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Sample records for chernobyl accident recovery

  1. Chernobyl Accident Fatalities and Causes

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1990-06-01

    TI FLE CY N Defense Nuclear Agency Alexandria, VA 22310-3398 SWES% Ot DNA-TR-89-45 Chernobyl Accident Fatalities and Causes A. Laupa G. H. Anno...0104 Chernobyl Accident Fatalities and Causes PE - 62715H PR - RM 6 AUTHOR(S) TA -RH A. Laupa: G. H. Anno WU - DH026130 7 PERFORMING ORGANIZATION NAME(S...vi 1 INTRODUCTION .......................................... 1I DATA SOURCES ON CHERNOBYL VICTIMS ............... 3 CHERNOBYL

  2. Radiation-epidemiological Study of Cerebrovascular Diseases in the Cohort of Russian Recovery Operation Workers of the Chernobyl Accident.

    PubMed

    Kashcheev, V V; Chekin, S Yu; Maksioutov, M A; Tumanov, K A; Menyaylo, A N; Kochergina, E V; Kashcheeva, P V; Gorsky, A I; Shchukina, N V; Karpenko, S V; Ivanov, V K

    2016-08-01

    The paper presents an analysis of the incidence of cerebrovascular diseases (CeVD) in the cohort of Russian workers involved in recovery tasks after the Chernobyl accident. The studied cohort consists of 53,772 recovery operation workers (liquidators) who arrived in the zone of the Chernobyl accident within the first year after this accident (26 April 1986-26 April 1987). The mean external whole body dose in the cohort was 0.161 Gy, while individual doses varied from 0.0001 Gy to 1.42 Gy. During the follow-up period 1986-2012, a total of 23,264 cases of CeVD were diagnosed as a result of annual health examinations. A Poisson regression model was applied for estimation of radiation risks and for an assessment of other risk factors of CeVD. The following factors were considered as risk factors for CeVD: the dose, duration of the liquidators' work in the Chernobyl zone, and the concomitant diseases (hypertension, ischemic heart disease, atherosclerosis, and diabetes). The baseline incidence of CeVD is statistically significantly (p < 0.001) associated with all studied concomitant diseases. The incidence of CeVD has revealed a statistically significant dose response with the lack of a latent period and with the average ERR/Gy = 0.45, 95% CI: (0.28, 0.62), p < 0.001. Radiation risks of CeVD statistically significantly (p = 0.03) varied with the duration of liquidators' stay in the Chernobyl zone; for those who stayed in the Chernobyl zone less than 6 wk, ERR/Gy = 0.64, 95% CI = (0.38; 0.93), p < 0.001. Among studied concomitant diseases, diabetes mellitus statistically significantly (p = 0.002) increases the radiation risk of CeVD: for liquidators with diagnosed diabetes, ERR/Gy = 1.29.

  3. Clastogenic factors in the plasma of Chernobyl accident recovery workers: Anticlastogenic effect of Ginkgo biloba extract

    SciTech Connect

    Emerit, I.; Levy, A.; Cernjavski, L.

    1995-11-01

    Clastogenic factors are found in the plasma of persons irradiated accidentally or therapeutically. They persisted in the plasma of A-bomb survivors over 30 years. Clastogenic factors were found in 33 or 47 Chernobyl accident recovery workers (often referred to as liquidators) in a previous study. In the present study, we show that there is a positive correlation between clastogenic activity and dose and that these biomarkers of oxidative stress can be influenced successfully by appropriate antioxidant treatment. With the authorization of the Armenian Ministry of Health, 30 workers were treated with antioxidants from Ginkgo biloba leaves. The extract EGb 761 containing flavonoids and terpenoids was given at a daily dose of 3 x 40 mg (Tanakan, IPSEN, France) during 2 months. The clastogenic activity of the plasma was reduced to control levels on the first day after the end of the treatment. A 1-year follow-up showed that the benefit of the treatment persisted for at least 7 months. One-third of the workers again had clastogenic factors after 1 year, demonstrating that the process which produced clastogenic factors continued. However, the observation that antioxidants do not have to be given continuously is encouraging for intervention trials on a large-scale basis. These appear justified, since clastogenic factors are thought to be risk factors for the development of late effects of irradiation. 43 refs., 6 tabs.

  4. Telomere length in Chernobyl accident recovery workers in the late period after the disaster

    PubMed Central

    Reste, Jelena; Zvigule, Gunda; Zvagule, Tija; Kurjane, Natalja; Eglite, Maija; Gabruseva, Natalija; Berzina, Dace; Plonis, Juris; Miklasevics, Edvins

    2014-01-01

    The outcome of the Chernobyl nuclear power plant (CNPP) accident was that a huge number of people were exposed to ionizing radiation. Previous studies of CNPP clean-up workers from Latvia revealed a high occurrence of age-associated degenerative diseases and cancer in young adults, as well as a high mortality as a result of cardiovascular disorders at age 45–54 years. DNA tandem repeats that cap chromosome ends, known as telomeres, are sensitive to oxidative damage and exposure to ionizing radiation. Telomeres are important in aging processes and carcinogenesis. The aim of this study was to investigate the long-term effect of protracted ionizing radiation exposure on telomere length in CNPP clean-up workers. Relative telomere length (RTL) was measured in peripheral blood leukocytes of 595 CNPP clean-up workers and 236 gender- and age-matched controls using real-time quantitative polymerase chain reaction (q-PCR). Close attention was paid to participation year and tasks performed during the worker's stay in Chernobyl, health status, and RTL differences between subgroups. Telomere shortening was not found in CNPP clean-up workers; on the contrary, their RTL was slightly greater than in controls (P = 0.001). Longer telomeres were found in people who worked during 1986, in those undertaking ‘dirty’ tasks (digging and deactivation), and in people with cancer. Shorter telomeres appeared frequently in those with cataract, osteoporosis, atherosclerosis, or coronary heart disease. We conclude that the longer telomeres revealed in people more heavily exposed to ionizing radiation probably indicate activation of telomerase as a chromosome healing mechanism following damage, and reflect defects in telomerase regulation that could potentiate carcinogenesis. PMID:25015931

  5. Telomere length in Chernobyl accident recovery workers in the late period after the disaster.

    PubMed

    Reste, Jelena; Zvigule, Gunda; Zvagule, Tija; Kurjane, Natalja; Eglite, Maija; Gabruseva, Natalija; Berzina, Dace; Plonis, Juris; Miklasevics, Edvins

    2014-11-01

    The outcome of the Chernobyl nuclear power plant (CNPP) accident was that a huge number of people were exposed to ionizing radiation. Previous studies of CNPP clean-up workers from Latvia revealed a high occurrence of age-associated degenerative diseases and cancer in young adults, as well as a high mortality as a result of cardiovascular disorders at age 45-54 years. DNA tandem repeats that cap chromosome ends, known as telomeres, are sensitive to oxidative damage and exposure to ionizing radiation. Telomeres are important in aging processes and carcinogenesis. The aim of this study was to investigate the long-term effect of protracted ionizing radiation exposure on telomere length in CNPP clean-up workers. Relative telomere length (RTL) was measured in peripheral blood leukocytes of 595 CNPP clean-up workers and 236 gender- and age-matched controls using real-time quantitative polymerase chain reaction (q-PCR). Close attention was paid to participation year and tasks performed during the worker's stay in Chernobyl, health status, and RTL differences between subgroups. Telomere shortening was not found in CNPP clean-up workers; on the contrary, their RTL was slightly greater than in controls (P = 0.001). Longer telomeres were found in people who worked during 1986, in those undertaking 'dirty' tasks (digging and deactivation), and in people with cancer. Shorter telomeres appeared frequently in those with cataract, osteoporosis, atherosclerosis, or coronary heart disease. We conclude that the longer telomeres revealed in people more heavily exposed to ionizing radiation probably indicate activation of telomerase as a chromosome healing mechanism following damage, and reflect defects in telomerase regulation that could potentiate carcinogenesis. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of The Japan Radiation Research Society and Japanese Society for Radiation Oncology.

  6. US Department of Energy Chernobyl accident bibliography

    SciTech Connect

    Kennedy, R A; Mahaffey, J A; Carr, F Jr

    1992-04-01

    This bibliography has been prepared by Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) for the US Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Health and Environmental Research to provide bibliographic information in a usable format for research studies relating to the Chernobyl nuclear accident that occurred in the Ukrainian Republic, USSR in 1986. This report is a product of the Chernobyl Database Management project. The purpose of this project is to produce and maintain an information system that is the official United States repository for information related to the accident. Two related products prepared for this project are the Chernobyl Bibliographic Search System (ChernoLit{trademark}) and the Chernobyl Radiological Measurements Information System (ChernoDat). This report supersedes the original release of Chernobyl Bibliography (Carr and Mahaffey, 1989). The original report included about 2200 references. Over 4500 references and an index of authors and editors are included in this report.

  7. Chernobyl accident: A comprehensive risk assessment

    SciTech Connect

    Vargo, G.J.; Poyarkov, V.; Baryakhtar, V.; Kukhar, V.; Los, I.

    1999-01-01

    The authors, all of whom are Ukrainian and Russian scientists involved with Chernobyl nuclear power plant since the April 1986 accident, present a comprehensive review of the accident. In addition, they present a risk assessment of the remains of the destroyed reactor and its surrounding shelter, Chernobyl radioactive waste storage and disposal sites, and environmental contamination in the region. The authors explore such questions as the risks posed by a collapse of the shelter, radionuclide migration from storage and disposal facilities in the exclusion zone, and transfer from soil to vegetation and its potential regional impact. The answers to these questions provide a scientific basis for the development of countermeasures against the Chernobyl accident in particular and the mitigation of environmental radioactive contamination in general. They also provide an important basis for understanding the human health and ecological risks posed by the accident.

  8. Chernobyl accident: A comprehensive risk assessment

    SciTech Connect

    Vargo, G.J.; Poyarkov, V.; Baryakhtar, V.; Kukhar, V.; Los, I.

    1999-11-01

    The authors, all of whom are Ukrainian and Russian scientists involved with Chernobyl nuclear power plant since the April 1986 accident, present a comprehensive review of the accident. In addition, they present a risk assessment of the remains of the destroyed reactor and its surrounding shelter, Chernobyl radioactive waste storage and disposal sites, and environmental contamination in the region. The authors explore such questions as the risks posed by a collapse of the shelter, radionuclide migration from storage and disposal facilities in the exclusion zone, and transfer from soil to vegetation and its potential regional impact. The answers to these questions provide a scientific basis for the development of countermeasures against the Chernobyl accident in particular and the mitigation of environmental radioactive contamination in general. They also provide an important basis for understanding the human health and ecological risks posed by the accident.

  9. [Chernobyl nuclear power plant accident and Tokaimura criticality accident].

    PubMed

    Takada, Jun

    2012-03-01

    It is clear from inspection of historical incidents that the scale of disasters in a nuclear power plant accident is quite low level overwhelmingly compared with a nuclear explosion in nuclear war. Two cities of Hiroshima and Nagasaki were destroyed by nuclear blast with about 20 kt TNT equivalent and then approximately 100,000 people have died respectively. On the other hand, the number of acute death is 30 in the Chernobyl nuclear reactor accident. In this chapter, we review health hazards and doses in two historical nuclear incidents of Chernobyl and Tokaimura criticality accident and then understand the feature of the radiation accident in peaceful utilization of nuclear power.

  10. Dose estimates from the Chernobyl accident

    SciTech Connect

    Lange, R.; Dickerson, M.H.; Gudiksen, P.H.

    1987-11-01

    The Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory Atmospheric Release Advisory Capability (ARAC) responded to the Chernobyl nuclear reactor accident in the Soviet Union by utilizing long-range atmospheric dispersion modeling to estimate the amount of radioactivity released (source term) and the radiation dose distribution due to exposure to the radioactive cloud over Europe and the Northern Hemisphere. In later assessments, after the release of data on the accident by the Soviet Union, the ARAC team used their mesoscale to regional scale model to focus in on the radiation dose distribution within the Soviet Union and the vicinity of the Chernobyl plant. 22 refs., 5 figs., 5 tabs.

  11. Dose estimates from the Chernobyl accident

    SciTech Connect

    Lange, R.; Dickerson, M.H.; Gudiksen, P.H. )

    1988-09-01

    The Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory Atmospheric Release Advisory Capability (ARAC) responded to the Chernobyl nuclear reactor accident in the Soviet Union by utilizing long-range atmospheric dispersion modeling to estimate the amount of radioactivity released (source term) and the radiation dose distribution due to exposure to the radioactive cloud over Europe and the northern hemisphere. In later assessments, after the release of data on the accident by the Soviet Union, the ARAC team used their mesoscale-to-regional-scale model to focus on the radiation dose distribution within the Soviet Union and the vicinity of the Chernobyl plant.

  12. Biomedical Lessons from the Chernobyl Nuclear Power Plant Accident

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1990-10-01

    Lessons From the Lt Col Doris Browne, MC Chernobyl Nuclear Power Plant Accident The Chernobyl nuclear accident afforded the treating physicians a...radiation accident posited on the skin and mucous mem- A Lt Col Dori Browne, MC, is Chief, Medicaloccurred at the Chernobyl nuclear branes from the molten...Conclusion ulcers of oral mucosa, which required irradiation. He also had persistent The consequences ot the Chernobyl sterile saline irrigation and

  13. Structural aspects of the Chernobyl accident

    SciTech Connect

    Murray, R.C.; Cummings, G.E.

    1988-09-02

    On April 26, 1986 the world's worst nuclear power plant accident occurred at the Unit 4 of the Chernobyl Nuclear Power Station in the USSR. This paper presents a discussion of the design of the Chernobyl Power Plant, the sequence of events that led to the accident and the damage caused by the resulting explosion. The structural design features that contributed to the accident and resulting damage will be highlighted. Photographs and sketches obtained from various worldwide news agencies will be shown to try and gain a perspective of the extent of the damage. The aftermath, clean-up, and current situation will be discussed and the important lessons learned for the structural engineer will be presented. 15 refs., 10 figs.

  14. Simulating Wet Deposition of Radiocesium from the Chernobyl Accident

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2001-03-01

    In response to the Chernobyl nuclear power plant accident of 1986, a cesium-137 deposition dataset was assembled. Most of the airborne Chernobyl ... Chernobyl cesium-137. A cloud base parameterization modification is tested and appears to slightly improve the accuracy of one HYSPLIT simulation of...daily Chernobyl cesium-137 deposition over the course of the accident at isolated European sites, and degrades the accuracy of another HYSPLIT simulation

  15. The Chernobyl accident and its consequences.

    PubMed

    Saenko, V; Ivanov, V; Tsyb, A; Bogdanova, T; Tronko, M; Demidchik, Yu; Yamashita, S

    2011-05-01

    The accident at the Chernobyl nuclear power plant was the worst industrial accident of the last century that involved radiation. The unprecedented release of multiple different radioisotopes led to radioactive contamination of large areas surrounding the accident site. The exposure of the residents of these areas was varied and therefore the consequences for health and radioecology could not be reliably estimated quickly. Even though some studies have now been ongoing for 25 years and have provided a better understanding of the situation, these are yet neither complete nor comprehensive enough to determine the long-term risk. A true assessment can only be provided after following the observed population for their natural lifespan. Here we review the technical aspects of the accident and provide relevant information on radioactive releases that resulted in exposure of this large population to radiation. A number of different groups of people were exposed to radiation: workers involved in the initial clean-up response, and members of the general population who were either evacuated from the settlements in the Chernobyl nuclear power plant vicinity shortly after the accident, or continued to live in the affected territories of Belarus, Russia and Ukraine. Through domestic efforts and extensive international co-operation, essential information on radiation dose and health status for this population has been collected. This has permitted the identification of high-risk groups and the use of more specialised means of collecting information, diagnosis, treatment and follow-up. Because radiation-associated thyroid cancer is one of the major health consequences of the Chernobyl accident, a particular emphasis is placed on this malignancy. The initial epidemiological studies are reviewed, as are the most significant studies and/or aid programmes in the three affected countries. Copyright © 2011 The Royal College of Radiologists. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights

  16. [Health consequences of the Chernobyl accident].

    PubMed

    Sewerin, I

    2001-10-22

    The Chernobyl accident in 1986 has been and still is the subject of great interest. Journalistic reports often contain exaggerations and undocumented statements and much uncertainty about the true consequences of the accident prevails in the population. This article reviews the current literature with the focus on reports from official commissions and documentation in the form of controlled studies. The fatal deterministic consequences comprise about 30 victims. The most important outcome is a marked increase in the incidence of thyroid cancer in children and adolescents in the most heavily contaminated area. Furthermore, pronounced psychosocial problems are dominant in the population of the contaminated area. Other significant and documented health consequences are not seen.

  17. ARAC response to the Chernobyl reactor accident

    SciTech Connect

    Dickerson, M.H.; Sullivan, T.J.

    1986-07-01

    This report summarizes the assessments provided by ARAC during the first two weeks after the Chernobyl reactor accident began. Results of this work and measurements made by European countries during that same period show that no major short-term acute health effects would be expected in Europe as a result of this accident. Statistical long-term health effects were not addressed in these studies. Both measured and calculated I-131 concentrations in milk in the US were over an order of magnitude below the USDA guideline of 15,000 pCi/l.

  18. Preliminary dose assessment of the Chernobyl accident

    SciTech Connect

    Hull, A.P.

    1987-01-01

    From the major accident at Unit 4 of the Chernobyl nuclear power station, a plume of airborne radioactive fission products was initially carried northwesterly toward Poland, thence toward Scandinavia and into Central Europe. Reports of the levels of radioactivity in a variety of media and of external radiation levels were collected in the Department of Energy's Emergency Operations Center and compiled into a data bank. Portions of these and other data which were obtained directly from published and official reports were utilized to make a preliminary assessment of the extent and magnitude of the external dose to individuals downwind from Chernobyl. Radioactive /sup 131/I was the predominant fission product. The time of arrival of the plume and the maximum concentrations of /sup 131/I in air, vegetation and milk and the maximum reported depositions and external radiation levels have been tabulated country by country. A large amount of the total activity in the release was apparently carried to a significant elevation. The data suggest that in areas where rainfall occurred, deposition levels were from ten to one-hundred times those observed in nearby ''dry'' locations. Sufficient spectral data were obtained to establish average release fractions and to establish a reference spectra of the other nuclides in the release. Preliminary calculations indicated that the collective dose equivalent to the population in Scandinavia and Central Europe during the first year after the Chernobyl accident would be about 8 x 10/sup 6/ person-rem. From the Soviet report, it appears that a first year population dose of about 2 x 10/sup 7/ person-rem (2 x 10/sup 5/ Sv) will be received by the population who were downwind of Chernobyl within the U.S.S.R. during the accident and its subsequent releases over the following week. 32 refs., 14 figs., 20 tabs.

  19. Thyroid consequences of the Chernobyl nuclear accident.

    PubMed

    Pacini, F; Vorontsova, T; Molinaro, E; Shavrova, E; Agate, L; Kuchinskaya, E; Elisei, R; Demidchik, E P; Pinchera, A

    1999-12-01

    It is well recognized that the use of external irradiation of the head and neck to treat patients with various non-thyroid disorders increases their risk of developing papillary thyroid carcinoma years after radiation exposure. An increased risk of thyroid cancer has also been reported in survivors of the atomic bombs in Japan, as well as in Marshall Island residents exposed to radiation during the testing of hydrogen bombs. More recently, exposure to radioactive fallout as a result of the Chernobyl nuclear reactor accident has clearly caused an enormous increase in the incidence of childhood thyroid carcinoma in Belarus, Ukraine, and, to a lesser extent, in the Russian Federation, starting in 1990. When clinical and epidemiological features of thyroid carcinomas diagnosed in Belarus after the Chernobyl accident are compared with those of naturally occurring thyroid carcinomas in patients of the same age group in Italy and France, it becomes apparent that the post-Chernobyl thyroid carcinomas were much less influenced by gender, virtually always papillary (solid and follicular variants), more aggressive at presentation and more frequently associated with thyroid autoimmunity. Gene mutations involving the RET proto-oncogene, and less frequently TRK, have been shown to be causative events specific for papillary cancer. RET activation was found in nearly 70% of the patients who developed papillary thyroid carcinomas following the Chernobyl accident. In addition to thyroid cancer, radiation-induced thyroid diseases include benign thyroid nodules, hypothyroidism and autoimmune thyroiditis, with or without thyroid insufficiency, as observed in populations after environmental exposure to radioisotopes of iodine and in the survivors of atomic bomb explosions. On this basis, the authors evaluated thyroid autoimmune phenomena in normal children exposed to radiation after the Chernobyl accident. The results demonstrated an increased prevalence of circulating thyroid

  20. The Chernobyl accident — an epidemiological perspective

    PubMed Central

    Cardis, E.; Hatch, M.

    2011-01-01

    Twenty-five years have passed since radioactive releases from the Chernobyl nuclear accident led to exposure of millions of people in Europe. Studies of affected populations have provided important new data on the links between radiation and cancer – particularly the risk of thyroid tumours from exposure to iodine isotopes - that are important not only for a fuller scientific understanding of radiation effects, but also for radiation protection. It is now well-documented that children and adolescents exposed to radioiodines from Chernobyl fallout have a sizeable dose-related increase in thyroid cancer, with risk greatest in those youngest at exposure and with a suggestion that deficiency in stable iodine may increase the risk. Data on thyroid cancer risks to other age groups are somewhat less definitive. In addition, there have been reported increases in incidence and mortality from non-thyroid cancers and non-cancer endpoints. Although some studies are difficult to interpret because of methodological limitations, recent investigations of Chernobyl clean-up workers (“liquidators”) have provided evidence of increased risks of leukaemia and other hematological malignancies and of cataracts, and suggestions of an increase in risk of cardiovascular diseases, following low doses and low dose rates of radiation. Further careful follow-up of these populations, including establishment and long-term support of life-span study cohorts, could provide additional important information for the quantification of radiation risks and the protection of persons exposed to low doses of radiation. PMID:21396807

  1. The Chernobyl accident: Causes and consequences

    SciTech Connect

    Malinauskas, A.P.

    1987-01-01

    Two explosions, one immediately following the other, in Unit 4 of the Chernobyl nuclear power station in the Soviet Union signaled the worst disaster ever to befall the commercial nuclear power production industry. This accident, which occurred at 1:24 a.m. on April 26, 1986, resulted from an almost incredible series of operational errors associated, ironically, with an attempt to enhance the capability of the reactor to safely accommodate station blackout accidents (i.e., accidents arising from a loss of station electrical power). Disruption of the core, due to a prompt criticality excursion, resulted in the destruction of the core vault and reactor building and the sudden dispersal of about 3% of the fuel from the core region into the environment. Lesser but significant releases of radioactivity continued through May 6, 1986, before attempts to certain the radioactivity and cool the remnants of the core were successful. The amount and composition of material released in the course of the accident remain somewhat uncertain, and inconsistencies in the release estimates are evident. The Soviet estimates, in addition to the dispersal of about 3% of the fuel, include complete release of the noble gas core inventory, 20% of the fission product iodine inventory, 15% of the tellurium inventory, and 10 to 13% of the fission product cesium inventory. The iodine and cesium release estimates are not consistent with the noble gas values, and are as much as a factor of two less than some estimates made by experts outside the Soviet Union.

  2. The Chernobyl accident--an epidemiological perspective.

    PubMed

    Cardis, E; Hatch, M

    2011-05-01

    Twenty-five years have passed since radioactive releases from the Chernobyl nuclear accident led to the exposure of millions of people in Europe. Studies of affected populations have provided important new data on the links between radiation and cancer-particularly the risk of thyroid tumours from exposure to iodine isotopes-that are important not only for a fuller scientific understanding of radiation effects, but also for radiation protection. It is now well documented that children and adolescents exposed to radioiodines from Chernobyl fallout have a sizeable dose-related increase in thyroid cancer, with the risk greatest in those youngest at exposure and with a suggestion that deficiency in stable iodine may increase the risk. Data on thyroid cancer risks to other age groups are somewhat less definitive. In addition, there have been reported increases in incidence and mortality from non-thyroid cancers and non-cancer end points. Although some studies are difficult to interpret because of methodological limitations, recent investigations of Chernobyl clean-up workers ('liquidators') have provided evidence of increased risks of leukaemia and other haematological malignancies and of cataracts, and suggestions of an increase in the risk of cardiovascular diseases, following low doses and low dose rates of radiation. Further careful follow-up of these populations, including the establishment and long-term support of life-span study cohorts, could provide additional important information for the quantification of radiation risks and the protection of persons exposed to low doses of radiation. Copyright © 2011 The Royal College of Radiologists. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. The Chernobyl accident ten years later

    SciTech Connect

    Squires, D.J.

    1996-12-31

    On April 26, 1986 at 1:23 AM a fire and explosion occurred at the fourth unit of the Chernobyl Nuclear Power Plant Complex, located in the Ukraine, that resulted in the destruction of the reactor core and most of the building in which it was housed. Several environmental impacts resulting from the accident will be discussed in this paper, which will include the effects on plant and wild life, radioactive waste generated and stored or disposed of, effects of evacuations relating to residents within the subsequently established 10km and 30km control zones, impacts of the emergency containment structure (sarcophagus), and potential effects on world opinion and future development of nuclear power. As an immediate result of the fire, 31 people died (2 from the fire & smoke, and 29 from excessive radiation); 237 cases of acute radiation sickness occurred; the total fatalities based upon induced chronic diseases as a result of the accident is unknown: more than 100,000 people were evacuated from within the subsequently established 30 km control zone; in excess of 50 million curies of radionuclides that included finely dispersed nuclear fuel, fragments of graphite, concrete and other building materials were released from the reactor into the environment; an estimated one million cubic meters of radioactive waste were generated (LLW, ILW, HLW); more than 5000 tons of materials (sand, boron, dolomite, cement, and lead) were used to put the fire out by helicopter; shutdown of the adjacent power plants were performed; and other environmental impacts occurred. The Chernobyl Nuclear Power Plant Unit No 4 is an RBMK-1000. It initiated operations in 1983, it was a 1000 MWe with a power output of 3200 MW(th), the reactor core contained 190 MT of fuel, with 1659 assemblies (plus 211 control rods), the average burnup rate was 10.3 MWd/kg, and the reactor operated on a continuous basis with maintenance and fuel reload performed during operations.

  4. Reconsidering Health Consequences of the Chernobyl Accident

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    The Chernobyl accident led to major human suffering caused by the evacuation and other counter-measures. However, the direct health consequences of the accident-related radiation exposures, besides the acute effects and small number of thyroid cancers, have not been observed. This absence is challenged by some influential groups affecting public policies who claim that the true extent of radiogenic health consequences is covered up. We consider such claims. The most conservative (in this case – overestimating) linear no-threshold hypothesis was used to calculate excess cancer expectations for cleanup workers, the population of the contaminated areas and the global population. Statistical estimations were performed to verify whether such expected excess was detectable. The calculated cancer excess for each group is much less than uncertainties in number of cancer cases in epidemiological studies. Therefore the absence of detected radiation carcinogenesis is in full correspondence with the most conservative a priori expectations. Regarding the cover-up claims, rational choice analysis was performed. Such analysis shows that these claims are ill-founded. The present overcautious attitude to radiological hazards should be corrected in order to mitigate the present suffering and to avoid such suffering in the future. PMID:26674769

  5. Radiation damage aspects of the chernobyl accident

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parmentier, N.; Nenot, J. C.

    During the night of 25 to 26 April 1986, the most severe nuclear accident occurred at the Chernobyl power station, about 150km north of Kiev, in the Ukraine. It resulted in the irradiation of 237 workers at dose levels justifying medical care. The most severe cases (115) were hospitalized in Moscow, with 20 patients with doses higher than 6 Gy. In most cases, the treatment was classical, based on transfusion of red cells and platelets, and heavy supportive therapy. For 19 patients with severe aplasia, transplantations of bone marrow (13) or foetal liver (6) were decided. Of these patients only one survived, which justifies the statement from U.S.S.R. physicians: after an accident the indications of grafting are limited and its risks may not justify its use. Most of the complications were related to radiation burns which involved 56 victims and resulted in fatal outcomes in at least 19 patients. The population was evacuated from a 30 km zone around the site; based on direct measurements and calculations, the collective dose was evaluated at 1.6 × 10 4 man Sv, with an individual average lower than 250 mSv. The European part of U.S.S.R. with 75 million persons is supposed to have received a collective dose likely to increase the natural mortality by less than 0.1%. The numbers with cancer in the Northern Hemisphere might increase by 0.004% over the next 50 years.

  6. Editorial: Thyroid cancer and the Chernobyl accident

    SciTech Connect

    Williams, D.

    1996-01-01

    The accident at the Chernobyl power station nearly 10 years ago was unprecedented in the exposure of a very large population to high levels of fallout including high levels of isotopes of iodine, predominantly {sup 131}I. An increase in incidence of childhood thyroid cancer was first observed in 1990 in Belarus and in the Ukraine, and the first reports in the Western literature were published in 1992. At a symposium in Nagasaki in June 1994, the numbers of cases that had occurred between 1990 and 1993 in Belarus, a country with a population of just over 10 million, was reported to be 233, and in the heavily contaminated northern parts of the Ukraine, with a population of about 7 million, 36 cases occurred in the same period. To put these figures into perspective, the number of childhood thyroid cancers registered in England and Wales over a 30-year period was 154, an average of 5 cases per yr in a population of 50 million people, with about 10 million children under 15 yr of age. The initial reports of such a great increase in childhood thyroid cancers in the areas exposed to fallout from Chernobyl were at first greeted in the West with some skepticism. The latent period between exposure and development of thyroid cancer was surprisingly short, based on experience with thyroid carcinomas developing after external radiation to the neck. The reliability of the figures based on the pathological diagnosis was questioned because the cases had not been confirmed by Western pathologists, and because the known high frequency of papillary microcarcinoms in adults raised the possibility that the reported incidence was resulted form increased ascertainment and not a true increase in incidence. 14 refs.

  7. Estimated long term health effects of the Chernobyl accident

    SciTech Connect

    Cardis, E.

    1996-07-01

    Apart from the dramatic increase in thyroid cancer in those exposed as children, there is no evidence to date of a major public health impact as a result of radiation exposure due to the Chernobyl accident in the three most affected countries (Belarus, Russia, and Ukraine). Although some increases in the frequency of cancer in exposed populations have been reported ,these results are difficult to interpret, mainly because of differences in the intensity and method of follow-up between exposed populations and the general population with which they are compared. If the experience of the survivors of the atomic bombing of Japan and of other exposed populations is applicable, the major radiological impact of the accident will be cases of cancer. The total lifetime numbers of excess cancers will be greatest among the `liquidators` (emergency and recovery workers) and among the residents of `contaminated` territories, of the order of 2000 to 2500 among each group (the size of the exposed populations is 200,000 liquidators and 3,700,000 residents of `contaminated` areas). These increases would be difficult to detect epidemiologically against an expected background number of 41500 and 433000 cases of cancer respectively among the two groups. The exposures for populations due to the Chernobyl accident are different in type and pattern from those of the survivors of the atomic bombing of Japan. Thus predictions derived from studies of these populations are uncertain. The extent of the incidence of thyroid cancer was not envisaged. Since only ten years have lapsed since the accident, continued monitoring of the health of the population is essential to assess the public health impact.

  8. Chromosome aberrations in Norwegian reindeer following the Chernobyl accident.

    PubMed

    Røed, K H; Jacobsen, M

    1995-03-01

    Chromosome analyses were carried out on peripheral blood lymphocytes of semi-domestic reindeer in Norway which had been exposed to varying amounts of radiocesium emanating from the Chernobyl accident. The sampling was done in the period 1987-1990. The material included 192 reindeer, originating from four herds in central Norway, an area considerably affected by fallout from the Chernobyl accident, and from three herds in northern Norway which was unaffected by fallout from the accident. Significant heterogeneity in the distribution of chromosome aberrations between herds was observed. The pattern of chromosome aberration frequencies between herds was not related to the variation in radiocesium exposure from the Chernobyl accident. Other factors than the Chernobyl accident appear therefore to be of importance for the distribution of aberration frequencies found among present herds. Within the most contaminated area the reindeer born in 1986 showed significantly more chromosome aberrations than those born both before and after 1986. This could suggest that the Chernobyl accident fallout created an effect particularly among calves, during the immediate post-accident period in the most exposed areas.

  9. Validity of thyroid cancer incidence data following the Chernobyl accident.

    PubMed

    Jargin, Sergei V

    2011-12-01

    The only clearly demonstrated cancer incidence increase that can be attributed to radiation from the Chernobyl accident is thyroid carcinoma in patients exposed during childhood or adolescence. Significant increases in thyroid disease were observed as soon as 4 y after the accident. The solid/follicular subtype of papillary carcinoma predominated in the early period after the accident. Morphological diagnosis of cancer in such cases, if no infiltrative growth is clearly visible, depends mainly on the nuclear criteria. Outdated equipment and insufficient quality of histological specimens impeded reliable evaluation of the nuclear criteria. Access to foreign professional literature has always been limited in the former Soviet Union. The great number of advanced tumors observed shortly after the accident can be explained by the screening effect (detection of previously neglected cancers) and by the fact that many patients were brought from non-contaminated areas and registered as Chernobyl victims. It is also worth noting that exaggeration of the Chernobyl cancer statistics facilitated the writing of dissertations, financing of research, and assistance from outside the former Soviet Union. "Chernobyl hysteria" impeded nuclear energy production in some countries, thus contributing to higher prices for fossil fuel. The concluding point is that since post-Chernobyl cancers tend on average to be in a later stage of tumor progression, some published data on molecular or immunohistochemical characteristics of Chernobyl-related cancers require reevaluation.

  10. [Morphological verification problems of Chernobyl factor influence on the prostate of coalminers of Donbas--liquidators of Chernobyl accident].

    PubMed

    Danylov, Iu V; Motkov, K V; Shevchenko, T I

    2013-12-01

    Problem of a diagnostic of Chernobyl factor influences on different organs and systems of Chernobyl accident liquidators are remain actually until now. Though morbidly background which development at unfavorable work conditions in underground coalminers prevents from objective identification features of Chernobyl factor influences. The qualitative and quantitative histological and immunohistochemical law of morphogenesis changes in prostate of Donbas's coalminer-non-liquidators Chernobyl accident in comparison with the group of Donbas's coalminers-liquidators Chernobyl accident which we were stationed non determined problem. This reason stipulates to development and practical use of mathematical model of morphogenesis of a prostatic gland changes.

  11. [Morphological verification problems of Chernobyl factor influence on the testis of coal miners of Donbas-liquidators of Chernobyl accident].

    PubMed

    Danylov, Iu V; Motkov, K V; Shevchenko, T I

    2013-01-01

    Problem of a diagnostic of Chernobyl factor influences on different organs and systems of Chernobyl accident liquidators are remain actually until now. Though morbidly background which development at unfavorable work conditions in underground coalminers prevents from objective identification features of Chernobyl factor influences. The qualitative and quantitative histological and immunohistochemical law of morphogenesis changes in testis of Donbas's coalminer - non-liquidators Chernobyl accident in comparison with the group of Donbas's coalminers-liquidators Chernobyl accident, which we were stationed non determined problem. This reason stipulates to development and practical use of mathematical model of morphogenesis of a testis changes.

  12. Radioactive fallout from the Chernobyl nuclear reactor accident

    SciTech Connect

    Beiriger, J.M.; Failor, R.A.; Marsh, K.V.; Shaw, G.E.

    1987-08-01

    This report describes the detection of fallout in the United States from the Chernobyl nuclear reactor accident. As part of its environmental surveillance program, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory maintained detectors for gamma-emitting radionuclides. Following the reactor accident, additional air filters were set out. Several uncommon isotopes were detected at the time the plume passed into the US. (TEM)

  13. Ecological lessons from the Chernobyl accident.

    PubMed

    Bell, J N B; Shaw, G

    2005-08-01

    The Chernobyl nuclear accident in 1986 not only caused serious ecological problems in both the Ukraine and Belarus, which continue to the present day, but also contaminated a large part of the higher latitudes of the northern hemisphere. In this paper an overview is given of the latter problems in upland UK, where ecological problems still remain some 17 years after initial contamination. Following deposition of radiocaesium and radioiodine in May 1986, measurements of radioactivity in grass and soil indicated a rapidly declining problem as the radioiodine decayed and the radiocaesium became immobilised by attachment to clay particles. However, these studies, as well as the advice received by the Ministry of Agriculture, Fisheries and Food, were based on lowland agricultural soils, with high clay and low organic matter contents. The behaviour of radiocaesium in upland UK turned out to be dominated by high and persistent levels of mobility and bioavailability. This resulted in the free passage of radiocaesium through the food chain and into sheep. Consequently the Ministry banned the sale and movement of sheep over large areas of upland Britain, with bans remaining on some farms to the present day. Present day predictions suggest that these bans will continue in some cases for some years to come. The causes of radiocaesium mobility in upland areas have subsequently been the subject of intense investigation centred around vegetation and, in particular, soil characteristics. Soil types were identified which were particularly vulnerable in this respect and, where these coincided with high levels of deposition, sheep bans tended to be imposed. While much of the earlier work suggested that a low clay content was the main reason for continuing mobility, a very high organic matter content is now also believed to play a major role, this being a characteristic of wet and acidic upland UK soils. The overall message from this affair is the importance of a fundamental

  14. Environmental radionuclide distribution in Georgia after the Chernobyl accident

    SciTech Connect

    Mosulishvili, L.M.; Shoniya, N.I.; Katamadze, N.M.

    1994-01-01

    Atmospheric Chernobyl-released radioactivity, assessed at about 2 x 10{sup 18} Bq, caused global environmental contamination. Contaminated air masses appeared in the Transcaucasian region in early May, 1986. Rains that month promoted intense radionuclide deposition all over Georgia. The contamination level of western Georgia considerably exceeded the contamination level of eastern Georgia. The Black Sea coast of Georgia suffered from the Chernobyl accident as much as did strongly contaminated areas of the Ukraine and Belarus`. Unfortunately, governmental decrees on countermeasures against the consequences of the Chernobyl accident at that time did not even refer to the coast of Georgia. The authors observed the first increase in radioactivity background in rainfall samples collected on May 2, 1986, in Tbilisi. {gamma}-Spectrometric measurements of aerosol filters, vegetation, food stuffs, and other objects, in addition to rainfall, persistently confirmed the occurrence of short-lived radionuclides, including {sup 131}I. At first, this fact seemed unbelievable, because the Chernobyl accident had occurred only 4-5 days earlier and far from Georgia. However, these arguments proved to be faulty. Soon, environmental monitoring of radiation in Georgia became urgent. Environmental radionuclide distribution in Georgia shortly after the Chernobyl accident, as well as the methods of analysis, are reported in this paper.

  15. Radiation doses in Sweden after the Chernobyl accident

    SciTech Connect

    Haegg, N.C.

    1989-01-01

    The reactor accident at Chernobyl led to releases of large amounts of radioactive matter that was spread over the world and particularly over Europe. The radioactive material released gave rise to radiation doses originating from inhalation, external radiation from both the passing cloud and radioactive material deposited on the ground, and internal irradiation from consumption of food stuffs. This paper summarizes the consequences in Sweden after the Chernobyl accident. The emphasis is mainly on radiation doses received by the public and the long-term effects in Sweden.

  16. Immediate medical consequences of nuclear accidents. Lessons from Chernobyl.

    PubMed

    Gale, R P

    1987-08-07

    The immediate medical response to the nuclear accident at the Chernobyl nuclear power station involved containment of the radioactivity and evacuation of the nearby population. The next step consisted of assessment of the radiation dose received by individuals, based on biological dosimetry, and treatment of those exposed. Medical care involved treatment of skin burns; measures to support bone marrow failure, gastrointestinal tract injury, and other organ damage (ie, infection prophylaxis and transfusions) for those with lower radiation dose exposure; and bone marrow transplantation for those exposed to a high dose of radiation. At Chernobyl, two victims died immediately and 29 died of radiation or thermal injuries in the next three months. The remaining victims of the accident are currently well. A nuclear accident anywhere is a nuclear accident everywhere. Prevention and cooperation in response to these accidents are essential goals.

  17. Impact of the Chernobyl accident on Turkey

    SciTech Connect

    Fields, D.E.; Ozluoglu, N.; Yalcintas, M.G.

    1987-01-01

    In this paper, we present and discuss measurements of radionuclide concentrations made in Turkey during the Chernobyl event and perform preliminary analyses of the internal and external doses associated with exposure to these materials. 15 refs., 1 tab.

  18. Reduced electroencephalographic coherence asymmetry in the Chernobyl accident survivors.

    PubMed

    Zhavoronkova, Ludmila A; Kholodova, Nina B; Belostocky, Alexey P; Koulikov, Mikhail A

    2008-11-01

    An electroencephalograph (EEG) study was carried out from 1990 to 2006, using power spectra, averaged coherence, and integral EEG coherence asymmetry coefficients to compare 189 clean-up workers of the Chernobyl accident with 63 age-matched healthy controls. Most of the Chernobyl workers showed three abnormal EEG patterns, as indicated by EEG power mapping. The higher power, most prominent in slow alpha and theta bands, or in fast alpha frequencies, were observed in persons 3-5 years after the clean-up works (the early stage). The lower EEG power in alpha band was found in Chernobyl workers 10 or more years after the accident (the late stage). EEG coherence analysis revealed the existence of two stages in EEG alterations following the Chernobyl clean-up. In the early stage, an increase of EEG coherence in the central brain areas was observed, whereas at the later stage, a decrease of EEG coherence, most prominent in the frontal brain areas, and reduced brain asymmetry prevailed. These results allow us to propose that the described EEG signs may be a reflection of radiation-induced brain dysfunction at the late period after the Chernobyl clean-up and were similar to the EEG markers of brain ageing. The results, in comparison to data of the literature, provide additional support to the premature brain ageing hypothesis in Chernobyl survivors as a result of the radiation brain damage after-effect.

  19. Radioactive waste management in the Chernobyl exclusion zone: 25 years since the Chernobyl nuclear power plant accident.

    PubMed

    Oskolkov, Boris Y; Bondarkov, Mikhail D; Zinkevich, Lubov I; Proskura, Nikolai I; Farfán, Eduardo B; Jannik, G Timothy

    2011-10-01

    Radioactive waste management is an important component of the Chernobyl Nuclear Power Plant accident mitigation and remediation activities in the so-called Chernobyl Exclusion Zone. This article describes the localization and characteristics of the radioactive waste present in the Chernobyl Exclusion Zone and summarizes the pathways and strategy for handling the radioactive waste-related problems in Ukraine and the Chernobyl Exclusion Zone and, in particular, the pathways and strategies stipulated by the National Radioactive Waste Management Program.

  20. Brookhaven lecture series No. 227: The Chernobyl accident

    SciTech Connect

    Kouts, H.

    1986-09-24

    This lecture discusses the events leading to, during, and following the Chernobyl Reactor number 4 accident. A description of the light water cooled, graphite moderated reactor, the reactor site conditions leading to meltdown is presented. The emission of radioactive effluents and the biological radiation effects is also discussed. (FI)

  1. The Chernobyl Nuclear Power Plant accident: ecotoxicological update

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Eisler, R.; Hoffman, David J.; Rattner, Barnett A.; Burton, G. Allen; Cairns, John

    2003-01-01

    The accident at the Chernobyl, Ukraine, nuclear reactor on 26 April 1986 released large amounts of radiocesium and other radionuclides into the environment, contaminating much of the northern hemisphere, especially Europe. In the vicinity of Chernobyl, at least 30 people died, more than 115,000 others were evacuated, and consumption of milk and other foods was banned because of radiocontamination. At least 14,000 human cancer deaths are expected in Russia, Belarus, and the Ukraine as a direct result of Chernobyl. The most sensitive local ecosystems, as judged by survival, were the soil fauna, pine forest communities, and certain populations of rodents. Elsewhere, fallout from Chernobyl significantly contaminated freshwater and terrestrial ecosystems and flesh and milk of domestic livestock; in many cases, radionuclide concentrations in biological samples exceeded current radiation protection guidelines. Reindeer (Rangifer tarandus) in Scandinavia were among the most seriously afflicted by Chernobyl fallout, probably because their main food during winter (lichens) is an efficient absorber of airborne particles containing radiocesium. Some reindeer calves contaminated with 137Cs from Chernobyl showed 137Cs-dependent decreases in survival and increases in frequency of chromosomal aberrations. Although radiation levels in the biosphere are declining with time, latent effects of initial exposure--including an increased frequency of thyroid and other cancers--are now measurable. The full effect of the Chernobyl nuclear reactor accident on natural resources will probably not be known for at least several decades because of gaps in data on long-term genetic and reproductive effects and on radiocesium cycling and toxicokinetics.

  2. AQUATIC ASSESSMENT OF THE CHERNOBYL NUCLEAR ACCIDENT AND ITS REMEDIATION

    SciTech Connect

    Onishi, Yasuo; Kivva, Sergey L.; Zheleznyak, Mark J.; Voitsekhovitch, Oleg V.

    2007-11-01

    This modeling study evaluated aquatic environment affected by the Chernobyl nuclear accident and the effectiveness of remediation efforts. Study results indicate that radionuclide concentrations in the Pripyat and Dnieper rivers were well above the drinking water limits immediately after the Chernobyl accident, but have decreased significantly in subsequent years due to flashing, burying, and decay. Because high concentrations of 90Sr and 137Cs, the major radionuclides affecting human health through aquatic pathways, are associated with flooding, an earthen dike was constructed along the Pripyat River in its most contaminated floodplain. The dike was successful in reducing the 90Sr influx to the river by half. A 100-m-high movable dome called the New Safe Confinement is planned to cover the Chernobyl Shelter (formally called the sarcophagus) that was erected shortly after the accident. The NSC will reduce radionuclide contamination further in these rivers and nearby groundwater; however, even if the Chernobyl Shelter collapses before the NSC is built, the resulting peak concentrations of 90Sr and 137Cs in the Dnieper River would still be below the drinking water limits.

  3. Source term and radiological consequences of the Chernobyl accident

    SciTech Connect

    Mourad, R.; Snell, V.

    1987-01-01

    The objective of this work is to assess the source term and to evaluate the maximum hypothetical individual doses in European countries (including the Soviet Union) from the Chernobyl accident through the analyses of measurements of meteorological data, radiation fields, and airborne and deposited activity in these countries. Applying this information to deduce the source term involves a reversal of the techniques of nuclear accident analysis, which estimate the off-site consequences of postulated accidents. In this study the authors predict the quantities of radionuclides that, if released at Chernobyl and following the calculated trajectories, would explain and unify the observed radiation levels and radionuclide concentrations as measured by European countries and the Soviet Union. The simulation uses the PEAR microcomputer program following the methodology described in Canadian Standards Association standard N288.2. The study was performed before the Soviets published their estimate of the source term and the two results are compared.

  4. Down syndrome clusters in Germany after the Chernobyl accident

    SciTech Connect

    Burkart, W.; Grosche, B.; Schoetzau, A.

    1997-03-01

    In two independent studies using different approaches and covering West Berlin and Bavaria, respectively, highly significant temporal clusters of Down syndrome were found. Both sharp increases occurred in areas receiving relatively low Chernobyl fallout and concomitant radiation exposures. Only for the Berlin cluster was fallout present at the time of the affected meiosis, whereas the Nuremberg cluster preceded the radioactive contamination by 1 month. Hypotheses on possible causal relationships are compared. Radiation from the Chernobyl accident is an unlikely factor, because the associated cumulative dose was so low in comparison with natural background. Microdosimetric considerations would indicate that fewer than 1 in 200 oocyte nuclei would have experienced an ionizing event from Chernobyl radioactivity. Given the lack of understanding of what causes Down syndrome, other than factors associated with increased maternal age, additional research into environmental and infectious risk factors is warranted. 23 refs., 4 figs., 2 tabs.

  5. Consequences and countermeasures in a nuclear power accident: Chernobyl experience.

    PubMed

    Kirichenko, Vladimir A; Kirichenko, Alexander V; Werts, Day E

    2012-09-01

    Despite the tragic accidents in Fukushima and Chernobyl, the nuclear power industry will continue to contribute to the production of electric energy worldwide until there are efficient and sustainable alternative sources of energy. The Chernobyl nuclear accident, which occurred 26 years ago in the former Soviet Union, released an immense amount of radioactivity over vast territories of Belarus, Ukraine, and the Russian Federation, extending into northern Europe, and became the most severe accident in the history of the nuclear industry. This disaster was a result of numerous factors including inadequate nuclear power plant design, human errors, and violation of safety measures. The lessons learned from nuclear accidents will continue to strengthen the safety design of new reactor installations, but with more than 400 active nuclear power stations worldwide and 104 reactors in the Unites States, it is essential to reassess fundamental issues related to the Chernobyl experience as it continues to evolve. This article summarizes early and late events of the incident, the impact on thyroid health, and attempts to reduce agricultural radioactive contamination.

  6. Third annual Warren K. Sinclair keynote address: retrospective analysis of impacts of the Chernobyl accident.

    PubMed

    Balonov, Mikhail

    2007-11-01

    The accident at the Chernobyl Nuclear Power Plant in 1986 was the most severe in the history of the nuclear industry, causing a huge release of radionuclides over large areas of Europe. The recently completed Chernobyl Forum concluded that after a number of years, along with reduction of radiation levels and accumulation of humanitarian consequences, severe social and economic depression of the affected regions and associated psychological problems of the general public and the workers had become the most significant problem to be addressed by the authorities. The majority of the >600,000 emergency and recovery operation workers and five million residents of the contaminated areas in Belarus, Russia, and Ukraine received relatively minor radiation doses which are comparable with the natural background levels. An exception is a cohort of several hundred emergency workers who received high radiation doses and of whom 28 persons died in 1986 due to acute radiation sickness. Apart from the dramatic increase in thyroid cancer incidence among those exposed to radioiodine at a young age and some increase of leukemia in the most exposed workers, there is no clearly demonstrated increase in the somatic diseases due to radiation. There was, however, an increase in psychological problems among the affected population, compounded by the social disruption that followed the break-up of the Soviet Union. Despite the unprecedented scale of the Chernobyl accident, its consequences on the health of people are far less severe than those of the atomic bombings of the cities of Hiroshima and Nagasaki. Studying the consequences of the Chernobyl accident has made an invaluable scientific contribution to the development of nuclear safety, radioecology, radiation medicine and protection, and also the social sciences. The Chernobyl accident initiated the global nuclear and radiation safety regime.

  7. Chernobyl

    SciTech Connect

    Park, C.C.

    1989-01-01

    This book is an interdisciplinary assessment of the Chernobyl nuclear disaster. It considers a variety of topics including how and why the accident occurred; short and long term effects of radiation; and current public opinion of nuclear power. Includes a lengthy bibliography for further reading.

  8. Genetic implications and health consequences following the Chernobyl nuclear accident.

    PubMed

    Kozenko, M; Chudley, A E

    2010-03-01

    It has been almost 25 years since the Chernobyl nuclear accident in Ukraine. We review relevant data derived from published reports originating in the Former Soviet Union. We cite census data from Ukraine and research studies from Western Europe that analyzed the effect of radiation on genetics and health outcome in the exposed populations. We also present philatelic materials that pictorially captured that fateful event in history.

  9. Comparison of the Chernobyl and Fukushima nuclear accidents: a review of the environmental impacts.

    PubMed

    Steinhauser, Georg; Brandl, Alexander; Johnson, Thomas E

    2014-02-01

    The environmental impacts of the nuclear accidents of Chernobyl and Fukushima are compared. In almost every respect, the consequences of the Chernobyl accident clearly exceeded those of the Fukushima accident. In both accidents, most of the radioactivity released was due to volatile radionuclides (noble gases, iodine, cesium, tellurium). However, the amount of refractory elements (including actinides) emitted in the course of the Chernobyl accident was approximately four orders of magnitude higher than during the Fukushima accident. For Chernobyl, a total release of 5,300 PBq (excluding noble gases) has been established as the most cited source term. For Fukushima, we estimated a total source term of 520 (340-800) PBq. In the course of the Fukushima accident, the majority of the radionuclides (more than 80%) was transported offshore and deposited in the Pacific Ocean. Monitoring campaigns after both accidents reveal that the environmental impact of the Chernobyl accident was much greater than of the Fukushima accident. Both the highly contaminated areas and the evacuated areas are smaller around Fukushima and the projected health effects in Japan are significantly lower than after the Chernobyl accident. This is mainly due to the fact that food safety campaigns and evacuations worked quickly and efficiently after the Fukushima accident. In contrast to Chernobyl, no fatalities due to acute radiation effects occurred in Fukushima.

  10. The impact of the Chernobyl accident on radiation protection.

    PubMed

    Paretzke, H G

    1988-08-01

    The science of radiation protection is a fundamental outgrowth of peaceful and military applications of ionizing radiation and the use of nuclear energy. Scientific progress in radiation protection has not, however, been as dramatic as progress in other scientific endeavors, because many users of ionizing radiation have perceived that the major technical and institutional problems have already been solved. This misperception is not based on solid fact and is not shared by radiation protection professionals, who have a broader vision of both past achievements and problems remaining in this area. Experience gained as a consequence of the Chernobyl accident has highlighted new problems and demonstrated the urgency of finding better answers to some old questions. This paper addresses the future impact of the recent Chernobyl accident on the science of radiation protection. In summary, the accident demonstrated that particular emphasis should be directed toward: Improvement of dosimetric and health-effects models for predicting the consequences of exposure of the public to low doses of ionizing radiation. Development of optimized, realistic countermeasures and improvement in emergency preparedness. Education of the public, including students, scientists and politicians with regard to radiation protection issues. Development of advanced computer programs and radiation instruments for evaluating reactor accidents and their consequences. Transfer of learned concepts, methods and approaches to other scientific fields, such as environmental sciences, toxicology, pharmacology, etc.

  11. Impact of the Chernobyl accident on radiation protection

    SciTech Connect

    Paretzke, H.G.

    1988-08-01

    The science of radiation protection is a fundamental outgrowth of peaceful and military applications of ionizing radiation and the use of nuclear energy. Scientific progress in radiation protection has not, however, been as dramatic as progress in other scientific endeavors, because many users of ionizing radiation have perceived that the major technical and institutional problems have already been solved. This misperception is not based on solid fact and is not shared by radiation protection professionals, who have a broader vision of both past achievements and problems remaining in this area. Experience gained as a consequence of the Chernobyl accident has highlighted new problems and demonstrated the urgency of finding better answers to some old questions. This paper addresses the future impact of the recent Chernobyl accident on the science of radiation protection. In summary, the accident demonstrated that particular emphasis should be directed toward: Improvement of dosimetric and health-effects models for predicting the consequences of exposure of the public to low doses of ionizing radiation. Development of optimized, realistic countermeasures and improvement in emergency preparedness. Education of the public, including students, scientists and politicians with regard to radiation protection issues. Development of advanced computer programs and radiation instruments for evaluating reactor accidents and their consequences. Transfer of learned concepts, methods and approaches to other scientific fields, such as environmental sciences, toxicology, pharmacology, etc.

  12. [Remote effects of the Chernobyl accident: evaluation of the maxillodental status of the children].

    PubMed

    Sevbitov, A V

    2004-01-01

    Examinations of children exposed to the Chernobyl factor showed deterioration of the maxillodental status, presenting as a decrease in the incidence of normal-for-age status in comparison with children from the control group. The incidence of dental abnormalities in children whose parents participated in the Chernobyl accident aftermath is increased by 240,09%. The determination of remote effects of the Chernobyl accident for the health status of Russian children requires a differentiated approach and deserves a special study.

  13. Nuclear Accidents in the Former Soviet Union: Kyshtym, Chelyabinsk and Chernobyl

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1991-01-01

    in the Former Soviet Union: Kyshtym, Chelyabinsk and Chernobyl DNA/AFRRI 4020 *. AUTHORIS) Daniel L. Collins, Ph.D. Lt Col, USAF lE L E T E 1...sJ Three nuclear accidents besides Chernobyl have occurred in the Former Soviet Union (FSU). The accidents occurred over the geographic area around...enviromental chemicals. 94,1 126 14. SUBJECT TERMS 16. NUMBER OF PAGES Kyshtym, Chelyabinsk, Chernobyl , REM, human, psychological 0 radiation 90Sr, Curies

  14. External dose assessment in the Ukraine following the Chernobyl accident

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frazier, Remi Jordan Lesartre

    While the physiological effects of radiation exposure have been well characterized in general, it remains unclear what the relationship is between large-scale radiological events and psychosocial behavior outcomes in individuals or populations. To investigate this, the National Science Foundation funded a research project in 2008 at the University of Colorado in collaboration with Colorado State University to expand the knowledge of complex interactions between radiation exposure, perception of risk, and psychosocial behavior outcomes by modeling outcomes for a representative sample of the population of the Ukraine which had been exposed to radiocontaminant materials released by the reactor accident at Chernobyl on 26 April 1986. In service of this project, a methodology (based substantially on previously published models specific to the Chernobyl disaster and the Ukrainian population) was developed for daily cumulative effective external dose and dose rate assessment for individuals in the Ukraine for as a result of the Chernobyl disaster. A software platform was designed and produced to estimate effective external dose and dose rate for individuals based on their age, occupation, and location of residence on each day between 26 April 1986 and 31 December 2009. A methodology was developed to transform published 137Cs soil deposition contour maps from the Comprehensive Atlas of Caesium Deposition on Europe after the Chernobyl Accident into a geospatial database to access these data as a radiological source term. Cumulative effective external dose and dose rate were computed for each individual in a 703-member cohort of Ukrainians randomly selected to be representative of the population of the country as a whole. Error was estimated for the resulting individual dose and dose rate values with Monte Carlo simulations. Distributions of input parameters for the dose assessment methodology were compared to computed dose and dose rate estimates to determine which

  15. Thyroid cancer among "liquidators" of the Chernobyl accident.

    PubMed

    Ivanov, V K; Tsyb, A F; Gorsky, A I; Maksyutov, M A; Rastopchin, E M; Konogorov, A P; Biryukov, A P; Matyash, V A; Mould, R F

    1997-09-01

    In 1986, immediately after the Chernobyl accident, the USSR Ministry of Health adopted a large scale programme of establishing an All-Union Distributed Registry of persons affected by radiation due to the accident. The registry was based at the Medical Radiological Research Centre of the Russian Academy of Medical Sciences (MRRC RAMS). In 1992, when the USSR was dissolved, this registry database contained information on 659,000 persons, including 284,000 Chernobyl accident emergency workers ("liquidators"). Currently, the Russian National Medical Dosimetric Registry (RNMDR) contains data on 435,276 persons, including 167,862 liquidators. This paper reviews the data for 47 verified thyroid cancers in the liquidator subgroup of the RNMDR. Analyses show that there is an excess relative risk of thyroid cancer per Gy of 5.31 (95% confidence intervals 0.04 and 10.58) and an excess absolute risk of thyroid cancer per 10(4) person-years per Gy of 1.15 (95% confidence intervals 0.08 and 2.22).

  16. Radioactive fallout from the Chernobyl nuclear reactor accident

    SciTech Connect

    Beiriger, J.M.; Failor, R.A.; Marsh, K.V.; Shaw, G.E.

    1987-03-23

    Following the accident at the nuclear reactor at Chernobyl, in the Soviet Union on April 26, 1986, we performed a variety of measurements to determine the level of the radioactive fallout on the western United States. We used gamma-spectroscopy to analyze air filters from the areas around Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL), California, and Barrow and Fairbanks, Alaska. Milk from California and imported vegetables were also analyzed. The levels of the various fission products detected were far below the maximum permissible concentration levels.

  17. [Molecular and cellular consequences of the Chernobyl accident].

    PubMed

    Pelevina, I I; Afanas'ev, G G; Aleshchenko, A V; Antoshchina, M M; Gotlib, V Ia; Konradov, A A; Kudriashova, O V; Lizunova, E Iu; Osipov, A N; Riabchenko, N I; Serebrianyĭ, A M

    2011-01-01

    In this paper the results of the Chernobyl accident investigation 5-10 and 24 years after are summarized. The genomic instability, adaptive response formation, genome damage and oxidative status have been investigated. The studies were performed on cells in culture, mice, children and adults living in contaminated areas and liquidators. On cells in culture after exposition in the accident zone and culturing thereafter in laboratory conditions the cell proliferative activity decrease; the late cell death, the frequency of cells with micronuclei and giant cells increasing have been observed. In the progeny of exposed cells the enhancement of radiosensitivity has been noticed. So we can suppose that in cultured cells exposition in the zone of the accident the genomic instability is induced which results in many disturbances. At the organism level in mice exposed in the Chernobyl zone the radiosensitivity increase and the decrease of endotheliocytes density in brain tissue has been observed. On the stimulated by PHA blood lymphocytes of children the increase of the frequency of cells with micronuclei more than 2 time have been noticed. In all groups investigated, the decrease of individuals with significant adaptive response was observed. In children and adults inhabitants the increase of radiosensitivity after low dose of irradiation has been noticed. 24-year after the accident it was discovered that in liquidators lymphocytes the frequency of cells with micronuclei, with chromosome type aberrations, with DNA double strand breaks have been increased; the reactive oxygen species (ROS) were decreased in comparison with the control population. We can suppose that genomic instability induced in residents of contaminated regions and liquidators long after the accident results in the genetic apparatus damage, radiosensitivity enhancement, hypoxia that represent risk factors and increase the probability of tumour and non-tumour diseases. The development of these pathological

  18. 137Cs uptake with cafeteria food after the Chernobyl accident

    SciTech Connect

    Voigt, G.; Paretzke, H.G. )

    1992-11-01

    After the Chernobyl accident, the activity concentrations of radiocesium were measured in both the meals served at the cafeteria of a research center and in the employees eating there. The time-dependent means of monthly 137Cs activities in meals and people show a similar distribution pattern with highest values between March and July 1987, i.e., only 1 y after the accident. In meals, the highest activities were found when the menu consisted of pork, milk, or milk products. The 50-y cumulative effective dose calculated from the whole-body measurements is 0.21 mSv for male and 0.15 mSv for female employees. Cafeteria food contributed only a small share to this exposure.

  19. Evironmental health policy in ukraine after the Chernobyl accident

    SciTech Connect

    Page, G.W.; Bobyleva, O.A.; Naboka, M.V.

    1995-09-01

    The 1986 accident at the Chernobyl nuclear power plant in Ukraine produced severe environmental health problems. This paper reports on the environmental health conditions in Ukraine after the accident and the health policy approaches employed to respond to the environmental conditions and health problems. Crisis conditions and a period of rapid change in Ukraine contributed to the difficulties of developing and implementing policy to address serious environmental health problems. Despite these difficulties, Ukraine is taking effective action. The paper describes the primary environmental health problem areas and the efforts taken to solve them. The effect of intense public fear of radiation on policymaking is described. The paper discusses the ability of public fear to distort health policy towards certain problems, leaving problems of greater importance with fewer resources. 35 refs., 1 fig.

  20. Consequences of the nuclear power plant accident at Chernobyl.

    PubMed

    Ginzburg, H M; Reis, E

    1991-01-01

    The Chernobyl Nuclear Power Plant accident, in the Ukrainian Soviet Socialist Republic (SSR), on April 26, 1986, was the first major nuclear power plant accident that resulted in a large-scale fire and subsequent explosions, immediate and delayed deaths of plant operators and emergency service workers, and the radioactive contamination of a significant land area. The release of radioactive material, over a 10-day period, resulted in millions of Soviets, and other Europeans, being exposed to measurable levels of radioactive fallout. Because of the effects of wind and rain, the radioactive nuclide fallout distribution patterns are not well defined, though they appear to be focused in three contiguous Soviet Republics: the Ukrainian SSR, the Byelorussian SSR, and the Russian Soviet Federated Socialist Republic. Further, because of the many radioactive nuclides (krypton, xenon, cesium, iodine, strontium, plutonium) released by the prolonged fires at Chernobyl, the long-term medical, psychological, social, and economic effects will require careful and prolonged study. Specifically, studies on the medical (leukemia, cancers, thyroid disease) and psychological (reactive depressions, post-traumatic stress disorders, family disorganization) consequences of continued low dose radiation exposure in the affected villages and towns need to be conducted so that a coherent, comprehensive, community-oriented plan may evolve that will not cause those already affected any additional harm and confusion.

  1. Consequences of the nuclear power plant accident at Chernobyl.

    PubMed Central

    Ginzburg, H M; Reis, E

    1991-01-01

    The Chernobyl Nuclear Power Plant accident, in the Ukrainian Soviet Socialist Republic (SSR), on April 26, 1986, was the first major nuclear power plant accident that resulted in a large-scale fire and subsequent explosions, immediate and delayed deaths of plant operators and emergency service workers, and the radioactive contamination of a significant land area. The release of radioactive material, over a 10-day period, resulted in millions of Soviets, and other Europeans, being exposed to measurable levels of radioactive fallout. Because of the effects of wind and rain, the radioactive nuclide fallout distribution patterns are not well defined, though they appear to be focused in three contiguous Soviet Republics: the Ukrainian SSR, the Byelorussian SSR, and the Russian Soviet Federated Socialist Republic. Further, because of the many radioactive nuclides (krypton, xenon, cesium, iodine, strontium, plutonium) released by the prolonged fires at Chernobyl, the long-term medical, psychological, social, and economic effects will require careful and prolonged study. Specifically, studies on the medical (leukemia, cancers, thyroid disease) and psychological (reactive depressions, post-traumatic stress disorders, family disorganization) consequences of continued low dose radiation exposure in the affected villages and towns need to be conducted so that a coherent, comprehensive, community-oriented plan may evolve that will not cause those already affected any additional harm and confusion. Images p38-a p38-b PMID:1899937

  2. Consequences of the nuclear power plant accident at Chernobyl

    SciTech Connect

    Ginzburg, H.M.; Reis, E. )

    1991-01-01

    The Chernobyl Nuclear Power Plant accident, in the Ukrainian Soviet Socialist Republic (SSR), on April 26, 1986, was the first major nuclear power plant accident that resulted in a large-scale fire and subsequent explosions, immediate and delayed deaths of plant operators and emergency service workers, and the radioactive contamination of a significant land area. The release of radioactive material, over a 10-day period, resulted in millions of Soviets, and other Europeans, being exposed to measurable levels of radioactive fallout. Because of the effects of wind and rain, the radioactive nuclide fallout distribution patterns are not well defined, though they appear to be focused in three contiguous Soviet Republics: the Ukrainian SSR, the Byelorussian SSR, and the Russian Soviet Federated Socialist Republic. Further, because of the many radioactive nuclides (krypton, xenon, cesium, iodine, strontium, plutonium) released by the prolonged fires at Chernobyl, the long-term medical, psychological, social, and economic effects will require careful and prolonged study. Specifically, studies on the medical (leukemia, cancers, thyroid disease) and psychological (reactive depressions, post-traumatic stress disorders, family disorganization) consequences of continued low dose radiation exposure in the affected villages and towns need to be conducted so that a coherent, comprehensive, community-oriented plan may evolve that will not cause those already affected any additional harm and confusion.

  3. RADIOACTIVE WASTE MANAGEMENT IN THE CHERNOBYL EXCLUSION ZONE - 25 YEARS SINCE THE CHERNOBYL NUCLEAR POWER PLANT ACCIDENT

    SciTech Connect

    Farfan, E.; Jannik, T.

    2011-10-01

    Radioactive waste management is an important component of the Chernobyl Nuclear Power Plant accident mitigation and remediation activities of the so-called Chernobyl Exclusion Zone. This article describes the localization and characteristics of the radioactive waste present in the Chernobyl Exclusion Zone and summarizes the pathways and strategy for handling the radioactive waste related problems in Ukraine and the Chernobyl Exclusion Zone, and in particular, the pathways and strategies stipulated by the National Radioactive Waste Management Program. The brief overview of the radioactive waste issues in the ChEZ presented in this article demonstrates that management of radioactive waste resulting from a beyond-designbasis accident at a nuclear power plant becomes the most challenging and the costliest effort during the mitigation and remediation activities. The costs of these activities are so high that the provision of radioactive waste final disposal facilities compliant with existing radiation safety requirements becomes an intolerable burden for the current generation of a single country, Ukraine. The nuclear accident at the Fukushima-1 NPP strongly indicates that accidents at nuclear sites may occur in any, even in a most technologically advanced country, and the Chernobyl experience shows that the scope of the radioactive waste management activities associated with the mitigation of such accidents may exceed the capabilities of a single country. Development of a special international program for broad international cooperation in accident related radioactive waste management activities is required to handle these issues. It would also be reasonable to consider establishment of a dedicated international fund for mitigation of accidents at nuclear sites, specifically, for handling radioactive waste problems in the ChEZ. The experience of handling Chernobyl radioactive waste management issues, including large volumes of radioactive soils and complex structures

  4. Radiation Risk of Cardiovascular Diseases in the Cohort of Russian Emergency Workers of the Chernobyl Accident.

    PubMed

    Kashcheev, V V; Chekin, S Yu; Karpenko, S V; Maksioutov, M A; Menyaylo, A N; Tumanov, K A; Kochergina, E V; Kashcheeva, P V; Gorsky, A I; Shchukina, N V; Lovachev, S S; Vlasov, O K; Ivanov, V K

    2017-07-01

    This paper continues a series of publications that analyze the impact of radiation on incidence of circulatory system diseases in the cohort of Russian recovery operation workers (liquidators) and presents the results of the analysis of cardiovascular disease (CVD) incidence. The studied cohort consists of 53,772 liquidators who arrived in the Chernobyl accident zone within the first year after the accident (26 April 1986 to 26 April 1987). The individual doses varied from 0.0001 Gy to 1.42 Gy, and the mean external whole body dose in the cohort was 0.161 Gy. A total of 27,456 cases of CVD were diagnosed during the follow-up period 1986-2012 as a result of annual health examinations. A Poisson regression model was applied to estimate radiation risks and other risk factors associated with CVD. The following factors were identified as risk factors for CVD: the dose, duration of the liquidators' work in the Chernobyl zone, and concomitant diseases (diabetes mellitus, hypertension, overweight, and alcohol dependence). The baseline incidence of CVD is statistically significantly (p < 0.001) associated with all studied concomitant diseases. The incidence of CVD has revealed a statistically significant dose response with the lack of a latent period and with the average ERR Gy = 0.47, 95% CI = 0.31, 0.63, p < 0.001. Radiation risks of CVD statistically significantly (p = 0.01) varied with the duration of liquidators' stay in the Chernobyl zone; for those who stayed in the Chernobyl zone less than 6 wk, ERR/Gy = 0.80, 95% CI = 0.53; 1.08, p < 0.001.

  5. Estimation of Explosion Energy Yield at Chernobyl NPP Accident

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pakhomov, Sergey A.; Dubasov, Yuri V.

    2010-05-01

    The value of the 133Xe/133mXe isometric activity ratio for the stationary regime of reactor work is about 35, and that for an instant fission (explosion) is about 11, which allowed estimation of the nuclear component of the instant (explosion) energy release during the NPP accident. Atmospheric xenon samples were taken at the trajectory of accident product transfers (in the Cherepovetz area); these samples were measured by a gamma spectrometer, and the 133Xe/133mXe ratio was determined as an average value of 22.4. For estimations a mathematic model was elaborated considering both the value of instant released energy and the schedule of reactor power change before the accident, as well as different fractionation conditions on the isobaric chain. Comparison of estimated results with the experimental data showed the value of the instant specific energy release in the Chernobyl NPP accident to be 2·105-2·106 J/Wt or 6·1014-6·1015 J (100-1,000 kt). This result is matched up to a total reactor power of 3,200 MWt. However this estimate is not comparable with the actual explosion scale estimated as 10t TNT. This suggests a local character of the instant nuclear energy release and makes it possible to estimate the mass of fuel involved in this explosion process to be from 0.01 to 0.1% of total quantity.

  6. The accident at Chernobyl and outcome of pregnancy in Finland.

    PubMed Central

    Harjulehto, T.; Aro, T.; Rita, H.; Rytömaa, T.; Saxén, L.

    1989-01-01

    OBJECTIVE--To evaluate the outcome of pregnancy in Finnish women after the accident at the Chernobyl nuclear power plant on 26 April 1986. DESIGN--Geographic and temporal cohort study. SETTING--Finland divided into three zones according to amount of radioactive fallout. SUBJECTS--All children who were exposed to radiation during their fetal development. Children born before any effects of the accident could be postulated--that is, between 1 January 1984 and 30 June 1986--served as controls. INTERVENTIONS--Children were divided into three temporal groups: controls, children who were expected to be born in August to December 1986, and children who were expected to be born in February to December 1987. They were also divided, separately, into three groups according to the three geographic zones. END POINT--Incidence of congenital malformations, preterm births, and perinatal deaths. MEASUREMENTS AND MAIN RESULTS--There were no significant differences in the incidence of malformations or perinatal deaths among the three temporal and three geographic groups. A significant increase in preterm births occurred among children who were exposed to radiation during the first trimester whose mothers lived in zones 2 and 3, where the external dose rate and estimated surface activity of caesium-137 were highest. CONCLUSIONS--The results suggest that the amount of radioactive fallout that Finnish people were exposed to after the accident at Chernobyl was not high enough to cause fetal damage in children born at term. The higher incidence of premature births among malformed children in the most heavily polluted areas, however, remains unexplained. PMID:2499391

  7. Neurocognitive and Physical Abilities Assessments Twelve Years After the Chernobyl Nuclear Accident

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2001-03-01

    Chernobyl , Ukraine was conducted. In this report are findings from 1995 to 1998. Participants were volunteers who resided in Ukraine during and since...the Chernobyl Nuclear Power Plant accident. A translated subset of the Automated Neuropsychological Assessment Metrics battery and the Gamache Physical

  8. Chernobyl dose for population of areas radiocontaminated after the Chernobyl accident

    SciTech Connect

    Balonov, M.I.

    1996-12-31

    The parameters and consequences of the Chernobyl accident that took place on 26 April 1986 are of special interest, because it was an extremely serious accident of an operating power nuclear reactor, one of over four hundred in the world. The basic specific feature of this accident determining the complex character of radiation impact on man was the explosive destruction and subsequent high-temperature burning of the reactor, which caused not only the release of inert radioactive gases and radioisotopes of volatile elements (iodine, cesium, tellurium, etc.), but also the evaporation of refractory fission products (barium, strontium, etc.), and the dispersion of fuel particles. Another important feature of the radioactive contamination of the area as compared with that of the global fallout from nuclear weapons testing is a single or short-term deposition which nevertheless leads to long-term exposure of man by long-lived radionuclides. The third specific feature is the combined and strong influence of natural soil and climate factors, on the one hand, and of anthropogenic factors, basically, of wide-scale countermeasures. on the other hand, on the level of exposure of man. 20 refs., 11 figs., 12 tabs.

  9. Internally deposited fallout from the Chernobyl reactor accident

    SciTech Connect

    Schlenker, R.A.; Oltman, B.G.; Lucas, H.F.

    1987-01-01

    Measurements of fallout radioactivity were made in the thyroid region, abdomen, whole body, or urine of 96 persons who were in eastern Europe at the time of the Chernobyl reactor accident or who went there shortly afterward. The most frequently encountered radionuclides were /sup 131/I, /sup 134,137/Cs, and /sup 103/Ru//sup 103/Rh. The median /sup 131/I activity in the thyroids of 42 subjects in whom radioiodine was detected and who were in Europe when the accident began was projected as 42 nCi the day the accident began. The median total body activity of /sup 134/Cs in 40 subjects in which it was detected was 1.7 nCi upon arrival in the US. For 51 subjects with detectable /sup 137/Cs burdens, the total body activity was 4.6 nCi. The risk of fatal thyroid cancer is less than 3 x 10/sup -6/ for nearly all subjects in this series. The risk of fatal cancer from /sup 134,137/Cs for subjects with cesium exposures similar to the ones observed by us, but who remained in Europe, is estimated as 1.4 x 10/sup -6/ to 4.2 x 10/sup -5/ with 95% of the risk attributable to /sup 137/Cs. 5 refs., 4 tabs.

  10. The role of chemical reactions in the Chernobyl accident

    SciTech Connect

    Grishanin, E. I.

    2010-12-15

    It is shown that chemical reactions played an essential role in the Chernobyl accident at all of its stages. It is important that the reactor before the explosion was at maximal xenon poisoning, and its reactivity, apparently, was not destroyed by the explosion. The reactivity release due to decay of Xe-235 on the second day after the explosion led to a reactor power of 80-110 MW. Owing to this power, the chemical reactions of reduction of uranium, plutonium, and other metals at a temperature of about 2000 Degree-Sign C occurred in the core. The yield of fission products thus sharply increased. Uranium and other metals flew down in the bottom water communications and rooms. After reduction of the uranium and its separation from the graphite, the chain reaction stopped, the temperature of the core decreased, and the activity yield stopped.

  11. Short-Term Medical Consequences of the Chernobyl Nuclear Accident: Lessons for the Future

    PubMed Central

    Gale, Robert Peter

    1988-01-01

    The author of this article discusses the world's most serious nuclear accident to date: the Chernobyl nuclear accident of April 1986. His major focus is on the short-term medical consequences of the accident, including reduction of exposure to persons at risk, evaluation of persons potentially affected, dosimetry, and specific medical interventions. PMID:21253129

  12. The Chernobyl reactor accident: the impact on the United Kingdom.

    PubMed

    Fry, F A

    1987-12-01

    I had originally thought that by this time, nearly 1 year after the Chernobyl reactor accident, I would be in a position to describe fully its impact on the UK in terms of radiation doses, economics and future emergency planning. However, only one of these is reasonably clear-the radiological impact. We shall continue our measurements, particularly those of activity in persons, and doubtless we shall refine our estimates of collective dose, but they are unlikely to change significantly. We can therefore be certain that the radiological impact on the UK was small and that the health effects will not be detectable. Predictions of the consequences of accidental releases of radionuclides have in the past, perforce, relied upon models of environmental transfer. Data on which the models are based were obtained from investigations of weapons fallout and of routine releases from nuclear facilities. The Chernobyl accident provided a situation of activity deposition that was well characterised in time and in geographical distribution, and measurements along environmental pathways will allow us to validate or refine our models. This accidental deposition reinforced the importance of some effects that we knew about-such as the importance of wet deposition-and will cause us to consider the need to take account of specific situations that we had not considered previously in adequate detail-in particular, the behaviour of radionuclides in upland ecosystems. The overall economic impact is not yet clear and, unfortunately, is unlikely to become so until all restrictions on the movement and slaughter of sheep are removed and the farmers have received compensation. The effect on international trade may never be quantified. Some international agencies are evaluating the consequences of Chernobyl and their reports will become available during 1987. International agreements on intervention levels are also still under discussion and it would be premature to speculate about the need for

  13. Comparison of the accident process, radioactivity release and ground contamination between Chernobyl and Fukushima-1.

    PubMed

    Imanaka, Tetsuji; Hayashi, Gohei; Endo, Satoru

    2015-12-01

    In this report, we have reviewed the basic features of the accident processes and radioactivity releases that occurred in the Chernobyl accident (1986) and in the Fukushima-1 accident (2011). The Chernobyl accident was a power-surge accident that was caused by a failure of control of a fission chain reaction, which instantaneously destroyed the reactor and building, whereas the Fukushima-1 accident was a loss-of-coolant accident in which the reactor cores of three units were melted by decay heat after losing the electricity supply. Although the quantity of radioactive noble gases released from Fukushima-1 exceeded the amount released from Chernobyl, the size of land area severely contaminated by (137)Cesium ((137)Cs) was 10 times smaller around Fukushima-1 compared with around Chernobyl. The differences in the accident process are reflected in the composition of the discharged radioactivity as well as in the composition of the ground contamination. Volatile radionuclides (such as (132)Te-(132)I, (131)I, (134)Cs and (137)Cs) contributed to the gamma-ray exposure from the ground contamination around Fukishima-1, whereas a greater variety of radionuclides contributed significantly around Chernobyl. When radioactivity deposition occurred, the radiation exposure rate near Chernobyl is estimated to have been 770 μGy h(-1) per initial (137)Cs deposition of 1000 kBq m(-2), whereas it was 100 μGy h(-1) around Fukushima-1. Estimates of the cumulative exposure for 30 years are 970 and 570 mGy per initial deposition of 1000 kBq m(-2) for Chernobyl and Fukusima-1, respectively. Of these exposures, 49 and 98% were contributed by radiocesiums ((134)Cs + (137)Cs) around Chernobyl and Fukushima-1, respectively. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of The Japan Radiation Research Society and Japanese Society for Radiation Oncology.

  14. Comparison of the accident process, radioactivity release and ground contamination between Chernobyl and Fukushima-1

    PubMed Central

    Imanaka, Tetsuji; Hayashi, Gohei; Endo, Satoru

    2015-01-01

    In this report, we have reviewed the basic features of the accident processes and radioactivity releases that occurred in the Chernobyl accident (1986) and in the Fukushima-1 accident (2011). The Chernobyl accident was a power-surge accident that was caused by a failure of control of a fission chain reaction, which instantaneously destroyed the reactor and building, whereas the Fukushima-1 accident was a loss-of-coolant accident in which the reactor cores of three units were melted by decay heat after losing the electricity supply. Although the quantity of radioactive noble gases released from Fukushima-1 exceeded the amount released from Chernobyl, the size of land area severely contaminated by 137Cesium (137Cs) was 10 times smaller around Fukushima-1 compared with around Chernobyl. The differences in the accident process are reflected in the composition of the discharged radioactivity as well as in the composition of the ground contamination. Volatile radionuclides (such as 132Te-132I, 131I, 134Cs and 137Cs) contributed to the gamma-ray exposure from the ground contamination around Fukishima-1, whereas a greater variety of radionuclides contributed significantly around Chernobyl. When radioactivity deposition occurred, the radiation exposure rate near Chernobyl is estimated to have been 770 μGy h−1 per initial 137Cs deposition of 1000 kBq m−2, whereas it was 100 μGy h−1 around Fukushima-1. Estimates of the cumulative exposure for 30 years are 970 and 570 mGy per initial deposition of 1000 kBq m−2 for Chernobyl and Fukusima-1, respectively. Of these exposures, 49 and 98% were contributed by radiocesiums (134Cs + 137Cs) around Chernobyl and Fukushima-1, respectively. PMID:26568603

  15. Accident at the Chernobyl nuclear power plant and its consequences

    SciTech Connect

    Lewis, H.W.

    1986-11-01

    In the early morning of April 26, 1986, as the culmination of an almost incredible series of errors that began 24 hours earlier, Unit 4 of the Chernobyl nuclear complex, a so-called RBMK-1000 reactor, suffered the worst accident in the history of commercial nuclear power. There was an uncontrolled nuclear excursion, release of a large amount of energy, possibly comparable to hundreds of pounds of TNT, blowing the top off the reactor. There was no containment, in the traditional American sense, so the roof of the building was blown out, an unprecedented amount of radioactivity was released to the biosphere, and a graphite fire was ignited, which burned for days. The radiation that was released spread through Eastern Europe (the world first learned of it through Swedish observations), bringing with it both official and unofficial protests that the Soviet Union had made no announcement of the radiation release until they were, in effect, caught. In fact, after a few days, the Soviets seemed to recognize that nuclear safety is a matter of international concern, and became quite open in their search for cooperation. They invited officials of the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) to visit the area and to fly over the plant, and agreed, in the end, to make a complete disclosure of the details of the accident at a special meeting of IAEA in Vienna, August 25 to 29, 1986. In preparation for that meeting they distributed a lengthy (400 pages) report on the event. This paper reviews this report.

  16. The chernobyl accident 20 years on: an assessment of the health consequences and the international response.

    PubMed

    Baverstock, Keith; Williams, Dillwyn

    2006-09-01

    The Chernobyl accident in 1986 caused widespread radioactive contamination and enormous concern. Twenty years later, the World Health Organization and the International Atomic Energy Authority issued a generally reassuring statement about the consequences. Accurate assessment of the consequences is important to the current debate on nuclear power. Our objectives in this study were to evaluate the health impact of the Chernobyl accident, assess the international response to the accident, and consider how to improve responses to future accidents. So far, radiation to the thyroid from radioisotopes of iodine has caused several thousand cases of thyroid cancer but very few deaths ; exposed children were most susceptible. The focus on thyroid cancer has diverted attention from possible nonthyroid effects, such as mini-satellite instability, which is potentially important. The international response to the accident was inadequate and uncoordinated, and has been unjustifiably reassuring. Accurate assessment of Chernobyl's future health effects is not currently possible in the light of dose uncertainties, current debates over radiation actions, and the lessons from the late consequences of atomic bomb exposure. Because of the uncertainties over the dose from and the consequences of the Chernobyl accident, it is essential that investigations of its effects should be broadened and supported for the long term. Because of the problems with the international response to Chernobyl, the United Nations should initiate an independent review of the actions and assignments of the agencies concerned, with recommendations for dealing with future international-scale accidents. These should involve independent scientists and ensure cooperation rather than rivalry.

  17. [The psychic status and work capacity of the victims of the accident at the Chernobyl Nuclear Power Station in the period of recovery from and near-term consequences of acute radiation sickness].

    PubMed

    Torubarov, F S; Chinkina, O V

    1991-01-01

    Analysis of the results of clinicopsychological investigation of persons developing ARS (I-III degree of severity) as a result of the Chernobyl accident has shown that 4-6 mos. after the exposure the psychic status and mental working ability of the affected persons showed close correlation with a degree of ARS. In 12-18 mos. profession and adequate employment played a decisive role in the formation of unfavorable psychic conditions and limited working ability. Later on in 2.5-3 years after exposure a decrease in psychic working ability, the development of unfavorable psychic conditions was noted more frequently in patients with ARS of more severe types and in examinees of older age. At all stages of rehabilitation personality traits of the affected persons play an important role in the revival of working abilities.

  18. Agricultural land management options after the Chernobyl and Fukushima accidents: The articulation of science, technology, and society.

    PubMed

    Vandenhove, Hildegarde; Turcanu, Catrinel

    2016-10-01

    The options adopted for recovery of agricultural land after the Chernobyl and Fukushima accidents are compared by examining their technical and socio-economic aspects. The analysis highlights commonalities such as the implementation of tillage and other types of countermeasures and differences in approach, such as preferences for topsoil removal in Fukushima and the application of K fertilizers in Chernobyl. This analysis shows that the recovery approach needs to be context-specific to best suit the physical, social, and political environment. The complex nature of the decision problem calls for a formal process for engaging stakeholders and the development of adequate decision support tools. Integr Environ Assess Manag 2016;12:662-666. © 2016 SETAC.

  19. Simulation of atmospheric dispersion of radioactivity from the Chernobyl accident

    SciTech Connect

    Lange, R.; Sullivan, T.J.; Gudiksen, P.H. )

    1989-07-01

    Measurements of airborne radioactivity over Europe, Japan, and the United States indicated that the release from the Chernobyl reactor accident in the Soviet Union on April 26, 1986 contained a wide spectrum of fission up to heights of 7 km or more within a few days after the initial explosion. This high-altitude presence of radioactivity would in part be attributable to atmospheric dynamics factors other than the thermal energy released in the initial explosion. Indications were that two types of releases had taken place -- an initial powerful explosion followed by days of a less energetic reactor fire. The Atmospheric Release Advisory Capability (ARAC) at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) utilized three-dimensional atmospheric dispersion models to determine the characteristics of the source term (release) and the evolution of the spatial distributions of the airborne radioactivity as it was transported over Europe and subsequently over the northern hemisphere. This paper describes the ARAC involvement and the results of the hemispheric model calculations which graphically depict the extensive dispersal of radioactivity. 1 fig.

  20. Radiocaesium contamination of beef in Croatia after the Chernobyl accident.

    PubMed

    Franić, Zdenko; Marović, Gordana; Mestrović, Jurica

    2008-06-01

    Long-term investigations of radiocaesium activity concentrations in beef in the Republic of Croatia are presented. The radiocaesium levels in beef decreased exponentially and the effective ecological half-life of 137Cs was estimated to be 0.57+/-0.06 years for 1986-1990 period and 5.21+/-0.27 years for the 1991-2005 period. For 1986-1990 period, the effective ecological half-life of 134Cs in was estimated to be about 0.69+/-0.05 while 134Cs activity concentrations after year 1990 were below the detection limit of the instruments. The 134Cs:137Cs activity ratio in beef has been found to be similar to the ratio that has been observed in other foodstuffs and environmental samples. Radioecological sensitivity for beef meat, i.e., the transfer coefficient from fallout to sample was estimated to be 1.15x 10(-2)Bqykg(-1)/(Bqm(-2)). For an adult member of Croatian population annual effective doses received by 134Cs and 137Cs intake due to consumption of beef are small, as per caput effective dose for the overall 1986-2005 period was estimated to be 24.6microSv. Consequently, after the Chernobyl accident beef consumption was not a critical pathway for the transfer of radiocaesium from fallout to humans in Croatia.

  1. International program on the health effects of the Chernobyl accident.

    PubMed

    Kreisel, W

    1995-05-01

    The International Program on the Health Effects of the Chernobyl Accident (IPHECA) was established by the World Health Organization (WHO) in 1991. Currently, the technical part of IPHECA consists of five projects addressing the following areas of priority health problems or needs: thyroid, hematology, brain damage in utero, epidemiological registry and oral health. Important findings are: 1) a significant increase of thyroid cancer in children in Belarus and Ukraine since 1989, and in Russia since 1992 though not so pronounced. A relationship between detected thyroid cancers and radiation exposure is yet to be established, 2) no increase yet in the incidence of hemoblastoses in the three States, 3) no relationship established between mental retardation and radiation exposure in utero in 4,500 children investigated. The importance of dosimetry and biological indicators of radiation damage has been recognized by IPHECA. Several methods of biological and physical dosimetry are being employed using instrumentation provided by IPHECA. Some preliminary results indicate: 1) unstable aberrations can indicate an integral exposure but it is heavily biased to recent exposures, 2) when comparing healthy persons and patients with hematological diseases in contaminated areas, there is a higher ratio of total aberrations compared to their background and that the level of stable is lower than unstable aberrations, and 3) by applying electron spin resonance (ESR) it has been shown that the individual distribution of doses approaches a log-normal one, especially for adults, and that a peak shift towards higher doses is noticeable for children.

  2. [Radiation effects of the Chernobyl accident on the Hungarian population].

    PubMed

    Kanyár, Béla

    2002-05-12

    Due to the nuclear accident at Chernobyl in April 1986, the atmospheric transport spread the released radioactivity throughout the whole Europe. The initial plume moved into the north-western direction and a portion of this plum turned to west and later on to south-west. The central European countries including Hungary became affected in 29-30 April. The release during the last period (5-7 May) was directed to Romania, Bulgaria and Greece. In addition to the main trajectories of the atmospheric transport, the local meteorological conditions with winds of different directions at various altitudes, rainfalls etc. produced a very complex deposition pattern in Central Europe. The contamination of the soil surface and vegetation were strongly influenced by the wash-out of the radioactive materials from the local air. Due to the high geographical variation of the rains the surface contamination provided a similar heterogeneity among the territories of the country. The northern-west part and the region of the capital Budapest became nearly 5 times higher contaminated than the middle part of the country. Radiation doses of the population have been provided by activity concentrations in air, soil, vegetation, foods etc. and the external dose rates, mainly due to the surface contamination by the isotopes of 131I, 134Cs and 137Cs. The average effective dose contribution received by the individuals (adults) in Hungary during the 15 years following the accident has been assessed to be 0.30 mSv while the annual dose from the natural background is 2.5-3 mSv. Contribution to total dose from the internal pathway (committed effective dose) resulted about 0.10 mSv and the external radiation provided 0.19 mSv. The contributions of the external exposure from the contaminated air and inhalation are less than 5% of the total one.

  3. [State of broncho-pulmonary system in liquidators of Chernobyl power accident consequences].

    PubMed

    Guseva, M Iu

    2006-01-01

    Liquidators of Chernobyl power accident consiquences were subjected to simultaneous external gamma-beta radiation and inhalation of particles containing radionuclides aerosols, nonradiation toxic chemicals and dust. Typical defects of medical examination of liquidators were seen: sending people with pulmonary diseases to post-accident work, erroneous interpretation of the disease severity with underestimation of previous occupational history and nonradiation factors deteriorating the case.

  4. [Long-term response of bronchopulmonary system in liquidators of Chernobyl accident].

    PubMed

    Antonova, M Iu

    2005-01-01

    Liquidators of chernobyl accident consequences were subjected to simultaneous external gamma-beta-radiation and inhalation of particles containing radionuclide aerosols and nonradiation toxic chemicals. findings are typical defects of the liquidators examination: assignment of individuals with pulmonary disorders to post-accident work, misinterpretation of the disease severity with underestimation of previous occupational anamnesis and aggravating role of nonradiation.

  5. Thirty years after the Chernobyl accident: What lessons have we learnt?

    PubMed

    Beresford, N A; Fesenko, S; Konoplev, A; Skuterud, L; Smith, J T; Voigt, G

    2016-06-01

    April 2016 sees the 30(th) anniversary of the accident at the Chernobyl nuclear power plant. As a consequence of the accident populations were relocated in Belarus, Russia and Ukraine and remedial measures were put in place to reduce the entry of contaminants (primarily (134+137)Cs) into the human food chain in a number of countries throughout Europe. Remedial measures are still today in place in a number of countries, and areas of the former Soviet Union remain abandoned. The Chernobyl accident led to a large resurgence in radioecological studies both to aid remediation and to be able to make future predictions on the post-accident situation, but, also in recognition that more knowledge was required to cope with future accidents. In this paper we discuss, what in the authors' opinions, were the advances made in radioecology as a consequence of the Chernobyl accident. The areas we identified as being significantly advanced following Chernobyl were: the importance of semi-natural ecosystems in human dose formation; the characterisation and environmental behaviour of 'hot particles'; the development and application of countermeasures; the "fixation" and long term bioavailability of radiocaesium and; the effects of radiation on plants and animals.

  6. Fallout from the Chernobyl accident and overall cancer incidence in Finland.

    PubMed

    Kurttio, Päivi; Seppä, Karri; Pasanen, Kari; Patama, Toni; Auvinen, Anssi; Pukkala, Eero; Heinävaara, Sirpa; Arvela, Hannu; Hakulinen, Timo

    2013-10-01

    We studied whether incidence of all cancer sites combined was associated with the radiation exposure due to fallout from the Chernobyl accident in Finland. An emphasis was on the first decade after the accident to assess the suggested "promotion effect". The segment of Finnish population with a stable residence in the first post-Chernobyl year (2 million people) was studied. The analyses were based on a 250m × 250m grid squares covering all of Finland and all cancer cases except cancers of the breast, prostate and lung. Cancer incidence in four exposure areas (based on first-year dose due to external exposure <0.1 mSv, 0.1-1.3, 0.3-0.5, or ≥ 0.5 mSv) was compared before the Chernobyl accident (1981-1985) and after it (1988-2007) taking into account cancer incidence trends for a longer period prior to the accident (since 1966). There were no systematic differences in the cancer incidence in relation to radiation exposure in any calendar period, or any subgroup by sex or age at accident. The current large and comprehensive cohort analysis of the relatively low levels of the Chernobyl fallout in Finland did not observe a cancer promotion effect. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Rehabilitation of soils and surface after a nuclear accident: Some techniques tried in the Chernobyl zone

    SciTech Connect

    Jouve, A.; Maubert, H.; Kutlakhamedov, Y.

    1993-12-31

    Six years after the Chernobyl accident, the major part of deposited radio nuclides remains in the 3 or 4 cm of the topsoil of abandoned fields in the chernobyl zone. The Decontaminating Vegetal Network allows a layer of few centimeters of the top soil to be removed with a turf harvester. The efficiency observed at Chernobyl was 97% for cesium-137 and strontium-90. After scraping the soil with the turf harvester, the bare soil must be covered and re-grown in order to prevent wind erosion of the sandy soil. A trial spraying of polyacrylamide on the soil was carried out. This technique seems promising. Trials of bio-decontamination of the removed turf using anaerobic degradation were also carried out. This experiment provided an opportunity to measure in real conditions the transfer of radionuclides in the Chernobyl zone.

  8. Justification of remediation strategies in the long term after the Chernobyl accident.

    PubMed

    Fesenko, S; Jacob, P; Ulanovsky, A; Chupov, A; Bogdevich, I; Sanzharova, N; Kashparov, V; Panov, A; Zhuchenka, Yu

    2013-05-01

    Following the accident at the nuclear power plant in Chernobyl a number of different remedial actions were developed and implemented in Belarus, Russia, and Ukraine. Recommendations on the application of countermeasures and remedial actions were published by the IAEA as "Guidelines for agricultural countermeasures following an accidental release of radionuclides" in 1994. Since then, new information on the behaviour of radionuclides in the environment and effectiveness of countermeasures in the long term has been obtained and reviewed by many projects, including the Chernobyl Forum. Additionally, new approaches to derive remediation strategies were developed and successfully implemented in the most affected countries. This paper describes a justification of the remediation strategies suggested for rehabilitation of the areas most affected by the Chernobyl accident based on this experience.

  9. Scientific and technical assistance to the Republic of Belarus in the wake of the Chernobyl accident

    SciTech Connect

    Stanley, N.W.

    1996-12-31

    Observations are presented in this paper from a visit to the Republic of Belarus after the Chernobyl accident. The trip was part of the Volunteers in Overseas Cooperative Assistance (VOCA) program. The primary focus of the paper is on environmental issues and the impact on agriculture. This overview discusses pertinent technical, social, and economic issues, and provides recommendations for continued international assistance. 4 refs.

  10. [Effects on health of the Chernobyl accident: 30 years on].

    PubMed

    Weiland, N; Steiner, Dr M; Grosche, B

    2016-09-01

    This paper reflects the current state of research into the short- and long-term effects on health in the former Soviet Union and Europe of the nuclear accident in Chernobyl. It discusses the latest results of epidemiological studies and presents future research perspectives.

  11. [Specific Features of Scots Pine Seeds Formation in the Remote Period after the Chernobyl NPP Accident].

    PubMed

    Geras'kin, S A; Vasiliev, D V; Kuzmenkov, A G

    2015-01-01

    The results of long-term (2007-2011) observations on the quality of seed progeny in Scots pine populations inhabiting the sites within the Bryansk region contaminated as a result of the Chernobyl NPP accident are presented. Formed under the chronic exposure seeds are characterized by a high interannual variability, which is largely determined by weather conditions.

  12. Long term radiocesium contamination of fruit trees following the Chernobyl accident

    SciTech Connect

    Antonopoulos-Domis, M.; Clouvas, A.; Gagianas, A.

    1996-12-01

    Radiocesium contamination form the Chernobyl accident of fruits and leaves from various fruit trees was systematically studied form 1990-1995 on two agricultural experimentation farms in Northern Greece. The results are discussed in the framework of a previously published model describing the long-term radiocesium contamination mechanism of deciduous fruit trees after a nuclear accident. The results of the present work qualitatively verify the model predictions. 11 refs., 5 figs., 1 tab.

  13. Behavioral differences of irradiated persons associated with the Kyshtym, Chelyabinsk, and Chernobyl nuclear accidents.

    PubMed

    Collins, D L

    1992-10-01

    Three nuclear accidents besides Chernobyl have occurred in the former Soviet Union. The accidents occurred around Kyshtym and Chelyabinsk in the Ural Mountains between 1949 and 1967 and contaminated over one-half million people. The health ministries are now interested in the data previously collected on these irradiated populations in order to examine the health (e.g., psychological, hereditary, genome damage, etc.) implications of long-term radiation exposure.

  14. Effects of non-human species irradiation after the Chernobyl NPP accident.

    PubMed

    Geras'kin, S A; Fesenko, S V; Alexakhin, R M

    2008-08-01

    The area affected by the Chernobyl Nuclear Power Plant accident in 1986 has become a unique test site where long-term ecological and biological consequences of a drastic change in a range of environmental factors as well as trends and intensity of selection are studied in natural settings. The consequences of the Chernobyl accident for biota varied from an enhanced rate of mutagenesis to damage at the ecosystem level. The review comprehensively brings together key data of the long-term studies of biological effects in plants and animals inhabiting over 20 years the Chernobyl NPP zone. The severity of radiation effects was strongly dependent on the dose received in the early period after the accident. The most exposed phytocenoses and soil animals' communities exhibited dose dependent alterations in the species composition and reduction in biological diversity. On the other hand, no decrease in numbers or taxonomic diversity of small mammals even in the most radioactive habitat was shown. In a majority of the studies, in both plant and animal populations from the Chernobyl zone, in the first years after the accident high increases in mutation rates were documented. In most cases the dose-effect relationships were nonlinear and the mutation rates per unit dose were higher at low doses and dose rates. In subsequent years a decline in the radiation background rate occurred faster than reduction in the mutation rate. Plant and animal populations have shown signs of adaptation to chronic exposure. In adaptation to the enhanced level of exposure an essential role of epigenetic mechanisms of gene expression regulation was shown. Based on the Chernobyl NPP accident studies, in the present review attempts were made to assess minimum doses at which ecological and biological effects were observed.

  15. Evacuation zone changes in Belarussian wildlife populations following the Chernobyl nuclear accident

    SciTech Connect

    Plenin, A.E.; Rurv, P.M.

    1995-12-31

    Nine years of wildlife monitoring in the 30-km Chernobyl evacuation zone documented effects on faunal biodiversity at various levels of ecosystem integration, helping to focus future investigations needed to distinguish radioecological impacts from those caused by reduced human activity within this zone. Following the direct, aucte radiation effects on the fauna, some long-term stabilization appears in the radionuclide content of animal tissues. The recovery of faunal populations seems to depend more on the secondary effects of human evacuation than on direct radioecological impacts. Natural ecological succession may have accelerated due to the post-evacuation removal of human pressure on contaminated habitats. Cessation of human activity has most benefited the commercially hunted bird and mammal populations. Wild boar, elk, and roe deer populations also have increased to new levels of post-accident equilibrium whereas the recovery of other animal populations is less pronounced. While the number of some rare wildlife species increased in the affected communities, many of those wildlife populations normally associated with human activity have disappeared. In abandoned settlements, the succession of plant communities dominated by trees and shrubs now promotes recolonization by those wildlife communities that are more typical of woodland habitats undisturbed by human activity. These dynamic processes of transformation of wildlife communities offer a unique opportunity to study the development and conservation of wild animal biodiversity within the context of specific land use and landscape ecological changes.

  16. The Chernobyl Accident 20 Years On: An Assessment of the Health Consequences and the International Response

    PubMed Central

    Baverstock, Keith; Williams, Dillwyn

    2006-01-01

    Background The Chernobyl accident in 1986 caused widespread radioactive contamination and enormous concern. Twenty years later, the World Health Organization and the International Atomic Energy Authority issued a generally reassuring statement about the consequences. Accurate assessment of the consequences is important to the current debate on nuclear power. Objectives Our objectives in this study were to evaluate the health impact of the Chernobyl accident, assess the international response to the accident, and consider how to improve responses to future accidents. Discussion So far, radiation to the thyroid from radioisotopes of iodine has caused several thousand cases of thyroid cancer but very few deaths; exposed children were most susceptible. The focus on thyroid cancer has diverted attention from possible nonthyroid effects, such as mini-satellite instability, which is potentially important. The international response to the accident was inadequate and uncoordinated, and has been unjustifiably reassuring. Accurate assessment of Chernobyl’s future health effects is not currently possible in the light of dose uncertainties, current debates over radiation actions, and the lessons from the late consequences of atomic bomb exposure. Conclusions Because of the uncertainties over the dose from and the consequences of the Chernobyl accident, it is essential that investigations of its effects should be broadened and supported for the long term. Because of the problems with the international response to Chernobyl, the United Nations should initiate an independent review of the actions and assignments of the agencies concerned, with recommendations for dealing with future international-scale accidents. These should involve independent scientists and ensure cooperation rather than rivalry. PMID:16966081

  17. Estimates of the cancer burden in Europe from radioactive fallout from the Chernobyl accident.

    PubMed

    Cardis, Elisabeth; Krewski, Daniel; Boniol, Mathieu; Drozdovitch, Vladimir; Darby, Sarah C; Gilbert, Ethel S; Akiba, Suminori; Benichou, Jacques; Ferlay, Jacques; Gandini, Sara; Hill, Catherine; Howe, Geoffrey; Kesminiene, Ausrele; Moser, Mirjana; Sanchez, Marie; Storm, Hans; Voisin, Laurent; Boyle, Peter

    2006-09-15

    The Chernobyl accident, which occurred April 26, 1986, resulted in a large release of radionuclides, which were deposited over a very wide area, particularly in Europe. Although an increased risk of thyroid cancer in exposed children has been clearly demonstrated in the most contaminated regions, the impact of the accident on the risk of other cancers as well as elsewhere in Europe is less clear. The objective of the present study was to evaluate the human cancer burden in Europe as a whole from radioactive fallout from the accident. Average country- and region-specific whole-body and thyroid doses from Chernobyl were estimated using new dosimetric models and radiological data. Numbers of cancer cases and deaths possibly attributable to radiation from Chernobyl were estimated, applying state-of-the-art risk models derived from studies of other irradiated populations. Simultaneously, trends in cancer incidence and mortality were examined over time and by dose level. The risk projections suggest that by now Chernobyl may have caused about 1,000 cases of thyroid cancer and 4,000 cases of other cancers in Europe, representing about 0.01% of all incident cancers since the accident. Models predict that by 2065 about 16,000 (95% UI 3,400-72,000) cases of thyroid cancer and 25,000 (95% UI 11,000-59,000) cases of other cancers may be expected due to radiation from the accident, whereas several hundred million cancer cases are expected from other causes. Although these estimates are subject to considerable uncertainty, they provide an indication of the order of magnitude of the possible impact of the Chernobyl accident. It is unlikely that the cancer burden from the largest radiological accident to date could be detected by monitoring national cancer statistics. Indeed, results of analyses of time trends in cancer incidence and mortality in Europe do not, at present, indicate any increase in cancer rates -- other than of thyroid cancer in the most contaminated regions

  18. [Comparative analysis of the radionuclide composition in fallout after the Chernobyl and the Fukushima accidents].

    PubMed

    Kotenko, K V; Shinkarev, S M; Abramov, Iu V; Granovskaia, E O; Iatsenko, V N; Gavrilin, Iu I; Margulis, U Ia; Garetskaia, O S; Imanaka, T; Khoshi, M

    2012-01-01

    The nuclear accident occurred at Fukushima Dai-ichi Nuclear Power Plant (NPP) (March 11, 2011) similarly to the accident at the Chernobyl NPP (April 26, 1986) is related to the level 7 of the INES. It is of interest to make an analysis of the radionuclide composition of the fallout following the both accidents. The results of the spectrometric measurements were used in that comparative analysis. Two areas following the Chernobyl accident were considered: (1) the near zone of the fallout - the Belarusian part of the central spot extended up to 60 km around the Chernobyl NPS and (2) the far zone of the fallout--the "Gomel-Mogilev" spot centered 200 km to the north-northeast of the damaged reactor. In the case of Fukushima accident the near zone up to about 60 km considered. The comparative analysis has been done with respect to refractory radionuclides (95Zr, 95Nb, 141Ce, 144Ce), as well as to the intermediate and volatile radionuclides 103Ru, 106Ru, 131I, 134Cs, 137Cs, 140La, 140Ba and the results of such a comparison have been discussed. With respect to exposure to the public the most important radionuclides are 131I and 137Cs. For the both accidents the ratios of 131I/137Cs in the considered soil samples are in the similar ranges: (3-50) for the Chernobyl samples and (5-70) for the Fukushima samples. Similarly to the Chernobyl accident a clear tendency that the ratio of 131I/137Cs in the fallout decreases with the increase of the ground deposition density of 137Cs within the trace related to a radioactive cloud has been identified for the Fukushima accident. It looks like this is a universal tendency for the ratio of 131I/137Cs versus the 137Cs ground deposition density in the fallout along the trace of a radioactive cloud as a result of a heavy accident at the NPP with radionuclides releases into the environment. This tendency is important for an objective reconstruction of 131I fallout based on the results of 137Cs measurements of soil samples carried out at

  19. The mental health of clean-up workers 18 years after the Chernobyl accident.

    PubMed

    Loganovsky, K; Havenaar, J M; Tintle, N L; Guey, L T; Kotov, R; Bromet, E J

    2008-04-01

    The psychological aftermath of the Chernobyl accident is regarded as the largest public health problem unleashed by the accident to date. Yet the mental health of the clean-up workers, who faced the greatest radiation exposure and threat to life, has not been systematically evaluated. This study describes the long-term psychological effects of Chernobyl in a sample of clean-up workers in Ukraine. The cohorts were 295 male clean-up workers sent to Chernobyl between 1986 and 1990 interviewed 18 years after the accident (71% participation rate) and 397 geographically matched controls interviewed as part of the Ukraine World Mental Health (WMS) Survey 16 years after the accident. The World Health Organization (WHO) Composite International Diagnostic Interview (CIDI) was administered. We examined group differences in common psychiatric disorders, suicide ideation and severe headaches, differential effects of disorder on days lost from work, and in the clean-up workers, the relationship of exposure severity to disorder and current trauma and somatic symptoms. Analyses were adjusted for age in 1986 and mental health prior to the accident. Relatively more clean-up workers than controls experienced depression (18.0% v. 13.1%) and suicide ideation (9.2% v. 4.1%) after the accident. In the year preceding interview, the rates of depression (14.9% v. 7.1%), post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) (4.1% v. 1.0%) and headaches (69.2% v. 12.4%) were elevated. Affected workers lost more work days than affected controls. Exposure level was associated with current somatic and PTSD symptom severity. Long-term mental health consequences of Chernobyl were observed in clean-up workers.

  20. Retrospection of Chernobyl nuclear accident for decision analysis concerning remedial actions in Ukraine

    SciTech Connect

    Georgievskiy, Vladimir

    2007-07-01

    It is considered the efficacy of decisions concerning remedial actions when of-site radiological monitoring in the early and (or) in the intermediate phases was absent or was not informative. There are examples of such situations in the former Soviet Union where many people have been exposed: releases of radioactive materials from 'Krasnoyarsk-26' into Enisey River, releases of radioactive materials from 'Chelabinsk-65' (the Kishtim accident), nuclear tests at the Semipalatinsk Test Site, the Chernobyl nuclear accident etc. If monitoring in the early and (or) in the intermediate phases is absent the decisions concerning remedial actions are usually developed on the base of permanent monitoring. However decisions of this kind may be essentially erroneous. For these cases it is proposed to make retrospection of radiological data of the early and intermediate phases of nuclear accident and to project decisions concerning remedial actions on the base of both retrospective data and permanent monitoring data. In this Report the indicated problem is considered by the example of the Chernobyl accident for Ukraine. Their of-site radiological monitoring in the early and intermediate phases was unsatisfactory. In particular, the pasture-cow-milk monitoring had not been made. All official decisions concerning dose estimations had been made on the base of measurements of {sup 137}Cs in body (40 measurements in 135 days and 55 measurements in 229 days after the Chernobyl accident). For the retrospection of radiological data of the Chernobyl accident dynamic model has been developed. This model has structure similar to the structure of Pathway model and Farmland model. Parameters of the developed model have been identified for agricultural conditions of Russia and Ukraine. By means of this model dynamics of 20 radionuclides in pathways and dynamics of doses have been estimated for the early, intermediate and late phases of the Chernobyl accident. The main results are following

  1. [Nuclear-power-plant accidents: thyroid cancer incidence and radiation-related health effects from the Chernobyl accident].

    PubMed

    Schlumberger, Martin; Le Guen, Bernard

    2012-01-01

    Following the Chernobyl accident, enormous amounts of radioisotopes were released in the atmosphere and have contaminated surrounding populations in the absence of rapid protective countermeasures. The highest radiation doses were delivered to the thyroid gland, and the only direct consequence of radiation exposure observed among contaminated population is the increased incidence of thyroid cancers among subjects who were children in 1986 and who lived at that time in Belarus, Ukraine or Russia. © 2012 médecine/sciences – Inserm / SRMS.

  2. [Analysis of radiation-hygienic and medical consequences of the Chernobyl accident].

    PubMed

    Onishchenko, G G

    2013-01-01

    Since the day of "the Chernobyl accident" in 1986 more than 25 years have been past. Radioactively contaminated areas 14 subjects of the Russian Federation with a total area of more than 50 thousand km2, where 1.5 million people now reside were exposed to radioactive contamination. Currently, a system of comprehensive evaluation of radiation doses of the population affected by the "Chernobyl accidents", including 11 guidance documents has been created. There are methodically provided works on the assessment of average annual, accumulated and predicted radiation doses of population and its critical groups, as well as doses to the thyroid gland The relevance of the analysis of the consequences of the "Chernobyl accident" is demonstrated by the events in Japan, at nuclear power Fukusima-1. In 2011 - 20/2 there were carried out comprehensive maritime expeditions under the auspices of the Russian Geographical Society with the participation of relevant ministries and agencies, leading academic institutions in Russia. In 2012, work was carried out on radiation protection of the population from the potential transboundary impact of the accident at the Japanese nuclear power plant Fukushima-l. The results provide a basis for the favorable outlook for the radiation environment in our Far East and the Pacific coast of Russia.

  3. [Pneumocystosis distribution among accident liquidators in the Chernobyl nuclear power plant in remote period].

    PubMed

    Meĭmarian, M A

    2009-01-01

    The goal of the present study was to discover etiological role of Pneumocystis carini/jiroveci and to determine frequency of pneumocystic infection in the structure of bronchopulmonary pathology among armenians-liquidators of accident consequences in the Chernobyl Nuclear Power Plant. For the study, 65 patients-liquidators with diagnosed pneumonia, 44 liquidators with chronic bronchitis and 34 with bronchial asthma were examined. The control group was included 65 patients with pneumonia, 44 with chronic bronchitis, 34 with bronchial asthma which were unlinked with radionucleotide aggression. Mean age in main group was 46,9 and in control group- 47,6 years old. Main and control groups were randomized by sexual characteristics also. Serologic examinations were performed by the ELISA (enzyme-linked immunoSorbent assay) and method of immunofluorescent detection of P.carinii. Circulation of pneumocystosis etiologic agent among patients-liquidators of accident consequences in the Chernobyl Nuclear Power Plant with different bronchopulmonary pathology was established and high percentage of seropositivity was revealed. Overall these data revealed high probability of Pneumocystis carini/jiroveci in the etiology of bronchopulmonary pathology among liquidators of accident consequences in the the Chernobyl Nuclear Power Plant. Even among immunocompromised patients, liquidators of accident consequences, represent an exclusive group, that is in risk for activation of latent infection or new infection with P. carini/jiroveci. Therefore these findings suggest that there is a need for regular complex epidemiological monitoring of these patients.

  4. Mental health and alcohol problems among Estonian cleanup workers 24 years after the Chernobyl accident.

    PubMed

    Laidra, Kaia; Rahu, Kaja; Tekkel, Mare; Aluoja, Anu; Leinsalu, Mall

    2015-11-01

    To study the long-term mental health consequences of the 1986 Chernobyl nuclear accident among cleanup workers from Estonia. In 2010, 614 Estonian Chernobyl cleanup workers and 706 geographically and age-matched population-based controls completed a mail survey that included self-rated health, the Posttraumatic Stress Disorder Checklist (PCL), alcohol symptoms (AUDIT), and scales measuring depressive, anxiety, agoraphobia, fatigue, insomnia, and somatization symptoms. Respondents were dichotomized into high (top quartile) and low symptom groups on each measure. Logistic regression analysis detected significant differences between cleanup workers and controls on all measures even after adjustment for ethnicity, education, marital status, and employment status. The strongest difference was found for somatization, with cleanup workers being three times more likely than controls to score in the top quartile (OR = 3.28, 95% CI 2.39-4.52), whereas for alcohol problems the difference was half as large (OR = 1.52, 95% CI 1.16-1.99). Among cleanup workers, arrival at Chernobyl in 1986 (vs. later) was associated with sleep problems, somatization, and symptoms of agoraphobia. The toll of cleanup work was evident 24 years after the Chernobyl accident among Estonian cleanup workers indicating the need for focused mental health interventions.

  5. Compendium of the Environmental Measurements Laboratory's research projects related to the Chernobyl nuclear accident

    SciTech Connect

    Volchok, H L; Chieco, N

    1986-10-01

    Following the accident at the Chernobyl nuclear reactor power station in the USSR on April 26, 1986, the Environmental Measurements Laboratory (EML) initiated a number of research projects as follows: (1) selected sites in both the Deposition and Surface Air networks were alerted and their sampling protocols adjusted to accommodate the anticipated arrival times and activity concentrations of the Chernobyl debris; (2) a number of cooperative programs involving field work, sampling, analysis and data interpretation were set up with institutions and scientists in other countries; (3) EML's Regional Baseline Station at Chester, NJ, as well as the roof of the Laboratory in New York City, provided bases for sampling and measurements to study the radionuclide concentrations, radiation levels, physical characteristics and potential biological implications of the Chernobyl fallout on the northeastern United States; and (4) the resulting fallout from the Chernobyl accident provided an 'experiment of opportunity' in that it enabled us to study fresh fission product deposition using collection systems resurrected from the 1950's and 1960's for comparison with current state-of-the-art methodology. The 13 reports of this volume have been entered separately into the data base.

  6. [The hematological effects of the Chernobyl accident in children].

    PubMed

    Stepanova, E I; Kondrashova, V G; Davidenko, O A; Kniazeva, O B; Galichanskaia, T Ia

    1992-01-01

    A total of 878 children from the regions with unfavourable radiation situation were investigated in varying periods after the catastrophe. The data obtained were compared with the results of the study of 317 children from "pure" regions. Morphological, metabolic and ultrastructural changes were detected in blood cells of the children from radioactively contaminated regions after the Chernobyl catastrophe. A tendency to normalization of these parameters was noted in the time course of the post-catastrophe period. No clear relationship was established between the dose and effect. However, significant correlations between the severity of disorders in blood cells and the intensity of free-radical processes in the body were recorded.

  7. Monte-Carlo prediction of changes in areas of west Cumbria requiring restrictions on sheep following the Chernobyl accident.

    PubMed

    Wright, S M; Smith, J T; Beresford, N A; Scott, W A

    2003-04-01

    Following the 1986 Chernobyl accident radiocaesium levels in sheep meat in some upland areas of the United Kingdom were above the national intervention limit. West Cumbria was one of these areas and restrictions are currently still in place. In addition to deposition from the Chernobyl accident, Cumbria has been subject to radiocaesium deposition from atmospheric nuclear weapons tests, the 1957 Windscale accident and routine releases from the Sellafield nuclear reprocessing plant. A Monte-Carlo approach has been used to try to predict areas in west Cumbria where radiocaesium activity concentrations in lamb meat would require the imposition of restrictions at different times after the Chernobyl accident. The approach models the transfer of radiocaesium from soil to vegetation, based upon soil organic matter, and from vegetation to lamb meat. Spatial inputs are soil organic matter and total post-Chernobyl (137)Cs and (134)Cs deposition; a ratio of Chernobyl (137)Cs to (134)Cs deposition has been used to differentiate Chernobyl and pre-Chernobyl (137)Cs deposition. Comparisons of predicted radiocaesium transfer from soil-vegetation and the spatial variation in lamb (137)Cs activity concentrations are good and predicted restricted areas with time after Chernobyl compare well to the restricted areas set by UK government. We predict that restrictions may be required until 2024 and that in some areas the contribution of pre-Chernobyl (137)Cs to predicted lamb radiocaesium activity concentrations is significant, such that restrictions may only have been required until 1994 as a consequence of Chernobyl radiocaesium deposition alone. This work represents a novel implementation of a spatial radioecological model using a Monte-Carlo approach.

  8. [Informative value of the specialized registers in research of leukemia in Chernobyl accident liquidators in Ukraine].

    PubMed

    Romanenko, A E; Gudzenko, N A; Bebeshko, V G; Bazyka, D A; Ledoshchuk, B A; Trotsiuk, N K; Babkina, N G; Bomko, E I; Beliaev, Iu N; Diagil', I S; Fedorenko, Z P; Gulak, L O; Gorokh, E L; Kortushin, G I

    2006-06-01

    The article considers the possibility of the use of current infrastructure of specialized population registers of Ukraine to study leukemia and other systemic blood diseases revealed in Chernobyl accident liquidators. Advantage and limitation of such registers in the use are discussed in the article. Ukrainian state register of people who suffered from Chernobyl accident and Ukrainian national cancer registers are the largest population registers in the country, which cover all the territory of Ukraine and contain information on each individual and may serve as source base for epidemiological studies. To solve issues on leukemia and other oncological diseases is recommended to use in complex data of specialized registers of Ukraine. It should be also taken into account necessity of using late registered cases and verifying registered diagnoses.

  9. [Frequency of congenital abnormalities in Hungary after the Chernobyl nuclear power accident].

    PubMed

    Sándor, János; Métneki, Júlia; Szunyogh, Melinda; Siffel, Csaba

    2003-11-09

    The only positive result of earlier Hungarian teratological investigations on consequences of Chernobyl nuclear power station accident was the description of increased prevalence of birth with less than 2500 g body weight. It was attributed to the concern of the pregnant women, not to the direct effect of ionising radiation. The present study aimed to refine the earlier results by application of sensitive epidemiological techniques. The exposure data observed in the 150 districts of Hungary were correlated with the prevalence of Down syndrome by geographical information system and the monthly detected prevalences were analysed in the function of exposure. The ecological investigation on geographical inequalities revealed that there is no correlation between the district level exposure and Down syndrome prevalence. The time trend analysis on monthly data showed no exposure-related elevation of Down-syndrome occurrence. The results supported the earlier conclusions of the studies that the Chernobyl accident related exposure did not elicited detectable increase of Down syndrome.

  10. Modelling transport and deposition of caesium and iodine from the Chernobyl accident using the DREAM model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brandt, J.; Christensen, J. H.; Frohn, L. M.

    2002-06-01

    A tracer model, DREAM (the Danish Rimpuff and Eulerian Accidental release Model), has been developed for modelling transport, dispersion and deposition (wet and dry) of radioactive material from accidental releases, as the Chernobyl accident. The model is a combination of a Lagrangian model, that includes the near source dispersion, and an Eulerian model describing the long-range transport. The performance of the transport model has previously been tested within the European Tracer Experiment, ETEX, which included transport and dispersion of an inert, non-depositing tracer from a controlled release. The focus of this paper is the model performance with respect to the deposition of 137Cs, 134Cs and 131I from the Chernobyl accident, using different relatively simple and comprehensive parameterizations. The performance, compared to measurements, of different combinations of parameterizations of wet and dry deposition schemes has been evaluated, using different statistical tests.

  11. Radionuclide monitoring in Northern Ireland of the Chernobyl nuclear reactor accident

    PubMed Central

    Gilmore, B J; Cranley, K

    1987-01-01

    Northern Ireland received higher radiation doses due to the radionuclide contamination from the Chernobyl nuclear reactor accident than did the south of England. Levels of radioactive iodine (131I) and caesium (137Cs) in cows' milk in Northern Ireland increased to 166 and 120 Bq/l respectively in May 1986, but had decreased by factors of one million, and of twenty-five, respectively, by 1 September 1986. The resultant radiation doses represent less than one per cent of those received by a Northern Ireland individual over a period of 40 years from natural background radiation sources. The added risk to any individual from the Chernobyl accident will therefore be very small and may best be judged in the context of the enormously greater risk of death due to potentially preventable diseases, such as smoking-related lung cancer, and coronary heart disease. PMID:3590387

  12. Impact on agriculture in Norway from the Chernobyl accident, 1986-1995

    SciTech Connect

    Tveten, U.; Bergen, T.D.S.; Brynildsen, L.I.; Amundsen, I.

    1996-12-31

    Even now, 10 yr after the Chernobyl accident, the consequences are felt in some Western European countries, particularly in Norway, where considerable yearly economic consequences to Norwegian agriculture are incurred. This paper summarizes these economic consequences year by year over the 10-yr period and describes the various countermeasures adopted to reduce the consequences. The consequences are mainly connected to the production of mutton and reindeer meat.

  13. Health effects of the Chernobyl accident: fears, rumours and the truth.

    PubMed

    Rahu, Mati

    2003-02-01

    The impact of the world's worst nuclear disaster at Chernobyl in 1986 is reviewed within a framework of a triad of fear, rumour and truth. The scope of the accident, Soviet secrecy about it, and the lack of general awareness of, or disregard for, the effects of radiation created a fertile ground for persistent fears and rumours attributing any health problem to Chernobyl. Scientifically correct answers to health issues have been the means to combat disinformation, and to replace interconnected fears, misconceptions and rumours. To date, according to the United Nations Scientific Committee on the Effects of Atomic Radiation (UNSCEAR) 2000 Report, based on a review of epidemiological and radiobiological studies, the main radiation-related effect of the Chernobyl accident is an increased risk of childhood thyroid cancer. In addition, the accident has had serious non-radiation-related psychological consequences on the residents of the contaminated territories, resettled populations and clean-up workers. Researchers in search of the truth through epidemiological reasoning are facing serious challenges which are reviewed within this article.

  14. Increased leukemia risk in Chernobyl cleanup workers

    Cancer.gov

    A new study found a significantly elevated risk for chronic lymphocytic leukemia among workers who were engaged in recovery and clean-up activities following the Chernobyl power plant accident in 1986.

  15. The Chernobyl accident: EPR dosimetry on dental enamel of children.

    PubMed

    Gualtieri, G; Colacicchi, S; Sgattoni, R; Giannoni, M

    2001-07-01

    The radiation dose on tooth enamel of children living close to Chernobyl has been evaluated by EPR. The sample preparation was reduced to a minimum of mechanical steps to remove a piece of enamel. A standard X-ray tube at low energy was used for additive irradiation. The filtration effect of facial soft tissue was taken into account. The radiation dose for a group of teeth slightly exceeds the annual dose, whereas for another group the dose very much exceeds the annual dose. Since the higher dose is found in teeth whose enamel have much lower EPR sensitivity to the radiation, it can be suggested that for these teeth the native signal could alter the evaluation of the smaller radiation signal.

  16. Monitoring of radioactive contamination of water systems after Chernobyl accident

    SciTech Connect

    Kuznetsov, Y.V.

    1993-12-31

    The contamination of the water systems within the Russian North-West region, the Danube river and the reservoir of the Dnieper River during the period from June 1986 to 1992 was studied. The water reservoirs in the vicinity of the Chernobyl NPP contained suspended matter and the bottom sediments contained a wide range of radionuclides, including the isotopes of Pu and TPE. In the Baltic Sea and the allied river and lake reservoirs the concentrations of {sup 137}Cs ({sup 134}Cs was also detected) increased drastically, however, the concentrations of {sup 90}Sr and plutonium isotopes remained essentially at the global level. The Danube River contained increased concentrations of {sup 137}Cs and {sup 90}Sr as compared with 1985; no rise in the concentration of plutonium was observed. In subsequent years (1987--1990) the concentration of cesium isotopes in the reservoirs decreased sharply; but, on the other hand, their concentrations in sediments increased.

  17. Particle size distribution of radioactive aerosols after the Fukushima and the Chernobyl accidents.

    PubMed

    Malá, Helena; Rulík, Petr; Bečková, Vera; Mihalík, Ján; Slezáková, Miriam

    2013-12-01

    Following the Fukushima accident, a series of aerosol samples were taken between 24th March and 13th April 2011 by cascade impactors in the Czech Republic to obtain the size distribution of (131)I, (134)Cs, (137)Cs, and (7)Be aerosols. All distributions could be considered monomodal. The arithmetic means of the activity median aerodynamic diameters (AMADs) for artificial radionuclides and for (7)Be were 0.43 and 0.41 μm with GDSs 3.6 and 3.0, respectively. The time course of the AMADs of (134)Cs, (137)Cs and (7)Be in the sampled period showed a slight decrease at a significance level of 0.05, whereas the AMAD pertaining to (131)I increased at a significance level of 0.1. Results obtained after the Fukushima accident were compared with results obtained after the Chernobyl accident. The radionuclides released during the Chernobyl accident for which we determined the AMAD fell into two categories: refractory radionuclides ((140)Ba, (140)La (141)Ce, (144)Ce, (95)Zr and (95)Nb) and volatile radionuclides ((134)Cs, (137)Cs, (103)Ru, (106)Ru, (131)I, and (132)Te). The AMAD of the refractory radionuclides was approximately 3 times higher than the AMAD of the volatile radionuclides; nevertheless, the size distributions for volatile radionuclides having a mean AMAD value of 0.51 μm were very close to the distributions after the Fukushima accident.

  18. Transgenic plants are sensitive bioindicators of nuclear pollution caused by the Chernobyl accident

    SciTech Connect

    Kovalchuk, I.; Kovalchuk, O. |; Arkhipov, A.; Hohn, B.

    1998-11-01

    To evaluate the genetic consequences of radioactive contamination originating from the Nuclear reactor accident of Chernobyl on indigenous populations of plants and animals, it is essential to determine the rates of accumulating genetic changes in chronically irradiated populations. An increase in germline mutation rates in humans living close to the Chernobyl Nuclear Power Plant site, and a two- to tenfold increase in germline mutations in barn swallows breeding in Chernobyl have been reported. Little is known, however, about the effects of chronic irradiation on plant genomes. Ionizing radiation causes double-strand breaks in DNA, which are repaired via illegitimate or homologous recombination. The authors make use of Arabidopsis thaliana plants carrying a {beta}-glucuronidase marker gene as a recombination substrate to monitor genetic alterations in plant populations, which are caused by nuclear pollution of the environment around Chernobyl. A significant increase in somatic intrachromosomal recombination frequencies was observed at nuclear pollution levels from 0.1--900 Ci/km{sup 2}, consistent with an increase in chromosomal aberrations. This bioindicator may serve as a convenient and ethically acceptable alternative to animal systems.

  19. Management of Ultimate Risk of Nuclear Power Plants by Source Terms - Lessons Learned from the Chernobyl Accident

    SciTech Connect

    Genn Saji

    2006-07-01

    The term 'ultimate risk' is used here to describe the probabilities and radiological consequences that should be incorporated in siting, containment design and accident management of nuclear power plants for hypothetical accidents. It is closely related with the source terms specified in siting criteria which assures an adequate separation of radioactive inventories of the plants from the public, in the event of a hypothetical and severe accident situation. The author would like to point out that current source terms which are based on the information from the Windscale accident (1957) through TID-14844 are very outdated and do not incorporate lessons learned from either the Three Miles Island (TMI, 1979) nor Chernobyl accident (1986), two of the most severe accidents ever experienced. As a result of the observations of benign radionuclides released at TMI, the technical community in the US felt that a more realistic evaluation of severe reactor accident source terms was necessary. In this background, the 'source term research project' was organized in 1984 to respond to these challenges. Unfortunately, soon after the time of the final report from this project was released, the Chernobyl accident occurred. Due to the enormous consequences induced by then accident, the one time optimistic perspectives in establishing a more realistic source term were completely shattered. The Chernobyl accident, with its human death toll and dispersion of a large part of the fission fragments inventories into the environment, created a significant degradation in the public's acceptance of nuclear energy throughout the world. In spite of this, nuclear communities have been prudent in responding to the public's anxiety towards the ultimate safety of nuclear plants, since there still remained many unknown points revolving around the mechanism of the Chernobyl accident. In order to resolve some of these mysteries, the author has performed a scoping study of the dispersion and deposition

  20. MESORAD dose assessment of the Chernobyl reactor accident

    SciTech Connect

    Ramsdell, J.V.; Hubbe, J.M.; Athey, G.F.; Davis, W.E.

    1989-12-01

    An accident involving Unit 4 of the Chernobylskaya Atomic Energy Station resulted in the release of a large amount of radioactive material to the atmosphere. This report describes the results of an assessment of the doses near the site (within 80 km) made at the Pacific Northwest Laboratory using the MESORAD Dose Assessment model. 6 refs., 10 figs., 5 tabs.

  1. Formation of hot particles during the Chernobyl nuclear power plant accident

    SciTech Connect

    Kashparov, V.A.; Ivanov, Y.A.; Zvarisch, S.I.; Protsak, V.P.; Khomutinin, Y.V.; Kurepin, A.D.; Pazukhin, E.M.

    1996-05-01

    The oxidation of irradiated Chernobyl nuclear fuel at 670 to 1,170 K for 3 to 21 h resulted in its destruction into fine particles, the dispersal composition of which is well described by lognormal distribution regularity. The median radius of the formed particles does not depend on the annealing temperature and decreases with the increase of the annealing period from 10 to 3 {micro}m. Proceeding from the dispersal composition and matrix composition of the Chernobyl hot fuel particles, it can be concluded that the oxidation of nuclear fuel was one of the basic mechanisms of hot fuel particle formation during the accident at the Chernobyl nuclear power plant. With oxidation in air and the dispersal of irradiated oxide nuclear fuel at as low as 670 K, ruthenium, located on the granular borders, is released. Ruthenium is oxidized to volatile RuO{sub 4}, sublimated, and condensed on materials of iron. Nickel and stainless steel can be efficiently used at high temperatures (tested to 1,200 K) for radioruthenium adsorption in accidents and for some technological operations. As the temperature of hot fuel particles annealed in inert media increases from 1,270 to 2,270 K, the relative release of radionuclides increases in the following sequence: cesium isotopes; europium isotopes; cerium isotopes; americium isotopes; and ruthenium, plutonium, and curium isotopes.

  2. Thyroid examination in highly radiation-exposed workers after the Chernobyl accident.

    PubMed

    Boehm, Bernhard O; Steinert, Marianna; Dietrich, Johannes W; Peter, Ralf U; Belyi, David; Wagemaker, Gerald; Rosinger, Silke; Fliedner, Theodor M; Weiss, Melanie

    2009-04-01

    Radioactive contamination from the Chernobyl nuclear accident that happened on the morning of 26th April 1986 had a major impact on thyroid health in the Belarus region. Observational study of a cohort of 99 adults, most strongly exposed to ionizing radioactivity. Observational study performed between 1998 and 2000. The cohort comprised 99 workers (92 male) of the Chernobyl nuclear power plant. Examination including physical examination, ultrasonography of the thyroid gland and measurement of serum free thyroxin (fT(4)), free triiodothyronine (fT(3)) and TSH. Anti-thyroperoxidase (anti-TPO), antithyroglobulin (anti-Tg) antibodies and thyroid stimulating immunoglobulin were also determined. The impact of exposure to high-dose radiation, including radioactive iodine, on the thyroid gland was examined. Levels of fT(4) in all probands were within the normal World Health Organization-defined range. Elevated levels of fT(3) were found in two workers (2%), high titres of anti-TPO and anti-Tg antibodies were present in four subjects (4%). Mild hypothyroidism was present in one patient. Enlargement of the thyroid gland was observed in 17 workers (17%). There was no evidence of clinically overt thyroid cancer. The Chernobyl accident showed surprisingly little impact on the thyroid in a cohort of workers strongly exposed to radiation. Our data suggest an age-dependent heterogeneity in response to the short-lived radioiodine isotopes and favours long-term follow-up analysis.

  3. Long-term health implications of the Chernobyl accident and relevant projects of the World Health Organization.

    PubMed

    Yamashita, Shunichi; Carr, Zhanat; Repacholi, Michael

    2007-11-01

    The past two decades have witnessed dramatic changes in public health governance and international cooperation on the Chernobyl Nuclear Power Plant accident, especially after the end of the Cold War. The World Health Organization (WHO) has committed itself deeply to the public health issues around Chernobyl and has participated in various health projects such as health monitoring and cancer screening. WHO has also been engaged in research activities such as the Chernobyl Tissue Bank, in close collaboration with the Ministries of Health in Belarus, Russia, and Ukraine. In addition to the official report of the Chernobyl Forum "Health Expert Groups" in 2005, the task of WHO is to not only analyze and clarify the global burden of Chernobyl-related illness, but also to promote the well-being of the local residents who suffered chronic low-level radiation exposure from radiation fallout.

  4. Radiation Exposure and Thyroid Cancer Risk After the Fukushima Nuclear Power Plant Accident in Comparison with the Chernobyl Accident.

    PubMed

    Yamashita, S; Takamura, N; Ohtsuru, A; Suzuki, S

    2016-09-01

    The actual implementation of the epidemiological study on human health risk from low dose and low-dose rate radiation exposure and the comprehensive long-term radiation health effects survey are important especially after radiological and nuclear accidents because of public fear and concern about the long-term health effects of low-dose radiation exposure have increased considerably. Since the Great East Japan earthquake and the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant accident in Japan, Fukushima Prefecture has started the Fukushima Health Management Survey Project for the purpose of long-term health care administration and medical early diagnosis/treatment for the prefectural residents. Especially on a basis of the lessons learned from the Chernobyl accident, both thyroid examination and mental health care are critically important irrespective of the level of radiation exposure. There are considerable differences between Chernobyl and Fukushima regarding radiation dose to the public, and it is very difficult to estimate retrospectively internal exposure dose from the short-lived radioactive iodines. Therefore, the necessity of thyroid ultrasound examination in Fukushima and the intermediate results of this survey targeting children will be reviewed and discussed in order to avoid any misunderstanding or misinterpretation of the high detection rate of childhood thyroid cancer.

  5. Multifractal analysis of the 137Cs fallout pattern in Austria resulting from the Chernobyl accident.

    PubMed

    Pausch, G; Bossew, P; Hofmann, W; Steger, F

    1998-06-01

    The cumulative deposition of the 137Cs fallout in Austria resulting from the passage of the Chernobyl cloud has been investigated by applying correlation dimension and hyperbolic frequency distribution methods. For the analysis, a total of 1,881 deposition values were used, which were collected by the Federal Environmental Agency of Austria and the Federal Ministry of Health, representing all available measurements of 137Cs in soil made in Austria after the Chernobyl accident. From these data a hyperbolic exponent for the frequency distribution of 4.0 and a set of fractal correlation dimensions, which decrease from 1.426 +/- 0.022 (for the whole network) to 0.706 +/- 0.047 (for 137Cs values > or = 100 kBq m(-2)), were derived, thus confirming that the fallout pattern can be described as a multifractal.

  6. Vertical migration studies of 137Cs from nuclear weapons fallout and the Chernobyl accident.

    PubMed

    Almgren, S; Isaksson, M

    2006-01-01

    The vertical migration of (137)Cs originating from nuclear weapons fallout (NWF) and the Chernobyl accident has been studied at 33 sampling sites in western Sweden. An attempt to describe the present depth distribution with a solution to the convection-diffusion equation (CDE) with a pulse-like fallout event as the initial condition was made. A sum of two CDEs describing the NWF and Chernobyl debris was fitted to the actual depth profiles measured by soil sampling. The fitted depth profiles were used to correct in situ measurements for the actual depth distribution, showing good agreement with the accumulated activities in soil samples. As expected, the vertical migration was very slow and most caesium was still present in the upper soil layers. The ranges of the apparent convection velocity, v, and apparent diffusion coefficient, D, were between 0 and 0.35 cm/year and 0.06 and 2.63 cm(2)/year, respectively.

  7. A consistent radionuclide vector after the Chernobyl accident.

    PubMed

    Mück, Konrad; Pröhl, Gerhard; Likhtarev, Ilya; Kovgan, Lina; Meckbach, Reinhard; Golikov, Vladislav

    2002-02-01

    The radionuclide vector in the release plume from the destroyed unit 4 of the Chernobyl Nuclear Power Plant was assessed. Emphasis was laid on radionuclides relevant for the internal dose, including those with short half-lives, and on the radionuclide vector in the 30-km zone where practically no data in air or foodstuff are available. An evaluation of data was performed by comparing core analysis data and actual measurements of air filters and deposition data. The derived nuclide vector is consistent with most measurements and core analysis data. The ratios of the various radionuclides with regard to the guide isotope 137Cs vary both with direction of release and with increasing distance from the power plant. The variation and its causes are discussed, and a credible, consistent model for the vector at arbitrary distances from the nuclear power plant, in particular with regard to non-volatile radionuclides, is given. In that way the observed large discrepancies of the radionuclide vector determined by Russian and Ukrainian researchers, and those measured in Central and Northern European are explained by the fact that 90Sr, 95Zr, 140Ba, and 144Ce, which showed a much higher ratio to 137Cs close to the reactor than at 1,000 km distance, were attached to particle sizes of 8 microm and thus quicker deposited than the volatile radionuclides which were attached to 1 microm particulates on average. Also, the 131I to 137Cs ratio changes with distance by almost one order of magnitude which is explained by the higher deposition velocity of iodine.

  8. Present concept on current water protection and remediation activities for the areas contaminated by the 1986 Chernobyl accident

    SciTech Connect

    Voitsekhovitch, O.; Prister, B.; Nasvit, O.; Los, I.; Berkovski, V.

    1996-07-01

    The results of radiation monitoring data and migration pathway analysis of water bodies within areas affected by the 1986 Chernobyl accident provide a unique opportunity for decision-makers working in other extensively contaminated regions to optimize their approaches to surface and groundwater protection. Most engineering measures within the Chernobyl 30-km exclusion zone were focused on preventing secondary contamination of surface and groundwater from entering the Pripyat River and the Kiev Reservoir. However, implementation of these measures required huge financial and human resources. Therefore, lessons about post-accidental water protection activities can be learned form the Chernobyl example. 9 refs., 9 figs.

  9. Evidence for an increase in trisomy 21 (Down syndrome) in Europe after the Chernobyl reactor accident.

    PubMed

    Sperling, Karl; Neitzel, Heidemarie; Scherb, Hagen

    2012-01-01

    The objective of this study is to investigate the prevalence of Down syndrome (DS) associated with Chernobyl fallout. Maternal age-adjusted DS data and corresponding live birth data from the following seven European countries or regions were analyzed: Bavaria and West Berlin in Germany, Belarus, Hungary, the Lothian Region of Scotland, North West England, and Sweden from 1981 to 1992. To assess the underlying time trends in the DS occurrence, and to investigate whether there have been significant changes in the trend functions after Chernobyl, we applied logistic regression allowing for peaks and jumps from January 1987 onward. The majority of the trisomy 21 cases of the previously reported, highly significant January 1987 clusters in Belarus and West Berlin were conceived when the radioactive clouds with significant amounts of radionuclides with short physical half-lives, especially (131)iodine, passed over these regions. Apart from this, we also observed a significant longer lasting effect in both areas. Moreover, evidence for long-term changes in the DS prevalence in several other European regions is presented and explained by exposure, especially to (137)Cs. In many areas, (137)Cs uptake reached its maximum one year after the Chernobyl accident. Thus, the highest increase in trisomy 21 should be observed in 1987/1988, which is indeed the case. Based on the fact that maternal meiosis is an error prone process, the assumption of a causal relationship between low-dose irradiation and nondisjunction is the most likely explanation for the observed increase in DS after the Chernobyl reactor accident.

  10. Post-Chernobyl accident radioactivity measurements in the Comunidad Autonoma de Valencia, Spain.

    PubMed

    Ortiz, J; Ballesteros, L; Serradell, V

    1992-03-01

    Increased atmospheric radioactivity after the accident in Chernobyl was first detected on air filters. Measurements were begun in Valencia on May 2, 1986, with the maximum activity being observed around May 3-4, 1986. As a consequence of this accident, annual campaigns of measurements on migrating birds (several species of aquatic birds and song-thrushes) were started. The data corresponding to the campaign immediately after the accident (1986/87) show a generalized contamination (approximately 50% of the measured specimens). Significant levels of 134Cs, 137Cs and 110Agm were found. It is important to note that 110Agm is only present in Aythya ferina. In the successive campaigns in 1988/89 and 1989/91 few samples were found to be contaminated and only 137Cs was identified. Strontium-90 was measured and identified in some specimens, mainly in their bones.

  11. Radiological impact in Greece of the Chernobyl accident--a 10-y retrospective synopsis.

    PubMed

    Kritidis, P; Florou, H

    2001-05-01

    The present study summarizes the published results of the studies of the Environmental Radioactivity Laboratory on the radiological impact in Greece of the Chernobyl nuclear accident. Some unpublished data from personal communications also have been used to present the time evolution of the studies. The radiological impact in Greece of the Chernobyl accident is examined in two separate phases: that of the acute effects and that of the delayed effects. Some measurements cover the whole period from the accidental pollution to the return to pre-accident levels and are used for estimations of ecological half-lives. The composition of radioactive fallout is examined, and the integrated concentrations of the principal radionuclides in the fallout are presented. The variations in the air concentrations of certain radionuclides and those of the gamma-ray intensity are presented as well. Some results from the study of hot particles detected during the acute phase are also given. The radioactive contamination of abiotic environmental components, food, and crops during the acute and the delayed effects phases are discussed in relation to the radiological impact on the population.

  12. Thyroid cancer incidence among people living in areas contaminated by radiation from the Chernobyl accident.

    PubMed

    Ron, Elaine

    2007-11-01

    As a result of the Chernobyl nuclear power plant accident, massive amounts of radioactive materials were released into the environment and large numbers of individuals living in Belarus, Russia, and Ukraine were exposed to radioactive iodines, primarily 131I. Iodine-131 concentrated in the thyroid gland of residents of the contaminated areas, with children and adolescents being particularly affected. In the decade after the accident, a substantial increase in thyroid cancer incidence was observed among exposed children in the three affected countries, and compelling evidence of an association between pediatric thyroid cancer incidence and radiation exposure to the thyroid gland accumulated. The data currently available suggest that both the magnitude and patterns of thyroid cancer risk are generally consistent with those reported following external exposure. Based on data from case-control studies, iodine deficiency appeared to enhance the risk of developing thyroid cancer following exposure from Chernobyl. Results from a recent large cohort study, however, did not support these findings. Data on adult exposure are limited and not entirely consistent. Similarly, information on thyroid cancer risks associated with in utero exposure is insufficient to draw conclusions. The lack of information on these two population groups indicates an important gap that needs to be filled. Twenty years after the accident, excess thyroid cancers are still occurring among persons exposed as children or adolescents, and, if external radiation can be used as a guide, we can expect an excess of radiation-associated thyroid cancers for several more decades. Since considerable uncertainties about the long-term health effects from Chernobyl remain, continued follow-up of the exposed populations should provide valuable information.

  13. [Genetic effects in the liquidators of consequences of Chernobyl Nuclear Power Plant accident].

    PubMed

    Liaginskaia, A M; Tukov, A R; Osipov, V A; Prokhorova, O N

    2007-01-01

    The purpose of the present research was the estimation of probable genetic consequences at the liquidators of the consequences of Chernobyl accident in 1986-1987. The research is made on two groups of the liquidators. The first group included the liquidators taking place on the account in the branch register and working now at the enterprises of a nuclear industry. The second group included 902 liquidators of consequences of Chernobyl accident in 1986 constantly living in the Ryazan area and which are taking place on permanent observation the account in regional hospital. For an estimation of probable genetic effects analyzed the data on frequency and outcomes pregnancy of the wives of the liquidators, on condition and on diseases of newborn, on switching intrauterine development defects (IDD). The analysis carried out depending on dozes of an irradiation: up to 5 cGy; 5-10 cGy and 10-25 cGy. Received materials testify, that at the liquidators, at a doze of an external irradiation 10-25 cGy, the determined effects--period long sterility, kept at a part them till 3 years come to light. The set of the received data, such as depending from the dose increase of frequency of spontaneous abortions and of inherent defects of development of newborn, the increase of frequency diseases of newborn and share newborn with low weight, allows to make a conclusion about an induction of genetic effects in sexual cells of the liquidators of consequences of Chernobyl accident at dozes of an external irradiation more than 10 cGy. Taking into account high biological efficiency of alpha-radiation (K = 20), and of beta-radiation (K = 2-4), the equivalent effective doze male gonads (testes) in 3-5 times is higher, than estimated only from external gamma-radiation.

  14. Nuclear reactor accidents: Chernobyl, TMI, and windscale. (Latest citations from Pollution Abstracts). Published Search

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1994-11-01

    The bibliography contains citations concerning studies and measurements of the radiological consequences of nuclear reactor accidents. The citations cover specifically the Chernobyl reactor in the USSR, the Three Mile Island (TMI) reactor in the US, and the Windscale reactor in the UK. Included are detection and monitoring of the fallout; the resultant runoff into rivers, lakes, and the sea; the radiation effects on people; and the transfrontier radioactive contamination of the environment. (Contains 250 citations and includes a subject term index and title list.)

  15. Nuclear reactor accidents: Chernobyl, TMI, and Windscale. (Latest citations from Pollution abstracts). Published Search

    SciTech Connect

    1995-12-01

    The bibliography contains citations concerning studies and measurements of the radiological consequences of nuclear reactor accidents. The citations cover specifically the Chernobyl reactor in the USSR, the Three Mile Island (TMI) reactor in the US, and the Windscale reactor in the UK. Included are detection and monitoring of the fallout; the resultant runoff into rivers, lakes, and the sea; the radiation effects on people; and the transfrontier radioactive contamination of the environment. (Contains 50-250 citations and includes a subject term index and title list.) (Copyright NERAC, Inc. 1995)

  16. [Unsolved radioecological problems of Chernobyl NPP Exclusion Zone at late phase of the accident].

    PubMed

    Ivanov, Iu A; Bondar'kov, M D

    2009-01-01

    Some scientific and scientific-industrial radioecological problems of Chernobyl NPP Exclusion Zone are considered. These problems are demanding its solution or development of already obtaining results for adequate understanding and planning of conducted researches as well as for decision support of activities directed to minimization of the accident consequences. Following problems are discussed: an estimation of radiological significance of natural and technogenic objects of the Zone, long-term dynamics of radioecological processes, autorehabilitation processes of the Zone ecosystems, complex estimation of the influence of the Zone technogenic objects to radioecological state of ecosystems, radioecology of urban ecosystems (by the example of former town Pripyat) and problems of rehabilitation of abandoned areas.

  17. [Genetic disorders in house mice after the accident at Chernobyl power plant].

    PubMed

    Pomerantseva, M D; Ramaĭa, L K; Chekhovich, A V

    1997-01-01

    Genetic effects were studied in house mice caught from 1986 to 1994 in regions polluted by radionuclides as a result of the Chernobyl disaster. The dose rates of gamma-radiation on the soil surface ranged from 0.02 to 200 mR/h. The frequency of reciprocal translocations in mouse spermatocytes was relatively low, but increased with the dose rate. Embryo mortality was increased only in the progeny of male mice caught in 1987 in the area with maximum contamination. The frequency of mice heterozygous for recessive lethal mutations decreased with the time after the accident.

  18. [Genetic sequelae of the accident at the Chernobyl nuclear power plant in house mice (Mus musculus)].

    PubMed

    Pomerantseva, M D; Ramaĭa, L K; Chekhovich, A V

    1996-02-01

    Genetic disorders were studied in house mice caught from 1986 to 1993 in areas contaminated by radionuclides after the Chernobyl disaster. Dose rates on soil surface ranged from 0.02 to 200 mR/h. Frequency of reciprocal translocations in spermatocytes of the mice studied was relatively low, but increased with dose rate. In populations, frequency of mice heterozygous for recessive lethal mutations decreased with time after the accident. The data obtained allow us to assume that induced mutations may lead to elimination of germ cells and decreased viability in mice heterozygous for the mutations. These processes result in removing excess mutations from the population.

  19. Radionuclide deposition and exposure in the Federal Republic of Germany after the Chernobyl accident

    SciTech Connect

    Winkelmann, I.; Haubelt, R.; Neumann, P.; Fields, D.E. . Inst. fuer Strahlenhygiene; Oak Ridge National Lab., TN )

    1989-11-01

    Analyses of air, water, and foodstuff samples, together with in situ gamma spectrometric measurements in the Federal Republic of Germany, have documented the deposition and exposure consequences of the Chernobyl accident. In some cases, exposure values are significantly higher than background levels. Data compiled for the period from the initial identification of excess atmospheric radioactivity to the present, represent a unique resource for testing and validating models of environmental transport and human exposure. These data will serve as the bases for future studies of organism response, both somatic and genetic, to nuclear radiation. They will also prove useful in suggesting modifications to environmental sampling and monitoring systems. 14 refs., 13 figs., 4 tabs.

  20. [The dose estimation of woody plants in the long-term after the Chernobyl NPP accident].

    PubMed

    Spiridonov, S I; Fesenko, S V; Geras'kin, S A; Solomatin, V M; Karpenko, E I

    2008-01-01

    Dosimetric models have been developed to estimate the exposure doses of woody plants growing in the area contaminated by long-lived radionuclides. The models are parameterized based on the data obtained from the experimental plots in the south-west districts of the Bryansk region affected by radioactive fallout of the Chernobyl NPP accident. Doses are estimated to generative organs of pine trees from these plots. The contribution from various sources and types of ionizing radiation to the absorbed dose formation for these objects is determined.

  1. Radiocesium in migratory bird species in northern Ireland following the Chernobyl accident

    SciTech Connect

    Pearce, J.

    1995-06-01

    Radioactive fallout arising form the nuclear reactor accident at Chernobyl on 26 April 1986 reached Northern Ireland in early May and was deposited in rain. However, the subsequent contamination of food supplies in Northern Ireland were well below national and international levels at which any action would be considered necessary and presented no risks to health. In addition to the direct contamination of food supplies with radionuclides in the form of fallout following the Chernobyl incident another potential source of radioactive contamination entering the human food chain was through the arrival of migratory species of game birds. Each autumn and winter many thousands of birds migrate to Northern Ireland from Northern and Eastern Europe and some of these could have been contaminated as a result of being directly affected by the fallout from Chernobyl. The purpose of this work was to examine the extend of radionuclide contamination in such species and a number of samples were obtained for analyses during the autumn/winter periods in 1986/87 and 1987/88. The results obtained are outlined below. 5 refs., 3 tabs.

  2. The Chernobyl accident, the male to female ratio at birth and birth rates.

    PubMed

    Grech, Victor

    2014-01-01

    The male:female ratio at birth (male births divided by total live births - M/T) has been shown to increase in response to ionizing radiation due to gender-biased fetal loss, with excess female loss. M/T rose sharply in 1987 in central-eastern European countries following the Chernobyl accident in 1986. This study analyses M/T and births for the former Soviet Republics and for the countries most contaminated by the event. Annual birth data was obtained from the World Health Organisation. The countries with the highest exposure levels (by ¹³⁷Cs) were identified from an official publication of the International Atomic Energy Agency. All of the former Soviet states were also analysed and the periods before and after 1986 were compared. Except for the Baltic States, all regions in the former USSR showed a significant rise in M/T from 1986. There were significant rises in M/T in the three most exposed (Belarus, Ukraine and the Russian Federation). The birth deficit in the post-Soviet states for the ten years following Chernobyl was estimated at 2,072,666, of which 1,087,924 are accounted by Belarus and Ukraine alone. Chernobyl has resulted in the loss of millions of births, a process that has involved female even more than male fetuses. This is another and oft neglected consequence of widespread population radiation contamination.

  3. Radiocaesium activity concentrations in potatoes in Croatia after the Chernobyl accident and dose assessment.

    PubMed

    Franić, Zdenko; Petrinec, Branko; Marović, Gordana; Franić, Zrinka

    2007-02-01

    Systematic investigations of (137)Cs and (134)Cs activity concentrations in potatoes (Solanum tuberosum) for the post-Chernobyl period (1986-2005) in the Republic of Croatia are summarized. The correlation between (137)Cs activity concentrations in fallout and potatoes, has been found to be very good, the correlation coefficient being r = 0.88 with P(t) < 0.001 for 18 degrees of freedom. As the radiocaesium levels in potatoes decreased exponentially, the mean residence time of (137)Cs in potatoes was estimated by fitting the measured activity concentrations to the exponential curve. The mean residence time was found to be 6.8 +/- 1.1 years, the standard deviation being estimated by the Monte Carlo simulations. The initial observed (134)Cs:(137)Cs activity ratio in potatoes has been found to be quite variable, but slightly lesser than the theoretically predicted value of 0.5, calculated by applying the known inventory of these radionuclides in the Chernobyl reactor to the equation for the differential radioactive decay. This can be explained by presence of the pre-Chernobyl (137)Cs in soil that originated from nuclear fallout. The annual effective doses received by (134)Cs and (137)Cs intake due to consumption of potatoes estimated for an adult member of the Croatian population were found to be very small, as the per caput Dose for the entire 1986-2005 period was calculated to be about 2.9 microSv, (134)Cs accounting approximately for 1/3 of the entire dose. Therefore, after the Chernobyl accident consumption of potatoes was not the critical pathway for human intake of radiocaesium from the environment in Croatia.

  4. Thyroid consequences of the Chernobyl nuclear power station accident on the Turkish population.

    PubMed

    Emral, Rifat; Baştemir, Mehmet; Güllü, Sevim; Erdoğan, Gürbüz

    2003-05-01

    The Chernobyl accident caused widespread effects across Europe and huge areas were radiocontaminated. The major impact of the accident on human health was a sharp increase in childhood thyroid carcinoma and autoimmune thyroid diseases in exposed populations. The thyroidal effects of the Chernobyl accident have been investigated in most European countries, except Turkey. The aim of the current study was therefore to determine the thyroidal consequences of the Chernobyl nuclear power station accident in a selected Turkish population. This study was designed as a sectional, area study, between October 2000 and March 2001, in two different regions of Turkey. According to the data of the Turkish Atomic Energy Authority, the eastern part of the Black Sea region was the most radiocontaminated area in Turkey at the time of Chernobyl accident, while Middle Anatolia was not seriously affected. Thus, Rize city, which is located in the eastern Black Sea region, served as a study area, and 970 adolescents, living in this region, comprised our study group (group R). On the other hand, Beypazari, which is located in Middle Anatolia, was chosen as the control region, and 710 adolescents living in this location were enrolled into the study as controls (group B). During the study, thyroid ultrasounds were performed in all subjects and thyroid volumes were calculated. World Health Organization and International Council for Control of Iodine Deficiency Disorders criteria were used for the determination of goiter. Thyroid fine-needle aspiration biopsy with ultrasound guidance was performed when a nodule was detected. Blood samples for thyroid function tests and thyroid autoantibodies, and urine samples for urinary iodine excretion were collected from all subjects. Thyroid function tests were similar in both groups, but thyroid volumes were found to be higher in group B (13.93+/-5.04 vs 17.66+/-5.58 ml; P<0.001). The prevalence of goiter was found to be 28.25% in group R and 61.95% in

  5. Radiation signatures in childhood thyroid cancers after the Chernobyl accident: possible roles of radiation in carcinogenesis.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, Keiji; Mitsutake, Norisato; Saenko, Vladimir; Yamashita, Shunichi

    2015-02-01

    After the Tokyo Electric Power Company Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant accident, cancer risk from low-dose radiation exposure has been deeply concerning. The linear no-threshold model is applied for the purpose of radiation protection, but it is a model based on the concept that ionizing radiation induces stochastic oncogenic alterations in the target cells. As the elucidation of the mechanism of radiation-induced carcinogenesis is indispensable to justify the concept, studies aimed at the determination of molecular changes associated with thyroid cancers among children who suffered effects from the Chernobyl nuclear accident will be overviewed. We intend to discuss whether any radiation signatures are associated with radiation-induced childhood thyroid cancers.

  6. Radiation signatures in childhood thyroid cancers after the Chernobyl accident: Possible roles of radiation in carcinogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Suzuki, Keiji; Mitsutake, Norisato; Saenko, Vladimir; Yamashita, Shunichi

    2015-01-01

    After the Tokyo Electric Power Company Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant accident, cancer risk from low-dose radiation exposure has been deeply concerning. The linear no-threshold model is applied for the purpose of radiation protection, but it is a model based on the concept that ionizing radiation induces stochastic oncogenic alterations in the target cells. As the elucidation of the mechanism of radiation-induced carcinogenesis is indispensable to justify the concept, studies aimed at the determination of molecular changes associated with thyroid cancers among children who suffered effects from the Chernobyl nuclear accident will be overviewed. We intend to discuss whether any radiation signatures are associated with radiation-induced childhood thyroid cancers. PMID:25483826

  7. (Environmental impact of radionuclide release during the Kyshtym, Windscale, and Chernobyl accidents)

    SciTech Connect

    Trabalka, J.R.

    1990-10-22

    The traveler attended the conference, Comparative Assessment of the Environmental Impact of Radionuclides Released During Three Major Nuclear Accidents: Kyshtym, Windscale, and Chernobyl and presented an invited paper giving a western perspective of the Kyshtym (Chelyabinsk-40) high-level waste explosion that took place in 1957. Papers of interest to several ORNL and DOE programs were presented. These covered the topics of accident source terms, atmospheric dispersion, resuspension, chemical and physical forms of contamination (e.g., hot'' particles), environmental contamination and transfer, radiological effects on humans and the environment, and countermeasures. The traveler also made valuable contacts with Soviet and other scientists related to an ongoing assessment sponsored by the International Union of Radioecologists of releases from the Chelyabinsk-40 site. This included an agreement in principle for direct participation by key Soviet scientists.

  8. Effects of the Chernobyl accident on animal husbandry and production, from a Swedish perspective

    SciTech Connect

    Jones, B.E.

    1989-04-01

    About 20% of the Swedish land area was considerably contaminated by radionuclides released by the nuclear accident at Chernobyl, Ukraine, in April 1986. However, less than 10% of the arable land was contaminated. The heavy contamination was closely correlated with the amount of rain received during the first days of May 1986. Immediate restrictions on grazing limited the early uptake of contaminants in animal products. Changes in management of animals, especially sheep, goats, and reindeer in the contaminated areas have effectively reduced the transfer of radionuclides to human beings. One important factor was the possibility of obtaining uncontaminated feeds from unaffected parts of the country. The direct costs during the first 2 years after the accident were approximately +10 million for analyses and +90 million for compensation to farmers for condemned products (milk, mutton, and reindeer meat) and reimbursement for purchase of uncontaminated feeds from other parts of the country.

  9. Short and medium effects on the environment of Valencia, Spain of the Chernobyl nuclear plant accident

    SciTech Connect

    Moreno, A.; Navarro, E.; Senent, F. ); Baeza, A.; Miro, C.; Rio, M. del )

    1991-01-01

    As a consequence of the 26 April 1986 accident at the Chernobyl nuclear plant, a large amount of radioactivity was released into the atmosphere. The radioactive plume formed could be detected in practically the whole of the Northern Hemisphere a few days later. The zone most affected by the radioactive cloud over Spain was that of the Mediterranean coast and the Balearic Islands. In this paper, the authors examine the level of the radioactive contamination reached in various receptive media in Valencia, such as air, dry-fallout, water, soil, grass and milk samples collected in Valencia immediately after the accident. The activity levels are compared with those found during 1964 and 1965 due to the Chinese nuclear atmospheric explosions. The levels of contamination presented by four species of migratory birds which spend the winter in this area is analyzed. Lastly, an estimate is made of the absorbed dose.

  10. External exposure of the population living in areas of Russia contaminated due to the Chernobyl accident.

    PubMed

    Golikov, V Yu; Balonov, M I; Jacob, P

    2002-09-01

    An updated version of external dose modeling is presented with reference to the population in Russian areas contaminated due to the Chernobyl accident. An earlier version has been modified by applying a study time interval with a starting point immediately after radionuclide deposition (rather than 4 years after the accident as applied earlier) and by introducing an estimate of individual dose distributions. New input data to the model are the nuclide-specific composition of the deposit, additional data about migration of caesium in soil, time dependence of location factors and uncertainty distributions of all input parameters. Model results (i.e. effective dose-rates and accumulated effective doses) from external exposure for the rural and urban populations in contaminated areas of Russia during 100 years after the accident are presented. Radionuclide contributions to the dose during various time intervals after the accident have been estimated. The model has been validated by measurements of absorbed dose-rate in air during the first 30 days after the accident and by TLD measurements of individual external doses among inhabitants of contaminated rural settlements in the year 1993. Both the measurements and model show that the geometric mean of individual external doses is about 10% lower than the arithmetic mean and the upper bound of the 95% confidence range is larger by a factor of about 2.

  11. Increase of regional total cancer incidence in north Sweden due to the Chernobyl accident?

    PubMed

    Tondel, Martin; Hjalmarsson, Peter; Hardell, Lennart; Carlsson, Göran; Axelson, Olav

    2004-12-01

    Is there any epidemiologically visible influence on the cancer incidence after the Chernobyl fallout in Sweden? A cohort study was focused on the fallout of caesium-137 in relation to cancer incidence 1988-1996. In northern Sweden, affected by the Chernobyl accident in 1986, 450 parishes were categorised by caesium-137 deposition: < 3 (reference), 3-29, 30-39, 40-59, 60-79, and 80-120 kiloBecquerel/m(2). All people 0-60 years living in these parishes in 1986 to 1987 were identified and enrolled in a cohort of 1 143 182 persons. In the follow up 22 409 incident cancer cases were retrieved in 1988-1996. A further analysis focused on the secular trend. Taking age and population density as confounding factors, and lung cancer incidence in 1988-1996 and total cancer incidence in 1986-1987 by municipality as proxy confounders for smoking and time trends, respectively, the adjusted relative risks for the deposition categories were 1.00 (reference < 3 kiloBecquerel/m(2)), 1.05, 1.03, 1.08, 1.10, and 1.21. The excess relative risk was 0.11 per 100 kiloBecquerel/m(2) (95% CI 0.03 to 0.20). Considering the secular trend, directly age standardised cancer incidence rate differences per 100 000 person years between 1988 to 1996 and the reference period 1986-1987, were 30.3 (indicating a time trend in the reference category), 36.8, 42.0, 45.8, 50.1, and 56.4. No clear excess occurred for leukaemia or thyroid cancer. Unless attributable to chance or remaining uncontrolled confounding, a slight exposure related increase in total cancer incidence has occurred in northern Sweden after the Chernobyl accident.

  12. Distribution of radiocesium in soil and biomass of oak ecosystems in Bulgaria after the Chernobyl accident

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sokolovska, M.; Zhiyanski, M.; Bech, J.; Roca, N.; Slavtcheva, E.

    2012-04-01

    The radiocaesium is characterized by a long-term impact on forest ecosystems determined by the fact that the isotope could be found in all compartments of these ecosystems. The forest vegetation has great capacity to catch radioactive deposits and to retain these deposits for a very long time. This study focuses on radiocaesium contamination, expressed in active concentration of the element (Bq.kg-1), in different compartments of the aboveground biomass (leaves, branches, bark and timber), in forest floor and in soil of representative oak forest ecosystems from the region of South Bulgaria affected by the Chernobyl accident (1986). The study shows that the radicaesium is mainly accumulated in bark of oak trees. The contamination of bark is 5 to 7 times higher than in other organs of studied trees. The highest contamination of bark is detected at distance of 1,3 m from the basis of the trunk (18-23 Bq.kg-1). In comparison with other organs of oaks the timber is low contaminated and the active concentration of caesium-137 varies from 0,8 to 1,5 Bq.kg-1. The presence of caesium in branches, leaves and timber, formed after 1986 shows that the main mechanism for contamination of trees is the root uptake. It is established that after Chernobyl accident 44% from Cs-137 in oak forest ecosystem is accumulated in forest floor layers and 30% in the superficial 0-5 cm of mineral soil. The peak in caesium-137 active concentration in forest floor has moved to the lower AoF layer. The major part of the Chernobyl radiocaesium accumulated in the topsoil is insoluble in water and its vertical migration in soil is very slow.

  13. Workshop on short-term health effects of reactor accidents: Chernobyl

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1986-08-08

    The high-dose early-effects research that has been continued has been done in the context of infrequent accidents with large radiation sources and the use of bone marrow transfusions for treating malignancies, especially leukemia. It thus seemed appropriate to bring together those who have done research on and have had experience with massive whole-body radiation. The objectives were to review what is known about the acute effects of whole-body irradiation, to review the current knowledge of therapy, and particularly of the diagnostic and immunologic problems encountered in bone marrow therapy, and to compare this knowledge with observations made to date on the Chernobyl accident radiation casualties. Dr. Robert Gale, who had helped to care for these casualties, was present at the Workshop. It was hoped that such a review would help those making continuing clinical and pathological observations on the Chernobyl casualties, and that these observations would provide a basis for recommendations for additional research that might result in improved ability to manage successfully this type of severe injury.

  14. Mesoscale modelling of radioactive contamination formation in Ukraine caused by the Chernobyl accident.

    PubMed

    Talerko, Nikolai

    2005-01-01

    This work is devoted to the reconstruction of time-dependent radioactive contamination fields in the territory of Ukraine in the initial period of the Chernobyl accident using the model of atmospheric transport LEDI (Lagrangian-Eulerian DIffusion model). The modelling results were compared with available 137Cs air and ground contamination measurement data. The 137Cs atmospheric transport over the territory of Ukraine was simulated during the first 12 days after the accident (from 26 April to 7 May 1986) using real aerological information and rain measurement network data. The detailed scenario of the release from the accidental unit of the Chernobyl nuclear plant has been built (including time-dependent radioactivity release intensity and time-varied height of the release). The calculations have enabled to explain the main features of spatial and temporal variations of radioactive contamination fields over the territory of Ukraine on the regional scale, including the formation of the major large-scale spots of radioactive contamination caused by dry and wet deposition.

  15. A radioecological model for thyroid dose reconstruction of the Belarus population following the Chernobyl accident.

    PubMed

    Kruk, J E; Pröhl, G; Kenigsberg, J I

    2004-07-01

    A radioecological model was developed to estimate thyroid exposures of the Belarus population following the Chernobyl accident. The input of the model includes an extensive data set of the (137)Cs activity per unit area deposited during the Chernobyl accident, the rainfall data for different regions of Belarus, the (131)I/(137)Cs ratio in the deposit and the start of the grazing period in Belarus in April/May 1986. The output of the model is the age-dependent thyroid exposure due to the intake of (131)I with fresh milk. Age-dependent average thyroid doses were assessed for selected regions of Belarus. The maximum thyroid doses were estimated for the inhabitants of Gomel oblast where the highest deposition was observed among the regions considered here. The lowest doses were estimated for Vitebsk oblast with the lowest level of depositions. The mean exposures for the oblasts of Grodno, Minsk, Mogilev and Brest were very similar. The results were compared with estimations of thyroid exposure that were based on (131)I measurements in human thyroids, and they are in good agreement. The model may be used for the assessment of thyroid doses in Belarus for areas where no (131)I measurements are available.

  16. Incidence of childhood disease in Belarus associated with the Chernobyl accident.

    PubMed Central

    Lomat, L; Galburt, G; Quastel, M R; Polyakov, S; Okeanov, A; Rozin, S

    1997-01-01

    Study of the childhood incidence of cancer and other diseases in Belarus is of great importance because of the present unfavorable environmental situation. About 20% of the children in the republic were exposed in various degrees to radiation as a result of the Chernobyl accident. Since 1987 increases in the incidence of most classes of disease have been reported, including the development of thyroid cancer. From 1987 to 1995, thyroid cancer was diagnosed in 424 children; its incidence having increased from 0.2 to 4.0/10(5) in 1995. According to preliminary data for 1996, 81 childhood cancer cases were reported. During 1995 there also were increases in the incidence of endocrine and dermatologic diseases and mental disorders. During the period 1987 to 1995 significant increases in the incidences of all illnesses were observed for children listed in the Chernobyl registry. The highest incidence rates were found in evacuated children and those residing in contaminated areas. There also were increased incidences of thyroid and digestive organ diseases among these children and in addition, high prevalence of chronic tonsillitis and adenoiditis was observed. Since 1990 an increase of autoimmune thyroiditis has been observed. The highest rates of hematopoietic tissue diseases were found in children born after the accident to irradiated parents. PMID:9467077

  17. [Genetic effects in populations of plants growing in the zone of Kyshtym and Chernobyl accidents].

    PubMed

    Shevchenko, V A; Kal'chenko, V A; Abramov, V I; Rubanovich, A V; Shevchenko, V V; Grinikh, L I

    1999-01-01

    Studies to analyze the genetic processes in natural populations of plants were started on the territory of the East-Ural Radioactive Trace (EURT) in 1962 and in the zone of the Chernobyl accident in May 1986. The main directions of the genetic studies in both radioactive areas were similar: 1) study of the mutation process intensity depending on the dose and dose rate and analysis of dose-effect relationships for different genetic changes (point mutations, chromosome aberrations in mitosis and meiosis) in irradiated plant populations; 2) study of the mutation process dynamics in generations of chronically (prolongly) irradiated populations of plants; 3) analysis of microevolutionary processes in irradiated plant populations. The report presents an analysis of observed dose-effect relationships under the action of radiation on populations of Arabidopsis thaliana, Pinus sylvestris and a number of other plant species. Analysis of the mutation processes dynamics in 8 Arabidopsis populations growing in the zone of the Chernobyl catastrophe has demonstrated that the level of the embryo lethal mutations 10 years after the accident in the irradiated populations significantly exceeds the control level. The following phenomena observed in chronically irradiated populations have also been considered: increased radioresistance of irradiated populations (radioadaptation), the appearance of abnormal karyotypes and selective markers upon chronic irradiation. The authors call attention to the high importance of monitoring of genetic processes in irradiated plant populations for understanding of the action of radiation on human populations.

  18. Economic consequences of the Chernobyl accident in Norway in 1986 and 1987

    SciTech Connect

    Tveten, U.

    1988-01-01

    In the accident consequence assessment (ACA) area there is extensive cooperation between the Nordic countries (Denmark, Finland, Norway, and Sweden), performed within the Nordic Safety Program, and partially funded by the Nordic Council of Ministers, via the Nordic Liaison Committee for Atomic Energy. One of the 17 projects in the ACA-related program area is concerned with the economic consequences of the Chernobyl accident in Finland, Norway, and Sweden. This paper is limited to describing conditions in Norway. There are areas in Norway where the Chernobyl fallout is >100 kBq/m{sup 2}, and the total amount of radiocesium deposited over Norway is estimated by the National Institute for Radiation Hygiene to be 6% of the radiocesium released from the reactor. The areas where ground concentrations are highest are mostly in sparsely populated mountain areas. These areas are, however, important in connection with several nutritional pathways, notably, sheep, goats, reindeer, and freshwater fish. The purpose of this paper is to summarize information on mitigating actions and economic consequences of the deposited radioactive materials to Norwegian agriculture in the 1986-87 and 1987-88 slaughtering periods.

  19. Cancer incidence in northern Sweden before and after the Chernobyl nuclear power plant accident.

    PubMed

    Alinaghizadeh, Hassan; Tondel, Martin; Walinder, Robert

    2014-08-01

    Sweden received about 5 % of the total release of (137)Cs from the Chernobyl nuclear power plant accident in 1986. The distribution of the fallout mainly affected northern Sweden, where some parts of the population could have received an estimated annual effective dose of 1-2 mSv per year. It is disputed whether an increased incidence of cancer can be detected in epidemiological studies after the Chernobyl nuclear power plant accident outside the former Union of Soviet Socialist Republics. In the present paper, a possible exposure-response pattern between deposition of (137)Cs and cancer incidence after the Chernobyl nuclear power plant accident was investigated in the nine northernmost counties of Sweden (2.2 million inhabitants in 1986). The activity of (137)Cs from the fallout maps at 1986 was used as a proxy for the received dose of ionizing radiation. Diagnoses of cancer (ICD-7 code 140-209) from 1980 to 2009 were received from the Swedish Cancer Registry (273,222 cases). Age-adjusted incidence rate ratios, stratified by gender, were calculated with Poisson regression in two closed cohorts of the population in the nine counties 1980 and 1986, respectively. The follow-up periods were 1980-1985 and 1986-2009, respectively. The average surface-weighted deposition of (137)Cs at three geographical levels; county (n = 9), municipality (n = 95) and parish level (n = 612) was applied for the two cohorts to study the pre- and the post-Chernobyl periods separately. To analyze time trends, the age-standardized total cancer incidence was calculated for the general Swedish population and the population in the nine counties. Joinpoint regression was used to compare the average annual percent change in the general population and the study population within each gender. No obvious exposure-response pattern was seen in the age-adjusted total cancer incidence rate ratios. A spurious association between fallout and cancer incidence was present, where areas with the

  20. Chernobyl nuclear reactor accident fallout: Measurement and consequences. (Latest citations from the NTIS bibliographic database). Published Search

    SciTech Connect

    1994-01-01

    The bibliography contains citations concerning the consequences of radioactive fallout from the Chernobyl nuclear reactor accident. Citations discuss radioactive monitoring, health hazards, and radiation dosimetry. Radiation contamination in the air, soil, vegetation, and food is examined. (Contains a minimum of 210 citations and includes a subject term index and title list.)

  1. Chernobyl nuclear accident: Effects on food. (Latest citations from the Food Science and Technology Abstracts database). Published Search

    SciTech Connect

    1993-09-01

    The bibliography contains citations concerning studies and measurements of the radioactive contamination by the Chernobyl nuclear reactor accident of food and the food chain. The studies cover meat and dairy products, vegetables, fish, food chains, and radioactive contamination of agricultural farms and lands. (Contains 250 citations and includes a subject term index and title list.)

  2. Chernobyl Nuclear Reactor accident fallout: Measurement and consequences. (Latest citations from the NTIS bibliographic database). Published Search

    SciTech Connect

    1996-11-01

    The bibliography contains citations concerning the consequences of radioactive fallout from the Chernobyl nuclear reactor accident. Citations discuss radioactive monitoring, health hazards, and radiation dosimetry. Radiation contamination in the air, soil, vegetation, and food is examined. (Contains 50-250 citations and includes a subject term index and title list.) (Copyright NERAC, Inc. 1995)

  3. Chernobyl nuclear reactor accident fallout: Measurement and consequences. (Latest citations from the NTIS Bibliographic database). Published Search

    SciTech Connect

    1993-09-01

    The bibliography contains citations concerning the consequences of radioactive fallout from the Chernobyl nuclear reactor accident. Citations discuss radioactive monitoring, health hazards, and radiation dosimetry. Radiation contamination in the air, soil, vegetation, and food is examined. (Contains a minimum of 208 citations and includes a subject term index and title list.)

  4. Chernobyl nuclear reactor accident fallout: Measurement and consequences. (Latest citations from the NTIS bibliographic database). Published Search

    SciTech Connect

    1996-01-01

    The bibliography contains citations concerning the consequences of radioactive fallout from the Chernobyl nuclear reactor accident. Citations discuss radioactive monitoring, health hazards, and radiation dosimetry. Radiation contamination in the air, soil, vegetation, and food is examined. (Contains 50-250 citations and includes a subject term index and title list.) (Copyright NERAC, Inc. 1995)

  5. Chernobyl nuclear reactor accident fallout: Measurement and consequences. (Latest citations from the NTIS bibliographic database). Published Search

    SciTech Connect

    1995-02-01

    The bibliography contains citations concerning the consequences of radioactive fallout from the Chernobyl nuclear reactor accident. Citations discuss radioactive monitoring, health hazards, and radiation dosimetry. Radiation contamination in the air, soil, vegetation, and food is examined. (Contains a minimum of 247 citations and includes a subject term index and title list.)

  6. Behavioral differences of irradiated persons associated with the Kyshtym, Chelyabinsk, and Chernobyl Nuclear Accidents. (Reannouncement with new availability information)

    SciTech Connect

    Collins, D.L.

    1992-12-31

    Three nuclear accidents besides Chernobyl have occurred in the former Soviet Union. The accidents occurred around Kyshtym and Chelyabinsk in the Ural Mountains between 1949 and 1967 and contaminated over one-half million people. The health ministries are now interested in the data previously collected on these irradiated populations in order to examine the health (e.g., psychological, hereditary, genome damage, etc.) implications of long-term radiation exposure.

  7. {sup 129}I, {sup 131}I and {sup 127}I in animal thyroids after the Chernobyl nuclear accident

    SciTech Connect

    VanMiddleworth, L.; Handle, J.

    1997-10-01

    A small number of animal thyroids from Bad Hall, Austria; Ulm, Germany; and Steinkjer, Norway had {sup 131}I (half-life 8.06 d) measured between 21 and 72 d following the nuclear accident at Chernobyl on 26 April 1986. Nine years later {sup 129}I (half-life 1.57 x 10{sup 7} y) fission product and natural {sup 127}I were measured in the same thyroids. The mass ratios, {sup 129}I/{sup 131}I were calculated to the date of the Chernobyl accident and they ranged between 13 and 71. These ratios are compared to the expected ratios within an operating nuclear reactor during 2 y of operation, where the {sup 129}I/{sup 131}I{sup -1} ratio never exceeded 30. The observed ratio of {sup 129}I to natural {sup 127}I in thyroids ranged from 5 to 200 times the ratio before the accident, except that the Norwegian thyroids had {sup 129}I/{sup 127}I ratios which were less than the ratios of pre-Chernobyl thyroids from Ulm. These studies show the {sup 129}I and {sup 131}I from the Chernobyl accident were accumulated with natural {sup 127}I in animal thyroids but the isotope ratios, calculated to the release date, had wide ranges. The {sup 131}I radioactive exposure might be estimated from a fission product mixture by measuring {sup 129}I in thyroids long after the exposure to {sup 131}I, but the results would probably show a wide range of possibilities. The determining variables should be evaluated. We know of no previous data regarding both {sup 131}I and {sup 129}I in thyroid glands during the first 3 mo after the Chernobyl accident. 16 refs., 1 fig., 2 tabs.

  8. Transport of iodine and cesium via the grass-cow-milk pathway after the Chernobyl accident

    SciTech Connect

    Kirchner, G.

    1994-06-01

    More than 150 data sets giving time-dependent concentrations of {sup 131}I and {sup 137}Cs in feed and milk of cows after the Chernobyl accident are evaluated using a minimal compartmental modeling approach. Transfer of cesium via the grass-cow-milk pathway is adequately described by a three-compartmental model. No unique model results for {sup 131}I, as a compartment with slow secretion of {sup 131}I into milk, are identified for some datasets only. Frequency distributions of weathering half-lives on grass and of equilibrium feed-to-milk transfer coefficients are approximately lognormal. Mean values of weathering half-lives on plants are 9.1 {plus_minus} 0.6 d for iodine and 11.1 {plus_minus} 0.8 d for cesium, in good agreement with means established from experiments performed before 1986. Mean values of equilibrium feed-to-milk transfer coefficients are 3.4 {plus_minus} 0.4 10{sup {minus}3} d L{sup {minus}1} for {sup 131}I and 5.4 {plus_minus} 0.5 10{sup {minus}3} d L{sup {minus}1} for {sup 137}Cs. Both are lower than means calculated from the pre-Chernobyl data base. Plausible explanations of the differences include (1) reduced availability of fallout compared to soluble tracer; (2) underestimation of post-Chernobyl transfer coefficients by some experiments concluded too early to record slow transport processes; and (3) reduced transfer of {sup 131}I compared to long-lived iodine isotopes due to decay during fixation in the thyroid. Feed-to-milk transfer of {sup 131}I is related to milk yield, but no influence of milk yield and type of feed on transfer is apparent for cesium. 73 refs., 3 figs., 5 tabs.

  9. Long-term behavior of radiocesium in diary herds in the years following the Chernobyl accident

    SciTech Connect

    Voigt, G.; Paretzke, H.G.; Rauch, F.

    1996-09-01

    The longterm behavior of {sup 137}Cs in milk of a Bavarian farm (farm A) deposited as a consequence of the Chernobyl accident has been followed from April 1986 until August 1994. On the basis of activity measurements in milk and feed, transfer coefficients for the different seasons have been estimated in order to see any changes in transfer behavior (aging effect) of {sup 137}Cs with time. The influence of different grazing regimes has been tested by comparison of activity concentrations in milk and pasture grass in one farm (farm A with rotational grazing regime) with that of a nearby farm (farm B with continuous grazing regime) over a complete grazing season by frequent measurements in 1993. Though the farms are located only 4 km apart, have similar soils, and were contaminated to the same extent by the Chernobyl fallout, tenfold lower {sup 137}Cs activity concentrations in milk have been observed in farm B. This finding seems to be partly due to the influence of a different grazing intensity. 15 refs., 4 figs., 3 tabs.

  10. Down syndrome time-clustering in January 1987 in Belarus: link with the Chernobyl accident?

    PubMed

    Zatsepin, Ivan; Verger, Pierre; Robert-Gnansia, Elisabeth; Gagnière, Bertrand; Tirmarche, Margot; Khmel, Rostislav; Babicheva, Irina; Lazjuk, Gennady

    2007-01-01

    The Chernobyl accident (April 26, 1986) exposed a large part of the Belarus population to ionizing radiation. We analyzed the time trends of Down syndrome (DS) in Belarus to evaluate whether either brief exposure at high dose rates during the plume passage or continuous exposure at low doses and dose rates of the residents of contaminated areas had any detectable impact on DS prevalence at birth. DS data came from the Belarus National Registry of Congenital Malformations (1981-2001). We observed a significant peak of DS in January 1987 (26 cases observed and 9.84 expected; observed/expected ratio=2.64; 95% CI=1.72-3.76), but found no positive long-term time trends in contaminated or control areas. The time occurrence of the January peak, high dose rates during the plume passage and experimental data showing a radiosensitive phase of oogenesis around conception time in mammals suggest that the January peak may be linked to the Chernobyl plume.

  11. Elevated frequency of glycophorin A mutations in erythrocytes from Chernobyl accident victims

    SciTech Connect

    Jensen, R.H.; Langlois, R.G.; Bigbee, W.L.; Grant, S.G.; Moore, D. II; Pilinskaya, M.; Vorobtsova, I.; Pleshanov, P.

    1995-02-01

    In 1986, when an explosion accident occurred at the Chernobyl, Ukraine nuclear power plant, a large number of people were exposed to significant amounts of ionizing radiation. During the time between 1986 and 1992, peripheral blood samples were obtained from 102 people who either were on site during the emergency or were brought to Chernobyl shortly thereafter to assist in the cleanup of radioactive contaminants and isolate the damaged reactor from the environment. These blood samples plus samples from 13 unexposed Soviet individuals were analyzed by flow cytometry using the allele-loss somatic mutation assay for glycophorin A. Results of these assays show that the frequency of N/{O} variant red cells increased in proportion to the estimated radiation exposure of each individual. The radiation dose-response function derived from this population closely resembles that determined previously for atomic bomb survivors whose blood samples were obtained and analyzed 40 years after their exposure. This suggests comparable mutation induction per unit dose for these two populations and long-term persistence of the mutational damage. In addition, measurements on multiple blood samples from each of 10 donors taken over a 7-year period showed no significant changes in N/{O} variant cell frequencies, confirming the persistence of radiation-induced somatic mutations in long-lived bone marrow stem cells. 19 refs., 3 figs., 3 tabs.

  12. Microfibril angle in wood of Scots pine trees (Pinus sylvestris) after irradiation from the Chernobyl nuclear reactor accident.

    PubMed

    Tulik, Mirela; Rusin, Aleksandra

    2005-03-01

    The secondary cell wall structure of tracheids of Scots pine (Pinus sylvestris L.), especially the angle of microfibrils in the S(2) layer, was examined in wood deposited prior to and after the Chernobyl accident in 1986. Microscopic analysis was carried out on wood samples collected in October 1997 from breast height of three pine trees 16, 30 and 42 years old. The polluted site was located in a distance of 5 km south from the Chernobyl nuclear power plant where radioactive contamination in 1997 was 3.7 x 10(5) kBq m(-2). Anatomical analysis showed that the structure of the secondary cell wall in tracheids formed after the Chernobyl accident was changed. Changes occurred both in S(2) and S(3) layers. The angle of microfibrils in S(2) layer in wood deposited after the Chernobyl accident was different in comparison to this measured in wood formed prior to the disaster. The intensity of the changes, i.e. alteration of the microfibrils angle in S(2) layer and unusual pattern of the S(3) layer, depended on the age of the tree and was most intensive in a young tree.

  13. Radioactivity in persons exposed to fallout from the Chernobyl reactor accident

    SciTech Connect

    Schlenker, R.A.; Oltman, B.G.; Lucas, H.F.

    1987-01-01

    Measurements of fallout radioactivity were made in the thyroid region, abdomen, whole body, or urine of 96 persons who were in eastern Europe at the time of the Chernobyl reactor accident or who went there shortly afterward. The most frequently encountered radionuclides were /sup 131/I, sup 134,137/Cs, and /sup 103/Ru//sup 103/Rh. The median /sup 131/I activity in the thyroids of 42 subjects in whom radioiodine was detected and who were in Europe when the accident began was projected as 42 nCi the day the accident began. The median total body activity of /sup 134/Cs in 40 subjects in which it was detected was 1.7 nCi upon arrival in the US. For 51 subjects with detectable /sup 137/Cs burdens, the total body activity was 4.6 nCi. The risk of fatal thyroid cancer is less than 3 x 10/sup -6/ for nearly all subjects in this series. The risk of fatal cancer from /sup 134,137/Cs for subjects with cesium exposures similar to the ones observed by us, but who remained in Europe, is estimated as 1.4 x 10/sup -6/ to 4.2 x 10/sup -5/ with 95% of the risk attributable to /sup 137/Cs. 5 refs., 4 tabs.

  14. Female reproductive function in areas affected by radiation after the Chernobyl power station accident

    SciTech Connect

    Kulakov, V.I.; Sokur, T.N.; Volobuev, A.I.

    1993-07-01

    This paper reports the results of a comprehensive survey of the effects of the accidental release of radiation caused by the accident at the Chernobyl nuclear power station in April 1986. The accident and the resulting release of radiation and radioactive products into the atmosphere produced the most serious environmental contamination so far recorded. We have concentrated on evaluating the outcomes and health risks to women, their reproductive situation, and consequences for their progeny. We have concentrated on two well-defined areas: the Chechersky district of the Gomel region in Belorussia and the Polessky district of the Kiev region in the Ukraine. A number of investigations were carried out on 688 pregnant women and their babies, and data were obtained from 7000 labor histories of the development of newborns for a period of 8 years (3 years before the accident and 5 years after it). Parameters examined included birth rate, thyroid pathology, extragenital pathology such as anemias, renal disorders, hypertension, and abnormalities in the metabolism of fats, complications of gestation, spontaneous abortions, premature deliveries, perinatal morbidity and mortality, stillbirths and early neonatal mortality, infections and inflammatory diseases, neurological symptoms and hemic disturbances in both mothers and infants, trophic anomalies, and biochemical and structural changes in the placenta. Several exogenous, complicating influences were also considered such as psycho-emotional factors, stress, lifestyle changes, and others caused directly by the hazardous situation and by its consequences such as treatment, removal from affected areas, etc. 9 figs.

  15. Reconstruction of transuranium radionuclide radiation dose to the population in regions far from the Chernobyl accident

    SciTech Connect

    Makhon`ko, K.P.

    1994-06-01

    The objective of this study was to estimate the dose due to transuranic nuclides released during the Chernobyl accident. Calculations have shown that most of this dose was formed prior to May 6, 1986 and was due to curium 242 and the plutonium isotopes. With a 162.8 day half-life, the curium 242 fraction is presently negligible, while the americium 241 fraction is increasing. In this study, the total dose from curium 242 and plutonium isotopes was calculated for three specific population points far from the accident site. Calculations were performed for inhalation of the subject isotopes by an average adult male irradiated for 50 years, with analogous calculations performed for women and children. As most of the dose was received by inhalation, the calculations were sensitive to particle size, and the results obtained were expected to be an upperlimit. The effective whole-body dose was also calculated, as was the dose for certain organs. Based upon these calculations, the calculated risk factors for genetic and somatic consequences were low and consistent with observations since the accident.

  16. Overview of 1993 research activities in Belarus related to the Chernobyl accident.

    PubMed

    Krissenko, N

    1997-01-01

    This overview describes the medical and biological consequences of the Chernobyl nuclear power plant accident that had been assessed by Belarus scientists as of 1993. In particular, childhood thyroid cancer has increased in both frequency and severity. Other malignant tumors may have also increased, as may have childhood diseases that result from impaired immune function. It is unknown whether these increases in human disease (other than thyroid cancer) are due to improved methods of reporting or to exposure to ionizing radiation. In addition to the medical consequences of radiation damage, there are also significant psychological problems endured by the population living in contaminated areas. The Republic of Belarus has participated in several international programs for the study and management of widespread radiation exposure, and will continue to do so. Programs to address issues of radiation protection and population safety are being implemented wherever possible.

  17. Artificial radioactivity in fuel peat and peat ash in Finland after the Chernobyl accident

    SciTech Connect

    Mustonen, R.A.; Reponen, A.R.; Jantunen, M.J.

    1989-04-01

    The accident at the Chernobyl nuclear power plant in April 1986 caused very uneven deposition of radionuclides in Finland. The deposited radionuclides were found in relatively high concentrations in fuel peat and especially in peat ash because a thin surface layer of peat-production bogs was extracted as fuel peat soon after the fallout occurred. Concentrations of artificial radionuclides in fuel peat and peat ash were measured at six peat-fired power plants in Finland throughout the heating season 1986-87. Concentrations of /sup 137/Cs in composite peat samples varied between 30 and 3600 Bq kg-1 dry weight and in ash samples between 600 and 68,000 Bq kg-1. High concentrations in peat ash caused some restrictions to the utilization of peat ash for various purposes.

  18. The feasibility of using 129I to reconstruct 131I deposition from the Chernobyl reactor accident.

    PubMed

    Straume, T; Marchetti, A A; Anspaugh, L R; Khrouch, V T; Gavrilin YuI; Shinkarev, S M; Drozdovitch, V V; Ulanovsky, A V; Korneev, S V; Brekeshev, M K; Leonov, E S; Voigt, G; Panchenko, S V; Minenko, V F

    1996-11-01

    Radioiodine released to the atmosphere from the accident at the Chernobyl nuclear power station in the spring of 1986 resulted in large-scale thyroid-gland exposure of populations in Ukraine, Belarus, and Russia. Because of the short half life of 131I (8.04 d), adequate data on the intensities and patterns of iodine deposition were not collected, especially in the regions where the incidence of childhood-thyroid cancer is now increasing. Results are presented from a feasibility study that show that accelerator-mass-spectrometry measurements of 129I (half life 16 x 106 y) in soil can be used to reconstruct 131I-deposition density and thus help in the thyroid-dosimetry effort that is now urgently needed to support epidemiologic studies of childhood-thyroid cancer in the affected regions.

  19. [Peripheral blood of children exposed to radiation as a consequence of the Chernobyl AES accident].

    PubMed

    Torubarova, D A; Kovalev, G I

    1991-01-01

    As many as 103 children exposed to minor doses of radiation after the Chernobyl accident were examined for peripheral blood morphology. Statistical and individual analysis did not reveal any pathological alterations on the part of the hemograms of the radiated children. At the same time they manifested certain deviations in the form of leukopenia, lymphopenia and neutropenia, suggesting the action produced by radiation factor. On the whole, these alterations were characterized as adaptation ones of multifactorial genesis. The data obtained support an assumption that the changes in the quantitative composition of blood exposed to radiation in the doses not exceeding the maximal permissible limits were not remarkable, occurring within the physiological boundaries and could be detected only during observations made over time. Emphasis is laid on the necessity of further monitoring of the hemopoietic system of the radiated children according to the current principles of dispensary observation.

  20. [Clinical and experimental parallels between immunological observations of irradiated animals and patients injured during Chernobyl accident].

    PubMed

    Mal'tsev, V N

    2011-01-01

    Immunological parameters in different periods of acute radiation syndrome (ARS) of experimental animals and Chernobyl reactor accident-injured patients have been studied. 148 patients and experimental animals (123 dogs and 198 monkeys) were observed after radiation exposure of different levels (from a sub-lethal dose to the minimal absolute lethal dose). We have found the increase in the C-reactive protein, fluctuation of normal antibody titers and the complement in blood serum, as well as the growing number of skin microbes after exposures to lethal doses. Experimental results match clinical data in terms of ARS progress phases but differ from the latter in terms of the time of clinical manifestations. The highest rate of clinical manifestations is observed on the 7-14 days for experimental animals (rats, dogs and monkeys) and on the 20-30 days for patients after radiation exposure. Regenerative processes in animals run faster than those in humans.

  1. Strontium-90 concentrations in human teeth in south Ukraine, 5 years after the Chernobyl accident.

    PubMed

    Kulev, Y D; Polikarpov, G G; Prigodey, E V; Assimakopoulos, P A

    1994-10-28

    Approximately 1000 human teeth, collected in South Ukraine, in 1990-1991, were measured for 90Sr concentration. The teeth were grouped into 18 samples according to the age and sex of the donors. Measured levels of 90Sr concentrations were lower by a factor of 10 than measurements taken in the mid-1960s and mid-1970s. An interesting feature of the data is a 3-fold enhancement of contamination levels in the 25-45 year-old age group of the male population. A possible explanation for this anomaly is that this age group contains a significant number of men who were mobilized immediately after the Chernobyl accident for clean-up operations within the 30-km zone around the damaged nuclear power plant.

  2. Observations on the geology and geohydrology of the Chernobyl' nuclear accident site, Ukraine

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Matzko, J.R.; Percious, D.J.; Rachlin, J.; Marples, D.R.

    1994-01-01

    The most highly contaminated surface areas from cesium-137 fallout from the April 1986 accident at the Chernobyl' nuclear power station in Ukraine occur within the 30-km radius evacuation zone set up around the station, and an 80-km lobe extending to the west-southwest. Lower levels of contamination extend 300 km to the west of the power station. The geology, the presence of surface water, a shallow water table, and leaky aquifers at depth make this an unfavorable environment for the long-term containment and storage of the radioactive debris. An understanding of the general geology and hydrology of the area is important to assess the environmental impact of this unintended waste storage site, and to evaluate the potential for radionuclide migration through the soil and rock and into subsurface aquifers and nearby rivers. -from Authors

  3. Radiocesium concentration in migratory birds wintering in Spain after the Chernobyl accident

    SciTech Connect

    Baeza, A.; del Rio, M.; Miro, C.; Paniagua, J.M.; Moreno, A.; Navarro, E.

    1988-12-01

    Levels of TXCs and TUCs resulting from the Chernobyl nuclear accident were studied in 195 birds that winter in two regions of Spain. Only five of the 12 species examined were contaminated. The average values for TXCs vary between 1.6 and 41 Bq kg-1 fresh. In particular, the contamination for song-thrushes (Turdus philomelos) are compared between the regions of Extremadura and Valencia, 350 km east of Extremadura at the same latitude. The results show that the contamination of birds wintering in Spain decreases from east to west. The whole-body dose commitment for humans consuming these contaminated birds was calculated. The values are well below the established ICRP guideline.

  4. [137Cs vertical migration in boggy soils in the long term after the Chernobyl accident].

    PubMed

    Podvorko, G A; Sanzharova, N I; Spiridonov, S I; Konopleva, I V

    2004-01-01

    137Cs vertical migration in boggy soils has been studied 15 years after the Chernobyl accident. The rate of vertical migration of the radionuclide is shown to be dependent on the peculiarities of formation of peatbogs, their moistening regime and soil properties. 137Cs migration in a high-land peatbog is characterized by higher intensity then in lowland or transitional peatbogs. Differences in 137Cs vertical migration are to a large extent caused by the contents in soil of exhangeable and mobile radionuclide forms. The derived experimental data that describe 137Cs distribution over the profiles of peaty soils of different type are used for parameterization of two-component convective-diffusion model. Ecological and effective half-life periods of 137Cs content reduction in the soil root layer have been calculated. A long-term prediction is given of the dynamics of the radionuclide content in the root layer of peaty soils.

  5. Modelling transport and deposition of caesium and iodine from the Chernobyl accident using the DREAM model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brandt, J.; Christensen, J. H.; Frohn, L. M.

    2002-12-01

    A tracer model, DREAM (the Danish Rimpuff and Eulerian Accidental release Model), has been developed for modelling transport, dispersion and deposition (wet and dry) of radioactive material from accidental releases, as the Chernobyl accident. The model is a combination of a Lagrangian model, that includes the near source dispersion, and an Eulerian model describing the long-range transport. The performance of the transport model has previously been tested within the European Tracer Experiment, ETEX, which included transport and dispersion of an inert, non-depositing tracer from a controlled release. The focus of this paper is the model performance with respect to the total deposition of 137Cs, 134Cs and 131I from the Chernobyl accident, using different relatively simple and comprehensive parameterizations for dry- and wet deposition. The performance, compared to measurements, of using different combinations of two different wet deposition parameterizations and three different parameterizations of dry deposition has been evaluated, using different statistical tests. The best model performance, compared to measurements, is obtained when parameterizing the total deposition combined of a simple method for dry deposition and a subgrid-scale averaging scheme for wet deposition based on relative humidities. The same major conclusion is obtained for all the three different radioactive isotopes and using two different deposition measurement databases. Large differences are seen in the results obtained by using the two different parameterizations of wet deposition based on precipitation rates and relative humidities, respectively. The parameterization based on subgrid-scale averaging is, in all cases, performing better than the parameterization based on precipitation rates. This indicates that the in-cloud scavenging process is more important than the below cloud scavenging process for the submicron particles and that the precipitation rates are relatively uncertain in the

  6. A 25 year retrospective review of the psychological consequences of the Chernobyl accident.

    PubMed

    Bromet, E J; Havenaar, J M; Guey, L T

    2011-05-01

    The Chernobyl Forum Report from the 20th anniversary of the Chernobyl nuclear power plant disaster concluded that mental health effects were the most significant public health consequence of the accident. This paper provides an updated review of research on the psychological impact of the accident during the 25 year period since the catastrophe began. First responders and clean-up workers had the greatest exposure to radiation. Recent studies show that their rates of depression and post-traumatic stress disorder remain elevated two decades later. Very young children and those in utero who lived near the plant when it exploded or in severely contaminated areas have been the subject of considerable research, but the findings are inconsistent. Recent studies of prenatally exposed children conducted in Kiev, Norway and Finland point to specific neuropsychological and psychological impairments associated with radiation exposure, whereas other studies found no significant cognitive or mental health effects in exposed children grown up. General population studies report increased rates of poor self-rated health as well as clinical and subclinical depression, anxiety, and post-traumatic stress disorder. Mothers of young children exposed to the disaster remain a high-risk group for these conditions, primarily due to lingering worries about the adverse health effects on their families. Thus, long-term mental health consequences continue to be a concern. The unmet need for mental health care in affected regions remains an important public health challenge 25 years later. Future research is needed that combines physical and mental health outcome measures to complete the clinical picture. Copyright © 2011 The Royal College of Radiologists. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Specificity of Cs-137 redistribution in toposequence of arable soils cultivated after the Chernobyl accident

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Korobova, Elena; Romanov, Sergey; Baranchukov, Vladimir; Berezkin, Victor; Moiseenko, Fedor; Kirov, Sergey

    2017-04-01

    Investigations performed after the Chernobyl accident showed high spatial variation of radionuclide contamination of the soil cover in elementary landscape geochemical systems (ELGS) that characterize catena's structure. Our studies of Cs-137 distribution along and cross the slopes of local ridges in natural forested key site revealed a cyclic character of variation of the radionuclide surface activity along the studied transections (Korobova et al, 2008; Korobova, Romanov, 2009; 2011). We hypothesized that the observed pattern reflects a specific secondary migration of Cs-137 with water, and that this process could have taken place in any ELGS. To test this hypothesis a detailed field measurement of Cs-137 surface activity was performed in ELGS in agricultural area cultivated after the Chernobyl accident but later withdrawn from land-use. In situ measurements carried out by field gamma-spectrometry were accompanied by soil core sampling at the selected points. Soil samples were taken in increments of 2 cm down to 20 cm and of 5 cm down to 40 cm. The samples were analyzed for Cs-137 in laboratory using Canberra gamma-spectrometer with HP-Ge detector. Obtained results confirmed the fact of area cultivation down to 20 cm that was clearly traced by Cs-137 profile in soil columns. At the same time, the measurements also showed a cyclic character of Cs-137 variation in a sequence of ELGS from watershed to the local depression similar to that found in woodland key site. This proved that the observed pattern is a natural process typical for matter migration in ELGS independently of the vegetation type and ploughing. Therefore, spatial aspect is believed to be an important issue for development of adequate technique for a forecast of contamination of agricultural production and remediation of the soil cover on the local scale within the contaminated areas. References Korobova, E.M., Romanov, S.L., 2009. A Chernobyl 137Cs contamination study as an example for the spatial

  8. [Specificity of auditory evoked potencials changes in participants of Chernobyl accident consequences: I. Analysis of early N1 component].

    PubMed

    Zhavoronkova, L A; Belostotskiĭ, A P; Kulikov, M A; Oknina, L B; Kholodova, N B; Kuptsova, S V

    2010-01-01

    Amplitude-time characteristics analysis of the N1 component of auditory cognitive evoked potentials (EP) was made in 10 persons who had participated in the cleanup of the Chenobyl Accident - liquidators (mean age 50.5 +/- 4.0 years old) and in 10 healthy subjects (mean age 47 +/- 6.0 years old). Comparison of amplitude features of the N1 auditory EP component in liquidators of the Chernobyl Accident found a decrease in all areas of the cortex with the maximum decrease in the central and frontal leads, and also an inversion in reactive changes to stimuli of different significance in comparison to healthy subjects of the same age. The most distinct differences between the healthy subjects and liquidators of the Chernobyl Accident were found for time characteristics of the N1 component. They show a significantly smaller value of latent period (LP) for all stimuli and for all experimental tasks in comparison with healthy subjects and more distinct for a significant stimulus when persons counted these stimuli. Analysis of regional changes in LP of the N1 component found that liquidators, in comparison with healthy subjects, have maximal differences in the frontal area of the left hemisphere which were accompanied with inversion asymmetry of LP in this component. Less distinct changes were observed in the central area with relatively little damage in the parietal area. Detected changes in the amplitude-time characteristics of the N1 component of the auditory cognitive EP in liquidators of Chernobyl Accident can show an abnormality in primary attention and its reserves due to weakened inhibitory processes in comparison with healthy subjects, which has similarities of old age. The obtained data supports the hypothesis about the accelerated brain aging in liquidators of Chernobyl Accident as a result of low dosage radiation effects; however, it also allows the pathological development of the brain ageing due to the effects of radiation.

  9. [20 years after Chernobyl accident--is it a lot or not for the estimation its characteristics ?].

    PubMed

    Pelevina, I I; Gotlib, V Ia; Konradov, A A

    2006-01-01

    The results of long standing researches in the zones, which suffered from Chernobyl accident, on cultured cells, mice, blood lymphocytes of inhabitants of polluted regions (adults and children) are brought in the paper. The conclusion is that residence in polluted territories results in genomic instability, that is manifested in many effects on cytogenetic, cellular and organisms levels. It was shown, that in late descendants of cells after exposition in Chernobyl zone the increase of cell death, the micronuclei level, the frequency of giant cells, the enhancement of radiosensitivity and the absence of the adaptive response was observed. In the culture of embryonic fibroblasts, that was obtained from the exposed mice, the increase of cells with aberrations of chromosome and the frequency of multiaberrant cells was noticed. In mice exposed in Chernobyl zone the decrease of amounts of the endothelial cells in the different parts of the brain, the enhancement of mice radiosensitivity was observed. All effects were discovered in the late descendants of cells and can be the result of genomic instability induced by low level irradiation in polluted by Chernobyl accident regions.

  10. Chernobyl: What really happened

    SciTech Connect

    Sweet, W. )

    1989-07-01

    The author conducted interviews with Western analysts to reach a consensus view of the accident in 1986 at Chernobyl. This view is illustrated in this article. The Chernobyl RBMK reactor is described, as are the events surrounding the accident. Post-accident safety measures taken by the U.S.S.R. are discussed and critiques. Implications of the Chernobyl accident on RBMK reactor safety and on Soviet nuclear energy management capabilities are also addressed.

  11. The outcome of local radiation injuries: 14 years of follow-up after the Chernobyl accident.

    PubMed

    Gottlöber, P; Steinert, M; Weiss, M; Bebeshko, V; Belyi, D; Nadejina, N; Stefani, F H; Wagemaker, G; Fliedner, T M; Peter, R U

    2001-03-01

    The Chernobyl nuclear power plant accident on April 26, 1986 was the largest in the history of the peaceful use of nuclear energy. Of the 237 individuals initially suspected to have been significantly exposed to radiation during or in the immediate aftermath of the accident, the diagnosis of acute radiation sickness (ARS) could be confirmed in 134 cases on the basis of clinical symptoms. Of these, 54 patients suffered from cutaneous radiation syndrome (CRS) to varying degrees. Among the 28 patients who died from the immediate consequences of accidental radiation exposure, acute hemopoietic syndrome due to bone marrow failure was the primary cause of death only in a minority. In 16 of these 28 deaths, the primary cause was attributed to CRS. This report describes the characteristic cutaneous sequelae as well as associated clinical symptoms and diseases of 15 survivors of the Chernobyl accident with severe localized exposure who were systematically followed up by our groups between 1991 and 2000. All patients presented with CRS of varying severity, showing xerosis, cutaneous telangiectasias and subungual splinter hemorrhages, hemangiomas and lymphangiomas, epidermal atrophy, disseminated keratoses, extensive dermal and subcutaneous fibrosis with partial ulcerations, and pigmentary changes including radiation lentigo. Surprisingly, no cutaneous malignancies have been detected so far in those areas that received large radiation exposures and that developed keratoses; however, two patients first presented in 1999 with basal cell carcinomas on the nape of the neck and the right lower eyelid, areas that received lower exposures. During the follow-up period, two patients were lost due to death from myelodysplastic syndrome in 1995 and acute myelogenous leukemia in 1998, respectively. Other radiation-induced diseases such as dry eye syndrome (3/15), radiation cataract (5/15), xerostomia (4/15) and increased FSH levels (7/15) indicating impaired fertility were also

  12. Thyroid neoplasia risk is increased nearly 30 years after the Chernobyl accident.

    PubMed

    Tronko, Mykola; Brenner, Alina V; Bogdanova, Tetiana; Shpak, Victor; Oliynyk, Valeriy; Cahoon, Elizabeth K; Drozdovitch, Vladimir; Little, Mark P; Tereshchenko, Valeriy; Zamotayeva, Galyna; Terekhova, Galyna; Zurnadzhi, Lyudmila; Hatch, Maureen; Mabuchi, Kiyohiko

    2017-10-15

    To evaluate risk of thyroid neoplasia nearly 30 years following exposure to radioactive iodine (I-131) from the 1986 Chernobyl nuclear accident, we conducted a fifth cycle of thyroid screening of the Ukrainian-American cohort during 2012-2015, following four previous screening cycles started in 1998. We identified 47 thyroid cancers (TC) and 33 follicular adenomas (FA) among 10,073 individuals who were <18 years at the time of the accident and had a mean I-131 dose of 0.62 Gy. We found a significant I-131 dose response for both TC and FA, with an excess odd ratio per Gy of 1.36 (95% CI: 0.39-4.15) and 2.03 (95% CI: 0.55-6.69), respectively. The excess risk of malignant and benign thyroid neoplasia persists nearly three decades after exposure and underscores the importance of continued follow-up of this cohort to characterize long-term pattern of I-131 risk. © 2017 UICC.

  13. Reconstruction of thyroid doses for the population of Belarus following the Chernobyl accident

    SciTech Connect

    Gavrilin, Y.I.; Khrouch, V.T.; Shinkarev, S.M.; Minenko, V.F.; Drozdovich, V.V.; Ulanovsky, A.V.; Bouville, A.C.; Anspaugh, L.R.; Straume, T.

    1995-09-01

    As a sequela to the large release of {sup 131}I from the accident at the Chernobyl Nuclear Power Plant, an expected late effect is thyroid cancer, especially in children. In anticipation of this problem, hundreds of thousands of measurements of thyroid glands were made with survey meters. Much attention was also focused on measuring the deposition density of {sup 137}Cs. The expectation was that the latter measurement could be a good surrogate for the deposition density of {sup 131}I, so that ecological models could be used to reconstruct thyroid doses in locations where no direct measurements of thyroid activity were made. However, this assumption has been seriously questioned, and there is interest in a more suitable surrogate that can still be measured even nine years or more after the accident. The purpose of this paper is to discuss the reconstruction of thyroid doses for a case-control study of childhood-thyroid cancer that has just been concluded, to discuss the reconstruction of thyroid doses for a current cohort study of childhood-thyroid cancer, and to discuss the use of {sup 129}I as a surrogate for the deposition density of {sup 131}I.

  14. [Influence of nuclear reactor accident at Chernobyl' on the environmental radioactivity in Toyama].

    PubMed

    Morita, M; Shoji, M; Honda, T; Sakanoue, M

    1987-06-01

    The environmental radioactivity caused by the reactor accident at Chernobyl' was investigated from May 7 to May 31 of 1986 in Toyama. Measurement of radioactivities in airborne particles, rain water, drinking water, milk, and mugwort are carried out by gamma-ray spectrometry (pure Ge detector; ORTEC GMX-23195). Ten different nuclides (103Ru, 106Ru, 131I, 132Te-I, 134Cs, 136Cs, 137Cs, 140Ba-La) are identified from samples of airborne particles. In the air samples, a maximum radioactivity concentration of each nuclide is observed on 13th May 1986. The time of the reactor shut-down and the flux of thermal neutron at the reactor were calculated from 131I/132I and 137Cs/134Cs ratio. The exposure dose in Toyama by this accident is given as follows: internal exposure; [thyroid] adult-59 microSv, child-140 microSv, baby-130 microSv, [total body] adult-0.2 microSv, child, baby-0.4 microSv, external exposure; 7 microSv, effective dose equivalent; adult-9 microSv, child-12 Sv, baby-11 microSv.

  15. A cytogenetic follow-up of some highly irradiated victims of the Chernobyl accident.

    PubMed

    Sevan'kaev, A V; Lloyd, D C; Edwards, A A; Khvostunov, I K; Mikhailova, G F; Golub, E V; Shepel, N N; Nadejina, N M; Galstian, I A; Nugis, V Yu; Barrios, L; Caballin, M R; Barquinero, J F

    2005-01-01

    A follow-up of 10 highly irradiated men, mostly reactor crew, from the Chernobyl accident is described. Their pre-accident medical conditions and relevant medical status approximately 10-13 y later are listed. A comparison is made between estimates of their average whole-body penetrating radiation doses derived from several biological parameters. First estimates were based on their presenting severity of prodromal sickness, early changes in blood cell counts and dicentric chromosome aberrations in lymphocytes. In three cases ESR measurements on tooth enamel were also made. Retrospective dosimetry using FISH translocations was attempted 10-13 y later. This showed good agreement for those patients with the lower earlier dose estimates, up to about 3 Gy. For the others, extending up to about 12 Gy, the translocations indicated lower values, suggesting that in these cases translocations had somewhat declined. Repeated chromosomal examinations during the follow-up period showed an expected decline in dicentric frequencies. The pattern of decline was bi-phasic with a more rapid first phase, with a half-life of approximately 4 months followed by a slower decline with half-lives around 2-4 y. The rapid phase persisted for a longer time in those patients who had received the highest doses. 10-13 y later dicentric levels were still above normal background, but well below the translocation frequencies.

  16. Estimate of the accident irradiation dose in 1986 to personnel at the Chernobyl nuclear power plant

    SciTech Connect

    Ivanov, E.A.; Kham`yanov, L.P.; Il`ichev, S.V.

    1995-09-01

    The main difficulty in making a retrospective assessment of the collective indicators of the degree of irradiation of personnel at the Chernobyl nuclear power plant in 1986 is that complete data on the individual dose load are not available. However, information obtained thus far makes it possible to estimate, to a first approximation, the collective irradiation dose to personnel. The data on which the calculation is based were obtained by a detailed reconstruction of the individual routes under accident and post-accident radiation conditions. This reconstruction was made possible by working directly with eye witnesses and witnesses to the events of 1986, the participation of experts, and the use of data from the teams and archives of the accountants at the plant, and many other auxiliary organizations. From the standpoint of mathematical statistics, the actual individual irradiation does to personnel in 1986 consists of a universe of data and the part that is constructed at a given time---the sample. The universe of data is not known but can be adequately determined only after the dose reconstruction work has been completed. In this paper, we estimate the collective irradiation dose to personnel as a parameter of an unknown universe of data on the basis of a sample of the individual irradiation doses identified at a given time.

  17. The spatial distribution of caesium-137 over Northern Ireland from fallout from the Chernobyl nuclear accident

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rawlins, B. G.; Scheib, C.; Tyler, A. N.; Jones, D.; Webster, R.; Young, M. E.

    2009-04-01

    The spatial distribution of caesium-137 (137Cs) across the land is of much interest because it can tell us about the redistribution of the radionuclide as a result of soil erosion, differential migration through the soil—or its complement, differential retention in the soil. Any such inferences from survey measurements depend on the assumption of a broadly even distribution from weapons testing fallout, and the substantial deposition of 137Cs in rain following the Chernobyl accident on 26 April 1986. Deposition from the latter was not uniform over large areas, of course, and measurements across northern England showed that the magnitude of 137Cs deposition depended largely on the distribution of convective rainfall in the days immediately after the accident. There were too few measurements of 137Cs deposition at close spacings to estimate local variation. Twenty years after the deposition from Chernobyl a detailed airborne radiometric survey of the whole of Northern Ireland was flown. Flights were made along transects 200 m apart with recordings at 80 m intervals along the flight lines to give more than one million data in total. We have used the data to investigate the spatial distribution of 137Cs. Our initial geostatistical analyses suggested substantial short-range variation in the distribution of 137Cs. We wished to determine whether soil erosion or soil type could account for this. We made further detailed analyses using the terrain parameter compound topographic index as an index of soil erosion and deposition and soil maps to account for the migration or retention of 137Cs. The concentration of 137Cs in the soil is greatest where most rain fell in the few days after the accident. However, the local variances are of similar magnitudes across the the majority of the province. The global variogram of the radionuclide shows a large proportion of the spatially correlated variance occurring within 700 m and a longer-range structure extending to 15 km. Local

  18. Computational modeling of the accident in the fourth power-generating unit of the Chernobyl nuclear power plant

    SciTech Connect

    Podlazov, L.N.; Trekhov, V.E.; Cherkashov, Y.M.

    1995-02-01

    During the accident in the fourth power-generating unit of the Chernobyl nuclear power plant complicated spatially distributed processes (neutron-physical, thermohydrodynamic, chemical, and thermomechanical) were focused and became intertwined. This has made it difficult to model the accident numberically and it has made international collaboration in this field urgent. As a result, specialists in three different countries performed a series of methodological investigations of the effect of different factors on the positive reactive arising as a result of the insertion of the safety and control rods. These works confirmed that the positive reactivity is highly sensitive to the state of the core prior to the accident and they substantiated the need for reproducing in detail the preliminary initial conditions during computational modeling of the first phase of the accident. The first stage of a combined comprehensive computational analysis of the Chernobyl accident were quasistatic estimates of the positive reactivity according the DINA and CITATION codes. The results of the reconstruction of the three-dimensional neutron fields on the basis of information recorded approximately 2 minute prior to the accident by the SKALA system were used as the initial information for constructing the preaccident state of the reactor.

  19. Cancer risk estimation in Belarussian children due to thyroid irradiation as a consequence of the Chernobyl nuclear accident

    SciTech Connect

    Buglova, E.; Kenigsberg, J.E.; Sergeeva, N.V.

    1996-07-01

    The thyroid doses received by the juvenile population of Belarus following the Chernobyl accident ranged up to about 10 Gy. The thyroid cancer risk estimate recommended in NCRP Report No. 80 was used to predict the number of thyroid cancer cases among children during 1990-1992 in selected Belarussian regions and cities. The results obtained using this risk estimate show an excess of thyroid cancer cases being registered vs. the predicted cases. Thyroid cancer incidence rate among boys under investigation is higher than among girls in the postaccident period. The excess of the observed over the expected incidence in the general juvenile population is caused by the high thyroid cancer incidence rate among boys. These results, which can be considered part of the first stage of a thorough thyroid cancer risk estimation after the Chernobyl accident, demonstrate the critical need to complete these studies in depth. 6 refs., 5 figs., 3 tabs.

  20. Database of meteorological and radiation measurements made in Belarus during the first three months following the Chernobyl accident.

    PubMed

    Drozdovitch, Vladimir; Zhukova, Olga; Germenchuk, Maria; Khrutchinsky, Arkady; Kukhta, Tatiana; Luckyanov, Nickolas; Minenko, Victor; Podgaiskaya, Marina; Savkin, Mikhail; Vakulovsky, Sergey; Voillequé, Paul; Bouville, André

    2013-02-01

    Results of all available meteorological and radiation measurements that were performed in Belarus during the first three months after the Chernobyl accident were collected from various sources and incorporated into a single database. Meteorological information such as precipitation, wind speed and direction, and temperature in localities were obtained from meteorological station facilities. Radiation measurements include gamma-exposure rate in air, daily fallout, concentration of different radionuclides in soil, grass, cow's milk and water as well as total beta-activity in cow's milk. Considerable efforts were made to evaluate the reliability of the measurements that were collected. The electronic database can be searched according to type of measurement, date, and location. The main purpose of the database is to provide reliable data that can be used in the reconstruction of thyroid doses resulting from the Chernobyl accident. Copyright © 2012. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  1. DATABASE OF METEOROLOGICAL AND RADIATION MEASUREMENTS MADE IN BELARUS DURING THE FIRST THREE MONTHS FOLLOWING THE CHERNOBYL ACCIDENT

    PubMed Central

    Drozdovitch, Vladimir; Zhukova, Olga; Germenchuk, Maria; Khrutchinsky, Arkady; Kukhta, Tatiana; Luckyanov, Nickolas; Minenko, Victor; Podgaiskaya, Marina; Savkin, Mikhail; Vakulovsky, Sergey; Voillequé, Paul; Bouville, André

    2012-01-01

    Results of all available meteorological and radiation measurements that were performed in Belarus during the first three months after the Chernobyl accident were collected from various sources and incorporated into a single database. Meteorological information such as precipitation, wind speed and direction, and temperature in localities were obtained from meteorological station facilities. Radiation measurements include gamma-exposure rate in air, daily fallout, concentration of different radionuclides in soil, grass, cow’s milk and water as well as total beta-activity in cow’s milk. Considerable efforts were made to evaluate the reliability of the measurements that were collected. The electronic database can be searched according to type of measurement, date, and location. The main purpose of the database is to provide reliable data that can be used in the reconstruction of thyroid doses resulting from the Chernobyl accident. PMID:23103580

  2. (137)Cs contamination over Transylvania region (Romania) after Chernobyl Nuclear Power Plant Accident.

    PubMed

    Begy, R Cs; Simon, H; Vasilache, D; Kelemen, Sz; Cosma, C

    2017-12-01

    Following the radionuclide releases due to Chernobyl Nuclear Power Plant accident, various studies were completed by researchers all over the world in order to measure the surface contaminations by artificial radionuclides. The aim of this study was to evaluate (137)Cs surface contamination and to create an inventory distribution for Transylvania region (Romania) after the Chernobyl event using γ spectrometric measurements on soil samples collected from 153 locations. The results were compared to measured data from the Danube Delta and Moldova Republic, as well as to (137)Cs concentrations from the rest of Europe reported by literature. The (137)Cs surface concentrations in soil samples ranged between 0.4±0.1kBqm(-2) and 301.1±3.0kBqm(-2), having an average of 8.3±0.2kBqm(-2), with more elevated values in the mountain areas (18.3±0.6kBqm(-2)) compared to the hills and plains (2.6±0.1kBqm(-2)). Taking into consideration the cardinal regions, the northern and western regions received the least amount of (137)Cs (2.9±0.1kBqm(-2)), while the southern part received 16.3±0.6kBqm(-2). Sampling points with eastern slope exposure received the highest average (27.8±0.5kBqm(-2)), while southern, north-western and north-eastern ones received less than 8kBqm(-2). Two hotspots are reported at Iezer-Ighiel (72.7±5.9kBqm(-2)) and Tulgheș areas (51.5±0.6kBqm(-2)). Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Reconstruction of the inhalation dose in the 30-km zone after the Chernobyl accident.

    PubMed

    Mück, Konrad; Pröhl, Gerhard; Likhtarev, Ilya; Kovgan, Lina; Golikov, Vladislav; Zeger, Johann

    2002-02-01

    Due to lack of measurements of activity concentrations in air, the assessment of the inhalation dose of the population evacuated from the 30-km zone after the Chernobyl accident is not possible from continuous filter measurements. Since the evaluation of the inhalation dose in each settlement of the zone is of great interest for epidemiological purposes, an approach was chosen that utilizes the available data on ground deposition of 137Cs, a recently performed best estimate of the radionuclide vector and its spatial distribution as well as the radionuclide dependent deposition velocity. The derived inhalation dose values in the 30-km zone range between 3 mSv to 150 mSv effective dose for adults depending on the distance to the reactor site and the day of evacuation. For 1-y-old infants the values range between 10 to 700 mSv. In Chernobyl town, an effective inhalation dose of 25 mSv until evacuation day was assessed. Thyroid doses due to inhalation ranged from 0.02 to 1 Sv for adults, for 1-y-old infants from 0.02 to 6 Sv. The inhalation dose in each settlement of the 30-km zone is approximately 8-13 times higher than the external exposure in each settlement if evacuation of the settlement occurred at an early stage. For settlements with evacuation at a later stage (day 10 or later) the inhalation dose was about 50-70% higher than the external dose. The dominant contribution to the effective inhalation dose comes from 131I (about 40%) and tellurium and rubidium isotopes (about 20-30%). Despite high zirconium and cerium ground depositions, zirconium and cerium isotopes contribute rather little to the inhalation dose which is mainly due to the great particle sizes to which they are attached. The relative contribution of short-lived radionuclides is, despite higher activities than at greater distances, less than 5%.

  4. Significant increase in trisomy 21 in Berlin nine months after the Chernobyl reactor accident: temporal correlation or causal relation?

    PubMed Central

    Sperling, K.; Pelz, J.; Wegner, R. D.; Dörries, A.; Grüters, A.; Mikkelsen, M.

    1994-01-01

    OBJECTIVE--To assess whether the increased prevalence of trisomy 21 in West Berlin in January 1987 might have been causally related to exposure to ionising radiation as a result of the Chernobyl reactor accident or was merely a chance event. DESIGN--Analysis of monthly prevalence of trisomy 21 in West Berlin from January 1980 to December 1989. SETTING--Confines of West Berlin. RESULTS--Owing to the former "island" situation of West Berlin and its well organised health services, ascertainment of trisomy 21 was thought to be almost complete. A cluster of 12 cases occurred in January 1987 as compared with two or three expected. After exclusion of factors that might have explained the increase, including maternal age distribution, only exposure to radiation as a result of the Chernobyl reactor accident remained. In six of seven cases that could be studied cytogenetically the extra chromosome was of maternal origin, confirming that nondisjunction had occurred at about the time of conception. CONCLUSION--On the basis of two assumptions--(a) that maternal meiosis is an error prone process susceptible to exogenous factors at the time of conception; (b) that owing to the high prevalence of iodine deficiency in Berlin a large amount of iodine-131 would have been accumulated over a short period--it is concluded that the increased prevalence of trisomy 21 in West Berlin in January 1987 was causally related to a short period of exposure to ionising radiation as a result of the Chernobyl reactor accident. PMID:8044094

  5. Rural areas affected by the Chernobyl accident: radiation exposure and remediation strategies.

    PubMed

    Jacob, P; Fesenko, S; Bogdevitch, I; Kashparov, V; Sanzharova, N; Grebenshikova, N; Isamov, N; Lazarev, N; Panov, A; Ulanovsky, A; Zhuchenko, Y; Zhurba, M

    2009-12-15

    Main objectives of the present work were to develop an internationally agreed methodology for deriving optimized remediation strategies in rural areas that are still affected by the Chernobyl accident, and to give an overview of the radiological situation in the three affected countries, Belarus, Russia and Ukraine. Study settlements were defined by having in 2004 less than 10,000 inhabitants and official dose estimates exceeding 1 mSv. Data on population, current farming practices, contamination of soils and foodstuffs, and remedial actions previously applied were collected for each of such 541 study settlements. Calculations of the annual effective dose from internal radiation were validated with extensive data sets on whole body counter measurements. According to our calculations for 2004, in 290 of the study settlements the effective dose exceeded 1 mSv, and the collective dose in these settlements amounted to about 66 person-Sv. Six remedial actions were considered: radical improvement of grassland, application of ferrocyn to cows, feeding pigs with uncontaminated fodder before slaughter, application of mineral fertilizers for potato fields, information campaign on contaminated forest produce, and replacement of contaminated soil in populated areas by uncontaminated soil. Side effects of the remedial actions were quantified by a 'degree of acceptability'. Results are presented for two remediation strategies, namely, Strategy 1, in which the degree of acceptability was given a priority, and Remediation Strategy 2, in which remedial actions were chosen according to lowest costs per averted dose only. Results are highly country-specific varying from preference for soil replacement in populated areas in Belarus to preference for application of ferrocyn to cows in Ukraine. Remedial actions in 2010 can avert a large collective dose of about 150 person-Sv (including averted doses, which would be received in the following years). Nevertheless, the number of

  6. Classification of hot particles from the Chernobyl accident and nuclear weapons detonations by non-destructive methods.

    PubMed

    Zheltonozhsky, V; Mück, K; Bondarkov, M

    2001-01-01

    Both after the Chernobyl accident and nuclear weapon detonations, agglomerates of radioactive material, so-called hot particles, were released or formed which show a behaviour in the environment quite different from the activity released in gaseous or aerosol form. The differences in their characteristic properties, in the radionuclide composition and the uranium and actinide contents are described in detail for these particles. While nuclear bomb hot particles (both from fission and fusion bombs) incorporate well detectable trace amounts of 60Co and 152Eu, these radionuclides are absent in Chernobyl hot particles. In contrast, Chernobyl hot particles contain 125Sb and 144Ce which are absent in atomic bomb HPs. Obvious differences are also observable between fusion and fission bombs' hot particles (significant differences in 152Eu/l55Eu, 154Eu/155Eu and 238Pu/239Pu ratios) which facilitate the identification of HPs of unknown provensence. The ratio of 239Pu/240Pu in Chernobyl hot particles could be determined by a non-destructive method at 1:1.5. A non-destructive method to determine the content of non-radioactive elements by Kalpha-emission measurements was developed by which inactive Zr, Nb, Fe and Ni could be verified in the particles.

  7. Consequences of the Chernobyl accident for the natural and human environments

    SciTech Connect

    Dreicer, M.; Aarkog, A.; Alexakhin, R.; Anspaugh, L.; Arkhipov, N.P.; Johansson, K.-J.

    1996-07-01

    In the ten years since the Chernobyl accident, an enormous amount of work has been done to assess the consequences to the natural and human environment. Although it is difficult to summarize such a large and varied field, some general conclusions can be drawn. This background paper includes the main findings concerning the direct impacts of radiation on the flora and fauna; the general advances of knowledge in the cycling of radionuclides in natural, seminatural and agricultural environments; some evaluation of countermeasures that were used; and a summary of the human radiation doses resulting from the environmental contamination. although open questions still remain, it can be concluded that: (1) at high radiation levels, the natural environment has shown short term impacts but any significant long term impacts remain to be seen; (2) effective countermeasures can be taken to reduce the transfer of contamination from the environment to humans but these are highly site specific and must be evaluated in terms of practicality as well as population does reduction; (3) the majority of the doses have already been received by the human population. If agricultural countermeasures are appropriately taken, the main source of future doses will be the gathering of food and recreational activities in natural and seminatural ecosystems.

  8. Effects of radioactive contamination on Scots pines in the remote period after the Chernobyl accident.

    PubMed

    Geras'kin, Stanislav; Oudalova, Alla; Dikareva, Nina; Spiridonov, Sergey; Hinton, Thomas; Chernonog, Elena; Garnier-Laplace, Jacqueline

    2011-08-01

    A 6 year study of Scots pine populations inhabiting sites in the Bryansk region of Russia radioactively contaminated as a result of the Chernobyl accident is presented. In six study sites, (137)Cs activity concentrations and heavy metal content in soils, as well as (137)Cs, (90)Sr and heavy metal concentrations in cones were measured. Doses absorbed in reproduction organs of pine trees were calculated using a dosimetric model. The maximum annual dose absorbed at the most contaminated site was about 130 mGy. Occurrence of aberrant cells scored in the root meristem of germinated seeds collected from pine trees growing on radioactively contaminated territories for over 20 years significantly exceeded the reference levels during all 6 years of the study. The data suggest that cytogenetic effects occur in Scots pine populations due to the radioactive contamination. However, no consistent differences in reproductive ability were detected between the impacted and reference populations as measured by the frequency of abortive seeds. Even though the Scots pine populations have occupied radioactively contaminated territories for two decades, there were no clear indications of adaptation to the radiation, when measured by the number of aberrant cells in root meristems of seeds exposed to an additional acute dose of radiation.

  9. 137Cs distribution among annual rings of different tree species contaminated after the Chernobyl accident.

    PubMed

    Soukhova, N V; Fesenko, S V; Klein, D; Spiridonov, S I; Sanzharova, N I; Badot, P M

    2003-01-01

    The distributions of 137Cs among annual rings of Pinus sylvestris and Betula pendula at four experimental sites located in the most contaminated areas in the Russian territory after the Chernobyl accident in 1986 were studied. Trees of different ages were sampled from four forest sites with different tree compositions and soil properties. The data analysis shows that 137Cs is very mobile in wood and the 1986 rings do not show the highest contamination. The difference between pine and birch in the pattern of radial 137Cs distribution can be satisfactorily explained by the difference in radial ray composition. 137Cs radial distribution in the wood can be described as the sum of two exponential functions for both species. The function parameters are height, age and species dependent. The distribution of 137Cs in birch wood reveals much more pronounced dependence on site characteristics and/or the age of trees than pines. The data obtained can be used to assess 137Cs content in wood.

  10. Atmospheric deposition of cosmogenic 7Be and 137Cs from fallout of the Chernobyl accident.

    PubMed

    Papastefanou, C; Ioannidou, A; Stoulos, S; Manolopoulou, M

    1995-08-18

    Atmospheric (tropospheric) depositional fluxes of the naturally occurring 7Be of cosmogenic origin and 137Cs from fallout of the Chernobyl accident were measured over a 7-year period (January 1987-December 1993) at Thessaloniki, Greece (40 degrees 38' N, 22 degrees 58' E). The annual total deposition fluxes of 7Be varied between 854 Bq/m2 (1987) and 1242 Bq/m2 (1992), showing a minimum in the years 1988-89. The annual total deposition fluxes of 137Cs varied between 183 Bq/m2 (1987) and 16.4 Bq/m2 (1992), showing a significant decrease as expected for natural removal and radioactive decay and no new releases from nuclear facilities or weapons testing. The annual average total deposition velocity for 7Be was from 0.3 cm/s (1988) up to 0.8 cm/s (1991), while for 137Cs the corresponding values were much higher, hence 137Cs was associated with larger atmospheric particles. High 7Be concentrations in air were related to the very little solar activity (1987-88 and 1993-94), while low 7Be concentrations in air related to the high solar activity (1989-91). Maximum 137Cs concentrations in air were registered during the spring 1991 and 1992, reflecting some stratospheric inputs. An unusual highly elevated value of 137Cs concentration in air, reaching 0.25 mBq/m3, was observed during the summer 1990.

  11. Health effects in those with acute radiation sickness from the Chernobyl accident.

    PubMed

    Mettler, Fred A; Gus'kova, Angelina K; Gusev, Igor

    2007-11-01

    The Chernobyl accident resulted in almost one-third of the reported cases of acute radiation sickness (ARS) reported worldwide. Cases occurred among the plant employees and first responders but not among the evacuated populations or general population. The diagnosis of ARS was initially considered for 237 persons based on symptoms of nausea, vomiting, and diarrhea. Ultimately, the diagnosis of ARS was confirmed in 134 persons. There were 28 short term deaths of which 95% occurred at whole body doses in excess of 6.5 Gy. Underlying bone marrow failure was the main contributor to all deaths during the first 2 mo. Allogenic bone marrow transplantation was performed on 13 patients and an additional six received human fetal liver cells. All of these patients died except one individual who later was discovered to have recovered his own marrow and rejected the transplant. Two or three patients were felt to have died as a result of transplant complications. Skin doses exceeded bone marrow doses by a factor of 10-30, and at least 19 of the deaths were felt to be primarily due to infection from large area beta burns. Internal contamination was of relatively minor importance in treatment. By the end of 2001, an additional 14 ARS survivors died from various causes. Long term treatment has included therapy for beta burn fibrosis and skin atrophy as well as for cataracts.

  12. [Congenital malformations among offspring of the liquidators of the consequences from Chernobyl accident].

    PubMed

    Liaginskaia, A M; Tukov, A R; Osipov, V A; Ermalitskiĭ, A P; Prokhorova, O N

    2009-01-01

    The frequency and the structure of congenital malformations at children of the liquidators of the consequences from Chernobyl accident, undergone to an external scale gamma-irradiation in dozes up to 25 cGy. In total is surveyed 2379 newborn at which is revealed 318 intrauterine development defects. The received results are compared to the earlier published data on birth of congenital malformations in families of the fathers who have undergone to an irradiation in connection with professional activity at the enterprises of a nuclear industry, with emergency irradiation, with irradiation as a result of explosions of nuclear bombs in Japan, and are discussed from positions of the basic rules (situations) of radiating genetics. Total frequency, the frequency of forms 21 of inherent defects of development, taken into account in the International register of congenital malformations and frequency 9 forms heaviest of congenital intrauterine development defects with the high contribution mutation components at children of the liquidators authentically is higher than on the average on Russian Federation. The dependence of the frequency congenital malformations at children from dozes of an irradiation of the fathers--liquidators is revealed. The curve of dependence of the frequency of congenital malformations from time, past after work up to copulation carries arched character with peak of rise of frequency of congenital malformations in 2-3 years and decrease in 6-7 years.

  13. Effective doses due to external irradiation from the Chernobyl accident for different population groups of Ukraine.

    PubMed

    Likhtariov, I; Kovgan, L; Novak, D; Vavilov, S; Jacob, P; Paretzke, H G

    1996-01-01

    A model for the external exposure of the Ukrainian population after the Chernobyl accident was developed. It is based on extensive measurements of external gamma-exposure rates (EGER) in air and of external effective doses of members of five population groups. Questionnaires were used to determine the occupancy times of members of the population groups at three types of locations; inside houses, outdoors, and outside of the home settlement. Behavior factors are defined as the ratio of individual external doses to a reference dose for a phantom standing permanently over an open field with the same average 137Cs activity per unit area as in the settlement. The behavior factors were derived for five population groups (children younger than seven years, the age group from eight to seventeen years, employees, agricultural workers, and pensioners) by two methods: first from direct measurements of individual doses by thermoluminescent dosimetry and an experimental determination of the average 137Cs activity per unit area in the settlement of interest; and second from external gamma-exposure rates in air at various types of locations and from the questionnaire data. The methods were found to be consistent and the results were used to calculate external exposures of the five population groups in the years 1987 through 1991.

  14. Observations on the geology and geohydrology of the Chernobyl Nuclear Accident Site, Ukraine

    SciTech Connect

    Matzko, J.R.; Percious, D.J.; Rachlin, J.; Marples, D.R.

    1994-02-01

    The most highly contaminated surface areas from cesium-137 fallout from the April 1986 accident at the Chernobyl` nuclear power station in Ukraine occur within the 30-km radius evacuation zone set up around the station, and an 80-km lobe extending to the west-southwest. Lower levels of contamination extend 300 km to the west of the power station. The deposition of this radioactive dust on the surface and the subsequent entombment of the damaged reactor effectively result in the de facto establishment of an above-ground nuclear waste storage site. This site is located on a thick sedimentary sequence of loose, mostly clastic deposits, with a shallow (generally 3-5 m) water table. The geology, the presence of surface water, a shallow water table, and leaky aquifers at depth make this an unfavorable environment for the long-term containment and storage of the radioactive debris. An understanding of the general geology and hydrology of the area is important to assess the environmental impact of this unintended waste storage site, and to evaluate the potential for radionuclide migration through the soil and rock and into subsurface aquifers and nearby rivers. 27 refs., 3 figs.

  15. Follow-up studies on genome damage in children after Chernobyl nuclear power plant accident.

    PubMed

    Fucic, Aleksandra; Aghajanyan, Anna; Druzhinin, Vladimir; Minina, Varvara; Neronova, Elizaveta

    2016-09-01

    As children are more susceptible to ionizing radiation than adults, each nuclear accident demands special attention and care of this vulnerable population. The Chernobyl nuclear disaster occurred in a region populated with a large number of children, but despite all efforts and expertise of nuclear specialists, it was not possible to avoid casualties. As vast regions of Ukraine, Belarus and Russia were exposed to doses of ionizing radiation, which are known to be related with different diseases, shortly after the accident medical surveillance was launched, which also included analysis of genome damage. Child population affected by internal and external radiation consisted of subjects exposed prenatally, postnatally (both evacuated and non-evacuated), born by irradiated fathers who worked as liquidators, and parents exposed environmentally. In all groups of children during the last 30 years who were exposed to doses which were significantly higher than that recommended for general population of 1 mSv per year, increased genome damage was detected. Increased genome damage includes statistically higher frequency of dicentric and ring chromosomes, chromated and chromosome breaks, acentric fragments, translocations, and micronuclei. The presence of rogue cells confirmed internal contamination. Genome instability and radiosensitivity in children was detected both in evacuated and continuously exposed children. Today the population exposed to ionizing radiation in 1986 is in reproductive period of life and follow-up of this population and their offspring is of great importance. This review aims to give insight in results of studies, which reported genome damage in children in journals without language restrictions.

  16. Retrospective evaluation of 131I deposition density and thyroid dose in Poland after the Chernobyl accident.

    PubMed

    Pietrzak-Flis, Zofia; Krajewski, Pawel; Radwan, Irena; Muramatsu, Yasuyuki

    2003-06-01

    The 131I deposition in Poland after the Chernobyl accident on 26 April 1986 was evaluated from the determined 129I deposition and the estimated 129I/131I ratio at the time of the arrival of fallout. Concentrations of 129I and 127I were determined by neutron activation analysis in uncultivated soils from 16 locations in Poland. Determination of 137Cs in soils was carried out by gamma spectrometry. The atomic ratio of 129I/131I at the time of fallout arrival was estimated using the 129I/131I ratio at the time of the accident, which, on the basis of the core inventory data, was assumed to be 22.8. It was estimated from the time of fallout arrival and from the weighed mean atomic ratio that the 129I/131I ratio for Poland was 32.8. The calculated 131I deposition ranged from 63.2 to 729 kBq m(-2). High deposition of 131I occurred in the locations with rainfall but occasionally also in locations without rainfall. Committed equivalent doses from 131I were evaluated for 5-y-old children, 10-y-old children, and adults using the computer model CLRP for the situations with and without countermeasures including iodine prophylaxis. The highest thyroid doses from inhalation and ingestion without countermeasures were 178 mSv, 120 mSv, and 45 mSv for 5-y-old children, 10-y-old children, and adults, respectively. The countermeasures reduced these doses by about 30%.

  17. The psychological consequences of the Chernobyl accident--findings from the International Atomic Energy Agency Study.

    PubMed Central

    Ginzburg, H M

    1993-01-01

    In October 1989, more than 3 years after the nuclear power plant accident at Chernobyl, in the Ukraine, the Government of the Union of Soviet Socialist Republics requested that the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) evaluate the medical and psychological health of residents living in areas identified as being contaminated with radioactive fallout. The IAEA designed and conducted a collaborative study to examine whether there were any measurable effects of exposure to the low levels of ionizing radiation resulting from the accident. The study, using structured interviews and IAEA laboratory equipment, collected data on more than 1,350 residents of 13 villages. IAEA clinical staff members concluded that they could not identify any health disorders in either the contaminated or nearby (uncontaminated) control villages that could be attributed directly to radiation exposure. The clinical staff, however, did note that the levels of anxiety and stress of the villagers appeared to be disproportionate to the biological significance of the levels of IAEA-measured radio-active contamination. Almost half the adults in all the villages were unsure if they had a radiation-related illness. More than 70 percent of persons in the contaminated villages wanted to move away, and approximately 83 percent believed that the government should relocate them. The IAEA effort indicates that the villagers need to be educated about their actual risks, and they need to understand what types of illnesses are, and are not, associated with exposure to radioactive contamination. Unfortunately, the villagers' needs may exceed the available resources of their local and central governments. PMID:8464974

  18. Thirty-five-year-old woman with signet ring cell gastric carcinoma secondary to the chernobyl nuclear accident: a case report.

    PubMed

    Mayhall, Kim; Ghayouri, Masoumeh; Henry, Katherine; Margin, Veronica; Copolla, Domeinico; Shackelford, Rodney

    2013-01-01

    The 1986 Chernobyl nuclear accident resulted in radiation exposures throughout much of Europe, with the highest exposures within the city of Pripyat, Ukraine, where the accident occurred. We report a woman who was exposed to the Chernobyl accident at age 13. Beginning in her early thirties, she experienced several years of upper abdominal pain that became progressively more severe. At age 35, she underwent upper endoscopy and gastric biopsy. Histological examination revealed a signet ring cell (SRC) gastric carcinoma. The tumor was discovered at an advanced stage and proved unresectable. She died 3 months following her diagnosis. The mean age for SRC gastric carcinoma diagnosis is about 62 years; the median survival following diagnosis is 13 months. The early appearance and aggressive clinical course of this malignancy in relation to the Chernobyl nuclear accident is discussed.

  19. Thirty-Five-Year-Old Woman with Signet Ring Cell Gastric Carcinoma Secondary to the Chernobyl Nuclear Accident: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Mayhall, Kim; Ghayouri, Masoumeh; Henry, Katherine; Margin, Veronica; Copolla, Domeinico; Shackelford, Rodney

    2013-01-01

    The 1986 Chernobyl nuclear accident resulted in radiation exposures throughout much of Europe, with the highest exposures within the city of Pripyat, Ukraine, where the accident occurred. We report a woman who was exposed to the Chernobyl accident at age 13. Beginning in her early thirties, she experienced several years of upper abdominal pain that became progressively more severe. At age 35, she underwent upper endoscopy and gastric biopsy. Histological examination revealed a signet ring cell (SRC) gastric carcinoma. The tumor was discovered at an advanced stage and proved unresectable. She died 3 months following her diagnosis. The mean age for SRC gastric carcinoma diagnosis is about 62 years; the median survival following diagnosis is 13 months. The early appearance and aggressive clinical course of this malignancy in relation to the Chernobyl nuclear accident is discussed. PMID:23626554

  20. The Chernobyl accident as a source of new radiological knowledge: implications for Fukushima rehabilitation and research programmes.

    PubMed

    Balonov, Mikhail

    2013-03-01

    The accident at the Chernobyl nuclear power plant in Ukraine in 1986 caused a huge release of radionuclides over large areas of Europe. During large scale activities focused on overcoming of its negative consequences for public health, various research programmes in radioecology, dosimetry and radiation medicine were conducted. New knowledge was applied internationally in substantial updating of radiation protection systems for emergency and existing situations of human exposure, for improvement of emergency preparedness and response. Radioecological and dosimetry models were significantly improved and validated with numerous measurement data, guidance on environmental countermeasures and monitoring elaborated and tested.New radiological knowledge can be of use in the planning and implementation of rehabilitation programmes in Japan following the Fukushima nuclear accident. In particular, the following activity areas would benefit from application of the Chernobyl experience: strategy of rehabilitation, and technology of settlement decontamination and of countermeasures applied in agriculture and forestry. The Chernobyl experience could be very helpful in planning research activities initiated by the Fukushima radionuclide fallout, i.e. environmental transfer of radionuclides, effectiveness of site-specific countermeasures, nationwide dose assessment, health effect studies, etc.

  1. Time dependence of the {sup 137}Cs resuspension factor on the Romanian territory after the Chernobyl accident

    SciTech Connect

    Mihaila, B.; Cuculeanu, V.

    1994-08-01

    On the basis of the radioactivity levels in aerosol and atmospheric deposition samples due to the Chernobyl accident, the resuspension factor of {sup 137}Cs as a four-parameter function has been inferred. The standard procedure to derive the dependence of resuspension on time assumes that the initial deposit is instantaneous. A simple method assuming a constant deposition rate over a fixed period has been proposed. Also, based on existing experimental data, an attempt was made to consider a realistic time dependence of the deposition rate to cope with the particular case of the Chernobyl accident. The differences between the two models are outlined. The Chernobyl direct deposit has been assumed to be the deposit measured between 30 April and 30 June 1986. The calculated values of the resuspension factor are consistent with the IAEA`s recommended model and depend on the rainfall that occurred in June 1986 and the site-specific disturbance conditions during the first 100 d following 1 July 1986 and only on artificial disturbance by humans and vehicles after that. 16 refs., 5 figs., 3 tabs.

  2. Trends in the human sex odds at birth in Europe and the Chernobyl Nuclear Power Plant accident.

    PubMed

    Scherb, Hagen; Voigt, Kristina

    2007-06-01

    To investigate trends in the sex odds before and after the Chernobyl accident, gender-specific annual birth statistics were obtained from the Czech Republic, Denmark, Finland, Germany, Hungary, Norway, Poland, and Sweden between 1982 and 1992. For parts of Germany, annual birth statistics and fallout measurements after Chernobyl are available at the district level. Trend models allowing for discontinuities of the male birth proportions are suggested. Superimposed on a downward trend in male proportions there was a jump in 1987 with a sex odds ratio of 1.0047 (95%-confidence interval: 1.0013-1.0081, p=0.0061). A positive association of the male proportion in Germany between 1986 and 1991 with radioactive exposure at the district level is reflected by a sex odds ratio of 1.0145 per mSv/a (1.0021-1.0271, p=0.0218). These findings suggest a possible long-term chronic influence of the Chernobyl Nuclear Power Plant accident on the human sex odds at birth in several European countries.

  3. Mature B-cell neoplasms in Chernobyl clean-up workers of 1986-1987: summary of cytomorphological and immunocytochemical study in 25 years after Chernobyl accident.

    PubMed

    Gluzman, D F; Sklyarenko, L M; Nadgornaya, V A; Zavelevich, M P

    2011-03-01

    The data on the verified cases of mature B-cell neoplasms (chronic lymphocytic leukemia - CLL, B-prolymphocytic leukemia, non-Hodgkin's lymphoma in leukemization phase and multiple myeloma - MM; 146 cases in total) in the consecutive group of Ukrainian clean-up workers within 10-25 years after Chernobyl accident are summarized. B-cell neoplasms represent the most prevalent group among all diagnosed neoplasms of hematopoietic and lymphoid tissues in clean-up worker patients under study (49.4%). MM percentage in the patients of Chernobyl clean-up worker group turned out to be significantly higher than in the patients of the general populations studied at the same period. While the percentage of B-CLL is similar in clean-up worker patients and patients of general population, the trend towards younger age of patients with mature B-cell neoplasms in clean-up worker group is evident. The current concepts on the possible association between mature B-cell neoplasms (mainly B-CLL) and radiation exposure are briefly outlined. Only the precise diagnosis of hematopoietic malignancies combining with large-scale analytical epidemiological studies with careful dose assessment and long-term follow-up may represent the basis for resolving the question whether mature B-cell neoplasms may be radiogenic.

  4. Effects of ionizing radiation on wildlife: what knowledge have we gained between the Chernobyl and Fukushima accidents?

    PubMed

    Beresford, Nicholas A; Copplestone, David

    2011-07-01

    The recent events at the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant in Japan have raised questions over the effects of radiation in the environment. This article considers what we have learned about the radiological consequences for the environment from the Chernobyl accident, Ukraine, in April 1986. The literature offers mixed opinions of the long-term impacts on wildlife close to the Chernobyl plant, with some articles reporting significant effects at very low dose rates (below natural background dose rate levels in, for example, the United Kingdom). The lack of agreement highlights the need for further research to establish whether current radiological protection criteria for wildlife are adequate (and to determine if there are any implications for human radiological protection). Copyright © 2011 SETAC.

  5. Investigations of radiocaesium in the natural terrestrial environment in Norway following the Chernobyl accident.

    PubMed

    Bretten, S; Gaare, E; Skogland, T; Steinnes, E

    1992-03-01

    Radioactive fallout from the Chernobyl accident affected parts of central Norway to a considerable extent, in particular the 134Cs+137Cs deposition had a significant impact on the natural environment. When this became apparent, a comprehensive radioecological research programme was initiated in order to study the behaviour of radiocaesium in boreal and alpine ecosystems, with emphasis on food-chains leading to exposure of species used for human consumption, i.e., reindeer and freshwater fish. In this paper results from the terrestrial part of this research programme during the period 1986-1990 are presented. The work was mainly confined to the mountain areas of Dovre and Rondane. Parallel studies were performed in eutrophic and strongly oligotrophic communities. The influence of local variations in topography and microclimate on the observed radiocaesium levels in topsoils, lichens and vascular plants was studied in detail. Currently a significant re-distribution of radiocaesium from the originally strongly exposed surfaces to those that were less exposed is observed. In the soil, radiocaesium is strongly retained in the litter and raw humus layers. Current levels in lichens are 1-2 orders of magnitude higher than in vascular plants. This strongly affects the seasonal variation of radiocaesium in reindeer, showing winter maxima of about 5 times higher than the August levels. The radiocaesium levels in reindeer showed a decline of approximately a factor of 3 during the period 1987-1990. Other animal species studied in the programme exhibited substantially lower radiocaesium levels than reindeer, but a considerable interspecies variation was observed.

  6. Thyroid Dose Estimates for a Cohort of Belarusian Children Exposed to Radiation from the Chernobyl Accident

    PubMed Central

    Drozdovitch, Vladimir; Minenko, Victor; Khrouch, Valeri; Leshcheva, Svetlana; Gavrilin, Yury; Khrutchinsky, Arkady; Kukhta, Tatiana; Kutsen, Semion; Luckyanov, Nickolas; Shinkarev, Sergey; Tretyakevich, Sergey; Trofimik, Sergey; Voillequé, Paul; Bouville, André

    2013-01-01

    The U.S. National Cancer Institute, in collaboration with the Belarusian Ministry of Health, is conducting a study of thyroid cancer and other thyroid diseases in a cohort of about 12,000 persons who were exposed to fallout from the Chernobyl accident in April 1986. The study subjects were 18 years old or younger at the time of exposure and resided in Belarus in the most contaminated areas of the Gomel and Mogilev Oblasts, as well as in the city of Minsk. All cohort members had at least one direct thyroid measurement made in April–June 1986. Individual data on residential history, consumption of milk, milk products and leafy vegetables as well as administration of stable iodine were collected for all cohort members by means of personal interviews conducted between 1996 and 2007. Based on the estimated 131I activities in the thyroids, which were derived from the direct thyroid measurements, and on the responses to the questionnaires, individual thyroid doses from intakes of 131I were reconstructed for all cohort members. In addition, radiation doses to the thyroid were estimated for the following minor exposure pathways: (a) intake of short-lived 132I, 133I and 132Te by inhalation and ingestion; (b) external irradiation from radionuclides deposited on the ground; and (c) ingestion intake of 134Cs and 137Cs. Intake of 131I was the major pathway for thyroid exposure; its mean contribution to the thyroid dose was 92%. The thyroid doses from 131I intakes varied from 0.5 mGy to almost 33 Gy; the mean was estimated to be 0.58 Gy, while the median was 0.23 Gy. The reconstructed doses are being used to evaluate the risk of thyroid cancer and other thyroid diseases in the cohort. PMID:23560632

  7. Reconstruction of doses and deposition in the western trace from the Chernobyl accident.

    PubMed

    Sikkeland, T; Skuterud, L; Goltsova, N I; Lindmo, T

    1997-05-01

    A model is presented for the explosive cloud of particulates that produced the western trace of high radioactive ground contamination in the Chernobyl accident on 26 April 1986. The model was developed to reproduce measured dose rates and nuclide contamination and to relate estimated doses to observed changes in: (1) infrared emission from the foliage and (2) morphological and histological structures of individual pines. Dominant factors involved in ground contamination were initial cloud shape, particle size distribution, and rate of particle fallout. At time of formation, the cloud was assumed to be parabolical and to contain a homogeneous distribution of spherically shaped fuel particulates having a log-normal size distribution. The particulates were dispersed by steady winds and diffusion that produced a straight line deposition path. The analysis indicates that two clouds, denoted by Cloud I and Cloud II, were involved. Fallout from the former dominated the far field region and fallout from latter the region near the reactor. At formation they had a full width at half maximum of 1800 m and 500 m, respectively. For wind velocities of 5-10 m s(-1) the particulates' radial distribution at formation had a standard deviation and mode of 1.8 microm and 0.5 microm, respectively. This distribution corresponds to a release of 390 GJ in the runaway explosion. The clouds' height and mass are not uniquely determined but are coupled together. For an initial height of 3,600 m, Cloud I contained about 400 kg fuel. For Cloud II the values were, respectively, 1,500 m and 850 kg. Loss of activities from the clouds is found to be small. Values are obtained for the rate of radionuclide migration from the deposit. Various types of biological damage to pines, as reported in the literature, are shown to be mainly due to ionizing radiation from the deposit by Cloud II. A formula is presented for the particulate size distribution in the trace area.

  8. [Higher mental functions and cognitive auditory event-related potentials impairment in liquidators of Chernobyl accident].

    PubMed

    Zhavoronkova, L A; Belostotskiĭ, A P; Kholodova, N B; Kuptsova, S V; Snegireva, I P; Kulikov, M A; Oknina, L B

    2012-01-01

    An integrated neuropsychological study and analysis of cognitive auditory event-related potentials (ERP) using the three-stimulus oddball paradigm was performed in ten subjects who participated in the liquidation of Chernobyl accident and ten healthy subjects. Impairment of higher mental functions, including aspontaneity, fatigability, a decrease in the auditory-verbal and visual memories, and higher motor function deficiency was shown in liquidators. A decrease of amplitude in all components of ERP (N1, N2 and P3) was found in liquidators for all stimuli in both experimental situations (audition of all stimuli and counting of deviant stimuli) compared to healthy subjects. The latent period (LP) of ERP in liquidators was decreased for N1 and N2 components and increased for P3. The largest between-group differences in the LP were revealed in the frontal areas for N1 and P3 in the left hemisphere and for N2 - in the right one. The correlation analysis between the ERP and a neuropsychological study had shown that changes in the LP of N1 are correlated to the impairment of short-term memory and pose praxis of the right hand while changes in the N2 were correlated to the impairment of long-term memory and pose praxis of the left hand. The changes in LP of P3 were correlated to complex cognitive processing disorders. Thus, the complex study identified the deceleration of perception, processing, and analysis of information combined with the weakened inhibition and "uneconomical" type of reactivity which led to the impairment of higher mental functions in liquidators compared to healthy subjects of the same age. The changes found in liquidators are similar to those observed in elderly people and support the hypotheses on accelerated brain ageing caused by low dose irradiation.

  9. Thyroid carcinoma in children and adolescents in Ukraine after the Chernobyl nuclear accident: statistical data and clinicomorphologic characteristics.

    PubMed

    Tronko, M D; Bogdanova, T I; Komissarenko, I V; Epstein, O V; Oliynyk, V; Kovalenko, A; Likhtarev, I A; Kairo, I; Peters, S B; LiVolsi, V A

    1999-07-01

    The increase in the number of childhood thyroid carcinoma cases in Ukraine after the Chernobyl nuclear accident in 1986 prompted the development of a registry of thyroid carcinoma cases at the Institute of Endocrinology and Metabolism in Kiev. In the current study, the authors report the statistical data and clinicomorphologic features of the cases included in this registry. To study the incidence, and age and gender distribution of thyroid carcinoma in Ukraine, the authors compiled complete clinical information from cases diagnosed and treated at the Institute of Endocrinology and Metabolism and statistical reports submitted to the registry from 27 regions of Ukraine. Morphologic features of the resected tumors were examined and were included in the database. During the 5 years preceding the Chernobyl nuclear accident, a total of 59 cases of thyroid carcinoma were identified in the birth to 18 years age group (25 in children age < or = 14 years and 34 in adolescents ages 15-18 years). Between 1986 and 1997, the total number of thyroid carcinomas in Ukrainian children and adolescents was 577 (358 children and 219 adolescents). Morphologically, the thyroid tumors overwhelmingly were papillary carcinomas, and the majority of these also showed a follicular and/or solid growth pattern. Lymph node metastases and other extrathyroidal spread were common, thus necessitating total thyroidectomy and lymph node dissections in many patients. Between 1990 and 1997, a significant increase in the incidence of thyroid carcinoma was noted in children and adolescents in Ukraine; the group most affected was comprised of the individuals who were age < or = 5 years in 1986 (the year of the Chernobyl nuclear accident). The largest number of cases occurred in patients living in areas of thyroid radiation doses of > or =0.50 grays. The morphologic features of those thyroid tumors suggest that they are aggressive tumors with a high frequency of lymph node metastases, venous invasion, and

  10. Chernobyl nuclear reactor accident fallout: measurement and consequences. (Latest citations from the NTIS data base). Published Search

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-04-01

    The bibliography contains citations concerning the consequences of radioactive fallout from the Chernobyl nuclear reactor accident. Coverage includes transfrontier radioactive contamination, deposition of radioactive pollutants from the atmosphere, and radionuclide concentrations in ground-level air and soil contamination, and in vegetation and food. Monthly radioactive monitoring in different countries, possible health hazards caused by the radiation, and estimates of radiation doses to the population from the fallout are also discussed. (Contains a minimum of 209 citations and includes a subject term index and title list.)

  11. [The electrophysiological characteristic of the brain functional status in liquidators of the consequences of the Chernobyl Nuclear Power Plant accident].

    PubMed

    Evstratova, L V; Ar'ev, A L; Azin, A L; Ovsiannikova, N A; Kozina, L S

    2010-01-01

    41 liquidators who had worked in the Chernobyl accident area were examined. All of them had nervous diseases. Both alpha-rhythms disorganization and increase of beta-activity were usually observed in brain cortex sensomotor areas of 41 liquidators as compared with 30 healthy individuals. The majority of patients were characterized by both enhanced reaction to light flashes rhythm assimilation and the decrease of nonspecific and skin-galvanic reactions to the light stimulus. The conclusion is made about the systemic CNS damage in liquidators as compared with healthy individuals.

  12. Hungarian surveillance of germinal mutations. Lack of detectable increase in indicator conditions caused by germinal mutations following the Chernobyl accident.

    PubMed

    Czeizel, A

    1989-07-01

    The Hungarian surveillance of germinal mutations is based on three indicator conditions seen in offspring, i.e., 15 sentinel anomalies, Down syndrome and component anomaly pairs of unidentified multiple congenital anomalies. It is an "opportunistic program," because the necessary data are available from the Hungarian Congenital Malformation Registry. This system is described and the criteria of a good registry are summarized. The analysis of indicator conditions caused by germinal mutations did not reveal any measurable mutagenic effects in Hungary following the accident at the Chernobyl nuclear power plant. The pros and cons of germinal mutation surveillance are discussed.

  13. [Regularities of changes in 137Cs content in milk in the long term after the Chernobyl nuclear reactor accident].

    PubMed

    Fesenko, S V; Pakhomov, A Iu; Pasternak, A D; Goriainov, V A; Fesenko, G A; Panov, A V

    2004-01-01

    Regularities of changes in 137Cs content in cattle milk in the long term after the Chernobyl accident have been analyzed. Contamination levels of haylands and pastures, soil properties, specific features of agricultural production and time after the fallout play a crucial role in 137Cs concentration changes in animal products. Trends have been studied that reflect the influence of these factors and their significance assessed. The half-life periods of 137Cs decay in milk vary over the period of 1994 to 2000 between 7.1 and 14.8 years and approach similar periods calculated for the long term after global radioactive fallout from nuclear weapons tests.

  14. [The rehabilitation under alpine conditions of the participants in the cleanup of the accident at the Chernobyl Atomic Electric Power Station who are ill with chronic bronchitis].

    PubMed

    Brimkulov, N N; Abdulina, A A; Davletalieva, N E; Bakirova, A N; Karamuratov, A; Mirrakhimov, M M

    1996-01-01

    24 patients exposed to low-dose radiation after the Chernobyl accident were examined before and after 24-day treatment of chronic bronchitis in the high-altitude rehabilitation center (3200 m above the sea level) in Tien Shan. Sanogenic alpine climate improved the patients' general condition, physical performance and lung ventilation, corrected compromised immunity. After high-altitude adaptation tracheobronchial inflammation alleviated, cytologic composition and surface activity of bronchoalveolar fluid returned to normal. Therefore, high-altitude treatment of Chernobyl accident victims with chronic bronchitis is effective and can be recommended for such patients.

  15. Alterations of ubiquitylation and sumoylation in conventional renal cell carcinomas after the Chernobyl accident: a comparison with Spanish cases.

    PubMed

    Morell-Quadreny, Luisa; Romanenko, Alina; Lopez-Guerrero, Jose Antonio; Calabuig, Silvia; Vozianov, Alexander; Llombart-Bosch, Antonio

    2011-09-01

    We determined whether ubiquitylation and sumoylation processes are involved in conventional renal cell carcinogenesis associated with chronic, long-term, persistent low doses of ionizing radiation (IR) in patients living for more than 20 years in cesium-137 ((137)Cs)-contaminated areas after the Chernobyl accident in Ukraine. To this end, we assessed the immunohistochemical expression of ubiquitin (Ub), SUMO1, SUMO E2 conjugating enzyme Ubc9, and the cell cycle regulators p53, mdm2, and p14(ARF) in 38 conventional renal cell carcinomas from Ukrainian patients with different degrees of radiation exposure after the Chernobyl accident. As control cases, 18 conventional renal carcinoma (cRCC) tissues from a Spanish cohort were analyzed. No significant differences between the Ukrainian and Spanish groups were found regarding Ub overexpression, although being higher in the Ukrainian cases. Furthermore, this expression was inversely associated with SUMO1 and Ubc9, with no correlation with tumor nuclear grade. There was also a direct relationship between Ubc9 and inflammatory response. These findings do not allow us to consider the immunohistochemical expression of ubiquitylation and sumoylation as valuable markers for discriminating the effects of long-term, low-dose IR exposure in cRCC carcinogenesis.

  16. Effect of dry deposition, washout and resuspension on radionuclide ratios after the Chernobyl accident.

    PubMed

    Rosner, G; Hötzl, H; Winkler, R

    1990-01-01

    The temporal variations of radionuclide ratios in air and deposition samples collected simultaneously at Munich-Neuherberg (F.R.G.) after the Chernobyl accident have been studied. Until 8 May 1986, the radionuclides investigated were 99Mo, 103Ru, 106Ru, 110mAg, 125Sb, 129mTe, 132Te, 131I, 134Cs, 137Cs, 140Ba, 141Ce and 144Ce. After 8 May, 99Mo, 110mAg, 125Sb, and the Ce isotopes were below the detection limits. Considerable temporal variations of the above radionuclides, relative to 137Cs, were observed in air as well as in deposition. In air the temporal variations reflect the arrival of different parts of the reactor plume with different elemental composition. In deposition, the temporal patterns were quite different from those in air for a given radionuclide. This is explained by varying contributions of dry and wet deposition. Until 8 May, the washout ratios of the above radionuclides covered a range from 240 to 5600, with smaller variations for all radionuclides within one event (e.g. 460-910), and larger variations from one event to another (e.g. 460-3300 for 137Cs). The dry deposition velocity of 137Cs was found to be 0.27 cm s-1, similar to that of 110mAg, aerosol 131I and 140Ba (0.37, 0.13 and 0.15 cm s-1). Another group of radionuclides includes 103Ru, 106Ru, 125Sb, total 131I and 132Te with dry deposition velocities of 0.08, 0.10, 0.07, 0.03 and 0.08 cm s-1 and with temporal variations in deposition which are quite different from those of the first group. From 8 May to the end of June, the washout ratios increased to values between 1500 and 24,000, with the exception of iodine, which had considerably lower washout ratios of between 37 and 4400. These later effects are explained by resuspension and, in the case of iodine, by remobilization of gaseous species.

  17. Using a bank of predatory fish samples for bioindication of radioactive contamination of aquatic food chains in the area affected by the Chernobyl accident.

    PubMed

    Kryshev, I I; Ryabov, I N; Sazykina, T G

    1993-11-01

    From the analysis of experimental data on radioactive contamination of various fish, it is suggested that predatory fish specimens can be used as bioindicators of radionuclide accumulation in reservoir food chains of the Chernobyl emergency area. The increased content of cesium radionuclides were detected in the muscle tissue of predatory fish collected in various regions of the Chernobyl emergency area. In most of the water bodies studied, maximum contamination levels of predatory fish by radionuclides of cesium occurred in 1987-1988, whereas in 'nonpredatory' fish the concentration of cesium was maximum, as a rule, in the first year following the accident. The exposure doses of fish of various ecological groups and ages are estimated. The exposure doses of various population groups, using fish from contaminated water bodies, are also estimated. When forming the environmental data bank for the Chernobyl accident zone it is suggested that perch, pike-perch and pike be used as bioindicators of radioactive contamination of food chains.

  18. Auto Accidents: Reducing Frequency, Increasing Recovery.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Comeaux, Linda Atkins

    1988-01-01

    Careful hiring, monitoring, training, discipline, and safety policies will reduce school automobile and bus accidents. Guidelines are offered for accident reporting, claim handling, and dealing with insurance adjusters. (MLF)

  19. Auto Accidents: Reducing Frequency, Increasing Recovery.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Comeaux, Linda Atkins

    1988-01-01

    Careful hiring, monitoring, training, discipline, and safety policies will reduce school automobile and bus accidents. Guidelines are offered for accident reporting, claim handling, and dealing with insurance adjusters. (MLF)

  20. [Tonus state of arterial vessels in the brain hemispheres depending on sex and age of patients with arterial hypertension, which have suffered from Chernobyl accident].

    PubMed

    Vereskun, S B

    2006-01-01

    The author established distinctive sex and age differences in tonus state of arterial little and medium size vessels located in the brain hemispheres in patients with arterial hypertension, which have suffered from Chernobyl accident, using tetrapolar impedance plethysmography (RA5-01).

  1. Chernobyl nuclear accident: effects on foods. April 1986-October 1988 (Citations from the Food Science and Technology Abstracts data base). Report for April 1986-October 1988

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1988-11-01

    This bibliography contains citations concerning studies and measurements of the radioactive contamination of the Chernobyl nuclear reactor accident of food and food chains. The studies cover meat and dairy products, vegetables, fish, food chains, and radioactive contamination of agricultural farms and lands. (Contains 65 citations fully indexed and including a title list.)

  2. [Features of cardiovascular diseases in cleaners-up of consequences of the Chernobyl Nuclear Power Station accident and in residents of territories polluted by radionuclides].

    PubMed

    Babkin, A P; Choporov, O N; Kuralesin, N A

    2002-01-01

    The authors discuss features of cardiovascular diseases in liquidators of Chernobyl nuclear power station accident consequences and in residents of territories polluted with radionuclides, present recommendations on correction of risk factors leading to atherosclerosis--the main cause of cardiovascular complications.

  3. Chernobyl nuclear accident: Effects on food. April 1986-November 1989 (Citations from the Food Science and Technology Abstracts data base). Report for April 1986-November 1989

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1989-12-01

    This bibliography contains citations concerning studies and measurements of the radioactive contamination by the Chernobyl nuclear reactor accident of food and the food chain. The studies cover meat and dairy products, vegetables, fish, food chains, and radioactive contamination of agricultural farms and lands. (This updated bibliography contains 108 citations, 43 of which are new entries to the previous edition.)

  4. [The radioecological situation in the agricultural sphere in the contaminated regions of russia during the long-term after the Chernobyl accident].

    PubMed

    Panov, A V; Fesenko, S V; Aleksakhin, R M; Pasternak, A D; Prudnikov, P V; Sanzharova, N I; Goriainov, V A; Novikov, A A; Muzalevskaia, A A

    2007-01-01

    The results of the contamination monitoring of the agricultural land and products in 2000-2005 in the regions of Russia affected by the Chernobyl accident are presented. The contribution is assessed of foodstuffs to the formation of internal exposure doses to the population during the long-term after the accident. Prediction is made of the change in the radioecological situation in radioactively contaminated areas.

  5. Reduced abundance of insects and spiders linked to radiation at Chernobyl 20 years after the accident.

    PubMed

    Møller, Anders Pape; Mousseau, Timothy A

    2009-06-23

    Effects of low-level radiation on abundance of animals are poorly known. We conducted standardized point counts and line transects of bumble-bees, butterflies, grasshoppers, dragonflies and spider webs at forest sites around Chernobyl differing in background radiation by over four orders of magnitude. Abundance of invertebrates decreased with increasing radiation, even after controlling for factors such as soil type, habitat and height of vegetation. These effects were stronger when comparing plots differing in radiation within rather than among sites, implying that the ecological effects of radiation from Chernobyl on animals are greater than previously assumed.

  6. Reduced abundance of insects and spiders linked to radiation at Chernobyl 20 years after the accident

    PubMed Central

    Møller, Anders Pape; Mousseau, Timothy A.

    2009-01-01

    Effects of low-level radiation on abundance of animals are poorly known. We conducted standardized point counts and line transects of bumble-bees, butterflies, grasshoppers, dragonflies and spider webs at forest sites around Chernobyl differing in background radiation by over four orders of magnitude. Abundance of invertebrates decreased with increasing radiation, even after controlling for factors such as soil type, habitat and height of vegetation. These effects were stronger when comparing plots differing in radiation within rather than among sites, implying that the ecological effects of radiation from Chernobyl on animals are greater than previously assumed. PMID:19324644

  7. A review of post-accident mitigative measures affecting transport and isolation of radionuclides released from the Chernobyl accident

    SciTech Connect

    Waters, R.; Gibson, D.; Bugai, D.; Shalsky, A.; Dgepo, S.; Voitsekhovitch, O.

    1994-09-01

    This paper summarizes the results of eight years of mitigative measures to radioactive contamination within the 30 kilometer exclusion zone surrounding the Chernobyl Nuclear Power Plant. We hope to demonstrate that effectiveness of mitigative measures depends not only on proper application of technology but also on selection of projects offering significant risk reduction potential. In a limited national economy, environmental mitigation projects must maximize risk reduction and cost effectiveness or risk losing funding to more pressing social issues.

  8. The psychological well-being of Norwegian adolescents exposed in utero to radiation from the Chernobyl accident

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background On 26 April 1986, the Chernobyl nuclear power plant suffered an accident. Several areas of central Norway were heavily affected by far field radioactive fallout. The present study focuses on the psychological well-being of adolescents who were exposed to this radiation as fetuses. Methods The adolescents (n = 53) and their mothers reported their perceptions of the adolescents' current psychological health as measured by the Youth Self Report and Child Behaviour Checklist. Results In spite of previous reports of subtle cognitive deficits in these exposed adolescents, there were few self-reported problems and fewer problems reported by the mothers. This contrasts with findings of studies of children from the former Soviet Union exposed in utero, in which objective measures are inconsistent, and self-reports, especially by mothers, express concern for adolescents' cognitive functioning and psychological well-being. Conclusion In the current paper, we explore possible explanations for this discrepancy and suggest that protective factors in Norway, in addition to perceived physical and psychological distance from the disaster, made the mothers less vulnerable to Chernobyl-related anxiety, thus preventing a negative effect on the psychological health of both mother and child. PMID:21496337

  9. [The state of immunity in the liquidators of consequences of the Chernobyl accident with cardio-vascular diseases].

    PubMed

    Timoshevskiĭ, A A; Kalinina, N M; Grebeniuk, A N

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of the work was research and functional reserves immunity in participants in the Chernobyl with cardiovascular disease. A Clinical Lab 49 men aged 44 to 52 years with diseases of the cardiovascular system, participated in the Chernobyl nuclear power plant in 1986 to 1988. As control used data 33 patients with similar pathology, and 16 healthy men. Researched the total number of white blood cells, lymphocytes and transfusions, the absolute number and relative CD4+ and CD8+, CD 16, CD20+, CD95+ lymphocytes peripheral blood, number mononuclear, synthesizing IL-1beta, TNF-alpha, INF-alpha, IL-4, the content of lipids and proteins, the activity of alkaline phosphatase and mieloperoksidazy in neutrophils. To assess the functional reserve immune system blood samples studied people subjected to radiation doses 0.25, 50, 1.0 Gy of in vitro and studied the reaction cytochemical indicators neutrophils before and after the radiative forcing. The liquidators not detected significant changes in the absolute number of leucocytes, but compared with control groups noted significant reduction in the absolute number of CD8+ and CD20+ lymphocytes, increased the number of cells, expression of FAS-antigen, change the number of mononuclear spontaneously synthesizing and produce cytokines, decreased maintenance of cation proteins in neutrophils. Radiation samples peripheral blood liquidators caused the same reaction cytochemical indicators of neutrophils and control groups, the compensatory and adaptive nature of the changes in the immune system, developed in response to complex factors radiation accident.

  10. Incidence of neoplasms in ages 0-19 Y in parts of Sweden with high {sup 137}Cs fallout after the Chernobyl accident

    SciTech Connect

    Tondel, M.; Flodin, U.; Skoeldestig, A.; Axelson, O.

    1996-12-01

    The incidence of neoplasms in childhood and adolescence in northern and central Sweden before and after the radioactive fallout from the Chernobyl accident was investigated in an ecologic study, 1978 to 1992. The study included all parishes in the six most contaminated counties classified after aerial mapping of ground radiation form {sup 137}Cs and investigated 746 cases of neoplasms in ages 0-19 y, diagnosed in the six counties. Incidence and relative risks of neoplasms were compared in areas with high, intermediate, and low contamination after versus before the Chernobyl accident in 1986. A continuous increase of brain tumor incidence in the ages 0-19 y during the period 1978-92 without clear relationship to the Chernobyl fallout was discovered. No clear relationship between the incidence of brain tumor and the exposure to varying levels of radiation from {sup 137}Cs was apparent. A some-what decreased relative risk of acute lymphatic leukemia appeared in areas with increased exposure. Other neoplasms showed no changes in incidence over time or with regard to exposure. Until now, there is no indication that the Chernobyl accident has affected the incidence of childhood and adolescence neoplasms in Sweden, but it is still too early for any final conclusion about the effect of this event. 12 refs., 1 fig., 2 tabs.

  11. 30 years After the Chernobyl Nuclear Accident: Time for Reflection and Re-evaluation of Current Disaster Preparedness Plans.

    PubMed

    Zablotska, Lydia B

    2016-06-01

    It has been 30 years since the worst accident in the history of the nuclear era occurred at the Chernobyl power plant in Ukraine close to densely populated urban areas. To date, epidemiological studies reported increased long-term risks of leukemia, cardiovascular diseases, and cataracts among cleanup workers and of thyroid cancer and non-malignant diseases in those exposed as children and adolescents. Mental health effects were the most significant public health consequence of the accident in the three most contaminated countries of Ukraine, Belarus, and the Russian Federation. Timely and clear communication with affected populations emerged as one of the main lessons in the aftermath of the Chernobyl nuclear accident.

  12. The influence of biotic and abiotic factors on (137)Cs accumulation in higher fungi after the accident at Chernobyl NPP.

    PubMed

    Zarubina, N

    2016-09-01

    Levels of soil contamination with (137)Cs, the belonging of fungi to a certain ecological group, the localization depth of the main part of mycelium in soil are the primary factors influencing the value of (137)Cs specific activity in higher fungi after the accident at Chernobyl NPP. It has been found that the value of (137)Cs specific activity in fungi of one species could vary by more than 10 times during a vegetation period. A correlation between the changes of (137)Cs content in fungi during the vegetation period and the amount of precipitates during various periods preceding the collection of samples has not been determined. An assumption has been proposed stating dependence between peculiarities of mycelium growth during the vegetation period and the changes of (137)Cs specific activity in fungi.

  13. Radiation exposure in the remote period after the Chernobyl accident caused oxidative stress and genetic effects in Scots pine populations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Volkova, Polina Yu.; Geras'Kin, Stanislav A.; Kazakova, Elizaveta A.

    2017-02-01

    Even 30 years after the Chernobyl accident, biological effects of irradiation are observed in the chronically exposed Scots pine populations. Chronic radiation exposure at dose rates above 50 mGy•yr-1 caused oxidative stress and led to the increase of antioxidants concentrations in these populations. Genetic variability was examined for 6 enzymes and 14 enzymatic loci of 6 Scots pine populations. Dose rates over 10 mGy•yr-1 caused the increased frequency of mutations and changes in genetic structure of Scots pine populations. However, the same dose rates had no effect on enzymatic activities. The results indicate that even relatively low dose rates of radiation can be considered as an ecological factor which should be taken into account for ecological management and radiation protection of biota species.

  14. Radiation exposure in the remote period after the Chernobyl accident caused oxidative stress and genetic effects in Scots pine populations.

    PubMed

    Volkova, Polina Yu; Geras'kin, Stanislav A; Kazakova, Elizaveta A

    2017-02-22

    Even 30 years after the Chernobyl accident, biological effects of irradiation are observed in the chronically exposed Scots pine populations. Chronic radiation exposure at dose rates above 50 mGy∙yr(-1) caused oxidative stress and led to the increase of antioxidants concentrations in these populations. Genetic variability was examined for 6 enzymes and 14 enzymatic loci of 6 Scots pine populations. Dose rates over 10 mGy∙yr(-1) caused the increased frequency of mutations and changes in genetic structure of Scots pine populations. However, the same dose rates had no effect on enzymatic activities. The results indicate that even relatively low dose rates of radiation can be considered as an ecological factor which should be taken into account for ecological management and radiation protection of biota species.

  15. [Aspects of aetiology of neuro-psychic disorders in male liquidators of Chernobyl nuclear power accident consequences].

    PubMed

    Skavysh, V A

    2009-01-01

    The author considered aetiology of neuro-psychic disorders in liquidators of Chernobyl nuclear power accident consequences, demonstrated scientific value of studying the liquidators cohort, as they were protected from internal radiation factors and reside on radiation "pure" territories. External radiation doses in those liquidators vary from 16 cGy to 18.7 +/- 10.8 cGy, according to the author. Catamnesis enabled to doubt radiation aetiology of psychic organic syndrome revealed in 1991-1994 by clinical and instrumental studies among 53.6% of 213 male examinees. According to the author, prolonged over 1-2 months external radiation of low dose could not cause health deterioration in adult males. Diagnosed psychic organic syndrome and vascular encephalopathy in some cases could have alcohol aetiology. This conclusion is not extrapolated to the whole liquidators cohort.

  16. [Frequency of stable chromosomal aberrations determined by FISH in 49 Chernobyl nuclear accident liquidators exposed to various doses of radiation].

    PubMed

    Pilinskaia, M A; Dybskiĭ, S S

    2001-01-01

    FISH technique was tested on the 49 liquidators of the Chernobyl Accident. Groups were formed according to average group exposure doses and/or individual ones determined by the method of EPR. The essential variability of spontaneous and irradiation-induced frequencies of reciprocal translocations was observed. In groups with the lowest EPR-doses (below 25 cGy) the average cytogenetic dose was considerably higher then doses determined by EPR-method. The best coincidences between average in-group EPR- and FISH-doses were in the group with 25-50 cGy doses for "acute irradiation" model and in the group with 50-100 cGy and higher for "chronic irradiation" model.

  17. Chernobyl accident. Hearing before the Committee on Energy and Natural Resources, United States Congress, Second Session, June 19, 1986

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1986-01-01

    Seventeen representatives of the nuclear industry, DOE, environmental organizations, electric power industry, and members of Congress testified at a hearing to review the effects of the Chernobyl accident in the Soviet Union on April 26, 1986 and its implications for the US commercial power program. The purpose of the hearing was to review the adequacy of licensing regulations and safety standards and to reassure the public. Witnesses, even those satisfied with the US safety record, emphasized the importance of continued efforts to reduce risks and to monitor and review procedures. Critics of the nuclear industry felt that more effort was put into selling nuclear power than to protecting public health and the environment. Industry spokesmen pointed to the Institute of Nuclear Power Operations training programs to illustrate their commitment. An appendix with responses to committee questions follows the testimony.

  18. Radiation exposure in the remote period after the Chernobyl accident caused oxidative stress and genetic effects in Scots pine populations

    PubMed Central

    Volkova, Polina Yu.; Geras’kin, Stanislav A.; Kazakova, Elizaveta A.

    2017-01-01

    Even 30 years after the Chernobyl accident, biological effects of irradiation are observed in the chronically exposed Scots pine populations. Chronic radiation exposure at dose rates above 50 mGy∙yr−1 caused oxidative stress and led to the increase of antioxidants concentrations in these populations. Genetic variability was examined for 6 enzymes and 14 enzymatic loci of 6 Scots pine populations. Dose rates over 10 mGy∙yr−1 caused the increased frequency of mutations and changes in genetic structure of Scots pine populations. However, the same dose rates had no effect on enzymatic activities. The results indicate that even relatively low dose rates of radiation can be considered as an ecological factor which should be taken into account for ecological management and radiation protection of biota species. PMID:28223696

  19. The feasibility of using {sup 129}I to reconstruct {sup 131}I desposition from the Chernobyl reactor accident

    SciTech Connect

    Straume, T.; Marchetti, A.A.; Anspaugh, L.R.

    1996-11-01

    Radioiodine released to the atmosphere from the accident at the Chernobyl nuclear power station in the spring of 1986 resulted in large-scale thyroid-gland exposure of populations in Ukraine, Belarus, and Russia. Because of the short half life of {sup 131}I (8.04 d), adequate data on the intensities and patterns of iodine deposition were not collected, especially in the regions where the incidence of childhood-thyroid cancer is now increasing. Results are presented from a feasibility study that show that accelerator-mass-spectrometry measurements of {sup 129}I (half life 16 {times} 10{sup 6}y) in soil can be used to reconstruct {sup 131}I-deposition density and thus help in the thyroid-dosimetry effort that is now urgently needed to support epidemiologic studies of childhood-thyroid cancer in the affected regions. 32refs., 9 figs., 3 tabs.

  20. Estimation of thyroid doses received by the population of Belarus as a result of the Chernobyl accident

    SciTech Connect

    Gavrilin, Y.; Khrouch, V.; Shinkarev, S.; Drozdovitch, V.; Minenko, V.; Shemyakina, E.; Bouville, A.; Anspaugh, L.

    1996-02-01

    Within weeks of the Chernobyl accident ABOUT 300,000 measurements of human thyroidal iodine-131 content were conducted in the more contaminated areas of Belarus. Results of these and other measurements form the basis of thyroid-dose reconstruction for the residents. For Class 1 (measured dose), individual doses are estimated directly from measured thyroidal iodine content plus information on life style and dietary habits. Such estimates are available for about 130,000 individuals from Gomel and Mogilev Oblasts and Minsk City. For Class 2 (passport doses), every settlement with a sufficient number of residents with measured doses, individual thyroid-dose distributions were determined for several age groups and levels of milk consumption. A population of about 2.7 million resides in the passport settlements.

  1. [CHANGES OF GLOBAL AND LOCAL MYOCARDIAL CONTRACTILITY OF CHERNOBYL ACCIDENT CLEAN-UP WORKERS WITH STABLE ANGINA].

    PubMed

    Nastina, O

    2014-01-01

    Changes of global and local myocardial contractility of Chernobyl accident clean-up workers (ChA CW) with stable angina were investigated. There were discovered that regular long-term treatment of ChA CW with stable angina using of antiischemic and metabolic drugs promoted to stabilization of global and local myocardial contractility indexes. Ejection fraction, degree of contraction of front-rear systolic left ventricle size, systolic thickness of interventricular septum sufficiently increased. Step-by-step worsening of global and local myocardial contractility indexes in cases of non-regular treatment was taken place. Sufficient differences between indexes of ejection fraction, left ventricle end-diastolic volume, systolic thickness and excursion of interventricular septum in stable angina patients of general population and ChA CW were discovered. Results of global and local myocardial contractility monitoring in ChA CW with stable angina substantiate the advisability of long-term supporting treatment using evidence-based drugs.

  2. Aerosol radioactivity record in Bratislava/Slovakia following the Fukushima accident--a comparison with global fallout and the Chernobyl accident.

    PubMed

    Povinec, P P; Sýkora, I; Holý, K; Gera, M; Kováčik, A; Brest'áková, L

    2012-12-01

    Results of radioactivity measurements in Bratislava aerosols following the Fukushima accident showed that at least three radioactive plumes arrived to Bratislava as indicated by (131)I/(137)Cs activity ratios. When compared with the Chernobyl results available for the Bratislava station, the Fukushima radionuclide levels were almost five orders of magnitude lower, with the maximum values for (131)I and (137)Cs of 0.5 and 0.07 mBq/m(3), respectively. The (131)I and (137)Cs vs. (7)Be aerosol activity records showed that the increases in (131)I and (137)Cs activity concentrations were accompanied by (7)Be increases, indicating that both the horizontal and vertical transports of radionuclides were responsible for observed radionuclide concentrations. The (134)Cs/(137)Cs activity ratio was close to 1, as has also been reported by other investigators.

  3. DNA repair polymorphisms in B-cell chronic lymphocytic leukemia in sufferers of Chernobyl Nuclear Power Plant accident.

    PubMed

    Abramenko, Iryna; Bilous, Nadiia; Chumak, Anatolyi; Kostin, Alexey; Martina, Zoya; Dyagil, Iryna

    2012-01-01

    An association between DNA repair gene polymorphisms, environmental factors, and development of some types of cancer has been suggested by several studies. Chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) is the most common form of leukemia in the clean-up workers of the Chernobyl Nuclear Power Plant (NPP) accident and it has some specific features. Therefore, we have studied the possible differences in DNA repair gene polymorphisms in CLL patients depending on ionizing radiation (IR) exposure history and their clinical characterictics. Arg399Gln XRCC1, Thr241Met XRCC3, and Lys751Gln XPD polymorphisms were studied in 64 CLL patients, exposed to IR due to the Chernobyl NPP accident, 114 IR-non-exposed CLL patients, and 103 sex- and age-matched IR-exposed controls using polymerase chain reaction-restriction fragment-length polymorphism analysis. All investigated polymorphisms were equally distributed between two groups of CLL patients and IR-exposed controls, except that that there was a significant reduction of the common homozygous Lys/Lys XPD genotype among IR-exposed CLL patients (23.7%) compared with IR-exposed controls (45.6%), OR = 0.37; 95% CI = 0.18-0.75; (P = 0.005). The number of IR-non-exposed CLL patients (37.4%) with the Lys/Lys XPD genotype was also decreased compared to IR-exposed controls, although this difference was not significant (P = 0.223). These preliminary data suggest a possible modifying role of Lys751Gln XPD polymorphism for the development of CLL, expecially in radiation-exposed persons.

  4. [The genetic sequelae for plant populations of radioactive environmental pollution in connection with the Chernobyl accident].

    PubMed

    Shevchenko, V A; Abramov, V I; Kal'chenko, V A; Fedotov, I S; Rubanovich, A V

    1996-01-01

    Populations of Arabidopsis thaliana (L.) Heynh., and Pinus sylvestris L., growing within 30 km of Chernobyl and Bryansk region have been analyzed for the frequency of embryonic lethal mutations on Arabidopsis and frequency of chlorophyll mutations and chromosome aberrations by pine. On pine also have been analyzed rate of mutations at enzyme loci in endosperms of seeds. Dose dependence of the value genetic damage on level of radioactive pollution was observed.

  5. Current status and epidemiological research needs for achieving a better understanding of the consequences of the Chernobyl accident.

    PubMed

    Cardis, Elisabeth

    2007-11-01

    Twenty years after the Chernobyl accident, there is no clearly demonstrated increase in the incidence of cancers in the most affected populations that can be attributed to radiation from the accident, except for the dramatic increase in thyroid cancer incidence among those exposed in childhood and adolescence. Increases in the incidence of cancers and other diseases have been reported in Belarus, the Russian Federation, and Ukraine, but much of the increase appears to be due to other factors, including improvements in diagnosis, reporting, and registration. Recent findings indicate a possible doubling of leukemia risk among Chernobyl liquidators and a small increase in the incidence of premenopausal breast cancer in the very most contaminated districts. Increased risks of cardiovascular diseases and cataracts have also been reported. These findings, however, need confirmation in well-designed analytical epidemiological studies with careful individual dose reconstruction. The absence of demonstrated increases in cancer risk--apart from thyroid cancer--is not the proof that no increase has in fact occurred. Based on the experience of atomic bomb survivors, and assuming that there is a linear, no-threshold dose-response relationship between exposure to ionizing radiation and the development of cancer in humans, a small increase in the relative risk of cancer is expected, even at the low to moderate doses received. Given the large number of individuals exposed, the absolute number of cancer cases caused could be substantial, particularly in the future. It is therefore essential to continue to use population registries to monitor trends in disease morbidity and mortality in the most contaminated areas, as well as among liquidators, in order to assess the public health impact of the accident. Studies of selected populations and diseases are also essential in order to study the real effect of the accident and compare it to predictions. Careful studies may in particular

  6. [Comparative characteristic of blood vessel filling and vascular tonus of microcirculation bed in patients with vasculo-autonomic dystonia and arterial hypertension, suffered as the result of accident on Chernobyl Atomic Electric Plant].

    PubMed

    Vereskun, S B

    2004-01-01

    Reliable difference of microvascular filling and microvascular tone of cerebral hemispheres and shins according to impedance tetrapolar plethysmography (rheoanalyzer PAS-01) data in patients with vegetovascular dystonia and arterial hypertension, suffered from Chernobyl accident was detected.

  7. Use of 129I and 137Cs in soils for the estimation of 131I deposition in Belarus as a result of the Chernobyl accident.

    PubMed

    Mironov, V; Kudrjashov, V; Yiou, F; Raisbeck, G M

    2002-01-01

    Using radioactivity measurements for 131I and 137Cs and nuclear activation analysis (NAA) or accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS) for 129I, ratios of 131I/137Cs and 129I/137Cs have been determined in soils from Belarus. We find that the pre-Chernobyl ratio of 129I/137Cs in Belarus is significantly larger than expected from nuclear weapons fallout. For the Chernobyl accident, our results support the hypothesis that there was relatively little fractionation of iodine and caesium during migration and deposition of the radioactive cloud. For sites having 137Cs > 300 Bq/kg, 129I can potentially give more reliable retroactive estimates of Chernobyl 131I deposition. However, our results suggest that 137Cs can also give reasonably good (+/-50%) estimates for 131I in Belarus.

  8. [Genomic instability after exposure to radiation at low doses (in the 10-kilometer zone of the accident at the Chernobyl Atomic Electric Power Station and under laboratory conditions)].

    PubMed

    Pelevina, I I; Gotlib, V Ia; Kudriashova, O V; Serebrianyĭ, A M; Afanas'ev, G G

    1996-01-01

    The results of series investigations of late effects after Chernobyl accident are discussed. Genomic instability induced by chronic irradiation of cultural cells in Chernobyl zone and in laboratory conditions have been studied. It was shown that low level prolonged irradiation result in increase of frequency of cells with micronuclei, giant cells, enhancement of radiosensitivity in descendents of early irradiated cells. Chronic low doses irradiation doesn't induce the adaptive response. Comparative investigation of adaptive response in blood lymphocytes of people (adults and children) living in Moscow and in regions polluted with radionuclides (5-40 ci/km2) after Chernobyl disaster have been conducted. In population from contaminated areas the frequency of individuals with definite adaptive response is decreased and there are individuals with increasing radiosensitivity after irradiation in conditioned dose. Chronic irradiation during living on contaminated areas don't induce the adaptive response.

  9. [Level of chromosome aberrations in peripheral blood lymphocytes in evacuees from the 30-kilometer zone of the Chernobyl Atomic Energy Station and residents of radioactively-polluted territories in the long term after the Chernobyl accident].

    PubMed

    Maznik, N A; Vinnikov, V A

    2002-01-01

    Eighteen Ukrainian evacuees from the Chernobyl exclusive zone, twenty one inhabitants of radioactively contaminated areas of Belarus and twelve control donors age-matched to the exposed persons were investigated 14-15 years after the Chernobyl accident for chromosomal aberration yields detected in blood lymphocytes by fluorescence in situ hybridisation technique. Unstable aberration yields measured in both Chernobyl cohorts were close to the background frequencies. Positive age-dependence trends in control donors were determined for the all type stable aberration levels. In evacuees the tendency for diminishing the difference between them and controls for stable aberration levels with persons' age increasing was found. The total stable chromosome exchange yields in evacuees 46-55 years old and inhabitants of areas with low contamination level didn't exceed the control values, but for younger evacuees and inhabitants of sufficiently contaminated regions the statistical increase above the age relevant background meanings was detected for this end-point. The advantages of using the FISH-detectable stable aberrations and particularly the total level of stable chromosome exchanges as the end-points for retrospective biological indication of past radiation exposure in Chernobyl cohorts were discussed.

  10. Use of post-Chernobyl data from Norway to validate the long-term exposure pathway models in the accident consequence code MACCS

    SciTech Connect

    Tveten, U. )

    1994-03-01

    This paper describes a task performed for the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC), consisting of using post-Chernobyl data from Norway to verify or find areas for possible improvement in the chronic exposure pathway models utilized in the NRC's program for probabilistic risk analysis, level 3, of the MELCOR accident consequence code system (MACCS), developed at Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, New Mexico. Because of unfortunate combinations of weather conditions, the levels of Chernobyl fallout in parts of Norway were quite high, with large areas contaminated to more than 100 kBq/m[sup 2] of radioactive cesium. Approximately 6% of the total amount of radioactive cesium released from Chernobyl is deposited on Norwegian territory, according to a countrywide survey performed by the Norwegian National Institute for Radiation Hygiene. Accordingly, a very large monitoring effort was carried out in Norway, and some of the results of this effort have provided important new insights into the ways in which radioactive cesium behaves in the environment. In addition to collection and evaluation of post-Chernobyl monitoring results, some experiments were also performed as part of the task. Some experiments performed pre-Chernobyl were also relevant, and some conclusions could be drawn from these. In most connections, the data available show the models and data in MACCS to be appropriate. A few areas where the data indicate that the MACCS approach is inadequate are, however, also pointed out in the paper.

  11. Secondary radioactive contamination of the Black Sea after Chernobyl accident: recent levels, pathways and trends.

    PubMed

    Gulin, S B; Mirzoyeva, N Yu; Egorov, V N; Polikarpov, G G; Sidorov, I G; Proskurnin, V Yu

    2013-10-01

    The recent radionuclide measurements have showed that concentrations of the Chernobyl-derived (137)Cs and (90)Sr in the surface Black Sea waters are still relatively high, reaching 56 and 32 Bq m(-3), respectively. This is comparable or even exceeds the pre-Chernobyl levels (∼16 Bq (137)Cs and 22 Bq (90)Sr per m(3) as the basin-wide average values). The measurements have revealed that the Black Sea continues to receive Chernobyl radionuclides, particularly (90)Sr, by the runoff from the Dnieper River. An additional source of (90)Sr and (137)Cs was found in the area adjacent to the Kerch Strait that connects the Black Sea and the Sea of Azov. This may be caused by the inflow of the contaminated Dnieper waters, which come to this area through the North-Crimean Canal. The long-term monitoring of (137)Cs and (90)Sr concentration in the Black Sea surface waters and in the benthic brown seaweed Cystoseira sp., in comparison with the earlier published sediment records of the radionuclides, have showed signs of a secondary radioactive contamination, which has started to increase since the late 1990's. This may be the result of the combined effect of a higher input of radionuclides from the rivers in 1995-1999 due to an increased runoff; and a slow transport of the particulate bound radionuclides from the watersheds followed by their desorption in seawater from the riverine suspended matter and remobilization from the sediments adjacent to the river mouths.

  12. U.S./Belarus/Ukraine joint research on the biomedical effects of the Chernobyl Reactor Accident. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Bruce Wachholz

    2000-06-20

    The National Cancer Institute has negotiated with the governments of Belarus and Ukraine (Ministers/Ministries of Health, institutions and scientists) to develop scientific research protocols to study the effects of radioactive iodine released by the Chernobyl accident upon thyroid anatomy and function in defined cohorts of persons under the age of 19 years at the time of the accident. These studies include prospective long term medical follow-up of the cohort and the reconstruction of the radiation dose to each cohort subject's thyroid. The protocol for the study in Belarus was signed by the US and Belorussian governments in May 1994 and the protocol for the study in Ukraine was signed by the US and Ukraine in May 1995. A second scientific research protocol also was negotiated with Ukraine to study the feasibility of a long term study to follow the development of leukemia and lymphoma among Ukrainian cleanup workers; this protocol was signed by the US and Ukraine in October 1996.

  13. Effects of the Chernobyl and Fukushima nuclear accidents on atmospheric electricity parameters recorded at Polish observation stations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kubicki, Marek; Baranski, Piotr; Odzimek, Anna; Michnowski, Stanislaw; Myslek-Laurikainen, Bogna

    2013-04-01

    We analyse the atmospheric electricity parameters, measured at Polish geophysical stations in Swider, Poland, and Hornsund, Spitsbergen, in connection with the radioactive incident in Fukushima, Japan, beginning on 11 March 2011, following the 9.0 earthquake and tsunami. We compare our results with the situation during and after the Chernobyl disaster on April 26, 1986, when the radioactive fallout detected at Swider increased in the last week of April 1986, from 4.111 to 238.7 Bq/m2 and up to 967.0 Bq/m2 in the second week of May 1986 - what was more than 235 times greater than the values measured prior to that accident. Besides the electric field especially the electric conductivity is very sensitive to the radioactive contamination of the air. Thus we postulate that these two measurements should be run at geophysical stations over the world and used as a relatively simple and low-cost tool for continuous monitoring of possible hazard caused by nuclear power plant accidents.

  14. Reconstruction and forecast of doses due to ingestion of 137Cs and 90Sr after the Chernobyl accident.

    PubMed

    Kravets, A P; Pavlenko, Yu A

    2008-04-01

    The assessment doses due to ingestion of (137)Cs and (90)Sr for the population suffering from the Chernobyl accident was performed on the basis of the new mechanistic ecological model for assessment of radiological consequences of agricultural lands contamination (EMARC). The EMARC model allows estimation of internal doses based on ecological factors influencing the contamination of foodstuff, for the post-accidental years in the countries of the former Soviet Union. The EMARC model allows estimation of all quantities required in radiation hygiene practice. For example, the proposed analytical method may be used for both retrospective dose reconstruction and prospective estimates of annual dose and integrated "life-time" dose, for different age intervals. According to the EMARC model, estimated reference "life-time" doses for adults are between 7 and 269 microSv kBq(-1) m(2) for (137)Cs, and between 25 and 235 microSv kBq(-1) m(2) for (90)Sr. Maximal doses were estimated for persons who were 3, 9 and 11 years old, at the time of the accident and these doses exceed those for adults by a factors of 1, 5 for (90)Sr, and 1.4 for (137)Cs.

  15. Long-term decline of 137Cs concentration in honey in the second decade after the Chernobyl accident.

    PubMed

    Panatto, Donatella; Gasparini, Roberto; Lai, Piero; Rovatti, Paola; Gallelli, Giovanni

    2007-08-15

    In the years 2001-2004 the (137)Cs activity was investigated in a total of 336 samples of different varieties of honey harvested in the Liguria Region of Northern Italy. Our purpose was to define (a) residual radioactive contamination following the Chernobyl accident and (137)Cs long-term decline, (b) correlation between (137)Cs activity and different honey varieties, and (c) correlation between (137)Cs activity and the prevailing geomorphological configuration in the collection areas. The mean (137)Cs specific activity was 4.33+/-5.04 S.D. Bq/kg. Chestnut honey showed higher levels of radioactive contamination, which were ascribed to the extensive, superficial and deep, root apparatus of the tree. Honey samples from acidic argillite soils, which withhold radionuclides after deposition and slowly release them to plants, also showed higher (137)Cs activity. Long-term decline was calculated at 456 days, a value lower than those published from different food sources in the years following the accident. The rate of long-term decline decreases with time.

  16. [Radioecological studies of freshwater mollusks in the Chernobyl accident exclusion zone].

    PubMed

    Gudkov, D I; Nazarov, A B; Dziubenko, E V; Kaglian, A E; Klenus, V G

    2009-01-01

    Species-specificity and dynamics of 90Sr, 137Cs and some transuranic elements accumulation in bivalve and gastropod freshwater molluscs of the Chernobyl exclusion zone during 1997-2008 was analyzed. The results of radiation dose and chromosome aberration rate estimation and the analysis of hemolymph composition of freshwater snail (Lymnaea stagnalis L.) was produced. The absorbed dose rate was registered in the range of 0.3-85.0 microGy/h. In closed water bodies the heightened chromosome aberration rate (up to 27%) in embryo tissues, and also the change of haematological indexes for the adult individuals of snails was registered.

  17. Post-crisis efforts towards recovery and resilience after the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant accident.

    PubMed

    Yamashita, Shunichi; Takamura, Noboru

    2015-08-01

    One of the well-known radiation-associated late-onset cancers is childhood thyroid cancer as demonstrated around Chernobyl apparently from 1991. Therefore, immediately after the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant accident on March 2011, iodine thyroid blocking was considered regardless of its successful implementation or not at the indicated timing and places as one of the radiation protection measurements, in addition to evacuation and indoor sheltering, because a short-lived radioactive iodine was massively released into the environment which might crucially affect thyroid glands through inhalation and unrestricted consumption of contaminated food and milk. However, very fortunately, it is now increasingly believed that the exposure doses on the thyroid as well as whole body are too low to detect any radiation-associated cancer risk in Fukushima. Although the risk of radiation-associated health consequences of residents in Fukushima is quite different from that of Chernobyl and is considerably low based on the estimated radiation doses received during the accident for individuals, a large number of people have received psychosocial and mental stresses aggravated by radiation fear and anxiety, and remained in indeterminate and uncertain situation having been evacuated but not relocated. It is, therefore, critically important that best activities and practices related to recovery and resilience should be encouraged, supported and implemented at local and regional levels. Since psychosocial well-being of individuals and communities is the core element of resilience, local individuals, health professionals and authorities are uniquely positioned to identify and provide insight into what would provide the best resolution for their specific needs.

  18. Physical dosimetry and biological indicators of carcinogenic risk in a cohort of persons exposed to unhealthy ecological factors following the Chernobyl Nuclear Power Plant accident.

    PubMed

    Orel, V E; Tereschenki, V M; Czyatkovskaya, N N; Mazepa, M G; Buzunov, V A

    1998-01-01

    The April 1986 Chernobyl Nuclear Power Plant accident caused ecological changes in the Ovruch State forests in the Zhytomir oblast in the Ukraine. The highest radioactivity existed in moss, followed by the pine-forest substrate and soil. During 1984-1985, the pine needles were primarily surface contaminated, whereas during 1986-1988, they were contaminated secondarily. Radioactivity in air was highest (1.07+/-0.185 Bq/l) during dry and sunny weather and when trees were felled; the lowest levels (0.196+/-0.044 Bq/l) occurred during periods of stable snow coverage. Between 1987 and 1989 (i.e., after the Chernobyl accident), the caesium levels in forestry employees exceeded by 13.9-fold the average levels found in the Ukrainian Polessje population. Ovruch forest guards and woodcutters had the highest effective equivalent doses of radiation, and they therefore exhibited the highest carcinogenic risk.

  19. Iodine-131 dose dependent gene expression in thyroid cancers and corresponding normal tissues following the Chernobyl accident.

    PubMed

    Abend, Michael; Pfeiffer, Ruth M; Ruf, Christian; Hatch, Maureen; Bogdanova, Tetiana I; Tronko, Mykola D; Riecke, Armin; Hartmann, Julia; Meineke, Viktor; Boukheris, Houda; Sigurdson, Alice J; Mabuchi, Kiyohiko; Brenner, Alina V

    2012-01-01

    The strong and consistent relationship between irradiation at a young age and subsequent thyroid cancer provides an excellent model for studying radiation carcinogenesis in humans. We thus evaluated differential gene expression in thyroid tissue in relation to iodine-131 (I-131) doses received from the Chernobyl accident. Sixty three of 104 papillary thyroid cancers diagnosed between 1998 and 2008 in the Ukrainian-American cohort with individual I-131 thyroid dose estimates had paired RNA specimens from fresh frozen tumor (T) and normal (N) tissue provided by the Chernobyl Tissue Bank and satisfied quality control criteria. We first hybridized 32 randomly allocated RNA specimen pairs (T/N) on 64 whole genome microarrays (Agilent, 4×44 K). Associations of differential gene expression (log(2)(T/N)) with dose were assessed using Kruskall-Wallis and trend tests in linear mixed regression models. While none of the genes withstood correction for the false discovery rate, we selected 75 genes with a priori evidence or P kruskall/P trend <0.0005 for validation by qRT-PCR on the remaining 31 RNA specimen pairs (T/N). The qRT-PCR data were analyzed using linear mixed regression models that included radiation dose as a categorical or ordinal variable. Eleven of 75 qRT-PCR assayed genes (ACVR2A, AJAP1, CA12, CDK12, FAM38A, GALNT7, LMO3, MTA1, SLC19A1, SLC43A3, ZNF493) were confirmed to have a statistically significant differential dose-expression relationship. Our study is among the first to provide direct human data on long term differential gene expression in relation to individual I-131 doses and to identify a set of genes potentially important in radiation carcinogenesis.

  20. Mapping of 137Cs deposition over eastern France 16 years after the Chernobyl accident.

    PubMed

    Renaud, Philippe; Pourcelot, Laurent; Métivier, Jean-Michel; Morello, Marcel

    2003-06-20

    We observed the relationship between present-day 137Cs surface activity and the rainfall in May 1986 to establish a relevant map of 137Cs deposition over eastern France. This study was performed in an area of the lower Rhône valley where clayey soils are assumed to trap caesium efficiently. Based on the rainwater/airborne activity ratio deduced from this relationship, we verified that present-day activities, measured in clayey soils of this type, are relatively representative of the initial depositions. The interlocked contaminated areas of the resulting map can be related to rainfall occurrences, as is the case for all countries affected by the Chernobyl fallout. This map can be reasonably compared with those obtained for countries bordering France in terms of both activity levels and extent of homogeneous activity areas. Lastly, we demonstrate that it would not be possible to produce a coherent map of initial fallout by extending the campaign over the whole of the eastern territory based on present-day soil activity measurements alone. Hence, only the relationship between 137Cs deposition and the rainfall of the first week of May 1986 can be used to construct a map depicting the Chernobyl fallout over eastern France.

  1. Averted doses to Norwegian Sámi reindeer herders after the Chernobyl accident.

    PubMed

    Skuterud, Lavrans; Thørring, Håvard

    2012-02-01

    The Chernobyl fallout is an enduring challenge to reindeer husbandry in Norway, and South Sámi reindeer herders in central and southern Norway are as contaminated by (137)Cs as inhabitants close to Chernobyl. Therefore, Norwegian authorities continuously recommend to these reindeer herders the use of countermeasures to reduce their intake of (137)Cs. In this study, the authors have applied data on contamination levels in reindeer, results of dietary surveys, and whole body monitoring data in low and high contaminated areas to estimate the effectiveness of countermeasures and resulting averted doses to the reindeer herders. In the most contaminated area, the various countermeasures applied reduced radiocesium ingestion doses during 1986-2009 by about 73%, to an integrated dose of about 17 mSv. However, to comply with the recommended (137)Cs ingestion dose limit of 1 mSv y(-1), the study indicates that reindeer herders in the most contaminated areas will need to carry on with their countermeasures for another 10-15 y. Furthermore, the study indicates that whole body monitoring is an important tool to assess individual doses and countermeasure effectiveness in long-term management of a contamination situation and that such monitoring may be required to reach long-term reference levels.

  2. Proposed radiation hardened mobile vehicle for Chernobyl dismantlement and nuclear accident response

    SciTech Connect

    Rowland, M.S.; Holliday, M.A.; Karpachov, J.A.; Ivanov, A.

    1995-01-01

    Researchers are developing a radiation hardened, Telerobotic Dismantling System (TDS) to remediate the Chernobyl facility. To withstand the severe radiation fields, the robotic system, will rely on electrical motors, actuators, and relays proven in the Chernobyl power station. Due to its dust suppression characteristics and ability to cut arbitrary materials the authors propose using a water knife as the principle tool to slice up the large fuel containing masses. The front end of the robot will use a minimum number of moving parts by locating most of the susceptible and bulky components outside the work area. Hardened and shielded video cameras will be designed for remote control and viewing of the robotic functions. Operators will supervise and control robot movements based on feedback from a suite of sensory systems that would include vision systems, radiation detection and measurement systems and force reflection systems. A gripper will be instrumented with a variety of sensors (e.g. force, torque, or tactile), allowing varying debris surface properties to be grasped. The gripper will allow the operator to manipulate and segregate debris items without entering the radiologically and physically dangerous dismantlement operations area. The robots will initially size reduce the FCM`s to reduce the primary sources of the airborne radionuclides. The robot will then remove the high level waste for packaging or decontamination, and storage nearby.

  3. [Frequency dynamics of stomach and duodenum ulcer found in liquidators of consequence of Chernobyl accident (according to the data of long-term observation)].

    PubMed

    Gasanova, E V; Kovalenko, A N

    2004-01-01

    The authors have studied the frequency dynamics of stomach and duodenum ulcer occurrence revealed in liquidators of consequence of Chernobyl accident (1986-1987) after long-term medical observation with age and radiation absorbed dose variations. According to the findings, duodenum ulcer incidence prevails over stomach ulcer in all scale of age. The connection between the frequency dynamics of duodenum ulcer and age of the patients wasn't found.

  4. Modeling the early-phase redistribution of radiocesium fallouts in an evergreen coniferous forest after Chernobyl and Fukushima accidents.

    PubMed

    Calmon, P; Gonze, M-A; Mourlon, Ch

    2015-10-01

    Following the Chernobyl accident, the scientific community gained numerous data on the transfer of radiocesium in European forest ecosystems, including information regarding the short-term redistribution of atmospheric fallout onto forest canopies. In the course of international programs, the French Institute for Radiological Protection and Nuclear Safety (IRSN) developed a forest model, named TREE4 (Transfer of Radionuclides and External Exposure in FORest systems), 15 years ago. Recently published papers on a Japanese evergreen coniferous forest contaminated by Fukushima radiocesium fallout provide interesting and quantitative data on radioactive mass fluxes measured within the forest in the months following the accident. The present study determined whether the approach adopted in the TREE4 model provides satisfactory results for Japanese forests or whether it requires adjustments. This study focused on the interception of airborne radiocesium by forest canopy, and the subsequent transfer to the forest floor through processes such as litterfall, throughfall, and stemflow, in the months following the accident. We demonstrated that TREE4 quite satisfactorily predicted the interception fraction (20%) and the canopy-to-soil transfer (70% of the total deposit in 5 months) in the Tochigi forest. This dynamics was similar to that observed in the Höglwald spruce forest. However, the unexpectedly high contribution of litterfall (31% in 5 months) in the Tochigi forest could not be reproduced in our simulations (2.5%). Possible reasons for this discrepancy are discussed; and sensitivity of the results to uncertainty in deposition conditions was analyzed. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Determination of the uranium content and isotopic composition of hot particles after the Chernobyl accident

    SciTech Connect

    Lyul, A.Yu.; Kolesov, G.M.

    1995-11-01

    The uranium content and isotopic composition of hot particles from the Chernobyl nuclear power plant region were determined by instrumental neutron-activation analysis. The uranium content of the particles ranged from fractions of a percent to several tens of percents, and the isotopic composition corresponded to the irradiated nuclear fuel. Two particles with anomalously high enrichment in {sup 235}U were found. A simplified but reasonably accurate and rapid method for evaluating the {sup 235}U content of nuclear fuel without using a standard was suggested on the basis of the relationship found between the {sup 235}U content of uranium contained in the hot particles and the ratio of induced radioactivity {sup 239}Np({sup 238}U)/{sup 99}Mo({sup 235}U).

  6. Simulation of ¹³⁷Cs transport and deposition after the Chernobyl Nuclear Power Plant accident and radiological doses over the Anatolian peninsula.

    PubMed

    Simsek, V; Pozzoli, L; Unal, A; Kindap, T; Karaca, M

    2014-11-15

    The Chernobyl Nuclear Power Plant (CNPP) accident occurred on April 26 of 1986, it is still an episode of interest, due to the large amount of radionuclides dispersed in the atmosphere. Caesium-137 ((137)Cs) is one of the main radionuclides emitted during the Chernobyl accident, with a half-life of 30years, which can be accumulated in humans and animals, and for this reason the impacts on population are still monitored today. One of the main parameters in order to estimate the exposure of population to (137)Cs is the concentration in the air, during the days after the accident, and the deposition at surface. The transport and deposition of (137)Cs over Europe occurred after the CNPP accident has been simulated using the WRF-HYSPLIT modeling system. Four different vertical and temporal emission rate profiles have been simulated, as well as two different dry deposition velocities. The model simulations could reproduce fairly well the observations of (137)Cs concentrations and deposition, which were used to generate the 'Atlas of Caesium deposition on Europe after the Chernobyl accident' and published in 1998. An additional focus was given on (137)Cs deposition and air concentrations over Turkey, which was one of the main affected countries, but not included in the results of the Atlas. We estimated a total deposition of 2-3.5 PBq over Turkey, with 2 main regions affected, East Turkey and Central Black Sea coast until Central Anatolia, with values between 10 kBq m(-2) and 100 kBq m(-2). Mean radiological effective doses from simulated air concentrations and deposition has been estimated for Turkey reaching 0.15 mSv/year in the North Eastern part of Turkey, even if the contribution from ingestion of contaminated food and water is not considered, the estimated levels are largely below the 1 mSv limit indicated by the International Commission on Radiological Protection.

  7. Chernobyl bibliography

    SciTech Connect

    Carr, F. Jr.; Mahaffey, J.A.

    1989-09-01

    The purpose of the DOE/OHER Chernobyl Database project is to create and maintain an information system to provide usable information for research studies related to the nuclear accident. The system is the official United States repository for information about the Chernobyl accident and its consequences, and currently includes an extensive bibliography and diverse radiological measurements with supporting information. PNL has established two resources: original (not summarized) measurement data, currently about 80,000 measurements, with ancillary information; and about 2,200 bibliographic citations, some including abstracts. Major organizations that have contributed radiological measurement data include the Washington State Department of Social and Health Services; United States Environmental Protection Agency (domestic and foreign data); United States Nuclear Regulatory Commission; Stone Webster; Brookhaven National Laboratory; Commissariat A L'energie Atomique in France; Ministry of Agriculture, Fisheries, and Food in the United Kingdom; Japan National Institute of Radiological Sciences; and the Finnish Centre For Radiation and Nuclear Safety (STUK). Scientists in Australia, Austria, Belgium, Canada, China, Denmark, England, Federal Republic of Germany, Finland, France, Ireland, Italy, Japan, the Netherlands, Romania, Scotland, Spain, Sweden, Switzerland, United States, Wales, and Yugoslavia have made contributions. Bibliographic materials have been obtained from scientists in the above countries that have replied to requests. In addition, literature searches have been conducted, including a search of the DOE Energy Database. The last search was conducted in January, 1989. This document lists the bibliographic information in the DOE/OHER Chernobyl Database at the current time.

  8. Thyroid Dose Estimates for a Cohort of Belarusian Children Exposed to 131I from the Chernobyl Accident: Assessment of Uncertainties

    PubMed Central

    Drozdovitch, Vladimir; Minenko, Victor; Golovanov, Ivan; Khrutchinsky, Arkady; Kukhta, Tatiana; Kutsen, Semion; Luckyanov, Nickolas; Ostroumova, Evgenia; Trofimik, Sergey; Voillequé, Paul; Simon, Steven L.; Bouville, André

    2015-01-01

    Deterministic thyroid radiation doses due to iodine-131 (131I) intake were reconstructed in a previous article for 11,732 participants of the Belarusian–American cohort study of thyroid cancer and other thyroid diseases in individuals exposed during childhood or adolescence to fallout from the Chernobyl accident. The current article describes an assessment of uncertainties in reconstructed thyroid doses that accounts for the shared and unshared errors. Using a Monte Carlo simulation procedure, 1,000 sets of cohort thyroid doses due to 131I intake were calculated. The arithmetic mean of the stochastic thyroid doses for the entire cohort was 0.68 Gy. For two-thirds of the cohort the arithmetic mean of individual stochastic thyroid doses was less than 0.5 Gy. The geometric standard deviation of stochastic doses varied among cohort members from 1.33 to 5.12 with an arithmetic mean of 1.76 and a geometric mean of 1.73. The uncertainties in thyroid dose were driven by the unshared errors associated with the estimates of values of thyroid mass and of the 131I activity in the thyroid of the subject; the contribution of shared errors to the overall uncertainty was small. These multiple sets of cohort thyroid doses will be used to evaluate the radiation risks of thyroid cancer and non-cancer thyroid diseases, taking into account the structure of the errors in the dose estimates. PMID:26207684

  9. Laser-based flow cytometric analysis of genotoxicity of humans exposed to ionizing radiation during the Chernobyl accident

    SciTech Connect

    Jensen, R.H.; Bigbee, W.L.; Langlois, R.G.; Grant, S.G. ); Pleshanov, P.G. ); Chirkov, A.A. ); Pilinskaya, M.A. )

    1990-09-12

    An analytical technique has been developed that allows laser-based flow cytometric measurement of the frequency of red blood cells that have lost allele-specific expression of a cell surface antigen due to genetic toxicity in bone marrow precursor cells. Previous studies demonstrated a correlation of such effects with the exposure of each individual to mutagenic phenomena, such as ionizing radiation, and the effects can persist for the lifetime of each individual. During the emergency response to the nuclear power plant accident at Chernobyl, Ukraine, USSR, a number of people were exposed to whole body doses of ionizing radiation. Some of these individuals were tested with this laser-based assay and found to express a dose-dependent increase in the frequency of variant red blood cells that appears to be a persistent biological effect. All data indicate that this assay might well be used as a biodosimeter to estimate radiation dose and also as an element to be used for estimating the risk of each individual to develop cancer due to radiation exposure. 17 refs., 5 figs.

  10. Monte Carlo modeling of beta-radiometer device used to measure milk contaminated as a result of the Chernobyl accident.

    PubMed

    Khrutchinsky, A; Kutsen, S; Minenko, V; Zhukova, O; Luckyanov, N; Bouville, A; Drozdovitch, V

    2009-06-01

    This paper presents results of Monte Carlo modeling of the beta-radiometer device with Geiger-Mueller detector used in Belarus and Russia to measure the radioactive contamination of milk after the Chernobyl accident. This type of detector, which is not energy selective, measured the total beta-activity of the radionuclide mix. A mathematical model of the beta-radiometer device, namely DP-100, was developed, and the calibration factors for the different radionuclides that might contribute to the milk contamination were calculated. The estimated calibration factors for (131)I, (137)Cs, (134)Cs, (90)Sr, (144)Ce, and (106)Ru reasonably agree with calibration factors determined experimentally. The calculated calibration factors for (132)Te, (132)I, (133)I, (136)Cs, (89)Sr, (103)Ru, (140)Ba, (140)La, and (141)Ce had not been previously determined experimentally. The obtained results allow to derive the activity of specific radionuclides, in particular (131)I, from the results of the total beta-activity measurements in milk. Results of this study are important for the purposes of retrospective dosimetry that uses measurements of radioactivity in environmental samples performed with beta-radiometer devices.

  11. MONTE CARLO MODELING OF BETA-RADIOMETER DEVICE USED TO MEASURE MILK CONTAMINATED AS A RESULT OF THE CHERNOBYL ACCIDENT

    PubMed Central

    Khrutchinsky, A.; Kutsen, S.; Minenko, V.; Zhukova, O.; Luckyanov, N.; Bouville, A.; Drozdovitch, V.

    2009-01-01

    This paper presents results of Monte Carlo modeling of the beta-radiometer device with Geiger-Mueller detector used in Belarus and Russia to measure the radioactive contamination of milk after the Chernobyl accident. This type of detector, which is not energy selective, measured the total beta-activity of the radionuclide mix. A mathematical model of the beta-radiometer device, namely DP-100, was developed, and the calibration factors for the different radionuclides that might contribute to the milk contamination were calculated. The estimated calibration factors for 131I, 137Cs, 134Cs, 90Sr, 144Ce, and 106Ru reasonably agree with calibration factors determined experimentally. The calculated calibration factors for 132Te, 132I, 133I, 136Cs, 103Ru, 140Ba, 140La, and 141Ce had not been previously determined experimentally. The obtained results allow to derive the activity of specific radionuclides, in particular 131I, from the results of the total beta-activity measurements in milk. Results of this study are important for the purposes of retrospective dosimetry that uses measurements of radioactivity in environmental samples performed with beta-radiometer devices. PMID:19233662

  12. Long-term investigations of radiocaesium activity concentrations in carp in North Croatia after the Chernobyl accident.

    PubMed

    Franić, Zdenko; Marović, Gordana

    2007-01-01

    Long-term investigations of radiocaesium activity concentrations in carp in the Republic of Croatia are presented. The radiocaesium levels in carp decreased exponentially and the effective ecological half-life of (137)Cs was estimated to be about 1 year during 1987-2002 and 5 years during 1993-2005. The observed (134)Cs:(137)Cs activity ratio in carp was found to be similar to the ratio observed in other environmental samples. The concentration factor for carp (wet weight) was estimated to be 128+/-74 Lkg(-1), which is in reasonable agreement with model prediction based on K(+) concentrations in water. Estimated annual effective dose received by adult members of the Croatian population due to consumption of carp contaminated with (134)Cs and (137)Cs are small: per capita dose from this source during 1987-2005 was estimated to be 0.5+/-0.2 microSv. Due to minor freshwater fish consumption in Croatia and low radiocaesium activity concentrations in carp, it can be concluded that carp consumption was not a critical pathway for the transfer of radiocaesium from fallout to humans after the Chernobyl accident.

  13. Chernobyl retrospective.

    PubMed

    Bonte, F J

    1988-01-01

    On April 28, 1986 heavy radioactive fallout from an unknown source was reported from Sweden. Later, it was discovered that two days earlier, a nuclear power reactor at Chernobyl, in the Soviet Union, had exploded releasing an enormous cloud of effluent containing 40 million Ci of 131I, 3 million Ci of 137Cs, and 50 million Ci of xenon radioisotopes. This far exceeded the 15 Ci of 131I escape in the notorious Three Mile Island accident. Chernobyl reactor IV, of an antiquated design, was a graphite-moderated reactor which suffered a steam explosion when the operating staff attempted an experiment involving preservation of safety functions during a planned shutdown. Following the explosion, a fire started in the graphite core which required ten days to control. Thirty-one persons died, two in the initial explosion and 29 of various combinations of thermal and radiation burns, and gamma irradiation. Existing emergency plans were invoked involving treatment on the scene and evacuation of seriously injured patients to a special hospital in Moscow, as well as to nearby Kiev. Later, 135,000 residents of the immediate neighborhood were surveyed and evacuated after fallout radiation levels began to rise. Fallout patterns around Europe and the northern hemisphere were closely tracked. Consequences of the accident in human and monetary terms will require years of evaluation. Although the United States has no power reactors of the Chernobyl type, the country does have a radiation disaster management plan, often rehearsed at the state level. As a consequence of Chernobyl certain international agreements dealing with radiation disaster information and management have been forged.

  14. Decision making framework for application of forest countermeasures in the long term after the Chernobyl accident.

    PubMed

    Fesenko, S V; Voigt, G; Spiridonov, S I; Gontarenko, I A

    2005-01-01

    After the ChNPP accident a very large part of the territories covered by natural and artificial forests are contaminated with long-lived radionuclides, especially 137Cs. To protect people against exposure associated with forest contamination in the most affected regions of the NIS countries, countermeasures have been developed and recommended for the forest management. The paper presents a decision making framework to optimise forest countermeasures in the long term after the ChNPP accident. The approach presented is based on the analysis of the main exposure pathways and application of radiological, socio-economical and ecological criteria for the selection of optimal countermeasures strategies. Because of the diversity of these criteria modern decision support technologies based on multi-attributive analysis were applied. The results of the application of this approach are presented in a selected study area (Novozybkov district, Bryansk region, Russian Federation). The results prove and emphasize the need for a flexible technique to provide the optimised forest countermeasures taking into account radioecological, social and economic features of contaminated forests.

  15. The intellectual development, mental and behavioural disorders in children from Belarus exposed in utero following the chernobyl accident.

    PubMed

    Igumnov, S; Drozdovitch, V

    2000-06-01

    The study examined psychological development in 250 children at the age of 6-7 and 10-12 years who had been exposed in the prenatal period at the time of the Chernobyl accident in 1986. These children were compared to a control group of 250 children of the same age from non- and slightly contaminated areas of Belarus. The examination included psychiatric examination and intellectual assessment as well as the estimation of thyroid exposure in utero. The mean value of thyroid doses from (131)I 0.39 Gy was estimated for the prenatal exposed children. The children of the exposed group had a lower mean full-scale IQ compared to the control group (89.6 +/- 10.2 vs 92.1 +/- 10.5 at the age of 6-7 years, P = 0.007; and 94. 3 +/- 10.4 vs 95.8 +/- 10.9 at the age of 10-12 years, P = 0.117). Average IQ for the subgroup of highly exposed children (thyroid doses more than 1 Gy) was lower in comparison with average IQ for the whole exposed group (85.7 +/- 6.4 vs 89.6 +/- 10.2 at the age of 6-7 years, P = 0.014; 89.1 +/- 7.1 vs 94.3 +/- 10.4 at age 10-12 years, P = 0.003). No statistically significant distinctions in average IQ were found between the different subgroups of children in relation to the gestational age at the time of the Chernobyl accident. We notice a positive moderate correlation between IQ of children and the educational level of their parents (in exposed group - mothers: r = 0.50, P < 0.01 and fathers: r = 0.52, P < 0.01; in control group - mothers: r = 0.41, P < 0.05 and fathers: r = 0.42, P < 0.05). There was a moderate correlation between high personal anxiety in parents and emotional disorders in children (for mothers r = 0.38, P < 0.05; for fathers r = 0.43, P < 0.01). The relative risk of mental and behavioural disorders has been estimated for emotional disorders OR = 2.67, P < 0.001. The frequency of the formation of mental retardation, hyperkinetic disorders and other mental and behavioural disorders in children from both groups was approximately the

  16. Distribution and migration of ⁹⁰Sr in components of the Dnieper River basin and the Black Sea ecosystems after the Chernobyl NPP accident.

    PubMed

    Mirzoyeva, N Yu; Egorov, V N; Polikarpov, G G

    2013-11-01

    The change in (90)Sr concentrations in hydrobionts, water and bottom sediments of the Chernobyl NPP pond-cooler, the Kievskoe and Kakhovskoe reservoirs, the Northern-Crimean canal and the Black Sea after the Chernobyl NPP accident was studied. The environmental half-times for the decrease of (90)Sr concentrations were determined: in water - 4.1-24.3 years; algae and flowering water plants - 3.6-7.7 years, in molluscs - 2.4-6.7 years, and in fish - 7.8-12.9 years. The time for (90)Sr concentrations to decrease to pre-accident levels were estimated: in freshwater reservoirs and the northwest part of the Black Sea this was 32-44 years, and in freshwater hydrobionts this was 25-73 years. The contribution of dose from (90)Sr to the hydrobionts, sampled from the Kakhovskoe reservoir, the Northern-Crimean canal and the Black Sea, has not reached values which could impact them during the entire post-accident period. This complex of comparative studies was carried out for the first time.

  17. Major Factors Affecting Incidence of Childhood Thyroid Cancer in Belarus after the Chernobyl Accident: Do Nitrates in Drinking Water Play a Role?

    PubMed

    Drozd, Valentina M; Saenko, Vladimir A; Brenner, Alina V; Drozdovitch, Vladimir; Pashkevich, Vasilii I; Kudelsky, Anatoliy V; Demidchik, Yuri E; Branovan, Igor; Shiglik, Nikolay; Rogounovitch, Tatiana I; Yamashita, Shunichi; Biko, Johannes; Reiners, Christoph

    2015-01-01

    One of the major health consequences of the Chernobyl Nuclear Power Plant accident in 1986 was a dramatic increase in incidence of thyroid cancer among those who were aged less than 18 years at the time of the accident. This increase has been directly linked in several analytic epidemiological studies to iodine-131 (131I) thyroid doses received from the accident. However, there remains limited understanding of factors that modify the 131I-related risk. Focusing on post-Chernobyl pediatric thyroid cancer in Belarus, we reviewed evidence of the effects of radiation, thyroid screening, and iodine deficiency on regional differences in incidence rates of thyroid cancer. We also reviewed current evidence on content of nitrate in groundwater and thyroid cancer risk drawing attention to high levels of nitrates in open well water in several contaminated regions of Belarus, i.e. Gomel and Brest, related to the usage of nitrogen fertilizers. In this hypothesis generating study, based on ecological data and biological plausibility, we suggest that nitrate pollution may modify the radiation-related risk of thyroid cancer contributing to regional differences in rates of pediatric thyroid cancer in Belarus. Analytic epidemiological studies designed to evaluate joint effect of nitrate content in groundwater and radiation present a promising avenue of research and may provide useful insights into etiology of thyroid cancer.

  18. Major Factors Affecting Incidence of Childhood Thyroid Cancer in Belarus after the Chernobyl Accident: Do Nitrates in Drinking Water Play a Role?

    PubMed Central

    Drozd, Valentina M.; Saenko, Vladimir A.; Brenner, Alina V.; Drozdovitch, Vladimir; Pashkevich, Vasilii I.; Kudelsky, Anatoliy V.; Demidchik, Yuri E.; Branovan, Igor; Shiglik, Nikolay; Rogounovitch, Tatiana I.; Yamashita, Shunichi; Biko, Johannes; Reiners, Christoph

    2015-01-01

    One of the major health consequences of the Chernobyl Nuclear Power Plant accident in 1986 was a dramatic increase in incidence of thyroid cancer among those who were aged less than 18 years at the time of the accident. This increase has been directly linked in several analytic epidemiological studies to iodine-131 (131I) thyroid doses received from the accident. However, there remains limited understanding of factors that modify the 131I-related risk. Focusing on post-Chernobyl pediatric thyroid cancer in Belarus, we reviewed evidence of the effects of radiation, thyroid screening, and iodine deficiency on regional differences in incidence rates of thyroid cancer. We also reviewed current evidence on content of nitrate in groundwater and thyroid cancer risk drawing attention to high levels of nitrates in open well water in several contaminated regions of Belarus, i.e. Gomel and Brest, related to the usage of nitrogen fertilizers. In this hypothesis generating study, based on ecological data and biological plausibility, we suggest that nitrate pollution may modify the radiation-related risk of thyroid cancer contributing to regional differences in rates of pediatric thyroid cancer in Belarus. Analytic epidemiological studies designed to evaluate joint effect of nitrate content in groundwater and radiation present a promising avenue of research and may provide useful insights into etiology of thyroid cancer. PMID:26397978

  19. RECONSTRUCTION OF RADIATION DOSES IN A CASE-CONTROL STUDY OF THYROID CANCER FOLLOWING THE CHERNOBYL ACCIDENT

    PubMed Central

    Drozdovitch, Vladimir; Khrouch, Valeri; Maceika, Evaldas; Zvonova, Irina; Vlasov, Oleg; Bratilova, Angelica; Gavrilin, Yury; Goulko, Guennadi; Hoshi, Masaharu; Kesminiene, Ausrele; Shinkarev, Sergey; Tenet, Vanessa; Cardis, Elisabeth; Bouville, Andre

    2010-01-01

    A population-based case-control study of thyroid cancer was carried out in contaminated regions of Belarus and Russia among persons who were exposed during childhood and adolescence to fallout from the Chernobyl accident. For each study subject, individual thyroid doses were reconstructed for the following pathways of exposure: (1) intake of 131I via inhalation and ingestion; (2) intake of short-lived radioiodines (132I, 133I, and 135I) and radiotelluriums (131mTe, 132Te) via inhalation and ingestion; (3) external dose from radionuclides deposited on the ground; and (4) ingestion of 134Cs and 137Cs. A series of intercomparison exercises validated the models used for reconstruction of average doses to populations of specific age groups as well as of individual doses. Median thyroid doses from all factors for study subjects were estimated to be 0.37 and 0.034 Gy in Belarus and Russia, respectively. The highest individual thyroid doses among the subjects were 10.2 Gy in Belarus and 5.3 Gy in Russia. Iodine-131 intake was the main pathway for thyroid exposure. Estimated doses from short-lived radioiodines and radiotelluriums ranged up to 0.53 Gy. Reconstructed individual thyroid doses from external exposure ranged up to 0.1 Gy, while those from internal exposure due to ingested cesium did not exceed 0.05 Gy. The uncertainty of the reconstructed individual thyroid doses, characterized by the geometric standard deviation, varies from 1.7 to 4.0 with a median of 2.2. PMID:20539120

  20. Spatial distribution and vertical migration of (137)Cs in soils of Belgrade (Serbia) 25 years after the Chernobyl accident.

    PubMed

    Petrović, Jelena; Ćujić, Mirjana; Đorđević, Milan; Dragović, Ranko; Gajić, Boško; Miljanić, Šćepan; Dragović, Snežana

    2013-06-01

    In this study, the specific activity of (137)Cs was determined by gamma-ray spectrometry in 72 surface soil samples and 11 soil profiles collected from the territory of Belgrade 25 years after the Chernobyl accident. Based on the data obtained the external effective gamma dose rates due to (137)Cs were assessed and geographically mapped. The influence of pedogenic factors (pH, specific electrical conductivity, cation exchange capacity, organic matter content, soil particle size and carbonate content) on the spatial and vertical distribution of (137)Cs in soil was estimated through Pearson correlations. The specific activity of (137)Cs in surface soil samples ranged from 1.00 to 180 Bq kg(-1), with a mean value of 29.9 Bq kg(-1), while in soil profiles they ranged from 0.90 to 58.0 Bq kg(-1), with a mean value of 15.3 Bq kg(-1). The mean external effective gamma dose at 1 m above the ground due to (137)Cs in the soil was calculated to be 1.96 nSv h(-1). Geographic mapping of the external effective gamma dose rates originating from (137)Cs revealed much higher dose rates in southern parts of Belgrade city and around the confluence of the Sava and Danube. Negative Pearson correlation coefficients were found between pH, cation exchange capacity and (137)Cs specific activity in surface soil. There were positive correlations between organic matter and (137)Cs specific activity in surface soil; and between specific electrical conductivity, organic matter, silt content and (137)Cs specific activity in soil profiles.

  1. Reconstruction of radiation doses in a case-control study of thyroid cancer following the Chernobyl accident.

    PubMed

    Drozdovitch, Vladimir; Khrouch, Valeri; Maceika, Evaldas; Zvonova, Irina; Vlasov, Oleg; Bratilova, Angelica; Gavrilin, Yury; Goulko, Guennadi; Hoshi, Masaharu; Kesminiene, Ausrele; Shinkarev, Sergey; Tenet, Vanessa; Cardis, Elisabeth; Bouville, André

    2010-07-01

    A population-based case-control study of thyroid cancer was carried out in contaminated regions of Belarus and Russia among persons who were exposed during childhood and adolescence to fallout from the Chernobyl accident. For each study subject, individual thyroid doses were reconstructed for the following pathways of exposure: (1) intake of 131I via inhalation and ingestion; (2) intake of short-lived radioiodines (132I, 133I, and 135I) and radiotelluriums (131mTe, 132Te) via inhalation and ingestion; (3) external dose from radionuclides deposited on the ground; and (4) ingestion of 134Cs and 137Cs. A series of intercomparison exercises validated the models used for reconstruction of average doses to populations of specific age groups as well as of individual doses. Median thyroid doses from all factors for study subjects were estimated to be 0.37 and 0.034 Gy in Belarus and Russia, respectively. The highest individual thyroid doses among the subjects were 10.2 Gy in Belarus and 5.3 Gy in Russia. Iodine-131 intake was the main pathway for thyroid exposure. Estimated doses from short-lived radioiodines and radiotelluriums ranged up to 0.53 Gy. Reconstructed individual thyroid doses from external exposure ranged up to 0.1 Gy, while those from internal exposure due to ingested cesium did not exceed 0.05 Gy. The uncertainty of the reconstructed individual thyroid doses, characterized by the geometric standard deviation, varies from 1.7 to 4.0 with a median of 2.2.

  2. Pre- and post-Chernobyl accident levels of 129I and 137Cs in the Southern Baltic Sea by brown seaweed Fucus vesiculosus.

    PubMed

    Gómez-Guzmán, J M; Holm, E; Enamorado-Báez, S M; Abril, J A; Pinto-Gómez, A R; López-Gutiérrez, J M; García-León, M

    2013-01-01

    (129)I is a very long-lived radionuclide (T(1/2) = 15.7 × 10(6) years) that is present in the environment both because of natural and anthropogenic sources. In this work (129)I concentration and (129)I/(127)I ratio have been determined in seaweed Fucus vesiculosus collected in the Southern Baltic Sea during 1982 and 1986 (post-Chernobyl accident). The resulting data were evaluated in terms of (129)I concentrations, (129)I/(127)I and (129)I/(137)Cs ratios. (129)I concentrations were found to be in the order of (0.82-5.89) × 10(9) atoms g(-1) in 1982 and (1.33-38.83) × 10(9) atoms g(-1) in 1986. The (129)I/(127)I ratios ranged from (22.7-87.8) × 10(-10) for seaweed collected in 1982 and from (26.1-305.5) × 10(-10) for seaweed collected in 1986. Also a linear relationship was established for (127)I concentrations in seawater and salinity in this area, enabling the estimation of concentration factors for (127)I in F. vesiculosus. The high levels of (129)I and (129)I/(127)I in the Kattegat and their gradually decreasing trend to the Baltic Sea indicates that the most important contribution to the (129)I inventory in the Baltic Sea area comes from Sellafield and La Hague reprocessing plants. With respect to Chernobyl accident, (129)I concentrations in samples collected in 1986 were not much higher than those expected in less contaminated samples from 1982. This supports the view that the contribution of the Chernobyl accident to (129)I in the Baltic region was not significant. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Ingestion doses in Finland due to (90)Sr, (134)Cs, and (137)Cs from nuclear weapons testing and the Chernobyl accident.

    PubMed

    Rantavaara, A

    2008-11-01

    (90)Sr and (137)Cs in domestic foodstuffs and water have been analysed in Finland since the early 1960s, and (134)Cs since 1986. Using data on radionuclide deposition levels, agricultural production, and the processing and consumption of foodstuffs, the average intake and radiation dose from the ingestion of these radionuclides have been assessed. The estimated committed effective dose from the ingestion of (90)Sr, (137)Cs, and (134)Cs in food and water for the period 1960-2005 is 2.2 mSv, and for the period since the Chernobyl accident in 1986 it is 1.3 mSv.

  4. Atmospheric releases from severe nuclear accidents: Environmental transport and pathways to man: Modelling of radiation doses to man from Chernobyl releases

    SciTech Connect

    Anspaugh, L.R.; Goldman, M.; Catlin, R.J.

    1987-01-01

    The Chernobyl accident released a large amount of highly fractionated radioactive debris, including approximately 89 PBq of /sup 137/Cs. We calculated the resulting collective dose commitment to the Northern Hemisphere via the pathways of external exposure and ingestion of radionuclides withd food. We developed a rural/urban model of external dose and we used the PATHWAY model for ingestion. The results are a collective dose commitment of 630,000 person-Gy over the first year and 1,200,000 person-Gy over 50 years. 13 refs., 1 tab.

  5. [Level and pattern of morbidity of children residing in the Ukrainian S.S.R. exposed to radioactive pollution as the result of the Chernobyl AES accident].

    PubMed

    Bugaev, V N; Treskunova, T V; Bomko, E I

    1991-01-01

    It has been shown that there is a significant increase in total morbidity in children residing in the areas exposed to radioactive pollution due to the accident at the Chernobyl Atomic Power Station. This is due largely to higher morbidity of respiratory disease. There is also an increased in the incidence of digestive diseases, iron-deficiency anemias, mental disorders. The recorded growth of childhood morbidity in the areas examined is much higher than that in the children living in other areas unexposed to radioactive pollution.

  6. Measurements of long-term external and internal radiation exposure of inhabitants of some villages of the Bryansk region of Russia after the Chernobyl accident.

    PubMed

    Bernhardsson, C; Zvonova, I; Rääf, C; Mattsson, S

    2011-10-15

    A Nordic-Soviet programme was initiated in 1990 to evaluate the external and internal radiation exposure of the inhabitants of several villages in the Bryansk region of Russia. This area was one of the number of areas particularly affected by the nuclear accident at the Chernobyl Nuclear Power Plant in 1986. Measurements were carried out yearly until 1998 and after that more irregularly; in 2000, 2006 and 2008 respectively. The effective dose estimates were based on individual thermoluminescent dosemeters and on in vivo measurements of the whole body content of (137)Cs (and (134)Cs during the first years of the programme). The decrease in total effective dose during the almost 2 decade follow-up was due to a continuous decrease in the dominating external exposure and a less decreasing but highly variable exposure from internal irradiation. In 2008, the observed average effective dose (i.e. the sum of external and internal exposure) from Chernobyl (137)Cs to the residents was estimated to be 0.3mSv y(-1). This corresponds to 8% of the estimated annual dose in 1990 and to 1% of the estimated annual dose in 1986. As a mean for the population group and for the period of the present study (2006-2008), the average yearly effective dose from Chernobyl cesium was comparable to the absorbed dose obtained annually from external exposure to cosmic radiation plus internal exposure to naturally occurring radionuclides in the human body. Our data indicate that the effective dose from internal exposure is becoming increasingly important as the body burdens of Chernobyl (137)Cs are decreasing more slowly than the external exposure. However, over the years there have been large individual variations in both the external and internal effective doses, as well as differences between the villages investigated. These variations and differences are presented and discussed in this paper.

  7. [The results of computerization of studies of ecological consequences of the accident on the Chernobyl Nuclear Power Plant for terrestrial ecosystems].

    PubMed

    Mamikhin, S V

    2007-01-01

    In the paper some results of application of information and calculation technologies in researches of ecological consequences of accident on Chernobyl NPP are brought. The effectiveness of a computerization of investigations is scored. Technical and information component isselected. The singularities of application of the methodology of computerization in radioecological researches are considered. The special attention is given to integration of knowledge accumulated in the form of information materials, databases, mathematical models. The browse of the series of radioecological information and of informational-prognostic systems constructed from the moment of accident is made. As an example of successful usage of a computerization in radioecological researches provided by small scientific collectives experience of MSU division of radioecology and ecotoxicology are considered.

  8. Spatial variability of the dose rate from (137)Cs fallout in settlements in Russia and Belarus more than two decades after the Chernobyl accident.

    PubMed

    Bernhardsson, C; Rääf, C L; Mattsson, S

    2015-11-01

    Radionuclides from the 1986 Chernobyl accident were released and dispersed during a limited period of time, but under widely varying weather conditions. As a result, there was a high geographical variation in the deposited radioactive fallout per unit area over Europe, depending on the released composition of fission products and the weather during the 10 days of releases. If the plume from Chernobyl coincided with rain, then the radionuclides were unevenly distributed on the ground. However, large variations in the initial fallout also occurred locally or even on a meter scale. Over the ensuing years the initial deposition may have been altered further by different weathering processes or human activities such as agriculture, gardening, and decontamination measures. Using measurements taken more than two decades after the accident, we report on the inhomogeneous distribution of the ground deposition of the fission product (137)Cs and its influence on the dose rate 1 m above ground, on both large and small scales (10ths of km(2) - 1 m(2)), in the Gomel-Bryansk area close to the border between Belarus and Russia. The dose rate from the deposition was observed to vary by one order of magnitude depending on the size of the area considered, whether human processes were applied to the surface or not, and on location specific properties (e.g. radionuclide migration in soil). Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Measurements and modelling of 137Cs distribution on ground due to the Chernobyl accident: a 27-y follow-up study in Northern Greece.

    PubMed

    Clouvas, A; Xanthos, S; Kadi, S; Antonopoulos-Domis, M

    2014-08-01

    Following the Chernobyl accident, an area of ∼1000 m(2) in the University farm of the Aristotle University of Thessaloniki was considered as a test ground for radioecological measurements. The radiocesium deposition in this area, due to the Chernobyl accident, was 20 kBq m(-2). The profile of (137)Cs in the soil of this area was measured systematically from 1987 to 2012. The form of the profile has changed over the years. During the 1987-2000 period the (137)Cs distribution was reproducible by a sum of two exponentials. However, at least since 2005 the (137)Cs distribution can be successfully fitted by a single exponential function. The long-time (∼27 y) evolution study of the (137)Cs distribution in soil permit one to extract with the use of a simple compartment model, the mean vertical migration velocity of (137)Cs. Vertical migration of (137)Cs in soil is a very slow process. The mean vertical migration velocity is estimated to be 0.14 cm y(-1).The relative good comparison between the time dependence of the (137)Cs distribution in soil and the model predictions indicate that the simple model used is realistic. © The Author 2013. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  10. Reconstructing the Chernobyl Nuclear Power Plant (CNPP) accident 30 years after. A unique database of air concentration and deposition measurements over Europe.

    PubMed

    Evangeliou, Nikolaos; Hamburger, Thomas; Talerko, Nikolai; Zibtsev, Sergey; Bondar, Yuri; Stohl, Andreas; Balkanski, Yves; Mousseau, Timothy A; Møller, Anders P

    2016-09-01

    30 years after the Chernobyl Nuclear Power Plant (CNPP) accident, its radioactive releases still remain of great interest mainly due to the long half-lives of many radionuclides emitted. Observations from the terrestrial environment, which hosts radionuclides for many years after initial deposition, are important for health and environmental assessments. Furthermore, such measurements are the basis for validation of atmospheric transport models and can be used for constraining the still not accurately known source terms. However, although the "Atlas of cesium deposition on Europe after the Chernobyl accident" (hereafter referred to as "Atlas") has been published since 1998, less than 1% of the direct observations of (137)Cs deposition has been made publicly available. The remaining ones are neither accessible nor traceable to specific data providers and a large fraction of these data might have been lost entirely. The present paper is an effort to rescue some of the data collected over the years following the CNPP accident and make them publicly available. The database includes surface air activity concentrations and deposition observations for (131)I, (134)Cs and (137)Cs measured and provided by Former Soviet Union authorities the years that followed the accident. Using the same interpolation tool as the official authorities, we have reconstructed a deposition map of (137)Cs based on about 3% of the data used to create the Atlas map. The reconstructed deposition map is very similar to the official one, but it has the advantage that it is based exclusively on documented data sources, which are all made available within this publication. In contrast to the official map, our deposition map is therefore reproducible and all underlying data can be used also for other purposes. The efficacy of the database was proved using simulated activity concentrations and deposition of (137)Cs from a Langrangian and a Euleurian transport model.

  11. Exposure from the Chernobyl accident had adverse effects on erythrocytes, leukocytes, and, platelets in children in the Narodichesky region, Ukraine: A 6-year follow-up study

    PubMed Central

    Stepanova, Eugenia; Karmaus, Wilfried; Naboka, Marina; Vdovenko, Vitaliy; Mousseau, Tim; Shestopalov, Viacheslav M; Vena, John; Svendsen, Erik; Underhill, Dwight; Pastides, Harris

    2008-01-01

    Background After the Chernobyl nuclear accident on April 26, 1986, all children in the contaminated territory of the Narodichesky region, Zhitomir Oblast, Ukraine, were obliged to participate in a yearly medical examination. We present the results from these examinations for the years 1993 to 1998. Since the hematopoietic system is an important target, we investigated the association between residential soil density of 137Caesium (137Cs) and hemoglobin concentration, and erythrocyte, platelet, and leukocyte counts in 1,251 children, using 4,989 repeated measurements taken from 1993 to 1998. Methods Soil contamination measurements from 38 settlements were used as exposures. Blood counts were conducted using the same auto-analyzer in all investigations for all years. We used linear mixed models to compensate for the repeated measurements of each child over the six year period. We estimated the adjusted means for all markers, controlling for potential confounders. Results Data show a statistically significant reduction in red and white blood cell counts, platelet counts and hemoglobin with increasing residential 137Cs soil contamination. Over the six-year observation period, hematologic markers did improve. In children with the higher exposure who were born before the accident, this improvement was more pronounced for platelet counts, and less for red blood cells and hemoglobin. There was no exposure×time interaction for white blood cell counts and not in 702 children who were born after the accident. The initial exposure gradient persisted in this sub-sample of children. Conclusion The study is the first longitudinal analysis from a large cohort of children after the Chernobyl accident. The findings suggest persistent adverse hematological effects associated with residential 137Cs exposure. PMID:18513393

  12. Long-term development of the radionuclide exposure of murine rodent populations in Belarus after the Chernobyl accident.

    PubMed

    Ryabokon, N I; Smolich, I I; Kudryashov, V P; Goncharova, R I

    2005-12-01

    As a determinant of the associated health risks, the behavior of radionuclides in natural ecosystems needs to be better understood. Therefore, the activity concentration of various long-lived radionuclides released due to the Chernobyl accident, and the corresponding contributions to the whole-body dose rate, was studied as a function of time in mammalian indicator species inhabiting the natural forest ecosystems of Belarus, the bank vole (Clethrionomys glareolus) and the yellow-necked mouse (Apodemus flavicollus). The activity concentrations of 137Cs, 134Cs, 90Sr, 238Pu, 239,240Pu, 241Pu and 241Am in soil and in animals were measured at five monitoring sites with different ground deposition of radionuclides at different distances from the destroyed reactor. The observed temporal pattern of the radionuclide activity concentration in the studied animal populations reflects the changes in biological availability of these isotopes for biota, mostly due to fuel particle destruction and appearance of dissolved and exchangeable forms of radionuclides. The time course of 134+137Cs activity concentrations in animal populations appeared as a sequence of increase, peak and decrease. Maximal levels of radiocesium occurred 1-2 years after deposition, followed by an exponential decrease. Concentrations of incorporated 90Sr increased up to the tenth year after deposition. The activity concentrations of transuranic elements (238Pu, 239,240Pu, 241Pu and 241Am) were much lower than those of the other radionuclides, in the studied animals. A considerable activity of 241Am in animals from areas with high levels of contamination was firstly detected 5 years after deposition, it increased up to the tenth year and is expected to increase further in the future. Maximal values of the whole-body absorbed dose rates occurred during the year of deposition, followed by a decrease in the subsequent period. Generally, this decrease was monotonic, mainly determined by the decrease of the

  13. [The morphological status of the maxillodental system in children living in an area contaminated by radionuclides as a result of the accident at the Chernobyl Atomic Electric Power Station].

    PubMed

    Sevbitov, A V; Persin, L S; Slabkobskaia, A B; Pankratova, N V

    1999-01-01

    The present study has been done in the framework of federal programme "Children of Chernobyl" with the aim to determine spread and structure of dental jaw abnormalities in children born and living in the radiation polluted regions after Chernobyl accident in 1986. 183 children have been examined in Donskoi town of Tula Province with the polluted soil by Cs-137 up to 5 Ci/km. All the examined children were divided into 2 groups: group 1--born in 1980-1986 and group 2--born in 1987-1994. It was determined that 76.5% of children have dental jaw system abnormalities. The most spread ones were occlusion abnormalities in combination with teeth abnormalities (28.9% cases) while the state of dental jaw system corresponding to the age standard was 2 times rarer in children born after the Chernobyl accident.

  14. Cs-137 K-39 Distribution and Cycling in some Forest Ecosystems 25 Years after the Chernobyl Accident

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shcheglov, Alexey; Tsvetnova, Ol'ga; Klyashtorin, Alexey; Kasatskiy, Andrey

    2014-05-01

    Many radioecological research conducted in forest ecosystems after the Chernobyl Accident suggest that Cs-137 distribution in the forest stand and tree components changes with the time. Downward Cs-137 fluxes were shown to prevail during first several years after the accident. It was supposed that with the course of time, the parameters of Cs-137 migration and cycling in the forests would be similar to the corresponding parameters of K-39 that is a chemical analog of Cs-137. However, our later studies showed that in the forest ecosystems on chernozem and grey forest soils (Tula Oblast of Russian Federation, 400-500 km from the ChNPP), annual return of Cs-137 to the soil with litterfall still increased its root uptake by a factor of 2-5, while the K-39 cycle was in steady state. It suggests that Cs-137 cycling parameters in these ecosystems is different from the potassium cycling even a while after the fallout. In 2008-2013 a similar study was conducted in pine and birch forests located some 100 km from the ChNPP, in Bryans Oblast of Russian Federation where the composition and physico-chemical properties of the initial fallout were similar to that in the 30-km zone of exclusion. In 2008, Cs-137 deposition in the pine and birch ecosystems was 11000 and 6000 Kbq/m2, respectively. Cs-137 content in different tree parts varied from 4 to 38 Kbq/kg, and in the pine forest decreased in the following rank: yang needles > internal bark > twigs (under 1 cm in diameter) > external bark > large brunches (over 1 cm in diameter) > wood. In the birch forest, the Cs-137 content in the tree parts decreased in the following rank: leaves > twigs > internal bark > large branches> external bark > wood. The K-39 content in the tree parts varies from 0.01% to 1 % and is ranked as above, i.e. similar to Cs-137. The average coefficient of correlation between K-39 and Cs-137 in the tree components is 0.85, at P=0.95. In the investigated ecosystems, the total mass (activity) of potassium and

  15. Global and local cancer risks after the Fukushima Nuclear Power Plant accident as seen from Chernobyl: a modeling study for radiocaesium ((134)Cs &(137)Cs).

    PubMed

    Evangeliou, Nikolaos; Balkanski, Yves; Cozic, Anne; Møller, Anders Pape

    2014-03-01

    The accident at the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant (NPP) in Japan resulted in the release of a large number of fission products that were transported worldwide. We study the effects of two of the most dangerous radionuclides emitted, (137)Cs (half-life: 30.2years) and (134)Cs (half-life: 2.06years), which were transported across the world constituting the global fallout (together with iodine isotopes and noble gasses) after nuclear releases. The main purpose is to provide preliminary cancer risk estimates after the Fukushima NPP accident, in terms of excess lifetime incident and death risks, prior to epidemiology, and compare them with those occurred after the Chernobyl accident. Moreover, cancer risks are presented for the local population in the form of high-resolution risk maps for 3 population classes and for both sexes. The atmospheric transport model LMDZORINCA was used to simulate the global dispersion of radiocaesium after the accident. Air and ground activity concentrations have been incorporated with monitoring data as input to the LNT-model (Linear Non-Threshold) frequently used in risk assessments of all solid cancers. Cancer risks were estimated to be small for the global population in regions outside Japan. Women are more sensitive to radiation than men, although the largest risks were recorded for infants; the risk is not depended on the sex at the age-at-exposure. Radiation risks from Fukushima were more enhanced near the plant, while the evacuation measures were crucial for its reduction. According to our estimations, 730-1700 excess cancer incidents are expected of which around 65% may be fatal, which are very close to what has been already published (see references therein). Finally, we applied the same calculations using the DDREF (Dose and Dose Rate Effectiveness Factor), which is recommended by the ICRP, UNSCEAR and EPA as an alternative reduction factor instead of using a threshold value (which is still unknown). Excess lifetime cancer

  16. [Radiation injury of the plants in the zone of influence of the accident on Chernobyl Nuclear Power Station (NPS)].

    PubMed

    Grodzinskiĭ, D M; Gudkov, I N

    2006-01-01

    Were considered the radiobiological effects in some species of agricultural and wild growing plants in 30-kilometer zone of alienation of Chernobyl nuclear power station and other radionuclide contaminated territories. The particular attention was given to the distance plant reactions: immunity decreasing, genetic consequences, changes in phytocenosis. Was discussed the question of possibility of plant adaptation to conditions of high radiation influence.

  17. Processing and analysis of commercial satellite image data of the nuclear accident near Chernobyl, U.S.S.R.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sadowski, Franklin G.; Covington, Steven J.

    1987-01-01

    Advanced digital processing techniques were applied to Landsat-5 Thematic Mapper (TM) data and SPOT highresolution visible (HRV) panchromatic data to maximize the utility of images of a nuclear powerplant emergency at Chernobyl in the Soviet Ukraine. The images demonstrate the unique interpretive capabilities provided by the numerous spectral bands of the Thematic Mapper and the high spatial resolution of the SPOT HRV sensor.

  18. Total cancer incidence in relation to 137Cs fallout in the most contaminated counties in Sweden after the Chernobyl nuclear power plant accident: a register-based study.

    PubMed

    Alinaghizadeh, Hassan; Wålinder, Robert; Vingård, Eva; Tondel, Martin

    2016-12-20

    To determine the total cancer incidence in relation to a 5-year exposure to caesium-137 ((137)Cs) from the 1986 Chernobyl nuclear power plant accident. A closed cohort was defined as all individuals living in the three most contaminated counties in mid-Sweden in 1986. Fallout of (137)Cs was retrieved as a digital map from the Geological Survey of Sweden, demographic data from Statistics Sweden, and cancer diagnosis from the National Board of Health and Welfare. Individuals were assigned an annual (137)Cs exposure based on their place of residence (1986-1990), from which 5-year cumulative (137)Cs exposures were calculated, accounting for the physical decay of (137)Cs and changing residencies. HRs were adjusted for age, sex, rural/non-rural residence and pre-Chernobyl total cancer incidence. The 734 537 people identified were categorised by exposure: the first quartile was low exposure (0.0-45.4 kBq/m(2)), the second and third quartiles were intermediate exposure (45.41-118.8 kBq/m(2)), and the fourth quartile was the highest exposure (118.81-564.71 kBq/m(2)). Between 1991 and 2010, 82 495 cancer cases were registered in the 3 counties. Adjusted HRs (95% CI) were 1.03 (1.01 to 1.05) for intermediate exposure and 1.05 (1.03 to 1.07) for the highest exposure compared to the reference exposure. We found a small overall exposure-response pattern of the total cancer incidence related to (137)Cs after adjustment for age, sex, rural residence and pre-Chernobyl cancer incidence. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/.

  19. Elevated frequencies of hypoxanthine phosphoribosyltransferase lymphocyte mutants are detected in Russian liquidators 6 to 10 years after exposure to radiation from the Chernobyl nuclear power plant accident.

    PubMed

    Thomas, C B; Nelson, D O; Pleshanov, P; Vorobstova, I; Tureva, L; Jensen, R; Jones, I M

    1999-02-02

    This study was conducted to determine whether the frequency of hypoxanthine phosphoribosyltransferase (HPRT) deficient lymphocyte mutants would detect an effect of radiation exposure in a population of Russians who were exposed to low levels of radiation while working in 1986 and 1987 as liquidators cleaning up after the Chernobyl nuclear power reactor accident. The HPRT lymphocyte cloning assay was performed on peripheral blood lymphocytes collected between 1992 and 1996 from 142 liquidators and 66 Russian controls, and between 1989 and 1993 from 231 American controls. Russian and American controls were not significantly different for either cloning efficiency or mutant frequency (MF); inclusion of both sets of controls in the analysis increased the ability to detect a Chernobyl exposure effect in the liquidators. After adjusting for age and smoking, the results revealed no significant difference in cloning efficiency of Chernobyl liquidators relative to Russian controls but a significant, 24% increase in liquidator HPRT mutant frequency over Russian controls (90% confidence interval was 7% to 45% increase). The analytical method also accounted for differences in precision of the individual estimates of log CE and log MF and accommodated for outliers. The increase in HPRT mutant frequency of liquidators is an attribute of the exposed population as a whole rather than of individuals. These results demonstrate that, under appropriate circumstances, the HPRT specific locus mutation assay of peripheral blood lymphocytes can be used to detect a semi-acute, low dose radiation exposure of a population, even 6 to 10 years after the exposure. Copyright 1999 Elsevier Science B.V.

  20. Total cancer incidence in relation to 137Cs fallout in the most contaminated counties in Sweden after the Chernobyl nuclear power plant accident: a register-based study

    PubMed Central

    Alinaghizadeh, Hassan; Wålinder, Robert; Vingård, Eva; Tondel, Martin

    2016-01-01

    Objectives To determine the total cancer incidence in relation to a 5-year exposure to caesium-137 (137Cs) from the 1986 Chernobyl nuclear power plant accident. Methods A closed cohort was defined as all individuals living in the three most contaminated counties in mid-Sweden in 1986. Fallout of 137Cs was retrieved as a digital map from the Geological Survey of Sweden, demographic data from Statistics Sweden, and cancer diagnosis from the National Board of Health and Welfare. Individuals were assigned an annual 137Cs exposure based on their place of residence (1986–1990), from which 5-year cumulative 137Cs exposures were calculated, accounting for the physical decay of 137Cs and changing residencies. HRs were adjusted for age, sex, rural/non-rural residence and pre-Chernobyl total cancer incidence. Results The 734 537 people identified were categorised by exposure: the first quartile was low exposure (0.0–45.4 kBq/m2), the second and third quartiles were intermediate exposure (45.41–118.8 kBq/m2), and the fourth quartile was the highest exposure (118.81–564.71 kBq/m2). Between 1991 and 2010, 82 495 cancer cases were registered in the 3 counties. Adjusted HRs (95% CI) were 1.03 (1.01 to 1.05) for intermediate exposure and 1.05 (1.03 to 1.07) for the highest exposure compared to the reference exposure. Conclusions We found a small overall exposure–response pattern of the total cancer incidence related to 137Cs after adjustment for age, sex, rural residence and pre-Chernobyl cancer incidence. PMID:27998898

  1. Study of a ;hot; particle with a matrix of U-bearing metallic Zr: Clue to supercriticality during the Chernobyl nuclear accident

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pöml, P.; Burakov, B.

    2017-05-01

    This paper is dedicated to the 30th anniversary of the severe nuclear accident that occurred at the Chernobyl NPP on 26 April 1986. A detailed study on a Chernobyl ;hot; particle collected from contaminated soil was performed. Optical and electron microscopy, as well as quantitative x-ray microbeam analysis methods were used to determine the properties of the sample. The results show that the particle (≈ 240 x 165 μm) consists of a metallic Zr matrix containing 2-3 wt. % U and bearing veins of an U,Nb admixture. The metallic Zr matrix contains two phases with different amounts of O with the atomic proportions (U,Zr,Nb)0.73O0.27 and (U,Zr,Nb)0.61O0.39. The results confirm the interaction between UO2 fuel and zircaloy cladding in the reactor core. To explain the process of formation of the particle, its properties are compared to laboratory experiments. Because of the metallic nature of the particle it is concluded that it must have formed during a very high temperature (> 2400∘C) process that lasted for only a very short time (few microseconds or less); otherwise the particle should have been oxidised. Such a rapid very high temperature process indicates that at least part of the reactor core could have been supercritical prior to an explosion as it was previously suggested in the literature.

  2. {sup 137}Cs concentration among children in areas contaminated with radioactive fallout from the Chernobyl accident: Mogilev and Gomel oblasts, Belarus

    SciTech Connect

    Hoshi, Masaharu; Fujimura, Kingo; Shibata, Yoshisada; Okajima, Shunzo; Yamashita, Shunichi; Namba, Hiroyuki; Yokoyama, Naokata; Izumi, Motomori; Nagataki, Shigenobu

    1994-09-01

    The level of radiation exposure in children in Belarus caused by the Chernobyl accident was investigated on the basis of whole body {sup 137}Cs count. The subjects were 10,062 children (4,762 boys and 5,300 girls) in Mogilev and Gomel, Belarus, who received Chernobyl Sasakawa Health and Medical Cooperation Project health examinations from May 1991 to December 1992 and who were 5-16 y old at the time of examination. The median whole body {sup 137}Cs count per body weight varied from 21-48 Bq kg{sup {minus}1} and from 28-126 Bq kg{sup {minus}1} in Mogilev oblast and Gomel oblast, respectively. (The {open_quotes}oblast{close_quotes} is the largest administrative district constituting the country. Belarus consists of 6 oblasts). Corresponding annual effective dose equivalents were all less than the public dose limit of 1 mSv y{sup {minus}1}, but the observed levels in the children were considerably higher than the average level of 2.3 Bq kg{sup {minus}1} reported in the past for the former Soviet Union. 6 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab.

  3. Variation in transfer factor of radiocaesium in bank voles (Clethrionomys glareolus) in clear cut and mature forest sites after the Chernobyl accident.

    PubMed

    Palo, Thomas R

    2007-01-01

    Bank voles that were collected between 1986 and 2004 at sites in Chernobyl fallout areas of northern Sweden showed higher (137)Cs activity concentrations at the mature forest sites compared to clear cuts. This difference was not attributed to differences in ground deposition between sites but to differences in aggregated transfer rates to voles. Differences in transfer between forest types were evident for all years 1986-2004 but the change occurred at different rates in the two habitats. The apparent transfer factor between bilberry (Vaccinium myrtillus) and voles was positively related and indicated that a biomagnification was about 1.5 from vegetation to these small mammalian herbivores. The aggregated transfer factor to bank voles measured in the forest habitat, although starting at higher levels declined faster with time than clear cut sites and the differences between the forest habitat and the clear cut areas diminished with time. After the Chernobyl accident in 1986 the mean level in bank vole was 514Bq/kg fresh mass (SD=505) that increased to 1485Bq/kg (SD=881) in 1988. The activity concentration declined thereafter. The bank voles collected in similar habitats in 2004 contained on average 1022Bq/kg (SD=723). Still 18 years after the radionuclide fallout over Sweden high activity concentrations in voles could be found.

  4. A Perspective on Long-Term Recovery Following the Fukushima Nuclear Accident - 12075

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, S.Y.

    2012-07-01

    The tragic events at the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Station began occurring on March 11, 2011, following Japan's unprecedented earthquake and tsunami. The subsequent loss of external power and on-site cooling capacity severely compromised the plant's safety systems, and subsequently, led to core melt in the affected reactors and damage to spent nuclear fuel in the storage pools. Together with hydrogen explosions, this resulted in a substantial release of radioactive material to the environment (mostly Iodine-131 and Cesium- 137), prompting an extensive evacuation effort. The latest release estimate places the event at the highest severity level (Level 7) on the International Nuclear Event Scale, the same as the Chernobyl accident of 1986. As the utility owner endeavored to stabilize the damaged facility, environmental contamination continued to propagate and affect every aspect of daily life in the affected region of Japan. Elevated levels of radioactivity (mostly dominated by Cs-137 with the passage of time) were found in soil, drinking water, vegetation, produce, seafood, and other foodstuffs. An estimated 80,000 to 90,000 people were evacuated; more evacuations are being contemplated months after the accident, and a vast amount of land has become contaminated. Early actions were taken to ban the shipment and sale of contaminated food and drinking water, followed by later actions to ban the shipment and sale of contaminated beef, mushrooms, and seafood. As the event continues to evolve toward stabilization, the long-term recovery effort needs to commence - a process that doubtless will involve rather complex decision-making interactions between various stakeholders. Key issues that may be encountered and considered in such a process include (1) socio-political factors, (2) local economic considerations, (3) land use options, (4) remediation approaches, (5) decontamination methods, (6) radioactive waste management, (7) cleanup levels and options, and (8

  5. Characteristics of young adults of Belarus with post-Chernobyl papillary thyroid carcinoma: a long-term follow-up of patients with early exposure to radiation at the 30th anniversary of the accident.

    PubMed

    Fridman, Mikhail; Lam, Alfred King-Yin; Krasko, Olga

    2016-12-01

    Studies of thyroid cancer related to the Chernobyl accident have focused on children as they are the most vulnerable group with the highest risk of developing radiation-associated cancer. In contrast, our research aimed to look at the clinical and pathological features of patients with post-Chernobyl papillary thyroid carcinoma that were 2 years old or less at the time of the Chernobyl accident. The study subjects were patients (n = 359) aged 0 to 2 at the time of the Chernobyl accident and aged ≥19 years at presentation/surgery who were treated in Belarus for papillary thyroid carcinoma during the period 2003-2013. In conventional or oncocytic variant of papillary thyroid carcinoma, the prevalence of extra-thyroidal extension, nodal disease, infiltrative growth or lymphatic vessel invasion was above 50%. These features were less pronounced when compared to tall cell or diffuse sclerosing variants of papillary thyroid carcinoma. The highest frequency of central lymph node metastases was found in patients aged 1-2 years at exposure (P = 0·004). Subjects exposed in utero were characterized by absent/insignificant lymphocytic infiltration around the carcinoma (P = 0·025), predominance of conventional papillary architecture and an association with lymphocytic thyroiditis. A number of features were associated with this group of patients that were very young at the time of radiation exposure. In addition, the incidence and basic characteristics of adult papillary thyroid carcinoma varied depending on the types of exposure conditions. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  6. CEC/CIS collaboration projects on the consequences of the Chernobyl accident preliminary results on the project dealing with strategies of decontamination

    SciTech Connect

    Jouve, A.; Maubert, H.; Kutlakhmedov, Y.

    1994-12-31

    In 1992, an agreement was signed between the Commission of the European Communities (CEC) and the relevant Ministries of Belarus, Russia and Ukraine in order to mitigate the consequences of the Chernobyl accident, through the implementation of a collaboration program involving the participation of about 200 CIS (Commonwealth of Independent States) and EU (European Union) Institutes and Research Centers. In such a context, a collaboration project aiming at evaluating strategies of decontamination for the territories affected by the accident was launched. This project not only dealt with decontamination of agricultural soils, urban areas and forests but also included treatment of contaminated foodstuff. To date, the project comprised both experimental and theoretical activities. It is expected that the results of this project can be used for the development of practical strategies for decontaminating the relevant CIS territories, as well as for the definition of appropriate policies in the event of a future nuclear accident. Relying on a strong collaboration network which was progressively established between EU and CIS scientists, field experiments mainly dealt with decontamination of meadows using a turf harvester, and forests while producing valuable wood derivatives.

  7. Measurement of 129 I and 137 Cs in soils from Belarus and reconstruction of 131I deposition from the Chernobyl accident.

    PubMed

    Straume, T; Anspaugh, L R; Marchetti, A A; Voigt, G; Minenko, V; Gu, F; Men, P; Trofimik, S; Tretyakevich, S; Drozdovitch, V; Shagalova, E; Zhukova, O; Germenchuk, M; Berlovich, S

    2006-07-01

    I and Cs have been measured in a large number of soil samples collected throughout the country of Belarus to support efforts for thyroid-dose reconstruction following the Chernobyl accident. Samples of soil consisting of multiple 30-cm-deep cores per site were sampled following a selection process to ensure sites were undisturbed and representative. Samples were measured by accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS) for I, gamma spectrometry for Cs, and gas chromatography (GC) for total iodine. Results show that both I and Cs are retained firmly in the top approximately 15 to 20 cm of the soil. Our results also suggest that the correlation between I and Cs deposition across the country of Belarus is poor; hence, I is a better surrogate for I than is Cs. It was also noted that total iodine concentrations in topsoil from Belarus are low compared with other regions of the world where radiogenic thyroid cancer has been studied.

  8. EEG patterns in persons exposed to ionizing radiation as a result of the chernobyl accident. Part 2: quantitative EEG analysis in patients who had acute radiation sickness.

    PubMed

    Loganovsky, Konstantin N; Yuryev, Konstantin L

    2004-01-01

    Cross-sectional quantitative electroencephalogram (qEEG) study (1996-2001) among Chernobyl accident survivors, who had confirmed acute radiation sickness and were irradiated in dose of 1-5 Gy, revealed the neurophysiological markers of ionizing radiation. Neuropsychological markers were: left fronto-temporal dominant frequency reduction; absolute delta-power lateralization to the left (dominant) hemisphere; relative delta-power increase in the fronto-temporal areas; absolute theta-power decrease in the left temporal region; absolute and relative alpha-power diffusive decrease, which may reflect cortico-limbic dysfunction lateralized to the left, dominant hemisphere, with the fronto-temporal cortical and hippocampal damage. Quantitative electroencephalogram proposed for differentiation of radiation and nonradiation brain damages and as a new biological dosymetry method. High radiosensitivity of the brain, neocortex, and dominant hemisphere higher radiosensitivity are discussed.

  9. [The biological effects in animals in relation to the accident at the Chernobyl Atomic Electric Power Station. 5. Longevity and the carcinogenic effects].

    PubMed

    Serkiz, Ia I; Pinchuk, V G; Rodionova, N K; Pinchuk, L B; Gol'dshmid, B Ia; Druzhina, N A; Lipskaia, A I; Pukhova, G G; Nikitchenko, V V

    1991-01-01

    Remote effects in laboratory animals living in conditions of exposure to a mixture of external and internal radiation resulted from the Chernobyl A.P.S. disaster have been investigated. It has been found that the rate of deaths from non-tumor illnesses grows, the incidence of neoplasms increases and their latency time decreases. The redistribution within the spectrum of benign and malignant tumors and the increase in the multiplicity coefficient have been revealed. It is concluded that chronic exposure of animals to low-level radiation from the radionuclides, resulted from the accident, brings about a much larger number of negative stochastic and nonstochastic remote effects as compared to those expected from the extrapolation of the effects produced by high radiation doses.

  10. {sup 137}Cesium and {sup 134}cesium in roe deer from north and middle Hesse (Germany) subsequent to the reactor accident in Chernobyl

    SciTech Connect

    Brunn, H.; Georgii, S.; Eskens, U.

    1993-11-01

    Environmental contamination with radionuclides, heavy metals and chlorinated hydrocarbons is reflected by the concentration of these substances in the tissues of so-called {open_quotes}biological indicators,{close_quotes} animals such as game and fish that are wholly dependent upon their environment and therefore display environmental contamination with xenobiotics. The extent and the temporal development of the xenobiotic burden to the environment and food chain can be monitored by measuring concentration of xenobiotics in muscle tissue of biological indicators. The present report describes the contamination of muscle tissue from 396 roe-deer from north and middle Hesse (Germany) after the reactor accident in Chernobyl on April 26, 1986. 15 refs., 3 figs.

  11. Reflections on Chernobyl

    SciTech Connect

    Weinberg, A.M.

    1986-01-01

    In this paper the author discusses issues surrounding the Chernobyl nuclear accident and the possibility of inherently safe reactors. The author concludes that the possibility of inherently safe reactors is a powerful existence theorem and believes that eventually some inherently safe reactors will be built and their inherent safety demonstrated.

  12. Lessons of Chernobyl

    SciTech Connect

    Ramberg, B.

    1988-07-01

    Dr. Bennett Ramberg discusses the nuclear plant safety attitude leading to the Chernobyl accident, he reviews the accident and its immediate impact, and he then considers its long-term impact on the nuclear power-generating industry worldwide. This paper is based on a talk given by Dr. Ramberg on May 4, 1987, at the Center for National Security Studies of the Los Alamos National Laboratory. The presentation was followed by a question and answer session.

  13. [The problem of the transgeneration phenomenon of genome instability in sick children of different age groups after the accident at the Chernobyl Nuclear Power Plant].

    PubMed

    Suskov, I N; Agadzhanian, A V; Kuz'mina, N S; Elisova, T V; Iofa, E L; Nilova, I N; Akaeva, E A; Kuznetsova, G I; Rubanovich, A V; Tskhovrebova, L V; Baleva, L S; Sipiagina, A E

    2006-01-01

    A complex genetic examination of children which belong to two cohorts and their parents were carried out. The first cohort included children and constantly living on territories contaminated with radionuclides (Novozybkov district, Bryansk region). They were subdivided in groups according to the ontogenetic age periods of development of their parents at the time of the Chernobyl accident. In the children born in 1986-1995 the level of aberrant genomes is significantly higher as compared to the control (p < 0.001). In children born in 1998-2002 the differences are insignificant (p > 0.05). The frequency of aberrant genomes had a tendency to decrease with the period of time between the birth date of a child and the moment of the accident. Analysis of the results of cytogenetic investigation for the same living on territories with different densities of radioactive contamination (zone I-- 627-688 kBq/m2, 137Cs and zone II-- 135-402 kBq/m2, 137Cs) revealed insignificant differences in the spectrum and average frequencies of chromosome aberrations. The second cohort included children born in 1987-1991 and 1993-2002 from irradiated fathers (Chernobyl clean-up workers) and unirradiated mothers living on territories without radionuclide contamination. These children also displayed increased frequencies of aberrant genomes as compared to the control (p < 0.001). The analysis of the dynamics years of birth of cytogenetic disturbances in the same cohorts of children showed the average frequencies of aberrant genomes remain higher than the control level. In most of the children of both cohorts the repair synthesis of genome DNA by gamma- and UV-radiation is reduced as compared to one in the children from the control group.

  14. Practical improvement of the radiological quality of milk produced by peasant farmers in the territories of Belarus contaminated by the Chernobyl accident. The ETHOS project.

    PubMed

    Lepicard, S; Dubreuil, G H

    2001-01-01

    The Chernobyl post-accident situation has highlighted how the sudden emergence of persistent radioactive contamination in the environment is severely affecting the quality of life of the inhabitants in the concerned territories. The management of this situation is complex, mainly conditioned by the ability of the inhabitants themselves to be directly involved in the process of improving their living conditions. In this process, quality of life cannot be restricted solely to the dimension of radiological risk, but needs to encompass the diverse aspects of daily living, including the social, psychological, economic, political and ethical aspects. This paper presents the experience of the involvement of a group of peasant farmers from a village in the Republic of Belarus, in the process of improving the radiological quality of privately produced milk. This experience took place in the context of the ETHOS project, funded by the radiation protection research programme of the European Commission. The principal objective was to implement a complementary approach to the rehabilitation strategies adopted so far in the contaminated territories of the Republic of Belarus. This paper retraces the process of involvement of the inhabitants in a working group. It describes the characterisation of the situation by local actors, the opening of new possible actions to improve the radiological quality of milk at the individual level and the positive consequences at the scale of the village. The ETHOS project also illustrates how the scientific knowledge accumulated over many years since the Chernobyl accident in the field of radiation protection and radioecology can enter into local practices in the form of practical tools, which can be used by the population to produce significant improvements in the radiological situation.

  15. Origin of a signal detected with the LSD detector after the accident at the chernobyl nuclear power plant

    SciTech Connect

    Agafonova, N. Yu. Malgin, A. S.; Fulgione, W.

    2013-08-15

    A rare signal was detected at 23:53 Moscow time on April 27, 1986 with the LSD low-background scintillation detector located under Mont Blanc at a distance of 1820 km from Chernobyl. To reveal the origin of this signal, we discuss the results obtained with other instruments operating within a similar program, as well as analyze the characteristics of the pulses of the signal and facts referring to the explosion of the Chernobyl reactor. A hypothesis based on detection with the LSD of gamma-quanta from {beta} decays of {sup 135}I nuclei ejected into atmosphere by the reactor explosion and carried in the underground detector camera with air of positive ventilation is considered. The explosion origin of the LSD signal indicates a new technogenic source of the background in the search for neutrino bursts from cores of collapsing stars.

  16. Origin of a signal detected with the LSD detector after the accident at the chernobyl nuclear power plant

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Agafonova, N. Yu.; Malgin, A. S.; Fulgione, W.

    2013-08-01

    A rare signal was detected at 23:53 Moscow time on April 27, 1986 with the LSD low-background scintillation detector located under Mont Blanc at a distance of 1820 km from Chernobyl. To reveal the origin of this signal, we discuss the results obtained with other instruments operating within a similar program, as well as analyze the characteristics of the pulses of the signal and facts referring to the explosion of the Chernobyl reactor. A hypothesis based on detection with the LSD of gamma-quanta from β decays of 135I nuclei ejected into atmosphere by the reactor explosion and carried in the underground detector camera with air of positive ventilation is considered. The explosion origin of the LSD signal indicates a new technogenic source of the background in the search for neutrino bursts from cores of collapsing stars.

  17. [Immunological and transfusiological approaches to limiting the risk of leukemia related to the accident at the Chernobyl nuclear power plant].

    PubMed

    Zaretskaia, Iu M

    1990-12-01

    A programme including prophylactic, diagnostic aspects and reasons for the therapeutic tactics has been proposed for narrowing leukemia consequences related to the catastrophe at Chernobyl NPS. The state of the All-Union Register of typed donors and All-Union standard of typing sera has been considered. It is necessary to make reserves of blood containing no antibodies to cytomegalovirus (CMV-negative blood).

  18. [The irradiation levels of the participants in the cleanup of the aftermath of the Chernobyl accident in 1986-1987 and the verification of the dosimetric data].

    PubMed

    Il'in, L A; Kriuchkov, V P; Osanov, D P; Pavlov, D A

    1995-01-01

    It is considered the organization of individual dosimetric monitoring (IDM) within 30-km zone around Chernobyl nuclear power plant (CNPP) in 1986 for different contingents of recovery workers: the CNPP personnel, Management for Construction 605 (MC-605), military recovery workers, persons assigned to 30-km zone. It is concluded that the quality of IDM had decreased in the following series: the MC-605 personnel, the CNPP personnel, the assigned persons, and military units. The method of dosimetric data verification for recovery workers in 1986 is presented which is based on the analyses of the dependency H(delta)/In delta from delta, where delta is a step of the histogram of distribution, and H(delta) is delta-entropy of distribution. The results obtained by this method correspond to the results of the experts' estimation. It was shown that 60% of registered individual doses for the whole contingent of the recovery workers differ from the real exposure doses. Using the theory of hybrid lognormal distribution it was obtained, in our opinion, real external dose distribution for all the recovery workers. It was estimated that 7% of recovery workers received doses more than 0.25 Gy. Also, the data on values of mean and collective doses for different contingents, as well as for all persons involved in recovery operations is presented.

  19. Evaluation of thyroid antibodies and benign disease prevalence among young adults exposed to (131)I more than 25 years after the accident at the Chernobyl Nuclear Power Plant.

    PubMed

    Kimura, Yuko; Hayashida, Naomi; Takahashi, Jumpei; Rafalsky, Ruslan; Saiko, Alexsey; Gutevich, Alexander; Chorniy, Sergiy; Kudo, Takashi; Takamura, Noboru

    2016-01-01

    Background. The Chernobyl Nuclear Power Plant (CNPP) accident exposed a large number of inhabitants to internal (131)I radiation. The associations between internal (131)I exposure and thyroid autoimmunity and benign thyroid diseases remain controversial in the population living in the contaminated area around the CNNP. In this study, we evaluate the association of (131)I with benign thyroid diseases. Methods. We compared the prevalence of Anti-Thyroid Autoantibodies (ATAs), thyroid function, and prevalence of thyroid ultrasound finding outcomes in 300 residents of the contaminated area of Ukraine who were 0-5 years of age at the time of the CNPP accident (group 1) and 300 sex-matched residents who were born after the accident (group 2). Results. We did not find any differences of the prevalence of Antithyroglobulin Antibodies (TGAb) positive, Antithyroid Peroxidase Antibodies (TPOAb) positive, and TGAb and/or TPOAb positive between the study groups. (11.7% vs 10.3%; p = 0.602, 17.3% vs 13.0%; p = 0.136, 21.0% vs 17.3%; p = 0.254, respectively); after adjusting for age and sex, the prevalence was not associated with the (131)I exposure status in the study groups. The prevalence of subclinical and overt hypothyroidism cases was not significantly different (p = 0.093 and p = 0.320) in the two groups, nor was the prevalence of goiter (p = 0.482). On the other hand, the prevalence of nodules was significantly higher in group 1 (p = 0.003), though not significantly so after adjustment for age and sex. Discussion. Working 26-27 years after the CNNP accident, we found no increased prevalence of ATAs or benign thyroid diseases in young adults exposed to (131)I fallout during early childhood in the contaminated area of Ukraine. Long-term follow-up is needed to clarify the effects of radiation exposure on autoimmunity reaction in the thyroid.

  20. Evaluation of thyroid antibodies and benign disease prevalence among young adults exposed to 131I more than 25 years after the accident at the Chernobyl Nuclear Power Plant

    PubMed Central

    Kimura, Yuko; Hayashida, Naomi; Takahashi, Jumpei; Rafalsky, Ruslan; Saiko, Alexsey; Gutevich, Alexander; Chorniy, Sergiy; Kudo, Takashi

    2016-01-01

    Background. The Chernobyl Nuclear Power Plant (CNPP) accident exposed a large number of inhabitants to internal 131I radiation. The associations between internal 131I exposure and thyroid autoimmunity and benign thyroid diseases remain controversial in the population living in the contaminated area around the CNNP. In this study, we evaluate the association of 131I with benign thyroid diseases. Methods. We compared the prevalence of Anti-Thyroid Autoantibodies (ATAs), thyroid function, and prevalence of thyroid ultrasound finding outcomes in 300 residents of the contaminated area of Ukraine who were 0–5 years of age at the time of the CNPP accident (group 1) and 300 sex-matched residents who were born after the accident (group 2). Results. We did not find any differences of the prevalence of Antithyroglobulin Antibodies (TGAb) positive, Antithyroid Peroxidase Antibodies (TPOAb) positive, and TGAb and/or TPOAb positive between the study groups. (11.7% vs 10.3%; p = 0.602, 17.3% vs 13.0%; p = 0.136, 21.0% vs 17.3%; p = 0.254, respectively); after adjusting for age and sex, the prevalence was not associated with the 131I exposure status in the study groups. The prevalence of subclinical and overt hypothyroidism cases was not significantly different (p = 0.093 and p = 0.320) in the two groups, nor was the prevalence of goiter (p = 0.482). On the other hand, the prevalence of nodules was significantly higher in group 1 (p = 0.003), though not significantly so after adjustment for age and sex. Discussion. Working 26–27 years after the CNNP accident, we found no increased prevalence of ATAs or benign thyroid diseases in young adults exposed to 131I fallout during early childhood in the contaminated area of Ukraine. Long-term follow-up is needed to clarify the effects of radiation exposure on autoimmunity reaction in the thyroid. PMID:27019779

  1. [Cleft lip and cleft palate birth rate in Bavaria before and after the Chernobyl nuclear power plant accident].

    PubMed

    Scherb, H; Weigelt, E

    2004-03-01

    Cleft lip and palates (CLP) occur with a frequency of between 1 and 2 cases in 1000 live births and thus belong to the most frequent congenital anomalies. In the former German Democratic Republic (GDR), records covering 1967-1989 for CLP newborns show a 9.4% increase of the prevalence of CLP from 1987 to 1989, possibly due to Chernobyl. DATA AND STATISTICAL METHOD: In Bavaria, all congenital malformations in children's hospitals have been recorded from 1984 to 1991. Among these data, 1324 cases with CLP were found. A spatial-temporal analysis aimed at uncovering a possible association of the CLP occurrence with the Chernobyl fallout on a district level, as well as a synoptic analysis of the GDR and Bavarian data, were carried out. In Bavaria, from October 1986 to December 1990, the CLP frequency increased by 9.5% (p=0.10) relative to the trend as computed from the remaining years. The association of CLP rates with fallout on a district level is reflected by a significant relative risk (RR) per kBq/m(2) of RR=1.008 (p=0.03). A synoptic analysis of the Bavarian data and the GDR data restricted to the overlapping time window from 1984 to 1989 discloses a simultaneous significant jump of the CLP prevalence by 8.6% (p=0.02) after 1986. The presumption of a long-term increase of CLP after exposure to Chernobyl fallout is corroborated by the analysis of the Bavarian congenital malformation data.

  2. [The comparative analysis of gene and structural somatic mutations in inhabitants of Orel district areas contaminated with radionuclides as a result of Chernobyl accident].

    PubMed

    Sevan'kaev, A V; Zamulaeva, I A; Mikhaĭlova, G F; Potetnia, O I; Tsepenko, V V; Khvostunov, I K; Golub, E V; Piatenko, V S; Pozdyshkina, O V; Vereshchagina, A O; Smirnova, S G; Orlova, N V; Saenko, A S; Parshin, V S

    2006-01-01

    The results of comparative analysis of gene and structural mutations found in peripheral blood lymphocytes of inhabitants of Orel district areas contaminated with radionuclides as a result of Chernobyl accident are presented. The average level of 137Cs contamination in those areas ranged about 22-113 kBq/m2. In the study group was found the enhanced frequency of somatic cells with gene and structural mutations compared with laboratory control level by synchronous applying a T-cell receptor (TCR) loci mutation assay and cytogenetic analysis of unstable aberrations. The case-control comparison was carried out using the measured mutation frequencies and cases of various thyroid gland sickness recognized by ultrasonic examination. The cytogenetic assay did not show the statistical difference between healthy group and subjects with thyroid gland sickness. The average frequency of TCR loci mutation cells in the subjects with thyroid gland sickness was found to be statistically higher comparing with healthy persons. This finding was true for each study region and for Orel district in total. The subgroup of subject exposed in utero in 1986, soon after accident was analyzed. Both cytogenetic and TCR loci mutation assays shown enhancement of average mutation frequency in somatic cells in the subjects of this subgroup with thyroid gland sickness comparing with healthy persons.

  3. [Immunity status in persons participating in liquidation of the effects of the accident at the Chernobyl nuclear power plant].

    PubMed

    Kozyreva, T V; Nikiforova, N A; Kalmykova, I Ia; Skobel'tsyna, E S; Sorochan, P P; Starodubtseva, A N

    1990-12-01

    The time course study of the immunity status of 57 subjects who were engaged in liquidation of consequences of the catastrophe at Chernobyl NPS in May-December, 1986, has revealed a high frequency of disorders in bactericidal and digestive activities of neutrophils, as well as in the functional activity of T-lymphocytes in the peripheral blood. The incidence rate of subjects with disturbed functional activity of T-lymphocytes is significantly higher in the group of subjects with suppressed capacity of blood lymphocytes for DNA repair as compared to those with normal levels of blood lymphocyte capacity for DNA repair.

  4. Chernobyl's lengthening shadow

    SciTech Connect

    Marples, D. )

    1993-09-01

    This article reviews the April 26, 1986 nuclear disaster at Chernobyl. The information presented was gathered through talks between the author and scientists, citizens, and hospital workers in Belarus and Ukraine, as well as from library research. What is currently believed to have occurred at the time of the accident is related. The short and long term health effects of the accident as they are now understood are analyzed. The numbers of people evacuated and the location and severity of land contamination are described. Political and economic consequences of the accident are also explored. 2 refs.

  5. Incidence and mortality of solid cancer among emergency workers of the Chernobyl accident: assessment of radiation risks for the follow-up period of 1992-2009.

    PubMed

    Kashcheev, V V; Chekin, S Yu; Maksioutov, M A; Tumanov, K A; Kochergina, E V; Kashcheeva, P V; Shchukina, N V; Ivanov, V K

    2015-03-01

    This paper presents the results of a retrospective cohort study of cancer incidence and mortality among emergency workers of the Chernobyl accident, for the follow-up period 1992-2009. The cohort selected for analysis consists of 67,568 emergency workers who worked in the Chernobyl exclusion zone in 1986-1987. External radiation whole-body absorbed dose varied from 0.0001 gray (Gy) to 1.24 Gy, with a median of 0.102 Gy. Over the follow-up period 1992-2009, a total of 4,002 solid cancers of different sites were identified as the result of annual compulsory health examination, and a total of 2,442 deaths from all solid cancers in the study cohort were reported. Poisson regression was applied for the analysis of cancer incidence and mortality. The analysis of the standardized incidence ratio (SIR) has shown a statistically significant increase in cancer incidence in the cohort as compared with baseline cancer incidence among males of Russia. The average excess over the entire follow-up period is 18 % [SIR = 1.18, 95 % confidence interval (CI) 1.15; 1.22]. In contrast, however, no increase in the mortality from all cancers among the emergency workers as compared to the baseline mortality in Russian men was found. Values of excess relative risk of cancer incidence and mortality per 1 Gy (ERR Gy(-1)) are 0.47 (95 % CI 0.03; 0.96, p value = 0.034) and 0.58 (95 % CI 0.002; 1.25, p value = 0.049), respectively. These values are statistically significant.

  6. Karyopathological Traits of Thyrocytes and Exposure to Radioiodines in Belarusian Children and Adolescents following the Accident at the Chernobyl Nuclear Power Plant

    PubMed Central

    Nadyrov, Eldar; Rozhko, Alexander; Kravtsov, Viacheslav; Mabuchi, Kiyohiko; Hatch, Maureen; Nakamura, Nori; Nikonovich, Sergey; Aleksanin, Sergey

    2013-01-01

    The Belarus-American (BelAm) Thyroid Study cohort consists of persons 0–18 years of age at the time of exposure to radioiodines from the 1986 Chernobyl nuclear power plant accident who have undergone serial thyroid screenings with referral for fine-needle aspiration biopsy (FNAB) using standardized criteria. We investigated thyrocyte nuclear abnormalities in cytological samples from FNABs in 50 BelAm subjects with thyroid nodules and 43 control patients from Leningrad, Russia, unexposed to Chernobyl fallout. Nuclear abnormalities such as internuclear chromosome bridges and derivative nuclei with broken bridges (i.e., “tailed” nuclei), formed from dicentric and ring chromosomes, may be cellular markers of radiation exposure. In the exposed BelAm cohort, thyrocytes with bridges were present in 80% of subjects with single-nodular goiters compared with 27% of unexposed controls. The average frequency of thyrocytes with bridges was also significantly higher in the BelAm subjects than in controls as was the mean frequency of thyrocytes with tailed nuclei. In the case of multi-nodular goiters, thyrocytes with bridges were present in 75.0% of exposed BelAm patients compared with 16.7% of unexposed controls. Thyrocytes with tailed nuclei were observed in all of the BelAm subjects but in only 35% of controls, and the mean frequency of tailed nuclei was significantly higher. Unusually long bridges were detected in 29% of BelAm patients with single-nodular goiters and 35% of cases with multi-nodular goiters, while no such abnormalities were observed in the follicular thyroid epithelium of patients from the Leningrad region. Further study is needed to understand whether these phenomena represent irradiation consequences in the human organism. PMID:22382464

  7. Karyopathological traits of thyrocytes and exposure to radioiodines in Belarusian children and adolescents following the accident at the Chernobyl nuclear power plant.

    PubMed

    Nadyrov, Eldar; Rozhko, Alexander; Kravtsov, Viacheslav; Mabuchi, Kiyohiko; Hatch, Maureen; Nakamura, Nori; Nikonovich, Sergey; Aleksanin, Sergey

    2012-05-01

    The Belarus-American (BelAm) thyroid study cohort consists of persons who were 0-18 years of age at the time of exposure to radioactive iodine fallout from the 1986 Chernobyl nuclear power plant accident and who have undergone serial thyroid screenings with referral for fine-needle aspiration biopsy (FNAB) using standardized criteria. We investigated thyrocyte nuclear abnormalities in cytological samples from FNABs in 75 BelAm subjects with single and multiple thyroid nodules and 47 nodular goiter patients from Leningrad, Russia, unexposed to Chernobyl fallout. Nuclear abnormalities examined included internuclear chromosome bridges and derivative nuclei with broken bridges (i.e., "tailed" nuclei), which are formed from dicentric and ring chromosomes and thus may be cellular markers of radiation exposure. Among subjects with single-nodular goiter, thyrocytes with bridges were present in 86.8% of the exposed BelAm cohort compared with 27.0% of unexposed controls. The average frequency of thyrocytes with bridges and with tailed nuclei was also significantly higher in the BelAm subjects than in controls. Among subjects with multinodular goiters, thyrocytes with bridges were present in 75.7% of exposed BelAm patients compared with 16.7% of unexposed controls; thyrocytes with tailed nuclei were observed in all of the BelAm subjects but in only 40% of controls, and the mean frequencies of bridges and tailed nuclei were significantly higher in the exposed group. Unusually, long bridges were detected in 29% of BelAm patients with single-nodular goiters and 35% of those with multinodular goiters, while no such abnormalities were observed among patients from the Leningrad region. In the exposed subjects from BelAm, we also found positive correlations between their estimated dose of Iodine-131 from Chernobyl fallout and the frequency of tailed nuclei (p = 0.008) and bridges (p = 0.09). Further study is needed to confirm that these phenomena represent consequences of radiation

  8. Urinary bladder carcinogenesis induced by chronic exposure to persistent low-dose ionizing radiation after Chernobyl accident.

    PubMed

    Romanenko, Alina; Kakehashi, Anna; Morimura, Keiichirou; Wanibuchi, Hideki; Wei, Min; Vozianov, Alexander; Fukushima, Shoji

    2009-11-01

    Urinary bladder urothelium as well as cells in the microenvironment of lamina propria (endothelial elements, fibroblasts and lymphocytes) demonstrate a number of responses to chronic persistent long-term, low-dose ionizing radiation (IR). Thus, oxidative stress occurs, accompanied by up-regulation of at least two signaling pathways (p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase and nuclear factor-kappaB cascades) and activation of growth factor receptors, in the bladder urothelium of people living in Cesium 137-contaminated areas of Ukraine, resulting in chronic inflammation and the development of proliferative atypical cystitis, so-called Chernobyl cystitis, which is considered a possible pre-neoplastic condition in humans. Furthermore, significant alterations in regulation of cell cycle transitions are associated with increased cell proliferation, along with up-regulated ubiquitination and sumoylation processes as well as inefficient DNA repair (base and nucleotide excision repair pathways) in the affected urothelium. The microenvironmental changes induced by chronic long-term, low-dose IR also appear to promote angiogenesis and remodeling of the extracellular matrix that could facilitate invasion as well as progression of pre-existing initiated cells to malignancy. Based on the available findings, new strategies have been developed for predicting and treatment of Chernobyl cystitis-a first step in urinary bladder carcinogenesis in humans.

  9. [The radioecological lessons of Chernobyl].

    PubMed

    Aleksakhin, R M

    1993-01-01

    This paper presents the results of radioecological studies undertaken within the area exposed to ionizing radiation after Chernobyl disaster. Conclusions are made concerning the major regularities in radionuclide migration within various natural media and action of ionizing radiation on natural and artificial ecosystems. The efficiency of basic protective ecological measures in eliminating the accident consequences has been determined. The contribution of radioecological studies to the elimination of Chernobyl disaster sequences assessed.

  10. Radiocesium in muscle tissue of reindeer and pike from northern Sweden before and after the Chernobyl accident. A retrospective study on tissue samples from the Swedish Environmental Specimen Bank.

    PubMed

    Forberg, S; Odsjö, T; Olsson, M

    1992-04-30

    After the Chernobyl accident in April 1986, considerable deposition of radionuclides occurred regionally in eastern, central and northwestern Sweden. Locally, the fallout of radiocesium exceeded the remainder from atmospheric nuclear weapons tests by several magnitudes. Since the end of the 1960s samples of organs from various plant and animal species, annually collected at different localities, have been preserved in the Swedish Environmental Specimen Bank (ESB). In this work samples from the ESB have been used for retrospective studies of radioactive pollution. The activities of Cs-134 and Cs-137 in muscle tissues from reindeer, Rangifer tarandus, and pike, Esox lucius, preserved in the ESB, were measured. The samples were collected annually; the reindeer at three localities in northern Sweden and the pike at one of them. In material collected prior to the Chernobyl accident, the levels of Cs-137 were 57-180 Bq/kg in reindeer and 14-24 Bq/kg in pike, fresh weight basis. These levels relate to earlier nuclear bomb tests. A significant decrease was found in pike during the pre-Chernobyl period (1971-86). In post-Chernobyl samples the burden of Cs-137 varied from amounts equal to the former levels in the northernmost locality and up to 80 times higher for the maximum values in the southernmost locality. The highest value recorded was 18,425 Bq/kg in reindeer. The geographic variations in reindeer from Chernobyl fallout were in accordance with the pattern of deposition estimated by aircraft surveys performed in May 1986. The ratio between 'new' and 'old' radiocesium burdens in pike, caught in 1987, approached the corresponding ratio for reindeer grazing in the precipitation area of the lake; 33 and 19, respectively.

  11. [LIFE QUALITY OF CHILDREN WITH SMALL ANOMALIES OF HEART DEVELOPMENT, BORN TO PARENTS IRRADIATED IN CHILDHOOD IN THE CHERNOBYL ACCIDENT].

    PubMed

    Kondrashova, V G; Dombrovskaya, N S

    2015-01-01

    The study involved 162 children with small anomalies of heart development (SAHD) in core group (children born to parents evacuated from the 30-km zone in childhood) and 39 children in the control group. Quality of life of adolescents was assessed by questionnaire MOS-SF-36 in the Russified version (changed by International reseach centre of life quality, Russia, St. Petersburg, 1998). In children of main group with SAHD, was established systemic pathological process involving not only the cardiovascular system, but also an autonomic nervous systems, hemostasis, upper gastro-intestinal tract, hepatobiliary, urinary system, musculoskeletal system and others, which causes polymorphic clinical picture. Quality of life in children with SAHD, born from parents evacuated from the 30-km Chernobyl zone in childhood was reduced in comparison with practically healthy children. The quality life reduction relate, primarily, physical functioning. Clinical polymorphism and reduced quality of life require the development of approaches to improve diagnosis, treatment and rehabilitation of these patients.

  12. Thyroid cancer around Chernobyl

    SciTech Connect

    Beral, V.

    1997-03-01

    The author`s presentation on thyroid cancer around Chernobyl will focus on four different things. First will be the time trends, or the pattern of thyroid cancer occurrence before and after the accident. It is now very well known that the increase in thyroid cancer in children in several areas has been unprecedented. Second, the author discusses thyroid cancer in general and patterns of thyroid cancer around the world before the Chernobyl accident, including differences by age and pathology. Third, the author presents relatively crude analyses of risk according to dose to the thyroid gland. And last, the author attempts to contrast the findings for thyroid cancer in relation to the internal radioiodine dose in Chernobyl studies with analyses of the effects of external dose on thyroid cancer incidence. The bottom line to be developed is similar to that presented by Elaine Ron with regard to effects of external dose on thyroid cancer. The similarities between the childhood finding from Chernobyl studies and external radiation studies appear more remarkable than the differences.

  13. Accident response group (ARG) containers for recovery of damaged warheads

    SciTech Connect

    York, A.R. II; Hoffman, J.P.

    1993-09-01

    This report provides an overview of the containers that are currently stored at Pantex and available for use in response to an accident or for use in any other application where a sealed containment vessel and accident resistant overpack may be needed.

  14. Simulations of the transport and deposition of 137Cs over Europe after the Chernobyl NPP accident: influence of varying emission-altitude and model horizontal and vertical resolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Evangeliou, N.; Balkanski, Y.; Cozic, A.; Møller, A. P.

    2013-03-01

    The coupled model LMDzORINCA has been used to simulate the transport, wet and dry deposition of the radioactive tracer 137Cs after accidental releases. For that reason, two horizontal resolutions were deployed and used in the model, a regular grid of 2.5°×1.25°, and the same grid stretched over Europe to reach a resolution of 0.45°×0.51°. The vertical dimension is represented with two different resolutions, 19 and 39 levels, respectively, extending up to mesopause. Four different simulations are presented in this work; the first uses the regular grid over 19 vertical levels assuming that the emissions took place at the surface (RG19L(S)), the second also uses the regular grid over 19 vertical levels but realistic source injection heights (RG19L); in the third resolution the grid is regular and the vertical resolution 39 vertical levels (RG39L) and finally, it is extended to the stretched grid with 19 vertical levels (Z19L). The best choice for the model validation was the Chernobyl accident which occurred in Ukraine (ex-USSR) on 26 May 1986. This accident has been widely studied since 1986, and a large database has been created containing measurements of atmospheric activity concentration and total cumulative deposition for 137Cs from most of the European countries. According to the results, the performance of the model to predict the transport and deposition of the radioactive tracer was efficient and accurate presenting low biases in activity concentrations and deposition inventories, despite the large uncertainties on the intensity of the source released. However, the best agreement with observations was obtained using the highest horizontal resolution of the model (Z19L run). The model managed to predict the radioactive contamination in most of the European regions (similar to Atlas), and also the arrival times of the radioactive fallout. As regards to the vertical resolution, the largest biases were obtained for the 39 layers run due to the increase of

  15. Experimental determination of transfer coefficients of sup 137 Cs and sup 131 I from fodder into milk of cows and sheep after the Chernobyl accident

    SciTech Connect

    Voigt, G.; Mueller, H.P.; Proehl, G.P.; Paretzke, H.G.; Propstmeier, G.; Roehrmoser, G.H.; Hofmann, P. )

    1989-12-01

    Following the Chernobyl accident in April 1986, the transfer of {sup 131}I and {sup 137}Cs from feed to milk was studied under experimental and common agricultural conditions. From measurements in different dairy farms in Southern Bavaria, equilibrium transfer coefficients for cow's milk were calculated to be 0.003 d L-1 (range 0.0015 to 0.005) for {sup 131}I and 0.003 d L-1 (range 0.0025 to 0.004) for {sup 137}Cs. In feeding experiments with cows and sheep under more controlled conditions, milk transfer coefficients of 0.007 d L-1 (range 0.0055 to 0.0081) for {sup 131}I and 0.003 d L-1 (range 0.0023 to 0.0053) for {sup 137}Cs were obtained for cows, while for sheep the {sup 137}Cs transfer coefficient was higher: 0.06 d L-1. The kinetics of the Cs transfer from fodder to cow's milk can be described by two exponential terms assuming biological half-lives in milk of 1-2 d and 10-20 d. The use of a fast component with 1.5 d and a fraction of 0.8, and a slow component with 15 d, gives a good approximation to the kinetics for all cows in this experiment.

  16. Dose reconstruction by EPR spectroscopy of tooth enamel: application to the population of Zaborie village exposed to high radioactive contamination after the Chernobyl accident.

    PubMed

    Ivannikov, A I; Gaillard-Lecanu, E; Trompier, F; Stepanenko, V F; Skvortsov, V G; Borysheva, N B; Tikunov, D D; Petin, D V

    2004-02-01

    Individual irradiation doses were determined by electron paramagnetic resonance spectroscopy of the tooth enamel of the inhabitants of Zaborie, the most contaminated inhabited settlement not evacuated after the Chernobyl accident. Dose determination was performed using a specially developed automatic spectrum processing procedure. Spectrum processing was carried out in different operating modes, and average results were taken in order to reduce the contribution of uncertainty in dose determination caused by spectrum processing. The absorbed doses determined in enamel were corrected to take into account the contribution of natural background radiation and to determine the individual excess dose due to radioactive contamination of the territory. Individual excess doses are compared to calculated individualized doses to teeth, estimated using the local radioactive contamination levels, dose rates, and information concerning individual behavior. The individual excess doses measured by electron paramagnetic resonance spectroscopy and the calculated individualized doses are fully independent. Mean square variation between results of two methods was found to be 34 mGy, which is consistent with error estimation for both methods. This result can validate both the methodology of signal processing presented here when using electron paramagnetic resonance dosimetry of tooth enamel for low doses and the methodology of individualized dose calculation.

  17. [Restoration of pine plantations after effect of ionizing radiation in the region of the accident at the Chernobyl Atomic Energy Station].

    PubMed

    Fedotov, I S; Kal'chenko, V A; Rubanovich, A V; Igonina, E V; Shevchenko, V A

    2002-01-01

    The main results of the 12-year radiation-genetic monitoring of radiobiological, cytogenetic, and genetic parameters in the Pinus sylvestris L. forest plantations from the zone of the accident at the Chernobyl nuclear power plant presented. Acute ionizing irradiation at doses > 1 Gy was shown to induce the formation of morphoses and depressed growth; at doses > 2 Gy, the reproductive ability of the trees declined. The radiobiological parameters showed a linear (or close to linear) dose-effect relationship. Acute irradiation at a dose of 0.5 Gy induced cytogenetic and genetic effects that were significantly higher than the corresponding control values. The relationship between the cytogenetic effects and the absorbed dose was exponential. The dependence of the mutation frequency at specific loci on the absorbed dose was described by a nonlinear curve. The results of cytogenetic analysis of sprouts obtained from seeds annually (1986-1998) collected in zones of slight, moderate, and strong damage of Pinus sylvestris L. are presented.

  18. [Effect of infrared laser irradiation on the arterial blood pressure in liquidators of the accident at the Chernobyl power plant].

    PubMed

    Korkushko, O O

    2003-01-01

    Liquidators of Tchernobyl accident with discirculatory post-irradiation encephalopathy were treated with infra-red lazer irradiation together with a half doze of pharmacological agents usually used. Infra-red lazer irradiation has been shown to result in a significant reduce in the arterial pressure level, so it can be effective in correcting the disturbances in haemodynamics.

  19. Organization of radio-ecological monitoring of the areas of the Russian Federation contaminated due to the accident at the Chernobyl NPP (on example of the Bryansk region)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Linnik, Vitaly; Korobova, Elena; Vakulovsky, Sergey

    2013-04-01

    A severe accident at the Chernobyl NPP on April 26th, 1986 has led to radioactive contamination of many regions of the former USSR, now belonging to the Ukraine, the Republic of Belarus and the Russian Federation. Both natural and arable ecosystems have been subjected to fallout of radioactive isotopes. However both the distribution of radionuclides that define radioecological situation has depended not only on the initial contamination density but also on the landscape geochemical features of the areas controlling biogenic and abiogenic factors of radionuclide migration. To study and monitor peculiarities of migration of the most radioecologically significant radionuclides of Cs-137 and Sr-90 in different natural landscapes the Russian Scientific and Practical Experimental Center of the former State Chernobyl Committee has organized in 1992 a network of experimental plots in the most contaminated western part of the Bryansk region. It included 19 plots 100 m x 100 m in size which characterized 8 meadow and 11 forested catenas in the basin of the Iput' river. Cs-137 contamination level of the plots varied in 1992 from 740 kBq/m2 to 1850 kBq/m2. Although the study site has been located in the remote zone and the contamination was of condensation type the sampling performed at 11 plots registered some refractory radionuclides (144Ce, 154Eu, 238,239,240Pu and 90Sr) that proved the presence of fuel particles in fallout as far as 200 km from the damaged reactors. The sampling and monitoring scheme was organized to determine: the isotopic composition and contamination density of the plots; 2) estimation of radionuclide vertical and lateral migration; 3) evaluation of radionuclide inventories in different soil horizons; 4) calculation of radionuclide transfer in soil-plant system. Radiation measurements included field gamma-spectrometry using collimated gamma spectrometer "Corad" developed in the Kurchatov Institute and laboratory spectrometry the soil and plant samples

  20. US Department of Energy Chernobyl Database

    SciTech Connect

    Kennedy, R.A.; Mahaffey, J.A.; Smith, S.K.; Carr, F. Jr.

    1992-05-01

    The Chernobyl Database project is developing and maintaining an information to provide researchers with data and resource materials relating to the Chernobyl nuclear accident of April 1986. The system is the official United States repository for Chernobyl data. The system includes a collection of Chernobyl-related documents, a database of bibliographic references, and a collection of radiological measurements records. In addition, projects have been developed to make the resources more accessible and easy to use. These products include a personal-computer-based bibliographic search system (ChernoLit{trademark}), two printed bibliographies, and a personal- computer-based radiological measurements database system (ChernoDat).

  1. US Department of Energy Chernobyl Database

    SciTech Connect

    Kennedy, R.A.; Mahaffey, J.A.; Smith, S.K.; Carr, F. Jr.

    1992-05-01

    The Chernobyl Database project is developing and maintaining an information to provide researchers with data and resource materials relating to the Chernobyl nuclear accident of April 1986. The system is the official United States repository for Chernobyl data. The system includes a collection of Chernobyl-related documents, a database of bibliographic references, and a collection of radiological measurements records. In addition, projects have been developed to make the resources more accessible and easy to use. These products include a personal-computer-based bibliographic search system (ChernoLit{trademark}), two printed bibliographies, and a personal- computer-based radiological measurements database system (ChernoDat).

  2. Evaluation of (137)Cs body burden in inhabitants of Bryansk Oblast, Russian Federation, where a high incidence of thyroid cancer was observed after the accident at the Chernobyl nuclear power plant.

    PubMed

    Sekitani, Yui; Hayashida, Naomi; Karevskaya, Irina V; Vasilitsova, Olga A; Kozlovsky, Alexander; Omiya, Masanori; Yamashita, Shunichi; Takamura, Noboru

    2010-09-01

    To determine the current risk of internal radiation exposure after the Chernobyl accident, the (137)Cs body burden of the inhabitants of Bryansk Oblast, Russian Federation was evaluated, from 1998 to 2008. The study population is composed of 84 666 people who visited Bryansk No. 2 Hospital. A whole-body counter was used for measurement of (137)Cs body burden. (137)Cs concentration was significantly higher in the late period during the study and showed seasonal variation, suggesting that inhabitants may have consumed contaminated forest products. However, people with high annual exposure doses were quite rare during all years of the study. In conclusion, although internal radiation exposure from (137)Cs continues to this day in Bryansk Oblast, the annual exposure dose is low in almost all inhabitants. Because of the long half-life of (137)Cs, the long-term follow-up is necessary to monitor the health status and relieve the anxiety of the inhabitants around Chernobyl.

  3. [Relations between uricemia and some sensomotor functions in liquidators of the accident at the Chernobyl power plant].

    PubMed

    Aksentiĭchuk, B I

    2003-01-01

    Correlations between the level of uricemia and some parametres of the psycho-physiological testing were studied in liquidators of the Tchernobyl accident. Those correlations were of two types--determining and in determining. On the base of the data obtained four groups were chosen: 1/with normo- and hyperuricemia and low mental capacity; 2/with an expressed hypouricemia and over normal mental capacity; 3/with normouricemia and normal mental capacity; 4/with hypouricemia and normal mental capacity.

  4. Impact of Uncertainties in Exposure Assessment on Thyroid Cancer Risk among Persons in Belarus Exposed as Children or Adolescents Due to the Chernobyl Accident

    PubMed Central

    Little, Mark P.; Kwon, Deukwoo; Zablotska, Lydia B.; Brenner, Alina V.; Cahoon, Elizabeth K.; Rozhko, Alexander V.; Polyanskaya, Olga N.; Minenko, Victor F.; Golovanov, Ivan; Bouville, André; Drozdovitch, Vladimir

    2015-01-01

    Background The excess incidence of thyroid cancer in Ukraine and Belarus observed a few years after the Chernobyl accident is considered to be largely the result of 131I released from the reactor. Although the Belarus thyroid cancer prevalence data has been previously analyzed, no account was taken of dose measurement error. Methods We examined dose-response patterns in a thyroid screening prevalence cohort of 11,732 persons aged under 18 at the time of the accident, diagnosed during 1996–2004, who had direct thyroid 131I activity measurement, and were resident in the most radio-actively contaminated regions of Belarus. Three methods of dose-error correction (regression calibration, Monte Carlo maximum likelihood, Bayesian Markov Chain Monte Carlo) were applied. Results There was a statistically significant (p<0.001) increasing dose-response for prevalent thyroid cancer, irrespective of regression-adjustment method used. Without adjustment for dose errors the excess odds ratio was 1.51 Gy− (95% CI 0.53, 3.86), which was reduced by 13% when regression-calibration adjustment was used, 1.31 Gy− (95% CI 0.47, 3.31). A Monte Carlo maximum likelihood method yielded an excess odds ratio of 1.48 Gy− (95% CI 0.53, 3.87), about 2% lower than the unadjusted analysis. The Bayesian method yielded a maximum posterior excess odds ratio of 1.16 Gy− (95% BCI 0.20, 4.32), 23% lower than the unadjusted analysis. There were borderline significant (p = 0.053–0.078) indications of downward curvature in the dose response, depending on the adjustment methods used. There were also borderline significant (p = 0.102) modifying effects of gender on the radiation dose trend, but no significant modifying effects of age at time of accident, or age at screening as modifiers of dose response (p>0.2). Conclusions In summary, the relatively small contribution of unshared classical dose error in the current study results in comparatively modest effects on the regression parameters. PMID

  5. Impact of Uncertainties in Exposure Assessment on Estimates of Thyroid Cancer Risk among Ukrainian Children and Adolescents Exposed from the Chernobyl Accident

    PubMed Central

    Little, Mark P.; Kukush, Alexander G.; Masiuk, Sergii V.; Shklyar, Sergiy; Carroll, Raymond J.; Lubin, Jay H.; Kwon, Deukwoo; Brenner, Alina V.; Tronko, Mykola D.; Mabuchi, Kiyohiko; Bogdanova, Tetiana I.; Hatch, Maureen; Zablotska, Lydia B.; Tereshchenko, Valeriy P.; Ostroumova, Evgenia; Bouville, André C.; Drozdovitch, Vladimir; Chepurny, Mykola I.; Kovgan, Lina N.; Simon, Steven L.; Shpak, Victor M.; Likhtarev, Ilya A.

    2014-01-01

    The 1986 accident at the Chernobyl nuclear power plant remains the most serious nuclear accident in history, and excess thyroid cancers, particularly among those exposed to releases of iodine-131 remain the best-documented sequelae. Failure to take dose-measurement error into account can lead to bias in assessments of dose-response slope. Although risks in the Ukrainian-US thyroid screening study have been previously evaluated, errors in dose assessments have not been addressed hitherto. Dose-response patterns were examined in a thyroid screening prevalence cohort of 13,127 persons aged <18 at the time of the accident who were resident in the most radioactively contaminated regions of Ukraine. We extended earlier analyses in this cohort by adjusting for dose error in the recently developed TD-10 dosimetry. Three methods of statistical correction, via two types of regression calibration, and Monte Carlo maximum-likelihood, were applied to the doses that can be derived from the ratio of thyroid activity to thyroid mass. The two components that make up this ratio have different types of error, Berkson error for thyroid mass and classical error for thyroid activity. The first regression-calibration method yielded estimates of excess odds ratio of 5.78 Gy−1 (95% CI 1.92, 27.04), about 7% higher than estimates unadjusted for dose error. The second regression-calibration method gave an excess odds ratio of 4.78 Gy−1 (95% CI 1.64, 19.69), about 11% lower than unadjusted analysis. The Monte Carlo maximum-likelihood method produced an excess odds ratio of 4.93 Gy−1 (95% CI 1.67, 19.90), about 8% lower than unadjusted analysis. There are borderline-significant (p = 0.101–0.112) indications of downward curvature in the dose response, allowing for which nearly doubled the low-dose linear coefficient. In conclusion, dose-error adjustment has comparatively modest effects on regression parameters, a consequence of the relatively small errors, of a mixture of Berkson

  6. DNA damage, repair monitoring and epigenetic DNA methylation changes in seedlings of Chernobyl soybeans.

    PubMed

    Georgieva, Mariyana; Rashydov, Namik M; Hajduch, Martin

    2017-02-01

    This pilot study was carried out to assess the effect of radio-contaminated Chernobyl environment on plant genome integrity 27 years after the accident. For this purpose, nuclei were isolated from root tips of the soybean seedlings harvested from plants grown in the Chernobyl area for seven generations. Neutral, neutral-alkaline, and methylation-sensitive comet assays were performed to evaluate the induction and repair of primary DNA damage and the epigenetic contribution to stress adaptation mechanisms. An increased level of single and double strand breaks in the radio-contaminated Chernobyl seedlings at the stage of primary root development was detected in comparison to the controls. However, the kinetics of the recovery of DNA breaks of radio-contaminated Chernobyl samples revealed that lesions were efficiently repaired at the stage of cotyledon. Methylation-sensitive comet assay revealed comparable levels in the CCGG methylation pattern between control and radio-contaminated samples with a slight increase of approximately 10% in the latter ones. The obtained preliminary data allow us to speculate about the onset of mechanisms providing an adaptation potential to the accumulated internal irradiation after the Chernobyl accident. Despite the limitations of this study, we showed that comet assay is a sensitive and flexible technique which can be efficiently used for genotoxic screening of plant specimens in natural and human-made radio-contaminated areas, as well as for safety monitoring of agricultural products.

  7. Survival, neurological recovery and morbidity after spinal cord injuries following road accidents in Israel.

    PubMed

    Tchvaloon, E; Front, L; Gelernter, I; Ronen, J; Bluvshtein, V; Catz, A

    2008-02-01

    A retrospective cohort study. Assess outcomes in patients with spinal cord injuries (SCI) following road accidents, and factors that affect them. Loewenstein Rehabilitation Hospital, Raanana, Israel. A total of 143 patients admitted for rehabilitation between 1962 and 2004. Survival rates were estimated using the product limit (Kaplan-Meyer) method and their association with risk factors was analyzed with the Cox model. Neurological recovery was determined by comparing the Frankel grade at admission to rehabilitation and at discharge. The relation between recovery and various factors was tested with logistic regression. The risk of SCI in road accidents is higher among car drivers and motorcycle or bicycle riders. Median survival was 43 years. Survival was negatively associated with age at injury (P<0.0002) and with diagnosis of pressure sores (P=0.0065). Recovery of at least one Frankel grade occurred in 29.1% of patients. Useful recovery (upgrade to Frankel grade D or E) occurred in 23.1% of all patients. Neurological recovery was negatively associated with the severity of neurological deficit (P<0.001) and with thoracic injuries (P=0.046). The most common complications were pressure sores and those of the urinary and respiratory systems. In SCI following road accidents, survival rates were higher and recovery rates lower than in mixed types of trauma. This may be related to better compensation followed by better nursing for road accident victims in Israel, which may prevent life-shortening complications, and to more severe injuries caused by road accidents.

  8. Lessons from Chernobyl and prognosis for Fukushima: radiological consequences.

    PubMed

    Ivanov, Victor K

    2012-03-01

    The following are considered: results of large-scale radiation epidemiological studies of the health effects of the Chernobyl accident, radiation risks for emergency workers and the affected population; and verification of ICRP risk models taking into account data on the Chernobyl accident and preliminary prognostic estimates of potential radiological consequences of the Fukushima disaster.

  9. The Concept of Conversion Factors and Reference Crops for the Prediction of 137Cs Root Uptake: Field Verification in Post-Chernobyl Landscape, 30 Years after Nuclear Accident

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Komissarova, Olga; Paramonova, Tatiana

    2017-04-01

    One of the notable lessons obtained from nuclear accidents could be revealing the general features of 137Cs root uptake by agricultural crops for prediction the radionuclide accumulation in plants and its further distribution via food chains. Transfer factors (TFs) (the ratio of 137Cs activities in vegetation and in soil) have become a basis for such assessment when the characteristics of radioactive contamination, soil properties and phylogenetic features of different plant taxons important for root uptake are known. For the sake of simplicity the concept of conversion factor (CF) was accepted by IAEA (2006) to obtain unknown value of TF from the TF value of the reference crop cultivated on the same soil. Cereals were selected like reference group of agricultural crops. Presuming TF for cereals equal 1, CFs for tubers and fodder leguminous are 4, for grasses - 4.5, for leafy vegetables - 9, ets. To verify TFs and corresponding CFs values under environmental conditions of post-Chernobyl agricultural landscape the study in the area of Plavsky radioactive hotspot (Tula region, Russia) was conducted. Nowadays, after 30 years after the Chernobyl accident ( the first half-life period of 137Cs), arable chernozems of the territory are still polluted at the level 126-282 kBq/m2. The main crops of field rotation: wheat and barley (cereals), potatoes (tubers), soybean (leguminous), amaranth (non-leafy vegetables), rape ("other crops"), as well as galega-bromegrass mixture (cultivated species of grasses) and pasture grasses of semi-natural dry and wet meadows have been studied. Accumulation parameters of 137Cs in aboveground biomass, belowground biomass and edible parts of the plants were examined separately. Experimentally obtained 137Cs TFs in cereals are 0.24-0.32 for total biomass, 0.07-0.14 for aerial parts, 0.54-0.64 for roots and 0.01-0.02 for grain. Thus, (i) 137Cs transfer in grain of wheat and barley is insignificant and (ii) corresponding TFs values in both crops

  10. The Influence of Soil Properties and Local Characteristics on the Distribution, Migration and Potential Bioavailability of Radio-Cesium in Bavarian Forest Ecosystems More Than 20 Years After the Chernobyl Accident

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Winkelbauer, J.; Voelkel, J.; Leopold, M.; Huerkamp, K.; Dehos, R.

    2008-12-01

    Soil properties and local characteristics of landscapes and ecosystems influence the behaviour of Radio- Cesium. Humic horizons are a main factor in understanding the migration and potential bioavailability of radio-nuclides in soils. Until 1962 and in the year 1986, nuclear arms tests in the Pacific and the Chernobyl reactor accident emitted persistent radionuclides in the atmosphere that are stored in several European ecosystems. Short-term high as well as long-term low immissions lead to enrichments and increasing contamination of the environment up to superposition effects in certain ecosystems. South German forest ecosystems like the Bavarian Forest or the Northern pre-Alps are subareas of the cesium fallout affected sites after the Chernobyl accident. Cesium-137 is constantly contained in the vegetation and food chain in spite of decreasing local doses. Investigations have shown that the enrichment of cesium is mainly restricted to the organic top layers of the forest soils. Examples of several Bavarian forest ecosystems are given. Horizontal and vertical forest soil distributions of the cesium contamination and its bioavailability were determined to provide a default-document how to act in case of a repetition of a nuclear accident. Such a guideline has been created by order of the Bavarian State Government and its scope is presented here.

  11. Factors associated with serum thyroglobulin in a Ukrainian cohort exposed to iodine-131 from the accident at the Chernobyl Nuclear Plant.

    PubMed

    Peters, Kamau O; Tronko, Mykola; Hatch, Maureen; Oliynyk, Valeriy; Terekhova, Galyna; Pfeiffer, Ruth M; Shpak, Victor M; McConnell, Robert J; Drozdovitch, Vladimir; Little, Mark P; Zablotska, Lydia B; Mabuchi, Kiyohiko; Brenner, Alina V; Cahoon, Elizabeth K

    2017-07-01

    Serum thyroglobulin (Tg) is associated with the presence of thyroid disease and has been proposed as a biomarker of iodine status. Few studies have examined factors related to serum Tg in populations environmentally exposed to ionizing radiation and living in regions with endemic mild-to-moderate iodine deficiency. We screened 10,430 individuals who were living in Ukraine and under 18 years of age at the time of the 1986 Chernobyl Nuclear Power Plant accident for thyroid disease from 2001 to 2003. We estimated the percent change (PC) in serum Tg associated with demographic factors, iodine-131 thyroid dose, and indicators of thyroid structure and function using linear regression. We also examined these relationships for individuals with and without indications of thyroid abnormality. Mean and median serum Tg levels were higher among participants with abnormal thyroid structure/function. Percent change in serum Tg increased among females, smokers and with older age (p-values<0.001), and Tg increased with increasing thyroid volume, and serum thyrotropin (p-values for trend<0.001). We found no evidence of significant associations between iodine-131 thyroid dose and Tg. Serum Tg levels were inversely associated with iodized salt intake (PC=-7.90, 95% confidence interval: -12.08, -3.52), and over the range of urinary iodine concentration, the odds of having elevated serum Tg showed a U-shaped curve with elevated Tg at low and high urinary iodine concentrations. Serum Tg may be a useful indicator of population iodine status and a non-specific biomarker of structural and functional thyroid abnormalities in epidemiological studies. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Measures of Thyroid Function among Belarusian Children and Adolescents Exposed to Iodine-131 from the Accident at the Chernobyl Nuclear Plant

    PubMed Central

    Rozhko, Alexander; Hatch, Maureen; Furukawa, Kyoji; Polyanskaya, Olga; McConnell, Robert J.; Nadyrov, Eldar; Petrenko, Sergey; Romanov, George; Yauseyenka, Vasilina; Drozdovitch, Vladimir; Minenko, Viktor; Prokopovich, Alexander; Savasteeva, Irina; Zablotska, Lydia B.; Mabuchi, Kiyohiko; Brenner, Alina V.

    2013-01-01

    Background: Thyroid dysfunction after exposure to low or moderate doses of radioactive iodine-131 (131I) at a young age is a public health concern. However, quantitative data are sparse concerning 131I-related risk of these common diseases. Objective: Our goal was to assess the prevalence of thyroid dysfunction in association with 131I exposure during childhood (≤ 18 years) due to fallout from the Chernobyl accident. Methods: We conducted a cross-sectional analysis of hypothyroidism, hyperthyroidism, autoimmune thyroiditis (AIT), serum concentrations of thyroid-stimulating hormone (TSH), and autoantibodies to thyroperoxidase (ATPO) in relation to measurement-based 131I dose estimates in a Belarusian cohort of 10,827 individuals screened for various thyroid diseases. Results: Mean age at exposure (± SD) was 8.2 ± 5.0 years. Mean (median) estimated 131I thyroid dose was 0.54 (0.23) Gy (range, 0.001–26.6 Gy). We found significant positive associations of 131I dose with hypothyroidism (mainly subclinical and antibody-negative) and serum TSH concentration. The excess odds ratio per 1 Gy for hypothyroidism was 0.34 (95% CI: 0.15, 0.62) and varied significantly by age at exposure and at examination, presence of goiter, and urban/rural residency. We found no evidence of positive associations with antibody-positive hypothyroidism, hyperthyroidism, AIT, or elevated ATPO. Conclusions: The association between 131I dose and hypothyroidism in the Belarusian cohort is consistent with that previously reported for a Ukrainian cohort and strengthens evidence of the effect of environmental 131I exposure during childhood on hypothyroidism, but not other thyroid outcomes. PMID:23651658

  13. Reconstruction of (131)I radioactive contamination in Ukraine caused by the Chernobyl accident using atmospheric transport modelling.

    PubMed

    Talerko, Nikolai

    2005-01-01

    The evaluation of (131)I air and ground contamination field formation in the territory of Ukraine was made using the model of atmospheric transport LEDI (Lagrangian-Eulerian DIffusion model). The (131)I atmospheric transport over the territory of Ukraine was simulated during the first 12 days after the accident (from 26 April to 7 May 1986) using real aerological information and rain measurement network data. The airborne (131)I concentration and ground deposition fields were calculated as the database for subsequent thyroid dose reconstruction for inhabitants of radioactive contaminated regions. The small-scale deposition field variability is assessed using data of (137)Cs detailed measurements in the territory of Ukraine. The obtained results are compared with available data of radioiodine daily deposition measurements made at the network of meteorological stations in Ukraine and data of the assessments of (131)I soil contamination obtained from the (129)I measurements.

  14. Irradiation of members of the general public from radioactive caesium following the Chernobyl reactor accident: Field studies in a highly contaminated area in the Bryansk region, Russia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thornberg, Charlotte

    From 1990 to 1998, estimations of the effective dose due to irradiation from 137Cs and 134Cs were carried out for inhabitants in rural villages in the Bryansk region, Russia. The villages, situated about 180 km from the Chernobyl power plant received deposition of 137Cs in the range 0.9-2.7 MBq m-2 due to the accident in 1986. The body burden of 137,134Cs was estimated from measurements of the urinary concentration of caesium radionuclides, together with in vivo measurements using a portable detector. The external effective dose was estimated from measurements with thermoluminescent (TL)-dosemeters worn by the participants during one month each year. In a case study, the changes in biokinetics of 137Cs during pregnancy was investigated in a woman with an unintended intake of 137Cs via mushrooms grown in the area. During pregnancy the biological half-time of caesium was 54% of that before pregnancy. The ratio of the 137Cs concentration in breast milk (Bq L-1) to that in the mother's body (Bq kg-1) was 15% one month after the child was born. The body burden of 137Cs in the Russian individuals calculated from urine samples showed a good agreement with the body burden estimated from in vivo measurements in the same individuals. Normalisation of the caesium concentration in the urine samples by the use of potassium or creatinine excretion introduced systematic differences and a larger spread in the calculated values of the 137Cs body burden as compared with calculations without normalisation. The yearly effective dose to inhabitants in the Russian villages varied between 1.2 and 2.5 mSv as a mean for all villages between 1991 and 1998 and the internal effective dose was 30-50% of the total effective dose. The external effective dose decreased on average 15% per year, while the internal effective dose varied, depending to a great extent on the availability of mushrooms. The cumulated effective dose for a 70-year period after the accident was calculated to be 100 m

  15. Generalized results of individualized exposure doses reconstruction for the subjects of Ukrainian State Register of persons, affected due to Chernobyl accident.

    PubMed

    Likhtarov, I A; Kovgan, L M; Masiuk, S V; Ivanova, O M; Chepurny, M I; Boyko, Z N; Gerasymenko, V B; Tereshchenko, S A; Kravchenko, I G; Kortushin, G I; Marcenjyk, O D; Gubina, I G

    2015-12-01

    Since 2007, the department of dosimetry of NRCRM has been working for to supply the Ukrainian State Register (SRU) of persons affected due to Chernobyl accident by exposure doses estimations. As of now, the individualization of doses has been performed for nine raions located in Kyiv, Zhytomyr, Rivne and Chernihiv oblasts. The structure of raion-specific models used for the reconstruction of individualized doses was described in detail in the previous 19-th issue of this journal (2014). The choice conditions for persons from the SRU using which for each raion there was formed a contingent of persons for whom the dose could be reconstructed. During the period of 2007-2015, the individualized dose was reconstructed for 244226 persons in 9 raions, representing ~ 58% of all registered in the SRU inhabitants of the raions. The calculation results were transferred to the SRU in formats adapted to the common database structure of the SRU. For each person who satisfied the conditions of selection there were estimated: (1) possible absorbed internal exposure dose of the thyroid by radioiodine in 1986 (assuming that the person in 1986 lived in the same village and was enlisted in the SRU); (2) annual doses of external, internal and total exposure of the whole body for a period of observation in the SRU; (3) total exposure dose of whole body accumulated during the period of observation in the SRU; (4) the total cumulative dose of feasible exposure during the period since 1986 till the decision to be registered in the SRU. There are presented the generalized results of the SRU subjects distribution for different raions in dependence on intervals of doses accumulated at different periods after the accident. The raion matrix tables show the dynamics of accumulation of doses by the SRU subjects both for their stay on the account and for the period of their possible residence registration in the settlement since 1986. The directions for further research to be implemented for

  16. Chernobyl fallout on Alpine glaciers

    SciTech Connect

    Ambach, W.; Rehwald, W.; Blumthaler, M.; Eisner, H.; Brunner, P.

    1989-01-01

    Measurements of the gross beta activity of snow samples from four Alpine glaciers contaminated by radioactive fallout from the Chernobyl nuclear accident and a gamma-spectrum analysis of selected samples are reported. The results are discussed with respect to possible risks to the population from using meltwater from these glaciers as drinking water.

  17. Chernobyl fallout on Alpine glaciers.

    PubMed

    Ambach, W; Rehwald, W; Blumthaler, M; Eisner, H; Brunner, P

    1989-01-01

    Measurements of the gross beta activity of snow samples from four Alpine glaciers contaminated by radioactive fallout from the Chernobyl nuclear accident and a gamma-spectrum analysis of selected samples are reported. The results are discussed with respect to possible risks to the population from using meltwater from these glaciers as drinking water.

  18. [The characteristics of the clinical picture and of the psychotherapy of somatogenically induced neurosis-like disorders in people subjected to ionizing radiation exposure as a result of the accident at the Chernobyl Atomic Electric Power Station].

    PubMed

    Svintsitskiĭ, A S; Bekoeva, S N; Revenok, A A

    1998-12-01

    In a 10-year follow-up the time-related course was studied of neurosis-like disorders in those subjects presenting with digestive abnormalities. The group of examinees was 108 patients--liquidators of the Chernobyl accident who had come to be exposed to the doses of irradiation of the order of 0.7 Gy and higher, persons who had suffered acute radiation sickness. Rise in morbidity is shown. Some principles are suggested of devising rehabilitation measures together with therapeutic ones aimed to correct somatic disorders presenting with concurrent psychoneuronal type problems.

  19. [The transfer of 90Sr and of 137Cs radionuclides in the chain of soil-fodder-animal products in the area contaminated as a consequence of the Chernobyl AES accident].

    PubMed

    Spirin, E V; Aleksakhin, R M; Kalmykov, M V; Ageets, V Iu; Averin, V S; Lazarev, N M; Cavellin, G D; Biesold, H

    2006-01-01

    The database on 137Cs and or 90Sr transfer factors in the soil-fodder-animal products chain compiled in the framework of the project "Radioecological Consequences of the Chernobyl Accident" under the French-German Initiative was analyzed. The 137Cs transfer factors were determined into 10 fodder types for farm animals. The 137Cs and 90Sr transfer from daily diet to milk is practically independent from milk yield and season and is about 0.83% and 0.16%. 137Cs transfer factor into beef (adult animals) is about to 2.4% from the daily uptake with fodder per 1 kg meat.

  20. Chernobyl source term estimation

    SciTech Connect

    Gudiksen, P.H.; Harvey, T.F.; Lange, R.

    1990-09-01

    The Chernobyl source term available for long-range transport was estimated by integration of radiological measurements with atmospheric dispersion modeling and by reactor core radionuclide inventory estimation in conjunction with WASH-1400 release fractions associated with specific chemical groups. The model simulations revealed that the radioactive cloud became segmented during the first day, with the lower section heading toward Scandinavia and the upper part heading in a southeasterly direction with subsequent transport across Asia to Japan, the North Pacific, and the west coast of North America. By optimizing the agreement between the observed cloud arrival times and duration of peak concentrations measured over Europe, Japan, Kuwait, and the US with the model predicted concentrations, it was possible to derive source term estimates for those radionuclides measured in airborne radioactivity. This was extended to radionuclides that were largely unmeasured in the environment by performing a reactor core radionuclide inventory analysis to obtain release fractions for the various chemical transport groups. These analyses indicated that essentially all of the noble gases, 60% of the radioiodines, 40% of the radiocesium, 10% of the tellurium and about 1% or less of the more refractory elements were released. These estimates are in excellent agreement with those obtained on the basis of worldwide deposition measurements. The Chernobyl source term was several orders of magnitude greater than those associated with the Windscale and TMI reactor accidents. However, the {sup 137}Cs from the Chernobyl event is about 6% of that released by the US and USSR atmospheric nuclear weapon tests, while the {sup 131}I and {sup 90}Sr released by the Chernobyl accident was only about 0.1% of that released by the weapon tests. 13 refs., 2 figs., 7 tabs.

  1. US defensive operations against Libya and the nuclear accident at Chernobyl. Markup before the Committee on Foreign Affairs, House of Representatives, Ninety-Ninth Congress, Second Session on H. Res. 424 and H. Res 440, May 1, 1986

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1986-01-01

    The House Foreign Affairs Committee met to mark up two resolutions: H. Res. 424 and H. Res. 440. H. Res. 424 thanks the United Kingdom for its assistance in the April 14, 1986 operation against Libya. Despite objections to the raid and to including the British, as well as questions about the quality of the US response and about the President's compliance with the Constitution and the War Powers Resolution, the resolution passed. H. Res. 440 expresses sympathy to the victims of the Chernobyl accident and asks the Soviet Union to relax restrictions on communications and the transfer of whatever technology and assistance will be helpful. It also criticizes the Soviet handling of information about the accident. An amendment strengthened the wording of the criticism, and the resolution passed. The report includes the committee discussion and the tests of the two resolutions.

  2. [Prognosis of dynamics and risk of exceeding permissible levels of 137Cs and 90Sr contents in fish in the Kiev Reservoir at the late phase of the Chernobyl accident].

    PubMed

    Homutinin, Iu V; Kashparov, V A; Kuz'menko, A V; Pavliuchenko, V V

    2013-01-01

    On the basis of the radionuclide specific activity measurements made on 832 samples of fish in 2009-2011 and taking into account literature data, the parameters of the stochastic model have been derived to describe the 137Cs and 90Sr contents in typical commercial fish species in the Kiev Reservoir at the late phase of the Chernobyl accident, including: statistical variability, seasonal changes and monotonous long-term trends. At any fixed moment of the year the standard deviations of logarithms of the 137Cs and 90Sr specific activities in carnivorous and benthophage fish species do not reliably differ, making up at average 0.4. The maximum vari- ation of the 137Cs specific activity (a four-fold decrease from April to November) was observed in pike. The obtained values of the ecological half-life periods for 137Cs and 90Sr (1.3-14 years) in fish of the Kiev reservoir in 2002-2012 were significantly lower than both the radioactive decay periods and the estimates of the IAEA Chernobyl Forum. Based on the obtained model parameters, the dynamics of the 137Cs and 90Sr specific ac- tivities in main commercial fish of the Kiev reservoir has been described and the risk of exceeding the permis- sible levels of these radionuclides in fish at the late phase of the Chernobyl accident has been estimated. Now the risk of catching fish with the specific activities of 137Cs and 90Sr above the permissible levels (150 Bq/kg and 35 Bq/kg, respectively) does not exceed 10% (except perch in the spring spawning period that is banned for fishing in Ukraine). Corresponding risks for roach, white bream and rudd are less than 0.1%.

  3. [The biological effects in animals related to the accident at the Chernobyl Atomic Electric Power Station. 2. The state of bone marrow hematopoiesis in rats].

    PubMed

    Pinchuk, L B; Serkiz, Ia I; Rodionova, N K; Pukhova, G G; Druzhina, N A; Koval', G N; Lipskaia, A I; Maslennyĭ, V N; Malinari, S T

    1991-01-01

    It has been shown that rats born during the first months after the Chernobyl A.P.S. disaster exhibit essential changes in the peripheral blood and bone marrow haemopoiesis throughout the entire lifetime. Rats brought up in Chernobyl from the age of three months on display even more pronounced changes. It is assumed that the changes in the haemopoiesis develop due to the continuous influence of low-level radiation of different quality and are attributed to the effect of the incorporated radionuclides.

  4. Risk of hematological malignancies among Chernobyl liquidators

    PubMed Central

    Kesminiene, Ausrele; Evrard, Anne-Sophie; Ivanov, Viktor K.; Malakhova, Irina V.; Kurtinaitis, Juozas; Stengrevics, Aivars; Tekkel, Mare; Anspaugh, Lynn R.; Bouville, André; Chekin, Sergei; Chumak, Vadim V.; Drozdovitch, Vladimir; Gapanovich, Vladimir; Golovanov, Ivan; Hubert, Phillip; Illichev, Sergei V.; Khait, Svetlana E.; Krjuchkov, Viktor P.; Maceika, Evaldas; Maksyoutov, Marat; Mirkhaidarov, Anatoly K.; Polyakov, Semion; Shchukina, Natalia; Tenet, Vanessa; Tserakhovich, Tatyana I.; Tsykalo, Aleksandr; Tukov, Aleksandr R.; Cardis, Elisabeth

    2010-01-01

    A case-control study of hematological malignancies was conducted among Chernobyl liquidators (accident recovery workers) from Belarus, Russia and Baltic countries in order to assess the effect of low-to-medium dose protracted radiation exposures on the relative risk of these diseases. The study was nested within cohorts of liquidators who had worked in 1986–87 around the Chernobyl plant. 117 cases (69 leukemia, 34 non-Hodgkin Lymphoma (NHL) and 14 other malignancies of lymphoid and hematopoietic tissue) and 481 matched controls were included in the study. Individual dose to the bone marrow and uncertainties were estimated for each subject. The main analyses were restricted to 70 cases (40 leukemia, 20 NHL and 10 other) and their 287 matched controls with reliable information on work in the Chernobyl area. Most subjects received very low doses (median 13 mGy). For all diagnoses combined, a significantly elevated OR was seen at doses of 200 mGy and above. The Excess Relative Risk (ERR) per 100 mGy was 0.60 (90% confidence interval (CI): −0.02, 2.35). The corresponding estimate for leukemia excluding chronic lymphoid leukemia (CLL) was 0.50 (90%CI −0.38, 5.7). It is slightly higher than, but statistically compatible with, those estimated from a-bomb survivors and recent low dose-rate studies. Although sensitivity analyses showed generally similar results, we cannot rule out the possibility that biases and uncertainties could have led to over or underestimation of the risk in this study. PMID:19138033

  5. Risk of hematological malignancies among Chernobyl liquidators.

    PubMed

    Kesminiene, Ausrele; Evrard, Anne-Sophie; Ivanov, Viktor K; Malakhova, Irina V; Kurtinaitis, Juozas; Stengrevics, Aivars; Tekkel, Mare; Anspaugh, Lynn R; Bouville, André; Chekin, Sergei; Chumak, Vadim V; Drozdovitch, Vladimir; Gapanovich, Vladimir; Golovanov, Ivan; Hubert, Phillipe; Illichev, Sergei V; Khait, Svetlana E; Kryuchkov, Viktor P; Maceika, Evaldas; Maksyoutov, Marat; Mirkhaidarov, Anatoly K; Polyakov, Semion; Shchukina, Natalia; Tenet, Vanessa; Tserakhovich, Tatyana I; Tsykalo, Aleksandr; Tukov, Aleksandr R; Cardis, Elisabeth

    2008-12-01

    A case-control study of hematological malignancies was conducted among Chernobyl liquidators (accident recovery workers) from Belarus, Russia and Baltic countries to assess the effect of low- to medium-dose protracted radiation exposures on the relative risk of these diseases. The study was nested within cohorts of liquidators who had worked around the Chernobyl plant in 1986-1987. A total of 117 cases [69 leukemia, 34 non-Hodgkin lymphoma (NHL) and 14 other malignancies of lymphoid and hematopoietic tissue] and 481 matched controls were included in the study. Individual dose to the bone marrow and uncertainties were estimated for each subject. The main analyses were restricted to 70 cases (40 leukemia, 20 NHL and 10 other) and their 287 matched controls with reliable information on work in the Chernobyl area. Most subjects received very low doses (median 13 mGy). For all diagnoses combined, a significantly elevated OR was seen at doses of 200 mGy and above. The excess relative risk (ERR) per 100 mGy was 0.60 [90% confidence interval (CI) -0.02, 2.35]. The corresponding estimate for leukemia excluding chronic lymphoid leukemia (CLL) was 0.50 (90% CI -0.38, 5.7). It is slightly higher than but statistically compatible with those estimated from A-bomb survivors and recent low-dose-rate studies. Although sensitivity analyses showed generally similar results, we cannot rule out the possibility that biases and uncertainties could have led to over- or underestimation of the risk in this study.

  6. Ten years after Chernobyl

    SciTech Connect

    Becker, K.

    1996-12-31

    As was amply demonstrated during the EU/IAEA/WHO Summing-up-Conference in Vienna, Austria, April 8-12, 1996, the radiological consequences of the Chernobyl accident were, fortunately, not as serious as frequently presented in the media: 28 people died from acute radiation syndrome in 1986, 14 more of possibly radiation-related causes since. Of the <1000 thyroid cancers in children, 90 to 95% are curable. There have so far been no other demonstrable increases in the former Soviet Union, as well as in Western Europe, of leukemias, solid cancers, or genetic defects, nor are any to be expected in the future. Even among the {open_quotes}liquidators{close_quotes} with doses {approximately}100 mSv, of the {approximately}150 additional expected leukemias during the 10 yr after the accident, none have been observed. The economical, social, and political consequences, however, both in the former Soviet Union and in Western Europe, have been very substantial. Whole countries developed an hysterical `radiation sickness.` As A. Merkel, the German Minister of Environment and Reactor Safety, who chaired the conference, pointed out, `the radiation sensitivity of societies far exceeds that of individuals.` It is obvious that important groups in Ukraine, Belaurus, and Russia try to blame a large fraction of all economic, social, and health problems during the last decade, which are substantial ({approx} 6 yr less life expectancy, twice the homicides and traffic deaths, increased alcoholism, and so forth), on radiation of the Chernobyl accident in an effort to attract more support. Western scientists refute such claims but admit large non-radiation-related problems caused by the accident.

  7. Cell damage seen from Chernobyl

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-07-24

    The 30 kilometer radius forbidden zone around the Chernobyl atomic plant serves as a sobering reminder of the world's worst nuclear accident. But for former Soviet biologists, it's also a unique natural laboratory. And one scientist, Nadejda Gulaya of Kiev's Pallaguine Institute of Biochemistry, has been doing studies that she claims offer surprising evidence of Chernobyl's after-effects. Prolonged exposure to radioactive fallout from the 1986 accident, she says, has caused damage to cell membranes in both animals and humans. For the past year, Gulaya has been comparing tissues from animals such as mink, pigs, and rodents inhabiting the Chernobyl area with those from other parts of Ukraine. Her conclusion: Exposure to radiation has, in many cases, caused alterations to membrane phospholipids. These changes, are similar to those that disrupt cellular metabolism following exposure to oxidizing free radicals. Gulaya also has preliminary data from human studies. She claims to have found similar alterations in the neurons of people who have died since being exposed to Chernobyl radiation. That leads her to speculate that the frequent psychiatric disorders may not just be from mental stress or radiophobia, but might reflect actual damage to the central nervous system.

  8. Using cost/risk procedures to establish recovery criteria following a nuclear reactor accident.

    PubMed

    Tawil, J J; Strenge, D L

    1987-02-01

    In the event of a major accidental release of radionuclides at a nuclear power plant, large populated areas could become seriously contaminated. Local officials would be responsible for establishing radiation recovery criteria that would permit the evacuated population to return safely to their jobs and homes. The range of acceptable criteria could imply variations in property losses in the billions of dollars. Given the likely public concern over the health consequences and the enormity of the potential property losses, a cost/risk analysis can provide important input to establishing the recovery criteria. This paper describes procedures for conducting a cost/risk analysis of a site radiologically contaminated by a nuclear power plant accident. The procedures are illustrated by analyzing a hypothetically contaminated site, using software developed for determining the property and health effects of major reactor accidents.

  9. From Devastation to Recovery and Revival in the Aftermath of Fukushima's Nuclear Power Plants Accident.

    PubMed

    Ohto, Hitoshi; Yasumura, Seiji; Maeda, Masaharu; Kainuma, Hiroshi; Fujimori, Keiya; Nollet, Kenneth E

    2017-03-01

    Japan's earthquake, tsunami, and subsequent Fukushima nuclear power plant accident in March 2011 forced the evacuation of 185 000 residents. Psychological and social impacts exacerbated by long-term evacuation and widespread rumors have influenced residents' physical and mental health, despite the fact that no direct fatalities occurred from radiation exposure. However, during the 5 years following the accident, steady recovery in industrial and economic activity has lessened previously widespread, deeply rooted stigma and self-stigma among a significant number of affected victims. More than 21 000 of 62 800 people who evacuated from Fukushima are gradually returning, and concurrently, Fukushima's economic and social recovery are progressing, as can be seen from remarkable increases in residential construction, recovering agricultural production, job growth, and industrial output. Although post-disaster interventions such as seminars and dialogues with residents are credited with building resilience, a significant proportion of people in the area have depressive tendencies and loss of purpose.

  10. Reporting on Radiation: A Content Analysis of Chernobyl Coverage.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Friedman, Sharon M.; And Others

    1987-01-01

    Evaluates how well the media guided readers and viewers through the Chernobyl disaster. Concludes that the press and television did not provide enough radiation and risk information in their coverage of the Chernobyl accident, but what was provided was appropriate, even-handed, and conservative. (NKA)

  11. Reporting on Radiation: A Content Analysis of Chernobyl Coverage.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Friedman, Sharon M.; And Others

    1987-01-01

    Evaluates how well the media guided readers and viewers through the Chernobyl disaster. Concludes that the press and television did not provide enough radiation and risk information in their coverage of the Chernobyl accident, but what was provided was appropriate, even-handed, and conservative. (NKA)

  12. [The autonomic regulation of the cardiovascular system in subjects with the autonomic dystonia syndrome subjected to ionizing radiation exposure as a result of the accident at the Chernobyl Atomic Electric Power Station].

    PubMed

    Niagu, A I; Zazimko, R N

    1995-01-01

    180 males in the age of 21-50, all the participants of Chernobyl accident consequences liquidation were examined. In all individuals vegetative dystonia (VD) syndrome was diagnosed (total radiation doses 0.1-1.0 Grey according to D. Erwin method). It was established that VD syndrome differed in these persons by pronounced stages of disorders manifestation as well as by polymorphism of vegetative disturbances. These findings testify central and peripheral vegetative nervous system parts involvement. In 40.2% of cases in individuals which were examined in rest and in 56.2% after dosed physical loading the functional disorders of vegetative cardiovascular system regulation of vagal type mainly (76.5%) were revealed. Clear correlation was not observed between vegetative disorders and radiation dose value. The estimation of contribution of each of the possible pathogenic factors (exactly stressogenic, radioactive and others) in vegetative disturbances development is not possible now.

  13. [The adaptive potentials of those who worked in the cleanup of the aftermath of the accident at the Chernobyl Atomic Electric Power Station under the influence of different treatment methods].

    PubMed

    Zozulia, I S; Iurchenko, A V

    2000-01-01

    A comprehensive evaluation was done in 162 patients-liquidators of the Chernobyl accident. Of these, 80 percent were diagnosed as having stage I and II dyscirculatory encephalopathy (DE), 20 percent were in stage III. It is shown that DE progression is caused by great strain on and breakdown of autoregulatory mechanisms of different biological systems (vascular, central nervous and vegetative, hormonal), and of central regulatory mechanisms as well. Under certain conditions there may occur their breakdown, with syncopal states, crises, and even insults developing in its wake. Treatment and rehabilitation of DE liquidators with pyracetam, vinpocetine, cerebrolysine with magne B6, and phytosorbents (spirulina, quercitrol, and vitapectine) lead to reconditioning of central and autoregulatory compensatory-and-adaptive mechanisms, long-lasting remission, provide complication prophylaxis and promote work activity.

  14. Effective half-lives of 134Cs and 137Cs in reindeer meat and in reindeer herders in Finland after the Chernobyl accident and the ensuing effective radiation doses to humans.

    PubMed

    Leppänen, Ari-Pekka; Muikku, Maarit; Jaakkola, Timo; Lehto, Jukka; Rahola, Tua; Rissanen, Kristina; Tillander, Michael

    2011-05-01

    Monitoring of 137Cs in reindeer herders and in reindeer meat in Finnish Lapland began in the early 1960s and has continued until today. The monitoring of 137Cs in reindeer herders and in reindeer meat in the Halla area began after the Chernobyl accident. In this study, reindeer herders together with reindeer meat samples were monitored for gamma-emitting radionuclides from two separate areas in the Finnish reindeer management area, Northern Finland and the Halla area. The effective half-lives determined for 137Cs in reindeer meat were from 3.0 ± 1.7 to 5.1 ± 0.5 y. For 134Cs, the observed effective half-lives in reindeer meat were from 1.3 ± 0.2 to 1.5 ± 0.1 y. The effective half-lives among male and female reindeer herders in Northern Finland were 5.5 ± 1.3 and 4.4 ± 0.9 y, respectively, for the body-burden of 137Cs. In the Halla reindeer herding cooperative, located to the south of Finnish Lapland in the province of Kuusamo, the effective half-lives in the reindeer herders were shorter, about 1-2 y. The 134Cs × 137Cs-1 ratios decreased more rapidly in reindeer meat and also in humans in the Halla area than in Northern Finland. This implies faster removal of Chernobyl-derived cesium from the reindeer-man food chain in the Halla area. The contribution of Chernobyl fallout (percent) in reindeer meat was 70% and 80% in the Paistunturi and Ivalo cooperatives, respectively, and 50% and 80% in the western and eastern part of Halla cooperative, respectively. In humans, the contribution of Chernobyl fallout to 137Cs in whole-body content was 60% in Northern Finland and 80% in the Halla area. The mean committed effective doses of Cs for reindeer herders in Finnish Lapland decreased from 0.36 mSv y-1 in 1987 to 0.053 mSv y-1 in 2005.

  15. Higher cancer risk continues after Chernobyl

    Cancer.gov

    Nearly 25 years after the accident at the Chernobyl nuclear power plant in Ukraine, exposure to radioactive iodine-131(I-131, a radioactive isotope) from fallout may be responsible for thyroid cancers that are still occurring among people who lived in the Chernobyl area and were children or adolescents at the time of the accident, researchers say. An international team of researchers led by the NCI found a clear dose-response relationship, in which higher absorption of radiation from I-131 led to an increased risk for thyroid cancer that has not seemed to diminish over time.

  16. Reassessing Nuclear Power: The Fallout from Chernobyl. Worldwatch Paper 75.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Flavin, Christopher

    The Chernobyl nuclear plant explosion on April 26, 1986, was the world's most serious nuclear power accident to date. This document examines the accident's impact on the world from a variety of perspectives. The first major section of the book provides a step-by-step account of the accident itself, beginning with the special testing that…

  17. Reassessing Nuclear Power: The Fallout from Chernobyl. Worldwatch Paper 75.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Flavin, Christopher

    The Chernobyl nuclear plant explosion on April 26, 1986, was the world's most serious nuclear power accident to date. This document examines the accident's impact on the world from a variety of perspectives. The first major section of the book provides a step-by-step account of the accident itself, beginning with the special testing that…

  18. Earthshots: Satellite images of environmental change – Chernobyl, Ukraine

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    ,

    2013-01-01

    The Landsat 5 image from April 29, 1986, was the first satellite image of the accident. The data from Landsat were used to help confirm that an explosion had happened at Chernobyl and that the plant had been shut down.

  19. Modeling the Dispersal and Deposition of Radionuclides: Lessons from Chernobyl.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    ApSimon, H. M.; And Others

    1988-01-01

    Described are theoretical models that simulate the dispersion of radionuclides on local and global scales following the accident at the Chernobyl nuclear power plant. Discusses the application of these results to nuclear weapons fallout. (CW)

  20. Modeling the Dispersal and Deposition of Radionuclides: Lessons from Chernobyl.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    ApSimon, H. M.; And Others

    1988-01-01

    Described are theoretical models that simulate the dispersion of radionuclides on local and global scales following the accident at the Chernobyl nuclear power plant. Discusses the application of these results to nuclear weapons fallout. (CW)

  1. [The medical management of patients with neurological disturbances who had participated in the elimination of the effects of the Chernobyl accident].

    PubMed

    Nikolenko, V Iu

    2003-01-01

    Effects have been studied of the drug arlevert on the nervous system and vestibular function in miners-liquidators (n = 28). The benefits derived by patients from a course administration of the drug for up to a fortnight included improvement of their clinical condition, decrease in the tone of cerebral vessels, slight degree of vestibular disturbances, shortened latent period of vestibular evoked potentials. Arlevert can be recommended as treatment of vestibular disorders in liquidators of Chernobyl disaster.

  2. Summary of Chernobyl followup research activities

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-06-01

    In NUREG-1251, ``Implications of the Accident at Chernobyl for Safety Regulation of Commercial Nuclear Power Plants in the United States,`` April 1989, the NRC staff concluded that no immediate changes in NRC`s regulations regarding design or operation of US commercial reactors were needed; however, it recommended that certain issues be considered further. NRC`s Chernobyl followup research program consisted of the research tasks undertaken in response to the recommendations in NUREG-1251. It included 23 tasks that addressed potential lessons to be learned from the Chernobyl accident. This report presents summaries of NRC`s Chernobyl followup research tasks. For each task, the Chernobyl-related issues are indicated, the work is described, and the staff`s findings and conclusions are presented. More detailed reports concerning the work are referenced where applicable. This report closes out NRC`s Chernobyl followup research program as such, but additional research will be conducted on some issues as needed. The report includes remarks concerning significant further activity with respect to the issues addressed.

  3. Summary of Chernobyl followup research activities

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-06-01

    In NUREG-1251, Implications of the Accident at Chernobyl for Safety Regulation of Commercial Nuclear Power Plants in the United States,'' April 1989, the NRC staff concluded that no immediate changes in NRC's regulations regarding design or operation of US commercial reactors were needed; however, it recommended that certain issues be considered further. NRC's Chernobyl followup research program consisted of the research tasks undertaken in response to the recommendations in NUREG-1251. It included 23 tasks that addressed potential lessons to be learned from the Chernobyl accident. This report presents summaries of NRC's Chernobyl followup research tasks. For each task, the Chernobyl-related issues are indicated, the work is described, and the staff's findings and conclusions are presented. More detailed reports concerning the work are referenced where applicable. This report closes out NRC's Chernobyl followup research program as such, but additional research will be conducted on some issues as needed. The report includes remarks concerning significant further activity with respect to the issues addressed.

  4. Analysis of thyroid malignant pathologic findings identified during 3 rounds of screening (1997-2008) of a cohort of children and adolescents from belarus exposed to radioiodines after the Chernobyl accident.

    PubMed

    Zablotska, Lydia B; Nadyrov, Eldar A; Rozhko, Alexander V; Gong, Zhihong; Polyanskaya, Olga N; McConnell, Robert J; O'Kane, Patrick; Brenner, Alina V; Little, Mark P; Ostroumova, Evgenia; Bouville, Andre; Drozdovitch, Vladimir; Minenko, Viktor; Demidchik, Yuri; Nerovnya, Alexander; Yauseyenka, Vassilina; Savasteeva, Irina; Nikonovich, Sergey; Mabuchi, Kiyohiko; Hatch, Maureen

    2015-02-01

    Recent studies of children and adolescents who were exposed to radioactive iodine-131 (I-131) after the 1986 Chernobyl nuclear accident in Ukraine exhibited a significant dose-related increase in the risk of thyroid cancer, but the association of radiation doses with tumor histologic and morphologic features is not clear. A cohort of 11,664 individuals in Belarus who were aged ≤18 years at the time of the accident underwent 3 cycles of thyroid screening during 1997 to 2008. I-131 thyroid doses were estimated from individual thyroid activity measurements taken within 2 months after the accident and from dosimetric questionnaire data. Demographic, clinical, and tumor pathologic characteristics of the patients with thyroid cancer were analyzed using 1-way analysis of variance, chi-square tests or Fisher exact tests, and logistic regression. In total, 158 thyroid cancers were identified as a result of screening. The majority of patients had T1a and T1b tumors (93.7%), with many positive regional lymph nodes (N1; 60.6%) but few distant metastases (M1; <1%). Higher I-131 doses were associated with higher frequency of solid and diffuse sclerosing variants of thyroid cancer (P < .01) and histologic features of cancer aggressiveness, such as lymphatic vessel invasion, intrathyroidal infiltration, and multifocality (all P < .03). Latency was not correlated with radiation dose. Fifty-two patients with self-reported thyroid cancers which were diagnosed before 1997 were younger at the time of the accident and had a higher percentage of solid variant cancers compared with patients who had screening-detected thyroid cancers (all P < .0001). I-131 thyroid radiation doses were associated with a significantly greater frequency of solid and diffuse sclerosing variants of thyroid cancer and various features of tumor aggressiveness. © 2014 American Cancer Society.

  5. Analysis of thyroid malignant pathological findings identified during three rounds of screening (1997-2008) of a Belarusian cohort of children and adolescents exposed to radioiodines after the Chernobyl accident

    PubMed Central

    Zablotska, Lydia; Nadyrov, Eldar; Rozhko, Alexander; Gong, Zhihong; Polyanskaya, Olga; McConnell, Robert; O'Kane, Patrick; Brenner, Alina; Little, Mark P.; Ostroumova, Evgenia; Bouville, Andre; Drozdovitch, Vladimir; Minenko, Viktor; Demidchik, Yuri; Nerovnya, Alexander; Yauseyenka, Vassilina; Savasteeva, Irina; Nikonovich, Sergey; Mabuchi, Kiyohiko; Hatch, Maureen

    2015-01-01

    Background Recent studies of children and adolescents exposed to radioactive iodine-131 (I-131) after the 1986 Chernobyl nuclear accident in Ukraine showed significant dose-related increase in the risk of thyroid cancer, but the association of radiation doses with tumor histological and morphological features is not clear. Methods A cohort of 11,664 individuals in Belarus ≤18 years at the time of the accident underwent three cycles of thyroid screening in 1997-2008. I-131 thyroid doses were estimated from individual thyroid activity measurements taken within two months after the accident and dosimetric data from questionnaires. Demographic, clinical and pathological characteristics of thyroid cancer cases were analyzed using one-way analysis of variance, chi-square or Fisher's exact tests, and logistic regression. Results As a result of screening, 158 thyroid cancers were identified. The majority of cases had T1a and T1b tumors (93.7%), with many regional N1 (60.6%) but few distant M1 (<1%) metastases. Higher I-131 doses were associated with higher frequency of solid or diffuse sclerosing variants of thyroid cancer (P<0.01) and histological features of cancer aggressiveness, such as lymphatic vessel invasion, intrathyroidal infiltration, and multifocality (all P<0.03). Latency was not correlated with radiation dose. Fifty-two cases of self-reported thyroid cancers diagnosed prior to 1997 were younger at the time of the accident and had a higher percentage of solid variant cancers compared to screening-detected cases (all P<0.0001). Conclusions I-131 thyroid radiation doses were associated with significantly higher frequency of solid or diffuse sclerosing variants of thyroid cancer and various features of tumor aggressiveness. PMID:25351557

  6. MELCOR Simulation of the TMI-2 Severe Accident and Initial Recovery Phases

    SciTech Connect

    Haste, T.; Birchley, J.; Cazzoli, E.; Vitazkova, J.

    2006-07-01

    MELCOR has become the preferred code package within the Swiss nuclear community for severe accident analysis of nuclear power plants, on account of its integrated systems-level approach and validation against experiments and more detailed codes. The present work extends previous MELCOR analysis at PSI from when a site emergency was declared, 18000 s, through to 70000 s, a point where recovery actions were initiated that eventually proved sufficient to restore the reactor to a safe and stable state. It arises out of a programme to assess MELCOR independently using empirical data consistent with the recommendations of the OECD/CSNI validation matrix for core degradation codes. It is the first successful attempt to simulate the whole plant sequence through to the recovery phase. The calculations were performed with code version 1.8.5RD, starting with the model for phases 1 to 4 reported at ICAPP-05. This was extended with a representation of the fission product release and transport pathways, and of the containment, as well as for the extended time period analysed, the so-called phase 5. Reference was made to original sources to obtain the appropriate time-dependent boundary conditions. This paper compares the results of the calculations with observed and deduced data for major accident signatures such as primary system pressure, hot leg temperatures; liquid levels in the vessel and in the pressurizer, and fission product release. The results show that the code can give a credible account of the accident, when reasonable assumptions are made regarding the input where uncertainties exist. The analysis therefore supports the use of the MELCOR-based strategy for severe accident plant transient analysis in Switzerland. Finally, observations are made regarding recent improvements in the code, on which further assessment will concentrate. (authors)

  7. Modelling atmospheric dispersal of the Chernobyl release across Europe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Apsimon, H. M.; Wilson, J. J. N.

    1987-12-01

    At the time of the Chernobyl accident little was known about the magnitude and time pattern of the release from the damaged reactor. This paper describes the detective work done in the weeks following the accident to assess the release and its dispersal across Europe; also calculations done since the USSR presentations in Vienna at the end of August 1986 and some estimates of longer term collective dose commitment. To conclude some general remarks are made about the implications of the Chernobyl accident for technical support in emergency procedures for any future nuclear accident.

  8. Agricultural recovery of a formerly radioactive area: II. Systematic proteomic characterization of flax seed development in the remediated Chernobyl area.

    PubMed

    Klubicová, Katarína; Danchenko, Maksym; Skultety, Ludovit; Berezhna, Valentyna V; Hricová, Andrea; Rashydov, Namik M; Hajduch, Martin

    2011-08-12

    Molecular characterization of crop plants grown in remediated, formerly radioactive, areas could establish a framework for future agricultural use of these areas. Recently, we have established a quantitative reference map for mature flax seed proteins (Linum usitatissimum L.) harvested from a remediated plot in Chernobyl town. Herein we describe results from our ongoing studies of this subject, and provide a proteomics-based characterization of developing flax seeds harvested from same field. A quantitative approach, based on 2-dimensional electrophoresis (2-DE) and tandem mass spectrometry, yielded expression profiles for 379 2-DE spots through seed development. Despite the paucity of genomic resources for flax, the identity for 102 proteins was reliably determined. These proteins were sorted into 11 metabolic functional classes. Proteins of unknown function comprise the largest group, and displayed a pattern of decreased abundance throughout seed development. Analysis of the composite expression profiles for metabolic protein classes revealed specific expression patterns during seed development. For example, there was an overall decrease in abundance of the glycolytic enzymes during seed development. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. [The epidemiological analysis of monitoring of the immune status in liquidators of consequences of the Chernobyl accident for early identification of risk groups and diagnostics of oncological diseases. Report 1].

    PubMed

    Oradovskaia, I V; Pashchenkova, Iu G; Feoktistov, V V; Nikonova, M F; Vikulov, G Kh; Bozheskaia, N V; Smirnova, N N

    2011-01-01

    Ionizing radiation is one of major factors of risk of oncological diseases. A question about the frequency of malignant neoplasms (MN) and their early identification in the liquidators of consequences of the Chernobyl accident remains opened. In the present work, the results of long-term immunological monitoring of the liquidators of consequences of the failure at the Chernobyl Nuclear Power Plant (ChN PP) living in the Northwest region of Russia are analyzed; we also heve made an attempt to reveal the predictors of oncological diseases in this group of individuals. The frequency of the newly revealed MN cases in a cohort of the persons who took part in liquidation of consequences of the ChNPP failure and were followed-up in 1999-2009, has made up 89 cases per 1005 persons (8.856%), which somewhat exceeds general population indicators. Regarding the frequency of separate MN localizations, lung cancer, cancer of stomach and cancer of prostate gland predominated, which corresponds to the world's tendency of MN prevalence. It has been established that as early as 1-3 years before diagnosis of MN is confirmed in liquidators, a number of changes in the immune status comes to light: drop in percentage of CD3+ and CD4(+)-T-lymphocytes, B-lymphocytes to a lesser extent, decrease in the CD4+/CD8+ index, increase of the relative and absolute content of CD16(+)-lymphocytes, increase of absolute content of CD8(+)-T-lymphocytes, prevalence of CD3+16/56+(NK-T) cell over CD3-16/56+(NK) cells, rise of the activity of phagocytes. Patients with the presence of one or several of the above-mentioned signs should be attributed to the MN risk group for determination of tumor markers, thorough examination and dynamic observation.

  10. [Comparative analysis of semiotic shifts, established by LCS of blood plasma from random samples of studied subjects from the zone of the Chernobyl accident, "Ural Radiation Trace", and collaborators from St. Petersburg Institute of Nuclear Physics of the Russian Academy of Sciences].

    PubMed

    Ternovoĭ, K S; Selezneva, T N; Akleev, A V; Pashkov, I A; Noskin, L A; Klopov, N V; Noskin, V A; Starodub, N F

    1998-01-01

    Using the developed "semiotic" classifier of laser correlation spectra of blood plasma the authors have carried out the verification of organism states of patients from the zone of Chernobyl accident, "Ural radiation trace" and collaborators from Sanct-Petersbourg Institute of Nuclear Physics. An analysis of results obtained using accidental selections which differed as to the character of radiation injury evidences for high informativeness of "semiotic" classifier of laser correlation spectra of blood plasma.

  11. Introduction: geoscientific knowledgebase of Chernobyl and Fukushima

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamauchi, Masatoshi; Voitsekhovych, Oleg; Korobova, Elena; Stohl, Andreas; Wotawa, Gerhard; Kita, Kazuyuki; Aoyama, Michio; Yoshida, Naohiro

    2013-04-01

    Radioactive contamination after the Chernobyl (1986) and Fukushima (2011) accidents is a multi-disciplinary geoscience problem. Just this session (GI1.4) contains presentations of (i) atmospheric transport for both short and long distances, (ii) aerosol physics and chemistry, (ii) geophysical measurement method and logistics, (iv) inversion method to estimate the geophysical source term and decay, (v) transport, migration, and sedimentation in the surface water system, (vi) transport and sedimentation in the ocean, (vii) soil chemistry and physics, (viii) forest ecosystem, (ix) risk assessments, which are inter-related to each other. Because of rareness of a severe accident like Chernobyl and Fukushima, the Chernobyl's 27 years experience is the only knowledgebase that provides a good guidance for the Fukushima case in understanding the physical/chemical processes related to the environmental radioactive contamination and in providing future prospectives, e.g., what we should do next for the observation/remediation. Unfortunately, the multi-disciplinary nature of the radioactive contamination problem makes it very difficult for a single scientist to obtain the overview of all geoscientific aspects of the Chernobyl experience. The aim of this introductory talk is to give a comprehensive knowledge of the wide geoscientific aspects of the Chernobyl contamination to Fukushima-related geoscience community.

  12. Vertical distribution of 137Cs in alluvial soils of the Lokna River floodplain (Tula oblast) long after the Chernobyl accident and its simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mamikhin, S. V.; Golosov, V. N.; Paramonova, T. A.; Shamshurina, E. N.; Ivanov, M. M.

    2016-12-01

    Profiles of vertical 137Cs distribution in alluvial meadow soils on the low and medium levels of the Lokna River floodplain (central part of the Plavsk radioactive spot in Tula oblast) 28 years after the Chernobyl fallout have been studied. A significant increase in the 137Cs pool is revealed on the low floodplain areas compared to the soils of interfluves due to the accumulation of alluvium, which hampers the reduction of the total radionuclide pool in alluvial soils because of radioactive decay. The rate of alluvium accumulation in the soil on the medium floodplain level is lower by three times on average. An imitation prognostic model has been developed, which considers the flooding and climatic conditions in the region under study. Numerical experiments have quantitatively confirmed the deciding role of low-mobile forms in the migration of maximum 137Cs content along the soil profile in the absence of manifested erosion-accumulation processes.

  13. Projected global health impacts from severe nuclear accidents: Conversion of projected doses to risks on a global scale: Experience from Chernobyl releases

    SciTech Connect

    Catlin, R.J.; Goldman, M.; Anspaugh, L.R.

    1987-01-01

    Best estimates of possible additional health effects were projected for the Northern Hemisphere: (1) over the next 50 years, up to 28 thousand radiation-induced fatal cancers, compared to an expected 600 million cancer deaths from natural or spontaneous causes; (2) over the next year, up to 700 additional cases of severe mental retardation, compared to a normal expectation of 340 thousand cases; and (3) in the first generation, up to 1.9 thousand radiation-induced genetic disorders, compared to 180 million naturally-occurring cases. The possibility of zero health effects at very low doses and dose rates cannot be excluded. Due to the very large numbers of naturally-occurring health effects, it is unlikely that any additional health effects will be demonstrable except, perhaps, for the more highly exposed population in the immediate vicinity of Chernobyl. 13 refs., 4 figs., 6 tabs.

  14. [Deoxyribonuclease activity in the blood serum of persons participating in liquidation of the effects of the accident at the Chernobyl nuclear power plant].

    PubMed

    Moskalenko, I P; Nikiforova, N A; Kalmykova, I Ia

    1990-12-01

    Deoxyribonuclease activity in blood serum was comparatively analyzed in 90 subjects who had been engaged in liquidation of consequences of the catastrophe at Chernobyl NPS in 1986, and in 55 normal donors. It was found that the mean value of deoxyribonuclease activity in the group of the liquidators was significantly lower as compared to that of donors. A stable decrease of activity of neutral deoxyribonuclease (DNAse I, pH 7.3) was detected in 18 and that of acid deoxyribonuclease (DNAse II) in 9 out of 90 subjects investigated. The anamnesis of most of the patients with lowered deoxyribonuclease activity has revealed transient leukopenia, decreased parameters of T-cellular immunity and phagocytic activity of neutrophils.

  15. [Radiation exposure of cultured tissue cells and animals (mice) within 10-kilometers zone of accident at Chernobyl nuclear plant. Effect on radiosensitivity to future radiation].

    PubMed

    Pelevina, I I; Afanasév, G G; Gotlib, V Ia; Alferovich, A A; Antoshchina, M M; Riabchenko, N I; Saenko, A S; Riabtsev, I A; Riabov, I N

    1993-01-01

    The effect of chronic low-level radiation exposure on radiosensitivity to posterior acute irradiation at high doses has been studied. Cells and mice were exposed within the ten-kilometer zone of Chernobyl disaster during various spaces of time (1-12 days), then over one or more days were additionally irradiated by doses of 1-4 Gy. It was shown that no adaptive response was developed under chronic exposure of cells and mice within the zone of disaster. On the contrary increased sensitivity to posterior irradiation was revealed. The number of cytogenetic damages of cultured tissue cells and marrow cells (chromosome aberrations and micronuclei) increases, the spectrum of aberrations being shifted to chromosome type, cells with multiaberration appearing. The decay of chromatine increases indicating an interphase death; the number of leucocytes in peripheral blood decreases.

  16. Radiation exposure and breast cancer: lessons from Chernobyl.

    PubMed

    Ogrodnik, Aleksandra; Hudon, Tyler W; Nadkarni, Prakash M; Chandawarkar, Rajiv Y

    2013-04-01

    The lessons learned from the Chernobyl disaster have become increasingly important after the second anniversary of the Fukushima, Japan nuclear accident. Historically, data from the Chernobyl reactor accident 27 years ago demonstrated a strong correlation with thyroid cancer, but data on the radiation effects of Chernobyl on breast cancer incidence have remained inconclusive. We reviewed the published literature on the effects of the Chernobyl disaster on breast cancer incidence, using Medline and Scopus from the time of the accident to December of 2010. Our findings indicate limited data and statistical flaws. Other confounding factors, such as discrepancies in data collection, make interpretation of the results from the published literature difficult. Re-analyzing the data reveals that the incidence of breast cancer in Chernobyl-disaster-exposed women could be higher than previously thought. We have learned little of the consequences of radiation exposure at Chernobyl except for its effects on thyroid cancer incidence. Marking the 27th year after the Chernobyl event, this report sheds light on a specific, crucial and understudied aspect of the results of radiation from a gruesome nuclear power plant disaster.

  17. Chernobyl nuclear accident hydrologic analysis and emergency evaluation of radionuclide distributions in the Dnieper River, Ukraine, during the 1993 summer flood

    SciTech Connect

    Voitsekhovitch, O.V.; Zheleznyak, M.J.; Onishi, Y.

    1994-06-01

    This report describes joint activities of Program 7.1.F, ``Radionuclide Transport in Water and Soil Systems,`` of the USA/Commonwealth of Independent States (CIS) Joint Coordinating Committee of Civilian Nuclear Reactor Safety to study the hydrogeochemical behavior of radionuclides released to the Pripyat and Dnieper rivers from the Chernobyl Nuclear Power Plant in Ukraine. These joint activities included rapid evaluation of radionuclide distributions in the Pripyat and Dnieper river system and field data evaluation and modeling for the 1993 summer flood to assist the Ukrainian government in their emergency response during the flood. In July-August 1993, heavy rainfall over the Pripyat River Catchment in Belarus and Ukraine caused severe flooding, significantly raising {sup 90}Sr concentrations in the river. Near the Chernobyl area, the maximum {sup 90}Sr concentration in the Pripyat River reached 20--25 PCi/L in early August; near the Pripyat River mouth, the concentration rose to 35 pCi/L. The peak {sup 90}Sr concentration in the Kiev Reservoir (a major source of drinking water for Kiev) was 12 pCi/L. Based on these measured radionuclide levels, additional modeling results and the assumption of water purification in a water treatment station, {sup 90}Sr concentrations in Kiev`s drinking water were estimated to be less than 8 pCi/L. Unlike {sup 90}Sr, {sup 137}Cs concentrations in the Pripyat River during the flood did not rise significantly to the pre-flood levels. Estimated {sup 137}Cs concentrations for the Kiev drinking water were two orders of magnitude lower than the drinking water standard of 500 pCi/L for {sup 137}Cs.

  18. [A dynamic assessment of the reaction of the human brain to radiation exposure (the aftermath of the accident at the Chernobyl Atomic Electric Power Station)].

    PubMed

    Zhavoronkova, L A; Kholodova, N B; Gogitidze, N V; Koptelov, Iu M

    1998-01-01

    The present study was aimed at the comparative assessment of electrophysiological and clinical data in persons (155 right-handed men) who took part in the Chernobyl clean-up in different periods after radiation. Dynamic evaluation of psychoneurological disorders revealed the growth of incidence and severity of cerebrovascular disturbances accompanied by the signs of organic symptoms' aggravation and encephalopathy in longer periods after radiation. The results of neuropsychological examination also showed the deterioration of patients' state manifested as growth of fatigue, cognitive defects, and emotional impairments. Analysis of the EEG parameters, including power and coherence mapping and 3-d dipole source localization analysis demonstrated the increasing number of patients with the most severe forms of EEG pathology: the "plane" type in combination with fast paroxysmal (beta-band) and slow forms of activity from 45% in 1990-92 to 63% in 1997. The "hypersynchronization" type of EEG activity was typical for the earlier period accompanied by the dominance of the pathological forms of EEG activity in mediobasal structures of the left hemisphere, and brainstem zones vs. diencephalon and the right hemisphere. The later period was characterized by decreasing coherence in symmetrical frontal and front-temporal areas of the left hemisphere, while in the early period the hypersynchronization prevailed in symmetrical central areas and in the right hemisphere. The evidence were obtained to a disconnection between the brain hemispheres. We suppose that the progressive involvement of structures of the limbic-reticular complex (especially, brainstem, mediobasal structures, and white matter) into the pathological process occurs with time in participants of clean-up of the Chernobyl disaster consequences.

  19. Integrating research on thyroid cancer after Chernobyl--the Chernobyl Tissue Bank.

    PubMed

    Thomas, G A; Bethel, J A; Galpine, A; Mathieson, W; Krznaric, M; Unger, K

    2011-05-01

    The only unequivocal radiological effect of the Chernobyl accident on human health is the increase in thyroid cancer in those exposed in childhood or early adolescence. In response to the scientific interest in studying the molecular biology of thyroid cancer after Chernobyl, the Chernobyl Tissue Bank was established. The project is supported by the governments of Ukraine and Russia, and financially supported (in total around US$3 million) by the European Commission, the National Cancer Institute of the USA and the Sasakawa Memorial Health Foundation of Japan. The project began collecting a variety of biological samples from patients on 1 October 1988, and has supplied material to 21 research projects in Japan, the USA and Europe. The establishment of the Chernobyl Tissue Bank has facilitated co-operation between these research projects and the combination of clinical and research data provides a paradigm for cancer research in the molecular biological age.

  20. Integrating Research on Thyroid Cancer after Chernobyl — the Chernobyl Tissue Bank

    PubMed Central

    Thomas, G.A.; Bethel, J.A.; Galpine, A.; Krznaric, M.; Unger, K.

    2011-01-01

    The only unequivocal radiological effect of the Chernobyl accident on human health is the increase in thyroid cancer in those exposed in childhood or early adolescence. In response to the scientific interest in studying the molecular biology of thyroid cancer after Chernobyl, the Chernobyl Tissue Bank was established. The project is supported by the governments of Ukraine and Russia, and financially supported (in total around US$3million) by the European Commission, the National Cancer Institute of the USA and the Sasakawa Memorial Health Foundation of Japan. The project began collecting a variety of biological samples from patients on 1 October 1988, and has supplied material to 21 research projects in Japan, the USA and Europe. The establishment of the Chernobyl Tissue Bank has facilitated cooperation between these research projects and the combination of clinical and research data provides a paradigm for cancer research in the molecular biological age. PMID:21345659

  1. Simulations of the transport and deposition of 137Cs over Europe after the Chernobyl Nuclear Power Plant accident: influence of varying emission-altitude and model horizontal and vertical resolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Evangeliou, N.; Balkanski, Y.; Cozic, A.; Møller, A. P.

    2013-07-01

    The coupled model LMDZORINCA has been used to simulate the transport, wet and dry deposition of the radioactive tracer 137Cs after accidental releases. For that reason, two horizontal resolutions were deployed and used in the model, a regular grid of 2.5° × 1.27°, and the same grid stretched over Europe to reach a resolution of 0.66° × 0.51°. The vertical dimension is represented with two different resolutions, 19 and 39 levels respectively, extending up to the mesopause. Four different simulations are presented in this work; the first uses the regular grid over 19 vertical levels assuming that the emissions took place at the surface (RG19L(S)), the second also uses the regular grid over 19 vertical levels but realistic source injection heights (RG19L); in the third resolution the grid is regular and the vertical resolution 39 levels (RG39L) and finally, it is extended to the stretched grid with 19 vertical levels (Z19L). The model is validated with the Chernobyl accident which occurred in Ukraine (ex-USSR) on 26 May 1986 using the emission inventory from Brandt et al. (2002). This accident has been widely studied since 1986, and a large database has been created containing measurements of atmospheric activity concentration and total cumulative deposition for 137Cs from most of the European countries. According to the results, the performance of the model to predict the transport and deposition of the radioactive tracer was efficient and accurate presenting low biases in activity concentrations and deposition inventories, despite the large uncertainties on the intensity of the source released. The best agreement with observations was obtained using the highest horizontal resolution of the model (Z19L run). The model managed to predict the radioactive contamination in most of the European regions (similar to De Cort et al., 1998), and also the arrival times of the radioactive fallout. As regards to the vertical resolution, the largest biases were obtained for

  2. Regional-scale application of the decision support system MOIRA-PLUS: an example of assessment of the radiological impact of the Chernobyl accident on the fresh water ecosystem in Italy.

    PubMed

    Monte, Luigi

    2011-02-01

    The present work illustrates the customisation and application of the decision support system MOIRA-PLUS (a MOdel-based computerised system for management support to Identify optimal remedial strategies for Restoring radionuclide contaminated Aquatic ecosystems and drainage areas) to the fresh water environment in Italy. MOIRA-PLUS is aimed at evaluating the behaviour of radiocaesium and radiostrontium in fresh water ecosystems and at assessing the appropriateness of suitable strategies for the management of contaminated water bodies by the application of multi-attribute analysis techniques. MOIRA-PLUS can be applied to complex networks of lakes, rivers and tributaries and can be straightforwardly customised utilising data and information from readily accessible sources such as official websites provided by scientific or government organisations. The present work shows an application of the decision system to 10 lakes and 18 rivers in Italy contaminated with (137)Cs of Chernobyl origin. Site-specific values of some aggregated transfer parameters were estimated for the most important Italian lakes. Although high values of fish and water consumptions were hypothesised, very low doses to public from the fresh water pathway following the accident were calculated.

  3. [Radiation-induced modification of human somatic cell chromosome sensitivity to the testing mutagenic exposure of bleomycin in vitro in lung cancer patients in delayed terms following Chernobyl accident].

    PubMed

    Pilinskaia, M A; Dybskiĭ, S S; Dybskaia, E B; Shvaĭko, L I

    2012-01-01

    By using modified "G2-bleomycin sensitivity assay" above background level of cytogenetic effect considered as a marker of hidden chromosome instability (HCI) has been investigated in 3 groups--liquidators of Chernobyl accident (occupational group 1), patients with lung cancer who denied conscious contact--with ionizing radiation (group of comparison), liquidators with lung cancer (occupational group 2). Significant interindividual variations of cytogenetic effects induced with bleomycin and the lack of positive correlation between background and above background frequencies of chromosome aberrations have been shown in all observed groups. It had been established that occupational group 2 was the most burdened group by expression of the above background cytogenetic effect and, accordingly, number of persons with HCI. The data obtained permit to suggest the existence of the association between radiation-induced increase of individual sensitivity to testing mutagenic exposure and the realization of cancer in persons exposed to ionizing radiation. The results show acceptability of "G2-bleomycin sensitivity assay" under the cytogenetic examination of irradiated contingents for determining HCI as one of informative markers of predisposition to oncopathology.

  4. Short- and long-term patterns of ¹³⁷Cs in fish and other aquatic organisms of small forest lakes in southern Finland since the Chernobyl accident.

    PubMed

    Rask, Martti; Saxén, Ritva; Ruuhijärvi, Jukka; Arvola, Lauri; Järvinen, Marko; Koskelainen, Ulla; Outola, Iisa; Vuorinen, Pekka J

    2012-01-01

    We summarize the patterns of ¹³⁷Cs activity concentrations and transfer into fish and other biota in four small forest lakes in southern Finland during a twenty-year period following the Chernobyl accident in April 1986. The results from summer 1986 showed fastest accumulation of ¹³⁷Cs into planktivorous fishes, i.e. along the shortest food chains. Since 1987, the highest annual mean values of ¹³⁷Cs have been recorded in fish occupying the highest trophic levels, for perch (Perca fluviatilis) 13,600 Bq/kg (ww) and for pike (Esox lucius) 20,700 Bq/kg (ww). At the same time, activity concentrations of ¹³⁷Cs in crustacean zooplankton and Asellus aquaticus have ranged between 1000 and 19,500 Bq/kg (dw). In 2006, 5-28% of the 1987 ¹³⁷Cs activity concentration levels were still present in perch and pike. Since 1989 their ¹³⁷Cs activity concentrations in oligohumic seepage lakes have remained significantly higher than in polyhumic drainage lakes due to the increased transfer of ¹³⁷Cs into fish in the seepage lakes with lower electrolyte concentrations, longer water retention times and lower sedimentation rate. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. [EVALUATION OF QUALITY INDICATORS OF LIFE AS A CRITERION OF THE EFFICIENCY OF TREATMENT FOR LIQUIDATORS OF THE ACCIDENT AT CHERNOBYL AEROSPHORUS, PATIENTS WITH HYPERTENSION DISEASE COMORBID WITH GASTROESOPHAGEAL REFLUX DISEASE].

    PubMed

    Synelnik, V; Oparin, A

    2017-04-01

    In order to assess the quality of life of liquidators of the accident at the Chernobyl nuclear power plant (CHPP) of patients with hypertensive comorbid disease with gastroesophageal reflux disease, 52 patients aged 46 to 71 years (mean age 57.5±0, 8 years old) who were on inpatient treatment in the therapeutic department of the Regional Clinical Specialized Dispensary for Radiation Protection of the Population of Kharkov from January 2016 to December 2016. The men among the examined were 44 (84.6%), women - 8 (15.4 All patients were divided into 2 groups, Group I patients received standard therapy, Group II patients, in addition to standard therapy, respectively nosology, received additionally the drug Actovegin ® Takeda Austria GmbH. All quality of life indicators were evaluated before the treatment and after In group I patients, after the standard treatment of GB comorbid with GERD, statistically significantly reduced the limitations on the scale of body pain (BP), therefore, in points, on the contrary, to 18.8±2.8 points increased, indicating a decrease in pain after treatment In patients. In patients with group II GB comorbid with GERD after standard treatment with additional use of Actovegin ®, the daily activity limitations associated with the disease on the scales of physical functioning (PF), role activity (RP), physical pain (BP), Vitality (VT), emotional state (RE).

  6. [The immunohistochemical determination of p53 and of proliferating cell nuclear antigen in the epithelial nuclei of benign prostatic hyperplasia following the accident at the Chernobyl Atomic Electric Power Station].

    PubMed

    Romanenko, A M; Vozianov, S O; Zabarko, L B

    1999-01-01

    With the purpose of studying into the morphogenesis and proliferous activity of the prostatic epithelium under a long-term exposure to low doses of ionizing radiation there have been conducted comparative histological and immunohistochemical (expression of p53 and proliferous cellular nuclear antigen-PCNA) investigations designed to study benign prostatic hyperplasia in patients living in those Ukraine territories affected by radionuclide contamination (group III), residents of Kiev (group II), and patients having been operated on before the Chernobyl accident, having constituted the control group I. It has been found out that the incidence of prostatic intraepithelial neoplasia (PIN), the level of nuclear expression of proteins p53 (in the PIN epithelium) and PCNA (in the epithelium of both benign prostatic hyperplasia and PIN) of patients in groups II and III are by far higher as compared with those in group I. The stroma of benign prostatic hyperplasia in patients of groups II and III was clearly different from that in the control group in that the former was characterized by apparent phenomena of hyalinosis, sclerosis, fibrosis, and extensive inflammatory infiltration, which changes can be explained by a long-term systematic exposure of prostatic tissue to low doses of ionizing radiation.

  7. Immunomodulatory and clinical effects of Viscum album (Iscador M and Iscador P) in children with recurrent respiratory infections as a result of the Chernobyl nuclear accident.

    PubMed

    Chernyshov, V P; Heusser, P; Omelchenko, L I; Chernyshova, L I; Vodyanik, M A; Vykhovanets, E V; Galazyuk, L V; Pochinok, T V; Gaiday, N V; Gumenyuk, M E; Zelinsky, G M; Schaefermeyer, H; Schaefermeyer, G

    2000-05-01

    Ninety-two children 5 to 14 years of age living in areas exposed to the radioactive fallout from Chernobyl with recurrent respiratory infections (RRIs) were treated after randomization with either Viscum album praeparatum mali or pini (Iscador M or P). The dosage was two subcutaneous injections a week for 5 weeks with individual doses of 0.001 mg to 1.0 mg. Both Viscum album preparations were effective in significantly reducing clinical symptoms. One year after a single treatment course, the frequency of RRI relapses decreased by 78% and 73%, respectively. Immunomodulatory effects were assessed by investigation of lymphocyte subsets, natural killer (NK) cell activity, phagocytic and oxidative activity of polymorphonuclear leukocytes, and antiviral activity of serum before and 1 week after treatment. Viscum album therapy resulted in normalization of initial immune indices either below or above the normal ranges. High levels of antiviral activity before treatment were significantly decreased by Viscum album mali. Viscum album treatment should be studied further in children with RRI.

  8. Chernobyl lessons learned review of N Reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Weber, E.T.; McNeece, J.P.; Omberg, R.P.; Stepnewski, D.D.; Lutz, R.J.; Henry, R.E.; Bonser, K.D.; Miller, N.R.

    1987-10-01

    A broad-base review of the N Reactor plant, design characteristics, administrative controls and responses unique to upset conditions has been completed. The review was keyed to Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC)-defined issues associated with the Chernobyl accident. Physical features of N Reactor that preclude an accident like Chernobyl include: lack of autocatalytic reactivity insertion (i.e., negative coolant void and power coefficents) and two separate, fast-acting scram systems. Administrative controls in place at N Reactor would effectively protect against the operator errors and safety violations that set up the Chernobyl accident. Several items were identified where further near-term action is appropriate to ensure effectiveness of existing safety features: Resolve a question concerning the exact point at which Emergency Core Cooling System (ECCS) activation by manual actions should be implemented or deferred if automatic ECCS trip fails. Ensure appropriate revision of the Emergency Response Guides and full communication of the correct procedure to all Operations, Safety and cognizant Technology staff. Train reactor operators in the currently recognized significance of the Graphite and Shield Cooling System (GSCS) in severe accident situations and cover this appropriately in the Emergency Response Guides. Complete reviews which establish an independent verification that pressure tube rupture will not propagate to other tubes. 15 refs., 3 tabs.

  9. The Chernobyl thyroid cancer experience: pathology.

    PubMed

    LiVolsi, V A; Abrosimov, A A; Bogdanova, T; Fadda, G; Hunt, J L; Ito, M; Rosai, J; Thomas, G A; Williams, E D

    2011-05-01

    The Chernobyl accident was followed by a large increase in the incidence of thyroid carcinoma in the areas exposed to high levels of fallout. The Chernobyl Tumor Bank was set up in 1998 to make tumours available for study internationally, and a pathology panel reviewed all the tumours and established an agreed diagnosis. The thyroid tumours that were discovered after the Chernobyl nuclear accident were virtually all (95%) of the papillary carcinoma type. Rare examples of other tumour types were identified. Within the papillary group, several subtypes were noted, including classical or usual type, follicular variant, solid variant and mixed patterns Diffuse sclerosis variant, cribriform/morular type and Warthin-like variant were rare. No tall cell or columnar cell variants were identified. The tumours examined by the Pathology Panel of the Chernobyl Tumor Bank constitute a large representative sample (estimated at about 50%) of the tumours that developed in this population. This overview describes the method adopted by the panel and the different diagnostic categories adopted; illustrates the pathology of these neoplasms; compares the pathological characteristics of the early lesions with those identified after long latency periods and the institution of screening programmes and outlines the possible associated causes for the various morphological patterns seen.

  10. [The characteristics of the clinical course of rheumatic diseases in persons subjected to the effect of ionizing radiation after the accident at the Chernobyl Atomic Electric Power Station].

    PubMed

    Babynina, L Ia; Bentsa, T M; Pravdivaia, V F

    1998-01-01

    Results are submitted of clinical, laboratory and immunological studies in patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA), systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE), systemic scleroderma (SSD), with n = 386, 35, 23 respectively, who had been exposed to ionizing radiation from the ChPP reactor accident. In the above patients, serum interferon (SI) levels were found out to be increased while those of natural killer cells (NKs) decreased by comparison with healthy donors; NKs appeared to be significantly lower (P < 0.001) in SLE and SSD patients than they were in RA ones and healthy subjects.

  11. [Health effects of the Chernobyl disaster. Fifteen years afterwards].

    PubMed

    Zafra Anta, M A; Amor Cabrera, M A; Díaz Mier, F; Cámara Moraño, C

    2002-04-01

    The Chernobyl nuclear accident of 1986 released large quantities of radioactive material causing heavy contamination in widespread areas of the former Soviet Union. Each summer, several hundred children visit Spain from Chernobyl. In this article we describe the accident, the environmental contamination, the mechanisms of radiation injury and the dose-response relationships. We review the health effects of exposure to ionizing radiation and the health impact of the Chernobyl catastrophe. We propose guidelines for the medical management and evaluation of children on temporary visits. The health status of adults and especially that of children in Belarus, Ukraine and the Russian Federation has been adversely affected. According to present knowledge, Chernobyl has given rise to a marked increase in the incidence of papillary thyroid cancer, psychological consequences and socioeconomic disruption. Many studies report that the incidence of other diseases has increased, but not all health problems seen after the nuclear accident can be attributed to radiation. Given the long latency period for diseases induced by radiation exposure, long-term follow-up of all potentially affected individuals is important. Fifteen years after the Chernobyl accident the international community is still learning scientific, medical and humanitarian lessons.

  12. Psychological Aid to the Children Who Suffered from the Chernobyl Catastrophe.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Garnets, O. N.; And Others

    This document considers the problems faced by the children and adolescents who were affected by the 1986 accident at the Chernobyl nuclear power plant in the Ukraine. It discusses problems with psycho-physical, social, and spiritual development. It is noted that the Chernobyl children do not form a homogeneous population, but can be divided into…

  13. [Content of free amino acids in blood plasma of the clean-up personnel at the Chernobyl nuclear power plant accident].

    PubMed

    Kuznetsov, H P; Chaialo, P P

    2002-01-01

    In two groups of the persons participating in liquidation of the Chornobyl Power Plant Catastrophe (individuals which suffered from acute radiation sickness and those ones who were exposed to irradiation at doses 0.25-1.0 Gy) in a year after medical treatment the free amino acids, their derivatives, glucose, sodium lactate and pyruvate homeostasis changed in comparison with the control. The causes and possible mechanisms of these substances exchange regulation disorders in the key biochemical reactions ensuring the body organs and systems functioning were estimated. The experimental findings received can be used at planning the further examination and treatment-and-prophylactic measures for the persons which have been affected by ionizing radiation consequently the accident at the Chornobyl Nuclear Power Plant.

  14. Estimated lifetime effective dose to hunters and their families in the three most contaminated counties in Sweden after the Chernobyl nuclear power plant accident in 1986 - A pilot study.

    PubMed

    Tondel, Martin; Rääf, Christopher; Wålinder, Robert; Mamour, Afrah; Isaksson, Mats

    2017-10-01

    Hunters and their families were one of the most exposed subpopulations in Sweden after the Chernobyl nuclear power plant accident in 1986. In this pilot study we used existing registries and whole-body measurements to develop algorithms to calculate lifetime effective doses and collective doses to some hunters in Sweden. Ten hunters and their family members were randomly selected from each of the three most contaminated counties in Sweden (Västernorrland, Uppsala, Gävleborg) using the register for hunting weapons from the Police Authority in 1985. Hence, this design can be regarded as a closed cohort only including hunters and their family members living in these three counties at the time of the accident. Statistics Sweden matched these individuals (n = 85) with their dwelling coordinates onto the digital map produced by the Swedish Radiation Safety Authority after aerial measurements of (137)Cs (kBq m(-2)). Internal effective doses were estimated using aggregated transfer factors from ground deposition to in-vivo body concentration for (134)Cs and (137)Cs in hunters (Bq kg(-1)). External effective doses were also calculated on the dwelling coordinate for (134)Cs, (137)Cs and short-lived nuclides in these three counties. Annual effective doses for external and internal doses were then cumulated up to a life expectancy of 80 years for men and 84 years for women, respectively. The total lifetime effective doses to the members of the hunter families in this cohort were on average 8.3 mSv in Västernorrland, 4.7 mSv in Uppsala and 4.1 mSv in Gävleborg. The effective dose to men were about 40% higher than in women. In all counties the internal dose was about 75% of the total lifetime effective dose. The collective dose for all hunters with family members, in total about 44,000 individuals, in these three counties could be approximated at about 256 manSv. This study shows it is possible to use register data to develop algorithms for calculating lifetime effective

  15. Atmospheric transport of radioactive debris to Norway in case of a hypothetical accident related to the recovery of the Russian submarine K-27.

    PubMed

    Bartnicki, Jerzy; Amundsen, Ingar; Brown, Justin; Hosseini, Ali; Hov, Øystein; Haakenstad, Hilde; Klein, Heiko; Lind, Ole Christian; Salbu, Brit; Szacinski Wendel, Cato C; Ytre-Eide, Martin Album

    2016-01-01

    The Russian nuclear submarine K-27 suffered a loss of coolant accident in 1968 and with nuclear fuel in both reactors it was scuttled in 1981 in the outer part of Stepovogo Bay located on the eastern coast of Novaya Zemlya. The inventory of spent nuclear fuel on board the submarine is of concern because it represents a potential source of radioactive contamination of the Kara Sea and a criticality accident with potential for long-range atmospheric transport of radioactive particles cannot be ruled out. To address these concerns and to provide a better basis for evaluating possible radiological impacts of potential releases in case a salvage operation is initiated, we assessed the atmospheric transport of radionuclides and deposition in Norway from a hypothetical criticality accident on board the K-27. To achieve this, a long term (33 years) meteorological database has been prepared and used for selection of the worst case meteorological scenarios for each of three selected locations of the potential accident. Next, the dispersion model SNAP was run with the source term for the worst-case accident scenario and selected meteorological scenarios. The results showed predictions to be very sensitive to the estimation of the source term for the worst-case accident and especially to the sizes and densities of released radioactive particles. The results indicated that a large area of Norway could be affected, but that the deposition in Northern Norway would be considerably higher than in other areas of the country. The simulations showed that deposition from the worst-case scenario of a hypothetical K-27 accident would be at least two orders of magnitude lower than the deposition observed in Norway following the Chernobyl accident.

  16. Chernobyl radionuclide distribution and migration.

    PubMed

    Izrael, Yury A

    2007-11-01

    The accident at Unit No. 4 of the Chernobyl Nuclear Power Plant on 26 April 1986 presented severe challenges in radiation protection. Early activity measurements defined the contaminated areas in order to determine what persons should be evacuated on the basis of the exposure limit at that time of 100 mSv (10 rem) for accidents. The immediate definition of these areas was accomplished with specially equipped aircraft capable of measuring external gamma-exposure rate and radionuclide spectra. Over time, maps of 137Cs contamination (the most important long-lived radionuclide) have become more and more sophisticated and have been used for further determinations of the control of the consequences of the accident. About 70% of the total release of 137Cs was deposited in Belarus, the Russian Federation, and Ukraine; but there was also widespread deposition throughout the countries of Western Europe. Two atlases of contamination throughout Europe were prepared, and the Russian atlas included data on other radionuclides and on external gamma-exposure rates. The radiocesiums behaved as volatile radionuclides because of the volatility of cesium. In contrast to the typical pattern after nuclear weapons tests, 90Sr behaved only as a refractory element, as its volatile precursors krypton and rubidium had already decayed within the reactor. Nearly all of the refractory elements (strontium, plutonium, etc.) released by the accident were confined to the 30-km zone around the reactor. A proposal is made to develop a more complete atlas of 137Cs deposition from the accident that would include the entire Northern Hemisphere. Water was not an important vector of exposure to human beings following the accident.

  17. External and internal irradiation of a rural Bryansk (Russia) population from 1990 to 2000, following high deposition of radioactive caesium from the Chernobyl accident.

    PubMed

    Thornberg, C; Vesanen, R; Wallström, E; Zvonova, I; Jesko, T; Balonov, M; Mattsson, S

    2005-10-01

    In 1990, a joint Nordic-Russian project was initiated in order to make independent estimations of the effective dose to selected groups of inhabitants in a highly contaminated area around the city of Novozybkov in the western Bryansk region of Russia. The inhabitants were living in six villages with initial contamination levels of (137)Cs between 0.9 and 2.7 MBq m(-2). Some villages had been decontaminated, others not. Both school children and adults participated in the study. The external irradiation of 100-130 inhabitants was determined during 1 month in September-October each year from 1990 to 2000 (except 1999), using individual thermoluminescent dosemeters. The body burden of (137,134)Cs was determined by in vivo measurements in about 500 inhabitants annually from 1991 to 2000, and for a subgroup also with analysis of the (137)Cs concentration in urine. The mean effective dose (E) from external and internal irradiation due to (137,134)Cs deposition varied between 2.5 and 1.2 mSv per year between 1990 and 2000. The total mean E decreased, on average, by 9% per year, while the mean external dose decreased by 16% per year. The dose rate from internal radiation decreased more slowly than the dose rate from external radiation, and also showed an irregular time variation. The contribution from the internal dose to the total E was 30-50%, depending on the village. Predictions for the long-term changes in the effective dose to people living in the areas are presented. The cumulated E for the 70 years following the accident was estimated to be about 90 mSv with the assumption that both internal and external dose decrease by 2% per year after year 2000. The highest E during a life-time received by single individuals living in the area may amount to around 500 mSv considering the individual variations in E.

  18. Doses for post-Chernobyl epidemiological studies: are they reliable?

    PubMed

    Drozdovitch, Vladimir; Chumak, Vadim; Kesminiene, Ausrele; Ostroumova, Evgenia; Bouville, André

    2016-09-01

    On 26 April 2016, thirty years will have elapsed since the occurrence of the Chernobyl accident, which has so far been the most severe in the history of the nuclear reactor industry. Numerous epidemiological studies were conducted to evaluate the possible health consequences of the accident. Since the credibility of the association between the radiation exposure and health outcome is highly dependent on the adequacy of the dosimetric quantities used in these studies, this paper makes an effort to overview the methods used to estimate individual doses and the associated uncertainties in the main analytical epidemiological studies (i.e. cohort or case-control) related to the Chernobyl accident. Based on the thorough analysis and comparison with other radiation studies, the authors conclude that individual doses for the Chernobyl analytical epidemiological studies have been calculated with a relatively high degree of reliability and well-characterized uncertainties, and that they compare favorably with many other non-Chernobyl studies. The major strengths of the Chernobyl studies are: (1) they are grounded on a large number of measurements, either performed on humans or made in the environment; and (2) extensive effort has been invested to evaluate the uncertainties associated with the dose estimates. Nevertheless, gaps in the methodology are identified and suggestions for the possible improvement of the current dose estimates are made.

  19. Decontamination of the populated areas contaminated as a result of nuclear accident

    SciTech Connect

    Voronik, N.I.; Shatilo, N.N.; Davydov, Y.P.

    1996-12-31

    Decontamination tests on urban surfaces contaminated by the Chernobyl accident have shown that Chernobyl fallout behaves differently from fallout from nuclear weapons tests and contamination on surfaces in nuclear power plant. The effectiveness of various decontamination compositions for removing Chernobyl fallout from urban surfaces and machinery was determined in a series of laboratory experiments and field trials.

  20. Elevated frequency of abnormalities in barn swallows from Chernobyl.

    PubMed

    Møller, A P; Mousseau, T A; de Lope, F; Saino, N

    2007-08-22

    Ever since the Chernobyl accident in 1986, that contaminated vast areas in surrounding countries with radiation, abnormalities and birth defects have been reported in human populations. Recently, several studies suggested that the elevated frequency of such abnormalities can be attributed to poverty and stress in affected human populations. Here, we present long-term results for a free-living population of barn swallows, Hirundo rustica, demonstrating the presence of 11 morphological abnormalities in populations around Chernobyl, but much less frequently in an uncontaminated Ukrainian control population and three more distant control populations. The presence of these abnormalities in barn swallows is associated with reduced viability. These findings demonstrate a link between morphological abnormalities and radiation in an animal population that cannot be attributed to poverty and stress. The most parsimonious hypothesis for abnormalities in animal and human populations alike is that the effects are caused by the same underlying cause, viz. radiation derived from the Chernobyl accident.

  1. Retrospective dosimetry of Iodine-131 exposures using Iodine-129 and Caesium-137 inventories in soils--A critical evaluation of the consequences of the Chernobyl accident in parts of Northern Ukraine.

    PubMed

    Michel, R; Daraoui, A; Gorny, M; Jakob, D; Sachse, R; Romantschuk, L D; Alfimov, V; Synal, H-A

    2015-12-01

    The radiation exposure of thyroid glands due to (131)I as a consequence of the Chernobyl accident was investigated retrospectively based on (129)I and (137)Cs inventories in soils in Northern Ukraine. To this end, soil samples from 60 settlements were investigated for (129)I, (127)I, and (137)Cs by AMS, ICP-MS and gamma-spectrometry, respectively. Sampling was performed between 2004 und 2007. In those parts of Northern Ukraine investigated here the (129)I and (137)Cs inventories are well correlated, the variability of the individual (129)I/(137)Cs ratios being, however, high. Both the (129)I and (137)Cs inventories in the individual 5 samples for each settlement allowed estimating the uncertainties of the inventories due to the variability of the radionuclide deposition and consequently of the retrospective dosimetry. Thyroid equivalent doses were calculated from the (129)I and the (137)Cs inventories using aggregated dose coefficients for 5-year old and 10-year-old children as well as for adults. The highest thyroid equivalent doses (calculated from (129)I inventories) were calculated for Wladimirowka with 30 Gy for 5-years-old children and 7 Gy for adults. In 35 settlements of contamination zone II the geometric mean of the thyroid equivalent doses was 2.0 Gy for 5-years-old children with a geometric standard deviation (GSD) of 3.0. For adults the geometric mean was 0.47 Gy also with a GSD of 3.0. In more than 25 settlements of contamination zone III the geometric means were 0.82 Gy for 5-years old children with a GSD of 1.8 and 0.21 Gy for adults (GSD 1.8). For 45 settlements, the results of the retrospective dosimetry could be compared with thyroid equivalent doses calculated using time-integrated (131)I activities of thyroids which were measured in 1986. Thus, a critical evaluation of the results was possible which demonstrated the general feasibility of the method, but also the associated uncertainties and limitations. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All

  2. How long is long-term? Reflections based on over 20 years of post-Chernobyl management in Norway.

    PubMed

    Liland, Astrid; Lochard, Jacques; Skuterud, Lavrans

    2009-07-01

    The radiation protection community has only recently started the important work of preparedness for long-term post-accidental management of radioactively contaminated areas, like for instance the EC projects STRATEGY, FARMING and EURANOS and the French authorities' CODIRPA and PAREX programmes. There are, however, different views concerning how long a long-term management might last. Based on the Norwegian and former Soviet Union experience after the Chernobyl accident, it is clear that a nuclear accident can entail decades of necessary management and rehabilitation of living conditions. The time period is dependent on a number of factors, e.g. amount of fallout, type of radionuclides, land use of contaminated area, number and density of people affected and available techniques and resources for implementing countermeasures. This paper discusses the management strategy implemented in Norway after the Chernobyl accident, the need for changing strategy over time and the important involvement of affected groups. Careful planning and reflections should be undertaken before actions are taken in the recovery phase, keeping in mind the possibility of decades with problems.

  3. Using Atmospheric (137)Cs Measurements and Hysplit to Confirm Chernobyl as a Source of (137)Cs in Europe

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2001-10-01

    USING ATMOSPHERIC 137CS MEASUREMENTS AND HYSPLIT TO CONFIRM CHERNOBYL AS A SOURCE OF 137CS IN EUROPE Erik L. Swanberg1 and Steven G. Hoffert2...Veridian Systems1, Autometric2 Sponsored by Defense Threat Reduction Agency Contract No. DTRA01-99-C-0031 ABSTRACT The Chernobyl ...this 137Cs is the ground contaminated by the Chernobyl accident. The PIDC routinely uses HYSPLIT (HYbrid Single-Particle Lagrangian Integrated

  4. JPRS Report, Soviet Union: Economic Affairs ("Chernobyl Notebook" By G. Medvedev, Published in Novy Mir, June 1989)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-11-02

    G.U. Medvedev’s Chernobyl Notebook" is a competent and dispassionately truthful account of the tragedy that occurred more than 3 years ago and which...and there is no departmental "diplomacy." The author is a nuclear power specialist who worked for a time at the Chernobyl AES and knows it well, just...crucial conferences concerning nuclear power plant construction. Immediately after the accident, Medvedev was sent to Chernobyl and had an opportunity to

  5. On protecting the inexperienced reader from Chernobyl myths.

    PubMed

    Balonov, M I

    2012-06-01

    The health and environmental consequences of the Chernobyl accident continue to attract the attention of experts, decision-makers and the general public, and now these consequences have been given added relevance by the similar accident in 2011 at the Fukushima-1 nuclear power plant (NPP) in Japan. Expert analysis of radiation levels and effects has been conducted by international bodies--UNSCEAR in 2008 and the Chernobyl Forum during 2003-5. At the same time, three Russian and Belarusian scientists, Yablokov, Nesterenko and Nesterenko (2009 Chernobyl. Consequences of the Catastrophe for People and the Environment (New York: Annals of the New York Academy of Sciences)) published both in Russian and English a substantial review of the consequences of Chernobyl based mostly on Russian-language papers. In this book, they suggested a departure from analytical epidemiological studies in favour of ecological ones. This erroneous approach resulted in the overestimation of the number of accident victims by more than 800 000 deaths during 1987-2004. This paper investigates the mistakes in methodology made by Yablokov et al and concludes that these errors led to a clear exaggeration of radiation-induced health effects. Should similar mistakes be made following the 2011 accident at Fukushima-1 NPP this could lead quite unnecessarily to a panic reaction by the public about possible health effects and to erroneous decisions by the authorities in Japan.

  6. [Radioecological problems of aquatic ecosystems of the Chernobyl exclusion zone].

    PubMed

    Gudkov, D I; Kuz'menko, M I; Kireev, S I; Nazarov, A B; Shevtsova, N L; Dziubenko, E V; Kaglian, A E

    2009-01-01

    The results of radioactive contamination dynamics in the main components of aquatic ecosystems and the absorbed dose rate for hydrobionts within the Chernobyl accident exclusion zone was analysed. Some cytogenetical and haematological effects of long-term irradiation on aquatic organisms as well as damage of higher aquatic plants by parasitic fungi and gall-producing arthropods were considered.

  7. An Evaluation of the Hazard Prediction and Assessment Capability (HPAC) Software’s Ability to Model the Chornobyl Accident

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2002-03-01

    source term. Several publications provided a thorough accounting of the accident, including “ Chernobyl Record” [Mould], and the NRC technical report...Report on the Accident at the Chernobyl Nuclear Power Station” [NUREG-1250]. The most comprehensive study of transport models to predict the...from the Chernobyl Accident: The ATMES Report” [Klug, et al.]. The Atmospheric Transport 5 Model Evaluation Study (ATMES) report used data

  8. Chernobyl source term, atmospheric dispersion, and dose estimation

    SciTech Connect

    Gudiksen, P.H.; Harvey, T.F.; Lange, R. )

    1989-11-01

    The Chernobyl source term available for long-range transport was estimated by integration of radiological measurements with atmospheric dispersion modeling and by reactor core radionuclide inventory estimation in conjunction with WASH-1400 release fractions associated with specific chemical groups. These analyses indicated that essentially all of the noble gases, 60% of the radioiodines, 40% of the radiocesium, 10% of the tellurium, and about 1% or less of the more refractory elements were released. Atmospheric dispersion modeling of the radioactive cloud over the Northern Hemisphere revealed that the cloud became segmented during the first day, with the lower section heading toward Scandinavia and the upper part heading in a southeasterly direction with subsequent transport across Asia to Japan, the North Pacific, and the west coast of North America. The inhalation doses due to direct cloud exposure were estimated to exceed 10 mGy near the Chernobyl area, to range between 0.1 and 0.001 mGy within most of Europe, and to be generally less than 0.00001 mGy within the United States. The Chernobyl source term was several orders of magnitude greater than those associated with the Windscale and TMI reactor accidents. However, the 137Cs from the Chernobyl event is about 6% of that released by the U.S. and U.S.S.R. atmospheric nuclear weapon tests, while the 131I and 90Sr released by the Chernobyl accident was only about 0.1% of that released by the weapon tests.

  9. Dispersal, deposition and collective doses after the Chernobyl disaster.

    PubMed

    Fairlie, Ian

    2007-01-01

    This article discusses the dispersal, deposition and collective doses of the radioactive fallout from the Chernobyl accident. It explains that, although Belarus, Ukraine and Russia were heavily contaminated by the Chernobyl fallout, more than half of the fallout was deposited outside these countries, particularly in Western Europe. Indeed, about 40 per cent of the surface area of Europe was contaminated. Collective doses are predicted to result in 30,000 to 60,000 excess cancer deaths throughout the northern hemisphere, mostly in western Europe. The article also estimates that the caesium-137 source term was about a third higher than official figures.

  10. Chernobyl vis-à-vis the nuclear future: an international perspective.

    PubMed

    González, Abel J

    2007-11-01

    The paper aims to provide an international perspective on the consequences of the Chernobyl accident vis-à-vis the future development of the use of nuclear energy for peaceful purposes. It describes the major international initiatives that were undertaken over the years in order to quantify the consequences of the Chernobyl accident, and also analyzes the impact of the accident on the development of nuclear energy taking account of the perception of its consequences. The paper revisits the historical saga flowing since the fateful explosion at the Chernobyl Nuclear Power Plant in the Ukraine 20 y ago. It looks at some of the misunderstandings about the consequences of the accident and explores the worldwide nuclear stagnation that followed Chernobyl, surveying the negative public reaction and also the possibilities of a nuclear revival. It finally searches for a way forward, concluding that an effective international nuclear safety regime is urgently needed with the purpose of preventing catastrophes like Chernobyl from occurring and also that the Chernobyl consequences need to be readdressed properly. The paper concludes with an appeal to the radiation protection community to resolve once and for all the difficult issues of attributing health effects to low-level radiation exposure.

  11. Ecological and toxicological aspects of the partial meltdown of the Chernobyl nuclear power plant reactor

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Eisler, Ronald; Hoffman, David J.; Rattner, Barnett A.; Burton, G. Allen; Cairns, John

    1995-01-01

    the partial meltdown of the 1000-MW reactor at Chernobyl, Ukraine, on April 26, 1986, released large amounts of radiocesium and other radionuclides into the environment, causing widespread radioactive contamination of Europe and the former Soviet Union.1-7 At least 3,000,000 trillion becquerels (TBq) were released from the fuel during the accident (Table 24.1), dwarfing, by orders of magnitude, radiation released from other highly publicized reactor accidents at Windscale (U.K.) and three-Mile Island (U.S.)3,8 The Chernobyl accident happened while a test was being conducted during a normal scheduled shutdown and is attributed mainly to human error.3

  12. Radiation carcinogenesis: lessons from Chernobyl.

    PubMed

    Williams, D

    2008-12-01

    Radiation is a carcinogen, interacting with DNA to produce a range of mutations. Irradiated cells also show genomic instability, as do adjacent non-irradiated cells (the bystander effect); the importance to carcinogenesis remains to be established. Current knowledge of radiation effects is largely dependent on evidence from exposure to atomic bomb whole body radiation, leading to increases in a wide range of malignancies. In contrast, millions of people were exposed to radioactive isotopes in the fallout from the Chernobyl accident, within the first 20 years there was a large increase in thyroid carcinoma incidence and a possible radiation-related increase in breast cancer, but as yet there is no general increase in malignancies. The increase in thyroid carcinoma, attributable to the very large amounts of iodine 131 released, was first noticed in children with a strong relationship between young age at exposure and risk of developing papillary thyroid carcinoma (PTC). The extent of the increase, the reasons for the relationship to age at exposure, the reduction in attributable fraction with increasing latency and the role of environmental factors are discussed. The large number of radiation-induced PTCs has allowed new observations. The subtype and molecular findings change with latency; most early cases were solid PTCs with RET-PTC3 rearrangements, later cases were classical PTCs with RET-PTC1 rearrangements. Small numbers of many other RET rearrangements have occurred in 'Chernobyl' PTCs, and also rearrangement of BRAF. Five of the N-terminal genes found in papillary carcinoma rearrangements are also involved in rearrangements in hematological malignancies; three are putative tumor suppressor genes, and two are further genes fused to RET in PTCs. Radiation causes double-strand breaks; the rearrangements common in these radiation-induced tumors reflect their etiology. It is suggested that oncogenic rearrangements may commonly involve both a tumor-suppressor gene

  13. Retrospective determination of 137Cs specific activity distribution in spruce bark and bark aggregated transfer factor in forests on the scale of the Czech Republic ten years after the Chernobyl accident.

    PubMed

    Suchara, I; Rulík, P; Hůlka, J; Pilátová, H

    2011-04-15

    The (137)Cs specific activities (mean 32Bq kg(-1)) were determined in spruce bark samples that had been collected at 192 sampling plots throughout the Czech Republic in 1995, and were related to the sampling year. The (137)Cs specific activities in spruce bark correlated significantly with the (137)Cs depositions in areas affected by different precipitation sums operating at the time of the Chernobyl fallout in 1986. The ratio of the (137)Cs specific activities in bark and of the (137)Cs deposition levels yielded bark aggregated transfer factor T(ag) about 10.5×10(-3)m(-2)kg(-1). Taking into account the residual specific activities of (137)Cs in bark 20Bq kg(-1) and the available pre-Chernobyl data on the (137)Cs deposition loads on the soil surface in the Czech Republic, the real aggregated transfer factor after and before the Chernobyl fallout proved to be T*(ag)=3.3×10(-3)m(-2)kg(-1) and T**(ag)=4.0×10(-3)m(-2)kg(-1), respectively. The aggregated transfer factors T*(ag) for (137)Cs and spruce bark did not differ significantly in areas unequally affected by the (137)Cs fallout in the Czech Republic in 1986, and the figures for these aggregated transfer factors were very similar to the mean bark T(ag) values published from the extensively affected areas near Chernobyl. The magnitude of the (137)Cs aggregated transfer factors for spruce bark for the pre-Chernobyl and post-Chernobyl period in the Czech Republic was also very similar. The variability in spruce bark acidity caused by the operation of local anthropogenic air pollution sources did not significantly influence the accumulation and retention of (137)Cs in spruce bark. Increasing elevation of the bark sampling plots had a significant effect on raising the remaining (137)Cs specific activities in bark in areas affected by precipitation at the time when the plumes crossed, because the sums of this precipitation increased with elevation (covariable).

  14. Psychological lessons of Chernobyl

    SciTech Connect

    Abramova, V.N.

    1989-01-01

    Up to the time of the disaster, the Chernobyl Nuclear Power Plant was regarded as one of the best in the USSR, and the city of Pripyat, housing the plant's staff, was rightly called one of the most comfortable. Also, the psychological climate of the plant provided no causes for worry. This was a worked-in team, composed of seasoned and knowledgeable experts. How can one then explain the events that happened in such an unlikely place. Isn't there a danger that the situation will repeat itself. The author considers the question and other psychological aspects of the Chernobyl incident.

  15. Aspermy, sperm quality and radiation in Chernobyl birds.

    PubMed

    Møller, Anders Pape; Bonisoli-Alquati, Andrea; Mousseau, Timothy A; Rudolfsen, Geir

    2014-01-01

    Following the Chernobyl nuclear power plant accident, large amounts of radionuclides were emitted and spread in the environment. Animals living in such contaminated areas are predicted to suffer fitness costs including reductions in the quality and quantity of gametes. We studied whether aspermy and sperm quality were affected by radioactive contamination by examining ejaculates from wild caught birds breeding in areas varying in background radiation level by more than three orders of magnitude around Chernobyl, Ukraine. The frequency of males with aspermy increased logarithmically with radiation level. While 18.4% of males from contaminated areas had no sperm that was only the case for 3.0% of males from uncontaminated control areas. Furthermore, there were negative relationships between sperm quality as reflected by reduced sperm velocity and motility, respectively, and radiation. Our results suggest that radioactive contamination around Chernobyl affects sperm production and quality. We are the first to report an interspecific difference in sperm quality in relation to radioactive contamination.

  16. The Chernobyl reference horizon ( ) in the Greenland ice sheet

    SciTech Connect

    Dibb, J. )

    1989-09-01

    Published reports of the presence of radioactive debris from the Chernobyl reactor accident in snow on the Greenland ice sheet raised the strong prospect that such debris might constitute a valuable time stratigraphic marker all over the ice sheet. Large volume snow samples to test this possibility were collected from 7 snowpits as part of a wide ranging regional snow chemistry survey conducted during 1987 and 1988. Snow labeled'' with Chernobyl derived radioactivity was detected in all of the pits. However, the total amount of radioactive debris found at the different locations varied over a 20 fold range. The variability in total fallout showed no clear large scale spatial pattern that could be related to the presumed progress of the radioactive plume over Greenland, suggesting that small scale differences in precipitation pattern and reworking of the snow by wind were predominantly responsible for the patchy preservation of the Chernobyl layer'' on the Greenland ice sheet. {copyright} American Geophysical Union 1989

  17. Abundance of birds in Fukushima as judged from Chernobyl.

    PubMed

    Møller, Anders Pape; Hagiwara, Atsushi; Matsui, Shin; Kasahara, Satoe; Kawatsu, Kencho; Nishiumi, Isao; Suzuki, Hiroyuki; Ueda, Keisuke; Mousseau, Timothy A

    2012-05-01

    The effects of radiation on abundance of common birds in Fukushima can be assessed from the effects of radiation in Chernobyl. Abundance of birds was negatively related to radiation, with a significant difference between Fukushima and Chernobyl. Analysis of 14 species common to the two areas revealed a negative effect of radiation on abundance, differing between areas and species. The relationship between abundance and radiation was more strongly negative in Fukushima than in Chernobyl for the same 14 species, demonstrating a negative consequence of radiation for birds immediately after the accident on 11 March 2011 during the main breeding season in March-July, when individuals work close to their maximum sustainable level. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Chernobyl's effects on the perceived risks of nuclear power: a small sample test

    SciTech Connect

    McDaniels, T.L.

    1988-09-01

    This paper presents the results of two risk perception surveys, one taken just before and one just after the accident at Chernobyl in May, 1985. The results show that Chernobyl affected short-term perceptions of nuclear power risks in ways that are predictable and measurable. In this sample, perceived levels of dread of nuclear power increased, perceived knowledge increased, and perceived severity decreased. Overall, the results are informative about how a single event could affect perceived risk characteristics.

  19. Thyroid nodularity and cancer among Chernobyl cleanup workers from Estonia

    SciTech Connect

    Inskip, P.D.; Boice, J.D. Jr.; Tekkel, M.

    1997-02-01

    Thyroid examinations, including palpation, ultrasound and, selectively, fine-needle aspiration biopsy, were conducted on nearly 2,000 Chernobyl cleanup workers from Estonia to evaluate the occurrence of thyroid cancer and nodular thyroid disease among men with protracted exposure to ionizing radiation. The examinations were conducted in four cities in Estonia during March-April 1995, 9 years after the reactor accident. The study population was selected from a predefined cohort of 4,833 cleanup workers from Estonia under surveillance for cancer incidence. These men had been sent to Chernobyl between 1986 and 1991 to entomb the damaged reactor, remove radioactive debris and perform related cleanup activities. A total of 2,997 men were invited for thyroid screening and 1,984 (66%) were examined. Estimates of radiation dose from external sources were obtained from military or other institutional records, and details about service dates and types of work performed while at Chernobyl were obtained from a self-administered questionnaire. Blood samples were collected for assay of chromosomal translocations in circulating lymphocytes and loss of expression of the glycophorin A (GPA) gene in erythrocytes. The primary outcome measure was the presence or absence of thyroid nodules as determined by the ultrasound examination. Of the screened workers, 1,247 (63%) were sent to Chernobyl in 1986, including 603 (30%) sent in April or May, soon after the accident. Workers served at Chernobyl for an average of 3 months. The average age was 32 years at the time of arrival at Chernobyl and 40 years at the time of thyroid examination. The mean documented radiation dose from external sources was 10.8 cGy. Biological indicators of exposure showed low correlations with documented dose, but did not indicate that the mean dose for the population was higher than the average documented dose. 47 refs., 1 fig., 9 tabs.

  20. Seeds in Chernobyl: the database on proteome response on radioactive environment.

    PubMed

    Klubicová, Katarína; Vesel, Martin; Rashydov, Namik M; Hajduch, Martin

    2012-01-01

    Two serious nuclear accidents during the last quarter century (Chernobyl, 1986 and Fukushima, 2011) contaminated large agricultural areas with radioactivity. The database "Seeds in Chernobyl" (http://www.chernobylproteomics.sav.sk) contains the information about the abundances of hundreds of proteins from on-going investigation of mature and developing seed harvested from plants grown in radioactive Chernobyl area. This database provides a useful source of information concerning the response of the seed proteome to permanently increased level of ionizing radiation in a user-friendly format.

  1. Agricultural recovery of a formerly radioactive area: I. Establishment of high-resolution quantitative protein map of mature flax seeds harvested from the remediated Chernobyl area.

    PubMed

    Klubicová, Katarína; Berčák, Michal; Danchenko, Maksym; Skultety, Ludovit; Rashydov, Namik M; Berezhna, Valentyna V; Miernyk, Ján A; Hajduch, Martin

    2011-07-01

    In recent years there has been an increasing tendency toward remediation of contaminated areas for agriculture purposes. The study described herein is part of a comprehensive, long-term characterization of crop plants grown in the area formerly contaminated with radioactivity. As a first step, we have established a quantitative map of proteins isolated from mature flax (Linum usitatissimum L.) seeds harvested from plants grown in a remediated plot localized directly in Chernobyl town. Flax was selected because it is a crop of economic and historical importance, despite the relative paucity of molecular resources. We used 2-dimensional electrophoresis followed by tandem mass spectrometry to establish a high-resolution seed proteome map. This approach yielded quantitative information for 318 protein spots. Genomic sequence resources for flax are very limited, leaving us with an "unknown function" annotation for 38% of the proteins analyzed including several that comprise very large spots. In addition to the seed storage proteins, we were able to reliably identify 82 proteins many of which are involved with central metabolism. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. The Chernobyl NPP decommissioning: Current status and alternatives

    SciTech Connect

    Mikolaitchouk, H.; Steinberg, N.

    1996-08-01

    After the Chernobyl accident of April 26, 1986, many contradictory decisions were taken concerning the Chernobyl nuclear power plant (NPP) future. The principal source of contradictions was a deadline for a final shutdown of the Chernobyl NPP units. Alterations in a political and socioeconomic environment resulted in the latest decision of the Ukrainian Authorities about 2000 as a deadline for a beginning of the Chernobyl NPP decommissioning. The date seems a sound compromise among the parties concerned. However, in order to meet the data a lot of work should be done. First of all, a decommissioning strategy has to be established. The problem is complicated due to both site-specific aspects and an absence of proven solutions for the RBMK-type reactor decommissioning. In the paper the problem of decommissioning option selection is considered taking into account an influence of the following factors: relevant legislative and regulatory requirements; resources required to carry out decommissioning (man-power, equipment, technologies, waste management infrastructure, etc.); radiological and physical status of the plant, including structural integrity and predictable age and weather effects; impact of planned activities at the destroyed unit 4 and within the 30-km exclusion zone of the Chernobyl NPP; planed use of the site; socio-economic considerations.

  3. Observations on the Chernobyl Disaster and LNT

    PubMed Central

    Jaworowski, Zbigniew

    2010-01-01

    The Chernobyl accident was probably the worst possible catastrophe of a nuclear power station. It was the only such catastrophe since the advent of nuclear power 55 years ago. It resulted in a total meltdown of the reactor core, a vast emission of radionuclides, and early deaths of only 31 persons. Its enormous political, economic, social and psychological impact was mainly due to deeply rooted fear of radiation induced by the linear non-threshold hypothesis (LNT) assumption. It was a historic event that provided invaluable lessons for nuclear industry and risk philosophy. One of them is demonstration that counted per electricity units produced, early Chernobyl fatalities amounted to 0.86 death/GWe-year), and they were 47 times lower than from hydroelectric stations (∼40 deaths/GWe-year). The accident demonstrated that using the LNT assumption as a basis for protection measures and radiation dose limitations was counterproductive, and lead to sufferings and pauperization of millions of inhabitants of contaminated areas. The projections of thousands of late cancer deaths based on LNT, are in conflict with observations that in comparison with general population of Russia, a 15% to 30% deficit of solid cancer mortality was found among the Russian emergency workers, and a 5% deficit solid cancer incidence among the population of most contaminated areas. PMID:20585443

  4. Observations on the Chernobyl Disaster and LNT.

    PubMed

    Jaworowski, Zbigniew

    2010-01-28

    The Chernobyl accident was probably the worst possible catastrophe of a nuclear power station. It was the only such catastrophe since the advent of nuclear power 55 years ago. It resulted in a total meltdown of the reactor core, a vast emission of radionuclides, and early deaths of only 31 persons. Its enormous political, economic, social and psychological impact was mainly due to deeply rooted fear of radiation induced by the linear non-threshold hypothesis (LNT) assumption. It was a historic event that provided invaluable lessons for nuclear industry and risk philosophy. One of them is demonstration that counted per electricity units produced, early Chernobyl fatalities amounted to 0.86 death/GWe-year), and they were 47 times lower than from hydroelectric stations ( approximately 40 deaths/GWe-year). The accident demonstrated that using the LNT assumption as a basis for protection measures and radiation dose limitations was counterproductive, and lead to sufferings and pauperization of millions of inhabitants of contaminated areas. The projections of thousands of late cancer deaths based on LNT, are in conflict with observations that in comparison with general population of Russia, a 15% to 30% deficit of solid cancer mortality was found among the Russian emergency workers, and a 5% deficit solid cancer incidence among the population of most contaminated areas.

  5. Mental health consequences of the Chernobyl disaster.

    PubMed

    Bromet, Evelyn J

    2012-03-01

    The psychosocial consequences of disasters have been studied for more than 100 years. The most common mental health consequences are depression, anxiety, post-traumatic stress disorder, medically unexplained somatic symptoms, and stigma. The excess morbidity rate of psychiatric disorders in the first year after a disaster is in the order of 20%. Disasters involving radiation are particularly pernicious because the exposure is invisible and universally dreaded, and can pose a long-term threat to health. After the Chernobyl disaster, studies of clean-up workers (liquidators) and adults from contaminated areas found a two-fold increase in post-traumatic stress and other mood and anxiety disorders and significantly poorer subjective ratings of health. Among liquidators, the most important risk factor was severity of exposure. In general population samples, the major risk factor was perceived exposure to harmful levels of radiation. These findings are consistent with results from A-bomb survivors and populations studied after the Three Mile Island nuclear power plant accident. With regard to children, apart from findings from ecological studies that lack direct data on radiation or other teratologic exposures and local studies in Kiev, the epidemiologic evidence suggests that neither radiation exposure nor the stress of growing up in the shadow of the accident was associated with emotional disorders, cognitive dysfunction, or impaired academic performance. Thus, based on the studies of adults, the Chernobyl Forum concluded that mental health was the largest public health problem unleashed by the accident. Since mental health is a leading cause of disability, physical morbidity, and mortality, health monitoring after radiation accidents like Fukushima should include standard measures of well-being. Moreover, given the comorbidity of mental and physical health, the findings support the value of training non-psychiatrist physicians in recognizing and treating common mental

  6. Recovery from musculoskeletal injury: the role of social support following a transport accident.

    PubMed

    Prang, Khic-Houy; Berecki-Gisolf, Janneke; Newnam, Sharon

    2015-07-03

    Social support can be an important coping resource for persons recovering from injury. In this study, we examined the effects of family structure and sources of social support on physical health, persistent pain and return to work (RTW) outcomes following musculoskeletal injury (MSI) sustained in a transport accident. Secondary analysis of Transport Accident Commission (TAC) cross-sectional surveys held in 2010 and 2011 was conducted. In total 1649 persons with MSI were identified and included. Family structure was determined by marital status and number of children. Sources of social support were measured as perceived help from family, friends, neighbours and employers. Physical health was measured with the Physical Component Summary (PCS) score of the Short-Form-12 Health Survey Version 2. Persistent pain was defined as self-reported persistent pain experienced in the last 3 months, and RTW was defined as being back at work for ≥3 months at time of interview. Multiple linear and logistic regressions were used for the analyses. Family and friends' support was associated with better physical health among persons with >1 day hospital stay. Being married or in a de facto relationship was associated with greater PCS score among non-hospitalised persons. Being widowed/separated/divorced was associated with more self-reported persistent pain (odds ratio 1.62 [95 % confidence intervals 1.11-2.37]). Support from family (0.40 [0.24-0.68]), friends (0.29 [0.17-0.47]) and neighbours (0.59 [0.41-0.84]) was associated with less persistent pain. Among women, support from family (0.09 [0.01-0.78]) was negatively associated with RTW, whereas support from friends (3.03 [1.15-8.02]) was positively associated with RTW. These associations were not observed among men. For both men (5.62 [2.77-11.38]) and women (7.22 [2.58-20.20]), support from employers was positively associated with RTW. Family structure and sources of social support had a positive impact on physical health

  7. Recovery from a chemical weapons accident or incident: A concept paper on planning

    SciTech Connect

    Herzenberg, C.L.; Haffenden, R.; Lerner, K.; Meleski, S.A.; Tanzman, E.A.; Lewis, L.M.; Hemphill, R.C.; Adams, J.D.

    1994-04-01

    Emergency planning for an unintended release of chemical agent from the nation`s chemical weapons stockpile should include preparation for. the period following implementation of immediate emergency response. That period -- the recovery, reentry, and restoration stage -- is the subject of this report. The report provides an overview of the role of recovery, reentry, and restoration planning in the Chemical Stockpile Emergency Preparedness Program (CSEPP), describes the transition from immediate emergency response to restoration, and analyzes the legal framework that would govern restoration activities. Social, economic, and administrative issues, as well as technical ones, need to be considered in the planning effort. Because of possible jurisdictional conflicts, appropriate federal, state, and local agencies need to be included in a coordinated planning process. Advance consideration should be given to the pertinent federal and state statutes and regulations. On the federal level, the principal statutes and regulations to be considered are those associated with the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act; the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act; and the National Environmental Policy Act. This report recommends that extensive preaccident planning be undertaken for the recovery, reentry, and restoration stage and outlines several key issues that should be considered in that planning. The need for interagency cooperation and coordination at all levels of the planning process is emphasized.

  8. Debate on the Chernobyl disaster: on the causes of Chernobyl overestimation.

    PubMed

    Jargin, Sergei V

    2012-01-01

    After the Chernobyl accident, many publications appeared that overestimated its medical consequences. Some of them are discussed in this article. Among the motives for the overestimation were anti-nuclear sentiments, widespread among some adherents of the Green movement; however, their attitude has not been wrong: nuclear facilities should have been prevented from spreading to overpopulated countries governed by unstable regimes and regions where conflicts and terrorism cannot be excluded. The Chernobyl accident has hindered worldwide development of atomic industry. Today, there are no alternatives to nuclear power: nonrenewable fossil fuels will become more and more expensive, contributing to affluence in the oil-producing countries and poverty in the rest of the world. Worldwide introduction of nuclear energy will become possible only after a concentration of authority within an efficient international executive. This will enable construction of nuclear power plants in optimally suitable places, considering all sociopolitical, geographic, geologic, and other preconditions. In this way, accidents such as that in Japan in 2011 will be prevented.

  9. Chernobyl shelter implementation plan -- project development and planning: Setting the stage for progress

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, W.; Kreid, D.; DeFranco, W.

    1998-09-01

    On April 26, 1986, the Chernobyl nuclear power plant (NPP) experienced a devastating accident. This accident left much of the plant and its safety systems destroyed with widespread radioactive waste contamination from the damaged nuclear fuel. In the 6 months following the accident, heroic measures were taken to stabilize the situation and erect a temporary confinement shelter over the damaged unit 4. Since that time the shelter and the contained radioactive materials and debris have begun to deteriorate. Lack of funding and staff has allowed only minor improvements to occur on-site, resulting in an existing shelter that is unstable and deteriorating. International aid has been provided to develop a comprehensive plan for the safe and environmentally sound conversion of the damaged Chernobyl reactor. These efforts are being performed in conjunction with US experts, European experts, and local Chernobyl NPP personnel. This plan is discussed here.

  10. [The structural-dynamic characteristics of the reactive psychoses in persons subjected to ionizing radiation exposure as a result of the accident at the Chernobyl Atomic Electric Power Station].

    PubMed

    Revenok, A A

    1991-08-01

    Thirty case histories were examined of patients who participated in liquidation of sequels of the Chernobyl disaster or inhabiting contaminated territory during the first months after the catastrophe. Of them eleven showed reactive states accompanied by psychopathological disorders. The psychotic disorders in these subjects were simple and concrete by their clinical course, developed mainly during the first 2-4 months after the disaster when the stressogeneity was maximal. This conclusion is confirmed by the fact that of 148 persons subjected to radiation effects and treated at a Kiev Mental hospital from 1986 through 1990 reactive psychoses were observed only in 11 cases.

  11. [The biological effects in animals in relation to the accident at the Chernobyl Atomic Electric Power Station. 11. The ultrastructure of the bone marrow cells in different generations of rats].

    PubMed

    Afanas'eva, V V; Zak, K P; Indyk, V M; Serkiz, Ia I; Tron'ko, N D

    1991-01-01

    In studying the bone marrow cell ultrastructure in male rats (F0-F2 generations) aged 3 months, which were brought up within the thirty kilometer Chernobyl A.P.S. disaster area, considerable submicroscopic changes have been revealed in the cells at all stages of maturation, including undifferentiated blasts and mature forms of cells of the neutrophilic, eosinophilic, monocytic and erythroid haemopoiesis series, as well as stromal elements of the microenvironment, megakaryocytes and endothelium. The severity of these changes increases, as the number of generations grows, displaying frequently a destructive character.

  12. [The clinico-pathogenetic characteristics of neurosis-like states in the participants in the cleanup of the aftermath of the accident at the Chernobyl Atomic Electric Power Station].

    PubMed

    Pishel', V Ia

    2000-03-01

    A clinical and paraclinical examination was done in 120 individuals with neurosis-like disorders, who had taken part in the elimination of the aftermath of the Chernobyl Nuclear Power Plant breakdown. A complex of etiological factors in the disorder has been identified. The most important syndrome was cerebral asthenia associated with depressive disorders and apparent vegetovascular dysfunction. Cerebral influences were implicated in the origination and development of neurosis-like disorders, with functional inadequacies having been disclosed in the patients' bodily catecholamine and immune systems.

  13. Belarus: towards a new post-chernobyl rehabilitation strategy.

    PubMed

    Trofimchik, Zoia

    2004-01-01

    Today, Belarus still has to deal with many problems that resulted owing to the extensive contamination of its territory after the Chernobyl accident. These problems remain omnipresent in everyday life of the affected population and have a continuous impact on the economic well being of the country. This paper describes the major changes that have been carried out in the rehabilitation strategies in Belarus since the Chernobyl accident. The evolution of the legal and administrative framework for rehabilitation and actions taken in this context over the past two decades are summarized. The continuing challenges faced by the population in the affected areas are discussed and the key principles underlying rehabilitation strategies (that are both practicable and accepted) are identified. The latter include openness, voluntary participation, collective decision-making and empowerment of local population and professionals. These principles have underpinned the development of recent national and international initiatives that are described. Copyright 2004 Oxford University Press

  14. Radiation accidents

    SciTech Connect

    Saenger, E.L.

    1986-09-01

    It is essential that emergency physicians understand ways to manage patients contaminated by radioactive materials and/or exposed to external radiation sources. Contamination accidents require careful surveys to identify the metabolic pathway of the radionuclides to guide prognosis and treatment. The level of treatment required will depend on careful surveys and meticulous decontamination. There is no specific therapy for the acute radiation syndrome. Prophylactic antibodies are desirable. For severely exposed patients treatment is similar to the supportive care given to patients undergoing organ transplantation. For high-dose extremity injury, no methods have been developed to reverse the fibrosing endarteritis that eventually leads to tissue death so frequently found with this type of injury. Although the Three Mile Island episode of March 1979 created tremendous public concern, there were no radiation injuries. The contamination outside the reactor building and the release of radioiodine were negligible. The accidental fuel element meltdown at Chernobyl, USSR, resulted in many cases of acute radiation syndrome. More than 100,000 people were exposed to high levels of radioactive fallout. The general principles outlined here are applicable to accidents of that degree of severity.

  15. Types of postaccident fuel release at Chernobyl Unit 4

    SciTech Connect

    Borovoy, A.A.; Bogatov, S.A.; Heruvimov, A.N. )

    1989-11-01

    Studies supporting activities for alleviating the consequences of the Chernobyl accident have revealed three types of fuel-containing masses (FCM): (1) elements of damaged fuel rods that contain some amount of pure nuclear fuel, (2) finely dispersed fuel in contaminants found in rooms within Unit 4, in the air (in an aerosol form), and in the soil of the surroundings, and (3) fuel-containing substances encountered in the rooms below the reactor, specifically, solidified glasslike masses similar to lava.

  16. Identification of 90Sr/40K Based on Cherenkov Detector for Recovery from the Fukushima Nuclear Accident

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ito, Hiroshi; Han, Soorim; Kobayashi, Atsushi; Kaneko, Naomi; Kawai, Hideyuki; Tabata, Makoto

    recovery efforts for the Fukushima accident, this study reports the current development status of this Cherenkov-radiation-based detector.

  17. Medical Response, Search and Recovery during the Space Shuttle Columbia Accident Investigation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stepaniak, Philip C.

    2010-01-01

    On February 1, 2003, the Space Shuttle Columbia broke apart during atmospheric re-entry on mission STS-107. After an event such as this, with high visibility and international interest, the operational challenge of recovering the crewmembers could not be underestimated. The Space Shuttle Program is organized to respond to a vehicle mishap using the resources of the Mishap Investigation Team (MIT). On the afternoon of Feb. 1, 2003, the MIT deployed to Barksdale Air Force Base (AFB), Louisiana. This location became the investigative center and interim storage location for crewmembers received from the Lufkin, Texas Disaster Field Office (DFO). The Lufkin DFO served as the primary area for all operations, including staging assets and deploying field teams for search, recovery and security of crewmember remains. More than 2,000 people from numerous organizations were involved with the recovery of the crew. All seven crewmembers of STS-107 were recovered and ceremonial last rights were administered. Astronaut and military personnel escorted the crew with honor to the MIT at Barksdale AFB, Louisiana. At Barksdale AFB a temporary morgue was established in an aircraft hangar and operated for approximately two weeks during which time coordination with the DFO field recovery teams, Armed Forces Institute of Pathology (AFIP) medical personnel, and the crew surgeons was on going. Families of crewmembers and NASA management were notified daily of the current findings. Working under the leadership of the MIT Lead, the medical team developed and executed a short-term plan to identify and relocate the crew with a military honor guard and protocol to the medical examiner at the Armed Forces Port Mortuary, Dover AFB, Delaware. After operations at Barksdale AFB were concluded the medical team transitioned back to Houston and a long-term plan was developed and implemented which involved the Air Force Mortuary Affairs at Randolph AFB, Texas. This plan was coordinated with search teams

  18. Chernobyl fallout and cancer incidence in Finland.

    PubMed

    Auvinen, Anssi; Seppä, Karri; Pasanen, Kari; Kurttio, Päivi; Patama, Toni; Pukkala, Eero; Heinävaara, Sirpa; Arvela, Hannu; Verkasalo, Pia; Hakulinen, Timo

    2014-05-01

    Twenty-five years have passed since the Chernobyl accident, but its health consequences remain to be well established. Finland was one of the most heavily affected countries by the radioactive fallout outside the former Soviet Union. We analyzed the relation of the estimated external radiation exposure from the fallout to cancer incidence in Finland in 1988-2007. The study cohort comprised all ∼ 3.8 million Finns who had lived in the same dwelling for 12 months following the accident (May 1986-April 1987). Radiation exposure was estimated using data from an extensive mobile dose rate survey. Cancer incidence data were obtained for the cohort divided into four exposure categories (the lowest with the first-year committed dose <0.1 mSv and the highest ≥ 0.5 mSv) allowing for a latency of 5 years for leukemia and thyroid cancer, and 10 years for other cancers. Of the eight predefined cancer sites regarded as radiation-related from earlier studies, only colon cancer among women showed an association with exposure from fallout [excess rate ratio per increment in exposure category 0.06, 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.02-0.11]. No such effect was observed for men, or other cancer sites. Our analysis of a large cohort over two decades did not reveal an increase in cancer incidence following the Chernobyl accident, with the possible exception of colon cancer among women. The largely null findings are consistent with extrapolation from previous studies suggesting that the effect is likely to remain too small to be empirically detectable and of little public health impact.

  19. A review of criticality accidents

    SciTech Connect

    Stratton, W R; Smith, D R

    1989-03-01

    Criticality accidents and the characteristics of prompt power excursions are discussed. Forty-one accidental power transients are reviewed. In each case where available, enough detail is given to help visualize the physical situation, the cause or causes of the accident, the history and characteristics of the transient, the energy release, and the consequences, if any, to personnel and property. Excursions associated with large power reactors are not included in this study, except that some information on the major accident at the Chernobyl reactor in April 1986 is provided in the Appendix. 67 refs., 21 figs., 2 tabs.

  20. The Chernobyl experience in the area of retrospective dosimetry.

    PubMed

    Chumak, Vadim V

    2012-03-01

    The Chernobyl accident, which occurred on 26 April 1986 at a nuclear power plant located less than 150 km north of Kiev, was the largest nuclear accident to date. The unprecedented scale of the accident was determined not only by the amount of released activity, but also by the number of workers and of the general public involved, and therefore exposed to increased doses of ionising radiation. Due to the unexpected and large scale of the accident, dosimetry techniques and practices were far from the optimum; personal dosimetry of cleanup workers (liquidators) was not complete, and there were no direct measurements of the exposures of members of the public. As a result, an acute need for retrospective dose assessment was dictated by radiation protection and research considerations. In response, substantial efforts have been made to reconstruct doses for the main exposed cohorts, using a broad variety of newly developed methods: analytical, biological and physical (electron paramagnetic resonance spectroscopy of teeth, thermoluminescence of quartz) and modelling. This paper reviews the extensive experience gained by the National Research Center for Radiation Medicine, Academy of Medical Sciences, Ukraine in the field of retrospective dosimetry of large cohorts of exposed population and professionals. These dose reconstruction projects were implemented, in particular, in the framework of epidemiological studies, designed to follow-up the medical consequences of the Chernobyl accident and study health effects of ionizing radiation, particularly Ukrainian-American studies of cataracts and leukaemia among liquidators.

  1. Epidemiologic Methods Lessons Learned from Environmental Public Health Disasters: Chernobyl, the World Trade Center, Bhopal, and Graniteville, South Carolina

    PubMed Central

    Svendsen, Erik R.; Runkle, Jennifer R.; Dhara, Venkata Ramana; Lin, Shao; Naboka, Marina; Mousseau, Timothy A.; Bennett, Charles

    2012-01-01

    Background: Environmental public health disasters involving hazardous contaminants may have devastating effects. While much is known about their immediate devastation, far less is known about long-term impacts of these disasters. Extensive latent and chronic long-term public health effects may occur. Careful evaluation of contaminant exposures and long-term health outcomes within the constraints imposed by limited financial resources is essential. Methods: Here, we review epidemiologic methods lessons learned from conducting long-term evaluations of four environmental public health disasters involving hazardous contaminants at Chernobyl, the World Trade Center, Bhopal, and Graniteville (South Carolina, USA). Findings: We found several lessons learned which have direct implications for the on-going disaster recovery work following the Fukushima radiation disaster or for future disasters. Interpretation: These lessons should prove useful in understanding and mitigating latent health effects that may result from the nuclear reactor accident in Japan or future environmental public health disasters. PMID:23066404

  2. Epidemiologic methods lessons learned from environmental public health disasters: Chernobyl, the World Trade Center, Bhopal, and Graniteville, South Carolina.

    PubMed

    Svendsen, Erik R; Runkle, Jennifer R; Dhara, Venkata Ramana; Lin, Shao; Naboka, Marina; Mousseau, Timothy A; Bennett, Charles

    2012-08-01

    Environmental public health disasters involving hazardous contaminants may have devastating effects. While much is known about their immediate devastation, far less is known about long-term impacts of these disasters. Extensive latent and chronic long-term public health effects may occur. Careful evaluation of contaminant exposures and long-term health outcomes within the constraints imposed by limited financial resources is essential. Here, we review epidemiologic methods lessons learned from conducting long-term evaluations of four environmental public health disasters involving hazardous contaminants at Chernobyl, the World Trade Center, Bhopal, and Graniteville (South Carolina, USA). We found several lessons learned which have direct implications for the on-going disaster recovery work following the Fukushima radiation disaster or for future disasters. These lessons should prove useful in understanding and mitigating latent health effects that may result from the nuclear reactor accident in Japan or future environmental public health disasters.

  3. Chernobyl seed project. Advances in the identification of differentially abundant proteins in a radio-contaminated environment.

    PubMed

    Rashydov, Namik M; Hajduch, Martin

    2015-01-01

    Plants have the ability to grow and successfully reproduce in radio-contaminated environments, which has been highlighted by nuclear accidents at Chernobyl (1986) and Fukushima (2011). The main aim of this article is to summarize the advances of the Chernobyl seed project which has the purpose to provide proteomic characterization of plants grown in the Chernobyl area. We present a summary of comparative proteomic studies on soybean and flax seeds harvested from radio-contaminated Chernobyl areas during two successive generations. Using experimental design developed for radio-contaminated areas, altered abundances of glycine betaine, seed storage proteins, and proteins associated with carbon assimilation into fatty acids were detected. Similar studies in Fukushima radio-contaminated areas might complement these data. The results from these Chernobyl experiments can be viewed in a user-friendly format at a dedicated web-based database freely available at http://www.chernobylproteomics.sav.sk.

  4. Chernobyl seed project. Advances in the identification of differentially abundant proteins in a radio-contaminated environment

    PubMed Central

    Rashydov, Namik M.; Hajduch, Martin

    2015-01-01

    Plants have the ability to grow and successfully reproduce in radio-contaminated environments, which has been highlighted by nuclear accidents at Chernobyl (1986) and Fukushima (2011). The main aim of this article is to summarize the advances of the Chernobyl seed project which has the purpose to provide proteomic characterization of plants grown in the Chernobyl area. We present a summary of comparative proteomic studies on soybean and flax seeds harvested from radio-contaminated Chernobyl areas during two successive generations. Using experimental design developed for radio-contaminated areas, altered abundances of glycine betaine, seed storage proteins, and proteins associated with carbon assimilation into fatty acids were detected. Similar studies in Fukushima radio-contaminated areas might complement these data. The results from these Chernobyl experiments can be viewed in a user-friendly format at a dedicated web-based database freely available at http://www.chernobylproteomics.sav.sk. PMID:26217350

  5. RADRUE METHOD FOR RECONSTRUCTION OF EXTERNAL PHOTON DOSES TO CHERNOBYL LIQUIDATORS IN EPIDEMIOLOGICAL STUDIES

    PubMed Central

    Kryuchkov, Victor; Chumak, Vadim; Maceika, Evaldas; Anspaugh, Lynn R.; Cardis, Elisabeth; Bakhanova, Elena; Golovanov, Ivan; Drozdovitch, Vladimir; Luckyanov, Nickolas; Kesminiene, Ausrele; Voillequé, Paul; Bouville, André

    2010-01-01

    Between 1986 and 1990, several hundred thousand workers, called “liquidators” or “clean-up workers”, took part in decontamination and recovery activities within the 30-km zone around the Chernobyl nuclear power plant in Ukraine, where a major accident occurred in April 1986. The Chernobyl liquidators were mainly exposed to external ionizing radiation levels that depended primarily on their work locations and the time after the accident when the work was performed. Because individual doses were often monitored inadequately or were not monitored at all for the majority of liquidators, a new method of photon (i.e. gamma and x-rays) dose assessment, called “RADRUE” (Realistic Analytical Dose Reconstruction with Uncertainty Estimation) was developed to obtain unbiased and reasonably accurate estimates for use in three epidemiologic studies of hematological malignancies and thyroid cancer among liquidators. The RADRUE program implements a time-and-motion dose reconstruction method that is flexible and conceptually easy to understand. It includes a large exposure rate database and interpolation and extrapolation techniques to calculate exposure rates at places where liquidators lived and worked within ~70 km of the destroyed reactor. The RADRUE technique relies on data collected from subjects’ interviews conducted by trained interviewers, and on expert dosimetrists to interpret the information and provide supplementary information, when necessary, based upon their own Chernobyl experience. The RADRUE technique was used to estimate doses from external irradiation, as well as uncertainties, to the bone-marrow for 929 subjects and to the thyroid gland for 530 subjects enrolled in epidemiologic studies. Individual bone-marrow dose estimates were found to range from less than one μGy to 3,300 mGy, with an arithmetic mean of 71 mGy. Individual thyroid dose estimates were lower and ranged from 20 μGy to 507 mGy, with an arithmetic mean of 29 mGy. The

  6. Radrue method for reconstruction of external photon doses for Chernobyl liquidators in epidemiological studies.

    PubMed

    Kryuchkov, Victor; Chumak, Vadim; Maceika, Evaldas; Anspaugh, Lynn R; Cardis, Elisabeth; Bakhanova, Elena; Golovanov, Ivan; Drozdovitch, Vladimir; Luckyanov, Nickolas; Kesminiene, Ausrele; Voillequé, Paul; Bouville, André

    2009-10-01

    Between 1986 and 1990, several hundred thousand workers, called "liquidators" or "clean-up workers," took part in decontamination and recovery activities within the 30-km zone around the Chernobyl nuclear power plant in Ukraine, where a major accident occurred in April 1986. The Chernobyl liquidators were mainly exposed to external ionizing radiation levels that depended primarily on their work locations and the time after the accident when the work was performed. Because individual doses were often monitored inadequately or were not monitored at all for the majority of liquidators, a new method of photon (i.e., gamma and x rays) dose assessment, called "RADRUE" (Realistic Analytical Dose Reconstruction with Uncertainty Estimation), was developed to obtain unbiased and reasonably accurate estimates for use in three epidemiologic studies of hematological malignancies and thyroid cancer among liquidators. The RADRUE program implements a time-and-motion dose-reconstruction method that is flexible and conceptually easy to understand. It includes a large exposure rate database and interpolation and extrapolation techniques to calculate exposure rates at places where liquidators lived and worked within approximately 70 km of the destroyed reactor. The RADRUE technique relies on data collected from subjects' interviews conducted by trained interviewers, and on expert dosimetrists to interpret the information and provide supplementary information, when necessary, based upon their own Chernobyl experience. The RADRUE technique was used to estimate doses from external irradiation, as well as uncertainties, to the bone marrow for 929 subjects and to the thyroid gland for 530 subjects enrolled in epidemiologic studies. Individual bone marrow dose estimates were found to range from less than one muGy to 3,300 mGy, with an arithmetic mean of 71 mGy. Individual thyroid dose estimates were lower and ranged from 20 muGy to 507 mGy, with an arithmetic mean of 29 mGy. The

  7. Leukemia incidence in the Russian cohort of Chernobyl emergency workers.

    PubMed

    Ivanov, V K; Tsyb, A F; Khait, S E; Kashcheev, V V; Chekin, S Yu; Maksioutov, M A; Tumanov, K A

    2012-05-01

    Of all potentially radiogenic cancers, leukemia, a type of cancer of the blood, has the highest risk attributable to ionizing radiation. Despite this, the quantitative estimation of radiation risk of a leukemia demands studying very large exposed cohorts, because of the very low level of this disease in unexposed populations and because of the tendency for its radiation risk to decrease with time. At present, the Japanese cohort of atomic bomb survivors is still the primary source of data that allows analysis of radiation-induced leukemia and the underlying dose-response relationship. The second large cohort that would allow to study radiation-induced leukemia is comprised of individuals who were exposed due to the accident of the Chernobyl nuclear power plant in 1986. The objective of the present study was to estimate radiation risks of leukemia incidence among the Russian cohort of Chernobyl emergency workers, for different time periods after the accident. Twenty-five years after the Chernobyl accident and based on the results of the present study, one can conclude that the radiation risk of leukemia incidence derived from the Russian cohort of Chernobyl emergency workers is similar to that derived from the cohort of atomic bomb survivors: The time-averaged excess relative risk per Gray (ERR Gy(-1)) equals 4.98 for the Russian cohort and 3.9 for the life span study (LSS) cohort; excess absolute risk decreases with time after exposure at an annual rate of 9% for the Russian cohort, and of 6.5% for the LSS cohort. Thus, the excess in risk of leukemia incidence in a population due to a single exposure is restricted in time after exposure by the period of about 15 years.

  8. Cerebral basis of posttraumatic stress disorder following the Chernobyl disaster.

    PubMed

    Loganovsky, Konstantin N; Zdanevich, Nataliya A

    2013-04-01

    Whether posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) following radiation emergency has psychopathological, neurocognitive, and neurophysiological peculiarities is at issue. The goal was to explore the features and cerebral basis of "radiation" PTSD in the survivors of the Chernobyl accident. Subjects and Methods The cross-sectional study included 241 people, 219 of whom have been diagnosed with PTSD according to the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, 4th ed. (DSM-IV) criteria, among them 115 clean-up workers of the Chernobyl accident (34 with acute radiation sickness), 76 evacuees from the Chernobyl exclusion zone, 28 veterans of the war in Afghanistan, and 22 healthy unexposed individuals. Psychometric examinations, neurocognitive assessments, computerized electroencephalography, and cerebral vascular Doppler were used. "Radiation" PTSD includes "flashforward" phenomena and anticipating stress (projection of fear and danger to the future); somatoform disorders (depression, trait and state anxiety); and neurocognitive deficit (impaired memory and attention, auditory-verbal memory and learning, proactive and retroactive interference, cerebellar and stem symptoms, intellectual changes). The intima-media component, thickness of common carotid arteries, and common and left internal carotid arteries stenosis rates are increased in the liquidators. Changes of bioelectrical brain activity as a decrease of beta- and theta-power, together with an increase of alpha-power, were found in the Chernobyl accident survivors with PTSD. PTSD following radiation emergency is characterized by comorbidity of psychopathology, neurocognitive deficit, and cerebrovascular pathology with increased risk of cerebral atherosclerosis and stroke. The cerebral basis of this PTSD is proposed to be an abnormal communication between the pyramidal cells of the neocortex and the hippocampus, and deep brain structures. It is recommended that a system of emergency and long-term psychological

  9. Chernobyl source term, atmospheric dispersion, and dose estimation

    SciTech Connect

    Gudiksen, P.H.; Harvey, T.F.; Lange, R.

    1988-02-01

    The Chernobyl source term available for long-range transport was estimated by integration of radiological measurements with atmospheric dispersion modeling, and by reactor core radionuclide inventory estimation in conjunction with WASH-1400 release fractions associated with specific chemical groups. These analyses indicated that essentially all of the noble gases, 80% of the radioiodines, 40% of the radiocesium, 10% of the tellurium, and about 1% or less of the more refractory elements were released. Atmospheric dispersion modeling of the radioactive cloud over the Northern Hemisphere revealed that the cloud became segmented during the first day, with the lower section heading toward Scandinavia and the uppper part heading in a southeasterly direction with subsequent transport across Asia to Japan, the North Pacific, and the west coast of North America. The inhalation doses due to direct cloud exposure were estimated to exceed 10 mGy near the Chernobyl area, to range between 0.1 and 0.001 mGy within most of Europe, and to be generally less than 0.00001 mGy within the US. The Chernobyl source term was several orders of magnitude greater than those associated with the Windscale and TMI reactor accidents, while the /sup 137/Cs from the Chernobyl event is about 6% of that released by the US and USSR atmospheric nuclear weapon tests. 9 refs., 3 figs., 6 tabs.

  10. A school investigation into Chernobyl fallout

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Plant, R. D.

    1988-01-01

    The nuclear power station operating at Chernobyl, just north of Kiev in the Ukraine, USSR, contains four RBMK reactors operating at 1000 MW each. The RBMK reactor is a graphite moderated light water cooled reactor using low enriched uranium fuel. Early on Saturday 26 April 1986 a serious accident occurred to one of the four reactors resulting in the release of radioactive material, some of which was carried by the wind northwards across Poland and Scandinavia. The Ursuline Convent School at Westgate-on-Sea is situated in a small seaside town on the North Kent coast. On 30 April the background count was measured in the physics laboratory of the school using a Mullard ZP1481 Geiger-Muller tube in conjunction with a Panax scaler.

  11. AMS applied to Hiroshima and Chernobyl dosimetry

    SciTech Connect

    Straume, T.; Marchetti, A.A.; Anspaugh, L.R.

    1995-12-01

    Two projects employing AMS are summarized and updated. One project employs AMS to measure {sup 36}Cl in concrete and other mineral samples from Hiroshima and Nagasaki to help reconstruct neutron fluences received by the atom-bomb survivors. In this project, we have demonstrated a large discrepancy between the neutron activation measured in Hiroshima and predictions based on the current dosimetry system. This discrepancy has practical implications for radiation risk assessment and radiation protection standards. The other project employs AMS to measure {sup 129}I in soil and other environmental samples from Belarus, Ukraine, and Russia. This is a proof-of-principle study to determine if the long lived {sup 129}I isotope (half life, 16 x 10{sup 6} y) measured by AMS can be used to reconstruct deposition of the short lived {sup 131}I isotope from the 1986 Chernobyl reactor accident. This is required because {sup 131}I disappeared before adequate measurements could be made.

  12. Biological consequences of Chernobyl: 20 years on.

    PubMed

    Møller, Anders Pape; Mousseau, Timothy A

    2006-04-01

    The disaster at the Chernobyl nuclear power plant in 1986 released 80 petabecquerel of radioactive caesium, strontium, plutonium and other radioactive isotopes into the atmosphere, polluting 200 000 km(2) of land in Europe. As we discuss here, several studies have since shown associations between high and low levels of radiation and the abundance, distribution, life history and mutation rates of plants and animals. However, this research is the consequence of investment by a few individuals rather than a concerted research effort by the international community, despite the fact that the effects of the disaster are continent-wide. A coordinated international research effort is therefore needed to further investigate the effects of the disaster, knowledge that could be beneficial if there are further nuclear accidents, including the threat of a "dirty bomb".

  13. Elevated Minisatellite Mutation Rate in the Post-Chernobyl Families from Ukraine

    PubMed Central

    Dubrova, Yuri E.; Grant, Gemma; Chumak, Anatoliy A.; Stezhka, Vasyl A.; Karakasian, Angela N.

    2002-01-01

    Germline mutation at eight human minisatellite loci has been studied among families from rural areas of the Kiev and Zhitomir regions of Ukraine, which were heavily contaminated by radionuclides after the Chernobyl accident. The control and exposed groups were composed of families containing children conceived before and after the Chernobyl accident, respectively. The groups were matched by ethnicity, maternal age, parental occupation, and smoking habits, and they differed only slightly by paternal age. A statistically significant 1.6-fold increase in mutation rate was found in the germline of exposed fathers, whereas the maternal germline mutation rate in the exposed families was not elevated. These data, together with the results of our previous analysis of the exposed families from Belarus, suggest that the elevated minisatellite mutation rate can be attributed to post-Chernobyl radioactive exposure. The mechanisms of mutation induction at human minisatellite loci are discussed. PMID:12226793

  14. Thyroid Carcinoma Secondary to Radiation Cloud Exposure from the Chernobyl Incident of 1986: A Case Study

    PubMed Central

    Atkinson, Andrew L.; Rosenthal, Andrew

    2010-01-01

    The Chernobyl accident of 1986 exposed most if not all of Europe to a blanket of radiation, creating a melting pot of human exposure sequelae that is still showing up in our medical clinics today. In our particular clinic, a young woman of 29 years presented with most of her extended family in attendance. The young woman was born and raised in northern Italy until the age of seven when she left and immigrated to the United States leaving most of her family behind. Shortly after the Chernobyl accident, 5 members of her family, all woman including her own mother, were diagnosed with papillary thyroid carcinoma. Twenty-two years later, this same young woman came into the clinic with papillary thyroid carcinoma, making her the sixth member of her family. This case report illustrates the patient's history with her radiation exposure while talking in depth about the source, Chernobyl. PMID:20740164

  15. Childhood leukaemia in Europe after Chernobyl: 5 year follow-up.

    PubMed Central

    Parkin, D. M.; Clayton, D.; Black, R. J.; Masuyer, E.; Friedl, H. P.; Ivanov, E.; Sinnaeve, J.; Tzvetansky, C. G.; Geryk, E.; Storm, H. H.; Rahu, M.; Pukkala, E.; Bernard, J. L.; Carli, P. M.; L'Huilluier, M. C.; Ménégoz, F.; Schaffer, P.; Schraub, S.; Kaatsch, P.; Michaelis, J.; Apjok, E.; Schuler, D.; Crosignani, P.; Magnani, C.; Bennett, B. G.

    1996-01-01

    The European Childhood Leukaemia - Lymphoma Incidence Study (ECLIS) is designed to address concerns about a possible increase in the risk of cancer in Europe following the nuclear accident in Chernobyle in 1986. This paper reports results of surveillance of childhood leukaemia in cancer registry populations from 1980 up to the end of 1991. There was a slight increase in the incidence of childhood leukaemia in Europe during this period, but the overall geographical pattern of change bears no relation to estimated exposure to radiation resulting from the accident. We conclude that at this stage of follow-up any changes in incidence consequent upon the Chernobyl accident remain undetectable against the usual background rates. Our results are consistent with current estimates of the leukaemogenic risk of radiation exposure, which, outside the immediate vicinity of the accident, was small. PMID:8611419

  16. Chernobyl doses. Volume 3. Habitat and vegetation near the Chernobyl Nuclear Reactor Station. Technical report, 29 September 1987-28 February 1992

    SciTech Connect

    Painter, E.L.; Whicker, F.W.

    1993-01-01

    This volume presents a detailed exposition on the soils, climate, and vegetation of the Poles'ye region of Ukraine and Belorussia with emphasis on the area around the Chernobyl Nuclear Reactor Station. This data provides background for interpretation of multispectral satellite imagery of the area. Volume 1 uses these images and the information of this report to analyze the radiation response of the canopy of the coniferous forests in the immediate vicinity of the reactor station after the accident of 26 April 1986.... Chernobyl, Forest damage, Landsat, Change detection, Conifer stress, Fallout, Ionizing radiation, Multispectral imagery.

  17. Evaluation of Radiation Impacts of Spent Nuclear Fuel Storage (SNFS-2) of Chernobyl NPP - 13495

    SciTech Connect

    Paskevych, Sergiy; Batiy, Valiriy; Sizov, Andriy; Schmieman, Eric

    2013-07-01

    Radiation effects are estimated for the operation of a new dry storage facility for spent nuclear fuel (SNFS-2) of Chernobyl NPP RBMK reactors. It is shown that radiation exposure during normal operation, design and beyond design basis accidents are minor and meet the criteria for safe use of radiation and nuclear facilities in Ukraine. (authors)

  18. Vegetation fires, smoke emissions, and dispersion of radionuclides in the chernobyl exclusion zone

    Treesearch

    Wei Min Hao; Oleg O. Bondarenko; Sergiy Zibtsev; Diane. Hutton

    2009-01-01

    The accident of the Chernobyl nuclear power plant (ChNPP) in 1986 was probably the worst environmental disaster in the past 30 years. The fallout and accumulation of radionuclides in the soil and vegetation could have long-term impacts on the environment. Radionuclides released during large, catastrophic vegetation fires could spread to continental Europe, Scandinavia...

  19. Chernobyl-related thyroid cancer in children of Belarus: a case-control study.

    PubMed

    Astakhova, L N; Anspaugh, L R; Beebe, G W; Bouville, A; Drozdovitch, V V; Garber, V; Gavrilin, Y I; Khrouch, V T; Kuvshinnikov, A V; Kuzmenkov, Y N; Minenko, V P; Moschik, K V; Nalivko, A S; Robbins, J; Shemiakina, E V; Shinkarev, S; Tochitskaya, S I; Waclawiw, M A

    1998-09-01

    The accident at the Chernobyl nuclear power plant on April 26, 1986, released approximately 2 EBq of 131I and other radioiodine isotopes that heavily contaminated southern Belarus. An increase in thyroid cancer reported in 1992 and attributed to the Chernobyl accident was challenged as possibly the result of intensive screening. We began a case-control study to test the hypothesis that the Chernobyl accident caused the increase in thyroid cancer. Records of childhood thyroid cancer in the national therapy centers in Minsk in 1992 yielded 107 individuals with confirmed pathology diagnoses and available for interview. Pathways to diagnosis were (1) routine endocrinological screening in 63, (2) presentation with enlarged or nodular thyroid in 25 and (3) an incidental finding in 19. Two sets of controls were chosen, one matched on pathway to diagnosis, the other representing the area of heavy fallout, both matched on age, sex and rural/urban residence in 1986. The 131I dose to the thyroid was estimated from ground deposition of 137Cs, ground deposition of 131I, a data bank of 1986 thyroid radiation measurements, questionnaires and interviews. Highly significant differences were observed between cases and controls (both sets) with respect to dose. The differences persisted within pathway to diagnosis, gender, age and year of diagnosis, and level of iodine in the soil, and were most marked in the southern portion of the Gomel region. The case-control comparisons indicate a strong relationship between thyroid cancer and estimated radiation dose from the Chernobyl accident.

  20. Calculating Risk: Radiation and Chernobyl.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gale, Robert Peter

    1987-01-01

    Considers who is at risk in a disaster such as Chernobyl. Assesses the difficulty in translating information regarding radiation to the public and in determining the acceptability of technological risks. (NKA)