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Sample records for chemotaxis genes reveals

  1. DNA Microarray and Gene Ontology Enrichment Analysis Reveals That a Mutation in opsX Affects Virulence and Chemotaxis in Xanthomonas oryzae pv. oryzae.

    PubMed

    Kim, Hong-Il; Park, Young-Jin

    2016-06-01

    Xanthomonas oryzae pv. oryzae (Xoo) causes bacterial leaf blight (BLB) in rice (Oryza sativa L.). In this study, we investigated the effect of a mutation in opsX (XOO1056), which encodes a saccharide biosynthesis regulatory protein, on the virulence and bacterial chemotaxis of Xoo. We performed DNA microarray analysis, which showed that 63 of 2,678 genes, including genes related to bacterial motility (flagellar and chemotaxis proteins) were significantly downregulated (<-2 log2 fold changes) by the mutation in opsX. Indeed, motility assays showed that the mutant strain was nonmotile on semisolid agar swarm plates. In addition, a mutant strain (opsX::Tn5) showed decreased virulence against the susceptible rice cultivar, IR24. Quantitative real-time RT-PCR reaction was performed to confirm the expression levels of these genes, including those related to flagella and chemotaxis, in the opsX mutant. Our findings revealed that mutation of opsX affects both virulence and bacterial motility. These results will help to improve our understanding of Xoo and provide insight into Xoo-rice interactions.

  2. Caenorhabditis elegans Semi-Automated Liquid Screen Reveals a Specialized Role for the Chemotaxis Gene cheB2 in Pseudomonas aeruginosa Virulence

    PubMed Central

    Garvis, Steven; Munder, Antje; Ball, Geneviève; de Bentzmann, Sophie; Wiehlmann, Lutz; Ewbank, Jonathan J.; Tümmler, Burkhard; Filloux, Alain

    2009-01-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa is an opportunistic human pathogen that causes infections in a variety of animal and plant hosts. Caenorhabditis elegans is a simple model with which one can identify bacterial virulence genes. Previous studies with C. elegans have shown that depending on the growth medium, P. aeruginosa provokes different pathologies: slow or fast killing, lethal paralysis and red death. In this study, we developed a high-throughput semi-automated liquid-based assay such that an entire genome can readily be scanned for virulence genes in a short time period. We screened a 2,200-member STM mutant library generated in a cystic fibrosis airway P. aeruginosa isolate, TBCF10839. Twelve mutants were isolated each showing at least 70% attenuation in C. elegans killing. The selected mutants had insertions in regulatory genes, such as a histidine kinase sensor of two-component systems and a member of the AraC family, or in genes involved in adherence or chemotaxis. One mutant had an insertion in a cheB gene homologue, encoding a methylesterase involved in chemotaxis (CheB2). The cheB2 mutant was tested in a murine lung infection model and found to have a highly attenuated virulence. The cheB2 gene is part of the chemotactic gene cluster II, which was shown to be required for an optimal mobility in vitro. In P. aeruginosa, the main player in chemotaxis and mobility is the chemotactic gene cluster I, including cheB1. We show that, in contrast to the cheB2 mutant, a cheB1 mutant is not attenuated for virulence in C. elegans whereas in vitro motility and chemotaxis are severely impaired. We conclude that the virulence defect of the cheB2 mutant is not linked with a global motility defect but that instead the cheB2 gene is involved in a specific chemotactic response, which takes place during infection and is required for P. aeruginosa pathogenicity. PMID:19662168

  3. Caenorhabditis elegans semi-automated liquid screen reveals a specialized role for the chemotaxis gene cheB2 in Pseudomonas aeruginosa virulence.

    PubMed

    Garvis, Steven; Munder, Antje; Ball, Geneviève; de Bentzmann, Sophie; Wiehlmann, Lutz; Ewbank, Jonathan J; Tümmler, Burkhard; Filloux, Alain

    2009-08-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa is an opportunistic human pathogen that causes infections in a variety of animal and plant hosts. Caenorhabditis elegans is a simple model with which one can identify bacterial virulence genes. Previous studies with C. elegans have shown that depending on the growth medium, P. aeruginosa provokes different pathologies: slow or fast killing, lethal paralysis and red death. In this study, we developed a high-throughput semi-automated liquid-based assay such that an entire genome can readily be scanned for virulence genes in a short time period. We screened a 2,200-member STM mutant library generated in a cystic fibrosis airway P. aeruginosa isolate, TBCF10839. Twelve mutants were isolated each showing at least 70% attenuation in C. elegans killing. The selected mutants had insertions in regulatory genes, such as a histidine kinase sensor of two-component systems and a member of the AraC family, or in genes involved in adherence or chemotaxis. One mutant had an insertion in a cheB gene homologue, encoding a methylesterase involved in chemotaxis (CheB2). The cheB2 mutant was tested in a murine lung infection model and found to have a highly attenuated virulence. The cheB2 gene is part of the chemotactic gene cluster II, which was shown to be required for an optimal mobility in vitro. In P. aeruginosa, the main player in chemotaxis and mobility is the chemotactic gene cluster I, including cheB1. We show that, in contrast to the cheB2 mutant, a cheB1 mutant is not attenuated for virulence in C. elegans whereas in vitro motility and chemotaxis are severely impaired. We conclude that the virulence defect of the cheB2 mutant is not linked with a global motility defect but that instead the cheB2 gene is involved in a specific chemotactic response, which takes place during infection and is required for P. aeruginosa pathogenicity.

  4. Regulated expression of CXCR4 constitutive active mutants revealed the up-modulated chemotaxis and up-regulation of genes crucial for CXCR4 mediated homing and engraftment of hematopoietic stem/progenitor cells.

    PubMed

    Sharma, M; Afrin, F; Tripathi, Rp; Gangenahalli, G

    2013-01-01

    SDF-1/CXCR4 axis plays a principle role in the homing and engraftment of hematopoietic stem/progenitor cells (HSPCs), a process that defines cells ability to reach and seed recipient bone marrow niche following their intravenous infusion. However, the proper functioning of CXCR4 downstream signaling depends upon consistent optimal expression of both SDF-1 ligand and its receptor CXCR4, which in turn is variable and regulated by several factors. The constitutive active mutants of CXCR4 (N119A and N119S) being able to induce autonomous downstream signaling, overcome the limitation of ligand-receptor interaction for induction of CXCR4 signaling. Therefore, we intended to explore their potential in Chemotaxis; a key cellular process which crucially regulates cells homing to bone marrow. In present study, Tet-on inducible gene expression vector system was used for doxycycline inducible regulated transgene expression of CXCR4 active mutants in hematopoietic stem progenitor cell line K-562. Both of these mutants revealed significantly enhanced Chemotaxis to SDF-1 gradient as compared to wild type. Furthermore, gene expression profiling of these genetically engineered cells as assessed by microarray analysis revealed the up-regulation of group of genes that are known to play a crucial role in CXCR4 mediated cells homing and engraftment. Hence, this study suggest the potential prospects of CXCR4 active mutants in research and development aimed to improve the efficiency of cells in the mechanism of homing and engraftment process.

  5. Interactions between chemotaxis genes and flagellar genes in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed Central

    Parkinson, J S; Parker, S R; Talbert, P B; Houts, S E

    1983-01-01

    Escherichia coli mutants defective in cheY and cheZ function are motile but generally nonchemotactic; cheY mutants have an extreme counterclockwise bias in flagellar rotation, whereas cheZ mutants have a clockwise rotational bias. Chemotactic pseudorevertants of cheY and cheZ mutants were isolated on semisolid agar and examined for second-site suppressors in other chemotaxis-related loci. Approximately 15% of the cheZ revertants and over 95% of the cheY revertants contained compensatory mutations in the flaA or flaB locus. When transferred to an otherwise wild-type background, most of these suppressor mutations resulted in a generally nonchemotactic phenotype: suppressors of cheY caused a clockwise rotational bias; suppressors of cheZ produced a counterclockwise rotational bias. Chemotactic double mutants containing a che and a fla mutation invariably exhibited flagellar rotation patterns in between the opposing extremes characteristic of the component mutations. This additive effect on flagellar rotation resulted in essentially wild-type swimming behavior and is probably the major basis of suppressor action. However, suppression effects were also allele specific, suggesting that the cheY and cheZ gene products interact directly with the flaA and flaB products. These interactions may be instrumental in establishing the unstimulated swimming pattern of E. coli. Images PMID:6305913

  6. The C. elegans neural editome reveals an ADAR target mRNA required for proper chemotaxis.

    PubMed

    Deffit, Sarah N; Yee, Brian A; Manning, Aidan C; Rajendren, Suba; Vadlamani, Pranathi; Wheeler, Emily C; Domissy, Alain; Washburn, Michael C; Yeo, Gene W; Hundley, Heather A

    2017-09-19

    ADAR proteins alter gene expression both by catalyzing adenosine (A) to inosine (I) RNA editing and binding to regulatory elements in target RNAs. Loss of ADARs affects neuronal function in all animals studied to date. Caenorhabditis elegans lacking ADARs exhibit reduced chemotaxis, but the targets responsible for this phenotype remain unknown. To identify critical neural ADAR targets in C. elegans, we performed an unbiased assessment of the effects of ADR-2, the only A-to-I editing enzyme in C. elegans, on the neural transcriptome. Development and implementation of publicly available software, SAILOR, identified 7,361 A-to-I editing events across the neural transcriptome. Intersecting the neural editome with adr-2 associated gene expression changes, revealed an edited mRNA, clec-41, whose neural expression is dependent on deamination. Restoring clec-41 expression in adr-2 deficient neural cells rescued the chemotaxis defect, providing the first evidence that neuronal phenotypes of ADAR mutants can be caused by altered gene expression.

  7. Transport genes and chemotaxis in Laribacter hongkongensis: a genome-wide analysis

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Laribacter hongkongensis is a Gram-negative, sea gull-shaped rod associated with community-acquired gastroenteritis. The bacterium has been found in diverse freshwater environments including fish, frogs and drinking water reservoirs. Using the complete genome sequence data of L. hongkongensis, we performed a comprehensive analysis of putative transport-related genes and genes related to chemotaxis, motility and quorum sensing, which may help the bacterium adapt to the changing environments and combat harmful substances. Results A genome-wide analysis using Transport Classification Database TCDB, similarity and keyword searches revealed the presence of a large diversity of transporters (n = 457) and genes related to chemotaxis (n = 52) and flagellar biosynthesis (n = 40) in the L. hongkongensis genome. The transporters included those from all seven major transporter categories, which may allow the uptake of essential nutrients or ions, and extrusion of metabolic end products and hazardous substances. L. hongkongensis is unique among closely related members of Neisseriaceae family in possessing higher number of proteins related to transport of ammonium, urea and dicarboxylate, which may reflect the importance of nitrogen and dicarboxylate metabolism in this assacharolytic bacterium. Structural modeling of two C4-dicarboxylate transporters showed that they possessed similar structures to the determined structures of other DctP-TRAP transporters, with one having an unusual disulfide bond. Diverse mechanisms for iron transport, including hemin transporters for iron acquisition from host proteins, were also identified. In addition to the chemotaxis and flagella-related genes, the L. hongkongensis genome also contained two copies of qseB/qseC homologues of the AI-3 quorum sensing system. Conclusions The large number of diverse transporters and genes involved in chemotaxis, motility and quorum sensing suggested that the bacterium may utilize a complex system to

  8. Different Migration Patterns of Sea Urchin and Mouse Sperm Revealed by a Microfluidic Chemotaxis Device

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Yoon Soo; Suarez, Susan S.; Wu, Mingming

    2013-01-01

    Chemotaxis refers to a process whereby cells move up or down a chemical gradient. Sperm chemotaxis is known to be a strategy exploited by marine invertebrates such as sea urchins to reach eggs efficiently in moving water. Less is understood about how or whether chemotaxis is used by mammalian sperm to reach eggs, where fertilization takes place within the confinement of a reproductive tract. In this report, we quantitatively assessed sea urchin and mouse sperm chemotaxis using a recently developed microfluidic model and high-speed imaging. Results demonstrated that sea urchin Arbacia punctulata sperm were chemotactic toward the peptide resact with high chemotactic sensitivity, with an average velocity Vx up the chemical gradient as high as 20% of its average speed (238 μm/s), while mouse sperm displayed no statistically significant chemotactic behavior in progesterone gradients, which had been proposed to guide mammalian sperm toward eggs. This work demonstrates the validity of a microfluidic model for quantitative sperm chemotaxis studies, and reveals a biological insight that chemotaxis up a progesterone gradient may not be a universal strategy for mammalian sperm to reach eggs. PMID:23613731

  9. Different migration patterns of sea urchin and mouse sperm revealed by a microfluidic chemotaxis device.

    PubMed

    Chang, Haixin; Kim, Beum Jun; Kim, Yoon Soo; Suarez, Susan S; Wu, Mingming

    2013-01-01

    Chemotaxis refers to a process whereby cells move up or down a chemical gradient. Sperm chemotaxis is known to be a strategy exploited by marine invertebrates such as sea urchins to reach eggs efficiently in moving water. Less is understood about how or whether chemotaxis is used by mammalian sperm to reach eggs, where fertilization takes place within the confinement of a reproductive tract. In this report, we quantitatively assessed sea urchin and mouse sperm chemotaxis using a recently developed microfluidic model and high-speed imaging. Results demonstrated that sea urchin Arbacia punctulata sperm were chemotactic toward the peptide resact with high chemotactic sensitivity, with an average velocity Vx up the chemical gradient as high as 20% of its average speed (238 μm/s), while mouse sperm displayed no statistically significant chemotactic behavior in progesterone gradients, which had been proposed to guide mammalian sperm toward eggs. This work demonstrates the validity of a microfluidic model for quantitative sperm chemotaxis studies, and reveals a biological insight that chemotaxis up a progesterone gradient may not be a universal strategy for mammalian sperm to reach eggs.

  10. Identification and analysis of a highly conserved chemotaxis gene cluster in Shewanella species.

    SciTech Connect

    Li, J.; Romine, Margaret F.; Ward, M.

    2007-08-01

    A conserved cluster of chemotaxis genes was identified from the genome sequences of fifteen Shewanella species. An in-frame deletion of the cheA-3 gene, which is located in this cluster, was created in S. oneidensis MR-1 and the gene shown to be essential for chemotactic responses to anaerobic electron acceptors. The CheA-3 protein showed strong similarity to Vibrio cholerae CheA-2 and P. aeruginosa CheA-1, two proteins that are also essential for chemotaxis. The genes encoding these proteins were shown to be located in chemotaxis gene clusters closely related to the cheA-3-containing cluster in Shewanella species. The results of this study suggest that a combination of gene neighborhood and homology analyses may be used to predict which cheA genes are essential for chemotaxis in groups of closely related microorganisms.

  11. A mutation in the aroE gene affects pigment production, virulence, and chemotaxis in Xanthomonas oryzae pv. oryzae.

    PubMed

    Kim, Hong-Il; Noh, Tae-Hwan; Lee, Chang-Soo; Park, Young-Jin

    2015-01-01

    Xanthomonas oryzae pv. oryzae (Xoo) causes bacterial blight (BB) in rice. To study its function, a random insertion mutation library of Xoo was constructed using the Tn5 transposon. A mutant strain with decreased virulence against the susceptible rice cultivar IR24 was isolated from the library (aroE mutant), which also had extremely low pigment production. Thermal asymmetric interlaced-polymerase chain reaction (TAIL-PCR) and sequence analysis of the mutant revealed that the transposon was inserted into the aroE gene (encoding shikimate dehydrogenase). To investigate gene expression changes in the pigment- and virulence-deficient mutant, DNA microarray analysis was performed, which showed downregulation of 20 genes involved in the chemotaxis of Xoo. Our findings reveal that mutation of the aroE gene affects virulence and pigment production, as well as expression of genes involved in Xoo chemotaxis.

  12. tlpA gene expression is required for arginine and bicarbonate chemotaxis in Helicobacter pylori.

    PubMed

    Cerda, Oscar A; Núñez-Villena, Felipe; Soto, Sarita E; Ugalde, José Manuel; López-Solís, Remigio; Toledo, Héctor

    2011-01-01

    About half of the human population is infected with Helicobacter pylori, a bacterium causing gastritis, peptic ulcer and progression to gastric cancer. Chemotaxis and flagellar motility are required for colonization and persistence of H. pylori in the gastric mucus layer. It is not completely clear which chemical gradients are used by H. pylori to maintain its position. TlpA, a chemotaxis receptor for arginine/ bicarbonate, has been identified. This study aimed to find out whether tlpA gene expression is required for the chemotactic response to arginine/bicarbonate. Wild-type motile H. pylori ATCC 700392 and H. pylori ATCC 43504, a strain having an interrupted tlpA gene, were used. Also, a tlpA-knockout mutant of H. pylori 700392 (H. pylori 700-tlpA::cat) was produced by homologous recombination. Expression of tlpA was assessed by a Reverse Transcriptase-Polymerase Chain Reaction (RT-PCR) assay. Chemotaxis was measured as a Relative Chemotaxis Response (RCR) by a modified capillary assay. H. pylori 700392 presented chemotaxis to arginine and sodium bicarbonate. H. pylori 700-tlpA::cat showed neither tlpA gene expression nor chemotaxis towards arginine and bicarbonate. Besides confirming that TlpA is a chemotactic receptor for arginine/bicarbonate in H. pylori, this study showed that tlpA gene expression is required for arginine/bicarbonate chemotaxis.

  13. Gene inactivation of a chemotaxis operon in the pathogen Leptospira interrogans.

    PubMed

    Lambert, Ambroise; Wong Ng, Jérôme; Picardeau, Mathieu

    2015-01-01

    Chemotaxis may have an important role in the infection process of pathogenic Leptospira spp.; however, little is known about the regulation of flagellar-based motility in these atypical bacteria. We generated a library of random transposon mutants of the pathogen L. interrogans, which included a mutant with insertion in the first gene of an operon containing the chemotaxis genes cheA, cheW, cheD, cheB, cheY and mcp. The disrupted gene encodes a putative histidine kinase (HK). The HK mutant was motile and virulent, but swarm plate and capillary assays suggested that chemotaxis was reduced in this mutant. Further analysis of bacterial trajectories by videomicroscopy showed that the ability of this mutant to reverse was significantly impaired in comparison to wild-type strain. Our data therefore show that this operon is required for full chemotaxis of Leptospira spp.

  14. The major chemotaxis gene cluster of Rhizobium leguminosarum bv. viciae is essential for competitive nodulation.

    PubMed

    Miller, Lance D; Yost, Christopher K; Hynes, Michael F; Alexandre, Gladys

    2007-01-01

    Rhizobium leguminosarum biovar viciae strain 3841 is a motile alpha-proteobacterium that can establish a nitrogen-fixing symbiosis within the roots of pea plants. In order to determine the contribution of chemotaxis to the lifestyle of R. leguminosarum, we have characterized the function of two chemotaxis gene clusters (che1 and che2) in controlling motility behaviour. We have found that both chemotaxis gene clusters modulate the motility swimming bias of R. leguminosarum cells and that the che1 cluster is the major pathway controlling swimming bias and chemotaxis. The che2 cluster also contributes to swimming bias, but has a minor effect on chemotaxis. Using competitive nodulation assays, we have demonstrated that a functional che1 cluster, but not the che2 cluster, promotes competitive nodulation of the peas. This finding implies that the environmental cue(s) triggering chemotaxis of R. leguminosarum bv. viciae cells towards the roots of pea and facilitating colonization are likely to be processed through the che1 cluster despite the contribution of both che clusters to swimming behaviour. A phylogenetic analysis of the distribution of che1 and che2 orthologues in the alpha-proteobacteria together with our results allow us to propose that che1 homologues are major controllers of chemotaxis and host association in the Rhizobiaceae.

  15. Chemokine-enhanced chemotaxis of lymphangioleiomyomatosis cells with mutations in the tumor suppressor TSC2 gene.

    PubMed

    Pacheco-Rodriguez, Gustavo; Kumaki, Fumiyuki; Steagall, Wendy K; Zhang, Yi; Ikeda, Yoshihiko; Lin, Jing-Ping; Billings, Eric M; Moss, Joel

    2009-02-01

    Lymphangioleiomyomatosis (LAM) is characterized by cystic lung destruction caused by LAM cells (smooth-muscle-like cells) that have mutations in the tumor suppressor genes tuberous sclerosis complex (TSC) 1 or 2 and have the capacity to metastasize. Since chemokines and their receptors function in chemotaxis of metastatic cells, we hypothesized that LAM cells may be recruited by chemokine(s) in the lung. Quantification of 25 chemokines in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid from LAM patients and healthy volunteers revealed that concentrations of CCL2, CXCL1, and CXCL5 were significantly higher in samples from LAM patients than those from healthy volunteers. In vitro, CCL2 or MCP-1 induced selective migration of cells, showing loss of heterozygosity of TSC2 from a heterogeneous population of cells grown from explanted LAM lungs. Additionally, the frequencies of single-nucleotide polymorphisms in the CCL2 gene promoter region differed significantly in LAM patients and healthy volunteers (p = 0.018), and one polymorphism was associated significantly more frequently with the decline of lung function. The presence (i.e., potential functionality) of chemokine receptors was evaluated using immunohistochemistry in lung sections from 30 LAM patients. Expression of chemokines and these receptors varied among LAM patients and differed from that seen in some cancers (e.g., breast cancer and melanoma cells). These observations are consistent with the notion that chemokines such as CCL2 may serve to determine mobility and specify the site of metastasis of the LAM cell.

  16. Microfluidic Platform for Studying Chemotaxis of Adhesive Cells Revealed a Gradient-Dependent Migration and Acceleration of Cancer Stem Cells.

    PubMed

    Zou, Heng; Yue, Wanqing; Yu, Wai-Kin; Liu, Dandan; Fong, Chi-Chun; Zhao, Jianlong; Yang, Mengsu

    2015-07-21

    Recent studies reveal that solid tumors consist of heterogeneous cells with distinct phenotypes and functions. However, it is unclear how different subtypes of cancer cells migrate under chemotaxis. Here, we developed a microfluidic device capable of generating multiple stable gradients, culturing cells on-chip, and monitoring single cell migratory behavior. The microfluidic platform was used to study gradient-induced chemotaxis of lung cancer stem cell (LCSC) and differentiated LCSC (dLCSC) in real time. Our results showed the dynamic and differential response of both LCSC and dLCSC to chemotaxis, which was regulated by the β-catenin dependent Wnt signaling pathway. The microfluidic analysis showed that LCSC and dLCSC from the same origin behaved differently in the same external stimuli, suggesting the importance of cancer cell heterogeneity. We also observed for the first time the acceleration of both LCSC and dLCSC during chemotaxis caused by increasing local concentration in different gradients, which could only be realized through the microfluidic approach. The capability to analyze single cell chemotaxis under spatially controlled conditions provides a novel analytical platform for the study of cellular microenvironments and cancer cell metastasis.

  17. Comparative genomics of Pseudomonas syringae pathovar tomato reveals novel chemotaxis pathways associated with motility and plant pathogenicity

    PubMed Central

    Hayes, Byron W.; Runde, Brendan J.; Markel, Eric; Swingle, Bryan M.; Vinatzer, Boris A.

    2016-01-01

    The majority of bacterial foliar plant pathogens must invade the apoplast of host plants through points of ingress, such as stomata or wounds, to replicate to high population density and cause disease. How pathogens navigate plant surfaces to locate invasion sites remains poorly understood. Many bacteria use chemical-directed regulation of flagellar rotation, a process known as chemotaxis, to move towards favorable environmental conditions. Chemotactic sensing of the plant surface is a potential mechanism through which foliar plant pathogens home in on wounds or stomata, but chemotactic systems in foliar plant pathogens are not well characterized. Comparative genomics of the plant pathogen Pseudomonas syringae pathovar tomato (Pto) implicated annotated chemotaxis genes in the recent adaptations of one Pto lineage. We therefore characterized the chemosensory system of Pto. The Pto genome contains two primary chemotaxis gene clusters, che1 and che2. The che2 cluster is flanked by flagellar biosynthesis genes and similar to the canonical chemotaxis gene clusters of other bacteria based on sequence and synteny. Disruption of the primary phosphorelay kinase gene of the che2 cluster, cheA2, eliminated all swimming and surface motility at 21 °C but not 28 °C for Pto. The che1 cluster is located next to Type IV pili biosynthesis genes but disruption of cheA1 has no observable effect on twitching motility for Pto. Disruption of cheA2 also alters in planta fitness of the pathogen with strains lacking functional cheA2 being less fit in host plants but more fit in a non-host interaction. PMID:27812402

  18. Comparative genomics of Pseudomonas syringae pathovar tomato reveals novel chemotaxis pathways associated with motility and plant pathogenicity.

    PubMed

    Clarke, Christopher R; Hayes, Byron W; Runde, Brendan J; Markel, Eric; Swingle, Bryan M; Vinatzer, Boris A

    2016-01-01

    The majority of bacterial foliar plant pathogens must invade the apoplast of host plants through points of ingress, such as stomata or wounds, to replicate to high population density and cause disease. How pathogens navigate plant surfaces to locate invasion sites remains poorly understood. Many bacteria use chemical-directed regulation of flagellar rotation, a process known as chemotaxis, to move towards favorable environmental conditions. Chemotactic sensing of the plant surface is a potential mechanism through which foliar plant pathogens home in on wounds or stomata, but chemotactic systems in foliar plant pathogens are not well characterized. Comparative genomics of the plant pathogen Pseudomonas syringae pathovar tomato (Pto) implicated annotated chemotaxis genes in the recent adaptations of one Pto lineage. We therefore characterized the chemosensory system of Pto. The Pto genome contains two primary chemotaxis gene clusters, che1 and che2. The che2 cluster is flanked by flagellar biosynthesis genes and similar to the canonical chemotaxis gene clusters of other bacteria based on sequence and synteny. Disruption of the primary phosphorelay kinase gene of the che2 cluster, cheA2, eliminated all swimming and surface motility at 21 °C but not 28 °C for Pto. The che1 cluster is located next to Type IV pili biosynthesis genes but disruption of cheA1 has no observable effect on twitching motility for Pto. Disruption of cheA2 also alters in planta fitness of the pathogen with strains lacking functional cheA2 being less fit in host plants but more fit in a non-host interaction.

  19. A mutation in the Xanthomonas oryzae pv. oryzae wxoD gene affects xanthan production and chemotaxis.

    PubMed

    Nam, Jae-Young; Kim, Hong-Il; Lee, Chang-Soo; Park, Young-Jin

    2013-11-01

    Xanthomonas oryzae pv. oryzae causes bacterial blight in rice (Oryza sativa L.). The effect of a mutation in the wxoD gene, that encodes a putative O-antigen acetylase, on xanthan production as well as bacterial chemotaxis was investigated. The mutation increased xanthan production by 52 %. The mutant strain was non-motile on semi-solid agar swarm plates. In addition, several genes involved in chemotaxis, including the cheW, cheV, cheR, and cheD genes, were down-regulated by a mutation in the wxoD gene. Thus, the mutation in the wxoD gene affects xanthan production as well as bacterial chemotaxis. However, the wxoD gene is not essential for the virulence of X. oryzae.

  20. Identification of the mcpA and mcpM genes, encoding methyl-accepting proteins involved in amino acid and l-malate chemotaxis, and involvement of McpM-mediated chemotaxis in plant infection by Ralstonia pseudosolanacearum (formerly Ralstonia solanacearum phylotypes I and III).

    PubMed

    Hida, Akiko; Oku, Shota; Kawasaki, Takeru; Nakashimada, Yutaka; Tajima, Takahisa; Kato, Junichi

    2015-11-01

    Sequence analysis has revealed the presence of 22 putative methyl-accepting chemotaxis protein (mcp) genes in the Ralstonia pseudosolanacearum GMI1000 genome. PCR analysis and DNA sequencing showed that the highly motile R. pseudosolanacearum strain Ps29 possesses homologs of all 22 R. pseudosolanacearum GMI1000 mcp genes. We constructed a complete collection of single mcp gene deletion mutants of R. pseudosolanacearum Ps29 by unmarked gene deletion. Screening of the mutant collection revealed that R. pseudosolanacearum Ps29 mutants of RSp0507 and RSc0606 homologs were defective in chemotaxis to l-malate and amino acids, respectively. RSp0507 and RSc0606 homologs were designated mcpM and mcpA. While wild-type R. pseudosolanacearum strain Ps29 displayed attraction to 16 amino acids, the mcpA mutant showed no response to 12 of these amino acids and decreased responses to 4 amino acids. We constructed mcpA and mcpM deletion mutants of highly virulent R. pseudosolanacearum strain MAFF106611 to investigate the contribution of chemotaxis to l-malate and amino acids to tomato plant infection. Neither single mutant exhibited altered virulence for tomato plants when tested by root dip inoculation assays. In contrast, the mcpM mutant (but not the mcpA mutant) was significantly less infectious than the wild type when tested by a sand soak inoculation assay, which requires bacteria to locate and invade host roots from sand. Thus, McpM-mediated chemotaxis, possibly reflecting chemotaxis to l-malate, facilitates R. pseudosolanacearum motility to tomato roots in sand. Copyright © 2015, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  1. Identification of the mcpA and mcpM Genes, Encoding Methyl-Accepting Proteins Involved in Amino Acid and l-Malate Chemotaxis, and Involvement of McpM-Mediated Chemotaxis in Plant Infection by Ralstonia pseudosolanacearum (Formerly Ralstonia solanacearum Phylotypes I and III)

    PubMed Central

    Hida, Akiko; Oku, Shota; Kawasaki, Takeru; Tajima, Takahisa

    2015-01-01

    Sequence analysis has revealed the presence of 22 putative methyl-accepting chemotaxis protein (mcp) genes in the Ralstonia pseudosolanacearum GMI1000 genome. PCR analysis and DNA sequencing showed that the highly motile R. pseudosolanacearum strain Ps29 possesses homologs of all 22 R. pseudosolanacearum GMI1000 mcp genes. We constructed a complete collection of single mcp gene deletion mutants of R. pseudosolanacearum Ps29 by unmarked gene deletion. Screening of the mutant collection revealed that R. pseudosolanacearum Ps29 mutants of RSp0507 and RSc0606 homologs were defective in chemotaxis to l-malate and amino acids, respectively. RSp0507 and RSc0606 homologs were designated mcpM and mcpA. While wild-type R. pseudosolanacearum strain Ps29 displayed attraction to 16 amino acids, the mcpA mutant showed no response to 12 of these amino acids and decreased responses to 4 amino acids. We constructed mcpA and mcpM deletion mutants of highly virulent R. pseudosolanacearum strain MAFF106611 to investigate the contribution of chemotaxis to l-malate and amino acids to tomato plant infection. Neither single mutant exhibited altered virulence for tomato plants when tested by root dip inoculation assays. In contrast, the mcpM mutant (but not the mcpA mutant) was significantly less infectious than the wild type when tested by a sand soak inoculation assay, which requires bacteria to locate and invade host roots from sand. Thus, McpM-mediated chemotaxis, possibly reflecting chemotaxis to l-malate, facilitates R. pseudosolanacearum motility to tomato roots in sand. PMID:26276117

  2. A modular gradient-sensing network for chemotaxis in Escherichia coli revealed by responses to time-varying stimuli.

    PubMed

    Shimizu, Thomas S; Tu, Yuhai; Berg, Howard C

    2010-06-22

    The Escherichia coli chemotaxis-signaling pathway computes time derivatives of chemoeffector concentrations. This network features modules for signal reception/amplification and robust adaptation, with sensing of chemoeffector gradients determined by the way in which these modules are coupled in vivo. We characterized these modules and their coupling by using fluorescence resonance energy transfer to measure intracellular responses to time-varying stimuli. Receptor sensitivity was characterized by step stimuli, the gradient sensitivity by exponential ramp stimuli, and the frequency response by exponential sine-wave stimuli. Analysis of these data revealed the structure of the feedback transfer function linking the amplification and adaptation modules. Feedback near steady state was found to be weak, consistent with strong fluctuations and slow recovery from small perturbations. Gradient sensitivity and frequency response both depended strongly on temperature. We found that time derivatives can be computed by the chemotaxis system for input frequencies below 0.006 Hz at 22 degrees C and below 0.018 Hz at 32 degrees C. Our results show how dynamic input-output measurements, time honored in physiology, can serve as powerful tools in deciphering cell-signaling mechanisms.

  3. Scarless deletion of up to seven methyl-accepting chemotaxis genes with an optimized method highlights key function of CheM in Salmonella Typhimurium.

    PubMed

    Hoffmann, Stefanie; Schmidt, Christiane; Walter, Steffi; Bender, Jennifer K; Gerlach, Roman G

    2017-01-01

    Site-directed scarless mutagenesis is an essential tool of modern pathogenesis research. We describe an optimized two-step protocol for genome editing in Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium to enable multiple sequential mutagenesis steps in a single strain. The system is based on the λ Red recombinase-catalyzed integration of a selectable antibiotics resistance marker followed by replacement of this cassette. Markerless mutants are selected by expressing the meganuclease I-SceI which induces double-strand breaks in bacteria still harboring the resistance locus. Our new dual-functional plasmid pWRG730 allows for heat-inducible expression of the λ Red recombinase and tet-inducible production of I-SceI. Methyl-accepting chemotaxis proteins (MCP) are transmembrane chemoreceptors for a vast set of environmental signals including amino acids, sugars, ions and oxygen. Based on the sensory input of MCPs, chemotaxis is a key component for Salmonella virulence. To determine the contribution of individual MCPs we sequentially deleted seven MCP genes. The individual mutations were validated by PCR and genetic integrity of the final seven MCP mutant WRG279 was confirmed by whole genome sequencing. The successive MCP mutants were functionally tested in a HeLa cell infection model which revealed increased invasion rates for non-chemotactic mutants and strains lacking the MCP CheM (Tar). The phenotype of WRG279 was reversed with plasmid-based expression of CheM. The complemented WRG279 mutant showed also partially restored chemotaxis in swarming assays on semi-solid agar. Our optimized scarless deletion protocol enables efficient and precise manipulation of the Salmonella genome. As demonstrated with whole genome sequencing, multiple subsequent mutagenesis steps can be realized without the introduction of unwanted mutations. The sequential deletion of seven MCP genes revealed a significant role of CheM for the interaction of S. Typhimurium with host cells which might give

  4. Scarless deletion of up to seven methyl-accepting chemotaxis genes with an optimized method highlights key function of CheM in Salmonella Typhimurium

    PubMed Central

    Hoffmann, Stefanie; Schmidt, Christiane; Walter, Steffi; Bender, Jennifer K.

    2017-01-01

    Site-directed scarless mutagenesis is an essential tool of modern pathogenesis research. We describe an optimized two-step protocol for genome editing in Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium to enable multiple sequential mutagenesis steps in a single strain. The system is based on the λ Red recombinase-catalyzed integration of a selectable antibiotics resistance marker followed by replacement of this cassette. Markerless mutants are selected by expressing the meganuclease I-SceI which induces double-strand breaks in bacteria still harboring the resistance locus. Our new dual-functional plasmid pWRG730 allows for heat-inducible expression of the λ Red recombinase and tet-inducible production of I-SceI. Methyl-accepting chemotaxis proteins (MCP) are transmembrane chemoreceptors for a vast set of environmental signals including amino acids, sugars, ions and oxygen. Based on the sensory input of MCPs, chemotaxis is a key component for Salmonella virulence. To determine the contribution of individual MCPs we sequentially deleted seven MCP genes. The individual mutations were validated by PCR and genetic integrity of the final seven MCP mutant WRG279 was confirmed by whole genome sequencing. The successive MCP mutants were functionally tested in a HeLa cell infection model which revealed increased invasion rates for non-chemotactic mutants and strains lacking the MCP CheM (Tar). The phenotype of WRG279 was reversed with plasmid-based expression of CheM. The complemented WRG279 mutant showed also partially restored chemotaxis in swarming assays on semi-solid agar. Our optimized scarless deletion protocol enables efficient and precise manipulation of the Salmonella genome. As demonstrated with whole genome sequencing, multiple subsequent mutagenesis steps can be realized without the introduction of unwanted mutations. The sequential deletion of seven MCP genes revealed a significant role of CheM for the interaction of S. Typhimurium with host cells which might give

  5. Regulation of flagellar, motility and chemotaxis genes in Rhizobium leguminosarum by the VisN/R-Rem cascade.

    PubMed

    Tambalo, Dinah D; Del Bel, Kate L; Bustard, Denise E; Greenwood, Paige R; Steedman, Audrey E; Hynes, Michael F

    2010-06-01

    In this paper, we describe the regulatory roles of VisN, VisR and Rem in the expression of flagellar, motility and chemotaxis genes in Rhizobium leguminosarum biovar viciae strains VF39SM and 3841. Individual mutations in the genes encoding these proteins resulted in a loss of motility and an absence of flagella, indicating that these regulatory genes are essential for flagellar synthesis and function. Transcriptional experiments involving gusA-gene fusions in wild-type and mutant backgrounds were performed to identify the genes under VisN/R and Rem regulation. Results showed that the chemotaxis and motility genes of R. leguminosarum could be separated into two groups: one group under VisN/R-Rem regulation and another group that is independent of this regulation. VisN and VisR regulate the expression of rem, while Rem positively regulates the expression of flaA, flaB, flaC, flaD, motA, motB, che1 and mcpD. All of these genes except mcpD are located within the main motility and chemotaxis gene cluster of R. leguminosarum. Other chemotaxis and motility genes, which are found outside of the main motility gene cluster (che2 operon, flaH for VF39SM, and flaG) or are plasmid-borne (flaE and mcpC), are not part of the VisN/R-Rem regulatory cascade. In addition, all genes exhibited the same regulation pattern in 3841 and in VF39SM, except flaE and flaH. flaE is not regulated by VisN/R-Rem in 3841 but it is repressed by Rem in VF39SM. flaH is under VisN/R-Rem regulation in 3841, but not in VF39SM. A kinetics experiment demonstrated that a subset of the flagellar genes is continuously expressed in all growth phases, indicating the importance of continuous motility for R. leguminosarum under free-living conditions. On the other hand, motility is repressed under symbiotic conditions. Nodulation experiments showed that the transcriptional activators VisN and Rem are dramatically downregulated in the nodules, suggesting that the symbiotic downregulation of motility-related genes

  6. Pseudomonas chemotaxis.

    PubMed

    Sampedro, Inmaculada; Parales, Rebecca E; Krell, Tino; Hill, Jane E

    2015-01-01

    Pseudomonads sense changes in the concentration of chemicals in their environment and exhibit a behavioral response mediated by flagella or pili coupled with a chemosensory system. The two known chemotaxis pathways, a flagella-mediated pathway and a putative pili-mediated system, are described in this review. Pseudomonas shows chemotaxis response toward a wide range of chemicals, and this review includes a summary of them organized by chemical structure. The assays used to measure positive and negative chemotaxis swimming and twitching Pseudomonas as well as improvements to those assays and new assays are also described. This review demonstrates that there is ample research and intellectual space for future investigators to elucidate the role of chemotaxis in important processes such as pathogenesis, bioremediation, and the bioprotection of plants and animals. © FEMS 2015. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permission@oup.com.

  7. Microfluidic source-sink model reveals effects of biophysically distinct CXCL12 isoforms in breast cancer chemotaxis.

    PubMed

    Cavnar, S P; Ray, P; Moudgil, P; Chang, S L; Luker, K E; Linderman, J J; Takayama, S; Luker, G D

    2014-05-01

    Chemokines critically regulate chemotaxis in normal and pathologic states, but there is limited understanding of how multicellular interactions generate gradients needed for cell migration. Previous studies of chemotaxis of CXCR4+ cells toward chemokine CXCL12 suggest the requirement of cells expressing scavenger receptor CXCR7 in a source-sink system. We leveraged an established microfluidic device to discover that chemotaxis of CXCR4 cells toward distinct isoforms of CXCL12 required CXCR7 scavenging only under conditions with higher than optimal levels of CXCL12. Chemotaxis toward CXCL12-β and -γ isoforms, which have greater binding to extracellular molecules and have been largely overlooked, was less dependent on CXCR7 than the more commonly studied CXCL12-α. Chemotaxis of CXCR4+ cells toward even low levels of CXCL12-γ and CXCL12-β still occurred during treatment with a FDA-approved inhibitor of CXCR4. We also detected CXCL12-γ only in breast cancers from patients with advanced disease. Physiological gradient formation within the device facilitated interrogation of key differences in chemotaxis among CXCL12 isoforms and suggests CXCL12-γ as a biomarker for metastatic cancer.

  8. Drosophila chemotaxis

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Xiaojing J

    2014-01-01

    Chemotaxis, the ability to direct movements according to chemical cues in the environment, is important for the survival of most organisms. In our original article, we combined a quantitative behavioral assay with genetic manipulations to dissect the neural substrate for chemotaxis. In this Extra View article, we offer a more chronological narration of the findings leading to our key conclusion that aversion engages specific motor-related circuits and kinematics. We speculate on the separation and crosstalk between aversion and attraction circuits in the brain and the ventral nerve cord, and the implication for valence encoding in the olfactory system. PMID:24091819

  9. Computational modeling reveals that a combination of chemotaxis and differential adhesion leads to robust cell sorting during tissue patterning.

    PubMed

    Tan, Rui Zhen; Chiam, Keng-Hwee

    2014-01-01

    Robust tissue patterning is crucial to many processes during development. The "French Flag" model of patterning, whereby naïve cells in a gradient of diffusible morphogen signal adopt different fates due to exposure to different amounts of morphogen concentration, has been the most widely proposed model for tissue patterning. However, recently, using time-lapse experiments, cell sorting has been found to be an alternative model for tissue patterning in the zebrafish neural tube. But it remains unclear what the sorting mechanism is. In this article, we used computational modeling to show that two mechanisms, chemotaxis and differential adhesion, are needed for robust cell sorting. We assessed the performance of each of the two mechanisms by quantifying the fraction of correct sorting, the fraction of stable clusters formed after correct sorting, the time needed to achieve correct sorting, and the size variations of the cells having different fates. We found that chemotaxis and differential adhesion confer different advantages to the sorting process. Chemotaxis leads to high fraction of correct sorting as individual cells will either migrate towards or away from the source depending on its cell type. However after the cells have sorted correctly, there is no interaction among cells of the same type to stabilize the sorted boundaries, leading to cell clusters that are unstable. On the other hand, differential adhesion results in low fraction of correct clusters that are more stable. In the absence of morphogen gradient noise, a combination of both chemotaxis and differential adhesion yields cell sorting that is both accurate and robust. However, in the presence of gradient noise, the simple combination of chemotaxis and differential adhesion is insufficient for cell sorting; instead, chemotaxis coupled with delayed differential adhesion is required to yield optimal sorting.

  10. Computational Modeling Reveals that a Combination of Chemotaxis and Differential Adhesion Leads to Robust Cell Sorting during Tissue Patterning

    PubMed Central

    Tan, Rui Zhen; Chiam, Keng-Hwee

    2014-01-01

    Robust tissue patterning is crucial to many processes during development. The "French Flag" model of patterning, whereby naïve cells in a gradient of diffusible morphogen signal adopt different fates due to exposure to different amounts of morphogen concentration, has been the most widely proposed model for tissue patterning. However, recently, using time-lapse experiments, cell sorting has been found to be an alternative model for tissue patterning in the zebrafish neural tube. But it remains unclear what the sorting mechanism is. In this article, we used computational modeling to show that two mechanisms, chemotaxis and differential adhesion, are needed for robust cell sorting. We assessed the performance of each of the two mechanisms by quantifying the fraction of correct sorting, the fraction of stable clusters formed after correct sorting, the time needed to achieve correct sorting, and the size variations of the cells having different fates. We found that chemotaxis and differential adhesion confer different advantages to the sorting process. Chemotaxis leads to high fraction of correct sorting as individual cells will either migrate towards or away from the source depending on its cell type. However after the cells have sorted correctly, there is no interaction among cells of the same type to stabilize the sorted boundaries, leading to cell clusters that are unstable. On the other hand, differential adhesion results in low fraction of correct clusters that are more stable. In the absence of morphogen gradient noise, a combination of both chemotaxis and differential adhesion yields cell sorting that is both accurate and robust. However, in the presence of gradient noise, the simple combination of chemotaxis and differential adhesion is insufficient for cell sorting; instead, chemotaxis coupled with delayed differential adhesion is required to yield optimal sorting. PMID:25302949

  11. Increased brain size in mammals is associated with size variations in gene families with cell signalling, chemotaxis and immune-related functions.

    PubMed

    Castillo-Morales, Atahualpa; Monzón-Sandoval, Jimena; Urrutia, Araxi O; Gutiérrez, Humberto

    2014-01-22

    Genomic determinants underlying increased encephalization across mammalian lineages are unknown. Whole genome comparisons have revealed large and frequent changes in the size of gene families, and it has been proposed that these variations could play a major role in shaping morphological and physiological differences among species. Using a genome-wide comparative approach, we examined changes in gene family size (GFS) and degree of encephalization in 39 fully sequenced mammalian species and found a significant over-representation of GFS variations in line with increased encephalization in mammals. We found that this relationship is not accounted for by known correlates of brain size such as maximum lifespan or body size and is not explained by phylogenetic relatedness. Genes involved in chemotaxis, immune regulation and cell signalling-related functions are significantly over-represented among those gene families most highly correlated with encephalization. Genes within these families are prominently expressed in the human brain, particularly the cortex, and organized in co-expression modules that display distinct temporal patterns of expression in the developing cortex. Our results suggest that changes in GFS associated with encephalization represent an evolutionary response to the specific functional requirements underlying increased brain size in mammals.

  12. Chemotaxis of Nonbiological Colloidal Rods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hong, Yiying; Blackman, Nicole M. K.; Kopp, Nathaniel D.; Sen, Ayusman; Velegol, Darrell

    2007-10-01

    Chemotaxis is the movement of organisms toward or away from a chemical attractant or toxin by a biased random walk process. Here we describe the first experimental example of chemotaxis outside biological systems. Platinum-gold rods 2.0μm long exhibit directed movement toward higher hydrogen peroxide concentrations through “active diffusion.” Brownian dynamics simulations reveal that no “temporal sensing” algorithm, commonly attributed to bacteria, is necessary; rather, the observed chemotaxis can be explained by random walk physics in a gradient of the active diffusion coefficient.

  13. Expression of metadherin/AEG-1 gene is positively related to orientation chemotaxis and adhesion of human hepatocellular carcinoma cell lines of different metastatic potentials.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Zhenzhen; Deng, Huan; Yan, Wei; Huang, Huanjun; Deng, Yueling; Li, Yuan; Tian, De'an

    2012-06-01

    Metastasis contributes to the poor prognosis of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). However, the mechanism through which a primary HCC cell develops into a metastatic phenotype is not well understood. The purpose of this study was to examine the correlation between metadherin (MTDH)/astrocyte elevated gene-1 (AEG-1) expression in HCC cell lines of different metastatic potentials and such metastatic phenotypes as orientation chemotaxis and adhesion. MTDH/AEG-1 expression was detected by RT-PCR and western blotting in HCC cell lines (HepG2, Huh7, Sk-HEP-1, MHCC-97H). Distribution of MTDH/AEG-1 was observed by immunofluorescence staining and confocal laser scanning microscopy. The abilities of orientation chemotaxis and adhesion and the index of interaction between HCC cell lines and microvascular endothelial cell lines (MVECs, including HUVECs and HPMECs) were measured by chemotaxis assay and adhesion assay, respectively. The results showed that MTDH/AEG-1 protein expression was significantly higher in high metastatic potential cancer cell lines (Sk-HEP-1, MHCC-97H) than in low metastatic potential cell lines (HepG2, Huh7) (P<0.05). The MTDH/AEG-1 protein was localized in the perinuclear region of HCC cells. Furthermore, the abilities of orientation chemotaxis and adhesion of HCC cells to HPMECs were increased as compared with those of HCC cells to HUVECs (P<0.05). The abilities of orientation chemotaxis and adhesion were much stronger in Sk-HEP-1 and MHCC-97H cells with MTDH/AEG-1 highly expressed than in HepG2 and Huh7 cells with MTDH/AEG-1 lowly expressed (P<0.05). These results suggested that the expression of MTDH/AEG-1 gene in HCC cell lines of different metastatic potentials was closely positively related to the abilities of orientation chemotaxis and adhesion of HCC cells. It was deduced that MTDH/AEG-1 might play a pivotal role in the lung-specific metastasis of HCC, which may be mediated through orientation chemotaxis and adhesion abilities of HCC cells. MTDH

  14. The role of flagella and chemotaxis genes in host pathogen interaction of the host adapted Salmonella enterica serovar Dublin compared to the broad host range serovar S. Typhimurium

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The importance of flagella and chemotaxis genes in host pathogen interaction in Salmonella enterica is mainly based on studies of the broad host range serovar, S. Typhimurium, while little is known on the importance in host specific and host adapted serovars, such as S. Dublin. In the current study we have used previously characterized insertion mutants in flagella and chemotaxis genes to investigate this and possible differences in the importance between the two serovars. Results fliC (encoding the structural protein of the flagella) was essential for adhesion and fliC and cheB (CheB restores the chemotaxis system to pre-stimulus conformation) were essential for invasion of S. Dublin into epithelial Int407 cells. In S. Typhimurium, both lack of flagella (fliC/fljB double mutant) and cheB influenced adhesion, and invasion was influenced by lack of both cheA (the histidine-kinase of the chemotaxis system), fliC/fljB and cheB mutation. Uptake in J774A.1 macrophage cells was significantly reduced in cheA, cheB and fliC mutants of S. Dublin, while cheA was dispensable in S. Typhimurium. Removal of flagella in both serotypes caused an increased ability to propagate intracellular in J774 macrophage cells and decreased cytotoxicity toward these cells. Flagella and chemotaxis genes were found not to influence the oxidative response. The induction of IL-6 from J774A-1 cells depended on the presence of flagella in S. Typhimurium, whilst this was not the case following challenge with S. Dublin. Addition of fliC from S. Typhimurium in trans to a fliC mutant of S. Dublin increased cytotoxicity but it did not increase the IL-6 production. Flagella were demonstrated to contribute to the outcome of infection following oral challenge of mice in S. Dublin, while an S. Typhimurium fliC/fljB mutant showed increased virulence following intra peritoneal challenge. Conclusions The results showed that flagella and chemotaxis genes differed in their role in host pathogen

  15. Dual chemotaxis signaling pathways in Bacillus subtilis: a sigma D-dependent gene encodes a novel protein with both CheW and CheY homologous domains.

    PubMed Central

    Fredrick, K L; Helmann, J D

    1994-01-01

    The alternative sigma factor, sigma D, activates the expression of genes required for chemotaxis and motility in Bacillus subtilis, including those encoding flagellin, hook-associated proteins, and the motor proteins. The sigma D protein is encoded in a large operon which also encodes the structural proteins for the basal body and homologs of the enteric CheW, CheY, CheA, and CheB chemotaxis proteins. We report the identification and molecular characterization of a novel chemotaxis gene, cheV. The predicted CheV gene product contains an amino-terminal CheW homologous domain linked to a response regulator domain of the CheY family, suggesting that either or both of these functions are duplicated. Transcription of cheV initiates from a sigma D-dependent promoter element both in vivo and in vitro, and expression of a cheV-lacZ fusion is completely dependent on sigD. Expression is repressed by nonpolar mutations in structural genes for the basal body, fliM or fliP, indicating that cheV belongs to class III in the B. subtilis flagellar hierarchy. The cheV locus is monocistronic and is located at 123 degrees on the B. subtilis genetic map near the previously defined cheX locus. A cheV mutant strain is motile but impaired in chemotaxis on swarm plates. Surprisingly, an insertion in the CheW homologous domain leads to a more severe defect than an insertion in the CheY homologous domain. The presence of dual pathways for chemotactic signal transduction is consistent with the residual signaling observed in previous studies of cheW mutants (D. W. Hanlon, L. Márques-Magaña, P. B. Carpenter, M. J. Chamberlin, and G. W. Ordal, J. Biol. Chem. 267:12055-12060, 1992). Images PMID:8169223

  16. Regulation by Light of Chemotaxis to Nitrite during the Sexual Life Cycle in Chlamydomonas reinhardtii.

    PubMed

    Ermilova, Elena; Zalutskaya, Zhanneta

    2014-02-26

    Nitrite plays an important role in the nitrogen metabolism of most cells, including Chlamydomonas reinhardtii. We have shown that vegetative cells of C. reinhardtii are attracted by nitrite. The Nia1nit2 mutant with defects in genes encoding the nitrate reductase and regulatory protein NIT2 respectively was found to exhibit normal chemotaxis to nitrite. The data suggest that chemotaxis events appear to be specific and independent of those involved in nitrate assimilation. Unlike vegetative cells and noncompetent pregametes, mature gametes did not show chemotaxis to nitrite. Just like gamete formation, the change in chemotaxis mode is controlled by the sequential action of two environmental cues, removal of nitrogen from the medium and light. Comparative analysis of wild-type and RNAi strains with reduced level of phototropin has indicated that switch-off of chemotaxis towards nitrite is dependent on phototropin. The studies revealed individual elements of the phototropin-dependent signal transduction pathway involved in the blue-light-controlled change in chemotaxis mode of C. reinhardtii during gamete formation: three protein kinases, one operating against signal flux and two that promote signal transduction. We have proposed a working model for the signaling pathway by which blue light controls chemotaxis towards attractants, which are nitrogen sources, during pregamete-to-gamete conversion of C. reinhardtii.

  17. Regulation by Light of Chemotaxis to Nitrite during the Sexual Life Cycle in Chlamydomonas reinhardtii

    PubMed Central

    Ermilova, Elena; Zalutskaya, Zhanneta

    2014-01-01

    Nitrite plays an important role in the nitrogen metabolism of most cells, including Chlamydomonas reinhardtii. We have shown that vegetative cells of C. reinhardtii are attracted by nitrite. The Nia1nit2 mutant with defects in genes encoding the nitrate reductase and regulatory protein NIT2 respectively was found to exhibit normal chemotaxis to nitrite. The data suggest that chemotaxis events appear to be specific and independent of those involved in nitrate assimilation. Unlike vegetative cells and noncompetent pregametes, mature gametes did not show chemotaxis to nitrite. Just like gamete formation, the change in chemotaxis mode is controlled by the sequential action of two environmental cues, removal of nitrogen from the medium and light. Comparative analysis of wild-type and RNAi strains with reduced level of phototropin has indicated that switch-off of chemotaxis towards nitrite is dependent on phototropin. The studies revealed individual elements of the phototropin-dependent signal transduction pathway involved in the blue-light-controlled change in chemotaxis mode of C. reinhardtii during gamete formation: three protein kinases, one operating against signal flux and two that promote signal transduction. We have proposed a working model for the signaling pathway by which blue light controls chemotaxis towards attractants, which are nitrogen sources, during pregamete-to-gamete conversion of C. reinhardtii. PMID:27135494

  18. Chemotaxis in cancer

    PubMed Central

    Roussos, Evanthia T.; Condeelis, John S.; Patsialou, Antonia

    2014-01-01

    Chemotaxis of tumour cells and stromal cells in the surrounding microenvironment is an essential component of tumour dissemination during progression and metastasis. This Review summarizes how chemotaxis directs the different behaviours of tumour cells and stromal cells in vivo, how molecular pathways regulate chemotaxis in tumour cells and how chemotaxis choreographs cell behaviour to shape the tumour microenvironment and to determine metastatic spread. The central importance of chemotaxis in cancer progression is highlighted by discussion of the use of chemotaxis as a prognostic marker, a treatment end point and a target of therapeutic intervention. PMID:21779009

  19. Early osteoinductive human bone marrow mesenchymal stromal/stem cells support an enhanced hematopoietic cell expansion with altered chemotaxis- and adhesion-related gene expression profiles

    SciTech Connect

    Sugino, Noriko; Miura, Yasuo; Yao, Hisayuki; Iwasa, Masaki; Fujishiro, Aya; Fujii, Sumie; Hirai, Hideyo; Takaori-Kondo, Akifumi; Maekawa, Taira

    2016-01-22

    Bone marrow (BM) microenvironment has a crucial role in supporting hematopoiesis. Here, by using a microarray analysis, we demonstrate that human BM mesenchymal stromal/stem cells (MSCs) in an early osteoinductive stage (e-MSCs) are characterized by unique hematopoiesis-associated gene expression with an enhanced hematopoiesis-supportive ability. In comparison to BM-MSCs without osteoinductive treatment, gene expression in e-MSCs was significantly altered in terms of their cell adhesion- and chemotaxis-related profiles, as identified with Gene Ontology and Gene Set Enrichment Analysis. Noteworthy, expression of the hematopoiesis-associated molecules CXCL12 and vascular cell adhesion molecule 1 was remarkably decreased in e-MSCs. e-MSCs supported an enhanced expansion of CD34{sup +} hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells, and generation of myeloid lineage cells in vitro. In addition, short-term osteoinductive treatment favored in vivo hematopoietic recovery in lethally irradiated mice that underwent BM transplantation. e-MSCs exhibited the absence of decreased stemness-associated gene expression, increased osteogenesis-associated gene expression, and apparent mineralization, thus maintaining the ability to differentiate into adipogenic cells. Our findings demonstrate the unique biological characteristics of e-MSCs as hematopoiesis-regulatory stromal cells at differentiation stage between MSCs and osteoprogenitor cells and have significant implications in developing new strategy for using pharmacological osteoinductive treatment to support hematopoiesis in hematopoietic stem and progenitor cell transplantation. - Highlights: • Human BM-MSCs in an early osteoinductive stage (e-MSCs) support hematopoiesis. • Adhesion- and chemotaxis-associated gene signatures are altered in e-MSCs. • Expression of CXCL12 and VCAM1 is remarkably decreased in e-MSCs. • e-MSCs are at differentiation stage between MSCs and osteoprogenitor cells. • Osteoinductive treatment

  20. Crystal structure of pentapeptide-independent chemotaxis receptor methyltransferase (CheR) reveals idiosyncratic structural determinants for receptor recognition.

    PubMed

    Batra, Monu; Sharma, Rajesh; Malik, Anjali; Dhindwal, Sonali; Kumar, Pravindra; Tomar, Shailly

    2016-12-01

    Chemotactic methyltransferase, CheR catalyse methylation of specific glutamate residues in the cytoplasmic domain of methyl-accepting chemotactic protein receptors (MCPRs). The methylation of MCPRs is essential for the chemical sensing and chemotactic bacterial mobility towards favorable chemicals or away from unfavorable ones. In this study, crystal structure of B. subtilis CheR (BsCheR) in complex with S-adenosyl-l-homocysteine (SAH) has been determined to 1.8Å resolution. This is the first report of crystal structure belonging to the pentapeptide-independent CheR (PICheR) class. Till date, only one crystal structure of CheR from S. typhimurium (StCheR) belonging to pentapeptide-dependent CheR (PDCheR) class is available. Structural analysis of BsCheR reveals a helix-X-helix motif (HXH) with Asp53 as the linker residue in the N-terminal domain. The key structural features of the PDCheR β-subdomain involved in the formation of a tight complex with the pentapeptide binding motif in MCPRs were found to be absent in the structure of BsCheR. Additionally, isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC) experiments were performed to investigate S-adenosyl-(l)-methionine (SAM) binding affinity and KD was determined to be 0.32mM. The structure of BsCheR reveals that mostly residues of the large C-terminal domain contribute to SAH binding, with contributions of few residues from the linker region and the N-terminal domain. Structural investigations and sequence analysis carried out in this study provide critical insights into the distinct receptor recognition mechanism of the PDCheR and PICheR methyltransferase classes.

  1. A comparative proteome analysis reveals flagellin, chemotaxis regulated proteins and amylovoran to be involved in virulence differences between Erwinia amylovora strains.

    PubMed

    Holtappels, M; Vrancken, K; Schoofs, H; Deckers, T; Remans, T; Noben, J P; Valcke, R

    2015-06-18

    Erwinia amylovora is a Gram-negative bacterium that causes the destructive disease fire blight affecting most members of the Rosaceae family, of which apple and pear are economically the most important hosts. E. amylovora has been considered as a homogeneous species in whole, although significant differences in virulence patterns have been observed. However, the underlying causes of the differences in virulence remain to be discovered. In a first-time comparative proteomic approach using E. amylovora, 2D differential in-gel electrophoresis (DIGE) was used to identify proteins that could explain the gradual difference in virulence between four different strains. Two important proteins were identified, FliC and CheY, both involved in flagella structure, motility and chemotaxis, which were more abundant in the least virulent strain. In the highly virulent strains the protein GalF, involved in amylovoran production, was more abundant, which was consistent with the higher expression of the gene and the higher amylovoran content in this strain in vitro. Together, these results confirm the involvement of amylovoran in virulence, but also imply an indirect role of flagellin in virulence as elicitor of plant defence. This research provides new insights into our current understanding of the virulence of Erwinia amylovora. This plant-pathogen is considered a homogeneous species although different strains show differences in virulence. Despite the efforts made on the genomic level which resulted in the discovery of virulence factors, the reason for the different virulence patterns between strains has not yet been identified. In our lab we used a comparative proteomic approach, which has never been published before, to identify proteins involved in these differences between strains and hereby possibly involved in virulence. Our results provide interesting insights in virulence and present us with the opportunity to glance into the proteome of E. amylovora. Copyright © 2015

  2. Frequency-Dependent Escherichia coli Chemotaxis Behavior

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Xuejun; Si, Guangwei; Deng, Nianpei; Ouyang, Qi; Wu, Tailin; He, Zhuoran; Jiang, Lili; Luo, Chunxiong; Tu, Yuhai

    2012-03-01

    We study Escherichia coli chemotaxis behavior in environments with spatially and temporally varying attractant sources by developing a unique microfluidic system. Our measurements reveal a frequency-dependent chemotaxis behavior. At low frequency, the E. coli population oscillates in synchrony with the attractant. In contrast, in fast-changing environments, the population response becomes smaller and out of phase with the attractant waveform. These observations are inconsistent with the well-known Keller-Segel chemotaxis equation. A new continuum model is proposed to describe the population level behavior of E. coli chemotaxis based on the underlying pathway dynamics. With the inclusion of a finite adaptation time and an attractant consumption rate, our model successfully explains the microfluidic experiments at different stimulus frequencies.

  3. Movement within and movement beyond: synaptotagmin-mediated vesicle fusion during chemotaxis.

    PubMed

    Colvin, Richard A; Luster, Andrew D

    2011-01-01

    Leukocyte chemotaxis plays an essential role in generating and delivering immune responses and is a critical component of inflammation. In order to identify novel genes and pathways important for regulating chemotaxis, we performed an RNAi-based screen and identified several genes involved with vesicle movement and fusion as mediators of chemotaxis. Our recently published data show that during chemotaxis vesicle trafficking proteins are required for lysosome fusion, uropod release and efficient directed cell migration.

  4. Negative chemotaxis of Ralstonia pseudosolanacearum to maleate and identification of the maleate chemosensory protein.

    PubMed

    Tunchai, Mattana; Hida, Akiko; Oku, Shota; Nakashimada, Yutaka; Nikata, Toshiyuki; Tajima, Takahisa; Kato, Junichi

    2017-07-22

    Ralstonia pseudosolanacearum Ps29 was repelled by maleate. Screening of a complete collection of Ps29 single-methyl-accepting chemotaxis protein (mcp) gene mutants identified the RSp0303 homolog (McpP) as a chemotaxis sensor mediating negative chemotaxis to maleate. Interestingly, the mcpP-deletion mutant was attracted to maleate, indicating that this bacterium expresses a MCP(s) for both positive and negative chemotaxis to maleate. We constructed a Ps29 derivative (designated POC14) harboring deletions in 14 individual mcp genes, including mcpP, to characterize McpP. Introduction of a plasmid harboring the mcpP gene (pPS16) restored the ability to negatively respond to maleate, confirming that McpP is a MCP for negative chemotaxis to maleate. We thought that maleate might be applied to controlling plant infection by R. pseudosolanacearum. To evaluate this possibility, we measured chemotactic responses of seven other virulent R. pseudosolanacearum strains to maleate. We confirmed that they harbored functional mcpP orthologues, but they showed no chemotactic responses to maleate. Quantitative RT-PCR analysis revealed that these seven R. pseudosolanacearum strains did not show negative chemotaxis to maleate because of negligible transcription of the mcpP genes. We compared the chemotactic responses of POC14 and POC14[pPS16] toward various chemicals and found that McpP senses inorganic phosphate as a chemoattractant. Copyright © 2017 The Society for Biotechnology, Japan. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Early osteoinductive human bone marrow mesenchymal stromal/stem cells support an enhanced hematopoietic cell expansion with altered chemotaxis- and adhesion-related gene expression profiles.

    PubMed

    Sugino, Noriko; Miura, Yasuo; Yao, Hisayuki; Iwasa, Masaki; Fujishiro, Aya; Fujii, Sumie; Hirai, Hideyo; Takaori-Kondo, Akifumi; Ichinohe, Tatsuo; Maekawa, Taira

    2016-01-22

    Bone marrow (BM) microenvironment has a crucial role in supporting hematopoiesis. Here, by using a microarray analysis, we demonstrate that human BM mesenchymal stromal/stem cells (MSCs) in an early osteoinductive stage (e-MSCs) are characterized by unique hematopoiesis-associated gene expression with an enhanced hematopoiesis-supportive ability. In comparison to BM-MSCs without osteoinductive treatment, gene expression in e-MSCs was significantly altered in terms of their cell adhesion- and chemotaxis-related profiles, as identified with Gene Ontology and Gene Set Enrichment Analysis. Noteworthy, expression of the hematopoiesis-associated molecules CXCL12 and vascular cell adhesion molecule 1 was remarkably decreased in e-MSCs. e-MSCs supported an enhanced expansion of CD34(+) hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells, and generation of myeloid lineage cells in vitro. In addition, short-term osteoinductive treatment favored in vivo hematopoietic recovery in lethally irradiated mice that underwent BM transplantation. e-MSCs exhibited the absence of decreased stemness-associated gene expression, increased osteogenesis-associated gene expression, and apparent mineralization, thus maintaining the ability to differentiate into adipogenic cells. Our findings demonstrate the unique biological characteristics of e-MSCs as hematopoiesis-regulatory stromal cells at differentiation stage between MSCs and osteoprogenitor cells and have significant implications in developing new strategy for using pharmacological osteoinductive treatment to support hematopoiesis in hematopoietic stem and progenitor cell transplantation. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Chemotaxis: Under Agarose Assay.

    PubMed

    Brazill, Derrick

    2016-01-01

    The unicellular eukaryote Dictyostelium discoideum represents a superb model for examining chemotaxis. Under vegetative conditions, the amoebae are chemotactically responsive to pterins, such as folate. Under starved conditions, they lose their sensitivity to pterins, and become chemotactically responsive to cAMP. As an NIH model system, Dictyostelium offers a variety of advantages in studying chemotaxis, including its conservation of mammalian signaling pathways, its ease of growth, and its genetic tractability. In this chapter, we describe the use of the under agarose chemotaxis assay to identify proteins involved in controlling motility and directional sensing in Dictyostelium discoideum. Given the similarities between Dictyostelium and mammalian cells, this allows us to dissect the conserved pathways involved in eukaryotic chemotaxis.

  7. Neocortex expansion is linked to size variations in gene families with chemotaxis, cell–cell signalling and immune response functions in mammals

    PubMed Central

    Castillo-Morales, Atahualpa; Monzón-Sandoval, Jimena; de Sousa, Alexandra A.

    2016-01-01

    Increased brain size is thought to have played an important role in the evolution of mammals and is a highly variable trait across lineages. Variations in brain size are closely linked to corresponding variations in the size of the neocortex, a distinct mammalian evolutionary innovation. The genomic features that explain and/or accompany variations in the relative size of the neocortex remain unknown. By comparing the genomes of 28 mammalian species, we show that neocortical expansion relative to the rest of the brain is associated with variations in gene family size (GFS) of gene families that are significantly enriched in biological functions associated with chemotaxis, cell–cell signalling and immune response. Importantly, we find that previously reported GFS variations associated with increased brain size are largely accounted for by the stronger link between neocortex expansion and variations in the size of gene families. Moreover, genes within these families are more prominently expressed in the human neocortex during early compared with adult development. These results suggest that changes in GFS underlie morphological adaptations during brain evolution in mammalian lineages. PMID:27707894

  8. RNA-Seq Analysis Identifies New Genes Regulated by the Histone-Like Nucleoid Structuring Protein (H-NS) Affecting Vibrio cholerae Virulence, Stress Response and Chemotaxis

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Hongxia; Ayala, Julio C.; Benitez, Jorge A.; Silva, Anisia J.

    2015-01-01

    The histone-like nucleoid structuring protein (H-NS) functions as a transcriptional silencer by binding to AT-rich sequences at bacterial promoters. However, H-NS repression can be counteracted by other transcription factors in response to environmental changes. The identification of potential toxic factors, the expression of which is prevented by H-NS could facilitate the discovery of new regulatory proteins that may contribute to the emergence of new pathogenic variants by anti-silencing. Vibrio cholerae hns mutants of the El Tor biotype exhibit altered virulence, motility and environmental stress response phenotypes compared to wild type. We used an RNA-seq analysis approach to determine the basis of the above hns phenotypes and identify new targets of H-NS transcriptional silencing. H-NS affected the expression of 18% of all predicted genes in a growth phase-dependent manner. Loss of H-NS resulted in diminished expression of numerous genes encoding methyl-accepting chemotaxis proteins as well as chemotaxis toward the attractants glycine and serine. Deletion of hns also induced an endogenous envelope stress response resulting in elevated expression of rpoE encoding the extracytoplamic sigma factor E (σE). The RNA-seq analysis identified new genes directly repressed by H-NS that can affect virulence and biofilm development in the El Tor biotype cholera bacterium. We show that H-NS and the quorum sensing regulator HapR silence the transcription of the vieSAB three-component regulatory system in El Tor biotype V. cholerae. We also demonstrate that H-NS directly represses the transcription of hlyA (hemolysin), rtxCA (the repeat in toxin or RTX), rtxBDE (RTX transport) and the biosynthesis of indole. Of these genes, H-NS occupancy at the hlyA promoter was diminished by overexpression of the transcription activator HlyU. We discuss the role of H-NS transcriptional silencing in phenotypic differences exhibited by V. cholerae biotypes. PMID:25679988

  9. GPCR-controlled chemotaxis in Dictyostelium discoideum.

    PubMed

    Jin, Tian

    2011-01-01

    Dictyostelium discoideum has been chosen as the key model organism for the study of eukaryotic chemotaxis. Studies in this lower eukaryotic organism have allowed us to discover eukaryotic chemotaxis behavior and to gradually understand the mechanism of chemotaxis. Investigations in this simple organism often guide the direction of chemotaxis studies in areas such as forming concepts, discovering molecular components, revealing pathways and networks. The cooperation between experimental approaches and computational modeling has helped us to comprehend the signaling network as a system. To further reveal the relationships among the molecular mechanisms of individual signaling steps, a continuous interplay between model development and refinement and experimental testing and verification will be useful. This article focuses on a chemoattractant G-protein-coupled receptor (GPCR)/G-protein gradient sensing machinery, which is monitored by PIP(3) responses and investigated by the interplay between live cell imaging experiments and computational modeling. We believe that such an approach will lead to a much better understanding of GPCR-controlled chemotaxis of all eukaryotic cells.

  10. Inhibition of CXCL12-mediated chemotaxis of Jurkat cells by direct immunotoxicants.

    PubMed

    Shao, Jia; Stout, Inge; Volger, Oscar L; Hendriksen, Peter J M; van Loveren, Henk; Peijnenburg, Ad A C M

    2016-07-01

    Directional migration of cells to specific locations is required in tissue development, wound healing, and immune responses. Immune cell migration plays a crucial role in both innate and adaptive immunity. Chemokines are small pro-inflammatory chemoattractants that control the migration of leukocytes. In addition, they are also involved in other immune processes such as lymphocyte development and immune pathology. In a previous toxicogenomics study using the Jurkat T cell line, we have shown that the model immunotoxicant TBTO inhibited chemotaxis toward the chemokine CXCL12. In the present work, we aimed at assessing a novel approach to detecting chemicals that affect the process of cell migration. For this, we first evaluated the effects of 31 chemicals on mRNA expression of genes that are known to be related to cell migration. With this analysis, seven immunotoxicants were identified as potential chemotaxis modulators, of which five (CoCl2 80 µM, MeHg 1 µM, ochratoxin A 10 µM, S9-treated ochratoxin A 10 µM, and TBTO 100 nM) were confirmed as chemotaxis inhibitor in an in vitro trans-well chemotaxis assay using the chemokine CXCL12. The transcriptome data of the five compounds together with previously obtained protein phosphorylation profiles for two out of five compounds (i.e., ochratoxin A and TBTO) revealed that the mechanisms behind the chemotaxis inhibition are different for these immunotoxicants. Moreover, the mTOR inhibitor rapamycin had no effect on the chemotaxis of Jurkat cells, indicating that the mTOR pathway is not involved in CXCL12-mediated chemotaxis of Jurkat cells, which is opposite to the findings on human primary T cells (Munk et al. in PLoS One 6(9):e24667, 2011). Thus, the results obtained from the chemotaxis assay conducted with Jurkat cells might not fully represent the results obtained with human primary T cells. Despite this difference, the present study indicated that some compounds may exert their immunotoxic effects through

  11. Chemotaxis of Pseudomonas putida toward chlorinated benzoates

    SciTech Connect

    Harwood, C.S.; Parales, R.E.; Dispensa, M. )

    1990-05-01

    The chlorinated aromatic acids 3-chlorobenzoate and 4-chlorobenzoate are chemoattractants for Pseudomonas putida PRS2000. These compounds are detected by a chromosomally encoded chemotactic response to benzoate which is inducible by {beta}-ketoadipate, and intermediate of benzoate catabolism. Plasmid pAC27, encoding enzymes for 3-chlorobenzoate degradation, does not appear to carry genes for chemotaxis toward chlorinated compounds.

  12. Arsenite oxidation regulator AioR regulates bacterial chemotaxis towards arsenite in Agrobacterium tumefaciens GW4

    PubMed Central

    Shi, Kaixiang; Fan, Xia; Qiao, Zixu; Han, Yushan; McDermott, Timothy R.; Wang, Qian; Wang, Gejiao

    2017-01-01

    Some arsenite [As(III)]-oxidizing bacteria exhibit positive chemotaxis towards As(III), however, the related As(III) chemoreceptor and regulatory mechanism remain unknown. The As(III)-oxidizing bacterium Agrobacterium tumefaciens GW4 displays positive chemotaxis towards 0.5–2 mM As(III). Genomic analyses revealed a putative chemoreceptor-encoding gene, mcp, located in the arsenic gene island and having a predicted promoter binding site for the As(III) oxidation regulator AioR. Expression of mcp and other chemotaxis related genes (cheA, cheY2 and fliG) was inducible by As(III), but not in the aioR mutant. Using capillary assays and intrinsic tryptophan fluorescence spectra analysis, Mcp was confirmed to be responsible for chemotaxis towards As(III) and to bind As(III) (but not As(V) nor phosphate) as part of the sensing mechanism. A bacterial one-hybrid system technique and electrophoretic mobility shift assays showed that AioR interacts with the mcp regulatory region in vivo and in vitro, and the precise AioR binding site was confirmed using DNase I foot-printing. Taken together, these results indicate that this Mcp is responsible for the chemotactic response towards As(III) and is regulated by AioR. Additionally, disrupting the mcp gene affected bacterial As(III) oxidation and growth, inferring that Mcp may exert some sort of functional connection between As(III) oxidation and As(III) chemotaxis. PMID:28256605

  13. Self-similar dynamics of bacterial chemotaxis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ngamsaad, Waipot; Khompurngson, Kannika

    2012-12-01

    Colonies of bacteria grown on thin agar plate exhibit fractal patterns as a result of adaptation to their environments. The bacterial colony pattern formation is regulated crucially by chemotaxis, the movement of cells along a chemical concentration gradient. Here, the dynamics of pattern formation in a bacterial colony is investigated theoretically through a continuum model that considers chemotaxis. In the case of the gradient sensed by the bacterium is nearly uniform, the bacterial colony patterns are self-similar, which means they look the same at every scale. The scaling law of the bacterial colony growth has been revealed explicitly. Chemotaxis biases the movement of the bacterial population in colony to trend toward the chemical attractant. Moreover, the bacterial colonies evolve for a long time as the traveling wave with a sharp front.

  14. In vivo influence of sodium fluoride on sperm chemotaxis in male mice.

    PubMed

    Lu, Zhaojing; Wang, Shaolin; Sun, Zilong; Niu, Ruiyan; Wang, Jundong

    2014-02-01

    Reproductive process covers lots of procedures, including capacitation, hyperactivation, chemotaxis and the acrosome reaction. Each plays an important role in the success of fertilization. Although multiple studies have reported the toxic effects of fluoride on the male reproduction, the effect of fluoride on sperm chemotaxis is little known. This study is to examine the effect of fluoride on the sperm chemotaxis and then to reveal the underling mechanisms of fluoride toxicity in sperm chemotaxis. 260 healthy Kunming male mice (8 weeks old) were randomly divided into four groups and exposed to 50, 100, 150 mg NaF/L in the drinking water for 8 weeks. At the end of the exposure, sperm chemotaxis was examined using a microchannel-based device. Ca(2+) concentration, adenylate cyclase (AC) content and mRNA expression of mACIII, mACVIII, Golf alpha, CatSper1, CatSper2 were measured to elucidate the possible molecular mechanisms. The results showed that the percentage of chemotactic sperm was decreased by NaF in a dose-dependent manner. In the 100 and 150 mg/L groups, Ca(2+) concentration and AC content were notably lower than the control group. Compared with the control group, mRNA expression of CatSper1 in the 100 and 150 mg/L treatment groups was decreased significantly, and other genes showed no statistical difference. These data suggested that excessive fluoride did adversely affect sperm chemotaxis. The alteration of Ca(2+) concentration, AC content and CatSper1 mRNA expression level may play a key role in the mechanism underlying the affection.

  15. Chemotaxis signaling systems in model beneficial plant-bacteria associations.

    PubMed

    Scharf, Birgit E; Hynes, Michael F; Alexandre, Gladys M

    2016-04-01

    Beneficial plant-microbe associations play critical roles in plant health. Bacterial chemotaxis provides a competitive advantage to motile flagellated bacteria in colonization of plant root surfaces, which is a prerequisite for the establishment of beneficial associations. Chemotaxis signaling enables motile soil bacteria to sense and respond to gradients of chemical compounds released by plant roots. This process allows bacteria to actively swim towards plant roots and is thus critical for competitive root surface colonization. The complete genome sequences of several plant-associated bacterial species indicate the presence of multiple chemotaxis systems and a large number of chemoreceptors. Further, most soil bacteria are motile and capable of chemotaxis, and chemotaxis-encoding genes are enriched in the bacteria found in the rhizosphere compared to the bulk soil. This review compares the architecture and diversity of chemotaxis signaling systems in model beneficial plant-associated bacteria and discusses their relevance to the rhizosphere lifestyle. While it is unclear how controlling chemotaxis via multiple parallel chemotaxis systems provides a competitive advantage to certain bacterial species, the presence of a larger number of chemoreceptors is likely to contribute to the ability of motile bacteria to survive in the soil and to compete for root surface colonization.

  16. Coupled Oscillators with Chemotaxis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sawai, Satoshi; Aizawa, Yoji

    1998-08-01

    A simple coupled oscillator system with chemotaxis is introducedto study morphogenesis of cellular slime molds. The modelsuccessfuly explains the migration of pseudoplasmodium which hasbeen experimentally predicted to be lead by cells with higherintrinsic frequencies. Results obtained predict that its velocityattains its maximum value in the interface region between totallocking and partial locking and also suggest possible rolesplayed by partial synchrony during multicellular development.

  17. THE CHEMOSUPPRESSION OF CHEMOTAXIS

    PubMed Central

    Ward, Peter A.

    1966-01-01

    The effects of various drugs on chemotaxis of polymorphonuclear leukocytes (PMN's) in vitro and in vivo have been studied. Response of rabbit PMN's in vitro to the chemotactic factor of rabbit serum, consisting of an activated protein-protein complex of the fifth and sixth (and probably seventh) components of complement (C'), is suppressed by hydrocortisone, methyl prednisolone, and chloroquine. Drug concentrations causing 50% inhibition of chemotaxis in vitro were found to be: hydrocortisone, 2.9 x 10–4 M; methly prednisolone, 1.2 x 10–4 M; and chloroquine 8.5 x 10–6 M. The hydrocortisone effect on PMN's appeared to be irreversible, since washing of the cells did not restore their chemotactic response. 2, 4-Dinitrophenol (DNP), vitamin A, and endotoxin did not inhibit chemotaxis. Hydrocortisone and chloroquine did block serum C' activity in vitro, but only at substantially higher concentrations. Using the reversed passive Arthus reaction in guinea pigs as a model for chemotaxis in vivo, systemic treatment of animals with hydrocortisone or chloroquine inhibited development of the vasculitis. Circulating antigen and C' were fixed in vascular structures, and serum C' was not perceptibly altered. Nevertheless, PMN infiltrates failed to occur. Local administration of hydrocortisone also prevented influx of PMN's in the Arthus reaction, in spite of the fact that immune reactants were found fixed in the vascular walls. Systemic treatment of guinea pigs with DNP did not diminish the intensity of the Arthus reactions. Phagocytosis of zymosan particles by rabbit PMN's was inhibited by hydrocortisone, methyl prednisolone, and chloroquine, but not by DNP or endotoxin. The concentrations of drugs inhibitory in phagocytosis were substantially higher than those required for inhibition of chemotaxis in vitro. These findings suggest that hydrocortisone and chloroquine inhibit the inflammatory process by preventing the response of leukocytes to chemotactic stimuli. PMID

  18. Thermodynamic and kinetic characterization of two methyl-accepting chemotaxis heme sensors from Geobacter sulfurreducens reveals the structural origin of their functional difference.

    PubMed

    Silva, Marta A; Valente, Raquel C; Pokkuluri, P Raj; Turner, David L; Salgueiro, Carlos A; Catarino, Teresa

    2014-06-01

    The periplasmic sensor domains GSU582 and GSU935 are part of methyl-accepting chemotaxis proteins of the bacterium Geobacter sulfurreducens containing one c-type heme and a PAS-like fold. Their spectroscopic properties were shown previously to share similar spectral features. In both sensors, the heme group is in the high-spin form in the oxidized state and low-spin after reduction and binding of a methionine residue. Therefore, it was proposed that this redox-linked ligand switch might be related to the signal transduction mechanism. We now report the thermodynamic and kinetic characterization of the sensors GSU582 and GSU935 by visible spectroscopy and stopped-flow techniques, at several pH and ionic strength values. Despite their similar spectroscopic features, the midpoint reduction potentials and the rate constants for reduction by dithionite are considerably different in the two sensors. The reduction potentials of both sensors are negative and well framed within the typical anoxic subsurface environments in which Geobacter species predominate. The midpoint reduction potentials of sensor GSU935 are lower than those of GSU582 at all pH and ionic strength values and the same was observed for the reduction rate constants. The origin of the different functional properties of these closely related sensors is rationalized in the terms of the structures. The results suggest that the sensors are designed to function in different working potential ranges, allowing the bacteria to trigger an adequate cellular response in different anoxic subsurface environments. These findings provide an explanation for the co-existence of two similar methyl-accepting chemotaxis proteins in G. sulfurreducens.

  19. Association of Campylobacter Jejuni ssp. Jejuni Chemotaxis Receptor Genes with Multilocus Sequence Types and Source of Isolation

    PubMed Central

    Mund, Norah Lynn-Anne; Masanta, Wycliffe Omurwa; Goldschmidt, Anne-Marie; Lugert, Raimond; Groß, Uwe; Zautner, Andreas E.

    2016-01-01

    Campylobacter jejuni’s flagellar locomotion is controlled by eleven chemoreceptors. Assessment of the distribution of the relevant chemoreceptor genes in the C. jejuni genomes deposited in the National Center for Biotechnology Information (NCBI) database led to the identification of two previously unknown tlp genes and a tlp5 pseudogene. These two chemoreceptor genes share the same locus in the C. jejuni genome with tlp4 and tlp11, but the gene region encoding the periplasmic ligand binding domain differs significantly from other chemoreceptor genes. Hence, they were named tlp12 and tlp13. Consequently, it was of interest to study their distribution in C. jejuni subpopulations of different clonality, and their cooccurrence with the eleven previously reported chemoreceptor genes. Therefore, the presence of all tlp genes was detected by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) in 292 multilocus sequence typing (MLST)-typed C. jejuni isolates from different hosts. The findings show interesting trends: Tlp4, tlp11, tlp12, and tlp13 appeared to be mutually exclusive and cooccur in a minor subset of isolates. Tlp4 was found to be present in only 33.56% of all tested isolates and was significantly less often detected in turkey isolates. Tlp11 was tested positive in only 17.8% of the isolates, while tlp12 was detected in 29.5% of all isolates, and tlp13 was found to be present in 38.7%. PMID:27766165

  20. Tuning sperm chemotaxis.

    PubMed

    Guerrero, Adán; Wood, Christopher D; Nishigaki, Takuya; Carneiro, Jorge; Darszon, Alberto

    2010-10-01

    Sperm chemotaxis is a long-term puzzle and most of our knowledge comes from studying marine animals that are external fertilizers. Sperm are attracted by diffusible chemical factors (chemoattractants) released from the egg which redirect their swimming paths towards their source. This redirection is driven by increases in flagellar curvature that correlate with transient flagellar Ca(2+) increases. Recent experimental and modelling results provide insights into the signal flow underlying the translation of an external chemical gradient into an intracellular molecular and motor response. A fundamental element of sea-urchin sperm chemotaxis lies in the ability of these cells to suppress Ca(2+)-mediated increases in flagellar curvature while experiencing an increasing chemoattractant gradient. The article considers this new evidence and summarizes the known underlying cellular mechanisms and behavioural strategies that sperm use to locate and fertilize the oocyte.

  1. Fractional chemotaxis diffusion equations.

    PubMed

    Langlands, T A M; Henry, B I

    2010-05-01

    We introduce mesoscopic and macroscopic model equations of chemotaxis with anomalous subdiffusion for modeling chemically directed transport of biological organisms in changing chemical environments with diffusion hindered by traps or macromolecular crowding. The mesoscopic models are formulated using continuous time random walk equations and the macroscopic models are formulated with fractional order differential equations. Different models are proposed depending on the timing of the chemotactic forcing. Generalizations of the models to include linear reaction dynamics are also derived. Finally a Monte Carlo method for simulating anomalous subdiffusion with chemotaxis is introduced and simulation results are compared with numerical solutions of the model equations. The model equations developed here could be used to replace Keller-Segel type equations in biological systems with transport hindered by traps, macromolecular crowding or other obstacles.

  2. Directional Sensing During Chemotaxis

    PubMed Central

    Janetopoulos, Christopher; Firtel, Richard A.

    2008-01-01

    Summary Cells have the innate ability to sense and move towards a variety of chemoattractants. We investigate the pathways by which cells sense and respond to chemoattractant gradients. We focus on the model system Dictyostelium and compare our understanding of chemotaxis in this system with recent advances made using neutrophils and other mammalian cell types, which share many molecular components and signaling pathways with Dictyostelium. The review also examines models that have been proposed to explain how cells are able to respond to small differences in ligand concentrations between the anterior leading edge and posterior of the cell. In addition, we highlight the overlapping functions of many signaling components in diverse processes beyond chemotaxis, including random cell motility and cell division. PMID:18452713

  3. Signaling Mechanisms for Chemotaxis

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yu; Chen, Chun-Lin; Iijima, Miho

    2011-01-01

    Cells recognize external chemical gradients and translate these environmental cues into amplified intracellular signaling that results in elongated cell shape, actin polymerization toward the leading edge, and movement along the gradient. Mechanisms underlying chemotaxis are conserved evolutionarily from Dictyostelium amoeba to mammalian neutrophils. Recent studies have uncovered several parallel intracellular signaling pathways that crosstalk in chemotaxing cells. Here, we review these signaling mechanisms in Dictyostelium discoideum. PMID:21585354

  4. Chemotaxis in Campylobacter jejuni.

    PubMed

    Zautner, A E; Tareen, A Malik; Groß, U; Lugert, R

    2012-03-01

    Chemotaxis is the common way of flagellated bacteria to direct their locomotion to sites of most favourable living conditions, that are sites with the highest concentrations of energy sources and the lowest amounts of bacteriotoxic substances. The general prerequisites for chemotaxis are chemoreceptors, a chemosensory signal-transduction system and the flagellar apparatus. Epsilonproteobacteria like Campylobacter sp. show specific variations of the common chemotaxis components. CheV, a CheW-like linking-protein with an additional response regulator (RR) domain, was identified as commonly used coupling scaffold protein of Campylobacter jejuni. It attaches the histidine autokinase (CheAY), which also has an additional RR-domain, to the chemoreceptors signalling domains. These additional RR-domains seem to play an important role in the regulation of the CheAY-phosphorylation state and thereby in sensory adaptation. The Campylobacter-chemoreceptors are arranged into the three groups A, B, and C. Group A contains membrane-anchored receptors sensing periplasmic signals, group B consists only of one receptor with two cytoplasmic ligand-proteins representing a bipartite energy taxis system that senses pyruvate and fumarate, and group C receptors are cytoplasmic signalling domains with mostly unknown cytoplasmic ligand-binding proteins as sensory constituents. Recent findings demonstrating different alleles of the TLP7 chemoreceptor, specific for formic acid, led to an amendment of this grouping.

  5. Chemotaxis in Campylobacter jejuni

    PubMed Central

    Zautner, A. E.; Tareen, A. Malik; Groß, U.; Lugert, R.

    2012-01-01

    Chemotaxis is the common way of flagellated bacteria to direct their locomotion to sites of most favourable living conditions, that are sites with the highest concentrations of energy sources and the lowest amounts of bacteriotoxic substances. The general prerequisites for chemotaxis are chemoreceptors, a chemosensory signal-transduction system and the flagellar apparatus. Epsilonproteobacteria like Campylobacter sp. show specific variations of the common chemotaxis components. CheV, a CheW-like linking-protein with an additional response regulator (RR) domain, was identified as commonly used coupling scaffold protein of Campylobacter jejuni. It attaches the histidine autokinase (CheAY), which also has an additional RR-domain, to the chemoreceptors signalling domains. These additional RR-domains seem to play an important role in the regulation of the CheAY-phosphorylation state and thereby in sensory adaptation. The Campylobacter-chemoreceptors are arranged into the three groups A, B, and C. Group A contains membrane-anchored receptors sensing periplasmic signals, group B consists only of one receptor with two cytoplasmic ligand-proteins representing a bipartite energy taxis system that senses pyruvate and fumarate, and group C receptors are cytoplasmic signalling domains with mostly unknown cytoplasmic ligand-binding proteins as sensory constituents. Recent findings demonstrating different alleles of the TLP7 chemoreceptor, specific for formic acid, led to an amendment of this grouping. PMID:24611118

  6. Identification of a Chemoreceptor in Pseudomonas aeruginosa That Specifically Mediates Chemotaxis Toward α-Ketoglutarate.

    PubMed

    Martín-Mora, David; Ortega, Alvaro; Reyes-Darias, José A; García, Vanina; López-Farfán, Diana; Matilla, Miguel A; Krell, Tino

    2016-01-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa is an ubiquitous pathogen able to infect humans, animals, and plants. Chemotaxis was found to be associated with the virulence of this and other pathogens. Although established as a model for chemotaxis research, the majority of the 26 P. aeruginosa chemoreceptors remain functionally un-annotated. We report here the identification of PA5072 (named McpK) as chemoreceptor for α-ketoglutarate (αKG). High-throughput thermal shift assays and isothermal titration calorimetry studies (ITC) of the recombinant McpK ligand binding domain (LBD) showed that it recognizes exclusively α-ketoglutarate. The ITC analysis indicated that the ligand bound with positive cooperativity (Kd1 = 301 μM, Kd2 = 81 μM). McpK is predicted to possess a helical bimodular (HBM) type of LBD and this and other studies suggest that this domain type may be associated with the recognition of organic acids. Analytical ultracentrifugation (AUC) studies revealed that McpK-LBD is present in monomer-dimer equilibrium. Alpha-KG binding stabilized the dimer and dimer self-dissociation constants of 55 μM and 5.9 μM were derived for ligand-free and αKG-bound forms of McpK-LBD, respectively. Ligand-induced LBD dimer stabilization has been observed for other HBM domain containing receptors and may correspond to a general mechanism of this protein family. Quantitative capillary chemotaxis assays demonstrated that P. aeruginosa showed chemotaxis to a broad range of αKG concentrations with maximal responses at 500 μM. Deletion of the mcpK gene reduced chemotaxis over the entire concentration range to close to background levels and wild type like chemotaxis was recovered following complementation. Real-time PCR studies indicated that the presence of αKG does not modulate mcpK expression. Since αKG is present in plant root exudates it was investigated whether the deletion of mcpK altered maize root colonization. However, no significant changes with respect to the wild type strain

  7. Identification of a Chemoreceptor in Pseudomonas aeruginosa That Specifically Mediates Chemotaxis Toward α-Ketoglutarate

    PubMed Central

    Martín-Mora, David; Ortega, Alvaro; Reyes-Darias, José A.; García, Vanina; López-Farfán, Diana; Matilla, Miguel A.; Krell, Tino

    2016-01-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa is an ubiquitous pathogen able to infect humans, animals, and plants. Chemotaxis was found to be associated with the virulence of this and other pathogens. Although established as a model for chemotaxis research, the majority of the 26 P. aeruginosa chemoreceptors remain functionally un-annotated. We report here the identification of PA5072 (named McpK) as chemoreceptor for α-ketoglutarate (αKG). High-throughput thermal shift assays and isothermal titration calorimetry studies (ITC) of the recombinant McpK ligand binding domain (LBD) showed that it recognizes exclusively α-ketoglutarate. The ITC analysis indicated that the ligand bound with positive cooperativity (Kd1 = 301 μM, Kd2 = 81 μM). McpK is predicted to possess a helical bimodular (HBM) type of LBD and this and other studies suggest that this domain type may be associated with the recognition of organic acids. Analytical ultracentrifugation (AUC) studies revealed that McpK-LBD is present in monomer-dimer equilibrium. Alpha-KG binding stabilized the dimer and dimer self-dissociation constants of 55 μM and 5.9 μM were derived for ligand-free and αKG-bound forms of McpK-LBD, respectively. Ligand-induced LBD dimer stabilization has been observed for other HBM domain containing receptors and may correspond to a general mechanism of this protein family. Quantitative capillary chemotaxis assays demonstrated that P. aeruginosa showed chemotaxis to a broad range of αKG concentrations with maximal responses at 500 μM. Deletion of the mcpK gene reduced chemotaxis over the entire concentration range to close to background levels and wild type like chemotaxis was recovered following complementation. Real-time PCR studies indicated that the presence of αKG does not modulate mcpK expression. Since αKG is present in plant root exudates it was investigated whether the deletion of mcpK altered maize root colonization. However, no significant changes with respect to the wild type strain

  8. Robustness in bacterial chemotaxis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alon, U.; Surette, M. G.; Barkai, N.; Leibler, S.

    1999-01-01

    Networks of interacting proteins orchestrate the responses of living cells to a variety of external stimuli, but how sensitive is the functioning of these protein networks to variations in theirbiochemical parameters? One possibility is that to achieve appropriate function, the reaction rate constants and enzyme concentrations need to be adjusted in a precise manner, and any deviation from these `fine-tuned' values ruins the network's performance. An alternative possibility is that key properties of biochemical networks are robust; that is, they are insensitive to the precise values of the biochemical parameters. Here we address this issue in experiments using chemotaxis of Escherichia coli, one of the best-characterized sensory systems,. We focus on how response and adaptation to attractant signals vary with systematic changes in the intracellular concentration of the components of the chemotaxis network. We find that some properties, such as steady-state behaviour and adaptation time, show strong variations in response to varying protein concentrations. In contrast, the precision of adaptation is robust and does not vary with the protein concentrations. This is consistent with a recently proposed molecular mechanism for exact adaptation, where robustness is a direct consequence of the network's architecture.

  9. Optimality in Bacterial Chemotaxis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vladimirov, Nikita; Lebiedz, Dirk; Sourjik, Victor

    2010-03-01

    One of the central questions of systems biology is the role of microscopic parameters of a single cell in the behavior of population. Multiscale models address this problem, allowing us to understand population behavior from single-cell molecular components and reactions. In this work a multiscale (hybrid) model is presented, which describes chemotactic Escherichia coli bacterium by combination of mathematical models and time-scale separation of key reactions. The bacterial behavior is described with high accuracy according to the available experimental data. The model shows several new aspects of chemotactic optimality in terms of adaptation rate, gradient steepness and type of medium (liquid or porous). Also, it predicts existence of an additional mechanism of gradient navigation in E. coli. Based on the available experiments, the model suggests that tumbles are anisotropic, i.e. the angle of reorientation during a tumble depends on the swimming direction along the gradient. This result demonstrates a new level of optimization in E. coli chemotaxis, which is likely to be used by some other peritrichously flagellated bacteria, and indicates yet another level of evolutionary optimization in bacterial chemotaxis.

  10. Network Topology Reveals Key Cardiovascular Disease Genes

    PubMed Central

    Stojković, Neda; Radak, Djordje; Pržulj, Nataša

    2013-01-01

    The structure of protein-protein interaction (PPI) networks has already been successfully used as a source of new biological information. Even though cardiovascular diseases (CVDs) are a major global cause of death, many CVD genes still await discovery. We explore ways to utilize the structure of the human PPI network to find important genes for CVDs that should be targeted by drugs. The hope is to use the properties of such important genes to predict new ones, which would in turn improve a choice of therapy. We propose a methodology that examines the PPI network wiring around genes involved in CVDs. We use the methodology to identify a subset of CVD-related genes that are statistically significantly enriched in drug targets and “driver genes.” We seek such genes, since driver genes have been proposed to drive onset and progression of a disease. Our identified subset of CVD genes has a large overlap with the Core Diseasome, which has been postulated to be the key to disease formation and hence should be the primary object of therapeutic intervention. This indicates that our methodology identifies “key” genes responsible for CVDs. Thus, we use it to predict new CVD genes and we validate over 70% of our predictions in the literature. Finally, we show that our predicted genes are functionally similar to currently known CVD drug targets, which confirms a potential utility of our methodology towards improving therapy for CVDs. PMID:23977067

  11. Identification of chemotaxis sensory proteins for amino acids in Pseudomonas fluorescens Pf0-1 and their involvement in chemotaxis to tomato root exudate and root colonization.

    PubMed

    Oku, Shota; Komatsu, Ayaka; Tajima, Takahisa; Nakashimada, Yutaka; Kato, Junichi

    2012-01-01

    Pseudomonas fluorescens Pf0-1 showed positive chemotactic responses toward 20 commonly-occurring l-amino acids. Genomic analysis revealed that P. fluorescens Pf0-1 possesses three genes (Pfl01_0124, Pfl01_0354, and Pfl01_4431) homologous to the Pseudomonas aeruginosa PAO1 pctA gene, which has been identified as a chemotaxis sensory protein for amino acids. When Pf01_4431, Pfl01_0124, and Pfl01_0354 were introduced into the pctA pctB pctC triple mutant of P. aeruginosa PAO1, a mutant defective in chemotaxis to amino acids, its transformants showed chemotactic responses to 18, 16, and one amino acid, respectively. This result suggests that Pf01_4431, Pfl01_0124, and Pfl01_0354 are chemotaxis sensory proteins for amino acids and their genes were designated ctaA, ctaB, and ctaC, respectively. The ctaA ctaB ctaC triple mutant of P. fluorescens Pf0-1 showed only weak responses to Cys and Pro but no responses to the other 18 amino acids, indicating that CtaA, CtaB, and CtaC are major chemotaxis sensory proteins in P. fluorescens Pf0-1. Tomato root colonization by P. fluorescens strains was analyzed by gnotobiotic competitive root colonization assay. It was found that ctaA ctaB ctaC mutant was less competitive than the wild-type strain, suggesting that chemotaxis to amino acids, major components of root exudate, has an important role in root colonization by P. fluorescens Pf0-1. The ctaA ctaB ctaC triple mutant was more competitive than the cheA mutant of P. fluorescens Pf0-1, which is non-chemotactic, but motile. This result suggests that chemoattractants other than amino acids are also involved in root colonization by P. fluorescens Pf0-1.

  12. TRPC6 regulates CXCR2-mediated chemotaxis of murine neutrophils.

    PubMed

    Lindemann, Otto; Umlauf, Daniel; Frank, Svetlana; Schimmelpfennig, Sandra; Bertrand, Jessica; Pap, Thomas; Hanley, Peter J; Fabian, Anke; Dietrich, Alexander; Schwab, Albrecht

    2013-06-01

    Unraveling the mechanisms involved in chemotactic navigation of immune cells is of particular interest for the development of new immunoregulatory therapies. It is generally agreed upon that members of the classical transient receptor potential channel family (TRPC) are involved in chemotaxis. However, the regulatory role of TRPC channels in chemoattractant receptor-mediated signaling has not yet been clarified in detail. In this study, we demonstrate that the TRPC6 channels play a pronounced role in CXCR2-mediated intermediary chemotaxis, whereas N-formyl-methionine-leucine-phenylalanine receptor-mediated end-target chemotaxis is TRPC6 independent. The knockout of TRPC6 channels in murine neutrophils led to a strongly impaired intermediary chemotaxis after CXCR2 activation which is not further reinforced by CXCR2, PI3K, or p38 MAPK inhibition. Furthermore, CXCR2-mediated Ca(2+) influx but not Ca(2+) store release was attenuated in TRPC6(-/-) neutrophils. We demonstrate that the TRPC6 deficiency affected phosphorylation of AKT and MAPK downstream of CXCR2 receptor activation and led to altered remodeling of actin. The relevance of this TRPC6-depending defect in neutrophil chemotaxis is underscored by our in vivo findings. A nonseptic peritoneal inflammation revealed an attenuated recruitment of neutrophils in the peritoneal cavity of TRPC6(-/-) mice. In summary, this paper defines a specific role of TRPC6 channels in CXCR2-induced intermediary chemotaxis. In particular, TRPC6-mediated supply of calcium appears to be critical for activation of downstream signaling components.

  13. Nemertean toxin genes revealed through transcriptome sequencing.

    PubMed

    Whelan, Nathan V; Kocot, Kevin M; Santos, Scott R; Halanych, Kenneth M

    2014-11-27

    Nemerteans are one of few animal groups that have evolved the ability to utilize toxins for both defense and subduing prey, but little is known about specific nemertean toxins. In particular, no study has identified specific toxin genes even though peptide toxins are known from some nemertean species. Information about toxin genes is needed to better understand evolution of toxins across animals and possibly provide novel targets for pharmaceutical and industrial applications. We sequenced and annotated transcriptomes of two free-living and one commensal nemertean and annotated an additional six publicly available nemertean transcriptomes to identify putative toxin genes. Approximately 63-74% of predicted open reading frames in each transcriptome were annotated with gene names, and all species had similar percentages of transcripts annotated with each higher-level GO term. Every nemertean analyzed possessed genes with high sequence similarities to known animal toxins including those from stonefish, cephalopods, and sea anemones. One toxin-like gene found in all nemerteans analyzed had high sequence similarity to Plancitoxin-1, a DNase II hepatotoxin that may function well at low pH, which suggests that the acidic body walls of some nemerteans could work to enhance the efficacy of protein toxins. The highest number of toxin-like genes found in any one species was seven and the lowest was three. The diversity of toxin-like nemertean genes found here is greater than previously documented, and these animals are likely an ideal system for exploring toxin evolution and industrial applications of toxins. © The Author(s) 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society for Molecular Biology and Evolution.

  14. Nemertean Toxin Genes Revealed through Transcriptome Sequencing

    PubMed Central

    Whelan, Nathan V.; Kocot, Kevin M.; Santos, Scott R.; Halanych, Kenneth M.

    2014-01-01

    Nemerteans are one of few animal groups that have evolved the ability to utilize toxins for both defense and subduing prey, but little is known about specific nemertean toxins. In particular, no study has identified specific toxin genes even though peptide toxins are known from some nemertean species. Information about toxin genes is needed to better understand evolution of toxins across animals and possibly provide novel targets for pharmaceutical and industrial applications. We sequenced and annotated transcriptomes of two free-living and one commensal nemertean and annotated an additional six publicly available nemertean transcriptomes to identify putative toxin genes. Approximately 63–74% of predicted open reading frames in each transcriptome were annotated with gene names, and all species had similar percentages of transcripts annotated with each higher-level GO term. Every nemertean analyzed possessed genes with high sequence similarities to known animal toxins including those from stonefish, cephalopods, and sea anemones. One toxin-like gene found in all nemerteans analyzed had high sequence similarity to Plancitoxin-1, a DNase II hepatotoxin that may function well at low pH, which suggests that the acidic body walls of some nemerteans could work to enhance the efficacy of protein toxins. The highest number of toxin-like genes found in any one species was seven and the lowest was three. The diversity of toxin-like nemertean genes found here is greater than previously documented, and these animals are likely an ideal system for exploring toxin evolution and industrial applications of toxins. PMID:25432940

  15. Adaptability of non-genetic diversity in bacterial chemotaxis.

    PubMed

    Frankel, Nicholas W; Pontius, William; Dufour, Yann S; Long, Junjiajia; Hernandez-Nunez, Luis; Emonet, Thierry

    2014-10-03

    Bacterial chemotaxis systems are as diverse as the environments that bacteria inhabit, but how much environmental variation can cells tolerate with a single system? Diversification of a single chemotaxis system could serve as an alternative, or even evolutionary stepping-stone, to switching between multiple systems. We hypothesized that mutations in gene regulation could lead to heritable control of chemotactic diversity. By simulating foraging and colonization of E. coli using a single-cell chemotaxis model, we found that different environments selected for different behaviors. The resulting trade-offs show that populations facing diverse environments would ideally diversify behaviors when time for navigation is limited. We show that advantageous diversity can arise from changes in the distribution of protein levels among individuals, which could occur through mutations in gene regulation. We propose experiments to test our prediction that chemotactic diversity in a clonal population could be a selectable trait that enables adaptation to environmental variability.

  16. Chemotaxis and Actin Oscillations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bodenschatz, Eberhard; Hsu, Hsin-Fang; Negrete, Jose; Beta, Carsten; Pumir, Alain; Gholami, Azam; Tarantola, Marco; Westendorf, Christian; Zykov, Vladimir

    Recently, self-oscillations of the cytoskeletal actin have been observed in Dictyostelium, a model system for studying chemotaxis. Here we report experimental results on the self-oscillation mechanism and the role of regulatory proteins and myosin II. We stimulate cells rapidly and periodically by using photo un-caging of the chemoattractant in a micro-fluidic device and measured the cellular responses. We found that the response amplitude grows with stimulation strength only in a very narrow region of stimulation, after which the response amplitude reaches a plateau. Moreover, the frequency-response is not constant but rather varies with the strength of external stimuli. To understand the underlying mechanism, we analyzed the polymerization and de-polymerization time in the single cell level. Despite of the large cell-to-cell variability, we found that the polymerization time is independent of external stimuli and the de-polymerization time is prolonged as the stimulation strength increases. Our conclusions will be summarized and the role of noise in the signaling network will be discussed. German Science Foundation CRC 937.

  17. ArcA Controls Metabolism, Chemotaxis, and Motility Contributing to the Pathogenicity of Avian Pathogenic Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Fengwei; An, Chunxia; Bao, Yinli; Zhao, Xuefeng; Jernigan, Robert L.; Lithio, Andrew; Nettleton, Dan; Li, Ling; Wurtele, Eve Syrkin; Nolan, Lisa K.; Lu, Chengping

    2015-01-01

    Avian pathogenic Escherichia coli (APEC) strains cause one of the three most significant infectious diseases in the poultry industry and are also potential food-borne pathogens threating human health. In this study, we showed that ArcA (aerobic respiratory control), a global regulator important for E. coli's adaptation from anaerobic to aerobic conditions and control of that bacterium's enzymatic defenses against reactive oxygen species (ROS), is involved in the virulence of APEC. Deletion of arcA significantly attenuates the virulence of APEC in the duck model. Transcriptome sequencing (RNA-Seq) analyses comparing the APEC wild type and the arcA mutant indicate that ArcA regulates the expression of 129 genes, including genes involved in citrate transport and metabolism, flagellum synthesis, and chemotaxis. Further investigations revealed that citCEFXG contributed to APEC's microaerobic growth at the lag and log phases when cultured in duck serum and that ArcA played a dual role in the control of citrate metabolism and transportation. In addition, deletion of flagellar genes motA and motB and chemotaxis gene cheA significantly attenuated the virulence of APEC, and ArcA was shown to directly regulate the expression of motA, motB, and cheA. The combined results indicate that ArcA controls metabolism, chemotaxis, and motility contributing to the pathogenicity of APEC. PMID:26099584

  18. Chemotaxis by natural populations of coral reef bacteria.

    PubMed

    Tout, Jessica; Jeffries, Thomas C; Petrou, Katherina; Tyson, Gene W; Webster, Nicole S; Garren, Melissa; Stocker, Roman; Ralph, Peter J; Seymour, Justin R

    2015-08-01

    Corals experience intimate associations with distinct populations of marine microorganisms, but the microbial behaviours underpinning these relationships are poorly understood. There is evidence that chemotaxis is pivotal to the infection process of corals by pathogenic bacteria, but this evidence is limited to experiments using cultured isolates under laboratory conditions. We measured the chemotactic capabilities of natural populations of coral-associated bacteria towards chemicals released by corals and their symbionts, including amino acids, carbohydrates, ammonium and dimethylsulfoniopropionate (DMSP). Laboratory experiments, using a modified capillary assay, and in situ measurements, using a novel microfabricated in situ chemotaxis assay, were employed to quantify the chemotactic responses of natural microbial assemblages on the Great Barrier Reef. Both approaches showed that bacteria associated with the surface of the coral species Pocillopora damicornis and Acropora aspera exhibited significant levels of chemotaxis, particularly towards DMSP and amino acids, and that these levels of chemotaxis were significantly higher than that of bacteria inhabiting nearby, non-coral-associated waters. This pattern was supported by a significantly higher abundance of chemotaxis and motility genes in metagenomes within coral-associated water types. The phylogenetic composition of the coral-associated chemotactic microorganisms, determined using 16S rRNA amplicon pyrosequencing, differed from the community in the seawater surrounding the coral and comprised known coral associates, including potentially pathogenic Vibrio species. These findings indicate that motility and chemotaxis are prevalent phenotypes among coral-associated bacteria, and we propose that chemotaxis has an important role in the establishment and maintenance of specific coral-microbe associations, which may ultimately influence the health and stability of the coral holobiont.

  19. Chemotaxis by natural populations of coral reef bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Tout, Jessica; Jeffries, Thomas C; Petrou, Katherina; Tyson, Gene W; Webster, Nicole S; Garren, Melissa; Stocker, Roman; Ralph, Peter J; Seymour, Justin R

    2015-01-01

    Corals experience intimate associations with distinct populations of marine microorganisms, but the microbial behaviours underpinning these relationships are poorly understood. There is evidence that chemotaxis is pivotal to the infection process of corals by pathogenic bacteria, but this evidence is limited to experiments using cultured isolates under laboratory conditions. We measured the chemotactic capabilities of natural populations of coral-associated bacteria towards chemicals released by corals and their symbionts, including amino acids, carbohydrates, ammonium and dimethylsulfoniopropionate (DMSP). Laboratory experiments, using a modified capillary assay, and in situ measurements, using a novel microfabricated in situ chemotaxis assay, were employed to quantify the chemotactic responses of natural microbial assemblages on the Great Barrier Reef. Both approaches showed that bacteria associated with the surface of the coral species Pocillopora damicornis and Acropora aspera exhibited significant levels of chemotaxis, particularly towards DMSP and amino acids, and that these levels of chemotaxis were significantly higher than that of bacteria inhabiting nearby, non-coral-associated waters. This pattern was supported by a significantly higher abundance of chemotaxis and motility genes in metagenomes within coral-associated water types. The phylogenetic composition of the coral-associated chemotactic microorganisms, determined using 16S rRNA amplicon pyrosequencing, differed from the community in the seawater surrounding the coral and comprised known coral associates, including potentially pathogenic Vibrio species. These findings indicate that motility and chemotaxis are prevalent phenotypes among coral-associated bacteria, and we propose that chemotaxis has an important role in the establishment and maintenance of specific coral–microbe associations, which may ultimately influence the health and stability of the coral holobiont. PMID:25615440

  20. Network analysis reveals crosstalk between autophagy genes and disease genes

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Ji-Ye; Yao, Wei-Xuan; Wang, Yun; Fan, Yi-lei; Wu, Jian-Bing

    2017-01-01

    Autophagy is a protective and life-sustaining process in which cytoplasmic components are packaged into double-membrane vesicles and targeted to lysosomes for degradation. Accumulating evidence supports that autophagy is associated with several pathological conditions. However, research on the functional cross-links between autophagy and disease genes remains in its early stages. In this study, we constructed a disease-autophagy network (DAN) by integrating known disease genes, known autophagy genes and protein-protein interactions (PPI). Dissecting the topological properties of the DAN suggested that nodes that both autophagy and disease genes (inter-genes), are topologically important in the DAN structure. Next, a core network from the DAN was extracted to analyze the functional links between disease and autophagy genes. The genes in the core network were significantly enriched in multiple disease-related pathways, suggesting that autophagy genes may function in various disease processes. Of 17 disease classes, 11 significantly overlapped with autophagy genes, including cancer diseases, metabolic diseases and hematological diseases, a finding that is supported by the literatures. We also found that autophagy genes have a bridging role in the connections between pairs of disease classes. Altogether, our study provides a better understanding of the molecular mechanisms underlying human diseases and the autophagy process. PMID:28295050

  1. The unique paradigm of spirochete motility and chemotaxis.

    PubMed

    Charon, Nyles W; Cockburn, Andrew; Li, Chunhao; Liu, Jun; Miller, Kelly A; Miller, Michael R; Motaleb, Md A; Wolgemuth, Charles W

    2012-01-01

    Spirochete motility is enigmatic: It differs from the motility of most other bacteria in that the entire bacterium is involved in translocation in the absence of external appendages. Using the Lyme disease spirochete Borrelia burgdorferi (Bb) as a model system, we explore the current research on spirochete motility and chemotaxis. Bb has periplasmic flagella (PFs) subterminally attached to each end of the protoplasmic cell cylinder, and surrounding the cell is an outer membrane. These internal helix-shaped PFs allow the spirochete to swim by generating backward-moving waves by rotation. Exciting advances using cryoelectron tomography are presented with respect to in situ analysis of cell, PF, and motor structure. In addition, advances in the dynamics of motility, chemotaxis, gene regulation, and the role of motility and chemotaxis in the life cycle of Bb are summarized. The results indicate that the motility paradigms of flagellated bacteria do not apply to these unique bacteria.

  2. Ecology and evolution of soil nematode chemotaxis.

    PubMed

    Rasmann, Sergio; Ali, Jared Gregory; Helder, Johannes; van der Putten, Wim H

    2012-06-01

    Plants influence the behavior of and modify community composition of soil-dwelling organisms through the exudation of organic molecules. Given the chemical complexity of the soil matrix, soil-dwelling organisms have evolved the ability to detect and respond to these cues for successful foraging. A key question is how specific these responses are and how they may evolve. Here, we review and discuss the ecology and evolution of chemotaxis of soil nematodes. Soil nematodes are a group of diverse functional and taxonomic types, which may reveal a variety of responses. We predicted that nematodes of different feeding guilds use host-specific cues for chemotaxis. However, the examination of a comprehensive nematode phylogeny revealed that distantly related nematodes, and nematodes from different feeding guilds, can exploit the same signals for positive orientation. Carbon dioxide (CO(2)), which is ubiquitous in soil and indicates biological activity, is widely used as such a cue. The use of the same signals by a variety of species and species groups suggests that parts of the chemo-sensory machinery have remained highly conserved during the radiation of nematodes. However, besides CO(2), many other chemical compounds, belonging to different chemical classes, have been shown to induce chemotaxis in nematodes. Plants surrounded by a complex nematode community, including beneficial entomopathogenic nematodes, plant-parasitic nematodes, as well as microbial feeders, are thus under diffuse selection for producing specific molecules in the rhizosphere that maximize their fitness. However, it is largely unknown how selection may operate and how belowground signaling may evolve. Given the paucity of data for certain groups of nematodes, future work is needed to better understand the evolutionary mechanisms of communication between plant roots and soil biota.

  3. Analysis of chemotaxis in Dictyostelium

    PubMed Central

    Cai, Huaqing; Huang, Chuan-Hsiang; Devreotes, Peter N.; Iijima, Miho

    2012-01-01

    Dictyostelium discoideum is an excellent model organism for the study of directed cell migration since Dictyostelium cells show robust chemotactic responses to the chemoattractant cAMP. Many powerful experimental tools are applicable, including forward and reverse genetics, biochemistry, microscopy, and proteomics. Recent studies have demonstrated that many components involved in chemotaxis are functionally conserved between human neutrophils and Dictyostelium amoebae. In this section, we will describe how to define the functions of proteins that mediate and regulate cell motility, cell polarity, and directional sensing during chemotaxis in Dictyostelium. PMID:21909927

  4. Single-cell twitching chemotaxis in developing biofilms.

    PubMed

    Oliveira, Nuno M; Foster, Kevin R; Durham, William M

    2016-06-07

    Bacteria form surface-attached communities, known as biofilms, which are central to bacterial biology and how they affect us. Although surface-attached bacteria often experience strong chemical gradients, it remains unclear whether single cells can effectively perform chemotaxis on surfaces. Here we use microfluidic chemical gradients and massively parallel automated tracking to study the behavior of the pathogen Pseudomonas aeruginosa during early biofilm development. We show that individual cells can efficiently move toward chemoattractants using pili-based "twitching" motility and the Chp chemosensory system. Moreover, we discovered the behavioral mechanism underlying this surface chemotaxis: Cells reverse direction more frequently when moving away from chemoattractant sources. These corrective maneuvers are triggered rapidly, typically before a wayward cell has ventured a fraction of a micron. Our work shows that single bacteria can direct their motion with submicron precision and reveals the hidden potential for chemotaxis within bacterial biofilms.

  5. GLUTAMATE RECEPTOR-LIKE channels are essential for chemotaxis and reproduction in mosses.

    PubMed

    Ortiz-Ramírez, Carlos; Michard, Erwan; Simon, Alexander A; Damineli, Daniel S C; Hernández-Coronado, Marcela; Becker, Jörg D; Feijó, José A

    2017-09-07

    Glutamate receptors are well characterized channels that mediate cell-to-cell communication during neurotransmission in animals, but their functional role in organisms without a nervous system remains unclear. In plants, genes of the GLUTAMATE RECEPTOR-LIKE (GLR) family have been implicated in defence against pathogens, reproduction, control of stomata aperture and light signal transduction. However, the large number of GLR genes present in angiosperm genomes (20 to 70) has prevented the observation of strong phenotypes in loss-of-function mutants. Here we show that in the basal land plant Physcomitrella patens, mutation of the GLR genes GLR1 and GLR2 causes failure of sperm cells to target the female reproductive organs. In addition, we show that GLR genes encode non-selective Ca(2+)-permeable channels that can regulate cytoplasmic Ca(2+) and are needed to induce the expression of a BELL1-like transcription factor essential for zygote development. Our work reveals functions for GLR channels in sperm chemotaxis and transcriptional regulation. Sperm chemotaxis is essential for fertilization in both animals and early land plants such as bryophytes and pteridophytes. Therefore, our results suggest that ionotropic glutamate receptors may have been conserved throughout plant evolution to mediate cell-to-cell communication during sexual reproduction.

  6. Dynamic encoding of perception, memory, and movement in a C. elegans chemotaxis circuit.

    PubMed

    Luo, Linjiao; Wen, Quan; Ren, Jing; Hendricks, Michael; Gershow, Marc; Qin, Yuqi; Greenwood, Joel; Soucy, Edward R; Klein, Mason; Smith-Parker, Heidi K; Calvo, Ana C; Colón-Ramos, Daniel A; Samuel, Aravinthan D T; Zhang, Yun

    2014-06-04

    Brain circuits endow behavioral flexibility. Here, we study circuits encoding flexible chemotaxis in C. elegans, where the animal navigates up or down NaCl gradients (positive or negative chemotaxis) to reach the salt concentration of previous growth (the set point). The ASER sensory neuron mediates positive and negative chemotaxis by regulating the frequency and direction of reorientation movements in response to salt gradients. Both salt gradients and set point memory are encoded in ASER temporal activity patterns. Distinct temporal activity patterns in interneurons immediately downstream of ASER encode chemotactic movement decisions. Different interneuron combinations regulate positive versus negative chemotaxis. We conclude that sensorimotor pathways are segregated immediately after the primary sensory neuron in the chemotaxis circuit, and sensory representation is rapidly transformed to motor representation at the first interneuron layer. Our study reveals compact encoding of perception, memory, and locomotion in an experience-dependent navigational behavior in C. elegans.

  7. Dynamic encoding of perception, memory and movement in a C. elegans chemotaxis circuit

    PubMed Central

    Luo, Linjiao; Wen, Quan; Ren, Jing; Hendricks, Michael; Gershow, Marc; Qin, Yuqi; Greenwood, Joel; Soucy, Ed; Klein, Mason; Smith-Parker, Heidi K.; Calvo, Ana C.; Colón-Ramos, Daniel A.; Samuel, Aravinthan; Zhang, Yun

    2014-01-01

    Brain circuits endow behavioral flexibility. Here, we study circuits encoding flexible chemotaxis in C. elegans, where the animal navigates up or down NaCl gradients (positive or negative chemotaxis) to reach the salt concentration of previous growth (the setpoint). The ASER sensory neuron mediates positive and negative chemotaxis by regulating the frequency and direction of reorientation movements in response to salt gradients. Both salt gradients and setpoint memory are encoded in ASER temporal activity patterns. Distinct temporal activity patterns in interneurons immediately downstream of ASER encode chemotactic movement decisions. Different interneuron combinations regulate positive vs. negative chemotaxis. We conclude that sensorimotor pathways are segregated immediately after the primary sensory neuron in the chemotaxis circuit, and sensory representation is rapidly transformed to motor representation at the first interneuron layer. Our study reveals compact encoding of perception, memory, and locomotion in an experience-dependent navigational behavior in C. elegans. PMID:24908490

  8. The relation of signal transduction to the sensitivity and dynamic range of bacterial chemotaxis.

    PubMed

    Namba, Toshinori; Nishikawa, Masatoshi; Shibata, Tatsuo

    2012-09-19

    Complex networks of interacting molecular components of living cells are responsible for many important processes, such as signal processing and transduction. An important challenge is to understand how the individual properties of these molecular interactions and biochemical transformations determine the system-level properties of biological functions. Here, we address the issue of the accuracy of signal transduction performed by a bacterial chemotaxis system. The chemotaxis sensitivity of bacteria to a chemoattractant gradient has been measured experimentally from bacterial aggregation in a chemoattractant-containing capillary. The observed precision of the chemotaxis depended on environmental conditions such as the concentration and molecular makeup of the chemoattractant. In a quantitative model, we derived the chemotactic response function, which is essential to describing the signal transduction process involved in bacterial chemotaxis. In the presence of a gradient, an analytical solution is derived that reveals connections between the chemotaxis sensitivity and the characteristics of the signaling system, such as reaction rates. These biochemical parameters are integrated into two system-level parameters: one characterizes the efficiency of gradient sensing, and the other is related to the dynamic range of chemotaxis. Thus, our approach explains how a particular signal transduction property affects the system-level performance of bacterial chemotaxis. We further show that the two parameters can be derived from published experimental data from a capillary assay, which successfully characterizes the performance of bacterial chemotaxis.

  9. Metabolic products of soluble epoxide hydrolase are essential for monocyte chemotaxis to MCP-1 in vitro and in vivo.

    PubMed

    Kundu, Suman; Roome, Talat; Bhattacharjee, Ashish; Carnevale, Kevin A; Yakubenko, Valentin P; Zhang, Renliang; Hwang, Sung Hee; Hammock, Bruce D; Cathcart, Martha K

    2013-02-01

    Monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 (MCP-1)-induced monocyte chemotaxis is a major event in inflammatory disease. Our prior studies have demonstrated that MCP-1-dependent chemotaxis requires release of arachidonic acid (AA) by activated cytosolic phospholipase A(2) (cPLA(2)). Here we investigated the involvement of AA metabolites in chemotaxis. Neither cyclooxygenase nor lipoxygenase pathways were required, whereas pharmacologic inhibitors of both the cytochrome-P450 (CYP) and the soluble epoxide hydrolase (sEH) pathways blocked monocyte chemotaxis to MCP-1. To verify specificity, we demonstrated that the CYP and sEH products epoxyeiscosatrienoic acids (EETs) and dihydroxyeicosatrienoic acids (DHETs), respectively, restored chemotaxis in the presence of the inhibitors, indicating that sEH-derived products are essential for MCP-1-driven chemotaxis. Importantly, DHETs also rescued chemotaxis in cPLA(2)-deficient monocytes and monocytes with blocked Erk1/2 activity, because Erk controls cPLA(2) activation. The in vitro findings regarding the involvement of CYP/sEH pathways were further validated in vivo using two complementary approaches measuring MCP-1-dependent chemotaxis in mice. These observations reveal the importance of sEH in MCP-1-regulated monocyte chemotaxis and may explain the observed therapeutic value of sEH inhibitors in treatment of inflammatory diseases, cardiovascular diseases, pain, and even carcinogenesis. Their effectiveness, often attributed to increasing EET levels, is probably influenced by the impairment of DHET formation and inhibition of chemotaxis.

  10. Sequential Waves of Gene Expression in Patients with Clinically Defined Dengue Illnesses Reveal Subtle Disease Phases and Predict Disease Severity

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Peifang; García, Josefina; Comach, Guillermo; Vahey, Maryanne T.; Wang, Zhining; Forshey, Brett M.; Morrison, Amy C.; Sierra, Gloria; Bazan, Isabel; Rocha, Claudio; Vilcarromero, Stalin; Blair, Patrick J.; Scott, Thomas W.; Camacho, Daria E.; Ockenhouse, Christian F.; Halsey, Eric S.; Kochel, Tadeusz J.

    2013-01-01

    Background Dengue virus (DENV) infection can range in severity from mild dengue fever (DF) to severe dengue hemorrhagic fever (DHF) or dengue shock syndrome (DSS). Changes in host gene expression, temporally through the progression of DENV infection, especially during the early days, remains poorly characterized. Early diagnostic markers for DHF are also lacking. Methodology/Principal Findings In this study, we investigated host gene expression in a cohort of DENV-infected subjects clinically diagnosed as DF (n = 51) and DHF (n = 13) from Maracay, Venezuela. Blood specimens were collected daily from these subjects from enrollment to early defervescence and at one convalescent time-point. Using convalescent expression levels as baseline, two distinct groups of genes were identified: the “early” group, which included genes associated with innate immunity, type I interferon, cytokine-mediated signaling, chemotaxis, and complement activity peaked at day 0–1 and declined on day 3–4; the second “late” group, comprised of genes associated with cell cycle, emerged from day 4 and peaked at day 5–6. The up-regulation of innate immune response genes coincided with the down-regulation of genes associated with viral replication during day 0–3. Furthermore, DHF patients had lower expression of genes associated with antigen processing and presentation, MHC class II receptor, NK and T cell activities, compared to that of DF patients. These results suggested that the innate and adaptive immunity during the early days of the disease are vital in suppressing DENV replication and in affecting outcome of disease severity. Gene signatures of DHF were identified as early as day 1. Conclusions/Significance Our study reveals a broad and dynamic picture of host responses in DENV infected subjects. Host response to DENV infection can now be understood as two distinct phases with unique transcriptional markers. The DHF signatures identified during day 1–3 may have

  11. Integrative analyses reveal biological pathways and key genes in psoriasis.

    PubMed

    Dou, J; Zhang, L; Xie, X; Ye, L; Yang, C; Wen, L; Shen, C; Zhu, C; Zhao, S; Zhu, Z; Liang, B; Wang, Z; Li, H; Fan, X; Liu, S; Yin, X; Zheng, X; Sun, L; Yang, S; Cui, Y; Zhou, F; Zhang, X

    2017-05-25

    Psoriasis is a complex disease that is influenced by both genetic and environmental factors with abnormal gene expression in lesional skin. However, no studies are available on genome-scale gene expression of psoriatic lesions in the Chinese population. In addition, systematic studies on the biological pathways, pathogenicity and interaction networks of psoriasis-related genes with abnormal expression profiles require further investigation. To further explore the associated pathways in psoriasis by functional analysis and to identify the key genes by gene pathogenicity analysis. We performed RNA sequencing on 60 skin biopsy samples from psoriasis patients and healthy controls to identify the primary differentially expressed genes in psoriatic lesional skin. We retrieved all reported psoriasis-associated genes and performed integrative analyses covering gene expression profiling, pathway analysis, gene pathogenicities and protein-protein interaction networks. We found that internal and external stimuli may activate immuno-inflammatory responses to promote the development of psoriasis. Pathways associated with infectious diseases and cancers were identified by functional and pathway analyses. The gene pathogenicity analysis revealed five key genes in psoriasis, including PPARD, GATA3, TIMP3, WNT5A and PTTG1. Our analyses showed that genes contributed to the pathogenesis of psoriasis by activating risk pathways with components abnormality in expression. We identified five potentially pathogenic genes for psoriasis that may serve as important biomarkers for the diagnosis and treatment. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  12. Genetic characterization of the hmp locus, a chemotaxis-like gene cluster that regulates hormogonium development and motility in Nostoc punctiforme.

    PubMed

    Risser, Douglas D; Chew, William G; Meeks, John C

    2014-04-01

    Filamentous cyanobacteria are capable of gliding motility, but the mechanism of motility is not well defined. Here we present a detailed characterization of the hmp locus from Nostoc punctiforme, which encodes chemotaxis-like proteins. Deletions of hmpB, C, D and E abolished differentiation of hormogonia under standard growth conditions, but, upon addition of a symbiotic partner exudate, the mutant strains differentiated hormogonium-like filaments that lacked motility and failed to secrete hormogonium specific polysaccharide. The hmp locus is expressed as two transcripts, one originating 5' of hmpA and encompassing the entire hmp locus, and the other 5' of hmpB and encompassing hmpBCDE. The CheA-like HmpE donates phosphate to its own C-terminal receiver domain, and to the CheY-like HmpB, but not to the PatA family CheY-like HmpA. A GFP-tagged variant of each hmp locus protein localized to a ring adjacent to the septum on each end of the rod-shaped cell. Immunofluorescence demonstrated that PilA localizes to a ring at the junction between cells. The phenotype of the deletion strains, and the localization of the Hmp proteins and the putative PilA protein to rings at the cell junctions are consistent with the hypothesis that these proteins are part of the junctional pore complex observed in a number of filamentous cyanobacteria.

  13. Structural conservation of chemotaxis machinery across Archaea and Bacteria.

    PubMed

    Briegel, Ariane; Ortega, Davi R; Huang, Audrey N; Oikonomou, Catherine M; Gunsalus, Robert P; Jensen, Grant J

    2015-06-01

    Chemotaxis allows cells to sense and respond to their environment. In Bacteria, stimuli are detected by arrays of chemoreceptors that relay the signal to a two-component regulatory system. These arrays take the form of highly stereotyped super-lattices comprising hexagonally packed trimers-of-receptor-dimers networked by rings of histidine kinase and coupling proteins. This structure is conserved across chemotactic Bacteria, and between membrane-bound and cytoplasmic arrays, and gives rise to the highly cooperative, dynamic nature of the signalling system. The chemotaxis system, absent in eukaryotes, is also found in Archaea, where its structural details remain uncharacterized. Here we provide evidence that the chemotaxis machinery was not present in the last archaeal common ancestor, but rather was introduced in one of the waves of lateral gene transfer that occurred after the branching of Eukaryota but before the diversification of Euryarchaeota. Unlike in Bacteria, the chemotaxis system then evolved largely vertically in Archaea, with very few subsequent successful lateral gene transfer events. By electron cryotomography, we find that the structure of both membrane-bound and cytoplasmic chemoreceptor arrays is conserved between Bacteria and Archaea, suggesting the fundamental importance of this signalling architecture across diverse prokaryotic lifestyles.

  14. RasG signaling is important for optimal folate chemotaxis in Dictyostelium

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Signaling pathways linking receptor activation to actin reorganization and pseudopod dynamics during chemotaxis are arranged in complex networks. Dictyostelium discoideum has proven to be an excellent model system for studying these networks and a body of evidence has indicated that RasG and RasC, members of the Ras GTPase subfamily function as key chemotaxis regulators. However, recent evidence has been presented indicating that Ras signaling is not important for Dictyostelium chemotaxis. In this study, we have reexamined the role of Ras proteins in folate chemotaxis and then, having re-established the importance of Ras for this process, identified the parts of the RasG protein molecule that are involved. Results A direct comparison of folate chemotaxis methodologies revealed that rasG-C- cells grown in association with a bacterial food source were capable of positive chemotaxis, only when their initial position was comparatively close to the folate source. In contrast, cells grown in axenic medium orientate randomly regardless of their distance to the micropipette. Folate chemotaxis is restored in rasG-C- cells by exogenous expression of protein chimeras containing either N- or C- terminal halves of the RasG protein. Conclusions Conflicting data regarding the importance of Ras to Dictyostelium chemotaxis were the result of differing experimental methodologies. Both axenic and bacterially grown cells require RasG for optimal folate chemotaxis, particularly in weak gradients. In strong gradients, the requirement for RasG is relaxed, but only in bacterially grown cells. Both N- and C- terminal portions of the RasG protein are important for folate chemotaxis, suggesting that there are functionally important amino acids outside the well established switch I and switch II interaction surfaces. PMID:24742374

  15. Bacterial chemotaxis and entropy production

    PubMed Central

    Županović, Paško; Brumen, Milan; Jagodič, Marko; Juretić, Davor

    2010-01-01

    Entropy production is calculated for bacterial chemotaxis in the case of a migrating band of bacteria in a capillary tube. It is found that the speed of the migrating band is a decreasing function of the starting concentration of the metabolizable attractant. The experimentally found dependence of speed on the starting concentration of galactose, glucose and oxygen is fitted with power-law functions. It is found that the corresponding exponents lie within the theoretically predicted interval. The effect of the reproduction of bacteria on band speed is considered, too. The acceleration of the band is predicted due to the reproduction rate of bacteria. The relationship between chemotaxis, the maximum entropy production principle and the formation of self-organizing structure is discussed. PMID:20368258

  16. Maze-solving by chemotaxis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reynolds, A. M.

    2010-06-01

    Here, we report on numerical simulations showing that chemotaxis will take a body through a maze via the shortest possible route to the source of a chemoattractant. This is a robust finding that does not depend on the geometrical makeup of the maze. The predictions are supported by recent experimental studies which have shown that by moving down gradients in pH , a droplet of organic solvent can find the shortest of multiple possible paths through a maze to an acid-soaked exit. They are also consistent with numerical and experimental evidence that plant-parasitic nematodes take the shortest route through the labyrinth of air-filled pores within soil to preferred host plants that produce volatile chemoattractants. The predictions support the view that maze-solving is a robust property of chemotaxis and is not specific to particular kinds of maze or to the fractal structure of air-filled channels within soils.

  17. Maze-solving by chemotaxis.

    PubMed

    Reynolds, A M

    2010-06-01

    Here, we report on numerical simulations showing that chemotaxis will take a body through a maze via the shortest possible route to the source of a chemoattractant. This is a robust finding that does not depend on the geometrical makeup of the maze. The predictions are supported by recent experimental studies which have shown that by moving down gradients in pH , a droplet of organic solvent can find the shortest of multiple possible paths through a maze to an acid-soaked exit. They are also consistent with numerical and experimental evidence that plant-parasitic nematodes take the shortest route through the labyrinth of air-filled pores within soil to preferred host plants that produce volatile chemoattractants. The predictions support the view that maze-solving is a robust property of chemotaxis and is not specific to particular kinds of maze or to the fractal structure of air-filled channels within soils.

  18. Chemotaxis of large granular lymphocytes

    SciTech Connect

    Pohajdak, B.; Gomez, J.; Orr, F.W.; Khalil, N.; Talgoy, M.; Greenberg, A.H.

    1986-01-01

    The hypothesis that large granular lymphocytes (LGL) are capable of directed locomotion (chemotaxis) was tested. A population of LGL isolated from discontinuous Percoll gradients migrated along concentration gradients of N-formyl-methionyl-leucyl-phenylalanine (f-MLP), casein, and C5a, well known chemoattractants for polymorphonuclear leukocytes and monocytes, as well as interferon-..beta.. and colony-stimulating factor. Interleukin 2, tuftsin, platelet-derived growth factor, and fibronectin were inactive. Migratory responses were greater in Percoll fractions with the highest lytic activity and HNK-1/sup +/ cells. The chemotactic response to f-MLP, casein, and C5a was always greater when the chemoattractant was present in greater concentration in the lower compartment of the Boyden chamber. Optimum chemotaxis was observed after a 1 hr incubation that made use of 12 ..mu..m nitrocellulose filters. LGL exhibited a high degree of nondirected locomotion when allowed to migrate for longer periods (> 2 hr), and when cultured in vitro for 24 to 72 hr in the presence or absence of IL 2 containing phytohemagluttinin-conditioned medium. LGL chemotaxis to f-MLP could be inhibited in a dose-dependent manner by the inactive structural analog CBZ-phe-met, and the RNK tumor line specifically bound f-ML(/sup 3/H)P, suggesting that LGL bear receptors for the chemotactic peptide.

  19. Quantitative analysis of Caenorhabditis elegans chemotaxis using a microfluidic device.

    PubMed

    Hu, Liang; Ye, Jinjuan; Tan, Haowei; Ge, Anle; Tang, Lichun; Feng, Xiaojun; Du, Wei; Liu, Bi-Feng

    2015-08-05

    Caenorhabditis elegans, one of the widely studied model organisms, sense external chemical cues and perform relative chemotaxis behaviors through its simple chemosensory neuronal system. To study the mechanism underlying chemosensory behavior, a rapid and reliable method for quantitatively analyzing the worms' behaviors is essential. In this work, we demonstrated a microfluidic approach for investigating chemotaxis responses of worms to chemical gradients. The flow-based microfluidic chip was consisted of circular tree-like microchannels, which was able to generate eight flow streams containing stepwise chemical concentrations without the difference in flow velocity. Worms' upstream swimming into microchannels with various concentrations was monitored for quantitative analysis of the chemotaxis behavior. By using this microfluidic chip, the attractive and repellent responses of C. elegans to NaCl were successfully quantified within several minutes. The results demonstrated the wild type-like repellent responses and severely impaired attractive responses in grk-2 mutant animals with defects in calcium influx. In addition, the chemotaxis analysis of the third stage larvae revealed that its gustatory response was different from that in the adult stage. Thus, our microfluidic method provided a useful platform for studying the chemosensory behaviors of C. elegans and screening of chemosensation-related chemical drugs.

  20. Endotoxin promotes neutrophil hierarchical chemotaxis via the p38-membrane receptor pathway

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Xu; Qin, Weiting; Zhang, Yisen; Zhang, Huafeng; Sun, Bingwei

    2016-01-01

    Neutrophils are the most abundant leukocytes in peripheral blood and play critical a role in bacterial infection, tumor immunity and wound repair. Clarifying the process of neutrophil chemotaxis to target sites of immune activity has been a focus of increased interest within the past decade. In bacterial infectious foci, neutrophils migrate toward the bacterial-derived chemoattractant N-formyl-Met-Leu-Phe (fMLP) and ignore other intermediary chemoattractants to arrive at the area of infection. Using an under agarose chemotaxis assay, we observed that the bacterial fMLP-induced neutrophil chemotaxis signal overrode interleukin 8 (IL-8)- and leukotriene B4 (LTB4)-induced chemotaxis signals. Moreover, in the presence of bacterial lipopolysaccharide (LPS), the fMLP-induced hierarchical chemotaxis signal was enhanced. Further studies revealed that LPS increased the membrane expression of the fMLP receptor, formyl peptide receptor 1 (FPR1). However, expression levels of the membrane receptors for IL-8 and LTB4 were decreased by LPS administration. A human Phospho-mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) proteome array showed that the p38 pathway was significantly activated by LPS stimulation. Moreover, p38 was responsible for the altered expression of neutrophil membrane chemoattractant receptors. Inhibition of neutrophil p38 restored LPS-improved hierarchical chemotaxis. Taken together, these data indicate that endotoxin promotes neutrophil hierarchical chemotaxis via the p38-membrane receptor pathway. PMID:27655676

  1. Real-time imaging reveals that P2Y2 and P2Y12 receptor agonists are not chemoattractants and macrophage chemotaxis to complement C5a is phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K)- and p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK)-independent.

    PubMed

    Isfort, Katrin; Ebert, Franziska; Bornhorst, Julia; Sargin, Sarah; Kardakaris, Rozina; Pasparakis, Manolis; Bähler, Martin; Schwerdtle, Tanja; Schwab, Albrecht; Hanley, Peter J

    2011-12-30

    Adenosine 5'-triphosphate (ATP) has been implicated in the recruitment of professional phagocytes (neutrophils and macrophages) to sites of infection and tissue injury in two distinct ways. First, ATP itself is thought to be a chemotactic "find me" signal released by dying cells, and second, autocrine ATP signaling is implicated as an amplifier mechanism for chemotactic navigation to end-target chemoattractants, such as complement C5a. Here we show using real-time chemotaxis assays that mouse peritoneal macrophages do not directionally migrate to stable analogs of ATP (adenosine-5'-(γ-thio)-triphosphate (ATPγS)) or its hydrolysis product ADP (adenosine-5'-(β-thio)-diphosphate (ADPβS)). HPLC revealed that these synthetic P2Y(2) (ATPγS) and P2Y(12) (ADPβS) receptor ligands were in fact slowly degraded. We also found that ATPγS, but not ADPβS, promoted chemokinesis (increased random migration). Furthermore, we found that photorelease of ATP or ADP induced lamellipodial membrane extensions. At the cell signaling level, C5a, but not ATPγS, activated Akt, whereas both ligands induced p38 MAPK activation. p38 MAPK and Akt activation are strongly implicated in neutrophil chemotaxis. However, we found that inhibitors of phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K; upstream of Akt) and p38 MAPK (or conditional deletion of p38α MAPK) did not impair macrophage chemotactic efficiency or migration velocity. Our results suggest that PI3K and p38 MAPK are redundant for macrophage chemotaxis and that purinergic P2Y(2) and P2Y(12) receptor ligands are not chemotactic. We propose that ATP signaling is strictly autocrine or paracrine and that ATP and ADP may act as short-range "touch me" (rather than long-range find me) signals to promote phagocytic clearance via cell spreading.

  2. Real-time Imaging Reveals That P2Y2 and P2Y12 Receptor Agonists Are Not Chemoattractants and Macrophage Chemotaxis to Complement C5a Is Phosphatidylinositol 3-Kinase (PI3K)- and p38 Mitogen-activated Protein Kinase (MAPK)-independent*♦

    PubMed Central

    Isfort, Katrin; Ebert, Franziska; Bornhorst, Julia; Sargin, Sarah; Kardakaris, Rozina; Pasparakis, Manolis; Bähler, Martin; Schwerdtle, Tanja; Schwab, Albrecht; Hanley, Peter J.

    2011-01-01

    Adenosine 5′-triphosphate (ATP) has been implicated in the recruitment of professional phagocytes (neutrophils and macrophages) to sites of infection and tissue injury in two distinct ways. First, ATP itself is thought to be a chemotactic “find me” signal released by dying cells, and second, autocrine ATP signaling is implicated as an amplifier mechanism for chemotactic navigation to end-target chemoattractants, such as complement C5a. Here we show using real-time chemotaxis assays that mouse peritoneal macrophages do not directionally migrate to stable analogs of ATP (adenosine-5′-(γ-thio)-triphosphate (ATPγS)) or its hydrolysis product ADP (adenosine-5′-(β-thio)-diphosphate (ADPβS)). HPLC revealed that these synthetic P2Y2 (ATPγS) and P2Y12 (ADPβS) receptor ligands were in fact slowly degraded. We also found that ATPγS, but not ADPβS, promoted chemokinesis (increased random migration). Furthermore, we found that photorelease of ATP or ADP induced lamellipodial membrane extensions. At the cell signaling level, C5a, but not ATPγS, activated Akt, whereas both ligands induced p38 MAPK activation. p38 MAPK and Akt activation are strongly implicated in neutrophil chemotaxis. However, we found that inhibitors of phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K; upstream of Akt) and p38 MAPK (or conditional deletion of p38α MAPK) did not impair macrophage chemotactic efficiency or migration velocity. Our results suggest that PI3K and p38 MAPK are redundant for macrophage chemotaxis and that purinergic P2Y2 and P2Y12 receptor ligands are not chemotactic. We propose that ATP signaling is strictly autocrine or paracrine and that ATP and ADP may act as short-range “touch me” (rather than long-range find me) signals to promote phagocytic clearance via cell spreading. PMID:22057273

  3. Genome-wide analysis of homeobox genes from Mesobuthus martensii reveals Hox gene duplication in scorpions.

    PubMed

    Di, Zhiyong; Yu, Yao; Wu, Yingliang; Hao, Pei; He, Yawen; Zhao, Huabin; Li, Yixue; Zhao, Guoping; Li, Xuan; Li, Wenxin; Cao, Zhijian

    2015-06-01

    Homeobox genes belong to a large gene group, which encodes the famous DNA-binding homeodomain that plays a key role in development and cellular differentiation during embryogenesis in animals. Here, one hundred forty-nine homeobox genes were identified from the Asian scorpion, Mesobuthus martensii (Chelicerata: Arachnida: Scorpiones: Buthidae) based on our newly assembled genome sequence with approximately 248 × coverage. The identified homeobox genes were categorized into eight classes including 82 families: 67 ANTP class genes, 33 PRD genes, 11 LIM genes, five POU genes, six SINE genes, 14 TALE genes, five CUT genes, two ZF genes and six unclassified genes. Transcriptome data confirmed that more than half of the genes were expressed in adults. The homeobox gene diversity of the eight classes is similar to the previously analyzed Mandibulata arthropods. Interestingly, it is hypothesized that the scorpion M. martensii may have two Hox clusters. The first complete genome-wide analysis of homeobox genes in Chelicerata not only reveals the repertoire of scorpion, arachnid and chelicerate homeobox genes, but also shows some insights into the evolution of arthropod homeobox genes.

  4. Extensive chordate and annelid macrosynteny reveals ancestral homeobox gene organization.

    PubMed

    Hui, Jerome H L; McDougall, Carmel; Monteiro, Ana S; Holland, Peter W H; Arendt, Detlev; Balavoine, Guillaume; Ferrier, David E K

    2012-01-01

    Genes with the homeobox motif are crucial in developmental biology and widely implicated in the evolution of development. The Antennapedia (ANTP)-class is one of the two major classes of animal homeobox genes, and includes the Hox genes, renowned for their role in patterning the anterior-posterior axis of animals. The origin and evolution of the ANTP-class genes are a matter of some debate. A principal guiding hypothesis has been the existence of an ancient gene Mega-cluster deep in animal ancestry. This hypothesis was largely established from linkage data from chordates, and the Mega-cluster hypothesis remains to be seriously tested in protostomes. We have thus mapped ANTP-class homeobox genes to the chromosome level in a lophotrochozoan protostome. Our comparison of gene organization in Platynereis dumerilii and chordates indicates that the Mega-cluster, if it did exist, had already been broken up onto four chromosomes by the time of the protostome-deuterostome ancestor (PDA). These results not only elucidate an aspect of the genome organization of the PDA but also reveal high levels of macrosynteny between P. dumerilii and chordates. This implies a very low rate of interchromosomal genome rearrangement in the lineages leading to P. dumerilii and the chordate ancestor since the time of the PDA.

  5. Signaling Pathways Controlling Microglia Chemotaxis

    PubMed Central

    Fan, Yang; Xie, Lirui; Chung, Chang Y.

    2017-01-01

    Microglia are the primary resident immune cells of the central nervous system (CNS). They are the first line of defense of the brain’s innate immune response against infection, injury, and diseases. Microglia respond to extracellular signals and engulf unwanted neuronal debris by phagocytosis, thereby maintaining normal cellular homeostasis in the CNS. Pathological stimuli such as neuronal injury induce transformation and activation of resting microglia with ramified morphology into a motile amoeboid form and activated microglia chemotax toward lesion site. This review outlines the current research on microglial activation and chemotaxis. PMID:28301917

  6. Chemotaxis Control of Transient Cell Aggregation.

    PubMed

    Alexandre, Gladys

    2015-10-01

    Chemotaxis affords motile cells the ability to rapidly respond to environmental challenges by navigating cells to niches favoring growth. Such a property results from the activities of dedicated signal transduction systems on the motility apparatus, such as flagella, type IV pili, and gliding machineries. Once cells have reached a niche with favorable conditions, they often stop moving and aggregate into complex communities termed biofilms. An intermediate and reversible stage that precedes commitment to permanent adhesion often includes transient cell-cell contacts between motile cells. Chemotaxis signaling has been implicated in modulating the transient aggregation of motile cells. Evidence further indicates that chemotaxis-dependent transient cell aggregation events are behavioral responses to changes in metabolic cues that temporarily prohibit permanent attachment by maintaining motility and chemotaxis. This minireview discusses a few examples illustrating the role of chemotaxis signaling in the initiation of cell-cell contacts in bacteria moving via flagella, pili, or gliding.

  7. Interaction of Mycoplasma gallisepticum with Chicken Tracheal Epithelial Cells Contributes to Macrophage Chemotaxis and Activation

    PubMed Central

    Majumder, Sanjukta

    2015-01-01

    Mycoplasma gallisepticum colonizes the chicken respiratory mucosa and mediates a severe inflammatory response hallmarked by subepithelial leukocyte infiltration. We recently reported that the interaction of M. gallisepticum with chicken tracheal epithelial cells (TECs) mediated the upregulation of chemokine and inflammatory cytokine genes in these cells (S. Majumder, F. Zappulla, and L. K. Silbart, PLoS One 9:e112796, http://dx.doi.org/10.1371/journal.pone.0112796). The current study extends these observations and sheds light on how this initial interaction may give rise to subsequent inflammatory events. Conditioned medium from TECs exposed to the virulent Rlow strain induced macrophage chemotaxis to a much higher degree than the nonvirulent Rhigh strain. Coculture of chicken macrophages (HD-11) with TECs exposed to live mycoplasma revealed the upregulation of several proinflammatory genes associated with macrophage activation, including interleukin-1β (IL-1β), IL-6, IL-8, CCL20, macrophage inflammatory protein 1β (MIP-1β), CXCL-13, and RANTES. The upregulation of these genes was similar to that observed upon direct contact of HD-11 cells with live M. gallisepticum. Coculture of macrophages with Rlow-exposed TECs also resulted in prolonged expression of chemokine genes, such as those encoding CXCL-13, MIP-1β, RANTES, and IL-8. Taken together, these studies support the notion that the initial interaction of M. gallisepticum with host respiratory epithelial cells contributes to macrophage chemotaxis and activation by virtue of robust upregulation of inflammatory cytokine and chemokine genes, thereby setting the stage for chronic tissue inflammation. PMID:26527215

  8. Signal processing in eukaryotic chemotaxis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Segota, Igor; Rachakonda, Archana; Franck, Carl

    2013-03-01

    Unlike inanimate condensed matter, living cells depend upon the detection of chemical signals for their existence. First, we experimentally determined the chemotaxis response of eukaryotic Dictyostelium cells to static folic acid gradients and show that they can respond to gradients as shallow as 0.2% across the cell body. Second, using Shannon's information theory, we showed that the information cells receive about the gradient exceeds the theoretically predicted information at the receptor-ligand binding step, resulting in the violation of the data processing inequality. Finally, we analyzed how eukaryotic cells can affect the gradient signals by secreting enzymes that degrade the signal. We analyzed this effect with a focus on a well described Dictyostelium cAMP chemotaxis system where cAMP signals are affected by an extracellular cAMP phosphodiesterase (PDE) and its inhibitor (PDI). Using a reaction-diffusion model of this set of interactions in the extracellular space, we show that cells can effectively sense much steeper chemical gradients than naively expected (up to a factor of 12). We also found that the rough estimates of experimental PDE and PDI secretion rates are close to the optimal values for gradient sensing as predicted by our model.

  9. Intestinal invasion of Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium in the avian host is dose dependent and does not depend on motility and chemotaxis.

    PubMed

    Olsen, John Elmerdahl; Hoegh-Andersen, Kirsten Hobolt; Rosenkrantz, Jesper Tjørnholt; Schroll, Casper; Casadesús, Josep; Aabo, Søren; Christensen, Jens Peter

    2013-08-30

    Salmonella enterica serotype Typhimurium (S. Typhimurium) can invade in the intestine of the avian host, and knowledge on the mechanisms that govern this is potentially important for prevention of disease. This study investigated the invasion of S. Typhimurium in the avian host and to which extent it depended on motility and chemotaxis. Wild type and previously well-characterized transposon mutants in flagella genes fliC and fljB and in chemotaxis genes cheA, cheB and cheR were used as challenge strains in intestinal loop experiments. Invasion was shown to be dose dependent, but did not require functional flagella or chemotaxis genes. In support of the results from intestinal loop experiments, flagella and chemotaxis genes were not significantly important to the outcome of an oral infection. The results showed that S. Typhimurium invasion in the avian host was dose dependent and was not affected by the loss of flagella and chemotaxis genes.

  10. A Phytophthora sojae G-protein alpha subunit is involved in chemotaxis to soybean isoflavones.

    PubMed

    Hua, Chenlei; Wang, Yonglin; Zheng, Xiaobo; Dou, Daolong; Zhang, Zhengguang; Govers, Francine; Wang, Yuanchao

    2008-12-01

    For the soybean pathogen Phytophthora sojae, chemotaxis of zoospores to isoflavones is believed to be critical for recognition of the host and for initiating infection. However, the molecular mechanisms underlying this chemotaxis are largely unknown. To investigate the role of G-protein and calcium signaling in chemotaxis, we analyzed the expression of several genes known to be involved in these pathways and selected one that was specifically expressed in sporangia and zoospores but not in mycelium. This gene, named PsGPA1, is a single-copy gene in P. sojae and encodes a G-protein alpha subunit that shares 96% identity in amino acid sequence with that of Phytophthora infestans. To elucidate the function, expression of PsGPA1 was silenced by introducing antisense constructs into P. sojae. PsGPA1 silencing did not disturb hyphal growth or sporulation but severely affected zoospore behavior, including chemotaxis to the soybean isoflavone daidzein. Zoospore encystment and cyst germination were also altered, resulting in the inability of the PsGPA1-silenced mutants to infect soybean. In addition, the expressions of a calmodulin gene, PsCAM1, and two calcium- and calmodulin-dependent protein kinase genes, PsCMK3 and PsCMK4, were increased in the mutant zoospores, suggesting that PsGPA1 negatively regulates the calcium signaling pathways that are likely involved in zoospore chemotaxis.

  11. Adaptability of non-genetic diversity in bacterial chemotaxis

    PubMed Central

    Frankel, Nicholas W; Pontius, William; Dufour, Yann S; Long, Junjiajia; Hernandez-Nunez, Luis; Emonet, Thierry

    2014-01-01

    Bacterial chemotaxis systems are as diverse as the environments that bacteria inhabit, but how much environmental variation can cells tolerate with a single system? Diversification of a single chemotaxis system could serve as an alternative, or even evolutionary stepping-stone, to switching between multiple systems. We hypothesized that mutations in gene regulation could lead to heritable control of chemotactic diversity. By simulating foraging and colonization of E. coli using a single-cell chemotaxis model, we found that different environments selected for different behaviors. The resulting trade-offs show that populations facing diverse environments would ideally diversify behaviors when time for navigation is limited. We show that advantageous diversity can arise from changes in the distribution of protein levels among individuals, which could occur through mutations in gene regulation. We propose experiments to test our prediction that chemotactic diversity in a clonal population could be a selectable trait that enables adaptation to environmental variability. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.03526.001 PMID:25279698

  12. GPCR-mediated PLCβγ/PKCβ/PKD signaling pathway regulates the cofilin phosphatase slingshot 2 in neutrophil chemotaxis

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Xuehua; Gera, Nidhi; Li, Hongyan; Yun, Michelle; Zhang, Liyong; Wang, Youhong; Wang, Q. Jane; Jin, Tian

    2015-01-01

    Chemotaxis requires precisely coordinated polymerization and depolymerization of the actin cytoskeleton at leading fronts of migrating cells. However, GPCR activation-controlled F-actin depolymerization remains largely elusive. Here, we reveal a novel signaling pathway, including Gαi, PLC, PKCβ, protein kinase D (PKD), and SSH2, in control of cofilin phosphorylation and actin cytoskeletal reorganization, which is essential for neutrophil chemotaxis. We show that PKD is essential for neutrophil chemotaxis and that GPCR-mediated PKD activation depends on PLC/PKC signaling. More importantly, we discover that GPCR activation recruits/activates PLCγ2 in a PI3K-dependent manner. We further verify that PKCβ specifically interacts with PKD1 and is required for chemotaxis. Finally, we identify slingshot 2 (SSH2), a phosphatase of cofilin (actin depolymerization factor), as a target of PKD1 that regulates cofilin phosphorylation and remodeling of the actin cytoskeleton during neutrophil chemotaxis. PMID:25568344

  13. Internal Tandem Duplication Mutations in FLT3 Gene Augment Chemotaxis to Cxcl12 Protein by Blocking the Down-regulation of the Rho-associated Kinase via the Cxcl12/Cxcr4 Signaling Axis*

    PubMed Central

    Onish, Chie; Mori-Kimachi, Satomi; Hirade, Tomohiro; Abe, Mariko; Taketani, Takeshi; Suzumiya, Junji; Sugimoto, Toshitsugu; Yamaguchi, Seiji; Kapur, Reuben; Fukuda, Seiji

    2014-01-01

    Internal tandem duplication mutations in the Flt3 gene (ITD-FLT3) enhance cell migration toward the chemokine Cxcl12, which is highly expressed in the therapy-protective bone marrow niche, providing a potential mechanism underlying the poor prognosis of ITD-FLT3+ acute myeloid leukemia. We aimed to investigate the mechanisms linking ITD-FLT3 to increased cell migration toward Cxcl12. Classification of the expression of Cxcl12-regulated genes in ITD-FLT3+ cells demonstrated that the enhanced migration of ITD-FLT3+ cells toward Cxcl12 was associated with the differential expression of genes downstream of Cxcl12/Cxcr4, which are functionally distinct from those expressed in ITD-FLT3− cells but are independent of the Cxcr4 expression levels. Among these differentially regulated genes, the expression of Rock1 in the ITD-FLT3+ cells that migrated toward Cxcl12 was significantly higher than in ITD-FLT3− cells that migrated toward Cxcl12. In ITD-FLT3− cells, Rock1 expression and Mypt1 phosphorylation were transiently up-regulated but were subsequently down-regulated by Cxcl12. In contrast, the presence of ITD-FLT3 blocked the Cxcl12-induced down-regulation of Rock1 and early Mypt1 dephosphorylation. Likewise, the FLT3 ligand counteracted the Cxcl12-induced down-regulation of Rock1 in ITD-FLT3− cells, which coincided with enhanced cell migration toward Cxcl12. Rock1 antagonists or Rock1 shRNA abolished the enhanced migration of ITD-FLT3+ cells toward Cxcl12. Our findings demonstrate that ITD-FLT3 increases cell migration toward Cxcl12 by antagonizing the down-regulation of Rock1 expression. These findings suggest that the aberrant modulation of Rock1 expression and activity induced by ITD-FLT3 may enhance acute myeloid leukemia cell chemotaxis to the therapy-protective bone marrow niche, where Cxcl12 is abundantly expressed. PMID:25237195

  14. Deep sequencing reveals 50 novel genes for recessive cognitive disorders.

    PubMed

    Najmabadi, Hossein; Hu, Hao; Garshasbi, Masoud; Zemojtel, Tomasz; Abedini, Seyedeh Sedigheh; Chen, Wei; Hosseini, Masoumeh; Behjati, Farkhondeh; Haas, Stefan; Jamali, Payman; Zecha, Agnes; Mohseni, Marzieh; Püttmann, Lucia; Vahid, Leyla Nouri; Jensen, Corinna; Moheb, Lia Abbasi; Bienek, Melanie; Larti, Farzaneh; Mueller, Ines; Weissmann, Robert; Darvish, Hossein; Wrogemann, Klaus; Hadavi, Valeh; Lipkowitz, Bettina; Esmaeeli-Nieh, Sahar; Wieczorek, Dagmar; Kariminejad, Roxana; Firouzabadi, Saghar Ghasemi; Cohen, Monika; Fattahi, Zohreh; Rost, Imma; Mojahedi, Faezeh; Hertzberg, Christoph; Dehghan, Atefeh; Rajab, Anna; Banavandi, Mohammad Javad Soltani; Hoffer, Julia; Falah, Masoumeh; Musante, Luciana; Kalscheuer, Vera; Ullmann, Reinhard; Kuss, Andreas Walter; Tzschach, Andreas; Kahrizi, Kimia; Ropers, H Hilger

    2011-09-21

    Common diseases are often complex because they are genetically heterogeneous, with many different genetic defects giving rise to clinically indistinguishable phenotypes. This has been amply documented for early-onset cognitive impairment, or intellectual disability, one of the most complex disorders known and a very important health care problem worldwide. More than 90 different gene defects have been identified for X-chromosome-linked intellectual disability alone, but research into the more frequent autosomal forms of intellectual disability is still in its infancy. To expedite the molecular elucidation of autosomal-recessive intellectual disability, we have now performed homozygosity mapping, exon enrichment and next-generation sequencing in 136 consanguineous families with autosomal-recessive intellectual disability from Iran and elsewhere. This study, the largest published so far, has revealed additional mutations in 23 genes previously implicated in intellectual disability or related neurological disorders, as well as single, probably disease-causing variants in 50 novel candidate genes. Proteins encoded by several of these genes interact directly with products of known intellectual disability genes, and many are involved in fundamental cellular processes such as transcription and translation, cell-cycle control, energy metabolism and fatty-acid synthesis, which seem to be pivotal for normal brain development and function.

  15. Genes but Not Genomes Reveal Bacterial Domestication of Lactococcus Lactis

    PubMed Central

    Passerini, Delphine; Beltramo, Charlotte; Coddeville, Michele; Quentin, Yves; Ritzenthaler, Paul

    2010-01-01

    Background The population structure and diversity of Lactococcus lactis subsp. lactis, a major industrial bacterium involved in milk fermentation, was determined at both gene and genome level. Seventy-six lactococcal isolates of various origins were studied by different genotyping methods and thirty-six strains displaying unique macrorestriction fingerprints were analyzed by a new multilocus sequence typing (MLST) scheme. This gene-based analysis was compared to genomic characteristics determined by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE). Methodology/Principal Findings The MLST analysis revealed that L. lactis subsp. lactis is essentially clonal with infrequent intra- and intergenic recombination; also, despite its taxonomical classification as a subspecies, it displays a genetic diversity as substantial as that within several other bacterial species. Genome-based analysis revealed a genome size variability of 20%, a value typical of bacteria inhabiting different ecological niches, and that suggests a large pan-genome for this subspecies. However, the genomic characteristics (macrorestriction pattern, genome or chromosome size, plasmid content) did not correlate to the MLST-based phylogeny, with strains from the same sequence type (ST) differing by up to 230 kb in genome size. Conclusion/Significance The gene-based phylogeny was not fully consistent with the traditional classification into dairy and non-dairy strains but supported a new classification based on ecological separation between “environmental” strains, the main contributors to the genetic diversity within the subspecies, and “domesticated” strains, subject to recent genetic bottlenecks. Comparison between gene- and genome-based analyses revealed little relationship between core and dispensable genome phylogenies, indicating that clonal diversification and phenotypic variability of the “domesticated” strains essentially arose through substantial genomic flux within the dispensable genome

  16. CXC chemokines and leukocyte chemotaxis in common carp (Cyprinus carpio L.).

    PubMed

    Huising, Mark O; Stolte, Ellen; Flik, Gert; Savelkoul, Huub F J; Verburg-van Kemenade, B M Lidy

    2003-12-01

    CXC chemokines, structurally recognizable by the position of four conserved cysteine residues, are prominent mediators of chemotaxis. Here we report a novel carp CXC chemokine obtained through homology cloning and compare it with fish orthologues genes and with a second, recently elucidated, carp CXC chemokine. Phylogenetic analyses clearly show that neither CXC chemokine resembles any of the mammalian CXC chemokines in particular. However, basal expression is most prominent in immune organs like anterior kidney and spleen, suggesting involvement in the immune response. Furthermore we show that anterior kidney phagocyte-enriched leukocyte suspensions express both chemokines and that this expression is upregulated by brief (4 h) stimulation with PMA, but not lipopolysaccharide. Neutrophilic granulocyte-enriched leukocytes display chemotaxis to human recombinant CXCL8 (hrCXCL8; interleukin-8), confirming CXC chemokine mediated chemotaxis of neutrophilic granulocytes in teleost fish. Factors secreted from carp phagocytes are also capable of inducing chemotaxis and secretion of these factors into culture supernatants is upregulated by PMA. Finally we demonstrate involvement of both CXC chemokines as well as CXCR1 and CXCR2 in acute Argulus japonicus infection. Collectively the data presented implicate the involvement of CXC chemokines in chemotaxis of fish neutrophils in a fashion that shares characteristics with the mammalian situation. However, the CXC chemokines involved differ enough from those involved in neutrophil chemotaxis in mammals to warrant their own nomenclature.

  17. The EAL-domain protein FcsR regulates flagella, chemotaxis and type III secretion system in Pseudomonas aeruginosa by a phosphodiesterase independent mechanism.

    PubMed

    Rossello, Jessica; Lima, Analía; Gil, Magdalena; Rodríguez Duarte, Jorge; Correa, Agustín; Carvalho, Paulo C; Kierbel, Arlinet; Durán, Rosario

    2017-08-31

    The second messenger c-di-GMP regulates the switch between motile and sessile bacterial lifestyles. A general feature of c-di-GMP metabolism is the presence of a surprisingly large number of genes coding for diguanylate cyclases and phosphodiesterases, the enzymes responsible for its synthesis and degradation respectively. However, the physiological relevance of this apparent redundancy is not clear, emphasizing the need for investigating the functions of each of these enzymes. Here we focused on the phosphodiesterase PA2133 from Pseudomonas aeruginosa, an important opportunistic pathogen. We phenotypically characterized P. aeruginosa strain K overexpressing PA2133 or its inactive mutant. We showed that biofilm formation and motility are severely impaired by overexpression of PA2133. Our quantitative proteomic approach applied to the membrane and exoprotein fractions revealed that proteins involved in three processes were mostly affected: flagellar motility, type III secretion system and chemotaxis. While inhibition of biofilm formation can be ascribed to the phosphodiesterase activity of PA2133, down-regulation of flagellar, chemotaxis, and type III secretion system proteins is independent of this enzymatic activity. Based on these unexpected effects of PA2133, we propose to rename this gene product FcsR, for Flagellar, chemotaxis and type III secretion system Regulator.

  18. RpoS and quorum sensing control expression and polar localization of Vibrio cholerae chemotaxis cluster III proteins in vitro and in vivo.

    PubMed

    Ringgaard, Simon; Hubbard, Troy; Mandlik, Anjali; Davis, Brigid M; Waldor, Matthew K

    2015-08-01

    The diarrheal pathogen Vibrio cholerae contains three gene clusters that encode chemotaxis-related proteins, but only cluster II appears to be required for chemotaxis. Here, we present the first characterization of V. cholerae's 'cluster III' chemotaxis system. We found that cluster III proteins assemble into foci at bacterial poles, like those formed by cluster II proteins, but the two systems assemble independently and do not colocalize. Cluster III proteins are expressed in vitro during stationary phase and in conjunction with growth arrest linked to carbon starvation. This expression, as well as expression in vivo in suckling rabbits, is dependent upon RpoS. V. cholerae's CAI-1 quorum sensing (QS) system is also required for cluster III expression in stationary phase and modulates its expression in vivo, but is not required for cluster III expression in response to carbon starvation. Surprisingly, even though the CAI-1 and AI-2 QS systems are thought to feed into the same signaling pathway, the AI-2 system inhibited cluster III gene expression, revealing that the outputs of the two QS systems are not always the same. The distinctions between genetic determinants of cluster III expression in vitro and in vivo highlight the distinctive nature of the in vivo environment.

  19. L-fucose influences chemotaxis and biofilm formation in Campylobacter jejuni.

    PubMed

    Dwivedi, Ritika; Nothaft, Harald; Garber, Jolene; Xin Kin, Lin; Stahl, Martin; Flint, Annika; van Vliet, Arnoud H M; Stintzi, Alain; Szymanski, Christine M

    2016-08-01

    Campylobacter jejuni and Campylobacter coli are zoonotic pathogens once considered asaccharolytic, but are now known to encode pathways for glucose and fucose uptake/metabolism. For C. jejuni, strains with the fuc locus possess a competitive advantage in animal colonization models. We demonstrate that this locus is present in > 50% of genome-sequenced strains and is prevalent in livestock-associated isolates of both species. To better understand how these campylobacters sense nutrient availability, we examined biofilm formation and chemotaxis to fucose. C. jejuni NCTC11168 forms less biofilms in the presence of fucose, although its fucose permease mutant (fucP) shows no change. In a newly developed chemotaxis assay, both wild-type and the fucP mutant are chemotactic towards fucose. C. jejuni 81-176 naturally lacks the fuc locus and is unable to swim towards fucose. Transfer of the NCTC11168 locus into 81-176 activated fucose uptake and chemotaxis. Fucose chemotaxis also correlated with possession of the pathway for C. jejuni RM1221 (fuc+) and 81116 (fuc-). Systematic mutation of the NCTC11168 locus revealed that Cj0485 is necessary for fucose metabolism and chemotaxis. This study suggests that components for fucose chemotaxis are encoded within the fuc locus, but downstream signals only in fuc + strains, are involved in coordinating fucose availability with biofilm development. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  20. Genomic analysis of primordial dwarfism reveals novel disease genes.

    PubMed

    Shaheen, Ranad; Faqeih, Eissa; Ansari, Shinu; Abdel-Salam, Ghada; Al-Hassnan, Zuhair N; Al-Shidi, Tarfa; Alomar, Rana; Sogaty, Sameera; Alkuraya, Fowzan S

    2014-02-01

    Primordial dwarfism (PD) is a disease in which severely impaired fetal growth persists throughout postnatal development and results in stunted adult size. The condition is highly heterogeneous clinically, but the use of certain phenotypic aspects such as head circumference and facial appearance has proven helpful in defining clinical subgroups. In this study, we present the results of clinical and genomic characterization of 16 new patients in whom a broad definition of PD was used (e.g., 3M syndrome was included). We report a novel PD syndrome with distinct facies in two unrelated patients, each with a different homozygous truncating mutation in CRIPT. Our analysis also reveals, in addition to mutations in known PD disease genes, the first instance of biallelic truncating BRCA2 mutation causing PD with normal bone marrow analysis. In addition, we have identified a novel locus for Seckel syndrome based on a consanguineous multiplex family and identified a homozygous truncating mutation in DNA2 as the likely cause. An additional novel PD disease candidate gene XRCC4 was identified by autozygome/exome analysis, and the knockout mouse phenotype is highly compatible with PD. Thus, we add a number of novel genes to the growing list of PD-linked genes, including one which we show to be linked to a novel PD syndrome with a distinct facial appearance. PD is extremely heterogeneous genetically and clinically, and genomic tools are often required to reach a molecular diagnosis.

  1. CRISPR loci reveal networks of gene exchange in archaea

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background CRISPR (Clustered, Regularly, Interspaced, Short, Palindromic Repeats) loci provide prokaryotes with an adaptive immunity against viruses and other mobile genetic elements. CRISPR arrays can be transcribed and processed into small crRNA molecules, which are then used by the cell to target the foreign nucleic acid. Since spacers are accumulated by active CRISPR/Cas systems, the sequences of these spacers provide a record of the past "infection history" of the organism. Results Here we analyzed all currently known spacers present in archaeal genomes and identified their source by DNA similarity. While nearly 50% of archaeal spacers matched mobile genetic elements, such as plasmids or viruses, several others matched chromosomal genes of other organisms, primarily other archaea. Thus, networks of gene exchange between archaeal species were revealed by the spacer analysis, including many cases of inter-genus and inter-species gene transfer events. Spacers that recognize viral sequences tend to be located further away from the leader sequence, implying that there exists a selective pressure for their retention. Conclusions CRISPR spacers provide direct evidence for extensive gene exchange in archaea, especially within genera, and support the current dogma where the primary role of the CRISPR/Cas system is anti-viral and anti-plasmid defense. Open peer review This article was reviewed by: Profs. W. Ford Doolittle, John van der Oost, Christa Schleper (nominated by board member Prof. J Peter Gogarten) PMID:22188759

  2. Genomic analysis of primordial dwarfism reveals novel disease genes

    PubMed Central

    Shaheen, Ranad; Faqeih, Eissa; Ansari, Shinu; Abdel-Salam, Ghada; Al-Hassnan, Zuhair N.; Al-Shidi, Tarfa; Alomar, Rana; Sogaty, Sameera; Alkuraya, Fowzan S.

    2014-01-01

    Primordial dwarfism (PD) is a disease in which severely impaired fetal growth persists throughout postnatal development and results in stunted adult size. The condition is highly heterogeneous clinically, but the use of certain phenotypic aspects such as head circumference and facial appearance has proven helpful in defining clinical subgroups. In this study, we present the results of clinical and genomic characterization of 16 new patients in whom a broad definition of PD was used (e.g., 3M syndrome was included). We report a novel PD syndrome with distinct facies in two unrelated patients, each with a different homozygous truncating mutation in CRIPT. Our analysis also reveals, in addition to mutations in known PD disease genes, the first instance of biallelic truncating BRCA2 mutation causing PD with normal bone marrow analysis. In addition, we have identified a novel locus for Seckel syndrome based on a consanguineous multiplex family and identified a homozygous truncating mutation in DNA2 as the likely cause. An additional novel PD disease candidate gene XRCC4 was identified by autozygome/exome analysis, and the knockout mouse phenotype is highly compatible with PD. Thus, we add a number of novel genes to the growing list of PD-linked genes, including one which we show to be linked to a novel PD syndrome with a distinct facial appearance. PD is extremely heterogeneous genetically and clinically, and genomic tools are often required to reach a molecular diagnosis. PMID:24389050

  3. Amebic monocyte locomotion inhibitory factor peptide ameliorates inflammation in CIA mouse model by downregulation of cell adhesion, inflammation/chemotaxis, and matrix metalloproteinases genes.

    PubMed

    Godina-Gonzalez, Susana; Furuzawa-Carballeda, Janette; Utrera-Barillas, Dolores; Alcocer-Varela, Jorge; Teran, Luis M; Vazquez-del Mercado, Monica; Leal, Yelda A; Alvarado-Cabrero, Isabel; Velazquez, Juan R

    2010-12-01

    Monocyte locomotion inhibitory factor (MLIF), an amebic peptide with antiinflammatory properties, was evaluated in collagen-induced arthritis (CIA) to test its effects on the onset and acute inflammatory response of arthritis. DBA1/J mice at 8-10 weeks of age were divided into four groups (eight mice per group). The adjuvant group received Freund adjuvant, the CIA group was immunized with collagen II, the MLIF/CIA group received collagen II and MLIF, and the MLIF group received MLIF and Freund adjuvant. All groups were evaluated clinically. Seven weeks after the collagen injection, at the peak of the clinical arthritis score, limb specimens were collected and histological studies and gene expression analysis using microarrays were performed. MLIF administered weekly as a preventive scheme delayed and reduced the severity of acute arthritis. MLIF induced gene changes in functional categories including adhesion molecules, matrix metalloproteinases, and inflammatory cytokines. MLIF could be an interesting new molecule to investigate in the field of rheumatoid arthritis pathogenesis research for its potential to prevent inflammation.

  4. Chemotaxis and behavioral physiology of not-yet-cultivated microbes.

    PubMed

    Overmann, Jörg

    2005-01-01

    Chemotaxis assays provide a rapid and efficient means of (1) studying the chemotactic behavior of microorganisms in complex samples and (2) identifying potential growth substrates and generating inocula for subsequent isolation trials. The chemotaxis method thus complements the set of techniques currently available for the investigation of not-yet-cultured microbes. Although restricted to motile and chemotactically active microorganisms, a considerable fraction of species can be covered with this technique, particularly in bacterioplankton communities. Several formats of the chemotaxis assay have been developed. Capillaries are loaded with solutions of test compounds and are inserted in small microscopic chambers, in bottles containing culture suspensions, or incubated directly in situ. The latter two techniques are also suitable for experiments with anaerobic bacteria. In flat rectangular glass capillaries, the accumulating microorganisms can be observed directly by light microscopy in a dark field. Afterward, the chemotactically active bacteria can be identified by analyses of their 16S rRNA gene fragments. The method has been used to identify an essential carbon compound required for the growth of previously unculturable phototrophic consortia. This knowledge proved essential for the subsequent successful enrichment of these bacterial associations. Furthermore, it has been shown that different not-yet-cultured members of aerobic lake water bacterioplankton communities are chemotactically active and attracted by different carbon compounds.

  5. Glia maturation factor-γ mediates neutrophil chemotaxis

    PubMed Central

    Aerbajinai, Wulin; Liu, Lunhua; Chin, Kyung; Zhu, Jianqiong; Parent, Carole A.; Rodgers, Griffin P.

    2011-01-01

    Chemotaxis is fundamental to the directional migration of neutrophils toward endogenous and exogenous chemoattractants. Recent studies have demonstrated that ADF/cofilin superfamily members play important roles in reorganizing the actin cytoskeleton by disassembling actin filaments. GMFG, a novel ADF/cofilin superfamily protein that is expressed in inflammatory cells, has been implicated in regulating actin reorganization in microendothelial cells, but its function in neutrophils remains unclear. Here, we show that GMFG is an important regulator for cell migration and polarity in neutrophils. Knockdown of endogenous GMFG impaired fMLF- and IL-8 (CXCL8)-induced chemotaxis in dHL-60 cells. GMFG knockdown attenuated the formation of lamellipodia at the leading edge of cells exposed to fMLF or CXCL8, as well as the phosphorylation of p38 and PAK1/2 in response to fMLF or CXCL8. Live cell imaging revealed that GMFG was recruited to the leading edge of cells in response to fMLF, as well as CXCL8. Overexpression of GMFG enhanced phosphorylation of p38 but not of PAK1/2 in dHL-60 cells. In addition, we found that GMFG is associated with WAVE2. Taken together, our findings suggest that GMFG is a novel factor in regulating neutrophil chemotaxis by modulating actin cytoskeleton reorganization. PMID:21653232

  6. Bacterial Chemotaxis to Naphthalene and Nitroarene Compounds

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-07-31

    Qualitative capillary assays showing chemotaxis of succinate-grown 17 (uninduced) and induced (succinate plus salicylate -grown) Acidovorax sp. JS42...succinate plus 2NT- or succinate plus salicylate -grown) wild-type Acidovorax sp. JS42 cells List of Tables Table 1. Summary of chemotaxis...mM salicylate , or naphthalene crystals. Noble agar (1.8%; Difco) was used to solidify MSB medium for plates. For plasmid selection and maintenance

  7. Genetic evidence for CheB- and CheR-dependent chemotaxis system in A. tumefaciens toward acetosyringone.

    PubMed

    Harighi, Behrouz

    2009-01-01

    Agrobacterium tumefaciens has homologues of chemotaxis genes of the alpha-subgroup of proteobacteria, which include orf1, orf2, cheY1, cheA, cheR, cheB, cheY2, orf9, and orf10 and organized in one operon [Wright et al. A chemotaxis cluster from Agrobacterium tumefaciens. Gene 1998;220:83-9]. Two mutants of A. tumefaciens were created by in-frame deletions of cheB and cheR using suicide vector, pK18mobsacB. The chemosensory behaviour of mutants studied on swarm plates and in blind-well chemotaxis assay toward acetosyringone. Under the conditions tested, both CheR and CheB were essential for normal chemotaxis. 2008 Elsevier GmbH.

  8. Chemoreceptor VfcA Mediates Amino Acid Chemotaxis in Vibrio fischeri

    PubMed Central

    Brennan, Caitlin A.; DeLoney-Marino, Cindy R.

    2013-01-01

    Flagellar motility and chemotaxis by Vibrio fischeri are important behaviors mediating the colonization of its mutualistic host, the Hawaiian bobtail squid. However, none of the 43 putative methyl-accepting chemotaxis proteins (MCPs) encoded in the V. fischeri genome has been previously characterized. Using both an available transposon mutant collection and directed mutagenesis, we isolated mutants for 19 of these genes, and screened them for altered chemotaxis to six previously identified chemoattractants. Only one mutant was defective in responding to any of the tested compounds; the disrupted gene was thus named vfcA (Vibrio fischeri chemoreceptor A; locus tag VF_0777). In soft-agar plates, mutants disrupted in vfcA did not exhibit the serine-sensing chemotactic ring, and the pattern of migration in the mutant was not affected by the addition of exogenous serine. Using a capillary chemotaxis assay, we showed that, unlike wild-type V. fischeri, the vfcA mutant did not undergo chemotaxis toward serine and that expression of vfcA on a plasmid in the mutant was sufficient to restore the behavior. In addition to serine, we demonstrated that alanine, cysteine, and threonine are strong attractants for wild-type V. fischeri and that the attraction is also mediated by VfcA. This study thus provides the first insights into how V. fischeri integrates information from one of its 43 MCPs to respond to environmental stimuli. PMID:23315744

  9. Anaerobic electron acceptor chemotaxis in Shewanella putrefaciens

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nealson, K. H.; Moser, D. P.; Saffarini, D. A.

    1995-01-01

    Shewanella putrefaciens MR-1 can grow either aerobically or anaerobically at the expense of many different electron acceptors and is often found in abundance at redox interfaces in nature. Such redox interfaces are often characterized by very strong gradients of electron acceptors resulting from rapid microbial metabolism. The coincidence of S. putrefaciens abundance with environmental gradients prompted an examination of the ability of MR-1 to sense and respond to electron acceptor gradients in the laboratory. In these experiments, taxis to the majority of the electron acceptors that S. putrefaciens utilizes for anaerobic growth was seen. All anaerobic electron acceptor taxis was eliminated by the presence of oxygen, nitrate, nitrite, elemental sulfur, or dimethyl sulfoxide, even though taxis to the latter was very weak and nitrate and nitrite respiration was normal in the presence of dimethyl sulfoxide. Studies with respiratory mutants of MR-1 revealed that several electron acceptors that could not be used for anaerobic growth nevertheless elicited normal anaerobic taxis. Mutant M56, which was unable to respire nitrite, showed normal taxis to nitrite, as well as the inhibition of taxis to other electron acceptors by nitrite. These results indicate that electron acceptor taxis in S. putrefaciens does not conform to the paradigm established for Escherichia coli and several other bacteria. Carbon chemo-taxis was also unusual in this organism: of all carbon compounds tested, the only positive response observed was to formate under anaerobic conditions.

  10. Anaerobic electron acceptor chemotaxis in Shewanella putrefaciens.

    PubMed

    Nealson, K H; Moser, D P; Saffarini, D A

    1995-04-01

    Shewanella putrefaciens MR-1 can grow either aerobically or anaerobically at the expense of many different electron acceptors and is often found in abundance at redox interfaces in nature. Such redox interfaces are often characterized by very strong gradients of electron acceptors resulting from rapid microbial metabolism. The coincidence of S. putrefaciens abundance with environmental gradients prompted an examination of the ability of MR-1 to sense and respond to electron acceptor gradients in the laboratory. In these experiments, taxis to the majority of the electron acceptors that S. putrefaciens utilizes for anaerobic growth was seen. All anaerobic electron acceptor taxis was eliminated by the presence of oxygen, nitrate, nitrite, elemental sulfur, or dimethyl sulfoxide, even though taxis to the latter was very weak and nitrate and nitrite respiration was normal in the presence of dimethyl sulfoxide. Studies with respiratory mutants of MR-1 revealed that several electron acceptors that could not be used for anaerobic growth nevertheless elicited normal anaerobic taxis. Mutant M56, which was unable to respire nitrite, showed normal taxis to nitrite, as well as the inhibition of taxis to other electron acceptors by nitrite. These results indicate that electron acceptor taxis in S. putrefaciens does not conform to the paradigm established for Escherichia coli and several other bacteria. Carbon chemo-taxis was also unusual in this organism: of all carbon compounds tested, the only positive response observed was to formate under anaerobic conditions.

  11. PsHint1, associated with the G-protein α subunit PsGPA1, is required for the chemotaxis and pathogenicity of Phytophthora sojae.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xin; Zhai, Chunhua; Hua, Chenlei; Qiu, Min; Hao, Yujuan; Nie, Pingping; Ye, Wenwu; Wang, Yuanchao

    2016-02-01

    Zoospore chemotaxis to soybean isoflavones is essential in the early stages of infection by the oomycete pathogen Phytophthora sojae. Previously, we have identified a G-protein α subunit encoded by PsGPA1 which regulates the chemotaxis and pathogenicity of P. sojae. In the present study, we used affinity purification to identify PsGPA1-interacting proteins, including PsHint1, a histidine triad (HIT) domain-containing protein orthologous to human HIT nucleotide-binding protein 1 (HINT1). PsHint1 interacted with both the guanosine triphosphate (GTP)- and guanosine diphosphate (GDP)-bound forms of PsGPA1. An analysis of the gene-silenced transformants revealed that PsHint1 was involved in the chemotropic response of zoospores to the isoflavone daidzein. During interaction with a susceptible soybean cultivar, PsHint1-silenced transformants displayed significantly reduced infectious hyphal extension and caused a strong cell death in plants. In addition, the transformants displayed defective cyst germination, forming abnormal germ tubes that were highly branched and exhibited apical swelling. These results suggest that PsHint1 not only regulates chemotaxis by interacting with PsGPA1, but also participates in a Gα-independent pathway involved in the pathogenicity of P. sojae. © 2015 BSPP AND JOHN WILEY & SONS LTD.

  12. Response Tuning in Bacterial Chemotaxis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jasuja, Ravi; Yu-Lin; Trentham, David R.; Khan, Shahid

    1999-09-01

    Chemotaxis of enteric bacteria in spatial gradients toward a source of chemoattractant is accomplished by increases in the length of swimming runs up the gradient. Biochemical components of the intracellular signal pathway have been identified, but mechanisms for achieving the high response sensitivity remain unknown. Binding of attractant ligand to its receptor inactivates a receptor-associated histidine kinase, CheA, which phosphorylates the signal protein CheY. The reduction in phospho-CheY, CheY-P, levels prolongs swimming runs. Here, the stimulus-response relation has been determined by measurement of excitation responses mediated by the Tar receptor to defined concentration jumps of the attractant, aspartate, administered within milliseconds by photolysis of a photolabile precursor. The bacteria responded to <1% changes in Tar occupancy when adapted to aspartate over concentrations spanning three orders of magnitude. Response amplitudes increased approximately logarithmically with stimulus strength, extending responsiveness over a greater stimulus range. The extent and form of this relation indicates that, in contrast to mechanisms for adaptive recovery, excitation signal generation involves amplification based on cooperative interactions. These interactions could entail inactivation of multiple receptor-CheA signaling complexes and/or simultaneous activation of CheY-P dephosphorylation.

  13. Gene expression profiling of epithelial ovarian cancer reveals key genes and pathways associated with chemotherapy resistance.

    PubMed

    Zhang, M; Luo, S C

    2016-01-22

    The aim of this study is to analyze gene expression data to identify key genes and pathways associated with resistance to platinum-based chemotherapy in epithelial ovarian cancer (EOC) and to improve clinical treatment strategies. The gene expression data set was downloaded from Gene Expression Omnibus and included 12 chemotherapy-resistant EOC samples and 16 chemotherapy-sensitive EOC samples. A differential analysis was performed to screen out differentially expressed genes (DEGs). A functional enrichment analysis was conducted for the DEGs using the database for annotation, visualization, and integration discovery. A protein-protein interaction (PPI) network was constructed with information from the human protein reference database. Pathway-pathway interactions were determined with a test based on the hypergeometric distribution. A total of 1564 DEGs were identified in chemotherapy-sensitive EOC, including 654 upregulated genes and 910 downregulated genes. The top three upregulated genes were HIST1H3G, AKT3, and RTN3, while the top three downregulated genes were NBLA00301, TRIM62, and EPHA5. A Gene Ontology enrichment analysis showed that cell adhesion, biological adhesion, and intracellular signaling cascades were significantly enriched in the DEGs. A KEGG pathway enrichment analysis revealed that the calcium, mitogen-activated protein kinase, and B cell receptor signaling pathways were significantly over-represented in the DEGs. A PPI network containing 101 interactions was acquired. The top three hub genes were RAC1, CAV1, and BCL2. Five modules were identified from the PPI network. Taken together, these findings could advance the understanding of the molecular mechanisms underlying intrinsic chemotherapy resistance in EOC.

  14. Tonic inhibition of chemotaxis in human plasma

    PubMed Central

    Malawista, Stephen E.; de Boisfleury Chevance, Anne; van Damme, Jo; Serhan, Charles N.

    2008-01-01

    We found exaggerated chemotaxis in plasma treated with EDTA and thought that the EDTA might itself be inhibiting a tonic inhibitor(s) of chemotaxis. Our plasma fractionations suggested that evidence should be sought for a lipid moiety carrying this activity, and on spectrometry (LC-MS-MS together with GC-MS analyses), the biologically active but not the inactive fraction contained oleic and arachidonic acids. Because fatty acids are largely protein bound, we flooded plasma preparations with delipidated albumin, reasoning that it would bind enough fatty acids, including inhibitory ones, to counter their tonic inhibition. Indeed, we observed dramatic increases in chemotaxis. Hence, adding delipidated albumin to plasma has a similar effect to that of adding EDTA—amplification of the chemotactic response. Oleic acid in physiologic concentrations diminishes the magnifying effects of both EDTA and of delipidated albumin, and in fact diminishes the chemotactic response even without the presence of the amplifiers of chemotaxis. In contrast, arachidonic acid amplifies further the effect of EDTA but not of delipidated albumin, and this augmentation appears to be caused by an EDTA-dependent enrichment of the chemotactic gradient with leukotriene B4 (LTB4). We conclude that oleic acid, the blood levels of which vary among individuals, is at least one tonic inhibitor of chemotaxis in plasma. PMID:18997012

  15. Gene expression analysis of endometrium reveals progesterone resistance and candidate susceptibility genes in women with endometriosis.

    PubMed

    Burney, Richard O; Talbi, Said; Hamilton, Amy E; Vo, Kim Chi; Nyegaard, Mette; Nezhat, Camran R; Lessey, Bruce A; Giudice, Linda C

    2007-08-01

    The identification of molecular differences in the endometrium of women with endometriosis is an important step toward understanding the pathogenesis of this condition and toward developing novel strategies for the treatment of associated infertility and pain. In this study, we conducted global gene expression analysis of endometrium from women with and without moderate/severe stage endometriosis and compared the gene expression signatures across various phases of the menstrual cycle. The transcriptome analysis revealed molecular dysregulation of the proliferative-to-secretory transition in endometrium of women with endometriosis. Paralleled gene expression analysis of endometrial specimens obtained during the early secretory phase demonstrated a signature of enhanced cellular survival and persistent expression of genes involved in DNA synthesis and cellular mitosis in the setting of endometriosis. Comparative gene expression analysis of progesterone-regulated genes in secretory phase endometrium confirmed the observation of attenuated progesterone response. Additionally, interesting candidate susceptibility genes were identified that may be associated with this disorder, including FOXO1A, MIG6, and CYP26A1. Collectively these findings provide a framework for further investigations on causality and mechanisms underlying attenuated progesterone response in endometrium of women with endometriosis.

  16. Gene Essentiality Profiling Reveals Gene Networks and Synthetic Lethal Interactions with Oncogenic Ras.

    PubMed

    Wang, Tim; Yu, Haiyan; Hughes, Nicholas W; Liu, Bingxu; Kendirli, Arek; Klein, Klara; Chen, Walter W; Lander, Eric S; Sabatini, David M

    2017-02-23

    The genetic dependencies of human cancers widely vary. Here, we catalog this heterogeneity and use it to identify functional gene interactions and genotype-dependent liabilities in cancer. By using genome-wide CRISPR-based screens, we generate a gene essentiality dataset across 14 human acute myeloid leukemia (AML) cell lines. Sets of genes with correlated patterns of essentiality across the lines reveal new gene relationships, the essential substrates of enzymes, and the molecular functions of uncharacterized proteins. Comparisons of differentially essential genes between Ras-dependent and -independent lines uncover synthetic lethal partners of oncogenic Ras. Screens in both human AML and engineered mouse pro-B cells converge on a surprisingly small number of genes in the Ras processing and MAPK pathways and pinpoint PREX1 as an AML-specific activator of MAPK signaling. Our findings suggest general strategies for defining mammalian gene networks and synthetic lethal interactions by exploiting the natural genetic and epigenetic diversity of human cancer cells.

  17. [Chemotaxis of Rhizobium leguminosarum bv. viciae to organic substances].

    PubMed

    Stambul's'ka, U Ia; Lushchak, V I

    2009-01-01

    The chemotaxis of nodule bacteria cultures of pea Rhizobium leguminosarum bv. vicia RRL1, RRL3, RRL6 i RRL7 isolated from the plants of Ivano-Frankivsk district to different organic substances was investigated. Saccharose, pyruvate and tartaric acid were the most active attractants among carbohydrates and organic acids studied for all used nodule bacteria strains. Serine, alanine, glycine, tyrosine and cysteine were the most active attractants of amino acids. Dependence of pea nodule bacteria chemotaxic activity on time of growth and attractant concentrations was revealed. The isolate specificity towards organic substances for different strains of Rhizobium leguminosarum bv. vicia was found.

  18. A large scale screen reveals genes that mediate electrotaxis in Dictyostelium discoideum**

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Runchi; Zhao, Siwei; Jiang, Xupin; Sun, Yaohui; Zhao, Sanjun; Gao, Jing; Borleis, Jane; Willard, Stacey; Tang, Ming; Cai, Huaqing; Kamimura, Yoichiro; Huang, Yuesheng; Jiang, Jianxin; Huang, Zunxi; Mogilner, Alex; Pan, Tingrui; Devreotes, Peter N; Zhao, Min

    2015-01-01

    Directional cell migration in an electric field, a phenomenon called galvanotaxis or electrotaxis, occurs in many types of cells, and may play an important role in wound healing and development. Small extracellular electric fields can guide the migration of amoeboid cells, and here, we established a large-scale screening approach to search for mutants with electrotaxis phenotypes from a collection of 563 Dictyostelium discoideum strains with morphological defects. We identified 28 strains that were defective in electrotaxis and 10 strains with a slightly higher directional response. Using plasmid rescue followed by gene disruption, we identified some of the mutated genes, including some previously implicated in chemotaxis. Amongst these we studied PiaA, which encodes a critical component of TORC2, a kinase protein complex that transduces changes in motility by activating the kinase PKB (also known as Akt). Furthermore, we found that electrotaxis was decreased in mutants lacking gefA, rasC, rip3, lst8 or pkbR1, genes that encode other components of the TORC2-PKB pathway. Thus, we have developed a high-throughput screening technique that will be a useful tool to elucidate the molecular mechanisms of electrotaxis. PMID:26012633

  19. Transcriptome profiling of a Sinorhizobium meliloti fadD mutant reveals the role of rhizobactin 1021 biosynthesis and regulation genes in the control of swarming

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Swarming is a multicellular phenomenom characterized by the coordinated and rapid movement of bacteria across semisolid surfaces. In Sinorhizobium meliloti this type of motility has been described in a fadD mutant. To gain insights into the mechanisms underlying the process of swarming in rhizobia, we compared the transcriptome of a S. meliloti fadD mutant grown under swarming inducing conditions (semisolid medium) to those of cells grown under non-swarming conditions (broth and solid medium). Results More than a thousand genes were identified as differentially expressed in response to growth on agar surfaces including genes for several metabolic activities, iron uptake, chemotaxis, motility and stress-related genes. Under swarming-specific conditions, the most remarkable response was the up-regulation of iron-related genes. We demonstrate that the pSymA plasmid and specifically genes required for the biosynthesis of the siderophore rhizobactin 1021 are essential for swarming of a S. meliloti wild-type strain but not in a fadD mutant. Moreover, high iron conditions inhibit swarming of the wild-type strain but not in mutants lacking either the iron limitation response regulator RirA or FadD. Conclusions The present work represents the first transcriptomic study of rhizobium growth on surfaces including swarming inducing conditions. The results have revealed major changes in the physiology of S. meliloti cells grown on a surface relative to liquid cultures. Moreover, analysis of genes responding to swarming inducing conditions led to the demonstration that iron and genes involved in rhizobactin 1021 synthesis play a role in the surface motility shown by S. meliloti which can be circumvented in a fadD mutant. This work opens a way to the identification of new traits and regulatory networks involved in swarming by rhizobia. PMID:20210991

  20. Spirochetal motility and chemotaxis in the natural enzootic cycle and development of Lyme disease.

    PubMed

    Motaleb, Md A; Liu, Jun; Wooten, R Mark

    2015-12-01

    Two-thirds of all bacterial genomes sequenced to-date possess an organelle for locomotion, referred to as flagella, periplasmic flagella or type IV pili. These genomes may also contain a chemotaxis-signaling system which governs flagellar rotation, thus leading a coordinated function for motility. Motility and chemotaxis are often crucial for infection or disease process caused by pathogenic bacteria. Although motility-associated genes are well-characterized in some organisms, the highly orchestrated synthesis, regulation, and assembly of periplasmic flagella in spirochetes are just being delineated. Recent advances were fostered by development of unique genetic manipulations in spirochetes coupled with cutting-edge imaging techniques. These contemporary advances in understanding the role of spirochetal motility and chemotaxis in host persistence and disease development are highlighted in this review.

  1. Spirochetal motility and chemotaxis in the natural enzootic cycle and development of Lyme disease

    PubMed Central

    MOTALEB, MD A.; LIU, JUN; WOOTEN, R. MARK

    2015-01-01

    Two-thirds of all bacterial genomes sequenced to-date possess an organelle for locomotion, referred to as flagella, periplasmic flagella or type IV pili. These genomes may also contain a chemotaxis-signaling system which governs flagellar rotation, thus leading a coordinated function for motility. Motility and chemotaxis are often crucial for infection or disease process caused by pathogenic bacteria. Although motility-associated genes are well-characterized in some organisms, the highly-orchestrated synthesis, regulation, and assembly of periplasmic flagella in spirochetes are just being delineated. Recent advances were fostered by development of unique genetic manipulations in spirochetes coupled with cutting-edge imaging techniques. These contemporary advances in understanding the role of spirochetal motility and chemotaxis in host persistence and disease development are highlighted in this review. PMID:26519910

  2. Barrier Crossing in Escherichia coli Chemotaxis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Zhaojun; Cai, Qiuxian; Zhang, Xuanqi; Si, Guangwei; Ouyang, Qi; Luo, Chunxiong; Tu, Yuhai

    2017-03-01

    We study cell navigation in spatiotemporally complex environments by developing a microfluidic racetrack device that creates a traveling wave with multiple peaks and a tunable wave speed. We find that while the population-averaged chemotaxis drift speed increases with wave speed for low wave speed, it decreases sharply for high wave speed. This reversed dependence of population-averaged chemotaxis drift speed on wave speed is caused by a "barrier-crossing" phenomenon, where a cell hops backwards from one peak attractant location to the peak behind by crossing an unfavorable (barrier) region with low attractant concentrations. By using a coarse-grained model of chemotaxis, we map bacterial motility in an attractant field to the random motion of an overdamped particle in an effective potential. The observed barrier-crossing phenomenon of living cells and its dependence on the spatiotemporal profile of attractant concentration are explained quantitatively by Kramers reaction rate theory.

  3. Phototaxis and chemotaxis of brown algal swarmers.

    PubMed

    Kinoshita, Nana; Nagasato, Chikako; Motomura, Taizo

    2017-05-01

    Brown algae exhibit three patterns of sexual reproduction: isogamy, anisogamy, and oogamy. Unicellular swarmers including gametes and zoospores bear two heterogenous flagella, an anterior flagellum with mastigonemes (fine tripartite hairs) and a posterior one. In seawater, these flagellates usually receive physico-chemical signals for finding partners and good habitats. It is well known that brown algal swarmers change their swimming direction depending on blue light (phototaxis), and male gametes do so, based on the sex pheromones from female gametes (chemotaxis). In recent years, the comparative analysis of chemotaxis in isogamy, anisogamy, and oogamy has been conducted. In this paper, we focused on the phototaxis and chemotaxis of brown algal gametes comparing the current knowledge with our recent studies.

  4. Chemotaxis of catalytically-driven nanorods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Byun, Young-Moo; Lammert, Paul; Crespi, Vincent; Hong, Yiying; Sen, Ayusman

    2009-03-01

    Chemotaxis, a kind of taxis, is the directed motion of nanoscale organisms such as bacteria along the gradient of chemical concentration. Chemists have created non-biological nanorods, made of gold at one end and platinum at the other, which move autonomously through a solution of hydrogen peroxide due to a catalytic reaction,1 and showed that those metallic nanorods mimic chemotaxis by moving towards regions in a solution with a high concentration of hydrogen peroxide.2 In this talk, we present a theoretical model for chemotaxis and a way of how to analyze the motion of nanorods, and then compare our theory to the experimental data. 1. Paxton et al, J. Am. Chem. Soc., 126, 13424-13431 (2004) 2. Hong et al, Phys. Rev. Lett. 99, 178103 (2007)

  5. Ca2+ chemotaxis in Dictyostelium discoideum.

    PubMed

    Scherer, Amanda; Kuhl, Spencer; Wessels, Deborah; Lusche, Daniel F; Raisley, Brent; Soll, David R

    2010-11-01

    Using a newly developed microfluidic chamber, we have demonstrated in vitro that Ca(2+) functions as a chemoattractant of aggregation-competent Dictyostelium discoideum amoebae, that parallel spatial gradients of cAMP and Ca(2+) are more effective than either alone, and that cAMP functions as a stronger chemoattractant than Ca(2+). Effective Ca(2+) gradients are extremely steep compared with effective cAMP gradients. This presents a paradox because there is no indication to date that steep Ca(2+) gradients are generated in aggregation territories. However, given that Ca(2+) chemotaxis is co-acquired with cAMP chemotaxis during development, we speculate on the role that Ca(2+) chemotaxis might have and the possibility that steep, transient Ca(2+) gradients are generated during natural aggregation in the interstitial regions between cells.

  6. CIP4 controls CCL19-driven cell steering and chemotaxis in chronic lymphocytic leukemia.

    PubMed

    Malet-Engra, Gema; Viaud, Julien; Ysebaert, Loïc; Farcé, Manon; Lafouresse, Fanny; Laurent, Guy; Gaits-Iacovoni, Frédérique; Scita, Giorgio; Dupré, Loïc

    2013-06-01

    Solid tumor dissemination relies on the reprogramming of molecular pathways controlling chemotaxis. Whether the motility of nonsolid tumors such as leukemia depends on the deregulated expression of molecules decoding chemotactic signals remains an open question. We identify here the membrane remodeling F-BAR adapter protein Cdc42-interacting protein 4 (CIP4) as a key regulator of chemotaxis in chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL). CIP4 is expressed at abnormally high levels in CLL cells, where it is required for CCL19-induced chemotaxis. Upon CCL19 stimulation of CLL cells, CIP4 associates with GTP-bound Cdc42 and is recruited to the rear of the lamellipodium and along microspikes radiating through the lamellipodium. Consistent with its cellular distribution, CIP4 removal impairs both the assembly of the polarized lamellipodium and directional migration along a diffusible CCL19 gradient. Furthermore, CIP4 depletion results in decreased activation of WASP, but increased activation of PAK1 and p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK). Notably, p38 MAPK inhibition results in impaired lamellipodium assembly and loss of directional migration. This suggests that CIP4 modulates both the WASP and p38 MAPK pathways to promote lamellipodium assembly and chemotaxis. Overall, our study reveals a critical role of CIP4 in mediating chemotaxis of CLL cells by controlling the dynamics of microspike-containing protrusions and cell steering.

  7. Differential Gene Expression Reveals Candidate Genes for Drought Stress Response in Abies alba (Pinaceae)

    PubMed Central

    Ziegenhagen, Birgit; Liepelt, Sascha

    2015-01-01

    Increasing drought periods as a result of global climate change pose a threat to many tree species by possibly outpacing their adaptive capabilities. Revealing the genetic basis of drought stress response is therefore implemental for future conservation strategies and risk assessment. Access to informative genomic regions is however challenging, especially for conifers, partially due to their large genomes, which puts constraints on the feasibility of whole genome scans. Candidate genes offer a valuable tool to reduce the complexity of the analysis and the amount of sequencing work and costs. For this study we combined an improved drought stress phenotyping of needles via a novel terahertz water monitoring technique with Massive Analysis of cDNA Ends to identify candidate genes for drought stress response in European silver fir (Abies alba Mill.). A pooled cDNA library was constructed from the cotyledons of six drought stressed and six well-watered silver fir seedlings, respectively. Differential expression analyses of these libraries revealed 296 candidate genes for drought stress response in silver fir (247 up- and 49 down-regulated) of which a subset was validated by RT-qPCR of the twelve individual cotyledons. A majority of these genes code for currently uncharacterized proteins and hint on new genomic resources to be explored in conifers. Furthermore, we could show that some traditional reference genes from model plant species (GAPDH and eIF4A2) are not suitable for differential analysis and we propose a new reference gene, TPC1, for drought stress expression profiling in needles of conifer seedlings. PMID:25924061

  8. Differential Gene Expression Reveals Candidate Genes for Drought Stress Response in Abies alba (Pinaceae).

    PubMed

    Behringer, David; Zimmermann, Heike; Ziegenhagen, Birgit; Liepelt, Sascha

    2015-01-01

    Increasing drought periods as a result of global climate change pose a threat to many tree species by possibly outpacing their adaptive capabilities. Revealing the genetic basis of drought stress response is therefore implemental for future conservation strategies and risk assessment. Access to informative genomic regions is however challenging, especially for conifers, partially due to their large genomes, which puts constraints on the feasibility of whole genome scans. Candidate genes offer a valuable tool to reduce the complexity of the analysis and the amount of sequencing work and costs. For this study we combined an improved drought stress phenotyping of needles via a novel terahertz water monitoring technique with Massive Analysis of cDNA Ends to identify candidate genes for drought stress response in European silver fir (Abies alba Mill.). A pooled cDNA library was constructed from the cotyledons of six drought stressed and six well-watered silver fir seedlings, respectively. Differential expression analyses of these libraries revealed 296 candidate genes for drought stress response in silver fir (247 up- and 49 down-regulated) of which a subset was validated by RT-qPCR of the twelve individual cotyledons. A majority of these genes code for currently uncharacterized proteins and hint on new genomic resources to be explored in conifers. Furthermore, we could show that some traditional reference genes from model plant species (GAPDH and eIF4A2) are not suitable for differential analysis and we propose a new reference gene, TPC1, for drought stress expression profiling in needles of conifer seedlings.

  9. Adipose tissue gene expression analysis reveals changes in inflammatory, mitochondrial respiratory and lipid metabolic pathways in obese insulin-resistant subjects

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background To get insight into molecular mechanisms underlying insulin resistance, we compared acute in vivo effects of insulin on adipose tissue transcriptional profiles between obese insulin-resistant and lean insulin-sensitive women. Methods Subcutaneous adipose tissue biopsies were obtained before and after 3 and 6 hours of intravenously maintained euglycemic hyperinsulinemia from 9 insulin-resistant and 11 insulin-sensitive females. Gene expression was measured using Affymetrix HG U133 Plus 2 microarrays and qRT-PCR. Microarray data and pathway analyses were performed with Chipster v1.4.2 and by using in-house developed nonparametric pathway analysis software. Results The most prominent difference in gene expression of the insulin-resistant group during hyperinsulinemia was reduced transcription of nuclear genes involved in mitochondrial respiration (mitochondrial respiratory chain, GO:0001934). Inflammatory pathways with complement components (inflammatory response, GO:0006954) and cytokines (chemotaxis, GO:0042330) were strongly up-regulated in insulin-resistant as compared to insulin-sensitive subjects both before and during hyperinsulinemia. Furthermore, differences were observed in genes contributing to fatty acid, cholesterol and triglyceride metabolism (FATP2, ELOVL6, PNPLA3, SREBF1) and in genes involved in regulating lipolysis (ANGPTL4) between the insulin-resistant and -sensitive subjects especially during hyperinsulinemia. Conclusions The major finding of this study was lower expression of mitochondrial respiratory pathway and defective induction of lipid metabolism pathways by insulin in insulin-resistant subjects. Moreover, the study reveals several novel genes whose aberrant regulation is associated with the obese insulin-resistant phenotype. PMID:22471940

  10. Magneto-chemotaxis in sediment: first insights.

    PubMed

    Mao, Xuegang; Egli, Ramon; Petersen, Nikolai; Hanzlik, Marianne; Liu, Xiuming

    2014-01-01

    Magnetotactic bacteria (MTB) use passive alignment with the Earth magnetic field as a mean to increase their navigation efficiency in horizontally stratified environments through what is known as magneto-aerotaxis (M-A). Current M-A models have been derived from MTB observations in aqueous environments, where a >80% alignment with inclined magnetic field lines produces a one-dimensional search for optimal living conditions. However, the mean magnetic alignment of MTB in their most widespread living environment, i.e. sediment, has been recently found to be <1%, greatly reducing or even eliminating the magnetotactic advantage deduced for the case of MTB in water. In order to understand the role of magnetotaxis for MTB populations living in sediment, we performed first M-A observations with lake sediment microcosms. Microcosm experiments were based on different combinations of (1) MTB position with respect to their preferred living depth (i.e. above, at, and below), and (2) magnetic field configurations (i.e. correctly and incorrectly polarized vertical fields, horizontal fields, and zero fields). Results suggest that polar magnetotaxis is more complex than implied by previous experiments, and revealed unexpected differences between two types of MTB living in the same sediment. Our main findings are: (1) all investigated MTB benefit of a clear magnetotactic advantage when they need to migrate over macroscopic distances for reaching their optimal living depth, (2) magnetotaxis is not used by all MTB under stationary, undisturbed conditions, (3) some MTB can rely only on chemotaxis for macroscopic vertical displacements in sediment while other cannot, and (4) some MTB use a fixed polar M-A mechanisms, while other can switch their M-A polarity, performing what can be considered as a mixed polar-axial M-A. These observations demonstrate that sedimentary M-A is controlled by complex mechanical, chemical, and temporal factors that are poorly reproduced in aqueous

  11. Magneto-Chemotaxis in Sediment: First Insights

    PubMed Central

    Mao, Xuegang; Egli, Ramon; Petersen, Nikolai; Hanzlik, Marianne; Liu, Xiuming

    2014-01-01

    Magnetotactic bacteria (MTB) use passive alignment with the Earth magnetic field as a mean to increase their navigation efficiency in horizontally stratified environments through what is known as magneto-aerotaxis (M-A). Current M-A models have been derived from MTB observations in aqueous environments, where a >80% alignment with inclined magnetic field lines produces a one-dimensional search for optimal living conditions. However, the mean magnetic alignment of MTB in their most widespread living environment, i.e. sediment, has been recently found to be <1%, greatly reducing or even eliminating the magnetotactic advantage deduced for the case of MTB in water. In order to understand the role of magnetotaxis for MTB populations living in sediment, we performed first M-A observations with lake sediment microcosms. Microcosm experiments were based on different combinations of (1) MTB position with respect to their preferred living depth (i.e. above, at, and below), and (2) magnetic field configurations (i.e. correctly and incorrectly polarized vertical fields, horizontal fields, and zero fields). Results suggest that polar magnetotaxis is more complex than implied by previous experiments, and revealed unexpected differences between two types of MTB living in the same sediment. Our main findings are: (1) all investigated MTB benefit of a clear magnetotactic advantage when they need to migrate over macroscopic distances for reaching their optimal living depth, (2) magnetotaxis is not used by all MTB under stationary, undisturbed conditions, (3) some MTB can rely only on chemotaxis for macroscopic vertical displacements in sediment while other cannot, and (4) some MTB use a fixed polar M-A mechanisms, while other can switch their M-A polarity, performing what can be considered as a mixed polar-axial M-A. These observations demonstrate that sedimentary M-A is controlled by complex mechanical, chemical, and temporal factors that are poorly reproduced in aqueous

  12. The complexity of gene expression dynamics revealed by permutation entropy

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background High complexity is considered a hallmark of living systems. Here we investigate the complexity of temporal gene expression patterns using the concept of Permutation Entropy (PE) first introduced in dynamical systems theory. The analysis of gene expression data has so far focused primarily on the identification of differentially expressed genes, or on the elucidation of pathway and regulatory relationships. We aim to study gene expression time series data from the viewpoint of complexity. Results Applying the PE complexity metric to abiotic stress response time series data in Arabidopsis thaliana, genes involved in stress response and signaling were found to be associated with the highest complexity not only under stress, but surprisingly, also under reference, non-stress conditions. Genes with house-keeping functions exhibited lower PE complexity. Compared to reference conditions, the PE of temporal gene expression patterns generally increased upon stress exposure. High-complexity genes were found to have longer upstream intergenic regions and more cis-regulatory motifs in their promoter regions indicative of a more complex regulatory apparatus needed to orchestrate their expression, and to be associated with higher correlation network connectivity degree. Arabidopsis genes also present in other plant species were observed to exhibit decreased PE complexity compared to Arabidopsis specific genes. Conclusions We show that Permutation Entropy is a simple yet robust and powerful approach to identify temporal gene expression profiles of varying complexity that is equally applicable to other types of molecular profile data. PMID:21176199

  13. Chemotaxis, chemokine receptors and human disease.

    PubMed

    Jin, Tian; Xu, Xuehua; Hereld, Dale

    2008-10-01

    Cell migration is involved in diverse physiological processes including embryogenesis, immunity, and diseases such as cancer and chronic inflammatory disease. The movement of many cell types is directed by extracellular gradients of diffusible chemicals. This phenomenon, referred to as "chemotaxis", was first described in 1888 by Leber who observed the movement of leukocytes toward sites of inflammation. We now know that a large family of small proteins, chemokines, serves as the extracellular signals and a family of G-protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs), chemokine receptors, detects gradients of chemokines and guides cell movement in vivo. Currently, we still know little about the molecular machineries that control chemokine gradient sensing and migration of immune cells. Fortunately, the molecular mechanisms that control these fundamental aspects of chemotaxis appear to be evolutionarily conserved, and studies in lower eukaryotic model systems have allowed us to form concepts, uncover molecular components, develop new techniques, and test models of chemotaxis. These studies have helped our current understanding of this complicated cell behavior. In this review, we wish to mention landmark discoveries in the chemotaxis research field that shaped our current understanding of this fundamental cell behavior and lay out key questions that remain to be addressed in the future.

  14. Travelling waves in hybrid chemotaxis models.

    PubMed

    Franz, Benjamin; Xue, Chuan; Painter, Kevin J; Erban, Radek

    2014-02-01

    Hybrid models of chemotaxis combine agent-based models of cells with partial differential equation models of extracellular chemical signals. In this paper, travelling wave properties of hybrid models of bacterial chemotaxis are investigated. Bacteria are modelled using an agent-based (individual-based) approach with internal dynamics describing signal transduction. In addition to the chemotactic behaviour of the bacteria, the individual-based model also includes cell proliferation and death. Cells consume the extracellular nutrient field (chemoattractant), which is modelled using a partial differential equation. Mesoscopic and macroscopic equations representing the behaviour of the hybrid model are derived and the existence of travelling wave solutions for these models is established. It is shown that cell proliferation is necessary for the existence of non-transient (stationary) travelling waves in hybrid models. Additionally, a numerical comparison between the wave speeds of the continuum models and the hybrid models shows good agreement in the case of weak chemotaxis and qualitative agreement for the strong chemotaxis case. In the case of slow cell adaptation, we detect oscillating behaviour of the wave, which cannot be explained by mean-field approximations.

  15. A Dynamical Model Reveals Gene Co-Localizations in Nucleus

    PubMed Central

    Yao, Ye; Lin, Wei; Hennessy, Conor; Fraser, Peter; Feng, Jianfeng

    2011-01-01

    Co-localization of networks of genes in the nucleus is thought to play an important role in determining gene expression patterns. Based upon experimental data, we built a dynamical model to test whether pure diffusion could account for the observed co-localization of genes within a defined subnuclear region. A simple standard Brownian motion model in two and three dimensions shows that preferential co-localization is possible for co-regulated genes without any direct interaction, and suggests the occurrence may be due to a limitation in the number of available transcription factors. Experimental data of chromatin movements demonstrates that fractional rather than standard Brownian motion is more appropriate to model gene mobilizations, and we tested our dynamical model against recent static experimental data, using a sub-diffusion process by which the genes tend to colocalize more easily. Moreover, in order to compare our model with recently obtained experimental data, we studied the association level between genes and factors, and presented data supporting the validation of this dynamic model. As further applications of our model, we applied it to test against more biological observations. We found that increasing transcription factor number, rather than factory number and nucleus size, might be the reason for decreasing gene co-localization. In the scenario of frequency- or amplitude-modulation of transcription factors, our model predicted that frequency-modulation may increase the co-localization between its targeted genes. PMID:21760760

  16. Methods of Combinatorial Optimization to Reveal Factors Affecting Gene Length

    PubMed Central

    Bolshoy, Alexander; Tatarinova, Tatiana

    2012-01-01

    In this paper we present a novel method for genome ranking according to gene lengths. The main outcomes described in this paper are the following: the formulation of the genome ranking problem, presentation of relevant approaches to solve it, and the demonstration of preliminary results from prokaryotic genomes ordering. Using a subset of prokaryotic genomes, we attempted to uncover factors affecting gene length. We have demonstrated that hyperthermophilic species have shorter genes as compared with mesophilic organisms, which probably means that environmental factors affect gene length. Moreover, these preliminary results show that environmental factors group together in ranking evolutionary distant species. PMID:23300345

  17. Methods of combinatorial optimization to reveal factors affecting gene length.

    PubMed

    Bolshoy, Alexander; Tatarinova, Tatiana

    2012-01-01

    In this paper we present a novel method for genome ranking according to gene lengths. The main outcomes described in this paper are the following: the formulation of the genome ranking problem, presentation of relevant approaches to solve it, and the demonstration of preliminary results from prokaryotic genomes ordering. Using a subset of prokaryotic genomes, we attempted to uncover factors affecting gene length. We have demonstrated that hyperthermophilic species have shorter genes as compared with mesophilic organisms, which probably means that environmental factors affect gene length. Moreover, these preliminary results show that environmental factors group together in ranking evolutionary distant species.

  18. Microarray analysis reveals differential gene expression in hybrid sunflower species

    PubMed Central

    LAI, ZHAO; GROSS, BRIANA L.; YIZOU; ANDREWS, JUSTEN; RIESEBERG, LOREN H.

    2008-01-01

    This paper describes the creation of a cDNA microarray for annual sunflowers and its use to elucidate patterns of gene expression in Helianthus annuus, Helianthus petiolaris, and the homoploid hybrid species Helianthus deserticola. The array comprises 3743 ESTs (expressed sequence tags) representing approximately 2897 unique genes. It has an average clone/EST identity rate of 91%, is applicable across species boundaries within the annual sunflowers, and shows patterns of gene expression that are highly reproducible according to real-time RT–PCR (reverse transcription–polymerase chain reaction) results. Overall, 12.8% of genes on the array showed statistically significant differential expression across the three species. Helianthus deserticola displayed transgressive, or extreme, expression for 58 genes, with roughly equal numbers exhibiting up- or down-regulation relative to both parental species. Transport-related proteins were strongly over-represented among the transgressively expressed genes, which makes functional sense given the extreme desert floor habitat of H. deserticola. The potential adaptive value of differential gene expression was evaluated for five genes in two populations of early generation (BC2) hybrids between the parental species grown in the H. deserticola habitat. One gene (a G protein-coupled receptor) had a significant association with fitness and maps close to a QTL controlling traits that may be adaptive in the desert habitat. PMID:16626449

  19. Shotgun Metagenomic Sequencing Reveals Functional Genes and Microbiome Associated with Bovine Digital Dermatitis.

    PubMed

    Zinicola, Martin; Higgins, Hazel; Lima, Svetlana; Machado, Vinicius; Guard, Charles; Bicalho, Rodrigo

    2015-01-01

    Metagenomic methods amplifying 16S ribosomal RNA genes have been used to describe the microbial diversity of healthy skin and lesion stages of bovine digital dermatitis (DD) and to detect critical pathogens involved with disease pathogenesis. In this study, we characterized the microbiome and for the first time, the composition of functional genes of healthy skin (HS), active (ADD) and inactive (IDD) lesion stages using a whole-genome shotgun approach. Metagenomic sequences were annotated using MG-RAST pipeline. Six phyla were identified as the most abundant. Firmicutes and Actinobacteria were the predominant bacterial phyla in the microbiome of HS, while Spirochetes, Bacteroidetes and Proteobacteria were highly abundant in ADD and IDD. T. denticola-like, T. vincentii-like and T. phagedenis-like constituted the most abundant species in ADD and IDD. Recruitment plots comparing sequences from HS, ADD and IDD samples to the genomes of specific Treponema spp., supported the presence of T. denticola and T. vincentii in ADD and IDD. Comparison of the functional composition of HS to ADD and IDD identified a significant difference in genes associated with motility/chemotaxis and iron acquisition/metabolism. We also provide evidence that the microbiome of ADD and IDD compared to that of HS had significantly higher abundance of genes associated with resistance to copper and zinc, which are commonly used in footbaths to prevent and control DD. In conclusion, the results from this study provide new insights into the HS, ADD and IDD microbiomes, improve our understanding of the disease pathogenesis and generate unprecedented knowledge regarding the functional genetic composition of the digital dermatitis microbiome.

  20. Glycoprotein 63 (gp63) genes show gene conversion and reveal the evolution of Old World Leishmania.

    PubMed

    Mauricio, Isabel L; Gaunt, Michael W; Stothard, J Russell; Miles, Michael A

    2007-04-01

    Species of the subgenus Leishmania (Leishmania) cause the debilitating disease leishmaniasis on four continents. Species grouped within the Leishmania donovani complex cause visceral leishmaniasis, a life-threatening disease, often associated with poverty, and affecting some 0.5 million people each year. The Leishmania glycoprotein GP63, or major surface protease, is a metalloprotease involved in parasite survival, infectivity and virulence. Here, we show that evolution of the gp63 multigene family is influenced by mosaic or fragmental gene conversion. This is a major evolutionary force for both homogenisation and for generating diversity, even in the absence of sexual reproduction. We propose here that the high GC content at the third codon position in the gp63 family of Old World Leishmania may be higher in multicopy regions, under the biased gene conversion model, because increased copy numbers may lead to increased rates of recombination. We confirm that one class of gp63 genes with an extended 3'end signal, gp63(EXT), reveals genetic groups within the complex and gives insights into evolution and host associations. Gp63(EXT) genes can also provide the basis for rapid and reliable genotyping of strains in the L. donovani complex. Our results confirmed that a more stringent definition of Leishmania infantum is required and that the species Leishmania archibaldi should be suppressed.

  1. Pancreatic cancer genomes reveal aberrations in axon guidance pathway genes.

    PubMed

    Biankin, Andrew V; Waddell, Nicola; Kassahn, Karin S; Gingras, Marie-Claude; Muthuswamy, Lakshmi B; Johns, Amber L; Miller, David K; Wilson, Peter J; Patch, Ann-Marie; Wu, Jianmin; Chang, David K; Cowley, Mark J; Gardiner, Brooke B; Song, Sarah; Harliwong, Ivon; Idrisoglu, Senel; Nourse, Craig; Nourbakhsh, Ehsan; Manning, Suzanne; Wani, Shivangi; Gongora, Milena; Pajic, Marina; Scarlett, Christopher J; Gill, Anthony J; Pinho, Andreia V; Rooman, Ilse; Anderson, Matthew; Holmes, Oliver; Leonard, Conrad; Taylor, Darrin; Wood, Scott; Xu, Qinying; Nones, Katia; Fink, J Lynn; Christ, Angelika; Bruxner, Tim; Cloonan, Nicole; Kolle, Gabriel; Newell, Felicity; Pinese, Mark; Mead, R Scott; Humphris, Jeremy L; Kaplan, Warren; Jones, Marc D; Colvin, Emily K; Nagrial, Adnan M; Humphrey, Emily S; Chou, Angela; Chin, Venessa T; Chantrill, Lorraine A; Mawson, Amanda; Samra, Jaswinder S; Kench, James G; Lovell, Jessica A; Daly, Roger J; Merrett, Neil D; Toon, Christopher; Epari, Krishna; Nguyen, Nam Q; Barbour, Andrew; Zeps, Nikolajs; Kakkar, Nipun; Zhao, Fengmei; Wu, Yuan Qing; Wang, Min; Muzny, Donna M; Fisher, William E; Brunicardi, F Charles; Hodges, Sally E; Reid, Jeffrey G; Drummond, Jennifer; Chang, Kyle; Han, Yi; Lewis, Lora R; Dinh, Huyen; Buhay, Christian J; Beck, Timothy; Timms, Lee; Sam, Michelle; Begley, Kimberly; Brown, Andrew; Pai, Deepa; Panchal, Ami; Buchner, Nicholas; De Borja, Richard; Denroche, Robert E; Yung, Christina K; Serra, Stefano; Onetto, Nicole; Mukhopadhyay, Debabrata; Tsao, Ming-Sound; Shaw, Patricia A; Petersen, Gloria M; Gallinger, Steven; Hruban, Ralph H; Maitra, Anirban; Iacobuzio-Donahue, Christine A; Schulick, Richard D; Wolfgang, Christopher L; Morgan, Richard A; Lawlor, Rita T; Capelli, Paola; Corbo, Vincenzo; Scardoni, Maria; Tortora, Giampaolo; Tempero, Margaret A; Mann, Karen M; Jenkins, Nancy A; Perez-Mancera, Pedro A; Adams, David J; Largaespada, David A; Wessels, Lodewyk F A; Rust, Alistair G; Stein, Lincoln D; Tuveson, David A; Copeland, Neal G; Musgrove, Elizabeth A; Scarpa, Aldo; Eshleman, James R; Hudson, Thomas J; Sutherland, Robert L; Wheeler, David A; Pearson, John V; McPherson, John D; Gibbs, Richard A; Grimmond, Sean M

    2012-11-15

    Pancreatic cancer is a highly lethal malignancy with few effective therapies. We performed exome sequencing and copy number analysis to define genomic aberrations in a prospectively accrued clinical cohort (n = 142) of early (stage I and II) sporadic pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma. Detailed analysis of 99 informative tumours identified substantial heterogeneity with 2,016 non-silent mutations and 1,628 copy-number variations. We define 16 significantly mutated genes, reaffirming known mutations (KRAS, TP53, CDKN2A, SMAD4, MLL3, TGFBR2, ARID1A and SF3B1), and uncover novel mutated genes including additional genes involved in chromatin modification (EPC1 and ARID2), DNA damage repair (ATM) and other mechanisms (ZIM2, MAP2K4, NALCN, SLC16A4 and MAGEA6). Integrative analysis with in vitro functional data and animal models provided supportive evidence for potential roles for these genetic aberrations in carcinogenesis. Pathway-based analysis of recurrently mutated genes recapitulated clustering in core signalling pathways in pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma, and identified new mutated genes in each pathway. We also identified frequent and diverse somatic aberrations in genes described traditionally as embryonic regulators of axon guidance, particularly SLIT/ROBO signalling, which was also evident in murine Sleeping Beauty transposon-mediated somatic mutagenesis models of pancreatic cancer, providing further supportive evidence for the potential involvement of axon guidance genes in pancreatic carcinogenesis.

  2. Pancreatic cancer genomes reveal aberrations in axon guidance pathway genes

    PubMed Central

    Biankin, Andrew V.; Waddell, Nicola; Kassahn, Karin S.; Gingras, Marie-Claude; Muthuswamy, Lakshmi B.; Johns, Amber L.; Miller, David K.; Wilson, Peter J.; Patch, Ann-Marie; Wu, Jianmin; Chang, David K.; Cowley, Mark J.; Gardiner, Brooke B.; Song, Sarah; Harliwong, Ivon; Idrisoglu, Senel; Nourse, Craig; Nourbakhsh, Ehsan; Manning, Suzanne; Wani, Shivangi; Gongora, Milena; Pajic, Marina; Scarlett, Christopher J.; Gill, Anthony J.; Pinho, Andreia V.; Rooman, Ilse; Anderson, Matthew; Holmes, Oliver; Leonard, Conrad; Taylor, Darrin; Wood, Scott; Xu, Qinying; Nones, Katia; Fink, J. Lynn; Christ, Angelika; Bruxner, Tim; Cloonan, Nicole; Kolle, Gabriel; Newell, Felicity; Pinese, Mark; Mead, R. Scott; Humphris, Jeremy L.; Kaplan, Warren; Jones, Marc D.; Colvin, Emily K.; Nagrial, Adnan M.; Humphrey, Emily S.; Chou, Angela; Chin, Venessa T.; Chantrill, Lorraine A.; Mawson, Amanda; Samra, Jaswinder S.; Kench, James G.; Lovell, Jessica A.; Daly, Roger J.; Merrett, Neil D.; Toon, Christopher; Epari, Krishna; Nguyen, Nam Q.; Barbour, Andrew; Zeps, Nikolajs; Kakkar, Nipun; Zhao, Fengmei; Wu, Yuan Qing; Wang, Min; Muzny, Donna M.; Fisher, William E.; Brunicardi, F. Charles; Hodges, Sally E.; Reid, Jeffrey G.; Drummond, Jennifer; Chang, Kyle; Han, Yi; Lewis, Lora R.; Dinh, Huyen; Buhay, Christian J.; Beck, Timothy; Timms, Lee; Sam, Michelle; Begley, Kimberly; Brown, Andrew; Pai, Deepa; Panchal, Ami; Buchner, Nicholas; De Borja, Richard; Denroche, Robert E.; Yung, Christina K.; Serra, Stefano; Onetto, Nicole; Mukhopadhyay, Debabrata; Tsao, Ming-Sound; Shaw, Patricia A.; Petersen, Gloria M.; Gallinger, Steven; Hruban, Ralph H.; Maitra, Anirban; Iacobuzio-Donahue, Christine A.; Schulick, Richard D.; Wolfgang, Christopher L.; Morgan, Richard A.; Lawlor, Rita T.; Capelli, Paola; Corbo, Vincenzo; Scardoni, Maria; Tortora, Giampaolo; Tempero, Margaret A.; Mann, Karen M.; Jenkins, Nancy A.; Perez-Mancera, Pedro A.; Adams, David J.; Largaespada, David A.; Wessels, Lodewyk F. A.; Rust, Alistair G.; Stein, Lincoln D.; Tuveson, David A.; Copeland, Neal G.; Musgrove, Elizabeth A.; Scarpa, Aldo; Eshleman, James R.; Hudson, Thomas J.; Sutherland, Robert L.; Wheeler, David A.; Pearson, John V.; McPherson, John D.; Gibbs, Richard A.; Grimmond, Sean M.

    2012-01-01

    Pancreatic cancer is a highly lethal malignancy with few effective therapies. We performed exome sequencing and copy number analysis to define genomic aberrations in a prospectively accrued clinical cohort (n = 142) of early (stage I and II) sporadic pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma. Detailed analysis of 99 informative tumours identified substantial heterogeneity with 2,016 non-silent mutations and 1,628 copy-number variations. We define 16 significantly mutated genes, reaffirming known mutations (KRAS, TP53, CDKN2A, SMAD4, MLL3, TGFBR2, ARID1A and SF3B1), and uncover novel mutated genes including additional genes involved in chromatin modification (EPC1 and ARID2), DNA damage repair (ATM) and other mechanisms (ZIM2, MAP2K4, NALCN, SLC16A4 and MAGEA6). Integrative analysis with in vitro functional data and animal models provided supportive evidence for potential roles for these genetic aberrations in carcinogenesis. Pathway-based analysis of recurrently mutated genes recapitulated clustering in core signalling pathways in pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma, and identified new mutated genes in each pathway. We also identified frequent and diverse somatic aberrations in genes described traditionally as embryonic regulators of axon guidance, particularly SLIT/ROBO signalling, which was also evident in murine Sleeping Beauty transposon-mediated somatic mutagenesis models of pancreatic cancer, providing further supportive evidence for the potential involvement of axon guidance genes in pancreatic carcinogenesis. PMID:23103869

  3. NahY, a Catabolic Plasmid-Encoded Receptor Required for Chemotaxis of Pseudomonas putida to the Aromatic Hydrocarbon Naphthalene

    PubMed Central

    Grimm, Ann C.; Harwood, Caroline S.

    1999-01-01

    Pseudomonas putida G7 exhibits chemotaxis to naphthalene, but the molecular basis for this was not known. A new gene, nahY, was found to be cotranscribed with meta cleavage pathway genes on the NAH7 catabolic plasmid for naphthalene degradation. The nahY gene encodes a 538-amino-acid protein with a membrane topology and a C-terminal region that resemble those of chemotaxis transducer proteins. A P. putida G7 nahY mutant grew on naphthalene but was not chemotactic to this aromatic hydrocarbon. The protein NahY thus appears to function as a chemoreceptor for naphthalene or a related compound. The presence of nahY on a catabolic plasmid implies that chemotaxis may facilitate biodegradation. PMID:10322041

  4. EST analysis reveals putative genes involved in glycyrrhizin biosynthesis

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Glycyrrhiza uralensis is one of the most popular medicinal plants in the world and is also widely used in the flavoring of food and tobacco. Due to limited genomic and transcriptomic data, the biosynthetic pathway of glycyrrhizin, the major bioactive compound in G. uralensis, is currently unclear. Identification of candidate genes involved in the glycyrrhizin biosynthetic pathway will significantly contribute to the understanding of the biosynthetic and medicinal chemistry of this compound. Results We used the 454 GS FLX platform and Titanium regents to produce a substantial expressed sequence tag (EST) dataset from the vegetative organs of G. uralensis. A total of 59,219 ESTs with an average read length of 409 bp were generated. 454 ESTs were combined with the 50,666 G. uralensis ESTs in GenBank. The combined ESTs were assembled into 27,229 unique sequences (11,694 contigs and 15,535 singletons). A total of 20,437 unique gene elements representing approximately 10,000 independent transcripts were annotated using BLAST searches (e-value ≤ 1e-5) against the SwissProt, KEGG, TAIR, Nr and Nt databases. The assembled sequences were annotated with gene names and Gene Ontology (GO) terms. With respect to the genes related to glycyrrhizin metabolism, genes encoding 16 enzymes of the 18 total steps of the glycyrrhizin skeleton synthesis pathway were found. To identify novel genes that encode cytochrome P450 enzymes and glycosyltransferases, which are related to glycyrrhizin metabolism, a total of 125 and 172 unigenes were found to be homologous to cytochrome P450s and glycosyltransferases, respectively. The cytochrome P450 candidate genes were classified into 32 CYP families, while the glycosyltransferase candidate genes were classified into 45 categories by GO analysis. Finally, 3 cytochrome P450 enzymes and 6 glycosyltransferases were selected as the candidates most likely to be involved in glycyrrhizin biosynthesis through an organ-specific expression

  5. Coelacanth genome sequence reveals the evolutionary history of vertebrate genes.

    PubMed

    Noonan, James P; Grimwood, Jane; Danke, Joshua; Schmutz, Jeremy; Dickson, Mark; Amemiya, Chris T; Myers, Richard M

    2004-12-01

    The coelacanth is one of the nearest living relatives of tetrapods. However, a teleost species such as zebrafish or Fugu is typically used as the outgroup in current tetrapod comparative sequence analyses. Such studies are complicated by the fact that teleost genomes have undergone a whole-genome duplication event, as well as individual gene-duplication events. Here, we demonstrate the value of coelacanth genome sequence by complete sequencing and analysis of the protocadherin gene cluster of the Indonesian coelacanth, Latimeria menadoensis. We found that coelacanth has 49 protocadherin cluster genes organized in the same three ordered subclusters, alpha, beta, and gamma, as the 54 protocadherin cluster genes in human. In contrast, whole-genome and tandem duplications have generated two zebrafish protocadherin clusters comprised of at least 97 genes. Additionally, zebrafish protocadherins are far more prone to homogenizing gene conversion events than coelacanth protocadherins, suggesting that recombination- and duplication-driven plasticity may be a feature of teleost genomes. Our results indicate that coelacanth provides the ideal outgroup sequence against which tetrapod genomes can be measured. We therefore present L. menadoensis as a candidate for whole-genome sequencing.

  6. An unconventional myosin required for cell polarization and chemotaxis.

    PubMed

    Breshears, Laura M; Wessels, Deborah; Soll, David R; Titus, Margaret A

    2010-04-13

    MyTH/FERM (myosin tail homology 4/band 4.1, ezrin, radixin, and moesin) myosins have roles in cellular adhesion, extension of actin-filled projections such as filopodia and stereocilia, and directional migration. The amoeba Dictyostelium discoideum expresses a simple complement of MyTH/FERM myosins, a class VII (M7) myosin required for cell-substrate adhesion and a unique myosin named MyoG. Mutants lacking MyoG exhibit a wide range of normal actin-based behaviors, including chemotaxis to folic acid, but have a striking defect in polarization and chemotaxis to cAMP. Although the myoG mutants respond to cAMP stimulation by increasing persistence and weakly increasing levels of cortical F-actin, they do not polarize; instead, they maintain a round shape and move slowly and randomly when exposed to a chemotactic gradient. The mutants also fail to activate and localize PI3K to the membrane closest to the source of chemoattractant. These data reveal a role for a MyTH/FERM myosin in mediating early chemotactic signaling and suggest that MyTH/FERM proteins have conserved roles in signaling and the generation of cell polarity.

  7. Heart morphogenesis gene regulatory networks revealed by temporal expression analysis.

    PubMed

    Hill, Jonathon T; Demarest, Bradley; Gorsi, Bushra; Smith, Megan; Yost, H Joseph

    2017-10-01

    During embryogenesis the heart forms as a linear tube that then undergoes multiple simultaneous morphogenetic events to obtain its mature shape. To understand the gene regulatory networks (GRNs) driving this phase of heart development, during which many congenital heart disease malformations likely arise, we conducted an RNA-seq timecourse in zebrafish from 30 hpf to 72 hpf and identified 5861 genes with altered expression. We clustered the genes by temporal expression pattern, identified transcription factor binding motifs enriched in each cluster, and generated a model GRN for the major gene batteries in heart morphogenesis. This approach predicted hundreds of regulatory interactions and found batteries enriched in specific cell and tissue types, indicating that the approach can be used to narrow the search for novel genetic markers and regulatory interactions. Subsequent analyses confirmed the GRN using two mutants, Tbx5 and nkx2-5, and identified sets of duplicated zebrafish genes that do not show temporal subfunctionalization. This dataset provides an essential resource for future studies on the genetic/epigenetic pathways implicated in congenital heart defects and the mechanisms of cardiac transcriptional regulation. © 2017. Published by The Company of Biologists Ltd.

  8. The cavefish genome reveals candidate genes for eye loss

    PubMed Central

    McGaugh, Suzanne E.; Gross, Joshua B.; Aken, Bronwen; Blin, Maryline; Borowsky, Richard; Chalopin, Domitille; Hinaux, Hélène; Jeffery, William R.; Keene, Alex; Ma, Li; Minx, Patrick; Murphy, Daniel; O’Quin, Kelly E.; Rétaux, Sylvie; Rohner, Nicolas; Searle, Steve M. J.; Stahl, Bethany A.; Tabin, Cliff; Volff, Jean-Nicolas; Yoshizawa, Masato; Warren, Wesley C.

    2014-01-01

    Natural populations subjected to strong environmental selection pressures offer a window into the genetic underpinnings of evolutionary change. Cavefish populations, Astyanax mexicanus (Teleostei: Characiphysi), exhibit repeated, independent evolution for a variety of traits including eye degeneration, pigment loss, increased size and number of taste buds and mechanosensory organs, and shifts in many behavioural traits. Surface and cave forms are interfertile making this system amenable to genetic interrogation; however, lack of a reference genome has hampered efforts to identify genes responsible for changes in cave forms of A. mexicanus. Here we present the first de novo genome assembly for Astyanax mexicanus cavefish, contrast repeat elements to other teleost genomes, identify candidate genes underlying quantitative trait loci (QTL), and assay these candidate genes for potential functional and expression differences. We expect the cavefish genome to advance understanding of the evolutionary process, as well as, analogous human disease including retinal dysfunction. PMID:25329095

  9. Control Parameter Description of Eukaryotic Chemotaxis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bodenschatz, Eberhard; Amselem, Gabriel; Bae, Albert; Theves, Mathias; Beta, Carsten

    2013-03-01

    The chemotaxis of eukaryotic cells depends both on the average concentration of the chemoattractant and on the steepness of its gradient. For the social amoeba Dictyostelium discoideum, we test quantitatively the prediction by Ueda and Shibata [ Biophys. J. 93 11 (2007)] that the efficacy of chemotaxis depends on a single control parameter only, namely, the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR), determined by the stochastic fluctuations of (i) the binding of the chemoattractant molecule to the transmembrane receptor and (ii) the intracellular activation of the effector of the signaling cascade. For SNR 1, the theory captures the experimental findings well, while for larger SNR noise sources further downstream in the signaling pathway need to be taken into account. Supported by Deutsche Forschungsgemeinschaft SFB 937 and Max Planck Society.

  10. Control Parameter Description of Eukaryotic Chemotaxis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amselem, Gabriel; Theves, Matthias; Bae, Albert; Beta, Carsten; Bodenschatz, Eberhard

    2012-09-01

    The chemotaxis of eukaryotic cells depends both on the average concentration of the chemoattractant and on the steepness of its gradient. For the social amoeba Dictyostelium discoideum, we test quantitatively the prediction by Ueda and Shibata [Biophys. J.BIOJAU0006-3495 93, 11 (2007)10.1529/biophysj.106.100263] that the efficacy of chemotaxis depends on a single control parameter only, namely, the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR), determined by the stochastic fluctuations of (i) the binding of the chemoattractant molecule to the transmembrane receptor and (ii) the intracellular activation of the effector of the signaling cascade. For SNR ≲1, the theory captures the experimental findings well, while for larger SNR noise sources further downstream in the signaling pathway need to be taken into account.

  11. Neuronal chemotaxis by optically manipulated liposomes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pinato, G.; Lien, L. T.; D'Este, E.; Torre, V.; Cojoc, D.

    2011-08-01

    We probe chemotaxis of single neurons, induced by signalling molecules which were optically delivered from liposomes in the neighbourhood of the cells. We implemented an optical tweezers setup combined with a micro-dissection system on an inverted microscope platform. Molecules of Netrin-1 protein were encapsulated into micron-sized liposomes and manipulated to micrometric distances from a specific growth cone of a hippocampal neuron by the IR optical tweezers. The molecules were then released by breaking the liposomes with UV laser pulses. Chemotaxis induced by the delivered molecules was confirmed by the migration of the growth cone toward the liposome position. Since the delivery can be manipulated with high temporal and spatial resolution and the number of molecules released can be controlled quite precisely by tuning the liposome size and the solution concentration, this technique opens new opportunities to investigate the effect of physiological active compounds as Netrin-1 to neuronal signalling and guidance, which represents an important issue in neurobiology.

  12. Selection of chemotaxis mutants of Dictyostelium discoideum

    PubMed Central

    1987-01-01

    A method has been developed for the efficient selection of chemotaxis mutants of Dictyostelium discoideum. Mutants defective in the chemotactic response to folate could be enriched up to 30-fold in one round of selection using a chamber in which a compartment that contained the chemoattractant was separated by a sandwich of four nitrocellulose filters from a compartment that contained buffer. Mutagenized cells were placed in the center of the filter layer and exposed to the attractant gradient built up between the compartments for a period of 3-4 h. While wild-type cells moved through the filters in a wave towards the compartment that contained attractant, mutant cells remained in the filter to which they were applied. After several repetitions of the selection procedure, mutants defective in chemotaxis made up 10% of the total cell population retained in that filter. Mutants exhibiting three types of alterations were collected: motility mutants with either reduced speed of movement, or altered rates of turning; a single mutant defective in production of the attractant- degrading enzyme, folate deaminase; and mutants with normal motility but reduced chemotactic responsiveness. One mutant showed drastically reduced sensitivity in folate-induced cGMP production. Morphogenetic alterations of mutants defective in folate chemotaxis are described. PMID:3793759

  13. Listening to the noise: random fluctuations reveal gene network parameters.

    PubMed

    Munsky, Brian; Trinh, Brooke; Khammash, Mustafa

    2009-01-01

    The cellular environment is abuzz with noise originating from the inherent random motion of reacting molecules in the living cell. In this noisy environment, clonal cell populations show cell-to-cell variability that can manifest significant phenotypic differences. Noise-induced stochastic fluctuations in cellular constituents can be measured and their statistics quantified. We show that these random fluctuations carry within them valuable information about the underlying genetic network. Far from being a nuisance, the ever-present cellular noise acts as a rich source of excitation that, when processed through a gene network, carries its distinctive fingerprint that encodes a wealth of information about that network. We show that in some cases the analysis of these random fluctuations enables the full identification of network parameters, including those that may otherwise be difficult to measure. This establishes a potentially powerful approach for the identification of gene networks and offers a new window into the workings of these networks.

  14. Listening to the noise: random fluctuations reveal gene network parameters

    SciTech Connect

    Munsky, Brian; Khammash, Mustafa

    2009-01-01

    The cellular environment is abuzz with noise. The origin of this noise is attributed to the inherent random motion of reacting molecules that take part in gene expression and post expression interactions. In this noisy environment, clonal populations of cells exhibit cell-to-cell variability that frequently manifests as significant phenotypic differences within the cellular population. The stochastic fluctuations in cellular constituents induced by noise can be measured and their statistics quantified. We show that these random fluctuations carry within them valuable information about the underlying genetic network. Far from being a nuisance, the ever-present cellular noise acts as a rich source of excitation that, when processed through a gene network, carries its distinctive fingerprint that encodes a wealth of information about that network. We demonstrate that in some cases the analysis of these random fluctuations enables the full identification of network parameters, including those that may otherwise be difficult to measure. This establishes a potentially powerful approach for the identification of gene networks and offers a new window into the workings of these networks.

  15. Rescuing chemotaxis of the anticancer agent Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium VNP20009.

    PubMed

    Broadway, Katherine M; Denson, Elizabeth A P; Jensen, Roderick V; Scharf, Birgit E

    2015-10-10

    The role of chemotaxis and motility in Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium tumor colonization remains unclear. We determined through swim plate assays that the well-established anticancer agent S. Typhimurium VNP20009 is deficient in chemotaxis, and that this phenotype is suppressible. Through genome sequencing, we revealed that VNP20009 and four selected suppressor mutants had a single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) in cheY causing a mutation in the conserved proline residue at position 110. CheY is the response regulator that interacts with the flagellar motor-switch complex and modulates rotational bias. The four suppressor mutants additionally carried non-synonymous SNPs in fliM encoding a flagellar switch protein. The CheY-P110S mutation in VNP20009 likely rendered the protein unable to interact with FliM, a phenotype that could be suppressed by mutations in FliM. We replaced the mutated cheY in VNP20009 with the wild-type copy and chemotaxis was partially restored. The swim ring of the rescued strain, VNP20009 cheY(+), was 46% the size of the parental strain 14028 swim ring. When tested in capillary assays, VNP20009 cheY(+) was 69% efficient in chemotaxis towards the attractant aspartate as compared to 14028. Potential reasons for the lack of complete restoration and implications for bacterial tumor colonization will be discussed. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Chemotaxis and oospore formation in Phytophthora sojae are controlled by G-protein-coupled receptors with a phosphatidylinositol phosphate kinase domain.

    PubMed

    Yang, X; Zhao, W; Hua, C; Zheng, X; Jing, M; Li, D; Govers, F; Meijer, H J G; Wang, Y

    2013-04-01

    G-protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) are key cellular components that mediate extracellular signals into intracellular responses. Genome mining revealed that Phytophthora spp. have over 60 GPCR genes among which a prominent class of 12 encoding novel proteins with an N-terminal GPCR domain fused to a C-terminal phosphatidylinositol phosphate kinase (PIPK) domain. This study focuses on two GPCR-PIPKs (GKs) in Phytophthora sojae. PsGK4 and PsGK5 are differentially expressed during the life cycle with the highest expression in cysts and during cyst germination, and at late infection stages. In P. sojae transformants that constitutively express RFP-tagged PsGK4 and PsGK5, the fusion proteins in hyphae reside in small, rapidly moving vesicular-like structures. Functional analysis using gene silencing showed that PsGK4-silenced transformants displayed higher levels of encystment and a reduced cyst germination rate when compared with the recipient strain. Moreover, GK4 deficiency (or reduction) resulted in severe defects in zoospore chemotaxis towards isoflavones and soybean roots. In contrast, PsGK5-silenced transformants exhibited no obvious defects in asexual development but oospore production was severely impaired. Both, PsGK4- and PsGK5-silenced transformants showed reduced pathogenicity. These results point to involvement of GKs in zoospore behaviour, chemotaxis and oospore development, and suggest that PsGK4 and PsGK5 each head independent signalling pathways. © 2013 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  17. μ-Slide Chemotaxis: a new chamber for long-term chemotaxis studies.

    PubMed

    Zengel, Pamela; Nguyen-Hoang, Anna; Schildhammer, Christoph; Zantl, Roman; Kahl, Valentin; Horn, Elias

    2011-05-18

    Effective tools for measurement of chemotaxis are desirable since cell migration towards given stimuli plays a crucial role in tumour metastasis, angiogenesis, inflammation, and wound healing. As for now, the Boyden chamber assay is the longstanding "gold-standard" for in vitro chemotaxis measurements. However, support for live cell microscopy is weak, concentration gradients are rather steep and poorly defined, and chemotaxis cannot be distinguished from migration in a single experiment. Here, we describe a novel all-in-one chamber system for long-term analysis of chemotaxis in vitro that improves upon many of the shortcomings of the Boyden chamber assay. This chemotaxis chamber was developed to provide high quality microscopy, linear concentration gradients, support for long-term assays, and observation of slowly migrating cells via video microscopy. AlexaFluor 488 dye was used to demonstrate the establishment, shape and time development of linear chemical gradients. Human fibrosarcoma cell line HT1080 and freshly isolated human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVEC) were used to assess chemotaxis towards 10% fetal calf serum (FCS) and FaDu cells' supernatant. Time-lapse video microscopy was conducted for 48 hours, and cell tracking and analysis was performed using ImageJ plugins. The results disclosed a linear steady-state gradient that was reached after approximately 8 hours and remained stable for at least 48 hours. Both cell types were chemotactically active and cell movement as well as cell-to-cell interaction was assessable. Compared to the Boyden chamber assay, this innovative system allows for the generation of a stable gradient for a much longer time period as well as for the tracking of cell locomotion along this gradient and over long distances. Finally, random migration can be distinguished from primed and directed migration along chemotactic gradients in the same experiment, a feature, which can be qualified via cell morphology imaging.

  18. μ-Slide Chemotaxis: A new chamber for long-term chemotaxis studies

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Effective tools for measurement of chemotaxis are desirable since cell migration towards given stimuli plays a crucial role in tumour metastasis, angiogenesis, inflammation, and wound healing. As for now, the Boyden chamber assay is the longstanding "gold-standard" for in vitro chemotaxis measurements. However, support for live cell microscopy is weak, concentration gradients are rather steep and poorly defined, and chemotaxis cannot be distinguished from migration in a single experiment. Results Here, we describe a novel all-in-one chamber system for long-term analysis of chemotaxis in vitro that improves upon many of the shortcomings of the Boyden chamber assay. This chemotaxis chamber was developed to provide high quality microscopy, linear concentration gradients, support for long-term assays, and observation of slowly migrating cells via video microscopy. AlexaFluor 488 dye was used to demonstrate the establishment, shape and time development of linear chemical gradients. Human fibrosarcoma cell line HT1080 and freshly isolated human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVEC) were used to assess chemotaxis towards 10% fetal calf serum (FCS) and FaDu cells' supernatant. Time-lapse video microscopy was conducted for 48 hours, and cell tracking and analysis was performed using ImageJ plugins. The results disclosed a linear steady-state gradient that was reached after approximately 8 hours and remained stable for at least 48 hours. Both cell types were chemotactically active and cell movement as well as cell-to-cell interaction was assessable. Conclusions Compared to the Boyden chamber assay, this innovative system allows for the generation of a stable gradient for a much longer time period as well as for the tracking of cell locomotion along this gradient and over long distances. Finally, random migration can be distinguished from primed and directed migration along chemotactic gradients in the same experiment, a feature, which can be qualified via cell

  19. Functional gene pyrosequencing reveals core proteobacterial denitrifiers in boreal lakes

    PubMed Central

    Saarenheimo, Jatta; Tiirola, Marja Annika; Rissanen, Antti J.

    2015-01-01

    Denitrification is an important microbial process in aquatic ecosystems that can reduce the effects of eutrophication. Here, quantification and pyrosequencing of nirS, nirK, and nosZ genes encoding for nitrite and nitrous oxide reductases was performed in sediment samples from four boreal lakes to determine the structure and seasonal stability of denitrifying microbial populations. Sediment quality and nitrate concentrations were linked to the quantity and diversity of denitrification genes, the abundance of denitrifying populations (nirS and nosZ genes) correlated with coupled nitrification-denitrification (Dn), and the denitrification of the overlying water NO3- (Dw) correlated with the nirS/nirK ratio. The number of core nirS, nirK, and nosZ operational taxonomical units (OTUs) was low (6, 7, and 3, respectively), and most of these core OTUs were shared among the lakes. Dominant nirK sequences matched best with those of the order Rhizobiales, which was one of the main bacterial orders present in the sediment microbiomes, whereas the dominant nirS sequences were affiliated with the order Burkholderiales. Over half of the nosZ sequences belonged to a single OTU of the order Burkholderiales, but coupled nitrification–denitrification rate correlated with another dominant nosZ OTU assigned to the order Rhodospirillales. The study indicates that a few core proteobacterial clusters may drive denitrification in boreal lake sediments, as the same Alpha- and Betaproteobacteria denitrifier clusters were present in different lakes and seasons. PMID:26191058

  20. Fundamental Constraints on the Abundances of Chemotaxis Proteins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bitbol, Anne-Florence; Wingreen, Ned S.

    2015-03-01

    Flagellated bacteria, such as Escherichia coli, perform directed motion in gradients of concentration of attractants and repellents in a process called chemotaxis. The E. coli chemotaxis signaling pathway is a model for signal transduction, but it has unique features. We demonstrate that the need for fast signaling necessitates high abundances of the proteins involved in this pathway. We show that further constraints on the abundances of chemotaxis proteins arise from the requirements of self-assembly, both of flagellar motors and of chemoreceptor arrays. All these constraints are specific to chemotaxis, and published data confirm that chemotaxis proteins tend to be more highly expressed than their homologs in other pathways. Employing a chemotaxis pathway model, we show that the gain of the pathway at the level of the response regulator CheY increases with overall chemotaxis protein abundances. This may explain why, at least in one E. coli strain, the abundance of all chemotaxis proteins is higher in media with lower nutrient content. We also demonstrate that the E. coli chemotaxis pathway is particularly robust to abundance variations of the motor protein FliM.

  1. Griseofulvin inhibition of polymorphonuclear leucocyte chemotaxis in Boyden chambers.

    PubMed

    Bandmann, U; Norberg, B; Simmingsköld, G

    1975-09-01

    Griseofulvin inhibited the chemotaxis of polymorphonuclear leucocytes (PMN's) in vitro in the concentration range 0.1-1.0 mug/ml, i.e. at concentrations comparable to those obtained in serum during peroral treatment with griseofulvin. It is suggested that PMN chemotaxis is inhibited by griseofulvin interference with the redistribution of cytoplasmic microtubules, which is thought to be essential in the direction-finding of PMNs during chemotaxis. Furthermore, it is suggested that the griseofulvin inhibition of PMN chemotaxis - together with the previously known pharmacodynamic properties of griseofulvin - may provide the rationale for griseofulvin therapy in PMN-mediated tissue injury of the gut.

  2. Listening to the Noise: Random Fluctuations Reveal Gene Network Parameters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Munsky, Brian; Trinh, Brooke; Khammash, Mustafa

    2010-03-01

    The cellular environment is abuzz with noise originating from the inherent random motion of reacting molecules in the living cell. In this noisy environment, clonal cell populations exhibit cell-to-cell variability that can manifest significant prototypical differences. Noise induced stochastic fluctuations in cellular constituents can be measured and their statistics quantified using flow cytometry, single molecule fluorescence in situ hybridization, time lapse fluorescence microscopy and other single cell and single molecule measurement techniques. We show that these random fluctuations carry within them valuable information about the underlying genetic network. Far from being a nuisance, the ever-present cellular noise acts as a rich source of excitation that, when processed through a gene network, carries its distinctive fingerprint that encodes a wealth of information about that network. We demonstrate that in some cases the analysis of these random fluctuations enables the full identification of network parameters, including those that may otherwise be difficult to measure. We use theoretical investigations to establish experimental guidelines for the identification of gene regulatory networks, and we apply these guideline to experimentally identify predictive models for different regulatory mechanisms in bacteria and yeast.

  3. Different gene regulation strategies revealed by analysis of binding motifs.

    PubMed

    Wunderlich, Zeba; Mirny, Leonid A

    2009-10-01

    Coordinated regulation of gene expression relies on transcription factors (TFs) binding to specific DNA sites. Our large-scale information-theoretical analysis of > 950 TF-binding motifs demonstrates that prokaryotes and eukaryotes use strikingly different strategies to target TFs to specific genome locations. Although bacterial TFs can recognize a specific DNA site in the genomic background, eukaryotic TFs exhibit widespread, nonfunctional binding and require clustering of sites to achieve specificity. We find support for this mechanism in a range of experimental studies and in our evolutionary analysis of DNA-binding domains. Our systematic characterization of binding motifs provides a quantitative assessment of the differences in transcription regulation in prokaryotes and eukaryotes.

  4. The Vi capsular polysaccharide enables Salmonella enterica serovar typhi to evade microbe-guided neutrophil chemotaxis.

    PubMed

    Wangdi, Tamding; Lee, Cheng-Yuk; Spees, Alanna M; Yu, Chenzhou; Kingsbury, Dawn D; Winter, Sebastian E; Hastey, Christine J; Wilson, R Paul; Heinrich, Volkmar; Bäumler, Andreas J

    2014-08-01

    Salmonella enterica serovar Typhi (S. Typhi) causes typhoid fever, a disseminated infection, while the closely related pathogen S. enterica serovar Typhimurium (S. Typhimurium) is associated with a localized gastroenteritis in humans. Here we investigated whether both pathogens differ in the chemotactic response they induce in neutrophils using a single-cell experimental approach. Surprisingly, neutrophils extended chemotactic pseudopodia toward Escherichia coli and S. Typhimurium, but not toward S. Typhi. Bacterial-guided chemotaxis was dependent on the presence of complement component 5a (C5a) and C5a receptor (C5aR). Deletion of S. Typhi capsule biosynthesis genes markedly enhanced the chemotactic response of neutrophils in vitro. Furthermore, deletion of capsule biosynthesis genes heightened the association of S. Typhi with neutrophils in vivo through a C5aR-dependent mechanism. Collectively, these data suggest that expression of the virulence-associated (Vi) capsular polysaccharide of S. Typhi obstructs bacterial-guided neutrophil chemotaxis.

  5. Metabolic network analysis revealed distinct routes of deletion effects between essential and non-essential genes.

    PubMed

    Ma, Jing; Zhang, Xun; Ung, Choong Yong; Chen, Yu Zong; Li, Baowen

    2012-04-01

    Interest in essential genes has arisen recently given their importance in antimicrobial drug development. Although knockouts of essential genes are commonly known to cause lethal phenotypes, there is insufficient understanding on the intermediate changes followed by genetic perturbation and to what extent essential genes correlate to other genes. Here, we characterized the gene knockout effects by using a list of affected genes, termed as 'damage lists'. These damage lists were identified through a refined cascading failure approach that was based on a previous topological flux balance analysis. Using an Escherichia coli metabolic network, we incorporated essentiality information into damage lists and revealed that the knockout of an essential gene mainly affects a large range of other essential genes whereas knockout of a non-essential gene only interrupts other non-essential genes. Also, genes sharing common damage lists tend to have the same essentiality. We extracted 72 core functional modules from the common damage lists of essential genes and demonstrated their ability to halt essential metabolites production. Overall, our network analysis revealed that essential and non-essential genes propagated their deletion effects via distinct routes, conferring mechanistic explanation to the observed lethality phenotypes of essential genes.

  6. Behaviourally driven gene expression reveals song nuclei in hummingbird brain.

    PubMed

    Jarvis, E D; Ribeiro, S; da Silva, M L; Ventura, D; Vielliard, J; Mello, C V

    2000-08-10

    Hummingbirds have developed a wealth of intriguing features, such as backwards flight, ultraviolet vision, extremely high metabolic rates, nocturnal hibernation, high brain-to-body size ratio and a remarkable species-specific diversity of vocalizations. Like humans, they have also developed the rare trait of vocal learning, this being the ability to acquire vocalizations through imitation rather than instinct. Here we show, using behaviourally driven gene expression in freely ranging tropical animals, that the forebrain of hummingbirds contains seven discrete structures that are active during singing, providing the first anatomical and functional demonstration of vocal nuclei in hummingbirds. These structures are strikingly similar to seven forebrain regions that are involved in vocal learning and production in songbirds and parrots--the only other avian orders known to be vocal learners. This similarity is surprising, as songbirds, parrots and hummingbirds are thought to have evolved vocal learning and associated brain structures independently, and it indicates that strong constraints may influence the evolution of forebrain vocal nuclei.

  7. Hypothetical Protein BB0569 Is Essential for Chemotaxis of the Lyme Disease Spirochete Borrelia burgdorferi

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Kai; Liu, Jun; Charon, Nyles W.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT The Lyme disease spirochete Borrelia burgdorferi has five putative methyl-accepting chemotaxis proteins (MCPs). In this report, we provide evidence that a hypothetical protein, BB0569, is essential for the chemotaxis of B. burgdorferi. While BB0569 lacks significant homology to the canonical MCPs, it contains a conserved domain (spanning residues 110 to 170) that is often evident in membrane-bound MCPs such as Tar and Tsr of Escherichia coli. Unlike Tar and Tsr, BB0569 lacks transmembrane regions and recognizable HAMP and methylation domains and is similar to TlpC, a cytoplasmic chemoreceptor of Rhodobacter sphaeroides. An isogenic mutant of BB0569 constantly runs in one direction and fails to respond to attractants, indicating that BB0569 is essential for chemotaxis. Immunofluorescence, green fluorescent protein (GFP) fusion, and cryo-electron tomography analyses demonstrate that BB0569 localizes at the cell poles and is required for chemoreceptor clustering at the cell poles. Protein cross-linking studies reveal that BB0569 forms large protein complexes with MCP3, indicative of its interactions with other MCPs. Interestingly, analysis of B. burgdorferi mcp mutants shows that inactivation of either mcp2 or mcp3 reduces the level of BB0569 substantially and that such a reduction is caused by protein turnover. Collectively, these results demonstrate that the domain composition and function of BB0569 are similar in some respects to those of TlpC but that these proteins are different in their cellular locations, further highlighting that the chemotaxis of B. burgdorferi is unique and different from the Escherichia coli and Salmonella enterica paradigm. IMPORTANCE Spirochete chemotaxis differs substantially from the Escherichia coli and Salmonella enterica paradigm, and the basis for controlling the rotation of the bundles of periplasmic flagella at each end of the cell is unknown. In recent years, Borrelia burgdorferi, the causative agent of Lyme disease, has

  8. Sinorhizobium meliloti chemoreceptor McpU mediates chemotaxis toward host plant exudates through direct proline sensing.

    PubMed

    Webb, Benjamin A; Hildreth, Sherry; Helm, Richard F; Scharf, Birgit E

    2014-06-01

    Bacterial chemotaxis is an important attribute that aids in establishing symbiosis between rhizobia and their legume hosts. Plant roots and seeds exude a spectrum of molecules into the soil to attract their bacterial symbionts. The alfalfa symbiont Sinorhizobium meliloti possesses eight chemoreceptors to sense its environment and mediate chemotaxis toward its host. The methyl accepting chemotaxis protein McpU is one of the more abundant S. meliloti chemoreceptors and an important sensor for the potent attractant proline. We established a dominant role of McpU in sensing molecules exuded by alfalfa seeds. Mass spectrometry analysis determined that a single germinating seed exudes 3.72 nmol of proline, producing a millimolar concentration near the seed surface which can be detected by the chemosensory system of S. meliloti. Complementation analysis of the mcpU deletion strain verified McpU as the key proline sensor. A structure-based homology search identified tandem Cache (calcium channels and chemotaxis receptors) domains in the periplasmic region of McpU. Conserved residues Asp-155 and Asp-182 of the N-terminal Cache domain were determined to be important for proline sensing by evaluating mutant strains in capillary and swim plate assays. Differential scanning fluorimetry revealed interaction of the isolated periplasmic region of McpU (McpU40-284) with proline and the importance of Asp-182 in this interaction. Using isothermal titration calorimetry, we determined that proline binds with a Kd (dissociation constant) of 104 μM to McpU40-284, while binding was abolished when Asp-182 was substituted by Glu. Our results show that McpU is mediating chemotaxis toward host plants by direct proline sensing.

  9. Sinorhizobium meliloti Chemoreceptor McpU Mediates Chemotaxis toward Host Plant Exudates through Direct Proline Sensing

    PubMed Central

    Webb, Benjamin A.; Hildreth, Sherry; Helm, Richard F.

    2014-01-01

    Bacterial chemotaxis is an important attribute that aids in establishing symbiosis between rhizobia and their legume hosts. Plant roots and seeds exude a spectrum of molecules into the soil to attract their bacterial symbionts. The alfalfa symbiont Sinorhizobium meliloti possesses eight chemoreceptors to sense its environment and mediate chemotaxis toward its host. The methyl accepting chemotaxis protein McpU is one of the more abundant S. meliloti chemoreceptors and an important sensor for the potent attractant proline. We established a dominant role of McpU in sensing molecules exuded by alfalfa seeds. Mass spectrometry analysis determined that a single germinating seed exudes 3.72 nmol of proline, producing a millimolar concentration near the seed surface which can be detected by the chemosensory system of S. meliloti. Complementation analysis of the mcpU deletion strain verified McpU as the key proline sensor. A structure-based homology search identified tandem Cache (calcium channels and chemotaxis receptors) domains in the periplasmic region of McpU. Conserved residues Asp-155 and Asp-182 of the N-terminal Cache domain were determined to be important for proline sensing by evaluating mutant strains in capillary and swim plate assays. Differential scanning fluorimetry revealed interaction of the isolated periplasmic region of McpU (McpU40-284) with proline and the importance of Asp-182 in this interaction. Using isothermal titration calorimetry, we determined that proline binds with a Kd (dissociation constant) of 104 μM to McpU40-284, while binding was abolished when Asp-182 was substituted by Glu. Our results show that McpU is mediating chemotaxis toward host plants by direct proline sensing. PMID:24657863

  10. Receptor sensitivity in bacterial chemotaxis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sourjik, Victor; Berg, Howard C.

    2002-01-01

    Chemoreceptors in Escherichia coli are coupled to the flagella by a labile phosphorylated intermediate, CheY~P. Its activity can be inferred from the rotational bias of flagellar motors, but motor response is stochastic and limited to a narrow physiological range. Here we use fluorescence resonance energy transfer to monitor interactions of CheY~P with its phosphatase, CheZ, that reveal changes in the activity of the receptor kinase, CheA, resulting from the addition of attractants or repellents. Analyses of cheR and/or cheB mutants, defective in receptor methylation/demethylation, show that response sensitivity depends on the activity of CheB and the level of receptor modification. In cheRcheB mutants, the concentration of attractant that generates a half-maximal response is equal to the dissociation constant of the receptor. In wild-type cells, it is 35 times smaller. This amplification, together with the ultrasensitivity of the flagellar motor, explains previous observations of high chemotactic gain.

  11. DNA capture reveals transoceanic gene flow in endangered river sharks.

    PubMed

    Li, Chenhong; Corrigan, Shannon; Yang, Lei; Straube, Nicolas; Harris, Mark; Hofreiter, Michael; White, William T; Naylor, Gavin J P

    2015-10-27

    For over a hundred years, the "river sharks" of the genus Glyphis were only known from the type specimens of species that had been collected in the 19th century. They were widely considered extinct until populations of Glyphis-like sharks were rediscovered in remote regions of Borneo and Northern Australia at the end of the 20th century. However, the genetic affinities between the newly discovered Glyphis-like populations and the poorly preserved, original museum-type specimens have never been established. Here, we present the first (to our knowledge) fully resolved, complete phylogeny of Glyphis that includes both archival-type specimens and modern material. We used a sensitive DNA hybridization capture method to obtain complete mitochondrial genomes from all of our samples and show that three of the five described river shark species are probably conspecific and widely distributed in Southeast Asia. Furthermore we show that there has been recent gene flow between locations that are separated by large oceanic expanses. Our data strongly suggest marine dispersal in these species, overturning the widely held notion that river sharks are restricted to freshwater. It seems that species in the genus Glyphis are euryhaline with an ecology similar to the bull shark, in which adult individuals live in the ocean while the young grow up in river habitats with reduced predation pressure. Finally, we discovered a previously unidentified species within the genus Glyphis that is deeply divergent from all other lineages, underscoring the current lack of knowledge about the biodiversity and ecology of these mysterious sharks.

  12. DNA capture reveals transoceanic gene flow in endangered river sharks

    PubMed Central

    Li, Chenhong; Corrigan, Shannon; Yang, Lei; Straube, Nicolas; Harris, Mark; Hofreiter, Michael; White, William T.; Naylor, Gavin J. P.

    2015-01-01

    For over a hundred years, the “river sharks” of the genus Glyphis were only known from the type specimens of species that had been collected in the 19th century. They were widely considered extinct until populations of Glyphis-like sharks were rediscovered in remote regions of Borneo and Northern Australia at the end of the 20th century. However, the genetic affinities between the newly discovered Glyphis-like populations and the poorly preserved, original museum-type specimens have never been established. Here, we present the first (to our knowledge) fully resolved, complete phylogeny of Glyphis that includes both archival-type specimens and modern material. We used a sensitive DNA hybridization capture method to obtain complete mitochondrial genomes from all of our samples and show that three of the five described river shark species are probably conspecific and widely distributed in Southeast Asia. Furthermore we show that there has been recent gene flow between locations that are separated by large oceanic expanses. Our data strongly suggest marine dispersal in these species, overturning the widely held notion that river sharks are restricted to freshwater. It seems that species in the genus Glyphis are euryhaline with an ecology similar to the bull shark, in which adult individuals live in the ocean while the young grow up in river habitats with reduced predation pressure. Finally, we discovered a previously unidentified species within the genus Glyphis that is deeply divergent from all other lineages, underscoring the current lack of knowledge about the biodiversity and ecology of these mysterious sharks. PMID:26460025

  13. Redefining the sponge-symbiont acquisition paradigm: Sponge microbes exhibit chemotaxis towards host-derived compounds.

    PubMed

    Tout, Jessica; Astudillo-García, Carmen; Taylor, Michael W; Tyson, Gene W; Stocker, Roman; Ralph, Peter J; Seymour, Justin R; Webster, Nicole S

    2017-09-11

    Marine sponges host stable and species-specific microbial symbionts that are thought to be acquired and maintained by the host through a combination of vertical transmission and filtration from the surrounding seawater. To assess whether the microbial symbionts also actively contribute to the establishment of these symbioses, we performed in situ experiments on Orpheus Island, Great Barrier Reef, to quantify the chemotactic responses of natural populations of seawater microorganisms towards cellular extracts of the reef sponge Rhopaloeides odorabile. Flow cytometry analysis revealed significant levels of microbial chemotaxis towards R. odorabile extracts and 16S rRNA gene amplicon pyrosequencing showed enrichment of 'sponge-specific' microbial phylotypes, including a cluster within the Gemmatimonadetes and another within the Actinobacteria. These findings infer a potential mechanism for how sponges can acquire bacterial symbionts from the surrounding environment and suggest an active role of the symbionts in finding their host. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved. © 2017 Society for Applied Microbiology and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  14. Cannabinoid-induced chemotaxis in bovine corneal epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Murataeva, Natalia; Li, Shimin; Oehler, Olivia; Miller, Sally; Dhopeshwarkar, Amey; Hu, Sherry Shu-Jung; Bonanno, Joseph A; Bradshaw, Heather; Mackie, Ken; McHugh, Douglas; Straiker, Alex

    2015-05-01

    Cannabinoid CB1 receptors are found in abundance in the vertebrate eye, with most tissue types expressing this receptor. However, the function of CB1 receptors in corneal epithelial cells (CECs) is poorly understood. Interestingly, the corneas of CB1 knockout mice heal more slowly after injury via a mechanism proposed to involve protein kinase B (Akt) activation, chemokinesis, and cell proliferation. The current study examined the role of cannabinoids in CEC migration in greater detail. We determined the role of CB1 receptors in corneal healing. We examined the consequences of their activation on migration and proliferation in bovine CECs (bCECs). We additionally examined the mRNA profile of cannabinoid-related genes and CB1 protein expression as well as CB1 signaling in bovine CECs. We now report that activation of CB1 with physiologically relevant concentrations of the synthetic agonist WIN55212-2 (WIN) induces bCEC migration via chemotaxis, an effect fully blocked by the CB1 receptor antagonist SR141716. The endogenous agonist 2-arachidonoylglycerol (2-AG) also enhances migration. Separately, mRNA for most cannabinoid-related proteins are present in bovine corneal epithelium and cultured bCECs. Notably absent are CB2 receptors and the 2-AG synthesizing enzyme diglycerol lipase-α (DAGLα). The signaling profile of CB1 activation is complex, with inactivation of mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK). Lastly, CB1 activation does not induce bCEC proliferation, but may instead antagonize EGF-induced proliferation. In summary, we find that CB1-based signaling machinery is present in bovine cornea and that activation of this system induces chemotaxis.

  15. Cannabinoid-Induced Chemotaxis in Bovine Corneal Epithelial Cells

    PubMed Central

    Murataeva, Natalia; Li, Shimin; Oehler, Olivia; Miller, Sally; Dhopeshwarkar, Amey; Hu, Sherry Shu-Jung; Bonanno, Joseph A.; Bradshaw, Heather; Mackie, Ken; McHugh, Douglas; Straiker, Alex

    2015-01-01

    Purpose. Cannabinoid CB1 receptors are found in abundance in the vertebrate eye, with most tissue types expressing this receptor. However, the function of CB1 receptors in corneal epithelial cells (CECs) is poorly understood. Interestingly, the corneas of CB1 knockout mice heal more slowly after injury via a mechanism proposed to involve protein kinase B (Akt) activation, chemokinesis, and cell proliferation. The current study examined the role of cannabinoids in CEC migration in greater detail. Methods. We determined the role of CB1 receptors in corneal healing. We examined the consequences of their activation on migration and proliferation in bovine CECs (bCECs). We additionally examined the mRNA profile of cannabinoid-related genes and CB1 protein expression as well as CB1 signaling in bovine CECs. Results. We now report that activation of CB1 with physiologically relevant concentrations of the synthetic agonist WIN55212-2 (WIN) induces bCEC migration via chemotaxis, an effect fully blocked by the CB1 receptor antagonist SR141716. The endogenous agonist 2-arachidonoylglycerol (2-AG) also enhances migration. Separately, mRNA for most cannabinoid-related proteins are present in bovine corneal epithelium and cultured bCECs. Notably absent are CB2 receptors and the 2-AG synthesizing enzyme diglycerol lipase-α (DAGLα). The signaling profile of CB1 activation is complex, with inactivation of mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK). Lastly, CB1 activation does not induce bCEC proliferation, but may instead antagonize EGF-induced proliferation. Conclusions. In summary, we find that CB1-based signaling machinery is present in bovine cornea and that activation of this system induces chemotaxis. PMID:26024113

  16. Mammalian target of rapamycin and Rictor control neutrophil chemotaxis by regulating Rac/Cdc42 activity and the actin cytoskeleton

    PubMed Central

    He, Yuan; Li, Dong; Cook, Sara L.; Yoon, Mee-Sup; Kapoor, Ashish; Rao, Christopher V.; Kenis, Paul J. A.; Chen, Jie; Wang, Fei

    2013-01-01

    Chemotaxis allows neutrophils to seek out sites of infection and inflammation. The asymmetric accumulation of filamentous actin (F-actin) at the leading edge provides the driving force for protrusion and is essential for the development and maintenance of neutrophil polarity. The mechanism that governs actin cytoskeleton dynamics and assembly in neutrophils has been extensively explored and is still not fully understood. By using neutrophil-like HL-60 cells, we describe a pivotal role for Rictor, a component of mammalian target of rapamycin complex 2 (mTORC2), in regulating assembly of the actin cytoskeleton during neutrophil chemotaxis. Depletion of mTOR and Rictor, but not Raptor, impairs actin polymerization, leading-edge establishment, and directional migration in neutrophils stimulated with chemoattractants. Of interest, depletion of mSin1, an integral component of mTORC2, causes no detectable defects in neutrophil polarity and chemotaxis. In addition, experiments with chemical inhibition and kinase-dead mutants indicate that mTOR kinase activity and AKT phosphorylation are dispensable for chemotaxis. Instead, our results suggest that the small Rho GTPases Rac and Cdc42 serve as downstream effectors of Rictor to regulate actin assembly and organization in neutrophils. Together our findings reveal an mTORC2- and mTOR kinase–independent function and mechanism of Rictor in the regulation of neutrophil chemotaxis. PMID:24006489

  17. Recent developments in microfluidics-based chemotaxis studies.

    PubMed

    Wu, Jiandong; Wu, Xun; Lin, Francis

    2013-07-07

    Microfluidic devices can better control cellular microenvironments compared to conventional cell migration assays. Over the past few years, microfluidics-based chemotaxis studies showed a rapid growth. New strategies were developed to explore cell migration in manipulated chemical gradients. In addition to expanding the use of microfluidic devices for a broader range of cell types, microfluidic devices were used to study cell migration and chemotaxis in complex environments. Furthermore, high-throughput microfluidic chemotaxis devices and integrated microfluidic chemotaxis systems were developed for medical and commercial applications. In this article, we review recent developments in microfluidics-based chemotaxis studies and discuss the new trends in this field observed over the past few years.

  18. Cyanobacterial chemotaxis to extracts of host and nonhost plants.

    PubMed

    Nilsson, Malin; Rasmussen, Ulla; Bergman, Birgitta

    2006-03-01

    Chemotaxis may be important when forming cyanobacterial symbioses. However, knowledge of cyanobacterial attraction towards plants and factors affecting chemotaxis is limited. Chemo-attraction was observed in Nostoc strains 8964:3 and PCC 73102 towards exudate or crushed extract of the natural hosts Gunnera manicata, Cycas revoluta and Blasia pusilla, and the nonhost plants Trifolium repens, Arabidopsis thaliana and Oryza sativa. As all tested plant extracts generated chemotaxis, the possibility to attract cyanobacteria may be widespread in plants. Chemotaxis was reduced by increased temperature and darkness and was stimulated by phosphorous and iron starvation and elevated salt concentration. Sugars (arabinose, galactose, and glucose) had a positive effect on chemotaxis, whereas flavonoids (chrysin and naringenin) and amino acids (methionine, glycine, serine, phenylalanine, glutamine, and lysine) had no effect.

  19. Calaxin drives sperm chemotaxis by Ca²⁺-mediated direct modulation of a dynein motor.

    PubMed

    Mizuno, Katsutoshi; Shiba, Kogiku; Okai, Masahiko; Takahashi, Yusuke; Shitaka, Yuji; Oiwa, Kazuhiro; Tanokura, Masaru; Inaba, Kazuo

    2012-12-11

    Sperm chemotaxis occurs widely in animals and plants and plays an important role in the success of fertilization. Several studies have recently demonstrated that Ca(2+) influx through specific Ca(2+) channels is a prerequisite for sperm chemotactic movement. However, the regulator that modulates flagellar movement in response to Ca(2+) is unknown. Here we show that a neuronal calcium sensor, calaxin, directly acts on outer-arm dynein and regulates specific flagellar movement during sperm chemotaxis. Calaxin inhibition resulted in significant loss of sperm chemotactic movement, despite normal increases in intracellular calcium concentration. Using a demembranated sperm model, we demonstrate that calaxin is essential for generation and propagation of Ca(2+)-induced asymmetric flagellar bending. An in vitro motility assay revealed that calaxin directly suppressed the velocity of microtubule sliding by outer-arm dynein at high Ca(2+) concentrations. This study describes the missing link between chemoattractant-mediated Ca(2+) signaling and motor-driven microtubule sliding during sperm chemotaxis.

  20. Constraints on Genome Dynamics Revealed from Gene Distribution among the Ralstonia solanacearum Species

    PubMed Central

    Lefeuvre, Pierre; Cellier, Gilles; Remenant, Benoît; Chiroleu, Frédéric; Prior, Philippe

    2013-01-01

    Because it is suspected that gene content may partly explain host adaptation and ecology of pathogenic bacteria, it is important to study factors affecting genome composition and its evolution. While recent genomic advances have revealed extremely large pan-genomes for some bacterial species, it remains difficult to predict to what extent gene pool is accessible within or transferable between populations. As genomes bear imprints of the history of the organisms, gene distribution pattern analyses should provide insights into the forces and factors at play in the shaping and maintaining of bacterial genomes. In this study, we revisited the data obtained from a previous CGH microarrays analysis in order to assess the genomic plasticity of the R. solanacearum species complex. Gene distribution analyses demonstrated the remarkably dispersed genome of R. solanacearum with more than half of the genes being accessory. From the reconstruction of the ancestral genomes compositions, we were able to infer the number of gene gain and loss events along the phylogeny. Analyses of gene movement patterns reveal that factors associated with gene function, genomic localization and ecology delineate gene flow patterns. While the chromosome displayed lower rates of movement, the megaplasmid was clearly associated with hot-spots of gene gain and loss. Gene function was also confirmed to be an essential factor in gene gain and loss dynamics with significant differences in movement patterns between different COG categories. Finally, analyses of gene distribution highlighted possible highways of horizontal gene transfer. Due to sampling and design bias, we can only speculate on factors at play in this gene movement dynamic. Further studies examining precise conditions that favor gene transfer would provide invaluable insights in the fate of bacteria, species delineation and the emergence of successful pathogens. PMID:23723974

  1. Distinct Domains of CheA Confer Unique Functions in Chemotaxis and Cell Length in Azospirillum brasilense Sp7.

    PubMed

    Gullett, Jessica M; Bible, Amber; Alexandre, Gladys

    2017-07-01

    Chemotaxis is the movement of cells in response to gradients of diverse chemical cues. Motile bacteria utilize a conserved chemotaxis signal transduction system to bias their motility and navigate through a gradient. A central regulator of chemotaxis is the histidine kinase CheA. This cytoplasmic protein interacts with membrane-bound receptors, which assemble into large polar arrays, to propagate the signal. In the alphaproteobacterium Azospirillum brasilense, Che1 controls transient increases in swimming speed during chemotaxis, but it also biases the cell length at division. However, the exact underlying molecular mechanisms for Che1-dependent control of multiple cellular behaviors are not known. Here, we identify specific domains of the CheA1 histidine kinase implicated in modulating each of these functions. We show that CheA1 is produced in two isoforms: a membrane-anchored isoform produced as a fusion with a conserved seven-transmembrane domain of unknown function (TMX) at the N terminus and a soluble isoform similar to prototypical CheA. Site-directed and deletion mutagenesis combined with behavioral assays confirm the role of CheA1 in chemotaxis and implicate the TMX domain in mediating changes in cell length. Fluorescence microscopy further reveals that the membrane-anchored isoform is distributed around the cell surface while the soluble isoform localizes at the cell poles. Together, the data provide a mechanism for the role of Che1 in controlling multiple unrelated cellular behaviors via acquisition of a new domain in CheA1 and production of distinct functional isoforms.IMPORTANCE Chemotaxis provides a significant competitive advantage to bacteria in the environment, and this function has been transferred laterally multiple times, with evidence of functional divergence in different genomic contexts. The molecular principles that underlie functional diversification of chemotaxis in various genomic contexts are unknown. Here, we provide a molecular

  2. A Model of Drosophila Larva Chemotaxis.

    PubMed

    Davies, Alex; Louis, Matthieu; Webb, Barbara

    2015-11-01

    Detailed observations of larval Drosophila chemotaxis have characterised the relationship between the odour gradient and the runs, head casts and turns made by the animal. We use a computational model to test whether hypothesised sensorimotor control mechanisms are sufficient to account for larval behaviour. The model combines three mechanisms based on simple transformations of the recent history of odour intensity at the head location. The first is an increased probability of terminating runs in response to gradually decreasing concentration, the second an increased probability of terminating head casts in response to rapidly increasing concentration, and the third a biasing of run directions up concentration gradients through modulation of small head casts. We show that this model can be tuned to produce behavioural statistics comparable to those reported for the larva, and that this tuning results in similar chemotaxis performance to the larva. We demonstrate that each mechanism can enable odour approach but the combination of mechanisms is most effective, and investigate how these low-level control mechanisms relate to behavioural measures such as the preference indices used to investigate larval learning behaviour in group assays.

  3. Microfluidic technologies for temporal perturbations of chemotaxis.

    PubMed

    Irimia, Daniel

    2010-08-15

    Most cells in the body have the ability to change their physical locations during physiologic or pathologic events such as inflammation, wound healing, or cancer. When cell migration is directed toward sources of cue chemicals, the process is known as chemotaxis, and it requires linking the sensing of chemicals through receptors on the surfaces of the cells to the directional activation of the motility apparatus inside the cells. This link is supported by complex intracellular signaling pathways, and although details regarding the nature of the molecules involved in the signal transduction are well established, far less is known about how different signaling molecules and processes are dynamically interconnected and how slower and faster signaling events take place simultaneously inside moving cells. In this context, advances in microfluidic technologies are enabling the emergence of new tools that facilitate the development of experimental protocols in which the cellular microenvironment is precisely controlled in time and space and in which signaling-associated changes inside cells can be quantitatively measured and compared. These tools could enable new insights into the intricacies of the biological systems that participate in chemotaxis processes and could have the potential to accelerate the development of novel therapeutic strategies to control cell motility and enhance our abilities for medical intervention during health and disease.

  4. Microfluidic Technologies for Temporal Perturbations of Chemotaxis

    PubMed Central

    Irimia, Daniel

    2011-01-01

    Most cells in the body have the ability to change their physical locations during physiologic or pathologic events such as inflammation, wound healing, or cancer. When cell migration is directed toward sources of cue chemicals, the process is known as chemotaxis, and it requires linking the sensing of chemicals through receptors on the surfaces of the cells to the directional activation of the motility apparatus inside the cells. This link is supported by complex intracellular signaling pathways, and although details regarding the nature of the molecules involved in the signal transduction are well established, far less is known about how different signaling molecules and processes are dynamically interconnected and how slower and faster signaling events take place simultaneously inside moving cells. In this context, advances in microfluidic technologies are enabling the emergence of new tools that facilitate the development of experimental protocols in which the cellular microenvironment is precisely controlled in time and space and in which signaling-associated changes inside cells can be quantitatively measured and compared. These tools could enable new insights into the intricacies of the biological systems that participate in chemotaxis processes and could have the potential to accelerate the development of novel therapeutic strategies to control cell motility and enhance our abilities for medical intervention during health and disease. PMID:20450351

  5. Colloidal motility and patterning by physical chemotaxis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palacci, Jeremie; Abecassis, Benjamin; Cottin-Bizonne, Cecile; Ybert, Christophe; Bocquet, Lyderic

    2009-11-01

    We developped a microfluidic setup to show the motility of colloids or biomolecules under a controlled salt gradient thanks to the diffusiophoresis phenomenon [1,2]. We can therefore mimic chemotaxis on simple physical basis with thrilling analogies with the biological chemotaxis of E. Coli bacteria: salt dependance of the velocity [3] and log-sensing behavior [4]. In addition with a temporally tunable gradient we show we can generate an effective osmotic potential to trap colloids or DNA. These experimental observations are supported by numerical simulations and an asymptotic ratchet model. Finally, we use these traps to generate various patterns and because concentration gradients are ubiquitous in nature, we question for the role of such a mecanism in morphogenesis [5] or positioning perspectives in cells [6]. [4pt] [1] B. Abecassis, C. Cottin-Bizonne, C. Ybert, A. Ajdari, and L. Bocquet, Nat. Mat., 7(10):785--789, 2008. [2] Anderson, Ann. Rev. Fluid Mech, 21, 1989. [3] Y. L. Qi and J. Adler, PNAS, 86(21):8358--8362, 1989. [4] Y. V. Kalinin, L. L. Jiang, Y. H. Tu, and M. M. Wu, Biophys. J., 96(6):2439--2448, 2009. [4] J. B. Moseley, A. Mayeux, A. Paoletti, and P. Nurse, Nat., 459(7248):857--U8, 2009. [6] L. Wolpert, Dev., 107:3--12, 1989

  6. Modeling Transverse Chemotaxis in Porous Media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Porter, M. L.; Valdés-Parada, F. J.; Wood, B. D.

    2009-12-01

    The movement of microorganisms toward a chemical attractant (chemotaxis) has been shown to aid in subsurface contaminant degradation and enhanced oil recovery. However, chemotaxis is inherently a pore scale process that must be upscaled to arrive at continuum scale models for field applications. In this work, the method of volume averaging is used to upscale the microscale chemotactic microbial transport equations in order to obtain the corresponding macroscale models for the mass balance of bacteria and the chemical attractant to which they respond. As a first approach, cellular growth/death and consumption of the attractant by chemical reaction are assumed to be negligible with respect to convective and diffusive transport mechanisms. Two effective medium coefficients are introduced in the model, namely a total motility tensor and a total velocity vector. Under certain conditions, it is shown that the coefficients can differ considerably from the values corresponding to non-chemotactic transport. The model is validated by comparing the predicted transverse motility coefficients and concentration profiles to those measured within an engineered porous medium. For the concentration profiles, we introduced a lag that accounts for the difference between the arrival time of the microorganisms and the their chemotactic response to the attractant.

  7. A Stochastic Description of Dictyostelium Chemotaxis

    PubMed Central

    Amselem, Gabriel; Theves, Matthias; Bae, Albert; Bodenschatz, Eberhard; Beta, Carsten

    2012-01-01

    Chemotaxis, the directed motion of a cell toward a chemical source, plays a key role in many essential biological processes. Here, we derive a statistical model that quantitatively describes the chemotactic motion of eukaryotic cells in a chemical gradient. Our model is based on observations of the chemotactic motion of the social ameba Dictyostelium discoideum, a model organism for eukaryotic chemotaxis. A large number of cell trajectories in stationary, linear chemoattractant gradients is measured, using microfluidic tools in combination with automated cell tracking. We describe the directional motion as the interplay between deterministic and stochastic contributions based on a Langevin equation. The functional form of this equation is directly extracted from experimental data by angle-resolved conditional averages. It contains quadratic deterministic damping and multiplicative noise. In the presence of an external gradient, the deterministic part shows a clear angular dependence that takes the form of a force pointing in gradient direction. With increasing gradient steepness, this force passes through a maximum that coincides with maxima in both speed and directionality of the cells. The stochastic part, on the other hand, does not depend on the orientation of the directional cue and remains independent of the gradient magnitude. Numerical simulations of our probabilistic model yield quantitative agreement with the experimental distribution functions. Thus our model captures well the dynamics of chemotactic cells and can serve to quantify differences and similarities of different chemotactic eukaryotes. Finally, on the basis of our model, we can characterize the heterogeneity within a population of chemotactic cells. PMID:22662138

  8. Optimality and saturation in axonal chemotaxis.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Jiajia; Chan, Stanley; Mortimer, Duncan; Nguyen, Huyen; Goodhill, Geoffrey J

    2013-04-01

    Chemotaxis (detecting and following chemical gradients) plays a crucial role in the function of many biological systems. In particular, gradient following by neuronal growth cones is important for the correct wiring of the nervous system. There is increasing interest in the constraints that determine how small chemotacting devices respond to gradients, but little quantitative information is available in this regard for neuronal growth cones. Mortimer et al. ( 2009 ) and Mortimer, Dayan, Burrage, and Goodhill ( 2011 ) proposed a Bayesian ideal observer model that predicts chemotactic performance for shallow gradients. Here we investigated two important aspects of this model. First, we found by numerical simulation that although the analytical predictions of the model assume shallow gradients, these predictions remain remarkably robust to large deviations in gradient steepness. Second, we found experimentally that the chemotactic response increased linearly with gradient steepness for very shallow gradients as predicted by the model; however, the response saturated for steeper gradients. This saturation could be reproduced in simulations of a growth rate modulation response mechanism. Together these results illuminate the domain of validity of the Bayesian model and give further insight into the biological mechanisms of axonal chemotaxis.

  9. Gene expression profiling in equine polysaccharide storage myopathy revealed inflammation, glycogenesis inhibition, hypoxia and mitochondrial dysfunctions

    PubMed Central

    Barrey, Eric; Mucher, Elodie; Jeansoule, Nicolas; Larcher, Thibaut; Guigand, Lydie; Herszberg, Bérénice; Chaffaux, Stéphane; Guérin, Gérard; Mata, Xavier; Benech, Philippe; Canale, Marielle; Alibert, Olivier; Maltere, Péguy; Gidrol, Xavier

    2009-01-01

    Background Several cases of myopathies have been observed in the horse Norman Cob breed. Muscle histology examinations revealed that some families suffer from a polysaccharide storage myopathy (PSSM). It is assumed that a gene expression signature related to PSSM should be observed at the transcriptional level because the glycogen storage disease could also be linked to other dysfunctions in gene regulation. Thus, the functional genomic approach could be conducted in order to provide new knowledge about the metabolic disorders related to PSSM. We propose exploring the PSSM muscle fiber metabolic disorders by measuring gene expression in relationship with the histological phenotype. Results Genotypying analysis of GYS1 mutation revealed 2 homozygous (AA) and 5 heterozygous (GA) PSSM horses. In the PSSM muscles, histological data revealed PAS positive amylase resistant abnormal polysaccharides, inflammation, necrosis, and lipomatosis and active regeneration of fibers. Ultrastructural evaluation revealed a decrease of mitochondrial number and structural disorders. Extensive accumulation of an abnormal polysaccharide displaced and partially replaced mitochondria and myofibrils. The severity of the disease was higher in the two homozygous PSSM horses. Gene expression analysis revealed 129 genes significantly modulated (p < 0.05). The following genes were up-regulated over 2 fold: IL18, CTSS, LUM, CD44, FN1, GST01. The most down-regulated genes were the following: mitochondrial tRNA, SLC2A2, PRKCα, VEGFα. Data mining analysis showed that protein synthesis, apoptosis, cellular movement, growth and proliferation were the main cellular functions significantly associated with the modulated genes (p < 0.05). Several up-regulated genes, especially IL18, revealed a severe muscular inflammation in PSSM muscles. The up-regulation of glycogen synthase kinase-3 (GSK3β) under its active form could be responsible for glycogen synthase (GYS1) inhibition and hypoxia-inducible factor

  10. Simple F Test Reveals Gene-Gene Interactions in Case-Control Studies

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Guanjie; Yuan, Ao; Zhou, Jie; Bentley, Amy R.; Adeyemo, Adebowale; Rotimi, Charles N.

    2012-01-01

    Missing heritability is still a challenge for Genome Wide Association Studies (GWAS). Gene-gene interactions may partially explain this residual genetic influence and contribute broadly to complex disease. To analyze the gene-gene interactions in case-control studies of complex disease, we propose a simple, non-parametric method that utilizes the F-statistic. This approach consists of three steps. First, we examine the joint distribution of a pair of SNPs in cases and controls separately. Second, an F-test is used to evaluate the ratio of dependence in cases to that of controls. Finally, results are adjusted for multiple tests. This method was used to evaluate gene-gene interactions that are associated with risk of Type 2 Diabetes among African Americans in the Howard University Family Study. We identified 18 gene-gene interactions (P < 0.0001). Compared with the commonly-used logistical regression method, we demonstrate that the F-ratio test is an efficient approach to measuring gene-gene interactions, especially for studies with limited sample size. PMID:22837643

  11. A parallel diffusion-based microfluidic device for bacterial chemotaxis analysis.

    PubMed

    Si, Guangwei; Yang, Wei; Bi, Shuangyu; Luo, Chunxiong; Ouyang, Qi

    2012-04-07

    We developed a multiple-channel microfluidic device for bacterial chemotaxis detection. Some characteristics such as easy operation, parallel sample adding design and fast result readout make this device convenient for most biology labs. The characteristic feature of the design is the agarose gel channels, which serve as a semi-permeable membrane. They can stop the fluid flow and prevent bacteria getting across, but permit the diffusion of small molecules. In the device fabrication process a novel thermal-based method was used to control the shape of agarose gel in the microfluidic channel. The chemical gradient is established by diffusion which can be precisely controlled and measured. Combined with an 8-channel pipette, different attractants, repellent chemicals or different bacteria were analyzed by a two step operation with a readout time of one hour. This device may be useful in the high throughput detection of chemotaxis related molecules and genes.

  12. Gene network reconstruction reveals cell cycle and antiviral genes as major drivers of cervical cancer

    PubMed Central

    Mine, Karina L.; Shulzhenko, Natalia; Yambartsev, Anatoly; Rochman, Mark; Sanson, Gerdine F. O.; Lando, Malin; Varma, Sudhir; Skinner, Jeff; Volfovsky, Natalia; Deng, Tao; Brenna, Sylvia M. F.; Carvalho, Carmen R. N.; Ribalta, Julisa C. L.; Bustin, Michael; Matzinger, Polly; Silva, Ismael D. C. G.; Lyng, Heidi; Gerbase-DeLima, Maria; Morgun, Andrey

    2014-01-01

    Although human papillomavirus (HPV) was identified as an etiological factor in cervical cancer, the key human gene drivers of this disease remain unknown. Here we apply an unbiased approach integrating gene expression and chromosomal aberration data. In an independent group of patients, we reconstruct and validate a gene regulatory meta-network, and identify cell cycle and antiviral genes that constitute two major sub-networks up-regulated in tumour samples. These genes are located within the same regions as chromosomal amplifications, most frequently on 3q. We propose a model in which selected chromosomal gains drive activation of antiviral genes contributing to episomal virus elimination, which synergizes with cell cycle dysregulation. These findings may help to explain the paradox of episomal HPV decline in women with invasive cancer who were previously unable to clear the virus. PMID:23651994

  13. Gene network reconstruction reveals cell cycle and antiviral genes as major drivers of cervical cancer.

    PubMed

    Mine, Karina L; Shulzhenko, Natalia; Yambartsev, Anatoly; Rochman, Mark; Sanson, Gerdine F O; Lando, Malin; Varma, Sudhir; Skinner, Jeff; Volfovsky, Natalia; Deng, Tao; Brenna, Sylvia M F; Carvalho, Carmen R N; Ribalta, Julisa C L; Bustin, Michael; Matzinger, Polly; Silva, Ismael D C G; Lyng, Heidi; Gerbase-DeLima, Maria; Morgun, Andrey

    2013-01-01

    Although human papillomavirus was identified as an aetiological factor in cervical cancer, the key human gene drivers of this disease remain unknown. Here we apply an unbiased approach integrating gene expression and chromosomal aberration data. In an independent group of patients, we reconstruct and validate a gene regulatory meta-network, and identify cell cycle and antiviral genes that constitute two major subnetworks upregulated in tumour samples. These genes are located within the same regions as chromosomal amplifications, most frequently on 3q. We propose a model in which selected chromosomal gains drive activation of antiviral genes contributing to episomal virus elimination, which synergizes with cell cycle dysregulation. These findings may help to explain the paradox of episomal human papillomavirus decline in women with invasive cancer who were previously unable to clear the virus.

  14. Genome-wide Generation and Systematic Phenotyping of Knockout Mice Reveals New Roles for Many Genes

    PubMed Central

    White, Jacqueline K.; Gerdin, Anna-Karin; Karp, Natasha A.; Ryder, Ed; Buljan, Marija; Bussell, James N.; Salisbury, Jennifer; Clare, Simon; Ingham, Neil J.; Podrini, Christine; Houghton, Richard; Estabel, Jeanne; Bottomley, Joanna R.; Melvin, David G.; Sunter, David; Adams, Niels C.; Baker, Lauren; Barnes, Caroline; Beveridge, Ryan; Cambridge, Emma; Carragher, Damian; Chana, Prabhjoat; Clarke, Kay; Hooks, Yvette; Igosheva, Natalia; Ismail, Ozama; Jackson, Hannah; Kane, Leanne; Lacey, Rosalind; Lafont, David Tino; Lucas, Mark; Maguire, Simon; McGill, Katherine; McIntyre, Rebecca E.; Messager, Sophie; Mottram, Lynda; Mulderrig, Lee; Pearson, Selina; Protheroe, Hayley J.; Roberson, Laura-Anne; Salsbury, Grace; Sanderson, Mark; Sanger, Daniel; Shannon, Carl; Thompson, Paul C.; Tuck, Elizabeth; Vancollie, Valerie E.; Brackenbury, Lisa; Bushell, Wendy; Cook, Ross; Dalvi, Priya; Gleeson, Diane; Habib, Bishoy; Hardy, Matt; Liakath-Ali, Kifayathullah; Miklejewska, Evelina; Price, Stacey; Sethi, Debarati; Trenchard, Elizabeth; von Schiller, Dominique; Vyas, Sapna; West, Anthony P.; Woodward, John; Wynn, Elizabeth; Evans, Arthur; Gannon, David; Griffiths, Mark; Holroyd, Simon; Iyer, Vivek; Kipp, Christian; Lewis, Morag; Li, Wei; Oakley, Darren; Richardson, David; Smedley, Damian; Agu, Chukwuma; Bryant, Jackie; Delaney, Liz; Gueorguieva, Nadia I.; Tharagonnet, Helen; Townsend, Anne J.; Biggs, Daniel; Brown, Ellen; Collinson, Adam; Dumeau, Charles-Etienne; Grau, Evelyn; Harrison, Sarah; Harrison, James; Ingle, Catherine E.; Kundi, Helen; Madich, Alla; Mayhew, Danielle; Metcalf, Tom; Newman, Stuart; Pass, Johanna; Pearson, Laila; Reynolds, Helen; Sinclair, Caroline; Wardle-Jones, Hannah; Woods, Michael; Alexander, Liam; Brown, Terry; Flack, Francesca; Frost, Carole; Griggs, Nicola; Hrnciarova, Silvia; Kirton, Andrea; McDermott, Jordan; Rogerson, Claire; White, Gemma; Zielezinski, Pawel; DiTommaso, Tia; Edwards, Andrew; Heath, Emma; Mahajan, Mary Ann; Yalcin, Binnaz; Tannahill, David; Logan, Darren W.; MacArthur, Daniel G.; Flint, Jonathan; Mahajan, Vinit B.; Tsang, Stephen H.; Smyth, Ian; Watt, Fiona M.; Skarnes, William C.; Dougan, Gordon; Adams, David J.; Ramirez-Solis, Ramiro; Bradley, Allan; Steel, Karen P.

    2013-01-01

    Summary Mutations in whole organisms are powerful ways of interrogating gene function in a realistic context. We describe a program, the Sanger Institute Mouse Genetics Project, that provides a step toward the aim of knocking out all genes and screening each line for a broad range of traits. We found that hitherto unpublished genes were as likely to reveal phenotypes as known genes, suggesting that novel genes represent a rich resource for investigating the molecular basis of disease. We found many unexpected phenotypes detected only because we screened for them, emphasizing the value of screening all mutants for a wide range of traits. Haploinsufficiency and pleiotropy were both surprisingly common. Forty-two percent of genes were essential for viability, and these were less likely to have a paralog and more likely to contribute to a protein complex than other genes. Phenotypic data and more than 900 mutants are openly available for further analysis. PaperClip PMID:23870131

  15. Preferential associations between co-regulated genes reveal a transcriptional interactome in erythroid cells.

    PubMed

    Schoenfelder, Stefan; Sexton, Tom; Chakalova, Lyubomira; Cope, Nathan F; Horton, Alice; Andrews, Simon; Kurukuti, Sreenivasulu; Mitchell, Jennifer A; Umlauf, David; Dimitrova, Daniela S; Eskiw, Christopher H; Luo, Yanquan; Wei, Chia-Lin; Ruan, Yijun; Bieker, James J; Fraser, Peter

    2010-01-01

    The discovery of interchromosomal interactions in higher eukaryotes points to a functional interplay between genome architecture and gene expression, challenging the view of transcription as a one-dimensional process. However, the extent of interchromosomal interactions and the underlying mechanisms are unknown. Here we present the first genome-wide analysis of transcriptional interactions using the mouse globin genes in erythroid tissues. Our results show that the active globin genes associate with hundreds of other transcribed genes, revealing extensive and preferential intra- and interchromosomal transcription interactomes. We show that the transcription factor Klf1 mediates preferential co-associations of Klf1-regulated genes at a limited number of specialized transcription factories. Our results establish a new gene expression paradigm, implying that active co-regulated genes and their regulatory factors cooperate to create specialized nuclear hot spots optimized for efficient and coordinated transcriptional control.

  16. Isolation of Hox Cluster Genes from Insects Reveals an Accelerated Sequence Evolution Rate

    PubMed Central

    Hadrys, Heike; Simon, Sabrina; Kaune, Barbara; Schmitt, Oliver; Schöner, Anja; Jakob, Wolfgang; Schierwater, Bernd

    2012-01-01

    Among gene families it is the Hox genes and among metazoan animals it is the insects (Hexapoda) that have attracted particular attention for studying the evolution of development. Surprisingly though, no Hox genes have been isolated from 26 out of 35 insect orders yet, and the existing sequences derive mainly from only two orders (61% from Hymenoptera and 22% from Diptera). We have designed insect specific primers and isolated 37 new partial homeobox sequences of Hox cluster genes (lab, pb, Hox3, ftz, Antp, Scr, abd-a, Abd-B, Dfd, and Ubx) from six insect orders, which are crucial to insect phylogenetics. These new gene sequences provide a first step towards comparative Hox gene studies in insects. Furthermore, comparative distance analyses of homeobox sequences reveal a correlation between gene divergence rate and species radiation success with insects showing the highest rate of homeobox sequence evolution. PMID:22685537

  17. Concurrent Growth Rate and Transcript Analyses Reveal Essential Gene Stringency in Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    Goh, Shan; Boberek, Jaroslaw M.; Nakashima, Nobutaka; Stach, Jem; Good, Liam

    2009-01-01

    Background Genes essential for bacterial growth are of particular scientific interest. Many putative essential genes have been identified or predicted in several species, however, little is known about gene expression requirement stringency, which may be an important aspect of bacterial physiology and likely a determining factor in drug target development. Methodology/Principal Findings Working from the premise that essential genes differ in absolute requirement for growth, we describe silencing of putative essential genes in E. coli to obtain a titration of declining growth rates and transcript levels by using antisense peptide nucleic acids (PNA) and expressed antisense RNA. The relationship between mRNA decline and growth rate decline reflects the degree of essentiality, or stringency, of an essential gene, which is here defined by the minimum transcript level for a 50% reduction in growth rate (MTL50). When applied to four growth essential genes, both RNA silencing methods resulted in MTL50 values that reveal acpP as the most stringently required of the four genes examined, with ftsZ the next most stringently required. The established antibacterial targets murA and fabI were less stringently required. Conclusions RNA silencing can reveal stringent requirements for gene expression with respect to growth. This method may be used to validate existing essential genes and to quantify drug target requirement. PMID:19557168

  18. Global Gene Expression and Focused Knockout Analysis Reveals Genes Associated with Fungal Fruiting Body Development in Neurospora crassa

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Zheng; Lopez-Giraldez, Francesc; Lehr, Nina; Farré, Marta; Common, Ralph; Trail, Frances

    2014-01-01

    Fungi can serve as highly tractable models for understanding genetic basis of sexual development in multicellular organisms. Applying a reverse-genetic approach to advance such a model, we used random and multitargeted primers to assay gene expression across perithecial development in Neurospora crassa. We found that functionally unclassified proteins accounted for most upregulated genes, whereas downregulated genes were enriched for diverse functions. Moreover, genes associated with developmental traits exhibited stage-specific peaks of expression. Expression increased significantly across sexual development for mating type gene mat a-1 and for mat A-1 specific pheromone precursor ccg-4. In addition, expression of a gene encoding a protein similar to zinc finger, stc1, was highly upregulated early in perithecial development, and a strain with a knockout of this gene exhibited arrest at the same developmental stage. A similar expression pattern was observed for genes in RNA silencing and signaling pathways, and strains with knockouts of these genes were also arrested at stages of perithecial development that paralleled their peak in expression. The observed stage specificity allowed us to correlate expression upregulation and developmental progression and to identify regulators of sexual development. Bayesian networks inferred from our expression data revealed previously known and new putative interactions between RNA silencing genes and pathways. Overall, our analysis provides a fine-scale transcriptomic landscape and novel inferences regarding the control of the multistage development process of sexual crossing and fruiting body development in N. crassa. PMID:24243796

  19. Weighted gene co-expression network analysis reveals key genes involved in pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma development.

    PubMed

    Giulietti, Matteo; Occhipinti, Giulia; Principato, Giovanni; Piva, Francesco

    2016-08-01

    Pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) is a highly aggressive malignancy. Up till now, the patient's prognosis remains poor which, among others, is due to the paucity of reliable early diagnostic biomarkers. In the past, candidate diagnostic biomarkers and therapeutic targets have been delineated from genes that were found to be differentially expressed in normal versus tumour samples. Recently, new systems biology approaches have been developed to analyse gene expression data, which may yield new biomarkers. As of yet, the weighted gene co-expression network analysis (WGCNA) tool has not been applied to PDAC microarray-based gene expression data. PDAC microarray-based gene expression datasets, listed in the Gene Expression Omnibus (GEO) database, were analysed. After pre-processing of the data, we built two final datasets, Normal and PDAC, encompassing 104 and 129 patient samples, respectively. Next, we constructed a weighted gene co-expression network and identified modules of co-expressed genes distinguishing normal from disease conditions. Functional annotations of the genes in these modules were carried out to highlight PDAC-associated molecular pathways and common regulatory mechanisms. Finally, overall survival analyses were carried out to assess the suitability of the genes identified as prognostic biomarkers. Using WGCNA, we identified several key genes that may play important roles in PDAC. These genes are mainly related to either endoplasmic reticulum, mitochondrion or membrane functions, exhibit transferase or hydrolase activities and are involved in biological processes such as lipid metabolism or transmembrane transport. As a validation of the applied method, we found that some of the identified key genes (CEACAM1, MCU, VDAC1, CYCS, C15ORF52, TMEM51, LARP1 and ERLIN2) have previously been reported by others as potential PDAC biomarkers. Using overall survival analyses, we found that several of the newly identified genes may serve as biomarkers to

  20. Transcriptome Analysis of Hamelia patens (Rubiaceae) Anthers Reveals Candidate Genes for Tapetum and Pollen Wall Development

    PubMed Central

    Yue, Lin; Twell, David; Kuang, Yanfeng; Liao, Jingping; Zhou, Xianqiang

    2017-01-01

    Studies of the anther transcriptome on non-model plants without a known genome are surprisingly scarce. RNA-Seq and digital gene expression (DGE) profiling provides a comprehensive approach to identify candidate genes contributing to developmental processes in non-model species. Here we built a transcriptome library of developing anthers of Hamelia patens and analyzed DGE profiles from each stage to identify genes that regulate tapetum and pollen development. In total 7,720 putative differentially expressed genes across four anther stages were identified. The number of putative stage-specific genes was: 776 at microspore mother cell stage, 807 at tetrad stage, 322 at uninucleate microspore stage, and the highest number (1,864) at bicellular pollen stage. GO enrichment analysis revealed 243 differentially expressed and 108 stage-specific genes that are potentially related to tapetum development, sporopollenin synthesis, and pollen wall. The number of expressed genes, their function and expression profiles were all significantly correlated with anther developmental processes. Overall comparisons of anther and pollen transcriptomes with those of rice and Arabidopsis together with the expression profiles of homologs of known anther-expressed genes, revealed conserved patterns and also divergence. The divergence may reflect taxon-specific differences in gene expression, the use RNA-seq as a more sensitive methodology, variation in tissue composition and sampling strategies. Given the lack of genomic sequence, this study succeeded in assigning putative identity to a significant proportion of anther-expressed genes and genes relevant to tapetum and pollen development in H. patens. The anther transcriptome revealed a molecular distinction between developmental stages, serving as a resource to unravel the functions of genes involved in anther development in H. patens and informing the analysis of other members of the Rubiaceae. PMID:28119704

  1. A genome-wide survey reveals abundant rice blast R genes in resistant cultivars.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xiaohui; Yang, Sihai; Wang, Jiao; Jia, Yanxiao; Huang, Ju; Tan, Shengjun; Zhong, Yan; Wang, Ling; Gu, Longjiang; Chen, Jian-Qun; Pan, Qinghua; Bergelson, Joy; Tian, Dacheng

    2015-10-01

    Plant resistance genes (R genes) harbor tremendous allelic diversity, constituting a robust immune system effective against microbial pathogens. Nevertheless, few functional R genes have been identified for even the best-studied pathosystems. Does this limited repertoire reflect specificity, with most R genes having been defeated by former pests, or do plants harbor a rich diversity of functional R genes, the composite behavior of which is yet to be characterized? Here, we survey 332 NBS-LRR genes cloned from five resistant Oryza sativa (rice) cultivars for their ability to confer recognition of 12 rice blast isolates when transformed into susceptible cultivars. Our survey reveals that 48.5% of the 132 NBS-LRR loci tested contain functional rice blast R genes, with most R genes deriving from multi-copy clades containing especially diversified loci. Each R gene recognized, on average, 2.42 of the 12 isolates screened. The abundant R genes identified in resistant genomes provide extraordinary redundancy in the ability of host genotypes to recognize particular isolates. If the same is true for other pathogens, many extant NBS-LRR genes retain functionality. Our success at identifying rice blast R genes also validates a highly efficient cloning and screening strategy.

  2. A genome-wide survey reveals abundant rice blast R-genes in resistant cultivars

    PubMed Central

    Tan, Shengjun; Zhong, Yan; Wang, Ling; Gu, Longjiang; Chen, Jian-Qun; Pan, Qinghua; Bergelson, Joy; Tian, Dacheng

    2015-01-01

    Summary Plant resistance genes (R-genes) harbor tremendous allelic diversity, constituting a robust immune system effective against microbial pathogens. Nevertheless, few functional R-genes have been identified for even the best-studied pathosystems. Does this limited repertoire reflect specificity, with most R-genes having been defeated by former pests, or do plants harbor a rich diversity of functional R-genes whose composite behavior is yet to be characterized? Here, we survey 332 NBS-LRR genes cloned from 5 resistant rice cultivars for their ability to confer recognition of 12 rice blast isolates when transformed into susceptible cultivars. Our survey reveals that 48.5% of the 132 NBS-LRR loci tested contain functional rice blast R-genes, with most R-genes deriving from multi-copy clades containing especially diversified loci. Each R-gene recognized, on average, 2.42 of the 12 isolates screened. The abundant R-genes identified in resistant genomes provide extraordinary redundancy in the ability of host genotypes to recognize particular isolates. If the same is true for other pathogens, many extant NBS-LRR genes retain functionality. Our success at identifying rice blast R-genes also validates a highly efficient cloning and screening strategy. PMID:26248689

  3. Gene expression profiling reveals epithelial mesenchymal transition (EMT) genes can selectively differentiate eribulin sensitive breast cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Dezső, Zoltán; Oestreicher, Judith; Weaver, Amy; Santiago, Stephanie; Agoulnik, Sergei; Chow, Jesse; Oda, Yoshiya; Funahashi, Yasuhiro

    2014-01-01

    Eribulin mesylate is a synthetic macrocyclic ketone analog of the marine sponge natural product halichondrin B. Eribulin is a mechanistically unique inhibitor of microtubule dynamics. In this study, we investigated whether selective signal pathways were associated with eribulin activity compared to paclitaxel, which stabilizes microtubules, based on gene expression profiling of cell line panels of breast, endometrial, and ovarian cancer in vitro. We determined the sets of genes that were differentially altered between eribulin and paclitaxel treatment in breast, endometrial, and ovarian cancer cell line panels. Our unsupervised clustering analyses revealed that expression profiles of gene sets altered with treatments were correlated with the in vitro antiproliferative activities of the drugs. Several tubulin isotypes had significantly lower expression in cell lines treated with eribulin compared to paclitaxel. Pathway enrichment analyses of gene sets revealed that the common pathways altered between treatments in the 3 cancer panels were related to cytoskeleton remodeling and cell cycle regulation. The epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) pathway was enriched in genes with significantly altered expression between the two drugs for breast and endometrial cancers, but not for ovarian cancer. Expression of genes from the EMT pathway correlated with eribulin sensitivity in breast cancer and with paclitaxel sensitivity in endometrial cancer. Alteration of expression profiles of EMT genes between sensitive and resistant cell lines allowed us to predict drug sensitivity for breast and endometrial cancers. Gene expression analysis showed that gene sets that were altered between eribulin and paclitaxel correlated with drug in vitro antiproliferative activities in breast and endometrial cancer cell line panels. Among the panels, breast cancer provided the strongest differentiation between eribulin and paclitaxel sensitivities based on gene expression. In addition, EMT

  4. Gene expression profiling of lobular carcinoma in situ reveals candidate precursor genes for invasion.

    PubMed

    Andrade, Victor P; Morrogh, Mary; Qin, Li-Xuan; Olvera, Narciso; Giri, Dilip; Muhsen, Shirin; Sakr, Rita A; Schizas, Michail; Ng, Charlotte K Y; Arroyo, Crispinita D; Brogi, Edi; Viale, Agnes; Morrow, Monica; Reis-Filho, Jorge S; King, Tari A

    2015-04-01

    Lobular carcinoma in situ (LCIS) is both a risk indicator and non-obligate precursor of invasive lobular carcinoma (ILC). We sought to characterize the transcriptomic features of LCIS and ILC, with a focus on the identification of intrinsic molecular subtypes of LCIS and the changes involved in the progression from normal breast epithelium to LCIS and ILC. Fresh-frozen classic LCIS, classic ILC, and normal breast epithelium (N) from women undergoing prophylactic or therapeutic mastectomy were prospectively collected, laser-capture microdissected, and subjected to gene expression profiling using Affymetrix HG-U133A 2.0 microarrays. Unsupervised hierarchical clustering of 40 LCIS samples identified 2 clusters of LCIS distinguished by 6431 probe sets (p < 0.001). Genes identifying the clusters included proliferation genes and other genes related to cancer canonical pathways such as TGF beta signaling, p53 signaling, actin cytoskeleton, apoptosis and Wnt-Signaling pathway. A supervised analysis to identify differentially expressed genes (p < 0.001) between normal epithelium, LCIS, and ILC, using 23 patient-matched triplets of N, LCIS, and ILC, identified 169 candidate precursor genes, which likely play a role in LCIS progression, including PIK3R1, GOLM1, and GPR137B. These potential precursor genes map significantly more frequently to 1q and 16q, regions frequently targeted by gene copy number alterations in LCIS and ILC. Here we demonstrate that classic LCIS is a heterogeneous disease at the transcriptomic level and identify potential precursor genes in lobular carcinogenesis. Understanding the molecular heterogeneity of LCIS and the potential role of these potential precursor genes may help personalize the therapy of patients with LCIS. Copyright © 2014 Federation of European Biochemical Societies. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Regulation of Distinct Attractive and Aversive Mechanisms Mediating Benzaldehyde Chemotaxis in Caenorhabditis elegans

    PubMed Central

    Nuttley, William M.; Harbinder, Singh; van der Kooy, Derek

    2001-01-01

    Olfactory-mediated chemotaxis in nematodes provides a relatively simple system to study biological mechanisms of information processing. Analysis of the kinetics of chemotaxis in response to 100% benzaldehyde revealed an initial attractive response that is followed by a strong aversion to the odorant. We show that this behavior is mediated by two genetically separable attraction- and aversion-mediating response pathways. The attraction initially dominates behavior but with prolonged exposure habituation leads to a behavioral change, such that the odorant becomes repulsive. This olfactory habituation is susceptible to dishabituation, thereby re-establishing the attractive response to the odorant. Re-examination of the putative olfactory adaptation mutant adp-1(ky20) revealed that the phenotype observed in this line is due to a supersensitivity to a dishabituating stimulus, rather than a defect in the adaptation to odorants per se. A modified benzaldehyde chemotaxis assay was developed and used for the isolation of a mutant with a specific defect in habituation kinetics, expressed as a persistence of the attractive response. PMID:11390637

  6. Systematic Prioritization and Integrative Analysis of Copy Number Variations in Schizophrenia Reveal Key Schizophrenia Susceptibility Genes

    PubMed Central

    Luo, Xiongjian; Huang, Liang; Han, Leng; Luo, Zhenwu; Hu, Fang; Tieu, Roger; Gan, Lin

    2014-01-01

    Schizophrenia is a common mental disorder with high heritability and strong genetic heterogeneity. Common disease-common variants hypothesis predicts that schizophrenia is attributable in part to common genetic variants. However, recent studies have clearly demonstrated that copy number variations (CNVs) also play pivotal roles in schizophrenia susceptibility and explain a proportion of missing heritability. Though numerous CNVs have been identified, many of the regions affected by CNVs show poor overlapping among different studies, and it is not known whether the genes disrupted by CNVs contribute to the risk of schizophrenia. By using cumulative scoring, we systematically prioritized the genes affected by CNVs in schizophrenia. We identified 8 top genes that are frequently disrupted by CNVs, including NRXN1, CHRNA7, BCL9, CYFIP1, GJA8, NDE1, SNAP29, and GJA5. Integration of genes affected by CNVs with known schizophrenia susceptibility genes (from previous genetic linkage and association studies) reveals that many genes disrupted by CNVs are also associated with schizophrenia. Further protein-protein interaction (PPI) analysis indicates that protein products of genes affected by CNVs frequently interact with known schizophrenia-associated proteins. Finally, systematic integration of CNVs prioritization data with genetic association and PPI data identifies key schizophrenia candidate genes. Our results provide a global overview of genes impacted by CNVs in schizophrenia and reveal a densely interconnected molecular network of de novo CNVs in schizophrenia. Though the prioritized top genes represent promising schizophrenia risk genes, further work with different prioritization methods and independent samples is needed to confirm these findings. Nevertheless, the identified key candidate genes may have important roles in the pathogenesis of schizophrenia, and further functional characterization of these genes may provide pivotal targets for future therapeutics and

  7. Systematic prioritization and integrative analysis of copy number variations in schizophrenia reveal key schizophrenia susceptibility genes.

    PubMed

    Luo, Xiongjian; Huang, Liang; Han, Leng; Luo, Zhenwu; Hu, Fang; Tieu, Roger; Gan, Lin

    2014-11-01

    Schizophrenia is a common mental disorder with high heritability and strong genetic heterogeneity. Common disease-common variants hypothesis predicts that schizophrenia is attributable in part to common genetic variants. However, recent studies have clearly demonstrated that copy number variations (CNVs) also play pivotal roles in schizophrenia susceptibility and explain a proportion of missing heritability. Though numerous CNVs have been identified, many of the regions affected by CNVs show poor overlapping among different studies, and it is not known whether the genes disrupted by CNVs contribute to the risk of schizophrenia. By using cumulative scoring, we systematically prioritized the genes affected by CNVs in schizophrenia. We identified 8 top genes that are frequently disrupted by CNVs, including NRXN1, CHRNA7, BCL9, CYFIP1, GJA8, NDE1, SNAP29, and GJA5. Integration of genes affected by CNVs with known schizophrenia susceptibility genes (from previous genetic linkage and association studies) reveals that many genes disrupted by CNVs are also associated with schizophrenia. Further protein-protein interaction (PPI) analysis indicates that protein products of genes affected by CNVs frequently interact with known schizophrenia-associated proteins. Finally, systematic integration of CNVs prioritization data with genetic association and PPI data identifies key schizophrenia candidate genes. Our results provide a global overview of genes impacted by CNVs in schizophrenia and reveal a densely interconnected molecular network of de novo CNVs in schizophrenia. Though the prioritized top genes represent promising schizophrenia risk genes, further work with different prioritization methods and independent samples is needed to confirm these findings. Nevertheless, the identified key candidate genes may have important roles in the pathogenesis of schizophrenia, and further functional characterization of these genes may provide pivotal targets for future therapeutics and

  8. Primer Sets Developed for Functional Genes Reveal Shifts in Functionality of Fungal Community in Soils.

    PubMed

    Hannula, S Emilia; van Veen, Johannes A

    2016-01-01

    Phylogenetic diversity of soil microbes is a hot topic at the moment. However, the molecular tools for the assessment of functional diversity in the fungal community are less developed than tools based on genes encoding the ribosomal operon. Here 20 sets of primers targeting genes involved mainly in carbon cycling were designed and/or validated and the functioning of soil fungal communities along a chronosequence of land abandonment from agriculture was evaluated using them. We hypothesized that changes in fungal community structure during secondary succession would lead to difference in the types of genes present in soils and that these changes would be directional. We expected an increase in genes involved in degradation of recalcitrant organic matter in time since agriculture. Out of the investigated genes, the richness of the genes related to carbon cycling was significantly higher in fields abandoned for longer time. The composition of six of the genes analyzed revealed significant differences between fields abandoned for shorter and longer time. However, all genes revealed significant variance over the fields studied, and this could be related to other parameters than the time since agriculture such as pH, organic matter, and the amount of available nitrogen. Contrary to our initial hypothesis, the genes significantly different between fields were not related to the decomposition of more recalcitrant matter but rather involved in degradation of cellulose and hemicellulose.

  9. Primer Sets Developed for Functional Genes Reveal Shifts in Functionality of Fungal Community in Soils

    PubMed Central

    Hannula, S. Emilia; van Veen, Johannes A.

    2016-01-01

    Phylogenetic diversity of soil microbes is a hot topic at the moment. However, the molecular tools for the assessment of functional diversity in the fungal community are less developed than tools based on genes encoding the ribosomal operon. Here 20 sets of primers targeting genes involved mainly in carbon cycling were designed and/or validated and the functioning of soil fungal communities along a chronosequence of land abandonment from agriculture was evaluated using them. We hypothesized that changes in fungal community structure during secondary succession would lead to difference in the types of genes present in soils and that these changes would be directional. We expected an increase in genes involved in degradation of recalcitrant organic matter in time since agriculture. Out of the investigated genes, the richness of the genes related to carbon cycling was significantly higher in fields abandoned for longer time. The composition of six of the genes analyzed revealed significant differences between fields abandoned for shorter and longer time. However, all genes revealed significant variance over the fields studied, and this could be related to other parameters than the time since agriculture such as pH, organic matter, and the amount of available nitrogen. Contrary to our initial hypothesis, the genes significantly different between fields were not related to the decomposition of more recalcitrant matter but rather involved in degradation of cellulose and hemicellulose. PMID:27965632

  10. Cross-species transcriptomic approach reveals genes in hamster implantation sites.

    PubMed

    Lei, Wei; Herington, Jennifer; Galindo, Cristi L; Ding, Tianbing; Brown, Naoko; Reese, Jeff; Paria, Bibhash C

    2014-12-01

    The mouse model has greatly contributed to understanding molecular mechanisms involved in the regulation of progesterone (P4) plus estrogen (E)-dependent blastocyst implantation process. However, little is known about contributory molecular mechanisms of the P4-only-dependent blastocyst implantation process that occurs in species such as hamsters, guineapigs, rabbits, pigs, rhesus monkeys, and perhaps humans. We used the hamster as a model of P4-only-dependent blastocyst implantation and carried out cross-species microarray (CSM) analyses to reveal differentially expressed genes at the blastocyst implantation site (BIS), in order to advance the understanding of molecular mechanisms of implantation. Upregulation of 112 genes and downregulation of 77 genes at the BIS were identified using a mouse microarray platform, while use of the human microarray revealed 62 up- and 38 down-regulated genes at the BIS. Excitingly, a sizable number of genes (30 up- and 11 down-regulated genes) were identified as a shared pool by both CSMs. Real-time RT-PCR and in situ hybridization validated the expression patterns of several up- and down-regulated genes identified by both CSMs at the hamster and mouse BIS to demonstrate the merit of CSM findings across species, in addition to revealing genes specific to hamsters. Functional annotation analysis found that genes involved in the spliceosome, proteasome, and ubiquination pathways are enriched at the hamster BIS, while genes associated with tight junction, SAPK/JNK signaling, and PPARα/RXRα signalings are repressed at the BIS. Overall, this study provides a pool of genes and evidence of their participation in up- and down-regulated cellular functions/pathways at the hamster BIS. © 2014 Society for Reproduction and Fertility.

  11. Population and Functional Genomics of Neisseria Revealed with Gene-by-Gene Approaches

    PubMed Central

    Harrison, Odile B.

    2016-01-01

    Rapid low-cost whole-genome sequencing (WGS) is revolutionizing microbiology; however, complementary advances in accessible, reproducible, and rapid analysis techniques are required to realize the potential of these data. Here, investigations of the genus Neisseria illustrated the gene-by-gene conceptual approach to the organization and analysis of WGS data. Using the gene and its link to phenotype as a starting point, the BIGSdb database, which powers the PubMLST databases, enables the assembly of large open-access collections of annotated genomes that provide insight into the evolution of the Neisseria, the epidemiology of meningococcal and gonococcal disease, and mechanisms of Neisseria pathogenicity. PMID:27098959

  12. Microscopy assays for evaluation of mast cell migration and chemotaxis.

    PubMed

    Bambousková, Monika; Hájková, Zuzana; Dráber, Pavel; Dráber, Petr

    2014-01-01

    A better understanding of the molecular mechanisms leading to mast cell migration and chemotaxis is the long-term goal in mast cell research and is essential for comprehension of mast cell function in health and disease. Various techniques have been developed in recent decades for in vitro and in vivo assessment of mast cell motility and chemotaxis. In this chapter three microscopy assays facilitating real-time quantification of mast cell chemotaxis and migration are described, focusing on individual cell tracking and data analysis.

  13. Method for analysis of nanoparticle effects on cellular chemotaxis.

    PubMed

    Skoczen, Sarah L; Potter, Timothy M; Dobrovolskaia, Marina A

    2011-01-01

    Chemotaxis is the phenomenon in which cells direct their movements in the presence of certain chemicals (chemoattractants or chemorepellents). Leukocyte recruitment (via chemotaxis) is an important component of the inflammatory response, both in physiological host defense and in a range of prevalent disorders that include an inflammatory component. Circulating leukocytes in the bloodstream migrate towards the site of inflammation in response to a complex network of proinflammatory signaling molecules (including cytokines, chemokines and prostaglandins). This chapter describes a method for rapid measure of the chemoattractant capacity of nanoparticulate materials. This method is an in vitro model for chemotaxis, in which promyelocytic leukemia cell migration through a filter is monitored using a fluorescent dye.

  14. Chemotaxis to Excitable Waves in Dictyostelium Discoideum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhowmik, Arpan; Rappel, Wouter-Jan; Levine, Herbert

    In recent years, there have been significant advances in our understanding of the mechanisms underlying chemically directed motility by eukaryotic cells such as Dictyostelium. In particular, the LEGI model has proven capable of providing a framework for quantitatively explaining many experiments that present Dictyostelium cells with tailored chemical stimuli and monitor their subsequent polarization. Here, we couple the LEGI approach to an excitable medium model of the cAMP wave-field that is self-generated by the cells and investigate the extent to which this class of models enables accurate chemotaxis to the cAMP waveforms expected in vivo. Our results indicate that the ultra-sensitive version of the model does an excellent job in providing natural wave rectification, thereby providing a compelling solution to the ``back-of-the-wave paradox'' during cellular aggregation. This work was supported by National Institutes of Health Grant P01 GM078586.

  15. Precise adaptation in chemotaxis through ``assistance neighborhoods"

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Endres, Robert; Wingreen, Ned

    2006-03-01

    The chemotaxis network in Escherichia coli is remarkable for its sensitivity to small relative changes in the concentrations of multiple chemical signals over a broad range of ambient concentrations. Key to this sensitivity is an adaptation system that relies on methylation and demethylation/deamidation of specific modification sites of the chemoreceptors by the enzymes CheR and CheB, respectively. These enzymes can access 5-7 receptors once tethered to a particular receptor. Based on these ``assistance neighborhoods'', we present a model for precise adaptation of mixed clusters of two-state chemoreceptors. In agreement with experiment the response of adapted cells to addition/removal of attractant scales with the free-energy change at fixed ligand affinity. Our model further predicts two possible limits of precise adaptation: either the response to further addition of attractant stops through saturation of the receptors, or receptors fully methylate before they saturate and therefore stop adapting.

  16. Networked Chemoreceptors Benefit Bacterial Chemotaxis Performance

    PubMed Central

    Frank, Vered; Piñas, Germán E.; Cohen, Harel; Parkinson, John S.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Motile bacteria use large receptor arrays to detect and follow chemical gradients in their environment. Extended receptor arrays, composed of networked signaling complexes, promote cooperative stimulus control of their associated signaling kinases. Here, we used structural lesions at the communication interface between core complexes to create an Escherichia coli strain with functional but dispersed signaling complexes. This strain allowed us to directly study how networking of signaling complexes affects chemotactic signaling and gradient-tracking performance. We demonstrate that networking of receptor complexes provides bacterial cells with about 10-fold-heightened detection sensitivity to attractants while maintaining a wide dynamic range over which receptor adaptational modifications can tune response sensitivity. These advantages proved especially critical for chemotaxis toward an attractant source under conditions in which bacteria are unable to alter the attractant gradient. PMID:27999161

  17. Chemotaxis in P. Aeruginosa Biofilm Formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bienvenu, Samuel; Strain, Shinji; Thatcher, Travis; Gordon, Vernita

    2010-10-01

    Pseudomonas biofilms form infections in the lungs of Cystic Fibrosis (CF) patients that damage lung tissue and lead to death. Previous work shows chemotaxis is important for Pseudomonas in CF lungs. The work studied swimming bacteria at high concentrations. In contrast, medically relevant biofilms initiate from sparse populations of surface-bound bacteria. The recent development of software techniques for automated, high-throughput bacteria tracking leaves us well-poised to quantitatively study these chemotactic conditions. We will develop experimental systems for such studies, focusing on L-Arginine (an amino acid), D-Galactose (a sugar present in lungs), and succinate and glucose (carbon sources for bacteria). This suite of chemoattractants will allow us to study how chemoattractant characteristics--size and diffusion behavior--change bacterial response; the interaction of competing chemoattractants; and, differences in bacterial behaviors, like motility modes, in response to different types of chemoattractions and varying neighbor cell density.

  18. Lattice-Boltzmann model for bacterial chemotaxis.

    PubMed

    Hilpert, Markus

    2005-09-01

    We present a new numerical approach for modeling bacterial chemotaxis and the fate and transport of a chemoattractant in bulk liquids. This Lattice-Boltzmann method represents the microorganisms and the chemoattractant by quasi-particles that move, collide, and react with each other on a two-dimensional numerical lattice. We use the model to simulate traveling bands of bacteria along self-generated gradients in substrate concentration in bulk liquids. Particularly, we simulate Pseudomonas putida that respond chemotactically to naphthalene dissolved in water. We find that only a fraction of a bacterial slug injected into a domain containing the chemoattractant at constant concentration forms a traveling band as the slug length exceeds a critical value. An expanding bacterial ring forms as one injects a droplet of bacteria into a two-dimensional domain.

  19. Bacterial motility and chemotaxis in shear

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rusconi, Roberto; Guasto, Jeffrey S.; Son, Kwangmin; Stocker, Roman

    2011-11-01

    Bacteria often exhibit directed motility (``taxis'') in response to gradients of dissolved resources, like nutrients or oxygen. While we have a detailed understanding of chemotaxis in quiescent environments, it has been largely overlooked how this behavior is affected by fluid flow, despite the ubiquity of flow in bacterial habitats. Here we present experiments on aerotaxis (attraction to dissolved oxygen) of Bacillus subtilis in controlled shear flows. Using novel microfluidic devices we expose bacterial suspensions to steady oxygen gradients, with independent control over shear rates. From single-cell trajectories and the spatial distribution of bacteria, we show that the cell rotation induced by shear reduces the aerotactic performance, demonstrating that hydrodynamic conditions affect bacterial fitness.

  20. Chemotaxis of Azospirillum species to aromatic compounds

    SciTech Connect

    Lopez-de-Victoria, G.; Lovell, C.R. )

    1993-09-01

    Azospirillum sspeciesare free-living nitrogen fixing bacteria commonly found in soils and in association with plant roots, including important agricultural crops. Rhizosphere colonization my Azospirillum species has been shown to stimulate growth of a variety of plant species. Chemotaxis is one of the properties which may contribute to survival, rhizosphere colonization and the initiation of mutualistic interactions by Azospirillum species. This study evaluates the chemotactic responses of three Azospirillum stains to a variety of aromatic compounds:benzoate, catechol, 4-HB, and PCA. Results indicate that the same aromatic substance can elicit different chemotactic responses from different Azospirillum species, and that Azospirillum can detect aromatic substrates at concentrations similar to those they encounter naturally. 36 refs., 1 fig., 6 tabs.

  1. Identification and Characterization of a Putative Chemotaxis Protein, CheY, from the Oral Pathogen Campylobacter rectus

    PubMed Central

    LaGier, Michael J.; Bilokopytov, Ihor; Cockerill, Bradley; Threadgill, Deborah S.

    2014-01-01

    Campylobacter rectus is an understudied oral bacterium that contributes to periodontitis. Processes that contribute to the disease-causing capabilities of pathogens, such as chemotaxis, are largely unknown in C. rectus. The aim of this study was to better understand C. rectus chemotaxis, by examining the C. rectus genome for the presence of a cheY gene. CheY proteins play a part in chemotaxis by acting as two-component response regulators. Significantly, CheY proteins from several pathogens, including the related species Campylobacter jejuni, have been shown to contribute to bacterial virulence. Degenerate PCR, RT-PCR, sequence analyses, and structural modeling showed that C. rectus encodes a gene (Cr-CheY) which shares significant homology with previously characterized CheY proteins. Functional studies of a recombinant form of the protein supports a likely role of Cr-CheY in C. rectus chemotaxis. Cr-CheY is the first CheY characterized from the oral campylobacters. PMID:25598863

  2. The Vibrio cholerae ToxR Regulon Encodes Host-Specific Chemotaxis Proteins that Function in Intestinal Colonization.

    PubMed

    Selvaraj, Pradeep; Gupta, Rohit; Peterson, Kenneth M

    Virulence gene regulation in Vibrio cholerae is under the control of the ToxR-ToxT regulatory cascade. Chemotaxis and net motility have been shown to influence the infectivity of Vibrio cholerae. V. cholerae toxR mutants do not synthesize proteins required for chemotaxis towards mucus. The inability of the toxR mutant strain to recognize and swim towards mucus is due to their failure to synthesize AcfB, a methyl-accepting chemotaxis protein. AcfB has previously been shown to be involved in intestinal colonization using the infant mouse model of cholera infection. Wild type V. cholerae recognizes galactose-6-sulfate in the capillary tube assay whereas V. cholerae acfB mutants fail to migrate into the capillary tubes. Vibrio strains carrying a mutation in tcpI, a ToxR regulated gene found within the Vibrio Pathogenicity Island (VPI), which encodes a methyl accepting chemotaxis protein are fully chemotactic towards mucus and galactose-6-sulfate.

  3. The importance of motility and chemotaxis for extra-animal survival of Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium and Dublin.

    PubMed

    Olsen, J E; Hoegh-Andersen, K H; Casadesús, J; Thomsen, L E

    2012-09-01

    This study investigated the importance of flagella and motility of Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium and Dublin in models of extra-animal survival. The study was performed using transposon mutants in flagella genes fliC and fljB and in chemotaxis genes cheA, cheB and cheR. Flagella and chemotaxis were found to be of minor importance for attachment to plant leaves, survival in liquid manure and interaction with the nematode C. elegans, while differences were observed between the fliC mutant and the wild-type strain of S. Dublin in interactions with amoebae. The study shows that flagella and chemotaxis play a minor role in extra-animal survival of these two serovars of Salmonella under the conditions tested. Extra-animal survival is important in the full infection cycle for zoonotic salmonellae. Such serovars are motile. Even though the current study was only based on the characterization of two serovars, it strongly suggests that motility and chemotaxis are of minor importance during the spread of Salmonella from one animal to the next through the external environment. © 2012 The Authors Journal of Applied Microbiology © 2012 The Society for Applied Microbiology.

  4. Gene set enrichment analyses revealed differences in gene expression patterns between males and females.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Wei; Huang, R Stephanie; Duan, Shiwei; Dolan, M Eileen

    2009-01-01

    Men and women differ not only in their physical attributes and reproductive functions but also in many other characteristics, including the risks for some diseases as well as response to certain therapeutic treatments. Though genetically-identical for autosomal chromosomes, males and females could have gender-specific transcriptional or translational regulation, leading to differential mRNAs or protein products for some genes. To illustrate the gender-specific differences in mRNA-level expression, we compared gene expression patterns between males and females using a whole-genome microarray dataset on the unrelated HapMap lymphoblastoid cell lines derived from individuals of European (58 individuals) and African (59 individuals) ancestry. We applied the Gene Set Enrichment Analysis to identify any overrepresented predefined gene sets in either men or women. Distinct patterns of upregulation and downregulation of certain chromoSomal regions and other gene sets such as targets for certain microRNAs and transcription factors were identified in males or females, suggesting their potential roles in defining the gender-specific phenotypes. Gender-specific patterns of gene expression also appeared to be different between these two populations.

  5. Identification of Archaea-specific chemotaxis proteins which interact with the flagellar apparatus

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Background Archaea share with bacteria the ability to bias their movement towards more favorable locations, a process known as taxis. Two molecular systems drive this process: the motility apparatus and the chemotaxis signal transduction system. The first consists of the flagellum, the flagellar motor, and its switch, which allows cells to reverse the rotation of flagella. The second targets the flagellar motor switch in order to modulate the switching frequency in response to external stimuli. While the signal transduction system is conserved throughout archaea and bacteria, the archaeal flagellar apparatus is different from the bacterial one. The proteins constituting the flagellar motor and its switch in archaea have not yet been identified, and the connection between the bacterial-like chemotaxis signal transduction system and the archaeal motility apparatus is unknown. Results Using protein-protein interaction analysis, we have identified three proteins in Halobacterium salinarum that interact with the chemotaxis (Che) proteins CheY, CheD, and CheC2, as well as the flagella accessory (Fla) proteins FlaCE and FlaD. Two of the proteins belong to the protein family DUF439, the third is a HEAT_PBS family protein. In-frame deletion strains for all three proteins were generated and analyzed as follows: a) photophobic responses were measured by a computer-based cell tracking system b) flagellar rotational bias was determined by dark-field microscopy, and c) chemotactic behavior was analyzed by a swarm plate assay. Strains deleted for the HEAT_PBS protein or one of the DUF439 proteins proved unable to switch the direction of flagellar rotation. In these mutants, flagella rotate only clockwise, resulting in exclusively forward swimming cells that are unable to respond to tactic signals. Deletion of the second DUF439 protein had only minimal effects. HEAT_PBS proteins could be identified in the chemotaxis gene regions of all motile haloarchaea sequenced so far, but not

  6. Identification of horizontally transferred genes in the genus Colletotrichum reveals a steady tempo of bacterial to fungal gene transfer.

    PubMed

    Jaramillo, Vinicio D Armijos; Sukno, Serenella A; Thon, Michael R

    2015-01-02

    Horizontal gene transfer (HGT) is the stable transmission of genetic material between organisms by means other than vertical inheritance. HGT has an important role in the evolution of prokaryotes but is relatively rare in eukaryotes. HGT has been shown to contribute to virulence in eukaryotic pathogens. We studied the importance of HGT in plant pathogenic fungi by identifying horizontally transferred genes in the genomes of three members of the genus Colletotrichum. We identified eleven HGT events from bacteria into members of the genus Colletotrichum or their ancestors. The HGT events include genes involved in amino acid, lipid and sugar metabolism as well as lytic enzymes. Additionally, the putative minimal dates of transference were calculated using a time calibrated phylogenetic tree. This analysis reveals a constant flux of genes from bacteria to fungi throughout the evolution of subphylum Pezizomycotina. Genes that are typically transferred by HGT are those that are constantly subject to gene duplication and gene loss. The functions of some of these genes suggest roles in niche adaptation and virulence. We found no evidence of a burst of HGT events coinciding with major geological events. In contrast, HGT appears to be a constant, albeit rare phenomenon in the Pezizomycotina, occurring at a steady rate during their evolution.

  7. Sequence analysis of the ERCC2 gene regions in human, mouse, and hamster reveals three linked genes.

    PubMed

    Lamerdin, J E; Stilwagen, S A; Ramirez, M H; Stubbs, L; Carrano, A V

    1996-06-15

    The ERCC2 (excision repair cross-complementing rodent repair group 2) gene product is involved in transcription-coupled repair as an integral member of the basal transcription factor BTF2/TFIIH complex. Defects in this gene can result in three distinct human disorders, namely the cancer-prone syndrome xeroderma pigmentosum complementation group D, trichothiodystrophy, and Cockayne syndrome. We report the comparative analysis of 91.6 kb of new sequence including 54.3 kb encompassing the human ERCC2 locus, the syntenic region in the mouse (32.6 kb), and a further 4.7 kb of sequence 3' of the previously reported ERCC2 region in the hamster. In addition to ERCC2, our analysis revealed the presence of two previously undescribed genes in all three species. The first is centromeric (in the human) to ERCC2 and is most similar to the kinesin light chain gene in sea urchin. The second gene is telomeric (in the human) to ERCC2 and contains a motif found in ankyrins, some cell cycle proteins, and transcription factors. Multiple EST matches to this putative new gene indicate that it is expressed in several human tissues, including breast. The identification and description of two new genes provides potential candidate genes for disorders mapping to this region of 19q13.2.

  8. Sequence analysis of the ERCC2 gene regions in human, mouse, and hamster reveals three linked genes

    SciTech Connect

    Lamerdin, J.E.; Stilwagen, S.A.; Ramirez, M.H.

    1996-06-15

    The ERCC2 (excision repair cross-complementing rodent repair group 2) gene product is involved in transcription-coupled repair as an integral member of the basal transcription factor BTF2/TFIIH complex. Defects in this gene can result in three distinct human disorders, namely the cancer-prone syndrome xeroderma pigmentosum complementation group D, trichothiodystrophy, and Cockayne syndrome. We report the comparative analysis of 91.6 kb of new sequence including 54.3 kb encompassing the human ERCC2 locus, the syntenic region in the mouse (32.6 kb), and a further 4.7 kb of sequence 3{prime} of the previously reported ERCC2 region in the hamster. In addition to ERCC2, our analysis revealed the presence of two previously undescribed genes in all three species. The first is centromeric (in the human) to ERCC2 and is most similar to the kinesin light chain gene in sea urchin. The second gene is telomeric (in the human) to ERCC2 and contains a motif found in ankyrins, some cell proteins, and transcription factors. Multiple EST matches to this putative new gene indicate that it is expressed in several human tissues, including breast. The identification and description of two new genes provides potential candidate genes for disorders mapping to this region of 19q13.2. 42 refs., 6 figs., 3 tabs.

  9. Akirin1 (Mighty), a novel promyogenic factor regulates muscle regeneration and cell chemotaxis

    SciTech Connect

    Salerno, Monica Senna; Dyer, Kelly; Bracegirdle, Jeremy; Platt, Leanne; Thomas, Mark; Siriett, Victoria; Kambadur, Ravi; Sharma, Mridula

    2009-07-15

    Akirin1 (Mighty) is a downstream target gene of myostatin and has been shown to be a promyogenic factor. Although expressed in many tissues, akirin1 is negatively regulated by myostatin specifically in skeletal muscle tissue. In this manuscript we have characterized the possible function of akirin1 in postnatal muscle growth. Molecular and immunohistological analyses indicated that while low levels of akirin1 are associated with quiescent satellite cells (SC), higher levels of akirin1 are detected in activated proliferating SC indicating that akirin1 could be associated with satellite cell activation. In addition to SC, macrophages also express akirin1, and increased expression of akirin1 resulted in more efficient chemotaxis of both macrophages and myoblasts. Akirin1 appears to regulate chemotaxis of both macrophages and myoblasts by reorganising actin cytoskeleton, leading to more efficient lamellipodia formation via a PI3 kinase dependent pathway. Expression analysis during muscle regeneration also indicated that akirin1 expression is detected very early (day 2) in regenerating muscle, and expression gradually peaks to coincide the nascent myotube formation stage of muscle regeneration. Based on these results we propose that akirin1 could be acting as a transducer of early signals of muscle regeneration. Thus, we speculate that myostatin regulates key steps of muscle regeneration including chemotaxis of inflammatory cells, SC activation and migration through akirin1.

  10. ChePep Controls Helicobacter pylori Infection of the Gastric Glands and Chemotaxis in the Epsilonproteobacteria

    PubMed Central

    Howitt, Michael R.; Lee, Josephine Y.; Lertsethtakarn, Paphavee; Vogelmann, Roger; Joubert, Lydia-Marie; Ottemann, Karen M.; Amieva, Manuel R.

    2011-01-01

    ABSTRACT Microbes use directed motility to colonize harsh and dynamic environments. We discovered that Helicobacter pylori strains establish bacterial colonies deep in the gastric glands and identified a novel protein, ChePep, necessary to colonize this niche. ChePep is preferentially localized to the flagellar pole. Although mutants lacking ChePep have normal flagellar ultrastructure and are motile, they have a slight defect in swarming ability. By tracking the movement of single bacteria, we found that ∆ChePep mutants cannot control the rotation of their flagella and swim with abnormally frequent reversals. These mutants even sustain bursts of movement backwards with the flagella pulling the bacteria. Genetic analysis of the chemotaxis signaling pathway shows that ChePep regulates flagellar rotation through the chemotaxis system. By examining H. pylori within a microscopic pH gradient, we determined that ChePep is critical for regulating chemotactic behavior. The chePep gene is unique to the Epsilonproteobacteria but is found throughout this diverse group. We expressed ChePep from other members of the Epsilonproteobacteria, including the zoonotic pathogen Campylobacter jejuni and the deep sea hydrothermal vent inhabitant Caminibacter mediatlanticus, in H. pylori and found that ChePep is functionally conserved across this class. ChePep represents a new family of chemotaxis regulators unique to the Epsilonproteobacteria and illustrates the different strategies that microbes have evolved to control motility. PMID:21791582

  11. Functional screening of antibiotic resistance genes from human gut microbiota reveals a novel gene fusion.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Gong; Hu, Yongfei; Yin, Yeshi; Yang, Xi; Xiang, Chunsheng; Wang, Baohong; Chen, Yanfei; Yang, Fengling; Lei, Fang; Wu, Na; Lu, Na; Li, Jing; Chen, Quanze; Li, Lanjuan; Zhu, Baoli

    2012-11-01

    The human gut microbiota has a high density of bacteria that are considered a reservoir for antibiotic resistance genes (ARGs). In this study, one fosmid metagenomic library generated from the gut microbiota of four healthy humans was used to screen for ARGs against seven antibiotics. Eight new ARGs were obtained: one against amoxicillin, six against d-cycloserine, and one against kanamycin. The new amoxicillin resistance gene encodes a protein with 53% identity to a class D β-lactamase from Riemerella anatipestifer RA-GD. The six new d-cycloserine resistance genes encode proteins with 73-81% identity to known d-alanine-d-alanine ligases. The new kanamycin resistance gene encodes a protein of 274 amino acids with an N-terminus (amino acids 1-189) that has 42% identity to the 6'-aminoglycoside acetyltransferase [AAC(6')] from Enterococcus hirae and a C-terminus (amino acids 190-274) with 35% identity to a hypothetical protein from Clostridiales sp. SSC/2. A functional study on the novel kanamycin resistance gene showed that only the N-terminus conferred kanamycin resistance. Our results showed that functional metagenomics is a useful tool for the identification of new ARGs.

  12. Revealing genes associated with vitellogenesis in the liver of the zebrafish (Danio rerio) by transcriptome profiling

    PubMed Central

    Levi, Liraz; Pekarski, Irena; Gutman, Ellen; Fortina, Paolo; Hyslop, Terry; Biran, Jakob; Levavi-Sivan, Berta; Lubzens, Esther

    2009-01-01

    Background In oviparous vertebrates, including fish, vitellogenesis consists of highly regulated pathways involving 17β-estradiol (E2). Previous studies focused on a relatively small number of hepatic expressed genes during vitellogenesis. This study aims to identify hepatic genes involved in vitellogenesis and regulated by E2, by using zebrafish microarray gene expression profiling, and to provide information on functional distinctive genes expressed in the liver of a vitellogenic female, using zebrafish as a model fish. Results Genes associated with vitellogenesis were revealed by the following paired t-tests (SAM) comparisons: a) two-month old vitellogenic (Vit2) females were compared with non-vitellogenic (NV) females, showing 825 differentially expressed transcripts during early stages of vitellogenesis, b) four-month old vitellogenic (Vit4) females were compared with NV females, showing 1,046 differentially expressed transcripts during vitellogenesis and c) E2-treated males were compared with control males, showing 1,828 differentially expressed transcripts regulated by E2. A Venn diagram revealed 822 common transcripts in the three groups, indicating that these transcripts were involved in vitellogenesis and putatively regulated by E2. In addition, 431 transcripts were differentially expressed in Vit2 and Vit4 females but not in E2-treated males, indicating that they were putatively not up-regulated by E2. Correspondence analysis showed high similarity in expression profiles of Vit2 with Vit4 and of NV females with control males. The E2-treated males differed from the other groups. The repertoire of genes putatively regulated by E2 in vitellogenic females included genes associated with protein synthesis and reproduction. Genes associated with the immune system processes and biological adhesion, were among the genes that were putatively not regulated by E2. E2-treated males expressed a large array of transcripts that were not associated with vitellogenesis

  13. Borrelia burgdorferi CheY2 Is Dispensable for Chemotaxis or Motility but Crucial for the Infectious Life Cycle of the Spirochete.

    PubMed

    Xu, Hui; Sultan, Syed; Yerke, Aaron; Moon, Ki Hwan; Wooten, R Mark; Motaleb, M A

    2017-01-01

    The requirements for bacterial chemotaxis and motility range from dispensable to crucial for host colonization. Even though more than 50% of all sequenced prokaryotic genomes possess at least one chemotaxis signaling system, many of those genomes contain multiple copies of a chemotaxis gene. However, the functions of most of those additional genes are unknown. Most motile bacteria possess at least one CheY response regulator that is typically dedicated to the control of motility and which is usually essential for virulence. Borrelia burgdorferi appears to be notably different, in that it has three cheY genes, and our current studies on cheY2 suggests that it has varied effects on different aspects of the natural infection cycle. Mutants deficient in this protein exhibit normal motility and chemotaxis in vitro but show reduced virulence in mice. Specifically, the cheY2 mutants were severely attenuated in murine infection and dissemination to distant tissues after needle inoculation. Moreover, while ΔcheY2 spirochetes are able to survive normally in the Ixodes ticks, mice fed upon by the ΔcheY2-infected ticks did not develop a persistent infection in the murine host. Our data suggest that CheY2, despite resembling a typical response regulator, functions distinctively from most other chemotaxis CheY proteins. We propose that CheY2 serves as a regulator for a B. burgdorferi virulence determinant that is required for productive infection within vertebrate, but not tick, hosts.

  14. RNA Sequencing Revealed Numerous Polyketide Synthase Genes in the Harmful Dinoflagellate Karenia mikimotoi

    PubMed Central

    Kimura, Kei; Okuda, Shujiro; Nakayama, Kei; Shikata, Tomoyuki; Takahashi, Fumio; Yamaguchi, Haruo; Skamoto, Setsuko; Yamaguchi, Mineo; Tomaru, Yuji

    2015-01-01

    The dinoflagellate Karenia mikimotoi forms blooms in the coastal waters of temperate regions and occasionally causes massive fish and invertebrate mortality. This study aimed to elucidate the toxic effect of K. mikimotoi on marine organisms by using the genomics approach; RNA-sequence libraries were constructed, and data were analyzed to identify toxin-related genes. Next-generation sequencing produced 153,406 transcript contigs from the axenic culture of K. mikimotoi. BLASTX analysis against all assembled contigs revealed that 208 contigs were polyketide synthase (PKS) sequences. Thus, K. mikimotoi was thought to have several genes encoding PKS metabolites and to likely produce toxin-like polyketide molecules. Of all the sequences, approximately 30 encoded eight PKS genes, which were remarkably similar to those of Karenia brevis. Our phylogenetic analyses showed that these genes belonged to a new group of PKS type-I genes. Phylogenetic and active domain analyses showed that the amino acid sequence of four among eight Karenia PKS genes was not similar to any of the reported PKS genes. These PKS genes might possibly be associated with the synthesis of polyketide toxins produced by Karenia species. Further, a homology search revealed 10 contigs that were similar to a toxin gene responsible for the synthesis of saxitoxin (sxtA) in the toxic dinoflagellate Alexandrium fundyense. These contigs encoded A1–A3 domains of sxtA genes. Thus, this study identified some transcripts in K. mikimotoi that might be associated with several putative toxin-related genes. The findings of this study might help understand the mechanism of toxicity of K. mikimotoi and other dinoflagellates. PMID:26561394

  15. Transcriptome profiles reveal gene regulation of peanut (Arachis hypogaea L.) nodulation

    PubMed Central

    Peng, Ze; Liu, Fengxia; Wang, Liping; Zhou, Hai; Paudel, Dev; Tan, Lubin; Maku, James; Gallo, Maria; Wang, Jianping

    2017-01-01

    The molecular mechanisms of symbiosis in cultivated peanut with a ‘crack entry’ infection process are largely understudied. In this study, we investigated the root transcriptional profiles of two pairs of non-nodulating (nod−) and nodulating (nod+) sister inbred peanut lines, E4/E5 and E7/E6, and their nod+ parents, F487A and PI262090 during rhizobial infection and nodule initiation by using RNA-seq technology. A total of 143, 101, 123, 215, 182, and 289 differentially expressed genes (DEGs) were identified in nod− E4, E7 and nod+ E5, E6, F487A, and PI262090 after inoculation with Bradyrhizobium sp. Different deficiencies at upstream of symbiotic signaling pathway were revealed in the two nod− genotypes. DEGs specific in nod+ genotypes included orthologs to some known symbiotic signaling pathway genes, such as NFR5, NSP2, NIN, ERN1, and many other novel and/or functionally unknown genes. Gene ontology (GO) enrichment analysis of nod+ specific DEGs revealed 54 significantly enriched GO terms, including oxidation-reduction process, metabolic process, and catalytic activity. Genes related with plant defense systems, hormone biosynthesis and response were particularly enriched. To our knowledge, this is the first report revealing symbiosis-related genes in a genome-wide manner in peanut representative of the ‘crack entry’ species. PMID:28059169

  16. Three-dimensional chemotaxis model for a crawling neutrophil.

    PubMed

    Song, Jihwan; Kim, Dongchoul

    2010-11-01

    Chemotactic cell migration is a fundamental phenomenon in complex biological processes. A rigorous understanding of the chemotactic mechanism of crawling cells has important implications for various medical and biological applications. In this paper, we propose a three-dimensional model of a single crawling cell to study its chemotaxis. A single-cell study of chemotaxis has an advantage over studies of a population of cells in that it provides a clearer observation of cell migration, which leads to more accurate assessments of chemotaxis. The model incorporates the surface energy of the cell and the interfacial interaction between the cell and substrate. The semi-implicit Fourier spectral method is applied to achieve high efficiency and numerical stability. The simulation results provide the kinetic and morphological traits of a crawling cell during chemotaxis.

  17. Dispatch. Dictyostelium chemotaxis: fascism through the back door?

    PubMed

    Insall, Robert

    2003-04-29

    Aggregating Dictyostelium cells secrete cyclic AMP to attract their neighbours by chemotaxis. It has now been shown that adenylyl cyclase is enriched in the rear of cells, and this localisation is required for normal aggregation.

  18. Neutrophil chemotaxis by Propionibacterium acnes lipase and its inhibition.

    PubMed Central

    Lee, W L; Shalita, A R; Suntharalingam, K; Fikrig, S M

    1982-01-01

    The chemoattraction of Propionibacterium acnes lipase for neutrophils and the effect of lipase inhibitor and two antibiotic agents on the chemotaxis were evaluated. Of the various fractions tested, partially purified lipase (fraction 2c) was the most active cytotaxin produced by P. acnes. Serum mediators were not required for the generation of chemotaxis by lipase in vitro. Diisopropyl phosphofluoridate at low concentration (10(-4) mM) completely inhibited lipase activity as well as polymorphonuclear leukocyte chemotaxis generated by lipase. Tetracycline hydrochloride and erythromycin base at concentrations of 10(-1) mM and 1 mM, respectively, caused 100% inhibition of PMN migration toward lipase or zymosan-activated serum. The inhibiting activity of the antibiotics was directed against cells independently of any effect on lipase. Chemotaxis by P. acnes lipase suggests a wider role for this enzyme in the inflammatory process and the pathogenesis of acne vulgaris. Images PMID:7054130

  19. Function and Regulation of Heterotrimeric G Proteins during Chemotaxis.

    PubMed

    Kamp, Marjon E; Liu, Youtao; Kortholt, Arjan

    2016-01-14

    Chemotaxis, or directional movement towards an extracellular gradient of chemicals, is necessary for processes as diverse as finding nutrients, the immune response, metastasis and wound healing. Activation of G-protein coupled receptors (GPCRs) is at the very base of the chemotactic signaling pathway. Chemotaxis starts with binding of the chemoattractant to GPCRs at the cell-surface, which finally leads to major changes in the cytoskeleton and directional cell movement towards the chemoattractant. Many chemotaxis pathways that are directly regulated by Gβγ have been identified and studied extensively; however, whether Gα is just a handle that regulates the release of Gβγ or whether Gα has its own set of distinct chemotactic effectors, is only beginning to be understood. In this review, we will discuss the different levels of regulation in GPCR signaling and the downstream pathways that are essential for proper chemotaxis.

  20. A method for measuring bacterial chemotaxis parameters in a microcapillary

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Z.; Papadopoulos, K.D.

    1996-07-05

    A new method was developed which enables chemotaxis parameters to be measured at a single-cell level inside a capillary for the first time. The chemotaxis chamber consists of two reservoirs communicating through a capillary tube 50 {micro}m in diameter. Chemotaxis parameters are measured inside the capillary using image analysis, after a nearly linear attractant concentration gradient has been generated along the capillary by diffusion. Compared to previously published techniques, this method provides a well-characterized chemoattractant concentration profile in addition to allowing single-cell parameters to be measured inside a fine capillary. This procedure was used to measure the single-cell chemotaxis parameters for Escherichia coli K12, and the results are compared to published data on single E. coli cells chemotaxing in bulk.

  1. Gene response profiles for Daphnia pulex exposed to the environmental stressor cadmium reveals novel crustacean metallothioneins

    PubMed Central

    Shaw, Joseph R; Colbourne, John K; Davey, Jennifer C; Glaholt, Stephen P; Hampton, Thomas H; Chen, Celia Y; Folt, Carol L; Hamilton, Joshua W

    2007-01-01

    Background Genomic research tools such as microarrays are proving to be important resources to study the complex regulation of genes that respond to environmental perturbations. A first generation cDNA microarray was developed for the environmental indicator species Daphnia pulex, to identify genes whose regulation is modulated following exposure to the metal stressor cadmium. Our experiments revealed interesting changes in gene transcription that suggest their biological roles and their potentially toxicological features in responding to this important environmental contaminant. Results Our microarray identified genes reported in the literature to be regulated in response to cadmium exposure, suggested functional attributes for genes that share no sequence similarity to proteins in the public databases, and pointed to genes that are likely members of expanded gene families in the Daphnia genome. Genes identified on the microarray also were associated with cadmium induced phenotypes and population-level outcomes that we experimentally determined. A subset of genes regulated in response to cadmium exposure was independently validated using quantitative-realtime (Q-RT)-PCR. These microarray studies led to the discovery of three genes coding for the metal detoxication protein metallothionein (MT). The gene structures and predicted translated sequences of D. pulex MTs clearly place them in this gene family. Yet, they share little homology with previously characterized MTs. Conclusion The genomic information obtained from this study represents an important first step in characterizing microarray patterns that may be diagnostic to specific environmental contaminants and give insights into their toxicological mechanisms, while also providing a practical tool for evolutionary, ecological, and toxicological functional gene discovery studies. Advances in Daphnia genomics will enable the further development of this species as a model organism for the environmental sciences

  2. Slit-2/Robo-1 modulates the CXCL12/CXCR4-induced chemotaxis of T cells.

    PubMed

    Prasad, Anil; Qamri, Zahida; Wu, Jane; Ganju, Ramesh K

    2007-09-01

    Slit, which mediates its function by binding to the Roundabout (Robo) receptor, has been shown to regulate neuronal, dendritic, and leukocyte migration. However, the molecular mechanism by which the Slit/Robo complex inhibits the migration of cells is not well defined. Here, we showed that Slit-2 can inhibit the CXCL12-induced chemotaxis and transendothelial migration of T cells and monocytes. We observed that CXCR4 associates with Robo-1 and that Slit-2 treatment enhances this association with the Robo-1 receptor. Robo-1 is a single-pass transmembrane receptor whose intracellular region contains four conserved motifs designated as CC0, CC1, CC2, and CC3. Structural and functional analyses of Robo receptors revealed that interaction of the CC3 motif with the CXCR4 receptor may regulate the CXCL12-induced chemotaxis of T cells. We further characterized Slit-2-mediated inhibition of the CXCL12/CXCR4 chemotactic pathway and found that Slit-2 can block the CXCL12-induced activation of the Src and Lck kinases but not Lyn kinase. Although Slit-2 did not inhibit the CXCL12-induced activation of MAPKs, it did inhibit the Akt phosphorylation and Rac activation induced by this chemokine. Altogether, our studies indicate a novel mechanism by which the Slit/Robo complex may inhibit the CXCR4/CXCL12-mediated chemotaxis of T cells.

  3. Information Theoretical Analysis of a Bovine Gene Atlas Reveals Chromosomal Regions with Tissue Specific Gene Expression.

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    An essential step to understanding the genomic biology of any organism is to comprehensively survey its transcriptome. We present the Bovine Gene Atlas (BGA) a compendium of over 7.2 million unique 20 base Illumina DGE tags representing 100 tissue transcriptomes collected primarily from L1 Dominette...

  4. Tracking neutrophil intraluminal crawling, transendothelial migration and chemotaxis in tissue by intravital video microscopy.

    PubMed

    Xu, Najia; Lei, Xi; Liu, Lixin

    2011-09-24

    The recruitment of circulating leukocytes from blood stream to the inflamed tissue is a crucial and complex process of inflammation(1,2). In the postcapillary venules of inflamed tissue, leukocytes initially tether and roll on the luminal surface of venular wall. Rolling leukocytes arrest on endothelium and undergo firm adhesion in response to chemokine or other chemoattractants on the venular surface. Many adherent leukocytes relocate from the initial site of adhesion to the junctional extravasation site in endothelium, a process termed intraluminal crawling(3). Following crawling, leukocytes move across endothelium (transmigration) and migrate in extravascular tissue toward the source of chemoattractant (chemotaxis)(4). Intravital microscopy is a powerful tool for visualizing leukocyte-endothelial cell interactions in vivo and revealing cellular and molecular mechanisms of leukocyte recruitment(2,5). In this report, we provide a comprehensive description of using brightfield intravital microscopy to visualize and determine the detailed processes of neutrophil recruitment in mouse cremaster muscle in response to the gradient of a neutrophil chemoattractant. To induce neutrophil recruitment, a small piece of agarose gel (~1-mm(3) size) containing neutrophil chemoattractant MIP-2 (CXCL2, a CXC chemokine) or WKYMVm (Trp-Lys-Tyr-Val-D-Met, a synthetic analog of bacterial peptide) is placed on the muscle tissue adjacent to the observed postcapillary venule. With time-lapsed video photography and computer software ImageJ, neutrophil intraluminal crawling on endothelium, neutrophil transendothelial migration and the migration and chemotaxis in tissue are visualized and tracked. This protocol allows reliable and quantitative analysis of many neutrophil recruitment parameters such as intraluminal crawling velocity, transmigration time, detachment time, migration velocity, chemotaxis velocity and chemotaxis index in tissue. We demonstrate that using this protocol, these

  5. Microfluidic investigation of BDNF-enhanced neural stem cell chemotaxis in CXCL12 gradients.

    PubMed

    Xu, Hui; Heilshorn, Sarah C

    2013-02-25

    In vivo studies have suggested that gradients of CXCL12 (aka stromal cell-derived factor 1α) may be critical for neural stem cell (NSC) migration during brain development and neural tissue regeneration. However, traditional in vitro chemotaxis tools are limited by unstable concentration gradients and the inability to decouple cell migration directionality and speed. These limitations have restricted the reproducible and quantitative analysis of neuronal migration, which is required for mechanism-based studies. Using a microfluidic gradient generator, nestin and Sox-2 positive human embryonic NSC chemotaxis is quantified within a linear and stable CXCL12 gradient. While untreated NSCs are not able to chemotax within CXCL12 gradients, pre-treatment of the cells with brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) results in significant chemotactic, directional migration. BDNF pre-treatment has no effect on cell migration speed, which averages about 1 μm min(-1). Quantitative analysis determines that CXCL12 concentrations above 9.0 nM are above the minimum activation threshold, while concentrations below 14.7 nM are below the saturation threshold. Interestingly, although inhibitor studies with AMD 3100 revealed that CXCL12 chemotaxis requires receptor CXCR4 activation, BDNF pre-treatment is found to have no profound effects on the mRNA levels or surface presentation of CXCR4 or the putative CXCR7 scavenger receptor. The microfluidic study of NSC migration within stable chemokine concentration profiles provides quantitative analysis as well as new insight into the migratory mechanism underlying BDNF-induced chemotaxis towards CXCL12. Copyright © 2013 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  6. Chemotaxis Is Required for Virulence and Competitive Fitness of the Bacterial Wilt Pathogen Ralstonia solanacearum

    PubMed Central

    Yao, Jian; Allen, Caitilyn

    2006-01-01

    Ralstonia solanacearum, a soilborne plant pathogen of considerable economic importance, invades host plant roots from the soil. Qualitative and quantitative chemotaxis assays revealed that this bacterium is specifically attracted to diverse amino acids and organic acids, and especially to root exudates from the host plant tomato. Exudates from rice, a nonhost plant, were less attractive. Eight different strains from this heterogeneous species complex varied significantly in their attraction to a panel of carbohydrate stimuli, raising the possibility that chemotactic responses may be differentially selected traits that confer adaptation to various hosts or ecological conditions. Previous studies found that an aflagellate mutant lacking swimming motility is significantly reduced in virulence, but the role of directed motility mediated by the chemotaxis system was not known. Two site-directed R. solanacearum mutants lacking either CheA or CheW, which are core chemotaxis signal transduction proteins, were completely nonchemotactic but retained normal swimming motility. In biologically realistic soil soak virulence assays on tomato plants, both nonchemotactic mutants had significantly reduced virulence indistinguishable from that of a nonmotile mutant, demonstrating that directed motility, not simply random motion, is required for full virulence. In contrast, nontactic strains were as virulent as the wild-type strain was when bacteria were introduced directly into the plant stem through a cut petiole, indicating that taxis makes its contribution to virulence in the early stages of host invasion and colonization. When inoculated individually by soaking the soil, both nontactic mutants reached the same population sizes as the wild type did in the stems of tomato plants just beginning to wilt. However, when tomato plants were coinoculated with a 1:1 mixture of a nontactic mutant and its wild-type parent, the wild-type strain outcompeted both nontactic mutants by 100-fold

  7. Chemotaxis is required for virulence and competitive fitness of the bacterial wilt pathogen Ralstonia solanacearum.

    PubMed

    Yao, Jian; Allen, Caitilyn

    2006-05-01

    Ralstonia solanacearum, a soilborne plant pathogen of considerable economic importance, invades host plant roots from the soil. Qualitative and quantitative chemotaxis assays revealed that this bacterium is specifically attracted to diverse amino acids and organic acids, and especially to root exudates from the host plant tomato. Exudates from rice, a nonhost plant, were less attractive. Eight different strains from this heterogeneous species complex varied significantly in their attraction to a panel of carbohydrate stimuli, raising the possibility that chemotactic responses may be differentially selected traits that confer adaptation to various hosts or ecological conditions. Previous studies found that an aflagellate mutant lacking swimming motility is significantly reduced in virulence, but the role of directed motility mediated by the chemotaxis system was not known. Two site-directed R. solanacearum mutants lacking either CheA or CheW, which are core chemotaxis signal transduction proteins, were completely nonchemotactic but retained normal swimming motility. In biologically realistic soil soak virulence assays on tomato plants, both nonchemotactic mutants had significantly reduced virulence indistinguishable from that of a nonmotile mutant, demonstrating that directed motility, not simply random motion, is required for full virulence. In contrast, nontactic strains were as virulent as the wild-type strain was when bacteria were introduced directly into the plant stem through a cut petiole, indicating that taxis makes its contribution to virulence in the early stages of host invasion and colonization. When inoculated individually by soaking the soil, both nontactic mutants reached the same population sizes as the wild type did in the stems of tomato plants just beginning to wilt. However, when tomato plants were coinoculated with a 1:1 mixture of a nontactic mutant and its wild-type parent, the wild-type strain outcompeted both nontactic mutants by 100-fold

  8. Global analysis of gene expression in pulmonary fibrosis reveals distinct programs regulating lung inflammation and fibrosis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaminski, Naftali; Allard, John D.; Pittet, Jean F.; Zuo, Fengrong; Griffiths, Mark J. D.; Morris, David; Huang, Xiaozhu; Sheppard, Dean; Heller, Renu A.

    2000-02-01

    The molecular mechanisms of pulmonary fibrosis are poorly understood. We have used oligonucleotide arrays to analyze the gene expression programs that underlie pulmonary fibrosis in response to bleomycin, a drug that causes lung inflammation and fibrosis, in two strains of susceptible mice (129 and C57BL/6). We then compared the gene expression patterns in these mice with 129 mice carrying a null mutation in the epithelial-restricted integrin 6 subunit (6/-), which develop inflammation but are protected from pulmonary fibrosis. Cluster analysis identified two distinct groups of genes involved in the inflammatory and fibrotic responses. Analysis of gene expression at multiple time points after bleomycin administration revealed sequential induction of subsets of genes that characterize each response. The availability of this comprehensive data set should accelerate the development of more effective strategies for intervention at the various stages in the development of fibrotic diseases of the lungs and other organs.

  9. Metatranscriptome sequence analysis reveals diel periodicity of microbial community gene expression in the ocean's interior

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vislova, A.; Aylward, F.; Sosa, O.; DeLong, E.

    2016-02-01

    Previous work has revealed diel periodicity of gene expression in key metabolic pathways in both autotrophic and heterotrophic microbes in the surface ocean. In this study, we investigated patterns of diel periodicity of gene expression in depth profiles (25, 75, 125 and 250 meters). We postulated that microbial diel transcriptional signals would be increasingly dampened with depth, and that the timing of peak expression of specific transcripts would be shifted in time between depths, in accordance with depth-dependent diel light variability. Bacterioplankton were sampled from four depths every four hours at station ALOHA (22° 45' N 158° W) over 2 days. RNA was extracted from cells preserved on filters, converted to cDNA, and sequenced on the Illumina platform. Surprisingly, harmonic regression analysis revealed an increasing proportion of genes with diel periodic expression patterns with increasing depth between 25- 125 meters. At 250 meters, the proportion of genes exhibiting diel expression patterns decreased an order of magnitude compared to the photic zone. Community composition, functional gene categories, and diel patterns of gene expression were significantly different between the photic zone and 250 meter samples. The signals driving diel periodic gene expression in microbes at 250 meters is under further investigation. These data are now beginning provide a better understanding of the tempo and mode of microbial dynamics among specific taxa, throughout the ocean's interior.

  10. Gene expression profile analysis of testis and ovary of oriental river prawn, Macrobrachium nipponense, reveals candidate reproduction-related genes.

    PubMed

    Qiao, H; Xiong, Y W; Jiang, S F; Fu, H T; Sun, S M; Jin, S B; Gong, Y S; Zhang, W Y

    2015-03-20

    This study utilized high-throughput RNA sequencing technology to identify reproduction- and development-related genes of Macrobrachium nipponense by analyzing gene expression profiles of testis and ovary. More than 20 million 1 x 51-bp reads were obtained by Illumina sequencing, generating more than 7.7 and 11.7 million clean reads in the testis and ovary library, respectively. As a result, 10,018 unitags were supposed to be differentially expressed genes (DEGs) between ovary and testis. Compared to the ovary library, 4563 (45.5%) of these DEGs exhibited at least 6-fold upregulated expression, while 5455 (54.5%) DEGs exhibited at least 2-fold downregulated expression in the testis. The Gene Ontology (GO) enrichment analysis showed that 113 GO terms had potential molecular functions in reproduction. The Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes results revealed that the most important pathways may be relevant to reproduction and included 7 pathways. Forty-two genes were identified as reproduction-, development-, and sex-related genes based on GO classification and sequence comparison with other publications, including male reproductive-related LIM protein, spermatogenesis-associated protein, gametocyte-specific factor 1, VASA-like protein, vitellogenin, sex-determining protein fem-1, and other potential candidates. These results will advance research in the field of molecular genetics in M. nipponense and offer a valuable resource for further research related to reproduction in crustaceans.

  11. Wax constituents on the inflorescence stems of double eceriferum mutants in Arabidopsis reveal complex gene interactions.

    PubMed

    Goodwin, S Mark; Rashotte, Aaron M; Rahman, Musrur; Feldmann, Kenneth A; Jenks, Matthew A

    2005-04-01

    To shed new light on gene involvement in plant cuticular-wax production, 11 eceriferum (cer) mutants of Arabidopsis having dramatic alterations in wax composition of inflorescence stems were used to create 14 double cer mutants each with two homozygous recessive cer loci. A comprehensive analysis of stem waxes on these double mutants revealed unexpected CER gene interactions and new ideas about individual CER gene functions. Five of the 14 double cer mutants produced significantly more total wax than one of their respective cer parents, indicating from a genetic standpoint a partial bypassing (or complementation) of one cer mutation by the other. Eight of the 14 double cer mutants had alkane amounts lower than both respective cer parents, suggesting that most of these CER gene products play a major additive role in alkane synthesis. Other results suggested that some CER genes function in more than one step of the wax pathway, including those associated with sequential steps in acyl-CoA elongation. Surprisingly, complete epistasis was not observed for any of the cer gene combinations tested. Significant overlap or redundancy of genetic operations thus appears to be a central feature of wax metabolism. Future studies of CER gene product function, as well as the utilization of CER genes for crop improvement, must now account for the complex gene interactions described here.

  12. Gene Expression Profiling Analysis Reveals Fur Development in Rex Rabbits (Oryctolagus cuniculus).

    PubMed

    Zhao, Bohao; Chen, Yang; Yan, Xiaorong; Hao, Ye; Zhu, Jie; Weng, Qiiaoqing; Wu, Xinsheng

    2017-08-29

    Fur is an important economic trait in rabbits. The identification of genes that influence fur development and knowledge regarding the actions of these genes provides useful tools for improving fur quality. However, the mechanism of fur development is unclear. To obtain candidate genes related to fur development, the transcriptomes of tissues from backs and bellies of Chinchilla rex rabbits were compared. Of the genes analyzed, 336 showed altered expression in the two groups (285 upregulated and 51 downregulated), P≤0.05, fold-change≥2 or ≤0.5). Using GO and KEGG to obtain gene classes that were differentially enriched, we found several genes to be involved in many important biological processes. In addition, we identified several signaling pathways involved in fur development, including the Wnt and MAPK signaling pathways, revealing mechanisms of skin and hair follicle development, and epidermal cell and keratinocytes differentiation. The obtained rabbit transcriptome and differentially expressed gene profiling data provided comprehensive gene expression information for SFRP2, FRZB, CACNG1, SLC25A4 and SLC16A3. To validate the RNA-seq data, the expression levels of eight differentially expressed genes involved in fur development were confirmed by qRT-PCR. The results of rabbit transcriptomic profiling provide a basis for understanding the molecular mechanisms of fur development.

  13. Revealing gene clusters associated with the development of cholangiocarcinoma, based on a time series analysis.

    PubMed

    Wu, Jianyu; Xiao, Zhifu; Zhao, Xiulei; Wu, Xiangsong

    2015-05-01

    Cholangiocarcinoma (CC) is a rapidly lethal malignancy and currently is considered to be incurable. Biomarkers related to the development of CC remain unclear. The present study aimed to identify differentially expressed genes (DEGs) between normal tissue and intrahepatic CC, as well as specific gene expression patterns that changed together with the development of CC. By using a two‑way analysis of variance test, the biomarkers that could distinguish between normal tissue and intrahepatic CC dissected from different days were identified. A k‑means cluster method was used to identify gene clusters associated with the development of CC according to their changing expression pattern. Functional enrichment analysis was used to infer the function of each of the gene sets. A time series analysis was constructed to reveal gene signatures that were associated with the development of CC based on gene expression profile changes. Genes related to CC were shown to be involved in 'mitochondrion' and 'focal adhesion'. Three interesting gene groups were identified by the k‑means cluster method. Gene clusters with a unique expression pattern are related with the development of CC. The data of this study will facilitate novel discoveries regarding the genetic study of CC by further work.

  14. Bacterial Chemotaxis: The Early Years of Molecular Studies

    PubMed Central

    Hazelbauer, Gerald L.

    2014-01-01

    This review focuses on the early years of molecular studies of bacterial chemotaxis and motility, beginning in the 1960s with Julius Adler's pioneering work. It describes key observations that established the field and made bacterial chemotaxis a paradigm for the molecular understanding of biological signaling. Consideration of those early years includes aspects of science seldom described in journals: the accidental findings, personal interactions, and scientific culture that often drive scientific progress. PMID:22994495

  15. Fer kinase limits neutrophil chemotaxis toward end target chemoattractants.

    PubMed

    Khajah, Maitham; Andonegui, Graciela; Chan, Ronald; Craig, Andrew W; Greer, Peter A; McCafferty, Donna-Marie

    2013-03-01

    Neutrophil recruitment and directional movement toward chemotactic stimuli are important processes in innate immune responses. This study examines the role of Fer kinase in neutrophil recruitment and chemotaxis to various chemoattractants in vitro and in vivo. Mice targeted with a kinase-inactivating mutation (Fer(DR/DR)) or wild type (WT) were studied using time-lapse intravital microscopy to examine leukocyte recruitment and chemotaxis in vivo. In response to keratinocyte-derived cytokine, no difference in leukocyte chemotaxis was observed between WT and Fer(DR/DR) mice. However, in response to the chemotactic peptide WKYMVm, a selective agonist of the formyl peptide receptor, a 2-fold increase in leukocyte emigration was noted in Fer(DR/DR) mice (p < 0.05). To determine whether these defects were due to Fer signaling in the endothelium or other nonhematopoietic cells, bone marrow chimeras were generated. WKYMVm-induced leukocyte recruitment in chimeric mice (WT bone marrow to Fer(DR/DR) recipients or vice versa) was similar to WT mice, suggesting that Fer kinase signaling in both leukocytes and endothelial cells serves to limit chemotaxis. Purified Fer(DR/DR) neutrophils demonstrated enhanced chemotaxis toward end target chemoattractants (WKYMVm and C5a) compared with WT using an under-agarose gel chemotaxis assay. These defects were not observed in response to intermediate chemoattractants (keratinocyte-derived cytokine, MIP-2, or LTB(4)). Increased WKYMVm-induced chemotaxis of Fer(DR/DR) neutrophils correlated with sustained PI3K activity and reduced reliance on the p38 MAPK pathway compared with WT neutrophils. Together, these data identify Fer as a novel inhibitory kinase for neutrophil chemotaxis toward end target chemoattractants through modulation of PI3K activity.

  16. Exome analysis reveals differentially mutated gene signatures of stage, grade and subtype in breast cancers.

    PubMed

    Li, You; Wang, Xiaosheng; Vural, Suleyman; Mishra, Nitish K; Cowan, Kenneth H; Guda, Chittibabu

    2015-01-01

    Breast cancers exhibit highly heterogeneous molecular profiles. Although gene expression profiles have been used to predict the risks and prognostic outcomes of breast cancers, the high variability of gene expression limits its clinical application. In contrast, genetic mutation profiles would be more advantageous than gene expression profiles because genetic mutations can be stably detected and the mutational heterogeneity widely exists in breast cancer genomes. We analyzed 98 breast cancer whole exome samples that were sorted into three subtypes, two grades and two stages. The sum deleterious effect of all mutations in each gene was scored to identify differentially mutated genes (DMGs) for this case-control study. DMGs were corroborated using extensive published knowledge. Functional consequences of deleterious SNVs on protein structure and function were also investigated. Genes such as ERBB2, ESP8, PPP2R4, KIAA0922, SP4, CENPJ, PRCP and SELP that have been experimentally or clinically verified to be tightly associated with breast cancer prognosis are among the DMGs identified in this study. We also identified some genes such as ARL6IP5, RAET1E, and ANO7 that could be crucial for breast cancer development and prognosis. Further, SNVs such as rs1058808, rs2480452, rs61751507, rs79167802, rs11540666, and rs2229437 that potentially influence protein functions are observed at significantly different frequencies in different comparison groups. Protein structure modeling revealed that many non-synonymous SNVs have a deleterious effect on protein stability, structure and function. Mutational profiling at gene- and SNV-level revealed differential patterns within each breast cancer comparison group, and the gene signatures correlate with expected prognostic characteristics of breast cancer classes. Some of the genes and SNVs identified in this study show high promise and are worthy of further investigation by experimental studies.

  17. Exome Analysis Reveals Differentially Mutated Gene Signatures of Stage, Grade and Subtype in Breast Cancers

    PubMed Central

    Li, You; Wang, Xiaosheng; Vural, Suleyman; Mishra, Nitish K.; Cowan, Kenneth H.; Guda, Chittibabu

    2015-01-01

    Breast cancers exhibit highly heterogeneous molecular profiles. Although gene expression profiles have been used to predict the risks and prognostic outcomes of breast cancers, the high variability of gene expression limits its clinical application. In contrast, genetic mutation profiles would be more advantageous than gene expression profiles because genetic mutations can be stably detected and the mutational heterogeneity widely exists in breast cancer genomes. We analyzed 98 breast cancer whole exome samples that were sorted into three subtypes, two grades and two stages. The sum deleterious effect of all mutations in each gene was scored to identify differentially mutated genes (DMGs) for this case-control study. DMGs were corroborated using extensive published knowledge. Functional consequences of deleterious SNVs on protein structure and function were also investigated. Genes such as ERBB2, ESP8, PPP2R4, KIAA0922, SP4, CENPJ, PRCP and SELP that have been experimentally or clinically verified to be tightly associated with breast cancer prognosis are among the DMGs identified in this study. We also identified some genes such as ARL6IP5, RAET1E, and ANO7 that could be crucial for breast cancer development and prognosis. Further, SNVs such as rs1058808, rs2480452, rs61751507, rs79167802, rs11540666, and rs2229437 that potentially influence protein functions are observed at significantly different frequencies in different comparison groups. Protein structure modeling revealed that many non-synonymous SNVs have a deleterious effect on protein stability, structure and function. Mutational profiling at gene- and SNV-level revealed differential patterns within each breast cancer comparison group, and the gene signatures correlate with expected prognostic characteristics of breast cancer classes. Some of the genes and SNVs identified in this study show high promise and are worthy of further investigation by experimental studies. PMID:25803781

  18. Analysis of SSH library of rice variety Aganni reveals candidate gall midge resistance genes.

    PubMed

    Divya, Dhanasekar; Singh, Y Tunginba; Nair, Suresh; Bentur, J S

    2016-03-01

    The Asian rice gall midge, Orseolia oryzae, is a serious insect pest causing extensive yield loss. Interaction between the gall midge and rice genotypes is known to be on a gene-for-gene basis. Here, we report molecular basis of HR- (hypersensitive reaction-negative) type of resistance in Aganni (an indica rice variety possessing gall midge resistance gene Gm8) through the construction and analysis of a suppressive subtraction hybridization (SSH) cDNA library. In all, 2,800 positive clones were sequenced and analyzed. The high-quality ESTs were assembled into 448 non-redundant gene sequences. Homology search with the NCBI databases, using BlastX and BlastN, revealed that 73% of the clones showed homology to genes with known function and majority of ESTs belonged to the gene ontology category 'biological process'. Validation of 27 putative candidate gall midge resistance genes through real-time PCR, following gall midge infestation, in contrasting parents and their derived pre-NILs (near isogenic lines) revealed induction of specific genes related to defense and metabolism. Interestingly, four genes, belonging to families of leucine-rich repeat (LRR), heat shock protein (HSP), pathogenesis related protein (PR), and NAC domain-containing protein, implicated in conferring HR+ type of resistance, were found to be up-regulated in Aganni. Two of the reactive oxygen intermediates (ROI)-scavenging-enzyme-coding genes Cytosolic Ascorbate Peroxidase1, 2 (OsAPx1 and OsAPx2) were found up-regulated in Aganni in incompatible interaction possibly suppressing HR. We suggest that Aganni has a deviant form of inducible, salicylic acid (SA)-mediated resistance but without HR.

  19. Iron homeostasis in Arabidopsis thaliana: transcriptomic analyses reveal novel FIT-regulated genes, iron deficiency marker genes and functional gene networks.

    PubMed

    Mai, Hans-Jörg; Pateyron, Stéphanie; Bauer, Petra

    2016-10-03

    FIT (FER-LIKE IRON DEFICIENCY-INDUCED TRANSCRIPTION FACTOR) is the central regulator of iron uptake in Arabidopsis thaliana roots. We performed transcriptome analyses of six day-old seedlings and roots of six week-old plants using wild type, a fit knock-out mutant and a FIT over-expression line grown under iron-sufficient or iron-deficient conditions. We compared genes regulated in a FIT-dependent manner depending on the developmental stage of the plants. We assembled a high likelihood dataset which we used to perform co-expression and functional analysis of the most stably iron deficiency-induced genes. 448 genes were found FIT-regulated. Out of these, 34 genes were robustly FIT-regulated in root and seedling samples and included 13 novel FIT-dependent genes. Three hundred thirty-one genes showed differential regulation in response to the presence and absence of FIT only in the root samples, while this was the case for 83 genes in the seedling samples. We assembled a virtual dataset of iron-regulated genes based on a total of 14 transcriptomic analyses of iron-deficient and iron-sufficient wild-type plants to pinpoint the best marker genes for iron deficiency and analyzed this dataset in depth. Co-expression analysis of this dataset revealed 13 distinct regulons part of which predominantly contained functionally related genes. We could enlarge the list of FIT-dependent genes and discriminate between genes that are robustly FIT-regulated in roots and seedlings or only in one of those. FIT-regulated genes were mostly induced, few of them were repressed by FIT. With the analysis of a virtual dataset we could filter out and pinpoint new candidates among the most reliable marker genes for iron deficiency. Moreover, co-expression and functional analysis of this virtual dataset revealed iron deficiency-induced and functionally distinct regulons.

  20. Mapping of Gene Expression Reveals CYP27A1 as a Susceptibility Gene for Sporadic ALS

    PubMed Central

    van Rheenen, Wouter; Franke, Lude; Jansen, Ritsert C.; van Es, Michael A.; van Vught, Paul W. J.; Blauw, Hylke M.; Groen, Ewout J. N.; Horvath, Steve; Estrada, Karol; Rivadeneira, Fernando; Hofman, Albert; Uitterlinden, Andre G.; Robberecht, Wim; Andersen, Peter M.; Melki, Judith; Meininger, Vincent; Hardiman, Orla; Landers, John E.; Brown, Robert H.; Shatunov, Aleksey; Shaw, Christopher E.; Leigh, P. Nigel; Al-Chalabi, Ammar; Ophoff, Roel A.

    2012-01-01

    Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) is a progressive, neurodegenerative disease characterized by loss of upper and lower motor neurons. ALS is considered to be a complex trait and genome-wide association studies (GWAS) have implicated a few susceptibility loci. However, many more causal loci remain to be discovered. Since it has been shown that genetic variants associated with complex traits are more likely to be eQTLs than frequency-matched variants from GWAS platforms, we conducted a two-stage genome-wide screening for eQTLs associated with ALS. In addition, we applied an eQTL analysis to finemap association loci. Expression profiles using peripheral blood of 323 sporadic ALS patients and 413 controls were mapped to genome-wide genotyping data. Subsequently, data from a two-stage GWAS (3,568 patients and 10,163 controls) were used to prioritize eQTLs identified in the first stage (162 ALS, 207 controls). These prioritized eQTLs were carried forward to the second sample with both gene-expression and genotyping data (161 ALS, 206 controls). Replicated eQTL SNPs were then tested for association in the second-stage GWAS data to find SNPs associated with disease, that survived correction for multiple testing. We thus identified twelve cis eQTLs with nominally significant associations in the second-stage GWAS data. Eight SNP-transcript pairs of highest significance (lowest p = 1.27×10−51) withstood multiple-testing correction in the second stage and modulated CYP27A1 gene expression. Additionally, we show that C9orf72 appears to be the only gene in the 9p21.2 locus that is regulated in cis, showing the potential of this approach in identifying causative genes in association loci in ALS. This study has identified candidate genes for sporadic ALS, most notably CYP27A1. Mutations in CYP27A1 are causal to cerebrotendinous xanthomatosis which can present as a clinical mimic of ALS with progressive upper motor neuron loss, making it a plausible susceptibility gene for

  1. In silico clustering of Salmonella global gene expression data reveals novel genes co-regulated with the SPI-1 virulence genes through HilD

    PubMed Central

    Martínez-Flores, Irma; Pérez-Morales, Deyanira; Sánchez-Pérez, Mishael; Paredes, Claudia C.; Collado-Vides, Julio; Salgado, Heladia; Bustamante, Víctor H.

    2016-01-01

    A wide variety of Salmonella enterica serovars cause intestinal and systemic infections to humans and animals. Salmonella Patogenicity Island 1 (SPI-1) is a chromosomal region containing 39 genes that have crucial virulence roles. The AraC-like transcriptional regulator HilD, encoded in SPI-1, positively controls the expression of the SPI-1 genes, as well as of several other virulence genes located outside SPI-1. In this study, we applied a clustering method to the global gene expression data of S. enterica serovar Typhimurium from the COLOMBOS database; thus genes that show an expression pattern similar to that of SPI-1 genes were selected. This analysis revealed nine novel genes that are co-expressed with SPI-1, which are located in different chromosomal regions. Expression analyses and protein-DNA interaction assays showed regulation by HilD for six of these genes: gtgE, phoH, sinR, SL1263 (lpxR) and SL4247 were regulated directly, whereas SL1896 was regulated indirectly. Interestingly, phoH is an ancestral gene conserved in most of bacteria, whereas the other genes show characteristics of genes acquired by Salmonella. A role in virulence has been previously demonstrated for gtgE, lpxR and sinR. Our results further expand the regulon of HilD and thus identify novel possible Salmonella virulence genes. PMID:27886269

  2. Bacterial Chemotaxis to Naphthalene Desorbing from a Nonaqueous Liquid

    PubMed Central

    Law, Aaron M. J.; Aitken, Michael D.

    2003-01-01

    Bacterial chemotaxis has the potential to increase the rate of degradation of chemoattractants, but its influence on degradation of hydrophobic attractants initially dissolved in a non-aqueous-phase liquid (NAPL) has not been examined. We studied the effect of chemotaxis by Pseudomonas putida G7 on naphthalene mass transfer and degradation in a system in which the naphthalene was dissolved in a model NAPL. Chemotaxis by wild-type P. putida G7 increased the rates of naphthalene desorption and degradation relative to rates observed with nonchemotactic and nonmotile mutant strains. While biodegradation alone influenced the rate of substrate desorption by increasing the concentration gradient against which desorption occurred, chemotaxis created an even steeper gradient as the cells accumulated near the NAPL source. The extent to which chemotaxis affected naphthalene desorption and degradation depended on the initial bacterial and naphthalene concentrations, reflecting the influences of these variables on concentration gradients and on the relative rates of mass transfer and biodegradation. The results of this study suggest that chemotaxis can substantially increase the rates of mass transfer and degradation of NAPL-associated hydrophobic pollutants. PMID:14532051

  3. Sperm chemotaxis and regulation of flagellar movement by Ca2+.

    PubMed

    Yoshida, Manabu; Yoshida, Kaoru

    2011-08-01

    The chemotaxis of sperm towards eggs is a widespread phenomenon that occurs in most forms of life from lower plants to mammals and plays important roles in ensuring fertilization. In spermatozoa, the attractants act as beacons, indicating the path leading to the eggs from the same species. The existence of species-specific sperm chemotaxis has been demonstrated in marine invertebrates; thus, sperm chemotaxis may be involved in preventing crossbreeding, especially in marine invertebrates with external fertilization. However, the mechanisms of sperm chemotaxis in mammalian species differ from those of marine invertebrates. In mammals, the attractant source is not the egg, but follicular fluids or cumulus cells and chemotactic behaviour is shown only in small populations of sperm. Nevertheless, the fundamental mechanisms underlying sperm chemotaxis are likely to be common among all species. Among these mechanisms, intracellular Ca(2+) concentration ([Ca(2+)](i)) is an important factor for the regulation of chemotactic behaviour in spermatozoa. Sperm attractants induce the entry of extracellular Ca(2+), resulting in [Ca(2+)](i) increase in the sperm cells. Furthermore, [Ca(2+)](i) modulates sperm flagellar movement. However, the relationship between [Ca(2+)](i) and the chemotactic response of a sperm flagellum is not well known. Investigation of the dynamic responses of sperm cells to their attractants is important for our understanding of the regulation of fertilization. Here, we reviewed sperm chemotaxis focusing on the mechanisms that regulate sperm flagellar beating during the chemotactic response.

  4. Phylogenomic analysis reveals dynamic evolutionary history of the Drosophila heterochromatin protein 1 (HP1) gene family.

    PubMed

    Levine, Mia T; McCoy, Connor; Vermaak, Danielle; Lee, Yuh Chwen G; Hiatt, Mary Alice; Matsen, Frederick A; Malik, Harmit S

    2012-01-01

    Heterochromatin is the gene-poor, satellite-rich eukaryotic genome compartment that supports many essential cellular processes. The functional diversity of proteins that bind and often epigenetically define heterochromatic DNA sequence reflects the diverse functions supported by this enigmatic genome compartment. Moreover, heterogeneous signatures of selection at chromosomal proteins often mirror the heterogeneity of evolutionary forces that act on heterochromatic DNA. To identify new such surrogates for dissecting heterochromatin function and evolution, we conducted a comprehensive phylogenomic analysis of the Heterochromatin Protein 1 gene family across 40 million years of Drosophila evolution. Our study expands this gene family from 5 genes to at least 26 genes, including several uncharacterized genes in Drosophila melanogaster. The 21 newly defined HP1s introduce unprecedented structural diversity, lineage-restriction, and germline-biased expression patterns into the HP1 family. We find little evidence of positive selection at these HP1 genes in both population genetic and molecular evolution analyses. Instead, we find that dynamic evolution occurs via prolific gene gains and losses. Despite this dynamic gene turnover, the number of HP1 genes is relatively constant across species. We propose that karyotype evolution drives at least some HP1 gene turnover. For example, the loss of the male germline-restricted HP1E in the obscura group coincides with one episode of dramatic karyotypic evolution, including the gain of a neo-Y in this lineage. This expanded compendium of ovary- and testis-restricted HP1 genes revealed by our study, together with correlated gain/loss dynamics and chromosome fission/fusion events, will guide functional analyses of novel roles supported by germline chromatin.

  5. Reciprocal gene replacements reveal unique functions for Phox2 genes during neural differentiation

    PubMed Central

    Coppola, Eva; Pattyn, Alexandre; Guthrie, Sarah C; Goridis, Christo; Studer, Michèle

    2005-01-01

    The paralogous paired-like homeobox genes Phox2a and Phox2b are involved in the development of specific neural subtypes in the central and peripheral nervous systems. The different phenotypes of Phox2 knockout mutants, together with their asynchronous onset of expression, prompted us to generate two knock-in mutant mice, in which Phox2a is replaced by the Phox2b coding sequence, and vice versa. Our results indicate that Phox2a and Phox2b are not functionally equivalent, as only Phox2b can fulfill the role of Phox2a in the structures that depend on both genes. Furthermore, we demonstrate unique roles of Phox2 genes in the differentiation of specific motor neurons. Whereas the oculomotor and the trochlear neurons require Phox2a for their proper development, the migration of the facial branchiomotor neurons depends on Phox2b. Therefore, our analysis strongly indicates that biochemical differences between the proteins rather than temporal regulation of their expression account for the specific function of each paralogue. PMID:16319924

  6. Draft Genome Sequence of Arthrobacter crystallopoietes Strain BAB-32, Revealing Genes for Bioremediation

    PubMed Central

    Joshi, M. N.; Pandit, A. S.; Sharma, A.; Pandya, R. V.; Desai, S. M.; Saxena, A. K.

    2013-01-01

    Arthrobacter crystallopoietes strain BAB-32, a Gram-positive obligate aerobic actinobacterium having potential application in bioremediation and bioreduction of a few metals, was isolated from rhizosphere soil of Gandhinagar, Gujarat, India. The draft genome (4.3 Mb) of the strain revealed a few vital gene clusters involved in the metabolism of aromatic compounds, zinc, and sulfur. PMID:23833141

  7. The Role of cheA Genes in Swarming and Swimming Motility of Pseudomonas pseudoalcaligenes KF707

    PubMed Central

    Fedi, Stefano; Barberi, Tania Triscari; Nappi, Maria Rosaria; Sandri, Federica; Booth, Sean; Turner, Raymond J.; Attimonelli, Marcella; Cappelletti, Martina; Zannoni, Davide

    2016-01-01

    A genome analysis of Pseudomonas pseudoalcaligenes KF707, a PCBs degrader and metal-resistant soil microorganism, revealed the presence of two novel gene clusters named che2 and che3, which were predicted to be involved in chemotaxis-like pathways, in addition to a che1 gene cluster. We herein report that the histidine kinase coding genes, cheA2 and cheA3, have no role in swimming or chemotaxis in P. pseudoalcaligenes KF707, in contrast to cheA1. However, the cheA1 and cheA2 genes were both necessary for cell swarming, whereas the cheA3 gene product had a negative effect on the optimal swarming phenotype of KF707 cells. PMID:27151656

  8. Gain and Loss of Phototrophic Genes Revealed by Comparison of Two Citromicrobium Bacterial Genomes

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, Qiang; Zhang, Rui; Fogg, Paul C. M.; Beatty, J. Thomas; Wang, Yu; Jiao, Nianzhi

    2012-01-01

    Proteobacteria are thought to have diverged from a phototrophic ancestor, according to the scattered distribution of phototrophy throughout the proteobacterial clade, and so the occurrence of numerous closely related phototrophic and chemotrophic microorganisms may be the result of the loss of genes for phototrophy. A widespread form of bacterial phototrophy is based on the photochemical reaction center, encoded by puf and puh operons that typically are in a ‘photosynthesis gene cluster’ (abbreviated as the PGC) with pigment biosynthesis genes. Comparison of two closely related Citromicrobial genomes (98.1% sequence identity of complete 16S rRNA genes), Citromicrobium sp. JL354, which contains two copies of reaction center genes, and Citromicrobium strain JLT1363, which is chemotrophic, revealed evidence for the loss of phototrophic genes. However, evidence of horizontal gene transfer was found in these two bacterial genomes. An incomplete PGC (pufLMC-puhCBA) in strain JL354 was located within an integrating conjugative element, which indicates a potential mechanism for the horizontal transfer of genes for phototrophy. PMID:22558224

  9. DNA entropy reveals a significant difference in complexity between housekeeping and tissue specific gene promoters.

    PubMed

    Thomas, David; Finan, Chris; Newport, Melanie J; Jones, Susan

    2015-10-01

    The complexity of DNA can be quantified using estimates of entropy. Variation in DNA complexity is expected between the promoters of genes with different transcriptional mechanisms; namely housekeeping (HK) and tissue specific (TS). The former are transcribed constitutively to maintain general cellular functions, and the latter are transcribed in restricted tissue and cells types for specific molecular events. It is known that promoter features in the human genome are related to tissue specificity, but this has been difficult to quantify on a genomic scale. If entropy effectively quantifies DNA complexity, calculating the entropies of HK and TS gene promoters as profiles may reveal significant differences. Entropy profiles were calculated for a total dataset of 12,003 human gene promoters and for 501 housekeeping (HK) and 587 tissue specific (TS) human gene promoters. The mean profiles show the TS promoters have a significantly lower entropy (p<2.2e-16) than HK gene promoters. The entropy distributions for the 3 datasets show that promoter entropies could be used to identify novel HK genes. Functional features comprise DNA sequence patterns that are non-random and hence they have lower entropies. The lower entropy of TS gene promoters can be explained by a higher density of positive and negative regulatory elements, required for genes with complex spatial and temporary expression. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Comparative transcriptomics of three Poaceae species reveals patterns of gene expression evolution.

    PubMed

    Davidson, Rebecca M; Gowda, Malali; Moghe, Gaurav; Lin, Haining; Vaillancourt, Brieanne; Shiu, Shin-Han; Jiang, Ning; Robin Buell, C

    2012-08-01

    The Poaceae family, also known as the grasses, includes agronomically important cereal crops such as rice, maize, sorghum, and wheat. Previous comparative studies have shown that much of the gene content is shared among the grasses; however, functional conservation of orthologous genes has yet to be explored. To gain an understanding of the genome-wide patterns of evolution of gene expression across reproductive tissues, we employed a sequence-based approach to compare analogous transcriptomes in species representing three Poaceae subgroups including the Pooideae (Brachypodium distachyon), the Panicoideae (sorghum), and the Ehrhartoideae (rice). Our transcriptome analyses reveal that only a fraction of orthologous genes exhibit conserved expression patterns. A high proportion of conserved orthologs include genes that are upregulated in physiologically similar tissues such as leaves, anther, pistil, and embryo, while orthologs that are highly expressed in seeds show the most diverged expression patterns. More generally, we show that evolution of gene expression profiles and coding sequences in the grasses may be linked. Genes that are highly and broadly expressed tend to be conserved at the coding sequence level while genes with narrow expression patterns show accelerated rates of sequence evolution. We further show that orthologs in syntenic genomic blocks are more likely to share correlated expression patterns compared with non-syntenic orthologs. These findings are important for agricultural improvement because sequence information is transferred from model species, such as Brachypodium, rice, and sorghum to crop plants without sequenced genomes. © 2012 The Authors. The Plant Journal © 2012 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  11. Pax3/7 genes reveal conservation and divergence in the arthropod segmentation hierarchy.

    PubMed

    Davis, Gregory K; D'Alessio, Joseph A; Patel, Nipam H

    2005-09-01

    Several features of Pax3/7 gene expression are shared among distantly related insects, including pair-rule, segment polarity, and neural patterns. Recent data from arachnids imply that roles in segmentation and neurogenesis are likely to be played by Pax3/7 genes in all arthropods. To further investigate Pax3/7 genes in non-insect arthropods, we isolated two monoclonal antibodies that recognize the products of Pax3/7 genes in a wide range of taxa, allowing us to quickly survey Pax3/7 expression in all four major arthropod groups. Epitope analysis reveals that these antibodies react to a small subset of Paired-class homeodomains, which includes the products of all known Pax3/7 genes. Using these antibodies, we find that Pax3/7 genes in crustaceans are expressed in an early broad and, in one case, dynamic domain followed by segmental stripes, while myriapods and chelicerates exhibit segmental stripes that form early in the posterior-most part of the germ band. This suggests that Pax3/7 genes acquired their role in segmentation deep within, or perhaps prior to, the arthropod lineage. However, we do not detect evidence of pair-rule patterning in either myriapods or chelicerates, suggesting that the early pair-rule expression pattern of Pax3/7 genes in insects may have been acquired within the crustacean-hexapod lineage.

  12. Comparison of larval and adult Drosophila astrocytes reveals stage-specific gene expression profiles.

    PubMed

    Huang, Yanmei; Ng, Fanny S; Jackson, F Rob

    2015-02-04

    The analysis of adult astrocyte glial cells has revealed a remarkable heterogeneity with regard to morphology, molecular signature, and physiology. A key question in glial biology is how such heterogeneity arises during brain development. One approach to this question is to identify genes with differential astrocyte expression during development; certain genes expressed later in neural development may contribute to astrocyte differentiation. We have utilized the Drosophila model and Translating Ribosome Affinity Purification (TRAP)-RNA-seq methods to derive the genome-wide expression profile of Drosophila larval astrocyte-like cells (hereafter referred to as astrocytes) for the first time. These studies identified hundreds of larval astrocyte-enriched genes that encode proteins important for metabolism, energy production, and protein synthesis, consistent with the known role of astrocytes in the metabolic support of neurons. Comparison of the larval profile with that observed for adults has identified genes with astrocyte-enriched expression specific to adulthood. These include genes important for metabolism and energy production, translation, chromatin modification, protein glycosylation, neuropeptide signaling, immune responses, vesicle-mediated trafficking or secretion, and the regulation of behavior. Among these functional classes, the expression of genes important for chromatin modification and vesicle-mediated trafficking or secretion is overrepresented in adult astrocytes based on Gene Ontology analysis. Certain genes with selective adult enrichment may mediate functions specific to this stage or may be important for the differentiation or maintenance of adult astrocytes, with the latter perhaps contributing to population heterogeneity.

  13. Whole genome sequence of Desulfovibrio magneticus strain RS-1 revealed common gene clusters in magnetotactic bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Nakazawa, Hidekazu; Arakaki, Atsushi; Narita-Yamada, Sachiko; Yashiro, Isao; Jinno, Koji; Aoki, Natsuko; Tsuruyama, Ai; Okamura, Yoshiko; Tanikawa, Satoshi; Fujita, Nobuyuki; Takeyama, Haruko; Matsunaga, Tadashi

    2009-01-01

    Magnetotactic bacteria are ubiquitous microorganisms that synthesize intracellular magnetite particles (magnetosomes) by accumulating Fe ions from aquatic environments. Recent molecular studies, including comprehensive proteomic, transcriptomic, and genomic analyses, have considerably improved our hypotheses of the magnetosome-formation mechanism. However, most of these studies have been conducted using pure-cultured bacterial strains of α-proteobacteria. Here, we report the whole-genome sequence of Desulfovibrio magneticus strain RS-1, the only isolate of magnetotactic microorganisms classified under δ-proteobacteria. Comparative genomics of the RS-1 and four α-proteobacterial strains revealed the presence of three separate gene regions (nuo and mamAB-like gene clusters, and gene region of a cryptic plasmid) conserved in all magnetotactic bacteria. The nuo gene cluster, encoding NADH dehydrogenase (complex I), was also common to the genomes of three iron-reducing bacteria exhibiting uncontrolled extracellular and/or intracellular magnetite synthesis. A cryptic plasmid, pDMC1, encodes three homologous genes that exhibit high similarities with those of other magnetotactic bacterial strains. In addition, the mamAB-like gene cluster, encoding the key components for magnetosome formation such as iron transport and magnetosome alignment, was conserved only in the genomes of magnetotactic bacteria as a similar genomic island-like structure. Our findings suggest the presence of core genetic components for magnetosome biosynthesis; these genes may have been acquired into the magnetotactic bacterial genomes by multiple gene-transfer events during proteobacterial evolution. PMID:19675025

  14. Modelling epigenetic regulation of gene expression in 12 human cell types reveals combinatorial patterns of cell-type-specific genes.

    PubMed

    Lu, Yiming; Qu, Wubin; Min, Bo; Liu, Zheyan; Chen, Changsheng; Zhang, Chenggang

    2014-06-01

    The maintenance of the diverse cell types in a multicellular organism is one of the fundamental mysteries of biology. Modelling the dynamic regulatory relationships between the histone modifications and the gene expression across the diverse cell types is essential for the authors to understand the mechanisms of the epigenetic regulation. Here, the authors thoroughly assessed the histone modification enrichment profiles at the promoters and constructed quantitative models between the histone modification abundances and the gene expression in 12 human cell types. The author's results showed that the histone modifications at the promoters exhibited remarkably cell-type-dependent variability in the cell-type-specific (CTS) genes. They demonstrated that the variable profiles of the modifications are highly predictive for the dynamic changes of the gene expression across all the cell types. Their findings revealed the close relationship between the combinatorial patterns of the histone modifications and the CTS gene expression. They anticipate that the findings and the methods they used in this study could provide useful information for the future studies of the regulatory roles of the histone modifications in the CTS genes.

  15. Comorbid Analysis of Genes Associated with Autism Spectrum Disorders Reveals Differential Evolutionary Constraints

    PubMed Central

    David, Maude M.; Enard, David; Ozturk, Alp; Daniels, Jena; Jung, Jae-Yoon; Diaz-Beltran, Leticia; Wall, Dennis. P.

    2016-01-01

    The burden of comorbidity in Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD) is substantial. The symptoms of autism overlap with many other human conditions, reflecting common molecular pathologies suggesting that cross-disorder analysis will help prioritize autism gene candidates. Genes in the intersection between autism and related conditions may represent nonspecific indicators of dysregulation while genes unique to autism may play a more causal role. Thorough literature review allowed us to extract 125 ICD-9 codes comorbid to ASD that we mapped to 30 specific human disorders. In the present work, we performed an automated extraction of genes associated with ASD and its comorbid disorders, and found 1031 genes involved in ASD, among which 262 are involved in ASD only, with the remaining 779 involved in ASD and at least one comorbid disorder. A pathway analysis revealed 13 pathways not involved in any other comorbid disorders and therefore unique to ASD, all associated with basal cellular functions. These pathways differ from the pathways associated with both ASD and its comorbid conditions, with the latter being more specific to neural function. To determine whether the sequence of these genes have been subjected to differential evolutionary constraints, we studied long term constraints by looking into Genomic Evolutionary Rate Profiling, and showed that genes involved in several comorbid disorders seem to have undergone more purifying selection than the genes involved in ASD only. This result was corroborated by a higher dN/dS ratio for genes unique to ASD as compare to those that are shared between ASD and its comorbid disorders. Short-term evolutionary constraints showed the same trend as the pN/pS ratio indicates that genes unique to ASD were under significantly less evolutionary constraint than the genes associated with all other disorders. PMID:27414027

  16. Conserved synteny at the protein family level reveals genes underlying Shewanella species cold tolerance and predicts their novel phenotypes

    SciTech Connect

    Karpinets, Tatiana V.; Obraztsova, Anna; Wang, Yanbing; Schmoyer, Denise D.; Kora, Guruprasad; Park, Byung H.; Serres, Margrethe H.; Romine, Margaret F.; Land, Miriam L.; Kothe, Terence B.; Fredrickson, Jim K.; Nealson, Kenneth H.; Uberbacher, Edward

    2010-03-01

    Bacteria of the genus Shewanella can thrive in different environments and demonstrate significant variability in their metabolic and ecophysiological capabilities including cold and salt tolerance. Genomic characteristics underlying this variability across species are largely unknown. In this study we address the problem by a comparison of the physiological, metabolic and genomic characteristics of 19 sequenced Shewanella species. We have employed two novel approaches based on association of a phenotypic trait with the number of the trait-specific protein families (Pfam domains) and on the conservation of synteny (order in the genome) of the trait-related genes. Our first approach is top-down and involves experimental evaluation and quantification of the species’ cold tolerance followed by identification of the correlated Pfam domains and genes with a conserved synteny. The second, a bottom-up approach, predicts novel phenotypes of the species by calculating profiles of each Pfam domain among their genomes and following pair-wise correlation of the profiles and their network clustering. Using the first approach we find a link between cold and salt tolerance of the species and the presence in the genome of a Na+/H+ antiporter gene cluster. Other cold tolerance related genes includes peptidases, chemotaxis sensory transducer proteins, a cysteine exporter, and helicases. Using the bottom-up approach we found several novel phenotypes in the newly sequenced Shewanella species, including degradation of aromatic compounds by an aerobic hybrid pathway in S. woodyi, degradation of ethanolamine by S. benthica, and propanediol degradation by S. putrefaciens CN32 and S. sp. W3-18-1.

  17. An atlas of gene regulatory networks reveals multiple three-gene mechanisms for interpreting morphogen gradients

    PubMed Central

    Cotterell, James; Sharpe, James

    2010-01-01

    The interpretation of morphogen gradients is a pivotal concept in developmental biology, and several mechanisms have been proposed to explain how gene regulatory networks (GRNs) achieve concentration-dependent responses. However, the number of different mechanisms that may exist for cells to interpret morphogens, and the importance of design features such as feedback or local cell–cell communication, is unclear. A complete understanding of such systems will require going beyond a case-by-case analysis of real morphogen interpretation mechanisms and mapping out a complete GRN ‘design space.' Here, we generate a first atlas of design space for GRNs capable of patterning a homogeneous field of cells into discrete gene expression domains by interpreting a fixed morphogen gradient. We uncover multiple very distinct mechanisms distributed discretely across the atlas, thereby expanding the repertoire of morphogen interpretation network motifs. Analyzing this diverse collection of mechanisms also allows us to predict that local cell–cell communication will rarely be responsible for the basic dose-dependent response of morphogen interpretation networks. PMID:21045819

  18. Lipid rafts function in Ca2+ signaling responsible for activation of sperm motility and chemotaxis in the ascidian Ciona intestinalis.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Lihong; Inaba, Kazuo

    2011-12-01

    Lipid rafts are specialized membrane microdomains that function as signaling platforms across plasma membranes of many animal and plant cells. Although there are several studies implicating the role of lipid rafts in capacitation of mammalian sperm, the function of these structures in sperm motility activation and chemotaxis remains unknown. In the ascidian Ciona intestinalis, egg-derived sperm activating- and attracting-factor (SAAF) induces both activation of sperm motility and sperm chemotaxis to the egg. Here we found that a lipid raft disrupter, methyl-β-cyclodextrin (MCD), inhibited both SAAF-induced sperm motility activation and chemotaxis. MCD inhibited both SAAF-promoted synthesis of intracellular cyclic AMP and sperm motility induced by ionophore-mediated Ca(2+) entry, but not that induced by valinomycin-mediated hyperpolarization. Ca(2+)-imaging revealed that lipid raft disruption inhibited Ca(2+) influx upon activation of sperm motility. The Ca(2+)-activated adenylyl cyclase was clearly inhibited by MCD in isolated lipid rafts. The results suggest that sperm lipid rafts function in signaling upstream of cAMP synthesis, most likely in SAAF-induced Ca(2+) influx, and are required for Ca(2+)-dependent pathways underlying activation and chemotaxis in Ciona sperm. Copyright © 2011 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  19. Analysis of Synaptic Gene Expression in the Neocortex of Primates Reveals Evolutionary Changes in Glutamatergic Neurotransmission

    PubMed Central

    Muntané, Gerard; Horvath, Julie E.; Hof, Patrick R.; Ely, John J.; Hopkins, William D.; Raghanti, Mary Ann; Lewandowski, Albert H.; Wray, Gregory A.; Sherwood, Chet C.

    2015-01-01

    Increased relative brain size characterizes the evolution of primates, suggesting that enhanced cognition plays an important part in the behavioral adaptations of this mammalian order. In addition to changes in brain anatomy, cognition can also be regulated by molecular changes that alter synaptic function, but little is known about modifications of synapses in primate brain evolution. The aim of the current study was to investigate the expression patterns and evolution of 20 synaptic genes from the prefrontal cortex of 12 primate species. The genes investigated included glutamate receptors, scaffolding proteins, synaptic vesicle components, as well as factors involved in synaptic vesicle release and structural components of the nervous system. Our analyses revealed that there have been significant changes during primate brain evolution in the components of the glutamatergic signaling pathway in terms of gene expression, protein expression, and promoter sequence changes. These results could entail functional modifications in the regulation of specific genes related to processes underlying learning and memory. PMID:24408959

  20. Meta-Analysis of Gene Expression Profiles in Acute Promyelocytic Leukemia Reveals Involved Pathways

    PubMed Central

    Jalili, Mahdi; Salehzadeh-Yazdi, Ali; Mohammadi, Saeed; Yaghmaie, Marjan; Ghavamzadeh, Ardeshir; Alimoghaddam, Kamran

    2017-01-01

    Background: Acute promyelocytic leukemia (APL) is a unique subtype of acute leukemia. APL is a curable disease; however, drug resistance, early mortality, disease relapse and treatment-related complications remain challenges in APL patient management. One issue underlying these challenges is that the molecular mechanisms of the disease are not sufficiently understood. Materials and Methods: In this study, we performed a meta-analysis of gene expression profiles derived from microarray experiments and explored the background of disease by functional and pathway analysis. Results: Our analysis revealed a gene signature with 406 genes that are up or down-regulated in APL. The pathway analysis determined that MAPK pathway and its involved elements such as JUN gene and AP-1 play important roles in APL pathogenesis along with insulin-like growth factor–binding protein-7. Conclusion: The results of this meta-analysis could be useful for developing more effective therapy strategies and new targets for diagnosis and drugs. PMID:28286608

  1. Analysis of synaptic gene expression in the neocortex of primates reveals evolutionary changes in glutamatergic neurotransmission.

    PubMed

    Muntané, Gerard; Horvath, Julie E; Hof, Patrick R; Ely, John J; Hopkins, William D; Raghanti, Mary Ann; Lewandowski, Albert H; Wray, Gregory A; Sherwood, Chet C

    2015-06-01

    Increased relative brain size characterizes the evolution of primates, suggesting that enhanced cognition plays an important part in the behavioral adaptations of this mammalian order. In addition to changes in brain anatomy, cognition can also be regulated by molecular changes that alter synaptic function, but little is known about modifications of synapses in primate brain evolution. The aim of the current study was to investigate the expression patterns and evolution of 20 synaptic genes from the prefrontal cortex of 12 primate species. The genes investigated included glutamate receptors, scaffolding proteins, synaptic vesicle components, as well as factors involved in synaptic vesicle release and structural components of the nervous system. Our analyses revealed that there have been significant changes during primate brain evolution in the components of the glutamatergic signaling pathway in terms of gene expression, protein expression, and promoter sequence changes. These results could entail functional modifications in the regulation of specific genes related to processes underlying learning and memory.

  2. Circuit-wide transcriptional profiling reveals brain region-specific gene networks regulating depression susceptibility

    PubMed Central

    Bagot, Rosemary C.; Cates, Hannah M.; Purushothaman, Immanuel; Lorsch, Zachary S.; Walker, Deena M.; Wang, Junshi; Huang, Xiaojie; Schlüter, Oliver M.; Maze, Ian; Peña, Catherine J.; Heller, Elizabeth A.; Issler, Orna; Wang, Minghui; Song, Won-min; Stein, Jason. L.; Liu, Xiaochuan; Doyle, Marie A.; Scobie, Kimberly N.; Sun, Hao Sheng; Neve, Rachael L.; Geschwind, Daniel; Dong, Yan; Shen, Li; Zhang, Bin; Nestler, Eric J.

    2016-01-01

    Summary Depression is a complex, heterogeneous disorder and a leading contributor to the global burden of disease. Most previous research has focused on individual brain regions and genes contributing to depression. However, emerging evidence in humans and animal models suggests that dysregulated circuit function and gene expression across multiple brain regions drive depressive phenotypes. Here we performed RNA-sequencing on 4 brain regions from control animals and those susceptible or resilient to chronic social defeat stress at multiple time points. We employed an integrative network biology approach to identify transcriptional networks and key driver genes that regulate susceptibility to depressive-like symptoms. Further, we validated in vivo several key drivers and their associated transcriptional networks that regulate depression susceptibility and confirmed their functional significance at the levels of gene transcription, synaptic regulation and behavior. Our study reveals novel transcriptional networks that control stress susceptibility and offers fundamentally new leads for antidepressant drug discovery. PMID:27181059

  3. Chemotaxis Toward Sugars in Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    Adler, Julius; Hazelbauer, Gerald L.; Dahl, M. M.

    1973-01-01

    Using a quantitative assay for measuring chemotaxis, we tested a variety of sugars and sugar derivatives for their ability to attract Escherichia coli bacteria. The most effective attractants, i.e., those that have thresholds near 10−5 M or below, are N-acetyl-d-glucosamine, 6-deoxy-d-glucose, d-fructose, d-fucose, 1-d-glycerol-β-d-galactoside, galactitol, d-galactose, d-glucosamine, d-glucose, α-d-glucose-1-phosphate, lactose, maltose, d-mannitol, d-mannose, methyl-β-d-galactoside, methyl-β-d-glucoside, d-ribose, d-sorbitol, and trehalose. Lactose, and probably d-glucose-1-phosphate, are attractive only after conversion to the free monosaccharide, while the other attractants do not require breakdown for taxis. Nine different chemoreceptors are involved in detecting these various attractants. They are called the N-acetyl-glucosamine, fructose, galactose, glucose, maltose, mannitol, ribose, sorbitol, and trehalose chemoreceptors; the specificity of each was studied. The chemoreceptors, with the exception of the one for d-glucose, are inducible. The galactose-binding protein serves as the recognition component of the galactose chemoreceptor. E. coli also has osmotically shockable binding activities for maltose and d-ribose, and these appear to serve as the recognition components for the corresponding chemoreceptors. PMID:4580570

  4. Signal transduction and chemotaxis in mast cells.

    PubMed

    Draber, Petr; Halova, Ivana; Polakovicova, Iva; Kawakami, Toshiaki

    2016-05-05

    Mast cells play crucial roles in both innate and adaptive arms of the immune system. Along with basophils, mast cells are essential effector cells for allergic inflammation that causes asthma, allergic rhinitis, food allergy and atopic dermatitis. Mast cells are usually increased in inflammatory sites of allergy and, upon activation, release various chemical, lipid, peptide and protein mediators of allergic reactions. Since antigen/immunoglobulin E (IgE)-mediated activation of these cells is a central event to trigger allergic reactions, innumerable studies have been conducted on how these cells are activated through cross-linking of the high-affinity IgE receptor (FcεRI). Development of mature mast cells from their progenitor cells is under the influence of several growth factors, of which the stem cell factor (SCF) seems to be the most important. Therefore, how SCF induces mast cell development and activation via its receptor, KIT, has been studied extensively, including a cross-talk between KIT and FcεRI signaling pathways. Although our understanding of the signaling mechanisms of the FcεRI and KIT pathways is far from complete, pharmaceutical applications of the knowledge about these pathways are underway. This review will focus on recent progresses in FcεRI and KIT signaling and chemotaxis.

  5. Optimal search in E. coli chemotaxis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dev, Subrata; Chatterjee, Sakuntala

    2015-04-01

    We study chemotaxis of a single E. coli bacterium in a medium where the nutrient chemical is also undergoing diffusion and its concentration has the form of a Gaussian whose width increases with time. We measure the average first passage time of the bacterium at a region of high nutrient concentration. In the limit of very slow nutrient diffusion, the bacterium effectively experiences a Gaussian concentration profile with a fixed width. In this case we find that there exists an optimum width of the Gaussian when the average first passage time is minimum, i.e., the search process is most efficient. We verify the existence of the optimum width for the deterministic initial position of the bacterium and also for the stochastic initial position, drawn from uniform and steady state distributions. Our numerical simulation in a model of a non-Markovian random walker agrees well with our analytical calculations in a related coarse-grained model. We also present our simulation results for the case when the nutrient diffusion and bacterial motion occur over comparable time scales and the bacterium senses a time-varying concentration field.

  6. Fluidic control over cell proliferation and chemotaxis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Groisman, Alex

    2006-03-01

    Microscopic flows are almost always stable and laminar that allows precise control of chemical environment in micro-channels. We describe design and operation of several microfluidic devices, in which various types of environments are created for different experimental assays with live cells. In a microfluidic chemostat, colonies of non-adherent bacterial and yeast cells are trapped in micro-chambers with walls permeable for chemicals. Fast chemical exchange between the chambers and nearby flow-through channels creates essentially chemostatic medium conditions in the chambers and leads to exponential growth of the colonies up to very high cell densities. Another microfluidic device allows creation of linear concentration profiles of a pheromone (α-factor) across channels with non-adherent yeast cells, without exposure of the cells to flow or other mechanical perturbation. The concentration profile remains stable for hours enabling studies of chemotropic response of the cells to the pheromone gradient. A third type of the microfluidic devices is used to study chemotaxis of human neutrophils exposed to gradients of a chemoattractant (fMLP). The devices generate concentration profiles of various shapes, with adjustable steepness and mean concentration. The ``gradient'' of the chemoattractant can be imposed and reversed within less than a second, allowing repeated quantitative experiments.

  7. Upscaling microbial chemotaxis in porous media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Valdés-Parada, Francisco J.; Porter, Mark L.; Narayanaswamy, Karthik; Ford, Roseanne M.; Wood, Brian D.

    2009-09-01

    Biodegradation is an important mechanism for contaminant reduction in groundwater environments; in fact, in situ bioremediation and bioaugmentation methods represent alternatives to traditional methods such as pump-and-treat. Microbial chemotaxis has been shown to significantly increase contaminant degradation in subsurface environments. In this work, the method of volume averaging is used to upscale the microscale chemotactic microbial transport equations in order to obtain the corresponding effective medium models for the mass balance of bacteria and the chemical attractant to which they respond. As a first approach, cellular growth/death and consumption of the attractant by chemical reaction are assumed to be negligible with respect to convective and diffusive transport mechanisms. For microorganisms, two effective coefficients are introduced, namely a total motility tensor and a total velocity vector. Our results show that, under certain conditions, these coefficients can differ considerably from the values corresponding to non-chemotactic transport. These transport coefficients show strong dependence of the microstructure of the porous medium, the fluid flow fields and the distribution of the attractant.

  8. Signal transduction and chemotaxis in mast cells

    PubMed Central

    Draber, Petr; Halova, Ivana; Polakovicova, Iva; Kawakami, Toshiaki

    2015-01-01

    Mast cells play crucial roles in both innate and adaptive arms of the immune system. Along with basophils, mast cells are essential effector cells for allergic inflammation that causes asthma, allergic rhinitis, food allergy and atopic dermatitis. Mast cells are usually increased in inflammatory sites of allergy and, upon activation, release various chemical, lipid, peptide and protein mediators of allergic reactions. Since antigen/immunoglobulin E (IgE)-mediated activation of these cells is a central event to trigger allergic reactions, innumerable studies have been conducted on how these cells are activated through cross-linking of the high-affinity IgE receptor (FcεRI). Development of mature mast cells from their progenitor cells is under the influence of several growth factors, of which the stem cell factor (SCF) seems to be the most important. Therefore, how SCF induces mast cell development and activation via its receptor, KIT, has been studied extensively, including a cross-talk between KIT and FcεRI signaling pathways. Although our understanding of the signaling mechanisms of the FcεRI and KIT pathways is far from complete, pharmaceutical applications of the knowledge about these pathways are underway. This review will focus on recent progresses in FcεRI and KIT signaling and chemotaxis. PMID:25941081

  9. cDNA Microarray Analysis Revealing Candidate Biomineralization Genes of the Pearl Oyster, Pinctada fucata martensii.

    PubMed

    Shi, Yaohua; Zheng, Xing; Zhan, Xin; Wang, Aimin; Gu, Zhifeng

    2016-06-01

    Biomineralization is a common biological phenomenon resulting in strong tissue, such as bone, tooth, and shell. Pinctada fucata martensii is an ideal animal for the study of biomineralization. Here, microarray technique was used to identify biomineralization gene in mantle edge (ME), mantle center (MC), and both ME and MC (ME-MC) for this pearl oyster. Results revealed that 804, 306, and 1127 contigs expressed at least three times higher in ME, MC, and ME-MC as those in other tissues. Blast against non-redundant database showed that 130 contigs (16.17 %), 53 contigs (17.32 %), and 248 contigs (22.01 %) hit reference genes (E ≤ -10), among which 91 contigs, 48 contigs, and 168 contigs could be assigned to 32, 26, and 63 biomineralization genes in tissue of ME, MC, and ME-MC at a threshold of 3 times upregulated expression level. The ratios of biomineralization contigs to homologous contigs were similar at 3 times, 10 times, and 100 times of upregulated expression level in either ME, MC, or ME-MC. Moreover, the ratio of biomineralization contigs was highest in MC. Although mRNA distribution characters were similar to those in other studies for eight biomineralization genes of PFMG3, Pif, nacrein, MSI7, mantle gene 6, Pfty1, prismin, and the shematrin, most biomineralization genes presented different expression profiles from existing reports. These results provided massive fundamental information for further study of biomineralization gene function, and it may be helpful for revealing gene nets of biomineralization and the molecular mechanisms underlining formation of shell and pearl for the oyster.

  10. Disease-aging network reveals significant roles of aging genes in connecting genetic diseases.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jiguang; Zhang, Shihua; Wang, Yong; Chen, Luonan; Zhang, Xiang-Sun

    2009-09-01

    One of the challenging problems in biology and medicine is exploring the underlying mechanisms of genetic diseases. Recent studies suggest that the relationship between genetic diseases and the aging process is important in understanding the molecular mechanisms of complex diseases. Although some intricate associations have been investigated for a long time, the studies are still in their early stages. In this paper, we construct a human disease-aging network to study the relationship among aging genes and genetic disease genes. Specifically, we integrate human protein-protein interactions (PPIs), disease-gene associations, aging-gene associations, and physiological system-based genetic disease classification information in a single graph-theoretic framework and find that (1) human disease genes are much closer to aging genes than expected by chance; and (2) diseases can be categorized into two types according to their relationships with aging. Type I diseases have their genes significantly close to aging genes, while type II diseases do not. Furthermore, we examine the topological characters of the disease-aging network from a systems perspective. Theoretical results reveal that the genes of type I diseases are in a central position of a PPI network while type II are not; (3) more importantly, we define an asymmetric closeness based on the PPI network to describe relationships between diseases, and find that aging genes make a significant contribution to associations among diseases, especially among type I diseases. In conclusion, the network-based study provides not only evidence for the intricate relationship between the aging process and genetic diseases, but also biological implications for prying into the nature of human diseases.

  11. Comparative transcriptome analysis to reveal genes involved in wheat hybrid necrosis.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yong; Cheng, Yan; Guo, Jiahui; Yang, Ennian; Liu, Cheng; Zheng, Xuelian; Deng, Kejun; Zhou, Jianping

    2014-12-16

    Wheat hybrid necrosis is an interesting genetic phenomenon that is found frequently and results in gradual death or loss of productivity of wheat. However, the molecular basis and mechanisms of this genetic phenomenon are still not well understood. In this study, the transcriptomes of wheat hybrid necrosis F1 and its parents (Neimai 8 and II469) were investigated using digital gene expression (DGE). A total of 1300 differentially expressed genes were identified, indicating that the response to hybrid necrosis in wheat is complicated. The assignments of the annotated genes based on Gene Ontology (GO) revealed that most of the up-regulated genes belong to "universal stress related", "DNA/RNA binding", "protein degradation" functional groups, while the down-regulated genes belong to "carbohydrate metabolism" and "translation regulation" functional groups. These findings suggest that these pathways were affected by hybrid necrosis. Our results provide preliminarily new insight into the underlying molecular mechanisms of hybrid necrosis and will help to identify important candidate genes involved in wheat hybrid necrosis.

  12. Production of individualized V gene databases reveals high levels of immunoglobulin genetic diversity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Corcoran, Martin M.; Phad, Ganesh E.; Bernat, Néstor Vázquez; Stahl-Hennig, Christiane; Sumida, Noriyuki; Persson, Mats A. A.; Martin, Marcel; Hedestam, Gunilla B. Karlsson

    2016-12-01

    Comprehensive knowledge of immunoglobulin genetics is required to advance our understanding of B cell biology. Validated immunoglobulin variable (V) gene databases are close to completion only for human and mouse. We present a novel computational approach, IgDiscover, that identifies germline V genes from expressed repertoires to a specificity of 100%. IgDiscover uses a cluster identification process to produce candidate sequences that, once filtered, results in individualized germline V gene databases. IgDiscover was tested in multiple species, validated by genomic cloning and cross library comparisons and produces comprehensive gene databases even where limited genomic sequence is available. IgDiscover analysis of the allelic content of the Indian and Chinese-origin rhesus macaques reveals high levels of immunoglobulin gene diversity in this species. Further, we describe a novel human IGHV3-21 allele and confirm significant gene differences between Balb/c and C57BL6 mouse strains, demonstrating the power of IgDiscover as a germline V gene discovery tool.

  13. Yeast genome-wide screen reveals dissimilar sets of host genes affecting replication of RNA viruses

    PubMed Central

    Panavas, Tadas; Serviene, Elena; Brasher, Jeremy; Nagy, Peter D.

    2005-01-01

    Viruses are devastating pathogens of humans, animals, and plants. To further our understanding of how viruses use the resources of infected cells, we systematically tested the yeast single-gene-knockout library for the effect of each host gene on the replication of tomato bushy stunt virus (TBSV), a positive-strand RNA virus of plants. The genome-wide screen identified 96 host genes whose absence either reduced or increased the accumulation of the TBSV replicon. The identified genes are involved in the metabolism of nucleic acids, lipids, proteins, and other compounds and in protein targeting/transport. Comparison with published genome-wide screens reveals that the replication of TBSV and brome mosaic virus (BMV), which belongs to a different supergroup among plus-strand RNA viruses, is affected by vastly different yeast genes. Moreover, a set of yeast genes involved in vacuolar targeting of proteins and vesicle-mediated transport both affected replication of the TBSV replicon and enhanced the cytotoxicity of the Parkinson's disease-related α-synuclein when this protein was expressed in yeast. In addition, a set of host genes involved in ubiquitin-dependent protein catabolism affected both TBSV replication and the cytotoxicity of a mutant huntingtin protein, a candidate agent in Huntington's disease. This finding suggests that virus infection and disease-causing proteins might use or alter similar host pathways and may suggest connections between chronic diseases and prior virus infection. PMID:15883361

  14. Transcriptomic Analysis of Leaf in Tree Peony Reveals Differentially Expressed Pigments Genes.

    PubMed

    Luo, Jianrang; Shi, Qianqian; Niu, Lixin; Zhang, Yanlong

    2017-02-20

    Tree peony (Paeonia suffruticosa Andrews) is an important traditional flower in China. Besides its beautiful flower, the leaf of tree peony has also good ornamental value owing to its leaf color change in spring. So far, the molecular mechanism of leaf color change in tree peony is unclear. In this study, the pigment level and transcriptome of three different color stages of tree peony leaf were analyzed. The purplish red leaf was rich in anthocyanin, while yellowish green leaf was rich in chlorophyll and carotenoid. Transcriptome analysis revealed that 4302 differentially expressed genes (DEGs) were upregulated, and 4225 were downregulated in the purplish red leaf vs. yellowish green leaf. Among these DEGs, eight genes were predicted to participate in anthocyanin biosynthesis, eight genes were predicted involved in porphyrin and chlorophyll metabolism, and 10 genes were predicted to participate in carotenoid metabolism. In addition, 27 MYBs, 20 bHLHs, 36 WD40 genes were also identified from DEGs. Anthocyanidin synthase (ANS) is the key gene that controls the anthocyanin level in tree peony leaf. Protochlorophyllide oxido-reductase (POR) is the key gene which regulated the chlorophyll content in tree peony leaf.

  15. Analysis of spatial-temporal gene expression patterns reveals dynamics and regionalization in developing mouse brain.

    PubMed

    Chou, Shen-Ju; Wang, Chindi; Sintupisut, Nardnisa; Niou, Zhen-Xian; Lin, Chih-Hsu; Li, Ker-Chau; Yeang, Chen-Hsiang

    2016-01-20

    Allen Brain Atlas (ABA) provides a valuable resource of spatial/temporal gene expressions in mammalian brains. Despite rich information extracted from this database, current analyses suffer from several limitations. First, most studies are either gene-centric or region-centric, thus are inadequate to capture the superposition of multiple spatial-temporal patterns. Second, standard tools of expression analysis such as matrix factorization can capture those patterns but do not explicitly incorporate spatial dependency. To overcome those limitations, we proposed a computational method to detect recurrent patterns in the spatial-temporal gene expression data of developing mouse brains. We demonstrated that regional distinction in brain development could be revealed by localized gene expression patterns. The patterns expressed in the forebrain, medullary and pontomedullary, and basal ganglia are enriched with genes involved in forebrain development, locomotory behavior, and dopamine metabolism respectively. In addition, the timing of global gene expression patterns reflects the general trends of molecular events in mouse brain development. Furthermore, we validated functional implications of the inferred patterns by showing genes sharing similar spatial-temporal expression patterns with Lhx2 exhibited differential expression in the embryonic forebrains of Lhx2 mutant mice. These analysis outcomes confirm the utility of recurrent expression patterns in studying brain development.

  16. Genome-wide generation and systematic phenotyping of knockout mice reveals new roles for many genes.

    PubMed

    White, Jacqueline K; Gerdin, Anna-Karin; Karp, Natasha A; Ryder, Ed; Buljan, Marija; Bussell, James N; Salisbury, Jennifer; Clare, Simon; Ingham, Neil J; Podrini, Christine; Houghton, Richard; Estabel, Jeanne; Bottomley, Joanna R; Melvin, David G; Sunter, David; Adams, Niels C; Tannahill, David; Logan, Darren W; Macarthur, Daniel G; Flint, Jonathan; Mahajan, Vinit B; Tsang, Stephen H; Smyth, Ian; Watt, Fiona M; Skarnes, William C; Dougan, Gordon; Adams, David J; Ramirez-Solis, Ramiro; Bradley, Allan; Steel, Karen P

    2013-07-18

    Mutations in whole organisms are powerful ways of interrogating gene function in a realistic context. We describe a program, the Sanger Institute Mouse Genetics Project, that provides a step toward the aim of knocking out all genes and screening each line for a broad range of traits. We found that hitherto unpublished genes were as likely to reveal phenotypes as known genes, suggesting that novel genes represent a rich resource for investigating the molecular basis of disease. We found many unexpected phenotypes detected only because we screened for them, emphasizing the value of screening all mutants for a wide range of traits. Haploinsufficiency and pleiotropy were both surprisingly common. Forty-two percent of genes were essential for viability, and these were less likely to have a paralog and more likely to contribute to a protein complex than other genes. Phenotypic data and more than 900 mutants are openly available for further analysis. PAPERCLIP: Copyright © 2013 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Production of individualized V gene databases reveals high levels of immunoglobulin genetic diversity

    PubMed Central

    Corcoran, Martin M.; Phad, Ganesh E.; Bernat, Néstor Vázquez; Stahl-Hennig, Christiane; Sumida, Noriyuki; Persson, Mats A.A.; Martin, Marcel; Hedestam, Gunilla B. Karlsson

    2016-01-01

    Comprehensive knowledge of immunoglobulin genetics is required to advance our understanding of B cell biology. Validated immunoglobulin variable (V) gene databases are close to completion only for human and mouse. We present a novel computational approach, IgDiscover, that identifies germline V genes from expressed repertoires to a specificity of 100%. IgDiscover uses a cluster identification process to produce candidate sequences that, once filtered, results in individualized germline V gene databases. IgDiscover was tested in multiple species, validated by genomic cloning and cross library comparisons and produces comprehensive gene databases even where limited genomic sequence is available. IgDiscover analysis of the allelic content of the Indian and Chinese-origin rhesus macaques reveals high levels of immunoglobulin gene diversity in this species. Further, we describe a novel human IGHV3-21 allele and confirm significant gene differences between Balb/c and C57BL6 mouse strains, demonstrating the power of IgDiscover as a germline V gene discovery tool. PMID:27995928

  18. An integrative systems genetics approach reveals potential causal genes and pathways related to obesity.

    PubMed

    Kogelman, Lisette J A; Zhernakova, Daria V; Westra, Harm-Jan; Cirera, Susanna; Fredholm, Merete; Franke, Lude; Kadarmideen, Haja N

    2015-10-20

    Obesity is a multi-factorial health problem in which genetic factors play an important role. Limited results have been obtained in single-gene studies using either genomic or transcriptomic data. RNA sequencing technology has shown its potential in gaining accurate knowledge about the transcriptome, and may reveal novel genes affecting complex diseases. Integration of genomic and transcriptomic variation (expression quantitative trait loci [eQTL] mapping) has identified causal variants that affect complex diseases. We integrated transcriptomic data from adipose tissue and genomic data from a porcine model to investigate the mechanisms involved in obesity using a systems genetics approach. Using a selective gene expression profiling approach, we selected 36 animals based on a previously created genomic Obesity Index for RNA sequencing of subcutaneous adipose tissue. Differential expression analysis was performed using the Obesity Index as a continuous variable in a linear model. eQTL mapping was then performed to integrate 60 K porcine SNP chip data with the RNA sequencing data. Results were restricted based on genome-wide significant single nucleotide polymorphisms, detected differentially expressed genes, and previously detected co-expressed gene modules. Further data integration was performed by detecting co-expression patterns among eQTLs and integration with protein data. Differential expression analysis of RNA sequencing data revealed 458 differentially expressed genes. The eQTL mapping resulted in 987 cis-eQTLs and 73 trans-eQTLs (false discovery rate < 0.05), of which the cis-eQTLs were associated with metabolic pathways. We reduced the eQTL search space by focusing on differentially expressed and co-expressed genes and disease-associated single nucleotide polymorphisms to detect obesity-related genes and pathways. Building a co-expression network using eQTLs resulted in the detection of a module strongly associated with lipid pathways. Furthermore, we

  19. Differential Gene Expression by Lactobacillus plantarum WCFS1 in Response to Phenolic Compounds Reveals New Genes Involved in Tannin Degradation.

    PubMed

    Reverón, Inés; Jiménez, Natalia; Curiel, José Antonio; Peñas, Elena; López de Felipe, Félix; de Las Rivas, Blanca; Muñoz, Rosario

    2017-04-01

    Lactobacillus plantarum is a lactic acid bacterium that can degrade food tannins by the successive action of tannase and gallate decarboxylase enzymes. In the L. plantarum genome, the gene encoding the catalytic subunit of gallate decarboxylase (lpdC, or lp_2945) is only 6.5 kb distant from the gene encoding inducible tannase (L. plantarumtanB [tanBLp ], or lp_2956). This genomic context suggests concomitant activity and regulation of both enzymatic activities. Reverse transcription analysis revealed that subunits B (lpdB, or lp_0271) and D (lpdD, or lp_0272) of the gallate decarboxylase are cotranscribed, whereas subunit C (lpdC, or lp_2945) is cotranscribed with a gene encoding a transport protein (gacP, or lp_2943). In contrast, the tannase gene is transcribed as a monocistronic mRNA. Investigation of knockout mutations of genes located in this chromosomal region indicated that only mutants of the gallate decarboxylase (subunits B and C), tannase, GacP transport protein, and TanR transcriptional regulator (lp_2942) genes exhibited altered tannin metabolism. The expression profile of genes involved in tannin metabolism was also analyzed in these mutants in the presence of methyl gallate and gallic acid. It is noteworthy that inactivation of tanR suppresses the induction of all genes overexpressed in the presence of methyl gallate and gallic acid. This transcriptional regulator was also induced in the presence of other phenolic compounds, such as kaempferol and myricetin. This study complements the catalog of L. plantarum expression profiles responsive to phenolic compounds, which enable this bacterium to adapt to a plant food environment.IMPORTANCELactobacillus plantarum is a bacterial species frequently found in the fermentation of vegetables when tannins are present. L. plantarum strains degrade tannins to the less-toxic pyrogallol by the successive action of tannase and gallate decarboxylase enzymes. The genes encoding these enzymes are located close to each

  20. An EST-based analysis identifies new genes and reveals distinctive gene expression features of Coffea arabica and Coffea canephora.

    PubMed

    Mondego, Jorge Mc; Vidal, Ramon O; Carazzolle, Marcelo F; Tokuda, Eric K; Parizzi, Lucas P; Costa, Gustavo Gl; Pereira, Luiz Fp; Andrade, Alan C; Colombo, Carlos A; Vieira, Luiz Ge; Pereira, Gonçalo Ag

    2011-02-08

    Coffee is one of the world's most important crops; it is consumed worldwide and plays a significant role in the economy of producing countries. Coffea arabica and C. canephora are responsible for 70 and 30% of commercial production, respectively. C. arabica is an allotetraploid from a recent hybridization of the diploid species, C. canephora and C. eugenioides. C. arabica has lower genetic diversity and results in a higher quality beverage than C. canephora. Research initiatives have been launched to produce genomic and transcriptomic data about Coffea spp. as a strategy to improve breeding efficiency. Assembling the expressed sequence tags (ESTs) of C. arabica and C. canephora produced by the Brazilian Coffee Genome Project and the Nestlé-Cornell Consortium revealed 32,007 clusters of C. arabica and 16,665 clusters of C. canephora. We detected different GC3 profiles between these species that are related to their genome structure and mating system. BLAST analysis revealed similarities between coffee and grape (Vitis vinifera) genes. Using KA/KS analysis, we identified coffee genes under purifying and positive selection. Protein domain and gene ontology analyses suggested differences between Coffea spp. data, mainly in relation to complex sugar synthases and nucleotide binding proteins. OrthoMCL was used to identify specific and prevalent coffee protein families when compared to five other plant species. Among the interesting families annotated are new cystatins, glycine-rich proteins and RALF-like peptides. Hierarchical clustering was used to independently group C. arabica and C. canephora expression clusters according to expression data extracted from EST libraries, resulting in the identification of differentially expressed genes. Based on these results, we emphasize gene annotation and discuss plant defenses, abiotic stress and cup quality-related functional categories. We present the first comprehensive genome-wide transcript profile study of C. arabica and C

  1. An EST-based analysis identifies new genes and reveals distinctive gene expression features of Coffea arabica and Coffea canephora

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Coffee is one of the world's most important crops; it is consumed worldwide and plays a significant role in the economy of producing countries. Coffea arabica and C. canephora are responsible for 70 and 30% of commercial production, respectively. C. arabica is an allotetraploid from a recent hybridization of the diploid species, C. canephora and C. eugenioides. C. arabica has lower genetic diversity and results in a higher quality beverage than C. canephora. Research initiatives have been launched to produce genomic and transcriptomic data about Coffea spp. as a strategy to improve breeding efficiency. Results Assembling the expressed sequence tags (ESTs) of C. arabica and C. canephora produced by the Brazilian Coffee Genome Project and the Nestlé-Cornell Consortium revealed 32,007 clusters of C. arabica and 16,665 clusters of C. canephora. We detected different GC3 profiles between these species that are related to their genome structure and mating system. BLAST analysis revealed similarities between coffee and grape (Vitis vinifera) genes. Using KA/KS analysis, we identified coffee genes under purifying and positive selection. Protein domain and gene ontology analyses suggested differences between Coffea spp. data, mainly in relation to complex sugar synthases and nucleotide binding proteins. OrthoMCL was used to identify specific and prevalent coffee protein families when compared to five other plant species. Among the interesting families annotated are new cystatins, glycine-rich proteins and RALF-like peptides. Hierarchical clustering was used to independently group C. arabica and C. canephora expression clusters according to expression data extracted from EST libraries, resulting in the identification of differentially expressed genes. Based on these results, we emphasize gene annotation and discuss plant defenses, abiotic stress and cup quality-related functional categories. Conclusion We present the first comprehensive genome-wide transcript

  2. Single-cell gene expression profiling reveals functional heterogeneity of undifferentiated human epidermal cells

    PubMed Central

    Tan, David W. M.; Jensen, Kim B.; Trotter, Matthew W. B.; Connelly, John T.; Broad, Simon; Watt, Fiona M.

    2013-01-01

    Human epidermal stem cells express high levels of β1 integrins, delta-like 1 (DLL1) and the EGFR antagonist LRIG1. However, there is cell-to-cell variation in the relative abundance of DLL1 and LRIG1 mRNA transcripts. Single-cell global gene expression profiling showed that undifferentiated cells fell into two clusters delineated by expression of DLL1 and its binding partner syntenin. The DLL1+ cluster had elevated expression of genes associated with endocytosis, integrin-mediated adhesion and receptor tyrosine kinase signalling. Differentially expressed genes were not independently regulated, as overexpression of DLL1 alone or together with LRIG1 led to the upregulation of other genes in the DLL1+ cluster. Overexpression of DLL1 and LRIG1 resulted in enhanced extracellular matrix adhesion and increased caveolin-dependent EGFR endocytosis. Further characterisation of CD46, one of the genes upregulated in the DLL1+ cluster, revealed it to be a novel cell surface marker of human epidermal stem cells. Cells with high endogenous levels of CD46 expressed high levels of β1 integrin and DLL1 and were highly adhesive and clonogenic. Knockdown of CD46 decreased proliferative potential and β1 integrin-mediated adhesion. Thus, the previously unknown heterogeneity revealed by our studies results in differences in the interaction of undifferentiated basal keratinocytes with their environment. PMID:23482486

  3. The genome of Rhizobiales bacteria in predatory ants reveals urease gene functions but no genes for nitrogen fixation.

    PubMed

    Neuvonen, Minna-Maria; Tamarit, Daniel; Näslund, Kristina; Liebig, Juergen; Feldhaar, Heike; Moran, Nancy A; Guy, Lionel; Andersson, Siv G E

    2016-12-15

    Gut-associated microbiota of ants include Rhizobiales bacteria with affiliation to the genus Bartonella. These bacteria may enable the ants to fix atmospheric nitrogen, but no genomes have been sequenced yet to test the hypothesis. Sequence reads from a member of the Rhizobiales were identified in the data collected in a genome project of the ant Harpegnathos saltator. We present an analysis of the closed 1.86 Mb genome of the ant-associated bacterium, for which we suggest the species name Candidatus Tokpelaia hoelldoblerii. A phylogenetic analysis reveals a relationship to Bartonella and Brucella, which infect mammals. Novel gene acquisitions include a gene for a putative extracellular protein of more than 6,000 amino acids secreted by the type I secretion system, which may be involved in attachment to the gut epithelium. No genes for nitrogen fixation could be identified, but genes for a multi-subunit urease protein complex are present in the genome. The urease genes are also present in Brucella, which has a fecal-oral transmission pathway, but not in Bartonella, which use blood-borne transmission pathways. We hypothesize that the gain and loss of the urease function is related to transmission strategies and lifestyle changes in the host-associated members of the Rhizobiales.

  4. The genome of Rhizobiales bacteria in predatory ants reveals urease gene functions but no genes for nitrogen fixation

    PubMed Central

    Neuvonen, Minna-Maria; Tamarit, Daniel; Näslund, Kristina; Liebig, Juergen; Feldhaar, Heike; Moran, Nancy A.; Guy, Lionel; Andersson, Siv G. E.

    2016-01-01

    Gut-associated microbiota of ants include Rhizobiales bacteria with affiliation to the genus Bartonella. These bacteria may enable the ants to fix atmospheric nitrogen, but no genomes have been sequenced yet to test the hypothesis. Sequence reads from a member of the Rhizobiales were identified in the data collected in a genome project of the ant Harpegnathos saltator. We present an analysis of the closed 1.86 Mb genome of the ant-associated bacterium, for which we suggest the species name Candidatus Tokpelaia hoelldoblerii. A phylogenetic analysis reveals a relationship to Bartonella and Brucella, which infect mammals. Novel gene acquisitions include a gene for a putative extracellular protein of more than 6,000 amino acids secreted by the type I secretion system, which may be involved in attachment to the gut epithelium. No genes for nitrogen fixation could be identified, but genes for a multi-subunit urease protein complex are present in the genome. The urease genes are also present in Brucella, which has a fecal-oral transmission pathway, but not in Bartonella, which use blood-borne transmission pathways. We hypothesize that the gain and loss of the urease function is related to transmission strategies and lifestyle changes in the host-associated members of the Rhizobiales. PMID:27976703

  5. Transcriptome sequencing of Mycosphaerella fijiensis during association with Musa acuminata reveals candidate pathogenicity genes.

    PubMed

    Noar, Roslyn D; Daub, Margaret E

    2016-08-30

    genes with higher expression in infected leaf tissue, suggesting that they may play a role in pathogenicity. For two other scaffolds, no transcripts were detected in either condition, and PCR assays support the hypothesis that at least one of these scaffolds corresponds to a dispensable chromosome that is not required for survival or pathogenicity. Our study revealed major changes in the transcriptome of Mycosphaerella fijiensis, when associating with its host compared to during saprophytic growth in medium. This analysis identified putative pathogenicity genes and also provides support for the existence of dispensable chromosomes in this fungus.

  6. Gene targeting by the TAL effector PthXo2 reveals cryptic resistance gene for bacterial blight of rice.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Junhui; Peng, Zhao; Long, Juying; Sosso, Davide; Liu, Bo; Eom, Joon-Seob; Huang, Sheng; Liu, Sanzhen; Vera Cruz, Casiana; Frommer, Wolf B; White, Frank F; Yang, Bing

    2015-05-01

    Bacterial blight of rice is caused by the γ-proteobacterium Xanthomonas oryzae pv. oryzae, which utilizes a group of type III TAL (transcription activator-like) effectors to induce host gene expression and condition host susceptibility. Five SWEET genes are functionally redundant to support bacterial disease, but only two were experimentally proven targets of natural TAL effectors. Here, we report the identification of the sucrose transporter gene OsSWEET13 as the disease-susceptibility gene for PthXo2 and the existence of cryptic recessive resistance to PthXo2-dependent X. oryzae pv. oryzae due to promoter variations of OsSWEET13 in japonica rice. PthXo2-containing strains induce OsSWEET13 in indica rice IR24 due to the presence of an unpredicted and undescribed effector binding site not present in the alleles in japonica rice Nipponbare and Kitaake. The specificity of effector-associated gene induction and disease susceptibility is attributable to a single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP), which is also found in a polymorphic allele of OsSWEET13 known as the recessive resistance gene xa25 from the rice cultivar Minghui 63. The mutation of OsSWEET13 with CRISPR/Cas9 technology further corroborates the requirement of OsSWEET13 expression for the state of PthXo2-dependent disease susceptibility to X. oryzae pv. oryzae. Gene profiling of a collection of 104 strains revealed OsSWEET13 induction by 42 isolates of X. oryzae pv. oryzae. Heterologous expression of OsSWEET13 in Nicotiana benthamiana leaf cells elevates sucrose concentrations in the apoplasm. The results corroborate a model whereby X. oryzae pv. oryzae enhances the release of sucrose from host cells in order to exploit the host resources.

  7. Heterogeneity of neural progenitor cells revealed by enhancers in the nestin gene

    PubMed Central

    Yaworsky, Paul J.; Kappen, Claudia

    2014-01-01

    Using transgenic embryos, we have identified two distinct CNS progenitor cell-specific enhancers, each requiring the cooperation of at least two independent regulatory sites, within the second intron of the rat nestin gene. One enhancer is active throughout the developing CNS while the other is specifically active in the ventral midbrain. These experiments demonstrate that neural progenitor cells in the midbrain constitute a unique subpopulation based upon their ability to activate the midbrain regulatory elements. Our finding of differential enhancer activity from a gene encoding a structural protein reveals a previously unrecognized diversity in neural progenitor cell populations. PMID:9917366

  8. Genome-Wide Analysis of Gene Expression in Primate Taste Buds Reveals Links to Diverse Processes

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Min; Gao, Na; White, Evan; Echeverri, Fernando; Kalabat, Dalia; Soto, Hortensia; Laita, Bianca; Li, Cherry; Yeh, Shaoyang Anthony; Zoller, Mark; Zlotnik, Albert

    2009-01-01

    Efforts to unravel the mechanisms underlying taste sensation (gustation) have largely focused on rodents. Here we present the first comprehensive characterization of gene expression in primate taste buds. Our findings reveal unique new insights into the biology of taste buds. We generated a taste bud gene expression database using laser capture microdissection (LCM) procured fungiform (FG) and circumvallate (CV) taste buds from primates. We also used LCM to collect the top and bottom portions of CV taste buds. Affymetrix genome wide arrays were used to analyze gene expression in all samples. Known taste receptors are preferentially expressed in the top portion of taste buds. Genes associated with the cell cycle and stem cells are preferentially expressed in the bottom portion of taste buds, suggesting that precursor cells are located there. Several chemokines including CXCL14 and CXCL8 are among the highest expressed genes in taste buds, indicating that immune system related processes are active in taste buds. Several genes expressed specifically in endocrine glands including growth hormone releasing hormone and its receptor are also strongly expressed in taste buds, suggesting a link between metabolism and taste. Cell type-specific expression of transcription factors and signaling molecules involved in cell fate, including KIT, reveals the taste bud as an active site of cell regeneration, differentiation, and development. IKBKAP, a gene mutated in familial dysautonomia, a disease that results in loss of taste buds, is expressed in taste cells that communicate with afferent nerve fibers via synaptic transmission. This database highlights the power of LCM coupled with transcriptional profiling to dissect the molecular composition of normal tissues, represents the most comprehensive molecular analysis of primate taste buds to date, and provides a foundation for further studies in diverse aspects of taste biology. PMID:19636377

  9. Integrative Genomics Reveals Novel Molecular Pathways and Gene Networks for Coronary Artery Disease

    PubMed Central

    Mäkinen, Ville-Petteri; Civelek, Mete; Meng, Qingying; Zhang, Bin; Zhu, Jun; Levian, Candace; Huan, Tianxiao; Segrè, Ayellet V.; Ghosh, Sujoy; Vivar, Juan; Nikpay, Majid; Stewart, Alexandre F. R.; Nelson, Christopher P.; Willenborg, Christina; Erdmann, Jeanette; Blakenberg, Stefan; O'Donnell, Christopher J.; März, Winfried; Laaksonen, Reijo; Epstein, Stephen E.; Kathiresan, Sekar; Shah, Svati H.; Hazen, Stanley L.; Reilly, Muredach P.; Lusis, Aldons J.; Samani, Nilesh J.; Schunkert, Heribert; Quertermous, Thomas; McPherson, Ruth; Yang, Xia; Assimes, Themistocles L.

    2014-01-01

    The majority of the heritability of coronary artery disease (CAD) remains unexplained, despite recent successes of genome-wide association studies (GWAS) in identifying novel susceptibility loci. Integrating functional genomic data from a variety of sources with a large-scale meta-analysis of CAD GWAS may facilitate the identification of novel biological processes and genes involved in CAD, as well as clarify the causal relationships of established processes. Towards this end, we integrated 14 GWAS from the CARDIoGRAM Consortium and two additional GWAS from the Ottawa Heart Institute (25,491 cases and 66,819 controls) with 1) genetics of gene expression studies of CAD-relevant tissues in humans, 2) metabolic and signaling pathways from public databases, and 3) data-driven, tissue-specific gene networks from a multitude of human and mouse experiments. We not only detected CAD-associated gene networks of lipid metabolism, coagulation, immunity, and additional networks with no clear functional annotation, but also revealed key driver genes for each CAD network based on the topology of the gene regulatory networks. In particular, we found a gene network involved in antigen processing to be strongly associated with CAD. The key driver genes of this network included glyoxalase I (GLO1) and peptidylprolyl isomerase I (PPIL1), which we verified as regulatory by siRNA experiments in human aortic endothelial cells. Our results suggest genetic influences on a diverse set of both known and novel biological processes that contribute to CAD risk. The key driver genes for these networks highlight potential novel targets for further mechanistic studies and therapeutic interventions. PMID:25033284

  10. The Caenorhabditis globin gene family reveals extensive nematode-specific radiation and diversification

    PubMed Central

    2008-01-01

    Background Globin isoforms with variant properties and functions have been found in the pseudocoel, body wall and cuticle of various nematode species and even in the eyespots of the insect-parasite Mermis nigrescens. In fact, much higher levels of complexity exist, as shown by recent whole genome analysis studies. In silico analysis of the genome of Caenorhabditis elegans revealed an unexpectedly high number of globin genes featuring a remarkable diversity in gene structure, amino acid sequence and expression profiles. Results In the present study we have analyzed whole genomic data from C. briggsae, C. remanei, Pristionchus pacificus and Brugia malayi and EST data from several other nematode species to study the evolutionary history of the nematode globin gene family. We find a high level of conservation of the C. elegans globin complement, with even distantly related nematodes harboring orthologs to many Caenorhabditis globins. Bayesian phylogenetic analysis resolves all nematode globins into two distinct globin classes. Analysis of the globin intron-exon structures suggests extensive loss of ancestral introns and gain of new positions in deep nematode ancestors, and mainly loss in the Caenorhabditis lineage. We also show that the Caenorhabditis globin genes are expressed in distinct, mostly non-overlapping, sets of cells and that they are all under strong purifying selection. Conclusion Our results enable reconstruction of the evolutionary history of the globin gene family in the nematode phylum. A duplication of an ancestral globin gene occurred before the divergence of the Platyhelminthes and the Nematoda and one of the duplicated genes radiated further in the nematode phylum before the split of the Spirurina and Rhabditina and was followed by further radiation in the lineage leading to Caenorhabditis. The resulting globin genes were subject to processes of subfunctionalization and diversification leading to cell-specific expression patterns. Strong purifying

  11. The Caenorhabditis globin gene family reveals extensive nematode-specific radiation and diversification.

    PubMed

    Hoogewijs, David; De Henau, Sasha; Dewilde, Sylvia; Moens, Luc; Couvreur, Marjolein; Borgonie, Gaetan; Vinogradov, Serge N; Roy, Scott W; Vanfleteren, Jacques R

    2008-10-09

    Globin isoforms with variant properties and functions have been found in the pseudocoel, body wall and cuticle of various nematode species and even in the eyespots of the insect-parasite Mermis nigrescens. In fact, much higher levels of complexity exist, as shown by recent whole genome analysis studies. In silico analysis of the genome of Caenorhabditis elegans revealed an unexpectedly high number of globin genes featuring a remarkable diversity in gene structure, amino acid sequence and expression profiles. In the present study we have analyzed whole genomic data from C. briggsae, C. remanei, Pristionchus pacificus and Brugia malayi and EST data from several other nematode species to study the evolutionary history of the nematode globin gene family. We find a high level of conservation of the C. elegans globin complement, with even distantly related nematodes harboring orthologs to many Caenorhabditis globins. Bayesian phylogenetic analysis resolves all nematode globins into two distinct globin classes. Analysis of the globin intron-exon structures suggests extensive loss of ancestral introns and gain of new positions in deep nematode ancestors, and mainly loss in the Caenorhabditis lineage. We also show that the Caenorhabditis globin genes are expressed in distinct, mostly non-overlapping, sets of cells and that they are all under strong purifying selection. Our results enable reconstruction of the evolutionary history of the globin gene family in the nematode phylum. A duplication of an ancestral globin gene occurred before the divergence of the Platyhelminthes and the Nematoda and one of the duplicated genes radiated further in the nematode phylum before the split of the Spirurina and Rhabditina and was followed by further radiation in the lineage leading to Caenorhabditis. The resulting globin genes were subject to processes of subfunctionalization and diversification leading to cell-specific expression patterns. Strong purifying selection subsequently

  12. Comparative study of human mitochondrial proteome reveals extensive protein subcellular relocalization after gene duplications

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Background Gene and genome duplication is the principle creative force in evolution. Recently, protein subcellular relocalization, or neolocalization was proposed as one of the mechanisms responsible for the retention of duplicated genes. This hypothesis received support from the analysis of yeast genomes, but has not been tested thoroughly on animal genomes. In order to evaluate the importance of subcellular relocalizations for retention of duplicated genes in animal genomes, we systematically analyzed nuclear encoded mitochondrial proteins in the human genome by reconstructing phylogenies of mitochondrial multigene families. Results The 456 human mitochondrial proteins selected for this study were clustered into 305 gene families including 92 multigene families. Among the multigene families, 59 (64%) consisted of both mitochondrial and cytosolic (non-mitochondrial) proteins (mt-cy families) while the remaining 33 (36%) were composed of mitochondrial proteins (mt-mt families). Phylogenetic analyses of mt-cy families revealed three different scenarios of their neolocalization following gene duplication: 1) relocalization from mitochondria to cytosol, 2) from cytosol to mitochondria and 3) multiple subcellular relocalizations. The neolocalizations were most commonly enabled by the gain or loss of N-terminal mitochondrial targeting signals. The majority of detected subcellular relocalization events occurred early in animal evolution, preceding the evolution of tetrapods. Mt-mt protein families showed a somewhat different pattern, where gene duplication occurred more evenly in time. However, for both types of protein families, most duplication events appear to roughly coincide with two rounds of genome duplications early in vertebrate evolution. Finally, we evaluated the effects of inaccurate and incomplete annotation of mitochondrial proteins and found that our conclusion of the importance of subcellular relocalization after gene duplication on the genomic scale was

  13. Gene expression profiles of prostate cancer reveal involvement of multiple molecular pathways in the metastatic process

    PubMed Central

    Chandran, Uma R; Ma, Changqing; Dhir, Rajiv; Bisceglia, Michelle; Lyons-Weiler, Maureen; Liang, Wenjing; Michalopoulos, George; Becich, Michael; Monzon, Federico A

    2007-01-01

    Background Prostate cancer is characterized by heterogeneity in the clinical course that often does not correlate with morphologic features of the tumor. Metastasis reflects the most adverse outcome of prostate cancer, and to date there are no reliable morphologic features or serum biomarkers that can reliably predict which patients are at higher risk of developing metastatic disease. Understanding the differences in the biology of metastatic and organ confined primary tumors is essential for developing new prognostic markers and therapeutic targets. Methods Using Affymetrix oligonucleotide arrays, we analyzed gene expression profiles of 24 androgen-ablation resistant metastatic samples obtained from 4 patients and a previously published dataset of 64 primary prostate tumor samples. Differential gene expression was analyzed after removing potentially uninformative stromal genes, addressing the differences in cellular content between primary and metastatic tumors. Results The metastatic samples are highly heterogenous in expression; however, differential expression analysis shows that 415 genes are upregulated and 364 genes are downregulated at least 2 fold in every patient with metastasis. The expression profile of metastatic samples reveals changes in expression of a unique set of genes representing both the androgen ablation related pathways and other metastasis related gene networks such as cell adhesion, bone remodelling and cell cycle. The differentially expressed genes include metabolic enzymes, transcription factors such as Forkhead Box M1 (FoxM1) and cell adhesion molecules such as Osteopontin (SPP1). Conclusion We hypothesize that these genes have a role in the biology of metastatic disease and that they represent potential therapeutic targets for prostate cancer. PMID:17430594

  14. CheY3 of Borrelia burgdorferi is the key response regulator essential for chemotaxis and forms a long-lived phosphorylated intermediate.

    PubMed

    Motaleb, M A; Sultan, Syed Z; Miller, Michael R; Li, Chunhao; Charon, Nyles W

    2011-07-01

    Spirochetes have a unique cell structure: These bacteria have internal periplasmic flagella subterminally attached at each cell end. How spirochetes coordinate the rotation of the periplasmic flagella for chemotaxis is poorly understood. In other bacteria, modulation of flagellar rotation is essential for chemotaxis, and phosphorylation-dephosphorylation of the response regulator CheY plays a key role in regulating this rotary motion. The genome of the Lyme disease spirochete Borrelia burgdorferi contains multiple homologues of chemotaxis genes, including three copies of cheY, referred to as cheY1, cheY2, and cheY3. To investigate the function of these genes, we targeted them separately or in combination by allelic exchange mutagenesis. Whereas wild-type cells ran, paused (flexed), and reversed, cells of all single, double, and triple mutants that contained an inactivated cheY3 gene constantly ran. Capillary tube chemotaxis assays indicated that only those strains with a mutation in cheY3 were deficient in chemotaxis, and cheY3 complementation restored chemotactic ability. In vitro phosphorylation assays indicated that CheY3 was more efficiently phosphorylated by CheA2 than by CheA1, and the CheY3-P intermediate generated was considerably more stable than the CheY-P proteins found in most other bacteria. The results point toward CheY3 being the key response regulator essential for chemotaxis in B. burgdorferi. In addition, the stability of CheY3-P may be critical for coordination of the rotation of the periplasmic flagella.

  15. Chicken genome analysis reveals novel genes encoding biotin-binding proteins related to avidin family

    PubMed Central

    Niskanen, Einari A; Hytönen, Vesa P; Grapputo, Alessandro; Nordlund, Henri R; Kulomaa, Markku S; Laitinen, Olli H

    2005-01-01

    Background A chicken egg contains several biotin-binding proteins (BBPs), whose complete DNA and amino acid sequences are not known. In order to identify and characterise these genes and proteins we studied chicken cDNAs and genes available in the NCBI database and chicken genome database using the reported N-terminal amino acid sequences of chicken egg-yolk BBPs as search strings. Results Two separate hits showing significant homology for these N-terminal sequences were discovered. For one of these hits, the chromosomal location in the immediate proximity of the avidin gene family was found. Both of these hits encode proteins having high sequence similarity with avidin suggesting that chicken BBPs are paralogous to avidin family. In particular, almost all residues corresponding to biotin binding in avidin are conserved in these putative BBP proteins. One of the found DNA sequences, however, seems to encode a carboxy-terminal extension not present in avidin. Conclusion We describe here the predicted properties of the putative BBP genes and proteins. Our present observations link BBP genes together with avidin gene family and shed more light on the genetic arrangement and variability of this family. In addition, comparative modelling revealed the potential structural elements important for the functional and structural properties of the putative BBP proteins. PMID:15777476

  16. Chicken genome analysis reveals novel genes encoding biotin-binding proteins related to avidin family.

    PubMed

    Niskanen, Einari A; Hytönen, Vesa P; Grapputo, Alessandro; Nordlund, Henri R; Kulomaa, Markku S; Laitinen, Olli H

    2005-03-18

    A chicken egg contains several biotin-binding proteins (BBPs), whose complete DNA and amino acid sequences are not known. In order to identify and characterise these genes and proteins we studied chicken cDNAs and genes available in the NCBI database and chicken genome database using the reported N-terminal amino acid sequences of chicken egg-yolk BBPs as search strings. Two separate hits showing significant homology for these N-terminal sequences were discovered. For one of these hits, the chromosomal location in the immediate proximity of the avidin gene family was found. Both of these hits encode proteins having high sequence similarity with avidin suggesting that chicken BBPs are paralogous to avidin family. In particular, almost all residues corresponding to biotin binding in avidin are conserved in these putative BBP proteins. One of the found DNA sequences, however, seems to encode a carboxy-terminal extension not present in avidin. We describe here the predicted properties of the putative BBP genes and proteins. Our present observations link BBP genes together with avidin gene family and shed more light on the genetic arrangement and variability of this family. In addition, comparative modelling revealed the potential structural elements important for the functional and structural properties of the putative BBP proteins.

  17. Comparative Genomic Analysis Reveals Organization, Function and Evolution of ars Genes in Pantoea spp.

    PubMed

    Wang, Liying; Wang, Jin; Jing, Chuanyong

    2017-01-01

    Numerous genes are involved in various strategies to resist toxic arsenic (As). However, the As resistance strategy in genus Pantoea is poorly understood. In this study, a comparative genome analysis of 23 Pantoea genomes was conducted. Two vertical genetic arsC-like genes without any contribution to As resistance were found to exist in the 23 Pantoea strains. Besides the two arsC-like genes, As resistance gene clusters arsRBC or arsRBCH were found in 15 Pantoea genomes. These ars clusters were found to be acquired by horizontal gene transfer (HGT) from sources related to Franconibacter helveticus, Serratia marcescens, and Citrobacter freundii. During the history of evolution, the ars clusters were acquired more than once in some species, and were lost in some strains, producing strains without As resistance capability. This study revealed the organization, distribution and the complex evolutionary history of As resistance genes in Pantoea spp.. The insights gained in this study improved our understanding on the As resistance strategy of Pantoea spp. and its roles in the biogeochemical cycling of As.

  18. Comparative Genomic Analysis Reveals Organization, Function and Evolution of ars Genes in Pantoea spp.

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Liying; Wang, Jin; Jing, Chuanyong

    2017-01-01

    Numerous genes are involved in various strategies to resist toxic arsenic (As). However, the As resistance strategy in genus Pantoea is poorly understood. In this study, a comparative genome analysis of 23 Pantoea genomes was conducted. Two vertical genetic arsC-like genes without any contribution to As resistance were found to exist in the 23 Pantoea strains. Besides the two arsC-like genes, As resistance gene clusters arsRBC or arsRBCH were found in 15 Pantoea genomes. These ars clusters were found to be acquired by horizontal gene transfer (HGT) from sources related to Franconibacter helveticus, Serratia marcescens, and Citrobacter freundii. During the history of evolution, the ars clusters were acquired more than once in some species, and were lost in some strains, producing strains without As resistance capability. This study revealed the organization, distribution and the complex evolutionary history of As resistance genes in Pantoea spp.. The insights gained in this study improved our understanding on the As resistance strategy of Pantoea spp. and its roles in the biogeochemical cycling of As. PMID:28377759

  19. The king cobra genome reveals dynamic gene evolution and adaptation in the snake venom system

    PubMed Central

    Vonk, Freek J.; Casewell, Nicholas R.; Henkel, Christiaan V.; Heimberg, Alysha M.; Jansen, Hans J.; McCleary, Ryan J. R.; Kerkkamp, Harald M. E.; Vos, Rutger A.; Guerreiro, Isabel; Calvete, Juan J.; Wüster, Wolfgang; Woods, Anthony E.; Logan, Jessica M.; Harrison, Robert A.; Castoe, Todd A.; de Koning, A. P. Jason; Pollock, David D.; Yandell, Mark; Calderon, Diego; Renjifo, Camila; Currier, Rachel B.; Salgado, David; Pla, Davinia; Sanz, Libia; Hyder, Asad S.; Ribeiro, José M. C.; Arntzen, Jan W.; van den Thillart, Guido E. E. J. M.; Boetzer, Marten; Pirovano, Walter; Dirks, Ron P.; Spaink, Herman P.; Duboule, Denis; McGlinn, Edwina; Kini, R. Manjunatha; Richardson, Michael K.

    2013-01-01

    Snakes are limbless predators, and many species use venom to help overpower relatively large, agile prey. Snake venoms are complex protein mixtures encoded by several multilocus gene families that function synergistically to cause incapacitation. To examine venom evolution, we sequenced and interrogated the genome of a venomous snake, the king cobra (Ophiophagus hannah), and compared it, together with our unique transcriptome, microRNA, and proteome datasets from this species, with data from other vertebrates. In contrast to the platypus, the only other venomous vertebrate with a sequenced genome, we find that snake toxin genes evolve through several distinct co-option mechanisms and exhibit surprisingly variable levels of gene duplication and directional selection that correlate with their functional importance in prey capture. The enigmatic accessory venom gland shows a very different pattern of toxin gene expression from the main venom gland and seems to have recruited toxin-like lectin genes repeatedly for new nontoxic functions. In addition, tissue-specific microRNA analyses suggested the co-option of core genetic regulatory components of the venom secretory system from a pancreatic origin. Although the king cobra is limbless, we recovered coding sequences for all Hox genes involved in amniote limb development, with the exception of Hoxd12. Our results provide a unique view of the origin and evolution of snake venom and reveal multiple genome-level adaptive responses to natural selection in this complex biological weapon system. More generally, they provide insight into mechanisms of protein evolution under strong selection. PMID:24297900

  20. The king cobra genome reveals dynamic gene evolution and adaptation in the snake venom system.

    PubMed

    Vonk, Freek J; Casewell, Nicholas R; Henkel, Christiaan V; Heimberg, Alysha M; Jansen, Hans J; McCleary, Ryan J R; Kerkkamp, Harald M E; Vos, Rutger A; Guerreiro, Isabel; Calvete, Juan J; Wüster, Wolfgang; Woods, Anthony E; Logan, Jessica M; Harrison, Robert A; Castoe, Todd A; de Koning, A P Jason; Pollock, David D; Yandell, Mark; Calderon, Diego; Renjifo, Camila; Currier, Rachel B; Salgado, David; Pla, Davinia; Sanz, Libia; Hyder, Asad S; Ribeiro, José M C; Arntzen, Jan W; van den Thillart, Guido E E J M; Boetzer, Marten; Pirovano, Walter; Dirks, Ron P; Spaink, Herman P; Duboule, Denis; McGlinn, Edwina; Kini, R Manjunatha; Richardson, Michael K

    2013-12-17

    Snakes are limbless predators, and many species use venom to help overpower relatively large, agile prey. Snake venoms are complex protein mixtures encoded by several multilocus gene families that function synergistically to cause incapacitation. To examine venom evolution, we sequenced and interrogated the genome of a venomous snake, the king cobra (Ophiophagus hannah), and compared it, together with our unique transcriptome, microRNA, and proteome datasets from this species, with data from other vertebrates. In contrast to the platypus, the only other venomous vertebrate with a sequenced genome, we find that snake toxin genes evolve through several distinct co-option mechanisms and exhibit surprisingly variable levels of gene duplication and directional selection that correlate with their functional importance in prey capture. The enigmatic accessory venom gland shows a very different pattern of toxin gene expression from the main venom gland and seems to have recruited toxin-like lectin genes repeatedly for new nontoxic functions. In addition, tissue-specific microRNA analyses suggested the co-option of core genetic regulatory components of the venom secretory system from a pancreatic origin. Although the king cobra is limbless, we recovered coding sequences for all Hox genes involved in amniote limb development, with the exception of Hoxd12. Our results provide a unique view of the origin and evolution of snake venom and reveal multiple genome-level adaptive responses to natural selection in this complex biological weapon system. More generally, they provide insight into mechanisms of protein evolution under strong selection.

  1. Expression differences of anthocyanin biosynthesis genes reveal regulation patterns for red pear coloration.

    PubMed

    Yang, Ya-nan; Yao, Gai-fang; Zheng, Danman; Zhang, Shao-ling; Wang, Chao; Zhang, Ming-yue; Wu, Jun

    2015-02-01

    This research reveals the different expression patterns of anthocyanin biosynthesis enzyme genes and transcription factors in six red-skinned pear cultivars with different genetic backgrounds. Skin color is an important feature of pear fruits, with red skin generally attracting consumers. However, great differences of coloration exist in different pear cultivars. To elucidate the characteristics of pigmentation in pear cultivars with different genetic backgrounds, six cultivars, belonging to P. communis, P. pyrifolia, P. ussuriensis, P. bretschneideri, and a hybrid of P. communis × P. pyrifolia, were used to detect pigment concentrations, expressions of seven anthocyanin biosynthesis enzyme genes, and three related transcription factor genes. Results showed that the occidental pears 'Starkrimson' and 'Red Bartlett' colored at the beginning of fruit setting, but color decreased with fruit maturity; the other four cultivars showed low anthocyanin accumulations and the contents increased during fruit development, but also decreased at later stages. The expression patterns of genes encoding enzymes indicated that ANS and UFGT were decisive genes for anthocyanin biosynthesis for red-skinned pear, and their different expressions led to the coloration differences between occidental and oriental pears. The expression patterns of transcription factors indicated that the different co-expression of MYB10 and bHLH33 genes and the different expressions of WD40 are involved in the differential regulation mechanisms of anthocyanin biosynthesis and coloration pattern between occidental and oriental pears.

  2. Targeted capture and resequencing of 1040 genes reveal environmentally driven functional variation in grey wolves.

    PubMed

    Schweizer, Rena M; Robinson, Jacqueline; Harrigan, Ryan; Silva, Pedro; Galverni, Marco; Musiani, Marco; Green, Richard E; Novembre, John; Wayne, Robert K

    2016-01-01

    In an era of ever-increasing amounts of whole-genome sequence data for individuals and populations, the utility of traditional single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) array-based genome scans is uncertain. We previously performed a SNP array-based genome scan to identify candidate genes under selection in six distinct grey wolf (Canis lupus) ecotypes. Using this information, we designed a targeted capture array for 1040 genes, including all exons and flanking regions, as well as 5000 1-kb nongenic neutral regions, and resequenced these regions in 107 wolves. Selection tests revealed striking patterns of variation within candidate genes relative to noncandidate regions and identified potentially functional variants related to local adaptation. We found 27% and 47% of candidate genes from the previous SNP array study had functional changes that were outliers in sweed and bayenv analyses, respectively. This result verifies the use of genomewide SNP surveys to tag genes that contain functional variants between populations. We highlight nonsynonymous variants in APOB, LIPG and USH2A that occur in functional domains of these proteins, and that demonstrate high correlation with precipitation seasonality and vegetation. We find Arctic and High Arctic wolf ecotypes have higher numbers of genes under selection, which highlight their conservation value and heightened threat due to climate change. This study demonstrates that combining genomewide genotyping arrays with large-scale resequencing and environmental data provides a powerful approach to discern candidate functional variants in natural populations.

  3. Investigation of bacterial chemotaxis in flow-based microfluidic devices.

    PubMed

    Englert, Derek L; Manson, Michael D; Jayaraman, Arul

    2010-05-01

    The plug-in-pond and capillary assays are convenient methods for measuring attractant and repellent bacterial chemotaxis. However, these assays do not provide quantitative information on the extent of migration and are not well-suited for investigating repellent taxis. Here, we describe a protocol for a flow-based microfluidic system (microFlow) to quantitatively investigate chemotaxis in response to concentration gradients of attractants and repellents. The microFlow device uses diffusive mixing to generate concentration gradients that are stable throughout the chemotaxis chamber and for the duration of the experiment. The gradients may be of any desired absolute concentration and gradient strength. GFP-expressing bacteria immediately encounter a stable concentration gradient when they enter the chemotaxis chamber, and the migration in response to the gradient is monitored by microscopy. The effects of different parameters that influence the extent of migration in the microFlow device-preparation of the motile bacterial population preparation, strength of the concentration gradient and duration of exposure to the gradient-are discussed in the context of repellent taxis of chemotactically wild-type Escherichia coli cells in a gradient of NiSO(4). Fabrication of the microfluidic device takes 1 d while preparing motile cells and carrying out the chemotaxis experiment takes 4-6 h to complete.

  4. Activity of PLCε contributes to chemotaxis of fibroblasts towards PDGF

    PubMed Central

    Martins, Marta; Warren, Sean; Kimberley, Christopher; Margineanu, Anca; Peschard, Pascal; McCarthy, Afshan; Yeo, Maggie; Marshall, Christopher J.; Dunsby, Christopher; French, Paul M. W.; Katan, Matilda

    2012-01-01

    Summary Cell chemotaxis, such as migration of fibroblasts towards growth factors during development and wound healing, requires precise spatial coordination of signalling events. Phosphoinositides and signalling enzymes involved in their generation and hydrolysis have been implicated in regulation of chemotaxis; however, the role and importance of specific components remain poorly understood. Here, we demonstrate that phospholipase C epsilon (PLCε) contributes to fibroblast chemotaxis towards platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF-BB). Using PLCe1 null fibroblasts we show that cells deficient in PLCε have greatly reduced directionality towards PDGF-BB without detrimental effect on their basal ability to migrate. Furthermore, we show that in intact fibroblasts, signalling events, such as activation of Rac, are spatially compromised by the absence of PLCε that affects the ability of cells to enlarge their protrusions in the direction of the chemoattractant. By further application of live cell imaging and the use of FRET-based biosensors, we show that generation of Ins(1,4,5)P3 and recruitment of PLCε are most pronounced in protrusions responding to the PDGF-BB gradient. Furthermore, the phospholipase C activity of PLCε is critical for its role in chemotaxis, consistent with the importance of Ins(1,4,5)P3 generation and sustained calcium responses in this process. As PLCε has extensive signalling connectivity, using transgenic fibroblasts we ruled out its activation by direct binding to Ras or Rap GTPases, and suggest instead new unexpected links for PLCε in the context of chemotaxis. PMID:22992460

  5. Coupled effects of chemotaxis and growth on traveling bacterial waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, Z.; Hilpert, M.; Bouwer, E. J.

    2014-12-01

    Traveling bacterial waves are capable of improving contaminant remediation in the subsurface. It is fairly well understood how bacterial chemotaxis and growth separately affect the formation and propagation of such waves. However, their interaction is not well understood. We therefore perform a modeling study to investigate the coupled effects of chemotaxis and growth on bacterial migration, and examine their effects on contaminant remediation. We study the waves by using different initial electron acceptor concentrations for different bacteria and substrate systems. Three types of traveling waves can occur: a chemotactic wave due to the biased movement of chemotactic bacteria resulting from metabolism-generated substrate concentration gradients; a growth/decay/motility wave due to a dynamic equilibrium between bacterial growth, decay and random motility; and an integrated wave due to the interaction between bacterial chemotaxis and growth. Chemotaxis hardly enhances the bacterial propagation if it is too weak to form a chemotactic wave or its wave speed is less than half of the growth/decay/motility wave speed. However, chemotaxis significantly accelerates bacterial propagation once its wave speed exceeds the growth/decay/motility wave speed. When convection occurs, it speeds up the growth/decay/motility wave but slows down or even eliminates the chemotactic wave due to the dispersion. Bacterial survival proves particularly important for bacterial propagation. Therefore we develop a conceptual model to estimate the speed of growth/decay/motility waves.

  6. Coupled effects of chemotaxis and growth on traveling bacterial waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, Zhifeng; Bouwer, Edward J.; Hilpert, Markus

    2014-08-01

    Traveling bacterial waves are capable of improving contaminant remediation in the subsurface. It is fairly well understood how bacterial chemotaxis and growth separately affect the formation and propagation of such waves. However, their interaction is not well understood. We therefore perform a modeling study to investigate the coupled effects of chemotaxis and growth on bacterial migration, and examine their effects on contaminant remediation. We study the waves by using different initial electron acceptor concentrations for different bacteria and substrate systems. Three types of traveling waves can occur: a chemotactic wave due to the biased movement of chemotactic bacteria resulting from metabolism-generated substrate concentration gradients; a growth/decay/motility wave due to a dynamic equilibrium between bacterial growth, decay and random motility; and an integrated wave due to the interaction between bacterial chemotaxis and growth. Chemotaxis hardly enhances the bacterial propagation if it is too weak to form a chemotactic wave or its wave speed is less than half of the growth/decay/motility wave speed. However, chemotaxis significantly accelerates bacterial propagation once its wave speed exceeds the growth/decay/motility wave speed. When convection occurs, it speeds up the growth/decay/motility wave but slows down or even eliminates the chemotactic wave due to the dispersion. Bacterial survival proves particularly important for bacterial propagation. Therefore we develop a conceptual model to estimate the speed of growth/decay/motility waves.

  7. Chemotaxis of Silicibacter sp. Strain TM1040 toward Dinoflagellate Products†

    PubMed Central

    Miller, Todd R.; Hnilicka, Kristin; Dziedzic, Amanda; Desplats, Paula; Belas, Robert

    2004-01-01

    The α-proteobacteria phylogenetically related to the Roseobacter clade are predominantly responsible for the degradation of organosulfur compounds, including the algal osmolyte dimethylsulfoniopropionate (DMSP). Silicibacter sp. strain TM1040, isolated from a DMSP-producing Pfiesteria piscicida dinoflagellate culture, degrades DMSP, producing 3-methylmercaptopropionate. TM1040 possesses three lophotrichous flagella and is highly motile, leading to a hypothesis that TM1040 interacts with P. piscicida through a chemotactic response to compounds produced by its dinoflagellate host. A combination of a rapid chemotaxis screening assay and a quantitative capillary assay were used to measure chemotaxis of TM1040. These bacteria are highly attracted to dinoflagellate homogenates; however, the response decreases when homogenates are preheated to 80°C. To help identify the essential attractant molecules within the homogenates, a series of pure compounds were tested for their ability to serve as attractants. The results show that TM1040 is strongly attracted to amino acids and DMSP metabolites, while being only mildly responsive to sugars and the tricarboxylic acid cycle intermediates. Adding pure DMSP, methionine, or valine to the chemotaxis buffer resulted in a decreased response to the homogenates, indicating that exogenous addition of these chemicals blocks chemotaxis and suggesting that DMSP and amino acids are essential attractant molecules in the dinoflagellate homogenates. The implication of Silicibacter sp. strain TM1040 chemotaxis in establishing and maintaining its interaction with P. piscicida is discussed. PMID:15294804

  8. Coupled effects of chemotaxis and growth on traveling bacterial waves.

    PubMed

    Yan, Zhifeng; Bouwer, Edward J; Hilpert, Markus

    2014-08-01

    Traveling bacterial waves are capable of improving contaminant remediation in the subsurface. It is fairly well understood how bacterial chemotaxis and growth separately affect the formation and propagation of such waves. However, their interaction is not well understood. We therefore perform a modeling study to investigate the coupled effects of chemotaxis and growth on bacterial migration, and examine their effects on contaminant remediation. We study the waves by using different initial electron acceptor concentrations for different bacteria and substrate systems. Three types of traveling waves can occur: a chemotactic wave due to the biased movement of chemotactic bacteria resulting from metabolism-generated substrate concentration gradients; a growth/decay/motility wave due to a dynamic equilibrium between bacterial growth, decay and random motility; and an integrated wave due to the interaction between bacterial chemotaxis and growth. Chemotaxis hardly enhances the bacterial propagation if it is too weak to form a chemotactic wave or its wave speed is less than half of the growth/decay/motility wave speed. However, chemotaxis significantly accelerates bacterial propagation once its wave speed exceeds the growth/decay/motility wave speed. When convection occurs, it speeds up the growth/decay/motility wave but slows down or even eliminates the chemotactic wave due to the dispersion. Bacterial survival proves particularly important for bacterial propagation. Therefore we develop a conceptual model to estimate the speed of growth/decay/motility waves.

  9. Simvastatin Inhibits IL-5-Induced Chemotaxis and CCR3 Expression of HL-60-Derived and Human Primary Eosinophils.

    PubMed

    Fu, Chia-Hsiang; Tsai, Wan-Chun; Lee, Ta-Jen; Huang, Chi-Che; Chang, Po-Hung; Su Pang, Jong-Hwei

    2016-01-01

    IL-5-induced chemotaxis of eosinophils is an important feature of allergic airway inflammatory diseases. Simvastatin, a lipid lowering agent, has been shown to exhibit anti-inflammatory and anti-allergic effects. Our aim was to investigate the effect of simvastatin on IL-5-induced eosinophil chemotaxis and its regulatory mechanisms. Eosinophils were derived by treating HL-60 clone 15 (HC15) cells with butyric acid (BA) in an alkaline condition or through direct isolation from human peripheral blood. The expressions of CC chemokine receptor 3 (CCR3) and interleukin (IL)-5 receptors (IL5Rα and β) were analyzed using RT/real-time PCR. The granular proteins were stained using fast green. Eotaxin-induced chemotaxis was measured using a transwell migration assay. CCR3 protein expression was revealed by immunocytochemistry. An animal model of allergic rhinitis was established by challenging Sprague-Dawley® rats repeatedly with ovalbumin. Butyric acid significantly increased the expression of IL5Rα and IL5Rβ, CCR3 and granular proteins in HC15 cells, indicating the maturation of eosinophils (BA-E cells). IL-5 further enhanced the CCR3 expression at both the mRNA and protein levels and the eotaxin-induced chemotaxis of BA-E cells. Simvastatin inhibited the effects of IL-5 on BA-E cells, but not in the presence of mevalonate. Similar results were also exhibited in human primary eosinophils. In vivo animal studies further confirmed that oral simvastatin could significantly suppress the infiltration of eosinophils into turbinate tissues of allergic rats. Therefore, simvastatin was demonstrated to inhibit IL-5-induced CCR3 expression and chemotaxis of eosinophils mediated via the mevalonate pathway. We confirmed that simvastatin also reduced eosinophilic infiltration in allergic rhinitis.

  10. A diffusion based long-range and steady chemical gradient generator on a microfluidic device for studying bacterial chemotaxis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murugesan, Nithya; Singha, Siddhartha; Panda, Tapobrata; Das, Sarit K.

    2016-03-01

    Studies on chemotaxis in microfluidics device have become a major area of research to generate physiologically similar environment in vitro. In this work, a novel micro-fluidic device has been developed to study chemo-taxis of cells in near physiological condition which can create controllable, steady and long-range chemical gradients using various chemo-effectors in a micro-channel. Hydrogels like agarose, collagen, etc, can be used in the device to maintain exclusive diffusive flux of various chemical species into the micro-channel under study. Variations of concentrations and flow rates of Texas Red dextran in the device revealed that an increase in the concentration of the dye in the feed from 6 to 18 μg ml-1, causes a steeper chemical gradient in the device, whereas the flow rate of the dye has practically no effect on the chemical gradient in the device. This observation confirms that a diffusion controlled chemical gradient is generated in the micro-channel. Chemo-taxis of E. coli cells were studied under the steady gradient of a chemo-attractant and a chemo-repellent separately in the same chemical gradient generator. For sorbitol and NiSO4·6H2O, the bacterial cells exhibit a steady distribution in the micro channel after 1 h and 30 min, respectively. From the distribution of bacterial population chemo-tactic strength of the chemo-effectors was estimated for E. coli. In a long microfluidic channel, migration behavior of bacterial cells under diffusion controlled chemical gradient showed chemotaxis, random movement, aggregation, and concentration dependent reverse chemotaxis.

  11. The sensory transduction pathways in bacterial chemotaxis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Taylor, Barry L.

    1989-01-01

    Bacterial chemotaxis is a useful model for investigating in molecular detail the behavioral response of cells to changes in their environment. Peritrichously flagellated bacteria such as coli and typhimurium swim by rotating helical flagella in a counterclockwise direction. If flagellar rotation is briefly reversed, the bacteria tumble and change the direction of swimming. The bacteria continuously sample the environment and use a temporal sensing mechanism to compare the present and immediate past environments. Bacteria respond to a broad range of stimuli including changes in temperature, oxygen concentration, pH and osmotic strength. Bacteria are attracted to potential sources of nutrition such as sugars and amino acids and are repelled by other chemicals. In the methylation-dependent pathways for sensory transduction and adaptation in E. coli and S. typhimurium, chemoeffectors bind to transducing proteins that span the plasma membrane. The transducing proteins are postulated to control the rate of autophosphorylation of the CheA protein, which in turn phosphorylates the CheY protein. The phospho-CheY protein binds to the switch on the flagellar motor and is the signal for clockwise rotation of the motor. Adaptation to an attractant is achieved by increasing methylation of the transducing protein until the attractant stimulus is cancelled. Responses to oxygen and certain sugars involve methylation-independent pathways in which adaption occurs without methylation of a transducing protein. Taxis toward oxygen is mediated by the electron transport system and changes in the proton motive force. Recent studies have shown that the methylation-independent pathway converges with the methylation-dependent pathway at or before the CheA protein.

  12. Limits of Feedback Control in Bacterial Chemotaxis

    PubMed Central

    Hernandez-Nunez, Luis; Emonet, Thierry

    2014-01-01

    Inputs to signaling pathways can have complex statistics that depend on the environment and on the behavioral response to previous stimuli. Such behavioral feedback is particularly important in navigation. Successful navigation relies on proper coupling between sensors, which gather information during motion, and actuators, which control behavior. Because reorientation conditions future inputs, behavioral feedback can place sensors and actuators in an operational regime different from the resting state. How then can organisms maintain proper information transfer through the pathway while navigating diverse environments? In bacterial chemotaxis, robust performance is often attributed to the zero integral feedback control of the sensor, which guarantees that activity returns to resting state when the input remains constant. While this property provides sensitivity over a wide range of signal intensities, it remains unclear how other parameters such as adaptation rate and adapted activity affect chemotactic performance, especially when considering that the swimming behavior of the cell determines the input signal. We examine this issue using analytical models and simulations that incorporate recent experimental evidences about behavioral feedback and flagellar motor adaptation. By focusing on how sensory information carried by the response regulator is best utilized by the motor, we identify an operational regime that maximizes drift velocity along chemical concentration gradients for a wide range of environments and sensor adaptation rates. This optimal regime is outside the dynamic range of the motor response, but maximizes the contrast between run duration up and down gradients. In steep gradients, the feedback from chemotactic drift can push the system through a bifurcation. This creates a non-chemotactic state that traps cells unless the motor is allowed to adapt. Although motor adaptation helps, we find that as the strength of the feedback increases individual

  13. Chemotaxis migration and morphogenesis of living colonies.

    PubMed

    Ben Amar, Martine

    2013-06-01

    Development of forms in living organisms is complex and fascinating. Morphogenetic theories that investigate these shapes range from discrete to continuous models, from the variational elasticity to time-dependent fluid approach. Here a mixture model is chosen to describe the mass transport in a morphogenetic gradient: it gives a mathematical description of a mixture involving several constituents in mechanical interactions. This model, which is highly flexible can incorporate many biological processes but also complex interactions between cells as well as between cells and their environment. We use this model to derive a free-boundary problem easier to handle analytically. We solve it in the simplest geometry: an infinite linear front advancing with a constant velocity. In all the cases investigated here as the 3 D diffusion, the increase of mitotic activity at the border, nonlinear laws for the uptake of morphogens or for the mobility coefficient, a planar front exists above a critical threshold for the mobility coefficient but it becomes unstable just above the threshold at long wavelengths due to the existence of a Goldstone mode. This explains why sparsely bacteria exhibit dendritic patterns experimentally in opposition to other colonies such as biofilms and epithelia which are more compact. In the most unstable situation, where all the laws: diffusion, chemotaxis driving and chemoattractant uptake are linear, we show also that the system can recover a dynamic stability. A second threshold for the mobility exists which has a lower value as the ratio between diffusion coefficients decreases. Within the framework of this model where the biomass is treated mainly as a viscous and diffusive fluid, we show that the multiplicity of independent parameters in real biologic experimental set-up may explain varieties of observed patterns.

  14. Comprehensive Gene Expression Profiling Reveals Synergistic Functional Networks in Cerebral Vessels after Hypertension or Hypercholesterolemia

    PubMed Central

    Ong, Wei-Yi; Ng, Mary Pei-Ern; Loke, Sau-Yeen; Jin, Shalai; Wu, Ya-Jun; Tanaka, Kazuhiro; Wong, Peter Tsun-Hon

    2013-01-01

    Atherosclerotic stenosis of cerebral arteries or intracranial large artery disease (ICLAD) is a major cause of stroke especially in Asians, Hispanics and Africans, but relatively little is known about gene expression changes in vessels at risk. This study compares comprehensive gene expression profiles in the middle cerebral artery (MCA) of New Zealand White rabbits exposed to two stroke risk factors i.e. hypertension and/or hypercholesterolemia, by the 2-Kidney-1-Clip method, or dietary supplementation with cholesterol. Microarray and Ingenuity Pathway Analyses of the MCA of the hypertensive rabbits showed up-regulated genes in networks containing the node molecules: UBC (ubiquitin), P38 MAPK, ERK, NFkB, SERPINB2, MMP1 and APP (amyloid precursor protein); and down-regulated genes related to MAPK, ERK 1/2, Akt, 26 s proteasome, histone H3 and UBC. The MCA of hypercholesterolemic rabbits showed differentially expressed genes that are surprisingly, linked to almost the same node molecules as the hypertensive rabbits, despite a relatively low percentage of ‘common genes’ (21 and 7%) between the two conditions. Up-regulated common genes were related to: UBC, SERPINB2, TNF, HNF4A (hepatocyte nuclear factor 4A) and APP, and down-regulated genes, related to UBC. Increased HNF4A message and protein were verified in the aorta. Together, these findings reveal similar nodal molecules and gene pathways in cerebral vessels affected by hypertension or hypercholesterolemia, which could be a basis for synergistic action of risk factors in the pathogenesis of ICLAD. PMID:23874591

  15. Genome-wide gene expression profiling reveals unsuspected molecular alterations in pemphigus foliaceus

    PubMed Central

    Malheiros, Danielle; Panepucci, Rodrigo A; Roselino, Ana M; Araújo, Amélia G; Zago, Marco A; Petzl-Erler, Maria Luiza

    2014-01-01

    Pemphigus foliaceus (PF) is a complex autoimmune disease characterized by bullous skin lesions and the presence of antibodies against desmoglein 1. In this study we sought to contribute to a better understanding of the molecular processes in endemic PF, as the identification of factors that participate in the pathogenesis is a prerequisite for understanding its biological basis and may lead to novel therapeutic interventions. CD4+ T lymphocytes are central to the development of the disease. Therefore, we compared genome-wide gene expression profiles of peripheral CD4+ T cells of various PF patient subgroups with each other and with that of healthy individuals. The patient sample was subdivided into three groups: untreated patients with the generalized form of the disease, patients submitted to immunosuppressive treatment, and patients with the localized form of the disease. Comparisons between different subgroups resulted in 135, 54 and 64 genes differentially expressed. These genes are mainly related to lymphocyte adhesion and migration, apoptosis, cellular proliferation, cytotoxicity and antigen presentation. Several of these genes were differentially expressed when comparing lesional and uninvolved skin from the same patient. The chromosomal regions 19q13 and 12p13 concentrate differentially expressed genes and are candidate regions for PF susceptibility genes and disease markers. Our results reveal genes involved in disease severity, potential therapeutic targets and previously unsuspected processes involved in the pathogenesis. Besides, this study adds original information that will contribute to the understanding of PF's pathogenesis and of the still poorly defined in vivo functions of most of these genes. PMID:24813052

  16. Insertional mutagenesis reveals progression genes and checkpoints in MYC/Runx2 lymphomas

    PubMed Central

    2008-01-01

    In this study we have exploited the power of insertional mutagenesis to elucidate tumor progression pathways in mice carrying two oncogenes (MYC/Runx2) that collaborate to drive early lymphoma development. Neonatal infection of these mice with Moloney murine leukemia virus (MLV) resulted in accelerated tumor onset with associated increases in clonal complexity and lymphoid dissemination. Large-scale analysis of retroviral integration sites in these tumors revealed a profound bias towards a narrow range of target genes including Jdp2 (Jundm2), D cyclin and Pim family genes. Remarkably, direct PCR analysis of integration hot-spots revealed that every progressing tumor consisted of multiple clones harbouring hits at these loci, giving access to large numbers of independent insertion events and uncovering the contrasting mutagenic mechanisms operating at each target gene. Direct PCR analysis showed that high frequency targeting occurs only in the tumor environment in vivo and is specific for the progression gene set. These results indicate that early lymphomas in MYC/Runx2 mice remain dependent on exogenous growth signals and that progression can be achieved by constitutive activation of pathways converging on a cell cycle checkpoint that acts as the major rate-limiting step for lymphoma outgrowth. PMID:17545590

  17. Comparative genomic analysis reveals a distant liver enhancer upstream of the COUP-TFII gene

    SciTech Connect

    Baroukh, Nadine; Ahituv, Nadav; Chang, Jessie; Shoukry, Malak; Afzal, Veena; Rubin, Edward M.; Pennacchio, Len A.

    2004-08-20

    COUP-TFII is a central nuclear hormone receptor that tightly regulates the expression of numerous target lipid metabolism genes in vertebrates. However, it remains unclear how COUP-TFII itself is transcriptionally controlled since studies with its promoter and upstream region fail to recapitulate the genes liver expression. In an attempt to identify liver enhancers in the vicinity of COUP-TFII, we employed a comparative genomic approach. Initial comparisons between humans and mice of the 3,470kb gene poor region surrounding COUP-TFII revealed 2,023 conserved non-coding elements. To prioritize a subset of these elements for functional studies, we performed further genomic comparisons with the orthologous pufferfish (Fugu rubripes) locus and uncovered two anciently conserved non-coding sequences (CNS) upstream of COUP-TFII (CNS-62kb and CNS-66kb). Testing these two elements using reporter constructs in liver (HepG2) cells revealed that CNS-66kb, but not CNS-62kb, yielded robust in vitro enhancer activity. In addition, an in vivo reporter assay using naked DNA transfer with CNS-66kb linked to luciferase displayed strong reproducible liver expression in adult mice, further supporting its role as a liver enhancer. Together, these studies further support the utility of comparative genomics to uncover gene regulatory sequences based on evolutionary conservation and provide the substrates to better understand the regulation and expression of COUP-TFII.

  18. High polymorphism in big defensin gene expression reveals presence-absence gene variability (PAV) in the oyster Crassostrea gigas.

    PubMed

    Rosa, Rafael D; Alonso, Pascal; Santini, Adrien; Vergnes, Agnès; Bachère, Evelyne

    2015-04-01

    We report here the first evidence in an invertebrate, the oyster Crassostrea gigas, of a phenomenon of Presence-Absence Variation (PAV) affecting immune-related genes. We previously evidenced an extraordinary interindividual variability in the basal mRNA abundances of oyster immune genes including those coding for a family of antimicrobial peptides, the big defensins (Cg-BigDef). Cg-BigDef is a diverse family composed of three members: Cg-BigDef1 to -3. Here, we show that besides a high polymorphism in Cg-BigDef mRNA expression, not all individual oysters express simultaneously the three Cg-BigDefs. Moreover, in numerous individuals, no expression of Cg-BigDefs could be detected. Further investigation at the genomic level revealed that in individuals in which the transcription of one or all Cg-BigDefs was absent the corresponding Cg-bigdef gene was missing. In our experiments, no correlation was found between Cg-bigdef PAV and oyster capacity to survive Vibrio infections. The discovery of P-A immune genes in oysters leads to reconsider the role that the immune system plays in the individual adaptation to survive environmental, biotic and abiotic stresses.

  19. Role of chemotaxis in the ecology of denitrifiers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kennedy, M. J.; Lawless, J. G.

    1985-01-01

    It has been recognized that the process of denitrification represents a major sequence in the nitrogen cycle. It involves the anaerobic reduction of nitrate or nitrite to nitrous oxide or elemental nitrogen. This process is responsible for significant losses of nitrogen from agricultural soils. Up to now, little attention has been paid to the ecology of the organisms responsible for denitrification. It is pointed out that chemotaxis would probably offer a strong competitive mechanism for denitrifiers, since chemotaxis would allow denitrifiers to actively reach nitrate by directed motility, rather than by random movement or diffusion of nitrate. The present investigation was initiated to examine the chemotactic responses of several denitrifiers to nitrate and nitrite. Attention is given to bacterial strains, culture media and cell preparation, chemotaxis assays, and competition experiments. It was found that several denitrifiers, including P. aeruginosa, P. fluorescens, and P. Stutzeri, were strongly attracted to NO3(-) and NO2(-).

  20. Relation between chemotaxis and consumption of amino acids in bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Yiling; M. Pollard, Abiola; Höfler, Carolin; Poschet, Gernot; Wirtz, Markus; Hell, Rüdiger

    2015-01-01

    Summary Chemotaxis enables bacteria to navigate chemical gradients in their environment, accumulating toward high concentrations of attractants and avoiding high concentrations of repellents. Although finding nutrients is likely to be an important function of bacterial chemotaxis, not all characterized attractants are nutrients. Moreover, even for potential nutrients, the exact relation between the metabolic value of chemicals and their efficiency as chemoattractants has not been systematically explored. Here we compare the chemotactic response of amino acids with their use by bacteria for two well‐established models of chemotactic behavior, E scherichia coli and B acillus subtilis. We demonstrate that in E . coli chemotaxis toward amino acids indeed strongly correlates with their utilization. However, no such correlation is observed for B . subtilis, suggesting that in this case, the amino acids are not followed because of their nutritional value but rather as environmental cues. PMID:25807888

  1. Modelling cellular aggregation induced by chemotaxis and phototaxis.

    PubMed

    Fatehi, Hasnaa; Meyer-Hermann, Michael; Figge, Marc Thilo

    2010-12-01

    We use a generic agent-based model to investigate cellular aggregation in response to cell-cell interactions. Cells secrete soluble chemokines that are detected by other cells which carry specific receptors for this chemokine. In a process termed 'chemotaxis' the direction of motility of cells is determined by the concentration gradient of chemokines. 'Phototaxis' relies on the detection of light by intracellular receptors. In particular, we consider the case where intercellular signalling is induced by light that is emitted by the cells themselves. While chemotaxis is a frequently analysed and modelled intercellular communication path, phototaxis is only rarely investigated. We characterize and compare the collective response of cells to these mechanisms and show that chemotaxis and phototaxis can be distinguished by the emerging aggregation profile. This result provides a guideline to differentiate between these cell-cell interactions under specific circumstances in experiment.

  2. Rethinking the relationship between hyperactivation and chemotaxis in mammalian sperm.

    PubMed

    Chang, Haixin; Suarez, Susan S

    2010-10-01

    Hyperactivation, a motility pattern of mammalian sperm in the oviduct, is essential to fertilization. Hyperactivation helps sperm to swim effectively through oviductal mucus, to escape from the sperm reservoir, and to penetrate the cumulus matrix and zona pellucida of the oocyte. There is some evidence that mammalian sperm can undergo chemotaxis; however, the relationship of chemotaxis to hyperactivation is unknown. Ca(2+) signaling is involved in hyperactivation and implicated in chemotaxis as well. In vivo, sperm hyperactivate in the lower oviduct, far from the cumulus-oocyte complex and possibly beyond the influence of chemotactic gradients emanating from the oocyte or cumulus. Thus, sperm are likely to be hyperactivated before sensing chemotactic gradients. Chemotactic signals might modulate hyperactivation to direct sperm toward oocytes as they reach a region of influence. Ca(2+)-directed modulation of hyperactivation is a potential mechanism of this process.

  3. SHP2 Phosphatase Promotes Mast Cell Chemotaxis toward Stem Cell Factor via Enhancing Activation of the Lyn/Vav/Rac Signaling Axis

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, Namit; Everingham, Stephanie; Ramdas, Baskar; Kapur, Reuben; Craig, Andrew W. B.

    2015-01-01

    SHP2 protein–tyrosine phosphatase (encoded by Ptpn11) positively regulates KIT (CD117) signaling in mast cells and is required for mast cell survival and homeostasis in mice. In this study, we uncover a role of SHP2 in promoting chemotaxis of mast cells toward stem cell factor (SCF), the ligand for KIT receptor. Using an inducible SHP2 knockout (KO) bone marrow–derived mast cell (BMMC) model, we observed defects in SCF-induced cell spreading, polarization, and chemotaxis. To address the mechanisms involved, we tested whether SHP2 promotes activation of Lyn kinase that was previously shown to promote mast cell chemotaxis. In SHP2 KO BMMCs, SCF-induced phosphorylation of the inhibitory C-terminal residue (pY507) was elevated compared with control cells, and phosphorylation of activation loop (pY396) was diminished. Because Lyn also was detected by substrate trapping assays, these results are consistent with SHP2 activating Lyn directly by dephosphorylation of pY507. Further analyses revealed a SHP2- and Lyn-dependent pathway leading to phosphorylation of Vav1, Rac activation, and F-actin polymerization in SCF-treated BMMCs. Treatment of BMMCs with a SHP2 inhibitor also led to impaired chemotaxis, consistent with SHP2 promoting SCF-induced chemotaxis of mast cells via a phosphatase-dependent mechanism. Thus, SHP2 inhibitors may be useful to limit SCF/KIT-induced mast cell recruitment to inflamed tissues or the tumor microenvironment. PMID:24733849

  4. SHP2 phosphatase promotes mast cell chemotaxis toward stem cell factor via enhancing activation of the Lyn/Vav/Rac signaling axis.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Namit; Everingham, Stephanie; Ramdas, Baskar; Kapur, Reuben; Craig, Andrew W B

    2014-05-15

    SHP2 protein-tyrosine phosphatase (encoded by Ptpn11) positively regulates KIT (CD117) signaling in mast cells and is required for mast cell survival and homeostasis in mice. In this study, we uncover a role of SHP2 in promoting chemotaxis of mast cells toward stem cell factor (SCF), the ligand for KIT receptor. Using an inducible SHP2 knockout (KO) bone marrow-derived mast cell (BMMC) model, we observed defects in SCF-induced cell spreading, polarization, and chemotaxis. To address the mechanisms involved, we tested whether SHP2 promotes activation of Lyn kinase that was previously shown to promote mast cell chemotaxis. In SHP2 KO BMMCs, SCF-induced phosphorylation of the inhibitory C-terminal residue (pY507) was elevated compared with control cells, and phosphorylation of activation loop (pY396) was diminished. Because Lyn also was detected by substrate trapping assays, these results are consistent with SHP2 activating Lyn directly by dephosphorylation of pY507. Further analyses revealed a SHP2- and Lyn-dependent pathway leading to phosphorylation of Vav1, Rac activation, and F-actin polymerization in SCF-treated BMMCs. Treatment of BMMCs with a SHP2 inhibitor also led to impaired chemotaxis, consistent with SHP2 promoting SCF-induced chemotaxis of mast cells via a phosphatase-dependent mechanism. Thus, SHP2 inhibitors may be useful to limit SCF/KIT-induced mast cell recruitment to inflamed tissues or the tumor microenvironment.

  5. Networks of Gene Sharing among 329 Proteobacterial Genomes Reveal Differences in Lateral Gene Transfer Frequency at Different Phylogenetic Depths

    PubMed Central

    Kloesges, Thorsten; Popa, Ovidiu; Martin, William; Dagan, Tal

    2011-01-01

    Lateral gene transfer (LGT) is an important mechanism of natural variation among prokaryotes. Over the full course of evolution, most or all of the genes resident in a given prokaryotic genome have been affected by LGT, yet the frequency of LGT can vary greatly across genes and across prokaryotic groups. The proteobacteria are among the most diverse of prokaryotic taxa. The prevalence of LGT in their genome evolution calls for the application of network-based methods instead of tree-based methods to investigate the relationships among these species. Here, we report networks that capture both vertical and horizontal components of evolutionary history among 1,207,272 proteins distributed across 329 sequenced proteobacterial genomes. The network of shared proteins reveals modularity structure that does not correspond to current classification schemes. On the basis of shared protein-coding genes, the five classes of proteobacteria fall into two main modules, one including the alpha-, delta-, and epsilonproteobacteria and the other including beta- and gammaproteobacteria. The first module is stable over different protein identity thresholds. The second shows more plasticity with regard to the sequence conservation of proteins sampled, with the gammaproteobacteria showing the most chameleon-like evolutionary characteristics within the present sample. Using a minimal lateral network approach, we compared LGT rates at different phylogenetic depths. In general, gene evolution by LGT within proteobacteria is very common. At least one LGT event was inferred to have occurred in at least 75% of the protein families. The average LGT rate at the species and class depth is about one LGT event per protein family, the rate doubling at the phylum level to an average of two LGT events per protein family. Hence, our results indicate that the rate of gene acquisition per protein family is similar at the level of species (by recombination) and at the level of classes (by LGT). The

  6. Networks of gene sharing among 329 proteobacterial genomes reveal differences in lateral gene transfer frequency at different phylogenetic depths.

    PubMed

    Kloesges, Thorsten; Popa, Ovidiu; Martin, William; Dagan, Tal

    2011-02-01

    Lateral gene transfer (LGT) is an important mechanism of natural variation among prokaryotes. Over the full course of evolution, most or all of the genes resident in a given prokaryotic genome have been affected by LGT, yet the frequency of LGT can vary greatly across genes and across prokaryotic groups. The proteobacteria are among the most diverse of prokaryotic taxa. The prevalence of LGT in their genome evolution calls for the application of network-based methods instead of tree-based methods to investigate the relationships among these species. Here, we report networks that capture both vertical and horizontal components of evolutionary history among 1,207,272 proteins distributed across 329 sequenced proteobacterial genomes. The network of shared proteins reveals modularity structure that does not correspond to current classification schemes. On the basis of shared protein-coding genes, the five classes of proteobacteria fall into two main modules, one including the alpha-, delta-, and epsilonproteobacteria and the other including beta- and gammaproteobacteria. The first module is stable over different protein identity thresholds. The second shows more plasticity with regard to the sequence conservation of proteins sampled, with the gammaproteobacteria showing the most chameleon-like evolutionary characteristics within the present sample. Using a minimal lateral network approach, we compared LGT rates at different phylogenetic depths. In general, gene evolution by LGT within proteobacteria is very common. At least one LGT event was inferred to have occurred in at least 75% of the protein families. The average LGT rate at the species and class depth is about one LGT event per protein family, the rate doubling at the phylum level to an average of two LGT events per protein family. Hence, our results indicate that the rate of gene acquisition per protein family is similar at the level of species (by recombination) and at the level of classes (by LGT). The

  7. CLK-dependent exon recognition and conjoined gene formation revealed with a novel small molecule inhibitor.

    PubMed

    Funnell, Tyler; Tasaki, Shinya; Oloumi, Arusha; Araki, Shinsuke; Kong, Esther; Yap, Damian; Nakayama, Yusuke; Hughes, Christopher S; Cheng, S-W Grace; Tozaki, Hirokazu; Iwatani, Misa; Sasaki, Satoshi; Ohashi, Tomohiro; Miyazaki, Tohru; Morishita, Nao; Morishita, Daisuke; Ogasawara-Shimizu, Mari; Ohori, Momoko; Nakao, Shoichi; Karashima, Masatoshi; Sano, Masaya; Murai, Aiko; Nomura, Toshiyuki; Uchiyama, Noriko; Kawamoto, Tomohiro; Hara, Ryujiro; Nakanishi, Osamu; Shumansky, Karey; Rosner, Jamie; Wan, Adrian; McKinney, Steven; Morin, Gregg B; Nakanishi, Atsushi; Shah, Sohrab; Toyoshiba, Hiroyoshi; Aparicio, Samuel

    2017-12-01

    CDC-like kinase phosphorylation of serine/arginine-rich proteins is central to RNA splicing reactions. Yet, the genomic network of CDC-like kinase-dependent RNA processing events remains poorly defined. Here, we explore the connectivity of genomic CDC-like kinase splicing functions by applying graduated, short-exposure, pharmacological CDC-like kinase inhibition using a novel small molecule (T3) with very high potency, selectivity, and cell-based stability. Using RNA-Seq, we define CDC-like kinase-responsive alternative splicing events, the large majority of which monotonically increase or decrease with increasing CDC-like kinase inhibition. We show that distinct RNA-binding motifs are associated with T3 response in skipped exons. Unexpectedly, we observe dose-dependent conjoined gene transcription, which is associated with motif enrichment in the last and second exons of upstream and downstream partners, respectively. siRNA knockdown of CLK2-associated genes significantly increases conjoined gene formation. Collectively, our results reveal an unexpected role for CDC-like kinase in conjoined gene formation, via regulation of 3'-end processing and associated splicing factors.The phosphorylation of serine/arginine-rich proteins by CDC-like kinase is a central regulatory mechanism for RNA splicing reactions. Here, the authors synthesize a novel small molecule CLK inhibitor and map CLK-responsive alternative splicing events and discover an effect on conjoined gene transcription.

  8. Identification of essential Alphaproteobacterial genes reveals operational variability in conserved developmental and cell cycle systems

    PubMed Central

    Curtis, Patrick D.; Brun, Yves V.

    2014-01-01

    Summary The cell cycle of Caulobacter crescentus is controlled by a complex signaling network that coordinates events. Genome sequencing has revealed many C. crescentus cell cycle genes are conserved in other Alphaproteobacteria, but it is not clear to what extent their function is conserved. As many cell cycle regulatory genes are essential in C. crescentus, the essential genes of two Alphaproteobacteria, Agrobacterium tumefaciens (Rhizobiales) and Brevundimonas subvibrioides (Caulobacterales), were elucidated to identify changes in cell cycle protein function over different phylogenetic distances as demonstrated by changes in essentiality. The results show the majority of conserved essential genes are involved in critical cell cycle processes. Changes in component essentiality reflect major changes in lifestyle, such as divisome components in A. tumefaciens resulting from that organism’s different growth pattern. Larger variability of essentiality was observed in cell cycle regulators, suggesting regulatory mechanisms are more customizable than the processes they regulate. Examples include variability in the essentiality of divJ and divK spatial cell cycle regulators, and non-essentiality of the highly conserved and usually essential DNA methyltransferase CcrM. These results show that while essential cell functions are conserved across varying genetic distance, much of a given organism’s essential gene pool is specific to that organism. PMID:24975755

  9. Metagenomic analysis reveals that bacteriophages are reservoirs of antibiotic resistance genes.

    PubMed

    Subirats, Jéssica; Sànchez-Melsió, Alexandre; Borrego, Carles M; Balcázar, José Luis; Simonet, Pascal

    2016-08-01

    A metagenomics approach was applied to explore the presence of antibiotic resistance genes (ARGs) in bacteriophages from hospital wastewater. Metagenomic analysis showed that most phage sequences affiliated to the order Caudovirales, comprising the tailed phage families Podoviridae, Siphoviridae and Myoviridae. Moreover, the relative abundance of ARGs in the phage DNA fraction (0.26%) was higher than in the bacterial DNA fraction (0.18%). These differences were particularly evident for genes encoding ATP-binding cassette (ABC) and resistance-nodulation-cell division (RND) proteins, phosphotransferases, β-lactamases and plasmid-mediated quinolone resistance. Analysis of assembled contigs also revealed that blaOXA-10, blaOXA-58 and blaOXA-24 genes belonging to class D β-lactamases as well as a novel blaTEM (98.9% sequence similarity to the blaTEM-1 gene) belonging to class A β-lactamases were detected in a higher proportion in phage DNA. Although preliminary, these findings corroborate the role of bacteriophages as reservoirs of resistance genes and thus highlight the necessity to include them in future studies on the emergence and spread of antibiotic resistance in the environment. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. and International Society of Chemotherapy. All rights reserved.

  10. Mammalian Axoneme Central Pair Complex Proteins: Broader Roles Revealed by Gene Knockout Phenotypes

    PubMed Central

    Teves, Maria E.; Nagarkatti-Gude, David R.; Zhang, Zhibing; Strauss, Jerome F.

    2016-01-01

    The axoneme genes, their encoded proteins, their functions and the structures they form are largely conserved across species. Much of our knowledge of the function and structure of axoneme proteins in cilia and flagella is derived from studies on model organisms like the green algae, Chlamydomonas reinhardtii. The core structure of cilia and flagella is the axoneme, which in most motile cilia and flagella contains a 9 + 2 configuration of microtubules. The two central microtubules are the scaffold of the central pair complex (CPC). Mutations that disrupt CPC genes in Chlamydomonas and other model organisms result in defects in assembly, stability and function of the axoneme, leading to flagellar motility defects. However, targeted mutations generated in mice in the orthologous CPC genes have revealed significant differences in phenotypes of mutants compared to Chlamydomonas. Here we review observations that support the concept of cell-type specific roles for the CPC genes in mice, and an expanded repertoire of functions for the products of these genes in cilia, including non-motile cilia, and other microtubule-associated cellular functions. PMID:26785425

  11. Brain slice invasion model reveals genes differentially regulated in glioma invasion

    SciTech Connect

    Holtkamp, Nikola . E-mail: nikola.holtkamp@charite.de; Afanasieva, Anastasia; Elstner, Anja; Landeghem, Frank K.H. van; Koenneker, Matthias; Kuhn, Susanne A.; Kettenmann, Helmut; Deimling, Andreas von

    2005-11-04

    Invasion of tumor cells into adjacent brain areas is one of the major problems in treatment of glioma patients. To identify genes that might contribute to invasion, fluorescent F98 glioma cells were allowed to invade an organotypic brain slice. Gene expression analysis revealed 5 up-regulated and 14 down-regulated genes in invasive glioma cells as compared to non-invasive glioma cells. Two gene products, ferritin and cyclin B1, were verified in human gliomas by immunohistochemistry. Ferritin exhibited high mRNA levels in migratory F98 cells and also showed higher protein expression in the infiltrating edge of human gliomas. Cyclin B1 with high mRNA expression levels in stationary F98 cells showed marked protein expression in the central portions of gliomas. These findings are compatible with the concept of tumor cells either proliferating or migrating. Our study is the first to apply brain slice cultures for the identification of differentially regulated genes in glioma invasion.

  12. RNA sequencing analysis of human podocytes reveals glucocorticoid regulated gene networks targeting non-immune pathways.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Lulu; Hindmarch, Charles C T; Rogers, Mark; Campbell, Colin; Waterfall, Christy; Coghill, Jane; Mathieson, Peter W; Welsh, Gavin I

    2016-10-24

    Glucocorticoids are steroids that reduce inflammation and are used as immunosuppressive drugs for many diseases. They are also the mainstay for the treatment of minimal change nephropathy (MCN), which is characterised by an absence of inflammation. Their mechanisms of action remain elusive. Evidence suggests that immunomodulatory drugs can directly act on glomerular epithelial cells or 'podocytes', the cell type which is the main target of injury in MCN. To understand the nature of glucocorticoid effects on non-immune cell functions, we generated RNA sequencing data from human podocyte cell lines and identified the genes that are significantly regulated in dexamethasone-treated podocytes compared to vehicle-treated cells. The upregulated genes are of functional relevance to cytoskeleton-related processes, whereas the downregulated genes mostly encode pro-inflammatory cytokines and growth factors. We observed a tendency for dexamethasone-upregulated genes to be downregulated in MCN patients. Integrative analysis revealed gene networks composed of critical signaling pathways that are likely targeted by dexamethasone in podocytes.

  13. Comparative expression profiling reveals gene functions in female meiosis and gametophyte development in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Lihua; He, Jiangman; Cai, Hanyang; Lin, Haiyan; Li, Yanqiang; Liu, Renyi; Yang, Zhenbiao; Qin, Yuan

    2014-11-01

    Megasporogenesis is essential for female fertility, and requires the accomplishment of meiosis and the formation of functional megaspores. The inaccessibility and low abundance of female meiocytes make it particularly difficult to elucidate the molecular basis underlying megasporogenesis. We used high-throughput tag-sequencing analysis to identify genes expressed in female meiocytes (FMs) by comparing gene expression profiles from wild-type ovules undergoing megasporogenesis with those from the spl mutant ovules, which lack megasporogenesis. A total of 862 genes were identified as FMs, with levels that are consistently reduced in spl ovules in two biological replicates. Fluorescence-assisted cell sorting followed by RNA-seq analysis of DMC1:GFP-labeled female meiocytes confirmed that 90% of the FMs are indeed detected in the female meiocyte protoplast profiling. We performed reverse genetic analysis of 120 candidate genes and identified four FM genes with a function in female meiosis progression in Arabidopsis. We further revealed that KLU, a putative cytochrome P450 monooxygenase, is involved in chromosome pairing during female meiosis, most likely by affecting the normal expression pattern of DMC1 in ovules during female meiosis. Our studies provide valuable information for functional genomic analyses of plant germline development as well as insights into meiosis.

  14. RNA sequencing analysis of human podocytes reveals glucocorticoid regulated gene networks targeting non-immune pathways

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Lulu; Hindmarch, Charles C. T.; Rogers, Mark; Campbell, Colin; Waterfall, Christy; Coghill, Jane; Mathieson, Peter W.; Welsh, Gavin I.

    2016-01-01

    Glucocorticoids are steroids that reduce inflammation and are used as immunosuppressive drugs for many diseases. They are also the mainstay for the treatment of minimal change nephropathy (MCN), which is characterised by an absence of inflammation. Their mechanisms of action remain elusive. Evidence suggests that immunomodulatory drugs can directly act on glomerular epithelial cells or ‘podocytes’, the cell type which is the main target of injury in MCN. To understand the nature of glucocorticoid effects on non-immune cell functions, we generated RNA sequencing data from human podocyte cell lines and identified the genes that are significantly regulated in dexamethasone-treated podocytes compared to vehicle-treated cells. The upregulated genes are of functional relevance to cytoskeleton-related processes, whereas the downregulated genes mostly encode pro-inflammatory cytokines and growth factors. We observed a tendency for dexamethasone-upregulated genes to be downregulated in MCN patients. Integrative analysis revealed gene networks composed of critical signaling pathways that are likely targeted by dexamethasone in podocytes. PMID:27774996

  15. Systems-level analysis reveals selective regulation of Aqp2 gene expression by vasopressin

    PubMed Central

    Sandoval, Pablo C.; Claxton, J’Neka S.; Lee, Jae Wook; Saeed, Fahad; Hoffert, Jason D.; Knepper, Mark A.

    2016-01-01

    Vasopressin-mediated regulation of renal water excretion is defective in a variety of water balance disorders in humans. It occurs in part through long-term mechanisms that regulate the abundance of the aquaporin-2 water channel in renal collecting duct cells. Here, we use deep DNA sequencing in mouse collecting duct cells to ask whether vasopressin signaling selectively increases Aqp2 gene transcription or whether it triggers a broadly targeted transcriptional network. ChIP-Seq quantification of binding sites for RNA polymerase II was combined with RNA-Seq quantification of transcript abundances to identify genes whose transcription is regulated by vasopressin. (View curated dataset at https://helixweb.nih.gov/ESBL/Database/Vasopressin/). The analysis revealed only 35 vasopressin-regulated genes (of 3659) including Aqp2. Increases in RNA polymerase II binding and mRNA abundances for Aqp2 far outstripped corresponding measurements for all other genes, consistent with the conclusion that vasopressin-mediated transcriptional regulation is highly selective for Aqp2. Despite the overall selectivity of the net transcriptional response, vasopressin treatment was associated with increased RNA polymerase II binding to the promoter proximal region of a majority of expressed genes, suggesting a nearly global positive regulation of transcriptional initiation with transcriptional pausing. Thus, the overall net selectivity appears to be a result of selective control of transcriptional elongation. PMID:27725713

  16. Targeted next-generation sequencing reveals multiple deleterious variants in OPLL-associated genes

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Xin; Guo, Jun; Cai, Tao; Zhang, Fengshan; Pan, Shengfa; Zhang, Li; Wang, Shaobo; Zhou, Feifei; Diao, Yinze; Zhao, Yanbin; Chen, Zhen; Liu, Xiaoguang; Chen, Zhongqiang; Liu, Zhongjun; Sun, Yu; Du, Jie

    2016-01-01

    Ossification of the posterior longitudinal ligament of the spine (OPLL), which is characterized by ectopic bone formation in the spinal ligaments, can cause spinal-cord compression. To date, at least 11 susceptibility genes have been genetically linked to OPLL. In order to identify potential deleterious alleles in these OPLL-associated genes, we designed a capture array encompassing all coding regions of the target genes for next-generation sequencing (NGS) in a cohort of 55 unrelated patients with OPLL. By bioinformatics analyses, we successfully identified three novel and five extremely rare variants (MAF < 0.005). These variants were predicted to be deleterious by commonly used various algorithms, thereby resulting in missense mutations in four OPLL-associated genes (i.e., COL6A1, COL11A2, FGFR1, and BMP2). Furthermore, potential effects of the patient with p.Q89E of BMP2 were confirmed by a markedly increased BMP2 level in peripheral blood samples. Notably, seven of the variants were found to be associated with the patients with continuous subtype changes by cervical spinal radiological analyses. Taken together, our findings revealed for the first time that deleterious coding variants of the four OPLL-associated genes are potentially pathogenic in the patients with OPLL. PMID:27246988

  17. TALEN-engineered AR gene rearrangements reveal endocrine uncoupling of androgen receptor in prostate cancer

    PubMed Central

    Nyquist, Michael D.; Li, Yingming; Hwang, Tae Hyun; Manlove, Luke S.; Vessella, Robert L.; Silverstein, Kevin A. T.; Voytas, Daniel F.; Dehm, Scott M.

    2013-01-01

    Androgen receptor (AR) target genes direct development and survival of the prostate epithelial lineage, including prostate cancer (PCa). Thus, endocrine therapies that inhibit the AR ligand-binding domain (LBD) are effective in treating PCa. AR transcriptional reactivation is central to resistance, as evidenced by the efficacy of AR retargeting in castration-resistant PCa (CRPC) with next-generation endocrine therapies abiraterone and enzalutamide. However, resistance to abiraterone and enzalutamide limits this efficacy in most men, and PCa remains the second-leading cause of male cancer deaths. Here we show that AR gene rearrangements in CRPC tissues underlie a completely androgen-independent, yet AR-dependent, resistance mechanism. We discovered intragenic AR gene rearrangements in CRPC tissues, which we modeled using transcription activator-like effector nuclease (TALEN)-mediated genome engineering. This modeling revealed that these AR gene rearrangements blocked full-length AR synthesis, but promoted expression of truncated AR variant proteins lacking the AR ligand-binding domain. Furthermore, these AR variant proteins maintained the constitutive activity of the AR transcriptional program and a CRPC growth phenotype independent of full-length AR or androgens. These findings demonstrate that AR gene rearrangements are a unique resistance mechanism by which AR transcriptional activity can be uncoupled from endocrine regulation in CRPC. PMID:24101480

  18. Methyl group turnover on methyl-accepting chemotaxis proteins during chemotaxis by Bacillus subtilis

    SciTech Connect

    Thoelke, M.S.; Casper, J.M.; Ordal, G.W. )

    1990-02-05

    The addition of attractant to Bacillus subtilis briefly exposed to radioactive methionine causes an increase of labeling of the methyl-accepting chemotaxis proteins. The addition of attractant to cells radiolabeled for longer times shows no change in the extent of methylation. Therefore, the increase in labeling for the briefly labeled cells is due to an increased turnover of methyl groups caused by attractant. All amino acids gave enhanced turnover. This turnover lasted for a prolonged time, probably spanning the period of smooth swimming caused by the attractant addition. Repellent did not affect the turnover when added alone or simultaneously with attractant. Thus, for amino acid attractants, the turnover is probably the excitatory signal, which is seen to extend long into or throughout the adaptation period, not just at the start of it.

  19. Duplication and differentiation of common carp (Cyprinus carpio) myoglobin genes revealed by BAC analysis.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Zi-Xia; Xu, Peng; Cao, Ding-Chen; Kuang, You-Yi; Deng, Hai-Xia; Zhang, Yan; Xu, Li-Ming; Li, Jiong-Tang; Xu, Jian; Sun, Xiao-Wen

    2014-09-15

    Two distinct myoglobin (mb) transcripts have been reported in common carp, Cyprinus carpio, which is a hypoxia-tolerant fish living in habitats with greatly fluctuant dissolved oxygen levels. Recombinant protein analysis has shown functional specialization of the two mb transcripts. In this work, analysis for mb-containing bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC) clones indicated different genome loci for common carp myoglobin-1 (mb-1) and myoglobin-2 (mb-2) genes. Fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) revealed that mb-1 and mb-2 are located on separate chromosomes. In both of the mb-1 and mb-2 containing BAC clones, gene synteny was well conserved with the homologous region on zebrafish chromosome 1, supporting that the common carp specific mb-2 gene originated from the recent whole genome duplication event in cyprinid lineage. Transcription factor binding sites search indicated that both common carp mb genes lacked specificity Protein 1 (Sp1) and myocyte enhancer factor-2 (MEF2) binding sites, which mediated muscle-specific and calcium-dependent expression in the well-studied mb promoters. Potential hypoxia response elements (HREs) were predicted in the regulatory region of common carp mb genes. These characteristics of common carp mb gene regulatory region well interpreted the hypoxia-inducible, non-muscle expression pattern of mb-1. In the case of mb-2, a 10 bp insertion to the binding site of upstream stimulatory factor (USF), which was a co-factor of hypoxia inducible factor (HIF), might cause the non-response to hypoxia treatment of mb-2. The case of common carp mb gene duplication and subsequent differentiation in expression pattern and protein function provided an example for adaptive evolution toward aquatic hypoxia tolerance.

  20. Genome-wide transcriptional analysis of T cell activation reveals differential gene expression associated with psoriasis.

    PubMed

    Palau, Nuria; Julià, Antonio; Ferrándiz, Carlos; Puig, Lluís; Fonseca, Eduardo; Fernández, Emilia; López-Lasanta, María; Tortosa, Raül; Marsal, Sara

    2013-11-23

    Psoriasis is a chronic autoimmune disease in which T cells have a predominant role in initiating and perpetuating the chronic inflammation in skin. However, the mechanisms that regulate T cell activation in psoriasis are still incompletely understood. The objective of the present study was to characterize the main genetic pathways associated with T cell activation in psoriasis. Gene expression profiles from in vitro activated T cells were obtained from 17 psoriasis patients and 7 healthy controls using Illumina HT-12 v4 microarrays. From a total of 47,321 analyzed transcripts, 42 genes were found to be differentially expressed between psoriasis and controls (FDR p-value < 0.1, absolute fold-change > 1.2). Using an independent cohort of 8 patients and 8 healthy controls we validated the overexpression of SPATS2L (p-value =0.0009) and KLF6 (p-value =0.0012) genes in activated T cells from psoriasis patients. Using weighted correlation analysis we identified SPATS2L and KLF6 coexpression networks, which were also significantly associated with psoriasis (p-value < 0.05). Gene Ontology analysis allowed the identification of several biological processes associated with each coexpression network. Finally, using Gene Set Enrichment Analysis over the global T cell transcriptome we also found additional genetic pathways strongly associated with psoriasis (p-value < 0.0001). This study has identified two new genes, SPATS2L and KLF6, strongly associated with T cell activation in psoriasis. Functional analyses of the gene expression profiles also revealed new biological processes and genetic pathways associated with psoriasis. The results of this study provide an important insight into the biology of this common chronic inflammatory disease.

  1. Analysis of Notch Signaling-Dependent Gene Expression in Developing Airways Reveals Diversity of Clara Cells

    PubMed Central

    Guha, Arjun; Vasconcelos, Michelle; Zhao, Rui; Gower, Adam C.; Rajagopal, Jayaraj; Cardoso, Wellington V.

    2014-01-01

    Clara cells (CCs) are a morphologically and operationally heterogeneous population of Secretoglobin Scgb1a1-expressing secretory cells that are crucial for airway homeostasis and post-injury repair. Analysis of the extent and origin of CC diversity are limited by knowledge of genes expressed in these cells and their precursors. To identify novel putative markers of CCs and explore the origins of CC diversity, we characterized global changes in gene expression in embryonic lungs in which CCs do not form due to conditional disruption of Notch signaling (RbpjkCNULL). Microarray profiling, Real Time PCR (qRT-PCR), and RNA in situ hybridization (ISH) identified eleven genes downregulated in the E18.5 airways of Rbpjkcnull compared to controls, nearly half not previously known to mark CCs. ISH revealed that several genes had overlapping but distinct domains of expression of in the normal developing lung (E18.5). Notably, Reg3g, Chad, Gabrp and Lrrc26 were enriched in proximal airways, Hp in the distal airways and Upk3a in clusters of cells surrounding Neuroepithelial Bodies (NEBs). Seven of the eleven genes, including Reg3g, Hp, and Upk3a, were expressed in the adult lung in CCs in a pattern similar to that observed in the developing airways. qRT-PCR-based analysis of gene expression of CCs isolated from different airway regions of B1-EGFP reporter mice corroborated the spatial enrichment in gene expression observed by ISH. Our study identifies candidate markers for CC-precursors and CCs and supports the idea that the diversification of the CC phenotype occurs already during embryonic development. PMID:24586412

  2. Fine Mapping and Transcriptome Analysis Reveal Candidate Genes Associated with Hybrid Lethality in Cabbage (Brassica Oleracea).

    PubMed

    Xiao, Zhiliang; Hu, Yang; Zhang, Xiaoli; Xue, Yuqian; Fang, Zhiyuan; Yang, Limei; Zhang, Yangyong; Liu, Yumei; Li, Zhansheng; Liu, Xing; Liu, Zezhou; Lv, Honghao; Zhuang, Mu

    2017-06-05

    Hybrid lethality is a deleterious phenotype that is vital to species evolution. We previously reported hybrid lethality in cabbage (Brassica oleracea) and performed preliminary mapping of related genes. In the present study, the fine mapping of hybrid lethal genes revealed that BoHL1 was located on chromosome C1 between BoHLTO124 and BoHLTO130, with an interval of 101 kb. BoHL2 was confirmed to be between insertion-deletion (InDels) markers HL234 and HL235 on C4, with a marker interval of 70 kb. Twenty-eight and nine annotated genes were found within the two intervals of BoHL1 and BoHL2, respectively. We also applied RNA-Seq to analyze hybrid lethality in cabbage. In the region of BoHL1, seven differentially expressed genes (DEGs) and five resistance (R)-related genes (two in common, i.e., Bo1g153320 and Bo1g153380) were found, whereas in the region of BoHL2, two DEGs and four R-related genes (two in common, i.e., Bo4g173780 and Bo4g173810) were found. Along with studies in which R genes were frequently involved in hybrid lethality in other plants, these interesting R-DEGs may be good candidates associated with hybrid lethality. We also used SNP/InDel analyses and quantitative real-time PCR to confirm the results. This work provides new insight into the mechanisms of hybrid lethality in cabbage.

  3. Characterization of the biocontrol activity of pseudomonas fluorescens strain X reveals novel genes regulated by glucose.

    PubMed

    Kremmydas, Gerasimos F; Tampakaki, Anastasia P; Georgakopoulos, Dimitrios G

    2013-01-01

    Pseudomonas fluorescens strain X, a bacterial isolate from the rhizosphere of bean seedlings, has the ability to suppress damping-off caused by the oomycete Pythium ultimum. To determine the genes controlling the biocontrol activity of strain X, transposon mutagenesis, sequencing and complementation was performed. Results indicate that, biocontrol ability of this isolate is attributed to gcd gene encoding glucose dehydrogenase, genes encoding its co-enzyme pyrroloquinoline quinone (PQQ), and two genes (sup5 and sup6) which seem to be organized in a putative operon. This operon (named supX) consists of five genes, one of which encodes a non-ribosomal peptide synthase. A unique binding site for a GntR-type transcriptional factor is localized upstream of the supX putative operon. Synteny comparison of the genes in supX revealed that they are common in the genus Pseudomonas, but with a low degree of similarity. supX shows high similarity only to the mangotoxin operon of Ps. syringae pv. syringae UMAF0158. Quantitative real-time PCR analysis indicated that transcription of supX is strongly reduced in the gcd and PQQ-minus mutants of Ps. fluorescens strain X. On the contrary, transcription of supX in the wild type is enhanced by glucose and transcription levels that appear to be higher during the stationary phase. Gcd, which uses PQQ as a cofactor, catalyses the oxidation of glucose to gluconic acid, which controls the activity of the GntR family of transcriptional factors. The genes in the supX putative operon have not been implicated before in the biocontrol of plant pathogens by pseudomonads. They are involved in the biosynthesis of an antimicrobial compound by Ps. fluorescens strain X and their transcription is controlled by glucose, possibly through the activity of a GntR-type transcriptional factor binding upstream of this putative operon.

  4. Molecular characterization of a chemotaxis operon in the oral spirochete, Treponema denticola.

    PubMed

    Greene, S R; Stamm, L V

    1999-05-17

    A chemotaxis gene cluster from Treponema denticola (Td), a pathogenic spirochete associated with human periodontal diseases, was cloned, sequenced, and analyzed. The gene cluster contained three chemotaxis (che) genes (cheA, cheW, and cheY) and an open reading frame (cheX) that is homologous with Treponema pallidum (Tp) and Borrelia burgdorferi (Bb) cheX. The Td che genes have the same transcriptional orientation with a sigma 70-like promoter located upstream of cheA and a stem-loop structure characteristic of a Rho-independent transcriptional terminator downstream of cheY. Primer extension analysis identified a transcriptional start point six nucleotides (nt) downstream of the -10 (TAAAAA) promoter sequence. Reverse-transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) data indicated that cheA through cheY are co-transcribed and suggested that transcription is terminated after cheY. The gene organization of the Td che operon is identical to that of the Tp che operon. Southern blot analysis indicated the presence of one copy of each che gene on the Td genome. The cheA, cheW, cheX, and cheY genes are 2403, 1332, 462, and 438nt long, respectively, and encode proteins with predicted molecular masses of 88.2, 49.7, 16.8, and 16. 0kDa, respectively. Functional domains of the T. denticola CheA and CheY proteins are highly conserved with those of the Escherichia coli (Ec) CheA and CheY proteins. Phylogenetic analysis of Td CheY indicated that it is closely related to Tp CheY and Bb CheY3.

  5. Inhibition of adipocyte inflammation and macrophage chemotaxis by butein.

    PubMed

    Wang, Zheng; Lee, Youngyi; Eun, Jae Soon; Bae, Eun Ju

    2014-09-05

    Adipose tissue inflammation has been proposed as a therapeutic target for the treatment of obesity and metabolic disorders such as insulin resistance and type 2 diabetes. Butein, a polyphenol of vegetal origin, exhibits anti-inflammatory effects in macrophages but it was not reported whether butein prevents adipocyte inflammation. Here, we investigated the effects of butein on adipocyte inflammation in 3T3-L1 cells and performed functional macrophage migration assays. Butein opposed the stimulation of inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) protein expression and of nitric oxide production by simultaneous treatment of adipocytes with tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNFα), lipopolysaccharide (LPS), and interferon gamma (TLI). In addition, butein inhibited mRNA expression of pro-inflammatory genes and chemokines in adipocytes stimulated with TLI or conditioned medium from RAW 264.7 macrophages treated with LPS. These effects were associated with suppression of inhibitor of kappa B alpha degradation induced by TNFα and with nuclear factor-kappa B (NF-κB) p65 phosphorylation and acetylation. Moreover, butein prevented phosphorylation of extracellular signal-regulated kinases, c-Jun N-terminal kinase, and the mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) p38. These results suggest that butein suppresses adipocyte inflammation by inhibiting NF-κB/MAPK-dependent transcriptional activity. Furthermore, conditioned media from adipocytes stimulated macrophage chemotaxis, whereas media from adipocytes treated with butein blocked macrophage migration, an effect that was consistent with suppression of MCP-1 secretion by adipocytes treated with butein. In addition, macrophages treated with butein exhibited a reduced ability to migrate toward adipocyte CM. In conclusion, butein may represent a therapeutic agent to prevent adipose tissue inflammation and the obesity-linked insulin resistance.

  6. Piracy on the molecular level: human herpesviruses manipulate cellular chemotaxis.

    PubMed

    Cornaby, Caleb; Tanner, Anne; Stutz, Eric W; Poole, Brian D; Berges, Bradford K

    2016-03-01

    Cellular chemotaxis is important to tissue homeostasis and proper development. Human herpesvirus species influence cellular chemotaxis by regulating cellular chemokines and chemokine receptors. Herpesviruses also express various viral chemokines and chemokine receptors during infection. These changes to chemokine concentrations and receptor availability assist in the pathogenesis of herpesviruses and contribute to a variety of diseases and malignancies. By interfering with the positioning of host cells during herpesvirus infection, viral spread is assisted, latency can be established and the immune system is prevented from eradicating viral infection.

  7. Genome Mining for Radical SAM Protein Determinants Reveals Multiple Sactibiotic-Like Gene Clusters

    PubMed Central

    Murphy, Kiera; O'Sullivan, Orla; Rea, Mary C.; Cotter, Paul D.; Ross, R. Paul; Hill, Colin

    2011-01-01

    Thuricin CD is a two-component bacteriocin produced by Bacillus thuringiensis that kills a wide range of clinically significant Clostridium difficile. This bacteriocin has recently been characterized and consists of two distinct peptides, Trnβ and Trnα, which both possess 3 intrapeptide sulphur to α-carbon bridges and act synergistically. Indeed, thuricin CD and subtilosin A are the only antimicrobials known to possess these unusual structures and are known as the sactibiotics (sulplur to alpha carbon-containing antibiotics). Analysis of the thuricin CD-associated gene cluster revealed the presence of genes encoding two highly unusual SAM proteins (TrnC and TrnD) which are proposed to be responsible for these unusual post-translational modifications. On the basis of the frequently high conservation among enzymes responsible for the post-translational modification of specific antimicrobials, we performed an in silico screen for novel thuricin CD–like gene clusters using the TrnC and TrnD radical SAM proteins as driver sequences to perform an initial homology search against the complete non-redundant database. Fifteen novel thuricin CD–like gene clusters were identified, based on the presence of TrnC and TrnD homologues in the context of neighbouring genes encoding potential bacteriocin structural peptides. Moreover, metagenomic analysis revealed that TrnC or TrnD homologs are present in a variety of metagenomic environments, suggesting a widespread distribution of thuricin-like operons in a variety of environments. In-silico analysis of radical SAM proteins is sufficient to identify novel putative sactibiotic clusters. PMID:21760885

  8. The tert-butylhydroquinone-mediated activation of the human thioredoxin gene reveals a novel promoter structure

    PubMed Central

    Osborne, Simone A.; Hawkes, Hye-Jin Kim; Baldwin, Ben L.; Alexander, Kylie A.; Svingen, Terje; Clarke, Frank M.; Tonissen, Kathryn F.

    2006-01-01

    Thioredoxin is a redox-active protein that plays multiple roles in regulating cell growth, cell signalling and apoptosis. Here, we have demonstrated that a complex mechanism involving multiple regulatory elements is involved in the tBHQ [tert-butylhydroquinone or 2,5-di-(t-butyl)-1,4-hydroquinone]-mediated activation of the thioredoxin gene. Luciferase assays, utilizing various wild-type and mutated thioredoxin promoter fragments, revealed roles for the ORE (oxidative stress responsive element), ARE (antioxidant responsive element), three Sp1 (specificity protein 1)-binding sites and the TATA box in the activation of the thioredoxin gene by tBHQ. The ORE required the presence of the ARE to elicit its response, whereas the independent removal of three Sp1-binding sites and the TATA box also decreased activation of the thioredoxin gene, with mutation of the TATA box having the greatest effect. Real-time RT (reverse transcriptase)–PCR analysis also revealed varying roles for two TSSs (transcription start sites) in the activation of the thioredoxin gene by tBHQ. Transcription was initiated from both TSSs; however, different response rates and fold inductions were observed. Together, these results suggest that the thioredoxin gene is controlled by a novel arrangement of two overlapping core promoter regions, one containing a TATA box and the other TATA-less. Altering the intracellular levels of thioredoxin in a breast cancer cell line also influenced the induction of thioredoxin transcription in response to tBHQ. Stable transfections with a redox-inactive thioredoxin mutant produced 3.6 times higher induction levels of thioredoxin transcription compared with control cells, indicating an intrinsic form of control of promoter activity by the thioredoxin system itself. PMID:16712525

  9. Gene Expression Profiling Reveals New Potential Players of Gonad Differentiation in the Chicken Embryo

    PubMed Central

    Carré, Gwenn-Aël; Couty, Isabelle; Hennequet-Antier, Christelle; Govoroun, Marina S.

    2011-01-01

    Background In birds as in mammals, a genetic switch determines whether the undifferentiated gonad develops into an ovary or a testis. However, understanding of the molecular pathway(s) involved in gonad differentiation is still incomplete. Methodology/Principal Findings With the aim of improving characterization of the molecular pathway(s) involved in gonad differentiation in the chicken embryo, we developed a large scale real time reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction approach on 110 selected genes for evaluation of their expression profiles during chicken gonad differentiation between days 5.5 and 19 of incubation. Hierarchical clustering analysis of the resulting datasets discriminated gene clusters expressed preferentially in the ovary or the testis, and/or at early or later periods of embryonic gonad development. Fitting a linear model and testing the comparisons of interest allowed the identification of new potential actors of gonad differentiation, such as Z-linked ADAMTS12, LOC427192 (corresponding to NIM1 protein) and CFC1, that are upregulated in the developing testis, and BMP3 and Z-linked ADAMTSL1, that are preferentially expressed in the developing ovary. Interestingly, the expression patterns of several members of the transforming growth factor β family were sexually dimorphic, with inhibin subunits upregulated in the testis, and bone morphogenetic protein subfamily members including BMP2, BMP3, BMP4 and BMP7, upregulated in the ovary. This study also highlighted several genes displaying asymmetric expression profiles such as GREM1 and BMP3 that are potentially involved in different aspects of gonad left-right asymmetry. Conclusion/Significance This study supports the overall conservation of vertebrate sex differentiation pathways but also reveals some particular feature of gene expression patterns during gonad development in the chicken. In particular, our study revealed new candidate genes which may be potential actors of chicken gonad

  10. Comparative Transcriptional Analysis Reveals Differential Gene Expression between Asymmetric and Symmetric Zygotic Divisions in Tobacco

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Jie

    2011-01-01

    Asymmetric cell divisions occur widely during many developmental processes in plants. In most angiosperms, the first zygotic cell division is asymmetric resulting in two daughter cells of unequal size and with distinct fates. However, the critical molecular mechanisms regulating this division remain unknown. Previously we showed that treatment of tobacco zygotes with beta-glucosyl Yariv (βGlcY) could dramatically alter the first zygotic asymmetric division to produce symmetric two-celled proembryos. In the present study, we isolated zygotes and two-celled asymmetric proembryos in vivo by micromanipulation, and obtained symmetric, two-celled proembryos by in vitro cell cultures. Using suppression-subtractive hybridization (SSH) and macroarray analysis differential gene expression between the zygote and the asymmetric and symmetric two-celled proembryos was investigated. After sequencing of the differentially expressed clones, a total of 1610 EST clones representing 685 non-redundant transcripts were obtained. Gene ontology (GO) term analysis revealed that these transcripts include those involved in physiological processes such as response to stimulus, regulation of gene expression, and localization and formation of anatomical structures. A homology search against known genes from Arabidopsis indicated that some of the above transcripts are involved in asymmetric cell division and embryogenesis. Quantitative real-time PCR confirmed the up- or down-regulation of the selected candidate transcripts during zygotic division. A few of these transcripts were expressed exclusively in the zygote, or in either type of the two-celled proembryos. Expression analyses of select genes in different tissues and organs also revealed potential roles of these transcripts in fertilization, seed maturation and organ development. The putative roles of few of the identified transcripts in the regulation of zygotic division are discussed. Further functional work on these candidate

  11. Comparative Genomics Reveals New Candidate Genes Involved in Selenium Metabolism in Prokaryotes

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Jie; Peng, Ting; Jiang, Liang; Ni, Jia-Zuan; Liu, Qiong; Chen, Luonan; Zhang, Yan

    2015-01-01

    Selenium (Se) is an important micronutrient that mainly occurs in proteins in the form of selenocysteine and in tRNAs in the form of selenouridine. In the past 20 years, several genes involved in Se utilization have been characterized in both prokaryotes and eukaryotes. However, Se homeostasis and the associated regulatory network are not fully understood. In this study, we conducted comparative genomics and phylogenetic analyses to examine the occurrence of all known Se utilization traits in prokaryotes. Our results revealed a highly mosaic pattern of species that use Se (in different forms) in spite that most organisms do not use this element. Further investigation of genomic context of known Se-related genes in different organisms suggested novel candidate genes that may participate in Se metabolism in bacteria and/or archaea. Among them, a membrane protein, YedE, which contains ten transmembrane domains and shows distant similarity to a sulfur transporter, is exclusively found in Se-utilizing organisms, suggesting that it may be involved in Se transport. A LysR-like transcription factor subfamily might be important for the regulation of Sec biosynthesis and/or other Se-related genes. In addition, a small protein family DUF3343 is widespread in Se-utilizing organisms, which probably serves as an important chaperone for Se trafficking within the cells. Finally, we proposed a simple model of Se homeostasis based on our findings. Our study reveals new candidate genes involved in Se metabolism in prokaryotes and should be useful for a further understanding of the complex metabolism and the roles of Se in biology. PMID:25638258

  12. Labellum transcriptome reveals alkene biosynthetic genes involved in orchid sexual deception and pollination-induced senescence.

    PubMed

    Monteiro, Filipa; Sebastiana, Mónica; Figueiredo, Andreia; Sousa, Lisete; Cotrim, Helena C; Pais, Maria Salomé

    2012-11-01

    One of the most remarkable pollination strategy in orchids biology is pollination by sexual deception, in which the modified petal labellum lures pollinators by mimicking the chemical (e.g. sex pheromones), visual (e.g. colour and shape/size) and tactile (e.g. labellum trichomes) cues of the receptive female insect species. The present study aimed to characterize the transcriptional changes occurring after pollination in the labellum of a sexually deceptive orchid (Ophrys fusca Link) in order to identify genes involved on signals responsible for pollinator attraction, the major goal of floral tissues. Novel information on alterations in the orchid petal labellum gene expression occurring after pollination demonstrates a reduction in the expression of alkene biosynthetic genes using O. fusca Link as the species under study. Petal labellum transcriptional analysis revealed downregulation of transcripts involved in both pigment machinery and scent compounds, acting as visual and olfactory cues, respectively, important in sexual mimicry. Regulation of petal labellum senescence was revealed by transcripts related to macromolecules breakdown, protein synthesis and remobilization of nutrients.

  13. Genetic mapping of sulfur assimilation genes reveals a QTL for onion bulb pungency.

    PubMed

    McCallum, John; Pither-Joyce, Meeghan; Shaw, Martin; Kenel, Fernand; Davis, Sheree; Butler, Ruth; Scheffer, John; Jakse, Jernej; Havey, Michael J

    2007-03-01

    Onion exhibits wide genetic and environmental variation in bioactive organosulfur compounds that impart pungency and health benefits. A PCR-based molecular marker map that included candidate genes for sulfur assimilation was used to identify genomic regions affecting pungency in the cross 'W202A' x 'Texas Grano 438'. Linkage mapping revealed that genes encoding plastidic ferredoxin-sulfite reductase (SiR) and plastidic ATP sulfurylase (ATPS) are closely linked (1-2 cM) on chromosome 3. Inbred F(3) families derived from the F(2 )population used to construct the genetic map were grown in replicated trials in two environments and bulb pungency was evaluated as pyruvic acid or lachrymatory factor. Broad-sense heritability of pungency was estimated to be 0.78-0.80. QTL analysis revealed significant associations of both pungency and bulb soluble solids content with marker intervals on chromosomes 3 and 5, which have previously been reported to condition pleiotropic effects on bulb carbohydrate composition. Highly significant associations (LOD 3.7-8.7) were observed between ATPS and SiR Loci and bulb pungency but not with bulb solids content. This association was confirmed in two larger, independently derived F(2) families from the same cross. Single-locus models suggested that the partially dominant locus associated with these candidate genes controls 30-50% of genetic variation in pungency in these pedigrees. These markers may provide a practical means to select for lower pungency without correlated selection for lowered solids.

  14. Molecular evidence of RNA polymerase II gene reveals the origin of worldwide cultivated barley

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yonggang; Ren, Xifeng; Sun, Dongfa; Sun, Genlou

    2016-01-01

    The origin and domestication of cultivated barley have long been under debate. A population-based resequencing and phylogenetic analysis of the single copy of RPB2 gene was used to address barley domestication, to explore genetic differentiation of barley populations on the worldwide scale, and to understand gene-pool exchanges during the spread and subsequent development of barley cultivation. Our results revealed significant genetic differentiation among three geographically distinct wild barley populations. Differences in haplotype composition among populations from different geographical regions revealed that modern cultivated barley originated from two major wild barley populations: one from the Near East Fertile Crescent and the other from the Tibetan Plateau, supporting polyphyletic origin of cultivated barley. The results of haplotype frequencies supported multiple domestications coupled with widespread introgression events that generated genetic admixture between divergent barley gene pools. Our results not only provide important insight into the domestication and evolution of cultivated barley, but also enhance our understanding of introgression and distinct selection pressures in different environments on shaping the genetic diversity of worldwide barley populations, thus further facilitating the effective use of the wild barley germplasm. PMID:27786300

  15. A genetic strategy to measure circulating Drosophila insulin reveals genes regulating insulin production and secretion.

    PubMed

    Park, Sangbin; Alfa, Ronald W; Topper, Sydni M; Kim, Grace E S; Kockel, Lutz; Kim, Seung K

    2014-08-01

    Insulin is a major regulator of metabolism in metazoans, including the fruit fly Drosophila melanogaster. Genome-wide association studies (GWAS) suggest a genetic basis for reductions of both insulin sensitivity and insulin secretion, phenotypes commonly observed in humans with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM). To identify molecular functions of genes linked to T2DM risk, we developed a genetic tool to measure insulin-like peptide 2 (Ilp2) levels in Drosophila, a model organism with superb experimental genetics. Our system permitted sensitive quantification of circulating Ilp2, including measures of Ilp2 dynamics during fasting and re-feeding, and demonstration of adaptive Ilp2 secretion in response to insulin receptor haploinsufficiency. Tissue specific dissection of this reduced insulin signaling phenotype revealed a critical role for insulin signaling in specific peripheral tissues. Knockdown of the Drosophila orthologues of human T2DM risk genes, including GLIS3 and BCL11A, revealed roles of these Drosophila genes in Ilp2 production or secretion. Discovery of Drosophila mechanisms and regulators controlling in vivo insulin dynamics should accelerate functional dissection of diabetes genetics.

  16. Structures and solution properties of two novel periplasmic sensor domains with c-type heme from chemotaxis proteins of Geobacter sulfurreducens : implications for signal transduction.

    SciTech Connect

    Pokkuluri, P. R.; Pessanha, M.; Londer, Y. Y.; Wood, S. J.; Duke, N. E. C.; Wilton, R.; Catarino, T.; Salgueiro, C. A.; Schiffer, M.; Biosciences Division; Univ.Nova de Lisboa; Insti. de Tecnologia Quimica e Biologica

    2008-04-11

    Periplasmic sensor domains from two methyl-accepting chemotaxis proteins from Geobacter sulfurreducens (encoded by genes GSU0935 and GSU0582) were expressed in Escherichia coli. The sensor domains were isolated, purified, characterized in solution, and their crystal structures were determined. In the crystal, both sensor domains form swapped dimers and show a PAS-type fold. The swapped segment consists of two helices of about 45 residues at the N terminus with the hemes located between the two monomers. In the case of the GSU0582 sensor, the dimer contains a crystallographic 2-fold symmetry and the heme is coordinated by an axial His and a water molecule. In the case of the GSU0935 sensor, the crystals contain a non-crystallographic dimer, and surprisingly, the coordination of the heme in each monomer is different; monomer A heme has His-Met ligation and monomer B heme has His-water ligation as found in the GSU0582 sensor. The structures of these sensor domains are the first structures of PAS domains containing covalently bound heme. Optical absorption, electron paramagnetic resonance and NMR spectroscopy have revealed that the heme groups of both sensor domains are high-spin and low-spin in the oxidized and reduced forms, respectively, and that the spin-state interconversion involves a heme axial ligand replacement. Both sensor domains bind NO in their ferric and ferrous forms but bind CO only in the reduced form. The binding of both NO and CO occurs via an axial ligand exchange process, and is fully reversible. The reduction potentials of the sensor domains differ by 95 mV (-156 mV and -251 mV for sensors GSU0582 and GSU0935, respectively). The swapped dimerization of these sensor domains and redox-linked ligand switch might be related to the mechanism of signal transduction by these chemotaxis proteins.

  17. Compound C inhibits macrophage chemotaxis through an AMPK-independent mechanism

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Youngyi; Park, Byung-Hyun; Bae, Eun Ju

    2016-01-15

    Macrophage infiltration in adipose tissue is a well-established cause of obesity-linked insulin resistance. AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) activation in peripheral tissues such as adipose tissue has beneficial effects on the protection against obesity-induced insulin resistance, which is mainly mediated by prevention of adipose tissue macrophage infiltration and inflammation. In examining the role of AMPK on adipose tissue inflammation, we unexpectedly found that compound C (CC), despite its inhibition of AMPK, robustly inhibited macrophage chemotaxis in RAW 264.7 cells when adipocyte conditioned medium (CM) was used as a chemoattractant. Here, we report that CC inhibition of macrophage migration occurred independently of AMPK. Mechanistically, this inhibitory effect of cell migration by CC was mediated by inhibition of the focal adhesion kinase, AKT, nuclear factor κB pathways. Moreover, the expression of chemokine monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 and pro-inflammatory genes such as tumor necrosis factor α and inducible nitric oxide synthase were prevented by CC treatment in RAW 264.7 cells stimulated with either adipocyte CM or lipopolysaccharide. Lastly, in accord with the findings of the anti-inflammatory effect of CC, we demonstrated that CC functioned as a repressor of macrophage CM-mediated insulin resistance in adipocytes. Taken together, our results suggest that CC serves as a useful inhibitory molecule against macrophage chemotaxis into adipose tissue and thus might have therapeutic potential for the treatment of obesity-linked adipose inflammation. - Highlights: • Compound C (CC) inhibits macrophage chemotaxis regardless of AMPK suppression. • CC enhances insulin sensitivity in adipocytes. • CC inhibits focal adhesion kinase, AKT, and NF-κB signaling in RAW 264.7 cells.

  18. Pausing of flagellar rotation is a component of bacterial motility and chemotaxis.

    PubMed Central

    Lapidus, I R; Welch, M; Eisenbach, M

    1988-01-01

    When bacterial cells are tethered to glass by their flagella, many of them spin. On the basis of experiments with tethered cells it has generally been thought that the motor which drives the flagellum is a two-state device, existing in either a counterclockwise or a clockwise state. Here we show that a third state of the motor is that of pausing, the duration and frequency of which are affected by chemotactic stimuli. We have recorded on video tape the rotation of tethered Escherichia coli and Salmonella typhimurium cells and analyzed the recordings frame by frame and in slow motion. Most wild-type cells paused intermittently. The addition of repellents caused an increase in the frequency and duration of the pauses. The addition of attractants sharply reduced the number of pauses. A chemotaxis mutant which lacks a large part of the chemotaxis machinery owing to a deletion of the genes from cheA to cheZ did not pause at all and did not respond to repellents by pausing. A tumbly mutant of S. typhimurium responded to repellents by smooth swimming and to attractants by tumbling. When tethered, these cells exhibited a normal rotational response but an inverse pausing response to chemotactic stimuli: the frequency of pauses decreased in response to repellents and increased in response to attractants. It is suggested that (i) pausing is an integral part of bacterial motility and chemotaxis, (ii) pausing is independent of the direction of flagellar rotation, and (iii) pausing may be one of the causes of tumbling. PMID:3042756

  19. Protection against chemotaxis in the anti-inflammatory effect of bioactives from tomato ketchup.

    PubMed

    Hazewindus, Merel; Haenen, Guido R M M; Weseler, Antje R; Bast, Aalt

    2014-01-01

    The consumption of tomato products has been associated with a decreased risk for chronic inflammatory diseases. In this study, the anti-inflammatory potential of tomato ketchup was evaluated by studying the effect of tomato ketchup extracts and bioactives from tomato ketchup on human monocytes and vascular endothelial cells (HUVEC). HUVEC were pre-treated for 1 h with either individual bioactives (7.5 µM lycopene, 1.4 µM α-tocopherol or 55 µM ascorbic acid) or a combination of these three compounds, or with the hydrophilic or lipophilic tomato ketchup extracts or with the two extracts combined. After the pretreatment, the cells were washed and challenged with TNF-α (10 ng/ml) for 6 h. The medium was used for the determination of the release of cytokines and the chemotaxis of monocytes. Inflammatory protein expression and production were assayed with real-time RT-PCR and ELISA. It was found that tomato ketchup extracts significantly reduced gene expression and release of the pro-inflammatory cytokines TNF-α and IL-8 in HUVEC after the inflammatory challenge, whereas the release of the anti-inflammatory cytokine IL-10 was increased. Chemotaxis was effectively impeded as demonstrated by a reduced monocyte migration. This effect correlated with the reduction of IL-8 production in the presence of the test compounds and extracts. The results consistently emphasize the contribution of lycopene to the anti-inflammatory effect of tomato ketchup. Other compounds in tomato ketchup such as α-tocopherol and ascorbic acid appeared to strengthen the anti-inflammatory effect of lycopene. The tomato ketchup extracts subtly interfered with several inflammatory phases that inhibit chemotaxis. Such a pleotropic mode of action exemplifies its potential mitigation of diseases characterized by prolonged low grade inflammation.

  20. Microbial signatures of oral dysbiosis, periodontitis and edentulism revealed by Gene Meter methodology.

    PubMed

    Hunter, M Colby; Pozhitkov, Alex E; Noble, Peter A

    2016-12-01

    Conceptual models suggest that certain microorganisms (e.g., the "red" complex) are indicative of a specific disease state (e.g., periodontitis); however, recent studies have questioned the validity of these models. Here, the abundances of 500+ microbial species were determined in 16 patients with clinical signs of one of the following oral conditions: periodontitis, established caries, edentulism, and oral health. Our goal was to determine if the abundances of certain microorganisms reflect dysbiosis or a specific clinical condition that could be used as a 'signature' for dental research. Microbial abundances were determined by the analysis of 138,718 calibrated probes using Gene Meter methodology. Each 16S rRNA gene was targeted by an average of 194 unique probes (n=25nt). The calibration involved diluting pooled gene target samples, hybridizing each dilution to a DNA microarray, and fitting the probe intensities to adsorption models. The fit of the model to the experimental data was used to assess individual and aggregate probe behavior; good fits (R(2)>0.90) were retained for back-calculating microbial abundances from patient samples. The abundance of a gene was determined from the median of all calibrated individual probes or from the calibrated abundance of all aggregated probes. With the exception of genes with low abundances (<2 arbitrary units), the abundances determined by the different calibrations were highly correlated (r~1.0). Seventeen genera were classified as 'signatures of dysbiosis' because they had significantly higher abundances in patients with periodontitis and edentulism when contrasted with health. Similarly, 13 genera were classified as 'signatures of periodontitis', and 14 genera were classified as 'signatures of edentulism'. The signatures could be used, individually or in combination, to assess the clinical status of a patient (e.g., evaluating treatments such as antibiotic therapies). Comparisons of the same patient samples revealed

  1. Human mast cell tryptase: Multiple cDNAs and genes reveal a multigene serine protease family

    SciTech Connect

    Vanderslice, P.; Ballinger, S.M., Tam, E.K.; Goldstein, S.M.; Craik, C.S.; Caughey, G.H. )

    1990-05-01

    Three different cDNAs and a gene encoding human skin mast cell tryptase have been cloned and sequenced in their entirety. The deduced amino acid sequences reveal a 30-amino acid prepropeptide followed by a 245-amino acid catalytic domain. The C-terminal undecapeptide of the human preprosequence is identical in dog tryptase and appears to be part of a prosequence unique among serine proteases. The differences among the three human tryptase catalytic domains include the loss of a consensus N-glycosylation site in one cDNA, which may explain some of the heterogeneity in size and susceptibility to deglycosylation seen in tryptase preparations. All three tryptase cDNAs are distinct from a recently reported cDNA obtained from a human lung mast cell library. A skin tryptase cDNA was used to isolate a human tryptase gene, the exons of which match one of the skin-derived cDNAs. The organization of the {approx}1.8-kilobase-pair tryptase gene is unique and is not closely related to that of any other mast cell or leukocyte serine protease. The 5{prime} regulatory regions of the gene share features with those of other serine proteases, including mast cell chymase, but are unusual in being separated from the protein-coding sequence by an intron. High-stringency hybridization of a human genomic DNA blot with a fragment of the tryptase gene confirms the presence of multiple tryptase genes. These findings provide genetic evidence that human mast cell tryptases are the products of a multigene family.

  2. Revealing Shared and Distinct Gene Network Organization in Arabidopsis Immune Responses by Integrative Analysis1

    PubMed Central

    Dong, Xiaobao; Jiang, Zhenhong; Peng, You-Liang; Zhang, Ziding

    2015-01-01

    Pattern-triggered immunity (PTI) and effector-triggered immunity (ETI) are two main plant immune responses to counter pathogen invasion. Genome-wide gene network organizing principles leading to quantitative differences between PTI and ETI have remained elusive. We combined an advanced machine learning method and modular network analysis to systematically characterize the organizing principles of Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) PTI and ETI at three network resolutions. At the single network node/edge level, we ranked genes and gene interactions based on their ability to distinguish immune response from normal growth and successfully identified many immune-related genes associated with PTI and ETI. Topological analysis revealed that the top-ranked gene interactions tend to link network modules. At the subnetwork level, we identified a subnetwork shared by PTI and ETI encompassing 1,159 genes and 1,289 interactions. This subnetwork is enriched in interactions linking network modules and is also a hotspot of attack by pathogen effectors. The subnetwork likely represents a core component in the coordination of multiple biological processes to favor defense over development. Finally, we constructed modular network models for PTI and ETI to explain the quantitative differences in the global network architecture. Our results indicate that the defense modules in ETI are organized into relatively independent structures, explaining the robustness of ETI to genetic mutations and effector attacks. Taken together, the multiscale comparisons of PTI and ETI provide a systems biology perspective on plant immunity and emphasize coordination among network modules to establish a robust immune response. PMID:25614062

  3. Blood-Gene Expression Reveals Reduced Circadian Rhythmicity in Individuals Resistant to Sleep Deprivation

    PubMed Central

    Arnardottir, Erna S.; Nikonova, Elena V.; Shockley, Keith R.; Podtelezhnikov, Alexei A.; Anafi, Ron C.; Tanis, Keith Q.; Maislin, Greg; Stone, David J.; Renger, John J.; Winrow, Christopher J.; Pack, Allan I.

    2014-01-01

    Study Objectives: To address whether changes in gene expression in blood cells with sleep loss are different in individuals resistant and sensitive to sleep deprivation. Design: Blood draws every 4 h during a 3-day study: 24-h normal baseline, 38 h of continuous wakefulness and subsequent recovery sleep, for a total of 19 time-points per subject, with every 2-h psychomotor vigilance task (PVT) assessment when awake. Setting: Sleep laboratory. Participants: Fourteen subjects who were previously identified as behaviorally resistant (n = 7) or sensitive (n = 7) to sleep deprivation by PVT. Intervention: Thirty-eight hours of continuous wakefulness. Measurements and Results: We found 4,481 unique genes with a significant 24-h diurnal rhythm during a normal sleep-wake cycle in blood (false discovery rate [FDR] < 5%). Biological pathways were enriched for biosynthetic processes during sleep. After accounting for circadian effects, two genes (SREBF1 and CPT1A, both involved in lipid metabolism) exhibited small, but significant, linear changes in expression with the duration of sleep deprivation (FDR < 5%). The main change with sleep deprivation was a reduction in the amplitude of the diurnal rhythm of expression of normally cycling probe sets. This reduction was noticeably higher in behaviorally resistant subjects than sensitive subjects, at any given P value. Furthermore, blood cell type enrichment analysis showed that the expression pattern difference between sensitive and resistant subjects is mainly found in cells of myeloid origin, such as monocytes. Conclusion: Individual differences in behavioral effects of sleep deprivation are associated with differences in diurnal amplitude of gene expression for genes that show circadian rhythmicity. Citation: Arnardottir ES, Nikonova EV, Shockley KR, Podtelezhnikov AA, Anafi RC, Tanis KQ, Maislin G, Stone DJ, Renger JJ, Winrow CJ, Pack AI. Blood-gene expression reveals reduced circadian rhythmicity in individuals resistant to

  4. A combination of transcriptome and methylation analyses reveals embryologically-relevant candidate genes in MRKH patients.

    PubMed

    Rall, Katharina; Barresi, Gianmaria; Walter, Michael; Poths, Sven; Haebig, Karina; Schaeferhoff, Karin; Schoenfisch, Birgitt; Riess, Olaf; Wallwiener, Diethelm; Bonin, Michael; Brucker, Sara

    2011-05-28

    The Mayer-Rokitansky-Küster-Hauser (MRKH) syndrome is present in at least 1 out of 4,500 female live births and is the second most common cause for primary amenorrhea. It is characterized by vaginal and uterine aplasia in an XX individual with normal secondary characteristics. It has long been considered a sporadic anomaly, but familial clustering occurs. Several candidate genes have been studied although no single factor has yet been identified. Cases of discordant monozygotic twins suggest that the involvement of epigenetic factors is more likely. Differences in gene expression and methylation patterns of uterine tissue between eight MRKH patients and eight controls were identified using whole-genome microarray analyses. Results obtained by expression and methylation arrays were confirmed by qRT-PCR and pyrosequencing. We delineated 293 differentially expressed and 194 differentially methylated genes of which nine overlap in both groups. These nine genes are mainly embryologically relevant for the development of the female genital tract. Our study used, for the first time, a combined whole-genome expression and methylation approach to reveal the etiology of the MRKH syndrome. The findings suggest that either deficient estrogen receptors or the ectopic expression of certain HOXA genes might lead to abnormal development of the female reproductive tract. In utero exposure to endocrine disruptors or abnormally high maternal hormone levels might cause ectopic expression or anterior transformation of HOXA genes. It is, however, also possible that different factors influence the anti-Mullerian hormone promoter activity during embryological development causing regression of the Müllerian ducts. Thus, our data stimulate new research directions to decipher the pathogenic basis of MRKH syndrome.

  5. A combination of transcriptome and methylation analyses reveals embryologically-relevant candidate genes in MRKH patients

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background The Mayer-Rokitansky-Küster-Hauser (MRKH) syndrome is present in at least 1 out of 4,500 female live births and is the second most common cause for primary amenorrhea. It is characterized by vaginal and uterine aplasia in an XX individual with normal secondary characteristics. It has long been considered a sporadic anomaly, but familial clustering occurs. Several candidate genes have been studied although no single factor has yet been identified. Cases of discordant monozygotic twins suggest that the involvement of epigenetic factors is more likely. Methods Differences in gene expression and methylation patterns of uterine tissue between eight MRKH patients and eight controls were identified using whole-genome microarray analyses. Results obtained by expression and methylation arrays were confirmed by qRT-PCR and pyrosequencing. Results We delineated 293 differentially expressed and 194 differentially methylated genes of which nine overlap in both groups. These nine genes are mainly embryologically relevant for the development of the female genital tract. Conclusion Our study used, for the first time, a combined whole-genome expression and methylation approach to reveal the etiology of the MRKH syndrome. The findings suggest that either deficient estrogen receptors or the ectopic expression of certain HOXA genes might lead to abnormal development of the female reproductive tract. In utero exposure to endocrine disruptors or abnormally high maternal hormone levels might cause ectopic expression or anterior transformation of HOXA genes. It is, however, also possible that different factors influence the anti-Mullerian hormone promoter activity during embryological development causing regression of the Müllerian ducts. Thus, our data stimulate new research directions to decipher the pathogenic basis of MRKH syndrome. PMID:21619687

  6. Human mast cell tryptase: multiple cDNAs and genes reveal a multigene serine protease family.

    PubMed Central

    Vanderslice, P; Ballinger, S M; Tam, E K; Goldstein, S M; Craik, C S; Caughey, G H

    1990-01-01

    Three different cDNAs and a gene encoding human skin mast cell tryptase have been cloned and sequenced in their entirety. The deduced amino acid sequences reveal a 30-amino acid prepropeptide followed by a 245-amino acid catalytic domain. The C-terminal undecapeptide of the human preprosequence is identical in dog tryptase and appears to be part of a prosequence unique among serine proteases. The differences among the three human tryptase catalytic domains include the loss of a consensus N-glycosylation site in one cDNA, which may explain some of the heterogeneity in size and susceptibility to deglycosylation seen in tryptase preparations. All three tryptase cDNAs are distinct from a recently reported cDNA obtained from a human lung mast cell library. A skin tryptase cDNA was used to isolate a human tryptase gene, the exons of which match one of the skin-derived cDNAs. The organization of the approximately 1.8-kilobase-pair tryptase gene is unique and is not closely related to that of any other mast cell or leukocyte serine protease. The 5' regulatory regions of the gene share features with those of other serine proteases, including mast cell chymase, but are unusual in being separated from the protein-coding sequence by an intron. High-stringency hybridization of a human genomic DNA blot with a fragment of the tryptase gene confirms the presence of multiple tryptase genes. These findings provide genetic evidence that human mast cell tryptases are the products of a multigene family. Images PMID:2187193

  7. Transcriptome and Proteome Data Reveal Candidate Genes for Pollinator Attraction in Sexually Deceptive Orchids

    PubMed Central

    Sedeek, Khalid E. M.; Qi, Weihong; Schauer, Monica A.; Gupta, Alok K.; Poveda, Lucy; Xu, Shuqing; Liu, Zhong-Jian; Grossniklaus, Ueli; Schiestl, Florian P.; Schlüter, Philipp M.

    2013-01-01

    Background Sexually deceptive orchids of the genus Ophrys mimic the mating signals of their pollinator females to attract males as pollinators. This mode of pollination is highly specific and leads to strong reproductive isolation between species. This study aims to identify candidate genes responsible for pollinator attraction and reproductive isolation between three closely related species, O. exaltata, O. sphegodes and O. garganica. Floral traits such as odour, colour and morphology are necessary for successful pollinator attraction. In particular, different odour hydrocarbon profiles have been linked to differences in specific pollinator attraction among these species. Therefore, the identification of genes involved in these traits is important for understanding the molecular basis of pollinator attraction by sexually deceptive orchids. Results We have created floral reference transcriptomes and proteomes for these three Ophrys species using a combination of next-generation sequencing (454 and Solexa), Sanger sequencing, and shotgun proteomics (tandem mass spectrometry). In total, 121 917 unique transcripts and 3531 proteins were identified. This represents the first orchid proteome and transcriptome from the orchid subfamily Orchidoideae. Proteome data revealed proteins corresponding to 2644 transcripts and 887 proteins not observed in the transcriptome. Candidate genes for hydrocarbon and anthocyanin biosynthesis were represented by 156 and 61 unique transcripts in 20 and 7 genes classes, respectively. Moreover, transcription factors putatively involved in the regulation of flower odour, colour and morphology were annotated, including Myb, MADS and TCP factors. Conclusion Our comprehensive data set generated by combining transcriptome and proteome technologies allowed identification of candidate genes for pollinator attraction and reproductive isolation among sexually deceptive orchids. This includes genes for hydrocarbon and anthocyanin biosynthesis and

  8. Comparative transcriptome analysis reveals differentially expressed genes associated with sex expression in garden asparagus (Asparagus officinalis).

    PubMed

    Li, Shu-Fen; Zhang, Guo-Jun; Zhang, Xue-Jin; Yuan, Jin-Hong; Deng, Chuan-Liang; Gao, Wu-Jun

    2017-08-22

    Garden asparagus (Asparagus officinalis) is a highly valuable vegetable crop of commercial and nutritional interest. It is also commonly used to investigate the mechanisms of sex determination and differentiation in plants. However, the sex expression mechanisms in asparagus remain poorly understood. De novo transcriptome sequencing via Illumina paired-end sequencing revealed more than 26 billion bases of high-quality sequence data from male and female asparagus flower buds. A total of 72,626 unigenes with an average length of 979 bp were assembled. In comparative transcriptome analysis, 4876 differentially expressed genes (DEGs) were identified in the possible sex-determining stage of female and male/supermale flower buds. Of these DEGs, 433, including 285 male/supermale-biased and 149 female-biased genes, were annotated as flower related. Of the male/supermale-biased flower-related genes, 102 were probably involved in anther development. In addition, 43 DEGs implicated in hormone response and biosynthesis putatively associated with sex expression and reproduction were discovered. Moreover, 128 transcription factor (TF)-related genes belonging to various families were found to be differentially expressed, and this finding implied the essential roles of TF in sex determination or differentiation in asparagus. Correlation analysis indicated that miRNA-DEG pairs were also implicated in asparagus sexual development. Our study identified a large number of DEGs involved in the sex expression and reproduction of asparagus, including known genes participating in plant reproduction, plant hormone signaling, TF encoding, and genes with unclear functions. We also found that miRNAs might be involved in the sex differentiation process. Our study could provide a valuable basis for further investigations on the regulatory networks of sex determination and differentiation in asparagus and facilitate further genetic and genomic studies on this dioecious species.

  9. A Minimal Set of Glycolytic Genes Reveals Strong Redundancies in Saccharomyces cerevisiae Central Metabolism.

    PubMed

    Solis-Escalante, Daniel; Kuijpers, Niels G A; Barrajon-Simancas, Nuria; van den Broek, Marcel; Pronk, Jack T; Daran, Jean-Marc; Daran-Lapujade, Pascale

    2015-08-01

    As a result of ancestral whole-genome and small-scale duplication events, the genomes of Saccharomyces cerevisiae and many eukaryotes still contain a substantial fraction of duplicated genes. In all investigated organisms, metabolic pathways, and more particularly glycolysis, are specifically enriched for functionally redundant paralogs. In ancestors of the Saccharomyces lineage, the duplication of glycolytic genes is purported to have played an important role leading to S. cerevisiae's current lifestyle favoring fermentative metabolism even in the presence of oxygen and characterized by a high glycolytic capacity. In modern S. cerevisiae strains, the 12 glycolytic reactions leading to the biochemical conversion from glucose to ethanol are encoded by 27 paralogs. In order to experimentally explore the physiological role of this genetic redundancy, a yeast strain with a minimal set of 14 paralogs was constructed (the "minimal glycolysis" [MG] strain). Remarkably, a combination of a quantitative systems approach and semiquantitative analysis in a wide array of growth environments revealed the absence of a phenotypic response to the cumulative deletion of 13 glycolytic paralogs. This observation indicates that duplication of glycolytic genes is not a prerequisite for achieving the high glycolytic fluxes and fermentative capacities that are characteristic of S. cerevisiae and essential for many of its industrial applications and argues against gene dosage effects as a means of fixing minor glycolytic paralogs in the yeast genome. The MG strain was carefully designed and constructed to provide a robust prototrophic platform for quantitative studies and has been made available to the scientific community.

  10. Metagenomic Analysis of Apple Orchard Soil Reveals Antibiotic Resistance Genes Encoding Predicted Bifunctional Proteins▿

    PubMed Central

    Donato, Justin J.; Moe, Luke A.; Converse, Brandon J.; Smart, Keith D.; Berklein, Flora C.; McManus, Patricia S.; Handelsman, Jo

    2010-01-01

    To gain insight into the diversity and origins of antibiotic resistance genes, we identified resistance genes in the soil in an apple orchard using functional metagenomics, which involves inserting large fragments of foreign DNA into Escherichia coli and assaying the resulting clones for expressed functions. Among 13 antibiotic-resistant clones, we found two genes that encode bifunctional proteins. One predicted bifunctional protein confers resistance to ceftazidime and contains a natural fusion between a predicted transcriptional regulator and a β-lactamase. Sequence analysis of the entire metagenomic clone encoding the predicted bifunctional β-lactamase revealed a gene potentially involved in chloramphenicol resistance as well as a predicted transposase. A second clone that encodes a predicted bifunctional protein confers resistance to kanamycin and contains an aminoglycoside acetyltransferase domain fused to a second acetyltransferase domain that, based on nucleotide sequence, was predicted not to be involved in antibiotic resistance. This is the first report of a transcriptional regulator fused to a β-lactamase and of an aminoglycoside acetyltransferase fused to an acetyltransferase not involved in antibiotic resistance. PMID:20453147

  11. Gene expression profiles in granuloma tissue reveal novel diagnostic markers in sarcoidosis.

    PubMed

    Christophi, George P; Caza, Tiffany; Curtiss, Christopher; Gumber, Divya; Massa, Paul T; Landas, Steve K

    2014-06-01

    Sarcoidosis is an immune-mediated multisystem disease characterized by the formation of non-caseating granulomas. The pathogenesis of sarcoidosis is unclear, with proposed infectious or environmental antigens triggering an aberrant immune response in susceptible hosts. Multiple pro-inflammatory signaling pathways have been implicated in mediating macrophage activation and granuloma formation in sarcoidosis, including IFN-γ/STAT-1, IL-6/STAT-3, and NF-κB. It is difficult to distinguish sarcoidosis from other granulomatous diseases or assess disease severity and treatment response with histopathology alone. Therefore, development of improved diagnostic tools is imperative. Herein, we describe an efficient and reliable technique to classify granulomatous disease through selected gene expression and identify novel genes and cytokine pathways contributing to the pathogenesis of sarcoidosis. We quantified the expression of twenty selected mRNAs extracted from formalin-fixed paraffin embedded (FFPE) tissue (n = 38) of normal lung, suture granulomas, sarcoid granulomas, and fungal granulomas. Utilizing quantitative real-time RT-PCR we analyzed the expression of several genes, including IL-6, COX-2, MCP-1, IFN-γ, T-bet, IRF-1, Nox2, IL-33, and eotaxin-1 and revealed differential regulation between suture, sarcoidosis, and fungal granulomas. This is the first study demonstrating that quantification of target gene expression in FFPE tissue biopsies is a potentially effective diagnostic and research tool in sarcoidosis.

  12. Comparative Transcriptome Analysis Reveals Early Pregnancy-Specific Genes Expressed in Peripheral Blood of Pregnant Sows

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Shien; Shi, Wenqing; Hu, Maishun; Fu, Xiangwei; Wang, Chuduan; Wang, Yachun; Zhang, Qin; Yu, Ying

    2014-01-01

    Early and accurate diagnosis of pregnancy is important for effective management of an economical pig farm. Besides the currently available methods used in early diagnosis of sows, circulating nucleic acids in peripheral blood may contain some early pregnancy-specific molecular markers. For the first time, microarray analysis of peripheral blood from pregnant sows versus non-pregnant sows identified 127 up-regulated and 56 down-regulated genes at day 14 post-insemination. Gene Ontology annotation grouped the total differently expressed genes into 3 significantly enriched terms, cell surface receptor linked signal transduction, G-protein coupled receptor protein signaling pathway and regulation of vesicle-mediated transport. Signaling pathway analysis revealed the only one significantly changed pathway was arachidonic acid metabolism. Of the differently expressed genes, nine (including LPAR3, RXFP4, GALP, CBR1, CBR2, GPX6, USP18, LHB and NR5A1) were found to exert function related to early pregnancy processes. This study provides a clue that differentially abundant RNAs in maternal peripheral blood can help to identify the molecular markers of early pregnancy in pigs. PMID:25479131

  13. Enhanced transcriptome maps from multiple mouse tissues reveal evolutionary constraint in gene expression

    PubMed Central

    Pervouchine, Dmitri D.; Djebali, Sarah; Breschi, Alessandra; Davis, Carrie A.; Barja, Pablo Prieto; Dobin, Alex; Tanzer, Andrea; Lagarde, Julien; Zaleski, Chris; See, Lei-Hoon; Fastuca, Meagan; Drenkow, Jorg; Wang, Huaien; Bussotti, Giovanni; Pei, Baikang; Balasubramanian, Suganthi; Monlong, Jean; Harmanci, Arif; Gerstein, Mark; Beer, Michael A.; Notredame, Cedric; Guigó, Roderic; Gingeras, Thomas R.

    2015-01-01

    Mice have been a long-standing model for human biology and disease. Here we characterize, by RNA sequencing, the transcriptional profiles of a large and heterogeneous collection of mouse tissues, augmenting the mouse transcriptome with thousands of novel transcript candidates. Comparison with transcriptome profiles in human cell lines reveals substantial conservation of transcriptional programmes, and uncovers a distinct class of genes with levels of expression that have been constrained early in vertebrate evolution. This core set of genes captures a substantial fraction of the transcriptional output of mammalian cells, and participates in basic functional and structural housekeeping processes common to all cell types. Perturbation of these constrained genes is associated with significant phenotypes including embryonic lethality and cancer. Evolutionary constraint in gene expression levels is not reflected in the conservation of the genomic sequences, but is associated with conserved epigenetic marking, as well as with characteristic post-transcriptional regulatory programme, in which sub-cellular localization and alternative splicing play comparatively large roles. PMID:25582907

  14. Transcriptome analysis reveals novel players in the cranial neural crest gene regulatory network

    PubMed Central

    Simões-Costa, Marcos; Tan-Cabugao, Joanne; Antoshechkin, Igor; Sauka-Spengler, Tatjana; Bronner, Marianne E.

    2014-01-01

    The neural crest is an embryonic stem cell population that gives rise to a multitude of derivatives. In particular, the cranial neural crest (CNC) is unique in its ability to contribute to both facial skeleton and peripheral ganglia. To gain further insight into the molecular underpinnings that distinguish the CNC from other embryonic tissues, we have utilized a CNC-specific enhancer as a tool to isolate a pure, region-specific NC subpopulation for transcriptional profiling. The resulting data set reveals previously unknown transcription factors and signaling pathways that may influence the CNC's ability to migrate and/or differentiate into unique derivatives. To elaborate on the CNC gene regulatory network, we evaluated the effects of knocking down known neural plate border genes and early neural crest specifier genes on selected neural crest-enriched transcripts. The results suggest that ETS1 and SOX9 may act as pan-neural crest regulators of the migratory CNC. Taken together, our analysis provides unprecedented characterization of the migratory CNC transcriptome and identifies new links in the gene regulatory network responsible for development of this critical cell population. PMID:24389048

  15. Genomic analysis reveals distinct mechanisms and functional classes of SOX10-regulated genes in melanocytes

    PubMed Central

    Fufa, Temesgen D.; Harris, Melissa L.; Watkins-Chow, Dawn E.; Levy, Denise; Gorkin, David U.; Gildea, Derek E.; Song, Lingyun; Safi, Alexias; Crawford, Gregory E.; Sviderskaya, Elena V.; Bennett, Dorothy C.; Mccallion, Andrew S.; Loftus, Stacie K.; Pavan, William J.

    2015-01-01

    SOX10 is required for melanocyte development and maintenance, and has been linked to melanoma initiation and progression. However, the molecular mechanisms by which SOX10 guides the appropriate gene expression programs necessary to promote the melanocyte lineage are not fully understood. Here we employ genetic and epigenomic analysis approaches to uncover novel genomic targets and previously unappreciated molecular roles of SOX10 in melanocytes. Through global analysis of SOX10-binding sites and epigenetic characteristics of chromatin states, we uncover an extensive catalog of SOX10 targets genome-wide. Our findings reveal that SOX10 predominantly engages ‘open’ chromatin regions and binds to distal regulatory elements, including novel and previously known melanocyte enhancers. Integrated chromatin occupancy and transcriptome analysis suggest a role for SOX10 in both transcriptional activation and repression to regulate functionally distinct classes of genes. We demonstrate that distinct epigenetic signatures and cis-regulatory sequence motifs predicted to bind putative co-regulatory transcription factors define SOX10-activated and SOX10-repressed target genes. Collectively, these findings uncover a central role of SOX10 as a global regulator of gene expression in the melanocyte lineage by targeting diverse regulatory pathways. PMID:26206884

  16. A model of gene expression based on random dynamical systems reveals modularity properties of gene regulatory networks.

    PubMed

    Antoneli, Fernando; Ferreira, Renata C; Briones, Marcelo R S

    2016-06-01

    Here we propose a new approach to modeling gene expression based on the theory of random dynamical systems (RDS) that provides a general coupling prescription between the nodes of any given regulatory network given the dynamics of each node is modeled by a RDS. The main virtues of this approach are the following: (i) it provides a natural way to obtain arbitrarily large networks by coupling together simple basic pieces, thus revealing the modularity of regulatory networks; (ii) the assumptions about the stochastic processes used in the modeling are fairly general, in the sense that the only requirement is stationarity; (iii) there is a well developed mathematical theory, which is a blend of smooth dynamical systems theory, ergodic theory and stochastic analysis that allows one to extract relevant dynamical and statistical information without solving the system; (iv) one may obtain the classical rate equations form the corresponding stochastic version by averaging the dynamic random variables (small noise limit). It is important to emphasize that unlike the deterministic case, where coupling two equations is a trivial matter, coupling two RDS is non-trivial, specially in our case, where the coupling is performed between a state variable of one gene and the switching stochastic process of another gene and, hence, it is not a priori true that the resulting coupled system will satisfy the definition of a random dynamical system. We shall provide the necessary arguments that ensure that our coupling prescription does indeed furnish a coupled regulatory network of random dynamical systems. Finally, the fact that classical rate equations are the small noise limit of our stochastic model ensures that any validation or prediction made on the basis of the classical theory is also a validation or prediction of our model. We illustrate our framework with some simple examples of single-gene system and network motifs.

  17. Clostridium sordellii genome analysis reveals plasmid localized toxin genes encoded within pathogenicity loci.

    PubMed

    Couchman, Edward C; Browne, Hilary P; Dunn, Matt; Lawley, Trevor D; Songer, J Glenn; Hall, Val; Petrovska, Liljana; Vidor, Callum; Awad, Milena; Lyras, Dena; Fairweather, Neil F

    2015-05-16

    Clostridium sordellii can cause severe infections in animals and humans, the latter associated with trauma, toxic shock and often-fatal gynaecological infections. Strains can produce two large clostridial cytotoxins (LCCs), TcsL and TcsH, related to those produced by Clostridium difficile, Clostridium novyi and Clostridium perfringens, but the genetic basis of toxin production remains uncharacterised. Phylogenetic analysis of the genome sequences of 44 strains isolated from human and animal infections in the UK, US and Australia placed the species into four clades. Although all strains originated from animal or clinical disease, only 5 strains contained LCC genes: 4 strains contain tcsL alone and one strain contains tcsL and tcsH. Four toxin-positive strains were found within one clade. Where present, tcsL and tcsH were localised in a pathogenicity locus, similar to but distinct from that present in C. difficile. In contrast to C. difficile, where the LCCs are chromosomally localised, the C. sordellii tcsL and tcsH genes are localised on plasmids. Our data suggest gain and loss of entire toxigenic plasmids in addition to horizontal transfer of the pathogenicity locus. A high quality, annotated sequence of ATCC9714 reveals many putative virulence factors including neuraminidase, phospholipase C and the cholesterol-dependent cytolysin sordellilysin that are highly conserved between all strains studied. Genome analysis of C. sordellii reveals that the LCCs, the major virulence factors, are localised on plasmids. Many strains do not contain the LCC genes; it is probable that in several of these cases the plasmid has been lost upon laboratory subculture. Our data are consistent with LCCs being the primary virulence factors in the majority of infections, but LCC-negative strains may precipitate certain categories of infection. A high quality genome sequence reveals putative virulence factors whose role in virulence can be investigated.

  18. Differentially expressed genes and interacting pathways in bladder cancer revealed by bioinformatic analysis.

    PubMed

    Shen, Yinzhou; Wang, Xuelei; Jin, Yongchao; Lu, Jiasun; Qiu, Guangming; Wen, Xiaofei

    2014-10-01

    The goal of this study was to identify cancer-associated differentially expressed genes (DEGs), analyze their biological functions and investigate the mechanism(s) of cancer occurrence and development, which may provide a theoretical foundation for bladder cancer (BCa) therapy. We downloaded the mRNA expression profiling dataset GSE13507 from the Gene Expression Omnibus database; the dataset includes 165 BCa and 68 control samples. T‑tests were used to identify DEGs. To further study the biological functions of the identified DEGs, we performed a Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes (KEGG) pathway enrichment analysis. Next, we built a network of potentially interacting pathways to study the synergistic relationships among DEGs. A total of 12,105 genes were identified as DEGs, of which 5,239 were upregulated and 6,866 were downregulated in BCa. The DEGs encoding activator protein 1 (AP-1), nuclear factor of activated T-cells (NFAT) proteins, nuclear factor κ-light-chain-enhancer of activated B cells (NF-κB) and interleukin (IL)-10 were revealed to participate in the significantly enriched immune pathways that were downregulated in BCa. KEGG enrichment analysis revealed 7 significantly upregulated and 47 significantly downregulated pathways enriched among the DEGs. We found a crosstalk interaction among a total of 44 pathways in the network of BCa-affected pathways. In conclusion, our results show that BCa involves dysfunctions in multiple systems. Our study is expected to pave ways for immune and inflammatory research and provide molecular insights for cancer therapy.

  19. Analysis of clock-regulated genes in Neurospora reveals widespread posttranscriptional control of metabolic potential.

    PubMed

    Hurley, Jennifer M; Dasgupta, Arko; Emerson, Jillian M; Zhou, Xiaoying; Ringelberg, Carol S; Knabe, Nicole; Lipzen, Anna M; Lindquist, Erika A; Daum, Christopher G; Barry, Kerrie W; Grigoriev, Igor V; Smith, Kristina M; Galagan, James E; Bell-Pedersen, Deborah; Freitag, Michael; Cheng, Chao; Loros, Jennifer J; Dunlap, Jay C

    2014-12-02

    Neurospora crassa has been for decades a principal model for filamentous fungal genetics and physiology as well as for understanding the mechanism of circadian clocks. Eukaryotic fungal and animal clocks comprise transcription-translation-based feedback loops that control rhythmic transcription of a substantial fraction of these transcriptomes, yielding the changes in protein abundance that mediate circadian regulation of physiology and metabolism: Understanding circadian control of gene expression is key to understanding eukaryotic, including fungal, physiology. Indeed, the isolation of clock-controlled genes (ccgs) was pioneered in Neurospora where circadian output begins with binding of the core circadian transcription factor WCC to a subset of ccg promoters, including those of many transcription factors. High temporal resolution (2-h) sampling over 48 h using RNA sequencing (RNA-Seq) identified circadianly expressed genes in Neurospora, revealing that from ∼10% to as much 40% of the transcriptome can be expressed under circadian control. Functional classifications of these genes revealed strong enrichment in pathways involving metabolism, protein synthesis, and stress responses; in broad terms, daytime metabolic potential favors catabolism, energy production, and precursor assembly, whereas night activities favor biosynthesis of cellular components and growth. Discriminative regular expression motif elicitation (DREME) identified key promoter motifs highly correlated with the temporal regulation of ccgs. Correlations between ccg abundance from RNA-Seq, the degree of ccg-promoter activation as reported by ccg-promoter-luciferase fusions, and binding of WCC as measured by ChIP-Seq, are not strong. Therefore, although circadian activation is critical to ccg rhythmicity, posttranscriptional regulation plays a major role in determining rhythmicity at the mRNA level.

  20. GRPR antagonist protects from drug-induced liver injury by impairing neutrophil chemotaxis and motility.

    PubMed

    Czepielewski, Rafael S; Jaeger, Natália; Marques, Pedro E; Antunes, Maísa M; Rigo, Maurício M; Alvarenga, Débora M; Pereira, Rafaela V; da Silva, Rodrigo D; Lopes, Tiago G; da Silva, Vinícius D; Porto, Bárbara N; Menezes, Gustavo B; Bonorino, Cristina

    2017-04-01

    Drug-induced liver injury (DILI) is a major cause of acute liver failure (ALF), where hepatocyte necrotic products trigger liver inflammation, release of CXC chemokine receptor 2 (CXCR2) ligands (IL-8) and other neutrophil chemotactic molecules. Liver infiltration by neutrophils is a major cause of the life-threatening tissue damage that ensues. A GRPR (gastrin-releasing peptide receptor) antagonist impairs IL-8-induced neutrophil chemotaxis in vitro. We investigated its potential to reduce acetaminophen-induced ALF, neutrophil migration, and mechanisms underlying this phenomenon. We found that acetaminophen-overdosed mice treated with GRPR antagonist had reduced DILI and neutrophil infiltration in the liver. Intravital imaging and cell tracking analysis revealed reduced neutrophil mobility within the liver. Surprisingly, GRPR antagonist inhibited CXCL2-induced migration in vivo, decreasing neutrophil activation through CD11b and CD62L modulation. Additionally, this compound decreased CXCL8-driven neutrophil chemotaxis in vitro independently of CXCR2 internalization, induced activation of MAPKs (p38 and ERK1/2) and downregulation of neutrophil adhesion molecules CD11b and CD66b. In silico analysis revealed direct binding of GRPR antagonist and CXCL8 to the same binding spot in CXCR2. These findings indicate a new potential use for GRPR antagonist for treatment of DILI through a mechanism involving adhesion molecule modulation and possible direct binding to CXCR2.

  1. Cancer cell chemokines direct chemotaxis of activated stellate cells in pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma.

    PubMed

    Roy, Ishan; Boyle, Kathleen A; Vonderhaar, Emily P; Zimmerman, Noah P; Gorse, Egal; Mackinnon, A Craig; Hwang, Rosa F; Franco-Barraza, Janusz; Cukierman, Edna; Tsai, Susan; Evans, Douglas B; Dwinell, Michael B

    2017-03-01

    The mechanisms by which the extreme desmoplasia observed in pancreatic tumors develops remain unknown and its role in pancreatic cancer progression is unsettled. Chemokines have a key role in the recruitment of a wide variety of cell types in health and disease. Transcript and protein profile analyses of human and murine cell lines and human tissue specimens revealed a consistent elevation in the receptors CCR10 and CXCR6, as well as their respective ligands CCL28 and CXCL16. Elevated ligand expression was restricted to tumor cells, whereas receptors were in both epithelial and stromal cells. Consistent with its regulation by inflammatory cytokines, CCL28 and CCR10, but not CXCL16 or CXCR6, were upregulated in human pancreatitis tissues. Cytokine stimulation of pancreatic cancer cells increased CCL28 secretion in epithelial tumor cells but not an immortalized activated human pancreatic stellate cell line (HPSC). Stellate cells exhibited dose- and receptor-dependent chemotaxis in response to CCL28. This functional response was not linked to changes in activation status as CCL28 had little impact on alpha smooth muscle actin levels or extracellular matrix deposition or alignment. Co-culture assays revealed CCL28-dependent chemotaxis of HPSC toward cancer but not normal pancreatic epithelial cells, consistent with stromal cells being a functional target for the epithelial-derived chemokine. These data together implicate the chemokine CCL28 in the inflammation-mediated recruitment of cancer-associated stellate cells into the pancreatic cancer parenchyma.

  2. Sinorhizobium meliloti chemotaxis to quaternary ammonium compounds is mediated by the chemoreceptor McpX.

    PubMed

    Webb, Benjamin A; Karl Compton, K; Castañeda Saldaña, Rafael; Arapov, Timofey D; Keith Ray, W; Helm, Richard F; Scharf, Birgit E

    2017-01-01

    The bacterium Sinorhizobium meliloti is attracted to seed exudates of its host plant alfalfa (Medicago sativa). Since quaternary ammonium compounds (QACs) are exuded by germinating seeds, we assayed chemotaxis of S. meliloti towards betonicine, choline, glycine betaine, stachydrine and trigonelline. The wild type displayed a positive response to all QACs. Using LC-MS, we determined that each germinating alfalfa seed exuded QACs in the nanogram range. Compared to the closely related nonhost species, spotted medic (Medicago arabica), unique profiles were released. Further assessments of single chemoreceptor deletion strains revealed that an mcpX deletion strain displayed little to no response to these compounds. Differential scanning fluorimetry showed interaction of the isolated periplasmic region of McpX (McpX(PR) and McpX34-306 ) with QACs. Isothermal titration calorimetry experiments revealed tight binding to McpX(PR) with dissociation constants (Kd ) in the nanomolar range for choline and glycine betaine, micromolar Kd for stachydrine and trigonelline and a Kd in the millimolar range for betonicine. Our discovery of S. meliloti chemotaxis to plant-derived QACs adds another role to this group of compounds, which are known to serve as nutrient sources, osmoprotectants and cell-to-cell signalling molecules. This is the first report of a chemoreceptor that mediates QACs taxis through direct binding. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  3. Transcriptomic Comparison Reveals Candidate Genes for Triterpenoid Biosynthesis in Two Closely Related Ilex Species

    PubMed Central

    Wen, Lingling; Yun, Xiaoyun; Zheng, Xiasheng; Xu, Hui; Zhan, Ruoting; Chen, Weiwen; Xu, Yaping; Chen, Ye; Zhang, Jie

    2017-01-01

    Native to Southern China, Ilex pubescens and Ilex asprella are frequently used in traditional Chinese medicine. Both of them produce a large variety of ursane-type triterpenoid saponins, which have been demonstrated to have different pharmacological effects. However, little is known about their biosynthesis. In this study, transcriptomic analysis of I. pubescens and comparison with its closely related specie I. asprella were carried out to identify potential genes involved in triterpenoid saponin biosynthesis. Through RNA sequencing (RNA-seq) and de novo transcriptome assembly of I. pubescens, a total of 68,688 UniGene clusters are obtained, of which 32,184 (46.86%) are successfully annotated by comparison with the sequences in major public databases (NCBI, Swiss-Prot, and KEGG). It includes 128 UniGenes related to triterpenoid backbone biosynthesis, 11 OSCs (oxidosqualene cyclases), 233 CYPs (cytochrome P450), and 269 UGTs (UDP-glycosyltransferases). By homology-based blast and phylogenetic analysis with well-characterized genes involved in triterpenoid saponin biosynthesis, 5 OSCs, 14 CYPs, and 1 UGT are further proposed as the most promising candidate genes. Transcriptomic comparison between two Ilex species using blastp and OrthoMCL method reveals high sequence similarity. All OSCs and UGTs as well as most CYPs are classified as orthologous genes, while only 5 CYPs in I. pubescens and 3 CYPs in I. asprella are species-specific. One of OSC candidates, named as IpAS1, was successfully cloned and expressed in Saccharomyces cerevisiae INVSc1. Analysis of the yeast extract by gas chromatography (GC) and gas chromatography–mass spectrometry (GC-MS) shows IpAS1 is a mixed amyrin synthase, producing α-amyrin and β-amyrin at ratio of 5:1, which is similar to its ortholog IaAS1 from I. asprella. This study is the first exploration to profile the transcriptome of I. pubescens, the generated data and gene models will facilitate further molecular studies on the

  4. Sperm chemotaxis promotes individual fertilization success in sea urchins.

    PubMed

    Hussain, Yasmeen H; Guasto, Jeffrey S; Zimmer, Richard K; Stocker, Roman; Riffell, Jeffrey A

    2016-05-15

    Reproductive success fundamentally shapes an organism's ecology and evolution, and gamete traits mediate fertilization, which is a critical juncture in reproduction. Individual male fertilization success is dependent on the ability of sperm from one male to outcompete the sperm of other males when searching for a conspecific egg. Sperm chemotaxis, the ability of sperm to navigate towards eggs using chemical signals, has been studied for over a century, but such studies have long assumed that this phenomenon improves individual male fitness without explicit evidence to support this claim. Here, we assessed fertilization changes in the presence of a chemoattractant-digesting peptidase and used a microfluidic device coupled with a fertilization assay to determine the effect of sperm chemotaxis on individual male fertilization success in the sea urchin Lytechinus pictus We show that removing chemoattractant from the gametic environment decreases fertilization success. We further found that individual male differences in chemotaxis to a well-defined gradient of attractant correlate with individual male differences in fertilization success. These results demonstrate that sperm chemotaxis is an important contributor to individual reproductive success. © 2016. Published by The Company of Biologists Ltd.

  5. Relevance of intracellular polarity to accuracy of eukaryotic chemotaxis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hiraiwa, Tetsuya; Nagamatsu, Akihiro; Akuzawa, Naohiro; Nishikawa, Masatoshi; Shibata, Tatsuo

    2014-10-01

    Eukaryotic chemotaxis is usually mediated by intracellular signals that tend to localize at the front or back of the cell. Such intracellular polarities frequently require no extracellular guidance cues, indicating that spontaneous polarization occurs in the signal network. Spontaneous polarization activity is considered relevant to the persistent motions in random cell migrations and chemotaxis. In this study, we propose a theoretical model that connects spontaneous intracellular polarity and motile ability in a chemoattractant solution. We demonstrate that the intracellular polarity can enhance the accuracy of chemotaxis. Chemotactic accuracy should also depend on chemoattractant concentration through the concentration-dependent correlation time in the polarity direction. Both the polarity correlation time and the chemotactic accuracy depend on the degree of responsiveness to the chemical gradient. We show that optimally accurate chemotaxis occurs at an intermediate responsiveness of intracellular polarity. Experimentally, we find that the persistence time of randomly migrating Dictyostelium cells depends on the chemoattractant concentration, as predicted by our theory. At the optimum responsiveness, this ameboid cell can enhance its chemotactic accuracy tenfold.

  6. Chemotaxis detection towards chlorophenols using video processing analysis.

    PubMed

    Okada, E; Nisenbaum, M; Martínez Arca, J; Murialdo, S E

    2017-11-01

    To our knowledge, this communication is the first report of chemotaxis towards chlorophenols by any bacteria. We used a recently published method based on the agarose in-plug assay combined with video processing analysis and we also present a new index of bacterial mean speed for these assays. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Asymmetric Localization of Calpain 2 during Neutrophil Chemotaxis

    PubMed Central

    Nuzzi, Paul A.; Senetar, Melissa A.

    2007-01-01

    Chemoattractants induce neutrophil polarization through localized polymerization of F-actin at the leading edge. The suppression of rear and lateral protrusions is required for efficient chemotaxis and involves the temporal and spatial segregation of signaling molecules. We have previously shown that the intracellular calcium-dependent protease calpain is required for cell migration and is involved in regulating neutrophil chemotaxis. Here, we show that primary neutrophils and neutrophil-like HL-60 cells express both calpain 1 and calpain 2 and that chemoattractants induce the asymmetric recruitment of calpain 2, but not calpain 1, to the leading edge of polarized neutrophils and differentiated HL-60 cells. Using time-lapse microscopy, we show that enrichment of calpain 2 at the leading edge occurs during early pseudopod formation and that its localization is sensitive to changes in the chemotactic gradient. We demonstrate that calpain 2 is recruited to lipid rafts and that cholesterol depletion perturbs calpain 2 localization, suggesting that its enrichment at the front requires proper membrane organization. Finally, we show that catalytic activity of calpain is required to limit pseudopod formation in the direction of chemoattractant and for efficient chemotaxis. Together, our findings identify calpain 2 as a novel component of the frontness signal that promotes polarization during chemotaxis. PMID:17192410

  8. Universal response-adaptation relation in bacterial chemotaxis.

    PubMed

    Krembel, Anna K; Neumann, Silke; Sourjik, Victor

    2015-01-01

    The bacterial strategy of chemotaxis relies on temporal comparisons of chemical concentrations, where the probability of maintaining the current direction of swimming is modulated by changes in stimulation experienced during the recent past. A short-term memory required for such comparisons is provided by the adaptation system, which operates through the activity-dependent methylation of chemotaxis receptors. Previous theoretical studies have suggested that efficient navigation in gradients requires a well-defined adaptation rate, because the memory time scale needs to match the duration of straight runs made by bacteria. Here we demonstrate that the chemotaxis pathway of Escherichia coli does indeed exhibit a universal relation between the response magnitude and adaptation time which does not depend on the type of chemical ligand. Our results suggest that this alignment of adaptation rates for different ligands is achieved through cooperative interactions among chemoreceptors rather than through fine-tuning of methylation rates for individual receptors. This observation illustrates a yet-unrecognized function of receptor clustering in bacterial chemotaxis.

  9. Relevance of intracellular polarity to accuracy of eukaryotic chemotaxis.

    PubMed

    Hiraiwa, Tetsuya; Nagamatsu, Akihiro; Akuzawa, Naohiro; Nishikawa, Masatoshi; Shibata, Tatsuo

    2014-08-14

    Eukaryotic chemotaxis is usually mediated by intracellular signals that tend to localize at the front or back of the cell. Such intracellular polarities frequently require no extracellular guidance cues, indicating that spontaneous polarization occurs in the signal network. Spontaneous polarization activity is considered relevant to the persistent motions in random cell migrations and chemotaxis. In this study, we propose a theoretical model that connects spontaneous intracellular polarity and motile ability in a chemoattractant solution. We demonstrate that the intracellular polarity can enhance the accuracy of chemotaxis. Chemotactic accuracy should also depend on chemoattractant concentration through the concentration-dependent correlation time in the polarity direction. Both the polarity correlation time and the chemotactic accuracy depend on the degree of responsiveness to the chemical gradient. We show that optimally accurate chemotaxis occurs at an intermediate responsiveness of intracellular polarity. Experimentally, we find that the persistence time of randomly migrating Dictyostelium cells depends on the chemoattractant concentration, as predicted by our theory. At the optimum responsiveness, this ameboid cell can enhance its chemotactic accuracy tenfold.

  10. RNA-Seq reveals leaf cuticular wax-related genes in Welsh onion.

    PubMed

    Liu, Qianchun; Wen, Changlong; Zhao, Hong; Zhang, Liying; Wang, Jian; Wang, Yongqin

    2014-01-01

    The waxy cuticle plays a very important role in plant resistance to various biotic and abiotic stresses and is an important characteristic of Welsh onions. Two different types of biangan Welsh onions (BG) were selected for this study: BG, a wild-type covered by wax, which forms a continuous lipid membrane on its epidermal cells, and GLBG, a glossy mutant of BG whose epidermal cells are not covered by wax. To elucidate the waxy cuticle-related gene expression changes, we used RNA-Seq to compare these two Welsh onion varieties with distinct differences in cuticular wax. The de novo assembly yielded 42,881 putative unigenes, 25.41% of which are longer than 1,000 bp. Among the high-quality unique sequences, 22,289 (52.0%) had at least one significant match to an existing gene model. A total of 798 genes, representing 1.86% of the total putative unigenes, were differentially expressed between these two Welsh onion varieties. The expression patterns of four important unigenes that are related to waxy cuticle biosynthesis were confirmed by RT-qPCR and COG class annotation, which demonstrated that these genes play an important role in defense mechanisms and lipid transport and metabolism. To our knowledge, this study is the first exploration of the Welsh onion waxy cuticle. These results may help to reveal the molecular mechanisms underlying the waxy cuticle and will be useful for waxy gene cloning, genetics and breeding as well as phylogenetic and evolutionary studies of the Welsh onion.

  11. Analysis of the Dendrobium officinale transcriptome reveals putative alkaloid biosynthetic genes and genetic markers.

    PubMed

    Guo, Xu; Li, Ying; Li, Chunfang; Luo, Hongmei; Wang, Lizhi; Qian, Jun; Luo, Xiang; Xiang, Li; Song, Jingyuan; Sun, Chao; Xu, Haibin; Yao, Hui; Chen, Shilin

    2013-09-15

    Dendrobium officinale Kimura et Migo (Orchidaceae) is a traditional Chinese medicinal plant. The stem contains an alkaloid that is the primary bioactive component. However, the details of alkaloid biosynthesis have not been effectively explored because of the limited number of expressed sequence tags (ESTs) available in GenBank. In this study, we analyzed RNA isolated from the stem of D. officinale using a single half-run on the Roche 454 GS FLX Titanium platform to generate 553,084 ESTs with an average length of 417 bases. The ESTs were assembled into 36,407 unique putative transcripts. A total of 69.97% of the unique sequences were annotated, and a detailed view of alkaloid biosynthesis was obtained. Functional assignment based on Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes (KEGG) terms revealed 69 unique sequences representing 25 genes involved in alkaloid backbone biosynthesis. A series of qRT-PCR experiments confirmed that the expression levels of 5 key enzyme-encoding genes involved in alkaloid biosynthesis are greater in the leaves of D. officinale than in the stems. Cytochrome P450s, aminotransferases, methyltransferases, multidrug resistance protein (MDR) transporters and transcription factors were screened for possible involvement in alkaloid biosynthesis. Furthermore, a total of 1061 simple sequence repeat motifs (SSR) were detected from 36,407 unigenes. Dinucleotide repeats were the most abundant repeat type. Of these, 179 genes were associated with a metabolic pathway in KEGG. This study is the first to produce a large volume of transcriptome data from D. officinale. It extends the foundation to facilitate gene discovery in D. officinale and provides an important resource for the molecular genetic and functional genomic studies in this species. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.