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Sample records for chemotherapy agent thiotepa

  1. Thiotepa Injection

    MedlinePlus

    ... reproductive organs where eggs are formed), breast, and bladder cancer. It is also used to treat malignant effusions ( ... how you respond to thiotepa.When used for bladder cancer, thiotepa is infused (injected slowly) into your bladder ...

  2. Chemotherapy drug thioTEPA exacerbates stress-induced anhedonia and corticosteroid responses but not impairment of hippocampal cell proliferation in adult mice.

    PubMed

    Wilson, Courtney L; Weber, E Todd

    2013-01-01

    Cancer patients often suffer long-lasting affective and cognitive impairments as a result of chemotherapy treatment. Previous work in our lab has shown deficits in learning and memory and hippocampal cell proliferation in mice lasting up to 20 weeks following acute administration of thioTEPA. In this study, the effects of thioTEPA in conjunction with effects of chronic stress on depression-related behavior were examined in C57BL/6J mice, 12 weeks following thioTEPA administration. Chemotherapy-treated mice showed a diminished sucralose preference compared to controls that was further exacerbated after 2 weeks of daily restraint stress. This intensifying effect was not observed in the Porsolt forced swim test. Moreover, stress-induced corticosteroid responses were exaggerated in thioTEPA-treated mice. Cell proliferation in the dentate gyrus of the hippocampus was also impaired similarly by prior thioTEPA treatment and by daily restraint stress, with no additive effect. Results suggest that some depression-related impairments may be exacerbated by chemotherapy treatment through altered corticosteroid regulation.

  3. Triethylene thiophosphoramide (thio-tepa) and pterygium.

    PubMed

    Liddy, B S; Morgan, J F

    1966-05-01

    A 1:2000 solution of a radiomimetic alkylating agent-triethylene thiophosphoramide (thio-tepa, Lederle Laboratories) with a proven inhibitory action on proliferating vascular endothelium, was used topically as an adjunct to pterygium surgery in an attempt to decrease the incidence of recurrence. A bare-sclera technique, with excision of the pterygium, was the surgical method used. Two drops of 1:2000 solution of thiotepa (15 mg in 30 cc of Ringer's solution) were applied every three hours while awake from the second postoperative day for six weeks. Twenty-six eyes received this treatment. There was one recurrence in the period of follow-up, which has been up to three years. Four fellow eyes, operated on at the same time with the same surgical technique, received no topical thio-tepa postoperatively. Two of these eyes developed a recurrence of the pterygium. No sequelae related to corneal damage, defective vision, or interference with wound healing were observed. No systemic effects were encountered. It is concluded that thio-tepa, used as described, is a safe, inexpensive and valuable aid in pterygium surgery.

  4. Intrathecal chemotherapy. Selection of cytostatic agents.

    PubMed

    Hayakawa, T; Yamada, R; Kanai, N; Kuroda, R; Ushio, Y; Higashi, H; Mogami, H

    1970-09-01

    Selection of cytostatic agents for intrathecal administration is the subject of this paper.Both the toxic side effects-destruction of blood-brain barrier and change of body weight-and the cytostatic effects on intracranially transplanted Yoshida ascites sarcoma were investigated of intrathecal administration of various cytostatic agents. As a result, it may be concluded that Methotrexate and Endoxan and lower dose of mitomycin C are suitable drugs for intrathecal chemotherapy.Based on these findings, clinical cases of malignant brain tumours were treated with intrathecal chemotherapy.Grateful acknowledgement is made to Professor Dennosuke Jinnai for his constant interest and guidance in this investigation.

  5. Survival of breast cancer patients with meningeal carcinomatosis treated by intrathecal thiotepa.

    PubMed

    Comte, A; Jdid, W; Guilhaume, M N; Kriegel, I; Piperno-Neumann, S; Dieras, V; Dorval, T; Pierga, J Y; Cottu, P H; Mignot, L; Bidard, F C

    2013-12-01

    Treatment of breast cancer meningeal carcinomatosis (MC) relies on intrathecal chemotherapy. Thiotepa is one of the few drugs approved in this setting, although no large cohort has been reported. The aim of our retrospective study is to describe survival and prognostic factors of breast cancer patients treated by intrathecal thiotepa. A search in the electronic database of the Institut Curie was performed and retrieved the patients diagnosed with breast cancer MC from 2000 to 2012 and who received at least one intrathecal injection of thiotepa. The standard regimen was intrathecal thiotepa (10 mg) and methylprednisolone (40 mg), repeated every other week. Clinical data were retrieved from the computerized medical file of each patient. Sixty-six patients have been treated with intrathecal thiotepa either as first line or second line of treatment for breast cancer MC. The median overall survival was 4.5 months (range 0.1-50). There was no significant survival difference between patients treated as first or second line. In multivariate analysis, main adverse prognostic factors at diagnosis were performance status >2 (p = 0.001, RR = 3.4, 95 % CI 1.6-7.2) and history of more than 3 previous systemic chemotherapy lines (p = 0.002, RR = 2.90, 95 % CI 1.50-5.65). After start of the treatment, high primary tumor grade, elevated Cyfra 21-1 levels in the cerebrospinal fluid, and lack of clinical improvement were also independent adverse prognostic factors in multivariate analysis. This is the largest retrospective cohort of breast cancer MC treated by intrathecal thiotepa ever reported. The median overall survival was short but some patients clearly benefited from this treatment, even used as second line. PMID:24043602

  6. Salvage intracerebrospinal fluid thiotepa in breast cancer-related leptomeningeal metastases: a retrospective case series.

    PubMed

    Le Rhun, Emilie; Taillibert, Sophie; Devos, Patrick; Zairi, Fahed; Turpin, Anthony; Rodrigues, Isabelle; Cazin, Jean Louis; Pierret, Matthieu Faivre; André, Charles; Dubois, François; Bonneterre, Jacques; Chamberlain, Marc C

    2013-11-01

    There is currently a paucity of data on salvage intracerebrospinal fluid (intra-CSF) chemotherapy in leptomeningeal metastases (LM). This report is a single-institution experience with salvage treatment in patients with breast cancer (BC) and LM. This retrospective cohort describes 24 consecutive patients with BC selected for a second-line of treatment for LM. The first line of LM treatment consisted of intra-CSF liposomal cytarabine in all patients combined with systemic therapy in 18 cases and radiotherapy in four cases. Second-line (salvage) treatment utilized intra-CSF thiotepa in all and systemic chemotherapy in nine patients. No patient received CNS-directed radiotherapy. The median Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group performance status at initiation of intra-CSF thiotepa treatment was 3 (range 1-4). The median progression-free survival and median survival following intra-CSF thiotepa was 3.1 months (range 3 days-2 years) and 4.0 months (range 6 days-2.5 years), respectively. The median overall survival from LM diagnosis was 9.5 months (range 1.3 months-2.7 years). No grade 3 or higher toxicity was observed. Recognizing the limits of a retrospective study, intra-CSF thiotepa has an acceptable toxicity profile and appears to be a reasonable option for selected BC patients.

  7. Rational Choice of Antiemetic Agents during Cancer Chemotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Brigden, Malcolm L.; Wilson, Kenneth S.; Barnett, Jeffrey B.

    1983-01-01

    Nausea and vomiting are major limitations in cancer chemotherapy. Individual susceptibility to nausea varies enormously. There is no ideal antiemetic, but some work with some chemotherapeutic agents, and some are more effective in younger patients. This article describes a flexible, stepped approach using the phenothiazines, metoclopramide, cannabinoids, anticholinergics, antihistamines and others. PMID:21283402

  8. Principles and major agents in clinical oncology chemotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Weller, R.E.

    1991-10-01

    This paper provides a brief classification of drugs available for veterinary chemotherapy, as well as justifications for their use. Some common neoplasia and the drugs of choice for their treatment are described. A listing by class of systemic chemotherapeutic agents, their mode of action, tumors responsive to the drugs, precautions and common adverse effects and mode of administration is provided. 2 tabs. (MHB)

  9. Chemotherapy-induced pulmonary hypertension: role of alkylating agents.

    PubMed

    Ranchoux, Benoît; Günther, Sven; Quarck, Rozenn; Chaumais, Marie-Camille; Dorfmüller, Peter; Antigny, Fabrice; Dumas, Sébastien J; Raymond, Nicolas; Lau, Edmund; Savale, Laurent; Jaïs, Xavier; Sitbon, Olivier; Simonneau, Gérald; Stenmark, Kurt; Cohen-Kaminsky, Sylvia; Humbert, Marc; Montani, David; Perros, Frédéric

    2015-02-01

    Pulmonary veno-occlusive disease (PVOD) is an uncommon form of pulmonary hypertension (PH) characterized by progressive obstruction of small pulmonary veins and a dismal prognosis. Limited case series have reported a possible association between different chemotherapeutic agents and PVOD. We evaluated the relationship between chemotherapeutic agents and PVOD. Cases of chemotherapy-induced PVOD from the French PH network and literature were reviewed. Consequences of chemotherapy exposure on the pulmonary vasculature and hemodynamics were investigated in three different animal models (mouse, rat, and rabbit). Thirty-seven cases of chemotherapy-associated PVOD were identified in the French PH network and systematic literature analysis. Exposure to alkylating agents was observed in 83.8% of cases, mostly represented by cyclophosphamide (43.2%). In three different animal models, cyclophosphamide was able to induce PH on the basis of hemodynamic, morphological, and biological parameters. In these models, histopathological assessment confirmed significant pulmonary venous involvement highly suggestive of PVOD. Together, clinical data and animal models demonstrated a plausible cause-effect relationship between alkylating agents and PVOD. Clinicians should be aware of this uncommon, but severe, pulmonary vascular complication of alkylating agents. PMID:25497573

  10. Immunological Effects of Conventional Chemotherapy and Targeted Anticancer Agents.

    PubMed

    Galluzzi, Lorenzo; Buqué, Aitziber; Kepp, Oliver; Zitvogel, Laurence; Kroemer, Guido

    2015-12-14

    The tremendous clinical success of checkpoint blockers illustrates the potential of reestablishing latent immunosurveillance for cancer therapy. Although largely neglected in the clinical practice, accumulating evidence indicates that the efficacy of conventional and targeted anticancer agents does not only involve direct cytostatic/cytotoxic effects, but also relies on the (re)activation of tumor-targeting immune responses. Chemotherapy can promote such responses by increasing the immunogenicity of malignant cells, or by inhibiting immunosuppressive circuitries that are established by developing neoplasms. These immunological "side" effects of chemotherapy are desirable, and their in-depth comprehension will facilitate the design of novel combinatorial regimens with improved clinical efficacy.

  11. Chemotherapy agents and the induction of late lethal defects.

    PubMed

    Seymour, C B; Mothersill, C

    1991-01-01

    Radiation is now known to be capable of producing both lethal and non lethal lesions in a variety of mammalian cells which may not be expressed for several cell divisions after the initial insult. The mechanism by which such an effect occurs is unknown. Because of the possible implications for cancer treatment, if such an effect also occurred following chemotherapy exposure, cells were exposed to various cytotoxic chemotherapy agents with known and well characterised effects on DNA or other areas of cell function or structure. The results indicate that late lethal defects are not detectable after treatment with appropriate ranges of doses of cisplatinum, vincristine, BCNU or adriamycin, but that they are induced by Bleomycin and to a lesser extent by 5-Fluorouracil. Bleomycin is known to cause strand breaks and is regarded as a radiomimetic agent. 5-Fluorouracil may act by preventing efficient and faithful synthesis of DNA, allowing mutations to become integrated into the genome. The occurrence of lethal mutations with both these agents supports previous suggestions that error-prone repair of DNA base sequence abnormalities may be fundamental to the process of late lethal damage production in mammalian cells. The cloning efficiency of cells which survived exposure to Vincristine or BCNU over a wide dose range was found to be significantly increased; this may represent an adaptive response to the drugs.

  12. [Chemotherapy].

    PubMed

    Aiba, Keisuke

    2004-05-01

    Cancer chemotherapy in the treatment of colorectal cancer has been evolving so extensively than ever. 5-fluorouracil (5-FU) has been a pivotal and a single active agent in the treatment of colorectal cancer. Reproducing and consistent better response rate has been shown since the introduction of the concept of biochemical modulation of 5-FU by leucovorin, a reduced folate, to the clinic and a combination chemotherapy of 5-FU and leucovorin (FL) has enable us to obtain a response rate around 20-30% and a median survival time ranging from 10 to 12 months. IFL regimen combing CPT-11 with FL showed a better MST ranging from 14 to 15 months, but now serious toxicity precludes general use outside of clinical trials. In the Europe, de Gramont regimen, an unique dose and schedule of 5-FU using a combination of continuous intravenous infusion of 5-FU with leucovorin over two days and bolus infusion of 5-FU twice over the same period, has been developed and shown improved antitumor activity and toxic profiles. FOLFOX 4, a combination chemotherapy of de Gramont regimen and oxaliplatin which is a third generation of cisplatin and a uniqe toxic profile with neuropathy, has demonstrated improved MST over a year and acceptable toxic profiles. Now FOLFOX 4 is considered to be a standard chemotherapy for the patients with advanced colorectal cancer, since a large phase III randomized study has shown that FOLFOX 4 was the most active and less toxic treatment regimen among active regimens such as IFL and IROX (CPT-11 and oxaliplatin). More recently, a combination of IFL and bevacizumab which is one of the molecular target agents and a antibody agent against vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), has demonstrated better MST reaching 20 months. Future large scale trials will attempt to develop more active regimen incorporating so-called molecular target agents.

  13. Chemotherapy

    MedlinePlus

    ... getting chemotherapy. Chemotherapy is most often given in cycles. These cycles may last one day, several days, or a ... period when no chemotherapy is given between each cycle. A rest period may last for days, weeks, ...

  14. Phase I study of temozolomide in combination with thiotepa and carboplatin with autologous hematopoietic cell rescue in patients with malignant brain tumors with minimal residual disease.

    PubMed

    Egan, G; Cervone, K A; Philips, P C; Belasco, J B; Finlay, J L; Gardner, S L

    2016-04-01

    Recurrence of malignant brain tumors results in a poor prognosis with limited treatment options. High-dose chemotherapy with autologous hematopoietic cell rescue (AHCR) has been used in patients with recurrent malignant brain tumors and has shown improved outcomes compared with standard chemotherapy. Temozolomide is standard therapy for glioblastoma and has also shown activity in patients with medulloblastoma/primitive neuro-ectodermal tumor (PNET), particularly those with recurrent disease. Temozolomide was administered twice daily on days -10 to -6, followed by thiotepa 300 mg/m(2) per day and carboplatin dosed using the Calvert formula or body surface area on days -5 to -3, with AHCR day 0. Twenty-seven patients aged 3-46 years were enrolled. Diagnoses included high-grade glioma (n=12); medulloblastoma/PNET (n=9); central nervous system (CNS) germ cell tumor (n=4); ependymoma (n=1) and spinal cord PNET (n=1). Temozolomide doses ranged from 100 mg/m(2) per day to 400 mg/m(2) per day. There were no toxic deaths. Prolonged survival was noted in several patients including those with recurrent high-grade glioma, medulloblastoma and CNS germ cell tumor. Increased doses of temozolomide are feasible with AHCR. A phase II study using temozolomide, carboplatin and thiotepa with AHCR for children with recurrent malignant brain tumors is being conducted through the Pediatric Blood and Marrow Transplant Consortium. PMID:26726947

  15. DNA-damaging agents in cancer chemotherapy: serendipity and chemical biology.

    PubMed

    Cheung-Ong, Kahlin; Giaever, Guri; Nislow, Corey

    2013-05-23

    DNA-damaging agents have a long history of use in cancer chemotherapy. The full extent of their cellular mechanisms, which is essential to balance efficacy and toxicity, is often unclear. In addition, the use of many anticancer drugs is limited by dose-limiting toxicities as well as the development of drug resistance. Novel anticancer compounds are continually being developed in the hopes of addressing these limitations; however, it is essential to be able to evaluate these compounds for their mechanisms of action. This review covers the current DNA-damaging agents used in the clinic, discusses their limitations, and describes the use of chemical genomics to uncover new information about the DNA damage response network and to evaluate novel DNA-damaging compounds. PMID:23706631

  16. Conventional chemotherapy or hypomethylating agents for older patients with acute myeloid leukaemia?

    PubMed

    Ferrara, Felicetto

    2014-03-01

    Acute myeloid leukaemia (AML) is the second more frequent hematologic malignancy in developed countries and primarily affects older adults with a median age at diagnosis of 69 years. Given the progressive ageing of the general population, the incidence of the disease in elderly people is expected to further increase in the years to come. Along with cytogenetics at diagnosis, age represents the most relevant prognostic factor in AML, in that the outcome steadily declines with increasing age. Reasons for poor prognosis include more frequent unfavourable karyotype and other adverse biologic characteristics, such as high rates of expression of genes drug resistance related and high prevalence of secondary AML. Noticeably, as compared with young adults, poorer results in elderly patients have been reported within any cytogenetic and molecular prognostic subgroup, because of frequent comorbid diseases, which render many patients ineligible to intensive chemotherapy. Therefore, predictive models have been developed with the aim of achieving best therapeutic results avoiding unnecessary toxicity. Following conventional induction therapy, older AML patients have complete remission rates in the range of 45-65%, and fewer than 10% of them survive for a minimum of 5 years. On the other hand, hypomethylating agents, such as azacytidine and decitabine offer the possibility of long-term disease control without necessarily achieving complete remission and can represent a reasonable alternative to intensive chemotherapy. Either intensive chemotherapy or hypomethylating agents have lights and shadows, and the therapeutic selection is often influenced by physician's and patient's attitude rather than definite criteria. Research is progress in order to assess predictive biologic factors, which would help clinicians in the selection of patients who can take actual benefit from different therapeutic options.

  17. Single agent carboplatin for pediatric low-grade glioma: A retrospective analysis shows equivalent efficacy to multiagent chemotherapy.

    PubMed

    Dodgshun, Andrew J; Maixner, Wirginia J; Heath, John A; Sullivan, Michael J; Hansford, Jordan R

    2016-01-15

    Pediatric low-grade gliomas (LGG) that are unresectable often require adjuvant chemotherapy such as carboplatin/vincristine. Small Phase II studies have suggested equivalent efficacy of single agent 4-weekly carboplatin. A single-institution retrospective review captured all patients aged 0 to 18 years diagnosed with LGG between 1996 and 2013 and treated with carboplatin monotherapy. The response and survival according to tumor site was compared to published results for multiagent chemotherapy. Of 268 children diagnosed with LGG diagnosed in this period, 117 received chemotherapy and 104 children received single agent carboplatin as first line chemotherapy. All patients received carboplatin at 560 mg/m(2), four-weekly for a median of 12 courses. The mean age at diagnosis was 5.8 years (range 3m-16y) and 32% had neurofibromatosis type 1. With a mean followup of 54 months, 86% of patients achieved stabilisation or better (SD/PR/CR). 3-year progression free survival (PFS) 66% (95% CI 57-76%), and 5-year PFS was 51% (95% CI 41-63%). 5-year overall survival was 97%. Multivariate analysis showed poorer PFS for those with chiasmatic/hypothalamic tumors. In this retrospective analysis single agent carboplatin shows comparable efficacy to historical multiagent chemotherapy for the treatment of patients with unresectable LGG. Equivalent outcomes are achieved with less chemotherapy, reduced side effects and fewer hospital visits. Further research is required to establish the place of this simplified regimen in the up-front treatment of unresectable LGG.

  18. Efficacy of concurrent single-agent chemotherapy using radiotherapy in patients with cervical cancer: a meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Ying; Yang, Zhicheng; Zhou, Yijin; Pan, Jingjing; Liu, Yongyuan

    2015-01-01

    Concurrent chemoradiotherapy has proven to be more effective on patients with advanced cervical cancer than radiotherapy alone. Although cisplatin has been recommended to be the standard agent in chemotherapy, it has some limitations in clinical use because of its strong side effects. Moreover, the optimal chemotherapy regimen remains unclear. A comprehensive electronic search was conducted via the Internet retrieval system to identify eligible trials. The ending points included response, overall survival (OS), local recurrent, and distant metastasis rates. Odds ratios and 95% confidence interval were calculated to compare the effects. Fifteen trials with 1142 patients were eligible. With regard to the response rate, only nedaplatin showed a significant improvement compared with cisplatin. Docetaxel, pacitaxel, fluoropyrimidine, paclitaxel liposome, and irinotecan did not show any advantages. When targeted on OS or local recurrent rate, no significant advantage was found when these single-drug regimens were compared with cisplatin. However, when aimed at distant metastasis rate, fluoropyrimidine showed a disadvantage to cisplatin, whereas others showed equal efficacy. Nedaplatin, docetaxel, pacitaxel, and fluoropyrimidine showed a better effect on reducing chemotherapy toxicity than cisplatin. Single-drug chemotherapy concurrent with radiotherapy, except for nedaplatin, may have no advantage on clinical outcomes when compared with cisplatin but showed a better effect on reducing chemotherapy toxicity, which could be used as an alternative to patients who can not tolerate the side effects of cisplatin. Nedaplatin is also effective and safe, and may be highly valuable in clinical applications. PMID:26309518

  19. Pharmacotherapeutic Management of Metastatic, Castration-Resistant Prostate Cancer in the Elderly: Focus on Non-Chemotherapy Agents

    PubMed Central

    Beer, Tomasz M.

    2015-01-01

    In the past 4 years, five new agents have been approved for metastatic, castration-resistant prostate cancer. Four of them are non-chemotherapeutic and generally well tolerated. However, each has toxicities that can negatively impact patients, particularly the elderly. This review covers the epidemiology of prostate cancer in elderly men. It discusses the efficacy data for sipuleucel-T, abiraterone in chemotherapy-naïve patients, enzalutamide in chemotherapy-naïve patients and radium-223 and presents any additional studies done for those over 75 years of age. Disease burden, such as the presence or absence of visceral disease, and comorbid conditions weigh into the selection of therapy and are discussed here. Drug–drug interactions between these agents and other drugs commonly used in the elderly population are also considered. The emerging therapies tasquinimod and ipilimumab are reviewed. With the arrival of so many agents for prostate cancer, selection of the most appropriate agent can be perplexing, particularly because these agents were tested against placebo, not one another. Furthermore, the study population differs significantly from those seen in clinical practice. This review addresses these issues. PMID:25387443

  20. Chemotherapy Agents Alter Plasma Lipids in Breast Cancer Patients and Show Differential Effects on Lipid Metabolism Genes in Liver Cells.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Monika; Tuaine, Jo; McLaren, Blair; Waters, Debra L; Black, Katherine; Jones, Lynnette M; McCormick, Sally P A

    2016-01-01

    Cardiovascular complications have emerged as a major concern for cancer patients. Many chemotherapy agents are cardiotoxic and some appear to also alter lipid profiles, although the mechanism for this is unknown. We studied plasma lipid levels in 12 breast cancer patients throughout their chemotherapy. Patients received either four cycles of doxorubicin and cyclophosphamide followed by weekly paclitaxel or three cycles of epirubicin, cyclophosphamide and 5'-fluorouracil followed by three cycles of docetaxel. Patients demonstrated a significant reduction (0.32 mmol/L) in high density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C) and apolipoprotein A1 (apoA1) levels (0.18 g/L) and an elevation in apolipoprotein B (apoB) levels (0.15 g/L) after treatment. Investigation of the individual chemotherapy agents for their effect on genes involved in lipoprotein metabolism in liver cells showed that doxorubicin decreased ATP binding cassette transporter A1 (ABCA1) via a downregulation of the peroxisomal proliferator activated receptor γ (PPARγ) and liver X receptor α (LXRα) transcription factors. In contrast, ABCA1 levels were not affected by cyclophosphamide or paclitaxel. Likewise, apoA1 levels were reduced by doxorubicin and remained unaffected by cyclophosphamide and paclitaxel. Doxorubicin and paclitaxel both increased apoB protein levels and paclitaxel also decreased low density lipoprotein receptor (LDLR) protein levels. These findings correlate with the observed reduction in HDL-C and apoA1 and increase in apoB levels seen in these patients. The unfavourable lipid profiles produced by some chemotherapy agents may be detrimental in the longer term to cancer patients, especially those already at risk of cardiovascular disease (CVD). This knowledge may be useful in tailoring effective follow-up care plans for cancer survivors.

  1. Release of thiotepa sterilized males into caged populations of Aedes aegypti: life table analysis.

    PubMed

    Gato, René; Companioni, Ariamys; Bruzón, Rosa Y; Menéndez, Zulema; González, Aileen; Rodríguez, Misladys

    2014-04-01

    Successful SIT trials against mosquitoes in the 1960-70s were achieved by sterilizing male mosquitoes using chemosterilants. Their use was discontinued after concerns were raised about the effect of residues on non-target organisms, although scant evidence has been published. Irradiation is an expensive process; chemosterilization could be an affordable option for implementing SIT programs in developing countries. We compare life table parameters of three Aedes aegypti populations comprising different ratios of thiotepa-treated and non-treated males in order to identify the impact on reproductive potential of the presence of sterile males. No difference was observed in the survival of the treated and untreated males. The release of thiotepa sterilized males into caged Ae. aegypti populations had no effect on death or survival probability of the individuals in the cages but the fecundity of females was significantly reduced, as evaluated by hatch rate and stable age structure parameters. The significant decreases in net reproduction rate, finite rate of natural increase and intrinsic rate of natural increase in populations including sterile males are sufficient to indicate that such populations would not be able to proliferate in natural conditions. This suggests that release of Ae. aegypti thiotepa-treated males could be effective in reducing the reproductive capability of the target population and consequently contribute to vector control. PMID:24513037

  2. Magnetic nanoparticle-based therapeutic agents for thermo-chemotherapy treatment of cancer.

    PubMed

    Hervault, Aziliz; Thanh, Nguyen Th Kim

    2014-10-21

    Magnetic nanoparticles have been widely investigated for their great potential as mediators of heat for localised hyperthermia therapy. Nanocarriers have also attracted increasing attention due to the possibility of delivering drugs at specific locations, therefore limiting systematic effects. The enhancement of the anti-cancer effect of chemotherapy with application of concurrent hyperthermia was noticed more than thirty years ago. However, combining magnetic nanoparticles with molecules of drugs in the same nanoformulation has only recently emerged as a promising tool for the application of hyperthermia with combined chemotherapy in the treatment of cancer. The main feature of this review is to present the recent advances in the development of multifunctional therapeutic nanosystems incorporating both magnetic nanoparticles and drugs, and their superior efficacy in treating cancer compared to either hyperthermia or chemotherapy as standalone therapies. The principle of magnetic fluid hyperthermia is also presented. PMID:25212238

  3. Rapid chemotherapy-induced acute endothelial progenitor cell mobilization: implications for antiangiogenic drugs as chemosensitizing agents

    PubMed Central

    Shaked, Yuval; Henke, Erik; Roodhart, Jeanine; Mancuso, Patrizia; Langenberg, Marlies; Colleoni, Marco; Daenen, Laura G.; Man, Shan; Xu, Ping; Emmenegger, Urban; Tang, Terence; Zhu, Zhenping; Witte, Larry; Strieter, Robert M.; Bertolini, Francesco; Voest, Emile; Benezra, Robert; Kerbel, Robert S.

    2008-01-01

    SUMMARY Several hypotheses have been proposed to explain how antiangiogenic drugs enhance the treatment efficacy of cytotoxic chemotherapy including impairing the ability of chemotherapy-responsive tumors to regrow after therapy. With respect to the latter, we show that certain chemotherapy drugs, e.g. paclitaxel, can rapidly induce pro-angiogenic bone marrow derived circulating endothelial cell (CEP) mobilization, and subsequent tumor homing, whereas others, e.g. gemcitabine, did not. Acute CEP mobilization was mediated, at least in part, by systemic induction of SDF-1α and could be prevented by various procedures such as treatment with anti-VEGFR2 blocking antibodies or by paclitaxel treatment in CEP-deficient Id-mutant mice, both of which resulted in enhanced anti-tumor effects mediated by paclitaxel, but not gemcitabine. PMID:18772115

  4. Alternative agents versus prophylactic platelet transfusion for preventing bleeding in patients with haematological disorders after chemotherapy or stem cell transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Estcourt, Lise J; Gregg, Richard; Stanworth, Simon; Doree, Carolyn; Trivella, Marialena; Murphy, Michael F; Tinmouth, Alan

    2014-01-01

    This is the protocol for a review and there is no abstract. The objectives are as follows: To determine whether alternative agents (e.g. artificial platelet substitutes, platelet-poor plasma, fibrinogen, rFVIIa, thrombopoietin mimetics) are as effective and safe as the use of platelet transfusions for the prevention of bleeding (prophylactic platelet transfusion) in patients with haematological disorders who are undergoing myelosuppressive chemotherapy or stem cell transplantation. Antifibrinolytics (lysine analogues) will not be included in this review because they have been the focus of another Cochrane review (Wardrop 2013). PMID:25722650

  5. Outcomes of children with central nervous system germinoma treated with multi-agent chemotherapy followed by reduced radiation.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Sylvia; Kilday, John-Paul; Laperriere, Normand; Janzen, Laura; Drake, James; Bouffet, Eric; Bartels, Ute

    2016-03-01

    CNS germinomas have an excellent prognosis with radiation therapy alone. However, in children, volume and dose of CNS radiation are associated with neurocognitive and neuroendocrine sequelae. Our objective was to determine long-term outcomes of our cohort who received chemotherapy and reduced radiation. This retrospective cohort study analyzed treatment and outcome of intracranial germinoma patients consecutively treated at Sick Kids, Toronto, Canada, from January 2000 to December 2013. 24 children (13 male, 11 female; median age 13.36 years) were identified. Median follow up was 61 months (range 1-144 months). Tumor location was suprasellar (n = 9), bifocal (8), pineal (6), and basal ganglia (1). Three children showed dissemination on imaging. 2/24 had only elevated serum human chorionic gonadotropin, 3/24 only elevated lumbar cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) hCG, and 2/24 had both elevated serum and lumbar CSF hCG. 23/24 children completed treatment and received multi-agent chemotherapy followed by either ventricular radiation (2340-2400 cGy) (n = 9), ventricular radiation + boost (1600 cGy) (n = 8), whole brain (2340 cGy) (n = 3), focal (4000 cGy) (n = 2) or craniospinal radiation (2340 cGy) (n = 1). Five-year progression free and overall survival was 96 and 100 % respectively. 8/24 patients with ventricular radiation ± boost (2340/4000 cGy) displayed stable full scale intelligence quotient over a mean interval of 3 years following radiation, but showed declined processing speed. In this limited experience, excellent 5-year overall survival rates were achieved with chemotherapy followed by reduced whole ventricular radiation even if ventricular radiation was delivered without boost. PMID:26744133

  6. High affinity and covalent-binding microtubule stabilizing agents show activity in chemotherapy-resistant acute myeloid leukemia cells

    PubMed Central

    Pera, Benet; Calvo-Vidal, M. Nieves; Ambati, Srikanth; Jordi, Michel; Kahn, Alissa; Díaz, J. Fernando; Fang, Weishuo; Altmann, Karl-Heinz; Cerchietti, Leandro; Moore, Malcolm A.S.

    2016-01-01

    Treatment failure in acute myeloid leukemia (AML) is frequently due to the persistence of a cell population resistant to chemotherapy through different mechanisms, in which drug efflux via ATP-binding cassette (ABC) proteins, specifically P-glycoprotein, is one of the most recognized. However, disappointing results from clinical trials employing inhibitors for these transporters have demonstrated the need to adopt different strategies. We hypothesized that microtubule targeting compounds presenting high affinity or covalent binding could overcome the effect of ABC transporters. We therefore evaluated the activity of the high-affinity paclitaxel analog CTX-40 as well as the covalent binder zampanolide (ZMP) in AML cells. Both molecules were active in chemosensitive as well as in chemoresistant cell lines overexpressing P-glycoprotein. Moreover, ZMP or CTX-40 in combination with daunorubicin showed synergistic killing without increased in vitro hematopoietic toxicity. In a primary AML sample, we further demonstrated that ZMP and CTX-40 are active in progenitor and differentiated leukemia cell populations. In sum, our data indicate that high affinity and covalent-binding anti-microtubule agents are active in AML cells otherwise chemotherapy resistant. PMID:26277539

  7. The hypomethylating agent decitabine prior to chemotherapy improves the therapy efficacy in refractory/relapsed acute myeloid leukemia patients.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Xuejie; Wang, Zhixiang; Ding, Bingjie; Yin, Changxin; Zhong, Qingxiu; Carter, Bing Z; Yu, Guopan; Jiang, Ling; Ye, Jieyu; Dai, Min; Zhang, Yu; Liang, Shuang; Zhao, Qingxia; Liu, Qifa; Meng, Fanyi

    2015-10-20

    In this study, we investigated the effect of pre-treatment with demethylating agent decitabine on susceptibility to chemotherapeutic drugs in HL60/ADR, Kasumi-1 and primary AML cells. Cytotoxic effect was increased by decitabine through activation of p53 and inhibition of c-Myc, Survivin and Bcl-2. We demonstrated in clinic that combination of decitabine and HAA consisting of harringtonine, aclarubicin and cytarabine was effective and safe to treat patients with refractory, relapsed or high-risk AML. Decitabine prior to HAA regimen improved the first induction complete response rate, and significantly prolonged overall survival and disease-free survival in these patients compared with HAA alone. These findings support clinic protocols based on decitabine prior to chemotherapy to overcome resistance and improve therapeutic efficacy in AML patients.

  8. Anticancer chemotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Weller, R.E.

    1988-10-01

    Despite troubled beginnings, anticancer chemotherapy has made significant contribution to the control of cancer in man, particularly within the last two decades. Early conceptual observations awakened the scientific community to the potentials of cancer chemotherapy. There are now more than 50 agents that are active in causing regression of clinical cancer. Chemotherapy's major conceptual contributions are two-fold. First, there is now proof that patients with overt metastatic disease can be cured, and second, to provide a strategy for control of occult metastases. In man, chemotherapy has resulted in normal life expectancy for some patients who have several types of metastatic cancers, including choriocarcinoma, Burkitt's lymphomas, Wilm's tumor, acute lymphocytic leukemia, Hodgkins disease, diffuse histiocytic lymphoma and others. Anticancer chemotherapy in Veterinary medicine has evolved from the use of single agents, which produce only limited remissions, to the concept of combination chemotherapy. Three basic principles underline the design of combination chemotherapy protocols; the fraction of tumor cell killed by one drug is independent of the fraction killed by another drug; drugs with different mechanisms of action should be chosen so that the antitumor effects will be additive; and since different classes of drugs have different toxicities the toxic effects will not be additive.

  9. Reduced-intensity conditioning using fludarabine, melphalan and thiotepa for adult patients undergoing haploidentical SCT

    PubMed Central

    Ciurea, SO; Saliba, R; Rondon, G; Pesoa, S; Cano, P; Fernandez-Vina, M; Qureshi, S; Worth, LL; McMannis, J; Kebriaei, P; Jones, RB; Korbling, M; Qazilbash, M; Shpall, EJ; Giralt, S; de Lima, M; Champlin, RE; Gajewski, J

    2014-01-01

    Haploidentical SCT (HaploSCT) has been most commonly performed using a myeloablative, TBI-based preparative regimen; however, the toxicity with this approach remains very high. We studied the feasibility of a reduced-intensity conditioning regimen in a phase II clinical trial using fludarabine, melphalan and thiotepa and antithymocyte globulin (ATG) for patients with advanced hematological malignancies undergoing T-cell depleted HaploSCT. Twenty-eight patients were entered in the study. Engraftment with donor-derived hematopoiesis was achieved in 78% of patients after a median of 13 days. Six patients experienced primary graft failure, three out of four tested patients had donor-specific anti-HLA antibodies (DSA) (P = 0.001). Toxicity included mostly infections. A total of 21 out of 22 patients with AML/myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS) achieved remission after transplant (16 with relapsed/refractory AML). Five out of the 12 patients (42%) with AML/MDS with <15% BM blasts survived long term as compared with none with more advanced disease (P = 0.03). HaploSCT with this fludarabine, melphalan and thiotepa and ATG RIC is an effective, well-tolerated conditioning regimen for patients with AML/MDS with low disease burden at the time of transplant and allowed a high rate of engraftment in patients without DSA. Patients with overt relapse fared poorly and require novel treatment strategies. PMID:19668237

  10. The hypoxia-mimetic agent CoCl₂ induces chemotherapy resistance in LOVO colorectal cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Yang, Guanglei; Xu, Shuqing; Peng, Lintao; Li, Hui; Zhao, Yan; Hu, Yanfang

    2016-03-01

    Hypoxia, which is an important factor that mediates tumor progression and poor treatment response, is particularly associated with tumor chemoresistance. However, the molecular mechanisms underlying hypoxia-induced colorectal cancer chemoresistance remain unclear. The present study aimed to explore the mechanism underlying hypoxia‑induced chemotherapy resistance in LOVO colorectal cancer cells. LOVO cells were cultured in a hypoxic environment simulated by cobalt chloride (CoCl2), which is a chemical inducer of hypoxia‑inducible factor‑1α (HIF‑1α). HIF‑1α is a transcription factor that has an important role in tumor cell adaptation to hypoxia, and controls the expression of several genes. Various CoCl2 concentrations are often used to simulate degrees of hypoxia. In the present study, following treatment with CoCl2, an MTT assay was conducted to determine the growth and drug sensitivity of LOVO cells. Reverse transcription‑polymerase chain reaction and western blotting were used to detect the mRNA and protein expression levels of HIF‑1α and factors associated with chemotherapy resistance, including multidrug resistance protein (MRP) and multidrug resistant 1 (MDR1), which encodes the major transmembrane efflux transporter P‑glycoprotein (P‑gp). In addition, the expression levels of apoptosis‑related proteins, including B‑cell lymphoma 2 (Bcl‑2), Bcl‑2‑associated X protein (Bax) and Bcl‑2‑associated agonist of cell death (Bad) were detected by western blotting. Flow cytometry (FCM) was used to visually observe Adriamycin (ADR) accumulation and retention, thus analyzing intracellular drug transportation in cells under hypoxic and normoxic conditions. CoCl2‑simulated hypoxia was able to inhibit tumor cell proliferation, and upregulate the expression levels of HIF‑1α, MDR1/P‑gp and MRP. In addition, proapoptotic members of the Bcl‑2 protein family, Bax and Bad, were downregulated. The anti‑apoptotic member Bcl‑2

  11. Bactericidal Action of Photodynamic Antimicrobial Chemotherapy (PACT) with Photosensitizers Used as Plaque-Disclosing Agents against Experimental Biofilm.

    PubMed

    Ishiyama, Kirika; Nakamura, Keisuke; Kanno, Taro; Niwano, Yoshimi

    2016-01-01

    Our previous study revealed that the photo-irradiation of rose bengal, erythrosine, and phloxine, xanthene photosensitizers, used as dental plaque disclosing agents, could exert bactericidal action on planktonic Streptococcus mutans via the singlet oxygen. In the present study, the photo-irradiation induced bactericidal activity of the three xanthene compounds against the experimental biofilm of S. mutans was investigated in combination with acid electrolyzed water (AcEW) and alkaline electrolyzed water (AlEW). As a result, only the photo-irradiated rose bengal in AlEW showed prominent bactericidal activity with a >3-log reduction of the viable bacterial count. Since our previous study showed that the affinity of rose bengal to bacterial cells was superior to that of erythrosine and phloxine, it was speculated that AlEW damaged the extracellular matrix of the experimental biofilm, which would let the rose bengal easily be bound to the bacterial cells. From these results, it is strongly suggested that rose bengal is a suitable photosensitizer for use as a plaque disclosing agent in photodynamic antimicrobial chemotherapy to treat dental plaque. PMID:27667525

  12. Characterization of nonexchangeable radioactivity in L1210 cells incubated with ( sup 14 C)thiotepa: Labeling of phosphatidylethanolamine

    SciTech Connect

    Egorin, M.J.; Snyder, S.W. )

    1990-07-01

    N,N',N''-Triethylenethiophosphoramide ((14C)thiotepa) accumulation by L1210 cells is a biphasic process. A very rapid initial phase is followed by a much slower second phase that reflects accumulation of radioactivity in a form that is not lost or exchanged when cells are resuspended and incubated in drug-free medium for up to 8 h. In this study we attempted to characterize this nonexchangeable radioactivity. Nuclei (10(7)) isolated from L1210 cells and incubated with (14C)thiotepa did not accumulate 14C during incubations of up to 5 h. Similarly, nuclei isolated from 10(7) L1210 cells that had been shown to accumulate nonexchangeable 14C after incubation with (14C)thiotepa did not show an increase in nuclear-associated 14C. Eighty to 85% of nonexchangeable 14C in L1210 cells incubated with (14C)thiotepa was soluble in ethanol or chloroform:methanol (2:1, v/v), and although most of this cell-associated nonexchangeable 14C was precipitated by trichloroacetic acid, subsequent treatment of that precipitate with methanol solubilized most of the 14C so that only 15 to 20% remained with the final precipitate. When chloroform:methanol-soluble nonexchangeable 14C was analyzed with thin-layer chromatography systems suitable for thiotepa or simple lipids, all radioactivity remained at the origin. In contrast, when analyzed with one- and two-dimensional thin-layer chromatographic systems suitable for complex lipids, all chloroform:methanol-soluble radioactivity was associated with a single lipid spot. This lipid cochromatographed with phosphatidylethanolamine, reacted with ninhydrin but not with 4-(p-nitrobenzyl)pyridine or the Dragendorff choline reagent, and was digested by phospholipases C and D, all of which lead to its identification as phosphatidylethanolamine.

  13. Tunable release of chemotherapeutic and vascular disrupting agents from injectable fiber fragments potentiates combination chemotherapy.

    PubMed

    Luo, Xiaoming; Xu, Guisen; Wei, Jiaojun; Chen, Maohua; Zhang, Hong; Li, Xiaohong

    2016-06-15

    Cancer progression and metastasis relies much on vasculature networks in tumor microenvironment, and the combination treatment with chemotherapeutic drugs and vascular disrupting agents represents apparent clinical benefits. In the current study, fiber fragments with loadings of hydroxycamptothecin (HCPT) or combretastatin A-4 (CA4) were proposed for tumor inhibition and blood vessel disruption after local administration in tumors. To address challenges in balancing the disruption of tumor vessels and intratumoral uptake of chemotherapeutic agents, this study is focus on release tuning of HCPT and CA4 from the fiber fragment mixtures. Hydroxypropyl-β-cyclodextrin (HPCD) was blended at ratios from 0 to 10% into CA4-loaded fiber fragments (Fc) to modulate CA4 release durations from 0.5 to 24days, and HCPT-loaded fiber fragments (Fh) indicated a sustained release for over 35days. In vitro cytotoxicity tests indicated a sequential inhibition on the endothelial and tumor cell growth, and the growth inhibition of tumor cells was more significant after treatment with mixtures of Fh and Fc containing 2% HPCD (Fc2) than that of other mixtures. In an orthotopic breast tumor model, compared with those of free CA4, or Fc with a fast or slow release of CA4, Fh/Fc mixtures with CA4 release durations from 2 to 12days indicated a lower tumor growth rate, a prolonged animal survival, a lower vessel density in tumors, and a less significant tumor metastasis. In addition, the tumor cell proliferation rate, hypoxia-inducible factor-1α expression within tumors, and the number of surface metastatic nodules in lungs were significantly lower after treatment with Fh/Fc2 mixtures with a CA4 release duration of 5days than those of other mixtures. It demonstrates the advantages of fiber fragment mixtures in independently modulating the release of multiple drugs and the essential role of release tuning of chemotherapeutic drugs and vascular disrupting agents in improving the therapeutic

  14. Intracavitary chemotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Markman, M.

    1985-01-01

    Pharmacokinetic modeling has suggested, and clinical investigations have confirmed, that intracavitary drug administration can result in a much greater drug exposure for the cavity into which the agent is instilled compared to the plasma. Both the safety and the efficacy of several agents administered individually or in combination have now been demonstrated. Several malignancies, in particular ovarian carcinoma and malignant mesothelioma, which remain confined to body cavities for much of their natural history, might be most rationally treated by the intracavitary treatment approach. Early clinical trials have demonstrated significant activity of intracavitary chemotherapy in both of these malignancies. Optimal drugs and dosages as well as appropriate scheduling for the various tumors involving body cavities remain to be defined. Whether or not combination intracavitary chemotherapy will significantly improve survival of patients with malignant disease confined to body cavities must await carefully controlled clinical trials comparing this treatment approach to standard systemically administered chemotherapy. 144 references.

  15. Double-conditioning regimens consisting of thiotepa, melphalan and busulfan with stem cell rescue for the treatment of pediatric solid tumors.

    PubMed

    Hara, J; Osugi, Y; Ohta, H; Matsuda, Y; Nakanishi, K; Takai, K; Fujisaki, H; Tokimasa, S; Fukuzawa, M; Okada, A; Okada, S

    1998-07-01

    Major dose-limiting factors of high-dose thiotepa (TEPA) and melphalan are life-threatening mucositis and neurotoxicity. To administer a maximum dose of these drugs safely and to obtain a maximum anti-cancer effect, a double-conditioning regimen with a single grafting, two cycles of administration of a combination of TEPA (300-600 mg/m2) plus melphalan (70-150 mg/m2) with a 1-week interval was attempted in 20 patients with pediatric advanced or chemotherapy-resistant solid tumors (seven rhabdomyosarcoma, four hepatoblastoma, three neuroblastoma and four other malignancy). Combinations of TEPA plus melphalan/busulfan (Bu) (8-10 mg/kg) and TEPA plus Bu were given to four and two patients with brain tumors, respectively. In an additional two patients, three cycles of drug administration were performed. According to the results of the dose-escalating study, the maximum tolerable doses of TEPA and melphalan for children aged 2 years old or older were 1000 mg/m2 and 280 mg/m2, respectively. Mucositis was dose-limiting. Renal toxicity was also dose-limiting in young children (<2 years old). There were two treatment-related deaths (7%) (fungal pneumonia and renal tubular acidosis). Among 13 patients who received high-dose chemotherapy during CR, 10 are alive with no evidence of disease (15-59 months, median: 35 months) and in 13 evaluable patients without CR, six are alive without regrowth of the disease (14-59 months, median: 39 months). Thus, these novel conditioning regimens allowed us to increase the dose intensity to nearly the maximum for each drug and seemed to reduce adverse effects compared to previously reported regimens with these drugs. With regard to the effect on outcome, the results of this study seem to be encouraging, but a further study on a larger number of patients is required.

  16. Predictive value of BRCA1 expression on the efficacy of chemotherapy based on anti-microtubule agents: a pooled analysis across different malignancies and agents

    PubMed Central

    He, Qihua; Zhang, Mingzhe; Zhang, Jianrong; Zhong, Shengyi; Liu, Yang; Shen, Jianfei; He, Jiaxi; Jiang, Long; Yang, Chenglin; Zeng, Yuan; Guo, Minzhang; Chen, Xuewei

    2016-01-01

    Background Breast cancer susceptibility gene 1 (BRCA1) expression has been suggested as a predictor in anti-neoplastic treatment with anti-microtubule agents. However, the existing evidence is conflicting. Consulting the literature, we sought to examine the true impact of BRCA1 expression on the efficacy of anti-microtubule agents. Methods Medline by PubMed and Embase databases were searched for eligible studies. The primary endpoints were objective response rate (ORR) and progression free survival (PFS). Additional subgroup analyses stratified for detection methods, regimen, and patient origin were also performed. Results A total of 13 relevant studies involving a total of 1,490 cases were enrolled. Involved agents included paclitaxel, docetaxel and vinorelbine; Malignancies included non-small cell lung cancer, gastric cancer, esophageal carcinoma, ovarian carcinoma, malignant pleural mesothelioma, breast cancer, and small cell lung cancer. Through meta-analyses, we observed a potentially greater ORR in the population with high BRCA1 expression vs. low BRCA1 expression (OR 1.63, 95% CI: 0.92 to 2.88, P=0.09) but the heterogeneity is severe (P=0.01; I2=61%). Similar results were observed in PFS (high vs. low expression, HR 0.93, 95% CI: 0.75 to 1.15, P=0.49; heterogeneity, P<0.01, I2=75%). After stratification by testing methods, a significantly higher ORR in the population with high BRCA1 expression was shown in the subgroup using mRNA as a quantitative method (OR 2.90, 95% CI: 1.92 to 4.39, P<0.01; I2=0) whereas the difference in the subgroup using immunohistochemistry (IHC) was not significant (OR 0.60, 95% CI: 0.33 to 1.10, P=0.10; I2=0). Stratification by regimen (platinum-based vs. non platinum-based) and patient origin (Asian vs. Caucasian) did not reduce the heterogeneity. Conclusions Although the predictive value of BRCA1 expression on the anti-microtubule chemotherapy remained uncertain based on overall results, our exploratory analyses suggested that

  17. A Novel Scheme for Optimal Control of a Nonlinear Delay Differential Equations Model to Determine Effective and Optimal Administrating Chemotherapy Agents in Breast Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Ramezanpour, HR; Setayeshi, S; Akbari, ME

    2011-01-01

    Background Determining the optimal and effective scheme for administrating the chemotherapy agents in breast cancer is the main goal of this scientific research. The most important issue here is the amount of drug or radiation administrated in chemotherapy and radiotherapy for increasing patient's survival. This is because in these cases, the therapy not only kills the tumor cells, but also kills some of the healthy tissues and causes serious damages. In this paper we investigate optimal drug scheduling effect for breast cancer model which consist of nonlinear ordinary differential time-delay equations. Methods In this paper, a mathematical model of breast cancer tumors is discussed and then optimal control theory is applied to find out the optimal drug adjustment as an input control of system. Finally we use Sensitivity Approach (SA) to solve the optimal control problem. Results The goal of this paper is to determine optimal and effective scheme for administering the chemotherapy agent, so that the tumor is eradicated, while the immune systems remains above a suitable level. Simulation results confirm the effectiveness of our proposed procedure. Conclusion In this paper a new scheme is proposed to design a therapy protocol for chemotherapy in Breast Cancer. In contrast to traditional pulse drug delivery, a continuous process is offered and optimized, according to the optimal control theory for time-delay systems. PMID:26322192

  18. [Analysis of the risk factors for severe neutropenia in advanced non-small cell lung cancer after the first course of chemotherapy with third-generation agents].

    PubMed

    Shibuya, Midori; Kogo, Mari; Kurihara, Tatsuya; Shikama, Yusuke; Nakajima, Hiroaki; Yoneyama, Keiichiro; Kiuchi, Yuji

    2013-01-01

      We retrospectively evaluated clinical data before therapy to determine the risk factors for severe neutropenia in advanced non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) patients treated with third-generation agents. We analyzed 100 patients who received such agents (paclitaxel, docetaxel, gemcitabine, irinotecan, or vinorelbine) for advanced NSCLC. The endpoint of the survey was the occurrence of severe neutropenia (grade 4). Risk factors significantly related to severe neutropenia were identified using logistic regression analysis. Of the 100 patients studied, the median age was 62.0 (32-81 years), and 77 (77.0%) were male. CEA 6.6 (0-2220) ng/dL and cytokeratin 19 fragment 21-1 (CYFRA) 4.8 (0.2-173.8) ng/dL before chemotherapy were higher than normal range. Severe neutropenia occurred in 36.0%, the incidence being highest in the first cycle (61.1%). In the univariate analysis, variables associated with severe neutropenia were sex, chest pain, absolute neutrophil count (ANC), Cr, CRP, and CYFRA. In the multivariate analysis, low CYFRA level was identified as a significant risk factor that contributed independently to chemotherapy-induced severe neutropenia (p<0.05). Our analysis suggests that low CYFRA level is the most important risk factor for severe neutropenia in advanced NSCLC patients after the first course of chemotherapy with third-generation agents. PMID:23728094

  19. Antiangiogenic agents significantly improve survival in tumor-bearing mice by increasing tolerance to chemotherapy-induced toxicity

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Danfang; Hedlund, Eva-Maria E.; Lim, Sharon; Chen, Fang; Zhang, Yin; Sun, Baocun; Cao, Yihai

    2011-01-01

    Chemotherapy-induced broad toxicities are the leading cause of the drug-induced mortality in cancer patients. Antiangiogenic drugs (ADs) in combination with chemotherapy are widely used as front-line therapy for the treatment of various human cancers. However, the beneficial mechanisms underlying combination therapy are poorly understood. Here we show that, in several murine tumor models, administration of sunitinib markedly reduced chemotherapy-induced bone marrow toxicity. Intriguingly, in a sequential treatment regimen, delivery of ADs followed by chemotherapy demonstrated superior survival benefits compared with simultaneous administration of two drugs. In murine tumor models, we show that VEGF increased chemotoxicity by synergistically suppressing bone marrow hematopoiesis with cytostatic drugs. These findings shed light on molecular mechanisms by which ADs in combination with chemotherapy produce survival benefits in cancer patients and provide conceptual information guiding future designs of clinical trials, current practice, and optimization of ADs for the treatment of cancer. PMID:21367692

  20. Large indoor cage study of the suppression of stable Aedes aegypti populations by the release of thiotepa-sterilised males

    PubMed Central

    Gato, René; Lees, Rosemary Susan; Bruzon, Rosa Y; Companioni, Ariamys; Menendez, Zulema; González, Aileen; Rodríguez, Misladys

    2014-01-01

    The sterile insect technique (SIT) is a promising pest control method in terms of efficacy and environmental compatibility. In this study, we determined the efficacy of thiotepa-sterilised males in reducing the target Aedes aegypti populations. Treated male pupae were released weekly into large laboratory cages at a constant ratio of either 5:1 or 2:1 sterile-to-fertile males. A two-to-one release ratio reduced the hatch rate of eggs laid in the cage by approximately a third and reduced the adult catch rate by approximately a quarter, but a 5:1 release drove the population to elimination after 15 weeks of release. These results indicate that thiotepa exposure is an effective means of sterilising Ae. aegypti and males thus treated are able to reduce the reproductive capacity of a stable population under laboratory conditions. Further testing of the method in semi-field enclosures is required to evaluate the mating competitiveness of sterile males when exposed to natural environmental conditions. If proven effective, SIT using thiotepa-sterilised males may be incorporated into an integrated programme of vector control to combat dengue in Cuba. PMID:24863972

  1. Large indoor cage study of the suppression of stable Aedes aegypti populations by the release of thiotepa-sterilised males.

    PubMed

    Gato, René; Lees, Rosemary Susan; Bruzon, Rosa Y; Companioni, Ariamys; Menendez, Zulema; González, Aileen; Rodríguez, Misladys

    2014-06-01

    The sterile insect technique (SIT) is a promising pest control method in terms of efficacy and environmental compatibility. In this study, we determined the efficacy of thiotepa-sterilised males in reducing the target Aedes aegypti populations. Treated male pupae were released weekly into large laboratory cages at a constant ratio of either 5:1 or 2:1 sterile-to-fertile males. A two-to-one release ratio reduced the hatch rate of eggs laid in the cage by approximately a third and reduced the adult catch rate by approximately a quarter, but a 5:1 release drove the population to elimination after 15 weeks of release. These results indicate that thiotepa exposure is an effective means of sterilising Ae. aegypti and males thus treated are able to reduce the reproductive capacity of a stable population under laboratory conditions. Further testing of the method in semi-field enclosures is required to evaluate the mating competitiveness of sterile males when exposed to natural environmental conditions. If proven effective, SIT using thiotepa-sterilised males may be incorporated into an integrated programme of vector control to combat dengue in Cuba. PMID:24863972

  2. A pilot study of nimotuzumab plus single agent chemotherapy as second- or third-line treatment or more in patients with recurrent, persistent or metastatic cervical cancer

    PubMed Central

    Cetina, Lucely; Crombet, Tania; Jiménez-Lima, Roberto; Zapata, Sergio; Ramos, Mayra; Avila, Sandra; Coronel, Jaime; Charco, Eduardo; Bojalil, Rafael; Astudillo, Horacio; Bazán, Blanca; Dueñas-González, Alfonso

    2015-01-01

    Nimotuzumab is a humanized IgG1 monoclonal antibody against the EGFR extracellular domain that has been evaluated in solid tumors as a single agent or in combination with chemotherapy and radiation. Cervical cancer patients who are refractory or progressive to first-line chemotherapy have a dismal prognosis, and no second- or third-line chemotherapy is considered standard. This pilot trial aimed to evaluate the efficacy and safety of nimotuzumab in 17 patients with pre-treated advanced refractory or progressive cervical cancer. Nimotuzumab was administered weekly at 200 mg/m2 as single agent for 4 weeks (induction phase), then concurrent with 6 21-day cycles of gemcitabine (800 mg/m2) or cisplatin (50 mg/m2) for 18 weeks (concurrent phase) and then once every 2 weeks (maintenance phase). Nimotuzumab could be continued beyond disease progression. Seventeen patients were accrued and evaluated for safety and efficacy. The median number of nimotuzumab applications was 20 (5–96). The median number of chemotherapy cycles administered was 6 (1-6). No toxicity occurred during induction and maintenance phases (single agent nimotuzumab). In the concurrent phase, grade 3 toxicity events observed were leucopenia, anemia and diarrhea in 11.7%, 5.8% and 11.7% respectively. No complete or partial responses were observed. The stable disease (SD) rate was 35%. The median PFS and OS rates were163 days (95% CI, 104 to 222), and 299 days (95% IC, 177 to 421) respectively. Nimotuzumab is well tolerated and may have a role in the treatment of advanced cervical cancer. PMID:25802932

  3. Testing chemotherapeutic agents in the feather follicle identifies a selective blockade of cell proliferation and a key role for sonic hedgehog signaling in chemotherapy-induced tissue damage.

    PubMed

    Xie, Guojiang; Wang, Hangwei; Yan, Zhipeng; Cai, Linyan; Zhou, Guixuan; He, Wanzhong; Paus, Ralf; Yue, Zhicao

    2015-03-01

    Chemotherapeutic agents induce complex tissue responses in vivo and damage normal organ functions. Here we use the feather follicle to investigate details of this damage response. We show that cyclophosphamide treatment, which causes chemotherapy-induced alopecia in mice and man, induces distinct defects in feather formation: feather branching is transiently and reversibly disrupted, thus leaving a morphological record of the impact of chemotherapeutic agents, whereas the rachis (feather axis) remains unperturbed. Similar defects are observed in feathers treated with 5-fluorouracil or taxol but not with doxorubicin or arabinofuranosyl cytidine (Ara-C). Selective blockade of cell proliferation was seen in the feather branching area, along with a downregulation of sonic hedgehog (Shh) transcription, but not in the equally proliferative rachis. Local delivery of the Shh inhibitor, cyclopamine, or Shh silencing both recapitulated this effect. In mouse hair follicles, those chemotherapeutic agents that disrupted feather formation also downregulated Shh gene expression and induced hair loss, whereas doxorubicin or Ara-C did not. Our results reveal a mechanism through which chemotherapeutic agents damage rapidly proliferating epithelial tissue, namely via the cell population-specific, Shh-dependent inhibition of proliferation. This mechanism may be targeted by future strategies to manage chemotherapy-induced tissue damage.

  4. In Vitro and In Vivo Studies of Non-Platinum-Based Halogenated Compounds as Potent Antitumor Agents for Natural Targeted Chemotherapy of Cancers.

    PubMed

    Lu, Qing-Bin; Zhang, Qin-Rong; Ou, Ning; Wang, Chun-Rong; Warrington, Jenny

    2015-06-01

    Based on a molecular-mechanism-based anticancer drug discovery program enabled by an innovative femtomedicine approach, we have found a previously unknown class of non-platinum-based halogenated molecules (called FMD compounds) as potent antitumor agents for effective treatment of cancers. Here, we present in vitro and in vivo studies of the compounds for targeted chemotherapy of cervical, breast, ovarian, and lung cancers. Our results show that these FMD agents led to DNA damage, cell cycle arrest in the S phase, and apoptosis in cancer cells. We also observed that such a FMD compound caused an increase of reduced glutathione (GSH, an endogenous antioxidant) levels in human normal cells, while it largely depleted GSH in cancer cells. We correspondingly found that these FMD agents exhibited no or little toxicity toward normal cells/tissues, while causing significant cytotoxicity against cancer cells, as well as suppression and delay in tumor growth in mouse xenograft models of cervical, ovarian, breast and lung cancers. These compounds are therefore a previously undiscovered class of potent antitumor agents that can be translated into clinical trials for natural targeted chemotherapy of multiple cancers.

  5. In Vitro and In Vivo Studies of Non-Platinum-Based Halogenated Compounds as Potent Antitumor Agents for Natural Targeted Chemotherapy of Cancers

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Qing-Bin; Zhang, Qin-Rong; Ou, Ning; Wang, Chun-Rong; Warrington, Jenny

    2015-01-01

    Based on a molecular-mechanism-based anticancer drug discovery program enabled by an innovative femtomedicine approach, we have found a previously unknown class of non-platinum-based halogenated molecules (called FMD compounds) as potent antitumor agents for effective treatment of cancers. Here, we present in vitro and in vivo studies of the compounds for targeted chemotherapy of cervical, breast, ovarian, and lung cancers. Our results show that these FMD agents led to DNA damage, cell cycle arrest in the S phase, and apoptosis in cancer cells. We also observed that such a FMD compound caused an increase of reduced glutathione (GSH, an endogenous antioxidant) levels in human normal cells, while it largely depleted GSH in cancer cells. We correspondingly found that these FMD agents exhibited no or little toxicity toward normal cells/tissues, while causing significant cytotoxicity against cancer cells, as well as suppression and delay in tumor growth in mouse xenograft models of cervical, ovarian, breast and lung cancers. These compounds are therefore a previously undiscovered class of potent antitumor agents that can be translated into clinical trials for natural targeted chemotherapy of multiple cancers. PMID:26351651

  6. Efficacy of Addition of Antiangiogenic Agents to Taxanes-Containing Chemotherapy in Advanced Nonsmall-Cell Lung Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Sheng, Jin; Yang, Yun-Peng; Yang, Bi-Jun; Zhao, Yuan-Yuan; Ma, Yu-Xiang; Hong, Shao-Dong; Zhang, Ya-Xiong; Zhao, Hong-Yun; Huang, Yan; Zhang, Li

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Preclinical researches indicated a potential synergistic effect of taxanes-containing chemotherapy (TCC) and antiangiogenic agents (AAs) on the treatment of advanced nonsmall-cell lung cancer (NSCLC). The advantage of adding AA to TCC in the real world remains confusing. We summarized the current evidences from relevant phase II/III randomized controlled trials (RCTs) by performing this meta-analyses. Electronic databases were searched for eligible literatures. The primary endpoint was overall survival (OS). Pooled hazard ratios (HRs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) for outcomes were calculated using RevMan 5.2. A total of 14 phase II/III RCTs involving 9703 participants were included. Compared to standard TCC, the addition of AA was associated with the significant better OS (HR 0.92, 95% CI 0.87–0.97, P = 0.002), prolonged progression-free survival (HR 0.79, 95% CI 0.71–0.87, P < 0.00001), superior response rate (risk ratio [RR] 1.69, 95% CI 1.47–1.95, P < 0.0001), and disease control rate (RR 1.19, 95% CI 1.08–1.32, P < 0.00001). Subgroup analyses indicated that patient treated with monoclonal antibodies (HR 0.89, 95% CI 0.82–0.96, P = 0.02) as well as application in second-line (HR 0.91, 95% CI 0.85–0.96, P = 0.02) acquired significant OS improvement. Other clinical factors directing significant OS improvement by the combination strategy included nonsquamous cancer (P = 0.002), nonsmokers (P = 0.0005), and female (P = 0.02). Toxicities were greater but generally mild or moderate in the combination group, and were mostly manageable. In summary, the addition of AAs to TCC could improve prognosis of advanced NSCLC. Furthermore, proper selection of patient population and AAs is crucial for clinical trials design and clinical practice in the future. PMID:26252298

  7. Topotecan, thiotepa, and carboplatin for neuroblastoma: failure to prevent relapse in the central nervous system.

    PubMed

    Kushner, B H; Kramer, K; Modak, S; Kernan, N A; Reich, L M; Danis, K; Cheung, N-K V

    2006-02-01

    We report on a three-drug myeloablative regimen designed to consolidate remission and to prevent central nervous system (CNS) relapse of high-risk neuroblastoma (NB). Sixty-six NB patients received topotecan 2 mg/m2/day, x 4 days; thiotepa 300 mg/m2/day, x 3 days; and carboplatin approximately 500 mg/m2/day, x 3 days. Post-SCT treatments included radiotherapy, immunotherapy, 13-cis-retinoic acid, +/-oral etoposide. Significant nonhematologic toxicities were mucositis and skin-related in all patients, convulsions in three patients, and cardiac failure and venocclusive disease of liver in one patient each. Grade 2 hepatotoxicity led to truncating cytoreduction in two patients; both later relapsed in brain. Among 46 patients transplanted in first complete/very good partial remission (CR/VGPR), event-free survival is 54% (s.e.+/-8%) at 36 months post-SCT; notable events were three non-NB-related deaths (adenovirus on day +9, bowel necrosis at 5 months, multiorgan failure at seven months) and four relapses in brain. Of 12 patients transplanted with evidence of NB, two became long-term event-free survivors and two relapsed in the brain. Of eight patients transplanted in second or greater CR/VGPR, one became a long-term event-free survivor and seven relapsed though not in the CNS. This regimen has manageable toxicity but does not prevent CNS relapse.

  8. Heat shock protein 27 is a potential indicator for response to YangZheng XiaoJi and chemotherapy agents in cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Owen, Sioned; Zhao, Huishan; Dart, Alwyn; Wang, Yamei; Ruge, Fiona; Gao, Yong; Wei, Cong; Wu, Yiling; Jiang, Wen G.

    2016-01-01

    Heat shock protein 27 (HSP27) is a member of the heat shock protein family which has been linked to tumour progression and, most interestingly, to chemotherapy resistance in cancer patients. The present study examined the potential interplay between HSP27 and YangZheng XiaoJi, a traditional Chinese medicine used in cancer treatment. A range of cell lines from different tumour types including pancreatic, lung, gastric, colorectal, breast, prostate and ovarian cancer (both wild-type and resistant) were used. Levels and activation of HSP27 and its potential associated signalling pathways were evaluated by protein array and western blotting. Knockdown of HSP27 in cancer cells was achieved using siRNA. Localisation and co-localisation of HSP27 and other proteins were carried out by immunofluorescence. Cell growth and migration were evaluated in their response to a range of chemotherapeutic agents. The present study first identified, by way of protein array, that YangZheng XiaoJi was able to inhibit the phosphorylation of HSP27 protein in cancer cells. We further demonstrated that HSP27, which is co-localised with caspase-9, can be blocked from localising in focal adhesions and co-localising with caspase-9 by YangZheng XiaoJi. The study also demonstrated that YangZheng XiaoJi was able to sensitise cancer cells including those cells that were resistant to chemotherapy, to chemotherapeutic agents. Finally, knocking down HSP27 markedly reduced the migration of cancer cells and increased the sensitivity of cancer cells to the inhibitory effect on cellular migration by YangZheng XiaoJi. YangZheng XiaoJi can act as an agent in first sensitising cancer cells to chemotherapy and secondly to overcome, to some degree, chemoresistance when used in an appropriate fashion in patients who have active HSP27. PMID:27600495

  9. A case series of children with high-risk metastatic neuroblastoma treated with a novel treatment strategy consisting of postponed primary surgery until the end of systemic chemotherapy including high-dose chemotherapy.

    PubMed

    Hashii, Yoshiko; Kusafuka, Takeshi; Ohta, Hideaki; Yoneda, Akihiro; Osugi, Yuko; Kobayashi, Yasutsugu; Fukuzawa, Masahiro; Hara, Junichi

    2008-06-01

    The aim of this study was to clarify the feasibility of a novel treatment strategy consisting of postponed primary surgery till the end of systemic chemotherapy including HDC without interruption by local therapy for neuroblastoma patients at a high risk for relapse. After induction chemotherapy, patients received double conditioning HDC consisting of thiotepa and melphalan. Radical surgery was applied to local lesions. Irradiation was not applied to any lesions. Eleven consecutive pediatric neuroblastoma patients were treated according to this strategy. Seven of 11 patients remained in complete remission for 21-171 months. This treatment strategy seems feasible and a further study is warranted.

  10. Efficacy of weekly paclitaxel treatment as a single agent chemotherapy following first-line cisplatin treatment in urothelial bladder cancer

    PubMed Central

    SIDERIS, SPYRIDON; AOUN, FOUAD; ZANATY, MARC; MARTINEZ, NIEVES CHANZA; LATIFYAN, SOFIA; AWADA, AHMAD; GIL, THIERRY

    2016-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to investigate the efficacy of paclitaxel following a first-line cisplatin regimen in patients with metastatic bladder cancer. The present study retrospectively evaluated the clinical effects and toxicities of second-line paclitaxel regimens following first-line cisplatin treatment in metastatic bladder cancer. A total of 42 patients with progressing metastatic urothelial bladder cancer following cisplatin-based chemotherapy were enrolled. The patients received weekly treatment with paclitaxel (80 mg/m2) with a median duration of 3 months. The overall response rate, disease control rate and median progression free survival were 9.5, 45.2 and 6.4 months, respectively. Weekly paclitaxel was well-tolerated with rare grade III or IV toxicities. Second-line weekly paclitaxel treatment following first-line cisplatin-based chemotherapy is an effective and well-tolerated regimen in urothelial metastatic bladder cancer. PMID:27284445

  11. Hyperthermic Intraperitoneal Chemotherapy (HIPEC) Methodology, Drugs and Bidirectional Chemotherapy.

    PubMed

    Valle, S J; Alzahrani, N A; Liauw, W; Sugarbaker, P H; Bhatt, A; Morris, D L

    2016-06-01

    Cytoreductive surgery (CRS) and hyperthermic intraperitoneal chemotherapy (HIPEC) combined have been recognized as standard of care for treatment of a subset of patients with peritoneal carcinomatosis (PC). The aim of CRS is to eliminate all macroscopic disease through a series of visceral resections followed by targeting any residual microscopic disease with intraperitoneal chemotherapy, exposing the peritoneal surfaces to a high concentration of chemotherapy with a lower systemic toxicity. Different regimes of intraperitoneal chemotherapy include HIPEC, early postoperative intraperitoneal chemotherapy (EPIC) and bidirectional chemotherapy. The efficacy and modality of treatment with intraperitoneal chemotherapy is dependent on multiple factors including the chosen cytotoxic agent and its pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics. There is no standardized methodology for intraperitoneal chemotherapy administration. This review will discuss the pharmacological principles of the various intraperitoneal chemotherapy techniques. PMID:27065705

  12. A study of thiotepa, etoposide and fractionated total body irradiation as a preparative regimen prior to bone marrow transplantation for poor prognosis patients with neuroblastoma.

    PubMed

    Kamani, N; August, C S; Bunin, N; Leahey, A; Bayever, E; Goldwein, J; Zusman, J; Evans, A E; Angio, G D

    1996-06-01

    We report the toxicity and efficacy of a new conditioning regimen for bone marrow transplantation (BMT) in children with poor prognosis neuroblastoma (NBL). Twenty-seven patients with poor prognosis NBL were treated with teniposide (360 mg/m2) or etoposide (500 mg/m2), thiotepa (600-900 mg/m2), and 1200 cGy fractionated total body irradiation (fTBI) followed by autologous marrow rescue (n = 19) or allogeneic BMT from HLA-identical siblings (n = 8). The two patients who received teniposide, 600 mg/m2 thiotepa and fTBI had minimal toxicity but relapsed 4 and 12 months post-auto BMT. The next two patients received 750 mg/m2 thiotepa, 500 mg/m2 etoposide and TBI. They tolerated the conditioning regimen well and are alive and in remission 77 and 75 months post-BMT. At the next thiotepa dose level (900 mg/m2), the first two allograft recipients both experienced fatal regimen-related toxicity. All subsequent allograft recipients received 750 mg/m2 thiotepa and autograft recipients received 900 mg/m2 thiotepa. As of 1 April 1995, eight of the 19 patients who received autologous marrow are surviving disease-free 21 to 77 months post-BMT. Nine autograft recipients relapsed at 2 to 37 months following transplantation. One patient died of hepatic veno-occlusive disease 2 months after auto BMT, and one of pneumonia 6 months post-transplantation. Three allograft recipients have relapsed at 6, 10 and 39 months post-transplant and three are alive and in remission 75, 53 and 27 months post-BMT. Overall, 11/27 patients (41%) are alive and in remission 21-77 months (median 47 months) following BMT. A conditioning regimen consisting of 500 mg/m2 etoposide, thiotepa (750 mg/m2 for allograft recipients and 900 mg/m2 for autograft recipients) and 1200 cGy fTBI has acceptable toxicity and is at least as effective as melphalan-containing regimens in the treatment of high-risk NBL.

  13. The Efficacy of Combining Antiangiogenic Agents with Chemotherapy for Patients with Advanced Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer Who Failed First-Line Chemotherapy: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Bijun; Zhang, Yaxiong; Kang, Shiyang; Zhou, Ting; Hong, Shaodong; Qin, Tao; Hu, Zhihuang; Fang, Wenfeng; Huang, Yan; Zhang, Li

    2015-01-01

    Background The clinical outcomes of patients with NSCLC who progressed after first-line treatments remain poor. The purpose of this study was to assess the advantage of antiangiogenic therapy plus standard treatment versus standard treatment alone for this population of patients. Methods We conducted a rigorous search using electronic databases for eligible studies reporting antiangiogenic therapy combined with standard second-line chemotherapy versus standard second-line treatment for patient who progressed after front-line treatment. Pooled risk ratio and 95% confidence intervals were calculated using proper statistical method. Predefined subgroup analyses were conducted to identify the potential proper patients. Results Thirteen phase II/III RCTs which involved a total of 8358 participants were included. Overall, there was significant improvement in OS (HR 0.94, 95%CI: 0.89-0.99, p=0.03), PFS (HR 0.80, 95%CI: 0.76-0.84, p<0.00001), ORR (RR 1.75, 95%CI: 1.55-1.98, p<0.00001) and DCR (RR 1.23, 95%CI: 1.18-1.28, p<0.00001) in the group with antiangiogenic therapy plus standard treatment versus the group with standard treatment alone. Subgroup analysis showed that OS benefit was presented only in patients treated with docetaxel plus antiangiogenic agents (HR 0.92, 95%CI: 0.86-0.99, p=0.02) and patients with non-squamous NSCLC (HR for OS 0.92, 95%CI: 0.86-0.99, p=0.02). Conclusions This study revealed that the addition of antiangiogenic agents to the standard treatments could provide clinical benefit to NSCLC patients who failed their first-line therapy. Furthermore, proper selection of the combined standard cytotoxic agent, as well as the patient population by tumor histology, is warranted for future studies and clinical application of antiangiogenic therapy. PMID:26034985

  14. Chemotherapy-Related Neurotoxicity.

    PubMed

    Taillibert, Sophie; Le Rhun, Emilie; Chamberlain, Marc C

    2016-09-01

    Chemotherapy may have detrimental effects on either the central or peripheral nervous system. Central nervous system neurotoxicity resulting from chemotherapy manifests as a wide range of clinical syndromes including acute, subacute, and chronic encephalopathies, posterior reversible encephalopathy, acute cerebellar dysfunction, chronic cognitive impairment, myelopathy, meningitis, and neurovascular syndromes. These clinical entities vary by causative agent, degree of severity, evolution, and timing of occurrence. In the peripheral nervous system, chemotherapy-induced peripheral neuropathy (CIPN) and myopathy are the two main complications of chemotherapy. CIPN is the most common complication, and the majority manifest as a dose-dependent length-dependent sensory axonopathy. In severe cases of CIPN, the dose of chemotherapy is reduced, the administration delayed, or the treatment discontinued. Few treatments are available for CIPN and based on meta-analysis, duloxetine is the preferred symptomatic treatment. Myopathy due to corticosteroid use is the most frequent cause of muscle disorders in patients with cancer. PMID:27443648

  15. Innovative Treatments for Cancer:. The Impact of Delivering siRNAs, Chemotherapies, and Preventative Agents Using Nanoformulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hook, Sara S.; Farrell, Dorothy; Hinkal, George W.; Ptak, Krzystzof; Grodzinski, Piotr; Panaro, Nicholas J.

    2013-09-01

    A multi-disciplinary approach to research epitomized by the emerging field of cancer nanotechnology can catalyze scientific developments and enable clinical translation beyond what we currently utilize. Engineers, chemists, and physical scientists are teaming up with cancer biologists and clinical oncologists to attack the vast array of cancer malignancies using materials at the nanoscale. We discuss how nanoformulations are enabling the targeted, efficient, delivery of not only genetic therapies such silencing RNAs, but also conventional cytotoxic agents and small molecules which results in decreased systemic toxicity and improved therapeutic index. As preventative approaches, there are various imaging agents and devices are being developed for screening purposes as well as new formulations of sunscreens, neutraceuticals, and cancer vaccines. The goal then of incorporating nanotechnology into clinical applications is to achieve new and more effective ways of diagnosing, treating, and preventing cancer to ultimately change the lives of patients worldwide.

  16. A short course of induction chemotherapy followed by two cycles of high-dose chemotherapy with stem cell rescue for chemotherapy naive metastatic breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Elias, A D; Richardson, P; Avigan, D; Ibrahim, J; Joyce, R; Demetri, G; Levine, J; Warren, D; Arthur, T; Reich, E; Wheele, C; Frei, E; Ayash, L

    2001-02-01

    A single cycle of high-dose chemotherapy with stem cell support (HDC) in women with responsive metastatic breast cancer (BC) consistently achieves over 50% complete and near complete response (CR/nCR). This significant cytoreduction results in a median event-free survival (EFS) of 8 months, and approximately 20% 3-year and 16% 5-year EFS in selected patients. To improve long-term outcomes, new strategies to treat minimal residual tumor burden are needed. Increased total dose delivered can be achieved with two cycles of HDC. Critical design issues include shortening induction chemotherapy to avoid development of drug resistance and the use of different agents for each HDC cycle. We have determined the maximum tolerated dose (MTD) for paclitaxel combined with high-dose melphalan in the context of a double transplant and explored the impact of a short induction phase. Between June 1994 and August 1996, we enrolled 32 women with metastatic BC on to this phase I double transplant trial. Induction consisted of doxorubicin 30 mg/m2/day days 1-3 given for 2 cycles every 14 days with G-CSF 5 microg/kg s.c. days 4-12. Stem cell collection was performed by leukapheresis in each cycle when the WBC recovered to above 1000/microl. Patients with stable disease or better response to induction were eligible to proceed with HDC. HDC regimen I (TxM) included paclitaxel with dose escalation from 0 to 300 mg/m2 given on day 1 and melphalan 180 mg/m2 in two divided doses given on day 3. HDC regimen II was CTCb (cyclophosphamide 6 g/m2, thiotepa 500 mg/m2, and carboplatin 800 mg/m2 total doses) delivered by 96-h continuous infusion. At the first dose level of 150 mg/m2 paclitaxel by 3 h infusion, four of five patients developed dose-limiting toxicity consisting of diffuse skin erythema and capillary leak syndrome. Only two of these five completed the second transplant. Subsequently, paclitaxel was delivered by 24-h continuous infusion together with 96 h of dexamethasone and histamine

  17. An AS1411 aptamer-conjugated liposomal system containing a bubble-generating agent for tumor-specific chemotherapy that overcomes multidrug resistance.

    PubMed

    Liao, Zi-Xian; Chuang, Er-Yuan; Lin, Chia-Chen; Ho, Yi-Cheng; Lin, Kun-Ju; Cheng, Po-Yuan; Chen, Ko-Jie; Wei, Hao-Ji; Sung, Hsing-Wen

    2015-06-28

    Recent research in chemotherapy has prioritized overcoming the multidrug resistance (MDR) of cancer cells. In this work, liposomes that contain doxorubicin (DOX) and ammonium bicarbonate (ABC, a bubble-generating agent) are prepared and functionalized with an antinucleolin aptamer (AS1411 liposomes) to target DOX-resistant breast cancer cells (MCF-7/ADR), which overexpress nucleolin receptors. Free DOX and liposomes without functionalization with AS1411 (plain liposomes) were used as controls. The results of molecular dynamic simulations suggest that AS1411 functionalization may promote the affinity and specific binding of liposomes to the nucleolin receptors, enhancing their subsequent uptake by tumor cells, whereas plain liposomes enter cells with difficulty. Upon mild heating, the decomposition of ABC that is encapsulated in the liposomes enables the immediate activation of generation of CO2 bubbles, creating permeable defects in their lipid bilayers, and ultimately facilitating the swift intracellular release of DOX. In vivo studies in nude mice that bear tumors demonstrate that the active targeting of AS1411 liposomes can substantially increase the accumulation of DOX in the tumor tissues relative to free DOX or passively targeted plain liposomes, inhibiting tumor growth and reducing systemic side effects, including cardiotoxicity. The above findings indicate that liposomes that are functionalized with AS1411 represent an attractive therapeutic alternative for overcoming the MDR effect, and support a potentially effective strategy for cancer therapy.

  18. FePt nanoparticles as a potential X-ray activated chemotherapy agent for HeLa cells.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Yanhong; Tang, Yunlan; Bao, Zhirong; Wang, Hui; Ren, Feng; Guo, Mingxiong; Quan, Hong; Jiang, Changzhong

    2015-01-01

    Nanomaterials have an advantage in "personalized" therapy, which is the ultimate goal of tumor treatment. In order to investigate the potential ability of FePt nanoparticles (NPs) in the diagnosis and chemoradiotherapy treatment of malignant tumors, superparamagnetic, monodispersed FePt (~3 nm) alloy NPs were synthesized, using cysteamine as a capping agent. The NPs were characterized by means of X-ray diffraction; transmission electron microscopy, Physical Property Measurement System, and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy. The cytotoxicity of FePt NPs on Vero cells was assessed using an MTT assay, and tumor cell proliferation inhibited by individual FePt NPs and FePt NPs combined with X-ray beams were also collected using MTT assays; HeLa human cancer cell lines were used as in vitro models. Further confirmation of the combined effect of FePt NPs and X-rays was verified using HeLa cells, after which, the cellular uptake of FePt NPs was captured by transmission electron microscopy. The results indicated that the growth of HeLa cells was significantly inhibited by FePt NPs in a concentration-dependent manner, and the growth was significantly more inhibited by FePt NPs combined with a series of X-ray beam doses; the individual NPs did not display any remarkable cytotoxicity on Vero cells at a concentration <250 μg/mL. Meanwhile, the FePt NPs showed negative/positive contrast enhancement for MRI/CT molecule imaging at the end of the study. Therefore, the combined results implied that FePt NPs might potentially serve as a promising nanoprobe for the integration of tumor diagnosis and chemoradiotherapy.

  19. FePt nanoparticles as a potential X-ray activated chemotherapy agent for HeLa cells

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, Yanhong; Tang, Yunlan; Bao, Zhirong; Wang, Hui; Ren, Feng; Guo, Mingxiong; Quan, Hong; Jiang, Changzhong

    2015-01-01

    Nanomaterials have an advantage in “personalized” therapy, which is the ultimate goal of tumor treatment. In order to investigate the potential ability of FePt nanoparticles (NPs) in the diagnosis and chemoradiotherapy treatment of malignant tumors, superparamagnetic, monodispersed FePt (~3 nm) alloy NPs were synthesized, using cysteamine as a capping agent. The NPs were characterized by means of X-ray diffraction; transmission electron microscopy, Physical Property Measurement System, and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy. The cytotoxicity of FePt NPs on Vero cells was assessed using an MTT assay, and tumor cell proliferation inhibited by individual FePt NPs and FePt NPs combined with X-ray beams were also collected using MTT assays; HeLa human cancer cell lines were used as in vitro models. Further confirmation of the combined effect of FePt NPs and X-rays was verified using HeLa cells, after which, the cellular uptake of FePt NPs was captured by transmission electron microscopy. The results indicated that the growth of HeLa cells was significantly inhibited by FePt NPs in a concentration-dependent manner, and the growth was significantly more inhibited by FePt NPs combined with a series of X-ray beam doses; the individual NPs did not display any remarkable cytotoxicity on Vero cells at a concentration <250 μg/mL. Meanwhile, the FePt NPs showed negative/positive contrast enhancement for MRI/CT molecule imaging at the end of the study. Therefore, the combined results implied that FePt NPs might potentially serve as a promising nanoprobe for the integration of tumor diagnosis and chemoradiotherapy. PMID:26604740

  20. FePt nanoparticles as a potential X-ray activated chemotherapy agent for HeLa cells.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Yanhong; Tang, Yunlan; Bao, Zhirong; Wang, Hui; Ren, Feng; Guo, Mingxiong; Quan, Hong; Jiang, Changzhong

    2015-01-01

    Nanomaterials have an advantage in "personalized" therapy, which is the ultimate goal of tumor treatment. In order to investigate the potential ability of FePt nanoparticles (NPs) in the diagnosis and chemoradiotherapy treatment of malignant tumors, superparamagnetic, monodispersed FePt (~3 nm) alloy NPs were synthesized, using cysteamine as a capping agent. The NPs were characterized by means of X-ray diffraction; transmission electron microscopy, Physical Property Measurement System, and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy. The cytotoxicity of FePt NPs on Vero cells was assessed using an MTT assay, and tumor cell proliferation inhibited by individual FePt NPs and FePt NPs combined with X-ray beams were also collected using MTT assays; HeLa human cancer cell lines were used as in vitro models. Further confirmation of the combined effect of FePt NPs and X-rays was verified using HeLa cells, after which, the cellular uptake of FePt NPs was captured by transmission electron microscopy. The results indicated that the growth of HeLa cells was significantly inhibited by FePt NPs in a concentration-dependent manner, and the growth was significantly more inhibited by FePt NPs combined with a series of X-ray beam doses; the individual NPs did not display any remarkable cytotoxicity on Vero cells at a concentration <250 μg/mL. Meanwhile, the FePt NPs showed negative/positive contrast enhancement for MRI/CT molecule imaging at the end of the study. Therefore, the combined results implied that FePt NPs might potentially serve as a promising nanoprobe for the integration of tumor diagnosis and chemoradiotherapy. PMID:26604740

  1. Chemotherapy for Melanoma.

    PubMed

    Wilson, Melissa A; Schuchter, Lynn M

    2016-01-01

    Prior to the recent therapeutic advances, chemotherapy was the mainstay of treatment options for advanced-stage melanoma. A number of studies have investigated various chemotherapy combinations in order to expand on the clinical responses achieved with single-agent dacarbazine, but these have not demonstrated an improvement in overall survival. Similar objective responses were observed with the combination of carboplatin and paclitaxel as were seen with single-agent dacarbazine. The combination of chemotherapy and immunotherapy, known as biochemo-therapy, has shown high clinical responses; however, biochemo-therapy has not been shown to improve overall survival and resulted in increased toxicities. In contrast, palliation and long-term responses have been observed with localized treatment with isolated limb perfusion or infusion in limb-isolated disease. Although new, improved therapeutic options exist for first-line management of advanced-stage melanoma, chemotherapy may still be important in the palliative treatment of refractory, progressive, and relapsed melanoma. We review the various chemotherapy options available for use in the treatment and palliation of advanced-stage melanoma, discuss the important clinical trials supporting the treatment recommendations, and focus on the clinical circumstances in which treatment with chemotherapy is useful.

  2. Thiotepa cyclophosphamide followed by granulocyte colony-stimulating factor mobilized allogeneic peripheral blood cells in adults with advanced leukemia.

    PubMed

    Bacigalupo, A; Van Lint, M T; Valbonesi, M; Lercari, G; Carlier, P; Lamparelli, T; Gualandi, F; Occhini, D; Bregante, S; Valeriani, A; Piaggio, G; Pitto, A; Benvenuto, F; Figari, O; De Stefano, G; Caimo, A; Sessarego, M

    1996-07-01

    Thirty-one patients (median age, 44 years) with advanced hematologic malignancies were given thiotepa 15 mg/kg, and cyclophosphamide 120 (n = 14) or 150 (n = 17) mg/kg followed by unfractionated peripheral blood stem cell transplants (PBSCT) from genotypically identical siblings (n = 28) or one antigen mismatched family donor (n = 3). Donors were mobilized with granulocyte colony-stimulating factor 5 to 10 microgram/kg/d for 6 days and underwent two to three leukapheresis on days +5, +6, +7. The median cell yield per donor expressed/kg of recipients body weight was as follows: nucleated cells 13 x 10(8)/kg; CD34+ cells 6 x 10(6)/kg; colony-forming unit-granulocyte macrophage 38 x 10(4)/kg, and CD3+ cells 449 x 10(6)/kg. The diagnoses were chronic myeloid leukemia (n = 4), acute myeloid (n = 9) or lymphoid leukemia (n = 2), acute myelofibrosis (n = 2), multiple myeloma (n = 1), lymphoma (n = 6), chronic lymphocytic leukemia (n = 1) myelodysplasia (n = 6). Twenty-eight patients had advanced disease, 29 patients were first grafts, and 2 were second transplants 3 and 9 years after the first. Neutrophil counts of 0.5 x 10(9)/L and platelet counts of 30 x 10(9)/L platelets were both achieved on day +14 (median). Engraftment could be proven by sex markers or DNA polymorphism in 29 of 31 patients: one had early leukemia relapse and one patient was unevaluable because of early death. Acute graft-versus-host disease (GVHD) was scored as minimal or absent (grade 0 to 1) in 14 patients, moderate (grade II) in 13, and severe (grade III to IV) in four. Causes of death were leukemia (n = 4), acute GVHD (n = 4, with associated cytomegalovirus infections in three), sepsis (n = 1), liver failure (n = 1), multiorgan failure (n = 1), and hemorrhage (n = 1). The actuarial transplant mortality is 29%, the actuarial relapse rate 22%. Nineteen patients survive with a median follow up of 288 days (100-690). The actuarial 2-year survival is 57%. Three patients received PBSCT from family

  3. Alkylating agents and immunotoxins exert synergistic cytotoxic activity against ovarian cancer cells. Mechanism of action.

    PubMed Central

    Lidor, Y J; O'Briant, K C; Xu, F J; Hamilton, T C; Ozols, R F; Bast, R C

    1993-01-01

    Alkylating agents can be administered in high dosage to patients with ovarian cancer using autologous bone marrow support, but drug-resistant tumor cells can still persist. Immunotoxins provide reagents that might eliminate drug resistant cells. In the present study, concurrent treatment with alkylators and immunotoxins proved superior to treatment with each agent alone. Toxin immunoconjugates prepared from different monoclonal antibodies and recombinant ricin A chain (rRTA) inhibited clonogenic growth of ovarian cancer cell lines in limiting dilution assays. When alkylating agents and toxin conjugates were used in combination, the addition of the immunotoxins to cisplatin, or to cisplatin and thiotepa, produced synergistic cytotoxic activity against the OVCA 432 and OVCAR III cell lines. Studies performed to clarify the mechanism of action showed that cisplatin and thiotepa had no influence on internalization and binding of the 317G5-rRTA immunotoxin. Intracellular uptake of [195m]Pt-cisplatin was not affected by the immunoconjugate and thiotepa. The combination of the 317G5-rRTA and thiotepa, as well as 317G5-rRTA alone, increased [195m]Pt cisplatin-DNA adduct levels. The immunotoxin alone and in combination with the alkylators decreased intracellular glutathione levels and reduced glutathione-S-transferase activity. Repair of DNA damage induced by the combination of alkylators and 317G5-rRTA was significantly reduced when compared to repair after damage with alkylators alone. These findings suggest that immunotoxins affect levels and activity of enzymes required for the prevention and repair of alkylator damage. Images PMID:8227359

  4. Neoadjuvant chemotherapy (NCT) plus targeted agents versus NCT alone in colorectal liver metastases patients: A systematic review and meta-analysis

    PubMed Central

    Cui, Chun-Hui; Huang, Shu-Xin; Qi, Jia; Zhu, Hui-Juan; Huang, Zong-Hai; Yu, Jin-Long

    2015-01-01

    Purpose To assess the efficacy of neoadjuvant chemotherapy (NCT) plus targeted agents versus NCT alone for the treatment of colorectal liver metastases (CRLM) patients. Methods Trials published between 1994 and 2015 were identified by an electronic search of public databases (MEDLINE, EMBASE, Cochrane library). All clinical studies were independently identified by two authors for inclusion. Demographic data, treatment regimens, objective response rate (ORR), hepatic resection and R0 hepatic resection rate were extracted and analyzed using Comprehensive MetaAnalysis software (Version 2.0). Results A total of 40 cohorts with 2099 CRLM patients were included: 962 patients were treated with NCT alone, 602 with NCT plus anti-epidermal growth-factor receptor (EGFR)-monoclonal antibodies (MoAbs) and 535 with NCT plus bevacizumab. Pooled ORR was significantly higher for NCT plus bevacizumab or anti-EGFR-MoAbs than NCT alone [relative risk (RR) 1.53, 95% CI 1.30–1.80; p < 0.001; RR 1.53, 95% CI: 1.27–1.83, p < 0.001; respectively]. NCT plus bevacizumab significantly improved R0 hepatic resection rate (RR 1.61, 95% CI: 1.27–2.04, p < 0.001), but not for overall hepatic resection rate (RR 1.26, 95% CI: 0.81–1.94, p = 0.30). While hepatic resection and R0 hepatic resection rate was comparable between NCT plus anti-EGFR-MoAbs and NCT alone (p = 0.42 and p = 0.37, respectively). Conclusions In comparison with NCT alone, NCT plus bevacizumab significantly improve ORR and R0 hepatic resection rate but not for hepatic resection rate. Our findings support the need to compare NCT plus bevacizumab with NCT alone in the neoadjuvant setting in large prospective trials due to its higher hepatic resection rate and R0 hepatic resection rate in CRLM patients. PMID:26515604

  5. Phase II study of central nervous system (CNS)-directed chemotherapy including high-dose chemotherapy with autologous stem cell transplantation for CNS relapse of aggressive lymphomas

    PubMed Central

    Korfel, Agnieszka; Elter, Thomas; Thiel, Eckhard; Hänel, Matthias; Möhle, Robert; Schroers, Roland; Reiser, Marcel; Dreyling, Martin; Eucker, Jan; Scholz, Christian; Metzner, Bernd; Röth, Alexander; Birkmann, Josef; Schlegel, Uwe; Martus, Peter; Illerhaus, Gerard; Fischer, Lars

    2013-01-01

    The prognosis of patients with central nervous system relapse of aggressive lymphoma is very poor with no therapy established so far. In a prospective multicenter phase II study, we evaluated a potentially curative chemotherapy-only regimen in these patients. Adult immunocompetent patients 65 years of age or under received induction chemotherapy with MTX/IFO/DEP (methotrexate 4 g/m2 intravenously (i.v.) Day 1, ifosfamide 2 g/m2 i.v. Days 3– 5 and liposomal cytarabine 50 mg intrathecally (i.th) Day 6) and AraC/TT/DEP (cytarabine 3g/m2 i.v. Days 1–2, thiotepa 40 mg/m2 i.v. Day 2 and i.th. liposomal cytarabine 50 mg i.th. Day 3) followed by high-dose chemotherapy with carmustine 400 mg/m2 i.v. Day −5, thiotepa 2×5 mg/kg i.v. Days −4 to −3 and etoposide 150 mg/m2 i.v. Days −5 to −3, and autologous stem cell transplantation Day 0 (HD-ASCT). Thirty eligible patients (median age 58 years) were enrolled. After HD-ASCT (n=24), there was a complete remission in 15 (63%), partial remission in 2 (8%) and progressive disease in 7 (29%) patients. Myelotoxicity was the most adverse event with CTC grade 3/4 infections in 12% of MTX/IFO/DEP courses, 21% of AraC/TT/DEP courses and 46% of HD-ASCT courses. The 2-year time to treatment failure was 49%±19 for all patients and 58%±22 for patients completing HD-ASCT. The protocol assessed proved feasible and highly active with long-lasting remissions in a large proportion of patients. (ClinicalTrials.govIdentifier NCT01148173) PMID:23242601

  6. Molecular mechanisms for tumour resistance to chemotherapy.

    PubMed

    Pan, Shu-Ting; Li, Zhi-Ling; He, Zhi-Xu; Qiu, Jia-Xuan; Zhou, Shu-Feng

    2016-08-01

    Chemotherapy is one of the prevailing methods used to treat malignant tumours, but the outcome and prognosis of tumour patients are not optimistic. Cancer cells gradually generate resistance to almost all chemotherapeutic drugs via a variety of distinct mechanisms and pathways. Chemotherapeutic resistance, either intrinsic or acquired, is caused and sustained by reduced drug accumulation and increased drug export, alterations in drug targets and signalling transduction molecules, increased repair of drug-induced DNA damage, and evasion of apoptosis. In order to better understand the mechanisms of chemoresistance, this review highlights our current knowledge of the role of altered drug metabolism and transport and deregulation of apoptosis and autophagy in the development of tumour chemoresistance. Reduced intracellular activation of prodrugs (e.g. thiotepa and tegafur) or enhanced drug inactivation by Phase I and II enzymes contributes to the development of chemoresistance. Both primary and acquired resistance can be caused by alterations in the transport of anticancer drugs which is mediated by a variety of drug transporters such as P-glycoprotein (P-gp), multidrug resistance associated proteins, and breast cancer resistance protein. Presently there is a line of evidence indicating that deregulation of programmed cell death including apoptosis and autophagy is also an important mechanism for tumour resistance to anticancer drugs. Reversal of chemoresistance is likely via pharmacological and biological approaches. Further studies are warranted to grasp the full picture of how each type of cancer cells develop resistance to anticancer drugs and to identify novel strategies to overcome it.

  7. Molecular mechanisms for tumour resistance to chemotherapy.

    PubMed

    Pan, Shu-Ting; Li, Zhi-Ling; He, Zhi-Xu; Qiu, Jia-Xuan; Zhou, Shu-Feng

    2016-08-01

    Chemotherapy is one of the prevailing methods used to treat malignant tumours, but the outcome and prognosis of tumour patients are not optimistic. Cancer cells gradually generate resistance to almost all chemotherapeutic drugs via a variety of distinct mechanisms and pathways. Chemotherapeutic resistance, either intrinsic or acquired, is caused and sustained by reduced drug accumulation and increased drug export, alterations in drug targets and signalling transduction molecules, increased repair of drug-induced DNA damage, and evasion of apoptosis. In order to better understand the mechanisms of chemoresistance, this review highlights our current knowledge of the role of altered drug metabolism and transport and deregulation of apoptosis and autophagy in the development of tumour chemoresistance. Reduced intracellular activation of prodrugs (e.g. thiotepa and tegafur) or enhanced drug inactivation by Phase I and II enzymes contributes to the development of chemoresistance. Both primary and acquired resistance can be caused by alterations in the transport of anticancer drugs which is mediated by a variety of drug transporters such as P-glycoprotein (P-gp), multidrug resistance associated proteins, and breast cancer resistance protein. Presently there is a line of evidence indicating that deregulation of programmed cell death including apoptosis and autophagy is also an important mechanism for tumour resistance to anticancer drugs. Reversal of chemoresistance is likely via pharmacological and biological approaches. Further studies are warranted to grasp the full picture of how each type of cancer cells develop resistance to anticancer drugs and to identify novel strategies to overcome it. PMID:27097837

  8. The effects of erythropoiesis-stimulating agents on the short-term and long-term survivals in metastatic breast cancer patients receiving chemotherapy: a SEER population-based study.

    PubMed

    Lai, Yinzhi; Ye, Zhong; Civan, Jesse M; Wang, Chun; Cristofanilli, Massimo; Mu, Zhaomei; Austin, Laura; Palazzo, Juan P; Myers, Ronald E; Yang, Hushan

    2015-09-01

    Current clinical guidelines state that the use of erythropoiesis-stimulating agents (ESAs) may be considered to treat chemotherapy-induced anemia in the non-curative setting to alleviate anemia-related symptoms. However, no convincing survival benefit has been demonstrated to support the use of ESAs in these patients. Using the comprehensive data collected in the National Cancer Institute (NCI)-surveillance epidemiology and end results (SEER) and Medicare-linked database, we analyzed the effect of ESA use on the short-term (18-month) and long-term (60-month) survival rates of chemotherapy-treated metastatic breast cancer patients. Confounding variables were adjusted using a propensity score approach. We also analyzed the effects of ESA on the survival of patients receiving trastuzumab, a commonly prescribed targeted therapy agent in treating HER2-positive tumors. Metastatic breast cancer patients who received ESA treatment exhibited similar 60-month survival rate to those without ESA treatment (22.8 vs. 24.9%, p = 0.8). ESA-treated patients had a trend toward better 18-month survival [crude hazard ratio (HR) 0.86, 95% confidence intervals (CI) 0.68-1.09, p = 0.21]. This protective effect during the first 18 months of chemotherapy became marginally significant after adjusting for the propensity of receiving ESAs (HR 0.80, 95% CI 0.63-1.01, p = 0.070). An interaction effect between ESA and trastuzumab on patient survival was noticeable but not statistically significant. ESAs did not negatively affect the long-term survival of metastatic breast cancer patients. Moreover, ESAs improved patients' survival during the first 18 months of chemotherapy treatment. These findings endorse the current clinical guideline. Given the short survival of these patients, the potential short-term beneficial effects of ESAs are clinically meaningful.

  9. A study of the susceptibility of different mice strains to thio-TEPA: An experiment with recombinant strains

    SciTech Connect

    Malashenko, A.M.; Beskova, T.B.

    1995-07-01

    The study is devoted to the clastogenic effect of thio-TEPA in raising recombinant strains 1XC3 in mice (obtained from 101/H x C3H/Sn crossing). By the summer of 1993, 15 strains had reached 10 generations of inbreeding. Five to six sibs of each strain (males and females) aged 6-8 weeks were treated with the mutagen (3 mg/kg, i/p). Strain sensitivity was estimated by the frequency of marrow cells exhibiting chromosome lesions (including gaps). According to this characteristic, the strains were divided into two unequal groups. The first one included 12 less-sensitive strains (chromosome aberrations were present, on average, in 33.5% of the cells, and lay in the range from 27.0{+-}4.5 to 39.8{+-}4.9). The second group included three more-sensitive strains with 51.2, 51.7, and 59.5% of the cells being affected (54.1% on average). A similar difference between the groups was found with respect to the number of breaks per cell: 1.15 in resistant strains and 2.88 in sensitive ones. This difference was significant and similar to that found earlier for C3H and 101 strains. Thus, the results obtained support the hypothesis that mice of the 101/H strain carry a gene enhancing sensitivity to chemical mutagens (mut-l). Some strains of the first group were eliminated; the remaining ones will be bred until the 20th generation, when they will be investigated again in more detail. 24 refs., 1 fig., 2 tabs.

  10. Chemotherapy and Your Mouth

    MedlinePlus

    ... Health > Chemotherapy and Your Mouth Chemotherapy and Your Mouth Main Content Are You Being Treated With Chemotherapy ... Back to Top How Does Chemotherapy Affect the Mouth? Chemotherapy is the use of drugs to treat ...

  11. Sex-specific effects of cytotoxic chemotherapy agents cyclophospha-mide and mitomycin C on gene expression, oxidative DNA damage, and epigenetic alterations in the prefrontal cortex and hippocampus – an aging connection

    PubMed Central

    Kovalchuk, Anna; Rodriguez-Juarez, Rocio; Ilnytskyy, Yaroslav; Byeon, Boseon; Shpyleva, Svitlana; Melnyk, Stepan; Pogribny, Igor; Kolb, Bryan; Kovalchuk, Olga

    2016-01-01

    Recent research shows that chemotherapy agents can be more toxic to healthy brain cells than to the target cancer cells. They cause a range of side effects, including memory loss and cognitive dysfunction that can persist long after the completion of treatment. This condition is known as chemo brain. The molecular and cellular mechanisms of chemo brain remain obscure. Here, we analyzed the effects of two cytotoxic chemotherapy drugs—cyclophosphamide (CPP) and mitomycin C (MMC) - on transcriptomic and epigenetic changes in the murine prefrontal cortex (PFC) and hippocampal regions. We for the first time showed that CPP and MMC treatments led to profound sex- and brain region-specific alterations in gene expression profiles. Gene expression changes were most prominent in the PFC tissues of female mice 3 weeks after MMC treatment, and the gene expression response was much greater for MCC than CPP exposure. MMC exposure resulted in oxidative DNA damage, evidenced by accumulation of 8-oxo-2′-deoxyguanosine (8-oxodG) and a decrease in the level of 8-oxodG repair protein OGG1 in the PFC of female animals 3 weeks after treatment. MMC treatment decreased global DNA methylation and increased DNA hydroxymethylation in the PFC tissues of female mice. The majority of the changes induced by chemotherapy in the PFC tissues of female mice resembled those that occur during the brain's aging processes. Therefore, our study suggests a link between chemotherapy-induced chemo brain and brain aging, and provides an important roadmap for future analysis. PMID:27032448

  12. Chemotherapy in Retinoblastoma: Current Approaches

    PubMed Central

    Yanık, Özge; Gündüz, Kaan; Yavuz, Kıvılcım; Taçyıldız, Nurdan; Ünal, Emel

    2015-01-01

    Retinoblastoma (RB) is the most common childhood malignant intraocular tumor. Although enucleation and external beam radiotherapy have been historically used, today the most commonly used eye-sparing approach is chemotherapy. Chemotherapy can be used in both intraocular and extraocular RB cases. Chemotherapeutic agents may be applied in different ways, including systemic, subconjunctival, intra-arterial and intravitreal routes. The main purposes of application of systemic therapy are to reduce the tumor size for local treatment (chemoreduction), or to reduce the risk of metastasis after enucleation surgery (adjuvant therapy). Intra-arterial chemotherapy with the current name “super-selective intra-arterial infusion therapy” could be applied as primary therapy in tumors confined to the retina or as a secondary method in tumor recurrence. The most important advantage of intra-arterial therapy is the prevention of systemic chemotherapy complications. Intravitreal chemotherapy is administered in the presence of persistent or recurrent vitreous seeding. The term “extraocular RB” includes orbital invasion and metastatic disease. Current treatment for orbital invasion is neoadjuvant chemotherapy followed by surgical enucleation and adjuvant chemotherapy and radiotherapy after surgery. In metastatic disease, regional lymph node involvement, distant metastases, and/or central nervous system (CNS) involvement may occur. Among them, CNS involvement has the worst prognosis, remaining at almost 100% mortality. In metastatic disease, high-dose salvage chemotherapy and autologous hematopoietic stem cell rescue therapy are the possible treatment options; radiotherapy could also be added to the protocol according to the side of involvement. PMID:27800245

  13. Thiotepa-based versus total body irradiation-based myeloablative conditioning prior to allogeneic stem cell transplantation for acute myeloid leukaemia in first complete remission: a retrospective analysis from the Acute Leukemia Working Party of the European Group for Blood and Marrow Transplantation.

    PubMed

    Eder, Sandra; Labopin, Myriam; Arcese, William; Or, Reuven; Majolino, Ignazio; Bacigalupo, Andrea; de Rosa, Gennaro; Volin, Liisa; Beelen, Dietrich; Veelken, Hendrik; Schaap, Nicolaas P M; Kuball, Jurgen; Cornelissen, Jan; Nagler, Arnon; Mohty, Mohamad

    2016-01-01

    Thiotepa is an alkylating compound with an antineoplastic and myeloablative activity and can mimic the effect of radiation. However, it is unknown whether this new regimen could safely replace the long-established ones. This retrospective matched-pair analysis evaluated the outcome of adults with acute myeloid leukaemia in first complete remission who received myeloablative conditioning either with a thiotepa-based (n = 121) or a cyclophosphamide/total body irradiation-based (TBI; n = 358) regimen for allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation from an HLA-matched sibling or an unrelated donor. With a median follow-up of 44 months, the outcome was similar in both groups. Acute graft-versus-host disease grade II-IV was observed in 25% after thiotepa-containing regimen versus 35% after TBI (P = 0.06). The 2-yr cumulative incidence of chronic graft-versus-host disease was 40.5% for thiotepa and 41% for TBI (P = 0.98). At 2 yrs, the cumulative incidences of non-relapse mortality and relapse incidence were 23.9% (thiotepa) vs. 22.4% (TBI; P = 0.66) and 17.2% (thiotepa) vs. 23.3% (TBI; P = 0.77), respectively. The probabilities of leukaemia-free and overall survival at 2 yrs were not significantly different between the thiotepa and TBI groups, at 58.9% vs. 54.2% (P = 0.95) and 61.4% vs. 58% (P = 0.72), respectively. Myeloablative regimens using combinations including thiotepa can provide satisfactory outcomes, but the optimal conditioning remains unclear for the individual patient in this setting.

  14. Understanding Chemotherapy

    MedlinePlus

    ... you may get chemotherapy before a peripheral blood stem cell transplant. Fill this section in with your doctor or nurse. I am getting chemo ... can be given in these forms: An IV (intravenously) A shot (injection) into a muscle or other part of your body A pill ...

  15. Curative cancer chemotherapy.

    PubMed

    Frei, E

    1985-12-01

    Cancer chemotherapy provides variably effective treatment for the majority of forms of human cancer and curative treatment for some 12 categories of cancer. Curative treatment is defined as the proportion of patients who survive beyond the time after which the risk of treatment failure approaches zero, i.e., the disease-free survival plateau. This progress has resulted from a closely integrated scientific effort, including drug development, pharmacology, preclinical modeling, experimental design with respect to clinical trials, quantitative criteria for response, and a series of clinical trials (initially in children with acute lymphocytic leukemia) in which the importance of complete remission, of dose and schedule, of sequencing chemotherapeutic agents, of pharmacological sanctuaries, and particularly of combination chemotherapy was studied. The principles derived from these studies, particularly those relating to combination chemotherapy, resulted in curative treatment for disseminated Hodgkin's disease, non-Hodgkin's lymphoma, pediatric solid tumors, testicular cancer, and limited small cell lung cancer. Many patients with certain stages of solid tumors, such as breast cancer and osteogenic sarcoma, are at high risk of having disseminated microscopic disease. Experimental studies indicate that treatment which is only partially effective against macroscopic disease is much more effective against microscopic tumors. Therefore chemotherapy is administered immediately following control of the primary tumor in patients at high risk of having disseminated microscopic disease, a treatment known as adjuvant chemotherapy. This program has been highly successful in increasing the cure rate in patients with pediatric solid tumors and in prolonging disease-free survival in patients with premenopausal breast cancer. Given dissemination of the technology, it is estimated that 15,000-30,000 patients per year are potentially curable in the United States. Curability of cancer

  16. Chemotherapy of human african trypanosomiasis.

    PubMed

    Bacchi, Cyrus J

    2009-01-01

    Human Africa trypanosomiasis is a centuries-old disease which has disrupted sub-Saharan Africa in both physical suffering and economic loss. This article presents an update of classic chemotherapeutic agents, in use for >50 years and the recent development of promising non-toxic combination chemotherapy suitable for use in rural clinics.

  17. Rationale for combining immunotherapy with chemotherapy.

    PubMed

    Dalgleish, Angus G

    2015-01-01

    Immunotherapy has usually been considered as an alternative to more traditional modalities. Moreover, it has previously been felt that chemotherapy is inherently immunosuppressive and not suitable for combining with immunotherapy. In this review, the concept of combining different modalities that result in cell death, such as radiotherapy and chemotherapy, with immunotherapy is explored. Tumors actively cause immune suppression which can be reversed by their removal but when this is not possible, enhancing the immune response with nonspecific immune stimulation can enhance the response to other modalities, such as radiotherapy and chemotherapy. Additionally, several chemotherapy agents at low doses selectively inhibit regulatory and suppressor cells.

  18. [Primary systemic chemotherapy for breast cancer].

    PubMed

    Takada, Masahiro; Toi, Masakazu

    2007-11-01

    Neoadjuvant chemotherapy for breast cancer has achieved a higher response rate with the combination of anthracycline and taxane. Molecular targeted agents, such as trastuzumab, are expected to enhance the effectiveness of treatment. The main objectives of neoadjuvant chemotherapy are to reduce tumor size, increase breast conserving rate, identify treatment response, adjust the following treatment strategy, and develop a new treatment using biological specimens. Recently, there has been an increasing demand to provide a tailored treatment in neoadjuvant chemotherapy with establishment of genetic testing for biological markers and adjustment of therapeutic strategy following identification of the early treatment response. We reviewed recent advances in neoadjuvant chemotherapy for breast cancer.

  19. [Chemotherapy of brain tumors].

    PubMed

    Kuratsu, J; Ushio, Y

    1994-10-01

    Despite recent attempts to improve chemotherapeutic approaches for the treatment of malignant gliomas, results remain limited and palliative. The development of effective chemotherapy for tumors of the central nervous system (CNS) is complicated in that the blood-brain barrier (B.B.B.) hampers the penetration of most drugs into the brain and cerebrospinal fluid. The factors governing delivery in the brain are the drug's molecular weight, lipophilicity and degree of ionization. Now the standard therapy for malignant glioma is maximal tumor resection followed by combination radiotherapy plus chemotherapy. Nitrosoureas are representative drugs which easily cross the B.B.B.. It has been shown that nitrosourea compounds have an additive effect to radiotherapy. The toxicity profile of nitrosoureas is leukocytopenia and thrombocytopenia as a dose-limiting factor. Furthermore, the great heterogeneity of malignant glioma tissues offered a rationale for the use of multiple drugs. Many studies were reported to show a substantial advantage for the multidrug regimen over control series utilizing single drugs alone. Despite clear examples of the effectiveness of chemotherapy, we are still far from improving the cure rate for the vast majority of patients with primary malignancies of the CNS. Further improvement in patient survival may depend upon understanding and manipulating the pathways that regulate aberrant growth in these tumors. The development of new anticancer agents, which are sensitive to malignant glioma and can reach a high concentration in glioma tissue, is warranted. PMID:7986118

  20. Prevention of chemotherapy-induced ovarian damage.

    PubMed

    Roness, Hadassa; Kashi, Oren; Meirow, Dror

    2016-01-01

    Recent advances in our understanding of the mechanisms underlying the impact of cytotoxic drugs on the ovary have opened up new directions for the protection of the ovary from chemotherapy-induced damage. These advances have spurred the investigation of pharmacological agents to prevent ovarian damage at the time of treatment. Prevention of ovarian damage and follicle loss would provide significant advantages over existing fertility preservation techniques. This manuscript reviews new methods for the prevention of chemotherapy-induced ovarian damage, including agents that act on the PI3K/PTEN/Akt follicle activation pathway, apoptotic pathways, the vascular system, and other potential methods of reducing chemotherapy-induced ovotoxicity.

  1. Anticancer chemotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Weller, R.E.

    1991-10-01

    This document examines chemotherapeutic agents for use in veterinary oncology. It lists some of the most common categories of chemotherapeutic drugs, such as alkylating agents and corticosteroids. For each category, the paper lists some example drugs, gives their mode of action, tumors usually susceptible to the drug, and common side effects. A brief discussion of mechanisms of drug resistance is also provided. (MHB)

  2. A phase II study evaluating the toxicity and efficacy of single-agent temsirolimus in chemotherapy-naïve castration-resistant prostate cancer

    PubMed Central

    Kruczek, K; Ratterman, M; Tolzien, K; Sulo, S; Lestingi, T M; Nabhan, C

    2013-01-01

    Background: The mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) pathway is deregulated in castration-resistant prostate cancer (CRPC). We investigated the efficacy and toxicity of temsirolimus, an mTOR inhibitor, in chemotherapy-naïve CRPC. Methods: In this phase II open label study, eligible patients received IV temsirolimus at 25 mg weekly until objective disease progression, unacceptable toxicity or investigator's discretion. Toxicity was assessed every 4 weeks and responses every 8 weeks. Primary end point was calculating the overall response (OR) rate as well as measuring stable disease (SD) to assess the overall clinical benefit calculated as OR+SD. Secondary end points included prostatic-specific antigen (PSA) changes and time to progression biochemically and radiographically. Correlative studies included prospective assessment of quality of life (QoL) using two previously validated scales. Results: Although the sponsor halted the study early, 21 patients were enrolled of which, 15 were evaluable for efficacy and OR. Median age was 74 (range: 57–89), median PSA was 237.5 ng ml−1 (range: 8.2–2360), visceral disease present in 11 patients (52%), and 17 patients (81%) patients had Gleason score (7–10). Two patients had a partial response (PR) and eight had SD. The OR was 13% (2/15) and the overall clinical benefit (OR+SD) was 67% (10/15). Median time to radiographic disease progression was 2 months (range 2–10 months). Biochemical response assessment was available for 14/15 patients. Any PSA decline was observed in four patients (28.5% 4/14) with one patient (7%) having >50% PSA decline. Median time to progression by PSA was 2 months (range 1–10 months). With a median follow-up of 32 months, median overall survival (OS) was 13 months (range: 2–37) and three patients remain alive at the data cutoff (5/2013) for an OS of 14% at 4 years on an intent-to-treat analysis. Major non-haematologic toxicities included fatigue (19%) and pneumonia (14%). Main

  3. HIV chemotherapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Richman, Douglas D.

    2001-04-01

    The use of chemotherapy to suppress replication of the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) has transformed the face of AIDS in the developed world. Pronounced reductions in illness and death have been achieved and healthcare utilization has diminished. HIV therapy has also provided many new insights into the pathogenesis and the viral and cellular dynamics of HIV infection. But challenges remain. Treatment does not suppress HIV replication in all patients, and the emergence of drug-resistant virus hinders subsequent treatment. Chronic therapy can also result in toxicity. These challenges prompt the search for new drugs and new therapeutic strategies to control chronic viral replication.

  4. Extended Survival after Complete Pathological Response in Metastatic Pancreatic Ductal Adenocarcinoma Following Induction Chemotherapy, Chemoradiotherapy, and a Novel Immunotherapy Agent, IMM-101.

    PubMed

    Costa Neves, Mafalda; Giakoustidis, Alex; Stamp, Gordon; Gaya, Andy; Mudan, Satvinder

    2015-01-01

    Pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) has an extremely poor prognosis. Median survival for metastatic patients is six to nine months and survivors beyond one year are exceptional. Pancreatic cancer is resistant to conventional chemotherapy and is often diagnosed at advanced stages. However, immunotherapy is a rapidly advancing new treatment modality, which shows promise in many solid tumor types.​ We present a patient with metastatic pancreatic cancer who underwent a synchronous resection of the primary tumour (pancreatoduodenectomy) and metastatic site (left hepatectomy) after multimodality neoadjuvant treatment with gemcitabine, nab-paclitaxel, and immunotherapy backbone with IMM-101 (an intradermally applied immunomodulator), as well as consolidation chemoradiation. Pathology of the specimens showed a complete response in both sites of the disease. The patient remains alive four years from the initial diagnosis and continues on maintenance immunotherapy. This exceptional response to initial chemo-immunotherapy was followed by a novel and off-protocol approach of low-dose capecitabine and IMM-101 as a maintenance strategy. The survival benefit and sustained performance status could set this as a new paradigm for the treatment of oligometastatic pancreatic cancer following response to systemic therapy and immunotherapy.​. PMID:26870619

  5. Single Agents with Designed Combination Chemotherapy Potential: Synthesis and Evaluation of Substituted Pyrimido[4,5-b]indoles as Receptor Tyrosine Kinase and Thymidylate Synthase Inhibitors and as Antitumor Agents

    PubMed Central

    Gangjee, Aleem; Zaware, Nilesh; Raghavan, Sudhir; Ihnat, Michael; Shenoy, Satyendra; Kisliuk, Roy L.

    2010-01-01

    Combinations of antiangiogenic agents (AAs) with cytotoxic agents have shown significant promise and several such clinical trials are currently underway. We have designed, synthesized and evaluated two compounds that each inhibit vascular endothelial growth factor receptor-2 (VEGFR-2) and platelet derived growth factor receptor-beta (PDGFR-β) for antiangiogenic effects and also inhibit human thymidylate synthase (hTS) for cytotoxic effects in single agents. The synthesis of these compounds involved the nucleophilic displacement of the common intermediate 5-chloro-9H-pyrimido[4,5-b]indole-2,4-diamine with appropriate benzenethiols. The inhibitory potency of both these single agents against VEGFR-2, PDGFR-β and hTS is better than or close to standards. In a COLO-205 xenograft mouse model one of the analogs significantly decreased tumor growth (TGI = 76% at 35 mg/kg), liver metastases and tumor blood vessels compared to a standard drug and to control and thus demonstrated potent tumor growth inhibition, inhibition of metastasis and antiangiogenic effects in vivo. These compounds afford combination chemotherapeutic potential in single agents. PMID:20092323

  6. Bridging the gap: the Virtual Chemotherapy Unit.

    PubMed

    Scavuzzo, Jennifer; Gamba, Nicole

    2004-01-01

    Due to the complexity of pediatric chemotherapy administration, systems promoting safety must be utilized. Computerized order entry has been proven to reduce errors in the ordering of chemotherapeutic agents. A task force (the Breakthrough Committee) at The Children's Hospital of Philadelphia (CHOP) evaluated systems and identified the need to streamline the chemotherapy admission process from the outpatient clinic to the inpatient unit. In the outpatient setting chemotherapy orders were handwritten, whereas inpatient orders were computerized. Patients due for chemotherapy admissions were unable to start chemotherapy until they were physically admitted to an inpatient bed. In many cases, patients would not start receiving chemotherapy until late in the evening or even overnight. The Breakthrough Committee created the Virtual Chemotherapy Unit (Virtual Unit), which standardizes the ordering and documentation for all chemotherapy admissions. As per its name, the Virtual Unit is not an actual hospital unit but merely a location in the computer system where the patient is admitted prior to having a bed on the inpatient unit. Patients are now able to start chemotherapy infusions in the outpatient setting early in the day, rather than waiting until arrival to the inpatient unit. The nurses in the outpatient clinic are able to document chemotherapy administration online, giving the inpatient staff the ability to view the medications that were given. The Virtual Unit bridges the gap in chemotherapy ordering and documentation by utilizing 1 online episode per patient admission. Oncology nurses at CHOP played a fundamental role in the creation of the Virtual Unit. Nurses identified situations with potential for error in the ordering and administration of chemotherapy. These scenarios were analyzed and used in creating a safer system.

  7. Clinical significance of the administration of cytarabine or thiotepa in addition to total body irradiation and cyclophosphamide for allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation in patients with acute leukemia.

    PubMed

    Tachibana, Takayoshi; Tanaka, Masatsugu; Hagihara, Maki; Kawasaki, Rika; Yamazaki, Etsuko; Koharazawa, Hideyuki; Taguchi, Jun; Tomita, Naoto; Fujimaki, Katsumichi; Sakai, Rika; Fujita, Hiroyuki; Fujisawa, Shin; Maruta, Atsuo; Ishigatsubo, Yoshiaki; Kanamori, Heiwa

    2015-10-01

    A multicenter retrospective study was performed to determine the significance of adding cytarabine (CA) or thiotepa (TT) in the context of total body irradiation (TBI) and cyclophosphamide (CY). A total of 322 patients who underwent allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT) were distributed to the following three groups: TBI/CY (n = 75), TBI/CY/CA (n = 77), and TBI/CY/TT (n = 170). In the TBI/CY/TT group, 164 of patients (96 %) received HCT during the previous year (2000-2005). Multivariate analysis revealed that the TBI/CY/TT group demonstrated a trend of poorer survival rate than the TBI/CY group, [hazard ratio (HR) = 1.49, 95 % confidence interval (CI) 0.99-2.24, P = 0.055] with a higher non-relapse mortality (NRM) (HR = 2.34, 95 % CI 1.35-4.06, P = 0.002) rates, while TBI/CY/CA group demonstrated similar outcomes. Even in the subgroup analyses of disease type or disease risk, the outcomes with intensified conditioning regimens were not superior to those with TBI/CY. In conclusion, although the significant bias has to be carefully considered, the clinical benefit of adding CA or TT to the TBI/CY regimen was not demonstrated.

  8. Lamellar crystalline self-assembly behaviour and solid lipid nanoparticles of a palmityl prodrug analogue of Capecitabine—A chemotherapy agent

    SciTech Connect

    Gong, Xiaojuan; Moghaddam, Minoo J.; Sagnella, Sharon M.; Conn, Charlotte E.; Danon, Stephen J.; Waddington, Lynne J.; Drummond, Calum J.

    2014-09-24

    An amphiphile prodrug, 5'-deoxy-5-fluoro-N4-(palmityloxycarbonyl) cytidine or 5'-deoxy-5-fluoro-N4-(hexadecanaloxycarbonyl) cytidine (5-FCPal), consisting of the same head group as the commercially available chemotherapeutic agent Capecitabine, linked to a palmityl hydrocarbon chain via a carbamate bond is reported. Thermal analysis of this prodrug indicates that it melts at ~115 °C followed quickly by degradation beginning at ~120 °C. The neat solid 5-FCPal amphiphile acquires a lamellar crystalline arrangement with a d-spacing of 28.6 ± 0.3 Å, indicating interdigitation of the hydrocarbon chains. Under aqueous conditions, solid 5-FCPal is non-swelling and no lyotropic liquid crystalline phase formation is observed. In order to assess the in vitro toxicity and in vivo efficacy in colloidal form, solid lipid nanoparticles (SLNs) with an average size of ~700 nm were produced via high pressure homogenization. The in vitro toxicity of the 5-FCPal SLNs against several different cancer and normal cell types was assessed over a 48 h period, and IC50 values were comparable to those observed for Capecitabine. The in vivo efficacy of the 5-FCPal SLNs was then assessed against the highly aggressive mouse 4T1 breast cancer model. To do so, the prodrug SLNs were administered orally at 3 different dosages (0.1, 0.25, 0.5 mmol/mouse/day) and compared to Capecitabine delivered at the same dosages. After 21 days of receiving the treatments, the 0.5 mmol dose of 5-FCPal exhibited the smallest average tumour volume. Since 5-FCPal is activated in a similar manner to Capecitabine via a 3 step enzymatic pathway with the final step occurring preferentially at the tumour site, formulation of the prodrug into SLNs combines the advantage of selective, localized activation with the sustained release properties of nanostructured amphiphile self-assembly and multiple payload materials thereby potentially creating a more effective anticancer agent.

  9. Improving Systemic Chemotherapy for Bladder Cancer.

    PubMed

    Rose, Tracy L; Milowsky, Matthew I

    2016-05-01

    Systemic chemotherapy is integral to the management of muscle-invasive and metastatic bladder cancer (BCa). Neoadjuvant chemotherapy has been increasingly utilized for muscle-invasive BCa over the past several years, and several options for cisplatin-based regimens have emerged. Adjuvant chemotherapy may be considered for select patients who did not receive neoadjuvant therapy. Systemic chemotherapy added to radiotherapy is a critical component of a bladder-preserving approach and superior to radiotherapy alone. Cisplatin-based chemotherapy has been the mainstay for metastatic BCa for more than three decades. Novel targeted agents are in development fueled by the recent molecular characterization of BCa. Recent trials of immunotherapy have demonstrated the possibility of a less toxic and potentially more effective treatment for metastatic disease. It is an extremely exciting time for BCa research, and much needed improvements in systemic treatment are most certainly on the horizon. PMID:26984414

  10. Efficacy of Combination Chemotherapy Using a Novel Oral Chemotherapeutic Agent, TAS-102, with Oxaliplatin on Human Colorectal and Gastric Cancer Xenografts.

    PubMed

    Nukatsuka, Mamoru; Nakagawa, Fumio; Takechi, Teiji

    2015-09-01

    TAS-102 is a novel oral nucleoside antitumor agent consisting of trifluridine (FTD) and the thymidine phosphorylase inhibitor tipiracil hydrochloride (at a molar ratio of 1:0.5) that was approved in Japan in 2014 for the treatment of unresectable advanced or recurrent colorectal cancer. In the present study, the enhancement of therapeutic efficacy using a combination of TAS-102 and oxaliplatin was evaluated in a xenograft-bearing nude mouse model of colorectal and gastric cancer. TAS-102 was orally administered twice-a-day from day 1 to 14, and oxaliplatin was administered intravenously on days 1 and 8. The in vivo growth-inhibitory activity was evaluated based on the tumor volume and the growth-delay period, was estimated based on the period required to reach a tumor volume five-times greater than the initial volume (RTV5). The tumor growth-inhibitory activity and RTV5 in mice administered TAS-102 with oxaliplatin were significantly superior to those associated with either monotherapy in mice with colorectal (HCT 116, SW-48; p<0.001) and gastric cancer (SC-2, MKN74; p<0.001). MKN74/5FU, a 5-fluorouracil-resistant MKN74 sub-line, was sensitive to both FTD and oxaliplatin in vitro. In vivo, TAS-102 alone was effective in MKN74/5FU, and its anti-tumor activity was significantly enhanced in combination with oxaliplatin (p<0.001). No significant decrease in body weight or toxicity was observed compared to either monotherapy. The present pre-clinical findings indicate that combination of TAS-102 and oxaliplatin is a promising treatment option for colorectal or gastric cancer, and can be utilized in both chemo-naïve tumors and recurrent tumors after 5-fluorouracil treatment.

  11. Pregnancies and menstrual function before and after combined radiation (RT) and chemotherapy (TVPP) for Hodgkin's disease

    SciTech Connect

    Lacher, M.J.; Toner, K.

    1986-01-01

    The menstrual cycle, pregnancies, and offspring were evaluated before and after initial combined radiation (RT) and chemotherapy with thiotepa, vinblastine, vincristine, procarbazine, and prednisone (TVPP), in 34 women between the ages of 18 and 44 (median 26.5 years) treated for Stage II and Stage III Hodgkin's disease. The median range of follow-up is 83.1 months (range 40.5-140). After therapy 94.1% (32/34) continued to menstruate. Two of the four patients over the age of 35 ceased to menstruate. All patients under the age of 35 continued to menstruate (30/30). Age at the time of diagnosis was the only factor affecting change in menses with a significant probability (p = .001) that women greater than 30 years of age will experience some change in menstrual pattern. Seventeen pregnancies occurred in 12 women after therapy; 2 had 4 elective abortions; 10 delivered 12 children with normal physical development; 1 will deliver six months from now. Twelve of thirteen patients who wanted to become pregnant have conceived. The ability to become pregnant and deliver normal children after intensive treatment with combined radiation and chemotherapy (RT/TVPP) was comparable to the patients' pretreatment record.

  12. Supratentorial primitive neuroectodermal tumors (S-PNET) in children: A prospective experience with adjuvant intensive chemotherapy and hyperfractionated accelerated radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Massimino, Maura . E-mail: maura.massimino@istitutotumori.mi.it; Gandola, Lorenza; Spreafico, Filippo; Luksch, Roberto; Collini, Paola; Giangaspero, Felice; Simonetti, Fabio; Casanova, Michela; Cefalo, Graziella; Pignoli, Emanuele; Ferrari, Andrea; Terenziani, Monica; Podda, Marta; Meazza, Cristina; Polastri, Daniela; Poggi, Geraldina; Ravagnani, Fernando; Fossati-Bellani, Franca

    2006-03-15

    Purpose: Supratentorial primitive neuroectodermal tumors (S-PNET) are rare and have a grim prognosis, frequently taking an aggressive course with local relapse and metastatic spread. We report the results of a mono-institutional therapeutic trial. Methods and Materials: We enrolled 15 consecutive patients to preradiation chemotherapy (CT) consisting of high-dose methotrexate, high-dose etoposide, high-dose cyclophosphamide, and high-dose carboplatin, craniospinal irradiation (CSI) with hyperfractionated accelerated radiotherapy (HART) plus focal boost, maintenance with vincristine/lomustine or consolidation with high-dose thiotepa followed by autologous stem-cell rescue. Results: Median age was 9 years; 7 were male, 8 female. Site of disease was pineal in 3, elsewhere in 12. Six patients were had no evidence of disease after surgery (NED). Of those with evidence of disease after surgery (ED), 2 had central nervous system spread. Of the 9 ED patients, 2 had complete response (CR) and 2 partial response (PR) after CT, 4 stable disease, and 1 progressive disease. Of the 7 ED patients before radiotherapy, 1 had CR, 4 PR, and 2 minor response, thus obtaining a 44% CR + PR after CT and 71% after HART. Because of rapid progression in 2 of the first 5 patients, high-dose thiotepa was systematically adopted after HART in the subsequent 10 patients. Six of 15 patients relapsed (4 locally, 1 locally with dissemination, 1 with dissemination) a mean of 6 months after starting CT, 2 developed second tumors; 5 of 6 relapsers died at a median of 13 months. Three-year progression-free survival, event-free survival, and overall survival were 54%, 34%, and 61%, respectively. Conclusion: Hyperfractionated accelerated RT was the main tool in obtaining responses in S-PNET; introducing the myeloablative phase improved the prognosis (3/10 vs. 3/5 relapses), though the outcome remained unsatisfactory despite the adoption of this intensive treatment.

  13. Management of Chemotherapy Induced Nausea and Vomiting in Patients on Multiday Cisplatin Based Combination Chemotherapy.

    PubMed

    Ranganath, Praveen; Einhorn, Lawrence; Albany, Costantine

    2015-01-01

    Introduction of cisplatin based chemotherapy has revolutionized the treatment of germ cell tumors. A common side effect of multiday cisplatin chemotherapy is severe nausea and vomiting. Considerable progress has been made in the control of these side effects since the introduction of cisplatin based chemotherapy in the 1970s. Germ cell tumor which is a model for a curable neoplasm has also turned into an excellent testing ground to develop effective strategies to prevent chemotherapy induced nausea and vomiting (CINV) in multiday cisplatin based regimens. The use of combination of a 5-hydroxytryptamine (HT)3 receptor antagonist, a neurokinin-1 (NK1) antagonist, and dexamethasone has greatly improved our ability to prevent and control acute and delayed CINV. Mechanism and pattern of CINV with multiday chemotherapy may differ from those in single day chemotherapy and therefore efficacy of antiemetic drugs as observed in single day chemotherapy may not be applicable. There are only few randomized clinical trials with special emphasis on multiday chemotherapy. Further studies are essential to determine the efficacy, optimal dose, and duration of the newer agents and combinations in multiday cisplatin based chemotherapy. PMID:26425563

  14. Management of Chemotherapy Induced Nausea and Vomiting in Patients on Multiday Cisplatin Based Combination Chemotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Ranganath, Praveen; Einhorn, Lawrence; Albany, Costantine

    2015-01-01

    Introduction of cisplatin based chemotherapy has revolutionized the treatment of germ cell tumors. A common side effect of multiday cisplatin chemotherapy is severe nausea and vomiting. Considerable progress has been made in the control of these side effects since the introduction of cisplatin based chemotherapy in the 1970s. Germ cell tumor which is a model for a curable neoplasm has also turned into an excellent testing ground to develop effective strategies to prevent chemotherapy induced nausea and vomiting (CINV) in multiday cisplatin based regimens. The use of combination of a 5-hydroxytryptamine (HT)3 receptor antagonist, a neurokinin-1 (NK1) antagonist, and dexamethasone has greatly improved our ability to prevent and control acute and delayed CINV. Mechanism and pattern of CINV with multiday chemotherapy may differ from those in single day chemotherapy and therefore efficacy of antiemetic drugs as observed in single day chemotherapy may not be applicable. There are only few randomized clinical trials with special emphasis on multiday chemotherapy. Further studies are essential to determine the efficacy, optimal dose, and duration of the newer agents and combinations in multiday cisplatin based chemotherapy. PMID:26425563

  15. Role of Chemotherapy and Mechanisms of Resistance to Chemotherapy in Metastatic Castration-Resistant Prostate Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Lohiya, Vipin; Aragon-Ching, Jeanny B.; Sonpavde, Guru

    2016-01-01

    Chemotherapy using the taxanes, docetaxel and cabazitaxel, remains an important therapeutic option in metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer (CRPC). However, despite the survival benefits afforded by these agents, the survival increments are modest and resistance occurs universally. Efforts to overcome resistance to docetaxel by combining with biologic agents have heretofore been unsuccessful. Indeed, resistance to these taxanes is also associated with cross-resistance to the antiandrogen drugs, abiraterone and enzalutamide. Here, we discuss the various mechanisms of resistance to chemotherapy in metastatic CRPC and the potential role of emerging regimens and agents in varying clinical phases of development. PMID:27773999

  16. Nanostructured self-assembly materials from neat and aqueous solutions of C18 lipid pro-drug analogues of Capecitabine—a chemotherapy agent. Focus on nanoparticulate cubosomes™ of the oleyl analogue

    SciTech Connect

    Gong, Xiaojuan; Moghaddam, Minoo J.; Sagnella, Sharon M.; Conn, Charlotte E.; Mulet, Xavier; Danon, Stephen J.; Waddington, Lynne J.; Drummond, Calum J.

    2014-09-24

    A series of prodrug analogues based on the established chemotherapy agent, 5-fluorouracil, have been prepared and characterized. C18 alkyl and alkenyl chains with increasing degree of unsaturation were attached to the N4 position of the 5-fluorocytosine (5-FC) base via a carbamate bond. Physicochemical characterization of the prodrug analogues was carried out using a combination of differential scanning calorimetry, cross-polarized optical microscopy, X-ray diffraction and small-angle X-ray scattering. The presence of a monounsaturated oleyl chain was found to promote lyotropic liquid crystalline phase formation in excess water with a fluid lamellar phase observed at room temperature and one or more bicontinuous cubic phases at 37 °C. The bulk phase was successfully dispersed into liposomes or cubosomes at room and physiological temperature respectively. In vitro toxicity of the nanoparticulate 5-FCOle dispersions was evaluated against several normal and cancer cell types over a 48 h period and exhibited an IC50 of -100 μM against all cell types. The in vivo efficacy of 5-FCOle cubosomes was assessed against the highly aggressive mouse 4T1 breast cancer model and compared to Capecitabine (a water-soluble commercially available 5-FU prodrug) delivered at the same dosages. After 21 days of treatment, the 0.5 mmol 5-FCOle treatment group exhibited a significantly smaller average tumour volume than all other treatment groups including Capecitabine at similar dosage. These results exemplify the potential of self-assembled amphiphile prodrugs for delivery of bioactives in vivo.

  17. Relationship of gonadal activity and chemotherapy-induced gonadal damage

    SciTech Connect

    Rivkees, S.A.; Crawford, J.D.

    1988-04-08

    The authors tested the hypothesis that chemotherapy-induced gonadal damage is proportional to the degree of gonadal activity during treatment. Thirty studies that evaluated gonadal function after cyclophosphamide therapy for renal disease or combination chemotherapy for Hodgkin's disease or acute lymphocytic leukemia provided data for analysis. Data were stratified according to sex, illness, chemotherapeutic regimen and dose, and pubertal stage at the time of treatment. Chemotherapy-induced damage was more likely to occur in patients who were treated when sexually mature compared with those who were treated when prepubertal. Males were significantly more frequently affected than females when treated for renal disease of Hodgkin's disease. Chemotherapy-induced damage was also more likely to occur when patients were treated with large doses of alkylating agents. These data suggest that chemotherapy-induced damage is proportional to gonadal activity. Further efforts are needed to test whether induced gonadal quiescence during chemotherapy will reduce the strikingly high incidence of gonadal failure following chemotherapy.

  18. Prognostic nutritional index before adjuvant chemotherapy predicts chemotherapy compliance and survival among patients with non-small-cell lung cancer

    PubMed Central

    Shimizu, Katsuhiko; Okita, Riki; Saisho, Shinsuke; Yukawa, Takuro; Maeda, Ai; Nojima, Yuji; Nakata, Masao

    2015-01-01

    Background Adjuvant chemotherapy after the complete resection of non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) is now the standard of care. To improve survival, it is important to identify risk factors for the continuation of adjuvant chemotherapy. In this study, we analyzed chemotherapy compliance and magnitude of the prognostic impact of the prognostic nutritional index (PNI) before adjuvant chemotherapy. Methods We conducted a retrospective review of data from 106 patients who had received adjuvant chemotherapy. The adjuvant chemotherapy consisted of an oral tegafur agent (OT) or platinum-based chemotherapy (PB). The correlations between the PNI values and recurrence-free survival (RFS) were then evaluated. Results In the PB group, the percentage of patients who completed the four planned cycles of chemotherapy was not correlated with the PNI. In the OT group, however, a significant difference was observed in the percentage of patients who completed the planned chemotherapy according to the PNI before adjuvant chemotherapy. The RFS of patients with a PNI <50 before adjuvant chemotherapy was significantly poorer than that of the patients with a PNI ≥50. A multivariate analysis showed that nodal metastasis and PNI before chemotherapy were independent predictors of the RFS. However, PNI before surgery was not a predictor of the RFS. In the subgroup analysis, PNI before chemotherapy was independent predictor of the RFS in the OT group (P=0.019), but not in the PB group (P=0.095). Conclusion The PNI before adjuvant chemotherapy influenced the treatment compliance with the planned chemotherapy in the OT group, but not the PB group. In addition, a low PNI before adjuvant chemotherapy was associated with a poor RFS in a multivariate analysis, especially in the OT group. PMID:26504397

  19. Administration of chemotherapy in patients on dialysis.

    PubMed

    Kuo, James C; Craft, Paul S

    2015-08-01

    The prevalence of patients on dialysis has increased and these patients present a challenge for chemotherapy administration when diagnosed with cancer. A consensus on the dosage and timing of different chemotherapeutic agents in relation to dialysis has not been established. We describe the pattern of care and treatment outcome for cancer patients on dialysis in our institution. The dataset from the Australia and New Zealand Dialysis and Transplant Registry of patients on dialysis who had a diagnosis of cancer was obtained and matched to the pharmacy records in our institution to identify patients who had received chemotherapy while on dialysis. Relevant clinical information including details of the dialysis regimen, chemotherapy administration and adverse events was extracted for analysis. Between July 1999 and July 2014, 21 patients on dialysis were included for analysis. Five (23.8%) received chemotherapy, most of which was administered before dialysis sessions. As a result of adverse events, one patient discontinued treatment; two other patients required dose reduction or treatment delay. Chemotherapy administration was feasible in cancer patients on dialysis, but chemotherapy usage was low. Better understanding of the altered pharmacokinetics in patients on dialysis may improve chemotherapy access and practice.

  20. Modification of chemotherapy by nitroimidazoles

    SciTech Connect

    Siemann, D.W.

    1984-09-01

    The potentiation of chemotherapeutic agents by radiation sensitizers has been extensively studied for several years. There is little doubt that the effectiveness of certain anti-cancer drugs, primarily alkylating agents, can readily be enhanced both in vitro and in vivo through the addition of a sensitizer. While enhanced effects have been observed in certain critical normal tissues, in general most animal model studies have demonstrated a therapeutic gain at large sensitizer doses. This approach to combination therapies therefore appears promising. Yet many questions concerning the interaction between chemotherapeutic agents and radiosensitizers, particularly in the aspects of modification of chemotherapy by nitroimidazoles are reviewed and discussed. These address the importance in chemopotentiation of (i) hypoxia, (ii) alterations in DNA damage and/or repair, (iii) depletion of intracellular sulfhydryls and (iv) modification of drug pharmacokinetics.

  1. Combining Chemotherapy with Bevacizumab Improves Outcomes for Ovarian Cancer Patients

    Cancer.gov

    Results from two phase III randomized clinical trials suggest that, at least for some patients with ovarian cancer, adding the antiangiogenesis agent bevacizumab to chemotherapy increases the time to disease progression and may improve survival.

  2. Chemotherapy-induced peripheral neuropathy.

    PubMed

    Fehrenbacher, Jill C

    2015-01-01

    Chemotherapy-induced peripheral neuropathy (CIPN) is common in patients receiving anticancer treatment and can affect survivability and long-term quality of life of the patient following treatment. The symptoms of CIPN primarily include abnormal sensory discrimination of touch, vibration, thermal information, and pain. There is currently a paucity of pharmacological agents to prevent or treat CIPN. The lack of efficacious therapeutics is due, at least in part, to an incomplete understanding of the mechanisms by which chemotherapies alter the sensitivity of sensory neurons. Although the clinical presentation of CIPN can be similar with the various classes of chemotherapeutic agents, there are subtle differences, suggesting that each class of drugs might induce neuropathy via different mechanisms. Multiple mechanisms have been proposed to underlie the development and maintenance of neuropathy; however, most pharmacological agents generated from preclinical experiments have failed to alleviate the symptoms of CIPN in the clinic. Further research is necessary to identify the specific mechanisms by which each class of chemotherapeutics induces neuropathy.

  3. No Salvage Using High-Dose Chemotherapy Plus/Minus Reirradiation for Relapsing Previously Irradiated Medulloblastoma

    SciTech Connect

    Massimino, Maura Gandola, Lorenza; Spreafico, Filippo; Biassoni, Veronica; Luksch, Roberto; Collini, Paola; Solero, Carlo N.; Simonetti, Fabio; Pignoli, Emanuele; Cefalo, Graziella; Poggi, Geraldina; Modena, Piergiorgio Ph.D.; Mariani, Luigi; Potepan, Paolo; Podda, Marta; Casanova, Michela; Pecori, Emilia; Acerno, Stefania; Ferrari, Andrea; Terenziani, Monica

    2009-04-01

    Purpose: Myeloablative regimens were frequently used for medulloblastoma relapsing after craniospinal irradiation (CSI): in 1997-2002, we used repeated surgery, standard-dose and myeloablative chemotherapy, and reirradiation. Methods and Materials: In 10 patients, reinduction included sequential high-dose etoposide, high-dose cyclophosphamide/vincristine, and high-dose carboplatin/vincristine, then two myeloablative courses with high-dose thiotepa ({+-} carboplatin); 6 other patients received two of four courses of cisplatin/etoposide. Hematopoietic precursor mobilization followed high-dose etoposide or high-dose cyclophosphamide or cisplatin/etoposide therapy. After the overall chemotherapy program, reirradiation was prescribed when possible. Results: Seventeen patients were treated: previous treatment included CSI of 19.5-36 Gy with posterior fossa/tumor boost and chemotherapy in 16 patients. Fifteen patients were in their first and 2 in their second and third relapses, respectively. First progression-free survival had lasted a median of 26 months. Relapse sites included leptomeninges in 9 patients, spine in 4 patients, posterior fossa in 3 patients, and brain in 1 patient. Three patients underwent complete resection of recurrence, and 10 underwent reirradiation. Twelve of 14 patients with assessable tumor had an objective response after reinduction; 2 experienced progression and were not given the myeloablative courses. Remission lasted a median of 16 months. Additional relapses appeared in 13 patients continuing the treatment. Fifteen patients died of progression and 1 died of pneumonia 13 months after relapse. The only survivor at 93 months had a single spinal metastasis that was excised and irradiated. Survival for the series as a whole was 11-93 months, with a median of 41 months. Conclusions: Despite responses being obtained and ample use of surgery and reirradiation, second-line therapy with myeloablative schedules was not curative, barring a few

  4. [The second-line chemotherapy for urological cancers].

    PubMed

    Miki, Tsuneharu; Mikami, Kazuya; Mizutani, Yoichi

    2005-01-01

    This review summarizes second-line chemotherapy for testicular cancer and urothelial cancer. For testicular cancer, the combination of bleomycin (BLM), etoposide (ETP), and cisplatin (CDDP) (BEP) is commonly used as an induction therapy. The combination of vinblastine (VLB), ifosfamide (IFM) and CDDP (VeIP) or ETP, IFM, and CDDP (VIP) is used for the second-line chemotherapy. When the efficacy of VeIP and VIP is not sufficient, high-dose chemotherapy or chemotherapy with new anticancer agents has been used for the second-line chemotherapy. High-dose chemotherapy showed long-term survival rates of 30-50%, but patients with testicular cancer resistance to CDDP have poor outcomes. Although new anticancer agents, such as paclitaxel (TXL), gemcitabine (GEM) and irinotecan have been introduced, further examinations are needed to evaluate these drugs. The combination of methotrexate, VLB, adriamycin, and CDDP (MVAC) is used as the standard chemotherapy for urothelial cancer. The outcomes of MVAC are favorable, but the duration of response is short and long-term survival cannot be expected. Recently, the efficacy of new anticancer agents including TXL and GEM against urothelial cancers has been demonstrated. Although TXL and GEM combination therapy as the second-line chemotherapy has some effects, more evidence needs to be accumulated to establish it as a second-line treatment.

  5. Inhaled chemotherapy in lung cancer: future concept of nanomedicine

    PubMed Central

    Zarogoulidis, Paul; Chatzaki, Ekaterini; Porpodis, Konstantinos; Domvri, Kalliopi; Hohenforst-Schmidt, Wolfgang; Goldberg, Eugene P; Karamanos, Nikos; Zarogoulidis, Konstantinos

    2012-01-01

    Regional chemotherapy was first used for lung cancer 30 years ago. Since then, new methods of drug delivery and pharmaceuticals have been investigated in vitro, and in animals and humans. An extensive review of drug delivery systems, pharmaceuticals, patient monitoring, methods of enhancing inhaled drug deposition, safety and efficacy, and also additional applications of inhaled chemotherapy and its advantages and disadvantages are presented. Regional chemotherapy to the lung parenchyma for lung cancer is feasible and efficient. Safety depends on the chemotherapy agent delivered to the lungs and is dose-dependent and time-dependent. Further evaluation is needed to provide data regarding early lung cancer stages, and whether regional chemotherapy can be used as neoadjuvant or adjuvant treatment. Finally, inhaled chemotherapy could one day be administered at home with fewer systemic adverse effects. PMID:22619512

  6. Chemotherapy for Stage II Colon Cancer.

    PubMed

    Varghese, Anna

    2015-12-01

    The adjuvant treatment of patients with stage II colon cancer is an area of controversy in medical oncology. Adjuvant chemotherapy aims to eradicate micrometastatic disease present at the time of surgery, preventing the development of distant metastatic disease and thereby curing those patients of their cancer. National and international guidelines for the adjuvant treatment of stage II colon cancer recommend a range of treatment options from observation to chemotherapy with single-agent or combination regimens, depending on the presence or absence of high-risk features (poorly differentiated histology, presence of lymphovascular invasion, presence of perineural invasion, report of < 12 lymph nodes, bowel obstruction, localized perforation, or positive margins). In the one prospective study designed to address the role of adjuvant chemotherapy in stage II colon cancer, a small but statistically significant benefit in overall survival was seen for those patients who received adjuvant chemotherapy; however, multiple meta-analyses and retrospective subgroup analyses have called these findings into question. Though there may be a role for adjuvant chemotherapy in the treatment of patients with stage II colon cancer, its incremental benefit is small, at best, and comes with the risks of real and rarely fatal complications of chemotherapy. PMID:26648796

  7. Adjuvant chemotherapy in head and neck cancer.

    PubMed Central

    Stell, P. M.; Rawson, N. S.

    1990-01-01

    An overview is presented of 23 trials of adjuvant chemotherapy in squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck. These were reviewed from the point of view of design of the trial, analysis of survival, response rates, meta-analysis, site of failure, toxicity and cost. The minimal increase in survival that could be detected ranged from 11 to 51%, with a median of 25%. No trial was big enough to detect the likely increase of survival, which is 5%. Many trials excluded some eligible patients before randomisation, the proportion being 21% in those series with details. A further 9% of treated patients were excluded from analysis. A response rate in four induction studies of 47% equated with a 6% increase in cancer mortality. Meta-analysis showed an insignificant overall improvement in cancer mortality of 0.5%. Induction chemotherapy, synchronous chemotherapy and induction/maintenance chemotherapy did not affect cancer mortality whereas synchronous/maintenance therapy did. Cisplatinum, methotrexate, bleomycin, 5-FU and a variety of other regimens did not affect the death rate from cancer, but the combination of VBM significantly increased it. Neither single agent nor combination chemotherapy produced a significant reduction of cancer deaths. The rate of locoregional failure was significantly lower in the treated arms, whereas the metastatic rate was similar in both arms. Only three papers gave full details of toxicity with grading: these showed a high toxicity rate. The mortality rate from chemotherapy in nine series averaged 6.5%. PMID:2140045

  8. Mechanisms of chemotherapy-induced behavioral toxicities

    PubMed Central

    Vichaya, Elisabeth G.; Chiu, Gabriel S.; Krukowski, Karen; Lacourt, Tamara E.; Kavelaars, Annemieke; Dantzer, Robert; Heijnen, Cobi J.; Walker, Adam K.

    2015-01-01

    While chemotherapeutic agents have yielded relative success in the treatment of cancer, patients are often plagued with unwanted and even debilitating side-effects from the treatment which can lead to dose reduction or even cessation of treatment. Common side effects (symptoms) of chemotherapy include (i) cognitive deficiencies such as problems with attention, memory and executive functioning; (ii) fatigue and motivational deficit; and (iii) neuropathy. These symptoms often develop during treatment but can remain even after cessation of chemotherapy, severely impacting long-term quality of life. Little is known about the underlying mechanisms responsible for the development of these behavioral toxicities, however, neuroinflammation is widely considered to be one of the major mechanisms responsible for chemotherapy-induced symptoms. Here, we critically assess what is known in regards to the role of neuroinflammation in chemotherapy-induced symptoms. We also argue that, based on the available evidence, neuroinflammation is unlikely the only mechanism involved in the pathogenesis of chemotherapy-induced behavioral toxicities. We evaluate two other putative candidate mechanisms. To this end we discuss the mediating role of damage-associated molecular patterns (DAMPs) activated in response to chemotherapy-induced cellular damage. We also review the literature with respect to possible alternative mechanisms such as a chemotherapy-induced change in the bioenergetic status of the tissue involving changes in mitochondrial function in relation to chemotherapy-induced behavioral toxicities. Understanding the mechanisms that underlie the emergence of fatigue, neuropathy, and cognitive difficulties is vital to better treatment and long-term survival of cancer patients. PMID:25954147

  9. High-dose chemotherapy and autologous stem cell support followed by posttransplantation doxorubicin as initial therapy for metastatic breast cancer.

    PubMed

    deMagalhaes-Silverman, M; Bloom, E; Lembersky, B; Lister, J; Pincus, S; Rybka, W; Voloshin, M; Wilson, J; Ball, E

    1997-02-01

    High-dose chemotherapy is associated with a high complete response rate and possibly some survival advantage in patients with metastatic breast cancer. We designed a clinical trial consisting of a two-step high-dose chemotherapy regimen followed by posttransplantation doxorubicin as the first chemotherapy treatment for metastatic disease. Twenty-one patients with metastatic breast cancer and no previous chemotherapy for metastatic disease were treated with high-dose cyclophosphamide (Cy; 5000 mg/m2), followed by granulocyte colony-stimulating factor. Peripheral blood stem cells were collected. Subsequently, patients received Cy (6000 mg/m2), thiotepa (500 mg/m2), and carboplatin (800 mg/m2) (CTCb) with hematopoietic rescue. Upon recovery of hematopoietic and gastrointestinal toxicity, three cycles of doxorubicin (Dox; 60 mg/m2) were delivered. After Cy, nine patients (45%) developed neutropenic fevers. There were no episodes of bacteremia. Patients received CTCb 37 days after starting Cy and had a hospital stay of 19 days. After CTCb, the median number of days to an absolute neutrophil count >5 x 10(9)/liter was 8, and the median number of days to a platelet count >20 x 10(9)/liter was 9. Neutropenic fevers occurred in 12 patients. There were no hemorrhagic complications. Fifty-five of the 63 planned courses of Dox were delivered. The median time from peripheral blood stem cell infusion to the first Dox cycle was 38 days. The median time to the second Dox cycle was 28 days, and to the last cycle was 30 days. Three episodes of neutropenic fevers were observed. Two patients developed herpes zoster. This regimen is feasible, with acceptable toxicity. PMID:9815672

  10. Optimizing initial chemotherapy for metastatic pancreatic cancer.

    PubMed

    Mantripragada, Kalyan C; Safran, Howard

    2016-05-01

    The two combination chemotherapy regimens FOLFIRINOX and gemcitabine plus nab-paclitaxel represent major breakthroughs in the management of metastatic pancreatic cancer. Both regimens showed unprecedented survival advantage in the setting of front-line therapy. However, their application for treatment of patients in the community is challenging because of significant toxicities, thus limiting potential benefits to a narrow population of patients. Modifications to the dose intensity or schedule of those regimens improve their tolerability, while likely retaining survival advantage over single-agent chemotherapy. Newer strategies to optimize these two active regimens in advanced pancreatic cancer are being explored that can help personalize treatment to individual patients.

  11. Pharmacokinetics and pharmacogenomics in gastric cancer chemotherapy.

    PubMed

    Nishiyama, Masahiko; Eguchi, Hidetaka

    2009-05-20

    Despite extensive efforts, treatment of gastric cancer by chemotherapy, the globally accepted standard, is yet undetermined, and uncertainty remains regarding the optimal regimen. Recent introduction of active "new generation agents" offers hope for improving patient outcomes. Current chemotherapeutic trials provided several regimens that may become a possible standard treatment, including docetaxel/cisplatin/5-FU (TCF) and cisplatin/S-1 for advanced and metastatic cancer and S-1 monotherapy in the adjuvant setting. Along with the development of novel active regimens, individual optimization of cancer chemotherapy has been attempted in order to reduce toxicity and enhance tumor response. Unlike the rare and limited contribution of pharmacokinetic studies, pharmacogenomic studies are increasing the potential to realize the therapeutics against gastric cancer. Despite the limited data, pharmacogenomics in gastric cancer have provided a number of putative biomarkers for the prediction of tumor response to chemotherapies and of toxicity.

  12. Brain Magnetic Resonance Imaging After High-Dose Chemotherapy and Radiotherapy for Childhood Brain Tumors

    SciTech Connect

    Spreafico, Filippo Gandola, Lorenza; Marchiano, Alfonso; Simonetti, Fabio; Poggi, Geraldina; Adduci, Anna; Clerici, Carlo Alfredo; Luksch, Roberto; Biassoni, Veronica; Meazza, Cristina; Catania, Serena; Terenziani, Monica; Musumeci, Renato; Fossati-Bellani, Franca; Massimino, Maura

    2008-03-15

    Purpose: Brain necrosis or other subacute iatrogenic reactions has been recognized as a potential complication of radiotherapy (RT), although the possible synergistic effects of high-dose chemotherapy and RT might have been underestimated. Methods and Materials: We reviewed the clinical and radiologic data of 49 consecutive children with malignant brain tumors treated with high-dose thiotepa and autologous hematopoietic stem cell rescue, preceded or followed by RT. The patients were assessed for neurocognitive tests to identify any correlation with magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) anomalies. Results: Of the 49 children, 18 (6 of 25 with high-grade gliomas and 12 of 24 with primitive neuroectodermal tumors) had abnormal brain MRI findings occurring a median of 8 months (range, 2-39 months) after RT and beginning to regress a median of 13 months (range, 2-26 months) after onset. The most common lesion pattern involved multiple pseudonodular, millimeter-size, T{sub 1}-weighted unevenly enhancing, and T{sub 2}-weighted hyperintense foci. Four patients with primitive neuroectodermal tumors also had subdural fluid leaks, with meningeal enhancement over the effusion. One-half of the patients had symptoms relating to the new radiographic findings. The MRI lesion-free survival rate was 74% {+-} 6% at 1 year and 57% {+-} 8% at 2 years. The number of marrow ablative courses correlated significantly to the incidence of radiographic anomalies. No significant difference was found in intelligent quotient scores between children with and without radiographic changes. Conclusion: Multiple enhancing cerebral lesions were frequently seen on MRI scans soon after high-dose chemotherapy and RT. Such findings pose a major diagnostic challenge in terms of their differential diagnosis vis-a-vis recurrent tumor. Their correlation with neurocognitive results deserves further investigation.

  13. The chemotherapy of posterior fossa tumors in childhood.

    PubMed

    Friedman, H S; Oakes, W J

    1987-01-01

    Conventional therapy for brain tumors, consisting of neurosurgical intervention and radiotherapy, has not resulted in the successes achievable in other childhood malignancies. The role of adjuvant chemotherapy, well defined in many childhood cancers, has not yet contributed significantly to the treatment of children with brain tumors. Chemotherapy of recurrent tumors has produced regressions but no cures. The most active agents identified to date in the treatment of recurrent posterior fossa tumors include cisplatinum, cyclophosphamide and methotrexate. Future efforts will need to focus on the rational selection of drugs for study in limited agent histology-stratified phase II trials, with advancement of active agents into large randomized phase III adjuvant therapy trials.

  14. Chemotherapy in Elderly Patients with Gastric Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Hyeong Su; Kim, Jung Han; Kim, Ji Won; Kim, Byung Chun

    2016-01-01

    Gastric cancer (GC) is one of the most frequent malignant diseases in the elderly. Systemic chemotherapy showed an improvement of quality of life and survival benefit compared to supportive care alone in patients with advanced GC. Because comorbidities or age-related changes in pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics may lead to higher toxicity, however, many oncologists hesitate to recommend elderly patients to receive chemotherapy. Available data suggest that elderly patients with GC are able to tolerate and benefit from systemic chemotherapy to the same extent as younger patients. The age alone should not be the only criteria to preclude effective chemotherapy. However, proper patient selection is extremely important to deliver effective treatment safely. A comprehensive geriatric assessment (CGA) is a useful method to assess life expectancy and risk of morbidity in older patients and to guide providing optimal treatment. Treatment should be personalized based on the nature of the disease, the life expectancy, the risk of complication, and the patient's preference. Combination chemotherapy can be considered for older patients with metastatic GC who are classified as non-frail patients by CGA. For frail or vulnerable patients, however, monotherapy or only symptomatic treatment may be desirable. Targeted agents seem to be promising treatment options for elderly patients with GC considering their better efficacy and less toxicity. PMID:26722364

  15. Phase II Trial Assessing the Ability of Neoadjuvant Chemotherapy With or Without Second-Look Surgery to Eliminate Measurable Disease for Nongerminomatous Germ Cell Tumors: A Children's Oncology Group Study

    PubMed Central

    Goldman, Stewart; Bouffet, Eric; Fisher, Paul G.; Allen, Jeffrey C.; Robertson, Patricia L.; Chuba, Paul J.; Donahue, Bernadine; Kretschmar, Cynthia S.; Zhou, Tianni; Buxton, Allen B.; Pollack, Ian F.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose This phase II trial evaluated the effect of neoadjuvant chemotherapy with or without second-look surgery before craniospinal irradiation on response rates and survival outcomes in children with newly diagnosed nongerminomatous germ cell tumors. Patients and Methods Induction chemotherapy consisted of six cycles of carboplatin/etoposide alternating with ifosfamide/etoposide. Patients demonstrating less than complete response after induction chemotherapy were encouraged to undergo second-look surgery. Patients who did not achieve complete response or partial response after chemotherapy with or without second-look surgery proceeded to high-dose chemotherapy with thiotepa and etoposide and autologous peripheral blood stem-cell rescue before craniospinal irradiation. Results The study included 102 patients treated between January 2004 and July 2008. Median age was 12 years, and 76% were male; 53.9% had pineal region masses, and 23.5% had suprasellar lesions. Sixty-nine percent of patients achieved complete response or partial response with neoadjuvant chemotherapy. At 5 years, event-free survival was 84% ± 4% (SE) and overall survival was 93% ± 3%. During the median follow-up of 5.1 years, 16 patients recurred or progressed, with seven deaths after relapse. No deaths were attributed to therapy-related toxicity. Relapse occurred at the site of primary disease in 10 patients, at a distant site in three patients, or both in one patient. In two patients, progression was detected by marker increase alone. Increased serum α-fetoprotein was a negative prognostic variable. Histologic subtype and increase of beta-human chorionic gonadotropin were not significantly correlated with worse outcomes. Conclusion Neoadjuvant chemotherapy with or without second-look surgery achieved high response rates contributing to excellent survival outcomes in children with newly diagnosed nongerminomatous germ cell tumors. This regimen should be included as a backbone for further

  16. Chemotherapy (For Parents)

    MedlinePlus

    ... sample before beginning chemotherapy to evaluate kidney function. Giving your child plenty of fluids to drink will ... eating, after using the bathroom, and after touching animals. They shouldn't share cups or utensils with ...

  17. Chemotherapy in metastatic retinoblastoma.

    PubMed

    Kingston, J E; Hungerford, J L; Plowman, P N

    1987-03-01

    Eleven children with metastatic retinoblastoma diagnosed during the period 1970-1984 were treated with chemotherapy. Short-term complete responses were observed in three children treated with a four-drug combination which included cisplatinum, and in one child treated with vincristine and cyclophosphamide. The median duration of survival of the 11 children receiving chemotherapy was nine months, whilst the median survival of 13 children with metastatic retinoblastoma who were not given chemotherapy was only 2.3 months (p = 0.06). This suggests that retinoblastoma is a chemosensitive tumour and therefore adjuvant chemotherapy may have a role in children with retinoblastoma who at diagnosis are thought to be at high risk of developing metastatic disease. PMID:3587892

  18. Dietetic management in gastrointestinal complications from antimalignant chemotherapy.

    PubMed

    Calixto-Lima, L; Martins de Andrade, E; Gomes, A P; Geller, M; Siqueira-Batista, R

    2012-01-01

    Antineoplastic chemotherapy (CT) represents the systemic treatment of malignant tumors. It can be used alone or combined with surgery and / or radiotherapy. The cytotoxic agents used in chemotherapy work on both cancerous cells and noncancerous cells of the body, generally resulting in high toxicity. The biological aggressiveness of chemotherapy particularly affects rapidly replicating cells, such as those of the digestive tract, resulting in adverse effects that impair food intake, leading to compromised nutritional status and which may lead to cachexia. The main toxic effects of chemotherapy in the gastrointestinal tract include nausea, vomiting -these are the most frequent- constipation, diarrhea, xerostomia, mucositis, dysphagia and anorexia. Given the high frequency of such effects, nutritional intervention should be an integral part of cancer treatment, to maintain and/or improve the patient's nutritional status and reduce or minimize the side effects caused by treatment. Accordingly, the goal of this study is to review dietetic conduct in the process of caring for patients undergoing cancer chemotherapy.

  19. Case report: retinitis pigmentosa following cytotoxic chemotherapy in Usher's syndrome.

    PubMed

    Blanchet, P; Wellemeyer, M L; Burton, G V

    1992-05-01

    Ocular toxicity is an uncommon complication of cytotoxic chemotherapy. Retinitis pigmentosa complicating cancer chemotherapy has not been reported. A patient with probable Usher's syndrome (congenital sensorineural deafness) had apparent acceleration of retinitis pigmentosa with blindness following cytotoxic chemotherapy for non-Hodgkin's lymphoma. Retinitis pigmentosa, a feature of Usher's syndrome, usually develops as a slowly progressive process. The rapid acceleration of retinopathy following tumor therapy suggests a possible relationship to the cytotoxic chemotherapy. Lymphocytes and fibroblasts from patients with Usher's syndrome are hypersensitive to the x-ray type of DNA-damaging agents. The DNA-damaging effects of chemotherapy may have accelerated the progression of retinitis pigmentosa in this patient. PMID:1580321

  20. Update in Cancer Chemotherapy: Gastrointestinal Cancer—Colorectal Cancer, Part 2

    PubMed Central

    Wright, Jane C.

    1986-01-01

    An update of the state of the art of cancer chemotherapeutic treatment of gastrointestinal tract cancer is described in a multi-part series. Part 1 surveyed colorectal cancer and the use of single-agent chemotherapy in the April issue of the Journal. Part 2 of colorectal cancer will describe combination chemotherapy, preoperative and postoperative radiation, and combinations of chemotherapy and radiation, and adjuvant chemotherapy. In advanced gastrointestinal tract cancer, chemotherapy is only of palliative value with response rates generally under 50 percent and survival rates of several months to one year or more. Combination chemotherapy often produces higher response rates, yet there is no acceptable evidence that survival is improved. While some adjuvant chemotherapy trials suggest improvement, major survival gains remain to be demonstrated. Uncertainty as to the role of chemotherapy in the treatment of gastrointestinal cancers may be due to lack of data. PMID:3519988

  1. Tandem high-dose chemotherapy and autologous stem cell transplantation in patients with high-risk neuroblastoma: results of SMC NB-2004 study.

    PubMed

    Sung, K W; Son, M H; Lee, S H; Yoo, K H; Koo, H H; Kim, J Y; Cho, E J; Lee, S K; Choi, Y S; Lim, D H; Kim, J-S; Kim, D W

    2013-01-01

    From January 2004 to December 2008, 50 consecutive patients with high-risk neuroblastoma were assigned to receive tandem HDCT (high-dose chemotherapy)/auto-SCT after nine cycles of induction chemotherapy. CEC (carboplatin + etoposide + cyclophosphamide) regimen and TM (thiotepa + melphalan)-TBI regimen (or TM regimen for stage 3 patients) were the first and second HDCT regimens. Local radiotherapy, differentiation therapy with 13-cis-retinoid acid and immunotherapy with interleukin-2 were given after tandem HDCT/auto-SCT. Of the 50 patients, 49 underwent a first HDCT/auto-SCT and 47 underwent a second HDCT/auto-SCT. The tumor relapsed or progressed in 14 patients, secondary malignancy developed in one patient and one patient died from chronic lung disease. Therefore, 34 patients remained event free with a median follow-up of 54.5 months (range, 14-94 months) from diagnosis. The probabilities of 5-year OS and EFS for all 50 patients were 77.0% (95% confidence interval (CI), 63.7-90.3) and 71.4% (95% CI, 58.7-84.1), respectively. However, all patients who remained event free for >3 years after tandem HDCT/auto-SCT experienced late adverse effects. Chemotherapeutic dose-escalation strategy using tandem HDCT/auto-SCT was very encouraging for survival. However, further studies incorporating newer treatment modalities are needed to reduce late adverse effects without jeopardizing the survival rate.

  2. Improved survival rate in children with stage III and IV B cell non-Hodgkin's lymphoma and leukemia using multi-agent chemotherapy: results of a study of 114 children from the French Pediatric Oncology Society.

    PubMed

    Patte, C; Philip, T; Rodary, C; Bernard, A; Zucker, J M; Bernard, J L; Robert, A; Rialland, X; Benz-Lemoine, E; Demeocq, F

    1986-08-01

    Children with B cell non-Hodgkin's lymphoma who have not relapsed 1 year after diagnosis and treatment are generally cured. We report here the results of treatment in 114 children who all had a minimum follow-up of 20 months. The protocol LMB 0281 from the French Pediatric Oncology Society was used. This nine-drug intensive-pulsed chemotherapy was based on high-dose cyclophosphamide, high-dose methotrexate (HD MTX), and cytosine arabinoside (ara-C) in continuous infusion. CNS prophylaxis was with chemotherapy only. No local irradiation was performed. No debulking surgery was recommended. There were 72 patients with stage III lymphoma and 42 patients with stage IV lymphoma or B cell acute lymphocytic leukemia (B-ALL). Among those 42 patients, seven had CNS involvement alone, 21 had bone marrow alone, and 14 had both; 26 had greater than 25% blast cells in bone marrow, 14 of whom had blast cells in blood. The primary site of involvement was the abdomen in 90 patients, the Waldeyer Ring in nine, and various sites in eight; seven patients presented without tumor. Seventy-seven patients are alive with a median follow-up of 2 years and 8 months. Seven patients died due to initial treatment failure, 11 died from toxicity, and 19 died after relapse. Among the 93 patients without initial CNS involvement, only one isolated relapse in CNS occurred. Survival and disease-free survival rates reached 67% and 64%, respectively, for all patients, 75% and 73% for stage III patients and 54% and 48% for stage IV and B-ALL patients. Bone marrow involvement was not an adverse prognostic factor. Contrary initial CNS involvement indicated a bad prognosis with a disease-free survival rate of 19% compared with 76% without CNS disease. This study showed that CNS prophylaxis and local control of the primary tumor can be achieved by intensive chemotherapy alone, without radiotherapy or debulking surgery. PMID:3525767

  3. WE-D-BRE-04: Modeling Optimal Concurrent Chemotherapy Schedules

    SciTech Connect

    Jeong, J; Deasy, J O

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: Concurrent chemo-radiation therapy (CCRT) has become a more common cancer treatment option with a better tumor control rate for several tumor sites, including head and neck and lung cancer. In this work, possible optimal chemotherapy schedules were investigated by implementing chemotherapy cell-kill into a tumor response model of RT. Methods: The chemotherapy effect has been added into a published model (Jeong et al., PMB (2013) 58:4897), in which the tumor response to RT can be simulated with the effects of hypoxia and proliferation. Based on the two-compartment pharmacokinetic model, the temporal concentration of chemotherapy agent was estimated. Log cell-kill was assumed and the cell-kill constant was estimated from the observed increase in local control due to concurrent chemotherapy. For a simplified two cycle CCRT regime, several different starting times and intervals were simulated with conventional RT regime (2Gy/fx, 5fx/wk). The effectiveness of CCRT was evaluated in terms of reduction in radiation dose required for 50% of control to find the optimal chemotherapy schedule. Results: Assuming the typical slope of dose response curve (γ50=2), the observed 10% increase in local control rate was evaluated to be equivalent to an extra RT dose of about 4 Gy, from which the cell-kill rate of chemotherapy was derived to be about 0.35. Best response was obtained when chemotherapy was started at about 3 weeks after RT began. As the interval between two cycles decreases, the efficacy of chemotherapy increases with broader range of optimal starting times. Conclusion: The effect of chemotherapy has been implemented into the resource-conservation tumor response model to investigate CCRT. The results suggest that the concurrent chemotherapy might be more effective when delayed for about 3 weeks, due to lower tumor burden and a larger fraction of proliferating cells after reoxygenation.

  4. [Principles of managing chemotherapy-induced nausea and vomiting].

    PubMed

    Takiuchi, Hiroya; Kawabe, Shinichiro; Goto, Masahiro; Ota, Syunsuke; Kii, Takayuki; Tanaka, Toshimitsu; Nishitani, Hitoshi; Kuwakado, Shin; Katsu, Ken-ichi

    2006-01-01

    Chemotherapy-induced nausea and vomiting (emesis) can significantly affect a patient's quality of life, leading to poor compliance with further chemotherapy treatment. For patients treated with emetogenic chemotherapy, it is very important to prevent nausea and vomiting completely. The incidence and severity of nausea and/or vomiting in patients receiving chemotherapy are affected by numerous factors, including: 1) the specific chemotherapeutic agents used; 2) their dosage; 3) the schedule and route of administration; and 4) individual patient variability. Approximately 70 to 80% of all cancer patients receiving chemotherapy experience emesis, whereas 10% to 44% experience anticipatory emesis. The following general principles are recommended. 1) A 5-HT3 receptor antagonist should be administered prior to each day's 1st dose of moderately or highly emetogenic chemotherapy. 2) Dexamethasone should be administered once daily either orally or intravenously for every day of moderately or highly-emetogenic chemotherapy and for 2-3 days after chemotherapy for regimens that are likely to cause significant delayed-emesis. 3) The most effective way to treat anticipatory nausea and/or vomiting is to prevent it by using optimal antiemetic therapy during every cycle of treatment.

  5. Circumventing Tumor Resistance to Chemotherapy by Nanotechnology

    PubMed Central

    Liang, Xing-Jie; Chen, Chunying; Zhao, Yuliang; Wang, Paul C.

    2011-01-01

    Patient relapse and metastasis of malignant cells is very common after standard cancer treatment with surgery, radiation, and/or chemotherapy. Chemotherapy, a cornerstone in the development of present day cancer therapy, is one of the most effective and potent strategies to treat malignant tumors. However, the resistance of cancer cells to the drugs remains a significant impediment to successful chemotherapy. An additional obstacle is the inability of chemotherapeutic drugs to selectively target tumor cells. Almost all the anticancer agents have severe side effects on normal tissues and organs. The toxicity of currently available anticancer drugs and the inefficiency of chemotherapeutic treatments, especially for advanced stages of the disease, have limited the optimization of clinical drug combinations and effective chemotherapeutic protocols. Nanomedicine allows the release of drugs by biodegradation and self-regulation of nanomaterials in vitro and in vivo. Nanotechnologies are characterized by effective drug encapsulation, controllable self-assembly, specificity and biocompatibility as a result of their own material properties. Nanotechnology has the potential to overcome current chemotherapeutic barriers in cancer treatment, because of the unique nanoscale size and distinctive bioeffects of nanomaterials. Nanotechnology may help to solve the problems associated with traditional chemotherapy and multidrug resistance. PMID:19949937

  6. The curability of advanced cancers with chemotherapy.

    PubMed

    Boh-Seng, Y

    1981-07-01

    The tremendous progress that has been made in the chemotherapy of malignant diseases since the early 1950's has enabled the cure of a significant number of cancers such as chloriocarcinoma, Burkitt's lymphoma, Hodgkin's disease, non-Hodgkin's lymphoma, the acute leukaemias, testicular carcinoma, and many childhood cancers such as rhabdomyosarcoma, Wilm's tumor, Ewing's sarcoma, ovarian cancer, and retinoblastoma. As a result, the mortality from cancers has dropped by 15% for persons under the age of 45 years and even more for those under 30 years of age. Many other metastatic cancers can now be successfully controlled with chemotherapy and, ultimately, more will be added to the growing list of curable cancers. The chemotherapeutic agents responsible for the cures of some cancers include asparaginase, actinomycin D, Adriamycin, bleomycin, cisplatin, cyclophosphamide, cytosine arabinoside, 5-fluorouracil, 6-mercaptopurine, methotrexate, nitrogen mustard, prednisone, procarbazine, and vincristine. The discovery of new effective drugs such as AMSA and anthracenedione promises to improve the success rates obtained with present therapy. Chemotherapy is indicated for every patient who has metastatic cancer, since virtually every patient can receive some palliation from such therapy, while for some patients chemotherapy holds the promise of prolongation of life or even cure.

  7. Chemotherapy-Induced Cardiotoxicity: Overview of the Roles of Oxidative Stress

    PubMed Central

    Angsutararux, Paweorn; Luanpitpong, Sudjit; Issaragrisil, Surapol

    2015-01-01

    Chemotherapy-induced cardiotoxicity is a serious complication that poses a serious threat to life and limits the clinical use of various chemotherapeutic agents, particularly the anthracyclines. Understanding molecular mechanisms of chemotherapy-induced cardiotoxicity is a key to effective preventive strategies and improved chemotherapy regimen. Although no reliable and effective preventive treatment has become available, numerous evidence demonstrates that chemotherapy-induced cardiotoxicity involves the generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS). This review provides an overview of the roles of oxidative stress in chemotherapy-induced cardiotoxicity using doxorubicin, which is one of the most effective chemotherapeutic agents against a wide range of cancers, as an example. Current understanding in the molecular mechanisms of ROS-mediated cardiotoxicity will be explored and discussed, with emphasis on cardiomyocyte apoptosis leading to cardiomyopathy. The review will conclude with perspectives on model development needed to facilitate further progress and understanding on chemotherapy-induced cardiotoxicity. PMID:26491536

  8. An overview of randomised controlled trials of adjuvant chemotherapy in head and neck cancer.

    PubMed Central

    Munro, A. J.

    1995-01-01

    Meta-analysis of the published results from 54 randomised controlled trials of adjuvant chemotherapy in head and neck cancer suggests that chemotherapy might increase absolute survival by 6.5% (95% confidence interval 3.1-9.9%). The odds ratio in favour of chemotherapy is 1.37 (95% confidence interval 1.24-1.5). Single-agent chemotherapy given synchronously with radiotherapy increased survival by 12.1% (95% confidence interval 5-19%). The benefit from neoadjuvant chemotherapy was less: a rate difference of 3.7% (95% confidence interval 0.9-6.5%). The results suggest that the investigation of optimal agents and scheduling for synchronous radiotherapy and chemotherapy might still be important in clinical trials in head and neck cancer. PMID:7819055

  9. [INTRAVENOUS CHEMOTHERAPY VERSUS INTRAPERITONEAL CHEMOTHERAPY IN ADVANCED OVARIAN CANCER: UPDATE ON THE SITUATION WORLDWIDE AND IN ISRAEL].

    PubMed

    Binyamin, Sivan; Segev, Yakir; Auslender, Ron; Bitterman, Arie; Lavie, Ofer

    2015-09-01

    Ovarian cancer is the second in incidence and the first cause of death. As much as 70% of ovarian cancer patients are diagnosed with advanced disease. The standard treatment of advanced ovarian cancer is a combination of primary optimal debulking (POD) followed by a combined adjuvant chemotherapy treatment. Another optional treatment includes neoadjuvant chemotherapy followed by optimal debulking and then adjuvant chemotherapy. The common adjuvant chemotherapy includes a combination of platinum and taxol compounds given intravenously. Other possible treatments which had been evaluated in the past decades include a combination of chemotherapy given intravenously and intraperitoneally. The rationale behind delivering the chemotherapy intraperitoneally is to provide a much higher concentrations of cytotoxic agents in the peritoneal cavity and to reduce the systemic side effects. A number of randomized trials have shown that the combination of IV and IP chemotherapy entails a survival advantage. Most studies included treatment based on cisplatin treatments with/ without taxol given intravenously versus a combined treatment (intravenously and intraperitoneally) of those agents. An advantage of up to 8 months in disease-free survival and 11 months in overall survival was noted in the IP group. On the other hand, this treatment led to a higher rate of side effects, including abdominal pain, electrolyte imbalance and catheter related complications. Despite the inconsistency in the treatment protocols between the different trials comparing intravenous and intra-peritoneal treatment, one cannot ignore the statistical significance between the groups, for disease-free survival and overall survival. That is why, when addressing patients who completed optimal surgery, one needs to conduct a thorough evaluation regarding the complementary chemotherapy treatment. Due to the broad side effect profile, special notice should be taken as to the patient's age, medical history, and

  10. Treatment-induced cell cycle kinetics dictate tumor response to chemotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Hallett, Robin M.; Huang, Cheng; Motazedian, Ali; Auf der Mauer, Stefanie; Pond, Gregory R.; Hassell, John A.; Nordon, Robert E.; Draper, Jonathan S.

    2015-01-01

    Chemotherapy fails to provide durable cure for the majority of cancer patients. To identify mechanisms associated with chemotherapy resistance, we identified genes differentially expressed before and after chemotherapeutic treatment of breast cancer patients. Treatment response resulted in either increased or decreased cell cycle gene expression. Tumors in which cell cycle gene expression was increased by chemotherapy were likely to be chemotherapy sensitive, whereas tumors in which cell cycle gene transcripts were decreased by chemotherapy were resistant to these agents. A gene expression signature that predicted these changes proved to be a robust and novel index that predicted the response of patients with breast, ovarian, and colon tumors to chemotherapy. Investigations in tumor cell lines supported these findings, and linked treatment induced cell cycle changes with p53 signaling and G1/G0 arrest. Hence, chemotherapy resistance, which can be predicted based on dynamics in cell cycle gene expression, is associated with TP53 integrity. PMID:25749523

  11. High pre-transplant serum ferritin and busulfan-thiotepa conditioning regimen as risk factors for hepatic sinusoidal obstructive syndrome after autologous stem cell transplantation in patients with malignant lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Hwang, Doh Yu; Kim, Soo-Jeong; Cheong, June-Won; Kim, Yundeok; Jang, Ji Eun; Lee, Jung Yeon; Min, Yoo Hong; Yang, Woo Ick; Kim, Jin Seok

    2016-01-01

    Few studies have evaluated the risk factors for hepatic sinusoidal obstructive syndrome (SOS) in patients with malignant lymphoma receiving autologous stem cell transplantation (ASCT). We retrospectively analyzed 132 malignant lymphoma patients who underwent ASCT. Intravenous busulfan-based conditioning regimens were used in 108 (81.8%) patients. The combination of heparin and ursodeoxycholic acid was used for prophylaxis of SOS. Hepatic SOS was developed in 10 (7.6%) patients at a median of 30 days post-ASCT. In nine (90.0%) patients, SOS was diagnosed after 20 days post-ASCT. Two patients developed severe SOS and eventually died from multiple organ failure. In multivariate analysis, the use of the busulfan-thiotepa conditioning regimen (p = 0.003) and a high pre-transplant serum ferritin level (≥ 950 ng/mL) (p = 0.003) were risk factors for hepatic SOS. The evaluation of pre-transplant serum ferritin may be helpful in determining the most appropriate conditioning regimen with a lower risk of SOS.

  12. Using Epigenetic Therapy to Overcome Chemotherapy Resistance.

    PubMed

    Strauss, Julius; Figg, William D

    2016-01-01

    It has been known for decades that as cancer progresses, tumors develop genetic alterations, making them highly prone to developing resistance to therapies. Classically, it has been thought that these acquired genetic changes are fixed. This has led to the paradigm of moving from one cancer therapy to the next while avoiding past therapies. However, emerging data on epigenetic changes during tumor progression and use of epigenetic therapies have shown that epigenetic modifications leading to chemotherapy resistance have the potential to be reversible with epigenetic therapy. In fact, promising clinical data exist that treatment with epigenetic agents can diminish chemotherapy resistance in a number of tumor types including chronic myelogenous leukemia, colorectal, ovarian, lung and breast cancer. The potential for epigenetic-modifying drugs to allow for treatment of resistant disease is exciting and clinical trials have just begun to evaluate this area.

  13. Chemotherapy for Advanced Non-small Cell Lung Cancer.

    PubMed

    Dietrich, Martin F; Gerber, David E

    2016-01-01

    Non-small cell lung cancer has seen an unprecedented augmentation of therapeutic options over the last couple of years. Improved understanding of molecular drivers and the role of the immune system in cancer therapy have brought new drugs to the armamentarium. Despite these advances, cytotoxic chemotherapy remains a substantial part of therapy for most patients in locally advanced and metastatic stage. Initially thought to be a chemotherapy-resistant entity, meta-analyses in the mid-1990s demonstrated modest efficacy of platinum-based therapy. Further combination trials demonstrated enhanced efficacy for several regimen in first and second lines, including the introduction of antimetabolites, taxanes, and anti-angiogenic agents. Maintenance chemotherapy has been another novel, successful approach for management of metastatic disease. Herein, we summarize the current concepts of chemotherapy, its applicability to the different histologies, and novel concepts of therapy. PMID:27535392

  14. Chemotherapy of prostate cancer: present and future.

    PubMed

    Trump, Donald; Lau, Yiu-Keung

    2003-06-01

    The role of chemotherapy in prostate cancer continues to evolve. In men with symptomatic androgen-independent prostate cancer, significant reduction in pain and analgesic requirements are achievable with mitoxantrone and glucocorticoid combinations compared with glucocorticoids alone. However, survival rates are not improved. Taxane-based combinations with estramustine phosphate or other new agents show promise. Prostate-specific antigen response rates with these combinations appear to be 1.5 to 2 times more frequent than with mitoxantrone-based combinations. Randomized trials of taxane versus mitoxantrone-based therapies are underway. New agents and applications of current agents in adjuvant settings should be explored if survival in men with prostate cancer is to be improved. PMID:12756087

  15. Chemotherapy of prostate cancer: present and future.

    PubMed

    Trump, Donald; Lau, Yiu-Keung

    2003-06-01

    The role of chemotherapy in prostate cancer continues to evolve. In men with symptomatic androgen-independent prostate cancer, significant reduction in pain and analgesic requirements are achievable with mitoxantrone and glucocorticoid combinations compared with glucocorticoids alone. However, survival rates are not improved. Taxane-based combinations with estramustine phosphate or other new agents show promise. Prostate-specific antigen response rates with these combinations appear to be 1.5 to 2 times more frequent than with mitoxantrone-based combinations. Randomized trials of taxane versus mitoxantrone-based therapies are underway. New agents and applications of current agents in adjuvant settings should be explored if survival in men with prostate cancer is to be improved.

  16. Interaction of hyperthermia and cytotoxic agents

    SciTech Connect

    Roizin-Towle, R.; Hall, E.J.; Capuano, L.

    1980-01-01

    Chinese hamster V79 cells in culture were used to investigate the temperature dependence of the cytotoxic action of 4 widely used chemotherapy agents, i.e., adriamycin, bleomycin, cis-platinum(II) diamminedichloride, and N-(phosphonacetyl)-L-aspartate. Cells were exposed to graded doses of each drug for 1 hour at a range of temperatures. Bleomycin showed the largest temperature dependence and N-(phosphonacetyl)-L-aspartate the least, with adriamycin and cis-platinum(II) diamminedichloride between the two extremes. The results presented demonstrated significant differences in the cytotoxicities of chemotherapy agents and their interactions with heat. The idea of combining localized hyperthermia with some chemotherapy agents allowed a targeting of the chemotherapy not otherwise possible.

  17. Chemotherapy for cholangiocarcinoma: An update.

    PubMed

    Ramírez-Merino, Natalia; Aix, Santiago Ponce; Cortés-Funes, Hernán

    2013-07-15

    tumor effects. Nowadays, no neoadjuvant therapy can be considered a standard approach for the treatment of patients with cholangiocarcinoma. There are promising results and randomized trials are needed in patients with a metastatic cholangiocarcinoma. In systemic therapy, no single drug or combination has consistently increased median survival beyond the expected 8-12 mo. It is always recommended that patients enrol in clinical trials. Clinical trials have shown that the more standard chemotherapy for a first line regimen of gemcitabine plus cisplatin (or oxaliplatin as a potentially better tolerated agent) is superior to gemcitabine alone. Leucovorin-modulated 5-fluorouracil, capecitabine monotherapy or single agent gemcitabine are reasonable options for patients with a borderline performance status. After progression in patients with an adequate performance status, active regimens that could be considered include gemcitabine plus capecitabine, or erlotinib plus bevacizumab, for second line treatment.

  18. Chemotherapy for cholangiocarcinoma: An update

    PubMed Central

    Ramírez-Merino, Natalia; Aix, Santiago Ponce; Cortés-Funes, Hernán

    2013-01-01

    tumor effects. Nowadays, no neoadjuvant therapy can be considered a standard approach for the treatment of patients with cholangiocarcinoma. There are promising results and randomized trials are needed in patients with a metastatic cholangiocarcinoma. In systemic therapy, no single drug or combination has consistently increased median survival beyond the expected 8-12 mo. It is always recommended that patients enrol in clinical trials. Clinical trials have shown that the more standard chemotherapy for a first line regimen of gemcitabine plus cisplatin (or oxaliplatin as a potentially better tolerated agent) is superior to gemcitabine alone. Leucovorin-modulated 5-fluorouracil, capecitabine monotherapy or single agent gemcitabine are reasonable options for patients with a borderline performance status. After progression in patients with an adequate performance status, active regimens that could be considered include gemcitabine plus capecitabine, or erlotinib plus bevacizumab, for second line treatment. PMID:23919111

  19. Comparison of Intensive Chemotherapy and Hypomethylating Agents before Allogeneic Stem Cell Transplantation for Advanced Myelodysplastic Syndromes: A Study of the Myelodysplastic Syndrome Subcommittee of the Chronic Malignancies Working Party of the European Society for Blood and Marrow Transplant Research.

    PubMed

    Potter, Victoria T; Iacobelli, Simona; van Biezen, Anja; Maertens, Johann; Bourhis, Jean-Henri; Passweg, Jakob R; Yakhoub-Agha, Ibrahim; Tabrizi, Reza; Bay, Jacques-Olivier; Chevallier, Patrice; Chalandon, Yves; Huynh, Anne; Cahn, Jean Yves; Ljungman, Per; Craddock, Charles; Lenhoff, Stig; Russell, N H; Fegueux, Nathalie; Socié, Gerard; Benedetto, Bruno; Meijer, Ellen; Mufti, G J; de Witte, Theo; Robin, Marie; Kröger, Nicolaus

    2016-09-01

    The European Society for Blood and Marrow Transplant Research data set was used to retrospectively analyze the outcomes of hypomethylating therapy (HMA) compared with those of conventional chemotherapy (CC) before hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) in 209 patients with advanced myelodysplastic syndromes. Median follow-up was 22.1 months and the median age of the group was 57.6 years with 37% of the population older than > 60 years. The majority of patients (59%) received reduced-intensity conditioning and 34% and 27% had intermediate-2 and high international prognostic scoring system (IPSS) scores. At time of HSCT, 32% of patients did not achieve complete remission (CR) and 13% had primary refractory disease. On univariate analysis, outcomes at 3 years were not significantly different between HMA and CC for overall survival (OS), relapse-free survival (RFS), cumulative incidence of relapse (CIR), and nonrelapse mortality (NRM): OS (42% versus 35%), RFS (29% versus 31%), CIR (45% versus 40%), and NRM (26% versus 28%). Comparing characteristics of the groups, there were more patients < 55 years old, more patients in CR (68% versus 32%), and fewer patients with primary refractory disease in the CC group than in the HMA group (10% versus 19%, P < .001). Patients with primary refractory disease had worse outcomes than those in CR with regard to OS (hazard ratio [HR], 2.42; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.41 to 4.13; P = .001), RFS (HR, 2.27; 95% CI, 1.37 to 3.76; P = .001), and NRM (HR, 2.49; 95% CI, 1.18 to 5.26; P = .016). In addition, an adverse effect of IPSS-R cytogenetic risk group was evident for RFS. In summary, outcomes after HSCT are similar for patients receiving HMA compared with those receiving CC, despite the higher proportion of patients with primary refractory disease in the HMA group. PMID:27264633

  20. Comparison of Intensive Chemotherapy and Hypomethylating Agents before Allogeneic Stem Cell Transplantation for Advanced Myelodysplastic Syndromes: A Study of the Myelodysplastic Syndrome Subcommittee of the Chronic Malignancies Working Party of the European Society for Blood and Marrow Transplant Research.

    PubMed

    Potter, Victoria T; Iacobelli, Simona; van Biezen, Anja; Maertens, Johann; Bourhis, Jean-Henri; Passweg, Jakob R; Yakhoub-Agha, Ibrahim; Tabrizi, Reza; Bay, Jacques-Olivier; Chevallier, Patrice; Chalandon, Yves; Huynh, Anne; Cahn, Jean Yves; Ljungman, Per; Craddock, Charles; Lenhoff, Stig; Russell, N H; Fegueux, Nathalie; Socié, Gerard; Benedetto, Bruno; Meijer, Ellen; Mufti, G J; de Witte, Theo; Robin, Marie; Kröger, Nicolaus

    2016-09-01

    The European Society for Blood and Marrow Transplant Research data set was used to retrospectively analyze the outcomes of hypomethylating therapy (HMA) compared with those of conventional chemotherapy (CC) before hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) in 209 patients with advanced myelodysplastic syndromes. Median follow-up was 22.1 months and the median age of the group was 57.6 years with 37% of the population older than > 60 years. The majority of patients (59%) received reduced-intensity conditioning and 34% and 27% had intermediate-2 and high international prognostic scoring system (IPSS) scores. At time of HSCT, 32% of patients did not achieve complete remission (CR) and 13% had primary refractory disease. On univariate analysis, outcomes at 3 years were not significantly different between HMA and CC for overall survival (OS), relapse-free survival (RFS), cumulative incidence of relapse (CIR), and nonrelapse mortality (NRM): OS (42% versus 35%), RFS (29% versus 31%), CIR (45% versus 40%), and NRM (26% versus 28%). Comparing characteristics of the groups, there were more patients < 55 years old, more patients in CR (68% versus 32%), and fewer patients with primary refractory disease in the CC group than in the HMA group (10% versus 19%, P < .001). Patients with primary refractory disease had worse outcomes than those in CR with regard to OS (hazard ratio [HR], 2.42; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.41 to 4.13; P = .001), RFS (HR, 2.27; 95% CI, 1.37 to 3.76; P = .001), and NRM (HR, 2.49; 95% CI, 1.18 to 5.26; P = .016). In addition, an adverse effect of IPSS-R cytogenetic risk group was evident for RFS. In summary, outcomes after HSCT are similar for patients receiving HMA compared with those receiving CC, despite the higher proportion of patients with primary refractory disease in the HMA group.

  1. Protection of ovarian function during chemotherapy for ovarian cancer.

    PubMed

    Tianmin, X; Weiqin, C; Shuying, W; Yang, L; Manhua, C

    2014-01-01

    The protection of ovarian function during chemotherapy is an urgent issue to be resolved after the fertility preserving surgery on patients with ovarian cancer. The paper summarizes and analyzes the research progress on the protective measures in the aspects of gonadotropin releasing hormone analogue (GnRHa), cell protecting agents, and traditional Chinese medical science and drugs.

  2. R-MPV followed by high-dose chemotherapy with TBC and autologous stem-cell transplant for newly diagnosed primary CNS lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Omuro, Antonio; Correa, Denise D; DeAngelis, Lisa M; Moskowitz, Craig H; Matasar, Matthew J; Kaley, Thomas J; Gavrilovic, Igor T; Nolan, Craig; Pentsova, Elena; Grommes, Christian C; Panageas, Katherine S; Baser, Raymond E; Faivre, Geraldine; Abrey, Lauren E; Sauter, Craig S

    2015-02-26

    High-dose methotrexate-based chemotherapy is the mainstay of treatment of primary central nervous system lymphoma (PCNSL), but relapses remain frequent. High-dose chemotherapy (HDC) with autologous stem-cell transplant (ASCT) may provide an alternative to address chemoresistance and overcome the blood-brain barrier. In this single-center phase-2 study, newly diagnosed PCNSL patients received 5 to 7 cycles of chemotherapy with rituximab, methotrexate (3.5 g/m(2)), procarbazine, and vincristine (R-MPV). Those with a complete or partial response proceeded with consolidation HDC with thiotepa, cyclophosphamide, and busulfan, followed by ASCT and no radiotherapy. Primary end point was 1-year progression-free survival (PFS), N = 32. Median age was 57, and median Karnofsky performance status 80. Following R-MPV, objective response rate was 97%, and 26 (81%) patients proceeded with HDC-ASCT. Among all patients, median PFS and overall survival (OS) were not reached (median follow-up: 45 months). Two-year PFS was 79% (95% confidence interval [CI], 58-90), with no events observed beyond 2 years. Two-year OS was 81% (95% CI, 63-91). In transplanted patients, 2-year PFS and OS were 81%. There were 3 treatment-related deaths. Prospective neuropsychological evaluations suggested relatively stable cognitive functions posttransplant. In conclusion, this treatment was associated with excellent disease control and survival, an acceptable toxicity profile, and no evidence of neurotoxicity thus far. This trial was registered at www.clinicaltrials.gov as NCT00596154.

  3. Selection of chemotherapy for non-small cell lung cancer is facilitated by new therapeutic strategies

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Zhehai

    2014-01-01

    Nowadays, advanced non-small cell lung cancer is still an incurable disease. Recent researches have led to considerable progress in the treatment of non-small cell lung cancer. This article reviews the main studies on chemotherapy on non-small cell lung cancer and discusses the new therapeutic strategies available to date. Stable disease (SD) is necessary in chemotherapy for tumor. The proportion of population with responders or SD basically maintained similar regardless of regimens. The overall survival after chemotherapy for patients with SD was lower than patients with responders, and higher than patients with progressive disease. Greater benefits could be achieved in patients with effective induction chemotherapy using chemotherapeutic agents for maintenance therapy, whereas the benefits were relatively small for patients with SD. It has been found that epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) mutation status had certain correlation with the efficacy of chemotherapy. First-line chemotherapy has shown advantages in effective rate and progression free survival on EGFR mutant. EGFR mutation produced significant effects on the efficacy of postoperative adjuvant chemotherapy. Patients with EGFR mutation had a higher effective rate than wild-type EGFR patients, and patients with responders had a greater benefit in progression free survival from maintenance therapy. However, it is still necessary to carry out more careful and deeper studies and analyses on traditional cytotoxic chemotherapy, to further optimize cytotoxic chemotherapy and to use molecular targeted agents with different mechanisms. PMID:25550891

  4. Systemic Treatment Safety Symposium 2014: Oral Chemotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Simanovski, V.; Kaizer, L.; Wright, M.; Rae, E.; Ahmad, N.; Creber, K.; Green, E.; Vu, K.; Kukreti, V.; Krzyzanowska, M.K.

    2014-01-01

    The second Systemic Treatment Safety Symposium, which took place February 21, 2014, in Toronto, aimed to identify opportunities for improving the delivery of systemic cancer treatment in Ontario based on regional needs, while providing a venue for collaboration and knowledge-sharing. The agenda included a series of panel sessions followed by discussions, presentations of regional improvement projects and results, and breakout sessions. Based on the discussion that took place at the symposium, a provincial goal of zero handwritten or verbal oral chemotherapy orders by June 30, 2015, has now been established, and regions will be provided with funding for safe prescribing initiatives to support achievement of that aim. Building on the lessons learned from the 2014 System Treatment Safety Symposium, a common measurement strategy will be identified, and Cancer Care Ontario (cco) will also support the work by identifying the recommended key elements of a safe oral chemotherapy prescription. Additionally, cco will identify areas for improving systemic treatment computerized prescriber order entry systems to better enable prescribing of oral agents within such systems. Among the most prominent of the lessons learned during the symposium was the importance of having a focused topic (such as oral chemotherapy) while maintaining a province-wide scope. Another significant takeaway was that attendees appreciate the opportunity to hear from colleagues across the province about the work underway in various regions. Future safety symposia will also explore opportunities for enhanced engagement with participants through greater use of technology.

  5. Etravirine: a good option for concomitant use with chemotherapy for Hodgkin's lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Kurz, Mario; Stoeckle, Marcel; Krasniqi, Fatime; Battegay, Manuel; Marzolini, Catia

    2015-03-01

    The treatment of malignancies in HIV patients is challenged by the issue of drug-drug interactions between antiretroviral therapy and antineoplastic agents. While protease inhibitors have been shown to increase the incidence and severity of cancer therapy-related side effects, the impact of other antiretroviral agents on the tolerability and response to chemotherapy is less well documented. We report the successful use of an etravirine-based regimen in a patient treated with BEACOPP chemotherapy for advanced Hodgkin's lymphoma. Etravirine constitutes a valuable option for concomitant use with chemotherapy due to its moderate inducing effect on drug metabolising enzymes.

  6. High-dose chemotherapy with autologous hematopoietic stem-cell rescue for pediatric brain tumor patients: a single institution experience from UCLA.

    PubMed

    Panosyan, Eduard H; Ikeda, Alan K; Chang, Vivian Y; Laks, Dan R; Reeb, Charles L; Bowles, La Vette; Lasky, Joseph L; Moore, Theodore B

    2011-01-01

    Background. Dose-dependent response makes certain pediatric brain tumors appropriate targets for high-dose chemotherapy with autologous hematopoietic stem-cell rescue (HDCT-AHSCR). Methods. The clinical outcomes and toxicities were analyzed retrospectively for 18 consecutive patients ≤19 y/o treated with HDCT-AHSCR at UCLA (1999-2009). Results. Patients' median age was 2.3 years. Fourteen had primary and 4 recurrent tumors: 12 neural/embryonal (7 medulloblastomas, 4 primitive neuroectodermal tumors, and a pineoblastoma), 3 glial/mixed, and 3 germ cell tumors. Eight patients had initial gross-total and seven subtotal resections. HDCT mostly consisted of carboplatin and/or thiotepa ± etoposide (n = 16). Nine patients underwent a single AHSCR and nine ≥3 tandems. Three-year progression-free and overall survival probabilities were 60.5% ± 16 and 69.3% ± 11.5. Ten patients with pre-AHSCR complete remissions were alive/disease-free, whereas 5 of 8 with measurable disease were deceased (median followup: 2.3 yrs). Nine of 13 survivors avoided radiation. Single AHSCR regimens had greater toxicity than ≥3 AHSCR (P < .01). Conclusion. HDCT-AHSCR has a definitive, though limited role for selected pediatric brain tumors with poor prognosis and pretransplant complete/partial remissions. PMID:21559259

  7. High-Dose Chemotherapy with Autologous Hematopoietic Stem-Cell Rescue for Pediatric Brain Tumor Patients: A Single Institution Experience from UCLA

    PubMed Central

    Panosyan, Eduard H.; Ikeda, Alan K.; Chang, Vivian Y.; Laks, Dan R.; Reeb, Charles L.; Bowles, La Vette; Lasky, Joseph L.; Moore, Theodore B.

    2011-01-01

    Background. Dose-dependent response makes certain pediatric brain tumors appropriate targets for high-dose chemotherapy with autologous hematopoietic stem-cell rescue (HDCT-AHSCR). Methods. The clinical outcomes and toxicities were analyzed retrospectively for 18 consecutive patients ≤19 y/o treated with HDCT-AHSCR at UCLA (1999–2009). Results. Patients' median age was 2.3 years. Fourteen had primary and 4 recurrent tumors: 12 neural/embryonal (7 medulloblastomas, 4 primitive neuroectodermal tumors, and a pineoblastoma), 3 glial/mixed, and 3 germ cell tumors. Eight patients had initial gross-total and seven subtotal resections. HDCT mostly consisted of carboplatin and/or thiotepa ± etoposide (n = 16). Nine patients underwent a single AHSCR and nine ≥3 tandems. Three-year progression-free and overall survival probabilities were 60.5% ± 16 and 69.3% ± 11.5. Ten patients with pre-AHSCR complete remissions were alive/disease-free, whereas 5 of 8 with measurable disease were deceased (median followup: 2.3 yrs). Nine of 13 survivors avoided radiation. Single AHSCR regimens had greater toxicity than ≥3 AHSCR (P < .01). Conclusion. HDCT-AHSCR has a definitive, though limited role for selected pediatric brain tumors with poor prognosis and pretransplant complete/partial remissions. PMID:21559259

  8. High-dose chemotherapy for high-risk retinoblastoma: clinical course and outcome of 14 cases in the National Cancer Center, Japan.

    PubMed

    Yasui, N; Kawamoto, H; Fujiwara, M; Aihara, Y; Ogawa, C; Hosono, A; Suzuki, S

    2015-02-01

    The prognosis of high-risk retinoblastoma (RB) with extraocular disease, relapse, or invasion of the cut end of the optic nerve is extremely poor. Following the discontinuation of thiotepa production in Japan, BU- and melphalan (Mel)-based regimens have been used, followed by the standard treatment for neuroblastoma. This study retrospectively analyzed 14 high-risk RB patients who underwent high-dose chemotherapy (HDC) and hematopoietic SCT; 8 received a BU/Mel conditioning regimen and 6 received other regimens. The disease status at HDC was relapse in 8 patients and extraocular involvement in 5. All patients received peripheral blood stem cell infusion >1.5 × 10(6)/kg. Engraftment occurred within a median of 11 days (BU/Mel: 10-13, others: 9-13). Primary toxicities included mucositis (⩾grade 3) in 9 patients (4 with BU/Mel, 5 with others). Veno-occlusive disease (VOD) occurred in two 1-year-old patients in the BU/Mel group. There were no treatment-related deaths. Of 4 (2 with BU/Mel, 2 with others) patients with central nervous system (CNS) relapse after HDC, 3 died. In conclusion, the BU/Mel regimen may be feasible for high-risk RB under careful monitoring for VOD, particularly in younger patients. CNS relapse associated with a lethal prognosis occurred after all regimens; therefore, further evaluation of HDC efficacy for high-risk RB is required.

  9. Chemotherapy following radium‐223 dichloride treatment in ALSYMPCA

    PubMed Central

    Hoskin, Peter; Coleman, Robert E.; Nilsson, Sten; Vogelzang, Nicholas J.; Petrenciuc, Oana; Staudacher, Karin; Thuresson, Marcus; Parker, Christopher

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND Radium‐223 prolongs overall survival in patients with castration‐resistant prostate cancer (CRPC) and symptomatic bone metastases, regardless of prior docetaxel. Whether or not chemotherapy can be safely administered following radium‐223 treatment is of clinical importance. An exploratory analysis of prospectively collected data, from the ALSYMPCA (ALpharadin in SYMptomatic Prostate CAncer) patient subgroup who received chemotherapy after radium‐223 or placebo treatment, was conducted to evaluate the safety and efficacy of chemotherapy following radium‐223. METHODS In ALSYMPCA, CRPC patients with symptomatic bone metastases and no visceral metastases were randomized 2:1 to receive six injections of radium‐223 (50 kBq/kg IV) or placebo plus best standard of care, stratified by prior docetaxel, baseline alkaline phosphatase, and current bisphosphonate use. In this exploratory analysis, chemotherapy agents administered following study treatment were identified; timing and duration were calculated. Hematologic safety was reviewed, and overall survival analyzed. RESULTS Overall, 142 radium‐223 and 64 placebo patients received subsequent chemotherapy; most common were docetaxel (70% radium‐223, 72% placebo) and mitoxantrone (16% radium‐223, 20% placebo). The majority of patients (61% radium‐223, 58% placebo) had received prior docetaxel. Radium‐223 patients started subsequent chemotherapy later than placebo patients; chemotherapy duration was similar between groups. In radium‐223 and placebo patients receiving subsequent chemotherapy, median hematologic values (hemoglobin, neutrophils, and platelets) remained nearly constant up to 18 months following start of chemotherapy, regardless of prior docetaxel treatment. A low percentage of patients in both groups had grades 3–4 hematologic values (<10%). Platelet count decline, from last measurement before chemotherapy, was numerically greater in radium‐223 versus placebo patients. Median

  10. Chemotherapy for gliomas in mainland China: An overview

    PubMed Central

    SAI, KE; YANG, QUN-YING; SHEN, DONG; CHEN, ZHONG-PING

    2013-01-01

    Chemotherapy is currently the standard treatment modality for malignant gliomas. Many patients with gliomas are treated in mainland China every year. The history and development of chemotherapy for glioma, however, are not well documented. In this study, an extensive literature search of Pubmed and major Chinese electronic databases was performed to identify clinical studies. A total of 210 publications were identified, with a total of 10,105 patients. Among these studies, 76.2% were retrospective and 23.8% were prospective. Chemotherapy was found to have been administered by the Department of Neurosurgery in 143 studies (68.1%). Oral or intravenous administration was found in 55.7% of studies, followed by intra-arterial (26.7%) and interstitial (15.7%) chemotherapy. Nitrosoureas were the most frequently used chemotherapeutic agents, as found in 133 studies (63.3%). Since 2003, 56 studies on temozolomide (TMZ) have been published. Studies on chemotherapy for gliomas began in the 1970s in mainland China but well-designed randomized controlled trials (RCTs) are rare. Much effort and collaboration should be made to carry out high-quality multicenter RCTs on chemotherapy for gliomas. PMID:23761809

  11. Pharmacogenetics in cancer chemotherapy: balancing toxicity and response.

    PubMed

    Donnelly, James G

    2004-04-01

    The goal of chemotherapy is the elimination of tumor cells from the host. This is achieved by the use of therapeutic agents that are often more harmful to normal tissues than to the targeted tumor. Many chemotherapeutic agents are designed to damage cell replication machinery either directly at the level of DNA or indirectly, by inhibiting enzymes involved with DNA repair and synthesis. Novel therapeutic agents that exert their effects at signal transduction pathways have advanced chemotherapy; however, a role for the classic chemotherapeutic agents remains. These classic agents are associated with tumor cell resistance, toxicity, and occasionally secondary neoplasia. Current practices for the dosing of therapeutic agents rely on height and body surface measurements or drug monitoring and Bayesian adaptive control. Pharmacogenetics is emerging as an alternate approach to managing chemotherapy that may prevent undertreatment while avoiding overtreatment and associated toxicities. By determining the polymorphic genetic makeup of the host and, in some instances, the altered genetic expression of the tumor, chemotherapy can be tailored for interindividual response and toxicity avoidance. Chemotherapy is particularly applicable to the pharmacogenetic approach to tailored therapy for a number of reasons. The margin of safety is low with chemotherapeutic agents. Some drugs require biotransformation for activation. Drug activation correlates with toxicity. The pathways of drug clearance or inactivation exhibit polymorphic differences. Interindividual, race-specific, and age-related responses to chemotherapeutic agents are common. Last, drug resistance can be inherent to the tumor as a result of the suppression of apoptosis. Variations in response and toxicity to a specific drug can be caused by alterations in drug-metabolizing enzymes or receptor expression. These effects can be classed as pharmacokinetic and pharmacogenetic differences. Some of the genes known to display

  12. Hypersensitivity to antineoplastic agents.

    PubMed

    Castells, M C

    2008-01-01

    The need to offer first line therapy for primary and recurrent cancers has spurred the clinical development of rapid desensitizations for chemotherapy and monoclonal antibodies. Rapid desensitizations allow patients to be treated with medications to which they have presented with hypersensitivity reactions (HSRs), including anaphylaxis. Rapid desensitization achieves temporary tolerization to full therapeutic doses by slow administration of incremental doses of the drug inducing the HSR. Protocols are available for most chemotherapy agents, including taxanes, platins, doxorubicin, monoclonal antibodies, and others. Candidate patients include those who present with type I HSRs, mast cell/IgE dependent, including anaphylaxis, and non-IgE mediated HSRs, during the chemotherapy infusion or shortly after. Idiosyncratic reactions, erythema multiforme, Stevens-Johnson syndrome and toxic epidermal necrolysis are not amenable to rapid desensitization. The recommendation for rapid desensitization can only be made by allergy and immunology specialists and can only be performed in settings with one-to-one nurse-patient care and where resuscitation personnel and resources are readily available. Repeated desensitizations can be safely performed in outpatient settings with similar conditions, which allow cancer patients to remain in clinical studies. We have generated a universal 12-step protocol that was applied to 413 cases of intravenous and intraperitoneal rapid desensitizations using taxanes, platins, liposomal doxorubicin, doxorubicin, rituximab, and other chemotherapy drugs. Under this protocol all patients were able to complete their target dose, and 94% of the patients had limited or no reactions. No deaths or codes were reported, indicating that the procedure was safe and effective in delivering first line chemotherapy drugs. PMID:18991707

  13. The impact of induction duration and the number of high-dose cycles on the long-term survival of women with metastatic breast cancer treated with high-dose chemotherapy with stem cell rescue: an analysis of sequential phase I/II trials from the Dana-Farber/Beth Israel STAMP program.

    PubMed

    Elias, A D; Ibrahim, J; Richardson, P; Avigan, D; Joyce, R; Reich, E; McCauley, M; Wheeler, C; Frei, E

    2002-01-01

    Although high-dose chemotherapy (HDC) with stem cell rescue for the treatment of women with metastatic breast cancer (MBC) is currently a controversial strategy, we report the long-term outcomes of women undergoing high-dose therapy for MBC over the past 12 years while participating in a sequence of research studies transitioning between a single to a double intensification approach. Univariate and multivariate analyses provide a framework to understand the prognostic factors important for event-free and overall survival. Between May 1988 and April 1998, we enrolled 188 women with MBC into 3 trials of previously reported sequential transplantation strategies. Trial I (long induction/single transplantation) accepted 62 women in partial or complete response to an unspecified induction therapy and treated them with high-dose CTCb (cyclophosphamide, thiotepa, and carboplatin) supported by marrow or peripheral blood progenitor cells (PBPC). Trial II (long induction/double transplantation) accepted 68 women in partial or complete response to an unspecified induction therapy, and mobilized stem cells with 2 cycles of AF (doxorubicin and 5-fluorouracil) with granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF). These women then received 1 cycle of high-dose single-agent melphalan followed 3 to 5 weeks later by CTCb, each with marrow or PBPC support. Trial III (short induction/double transplantation) enrolled 58 women prior to chemotherapy treatment for metastatic disease. Induction/mobilization consisted of 2 cycles given 14 days apart of doxorubicin and G-CSF. In contrast to trials I and II, patients with stable disease or better response to induction were eligible to proceed ahead with 2 cycles of HDC, 1 being CTCb and the other being dose escalated paclitaxel together with high-dose melphalan (TxM). These 2 HDC regimens were administered 5 weeks apart. TxM was given first in 32 patients and CTCb was given first in 26 patients. The median follow-up periods for trials I, II, and

  14. The impact of induction duration and the number of high-dose cycles on the long-term survival of women with metastatic breast cancer treated with high-dose chemotherapy with stem cell rescue: an analysis of sequential phase I/II trials from the Dana-Farber/Beth Israel STAMP program.

    PubMed

    Elias, A D; Ibrahim, J; Richardson, P; Avigan, D; Joyce, R; Reich, E; McCauley, M; Wheeler, C; Frei, E

    2002-01-01

    Although high-dose chemotherapy (HDC) with stem cell rescue for the treatment of women with metastatic breast cancer (MBC) is currently a controversial strategy, we report the long-term outcomes of women undergoing high-dose therapy for MBC over the past 12 years while participating in a sequence of research studies transitioning between a single to a double intensification approach. Univariate and multivariate analyses provide a framework to understand the prognostic factors important for event-free and overall survival. Between May 1988 and April 1998, we enrolled 188 women with MBC into 3 trials of previously reported sequential transplantation strategies. Trial I (long induction/single transplantation) accepted 62 women in partial or complete response to an unspecified induction therapy and treated them with high-dose CTCb (cyclophosphamide, thiotepa, and carboplatin) supported by marrow or peripheral blood progenitor cells (PBPC). Trial II (long induction/double transplantation) accepted 68 women in partial or complete response to an unspecified induction therapy, and mobilized stem cells with 2 cycles of AF (doxorubicin and 5-fluorouracil) with granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF). These women then received 1 cycle of high-dose single-agent melphalan followed 3 to 5 weeks later by CTCb, each with marrow or PBPC support. Trial III (short induction/double transplantation) enrolled 58 women prior to chemotherapy treatment for metastatic disease. Induction/mobilization consisted of 2 cycles given 14 days apart of doxorubicin and G-CSF. In contrast to trials I and II, patients with stable disease or better response to induction were eligible to proceed ahead with 2 cycles of HDC, 1 being CTCb and the other being dose escalated paclitaxel together with high-dose melphalan (TxM). These 2 HDC regimens were administered 5 weeks apart. TxM was given first in 32 patients and CTCb was given first in 26 patients. The median follow-up periods for trials I, II, and

  15. Chemotherapy-induced peripheral neuropathy: an update on the current understanding.

    PubMed

    Addington, James; Freimer, Miriam

    2016-01-01

    Chemotherapy-induced peripheral neuropathy is a common side effect of selected chemotherapeutic agents. Previous work has suggested that patients often under report the symptoms of chemotherapy-induced peripheral neuropathy and physicians fail to recognize the presence of such symptoms in a timely fashion. The precise pathophysiology that underlies chemotherapy-induced peripheral neuropathy, in both the acute and the chronic phase, remains complex and appears to be medication specific. Recent work has begun to demonstrate and further clarify potential pathophysiological processes that predispose and, ultimately, lead to the development of chemotherapy-induced peripheral neuropathy. There is increasing evidence that the pathway to neuropathy varies with each agent. With a clearer understanding of how these agents affect the peripheral nervous system, more targeted treatments can be developed in order to optimize treatment and prevent long-term side effects.

  16. Chemotherapy-induced peripheral neuropathy: an update on the current understanding

    PubMed Central

    Addington, James; Freimer, Miriam

    2016-01-01

    Chemotherapy-induced peripheral neuropathy is a common side effect of selected chemotherapeutic agents. Previous work has suggested that patients often under report the symptoms of chemotherapy-induced peripheral neuropathy and physicians fail to recognize the presence of such symptoms in a timely fashion. The precise pathophysiology that underlies chemotherapy-induced peripheral neuropathy, in both the acute and the chronic phase, remains complex and appears to be medication specific. Recent work has begun to demonstrate and further clarify potential pathophysiological processes that predispose and, ultimately, lead to the development of chemotherapy-induced peripheral neuropathy. There is increasing evidence that the pathway to neuropathy varies with each agent. With a clearer understanding of how these agents affect the peripheral nervous system, more targeted treatments can be developed in order to optimize treatment and prevent long-term side effects. PMID:27408692

  17. Preventing medication errors in cancer chemotherapy.

    PubMed

    Cohen, M R; Anderson, R W; Attilio, R M; Green, L; Muller, R J; Pruemer, J M

    1996-04-01

    Recommendations for preventing medication errors in cancer chemotherapy are made. Before a health care provider is granted privileges to prescribe, dispense, or administer antineoplastic agents, he or she should undergo a tailored educational program and possibly testing or certification. Appropriate reference materials should be developed. Each institution should develop a dose-verification process with as many independent checks as possible. A detailed checklist covering prescribing, transcribing, dispensing, and administration should be used. Oral orders are not acceptable. All doses should be calculated independently by the physician, the pharmacist, and the nurse. Dosage limits should be established and a review process set up for doses that exceed the limits. These limits should be entered into pharmacy computer systems, listed on preprinted order forms, stated on the product packaging, placed in strategic locations in the institution, and communicated to employees. The prescribing vocabulary must be standardized. Acronyms, abbreviations, and brand names must be avoided and steps taken to avoid other sources of confusion in the written orders, such as trailing zeros. Preprinted antineoplastic drug order forms containing checklists can help avoid errors. Manufacturers should be encouraged to avoid or eliminate ambiguities in drug names and dosing information. Patients must be educated about all aspects of their cancer chemotherapy, as patients represent a last line of defense against errors. An interdisciplinary team at each practice site should review every medication error reported. Pharmacists should be involved at all sites where antineoplastic agents are dispensed. Although it may not be possible to eliminate all medication errors in cancer chemotherapy, the risk can be minimized through specific steps. Because of their training and experience, pharmacists should take the lead in this effort. PMID:8697025

  18. Cytotoxic chemotherapy in the contemporary management of metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer (mCRPC).

    PubMed

    Sonpavde, Guru; Wang, Christopher G; Galsky, Matthew D; Oh, William K; Armstrong, Andrew J

    2015-07-01

    For several years, docetaxel was the only treatment shown to improve survival of patients with metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer (mCRPC). There are now several novel agents available, although chemotherapy with docetaxel and cabazitaxel continues to play an important role. However, the increasing number of available agents will inevitably affect the timing of chemotherapy and therefore it may be important to offer this approach before declining performance status renders patients ineligible for chemotherapy. Patient selection is also important to optimise treatment benefit. The role of predictive biomarkers has assumed greater importance due to the development of multiple agents and resistance to available agents. In addition, the optimal sequence of treatments remains undefined and requires further study in order to maximize long-term outcomes. We provide an overview of the clinical data supporting the role of chemotherapy in the treatment of mCRPC and the emerging role in metastatic castration-sensitive prostate cancer. We review the key issues in the management of patients including selection of patients for chemotherapy, when to start chemotherapy, and how best to sequence treatments to maximise outcomes. In addition, we briefly summarise the promising new chemotherapeutic agents in development in the context of emerging therapies.

  19. Novel agents for advanced pancreatic cancer

    PubMed Central

    Akinleye, Akintunde; Iragavarapu, Chaitanya; Furqan, Muhammad; Cang, Shundong; Liu, Delong

    2015-01-01

    Pancreatic cancer is relatively insensitive to conventional chemotherapy. Therefore, novel agents targeting dysregulated pathways (MAPK/ERK, EGFR, TGF-β, HEDGEHOG, NOTCH, IGF, PARP, PI3K/AKT, RAS, and Src) are being explored in clinical trials as monotherapy or in combination with cytotoxic chemotherapy. This review summarizes the most recent advances with the targeted therapies in the treatment of patients with advanced pancreatic cancer. PMID:26369833

  20. Chemotherapy targeting cancer stem cells.

    PubMed

    Liu, Haiguang; Lv, Lin; Yang, Kai

    2015-01-01

    Conventional chemotherapy is the main treatment for cancer and benefits patients in the form of decreased relapse and metastasis and longer overall survival. However, as the target therapy drugs and delivery systems are not wholly precise, it also results in quite a few side effects, and is less efficient in many cancers due to the spared cancer stem cells, which are considered the reason for chemotherapy resistance, relapse, and metastasis. Conventional chemotherapy limitations and the cancer stem cell hypothesis inspired our search for a novel chemotherapy targeting cancer stem cells. In this review, we summarize cancer stem cell enrichment methods, the search for new efficient drugs, and the delivery of drugs targeting cancer stem cells. We also discuss cancer stem cell hierarchy complexity and the corresponding combination therapy for both cancer stem and non-stem cells. Learning from cancer stem cells may reveal novel strategies for chemotherapy in the future.

  1. Chemotherapy targeting cancer stem cells

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Haiguang; Lv, Lin; Yang, Kai

    2015-01-01

    Conventional chemotherapy is the main treatment for cancer and benefits patients in the form of decreased relapse and metastasis and longer overall survival. However, as the target therapy drugs and delivery systems are not wholly precise, it also results in quite a few side effects, and is less efficient in many cancers due to the spared cancer stem cells, which are considered the reason for chemotherapy resistance, relapse, and metastasis. Conventional chemotherapy limitations and the cancer stem cell hypothesis inspired our search for a novel chemotherapy targeting cancer stem cells. In this review, we summarize cancer stem cell enrichment methods, the search for new efficient drugs, and the delivery of drugs targeting cancer stem cells. We also discuss cancer stem cell hierarchy complexity and the corresponding combination therapy for both cancer stem and non-stem cells. Learning from cancer stem cells may reveal novel strategies for chemotherapy in the future. PMID:26045975

  2. Treatment of metastatic and recurrent cervix cancer with chemotherapy: a randomised trial comparing hydroxyurea with cisdiamminedichloro-platinum plus methotrexate.

    PubMed

    Bezwoda, W R; Nissenbaum, M; Derman, D P

    1986-01-01

    In a randomised trial comparing single-agent chemotherapy (hydroxyurea) to combination chemotherapy in advanced cervix cancer, response was seen in 57% (including 13% CR) of patients receiving the combination (DDP + MTX) regimen. Responding patients survived significantly longer (11 months) than either those receiving hydroxyurea or those not responding to combination chemotherapy (4 months). Two patients remain in complete remission for 14+ and 17+ months.

  3. Pioneers in Antimicrobial Chemotherapy.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Neha; Rodrigues, Camilla; Soman, Rajeev

    2015-09-01

    "If we are not careful, we soon will be in the post-antibiotic era, and for some patients and some microbes we are already there"- Tom Friedan Antibiotics revolutionized medicine in the 20th century. The era of antibacterial chemotherapy began in 1907 with the discovery of arsphenamine, first synthesized by Alferd Bertheim and Paul Ehrlich in 1907, used to treat syphilis. The first systemically active antibiotic, Prontosil was discovered in 1933 by Gerhard Domagk, for which he was awarded the 1939 Nobel Prize. Fleming's accidental discovery and isolation of penicillin in September 1928 marked the start of modern antibiotics. It was a discovery that changed the course of history and saved millions of lives. PMID:27608881

  4. Carotidynia after anticancer chemotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Hayashi, Shinichi; Maruoka, Shuichiro; Takahashi, Noriaki; Hashimoto, Shu

    2014-01-01

    Carotidynia is characterised by inflammation limited to the common carotid artery, which has been recognised as a distinct disease entity by advanced vascular imaging. Although most cases of carotidynia are idiopathic, we herein present a case of carotidynia after anticancer chemotherapy. A 64-year-old male patient received docetaxel followed by granulocyte-colony stimulating factor (G-CSF) for the treatment of lung squamous carcinoma. After the treatment, bilateral cervical pain developed. Vascular imaging, including magnetic resonance imaging, computed tomography and ultrasonography, showed characteristics specific for carotidynia. Although there was no strong confirmation using tests such as a challenge test, our observations suggest that docetaxel or G-CSF could be a causative drug triggering carotidynia. PMID:25273942

  5. Adult medulloblastoma: multiagent chemotherapy.

    PubMed Central

    Greenberg, H. S.; Chamberlain, M. C.; Glantz, M. J.; Wang, S.

    2001-01-01

    In this study, the records of 17 adult patients with medulloblastoma treated with craniospinal radiation and 1 of 2 multiagent chemotherapy protocols were reviewed for progression-free survival, overall survival, and toxicity, and the patients were compared with each other and with similarly treated children and adults. Records of patients treated at 3 institutions were reviewed. Seventeen medulloblastoma patients (11 female, 6 male) with a median age of 23 years (range, 18-47 years) were treated with surgery, craniospinal radiation (CSRT) plus local boost, and 1 of 2 adjuvant chemotherapy regimens. All tumors were infratentorial (10 in 4th ventricle and 7 in left or right hemisphere). Ten patients presented with hydrocephalus, and 7 of them were shunted. Eight patients had gross total resection, 7 had subtotal resection (>50% removed), and 2 had partial resection (<50% removed). Postoperatively, 3 patients had positive cytology and 3 had positive spinal MRI. Five patients were classified as good risk and 12 were classified as poor risk (Chang staging system). Ten patients were treated with the "Packer protocol," consisting of CSRT plus weekly vincristine followed by 8 cycles of cisplatin, lomustine, and vincristine. Seven patients were treated with the Pediatric Oncology Group (POG) protocol, consisting of alternating courses of cisplatin/etoposide and cyclophosphamide/vincristine, followed by CSRT. Eight of 17 patients relapsed, with all 8 relapsing at the primary site. Other relapse sites included the leptomeninges (5), bone (1), and brain (1). The estimated median relapse-free survival (Kaplan-Meier) for all patients was 48 months (95% confidence interval, >26 months to infinity). Median relapse-free survival for patients on the Packer protocol was 26 months, and for those on the POG regimen was 48 months (P = 0.410). Five of 10 on the Packer protocol were relapse-free, while 4 of 7 were relapse-free on the POG regimen. Two patients relapsed during chemotherapy

  6. Pioneers in Antimicrobial Chemotherapy.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Neha; Rodrigues, Camilla; Soman, Rajeev

    2015-09-01

    "If we are not careful, we soon will be in the post-antibiotic era, and for some patients and some microbes we are already there"- Tom Friedan Antibiotics revolutionized medicine in the 20th century. The era of antibacterial chemotherapy began in 1907 with the discovery of arsphenamine, first synthesized by Alferd Bertheim and Paul Ehrlich in 1907, used to treat syphilis. The first systemically active antibiotic, Prontosil was discovered in 1933 by Gerhard Domagk, for which he was awarded the 1939 Nobel Prize. Fleming's accidental discovery and isolation of penicillin in September 1928 marked the start of modern antibiotics. It was a discovery that changed the course of history and saved millions of lives.

  7. Chemotherapy for small cell lung cancer: a comprehensive review

    PubMed Central

    Karim, Syed Mustafa; Zekri, Jamal

    2012-01-01

    Combination chemotherapy is the current strategy of choice for treatment of small cell lung cancer (SCLC). Platinum containing combination regimens are superior to non-platinum regimens in limited stage-SCLC and possibly also in extensive stage-SCLC as first and second-line treatments. The addition of ifosfamide to platinum containing regimens may improve the outcome but at the price of increased toxicity. Suboptimal doses of chemotherapy result in inferior survival. Early intensified, accelerated and high-dose chemotherapy gave conflicting results and is not considered a standard option outside of clinical trials. A number of newer agents have provided promising results when used in combination regimens, for example, gemcitabine, irinotecan and topotecan. However, more studies are required to appropriately evaluate them. There is a definitive role for radiotherapy in LD-SCLC. However, timing and schedule are subject to further research. Novel approaches are currently being investigated in the hope of improving outcome. PMID:25992206

  8. Chemotherapy-induced ovarian failure: manifestations and management.

    PubMed

    Molina, Julian R; Barton, Debra L; Loprinzi, Charles L

    2005-01-01

    Thanks to improvements in treatment regimens, more and more patients are now surviving cancer. However, cancer survivors are faced with the serious long-term effects of the different modalities of cancer treatments. One of these adverse effects is chemotherapy-induced irreversible damage to the ovarian tissues, which leads to premature ovarian failure and its resulting consequences such as hot flashes, osteoporosis, sexual dysfunction and the risk of infertility. Chemotherapy-induced ovarian failure (or chemotherapy-induced premature menopause) affects the quality of life of female cancer survivors. Although there is no clear definition of chemotherapy-induced ovarian failure, irreversible amenorrhoea lasting for several months (>12 months) following chemotherapy and a follicle stimulating hormone level of > or = 30 MIU/mL in the presence of a negative pregnancy test seems to be an appropriate characterisation. Different chemotherapy agents, alkylating cytotoxics in particular, have the potential to cause progressive and irreversible damage to the ovaries. The result of this damage is a state of premature ovarian failure, with progressive declining of estrogen levels, decreasing bone mass and an increased risk of fractures. Historically, hormonal replacement therapy (HRT) has been used to treat menopausal problems in the general population, but concerns about the potential of estrogen to increase the risk of breast cancer in women at high-risk or increase the risk of recurrence in cancer survivors, have forced physicians to utilise alternative treatments. This review discusses some of the newer therapies that are now available to provide appropriate symptom control, avoid complications such as fractures and possibly prevent infertility by making the ovarian epithelium less susceptible to cytotoxic agents.

  9. High-dose chemotherapy and autologous stem cell support followed by post-transplant doxorubicin and taxol as initial therapy for metastatic breast cancer: hematopoietic tolerance and efficacy.

    PubMed

    deMagalhaes-Silverman, M; Hammert, L; Lembersky, B; Lister, J; Rybka, W; Ball, E

    1998-06-01

    A multistep HDC regimen was designed as first-line chemotherapy for MBC. Twenty-four patients with MBC and no previous chemotherapy for metastatic disease were treated with high-dose cyclophosphamide (5000 mg/m2), and etoposide (1000 mg/m2) (CyVP16), followed by granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF). Peripheral blood stem cells (PBSCs) were collected. Subsequently patients received cyclophosphamide (6000 mg/m2), thiotepa (500 mg/m2) and carboplatin (800 mg/m2) (CTCb) with hematopoietic rescue. Upon recovery from hematopoietic and gastrointestinal toxicity three cycles of doxorubicin (50 mg/m2) and taxol (150 mg/m2) were delivered. After CyVP16 42% of patients developed neutropenic fevers. There was one documented episode of bacteremia. Patients received CTCb 32 days after starting CyVP16. After CTCb the median number of days to ANC >5 x 10(9)/l was 10 and to a platelet count >20 x 10(9)/l was 14. Neutropenic fevers developed in 16 patients. There were no hemorrhagic episodes. A total of 69 cycles of doxorubicin and taxol were delivered (87% of planned). The median time from PBSC infusion to the first cycle was 38 days. The median time to the second cycle was 27 days and to the last cycle was 24 days. One patient developed congestive heart failure. Two episodes of neutropenic fevers were observed. No toxicity-related deaths were observed. Grafts are stable at 6 months post transplantation. This multistep regimen is feasible with acceptable toxicity. PMID:9674853

  10. The Safety of Chemotherapy for Breast Cancer Patients with Hepatitis C Virus Infection

    PubMed Central

    Miura, Yuji; Theriault, Richard L; Naito, Yoichi; Suyama, Koichi; Shimomura, Akihiko; Iwatani, Tsuguo; Miura, Daishu; Kawabata, Hidetaka; Kumada, Hiromitsu; Takano, Toshimi

    2013-01-01

    Background: Hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection is one of the major causes of chronic liver disease, and more than 880,000 people are estimated to be infected with HCV in Japan. Little information is available on the outcomes of HCV during chemotherapy for solid tumors, and the impact of HCV infection on toxicity of chemotherapy is unknown. Materials and methods: We performed a retrospective survey of 1,110 patients diagnosed with breast cancer between January 2006 and March 2011 at our institution. All patients had been screened for hepatitis C serology at diagnosis of breast cancer. We retrospectively investigated the change in HCV load and the toxicities of chemotherapy, based on review of their medical records. Results: 23 patients were identified as having a positive test for anti-HCV antibodies. Ten of these patients received chemotherapy. Their median age was 66 years. No patient had decompensated liver disease at baseline. Eight patients received cytotoxic agents with or without trastuzumab, and two patients received trastuzumab alone. Four of eight patients who received cytotoxic chemotherapy developed febrile neutropenia and one developed transaminases elevation. Serum HCV-ribonucleic acid (RNA) level before and after chemotherapy was evaluated in six patients. Median serum HCV-RNA level at baseline and after chemotherapy was 6.5 and 6.7 logIU/ml, respectively. Conclusion: Chemotherapy for breast cancer patients with HCV infection is feasible, and viral load doesn't change during the chemotherapy. PMID:23901352

  11. Agent Orange

    MedlinePlus

    ... Index Agent Orange Agent Orange Home Facts about Herbicides Veterans' Diseases Birth Defects Benefits Exposure Locations Provider ... millions of gallons of Agent Orange and other herbicides on trees and vegetation during the Vietnam War. ...

  12. Interstitial chemotherapy for malignant glioma: Future prospects in the era of multimodal therapy

    PubMed Central

    Mangraviti, Antonella; Tyler, Betty; Brem, Henry

    2015-01-01

    The advent of interstitial chemotherapy has significantly increased therapeutic options for patients with malignant glioma. Interstitial chemotherapy can deliver high concentrations of chemotherapeutic agents, directly at the site of the brain tumor while bypassing systemic toxicities. Gliadel, a locally implanted polymer that releases the alkylating agent carmustine, given alone and in combination with various other antitumor and resistance modifying therapies, has significantly increased the median survival for patients with malignant glioma. Convection enhanced delivery, a technique used to directly infuse drugs into brain tissue, has shown promise for the delivery of immunotoxins, monoclonal antibodies, and chemotherapeutic agents. Preclinical studies include delivery of chemotherapeutic and immunomodulating agents by polymer and microchips. Interstitial chemotherapy was shown to maximize local efficacy and is an important strategy for the efficacy of any multimodal approach. PMID:25722936

  13. Major contributions towards finding a cure for cancer through chemotherapy: a historical review.

    PubMed

    Masood, Imran; Kiani, Maria H; Ahmad, Mahmood; Masood, Muhammed I; Sadaquat, Hadia

    2016-01-01

    The history of cancer chemotherapy is as old as cancer itself. With the increase in the complexities of cancer and the development of resistance towards existing anticancer agents, increased attention is now being paid to the advancement of chemotherapy. Some chemotherapeutic agents were discovered by accident or trial-and-error methods while others were found to be useful for neoplasia when they were being evaluated for some other purpose. Broadly, these agents have been classified as alkylating agents, antimetabolites, platinum compounds, antitumor antibiotics and natural products. Hormones and compounds interfering with hormone metabolism are widely used in cancer treatment, besides monoclonal antibodies and small molecules targeting angiogenesis. In this review an attempt is made to discuss the major breakthroughs that have shaped the course of cancer chemotherapy, helping to decrease the mortality as well as lessen the suffering of patients.

  14. Perioperative chemotherapy for resectable gastric cancer: MAGIC and beyond.

    PubMed

    Choi, Audrey H; Kim, Joseph; Chao, Joseph

    2015-06-28

    Over the last 15 years, there have been major advances in the multimodal treatment of gastric cancer, in large part due to several phase III studies showing the treatment benefits of neoadjuvant and adjuvant chemotherapy and chemoradiation protocols. The objective of this editorial is to review the current high-level evidence supporting the use of chemotherapy, chemoradiation and anti-HER2 agents in both the neoadjuvant and adjuvant settings, as well as to provide a clinical framework for use of this data based on our own institutional protocol for gastric cancer. Major studies reviewed include the SWOG/INT 0116, Medical Research Council Adjuvant Gastric Infusional Chemotherapy (MAGIC), CLASSIC, ACTS-GC, Adjuvant Chemoradiation Therapy in Stomach Cancer (ARTIST) and Trastuzumab for Gastric Cancer trials. Although these studies have demonstrated that multiple approaches in terms of the timing and therapy for gastric cancer are effective, no standard of care is widely accepted and questions regarding the optimal timing of chemotherapy, the benefit of radiotherapy, the minimum required extent of lymphadenectomy and optimal chemotherapy regimen still exist. Protocols from the upcoming ARTIST II, CRITICS, TOPGEAR, Neo-AEGIS and MAGIC-B studies are outlined, and results from these studies will provide critical information regarding optimal timing and treatment regimen. Additionally, the future directions of gastric cancer research predicated on molecular profiling and tailored therapies based on targetable genetic alterations in individual patient's tumors are addressed.

  15. Progress in adjuvant chemotherapy for breast cancer: an overview.

    PubMed

    Anampa, Jesus; Makower, Della; Sparano, Joseph A

    2015-01-01

    Breast cancer is the most common cause of cancer and cancer death worldwide. Although most patients present with localized breast cancer and may be rendered disease-free with local therapy, distant recurrence is common and is the primary cause of death from the disease. Adjuvant systemic therapies are effective in reducing the risk of distant and local recurrence, including endocrine therapy, anti-HER2 therapy, and chemotherapy, even in patients at low risk of recurrence. The widespread use of adjuvant systemic therapy has contributed to reduced breast cancer mortality rates. Adjuvant cytotoxic chemotherapy regimens have evolved from single alkylating agents to polychemotherapy regimens incorporating anthracyclines and/or taxanes. This review summarizes key milestones in the evolution of adjuvant systemic therapy in general, and adjuvant chemotherapy in particular. Although adjuvant treatments are routinely guided by predictive factors for endocrine therapy (hormone receptor expression) and anti-HER2 therapy (HER2 overexpression), predicting benefit from chemotherapy has been more challenging. Randomized studies are now in progress utilizing multiparameter gene expression assays that may more accurately select patients most likely to benefit from adjuvant chemotherapy.

  16. Responsiveness of Experimental Surgical-Wound Infections to Topical Chemotherapy

    PubMed Central

    McRipley, R. J.; Whitney, R. R.

    1976-01-01

    Topical agents freshly formulated in a cream base vehicle as well as commercial topical preparations were used to evaluate in mice the responsiveness of experimental surgical wounds infected with Staphylococcus aureus or Pseudomonas aeruginosa to chemotherapy. The responsiveness of the infections to therapy or the efficacy of a topical agent was assessed primarily by means of wound counts of the infecting organism before and after the employment of an immediate (prophylactic) or delayed (therapeutic) treatment regimen. From tests of several concentrations of an agent formulated in the vehicle, a median effective dose could be determined. In the case of the lethal P. aeruginosa infection, a median protective dose could be determined. Both infections were found to be quite susceptible to treatment with those topical agents that demonstrated good activity in vitro against the test organisms. The results of the investigation indicated that the model infections were suitable for the screening of potential topical agents in vivo. PMID:984757

  17. Systemic chemotherapy in inoperable or metastatic bladder cancer.

    PubMed

    Bamias, A; Tiliakos, I; Karali, M-D; Dimopoulos, M A

    2006-04-01

    Urothelial cancer is a common malignancy. The management of patients with recurrent disease after cystectomy or initially metastatic or unresectable disease represents a therapeutic challenge. Systemic chemotherapy prolongs survival but long-term survival remains infrequent. During recent years there has been improvement due to the use of novel chemotherapeutic agents, mainly gemcitabine and the taxanes. The long-considered-standard MVAC has been challenged by combinations showing more favourable toxicity profiles and equal (gemcitabine-cisplatin) or even improved (dose-dense, G-CSF-supported MVAC) efficacy. Specific interest has also been generated in specific groups of patients (elderly patients, patients with renal function impairment or comorbidities), who are not fit for the standard cisplatin-based chemotherapy but can derive significant benefit from carboplatin- or taxane-based treatment. Retrospective analyses have enabled the identification of groups of patients with different prognoses, who possibly require different therapeutic approaches. Modern chemotherapy offers a chance of long-term survival in patients without visceral metastases, possibly in combination with definitive local treatment. Finally, the progress of targeted therapies in other neoplasms seems to be reflected in advanced bladder cancer by recent studies indicating that biological agents can be combined with modern chemotherapy. The true role of such therapies is currently being evaluated. PMID:16303860

  18. [Monitoring sheet covering long-term chemotherapy to predict individual adverse reaction patterns for patients with gynecologic chemotherapy].

    PubMed

    Doi, Chiaki; Iihara, Naomi; Kawazoe, Hitoshi; Fukuoka, Noriyasu; Houchi, Hitoshi; Kurosaki, Yuji; Morita, Shushi

    2007-06-01

    Monitoring the adverse reaction patterns specific to individual patients is important to avoid subsequent reactions. Gynecologic cancer chemotherapy is often implemented repeatedly with an altered protocol during prolonged terms. The purpose of this study was to develop and assess the efficacy of a worksheet that pharmacists can use to analyze adverse reaction patterns in individual patients with gynecologic chemotherapy. The worksheet which we developed consisted of multiple sections. One section is for necessary drug information for the proper use of antineoplastic agents. Another section is for the following items recorded by the pharmacists: a) patients' basic information such as stage of disease and protocol, b) state of implementation and break of chemotherapy and supportive therapy on calendar, and c) laboratory data and symptoms. We arranged the last item below the calendar and enabled pharmacists to easily assess individual adverse reactions coupled with the treatment course. Reviews of the developed worksheet indicated that the worksheet led to the convenient detection of individual adverse reaction patterns and effective prevention of additional adverse reactions. This monitoring sheet covering long-term chemotherapy which was designed to predict individual adverse reaction patterns will improve the individualization and safety of gynecologic chemotherapy.

  19. Chemotherapy for Soft Tissue Sarcomas

    MedlinePlus

    ... drugs may be used as well, including cisplatin, dacarbazine (DTIC), docetaxel (Taxotere ® ), gemcitabine (Gemzar ® ), methotrexate, oxaliplatin, paclitaxel (Taxol ® ), ... such as: MAID (mesna, Adriamycin [doxorubicin], ifosfamide, and dacarbazine). Chemotherapy drugs kill cancer cells but also damage ...

  20. The evolving role of cytotoxic chemotherapy in the management of patients with metastatic prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Diamond, Elan; Garcias, María del Carmen; Karir, Beerinder; Tagawa, Scott T

    2015-02-01

    Prostate cancer (PC) is the most common cancer in men in the United States. Although outcomes are excellent for early-stage disease, survival for men with metastatic PC is limited. While older studies did not supported the use of chemotherapy in PC, the efficacy of taxane chemotherapy plus prednisone is now well established in men with metastatic castration resistant PC (CRPC). The results of CHAARTED trial have further expanded the use of chemotherapy to patients with metastatic hormone-sensitive disease. The clinical efficacy of taxanes over other chemotherapeutics may be a result of its ability to inhibit microtubule-dependent trafficking of proteins such as the androgen-receptor (AR). Ongoing research uses chemotherapy earlier in the disease course as well as explores the utility of combining cytotoxic chemotherapy with biologic agents. PMID:25762124

  1. [Chemotherapy for prostate cancer].

    PubMed

    Rauchenwald, Michael; De Santis, Maria; Fink, Eleonore; Höltl, Wolfgang; Kramer, Gero; Marei, Isabella-Carolina; Neumann, Hans-Jörg; Reissigl, Andreas; Schmeller, Nikolaus; Stackl, Walter; Hobisch, Alfred; Krainer, Michael

    2008-01-01

    For many years the benefit of chemotherapy in patients with prostate cancer was thought to be limited to palliation of late-stage disease, and thus this treatment option only became involved in patient care towards the end of the disease process, if at all. However, two landmark phase-III trials with docetaxel-based therapy (TAX 327 and Southwest Oncology Group, SWOG, 9916) have shown a survival benefit for patients with hormone refractory prostate cancer (HRPC) thus prompting a change in patterns of care. With raising interest for chemotherapeutic options and clinical trials for new drugs and new indications (neoadjuvant therapy, adjuvant therapy, increasing PSA levels after local treatment, and hormone sensitive cancer) under way our goal was to review within the context of a multidisciplinary team the available evidence and explore the standard for the medical treatment of prostate cancer outside of clinical trials. We are carefully evaluating the current treatment recommendations based on the available evidence and highlight potential future treatment options but also discuss important clinical topics (treatment until progression versus the advantage of chemo holidays, definition of particular patient subgroups and potential second line options) for which there are no clear cut answers to date. The role and importance of radiotherapy, biphosphonate treatment and the medical management of pain and side effects is also discussed. The multitude of treatment options for patients with advanced prostate cancer clearly asks for a close collaboration between urologists, medical oncologists and radiation therapists. PMID:18726672

  2. Update in Cancer Chemotherapy: Gastrointestinal Cancer, Cancer of the Small Intestines, Gallbladder, Liver, and Esophagus

    PubMed Central

    Wright, Jane C.

    1986-01-01

    This article updating cancer chemotherapy of gastrointestinal cancer completes the fivepart series begun in the April issue of the Journal. Treatment of cancer of the small intestine, the gallbladder and bile duct, primary cancer of the liver, and the esophagus are reviewed in this concluding article. Treatment of choice of cancer of the small intestine is surgical resection. Small bowel cancer is less responsive than gastric cancer to chemotherapy. While chemotherapy may produce temporary partial remissions in patients with gallbladder and bile duct cancer, there is no evidence that it produces longterm survival time. In primary liver cancer, surgery is the only curative treatment, but only 30 percent of patients are diagnosed with resectable lesions, and the surgical mortality rate is high. The most active single agents appear to be doxorubicin, fluorouracil, and neocarcinostatin. Data on combination chemotherapy are limited. With carcinoma of the esophagus, 95 percent of patients die of the condition. The standard treatment for locoregional disease is surgical resection and/or radiation therapy. Chemotherapy has been slow to develop; single-agent chemotherapy has been reported to be active in 15 percent of cases with durations of 2 to 5 months. Combination chemotherapy is so recent that data are incomplete as to long-term results of disease-free and total survival times, but polychemotherapy appears to be more effective than single agents. With earlier detection, prompt surgery, earlier chemotherapy, improved dose scheduling, and further exploration of combination therapy, better overall results with a major impact years later may be expected. Because of the lack of data, there remains uncertainty as to the place of chemotherapy in the treatment of gastrointestinal cancer. PMID:3531532

  3. A Case of Neurotoxicity Following 5-Fluorouracil-based Chemotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Ki, Seung Seog; Jeong, Jin Mo; Kim, Seong Ho; Jeong, Sook Hyang; Lee, Jin Hyuk; Han, Chul Ju; Kim, You Cheol; Lee, Jhin Oh; Hong, Young Joon

    2002-01-01

    5-Fluorouracil (5-FU) is a commonly used chemotherapeutic agent. However, its neurotoxicity is rare and not well recognized. We report a case of 5-FU neurotoxicity with organic brain syndrome and progression to multifocal leukoencephalopathy in a 44-year-old male patient having malignant gastrointestinal stromal tumor. 5-FU-induced neurotoxicity should, therefore, be considered as an important differential diagnosis in cancer patients with neurological abnormality and history of chemotherapy. PMID:12014219

  4. Ambient noise levels in the chemotherapy clinic

    PubMed Central

    Gladd, Dana K.; Saunders, Gabrielle H.

    2016-01-01

    Many of the drugs used for chemotherapy treatments are known to be ototoxic, and can result in permanent hearing threshold shifts. The degree of ototoxic damage can be influenced by many factors including dosage, duration of exposure, genetics, and coadministration with other ototoxic agents. Cisplatin is known for its ototoxic effects on hearing thresholds, particularly in the high frequencies. Recent studies have indicated a synergistic relationship between Cisplatin administration and moderate to high noise level exposure starting between 70–85 dB SPL. This study measured the noise levels in the Portland Veteran’s Affairs Medical Center’s outpatient chemotherapy clinic. Average (LAeq) and peak (LCpeak) noise measures were recorded every minute from 7 am until 6 pm on the two busiest clinic days. Patients, visitors, and staff members filled out anonymous surveys regarding their reactions to noise levels. Cumulative noise levels were not at levels known to interact with Cisplatin for a significant period of time. Noise measurement analysis indicated that levels were at or above 70 dB SPL for less than ten minutes during the 11-hour recording window. The patient and visitor surveys indicated that both groups were unbothered by noise in the clinic. However, most staff members were bothered by or concerned about noise levels, and many felt that it caused stress and difficulty communicating on the phone. PMID:22122961

  5. Treatment of a solid tumor using engineered drug-resistant immunocompetent cells and cytotoxic chemotherapy.

    PubMed

    Dasgupta, Anindya; Shields, Jordan E; Spencer, H Trent

    2012-07-01

    Multimodal therapy approaches, such as combining chemotherapy agents with cellular immunotherapy, suffers from potential drug-mediated toxicity to immune effector cells. Overcoming such toxic effects of anticancer cellular products is a potential critical barrier to the development of combined therapeutic approaches. We are evaluating an anticancer strategy that focuses on overcoming such a barrier by genetically engineering drug-resistant variants of immunocompetent cells, thereby allowing for the coadministration of cellular therapy with cytotoxic chemotherapy, a method we refer to as drug-resistant immunotherapy (DRI). The strategy relies on the use of cDNA sequences that confer drug resistance and recombinant lentiviral vectors to transfer nucleic acid sequences into immunocompetent cells. In the present study, we evaluated a DRI-based strategy that incorporates the immunocompetent cell line NK-92, which has intrinsic antitumor properties, genetically engineered to be resistant to both temozolomide and trimetrexate. These immune effector cells efficiently lysed neuroblastoma cell lines, which we show are also sensitive to both chemotherapy agents. The antitumor efficacy of the DRI strategy was demonstrated in vivo, whereby neuroblastoma-bearing NOD/SCID/γ-chain knockout (NSG) mice treated with dual drug-resistant NK-92 cell therapy followed by dual cytotoxic chemotherapy showed tumor regression and significantly enhanced survival compared with animals receiving either nonengineered cell-based therapy and chemotherapy, immunotherapy alone, or chemotherapy alone. These data show there is a benefit to using drug-resistant cellular therapy when combined with cytotoxic chemotherapy approaches.

  6. Treatment of a Solid Tumor Using Engineered Drug-Resistant Immunocompetent Cells and Cytotoxic Chemotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Dasgupta, Anindya; Shields, Jordan E.

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Multimodal therapy approaches, such as combining chemotherapy agents with cellular immunotherapy, suffers from potential drug-mediated toxicity to immune effector cells. Overcoming such toxic effects of anticancer cellular products is a potential critical barrier to the development of combined therapeutic approaches. We are evaluating an anticancer strategy that focuses on overcoming such a barrier by genetically engineering drug-resistant variants of immunocompetent cells, thereby allowing for the coadministration of cellular therapy with cytotoxic chemotherapy, a method we refer to as drug-resistant immunotherapy (DRI). The strategy relies on the use of cDNA sequences that confer drug resistance and recombinant lentiviral vectors to transfer nucleic acid sequences into immunocompetent cells. In the present study, we evaluated a DRI-based strategy that incorporates the immunocompetent cell line NK-92, which has intrinsic antitumor properties, genetically engineered to be resistant to both temozolomide and trimetrexate. These immune effector cells efficiently lysed neuroblastoma cell lines, which we show are also sensitive to both chemotherapy agents. The antitumor efficacy of the DRI strategy was demonstrated in vivo, whereby neuroblastoma-bearing NOD/SCID/γ-chain knockout (NSG) mice treated with dual drug-resistant NK-92 cell therapy followed by dual cytotoxic chemotherapy showed tumor regression and significantly enhanced survival compared with animals receiving either nonengineered cell-based therapy and chemotherapy, immunotherapy alone, or chemotherapy alone. These data show there is a benefit to using drug-resistant cellular therapy when combined with cytotoxic chemotherapy approaches. PMID:22397715

  7. Chemotherapy at end-of-life: an integration of oncology and palliative team.

    PubMed

    Chan, Wing-lok; Lam, Ka-on; Siu, Wai-kwan; Yuen, Kwok-keung

    2016-03-01

    Palliative chemotherapy is increasingly used in cancer patients near end of life. With the development of newer anticancer agents which have less side effects and higher expected efficacy, the decision on palliative chemotherapy in patients near end of life is complex. This article illustrates how oncologist and palliative care physicians can work together effectively. This article also gives an overview about the risks of palliative chemotherapy near end of life, patients' and physicians' perspectives in choosing the aggressive treatment and describes what an oncologist should do when facing this challenging situation.

  8. Discovery and Delivery of Synergistic Chemotherapy Drug Combinations to Tumors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Camacho, Kathryn Militar

    applied to various agents. Findings from our research can potentially widen the therapeutic window of chemotherapy combinations by emphasizing investigations of optimal drug ratios rather than maximum drug doses and by identifying appropriate nanoparticles for their delivery. Application of these concepts can ultimately help capture the full therapeutic potential of combination regimens.

  9. Chemotherapy and novel therapeutics before radical prostatectomy for high-risk clinically localized prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Cha, Eugene K; Eastham, James A

    2015-05-01

    Although both surgery and radiation are potential curative options for men with clinically localized prostate cancer, a significant proportion of men with high-risk and locally advanced disease will demonstrate biochemical and potentially clinical progression of their disease. Neoadjuvant systemic therapy before radical prostatectomy (RP) is a logical strategy to improve treatment outcomes for men with clinically localized high-risk prostate cancer. Furthermore, delivery of chemotherapy and other systemic agents before RP affords an opportunity to explore the efficacy of these agents with pathologic end points. Neoadjuvant chemotherapy, primarily with docetaxel (with or without androgen deprivation therapy), has demonstrated feasibility and safety in men undergoing RP, but no study to date has established the efficacy of neoadjuvant chemotherapy or neoadjuvant chemohormonal therapies. Other novel agents, such as those targeting the vascular endothelial growth factor receptor, epidermal growth factor receptor, platelet-derived growth factor receptor, clusterin, and immunomodulatory therapeutics, are currently under investigation.

  10. Inducible protective proteins: a potentially novel approach to chemotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Tobey, R.A.; Enger,M.D.; Griffith, J.K.; Hildebrand, C.E.

    1982-01-01

    A number of toxic chemical and physical agents elicit the induction of a series of protein species, some of which react with the agents and render them non-toxic. A few of the induced species (e.g., metallothionein) are rich in thiol groups which might be expected to react with alkylating agents and render them non-toxic. If a safe means could be found for selectively enhancing the synthesis of alkylating agent-reactive species in normal but not tumor cells, such a procedure would have ramifications in the area of cancer chemotherapy. In this report, we have utilized a variety of trace elements (Zn, Se, Cu, As) as inducers of synthesis of protective species in line CHO Chinese hamster cells and in a number of derived variants to determine whether this type of approach can be utilized to increase resistance to alkylating agent toxicity. Our results indicate that Zn, Se, and Cu elicit a protective response (increased survival) against the toxic effects of iodoacetate or melphalan, and, at least in the case of zinc, at levels which are physiologically reasonable. Arsenite appears to be a marginally effective inducer in the CHO cell. The increased survival is not attributable to metallothionein inducibility, decreased availability of the alkylating agent in the medium or decreased uptake of the drug into the trace element-pretreated cells. The protective responses induced by zinc or selenite alone are additive in cells receiving both trace element prior to exposure to alkylating agent which suggests that different domains of response are elicited by the two metals. Based upon reported differences in inducibility of protective proteins between normal and tumor cells, a possibility is raised for a novel approach to alkylating agent chemotherapy, somewhat analogous to the protocol utilized in high dose methotrexate therapy.

  11. Surgical technology and pharmacology of hyperthermic perioperative chemotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Van der Speeten, Kurt

    2016-01-01

    Although cytoreductive surgery (CRS) and hyperthermic perioperative chemotherapy (HIPEC) have not been shown to be effective by themselves, as a combined treatment they are now standard of care for peritoneal metastases from appendiceal cancer and from colorectal cancer as well as peritoneal mesothelioma. The timing of the HIPEC in relation to the CRS is crucial in that the HIPEC is to destroy minimal residual disease that remains following the CRS and prevent microscopic tumor emboli within the abdomen and pelvis from implanting within the resection site, within fibrinous clot, or within blood clot. Proper selection of chemotherapy agents is crucial to the long-term benefit of CRS and HIPEC. One must consider the response expected with the cancer chemotherapy agent, its area under the curve (AUC) ratio indicating the amount of dose intensity within the peritoneal space, and the drug retention within the peritoneal space for a prolonged exposure. Hyperthermia will augment the cytotoxicity of the cancer chemotherapy agents and improve drug penetration. Irrigation techniques should not be overlooked as an important means of reducing the cancer cell burden within the abdomen and pelvis. Multiple technologies for HIPEC exist and these have advantages and disadvantages. The techniques vary from a totally open technique with a vapor barrier over the open abdominal space to a totally closed technique whereby the HIPEC is administered at the completion of the surgical procedure. The open techniques depend on a table-mounted retractor for suspension of the skin edges allowing a reservoir to occur within the abdomen and pelvis. There are nearly a dozen commercially available hyperthermia pumps, all of which seem to perform adequately for HIPEC although there is a variable degree of convenience and documentation of the HIPEC procedure. As the management of peritoneal metastases has progressed over three decades, early cases are now seen in which a laparoscopic CRS and HIPEC

  12. Biological Agents

    MedlinePlus

    ... to Z Index Contact Us FAQs What's New Biological Agents This page requires that javascript be enabled ... and Health Topics A-Z Index What's New Biological agents include bacteria, viruses, fungi, other microorganisms and ...

  13. Lumbar reservoir for intrathecal chemotherapy.

    PubMed

    Dyck, P

    1985-06-15

    The Ommaya ventricular reservoir has been the standby of intrathecal chemotherapy for more than a decade, in spite of some specific drawbacks. A general anaesthetic is often required. The scalp must be shaven. Ventricular puncture may not always be easy and keeping the ventricular catheter patent is sometimes difficult. Hence the author has adapted a commercially available lumbar peritoneal shunt system to function as a lumbar intrathecal reservoir. The procedure is simple and can be performed expeditiously under local anaesthesia. To date, eight cases have received intrathecal chemotherapy by this means. PMID:3838918

  14. Ovarian toxicity: from environmental exposure to chemotherapy.

    PubMed

    Iorio, Roberto; Castellucci, Annalisa; Ventriglia, Giovanni; Teoli, Flavia; Cellini, Valerio; Macchiarelli, Guido; Cecconi, Sandra

    2014-01-01

    Unlike men, who have continuous spermatogenesis throughout most of their lifetime, women are born with a fixed supply of follicles, and this number progressively declines with age until the menopause. Beside age, the speed of follicle depletion can be regulated by genetic, hormonal and environmental influences. In the course of their lives, women are exposed to multiple chemicals and radiation sources that can increase the chance of developing permanent infertility and premature ovarian failure (POF). A wealth of experimental data indicate that iatrogenic (chemotherapy, radiotherapy) and xenobiotic agents (e.g., chemicals, pharmaceuticals) are potent ovotoxicants capable of accelerating ovarian reserve depletion. In the present review we reported the negative effects exerted on mammalian ovary by some widely diffused environmental chemicals, as polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) and dithiocarbamate mancozeb, and by 1-3 butadiene and 4-vinylcycloexene, two occupational chemicals known to be capable of inducing ovarian cancer and infertility. Furthermore, attention has been devoted to the consequences of chemo- and radiotherapy on the ovary, both known to affect reproductive lifespan. Our increasing understanding of metabolic alterations induced by these agents is fundamental to individuate new therapeutic strategies aimed to prevent ovarian dysfunction in fertile women. PMID:24502597

  15. Symptoms: Chemotherapy-Induced Peripheral Neuropathy.

    PubMed

    Schneider, Bryan P; Hershman, Dawn L; Loprinzi, Charles

    2015-01-01

    Chemotherapy-induced peripheral neuropathy (CIPN) is a problematic, treatment-induced toxicity that has the potential to impact quality of life and limit the doses of curative intent therapy. This therapy-induced side effect is one of the most troublesome in oncology clinical practices, considering the morbidity, the frequency, and the potential irreversibility of this problem. Patients with breast cancer are particularly impacted by this side effect as multiple agents commonly used for this disease can cause neuropathy. In this chapter, we provide an overview of CIPN, including: clinical predictors, frequency, and its impact on quality of life. Further, we highlight the pathophysiology and review the literature to date for agents designed to prevent or treat CIPN. We also highlight the most important ongoing clinical and translational research questions that hope to help better predict and prevent this toxicity. This includes optimizing the methods of assessment, using host specific factors (Race and genetics) to predict those more likely to experience CIPN, and determining how CIPN might impact clinical decisions toward therapy.

  16. Managing Chemotherapy Side Effects: Memory Changes

    MedlinePlus

    ... C ancer I nstitute Managing Chemotherapy Side Effects Memory Changes What is causing these changes? Your doctor ... thinking or remembering things Managing Chemotherapy Side Effects: Memory Changes Get help to remember things. Write down ...

  17. Managing Chemotherapy Side Effects: Swelling (Fluid Retention)

    MedlinePlus

    ... ancer I nstitute Managing Chemotherapy Side Effects Swelling (Fluid retention) “My hands and feet were swollen and ... at one time. Managing Chemotherapy Side Effects: Swelling (Fluid retention) Weigh yourself. l Weigh yourself at the ...

  18. Role of nuclear medicine in chemotherapy of malignant lesions

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, E.E.; Haynie, T.P.

    1985-01-01

    The major role of nuclear medicine in clinical oncology is in tumor imaging, which includes evaluating specific organs or the entire body for the presence of tumor. Nuclear medicine studies have been used clinically in the initial evaluation of the tumor extent and in the subsequent management of the cancer patient to assess response to treatment, to detect early relapse, and to assist in making decisions concerning follow-up treatment. Technetium-99m macroaggregated albumin perfusion study for intraarterial chemotherapy has been helpful in monitoring the catheter tip, providing a map of regional perfusion at the capillary level (tumor vascularity), evaluating the degree of arteriovenous shunt in tumor bed, and optimizing division of the dose of chemotherapeutic agent when bilateral arterial catheters are used. Quantitative and serial radionuclide angiocardiography has been useful in assessing doxorubicin (Adriamycin, Adria Laboratories, Columbus, Ohio) toxicity, and /sup 67/Ga-citrate imaging has been used to monitor chemotherapy effect on lungs and kidneys. Radionuclide venography can demonstrate suspected thrombus, and the delineation of the vascular anatomy also allows proper placement of another catheter for continuous effective chemotherapy. Serial bone scans have been the primary modality to assess the response of bone metastasis to systemic therapy in breast cancer patients, and nuclear hepatic imaging may show tumor response, hepatocellular dysfunction, and cholecystitis related to chemotherapeutic agents. 41 references.

  19. Pancreatic cancer: chemotherapy and radiotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Andrén-Sandberg, Åke

    2011-01-01

    Pancreatic cancer in many cases appears in a non-curatively resectable stage when the diagnosis is made. Palliative treatment become an option in the patients with advanced stage. The present article reviewed chemotherapy and radiotherapy in various advanced stage of pancreatic cancer. PMID:22540056

  20. Effect of Herbal Therapy to Intensity Chemotherapy-Induced Nausea and Vomiting in Cancer Patients.

    PubMed Central

    Montazeri, Akram Sadat; Raei, Mehdi; Ghanbari, Atefeh; Dadgari, Ali; Montazeri, Azam Sadat; Hamidzadeh, Azam

    2013-01-01

    Background: Chemotherapy-induced nausea and vomiting are the most important complications for cancer patients as its prevalence has been reported to be about 54-96 percent. ginger has been used for medicinal purposes including nausea and vomiting in traditional Persian, Chinese and Indian pharmacopoeia. Objectives: The objective of this study was to evaluate the efficacy of complimentary ginger among cancer patients experiencing nausea and vomiting. Material and Methods: A randomized cross-over clinical trial was carried out on patients under chemotherapy treatment for at least 2 episodes of chemotherapy and at least 2 episodes of previous experience of nausea and vomiting. Subjects of this study received 2 different complementary regimes with 250mg ginger capsule in regime A and placebo capsule in regime B. subjects of the study were crossed over to receive the other regime during the two cycles of chemotherapy. Results: Findings of the study indicated that subjects receiving ginger showed significant reduction in frequency and intensity of nausea and vomiting compared to placebo receiving subjects. Conclusions: According to finding of this study, in accordance to most of other researches, ginger is an effective agent to reduce chemotherapy-induced nausea and vomiting. However, there are some researches supporting ginger as a moderate antiemetic agent among cancerous patients under chemotherapy. PMID:24693415

  1. Update in Cancer Chemotherapy: Gastrointestinal Cancer, Cancer of the Stomach and Carcinoid Tumors

    PubMed Central

    Wright, Jane C.

    1986-01-01

    Cancer chemotherapy in the treatment of advanced gastric cancer provides only palliation with perhaps increased survival time in some patients. The primary treatment of gastric carcinomas is surgical, as this is the only hope for cure. It is estimated that 80 to 85 percent of patients with newly diagnosed cases of stomach cancer will be dead of their disease within five years. Radiation therapy alone is seldom employed, except as a palliative measure to control hemorrhage or pain. There are no data to suggest that postoperative radiation increases survival rates. Single-agent chemotherapy is of temporary palliative value in 20 to 30 percent of cases with a duration of response from three to five months. Combination chemotherapy has shown a somewhat higher response rate than single-agent therapy. In advanced gastric cancer, there is no evidence of improved long-term disease-free survival rates with any combination yet reported. The treatment of carcinoid cancer of the intestinal tract is surgical removal, as this offers the only hope of cure. Radiation therapy is of little benefit, except for moderate palliation in cases of extensive liver metasasis. Carcinoid cancers are moderately sensitive to chemotherapy. While some adjuvant chemotherapy trials suggest improvement, major survival gains remain to be demonstrated. Uncertainty as to the role of chemotherapy in the treatment of gastrointestinal cancers is probably due to lack of data. PMID:3528508

  2. Biomaterial-based regional chemotherapy: Local anticancer drug delivery to enhance chemotherapy and minimize its side-effects.

    PubMed

    Krukiewicz, Katarzyna; Zak, Jerzy K

    2016-05-01

    Since the majority of anticancer pharmacological agents affect not only cancer tissue but also normal cells, chemotherapy is usually accompanied with severe side effects. Regional chemotherapy, as the alternative version of conventional treatment, leads to the enhancement of the therapeutic efficiency of anticancer drugs and, simultaneously, reduction of toxic effects to healthy tissues. This paper provides an insight into different approaches of local delivery of chemotherapeutics, such as the injection of anticancer agents directly into tumor tissue, the use of injectable in situ forming drug carriers or injectable platforms in a form of implants. The wide range of biomaterials used as reservoirs of anticancer drugs is described, i.e. poly(ethylene glycol) and its copolymers, polyurethanes, poly(lactic acid) and its copolymers, poly(ɛ-caprolactone), polyanhydrides, chitosan, cellulose, cyclodextrins, silk, conducting polymers, modified titanium surfaces, calcium phosphate based biomaterials, silicone and silica implants, as well as carbon nanotubes and graphene. To emphasize the applicability of regional chemotherapy in cancer treatment, the commercially available products approved by the relevant health agencies are presented. PMID:26952500

  3. Biomaterial-based regional chemotherapy: Local anticancer drug delivery to enhance chemotherapy and minimize its side-effects.

    PubMed

    Krukiewicz, Katarzyna; Zak, Jerzy K

    2016-05-01

    Since the majority of anticancer pharmacological agents affect not only cancer tissue but also normal cells, chemotherapy is usually accompanied with severe side effects. Regional chemotherapy, as the alternative version of conventional treatment, leads to the enhancement of the therapeutic efficiency of anticancer drugs and, simultaneously, reduction of toxic effects to healthy tissues. This paper provides an insight into different approaches of local delivery of chemotherapeutics, such as the injection of anticancer agents directly into tumor tissue, the use of injectable in situ forming drug carriers or injectable platforms in a form of implants. The wide range of biomaterials used as reservoirs of anticancer drugs is described, i.e. poly(ethylene glycol) and its copolymers, polyurethanes, poly(lactic acid) and its copolymers, poly(ɛ-caprolactone), polyanhydrides, chitosan, cellulose, cyclodextrins, silk, conducting polymers, modified titanium surfaces, calcium phosphate based biomaterials, silicone and silica implants, as well as carbon nanotubes and graphene. To emphasize the applicability of regional chemotherapy in cancer treatment, the commercially available products approved by the relevant health agencies are presented.

  4. Mechanisms involved in the development of chemotherapy-induced neuropathy

    PubMed Central

    Boyette-Davis, Jessica A; Walters, Edgar T; Dougherty, Patrick M

    2015-01-01

    SUMMARY Chemotherapy-induced peripheral neuropathy (CIPN) is a debilitating and painful condition seen in patients undergoing treatment with common agents such as vincristine, paclitaxel, oxaliplatin and bortezomib. The mechanisms of this condition are diverse, and include an array of molecular and cellular contributions. Current research implicates genetic predispositions to this condition, which then may influence cellular responses to chemotherapy. Processes found to be influenced during CIPN include increased expression of inflammatory mediators, primarily cytokines, which can create cascading effects in neurons and glia. Changes in ion channels and neurotransmission, as well as changes in intracellular signaling and structures have been implicated in CIPN. This review explores these issues and suggests considerations for future research. PMID:26087973

  5. Pretreatment Mitochondrial Priming Correlates with Clinical Response to Cytotoxic Chemotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Chonghaile, Triona Ni; Sarosiek, Kristopher A.; Vo, Thanh-Trang; Ryan, Jeremy A.; Tammareddi, Anupama; Moore, Victoria Del Gaizo; Deng, Jing; Anderson, Ken; Richardson, Paul; Tai, Yu-Tzu; Mitsiades, Constantine S.; Matulonis, Ursula A.; Drapkin, Ronny; Stone, Richard; DeAngelo, Daniel J.; McConkey, David J.; Sallan, Stephen E.; Silverman, Lewis; Hirsch, Michelle S.; Carrasco, Daniel Ruben; Letai, Anthony

    2011-01-01

    Cytotoxic chemotherapy targets elements common to all nucleated human cells, such as DNA and microtubules, yet it selectively kills tumor cells. Here we show that clinical response to these drugs correlates with, and may be partially governed by, the pre-treatment proximity of tumor cell mitochondria to the apoptotic threshold, a property called mitochondrial priming. We used BH3 profiling to measure priming in tumor cells from patients with multiple myeloma, acute myelogenous and lymphoblastic leukemia, and ovarian cancer. This assay measures mitochondrial response to peptides derived from pro-apoptotic BH3 domains of proteins critical for death signaling to mitochondria. Patients with highly primed cancers exhibited superior clinical response to chemotherapy. In contrast, chemoresistant cancers and normal tissues were poorly primed. Manipulation of mitochondrial priming might enhance the efficacy of cytotoxic agents. PMID:22033517

  6. Therapeutic potential of cannabinoids in counteracting chemotherapy-induced adverse effects: an exploratory review.

    PubMed

    Ostadhadi, Sattar; Rahmatollahi, Mahdieh; Dehpour, Ahmad-Reza; Rahimian, Reza

    2015-03-01

    Cannabinoids (the active constituents of Cannabis sativa) and their derivatives have got intense attention during recent years because of their extensive pharmacological properties. Cannabinoids first developed as successful agents for alleviating chemotherapy associated nausea and vomiting. Recent investigations revealed that cannabinoids have a wide range of therapeutic effects such as appetite stimulation, inhibition of nausea and emesis, suppression of chemotherapy or radiotherapy-associated bone loss, chemotherapy-induced nephrotoxicity and cardiotoxicity, pain relief, mood amelioration, and last but not the least relief from insomnia. In this exploratory review, we scrutinize the potential of cannabinoids to counteract chemotherapy-induced side effects. Moreover, some novel and yet important pharmacological aspects of cannabinoids such as antitumoral effects will be discussed.

  7. Rolapitant for the treatment of chemotherapy-induced nausea and vomiting.

    PubMed

    Navari, Rudolph M

    2015-01-01

    Chemotherapy-induced nausea and vomiting is a significant clinical issue which affects patient's quality of life and treatment decisions. Significant improvements in the control of chemotherapy-induced nausea and vomiting have occurred in the past 15 years with the introduction of new antiemetic agents 5-HT3, receptor antagonists, neurokinin-1 (NK-1) receptor antagonists, and olanzapine. Aprepitant was the first NK-1 receptor antagonist introduced (2003) for the prevention of chemotherapy-induced nausea and vomiting in combination with a 5-HT3 receptor antagonist and dexamethasone. A second NK-1 receptor antagonist netupitant was approved for use in October 2014. Phase III clinical trials of an additional NK-1 receptor antagonist rolapitant have been completed, and the data have been submitted for regulatory approval. A description of rolapitant and its role in chemotherapy-induced nausea and vomiting will be presented, along with a comparison of the other neurolinin-1 receptor antagonists aprepitant and netupitant.

  8. Hematopoietic stem cell compartment: Acute and late effects of radiation therapy an chemotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Mauch, P.; Constine, L.; Greenberger, J.

    1995-03-30

    The bone marrow is an important dose-limiting cell renewal tissue for chemotherapy, wide-field irradiation, and autologous bone marrow transplantion. Over the past 5-10 years a great deal has been discovered about the hematopoietic stem cell compartment. Although the toxicity associated with prolonged myelosuppression continue to limit the wider use of chemotherapy and irradiation, ways are being discovered to circumvent this toxicity such as with the increasing use of cytokines. This review describes what is known of how chemotherapy and irradiation damage stem cells and the microenvironment, how cytokines protect hematopoietic cells from radiation damage and speed marrow recovery after chemotherapy or marrow transplantation, and how various types of blood marrow cells contribute to engraftment and long-term hematopoiesis after high doses of cytotoxic agents and/or total body irradiation. 167 refs., 7 figs., 6 tabs.

  9. Epoetin beta for the treatment of chemotherapy-induced anemia: an update

    PubMed Central

    Galli, Luca; Ricci, Clara; Egan, Colin Gerard

    2015-01-01

    Epoetin beta belongs to the class of erythropoiesis-stimulating agents (ESAs) that are currently available to treat anemic patients receiving chemotherapy. Chemotherapy-induced anemia affects a high percentage of cancer patients and, due to its negative effects on disease outcome and the patient’s quality of life, should be treated when first diagnosed. Initial trials with ESAs have shown efficacy in improving quality of life and reducing the need for blood transfusions in patients with chemotherapy-induced anemia. However, recent meta-analyses have provided conflicting data on the impact of ESAs on survival and tumor progression. Here we provide an overview of these recent data and review the role of epoetin beta in the treatment of chemotherapy-induced anemia over the past 20 years. PMID:25784818

  10. Ill patient, public activist: Rose Kushner's attack on breast cancer chemotherapy.

    PubMed

    Lerner, Barron H

    2007-01-01

    In 1984 the noted breast cancer activist Rose Kushner published a controversial article, "Is Aggressive Adjuvant Chemotherapy the Halsted Radical of the '80s?" In it, she argued that chemotherapy was being used as indiscriminately as the radical mastectomy had been, before she and others had successfully discredited the disfiguring operation. As with all of Kushner's writings, this article raised valid points in an informed and provocative style, but her attack on chemotherapy was more one-sided than was typical. This may have been due to the highly personal nature of the topic: when she was diagnosed with recurrent breast cancer, she had declined chemotherapy in favor of a hormonal agent, tamoxifen. She also developed a close working and financial relationship with the manufacturers of tamoxifen. Although not seen as a problem at the time, Kushner's dual roles as patient and advocate for a particular treatment foreshadowed conflict-of-interest issues that would take center stage in medicine in subsequent decades.

  11. Integrative review of factors related to the nursing diagnosis nausea during antineoplastic chemotherapy 1

    PubMed Central

    Moysés, Aline Maria Bonini; Durant, Lais Corsino; de Almeida, Ana Maria; Gozzo, Thais de Oliveira

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Objective: to identify factors related to the nursing diagnosis nausea among cancer patients undergoing chemotherapy. Method: integrative review conducted in four electronic databases (PUBMED, EMBASE, CINAHL and LILACS) using the key words: neoplasia, antineoplastic agents and nausea. Results: only 30 out of 1,258 papers identified met the inclusion criteria. The most frequent related factors were: being younger than 50 years old, motion sickness, being a woman, emetogenic potential of the chemotherapy, anxiety, conditioned stimulus, and expecting nausea after treatment. Conclusion: this review's findings, coupled with the incidence of nausea among cancer patients undergoing chemotherapy, reveal an important difference between evidence found and that used by NANDA International, Inc. Even though it provides an appropriate definition of related factors, it does not mention chemotherapy, despite the various studies addressing the topic using different designs and presenting various objectives and outcomes. PMID:27737380

  12. A novel rat model for chemotherapy-induced alopecia

    PubMed Central

    Wikramanayake, T. C.; Amini, S.; Simon, J.; Mauro, L. M.; Elgart, G.; Schachner, L. A.; Jimenez, J. J.

    2011-01-01

    Summary Background More than half of all people diagnosed with cancer receive chemotherapy, and approximately 65% of these develop chemotherapy-induced alopecia (CIA), a side-effect that can have considerable negative psychological repercussions. Currently, there are very few animal models available to study the mechanism and prevention of CIA. Aim To develop a clinically relevant adult rat model for CIA. Methods We first tested whether neonatal pigmented Long–Evans (LE) rats developed alopecia in response to the chemotherapeutic agents etoposide and cyclophosphamide. We then determined whether the rats developed CIA as adults. In the latter experiment, rat dorsal hair was clipped during the early telogen stage to synchronize the hair cycle. and starting 15 days later, the rats were treated with etoposide for 3 days. Results Neonatal LE pups developed CIA in response to etoposide and cyclophosphamide, similar to other murine models for CIA. Clipping of the hair shaft during early telogen resulted in synchronized anagen induction and subsequent alopecia after etoposide treatment in the clipped areas only. Hair follicles in the clipped areas had the typical chemotherapy-induced follicular dystrophy (dystrophic catagen). When the hair in the pigmented alopecic areas regrew, it had normal pigmentation. Conclusions A novel, pigmented adult rat model has been established for CIA. By hair shaft clipping during early telogen, synchronized anagen entry was induced that resulted in alopecia in response to chemotherapy. This is the first clinically relevant adult rat model for CIA and will be a useful tool to test agents for the prevention and treatment of CIA. PMID:22409523

  13. Treatment of Nausea and Vomiting During Chemotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Mustian, Karen M; Devine, Katie; Ryan, Julie L; Janelsins, Michelle C; Sprod, Lisa K; Peppone, Luke J; Candelario, Grace D; Mohile, Supriya G; Morrow, Gary R

    2014-01-01

    Nausea and vomiting are two of the most troubling side effects patients experience during chemotherapy. While newly available treatments have improved our ability to manage nausea and vomiting, anticipatory and delayed nausea and vomiting are still a major problem for patients receiving chemotherapy. Many cancer patients will delay or refuse future chemotherapy treatments and contemplate stopping chemotherapy altogether because of their fear of experiencing further nausea and vomiting. The purpose of this article is to provide an overview of the patho-psychophysiology of chemotherapy-induced nausea and vomiting and the recommended guidelines for treatment. PMID:24466408

  14. Chemotherapy against cancer during pregnancy

    PubMed Central

    Esposito, Susanna; Tenconi, Rossana; Preti, Valentina; Groppali, Elena; Principi, Nicola

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Background: The concomitant incidence of cancer and pregnancy has increased in recent years because of the increase in maternal age at the time of the 1st pregnancy. The diagnosis of cancer in a pregnant woman causes ethical and therapeutic problems for both the patient and the physician. The main aim of this paper is to describe the available evidence concerning the short- and long-term neonatal impact of chemotherapy given to pregnant women. Methods: The relevant publications in English were identified by a systematic review of MEDLINE and PubMed for the last 15 years. The search strategy included “cancer[Title/Abstract] OR tumor[Title/Abstract] AND pregnancy[Title/Abstract] OR pregnant[Title/Abstract] AND embryo[Title/Abstract] or fetus[Title/Abstract] or neonate[Title/Abstract] or newborn[Title/Abstract] or pediatric[Title/Abstract] or child[Title/Abstract] AND English[lang].” Results: An analysis of the literature showed that only the administration of chemotherapy during the embryonic stage of conceptus is dangerous and can lead to the termination of the pregnancy. When the disease is diagnosed in the 2nd or 3rd trimester of gestation or when it is possible to delay the initiation of chemotherapy beyond the 14th week, the risk of severe problems for the fetus are low, and pregnancy termination is not required. Conclusion: Data regarding the final outcome of children who have received in utero chemotherapy seem reassuring. Only the administration in the embryonal stage of conceptus is dangerous and can lead to the termination of pregnancy. When the disease is diagnosed in the 2nd or 3rd trimester of gestation or when it is possible to delay the initiation of chemotherapy beyond the 14th week, the risk of severe problems for the fetus are low and pregnancy termination is not needed. Increased knowledge of how to minimize the risks of chemotherapy can reduce improper management including unnecessary termination of pregnancy, delayed maternal

  15. Other Chemotherapeutic Agents in Cutaneous T-Cell Lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Chung, Catherine G; Poligone, Brian

    2015-10-01

    Traditional chemotherapies, interleukins, phosphorylase inhibitors, and proteasome inhibitors are important therapies available to patients with cutaneous T-cell lymphoma (CTCL). Traditional chemotherapies, both in combination and as single agents, are commonly used in relapsed, refractory CTCLs that behave in an aggressive manner. Interleukins, phosphorylase inhibitors, and proteasome inhibitors are less commonly used but data support a role in patients with more refractory disease. PMID:26433850

  16. Recent Advances in Preventing Chemotherapy-Induced Nausea and Vomiting.

    PubMed

    Nasir, Syed Sameer; Schwartzberg, Lee S

    2016-08-01

    Chemotherapy-induced nausea and vomiting (CINV) remains an important adverse effect of cancer therapy. The goal of CINV prophylaxis is to reduce the morbidity associated with nausea and vomiting, as well as to preserve quality of life, while maintaining the desired chemotherapy regimen. The US Food and Drug Administration has recently approved new therapies for prevention of CINV, including the neurokinin-1 (NK1) receptor antagonist rolapitant and the fixed-dose combination of the second-generation 5-hydroxytryptamine type 3 receptor antagonist palonosetron with the novel NK1 receptor antagonist netupitant. Alternative agents, like the atypical antipsychotic olanzapine, have also expanded the options available for preventing delayed and refractory CINV. Consensus guidelines for prevention of CINV from several organizations are generally consistent with one another and are updated based on expert review of available clinical trial data. This article will address changes in CINV guidelines over the past 5 years and provide updates on recently approved agents and agents that are expected to be approved, based on published phase III trials. It will also explore other factors affecting optimal CINV control, including the role of patient-related risk factors and the role of physician adherence to antiemetic guidelines in reducing the residual risk of CINV. PMID:27539626

  17. Development of a Mouse Model for Assessing Fatigue during Chemotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Ray, Maria A; Trammell, Rita A; Verhulst, Steve; Ran, Sophia; Toth, Linda A

    2011-01-01

    Fatigue and disturbed sleep are common problems for cancer patients and affect both quality of life and compliance with treatment. Fatigue may be associated with cancer itself and with the treatment, particularly for therapies with neurotoxic side effects. To develop a model system for evaluation of chemotherapy-related fatigue, we studied mice treated with either a commonly used formulation of the chemotherapeutic agent paclitaxel (paclitaxel; Taxol), which is known to have neurotoxic properties, or a nanoparticle formulation of paclitaxel (nab-paclitaxel; Abraxane) that is reported to have greater potency and efficacy yet fewer side effects than does paclitaxel. Mice were treated with 1 of these 2 agents (10 mg/kg IV daily for 5 consecutive days) and were monitored from 1 wk before through 4 wk after treatment. Dependent measures included running wheel activity, locomotor activity on the cage floor, core temperature, sleep patterns, CBC count, serum cytokine and chemokine concentrations, and neurologic assessment. For both drugs, mice showed the most severe perturbations of activity during the first recovery week after drug administration. Mice treated with paclitaxel showed greater neutropenia and motor deficits than did mice treated with nab-paclitaxel. However, deficits had largely resolved by 4 wk after administration of either drug. We conclude that these measures provide an assessment of chemotherapy-related fatigue that potentially can distinguish toxicity associated with different formulations of the same agent. PMID:21535922

  18. Recent advances in chemotherapy for advanced gastric cancer.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jong Gwang; Chung, Ho Young; Yu, Wansik

    2010-07-15

    Although medical treatment has been shown to improve quality of life and prolong survival, no significant progress has been made in the treatment of advanced gastric cancer (AGC) within the last two decades. Thus, the choice of optimum standard first-line chemotherapy regimen for AGC remains debatable, and most responses to chemotherapy are partial and of short duration, with a median survival of approximately 7-11 mo and survival at 2 years rarely more than 10%. Recently, remarkable progress in tumor biology has led to the development of new agents that target critical aspects of oncogenic pathways. For AGC, several molecular targeting agents are now under evaluation in international randomized studies, and trastuzumab, an anti-HER2 monoclonal antibody, has shown antitumor activity against HER-2 positive AGC. However, this benefit is limited to only about 20% of patients with AGC (patients with HER-2 positive AGC). Therefore, there remains a critical need for both the development of more effective agents and the identification of predictive and prognostic molecular markers to select those patients who will benefit most from specific chemotherapeutic regimens and targeted therapies.

  19. [Chemotherapy-free treatment of chronic lymphocytic leukemia?].

    PubMed

    Wendtner, C-M

    2013-10-01

    Treatment of CLL patients with conventional cytotoxic agents is often combined with significant toxicity that prevents broad application especially in elderly patients. In addition, relapse frequently occurs after application of conventional chemotherapy in CLL. Recently several new chemo-free treatment options have been introduced within clinical trials. Among them are monoclonal antibodies, most of them targeting the CD20 molecule: besides the licensed drugs rituximab and ofatumumab obinutuzumab, although in combination with chemotherapy, has recently shown high clinical efficacy in front-line treatment of elderly patients with CLL. Lenalidomide as monotherapy has demonstrated clinical efficacy in patients with relapsed disease and first data within clinical trials have been generated in the front-line setting. A promising class of novel agents has been designed to block aberrant signaling from the B-cell receptor. Ibrutinib acts by inhibiting the Bruton's tyrosine kinase (BTK) while idelalisib represents a first-in-class specific inhibitor of the phosphoinositol-3 kinase (PI3K) delta isoform. Another class of drugs with potential impact for chemo-free treatment strategies in CLL are the BH3-mimetic inhibitors of the Bcl-2 family of pro-survival proteins. Other interesting candidate drugs that are currently explored for CLL patients include small modular immunopharmaceutical (SMIP) proteins (e. g. TRU-016), CDK inhibitors (e. g. dinaciclib), HDAC inhibitors and others. Given all these novel agents and targets, chemo-free or at least chemo-reduced concepts may become reality in the near future for our patients suffering from CLL.

  20. Natural products as antimitotic agents.

    PubMed

    Dall'Acqua, Stefano

    2014-01-01

    Natural products still play an important role in the medicinal chemistry, especially in some therapeutic areas. As example more than 60% of currently-used anticancer agents are derives from natural sources including plants, marine organisms or micro-organism. Thus natural products (NP) are an high-impact source of new "lead compounds" or new potential therapeutic agents despite the large development of biotechnology and combinatorial chemistry in the drug discovery and development. Many examples of anticancer drugs as paclitaxel, combretastatin, bryostatin and discodermolide have shown the importance of NP in the anticancer chemotherapy through many years. Many organisms have been studied as sources of drugs namely plants, micro-organisms and marine organisms and the obtained NP can be considered a group of "privileged chemical structures" evolved in nature to interact with other organisms. For this reason NP are a good starting points for pharmaceutical research and also for library design. Tubulin and microtubules are one of the most studied targets for the search of anticancer compounds. Microtubule targeting agents (MTA) also named antimitotic agents are compounds that are able to perturb mitosis but are also able to arrest cell growing during interphase. The anticancer drugs, taxanes and vinca alkaloids have established tubulin as important target in cancer therapy. More recently the vascular disrupting agents (VDA) combretastatin analogues were studied for their antimitotics properties. This review will consider the anti mitotic NP and their potential impact in the development of new therapeutic agents.

  1. Chemotherapy-induced endometrial pathology: mimicry of malignancy and viral endometritis

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Eun Kyung; Yoon, Gun; Kim, Hyun-Soo

    2016-01-01

    Chemotherapy is a common type of preoperative neoadjuvant treatment and postoperative adjuvant or palliative therapy for many different types of malignancies. Certain chemotherapeutic agents can induce bizarre epithelial atypia that mimics malignancy. Unfamiliarity with these changes could potentially cause confusion with a neoplastic or infectious process. The endometrium is one of the few sites where chemotherapy-induced epithelial atypia has not been appreciated. We identified four patients with marked cytologic atypia of the endometrial glandular epithelium from the surgical pathology files of Severance Hospital. The histopathologic features, immunostaining results and medical records of these patients were reviewed. All patients underwent hysteroscopic examination with endometrial curettage for investigation of vaginal bleeding. They had previously undergone chemotherapy for uterine cervical cancer (n=1), rectal cancer (n=2) and myelodysplastic syndrome (n=1). The chemotherapy regimens included alkylating agents (busulfan, cyclophosphamide, ifosfamide, cisplatin, and oxaliplatin), pyrimidine antagonists (capecitabine, decitabine, and 5-fluorouracil), taxanes (paclitaxel), and topoisomerase inhibitors (irinotecan and etoposide). On histopathological examination, the atypical epithelial changes included marked nuclear enlargement and pleomorphism, a degenerative-looking chromatin pattern, abundant microvacuolated cytoplasm, and preservation of the nuclear/cytoplasmic ratio. This study demonstrates that certain chemotherapeutic agents may cause bizarre, reactive atypia of the endometrial glandular epithelium. These changes should not be interpreted as neoplastic or infectious in nature. An awareness of prior exposure to cytotoxic agents and a familiarity with the nature and distribution of these bizarre alterations is essential to avoid misinterpretation of the morphologic features and prevent unnecessary treatment. PMID:27347355

  2. Chemotherapy-induced endometrial pathology: mimicry of malignancy and viral endometritis.

    PubMed

    Kim, Eun Kyung; Yoon, Gun; Kim, Hyun-Soo

    2016-01-01

    Chemotherapy is a common type of preoperative neoadjuvant treatment and postoperative adjuvant or palliative therapy for many different types of malignancies. Certain chemotherapeutic agents can induce bizarre epithelial atypia that mimics malignancy. Unfamiliarity with these changes could potentially cause confusion with a neoplastic or infectious process. The endometrium is one of the few sites where chemotherapy-induced epithelial atypia has not been appreciated. We identified four patients with marked cytologic atypia of the endometrial glandular epithelium from the surgical pathology files of Severance Hospital. The histopathologic features, immunostaining results and medical records of these patients were reviewed. All patients underwent hysteroscopic examination with endometrial curettage for investigation of vaginal bleeding. They had previously undergone chemotherapy for uterine cervical cancer (n=1), rectal cancer (n=2) and myelodysplastic syndrome (n=1). The chemotherapy regimens included alkylating agents (busulfan, cyclophosphamide, ifosfamide, cisplatin, and oxaliplatin), pyrimidine antagonists (capecitabine, decitabine, and 5-fluorouracil), taxanes (paclitaxel), and topoisomerase inhibitors (irinotecan and etoposide). On histopathological examination, the atypical epithelial changes included marked nuclear enlargement and pleomorphism, a degenerative-looking chromatin pattern, abundant microvacuolated cytoplasm, and preservation of the nuclear/cytoplasmic ratio. This study demonstrates that certain chemotherapeutic agents may cause bizarre, reactive atypia of the endometrial glandular epithelium. These changes should not be interpreted as neoplastic or infectious in nature. An awareness of prior exposure to cytotoxic agents and a familiarity with the nature and distribution of these bizarre alterations is essential to avoid misinterpretation of the morphologic features and prevent unnecessary treatment. PMID:27347355

  3. Application of biodynamic imaging for personalized chemotherapy in canine lymphoma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Custead, Michelle R.

    Biodynamic imaging (BDI) is a novel phenotypic cancer profiling technology which characterizes changes in cellular and subcellular motion in living tumor tissue samples following in vitro or ex vivo treatment with chemotherapeutics. The ability of BDI to predict clinical response to single-agent doxorubicin chemotherapy was tested in ten dogs with naturally-occurring non-Hodgkin's lymphomas (NHL). Pre-treatment tumor biopsy samples were obtained from all dogs and treated with doxorubicin (10 muM) ex vivo. BDI captured cellular and subcellular motility measures on all biopsy samples at baseline and at regular intervals for 9 hours following drug application. All dogs subsequently received treatment with a standard single-agent doxorubicin protocol. Objective response (OR) to doxorubicin and progression-free survival time (PFST) following chemotherapy were recorded for all dogs. The dynamic biomarkers measured by BDI were entered into a multivariate logistic model to determine the extent to which BDI predicted OR and PFST following doxorubicin therapy. The model showed that the sensitivity, specificity, and accuracy of BDI for predicting treatment outcome were 95%, 91%, and 93%, respectively. To account for possible over-fitting of data to the predictive model, cross-validation with a one-left-out analysis was performed, and the adjusted sensitivity, specificity, and accuracy following this analysis were 93%, 87%, and 91%, respectively. These findings suggest that BDI can predict, with high accuracy, treatment outcome following single-agent doxorubicin chemotherapy in a relevant spontaneous canine cancer model, and is a promising novel technology for advancing personalized cancer medicine.

  4. Cytoreduction with hyperthermic intraperitoneal chemotherapy: An anaesthetic challenge

    PubMed Central

    Murughan, Kavita; Tiwari, Malati; Balakrishnan, Kalpana

    2014-01-01

    Cytoreductive surgery combined with hyperthermic intraperitoneal chemotherapy plays a considerable role as a treatment modality in surgical oncology in western countries. The advantage of this procedure is that the heated chemotherapeutic agent is circulated in the abdominal cavity and achieves high peritoneal concentration with limited systemic absorption. This procedure is complex not only to the surgical team, but also to the anaesthetist because apart from managing the usual physiologic changes associated with major surgery, one should also be prepared to manage the physiologic changes during the hyperthermic phase. Here, we present our experience with our first case. PMID:24700902

  5. Tuberculosis chemotherapy: current drug delivery approaches

    PubMed Central

    du Toit, Lisa Claire; Pillay, Viness; Danckwerts, Michael Paul

    2006-01-01

    Tuberculosis is a leading killer of young adults worldwide and the global scourge of multi-drug resistant tuberculosis is reaching epidemic proportions. It is endemic in most developing countries and resurgent in developed and developing countries with high rates of human immunodeficiency virus infection. This article reviews the current situation in terms of drug delivery approaches for tuberculosis chemotherapy. A number of novel implant-, microparticulate-, and various other carrier-based drug delivery systems incorporating the principal anti-tuberculosis agents have been fabricated that either target the site of tuberculosis infection or reduce the dosing frequency with the aim of improving patient outcomes. These developments in drug delivery represent attractive options with significant merit, however, there is a requisite to manufacture an oral system, which directly addresses issues of unacceptable rifampicin bioavailability in fixed-dose combinations. This is fostered by the need to deliver medications to patients more efficiently and with fewer side effects, especially in developing countries. The fabrication of a polymeric once-daily oral multiparticulate fixed-dose combination of the principal anti-tuberculosis drugs, which attains segregated delivery of rifampicin and isoniazid for improved rifampicin bioavailability, could be a step in the right direction in addressing issues of treatment failure due to patient non-compliance. PMID:16984627

  6. CHK1 Inhibitors in Combination Chemotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Dent, Paul; Tang, Yong; Yacoub, Adly; Dai, Yun; Fisher, Paul B.; Grant, Steven

    2011-01-01

    Cellular sensing of DNA damage, along with concomitant cell cycle arrest, is mediated by a great many proteins and enzymes. One focus of pharmaceutical development has been the inhibition of DNA damage signaling, and checkpoint kinases (Chks) in particular, as a means to sensitize proliferating tumor cells to chemotherapies that damage DNA. 7-Hydroxystaurosporine, or UCN-01, is a clinically relevant and well-studied kinase activity inhibitor that exerts chemosensitizing effects by inhibition of Chk1, and a multitude of Chk1 inhibitors have entered development. Clinical development of UCN-01 has overcome many initial obstacles, but the drug has nevertheless failed to show a high level of clinical activity when combined with chemotherapeutic agents. One very likely reason for the lack of clinical efficacy of Chk1 inhibitors may be that the inhibition of Chk1 causes the compensatory activation of ATM and ERK1/2 pathways. Indeed, inhibition of many enzyme activities, not necessarily components of cell cycle regulation, may block Chk1 inhibitor–induced ERK1/2 activation and enhance the toxicity of Chk1 inhibitors. This review examines the rationally hypothesized actions of Chk1 inhibitors as cell cycle modulatory drugs as well as the impact of Chk1 inhibition upon other cell survival signaling pathways. An understanding of Chk1 inhibition in multiple signaling contexts will be essential to the therapeutic development of Chk1 inhibitors. PMID:21540473

  7. Anticancer chemosensitivity changes between the original and recurrent tumors after successful chemotherapy selected according to the sensitivity assay.

    PubMed Central

    Nio, Y; Tamura, K; Tsubono, M; Kawabata, K; Masai, Y; Hayashi, H; Ishigami, S; Araya, S; Imamura, M

    1995-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: The authors compare and characterize the changes in chemosensitivity between the original tumors before chemotherapy and recurrent tumors after responses. SUMMARY BACKGROUND DATA: The drug resistance in clinical chemotherapy appears to be different from that in experimental chemotherapy, and the profile and mechanisms of clinical drug resistance in recurrent tumors, especially after successful chemotherapy has scarcely been studied. METHODS: Applied chemotherapies were selected out of four agents, cisplatin (CDDP), adriamycin (ADR), mitomycin-C (MMC) and 5-fluorouracil (5-FU), singly or in combinations by a DNA synthesis inhibition assay, by which the sensitivity of recurrent tumors was assessed. Responses were defined according to the standard criteria, and successful chemotherapy indicates complete response (CR) or partial response (PR) for solid tumors and complete disappearance for malignant effusion. RESULTS: In 37 patients, the effectiveness of four agents were compared between before chemotherapy and after recurrence, and the response lasted between 2 and 26 months (mean +/- SD, 7.7 +/- 5.5). The results suggest that locally recurred tumors may become resistant to the agents previously administered; by contrast, distantly recurred tumors may not necessarily become resistant to the agents administered. The recurrent tumors are suggested to be sensitive to the agents as follows: locally recurrent solid tumors, 5-FU; distantly recurrent solid tumors, 5-FU and CDDP; locally recurrent effusion, CDDP; distantly recurrent effusion, ADR. Twenty-three of 37 recurrent tumors were re-treated with chemotherapies selected according to the sensitivity assay, singly or in combination with a biologic response modifier (BRM)--a streptococcal preparation, OK-432, or interferon-alpha. Responses were seen in 1 of 13 solid recurrent tumors and in 6 of 10 recurrent effusions. Responses were seen only when the patients were treated with a combination of chemotherapy and

  8. 5-HT3 receptors as important mediators of nausea and vomiting due to chemotherapy.

    PubMed

    Navari, Rudolph M

    2015-10-01

    Chemotherapy-induced nausea and vomiting (CINV) is associated with a significant deterioration in quality of life. The emetogenicity of the chemotherapeutic agents, repeated chemotherapy cycles, and patient risk factors significantly influence CINV. The use of a combination of a 5-hydroxytryptamine-3 (5-HT3) receptor antagonist, dexamethasone, and a neurokinin-1 (NK-1) receptor antagonist has significantly improved the control of acute and delayed emesis in single-day chemotherapy. The first generation 5-HT3 receptor antagonists have been very effective in the control of chemotherapy induced emesis in the first 24 h postchemotherapy (acute emesis), but have not been as effective against delayed emesis (24-120 h postchemotherapy). Palonosetron, a second generation 5-HT3 receptor antagonist with a different half-life, a different binding capacity, and a different mechanism of action than the first generation 5-HT3 receptor antagonists appears to be the most effective agent in its class. Despite the control of emesis, nausea has not been well controlled by current agents. Olanzapine, a FDA approved antipsychotic that blocks multiple neurotransmitters: dopamine at D1, D2, D3, D4 brain receptors, serotonin at 5-HT2a, 5-HT2c, 5-HT3, 5-HT6 receptors, catecholamines at alpha1 adrenergic receptors, acetylcholine at muscarinic receptors, and histamine at H1 receptors, has emerged in recent trials as an effective preventative agent for chemotherapy-induced emesis and nausea, as well as a very effective agent for the treatment of breakthrough emesis and nausea. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Membrane channels and transporters in cancers.

  9. Chemotherapy for Late-Stage Cancer Patients: Meta-Analysis of Complete Response Rates

    PubMed Central

    Ashdown, Martin L.; Robinson, Andrew P.; Yatomi-Clarke, Steven L.; Ashdown, M. Luisa; Allison, Andrew; Abbott, Derek; Markovic, Svetomir N.; Coventry, Brendon J.

    2015-01-01

    Complete response (CR) rates reported for cytotoxic chemotherapy for late-stage cancer patients are generally low, with few exceptions, regardless of the solid cancer type or drug regimen. We investigated CR rates reported in the literature for clinical trials using chemotherapy alone, across a wide range of tumour types and chemotherapeutic regimens, to determine an overall CR rate for late-stage cancers. A total of 141 reports were located using the PubMed database. A meta-analysis was performed of reported CR from 68 chemotherapy trials (total 2732 patients) using standard agents across late-stage solid cancers—a binomial model with random effects was adopted. Mean CR rates were compared for different cancer types, and for chemotherapeutic agents with different mechanisms of action, using a logistic regression. Our results showed that the CR rates for chemotherapy treatment of late-stage cancer were generally low at 7.4%, regardless of the cancer type or drug regimen used. We found no evidence that CR rates differed between different chemotherapy drug types, but amongst different cancer types small CR differences were evident, although none exceeded a mean CR rate of 11%. This remarkable concordance of CR rates regardless of cancer or therapy type remains currently unexplained, and motivates further investigation. PMID:26834979

  10. [REACTIVATION OF TUBERCULOSIS PRESENTING WITH EMPYEMA DUE TO ANTICANCER CHEMOTHERAPY FOR DIFFUSE LARGE B CELL LYMPHOMA].

    PubMed

    Yuba, Tatsuya; Hatsuse, Mayumi; Kodama, Mai; Uda, Sayaka; Yoshimura, Akihiro; Kurisu, Naoko

    2016-04-01

    A 79-year-old man with a history of tuberculosis was found to have chronic empyema in the right lung and was diagnosed with malignant diffuse large-cell lymphoma (Ann Arbor stage IIE). After completion of one course of rituximab plus cyclophosphamide, pirarubicin, vincristine, and prednisolone (R-CHOP) chemotherapy, the patient developed lung abscess and sepsis caused by Streptococcus intermedius. This condition was treated with antimicrobial agents, and chemotherapy was resumed. After the second course, the chemotherapy regimen was continued without prednisolone, and after administration of the third course, a chest wall mass was found in the right lung. An acid-fast bacillus smear test of the abscess aspirate was positive, and Mycobacterium tuberculosis was detected in a polymerase chain reaction assay, leading to a diagnosis of perithoracic tuberculosis. Chemotherapy for the lymphoma was discontinued, and treatment with four oral antitubercular agents was started. This treatment led to remission of perithoracic tuberculosis. In Japan, tuberculous scar and chronic empyema are relatively common findings, and relapse of tuberculosis should always be considered for patients with these findings during chemotherapy and immunosuppressive therapy. PMID:27530021

  11. Current Pharmacotherapy for Chemotherapy-Induced Nausea and Vomiting in Cancer Patients

    PubMed Central

    Janelsins, Michelle C.; Tejani, Mohamed; Kamen, Charles; Peoples, Anita; Mustian, Karen M.; Morrow, Gary R.

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Nausea and vomiting are two of the most frequent and troubling side effects patients experience during chemotherapy, interfering with compliance with cancer therapies and quality of life. While newly available treatments have improved our ability to manage nausea and vomiting, anticipatory and delayed nausea and vomiting are still major problems for patients receiving chemotherapy. Many cancer patients consider delaying future chemotherapy cycles and some contemplate stopping chemotherapy altogether because of their fear of experiencing further nausea and vomiting. Areas Covered The purpose of this article is to provide an overview of the patho-psychophysiology of chemotherapy-induced nausea and vomiting, the recommended guidelines for treatment, current agents in late-stage clinical trials, and future research needs to address the continued challenges of treatment-related nausea and vomiting. Expert Opinion Despite advances in pharmaceutical and behavioral therapies, and the provision of standard clinical guidelines for effectively managing chemotherapy-induced nausea and vomiting (CINV), patients continue to experience CINV. Moreover, control of nausea, acute and delayed, and anticipatory nausea and vomiting (ANV) remains an important, unmet need among cancer patients. It is critical to focus attention on better understanding the mechanisms underlying nausea, anticipatory symptoms, and delayed symptoms. PMID:23496347

  12. PDE5 inhibitors enhance the lethality of standard of care chemotherapy in pediatric CNS tumor cells.

    PubMed

    Roberts, Jane L; Booth, Laurence; Conley, Adam; Cruickshanks, Nichola; Malkin, Mark; Kukreja, Rakesh C; Grant, Steven; Poklepovic, Andrew; Dent, Paul

    2014-06-01

    We determined whether clinically relevant phosphodiesterase 5 (PDE5) inhibitors interacted with clinically relevant chemotherapies to kill medulloblastoma cells. In medulloblastoma cells PDE5 inhibitors interacted in a greater than additive fashion with vincristine/etoposide/cisplatin to cause cell death. Knockdown of PDE5 expression recapitulated the combination effects of PDE5 inhibitor drugs with chemotherapy drugs. Expression of dominant negative caspase 9 did not significantly inhibit chemotherapy lethality but did significantly reduce enhanced killing in combination with the PDE5 inhibitor sildenafil. Overexpression of BCL-XL and c-FLIP-s suppressed individual and combination drug toxicities. Knockdown of CD95 or FADD suppressed drug combination toxicity. Treatment with PDE5 inhibitors and chemotherapy drugs promoted autophagy which was maximal at ~12 h post-treatment, and in a cell type-dependent manner knockdown of Beclin1 or ATG5 either suppressed or enhanced drug combination lethality. PDE5 inhibitors enhanced the induction of chemotherapy-induced DNA damage in a nitric oxide synthase-dependent fashion. In conclusion, our data demonstrate that the combination of PDE5 inhibitors with standard of care chemotherapy agents for medulloblastoma represents a possible novel modality for future treatment of this disease. PMID:24651037

  13. Significant response to lacosamide in a patient with severe chemotherapy-induced peripheral neuropathy.

    PubMed

    Ibrahim, Samar A; Albany, Zhanna; Albany, Constantine

    2015-05-01

    Chemotherapy-induced peripheral neuropathy (CIPN) is a major dose-limiting toxicity of potentially curative cancer therapy regimens. Cisplatin is the class of chemotherapy agent that has a broad spectrum of activity against several solid tumors, but it induces sensory neuropathy of upper and lower extremities. Cisplatin-induced peripheral neuropathy is usually in a "gloves and socks" distribution that can persist for months or years after completion of chemotherapy treatment. If the pain is severe, it affects the patient's long-term quality of life and can potentially result in chemotherapy dose reduction or treatment discontinuation. The mechanism of CIPN is not well understood, and a number of pathophysiological mechanisms have been proposed to explain the phenomenon. Although many therapies have been investigated for the prevention or treatment of CIPN, there is currently no accepted proven therapy. Here we report a case in which lacosamide alleviated painful CIPN symptoms. Lacosamide is an anticonvulsant drug that blocks the voltage-gated sodium channels in the neurons and may also be a promising novel candidate for the prevention and treatment of chemotherapy-induced peripheral neuropathy. Preclinical data support the role of lacosamide protective effect in a rat model of chemotherapy-induced neuropathy, randomized clinical trial is needed.

  14. Immunotherapy and chemotherapy in children with neuroblastoma.

    PubMed

    Nesbit, M E; Kersey, J; Finklestein, J; Weiner, J; Simmons, R

    1976-09-01

    Recent advances with immunotherapy in animal tumors suggested that trials with a combination of chemotherapy and immunotherapy in human malignant tumors might be worthwhile. A pilot program with Vibrio cholera neuraminidase-treated tumor cells plus BCG was tested in 3 patients who had had chemotherapy for disseminated neuroblastoma. Two of these children were in "complete remission" after radiation therapy and chemotherapy before the administration of immunotherapy. Relapse occurred in 5-6 months in all 3 patients. These disappointing results are discussed in relation to problems of current chemotherapy in disseminated neuroblastoma including results obtained at second-look operations in patients obtaining "complete remission."

  15. Chemotherapy

    MedlinePlus

    ... or get an injection (shot). Another way of giving chemo is through an IV line, which is ... eating, after using the bathroom, and after touching animals. This helps to prevent infection. Do not share ...

  16. Chemotherapy

    MedlinePlus

    ... En Español Making a Change – Your Personal Plan Hot Topics Meningitis Choosing Your Mood Prescription Drug Abuse ... temperature beverages may be easier to drink than hot or cold liquids. Get on a medication schedule. ...

  17. Chemotherapy

    MedlinePlus

    ... Brain Tumor Treatment Locations Treatment Side Effects & their Management Support and Resources Caregiver Resource Center Pediatric Caregiver Resource Center About Us Our Founders Board of Directors Staff Leadership Strategic Plan Financials News Careers Brain Tumor Information ...

  18. Bacteriocins as Potential Anticancer Agents

    PubMed Central

    Kaur, Sumanpreet; Kaur, Sukhraj

    2015-01-01

    Cancer remains one of the leading causes of deaths worldwide, despite advances in its treatment and detection. The conventional chemotherapeutic agents used for the treatment of cancer have non-specific toxicity toward normal body cells that cause various side effects. Secondly, cancer cells are known to develop chemotherapy resistance in due course of treatment. Thus, the demand for novel anti-cancer agents is increasing day by day. Some of the experimental studies have reported the therapeutic potential of bacteriocins against various types of cancer cell lines. Bacteriocins are ribosomally-synthesized cationic peptides secreted by almost all groups of bacteria. Some bacteriocins have shown selective cytotoxicity toward cancer cells as compared to normal cells. This makes them promising candidates for further investigation and clinical trials. In this review article, we present the overview of the various cancer cell-specific cytotoxic bacteriocins, their mode of action and efficacies. PMID:26617524

  19. Bacteriocins as Potential Anticancer Agents.

    PubMed

    Kaur, Sumanpreet; Kaur, Sukhraj

    2015-01-01

    Cancer remains one of the leading causes of deaths worldwide, despite advances in its treatment and detection. The conventional chemotherapeutic agents used for the treatment of cancer have non-specific toxicity toward normal body cells that cause various side effects. Secondly, cancer cells are known to develop chemotherapy resistance in due course of treatment. Thus, the demand for novel anti-cancer agents is increasing day by day. Some of the experimental studies have reported the therapeutic potential of bacteriocins against various types of cancer cell lines. Bacteriocins are ribosomally-synthesized cationic peptides secreted by almost all groups of bacteria. Some bacteriocins have shown selective cytotoxicity toward cancer cells as compared to normal cells. This makes them promising candidates for further investigation and clinical trials. In this review article, we present the overview of the various cancer cell-specific cytotoxic bacteriocins, their mode of action and efficacies.

  20. Impact of Clinical Oral Chemotherapy Program on Wastage and Hospitalizations

    PubMed Central

    Khandelwal, Nikhil; Duncan, Ian; Ahmed, Tamim; Rubinstein, Elan; Pegus, Cheryl

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: The oral chemotherapy cycle management program (CMP) provides clinical management support to patients receiving certain oral chemotherapies. The CMP includes a dose-monitoring (ie, split-fill) plan for early identification and management of adverse effects. If serious adverse effects are identified mid cycle, the remainder of the monthly supply is withheld, thus avoiding potential waste associated with early therapy discontinuation. This study investigated medication wastage and estimated potential cost savings for patients who were enrolled in the CMP, as compared with those who were not enrolled in the program. Study Design: Retrospective test-control study. Patients and Methods: Patients whose oral chemotherapy was initiated between June 2008 and February 2010 and who were enrolled in the CMP were included as the test group. Patient whose oral chemotherapy was initiated between June 2007 and May 2008 and who were not part of the CMP were included as the control group. Results: Medication wastage associated with early therapy discontinuation was found to be lower in the CMP group. Approximately 34% of patients in the CMP group could have avoided medication wastage if split-fill plans had been available, potentially realizing savings of approximately $934.20 per patient. Linear probability regression models showed that the CMP group had a 2.9% probability for reduction in hospital admissions (P < .05), resulting in additional savings of approximately $440.0 per patient. Combined savings resulting from reduced wastage and hospital admissions was approximately $1,374 per patient. Conclusion: Dose-monitoring programs such as the CMP effectively reduce wastage and serious adverse effects associated with oral chemotherapeutic agents, realizing potential cost savings for both payers and patients. PMID:21886508

  1. Sunscreening Agents

    PubMed Central

    Martis, Jacintha; Shobha, V; Sham Shinde, Rutuja; Bangera, Sudhakar; Krishnankutty, Binny; Bellary, Shantala; Varughese, Sunoj; Rao, Prabhakar; Naveen Kumar, B.R.

    2013-01-01

    The increasing incidence of skin cancers and photodamaging effects caused by ultraviolet radiation has increased the use of sunscreening agents, which have shown beneficial effects in reducing the symptoms and reoccurrence of these problems. Many sunscreen compounds are in use, but their safety and efficacy are still in question. Efficacy is measured through indices, such as sun protection factor, persistent pigment darkening protection factor, and COLIPA guidelines. The United States Food and Drug Administration and European Union have incorporated changes in their guidelines to help consumers select products based on their sun protection factor and protection against ultraviolet radiation, whereas the Indian regulatory agency has not yet issued any special guidance on sunscreening agents, as they are classified under cosmetics. In this article, the authors discuss the pharmacological actions of sunscreening agents as well as the available formulations, their benefits, possible health hazards, safety, challenges, and proper application technique. New technologies and scope for the development of sunscreening agents are also discussed as well as the role of the physician in patient education about the use of these agents. PMID:23320122

  2. Cancer immunotherapy via combining oncolytic virotherapy with chemotherapy: recent advances

    PubMed Central

    Simpson, Guy R; Relph, Kate; Harrington, Kevin; Melcher, Alan; Pandha, Hardev

    2016-01-01

    Oncolytic viruses are multifunctional anticancer agents with huge clinical potential, and have recently passed the randomized Phase III clinical trial hurdle. Both wild-type and engineered viruses have been selected for targeting of specific cancers, to elicit cytotoxicity, and also to generate antitumor immunity. Single-agent oncolytic virotherapy treatments have resulted in modest effects in the clinic. There is increasing interest in their combination with cytotoxic agents, radiotherapy and immune-checkpoint inhibitors. Similarly to oncolytic viruses, the benefits of chemotherapeutic agents may be that they induce systemic antitumor immunity through the induction of immunogenic cell death of cancer cells. Combining these two treatment modalities has to date resulted in significant potential in vitro and in vivo synergies through various mechanisms without any apparent additional toxicities. Chemotherapy has been and will continue to be integral to the management of advanced cancers. This review therefore focuses on the potential for a number of common cytotoxic agents to be combined with clinically relevant oncolytic viruses. In many cases, this combined approach has already advanced to the clinical trial arena. PMID:27579292

  3. Selection of chemotherapy for patient treatment utilizing a radiometric versus a cloning system

    SciTech Connect

    Von Hoff, D.D.; Forseth, B.J.; Turner, J.N.; Clark, G.M.; Warfel, L.E.

    1986-01-01

    From the 1950s to the 1970s, a number of in vitro systems that measured inhibition of glucose metabolism were used to predict the responsiveness of patients' tumors to chemotherapy. In vitro-in vivo correlations were excellent, with true positive predictions ranging from 68% to 96% and true negative predictions of 95% to 100%. The radiometric system is a new in vitro technique that measures the conversion of 14C-glucose to 14CO2. The system already has been utilized to screen prospective new antineoplastic agents for cytotoxicity. The present study was undertaken to determine if the radiometric system might be used to predict correctly the responsiveness of an individual patient's tumor to single-agent or combination-agent chemotherapy. Fifty-six tumor specimens were divided and tested for drug sensitivity in the radiometric system and a conventional human tumor clonning system. Overall, there was a significant correlation between in vitro and in vivo results for the conventional cloning system (P = 0.03). However, there was no significant relationship between in vitro and in vivo results for the radiometric system. The radiometric system consistently failed to predict the tumor's clinical sensitivity to single agents. A radiometric system is not useful in predicting the responsiveness of a patient's tumor to single agent chemotherapy and is not a replacement for the more biologically attractive human tumor cloning system.

  4. Cytotoxic chemotherapy: Still the mainstay of clinical practice for all subtypes metastatic breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Twelves, Chris; Jove, Maria; Gombos, Andrea; Awada, Ahmad

    2016-04-01

    Cytotoxic chemotherapy remains central to the treatment of all subtypes of metastatic breast cancer (MBC). We review evidence-based chemotherapy options for women with MBC after an anthracycline and a taxane including re-challenge with anthracycline or taxane, capecitabine, eribulin and ixabepilone as a single agent or combination with capecitabine (not approved in the EU); and the vinca alkaloid vinflunine as single agent or combined with either capecitabine/gemcitabine (also not approved EU or USA). Etirinotecan pegol, comprising irinotecan bound to polyethylene glycol by a biodegradable linker, is a new cytotoxic agent for patients with MBC that has achieved encouraging response rates in phase II studies; it has been further evaluated in the phase III BEACON trial. New cytotoxics should address novel targets or modes of delivery, achieve meaningful improvements in outcomes and seek to identify predictive biomarker(s). PMID:26857987

  5. Cytotoxic chemotherapy: Still the mainstay of clinical practice for all subtypes metastatic breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Twelves, Chris; Jove, Maria; Gombos, Andrea; Awada, Ahmad

    2016-04-01

    Cytotoxic chemotherapy remains central to the treatment of all subtypes of metastatic breast cancer (MBC). We review evidence-based chemotherapy options for women with MBC after an anthracycline and a taxane including re-challenge with anthracycline or taxane, capecitabine, eribulin and ixabepilone as a single agent or combination with capecitabine (not approved in the EU); and the vinca alkaloid vinflunine as single agent or combined with either capecitabine/gemcitabine (also not approved EU or USA). Etirinotecan pegol, comprising irinotecan bound to polyethylene glycol by a biodegradable linker, is a new cytotoxic agent for patients with MBC that has achieved encouraging response rates in phase II studies; it has been further evaluated in the phase III BEACON trial. New cytotoxics should address novel targets or modes of delivery, achieve meaningful improvements in outcomes and seek to identify predictive biomarker(s).

  6. Putting evidence into practice: evidence-based interventions for chemotherapy-induced peripheral neuropathy.

    PubMed

    Visovsky, Constance; Collins, Mary; Abbott, Linda; Aschenbrenner, Julie; Hart, Connie

    2007-12-01

    Chemotherapy-induced peripheral neuropathy (CIPN) continues to be a significant, debilitating symptom resulting from the administration of neurotoxic chemotherapy for the treatment of cancer. CIPN is an important consequence of cancer treatment because of its potential impact on physical functioning and quality of life. Oncology nurses play an important role in assessing, monitoring, and educating clients about CIPN. Despite investigations concerning pharmacologic and nonpharmacologic approaches to either preventing or minimizing the neurotoxicity resulting from certain chemotherapeutic agents, evidence to support the interventions is lacking. This article presents information concerning CIPN and summarizes the evidence for pharmacologic and nonpharmacologic approaches to the prevention and treatment of CIPN. PMID:18063548

  7. Pharmacogenomics in lung cancer chemotherapy: a review of what the oncologist should know.

    PubMed

    D'Antonio, Chiara; Milano, Annalisa; Righini, Riccardo; Onesti, Concetta Elisa; Bassanelli, Maria; Falcone, Rosa; Paris, Ida; Lauro, Salvatore; Marchetti, Paolo

    2014-10-01

    Lung cancer is the leading cause of cancer-related death around the world; the addition of chemotherapy to treatment of this disease has been shown to significantly increase progression-free survival and overall survival. Despite newer chemotherapies, it is important to personalize the care (treatment and dose) upon each single patient's susceptibility for controlling and reducing adverse side-effects, at best. The present review describes the current status of pharmacogenomics studies regarding germline DNA variants that may alter response and tolerability to chemotherapeutic agents used to treat lung cancer, including perspective studies.

  8. Antiparasitic agents.

    PubMed

    Rosenblatt, J E

    1992-03-01

    In recent years, introduction of new and more effective agents has improved the overall therapy for parasitic infections. This field, however, is still plagued by numerous problems, including the development of resistance to antimicrobial agents (especially with malaria), unavailability of agents in the United States or lack of approval by the Food and Drug Administration, and major toxicities or lack of experience in pregnant women and children, which limits use in these groups of patients. Widespread resistance of Plasmodium falciparum to chloroquine and other agents has complicated the treatment and prophylaxis of this type of malaria. A combination of quinine and Fansidar is usually effective oral therapy for falciparum malaria; quinidine may be administered if intravenous therapy is needed. Mefloquine, which is currently recommended for prophylaxis against chloroquine-resistant P. falciparum, is also effective for single-dose oral treatment, although this regimen has not yet been approved by the Food and Drug Administration. Metronidazole has been widely used for treatment of gastroenteritis due to Entamoeba histolytica and Giardia lamblia (not approved by the Food and Drug Administration for the latter) and is considered safe and effective. A new macrolide, azithromycin, has been reported to be effective for cryptosporidiosis in experimental animals; currently, no effective therapy is available for human infections. Combinations of sulfonamides with other antifolates, trimethoprim or pyrimethamine, are recommended therapy for Pneumocystis carinii pneumonia or toxoplasmosis, respectively. Therapies for the various types of leishmaniasis and trypanosomiasis are complex, often toxic, and often of limited efficacy. The benzimidazoles are effective for roundworm infections, although thiabendazole has severe toxic effects. The recent introduction of ivermectin has revolutionized the treatment and control of onchocerciasis. Another relatively new agent, praziquantel

  9. Chemotherapy for intraperitoneal use: a review of hyperthermic intraperitoneal chemotherapy and early post-operative intraperitoneal chemotherapy

    PubMed Central

    McPartland, Sarah; Detelich, Danielle; Saif, Muhammad Wasif

    2016-01-01

    Peritoneal spread of tumors is a major problem in cancer management. Patients develop a marked deterioration in quality of life and shortened survival. This is in part due to bowel obstructions, marked ascites, and overall increase debilitation. Standard medical management has shown to be inadequate for the treatment of these problems. Surgery can palliate symptoms, however, it is unable to be complete at the microscopic level by a significant spillage of tumor cells throughout the abdomen. Chemotherapy can have some improvement in symptoms however it is short lived due to poor penetration into the peritoneal cavity. The role of intraperitoneal chemotherapy is to maximize tumor penetration and optimize cell death while minimizing systemic toxicity. Hyperthermic intraperitoneal chemotherapy (HIPEC) and early post-operative intraperitoneal chemotherapy (EPIC) are two treatment methods that serve this role and have been shown to improve survival. This review will discuss different chemotherapies used for both of these treatment options. PMID:26941983

  10. Nano-structures mediated co-delivery of therapeutic agents for glioblastoma treatment: A review.

    PubMed

    Mujokoro, Basil; Adabi, Mohsen; Sadroddiny, Esmaeil; Adabi, Mahdi; Khosravani, Masood

    2016-12-01

    Glioblastoma is a malignant brain tumor and leads to death in most patients. Chemotherapy is a common method for brain cancer in clinics. However, the recent advancements in the chemotherapy of brain tumors have not been efficient enough. With the advancement of nanotechnology, the used drugs can enhance chemotherapy efficiency and increase the access to brain cancers. Combination of therapeutic agents has been recently attracted great attention for glioblastoma chemotherapy. One of the early benefits of combination therapies is the high potential to provide synergistic effects and decrease adverse side effects associated with high doses of single anticancer drugs. Therefore, brain tumor treatments with combination drugs can be considered as a crucial approach for avoiding tumor growth. This review investigates current progress in nano-mediated co-delivery of therapeutic agents with focus on glioblastoma chemotherapy prognosis. PMID:27612807

  11. Antidiabetic Agents.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Plummer, Nancy; Michael, Nancy, Ed.

    This module on antidiabetic agents is intended for use in inservice or continuing education programs for persons who administer medications in long-term care facilities. Instructor information, including teaching suggestions, and a listing of recommended audiovisual materials and their sources appear first. The module goal and objectives are then…

  12. Managing Chemotherapy Side Effects: Hair Loss (Alopecia)

    MedlinePlus

    ... C ancer I nstitute Managing Chemotherapy Side Effects Hair Loss (Alopecia) “Losing my hair was hard at first. Then I got used ... uncovered.” Questions other people have asked: Why does hair fall out? Chemotherapy can harm the cells that ...

  13. Chemotherapy plus interferon-alpha2b versus chemotherapy in the treatment of follicular lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Neri, N; Avilés, A; Cleto, S; Díaz, N; Talavera, A; García, E L; Díaz-Maqueo, J C

    2001-10-01

    The best treatment of follicular lymphoma remains to be determined because the long natural history of follicular lymphoma requires mature data for accurate analysis. Although the goal of primary treatment remains durable remission, the sequential application of effective treatments may also result in a prolongation of median survival time. The use of interferon (IFN) with doxorubicin-based chemotherapy has demonstrated an increase of event-free survival but not in overall survival; however, its acute and late cardiac toxicity limits its use. For this reason, we began a controlled clinical trial to assess the efficacy and toxicity of chemotherapy: COPP (cyclophosphamide, vincristine, prednisone, and procarbazine) + IFN alternating every month for six cycles compared to six cycles of chemotherapy. In an intent-to treat analysis, 55 patients were enrolled (median age 61 years). Most cases (91%) with advanced disease were randomly assigned to chemotherapy + IFN (28 cases) or chemotherapy (27 cases). Complete remission was observed in 16 patients: 59% (95% CI, 53-70%) in the chemotherapy arm compared to 20 patients 71% (95% CI, 58-79%) in the chemotherapy + IFN arm; total responses were 74% and 86%, respectively. At a median follow-up of 60 months, event-free survival was 100% for patients treated with chemotherapy + IFN, which was statistically different from patients treated with chemotherapy 70%. At 7 years, median survival has not yet been reached; 72% of patients chemotherapy + IFN remain alive without disease (95% CI, 59-81%), which is not statistically different from 72% (95%CI, 50-73%) in the chemotherapy arm. Non-hematological toxicity was most frequent and severe in the chemotherapy arm; hematological toxicity was similar in both groups. Thus, it appears that chemotherapy + IFN, as described herein, improves event-free survival but the overall survival rates remain unchanged. The use of COPP appears to be better that anthracycline-based chemotherapy because

  14. Potentiating effects of caffeine on teratogenicity of alkylating agents in mice

    SciTech Connect

    Fujii, T.; Nakatsuka, T.

    1983-08-01

    Teratogenic to subteratogenic doses of x-ray, mitomycin C, MNNG, thio-TEPA, cyclophosphamide, and chlorambucil were administered to pregnant ICR mice together with caffeine at doses of 12.5, 25, or 50 mg/kg on day 11 of gestation. Fetuses were examined for gross malformations on day 18 of gestation. The teratogenicity of mitomycin C was significantly potentiated by caffeine at a dose as low as 12.5 mg/kg. The teratogenicity of chlorambucil was also significantly potentiated by caffeine at 50 mg/kg, but similar potentiation was not observed for x-ray, MNNG, thio-TEPA, and cyclophosphamide.

  15. Trace Elements and Chemotherapy Sensitivity.

    PubMed

    Liu, Zhihui; Yang, Weiping; Long, Gang; Wei, Changyuan

    2016-10-01

    Trace elements might be associated with the development of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) and the efficacy of chemotherapy against HCC. Therefore, this study aimed to explore the association between trace elements and efficacy of chemotherapy in patients with HCC. Cancer, cancer-adjacent, and cancer-free tissues were collected intraoperatively from 55 patients with HCC between January 2001 and April 2004 at the Affiliated Tumor Hospital of Guangxi Medical University in Guangxi (China), a high HCC incidence area in the world. Trace element levels were analyzed by atomic absorption spectrophotometry. In vitro sensitivity of cancer cells to five chemotherapeutic drugs (5-fluorouracil, doxorubicin, cisplatin, carboplatin, and mitomycin) was tested using the 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide (MTT) assay in cancer cells from 32 patients. Zinc, copper, manganese, and selenium levels had the same gradient distribution in different liver tissues: cancer < cancer-adjacent < cancer-free tissues. Copper levels of cancer tissues were negatively correlated with body weight (r = -0.278, P = 0.027), while manganese and selenium levels were negatively correlated with age (r = -0.297, P = 0.015; r = -0.285, P = 0.018, respectively). Simple correlation analyses revealed that the carboplatin sensitivity was negatively correlated with selenium levels of cancer tissues, while doxorubicin sensitivity was negatively correlated with manganese levels (r = -0.497, P = 0.004). Partial correlation analyses showed that doxorubicin sensitivity only was negatively correlated with manganese levels (r = -0.450, P = 0.014). These results suggest that the selenium and manganese content in primary HCC tissues could influence the response of the HCC cells to carboplatin and doxorubicin. These preliminary results provide a basis for future studies. PMID:26961293

  16. Stosstherapy: a fresh look at some principles of therapy--especially chemotherapy.

    PubMed

    Keipert, J A

    1986-05-01

    Stosstherapy is the treatment of disease by a single or short-term, large and sometimes massive, dose of a therapeutic agent. It was most commonly used after the discovery of sulphonamides and penicillin, but has been revived with the recent use of single-dose chemotherapy. It is effective in many disorders, and these are documented, together with the dosage ranges which can be used. Stosstherapy has a rational basis, is safe, effective, has many advantages compared with long-term therapy, and could be used much more frequently. Reasons are given why stosstherapy conforms with accepted principles of chemotherapy, but it is given for a much shorter period because the time for an infection to be overcome may be much shorter than has been assumed. It is postulated that the duration of chemotherapy could be shortened in many diseases. PMID:3729824

  17. The role of chemotherapy in invasive cancer of the cervix uteri: current standards and future prospects.

    PubMed

    Rein, D T; Kurbacher, C M

    2001-11-01

    For many decades, invasive cervical cancer has been considered more or less chemoresistant and chemotherapy has been limited to patients presenting with overt metastatic disease or those suffering from pelvic recurrences which could not be advised to secondary local treatments. However, more than 20 different single agents are considered active in cervical cancer. Recent cooperative clinical trials have demonstrated the superiority of multi-modality strategies for patients with high-risk cervical cancer. These studies integrating chemotherapy as part of the primary therapeutic concept have provided the most significant improvement of locally advanced disease in more than three decades. This review summarizes current standards of chemotherapy for invasive cervical cancer and shows new developments which may improve systemic treatment of the disease.

  18. Phytonutrients as therapeutic agents.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Charu; Prakash, Dhan

    2014-09-01

    Nutrients present in various foods plays an important role in maintaining the normal functions of the human body. The major nutrients present in foods include carbohydrates, proteins, lipids, vitamins, and minerals. Besides these, there are some bioactive food components known as "phytonutrients" that play an important role in human health. They have tremendous impact on the health care system and may provide medical health benefits including the prevention and/or treatment of disease and various physiological disorders. Phytonutrients play a positive role by maintaining and modulating immune function to prevent specific diseases. Being natural products, they hold a great promise in clinical therapy as they possess no side effects that are usually associated with chemotherapy or radiotherapy. They are also comparatively cheap and thus significantly reduce health care cost. Phytonutrients are the plant nutrients with specific biological activities that support human health. Some of the important bioactive phytonutrients include polyphenols, terpenoids, resveratrol, flavonoids, isoflavonoids, carotenoids, limonoids, glucosinolates, phytoestrogens, phytosterols, anthocyanins, ω-3 fatty acids, and probiotics. They play specific pharmacological effects in human health such as anti-microbial, anti-oxidants, anti-inflammatory, antiallergic, anti-spasmodic, anti-cancer, anti-aging, hepatoprotective, hypolipidemic, neuroprotective, hypotensive, diabetes, osteoporosis, CNS stimulant, analgesic, protection from UVB-induced carcinogenesis, immuno-modulator, and carminative. This mini-review attempts to summarize the major important types of phytonutrients and their role in promoting human health and as therapeutic agents along with the current market trend and commercialization.

  19. New strategies against prostate cancer--Pt(II)-based chemotherapy.

    PubMed

    Matos, C S; de Carvalho, A L M B; Lopes, R P; Marques, M P M

    2012-01-01

    Prostate cancer is the second most common cancer worldwide and the sixth cause of cancer-related death in men. When hormone therapy fails to control tumour growth, castration-resistant prostate cancer (CRPC) occurs and chemotherapy drugs must be administered. Since 2004, docetaxel administration is the standard of care in metastatic CRPC, although it presents severe limitations such as acquired resistance and poor prognosis. An analogue (cabazitaxel) was approved by the FDA in 2010 as a second-line chemotherapeutic agent. Novel immuno- and hormonal therapy agents, as well as tumour vaccines, have been recently developed, but new strategies are still needed for effectively handling this type of neoplasia. Platinum compounds, in particular, have been the object of a growing interest, despite the former belief that they should have modest activity against prostate cancer. Compounds such as carboplatin, oxaliplatin or satraplatin, either alone or in combination, have lately shown promising results. In order to overcome the deleterious side-effects usually associated to these metal-based agents, several approaches have been followed with a view to optimise drug delivery and targeting, some of which showed considerable success in CRPC. Platinum drugs may therefore have an important role in the chemotherapeutic management of human metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer, mostly in second-line strategies. The present review addresses the most relevant studies on platinum-based antineoplastic agents towards CRPC in the last decade--from first--and second-generation complexes to newly developed compounds.

  20. Validity of reduced radiation dose for localized diffuse large B-cell lymphoma showing a good response to chemotherapy.

    PubMed

    Koiwai, Keiichiro; Sasaki, Shigeru; Yoshizawa, Eriko; Ina, Hironobu; Fukazawa, Ayumu; Sakai, Katsuya; Ozawa, Takesumi; Matsushita, Hirohide; Kadoya, Masumi

    2014-03-01

    To evaluate the validity of a decrease in the radiation dose for patients who were good responders to chemotherapy for localized diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL), 91 patients with localized DLBCL who underwent radiotherapy after multi-agent chemotherapy from 1988-2008 were reviewed. Exclusion criteria were as follows: central nervous system or nasal cavity primary site, or Stage II with bulky tumor (≥10 cm). Of these patients, 62 were identified as good responders to chemotherapy. They were divided into two groups receiving either a higher or a lower radiation dose (32-50.4 Gy or 15-30.6 Gy, respectively). There were no statistically significant differences between the lower and higher dose groups in progression-free survival, locoregional progression-free survival or overall survival. Adaptation of decreased radiation dose may be valid for localized DLBCL patients who show a good response to chemotherapy. PMID:24187329

  1. Comparison of bevacizumab plus chemotherapy with chemotherapy alone in advanced non-small-lung cancer patients.

    PubMed

    Tang, Ning; Wang, Zhehai

    2016-01-01

    Bevacizumab plus chemotherapy was approved by the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) as a first-line treatment for advanced nonsquamous, non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) in 2006. This study retrospectively compared the efficacy of bevacizumab plus chemotherapy with chemotherapy alone as the first-line and second-line treatment as well as the maintenance treatment for advanced NSCLC patients. A total of 1,352 patients were included and we analyzed the efficacy evaluation according to the criteria of the Response Evaluation Criteria In Solid Tumors (RECIST), survival, and adverse reactions. The data showed that for bevacizumab plus chemotherapy as the first-line treatment, the median progression-free survival (mPFS) and median overall survival (mOS) were 11.5 and 17.0 months, respectively, compared to 7.0 and 14 months, respectively, in patients who received chemotherapy alone (P<0.01). With bevacizumab plus chemotherapy as maintenance treatment, the mPFS and mOS were 6.0 and 17.4 months, respectively, compared to 3.0 and 15.0 months, respectively, with chemotherapy alone (P<0.01). With bevacizumab plus chemotherapy as the second-line treatment, the mPFS was 3.0 months compared to only 2.0 months with chemotherapy alone (P<0.01). The overall responses to the different regimens showed that the remission rate with bevacizumab plus chemotherapy was higher than that with chemotherapy alone (31.8% vs 25.5%, P<0.05), although there was no statistical difference in the disease control rate with either first- or second-line treatment. In conclusion, chemotherapy plus bevacizumab as the first-line and maintenance treatment, led to better curative rates and tolerable adverse reactions compared with chemotherapy alone in advanced NSCLC patients. Bevacizumab combined with cytotoxic drugs was suitable as the second-line treatment for such patients.

  2. Comparison of bevacizumab plus chemotherapy with chemotherapy alone in advanced non-small-lung cancer patients.

    PubMed

    Tang, Ning; Wang, Zhehai

    2016-01-01

    Bevacizumab plus chemotherapy was approved by the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) as a first-line treatment for advanced nonsquamous, non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) in 2006. This study retrospectively compared the efficacy of bevacizumab plus chemotherapy with chemotherapy alone as the first-line and second-line treatment as well as the maintenance treatment for advanced NSCLC patients. A total of 1,352 patients were included and we analyzed the efficacy evaluation according to the criteria of the Response Evaluation Criteria In Solid Tumors (RECIST), survival, and adverse reactions. The data showed that for bevacizumab plus chemotherapy as the first-line treatment, the median progression-free survival (mPFS) and median overall survival (mOS) were 11.5 and 17.0 months, respectively, compared to 7.0 and 14 months, respectively, in patients who received chemotherapy alone (P<0.01). With bevacizumab plus chemotherapy as maintenance treatment, the mPFS and mOS were 6.0 and 17.4 months, respectively, compared to 3.0 and 15.0 months, respectively, with chemotherapy alone (P<0.01). With bevacizumab plus chemotherapy as the second-line treatment, the mPFS was 3.0 months compared to only 2.0 months with chemotherapy alone (P<0.01). The overall responses to the different regimens showed that the remission rate with bevacizumab plus chemotherapy was higher than that with chemotherapy alone (31.8% vs 25.5%, P<0.05), although there was no statistical difference in the disease control rate with either first- or second-line treatment. In conclusion, chemotherapy plus bevacizumab as the first-line and maintenance treatment, led to better curative rates and tolerable adverse reactions compared with chemotherapy alone in advanced NSCLC patients. Bevacizumab combined with cytotoxic drugs was suitable as the second-line treatment for such patients. PMID:27536131

  3. Comparison of bevacizumab plus chemotherapy with chemotherapy alone in advanced non-small-lung cancer patients

    PubMed Central

    Tang, Ning; Wang, Zhehai

    2016-01-01

    Bevacizumab plus chemotherapy was approved by the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) as a first-line treatment for advanced nonsquamous, non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) in 2006. This study retrospectively compared the efficacy of bevacizumab plus chemotherapy with chemotherapy alone as the first-line and second-line treatment as well as the maintenance treatment for advanced NSCLC patients. A total of 1,352 patients were included and we analyzed the efficacy evaluation according to the criteria of the Response Evaluation Criteria In Solid Tumors (RECIST), survival, and adverse reactions. The data showed that for bevacizumab plus chemotherapy as the first-line treatment, the median progression-free survival (mPFS) and median overall survival (mOS) were 11.5 and 17.0 months, respectively, compared to 7.0 and 14 months, respectively, in patients who received chemotherapy alone (P<0.01). With bevacizumab plus chemotherapy as maintenance treatment, the mPFS and mOS were 6.0 and 17.4 months, respectively, compared to 3.0 and 15.0 months, respectively, with chemotherapy alone (P<0.01). With bevacizumab plus chemotherapy as the second-line treatment, the mPFS was 3.0 months compared to only 2.0 months with chemotherapy alone (P<0.01). The overall responses to the different regimens showed that the remission rate with bevacizumab plus chemotherapy was higher than that with chemotherapy alone (31.8% vs 25.5%, P<0.05), although there was no statistical difference in the disease control rate with either first- or second-line treatment. In conclusion, chemotherapy plus bevacizumab as the first-line and maintenance treatment, led to better curative rates and tolerable adverse reactions compared with chemotherapy alone in advanced NSCLC patients. Bevacizumab combined with cytotoxic drugs was suitable as the second-line treatment for such patients. PMID:27536131

  4. Virtual Reality: A Distraction Intervention for Chemotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Schneider, Susan M.; Hood, Linda E.

    2007-01-01

    Purpose/Objectives To explore virtual reality (VR) as a distraction intervention to relieve symptom distress in adults receiving chemotherapy treatments for breast, colon, and lung cancer. Design Crossover design in which participants served as their own control. Setting Outpatient clinic at a comprehensive cancer center in the southeastern United States. Sample 123 adults receiving initial chemotherapy treatments. Methods Participants were randomly assigned to receive the VR distraction intervention during one chemotherapy treatment and then received no intervention (control) during an alternate matched chemotherapy treatment. The Adapted Symptom Distress Scale–2, Revised Piper Fatigue Scale, and State Anxiety Inventory were used to measure symptom distress. The Presence Questionnaire and an open-ended questionnaire were used to evaluate the subjects’ VR experience. The influence of type of cancer, age, and gender on symptom outcomes was explored. Mixed models were used to test for differences in levels of symptom distress. Main Research Variables Virtual reality and symptom distress. Findings Patients had an altered perception of time (p < 0.001) when using VR, which validates the distracting capacity of the intervention. Evaluation of the intervention indicated that patients believed the head-mounted device was easy to use, they experienced no cybersickness, and 82% would use VR again. However, analysis demonstrated no significant differences in symptom distress immediately or two days following chemotherapy treatments. Conclusions Patients stated that using VR made the treatment seem shorter and that chemotherapy treatments with VR were better than treatments without the distraction intervention. However, positive experiences did not result in a decrease in symptom distress. The findings support the idea that using VR can help to make chemotherapy treatments more tolerable, but clinicians should not assume that use of VR will improve chemotherapy

  5. Taurine attenuates chemotherapy-induced nausea and vomiting in acute lymphoblastic leukemia.

    PubMed

    Islambulchilar, Mina; Asvadi, Iraj; Sanaat, Zohreh; Esfahani, Ali; Sattari, Mohammadreza

    2015-01-01

    Taurine has multiple physiological activities and it is decreased by chemotherapy. The purpose of our study was to evaluate the effect of oral taurine supplementation on the incidence of chemotherapy-induced nausea and vomiting in patients with acute lymphoblastic leukemia. Forty young patients aged over 16 (range: 16-23 years) suffering from acute lymphoblastic leukemia (all receiving same chemotherapy regimen) were recruited for the study at the beginning of maintenance course of their chemotherapy. The study population was randomized in a double-blind manner to receive either taurine or placebo (2 g per day orally, divided into two doses, taken 6 h after chemotherapeutic agents) for 6 months. Life quality and adverse effects including nausea and vomiting, taste and smell alterations, and weariness were assessed using a questionnaire. Data were analyzed using Pearson's Chi-square test. Of 40 participants, 32 finished the study (14 female and 18 male; mean age 19.2 ± 1.9 years). Four treatment and four placebo arm patients discontinued: one immigrated from the province, one died during the study, and six refused to continue. The results indicated that taurine-supplemented patients reported a significant (P < 0.05) improvement in chemotherapy-induced nausea and/or vomiting after taking taurine during study. Taurine significantly improved chemotherapy-induced taste and smell alterations (P < 0.05). Moreover, taurine significantly reduced weariness compared to placebo group (P < 0.05). This study showed that taurine co-administration decreased chemotherapy-induced nausea and vomiting during the maintenance therapy in acute lymphoblastic leukemia. PMID:25323734

  6. Overview, prevention and management of chemotherapy extravasation

    PubMed Central

    Kreidieh, Firas Y; Moukadem, Hiba A; El Saghir, Nagi S

    2016-01-01

    Chemotherapy extravasation remains an accidental complication of chemotherapy administration and may result in serious damage to patients. We review in this article the clinical aspects of chemotherapy extravasation and latest advances in definitions, classification, prevention, management and guidelines. We review the grading of extravasation and tissue damage according to various chemotherapeutic drugs and present an update on treatment and new antidotes including dexrazoxane for anthracyclines extravasation. We highlight the importance of education and training of the oncology team for prevention and prompt pharmacological and non-pharmacological management and stress the availability of new antidotes like dexrazoxane wherever anthracyclines are being infused. PMID:26862492

  7. Safe chemotherapy in the home environment.

    PubMed

    Chavis-Parker, Paula

    2015-05-01

    The Oncology Nursing Society and the American Society of Clinical Oncology have established guidelines for the safe and effective use of chemotherapeutic medications in the acute and outpatient care settings. A review of literature was performed to determine the safe and effective administration of chemotherapy in the home environment. The administration of oral and intravenous chemotherapy in the home has become a common intervention for patients being treated for cancer based on patient preference, cost-effectiveness of healthcare delivery, and increasing demand for oncology services. Home healthcare nurses can greatly impact the management of adverse effects of chemotherapy in the home, increasing the quality of life and improving patient outcomes.

  8. One-pot synthesis of dextran decorated reduced graphene oxide nanoparticles for targeted photo-chemotherapy.

    PubMed

    Hu, Yanfang; He, Liang; Ding, Jianxun; Sun, Diankui; Chen, Li; Chen, Xuesi

    2016-06-25

    Graphene-based nanocarriers show great potential in photo-chemotherapy, however, to prepare desired reduced graphene oxide (rGO) nanoparticles in a facile way is still a challenge. Herein, a novel strategy has been presented to prepare rGO nanoparticle using dextran (Dex) as a reducing agent. In this strategy, Dex was directly conjugated on rGO by hydrogen bond and then self-assemble to form rGO/Dex nanoparticles. After decorated by dextran, rGO-based nanoparticles not only show excellent biocompatibility but also can load anticancer drug for photo-chemotherapy. The data of fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) analysis, Raman spectrum analysis, thermos-gravimetric analysis (TGA), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), the transmission electron microscope (TEM) image and dynamic light scattering (DLS) measurements powerfully proved that the stable rGO-based nanoparticles with desired nanosize have been successfully prepared. To verify the photo-chemotherapy, anticancer drug, doxorubicin (DOX), has been loaded on rGO/Dex nanoparticles (rGO/DOX/Dex). And RGD, a kind of oligopeptide which can improve the intracellular uptake by αvβ3 recognition, also has been introduced (rGO/DOX/RDex). Compared with single chemotherapy, rGO/DOX/Dex and rGO/DOX/RDex combining the local specific chemotherapy and external near-infrared (NIR) photo-thermal therapy show higher therapeutic efficacy, endowing the desired rGO-based nanoparticle with great potential for cancer treatments. PMID:27083812

  9. Ginger augmented chemotherapy: A novel multitarget nontoxic approach for cancer management.

    PubMed

    Saxena, Roopali; Rida, Padmashree C G; Kucuk, Omer; Aneja, Ritu

    2016-06-01

    Cancer, referred to as the 'disease of civilization', continues to haunt humanity due to its dreadful manifestations and limited success of therapeutic interventions such as chemotherapy in curing the disease. Although effective, chemotherapy has repeatedly demonstrated inadequacy in disease management due to its debilitating side effects arising from its deleterious nonspecific effects on normal healthy cells. In addition, development of chemoresistance due to mono-targeting often results in cessation of chemotherapy. This urgently demands development and implementation of multitargeted alternative therapies with mild or no side effects. One extremely promising strategy that yet remains untapped in the clinic is augmenting chemotherapy with dietary phytochemicals or extracts. Ginger, depository of numerous bioactive molecules, not only targets cancer cells but can also mitigate chemotherapy-associated side effects. Consequently, combination therapy involving ginger extract and chemotherapeutic agents may offer the advantage of being efficacious with reduced toxicity. Here we discuss the remarkable and often overlooked potential of ginger extract to manage cancer, the possibility of developing ginger-based combinational therapies, and the major roadblocks along with strategies to overcome them in clinical translation of such inventions. We are optimistic that clinical implementation of such combination regimens would be a much sought after modality in cancer management. PMID:26842968

  10. One-pot synthesis of dextran decorated reduced graphene oxide nanoparticles for targeted photo-chemotherapy.

    PubMed

    Hu, Yanfang; He, Liang; Ding, Jianxun; Sun, Diankui; Chen, Li; Chen, Xuesi

    2016-06-25

    Graphene-based nanocarriers show great potential in photo-chemotherapy, however, to prepare desired reduced graphene oxide (rGO) nanoparticles in a facile way is still a challenge. Herein, a novel strategy has been presented to prepare rGO nanoparticle using dextran (Dex) as a reducing agent. In this strategy, Dex was directly conjugated on rGO by hydrogen bond and then self-assemble to form rGO/Dex nanoparticles. After decorated by dextran, rGO-based nanoparticles not only show excellent biocompatibility but also can load anticancer drug for photo-chemotherapy. The data of fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) analysis, Raman spectrum analysis, thermos-gravimetric analysis (TGA), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), the transmission electron microscope (TEM) image and dynamic light scattering (DLS) measurements powerfully proved that the stable rGO-based nanoparticles with desired nanosize have been successfully prepared. To verify the photo-chemotherapy, anticancer drug, doxorubicin (DOX), has been loaded on rGO/Dex nanoparticles (rGO/DOX/Dex). And RGD, a kind of oligopeptide which can improve the intracellular uptake by αvβ3 recognition, also has been introduced (rGO/DOX/RDex). Compared with single chemotherapy, rGO/DOX/Dex and rGO/DOX/RDex combining the local specific chemotherapy and external near-infrared (NIR) photo-thermal therapy show higher therapeutic efficacy, endowing the desired rGO-based nanoparticle with great potential for cancer treatments.

  11. Potential Use of Nicotinic Receptor Agonists for the Treatment of Chemotherapy-Induced Cognitive Deficits.

    PubMed

    Philpot, Rex M

    2015-10-01

    Over the past several decades, research in both humans and animals has established the existence of persistent cognitive deficits resulting from exposure to chemotherapeutic agents. Nevertheless, there has been very little research addressing the treatment of chemotherapy-induced cognitive deficits and there is currently no approved treatment for this condition, often referred to as 'chemo-brain.' Several drugs that enhance cholinergic function and/or increase nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (nAChR) activity have been demonstrated to improve cognitive performance and/or reverse cognitive deficits in animals, findings that have led to the use of these compounds to treat the cognitive deficits present in a variety of disorders including attention deficit disorder, Alzheimer's disease, Parkinson's disease and schizophrenia. Although nAChR agonists have not been assessed for their efficacy in treating chemotherapy-induced cognitive deficits, these drugs have been shown to produce measureable increases in performance on several behavioral tasks known to be disrupted by exposure to chemotherapeutic agents. While the processes underlying chemotherapy-induced cognitive deficits may differ from those underlying other disorders, there appears to be a broad spectrum of application for the use of nAChR agonists to improve cognitive function. Therefore, studies examining the use of these drugs in the treatment of chemotherapy-induced cognitive deficits should be conducted as they may be of benefit for the treatment of 'chemo-brain.' PMID:25652578

  12. KGB agents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gaina, Alex

    A short story is reported in which the activity of Communist Party of the USSR and secret KGB agents, which were payed by the State, in view of controlling of the conscience of population. The story reffers to the Physics Department of the Moscow University, Planing Institute of the Gosplan of Moldavian S.S.R. and Chishinau Technical University (actually: Technical University of Moldova), where the author has worked during Soviet times. Almost every 6-th citizen in the USSR was engaged in this activity, while actually the former communists rule in the Republic of Moldova.

  13. Breast Cancer Chemotherapy and Your Heart

    MedlinePlus

    ... of the American Heart Association Cardiology Patient Page Breast Cancer Chemotherapy and Your Heart Christine Unitt , Kamaneh Montazeri , ... Disclosures Footnotes Figures & Tables Info & Metrics eLetters Introduction Breast cancer is the most commonly diagnosed cancer in women. ...

  14. Novel Combination Chemotherapy for Localized Ewing Sarcoma

    Cancer.gov

    In this clinical trial, researchers will test whether the addition of the drug combination vincristine, topotecan, and cyclophosphamide to a standard chemotherapy regimen improves overall survival in patients with extracranial Ewing

  15. Effects of radiation therapy and chemotherapy on testicular function

    SciTech Connect

    Kinsella, T.J. )

    1989-01-01

    Chemotherapy and radiation therapy are commonly used alone or in combination in the curative management of many malignancies in adolescent and adult males. Over the last 15-20 years, the striking success in the treatment of some common cancers in reproductive males has led to increasing concern for damage to normal tissues, such as the testes, resulting from curative cancer treatment. Indeed, a major future goal for cancer treatment will be to improve on the complication-free cure rate. Inherent in achieving this goal is to understand the pathophysiology and clinical expression of testicular injury. Both chemotherapy and radiation therapy result in germ cell depletion with the development of oligo- to azoospermia and testicular atrophy. The type of drug (particularly the alkylating agents), duration of treatment, intensity of treatment, and drug combination are major variables in determining the extent and duration of testicular injury. Testicular injury with chemotherapy also appears to vary with the age of the patient at the time of treatment. Newer drug combinations are now being used which appear to have curative potential in tumors such as Hodgkin's disease and germ cell testicular cancer with less potential for testicular injury. The most accurate and complete information on radiation injury to the testes is derived from two studies of normal volunteers who received graded single doses directly to the testes. A clear dose-response relationship of clinical and histological testicular damage was found with gradual recovery occurring following doses of up to 600 cGy. While these two studies provide an important clinical data base, radiation therapy used in treating cancers involves multiple daily treatments, usually 25-35 delivered over several weeks. Additionally, direct testicular irradiation is seldom used clinically. 37 references.

  16. Fosaprepitant dimeglumine for the management of chemotherapy-induced nausea and vomiting: patient selection and perspectives.

    PubMed

    Candelario, Nellowe; Lu, Marvin Louis Roy

    2016-01-01

    Chemotherapy-induced nausea and vomiting (CINV) is a debilitating side effect of antineoplastic agents. Several treatment regimens are used to address this problem. Fosaprepitant is a neurokinin-1 receptor blocker used in the prevention and treatment of CINV, especially for moderately and severely emetogenic chemotherapy. It is highly effective in the treatment of delayed CINV. Data from previous studies show that fosaprepitant is noninferior to aprepitant in the management of CINV. Fosaprepitant is given as a single-dose intravenous infusion, thus offering better patient compliance. The dose-limiting side effect of fosaprepitant is an infusion-related reaction, ranging from pain at the infusion site to thrombophlebitis. This side effect has been reported with coadministration of anthracycline agents. PMID:27382332

  17. Fosaprepitant dimeglumine for the management of chemotherapy-induced nausea and vomiting: patient selection and perspectives

    PubMed Central

    Candelario, Nellowe; Lu, Marvin Louis Roy

    2016-01-01

    Chemotherapy-induced nausea and vomiting (CINV) is a debilitating side effect of antineoplastic agents. Several treatment regimens are used to address this problem. Fosaprepitant is a neurokinin-1 receptor blocker used in the prevention and treatment of CINV, especially for moderately and severely emetogenic chemotherapy. It is highly effective in the treatment of delayed CINV. Data from previous studies show that fosaprepitant is noninferior to aprepitant in the management of CINV. Fosaprepitant is given as a single-dose intravenous infusion, thus offering better patient compliance. The dose-limiting side effect of fosaprepitant is an infusion-related reaction, ranging from pain at the infusion site to thrombophlebitis. This side effect has been reported with coadministration of anthracycline agents. PMID:27382332

  18. Current and Evolving Therapies for Metastatic Pancreatic Cancer: Are We Stuck With Cytotoxic Chemotherapy?

    PubMed

    Varadhachary, Gauri R; Wolff, Robert A

    2016-09-01

    At present, front-line therapy for metastatic pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma is combination chemotherapy, most commonly FOLFIRINOX (fluorouracil, irinotecan, and oxaliplatin) or gemcitabine and nanoparticle albumin-bound paclitaxel. Despite a better understanding of the genomic landscape and the importance of the tumor microenvironment, we have not made a seismic shift in the overall survival for this disease. Given our growing understanding of the biology of pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma, the question remains whether novel, noncytotoxic agents will augment or even replace conventional chemotherapy. The thrust of ongoing efforts can be divided into broad categories, including exploiting the DNA damage repair phenotype, stroma and specific pathway-targeting agents, and enhancing immune destruction of pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma. In this article, we review the current and evolving therapeutic landscape of metastatic pancreatic cancer. PMID:27621332

  19. Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis on the Role of Chemotherapy in Advanced and Metastatic Neuroendocrine Tumor (NET)

    PubMed Central

    Wong, Matthew H.; Lee, Adrian; Li, Bob T.; Lumba, Sumit; Clarke, Stephen J.; Samra, Jaswinder; Pavlakis, Nick

    2016-01-01

    Background/Objectives In the era of somatostatin analogues and targeted therapies, the role of chemotherapy in NET remains largely undefined. This systematic review aimed to assess the effect of chemotherapy on response rates (RR), progression-free survival (PFS), overall survival (OS) and toxicity compared to other chemotherapies/systemic therapies or best supportive care in patients with advanced or metastatic NET. Methods Randomised controlled trials (RCTs) from 1946 to 2015 were identified from MEDLINE, EMBASE, other databases and conference proceedings. Review of abstracts, quality assessment and data abstraction were performed independently by two investigators. Meta-analyses were conducted using Mantel-Haenszel analysis with random-effects modelling. Results Six RCTs comparing standard streptozotocin plus 5-fluorouacil (STZ/5FU) chemotherapy to other chemotherapy regimens, and 2 comparing this to interferon (IFN) were included. Only 1 study was considered at low risk of bias. STZ/5-FU was no different to other chemotherapies in response rate [RR 0.96; 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.72–1.27], PFS (RR 0.95; CI 0.81–1.13), or OS (RR 1.03; CI 0.77–1.39). IFN may produce higher response than STZ/5FU (RR 0.20; CI 0.04–1.13), but event rates were small and survival was no different. Interferon was associated with higher overall haematological (RR 0.47; CI 0.27–0.82) and lower overall renal toxicity (RR 3.61; CI 1.24–10.51). Conclusion Strong evidence is lacking in the area of chemotherapy in neuroendocrine tumors. There is currently no evidence that one chemotherapeutic regimen is significantly better than the other, nor is interferon better than chemotherapy. There is an urgent need to design RCTs comparing modern chemotherapy to other agents in NET. PMID:27362760

  20. Prodrug strategies in anticancer chemotherapy.

    PubMed

    Kratz, Felix; Müller, Ivonne A; Ryppa, Claudia; Warnecke, André

    2008-01-01

    The majority of clinically approved anticancer drugs are characterized by a narrow therapeutic window that results mainly from a high systemic toxicity of the drugs in combination with an evident lack of tumor selectivity. Besides the development of suitable galenic formulations such as liposomes or micelles, several promising prodrug approaches have been followed in the last decades with the aim of improving chemotherapy. In this review we elucidate the two main concepts that underlie the design of most anticancer prodrugs: drug targeting and controlled release of the drug at the tumor site. Consequently, active and passive targeting using tumor-specific ligands or macromolecular carriers are discussed as well as release strategies that are based on tumor-specific characteristics such as low pH or the expression of tumor-associated enzymes. Furthermore, other strategies such as ADEPT (antibody-directed enzyme prodrug therapy) and the design of self-eliminating structures are introduced. Chemical realization of prodrug approaches is illustrated by drug candidates that have or may have clinical importance.

  1. Natural products for cancer chemotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Demain, Arnold L.; Vaishnav, Preeti

    2011-01-01

    Summary For over 40 years, natural products have served us well in combating cancer. The main sources of these successful compounds are microbes and plants from the terrestrial and marine environments. The microbes serve as a major source of natural products with anti‐tumour activity. A number of these products were first discovered as antibiotics. Another major contribution comes from plant alkaloids, taxoids and podophyllotoxins. A vast array of biological metabolites can be obtained from the marine world, which can be used for effective cancer treatment. The search for novel drugs is still a priority goal for cancer therapy, due to the rapid development of resistance to chemotherapeutic drugs. In addition, the high toxicity usually associated with some cancer chemotherapy drugs and their undesirable side‐effects increase the demand for novel anti‐tumour drugs active against untreatable tumours, with fewer side‐effects and/or with greater therapeutic efficiency. This review points out those technologies needed to produce the anti‐tumour compounds of the future. PMID:21375717

  2. Chemotherapy-induced Spontaneous Pneumothorax: Case Series.

    PubMed

    Hendarsih, Een; Fadjari, Trinugroho H; Oehadian, Amaylia

    2016-04-01

    We present 2 patients who developed spontaneous pneumothorax (SP) following rapid regression of lymphoma and rhabdomyosarcoma with lung metastases. Case 1, a 43-year old man was admitted to our hospital with dyspnea 10 days before admission. He denied any recent trauma or previous treatment for lung tuberculosis. Three weeks prior to admission, he received first cycle of CHOP for non-Hodgkin's lymphoma stage II BE. Chest X-ray consistent with right pneumothorax. After treatment with chest tube drainage for about 1 month, the patient recovered and chemotherapy could be continued without further complications. Case 2, a 35- year old man was admitted to other hospital with dyspnea and chest pain on day 4 after second cycle of systemic combined chemotherapy for rhabdomyosarcoma stage IV (lung metastases) with doxorubicin, ifosfamide, mesna, and dacarbazine. Chest X-ray showed hydropneumothorax on right and left lung. After treatment with chest tube drainage about 2 weeks, the patient recovered and chemotherapy could be continued without further complications. The mechanism of pneumothorax following chemotherapy is not clearly understood yet, however, several hypotheses have been considered: 1) the rupture of a subpleural bulla after chemotherapy; 2) the rupture of an emphysematous bulla in an over expanded portion of the lung which is partially obstructed by a neoplasm; 3) tumor lyses or necrosis due to cytotoxic chemotherapy directly induces the formation of fistula. Dyspnea and chest pain suddenly appear during successful chemotherapy for metastatic chemosensitive tumors should alert the physician to the possibility of SP. The treatment is directed toward lung re-expansion. Chemotherapy induced pneumothorax should be considered as oncologic emergency. PMID:27550883

  3. Reviewing current and emerging antiemetics for chemotherapy-induced nausea and vomiting prophylaxis.

    PubMed

    Natale, James J

    2015-01-01

    This review provides background information on chemotherapy-induced nausea and vomiting (CINV) classification and pathophysiology and reviews various antiemetic agents for CINV prophylaxis, including corticosteroids, serotonin receptor antagonists (5-HT3 RAs), tachykinin NK1 receptor antagonists (NK1 RAs), and olanzapine. Other less commonly used agents are briefly discussed. Practical considerations are reviewed as well, including emetogenicity of chemotherapeutic regimens, patient-specific risk factors for CINV, principles of CINV management, health economics outcome research, and quality of life. Available data on the newly FDA-approved antiemetic combination netupitant/palonosetron (NEPA) is also reviewed. Prevention of CINV is an important goal in managing patients with cancer and is especially difficult with respect to nausea and delayed CINV. Corticosteroids are a mainstay of CINV prophylaxis and are usually given in combination with other therapies. The 5-HT3 RA palonosetron has shown increased efficacy over other agents in the same class for prevention of delayed emesis with moderately emetogenic chemotherapy and NK1 RAs improve emesis prevention in combination with 5-HT3 RAs and dexamethasone. Olanzapine has shown efficacy for CINV prophylaxis and the treatment of breakthrough CINV. The new combination therapy, NEPA, has been shown to be efficacious for the prevention of acute, delayed, and overall CINV. Risk factors that have been identified for CINV include gender, age, and alcohol intake. It is important to assess the emetogenicity of chemotherapy regimens as well as the potential impact of patient risk factors in order to provide adequate prophylaxis. Acute and delayed CINV are severe, burdensome side effects of chemotherapy; however, new data on prevention and the discovery of new agents can further improve CINV control.

  4. Endocrinological late effects after chemotherapy for testicular cancer.

    PubMed Central

    Berger, C. C.; Bokemeyer, C.; Schuppert, F.; Schmoll, H. J.

    1996-01-01

    Type and extent of endocrinological alterations were studied in long-term disease-free survivors after cisplatin-based chemotherapy for testicular cancer. A total of 63 patients with a median age of 30 (19-53) years, and median follow-up of 42 (16-128) months were included. Elevated serum follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH) levels were found in 63% of patients, 24% showed pathologically elevated luteinising hormone (LH) levels with normal and 10% with subnormal testosterone levels. The degree of gonadotropin elevation was highly significantly correlated with the cumulative platinum (P) dose. Patients treated with platinum-vinblastine-bleomycin regimens showed higher gonadotropin levels than those treated with platinum-etoposide-bleomycin. The adrenal androgen dehydroepiandrosterone (DHEA), pathologically elevated in 68% of patients, was significantly correlated with the cumulative doses of chemotherapy (ctx) used and to the gonadotropin levels. Treatment variables, such as type and dose of cytotoxic agents used, as well as degree of gonadotropin elevation were further correlated with changes in oestron, testosterone and 17 alpha-OH-progesterone levels. Cholesterol levels were elevated in 32% of patients and significant interactions between the steroid hormone levels and cardiovascular risk factors could be shown. PMID:8624272

  5. Cytoreductive surgery and hyperthermic intraperitoneal chemotherapy in gastric cancer

    PubMed Central

    Seshadri, Ramakrishnan Ayloor; Glehen, Olivier

    2016-01-01

    Gastric cancer associated peritoneal carcinomatosis (GCPC) has a poor prognosis with a median survival of less than one year. Systemic chemotherapy including targeted agents has not been found to significantly increase the survival in GCPC. Since recurrent gastric cancer remains confined to the abdominal cavity in many patients, regional therapies like aggressive cytoreductive surgery (CRS) and hyperthermic intraperitoneal chemotherapy (HIPEC) have been investigated for GCPC. HIPEC has been used for three indications in GC- as an adjuvant therapy after a curative surgery, HIPEC has been shown to improve survival and reduce peritoneal recurrences in many randomised trials in Asian countries; as a definitive treatment in established PC, HIPEC along with CRS is the only therapeutic modality that has resulted in long-term survival in select groups of patients; as a palliative treatment in advanced PC with intractable ascites, HIPEC has been shown to control ascites and reduce the need for frequent paracentesis. While the results of randomised trials of adjuvant HIPEC from western centres are awaited, the role of HIPEC in the treatment of GCPC is still evolving and needs larger studies before it is accepted as a standard of care. PMID:26811651

  6. Salvage radiotherapy for carcinoma of the ovary following chemotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Cheung, A.Y.

    1988-05-01

    Following single-agent or combination chemotherapy, 9 patients with epithelial carcinoma of the ovary had elective second-look laparotomy. Macroscopic intraperitoneal disease was resected in 4 patients. Therefore, after the laparotomy, all 9 patients had only biopsy-proven, microscopic residual disease, and they received whole abdominopelvic irradiation. Hematological tolerance was satisfactory, with only 2 patients developing asymptomatic thrombocytopenia. Mild gastrointestinal reactions, while frequent during radiotherapy, did not interrupt treatment in any patient. After follow-up ranging from 6 to 28 months (median 12 months), 2 patients died of cancer, 2 were alive with cancer, 3 were alive without clinical recurrence, and 2 were alive without biopsy-proven recurrence. Bowel complication occurred in 4 patients: 2 developed intestinal obstruction due to recurrent tumor, 1 developed subacute bowel obstruction which spontaneously resolved, and 1 patient required bowel resection because of a radiation complication. This study indicated that after single- or multiple-drug chemotherapy, most patients could complete the course of whole abdominopelvic irradiation. Gastrointestinal complications could be secondary to radiation damage or to recurrent tumor. While whole abdominopelvic irradiation was not an effective second-line treatment, some long-term survivors could still be expected.

  7. Chemotherapy-free treatment in patients with follicular lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Sarkozy, Clémentine; Salles, Gilles; Bachy, Emmanuel

    2015-04-01

    The outcome of patients with follicular lymphoma (FL) has improved over the last two decades through the introduction of anti-CD20 monoclonal antibodies, usually used in combination with chemotherapy. However, patients with FL still experience multiple relapses, requiring several lines of treatment. Early toxicity of chemotherapy is a significant concern and as the life expectancy of patients with FL is increasing, late toxicities become an increasingly important concern. Progress made in understanding the biology of FL, especially dysregulation of intracellular pathways and immunological antitumor responses, recently allowed for the development of innovative chemo-free therapeutic approaches. In this report, different options such as new anti-CD20 antibodies, antibodies targeting other cell surface antigens, bi-specific antibodies, immunomodulation, idiotype vaccine and other targeted therapies are presented. The article also highlights how, although promising in early phase studies, the cost-effectiveness of new agents will have to be justified in Phase III trials. Furthermore, chemo-free regimen might not mean toxicity-free treatment and monitoring of early and late toxicities is required. PMID:25585961

  8. Acute and long-term gastrointestinal consequences of chemotherapy.

    PubMed

    Di Fiore, Frédéric; Van Cutsem, Eric

    2009-01-01

    There are many anti-neoplastic agents in cancer treatment. Combination regimens are often the main standard treatment, particularly for gastrointestinal malignancies. The introduction of new regimens that combine fluoropyrimidines with irinotecan or oxaliplatin and recently also with antibodies against the Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor (EGFR) (cetuximab and panitumumab) and against the Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor (VEGF) (bevacizumab) pathways, has dramatically improved the progression free survival and survival of patients with metastatic colorectal cancer. This rapid extension of available anti-neoplastic drugs has, however, also highlighted the urgent need for clinicians to better understand and identify the spectrum of acute and late toxicities of these drugs. Acute and long-term adverse effects are inherent to non-surgical cancer treatment using chemotherapy and/or radiation therapy, which can profoundly affect the gastrointestinal tract leading to a wide spectrum of acute and late toxicities. An improved knowledge of the aetiology, incidence, supportive measures and of the prevention of these toxicities is warranted to improve patient care. We herein review and discuss the main acute and late gastrointestinal toxicities of chemotherapy and/or radiotherapy for patients with gastrointestinal malignancies.

  9. Hyperthermia as Adjunct to Intravesical Chemotherapy for Bladder Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Owusu, Richmond A.; Abern, Michael R.; Inman, Brant A.

    2013-01-01

    Nonmuscle invasive bladder cancer remains a very costly cancer to manage because of high recurrence rates requiring long-term surveillance and treatment. Emerging evidence suggests that adjunct and concurrent use of hyperthermia with intravesical chemotherapy after transurethral resection of bladder tumor further reduces recurrence risk and progression to advanced disease. Hyperthermia has both direct and immune-mediated cytotoxic effect on tumor cells including tumor growth arrest and activation of antitumor immune system cells and pathways. Concurrent heat application also acts as a sensitizer to intravesical chemotherapy agents. As such the ability to deliver hyperthermia to the focus of tumor while minimizing damage to surrounding benign tissue is of utmost importance to optimize the benefit of hyperthermia treatment. Existing chemohyperthermia devices that allow for more localized heat delivery continue to pave the way in this effort. Current investigational methods involving heat-activated drug delivery selectively to tumor cells using temperature-sensitive liposomes also offer promising ways to improve chemohyperthermia efficacy in bladder cancer while minimizing toxicity to benign tissue. This will hopefully allow more widespread use of chemohyperthermia to all bladder cancer patients, including metastatic bladder cancer. PMID:24073396

  10. Critical evaluation of the role of nutritional support with chemotherapy.

    PubMed

    Chlebowski, R T

    1985-01-01

    Although weight loss has an adverse impact on cancer patient survival, the ability of caloric provision via total parenteral nutrition (TPN) to favorably influence outcome in chemotherapy-treated populations is not established. In randomized trials, no significant improvement in either response or survival was associated with TPN addition to chemotherapeutic treatment of adult patients with lymphoma, sarcoma, colon cancer, adenocarcinoma and small cell carcinoma of the lung, or testicular carcinoma. In two instances, TPN addition was associated with decreased survival, again raising the concern that caloric support in the absence of effective antitumor therapy might stimulate cancer growth. In any event, the hypothesis that nutritional repletion of a malnourished cancer patient receiving chemotherapy will improve clinical outcome remains to be critically tested, as studies demonstrating sequential improvement in lean body mass have not been reported. Most recently, consideration of potential mechanisms underlying the development of cancer cachexia has led to new strategies for nutritional intervention. For example, hypogonadism or low testosterone levels have been described in male patient populations with advanced cancer and correlated with weight loss and adverse outcome, leading to trial of replacement therapy with nandrolone decanoate. Similarly, the frequent identification of abnormal glucose metabolism in the patients with cancer cachexia has stimulated clinical trials with agents such as hydrazine sulfate and insulin designed to reverse the metabolic abnormality. Whether such efforts designed to alter metabolic abnormalities associated with cancer cachexia will improve clinical outcome will be determined in ongoing clinical trials.

  11. Pharmacologic Agents for Chronic Diarrhea.

    PubMed

    Lee, Kwang Jae

    2015-10-01

    Chronic diarrhea is usually associated with a number of non-infectious causes. When definitive treatment is unavailable, symptomatic drug therapy is indicated. Pharmacologic agents for chronic diarrhea include loperamide, 5-hydroxytryptamine type 3 (5-HT3) receptor antagonists, diosmectite, cholestyramine, probiotics, antispasmodics, rifaximin, and anti-inflammatory agents. Loperamide, a synthetic opiate agonist, decreases peristaltic activity and inhibits secretion, resulting in the reduction of fluid and electrolyte loss and an increase in stool consistency. Cholestyramine is a bile acid sequestrant that is generally considered as the first-line treatment for bile acid diarrhea. 5-HT3 receptor antagonists have significant benefits in patients with irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) with diarrhea. Ramosetron improves stool consistency as well as global IBS symptoms. Probiotics may have a role in the prevention of antibiotic-associated diarrhea. However, data on the role of probiotics in the treatment of chronic diarrhea are lacking. Diosmectite, an absorbent, can be used for the treatment of chronic functional diarrhea, radiation-induced diarrhea, and chemotherapy-induced diarrhea. Antispasmodics including alverine citrate, mebeverine, otilonium bromide, and pinaverium bromide are used for relieving diarrheal symptoms and abdominal pain. Rifaximin can be effective for chronic diarrhea associated with IBS and small intestinal bacterial overgrowth. Budesonide is effective in both lymphocytic colitis and collagenous colitis. The efficacy of mesalazine in microscopic colitis is weak or remains uncertain. Considering their mechanisms of action, these agents should be prescribed properly. PMID:26576135

  12. Pharmacologic Agents for Chronic Diarrhea

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Chronic diarrhea is usually associated with a number of non-infectious causes. When definitive treatment is unavailable, symptomatic drug therapy is indicated. Pharmacologic agents for chronic diarrhea include loperamide, 5-hydroxytryptamine type 3 (5-HT3) receptor antagonists, diosmectite, cholestyramine, probiotics, antispasmodics, rifaximin, and anti-inflammatory agents. Loperamide, a synthetic opiate agonist, decreases peristaltic activity and inhibits secretion, resulting in the reduction of fluid and electrolyte loss and an increase in stool consistency. Cholestyramine is a bile acid sequestrant that is generally considered as the first-line treatment for bile acid diarrhea. 5-HT3 receptor antagonists have significant benefits in patients with irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) with diarrhea. Ramosetron improves stool consistency as well as global IBS symptoms. Probiotics may have a role in the prevention of antibiotic-associated diarrhea. However, data on the role of probiotics in the treatment of chronic diarrhea are lacking. Diosmectite, an absorbent, can be used for the treatment of chronic functional diarrhea, radiation-induced diarrhea, and chemotherapy-induced diarrhea. Antispasmodics including alverine citrate, mebeverine, otilonium bromide, and pinaverium bromide are used for relieving diarrheal symptoms and abdominal pain. Rifaximin can be effective for chronic diarrhea associated with IBS and small intestinal bacterial overgrowth. Budesonide is effective in both lymphocytic colitis and collagenous colitis. The efficacy of mesalazine in microscopic colitis is weak or remains uncertain. Considering their mechanisms of action, these agents should be prescribed properly. PMID:26576135

  13. Pharmacologic Agents for Chronic Diarrhea.

    PubMed

    Lee, Kwang Jae

    2015-10-01

    Chronic diarrhea is usually associated with a number of non-infectious causes. When definitive treatment is unavailable, symptomatic drug therapy is indicated. Pharmacologic agents for chronic diarrhea include loperamide, 5-hydroxytryptamine type 3 (5-HT3) receptor antagonists, diosmectite, cholestyramine, probiotics, antispasmodics, rifaximin, and anti-inflammatory agents. Loperamide, a synthetic opiate agonist, decreases peristaltic activity and inhibits secretion, resulting in the reduction of fluid and electrolyte loss and an increase in stool consistency. Cholestyramine is a bile acid sequestrant that is generally considered as the first-line treatment for bile acid diarrhea. 5-HT3 receptor antagonists have significant benefits in patients with irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) with diarrhea. Ramosetron improves stool consistency as well as global IBS symptoms. Probiotics may have a role in the prevention of antibiotic-associated diarrhea. However, data on the role of probiotics in the treatment of chronic diarrhea are lacking. Diosmectite, an absorbent, can be used for the treatment of chronic functional diarrhea, radiation-induced diarrhea, and chemotherapy-induced diarrhea. Antispasmodics including alverine citrate, mebeverine, otilonium bromide, and pinaverium bromide are used for relieving diarrheal symptoms and abdominal pain. Rifaximin can be effective for chronic diarrhea associated with IBS and small intestinal bacterial overgrowth. Budesonide is effective in both lymphocytic colitis and collagenous colitis. The efficacy of mesalazine in microscopic colitis is weak or remains uncertain. Considering their mechanisms of action, these agents should be prescribed properly.

  14. Occupational Exposure to Chemotherapy of Pharmacy Personnel at a Single Centre

    PubMed Central

    Ramphal, Raveena; Bains, Tejinder; Goulet, Geneviève; Vaillancourt, Régis

    2015-01-01

    Background: Cyclophosphamide is one of the most commonly used chemotherapy drugs worldwide. Data concerning environmental contamination and biological exposure of pharmacy personnel to this and other chemotherapy drugs are limited. Objectives: To determine whether pharmacy personnel involved in preparing and checking cyclophosphamide doses were more likely to have detectable levels of this drug in their urine than non-oncology pharmacy personnel with no known contact with the drug, and to compare the degree of surface contamination with cyclophosphamide, methotrexate, and ifosfamide in the oncology pharmacy of a tertiary care pediatric hospital, where chemotherapy doses were prepared, and the main (control) pharmacy in the same institution, where no chemotherapy was prepared. Methods: Biological exposure to cyclophosphamide was compared between pharmacy personnel who did and did not handle this drug by determining whether participants had detectable amounts of cyclophosphamide in their urine. Environmental exposure to chemotherapy drugs was assessed by using surface wipes to determine the degree of surface contamination with various chemotherapy agents in the oncology pharmacy and the main (control) pharmacy. Results: On initial testing, cyclophosphamide was detected in the urine of all pharmacy personnel (n = 7 oncology personnel, n = 5 control personnel). However, it was determined that all control personnel had been exposed to the oncology pharmacy on the day of testing. Repeat testing of these individuals revealed no positive samples among those not exposed to the oncology pharmacy on the day of repeat testing. The sole positive result on retesting of control personnel was for a participant who had been exposed to the oncology pharmacy on the retest day. Surface wipe testing revealed contamination of the oncology pharmacy with cyclophosphamide and methotrexate before and after cleaning, as well as contamination with ifosfamide after cleaning. The main (control

  15. [Chemotherapy selection through the process of gastric cancer].

    PubMed

    Liu, Tian-Shu

    2012-02-01

    The role of chemotherapy has become more and more important in the whole process of gastric cancer. S-1 or XELOX regimen is regarded as the standard treatment option in adjuvant chemotherapy. First-line chemotherapy in advanced gastric cancer has been established to improve survival, and the benefit from second-line chemotherapy is being acknowledged. More studies are needed to assess the neoadjuvant chemotherapy.

  16. Filling agents.

    PubMed

    Glavas, Ioannis P

    2005-06-01

    Injectable fillers have become an important component of minimally invasive facial rejuvenation modalities. Their ease of use, effectiveness, low morbidity, and fast results with minimal downtime are factors that have made them popular among patients. Soft tissue augmentation has evolved to a unique combination of medicine and art. A wide selection of available agents and new products, each one with unique properties, may be used alone or in combination. The physician acquires the tools to rebalance facial characteristics not only by filling wrinkles but also by having the ability to shape the face and restore bony contours and lines. Careful selection of candidates, realistic expectations, and an understanding of the limitations of fillers are crucial for a successful result.

  17. [Use of erythropoiesis stimulating agents].

    PubMed

    Lapierre, A; Souquet, P-J

    2014-02-01

    Anemia is fairly common in lung neoplasms and adequate management can influence both the prognosis and the quality of life of patients. Anemia can stem from diverse mechanisms, and its management must include the search for correctable causes (iron deficiency, inflammation, disease- or treatment-related), and their subsequent treatment. Use of erythropoiesis stimulating agents, namely recombinant erythropoietin, results in hemoglobin increase, fewer blood transfusions, and better quality of life. However, there is also a significant increase in thromboembolic risk associated with this treatment, and their effect on overall survival is still debated. Thus, their use must be restricted to patients treated with palliative intent, receiving chemotherapy but no radiotherapy, with a baseline hemoglobin level under 100 g/L, and target hemoglobin level must not exceed 120 g/L.

  18. Pyridoxine deficiency: new approaches in immunosuppression and chemotherapy.

    PubMed

    Trakatellis, A; Dimitriadou, A; Trakatelli, M

    1997-10-01

    Pyridoxine deficiency leads to impairment of immune responses. It appears that the basic derangement is the decreased rate of production of one-carbon units necessary for the synthesis of nucleic acids. The key factor is a pyridoxine enzyme, serine hydroxymethyltransferase. This enzyme is very low in resting lymphocytes but increases significantly under the influence of antigenic or mitogenic stimuli, thus supplying the increased demand for nucleic acid synthesis during an immune response. Serine hydroxymethyltransferase activity is depressed by deoxypyridoxine, a potent antagonist of pyridoxal phosphate, and also by known immunosuppressive or antiproliferative agents. The combination of these agents is additive. Our results lead us to suggest the following medical applications: (a) combination of deoxypyridoxine with immunosuppressive or chemotherapeutic drugs may be effective in cases of immunosuppressive therapy or organ transplantation, (b) the development of special agents directed against the serine hydroxymethyltransferase apoprotein may prove to be a valuable medical tool, since this enzyme presents an excellent target for chemotherapy, (c) lymphocytes of individual patients could be used to design tailor-made specific immunosuppressive or chemotherapeutic treatment, and (d) the serine hydroxymethyltransferase activity of lymphocyte culture presents an excellent indicator for the evaluation of potency of immunosuppressive, chemotherapeutic or genotoxic compounds in a simple and rapid test.

  19. Intravesical chemotherapy in non-muscle-invasive bladder cancer

    PubMed Central

    Porten, Sima P.; Leapman, Michael S.; Greene, Kirsten L.

    2015-01-01

    Non-muscle-invasive bladder cancer (NMIBC) is characterized by a tendency for recurrence and capacity for progression. Intravesical instillation therapy has been employed in various clinical settings, which are summarized within this review. Several chemotherapeutic agents have shown clinical efficacy in reducing recurrence rates in the post-transurethral resection of bladder tumor (TURBT) setting, including mitomycin C (MMC), doxorubicin, and epirubicin. Mounting evidence also supports the use of intravesical MMC following nephroureterectomy to reduce later urothelial bladder recurrence. In the adjuvant setting, bacillus Calmette-Guérin (BCG) immunotherapy is an established first-line agent in the management of carcinoma in situ (CIS) and high-grade non muscle invasive urothelial carcinoma (UC). Among high and intermediate-risk patients (based on tumor grade, size, and focality) improvements in disease-free intervals have been seen with adjunctive administration of MMC prior to scheduled BCG dosing. Following failure of first-line intravesical therapy, gemcitabine and valrubicin have demonstrated modest activity, though valrubicin remains the only agent currently Food and Drug Administration (FDA)-approved for the treatment of BCG-refractory CIS. Techniques to optimize intravesical chemotherapy delivery have also been explored including pharmacokinetic methods such as urinary alkalization and voluntary dehydration. Chemohyperthermia and electromotive instillation have been associated with improved freedom from recurrence intervals but may be associated with increased urinary toxicity. Improvements in therapeutic selection may be heralded by novel opportunities for genomic profiling and refinements in clinical risk stratification. PMID:26604440

  20. Cancer cell spheroids as a model to evaluate chemotherapy protocols.

    PubMed

    Perche, Federico; Torchilin, Vladimir P

    2012-10-01

    To determine whether the spheroid culture can be used to evaluate drug efficacy, we have evaluated the toxicity of free or carrier-associated doxorubicin as a single drug or in combination with other antineoplastic agents using the spheroid cultures of drug-resistant cancer cells. Paclitaxel, cisplatin, dexamethasone, mitoxantrone, sclareol or methotrexate were used in combination with doxorubicin. The effect of the treatment protocols on free, micellar and liposomal doxorubicin accumulation in spheroids and on resulting toxicity was evaluated by fluorescence and lactate dehydrogenase release, respectively. Enhanced doxorubicin accumulation and toxicity were observed after spheroid pretreatment with mitoxantrone or paclitaxel. Effects of the drug combination with doxorubicin were sequence dependent, use of doxorubicin as the first drug being the least inducer of toxicity. Finally, spheroids were recognized by a cancer cell-specific antibody. Our results suggest the usefulness of spheroids to evaluate chemotherapy combinations. PMID:22892843

  1. Cancer cell spheroids as a model to evaluate chemotherapy protocols

    PubMed Central

    Perche, Federico; Torchilin, Vladimir P.

    2012-01-01

    To determine whether the spheroid culture can be used to evaluate drug efficacy, we have evaluated the toxicity of free or carrier-associated doxorubicin as a single drug or in combination with other antineoplastic agents using the spheroid cultures of drug-resistant cancer cells. Paclitaxel, cisplatin, dexamethasone, mitoxantrone, sclareol or methotrexate were used in combination with doxorubicin. The effect of the treatment protocols on free, micellar and liposomal doxorubicin accumulation in spheroids and on resulting toxicity was evaluated by fluorescence and lactate dehydrogenase release, respectively. Enhanced doxorubicin accumulation and toxicity were observed after spheroid pretreatment with mitoxantrone or paclitaxel. Effects of the drug combination with doxorubicin were sequence dependent, use of doxorubicin as the first drug being the least inducer of toxicity. Finally, spheroids were recognized by a cancer cell-specific antibody. Our results suggest the usefulness of spheroids to evaluate chemotherapy combinations. PMID:22892843

  2. Trial Watch: Immunogenic cell death inducers for anticancer chemotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Pol, Jonathan; Vacchelli, Erika; Aranda, Fernando; Castoldi, Francesca; Eggermont, Alexander; Cremer, Isabelle; Sautès-Fridman, Catherine; Fucikova, Jitka; Galon, Jérôme; Spisek, Radek; Tartour, Eric; Zitvogel, Laurence; Kroemer, Guido; Galluzzi, Lorenzo

    2015-01-01

    The term “immunogenic cell death” (ICD) is now employed to indicate a functionally peculiar form of apoptosis that is sufficient for immunocompetent hosts to mount an adaptive immune response against dead cell-associated antigens. Several drugs have been ascribed with the ability to provoke ICD when employed as standalone therapeutic interventions. These include various chemotherapeutics routinely employed in the clinic (e.g., doxorubicin, epirubicin, idarubicin, mitoxantrone, bleomycin, bortezomib, cyclophosphamide and oxaliplatin) as well as some anticancer agents that are still under preclinical or clinical development (e.g., some microtubular inhibitors of the epothilone family). In addition, a few drugs are able to convert otherwise non-immunogenic instances of cell death into bona fide ICD, and may therefore be employed as chemotherapeutic adjuvants within combinatorial regimens. This is the case of cardiac glycosides, like digoxin and digitoxin, and zoledronic acid. Here, we discuss recent developments on anticancer chemotherapy based on ICD inducers. PMID:26137404

  3. Extremely low frequency electromagnetic fields prevent chemotherapy induced myelotoxicity.

    PubMed

    Rossi, Edoardo; Corsetti, Maria Teresa; Sukkar, Samir; Poggi, Claudio

    2007-01-01

    Side effects of chemo-radiotherapy reduce the quality and also the survivability of patients. The consequent fatigue and infections, related to myelodepression, act to reduce the dose-intensity of the protocol. Late side effects of chemo-radiotherapy include secondary tumours, acute myeloid leukemias and cardiotoxicity. Side effects of chemotherapy are related to oxidative stress produced by the treatment. Oxidative stress also reduces the efficacy of the treatment. Antioxidative treatment with natural (dietetic) or chemical agents has been reported to reduce the toxicity of chemo-radiotherapy and improve the efficacy of treatment. We here report our experience with SEQEX, an electromedical device that generates Extremely Low Frequency ElectroMagnetic Fields (ELF-EMF) to produce endogenic cyclotronic ionic resonance, to reduce myelotoxicity consequent to ABVD protocol in patients with Hodgkin's lymphoma.

  4. Therapy related myelodysplasia/myeloproliferative neoplasia-unclassified with acute leukemic transformation following Paclitaxel and Carboplatin based chemotherapy in an ovarian cancer patient.

    PubMed

    Vanajakshi, S; Prasad, S V S S; Amina, S S; Kavitha, E; Iravathy Goud, K; Kshitija, K

    2014-09-01

    Alkylating agents used in chemotherapy are mutagenic and have strong leukemogenic potential. The most serious long term complication of chemotherapy is the development of secondary disease, particularly hematological malignancy; they have rarely been reported in the context of ovarian cancer treatment. We describe quite a rare occurrence of a myelodyplastic/myeloproliferative neoplasm, unclassified (MDS/MPN-U) with acute leukemic transformation and multiple cytogenetic abnormalities not usually found together as JAK2 V617F mutation, 5q- and 7q-deletion, after exposure to paclitaxel and carboplatin based chemotherapy in a patient treated for ovarian cancer. We should be aware of such complication whose prognosis is really poor. PMID:25332593

  5. Health care agents

    MedlinePlus

    Durable power of attorney for health care; Health care proxy; End-of-life - health care agent; Life support treatment - ... Respirator - health care agent; Ventilator - health care agent; Power of attorney - health care agent; POA - health care ...

  6. In vitro Development of Chemotherapy and Targeted Therapy Drug-Resistant Cancer Cell Lines: A Practical Guide with Case Studies.

    PubMed

    McDermott, Martina; Eustace, Alex J; Busschots, Steven; Breen, Laura; Crown, John; Clynes, Martin; O'Donovan, Norma; Stordal, Britta

    2014-01-01

    The development of a drug-resistant cell line can take from 3 to 18 months. However, little is published on the methodology of this development process. This article will discuss key decisions to be made prior to starting resistant cell line development; the choice of parent cell line, dose of selecting agent, treatment interval, and optimizing the dose of drug for the parent cell line. Clinically relevant drug-resistant cell lines are developed by mimicking the conditions cancer patients experience during chemotherapy and cell lines display between two- and eight-fold resistance compared to their parental cell line. Doses of drug administered are low, and a pulsed treatment strategy is often used where the cells recover in drug-free media. High-level laboratory models are developed with the aim of understanding potential mechanisms of resistance to chemotherapy agents. Doses of drug are higher and escalated over time. It is common to have difficulty developing stable clinically relevant drug-resistant cell lines. A comparative selection strategy of multiple cell lines or multiple chemotherapeutic agents mitigates this risk and gives insight into which agents or type of cell line develops resistance easily. Successful selection strategies from our research are presented. Pulsed-selection produced platinum or taxane-resistant large cell lung cancer (H1299 and H460) and temozolomide-resistant melanoma (Malme-3M and HT144) cell lines. Continuous selection produced a lapatinib-resistant breast cancer cell line (HCC1954). Techniques for maintaining drug-resistant cell lines are outlined including; maintaining cells with chemotherapy, pulse treating with chemotherapy, or returning to master drug-resistant stocks. The heterogeneity of drug-resistant models produced from the same parent cell line with the same chemotherapy agent is explored with reference to P-glycoprotein. Heterogeneity in drug-resistant cell lines reflects the heterogeneity that can occur in clinical

  7. In vitro Development of Chemotherapy and Targeted Therapy Drug-Resistant Cancer Cell Lines: A Practical Guide with Case Studies

    PubMed Central

    McDermott, Martina; Eustace, Alex J.; Busschots, Steven; Breen, Laura; Crown, John; Clynes, Martin; O’Donovan, Norma; Stordal, Britta

    2014-01-01

    The development of a drug-resistant cell line can take from 3 to 18 months. However, little is published on the methodology of this development process. This article will discuss key decisions to be made prior to starting resistant cell line development; the choice of parent cell line, dose of selecting agent, treatment interval, and optimizing the dose of drug for the parent cell line. Clinically relevant drug-resistant cell lines are developed by mimicking the conditions cancer patients experience during chemotherapy and cell lines display between two- and eight-fold resistance compared to their parental cell line. Doses of drug administered are low, and a pulsed treatment strategy is often used where the cells recover in drug-free media. High-level laboratory models are developed with the aim of understanding potential mechanisms of resistance to chemotherapy agents. Doses of drug are higher and escalated over time. It is common to have difficulty developing stable clinically relevant drug-resistant cell lines. A comparative selection strategy of multiple cell lines or multiple chemotherapeutic agents mitigates this risk and gives insight into which agents or type of cell line develops resistance easily. Successful selection strategies from our research are presented. Pulsed-selection produced platinum or taxane-resistant large cell lung cancer (H1299 and H460) and temozolomide-resistant melanoma (Malme-3M and HT144) cell lines. Continuous selection produced a lapatinib-resistant breast cancer cell line (HCC1954). Techniques for maintaining drug-resistant cell lines are outlined including; maintaining cells with chemotherapy, pulse treating with chemotherapy, or returning to master drug-resistant stocks. The heterogeneity of drug-resistant models produced from the same parent cell line with the same chemotherapy agent is explored with reference to P-glycoprotein. Heterogeneity in drug-resistant cell lines reflects the heterogeneity that can occur in clinical

  8. Chemotherapy, cognitive impairment and hippocampal toxicity.

    PubMed

    Dietrich, J; Prust, M; Kaiser, J

    2015-11-19

    Cancer therapies can be associated with significant central nervous system (CNS) toxicity. While radiation-induced brain damage has been long recognized both in pediatric and adult cancer patients, CNS toxicity from chemotherapy has only recently been acknowledged. Clinical studies suggest that the most frequent neurotoxic adverse effects associated with chemotherapy include memory and learning deficits, alterations of attention, concentration, processing speed and executive function. Preclinical studies have started to shed light on how chemotherapy targets the CNS both on cellular and molecular levels to disrupt neural function and brain plasticity. Potential mechanisms include direct cellular toxicity, alterations in cellular metabolism, oxidative stress, and induction of pro-inflammatory processes with subsequent disruption of normal cellular and neurological function. Damage to neural progenitor cell populations within germinal zones of the adult CNS has been identified as one of the key mechanisms by which chemotherapy might exert long-lasting and progressive neurotoxic effects. Based on the important role of the hippocampus for maintenance of brain plasticity throughout life, several experimental studies have focused on the study of chemotherapy effects on hippocampal neurogenesis and associated learning and memory. An increasing body of literature from both animal studies and neuroimaging studies in cancer patients suggests a possible relationship between chemotherapy induced hippocampal damage and the spectrum of neurocognitive deficits and mood alterations observed in cancer patients. This review aims to briefly summarize current preclinical and neuroimaging studies that are providing a potential link between the neurotoxic effects of chemotherapy and hippocampal dysfunction, highlighting challenges and future directions in this field of investigation.

  9. Chemotherapy, cognitive impairment and hippocampal toxicity.

    PubMed

    Dietrich, J; Prust, M; Kaiser, J

    2015-11-19

    Cancer therapies can be associated with significant central nervous system (CNS) toxicity. While radiation-induced brain damage has been long recognized both in pediatric and adult cancer patients, CNS toxicity from chemotherapy has only recently been acknowledged. Clinical studies suggest that the most frequent neurotoxic adverse effects associated with chemotherapy include memory and learning deficits, alterations of attention, concentration, processing speed and executive function. Preclinical studies have started to shed light on how chemotherapy targets the CNS both on cellular and molecular levels to disrupt neural function and brain plasticity. Potential mechanisms include direct cellular toxicity, alterations in cellular metabolism, oxidative stress, and induction of pro-inflammatory processes with subsequent disruption of normal cellular and neurological function. Damage to neural progenitor cell populations within germinal zones of the adult CNS has been identified as one of the key mechanisms by which chemotherapy might exert long-lasting and progressive neurotoxic effects. Based on the important role of the hippocampus for maintenance of brain plasticity throughout life, several experimental studies have focused on the study of chemotherapy effects on hippocampal neurogenesis and associated learning and memory. An increasing body of literature from both animal studies and neuroimaging studies in cancer patients suggests a possible relationship between chemotherapy induced hippocampal damage and the spectrum of neurocognitive deficits and mood alterations observed in cancer patients. This review aims to briefly summarize current preclinical and neuroimaging studies that are providing a potential link between the neurotoxic effects of chemotherapy and hippocampal dysfunction, highlighting challenges and future directions in this field of investigation. PMID:26086545

  10. [Molecular targeting agents for advanced or recurrent gastric cancer patients].

    PubMed

    Fuse, Nozomu

    2012-10-01

    The combination of fluoropyrimidine and platinum with or without epirubicin or docetaxel has been regarded as standard chemotherapy for advanced or recurrent gastric cancer patients. Recently, trastuzumab with conventional chemotherapy for human epidermal growth factor receptor(HER)2 positive gastric cancer patients was proved to be effective in terms of survival benefit and has become one of standard treatment options. Other molecular target agents, such as HER1, HER2, vascular endothelial growth factor, hepatocyte growth factor/c-Met, fibroblast growth factor and mammalian target of rapamycin inhibitors were and are being evaluated in clinical trials. However, no agents other than trastuzumab have shown clear survival benefit. The predictive biomarker seems to be necessary for developing new molecular targeting agents for gastric cancer with heterogeneity.

  11. Adverse mucocutaneous reactions related to chemotherapeutic agents: part II.

    PubMed

    Criado, Paulo Ricardo; Brandt, Hebert Roberto Clivati; Moure, Emanuella Rosyane Duarte; Pereira, Guilherme Luiz Stelko; Sanches Júnior, Jose Antonio

    2010-01-01

    Events and reactions involving chemotherapy are common in clinical oncology. Chemotherapeutic agents are widely used in therapy. Side effects range from the common to the rare and may be confused with other mucocutaneous manifestations resulting from the oncological treatment. The objective of this paper was to present data on skin reactions to chemotherapy, particularly those cases in which the dermatologist is requested to issue a report and asked to comment on the safety and viability of readministration of a specific drug. The authors describe aspects associated with these events, presenting a detailed analysis of each one of them.

  12. Detecting agents.

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, Susan C

    2003-01-01

    This paper reviews a recent set of behavioural studies that examine the scope and nature of the representational system underlying theory-of-mind development. Studies with typically developing infants, adults and children with autism all converge on the claim that there is a specialized input system that uses not only morphological cues, but also behavioural cues to categorize novel objects as agents. Evidence is reviewed in which 12- to 15-month-old infants treat certain non-human objects as if they have perceptual/attentional abilities, communicative abilities and goal-directed behaviour. They will follow the attentional orientation of an amorphously shaped novel object if it interacts contingently with them or with another person. They also seem to use a novel object's environmentally directed behaviour to determine its perceptual/attentional orientation and object-oriented goals. Results from adults and children with autism are strikingly similar, despite adults' contradictory beliefs about the objects in question and the failure of children with autism to ultimately develop more advanced theory-of-mind reasoning. The implications for a general theory-of-mind development are discussed. PMID:12689380

  13. Xenopatients show the need for precision medicine approach to chemotherapy in ovarian cancer

    PubMed Central

    Mittica, Gloria; Scalzo, Maria Stella; Vaira, Marco; De Simone, Michele; Ponzone, Riccardo; Katsaros, Dionyssios; Aglietta, Massimo; Calogero, Raffaele; Di Renzo, Maria Flavia; Valabrega, Giorgio

    2016-01-01

    Platinum-based chemotherapy is the recommended first-line treatment for high-grade serous (HGS) epithelial ovarian cancer (EOC). However, most patients relapse because of platinum refractory/resistant disease. We aimed at assessing whether other drugs, commonly used to treat relapsed HGS-EOC and poorly active in this clinical setting, might be more effective against chemotherapy-naïve cancers. We collected couples of HGS-EOC samples from the same patients before and after neo-adjuvant platinum-based chemotherapy. Samples were propagated as Patient Derived Xenografts (PDXs) in immunocompromised mice (“xenopatients”). Xenopatients were treated in parallel with carboplatin, gemcitabine, pegylated liposomal doxorubicin (PLD) and trabectedin. PDXs derived from a naïve HSG-EOC showed responsiveness to carboplatin, trabectedin and gemcitabine. The PDXs propagated from a tumor mass of the same patient, grown after carboplatin therapy, did no longer respond to trabectedin and gemcitabine and showed heterogeneous response to carboplatin. In line, the patient experienced clinically platinum-sensitivity first and then discordant responses of different tumor sites to platinum re-challenge. Loss of PDX responsiveness to drugs was associated with 4-fold increase of NR2F2 gene expression. PDXs from another naïve tumor showed complete response to PLD, which was lost in the PDXs derived from a mass grown in the same patient after platinum-based chemotherapy. This patient showed platinum refractoriness and responded poorly to PLD as second-line treatment. PDX response to PLD was associated with high expression of TOP2A protein. PDXs demonstrated that chemotherapy-naïve HGS-EOC might display susceptibility to agents not used commonly as first line treatment. Data suggest the importance of personalizing also chemotherapy. PMID:27027433

  14. Documentation of chemotherapy infusion preparation costs in academic- and community-based oncology practices.

    PubMed

    Brixner, Diana I; Oderda, Gary M; Nickman, Nancy A; Beveridge, Roy; Jorgenson, James A

    2006-03-01

    Significant changes in Medicare reimbursement for outpatient oncology services were proposed as part of the Medicare Modernization Act of 2003. The purpose of this study was to identify the "true cost" associated with drug-related handling for the preparation and delivery of chemotherapy doses to estimate the impact of changing reimbursement schema by Medicare. Two academic medical outpatient infusion centers and 2 community cancer centers provided data used to estimate all costs (excluding drug cost) associated with the preparation of chemotherapy doses. The data included both fixed costs (drug storage, space, equipment, and information resources) and variable costs (insurance management, inventory, waste management, pharmacy staff payroll, supplies, and shipping). The average cost for the preparation of chemotherapy doses across all sites was dollar 34.27 (range, dollar 32.08-dollar 41.23). A time-and-motion study was also performed to determine what tasks were conducted by pharmacy staff and how much time was spent in the preparation of the top 15 chemotherapeutic drugs and regimens used in the 4 sites. Data from the 4 centers was projected to show that if 3,990,495 million chemotherapy infusions were administered to a national Medicare population in 2003, when multiplied by the average cost of preparation for infusions determined by the current study (dollar 34.27), the estimated total annual cost to Medicare for chemotherapy preparation by pharmacists is dollar 136,754,263.65. The pharmacists spent most of their days (90% or more) performing tasks directly related to the preparation of these agents. These data provide scientific support for the consideration of appropriate reimbursement for chemotherapy services provided by pharmacists to Medicare beneficiaries. PMID:16507268

  15. β-Arrestin1 inhibits chemotherapy-induced intestinal stem cell apoptosis and mucositis

    PubMed Central

    Zhan, Y; Xu, C; Liu, Z; Yang, Y; Tan, S; Yang, Y; Jiang, J; Liu, H; Chen, J; Wu, B

    2016-01-01

    The mechanism of chemotherapy-induced gastrointestinal (GI) syndrome (CIGIS) is still controversial, and it is unclear whether chemotherapy induces intestinal stem cell (ISC) apoptosis. β-Arrestins are regulators and mediators of G protein-coupled receptor signaling in cell apoptosis, division and growth. In this study, we aimed to investigate whether chemotherapy induces ISC apoptosis to contribute to mucositis in CIGIS and whether β-arrestin1 (β-arr1) is involved in this apoptosis. Different chemotherapeutic agents were used to generate a CIGIS model. Lgr5-EGFP-IRES-creERT2+/− knock-in mice were used as a CIGIS model to investigate ISC apoptosis. β-arr1 knockout mice were used to determine whether β-arr1 is involved in the apoptosis in CIGIS. Intestinal histology was performed, the ISC apoptosis was analyzed and the mucosal barrier was examined. The effects of β-arr1 in apoptosis were investigated in the samples from humans and mice as well as in cell lines. Here, we demonstrate that chemotherapy induced intestinal mucositis by promoting crypt cell apoptosis, especially in Lgr5+ stem cells and Paneth cells but not in goblet cells, epithelial cells or vascular endothelial cells. Furthermore, β-arr1 deficiency exacerbated the Lgr5+ stem cell apoptosis, but not Paneth cell apoptosis, in CIGIS. In addition, the data showed that β-arr1 reduced the chemotherapy-induced Lgr5+ stem cell apoptosis by inhibiting endoplasmic reticulum stress-mediated mitochondrial apoptotic signaling. Our study indicates that β-arr1 inhibits chemotherapy-induced ISC apoptosis to alleviate intestinal mucositis in CIGIS. PMID:27195676

  16. Integrating Chemotherapy in the Management of Cervical Cancer: A Critical Appraisal.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Lalit; Gupta, Sudeep

    2016-01-01

    The management of locally advanced cervix cancer has undergone a paradigm shift during the last decade. Concurrent chemoradiation (CCRT) (with cisplatin alone or in combination) is currently the standard treatment approach. CCRT results in a 5-year overall survival rate of 66% and a disease-free survival of 58%. About 30-40% of patients with locally advanced cervical cancer fail to achieve complete response to CCRT; alternative approaches are needed to improve the outcome for such patients. Weekly paclitaxel and carboplatin for 4-6 weeks as dose-dense chemotherapy prior to CCRT could be one such potential approach. The role of adjuvant chemotherapy after CCRT in patients with positive lymph nodes, larger tumor volume and stage III-IVA disease needs further exploration. Adjuvant chemotherapy is also being investigated for early-stage (stages IA2, IB1 or IIA) cervical cancer with presence of risk factors such as lymph node metastasis, lymphovascular space invasion and invasion depth of more than 10 mm, microscopic parametrial invasion, non-squamous histology and positive surgical margins. For patients with early-stage disease (IA2-IIA), short-course chemotherapy prior to surgery is associated with an improved outcome in many studies. Neo-adjuvant chemotherapy followed by fertility preservation surgery is feasible in carefully selected young patients with bulky stage IB1 disease. Recently, a number of molecular pathways have been identified as potential therapeutic targets. Bevacizumab - an inhibitor of vascular endothelial growth factor - is associated with improved survival in patients with recurrent/metastatic cervical cancer. Whether bevacizumab and other similar novel agents targeting molecular pathways could be used in front-line treatment along with cytotoxic chemotherapy is likely to be an area of research in future studies. PMID:27464068

  17. Bevacizumab with preoperative chemotherapy versus preoperative chemotherapy alone for colorectal cancer liver metastases

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Zhen-Hai; Peng, Jian-Hong; Wang, Fu-Long; Yuan, Yun-Fei; Jiang, Wu; Li, Yu-Hong; Wu, Xiao-Jun; Chen, Gong; Ding, Pei-Rong; Li, Li-Ren; Kong, Ling-Heng; Lin, Jun-Zhong; Zhang, Rong-Xin; Wan, De-Sen; Pan, Zhi-Zhong

    2016-01-01

    Abstract This study aimed to assess the efficacy and safety of bevacizumab plus preoperative chemotherapy as first-line treatment for liver-only metastatic colorectal cancer in Chinese patients compared with those of preoperative chemotherapy alone. Patients with histologically confirmed liver-only metastatic colorectal cancer were sequentially reviewed, and received either preoperative chemotherapy plus bevacizumab (bevacizumab group, n = 32) or preoperative chemotherapy alone (chemotherapy group, n = 57). Progression-free survival, response rate, liver resection rate, conversion rate, and safety were analyzed. With median follow-up of 28.7 months, progression-free survival was 10.9 months (95% confidence interval: 8.7–13.1 months) in bevacizumab group and 9.9 months (95% confidence interval: 6.8–13.1 months) in chemotherapy group (P = 0.472). Response rates were 59.4% in bevacizumab group and 38.6% in chemotherapy group (P = 0.059). Overall liver resection (R0, R1, and R2) rate was 68.8% in bevacizumab group and 54.4% in chemotherapy group (P = 0.185). Conversion rate was 51.9% in bevacizumab group and 40.4% in chemotherapy group (P = 0.341). No postoperative complication was observed in all patients. Bevacizumab plus preoperative chemotherapy as first-line treatment for liver-only metastatic colorectal cancer tends to achieve better clinical benefit with controllable safety in Chinese patients. PMID:27583930

  18. Pathobiology of chemotherapy-induced hair loss.

    PubMed

    Paus, Ralf; Haslam, Iain S; Sharov, Andrey A; Botchkarev, Vladimir A

    2013-02-01

    Hair loss can be a psychologically devastating adverse effect of chemotherapy, but satisfactory management strategies for chemotherapy-induced alopecia remain elusive. In this Review we focus on the complex pathobiology of this side-effect. We discuss the clinical features and current management approaches, then draw upon evidence from mouse models and human hair-follicle organ-culture studies to explore the main pathobiology principles and explain why chemotherapy-induced alopecia is so challenging to manage. P53-dependent apoptosis of hair-matrix keratinocytes and chemotherapy-induced hair-cycle abnormalities, driven by the dystrophic anagen or dystrophic catagen pathway, play important parts in the degree of hair-follicle damage, alopecia phenotype, and hair-regrowth pattern. Additionally, the degree of hair-follicle stem-cell damage determines whether chemotherapy-induced alopecia is reversible. We highlight the need for carefully designed preclinical research models to generate novel, clinically relevant pointers to how this condition may be overcome.

  19. [Chemotherapy of chiasmal gliomas in children].

    PubMed

    Helcl, F

    1995-04-01

    Chiasmal gliomas are rare tumors occurring predominantly in childhood. Their optimal treatment is still controversial. In the past only neurosurgeons (performing partial or subtotal removal of the tumor, biopsy or shunting procedure in hydrocephalus) and radiotherapeutists participated in their treatment. In the middle of the eighties there was only a single article dealing with chemotherapy of these tumors (Rosenstock, 1985). Since that time there was an increased number of articles about harmful effects of radiotherapy on the developing child's brain. Neurosurgeons are aware that they will not solve this problem alone. During the past 7 years we have observed gradual retreat from radiotherapy and an inclination to combined chemotherapy of the chiasmal gliomas in children. The author has been engaged in the research of this clinical entity for more than 10 years and he offers to readers a summary of the contemporary knowledge about chemotherapy of chiasmal gliomas in children. Despite the fact that there is lacking experience with long-term survivors after chemotherapy, which is extremely important especially in this disease, the preliminary short-term results of combined chemotherapy of chiasmal gliomas in children are promising. Rapid development of chemistry and pharmacology in the last few years is promising for the discovery of further, more effective anti-tumor drugs. Their new combinations could improve present non-satisfactory results of treatment of chiasmal gliomas in children. (Ref. 25.)

  20. Innovative therapies: intraoperative intracavitary chemotherapy.

    PubMed

    Chang, Michael Y; Sugarbaker, David J

    2004-11-01

    Both phase I studies demonstrated that high-dose cisplatin can be delivered safely with acceptable complication rates. The maximum tolerated doses of 225 mg/m2 and 250 mg/m2 cisplatin, respectively, are higher than any other published report of intrapleural cisplatin. The intrapleural cisplatin doses reported in other trials have been 80 mg/m2, 100 mg/m2, and 200 mg/m2. Despite the use of high-dose intraoperative chemotherapy, the group of 50 patients who underwent EPP experienced mortality and morbidity comparable to the contemporaneous group of 41 patients who did not participate in the protocol, except for increased rates of deep venous thrombosis and diaphragmatic patch failure. The 44 patients who underwent P/D experienced a slightly higher mortality rate and creatinine toxicity rate than the first phase I trial. Given the demographics of this patient cohort (higher age, lower FEV1, and inability to withstand pneumonectomy because of limited cardiopulmonary reserve), however, the mortality and morbidity rates seem acceptable. The pharmacologic data from both studies support our hypothesis that high regional doses of cisplatin can be delivered with less systemic absorption than can be achieved with intravenous administration (data not shown). With the maximum tolerated dose of intracavitary cisplatin and safety of intraoperative administration after surgical resection firmly established by these phase I trials, we are prepared to implement phase II and III studies of EPP and P/D with intraoperative cisplatin lavage. We aim to monitor tumor recurrence and patient survival prospectively and compare these results with historic controls. We also intend to document prospectively the morbidity and mortality of the treatment protocols. Finally, we plan to evaluate the pharmacokinetics of cisplatin by measuring tissue and perfusate levels of active and inactive cisplatin. By approaching the problem of local recurrence after resection of MPM in a careful and methodical

  1. A model of hematopoietic stem cell proliferation under the influence of a chemotherapeutic agent in combination with a hematopoietic inducing agent

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Hematopoiesis is a complex process that encompasses both pro-mitotic and anti-mitotic stimuli. Pharmacological agents used in chemotherapy have a prominent anti-mitotic effect. The approach of inhibiting cell proliferation is rational with respect to the rapidly dividing malignant cells. However, it poses a serious problem with respect to cell proliferation of cell types required for the ‘house-keeping’ operations of the human body. One such affected system is hematopoiesis. Chemotherapy induced anemia is an undesired side effect of chemotherapy that can lead to serious complications. Patients exhibiting anemia or leukopenia during chemotherapy are frequently administered a hematopoietic inducing agent that enhances hematopoiesis. Methods In previous work, we derived a mathematical model consisting of a set of delay differential equations that was dependent on the effect of a hematopoietic inducing agent. The aim of the current work was to formulate a mathematical model that captures both the effect of a chemotherapeutic agent in combination with a hematopoietic inducing agent. Steady state solutions and stability analysis of the system of equations is performed and numerical simulations of the stem cell population are provided. Results Numerical simulations confirm that our mathematical model captures the desired result which is that the use of hematopoietic agents in conjunction with chemotherapeutic agents can decrease the negative secondary effects often experienced by patients. Conclusions The proposed model indicates that the introduction of hematopoietic inducing agents have clinical potential to offset the deleterious effects of chemotherapy treatment. Furthermore, the proposed model is relevant in that it enhances the understanding of stem cell dynamics and provides insight on the stem cell kinetics. PMID:24438084

  2. [Recent advance in chemotherapy for advanced colorectal cancer].

    PubMed

    Aiba, K

    1996-04-01

    Chemotherapy for advanced colorectal cancer is reviewed stressing the historical development of combination chemotherapy and the application of a new idea called biochemical modulation based upon a preclinical biochemical and molecular pharmacological rationale. While 5-fluorouracil (5-FU) is a key drug for more than three decades, many a combination chemotherapy with 5-FU and other drugs such as methyl-CCNU, vincristine, streptozocin, mitomycin C and so on has been studied extensively only to show no significant improvement compared with monotherapy with 5-FU. Recently, the mechanisms of 5-FU action have been recognized more in detail biochemically, and it enabled us to try the drug in a more optimal way. For example, bolus i.v. infusion of 5-FU can produce a response rate of around 10% to 15% at most for advanced colorectal cancer. On the other hand, a more continuous mode of i.v. infusion, typically known as protracted i.v. infusion lasting up to 6 weeks or more, can produce the response rate of up to 40%. The difference underlying the mechanisms of action in these typical two administrative methods is that the main target can be RNA-directed cytotoxicity in the bolus type infusion and it can be shifted toward DNA-directed cytotoxicity in the continuous type infusion through the inhibition of thymidylate synthase (TS) enzyme activity which is relevant to DNA de novo synthesis. More importantly, investigations using clinical materials imply that DNA-directed cytotoxicity may be more relevant in a clinical setting, showing consistent findings between bench-top experiments and the clinical outcome. Given a precise knowledge about the mechanisms of 5-FU action, we could have developed a new type combination chemotherapy called biochemical modulation which manipulates non-cytotoxic agents or cytotoxic agents in non-cytotoxic level as modulators enhancing cytotoxicity of 5-FU biochemically. Among modulators, leucovorin (LV) has been shown to have a pivotal role in

  3. [THE TOXIC EFFECTS OF CHEMOTHERAPY ON THE GASTROINTESTINAL TRACT].

    PubMed

    Sivak, L A; Maidanevich, N N; Lyalkin, S A; Aleksik, E M; Askolskiy, A V; Klimanov, M Y; Kasap, N V

    2015-01-01

    Chemotherapy in modern oncology is one of the main methods of treatment, along with surgery and radiotherapy techniques. More than 60% of patients receiving chemotherapy at different stages of treatment. Recently, modern chemotherapy has become more urgent personal approach to the choice of drugs and their doses, aimed at reducing the toxicity of chemotherapy. Complications of chemotherapy significantly degrade the effectiveness of the treatment of patients with malignant tumors, because they require lower doses of anticancer drug, or lengthening the intervals between cycles of chemotherapy, which affects treatment outcomes and quality of life. PMID:26118038

  4. An Updated Review of Natural Products Intended to Prevent or Treat Oral Mucositis in Patients Undergoing Radio-Chemotherapy.

    PubMed

    Panahi, Yunes; Saadat, Alireza; Shadboorestan, Amir; Ahmadi, Amirhossein

    2016-01-01

    Oral mucositis is a major clinical challenge in oncology and is characterized by pain and inflammation of the mucous membrane surface resulting from radiotherapy for head and neck cancer or from chemotherapeutic agents. Manifestations range from a burning sensation to ulcer formation that affect the patients' quality of life by producing pain and discomfort on swallowing, ultimately leading to malnutrition and dehydration. Due to complications arising from the use of chemical drugs, in recent decades, increasing attention has been paid to natural-based agents. The results from several studies evaluating natural products for the prevention or reduction of chemotherapy- and radiotherapy-induced oral mucositis are promising. This comprehensive review aims to provide updated information concerning the natural agents that are effective against mucositis in cancer patients receiving radiotherapy and/or chemotherapy. PMID:27640644

  5. Automated plan-recognition of chemotherapy protocols

    PubMed Central

    Bhatia, Haresh; Levy, Mia

    2011-01-01

    Cancer patients are often treated with multiple sequential chemotherapy protocols ranging in complexity from simple to highly complex patterns of multiple repeating drugs. Clinical documentation procedures that focus on details of single drug events, however, make it difficult for providers and systems to efficiently abstract the sequence and nature of treatment protocols. We have developed a data driven method for cancer treatment plan recognition that takes as input pharmacy chemotherapy dispensing records and produces the sequence of identified chemotherapy protocols. Compared to a manually annotated gold standard, our method was 75% accurate and 80% precise for a breast cancer testing set (110 patients, 2,029 drug events), and 54% accurate and 63% precise for a lung cancer testing set (53 patients, 670 drug events). This method for cancer treatment plan recognition may provide clinicians and systems an abstracted view of the patient’s treatment history. PMID:22195061

  6. Oncotherapy: A System for Requesting Chemotherapy Protocols.

    PubMed

    Righi, Laura Vera

    2015-01-01

    A clinical decision support system is able to provide oncologists with suitable treatment options at the moment of decision making regarding which chemotherapy protocol is the best to apply to a particular oncological case. The National Cancer Institute has created a Guidelines Committee that establishes therapeutical options for each clinical case. The Health Informatics Department has developed Oncotherapy, a knowledge database that incorporates information provided by the Guidelines Committee. Oncotherapy includes a tailored information repository to provide oncologists in the public health system with the chemotherapy protocols available given three types of data: clinical diagnosis, clinical stage and therapy criteria. The protocol selected by the treating oncologist is sent back to Oncotherapy, which may create new knowledge that can be incorporated into the knowledge database. In this way, the system supports making the best decision according to the chemotherapy protocol options available. Furthermore, it can warn of errors that could result from mistakenly chosen therapies. PMID:26262420

  7. Evaluation of Vascular Supply with Angio-Computed Tomography During Intra-Arterial Chemotherapy for Brain Tumors

    SciTech Connect

    Hirai, Toshinori Korogi, Yukunori; Ono, Ken; Yamashita, Yasuyuki

    2005-04-15

    We report the utility of a combined angiography and computed tomography (angio-CT) system in assessing drug distribution to the tumor during intra-arterial chemotherapy for metastatic brain tumors in a 65-year-old man. Although digital subtraction angiography did not clearly show tumor perfusion in two cerebellar tumors, angio-CT provided definite tumor perfusion in the complicated vascular territory, and anticancer agents were infused based on its findings. To our knowledge, however, this application for intra-arterial chemotherapy of brain tumors has not been previously described.

  8. [Induction chemotherapy for locally advanced cervical cancer].

    PubMed

    Morkhov, K Yu; Nechushkina, V M; Kuznetsov, V V

    2015-01-01

    The main methods of treatment for cervical cancer are surgery, radiotherapy or their combination. During past two decades chemotherapy are increasingly being used not only in patients with disseminated forms of this disease but also in patients undergoing chemoradiotherapy or as induction therapy. Possibilities of adjuvant chemotherapy for cervical cancer are being studied. According to A.D.Kaprin and V.V. Starinskiy in 2013 in Russia, 32% of patients with newly diagnosed cervical cancer underwent only radiation therapy, 32%--combined or complex treatment, 27.3%--only surgery, and just 8.7%--chemoradiotherapy. PMID:26087600

  9. Cancer Chemotherapy - Multiple Languages: MedlinePlus

    MedlinePlus

    ... العربية) Chemotherapy (Arabic) العربية Bilingual PDF Health Information Translations Handling Chemotherapy Safely (Arabic) التعامل الآمن مع العلاج الكيماوي - العربية Bilingual PDF Health Information Translations Nausea and Vomiting with Cancer Treatment (Arabic) العربية ...

  10. Simultaneous hyperthermia-chemotherapy with controlled drug delivery using single-drug nanoparticles

    PubMed Central

    Sato, Itaru; Umemura, Masanari; Mitsudo, Kenji; Fukumura, Hidenobu; Kim, Jeong-Hwan; Hoshino, Yujiro; Nakashima, Hideyuki; Kioi, Mitomu; Nakakaji, Rina; Sato, Motohiko; Fujita, Takayuki; Yokoyama, Utako; Okumura, Satoshi; Oshiro, Hisashi; Eguchi, Haruki; Tohnai, Iwai; Ishikawa, Yoshihiro

    2016-01-01

    We previously investigated the utility of μ-oxo N,N′- bis(salicylidene)ethylenediamine iron (Fe(Salen)) nanoparticles as a new anti-cancer agent for magnet-guided delivery with anti-cancer activity. Fe(Salen) nanoparticles should rapidly heat up in an alternating magnetic field (AMF), and we hypothesized that these single-drug nanoparticles would be effective for combined hyperthermia-chemotherapy. Conventional hyperthermic particles are usually made of iron oxide, and thus cannot exhibit anti-cancer activity in the absence of an AMF. We found that Fe(Salen) nanoparticles induced apoptosis in cultured cancer cells, and that AMF exposure enhanced the apoptotic effect. Therefore, we evaluated the combined three-fold strategy, i.e., chemotherapy with Fe(Salen) nanoparticles, magnetically guided delivery of the nanoparticles to the tumor, and AMF-induced heating of the nanoparticles to induce local hyperthermia, in a rabbit model of tongue cancer. Intravenous administration of Fe(Salen) nanoparticles per se inhibited tumor growth before the other two modalities were applied. This inhibition was enhanced when a magnet was used to accumulate Fe(Salen) nanoparticles at the tongue. When an AMF was further applied (magnet-guided chemotherapy plus hyperthermia), the tumor masses were dramatically reduced. These results indicate that our strategy of combined hyperthermia-chemotherapy using Fe(Salen) nanoparticles specifically delivered with magnetic guidance represents a powerful new approach for cancer treatment. PMID:27103308

  11. Molecular-targeted therapy for chemotherapy-refractory gastric cancer: a case report and literature review.

    PubMed

    Kuo, Hung-Yang; Yeh, Kun-Huei

    2014-07-01

    The prognosis of advanced gastric cancer (AGC) remains poor despite therapeutic advances in recent decades. Several recent positive phase III trials established the efficacy of second-line chemotherapy for metastatic gastric cancer in prolonging overall survival. However, malnutrition and poor performance of AGC in late stages usually preclude such patients from intensive treatment. Many targeted-therapies failed to show a significant survival benefit in AGC, but have regained attention after the positive result of ramucirumab was announced last year. Among all targeted agents, only trastuzumab, a monoclonal antibody against Human epidermal growth factor receptor-2 (HER2) protein, has been proven as having survival benefit by addition to first-line chemotherapy. Herein we reported a patient who benefited from adding trastuzumab to the same second-line combination chemotherapy (paclitaxel, 5-fluorouracil, and leucovorin) upon progression of bulky liver metastases. At least five months of progression-free survival were achieved without any additional toxicity. We also reviewed literature of molecularly-targeted therapy for chemotherapy-refractory gastric cancer, including several large phase III trials (REGARD, GRANITE-1, EXPAND, and REAL-3) published in 2013-2014. PMID:24982389

  12. Primary malignant mediastinal germ cell tumours: improved prognosis with platinum-based chemotherapy and surgery.

    PubMed Central

    Childs, W. J.; Goldstraw, P.; Nicholls, J. E.; Dearnaley, D. P.; Horwich, A.

    1993-01-01

    A retrospective analysis was performed of 18 patients with primary malignant germ cell tumours of the mediastinum treated with platinum-based chemotherapy between 1977 and 1990. All seven patients with pure seminoma were treated initially with chemotherapy and four of these patients received additional mediastinal radiotherapy. Only one patient relapsed; his initial therapy had included radiotherapy and single-agent carboplatin and he was successfully salvaged with combination chemotherapy. With a follow-up of 11 to 117 months (median 41 months) all seven patients with seminoma remain alive and disease free giving an overall survival of 100%. Eleven patients had malignant non seminoma; following chemotherapy eight of these had elective surgical resection of residual mediastinal masses. Complete remission was achieved in nine (82%) patients, however, one of these patients died from bleomycin pneumonitis. With a follow-up of 12 to 113 months (median 55 months) eight of 11 (73%) patients with malignant mediastinal teratoma remain alive and disease free. PMID:8494705

  13. Molecular-targeted therapy for chemotherapy-refractory gastric cancer: a case report and literature review.

    PubMed

    Kuo, Hung-Yang; Yeh, Kun-Huei

    2014-07-01

    The prognosis of advanced gastric cancer (AGC) remains poor despite therapeutic advances in recent decades. Several recent positive phase III trials established the efficacy of second-line chemotherapy for metastatic gastric cancer in prolonging overall survival. However, malnutrition and poor performance of AGC in late stages usually preclude such patients from intensive treatment. Many targeted-therapies failed to show a significant survival benefit in AGC, but have regained attention after the positive result of ramucirumab was announced last year. Among all targeted agents, only trastuzumab, a monoclonal antibody against Human epidermal growth factor receptor-2 (HER2) protein, has been proven as having survival benefit by addition to first-line chemotherapy. Herein we reported a patient who benefited from adding trastuzumab to the same second-line combination chemotherapy (paclitaxel, 5-fluorouracil, and leucovorin) upon progression of bulky liver metastases. At least five months of progression-free survival were achieved without any additional toxicity. We also reviewed literature of molecularly-targeted therapy for chemotherapy-refractory gastric cancer, including several large phase III trials (REGARD, GRANITE-1, EXPAND, and REAL-3) published in 2013-2014.

  14. Chemopreventive agents targeting tumor microenvironment.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Sharada H; Thulasingam, Senthilkumar; Nagarajan, Sangeetha

    2016-01-15

    Recent studies have shown that tumor development and progression depend not only on the perturbed genes that govern cell proliferation, but is also highly determined by the non-tumor cells of the stromal compartment surrounding the tumor called tumor microenvironment (TME). These findings highlight the importance of targeting the microenvironment in combination with therapies aimed at tumor cells as a valuable approach. The innate and adaptive immune cells in the TME interact among themselves and also with the endothelial cells, pericytes and mast cells of the stromal compartment through various autocrine and paracrine manner to regulate abnormal cell proliferation. Direct cytotoxic killing of cancer cells and/or reversion of the immunosuppressive TME are to be considered as better strategies for chemoprevention and chemotherapy. With a growing emphasis on a "hallmark targeting" strategy for cancer therapy, the TME now appears as a promising target for cancer prevention using natural products. Clarification on the nontumor stromal cells, the mediators involved, interactions with immune response cells, and immune-evasive mechanisms are needed in order to manipulate the characteristics of the TME by natural pharmacological agents to design effective therapies. This review will provide a glimpse on the roles played by various non-tumor cells in tumor progression and their intervention by pharmacological agents. PMID:26679106

  15. Current status of novel agents in advanced gastroesophageal adenocarcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Kothari, Nishi

    2015-01-01

    Gastroesophageal (GE) adenocarcinomas are highly lethal malignancies and despite multiple chemotherapy options, 5-year survival rates remain dismal. Chemotherapy is the mainstay of treatment but patients are often limited by toxicity and poor performance status. Because of molecular heterogeneity, it is essential to classify tumors based on the underlying oncogenic pathways and develop targeted therapies that act on individual tumors. Trastuzumab, a human epidermal growth factor receptor type 2 (HER2) monoclonal antibody, was the first such agent shown to improve response rate, progression free survival (PFS), and overall survival (OS) when added to cisplatin based chemotherapy in patients with HER2 over-expressing GE junction (GEJ) and gastric adenocarcinomas. However, HER2 over expressing GE tumors are in the minority and the need for additional targeted agents is urgent. Though many agents are in development, incorporating targeted therapy in the treatment of GE cancers comes with a unique set of challenges. In this review, we outline oncogenic pathways relevant to GE adenocarcinomas, including HER2, epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR), vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), fibroblast growth factor (FGF), hepatocyte growth factor (HGF), and c-Met, and discuss recent trials with agents targeting these pathways. PMID:25642339

  16. Current Development and Future Prospects in Chemotherapy of Tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Nuermberger, Eric L.; Spigelman, Melvin K.; Yew, Wing Wai

    2015-01-01

    Although treatment of drug-susceptible tuberculosis (TB) under ideal conditions may be successful in ≥95% of cases, cure rates in the field are often significantly lower due to the logistical challenges of administering and properly supervising the intake of combination chemotherapy for 6–9 months. Success rates are far worse for multidrug-resistant (MDR) and extensively drug-resistant (XDR) TB cases. There is general agreement that new anti-TB drugs are needed to shorten or otherwise simplify treatment for drug-susceptible and MDR/XDR-TB, including TB associated with HIV infection. For the first time in over 40 years, a nascent pipeline of new anti-TB drug candidates has been assembled. Eleven candidates from 7 classes are currently being evaluated in clinical trials. They include novel chemical entities belonging to entirely new classes of antibacterials, agents approved for use against infections other than TB, and an agent already approved for limited use against TB. In this article, we review the current state of TB treatment and its limitations and provide updates on the status of new drugs in clinical trials. In the conclusion, we briefly highlight ongoing efforts to discover new compounds and recent advances in alternative drug delivery systems. PMID:20546189

  17. Peripheral neuropathy induced by combination chemotherapy of docetaxel and cisplatin.

    PubMed Central

    Hilkens, P. H.; Pronk, L. C.; Verweij, J.; Vecht, C. J.; van Putten, W. L.; van den Bent, M. J.

    1997-01-01

    Docetaxel, a new semisynthetic taxoid that has demonstrated promising activity as an antineoplastic agent, was administered in combination with cisplatin to 63 patients in a dose-escalating study. As both drugs were known to be potentially neurotoxic, peripheral neurotoxicity was prospectively assessed in detail. Neuropathy was evaluated by clinical sum-score for signs and symptoms and by measurement of the vibration perception threshold (VPT). The severity of neuropathy was graded according to the National Cancer Institute's 'Common Toxicity Criteria'. The docetaxel-cisplatin combination chemotherapy induced a predominantly sensory neuropathy in 29 (53%) out of 55 evaluable patients. At cumulative doses of both cisplatin and docetaxel above 200 mg m(-2), 26 (74%) out of 35 patients developed a neuropathy which was mild in 15, moderate in ten and severe in one patient. Significant correlations were present between both the cumulative dose of docetaxel and cisplatin and the post-treatment sum-score of neuropathy (P < 0.01) as well as the post-treatment VPT (P < 0.01). The neurotoxic effects of this combination were more severe than either cisplatin or docetaxel as single agent at similar doses. PMID:9020489

  18. Relative susceptibilities of male germ cells to genetic defects induced by cancer chemotherapies

    SciTech Connect

    Wyrobek, A J; Schmid, T E; Marchetti, F

    2004-06-15

    Some chemotherapy regimens include agents that are mutagenic or clastogenic in model systems. This raises concerns that cancer survivors, who were treated before or during their reproductive years, may be at increased risks for abnormal reproductive outcomes. However, the available data from offspring of cancer survivors are limited, representing diverse cancers, therapies, time-to-pregnancies, and reproductive outcomes. Rodent breeding data after paternal exposures to individual chemotherapeutic agents illustrate the complexity of factors that influence the risk for transmitted genetic damage including agent, dose, endpoint, and the germ-cell susceptibility profiles that vary across agents. Direct measurements of chromosomal abnormalities in sperm of mice and humans by sperm FISH have corroborated the differences in germ-cell susceptibilities. The available evidence suggests that the risk of producing chromosomally defective sperm is highest during the first few weeks after the end of chemotherapy, and decays with time. Thus, sperm samples provided immediately after the initiation of cancer therapies may contain treatment-induced genetic defects that will jeopardize the genetic health of offspring.

  19. Olanzapine for the prevention and treatment of chronic nausea and chemotherapy-induced nausea and vomiting.

    PubMed

    Navari, Rudolph M

    2014-01-01

    Olanzapine is an atypical antipsychotic agent of the thiobenzodiazepine class. It blocks multiple neurotransmitter receptors including dopaminergic at D1, D2, D3, D4 brain receptors, serotonergic at 5-HT2a, 5-HT2c, 5-HT3, 5-HT6 receptors, catecholamines at alpha1 adrenergic receptors, acetylcholine at muscarinic receptors, and histamine at H1 receptors. Olanzapine has five times the affinity for 5-HT2 receptors than D2 receptors and has been used to treat schizophrenia and delirium. Olanzapine's activity at multiple receptors, particularly at the D2, 5-HT2c, and 5-HT3 receptors which appear to be involved in nausea and emesis, has prompted its use in the treatment of nausea and vomiting refractory to standard antiemetics. Case reports and formal clinical trials have demonstrated its efficacy in the treatment of chronic nausea, the prevention of chemotherapy-induced nausea and emesis, and the treatment of breakthrough chemotherapy-induced nausea and emesis. Phase II and phase III clinical trials have demonstrated that there is a significant improvement in nausea when olanzapine is added to guideline directed prophylactic antiemetic agents 5-HT3 receptor antagonists and tachykinin NK1 receptor antagonists in patients receiving moderately or highly emetogenic chemotherapy Common side effects of olanzapine when used over a period of months include weight gain as well as an association with the onset of diabetes mellitus, but these effects have not been seen with short term use of daily doses of less than one week.

  20. A decade of targets and patented drugs for chemotherapy of Chagas disease.

    PubMed

    Duschak, Vilma G

    2011-09-01

    Chagas disease, a parasitic infection typically spread by triatomine bugs, affects millions of people throughout Latin America. Current chemotherapy based on the nitroaromatic compounds, benzonidazole and nifurtimox provides unsatisfactory results and suffers from considerable side effects. Therefore, there is still an urgent need for new drugs to treat this neglected disease. During the last decade, the advances and understanding in the biology and biochemistry of Trypanosoma cruzi have allowed the identification of multiple new targets for Chagas' disease chemotherapy. Among the most promising targets for antiparasitic drugs are: cruzipain, the main cysteine protease of T. cruzi, essential for parasite survival and proliferation in mammalian host; ergosterol biosynthesis pathway; trypanothione synthesis and thiol-dependant redox metabolism. Specific enzymes of the glycolytic, pentose phosphate, polyisoprenoid (farnesylpyrophosphate synthase) and other particular biosynthetic pathways as well as enzymes from purine salvage (hypoxanthine-guanine phosphoribosyl-transferase, dihydrofolate reductase) have also been intensively studied in T. cruzi. In particular, trypanocidal agents that target the validated biochemical pathways of the parasite including cysteine proteinase inhibitors and inhibitors capable to block ergosterol biosynthesis are currently in the pipeline. Among the latter, posaconazole and ravuconazole, are planned to enter in clinical trials for trypanocidal chemotherapy in the near future. This review will summarize advances on antichagasic agents directed to specific parasite targets such as metabolic pathways or specific enzymes. Related patents filed and issued from 2000 to 2010 claiming inhibitors for specific parasite targets will be also discussed. Among them, the most represented were those related with cysteine proteinase inhibitors. PMID:21824073

  1. Palonosetron: a unique 5-HT3-receptor antagonist for the prevention of chemotherapy-induced emesis.

    PubMed

    Grunberg, Steven M; Koeller, James M

    2003-12-01

    Palonosetron (Aloxi) is a 5-HT(3)-receptor antagonist antiemetic indicated for the prevention of acute and delayed nausea and vomiting following moderately emetogenic chemotherapy and for acute nausea and vomiting following highly emetogenic chemotherapy. Although it is the fourth member of this class to enter the US market, palonosetron is distinguished by distinct pharmacological characteristics. It has a higher binding affinity for the 5-HT(3 )receptor and a terminal serum half-life at least four times greater than any other available agent of this class (approximately 40 h). The high affinity and long half-life may explain the persistence of antiemetic effect throughout the delayed emesis risk period. The indications for palonosetron are supported by one dose-ranging study and three large, randomised, Phase III studies that all demonstrated at least equivalent activity (and in some cases, superior activity) compared to other 5-HT(3)-receptor antagonists. In spite of the pharmacological differences, the side effect profile of palonosetron is comparable to that of other 5-HT(3)-receptor antagonists. Palonosetron may prove valuable in combination therapy for delayed emesis and may be an appropriate agent for clinical settings, such as multiple-day chemotherapy, where acute emesis is repeatedly induced. Palonosetron provides a convenience advantage if multiple-day 5-HT(3)-receptor antagonist therapy is anticipated and is a unique addition to the antiemetic armamentarium. PMID:14640928

  2. Treatment and prevention of chemotherapy-induced alopecia with PTH-CBD, a collagen-targeted parathyroid hormone analog, in a non-depilated mouse model

    PubMed Central

    Katikaneni, Ranjitha; Ponnapakkam, Tulasi; Matsushita, Osamu; Sakon, Joshua; Gensure, Robert

    2014-01-01

    Alopecia is a psychologically devastating complication of chemotherapy for which there is currently no effective therapy. PTH-CBD is a collagen-targeted parathyroid hormone analog that has shown promise as a therapy for alopecia disorders. To compare the efficacy of prophylactic versus therapeutic administration of PTH-CBD in chemotherapy-induced alopecia using a mouse model that mimics the cyclic chemotherapy dosing used clinically. C57BL/6J mice were treated with a single subcutaneous injection of PTH-CBD (320 mcg/kg) or vehicle control before or after hair loss developing from three courses of cyclophosphamide chemotherapy (50–150 mg/kg/week). Mice receiving chemotherapy alone developed hair loss and depigmentation over 6–12 months. Mice pretreated with PTH-CBD did not develop these changes and maintained a normal-appearing coat. Mice treated with PTH-CBD after development of hair loss showed a partial recovery. Observations of hair loss were confirmed quantitatively by gray scale analysis. Histological examination showed that in mice receiving chemotherapy alone, there were small, dystrophic hair follicles mostly in the catagen phase. Mice receiving PTH-CBD before chemotherapy showed a mix of normal-appearing telogen and anagen hair follicles with no evidence of dystrophy. Mice receiving PTH-CBD therapy after chemotherapy showed intermediate histological features. PTH-CBD was effective in both the prevention and the treatment of chemotherapy-induced alopecia in mice, but pretreatment appears to result in a better cosmetic outcome. PTH-CBD shows promise as an agent in the prevention of this complication of chemotherapy and improving the quality of life for cancer patients. PMID:24025564

  3. Chemotherapy and Chemoprevention by Thiazolidinediones

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Thiazolidinediones (TZDs) are synthetic ligands of Peroxisome-Proliferator-Activated Receptor gamma (PPARγ). Troglitazone, rosiglitazone, and pioglitazone have been approved for treatment of diabetes mellitus type II. All three compounds, together with the first TZD ciglitazone, also showed an antitumor effect in preclinical studies and a beneficial effect in some clinical trials. This review summarizes hypotheses on the role of PPARγ in tumors, on cellular targets of TZDs, antitumor effects of monotherapy and of TZDs in combination with other compounds, with a focus on their role in the treatment of differentiated thyroid carcinoma. The results of chemopreventive effects of TZDs are also considered. Existing data suggest that the action of TZDs is highly complex and that actions do not correlate with cellular PPARγ expression status. Effects are cell-, species-, and compound-specific and concentration-dependent. Data from human trials suggest the efficacy of TZDs as monotherapy in prostate cancer and glioma and as chemopreventive agent in colon, lung, and breast cancer. TZDs in combination with other therapies might increase antitumor effects in thyroid cancer, soft tissue sarcoma, and melanoma. PMID:25866814

  4. Radiation recall supraglottitis. A hazard in head and neck chemotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Wallenborn, P.A.; Postma, D.S.

    1984-09-01

    The enhanced effects of chemotherapy on previously irradiated tissue have been well demonstrated. When chemotherapy is given some time after irradiation and elicits a tissue reaction in the radiation field, the reaction is termed radiation recall. We review known interactions between chemotherapy and radiotherapy and report, to our knowledge, the first case of a supraglottitis radiation recall reaction. Familiarity with this phenomenon and potential complications of chemotherapy following head and neck irradiation may expedite early diagnosis and appropriate lifesaving treatment.

  5. Preparing Change Agents for Change Agent Roles.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sedlacek, James R.

    Seventy-seven Spanish- and Portuguese-speaking agricultural change agents from developing Central and South American countries responded to a questionnaire which sought perceptions of the roles in which the change agents felt they were involved and the roles for which they felt they were being trained. The agents were participating in training…

  6. [Nurse telephone support at home during chemotherapy].

    PubMed

    Despiau, Frédéric; Bombail, Marie; Leches, Céline; Montastruc, Marion; Gladieff, Laurence; Delord, Jean-Pierre

    2015-01-01

    An innovative scheme has been operational since 2013 at the Institut Claudius Regaud in Toulouse, aimed at patients undergoing chemotherapy. After an initial consultation, patients receive regular telephone support at home from expert nurses between treatments. The scheme helps to improve patient management and reinforce the community-hospital link. PMID:26365645

  7. Glossodynia after radiation therapy and chemotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Naylor, G.D.; Marino, G.G.; Shumway, R.C.

    1989-10-01

    Radiation therapy and chemotherapy have decreased the mortality rates of cancer patients, but the morbidity associated with oral complications is high in many cases. A pretreatment oral evaluation and institution of a preventive care program reduce oral symptoms such as glossodynia considerably. When oral symptoms are minimized, the dentist can improve the patient's quality of life.40 references.

  8. Neoadjuvant and Adjuvant Chemotherapy of Cervical Cancer.

    PubMed

    Mallmann, Peter; Mallmann, Christoph

    2016-01-01

    Neoadjuvant chemotherapy is indicated in patients who can tolerate the side effects of a chemotherapy and with preoperative presentation of one of the following clinical risk situations: bulky disease with a maximal tumor diameter of > 4 cm, suspicious lymph nodes in magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), computed tomography (CT) scan or endosonography, histopathologically confirmed lymph node metastasis, or histopathologically documented risk factors such as G3 and L1V1. A neoadjuvant chemotherapy followed by surgery should be performed with cisplatin at a dosage of > 25 mg/m2 per week and an application interval of < 14 days. The previously published data suggests an improved rate of complete resection and reduced incidences of positive lymph nodes and parametric infiltration. Accordingly, the percentage of patients in need for adjuvant radiochemotherapy after operation can be significantly reduced. Some studies demonstrated a prolongation of progression-free and overall survival. Following the previously published studies, adjuvant chemotherapy after operation or after radiochemotherapy has no significant effect on the overall survival and, following the current guidelines, should be avoided. PMID:27614740

  9. Adjuvant Chemotherapy in Rectal Cancer after Chemoradiotherapy.

    PubMed

    Boustani, J; Caubet, M; Bosset, J-F

    2016-02-01

    The aim of this overview was to investigate whether adjuvant chemotherapy has a favourable effect on the outcome of patients with rectal cancer who had preoperative (chemo)radiotherapy. A review of randomised clinical trials that allocated patients between fluorouracil-based and observation or between fluorouracil-based and oxaliplatin-based adjuvant chemotherapy after preoperative (chemo)radiotherapy was carried out, including their corresponding meta-analyses. None of the five randomised trials has shown a significant benefit of fluorouracil-based adjuvant chemotherapy for overall survival or disease-free survival. Also, the three corresponding meta-analyses failed to show a benefit of adjuvant treatment. Of three randomised trials - two phase III and one phase II with a 3-year disease-free survival end point - two showed a small benefit of adding oxaliplatin to fluorouracil, one failed. The corresponding meta-analyses showed that the pooled difference was not significant. In conclusion, the use of postoperative 5-fluorouracil-based chemotherapy with or without oxaliplatin in patients with rectal cancer after preoperative (chemo)radiotherapy is not scientifically proven.

  10. Bacillary angiomatosis in a child undergoing chemotherapy.

    PubMed

    Myers, S A; Prose, N S; Garcia, J A; Wilson, K H; Dunsmore, K P; Kamino, H

    1992-10-01

    Bacillary angiomatosis is an infectious disease of the skin and viscera characterized by vascular lesions, originally described in patients with human immunodeficiency virus infection. There are also case reports of bacillary angiomatosis occurring in immunocompetent patients and in noninfected patients with suppressed immune function. We report a case of bacillary angiomatosis in a child undergoing chemotherapy for acute leukemia.

  11. How to calculate the dose of chemotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Gurney, H

    2002-01-01

    Body surface area-dosing does not account for the complex processes of cytotoxic drug elimination. This leads to an unpredictable variation in effect. Overdosing is easily recognised but it is possible that unrecognised underdosing is more common and may occur in 30% or more of patients receiving standard regimen. Those patients who are inadvertently underdosed are at risk of a significantly reduced anticancer effect. Using published data, it can be calculated that there is an almost 20% relative reduction in survival for women receiving adjuvant chemotherapy for breast cancer as a result of unrecognised underdosing. Similarly, the cure rate of cisplatin-based chemotherapy for advanced testicular cancer may be reduced by as much as 10%. The inaccuracy of body surface area-dosing is more than an inconvenience and it is important that methods for more accurate dose calculation are determined, based on the known drug elimination processes for cytotoxic chemotherapy. Twelve rules for dose calculation of chemotherapy are given that can be used as a guideline until better dose-calculation methods become available. Consideration should be given to using fixed dose guidelines independent of body surface area and based on drug elimination capability, both as a starting dose and for dose adjustment, which may have accuracy, safety and financial advantages. British Journal of Cancer (2002) 86, 1297–1302. DOI: 10.1038/sj/bjc/6600139 www.bjcancer.com © 2002 Cancer Research UK PMID:11953888

  12. Prolonged remission of recurrent cervical carcinoma following paclitaxel and carboplatin chemotherapy with paclitaxel maintenance chemotherapy.

    PubMed

    Micha, John P; Sassoon, Aaron F; Wong, Humberto; Goldstein, Bram H

    2015-08-01

    Cervical cancer recurs in ~30% of cases, for which a favorable prognosis is often unattainable. We describe a cervical cancer patient who developed metastatic disease ~5 years after her initial diagnosis. She was subsequently treated with six cycles of paclitaxel (175 mg/m) and carboplatin area under the curve (AUC) 5 chemotherapy every 21 days, and paclitaxel (135 mg/m) maintenance therapy every 21 days; the patient has remained in clinical remission after more than 5 years of follow-up. Chemotherapy has not historically been effective in managing recurrent, persistent, or metastatic cervical cancer. However, our case study involving paclitaxel and carboplatin chemotherapy with maintenance chemotherapy represents one of the longest documented remission rates in association with the management of recurrent cervical cancer.

  13. Timed-sequential chemotherapy as induction and/or consolidation regimen for younger adults with acute myelogenous leukemia.

    PubMed

    Thomas, Xavier; Dombret, Hervé

    2007-02-01

    Increasing the intensity of induction chemotherapy has generated considerable recent interest in the treatment of acute myeloid leukemia. Achieving complete remission is a sine qua non condition for prolonged disease-free survival and may affect long-term outcome. In this setting, administering a repeat course of induction shortly after completion of the first course, known as timed-sequential chemotherapy (TSC), has been tested and may lead to an improved long-term outcome. Whether these results are due to the biologic recruitment of cell cycle-specific agents is unknown. However, this strategy to intensify induction may lead to more profound myelosuppression and to potential toxicities. Here we review the results of timed-sequential chemotherapy, used as induction regimen in de novo, relapsed or refractory AML or used as post-remission therapy, and compare them with those from other types of regimens.

  14. Organization of primary care pathway in head and neck oncology (short version): Organization of chemotherapy in head and neck oncology.

    PubMed

    Pavillet, J; Guigay, J; Lacau Saint-Guily, J; Righini, C-A

    2015-09-01

    Chemotherapy may be indicated in head and neck cancer: as induction, associated with radiation therapy, or as a palliative solution, in case of local or locoregional progression if surgery and radiation therapy are contraindicated, and/or in case of metastatic progression. The most frequently used anticancer agents are platins, antimetabolites (5-fluorouracil, methotrexate) and taxanes. For several years now, in some indications, chemotherapy may be associated with targeted anti-EGFR antibody therapy. Prescription of chemotherapy and follow-up in head and neck cancer requires particular attention due to comorbidities related to alcohol abuse and smoking and frequent denutrition. Management thus requires close cooperation between the ENT physician, medical oncologists and radiation oncologists.

  15. Organization of primary care pathway in head and neck oncology (short version): Organization of chemotherapy in head and neck oncology.

    PubMed

    Pavillet, J; Guigay, J; Lacau Saint-Guily, J; Righini, C-A

    2015-09-01

    Chemotherapy may be indicated in head and neck cancer: as induction, associated with radiation therapy, or as a palliative solution, in case of local or locoregional progression if surgery and radiation therapy are contraindicated, and/or in case of metastatic progression. The most frequently used anticancer agents are platins, antimetabolites (5-fluorouracil, methotrexate) and taxanes. For several years now, in some indications, chemotherapy may be associated with targeted anti-EGFR antibody therapy. Prescription of chemotherapy and follow-up in head and neck cancer requires particular attention due to comorbidities related to alcohol abuse and smoking and frequent denutrition. Management thus requires close cooperation between the ENT physician, medical oncologists and radiation oncologists. PMID:26183547

  16. Conditioned Emotional Distress in Women Receiving Chemotherapy for Breast Cancer.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jacobsen, Paul B.; And Others

    1995-01-01

    Investigated whether women undergoing outpatient chemotherapy for breast cancer can develop classically conditioned emotional distress. Patients' responses to a distinctive stimulus were assessed in a location not associated with chemotherapy administration. Results supported hypothesis that pairing a distinctive stimulus with chemotherapy would…

  17. Palliative communications: addressing chemotherapy in patients with advanced cancer.

    PubMed

    Kadakia, K C; Moynihan, T J; Smith, T J; Loprinzi, C L

    2012-04-01

    Patients with advanced cancers often endure chemotherapy late in their disease course leading to unnecessary adverse effects, loss of quality of life, and delay in hospice referral. Compassionate and honest communication about the use of chemotherapy can facilitate better patient care. This manuscript will explore communication issues regarding palliative-intent chemotherapy.

  18. Remote Agent Demonstration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dorais, Gregory A.; Kurien, James; Rajan, Kanna

    1999-01-01

    We describe the computer demonstration of the Remote Agent Experiment (RAX). The Remote Agent is a high-level, model-based, autonomous control agent being validated on the NASA Deep Space 1 spacecraft.

  19. [Hypomagnesemia following chemotherapy of disseminated testicular tumors].

    PubMed

    Hida, S; Nishimura, K; Nishio, Y; Okada, Y; Okada, K; Yoshida, O

    1988-01-01

    Sixteen patients with metastatic testicular cancer were treated with combination chemotherapy including cisplatin (CDDP) at 3- to 4-week intervals for two to five courses. There was a sequential fall in serum magnesium with each course of therapy: 13 of the 16 patients (81%) became hypomagnesemic, and the median magnesium nadir was 1.67 mg/dl. Serum magnesium nadir levels gradually decreased according to the cumulative CDDP dose. Acute clinical effects of the hypomagnesemia were observed in 4 patients, 2 of them complained of neuromuscular disturbance in the extremities, one of cardiac arrhythmia, and the other of Raynaud's phenomenon. The median time to the onset of hypomagnesemia was 67 days and the duration of hypomagnesemia was 24 days. The creatinine clearance (Ccr) decreased gradually according to the cumulative CDDP dose, and the mean Ccr declined from 87.2 ml/min before therapy to 55.8 ml/min. In 3 out of 16 patients, an irreversible decrease to below 50 ml/min was seen after chemotherapy. In patients with normal renal function treated by VAB-6 regimen, creatinine clearance (Ccr) decreased transiently during each course of chemotherapy and returned to the pretreatment level during the interval. The mean creatinine clearance declined from 90.7 ml/min before therapy to 82.9 ml/min after three courses of induction chemotherapy. Urinary excretion of beta 2 microglobulin (beta 2MG) increased transiently before Ccr began to decrease during each course of chemotherapy. Serum potassium and calcium concentrations decreased transiently probably due to urinary losses but there was no significant relationship between hypopotassemia, hypocalcemia and hypomagnesemia.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  20. Ratiometric spectral imaging for fast tumor detection and chemotherapy monitoring in vivo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hwang, Jae Youn; Gross, Zeev; Gray, Harry B.; Medina-Kauwe, Lali K.; Farkas, Daniel L.

    2011-06-01

    We report a novel in vivo spectral imaging approach to cancer detection and chemotherapy assessment. We describe and characterize a ratiometric spectral imaging and analysis method and evaluate its performance for tumor detection and delineation by quantitatively monitoring the specific accumulation of targeted gallium corrole (HerGa) into HER2-positive (HER2 +) breast tumors. HerGa temporal accumulation in nude mice bearing HER2 + breast tumors was monitored comparatively by a. this new ratiometric imaging and analysis method; b. established (reflectance and fluorescence) spectral imaging; c. more commonly used fluorescence intensity imaging. We also tested the feasibility of HerGa imaging in vivo using the ratiometric spectral imaging method for tumor detection and delineation. Our results show that the new method not only provides better quantitative information than typical spectral imaging, but also better specificity than standard fluorescence intensity imaging, thus allowing enhanced in vivo outlining of tumors and dynamic, quantitative monitoring of targeted chemotherapy agent accumulation into them.

  1. BRCA1 epigenetic inactivation predicts sensitivity to platinum-based chemotherapy in breast and ovarian cancer

    PubMed Central

    Stefansson, Olafur A.; Villanueva, Alberto; Vidal, August; Martí, Lola; Esteller, Manel

    2012-01-01

    Germline mutations in the BRCA1 or BRCA2 genes are associated with an increased risk of breast and ovarian cancer development. Both genes are involved in DNA repair, and tumors harboring genetic defects in them are thought to be more sensitive to DNA-damaging agents used in chemotherapy. However, as only a minority of breast and ovarian cancer patients carry BRCA1 or BRCA2 mutations, few patients are likely to benefit from these pharmacogenetic biomarkers. Herein, we show that, in cancer cell lines and xenografted tumors, BRCA1 CpG island promoter hypermethylation-associated silencing also predicts enhanced sensitivity to platinum-derived drugs to the same extent as BRCA1 mutations. Most importantly, BRCA1 hypermethylation proves to be a predictor of longer time to relapse and improved overall survival in ovarian cancer patients undergoing chemotherapy with cisplatin. PMID:23069641

  2. Chemotherapy-induced fatal hepatitis B virus reactivation in a small-cell lung cancer patient

    PubMed Central

    Qin, Lei; Wang, Fang; Zou, Bing-Wen; Ding, Zhen-Yu

    2016-01-01

    Hepatitis B virus (HBV) reactivation during chemotherapy is a major concern and is widely reported, particularly in association with hematological malignancies and lymphomas. While lung cancer ranks first in incidence and mortality worldwide, HBV reactivation has been largely overlooked in this disease. As regards small-cell lung cancer (SCLC), HBV reactivation has rarely been reported. We herein report the case of a hepatitis B surface antigen-seropositive SCLC patient in whom HBV was reactivated during the course of chemotherapy, despite preemptive use of lamivudine. The patient developed fulminant viral hepatitis and succumbed to liver failure. The aim of this report was to highlight the major but overlooked issue of HBV reactivation in SCLC, and suggest that agents more potent than lamivudine may be more efficacious in high-risk patients. PMID:27699030

  3. Prior exposure to chemotherapy: a marker of sensitivity and selection for antiangiogenic therapy in breast cancer?

    PubMed

    Xynos, Ioannis D; Tanna, Nikhil; Patten, Darren K; Palmieri, Carlo

    2014-02-01

    The identification of patients who are more likely to derive benefit from antiangiogenic therapy is a key to refine patient selection and so maximize clinical benefit, and reduce unnecessary treatment costs. Improved patient selection will equally be effective in minimizing the exposure of non-eligible patients to ineffectual treatment which could be associated with adverse effects as well as delaying effective treatment. Herein, we review the literature from clinical trials suggesting that the addition of antiangiogenic agents to chemotherapy for the treatment of HER-2 negative metastatic breast cancer in patients previously exposed to chemotherapy may deliver differential therapeutic benefit and may serve as a selection criteria in the current absence of a robust biomarker.

  4. Chemotherapy-induced fatal hepatitis B virus reactivation in a small-cell lung cancer patient

    PubMed Central

    Qin, Lei; Wang, Fang; Zou, Bing-Wen; Ding, Zhen-Yu

    2016-01-01

    Hepatitis B virus (HBV) reactivation during chemotherapy is a major concern and is widely reported, particularly in association with hematological malignancies and lymphomas. While lung cancer ranks first in incidence and mortality worldwide, HBV reactivation has been largely overlooked in this disease. As regards small-cell lung cancer (SCLC), HBV reactivation has rarely been reported. We herein report the case of a hepatitis B surface antigen-seropositive SCLC patient in whom HBV was reactivated during the course of chemotherapy, despite preemptive use of lamivudine. The patient developed fulminant viral hepatitis and succumbed to liver failure. The aim of this report was to highlight the major but overlooked issue of HBV reactivation in SCLC, and suggest that agents more potent than lamivudine may be more efficacious in high-risk patients.

  5. [A case of secondary myelodysplastic syndrome following chemotherapy for lung cancer].

    PubMed

    Uemura, M; Kasamatsu, Y; Sawada, M; Takemura, S; Sugino, S; Kondou, M

    1992-10-01

    A case of secondary myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS) following chemotherapy for lung cancer is reported. A 78-year-old man, with a smoking history of 20 cigarettes/day for 55 years, was incidentally, diagnosed as having stage IV squamous cell carcinoma of the lung in 1987 during admission for transurethral resection of bladder cancer. He received combination chemotherapy of mitomycin C, vincristin, and cisplatin for his lung cancer between July and September 1988. His clinical course remained almost stable until October 1989, when his blood count showed severe anemia and thrombocytopenia. He was diagnosed as having secondary MDS induced by cytotoxic agents used for the treatment of lung cancer, based on the dysplastic findings of precursor cells in the bone marrow and the chromosome abnormality of 51XY, +8, +9, +21, 3p-, 5q-, +2mar. He died of infection with the progression of MDS in March 1990.

  6. Severe cytomegalovirus enterocolitis after standard chemotherapy for non-Hodgkin's lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Nomura, Kenichi; Kamitsuji, Yuri; Kono, Eri; Matsumoto, Yosuke; Yoshida, Naohisa; Konishi, Hideyuki; Horiike, Shigeo; Okanoue, Takeshi; Taniwaki, Masafumi

    2005-05-01

    Reports of cytomegalovirus (CMV) colitis mainly concern patients with immunocompromisation resulting from, among others, HIV infection, allogeneic bone marrow transplantation and solid organ transplantation. CMV colitis rarely occurs during standard chemotherapy for non-Hodgkin's lymphoma (NHL). An unusual case of CMV enterocolitis in a 62-year-old patient is reported. After a first course of salvage chemotherapy for NHL, diffuse erosions and sloughing mucosa were seen throughout the large bowel. The final diagnosis was based on histological findings. Although ganciclovir and foscarnet are effective for CMV viremia, their use in the treatment of severe diarrhea in our patient did not result in improvement for one week, whereas concomitant use of octreotide led to rapid improvement. Octreotide may therefore be an effective agent for severe colitis.

  7. Neutrophil dynamics during concurrent chemotherapy and G-CSF administration: Mathematical modelling guides dose optimisation to minimise neutropenia.

    PubMed

    Craig, Morgan; Humphries, Antony R; Nekka, Fahima; Bélair, Jacques; Li, Jun; Mackey, Michael C

    2015-11-21

    The choice of chemotherapy regimens is often constrained by the patient's tolerance to the side effects of chemotherapeutic agents. This dose-limiting issue is a major concern in dose regimen design, which is typically focused on maximising drug benefits. Chemotherapy-induced neutropenia is one of the most prevalent toxic effects patients experience and frequently threatens the efficient use of chemotherapy. In response, granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) is co-administered during chemotherapy to stimulate neutrophil production, increase neutrophil counts, and hopefully avoid neutropenia. Its clinical use is, however, largely dictated by trial and error processes. Based on up-to-date knowledge and rational considerations, we develop a physiologically realistic model to mathematically characterise the neutrophil production in the bone marrow which we then integrate with pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic (PKPD) models of a chemotherapeutic agent and an exogenous form of G-CSF (recombinant human G-CSF, or rhG-CSF). In this work, model parameters represent the average values for a general patient and are extracted from the literature or estimated from available data. The dose effect predicted by the model is confirmed through previously published data. Using our model, we were able to determine clinically relevant dosing regimens that advantageously reduce the number of rhG-CSF administrations compared to original studies while significantly improving the neutropenia status. More particularly, we determine that it could be beneficial to delay the first administration of rhG-CSF to day seven post-chemotherapy and reduce the number of administrations from ten to three or four for a patient undergoing 14-day periodic chemotherapy. PMID:26343861

  8. [Pharmacoeconomic aspects of oral cytostatic agents].

    PubMed

    Poquet Jornet, J E; Carrera-Hueso, F J; Gasent Blesa, J M; Peris Godoy, M

    2011-05-01

    When validating oral chemotherapy, pharmacists should confirm the suitability and correctness of the prescription, applying the same safety standards as those used for parenteral cytostatic drugs. There are an increasing number of cancers for which orally administered drugs are available, which increases patient satisfaction as these drugs can be taken at home without the need to visit a hospital. As oral cytostatic treatments increase, so does the importance of ensuring optimal treatment compliance. The new oral cytostatic agents are less toxic, reduce indirect costs and imply less loss of time for patients and their families. However, the cost of these agents should be below a threshold acceptable for society. As an aid to decision making, pharmacoeconomic tools should be used.

  9. Development of anticancer agents: wizardry with osmium.

    PubMed

    Hanif, Muhammad; Babak, Maria V; Hartinger, Christian G

    2014-10-01

    Platinum compounds are one of the pillars of modern cancer chemotherapy. The apparent disadvantages of existing chemotherapeutics have led to the development of novel anticancer agents with alternative modes of action. Many complexes of the heavy metal osmium (Os) are potent growth inhibitors of human cancer cells and are active in vivo, often superior or comparable to cisplatin, as the benchmark metal-based anticancer agent, or clinically tested ruthenium (Ru) drug candidates. Depending on the choice of ligand system, osmium compounds exhibit diverse modes of action, including redox activation, DNA targeting or inhibition of protein kinases. In this review, we highlight recent advances in the development of osmium anticancer drug candidates and discuss their cellular mechanisms of action.

  10. Development of anticancer agents: wizardry with osmium.

    PubMed

    Hanif, Muhammad; Babak, Maria V; Hartinger, Christian G

    2014-10-01

    Platinum compounds are one of the pillars of modern cancer chemotherapy. The apparent disadvantages of existing chemotherapeutics have led to the development of novel anticancer agents with alternative modes of action. Many complexes of the heavy metal osmium (Os) are potent growth inhibitors of human cancer cells and are active in vivo, often superior or comparable to cisplatin, as the benchmark metal-based anticancer agent, or clinically tested ruthenium (Ru) drug candidates. Depending on the choice of ligand system, osmium compounds exhibit diverse modes of action, including redox activation, DNA targeting or inhibition of protein kinases. In this review, we highlight recent advances in the development of osmium anticancer drug candidates and discuss their cellular mechanisms of action. PMID:24955838

  11. Association of cytochrome P450 genetic polymorphisms with neoadjuvant chemotherapy efficacy in breast cancer patients

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background The enzymes of the cytochrome P450 family (CYPs) play an important role in the metabolism of a great variety of anticancer agents; therefore, polymorphisms in genes encoding for metabolizing enzymes and drugs transporters can affect drug efficacy and toxicity. Methods The genetic polymorphisms of cytochrome P450 were studied in 395 patients with breast cancer by RLFP analysis. Results Here, we studied the association of functionally significant variant alleles of CYP3A4, CYP3A5, CYP2B6, CYP2C8, CYP2C9 and CYP2C19 with the clinical response to neoadjuvant chemotherapy in breast cancer patients. A significant correlation was observed between the CYP2C9*2 polymorphism and chemotherapy resistance (OR = 4.64; CI 95% = 1.01 – 20.91), as well as between CYP2C9*2 heterozygotes and chemotherapy resistance in women with nodal forms of breast cancer and a cancer hereditary load (OR = 15.50; CI 95% = 1.08 – 826.12) when the potential combined effects were examined. No significant association between chemotherapy resistance and the other examined genotypes and the potential combined clinical and tumour-related parameters were discovered. Conclusion In conclusion, CYP2C9*2 was associated with neoadjuvant chemotherapy resistance (OR = 4.64; CI 95% = 1.01 – 20.91) in the population of interest. PMID:22702493

  12. Impressive Response to Dose-Dense Chemotherapy in a Patient with NUT Midline Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Maur, Michela; Toss, Angela; Dominici, Massimo; Frassoldati, Antonio; Corradini, Paolo; Maiorana, Antonio; Fontana, Annalisa; Conte, Pierfranco

    2015-01-01

    Patient: Male, 21 Final Diagnosis: NUT midline carcinoma Symptoms: Fatigue • fever • pain Medication: Romidepsin Clinical Procedure: Chemotherapy Specialty: Oncology Objective: Rare disease Background: NUT midline carcinoma (NMC) is a rare, highly lethal malignancy that results from a chromosome translocation and mostly arises in the midline organs. To date, no treatment has been established. Most patients receive combinations of chemotherapy regimens and radiation, and occasionally subsequent resection; nevertheless, patients have an average survival hardly exceeding 7 months. Case Report: A 21-year-old patient was admitted to our division with a large mediastinal mass with lung nodules, multiple vertebral metastases, and massive nodal involvement. In a few days, the patient developed a superior vena cava syndrome and an acute respiratory failure. Due to the rapid course of the disease, based on preliminary histology of poorly differentiated carcinoma, a dose-dense biweekly chemotherapy with paclitaxel, ifosfamide, and cisplatin was started. In the meantime, the diagnosis of NMC was confirmed. A surprising clinical benefit was obtained after the first cycle of chemotherapy, and after 6 cycles a PET-CT scan showed a very good response. At this point, radiotherapy was started but the disease progressed outside of the radiation field. The patient entered into a compassionate use protocol with Romidepsin, but a PET/CT scan after the first course showed disease progression with peritoneal and retroperitoneal carcinosis. A treatment with Pemetrexed was then started but the patient eventually died with rapid progressive disease. Conclusions: Our case history adds some interesting findings to available knowledge: NMC can be chemosensitive and radiosensitive. This opens the possibility to study more aggressive treatments, including high-dose consolidation chemotherapy and to evaluate the role of biological agents as maintenance treatments. PMID:26140332

  13. Bevacizumab Combined with Chemotherapy Improves Survival for Patients with Metastatic Colorectal Cancer: Evidence from Meta Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Jankovic, Slobodan

    2016-01-01

    Background Colorectal cancer is one of the leading causes of cancer deaths in both sexes in the world. Improvement of existing therapy modalities and implementing new ones in order to improve survival of patients with colorectal cancer represents a great challenge for medicine. The aim of this paper was to assess the impact that adding bevacizumab to chemotherapy has on survival in patients with metastatic colorectal cancer, compared to the use of chemotherapy alone. Methods Hazard ratios (HRs) with their 95% confidence intervals (CI) were determined from the studies and pooled. Two-sided p values were reported and considered to indicate statistical significance if less than 0.05. Results A total of 12 studies that meet the inclusion criteria were identified in the literature search, 3 phase II studies and 9 phase III studies. Based on the random effects meta-analysis, a statistically significant improvement was identified for both overall survival (HR = 0.84; 95% CI: 0.74–0.94; p = 0.003) and progression free survival (HR = 0.64; 95% CI: 0.55–0.73; p<0.00001) in patients with metastatic colorectal cancer when bevacizumab was added to chemotherapy, compared to chemotherapy treatment alone. Conclusion The findings of this meta analysis confirm the benefit of adding bevacizumab to chemotherapy in terms of survival and progression free survival, but the magnitude of this effect is not consistent throughout the included studies. This suggests the need for further research of interaction of bevacizumab with chemotherapeutic agents as well as recognition of patients’ characteristics important for the treatment selection criteria. PMID:27579775

  14. Is there liability with chemotherapy following immediate breast construction?

    PubMed

    Yule, G J; Concannon, M J; Croll, G; Puckett, C L

    1996-04-01

    Review of 46 consecutive patients undergoing immediate breast reconstruction with tissue expanders and subsequent implant placement was conducted to assess the potential liability of adjuvant chemotherapy. Twenty-three patients required chemotherapy, while 23 did not. Critical comparison of complications and outcome of the two groups revealed no significant differences. Within the parameters of the study (avoidance of expansion or surgery during the period of chemotherapy), there appeared to be no disadvantage posed to the immediate reconstruction patient by adjuvant chemotherapy. We feel that this option can continue to be offered despite the anticipation of probable chemotherapy.

  15. Chemotherapy: Does Neoadjuvant or Adjuvant Therapy Improve Outcomes?

    PubMed

    Canter, Robert J

    2016-10-01

    Since preoperative chemotherapy has been clearly shown to improve outcomes for patients with Ewing sarcoma, rhabdomyosarcoma, and osteosarcoma, practitioners have attempted to extend the use of adjuvant/neoadjuvant chemotherapy to other types of adult soft tissue sarcoma. Given the high risk of distant recurrence and disease-specific death for patients with soft tissue sarcoma tumors larger than 10 cm, these patients should be considered candidates for neoadjuvant chemotherapy as well as investigational therapies. Yet, potential toxicity from cytotoxic chemotherapy is substantial, and there remains little consensus and wide variation regarding the indications for use of chemotherapy in the adjuvant/neoadjuvant setting. PMID:27591503

  16. Mitoxantrone-loaded albumin microspheres for localized intratumoral chemotherapy of breast cancer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Almond, Brett Anthony

    The safety and efficacy of conventional chemotherapy is limited by its toxicity. The direct intratumoral injection of free or microsphere-loaded antineoplastic drugs is a promising modality for the treatment of solid tumors. Intratumoral chemotherapy delivers high localized doses of cytotoxic drugs to the tumor tissues than does systemic (intravenous) chemotherapy and it decreases systemic drug concentrations and toxicities. The use of drug-loaded microspheres also provides a prolonged release of drug into the surrounding tumor tissues, increasing exposure of the neoplasm to therapeutic levels of the cytotoxic drug. Mitoxantrone and 5-fluorouracil-loaded albumin microspheres were synthesized. The microspheres were synthesized using a suspension crosslinking technique and a glutardehyde crosslinking agent. The particle-size distribution of the microspheres was controlled by adjusting the emulsion energy and the concentration of cellulose acetate butyrate, the emulsion stabilization agent. Both microsphere size and crosslink density (glutaraldehyde concentration) were found to affect the in vitro release of loaded drugs in in vitro infinite sink conditions. The in vivo efficacy and toxicity of intratumoral chemotherapy with free and microsphere-loaded mitoxantrone were evaluated in a 16/C murine mammary adenocarcinoma model. Intratumoral chemotherapy with free mitoxantrone significantly improved survival and decreased toxicity compared to intravenously delivered drug. The efficacy of two size distributions of mitoxantrone-loaded albumin microspheres, corresponding to mean diameters of 5 to 10 mum and 20 to 40 mum, were evaluated delivered both alone and in combination with free mitoxantrone. Intratumoral injection of mitoxantrone-loaded microspheres was found to allow the safe delivery of increased doses compared to free drug. The maximum tolerated doses were approximately 40 mg/kg compared to 12 mg/kg, respectively. Intratumoral chemotherapy using free and

  17. Cognitive effects of chemotherapy-induced menopause in breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Vearncombe, Katharine J; Rolfe, Margaret; Andrew, Brooke; Pachana, Nancy A; Wright, Margaret; Beadle, Geoffrey

    2011-11-01

    This study examined whether chemotherapy-induced menopause affects cognitive functioning in women with early breast cancer. The neuropsychological performance of 121 breast cancer patients (age M=49.62, SD=8.11, range=25.25-67.92) treated with chemotherapy was assessed pre-chemotherapy, as well as 1, 6, and 18 months post-chemotherapy completion. Linear mixed modeling was used to evaluate the data. Type of menopause (pre, chemotherapy-induced, and post menopause) was found to significantly interact with cognitive performance on two cognitive variables. Specifically, chemotherapy-induced menopausal women did not show any significant changes in performance on an abstract reasoning task, while the pre-menopausal and post-menopausal groups significantly improved over time. A significant interaction on a test of finger dexterity and coordination was also found, although inspection of the results indicated that this was due to a significant improvement in the pre-menopausal groups at 6 months post chemotherapy. After chemotherapy most cognitive variables showed improvements over time, although two indicators of verbal memory showed significant declines immediately after chemotherapy, with improvement by 18 months post completion. The current study found little evidence to suggest that chemotherapy-induced menopause broadly affects cognitive functioning after treatment administration. However, longer follow-up assessments are warranted to assess the long-term effects of combined chemotherapy and endocrine treatment.

  18. Inhibition of anandamide hydrolysis attenuates nociceptor sensitization in a murine model of chemotherapy-induced peripheral neuropathy

    PubMed Central

    Uhelski, Megan L.; Khasabova, Iryna A.

    2014-01-01

    Painful neuropathy frequently develops as a consequence of commonly used chemotherapy agents for cancer treatment and is often a dose-limiting side effect. Currently available analgesic treatments are often ineffective on pain induced by neurotoxicity. Although peripheral administration of cannabinoids, endocannabinoids, and inhibitors of endocannabinoid hydrolysis has been effective in reducing hyperalgesia in models of peripheral neuropathy, including chemotherapy-induced peripheral neuropathy (CIPN), few studies have examined cannabinoid effects on responses of nociceptors in vivo. In this study we determined whether inhibition of fatty acid amide hydrolase (FAAH), which slows the breakdown of the endocannabinoid anandamide (AEA), reduced sensitization of nociceptors produced by chemotherapy. Over the course of a week of daily treatments, mice treated with the platinum-based chemotherapy agent cisplatin developed robust mechanical allodynia that coincided with sensitization of cutaneous C-fiber nociceptors as indicated by the development of spontaneous activity and increased responses to mechanical stimulation. Administration of the FAAH inhibitor URB597 into the receptive field of sensitized C-fiber nociceptors decreased spontaneous activity, increased mechanical response thresholds, and decreased evoked responses to mechanical stimuli. Cotreatment with CB1 (AM281) or CB2 (AM630) receptor antagonists showed that the effect of URB597 was mediated primarily by CB1 receptors. These changes following URB597 were associated with an increase in the endocannabinoid anandamide in the skin. Our results suggest that enhanced signaling in the peripheral endocannabinoid system could be utilized to reduce nociceptor sensitization and pain associated with CIPN. PMID:25505113

  19. Schedule-Dependent Antiangiogenic and Cytotoxic Effects of Chemotherapy on Vascular Endothelial and Retinoblastoma Cells

    PubMed Central

    Winter, Ursula; Mena, Hebe A.; Negrotto, Soledad; Arana, Eloisa; Pascual-Pasto, Guillem; Laurent, Viviana; Suñol, Mariona; Chantada, Guillermo L.; Carcaboso, Angel M.; Schaiquevich, Paula

    2016-01-01

    topotecan lead to significantly lower tumor volumes compared to conventional treatment after 14 days of treatment (p<0.05). Continuous exposure to melphalan or topotecan increased the chemosensitivity of retinoblastoma and endothelial cells to both chemotherapy agents with lower IC50 values compared to short-term treatment. These findings were validated in an in vivo model. None of the dosing modalities induced multidrug resistance mechanisms while apoptosis was the mechanism of cell death after both treatment schedules. Metronomic chemotherapy may be a valid option for retinoblastoma treatment allowing reductions of the daily dose. PMID:27467588

  20. A genome-wide association study of chemotherapy-induced alopecia in breast cancer patients

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Introduction Chemotherapy-induced alopecia is one of the most common adverse events caused by conventional cytotoxic chemotherapy, yet there has been very little progress in the prevention or treatment of this side effect. Although this is not a life-threatening event, alopecia is very psychologically difficult for many women to manage. In order to improve the quality of life for these women, it is important to elucidate the molecular mechanisms of chemotherapy-induced alopecia and develop ways to effectively prevent and/or treat it. To identify the genetic risk factors associated with chemotherapy-induced alopecia, we conducted a genome-wide association study (GWAS) using DNA samples from breast cancer patients who were treated with chemotherapy. Methods We performed a case-control association study of 303 individuals who developed grade 2 alopecia, and compared them with 880 breast cancer patients who did not show hair loss after being treated with conventional chemotherapy. In addition, we separately analyzed a subset of patients who received specific combination therapies by GWASs and applied the weighted genetic risk scoring (wGRS) system to investigate the cumulative effects of the associated SNPs. Results We identified an SNP significantly associated with drug-induced grade 2 alopecia (rs3820706 in CACNB4 (calcium channel voltage-dependent subunit beta 4) on 2q23, P = 8.13 × 10-9, OR = 3.71) and detected several SNPs that showed some suggestive associations by subgroup analyses. We also classified patients into four groups on the basis of wGRS analysis and found that patients who classified in the highest risk group showed 443 times higher risk of antimicrotubule agents-induced alopecia than the lowest risk group. Conclusions Our study suggests several associated genes and should shed some light on the molecular mechanism of alopecia in chemotherapy-treated breast cancer patients and hopefully will contribute to development of interventions that will

  1. Schedule-Dependent Antiangiogenic and Cytotoxic Effects of Chemotherapy on Vascular Endothelial and Retinoblastoma Cells.

    PubMed

    Winter, Ursula; Mena, Hebe A; Negrotto, Soledad; Arana, Eloisa; Pascual-Pasto, Guillem; Laurent, Viviana; Suñol, Mariona; Chantada, Guillermo L; Carcaboso, Angel M; Schaiquevich, Paula

    2016-01-01

    topotecan lead to significantly lower tumor volumes compared to conventional treatment after 14 days of treatment (p<0.05). Continuous exposure to melphalan or topotecan increased the chemosensitivity of retinoblastoma and endothelial cells to both chemotherapy agents with lower IC50 values compared to short-term treatment. These findings were validated in an in vivo model. None of the dosing modalities induced multidrug resistance mechanisms while apoptosis was the mechanism of cell death after both treatment schedules. Metronomic chemotherapy may be a valid option for retinoblastoma treatment allowing reductions of the daily dose. PMID:27467588

  2. Chemotherapy for Stage IV Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer: Protocol Versus Nonprotocol? Is Noninvestigational Treatment Worthwhile? Patient Selection? Which Regimen? What's Next?

    PubMed

    Bonomi

    1996-04-01

    The results of selected chemotherapy trials and philosophical considerations regarding the role of chemotherapy in Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer are discussed in this review. The issue of treating patients within a clinical or with a "standard regimen" is addressed. In addition, the survival results of randomized trials in which chemotherapy was compared with supportive care and the related quality of life and economic concerns are reviewed. Physicians' attitudes regarding treating advanced non-small cell lung cancer patients as well as the questions of patient selection and the choice of regimen including the consideration of single versus combination regimens are discussed. The results of single agent phase II trials that identified new agents with response rates >/=15%-paclitaxel, docetaxel, vinorelbine, gemcitabine, CPT11-are described, and their implications for the design of new clinical trials are discussed.

  3. Overcoming therapeutic resistance in pancreatic cancer is not a simple mix of PDT and chemotherapy: Evaluation of PDT-chemotherapy combinations in 3D tumor models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Celli, Jonathan P.; Petrovic, Ljubica; Massdodi, Iqbal; Rizvi, Imran; Hasan, Tayyaba

    2013-03-01

    The dismal survival statistics for pancreatic cancer are due in large part to the notoriously poor response of these tumors to conventional therapies. Here we examine the ability of photodynamic therapy (PDT), using the photosensitizer verteporfin to enhance of the efficacy of traditional chemotherapy agents and/or eradicate populations that are nonresponsive to these agents. Using an in vitro 3D tumor model of pancreatic cancer combined with an imaging-based methodology for quantifying therapeutic response, we specifically examine PDT combination treatments with gemcitabine and oxaliplatin. We show that our 3D cell culture model recapitulates a more clinically-relevant dose response to gemcitabine, with minimal cytotoxic response even at high doses. The same cultures exhibit modest response to PDT treatments, but are also less responsive to this modality relative to our previous reports of monolayer dose response in the same cells. In combination we found no evidence of any enhancement in efficacy of either PDT or gemcitabine treatment regardless of dose or sequence (PDT before gemcitabine, or gemcitabine before PDT). However, when oxaliplatin chemotherapy was administered immediately after treatment with 2.5J/cm2 verteporfin PDT, there was an observable enhancement in response that appears to exceed the additive combination of either treatment alone and suggesting there may be a synergistic interaction. This observation is consistent with previous reports of enhanced efficacy in combinations of PDT with platinum-based chemotherapy. The contrast in results between the combinations examined here underscores the need for rational design of mechanism-based PDT combinations.

  4. Cytotoxic drug: towards safer chemotherapy practices.

    PubMed

    Joshi, M C

    2007-01-01

    Health care is nearly 10 years behind other industries in its efforts to reduce the errors. Medication error may be nobody's baby, but when it happens, it could well turn out to be everyone's worry and the reasons given for medication error range from silly to the downright serious. The anticancer drugs are known to be mutagenic, teratogenic and carcinogenic, so extra precaution should be taken while storing, diluting, administering the drugs and disposing the waste. The objectives of this article are to define the standards for using cancer chemotherapy in hospitals; to tackle any spillage of drug and how to dispose of the waste of anticancer drugs. This could be beneficial to any hospital where chemotherapy is given without any defined standard operating procedure. The information furnished in this article is collected from the mentioned references and also from websites- The American Cancer Society: Cancer Facts and Figures 2002, www.cancer.org and www.cancersourceRN.com. PMID:17401222

  5. Chemotherapy-Induced Amenorrhea – An Update

    PubMed Central

    Liedtke, C.; Kiesel, L.

    2012-01-01

    Because of the heterogeneity in the definition of chemotherapy-induced amenorrhea (CIA) there are distinct differences in the literature with regard to its incidence as well as its dependence on various influencing factors. The occurrence of CIA varies greatly depending on the applied chemotherapy. The pathogenesis of CIA is especially based on a reduction of ovarian reserves. Various sonographic and biochemical factors can be used to exclude or confirm CIA. This is particularly important when an endocrine therapy with tamoxifen is not possible and the use of aromatase inhibitors is under consideration. CIA and especially the frequently thereby resulting early menopause can lead to pronounced restrictions in the quality of life of the affected patients, not least due to the resulting infertility. On the other hand, various studies have shown that CIA may have a positive prognostic significance. Thus, the identification of measures to prevent CIA (for example, through the use of GnRH analogues) is of particular importance. PMID:26640289

  6. [Scalp cooling for chemotherapy-induced alopecia].

    PubMed

    Komen, Marion M C; Smorenburg, Carolien H; van den Hurk, Corina J G; Nortier, J W R Hans

    2011-01-01

    Alopecia is a very common side effect of cytostatic therapy and is considered one of the most emotionally distressing effects. To prevent alopecia scalp cooling is currently used in some indications in medical oncology in 59 hospitals in the Netherlands. The success of scalp cooling depends on various factors such as type of chemotherapy, dose, infusion time, number of treatment cycles and combinations of drugs. In general, scalp cooling is well tolerated. The reported side-effects are headache, coldness, dizziness and sometimes claustrophobia. An increase in the risk of scalp metastases has not been demonstrated. Proceeding from the South Netherlands Comprehensive Cancer Centre a national working group is put together in order to draw up a national guideline for chemotherapy-induced alopecia. PMID:22085565

  7. Computed tomography of osteosarcoma after intraarterial chemotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Shirkhoda, A.; Jaffe, N.; Wallace, S.; Ayala, A.; Lindell, M.M.; Zornoza, J.

    1985-01-01

    The response to intraarterial cis-diamminedichloroplatinum II (CDP) chemotherapy was evaluated by computed tomography (CT) in 33 patients with pathologically proved osteosarcoma of the long or flat bones. Twenty-one of the 33 patients had a CT scan before chemotherapy was started. In the other 12 patients, a CT scan was obtained after at least two courses of treatment, and additional studies were performed during the course of therapy. In those patients responding to treatment, the posttherapy scan revealed a remarkable decrease or complete disappearance of the associated soft-tissue mass and clear reestablishment of the fat planes between the muscle bundles that had been obscured. There was sharp definition of the peripheral margins of the calcified healing neoplasm, and the calcification in the healing tumor could be differentiated easily from that of the original bone neoplasm. CT was more accurate than conventional studies in detecting healing process and diagnosis of remission.

  8. [Extravasation of cytostatic agents: a serious complication of oncological treatment].

    PubMed

    Alfaro-Rubio, Alberto; Sanmartín, Onofre; Requena, Celia; Llombart, Beatriz; Botella-Estrada, Rafael; Nagore, Eduardo; Serra-Guillén, Carlos; Hueso, Luis; Guillén, Carlos

    2006-04-01

    The extravasation of cytostatic agents is a known, serious situation that can easily occur and cause chronic, irreversible damage. The incidence of extravasation ranges from 0.1 %-6.5 %, according to different studies. Many cases of extravasation can be prevented by systematizing the administration techniques for cytostatic agents. We present the clinical and histological characteristics of a series of patients with extravasation lesions. Included in the study were all patients treated with chemotherapy who developed localized lesions in the area of the cytostatic injection after extravasation was detected during administration. The patients were studied and followed up for a three-year period, from January 2000 to December 2003, inclusive. We found nine cases of extravasation among the 2,186 patients who were treated with chemotherapy, which represents an incidence of 0.41 %, and 3.4 % of all chemotherapy-induced skin lesions. The cytostatic agent most often involved was vinorelbine, and the most frequent location was the antecubital fossa. The intensity of the lesions made it necessary to delay the next cycle of treatment in 55 % of the cases. The histological findings varied depending on when the biopsy was done, showing panniculitis with low cellularity together with epidermal lesions attributable to direct cytotoxicity. The best treatment for extravasation is prevention, but when it has already occurred, measures vary depending on the cytostatic drug extravasated and the intensity of the lesions. Conservative measures are advisable before surgery.

  9. Psychosocial and Physical Effects of Adjuvant Chemotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Hislop, Thomas Gregory; Elwood, J. Mark; Waxler-Morrison, Nancy; Ragaz, Joseph; Skippen, Diane Hazel; Turner, I.D.

    1991-01-01

    Breast cancer patients younger than 55 completed a questionnaire on psychosocial factors and physical side effects shortly after diagnosis and 9 to 15 months after diagnosis. Those who had used adjuvant chemotherapy were more likely than those who had not to report physical side effects; there was little difference in psychosocial factors. Recent users were more likely than ex-users to report physical side effects, difficulties with domestic chores, and improvement in psychosocial factors. PMID:21229020

  10. [Continuous ambulatory chemotherapy with elastomer pump].

    PubMed

    Cabrera Figueroa, J; Arias Hernández, M

    2001-09-01

    Continuous perfusion administration of chemotherapy can be performed by means of various devices known as pumps. There are syringe pumps, elastomeric pumps, peristaltic pumps and pumps which can be implanted. In our hospital environment, the elastomeric pump enjoys a high degree of acceptance since it permits a cancer patient to maintain a large degree of autonomy while he/she carries on his/her activities. PMID:12150128

  11. Chemotherapy or radiation-induced oral mucositis.

    PubMed

    Lalla, Rajesh V; Saunders, Deborah P; Peterson, Douglas E

    2014-04-01

    Oral mucositis is a significant toxicity of systemic chemotherapy and of radiation therapy to the head and neck region. The morbidity of oral mucositis can include pain, nutritional compromise, impact on quality of life, alteration in cancer therapy, risk for infection, and economic costs. Management includes general symptomatic support and targeted therapeutic interventions for the prevention or treatment of oral mucositis. Evidence-based clinical practice guidelines are available to guide clinicians in the selection of effective management strategies.

  12. A New mouthwash for Chemotherapy Induced Stomatitis

    PubMed Central

    Miranzadeh, Sedigheh; Adib-Hajbaghery, Mohsen; Soleymanpoor, Leyla; Ehsani, Majid

    2014-01-01

    Background: Stomatitis is a disturbing side-effect of chemotherapy that disturbs patients and causes difficulties in patient’s drinking, eating and talking, and may results in infection and bleeding. Objectives: This study aimed to investigate the effect of Yarrow distillate in the treatment of chemotherapy-induced stomatitis. Patients and Methods: This randomized controlled trial study was conducted during 2013. The study population consisted of all cancer patients with chemotherapy-induced oral stomatitis referred to Shahid Beheshti Medical Center, Kashan, Iran. The data collection instrument had two-part; a demographic part and another part recording the severity of the stomatitis at the first, seventh, and 14th days of the intervention based on a WHO criteria checklist in 2005. In this study, 56 patients diagnosed with cancer were randomly assigned into control and experimental groups in similar blocks according to their stomatitis severity. The experimental group gargled 15 mL of a routine solution mixed with Yarrow distillate 4 times a day for 14 days while the control group gargled 15 mL of routine solution. The severity of stomatitis was assessed at the beginning of the intervention, and then after 7 and 14 days of the study. Data were analyzed using chi-square and Fisher exact test, Mann-Whitney U, Kruskal-Wallis, and Friedman tests using SPSS 11.5 software. Results: At first, the median score of stomatitis in the experimental group was 2.50 that significantly reduced to 1 and 0 in days 7 and 14 of the intervention, respectively (P value < 0.001). However, in the control group, the median score of stomatitis was 2.50, which significantly increased to 3 in days 7 and 14 (P value < 0.001). Conclusions: Yarrow distillate-contained solution reduced stomatitis severity more than the routine solution. Therefore, we suggest using it in patients with chemotherapy-induced stomatitis. PMID:25699281

  13. PDE5 inhibitors enhance tumor permeability and efficacy of chemotherapy in a rat brain tumor model.

    PubMed

    Black, Keith L; Yin, Dali; Ong, John M; Hu, Jinwei; Konda, Bindu M; Wang, Xiao; Ko, MinHee K; Bayan, Jennifer-Ann; Sacapano, Manuel R; Espinoza, Andreas; Irvin, Dwain K; Shu, Yan

    2008-09-16

    The blood-brain tumor barrier (BTB) significantly limits delivery of therapeutic concentrations of chemotherapy to brain tumors. A novel approach to selectively increase drug delivery is pharmacologic modulation of signaling molecules that regulate BTB permeability, such as those in cGMP signaling. Here we show that oral administration of sildenafil (Viagra) and vardenafil (Levitra), inhibitors of cGMP-specific PDE5, selectively increased tumor capillary permeability in 9L gliosarcoma-bearing rats with no significant increase in normal brain capillaries. Tumor-bearing rats treated with the chemotherapy agent, adriamycin, in combination with vardenafil survived significantly longer than rats treated with adriamycin alone. The selective increase in tumor capillary permeability appears to be mediated by a selective increase in tumor cGMP levels and increased vesicular transport through tumor capillaries, and could be attenuated by iberiotoxin, a selective inhibitor for calcium-dependent potassium (K(Ca)) channels, that are effectors in cGMP signaling. The effect by sildenafil could be further increased by simultaneously using another BTB "opener", bradykinin. Collectively, this data demonstrates that oral administration of PDE5 inhibitors selectively increases BTB permeability and enhances anti-tumor efficacy for a chemotherapeutic agent. These findings have significant implications for improving delivery of anti-tumor agents to brain tumors. PMID:18674521

  14. Biological warfare agents.

    PubMed

    Pohanka, Miroslav; Kuca, Kamil

    2010-01-01

    Biological warfare agents are a group of pathogens and toxins of biological origin that can be potentially misused for military or criminal purposes. The present review attempts to summarize necessary knowledge about biological warfare agents. The historical aspects, examples of applications of these agents such as anthrax letters, biological weapons impact, a summary of biological warfare agents and epidemiology of infections are described. The last section tries to estimate future trends in research on biological warfare agents.

  15. Spacecraft sanitation agent development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1972-01-01

    The development of an effective sanitizing agent that is compatible with the spacecraft environment and the human occupant is discussed. Experimental results show that two sanitation agents must be used to satisfy mission requirements: one agent for personal hygiene and one for equipment maintenance. It was also recommended that a water rinse be used with the agents for best results, and that consideration be given to using the agents pressure packed or in aerosol formulations.

  16. The translocator protein (TSPO) ligand PK11195 induces apoptosis and cell cycle arrest and sensitizes to chemotherapy treatment in pre- and post-relapse neuroblastoma cell lines.

    PubMed

    Mendonça-Torres, Maria C; Roberts, Stephen S

    2013-04-01

    High-risk neuroblastoma (NB) has a poor prognosis. Even with intensive myeloablative chemotherapy, relapse is common and almost uniformly fatal, and new treatments are needed. Translocator protein 18kDa (TSPO) ligands have been studied as potential new therapeutic agents in many cancers, but not in NB. We studied the effects of TSPO ligands on cell proliferation, cell cycle progression and apoptosis using paired cell lines derived from the same patient at the time of initial surgery and again after development of progressive disease or relapse post-chemotherapy. We found that TSPO expression was significantly increased 2- to 10-fold in post-relapse cell lines compared with pre-treatment lines derived from the same individual. Subsequently, these cell lines were treated with the specific TSPO ligand 1-(2-chlorophenyl-N-methylpropyl)-3-isoquinolinecarboxamide (PK11195) (0-160µM) as a single agent, with cytotoxic chemotherapy agents alone (carboplatin, etoposide or melphalan), or with combinations of PK11195 and chemotherapy drugs. We found that PK11195 inhibited proliferation in a dose-dependent manner, induced apoptosis and caused G 1/S cell cycle arrest in all tested NB cell lines at micromolar concentrations. In addition, PK11195 significantly decreased mRNA expression of the chemotherapy resistance efflux pumps ABCA3, ABCB1 and ABCC1 in two post-relapse NB cell lines. We also found that pre-treatment with PK11195 sensitized these cell lines to treatment with cytotoxic chemotherapy agents. These results suggest that PK11195 alone or in combination with standard chemotherapeutic drugs warrants further study for the treatment of neuroblastoma.

  17. [Experimental study on chemotherapy of acute glanders].

    PubMed

    Iliukhin, V I; Rotov, K A; Senina, T V; Snatenkov, E A; Tikhonov, S N; Plekhanova, N G; Kulikova, A S; Shubnikova, E V; Korol', E V; Nekhezina, M O

    2012-01-01

    Glanders is a zoonotic infection inducing acute forms of the disease (pneumonia, sepsis) in humans and animals under certain conditions, which even with the use of modern chemotherapy have unfavourable prognosis. Insufficient of efficacy of antibiotics with in vitro low MIC for planktonic bacterial suspension of Burkholderia mallei in chemotherapy of acute forms of glanders was due to the capacity of the pathogen for intracellular survival and formation of biofilms. Under such conditions the susceptibility of B. mallei to antibiotics lowered by several orders of magnitude. Chemotherapy of the glanders acute forms in animals usually provided only an increase of the lifespan, while among the survivors there was recorded a high relapse rate. More favourable outcomes were observed with the use of in vitro effective antibiotics in the form of clathrate compounds or especially liposomal forms. In the experiments with golden hamsters the survival rate reached 100% in 1000 Dlm infection even with the treatment onset by meropenem liposomal form 48 hours after the infection. Chemotherapeutics in the liposomal form significantly lowered resistance of B. mallei in both the experiments with a suspension of planktonic organisms and the use of bacteria interned in eukaryotic cells (Tetrahymena pyriformis).

  18. Treatment of oral mucositis due to chemotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Bagán-Sebastián, José V

    2016-01-01

    Introduction The management of oral mucositis is a challenge, due to its complex biological nature. Over the last 10 years, different strategies have been developed for the management of oral mucositis caused by chemotherapy in cancer patients. Material and Methods An exhaustive search was made of the PubMed-Medline, Cochrane Library and Scopus databases, crossing the key words “oral mucositis”, “prevention” and “treatment” with the terms “chemotherapy” and “radiotherapy” by means of the boolean operators “AND” and “NOT”. A total of 268 articles were obtained, of which 96 met the inclusion criteria. Results Several interventions for the prevention of oral mucositis, such as oral hygiene protocols, amifostine, benzidamine, calcium phosphate, cryotherapy and iseganan, among others, were found to yield only limited benefits. Other studies have reported a decrease in the appearance and severity of mucositis with the use of cytoprotectors (sucralfate, oral glutamine, hyaluronic acid), growth factors, topical polyvinylpyrrolidone, and low power laser irradiation. Conclusions Very few interventions of confirmed efficacy are available for the management of oral mucositis due to chemotherapy. However, according to the reviewed literature, the use of palifermin, cryotherapy and low power laser offers benefits, reducing the incidence and severity of oral mucositis – though further studies are needed to confirm the results obtained. Key words:Chemotherapy-Induced Oral Mucositis Treatment. PMID:27034762

  19. Fertility preservation after chemotherapy for Hodgkin lymphoma.

    PubMed

    van der Kaaij, Marleen A E; van Echten-Arends, Jannie; Simons, Arnold H M; Kluin-Nelemans, Hanneke C

    2010-12-01

    Treatment for Hodgkin lymphoma can negatively affect fertility. This review summarizes data on fertility after chemotherapy in adult patients. Alkylating chemotherapy, especially if containing procarbazine and/or cyclophosphamide, is most harmful to gonadal functioning. Alkylating regimens cause prolonged azoospermia in 90-100% of men and ovarian failure in 5-25% of women under the age of 30. Non-alkylating chemotherapy, like ABVD, is much less harmful: one-third of male patients develop transient azoospermia, and almost no female patients experience ovarian failure. Age is an important factor for women: females over 30 years have a much higher risk of acute ovarian failure. However, with long-term follow-up the cumulative risk of menopause before the age of 40 becomes the same irrespective of treatment age. In males, semen cryopreservation before start of treatment should be offered to all (post)pubertal patients. For females with a partner, IVF followed by embryo cryopreservation is a widely available method, but this necessitates postponement of lymphoma therapy for at least a month. Oocyte cryopreservation and ovarian tissue cryopreservation are experimental techniques showing great promise. GnRH-analogues are being investigated as possible means to preserve fertility in women, but effectiveness has not yet been proven conclusively.

  20. Cancer stem cells targeting agents--a review.

    PubMed

    Shi, A-M; Tao, Z-Q; Li, H; Wang, Y-Q; Zhao, J

    2015-11-01

    Major current cancer strategies like surgery, radiotherapy, and chemotherapy are compromised due to major problem of recurrence, which usually lead to mortality. The widely accepted reason for this is resistance offered by cancer cells towards cancer drugs or inability of a therapeutic procedure to target real culprits viz. cancer-initiating cells (cancer stem cells). So, there is a current need of development of new agents targeting these cancer stem cells in order to overcome resistance to therapeutic procedures. The present review article is focused on new cancer cell targeting agents like salinomycin, apopotin etc and their mechanisms to target cancer stems cells will be discussed.

  1. Differential Effectiveness of Clinically-Relevant Analgesics in a Rat Model of Chemotherapy-Induced Mucositis

    PubMed Central

    Whittaker, Alexandra L.; Lymn, Kerry A.; Wallace, Georgia L.; Howarth, Gordon S.

    2016-01-01

    Chemotherapy-induced intestinal mucositis is characterized by pain and a pro-inflammatory tissue response. Rat models are frequently used in mucositis disease investigations yet little is known about the presence of pain in these animals, the ability of analgesics to ameliorate the condition, or the effect that analgesic administration may have on study outcomes. This study investigated different classes of analgesics with the aim of determining their analgesic effects and impact on research outcomes of interest in a rat model of mucositis. Female DA rats were allocated to 8 groups to include saline and chemotherapy controls (n = 8). Analgesics included opioid derivatives (buprenorphine; 0.05mg/kg and tramadol 12.5mg/kg) and NSAID (carprofen; 15mg/kg) in combination with either saline or 5-Fluorouracil (5-FU; 150mg/kg). Research outcome measures included daily clinical parameters, pain score and gut histology. Myeloperoxidase assay was performed to determine gut inflammation. At the dosages employed, all agents had an analgesic effect based on behavioural pain scores. Jejunal myeloperoxidase activity was significantly reduced by buprenorphine and tramadol in comparison to 5-FU control animals (53%, p = 0.0004 and 58%, p = 0.0001). Carprofen had no ameliorating effect on myeloperoxidase levels. None of the agents reduced the histological damage caused by 5-FU administration although tramadol tended to increase villus length even when administered to healthy animals. These data provide evidence that carprofen offers potential as an analgesic in this animal model due to its pain-relieving efficacy and minimal effect on measured parameters. This study also supports further investigation into the mechanism and utility of opioid agents in the treatment of chemotherapy-induced mucositis. PMID:27463799

  2. Induction Chemotherapy with Cisplatin and 5-Fluorouracil in Advanced Head and Neck Cancers: A Short Term Response Evaluation

    PubMed Central

    Rao, Raghavendra; Shenoy, Vijendra; Hegde, Mahesh Chandra; Prasad, Vishnu; Prasad, Krishna

    2015-01-01

    Background Considering the uprising number of Head and neck cancer in the state with limited options of medical and surgical treatment, the focus of this study involved on chemotherapy in advanced Head and neck cancers. The aim of this study was to evaluate the efficacy and toxicity of combination of Cisplatin and 5-Fluorouracil (PF) as induction chemotherapy in patients in locally advanced squamous cell cancer of head and neck. Materials and Methods Forty four patients with previously untreated stage III -IV advanced and inoperable cases were included in this prospective study. Induction chemotherapy consisted of 3 cycles of Cisplatin 100mg/mt2 as infusion on day 1, 5-Fluorouracil of 750mg/mt2 on day 2, 5-Fluorouracil of 1000mg/mt2 as infusion on day 3 in an inpatient basis. Cycles were repeated with an interval of 21 days. Patients were evaluated within a period of 3 weeks at the end of completion of third cycle of chemotherapy. Post chemotherapy local therapy was individualized based on the response, site and stage of the tumour. Results Out of 44 eligible and evaluable patients, major dominance was noted in male group constituting 68%. After induction chemotherapy 58.8% of stage III experienced stable response, & 44% had partial response. In stage IV, 44% showed a stable response and 33.3% had partial response. But in comparison to primary tumour response and nodal response, which had a significant clinical response, the overall response of malignancy with respect to stage and site specificity was clinically insignificant. Moderate adverse reaction was noted in 47.6% and 42.1% had mild reactions. Majority of patients experienced grade 3 adverse events, of which anaemia in females and leucopenia in males pre-dominated. Conclusion With the use of cisplatin and 5-FU as induction chemotherapy agents in advanced and inoperable squamous cell carcinoma of head and neck, a distinct benefit was seen in stabilizing the tumour from progression. But achieving a significant

  3. Tumor and host factors that may limit efficacy of chemotherapy in non-small cell and small cell lung cancer.

    PubMed

    Stewart, David J

    2010-09-01

    While chemotherapy provides useful palliation, advanced lung cancer remains incurable since those tumors that are initially sensitive to therapy rapidly develop acquired resistance. Resistance may arise from impaired drug delivery, extracellular factors, decreased drug uptake into tumor cells, increased drug efflux, drug inactivation by detoxifying factors, decreased drug activation or binding to target, altered target, increased damage repair, tolerance of damage, decreased proapoptotic factors, increased antiapoptotic factors, or altered cell cycling or transcription factors. Factors for which there is now substantial clinical evidence of a link to small cell lung cancer (SCLC) resistance to chemotherapy include MRP (for platinum-based combination chemotherapy) and MDR1/P-gp (for non-platinum agents). SPECT MIBI and Tc-TF scanning appears to predict chemotherapy benefit in SCLC. In non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC), the strongest clinical evidence is for taxane resistance with elevated expression or mutation of class III beta-tubulin (and possibly alpha tubulin), platinum resistance and expression of ERCC1 or BCRP, gemcitabine resistance and RRM1 expression, and resistance to several agents and COX-2 expression (although COX-2 inhibitors have had minimal impact on drug efficacy clinically). Tumors expressing high BRCA1 may have increased resistance to platinums but increased sensitivity to taxanes. Limited early clinical data suggest that chemotherapy resistance in NSCLC may also be increased with decreased expression of cyclin B1 or of Eg5, or with increased expression of ICAM, matrilysin, osteopontin, DDH, survivin, PCDGF, caveolin-1, p21WAF1/CIP1, or 14-3-3sigma, and that IGF-1R inhibitors may increase efficacy of chemotherapy, particularly in squamous cell carcinomas. Equivocal data (with some positive studies but other negative studies) suggest that NSCLC tumors with some EGFR mutations may have increased sensitivity to chemotherapy, while K-ras mutations

  4. TUMOR AND HOST FACTORS THAT MAY LIMIT EFFICACY OF CHEMOTHERAPY IN NON-SMALL CELL AND SMALL CELL LUNG CANCER

    PubMed Central

    Stewart, David J.

    2010-01-01

    While chemotherapy provides useful palliation, advanced lung cancer remains incurable since those tumors that are initially sensitive to therapy rapidly develop acquired resistance. Resistance may arise from impaired drug delivery, extracellular factors, decreased drug uptake into tumor cells, increased drug efflux, drug inactivation by detoxifying factors, decreased drug activation or binding to target, altered target, increased damage repair, tolerance of damage, decreased proapoptotic factors, increased antiapoptotic factors, or altered cell cycling or transcription factors. Factors for which there is now substantial clinical evidence of a link to small cell lung cancer (SCLC) resistance to chemotherapy include MRP (for platinum-based combination chemotherapy) and MDR1/P-gp (for non-platinum agents). SPECT MIBI and Tc-TF scanning appears to predict chemotherapy benefit in SCLC. In non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC), the strongest clinical evidence is for taxane resistance with elevated expression or mutation of class III β-tubulin (and possibly α tubulin), platinum resistance and expression of ERCC1 or BCRP, gemcitabine resistance and RRM1 expression, and resistance to several agents and COX-2 expression (although COX-2 inhibitors have had minimal impact on drug efficacy clinically). Tumors expressing high BRCA1 may have increased resistance to platinums but increased sensitivity to taxanes. Limited early clinical data suggest that chemotherapy resistance in NSCLC may also be increased with decreased expression of cyclin B1 or of Eg5, or with increased expression of ICAM, matrilysin, osteopontin, DDH, survivin, PCDGF, caveolin-1, p21WAF1/CIP1, or 14-3-3sigma, and that IGF-1R inhibitors may increase efficacy of chemotherapy, particularly in squamous cell carcinomas. Equivocal data (with some positive studies but other negative studies) suggest that NSCLC tumors with some EGFR mutations may have increased sensitivity to chemotherapy, while K-ras mutations and

  5. Topoisomerase I and II inhibitors: chemical structure, mechanisms of action and role in cancer chemotherapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dezhenkova, L. G.; Tsvetkov, V. B.; Shtil, A. A.

    2014-01-01

    The review summarizes and analyzes recent published data on topoisomerase I and II inhibitors as potential antitumour agents. Functions and the mechanism of action of topoisomerases are considered. The molecular mechanism of interactions between low-molecular-weight compounds and these proteins is discussed. Topoisomerase inhibitors belonging to different classes of chemical compounds are systematically covered. Assays for the inhibition of topoisomerases and the possibilities of using the computer-aided modelling for the rational design of novel drugs for cancer chemotherapy are presented. The bibliography includes 127 references.

  6. Development and Applications of Photo-triggered Theranostic Agents

    PubMed Central

    Rai, Prakash; Mallidi, Srivallesha; Zheng, Xiang; Rahmanzadeh, Ramtin; Mir, Youssef; Elrington, Stefan; Khurshid, Ahmat; Hasan, Tayyaba

    2010-01-01

    Theranostics, the fusion of therapy and diagnostics for optimizing efficacy and safety of therapeutic regimes, is a growing field that is paving the way towards the goal of personalized medicine for the benefit of patients. The use of light as a remote-activation mechanism for drug delivery has received increased attention due to its advantages in highly specific spatial and temporal control of compound release. Photo-triggered theranostic constructs could facilitate an entirely new category of clinical solutions which permit early recognition of the disease by enhancing contrast in various imaging modalities followed by the tailored guidance of therapy. Finally, such theranostic agents could aid imaging modalities in monitoring response to therapy. This article reviews recent developments in the use of light-triggered theranostic agents for simultaneous imaging and photoactivation of therapeutic agents. Specifically, we discuss recent developments in the use of theranostic agents for photodynamic-, photothermal- or photo-triggered chemo-therapy for several diseases. PMID:20858520

  7. Topoisomerase levels determine chemotherapy response in vitro and in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Burgess, Darren J.; Doles, Jason; Zender, Lars; Xue, Wen; Ma, Beicong; McCombie, W. Richard; Hannon, Gregory J.; Lowe, Scott W.; Hemann, Michael T.

    2008-01-01

    Topoisomerase poisons are chemotherapeutic agents that are used extensively for treating human malignancies. These drugs can be highly effective, yet tumors are frequently refractory to treatment or become resistant upon tumor relapse. Using a pool-based RNAi screening approach and a well characterized mouse model of lymphoma, we explored the genetic basis for heterogeneous responses to topoisomerase poisons in vitro and in vivo. These experiments identified Top2A expression levels as major determinants of response to the topoisomerase 2 poison doxorubicin and showed that suppression of Top2A produces resistance to doxorubicin in vitro and in vivo. Analogously, using a targeted RNAi approach, we demonstrated that suppression of Top1 produces resistance to the topoisomerase 1 poison camptothecin yet hypersensitizes cancer cells to doxorubicin. Importantly, lymphomas relapsing after treatment display spontaneous changes in topoisomerase levels as predicted by in vitro gene knockdown studies. These results highlight the utility of pooled shRNA screens for identifying genetic determinants of chemotherapy response and suggest strategies for improving the effectiveness of topoisomerase poisons in the clinic. PMID:18574145

  8. Myeloid neoplasms after chemotherapy and PRRT: myth and reality.

    PubMed

    Bodei, Lisa; Modlin, Irvin M; Luster, Markus; Forrer, Flavio; Cremonesi, Marta; Hicks, Rodney J; Ezziddin, Samer; Kidd, Mark; Chiti, Arturo

    2016-08-01

    Peptide receptor radionuclide therapy (PRRT) with (90)Y-octreotide or (177)Lu-octreotate is an effective treatment for inoperable or metastatic neuroendocrine tumors (NETs), particularly well-differentiated gastroenteropancreatic or bronchopulmonary NETs. PRRT is generally extremely well tolerated, with modest toxicity to target organs, kidney and bone marrow. Nevertheless, a priori concerns regarding long-term effects lead clinicians such as Brieau and coworkers, in this ERC issue, to ascribe to the combination of alkylating agents and PRRT the apparently high occurrence (n=4) of myeloproliferative events (therapy-related myeloid neoplasms (t-MNs)) in a small cohort of 20 progressive, advanced digestive NETs treated with PRRT after chemotherapy. Anecdotal reports of myelotoxic events should be placed in the correct perspective of larger series, where the reported incidence of these events is ~2%, with the aim of promoting a balanced awareness of the issue and unbiased and reasonable overall conclusions. For a comprehensive definition of the issue, we provide an evaluation of the occurrence of t-MN in patients treated with various myelotoxic treatments. PMID:27353035

  9. Oxidative stress of photodynamic antimicrobial chemotherapy inhibits Candida albicans virulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kato, Ilka Tiemy; Prates, Renato Araujo; Tegos, George P.; Hamblin, Michael R.; Simões Ribeiro, Martha

    2011-03-01

    Photodynamic antimicrobial chemotherapy (PACT) is based on the principal that microorganisms will be inactivated using a light source combined to a photosensitizing agent in the presence of oxygen. Oxidative damage of cell components occurs by the action of reactive oxygen species leading to cell death for microbial species. It has been demonstrated that PACT is highly efficient in vitro against a wide range of pathogens, however, there is limited information for its in vivo potential. In addition, it has been demonstrated that sublethal photodynamic inactivation may alter the virulence determinants of microorganisms. In this study, we explored the effect of sublethal photodynamic inactivation to the virulence factors of Candida albicans. Methylene Blue (MB) was used as photosensitizer for sublethal photodynamic challenge on C. albicans associated with a diode laser irradiation (λ=660nm). The parameters of irradiation were selected in causing no reduction of viable cells. The potential effects of PACT on virulence determinants of C. albicans cells were investigated by analysis of germ tube formation and in vivo pathogenicity assays. Systemic infection was induced in mice by the injection of fungal suspension in the lateral caudal vein. C. albicans exposed to sublethal photodynamic inactivation formed significantly less germ tube than untreated cells. In addition, mice infected with C. albicans submitted to sublethal PACT survived for a longer period of time than mice infected with untreated cells. The oxidative damage promoted by sublethal photodynamic inactivation inhibited virulence determinants and reduced in vivo pathogenicity of C. albicans.

  10. Scanning with L-(/sup 13/N) glutamate: Assessment of the response to chemotherapy of a patient with embryonal rhabdomyosarcoma

    SciTech Connect

    Sordillo, P.P.; Reiman, R.E.; Gelbard, A.S.; Benua, R.S.; Magill, G.B.; Laughlin, J.S.

    1982-06-01

    The use of /sup 13/N-labeled L-glutamate as an imaging agent in a patient with embryonal rhabdomyosarcoma is described. Localization of /sup 13/N in a large, poorly defined tumor of the left pectoral region was seen, and clinically occult right axilliary metastases were also detected. A marked reduction in uptake in these areas occurred after chemotherapy, paralleling the clinical disappearance of tumor. These changes were verified on gallium scan. /sup 13/N-labeled glutamate may be useful as an imaging agent, especially in patients with soft-tissue sarcomas.

  11. Operating personnel safety during the administration of Hyperthermic Intraperitoneal Chemotherapy (HIPEC).

    PubMed

    Kyriazanos, Ioannis; Kalles, Vasileios; Stefanopoulos, Anastasios; Spiliotis, John; Mohamed, Faheez

    2016-09-01

    Cytoreductive surgery (CRS) and Hyperthermic Intraperitoneal Chemotherapy (HIPEC) is increasingly used in the treatment of peritoneal malignancies. The administration of HIPEC after complete cytoreduction offers the combination of the pharmacokinetic advantages inherent to the intraperitoneal delivery of cytotoxic chemotherapy, with the direct cytotoxic effects of hyperthermia, and has been reported to offer significantly improved patient outcomes. As a result, this novel method disseminates rapidly, with many surgical teams having developed peritoneal malignancy treatment programs. Protocols are needed for the introduction, handling, and management of chemotherapeutic agents in the operating room to minimize risk to the staff involved in the procedure. The personnel exposure during CRS and HIPEC may arise from different routes, such as air contamination, direct contact, manipulation of perfusates or chemotherapy solutions, and manipulation of objects/tissues exposed to chemotherapeutics. Guidelines for safe administration of HIPEC including environmental contamination risk management, personal protective equipment, and occupational health issues are yet to be established. This review summarizes the existing evidence regarding the safety considerations of HIPEC administration.

  12. How Chemotherapy Increases the Risk of Systemic Candidiasis in Cancer Patients: Current Paradigm and Future Directions

    PubMed Central

    Teoh, Flora; Pavelka, Norman

    2016-01-01

    Candida albicans is a fungal commensal and a major colonizer of the human skin, as well as of the gastrointestinal and genitourinary tracts. It is also one of the leading causes of opportunistic microbial infections in cancer patients, often presenting in a life-threatening, systemic form. Increased susceptibility to such infections in cancer patients is attributed primarily to chemotherapy-induced depression of innate immune cells and weakened epithelial barriers, which are the body’s first-line defenses against fungal infections. Moreover, classical chemotherapeutic agents also have a detrimental effect on components of the adaptive immune system, which further play important roles in the antifungal response. In this review, we discuss the current paradigm regarding the mechanisms behind the increased risk of systemic candidiasis in cancer patients. We also highlight some recent findings, which suggest that chemotherapy may have more extensive effects beyond the human host, in particular towards C. albicans itself and the bacterial microbiota. The extent to which these additional effects contribute towards the development of candidiasis in chemotherapy-treated patients remains to be investigated. PMID:26784236

  13. Operating personnel safety during the administration of Hyperthermic Intraperitoneal Chemotherapy (HIPEC).

    PubMed

    Kyriazanos, Ioannis; Kalles, Vasileios; Stefanopoulos, Anastasios; Spiliotis, John; Mohamed, Faheez

    2016-09-01

    Cytoreductive surgery (CRS) and Hyperthermic Intraperitoneal Chemotherapy (HIPEC) is increasingly used in the treatment of peritoneal malignancies. The administration of HIPEC after complete cytoreduction offers the combination of the pharmacokinetic advantages inherent to the intraperitoneal delivery of cytotoxic chemotherapy, with the direct cytotoxic effects of hyperthermia, and has been reported to offer significantly improved patient outcomes. As a result, this novel method disseminates rapidly, with many surgical teams having developed peritoneal malignancy treatment programs. Protocols are needed for the introduction, handling, and management of chemotherapeutic agents in the operating room to minimize risk to the staff involved in the procedure. The personnel exposure during CRS and HIPEC may arise from different routes, such as air contamination, direct contact, manipulation of perfusates or chemotherapy solutions, and manipulation of objects/tissues exposed to chemotherapeutics. Guidelines for safe administration of HIPEC including environmental contamination risk management, personal protective equipment, and occupational health issues are yet to be established. This review summarizes the existing evidence regarding the safety considerations of HIPEC administration. PMID:27566037

  14. Laser assisted immunotherapy (LIT) for chemotherapy-resistant neoplasms: recent case reports

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nordquist, Robert E.; Bahavar, Cody; Zhou, Feifan; Hode, Tomas; Chen, Wei R.; Li, Xiaosong; Naylor, Mark F.

    2014-02-01

    T-cell stimulators such as anti-CTLA-4 antibodies enhance immunologic responses to chemotherapy-resistant solid tumors, such as melanoma, advanced breast cancer, ovarian cancer and pancreatic cancer. The efficacy of these new immunotherapy agents can in theory be enhanced substantially by therapies that stimulate new immunologic (T-cell) responses against the tumor. Laser immunotherapy (LIT) with imiquimod and InCVAX are techniques that produce useful responses in patients with advanced melanoma, the prototypical chemotherapy resistant solid tumor. The mechanism of action of these therapies is thought to be immunological, including the development of new T-cell responses. We have therefore been combining LIT using imiquimod and InCVAX treatment with the new T-cell stimulators (ipilimumab) in cases of stage IV melanoma. While still anecdotal, the use of novel combinations of immunologic therapies should provide much improved responses for chemotherapy-resistant solid tumors (such as melanoma) than was previously possible. Newer T-cell stimulating drugs such as the anti-PD-1 antibodies and anti-PD-L1 antibodies will make this general approach to treating chemoresistant advanced tumors even more effective in the future.

  15. Increased risk of deep-vein thrombosis in patients with multiple myeloma receiving thalidomide and chemotherapy.

    PubMed

    Zangari, M; Anaissie, E; Barlogie, B; Badros, A; Desikan, R; Gopal, A V; Morris, C; Toor, A; Siegel, E; Fink, L; Tricot, G

    2001-09-01

    The occurrence of deep-vein thrombosis (DVT) in patients with newly diagnosed multiple myeloma, who were randomly assigned to receive identical induction chemotherapy with or without thalidomide, are reported in this study. The 2 study arms were comparable with respect to key myeloma prognostic factors and known risk factors for DVT. One hundred patients received induction chemotherapy including 4 cycles of continuous infusion of combinations of dexamethasone, vincristine, doxorubicin, cyclophosphamide, etoposide, and cisplatin, and each patient completed at least one induction cycle. DVT developed in 14 of 50 patients (28%) randomly assigned to receive thalidomide but in only 2 of 50 patients (4%) not given the agent (P =.002). All episodes of DVT occurred during the first 3 cycles of induction. Administration of thalidomide was resumed safely in 75% of patients receiving anticoagulation therapy. Thus, thalidomide given in combination with multiagent chemotherapy and dexamethasone is associated with a significantly increased risk of DVT, which appears to be safely treated with anticoagulation and does not necessarily warrant discontinuation of thalidomide.

  16. New drugs in the palliative chemotherapy of advanced non-small-cell lung cancer.

    PubMed

    Malayeri, R; Pirker, R; Huber, H

    2001-10-01

    In inoperable advanced non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC), palliative chemotherapy is established and aims at palliation of symptoms, improvement of quality of life and prolongation of survival. In the last years, several new drugs with enhanced activity towards NSCLC and improved toxicity profile have been characterised, for example vinorelbine, gemcitabine, paclitaxel and docetaxel. Data from randomised trials suggest that regimens containing new drugs are more active than older combinations. Platin-based combinations of either vinorelbine, gemcitabine or paclitaxel have resulted in better outcome than cisplatin alone and new drugs in combination with platins are more active than the corresponding single agent. Non-platin-based combinations must be considered investigational until their non-inferiority to platin-based protocols has been proven in randomised trials on large patient populations. Patients with good performance status and adequate organ function should receive platin-based chemotherapy that includes the new drugs (vinorelbine, gemcitabine, paclitaxel or docetaxel). New drugs without platins are suitable for elderly patients and patients with poor performance status. Second-line chemotherapy prolongs survival in selected patients and should be particularly offered to patients with good performance status. PMID:11694767

  17. Update on Adjuvant Chemotherapy for Early Breast Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Rampurwala, Murtuza M; Rocque, Gabrielle B; Burkard, Mark E

    2014-01-01

    Breast cancer is the second most common cancer in women worldwide. Although most women are diagnosed with early breast cancer, a substantial number recur due to persistent micro-metastatic disease. Systemic adjuvant chemotherapy improves outcomes and has advanced from first-generation regimens to modern dose-dense combinations. Although chemotherapy is the cornerstone of adjuvant therapy, new biomarkers are identifying patients who can forego such treatment. Neo-adjuvant therapy is a promising platform for drug development, but investigators should recognize the limitations of surrogate endpoints and clinical trials. Previous decades have focused on discovering, developing, and intensifying adjuvant chemotherapy. Future efforts should focus on customizing therapy and reducing chemotherapy for patients unlikely to benefit. In some cases, it may be possible to replace chemotherapy with treatments directed at specific genetic or molecular breast cancer subtypes. Yet, we anticipate that chemotherapy will remain a critical component of adjuvant therapy for years to come. PMID:25336961

  18. Adjuvant chemotherapy for rectal cancer: Is it needed?

    PubMed Central

    Milinis, Kristijonas; Thornton, Michael; Montazeri, Amir; Rooney, Paul S

    2015-01-01

    Adjuvant chemotherapy has become a standard treatment of advanced rectal cancer in the West. The benefits of adjuvant chemotherapy after surgery alone have been well established. However, controversy surrounds the use adjuvant chemotherapy in patients who received preoperative chemoradiotherapy, despite it being recommended by a number of international guidelines. Results of recent multicentre randomised control trials showed no benefit of adjuvant chemotherapy in terms of survival and rates of distant metastases. However, concerns exist regarding the quality of the studies including inadequate staging modalities, out-dated chemotherapeutic regimens and surgical approaches and small sample sizes. It has become evident that not all the patients respond to adjuvant chemotherapy and more personalised approach should be employed when considering the benefits of adjuvant chemotherapy. The present review discusses the strengths and weaknesses of the current evidence-base and suggests improvements for future studies. PMID:26677436

  19. The Interplay of Immunotherapy and Chemotherapy: Harnessing Potential Synergies

    PubMed Central

    Emens, Leisha A.; Middleton, Gary

    2016-01-01

    Although cancer chemotherapy has historically been considered immune suppressive, it is now accepted that certain chemotherapies can augment tumor immunity. The recent success of immune checkpoint inhibitors has renewed interest in immunotherapies, and in combining them with chemotherapy to achieve additive or synergistic clinical activity. Two major ways that chemotherapy promotes tumor immunity are by inducing immunogenic cell death as part of its intended therapeutic effect, and by disrupting strategies that tumors use to evade immune recognition. This second strategy in particular is dependent on the drug, its dose, and the schedule of chemotherapy administration in relation to antigen exposure or release. In this Cancer Immunology at the Crossroads article we focus on cancer vaccines and immune checkpoint blockade as a forum for reviewing preclinical and clinical data demonstrating the interplay between immunotherapy and chemotherapy. PMID:25941355

  20. Chemical warfare agents.

    PubMed

    Chauhan, S; Chauhan, S; D'Cruz, R; Faruqi, S; Singh, K K; Varma, S; Singh, M; Karthik, V

    2008-09-01

    Chemical warfare agents (CWA's) are defined as any chemical substance whose toxic properties are utilised to kill, injure or incapacitate an enemy in warfare and associated military operations. Chemical agents have been used in war since times immemorial, but their use reached a peak during World War I. During World War II only the Germans used them in the infamous gas chambers. Since then these have been intermittently used both in war and acts of terrorisms. Many countries have stockpiles of these agents. There has been a legislative effort worldwide to ban the use of CWA's under the chemical weapons convention which came into force in 1997. However the manufacture of these agents cannot be completely prohibited as some of them have potential industrial uses. Moreover despite the remedial measures taken so far and worldwide condemnation, the ease of manufacturing these agents and effectiveness during combat or small scale terrorist operations still make them a powerful weapon to reckon with. These agents are classified according to mechanism of toxicity in humans into blister agents, nerve agents, asphyxiants, choking agents and incapacitating/behavior altering agents. Some of these agents can be as devastating as a nuclear bomb. In addition to immediate injuries caused by chemical agents, some of them are associated with long term morbidities and psychological problems. In this review we will discuss briefly about the historical background, properties, manufacture techniques and industrial uses, mechanism of toxicity, clinical features of exposure and pharmacological management of casualties caused by chemical agents. PMID:21783898

  1. Is intravesical Bacillus Calmette-Guérin therapy superior to chemotherapy for intermediate-risk non-muscle-invasive bladder cancer? An ongoing debate.

    PubMed

    Han, Kyung-Sik; You, Dalsan; Jeong, In Gab; Kwon, Teakmin; Hong, Bumsik; Hong, Jun Hyuk; Ahn, Hanjong; Ahn, Tai Young; Kim, Choung-Soo

    2015-03-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the risk of recurrence in patients with intermediate-risk non-muscle-invasive bladder cancer (NMIBC) after intravesical instillation with chemotherapeutic agents or Bacillus Calmette-Guérin (BCG) therapy. A cohort of 746 patients with intermediate-risk NMIBC comprised the study group. The primary outcome was time to first recurrence. The recurrence rates of the transurethral resection (TUR) alone, chemotherapy, and BCG groups were determined using Kaplan-Meier analysis. Risk factors for recurrence were identified using Cox regression analysis. In total, 507 patients (68.1%), 78 patients (10.5%), and 160 (21.4%) underwent TUR, TUR+BCG, or TUR+chemotherapy, respectively. After a median follow-up period of 51.7 months (interquartile range=33.1-77.8 months), 286 patients (38.5%) developed tumor recurrence. The 5-yr recurrence rates for the TUR, chemotherapy, and BCG groups were 53.6%±2.7%, 30.8%±5.7%, and 33.6%±4.7%, respectively (P<0.001). Chemotherapy and BCG treatment were found to be predictors of reduced recurrence. Cox-regression analysis showed that TUR+BCG did not differ from TUR+chemotherapy in terms of recurrence risk. Adjuvant intravesical instillation is an effective prophylactic that prevents tumor recurrence in intermediate-risk NMIBC patients following TUR. In addition, both chemotherapeutic agents and BCG demonstrate comparable efficacies for preventing recurrence.

  2. Creating and standardizing annual chemotherapy competencies throughout a healthcare system.

    PubMed

    Carreon, Nancy; Sugarman, Cathleen; Beener, Elizabeth; Agan, Donna

    2015-01-01

    Changes in chemotherapy delivery from inpatient to outpatient settings and transition from intravenous to oral administration threaten the competency level of chemotherapy nurses. To standardize care and demonstrate competency across five hospital campuses and four outpatient infusion centers, one health system developed a hands-on competency evaluation for chemotherapy nurses based on a scenario approach. Results included improved confidence, competence, identification of variation, and standardization of equipment, process, and policy. PMID:25608095

  3. The impact of extracellular matrix on the chemoresistance of solid tumors--experimental and clinical results of hyaluronidase as additive to cytostatic chemotherapy.

    PubMed

    Baumgartner, G; Gomar-Höss, C; Sakr, L; Ulsperger, E; Wogritsch, C

    1998-09-11

    Chemoresistance is of outstanding importance for the limited results of chemotherapy in solid tumors. Chemoresistance of multicellular tumor tissues is more pronounced than that of single cells in vivo and in vitro. The enzyme hyaluronidase is able to loosen the cell-cell contact and the interstitial connective tissue and as such, in a number of preclinical and clinical trials, was shown to enhance the efficacy of cytostatic agents. Although proven to be very effective as additive to local chemotherapy, the systemic efficacy is not documented as well. We present a randomized trial done in high-grade astrocytomas with combined chemotherapy and radiation therapy with and without hyaluronidase. After very promising pilot results with systemic hyaluronidase in various tumor entities and also astrocytomas, this randomized study failed to show synergy to chemotherapy and radiation therapy in high-grade astrocytomas concerning survival. The promising preclinical data and the rather well documented activity in therapeutic use as additive to local chemotherapy seem to be an adequate motive to further elucidate the complex manner in which hyaluronidase is active in the interstitial tumor matrix and to obtain more information concerning the optimal route of application, the optimal dosage and the spectrum of tumor entities where it is synergistic with cytostatic chemotherapy and perhaps even radiation therapy.

  4. Chemotherapy acts as an adjuvant to convert the tumor microenvironment into a highly permissive state for vaccination-induced antitumor immunity.

    PubMed

    Kang, Tae Heung; Mao, Chih-Ping; Lee, Sung Yong; Chen, Alexander; Lee, Ji-Hyun; Kim, Tae Woo; Alvarez, Ronald D; Roden, Richard B S; Pardoll, Drew; Hung, Chien-Fu; Wu, T-C

    2013-04-15

    Multiple classes of pharmacologic agents have the potential to induce the expression and release of proinflammatory factors from dying tumor cells. As a result, these cells can in theory elicit an immune response through various defined mechanisms to permanently eradicate disseminated cancer. However, the impact of chemotherapy on the tumor-specific immune response in the context of the tumor microenvironment is largely unknown. Within the tumor microenvironment, the immune response promoted by chemotherapy is antagonized by an immune-suppressive milieu, and the balance of these opposing forces dictates the clinical course of disease. Here, we report that high antigen exposure within the tumor microenvironment following chemotherapy is sufficient to skew this balance in favor of a productive immune response. In elevating antigen exposure, chemotherapy can achieve long-term control of tumor progression without the need of an additional adjuvant. We found that chemotherapy initiated this phenomenon in the tumor microenvironment through an accumulation of dendritic cells, which stimulated CD8(+) T cells and the type I IFN pathway. From this conceptual base, we developed a simple approach to cancer therapy combining chemotherapy and vaccination that may be widely applicable.

  5. Chemotherapy acts as an adjuvant to convert the tumor microenvironment into a highly permissive state for vaccination-induced antitumor immunity

    PubMed Central

    Kang, Tae Heung; Mao, Chih-Ping; Lee, Sung Yong; Chen, Alexander; Lee, Ji-Hyun; Kim, Tae Woo; Alvarez, Ronald D.; Roden, Richard B.S.; Pardoll, Drew; Hung, Chien-Fu; Wu, T-C

    2013-01-01

    Multiple classes of pharmacologic agents have the potential to induce the expression and release of pro-inflammatory factors from dying tumor cells. As a result, these cells can in theory elicit an immune response through various defined mechanisms to permanently eradicate disseminated cancer. However, the impact of chemotherapy on the tumor-specific immune response in the context of the tumor microenvironment is largely unknown. Within the tumor microenvironment, the immune response promoted by chemotherapy is antagonized by an immune-suppressive milieu, and the balance of these opposing forces dictates the clinical course of disease. Here we report that high antigen exposure within the tumor microenvironment following chemotherapy is sufficient to skew this balance in favor of a productive immune response. In elevating antigen exposure, chemotherapy can achieve long-term control of tumor progression without the need of an additional adjuvant. We found that chemotherapy initiated this phenomenon in the tumor microenvironment through an accumulation of dendritic cells, which stimulated CD8+ T cells and the type-I interferon pathway. From this conceptual base, we developed a simple approach to cancer therapy combining chemotherapy and vaccination that may be widely applicable. PMID:23418322

  6. Hepatic Arterial Infusion Chemotherapy Using Fluorouracil Followed by Systemic Therapy Using Oxaliplatin Plus Fluorouracil and Leucovorin for Patients with Unresectable Liver Metastases from Colorectal Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Seki, Hiroshi Ozaki, Toshirou; Shiina, Makoto

    2009-07-15

    The purpose of this study was to assess retrospectively the sequential treatment of hepatic arterial infusion (HAI) chemotherapy followed by systemic therapy using oxaliplatin plus 5-flourouracil (5-FU) and leucovorin, namely, FOLFOX, for patients with liver metastases from colorectal cancer. We reviewed 20 patients with unresectable liver metastases from colorectal cancer. Patients were initially treated with HAI chemotherapy until disease progression (5-fluorouracil, 1000 mg/m{sup 2} intra-arterial infusion, weekly) and then with FOLFOX thereafter (FOLFOX4, n = 13; modified FOLFOX6, n = 7). Adverse events, tumor response, and time to progression for each therapy were evaluated retrospectively, and overall survival was estimated. Toxicity of HAI chemotherapy was generally mild. Of 20 patients, adverse events leading to treatment discontinuation occurred in only 1 patient (5%) during initial therapy using HAI chemotherapy, while 9 patients (45%) exhibited adverse events during subsequent FOLFOX therapy. For HAI chemotherapy and FOLFOX, objective response rates were 85.0% and 35.0%, respectively, and median time to progression was 11.6 and 5.1 months, respectively. Median overall survival was 30.1 months. In conclusion, the sequence of HAI chemotherapy followed by FOLFOX is a promising treatment strategy for the long-term use of active chemotherapeutic agents, leading to a superior tumor response and fewer toxic effects in patients with unresectable liver metastases from colorectal cancer.

  7. A Clinical Prediction Model to Assess Risk for Chemotherapy-Related Hospitalization in Patients Initiating Palliative Chemotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Brooks, Gabriel A.; Kansagra, Ankit J.; Rao, Sowmya R.; Weitzman, James I.; Linden, Erica A.; Jacobson, Joseph O.

    2015-01-01

    IMPORTANCE Chemotherapy-related hospitalizations in patients with advanced cancer are common, distressing, and costly. Methods to identify patients at high risk of chemotherapy toxic effects will permit development of targeted strategies to prevent chemotherapy-related hospitalizations. OBJECTIVE To demonstrate the feasibility of using readily available clinical data to assess patient-specific risk of chemotherapy-related hospitalization. DESIGN, SETTING, AND PARTICIPANTS Nested case-control study conducted from January 2003 through December 2011 at the Mass General/North Shore Cancer Center, a community-based cancer center in north eastern Massachusetts. The parent cohort included 1579 consecutive patients with advanced solid-tumor cancer receiving palliative-intent chemotherapy. Case patients (n = 146) included all patients from the parent cohort who experienced a chemotherapy-related hospitalization. Controls (n = 292) were randomly selected from 1433 patients who did not experience a chemotherapy-related hospitalization. EXPOSURES Putative risk factors for chemotherapy-related hospitalization—including patient characteristics, treatment characteristics, and pretreatment laboratory values—were abstracted from medical records. Multivariable logistic regression was used to model the patient-specific risk of chemotherapy-related hospitalization. MAIN OUTCOMES AND MEASURES Chemotherapy-related hospitalization, as adjudicated by the oncology clinical care team within a systematic quality-assessment program. RESULTS A total of 146 (9.2%) of 1579 patients from the parent cohort experienced a chemotherapy-related hospitalization. In multivariate regression, 7 variables were significantly associated with chemotherapy-related hospitalization: age, Charlson comorbidity score, creatinine clearance, calcium level, below-normal white blood cell and/or platelet count, polychemotherapy (vs monotherapy), and receipt of camptothecin chemotherapy. The median predicted risk of

  8. Anti-cancer agents based on 6-trifluoromethoxybenzimidazole derivatives and method of making

    DOEpatents

    Gakh, Andrei A.; Vovk, Mykhaylo V.; Mel'nychenko, Nina V.; Sukach, Volodymyr A.

    2012-08-14

    The present disclosure relates to novel compounds having the structural Formulas (1a,1b), stereoisomers, tautomers, racemics, prodrugs, metabolites thereof, or pharmaceutically acceptable salt and/or solvate thereof as chemotherapy agents for treating of cancer, particularly androgen-independent prostate cancer. The disclosure also relates to methods for preparing said compounds, and to pharmaceutical compositions comprising said compounds.

  9. Anti-cancer agents based on 6-trifluoromethoxybenzimidazole derivatives and method of making

    DOEpatents

    Gakh, Andrei A; Vovk, Mykhaylo V; Mel& #x27; nychenko, Nina V; Sukach, Volodymyr A

    2012-10-23

    The present disclosure relates to novel compounds having the structural Formulas (1a,1b), stereoisomers, tautomers, racemics, prodrugs, metabolites thereof, or pharmaceutically acceptable salt and/or solvate thereof as chemotherapy agents for treating of cancer, particularly androgen-independent prostate cancer. The disclosure also relates to methods for preparing said compounds, and to pharmaceutical compositions comprising said compounds.

  10. Automated detection of breast tumor in MRI and comparison of kinetic features for assessing tumor response to chemotherapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aghaei, Faranak; Tan, Maxine; Zheng, Bin

    2015-03-01

    Dynamic contrast-enhanced breast magnetic resonance imaging (DCE-MRI) is used increasingly in diagnosis of breast cancer and assessment of treatment efficacy in current clinical practice. The purpose of this preliminary study is to develop and test a new quantitative kinetic image feature analysis method and biomarker to predict response of breast cancer patients to neoadjuvant chemotherapy using breast MR images acquired before the chemotherapy. For this purpose, we developed a computer-aided detection scheme to automatically segment breast areas and tumors depicting on the sequentially scanned breast MR images. From a contrast-enhancement map generated by subtraction of two image sets scanned pre- and post-injection of contrast agent, our scheme computed 38 morphological and kinetic image features from both tumor and background parenchymal regions. We applied a number of statistical data analysis methods to identify effective image features in predicting response of the patients to the chemotherapy. Based on the performance assessment of individual features and their correlations, we applied a fusion method to generate a final image biomarker. A breast MR image dataset involving 68 patients was used in this study. Among them, 25 had complete response and 43 had partially response to the chemotherapy based on the RECIST guideline. Using this image feature fusion based biomarker, the area under a receiver operating characteristic curve is AUC = 0.850±0.047. This study demonstrated that a biomarker developed from the fusion of kinetic image features computed from breast MR images acquired pre-chemotherapy has potentially higher discriminatory power in predicting response of the patients to the chemotherapy.

  11. Palonosetron versus older 5-HT3 receptor antagonists for nausea prevention in patients receiving chemotherapy: a multistudy analysis

    PubMed Central

    Morrow, Gary R; Schwartzberg, Lee; Barbour, Sally Y; Ballinari, Gianluca; Thorn, Michael D; Cox, David

    2015-01-01

    Background No clinical standard currently exists for the optimal management of nausea induced by emetogenic chemotherapy, particularly delayed nausea. Objective To compare the efficacy and safety of palonosetron with older 5-HT3 receptor antagonists (RAs) in preventing chemotherapy-induced nausea. Methods Data were pooled from 4 similarly designed multicenter, randomized, double-blind, clinical trials that compared single intravenous doses of palonosetron 0.25 mg or 0.75 mg with ondansetron 32 mg, dolasetron 100 mg, or granisetron 40 μg/kg, administered 30 minutes before moderately emetogenic chemotherapy (MEC) or highly emetogenic chemotherapy (HEC). Pooled data within each chemotherapy category (MEC: n = 1,132; HEC: n = 1,781) were analyzed by a logistic regression model. Nausea endpoints were complete control rates (ie, no more than mild nausea, no vomiting, and no rescue medication), nausea-free rates, nausea severity, and requirement for rescue antiemetic/antinausea medication over 5 days following chemotherapy. Pooled safety data were summarized descriptively. Results Numerically more palonosetron-treated patients were nausea-free on each day, and fewer had moderate-severe nausea. Similarly, usage of rescue medication was less frequent among palonosetron-treated patients. Complete control rates for palonosetron and older 5-HT3 RAs in the acute phase were 66% vs 63%, 52% vs 42% in the delayed phase (24-120 hours), and 46% vs 37% in the overall phase. The incidence of adverse events was similar for palonosetron and older 5-HT3 RAs. Limitations This post hoc analysis summarized data for palonosetron and several other 5-HT3 RAs but was not powered for statistical comparisons between individual agents. Because nausea is inherently subjective, the reliability of assessments of some aspects (eg, severity) may be influenced by interindividual variability. Conclusion Palonosetron may be more effective than older 5-HT3 RAs in preventing nausea, with comparable

  12. Preexisting antitumor immunity augments the antitumor effects of chemotherapy.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Lingbing; Feng, Dongdong; Yu, Lynda X; Tsung, Kangla; Norton, Jeffrey A

    2013-06-01

    Efficacy of cancer chemotherapy is generally believed to be the result of direct drug killing of tumor cells. However, increased tumor cell killing does not always lead to improved efficacy. Herein, we demonstrate that the status of antitumor immunity at the time of chemotherapy treatment is a critical factor affecting the therapeutic outcome in that tumor-bearing mice that possess preexisting antitumor immunity respond to chemotherapy much better than those that do not. Enhancing antitumor immunity before or at the time of chemotherapy-induced antigen release increases subsequent response to chemotherapy significantly. By in vitro and in vivo measurements of antitumor immunity, we found a close correlation between the intensity of antitumor immunity activated by chemotherapy and the efficacy of treatment. Immune intervention with interleukin-12 during the early phase of chemotherapy-induced immune activation greatly amplifies the antitumor response, often resulting in complete tumor eradication not only at the chemo-treated local site, but also systemically. These findings provide additional evidence for an immune-mediated antitumor response to chemotherapy. Further, our results show that timely immune modification of chemotherapy-activated antitumor immunity can result in enhanced antitumor-immune response and complete tumor eradication.

  13. Preexisting antitumor immunity augments the antitumor effects of chemotherapy.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Lingbing; Feng, Dongdong; Yu, Lynda X; Tsung, Kangla; Norton, Jeffrey A

    2013-06-01

    Efficacy of cancer chemotherapy is generally believed to be the result of direct drug killing of tumor cells. However, increased tumor cell killing does not always lead to improved efficacy. Herein, we demonstrate that the status of antitumor immunity at the time of chemotherapy treatment is a critical factor affecting the therapeutic outcome in that tumor-bearing mice that possess preexisting antitumor immunity respond to chemotherapy much better than those that do not. Enhancing antitumor immunity before or at the time of chemotherapy-induced antigen release increases subsequent response to chemotherapy significantly. By in vitro and in vivo measurements of antitumor immunity, we found a close correlation between the intensity of antitumor immunity activated by chemotherapy and the efficacy of treatment. Immune intervention with interleukin-12 during the early phase of chemotherapy-induced immune activation greatly amplifies the antitumor response, often resulting in complete tumor eradication not only at the chemo-treated local site, but also systemically. These findings provide additional evidence for an immune-mediated antitumor response to chemotherapy. Further, our results show that timely immune modification of chemotherapy-activated antitumor immunity can result in enhanced antitumor-immune response and complete tumor eradication. PMID:23595208

  14. [Salivation in children during anticancer chemotherapy].

    PubMed

    Popruzhenko, T V; Boris, S P

    2016-01-01

    The study aimed to assess the needs and options for salivation management in children treated with antileukemic chemotherapy. In a preliminary cross-sectional study the saliva flow rate and viscosity were evaluated in 75 leukemic children that received chemotherapy with methotrexate in low dose (44 people, 44 episode, group 1), or in high-dose (31 people, 42 episode, group 2), and in 25 healthy children (group 3). Then, 26 children were randomly divided into two groups in the 70 episodes course of high-dosed chemotherapy, and received acetylcysteine (A) or only standard oral management (S) for 1-10 day of treatment. Parameters of salivation and children performance (Lansky et al.) were evaluated. Mann-Whitney U-test was used for analysis. In group 1, 2 and 3 the flow rate (Me [LQ/HQ]) was 0.5 [0.3; 0.8]; 0.9 [0.6; 1.2] and 0.5 [0.3; 0.6] ml/min respectively (p1-3>0.05; p<0.01; p1-2<0.05). Viscosity levels in group 1, 2 and 3 were 2.75 [3.67; 3.67], 10.05 [5.3; 26.0] and 3.9 [2.7; 6.5] unites respectively (p1-3>0.05; p2, 3<0.01; p1, 2<0.01). In group A and S the flow rate was 2.7 [0.5; 4.1] and 0.4 [0.1; 2.2] ml/min (р<0.05); viscosity was 1.5 [1.2; 4.1] and 6.4 [5.3; 8.1] unites (р<0.001), performance Lansky index was 80 [65; 90] and 70 [60; 80] (р<0.01) respectively. Salivation dysfunction complicates the chemotherapy with high-dosed methotrexate in children: it is indicated by high viscosity combined with elevated flow rate. Acetylcysteine normalizes saliva viscosity and improves children's performance.

  15. Intestinal lymphangiectasia secondary to radiotherapy and chemotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Rao, S.S.; Dundas, S.; Holdsworth, C.D.

    1987-08-01

    We report a case of intestinal lymphangiectasia secondary to radiotherapy and chemotherapy. The patient also had small bowel bacterial overgrowth and pancreatic insufficiency. Lymphatic ectasia as a histological feature has been described previously in association with postradiotherapy malabsorption, but radiation-induced lymphangiectasia producing clinical manifestations has hitherto not been reported. Replacement of dietary long-chain fats with medium-chain triglycerides, pancreatic enzyme supplements, and a short course of oxytetracycline, resulted in dramatic clinical improvement. The possibility of intestinal lymphangiectasia should be borne in mind in patients with postradiotherapy malabsorption. A low serum albumin and lymphocyte count should draw attention to this possibility.

  16. Liposome-encapsulated actinomycin for cancer chemotherapy

    DOEpatents

    Rahman, Yueh-Erh; Cerny, Elizabeth A.

    1976-01-01

    An improved method is provided for chemotherapy of malignant tumors by injection of antitumor drugs. The antitumor drug is encapsulated within liposomes and the liposomes containing the encapsulated drug are injected into the body. The encapsulated drug penetrates into the tumor cells where the drug is slowly released and induces degeneration and death of the tumor cells, while any toxicity to the host body is reduced. Liposome encapsulation of actinomycin D has been found to be particularly effective in treating cancerous abdominal tumors, while drastically reducing the toxicity of actinomycin D to the host.

  17. Anaphylaxis to chemotherapy and monoclonal antibodies.

    PubMed

    Castells, Mariana C

    2015-05-01

    Hypersensitivity reactions are increasingly prevalent, although underrecognized and underreported. Platins induce immunoglobulin E-mediated sensitization; taxenes and some monoclonal antibodies can induce reactions at first exposure. Severe hypersensitivity can preclude first-line therapy. Tryptase level at the time of a reaction is a useful diagnostic tool. Skin testing provides a specific diagnosis. Newer tests are promising diagnostic tools to help identify patients at risk before first exposure. Safe management includes rapid drug desensitization. This review provides information regarding the scope of hypersensitivity and anaphylactic reactions induced by chemotherapy and biological drugs, as well as diagnosis, management, and treatment options. PMID:25841555

  18. Mobile Agents Applications.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Martins, Rosane Maria; Chaves, Magali Ribeiro; Pirmez, Luci; Rust da Costa Carmo, Luiz Fernando

    2001-01-01

    Discussion of the need to filter and retrieval relevant information from the Internet focuses on the use of mobile agents, specific software components which are based on distributed artificial intelligence and integrated systems. Surveys agent technology and discusses the agent building package used to develop two applications using IBM's Aglet…

  19. Hydroxypyridonate chelating agents

    DOEpatents

    Raymond, Kenneth N.; Scarrow, Robert C.; White, David L.

    1987-01-01

    Chelating agents having 1-hydroxy-2-pyridinone (HOPO) and related moieties incorporated within their structures, including polydentate HOPO-substituted polyamines such as spermidine and spermine, and HOPO-substituted desferrioxamine. The chelating agents are useful in selectively removing certain cations from solution, and are particularly useful as ferric ion and actinide chelators. Novel syntheses of the chelating agents are provided.

  20. Chemotherapy-induced toxic leukoencephalopathy causes a wide range of symptoms: a series of four autopsies.

    PubMed

    Moore-Maxwell, Crystal A; Datto, Michael B; Hulette, Christine M

    2004-02-01

    We have observed an increasing number of autopsies on patients with chemotherapy-related complications. One complication is toxic leukoencephalopathy, which is due to a direct toxic effect of chemotherapeutic agents on the central nervous system white matter. Autopsies of four cases of toxic leukoencephalopathy were performed following standard protocols. The brain and spinal cord were examined routinely, and histological sections were taken for evaluation. We report here three patients with hematologic malignancies and one patient with metastatic carcinoma with chemotherapy-induced leukoencephalopathy. The first was a 56-year-old male treated with multiple chemotherapeutics for multiple myeloma. He presented with confusion and focal seizures with a rapid progression to coma and decerebrate posturing. The second was a 36-year-old male who developed mental status changes, ataxia and dysarthria following treatment for lymphoma. The third was a 16-year-old male who developed a profound peripheral and central neuropathy after chemotherapy treatment for T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia. The fourth was a 49-year-old female patient who was treated with multiple chemotherapeutics for Stage II breast carcinoma and subsequently developed visual acuity and field defects. The neuropathologic findings in these cases, although similar, varied in severity and distribution. The white matter was affected by severe myelin pallor, edema, and a prominent macrophage infiltrate in each of the cases. The location and extent of the central nervous system pathology correlated with the type and severity of clinical symptoms. These four cases, with their varied presenting symptoms, clinical courses, and degree of pathology, emphasize the importance of considering toxic leukoencephalopathy as an etiology of acute neurologic deterioration following high-dose chemotherapy.

  1. Roles of Radiation Dose and Chemotherapy in the Etiology of Stomach Cancer as a Second Malignancy

    SciTech Connect

    Belt-Dusebout, Alexandra W. van den; Aleman, Berthe M.P.; Besseling, Gijs; Bruin, Marie L. de; Hauptmann, Michael; Veer, Mars B. van't; Wit, Ronald de; Ribot, Jacques G.; Noordijk, Evert M.; Kerst, J. Martijn; Gietema, Jourik A.; Leeuwen, Flora E. van

    2009-12-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the roles of radiation dose, chemotherapy, and other factors in the etiology of stomach cancer in long-term survivors of testicular cancer or Hodgkin lymphoma. Methods and Materials: We conducted a cohort study in 5,142 survivors of testicular cancer or Hodgkin lymphoma treated in the Netherlands between 1965 and 1995. In a nested case-control study, detailed information on treatment, smoking, gastrointestinal diseases, and family history was collected for 42 patients with stomach cancer and 126 matched controls. For each subject, the mean radiation dose to the stomach was estimated. Relative risks (RRs) of stomach cancer and the radiation-related excess relative risk (ERR) per gray were calculated by conditional logistic regression analysis. Results: The risk of stomach cancer was 3.4-fold increased compared with the general population. The risk increased with increasing mean stomach dose (p for trend, <0.001), at an ERR of 0.84 per Gy (95% confidence interval [CI], 0.12-15.6). Mean stomach doses of more than 20 Gy were associated with a RR of 9.9 (95% CI, 3.2-31.2) compared with doses below 11 Gy. The risk was 1.8-fold (95% CI, 0.8-4.4) increased after chemotherapy and 5.4-fold (95% CI, 1.2-23.9) increased after high doses of procarbazine (>=13,000 mg) vs. <10,000 mg. The RR of smoking more than 10 cigarettes per day vs. no smoking was 1.6 (95% CI, 0.6-4.2). Conclusions: Stomach cancer risk is strongly radiation dose dependent. The role of chemotherapy, particularly of procarbazine and related agents, needs further study, because of the relatively small numbers of chemotherapy-treated subjects.

  2. Thiolated chitosan-modified PLA-PCL-TPGS nanoparticles for oral chemotherapy of lung cancer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Liqin; Li, Xuemin; Liu, Lingrong; Zhang, Qiqing

    2013-02-01

    Oral chemotherapy is a key step towards `chemotherapy at home', a dream of cancer patients, which will radically change the clinical practice of chemotherapy and greatly improve the quality of life of the patients. In this research, three types of nanoparticle formulation from commercial PCL and self-synthesized d-α-tocopheryl polyethylene glycol 1000 succinate (PLA-PCL-TPGS) random copolymer were prepared in this research for oral delivery of antitumor agents, including thiolated chitosan-modified PCL nanoparticles, unmodified PLA-PCL-TPGS nanoparticles, and thiolated chitosan-modified PLA-PCL-TPGS nanoparticles. Firstly, the PLA-PCL-TPGS random copolymer was synthesized and characterized. Thiolated chitosan greatly increases its mucoadhesiveness and permeation properties, thus increasing the chances of nanoparticle uptake by the gastrointestinal mucosa and improving drug absorption. The PLA-PCL-TPGS nanoparticles were found by FESEM that they are of spherical shape and around 200 nm in diameter. The surface charge of PLA-PCL-TPGS nanoparticles was reversed from anionic to cationic after thiolated chitosan modification. The thiolated chitosan-modified PLA-PCL-TPGS nanoparticles have significantly higher level of the cell uptake than that of thiolated chitosan-modified PLGA nanoparticles and unmodified PLA-PCL-TPGS nanoparticles. In vitro cell viability studies showed advantages of the thiolated chitosan-modified PLA-PCL-TPGS nanoparticles over Taxol® in terms of cytotoxicity against A549 cells. It seems that the mucoadhesive nanoparticles can increase paclitaxel transport by opening tight junctions and bypassing the efflux pump of P-glycoprotein. In conclusion, PLA-PCL-TPGS nanoparticles modified by thiolated chitosan could enhance the cellular uptake and cytotoxicity, which revealed a potential application for oral chemotherapy of lung cancer.

  3. Thiolated chitosan-modified PLA-PCL-TPGS nanoparticles for oral chemotherapy of lung cancer.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Liqin; Li, Xuemin; Liu, Lingrong; Zhang, Qiqing

    2013-02-09

    Oral chemotherapy is a key step towards 'chemotherapy at home', a dream of cancer patients, which will radically change the clinical practice of chemotherapy and greatly improve the quality of life of the patients. In this research, three types of nanoparticle formulation from commercial PCL and self-synthesized d-α-tocopheryl polyethylene glycol 1000 succinate (PLA-PCL-TPGS) random copolymer were prepared in this research for oral delivery of antitumor agents, including thiolated chitosan-modified PCL nanoparticles, unmodified PLA-PCL-TPGS nanoparticles, and thiolated chitosan-modified PLA-PCL-TPGS nanoparticles. Firstly, the PLA-PCL-TPGS random copolymer was synthesized and characterized. Thiolated chitosan greatly increases its mucoadhesiveness and permeation properties, thus increasing the chances of nanoparticle uptake by the gastrointestinal mucosa and improving drug absorption. The PLA-PCL-TPGS nanoparticles were found by FESEM that they are of spherical shape and around 200 nm in diameter. The surface charge of PLA-PCL-TPGS nanoparticles was reversed from anionic to cationic after thiolated chitosan modification. The thiolated chitosan-modified PLA-PCL-TPGS nanoparticles have significantly higher level of the cell uptake than that of thiolated chitosan-modified PLGA nanoparticles and unmodified PLA-PCL-TPGS nanoparticles. In vitro cell viability studies showed advantages of the thiolated chitosan-modified PLA-PCL-TPGS nanoparticles over Taxol® in terms of cytotoxicity against A549 cells. It seems that the mucoadhesive nanoparticles can increase paclitaxel transport by opening tight junctions and bypassing the efflux pump of P-glycoprotein. In conclusion, PLA-PCL-TPGS nanoparticles modified by thiolated chitosan could enhance the cellular uptake and cytotoxicity, which revealed a potential application for oral chemotherapy of lung cancer.

  4. Thiolated chitosan-modified PLA-PCL-TPGS nanoparticles for oral chemotherapy of lung cancer.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Liqin; Li, Xuemin; Liu, Lingrong; Zhang, Qiqing

    2013-01-01

    Oral chemotherapy is a key step towards 'chemotherapy at home', a dream of cancer patients, which will radically change the clinical practice of chemotherapy and greatly improve the quality of life of the patients. In this research, three types of nanoparticle formulation from commercial PCL and self-synthesized d-α-tocopheryl polyethylene glycol 1000 succinate (PLA-PCL-TPGS) random copolymer were prepared in this research for oral delivery of antitumor agents, including thiolated chitosan-modified PCL nanoparticles, unmodified PLA-PCL-TPGS nanoparticles, and thiolated chitosan-modified PLA-PCL-TPGS nanoparticles. Firstly, the PLA-PCL-TPGS random copolymer was synthesized and characterized. Thiolated chitosan greatly increases its mucoadhesiveness and permeation properties, thus increasing the chances of nanoparticle uptake by the gastrointestinal mucosa and improving drug absorption. The PLA-PCL-TPGS nanoparticles were found by FESEM that they are of spherical shape and around 200 nm in diameter. The surface charge of PLA-PCL-TPGS nanoparticles was reversed from anionic to cationic after thiolated chitosan modification. The thiolated chitosan-modified PLA-PCL-TPGS nanoparticles have significantly higher level of the cell uptake than that of thiolated chitosan-modified PLGA nanoparticles and unmodified PLA-PCL-TPGS nanoparticles. In vitro cell viability studies showed advantages of the thiolated chitosan-modified PLA-PCL-TPGS nanoparticles over Taxol® in terms of cytotoxicity against A549 cells. It seems that the mucoadhesive nanoparticles can increase paclitaxel transport by opening tight junctions and bypassing the efflux pump of P-glycoprotein. In conclusion, PLA-PCL-TPGS nanoparticles modified by thiolated chitosan could enhance the cellular uptake and cytotoxicity, which revealed a potential application for oral chemotherapy of lung cancer. PMID:23394588

  5. Thiolated chitosan-modified PLA-PCL-TPGS nanoparticles for oral chemotherapy of lung cancer

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Oral chemotherapy is a key step towards ‘chemotherapy at home’, a dream of cancer patients, which will radically change the clinical practice of chemotherapy and greatly improve the quality of life of the patients. In this research, three types of nanoparticle formulation from commercial PCL and self-synthesized d-α-tocopheryl polyethylene glycol 1000 succinate (PLA-PCL-TPGS) random copolymer were prepared in this research for oral delivery of antitumor agents, including thiolated chitosan-modified PCL nanoparticles, unmodified PLA-PCL-TPGS nanoparticles, and thiolated chitosan-modified PLA-PCL-TPGS nanoparticles. Firstly, the PLA-PCL-TPGS random copolymer was synthesized and characterized. Thiolated chitosan greatly increases its mucoadhesiveness and permeation properties, thus increasing the chances of nanoparticle uptake by the gastrointestinal mucosa and improving drug absorption. The PLA-PCL-TPGS nanoparticles were found by FESEM that they are of spherical shape and around 200 nm in diameter. The surface charge of PLA-PCL-TPGS nanoparticles was reversed from anionic to cationic after thiolated chitosan modification. The thiolated chitosan-modified PLA-PCL-TPGS nanoparticles have significantly higher level of the cell uptake than that of thiolated chitosan-modified PLGA nanoparticles and unmodified PLA-PCL-TPGS nanoparticles. In vitro cell viability studies showed advantages of the thiolated chitosan-modified PLA-PCL-TPGS nanoparticles over Taxol® in terms of cytotoxicity against A549 cells. It seems that the mucoadhesive nanoparticles can increase paclitaxel transport by opening tight junctions and bypassing the efflux pump of P-glycoprotein. In conclusion, PLA-PCL-TPGS nanoparticles modified by thiolated chitosan could enhance the cellular uptake and cytotoxicity, which revealed a potential application for oral chemotherapy of lung cancer. PMID:23394588

  6. Neoadjuvant chemotherapy for radioinduced osteosarcoma of the extremity: The Rizzoli experience in 20 cases

    SciTech Connect

    Bacci, Gaetano . E-mail: gaetano.bacci@ior.it; Longhi, Alessandra; Forni, Cristiana R.N.; Fabbri, Nicola; Briccoli, Antonio; Barbieri, Enza; Mercuri, Mario; Balladelli, Alba B.A.; Ferrari, Stefano; Picci, Piero

    2007-02-01

    Purpose: Evaluate treatment and outcome of 20 patients with radioinduced osteosarcoma (RIO). Because of previous primary tumor treatment, RIO protocols were different from others we used for non-RIO. Patients and Methods: Between 1983 and 1998, we treated 20 RIO patients, ages 4-36 years (mean 16 years), with chemotherapy (two cycles before surgery, three postoperatively). The first preoperative cycle consisted of high-dose Methotrexate (HDMTX)/Cisplatinum (CDP)/Adriamycin (ADM) and the second of HDMTX/CDP/Ifosfamide (IFO). The three postoperative treatments were performed with cycles of MTX/CDP; IFO was used as single agent per cycle repeated three times. Results: Two patients received palliative treatment because their osteosarcoma remained unresectable after preoperative chemotherapy. The remaining 18 patients had surgery (7 amputations, 11 resections); histologic response to preoperative chemotherapy was good in 8 patients, poor in 10. At a mean follow-up of 11 years (range, 7-22 years), 9 patients remained continuously disease-free, 10 died from osteosarcoma and 1 died from a third neoplasm (myeloid acute leukemia). These results are not significantly different from those achieved in 754 patients with conventional osteosarcoma treated in the same period with protocols used for conventional treatment. However, this later group had an 18% 3-year event-free survival after treatment of relapse vs. 0% in the RIO group. Conclusion: Treated with neoadjuvant chemotherapy RIO seem to have an outcome that is not significantly different from that of comparable patients with conventional primary high grade osteosarcoma (5-year event-free survival: 40% vs. 60%, p = NS; 5-year overall survival 40% vs. 67%, p < 0.00008.

  7. Focal Adhesion-Chromatin Linkage Controls Tumor Cell Resistance to Radio- and Chemotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Storch, Katja; Cordes, Nils

    2012-01-01

    Cancer resistance to therapy presents an ongoing and unsolved obstacle, which has clear impact on patient's survival. In order to address this problem, novel in vitro models have been established and are currently developed that enable data generation in a more physiological context. For example, extracellular-matrix- (ECM-) based scaffolds lead to the identification of integrins and integrin-associated signaling molecules as key promoters of cancer cell resistance to radio- and chemotherapy as well as modern molecular agents. In this paper, we discuss the dynamic nature of the interplay between ECM, integrins, cytoskeleton, nuclear matrix, and chromatin organization and how this affects the response of tumor cells to various kinds of cytotoxic anticancer agents. PMID:22778951

  8. Evaluation of cisplatin plasma levels in patients undergoing cytoreductive surgery and hyperthermic intraperitoneal chemotherapy.

    PubMed

    Fleres, Francesco; Saladino, Edoardo; Catanoso, Rosaria; Arcoraci, Vincenzo; Mandolfino, Tommaso; Cucinotta, Eugenio; Macrì, Antonio

    2016-02-01

    Introduction Peritoneal surface malignancies have long been regarded as incurable, however, they can be treated with cytoreductive surgery in addition to hyperthermic intraperitoneal chemotherapy. This approach is associated with an increase in morbidity and mortality, unless hyperhydration is provided in a timely manner. Methods Cisplatin (CDDP) is the most widely used chemotherapeutic agent. Plasma levels of cisplatin (CDDP), a widely used chemotherapeutic agent, were measured before, during, and after the procedure. This was done in order to identify the window of highest risk as a function of drug concentrations, assuming a dose-dependent effect. Results Plasma levels of CDDP peak during perfusion. The concentration remains high until the 4th post-operative day and returns to pre-operative levels by the 7th post-operative day. Conclusions Our findings suggest that ensuring hyperhydration as well as infusing albumin and fresh frozen plasma may be of particular value for at least the first 4 days after the procedure. PMID:27385136

  9. Prevention of chemotherapy-induced alopecia in rats by CDK inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Davis, S T; Benson, B G; Bramson, H N; Chapman, D E; Dickerson, S H; Dold, K M; Eberwein, D J; Edelstein, M; Frye, S V; Gampe Jr, R T; Griffin, R J; Harris, P A; Hassell, A M; Holmes, W D; Hunter, R N; Knick, V B; Lackey, K; Lovejoy, B; Luzzio, M J; Murray, D; Parker, P; Rocque, W J; Shewchuk, L; Veal, J M; Walker, D H; Kuyper, L F

    2001-01-01

    Most traditional cytotoxic anticancer agents ablate the rapidly dividing epithelium of the hair follicle and induce alopecia (hair loss). Inhibition of cyclin-dependent kinase 2 (CDK2), a positive regulator of eukaryotic cell cycle progression, may represent a therapeutic strategy for prevention of chemotherapy-induced alopecia (CIA) by arresting the cell cycle and reducing the sensitivity of the epithelium to many cell cycle-active antitumor agents. Potent small-molecule inhibitors of CDK2 were developed using structure-based methods. Topical application of these compounds in a neonatal rat model of CIA reduced hair loss at the site of application in 33 to 50% of the animals. Thus, inhibition of CDK2 represents a potentially useful approach for the prevention of CIA in cancer patients.

  10. Standard Agent Framework 1

    SciTech Connect

    Goldsmith, Steven Y.

    1999-04-06

    The Standard Agent framework provides an extensible object-oriented development environment suitable for use in both research and applications projects. The SAF provides a means for constructing and customizing multi-agent systems through specialization of standard base classes (architecture-driven framework) and by composition of component classes (data driven framework). The standard agent system is implemented as an extensible object-centerd framework. Four concrete base classes are developed: (1) Standard Agency; (2) Standard Agent; (3) Human Factor, and (4) Resources. The object-centered framework developed and utilized provides the best comprimise between generality and flexibility available in agent development systems today.

  11. Drug Cocktail Optimization in Chemotherapy of Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Preissner, Saskia; Dunkel, Mathias; Hoffmann, Michael F.; Preissner, Sarah C.; Genov, Nikolai; Rong, Wen Wei; Preissner, Robert; Seeger, Karlheinz

    2012-01-01

    Background In general, drug metabolism has to be considered to avoid adverse effects and ineffective therapy. In particular, chemotherapeutic drug cocktails strain drug metabolizing enzymes especially the cytochrome P450 family (CYP). Furthermore, a number of important chemotherapeutic drugs such as cyclophosphamide, ifosfamide, tamoxifen or procarbazine are administered as prodrugs and have to be activated by CYP. Therefore, the genetic variability of these enzymes should be taken into account to design appropriate therapeutic regimens to avoid inadequate drug administration, toxicity and inefficiency. Objective The aim of this work was to find drug interactions and to avoid side effects or ineffective therapy in chemotherapy. Data sources and methods Information on drug administration in the therapy of leukemia and their drug metabolism was collected from scientific literature and various web resources. We carried out an automated textmining approach. Abstracts of PubMed were filtered for relevant articles using specific keywords. Abstracts were automatically screened for antineoplastic drugs and their synonyms in combination with a set of human CYPs in title or abstract. Results We present a comprehensive analysis of over 100 common cancer treatment regimens regarding drug-drug interactions and present alternatives avoiding CYP overload. Typical concomitant medication, e.g. antiemetics or antibiotics is a preferred subject to improvement. A webtool, which allows drug cocktail optimization was developed and is publicly available on http://bioinformatics.charite.de/chemotherapy. PMID:23236419

  12. Cancer chemotherapy and cardiac arrhythmias: a review.

    PubMed

    Tamargo, Juan; Caballero, Ricardo; Delpón, Eva

    2015-02-01

    Cardiovascular toxicity is a potential complication of cancer chemotherapy (CC) that increases the morbidity and mortality of cancer patients. Cardiac arrhythmias have been reported as an adverse effect of many chemotherapeutic drugs, including novel targeted therapies. The relationship between chemotherapy and arrhythmias has not been well-established and the proarrhythmogenic mechanisms remain uncertain as they can be the result of a direct electrophysiological effect or of changes in cardiac structure and function, including myocardial ischaemia and heart failure, which create an arrhythmogenic substrate. In this review we summarise available evidence of proarrhythmia induced by CC, discuss the possible mechanisms involved in this adverse effect and emphasise the importance of cardiac monitoring for the early diagnosis, intervention and surveillance of those patients more susceptible to develop proarrhythmia in an attempt to reduce the morbidity and mortality. Oncologists should be fully aware of proarrhythmia and the close collaboration between cardiologists and oncologists would result in a better cardiovascular assessment, risk stratification, cardiac monitoring and treatment during CC and during the follow-up. The final objective is to understand the mechanisms of proarrhythmia and evaluate its real incidence and clinical relevance so as to select the safest and most effective treatment for cancer patients.

  13. Light protection of chemotherapy drugs for infusion.

    PubMed

    Clarkson, Douglas McG; Harvey, Roger; Sheepy, Dave

    2015-02-01

    Specific chemotherapy drugs which require to be delivered by continuous infusion over time can have their effectiveness impaired by exposure to optical radiation. Mechanisms and processes of drug preparation and patient administration associated with light sensitive drugs were monitored within a Chemotherapy Unit. Levels of ambient light at locations of drug preparation/administration and levels of protection afforded by optical filter elements such as infusion lines were determined using a double grating Bentham Dmc150 spectroradiometer. Models of light exposure were developed for separate components of drug preparation and infusion delivery systems where the latter included the fluid bag with protective light cover, drip chamber and giving set line. In addition, the attenuation coefficient of Dacarbazine at the concentration typically used in patient treatments was determined using specially manufactured measurement cells. The relative contributions to light absorption of the drug bag, drip chamber and patient line were identified for specific types of giving sets, spectral content/intensity of light exposure and specific drug light absorption profiles. This indicated significant differences in the level of light protection afforded by specific giving sets and either single or double layer protection of the drug bag reservoir. It is not clear, however, if these variations could lead to significant differences of levels of drug de-activation and/or creation of undesirable photo-products such as in the case of Dacarbazine. Such techniques, however, provide a means of identifying how light exposure can be maintained at levels as low as reasonably possible as a precautionary measure.

  14. Adjuvant chemotherapy for soft tissue sarcoma.

    PubMed

    Casali, Paolo G

    2015-01-01

    Adjuvant chemotherapy is not standard treatment in soft tissue sarcoma (STS). However, when the risk of relapse is high, it is an option for shared decision making with the patient in conditions of uncertainty. This is because available evidence is conflicting, even if several randomized clinical trials have been performed for 4 decades and also have been pooled into meta-analyses. Indeed, available meta-analyses point to a benefit in the 5% to 10% range in terms of survival and distant relapse rate. Some local benefit also was suggested by some trials. Placing chemotherapy in the preoperative setting may help gain a local advantage in terms of the quality of surgical margins or decreased sequelae. This may be done within a personalized approach according to the clinical presentation. Attempts to personalize treatment on the basis of the variegated pathology and molecular biology of STS subgroups are ongoing as well, according to what is done in the medical treatment of advanced STS. Thus, decision making for adjuvant and neoadjuvant indications deserves personalization in clinical research and in clinical practice, taking profit from all multidisciplinary clinical skills available at a sarcoma reference center, though with a degree of subjectivity because of the limitations of available evidence. PMID:25993233

  15. Thermotherapy, chemotherapy, and meristem culture in banana.

    PubMed

    Lassois, Ludivine; Lepoivre, Philippe; Swennen, Rony; van den Houwe, Ines; Panis, Bart

    2013-01-01

    Bananas that provide a staple food to the millions of people are adversely affected by several viruses such as Banana bunchy Top Virus (BBTV), Banana Streak Virus (BSV), and Cucumber Mosaic Virus (CMV). These viruses are known to have a devastating effect on crop production and constraint to the international exchange and conservation of banana germplasm-a cornerstone for breeding new cultivars. The viruses are particularly problematic in vegetative propagated crops, like bananas, because of their transmission in the planting material. Different virus eradication techniques have been developed, such as thermotherapy, chemotherapy, and meristem culture for providing virus-free planting material. Meristem culture proved to be the most effective procedure to eradicate phloem-associated viruses. This method requires isolation of meristematic dome of plant under the aseptic conditions and culture in an appropriate nutrient medium to develop new virus-free plants. Thermotherapy is another widely used virus eradication technique, which is initially carried out on in vivo or in vitro plants and eventually combined with meristem culture technique. The plantlets are initially grown at 28°C day temperature and increase it by 2°C per day until reaches 40°C and the night temperature at 28°C; maintain plants at 40°C for 4 weeks; excise meristem and culture onto the regeneration medium. In chemotherapy technique, antiviral chemical compound Virazole(®) is applied on meristem culture. Combination of these techniques is also applied to improve the eradication rate.

  16. Ondansetron: a pharmacoeconomic and quality-of-life evaluation of its antiemetic activity in patients receiving cancer chemotherapy.

    PubMed

    Plosker, G L; Milne, R J

    1992-10-01

    Ondansetron is more effective than high-dose metoclopramide in the prevention of acute nausea and vomiting due to highly emetogenic chemotherapy, and, unlike metoclopramide, is rarely associated with extrapyramidal effects. Pharmacoeconomic analyses have demonstrated that, in specified clinical settings, ondansetron (8mg 4-hourly for 3 doses or 8mg followed by 1 mg/h for 24 hours) is equally cost-effective as high-dose metoclopramide (3 mg/kg followed by 0.5 mg/kg/h for 8 hours) in the prophylaxis of emesis in patients receiving highly emetogenic chemotherapy, at an acquisition cost 4- or 5-fold higher than that of the metoclopramide regimen. Furthermore, the combination of dexamethasone plus ondansetron has been shown to be more effective than ondansetron monotherapy in controlling emesis. In patients receiving high-dose ( greater than 50 mg/m2) cisplatin-based chemotherapy, antiemetic therapy with ondansetron (8mg intravenously as a single dose) plus dexamethasone (16mg total intravenous dose) was shown to be more cost-effective than the combination of high-dose metoclopramide (11 mg/kg total intravenous dose), dexamethasone (8mg intravenously as a single dose) plus lorazepam (1 to 1.5mg intravenously as a single dose). In a limited number of studies, quality-of-life scores, as assessed using the Rotterdam Symptom Checklist or the Functional Living Index--Emesis instrument, were significantly higher with ondansetron than with other antiemetic agents, including metoclopramide. Together, these results suggest that ondansetron, as an alternative to antiemetic regimens including high-dose metoclopramide, is appropriate cost-effective therapy for the prevention of acute nausea and vomiting in patients receiving highly emetogenic chemotherapy. Ondansetron is effective in controlling acute emesis associated with moderately emetogenic chemotherapy, and its use in this clinical setting may best be reserved for patients who have not responded well to previous antiemetic

  17. High-dose chemotherapy: is it standard management for any common solid tumor?

    PubMed

    MacNeil, M; Eisenhauer, E A

    1999-10-01

    High-dose chemotherapy with stem-cell support had as its basis the observation of dose-response relationships for many chemotherapeutic agents in laboratory models. The rationale to explore high-dose treatment in the clinic was further enhanced by several retrospective reviews in the 1980s which suggested delivered dose intensity of treatment was an important determinant of patient outcome. The availability of hematopoietic growth factors and technologic advances in the efficiency of stem-cell collection and administration have made the evaluation of exploring high-dose therapy safe and feasible. However, real questions remain regarding the apparently superior results of this treatment in the management of solid tumors. This paper reviews the results of high-dose chemotherapy in breast, ovarian and small cell lung cancers. Firstly the evidence for a dose-response relationship to chemotherapeutic agents in the 'standard' dosage range is examined. Secondly results of non-randomized and, where available, randomized trials of high-dose chemotherapy (HDCT) with stem-cell support are summarized and finally conclusions regarding the weight of the evidence for use of HDCT as 'standard' treatment are given. In none of these tumors is there sufficient evidence from randomized trials to consider HDCT a standard to be offered to all patients with a given stage of disease. The apparent benefit of HDCT seen in phase II trials could well be explained by such phenomena as stage shifts and patient selection. Many randomized trials in ovary and breast cancer are either ongoing or presented only as abstracts so final results must be awaited to quantify the benefit, if any of HDCT. It is acknowledged, however, that some practitioners already utilize this treatment. We speculate about the differences in philosophical approaches to cancer treatment which might contribute to early acceptance of novel therapies in the absence of adequate randomized data.

  18. Alternatives to chemotherapy and radiotherapy as adjuvant treatment for lung cancer.

    PubMed

    Shepherd, F A

    1997-06-01

    Because adjuvant chemotherapy has resulted in only modest prolongation of survival for patients with lung cancer, investigators have turned to the evaluation of alternative treatment strategies for this patient population. Immunotherapy with Bacillus Calmette Guerin, Corynebacterium parvum, and levamisole has been evaluated in several prospective randomized trials, and no study has shown a statistically significant difference in overall survival. Interferon has been evaluated in three trials of adjuvant therapy after response to chemotherapy for small cell lung cancer. Different interferon preparations were used, but none of the trials showed a significant prolongation of survival. The retinoids have been evaluated as adjuvant treatment after complete resection of stage IN-SCLC. One trial showed a reduction in second primary tumors, and in particular, tumors to tobacco smoking in patients treated with retinyl palmitate. A second trial using 13-cis retinoic acid is ongoing in North America. In the last decade, several inhibitors of angiogenesis have been identified, and they are now beginning to be evaluated in the clinical setting. The National Cancer Institute of Canada Clinical Trials Group and the European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer have initiated a study of adjuvant marimastat, a metalloproteinase inhibitor, for patients who have responded to induction chemotherapy for small cell lung cancer. This is the first adjuvant antiangiogenesis factor trial to be initiated for any tumor type. Other investigational agents which are currently undergoing Phase I and Phase II testing include monoclonal antibodies which may inhibit tumour cell growth by binding to growth factors, or which may be conjugated to toxins or chemotherapeutic agents which result in tumour cell death. In the last decade, we have witnessed an explosion in our knowledge and understanding of the regulation of normal and neoplastic cell growth at the molecular level. It remains

  19. Massive release of extracellular vesicles from cancer cells after photodynamic treatment or chemotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Aubertin, Kelly; Silva, Amanda K. A.; Luciani, Nathalie; Espinosa, Ana; Djemat, Aurélie; Charue, Dominique; Gallet, François; Blanc-Brude, Olivier; Wilhelm, Claire

    2016-01-01

    Photodynamic therapy is an emerging cancer treatment that is particularly adapted for localized malignant tumor. The phototherapeutic agent is generally injected in the bloodstream and circulates in the whole organism as a chemotherapeutic agent, but needs light triggering to induce localized therapeutic effects. We found that one of the responses of in vitro and in vivo cancer cells to photodynamic therapy was a massive production and emission of extracellular vesicles (EVs): only 1 hour after the photo-activation, thousands of vesicles per cell were emitted in the extracellular medium. A similar effect has been found after treatment with Doxorubicin (chemotherapy), but far less EVs were produced, even 24 hours after the treatment. Furthermore, we found that the released EVs could transfer extracellular membrane components, drugs and even large intracellular objects to naive target cells. In vivo, photodynamic treatment and chemotherapy increased the levels of circulating EVs several fold, confirming the vast induction of cancer cell vesiculation triggered by anti-cancer therapies. PMID:27752092

  20. Role of lipegfilgrastim in the management of chemotherapy-induced neutropenia

    PubMed Central

    Hoggatt, Jonathan; Tate, Tiffany A; Pelus, Louis M

    2015-01-01

    Chemotherapy, irradiation, and other agents are widely used to target the process of cell division in neoplastic cells. However, while these therapies are effective against most cancers, the high proliferative rate of the cells of the hematopoietic system that produce billions of blood cells needed daily throughout life is extremely sensitive to these agents, resulting in loss of blood cell populations, which can be life threatening. Neutropenia is the most serious hematologic toxicity of chemotherapy, which can result in patient morbidity and mortality due to opportunistic infection and often is the limiting factor in dose escalation or duration of chemotherapeutic administration. Neutropenic patients often require hospitalization and incur substantial medical costs associated with anti-infective therapy. Treatment of iatrogenic and congenic neutropenia was changed in the early 1990s with the introduction of filgrastim (Neupogen®) and pegfilgrastim (Neulasta®). With the expiration of patent lives of both of these drugs, biosimilars have begun to emerge. In this review, we will summarize the chemical characteristics, pharmacokinetics, safety and efficacy of lipegfilgrastim (Lonquex®), the first long-acting biosimilar filgrastim to receive regulatory approval and enter the marketplace. PMID:25878498

  1. Chemotherapy in advanced ovarian cancer: an overview of randomised clinical trials. Advanced Ovarian Cancer Trialists Group.

    PubMed Central

    1991-01-01

    OBJECTIVES--To consider the role of platinum and the relative merits of single agent and combination chemotherapy in the treatment of advanced ovarian cancer. DESIGN--Formal quantitative overview using updated individual patient data from all available randomised trials (published and unpublished). SUBJECTS--8139 patients (6408 deaths) included in 45 different trials. RESULTS--No firm conclusions could be reached. Nevertheless, the results suggest that in terms of survival immediate platinum based treatment was better than non-platinum regimens (overall relative risk 0.93; 95% confidence interval 0.83 to 1.05); platinum in combination was better than single agent platinum when used in the same dose (overall relative risk 0.85; 0.72 to 1.00); and cisplatin and carboplatin were equally effective (overall relative risk 1.05; 0.94 to 1.18). CONCLUSIONS--In the past, randomised clinical trials of chemotherapy in advanced ovarian cancer have been much too small to detect the degree of benefit which this overview suggests is realistic for currently available chemotherapeutic regimens. Hence a new trial comparing cisplatin, doxorubicin, and cyclophosphamide (CAP) with carboplatin has been launched and plans to accrue 2000 patients. PMID:1834291

  2. Adjuvant chemotherapy for breast cancer: side effects and quality of life.

    PubMed Central

    Palmer, B V; Walsh, G A; McKinna, J A; Greening, W P

    1980-01-01

    In a trial of postoperative adjuvant chemotherapy women with primary breast cancer and spread to one or more axillary nodes were randomised to receive a six-month course of either the single agent chlorambucil or the five-drug combination of chlorambucil, methotrexate, fluorouracil, vincristine, and adriamycin. On completing the treatment 47 patients were asked to fill in questionnaires at home on the side effects of treatment and its influence on the quality of their life. Side effects including nausea, vomiting, malaise, and alopecia had been severe enough to interfere with their lifestyle in 9 (42%) of the patients who had received the single agent and 19 (79%) of those who had received multiple-drug treatment. Various other side effects were reported by a few patients. Seven (29%) of the patients who had received the multiple-drug schedule voluntarily added that the treatment had been "unbearable" or "could never be gone though again." The proportion of patients who had experienced severe side effects while receiving the treatment was considerable; hence such adjuvant chemotherapy is justifiable only if it will substantially improve a patient's prognosis. PMID:7004560

  3. Chemotherapy in elderly patients with advanced non-small cell lung cancer.

    PubMed

    Quoix, Elisabeth; Westeel, Virginie; Zalcman, Gérard; Milleron, Bernard

    2011-12-01

    Because of increasing life expectancy and of higher risk of cancer with ageing, lung cancer in elderly is a frequent disease. For a long time nihilism influenced treatment decisions in elderly patients with advanced non-small cell lung cancer. Since the beginning of the last decade single agent chemotherapy has been accepted as standard of care, vinorelbine and gemcitabine being the most frequently used drugs in Europe and US, docetaxel in Japan. Platinum-based doublets have been shown to be superior to monotherapy in young and fit patients with advanced non-small cell lung cancer. Although there were some indications from subgroup analyses of clinical trials not specifically dedicated to elderly patients that a platinum-based doublet might also benefit to older patients, there was no definitive proof of concept until ASCO meeting 2010. At this meeting results of a phase 3 trial showed that PS 0-2 patients, aged 70-89 years drove a significant benefit from a treatment with carboplatin associated to weekly paclitaxel compared to a monotherapy. Thus, the paradigm of treatment in elderly patients should perhaps be modified from a single agent to doublet chemotherapy. Whether other platinum-based doublets would provide the same benefit as the specific one studied remains to be evaluated. PMID:21893363

  4. Chemotherapy and target therapy for hepatocellular carcinoma: New advances and challenges

    PubMed Central

    Deng, Gan-Lu; Zeng, Shan; Shen, Hong

    2015-01-01

    Primary liver cancer is one of the commonest causes of death. Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) accounts for 90% of primary liver cancers. For patients with unresectable or metastatic HCC, conventional chemotherapy is of limited or no benefit. Sorafenib is the only systemic treatment to demonstrate a statistically significant but modest overall survival benefit, leading to an era of targeted agents. Many clinical trials of targeted drugs have been carried out with many more in progress. Some drugs like PTK787 showed potential benefits in the treatment of HCC. Despite these promising breakthroughs, patients with HCC still have a dismal prognosis. Recently, both a phase III trial of everolimus and a phase II clinical trial of trebananib failed to demonstrate effective antitumor activity in advanced HCC. Sorafenib still plays a pivotal role in advanced HCC, leading to further explorations to exert its maximum efficacy. Combinations targeted with chemotherapy or transarterial chemoembolization is now being tested and might bring about advances. New targeted agents such as mammalian target of rapamycin inhibitors are under investigation, as well as further exploration of the mechanism of hepatocarcinogenesis. PMID:25914779

  5. Multifunctional Gold Nanostar Conjugates for Tumor Imaging and Combined Photothermal and Chemo-therapy

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Haiyan; Zhang, Xin; Dai, Shuhang; Ma, Yuxiang; Cui, Sisi; Achilefu, Samuel; Gu, Yueqing

    2013-01-01

    Uniform gold nanostars (Au NS) were conjugated with cyclic RGD (cRGD) and near infrared (NIR) fluorescence probe (MPA) or anti-cancer drug (DOX) to obtain multi-functional nanoconstructs, Au-cRGD-MPA and Au-cRGD-DOX respectively. The NIR contrast agent Au-cRGD-MPA was shown to have low cytotoxicity. Using tumor cells and tumor bearing mice, these imaging nanoparticles demonstrated favorable tumor-targeting capability mediated by RGD peptide binding to its over-expressed receptor on the tumor cells. The multi-therapeutic analogue, Au-cRGD-DOX, integrates targeting tumor, chemotherapy and photo-thermotherapy into a single system. The synergistic effect of photo-thermal therapy and chemotherapy was demonstrated in different tumor cell lines and in vivo using S180 tumor-bearing mouse models. The viability of MDA-MB-231 cells was only 40 % after incubation with Au-cRGD-DOX and irradiation with NIR light. Both tail vein and intratumoral injections showed Au-cRGD-DOX treated mice exhibiting the slowest tumor increase. These results indicate that the multifunctional nanoconstruct is a promising combined therapeutic agent for tumor-targeting treatment, with the potential to enhance the anti-cancer treatment outcomes. PMID:24019851

  6. Chemotherapy-Induced Weakness and Fatigue in Skeletal Muscle: The Role of Oxidative Stress

    PubMed Central

    St. Clair, Daret K.

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Significance Fatigue is one of the most common symptoms of cancer and its treatment, manifested in the clinic through weakness and exercise intolerance. These side effects not only compromise patient's quality of life (QOL), but also diminish physical activity, resulting in limited treatment and increased morbidity. Recent Advances Oxidative stress, mediated by cancer or chemotherapeutic agents, is an underlying mechanism of the drug-induced toxicity. Nontargeted tissues, such as striated muscle, are severely affected by oxidative stress during chemotherapy, leading to toxicity and dysfunction. Critical Issues These findings highlight the importance of investigating clinically applicable interventions to alleviate the debilitating side effects. This article discusses the clinically available chemotherapy drugs that cause fatigue and oxidative stress in cancer patients, with an in-depth focus on the anthracycline doxorubicin. Doxorubicin, an effective anticancer drug, is a primary example of how chemotherapeutic agents disrupt striated muscle function through oxidative stress. Future Directions Further research investigating antioxidants could provide relief for cancer patients from debilitating muscle weakness, leading to improved quality of life. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 15, 2543–2563. PMID:21457105

  7. Cholesterol reduces the sensitivity to platinum-based chemotherapy via upregulating ABCG2 in lung adenocarcinoma.

    PubMed

    Wu, Yufeng; Si, Ruirui; Tang, Hong; He, Zhen; Zhu, Hui; Wang, Lili; Fan, Yingchao; Xia, Suhua; He, Zelai; Wang, Qiming

    2015-02-20

    Inoperable lung adenocarcinoma is currently treated with platinum-based chemotherapy. However, the effectiveness of these chemotherapeutic agents is not the same for all patients. Patients either show quick chemoresistance (QCR) or delayed chemoresistance (DCR), which are defined by 87 and 242 days of progression-free survival (PFS) after initial platinum-based treatment, respectively. We found that QCR patients displayed an elevated level of serum cholesterol and that their tumors showed upregulated ABCG2 expression. We propose that chemoresistance may be attributed to cholesterol-induced ABCG2 expression and hypothesize that blocking ABCG2 may increase the efficacy of platinum-based chemotherapeutic agents. Using the MTT cell viability assay, we observed that cotreatment with ABCG2 blocker Nicardipine and platinum-based drugs Cisplatin, Oxaliplatin or Carboplatin significantly decreased cell viability of tumor cells. Importantly, our results also showed that incubating cells with cholesterol prior to chemotherapy treatment or cotreatment increased cell viability of tumor cells relative to the controls.

  8. Marginal effects of glucose, insulin and insulin-like growth factor on chemotherapy response in endothelial and colorectal cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    VOLKOVA, EKATERINA; ROBINSON, BRIDGET A.; WILLIS, JINNY; CURRIE, MARGARET J.; DACHS, GABI U.

    2014-01-01

    Resistance to chemotherapy is a major clinical issue for patients with colorectal cancer. Obesity has been associated with a poorer outcome and is a possible mechanism of resistance. The aim of the present study was to investigate the effect of obesity-related factors on the cell response to standard chemotherapy in stromal and colorectal cancer cells. Viability was measured following the treatment of colorectal cancer cell lines (WiDr and SW620) and stromal cells (human microvascular endothelial cells) in vitro with 5-fluorouracil, irinotecan and oxaliplatin under obesity-related conditions [elevated levels of insulin, insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF-1) and glucose] and compared with non-elevated conditions. Obesity-related conditions alone increased cell viability and in selected cases, accumulation of the transcription factor, hypoxia-inducible factor-1. However, these conditions did not consistently increase resistance to the chemotherapy agents tested. The combination of IGF-1 and extremely low-dose chemotherapy significantly induced cell viability in WiDr colorectal cancer cells. These in vitro results may have clinical importance in an environment of increasing rates of obesity and colorectal cancer, and the frequent under-dosing of obese cancer patients. PMID:24396438

  9. Hypofractionated Accelerated Radiotherapy With Concurrent Chemotherapy For Locally Advanced Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Head and Neck

    SciTech Connect

    Sanghera, Paul; McConkey, Chris; Ho, Kean-Fatt; Glaholm, John; Hartley, Andrew . E-mail: andrew.hartley@uhb.nhs.uk

    2007-04-01

    Purpose: To investigate the tumor control rates in locally advanced head-and-neck cancer using accelerated hypofractionated radiotherapy with chemotherapy. Methods and Materials: The data from patients with squamous cell cancer of the larynx, oropharynx, oral cavity, and hypopharynx (International Union Against Cancer Stage II-IV), who received accelerated hypofractionated radiotherapy with chemotherapy between January 1, 1998, and April 1, 2005, were retrospectively analyzed. Two different chemotherapy schedules were used, carboplatin and methotrexate, both single agents administered on an outpatient basis. The endpoints were overall survival, local control, and disease-free survival. Results: A total of 81 patients were analyzed. The 2-year overall survival rate was 71.6% (95% confidence interval [CI], 61.5-81.8%). The 2-year disease-free survival rate was 68.6% (95% CI, 58.4-78.8%). The 2-year local control rate was 75.4% (95% CI, 65.6-85.1%). When excluding patients with Stage II oral cavity, larynx, and hypopharynx tumors, 68 patients remained. For these patients, the 2-year overall survival, local control, and disease-free survival rate was 67.6% (95% CI, 56.0-79.2%), 72.0% (95% CI, 61.0-83.0%), and 64.1% (95% CI, 52.6-75.7%), respectively. Conclusion: Accelerated hypofractionated radiotherapy and synchronous chemotherapy can achieve high tumor control rates while being resource sparing and should be the subject of prospective evaluation.

  10. Metronomic Cyclophosphamide and Methotrexate Chemotherapy Combined with 1E10 Anti-Idiotype Vaccine in Metastatic Breast Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Soriano, Jorge L.; Batista, Noyde; Santiesteban, Eduardo; Lima, Mayté; González, Joaquín; García, Robin; Zarza, Yohanka; López, María V.; Rodríguez, Myriam; Loys, Jorge L.; Montejo, Narciso; Aguirre, Frank; Macías, Amparo; Vázquez, Ana M.

    2011-01-01

    The use of low doses of cytotoxic agents continuously for prolonged periods is an alternative for the treatment of patients with metastatic breast cancer who have developed resistance to conventional chemotherapy. The combination of metronomic chemotherapy with therapeutic vaccines might increase the efficacy of the treatment. Twenty one patients with metastatic breast cancer in progression and a Karnosky index ≥60%, were treated with metronomic chemotherapy (50 mg of cyclophospamide orally daily and 2.5 mg of methotrexate orally bi-daily), in combination with five bi-weekly subcutaneous injections of 1 mg of aluminum hydroxide-precipitated 1E10 anti-idiotype MAb (1E10-Alum), followed by reimmunizations every 28 days. Five patients achieved objective response, eight showed stable disease and eight had disease progression. Median time to progression was 9,8 months, while median overall survival time was 12,93 months. The median duration of the response (CR+PR+SD) was 18,43 months (12,20–24,10 months), being higher than 12 months in 76,9% of the patients. Overall toxicity was generally mild. Metronomic chemotherapy combined with 1E10-Alum vaccine immunotherapy might be a useful therapeutic option for the treatment of metastatic breast cancer due to its potential impact on survival and patient quality of live, low toxicity and advantages of the administration. PMID:22295231

  11. Pegfilgrastim use during chemotherapy: current and future applications.

    PubMed

    Wolf, Todd; Densmore, John J

    2004-11-01

    Chemotherapy-induced myelosuppression is the most common dose-limiting side effect of cancer chemotherapy. Neutropenia is a serious risk with chemotherapy, associated with infectious complications, use of intravenous antibiotics, hospitalization, and even death. The occurrence of febrile neutropenia can lead to dose reductions and delay in subsequent cycles of chemotherapy that may have a detrimental affect on overall survival and disease-free survival. Granulocyte colony-stimulating factors (G-CSF) can reduce the duration of severe neutropenia, the incidence of febrile neutropenia, and allow planned dosing and timing of chemotherapy. Filgrastim is a G-CSF that has demonstrated benefit for the treatment and prophylaxis of chemotherapy-induced neutropenia (CIN), but its short half-life requires repeated daily subcutaneous injection. Pegfilgrastim is a recombinant G-CSF created by attaching a polyethylene glycol (PEG) molecule to the filgrastim protein. Once-per-cycle dosing of pegfilgrastim has been evaluated in clinical trials using myelosuppressive chemotherapy in breast cancer, Hodgkin's lymphoma, and non-Hodgkin's lymphoma. Trials have demonstrated that pegfilgrastim is comparable in safety and efficacy to filgrastim for decreasing the duration of severe neutropenia after chemotherapy in patients with nonmyeloid malignancy. This review will summarize recent clinical trial results and novel uses of pegfilgrastim.

  12. Effects of chemotherapy on osseointegration of implants: a case report.

    PubMed

    McDonald, A R; Pogrel, M A; Sharma, A

    1998-01-01

    A patient underwent mandibular resection for high-grade osteosarcoma with immediate reconstruction with a microvascular fibula free bone graft and simultaneous placement of osseointegrated implants. Following initial healing, she underwent six cycles of chemotherapy and had further revision surgery prior to implant exposure and construction of a prosthesis. The chemotherapy appears to have had no deleterious effects on implant osseointegration or survival.

  13. [Collateral effects of intraoperative hyperthermic chemotherapy in peritoneal carcinomatosis].

    PubMed

    Izzo, L; Galati, G; D'Aprile, M R; Stasolla, A; Kharrub, Z; Maccioni, F; Sassayannis, P G; D'Arielli, D; Marini, M; Gazzanelli, S; Caputo, M

    2004-01-01

    The association between chemotherapy and hypertermia produces a synergic effect. In this study the Authors present their experience, by the analysis of the results. From 1993 to 2000, 17 patients have been treated with surgery associated with hypertermic chemotherapy for peritoneal carcinomatosis. For the management of these patients a constant cooperation among surgeon, cardiologist and anaesthetist is very important. PMID:15112761

  14. Management of HIV Infection in Patients With Cancer Receiving Chemotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Mayer, Kenneth H.; Torres, Harrys A.; Mulanovich, Victor

    2014-01-01

    The optimal antiretroviral therapy (ART) regimen for human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)–infected patients with cancer remains unknown, as clinical trials are lacking and published data are insufficient to guide recommendations. When concomitant use of chemotherapy and ART is anticipated, overlap of toxic effects and drug–drug interactions between chemotherapy and ART may alter the optimal choice of ART. Prospective studies are urgently needed to further define the toxic effects of combined chemotherapy and ART in HIV-positive cancer patients. Such studies should aid the development of guidelines for treatment of this population. For now, clinicians should individualize decisions regarding treatment of HIV according to clinical and laboratory findings, cancer treatment plan (chemotherapy, radiotherapy, or surgery), liver or renal disease, potential adverse drug effects (eg, rash, gastrointestinal intolerance, bone marrow suppression), and patient preference. This review focuses on what infectious disease specialists need to know to select the most appropriate ART regimens for patients receiving chemotherapy. PMID:24642555

  15. Neurobiological changes by cytotoxic agents in mice.

    PubMed

    Seigers, R; Loos, M; Van Tellingen, O; Boogerd, W; Smit, A B; Schagen, S B

    2016-02-15

    Cognitive deficit is a frequently reported side-effect of adjuvant chemotherapy. A large number of animal studies has been performed to examine the neurobiological mechanisms underlying this phenomenon, however, definite conclusions from these studies are restricted due to differences in experimental set-up. We systematically investigated the effects of 6 cytotoxic agents on various neurobiological parameters. C57Bl/6J mice were treated with cyclophosphamide, docetaxel, doxorubicin, 5-fluorouracil, methotrexate, or topotecan. The animals were sacrificed 3 or 15 weeks after treatment and the effect on neurogenesis, blood vessel density, and neuroinflammation was analyzed using immunohistochemistry. None of the cytostatic agents tested affected neurogenesis (cell survival or cell proliferation). Blood vessel density was increased in the hippocampus and prefrontal cortex 3 weeks after treatment with docetaxel and doxorubicin compared with control animals. A decrease in the number of microglial cells was observed in the prefrontal cortex after treatment with cyclophosphamide, docetaxel, 5-FU, and topotecan compared with control mice. The observed decrease in microglia cells is indicative of inflammation that occurred after treatment. Overall, the magnitude of the effects was relatively modest. Therefore, we conducted a similar study with topotecan in Abcg2;Abcb1a/b knock out and wildtype FVB mice. Animals were sacrificed 3 weeks after treatment and no notable effect was seen in hippocampal cell differentiation (DCX), microglia activation, or blood vessel density. Perhaps the FVB strain is more resistant to the neurotoxic effects of topotecan which makes this not the correct model to study the mechanism of chemotherapy-induced cognitive impairment. PMID:26602283

  16. The role of additional chemotherapy with oral UFT in intravenous combination chemotherapy with cisplatin and 5-fluorouracil for human gastric cancer xenograft lines of well- and poorly- differentiated adenocarcinomas transplanted in nude mice.

    PubMed

    Tseng, C C; Nio, Y; Tsubono, M; Kawabata, K; Masai, Y; Hayashi, H; Fukumoto, M; Tobe, T

    1992-01-01

    In order to assess the role of maintenance chemotherapy with the oral anticancer agent UFT, a mixture of uracil and futraful, in the intensive intravenous chemotherapy for gastric cancer, nude mice transplanted with human gastric cancer xenografts were treated with intravenous 5-fluorouracil (5-FU) and cisplatin (CDDP), alone or in combination, with or without the oral anticancer agent UFT. UFT was given at its maximal clinical dose of 10 mg/kg of body weight daily for 2 weeks, while 5-FU and/or CDDP was intravenously administered at the dose of 20 mg/kg and 1.8 mg/kg of body weight respectively once a week, alone or in combination, for two weeks. The results revealed that 5-FU or CDDP alone were ineffective for both GC-YN, a well differentiated adenocarcinoma line, and GC-SF, a poorly differentiated adenocarcinoma line; however, UFT was effective for GC-SF. In combinations, only the three-agent combination 5-FU + CDDP + UFT (FPU) was effective for GC-YN; however, all the two-agent combinations and FPU were effective for GC-SF. FPU significantly suppressed the growth of GC-YN much more than all the other treatment groups. In contrast, although all combinations as well as UFT alone were effective for GC-SF, there was no significant difference among these effective groups. Moreover, no side effects were noted in combined use of UFT. This study suggests that oral UFT as a maintenance treatment may be beneficial in the combination chemotherapy for human gastric cancer.

  17. Agent Architectures for Compliance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burgemeestre, Brigitte; Hulstijn, Joris; Tan, Yao-Hua

    A Normative Multi-Agent System consists of autonomous agents who must comply with social norms. Different kinds of norms make different assumptions about the cognitive architecture of the agents. For example, a principle-based norm assumes that agents can reflect upon the consequences of their actions; a rule-based formulation only assumes that agents can avoid violations. In this paper we present several cognitive agent architectures for self-monitoring and compliance. We show how different assumptions about the cognitive architecture lead to different information needs when assessing compliance. The approach is validated with a case study of horizontal monitoring, an approach to corporate tax auditing recently introduced by the Dutch Customs and Tax Authority.

  18. Tumor resistance to vascular disrupting agents: mechanisms, imaging, and solutions

    PubMed Central

    Liang, Wenjie; Ni, Yicheng; Chen, Feng

    2016-01-01

    The emergence of vascular disrupting agents (VDAs) is a significant advance in the treatment of solid tumors. VDAs induce rapid and selective shutdown of tumor blood flow resulting in massive necrosis. However, a viable marginal tumor rim always remains after VDA treatment and is a major cause of recurrence. In this review, we discuss the mechanisms involved in the resistance of solid tumors to VDAs. Hypoxia, tumor-associated macrophages, and bone marrow-derived circulating endothelial progenitor cells all may contribute to resistance. Resistance can be monitored using magnetic resonance imaging markers. The various solutions proposed to manage tumor resistance to VDAs emphasize combining these agents with other approaches including antiangiogenic agents, chemotherapy, radiotherapy, radioimmunotherapy, and sequential dual-targeting internal radiotherapy. PMID:26812886

  19. Exploring novel chemotherapy treatments using the WWW.

    PubMed

    Boyle, J; Henderson, D; McCall, J; McLeod, H; Usher, J

    1997-11-01

    A JAVA application, The Oncologists Workbench, which allows oncologists to estimate the influence of new cancer treatment schedules is being developed. The requirement for a rational approach to the design of chemotherapeutic regimens is well established [1]. Our prototype allows oncologists using the World Wide Web (WWW) to graphically construct treatment regimens while considering various toxic side effects. A simulation engine makes predictions of tumour growth based on previous clinical knowledge of response to treatment. The oncologist can then examine the predicted tumour response information with a specially constructed interactive viewer. These interlinked tools allow oncologists to develop and predict the effectiveness of novel chemotherapeutic regimens. This work is part of an ongoing collaboration between oncologists, mathematicians and computer scientists to provide tools for improving cancer chemotherapy.

  20. Photoswitchable nanoparticles for in vivo cancer chemotherapy.

    PubMed

    Tong, Rong; Chiang, Homer H; Kohane, Daniel S

    2013-11-19

    There are many obstacles to effective cancer chemotherapy, including drug penetration and accumulation in tumors and drug systemic toxicity. The penetration of therapies into tumors is limited by the dense tumor matrix and by compression of the tumor vasculature. We have developed spiropyran-based nanoparticles that shrink from 103 to 49 nm upon irradiation at 365 nm. That shrinkage enhanced tissue penetration and drug release. Irradiation of s.c. HT-1080 tumors in nude mice administered i.v. docetaxel-containing nanoparticles was more effective treatment than free docetaxel or encapsulated docetaxel without irradiation. Irradiation at the tumor site also resulted in less systemic toxicity than if the nanoparticles were irradiated before injection, presumably because of less systemically distributed free drug. The enhanced efficacy of nanoparticles in irradiated tumors may have been related to the observed enhanced tumor penetration by nanoparticles and decompression of tumor blood vessels, which may also increase nanoparticle delivery into tumors.

  1. Thermal potentiation of chemotherapy by magnetic nanoparticles

    PubMed Central

    Torres-Lugo, Madeline; Rinaldi, Carlos

    2014-01-01

    Clinical studies have demonstrated the effectiveness of hyperthermia as an adjuvant for chemotherapy and radiotherapy. However, significant clinical challenges have been encountered, such as a broader spectrum of toxicity, lack of patient tolerance, temperature control and significant invasiveness. Hyperthermia induced by magnetic nanoparticles in high-frequency oscillating magnetic fields, commonly termed magnetic fluid hyperthermia, is a promising form of heat delivery in which thermal energy is supplied at the nanoscale to the tumor. This review discusses the mechanisms of heat dissipation of iron oxide-based magnetic nanoparticles, current methods and challenges to deliver heat in the clinic, and the current work related to the use of magnetic nanoparticles for the thermal-chemopotentiation of therapeutic drugs. PMID:24074390

  2. Thermal potentiation of chemotherapy by magnetic nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Torres-Lugo, Madeline; Rinaldi, Carlos

    2013-10-01

    Clinical studies have demonstrated the effectiveness of hyperthermia as an adjuvant for chemotherapy and radiotherapy. However, significant clinical challenges have been encountered, such as a broader spectrum of toxicity, lack of patient tolerance, temperature control and significant invasiveness. Hyperthermia induced by magnetic nanoparticles in high-frequency oscillating magnetic fields, commonly termed magnetic fluid hyperthermia, is a promising form of heat delivery in which thermal energy is supplied at the nanoscale to the tumor. This review discusses the mechanisms of heat dissipation of iron oxide-based magnetic nanoparticles, current methods and challenges to deliver heat in the clinic, and the current work related to the use of magnetic nanoparticles for the thermal-chemopotentiation of therapeutic drugs.

  3. Anticipatory nausea and vomiting due to chemotherapy.

    PubMed

    Kamen, Charles; Tejani, Mohamedtaki A; Chandwani, Kavita; Janelsins, Michelle; Peoples, Anita R; Roscoe, Joseph A; Morrow, Gary R

    2014-01-01

    As a specific variation of chemotherapy-induced nausea and vomiting, anticipatory nausea and vomiting (ANV) appears particularly linked to psychological processes. The three predominant factors related to ANV are classical conditioning; demographic and treatment-related factors; and anxiety or negative expectancies. Laboratory models have provided some support for these underlying mechanisms for ANV. ANV may be treated with medical or pharmacological interventions, including benzodiazepines and other psychotropic medications. However, behavioral treatments, including systematic desensitization, remain first line options for addressing ANV. Some complementary treatment approaches have shown promise in reducing ANV symptoms. Additional research into these approaches is needed. This review will address the underlying models of ANV and provide a discussion of these various treatment options.

  4. A case of Takotsubo cardiomyopathy after chemotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Malley, Tamir; Watson, Edmund

    2016-01-01

    Here we present the case of a patient with diffuse large B-cell lymphoma who was admitted to hospital for an elective autologous peripheral blood stem cell transplant after cytotoxic treatment with lomustine, cytarabine, cyclophosphomide and etoposide (LACE). On the final day of chemotherapeutic treatment, she developed sudden onset dyspnoea. Electrocardiography confirmed acute antero-lateral T-wave inversion. She went onto have coronary angiography that demonstrated unobstructed coronary arteries. Left ventriculography demonstrated apical ballooning, consistent with Takotsubo (stress) cardiomyopathy. The link between chemotherapy and Takotsubo cardiomyopathy has become increasingly recognized in recent years, although causality remains to be established and the mechanism of action is not yet fully understood. PMID:27066260

  5. Chemotherapy and Fingerprint Loss: Beyond Cosmetic

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Hand–foot syndrome (HFS) is a common adverse reaction to several chemotherapy drugs. Focus has been on the clinically relevant sequelae associated with this condition, with fingerprint loss receiving little attention. We report the case of a 53-year old male patient with terminal metastatic adenocarcinoma of the rectum involving the liver and lungs who developed grade 3 HFS while on capecitabine therapy. This resulted in his inability to process required government papers as a result of the loss of his fingerprints, imposing significant inconvenience and frustration on a person severely challenged by his deteriorating health. We believe clinicians should pay more attention to this possible outcome that can add additional stress in the lives of patients whose quality of life is already severely compromised. PMID:22298801

  6. Intrathecal chemotherapy with ACNU for meningeal gliomatosis.

    PubMed Central

    Yoshida, T. K.; Beuls, E.; Shimizu, K.; Koulousakis, A.; Sturm, V.

    1992-01-01

    ACNU [1-(4-amino-2-methyl-5-pyrimidinyl) methyl-3-(2-chloroethyl)-3-nitrosourea hydrochloride], one of the chloroethylnitrosoureas (CENUs), is believed to be effective against malignant glioma when intravenously or intrathecally administered. A rat model with meningeal gliomatosis (MG) induced by an intracisternal inoculation of rat C6 or 9L glioma cells was intrathecally and intravenously treated with ACNU in order to test the feasibility of intrathecal chemotherapy with ACNU in the treatment of meningeal gliomatosis. The median survival time (MST) of the animals was significantly prolonged when ACNU was intrathecally administered at dosages of 0.5 to 1.5 mg kg-1 in the early stages of MG, i.e. within 3 days after the tumour inoculation, whereas intravenous therapy with ACNU at a dose of 15 mg kg-1 did not exhibit any efficacy in the rats inoculated with C6 glioma cells (C6-MG). Intrathecal ACNU, however, at dosages of up to 1.5 mg kg-1 failed to demonstrate any therapeutic effect in the late stage of MG, i.e. 5 days after the tumour inoculation, except in the rats inoculated with 9L brain tumour cells (9L-MG). Intravenous chemotherapy with ACNU at a dose of 15 mg kg-1 extended the MST of the 9L-MG rats more significantly in the late stage of MG than in its early stage. This points to the feasibility of intrathecal ACNU in the treatment of meningeal gliomatosis in its early stages, but not in its late stages in which intravenous ACNU might be more effective than intrathecal treatment against MG of which the parenchyma has already been deeply invaded by the tumour. Images Figure 5 PMID:1457369

  7. Radiation and concurrent chemotherapy for the treatment of Lewis lung tumor and B16 melanoma tumor in C57/BL mice

    SciTech Connect

    Pedersen, J.E.; Barron, G.

    1984-08-01

    C57/BL mice bearing either Lewis lung tumor or B16 melanoma tumor were treated with radiation and concurrent chemotherapy. The treatment results were determined in vivo by tumor regrowth delay assay. When continuous infusion of either Cyclophosphamide (CYCLO) or 5-Fluorouracil (5-FU) or Adriamycin (ADRIA) or Mitomycin-C (MITO-C) was used in combination with continuous radiation at 1 cGy/min, no increase in tumor regrowth delay was observed over that of radiation alone. When multiple drug chemotherapy, FAM (5-FU, ADRIA, MITO-C) was administered in combination with radiation at 80 cGy/min, no increase in tumor regrowth delay was observed over that of radiation alone. In these two murine tumor models, when clinically relevant concentrations of commonly used chemotherapy agents were combined with radiation, no therapeutic advantage was observed.

  8. Echocardiography and Alternative Cardiac Imaging Strategies for Long-Term Cardiotoxicity Surveillance of Cancer Survivors Treated with Chemotherapy and/or Radiation Exposure.

    PubMed

    Garg, Vinisha; Vorobiof, Gabriel

    2016-08-01

    Cardiotoxicity from chemotherapy is a leading cause of morbidity and mortality in cancer survivors. Cardiotoxic effects include left ventricular systolic dysfunction, coronary artery disease, hypertension, bradycardia, arrhythmias, pericardial disease, valvular disease, and radiation-induced restrictive cardiomyopathy. Noninvasive cardiac imaging has been at the forefront of detecting cardiotoxicity in patients receiving chemotherapeutic agents known to adversely affect cardiac structure and function. Regimens for cardiotoxicity surveillance prior to and during chemotherapy administration have been proposed; however, optimal screening for and treatment of long-term cancer survivors have yet to be clarified. This review focuses on the most common imaging modalities for assessing cardiac dysfunction along with newer imaging technologies, and reviews suggested long-term surveillance strategies in cancer survivors following chemotherapy and radiation therapy.

  9. Correlation between size and external temperature in four rat tumours after treatment with cytostatic agents.

    PubMed

    Nickers, P; Oosters, L; Brasseur, F; Kunkler, I; Maisin, H; Deckers, C

    1988-01-01

    The reduction in size of four experimental tumours (ISIS 130 and ISIS 208 immunocytomas, S 437 mammary adenocarcinoma, S 447 colon adenocarcinoma) was investigated in LOU rats under the influence of cytostatic agents belonging to different classes (5-fluorouracil, methotrexate, vinblastine, cisplatin, doxorubicin, cyclophosphamide). External tumour and rectal temperatures were measured at the same time, twice daily, during the whole experiment. With the rectal temperature of the rats kept constant, the reduction in tumour dimensions following chemotherapy correlated via a linear relationship with the duration and degree of tumour hypothermia for the three tumours S 437, ISIS 208, ISIS 130. However, for the same reduction in tumour volume following chemotherapy, the duration and degree of transient tumour hypothermia varied according to the type of tumour and cytostatic agent studied. There was not correlation between the decrease in size of S 447 and external tumour hypothermia. Even when the reduction in tumour size was statistically significant, the hypothermic tumour phase after drug administration was not sufficient to be significant, except for vinblastine. However, the temperature of this slowly growing tumour before chemotherapy was particularly low. The measurement of the degree and duration of external tumour hypothermia of tumours following chemotherapy would represent a new physiological technique for measuring the efficacy and duration of action of cytostatic agents.

  10. Paclitaxel-Loaded Polymersomes for Enhanced Intraperitoneal Chemotherapy.

    PubMed

    Simón-Gracia, Lorena; Hunt, Hedi; Scodeller, Pablo D; Gaitzsch, Jens; Braun, Gary B; Willmore, Anne-Mari A; Ruoslahti, Erkki; Battaglia, Giuseppe; Teesalu, Tambet

    2016-04-01

    Peritoneal carcinomatosis is present in more than 60% of gastric cancer, 40% of ovarian cancer, and 35% of colon cancer patients. It is the second most common cause of cancer-related mortality, with a median survival of 1 to 3 months. Cytoreductive surgery combined with intraperitoneal chemotherapy is the current clinical treatment, but achieving curative drug accumulation and penetration in peritoneal carcinomatosis lesions remains an unresolved challenge. Here, we used flexible and pH-sensitive polymersomes for payload delivery to peritoneal gastric (MKN-45P) and colon (CT26) carcinoma in mice. Polymersomes were loaded with paclitaxel and in vitro drug release was studied as a function of pH and time. Paclitaxel-loaded polymersomes remained stable in aqueous solution at neutral pH for up to 4 months. In cell viability assay on cultured cancer cell lines (MKN-45P, SKOV3, CT26), paclitaxel-loaded polymersomes were more toxic than free drug or albumin-bound paclitaxel (Abraxane). Intraperitoneally administered fluorescent polymersomes accumulated in malignant lesions, and immunofluorescence revealed an intense signal inside tumors with no detectable signal in control organs. A dual targeting of tumors was observed: direct (circulation-independent) penetration, and systemic, blood vessel-associated accumulation. Finally, we evaluated preclinical antitumor efficacy of paclitaxel-polymersomes in the treatment of MKN-45P disseminated gastric carcinoma using a total dose of 7 mg/kg. Experimental therapy with paclitaxel-polymersomes improved the therapeutic index of drug over free paclitaxel and Abraxane, as evaluated by intraperitoneal tumor burden and number of metastatic nodules. Our findings underline the potential utility of the polymersome platform for delivery of drugs and imaging agents to peritoneal carcinomatosis lesions. Mol Cancer Ther; 15(4); 670-9. ©2016 AACR.

  11. Paclitaxel-loaded Polymersomes for Enhanced Intraperitoneal Chemotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Simón-Gracia, Lorena; Hunt, Hedi; Scodeller, Pablo D; Gaitzsch, Jens; Braun, Gary B; Willmore, Anne-Mari A; Ruoslahti, Erkki; Battaglia, Giuseppe; Teesalu, Tambet

    2016-01-01

    Peritoneal carcinomatosis is present in more than 60% of gastric cancer, 40% of ovarian cancer, and 35% of colon cancer patients. It is the second most common cause of cancer mortality, with a median survival of 1–3 months. Cytoreductive surgery combined with intraperitoneal chemotherapy is the current clinical treatment, but achieving curative drug accumulation and penetration in peritoneal carcinomatosis lesions remains an unresolved challenge. Here we employed flexible and pH-sensitive polymersomes for payload delivery to peritoneal gastric (MKN-45P) and colon (CT26) carcinoma in mice. Polymersomes were loaded with Paclitaxel® and in vitro drug release was studied as a function of pH and time. Paclitaxel-loaded polymersomes remained stable in aqueous solution at neutral pH for up to four months. In cell viability assay on cultured cancer cell lines (MKN-45P, SKOV3, CT26), Paclitaxel-loaded polymersomes were more toxic than free drug or albumin-bound Paclitaxel (Abraxane®). Intraperitoneally administered fluorescent polymersomes accumulated in malignant lesions, and immunofluorescence revealed intense signal inside tumors with no detectable signal in control organs. A dual targeting of tumors was observed: direct (circulation independent) penetration, and systemic, blood vessel-associated accumulation. Finally, we evaluated preclinical antitumor efficacy of polymersomes-paclitaxel in treatment of MKN-45P disseminated gastric carcinoma using a total dose of 7 mg/kg. Experimental therapy with polymersome-Paclitaxel improved the therapeutic index of drug over Paclitaxel-Cremophor and Abraxane®, as evaluated by intraperitoneal tumor burden and number of metastatic nodules. Our findings underline the potential utility of the polymersome platform for delivery of drugs and imaging agents to peritoneal carcinomatosis lesions. PMID:26880267

  12. [Prospect of chemotherapy in the 21st century].

    PubMed

    Omura, S

    2000-10-01

    "Golden Era in Chemotherapy" has begun with the discovery of penicillin in the early 1940's and lasted for two decades during which many antibiotics were discovered. However, the once-believed bright prospect that every infectious disease could be eliminated on the earth by the discovery of antibiotics had to be canceled owing to the emerging of drug-resistant microbes. It was indeed a rat race. We are now at the point when we have to seek another way to combat infectious diseases: One possible way might be not to eradicate the microbes but to coexist with them so long as they do no harm to the human hosts. The first step of infection with pathogens to the host is the adherence of the microbes to the surface of host cells. Therefore, the method how to inhibit this adhesion of microbes to the host cells may provide a new tool to prevent the development of infectious diseases without elimination of microbes from the host. This is just an example of strategy by which humans and pathogens coexist at peace and should be taken into consideration for the development of new-type antibiotics or "anti-infective drugs" in the 21st century. The analysis of genome sequences has been accelerated recently for various pathogenic bacteria one by one. New targets in the pathogenic microbes for the development of new antibiotics can, therefore, be determined from the genetic point of view. The discovery of antibiotics has indeed been the history of collection of innumerable species and/or strains of bacteria from the soils to search for the biologically active anti-pathogenic agents. The current progress in the technology of molecular genetics, however, will certainly make it possible to search for active molecules by DNA technology; bacterial DNA but not whole microorganisms from the soil is to be transformed into the conventional bacteria and searched for active molecules with combat against pathogens. PMID:11109775

  13. 13 CFR 107.1620 - Functions of agents, including Central Registration Agent, Selling Agent and Fiscal Agent.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 13 Business Credit and Assistance 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Functions of agents, including... Assistance SMALL BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION SMALL BUSINESS INVESTMENT COMPANIES SBA Financial Assistance for... Functions of agents, including Central Registration Agent, Selling Agent and Fiscal Agent. (a) Agents....

  14. Targeting drug transport mechanisms for improving platinum-based cancer chemotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Helen HW; Chen, Wen-Chung; Liang, Zhang-Dong; Tsai, Wen-Bin; Long, Yan; Aiba, Isamu; Fu, Siqing; Broaddus, Russell; Liu, Jinsong; Feun, Lynn G; Savaraj, Niramol; Kuo, Macus Tien

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Platinum (Pt)-based antitumor agents remain important chemotherapeutic agents for treating many human malignancies. Elevated expression of the human high-affinity copper transporter 1 (hCtr1), resulting in enhanced Pt drug transport into cells, has been shown to be associated with improved treatment efficacy. Thus, targeting hCtr1 upregulation is an attractive strategy for improving the treatment efficacy of Pt-based cancer chemotherapy. Area covered Regulation of hCtr1 expression by cellular copper homeostasis is discussed. Association of elevated hCtr1 expression with intrinsic sensitivity of ovarian cancer to Pt drugs is presented. Mechanism of copper-lowering agents in enhancing hCtr1-mediated cis-diamminedichloroplatinum (II) (cisplatin, cDDP) transport is reviewed. Applications of copper chelation strategy in overcoming cDDP resistance through enhanced hCtr1 expression are evaluated. Expert opinion While both transcriptional and posttranslational mechanisms of hCtr1 regulation by cellular copper bioavailability have been proposed, detailed molecular insights into hCtr1 regulation by copper homeostasis remain needed. Recent clinical study using a copper-lowering agent in enhancing hCtr1-mediated drug transport has achieved incremental improvement in overcoming Pt drug resistance. Further improvements in identifying predictive measures in the subpopulation of patients that can benefit from the treatment are needed. PMID:26004625

  15. Bevacizumab with preoperative chemotherapy versus preoperative chemotherapy alone for colorectal cancer liver metastases: a retrospective cohort study.

    PubMed

    Lu, Zhen-Hai; Peng, Jian-Hong; Wang, Fu-Long; Yuan, Yun-Fei; Jiang, Wu; Li, Yu-Hong; Wu, Xiao-Jun; Chen, Gong; Ding, Pei-Rong; Li, Li-Ren; Kong, Ling-Heng; Lin, Jun-Zhong; Zhang, Rong-Xin; Wan, De-Sen; Pan, Zhi-Zhong

    2016-08-01

    This study aimed to assess the efficacy and safety of bevacizumab plus preoperative chemotherapy as first-line treatment for liver-only metastatic colorectal cancer in Chinese patients compared with those of preoperative chemotherapy alone.Patients with histologically confirmed liver-only metastatic colorectal cancer were sequentially reviewed, and received either preoperative chemotherapy plus bevacizumab (bevacizumab group, n = 32) or preoperative chemotherapy alone (chemotherapy group, n = 57). Progression-free survival, response rate, liver resection rate, conversion rate, and safety were analyzed.With median follow-up of 28.7 months, progression-free survival was 10.9 months (95% confidence interval: 8.7-13.1 months) in bevacizumab group and 9.9 months (95% confidence interval: 6.8-13.1 months) in chemotherapy group (P = 0.472). Response rates were 59.4% in bevacizumab group and 38.6% in chemotherapy group (P = 0.059). Overall liver resection (R0, R1, and R2) rate was 68.8% in bevacizumab group and 54.4% in chemotherapy group (P = 0.185). Conversion rate was 51.9% in bevacizumab group and 40.4% in chemotherapy group (P = 0.341). No postoperative complication was observed in all patients.Bevacizumab plus preoperative chemotherapy as first-line treatment for liver-only metastatic colorectal cancer tends to achieve better clinical benefit with controllable safety in Chinese patients. PMID:27583930

  16. Multifunctional superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles for combined chemotherapy and hyperthermia cancer treatment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Quinto, Christopher A.; Mohindra, Priya; Tong, Sheng; Bao, Gang

    2015-07-01

    Superparamagnetic iron oxide (SPIO) nanoparticles have the potential for use as a multimodal cancer therapy agent due to their ability to carry anticancer drugs and generate localized heat when exposed to an alternating magnetic field, resulting in combined chemotherapy and hyperthermia. To explore this potential, we synthesized SPIOs with a phospholipid-polyethylene glycol (PEG) coating, and loaded Doxorubicin (DOX) with a 30.8% w/w loading capacity when the PEG length is optimized. We found that DOX-loaded SPIOs exhibited a sustained DOX release over 72 hours where the release kinetics could be altered by the PEG length. In contrast, the heating efficiency of the SPIOs showed minimal change with the PEG length. With a core size of 14 nm, the SPIOs could generate sufficient heat to raise the local temperature to 43 °C, sufficient to trigger apoptosis in cancer cells. Further, we found that DOX-loaded SPIOs resulted in cell death comparable to free DOX, and that the combined effect of DOX and SPIO-induced hyperthermia enhanced cancer cell death in vitro. This study demonstrates the potential of using phospholipid-PEG coated SPIOs for chemotherapy-hyperthermia combinatorial cancer treatment with increased efficacy.Superparamagnetic iron oxide (SPIO) nanoparticles have the potential for use as a multimodal cancer therapy agent due to their ability to carry anticancer drugs and generate localized heat when exposed to an alternating magnetic field, resulting in combined chemotherapy and hyperthermia. To explore this potential, we synthesized SPIOs with a phospholipid-polyethylene glycol (PEG) coating, and loaded Doxorubicin (DOX) with a 30.8% w/w loading capacity when the PEG length is optimized. We found that DOX-loaded SPIOs exhibited a sustained DOX release over 72 hours where the release kinetics could be altered by the PEG length. In contrast, the heating efficiency of the SPIOs showed minimal change with the PEG length. With a core size of 14 nm, the SPIOs could

  17. Sensitizing basal-like breast cancer to chemotherapy using nanoparticles conjugated with interference peptide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sorolla, A.; Ho, D.; Wang, E.; Evans, C. W.; Ormonde, C. F. G.; Rashwan, R.; Singh, R.; Iyer, K. Swaminathan; Blancafort, P.

    2016-04-01

    Basal-like breast cancers are highly aggressive malignancies associated with very poor prognosis. Although these cancers may initially respond to first-line treatment, they become highly resistant to standard chemotherapy in the metastatic setting. Chemotherapy resistance in basal-like breast cancers is associated with highly selective overexpression of the homeobox transcription factor Engrailed 1 (EN1). Herein, we propose a novel therapeutic strategy using poly(glycidyl methacrylate) nanoparticles decorated with poly(acrylic acid) that enable dual delivery of docetaxel and interference peptides designed to block or inhibit EN1 (EN1-iPep). We demonstrate that EN1-iPep is highly selective in inducing apoptotic cell death in basal-like cancer cells with negligible effects in a non-neoplastic human mammary epithelial cell line. Furthermore, we show that treatment with EN1-iPep results in a highly synergistic pharmacological interaction with docetaxel in inhibiting cancer cell growth. The incorporation of these two agents in a single nanoformulation results in greater anticancer efficacy than current nanoparticle-based treatments used in the clinical setting.Basal-like breast cancers are highly aggressive malignancies associated with very poor prognosis. Although these cancers may initially respond to first-line treatment, they become highly resistant to standard chemotherapy in the metastatic setting. Chemotherapy resistance in basal-like breast cancers is associated with highly selective overexpression of the homeobox transcription factor Engrailed 1 (EN1). Herein, we propose a novel therapeutic strategy using poly(glycidyl methacrylate) nanoparticles decorated with poly(acrylic acid) that enable dual delivery of docetaxel and interference peptides designed to block or inhibit EN1 (EN1-iPep). We demonstrate that EN1-iPep is highly selective in inducing apoptotic cell death in basal-like cancer cells with negligible effects in a non-neoplastic human mammary

  18. Stimuli-free programmable drug release for combination chemo-therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fan, Li; Jin, Boquan; Zhang, Silu; Song, Chaojun; Li, Quan

    2016-06-01

    Combinational chemotherapy capable of targeted delivery and programmable multi-drug release leads to enhanced drug efficacy, and is highly desired for cancer treatment. However, effective approaches for achieving both features in a single treatment are limited. In the present work, we demonstrated programmed delivery of both chemotherapeutic and immunotherapeutic agents with tumor cell targeting capability by using SiO2 based self-decomposable nanoparticulate systems. The programmable drug delivery is realized by manipulating drug loading configurations instead of relying on external stimuli. Both in vitro and in vivo results showed specific drug binding to FAT1-expressing colon cancer cells. The loaded dual drugs were demonstrated to be delivered in a sequential manner with specific time intervals between their peak releases, which maximize the synergistic effect of the chemotherapeutics. These features led to significantly enhanced drug efficacy and reduced system toxicity. The tumor weight decreased by 1/350, together with a moderate increase in rats' body weight, which were observed when adopting the dual drug loaded nanoparticles, as compared to those of the control groups. The present system provides a simple and feasible method for the design of targeting and combination chemotherapy with programmed drug release.Combinational chemotherapy capable of targeted delivery and programmable multi-drug release leads to enhanced drug efficacy, and is highly desired for cancer treatment. However, effective approaches for achieving both features in a single treatment are limited. In the present work, we demonstrated programmed delivery of both chemotherapeutic and immunotherapeutic agents with tumor cell targeting capability by using SiO2 based self-decomposable nanoparticulate systems. The programmable drug delivery is realized by manipulating drug loading configurations instead of relying on external stimuli. Both in vitro and in vivo results showed specific drug

  19. Chemotherapy Drugs Thiocolchicoside and Taxol Permeabilize Lipid Bilayer Membranes by Forming Ion Pores

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ashrafuzzaman, Md; Duszyk, M.; Tuszynski, J. A.

    2011-12-01

    We report ion channel formation by chemotherapy drugs: thiocolchicoside (TCC) and taxol (TXL) which primarily target tubulin but not only. For example, TCC has been shown to interact with GABAA, nuclear envelope and strychnine-sensitive glycine receptors. TXL interferes with the normal breakdown of microtubules inducing mitotic block and apoptosis. It also interacts with mitochondria and found significant chemotherapeutic applications for breast, ovarian and lung cancer. In order to better understand the mechanisms of TCC and TXL actions, we examined their effects on phospholipid bilayer membranes. Our electrophysiological recordings across membranes constructed in NaCl aqueous phases consisting of TCC or TXL under the influence of an applied transmembrane potential (V) indicate that both molecules induce stable ion flowing pores/channels in membranes. Their discrete current versus time plots exhibit triangular shapes which is consistent with a spontaneous time-dependent change of the pore conductance in contrast to rectangular conductance events usually induced by ion channels. These events exhibit conductance (~0.01-0.1 pA/mV) and lifetimes (~5-30 ms) within the ranges observed in e.g., gramicidin A and alamethicin channels. The channel formation probability increases linearly with TCC/TXL concentration and V and is not affected by pH (5.7 - 8.4). A theoretical explanation on the causes of chemotherapy drug induced ion pore formation and the pore stability has also been found using our recently discovered binding energy between lipid bilayer and the bilayer embedded ion channels using gramicidin A channels as tools. This picture of energetics suggests that as the channel forming agents approach to the lipids on bilayer the localized charge properties in the constituents of both channel forming agents (e.g., chemotherapy drugs in this study) and the lipids determine the electrostatic drug-lipid coupling energy through screened Coulomb interactions between the drug

  20. Immediate versus postponed combination chemotherapy (CAMP) for unresectable non-small cell lung cancer: a randomized trial.

    PubMed

    Lad, T E; Nelson, R B; Diekamp, U; Kukla, L J; Sarma, P R; Larson, C S; Currie, E T; Chawla, M S; Tichler, T; Zawila, P; McGuire, W P

    1981-01-01

    A randomized control trial was performed in good performance status patients with unresectable non-small cell lung cancer to test a strategy of early aggressive combination chemotherapy (CAMP [cyclophosphamide, doxorubicin, methotrexate, and procarbazine]) versus a strategy of delaying such treatment until clinical deterioration. Thirty-seven patients received immediate CAMP and 35 patients received initial low-dose single-agent CCNU (CAMP was postponed). Immediate CAMP therapy produced an objective response rate of 44% in patients with measurable lesions, and CCNU produced none. Median survival was 193 days for the immediate-CAMP group and 175 days for the postponed-CAMP group (P = 0.26). Measures of quality of life were made and no difference emerged between the two treatment strategies. This trial failed to show substantial benefit from immediate combination chemotherapy in minimally symptomatic patients with non-small cell lung cancer.