over 92% of subjects reported willingness to comply with study requirements; multiple blood draws and trips to the Center, spiral CTs and chest x-rays. Subjects were relatively less enthusiastic (73-79%) about bronchoscopy, taking multiple study agents and assignment to placebo arm. Conclusions Our study strongly suggests feasibility, highlights potential challenges and the significant interest and willingness of this exceptionally high risk population to participate in chemoprevention trials. PMID:26101725

  3. Preclinical systemic toxicity evaluation of chitosan-solid lipid nanoparticle-encapsulated aspirin and curcumin in combination with free sulforaphane in BALB/c mice

    PubMed Central

    Thakkar, Arvind; Chenreddy, Sushma; Thio, Astrid; Khamas, Wael; Wang, Jeffrey; Prabhu, Sunil

    2016-01-01

    Our previous studies have established the efficacy of chemopreventive regimens of aspirin and curcumin (CUR) encapsulated within solid lipid nanoparticles (SLNs) in combination with free sulforaphane (ACS combination) to prevent or delay the initiation and progression of pancreatic cancer, classified as one of the deadliest diseases with very low chances of survival upon diagnosis. Although toxicity of individual drugs and SLN has been studied previously, there are no studies in current literature that evaluate the potential toxicity of a combined regimen of ACS, especially when encapsulated within chitosan-SLNs (c-SLNs). Hence, objective of the current study was to investigate the potential toxic effects of ACS c-SLN combined chemopreventive regimens following acute (3 days), subacute (28 days), and subchronic (90 days) administrations by oral gavage in BALB/c mice. Mice were administered the following regimens: saline, blank c-SLN, low-dose ACS c-SLN (2+4.5+0.16 mg/kg), medium-dose ACS c-SLN (20+45+1.6 mg/kg), and high-dose ACS c-SLN (60+135+4.8 mg/kg). The potential toxicity was evaluated based on animal survival, body weight, hematology, blood chemistry, and organ histopathology. During 3-day, 28-day, and 90-day study periods, no animal deaths were observed. Treatment with ACS c-SLNs did not cause alteration in complete blood counts and blood chemistry data. Histopathological examination of various organ sections (pancreas, heart, liver, kidney, and brain) appeared normal. Based on the results of this study, no signs of toxicity in acute, subacute, and subchronic studies following oral administration of ACS c-SLNs were found indicating that the oral dosing regimens were safe at the levels tested for long-term administration to prevent the onset of pancreatic cancer. PMID:27499621

  4. Ginseng Metabolites on Cancer Chemoprevention: An Angiogenesis Link?

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Chong-Zhi; Cai, Yi; Anderson, Samantha; Yuan, Chun-Su

    2015-01-01

    Cancer is a leading cause of death in the United States. Angiogenesis inhibitors have been introduced for the treatment of cancer. Based on the fact that many anticancer agents have been developed from botanical sources, there is a significant untapped resource to be found in natural products. American ginseng is a commonly used herbal medicine in the U.S., which possess antioxidant properties. After oral ingestion, natural ginseng saponins are biotransformed to their metabolites by the enteric microbiome before being absorbed. The major metabolites, ginsenoside Rg3 and compound K, showed significant potent anticancer activity compared to that of their parent ginsenosides Rb1, Rc and Rd. In this review, the molecular mechanisms of ginseng metabolites on cancer chemoprevention, especially apoptosis and angiogenic inhibition, are discussed. Ginseng gut microbiome metabolites showed significant anti-angiogenic effects on pulmonary, gastric and ovarian cancers. This review suggests that in addition to the chemopreventive effects of ginseng compounds, as angiogenic inhibitors, ginsenoside metabolites could be used in combination with other cancer chemotherapeutic agents in cancer management. PMID:26941993

  5. Brain mitochondria from rats treated with sulforaphane are resistant to redox-regulated permeability transition.

    PubMed

    Greco, Tiffany; Fiskum, Gary

    2010-12-01

    Oxidative stress promotes Ca2+-dependent opening of the mitochondrial inner membrane permeability transition pore (PTP), causing bioenergetic failure and subsequent cell death in many paradigms, including those related to acute brain injury. One approach to pre-conditioning against oxidative stress is pharmacologic activation of the Nrf2/ARE pathway of antioxidant gene expression by agents such as sulforaphane (SFP). This study tested the hypothesis that administration of SFP to normal rats increases resistance of isolated brain mitochondria to redox-sensitive PTP opening. SFP or DMSO vehicle was administered intraperitoneally to adult male rats at 10 mg/kg 40 h prior to isolation of non-synaptic brain mitochondria. Mitochondria were suspended in medium containing a respiratory substrate and were exposed to an addition of Ca2+ below the threshold for PTP opening. Subsequent addition of tert-butyl hydroperoxide (tBOOH) resulted in a cyclosporin A-inhibitable release of accumulated Ca2+ into the medium, as monitored by an increase in fluorescence of Calcium Green 5N within the medium, and was preceded by a decrease in the autofluorescence of mitochondrial NAD(P)H. SFP treatment significantly reduced the rate of tBOOH-induced Ca2+ release but did not affect NAD(P)H oxidation or inhibit PTP opening induced by the addition of phenylarsine oxide, a direct sulfhydryl oxidizing agent. SFP treatment had no effect on respiration by brain mitochondria and had no effect on PTP opening or respiration when added directly to isolated mitochondria. We conclude that SFP confers resistance of brain mitochondria to redox-regulated PTP opening, which could contribute to neuroprotection observed with SFP.

  6. Sulforaphane improves outcomes and slows cerebral ischemic/reperfusion injury via inhibition of NLRP3 inflammasome activation in rats.

    PubMed

    Yu, Chang; He, Qi; Zheng, Jing; Li, Ling Yu; Hou, Yang Hao; Song, Fang Zhou

    2017-02-09

    Ischemia/reperfusion (I/R) injury has been correlated with systemic inflammatory response. In addition, NLRP3 has been suggested as a cause in many inflammatory processes. Sulforaphane (SFN) is a naturally occurring isothiocyanate found in cruciferous vegetables, such as broccoli and cabbage. While recent studies have demonstrated that Sulforaphane has protective effects against cerebral ischemia/reperfusion injury, little is known about how those protective effects work. In this study, we focus our investigation on the role and process of Sulforaphane in the inhibition of NLRP3 inflammasome activation, as well as its effect on brain ischemia/reperfusion injury. Adult male Sprague-Dawley rats were injected with Sulforaphane (5 or 10mg/kg) intraperitoneally at the beginning of reperfusion, after a 60min period of occlusion. A neurological score and infarct volume were assessed at 24h after the administration of Sulforaphane. Myeloperoxidase (MPO) activity was measured at 24h to assess neutrophil infiltration in brain tissue. ELISA, RT-PCR and Western blot analyses were used to measure any inflammatory reaction. Sulforaphane treatment significantly reduced infarct volume and improved neurological scores when compared to a vehicle-treated group. Neutrophil infiltration was significantly higher in the vehicle-treated group than in the Sulforaphane treatment group. Sulforaphane treatment inhibits NLRP3 inflammasome activation and the downregulation of cleaved caspase-1, while reducing IL-1β and IL-18 expression. The inhibition of inflammatory response with Sulforaphane treatment improves outcomes after focal cerebral ischemia. This neuroprotective effect is likely exerted by Sulforaphane inhibited NLRP3 inflammasome activation caused by the downregulation of NLRP3, the induction of cleaved caspase-1, and thus the reduction of IL-1β and IL-18.

  7. Sulforaphane, a Dietary Isothiocyanate, Induces G2/M Arrest in Cervical Cancer Cells through CyclinB1 Downregulation and GADD45β/CDC2 Association

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Ya-Min; Tsai, Ching-Chou; Hsu, Yi-Chiang

    2016-01-01

    Globally, cervical cancer is the most common malignancy affecting women. The main treatment methods for this type of cancer include conization or hysterectomy procedures. Sulforaphane (SFN) is a natural, compound-based drug derived from dietary isothiocyanates which has previously been shown to possess potent anti-tumor and chemopreventive effects against several types of cancer. The present study investigated the effects of SFN on anti-proliferation and G2/M phase cell cycle arrest in cervical cancer cell lines (Cx, CxWJ, and HeLa). We found that cytotoxicity is associated with an accumulation of cells in the G2/M phases of the cell-cycle. Treatment with SFN led to cell cycle arrest as well as the down-regulation of Cyclin B1 expression, but not of CDC2 expression. In addition, the effects of GADD45β gene activation in cell cycle arrest increase proportionally with the dose of SFN; however, mitotic delay and the inhibition of proliferation both depend on the dosage of SFN used to treat cancer cells. These results indicate that SFN may delay the development of cancer by arresting cell growth in the G2/M phase via down-regulation of Cyclin B1 gene expression, dissociation of the cyclin B1/CDC2 complex, and up-regulation of GADD45β proteins. PMID:27626412

  8. Chemical genomics of cancer chemopreventive dithiolethiones

    PubMed Central

    Tran, Quynh T.; Xu, Lijing; Phan, Vinhthuy; Goodwin, Shirlean B.; Rahman, Mostafizur; Jin, Victor X.; Sutter, Carrie H.; Roebuck, Bill D.; Kensler, Thomas W.; George, E.Olusegun; Sutter, Thomas R.

    2009-01-01

    3H-1,2-dithiole-3-thione (D3T) and its analogues 4-methyl-5-pyrazinyl-3H-1,2-dithiole-3-thione (OLT) and 5-tert-butyl-3H-1,2-dithiole-3-thione (TBD) are chemopreventive agents that block or diminish early stages of carcinogenesis by inducing activities of detoxication enzymes. While OLT has been used in clinical trials, TBD has been shown to be more efficacious and possibly less toxic than OLT in animals. Here, we utilize a robust and high-resolution chemical genomics procedure to examine the pharmacological structure–activity relationships of these compounds in livers of male rats by microarray analyses. We identified 226 differentially expressed genes that were common to all treatments. Functional analysis identified the relation of these genes to glutathione metabolism and the nuclear factor, erythroid derived 2-related factor 2 pathway (Nrf2) that is known to regulate many of the protective actions of dithiolethiones. OLT and TBD were shown to have similar efficacies and both were weaker than D3T. In addition, we identified 40 genes whose responses were common to OLT and TBD, yet distinct from D3T. As inhibition of cytochrome P450 (CYP) has been associated with the effects of OLT on CYP expression, we determined the half maximal inhibitory concentration (IC50) values for inhibition of CYP1A2. The rank order of inhibitor potency was OLT ≫ TBD ≫ D3T, with IC50 values estimated as 0.2, 12.8 and >100 μM, respectively. Functional analysis revealed that OLT and TBD, in addition to their effects on CYP, modulate liver lipid metabolism, especially fatty acids. Together, these findings provide new insight into the actions of clinically relevant and lead dithiolethione analogues. PMID:19126641

  9. Chemoprevention of Radiation Induced Rat Mammary Neoplasms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huso, David L.

    1999-01-01

    Radiations encountered in space include protons and heavy ions such as iron as well as their secondaries. The relative biological effect (RBE) of these ions is not known, particularly at the doses and dose-rates expected for planetary missions. Neutrons, are not particularly relevant to space travel, but have been found experimentally to have an increase in their RBE with decreasing dose. If a similar trend of increasing RBE with decreasing dose is present for heavy ions and protons during irradiation in space, the small doses received during space travel could potentially have substantial carcinogenic risk. Clearly more investigation of the effects of heavy ions and protons is needed before accurate risk assessment for prolonged travel in space can be done. One means to mitigate the increased risk of cancer due to radiation exposure in space is by developing effective countermeasures that can reduce the incidence of tumor development. Tamoxifen has recently been shown to be an effective chemopreventive agent in both animal models and humans for the prevention of mammary tumors. Tamoxifen is a unique drug, with a highly specific mechanism of action affecting a specific radiation-sensitive population of epithelial cells in the mammary gland. In human studies, the annual incidence of a primary tumor in the contralateral breast of women with previous breast cancer is about 8 per 1000, making them an exceedingly high-risk group for the development of breast cancer. In this high risk group, treated with tamoxifen, daily, for 2 years, the incidence of a new primary tumor in the contralateral breast was approximately one third of that noted in the non-tamoxifen treatment group. Tamoxifen antagonizes the action of estrogen by competing for the nuclear receptor complex thereby altering the association of the receptor complex and nuclear binding sites. Its effects in reducing the development of breast cancer could be accomplished by controlling clinically undetectable

  10. Review paper: Cancer chemopreventive compounds and canine cancer.

    PubMed

    Baek, S J; McEntee, M F; Legendre, A M

    2009-07-01

    Canine cancer has become more prevalent in recent years because of increased life expectancy and greater attention to the health of pets. The range of cancers seen in dogs is as diverse as that in human patients, and despite more intensive therapeutic interventions, fatality rates remain unacceptably high in both species. Chemoprevention is therefore an important means of confronting this disease. Because domestic pets share our environment, greater cross-application and study of the protumorigenic and antitumorigenic factors in our shared environment will benefit all species, leading to the development of new families of less toxic antitumorigenic compounds based on novel and established molecular targets. Currently, the most interesting cancer preventive agents are nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-gamma ligands, and dietary compounds. This article provides an overview of what is known about how these agents affect molecular signaling in neoplastic disease, with reference to reported application and/or study in dogs where available.

  11. Chemopreventive effect of Lagenaria siceraria in two stages DMBA plus croton oil induced skin papillomagenesis.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Navneet; Kale, Raosaheb K; Tiku, Ashu B

    2013-01-01

    Cancer chemoprevention is a dietary or therapeutic strategy to prevent, suppress, or delay carcinogenesis either at initiation or progression level with nontoxic agents. Use of natural dietary compounds has been a major chemopreventive approach to modulate tumorigenic pathways. In the present study, we have evaluated Lagenaria siceraria (bottle gourd), a common vegetable of Indian household for its chemomodulatory potential. The fruit has been used in traditional medicine for a very long time for health benefits and to cure pain, ulcers, fever, cough, asthma, and other bronchial disorders. However, despite its reported beneficial effect the chemo modulatory potential of this plant has not been reported. Therefore chemopreventive effect of bottle gourd juice (BGJ) was studied against 7,12-dimethylbenz(a)anthracene (DMBA) plus croton oil induced skin papillomagenesis in Swiss albino mice. The effect was studied both at antiinitiation and antiinitiation/promotion level followed by histopathological study. A dose of 2.5% and 5% given in drinking water showed significant decrease in papilloma number, papilloma incidence, papilloma multiplicity, papilloma latency, papilloma volume, and papilloma size in different size range. Histopathological study showed chemopreventive effect by minimizing loss of stratification, a decrease in number of epithelial layers, reducing dermal infiltration and protection for various cytoplasmic changes. Higher dose of BGJ was found to be more effective than lower dose and the chemopreventive effect was maximum for antiinitiation/promotion treatment. Altogether, this study reports the chemopreventive effect of Lagenaria siceraria on skin papillomagenesis for the first time and suggests that its consumption may help in suppression of skin cancer.

  12. Ellagitannins in Cancer Chemoprevention and Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Ismail, Tariq; Calcabrini, Cinzia; Diaz, Anna Rita; Fimognari, Carmela; Turrini, Eleonora; Catanzaro, Elena; Akhtar, Saeed; Sestili, Piero

    2016-01-01

    It is universally accepted that diets rich in fruit and vegetables lead to reduction in the risk of common forms of cancer and are useful in cancer prevention. Indeed edible vegetables and fruits contain a wide variety of phytochemicals with proven antioxidant, anti-carcinogenic, and chemopreventive activity; moreover, some of these phytochemicals also display direct antiproliferative activity towards tumor cells, with the additional advantage of high tolerability and low toxicity. The most important dietary phytochemicals are isothiocyanates, ellagitannins (ET), polyphenols, indoles, flavonoids, retinoids, tocopherols. Among this very wide panel of compounds, ET represent an important class of phytochemicals which are being increasingly investigated for their chemopreventive and anticancer activities. This article reviews the chemistry, the dietary sources, the pharmacokinetics, the evidence on chemopreventive efficacy and the anticancer activity of ET with regard to the most sensitive tumors, as well as the mechanisms underlying their clinically-valuable properties. PMID:27187472

  13. Sulforaphane prevents quinolinic acid-induced mitochondrial dysfunction in rat striatum.

    PubMed

    Luis-García, Erika Rubí; Limón-Pacheco, Jorge Humberto; Serrano-García, Norma; Hernández-Pérez, Alma Delia; Pedraza-Chaverri, José; Orozco-Ibarra, Marisol

    2017-02-01

    Quinolinic acid (QA) triggers striatal neuronal death by an excitotoxic cascade that involves oxidative stress, which in turns is tightly linked to mitochondria. Mitochondrial dysfunction is a molecular feature described in several brain pathologies. In this work, we determined whether the sulforaphane-neuroprotective effect in the rodent experimental model of Huntington's disease induced by QA is associated with mitochondrial function preservation. We found that QA impaired mitochondrial function within 24 h post-lesion. Sulforaphane effectively disrupted the mitochondrial dysfunction by preventing the decrease in respiratory control ratio, transmembrane potential, ability to synthetize ATP, and the activity of mitochondrial complexes I, II, and IV.

  14. Sulforaphane Attenuates Gentamicin-Induced Nephrotoxicity: Role of Mitochondrial Protection

    PubMed Central

    Huerta-Yepez, Sara; Medina-Campos, Omar Noel; Zatarain-Barrón, Zyanya Lucía; Hernández-Pando, Rogelio; Torres, Ismael; Tapia, Edilia; Pedraza-Chaverri, José

    2013-01-01

    Sulforaphane (SFN), an isothiocyanate naturally occurring in Cruciferae, induces cytoprotection in several tissues. Its protective effect has been associated with its ability to induce cytoprotective enzymes through an Nrf2-dependent pathway. Gentamicin (GM) is a widely used antibiotic; nephrotoxicity is the main side effect of this compound. In this study, it was investigated if SFN is able to induce protection against GM-induced nephropathy both in renal epithelial LLC-PK1 cells in culture and in rats. SFN prevented GM-induced death and loss of mitochondrial membrane potential in LLC-PK1 cells. In addition, it attenuated GM-induced renal injury (proteinuria, increases in serum creatinine, in blood urea nitrogen, and in urinary excretion on N-acetyl-β-D-glucosaminidase, and decrease in creatinine clearance and in plasma glutathione peroxidase activity) and necrosis and apoptosis in rats. The apoptotic death was associated with enhanced active caspase-9. Caspase-8 was unchanged in all the studied groups. In addition, SFN was able to prevent GM-induced protein nitration and decrease in the activity of antioxidant enzymes catalase and glutathione peroxidase in renal cortex. In conclusion, the protective effect of SFN against GM-induced acute kidney injury could be associated with the preservation in mitochondrial function that would prevent the intrinsic apoptosis and nitrosative stress. PMID:23662110

  15. Sulforaphane enhances progerin clearance in Hutchinson-Gilford progeria fibroblasts.

    PubMed

    Gabriel, Diana; Roedl, Daniela; Gordon, Leslie B; Djabali, Karima

    2015-02-01

    Hutchinson-Gilford progeria syndrome (HGPS, OMIM 176670) is a rare multisystem childhood premature aging disorder linked to mutations in the LMNA gene. The most common HGPS mutation is found at position G608G within exon 11 of the LMNA gene. This mutation results in the deletion of 50 amino acids at the carboxyl-terminal tail of prelamin A, and the truncated protein is called progerin. Progerin only undergoes a subset of the normal post-translational modifications and remains permanently farnesylated. Several attempts to rescue the normal cellular phenotype with farnesyltransferase inhibitors (FTIs) and other compounds have resulted in partial cellular recovery. Using proteomics, we report here that progerin induces changes in the composition of the HGPS nuclear proteome, including alterations to several components of the protein degradation pathways. Consequently, proteasome activity and autophagy are impaired in HGPS cells. To restore protein clearance in HGPS cells, we treated HGPS cultures with sulforaphane (SFN), an antioxidant derived from cruciferous vegetables. We determined that SFN stimulates proteasome activity and autophagy in normal and HGPS fibroblast cultures. Specifically, SFN enhances progerin clearance by autophagy and reverses the phenotypic changes that are the hallmarks of HGPS. Therefore, SFN is a promising therapeutic avenue for children with HGPS.

  16. Sulforaphane induces adipocyte browning and promotes glucose and lipid utilization

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Hui Q.; Chen, Shi Y.; Wang, An S.; Yao, An J.; Fu, Jian F.; Zhao, Jin S.; Chen, Fen; Zou, Zu Q.; Shan, Yu J.; Bao, Yong P.

    2016-01-01

    1 Scope Obesity is closely related to the imbalance of white adipose tissue storing excess calories, and brown adipose tissue dissipating energy to produce heat in mammals. Recent studies revealed that acquisition of brown characteristics by white adipocytes, termed “browning,” may positively contribute to cellular bioenergetics and metabolism homeostasis. The goal was to investigate the putative effects of natural antioxidant sulforaphane (1‐isothiocyanate‐4‐methyl‐sulfonyl butane; SFN) on browning of white adipocytes. 2 Methods and results 3T3‐L1 mature white adipocytes were treated with SFN for 48 h, and then the mitochondrial content, function, and energy utilization were assessed. SFN was found to induce 3T3‐L1 adipocytes browning based on the increased mitochondrial content and activity of respiratory chain enzymes, whereas the mechanism involved the upregulation of nuclear factor E2‐related factor 2/sirtuin1/peroxisome proliferator activated receptor gamma coactivator 1 alpha signaling. SFN enhanced uncoupling protein 1 expression, a marker for brown adipocyte, leading to the decrease in cellular ATP. SFN also enhanced glucose uptake and oxidative utilization, lipolysis, and fatty acid oxidation in 3T3‐L1 adipocytes. 3 Conclusion SFN‐induced browning of white adipocytes enhanced the utilization of cellular fuel, and application of SFN is a promising strategy to combat obesity and obesity‐related metabolic disorder. PMID:27218607

  17. Sulforaphane Inhibits HIV Infection of Macrophages through Nrf2.

    PubMed

    Furuya, Andrea Kinga Marias; Sharifi, Hamayun J; Jellinger, Robert M; Cristofano, Paul; Shi, Binshan; de Noronha, Carlos M C

    2016-04-01

    Marburg virus, the Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV) and Dengue virus all activate, and benefit from, expression of the transcription regulator nuclear erythroid 2-related factor 2 (Nrf2). The impact of Nrf2 activation on human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection has not been tested. Sulforaphane (SFN), produced in cruciferous vegetables after mechanical damage, mobilizes Nrf2 to potently reprogram cellular gene expression. Here we show for the first time that SFN blocks HIV infection in primary macrophages but not in primary T cells. Similarly SFN blocks infection in PMA-differentiated promonocytic cell lines, but not in other cell lines tested. siRNA-mediated depletion of Nrf2 boosted HIV infectivity in primary macrophages and reduced the anti-viral effects of SFN treatment. This supports a model in which anti-viral activity is mediated through Nrf2 after it is mobilized by SFN. We further found that, like the type I interferon-induced cellular anti-viral proteins SAMHD1 and MX2, SFN treatment blocks infection after entry, but before formation of 2-LTR circles. Interestingly however, neither SAMHD1 nor MX2 were upregulated. This shows for the first time that Nrf2 action can potently block HIV infection and highlights a novel way to trigger this inhibition.

  18. The role of aspirin in colorectal cancer chemoprevention.

    PubMed

    Singh Ranger, Gurpreet

    2016-08-01

    Considerable interest has emerged over the last decade regarding the role of aspirin in prevention of colorectal cancer. This disease is one of the commonest cancers in the Western World, therefore, the existence of a simple "everyday" agent, which could have the ability to prevent the disease, represents an invaluable opportunity clinicians may be able to exploit. Evidence from case-control and cohort studies, and recent updates of randomised controlled trials have been very encouraging-indicating benefit from long term use of aspirin at low dose. Possible mechanisms of chemoprevention include inhibition of the cyclooxygenase (COX) pathway, or COX-independent mechanisms, for example, the PIK3CA pathway, or therapy-induced senescence of cancer cells. The most serious side effect of prolonged aspirin treatment is haemorrhage, especially from the GI tract. This is likely to be less of a problem with chemoprevention at lower doses. One also needs to consider the impact if aspirin resistance, an increasingly recognised clinical entity.

  19. Chemopreventive effect of dietary polyphenols in colorectal cancer cell lines.

    PubMed

    Araújo, João R; Gonçalves, Pedro; Martel, Fátima

    2011-02-01

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) is the second most fatal and the third most diagnosed type of cancer worldwide. Despite having multifactorial causes, most CRC cases are mainly determined by dietary factors. In recent years, a large number of studies have attributed a protective effect to polyphenols and foods containing these compounds (fruits and vegetables) against CRC. Indeed, polyphenols have been reported to interfere with cancer initiation, promotion, and progression, acting as chemopreventive agents. The aim of this review is to summarize the main chemopreventive properties of some polyphenols (quercetin, rutin, myricetin, chrysin, epigallocatechin-3-gallate, epicatechin, catechin, resveratrol, and xanthohumol) against CRC, observed in cell culture models. From the data reviewed in this article, it can be concluded that these compounds inhibit cell growth, by inducing cell cycle arrest and/or apoptosis; inhibit proliferation, angiogenesis, and/or metastasis; and exhibit anti-inflammatory and/or antioxidant effects. In turn, these effects involve multiple molecular and biochemical mechanisms of action, which are still not completely characterized. Thus, caution is mandatory when attempting to extrapolate the observations obtained in CRC cell line studies to humans.

  20. Sulforaphane Protects the Liver against CdSe Quantum Dot-Induced Cytotoxicity

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Wei; He, Yan; Yu, Guodong; Li, Baolong; Sexton, Darren W.; Wileman, Thomas; Roberts, Alexandra A.; Hamilton, Chris J.; Liu, Ruoxi; Chao, Yimin; Shan, Yujuan; Bao, Yongping

    2015-01-01

    The potential cytotoxicity of cadmium selenide (CdSe) quantum dots (QDs) presents a barrier to their use in biomedical imaging or as diagnostic and therapeutic agents. Sulforaphane (SFN) is a chemoprotective compound derived from cruciferous vegetables which can up-regulate antioxidant enzymes and induce apoptosis and autophagy. This study reports the effects of SFN on CdSe QD-induced cytotoxicity in immortalised human hepatocytes and in the livers of mice. CdSe QDs induced dose-dependent cell death in hepatocytes with an IC50 = 20.4 μM. Pre-treatment with SFN (5 μM) increased cell viability in response to CdSe QDs (20 μM) from 49.5 to 89.3%. SFN induced a pro-oxidant effect characterized by depletion of intracellular reduced glutathione during short term exposure (3–6 h), followed by up-regulation of antioxidant enzymes and glutathione levels at 24 h. SFN also caused Nrf2 translocation into the nucleus, up-regulation of antioxidant enzymes and autophagy. siRNA knockdown of Nrf2 suggests that the Nrf2 pathway plays a role in the protection against CdSe QD-induced cell death. Wortmannin inhibition of SFN-induced autophagy significantly suppressed the protective effect of SFN on CdSe QD-induced cell death. Moreover, the role of autophagy in SFN protection against CdSe QD-induced cell death was confirmed using mouse embryonic fibroblasts lacking ATG5. CdSe QDs caused significant liver damage in mice, and this was decreased by SFN treatment. In conclusion, SFN attenuated the cytotoxicity of CdSe QDs in both human hepatocytes and in the mouse liver, and this protection was associated with the induction of Nrf2 pathway and autophagy. PMID:26402917

  1. Sulforaphane Protects the Liver against CdSe Quantum Dot-Induced Cytotoxicity.

    PubMed

    Wang, Wei; He, Yan; Yu, Guodong; Li, Baolong; Sexton, Darren W; Wileman, Thomas; Roberts, Alexandra A; Hamilton, Chris J; Liu, Ruoxi; Chao, Yimin; Shan, Yujuan; Bao, Yongping

    2015-01-01

    The potential cytotoxicity of cadmium selenide (CdSe) quantum dots (QDs) presents a barrier to their use in biomedical imaging or as diagnostic and therapeutic agents. Sulforaphane (SFN) is a chemoprotective compound derived from cruciferous vegetables which can up-regulate antioxidant enzymes and induce apoptosis and autophagy. This study reports the effects of SFN on CdSe QD-induced cytotoxicity in immortalised human hepatocytes and in the livers of mice. CdSe QDs induced dose-dependent cell death in hepatocytes with an IC50 = 20.4 μM. Pre-treatment with SFN (5 μM) increased cell viability in response to CdSe QDs (20 μM) from 49.5 to 89.3%. SFN induced a pro-oxidant effect characterized by depletion of intracellular reduced glutathione during short term exposure (3-6 h), followed by up-regulation of antioxidant enzymes and glutathione levels at 24 h. SFN also caused Nrf2 translocation into the nucleus, up-regulation of antioxidant enzymes and autophagy. siRNA knockdown of Nrf2 suggests that the Nrf2 pathway plays a role in the protection against CdSe QD-induced cell death. Wortmannin inhibition of SFN-induced autophagy significantly suppressed the protective effect of SFN on CdSe QD-induced cell death. Moreover, the role of autophagy in SFN protection against CdSe QD-induced cell death was confirmed using mouse embryonic fibroblasts lacking ATG5. CdSe QDs caused significant liver damage in mice, and this was decreased by SFN treatment. In conclusion, SFN attenuated the cytotoxicity of CdSe QDs in both human hepatocytes and in the mouse liver, and this protection was associated with the induction of Nrf2 pathway and autophagy.

  2. Prostate Cancer Chemoprevention Targeting Men with High-Grade Prostatic Intraepithelial Neoplasia (HGPIN) and Atypical Small Acinar Proliferation (ASAP): Model for Trial Design and Outcome Measures

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Nagi; Crocker, Theresa; Smith, Tiffany; Connors, Shahnjayla; Pow-Sang, Julio; Spiess, Philippe E.; Egan, Kathleen; Quinn, Gwen; Schell, Michael; Sebti, Said; Kazi, Aslam; Chuang, Tian; Salup, Raoul; Helal, Mohamed; Zagaja, Gregory; Trabulsi, Edouard; McLarty, Jerry; Fazili, Tajammul; Williams, Christopher R.; Schreiber, Fred; Anderson, Kyle

    2014-01-01

    In spite of the large number of nutrient-derived agents demonstrating promise as potential chemopreventive agents, most have failed to prove effectiveness in clinical trials. Critical requirements for moving nutrient-derived agents to recommendation for clinical use include adopting a systematic, molecular-mechanism based approach and utilizing the same ethical and rigorous methods such as are used to evaluate other pharmacological agents. Preliminary data on a mechanistic rationale for chemoprevention activity as observed from epidemiological, in vitro and preclinical studies, phase I data of safety in suitable cohorts, duration of intervention based on time to progression of preneoplastic disease to cancer and the use of a valid panel of biomarkers representing the hypothesized carcinogenesis pathway for measuring efficacy must inform the design of phase II clinical trials. The goal of this paper is to provide a model for evaluating a well characterized agent- Polyphenon E- in a phase II clinical trial of prostate cancer chemoprevention. PMID:24533253

  3. Biological Basis for Chemoprevention of Ovarian Cancer

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2001-10-01

    Prevention may represent a feasible approach to decreasing ovarian cancer mortality . To achieve a better understanding of the etiology of ovarian...Progestins have a potent apoptotic effect on ovarian epithelial cells and we have shown that levonorgestrel dramatically decreases ovarian cancer incidence...effective chemoprevention strategies that might decrease mortality from this disease.

  4. COX-Independent Mechanisms of Cancer Chemoprevention by Anti-Inflammatory Drugs

    PubMed Central

    Gurpinar, Evrim; Grizzle, William E.; Piazza, Gary A.

    2013-01-01

    Epidemiological and clinical studies suggest that non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs), including cyclooxygenase (COX)-2 selective inhibitors, reduce the risk of developing cancer. Experimental studies in human cancer cell lines and rodent models of carcinogenesis support these observations by providing strong evidence for the antineoplastic properties of NSAIDs. The involvement of COX-2 in tumorigenesis and its overexpression in various cancer tissues suggest that inhibition of COX-2 is responsible for the chemopreventive efficacy of these agents. However, the precise mechanisms by which NSAIDs exert their antiproliferative effects are still a matter of debate. Numerous other studies have shown that NSAIDs can act through COX-independent mechanisms. This review provides a detailed description of the major COX-independent molecular targets of NSAIDs and discusses how these targets may be involved in their anticancer effects. Toxicities resulting from COX inhibition and the suppression of prostaglandin synthesis preclude the long-term use of NSAIDs for cancer chemoprevention. Furthermore, chemopreventive efficacy is incomplete and treatment often leads to the development of resistance. Identification of alternative NSAID targets and elucidation of the biochemical processes by which they inhibit tumor growth could lead to the development of safer and more efficacious drugs for cancer chemoprevention. PMID:23875171

  5. Dietary phytochemicals and cancer chemoprevention: a review of the clinical evidence

    PubMed Central

    Kotecha, Ritesh; Takami, Akiyoshi; Espinoza, J. Luis

    2016-01-01

    Cancer chemoprevention involves the use of different natural or biologic agents to inhibit or reverse tumor growth. Epidemiological and pre-clinical data suggest that various natural phytochemicals and dietary compounds possess chemopreventive properties, and in-vitro and animal studies support that these compounds may modulate signaling pathways involved in cell proliferation and apoptosis in transformed cells, enhance the host immune system and sensitize malignant cells to cytotoxic agents. Despite promising results from experimental studies, only a limited number of these compounds have been tested in clinical trials and have shown variable results. In this review, we summarize the data regarding select phytochemicals including curcumin, resveratrol, lycopene, folates and tea polyphenols with emphasis on the clinical evidence supporting the efficacy of these compounds in high-risk populations. PMID:27232756

  6. Dietary phytochemicals and cancer chemoprevention: a review of the clinical evidence.

    PubMed

    Kotecha, Ritesh; Takami, Akiyoshi; Espinoza, J Luis

    2016-08-09

    Cancer chemoprevention involves the use of different natural or biologic agents to inhibit or reverse tumor growth. Epidemiological and pre-clinical data suggest that various natural phytochemicals and dietary compounds possess chemopreventive properties, and in-vitro and animal studies support that these compounds may modulate signaling pathways involved in cell proliferation and apoptosis in transformed cells, enhance the host immune system and sensitize malignant cells to cytotoxic agents. Despite promising results from experimental studies, only a limited number of these compounds have been tested in clinical trials and have shown variable results. In this review, we summarize the data regarding select phytochemicals including curcumin, resveratrol, lycopene, folates and tea polyphenols with emphasis on the clinical evidence supporting the efficacy of these compounds in high-risk populations.

  7. Sulforaphane prevents pulmonary damage in response to inhaled arsenic by activating the Nrf2-defense response

    SciTech Connect

    Zheng, Yi; Tao, Shasha; Lian, Fangru; Chau, Binh T.; Chen, Jie; Sun, Guifan; Fang, Deyu; Lantz, R. Clark; Zhang, Donna D.

    2012-12-15

    Exposure to arsenic is associated with an increased risk of lung disease. Novel strategies are needed to reduce the adverse health effects associated with arsenic exposure in the lung. Nrf2, a transcription factor that mediates an adaptive cellular defense response, is effective in detoxifying environmental insults and prevents a broad spectrum of diseases induced by environmental exposure to harmful substances. In this report, we tested whether Nrf2 activation protects mice from arsenic-induced toxicity. We used an in vivo arsenic inhalation model that is highly relevant to low environmental human exposure to arsenic-containing dusts. Two-week exposure to arsenic-containing dust resulted in pathological alterations, oxidative DNA damage, and mild apoptotic cell death in the lung; all of which were blocked by sulforaphane (SF) in an Nrf2-dependent manner. Mechanistically, SF-mediated activation of Nrf2 alleviated inflammatory responses by modulating cytokine production. This study provides strong evidence that dietary intervention targeting Nrf2 activation is a feasible approach to reduce adverse health effects associated with arsenic exposure. -- Highlights: ► Exposed to arsenic particles and/or SF have elevated Nrf2 and its target genes. ► Sulforaphane prevents pathological alterations, oxidative damage and cell death. ► Sulforaphane alleviates infiltration of inflammatory cells into the lungs. ► Sulforaphane suppresses arsenic-induced proinflammatory cytokine production.

  8. In vivo biological activity of rocket extracts (Eruca vesicaria subsp. sativa (Miller) Thell) and sulforaphane.

    PubMed

    Villatoro-Pulido, M; Font, R; Saha, S; Obregón-Cano, S; Anter, J; Muñoz-Serrano, A; De Haro-Bailón, A; Alonso-Moraga, A; Del Río-Celestino, M

    2012-05-01

    Eruca is thought to be an excellent source of antioxidants like phenolic compounds, carotenoids, glucosinolates and their degradation products, such as isothiocyanates. Sulforaphane is one of the most potent indirect antioxidants of Eruca isolated until the date. In this work we investigate: (i) the safety and DNA protective activity of Eruca extracts and sulforaphane (under and without oxidative stress) in Drosophila melanogaster; and (ii) the influence on D. melanogaster life span treated with Eruca extracts and sulforaphane. Our results showed that among the four concentrations of Eruca extracts tested (from 0.625 to 5mg/ml), intermediate concentrations of the Es2 accession (1.25 and 2.5mg/ml) exhibited no genotoxic activity, as well as antigenotoxic activity (inhibition rate of 0.2-0.6) and the lowest concentration of Es2 and Es4 accessions (0.625 mg/ml) also enhanced the health span portion of the live span curves. Sulforaphane presented a high antigenotoxic activity in the SMART test of D. melanogaster and intermediate concentrations of this compound (3.75 μM) enhanced average healthspan. The results of this study indicate the presence of potent antigenotoxic factors in rocket, which are being explored further for their mechanism of action.

  9. Agents.

    PubMed

    Chambers, David W

    2002-01-01

    Although health care is inherently an economic activity, it is inadequately described as a market process. An alternative, grounded in organizational economic theory, is to view professionals and many others as agents, contracted to advance the best interests of their principals (patients). This view untangles some of the ethical conflicts in dentistry. It also helps identify major controllable costs in dentistry and suggests that dentists can act as a group to increase or decrease agency costs, primarily by controlling the bad actors who damage the value of all dentists.

  10. The chemopreventive activity of apple against carcinogenesis: antioxidant activity and cell cycle control.

    PubMed

    Ribeiro, Flávia A P; Gomes de Moura, Carolina F; Aguiar, Odair; de Oliveira, Flavia; Spadari, Regina C; Oliveira, Nara R C; Oshima, Celina T F; Ribeiro, Daniel A

    2014-09-01

    Apples and their derivatives are rich in phytochemicals, including flavonoids (catechins, flavonols, quercetin) and phenolic acids (quercetin glycosides, catechin, epicatechin, procyanidins), vitamins, and fibers, that confer an important antioxidant property. Chemoprevention is defined by the use of natural or synthetic agents to interfere with the progression, reverse, or inhibit carcinogenesis, thereby reducing the risk of developing clinically invasive disease. The aim of this article is to present data generated from the use of apples as a chemopreventive agent in carcinogenesis using in-vivo and in-vitro test systems. Apple and its bioactive compounds can exert chemopreventive properties as a result of antioxidant activity and cell cycle control. However, future focus of research on apple such as identifying the specific phytochemical responsible for the anticarcinogenic effect, timing of consumption, and adequate amount of apples to achieve the best preventive effect using human large randomized-controlled trials is needed. Furthermore, animal studies are also relevant for better understanding the role of this fruit in human health as well as modulation of degenerative diseases such as cancer. Therefore, this area warrants further investigation as a new way of thinking, which would apply not only to apples but also to other fruit used as promising therapeutic agents against human diseases.

  11. Selection of topically applied non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs for oral cancer chemoprevention.

    PubMed

    Sood, Sandeep; Shiff, Steven J; Yang, Chung S; Chen, Xiaoxin

    2005-07-01

    Topical delivery of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs through the oral mucosa has been used for oral cancer chemoprevention. Local permeation of these agents has been one of the major concerns. Here we propose an approach to predict the permeability of topically applied agents for oral cancer chemoprevention. In theory, the total flux through the oral mucosa (Jmax) can be estimated by adding the transcellular flux (JTC) and the paracellular flux (JPC). To target the Cox-2 enzyme in oral epithelial cells, it is desirable to maximize the theoretical activity index, the ratio of JTC and IC50 of a Cox-2 inhibitor (JTC/IC50-Cox-2). Among the 12 commonly used NSAIDs, celecoxib, nimesulide and ibuprofen had the highest values and may be the agents of choice to target Cox-2 in oral epithelial cells through topical application. Based on these calculations, a long-term chemopreventive experiment using celecoxib (3% or 6%) through topical application was performed in a DMBA induced hamster oral cancer model. Both 3% and 6% reduced the incidence of squamous cell carcinoma at the post-initiation stage.

  12. Isothiocyanate metabolism, distribution, and interconversion in mice following consumption of thermally processed broccoli sprouts or purified sulforaphane

    PubMed Central

    Bricker, Gregory V.; Riedl, Kenneth M.; Ralston, Robin A.; Tober, Kathleen L.; Oberyszyn, Tatiana M.; Schwartz, Steven J.

    2014-01-01

    Scope Broccoli sprouts are a rich source of glucosinolates, a group of phytochemicals that when hydrolyzed, are associated with cancer prevention. Our objectives were to investigate the metabolism, distribution, and interconversion of isothiocyanates (ITCs) in mice fed thermally processed broccoli sprout powders (BSPs) or the purified ITC sulforaphane. Methods and results For 1 wk, mice were fed a control diet (n = 20) or one of four treatment diets (n = 10 each) containing nonheated BSP, 60°C mildly heated BSP, 5-min steamed BSP, or 3 mmol purified sulforaphane. Sulforaphane and erucin metabolite concentrations in skin, liver, kidney, bladder, lung, and plasma were quantified using HPLC-MS/MS. Thermal intensity of BSP processing had disparate effects on ITC metabolite concentrations upon consumption. Mild heating generally resulted in the greatest ITC metabolite concentrations in vivo, followed by the nonheated and steamed BSP diets. We observed interconversion between sulforaphane and erucin species or metabolites, and report that erucin is the favored form in liver, kidney, and bladder, even when only sulforaphane is consumed. Conclusion ITC metabolites were distributed to all tissues analyzed, suggesting the potential for systemic benefits. We report for the first time tissue-dependent ratio of sulforaphane and erucin, though further investigation is warranted to assess biological activity of individual forms. PMID:24975513

  13. DNA Microarray Profiling Highlights Nrf2-Mediated Chemoprevention Targeted by Wasabi-Derived Isothiocyanates in HepG2 Cells.

    PubMed

    Trio, Phoebe Zapanta; Kawahara, Atsuyoshi; Tanigawa, Shunsuke; Sakao, Kozue; Hou, De-Xing

    2017-01-01

    6-MSITC and 6-MTITC are sulforaphane (SFN) analogs found in Japanese Wasabi. As we reported previously, Wasabi isothiocyanates (ITCs) are activators of Nrf2-antioxidant response element pathway, and also inhibitors of pro-inflammatory cyclooxygenase-2. This study is the first to assess the global changes in transcript levels by Wasabi ITCs, comparing with SFN, in HepG2 cells. We performed comparative gene expression profiling by treating HepG2 cells with ITCs, followed by DNA microarray analyses using HG-U133 plus 2.0 oligonucleotide array. Partial array data on selected gene products were confirmed by RT-PCR and Western blotting. Ingenuity Pathway Analysis (IPA) was used to identify functional subsets of genes and biologically significant network pathways. 6-MTITC showed the highest number of differentially altered (≥2 folds) gene expression, of which 114 genes were upregulated and 75 were downregulated. IPA revealed that Nrf2-mediated pathway, together with glutamate metabolism, is the common significantly modulated pathway across treatments. Interestingly, 6-MSITC exhibited the most potent effect toward Nrf2-mediated pathway. Our data suggest that 6-MSITC could exert chemopreventive role against cancer through its underlying antioxidant activity via the activation of Nrf2-mediated subsequent induction of cytoprotective genes.

  14. Pathobiology and Chemoprevention of Bladder Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Tanaka, Takuji; Miyazawa, Katsuhito; Tsukamoto, Tetsuya; Kuno, Toshiya; Suzuki, Koji

    2011-01-01

    Our understanding of the pathogenesis of bladder cancer has improved considerably over the past decade. Translating these novel pathobiological discoveries into therapies, prevention, or strategies to manage patients who are suspected to have or who have been diagnosed with bladder cancer is the ultimate goal. In particular, the chemoprevention of bladder cancer development is important, since urothelial cancer frequently recurs, even if the primary cancer is completely removed. The numerous alterations of both oncogenes and tumor suppressor genes that have been implicated in bladder carcinogenesis represent novel targets for therapy and prevention. In addition, knowledge about these genetic alterations will help provide a better understanding of the biological significance of preneoplastic lesions of bladder cancer. Animal models for investigating bladder cancer development and prevention can also be developed based on these alterations. This paper summarizes the results of recent preclinical and clinical chemoprevention studies and discusses screening for bladder cancer. PMID:21941546

  15. Biological Basis for Chemoprevention of Ovarian Cancer

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1999-10-01

    Since reduction of ovulation is protective against ovarian cancer, prevention may represent a feasible approach to decreasing mortality . To achieve a...cells, the use of levonorgestrel in chemoprevention of ovarian cancer is being explored in chickens and women. A chernoprevention trial is ongoing in...chickens and we will begin a trial to determine whether levonorgestrel induces apoptosis in the ovarian epithelium of women undergoing oophorectomy.

  16. Update from Asia. Asian studies on cancer chemoprevention.

    PubMed

    Yun, T K

    1999-01-01

    In Asia, nontoxic dietary products are considered desirable primary prevention vehicles for conquering cancer. As early as 1978, investigators in Korea carried out extensive long-term anticarcinogenicity experiments using the mouse lung tumor model and observed an anticarcinogenic effect of Panax ginseng C.A. Meyer extract in 1980. The results showed that natural products can provide hope for human cancer prevention. A newly established nine-week medium-term model using mouse lung tumors (Yun's model) could confirm the anticarcinogenicity of ginseng that varies according to its type and age. Subsequently, the ginseng was shown by epidemiological studies to be a nonorgan-specific cancer preventive agent associated with a dose-response relationship. The anticarcinogenic effects of vegetarian foods common at every dining table in Korea and some synthetics were also studied using Yun's nine-week model. In brief, ascorbic acid, soybean lecithin, capsaicin, biochanin A, Ganoderma lucidum, caffeine, and a novel synthetic 2-(allylthio)pyrazine decrease the incidence of mouse lung tumors, whereas fresh ginseng (4 years old), carrot, spinach, Sesamum indicum, beta-carotene, and 13-cis retinoic acid do not. This result regarding beta-carotene is consistent with the ineffective findings of the ATBC trial, the CARET trial, and the Physicians' Health Study. In 1983, a cancer chemoprevention study group was first established in Japan. Subsequently, (-)-epigallocatechin gallate, cryptoporic acid E, and sarcophytol A from natural products, and synthetic acyclic retinoid and canventol were shown to be anticarcinogenic or chemopreventive in human subjects. Despite the frequent consumption of tea wordwide as a beverage and current experimental evidence of anticarcinogenesis, including controversial results of epidemiological studies, more systematic clinical trials for confirmation of preventive activity of tea against cancer are needed. Placebo-controlled intervention trials of

  17. Cruciferous vegetable phytochemical sulforaphane affects phase II enzyme expression and activity in rat cardiomyocytes through modulation of Akt signaling pathway.

    PubMed

    Leoncini, Emanuela; Malaguti, Marco; Angeloni, Cristina; Motori, Elisa; Fabbri, Daniele; Hrelia, Silvana

    2011-09-01

    The isothiocyanate sulforaphane (SF), abundant in Cruciferous vegetables, is known to induce antioxidant/detoxification enzymes in many cancer cell lines, but studies focused on its cytoprotective action in nontransformed cells are just at the beginning. Since we previously demonstrated that SF elicits cardioprotection through an indirect antioxidative mechanism, the aim of this study was to analyze the signaling pathways through which SF exerts its protective effects. Using cultured rat cardiomyocytes, we investigated the ability of SF to activate Akt/protein kinase B (PKB) and extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1 and 2 (ERK1/2) signaling pathways, which are implicated in cardiac cell survival, and to increase the phosphorylation of Nuclear factor E2-related factor 2 (Nrf2) and its binding to the antioxidant response element. By means of specific inhibitors, we demonstrated that the Phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K)/Akt pathway represents a mechanism through which SF influences both expression and activity of glutathione reductase, glutathione-S-transferase, thioredoxin reductase, and NAD(P)H:quinone oxidoreductase-1, analyzed by western immunoblotting and spectrophotometric assay, respectively, and modulates Nrf2 binding and phosphorylation resulting in a cytoprotective action against oxidative damage. Results of this study confirm the importance of phase II enzymes modulation as cytoprotective mechanism and support the nutritional assumption of Cruciferous vegetables as source of nutraceutical cardioprotective agents.

  18. Luteolin nanoparticle in chemoprevention – in vitro and in vivo anticancer activity

    PubMed Central

    Majumdar, Debatosh; Jung, Kyung-Ho; Zhang, Hongzheng; Nannapaneni, Sreenivas; Wang, Xu; Amin, A.R.M Ruhul; Chen, Zhengjia; Chen, Zhuo (G).; Shin, Dong M.

    2013-01-01

    Cancer prevention (chemoprevention) by using naturally occurring dietary agents has gained immense interest due to the broad safety window of these compounds. However, many of these compounds are hydrophobic and poorly soluble in water. They frequently display low bioavailability, poor systemic delivery, and low efficacy. To circumvent this problem, we explored a novel approach towards chemoprevention using nanotechnology to deliver luteolin, a natural compound present in green vegetables. We formulated water soluble polymer-encapsulated Nano-Luteolin from hydrophobic luteolin, and studied its anticancer activity against lung cancer and head and neck cancer. In vitro studies demonstrated that, like luteolin, Nano-Luteolin inhibited the growth of lung cancer cells (H292 cell line) and squamous cell carcinoma of head and neck (SCCHN) cells (Tu212 cell line). In Tu212 cells, the IC50 value of Nano-Luteolin was 4.13μM, and that of luteolin was 6.96μM. In H292 cells, the IC50 of luteolin was 15.56μM, and Nano-Luteolin was 14.96μM. In vivo studies using a tumor xenograft mouse model demonstrated that Nano-Luteolin has a significant inhibitory effect on the tumor growth of SCCHN in comparison to luteolin. Our results suggest that nanoparticle delivery of naturally occurring dietary agents like luteolin has many advantages and may have potential application in chemoprevention in clinical settings. PMID:24403290

  19. Medicinal Plants and Cancer Chemoprevention

    PubMed Central

    Desai, Avni G.; Qazi, Ghulam N.; Ganju, Ramesh K.; El-Tamer, Mahmoud; Singh, Jaswant; Saxena, Ajit K.; Bedi, Yashbir S.; Taneja, Subhash C.; Bhat, Hari K.

    2014-01-01

    Cancer is the second leading cause of death worldwide. Although great advancements have been made in the treatment and control of cancer progression, significant deficiencies and room for improvement remain. A number of undesired side effects sometimes occur during chemotherapy. Natural therapies, such as the use of plant-derived products in cancer treatment, may reduce adverse side effects. Currently, a few plant products are being used to treat cancer. However, a myriad of many plant products exist that have shown very promising anti-cancer properties in vitro, but have yet to be evaluated in humans. Further study is required to determine the efficacy of these plant products in treating cancers in humans. This review will focus on the various plant-derived chemical compounds that have, in recent years, shown promise as anticancer agents and will outline their potential mechanism of action. PMID:18781909

  20. Chemopreventive effects of cardamom (Elettaria cardamomum L.) on chemically induced skin carcinogenesis in Swiss albino mice.

    PubMed

    Qiblawi, Samir; Al-Hazimi, Awdah; Al-Mogbel, Mohammed; Hossain, Ashfaque; Bagchi, Debasis

    2012-06-01

    The chemopreventive potential of cardamom was evaluated on 7,12-dimethylbenz[a]anthracene-initiated and croton oil-promoted mouse skin papillomagenesis. A significant reduction in the values of tumor incidence, tumor burden, and tumor yield and the cumulative number of papillomas was observed in mice treated orally with 0.5 mg of cardamom powder in suspension continuously at pre-, peri-, and post-initiational stages of papillomagenesis compared with the control group. The average weight and diameter of tumors recorded were also comparatively lower in the cardamom-treated mouse group. Treatment of cardamom suspension by oral gavage for 15 days resulted in a significant decrease in the lipid peroxidation level of the liver (P < .01). In addition, the reduced glutathione level was significantly elevated in comparison with the control group (P < .05) following cardamom suspension treatment. Taken together, these findings indicate the potential of cardamom as a chemopreventive agent against two-stage skin cancer.

  1. The tamoxifen controversy - clinical chemopreventive agent and experimental carcinogen

    SciTech Connect

    Pitot, H.C.

    1995-02-01

    While dramatic decreases in the mortality of heart disease, the major fatal disease in the United States, have occurred since 1950, there has been a slight but measurable increase in the cancer mortality rate since 1950 in this country. The reasons for the former precipitous decline in death from heart disease are a balanced combination of prevention and early detection of risk factors combined with improved treatment modalities. While improved treatment modalities of neoplasia have led to significant decreases in certain cancers such as that of testis, Hodgkin`s disease, acute lymphatic leukemia in children, and several other cancers, mortality rates from the major cancers, namely lung, breast, prostate, and colon, have either increased or not changed during this period. Since the treatment arm of cancer control has not exhibited the dramatic successes seen in, for example, heart disease therapy, many have and are advocating the importance of cancer prevention. 18 refs.

  2. Novel Investigations of Flavonoids as Chemopreventive Agents for Hepatocellular Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Liao, Chen-Yi; Lee, Ching-Chang; Tsai, Chi-chang; Hsueh, Chao-Wen; Wang, Chih-Chiang; Chen, I-Hung; Tsai, Ming-Kai; Liu, Mei-Yu; Hsieh, An-Tie; Su, Kuan-Jen; Wu, Hau-Ming; Huang, Shih-Chung; Wang, Yi-Chen; Wang, Chien-Yao; Huang, Shu-Fang; Yeh, Yen-Cheng; Ben, Ren-Jy; Chien, Shang-Tao; Hsu, Chin-Wen; Kuo, Wu-Hsien

    2015-01-01

    We would like to highlight the application of natural products to hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). We will focus on the natural products known as flavonoids, which target this disease at different stages of hepatocarcinogenesis. In spite of the use of chemotherapy and radiotherapy in treating HCC, patients with HCC still face poor prognosis because of the nature of multidrug resistance and toxicity derived from chemotherapy and radiotherapy. Flavonoids can be found in many vegetables, fruits, and herbal medicines that exert their different anticancer effects via different intracellular signaling pathways and serve as antioxidants. In this review, we will discuss seven common flavonoids that exert different biological effects against HCC via different pathways. PMID:26858957

  3. Chemopreventive Agent Development Funding Opportunities | Division of Cancer Prevention

    Cancer.gov

    The Division of Cancer Prevention (DCP) conducts and supports research to determine a person's risk of cancer and to find ways to reduce the risk. This knowledge is critical to making progress against cancer because risk varies over the lifespan as genetic and epigenetic changes can transform healthy tissue into invasive cancer.

  4. Chemopreventive Agent Development Clinical Trials | Division of Cancer Prevention

    Cancer.gov

    The Division of Cancer Prevention (DCP) conducts and supports research to determine a person's risk of cancer and to find ways to reduce the risk. This knowledge is critical to making progress against cancer because risk varies over the lifespan as genetic and epigenetic changes can transform healthy tissue into invasive cancer.

  5. Active Chemopreventive Agent Development Grants | Division of Cancer Prevention

    Cancer.gov

    The Division of Cancer Prevention (DCP) conducts and supports research to determine a person's risk of cancer and to find ways to reduce the risk. This knowledge is critical to making progress against cancer because risk varies over the lifespan as genetic and epigenetic changes can transform healthy tissue into invasive cancer.

  6. Chemopreventive Agent Development Staff | Division of Cancer Prevention

    Cancer.gov

    The Division of Cancer Prevention (DCP) conducts and supports research to determine a person's risk of cancer and to find ways to reduce the risk. This knowledge is critical to making progress against cancer because risk varies over the lifespan as genetic and epigenetic changes can transform healthy tissue into invasive cancer.

  7. Sulforaphane Ameliorates Okadaic Acid-Induced Memory Impairment in Rats by Activating the Nrf2/HO-1 Antioxidant Pathway.

    PubMed

    Dwivedi, Subhash; Rajasekar, N; Hanif, Kashif; Nath, Chandishwar; Shukla, Rakesh

    2016-10-01

    Okadaic acid (OKA) causes memory impairment and attenuates nuclear factor erythroid 2-related factor 2 (Nrf2) along with oxidative stress and neuroinflammation in rats. Sulforaphane (dietary isothiocyanate compound), an activator of Nrf2 signaling, exhibits neuroprotective effects. However, the protective effect of sulforaphane in OKA-induced neurotoxicity remains uninvestigated. Therefore, in the present study, the role of sulforaphane in OKA-induced memory impairment in rats was explored. A significant increased Nrf2 expression in the hippocampus and cerebral cortex was observed in trained (Morris water maze) rats, and a significant decreased Nrf2 expression in memory-impaired (OKA, 200 ng icv) rats indicated its involvement in memory function. Sulforaphane administration (5 and 10 mg/kg, ip, days 1 and 2) ameliorates OKA-induced memory impairment in rats. The treatment also restored Nrf2 and its downstream antioxidant protein expression (GCLC, HO-1) and attenuated oxidative stress (ROS, nitrite, GSH), neuroinflammation (NF-κB, TNF-α, IL-10), and neuronal apoptosis in the cerebral cortex and hippocampus of OKA-treated rats. Further, to determine whether modulation of Nrf2 signaling is responsible for the protective effect of sulforaphane, in vitro, Nrf2 siRNA and its downstream HO-1 inhibition studies were carried out in a rat astrocytoma cell line (C6). The protective effects of sulforaphane were abolished with Nrf2 siRNA and HO-1 inhibition in astrocytes. The results suggest that Nrf2-dependent activation of cellular antioxidant machinery results in sulforaphane-mediated protection against OKA-induced memory impairment in rats. Graphical Abstract ᅟ.

  8. Prostate cancer chemoprevention: Strategies for designing efficient clinical trials.

    PubMed

    Lieberman, R

    2001-04-01

    A chemoprevention (CP) strategy has evolved for conducting efficient clinical trials for prostate cancer (PCa) prevention. It integrates five key components, including agents, biomarkers, cohorts, designs, and endpoints. The rationale for the CP strategy relates to the natural history of prostate cancer. There is a wide array of natural and synthetic agents that hold promise for inhibiting, reversing, or modulating the transition from normal to precancer and from precancer to cancer. These agent classes include antiandrogens, antiestrogens, phytoestrogens, antioxidants, anti-inflammatory (proapoptotic) agents, antiproliferation/antidifferentiation agents, signal transduction modulators of receptor tyrosine kinase and ras farnesylation, antiangiogenesis agents, insulinlike growth factor (IGF)-1, peroxisome proliferator-activator receptor modulators (-gamma and -delta), and gene-based interventions. Biomarkers and endpoints are guided by the level of evidence required (eg, phase 1, 2, 3). Two candidate surrogate endpoints (SE) based on histology are high-grade prostatic intraepithelial neoplasia (HGPIN) and computer-assisted image analysis of dysplastic lesions. Phase 1 trials use standard endpoints of safety, pharmacokinetics and limited pharmacodynamics. Phase 2 trials use endpoints of modulation of biomarkers and correlation with histology. Phase 3 trials use endpoints of clinical benefit, such as cancer incidence reduction and quality of life. Validation of a biomarker as a SE involves correlation of the biomarker with clinical benefit. Cohorts (target populations) for phase 2/3 trials include the general population of men over age 50 with a normal prostate-specific antigen (PSA), subjects with a strong family history of PCa, subjects with elevated PSA/negative biopsy, and subjects with HGPIN/negative biopsy. These at-risk populations reflect key individual risk factors (age, race, serum PSA [free/total]; serum IGF-1/IGF binding protein (IGFBP)-3; 1, 25(OH)(2) D3

  9. Chemoprevention of Colon Cancer in a Rat Carcinogenesis Model Using a Novel Nanotechnology-based Combined Treatment System

    PubMed Central

    Chaudhary, Abhishek; Sutaria, Dhruvitkumar; Huang, Ying; Wang, Jeffrey; Prabhu, Sunil

    2011-01-01

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) is the third most common cause of cancer death in the US, accounting for ~51,000 deaths each year. We have previously shown in vitro chemopreventive effects of mixtures of aspirin, folic acid and calcium (AFAC) on colon cancer cell lines. The objective of the present study was to evaluate the in vivo effects of orally administered, colon targeted chemopreventive combination regimens on the inhibition of aberrant crypt foci (ACF) in a rat model of colon carcinogenesis using (1) unmodified (free drug) combinations of AFAC, and (2) nanoparticle-encapsulated combinations of the same agents. A 14-week animal study was conducted in three phases to determine an optimal effective dose from AFAC combinations and evaluate the efficacy of nanotechnology-based chemopreventive regimens administered in combined (mixtures), and individual (single entity) forms. ACF inhibition when compared to azoxymethane (AOM)-treated rat control group was significant in both, the unmodified and the modified nanoparticle-mediated chemopreventive regimens, demonstrating a range of 31 – 38% (p < 0.05) and 50 – 75% (p < 0.001) reduction respectively, in the number of ACFs. In addition, the nanoparticulate combination regimens of AFAC demonstrated a 2-fold increase in suppression of ACF compared to free drug mixtures. Individual administration of nanoparticle encapsulated drugs showed no significant effect on the reduction of ACF. Histochemical analysis provided further confirmation of chemopreventive effects, demonstrating a significant reduction in cell nuclear proliferation. Overall, our results provide a strong proof-of-concept using nanoparticle-mediated combination treatment in the chemoprevention of colon cancer. PMID:21914855

  10. Optimisation of enzymatic production of sulforaphane in broccoli sprouts and their total antioxidant activity at different growth and storage days.

    PubMed

    Tian, Ming; Xu, Xiaoyun; Hu, Hao; Liu, Yu; Pan, Siyi

    2017-01-01

    Sulforaphane, a type of isothiocyanate hydrolysed from glucosinolate, is a powerful anticancer compound naturally found in food especially in broccoli sprouts. Despite the function of sulforaphane has been extensively studied in recent years, little attention has been given to methods that can maximize the production of this compound in broccoli sprouts. The present study optimised the enzymolysis conditions for sulforaphane production in broccoli sprouts using response surface methodology. The maximum sulforaphane production (246.95 μg/g DW) was achieved using a solid-liquid ratio of 1:30, hydrolysis time of 1.5 h, ascorbic acid content of 3.95 mg/g DW sample, and temperature of 65 °C. The highest sulforaphane content in broccoli sprouts were 233.80 μg/g DW in 5-day-old sprouts and 1555.95 μg/g DW at day 4 of storage. The highest antioxidant activities were 37.22 U/min/g DW in 3-day-old sprouts and 35.08 U/min/g DW on 4th day of storage.

  11. Cancer chemoprevention research with selenium in the post-SELECT era: Promises and challenges

    PubMed Central

    Lü, Junxuan; Zhang, Jinhui; Jiang, Cheng; Deng, Yibin; Özten, Nur; Bosland, Maarten C.

    2016-01-01

    The negative efficacy outcomes of double-blinded, randomized, placebo-controlled Phase III human clinical trials with selenomethionine (SeMet) and SeMet-rich selenized-yeast (Se-yeast) for prostate cancer prevention and Se-yeast for prevention of non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) in North America lead to rejection of SeMet/Se-yeast for cancer prevention in Se-adequate populations. We identify two major lessons from the outcomes of these trials: 1) The antioxidant hypothesis was tested in wrong subjects or patient populations. 2) The selection of Se agents was not supported by cell culture and preclinical animal efficacy data as is common in drug development. We propose that next-generation forms of Se (next-gen Se), such as methylselenol precursors, offer biologically appropriate approaches for cancer chemoprevention but these are faced with formidable challenges. Solid mechanism-based preclinical efficacy assessments and comprehensive safety studies with next-gen Se will be essential to re-vitalize the idea of cancer chemoprevention with Se in the post-SELECT era. We advocate smaller mechanism-driven Phase I/II trials with these next-gen Se to guide and justify future decisions for definitive Phase III chemoprevention efficacy trials. PMID:26595411

  12. Injectable Sustained Release Microparticles of Curcumin: A New Concept for Cancer Chemoprevention

    PubMed Central

    Shahani, Komal; Swaminathan, Suresh Kumar; Freeman, Diana; Blum, Angela; Ma, Linan; Panyam, Jayanth

    2010-01-01

    Poor oral bioavailability limits the use of curcumin and other dietary polyphenols in the prevention and treatment of cancer. Minimally invasive strategies that can provide effective and sustained tissue concentrations of these agents will be highly valuable tools in the fight against cancer. The objective of this study was to investigate the use of an injectable sustained release microparticle formulation of curcumin as a novel approach to breast cancer chemoprevention. A biodegradable and biocompatible polymer, poly(D,L-lactide-co-glycolide) (PLGA), was used to fabricate curcumin microparticles. When injected subcutaneously in mice, a single dose of microparticles sustained curcumin levels in the blood and other tissues for nearly a month. Curcumin levels in the lungs and brain, frequent sites of breast cancer metastases, were 10-30-fold higher than that in the blood. Further, curcumin microparticles showed marked anticancer efficacy in nude mice bearing MDA-MB-231 xenografts compared to other controls. Repeated systemic injections of curcumin were not effective in inhibiting tumor growth. Treatment with curcumin microparticles resulted in diminished VEGF expression and poorly developed tumor microvessels, indicating a significant effect on tumor angiogenesis. These results suggest that sustained delivery of chemopreventives such as curcumin using polymeric microparticles is a promising new approach to cancer chemoprevention and therapy. PMID:20460537

  13. Chemopreventive Properties and Toxicity of Kelulut Honey in Sprague Dawley Rats Induced with Azoxymethane

    PubMed Central

    Muhamad Zali, Muhamad Firdaus Shyfiq; Mohd Ali, Razana; Zainal, Nurul Amira; Sapuan, Sarah; Tor, Yin Sim; Gopalsamy, Banulata; Syed Alwi, Sharifah Sakinah

    2016-01-01

    Ethnopharmacological Relevance. Colon cancer has been a major problem worldwide. Kelulut honey (KH) is produced by the stingless bees from Trigona species and has strong antioxidant activities that could be one of the potential chemopreventive agents from natural resources. Aim of This Study. This study investigated the chemopreventive properties and toxicity of KH in Sprague Dawley rats induced with azoxymethane (AOM). Material and Method. Twenty-four male Sprague Dawley rats aged 5 weeks were divided into 4 groups: (G1) untreated group not induced with AOM, (G2) untreated group induced with AOM, (G3) treated group induced with AOM, and (G4) treated group not induced with AOM. Injection of AOM (15 mg/kg) was via intraperitoneal route once a week for two subsequent weeks. The treatment groups were given oral administration of KH (1183 mg/kg body weight) twice daily for 8 weeks. Results. Treatment with KH significantly reduced the total number of aberrant crypt foci (ACF) and aberrant crypts (AC) and crypt multiplicity. KH was not toxic to the animals since the level of blood profile parameters, liver enzymes, and kidney functions was in normal range. Conclusions. The current finding shows that KH has chemopreventive properties in rats induced with colorectal cancer and also was found not toxic towards the animals. PMID:27525267

  14. Biochemical and molecular mechanisms underlying the chemopreventive efficacy of rosmarinic acid in a rat colon cancer.

    PubMed

    Venkatachalam, Karthikkumar; Gunasekaran, Sivagami; Namasivayam, Nalini

    2016-11-15

    To shed light on colon cancer chemoprevention, natural phytochemicals attract researchers by virtue of their beneficial biological effects. The chemopreventive potential of rosmarinic acid (RA) was tested by using the colon carcinogen, 1,2-dimethylhydrazine (DMH) by evaluating the Aberrant crypt foci (ACF), tumour incidence, lipid peroxidative byproducts, phase I & II drug metabolizing enzymes, cell proliferative and apoptotic proteins. Rats were divided into six groups and received modified pellet diet. Group 1 served as control rats, group 2 rats received RA (5mg/kg b.w. p.o.), rats in groups 3-6 received DMH (20mg/kg b.w., s.c.) for the first fifteen weeks. In addition to DMH, groups 4-6 received RA at the dose of 5mg/kg b.w. during initiation, post initiation stages and also for the entire study period. DMH treated rats showed an increase in the development of ACF, tumour formation and multiplicity and decrease in lipid peroxidative byproducts. Moreover, it modulates xenobiotic enzymes and reduces the expressions of proapoptotic proteins; increases expressions of anti apoptotic proteins at the end of the study. Supplementation with RA to carcinogen treated rats protected them from the above deleterious effects caused by DMH and thus RA may be used as a potent chemopreventive agent.

  15. An Overview of Ultraviolet B Radiation-Induced Skin Cancer Chemoprevention by Silibinin

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Rahul; Deep, Gagan; Agarwal, Rajesh

    2015-01-01

    Skin cancer incidences are rising worldwide, and one of the major causative factors is excessive exposure to solar ultraviolet radiation (UVR). Annually, ~5 million skin cancer patients are treated in United States, mostly with nonmelanoma skin cancer (NMSC), which is also frequent in other Western countries. As sunscreens do not provide adequate protection against deleterious effects of UVR, additional and alternative chemoprevention strategies are urgently needed to reduce skin cancer burden. Over the last couple of decades, extensive research has been conducted to understand the molecular basis of skin carcinogenesis, and to identifying novel agents which could be useful in the chemoprevention of skin cancer. In this regard, several natural non-toxic compounds have shown promising efficacy in preventing skin carcinogenesis at initiation, promotion and progression stages, and are considered important in better management of skin cancer. Consistent with this, we and others have studied and established the notable efficacy of natural flavonolignan silibinin against UVB-induced skin carcinogenesis. Extensive pre-clinical animal and cell culture studies report strong anti-inflammatory, anti-oxidant, DNA damage repair, immune-modulatory and anti-proliferative properties of silibinin. Molecular studies have identified that silibinin targets pleotropic signaling pathways including mitogenic, cell cycle, apoptosis, autophagy, p53, NF-κB, etc. Overall, the skin cancer chemopreventive potential of silibinin is well supported by comprehensive mechanistic studies, suggesting its greater use against UV-induced cellular damages and photocarcinogenesis. PMID:26097804

  16. Absence of chemopreventive influence of propolis on the rat liver altered foci development.

    PubMed

    Said, Roueda Abou; Grassi, Tony Fernando; Scolastici, Clarissa; Alves de Lima, Rodrigo Otávio; Darros, Bruno R; Barbisan, Luis Fernando; de Camargo, João Lauro V

    2010-07-01

    Propolis (bee glue) is a complex mixture of natural substances that exhibits a broad spectrum of biological activities. As the possibility exists that it may exert a chemopreventive role against cancer development, the present study aimed to evaluate the chemopreventive influence of a Brazilian aqueous propolis extract (APE) in a rat two-stage (initiation-promotion) medium-term bioassay for chemical liver carcinogenesis. Male Wistar rats were sequentially initiated with diethylnitrosamine (DEN, 200mg/kgb.w.) and, 2 weeks later, exposed to a diet containing hexachlorobenzene (HCB, 100ppm) and to APE 0.1% through drinking water for 6 weeks. Appropriate control groups were also established. The animals were sacrificed at the weeks 8th and 30th when liver samples were processed to evaluate the development of altered hepatocyte foci (AHF) identified under hematoxylin and eosin (H&E) staining and by the immunohistochemical expression of the enzyme glutathione S-transferase placental form (GST-P). The results indicate that APE 0.1% did not protect against the development of any of the differentially identified putative preneoplastic foci in DEN-initiated animals, exposed or not to the promoting agent HCB. Also, APE 0.1% by itself did not significantly induce any AHF, what is in line with its already known absence of genotoxic potential. Our results indicate that an aqueous extract of Brazilian propolis did not exert chemoprevention on the hepatocarcinogenesis process chemically induced in the rat.

  17. Chemopreventive Properties and Toxicity of Kelulut Honey in Sprague Dawley Rats Induced with Azoxymethane.

    PubMed

    Saiful Yazan, Latifah; Muhamad Zali, Muhamad Firdaus Shyfiq; Mohd Ali, Razana; Zainal, Nurul Amira; Esa, Nurulaidah; Sapuan, Sarah; Ong, Yong Sze; Tor, Yin Sim; Gopalsamy, Banulata; Voon, Fui Ling; Syed Alwi, Sharifah Sakinah

    2016-01-01

    Ethnopharmacological Relevance. Colon cancer has been a major problem worldwide. Kelulut honey (KH) is produced by the stingless bees from Trigona species and has strong antioxidant activities that could be one of the potential chemopreventive agents from natural resources. Aim of This Study. This study investigated the chemopreventive properties and toxicity of KH in Sprague Dawley rats induced with azoxymethane (AOM). Material and Method. Twenty-four male Sprague Dawley rats aged 5 weeks were divided into 4 groups: (G1) untreated group not induced with AOM, (G2) untreated group induced with AOM, (G3) treated group induced with AOM, and (G4) treated group not induced with AOM. Injection of AOM (15 mg/kg) was via intraperitoneal route once a week for two subsequent weeks. The treatment groups were given oral administration of KH (1183 mg/kg body weight) twice daily for 8 weeks. Results. Treatment with KH significantly reduced the total number of aberrant crypt foci (ACF) and aberrant crypts (AC) and crypt multiplicity. KH was not toxic to the animals since the level of blood profile parameters, liver enzymes, and kidney functions was in normal range. Conclusions. The current finding shows that KH has chemopreventive properties in rats induced with colorectal cancer and also was found not toxic towards the animals.

  18. Nrf2: friend or foe for chemoprevention?

    PubMed Central

    Kensler, Thomas W.; Wakabayashi, Nobunao

    2010-01-01

    Health reflects the ability of an organism to adapt to stress. Stresses—metabolic, proteotoxic, mitotic, oxidative and DNA-damage stresses—not only contribute to the etiology of cancer and other chronic degenerative diseases but are also hallmarks of the cancer phenotype. Activation of the Kelch-like ECH-associated protein 1 (KEAP1)–NF-E2-related factor 2 (NRF2)-signaling pathway is an adaptive response to environmental and endogenous stresses and serves to render animals resistant to chemical carcinogenesis and other forms of toxicity, whilst disruption of the pathway exacerbates these outcomes. This pathway can be induced by thiol-reactive small molecules that demonstrate protective efficacy in preclinical chemoprevention models and in clinical trials. However, mutations and epigenetic modifications affecting the regulation and fate of NRF2 can lead to constitutive dominant hyperactivation of signaling that preserves rather than attenuates cancer phenotypes by providing selective resistance to stresses. This review provides a synopsis of KEAP1–NRF2 signaling, compares the impact of genetic versus pharmacologic activation and considers both the attributes and concerns of targeting the pathway in chemoprevention. PMID:19793802

  19. Phyto-oestrogens and breast cancer chemoprevention

    PubMed Central

    Limer, Jane L; Speirs, Valerie

    2004-01-01

    Phytoestrogens are polyphenol compounds of plant origin that exhibit a structural similarity to the mammalian steroid hormone 17β-oestradiol. In Asian nations the staple consumption of phyto-oestrogen-rich foodstuffs correlates with a reduced incidence of breast cancer. Human dietary intervention trials have noted a direct relationship between phyto-oestrogen ingestion and a favourable hormonal profile associated with decreased breast cancer risk. However, these studies failed to ascertain the precise effect of dietary phyto-oestrogens on the proliferation of mammary tissue. Epidemiological and rodent studies crucially suggest that breast cancer chemoprevention by dietary phyto-oestrogen compounds is dependent on ingestion before puberty, when the mammary gland is relatively immature. Phyto-oestrogen supplements are commercially marketed for use by postmenopausal women as natural and safe alternatives to hormone replacement therapy. Of current concern is the effect of phyto-oestrogen compounds on the growth of pre-existing breast tumours. Data are contradictory, with cell culture studies reporting both the oestrogenic stimulation of oestrogen receptor-positive breast cancer cell lines and the antagonism of tamoxifen activity at physiological phyto-oestrogen concentrations. Conversely, phyto-oestrogen ingestion by rodents is associated with the development of less aggressive breast tumours with reduced metastatic potential. Despite the present ambiguity, current data do suggest a potential benefit from use of phyto-oestrogens in breast cancer chemoprevention and therapy. These aspects are discussed. PMID:15084232

  20. Chemoprevention of lung cancer by tea.

    PubMed

    Clark, Julie; You, Ming

    2006-02-01

    Tea is the second only to water as the most consumed beverage in the world. Both green and black teas have been studied for their health benefits for a variety of diseases, particularly cancer. Lung cancer is the predominant cause of cancer mortality in developed countries. Smokers' risk of lung cancer is 20 times that of persons who have never smoked. Epidemiological studies on the cancer-preventive effects of tea produce inconsistent results, which could in part be attributed to the lack of a universal standard for tea preparations. However, most animal studies indicate that tea has strong chemopreventive effects against lung tumorigenesis. The reported mechanisms for chemopreventive activity of green tea are antioxidation, induction of phase II enzymes, inhibition of TNFalpha expression and release, inhibition of cell proliferation, and induction of apoptosis. Cell cycle arrest and apoptosis induced by green tea are probably the two most significant factors. Future studies are needed to determine how green tea affects the genes associated with cell cycle regulation and apoptosis during the mouse lung carcinogenesis process.

  1. New Enlightenment of Skin Cancer Chemoprevention through Phytochemicals: In Vitro and In Vivo Studies and the Underlying Mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Madhulika; Suman, Shankar; Shukla, Yogeshwer

    2014-01-01

    Skin cancer is still a major cause of morbidity and mortality worldwide. Skin overexposure to ultraviolet irradiations, chemicals, and several viruses has a capability to cause severe skin-related disorders including immunosuppression and skin cancer. These factors act in sequence at various steps of skin carcinogenesis via initiation, promotion, and/or progression. These days cancer chemoprevention is recognized as the most hopeful and novel approach to prevent, inhibit, or reverse the processes of carcinogenesis by intervention with natural products. Phytochemicals have antioxidant, antimutagenic, anticarcinogenic, and carcinogen detoxification capabilities thereby considered as efficient chemopreventive agents. Considerable efforts have been done to identify the phytochemicals which may possibly act on one or several molecular targets that modulate cellular processes such as inflammation, immunity, cell cycle progression, and apoptosis. Till date several phytochemicals in the light of chemoprevention have been studied by using suitable skin carcinogenic in vitro and in vivo models and proven as beneficial for prevention of skin cancer. This revision presents a comprehensive knowledge and the main molecular mechanisms of actions of various phytochemicals in the chemoprevention of skin cancer. PMID:24757666

  2. New Enlightenment of Skin Cancer Chemoprevention through Phytochemicals: In Vitro and In Vivo Studies and the Underlying Mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Singh, Madhulika; Suman, Shankar; Shukla, Yogeshwer

    2014-01-01

    Skin cancer is still a major cause of morbidity and mortality worldwide. Skin overexposure to ultraviolet irradiations, chemicals, and several viruses has a capability to cause severe skin-related disorders including immunosuppression and skin cancer. These factors act in sequence at various steps of skin carcinogenesis via initiation, promotion, and/or progression. These days cancer chemoprevention is recognized as the most hopeful and novel approach to prevent, inhibit, or reverse the processes of carcinogenesis by intervention with natural products. Phytochemicals have antioxidant, antimutagenic, anticarcinogenic, and carcinogen detoxification capabilities thereby considered as efficient chemopreventive agents. Considerable efforts have been done to identify the phytochemicals which may possibly act on one or several molecular targets that modulate cellular processes such as inflammation, immunity, cell cycle progression, and apoptosis. Till date several phytochemicals in the light of chemoprevention have been studied by using suitable skin carcinogenic in vitro and in vivo models and proven as beneficial for prevention of skin cancer. This revision presents a comprehensive knowledge and the main molecular mechanisms of actions of various phytochemicals in the chemoprevention of skin cancer.

  3. Phase 0 Clinical Chemoprevention Trial of the AKT Inhibitor SR13668

    PubMed Central

    Reid, Joel M.; Walden, Chad; Qin, Rui; Allen Ziegler, Katie L.; Haslam, John L.; Rajewski, Roger A.; Warndahl, Roger; Fitting, Cindy L.; Boring, Daniel; Szabo, Eva; Crowell, James; Perloff, Marjorie; Jong, Ling; Mandrekar, Sumithra J.; Ames, Matthew M.; Limburg, Paul J.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose SR13668, an orally active AKT pathway inhibitor, has demonstrated cancer chemopreventive potential in preclinical studies. To accelerate the clinical development of this promising agent, we designed and conducted the first-ever phase 0 chemoprevention trial to evaluate and compare the effects of food and formulation on SR13668 bioavailability. Patients and Methods Healthy adult volunteers were randomly assigned to receive a single, 38 mg oral dose of SR13668 in one of five different formulations, with or without food. Based on existing animal data, SR13668 in a PEG400/Labrasol® oral solution was defined as the reference formulation. Blood samples were obtained pre- and post-agent administration for pharmacokinetic analyses. Area under the plasma concentration-time curve (AUC0-∞) was defined as the primary endpoint. Data were analyzed and compared using established statistical methods for phase 0 trials with a limited sample size. Results Participants (N=20) were rapidly accrued over a 5-month period. Complete pharmacokinetic data were available for 18 randomized participants. AUC0-∞ values were highest in the fed state (range = 122–439 ng/mL × hours) and were statistically significantly different across formulations (p = 0.007), with Solutol® HS15 providing the highest bioavailability. SR13668 time to peak plasma concentration (3 hours; range, 2 – 6 hours) and half-life were (11.2 ± 3.1 hours) were not formulation dependent. Conclusions Using a novel, highly efficient study design, we rapidly identified a lead formulation of SR13668 for further clinical testing. Our findings support application of the phase 0 trial paradigm to accelerate chemoprevention agent development. PMID:21372034

  4. Weaknesses and Pitfalls of Using Mice and Rats in Cancer Chemoprevention Studies

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Yukui; Jia, Yuping; Chen, Lichan; Ezeogu, Lewis; Yu, Baofa; Xu, Ningzhi; Liao, D. Joshua

    2015-01-01

    Many studies, using different chemical agents, have shown excellent cancer prevention efficacy in mice and rats. However, equivalent tests of cancer prevention in humans require decades of intake of the agents while the rodents' short lifespans cannot give us information of the long-term safety. Therefore, animals with a much longer lifespan should be used to bridge the lifespan gap between the rodents and humans. There are many transgenic mouse models of carcinogenesis available, in which DNA promoters are used to activate transgenes. One promoter may activate the transgene in multiple cell types while different promoters are activated at different ages of the mice. These spatial and temporal aspects of transgenes are often neglected and may be pitfalls or weaknesses in chemoprevention studies. The variation in the copy number of the transgene may widen data variation and requires use of more animals. Models of chemically-induced carcinogenesis do not have these transgene-related defects, but chemical carcinogens usually damage metabolic organs or tissues, thus affecting the metabolism of the chemopreventive agents. Moreover, many genetically edited and some chemically-induced carcinogenesis models produce tumors that exhibit cancerous histology but are not cancers because the tumor cells are still mortal, inducer-dependent, and unable to metastasize, and thus should be used with caution in chemoprevention studies. Lastly, since mice prefer an ambient temperature of 30-32°C, it should be debated whether future mouse studies should be performed at this temperature, but not at 21-23°C that cold-stresses the animals. PMID:26366220

  5. Cancer chemoprevention by natural carotenoids as an efficient strategy.

    PubMed

    Bolhassani, Azam

    2015-01-01

    The use of specific compounds to suppress the growth of tumors or reverse carcinogenesis is defined as chemoprevention. Natural products have been known as one of the most important resources of anticancer agents. Among them, carotenoids are lipophilic molecules accumulating in lipophilic compartments including lipoproteins and/or membranes. Various carotenoids were used as major phytonutrients to inhibit the development of tumors in vitro and in vivo. They have shown different functions such as scavenging free radicals, inhibition of angiogenesis, prevention of cell propagation, and apoptosis induction in lung, colon, breast and prostate. Regarding these roles, most carotenoids possess anti-oxidant properties. However, their therapeutic use is problematic due to the lack of solubility of carotenoids in water. Hence, recent studies have been focused on uncommon carotenoids soluble in water because of their glycosylated form, such as crocin(s) extracted from saffron. These structures with their cytotoxicity effects on human cancer cells are suggested as the most suitable compounds for cancer treatment. Herein, we summarize different functions of carotenoids for suppressing tumor growth.

  6. An effective and simple procedure to isolate abundant quantities of biologically active chemopreventive lunasin-protease inhibitor concentrate (LPIC) from soybean

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Lunasin is a 5-kDa soybean bioactive peptide with demonstrated anti-cancer and anti-inflammatory properties. The use of lunasin as a chemopreventive agent in large-scale animal studies and human clinical trials is hampered by the paucity of large quantities of lunasin. Recently, purification methods...

  7. Mechanism of Action of Sulforaphane as a Superoxide Radical Anion and Hydrogen Peroxide Scavenger by Double Hydrogen Transfer: A Model for Iron Superoxide Dismutase.

    PubMed

    Prasad, Ajit Kumar; Mishra, P C

    2015-06-25

    The mechanism of action of sulforaphane as a scavenger of superoxide radical anion (O2(•-)) and hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) was investigated using density functional theory (DFT) in both gas phase and aqueous media. Iron superoxide dismutase (Fe-SOD) involved in scavenging superoxide radical anion from biological media was modeled by a complex consisting of the ferric ion (Fe(3+)) attached to three histidine rings. Reactions related to scavenging of superoxide radical anion by sulforaphane were studied using DFT in the presence and absence of Fe-SOD represented by this model in both gas phase and aqueous media. The scavenging action of sulforaphane toward both superoxide radical anion and hydrogen peroxide was found to involve the unusual mechanism of double hydrogen transfer. It was found that sulforaphane alone, without Fe-SOD, cannot scavenge superoxide radical anion in gas phase or aqueous media efficiently as the corresponding reaction barriers are very high. However, in the presence of Fe-SOD represented by the above-mentioned model, the scavenging reactions become barrierless, and so sulforaphane scavenges superoxide radical anion by converting it to hydrogen peroxide efficiently. Further, sulforaphane was found to scavenge hydrogen peroxide also very efficiently by converting it into water. Thus, the mechanism of action of sulforaphane as an excellent antioxidant has been unravelled.

  8. Biological/chemopreventive activity of stilbenes and their effect on colon cancer.

    PubMed

    Rimando, Agnes M; Suh, Nanjoo

    2008-10-01

    Colon cancer is one of the leading causes of cancer death in men and women in Western countries. Epidemiological studies have linked the consumption of fruits and vegetables to a reduced risk of colon cancer, and small fruits are particularly rich sources of many active phytochemical stilbenes, such as resveratrol and pterostilbene. Recent advances in the prevention of colon cancer have stimulated an interest in diet and lifestyle as an effective means of intervention. As constituents of small fruits such as grapes, berries and their products, stilbenes are under intense investigation as cancer chemopreventive agents. One of the best-characterized stilbenes, resveratrol, has been known as an antioxidant and an anti-aging compound as well as an anti-inflammatory agent. Stilbenes have diverse pharmacological activities, which include cancer prevention, a cholesterol-lowering effect, enhanced insulin sensitivity, and increased lifespan. This review summarizes results related to the potential use of various stilbenes as cancer chemopreventive agents, their mechanisms of action, as well as their pharmacokinetics and efficacy for the prevention of colon cancer in animals and humans.

  9. Cancer chemopreventive properties of orally bioavailable flavonoids -methylated versus unmethylated flavones

    PubMed Central

    Walle, Thomas; Ta, Nga; Kawamori, Toshihiko; Wen, Xia; Tsuji, Petra A.; Walle, U. Kristina

    2007-01-01

    Poor oral bioavailability has been a major limitation for the successful use of dietary flavonoids as cancer chemopreventive agents. In this study, we examined fully methylated flavones as promising improved agents. In the humanoral SCC-9 cancer cells, 5,7-dimethoxyflavone and 5,7,4’-trimethoxyflavone were both ten times more potent inhibitors of cell proliferation (IC50 values 5-8 μM) than the corresponding unmethylated analogs chrysin and apigenin. Flow cytometry indicated that both methylated flavones arrested the SCC-9 cells in the G1 phase with a concomitant decrease in the S phase, dramatically different from the unmethylated analogs, which promoted G2/M phase arrest. Both methylated compounds inhibited the proliferation of two other cancer cell lines with very little effect on two immortalized normal cell lines. Examination of additional flavone structures indicated that methylated flavones in general have antiproliferative properties. Finally, we demonstrated that 5,7-dimethoxyflavone, in contrast to its unmethylated analog chrysin, was well absorbed and had high oral bioavailability as well as tissue accumulation in vivo in the rat. Thus, fully methylated flavones appear to have great potential as cancer chemopreventive/chemotherapeutic agents, in particular in oral cancer. PMID:17250812

  10. Cancer chemopreventive properties of orally bioavailable flavonoids--methylated versus unmethylated flavones.

    PubMed

    Walle, Thomas; Ta, Nga; Kawamori, Toshihiko; Wen, Xia; Tsuji, Petra A; Walle, U Kristina

    2007-05-01

    Poor oral bioavailability has been a major limitation for the successful use of dietary flavonoids as cancer chemopreventive agents. In this study, we examined fully methylated flavones as promising improved agents. In the human oral SCC-9 cancer cells, 5,7-dimethoxyflavone and 5,7,4'-trimethoxyflavone were both 10 times more potent inhibitors of cell proliferation (IC(50) values 5-8 microM) than the corresponding unmethylated analogs chrysin and apigenin. Flow cytometry indicated that both methylated flavones arrested the SCC-9 cells in the G1 phase with a concomitant decrease in the S phase, dramatically different from the unmethylated analogs, which promoted G2/M phase arrest. Both methylated compounds inhibited the proliferation of two other cancer cell lines with very little effect on two immortalized normal cell lines. Examination of additional flavone structures indicated that methylated flavones in general have antiproliferative properties. Finally, we demonstrated that 5,7-dimethoxyflavone, in contrast to its unmethylated analog chrysin, was well absorbed and had high oral bioavailability as well as tissue accumulation in vivo in the rat. Thus, fully methylated flavones appear to have great potential as cancer chemopreventive/chemotherapeutic agents, in particular in oral cancer.

  11. Hydrogen sulfide mediates the anti-survival effect of sulforaphane on human prostate cancer cells

    SciTech Connect

    Pei, Yanxi; Wu, Bo; Cao, Qiuhui; Wu, Lingyun; Yang, Guangdong

    2011-12-15

    Hydrogen sulfide (H{sub 2}S) is a novel gasotransmitter that regulates cell proliferation and other cellular functions. Sulforaphane (SFN) is a sulfur-containing compound that exhibits anticancer properties, and young sprouts of broccoli are particularly rich in SFN. There is consistent epidemiological evidence that the consumption of sulfur-containing vegetables, such as garlic and cruciferous vegetables, may help reduce the occurrence of prostate cancer. Here we found that a large amount of H{sub 2}S is released when SFN is added into cell culture medium or mixed with mouse liver homogenates, respectively. Both SFN and NaHS (a H{sub 2}S donor) decreased the viability of PC-3 cells (a human prostate cancer cell line) in a dose-dependent manner, and supplement of methemoglobin or oxidized glutathione (two H{sub 2}S scavengers) reversed SFN-reduced cell viability. We further found both cystathionine gamma-lyase (CSE) and cystathionine beta-synthase are expressed in PC-3 cells and mouse prostate tissues. H{sub 2}S production in prostate tissues from CSE knockout mice was only 20% of that from wild-type mice, suggesting CSE is a major H{sub 2}S-producing enzyme in prostate. CSE overexpression enhanced H{sub 2}S production and inhibited cell viability in PC-3 cells. In addition, both SFN and NaHS activated p38 mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPK) and c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK). Pre-treatment of PC-3 cells with methemoglobin decreased SFN-stimulated MAPK activities. Suppression of both p38 MAPK and JNK reversed H{sub 2}S- or SFN-reduced viability of PC-3 cells. Our results demonstrated that H{sub 2}S mediates the inhibitory effect of SFN on the proliferation of PC-3 cells, which suggests that H{sub 2}S-releasing diet or drug might be beneficial in the treatment of prostate cancer. Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer A large amount of H{sub 2}S is released from sulforaphane. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer H{sub 2}S mediates the anti-survival effect of

  12. Chemoprevention of lung tumorigenesis by intranasally administered diindolylmethane in A/J mice

    PubMed Central

    Kassie, Fekadu

    2013-01-01

    The main reasons for the failure of most chemopreventive agents during clinical trials are poor in vivo bioavailability and dose-limiting side effects. One potential approach to surmount these problems in lung cancer chemoprevention trials could be direct delivery of agents into the pulmonary tissue. In this study, we assessed the efficacy of intranasally delivered bio-response diindolylmethane (BRD) against 4-(methylnitrosamino)-1-(3-pyridyl)-1-butanone (NNK)-induced lung tumorigenesis in mice. Mice treated with NNK (two doses of 50mg/kg at an interval of a week, intraperitoneal) developed 16.3±2.9 lung tumors per mouse. Post-carcinogen administration of BRD, via intranasal instillation, for 24 weeks, twice a week, at a dose of 2mg per mouse (0.6mg pure diindolylmethane per mouse) reduced the lung tumor multiplicity to 4.6±2.2 tumors per mouse (72% reduction). Likewise, large tumors (>1mm) were almost completely abolished and multiplicities of tumors with a size of 0.5–1mm were reduced by 74%. Tumor volume was also reduced by 82%. Further studies using an in vitro model of lung tumorigenesis showed that BRD exhibited pronounced antiproliferative and apoptotic effects in premalignant and malignant bronchial cells but only minimal effects in parental immortalized cells through, at least in part, suppression of the phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K)/Akt signaling pathway. These results showed the potent lung tumor inhibitory activities of low doses of BRD given via intranasal instillation and, therefore, intranasal delivery of BRD holds a great promise for lung cancer chemoprevention in subjects at high risk to develop lung cancer. PMID:23239747

  13. Analysis and anti-Helicobacter activity of sulforaphane and related compounds present in broccoli ( Brassica oleracea L.) sprouts.

    PubMed

    Moon, Joon-Kwan; Kim, Jun-Ran; Ahn, Young-Joon; Shibamoto, Takayuki

    2010-06-09

    A crude methanol extract prepared from fresh broccoli sprouts was extracted with hexane, chloroform, ethyl acetate, and butanol sequentially. Residual water fraction was obtained from the residual aqueous layer. The greatest inhibition zones (>5 cm) were noted for Helicobacter pylori strain by the chloroform extract, followed by the hexane extract (5.03 cm), the ethyl acetate extract (4.90 cm), the butanol extract (3.10 cm), and the crude methanol extract (2.80 cm), whereas the residual water fraction did not show any inhibition zone. Including sulforaphane, five sulforaphane-related compounds were positively identified in the chloroform extract, of which 5-methylsulfinylpentylnitrile was found in the greatest concentration (475.7 mg/kg of fresh sprouts), followed by sulforaphane (222.6 mg/kg) and 4-methylsulfinylbutylnitrile (63.0 mg/kg). Among 18 sulforaphane and related compounds synthesized (6 amines, 6 isothiocyanates, and 6 nitriles), 2 amines, 6 isothiocyanates, and 1 nitrile exhibited >5 cm inhibitory zones for H. pylori strain. The results indicate that broccoli sprouts can be an excellent food source for medicinal substances.

  14. Cancer risk factors for selecting cohorts for large-scale chemoprevention trials.

    PubMed

    Greenwald, P

    1996-01-01

    for cancer; and chemopreventive agent selection and development. A comprehensive database is being established to support the PTDN's decision-making process and will help to determine which agents investigated in preclinical and early phase clinical trials should move to large-scale testing. Cohorts for large-scale chemoprevention trials include individuals who are determined to be at high risk as a result of genetic predisposition, carcinogenic exposure, or the presence of biomarkers indicative of increased risk. Current large-scale trials in well-defined, high-risk populations include the Breast Cancer Prevention Trial (tamoxifen), the Prostate Cancer Prevention Trial (finasteride), and the N-(4-hydroxyphenyl) retinamide (4-HPR) breast cancer prevention study being conducted in Milan. Biomarker studies will provide valuable information for refining the design and facilitating the implementation of future large-scale trials. For example, potential biomarkers are being assessed at biopsy in women with ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS). The women are then randomized to either placebo, tamoxifen, 4-HPR, or tamoxifen plus 4-HPR for 2-4 weeks, at which time surgery is performed and the biomarkers reassessed to determine biomarker modulation by the interventions. For prostate cancer, modulation of prostatic intraepithelial neoplasia (PIN) by 4-HPR and difluoromethylornithine is being investigated; similar studies are being planned for oltipraz, dehydroepiandrosterone, and vitamin E plus selenomethionine. The validation of biomarkers as surrogate endpoints for cancer incidence in high-risk cohorts will allow more agents to be evaluated in shorter studies that use fewer subjects to achieve the desired statistical power.

  15. Anti-Inflammatory and Anti-Superbacterial Properties of Sulforaphane from Shepherd's Purse

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Woo Jin; Kim, Seong Keun; Park, Hee Kuk; Sohn, Uy Dong

    2014-01-01

    Shepherd's purse, Capsella bursa-pastoris (L.) Medik., has been considered a health food for centuries in Asia and is known to contain the isothiocyanate compound sulforaphane. In this study, we evaluated the anti-inflammatory and antibacterial properties of a sulforaphane-containing solution (SCS) isolated from shepherd's purse. SCS had significant anti-inflammatory activity indicated by the decreased levels of nitric oxide (NO), cytokines (interleukin 1β [IL-1β], IL-6, and IL-10), and prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) in lipopolysaccharide-stimulated RAW 264.7 murine macrophages. In addition, SCS decreased the inducible NO synthase (iNOS) and cyclooxygenase 2 (COX-2) levels, which confirmed the anti-inflammatory activity of SCS. Further, SCS inhibited vancomycin-resistant enterococci (VRE) and Bacillus anthracis. The minimal inhibitory concentration was 250 µg/ml for VRE and 1,000 µg/ml for B. anthracis. Taken together, these data indicate that SCS has potential anti-inflammatory and anti-superbacterial properties, and thus it can be used as a functional food or pharmaceutical. PMID:24634594

  16. Effect of meal composition and cooking duration on the fate of sulforaphane following consumption of broccoli by healthy human subjects.

    PubMed

    Rungapamestry, Vanessa; Duncan, Alan J; Fuller, Zoë; Ratcliffe, Brian

    2007-04-01

    The isothiocyanate, sulforaphane, has been implicated in the cancer-protective effects of brassica vegetables. When broccoli is consumed, sulforaphane is released from hydrolysis of glucoraphanin by plant myrosinase and/or colonic microbiota. The influence of meal composition and broccoli-cooking duration on isothiocyanate uptake was investigated in a designed experiment. Volunteers (n 12) were each offered a meal, with or without beef, together with 150 g lightly cooked broccoli (microwaved 2.0 min) or fully cooked broccoli (microwaved 5.5 min), or a broccoli seed extract. They received 3 g mustard containing pre-formed allyl isothiocyanate (AITC) with each meal. Urinary output of allyl (AMA) and sulforaphane (SFMA) mercapturic acids, the biomarkers of production of AITC and sulforaphane respectively, were measured for 24 h after meal consumption. The estimated yield of sulforaphane in vivo was about 3-fold higher after consumption of lightly cooked broccoli than fully cooked broccoli. Absorption of AITC from mustard was about 1.3-fold higher following consumption of the meat-containing meal compared with the non meat-containing alternative. The meal matrix did not significantly influence the hydrolysis of glucoraphanin and its excretion as SFMA from broccoli. Isothiocyanates may interact with the meal matrix to a greater extent if they are ingested pre-formed rather than after their production from hydrolysis of glucosinolates in vivo. The main influence on the production of isothiocyanates in vivo is the way in which brassica vegetables are cooked, rather than the effect of the meal matrix.

  17. Sulforaphane protects against acrolein-induced oxidative stress and inflammatory responses: modulation of Nrf-2 and COX-2 expression

    PubMed Central

    Deng, Yu-Hui; Cui, Fa-Cai

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Acrolein (2-propenal) is a reactive α, β-unsaturated aldehyde which causes a health hazard to humans. The present study focused on determining the protection offered by sulforaphane against acrolein-induced damage in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC). Material and methods Acrolein-induced oxidative stress was determined through evaluating the levels of reactive oxygen species, protein carbonyl and sulfhydryl content, thiobarbituric acid reactive species, total oxidant status and antioxidant status (total antioxidant capacity, glutathione, superoxide dismutase, catalase, glutathione peroxidase, glutathione-S-transferase activity). Also, Nrf-2 expression levels were determined using western blot analysis. Acrolein-induced inflammation was determined through analyzing expression of cyclooxygenase-2 by western blot and PGE2 levels by ELISA. The protection offered by sulforaphane against acrolein-induced oxidative stress and inflammation was studied. Results Acrolein showed a significant (p < 0.001) increase in the levels of oxidative stress parameters and down-regulated Nrf-2 expression. Acrolein-induced inflammation was observed through upregulation (p < 0.001) of COX-2 and PGE2 levels. Pretreatment with sulforaphane enhanced the antioxidant status through upregulating Nrf-2 expression (p < 0.001) in PBMC. Acrolein-induced inflammation was significantly inhibited through suppression of COX-2 (p < 0.001) and PGE2 levels (p < 0.001). Conclusions The present study provides clear evidence that pre-treatment with sulforaphane completely restored the antioxidant status and prevented inflammatory responses mediated by acrolein. Thus the protection offered by sulforaphane against acrolein-induced damage in PBMC is attributed to its anti-oxidant and anti-inflammatory potential. PMID:27478470

  18. Sulforaphane Induces Nrf2 and Protects Against CYP2E1-dependent Binge Alcohol –induced Liver Steatosis

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Richard; Lin, Jianjun; Wu, Defeng

    2013-01-01

    Background The mechanism(s) by which alcohol causes cell injury are still not clear but a major mechanism appears to be the role of lipid peroxidation and oxidative stress in alcohol toxicity. CYP2E1-generated ROS contributes to the ethanol-induced oxidant stress and inhibition of CYP2E1 activity decreases ethanol-induced fatty liver. The transcription factor Nrf2 regulates the expression of many cytoprotective enzymes which results in cellular protection against a variety of toxins. Method The current study was designed to evaluate the ability of sulforaphane, an activator of Nrf2, to blunt CYP2E1-dependent, ethanol-induced steatosis in vivo and in vitro. Results The sulforaphane treatment activated Nrf2, increased levels of the Nrf2 target heme oxygenase -1 and subsequently lowered oxidant stress as shown by the decline in lipid peroxidation and 3-Nitrotyrosine protein adducts and an increase in GSH levels after the acute ethanol treatment. It decreased ethanol-elevated liver levels of triglycerides and cholesterol and Oil Red O staining. Similar results were found in vitro as addition of sulforaphane to HepG2 E47 cells, which express CYP2E1, elevated Nrf2 levels and decreased the accumulation of lipid in cells cultured with ethanol. Sulforaphane treatment had no effect on levels of or activity of CYP2E1. Conclusions Sulforaphane proved to be an effective in vivo inhibitor of acute ethanol–induced fatty liver in mice. General significance The possible amelioration of liver injury which occurs under these conditions by chemical activators of Nrf2 is of clinical relevance and worthy of further study. PMID:24060752

  19. Green tea in chemoprevention of cancer.

    PubMed

    Mukhtar, H; Ahmad, N

    1999-12-01

    The concept of prevention of cancer using naturally occurring substances that could be included in the diet consumed by the human population is gaining increasing attention. Tea, next to water, is the most popularly consumed beverage in the world and it is grown in about 30 countries. Abundant data, amassed from several laboratories around the world in the last ten years, provided convincing evidence that polyphenolic antioxidants present in tea afford protection against cancer risk in many animal-tumor bioassay systems. The epidemiological studies, though inconclusive, have also suggested that the consumption of tea is associated with a lowered risk of cancer. Much of this work has been done on green tea; less is known about black tea. Green tea contains many polyphenolic antioxidants, and (-)-epigallocatechin-3-gallate (EGCG) is the key polyphenolic antioxidant believed to be responsible for most of the cancer chemopreventive properties of green tea. This review will discuss these effects and the molecular mechanisms associated with the biological response to green-tea polyphenols.

  20. Trianthema portulacastrum Linn. exerts chemoprevention of 7,12-dimethylbenz(a)anthracene-induced mammary tumorigenesis in rats.

    PubMed

    Bishayee, Anupam; Mandal, Animesh

    2014-10-01

    Due to limited treatment options for advanced-stage metastatic breast cancer, a high priority should be given to develop non-toxic chemopreventive drugs. The value of various natural and dietary agents to reduce the risk of developing breast cancer is well established. Trianthema portulacastrum Linn. (Aizoaceae), a dietary and medicinal plant, has been found to exert antihepatotoxic and antihepatocarcinogenic properties in rodents. This study was initiated to investigate mechanism-based chemopreventive potential of an ethanolic extract of T. portulacastrum (TPE) against 7,12-dimethylbenz(a)anthracene (DMBA)-initiated rat mammary gland carcinogenesis, an experimental tumor model that closely resembles human breast cancer. Rats had access to a basal diet supplemented with TPE to yield three dietary doses of the extract, i.e., 50, 100 and 200 mg/kg body weight. Following two weeks of TPE treatment, mammary tumorigenesis was initiated by oral administration of DMBA (50 mg/kg body weight). At the end of the study (16 weeks after DMBA exposure), TPE exhibited a striking reduction of DMBA-induced mammary tumor incidence, total tumor burden and average tumor weight and reversed intratumor histopathological alterations. TPE dose-dependently suppressed proliferating cell nuclear antigen and cyclin D1 expression, induced apoptosis, upregulated proapoptotic protein Bax, downregulated antiapoptotic protein Bcl-2 and diminished the expression of nuclear and cytosolic β-catenin in mammary tumors. Our results clearly provide the first experimental evidence that TPE exerts chemopreventive effect in the classical DMBA model of breast cancer by suppressing abnormal cell proliferation and inducing apoptosis mediated through alteration of Bax/Bcl-2 ratio. Mechanistically, TPE is capable of diminishing activated canonical Wnt/β-catenin signaling to exhibit antiproliferative, proapoptotic and oncostatic effects during an early-stage breast cancer. These results may encourage further

  1. Ascorbic acid in cancer chemoprevention: translational perspectives and efficacy.

    PubMed

    Ullah, Mohammad F; Bhat, Showket H; Hussain, Eram; Abu-Duhier, Faisel; Ahmad, Aamir; Hadi, S M

    2012-12-01

    Chemoprevention, which is referred to as the use of nontoxic natural or synthetic chemicals to intervene in multistage carcinogenesis has since decades attracted a considerable interest in plant-derived chemical constituents often termed as "phytochemicals" or sometimes as "Nutraceuticals" in case they are derived from dietary sources. A comprehensive search of the literature show that such an interest in natural product pharmacology has surged in the last 25 years and particularly risen at exponential rates since the last one decade. Phytochemicals such as curcumin (from spice turmeric), resveratrol (from red wine) and genistein (from soy) share the major efforts as indicated by overwhelming publications, despite skepticism concerning their bioavailability. Ascorbic acid (AA), the popular anti-oxidant in fruits and vegetables, has even a longer historical perspective than these dietary agents as for more than 35 years; there had been lingering questions about the efficacy of AA in cancer therapy. The footprints of AA from "scurvy" to "cancer" though complex seems to carry potential provided the puzzle could be set right. The use of AA in cancer treatment has been debated extensively as evident from the literature but surprisingly the complementing early phase bench work on the mechanistic studies for anticancer action was rather retarded. Proposed mechanisms of action for AA in the prevention and treatment of cancer includes antioxidant as well as pro-oxidant properties, stimulation of the immune system, altering carcinogen metabolism, enhancement of collagen synthesis necessary for tumor encapsulation and interference with cancer cell signaling. The observation that the intravenous administration of AA enhances its bioavailability to the extent of deriving pharmacological benefits against cancer has in recent years partially supported the clinical plausibility (efficacy) of AA towards realizing its translational advantage. Here, we provide an overview of AA with

  2. Sulforaphane Protects against High Cholesterol-Induced Mitochondrial Bioenergetics Impairments, Inflammation, and Oxidative Stress and Preserves Pancreatic β-Cells Function

    PubMed Central

    Tan, Kah Ni; Gotteland, Martin

    2017-01-01

    Cholesterol plays an important role in inducing pancreatic β-cell dysfunction, leading to an impaired insulin secretory response to glucose. This study aimed to determine the protective effects of sulforaphane, a natural isothiocyanate Nrf2-inducer, against cholesterol-induced pancreatic β-cells dysfunction, through molecular and cellular mechanisms involving mitochondrial bioenergetics. Sulforaphane prevented cholesterol-induced alterations in the coupling efficiency of mitochondrial respiration, improving ATP turnover and spare capacity, and averted the impairment of the electron flow at complexes I, II, and IV. Sulforaphane also attenuated the cholesterol-induced activation of the NFκB pathway, normalizing the expression of pro- and anti-inflammatory cytokines. In addition, it also inhibited the decrease in sirtuin 1 expression and greatly increased Pgc-1α expression in Min6 cells. Sulforaphane increased the expression of antioxidant enzymes downstream of the Nrf2 pathway and prevented lipid peroxidation induced by cholesterol. The antioxidant and anti-inflammatory properties of sulforaphane and its ability to protect and improve mitochondrial bioenergetic function contribute to its protective action against cholesterol-induced pancreatic β-cell dysfunction. Our data provide a scientifically tested foundation upon which sulforaphane can be developed as nutraceutical to preserve β-cell function and eventually control hyperglycemia. PMID:28386307

  3. Chemoprevention of chemical-induced skin cancer by Panax ginseng root extract

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, Jyoti; Goyal, Pradeep K.

    2015-01-01

    Background Cancer has emerged as a major health problem globally as a consequence to the increased longevity of the population, changing the environment and life style. Chemoprevention is a new and promising strategy for reducing cancer burden. Recently, some natural products have been identified for their chemopreventive activity to reduce the cancer incidence. Ginseng is known for its potential to treat various ailments in human beings. The present study was designed to explore the anticancer and antioxidative potential of Panax ginseng against chemical-induced skin carcinogenesis in mammals. Methods Skin tumors were induced in Swiss albino mice by a single topical application of 7,12-dimethylbenz(a)anthracene (100 μg/100 μL acetone) and, 2 wks later, promoted by repeated applications of croton oil (thrice in a wk in 1% acetone) till the end of the experiment (i.e., 16 wk). Hydroalcoholic ginseng root extract at a dose of 25 mg/kg body weight/d was orally administered at the peri-initiation, postinitiation, and peri–post-initiation stages. Results Ginseng root extract treatment caused a significant reduction in tumor incidence, cumulative number of tumors, tumor yield, and tumor burden, as compared to the 7,12-dimethylbenz(a)anthracene–croton oil-treated control group. Further, biochemical assays revealed a significant enhancement in the levels of reduced glutathione, superoxide dismutase, catalase, vitamin C, and total proteins but a significant reduction in lipid peroxidation levels in both the liver and skin with ginseng root extract treatment, as compared to carcinogen-treated control group. Conclusion These results suggest that P. ginseng has the potential to become a pivotal chemopreventive agent that can reduce cancer in mammals. PMID:26199559

  4. Quinone formation as a chemoprevention strategy for hybrid drugs: balancing cytotoxicity and cytoprotection.

    PubMed

    Dunlap, Tareisha; Chandrasena, R Esala P; Wang, Zhiqiang; Sinha, Vaishali; Wang, Zhican; Thatcher, Gregory R J

    2007-12-01

    Cellular defense mechanisms that respond to damage from oxidative and electrophilic stress, such as from quinones, represent a target for chemopreventive agents. Drugs bioactivated to quinones have the potential to activate antioxidant/electrophile responsive element (ARE) transcription of genes for cytoprotective phase 2 enzymes such as NAD(P)H-dependent quinone oxidoreductase (NQO1) but can also cause cellular damage. Two isomeric families of compounds were prepared, including the NO-NSAIDs (NO-donating nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs) NCX 4040 and NCX 4016; one family was postulated to release a quinone methide on esterase bioactivation. The study of reactivity and GSH conjugation in model and cell systems confirmed the postulate. The quinone-forming family, including NCX 4040 and conisogenic bromides and mesylate, was rapidly bioactivated to a quinone, which gave activation of ARE and consequent induction of NQO1 in liver cells. Although the control family, including NCX 4016 and conisogenic bromides and mesylates, cannot form a quinone, ARE activation and NQO1 induction were observed, compatible with slower SN2 reactions with thiol sensor proteins, and consequent ARE-luciferase and NQO1 induction. Using a Chemoprevention Index estimate, the quinone-forming compounds suffered because of high cytoxicity and were more compatible with cancer therapy than chemoprevention. In the Comet assay, NCX 4040 was highly genotoxic relative to NCX 4016. There was no evidence that NO contributes to the observed biological activity and no evidence that NCX 4040 is an NO donor, instead, rapidly releasing NO3- and quinone. These results indicate a strategy for studying the quinone biological activity and reinforce the therapeutic attributes of NO-ASA through structural elements other than NO and ASA.

  5. Plant flavonoids in cancer chemoprevention: role in genome stability.

    PubMed

    George, Vazhappilly Cijo; Dellaire, Graham; Rupasinghe, H P Vasantha

    2016-11-28

    Carcinogenesis is a multistage process that involves a series of events comprising of genetic and epigenetic changes leading to the initiation, promotion and progression of cancer. Chemoprevention is referred to as the use of nontoxic natural compounds, synthetic chemicals or their combinations to intervene in multistage carcinogenesis. Chemoprevention through diet modification, i.e., increased consumption of plant-based food, has emerged as a most promising and potentially cost-effective approach to reducing the risk of cancer. Flavonoids are naturally occurring polyphenols that are ubiquitous in plant-based food such as fruits, vegetables and teas as well as in most medicinal plants. Over 10,000 flavonoids have been characterized over the last few decades. Flavonoids comprise of several subclasses including flavonols, flavan-3-ols, anthocyanins, flavanones, flavones, isoflavones and proanthocyanidins. This review describes the most efficacious plant flavonoids, including luteolin, epigallocatechin gallate, quercetin, apigenin and chrysin; their hormetic effects; and the molecular basis of how these flavonoids contribute to the chemoprevention with a focus on protection against DNA damage caused by various carcinogenic factors. The present knowledge on the role of flavonoids in chemoprevention can be used in developing effective dietary strategies and natural health products targeted for cancer chemoprevention.

  6. Chemoprevention of asbestos-linked cancers: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Neri, Monica; Ugolini, Donatella; Boccia, Stefania; Canessa, Pier Aldo; Cesario, Alfredo; Leoncini, Giacomo; Mutti, Luciano; Bonassi, Stefano

    2012-03-01

    Asbestos has been used extensively and, in spite of many countries having banned most of its uses, professional, domestic and environmental exposure has not ceased worldwide. Inhaled asbestos fibers can lead to malignant mesothelioma, lung cancer and non-cancerous conditions, while the substance persists indefinitely in the lung and pleural tissue, resulting in continuous damage. Exposed individuals may be offered medical surveillance or compensation, but nothing is currently being done to lower their specific cancer risk: chemoprevention seems a promising approach. A web search and a PubMed review of the literature on chemoprevention trials in individuals exposed to asbestos have been conducted. Forty-six articles on five projects were found and newly reviewed but, surprisingly, no novel trials have been set up for twenty years, although considerable advances have been gained in cancer chemoprevention. A re-consideration of possibilities offered by chemoprevention should be encouraged. New trials based on the most recently characterized molecules should be planned, taking into account specific issues such as the need for a very large number of participants and a long follow up or, alternatively, the use of biomarkers as surrogate endpoints. The long latency of asbestos related diseases may offer delayed intervention opportunities. The lack of chemoprevention trials for asbestos exposure highlights the urgent need for research in this field.

  7. Successful and not so successful chemoprevention of tobacco smoke-induced lung tumors.

    PubMed

    Witschi, H

    2000-12-01

    Strain A/J mice underwent whole body exposure for 6 hours a day, 5 days a week, for 5 months to a mixture of cigarette sidestream and mainstream smoke (89%-11%; total suspended particulates 80-150 mg/m3), then were kept for another 4 months in air before being killed for scoring of lung tumors. In 7 independent experiments, lung tumor multiplicity was significantly increased in all 7 trials and lung tumor incidence in 5. When animals were kept for 9 months in smoke, lung tumor multiplicity was not significantly higher than in controls, although lung tumor incidence was. The following chemopreventive agents were evaluated: green tea, phenethyl isothiocyanate (PEITC), acetylsalicylic acid (ASA), N-acetylcysteine (NAC), p-XSC (1,4-phenylenebis[methylene]selenocyanate), d-limonene (DL), and a mixture of PEITC and BITC (benzyl isothiocyanate). In animals exposed to tobacco smoke, none of these agents reduced lung tumor multiplicity or incidence. As a control, the effects of the same agents were examined in A/J mice initiated with 4-(methylnitrosamino)-1-(3pyridyl)-1-butanone (NNK) or urethane. In mice injected with NNK, green tea and ASA did not reduce lung tumor multiplicities and NAC had no effect on urethane-induced lung tumors, whereas PEITC, p-XSC and DL reduced NNK-induced tumor multiplicities to 20% to 50% of control values. On the other hand, dietary mixture of myoinositol and dexamethasone was not only highly protective against NNK, but reduced lung tumor multiplicities and incidence in smoke-exposed animals to control values. This effect was also seen when the animals were fed the myo-inositol-dexamethasone mixture once they were removed from smoke. It is concluded that in animal studies it might be preferable to evaluate the effectiveness of putative chemopreventive agents against full tobacco smoke rather than against selected model compounds. The observations made with myo-inositol-dexamethasone suggest that people who have recently quit smoking might

  8. Controlled-release systemic delivery - a new concept in cancer chemoprevention

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Many chemopreventive agents have encountered bioavailability issues in pre-clinical/clinical studies despite high oral doses. We report here a new concept utilizing polycaprolactone implants embedded with test compounds to obtain controlled systemic delivery, circumventing oral bioavailability issues and reducing the total administered dose. Compounds were released from the implants in vitro dose dependently and for long durations (months), which correlated with in vivo release. Polymeric implants of curcumin significantly inhibited tissue DNA adducts following the treatment of rats with benzo[a]pyrene, with the total administered dose being substantially lower than typical oral doses. A comparison of bioavailability of curcumin given by implants showed significantly higher levels of curcumin in the plasma, liver and brain 30 days after treatment compared with the dietary route. Withaferin A implants resulted in a nearly 60% inhibition of lung cancer A549 cell xenografts, but no inhibition occurred when the same total dose was administered intraperitoneally. More than 15 phytochemicals have been tested successfully by this formulation. Together, our data indicate that this novel implant-delivery system circumvents oral bioavailability issues, provides continuous delivery for long durations and lowers the total administered dose, eliciting both chemopreventive/chemotherapeutic activities. This would also allow the assessment of activity of minor constituents and synthetic metabolites, which otherwise remain uninvestigated in vivo. PMID:22696595

  9. Benzo(a)pyrene induced lung cancer: Role of dietary phytochemicals in chemoprevention.

    PubMed

    Kasala, Eshvendar Reddy; Bodduluru, Lakshmi Narendra; Barua, Chandana C; Sriram, Chandra Shekhar; Gogoi, Ranadeep

    2015-10-01

    Lung cancer is the major cause of overall cancer deaths, and chemoprevention is a promising strategy to control this disease. Benzo(a)pyrene [B(a)P], a polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon, is one among the principal constituents of tobacco smoke that plays a key role in lung carcinogenesis. The B(a)P induced lung cancer in mice offers a relevant model to study the effect of natural products and has been widely used by many researchers and found considerable success in ameliorating the pathophysiological changes of lung cancer. Currently available synthetic drugs that constitute the pharmacological armamentarium are themselves effective in managing the condition but not without setbacks. These hunches have accelerated the requisite for natural products, which may be used as dietary supplement to prevent the progress of lung cancer. Besides, these agents also supplement the conventional treatment and offer better management of the condition with less side effects. In the context of soaring interest toward dietary phytochemicals as newer pharmacological interventions for lung cancer, in the present review, we are attempting to give a silhouette of mechanisms of B(a)P induced lung carcinogenesis and the role of dietary phytochemicals in chemoprevention.

  10. Nutrient and nonnutrient components of legumes, and its chemopreventive activity: a review.

    PubMed

    Sánchez-Chino, Xariss; Jiménez-Martínez, Cristian; Dávila-Ortiz, Gloria; Álvarez-González, Isela; Madrigal-Bujaidar, Eduardo

    2015-01-01

    Legumes in combination with other products are the staple food for a large part of the world population, especially the low-income fragment, because their seeds provide valuable amounts of carbohydrates, fiber, and proteins, and have an important composition of essential amino acids, the sulphured amino acids being the limiting ones. Furthermore, legumes also have nonnutritional compounds that may decrease the absorption of nutrients or produce toxic effects; however, it has been reported that depending on the dose, these nonnutritional compounds also have different bioactivities as antioxidant, hypolipidemic, hypoglycemic, and anticarcinogenic agents, which have been proven in scientific studies. It has been observed that in countries with a high consumption of legumes, the incidence of colorectal cancer is lower. Some studies have shown that legume seeds are an alternative chemopreventive therapy against various cancers especially colon; this was verified in various animal models of induced by azoxymethane, a colon specific carcinogenic compound, in which a diet was supplemented with different concentrations of beans, lentils, chickpeas, or soybeans, mostly. These studies have proven the anticancer activity of legumes in early stages of carcinogenesis. Therefore, it is important to review the information available to elucidate the chemopreventive mechanisms of action of legume compounds.

  11. Chemopreventive effect of a mixture of Chinese Herbs (antitumor B) on chemically induced oral carcinogenesis.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yian; Yao, Ruisheng; Gao, Song; Wen, Weidong; Du, Yinqiu; Szabo, Eva; Hu, Ming; Lubet, Ronald A; You, Ming

    2013-01-01

    In this study, we evaluated chemopreventive efficacy of Antitumor B, a Chinese herbal mixture of six plants (Sophora tonkinensis, Polygonum bistorta, Prunella vulgaris, Sonchus arvensis L., Dictamnus dasycarpus, and Dioscorea bulbifera) on the development of 4-nitroquinoline-1-oxide (4NQO) induced oral squamous cell carcinomas in A/J mice. Antitumor B, delivered through diet, inhibited 4NQO-induced oral cancer development by 59.19%. The reduction of cell proliferation appears to be associated with efficacy of Antitumor B against 4NQO-induced oral cancer in A/J mice. The expression of epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) and phosphorylated EGFR (Tyr1173) were down-regulated by Antitumor B. Tissue distribution of Antitumor B was determined using obacunone, matrine, and maackiain as marker chemicals. We found significant amounts of obacunone, matrine, and maackiain in the blood after 1-wk treatment. The concentrations of these three compounds did not increase further at 18  wk, suggesting that plasma concentrations had reached a steady-state level at 1  wk. There was no significant body weight loss and there was no other obvious sign of toxicity in Antitumor B-treated mice. These results suggest that Antitumor B is a promising agent for human oral cancer chemoprevention.

  12. Clinical cancer chemoprevention: From the hepatitis B virus (HBV) vaccine to the human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccine.

    PubMed

    Tsai, Horng-Jyh

    2015-04-01

    Approximately 2 million new cancer cases are attributed to infectious agents each year worldwide. Vaccines for the hepatitis B virus (HBV), a risk factor of hepatocellular cancer, and human papillomavirus (HPV), a risk factor of cervical cancer, are considered major successes in clinical chemoprevention of cancer. In Taiwan, the first evidence of cancer prevention through vaccinations was provided by HBV vaccination data in infants. The Taiwanese HBV vaccination program has since become a model immunization schedule for newborns worldwide. Persistent infection with high-risk HPV is generally accepted as prerequisite for cervical cancer diagnosis; however, cervical cancer is a rare complication of HPV infections. This is due to the fact that such infections tend to be transient. The safety and efficacy of both available HPV quadrivalent vaccine and bivalent vaccine are not in doubt at the present time. Until a human cytomegalovirus (CMV) vaccine becomes available, simple hygienic practices, such as hand washing, can prevent CMV infection both before and during pregnancy. Each country should establish her official guidelines regarding which vaccines should be used to treat various conditions, the target population (i.e., universal or limited to a selected population), and the immunization schedules. After a vaccine is recommended, decisions regarding reimbursement by the public health care fund are evaluated. The guidelines become part of the immunization schedule, which is updated annually and published in the official bulletin. In conclusion, both HBV and HPV vaccines are considered major successes in the chemoprevention of cancer.

  13. The chemopreventive bioflavonoid apigenin modulates signal transduction pathways in keratinocyte and colon carcinoma cell lines.

    PubMed

    Van Dross, Rukiyah; Xue, Yue; Knudson, Alexandra; Pelling, Jill C

    2003-11-01

    Apigenin is a nonmutagenic chemopreventive agent found in fruits and green vegetables. In this study, we used two different epithelial cell lines (308 mouse keratinocytes and HCT116 colon carcinoma cells) to determine the effect of apigenin on the mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) cascade. Apigenin induced a dose-dependent phosphorylation of both extracellular signal-regulated protein kinase (ERK) and p38 kinase but had little effect on the phosphorylation of c-jun amino terminal kinase (JNK). We used immunoprecipitation-coupled kinase assays to show that apigenin increased the kinase activity of ERK and p38 but not JNK. Consistent with these results, we found that apigenin induced a 7.4-fold induction in the phosphorylation of Elk, the downstream phosphorylation target of ERK kinase. Similarly, apigenin induced a 3.2-fold induction in the phosphorylation of activating transcription factor-2, the downstream phosphorylation target of p38 kinase. Little change was observed in the phosphorylation of c-jun, the phosphorylation target of JNK. These data suggest that part of the chemopreventive activity of apigenin may be mediated by its ability to modulate the MAPK cascade.

  14. Biological Profile of Erucin: A New Promising Anticancer Agent from Cruciferous Vegetables

    PubMed Central

    Melchini, Antonietta; Traka, Maria H.

    2010-01-01

    Consumption of cruciferous vegetables has been associated with a reduced risk in the development of various types of cancer. This has been attributed to the bioactive hydrolysis products that are derived from these vegetables, namely isothiocyanates. Erucin is one such product derived from rocket salads, which is structurally related to sulforaphane, a well-studied broccoli-derived isothiocyanate. In this review, we present current knowledge on mechanisms of action of erucin in chemoprevention obtained from cell and animal models and relate it to other isothiocyanates. These mechanisms include modulation of phase I, II and III detoxification, regulation of cell growth by induction of apoptosis and cell cycle arrest, induction of ROS-mechanisms and regulation androgen receptor pathways. PMID:22069601

  15. Biological profile of erucin: a new promising anticancer agent from cruciferous vegetables.

    PubMed

    Melchini, Antonietta; Traka, Maria H

    2010-04-01

    Consumption of cruciferous vegetables has been associated with a reduced risk in the development of various types of cancer. This has been attributed to the bioactive hydrolysis products that are derived from these vegetables, namely isothiocyanates. Erucin is one such product derived from rocket salads, which is structurally related to sulforaphane, a well-studied broccoli-derived isothiocyanate. In this review, we present current knowledge on mechanisms of action of erucin in chemoprevention obtained from cell and animal models and relate it to other isothiocyanates. These mechanisms include modulation of phase I, II and III detoxification, regulation of cell growth by induction of apoptosis and cell cycle arrest, induction of ROS-mechanisms and regulation androgen receptor pathways.

  16. In vitro chemopreventive activity of Camellia sinensis, Ilex paraguariensis and Ardisia compressa tea extracts and selected polyphenols.

    PubMed

    Ramirez-Mares, Marco Vinicio; Chandra, Sonia; de Mejia, Elvira Gonzalez

    2004-10-04

    Several herbal teas contain bioactive compounds that have been associated with a lower risk of chronic diseases including cancer. The aim of this study was to evaluate the chemopreventive activity of tea aqueous extracts and selected constituent pure polyphenols using a battery of in vitro marker systems relevant for the prevention of cancer. The effects of (-) epigallocatechin gallate (EGCG), quercetin (Q), gallic acid (GA), green tea (GT, Camellia sinensis), ardisia tea (AT, Ardisia compressa) and mate tea (MT, Ilex paraguariensis) extracts were tested. Cytotoxicity, TPA-induced ornithine decarboxylase (ODC) and quinone reductase (QR) activities were evaluated in vitro using HepG2 cells. The topoisomerase inhibitory activity was also tested, using the Saccharomyces cerevisiae yeast system. Results suggest that MT, AT and GT are cytotoxic to the HepG2 cells, with MT demonstrating dominant cytotoxicity. EGCG showed greater cytotoxicity than Q and GA against HepG2 cells. The greatest inhibition (82%) of TPA-induced ODC activity was shown by Q, with 25 microM (IC50 = 11.90 microM). Topoisomerase II, but not topoisomerase I, was the cellular target of MT, AT, EGCG, Q and GA, which acted mainly as true catalytic inhibitors. The cytotoxic activity and the inhibition of topoisomerase II may contribute to the overall chemopreventive activity of AT and MT extracts. Ardisia and mate teas may thus share a public health potential as chemopreventive agents.

  17. Antimutagenic constituents of adlay (Coix lachryma-jobi L. var. ma-yuen Stapf) with potential cancer chemopreventive activity.

    PubMed

    Chen, Huang-Hui; Chiang, Wenchang; Chang, Jang-Yang; Chien, Ya-Lin; Lee, Ching-Kuo; Liu, Ko-Jiunn; Cheng, Yen-Ting; Chen, Ting-Fang; Kuo, Yueh-Hsiung; Kuo, Ching-Chuan

    2011-06-22

    Adlay has long been used in traditional Chinese medicine and as a nourishing food. The acetone extract of adlay hull had previously been demonstrated to possess potent antimutagenic activity. The aims of this study were to identify the antimutagenic constituents from adlay hull by using Ames antimutagenic activity-guide isolation procedures and to investigate their chemopreventive efficacies in cultured cells. The results demonstrated that six compounds showing great antimutagenic activity were identified by spectroscopic methods and by comparison with authentic samples to be p-hydroxybenzaldehyde, vanillin, syringaldehyde, trans-coniferylaldehyde, sinapaldehyde, and coixol. Two of them, trans-coniferylaldehyde and sinapaldehyde, exhibit relatively potent scavenging of DPPH radicals, inhibit TPA stimulated superoxide anion generation in neutrophil-like leukocytes, and induce Nrf2/ARE-driven luciferase activity in HSC-3 cells. Moreover, trans-coniferylaldehyde possesses cytoprotective efficacy against tert-butyl hydroperoxide-induced DNA double-strand breaks in cultured cells, and the chemopreventive potency induced by trans-coniferylaldehyde may be through the activation of kinase signals, including p38, ERK1/2, JNK, MEK1/2, and MSK1/2. In summary, we first identified six antimutagenic constituents from adlay hull. Among them, trans-coniferylaldehyde would be a highly promising agent for cancer chemoprevention and merits further investigation.

  18. Pharmacoproteomic analysis reveals that metapristone (RU486 metabolite) intervenes E-cadherin and vimentin to realize cancer metastasis chemoprevention

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Suhong; Yan, Cuicui; Yang, Xingtian; He, Sudang; Liu, Jian; Qin, Chongtao; Huang, Chuanzhong; Lu, Yusheng; Tian, Zhongping; Jia, Lee

    2016-01-01

    Metapristone is the most predominant biological active metabolite of mifepristone, and being developed as a novel cancer metastasis chemopreventive agent by us. Despite its prominent metastasis chemopreventive effect, the underlying mechanism remains elusive. Our study, for the first time, demonstrated that metapristone had the ability to prevent breast cancer cells from migration, invasion, and interfere with their adhesion to endothelial cells. To explore the underlying mechanism of metapristone, we employed the iTRAQ technique to assess the effect of metapristone on MDA-MB-231 cells. In total, 5,145 proteins were identified, of which, 311 proteins showed significant differences in metapristone-treated cells compared to the control group (P-value < 0.05). Bioinformatic analysis showed many differentially expressed proteins (DEPs) functionally associated with post-translational modification, chaperones, translation, transcription, replication, signal transduction, etc. Importantly, many of the DEPs, such as E-cadherin, vimentin, TGF-β receptor I/II, smad2/3, β-catenin, caveolin, and dystroglycan were associated with TGF-β and Wnt signaling pathways, which were also linked to epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EMT) process. Further validation of the epithelial marker “E-caderin” and mesenchymal marker “vimetin” were carried out using immunoblot and immunofluorescence. These results have revealed a novel mechanism that metapristone-mediated metastasis chemoprevention is through intervening the EMT-related signaling pathways. PMID:26932781

  19. Pharmacoproteomic analysis reveals that metapristone (RU486 metabolite) intervenes E-cadherin and vimentin to realize cancer metastasis chemoprevention.

    PubMed

    Yu, Suhong; Yan, Cuicui; Yang, Xingtian; He, Sudang; Liu, Jian; Qin, Chongtao; Huang, Chuanzhong; Lu, Yusheng; Tian, Zhongping; Jia, Lee

    2016-03-02

    Metapristone is the most predominant biological active metabolite of mifepristone, and being developed as a novel cancer metastasis chemopreventive agent by us. Despite its prominent metastasis chemopreventive effect, the underlying mechanism remains elusive. Our study, for the first time, demonstrated that metapristone had the ability to prevent breast cancer cells from migration, invasion, and interfere with their adhesion to endothelial cells. To explore the underlying mechanism of metapristone, we employed the iTRAQ technique to assess the effect of metapristone on MDA-MB-231 cells. In total, 5,145 proteins were identified, of which, 311 proteins showed significant differences in metapristone-treated cells compared to the control group (P-value < 0.05). Bioinformatic analysis showed many differentially expressed proteins (DEPs) functionally associated with post-translational modification, chaperones, translation, transcription, replication, signal transduction, etc. Importantly, many of the DEPs, such as E-cadherin, vimentin, TGF-β receptor I/II, smad2/3, β-catenin, caveolin, and dystroglycan were associated with TGF-β and Wnt signaling pathways, which were also linked to epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EMT) process. Further validation of the epithelial marker "E-caderin" and mesenchymal marker "vimetin" were carried out using immunoblot and immunofluorescence. These results have revealed a novel mechanism that metapristone-mediated metastasis chemoprevention is through intervening the EMT-related signaling pathways.

  20. Chemoprevention of Colon and Small Intestinal Tumorigenesis in APCmin/+ Mice by SHetA2 (NSC721689) without Toxicity

    PubMed Central

    Benbrook, Doris Mangiaracina; Guruswamy, Suresh; Wang, Yuhong; Sun, Zhongjie; Mohammed, Altaf; Zhang, Yuting; Li, Qian; Rao, Chinthalapally V.

    2013-01-01

    The occurrence of intestinal polyps in people at high risk for developing colorectal cancer provides an opportunity to test the efficacy of chemoprevention agents. In this situation of treating otherwise healthy people, the potential for toxicity must be minimal. The small molecule flexible heteroarotinoid (Flex-Het), called SHetA2, has chemoprevention activity in organotypic cultures in vitro and lack of toxicity at doses capable of inhibiting xenograft tumor growth in vivo. The objective of this study was to evaluate SHetA2 chemoprevention activity and toxicity in the APCMin/+ murine model. Oral administration of SHetA2 at 30 and 60 mg/kg five days per week for 12 weeks significantly reduced development of intestinal polyps by 40 to 60% depending on the dose and sex of the treatment group. Immunohistochemical and Western blot analysis of polyps demonstrated reduced levels of cyclin D1 and proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA) in both SHetA2 treatment groups. Western blot analysis also demonstrated SHetA2 induction of E-cadherin, Bax and caspase 3 cleavage along with reduction in Bcl-2, cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), consistent with SHetA2 regulation of apoptosis, inflammation and angiogenesis. Neither dose caused weight loss nor gross toxicity in APCMin/+ or wild type littermates. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of cardiac function showed no evidence of SHetA2 toxicity. SHetA2 did not alter left ventricular wall thickness. In summary, SHetA2 exerts chemoprevention activity without overt or cardiac toxicity in the APCMin/+ model. SHetA2 modulation of biomarkers in colon polyps identifies potential pharmacodynamic endpoints for SHetA2 clinical trials. PMID:23852423

  1. Multitargeted Low-Dose GLAD Combination Chemoprevention: A Novel and Promising Approach to Combat Colon Carcinogenesis12

    PubMed Central

    Mohammed, Altaf; Janakiram, Naveena B; Brewer, Misty; Vedala, Krishna; Steele, Vernon E; Rao, Chinthalapally V

    2013-01-01

    Preclinical studies have shown that gefitinib, licofelone, atorvastatin, and α-difluoromethylornithine (GLAD) are promising colon cancer chemopreventive agents. Because low-dose combination regimens can offer potential additive or synergistic effects without toxicity, GLAD combination was tested for toxicity and chemopreventive efficacy for suppression of intestinal tumorigenesis in adenomatous polyposis coli (APC)Min/+ mice. Six-week-old wild-type and APCMin/+ mice were fed modified American Institute of Nutrition 76A diets with or without GLAD (25 + 50 + 50 + 500 ppm) for 14 weeks. Dietary GLAD caused no signs of toxicity based on organ pathology and liver enzyme profiles. GLAD feeding strongly inhibited (80–83%, P < .0001) total intestinal tumor multiplicity and size in APCMin/+ mice (means ± SEM tumors for control vs GLAD were 67.1 ± 5.4 vs 11.3 ± 1.1 in males and 72.3 ± 8.9 vs 14.5 ± 2.8 in females). Mice fed GLAD had >95% fewer polyps with sizes of >2 mm compared with control mice and showed 75% and 85% inhibition of colonic tumors in males and females, respectively. Molecular analyses of polyps suggested that GLAD exerts efficacy by inhibiting cell proliferation, inducing apoptosis, decreasing β-catenin and caveolin-1 levels, increasing caspase-3 cleavage and p21, and modulating expression profile of inflammatory cytokines. These observations demonstrate that GLAD, a novel cocktail of chemopreventive agents at very low doses, suppresses intestinal tumorigenesis in APCMin/+ mice with no toxicity. This novel strategy to prevent colorectal cancer is an important step in developing agents with high efficacy without unwanted side effects. PMID:23633920

  2. Design, Synthesis, and Biological Evaluation of Indenoisoquinoline Rexinoids with Chemopreventive Potential

    PubMed Central

    Conda-Sheridan, Martin; Park, Eun-Jung; Beck, Daniel E.; Narasimha Reddy, P. V.; Nguyen, Trung X.; Hu, Bingjie; Chen, Lian; White, Jerry J.; van Breemen, Richard B.; Pezzuto, John M.; Cushman, Mark

    2013-01-01

    Nuclear receptors, such as the retinoid X receptor (RXR), are proteins that regulate a myriad of cellular processes. Molecules that function as RXR agonists are of special interest for the prevention and control of carcinogenesis. The majority of these ligands possess an acidic moiety that is believed to be key for RXR activation. This communication presents the design, synthesis and biological evaluation of both acidic and non-acidic indenoisoquinolines as new RXR ligands. In addition, a comprehensive structure-activity relationship study is presented that identifies the important features of the indenoisoquinoline rexinoids. The ease of modification of the indenoisoquinoline core and the lack of the necessity of a carboxyl group for activity make them an attractive and unusual family of RXR agonists. This work establishes a structural foundation for the design of new and novel rexinoid cancer chemopreventive agents. PMID:23472886

  3. Synthesis and Cancer Chemopreventive Activity of Zapotin, a Natural Product from Casimiroa edulis

    PubMed Central

    Maiti, Arup; Cuendet, Muriel; Kondratyuk, Tamara; Croy, Vicki L.; Pezzuto, John M.; Cushman, Mark

    2008-01-01

    An efficient method has been developed to synthesize zapotin (5,6,2′,6′-tetramethoxyflavone), a component of the edible fruit Casimiroa edulis, on multi-gram scale. The synthesis utilizes a regioselective C-acylation of a dilithium dianion derived from a substituted o-hydroxyactophenone to afford a β-diketone intermediate that can be cyclized to zapotin in good overall yield, thus avoiding the inefficient Baker-Venkataraman rearrangement pathway. Zapotin was found to induce both cell differentiation and apoptosis with cultured human promyelocytic leukemia cells (HL-60 cells). In addition, the compound inhibits 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol 13-acetate (TPAc)-induced ornithine decarboxylase (ODC) activity with human bladder carcinoma cells (T24 cells), and TPA-induced nuclear factor-kappa B (NF-κB) activity with human hepatocellular liver carcinoma cells (HepG2 cells). These data suggest that zapotin merits further investigation as a potential cancer chemopreventive agent. PMID:17228877

  4. Role of sulforaphane in the anti-initiating mechanism of lung carcinogenesis in vivo by modulating the metabolic activation and detoxification of benzo(a)pyrene.

    PubMed

    Kalpana Deepa Priya, D; Gayathri, R; Sakthisekaran, D

    2011-02-01

    Biomarkers are central to the molecular epidemiology approach. Since scientific research progress within this standard, a more complete biological understanding of the specific events underlying the multistage carcinogenesis model is essential. Hence the present investigation was designed to assess the anti-initiating potential of Sulforaphane (SFN) against benzo(a)pyrene [B(a)P] induced lung carcinogenesis in female Swiss Albino Mice by evaluating the activities of xenobiotic markers, and the balance between phase I and phase II carcinogen/drug metabolizing enzymes. We sought to institute whether orally administered SFN reaches the lung tissue and increases functional capacity of detoxification enzymes in this tissue and compare the biochemical changes associated with the initiation of cancer. We demonstrated the inhibitory effects of orally administered sulforaphane on B[a]P-induced aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AHR) activation which subsequently resulted in decreased Phase-I enzyme activities in vivo. The study also highlights that treatment with sulforaphane enhanced the Nuclear factor erythroid 2-related factor 2 (Nrf2) transcription which reflects its nuclear accumulation and DNA binding in mice, together with the induction of phase II enzymes as evident from our results. These modulations by sulforaphane further result in decreased carcinogen-induced stress. By and large, the results suggest an anti-initiating role of sulforaphane in pre- and post-initiation phase of experimentally induced lung carcinogenesis in female Swiss albino mice.

  5. Chemopreventive effects of Furan-2-yl-3-pyridin-2-yl-propenone against 7,12-dimethylbenz[a]anthracene-inducible genotoxicity

    SciTech Connect

    Hwang, Yong Pil; Han, Eun Hee; Choi, Jae Ho; Kim, Hyung Gyun; Lee, Kyung Jin; Jeong, Tae Cheon; Lee, Eung Seok; Jeong, Hye Gwang

    2008-05-01

    1-Furan-2-yl-3-pyridin-2-yl-propenone (FPP-3) is an anti-inflammatory agent with a propenone moiety and chemically synthesized recently. In this study, we examined the chemopreventive effect of FPP-3 on 7,12-dimethylbenz[a]anthracene (DMBA)-induced genotoxicity in MCF-7 cells. FPP-3 reduced the formation of the DMBA-DNA adduct. DMBA-induced CYP1A1 and CYP1B1 gene expression and enzyme activity were inhibited by FPP-3. It inhibited DMBA-induced aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR) transactivation and DMBA-inducible nuclear localization of the AhR. Induction of detoxifying phase II genes by chemopreventive agents represents a coordinated protective response against oxidative stress and neoplastic effects of carcinogens. Transcription factor NF-E2 related factor 2 (Nrf2) regulates antioxidant response element (ARE) of phase II detoxifying and antioxidant enzymes, such as glutathione S-transferase (GST) and NAD(P)H:quinone oxidoreductase (QR). FPP-3 increased the expression and enzymatic activity of GST and QR. Moreover, FPP-3 increased transcriptional activity of GST and QR. GST and QR induction and Nrf2 translocation by FPP-3 were blocked by the PKC inhibitor Goe6983, and the p38 inhibitor SB203580. These results reflected a partial role of PKC{delta} and p38 signaling in FPP-3-mediated GSTA and QR induction through nuclear translocation of Nrf2. Classically, chemopreventive agents either inhibit CYP metabolizing enzyme or induce phase II detoxifying enzymes. These results suggest that FPP-3 has a potent protective effect against DMBA-induced genotoxicity through modulating phase I and II enzymes and that it has potential as a chemopreventive agent.

  6. Neuroendocrine lung carcinogenesis in hamsters is inhibited by green tea or theophylline while the development of adenocarcinomas is promoted: implications for chemoprevention in smokers.

    PubMed

    Schuller, Hildegard M; Porter, B; Riechert, A; Walker, K; Schmoyer, R

    2004-07-01

    Lung cancer continues to be the leading cause of cancer death in developed countries. With smoking the major etiological factor for lung cancer, there is a great need for the development of chemopreventive treatments that inhibit the progression of initiated cells and premalignant lesions into overt lung cancer in smokers who quit. Although the major focus of chemoprevention research has been on agents that inhibit the metabolic activation of genotoxic chemicals contained in tobacco products, some of these agents may additionally modulate growth-regulating signal transduction. In turn, the function of such signaling pathways is highly cell type-specific, with a given pathway inhibiting the growth of one cell type while stimulating the growth of others. The current experiment has tested the hypothesis that green tea and the methylxanthine theophylline contained in tea inhibit the progression of neuroendocrine lung carcinogenesis in hamsters with hyperoxic lung injury and initiated with the tobacco carcinogen 4-(methylnitrosamino)-1-(3-pyridyl)-1-butanone (NNK) while promoting the development of Clara cell-derived pulmonary adenocarcinomas initiated by NNK in healthy hamsters. This hypothesis is based on published evidence that human small cell lung cancer as well as the neuroendocrine hamster tumors are regulated via autocrine signaling pathways that activate Raf-1 and the mitogen-activated (MAP) kinase pathway whereas human pulmonary adenocarcinomas of Clara cell lineage and the hamster model of this cancer type are regulated by a beta-adrenergic pathway involving the activation of cyclic adenosine 3',5'-monophosphate (cAMP) and the arachidonic acid (AA) cascade. In turn, it was hypothesized that theophylline would inhibit Raf-1-dependent tumor progression while promoting cAMP-dependent tumor progression due to its documented ability to inhibit the enzyme cAMP-phophodiesterase. The experimental design simulated chemoprevention in former smokers in that treatments

  7. Chemoprevention of Colon Cancer through Inhibition of Angiogenesis and Induction of Apoptosis by Nonsteroidal Anti-Inflammatory Drugs.

    PubMed

    Ghanghas, Preety; Jain, Shelly; Rana, Chandan; Sanyal, Sankar Nath

    2016-01-01

    Cancer cells require nourishment for the growth of the primary tumor mass and spread of the metastatic colony. These needs are fulfilled by tumor-associated neovasculature known as angiogenesis, which also favors the transition from hyperplasia to neoplasia, that is, from a state of cellular multiplication to uncontrolled proliferation. Therefore, targeting angiogenesis is profitable as a mechanism to inhibit tumor growth. Furthermore, it is important to understand the cross-communication between vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) and matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) in the neoplastic and proinflammatory milieu. We studied the role of two important chemokines (monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 [MCP-1] and macrophage inflammatory protein-1β [MIP-1β]) along with VEGF and MMPs in nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID)-induced chemopreventive effects in experimental colon cancer in rats. 1,2-Dimethylhydrazine dihydrochloride (DMH) was used as cancer-inducing agent and three NSAIDs (celecoxib, etoricoxib, and diclofenac) were given orally as chemopreventive agents. Analysis by immunofluorescence and western blotting shows that the expression of VEGF, MMP-2, and MMP-9 was found to be significantly elevated in the DMH- treated group and notably lowered by NSAID coadministration. The expression of MCP-1 was found to be markedly decreased, whereas that of MIP-1β increased after NSAID coadministration. NSAID coadministration was also able to induce apoptosis, confirmed using studies by Hoechst/propidium iodide (PI) costaining and terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase dUTP nick end labeling (TUNEL) assay. Results from the present study indicate the potential role of these chemokines along with VEGF and MMPs against angiogenesis in DMH-induced cancer. The inhibition of angiogenesis and induction of apoptosis by NSAIDs were found to be possible mechanisms in the chemoprevention of colon cancer.

  8. Role of saffron and its constituents on cancer chemoprevention

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Zhiyu; Wang, Chong-Zhi; Wen, Xiao-Dong; Shoyama, Yukihiro; Yuan, Chun-Su

    2014-01-01

    Context Cancer dramatically impacts human life expectancy and quality of life. Natural substances from vegetables, herbs and spices could be beneficial in the prevention or treatment of a variety of cancers. Crocus sativus, which has been used as a folk medicine for treating diseases for ages, showed obvious cancer chemoprevention potential. Objective This article focuses on the effects of Crocus sativus and its main ingredients, such as crocin, on cancer therapeutics. Methods We reviewed research data from saffron, a spice derived from the flower of Crocus sativus, and its constituents using the major databases, viz., Web of Science, SciFinder, and PubMed. Results and conclusion Saffron possesses free radical-scavenging properties and antitumor activities. Significant cancer chemopreventive effects have been shown in both in vitro and in vivo models. Based on current data, saffron and its ingredients could be considered as a promising candidate for clinical anticancer trials. PMID:23570520

  9. Shrimp Lipids: A Source of Cancer Chemopreventive Compounds

    PubMed Central

    López-Saiz, Carmen-María; Suárez-Jiménez, Guadalupe-Miroslava; Plascencia-Jatomea, Maribel; Burgos-Hernández, Armando

    2013-01-01

    Shrimp is one of the most popular seafoods worldwide, and its lipids have been studied for biological activity in both, muscle and exoskeleton. Free fatty acids, triglycerides, carotenoids, and other lipids integrate this fraction, and some of these compounds have been reported with cancer chemopreventive activities. Carotenoids and polyunsaturated fatty acids have been extensively studied for chemopreventive properties, in both in vivo and in vitro studies. Their mechanisms of action depend on the lipid chemical structure and include antioxidant, anti-proliferative, anti-mutagenic, and anti-inflammatory activities, among others. The purpose of this review is to lay groundwork for future research about the properties of the lipid fraction of shrimp. PMID:24135910

  10. Sulforaphane reduces the alterations induced by quinolinic acid: modulation of glutathione levels.

    PubMed

    Santana-Martínez, R A; Galván-Arzáte, S; Hernández-Pando, R; Chánez-Cárdenas, M E; Avila-Chávez, E; López-Acosta, G; Pedraza-Chaverrí, J; Santamaría, A; Maldonado, P D

    2014-07-11

    Glutamate-induced excitotoxicity involves a state of acute oxidative stress, which is a crucial event during neuronal degeneration and is part of the physiopathology of neurodegenerative diseases. In this work, we evaluated the ability of sulforaphane (SULF), a natural dietary isothiocyanate, to induce the activation of transcription factor Nrf2 (a master regulator of redox state in the cell) in a model of striatal degeneration in rats infused with quinolinic acid (QUIN). Male Wistar rats received SULF (5mg/kg, i.p.) 24h and 5min before the intrastriatal infusion of QUIN. SULF increased the reduced glutathione (GSH) levels 4h after QUIN infusion, which was associated with its ability to increase the activity of glutathione reductase (GR), an antioxidant enzyme capable to regenerate GSH levels at 24h. Moreover, SULF treatment increased glutathione peroxidase (GPx) activity, while no changes were observed in γ-glutamyl cysteine ligase (GCL) activity. SULF treatment also prevented QUIN-induced oxidative stress (measured by oxidized proteins levels), the histological damage and the circling behavior. These results suggest that the protective effect of SULF could be related to its ability to preserve GSH levels and increase GPx and GR activities.

  11. Anabolic and Antiresorptive Modulation of Bone Homeostasis by the Epigenetic Modulator Sulforaphane, a Naturally Occurring Isothiocyanate*

    PubMed Central

    Thaler, Roman; Maurizi, Antonio; Roschger, Paul; Sturmlechner, Ines; Khani, Farzaneh; Spitzer, Silvia; Rumpler, Monika; Zwerina, Jochen; Karlic, Heidrun; Dudakovic, Amel; Klaushofer, Klaus; Teti, Anna; Rucci, Nadia; Varga, Franz; van Wijnen, Andre J.

    2016-01-01

    Bone degenerative pathologies like osteoporosis may be initiated by age-related shifts in anabolic and catabolic responses that control bone homeostasis. Here we show that sulforaphane (SFN), a naturally occurring isothiocyanate, promotes osteoblast differentiation by epigenetic mechanisms. SFN enhances active DNA demethylation via Tet1 and Tet2 and promotes preosteoblast differentiation by enhancing extracellular matrix mineralization and the expression of osteoblastic markers (Runx2, Col1a1, Bglap2, Sp7, Atf4, and Alpl). SFN decreases the expression of the osteoclast activator receptor activator of nuclear factor-κB ligand (RANKL) in osteocytes and mouse calvarial explants and preferentially induces apoptosis in preosteoclastic cells via up-regulation of the Tet1/Fas/Caspase 8 and Caspase 3/7 pathway. These mechanistic effects correlate with higher bone volume (∼20%) in both normal and ovariectomized mice treated with SFN for 5 weeks compared with untreated mice as determined by microcomputed tomography. This effect is due to a higher trabecular number in these mice. Importantly, no shifts in mineral density distribution are observed upon SFN treatment as measured by quantitative backscattered electron imaging. Our data indicate that the food-derived compound SFN epigenetically stimulates osteoblast activity and diminishes osteoclast bone resorption, shifting the balance of bone homeostasis and favoring bone acquisition and/or mitigation of bone resorption in vivo. Thus, SFN is a member of a new class of epigenetic compounds that could be considered for novel strategies to counteract osteoporosis. PMID:26757819

  12. Sulforaphane Prevents Angiotensin II-Induced Testicular Cell Death via Activation of NRF2

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yonggang; Xin, Ying; Tan, Yi

    2017-01-01

    Although angiotensin II (Ang II) was reported to facilitate sperm motility and intratesticular sperm transport, recent findings shed light on the efficacy of Ang II in stimulating inflammatory events in testicular peritubular cells, effect of which may play a role in male infertility. It is still unknown whether Ang II can induce testicular apoptotic cell death, which may be a more direct action of Ang II in male infertility. Therefore, the present study aims to determine whether Ang II can induce testicular apoptotic cell death and whether this action can be prevented by sulforaphane (SFN) via activating nuclear factor (erythroid-derived 2)-like 2 (NRF2), the governor of antioxidant-redox signalling. Eight-week-old male C57BL/6J wild type (WT) and Nrf2 gene knockout mice were treated with Ang II, in the presence or absence of SFN. In WT mice, SFN activated testicular NRF2 expression and function, along with a marked attenuation in Ang II-induced testicular oxidative stress, inflammation, endoplasmic reticulum stress, and apoptotic cell death. Deletion of the Nrf2 gene led to a complete abolishment of these efficacies of SFN. The present study indicated that Ang II may result in testicular apoptotic cell death, which can be prevented by SFN via the activation of NRF2. PMID:28191275

  13. Cultivation conditions and selenium fertilization alter the phenolic profile, glucosinolate, and sulforaphane content of broccoli.

    PubMed

    Robbins, Rebecca J; Keck, Anna-Sigrid; Banuelos, Gary; Finley, John W

    2005-01-01

    Broccoli is a food often consumed for its potential health-promoting properties. The health benefits of broccoli are partly associated with secondary plant compounds that have bioactivity; glucosinolates and phenolic acids are two of the most abundant and important in broccoli. In an effort to determine how variety, stress, and production conditions affect the production of these bioactive components broccoli was grown in the greenhouse with and without selenium (Se) fertilization, and in the field under conventional or organic farming procedures and with or without water stress. High-performance liquid chromatography/mass spectrometry was used to separate and identify 12 primary phenolic compounds. Variety had a major effect: There was a preponderance of flavonoids in the Majestic variety, but hydroxycinnamic esters were relatively more abundant in the Legacy variety. Organic farming and water stress decreased the overall production of phenolics. Se fertilization increased glucosinolates in general, and sulforaphane in particular, up to a point; above that Se fertilization decreased glucosinolate production. Organic farming and water stress also decreased glucosinolate production. These data show environmental and genetic variation in phenolics and glucosinolates in broccoli, and warn that not all broccoli may contain all health-promoting bioactive components. They further show that selection for one bioactive component (Se) may decrease the content of other bioactive components such as phenolics and glucosinolates.

  14. Sulforaphane, a natural component of broccoli, inhibits vestibular schwannoma growth in vitro and in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Bo Gyung; Fujita, Takeshi; Stankovic, Konstantina M.; Welling, D. Bradley; Moon, In Seok; Choi, Jae Young; Yun, Jieun; Kang, Jong Soon; Lee, Jong Dae

    2016-01-01

    Vestibular schwannoma (VS) is an intracranial tumor that causes significant morbidity, including hearing loss, tinnitus, dizziness, and possibly even death from brainstem compression. However, FDA-approved pharmacologic treatments for VS do not exist. Sulforaphane (SFN) is a naturally occurring isothiocyanate found in cruciferous vegetables, such as broccoli, with potent chemoprotective effects in several cell types. Our objective was to determine whether SFN is effective against VS in vitro and in vivo. Human primary VS cells, HEI-193 schwannoma cells, and SC4 Nf2−/− Schwann cells were used to investigate the inhibitory effects of SFN in vitro. Cell proliferation was assessed by bromodeoxyuridine (BrdU) incorporation, and cell viability and metabolic activity was calculated by MTT assay. Apoptosis was measured by flow cytometry, terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase-mediated dUTP nick end labeling (TUNEL) staining, and Western blot for cleaved caspases. A mouse model with a murine schwannoma allograft was also used to examine the antitumor activity of SFN. SFN exhibited significant antiproliferative activity in schwannoma cells in vitro, via the inhibition of HDAC activity and the activation of ERK. SFN treatment induced apoptosis and cell cycle arrest at the G2/M phase. SFN also significantly inhibited schwannoma growth in vivo. Our preclinical studies motivate a future prospective clinical study of SFN for the treatment of VS. PMID:27805058

  15. Sulforaphane protects Microcystin-LR-induced toxicity through activation of the Nrf2-mediated defensive response

    SciTech Connect

    Gan Nanqin; Mi Lixin; Sun Xiaoyun; Dai Guofei; Chung Funglung; Song Lirong

    2010-09-01

    Microcystins (MCs), a cyclic heptapeptide hepatotoxins, are mainly produced by the bloom-forming cyanobacerium Microcystis, which has become an environmental hazard worldwide. Long term consumption of MC-contaminated water may induce liver damage, liver cancer, and even human death. Therefore, in addition to removal of MCs in drinking water, novel strategies that prevent health damages are urgently needed. Sulforaphane (SFN), a natural-occurring isothiocyanate from cruciferous vegetables, has been reported to reduce and eliminate toxicities from xenobiotics and carcinogens. The purpose of the present study was to provide mechanistic insights into the SFN-induced antioxidative defense system against MC-LR-induced cytotoxicity. We performed cell viability assays, including MTS assay, colony formation assay and apoptotic cell sorting, to study MC-LR-induced cellular damage and the protective effects by SFN. The results showed that SFN protected MC-LR-induced damages at a nontoxic and physiological relevant dose in HepG2, BRL-3A and NIH 3 T3 cells. The protection was Nrf2-mediated as evident by transactivation of Nrf2 and activation of its downstream genes, including NQO1 and HO-1, and elevated intracellular GSH level. Results of our studies indicate that pretreatment of cells with 10 {mu}M SFN for 12 h significantly protected cells from MC-LR-induced damage. SFN-induced protective response was mediated through Nrf2 pathway.

  16. Sulforaphane Inhibits c-Myc-Mediated Prostate Cancer Stem-Like Traits.

    PubMed

    Vyas, Avani R; Moura, Michelle B; Hahm, Eun-Ryeong; Singh, Krishna Beer; Singh, Shivendra V

    2016-11-01

    Preventive and therapeutic efficiencies of dietary sulforaphane (SFN) against human prostate cancer have been demonstrated in vivo, but the underlying mechanism(s) by which this occurs is poorly understood. Here, we show that the prostate cancer stem cell (pCSC)-like traits, such as accelerated activity of aldehyde dehydrogenase 1 (ALDH1), enrichment of CD49f+ fraction, and sphere forming efficiency, are attenuated by SFN treatment. Interestingly, the expression of c-Myc, an oncogenic transcription factor that is frequently deregulated in prostate cancer cells, was markedly suppressed by SFN both in vitro and in vivo. This is biologically relevant, because the lessening of pCSC-like phenotypes mediated by SFN was attenuated when c-Myc was overexpressed. Naturally occurring thio, sulfinyl, and sulfonyl analogs of SFN were also effective in causing suppression of c-Myc protein level. However, basal glycolysis, a basic metabolic pathway that can also be promoted by c-Myc overexpression, was not largely suppressed by SFN, implying that, in addition to c-Myc, there might be another SFN-sensitive cellular factor, which is not directly involved in basal glycolysis, but cooperates with c-Myc to sustain pCSC-like phenotypes. Our study suggests that oncogenic c-Myc is a target of SFN to prevent and eliminate the onset of human prostate cancer. J. Cell. Biochem. 117: 2482-2495, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  17. Development and validation of a LC-MS/MS method to determine sulforaphane in honey.

    PubMed

    Ares, Ana M; Valverde, Silvia; Bernal, José L; Nozal, María J; Bernal, José

    2015-08-15

    A new method was developed to determine sulforaphane (SFN) in honey using liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) with electrospray ionization (ESI). An efficient extraction procedure was proposed (average analyte recoveries were between 92% and 99%); this involved a solid phase extraction (SPE) with a polymeric sorbent. Chromatography was performed on a Synergi™ Hydro analytical column with a mobile phase of 0.02 M ammonium formate in water and acetonitrile, at a flow rate of 0.5 mL/min. The method was fully validated in terms of selectivity, limits of detection (LOD) and quantification (LOQ), linearity, carry-over effect, reinjection reproducibility, precision and accuracy. The LOD and LOQ values were below 0.8 μg/kg and 2.6 μg/kg, respectively. The proposed method was applied to analyze SFN in honey from different botanical origins (rosemary, multifloral, orange blossom and heather), and SFN was detected at trace levels in some of the honey samples examined.

  18. Sulforaphane mobilizes cellular defenses that protect skin against damage by UV radiation

    PubMed Central

    Talalay, Paul; Fahey, Jed W.; Healy, Zachary R.; Wehage, Scott L.; Benedict, Andrea L.; Min, Christine; Dinkova-Kostova, Albena T.

    2007-01-01

    UV radiation (UVR) is a complete carcinogen that elicits a constellation of pathological events, including direct DNA damage, generation of reactive oxidants that peroxidize lipids and damage other cellular components, initiation of inflammation, and suppression of the immune response. Recent dramatic increases in the incidence of nonmelanoma skin cancers are largely attributable to higher exposure of an aging population to UVR. Therefore, the development of cellular strategies for intrinsic protection of the skin against the deleterious effects of UVR is imperative. Here we show that erythema resulting from UVR is a comprehensive and noninvasive biomarker for assessing UVR damage and can be precisely and easily quantified in human skin. Topical application of sulforaphane-rich extracts of 3-day-old broccoli sprouts up-regulated phase 2 enzymes in the mouse and human skin, protected against UVR-induced inflammation and edema in mice, and reduced susceptibility to erythema arising from narrow-band 311-nm UVR in humans. In six human subjects (three males and three females, 28–53 years of age), the mean reduction in erythema across six doses of UVR (300–800 mJ/cm2 in 100 mJ/cm2 increments) was 37.7% (range 8.37–78.1%; P = 0.025). This protection against a carcinogen in humans is catalytic and long lasting. PMID:17956979

  19. Urease from Helicobacter pylori is inactivated by sulforaphane and other isothiocyanates

    PubMed Central

    Fahey, Jed W.; Stephenson, Katherine K.; Wade, Kristina L.; Talalay, Paul

    2013-01-01

    Infections by Helicobacter pylori are very common, causing gastroduodenal inflammation including peptic ulcers, and increasing the risk of gastric neoplasia. The isothiocyanate (ITC) sulforaphane [SF; 1-isothiocyanato-4-(methylsulfinyl)butane] derived from edible crucifers such as broccoli is potently bactericidal against Helicobacter, including antibiotic-resistant strains, suggesting a possible dietary therapy. Gastric H. pylori infections express high urease activity which generates ammonia, neutralizes gastric acidity, and promotes inflammation. The finding that SF inhibits (inactivates) urease (jack bean and Helicobacter) raised the issue of whether these properties might be functionally related. The rates of inactivation of urease activity depend on enzyme and SF concentrations and show first order kinetics. Treatment with SF results in time-dependent increases in the ultraviolet absorption of partially purified Helicobacter urease in the 280–340 nm region. This provides direct spectroscopic evidence for the formation of dithiocarbamates between the ITC group of SF and cysteine thiols of urease. The potencies of inactivation of Helicobacter urease by isothiocyanates structurally related to SF were surprisingly variable. Natural isothiocyanates closely related to SF, previously shown to be bactericidal (berteroin, hirsutin, phenethyl isothiocyanate, alyssin, and erucin), did not inactivate urease activity. Furthermore, SF is bactericidal against both urease positive and negative H. pylori strains. In contrast, some isothiocyanates such as benzoyl-ITC, are very potent urease inactivators, but are not bactericidal. The bactericidal effects of SF and other ITC against Helicobacter are therefore not obligatorily linked to urease inactivation, but may reduce the inflammatory component of Helicobacter infections. PMID:23583386

  20. Aspirin Metabolomics in Colorectal Cancer Chemoprevention | Division of Cancer Prevention

    Cancer.gov

    DESCRIPTION (provided by applicant): Substantial evidence supports the effectiveness of aspirin for cancer chemoprevention in addition to its well-established role in cardiovascular protection. In recent meta-analyses of randomized controlled trials in humans, daily aspirin use reduced incidence, metastasis and mortality from several common types of cancer, especially colorectal cancer. The mechanism(s) by which aspirin exerts an anticancer benefit is uncertain;numerous effects have been described involving both cyclooxygenase-dependent and -independent pathways. |

  1. Chemoprevention of Prostate Cancer: Soy Isoflavones and Curcumin

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    The burden of increasing morbidity and mortality due to prostate cancer imposes a need for new, effective measures of prevention in daily life. The influence of lifestyle on carcinogenesis in Asian men who migrate to Western cultures supports a causal role for dietary, environmental, and genetic factors in the epidemiology of prostate cancer. Chemoprevention, a prophylactic approach that uses nontoxic natural or synthetic compounds to reverse, inhibit, or prevent cancer by targeting specific steps in the carcinogenic pathway, is gaining traction among health care practitioners. Soy isoflavones and curcumin, staples of the Asian diet, have shown promise as functional factors for the chemoprevention of prostate cancer because of their ability to modulate multiple intracellular signaling pathways, including cellular proliferation, apoptosis, inflammation, and androgen receptor signaling. Recent evidence has revealed the DNA damage response (DDR) to be one of the earliest events in the multistep progression of human epithelial carcinomas to invasive malignancy. Soy isoflavones and curcumin activate the DDR, providing an opportunity and rationale for the clinical application of these nutraceuticals in the chemoprevention of prostate cancer. PMID:23136625

  2. Chemopreventive opportunities to control basal cell carcinoma: Current perspectives.

    PubMed

    Tilley, Cynthia; Deep, Gagan; Agarwal, Rajesh

    2015-09-01

    Basal cell carcinoma (BCC) is a major health problem with approximately 2.8 million new cases diagnosed each year in the United States. BCC incidences have continued to rise due to lack of effective chemopreventive options. One of the key molecular characteristics of BCC is the sustained activation of hedgehog signaling through inactivating mutations in the tumor suppressor gene patch (Ptch) or activating mutations in Smoothened. In the past, several studies have addressed targeting the activated hedgehog pathway for the treatment and prevention of BCC, although with toxic effects. Other studies have attempted BCC chemoprevention through targeting the promotional phase of the disease especially the inflammatory component. The compounds that have been utilized in pre-clinical and/or clinical studies include green and black tea, difluoromethylornithine, thymidine dinucleotide, retinoids, non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, vitamin D3, and silibinin. In this review, we have discussed genetic and epigenetic modifications that occur during BCC development as well as the current state of BCC pre-clinical and clinical chemoprevention studies.

  3. Activation of Nrf2 Reduces UVA-Mediated MMP-1 Upregulation via MAPK/AP-1 Signaling Cascades: The Photoprotective Effects of Sulforaphane and Hispidulin

    PubMed Central

    Chaiprasongsuk, Anyamanee; Lohakul, Jinaphat; Soontrapa, Kitipong; Sampattavanich, Somponnat; Akarasereenont, Pravit

    2017-01-01

    UVA irradiation plays a role in premature aging of the skin through triggering oxidative stress-associated stimulation of matrix metalloproteinase-1 (MMP-1) responsible for collagen degradation, a hallmark of photoaged skin. Compounds that can activate nuclear factor E2-related factor 2 (Nrf2), a transcription factor regulating antioxidant gene expression, should therefore serve as effective antiphotoaging agents. We investigated whether genetic silencing of Nrf2 could relieve UVA-mediated MMP-1 upregulation via activation of mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK)/activator protein 1 (AP-1) signaling using human keratinocyte cell line (HaCaT). Antiphotoaging effects of hispidulin (HPD) and sulforaphane (SFN) were assessed on their abilities to activate Nrf2 in controlling MMP-1 and collagen expressions in association with phosphorylation of MAPKs (extracellular signal-regulated kinase, c-Jun N-terminal kinase, and p38), c-Jun, and c-Fos, using the skin of BALB/c mice subjected to repetitive UVA irradiation. Our findings suggested that depletion of Nrf2 promoted both mRNA expression and activity of MMP-1 in the UVA-irradiated HaCaT cells. Treatment of Nrf2 knocked-down HaCaT cells with MAPK inhibitors significantly suppressed UVA-induced MMP-1 and AP-1 activities. Moreover, pretreatment of the mouse skin with HPD and SFN, which could activate Nrf2, provided protective effects against UVA-mediated MMP-1 induction and collagen depletion in correlation with the decreased levels of phosphorylated MAPKs, c-Jun, and c-Fos in the mouse skin. In conclusion, Nrf2 could influence UVA-mediated MMP-1 upregulation through the MAPK/AP-1 signaling cascades. HPD and SFN may therefore represent promising antiphotoaging candidates. PMID:28011874

  4. Sulforaphane inhibits invasion by phosphorylating ERK1/2 to regulate E-cadherin and CD44v6 in human prostate cancer DU145 cells.

    PubMed

    Peng, Xiaohui; Zhou, Yan; Tian, Hua; Yang, Gaoxiang; Li, Chunliu; Geng, Yang; Wu, Sai; Wu, Wei

    2015-09-01

    Advanced prostate cancer has highly invasive potential, which may lead to metastasis associated with poor prognosis. Sulforaphane (SFN), abundant in cruciferous vegetables, exhibited effective resistance to carcinogenesis in a variety of tumors. The aim of the present study was to investigate whether SFN inhibited invasion in human prostate cancer cells via sustained activation of ERK1/2 and downstream signaling by an invasion assay, gelatin zymography and western blot analysis. The results showed that SFN inhibited invasion and we characterized the underlying mechanisms in human DU145 prostate cancer cells. SFN (15 µM) changed cell morphology leading to short‑cell pseudopodia which may suppress tumor migration and invasion. The Transwell assay showed that SFN phosphorylated ERK1/2 in a dose- and time-dependent manner and significantly inhibited cell invasion, while the effect was reduced by the ERK1/2 blocker PD98059 (25 µM). Furthermore, these effects contributed to the upregulation of E-cadherin and the downregulation of CD44v6 and were eradicated by PD98059. Western blot analysis and gelatin zymography showed that SFN decreased the expression and activity of MMP-2. Thus, SFN inhibited invasion by activating ERK1/2 to upregulate E-cadherin and downregulate CD44v6, thereby reducing MMP-2 expression and activity. E-cadherin is an invasion inhibitor, while CD44v6 and MMP-2 are invasion promoters. Therefore, SFN is a prospective therapeutic agent that may be used to prevent invasion in prostate cancer.

  5. Chemopreventive Effect of Cardamom (Elettaria cardamomum L.) Against Benzo(α)Pyrene-Induced Forestomach Papillomagenesis in Swiss Albino Mice.

    PubMed

    Qiblawi, Samir; Dhanarasu, Sasikumar; Faris, Mo'ez Al-Islam

    2015-01-01

    Prevention of cancer through dietary intervention has recently gained significant recognition. Cardamom (Elettaria cardamomum), a dietary phytoproduct, is a popular spice that is regularly used as a flavoring agent in various cuisines, and is much valued for its medicinal properties. In the present study, the cancer chemopreventive potential of cardamom was investigated against benzo(α)pyrene [B(α)P]-induced forestomach papillomagenesis in mice. Results showed that treatment with cardamom [(B(α)P + cardamom] reduced tumor incidence and multiplicity significantly (P<0.001) by 41.67% and 74.55%, respectively, compared to that of the B(α)P control group. Biochemical assays revealed a significant enhancement in the hepatic activities of glutathione-S-transferases (P<0.01), superoxide dismutase (P<0.01), glutathione peroxidase (P<0.001), and catalase (P<0.001) in mice treated with cardamom compared with the control. Furthermore, the nonenzymatic antioxidant glutathione was significantly (P<0.001) increased in the cardamom-treated group, whereas the lipid peroxidation level along with lactate dehydrogenase activity exhibited a significant (P<0.01) reduction with cardamom treatment compared to the control. These results suggest that cardamom has the potential to become a pivotal chemopreventive agent against forestomach cancer.

  6. Cancer chemoprevention: Evidence of a nonlinear dose response for the protective effects of resveratrol in humans and mice.

    PubMed

    Cai, Hong; Scott, Edwina; Kholghi, Abeer; Andreadi, Catherine; Rufini, Alessandro; Karmokar, Ankur; Britton, Robert G; Horner-Glister, Emma; Greaves, Peter; Jawad, Dhafer; James, Mark; Howells, Lynne; Ognibene, Ted; Malfatti, Michael; Goldring, Christopher; Kitteringham, Neil; Walsh, Joanne; Viskaduraki, Maria; West, Kevin; Miller, Andrew; Hemingway, David; Steward, William P; Gescher, Andreas J; Brown, Karen

    2015-07-29

    Resveratrol is widely promoted as a potential cancer chemopreventive agent, but a lack of information on the optimal dose prohibits rationally designed trials to assess efficacy. To challenge the assumption that "more is better," we compared the pharmacokinetics and activity of a dietary dose with an intake 200 times higher. The dose-response relationship for concentrations generated and the metabolite profile of [(14)C]-resveratrol in colorectal tissue of cancer patients helped us to define clinically achievable levels. In Apc(Min) mice (a model of colorectal carcinogenesis) that received a high-fat diet, the low resveratrol dose suppressed intestinal adenoma development more potently than did the higher dose. Efficacy correlated with activation of adenosine monophosphate-activated protein kinase (AMPK) and increased expression of the senescence marker p21. Nonlinear dose responses were observed for AMPK and mechanistic target of rapamycin (mTOR) signaling in mouse adenoma cells, culminating in autophagy and senescence. In human colorectal tissues exposed to low dietary concentrations of resveratrol ex vivo, we measured enhanced AMPK phosphorylation and autophagy. The expression of the cytoprotective NAD(P)H dehydrogenase, quinone 1 (NQO1) enzyme was also increased in tissues from cancer patients participating in our [(14)C]-resveratrol trial. These findings warrant a revision of developmental strategies for diet-derived agents designed to achieve cancer chemoprevention.

  7. Resveratrol enhances the chemopreventive effect of celecoxib in chemically induced breast cancer in rats.

    PubMed

    Kisková, Terézia; Jendželovský, Rastislav; Rentsen, Erdenetsetsek; Maier-Salamon, Alexandra; Kokošová, Natália; Papčová, Zuzana; Mikeš, Jaromír; Orendáš, Peter; Bojková, Bianka; Kubatka, Peter; Svoboda, Martin; Kajo, Karol; Fedoročko, Peter; Jäger, Walter; Ekmekcioglu, Cem; Kassayová, Monika; Thalhammer, Theresia

    2014-11-01

    Resveratrol and celecoxib were used as chemopreventive agents in animal models of carcinogenesis, and exert antiproliferative and proapoptotic effects on cancer cells. Therefore, the aim of this study was to evaluate whether combining resveratrol with celecoxib may exert more potent anticarcinogenic effects than the single agents. Mammary carcinogenesis was initiated in 70 female Sprague-Dawley rats with N-methyl-N-nitrosourea (NMU). The chemoprevention with resveratrol, celecoxib, and their combination started 2 weeks before the first carcinogen dose and lasted until the end of the experiment. Tumor incidence and frequency, latency period, tumor volume, the expression of cyclooxygenase 2 (COX2) and growth differentiation factor 15 (GDF15), and also the formation of reactive oxygen species were analyzed using different methods. In addition, the levels of resveratrol and its metabolites in blood and selected tumor tissues were determined by high-performance liquid chromatography. Finally, the anticancer effects of the reagents were studied in the human breast cancer cell line MCF-7. Celecoxib as a single agent significantly decreased tumor frequency, prolonged tumor latency, and decreased the total number of malignant tumors compared with the NMU conditions. Tumor volume was nonsignificantly reduced (0.68±0.25 vs. 0.93±0.28 cm3). Importantly, the addition of resveratrol to celecoxib reduced tumor volume by 60% compared with celecoxib alone (from 0.68±0.25 to 0.27±0.07 cm3, P<0.05). Furthermore, the combination of resveratrol and celecoxib reduced tumor frequency by 29% compared with celecoxib alone (P=0.53). Tumor latency was not influenced by this combination compared with celecoxib alone (126.56±3.45 vs. 120.71±4.08 days). In addition, COX2 mRNA and immunoreactive protein stained on tumor sections were reduced and GDF15 protein increased significantly by the combination studied compared with the NMU conditions. In agreement with these data, a significant

  8. Chemopreventive effects of silymarin against 1,2-dimethylhydrazine plus dextran sodium sulfate-induced inflammation-associated carcinogenicity and genotoxicity in the colon of gpt delta rats.

    PubMed

    Toyoda-Hokaiwado, Naomi; Yasui, Yumiko; Muramatsu, Mina; Masumura, Kenichi; Takamune, Makiko; Yamada, Masami; Ohta, Toshihiro; Tanaka, Takuji; Nohmi, Takehiko

    2011-10-01

    Silymarin, a natural flavonoid from the seeds of milk thistle, is used for chemoprevention against various cancers in clinical settings and in experimental models. To examine the chemopreventive mechanisms of silymarin against colon cancer, we investigated suppressive effects of silymarin against carcinogenicity and genotoxicity induced by 1,2-dimethylhydrazine (DMH) plus dextran sodium sulfate (DSS) in the colon of F344 gpt delta transgenic rats. Male gpt delta rats were given a single subcutaneous injection of 40 mg/kg DMH and followed by 1.5% DSS in drinking water for a week. They were fed diets containing silymarin for 4 weeks, starting 1 week before DMH injection and samples were collected at 4, 20 and 32 weeks after the DMH treatment. Silymarin at doses of 100 and 500 p.p.m. suppressed the tumor formation in a dose-dependent manner and the reduction was statistically significant. In the mutation assays, DMH plus DSS enhanced the gpt mutant frequency (MF) in the colon, and the silymarin treatments reduced the MFs by 20%. Silymarin also reduced the genotoxicity of DMH in a dose-dependent manner in bacterial mutation assay with Salmonella typhimurium YG7108, a sensitive strain to alkylating agents, and the maximum reduction was >80%. These results suggest that silymarin is chemopreventive against DMH/DSS-induced inflammation-associated colon carcinogenesis and silymarin might act as an antigenotoxic agent, in part.

  9. Inhibition of akt enhances the chemopreventive effects of topical rapamycin in mouse skin

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Dickinson, Sally E; Janda, Jaroslav; Criswell, Jane; Blohm-Mangone, Karen; Olson, Erik R.; Liu, Zhonglin; Barber, Christie; Rusche, Jadrian J.; Petricoin, Emmanuel; Calvert, Valerie; Einspahr, Janine G.; Dickinson, Jesse; Stratton, Steven P.; Curiel-Lewandrowski, Clara; Saboda, Kathylynn; Hu, Chengcheng; Bode, Ann M.; Dong, Zigang; Alberts, David S.; Bowden, G. Timothy

    2016-01-01

    The PI3Kinase/Akt/mTOR pathway has important roles in cancer development for multiple tumor types, including UV-induced non-melanoma skin cancer. Immunosuppressed populations are at increased risk of aggressive cutaneous squamous cell carcinoma (SCC). Individuals who are treated with rapamycin, (sirolimus, a classical mTOR inhibitor) have significantly decreased rates of developing new cutaneous SCCs compared to those that receive traditional immunosuppression. However, systemic rapamycin use can lead to significant adverse events. Here we explored the use of topical rapamycin as a chemopreventive agent in the context of solar simulated light (SSL)-induced skin carcinogenesis. In SKH-1 mice, topical rapamycin treatment decreased tumor yields when applied after completion of 15 weeks of SSL exposure compared to controls. However, applying rapamycin during SSL exposure for 15 weeks, and continuing for 10 weeks after UV treatment, increased tumor yields. We also examined whether a combinatorial approach might result in more significant tumor suppression by rapamycin. We validated that rapamycin causes increased Akt (S473) phosphorylation in the epidermis after SSL, and show for the first time that this dysregulation can be inhibited in vivo by a selective PDK1/Akt inhibitor, PHT-427. Combining rapamycin with PHT-427 on tumor prone skin additively caused a significant reduction of tumor multiplicity compared to vehicle controls. Our findings indicate that patients taking rapamycin should avoid sun exposure, and that combining topical mTOR inhibitors and Akt inhibitors may be a viable chemoprevention option for individuals at high risk for cutaneous SCC.

  10. Chemopreventive effect of sinapic acid on 1,2-dimethylhydrazine-induced experimental rat colon carcinogenesis.

    PubMed

    Balaji, C; Muthukumaran, J; Nalini, N

    2014-12-01

    Sinapic acid (SA) is a naturally occurring phenolic acid found in various herbal plants which is attributed with numerous pharmacological properties. This study was aimed to investigate the chemopreventive effect of SA on 1,2-dimethylhydrazine (DMH)-induced rat colon carcinogenesis. Rats were treated with DMH injections (20 mg kg(-1) bodyweight (b.w.) subcutaneously once a week for the first 4 consecutive weeks and SA (20, 40 and 80 mg kg(-1) b.w.) post orally for 16 weeks. At the end of the 16-week experimental period, all the rats were killed, and the tissues were evaluated biochemically. Our results reveal that DMH alone treatment decreased the levels/activities of lipid peroxidation by-products such as thiobarbituric acid reactive substances, conjugated dienes and antioxidants such as superoxide dismutase, catalase, glutathione reductase, glutathione peroxidase and reduced glutathione in the intestine and colonic tissues which were reversed on supplementation with SA. Moreover, the activities of drug-metabolizing enzymes of phase I (cytochrome P450 and P4502E1) were enhanced and those of phase II (glutathione-S-transferase, DT-diaphorase and uridine diphosphate glucuronosyl transferase) were diminished in the liver and colonic mucosa of DMH alone-treated rats and were reversed on supplementation with SA. All the above changes were supported by the histopathological observations of the rat liver and colon. These findings suggest that SA at the dose of 40 mg kg(-1) b.w. was the most effective dose against DMH-induced colon carcinogenesis, and thus, SA could be used as a potential chemopreventive agent.

  11. Chemoprevention of esophageal adenocarcinoma in a rat model by ursodeoxycholic acid.

    PubMed

    Ojima, Eisuke; Fujimura, Takashi; Oyama, Katsunobu; Tsukada, Tomoya; Kinoshita, Jun; Miyashita, Tomoharu; Tajima, Hidehiro; Fushida, Sachio; Harada, Shin-ichi; Mukaisho, Ken-ichi; Hattori, Takanori; Ohta, Tetsuo

    2015-08-01

    Reflux of bile acid into the esophagus induces esophagitis, inflammation-stimulated hyperplasia, metaplasia such as Barrett's esophagus (BE), and esophageal adenocarcinoma (EAC). Caudal-type homeobox 2 (Cdx2) via nuclear factor (NF)-κB induced by bile acid is an important factor in the development of BE and EAC. In colorectal cancer, experimental data suggest a chemopreventive effect of ursodeoxycholic acid (UDCA). We hypothesized that UDCA may protect against the esophageal inflammation-metaplasia-carcinoma sequence by decreasing the overall proportion of the toxic bile acids. Wistar male rats that underwent a duodenoesophageal reflux procedure were divided into two groups. One group was given commercial chow (control group), and the other was given experimental chow containing UDCA (UDCA group). The animals were killed at 40 weeks after surgery, and their bile and esophagus were examined. In the UDCA group, the esophagitis was milder and the incidence of BE was significantly lower (p < 0.05) than in the control group, and EAC was not observed (p < 0.05). In analysis of the compartment of bile acid, UDCA was markedly increased in the UDCA group compared with the control group (32.7 ± 11.4 vs. 0.82 ± 0.33 mmol/L, p < 0.05) and cholic acid was decreased (32.7 ± 4.05 vs. 60.9 ± 8.26 mmol/L, p < 0.05). Expression intensity of Cdx2 and NF-κB was greater in the control group than in the UDCA group (p < 0.05). UDCA may be a chemopreventive agent against EAC by varying the bile acid composition.

  12. Inhibition of Akt Enhances the Chemopreventive Effects of Topical Rapamycin in Mouse Skin.

    PubMed

    Dickinson, Sally E; Janda, Jaroslav; Criswell, Jane; Blohm-Mangone, Karen; Olson, Erik R; Liu, Zhonglin; Barber, Christy; Petricoin, Emanuel F; Calvert, Valerie S; Einspahr, Janine; Dickinson, Jesse E; Stratton, Steven P; Curiel-Lewandrowski, Clara; Saboda, Kathylynn; Hu, Chengcheng; Bode, Ann M; Dong, Zigang; Alberts, David S; Timothy Bowden, G

    2016-03-01

    The PI3Kinase/Akt/mTOR pathway has important roles in cancer development for multiple tumor types, including UV-induced nonmelanoma skin cancer. Immunosuppressed populations are at increased risk of aggressive cutaneous squamous cell carcinoma (SCC). Individuals who are treated with rapamycin (sirolimus, a classical mTOR inhibitor) have significantly decreased rates of developing new cutaneous SCCs compared with those that receive traditional immunosuppression. However, systemic rapamycin use can lead to significant adverse events. Here, we explored the use of topical rapamycin as a chemopreventive agent in the context of solar-simulated light (SSL)-induced skin carcinogenesis. In SKH-1 mice, topical rapamycin treatment decreased tumor yields when applied after completion of 15 weeks of SSL exposure compared with controls. However, applying rapamycin during SSL exposure for 15 weeks, and continuing for 10 weeks after UV treatment, increased tumor yields. We also examined whether a combinatorial approach might result in more significant tumor suppression by rapamycin. We validated that rapamycin causes increased Akt (S473) phosphorylation in the epidermis after SSL, and show for the first time that this dysregulation can be inhibited in vivo by a selective PDK1/Akt inhibitor, PHT-427. Combining rapamycin with PHT-427 on tumor prone skin additively caused a significant reduction of tumor multiplicity compared with vehicle controls. Our findings indicate that patients taking rapamycin should avoid sun exposure, and that combining topical mTOR inhibitors and Akt inhibitors may be a viable chemoprevention option for individuals at high risk for cutaneous SCC.

  13. Quantitation of chemopreventive synergism between (-)-epigallocatechin-3-gallate and curcumin in normal, premalignant and malignant human oral epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Khafif, A; Schantz, S P; Chou, T C; Edelstein, D; Sacks, P G

    1998-03-01

    An in vitro model for oral cancer was used to examine the growth inhibitory effects of chemopreventive agents when used singly and in combination. The model consists of primary cultures of normal oral epithelial cells, newly established cell lines derived from dysplastic leukoplakia and squamous cell carcinoma. Two naturally occurring substances, (-)-epigallocatechin-3-gallate (EGCG) from green tea and curcumin from the spice turmeric were tested. Cells were treated singly and in combination and effects on growth determined in 5-day growth assays and by cell cycle analysis. Effective dose 50s and the combination index were calculated with the computerized Chou-Talalay method which is based on the median-effect principle. Agents were shown to differ in their inhibitory potency. EGCG was less effective with cell progression; the cancer cells were more resistant than normal or dysplastic cells. In contrast, curcumin was equally effective regardless of the cell type tested. Cell cycle analysis indicated that EGCG blocked cells in G1, whereas curcumin blocked cells in S/G2M. The combination of both agents showed synergistic interactions in growth inhibition and increased sigmoidicity (steepness) of the dose-effect curves, a response that was dose and cell type dependent. Combinations allowed for a dose reduction of 4.4-8.5-fold for EGCG and 2.2-2.8-fold for curcumin at ED50s as indicated by the dose reduction index (DRI). Even greater DRI values were observed above ED50 levels. Our results demonstrate that this model which includes normal, premalignant and malignant oral cells can be used to analyse the relative potential of various chemopreventive agents. Two such naturally-occurring agents, EGCG and curcumin, were noted to inhibit growth by different mechanisms, a factor which may account for their demonstrable interactive synergistic effect.

  14. Sulforaphane exerts its anti-inflammatory effect against amyloid-β peptide via STAT-1 dephosphorylation and activation of Nrf2/HO-1 cascade in human THP-1 macrophages.

    PubMed

    An, Ye Won; Jhang, Kyoung A; Woo, So-Youn; Kang, Jihee Lee; Chong, Young Hae

    2016-02-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is the most common neurodegenerative disorder worldwide, accounting for most cases of dementia in elderly individuals, and effective therapies are still lacking. This study was designed to investigate the anti-inflammatory properties of sulforaphane against Aβ1-42 monomers in human THP-1 microglia-like cells. The results showed that sulforaphane preferentially inhibited cathepsin B- and caspase-1-dependent NLRP3 inflammasome activation induced by mostly Aβ1-42 monomers, an effect that potently reduced excessive secretion of the proinflammatory cytokine interleukin-1β (IL-1β). Subsequent mechanistic studies revealed that sulforaphane mitigated the activation of signal transducer and activator of transcription-1 induced by Aβ1-42 monomers. Sulforaphane also increased nuclear factor erythroid 2-related factor 2 (Nrf2) nuclear translocation, which was followed by upregulation of heme-oxygenase 1 (HO-1). The anti-inflammatory effect of sulforaphane on Aβ1-42-induced IL-1β production was diminished by small interfering RNA-mediated knockdown of Nrf2 or HO-1. Moreover, sulforaphane significantly attenuated the levels of microRNA-146a, which is selectively upregulated in the temporal cortex and hippocampus of AD brains. The aforementioned effects of sulforaphane were replicated by the tyrosine kinase inhibitor, herbimycin A, and Nrf2 activator. These results indicate that signal transducer and activator of transcription-1 dephosphorylation, HO-1 and its upstream effector, Nrf2, play a pivotal role in triggering an anti-inflammatory signaling cascade of sulforaphane that results in decreases of IL-1β release and microRNA-146a production in Aβ1-42-stimulated human microglia-like cells. These findings suggest that the phytochemical sulforaphane has a potential application in AD therapeutics.

  15. Cancer Chemoprevention by Phytochemicals: Nature's Healing Touch.

    PubMed

    Zubair, Haseeb; Azim, Shafquat; Ahmad, Aamir; Khan, Mohammad Aslam; Patel, Girijesh Kumar; Singh, Seema; Singh, Ajay Pratap

    2017-03-03

    Phytochemicals are an important part of traditional medicine and have been investigated in detail for possible inclusion in modern medicine as well. These compounds often serve as the backbone for the synthesis of novel therapeutic agents. For many years, phytochemicals have demonstrated encouraging activity against various human cancer models in pre-clinical assays. Here, we discuss select phytochemicals-curcumin, epigallocatechin-3-gallate (EGCG), resveratrol, plumbagin and honokiol-in the context of their reported effects on the processes of inflammation and oxidative stress, which play a key role in tumorigenesis. We also discuss the emerging evidence on modulation of tumor microenvironment by these phytochemicals which can possibly define their cancer-specific action. Finally, we provide recent updates on how low bioavailability, a major concern with phytochemicals, is being circumvented and the general efficacy being improved, by synthesis of novel chemical analogs and nanoformulations.

  16. Chemopreventive activity of chlorophyllin against mouse skin carcinogenesis by benzo[a]pyrene and benzo[a]pyrene-7,8-dihydrodiol-9,10-epoxide.

    PubMed

    Park, K K; Surh, Y J

    1996-04-19

    Chlorophyllin (CHL), the sodium and copper salt of chlorophyll, was tested for its chemopreventive activity against tumorigenesis induced by benzo[a]pyrene (B[a]P) and its ultimate electrophilic and carcinogenic metabolite, benzo[a]pyrene-7,8-dihydrodiol-9,10-epoxide(BPDE). Administration of CHL (15 mg/kg body wt) by gavage to female ICR mice 30 min prior to a topical application of B[a]P or BPDE resulted in significant reduction in both incidence and multiplicity of skin tumors initiated by these carcinogens. CHL was rapidly distributed in the skin and other tissues of mice after oral administration. Taken together, these results suggest that CHL is a potential chemopreventive agent.

  17. Innovative agents in cancer prevention.

    PubMed

    Manson, Margaret M; Farmer, Peter B; Gescher, Andreas; Steward, William P

    2005-01-01

    There are many facets to cancer prevention: a good diet, weight control and physical activity, a healthy environment, avoidance of carcinogens such as those in tobacco smoke, and screening of populations at risk to allow early detection. But there is also the possibility of using drugs or naturally occurring compounds to prevent initiation of, or to suppress, tumour growth. Only a few such agents have been used to date in the clinic with any success, and these include non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs for colon, finasteride for prostate and tamoxifen or raloxifene for breast tumours. An ideal chemopreventive agent would restore normal growth control to a preneoplastic or cancerous cell population by modifying aberrant signalling pathways or inducing apoptosis (or both) in cells beyond repair. Characteristics for such an agent include selectivity for damaged or transformed cells, good bioavailability and more than one mechanism of action to foil redundancy or crosstalk in signalling pathways. As more research effort is being targeted towards this area, the distinction between chemotherapeutic and chemopreventive agents is blurring. Chemotherapeutic drugs are now being designed to target over- or under-active signalling molecules within cancer cells, a philosophy which is just as relevant in chemoprevention. Development of dietary agents is particularly attractive because of our long-standing exposure to them, their relative lack of toxicity, and encouraging indications from epidemiology. The carcinogenic process relies on the cell's ability to proliferate abnormally, evade apoptosis, induce angiogenesis and metastasise to distant sites. In vitro studies with a number of different diet-derived compounds suggest that there are molecules capable of modulating each of these aspects of tumour growth. However, on the negative side many of them have rather poor bioavailability. The challenge is to uncover their multiple mechanisms of action in order to predict their

  18. Novel targets for prostate cancer chemoprevention.

    PubMed

    Sarkar, Fazlul H; Li, Yiwei; Wang, Zhiwei; Kong, Dejuan

    2010-09-01

    Among many endocrine-related cancers, prostate cancer (PCa) is the most frequent male malignancy, and it is the second most common cause of cancer-related death in men in the United States. Therefore, this review focuses on summarizing the knowledge of molecular signaling pathways in PCa because, in order to better design new preventive strategies for the fight against PCa, documentation of the knowledge on the pathogenesis of PCa at the molecular level is very important. Cancer cells are known to have alterations in multiple cellular signaling pathways; indeed, the development and the progression of PCa are known to be caused by the deregulation of several selective signaling pathways such as the androgen receptor, Akt, nuclear factor-kappaB, Wnt, Hedgehog, and Notch. Therefore, strategies targeting these important pathways and their upstream and downstream signaling could be promising for the prevention of PCa progression. In this review, we summarize the current knowledge regarding the alterations in cell signaling pathways during the development and progression of PCa, and document compelling evidence showing that these are the targets of several natural agents against PCa progression and its metastases.

  19. Effect of broccoli (Brassica oleracea) and its phytochemical sulforaphane in balanced diets on the detoxification enzymes levels of tilapia (Oreochromis niloticus) exposed to a carcinogenic and mutagenic pollutant.

    PubMed

    Villa-Cruz, V; Davila, J; Viana, M T; Vazquez-Duhalt, R

    2009-03-01

    Tilapia fish (Oreochromis niloticus) were fed with enriched diets containing broccoli and its phytochemical sulforaphane over 30 d. The levels of cytochrome P450, superoxide dismutase, catalase, lipid peroxidation and glutathione-S-transferase activities were measured. Basal value of cytochrome P450 activity was significantly increased as consequence of the broccoli and sulforaphane enriched diets, while no statistically significant changes were found on catalase and lipid peroxidation activities. After benzo(a)pyrene exposure, the cytochrome P450 activity increased to higher levels in the fish feed with broccoli and sulforaphane when compared with the control fish. Activities of antioxidant enzymes also varied but without significant difference with the control fish. Supported by the lower concentrations of BaP metabolites in bile from fish fed with broccoli or with sulforaphane enriched diets (indicating a better xenobiotic elimination) the cytochrome P450 induction could be considered beneficial for the detoxification because this transformation is the first step for PAH elimination by the phase II system. The protection of aquaculture organism against pollution effects by designing special diets able to modulate the enzymes involved in the phase-I and phase-II detoxification mechanism are discussed.

  20. Phase 1 Study of a Sulforaphane-Containing Broccoli Sprout Homogenate for Sickle Cell Disease.

    PubMed

    Doss, Jennifer F; Jonassaint, Jude C; Garrett, Melanie E; Ashley-Koch, Allison E; Telen, Marilyn J; Chi, Jen-Tsan

    2016-01-01

    Sickle cell disease (SCD) is the most common inherited hemoglobinopathy worldwide. Our previous results indicate that the reduced oxidative stress capacity of sickle erythrocytes may be caused by decreased expression of NRF2 (Nuclear factor (erythroid-derived 2)-like 2), an oxidative stress regulator. We found that activation of NRF2 with sulforaphane (SFN) in erythroid progenitors significantly increased the expression of NRF2 targets HMOX1, NQO1, and HBG1 (subunit of fetal hemoglobin) in a dose-dependent manner. Therefore, we hypothesized that NRF2 activation with SFN may offer therapeutic benefits for SCD patients by restoring oxidative capacity and increasing fetal hemoglobin concentration. To test this hypothesis, we performed a Phase 1, open-label, dose-escalation study of SFN, contained in a broccoli sprout homogenate (BSH) that naturally contains SFN, in adults with SCD. The primary and secondary study endpoints were safety and physiological response to NRF2 activation, respectively. We found that BSH was well tolerated, and the few adverse events that occurred during the trial were not likely related to BSH consumption. We observed an increase in the mean relative whole blood mRNA levels for the NRF2 target HMOX1 (p = 0.02) on the last day of BSH treatment, compared to pre-treatment. We also observed a trend toward increased mean relative mRNA levels of the NRF2 target HBG1 (p = 0.10) from baseline to end of treatment, but without significant changes in HbF protein. We conclude that BSH, in the provided doses, is safe in stable SCD patients and may induce changes in gene expression levels. We therefore propose investigation of more potent NRF2 inducers, which may elicit more robust physiological changes and offer clinical benefits to SCD patients. Trial registration: ClinicalTrials.gov NCT01715480.

  1. Sulforaphane-rich broccoli sprout extract attenuates nasal allergic response to diesel exhaust particles.

    PubMed

    Heber, David; Li, Zhaoping; Garcia-Lloret, Maria; Wong, Angela M; Lee, Tsz Ying Amy; Thames, Gail; Krak, Michael; Zhang, Yanjun; Nel, Andre

    2014-01-01

    The generation of oxidative stress by ambient air pollution particles contributes to the development of allergic sensitization and asthma, as demonstrated by intranasal challenge with well-characterized diesel exhaust particle (DEP) suspensions in humans. This effect is due to the presence of redox active organic chemicals in DEP, and can be suppressed by antioxidants and inducers of phase II enzymes in animals. In this communication, we determined whether the administration of a standardized broccoli sprout extract (BSE), which contains a reproducible amount of the sulforaphane (SFN) precursor, glucoraphanin, could be used to suppress the nasal inflammatory response in human subjects challenged with 300 μg of an aqueous DEP suspension (equivalent to daily PM exposure levels on a Los Angeles freeway). SFN is capable of inducing an antioxidant and phase II response via activation of the nuclear transcription factor (erythroid-derived 2)-like 2 (Nrf2). Previous studies have shown that 70-90% SFN delivered by BSE is absorbed, metabolized, and excreted in humans. An initial intranasal challenge with DEP in 29 human subjects was used to characterize the magnitude of the inflammatory response. Following a 4 week washout, a BSE that delivers a reproducible and standardized dose of 100 μmol SFN in mango juice was administered daily for four days. The nasal DEP challenge was repeated and lavage fluid collected to perform white blood cell (WBC) counts. The average nasal WBC increased by 66% over the initial screening levels and by 85% over the control levels 24 hours after DEP exposure. However, total cell counts decreased by 54% when DEP challenge was preceded by daily BSE administration for 4 days (p < 0.001). Since the SFN dose in these studies is equivalent to the consumption of 100-200 g broccoli, our study demonstrates the potential preventive and therapeutic potential of broccoli or broccoli sprouts rich in glucoraphanin for reducing the impact of particulate

  2. Sulforaphane-induced apoptosis involves the type 1 IP3 receptor

    PubMed Central

    Hudecova, Sona; Markova, Jana; Simko, Veronika; Csaderova, Lucia; Stracina, Tibor; Sirova, Marta; Fojtu, Michaela; Svastova, Eliska; Gronesova, Paulina; Pastorek, Michal; Novakova, Marie; Cholujova, Dana; Kopacek, Juraj; Pastorekova, Silvia; Sedlak, Jan; Krizanova, Olga

    2016-01-01

    In this study we show that anti-tumor effect of sulforaphane (SFN) is partially realized through the type 1 inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate receptor (IP3R1). This effect was verified in vitro on three different stable cell lines and also in vivo on the model of nude mice with developed tumors. Early response (6 hours) of A2780 ovarian carcinoma cells to SFN treatment involves generation of mitochondrial ROS and increased transcription of NRF2 and its downstream regulated genes including heme oxygenase 1, NAD(P)H:quinine oxidoreductase 1, and KLF9. Prolonged SFN treatment (24 hours) upregulated expression of NRF2 and IP3R1. SFN induces a time-dependent phosphorylation wave of HSP27. Use of IP3R inhibitor Xestospongin C (Xest) attenuates both SFN-induced apoptosis and the level of NRF2 protein expression. In addition, Xest partially attenuates anti-tumor effect of SFN in vivo. SFN-induced apoptosis is completely inhibited by silencing of IP3R1 gene but only partially blocked by silencing of NRF2; silencing of IP3R2 and IP3R3 had no effect on these cells. Xest inhibitor does not significantly modify SFN-induced increase in the rapid activity of ARE and AP1 responsive elements. We found that Xest effectively reverses the SFN-dependent increase of nuclear content and decrease of reticular calcium content. In addition, immunofluorescent staining with IP3R1 antibody revealed that SFN treatment induces translocation of IP3R1 to the nucleus. Our results clearly show that IP3R1 is involved in SFN-induced apoptosis through the depletion of reticular calcium and modulation of transcription factors through nuclear calcium up-regulation. PMID:27528021

  3. Sulforaphane Preconditioning Sensitizes Human Colon Cancer Cells towards the Bioreductive Anticancer Prodrug PR-104A

    PubMed Central

    Erzinger, Melanie M.; Bovet, Cédric; Hecht, Katrin M.; Senger, Sabine; Winiker, Pascale; Sobotzki, Nadine; Cristea, Simona; Beerenwinkel, Niko; Shay, Jerry W.; Marra, Giancarlo; Wollscheid, Bernd; Sturla, Shana J.

    2016-01-01

    The chemoprotective properties of sulforaphane (SF), derived from cruciferous vegetables, are widely acknowledged to arise from its potent induction of xenobiotic-metabolizing and antioxidant enzymes. However, much less is known about the impact of SF on the efficacy of cancer therapy through the modulation of drug-metabolizing enzymes. To identify proteins modulated by a low concentration of SF, we treated HT29 colon cancer cells with 2.5 μM SF. Protein abundance changes were detected by stable isotope labeling of amino acids in cell culture. Among 18 proteins found to be significantly up-regulated, aldo-keto reductase 1C3 (AKR1C3), bioactivating the DNA cross-linking prodrug PR-104A, was further characterized. Preconditioning HT29 cells with SF reduced the EC50 of PR-104A 3.6-fold. The increase in PR-104A cytotoxicity was linked to AKR1C3 abundance and activity, both induced by SF in a dose-dependent manner. This effect was reproducible in a second colon cancer cell line, SW620, but not in other colon cancer cell lines where AKR1C3 abundance and activity were absent or barely detectable and could not be induced by SF. Interestingly, SF had no significant influence on PR-104A cytotoxicity in non-cancerous, immortalized human colonic epithelial cell lines expressing either low or high levels of AKR1C3. In conclusion, the enhanced response of PR-104A after preconditioning with SF was apparent only in cancer cells provided that AKR1C3 is expressed, while its expression in non-cancerous cells did not elicit such a response. Therefore, a subset of cancers may be susceptible to combined food-derived component and prodrug treatments with no harm to normal tissues. PMID:26950072

  4. Sulforaphane attenuates the development of atherosclerosis and improves endothelial dysfunction in hypercholesterolemic rabbits

    PubMed Central

    Suddek, Ghada M

    2016-01-01

    The aim of the present work was to explore possible protective effects of sulforaphane (SFN) against atherosclerosis development and endothelial dysfunction in hypercholesterolemic rabbits. Rabbits were assigned to three groups of five: group I fed normal chow diet for four weeks, group II fed 1% high cholesterol diet (HCD) and group III fed HCD + SFN (0.25 mg/kg/day). Blood samples were collected for measurement of serum triglycerides (TGs), total cholesterol (TC), high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C), lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) and C-reactive protein (CRP). Aortic malondialdehyde (MDA), reduced glutathione (GSH), superoxide dismutase (SOD) and total nitrite/nitrate (NOx) were measured. Vascular reactivity and intima/media (I/M) ratio were analyzed. Nuclear factor-kappa B (NF-κB) activation in aortic endothelial cells was identified immunohistochemically. HCD induced significant increases in serum TGs, TC, LDL-C, LDH, and CRP, and aortic MDA and SOD. Moreover, HCD caused significant reductions in serum HDL-C, aortic GSH and NOx. SFN administration significantly decreased HCD-induced elevations in serum TC, LDL-C, CRP, and LDH. while significantly increased HDL-C and GSH levels and normalized aortic SOD and NOx. Additionally, SFN significantly improved rabbit aortic endothelium-dependent relaxation to acetylcholine. Moreover, SFN significantly reduced the elevation in I/M ratio. This effect was confirmed by aortic histopathologic examination. The expression of NF-κB in aortic tissue showed a marked reduction upon treatment with SFN. In conclusion, this study reveals that SFN has the ability to ameliorate HCD-induced atherosclerotic lesions progression and vascular dysfunction, possibly via its lipid-lowering and antioxidant effects and suppression of NF-κB-mediated inflammation. PMID:26490346

  5. Sulforaphane restores cellular glutathione levels and reduces chronic periodontitis neutrophil hyperactivity in vitro.

    PubMed

    Dias, Irundika H K; Chapple, Ian L C; Milward, Mike; Grant, Melissa M; Hill, Eric; Brown, James; Griffiths, Helen R

    2013-01-01

    The production of high levels of reactive oxygen species by neutrophils is associated with the local and systemic destructive phenotype found in the chronic inflammatory disease periodontitis. In the present study, we investigated the ability of sulforaphane (SFN) to restore cellular glutathione levels and reduce the hyperactivity of circulating neutrophils associated with chronic periodontitis. Using differentiated HL60 cells as a neutrophil model, here we show that generation of extracellular O2 (. -) by the nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NADPH) oxidase complex is increased by intracellular glutathione depletion. This may be attributed to the upregulation of thiol regulated acid sphingomyelinase driven lipid raft formation. Intracellular glutathione was also lower in primary neutrophils from periodontitis patients and, consistent with our previous findings, patients neutrophils were hyper-reactive to stimuli. The activity of nuclear factor erythroid-2-related factor 2 (Nrf2), a master regulator of the antioxidant response, is impaired in circulating neutrophils from chronic periodontitis patients. Although patients' neutrophils exhibit a low reduced glutathione (GSH)/oxidised glutathione (GSSG) ratio and a higher total Nrf2 level, the DNA-binding activity of nuclear Nrf2 remained unchanged relative to healthy controls and had reduced expression of glutamate cysteine ligase catalytic (GCLC), and modifier (GCLM) subunit mRNAs, compared to periodontally healthy subjects neutrophils. Pre-treatment with SFN increased expression of GCLC and GCM, improved intracellular GSH/GSSG ratios and reduced agonist-activated extracellular O2 (. -) production in both dHL60 and primary neutrophils from patients with periodontitis and controls. These findings suggest that a deficiency in Nrf2-dependent pathways may underpin susceptibility to hyper-reactivity in circulating primary neutrophils during chronic periodontitis.

  6. Metallothionein Is Downstream of Nrf2 and Partially Mediates Sulforaphane Prevention of Diabetic Cardiomyopathy.

    PubMed

    Gu, Junlian; Cheng, Yanli; Wu, Hao; Kong, Lili; Wang, Shudong; Xu, Zheng; Zhang, Zhiguo; Tan, Yi; Keller, Bradley B; Zhou, Honglan; Wang, Yuehui; Xu, Zhonggao; Cai, Lu

    2017-02-01

    We have reported that sulforaphane (SFN) prevented diabetic cardiomyopathy in both type 1 and type 2 diabetes (T2DM) animal models via the upregulation of nuclear transcription factor erythroid 2-related factor 2 (Nrf2) and metallothionein (MT). In this study, we tested whether SFN protects the heart from T2DM directly through Nrf2, MT, or both. Using Nrf2-knockout (KO), MT-KO, and wild-type (WT) mice, T2DM was induced by feeding a high-fat diet for 3 months followed by a small dose of streptozotocin. Age-matched controls were given a normal diet. Both T2DM and control mice were then treated with or without SFN for 4 months by continually feeding a high-fat or normal diet. SFN prevented diabetes-induced cardiac dysfunction as well as diabetes-associated cardiac oxidative damage, inflammation, fibrosis, and hypertrophy, with increases in Nrf2 and MT expressions in the WT mice. Both Nrf2-KO and MT-KO diabetic mice exhibited greater cardiac damage than WT diabetic mice. SFN did not provide cardiac protection in Nrf2-KO mice, but partially or completely protected the heart from diabetes in MT-KO mice. SFN did not induce MT expression in Nrf2-KO mice, but stimulated Nrf2 function in MT-KO mice. These results suggest that Nrf2 plays the indispensable role for SFN cardiac protection from T2DM with significant induction of MT and other antioxidants. MT expression induced by SFN is Nrf2 dependent, but is not indispensable for SFN-induced cardiac protection from T2DM.

  7. Sulforaphane causes a major epigenetic repression of myostatin in porcine satellite cells.

    PubMed

    Fan, Huitao; Zhang, Rui; Tesfaye, Dawit; Tholen, Ernst; Looft, Christian; Hölker, Michael; Schellander, Karl; Cinar, Mehmet Ulas

    2012-12-01

    Satellite cells function as skeletal muscle stem cells to support postnatal muscle growth and regeneration following injury or disease. There is great promise for the improvement of muscle performance in livestock and for the therapy of muscle pathologies in humans by the targeting of myostatin (MSTN) in this cell population. Human diet contains many histone deacetylase (HDAC) inhibitors, such as the bioactive component sulforaphane (SFN), whose epigenetic effects on MSTN gene in satellite cells are unknown. Therefore, we aimed to investigate the epigenetic influences of SFN on the MSTN gene in satellite cells. The present work provides the first evidence, which is distinct from the effects of trichostatin A (TSA), that SFN supplementation in vitro not only acts as a HDAC inhibitor but also as a DNA methyltransferase (DNMT) inhibitor in porcine satellite cells. Compared with TSA and 5-aza-2'-deoxycytidine (5-aza-dC), SFN treatment significantly represses MSTN expression, accompanied by strongly attenuated expression of negative feedback inhibitors of the MSTN signaling pathway. miRNAs targeting MSTN are not implicated in posttranscriptional regulation of MSTN. Nevertheless, a weakly enriched myoblast determination (MyoD) protein associated with diminished histone acetylation in the MyoD binding site located in the MSTN promoter region may contribute to the transcriptional repression of MSTN by SFN. These findings reveal a new mode of epigenetic repression of MSTN by the bioactive compound SFN. This novel pharmacological, biological activity of SFN in satellite cells may thus allow for the development of novel approaches to weaken the MSTN signaling pathway, both for therapies of human skeletal muscle disorders and for livestock production improvement.

  8. Potential of Vinca rosea extracts in modulating trace element profile: a chemopreventive approach.

    PubMed

    Mohanta, Bidhan; Sudarshan, Mathummal; Boruah, Mandira; Chakraborty, Anindita

    2007-01-01

    Diethylnitrosamine (DEN) was used as cancer-inducing agent in the experimental animals. Vinca rosea extract was supplemented with the drinking water as a chemopreventive agent. After 4 wk of treatment, animals were sacrificed and livers were excised. Nuclei and mitochondria were separated by differential centrifugation. The proton-induced X-ray emission technique has been used as the analytical method. Elemental analysis were performed for whole liver, nuclei, and mitochondria.V. rosea plant parts were also analyzed for elemental contents. Treatment with DEN caused an increase of Ni, Zn, and Cr levels in the whole liver and nuclei. There is an increase in Fe concentration in the liver, although the level decreased in mitochondria. The concentrations of Br and Ca were unchanged in the liver as a whole, but there were substantial increases of Br in nuclei and mitochondria, whereas Ca levels depleted drastically in these two organelles. Vinca extracts were effective in reverting the changes in the elemental concentration in the hepatic tissue as a whole, but were not that effective at subcellular levels.

  9. Sulforaphane Prevents Testicular Damage in Kunming Mice Exposed to Cadmium via Activation of Nrf2/ARE Signaling Pathways

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Shu-Hua; Long, Miao; Yu, Li-Hui; Li, Lin; Li, Peng; Zhang, Yi; Guo, Yang; Gao, Feng; Liu, Ming-Da; He, Jian-Bin

    2016-01-01

    Sulforaphane (SFN) is a natural and highly effective antioxidant. Studies suggest that SFN protects cells and tissues against cadmium (Cd) toxicity. This study investigated the protective effect of SFN against oxidative damage in the testes of Kunming mice exposed to cadmium, and explored the possible molecular mechanisms involved. Cadmium greatly reduced the serum testosterone levels in mice, reduced sperm motility, total sperm count, and increased the sperm deformity rate. Cadmium also reduces superoxide dismutase (T-SOD) and glutathione (GSH) levels and increases malondialdehyde (MDA) concentrations. SFN intervention improved sperm quality, serum testosterone, and antioxidant levels. Both mRNA and protein expression of mouse testicular nuclear factor-erythroid 2-related factor 2 (Nrf2) was reduced in cadmium-treated group. Furthermore, the downstream genes of Nrf2, glutathione peroxidase (GSH-Px), γ-glutamyl cysteine synthetase (γ-GCS), heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1), and NAD(P)H:quinone oxidoreductase-1 (NQO1) were also decreased in cadmium-treated group. SFN intervention increases the expression of these genes. Sulforaphane prevents cadmium-induced testicular damage, probably via activation of Nrf2/ARE signaling. PMID:27727176

  10. Lack of Effect of Oral Sulforaphane Administration on Nrf2 Expression in COPD: A Randomized, Double-Blind, Placebo Controlled Trial

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Background COPD patients have high pulmonary and systemic oxidative stress that correlates with severity of disease. Sulforaphane has been shown to induce expression of antioxidant genes via activation of a transcription factor, nuclear factor erythroid-2 related factor 2 (Nrf2). Methods This parallel, placebo-controlled, phase 2, randomized trial was conducted at three US academic medical centers. Patients who met GOLD criteria for COPD and were able to tolerate bronchoscopies were randomly assigned (1:1:1) to receive placebo, 25 μmoles, or 150 μmoles sulforaphane daily by mouth for four weeks. The primary outcomes were changes in Nrf2 target gene expression (NQ01, HO1, AKR1C1 and AKR1C3) in alveolar macrophages and bronchial epithelial cells. Secondary outcomes included measures of oxidative stress and airway inflammation, and pulmonary function tests. Results Between July 2011 and May 2013, 89 patients were enrolled and randomized. Sulforaphane was absorbed in the patients as evident from their plasma metabolite levels. Changes in Nrf2 target gene expression relative to baseline ranged from 0.79 to 1.45 and there was no consistent pattern among the three groups; the changes were not statistically significantly different from baseline. Changes in measures of inflammation and pulmonary function tests were not different among the groups. Sulforaphane was well tolerated at both dose levels. Conclusion Sulforaphane administered for four weeks at doses of 25 μmoles and 150 μmoles to patients with COPD did not stimulate the expression of Nrf2 target genes or have an effect on levels of other anti-oxidants or markers of inflammation. Trial Registration Clinicaltrials.gov: NCT01335971. PMID:27832073

  11. Update on the chemopreventive effects of ginger and its phytochemicals.

    PubMed

    Baliga, Manjeshwar Shrinath; Haniadka, Raghavendra; Pereira, Manisha Maria; D'Souza, Jason Jerome; Pallaty, Princy Louis; Bhat, Harshith P; Popuri, Sandhya

    2011-07-01

    The rhizomes of Zingiber officinale Roscoe (Zingiberaceae), commonly known as ginger, is one of the most widely used spice and condiment. It is also an integral part of many traditional medicines and has been extensively used in Chinese, Ayurvedic, Tibb-Unani, Srilankan, Arabic, and African traditional medicines, since antiquity, for many unrelated human ailments including common colds, fever, sore throats, vomiting, motion sickness, gastrointestinal complications, indigestion, constipation, arthritis, rheumatism, sprains, muscular aches, pains, cramps, hypertension, dementia, fever, infectious diseases, and helminthiasis. The putative active compounds are nonvolatile pungent principles, namely gingerols, shogaols, paradols, and zingerone. These compounds are some of the extensively studied phytochemicals and account for the antioxidant, anti-inflammatory, antiemetic, and gastroprotective activities. A number of preclinical investigations with a wide variety of assay systems and carcinogens have shown that ginger and its compounds possess chemopreventive and antineoplastic effects. A number of mechanisms have been observed to be involved in the chemopreventive effects of ginger. The cancer preventive activities of ginger are supposed to be mainly due to free radical scavenging, antioxidant pathways, alteration of gene expressions, and induction of apoptosis, all of which contribute towards decrease in tumor initiation, promotion, and progression. This review provides concise information from preclinical studies with both cell culture models and relevant animal studies by focusing on the mechanisms responsible for the chemopreventive action. The conclusion describes directions for future research to establish its activity and utility as a human cancer preventive and therapeutic drug. The above-mentioned mechanisms of ginger seem to be promising for cancer prevention; however, further clinical studies are warranted to assess the efficacy and safety of ginger.

  12. Experimental and computational studies on newly synthesized resveratrol derivative: a new method for cancer chemoprevention and therapeutics?

    PubMed

    Banaganapalli, Babajan; Mulakayala, Chaitanya; Pulaganti, Madhusudana; Mulakayala, Naveen; Anuradha, C M; Suresh Kumar, Chitta; Shaik, Noor Ahmad; Yousuf Al-Aama, Jumana; Gudla, Dhananjaya

    2013-11-01

    Nature has been a provenance of medicinal agents for thousands of years. Resveratrol (RESL) is a naturally occurring polyphenolic compound in food stuffs such as peanuts, seeds, berries, grapes, and beverages (red wine). RESL has received significant attention due to a plethora of in vitro and in vivo reports on its cancer chemopreventive and therapeutic properties. In the present study, diacetate RESL derivative (RESL43) was synthesized. The RESL43 displayed potent cytotoxicity and triggered apoptosis in U937 cells as evidenced by poly (ADP-ribose) polymerase (PARP) cleavage, DNA fragmentation, morphological changes, and activation of FasR and FasL genes. The electrophoretic mobility shift assay revealed the suppression NFkB activity in U937 cells after treatment with RESL43 in corroboration with the deactivation of NFkB dependent genes such as IL-8, TNFR, and TNFα. Furthermore, molecular docking and dynamics studies have shown that RESL and RESL43 might exert their inhibitory activity on NFkB by altering the intramolecular binding abilities between DNA and NFkB. Taken together, RESL43 can have greater putative activity than parental RESL in a context of cancer chemoprevention and therapeutics. We suggest that the diacetate resveratrol derivative RESL43 warrants further evaluation in preclinical and clinical bridging studies in the near future.

  13. Chemopreventive effects of Strobilanthes crispus leaf extract on azoxymethane-induced aberrant crypt foci in rat colon

    PubMed Central

    Al-Henhena, Nawal; Khalifa, Shaden A. M.; Ying, Rozaida Poh Yuen; Hassandarvish, Pouya; Rouhollahi, Elham; Al-Wajeeh, Nahla Saeed; Ali, Habibah Mohd; Abdulla, Mahmood Ameen; El-Seedi, Hesham R.

    2015-01-01

    In this work, microscopic and histological studies suggest that Strobilanthes crispus ethanol extract reduce azoxymethane (AOM)-induced colonic aberrant crypt foci (ACF) in rats. S. crispus is considered a traditional medicine and used as an antioxidant. Its leaf contains a large amount of phenolic compounds to which its radical scavenging role is attributed and enhance its ability to eradicate oxidative stress reactions. The study was designed to determine the chemopreventive effect of S. crispus ethanol extract in vivo and in vitro by elucidating the effect of the extract on intermediate biomarkers which can be used as effective predictors of colon cancer. S. crispus was analyzed for DPPH free radical scavenging, nitric oxide (NO) and ferric acid reduction. The results indicated that S. crispus oral administration significantly inhibited colorectal carcinogenesis induced by AOM as revealed by the reduction in the number of ACF. S. crispus down-regulated the expression of PCNA, Bcl2 and β-catenin. Additionally, it exerted a pronounced inhibitory effect on MDA and NO levels and stimulatory effect on CAT and GPx activities. These results demonstrate that S. crispus is a chemopreventive agent for colorectal cancer through the suppression of early and intermediate carcinogenic phases that may be related to its flavonoid content. PMID:26307342

  14. Chemopreventive effects of aloin against 1,2-dimethylhydrazine-induced preneoplastic lesions in the colon of Wistar rats.

    PubMed

    Hamiza, O O; Rehman, M U; Khan, R; Tahir, M; Khan, A Q; Lateef, A; Sultana, S

    2014-02-01

    Chemoprevention opens new window in the prevention of all types of cancers including colon cancer. Aloin, an anthracycline in plant pigment, can be utilized as a protective agent in cancer induction. In the present study, we have evaluated the chemopreventive efficacy of aloin against 1,2-dimethylhydrazine (DMH)-induced preneoplastic lesions in the colon of Wistar rats. DMH-induced aberrant crypt foci (ACF) and mucin-depleted foci (MDF) have been used as biomarkers of colon cancer. Efficacy of aloin against the colon toxicity was evaluated in terms of biochemical estimation of antioxidant enzyme activities, lipid peroxidation, ACF, MDF, histopathological changes, and expression levels of molecular markers of inflammation and tumor promotion. Aloin pretreatment ameliorates the damaging effects induced by DMH through a protective mechanism that involved reduction in increased oxidative stress enzymes (p < 0.001), ACF, MDF, cyclooxygenase-2, inducible nitric oxide synthase, interleukin-6, proliferating cell nuclear antigen protein expression, and tumor necrosis factor-α (p < 0.001) release. From the results, it could be concluded that aloin clearly protects against chemically induced colon toxicity and acts reasonably by inducing antioxidant level, anti-inflammatory and antiproliferative markers.

  15. Chemopreventive and therapeutic efficacy of orally active tyrosine kinase inhibitors in a transgenic mouse model of gallbladder carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Kiguchi, Kaoru; Ruffino, Lynnsie; Kawamoto, Toru; Ajiki, Tetsuo; Digiovanni, John

    2005-08-01

    Biliary tract cancer (BTC) is the second most common primary hepatobiliary cancer after hepatocellular cancer. At the time of diagnosis, most BTC are at an advanced stage and are unresectable. There is presently no effective curative treatment of the advanced disease nor is there any effective clinical therapy that will prevent the development of BTC. All of these factors render gallbladder cancer nearly incurable with a poor survival rate. The aim of our study was to provide a better understanding of the mechanisms involved in the development of gallbladder carcinoma as the advancement of more effective treatment options would significantly improve prognosis. In the present study, we examined the effect of gefitinib, a selective epidermal growth factor receptor/tyrosine kinase inhibitor (EGFR/TKI), on the development of gallbladder carcinoma in BK5.erbB2 mice. In addition, we examined the effect of another quinazoline derivative, GW2974, which is able to block the activation of both the EGFR and erbB2, in this model. Animals were treated with either 400 ppm gefitinib or 200 ppm GW2974 as a supplement in the diet using either a chemopreventive or therapeutic protocol. The results show that both compounds were potent chemopreventive and therapeutic agents in this mouse model of human BTC. The results also suggest that activation of the EGFR plays an important role in development of BTC in this model and that targeting both the EGFR and erbB2 may be an effective strategy for treatment of this disease.

  16. Raman spectroscopic investigation of the chemopreventive response of naringenin and its nanoparticles in DMBA-induced oral carcinogenesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krishnakumar, N.; Sulfikkarali, N. K.; Manoharan, S.; Venkatachalam, P.

    2013-11-01

    Raman spectroscopy is a vibrational spectroscopic technique that can be used to optically probe the biomolecular changes associated with tumor progression. The aim of the present study is to investigate the biomolecular changes in chemopreventive response of prepared naringenin-loaded nanoparticles (NARNPs) relative to efficacy of free naringenin (NAR) during 7,12-dimethyl benz(a)anthracene (DMBA)-induced oral carcinogenesis by Fourier Transform Raman (FT-Raman) spectroscopy. Oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC) was developed in the buccal pouch of golden Syrian hamsters by painting with 0.5% DMBA in liquid paraffin three times a week for 14 weeks. Raman spectra differed significantly between the control and tumor tissues, with tumors showing higher percentage signals for nucleic acids, phenylalanine and tryptophan and a lower in the percentage of phospholipids. Moreover, oral administration of free NAR and NARNPs significantly increased phospholipids and decreased the levels of tryptophan, phenylalanine and nucleic acid contents. On a comparative basis, NARNPs was found to have a more potent antitumor effect than free NAR in completely preventing the formation of squamous cell carcinoma and in improving the biochemical status to a normal range in DMBA-induced oral carcinogenesis. The present study further suggest that Raman spectroscopy could be a valuable tool for rapid and sensitive detection of specific biomolecular changes in response to chemopreventive agents.

  17. Augmentation of natural killer cell and antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity in BALB/c mice by sulforaphane, a naturally occurring isothiocyanate from broccoli through enhanced production of cytokines IL-2 and IFN-gamma.

    PubMed

    Thejass, P; Kuttan, G

    2006-01-01

    Effect of sulforaphane on cell-mediated immune (CMI) response was studied in normal as well as Ehrlich ascites tumor-bearing BALB/c mice. Administration of sulforaphane significantly enhanced natural killer (NK) cell activity in both normal as well as tumor-bearing animals, and the activity was observed earlier than in tumor-bearing control animals. Antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity (ADCC) also was enhanced significantly in both normal as well as tumor-bearing animals after sulforaphane administration compared with untreated control tumor-bearing animals. An early antibody-dependent complement-mediated cytotoxicity (ACC) also was observed in sulforaphane-treated normal and tumor-bearing animals. Administration of sulforaphane significantly enhanced the production of Interleukin-2 and Interferon-gamma in normal as well as tumor-bearing animals. In addition, sulforaphane significantly enhanced the proliferation of splenocytes, bone marrow cells, and thymocytes by stimulating the mitogenic potential of various mitogens such as concanavalin A, phytohaemagglutinin, poke weed mitogen, and lipopolysaccharide.

  18. Chemopreventive efficacy of hesperidin against chemically induced nephrotoxicity and renal carcinogenesis via amelioration of oxidative stress and modulation of multiple molecular pathways.

    PubMed

    Siddiqi, Aisha; Hasan, Syed Kazim; Nafees, Sana; Rashid, Summya; Saidullah, Bano; Sultana, Sarwat

    2015-12-01

    In the present study, chemopreventive efficacy of hesperidin was evaluated against ferric nitrilotriacetate (Fe-NTA) induced renal oxidative stress and carcinogenesis in wistar rats. Nephrotoxicity was induced by single intraperitoneal injection of Fe-NTA (9 mg Fe/kg b.wt). Renal cancer was initiated by the administration of N-nitrosodiethylamine (DEN 200mg/kg b.wt ip) and promoted by Fe-NTA (9 mg Fe/kg b.wt ip) twice weekly for 16 weeks. Efficacy of hesperidin against Fe-NTA-induced nephrotoxicity was assessed in terms of biochemical estimation of antioxidant enzyme activities viz. reduced renal GSH, glutathione peroxidase, glutathione reductase, glutathione-S-transferase, catalase, superoxide dismutase and renal toxicity markers (BUN, Creatinine, KIM-1). Administration of Fe-NTA significantly depleted antioxidant renal armory, enhanced renal lipid peroxidation as well as the levels of BUN, creatinine and KIM-1. However, simultaneous pretreatment of hesperidin restored their levels in a dose dependent manner. Expression of apoptotic markers caspase-3, caspase-9, bax, bcl-2 and proliferative marker PCNA along with inflammatory markers (NFκB, iNOS, TNF-α) were also analysed to assess the chemopreventive potential of hesperidin in two-stage renal carcinogenesis model. Hesperidin was found to induce caspase-3, caspase-9, bax expression and downregulate bcl-2, NFκB, iNOS, TNF-α, PCNA expression. Histopathological findings further revealed hesperidin's chemopreventive efficacy by restoring the renal morphology. Our results provide a powerful evidence suggesting hesperidin to be a potent chemopreventive agent against renal carcinogenesis possibly by virtue of its antioxidant properties and by modulation of multiple molecular pathways.

  19. Sulforaphane is not an effective antagonist of the human pregnane X-receptor in vivo

    SciTech Connect

    Poulton, Emma Jane; Levy, Lisa; Lampe, Johanna W.; Shen, Danny D.; Tracy, Julia; Shuhart, Margaret C.; Thummel, Kenneth E.; Eaton, David L.

    2013-01-01

    Sulforaphane (SFN), is an effective in vitro antagonist of ligand activation of the human pregnane and xenobiotic receptor (PXR). PXR mediated CYP3A4 up-regulation is implicated in adverse drug-drug interactions making identification of small molecule antagonists a desirable therapeutic goal. SFN is not an antagonist to mouse or rat PXR in vitro; thus, normal rodent species are not suitable as in vivo models for human response. To evaluate whether SFN can effectively antagonize ligand activation of human PXR in vivo, a three-armed, randomized, crossover trial was conducted with 24 healthy adults. The potent PXR ligand — rifampicin (300 mg/d) was given alone for 7 days in arm 1, or in daily combination with 450 μmol SFN (Broccoli Sprout extract) in arm 2; SFN was given alone in arm 3. Midazolam as an in vivo phenotype marker of CYP3A was administered before and after each treatment arm. Rifampicin alone decreased midazolam AUC by 70%, indicative of the expected increase in CYP3A4 activity. Co-treatment with SFN did not reduce CYP3A4 induction. Treatment with SFN alone also did not affect CYP3A4 activity in the cohort as a whole, although in the subset with the highest basal CYP3A4 activity there was a statistically significant increase in midazolam AUC (i.e., decrease in CYP3A4 activity). A parallel study in humanized PXR mice yielded similar results. The parallel effects of SFN between humanized PXR mice and human subjects demonstrate the predictive value of humanized mouse models in situations where species differences in ligand-receptor interactions preclude the use of a native mouse model for studying human ligand-receptor pharmacology. -- Highlights: ► The effects of SFN on PXR mediated CYP3A4 induction in humanized PXR mice and humans were examined. ► SFN had no effect on rifampicin mediated CYP3A4 induction in humans or humanized mice. ► SFN had a modest effect on basal CYP3A4 activity among subjects with higher baseline activity. ► Humanized PXR

  20. Activation of Human Salivary Aldehyde Dehydrogenase by Sulforaphane: Mechanism and Significance

    PubMed Central

    Alam, Md. Fazle; Laskar, Amaj Ahmed; Maryam, Lubna

    2016-01-01

    Cruciferous vegetables contain the bio-active compound sulforaphane (SF) which has been reported to protect individuals against various diseases by a number of mechanisms, including activation of the phase II detoxification enzymes. In this study, we show that the extracts of five cruciferous vegetables that we commonly consume and SF activate human salivary aldehyde dehydrogenase (hsALDH), which is a very important detoxifying enzyme in the mouth. Maximum activation was observed at 1 μg/ml of cabbage extract with 2.6 fold increase in the activity. There was a ~1.9 fold increase in the activity of hsALDH at SF concentration of ≥ 100 nM. The concentration of SF at half the maximum response (EC50 value) was determined to be 52 ± 2 nM. There was an increase in the Vmax and a decrease in the Km of the enzyme in the presence of SF. Hence, SF interacts with the enzyme and increases its affinity for the substrate. UV absorbance, fluorescence and CD studies revealed that SF binds to hsALDH and does not disrupt its native structure. SF binds with the enzyme with a binding constant of 1.23 x 107 M-1. There is one binding site on hsALDH for SF, and the thermodynamic parameters indicate the formation of a spontaneous strong complex between the two. Molecular docking analysis depicted that SF fits into the active site of ALDH3A1, and facilitates the catalytic mechanism of the enzyme. SF being an antioxidant, is very likely to protect the catalytic Cys 243 residue from oxidation, which leads to the increase in the catalytic efficiency and hence the activation of the enzyme. Further, hsALDH which is virtually inactive towards acetaldehyde exhibited significant activity towards it in the presence of SF. It is therefore very likely that consumption of large quantities of cruciferous vegetables or SF supplements, through their activating effect on hsALDH can protect individuals who are alcohol intolerant against acetaldehyde toxicity and also lower the risk of oral cancer

  1. Sulforaphane protects liver injury induced by intestinal ischemia reperfusion through Nrf2-ARE pathway

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Hai-Dong; Zhang, Feng; Shen, Gang; Li, Yu-Bing; Li, Ying-Hua; Jing, Hui-Rong; Ma, Ling-Fei; Yao, Ji-Hong; Tian, Xiao-Feng

    2010-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the effect of sulforaphane (SFN) on regulation of NF-E2-related factor-2 (Nrf2)-antioxidant response element (ARE) pathway in liver injury induced by intestinal ischemia/reperfusion (I/R). METHODS: Rats were divided randomly into four experimental groups: control, SFN control, intestinal I/R and SFN pretreatment groups (n = 8 in each group). The intestinal I/R model was established by clamping the superior mesenteric artery for 1 h and 2 h reperfusion. In the SFN pretreatment group, surgery was performed as in the intestinal I/R group, with intraperitoneal administration of 3 mg/kg SFN 1 h before the operation. Intestine and liver histology was investigated. Serum levels of aspartate aminotransferase (AST), and alanine aminotransferase (ALT) were measured. Liver tissue superoxide dismutase (SOD), myeloperoxidase (MPO), glutathione (GSH) and glutathione peroxidase (GSH-Px) activity were assayed. The liver transcription factor Nrf2 and heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) were determined by immunohistochemical analysis and Western blotting analysis. RESULTS: Intestinal I/R induced intestinal and liver injury, characterized by histological changes as well as a significant increase in serum AST and ALT levels (AST: 260.13 ± 40.17 U/L vs 186.00 ± 24.21 U/L, P < 0.01; ALT: 139.63 ± 11.35 U/L vs 48.38 ± 10.73 U/L, P < 0.01), all of which were reduced by pretreatment with SFN, respectively (AST: 260.13 ± 40.17 U/L vs 216.63 ± 22.65 U/L, P < 0.05; ALT: 139.63 ± 11.35 U/L vs 97.63 ± 15.56 U/L, P < 0.01). The activity of SOD in the liver tissue decreased after intestinal I/R (P < 0.01), which was enhanced by SFN pretreatment (P < 0.05). In addition, compared with the control group, SFN markedly reduced liver tissue MPO activity (P < 0.05) and elevated liver tissue GSH and GSH-Px activity (P < 0.05, P < 0.05), which was in parallel with the increased level of liver Nrf2 and HO-1 expression. CONCLUSION: SFN pretreatment attenuates liver injury induced by

  2. Chemoprevention of colorectal cancer in individuals with previous colorectal neoplasia: systematic review and network meta-analysis

    PubMed Central

    Dulai, Parambir S; Marquez, Evelyn; Khera, Rohan; Prokop, Larry J; Limburg, Paul J; Gupta, Samir; Murad, Mohammad Hassan

    2016-01-01

    Objective To assess the comparative efficacy and safety of candidate agents (low and high dose aspirin, non-aspirin non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs), calcium, vitamin D, folic acid, alone or in combination) for prevention of advanced metachronous neoplasia (that is, occurring at different times after resection of initial neoplasia) in individuals with previous colorectal neoplasia, through a systematic review and network meta-analysis. Data sources Medline, Embase, Web of Science, from inception to 15 October 2015; clinical trial registries. Study selection Randomized controlled trials in adults with previous colorectal neoplasia, treated with candidate chemoprevention agents, and compared with placebo or another candidate agent. Primary efficacy outcome was risk of advanced metachronous neoplasia; safety outcome was serious adverse events. Data extraction Two investigators identified studies and abstracted data. A Bayesian network meta-analysis was performed and relative ranking of agents was assessed with surface under the cumulative ranking (SUCRA) probabilities (ranging from 1, indicating that the treatment has a high likelihood to be best, to 0, indicating the treatment has a high likelihood to be worst). Quality of evidence was appraised with GRADE criteria. Results 15 randomized controlled trials (12 234 patients) comparing 10 different strategies were included. Compared with placebo, non-aspirin NSAIDs were ranked best for preventing advanced metachronous neoplasia (odds ratio 0.37, 95% credible interval 0.24 to 0.53; SUCRA=0.98; high quality evidence), followed by low-dose aspirin (0.71, 0.41 to 1.23; SUCRA=0.67; low quality evidence). Low dose aspirin, however, was ranked the safest among chemoprevention agents (0.78, 0.43 to 1.38; SUCRA=0.84), whereas non-aspirin NSAIDs (1.23, 0.95 to 1.64; SUCRA=0.26) were ranked low for safety. High dose aspirin was comparable with low dose aspirin in efficacy (1.12, 0.59 to 2.10; SUCRA=0.58) but

  3. The potential of statins for individualized colorectal cancer chemoprevention.

    PubMed

    Jacobs, Rutger J; Kodach, Liudmila L; Hardwick, James C H

    2011-12-01

    Colorectal cancer is a leading cause of death by cancer in the western world. Despite major progress, even new chemotherapeutic regimens have had relatively little impact on long term survival in the approximately 50% of patients with advanced disease at presentation meaning that prevention is the only realistic way to reduce the burden of this disease. Many countries have implemented population-based screening methods to prevent colorectal cancer by the physical removal of its precursor lesion the adenoma, or to detect cancer at an earlier stage when it is amenable to surgical cure. However these programs have only been shown to reduce colorectal cancer deaths by 30% in those screened and therefore new or complimentary approaches are needed. One such approach is chemoprevention. A number of compounds have shown potential in reducing the incidence of colorectal cancer. Most widely known are NSAIDs but recently inhibitors of the 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl coenzyme A (HMG-CoA) reductase, also known as statins, commonly prescribed medications that lower serum cholesterol, have been shown to reduce colorectal cancer incidence. A critical issue in chemoprevention is the weighing of benefits against risks. In chemoprevention this balance is likely to be unfavourable when used in a wide unselected population even for the safest of compounds. Therapy should therefore be tailored to the individual patient. The balance will be more favourable in high risk groups such as individuals especially susceptible to neoplasia because of environmental risk factors, patients with inflammatory bowel disease, those with a hereditary predisposition and patients with a previous history of colorectal cancer or polyps. Furthermore colorectal cancer is not one disease but a heterogeneous group of diseases with different underlying molecular mechanisms. It is likely that both prevention and therapy will need to be tailored to the molecular subtype of the cancer in question. This may explain

  4. Cancer chemopreventive potential of aromathecins and phenazines, novel natural product derivatives.

    PubMed

    Marler, Laura; Conda-Sheridan, Martin; Cinelli, Maris A; Morrell, Andrew E; Cushman, Mark; Chen, Lian; Huang, Ke; Van Breemen, Richard; Pezzuto, John M

    2010-12-01

    In the search for agents with cancer chemopreventive potential, 14-chloromethyl-12H-5,11a-diazadibenzo[b,h]fluoren-11-one (compound 1), originally synthesized as a potential topoisomerase I inhibitor, and 2,4-dibromo-1-hydroxyphenazine (compound 2), an analog of a substance found in the marine bacteria Streptomyces CNS284, were found to significantly enhance NADP(H):quinone oxidoreductase 1 (QR1), glutathione S-transferase (GST), and glutathione (GSH) levels in cell culture. However, following a short-term absorption study, analyses of livers from the treatment groups did not reveal a significant increase in QR1 or GST activity, or GSH levels. This was consistent with RT-PCR analyses of tissue samples. The compounds were absorbed, as judged by LC/MS analyses of serum and tissue samples, although levels were well below the concentrations required to mediate in vitro responses. Metabolites of compound 2 formed in vitro by human liver microzones were characterized using high resolution tandem mass spectrometry. In sum, the in vivo activity of these compounds appears to be diminished by low bioavailability, but this experimental approach indicates the importance of systematic biomarker investigation.

  5. Part I: Synthesis, cancer chemopreventive activity and molecular docking study of novel quinoxaline derivatives.

    PubMed

    Galal, Shadia A; Abdelsamie, Ahmed S; Tokuda, Harukuni; Suzuki, Nobutaka; Lida, Akira; Elhefnawi, Mahmoud M; Ramadan, Raghda A; Atta, Mona H E; El Diwani, Hoda I

    2011-01-01

    The reaction of o-phenylene diamine and ethyl oxamate is reinvestigated and led to 3-aminoquinoxalin-2(1H)-one rather than benzimidazole-2-carboxamide as was previously reported. The structure of the obtained quinoxaline has been confirmed by X-ray. The anti-tumor activity of synthesized quinoxalines 1-21 has been evaluated by studying their possible inhibitory effects on Epstein-Barr virus early antigen (EBV-EA) activation induced by 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate (TPA). Among the studied compounds 1-21, compounds 12, 8, 13, 18, 17 and 19, respectively, demonstrated strong inhibitory effects on the EBV-EA activation without showing any cytotoxicity and their effects being stronger than that of a representative control, oleanolic acid. Furthermore, compound 12 exhibited a remarkable inhibitory effect on skin tumor promotion in an in vivo two-stage mouse skin carcinogenesis test using 7,12-dimethylbenz[a]anthracene (DMBA) as an initiator and TPA as a promoter. The result of the present investigation indicated that compound 12 might be valuable as a potent cancer chemopreventive agent. Moreover, the molecular docking into PTK (PDB: 1t46) has been done for lead optimization of the aforementioned compounds as potential PTK inhibitors.

  6. Chemopreventive action of Syzygium cumini on DMBA-induced skin papillomagenesis in mice.

    PubMed

    Parmar, Jyoti; Sharma, Priyanka; Verma, Preeti; Goyal, P K

    2010-01-01

    Syzygium cumini L. is widely used for the treatment of diabetes in various parts of India. The protective efficacy of S. cumini seed extract (SCE) against peroxidative damage contributing to skin carcinogenesis in Swiss albino mice was tested in the present study. A single topical application of 7,12-dimethyl benz(a)anthracene (100 microg/100 microl acetone), followed 2 weeks later by repeated application of croton oil (1% in acetone three times a week) and continued till the end of the experiment (i.e., 16 weeks) caused a 100% tumor incidence. In contrast, mice treated with the SCE (125 mg/ kg/ b.wt./ animal /day) in either the peri (i.e. 7 days before and 7 days after the application of DMBA) or post-initiation (i.e. from the day of start of croton oil treatment and continued till the end of the experiment) phases demonstrated significant reduction in cumulative numbers of papillomas and tumor incidence (75%). The average latency period in the SCE treated group was also significantly increased (Pre Group - 11.1 weeks; Post Group - 10.9 weeks) as compared with the carcinogen control group (7.9). Results from the present study indicate that the anticarcinogenic activity of SCE during DMBA-induced skin papillomagenesis is mediated through alteration of antioxidant status. Thus, SCE can be considered as a readily accessible, promising novel cancer chemopreventive agent.

  7. Cytochrome P450 1B1, a novel chemopreventive target for benzo[a]pyrene-initiated human esophageal cancer.

    PubMed

    Wen, Xia; Walle, Thomas

    2007-02-08

    Esophageal cancer is common worldwide, with poor prognosis. Smoking, including exposure to polyaromatic hydrocarbons like benzo[a]pyrene (BaP), is a major risk factor. In human esophageal HET-1A cells, we found that time-dependent BaP-DNA binding was associated with upregulation of CYP1B1, but not CYP1A1, mRNA and protein. The dietary flavonoid 5,7-dimethoxyflavone significantly inhibited BaP-DNA binding and down-regulated BaP-induced CYP1B1 mRNA and protein. 3',4'-Dimethoxyflavone was an even more potent inhibitor of CYP1B1 expression, while resveratrol had no effect. Thus, dietary methoxylated flavones inhibited BaP-induced CYP1B1 transcription in a cell-specific manner and hold promise as chemopreventive agents in esophageal carcinogenesis.

  8. Modulation of cisplatin sensitivity in human ovarian carcinoma A2780 and SKOV3 cell lines by sulforaphane.

    PubMed

    Hunakova, Luba; Gronesova, Paulina; Horvathova, Eva; Chalupa, Ivan; Cholujova, Dana; Duraj, Jozef; Sedlak, Jan

    2014-11-04

    Cisplatin resistance is one of the major obstacles in the treatment of ovarian cancer. In an effort to look for new possibilities of how to overcome this difficulty, we studied the mechanisms of the interactions between sulforaphane (SFN) and cisplatin (cisPt) in combined treatment of human ovarian carcinoma A2780 and SKOV3 cell lines. Synergy (A2780) and antagonism (SKOV3) found in MTT assay was confirmed by apoptosis. While SFN significantly potentiated cisPt-induced DNA damage in A2780 cells, it protected SKOV3 cells against cisPt-crosslinking. We revealed a less efficient Nrf-2 pathway inducibility by SFN in A2780 compared to SKOV3 cells, when activation of the Nrf-2 pathway incites its protectivity against cisPt. Thus, different activation of the Nrf-2 pathway may explain the dual effects of SFN.

  9. Sonic hedgehog signaling inhibition provides opportunities for targeted therapy by sulforaphane in regulating pancreatic cancer stem cell self-renewal.

    PubMed

    Rodova, Mariana; Fu, Junsheng; Watkins, Dara Nall; Srivastava, Rakesh K; Shankar, Sharmila

    2012-01-01

    Dysregulation of the sonic hedgehog (Shh) signaling pathway has been associated with cancer stem cells (CSC) and implicated in the initiation of pancreatic cancer. Pancreatic CSCs are rare tumor cells characterized by their ability to self-renew, and are responsible for tumor recurrence accompanied by resistance to current therapies. The lethality of these incurable, aggressive and invasive pancreatic tumors remains a daunting clinical challenge. Thus, the objective of this study was to investigate the role of Shh pathway in pancreatic cancer and to examine the molecular mechanisms by which sulforaphane (SFN), an active compound in cruciferous vegetables, inhibits self-renewal capacity of human pancreatic CSCs. Interestingly, we demonstrate here that Shh pathway is highly activated in pancreatic CSCs and plays important role in maintaining stemness by regulating the expression of stemness genes. Given the requirement for Hedgehog in pancreatic cancer, we investigated whether hedgehog blockade by SFN could target the stem cell population in pancreatic cancer. In an in vitro model, human pancreatic CSCs derived spheres were significantly inhibited on treatment with SFN, suggesting the clonogenic depletion of the CSCs. Interestingly, SFN inhibited the components of Shh pathway and Gli transcriptional activity. Interference of Shh-Gli signaling significantly blocked SFN-induced inhibitory effects demonstrating the requirement of an active pathway for the growth of pancreatic CSCs. SFN also inhibited downstream targets of Gli transcription by suppressing the expression of pluripotency maintaining factors (Nanog and Oct-4) as well as PDGFRα and Cyclin D1. Furthermore, SFN induced apoptosis by inhibition of BCL-2 and activation of caspases. Our data reveal the essential role of Shh-Gli signaling in controlling the characteristics of pancreatic CSCs. We propose that pancreatic cancer preventative effects of SFN may result from inhibition of the Shh pathway. Thus

  10. Chemopreventive activities of Trigonella foenum graecum (Fenugreek) against breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Amin, Amr; Alkaabi, Aysha; Al-Falasi, Shamaa; Daoud, Sayel A

    2005-08-01

    Cancer is the second leading cause of death worldwide. Conventional therapies cause serious side effects and, at best, merely extend the patient's lifespan by a few years. Cancer control may therefore benefit from the potential that resides in alternative therapies. There is thus an increasing demand to utilize alternative concepts or approaches to the prevention of cancer. In this report, we show a potential protective effect of Fenugreek seeds against 7,12-dimethylbenz(alpha)anthracene (DMBA)-induced breast cancer in rats. At 200 mg/kg b.wt., Fenugreek seeds' extract significantly inhibited the DMBA-induced mammary hyperplasia and decreased its incidence. Epidemiological studies also implicate apoptosis as a mechanism that might mediate the Fenugreek's anti-breast cancer protective effects. To our knowledge, this is the first study that suggests significant chemopreventive effects of Fenugreek seeds against breast cancer.

  11. Quantitative profiling of glucosinolates by LC-MS analysis reveals several cultivars of cabbage and kale as promising sources of sulforaphane.

    PubMed

    Sasaki, Katsunori; Neyazaki, Makiko; Shindo, Kazutoshi; Ogawa, Toshiya; Momose, Masaki

    2012-08-15

    Sulforaphane is an isothiocyanate well known for its potential health benefits. With the aim of finding sulforaphane supply sources, its precursor, glucoraphanin, was widely searched for among Brassica oleracea varieties. Quantitative profiling of seven glucosinolates by LC-MS analysis was performed on 6 cultivars of broccoli, 32 of cabbage and 24 cultivars of kale. The glucoraphanin levels found in three cultivars of cabbage and six cultivars of kale were comparable with, or even higher than, the highest of broccoli (119.4 mg/100g FW). The most promising group belonged to the black kale, Cavolo nero. Use of a C30 column and an ammonium formate buffer in LC-MS and a micro plate solid phase extraction technique was highly effective.

  12. Activation of multiple molecular mechanisms for apoptosis in human malignant glioblastoma T98G and U87MG cells treated with sulforaphane.

    PubMed

    Karmakar, S; Weinberg, M S; Banik, N L; Patel, S J; Ray, S K

    2006-09-01

    Glioblastoma is the most malignant and prevalent brain tumor that still remains incurable. Recent studies reported anti-cancer effect of the broccoli-derived compound sulforaphane. We explored the mechanisms of sulforaphane-mediated apoptosis in human glioblastoma T98G and U87MG cells. Wright staining and ApopTag assay confirmed apoptosis in glioblastoma cells treated with sulforaphane. Increase in intracellular free Ca2+ was detected by fura-2 assay, suggesting activation of Ca2+-dependent pathways for apoptosis. Western blotting was used to detect changes in expression of Bax and Bcl-2 proteins resulting in increased Bax:Bcl-2 ratio that indicated a commitment of glioblastoma cells to apoptosis. Upregulation of calpain, a Ca2+-dependent cysteine protease, activated caspase-12 that in turn caused activation of caspase-9. With the increased Bax:Bcl-2 ratio, cytochrome c was released from mitochondria to cytosol for sequential activation of caspase-9 and caspase-3. Increased calpain and caspase-3 activities generated 145 kD spectrin breakdown product and 120 kD spectrin breakdown product, respectively. Activation of caspase-3 also cleaved the inhibitor-of-caspase-activated-DNase. Accumulation of apoptosis-inducing-factor in cytosol suggested caspase-independent pathway of apoptosis as well. Two of the inhibitor-of-apoptosis proteins were downregulated because of an increase in 'second mitochondrial activator of caspases/Direct inhibitor-of-apoptosis protein binding protein with low pI.' Decrease in nuclear factor kappa B and increase in inhibitor of nuclear factor kappa B alpha expression favored the process of apoptosis. Collectively, our results indicated activation of multiple molecular mechanisms for apoptosis in glioblastoma cells following treatment with sulforaphane.

  13. Chemopreventive effect of raw and cooked lentils (Lens culinaris L) and soybeans (Glycine max) against azoxymethane-induced aberrant crypt foci.

    PubMed

    Faris, Mo'ez Al-Islam E; Takruri, Hamed R; Shomaf, Maha S; Bustanji, Yasser K

    2009-05-01

    Although lentils (Lens culinaris L) contain several bioactive compounds that have been linked to the prevention of cancer, the in vivo chemopreventive ability of lentils against chemically induced colorectal cancer has not been examined. Our present study examined the hypothesis that lentils could suppress the early carcinogenesis in vivo by virtue of their bioactive micro- and macroconstituents and that culinary thermal treatment could affect their chemopreventive potential. To accomplish this goal, we used raw whole lentils (RWL), raw split lentils (RSL), cooked whole lentils (CWL), and cooked split lentils (CSL). Raw soybeans (RSB; Glycine max) were used for the purpose of comparison with a well-studied chemopreventive agent. Sixty weanling Fischer 344 male rats, 4 to 5 weeks of age, were randomly assigned to 6 groups (10 rats/group): the control group (C) received AIN-93G diet, and treatment leguminous groups of RWL, CWL, RSL, CSL, and RSB received the treatment diets containing AIN-93G+5% of the above-mentioned legumes. After acclimatization for 1 week (at 5th to 6th week of age), all animals were put on the control and treatment diets separately for 5 weeks (from 6th to 11th week of age). At the end of the 5th week of feeding (end of 11th week of age), all rats received 2 subcutaneous injections of azoxymethane carcinogen at 15 mg/kg rat body weight per dose once a week for 2 consecutive weeks. After 17 weeks of the last azoxymethane injection (from 12th to 29th week of age), all rats were euthanized. Chemopreventive ability was assessed using colonic aberrant crypt foci and activity of hepatic glutathione-S-transferases. Significant reductions (P < .05) were found in total aberrant crypt foci number (mean +/- SEM) for RSB (27.33 +/- 4.32), CWL (33.44 +/- 4.56), and RSL (37.00 +/- 6.02) in comparison with the C group (58.33 +/- 8.46). Hepatic glutathione-S-transferases activities increased significantly (P < .05) in rats fed all treatment diets (from 51

  14. Sulforaphane-rich broccoli sprout extract improves hepatic abnormalities in male subjects

    PubMed Central

    Kikuchi, Masahiro; Ushida, Yusuke; Shiozawa, Hirokazu; Umeda, Rumiko; Tsuruya, Kota; Aoki, Yudai; Suganuma, Hiroyuki; Nishizaki, Yasuhiro

    2015-01-01

    AIM: To evaluate effects of dietary supplementation of sulforaphane (SF)-rich broccoli sprout (BS) extract on hepatic abnormalities in Japanese male participants. METHODS: In a randomized, placebo-controlled, double blind trial, male participants with fatty liver received either BS capsules containing glucoraphanin [GR; a precursor of SF (n = 24)] or placebo (n = 28) for 2 mo. Liver function markers, serum levels of aspartate and alanine aminotransferases (AST and ALT, respectively) and γ-glutamyl transpeptidase (γ-GTP) and an oxidative stress marker, urinary levels of 8-hydroxydeoxyguanosine (8-OHdG), were measured and compared in participants before and after the trial period. In an animal model, chronic liver failure was induced in Sprague-Dawley rats by successive intraperitoneal injection with N-nitrosodimethylamine (NDMA) for 4 wk. Concomitantly, rats received AIN-76 diets supplemented with or without BS extract. Thereafter, rats were sacrificed, and their sera and livers were collected to measure serum liver function markers and hepatic levels of thiobarbituric acid reactive substances (TBARS) levels and hepatic glutathione S-transferase (GST) activity, a prototypical phase 2 antioxidant enzyme. RESULTS: Dietary supplementation with BS extract containing SF precursor GR for 2 mo significantly decreased serum levels of liver function markers, ALT [median (interquartile range), before: 54.0 (34.5-79.0) vs after supplementation: 48.5 (33.3-65.3) IU/L, P < 0.05] and γ-GTP [before: 51.5 (40.8-91.3) vs after: 50.0 (37.8-85.3) IU/L, P < 0.05], as well as the alkali phosphatase activity. Placebo showed no significant effects on the markers. The urinary level of 8-OHdG, an established oxidative stress marker, was significantly reduced in participants who had received BS capsules but not the placebo [before: 6.66 (5.51-9.03) vs after: 5.49 (4.89-6.66) ng/mg-creatinine, P < 0.05]. The reduction of urinary 8-OHdG was significantly correlated with decreased levels of

  15. Is it time to advance the chemoprevention of environmental carcinogenesis with microdosing trials?

    PubMed

    Kensler, Thomas W; Groopman, John D

    2009-12-01

    This perspective on Jubert et al. (beginning on page [1015] in this issue of the journal) discusses the use of microdosing with environmental carcinogens to accelerate the evaluation and optimization of chemopreventive interventions. The need for chemoprevention of environmental carcinogenesis is considered, as are the structure of microdosing, or phase 0, trials, technologies required to conduct microdose studies in this context, and ethical concerns. We also reflect on what microdosing studies have taught us to date.

  16. NOSH-aspirin (NBS-1120), a novel nitric oxide- and hydrogen sulfide-releasing hybrid has enhanced chemo-preventive properties compared to aspirin, is gastrointestinal safe with all the classic therapeutic indications.

    PubMed

    Kodela, Ravinder; Chattopadhyay, Mitali; Velázquez-Martínez, Carlos A; Kashfi, Khosrow

    2015-12-15

    Aspirin is chemopreventive; however, side effects preclude its long-term use. NOSH-aspirin (NBS-1120), a novel hybrid that releases nitric oxide and hydrogen sulfide, was designed to be a safer alternative. Here we compare the gastrointestinal safety, anti-inflammatory, analgesic, anti-pyretic, anti-platelet, and chemopreventive properties of aspirin and NBS-1120 administered orally to rats at equimolar doses. Gastrointestinal safety: 6h post-administration, the number and size of hemorrhagic lesions in stomachs were counted; tissue samples were frozen for PGE2, SOD, and MDA determination. Anti-inflammatory: 1h after drug administration, the volume of carrageenan-induced rat paw edemas was measured for 5h. Anti-pyretic: fever was induced by LPS (ip) an hour before administration of the test drugs, core body temperature was measured hourly for 5h. Analgesic: time-dependent analgesic effects were evaluated by carrageenan-induced hyperalgesia. Antiplatelet: anti-aggregatory effects were studied on collagen-induced platelet aggregation of human platelet-rich plasma. Chemoprevention: nude mice were gavaged daily for 25 days with vehicle, aspirin or NBS-1120. After one week, each mouse was inoculated subcutaneously in the right flank with HT-29 human colon cancer cells. Both agents reduced PGE2 levels in stomach tissue; however, NBS-1120 did not cause any stomach ulcers, whereas aspirin caused significant bleeding. Lipid peroxidation induced by aspirin was higher than that exerted by NBS-1120. SOD activity was significantly inhibited by aspirin but increased by NBS-1120. Both agents showed similar anti-inflammatory, analgesic, anti-pyretic, and anti-platelet activities. Aspirin increased plasma TNFα more than NBS-1120-treated animals. NBS-1120 was better than aspirin as a chemopreventive agent; it dose-dependently inhibited tumor growth and tumor mass.

  17. Less is more for cancer chemoprevention: evidence of a non-linear dose response for the protective effects of resveratrol in humans and mice

    PubMed Central

    Scott, Edwina; Cai, Hong; Kholghi, Abeer; Andreadi, Catherine; Rufini, Alessandro; Karmokar, Ankur; Britton, Robert G.; Horner-Glister, Emma; Greaves, Peter; Jawad, Dhafer; James, Mark; Howells, Lynne; Ognibene, Ted; Malfatti, Mike; Goldring, Christopher; Kitteringham, Neil; Walsh, Joanne; Viskaduraki, Maria; West, Kevin; Miller, Andrew; Hemingway, David; Steward, William P.; Gescher, Andreas J.

    2016-01-01

    Resveratrol is widely promoted as a potential cancer chemopreventive agent, but a lack of information on the optimal dose prohibits rationally designed trials assessing efficacy. To challenge the assumption that ‘more is better’ we compared the pharmacokinetics and activity of a dietary dose with an intake 200-times higher. The dose response relationship and metabolite profile of [14C]-resveratrol in colorectal tissue of patients helped define clinically achievable concentrations. In ApcMin mice receiving a high-fat diet the low dose supressed intestinal adenoma development more potently than the higher dose. Efficacy correlated with increased AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) activation and the senescence marker p21. Non-linear dose responses were observed for AMPK and mTOR signalling in adenoma cells, culminating in autophagy and senescence. In human tissues low dietary exposures caused enhanced AMPK phosphorylation, autophagy and expression of the cytoprotective enzyme NQO1. These findings warrant revision of developmental strategies for diet-derived agents for cancer chemoprevention. PMID:26223300

  18. Piroxicam and other cyclooxygenase inhibitors: potential for cancer chemoprevention.

    PubMed

    Earnest, D L; Hixson, L J; Alberts, D S

    1992-01-01

    Piroxicam is a nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID) widely used for treatment of inflammatory arthritis. Recent experimental and clinical studies suggest that piroxicam, as well as other NSAIDs, may be useful for chemoprevention of colon cancer. While there is less information regarding NSAIDs for chemoprevention of urinary bladder malignancy, there are compelling data which suggest that this should be evaluated. A major effect of NSAIDs is inhibition of cyclooxygenase, the rate-limiting enzyme for conversion of arachidonic acid to important signal molecules, including prostaglandins, which profoundly affect cellular functions in many tissues. The initial enzyme reaction leading to formation of prostaglandin H can be accompanied by cooxidation of xenobiotics resulting in extrahepatic and local tissue production of reactive products which are carcinogenic. The end product prostaglandins, especially prostaglandin E2 (PGE2), are biological modifiers which can significantly affect cell proliferation and tumor growth. High levels of PGE2 stimulate growth of certain tumor cell lines while inhibition of prostaglandin synthesis with indomethacin or piroxicam can cause suppression. The mechanisms for this effect are unclear. Studies in cultured cells exposed to indomethacin show inhibition of G1-to-S phase progression of the cell cycle and a reduction in overall DNA synthesis. It is unclear whether this effect on cell growth results from some direct action of the NSAID or a reduction in prostaglandins or indirectly from modulation of important control signals, such as calcium flux. In addition to cyclooxygenase, NSAIDs can inhibit activity of other enzymes, including phosphodiesterases and cyclic GMP-AMP protein kinases, which may be central to cancer initiation and promotion. NSAIDs can also interfere with transmembrane ion fluxes and with cell-to-cell binding. Prostaglandins can modulate a variety of immunological responses and thereby play an important role in

  19. Chemical and biological characterisation of Machaerium hirtum (Vell.) Stellfeld: absence of cytotoxicity and mutagenicity and possible chemopreventive potential.

    PubMed

    Ribeiro, Diego Luis; Cilião, Heloísa Lizotti; Specian, Ana Flávia Leal; Serpeloni, Juliana Mara; de Souza, Marilesia Ferreira; Tangerina, Marcelo Marucci Pereira; Vilegas, Wagner; Boldrin, Paula Karina; Resende, Flávia Aparecida; Varanda, Eliana Aparecida; Martínez-López, Wilner; Sannomiya, Miriam; Cólus, Ilce Mara Syllos

    2016-03-01

    , this extract should be investigated further as a chemopreventive agent.

  20. Increased chemopreventive effect by combining arctigenin, green tea polyphenol and curcumin in prostate and breast cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Wang, Piwen; Wang, Bin; Chung, Seyung; Wu, Yanyuan; Henning, Susanne M; Vadgama, Jaydutt V

    2014-08-05

    The low bioavailability of most flavonoids limits their application as anti-carcinogenic agents in humans. A novel approach of treatment with a mixture of bioactive compounds that share molecular anti-carcinogenic targets may enhance the effect on these targets at low concentrations of individual compound, thereby overcoming the limitations of reduced bioavailability. We therefore investigated whether a combination of three natural products arctigenin (Arc), a novel anti-inflammatory lignan from the seeds of Arctium lappa, green tea polyphenol (-)-epigallocatechin gallate (EGCG) and curcumin (Cur) increases the chemopreventive potency of individual compounds. LNCaP prostate cancer and MCF-7 breast cancer cells were treated with 2-4 mg/L (about 5-10μM) Cur, 1μM Arc and 40μM EGCG alone or in combination for 48h. In both cell lines treatment with the mixture of Cur, Arc and EGCG synergistically increased the antiproliferative effect. In LNCaP cells both Arc and EGCG increased the pro-apoptotic effect of Cur. Whereas in MCF-7 cells Arc increased the cell apoptosis of Cur while EGCG enhanced cell cycle arrest of Cur at G0/G1 phase. The strongest effects on cell cycle arrest and apoptosis were achieved by combining all three compounds in both cell lines. The combination treatment significantly increased the ratio of Bax to Bcl-2 proteins, decreased the activation of NFκB, PI3K/Akt and Stat3 pathways and cell migration compared to individual treatment. These results warrant in vivo studies to confirm the efficacy of this novel regimen by combining Arc and EGCG with Cur to enhance chemoprevention in both prostate and breast cancer.

  1. Identification of an unintended consequence of Nrf2-directed cytoprotection against a key tobacco carcinogen plus a counteracting chemopreventive intervention.

    PubMed

    Paonessa, Joseph D; Ding, Yi; Randall, Kristen L; Munday, Rex; Argoti, Dayana; Vouros, Paul; Zhang, Yuesheng

    2011-06-01

    NF-E2-related factor 2 (Nrf2) is a major cytoprotective gene and is a key chemopreventive target against cancer and other diseases. Here we show that Nrf2 faces a dilemma in defense against 4-aminobiphenyl (ABP), a major human bladder carcinogen from tobacco smoke and other environmental sources. Although Nrf2 protected mouse liver against ABP (which is metabolically activated in liver), the bladder level of N-(deoxyguanosin-8-yl)-4-aminobiphenyl (dG-C8-ABP), the predominant ABP-DNA adduct formed in bladder cells and tissues, was markedly higher in Nrf2(+/+) mice than in Nrf2(-/-) mice after ABP exposure. Notably, Nrf2 protected bladder cells against ABP in vitro. Mechanistic investigations showed that the dichotomous effects of Nrf2 could be explained at least partly by upregulation of UDP-glucuronosyltransferase (UGT). Nrf2 promoted conjugation of ABP with glucuronic acid in the liver, increasing urinary excretion of the conjugate. Although glucuronidation of ABP and its metabolites is a detoxification process, these conjugates, which are excreted in urine, are known to be unstable in acidic urine, leading to delivery of the parent compounds to bladder. Hence, although higher liver UGT activity may protect the liver against ABP, it increases bladder exposure to ABP. These findings raise concerns of potential bladder toxicity when Nrf2-activating chemopreventive agents are used in humans exposed to ABP, especially in smokers. We further show that 5,6-dihydrocyclopenta[c][1,2]-dithiole-3(4H)-thione (CPDT) significantly inhibits dG-C8-ABP formation in bladder cells and tissues but does not seem to significantly modulate ABP-catalyzing UGT in liver. Thus, CPDT exemplifies a counteracting solution to the dilemma posed by Nrf2.

  2. Evaluation of the chemopreventive response of naringenin-loaded nanoparticles in experimental oral carcinogenesis using laser-induced autofluorescence spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sulfikkarali, N. K.; Krishnakumar, N.

    2013-04-01

    The aim of the present study is to investigate the chemopreventive effects of prepared naringenin-loaded nanoparticles (NARNPs) relative to the efficacy of free naringenin (NAR) in modifying the carcinogenic process and to study the changes in the endogenous fluorophores during DMBA-induced hamster buccal pouch (HBP) carcinogenesis by laser-induced autofluorescence (LIAF) spectroscopy. LIAF emission spectra from the hamster buccal mucosa of the control and experimental groups of animals were recorded in the 350-700 nm spectral range on a miniature fiber optic spectrometer from different anatomical sites of each group, with excitation at 404 nm from a diode laser. Oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC) was developed in the buccal pouch of golden Syrian hamsters by painting with 0.5% DMBA in liquid paraffin three times a week for 14 weeks. DMBA-painted animals revealed morphological changes, hyperplasia, dysplasia and well-differentiated squamous cell carcinoma. LIAF emission spectra showed significant difference between the control and tumor tissues. The tumor tissues are characterized by an increase in the emission of porphyrins and a decrease in the emission of nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide hydrogenase (NADH) and flavin adenine nucleotide (FAD) when compared to the control tissues. Furthermore, oral administration of NAR and its nanoparticulates restored the status of endogenous fluorophores in the buccal mucosa of DMBA-painted animals. On a comparative basis, the treatment of nanoparticulate naringenin was found to be more effective than free naringenin in completely preventing the formation of squamous cell carcinoma and in improving the status of endogenous porphyrins to a normal range in DMBA-induced hamster buccal pouch carcinogenesis. The result of the present study further suggests that LIAF spectroscopy may be a very valuable tool for rapid and sensitive detection of endogenous fluorophore changes in response to chemopreventive agents.

  3. Challenges and Potential Solutions to Meeting Accrual Goals in a Phase II Chemoprevention Trial for Prostate Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Nagi; Crocker, Theresa; Smith, Tiffany; Pow-Sang, Julio; Spiess, Philippe E.; Egan, Kathleen; Quinn, Gwen; Schell, Michael; Sebti, Said; Kazi, Aslam; Chuang, Tian; Salup, Raoul; Helal, Mohamed; Zagaja, Gregory; Trabulsi, Edouard; McLarty, Jerry; Fazili, Tajammul; Williams, Christopher R.; Schreiber, Fred; Slaton, Joel; Anderson, J Kyle

    2011-01-01

    Objective The goal of this report is to describe the on going strategies, successes, challenges and solutions for recruitment in this multi-center, phase II chemoprevention trial targeting men at high risk for prostate cancer. Methods We developed and implemented a multi-center clinical trial in institutions with supportive infrastructure, lead by a recruitment team of experienced and committed physicians and clinical trial staff, implementing multi-media and community outreach strategies to meet recruitment goals. Screening logs were reviewed to identify trends as well as patient, protocol and infrastructure -related barriers impacting accrual and revisions to protocol implemented. Results Between January 2008 and February 2011 a total of 3547 individuals were prescreened with 94% (n=3092) determined to be ineligible based on diagnosis of cancer or benign biopsy results. Of these, 216 were considered eligible for further screening with 52% (n=113) declining to participate due to patient related factors and 14% (n=29) eliminated due to protocol-related criteria for exclusion. Ninety four (94) subjects consented to participate with 34% of these subjects (n=74) meeting all eligibility criteria to be randomized to receive study agent or placebo. Across all sites, 99% of the recruitment of subjects in this clinical trial is via physician recruitment and referral with less than 1% responding to other recruitment strategies. Conclusion A contemporary approach to subject recruitment and frequent evaluation is needed to assure responsiveness to emerging challenges to accrual and the evolving scientific literature. A focus on investing on improving systems for physician recruitment may be key to meeting recruitment target in chemoprevention trials. PMID:22101219

  4. Distal bowel selectivity in the chemoprevention of experimental colon carcinogenesis by the non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug nabumetone.

    PubMed

    Roy, H K; Karolski, W J; Ratashak, A

    2001-05-15

    Use of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) for chemoprevention of colon cancer has been hindered by their potential gastro-intestinal toxicity. Nabumetone, which is approximately 10 to 36 times safer than conventional NSAIDs, was evaluated in 2 models of experimental colon carcinogenesis. In azoxymethane (AOM)-treated Fisher 344 rats, nabumetone caused dose-dependent inhibition of aberrant crypt foci (ACF), with 750 and 1,500 ppm resulting in 15% and 37% reductions, respectively (p < 0.05). Moreover, complex ACF were reduced by 48% in the latter group. MIN mice studies confirmed the chemopreventive efficacy of nabumetone, with 900 ppm suppressing approximately half of the intestinal tumors. Interestingly, inhibition of intermediate biomarkers in both models was markedly greater in the distal than the proximal bowel. To mechanistically evaluate this regional selectivity, we assessed cyclo-oxygenase-2 (COX-2) expression in the uninvolved mucosa and demonstrated a 3- to 4-fold excess in the distal relative to the proximal bowel in both MIN mice and AOM-treated rats. We then investigated another putative NSAID target, peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-delta (PPAR-delta) and demonstrated up-regulation during AOM-induced colonic tumorigenesis. Furthermore, in pre-neoplastic mucosa, there was a 3-fold excess of PPAR-delta in the distal colon. We demonstrate that nabumetone is an effective protective agent in both experimental models of colon carcinogenesis. The striking distal predilection of nabumetone may be, at least partially, explained by distal bowel over-expression of COX-2 and PPAR-delta.

  5. Chemopreventive and anti-leukemic effects of ethanol extracts of Moringa oleifera leaves on wistar rats bearing benzene induced leukemia.

    PubMed

    Akanni, E O; Adedeji, A L; Adedosu, O T; Olaniran, O I; Oloke, J K

    2014-01-01

    Pharmacological exploitation of natural compounds has continued to lead to development of non-synthetic and non-toxic anticancer agents that are promising at ameliorating the menace of neoplastic diseases such as leukemia. This study is an attempt to determine the chemopreventive and antileukemic activities of ethanol extracts of Moringa oleifera leaves on benzene induced leukemia bearing rats. Leukemia was induced by intravenous injection of 0.2 mL benzene solution 48 hourly for 4 weeks in appropriate rat groups. Ethanol extract of Moringa oleifera (EMO) leaves was administered at 0.2 mL of 100 mg/mL to respective treatment rat groups. A standard antileukemic drug (cyclophosphamide) was also used to treat appropriate rat groups. Clinical examination of liver and spleen with hematological parameters were employed to assess the leukemia burden following analysis of the rat blood samples on Sysmex KX-21N automated instrument. Leukemia induction reflected in severe anemia and a marked leukocytosis over the control/baseline group. Liver and spleen enlargements were also observed in group exposed to benzene carcinogen. The in vivo antioxidative potential of EMO was evaluated using Malondialdehyde (MDA) and reduced glutathione (GSH) levels. The liver MDA and GSH levels obtained in benzene induced leukemic rats treated with EMO compared favorably with those obtained in similar treatments with the standard drug (p< 0.05). The extract demonstrated chemopreventive and anti-leukemic activities as much as the standard anti-leukemic drug (p>0.05) by ameliorating the induced leukemic condition in the affected rat groups owing to its bioactive constituents. This study reveals that the extract might be an active, natural and non-toxic anticancer drug lead.

  6. Enhanced oral bioavailability of the hydrophobic chemopreventive agent (SR13668) in beagle dogs.

    PubMed

    Banerjee, Aryamitra A; Shen, Hao; Hautman, Mathew; Anwer, Jaseem; Hong, Seungpyo; Kapetanovic, Izet M; Liu, Ying; Lyubimov, Alexander V

    2013-01-01

    Potency and activity of SR13668 in cancer prevention have been proven in several in vitro and in vivo cancer models. However, the compound is highly hydrophobic and its limited oral bioavailability has hindered its clinical translation. In this study, we encapsulated SR13668 into polymeric nanoparticles to increase compound aqueous solubility and therefore bioavailability. Poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) (PLGA) nanoparticles (100-200 nm) encapsulating SR13668 with narrow size distribution and high drug loading were generated by a continuous and scalable process of flash nanoprecipitation integrated with spray dry. A single gavage dose of SR13668-PLGA nanoparticles at 2.8 mg/kg was administered in eight beagle dogs. Drug levels in animal whole blood and plasma were measured over 24 hours. Enhanced bioavailability of SR13668 using nanoparticles compared with formulations of Labrasol® and neat drug in 0.5% methylcellulose is reported. This is the first attempt to study pharmacokinetics of SR13668 in large animals with orally administrated nanoparticle suspension.

  7. 1-Alpha Hydroxyvitamin D(5) as a Chemotherapeutic and Possibly Chemopreventive Agent

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-03-01

    any underlying conditions that would contraindicate therapy with study treatment (or allergies to D5 used in this study). 6.2.5 Patients with prior...D2. Arch Biochem Biophys. 197:119-25. [10] Norman AW. (1998) Sunlight, season , skin pigmentation, vitamin D, and 25-hydroxyvitamin D: integral...cases of breast, colon, and prostate cancer diagnosed in the summer and fall—the seasons when serum levels of vitamin Dj are expected to be the highest

  8. Diallyl trisulfide, a chemopreventive agent from Allium vegetables, inhibits alpha-secretases in breast cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Kiesel, Violet A; Stan, Silvia D

    2017-03-18

    Breast cancer affects one in eight women throughout the course of their lifetime creating a demand for novel prevention strategies against this disease. The Notch signaling pathway is often aberrantly activated in human malignancies including breast cancer. Alpha secretases, including ADAM (A Disintegrin and Metalloprotease) -10 and -17, are proteases that play a key role in the cleavage of cell surface molecules and subsequent ligand-mediated activation of Notch signaling pathway. High expression levels of ADAM10 and 17 have been clinically associated with a lower disease-free survival in breast cancer patients. This study was undertaken to determine the effect of diallyl trisulfide (DATS), a bioactive organosulfide found in garlic and other Allium vegetables, on alpha secretases in breast cancer cells. Here we report for the first time that DATS inhibits the expression of ADAM10 and ADAM17 in estrogen-independent MDA-MB-231 and estrogen-dependent MCF-7 breast cancer cells, and in Harvey-ras (H-Ras) transformed MCF10A-H-Ras breast epithelial cells. We also show that DATS induces a dose-dependent reduction in colony formation ability of MDA-MB-231 and MCF-7 cells, suggesting a long-term effect of DATS on growth inhibition of breast cancer cells. Furthermore, we show that DATS inhibits the Notch ligands Jagged-1 and Jagged-2 involved in activation of Notch signaling pathway. Collectively, these findings show that DATS targets Notch pathway components overexpressed in breast cancer tumors and may serve as a functionally relevant bioactive for breast cancer prevention.

  9. In Vivo Testing of Chemopreventive Agents Using the Dog Model of Spontaneous Prostate Carcinogenesis

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2003-03-01

    or high-selenium yeast given prior (12) Waters DJ, Sakr WA, Hayden DW, Lang cancer and that were of a comparable CM, McKinney L, Murphy GP , et al...cancer. * Home Defibrillator ADHD Child? Researchers say the results show that selenium may help protect cells within the aging prostate from initial DNA...References: 1. Waters DJ, Sakr WA, Hayden DW, Lang CM, McKinney L, Murphy GP , Radinsky R, Ramoner R, Richardson RC, Tindall DJ. Workgroup 4

  10. 1 ALPHA-Hydroxyvitamin D5 as a Chemotherapeutic and Possibly Chemopreventive Agent

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2004-09-01

    size 0; Apothecary Products, Inc.) 4. Preparation of 10 jig dosage: a. Weigh 3 gm of cornstarch, NF b. Using a syringe, measure 0.5 mL D5 solution...cornstarch d. Weigh 150 mg of D5/cornstarch mixture to fill each of 52 capsules (size 0; Apothecary Products, Inc.) 5. Preparation of 15 jig dosage: a...capsules (size 0; Apothecary Products, Inc.) lchydroxyvitamin D5 Phase 1/11 Trial Protocol (Version #10 (06/30/04) - Page 32 of 33 6. Preparation of 20

  11. In Vivo Testing of Chemopreventive Agents Using the Dog Model of Spontaneous Prostate Carcinogenesis

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-03-01

    Toenail weight, laboratory batch Comstock et al. [35] , / / / Yoshizawa et al. [23] V / V / Body mass index, residence; intake of lycopene ...Erozan, M.S. Tockman, P.R. Taylor, Serum tocopherols. lycopene , alpha-tocopherol, beta-carotcne, retinol, and selenium and lung cancer risk among tin...prospective follow-up of nine years, Cancer 60 (1987) 145- of retinol, beta-carotene, lycopene , alpha-tocopherol. and 148. selenium, Cancer Epidemiol

  12. South African Herbal Extracts as Potential Chemopreventive Agents: Screening for Anticancer Splicing Activity.

    PubMed

    Dlamini, Zodwa; Mbita, Zukile; Bates, David O; Bates, David

    2016-01-01

    RT-PCR is an invaluable tool for the detection and characterization of mRNA. Cancer cell lines are treated with crude plant extracts and RNA is extracted and purified with DNase prior to RT-PCR. RT-PCR first-strand cDNA synthesis is done using random primers and can be refrigerated at 4 °C. PCR from the stored cDNA is performed using transcript-specific primers and electrophoresed on a molecular grade agarose gel to separate the splice variants.

  13. Expression of Metabolic and Apoptotic Genes During Treatment With Chemopreventive Agents for Breast Cancer

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-07-01

    per week, up to 58 times, with: (1) Vehicle I of TAM (Veh I, 10% ethanol in olive oil at 0.1 ml/rat, s.c.) + Vehicle II of 13C (Veh II, 20% ethanol in... olive oil at 2.5 ml/kg bw, i.g.), (2) TAM (10 jtg per rat in 50 gl Veh I, s.c.) + Veh II, (3) Veh I + 13C (250 mg/kg in Veh II, i.g.) and (4) TAM...were treated with either DIM (8.4 or 42 mg/kg b.wt.) or vehicle (20% ethanol in olive oil ) by oral gavage and either PB (75 mg/kg b.wt.) or saline by

  14. The chemopreventive activity of the histone deacetylase inhibitor tributyrin in colon carcinogenesis involves the induction of apoptosis and reduction of DNA damage

    SciTech Connect

    Heidor, Renato; Furtado, Kelly Silva; Ortega, Juliana Festa; Oliveira, Tiago Franco de; Tavares, Paulo Eduardo Latorre Martins; Vieira, Alessandra; Miranda, Mayara Lilian Paulino; Purgatto, Eduardo; Moreno, Fernando Salvador

    2014-04-15

    The chemopreventive activity of the histone deacetylase inhibitor (HDACi) tributyrin (TB), a prodrug of butyric acid (BA), was evaluated in a rat model of colon carcinogenesis. The animals were treated with TB (TB group: 200 mg/100 g of body weight, b.w.) or maltodextrin (MD isocaloric control group: 300 mg/100 g b.w.) daily for 9 consecutive weeks. In the 3rd and 4th weeks of treatment, the rats in the TB and MD groups were given DMH (40 mg/kg b.w.) twice a week. After 9 weeks, the animals were euthanized, and the distal colon was examined. Compared with the control group (MD group), TB treatment reduced the total number of aberrant crypt foci (ACF; p < 0.05) as well as the ACF with ≥ 4 crypts (p < 0.05), which are considered more aggressive, but not inhibited the formation of DMH-induced O6-methyldeoxyguanosine DNA adducts. The TB group also showed a higher apoptotic index (p < 0.05) and reduced DNA damage (p < 0.05) compared with MD group. TB acted as a HDACi, as rats treated with the prodrug of BA had higher levels of histone H3K9 acetylation compared with the MD group (p < 0.05). TB administration resulted in increased colonic tissue concentrations of BA (p < 0.05) compared with the control animals. These results suggest that TB can be considered a promising chemopreventive agent for colon carcinogenesis because it reduced the number of ACF, including those that were more aggressive. Induction of apoptosis and reduction of DNA damage are cellular mechanisms that appear to be involved in the chemopreventive activity of TB. - Highlights: • Tributyrin is a chemopreventive agent for rat colon aberrant crypt foci. • Tributyrin increased apoptosis in an experimental rat colon carcinogenesis model. • Tributyrin treatment in a rat colon carcinogenesis model decreased DNA damage. • Tributyrin treatment induced H3K9 acetylation in a rat colon carcinogenesis model.

  15. In vitro and In vivo Studies on Stilbene Analogs as Potential Treatment Agents for Colon Cancer

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Based upon the potential of resveratrol as a cancer chemopreventive agent, 27 stilbenes analogs were synthesized and tested against colon cancer cell line HT-29. Among these compounds, amino derivative (Z)-4-(3,5-dimethoxystyryl) aniline (4), (Z)-methyl 4-(3,5-dimethoxystyryl) benzoate (6) and (Z)-1...

  16. Cancer chemoprevention with green tea catechins: from bench to bed.

    PubMed

    Shirakami, Yohei; Shimizu, Masahito; Moriwaki, Hisataka

    2012-12-01

    Many epidemiological studies and a large number of experimental studies using a variety of animal models have observed that consumption or administration of green tea appears to exert cancer chemopreventive activity. Based on the results of numerous laboratory cell culture investigations, several mechanisms have been hypothesized to underlie the anti-cancer activity of green tea catechins, especially that of (-)-epigallocatechin-3-gallate (EGCG), the most abundant and active constituent in green tea. These mechanisms include promotion of anti-oxidant activity, inhibition of NF-κB and AP-1, regulation of the cell cycle, inhibition of receptor tyrosine kinase pathways, control of epigenetic modifications, and modulation of the immune system. Several recent interventional studies examining the anti-carcinogenic properties of green tea catechins in humans have yielded promising results that suggest the possibility of their application to human clinical trials. This review article analyzes the results of these studies to explicate the effects of consumption or administration of green tea and its constituents on malignancies observed to date and discuss future directions in this research field.

  17. Crocus sativus L. (saffron) for cancer chemoprevention: A mini review.

    PubMed

    Bhandari, Prasan R

    2015-04-01

    Cancer is one of the most feared diseases globally and there has been a sustained rise in its incidence in both developing and developed countries. Despite the growing therapeutic options for patients with cancer, their efficacy is time-limited and non-curative. Hence to overcome these drawbacks, an incessant screening for superior and safer drugs has been ongoing for numerous decades, resulting in the detection of anti-cancer properties of several phytochemicals. Chemoprevention using readily available natural substances from vegetables, fruits, herbs and spices is one of the significantly important approaches for cancer prevention in the present era. Among the spices, Crocus sativus L. (saffron; fān hóng huā) has generated interest because pharmacological experiments have established numerous beneficial properties including radical scavenging, anti-mutagenic and immuno-modulating effects. The more powerful components of saffron are crocin, crocetin and safranal. Studies in animal models and with cultured human malignant cell lines have demonstrated antitumor and cancer preventive activities of saffron and its main ingredients. This review provides a brief insight into the anticancer properties of saffron and its components.

  18. Polyamines and cancer: implications for chemotherapy and chemoprevention.

    PubMed

    Nowotarski, Shannon L; Woster, Patrick M; Casero, Robert A

    2013-02-22

    Polyamines are small organic cations that are essential for normal cell growth and development in eukaryotes. Under normal physiological conditions, intracellular polyamine concentrations are tightly regulated through a dynamic network of biosynthetic and catabolic enzymes, and a poorly characterised transport system. This precise regulation ensures that the intracellular concentration of polyamines is maintained within strictly controlled limits. It has frequently been observed that the metabolism of, and the requirement for, polyamines in tumours is frequently dysregulated. Elevated levels of polyamines have been associated with breast, colon, lung, prostate and skin cancers, and altered levels of rate-limiting enzymes in both biosynthesis and catabolism have been observed. Based on these observations and the absolute requirement for polyamines in tumour growth, the polyamine pathway is a rational target for chemoprevention and chemotherapeutics. Here we describe the recent advances made in the polyamine field and focus on the roles of polyamines and polyamine metabolism in neoplasia through a discussion of the current animal models for the polyamine pathway, chemotherapeutic strategies that target the polyamine pathway, chemotherapeutic clinical trials for polyamine pathway-specific drugs and ongoing clinical trials targeting polyamine biosynthesis.

  19. Polyamines and cancer: Implications for chemoprevention and chemotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Nowotarski, Shannon L.; Woster, Patrick M.; Casero, Robert A.

    2013-01-01

    Polyamines are small organic cations that are essential for normal cell growth and development in eukaryotes. Under normal physiological conditions, intracellular polyamine concentrations are tightly regulated through a dynamic network of biosynthetic and catabolic enzymes and a poorly characterized transport system. This precise regulation ensures that the intracellular concentration of polyamines is maintained within strictly controlled limits. It has frequently been observed that the metabolism of, and the requirement for, polyamines in tumours is frequently dysregulated. Elevated levels of polyamines have been associated with breast, colon, lung, prostate, and skin cancers, and altered levels of the rate limiting enzymes in both biosynthesis and catabolism have been observed. Based on these observations and the absolute requirement for polyamines in tumour growth, the polyamine pathway is a rational target for chemoprevention and chemotherapeutics. Here we describe the recent advances made in the polyamine field and focus on the roles of polyamines and polyamine metabolism in neoplasia through a discussion of the current animal models for the polyamine pathway, chemotherapeutic strategies that target the polyamine pathway, chemotherapeutic clinical trials for polyamine pathway specific drugs, and ongoing clinical trials targeting polyamine biosynthesis. PMID:23432971

  20. Polyamine catabolism in carcinogenesis: potential targets for chemotherapy and chemoprevention.

    PubMed

    Battaglia, Valentina; DeStefano Shields, Christina; Murray-Stewart, Tracy; Casero, Robert A

    2014-03-01

    Polyamines, including spermine, spermidine, and the precursor diamine, putrescine, are naturally occurring polycationic alkylamines that are required for eukaryotic cell growth, differentiation, and survival. This absolute requirement for polyamines and the need to maintain intracellular levels within specific ranges require a highly regulated metabolic pathway primed for rapid changes in response to cellular growth signals, environmental changes, and stress. Although the polyamine metabolic pathway is strictly regulated in normal cells, dysregulation of polyamine metabolism is a frequent event in cancer. Recent studies suggest that the polyamine catabolic pathway may be involved in the etiology of some epithelial cancers. The catabolism of spermine to spermidine utilizes either the one-step enzymatic reaction of spermine oxidase (SMO) or the two-step process of spermidine/spermine N (1)-acetyltransferase (SSAT) coupled with the peroxisomal enzyme N (1)-acetylpolyamine oxidase. Both catabolic pathways produce hydrogen peroxide and a reactive aldehyde that are capable of damaging DNA and other critical cellular components. The catabolic pathway also depletes the intracellular concentrations of spermidine and spermine, which are free radical scavengers. Consequently, the polyamine catabolic pathway in general and specifically SMO and SSAT provide exciting new targets for chemoprevention and/or chemotherapy.

  1. Polyamine catabolism in carcinogenesis: potential targets for chemotherapy and chemoprevention

    PubMed Central

    Battaglia, Valentina; Shields, Christina DeStefano; Murray-Stewart, Tracy; Casero, Robert A.

    2013-01-01

    Polyamines, including spermine, spermidine, and the precursor diamine, putrescine, are naturally occurring polycationic alkylamines that are required for eukaryotic cell growth, differentiation, and survival. This absolute requirement for polyamines and the need to maintain intracellular levels within specific ranges requires a highly regulated metabolic pathway primed for rapid changes in response to cellular growth signals, environmental changes, and stress. Although the polyamine metabolic pathway is strictly regulated in normal cells, dysregulation of polyamine metabolism is a frequent event in cancer. Recent studies suggest that the polyamine catabolic pathway may be involved in the etiology of some epithelial cancers. The catabolism of spermine to spermidine utilizes either the one-step enzymatic reaction of spermine oxidase (SMO) or the two-step process of spermidine/spermine N1-acetyltransferase (SSAT) coupled with the peroxisomal enzyme N1-acetylpolyamine oxidase (APAO). Both catabolic pathways produce hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) and a reactive aldehyde that are capable of damaging DNA and other critical cellular components. The catabolic pathway also depletes the intracellular concentrations of spermidine and spermine, which are free radical scavengers. Consequently, the polyamine catabolic pathway in general and specifically SMO and SSAT provide exciting new targets for chemoprevention and/or chemotherapy. PMID:23771789

  2. Chemopreventive functions and molecular mechanisms of garlic organosulfur compounds.

    PubMed

    Trio, Phoebe Zapanta; You, Sixiang; He, Xi; He, Jianhua; Sakao, Kozue; Hou, De-Xing

    2014-05-01

    Garlic (Allium sativum L.) has long been used both for culinary and medicinal purposes by many cultures. Population and preclinical investigations have suggested that dietary garlic intake has health benefits, such as lowering the risk of esophageal, stomach and prostate cancers. Extensive studies from laboratory and animal models have revealed that garlic has a wide range of biological activities, and garlic organosulfur compounds (OSCs) are responsible for the biological activities. However, the presence and potency of garlic OSCs vary with respect to the mode of garlic preparation and extraction. Cooked or processed garlic products showed different kinds of garlic OSCs, some of which are highly unstable and instantly decomposed. These facts, possibly gave paradoxical results on the garlic effects. In this review, we first summarized the biotransformation processes of garlic alliin into different garlic OSCs as well as the garlic OSCs compositions from different garlic preparations. Next, we reviewed the chemopreventive functions and molecular mechanisms focusing on the anti-inflammation, antioxidation, anti-diabetes and anticancer activity behind different garlic OSCs.

  3. Potential cncer chemopreventive flavonoids from the stems of Tephrosia toxicaria.

    PubMed

    Jang, Dae Sik; Park, Eun Jung; Kang, Young-Hwa; Hawthorne, Michael E; Vigo, Jose Schunke; Graham, James G; Cabieses, Fernando; Fong, Harry H S; Mehta, Rajendra G; Pezzuto, John M; Kinghorn, A Douglas

    2003-09-01

    A new butenylflavanone, (2S)-5-hydroxy-7-methoxy-8-[(E)-3-oxo-1-butenyl]flavanone (1), and a new rotenoid, 4',5'-dihydro-11,5'-dihydroxy-4'-methoxytephrosin (2), as well as three active flavonoids of previously known structure, isoliquiritigenin (3), genistein (4), and chrysoeriol (5), along with nine known inactive compounds, alpha-toxicarol (6), sumatrol, 6a,12a-dehydro-alpha-toxicarol, 11-hydroxytephrosin, obovatin, marmesin, lupenone, benzyl benzoate, and benzyl trans-cinnamate, were isolated from an ethyl acetate-soluble extract of the stems of Tephrosia toxicaria, using a bioassay based on the induction of quinone reductase (QR) in cultured Hepa 1c1c7 mouse hepatoma cells to monitor chromatographic fractionation. The structures of compounds 1 and 2 were elucidated by spectroscopic data interpretation. All isolates were evaluated for their potential cancer chemopreventive properties utilizing an in vitro assay to determine quinone reductase induction. Selected compounds were tested in a mouse mammary organ culture assay to evaluate the inhibition of 7,12-dimethylbenz[a]anthracene (DMBA)-induced preneoplastic lesions.

  4. Black tea: Phytochemicals, cancer chemoprevention, and clinical studies.

    PubMed

    Singh, Brahma N; Rawat, A K S; Bhagat, R M; Singh, B R

    2017-05-03

    Tea (Camellia sinensis L.) is the most popular, flavored, functional, and therapeutic non-alcoholic drink consumed by two-thirds of the world's population. Black tea leaves are reported to contain thousands of bioactive constituents such as polyphenols, amino acids, volatile compounds, and alkaloids that exhibit a range of promising pharmacological properties. Due to strong antioxidant property, black tea inhibits the development of various cancers by regulating oxidative damage of biomolecules, endogenous antioxidants, and pathways of mutagen and transcription of antioxidant gene pool. Regular drinking of phytochemicals-rich black tea is linked to regulate several molecular targets, including COX-2, 5-LOX, AP-1, JNK, STAT, EGFR, AKT, Bcl2, NF-κB, Bcl-xL, caspases, p53, FOXO1, TNFα, PARP, and MAPK, which may be the basis of how dose of black tea prevents and cures cancer. In vitro and preclinical studies support the anti-cancer activity of black tea; however, its effect in human trails is uncertain, although more clinical experiments are needed at molecular levels to understand its anti-cancer property. This review discusses the current knowledge on phytochemistry, chemopreventive activity, and clinical applications of black tea to reveal its anti-cancer effect.

  5. Chemopreventive effect of apple and berry fruits against colon cancer.

    PubMed

    Jaganathan, Saravana Kumar; Vellayappan, Muthu Vignesh; Narasimhan, Gayathri; Supriyanto, Eko; Octorina Dewi, Dyah Ekashanti; Narayanan, Aqilah Leela T; Balaji, Arunpandian; Subramanian, Aruna Priyadarshini; Yusof, Mustafa

    2014-12-07

    Colon cancer arises due to the conversion of precancerous polyps (benign) found in the inner lining of the colon. Prevention is better than cure, and this is very true with respect to colon cancer. Various epidemiologic studies have linked colorectal cancer with food intake. Apple and berry juices are widely consumed among various ethnicities because of their nutritious values. In this review article, chemopreventive effects of these fruit juices against colon cancer are discussed. Studies dealing with bioavailability, in vitro and in vivo effects of apple and berry juices are emphasized in this article. A thorough literature survey indicated that various phenolic phytochemicals present in these fruit juices have the innate potential to inhibit colon cancer cell lines. This review proposes the need for more preclinical evidence for the effects of fruit juices against different colon cancer cells, and also strives to facilitate clinical studies using these juices in humans in large trials. The conclusion of the review is that these apple and berry juices will be possible candidates in the campaign against colon cancer.

  6. Chemopreventive effect of apple and berry fruits against colon cancer

    PubMed Central

    Jaganathan, Saravana Kumar; Vellayappan, Muthu Vignesh; Narasimhan, Gayathri; Supriyanto, Eko; Octorina Dewi, Dyah Ekashanti; Narayanan, Aqilah Leela T; Balaji, Arunpandian; Subramanian, Aruna Priyadarshini; Yusof, Mustafa

    2014-01-01

    Colon cancer arises due to the conversion of precancerous polyps (benign) found in the inner lining of the colon. Prevention is better than cure, and this is very true with respect to colon cancer. Various epidemiologic studies have linked colorectal cancer with food intake. Apple and berry juices are widely consumed among various ethnicities because of their nutritious values. In this review article, chemopreventive effects of these fruit juices against colon cancer are discussed. Studies dealing with bioavailability, in vitro and in vivo effects of apple and berry juices are emphasized in this article. A thorough literature survey indicated that various phenolic phytochemicals present in these fruit juices have the innate potential to inhibit colon cancer cell lines. This review proposes the need for more preclinical evidence for the effects of fruit juices against different colon cancer cells, and also strives to facilitate clinical studies using these juices in humans in large trials. The conclusion of the review is that these apple and berry juices will be possible candidates in the campaign against colon cancer. PMID:25493015

  7. Sulforaphane inhibits TNF-α-induced adhesion molecule expression through the Rho A/ROCK/NF-κB signaling pathway.

    PubMed

    Hung, Chi-Nan; Huang, Hui-Pei; Wang, Chau-Jong; Liu, Kai-Li; Lii, Chong-Kuei

    2014-10-01

    Endothelial dysfunction is an early indicator of cardiovascular diseases. Increased stimulation of tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) triggers the inflammatory mediator secretion of endothelial cells, leading to atherosclerotic risk. In this study, we investigated whether sulforaphane (SFN) affected the expression of intracellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1) in TNF-α-induced ECV 304 endothelial cells. Our data showed that SFN attenuated TNF-α-induced expression of ICAM-1 in ECV 304 cells. Pretreatment of ECV 304 cells with SFN inhibited dose-dependently the secretion of proinflammatory cytokines, such as interleukin (IL)-1β, IL-6, and IL-8. SFN inhibited TNF-α-induced nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB) DNA binding activity. Furthermore, SFN decreased TNF-α-mediated phosphorylation of IκB kinase (IKK) and IκBα, Rho A, ROCK, ERK1/2, and plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 (PAI-1) levels. Collectively, SFN inhibited the NF-κB DNA binding activity and downregulated the TNF-α-mediated induction of ICAM-1 in endothelial cells by inhibiting the Rho A/ROCK/NF-κB signaling pathway, suggesting the beneficial effects of SFN on suppression of inflammation within the atherosclerotic lesion.

  8. Sulforaphane ameliorates the insulin responsiveness and the lipid profile but does not alter the antioxidant response in diabetic rats.

    PubMed

    de Souza, Carolina Guerini; da Motta, Leonardo Lisbôa; de Assis, Adriano Martimbianco; Rech, Anderson; Bruch, Ricardo; Klamt, Fábio; Souza, Diogo Onofre

    2016-04-01

    Diabetes is one of the most prevalent chronic non-communicable diseases and is characterized by hyperglycemia and increased oxidative stress. These two alterations are also responsible for the main diabetic complications: cardiovascular disease, retinopathy, nephropathy and peripheral neuropathy. Diabetes progression is governed by pancreatic β-cell failure, and recent studies showed that sulforaphane (SFN) might be able to prevent this change, preserving insulin production. Consequently, our goal was to test the effects of SFN on metabolic parameters related to diabetic complications and antioxidant defenses (superoxide dismutase, catalase and sulfhydryl groups) in the pancreas, liver and kidney of non-diabetic and diabetic rats. Male Wistar rats were treated with water or 0.5 mg kg(-1) SFN i.p. for 21 days after diabetes induction. In diabetic animals treated with SFN, the serum levels of total cholesterol, non-HDL cholesterol and triacylglycerols were similar to those of non-diabetic animals, and the insulin responsiveness was higher than that of the diabetic animals that did not receive the compound. No effect of SFN on the superoxide dismutase and catalase activity or sulfhydryl groups was observed in the pancreas, liver or kidney of the treated animals. We conclude that SFN ameliorates some features of clinical diabetic complications particularly the lipid profile and insulin responsiveness, but it does not modulate the antioxidant response induced by superoxide dismutase, catalase and sulfhydryl groups in the evaluated organs.

  9. Sulforaphane protects against cytokine- and streptozotocin-induced {beta}-cell damage by suppressing the NF-{kappa}B pathway

    SciTech Connect

    Song, Mi-Young; Kim, Eun-Kyung; Moon, Woo-Sung; Park, Jin-Woo; Kim, Hyung-Jin; So, Hong-Seob; Park, Raekil; Kwon, Kang-Beom Park, Byung-Hyun

    2009-02-15

    Sulforaphane (SFN) is an indirect antioxidant that protects animal tissues from chemical or biological insults by stimulating the expression of several NF-E2-related factor-2 (Nrf2)-regulated phase 2 enzymes. Treatment of RINm5F insulinoma cells with SFN increases Nrf2 nuclear translocation and expression of phase 2 enzymes. In this study, we investigated whether the activation of Nrf2 by SFN treatment or ectopic overexpression of Nrf2 inhibited cytokine-induced {beta}-cell damage. Treatment of RIN cells with IL-1{beta} and IFN-{gamma} induced {beta}-cell damage through a NF-{kappa}B-dependent signaling pathway. Activation of Nrf2 by treatment with SFN and induction of Nrf2 overexpression by transfection with Nrf2 prevented cytokine toxicity. The mechanism by which Nrf2 activation inhibited NF-{kappa}B-dependent cell death signals appeared to involve the reduction of oxidative stress, as demonstrated by the inhibition of cytokine-induced H{sub 2}O{sub 2} production. The protective effect of SFN was further demonstrated by the restoration of normal insulin secreting responses to glucose in cytokine-treated rat pancreatic islets. Furthermore, pretreatment with SFN blocked the development of type 1 diabetes in streptozotocin-treated mice.

  10. Sulforaphane Protects Pancreatic Acinar Cell Injury by Modulating Nrf2-Mediated Oxidative Stress and NLRP3 Inflammatory Pathway

    PubMed Central

    Dong, Zhaojun; Shang, Haixiao; Chen, Yong Q.; Pan, Li-Long

    2016-01-01

    Acute pancreatitis (AP) is characterized by early activation of intra-acinar proteases followed by acinar cell death and inflammation. Cellular oxidative stress is a key mechanism underlying these pathological events. Sulforaphane (SFN) is a natural organosulfur antioxidant with undescribed effects on AP. Here we investigated modulatory effects of SFN on cellular oxidation and inflammation in AP. AP was induced by cerulean hyperstimulation in BALB/c mice. Treatment group received a single dose of 5 mg/kg SFN for 3 consecutive days before AP. We found that SFN administration attenuated pancreatic injury as evidenced by serum amylase, pancreatic edema, and myeloperoxidase, as well as by histological examination. SFN administration reverted AP-associated dysregulation of oxidative stress markers including pancreatic malondialdehyde and redox enzymes superoxide dismutase (SOD) and glutathione peroxidase (GPx). In acinar cells, SFN treatment upregulated nuclear factor erythroid 2-related factor 2 (Nrf2) expression and Nrf2-regulated redox genes including quinoneoxidoreductase-1, heme oxidase-1, SOD1, and GPx1. In addition, SFN selectively suppressed cerulein-induced activation of the nucleotide-binding domain leucine-rich repeat containing family, pyrin domain-containing 3 (NLRP3) inflammasome, in parallel with reduced nuclear factor- (NF-) κB activation and modulated NF-κB-responsive cytokine expression. Together, our data suggested that SFN modulates Nrf2-mediated oxidative stress and NLRP3/NF-κB inflammatory pathways in acinar cells, thereby protecting against AP. PMID:27847555

  11. Microbiome and Potential Targets for Chemoprevention of Esophageal Adenocarcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Neto, Antonio Galvao; Whitaker, April; Pei, Zhiheng

    2015-01-01

    Esophageal cancer is one of the deadliest cancers, with a dismal prognosis. It is increasingly recognized that esophageal cancer is a heterogeneous disease. It can be subdivided into two distinct groups: squamous cell carcinoma and adenocarcinoma, based on histological appearance. In the Western world, the incidence of squamous cell carcinoma was considerably higher than esophageal adenocarcinoma (EA) until the 1990s when, due to a dramatic increase, the incidence of EA surpassed that of squamous cell carcinoma. EA typically follows a well-established stepwise evolution from chronic inflammation due to reflux esophagitis (RE) that progresses to metaplasia (Barrett’s esophagus- BE) to dysplasia, which often culminates in EA. The pathophysiology of EA is complex and involves diverse factors, including gastroesophageal reflux, gastric acid secretion, dysfunction of the antireflux barrier, gastric emptying disturbances, and abnormalities in esophageal defense mechanisms. The current understanding of the etiology of EA is mainly derived from epidemiological studies of risk factors such as cigarette smoking, obesity, gastroesophageal reflux disorders (GERD), and low fruit and vegetable consumption. Numerous studies have been done but the factors that drive the dynamic increase in the incidence of EA remain elusive. The advent of widespread antibiotic use occurred in the 1950s, preceding the surge of EA. Based on this temporal sequence, it has been hypothesized that antibiotics alter the microbiome to which the esophagus is exposed in patients who have GERD and that chronic exposure to this abnormal microbiome (i.e., changes in species diversity or abundance) accounts for the increase in EA. If changes in the proposed factors alter the stepwise progression (RE-BE-dysplasia- EA), they may represent potential targets for chemoprevention. New discoveries will help improve our understanding of the biology and pathogenesis of these cancers, and aid in finding novel

  12. Aspirin in the Chemoprevention of Colorectal Neoplasia: An Overview

    PubMed Central

    Chan, Andrew T.; Arber, Nadir; Burn, John; Chia, John Whay-Kuang; Elwood, Peter; Hull, Mark A.; Logan, Richard F.; Rothwell, Peter M.; Schrör, Karsten; Baron, John A.

    2011-01-01

    Considerable evidence supports the effectiveness of aspirin for chemoprevention of colorectal cancer (CRC) in addition to its well-established benefits in the prevention of vascular disease. Epidemiologic studies have consistently observed an inverse association between aspirin use and risk of CRC. A recent pooled analysis of a long-term post-trial follow-up of nearly 14,000 patients from 4 randomized, cardiovascular disease prevention trials showed that daily aspirin treatment for about 5 years was associated with a 34% reduction in 20-year CRC mortality. A separate meta-analysis of nearly 3,000 patients with a history of colorectal adenoma or cancer in 4 randomized adenoma prevention trials demonstrated that aspirin reduced the occurrence of advanced adenomas by 28% and any adenoma by 17%. Aspirin has also been shown to be beneficial in a clinical trial of patients with Lynch syndrome, a hereditary CRC syndrome; in those treated with aspirin for at least 2 years, there was a ≥ 50% reduction in the risk of CRC commencing 5 years after randomization and after aspirin had been discontinued. A few observational studies have shown an increase in survival among patients with CRC who use aspirin. Taken together, these findings strengthen the case for consideration of long-term aspirin use in CRC prevention. Despite these compelling data, there is a lack of consensus about the balance of risks and benefits associated with long-term aspirin use, particularly in low-risk populations. The optimal dose to use for cancer prevention and the precise mechanism underlying aspirin’s anticancer effect require further investigation. PMID:22084361

  13. Chemopreventive potential of the tannase-mediated biotransformation of green tea.

    PubMed

    Macedo, J A; Ferreira, L R; Camara, L E; Santos, J C; Gambero, A; Macedo, G A; Ribeiro, M L

    2012-07-15

    Green tea (Camellia sinensis) is one of the most widely consumed beverages in the world. The cancer chemopreventive qualities of green tea have been well documented. Epigallocatechin gallate (EGCG) is often described as the most potently chemopreventive green tea catechin; however, the low bioavailability of EGCG is a limiting factor for its biological effect. Thus, the aim of this work was to test the chemopreventive potential of green tea extract and EGCG after tannase-mediated hydrolysis. The results showed that the biotransformed compounds retained most of the beneficial properties of the original compounds, and some beneficial properties were improved in the biotransformed compounds. Biotransformation of EGCG decreased its toxicity without affecting its antiproliferative effects. Furthermore, human cells gene expression profiling showed that the biotransformed compounds modulated the expression of several genes related to carcinogenesis. These results demonstrate the benefits of the biotechnological modification of natural food molecules, allowing the improvement of the nutraceutical potential of a beverage as green tea.

  14. A Review of the Potential of Phytochemicals from Prunus africana (Hook f.) Kalkman Stem Bark for Chemoprevention and Chemotherapy of Prostate Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Komakech, Richard; Omujal, Francis

    2017-01-01

    Prostate cancer remains one of the major causes of death worldwide. In view of the limited treatment options for patients with prostate cancer, preventive and treatment approaches based on natural compounds can play an integral role in tackling this disease. Recent evidence supports the beneficial effects of plant-derived phytochemicals as chemopreventive and chemotherapeutic agents for various cancers, including prostate cancer. Prunus africana has been used for generations in African traditional medicine to treat prostate cancer. This review examined the potential roles of the phytochemicals from P. africana, an endangered, sub-Saharan Africa plant in the chemoprevention and chemotherapy of prostate cancer. In vitro and in vivo studies have provided strong pharmacological evidence for antiprostate cancer activities of P. africana-derived phytochemicals. Through synergistic interactions between different effective phytochemicals, P. africana extracts have been shown to exhibit very strong antiandrogenic and antiangiogenic activities and have the ability to kill tumor cells via apoptotic pathways, prevent the proliferation of prostate cancer cells, and alter the signaling pathways required for the maintenance of prostate cancer cells. However, further preclinical and clinical studies ought to be done to advance and eventually use these promising phytochemicals for the prevention and chemotherapy of human prostate cancer. PMID:28286531

  15. DuCLOX-2/5 inhibition: a promising target for cancer chemoprevention.

    PubMed

    Gautam, Swetlana; Roy, Subhadeep; Ansari, Mohd Nazam; Saeedan, Abdulaziz S; Saraf, Shubhini A; Kaithwas, Gaurav

    2017-03-01

    Cancer is a leading cause of death and major health concern worldwide. The animal and human studies support the presumption that inflammation directs the cancer initiation and progression. Cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) and 5-lipoxygenase (5-LOX) are the key players in the inflammatory cascade contributing towards the angiogenesis, tumor cell invasiveness, and disruption in the pathways of cellular proliferation/apoptosis. Contemporary studies have particularized a promising role of COX-2 and 5-LOX inhibitors in cancer chemoprevention. The present review is a pursuit to define implications of dual COX-2 and 5-LOX (DuCLOX-2/5) inhibition on various aspects of cancer augmentation and chemoprevention.

  16. Colorectal Cancer Chemoprevention: Is This the Future of Colorectal Cancer Prevention?

    PubMed Central

    Manzano, A.; Pérez-Segura, P.

    2012-01-01

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) is presently one of the most common causes of cancer-related death in our setting and affects a great number of people each year. Screening strategies are commonly used but they do not seem enough to avoid CRC development or prevent completely its mortality. Because of this fact other prevention strategies have gained interest in recent years. Chemoprevention seems to be an attractive option in this setting and several drugs have been studied in this field. This review is focused on salicylates, nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) and cycloxygenase-2 inhibitors (COXIBs), whose mechanism of action could be directly related to colon cancer chemoprevention. PMID:22649288

  17. Comparative effectiveness of chemopreventive interventions for colorectal cancer: protocol for a systematic review and network meta-analysis of randomised controlled trials

    PubMed Central

    Veettil, Sajesh K.; Saokaew, Surasak; Lim, Kean Ghee; Ching, Siew Mooi; Phisalprapa, Pochamana

    2016-01-01

    Background Colorectal cancer (CRC) is the third most common cancer worldwide and is associated with substantial socioeconomic burden. Despite considerable research, including numerous randomised controlled trials (RCTs) and systematic reviews assessed the effect of various chemopreventive interventions for CRC, there remains uncertainty regarding the comparative effectiveness of these agents. No network meta-analytic study has been published to evaluate the efficacies of these agents for CRC. Therefore, the aim of this study is to summarise the direct and indirect evidence for these interventions to prevent CRC in average-high risk individuals, and to rank these agents for practical consideration. Methods We will acquire eligible studies through a systematic search of MEDLINE, EMBASE, the Cochrane Central Registry of Controlled Trials, CINAHL plus, IPA and clinicaltrials.gov website. The Cochrane Risk of Bias Tool will be used to assess the quality of included studies. The primary outcomes are the incidence of CRC, the incidence/recurrence of any adenoma or change in polyp burden (number or size). Quantitative synthesis or meta-analysis will be considered. We will also construct a network meta-analysis (NMA) to improve precision of the comparisons among chemo-preventive interventions by combining direct and indirect evidence. The probability of each treatment being the best and/or safest, the number-needed-to-treat [NNT; 95% credible interval (CrIs)], and the number-needed-to-harm (NNH; 95% CrIs) will be calculated to provide measures of treatment efficacy. The GRADE approach will be used to rate the quality of evidence of estimates derived from NMA. Results This protocol has been registered (registration number: CRD42015025849) with the PROSPERO (International Prospective Register of Systematic Reviews). The procedures of this systematic review and NMA will be conducted in accordance with the PRISMA-compliant guideline. The results of this systematic review and

  18. Chemoprevention of Rat Mammary Carcinogenesis by Apiaceae Spices

    PubMed Central

    Aqil, Farrukh; Jeyabalan, Jeyaprakash; Munagala, Radha; Ravoori, Srivani; Vadhanam, Manicka V.; Schultz, David J.; Gupta, Ramesh C.

    2017-01-01

    Scientific evidence suggests that many herbs and spices have medicinal properties that alleviate symptoms or prevent disease. In this study, we examined the chemopreventive effects of the Apiaceae spices, anise, caraway, and celery seeds against 17β-estrogen (E2)-mediated mammary tumorigenesis in an ACI (August-Copenhagen Irish) rat model. Female ACI rats were given either control diet (AIN 93M) or diet supplemented with 7.5% (w/w) of anise, caraway, or celery seed powder. Two weeks later, one half of the animals in each group received subcutaneous silastic implants of E2. Diet intake and body weight were recorded weekly, and animals were euthanized after 3 and 12 weeks. E2-treatment showed significantly (2.1- and 3.4-fold) enhanced growth of pituitary gland at 3 and 12 weeks, respectively. All test spices significantly offset the pituitary growth by 12 weeks, except celery which was effective as early as three weeks. Immunohistochemical analysis for proliferative cell nuclear antigen (PCNA) in mammary tissues showed significant reduction in E2-mediated mammary cell proliferation. Test spices reduced the circulating levels of both E2 and prolactin at three weeks. This protection was more pronounced at 12 weeks, with celery eliciting the highest effect. RT-PCR and western blot analysis were performed to determine the potential molecular targets of the spices. Anise and caraway diets significantly offset estrogen-mediated overexpression of both cyclin D1 and estrogen receptor α (ERα). The effect of anise was modest. Likewise, expression of CYP1B1 and CYP1A1 was inhibited by all test spices. Based on short-term molecular markers, caraway was selected over other spices based on its enhanced effect on estrogen-associated pathway. Therefore, a tumor-end point study in ACI rats was conducted with dietary caraway. Tumor palpation from 12 weeks onwards revealed tumor latency of 29 days in caraway-treated animals compared with first tumor appearance at 92 days in control

  19. Chemoprevention of Rat Mammary Carcinogenesis by Apiaceae Spices.

    PubMed

    Aqil, Farrukh; Jeyabalan, Jeyaprakash; Munagala, Radha; Ravoori, Srivani; Vadhanam, Manicka V; Schultz, David J; Gupta, Ramesh C

    2017-02-16

    Scientific evidence suggests that many herbs and spices have medicinal properties that alleviate symptoms or prevent disease. In this study, we examined the chemopreventive effects of the Apiaceae spices, anise, caraway, and celery seeds against 17β-estrogen (E2)-mediated mammary tumorigenesis in an ACI (August-Copenhagen Irish) rat model. Female ACI rats were given either control diet (AIN 93M) or diet supplemented with 7.5% (w/w) of anise, caraway, or celery seed powder. Two weeks later, one half of the animals in each group received subcutaneous silastic implants of E2. Diet intake and body weight were recorded weekly, and animals were euthanized after 3 and 12 weeks. E2-treatment showed significantly (2.1- and 3.4-fold) enhanced growth of pituitary gland at 3 and 12 weeks, respectively. All test spices significantly offset the pituitary growth by 12 weeks, except celery which was effective as early as three weeks. Immunohistochemical analysis for proliferative cell nuclear antigen (PCNA) in mammary tissues showed significant reduction in E2-mediated mammary cell proliferation. Test spices reduced the circulating levels of both E2 and prolactin at three weeks. This protection was more pronounced at 12 weeks, with celery eliciting the highest effect. RT-PCR and western blot analysis were performed to determine the potential molecular targets of the spices. Anise and caraway diets significantly offset estrogen-mediated overexpression of both cyclin D1 and estrogen receptor α (ERα). The effect of anise was modest. Likewise, expression of CYP1B1 and CYP1A1 was inhibited by all test spices. Based on short-term molecular markers, caraway was selected over other spices based on its enhanced effect on estrogen-associated pathway. Therefore, a tumor-end point study in ACI rats was conducted with dietary caraway. Tumor palpation from 12 weeks onwards revealed tumor latency of 29 days in caraway-treated animals compared with first tumor appearance at 92 days in control

  20. Caspase-independent apoptosis in infected macrophages triggered by sulforaphane via Nrf2/p38 signaling pathways

    PubMed Central

    Bonay, M; Roux, A-L; Floquet, J; Retory, Y; Herrmann, J-L; Lofaso, F; Deramaudt, TB

    2015-01-01

    Mycobacterium abscessus (Mabs), a non-tuberculous mycobacterium, is an emerging and rapidly growing opportunistic pathogen that is frequently found in patients with cystic fibrosis and in immunosuppressed patients. Its high tolerance to antibiotics is of great concern for public health. In this study, our results showed that human THP-1-derived macrophages infected with M. abscessus presented an increase in ROS production and cell necrosis. In addition, M. abscessus infection triggered activation of the Nuclear factor E2-related factor 2 (Nrf2) signaling pathway, and the induction of HO-1 and NQO1 expression levels. Interestingly, pretreatment of macrophages with sulforaphane (SFN), an activator of the antioxidant key regulator Nrf2, followed by M. abscessus infection significantly decreased mycobacterial burden. We demonstrated that this reduction in mycobacterial growth was due to an activation in cell apoptosis in SFN-pretreated and M. abscessus-infected macrophages. Pretreatment with specific MAPK inhibitors, PD98059, SP600125, and SB203580 to ERK, JNK, and p38 respectively, failed to inhibit induction of Nrf2 expression, suggesting that Nrf2 signaling pathway was upstream of MAPK signaling. Activation of cell apoptosis was caspase 3/7 independent but p38 MAPK dependent. Moreover, p38 MAPK induction was abolished in macrophages transfected with Nrf2 siRNA. In addition, p38 inhibitor abolished Nrf2-dependent apoptosis in infected macrophages. Taken together, our results indicate that modulation of the Nrf2 signaling using Nrf2 activators may help potentiate the actual drug therapies used to treat mycobacterial infection. PMID:27551455

  1. Trace analysis of sulforaphane in bee pollen and royal jelly by liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Ares, Ana M; Ayuso, Irene; Bernal, José L; Nozal, María J; Bernal, José

    2016-02-15

    In this study, we investigate for the first time the presence of sulforaphane (SFN) residues in two of the most currently consumed food/dietary supplements, royal jelly and bee pollen. Chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) was the method employed, the mass spectrometer consisting of an ion-trap mass analyzer used with electrospray ionization (ESI) in positive ion mode. An efficient sample treatment involving a solvent extraction with methanol, centrifugation, and concentration in a rotary evaporator was proposed. In all cases average analyte recoveries were between 92 and 106%. Chromatographic analysis (16min) was performed on a core-shell technology based column (Kinetex C18, 150×4.6mm, 2.6μm, 100Å). The mobile phase consisted of 0.02M ammonium formate in water and acetonitrile, with a flow rate of 0.5mL/min in gradient elution mode. The fully validated method was selective, linear from 8 to 1000μg/kg (bee pollen), or from 10 to 1250μg/kg (royal jelly), precise and accurate; relative standard deviation (% RSD) and relative error (% RE) values were below 10%. Low limits of detection (LOD) and quantification (LOQ) were obtained, namely, 3μg/kg (LOD) and 8 (bee pollen) and 10 (royal jelly) μg/kg (LOQ). The method was applied for SFN analysis in several royal jelly and bee pollen samples. SFN was detected at trace levels in some bee pollen samples (<23μg/kg) examined, whilst SFN went undetected in the royal jelly samples analyzed.

  2. Impact of Nrf2 on UVB-induced skin inflammation/photoprotection and photoprotective effect of sulforaphane.

    PubMed

    Saw, Constance L; Huang, Mou-Tuan; Liu, Yue; Khor, Tin Oo; Conney, Allan H; Kong, Ah-Ng

    2011-06-01

    Ultraviolet (UV) of sunlight is a complete carcinogen that can burn skin, enhance inflammation, and drive skin carcinogenesis. Previously, we have shown that sulforaphane (SFN) inhibited chemically induced skin carcinogenesis via nuclear factor (erythroid-derived 2)-like 2 (Nrf2) and others have shown that broccoli sprout extracts containing high SFN protected against UV-induced skin carcinogenesis in SKH-1 hairless mice. A recent study showed that there was no difference between Nrf2 knockout (Nrf2 KO) and Nrf2 wild-type (WT) BALB/C mice after exposing to high dose of UVB. Since Nrf2 plays critical roles in the anti-oxidative stress/anti-inflammatory responses, it is relevant to assess the role of Nrf2 for photoprotection against UV. In this context, the role of Nrf2 in UVB-induced skin inflammation in Nrf2 WT and Nrf2 KO C57BL/6 mice was studied. A single dose of UVB (300 mJ/cm(2)) resulted in skin inflammation in both WT and Nrf2 KO (-/-) mice (KO mice) at 8 h and 8 d following UVB irradiation. In the WT mice inflammation returned to the basal level to a greater extent when compared to the KO mice. SFN treatment of Nrf2 WT but not Nrf2 KO mice restored the number of sunburn cells back to their basal level by 8 d after UVB irradiation. Additionally, UVB-induced short-term inflammatory biomarkers (interleukin-1β and interleukin-6) were increased in the KO mice and UVB-induced apoptotic cells in the KO mice were significantly higher as compared to that in the WT. Taken together, our results show that functional Nrf2 confers a protective effect against UVB-induced inflammation, sunburn reaction, and SFN-mediated photoprotective effects in the skin.

  3. Differential modulation of dibenzo[def,p]chrysene transplacental carcinogenesis: Maternal diets rich in indole-3-carbinol versus sulforaphane

    SciTech Connect

    Shorey, Lyndsey E.; Madeen, Erin P.; Atwell, Lauren L.; Ho, Emily; Löhr, Christiane V.; Pereira, Clifford B.; Dashwood, Roderick H.; Williams, David E.

    2013-07-01

    Cruciferous vegetable components have been documented to exhibit anticancer properties. Targets of action span multiple mechanisms deregulated during cancer progression, ranging from altered carcinogen metabolism to the restoration of epigenetic machinery. Furthermore, the developing fetus is highly susceptible to changes in nutritional status and to environmental toxicants. Thus, we have exploited a mouse model of transplacental carcinogenesis to assess the impact of maternal dietary supplementation on cancer risk in offspring. In this study, transplacental and lactational exposure to a maternal dose of 15 mg/Kg B.W. of dibenzo[def,p]chrysene (DBC) resulted in significant morbidity of offspring due to an aggressive T-cell lymphoblastic lymphoma. As in previous studies, indole-3-carbinol (I3C, feed to the dam at 100, 500 or 1000 ppm), derived from cruciferous vegetables, dose-dependently reduced lung tumor multiplicity and also increased offspring survival. Brussels sprout and broccoli sprout powders, selected for their relative abundance of I3C and the bioactive component sulforaphane (SFN), respectively, surprisingly enhanced DBC-induced morbidity and tumorigenesis when incorporated into the maternal diet at 10% wt/wt. Purified SFN, incorporated in the maternal diet at 400 ppm, also decreased the latency of DBC-dependent morbidity. Interestingly, I3C abrogated the effect of SFN when the two purified compounds were administered in equimolar combination (500 ppm I3C and 600 ppm SFN). SFN metabolites measured in the plasma of neonates positively correlated with exposure levels via the maternal diet but not with offspring mortality. These findings provide justification for further study of the safety and bioactivity of cruciferous vegetable phytochemicals at supplemental concentrations during the perinatal period. - Highlights: • Dietary supplementation may modulate cancer risk in a mouse model of lymphoma. • Cruciferous vegetables may not contain sufficient I3C

  4. Prevention by sulforaphane of diabetic cardiomyopathy is associated with up-regulation of Nrf2 expression and transcription activation.

    PubMed

    Bai, Yang; Cui, Wenpeng; Xin, Ying; Miao, Xiao; Barati, Michelle T; Zhang, Chi; Chen, Qiang; Tan, Yi; Cui, Taixing; Zheng, Yang; Cai, Lu

    2013-04-01

    This study was to investigate whether sulforaphane (SFN) can prevent diabetic cardiomyopathy. Type 1 diabetes was induced in FVB mice by multiple intraperitoneal injections with low-dose streptozotocin. Hyperglycemic and age-matched control mice were treated with or without SFN at 0.5mg/kg daily in five days of each week for 3 months and then kept until 6 months. At 3 and 6 months of diabetes, blood pressure and cardiac function were assessed. Cardiac fibrosis, inflammation, and oxidative damage were assessed by Western blot, real-time qPCR, and histopathological examination. SFN significantly prevented diabetes-induced high blood pressure and cardiac dysfunction at both 3 and 6 months, and also prevented diabetes-induced cardiac hypertrophy (increased the ratio of heart weight to tibia length and the expression of atrial natriuretic peptide mRNA and protein) and fibrosis (increased the accumulation of collagen and expression of connective tissue growth factor and tissue growth factor-β). SFN also almost completely prevented diabetes-induced cardiac oxidative damage (increased accumulation of 3-nitrotyrosine and 4-hydroxynonenal) and inflammation (increased tumor necrotic factor-α and plasminogen activator inhibitor 1 expression). SFN up-regulated NFE2-related factor 2 (Nrf2) expression and transcription activity that was reflected by increased Nrf2 nuclear accumulation and phosphorylation as well as the mRNA and protein expression of Nrf2 downstream antioxidants. Furthermore, in cultured H9c2 cardiac cells silencing Nrf2 gene with its siRNA abolished the SFN's prevention of high glucose-induced fibrotic response. These results suggest that diabetes-induced cardiomyopathy can be prevented by SFN, which was associated with the up-regulated Nrf2 expression and transcription function.

  5. Chemoprevention of colorectal cancer by targeting APC-deficient cells for apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Ling; Ren, Xiaoyang; Alt, Eckhard; Bai, Xiaowen; Huang, Shaoyi; Xu, Zhengming; Lynch, Patrick M; Moyer, Mary P; Wen, Xian-Feng; Wu, Xiangwei

    2010-04-15

    Cancer chemoprevention uses natural, synthetic, or biological substances to reverse, suppress, or prevent either the initial phase of carcinogenesis or the progression of neoplastic cells to cancer. It holds promise for overcoming problems associated with the treatment of late-stage cancers. However, the broad application of chemoprevention is compromised at present by limited effectiveness and potential toxicity. To overcome these challenges, here we developed a new chemoprevention approach that specifically targets premalignant tumour cells for apoptosis. We show that a deficiency in the adenomatous polyposis coli (APC) gene and subsequent activation of beta-catenin lead to the repression of cellular caspase-8 inhibitor c-FLIP (also known as CFLAR) expression through activation of c-Myc, and that all-trans-retinyl acetate (RAc) independently upregulates tumour necrosis factor-related apoptosis-inducing ligand (TRAIL) death receptors and suppresses decoy receptors. Thus, the combination of TRAIL and RAc induces apoptosis in APC-deficient premalignant cells without affecting normal cells in vitro. In addition, we show that short-term and non-continuous TRAIL and RAc treatment induce apoptosis specifically in intestinal polyps, strongly inhibit tumour growth, and prolong survival in multiple intestinal neoplasms C57BL/6J-Apc(Min)/J (Apc(Min)) mice. With our approach, we further demonstrate that TRAIL and RAc induce significant cell death in human colon polyps, providing a potentially selective approach for colorectal cancer chemoprevention by targeting APC-deficient cells for apoptosis.

  6. Chemoprevention of intestinal tumorigenesis by nabumetone: induction of apoptosis and Bcl-2 downregulation.

    PubMed

    Roy, H K; Karoski, W J; Ratashak, A; Smyrk, T C

    2001-05-18

    Treatment of MIN mice with the nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug, nabumetone, resulted in a dose-dependent suppression of intestinal tumorigenesis. In both the uninvolved MIN mouse colonic epithelium and HT-29 colon cancer cells, nabumetone downregulated the anti-apoptotic protein, Bcl-2, with concomitant induction of apoptosis, suggesting a potential mechanism for colon cancer chemoprevention.

  7. Changes in SeMSC, glucosinolates and sulforaphane levels, and in proteome profile in broccoli (Brassica oleracea var. Italica) fertilized with sodium selenate.

    PubMed

    Sepúlveda, Ignacio; Barrientos, Herna; Mahn, Andrea; Moenne, Alejandra

    2013-05-07

    The aim of this work was to analyze the effect of sodium selenate fortification on the content of selenomethyl selenocysteine (SeMSC), total glucosinolates and sulforaphane, as well as the changes in protein profile of the inflorescences of broccoli (Brassica oleracea var. Italica). Two experimental groups were considered: plants treated with 100 μmol/L sodium selenate (final concentration in the pot) and control plants treated with water. Fortification began 2 weeks after transplantation and was repeated once a week during 10 weeks. Broccoli florets were harvested when they reached appropriate size. SeMSC content in broccoli florets increased significantly with sodium selenate fortification; but total glucosinolates and sulforaphane content as well as myrosinase activity were not affected. The protein profile of broccoli florets changed due to fortification with sodium selenate. Some proteins involved in general stress-responses were up-regulated, whereas down-regulated proteins were identified as proteins involved in protection against pathogens. This is the first attempt to evaluate the physiological effect of fortification with sodium selenate on broccoli at protein level. The results of this work will contribute to better understanding the metabolic processes related with selenium uptake and accumulation in broccoli.

  8. Sulforaphane Ameliorates Bladder Dysfunction through Activation of the Nrf2-ARE Pathway in a Rat Model of Partial Bladder Outlet Obstruction

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Chong; Xu, Huan; Fu, Shi; Chen, Yanbo; Chen, Qi; Cai, Zhikang; Zhou, Juan; Wang, Zhong

    2016-01-01

    Purpose. We evaluated the effect of sulforaphane (SFN) treatment on the function and changes of expression of Nrf2-ARE pathway in the bladder of rats with bladder outlet obstruction (BOO). Materials and Methods. A total of 18 male Sprague-Dawley rats at age of 8 weeks were divided into 3 groups (6 of each): the sham operated group, the BOO group, and the BOO+SFN group. We examined histological alterations and the changes of oxidative stress markers and the protein expression of the Nrf2-ARE pathway. Results. We found that SFN treatment could prolong micturition interval and increase bladder capacity and bladder compliance. However, the peak voiding pressure was lower than BOO group. SFN treatment can ameliorate the increase of collagen fibers induced by obstruction. SFN treatment also increased the activity of SOD, GSH-Px, and CAT compared to the other groups. The level of bladder cell apoptosis was decreased in BOO rats with SFN treatment. Moreover, SFN could reduce the ratio of Bax/Bcl-2 expression. Furthermore, SFN could activate the Nrf2 expression with elevation of its target antioxidant proteins. Conclusions. The sulforaphane-mediated decrease of oxidative stress and activation of the Nrf2-ARE pathway may ameliorate bladder dysfunction caused by bladder outlet obstruction. PMID:27433291

  9. Potential New Pharmacological Agents Derived From Medicinal Plants for the Treatment of Pancreatic Cancer.

    PubMed

    Azimi, Haniye; Khakshur, Ali Asghar; Abdollahi, Mohammad; Rahimi, Roja

    2015-01-01

    In the present article, we reviewed plants and phytochemical compounds demonstrating beneficial effects in pancreatic cancer to find new sources of pharmaceutical agents. For this purpose, Scopus, PubMed, Web of Science, and Google scholar were searched for plants or herbal components with beneficial effects in the treatment of pancreatic cancer. Data were collected up to January 2013. The search terms were "plant," "herb," "herbal therapy," or "phytotherapy" and "pancreatic cancer" or "pancreas." All of the human in vivo and in vitro studies were included. According to studies, among diverse plants and phytochemicals, 12 compounds including apigenin, genistein, quercetin, resveratrol, epigallocatechin gallate, benzyl isothiocyanate, sulforaphane, curcumin, thymoquinone, dihydroartemisinin, cucurbitacin B, and perillyl alcohol have beneficial action against pancreatic cancer cells through 4 or more mechanisms. Applying their plausible synergistic effects can be an imperative approach for finding new efficient pharmacological agents in the treatment of pancreatic cancer.

  10. Using Breast Cancer Risk Associated Polymorphisms to Identify Women for Breast Cancer Chemoprevention

    PubMed Central

    Ziv, Elad; Tice, Jeffrey A.; Sprague, Brian; Vachon, Celine M.; Cummings, Steven R.; Kerlikowske, Karla

    2017-01-01

    Background Breast cancer can be prevented with selective estrogen receptor modifiers (SERMs) and aromatase inhibitors (AIs). The US Preventive Services Task Force recommends that women with a 5-year breast cancer risk ≥3% consider chemoprevention for breast cancer. More than 70 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) have been associated with breast cancer. We sought to determine how to best integrate risk information from SNPs with other risk factors to risk stratify women for chemoprevention. Methods We used the risk distribution among women ages 35–69 estimated by the Breast Cancer Surveillance Consortium (BCSC) risk model. We modeled the effect of adding 70 SNPs to the BCSC model and examined how this would affect how many women are reclassified above and below the threshold for chemoprevention. Results We found that most of the benefit of SNP testing a population is achieved by testing a modest fraction of the population. For example, if women with a 5-year BCSC risk of >2.0% are tested (~21% of all women), ~75% of the benefit of testing all women (shifting women above or below 3% 5-year risk) would be derived. If women with a 5-year risk of >1.5% are tested (~36% of all women), ~90% of the benefit of testing all women would be derived. Conclusion SNP testing is effective for reclassification of women for chemoprevention, but is unlikely to reclassify women with <1.5% 5-year risk. These results can be used to implement an efficient two-step testing approach to identify high risk women who may benefit from chemoprevention. PMID:28107349

  11. A gene expression signature that can predict green tea exposure and chemopreventive efficacy of lung cancer in mice.

    PubMed

    Lu, Yan; Yao, Ruisheng; Yan, Ying; Wang, Yian; Hara, Yukihiko; Lubet, Ronald A; You, Ming

    2006-02-15

    Green tea has been shown to be a potent chemopreventive agent against lung tumorigenesis in animal models. Previously, we found that treatment of A/J mice with either green tea (0.6% in water) or a defined green tea catechin extract (polyphenon E; 2.0 g/kg in diet) inhibited lung tumor tumorigenesis. Here, we described expression profiling of lung tissues derived from these studies to determine the gene expression signature that can predict the exposure and efficacy of green tea in mice. We first profiled global gene expressions in normal lungs versus lung tumors to determine genes which might be associated with the tumorigenic process (TUM genes). Gene expression in control tumors and green tea-treated tumors (either green tea or polyphenon E) were compared to determine those TUM genes whose expression levels in green tea-treated tumors returned to levels seen in normal lungs. We established a 17-gene expression profile specific for exposure to effective doses of either green tea or polyphenon E. This gene expression signature was altered both in normal lungs and lung adenomas when mice were exposed to green tea or polyphenon E. These experiments identified patterns of gene expressions that both offer clues for green tea's potential mechanisms of action and provide a molecular signature specific for green tea exposure.

  12. Familial adenomatous polyposis in pediatrics: natural history, emerging surveillance and management protocols, chemopreventive strategies, and areas of ongoing debate.

    PubMed

    Septer, Seth; Lawson, Caitlin E; Anant, Shrikant; Attard, Thomas

    2016-07-01

    Familial adenomatous polyposis (FAP) is a hereditary condition with a near 100 % lifetime risk of colorectal cancer without prophylactic colectomy. Most patients with FAP have a mutation in the adenomatous polyposis coli gene on chromosome 5q22. This condition frequently presents in children with polyps developing most frequently in the second decade of life and surveillance colonoscopy is required starting at age ten. Polyps are found not only in the colon, but in the stomach and duodenum. Knowledge of the natural history of FAP is important as there are several extra-colonic sequelae which also require surveillance. In infants and toddlers, there is an increased risk of hepatoblastoma, while in teenagers and adults duodenal carcinomas, desmoid tumors, thyroid cancer and medulloblastoma are more common in FAP than in the general population. Current chemopreventive strategies include several medications and natural products, although to this point there is no consensus on the most efficacious and safe agent. Genetic counseling is an important part of the diagnostic process for FAP. Appropriate use and interpretation of genetic testing is best accomplished with genetic counselor involvement as many families also have concerns regarding future insurability or discrimination when faced with genetic testing.

  13. Potentiating NK cell activity by combination of Rosuvastatin and Difluoromethylornithine for effective chemopreventive efficacy against Colon Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Janakiram, Naveena B.; Mohammed, Altaf; Bryant, Taylor; Zhang, Yuting; Brewer, Misty; Duff, Ashley; Biddick, Laura; Singh, Anil; Lightfoot, Stan; Steele, Vernon E; Rao, Chinthalapally V.

    2016-01-01

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) is the second highest cause of cancer-related deaths. A successful strategy to improve chemopreventive efficacies is by down-regulating tumor polyamines and enhancing NK cell activities. Colonic carcinogenesis was induced by azoxymethane (AOM) in male F344 rats. Eight weeks after AOM treatment, animals were fed diets containing Rosuvastatin and difluromethylornithine (DFMO) individually and in combination for 40 weeks. Both agents showed significant suppression of adenocarcinoma multiplicity and incidence with no toxicity compared to untreated rats. Low-dose Rosuvastatin plus DFMO suppressed colon adenocarcinoma multiplicity by 76% compared to low-dose Rosuvastatin (29%) and DFMO (46%), suggesting additive efficacy. Furthermore, low-dose combination caused a delay in colonic adenocarcinoma progression. DFMO, Rosuvastatin and/or combinations significantly decreased polyamine content and increased intra-tumoral NK cells expressing perforin plus IFN-γ compared to untreated colon tumors. Further ex-vivo analysis of splenic NK cells exposed to DFMO, Rosuvastatin or combination resulted in an increase of NKs with perforin expression. This is the first report on Rosuvastatin alone or combination strategy using clinically relevant statin plus DFMO doses which shows a significant suppression of colon adenocarcinomas, and their potential in increasing functional NK cells. This strategy has potential for further testing in high risk individuals for colon cancer. PMID:27841323

  14. Chemopreventive action of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs on the inflammatory pathways in colon cancer.

    PubMed

    Ghanghas, Preety; Jain, Shelly; Rana, Chandan; Sanyal, S N

    2016-03-01

    Non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) are emerging as novel chemopreventive agents against a variety of cancers owing to their capability in blocking the tumor development by cellular proliferation and by promoting apoptosis. Inflammation is principal cause of colon carcinogenesis. A missing link between inflammation and cancer could be the activation of NF-κB, which is a hallmark of inflammatory response, and is commonly detected in malignant tumors. Therefore, targeting pro-inflammatory cyclooxygenase enzymes and transcription factors will be profitable as a mechanism to inhibit tumor growth. In the present study, we have studied the role of various pro-inflammatory enzymes and transcription factors in the development of the 1,2-dimethylhydrazine dihydrochloride (DMH)-induced colorectal cancer and also observed the role of three NSAIDs, viz., Celecoxib, Etoricoxib and Diclofenac. Carcinogenic changes were observed in morphological and histopathological studies, whereas protein regulations of various biomolecules were identified by immunofluorescence analysis. Apoptotic studies was done by TUNEL assay and Hoechst/PI co-staining of the isolated colonocytes. It was found that DMH-treated animals were having an over-expression of pro-inflammatory enzymes, aberrant nuclear localization of activated cell survival transcription factor, NF-κB and suppression of anti-inflammatory transcription factor PPAR-γ, thereby suggesting a marked role of inflammation in the tumor progression. However, co-administration of NSAIDs has significantly reduced the inflammatory potential of the growing neoplasm.

  15. Chemoprevention of doxorubicin-induced alopecia in mice by dietary administration of L-cystine and vitamin B6.

    PubMed

    D'Agostini, Francesco; Fiallo, Paolo; Ghio, Massimo; De Flora, Silvio

    2013-01-01

    Chemotherapy-induced hair loss is one of the most serious and feared adverse effects of cancer therapy. Almost all traditional chemotherapeutic agents induce a more or less severe alopecia. At present, there is no effective treatment capable of preventing this damage. Several different experimental approaches, using various animal models, have been investigated over the last years, with promising results. Sulphur-containing amino acids (cystine, cysteine) are essential components for the health of normal hair. L-Cystine is used in the treatment of various forms of alopecia. Vitamin B6 plays an important role in the development and maintenance of the skin and it is useful in reducing hair loss. In the present study, we demonstrated that the combined oral administration at high dosages of L-cystine (1,600 or 800 mg/kg body weight/day) and vitamin B6 (160 or 80 mg/kg body weight/day) is an effective chemopreventive treatment against alopecia induced by doxorubicin treatment (1.1 mg/kg body weight intravenously) in C57BL/6 mice.

  16. Colon cancer and the epidermal growth factor receptor: Current treatment paradigms, the importance of diet, and the role of chemoprevention.

    PubMed

    Pabla, Baldeep; Bissonnette, Marc; Konda, Vani J

    2015-10-10

    Colorectal cancer represents the third most common and the second deadliest type of cancer for both men and women in the United States claiming over 50000 lives in 2014. The 5-year survival rate for patients diagnosed with metastatic colon and rectal cancer is < 15%. Early detection and more effective treatments are urgently needed to reduce morbidity and mortality of patients afflicted with this disease. Here we will review the risk factors and current treatment paradigms for colorectal cancer, with an emphasis on the role of chemoprevention as they relate to epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) blockade. We will discuss how various EGFR ligands are upregulated in the presence of Western diets high in saturated and N-6 polyunsaturated fats. We will also outline the various mechanisms of EGFR inhibition that are induced by naturally occurring chemopreventative agents such as ginseng, green tea, and curcumin. Finally, we will discuss the current role of targeted chemotherapy in colon cancer and outline the limitations of our current treatment options, describing mechanisms of resistance and escape.

  17. Asbestos Induces Oxidative Stress and Activation of Nrf2 Signaling in Murine Macrophages: Chemopreventive Role of the Synthetic Lignan Secoisolariciresinol Diglucoside (LGM2605).

    PubMed

    Pietrofesa, Ralph A; Velalopoulou, Anastasia; Albelda, Steven M; Christofidou-Solomidou, Melpo

    2016-03-01

    The interaction of asbestos fibers with macrophages generates harmful reactive oxygen species (ROS) and subsequent oxidative cell damage that are key processes linked to malignancy. Secoisolariciresinol diglucoside (SDG) is a non-toxic, flaxseed-derived pluripotent compound that has antioxidant properties and may thus function as a chemopreventive agent for asbestos-induced mesothelioma. We thus evaluated synthetic SDG (LGM2605) in asbestos-exposed, elicited murine peritoneal macrophages as an in vitro model of tissue phagocytic response to the presence of asbestos in the pleural space. Murine peritoneal macrophages (MFs) were exposed to crocidolite asbestos fibers (20 µg/cm²) and evaluated at various times post exposure for cytotoxicity, ROS generation, malondialdehyde (MDA), and levels of 8-iso Prostaglandin F2α (8-isoP). We then evaluated the ability of LGM2605 to mitigate asbestos-induced oxidative stress by administering LGM2605 (50 µM) 4-h prior to asbestos exposure. We observed a significant (p < 0.0001), time-dependent increase in asbestos-induced cytotoxicity, ROS generation, and the release of MDA and 8-iso Prostaglandin F2α, markers of lipid peroxidation, which increased linearly over time. LGM2605 treatment significantly (p < 0.0001) reduced asbestos-induced cytotoxicity and ROS generation, while decreasing levels of MDA and 8-isoP by 71%-88% and 41%-73%, respectively. Importantly, exposure to asbestos fibers induced cell protective defenses, such as cellular Nrf2 activation and the expression of phase II antioxidant enzymes, HO-1 and Nqo1 that were further enhanced by LGM2605 treatment. LGM2605 boosted antioxidant defenses, as well as reduced asbestos-induced ROS generation and markers of oxidative stress in murine peritoneal macrophages, supporting its possible use as a chemoprevention agent in the development of asbestos-induced malignant mesothelioma.

  18. Differentiation by NK cells is a prerequisite for effective targeting of cancer stem cells/poorly differentiated tumors by chemopreventive and chemotherapeutic drugs

    PubMed Central

    Kozlowska, Anna Karolina; Topchyan, Paytsar; Kaur, Kawaljit; Tseng, Han-Ching; Teruel, Antonia; Hiraga, Toru; Jewett, Anahid

    2017-01-01

    Natural Killer (NK) cells target oral, pancreatic, lung, breast, glioblastoma and melanoma stem-like/poorly differentiated tumors. Differentiation of the abovementioned tumors with supernatants from split-anergized NK cells decreases their susceptibility to NK cells, but increases their sensitivity to cisplatin (CDDP)-mediated cell death. Breast and melanoma tumor cells with CD44 knockdown display enhanced susceptibility to NK cell-mediated lysis, potentially due to decreased differentiation. We also demonstrate that sulindac, a non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug and a chemopreventive agent, not only limits the growth of oral tumor cells, but also aids in cancer cell elimination by NK cells. Treatment of oral tumors with sulindac, but not adriamycin inversely modulates the expression and function of NFκB and JNK, resulting in a significant down-regulation of IL-6, and VEGF secretion by oral tumor cells. In addition, increased secretion of IL-6 and VEGF is blocked by sulindac during interaction of oral tumors with NK cells. Sulindac treatment prevents synergistic induction of VEGF secretion by the tumor cells after their co-culture with untreated NK cells since non-activated NK cells lack the ability to efficiently kill tumor cells. Moreover, sulindac is able to profoundly reduce VEGF secretion by tumor cells cultured with IL-2 activated NK cells, which are able to significantly lyse the tumor cells. Based on the data presented in this study, we propose the following combinatorial approach for the treatment of stem-like/ poorly differentiated tumors in cancer patients with metastatic disease. Stem-like/ poorly differentiated tumor cells may in part undergo lysis or differentiation after NK cell immunotherapy, followed by treatment of differentiated tumors with chemotherapy and chemopreventive agents to eliminate the bulk of the tumor. This dual approach should limit tumor growth and prevent metastasis. PMID:28367234

  19. Asbestos Induces Oxidative Stress and Activation of Nrf2 Signaling in Murine Macrophages: Chemopreventive Role of the Synthetic Lignan Secoisolariciresinol Diglucoside (LGM2605)

    PubMed Central

    Pietrofesa, Ralph A.; Velalopoulou, Anastasia; Albelda, Steven M.; Christofidou-Solomidou, Melpo

    2016-01-01

    The interaction of asbestos fibers with macrophages generates harmful reactive oxygen species (ROS) and subsequent oxidative cell damage that are key processes linked to malignancy. Secoisolariciresinol diglucoside (SDG) is a non-toxic, flaxseed-derived pluripotent compound that has antioxidant properties and may thus function as a chemopreventive agent for asbestos-induced mesothelioma. We thus evaluated synthetic SDG (LGM2605) in asbestos-exposed, elicited murine peritoneal macrophages as an in vitro model of tissue phagocytic response to the presence of asbestos in the pleural space. Murine peritoneal macrophages (MFs) were exposed to crocidolite asbestos fibers (20 µg/cm2) and evaluated at various times post exposure for cytotoxicity, ROS generation, malondialdehyde (MDA), and levels of 8-iso Prostaglandin F2α (8-isoP). We then evaluated the ability of LGM2605 to mitigate asbestos-induced oxidative stress by administering LGM2605 (50 µM) 4-h prior to asbestos exposure. We observed a significant (p < 0.0001), time-dependent increase in asbestos-induced cytotoxicity, ROS generation, and the release of MDA and 8-iso Prostaglandin F2α, markers of lipid peroxidation, which increased linearly over time. LGM2605 treatment significantly (p < 0.0001) reduced asbestos-induced cytotoxicity and ROS generation, while decreasing levels of MDA and 8-isoP by 71%–88% and 41%–73%, respectively. Importantly, exposure to asbestos fibers induced cell protective defenses, such as cellular Nrf2 activation and the expression of phase II antioxidant enzymes, HO-1 and Nqo1 that were further enhanced by LGM2605 treatment. LGM2605 boosted antioxidant defenses, as well as reduced asbestos-induced ROS generation and markers of oxidative stress in murine peritoneal macrophages, supporting its possible use as a chemoprevention agent in the development of asbestos-induced malignant mesothelioma. PMID:26938529

  20. Sulforaphane Protects Rodent Retinas against Ischemia-Reperfusion Injury through the Activation of the Nrf2/HO-1 Antioxidant Pathway

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Ruixing; Brecha, Nicholas C.; Yu, Albert Cheung Hoi; Pu, Mingliang

    2014-01-01

    Retinal ischemia-reperfusion (I/R) injury induces oxidative stress, leukocyte infiltration, and neuronal cell death. Sulforaphane (SF), which can be obtained in cruciferous vegetables such as broccoli, exerts protective effects in response to oxidative stress in various tissues. These effects can be initiated through nuclear factor E2-related factor 2 (Nrf2)-mediated induction of heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1). This investigation was designed to elucidate the neural protective mechanisms of SF in the retinal I/R rat model. Animals were intraperitoneally (i.p.) injected with SF (12.5 mg/kg) or vehicle (corn oil) once a day for 7 consecutive days. Then, retinal I/R was made by elevating the intraocular pressure (IOP) to 130 mmHg for 1 h. To determine if HO-1 was involved in the Nrf2 antioxidant pathway, rats were subjected to protoporphyrin IX zinc (II) (ZnPP, 30 mg/kg, i.p.) treatments at 24 h before retinal ischemia. The neuroprotective effects of SF were assessed by determining the morphology of the retina, counting the infiltrating inflammatory cells and the surviving retinal ganglion cells (RGCs) and amacrine cells, and measuring apoptosis in the retinal layers. The expression of Nrf2 and HO-1 was studied by immunofluorescence analysis and western blotting. I/R induced a marked increase of ROS generation, caused pronounced inflammation, increased the apoptosis of RGCs and amacrine cells and caused the thinning of the inner retinal layer (IRL), and these effects were diminished or abolished by SF pretreatment. Meanwhile, SF pretreatment significantly elevated the nuclear accumulation of Nrf2 and the level of HO-1 expression in the I/R retinas; however, ZnPP reversed the protective effects of SF on I/R retinas. Together, we offer direct evidence that SF had protective effects on I/R retinas, which could be attributed, at least in part, to the activation of the Nrf2/HO-1 antioxidant pathway. PMID:25470382

  1. Pancreatic Cancer Chemoprevention Translational Workshop | Division of Cancer Prevention

    Cancer.gov

    Thursday, September 10th (6:00 to 9:30 PM) Welcome Barnett Kramer, MD, MPH (6:00 to 6:10 PM) Director of the Division of Cancer Prevention, NCI Introduction – Goals of the Workshop: ABCs of Cancer Prevention (Agents, Biomarkers, Cohorts) Mark Miller, PhD (6:10 to 6:25 PM) Program Director Division of Cancer Prevention, NCI |

  2. A Chemoprevention Trial to Study the Effects of High Tea Consumption on Smoking-Related Oxidative Stress

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-02-01

    of each subject’s baseline history of smoking, diet and tea intake, plasma catechins . and levels biomarkers of oxidative stress at baseline. All...AD Award Number: DAMDl7-03-1-0053 TITLE: A Chemoprevention Trial to Study the Effects of High Tea Consumption on Smoking-Related Oxidative Stress...NUMBERS A Chemoprevention Trial to Study the Effects of High Tea DAMDI7-03-1-0053 Consumption on Smoking-Related Oxidative Stress 6. AUTHOR(S) Iman A

  3. Evaluation of resveratrol and N-acetylcysteine for cancer chemoprevention in a Fanconi anemia murine model.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Qing-Shuo; Marquez-Loza, Laura; Sheehan, Andrea M; Watanabe-Smith, Kevin; Eaton, Laura; Benedetti, Eric; Major, Angela; Schubert, Kathryn; Deater, Matthew; Joseph, Eric; Grompe, Markus

    2014-04-01

    Fanconi anemia (FA) patients suffer from progressive bone marrow failure and often develop cancers. Previous studies showed that antioxidants tempol and resveratrol (RV) delayed tumor onset and reduced hematologic defects in FA murine models, respectively. Here we tested whether antioxidants N-acetylcysteine (NAC) or RV could delay cancer in tumor prone Fancd2(-/-) /Trp53(+/-) mice. Unlike tempol, neither compound had any significant chemopreventive effect in this model. We conclude that not all anti-oxidants are chemopreventive in FA. In addition, when given to Fancd2(-/-) mice, NAC helped maintain Fancd2(-/-) KSL cells in quiescence while tempol did not. The mechanisms behind the different actions of these antioxidants await further investigation.

  4. Combination chemoprevention of hamster buccal pouch carcinogenesis by bovine milk lactoferrin and black tea polyphenols.

    PubMed

    Mohan, K V P Chandra; Letchoumy, P Vidjaya; Hara, Y; Nagini, S

    2008-03-01

    Combination chemoprevention is a promising approach for oral cancer prevention. The authors evaluated the combined chemopreventive effects of bovine milk lactoferrin (bLF) and black tea polyphenols (Polyphenon-B) in a clinically relevant in vivo model of 7,12-dimethylbenz[a]anthracene (DMBA)-induced hamster buccal pouch (HBP) carcinogenesis. Although dietary administration of bLF and Polyphenon-B alone significantly reduced the tumor incidence, combined administration of bLF and polyphenon-B was more effective in inhibiting DMBA-induced genotoxicity and development of HBP carcinomas by modulation of carcinogen-metabolizing enzymes and cellular redox status. These results suggest that a "designer item" approach will be useful for human oral cancer prevention strategies.

  5. Chemopreventive effect of the non-psychotropic phytocannabinoid cannabidiol on experimental colon cancer.

    PubMed

    Aviello, Gabriella; Romano, Barbara; Borrelli, Francesca; Capasso, Raffaele; Gallo, Laura; Piscitelli, Fabiana; Di Marzo, Vincenzo; Izzo, Angelo A

    2012-08-01

    Colon cancer affects millions of individuals in Western countries. Cannabidiol, a safe and non-psychotropic ingredient of Cannabis sativa, exerts pharmacological actions (antioxidant and intestinal antinflammatory) and mechanisms (inhibition of endocannabinoid enzymatic degradation) potentially beneficial for colon carcinogenesis. Thus, we investigated its possible chemopreventive effect in the model of colon cancer induced by azoxymethane (AOM) in mice. AOM treatment was associated with aberrant crypt foci (ACF, preneoplastic lesions), polyps, and tumour formation, up-regulation of phospho-Akt, iNOS and COX-2 and down-regulation of caspase-3. Cannabidiol-reduced ACF, polyps and tumours and counteracted AOM-induced phospho-Akt and caspase-3 changes. In colorectal carcinoma cell lines, cannabidiol protected DNA from oxidative damage, increased endocannabinoid levels and reduced cell proliferation in a CB(1)-, TRPV1- and PPARγ-antagonists sensitive manner. It is concluded that cannabidiol exerts chemopreventive effect in vivo and reduces cell proliferation through multiple mechanisms.

  6. Molecular mechanisms underlying chemopreventive potential of curcumin: Current challenges and future perspectives.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Gaurav; Mittal, Sonam; Sak, Katrin; Tuli, Hardeep Singh

    2016-03-01

    In recent years, natural compounds have received considerable attention in preventing and curing most dreadful diseases including cancer. The reason behind the use of natural compounds in chemoprevention is associated with fewer numbers of side effects than conventional chemotherapeutics. Curcumin (diferuloylmethane, PubMed CID: 969516), a naturally occurring polyphenol, is derived from turmeric, which is used as a common Indian spice. It governs numerous intracellular targets, including proteins involved in antioxidant response, immune response, apoptosis, cell cycle regulation and tumor progression. A huge mass of available studies strongly supports the use of Curcumin as a chemopreventive drug. However, the main challenge encountered is the low bioavailability of Curcumin. This extensive review covers various therapeutic interactions of Curcumin with its recognized cellular targets involved in cancer treatment, strategies to overcome the bioavailability issue and adverse effects associated with Curcumin consumption.

  7. Comprehensive Review on Betulin as a Potent Anticancer Agent

    PubMed Central

    Kiełbus, Michał; Stepulak, Andrzej

    2015-01-01

    Numerous plant-derived substances, and their derivatives, are effective antitumour and chemopreventive agents. Yet, there are also a plethora of tumour types that do not respond, or become resistant, to these natural substances. This requires the discovery of new active compounds. Betulin (BE) is a pentacyclic triterpene and secondary metabolite of plants abundantly found in the outer bark of the birch tree Betulaceae sp. BE displays a broad spectrum of biological and pharmacological properties, among which the anticancer and chemopreventive activity attract most of the attention. In this vein, BE and its natural and synthetic derivatives act specifically on cancer cells with low cytotoxicity towards normal cells. Although the antineoplastic mechanism of action of BE is not well understood yet, several interesting aspects of BE's interactions are coming to light. This review will summarize the anticancer and chemopreventive potential of BE in vitro and in vivo by carefully dissecting and comparing the doses and tumour lines used in previous studies, as well as focusing on mechanisms underlying its activity at cellular and molecular level, and discuss future prospects. PMID:25866796

  8. Comprehensive review on betulin as a potent anticancer agent.

    PubMed

    Król, Sylwia Katarzyna; Kiełbus, Michał; Rivero-Müller, Adolfo; Stepulak, Andrzej

    2015-01-01

    Numerous plant-derived substances, and their derivatives, are effective antitumour and chemopreventive agents. Yet, there are also a plethora of tumour types that do not respond, or become resistant, to these natural substances. This requires the discovery of new active compounds. Betulin (BE) is a pentacyclic triterpene and secondary metabolite of plants abundantly found in the outer bark of the birch tree Betulaceae sp. BE displays a broad spectrum of biological and pharmacological properties, among which the anticancer and chemopreventive activity attract most of the attention. In this vein, BE and its natural and synthetic derivatives act specifically on cancer cells with low cytotoxicity towards normal cells. Although the antineoplastic mechanism of action of BE is not well understood yet, several interesting aspects of BE's interactions are coming to light. This review will summarize the anticancer and chemopreventive potential of BE in vitro and in vivo by carefully dissecting and comparing the doses and tumour lines used in previous studies, as well as focusing on mechanisms underlying its activity at cellular and molecular level, and discuss future prospects.

  9. Novel applications of COX-2 inhibitors, metformin, and statins for the primary chemoprevention of breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Micallef, Darren; Micallef, Sarah; Schembri-Wismayer, Pierre; Calleja-Agius, Jean

    2016-01-01

    Recent evidence shows that commonly prescribed drugs, such as non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs), metformin, and statins, may have beneficial roles in the primary chemoprevention of breast cancer. Therefore, these drugs could potentially be used in addition to the hormonal drugs currently used for this purpose (namely, selective estrogen receptor modulators and aromatase inhibitors) due to their alternative mechanisms of action. PMID:27990091

  10. Chronic unpredictable stress deteriorates the chemopreventive efficacy of pomegranate through oxidative stress pathway.

    PubMed

    Hasan, Shirin; Suhail, Nida; Bilal, Nayeem; Ashraf, Ghulam Md; Zaidi, Syed Kashif; AlNohair, Sultan; Banu, Naheed

    2016-05-01

    Chronic unpredictable stress (CUS) can influence the risk and progression of cancer through increased oxidative stress. Pomegranate is known to protect carcinogenesis through its anti-oxidative properties. This study is carried out to examine whether CUS affects the chemopreventive potential of pomegranate through oxidative stress pathway. Role of CUS on early stages of 7, 12 dimethyl benz(a) anthracene (DMBA) induced carcinogenesis, and its pre-exposure effect on chemopreventive efficacy of pomegranate juice (PJ) was examined in terms of in vivo antioxidant and biochemical parameters in Swiss albino rats. Rats were divided in various groups and were subjected to CUS paradigm, DMBA administration (65 mg/kg body weight, single dose), and PJ treatment. Exposure to stress (alone) and DMBA (alone) led to increased oxidative stress by significantly decreasing the antioxidant enzymes activities and altering the glutathione (GSH), malondialdehyde (MDA), glutamate oxaloacetate transaminase (GOT), and glutamate pyruvate transaminase (GPT) levels. A significant increase in DNA damage demonstrated by comet assay was seen in the liver cells. Stress exposure to DMBA-treated rats further increased the oxidative stress and disturbed the biochemical parameters as compared to DMBA (alone)-treated rats. Chemoprevention with PJ in DMBA (alone)-treated rats restored the altered parameters. However, in the pre-stress DMBA-treated rats, the overall antioxidant potential of PJ was significantly diminished. Our results indicate that chronic stress not only increases the severity of carcinogenesis but also diminishes the anti-oxidative efficacy of PJ. In a broader perspective, special emphasis should be given to stress management and healthy diet during cancer chemoprevention.

  11. GKLF as a Novel Target in Selenium Chemoprevention of Prostate Cancer

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-02-01

    AD_________________ Award Number: W81XWH-04-1-0009 TITLE: GKLF as a Novel Target in Selenium ...Novel Target in Selenium Chemoprevention of Prostate Cancer 5b. GRANT NUMBER W81XWH-04-1-0009 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6. AUTHOR(S) 5d...transcription factor gut-enriched krüppel-like factor (GKLF) in mediating selenium action in the androgen receptor (AR)-null PC-3 human prostate cancer cells

  12. Pomegranate-mediated chemoprevention of experimental hepatocarcinogenesis involves Nrf2-regulated antioxidant mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    Bishayee, Anupam; Bhatia, Deepak; Thoppil, Roslin J.; Darvesh, Altaf S.; Nevo, Eviatar; Lansky, Ephraim P.

    2011-01-01

    Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC), one of the most prevalent and lethal cancers, has shown an alarming rise in the USA. Without effective therapy for HCC, novel chemopreventive strategies may effectively circumvent the current morbidity and mortality. Oxidative stress predisposes to hepatocarcinogenesis and is the major driving force of HCC. Pomegranate, an ancient fruit, is gaining tremendous attention due to its powerful antioxidant properties. Here, we examined mechanism-based chemopreventive potential of a pomegranate emulsion (PE) against dietary carcinogen diethylnitrosamine (DENA)-induced rat hepatocarcinogenesis that mimics human HCC. PE treatment (1 or 10 g/kg), started 4 weeks prior to the DENA challenge and continued for 18 weeks thereafter, showed striking chemopreventive activity demonstrated by reduced incidence, number, multiplicity, size and volume of hepatic nodules, precursors of HCC. Both doses of PE significantly attenuated the number and area of γ-glutamyl transpeptidase-positive hepatic foci compared with the DENA control. PE also attenuated DENA-induced hepatic lipid peroxidation and protein oxidation. Mechanistic studies revealed that PE elevated gene expression of an array of hepatic antioxidant and carcinogen detoxifying enzymes in DENA-exposed animals. PE elevated protein and messenger RNA expression of the hepatic nuclear factor E2-related factor 2 (Nrf2). Our results provide substantial evidence, for the first time, that pomegranate constituents afford chemoprevention of hepatocarcinogenesis possibly through potent antioxidant activity achieved by upregulation of several housekeeping genes under the control of Nrf2 without toxicity. The outcome of this study strongly supports the development of pomegranate-derived products in the prevention and treatment of human HCC, which remains a devastating disease. PMID:21389260

  13. Chemoprevention of Prostate Cancer Initiation in a Novel Transgenic Mouse Model By Targeting 15-Lipoxygenase-1

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-02-01

    chemoprevention studies. Diets rich in either omega (ω)-3 or ω-6 polyunsaturated fatty acids ( PUFAs ) directly impact PCa tumor growth. Furthermore, the FLiMP...polyunsaturated fatty acids ( PUFAs ), 15-lipoxygenase-1, cyclooxygenase, prostate cancer, Array, Genes. 16. SECURITY CLASSIFICATION OF: 17. LIMITATION...observed) and, (3) Our study in year 2 provided mechanistic roles of omega (ω)-3 fatty acids in slowing PCa growth by altering ω-6/ ω-3 ratios via diet

  14. Chemoprevention of Prostate Cancer Initiation in a Novel Transgenic Mouse Model by Targeting 15-Lipoxygenase-1

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-02-01

    provide a valuable pre-clinical model for chemoprevention studies. Diets rich in either omega (ω)-3 or ω-6 polyunsaturated fatty acids ( PUFAs ) directly...polyunsaturated fatty acids ( PUFAs ), 15-lipoxygenase-1, cyclooxygenase, prostate cancer, Array, Genes. 16. SECURITY CLASSIFICATION OF: 17...FLiMP+/+ mice fed a normal diet (PIN observed) and, (3) Our study in year 2 provided mechanistic roles of omega (ω)-3 fatty acids in slowing PCa growth

  15. Chemoprevention of Prostate Cancer Initiation in a Novel Transgenic Mouse Model by Targeting 15-Lipoxygenase-1

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-02-01

    chemoprevention studies. Diets rich in either omega (ω)-3 or ω-6 polyunsaturated fatty acids ( PUFAs ) directly impact PCa tumor growth. Furthermore... acids effects on PIN development. 15. SUBJECT TERMS Diet, polyunsaturated fatty acids ( PUFAs ), 15-lipoxygenase-1, cyclooxygenase, prostate cancer...compared to FLiMP+/+ mice fed a normal diet (PIN observed) and, (3) Our study in year 2 provided mechanistic roles of omega (ω)-3 fatty acids in slowing

  16. Chemoprevention utility of silibinin and Cdk4 pathway inhibition in Apc−/+ mice

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Colorectal cancer (CRC) is the second leading cause of death from cancer in the United States. Colorectal cancers have a prolonged latency following initiation that may span decades providing ample time for implementing a chemoprevention strategy that could block or reverse the progression to CRC. Cdk4 pathway alterations have been linked to a number of cancers including CRC. In these experiments we focused on the Cdk4 pathway and its role in intestinal tumorigenesis as a possible target in chemoprevention strategies. Methods We evaluated the effect of Cdk4 blockade on the prevention of intestinal tumor formation by crossing Cdk4−/− mice to Apc−/+ mice. In addition, we tested the effect of the dietary compound silibinin on the Cdk4 pathway in Apc−/+ mice and HT-29 colon cancer cells in culture. Results Cdk4−/− mice backcrossed to Apc−/+ mice reduced intestinal adenoma formation compared to Apc−/+ controls. Silibinin effectively targeted the Cdk4 pathway causing hypophosphorylation of the retinoblastoma protein, inhibited cell growth, and induced apoptosis. As a result silibinin blocked the development of intestinal adenomas by 52% in this genetic model (Apc−/+ mice) of early events in colorectal cancer formation. No toxic abnormalities were detected in mice which received silibinin. Conclusions Modification of the Cdk4 pathway using a natural plant-derived compound such as silibinin may be a useful chemopreventive strategy for colorectal carcinomas. PMID:23530816

  17. Colon Cancer Chemoprevention by Sage Tea Drinking: Decreased DNA Damage and Cell Proliferation.

    PubMed

    Pedro, Dalila F N; Ramos, Alice A; Lima, Cristovao F; Baltazar, Fatima; Pereira-Wilson, Cristina

    2016-02-01

    Salvia officinalis and some of its isolated compounds have been found to be preventive of DNA damage and increased proliferation in vitro in colon cells. In the present study, we used the azoxymethane model to test effects of S. officinalis on colon cancer prevention in vivo. The results showed that sage treatment reduced the number of ACF formed only if administered before azoxymethane injection, demonstrating that sage tea drinking has a chemopreventive effect on colorectal cancer. A decrease in the proliferation marker Ki67 and in H2 O2 -induced and azoxymethane-induced DNA damage to colonocytes and lymphocytes were found with sage treatment. This confirms in vivo the chemopreventive effects of S. officinalis. Taken together, our results show that sage treatment prevented initiation phases of colon carcinogenesis, an effect due, at least in part, to DNA protection, and reduced proliferation rates of colon epithelial cell that prevent mutations and their fixation through cell replication. These chemopreventive effects of S. officinalis on colon cancer add to the many health benefits attributed to sage and encourage its consumption.

  18. Melatonin–sulforaphane hybrid ITH12674 induces neuroprotection in oxidative stress conditions by a ‘drug–prodrug’ mechanism of action

    PubMed Central

    Egea, Javier; Buendia, Izaskun; Parada, Esther; Navarro, Elisa; Rada, Patricia; Cuadrado, Antonio; López, Manuela G; García, Antonio G; León, Rafael

    2015-01-01

    Background and Purpose Neurodegenerative diseases are a major problem afflicting ageing populations; however, there are no effective treatments to stop their progression. Oxidative stress and neuroinflammation are common factors in their pathogenesis. Nuclear factor (erythroid-derived 2)-like 2 (Nrf2) is the master regulator of oxidative stress, and melatonin is an endogenous hormone with antioxidative properties that reduces its levels with ageing. We have designed a new compound that combines the effects of melatonin with Nrf2 induction properties, with the idea of achieving improved neuroprotective properties. Experimental Approach Compound ITH12674 is a hybrid of melatonin and sulforaphane designed to exert a dual drug–prodrug mechanism of action. We obtained the proposed hybrid in a single step. To test its neuroprotective properties, we used different in vitro models of oxidative stress related to neurodegenerative diseases and brain ischaemia. Key Results ITH12674 showed an improved neuroprotective profile compared to that of melatonin and sulforaphane. ITH12674 (i) mediated a concentration-dependent protective effect in cortical neurons subjected to oxidative stress; (ii) decreased reactive oxygen species production; (iii) augmented GSH concentrations in cortical neurons; (iv) enhanced the Nrf2–antioxidant response element transcriptional response in transfected HEK293T cells; and (v) protected organotypic cultures of hippocampal slices subjected to oxygen and glucose deprivation and re-oxygenation from stress by increasing the expression of haem oxygenase-1 and reducing free radical production. Conclusion and Implications ITH12674 combines the signalling pathways of the parent compounds to improve its neuroprotective properties. This opens a new line of research for such hybrid compounds to treat neurodegenerative diseases. PMID:25425158

  19. Chemopreventive effects of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs in the membrane lipid composition and fluidity parameters of the 1,2-dimethylhydrazine-induced colon carcinogenesis in rats.

    PubMed

    Kanwar, Shailender Singh; Vaiphei, Kim; Nehru, Bimla; Sanyal, Sankar N

    2007-01-01

    Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) such as aspirin, celecoxib, and etoricoxib are reported to act as chemopreventive agents in experimental colon cancer induced by 1,2-dimethylhydrazine (DMH) as they are known cyclooxygenase (COX) enzyme inhibitors. To determine whether NSAIDs can also effectively modulate the membrane lipid compositions and the fluidity parameters of colonic brush border membrane, rats were injected subcutaneously (s.c.) with DMH 30 mg/kg body weight per week for 6 weeks. The animals were simultaneously treated with NSAIDs orally at the dose of aspirin, 60 mg/kg body weight; celecoxib, 6 mg/kg body weight; and etoricoxib, 0.6 mg/kg body weight. The animals were sacrificed after 6 weeks of treatments. Brush border membrane was isolated from proximal and distal portions of the colon. Membrane lipids were extracted and analyzed while the fluidity parameters were assessed by steady-state fluorescence polarization technique using the membrane extrinsic fluorophore 1,6-diphenyl-1,3,5-hexatriene (DPH). The translational diffusion was measured by using the excimer formation of pyrene incorporated in the membrane. Colonic mucosal changes in DMH alone and DMH+NSAID treated animals were assessed histologically. The results demonstrate that (a) there is a distinct occurrence of premalignant alterations in DMH-induced colon in the form of multiple plaque lesions (MPLs), which were greatly reduced by the NSAIDs used, (b) the membrane lipid changes in DMH-induced colon were completely restored back, (c) the alterations in membrane fluorescence polarization and the fluidity parameters are partially recovered, particularly with etoricoxib, and (d) the pyrene excimer formation process was completely restored. It may be concluded that the NSAIDs, particularly the coxib group of the drugs (COX-2 selective), are effective in chemoprevention in the DMH-induced colon carcinogenesis and membrane alterations.

  20. Chemoprevention of intestinal polyps in ApcMin/+ mice fed with western or balanced diets by drinking annurca apple polyphenol extract.

    PubMed

    Fini, Lucia; Piazzi, Giulia; Daoud, Yahya; Selgrad, Michael; Maegawa, Shinji; Garcia, Melissa; Fogliano, Vincenzo; Romano, Marco; Graziani, Giulia; Vitaglione, Paola; Carmack, Susanne W; Gasbarrini, Antonio; Genta, Robert M; Issa, Jean-Pierre; Boland, C Richard; Ricciardiello, Luigi

    2011-06-01

    The Western diet (WD) is associated with a higher incidence of colorectal cancer (CRC) than the Mediterranean diet. Polyphenols extracted from Annurca apple showed chemopreventive properties in CRC cells. A multifactorial, four-arm study by using wild-type (wt) and Apc(Min/+) mice was carried out to evaluate the effect on polyp number and growth of APE treatment (60 μmol/L) ad libitum in drinking water combined with a WD or a balanced diet (BD) for 12 weeks. Compared with APE treatment, we found a significant drop in body weight (P < 0.0001), severe rectal bleeding (P = 0.0076), presence of extraintestinal tumors, and poorer activity status (P = 0.0034) in water-drinking Apc(Min/+) mice, more remarkably in the WD arm. In the BD and WD groups, APE reduced polyp number (35% and 42%, respectively, P < 0.001) and growth (60% and 52%, respectively, P < 0.0001) in both colon and small intestine. Increased antioxidant activity was found in wt animals fed both diets and in Apc(Min/+) mice fed WD and drinking APE. Reduced lipid peroxidation was found in Apc(Min/+) mice drinking APE fed both diets and in wt mice fed WD. In normal mucosa, mice drinking water had lower global levels of DNA methylation than mice drinking APE. APE treatment is highly effective in reducing polyps in Apc(Min/+) mice and supports the concept that a mixture of phytochemicals, as they are naturally present in foods, represent a plausible chemopreventive agent for CRC, particularly in populations at high risk for colorectal neoplasia.

  1. Agent Orange

    MedlinePlus

    ... Index Agent Orange Agent Orange Home Facts about Herbicides Veterans' Diseases Birth Defects Benefits Exposure Locations Provider ... Orange Parkinson’s Awareness Month Were you exposed to herbicides during service and have Parkinson’s disease? You may ...

  2. Mechanistic perspectives on cancer chemoprevention/chemotherapeutic effects of thymoquinone.

    PubMed

    Kundu, Juthika; Chun, Kyung-Soo; Aruoma, Okezie I; Kundu, Joydeb Kumar

    2014-10-01

    The bioactive natural products (plant secondary metabolites) are widely known to possess therapeutic value for the prevention and treatment of various chronic diseases including cancer. Thymoquinone (2-methyl-5-isopropyl-1,4-benzoquinone; TQ), a monoterpene present in black cumin seeds, exhibits pleiotropic pharmacological activities including antioxidant, anti-inflammatory, antidiabetic and antitumor effects. TQ inhibits experimental carcinogenesis in a wide range of animal models and has been shown to arrest the growth of various cancer cells in culture as well as xenograft tumors in vivo. The mechanistic basis of anticancer effects of TQ includes the inhibition of carcinogen metabolizing enzyme activity and oxidative damage of cellular macromolecules, attenuation of inflammation, induction of cell cycle arrest and apoptosis in tumor cells, blockade of tumor angiogenesis, and suppression of migration, invasion and metastasis of cancer cells. TQ shows synergistic and/or potentiating anticancer effects when combined with clinically used chemotherapeutic agents. At the molecular level, TQ targets various components of intracellular signaling pathways, particularly a variety of upstream kinases and transcription factors, which are aberrantly activated during the course of tumorigenesis.

  3. A potential role of PUFAs and COXIBs in cancer chemoprevention.

    PubMed

    Vara-Messler, Marianela; Buccellati, Carola; Pustina, Linda; Folco, Giancarlo; Rovati, G Enrico; Hoxha, Malvina

    2015-07-01

    Polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs), particularly the ω-3 PUFAs and COXIBs have been associated with decreased inflammation and the prevention of tumorigenesis. ω-3 PUFAs have shown to display multiple antitumour actions, while ω-6 PUFAs and its derived eicosanoids promote the effects in cancer cell growth, angiogenesis, and invasion. ω-3 PUFAs may act by suppressing the metabolism of arachidonic acid to form proinflammatory mediators or as a precursors of novel lipid mediators with pro-resolving activity, while COXIBs are able to modulate inflammatory response by inhibiting cyclooxygenase 2 (COX-2), an inducible prostaglandin synthase overexpressed in several human cancers. As recently has been postulated, the anti-inflammation and pro-resolution processes are not equivalent. A family of lipid mediators from ω-3 PUFAs can act as agonist promoting resolution, while antinflammatory agents such as COXIBs may act as antagonists limiting the inflammatory response. The present paper reviews the current knowledge about the role of PUFAs and its derivatives (metabolites), as well as the COXIBs activity in cancer process as a sinergic therapeutic alternative for cancer treatment.

  4. Naturally occurring anti-cancer agents targeting EZH2.

    PubMed

    Shahabipour, Fahimeh; Caraglia, Michele; Majeed, Muhammed; Derosa, Giuseppe; Maffioli, Pamela; Sahebkar, Amirhossein

    2017-03-18

    Natural products are considered as promising tools for the prevention and treatment of cancer. The enhancer of zeste homolog 2 (EZH2) is a histone methyltransferase unit of polycomb repressor complexes such as PRC2 complex that has oncogenic roles through interference with growth and metastatic potential. Several agents targeting EZH2 has been discovered but they often induce side effects in clinical trials. Recently, EZH2 has emerged as a potential target of natural products with documented anti-cancer effects and this discloses a new scenario for the development of EZH2 inhibitory strategies with agents with low cytotoxic detrimental effects. In fact, several natural products such as curcumin, triptolide, ursolic acid, sulforaphane, davidiin, tanshindiols, gambogic acid, berberine and Alcea rosea have been shown to serve as EZH2 modulators. Mechanisms like inhibition of histone H3K4, H3K27 and H3K36 trimethylation, down-regulation of matrix metalloproteinase expression, competitive binding to the S-adenosylmethionine binding site of EZH2 and modulation of tumor-suppressive microRNAs have been demonstrated to mediate the EZH2-inhibitory activity of the mentioned natural products. This review summarizes the pathways that are regulated by various natural products resulting in the suppression of EZH2, and provides a plausible molecular mechanism for the putative anti-cancer effects of these compounds.

  5. Pharmacogenetics, pharmacogenomics and epigenetics of Nrf2-regulated xenobiotic-metabolizing enzymes and transporters by dietary phytochemical and cancer chemoprevention.

    PubMed

    Wu, Tien-Yuan; Khor, Tin Oo; Lee, Jong Hun; Cheung, Ka Lung; Shu, Limin; Chen, Chi; Kong, Ah-Ng

    2013-07-01

    Cancer chemopreventive activities of various phytochemicals have been attributed to the modulation of xenobiotic disposition, which includes absorption, distribution, metabolism, and excretion. The interaction between xenobiotics and xenobiotic-metabolizing enzymes (XMEs) is bidirectional. XMEs are responsible for the biotransformation of xenobiotics such as bioactivation and detoxification. Conversely, xenobiotics affect XMEs through transcriptional regulation (induction or suppression) and post-translational interactions (inhibition or activation). Similar relationships also exist between xenobiotics and their transporters. Studies conducted over the past decade have demonstrated that the transcription factor, nuclear factor erythroid 2-related factor 2 (Nrf2), plays a critical role in the regulation of detoxifying enzymes and transporters through a signaling system that senses and responds to redox imbalance. The role of Nrf2 in the interaction between chemopreventive phytochemicals and detoxifying enzymes/transporters has become an important topic in cancer chemoprevention. In this review, the genetic and epigenetic factors that contribute to Nrf2-mediated regulation of detoxifying XMEs and transporters are discussed in the context of cancer chemoprevention. Phytochemicals may modulate the genome as well as epigenome, altering the regulation of XMEs and transporters, which may be critical for both cancer chemoprevention and the prevention of other oxidative stress- and inflammatory-related diseases, including cardiovascular, metabolic and neurological pathologies. The pharmacogenomic expression of XMEs and transporters, with an emphasis on both genomics and epigenetics, will also be discussed.

  6. Research progress on chemopreventive effects of phytochemicals on colorectal cancer and their mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    Yin, Teng-Fei; Wang, Min; Qing, Ying; Lin, Ying-Min; Wu, Dong

    2016-01-01

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) is a type of cancer with high morbidity and mortality rates worldwide and has become a global health problem. The conventional radiotherapy and chemotherapy regimen for CRC not only has a low cure rate but also causes side effects. Many studies have shown that adequate intake of fruits and vegetables in the diet may have a protective effect on CRC occurrence, possibly due to the special biological protective effect of the phytochemicals in these foods. Numerous in vitro and in vivo studies have demonstrated that phytochemicals play strong antioxidant, anti-inflammatory and anti-cancer roles by regulating specific signaling pathways and molecular markers to inhibit the occurrence and development of CRC. This review summarizes the progress on CRC prevention using the phytochemicals sulforaphane, curcumin and resveratrol, and elaborates on the specific underlying mechanisms. Thus, we believe that phytochemicals might provide a novel therapeutic approach for CRC prevention, but future clinical studies are needed to confirm the specific preventive effect of phytochemicals on cancer. PMID:27610016

  7. Chemopreventive effect of omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids and atorvastatin in rats with bladder cancer.

    PubMed

    El-Ashmawy, Nahla E; Khedr, Eman G; El-Bahrawy, Hoda A; Al-Tantawy, Samar M

    2017-02-01

    Bladder cancer remains a huge concern for the medical community because of its incidence and prevalence rates, as well as high percentage of recurrence and progression. Omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids and atorvastatin proved anti-inflammatory effects through peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma mechanism. However, their chemopreventive effect still remained to be examined and clarified. In this study, bladder cancer was induced in rats by the chemical carcinogen N-butyl-N-(4-hydroxybutyl)nitrosamine. Omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (docosahexaenoic acid and eicosapentaenoic acid: 2:3 w/w; 1200 mg/kg) and/or atorvastatin (6 mg/kg) were given orally daily to rats for eight consecutive weeks concomitantly with N-butyl-N-(4-hydroxybutyl)nitrosamine and continued for further 4 weeks after cessation of N-butyl-N-(4-hydroxybutyl)nitrosamine administration. The histopathological examination of rat bladder revealed the presence of tumors and the absence of apoptotic bodies in sections from N-butyl-N-(4-hydroxybutyl)nitrosamine group, while tumors were absent and apoptotic bodies were clearly observed in sections from rat groups treated with omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids, atorvastatin, or both drugs. The study of the molecular mechanisms illustrated downregulation of COX-2 and P53 (mutant) genes and suppression of transforming growth factor beta-1 and the lipid peroxidation product malondialdehyde in serum of rats of the three treated groups. This chemopreventive effect was confirmed by and associated with lower level of bladder tumor antigen in urine. However, the combined treatment with both drugs exhibited the major protective effect and nearly corrected the dyslipidemia that has been induced by N-butyl-N-(4-hydroxybutyl)nitrosamine. Collectively, omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids and atorvastatin, besides having anti-inflammatory properties, proved a chemopreventive effect against bladder cancer, which nominates them to be used as

  8. Recruitment strategies for a lung cancer chemoprevention trial involving ex-smokers.

    PubMed

    Kye, Steve H; Tashkin, Donald P; Roth, Michael D; Adams, Bradley; Nie, Wen-Xian; Mao, Jenny T

    2009-09-01

    The ability to recruit qualified subjects who are willing to adhere to the study protocol in clinical trials is an essential component of translational research. Such tasks can be particularly challenging for chemoprevention studies when the targeted study population is healthy, at risk individuals who do not have signs or symptoms of the disease, and the study participation involves complex scheduling and invasive procedures such as bronchoscopy. In this report, we describe the recruitment process and evaluated the effectiveness of various recruitment strategies utilized in our National Cancer Institute sponsored lung cancer chemoprevention study with celecoxib. Heavy ex-smokers were recruited into the study through various methods such as radio advertisements, print media, mass mailings, flyers, internet postings and others. The number of inquiries, on-site screenees and randomization generated by each method determined the efficacy of that recruitment strategy. We prescreened 4470 individuals, invited 323 people for on-site screening and randomized 137 subjects. Radio advertisements (ads) generated the most inquiries (71.1%), followed by internet posting (11.8%), print media (6.0%), posted and racked flyers (4.4%), mass mailings (2.7%) and other strategies such as referrals from friends or family members or health care providers (2.3%). Radio ads, although costly, yielded the most subjects for on-site screening and randomization. Moreover, among the various types of radio stations, news radio stations were by far the most successful. Our results suggest that advertising on news radio is a highly effective recruitment method for successful accrual of ex-smokers into lung cancer chemoprevention trials.

  9. Fatty Acid Synthesis Intermediates Represent Novel Noninvasive Biomarkers of Prostate Cancer Chemoprevention by Phenethyl Isothiocyanate.

    PubMed

    Singh, Krishna B; Singh, Shivendra V

    2017-03-14

    Increased de novo synthesis of fatty acids is a distinctive feature of prostate cancer, which continues to be a leading cause of cancer-related deaths among American men. Therefore, inhibition of de novo fatty acid synthesis represents an attractive strategy for chemoprevention of prostate cancer. We have shown previously that dietary feeding of phenethyl isothiocyanate (PEITC), a phytochemical derived from edible cruciferous vegetables such as watercress, inhibits incidence and burden of poorly-differentiated prostate cancer in Transgenic Adenocarcinoma of Mouse Prostate (TRAMP) model. The present study was designed to test the hypothesis of whether fatty acid intermediate(s) can serve as noninvasive biomarker(s) of prostate cancer chemoprevention by PEITC using archived plasma and tumor specimens from the TRAMP study as well as cellular models of prostate cancer. Exposure of prostate cancer cells (LNCaP and 22Rv1) to pharmacological concentrations of PEITC resulted in downregulation of key fatty acid metabolism proteins, including acetyl-CoA carboxylase 1 (ACC1), fatty acid synthase (FASN), and carnitine palmitoyltransferase 1A (CPT1A). The mRNA expression of FASN and CPT1A as well as acetyl-CoA levels were decreased by PEITC treatment in both cell lines. PEITC administration to TRAMP mice also resulted in a significant decrease in tumor expression of FASN protein. Consistent with these findings, the levels of total free fatty acids, total phospholipids, triglyceride, and ATP were significantly lower in the plasma and/or prostate tumors of PEITC-treated TRAMP mice compared with controls. The present study is the first to implicate inhibition of fatty acid synthesis in prostate cancer chemoprevention by PEITC.

  10. Chemopreventive Effect of Tadalafil in Cisplatin-Induced Nephrotoxicity in Rats.

    PubMed

    Adeneye, A A; Benebo, A S

    2016-08-30

    Nephrotoxicity remains a common untoward effect of cisplatin therapy with limited effective chemopreventive options available till date. This study aims to evaluate the possible chemopreventive effect and mechanism(s) of action of 2 mgkg-1 and 5 mgkg-1 of Tadalafil in cisplatin-induced nephrotoxic rats. In this study, twenty-five male Wistar rats were randomly divided into five groups (n = 5 rats per group) and daily pretreated with oral doses of distilled water (10 mLkg-1), ascorbic acid (100 mgkg-1), Tadalafil (2 mgkg-1 and 5 mgkg-1) for 7 days before cisplatin (5 mgkg-1, intraperitoneal) was administered. 72 hours post-cisplatin injections, rats were sacrificed humanely and blood samples for serum electrolytes, urea and creatinine and renal tissues for reduced glutathione (GSH), superoxide dismutase (SOD), catalase (CAT), glutathione peroxidase (GSH-Px) and malonialdehyde dehydrogenase (MAD) assays and histopathology were collected. Results showed that cisplatin injection caused significant decreases in the serum sodium (Na+), potassium (K+), bicarbonate (HCO3-), calcium (Ca2+), phosphate (PO42-) and concomitant significant increases in the serum urea and creatinine levels. In addition, there were significant decreases in the renal tissue GSH, SOD, CAT and increased MAD and GSH-Px levels which were corroborated by histopathological features of tubulonephritis. However, these histo-biochemical alterations were significantly attenuated by ascorbic acid and Tadalafil pretreatments. Overall, results of this study showed the chemopreventive potential of Tadalafil against cisplatin-induced nephrotoxicity which was possibly mediated via antioxidant and anti-lipoperoxidation mechanisms.

  11. Steroidal pyrazolines evaluated as aromatase and quinone reductase-2 inhibitors for chemoprevention of cancer.

    PubMed

    Abdalla, Mohamed M; Al-Omar, Mohamed A; Bhat, Mashooq A; Amr, Abdel-Galil E; Al-Mohizea, Abdullah M

    2012-05-01

    The aromatase and quinone reductase-2 inhibition of synthesized heterocyclic pyrazole derivatives fused with steroidal structure for chemoprevention of cancer is reported herein. All compounds were interestingly less toxic than the reference drug (Cyproterone(®)). The aromatase inhibitory activities of these compounds were much more potent than the lead compound resveratrol, which has an IC(50) of 80 μM. In addition, all the compounds displayed potent quinone reductase-2 inhibition. Initially the acute toxicity of the compounds was assayed via the determination of their LD(50). The aromatase and quinone reductase-2 inhibitors resulting from this study have potential value in the treatment and prevention of cancer.

  12. Chemopreventive effects of Cuminum cyminum in chemically induced forestomach and uterine cervix tumors in murine model systems.

    PubMed

    Gagandeep; Dhanalakshmi, Sivanandhan; Méndiz, Ester; Rao, Agra Ramesha; Kale, Raosaheb Kathalupant

    2003-01-01

    Lately, a strong correlation has been established between diet and cancer. For ages, cumin has been a part of the diet. It is a popular spice regularly used as a flavoring agent in a number of ethnic cousins. In the present study, cancer chemopreventive potentials of different doses of a cumin seed-mixed diet were evaluated against benzo(a)pyrene [B(a)P]-induced forestomach tumorigenesis and 3-methylcholanthrene (MCA)-induced uterine cervix tumorigenesis. Results showed a significant inhibition of stomach tumor burden (tumors per mouse) by cumin. Tumor burden was 7.33 +/- 2.10 in the B(a)P-treated control group, whereas it reduced to 3.10 +/- 0.57 (P < 0.001) by a 2.5% dose and 3.11 +/- 0.60 (P <0.001) by a 5% dose of cumin seeds. Cervical carcinoma incidence, compared with the MCA-treated control group (66.67%), reduced to 27.27% (P < 0.05) by a diet of 5% cumin seeds and to 12.50% (P < 0.05) by a diet of 7.5% cumin seeds. The effect of 2.5 and 5% cumin seed-mixed diets was also examined on carcinogen/xenobiotic metabolizing phase I and phase II enzymes, antioxidant enzymes, glutathione content, lactate dehydrogenase (LDH), and lipid peroxidation in the liver of Swiss albino mice. Levels of cytochrome P-450 (cyt P-450) and cytochrome b5 (cyt b(5)) were significantly augmented (P < 0.05) by the 2.5% dose of cumin seed diet. The levels of cyt P-450 reductase and cyt b(5) reductase were increased (significance level being from P < 0.05 to P < 0.01) by both doses of cumin. Among the phase II enzymes, glutathione S-transferase specific activity increased (P < 0.005) by the 5% dose, whereas that of DT-diaphorase increased significantly (P < 0.05) by both doses used (2.5 and 5%). In the antioxidant system, significant elevation of the specific activities of superoxide dismutase (P < 0.01) and catalase (P < 0.05) was observed with the 5% dose of cumin. The activities of glutathione peroxidase and glutathione reductase remained unaltered by both doses of cumin. The level

  13. Vitis vinifera peel and seed gold nanoparticles exhibit chemopreventive potential, antioxidant activity and induce apoptosis through mutant p53, Bcl-2 and pan cytokeratin down-regulation in experimental animals.

    PubMed

    Nirmala, J Grace; Narendhirakannan, R T

    2017-03-07

    Several studies suggest surface modifications of gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) by capping agents or surface coatings could play an important role in biological systems, and site directed delivery. The present study was carried out to assess the antioxidant and apoptotic activities of the Vitis vinifera peel and seed gold nanoparticles in experimentally induced cancer in Swiss albino mice. 12-dimethylbenz [a] anthracene (DMBA) (single application) and 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol 13-acetate (TPA) (thrice a week) were applied on the dorsal area of the skin to induce skin papillomagenesis in Swiss albino mice for 16 weeks. Gold nanoparticles were synthesized using Vitis vinifera peel and seed aqueous extracts and characterized by Transmission electron microscopic (TEM) analyses. On topical application, peel and seed gold nanoparticles demonstrated chemopreventive potential by significantly (p<0.05) reducing the cumulative number of tumors while increasing the antioxidant enzyme activities in the gold nanoparticles treated mice. The down-regulated expression of mutant p53, Bcl-2 and the levels of pan-cytokeratins might have facilitated the process of apoptosis in the chemical carcinogenesis process. The results were supported by the histopathological evaluation which exhibited mild dysplasia and acanthosis in the skin tissues of Vitis vinifera peel and seed AuNPs treated mice. Based on the present study, the chemopreventive action of Vitis vinifera peel and seed AuNPs is probably due to its ability to stimulate the antioxidant enzymes within the cells and suppressed abnormal skin cell proliferation that occurred during DMBA-induced skin papillomagenesis.

  14. A Chemopreventive Trial to Study the Effects of High Tea Consumption on Smoking-Related Oxidative Stress

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-02-01

    479.76 583.65 425.47 448.57 n 127 43 42 42 f) Determination of each subiect’s baseline history of smoking, diet and tea intake, plasma catechins ...AD Award Number: DAMD17-03-1-0053 TITLE: A Chemopreventive Trial to Study the Effects of High Tea Consumption on Smoking-Related Oxidative Stress...2006 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER A Chemopreventive Trial to Study the Effects of High Tea Consumption on Smoking- 5b. GRANT NUMBER Related

  15. Protection by sulforaphane from type 1 diabetes-induced testicular apoptosis is associated with the up-regulation of Nrf2 expression and function

    SciTech Connect

    Jiang, Xin; Bai, Yang; Zhang, Zhiguo; Xin, Ying; Cai, Lu

    2014-09-01

    Diabetes-induced testicular apoptosis is predominantly due to increased oxidative stress. The nuclear factor-erythroid 2-related factor 2 (Nrf2), as a master transcription factor in controlling anti-oxidative systems, is able to be induced by sulforaphane (SFN). To examine whether SFN prevents testicular apoptosis, type 1 diabetic mouse model was induced with multiple low-dose streptozotocin. Diabetic and age-matched control mice were treated with and without SFN at 0.5 mg/kg daily in five days of each week for 3 months and then kept until 6 months. Diabetes significantly increased testicular apoptosis that was associated with endoplasmic reticulum stress and mitochondrial cell death pathways, shown by the increased expression of C/EBP homologous protein (CHOP), cleaved caspase-12, Bax to Bcl2 expression ratio, and cleaved caspase-3. Diabetes also significantly increased testicular oxidative damage, inflammation and fibrosis, and decreased germ cell proliferation. All these diabetic effects were significantly prevented by SFN treatment for the first 3 months, and the protective effect could be sustained at 3 months after SFN treatment. SFN was able to up-regulate Nrf2 expression and function. The latter was reflected by the increased phosphorylation of Nrf2 at Ser40 and expression of Nrf2 downstream antioxidants at mRNA and protein levels. These results suggest that type 1 diabetes significantly induced testicular apoptosis and damage along with increasing oxidative stress and cell death and suppressing Nrf2 expression and function. SFN is able to prevent testicular oxidative damage and apoptosis in type 1 diabetes mice, which may be associated with the preservation of testicular Nrf2 expression and function under diabetic condition. - Highlights: • Sulforaphane (SFN) could attenuate diabetes-induced germ cell apoptosis. • SFN could preserve germ cell proliferation under diabetic conditions. • SFN testicular protection was sustained until 3 months after

  16. In Vitro Chemopreventive Properties of Green Tea, Rooibos and Honeybush Extracts in Skin Cells.

    PubMed

    Magcwebeba, Tandeka U; Swart, Pieter; Swanevelder, Sonja; Joubert, Elizabeth; Gelderblom, Wentzel C A

    2016-11-25

    The chemopreventive properties of the herbal teas rooibos (Aspalathus linearis) and honeybush (Cyclopia spp.) have been demonstrated on mouse skin in vivo but the underlying mechanisms are not clear. The aim of the current study was to determine the anti-proliferative and pro-apoptotic activity of methanol and aqueous extracts of rooibos and two Cyclopia species in different skin cells, using green tea (Camellia sinensis) as a benchmark. Extracts were also characterised for their major individual polyphenols by high performance liquid chromatography and spectroscopically for the total polyphenol (TP) groups. The methanol extract of rooibos, containing higher levels of polyphenols than its aqueous extract, displayed similar activity to green tea as it selectively targeted premalignant cells by inhibiting cell proliferation at lower concentrations whilst inducing apoptosis via membrane depolarisation at higher concentrations. Specific roles of the major rooibos dihydrochalcones and flavanol/proanthocyanidin-type (FLAVA) compounds are likely to be involved. The aqueous extracts of the Cyclopia species were more active against cell proliferation and at inducing apoptosis which was associated with a higher FLAVA content and a reduced TP/FLAVA ratio. In contrast, their methanol extracts exhibited a cytoprotective effect against apoptosis which was related to their monomeric xanthone and flavanone content. The underlying chemopreventive properties of green tea and the herbal teas appear to be associated with diverse and complex monomeric/polymeric polyphenolic cell interactions.

  17. The chemopreventive potential of lycopene against atrazine-induced cardiotoxicity: modulation of ionic homeostasis

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Jia; Li, Hui-Xin; Xia, Jun; Li, Xue-Nan; Jiang, Xiu-Qing; Zhu, Shi-Yong; Ge, Jing; Li, Jin-Long

    2016-01-01

    People who drink water contaminated with atrazine (ATR) over many years can experience problems with their cardiovascular system. Lycopene (LYC) has been shown to exhibit cardiovascular disease preventive effects. However, chemopreventive potential of LYC against ATR-induced cardiotoxicity remains unclear. To determine the effects of ATR and/or LYC on heart, mice were treated with ATR (50 mg/kg or 200 mg/kg) and/or LYC (5 mg/kg) by intragastric administration for 21 days. Histopathological and biochemical analyses, including analysis of ion concentrations (Na+, K+, Ca2+ and Mg2+), ATPases (Na+-K+-ATPase, Ca2+-ATPase, Mg2+-ATPase and Ca2+-Mg2+-ATPase) activities and the transcription of their subunits, were performed on heart. The results revealed that ATR led to decreased Creative Kinase (CK) activity and increased histological alterations. Furthermore, a significant change in Na+, K+ and Ca2+ content and the down-regulation of Na+-K+-ATPase and Ca2+-ATPase activities and the mRNA expression of their subunits were observed in ATR-exposed mice. Notably, supplementary LYC significantly protected the heart against ATR-induced damage. In conclusion, ATR induced cardiotoxicity by modulating cardiac ATPase activity and the transcription of its subunits, thereby triggering ionic disturbances. However, supplementary LYC significantly combated ATR-induced cardiotoxicity via the regulation of ATPase activity and subunit transcription. Thus, LYC exhibited a significant chemopreventive potential against ATR-induced cardiotoxicity. PMID:27112537

  18. Can transcriptomics provide insight into the chemopreventive mechanisms of complex mixtures of phytochemicals in humans?

    PubMed

    van Breda, Simone G J; Wilms, Lonneke C; Gaj, Stan; Jennen, Danyel G J; Briedé, Jacob J; Helsper, Johannes P; Kleinjans, Jos C S; de Kok, Theo M C M

    2014-05-10

    Blueberries contain relatively large amounts of different phytochemicals, which are suggested to have chemopreventive properties, but little information is available on the underlying molecular modes of action. This study investigates whole genome gene expression changes in lymphocytes of 143 humans after a 4-week blueberry-apple juice dietary intervention. Differentially expressed genes and genes correlating with the extent of antioxidant protection were identified in four subgroups. The magnitude of the preventive effect after the intervention differed between these four subgroups. Furthermore, subjects in two groups carried genetic polymorphisms that were previously found to influence the chemopreventive response. Pathway analysis of the identified genes showed strong but complex gene expression changes in pathways signaling for apoptosis, immune response, cell adhesion, and lipid metabolism. These pathways indicate increased apoptosis, upgraded growth control, induced immunity, reduced platelet aggregation and activation, blood glucose homeostasis, and regulation of fatty acid metabolism. Based on these observations, we hypothesize that combining transcriptomic data with phenotypic markers of oxidative stress may provide insight into the relevant cellular processes and genetic pathways, which contribute to the antioxidant response of complex mixtures of phytochemicals, such as found in blueberry-apple juice.

  19. Chemopreventive effects of nobiletin and its colonic metabolites on colon carcinogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Xian; Song, Mingyue; Wan