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Sample records for chernobylsk health project

  1. Working Group 7.0 Environmental Transport and Health Effects, Chernobyl Studies Project. Progress report, October 1994 -- March 1995

    SciTech Connect

    Anspaugh, L.R.; Hendrickson, S.M.

    1995-06-01

    This document presents the details from the working group 7.0 Chernobyl Studies Project. This working group looked at the environmental transport and health effects from the fallout due to the meltdown of Chernobylsk-4 reactor. Topics include: hydrological transport; chromosome painting dosimetry; EPR, TL and OSL dosimetry; stochastic effects; thyroid studies; and leukemia studies.

  2. Projecting Health Needs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1976-01-01

    NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory has developed a computer model for planning future health care needs in the Los Angeles area. The model integrates demographic health and other data to provide rational projections of hospital bed and physician specialty requirements.

  3. Innovative health systems projects.

    PubMed

    Green, Michael; Amad, Mansoor; Woodland, Mark

    2015-02-01

    Residency programmes struggle with the systems-based practice and improvement competency promoted by the Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education. The development of Innovative Health Systems Projects (IHelP) was driven by the need for better systems-based initiatives at an institutional level. Our objective was to develop a novel approach that successfully incorporates systems-based practice in our Graduate Medical Education (GME) programmes, while tracking our impact on health care delivery as an academic medical centre. We started the IHelP programme as a 'volunteer initiative' in 2010. A detailed description of the definition, development and implementation of the IHelP programme, along with our experience of the first year, is described. Residents, fellows and faculty mentors all played an important role in establishing the foundation of this initiative. Following the positive response, we have now incorporated IHelP into all curricula as a graduating requirement. IHelP has promoted scholarly activity and faculty mentorship, [and] has improved aspects of patient care and safety A total of 123 residents and fellows, representing 26 specialties, participated. We reviewed 145 projects that addressed topics ranging from administrative and departmental improvements to clinical care algorithms. The projects by area of focus were: patient care - clinical care, 38 per cent; patient care - quality, 27 per cent; resident education, 21 per cent; and a cumulative 16 per cent among pharmacy, department activities, patient education, medical records and clinical facility. We are pleased with the results of our first year of incorporating a systems-based improvement programme into the GME programmes. This initiative has promoted scholarly activity and faculty mentorship, has improved aspects of patient care and safety, and has led to the development of many practical innovations. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  4. Integrative Cardiac Health Project

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-09-01

    Kashani M, Vernalis M. Should Subclinical Hypothyroidism Be Treated to Lower Cardiovascular Risk? American College of Nurse Practitioners, Oct 2010...of subgroups for preclinical states (prehypertension, prediabetes, subclinical hypothyroidism ) • Creation of new track- Prevention Empowerment...evaluate the important health associations of Subclinical hypothyroidism in subjects entering our CPP. Of 340 consecutive patients, 51 (15%) were

  5. Integrative Cardiac Health Project

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-10-01

    Integrative Cardiac Health Project” protocol. Status: Sub Task #3.4 Collaboration on “Assessing Risk Factors for Cardiovascular Disease in Individuals...Coronary Heart Disease Reversal and the Sub-Study for Subjects in the Dr. Dean Ornish Program and 2) Cardiovascular Risk Assessment and Prevention...Cardiovasc Nurs. Circ. Manuscripts-to be submitted: Conclusions Appendix A 151 Cardiovascular disease (CVD) remains the

  6. The animal health foresight project.

    PubMed

    Willis, Norman G

    2007-01-01

    The Animal Health Foresight Project was co-sponsored by the Canadian Food Inspection Agency (CFIA) and the United States Department of Agriculture (USDA). This study is the most recent of a series of four international workshops of the International Working Group on Animal Disposal Alternatives (IWADA), created to determine alternative options for effective disease control without mass animal destruction. The study employed foresight technology to stimulate new thinking using the future perspective tools of challenge questions and scenario development. A total of 43 Canadian and American participants from industry, academia, the public and government made their contributions over the duration of four meetings. The group developed and analysed eight pictures of possible futures. Ten conclusions were formulated. Fundamental to these conclusions was the recognition of a need for a conceptual change to the management of animal health, a new paradigm. This paradigm was a policy change to the management of risks rather than disease elimination, a change in the roles for the establishment of policy and a convergence of animal health and public health. The new paradigm was incorporated into a hierarchy of decision-making options, out of which five principles for alternatives to mass animal destruction were identified.

  7. Explorations in Mental Health Training: Project Summaries.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Simon, Ralph, Ed.; And Others

    The report contains summaries of 176 pilot projects demonstrating new and innovative approaches for training mental health personnel. Projects were conducted under grants awarded by the Experimental and Special Training Branch of the Division of Manpower and Training Programs, National Institute of Mental Health. The projects have been developed…

  8. Health Project Management. A Manual of Procedures for Formulating and Implementing Health Projects.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bainbridge, J.; Sapirie, S.

    The manual presents 16 main steps for health project management, from project formulation through termination. The manual defines a health project as a temporary intensive effort to set up and put into operation a new or revised service that will result in the reduction of specific health or health-related problems. (Typical examples include the…

  9. Health Project Management. A Manual of Procedures for Formulating and Implementing Health Projects.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bainbridge, J.; Sapirie, S.

    The manual presents 16 main steps for health project management, from project formulation through termination. The manual defines a health project as a temporary intensive effort to set up and put into operation a new or revised service that will result in the reduction of specific health or health-related problems. (Typical examples include the…

  10. Multilingual health education tapes project.

    PubMed

    Vryheid, R

    1992-01-01

    The success of Thailand's 1985 malaria education cassette tapes project motivated the Highland Development Program to produce tapes in 6 tribal languages on family planning, maternal and child health, nutrition, and disease prevention. Staff produced tapes using a drama or radio magazine format as a series of short features with music and sound effects. Scriptwriters consulted villagers, broadcasting professionals, research workers, and health officials to tailor messages to the various hill tribes. They tried to avoid conflict between traditional and modern concepts and to minimize distrust of government services. The scriptwriters used basically short, grammatically simple sentences, and colloquial Thai to simplify translation. The staff tried to recruit literate, adult, native speakers of the target languages with some experience in health education in their own languages. Obstacles encountered with translation included some languages used an uncommon alphabet or translators did not know their own alphabet. The program backtranslated the scripts to assure the accuracy of the messages and the appropriateness of the words used. Backtranslation revealed deficiencies in the translated messages. Altering the meaning of technical terms tended to be simple mistakes, words with multiple meanings, and exaggeration of problems and/or solutions. Translators also sometimes failed to adapt cultural ideas to those of their tribes. For example, some persons translated all possible misconceptions about a disease yet the tribes did not have all the misconceptions. As of early 1992, recording, pretesting, distribution, and follow up had not yet taken place. The staff should meet with a recording studio to coordinate production including technicians and translators identifying means to communicate. Staff should be aware of signs of poor translation which they may have missed earlier and surfaces during recording. Pretesting should occur among literate and illiterate members of

  11. The Adolescent Smoking and Health Project.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sutherland, Mary; And Others

    This project was designed to specifically apply a health planning management system to a school based health education risk reduction program. Additionally, the Adolescent Smoking and Alcohol Project assisted youth in making informed decisions about the use/abuse of alcohol and cigarettes. Program components included a related knowledge base;…

  12. The Hillbrow Primary Health Care Project.

    PubMed

    Rawat, H

    1996-03-01

    This article describes the Hillbrow Primary Health Care Project for Health Personnel Education and Primary Health Care in Greater Johannesburg, South Africa. The project aims to influence health by forming a partnership between the community, the services and training institutions, and appropriate health personnel education. The partnership also aims to develop and implement comprehensive primary health care services in Hillbrow, targeted to the needs of the underserved. The goal is to empower the community to promote health and participate in the management of health services in order to improve community-based training of health personnel. The partners included the University of Witwatersrand and the B.G. Alexandra Nursing College, its faculty, and its medical and nursing students. Other service partners include the Greater Johannesburg Transitional Metropolitan Council's Directorate of Health, Housing, and Urbanization and Departments of Community Health and Environmental Health. 45% of the governing group are community members from various community organizations. The needs assessment identified priority areas as women's health, environmental health, youth, and the elderly and disabled. The community needs pre and postnatal and delivery services. Citizens needs to be mobilized around environmental health issues in the inner city and the education of environmental health officers. Youth need a center with sports facilities. The project's future efforts will include establishment of an effective governance structure, program boundaries and strategies, and the means for long-term sustainability.

  13. Health Activities Project (HAP), Trial Edition III.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Buller, Dave; And Others

    Contained within this Health Activities Project (HAP) trial edition (set III) are a teacher information folio and numerous student activity folios which center around the idea that students in grades 5-8 can control their own health and safety. Each student folio is organized into an Overview, Health Background, Materials, Setting Up, and…

  14. Health Activities Project (HAP), Trial Edition II.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Buller, Dave; And Others

    Contained within this Health Activities Project (HAP) trial edition (set II) are a teacher information folio and numerous student activity folios which center around the idea that students in grades 5-8 can control their own health and safety. Each student folio is organized into a Synopsis, Health Background, Materials, Setting Up, and Activities…

  15. Health sciences library building projects, 1998 survey.

    PubMed

    Bowden, V M

    1999-10-01

    Twenty-eight health sciences library building projects are briefly described, including twelve new buildings and sixteen additions, remodelings, and renovations. The libraries range in size from 2,144 square feet to 190,000 gross square feet. Twelve libraries are described in detail. These include three hospital libraries, one information center sponsored by ten institutions, and eight academic health sciences libraries.

  16. Oregon Migrant Health Project, 1970 Annual Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Oregon State Board of Health, Portland.

    The 1970 annual report on the Oregon Migrant Health Project discusses health services for migrant agricultural workers and their families (approximately 30,000 individuals) who worked and lived temporarily in various Oregon counties. As noted, some 9,000 of the 30,000 migrants were estimated to be in need of some type of medical service. Thus, the…

  17. Health Activities Project (HAP): Breathing Fitness Module.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Buller, Dave; And Others

    Contained within this Health Activities Project (HAP) learning packet are activities for children in grades 5-8. Design of the activities centers around the idea that students can control their own health and safety. Within this module are teacher and student folios describing four activities which involve students in learning how to measure their…

  18. A Rural Citizens Health Promotion Demonstration Project.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sutherland, Mary; And Others

    1989-01-01

    This article describes a health promotion demonstration project which addressed the health problem of hypertension, as related to variables of excercise, weight, blood pressure measurement and reduction, medication compliance, and nutritional practices. Participants (N=18) were senior citizens who were associated with a small, rural, predominantly…

  19. A Rural Citizens Health Promotion Demonstration Project.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sutherland, Mary; And Others

    1989-01-01

    This article describes a health promotion demonstration project which addressed the health problem of hypertension, as related to variables of excercise, weight, blood pressure measurement and reduction, medication compliance, and nutritional practices. Participants (N=18) were senior citizens who were associated with a small, rural, predominantly…

  20. Oregon Migrant Health Project, 1970 Annual Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Oregon State Board of Health, Portland.

    The 1970 annual report on the Oregon Migrant Health Project discusses health services for migrant agricultural workers and their families (approximately 30,000 individuals) who worked and lived temporarily in various Oregon counties. As noted, some 9,000 of the 30,000 migrants were estimated to be in need of some type of medical service. Thus, the…

  1. National health expenditure projections, 1994-2005.

    PubMed

    Burner, S T; Waldo, D R

    1995-01-01

    Using 1993 as a baseline and assuming that current laws and practices continue, the authors project U.S. health expenditures through the year 2005. Annual spending growth has declined since 1990, and, in the scenario reported here, that trend continues in 1994. Growth of health spending increases thereafter, but remains below the average experience of the past decade. Even so, health expenditures grow faster than the gross domestic product (GDP), and by 2005, account for 17.9 percent of the GDP. Unless the system changes, Medicare and Medicaid are projected to pay for an increasing share of total spending during the next decade.

  2. Addressing the reproductive health problems. JICA Reproductive Health Project.

    PubMed

    Nguyen Thi Han

    1999-01-01

    In an effort to ensure quality of medical and health services for all people in Vietnam, several multilateral and bilateral donors and international NGOs have collaborated. One of its most promising projects in the field of reproductive health is the technical cooperation project supported by Japan International Cooperation Agency (JICA). The JICA Reproductive Health Project, which started in June 1997, has created clear changes in staff's knowledge and skills, and people's awareness of the health problems and risks that they are faced with. It was developed to address the serious reproductive health problems in the province represented by an unacceptably high maternal mortality rate. In the Nghe An Province of Vietnam, the JICA Reproductive Health Project has gained the most important achievement. This has been the triumphant empowerment of midwives who are the focal persons of reproductive health care in Vietnam. In view of the success of the JICA Project, plans have been made to implement the reproductive health services in 11 other districts.

  3. Integrative Cardiac Health Project (ICHP)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-09-01

    spectrometry (LC-FTMS). All assays run in duplicate, manuscript in preparation. Structural and Functional Measures of Cardiovascular Health...exercise, meditation, yoga and group support, which may lead to improved CHD risk factor profiles and genetic markers of coronary artery disease

  4. Recent health sciences library building projects.

    PubMed

    Ludwig, L T

    1991-01-01

    Librarians were asked to submit information for an annual architectural feature on projected, partially funded, architect selected, nearly designed, bid completed, under construction, almost finished, or recently completed library construction. Thirty-two health sciences libraries reported expansion, construction of new facilities, or construction planning. Seven building programs were identified as projected, or in predesign or design stages. Five projects were new, stand-alone structures in which the library occupies all or a major portion of the space. Nine projects were part of new construction for several separately administered units in which the library is a major tenant. Eleven projects involved additions to or renovations of existing space. Seven projects are presented as illustrative of current library construction.

  5. Value propositions of mHealth projects.

    PubMed

    Gorski, Irena; Bram, Joshua T; Sutermaster, Staci; Eckman, Molly; Mehta, Khanjan

    While mHealth holds great potential for addressing global health disparities, a majority of the initiatives never proceed beyond the pilot stage. One fundamental concern is that mHealth projects are seldom designed from the customer's perspective to address their specific problems and/or create appreciable value. A customer-centric view, where direct tangible benefits of interventions are identified and communicated effectively, can drive customer engagement and advance projects toward self-sustaining business models. This article reviews the business models of 234 mHealth projects to identify nine distinct value propositions that solve specific problems for customers. Each of these value propositions is discussed with real-world examples, analyses of their design approaches and business strategies, and common enablers as well as hurdles to surviving past the pilot stage. Furthermore, a deeper analysis of 42 mHealth ventures that have achieved self-sustainability through project revenue provides a host of practical and poignant insights into the design of systems that can fulfil mHealth's promise to address healthcare challenges in the long term.

  6. Promoting Health Literacy through the Health Education Assessment Project

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Marx, Eva; Hudson, Nancy; Deal, Tami B.; Pateman, Beth; Middleton, Kathleen

    2007-01-01

    Background: The Council of Chief State School Officers' State Collaborative on Assessment and Student Standards Health Education Assessment Project (SCASS-HEAP) allows states to pool financial and human resources to develop effective ready-to-use health education assessment resources through a collaborative process. The purpose of this article is…

  7. The Use of Health Aides in Migrant Health Projects.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hoff, Wilbur

    Intended for migrant project administrators and other professional workers, this document contains recommendations developed from a nationwide study for evaluating the utilization and effectiveness of health aides (indigenous workers) in migrant health programs. Recommendations are provided for five major phases of activity essential for effective…

  8. Promoting Health Literacy through the Health Education Assessment Project

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Marx, Eva; Hudson, Nancy; Deal, Tami B.; Pateman, Beth; Middleton, Kathleen

    2007-01-01

    Background: The Council of Chief State School Officers' State Collaborative on Assessment and Student Standards Health Education Assessment Project (SCASS-HEAP) allows states to pool financial and human resources to develop effective ready-to-use health education assessment resources through a collaborative process. The purpose of this article is…

  9. The West Virginia Health Education Assessment Project.

    PubMed

    Tompkins, Nancy O'Hara; Kamal, Khalid M; Chapman, Don

    2005-08-01

    Well-designed school health education should provide students with the knowledge and skills to prevent the health risk behaviors most responsible for the major causes of morbidity and mortality. This paper reports the methodology and findings of a West Virginia statewide health education assessment initiative and describes how the findings are used to design professional development training for school health educators. Selected response items from the State Collaborative on Assessment and Student Standards, Health Education Assessment Project were used to develop a 40-item assessment instrument for 6 health education content areas. In West Virginia, 51 counties and 242 schools were recruited (county response rate = 93%; school response rate = 53%); 17,549 students were tested in grades 6, 8, and high school health education classes. Mean total scores by grade were 30.61 (grade 6), 26.55 (grade 8), and 26.53 (high school), indicating a slight decline in scores as grade level increased. Females in each grade level scored higher on total Health Education Assessment Project (HEAP) scores and subtest scores than males. The results suggest notable differences across grade levels. High school students failed to meet the standard on any health education content areas, indicating the need for enhanced knowledge and skill development. During professional development training, HEAP scores were examined in the context of results from the West Virginia Youth Risk Behavior Survey to underscore the importance of providing quality skills-based health education in West Virginia schools.

  10. UMTRA Project environmental, health, and safety plan

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1989-02-01

    The basic health and safety requirements established in this plan are designed to provide guidelines to be applied at all Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project sites. Specific restrictions are given where necessary. However, an attempt has been made to provide guidelines which are generic in nature, and will allow for evaluation of site-specific conditions. Health and safety personnel are expected to exercise professional judgment when interpreting these guidelines to ensure the health and safety of project personnel and the general population. This UMTRA Project Environmental, Health, and Safety (EH S) Plan specifies the basic Federal health and safety standards and special DOE requirements applicable to this program. In addition, responsibilities in carrying out this plan are delineated. Some guidance on program requirements and radiation control and monitoring is also included. An Environmental, Health, and Safety Plan shall be developed as part of the remedial action plan for each mill site and associated disposal site. Special conditions at the site which may present potential health hazards will be described, and special areas that should should be addressed by the Remedial Action Contractor (RAC) will be indicated. Site-specific EH S concerns will be addressed by special contract conditions in RAC subcontracts. 2 tabs.

  11. UMTRA Project: Environment, Safety, and Health Plan

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1995-02-01

    The US Department of Energy has prepared this UMTRA Project Environment, Safety, and Health (ES and H) Plan to establish the policy, implementing requirements, and guidance for the UMTRA Project. The requirements and guidance identified in this plan are designed to provide technical direction to UMTRA Project contractors to assist in the development and implementation of their ES and H plans and programs for UMTRA Project work activities. Specific requirements set forth in this UMTRA Project ES and H Plan are intended to provide uniformity to the UMTRA Project`s ES and H programs for processing sites, disposal sites, and vicinity properties. In all cases, this UMTRA Project ES and H Plan is intended to be consistent with applicable standards and regulations and to provide guidance that is generic in nature and will allow for contractors` evaluation of site or contract-specific ES and H conditions. This plan specifies the basic ES and H requirements applicable to UMTRA Project ES and H programs and delineates responsibilities for carrying out this plan. DOE and contractor ES and H personnel are expected to exercise professional judgment and apply a graded approach when interpreting these guidelines, based on the risk of operations.

  12. Recent health sciences library building projects.

    PubMed

    Ludwig, L

    1993-10-01

    The Medical Library Association's third annual survey of recent health sciences library building projects identified fourteen libraries planning, expanding, or constructing new library facilities. Three of five new library buildings are freestanding structures where the library occupies all or a major portion of the space. The two other new facilities are for separately administered units where the library is a major tenant. Nine projects involve additions to or renovations of existing space. Six projects are in projected, predesign, or design stages or are awaiting funding approval. This paper describes four projects that illustrate technology's growing effect on librarians and libraries. They are designed to accommodate change, a plethora of electronic gear, and easy use of technology. Outwardly, they do not look much different than many other modern buildings. But, inside, the changes have been dramatic although they have evolved slowly as the building structure has been adapted to new conditions.

  13. Health sciences library building projects, 1998 survey.

    PubMed Central

    Bowden, V M

    1999-01-01

    Twenty-eight health sciences library building projects are briefly described, including twelve new buildings and sixteen additions, remodelings, and renovations. The libraries range in size from 2,144 square feet to 190,000 gross square feet. Twelve libraries are described in detail. These include three hospital libraries, one information center sponsored by ten institutions, and eight academic health sciences libraries. Images PMID:10550027

  14. Song book on reproductive health issue. JICA Reproductive Health Project.

    PubMed

    1999-01-01

    This article reports on the use of poetry to disseminate messages to people, an approach that was utilized by the Japan International Cooperation Agency (JICA) Reproductive Health Project in its awareness creation campaign. The activity called on villagers living in the project area to write and contribute poems on reproductive health. The themes of the poem include 1) health benefits of receiving more than four prenatal checkups; 2) necessity of being immunized against tetanus; 3) how to make an early detection of the warning signs developing during pregnancy; 4) male participation in reproductive health; and 5) not having abortion. About 1300 people contributed their poems to the Poetical Works Publication Sub-Committee, who selected 140 poems for publication. The JICA project has printed 10,000 copies of an anthology entitled ¿Message to Everybody--Song Book on Reproductive Health Issues.¿ Three of the poems that were selected by the Management Team of the JICA Reproductive Health Project in Nghe An Province, are included in the article.

  15. Health sciences library building projects: 1995 survey.

    PubMed

    Ludwig, L

    1996-07-01

    The Medical Library Association's fifth annual survey of recent health sciences library building projects identified twenty-five libraries planning, expanding, or constructing new library facilities. None of the fifteen new library projects are free standing structures; however, several occupy a major portion of the project space. Ten projects involve renovation of or addition to existing space. Information regarding size, cost of project, type of construction, completion date, and other factual data was provided for twelve projects. The remaining identified projects are in pre-design or early-design stages, or are awaiting funding approval. Library building projects for three hospital libraries, three academic medical libraries, and an association library are described. Each illustrates how considerations of economics and technology are changing the traditional library model from a centrally stored information depository housing a wide range of information under one roof where users come to the information, into an electronic model gradually shifting from investment in the physical presence of resources to investment in creating work space for creditible information specialists who help in-house and distanced users to obtain information electronically from any place and at any time. This new model includes a highly skilled library team to manage, filter, and package the information to users trained by these resident experts.

  16. HOME HEALTH AIDE TRAINING PROJECT. FINAL REPORT.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Greater New Haven Community Council, CT.

    THE HOME HEALTH AIDE PERFORMS SIMPLE PERSONAL CARE FUNCTIONS UNDER NURSING SUPERVISION IN THE HOME CARE OF AN ILL OR DISABLED PERSON. THE PROJECT OBJECTIVES WERE TO TRAIN AS AIDES 30 MEN AND WOMEN AGE 45 YEARS AND OLDER WITH LIMITED INCOMES TO MEET A COMMUNITY EMPLOYMENT NEED AND TO EXPERIMENT IN RECRUITMENT, SELECTION, TRAINING, AND EMPLOYMENT…

  17. Health/Science: Objectives Guide. Project CAST.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Charles County Board of Education, La Plata, MD. Office of Special Education.

    The guide, one of a series of documents on Project CAST (Community and School Together), a community-based career education program for secondary special education students, presents a continuum of objectives in the areas of health and science which should be taught in grades 9-12 and which represent minimal competencies for independent living.…

  18. National health expenditures projections through 2030

    PubMed Central

    Burner, Sally T.; Waldo, Daniel R.; McKusick, David R.

    1992-01-01

    If current laws and practices continue, health expenditures in the United States will reach $1.7 trillion by the year 2000, an amount equal to 18.1 percent of the Nation's gross domestic product (GDP). By the year 2030, as America's baby boomers enter their seventies and eighties, health spending will top $16 trillion, or 32 percent of GDP. The projections presented here incorporate the assumptions and conclusions of the Medicare trustees in their 1992 report to Congress on the status of Medicare, and the 1992 President's budget estimates of Medicaid outlays. PMID:10124432

  19. National health expenditures projections through 2030.

    PubMed

    Burner, S T; Waldo, D R; McKusick, D R

    1992-01-01

    If current laws and practices continue, health expenditures in the United States will reach $1.7 trillion by the year 2000, an amount equal to 18.1 percent of the Nation's gross domestic product (GDP). By the year 2030, as America's baby boomers enter their seventies and eighties, health spending will top $16 trillion, or 32 percent of GDP. The projections presented here incorporate the assumptions and conclusions of the Medicare trustees in their 1992 report to Congress on the status of Medicare, and the 1992 President's budget estimates of Medicaid outlays.

  20. Project Health: Evaluation of a Project-Based Health Education Program

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zusevics, Kaija L.; Lemke, Melissa A.; Harley, Amy E.; Florsheim, Paul

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: Milwaukee has very high rates of risky sexual behavior and low rates of academic achievement among adolescents. Milwaukee school representatives partnered with researchers to create and implement an innovative project-based learning (PBL) high school health curriculum to engage students in school. This health education program, Project…

  1. Project Health: Evaluation of a Project-Based Health Education Program

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zusevics, Kaija L.; Lemke, Melissa A.; Harley, Amy E.; Florsheim, Paul

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: Milwaukee has very high rates of risky sexual behavior and low rates of academic achievement among adolescents. Milwaukee school representatives partnered with researchers to create and implement an innovative project-based learning (PBL) high school health curriculum to engage students in school. This health education program, Project…

  2. Project Kiddum: Early Intervention in a Health Care Setting.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tamir, Dov

    1981-01-01

    Project Kiddum functions in nine Mother and Child Health Care Centers in culturally deprived areas of Jerusalem. The project integrates a large scale infant intervention program into ongoing primary preventive mother and child health care. (Author/GC)

  3. Maternal and child health project in Nigeria.

    PubMed

    Okafor, Chinyelu B

    2003-12-01

    Maternal deaths in developing countries are rooted in womens powerlessness and their unequal access to employment, finance, education, basic health care, and other resources. Nigeria is Africa's most populous country, and it is an oil producing country, but Nigeria has one of the worst maternal mortality rates in Africa. These deaths were linked to deficiencies in access to health care including poor quality of health services, socio-cultural factors, and access issues related to the poor status of women. To address these problems, a participatory approach was used to bring Christian women from various denominations in Eastern Nigeria together. With technical assistance from a research unit in a university in Eastern Nigeria, the women were able to implement a Safe Motherhood project starting from needs assessment to program evaluation. Lessons learned from this program approach are discussed.

  4. Promoting health literacy through the health education assessment project.

    PubMed

    Marx, Eva; Hudson, Nancy; Deal, Tami B; Pateman, Beth; Middleton, Kathleen

    2007-04-01

    The Council of Chief State School Officers' State Collaborative on Assessment and Student Standards Health Education Assessment Project (SCASS-HEAP) allows states to pool financial and human resources to develop effective ready-to-use health education assessment resources through a collaborative process. The purpose of this article is to describe the extensive ongoing development of the SCASS-HEAP and its benefits for important stakeholders in health and education. A review of the products from the first decade of the SCASS-HEAP was undertaken. The SCASS-HEAP supports a comprehensive systems approach to helping educators focus effectively on the most important skills and issues in child and adolescent health and gives health education a place at the school reform table, providing visibility and credibility and promoting the essential links between health and learning. State education agencies and school districts can use SCASS-HEAP materials for assessment and, perhaps more importantly, to help teachers modify and improve instruction at the classroom level for increased student learning.

  5. Observations on a rural health manpower project.

    PubMed

    Pinchoff, D M; Ingall, J R; Crage, W D

    1977-02-01

    The Rural Externship Program was developed by the Lakes Area Regional Medical Program in conjunction with the State University of New York at Buffalo and the health professionals of western New York and northwestern Pennsylvania. It was designed to encourage health science students to practice in a rural area following graduation. This interdisciplinary program provides health science students with an eight-week summer living-working experience in a rural environment, supervised by practitioner-preceptors. The intent is to develop their appreciation of rural health care and life-styles. Since the summer of 1970, 240 students have participated. This paper describes and discusses the project and presents measures of the externs' changes in attitudes toward rural practice which occurred after they participated in the program. A survey of externs who have graduated shows the effect of the program on their decision to locate. Of the 61 externs contacted, 55 percent indicated that they were in rural practice, and 53 percent of the latter indicated that their experience in the Rural Externship Program was an important factor in their decision to practice in a rural area.

  6. A primary health care project in Sarawak.

    PubMed

    Chen, P C; Tan, Y K

    1982-03-01

    A joint pilot project between the Ministry of Health and the Dept. of Social and Preventive Medicine, University of Malaya, to test the value of village aides in extending the health care system into isolated Iban communities was begun in May 1979 in the Entabai District of Sarawak. A group of 15 village aides consisting of 11 traditional Iban manangs (medicine men) and 4 youths were trained to provide primary health care including simple curative care, preventive care, and to assist in the detection of malaria. Evaluation carreid out 2 years later showed the following. With regard to curative care, the village aides were each, on the average, treating 70.6 patients/month, the most common complaint being headache (30.4%), which along with abdominal pain, constipation, bodyache, diarrhea, vomiting, fever, worm infections, cough, and sore throat, accounted for 89% of all illnesses seen by them. Subsequent to the introduction of village aides in the project area, the number of seriously ill patients requiring admission to the rest beds of the klinik desa dropped by 43.8% and the number of emergency referrals to the backup divisional hospitals fell by 46.1% showing that patients were coming to the klink desa for treatment at an earlier stage. The 11 traditional Iban manangs, who had recently received training had, on their own accord, drastically reduced the use of traditional Iban modes of therapy in preference for modern medicine. During the 24 months immediately after the introduction of village aides into Entabai, 9 gravity feed water supply systems together with related health packages advocating general cleanliness, the use of latrines, and fences were affected, whereas only 6 such systems were installed in the previous 24 months, indicating that it is likely that the village aides were of some assistance in mobilizing the community with respect to self-help efforts. During the same period, the majority of longhouses in the area successfully established a number

  7. Child and Adolescent Health Profile Project: Annotated Bibliography.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Simkin, Linda; And Others

    Developed as part of the Child and Adolescent Health Profile Project, this annotated bibliography is intended as a reference for professionals interested in key dimensions of children's health. Citations are grouped into the following four categories: (1) background information on child health issues, (2) child health indicators and health status…

  8. Integrating mental health into public health: The community mental health development project in India

    PubMed Central

    Ng, Chee; Chauhan, Ajay P.; Chavan, Bir Singh; Ramasubramanian, Chellamuthu; Singh, Amool R.; Sagar, Rajesh; Fraser, Julia; Ryan, Brigid; Prasad, Jagdish; Singh, Sujeet; Das, Jayanta; Isaac, Mohan

    2014-01-01

    The Ministry of Health and Family Welfare and its public health institutes are collaborating with Asia Australia Mental Health on an innovative community mental health development project designed to enhance initiatives under the District Mental Health Program and increase accessibility of essential community mental health services. The project is an exciting opportunity to create positive change in meeting the challenges of community mental health care in India. It recognizes that no one single model of care can be applied to all the community in the country and that locally appropriate models working in close partnership with local communities is required. Targeted and skill-based training programs are useful to build local leadership capacity in implementing quality and culturally appropriate community mental health services. PMID:25316931

  9. Family Health Services project: the way forward.

    PubMed

    Dabiri, O M

    1993-01-01

    Nigerians did not readily accept family planning when Family Health Services (FHS) began in 1988. FHS has made much headway in training, IEC (information, education, and communication), and constituency building and advocacy. Its staff have identified obstacles to implementation, especially program sustainability and management structure. Key limits to sustainability of IEC efforts were inadequately trained personnel and inability of trained personnel to apply what they learned at work stations. The Federal Ministry and Social Services' role in the FHS project was not clearly defined. Some private sector factors contributing to a confused management structure were inadequate method mix, high contraceptive cost, poor monitoring of quality of care, and no coordination of family planning training with the public factor. FHS has since decided to focus its efforts on increasing the demand for and availability of modern contraceptives and improving the quality of family planning services of both the public and private sectors. FHS hopes that accomplishing these activities will reduce fertility, morbidity, and mortality. Strategic plans include a regional focus, quality of care, a variety of methods offered, intensification, hospital and clinics, a management information system, contraceptive logistics, distribution regulations, and addressing social, cultural, and behavioral factors. To effectively implement the strategy, USAID and the Federal Ministry held a workshop in 1993 to effect full integration of Nigerian experience in the 2nd phase of the project (FHS II). Participants reviewed the strengths and weaknesses of the first phase and agreed on implementation. For example, nongovernmental organizations should implement FHS II. FHS II includes training, IEC, and commodities/logistics.

  10. The increased competency of health staff. JICA Reproductive Health Project. Ministry of Health.

    PubMed

    Nguyen Dinh Loan

    1999-01-01

    This article reports the findings on a follow-up study of the reproductive health project supported by the Japan International Cooperation Agency (JICA). The project has been implemented in eight districts of Nghe An Province, one of the poorest provinces in Vietnam. The core of the project is a 1-month training of health staff in safe delivery, prenatal, and postnatal checkups. Substantial improvement in reproductive health conditions in Nghe An Province has been noted since the implementation of the project. The infant mortality rate, maternal mortality rate, and the total fertility rate has significantly lowered, while the contraceptive prevalence rate has increased. It is hoped that the JICA continues its assistance to the province for some more years.

  11. Health Careers Project for People in Public Housing.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Miami-Dade Community Coll., FL. Medical Center Campus.

    A serious shortage of qualified health care professionals is forcing hospitals and health care agencies to undertake costly recruitment and hiring of foreign nurses and other health care professionals to meet staffing needs. Hospitals in Dade County spend from $2,900 to $20,000 per recruit, not including salary. The Health Careers Project for…

  12. Texas State Department of Health Migrant Project. Annual Report 1971.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Texas State Dept. of Health Resources, Austin.

    The Texas Migrant Health Project under the State Department of Health aims to: (1) promote and improve medical, dental, and public health services for the domestic agricultural worker and his dependents and (2) encourage and support migrant efforts to participate in and be responsible for personal and family health. During 1969-70, the state was…

  13. Health Careers Project for People in Public Housing.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Miami-Dade Community Coll., FL. Medical Center Campus.

    A serious shortage of qualified health care professionals is forcing hospitals and health care agencies to undertake costly recruitment and hiring of foreign nurses and other health care professionals to meet staffing needs. Hospitals in Dade County spend from $2,900 to $20,000 per recruit, not including salary. The Health Careers Project for…

  14. The Pacific Island Health Care Project

    PubMed Central

    Person, Donald Ames

    2014-01-01

    Introduction/Background: US Associated/Affiliated Pacific Islands (USAPI) include three freely associated states: Marshall Islands, Federated States of Micronesia, Palau, and three Territories: American Samoa, Guam, and Commonwealth of the Northern Mariana Islands. Objective: The Pacific Island Health Care Project (PIHCP) provides humanitarian medical referral/consultation/care to >500,000 indigenous people of these remote islands. Methods: In the mid-1990s, we developed a simple store-and-forward program to link the USAPI with Tripler Army Medical Center. This application allowed image attachment to email consultations. Results: More than 8000 Pacific Islanders have benefited from the program. Three thousand Pacific Islanders prior to telemedicine (1990–1997) and since store-and-forward telemedicine (1997-present), the PIHCP has helped an additional 5000. Records post dynamically and are stored in an archival database. Conclusion: The PIHCP is the longest running telemedicine program in the world delivering humanitarian medical care. It has bridged the Developing World of the remote Pacific Islands with advanced medical and surgical care available at a major US military teaching hospital. (The opinions expressed here are those of the author and not that of the Army, Department of Defense, or the US Government.) PMID:25353012

  15. The human genome project and international health

    SciTech Connect

    Watson, J.D.; Cook-Deegan, R.M. )

    1990-06-27

    The human genome project is designed to provide common resources for the study of human genetics, and to assist biomedical researchers in their assault on disease. The main benefit will be to provide several kinds of maps of the human genome, and those of other organisms, to permit rapid isolation of genes for further study about DNA structure and function. This article describes genome research programs in developed and developing countries, and the international efforts that have contributed to genome research programs. For example, the large-scale collaborations to study Duchenne's muscular dystrophy, Huntington's disease, Alzheimer's disease, cystic fibrosis involve collaborators from many nations and families spread throughout the world. In the USA, the US Department of Energy was first to start a dedicated genome research program in 1987. Since then, another major government program has begun at the National Center for Human Genome Research of the National Institutes of Health. Italy, China, Australia, France, Canada, and Japan have genome research programs also.

  16. Oregon Migrant Health Project; Annual Progress Report 1969.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Oregon State Board of Health, Portland.

    In this 1969 annual report, 10 objectives of the Oregon Migrant Health Project--which served approximately 18,400 migrants during the project year--are listed. These objectives relate to providing for diagnostic and medical services, preventive medical services, and dental care, as well as promoting health awareness, education, and improved living…

  17. Needs assessment in health research projects: a new approach to project management in iran.

    PubMed

    Peykari, Niloofar; Owlia, Parviz; Malekafzali, Hossein; Ghanei, Mostafa; Babamahmoodi, Abdolreza; Djalalinia, Shirin

    2013-01-01

    The science and technology health plan has defined the outline of health research to the national vision of Iran by 2025. The aim of this study was to focus on the process of needs assessment of health research projects also health research priority setting in Iran. THE PROJECT MANAGEMENT LIFE CYCLE HAS FOUR PHASES: Initiation, Planning, Execution and Closure. Based on abovementioned points we conducted the study. Focusing on the needs assessment led to systematic implementation of needs assessment of health project in all of the medical sciences universities. Parallel with this achieved strategies health research priority setting was followed through specific process from empowerment to implementation. We should adopt with more systematic progressive methods of health project managements for both our national convenience as well as our international health research programs.

  18. Projections of National Health Expenditures, 1980, 1985, and 1990

    PubMed Central

    Freeland, Mark; Calat, George; Schendler, Carol Ellen

    1980-01-01

    This paper presents projections of national health expenditures by type of expenditure and sources of funds for 1980, 1985, and 1990. A major purpose of these projections is to provide a baseline for health care expenditures in the absence of national health insurance and cost containment. Rapid growth in health expenditures is projected to continue to 1990. National health expenditures increased 350 percent between 1965 and 1978, reaching $192 billion in 1978. They are projected to reach $245 billion in 1980, $440 billion in 1985 and $760 billion in 1990, under current legislation. As a proportion of the Gross National Product (GNP), health expenditures rose from 6.2 percent to 9.1 percent between 1965 and 1978. They are projected to continue to rise, reaching 10.5 percent by 1985 and 11.5 percent by 1990. Sources of payments for these expenditures are also shifting. From 1965 to 1978, the percentage of total health expenditures that was government financed increased 16 percentage points, from 25 to 41 percent. The Federal share of public funds during the same period grew rapidly, from 53 percent in 1965 to 69 percent in 1978. In 1985, approximately 42 percent of total health spending is projected to be financed from public funds, of which 72 percent will be paid by the Federal government. Public funds are expected to account for 43 percent of total national health expenditures by 1990. PMID:10309132

  19. The Health Information Literacy Research Project*

    PubMed Central

    Kurtz-Rossi, Sabrina; Funk, Carla J.

    2009-01-01

    Objectives: This research studied hospital administrators' and hospital-based health care providers' (collectively, the target group) perceived value of consumer health information resources and of librarians' roles in promoting health information literacy in their institutions. Methods: A web-based needs survey was developed and administered to hospital administrators and health care providers. Multiple health information literacy curricula were developed. One was pilot-tested by nine hospital libraries in the United States and Canada. Quantitative and qualitative methods were used to evaluate the curriculum and its impact on the target group. Results: A majority of survey respondents believed that providing consumer health information resources was critically important to fulfilling their institutions' missions and that their hospitals could improve health information literacy by increasing awareness of its impact on patient care and by training staff to become more knowledgeable about health literacy barriers. The study showed that a librarian-taught health information literacy curriculum did raise awareness about the issue among the target group and increased both the use of National Library of Medicine consumer health resources and referrals to librarians for health information literacy support. Conclusions: It is hoped that many hospital administrators and health care providers will take the health information literacy curricula and recognize that librarians can educate about the topic and that providers will use related consumer health services and resources. PMID:19851494

  20. The health information literacy research project.

    PubMed

    Shipman, Jean P; Kurtz-Rossi, Sabrina; Funk, Carla J

    2009-10-01

    This research studied hospital administrators' and hospital-based health care providers' (collectively, the target group) perceived value of consumer health information resources and of librarians' roles in promoting health information literacy in their institutions. A web-based needs survey was developed and administered to hospital administrators and health care providers. Multiple health information literacy curricula were developed. One was pilot-tested by nine hospital libraries in the United States and Canada. Quantitative and qualitative methods were used to evaluate the curriculum and its impact on the target group. A majority of survey respondents believed that providing consumer health information resources was critically important to fulfilling their institutions' missions and that their hospitals could improve health information literacy by increasing awareness of its impact on patient care and by training staff to become more knowledgeable about health literacy barriers. The study showed that a librarian-taught health information literacy curriculum did raise awareness about the issue among the target group and increased both the use of National Library of Medicine consumer health resources and referrals to librarians for health information literacy support. It is hoped that many hospital administrators and health care providers will take the health information literacy curricula and recognize that librarians can educate about the topic and that providers will use related consumer health services and resources.

  1. A Directory of Migrant Health Projects Supported Under the Migrant Health Act.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Community Health Service (DHEW/PHS), Bethesda, MD.

    Health service centers providing health care to migrants are listed by state in this booklet. A code system describes the services provided by the projects. Information listed for each project includes the project name, location, grantee, director, telephone number, service sites, services offered, periods during which the services are offered,…

  2. Economics of health care access and delivery projects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanenhaus, Robert

    1995-10-01

    This article updates and quantifies the costs and net government savings of two of three new technological projects introduced in last year's proceedings ('Use of Technology to Reduce Health Costs,' pp. 196-7). The projects are microcomputer video for medical outreach and ride tracking. The projects focus on maintaining or improving the delivery of and access to health care, while reducing cost significantly, by enabling more efficient or effective practices. As calculated to date, IMI currently estimates the two projects can save federal and state governments up to 180 million net per year, i.e., 20 million from microcomputer video for medical outreach and $160 million from ride tracking. (IMI is currently calculating the cost and savings of the third project, health care card system.) The article begins with a summary of each project, includes new accomplishments and participating organizations and lists the costs, savings categories and calculated savings.

  3. Planning a change project in mental health nursing.

    PubMed

    Thorpe, Rebecca

    2015-09-02

    This article outlines a plan for a change project to improve the quality of physical health care on mental health wards. The plan was designed to improve the monitoring and recording of respiratory rates on mental health wards, through the implementation of a training programme for staff. A root cause analysis was used to explore the reasons for the low incidence of respiratory rate measurement on mental health wards, and the results of this establish the basis of the proposed change project and its aims and objectives. The article describes how the project could be implemented using a change management model, as well as how its effects could be measured and evaluated. Potential barriers to the planned change project are discussed, including the human dimensions of change. The article suggests methods to overcome such barriers, discusses the value of leadership as an important factor, and examines the principles of clinical governance in the context of the planned change project.

  4. SSME Advanced Health Management: Project Overview

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Plowden, John

    2000-01-01

    This document is the viewgraphs from a presentation concerning the development of the Health Management system for the Space Shuttle Main Engine (SSME). It reviews the historical background of the SSME Advanced Health Management effort through the present final Health management configuration. The document includes reviews of three subsystems to the Advanced Health Management System: (1) the Real-Time Vibration Monitor System, (2) the Linear Engine Model, and (3) the Optical Plume Anomaly Detection system.

  5. The West Virginia Health Education Assessment Project

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tompkins, Nancy O'Hara; Kamal, Khalid M.; Chapman, Don

    2005-01-01

    Well-designed school health education should provide students with the knowledge and skills to prevent the health risk behaviors most responsible for the major causes of morbidity and mortality. This paper reports the methodology and findings of a West Virginia statewide health education assessment initiative and describes how the findings are…

  6. The West Virginia Health Education Assessment Project

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tompkins, Nancy O'Hara; Kamal, Khalid M.; Chapman, Don

    2005-01-01

    Well-designed school health education should provide students with the knowledge and skills to prevent the health risk behaviors most responsible for the major causes of morbidity and mortality. This paper reports the methodology and findings of a West Virginia statewide health education assessment initiative and describes how the findings are…

  7. The Fort Bragg Mental Health Demonstration Project

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1992-08-01

    care bill for 1990, $186 billion, exceeds their after-tax profits (Faltermayer, 1991). "Moreover, the average cost of health coverage went from $2,600...spending for health services as a percent of corporate after-tax profits grew to more than 100% (Karlin, 1991). So, American businesses share of the health

  8. Evaluating success of mobile health projects in the developing world.

    PubMed

    Ginige, J Anupama; Maeder, Anthony J; Long, Vanessa

    2014-01-01

    Many mobile health (mHealth) projects, typically deploying pilot or small scale implementations, have been undertaken in developing world settings and reported with a widely varying range of claims being made on their effectiveness and benefits. As a result, there is little evidence for which aspects of such projects lead to successful outcomes. This paper describes a literature review of papers from PubMed undertaken to identify strong contributions to execution and evaluation of mHealth projects in developing world settings, and suggests a template for classifying the main success factors to assist with collating evidence in the future.

  9. [School environment and children respiratory health: the SEARCH project].

    PubMed

    Zauli Sajani, Stefano; Colaiacomo, Elisabetta; De Maio, Francesca; Lauriola, Paolo; Sinisi, Luciana

    2009-01-01

    The Budapest Fourth Ministerial Conference on Environment and Health in 2004 launched the Children Environment and Health Action Plan for Europe (CEHAPE). The Fifth Ministerial Conference will be held in March 2010 in Parma (I) and the project activities implemented within the CEHAPE framework will be introduced. One of these projects is the European multicentric SEARCH project (School Environment And Respiratory health of Children), promoted by REC (Regional Environmental Center for Central and Eastern Europe) which involved, among national partners, several Italian regions and which will be briefly described in this paper.

  10. The Current and Projected Taxpayer Shares of US Health Costs

    PubMed Central

    Woolhandler, Steffie

    2016-01-01

    Objectives. We estimated taxpayers’ current and projected share of US health expenditures, including government payments for public employees’ health benefits as well as tax subsidies to private health spending. Methods. We tabulated official Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services figures on direct government spending for health programs and public employees’ health benefits for 2013, and projected figures through 2024. We calculated the value of tax subsidies for private spending from official federal budget documents and figures for state and local tax collections. Results. Tax-funded health expenditures totaled $1.877 trillion in 2013 and are projected to increase to $3.642 trillion in 2024. Government’s share of overall health spending was 64.3% of national health expenditures in 2013 and will rise to 67.1% in 2024. Government health expenditures in the United States account for a larger share of gross domestic product (11.2% in 2013) than do total health expenditures in any other nation. Conclusions. Contrary to public perceptions and official Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services estimates, government funds most health care in the United States. Appreciation of government’s predominant role in health funding might encourage more appropriate and equitable targeting of health expenditures. PMID:26794173

  11. Sources of project financing in health care systems.

    PubMed

    Smith, D G; Wheeler, J R; Rivenson, H L; Reiter, K L

    2000-01-01

    Through discussions with chief financial officers of leading health care systems, insights are offered on preferences for project financing and development efforts. Data from these same systems provide at least anecdotal evidence in support of pecking-order theory.

  12. Inventory of validation approaches in selected health telematics projects.

    PubMed

    Nykänen, P; Enning, J; Talmon, J; Hoyer, D; Sanz, F; Thayer, C; Roine, R; Vissers, M; Eurlings, F

    1999-12-01

    This paper presents the results from an inventory of validation approaches and methodologies which have been used in selected health telematics projects. The inventory was performed in the VATAM Validation of Telematic Applications in Medicine project, HC1115HC. The purpose of the inventory was to analyse the methodologies and their application assumptions in order to identify possibilities for harmonization and consolidation. The inventory was performed using five validation dimensions: IT-development; quality; user; technology assessment and marketing. The inventory results show that possibilities exist to synthesise methodologies and to provide practical guidance and support for projects that are developing health telematics applications. All stakeholders in health telematics projects, i.e. users, health care decision-makers, developers, suppliers and IT-industries, can benefit from practical validation guidelines and support for validation when guidelines are represented in a usable, easy to access and informative way.

  13. The national mobile health worker project in England.

    PubMed

    Drayton, Kathryn; Robinson, Karen

    2014-01-01

    Community services provide essential care to many, often vulnerable, people, families and communities along the spectrum from health promotion to end of life care. The Mobile Health Worker Project is part of a larger project, the Transforming Community Services programme, which was established to support providers make changes to service provision that would provide better health outcomes, as well as increasing efficiency through the use of technology. This paper draws on the results of the two phase Mobile Health Worker project which involved 11 sites around England, the aim of which was to understand the requirements of mobile working. The results demonstrate that increased productivity and efficiency can be achieved by making changes to working processes. The project also provides guidance to increase the rate of mobile working adoption by providing a solid economic basis for investment in and deployment of mobile solutions to community organisations.

  14. Camp for all connection: a community health information outreach project.

    PubMed

    Huber, Jeffrey T; Walsh, Teresa J; Varman, Beatriz

    2005-07-01

    The purpose of the Camp For All Connection project is to facilitate access to electronic health information resources at the Camp For All facility. Camp For All is a barrier-free camp working in partnership with organizations to enrich the lives of children and adults with chronic illnesses and disabilities and their families by providing camping and retreat experiences. The camp facility is located on 206 acres in Burton, Texas. The project partners are Texas Woman's University, Houston Academy of Medicine-Texas Medical Center Library, and Camp For All. The Camp For All Connection project placed Internet-connected workstations at the camp's health center in the main lodge and provided training in the use of electronic health information resources. A train-the-trainer approach was used to provide training to Camp For All staff. Project workstations are being used by health care providers and camp staff for communication purposes and to make better informed health care decisions for Camp For All campers. A post-training evaluation was administered at the end of the train-the-trainer session. In addition, a series of site visits and interviews was conducted with camp staff members involved in the project. The site visits and interviews allowed for ongoing dialog between project staff and project participants.

  15. Advertising a "Healthy Lifestyle:" A Cypriot Health Education Project

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ioannou, Soula

    2006-01-01

    This paper describes a health education program entitled "Young Consumer" project, financed by the European Union and implemented by the Cyprus Consumer Association between March and June 2004. The aim of the project was to promote a healthy lifestyle among a group of Cypriot primary school pupils (11-12 years old). Participants were…

  16. Building Ties: A Mental Health and Aging Project.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Grady, Sally C.; Maynard, Charles L.

    1987-01-01

    Describes Building Ties Project, a program that provides comprehensive assistance to local interagency planning committees addressing mental health service needs of older adults, including training program development materials and consultation. Notes that in two years, project activities in 23 counties increased services, improved interagency…

  17. Managing externally financed projects: the Integrated Primary Health Care Project in Bolivia.

    PubMed

    Homedes, N

    2001-12-01

    Bolivia is one of the poorest countries in Latin America. Health indicators are very poor, communicable diseases are prevalent and, coupled with malnutrition, remain the major killers of children under 5 years old. The Integrated Primary Health Care Project (PROISS) was a US$39 million project executed by the Ministry of Health (MOH), 50% financed by the World Bank and aimed at improving primary health care in the four largest Bolivian municipalities. The implementation of the project started in 1990 and ended in 1997. During implementation it went through three distinct phases: Phase 1 (1990-94) was a period characterized by conflict and confusion; Phase 2 (1995-mid-1996) documented major improvements in coverage and service quality; and Phase 3 (mid-1996-97) witnessed the decline of the project. This paper explores the factors that contributed to the success and the decline of the project, draws lessons for project managers and international agencies involved in the definition and implementation of social sector projects, and discusses the unlikelihood that externally financed projects can have a sustainable impact on the development of the health sector of recipient countries.

  18. The Western New York Health Resources Project: developing access to local health information.

    PubMed Central

    Gray, S A; O'Shea, R; Petty, M E; Loonsk, J

    1998-01-01

    The Western New York Health Resources Project was created to fill a gap in online access to local health information resources describing the health of a defined geographic area. The project sought to identify and describe information scattered among many institutions, agencies, and individuals, and to create a database that would be widely accessible. The project proceeded in three phases with initial phases supported by grant funding. This paper describes the database development and selection of content, and concludes that a national online network of local health data representing the various geographic regions of the United States would contribute to the quality of health care in general. PMID:9681168

  19. 1991 survey of recent health sciences library building projects.

    PubMed

    Ludwig, L T

    1992-04-01

    Twenty health sciences libraries reported building planning, expansion, or construction of new facilities in the association's second annual survey of recent building projects. Six projects are new, freestanding structures in which the library occupies all or a major portion of the space. Six other projects are part of new construction for separately administered units in which the library is a major tenant. The final eight projects involve additions to or renovations of existing space. Seven of these twenty libraries were still in projected, predesign, or design stages of awaiting funding approval; of those seven, five were not prepared to release the requested information. Six projects are reported here as illustrative of current building projects.

  20. Health Impact Assessment of Urban Development Project

    PubMed Central

    Shojaei, Parisa; Karimlou, Masoud; Mohammadi, Farahnaz; Malekafzali, Hosein

    2016-01-01

    Background: Health impact assessment (HIA) has emerged to identify those activities and policies likely to have major impacts on the health of a population. Method: In this research, qualitative method was applied to identifying health determinants that urban man made lake affect on them, formatting and weighing the hierarchy of the factors, calculating AHP, and Technique for Order Preference by Similarity to Ideal Solution (TOPSIS) method for decide and ranking alternatives. Results: According to the results of the study, from the structural determinants point of view, the most positive effect of man-made lake was on Recreational services by 89.5% and the most negative one was on housing. According to intermediary determinants and general average, the most positive effect of lake was on physical activity and quality of air by 88.9% and the most negative one was on noise pollution by 46.7%. Ultimately, considering the positive and negative effects of lake between constructing and not constructing the lake option, the construction option was selected. Conclusion: There is substantial potential to improve public health by bringing decision makers’ attention to the health consequences of their actions; city councilpersons, zoning commissioners, and other decision makers typically have little background in health. PMID:27157160

  1. [Outcomes evaluation of the school staff health promotion project].

    PubMed

    Woynarowska-Sołdan, Magdalena

    This article presents selected outcomes of a 3-year project "Health promotion of school staff in health-promoting schools," as well as the achievements and difficulties in its implementation. The research was conducted on 644 teachers and 226 members of non-teaching staff in 21 schools. The method involved opinion poll and authored questionnaires. A 2-part model of outcome evaluation was developed. Most participants appreciated the changes that took place within the 3 years of the project implementation. These included the improved level of their knowledge about health, health-conducive behaviors (62-93%) and the physical and social environment of the school (50-92%). Changes were more frequently acknowledged by teachers. About 80% of the participants had a positive attitude to the project, but only 20% assessed their involvement as considerable. About 90% believed that health promotion activities should be continued. According to the project leaders, insufficient support and financial resources, and difficulties in motivating school employees, particularly the nonteaching staff, to undertake health-promotion activities were the major handicaps in the project implementation. The project outcomes can be assessed as satisfying. They revealed that it is posssible to initiate health promotion among school staff. This can be effective on condition that participants are motivated, actively engaged in the project and supported by the head teacher and the local community. Necessarily, school leaders should be prepared to promote health among adults and to gain support from school policy decision makers, school administration, trade unions and universities involved in teacher training. Med Pr 2016;67(2):187-200. This work is available in Open Access model and licensed under a CC BY-NC 3.0 PL license.

  2. [Health impact assessment of building and investment projects].

    PubMed

    Thriene, B

    2003-02-01

    For regional planning and approval procedures for building projects of a certain order of magnitude and power rating according to the German Federal Act on the Prevention of Emissions with Integrated Environmental Impact Assessment (EIA), the German public health departments, acting as public authorities, increasingly perform health impact assessments (HIA). The amended Act on Environmental Impact Assessment, the Decree on industrial plants which require approval (4th Federal Decree on Emission Prevention) and the Health Service Acts of the Federal States of Germany form the legal basis for the assessment of health issues with regard to approval procedures for building and investment projects. In the framework of the "Action Programme for the Environment and Health", the present article aims at making this process binding and to ensure responsibility and general involvement of the Public Health departments in all German Federal States. Future criteria, basic principles and procedures for single-case testing as well as assessment standards should meet these requirements. The Federal Ministry for the Environment and the Federal Ministry for Health should agree on Health Impact Assessment (HIA ) as well as on the relaxant stipulations in their procedures and general administrative regulations for implementing the Environmental Impact Assessment Act (EIA). Current EIA procedures focus on urban development and road construction, industrial investment projects, intensive animal husbandry plants, waste incineration plants, and wind energy farms. This paper illustrates examples meeting with varying degrees of public acceptance. However, being involved in the regional planning procedure for the project "Extension of the federal motorway A 14 from Magdeburg to Schwerin", the Public Health Service also shares global responsibility for health and climate protection. Demands for shortest routing conflict with objectives of environmental protection which should be given long

  3. Building a Partnership to Evaluate School-Linked Health Services: The Cincinnati School Health Demonstration Project

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rose, Barbara L.; Mansour, Mona; Kohake, Kelli

    2005-01-01

    The Cincinnati School Health Demonstration Project was a 3-year collaboration that evaluated school-linked health services in 6 urban elementary (kindergarten to eighth grade) schools. Partners from the Cincinnati Health Department, Cincinnati Public Schools, Cincinnati Children's Hospital Medical Center, and The Health Foundation of Greater…

  4. Building a Partnership to Evaluate School-Linked Health Services: The Cincinnati School Health Demonstration Project

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rose, Barbara L.; Mansour, Mona; Kohake, Kelli

    2005-01-01

    The Cincinnati School Health Demonstration Project was a 3-year collaboration that evaluated school-linked health services in 6 urban elementary (kindergarten to eighth grade) schools. Partners from the Cincinnati Health Department, Cincinnati Public Schools, Cincinnati Children's Hospital Medical Center, and The Health Foundation of Greater…

  5. Development of Home Health Aide Curriculum Project. Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brown, Patricia

    This package contains materials intended for use in a new home health aide curriculum that is designed to be presented as a two-quarter program at Tacoma Community College in Tacoma, Washington. Included in the package are a final report outlining the objectives and outcomes of the project to develop a home health aide curriculum that would meet…

  6. Articulation for Allied Health. Final Report. Omnibus Dissemination Project.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Havens, Cheryl C.

    There exists in health occupations education, two types of educational institutions. One type prepares students for a certificate, and the other for a degree. The objective of the Articulation Project for Allied Health was to establish and document a procedure by which students with technical certificates could receive college credit, recommending…

  7. Development of Home Health Aide Curriculum Project. Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brown, Patricia

    This package contains materials intended for use in a new home health aide curriculum that is designed to be presented as a two-quarter program at Tacoma Community College in Tacoma, Washington. Included in the package are a final report outlining the objectives and outcomes of the project to develop a home health aide curriculum that would meet…

  8. Health Activities Project (HAP): Heart Fitness and Action Module.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Buller, Dave; And Others

    Contained within this Health Activities Project (HAP) learning packet are activities for children in grades 5-8. Design of the activities centers around the idea that students can control their own health and safety. Within the Heart Fitness and Action Module are teacher and student folios describing five activities which involve students in…

  9. [JICA Leprosy Control and Basic Health Services Project in Myanmar].

    PubMed

    Ishida, Yutaka; Hikita, Kazuo

    2005-09-01

    Japan International Cooperation Agency (JICA) implemented a 5-year long bilateral technical cooperation project, "Leprosy Control and Basic Health Services Project" in Myanmar. The project was implemented by National Leprosy Control Program, Department of Health with close technical collaboration of JICA experts mainly from International Medical Center of Japan (IMCJ) and National Sanatoriums of leprosy in Japan. It accelerated to achieve the elimination of leprosy at national level, which was declared in January 2003, and at sub-national level onward. It also developed the appropriate technologies for prevention of disability and prevention of worsening of disability (POD/POWD), which were introduced in 9 townships as a pilot service program. The Government stratified the POD/POWD services as a national program since 2005 by taking up the former pilot area to start with. The project also strengthened the function of referral system of leprosy control (Diagnosis and treatment), POD/POWD and physical rehabilitation. Beside leprosy, the project conducted a series of refresher trainings for primary health care givers, Basic Health Service Staff (BHS), of project areas (48 townships) to improve the services on tuberculosis, Malaria, Leprosy, Trachoma and HIV/AIDS for 3 years (2001-2003), which was evaluated in 2004. It contributed to improve the services at township level hospitals in procurement of audio-visual equipments and in conducting microscope training on leprosy, Malaria and tuberculosis at project areas.

  10. Contribution of the Japan International Cooperation Agency health-related projects to health system strengthening.

    PubMed

    Yuasa, Motoyuki; Yamaguchi, Yoshie; Imada, Mihoko

    2013-09-22

    The Japan International Cooperation Agency (JICA) has focused its attention on appraising health development assistance projects and redirecting efforts towards health system strengthening. This study aimed to describe the type of project and targets of interest, and assess the contribution of JICA health-related projects to strengthening health systems worldwide. We collected a web-based Project Design Matrix (PDM) of 105 JICA projects implemented between January 2005 and December 2009. We developed an analytical matrix based on the World Health Organization (WHO) health system framework to examine the PDM data and thereby assess the projects' contributions to health system strengthening. The majority of JICA projects had prioritized workforce development, and improvements in governance and service delivery. Conversely, there was little assistance for finance or medical product development. The vast majority (87.6%) of JICA projects addressed public health issues, for example programs to improve maternal and child health, and the prevention and treatment of infectious diseases such as AIDS, tuberculosis and malaria. Nearly 90% of JICA technical healthcare assistance directly focused on improving governance as the most critical means of accomplishing its goals. Our study confirmed that JICA projects met the goals of bilateral cooperation by developing workforce capacity and governance. Nevertheless, our findings suggest that JICA assistance could be used to support financial aspects of healthcare systems, which is an area of increasing concern. We also showed that the analytical matrix methodology is an effective means of examining the component of health system strengthening to which the activity and output of a project contributes. This may help policy makers and practitioners focus future projects on priority areas.

  11. DataView: National Health Expenditure Projections, 1994–2005

    PubMed Central

    Burner, Sally T.; Waldo, Daniel R.

    1995-01-01

    Using 1993 as a baseline and assuming that current laws and practices continue, the authors project U.S. health expenditures through the year 2005. Annual spending growth has declined since 1990, and, in the scenario reported here, that trend continues in 1994. Growth of health spending increases thereafter, but remains below the average experience of the past decade. Even so, health expenditures grow faster than the gross domestic product (GDP), and by 2005, account for 17.9 percent of the GDP. Unless the system changes, Medicare and Medicaid are projected to pay for an increasing share of total spending during the next decade. PMID:10151890

  12. Kentucky Allied Health Project Final Report: A State System for Allied Health Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kentucky State Council on Higher Education, Frankfort.

    The accomplishments of the Kentucky Allied Health Project, which implemented a model articulated system of allied health education, are described. The system included plans to promote transition from one education level to another and articulation in educational planning and resource utilization. The project has greatly increased…

  13. Kentucky Allied Health Project Final Report: A State System for Allied Health Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kentucky State Council on Higher Education, Frankfort.

    The accomplishments of the Kentucky Allied Health Project, which implemented a model articulated system of allied health education, are described. The system included plans to promote transition from one education level to another and articulation in educational planning and resource utilization. The project has greatly increased…

  14. The MORE HEALTH Bicycle Safety Project.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Liller, Karen D.; And Others

    1995-01-01

    The K-2 MORE HEALTH community bicycle safety education program was conducted in nine Florida elementary schools, offering interactive education sessions and reduced-cost bicycle helmets. Researchers reviewed classroom teacher evaluations and observed helmet use at the schools. Results indicated that the program affected helmet use in participating…

  15. Evaluation of a Student Health Project

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnson, Patricia C.; and others

    1969-01-01

    Analyzes the reaction of 53 medical students to their work experience in 3 poverty areas of California during the summer of 1967. They and 50 students from other professional schools were placed by The Student Health Organization in dental, community, and Planned Parenthood clinics, county hospitals, school districts, and Head Start programs. (WM)

  16. The Genome Project and human health

    SciTech Connect

    Collins, F.S. )

    1991-01-01

    The author claims that the positional cloning approach, whereby a gene is identified by its map position without making assumptions about its structure or function, has provided significant information about common inherited disorders. Genes responsible for cystic fibrosis, Duchenne muscular dystrophy, and neurofibromatosis have been cloned. However, this technology has been labor intensive and extremely expensive. The Human Genome Project will provide information that will drive research for at least the next 100 years and will likely transform medicine in the 21st century into the preventive mode.

  17. Providing quality services. JICA Reproductive Health Project. Thanh Chuong district.

    PubMed

    Nguyen Huu Son

    1999-01-01

    This article concerns the quality of services provided by the different groups sponsored by the Japan International Cooperation Agency (JICA) Reproductive Health project. Nguyen Huu Son, Chairperson of the People's Committee of Thanh Tien Commune, cites that the JICA project has helped improve their Commune Health Center (CHC). The project has provided basic medical equipment that has been lacking in the CHCs, subsequently making the task of providing quality services easier and more comfortable for midwives and other health personnel. For the Thanh Tien Commune Health Center, Nguyen Hoang An reports that the JICA project has brought about improvement in their CHC fields; namely, 1) providing health knowledge to community people; 2) increase in health staff's skills through training; 3) keeping record of management and the CHC services; and 4) renovating health facilities. As a result, clients have increased and many of the community people now have confidence in their services. For the Women's Union of Thanh Tien Commune, Nguyen Thi Loc reports that the assistance provided by JICA has greatly helped in the acquisition of necessary skills for disseminating adequate information to women.

  18. Contribution of the Japan International Cooperation Agency health-related projects to health system strengthening

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The Japan International Cooperation Agency (JICA) has focused its attention on appraising health development assistance projects and redirecting efforts towards health system strengthening. This study aimed to describe the type of project and targets of interest, and assess the contribution of JICA health-related projects to strengthening health systems worldwide. Methods We collected a web-based Project Design Matrix (PDM) of 105 JICA projects implemented between January 2005 and December 2009. We developed an analytical matrix based on the World Health Organization (WHO) health system framework to examine the PDM data and thereby assess the projects’ contributions to health system strengthening. Results The majority of JICA projects had prioritized workforce development, and improvements in governance and service delivery. Conversely, there was little assistance for finance or medical product development. The vast majority (87.6%) of JICA projects addressed public health issues, for example programs to improve maternal and child health, and the prevention and treatment of infectious diseases such as AIDS, tuberculosis and malaria. Nearly 90% of JICA technical healthcare assistance directly focused on improving governance as the most critical means of accomplishing its goals. Conclusions Our study confirmed that JICA projects met the goals of bilateral cooperation by developing workforce capacity and governance. Nevertheless, our findings suggest that JICA assistance could be used to support financial aspects of healthcare systems, which is an area of increasing concern. We also showed that the analytical matrix methodology is an effective means of examining the component of health system strengthening to which the activity and output of a project contributes. This may help policy makers and practitioners focus future projects on priority areas. PMID:24053583

  19. [Sensitivity analysis in health investment projects].

    PubMed

    Arroyave-Loaiza, G; Isaza-Nieto, P; Jarillo-Soto, E C

    1994-01-01

    This paper discusses some of the concepts and methodologies frequently used in sensitivity analyses in the evaluation of investment programs. In addition, a concrete example is presented: a hospital investment in which four indicators were used to design different scenarios and their impact on investment costs. This paper emphasizes the importance of this type of analysis in the field of management of health services, and more specifically in the formulation of investment programs.

  20. MIGRANT HEALTH PROJECT, PENNSYLVANIA, 1966--ANNUAL PROGRESS REPORT REPORT ON HEALTH AND MEDICAL SERVICES FOR MIGRANTS, PROJECT GRANT 33, UNITED STATES PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    CHAPMAN, A.L.; AND OTHERS

    HEALTH SERVICES WERE MADE AVAILABLE TO SOME 6176 SEASONAL AGRICULTURAL MIGRANTS IN A FIFTEEN-COUNTY PROJECT AREA OF PENNSYLVANIA DURING 1966. THIS PROJECT IS AN EXTENSION AND EXPANSION OF A FOUR-COUNTY MIGRANT HEALTH PROGRAM BEGUN IN 1963. THE SERVICES PROVIDED BY THIS PROGRAM HAVE BEEN EXPANDED FROM OUT-PATIENT SERVICES TO INCLUDE DENTAL CARE,…

  1. Project Public Health Ready: History and Evolution of a Best Practice for Public Health Preparedness Planning.

    PubMed

    Summers, Sarah K; Ferraro, Madison J

    2017-09-01

    We review the history and evolution of Project Public Health Ready and demonstrate why it is considered a best practice in public health preparedness planning. Previous articles on this program have described its impact on single health departments. We provide background information, review successes and challenges to date, and inform public health practitioners about a vetted tool for local public health planners to develop capacity and capability in all-hazards planning and response.

  2. Electronic health record project initiation and early planning in a community health center.

    PubMed

    Cortelyou-Ward, Kendall; Noblin, Alice; Martin, Jeremy

    2011-01-01

    Community health centers exist to help their constituents become proactive in addressing their own health care needs and to improve the overall well-being of the community. However, they pose a different set of challenges when implementing an electronic health record system. This article applies 2 project management principles, initiation and early planning, to the electronic health record implementation in a community health center. Issues such as planning, financial considerations, and quality improvement are discussed.

  3. A School Health Project Can Uplift the Health Status of School Children in Nepal

    PubMed Central

    Shrestha, Rachana Manandhar; Miyaguchi, Moe; Shibanuma, Akira; Khanal, Arun; Yasuoka, Junko; Jimba, Masamine

    2016-01-01

    Background School health is effective in helping students achieve health literacy, enhance their health-related behaviors, and thereby improve their health status. However, in resource-limited countries, evidence is limited to show the impact of school health. We determined the association of the school health and nutrition (SHN) project activities on students’ a) health knowledge, b) hygiene practices, and c) health outcomes, one year after the project completion. Methods This is a cross-sectional study conducted among the schools with the SHN project and without the project in four districts of Nepal. We recruited 604 students from six schools in the project group and 648 students from other six schools in the comparison group. We used a self-administered questionnaire to collect the data, and analyzed them using regression models and a structural equation model (SEM). Results Students from the SHN project group reported the decreased odds of worm infestation (AOR = 0.50, 95% CI: 0.34 to 0.75) and diarrhea/ dysentery infection (AOR = 0.67, 95% CI: 0.47 to 0.97) compared to those in the comparison group. Furthermore, the SEM analysis also showed that the students in the project group were more likely to have better health outcomes (β = 0.03, p< 0.05). Conclusion Students in the SHN project group were more likely to have better health outcomes compared to those in the comparison group, even after one year of the project completion. As it can bring about sustainable changes for students, it should be scaled up in other parts of the country. PMID:27812190

  4. UMDNJ school of nursing mobile healthcare project: a component of the New Jersey Children's Health Project.

    PubMed

    McNeal, Gloria J

    2008-01-01

    This article describes a mobile ambulatory care nurse-managed center on wheels designed to address the healthcare needs of at-risk inner city residents. A grant-funded initiative, the Project uniquely joins nursing academe with community-based organizations in a partnership that brings healthcare services directly to those communities most in need. In addition to providing healthcare services, the Project serves as a site for faculty practice and community clinical rotations for nursing and medical students. The broad objectives of this nurse-faculty managed mobile healthcare project are: (1) to screen, identify and provide health promotion/disease management services for at-risk populations, (2) to foster community involvement in the health assessment and referral process; and, (3) to provide culturally and linguistically sensitive health promotion/disease management health education.

  5. Financing health development projects: some macro-economic considerations.

    PubMed

    Sorkin, A L

    1986-01-01

    The paper briefly discusses the importance of macro-economic policy in health sector financing. The ways in which monetary and fiscal policy (macro-economic policy) affect interest rates, price levels and aggregate output are presented. The main portion of the paper considers a variety of methods for public financing of health and development projects. These approaches are analyzed in light of distributional and efficiency considerations. One way of increasing health sector resources is through reallocation from other sectors of the economy. The potential for redistribution from the defense to the health service industry is briefly considered.

  6. Encouraging Schools To Promote Health: Impact of the Western Australian School Health Project (1992-1995).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McBride, Nyanda; Midford, Richard

    1999-01-01

    Describes evaluation results from 12 months of the Western Australia School Health (WASH) Project, a school health-promotion intervention that used community-development strategies to help schools identify and respond to relevant health concerns. Surveys of intervention and comparison schools indicated that schools successfully made organizational…

  7. Health and Health Related Career Exploration: Exemplary Project.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Portland Public Schools, OR.

    The manual contains secondary level materials designed to integrate career education concepts into the Roosevelt High school (Portland, Oregon) health education curriculum. The materials are divided into three sections. The first concerns self-concepts and presents: short-term activities designed to encourage students to begin thinking about…

  8. Telemedicine in Primary Health: The Virtual Doctor Project Zambia

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    This paper is a commentary on a project application of telemedicine to alleviate primary health care problems in Lundazi district in the Eastern province of Zambia. The project dubbed 'The Virtual Doctor Project' will use hard body vehicles fitted with satellite communication devices and modern medical equipment to deliver primary health care services to some of the neediest areas of the country. The relevance and importance of the project lies in the fact that these areas are hard-to-reach due to rugged natural terrain and have very limited telecommunications infrastructure. The lack of these and other basic services makes it difficult for medical personnel to settle in these areas, which leads to an acute shortage of medical personnel. We comment on this problem and how it is addressed by 'The Virtual Doctor Project', emphasizing that while the telemedicine concept is not new in sub-Saharan Africa, the combination of mobility and connectivity to service a number of villages 'on the go' is an important variation in the shift back to the 1978 Alma Ata principles of the United Nations World Health Organization [WHO]. This overview of the Virtual Doctor Project in Zambia provides insight into both the potential for ICT, and the problems and limitations that any "real-world" articulation of this technology must confront. PMID:21569490

  9. Empowering women: participatory approaches in women's health and development projects.

    PubMed

    Manderson, L; Mark, T

    1997-01-01

    The authors describe the experience of NGOs (nongovernmental organizations) and community-based organizations in implementing projects aimed at improving women's health. The study included 16 projects, reflecting Australian NGO experiences in Africa, China, Southeast Asia, the Pacific, and South America. They illustrate the value of participatory approaches in determining needs and priorities, and the value of the continued involvement of women in implementation, monitoring, and evaluation. Approaches that succeeded in increasing women's access to and use of health services addressed gender issues, set realistic and achievable objectives, and recognized and enhanced the roles and status of women.

  10. The Families and Democracy and Citizen Health Care Project.

    PubMed

    Doherty, William J; Mendenhall, Tai J; Berge, Jerica M

    2010-10-01

    This article describes and updates the work of the Families and Democracy and Citizen Health Care Project, which engages with community concerns in order to effect change on many system levels. The project draws on family therapy's tradition of interest in larger social issues and adds democratic public theory and community organizing strategies. Since 1999 we have developed 14 citizen initiatives with a wide range of groups on a diverse set of problem areas. We describe the overall project and several of its initiatives, we address research and evaluation issues, and we outline opportunities for marriage and family therapists to learn how to do this work in their own communities.

  11. Interventions addressing health inequalities in European regions: the AIR project.

    PubMed

    Salmi, Louis-Rachid; Barsanti, Sara; Bourgueil, Yann; Daponte, Antonio; Piznal, Ewelina; Ménival, Solange

    2015-10-26

    Disparities in health between social groups have been documented all over Europe. We summarize the methods and results of the Addressing Inequalities in Regions (AIR) project, which identified illustrative interventions and policies developed in European regions to reduce inequalities at the primary health care level. The first phase was a systematic review of the published literature. The second phase was a survey of European regions, collecting information on policies aiming at reducing health inequalities through primary health care and identifying regional, innovative and evaluated interventions. The third phase assessed interventions through methods defined by a formal consensus, and selected illustrative practices considered good practices for several of nine evaluation criteria. The review included 98 evaluations of interventions and 10 reviews; 80% of interventions were from North-America. Three main pathways to reduce health inequalities were identified: providing health promotion, improving financial access to care and modifying care provision. The first survey identified 90 interventions. Most national strategies included health inequalities issues. Education was the most frequently identified targeted determinant. Most interventions were health promotion general or targeted at specific health determinants, conditions or groups. The second survey assessed 46 interventions. Many involved the population in planning, implementation and evaluation. We also identified the multidisciplinary of interventions, and some who had an impact on empowerment of the targeted population. The AIR project documented that policies and actions can be implemented at the regional level through primary care providers. Policies and interventions are seldom evaluated.

  12. Epidemiological measures of participation in community health promotion projects.

    PubMed

    Oddy, W H; Holman, C D; Corti, B; Donovan, R J

    1995-10-01

    The paper is concerned with the use of epidemiological methods to measure the rates at which different strata of a defined population participate in community health promotion projects. The specific aim was to estimate the incidence rates of participation in projects sponsored by the Western Australian Health Promotion Foundation (Healthway), separately for sociodemographic and health-related behavioral subgroups. Data were drawn from Healthway sponsorship projects in 1992. Each sport, arts, and racing project was associated with promotion of a health message and creation of a health promoting environment. The study used a 2-stage sampling design. 13 of 57 large sponsorship projects and 30 of 129 small projects were selected. In the second stage, respondents were randomly surveyed from among project participants. A total of 4060 respondents at least 10 years old was sampled from the 43 selected projects. Population-based incident participation were estimated and were related to person-years at risk. The total participation rate was 4.01 per person-year in people or= 10 years old. The rate was very high at ages 10-14 years and thereafter declined with increasing age. Compared with the least socially disadvantaged 25% of the population, the participation rate fell by around 1/3 in the medium and high disadvantaged groups, but exceeded the baseline by a ratio of 1.85 (95% confidence interval: 1.57-2.18) in the most disadvantaged 10% of the population. The comparatively high rate of participation in the most disadvantaged group occurred only at ages 50 years and the effect was most pronounced at ages 10-19 years. Compared with the least disadvantaged 25%, the rate ratio in the most disadvantaged 10% of the population was 2.50 in the metropolitan area and 1.25 in the country regions of western Australia. Participation was higher in those who smoked, drank alcohol unsafely, reported sunburn, and reported low consumption of fruit and vegetables. Epidemiological methods

  13. Design and management of development projects to avoid health hazards.

    PubMed

    Ackers, G L; Smith, D H

    1988-06-01

    By drawing from the examples of two dissimilar irrigation development projects it is concluded that for the success of a healthy land development project: (i) by deliberate design a suitable management organization must be set up which has the willing support of all the interested parties, which is given substance by statute and loan agreement, and which has the active support of government; (ii) the staffing should be headed by an enthusiastic person of high rank to provide historical continuity with an adequate secretariat to give effective technical and administrative support; (iii) a deterioration in health may actually threaten the continued existence of a development programme, and health services should be considered part of the development process and integrated with it at all stages from initial planning to several years after commissioning; (iv) health programmes should be responsive to the changing health needs of the settled populations which should be monitored to allow appropriate intervention and which must involve community participation; (v) although the operation of nationally accepted levels of health care facilities should be the responsibility of the national health authority, interventions attributable to the development should be part of the development cost; (vi) interventions should be based on pre-project epidemiology surveys and forecasts of its changes taking account of the disease experience of the settlement populations; (vii) to limit intervention to disease specific problems begs the basic issues. It should be possible to provide better cost-effective health facilities for populations of development projects than for their rural counterparts because they are better defined and more settled; (viii) such interventions by way of changes in fundamental design criteria for the primary engineering works are unlikely to be cost effective; (ix) adequate health facilities must be in place and capable of operation before settlement commences.

  14. Outreach to public health professionals: lessons learned from a collaborative Iowa public health project*

    PubMed Central

    Walton, Linda J.; Hasson, Seana; Ross, Faith VanToll; Martin, Elaine Russo

    2000-01-01

    In 1995, the National Library of Medicine (NLM) and the Public Health Service (PHS) recommended that special attention be given to the information needs of unaffiliated public health professionals. In response, the National Network of Libraries of Medicine (NN/LM) Greater Midwest Region initiated a collaborative outreach program for public health professionals working in rural east and central Iowa. Five public health agencies were provided equipment, training, and support for accessing the Internet. Key factors in the success of this project were: (1) the role of collaborating agencies in the implementation and ongoing success of information access outreach projects; (2) knowledge of the socio-cultural factors that influence the information-seeking habits of project participants (public health professionals); and (3) management of changing or varying technological infrastructures. Working with their funding, personnel from federal, state, and local governments enhanced the information-seeking skills of public health professionals in rural eastern and central Iowa communities. PMID:10783972

  15. Integrating children's health services: evaluation of a national demonstration project.

    PubMed

    Hughes, D C; Brindis, C; Halfon, N; Newacheck, P W

    1997-12-01

    Increasingly, the public and private sectors are turning to "service integration" efforts to reduce, if not eliminate, barriers to needed care created by categorical programs. In 1991, the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation established a new national demonstration project, called the Child Health Initiative, intended to test the feasibility of developing mechanisms at the community level to coordinate the delivery of health services and to pay for those services through a flexible pool of previously categorical funds. This article presents the findings of an independent evaluation of the Child Health Initiative. The evaluation utilized a combination of qualitative methods to assess and describe the experiences of the communities as they developed and implemented integrated health services. It used a repeated measures design involving two site visits and interim telephone interviews, as well as review of documents. Overall, the demonstration project achieved mixed success. Both care coordination and the production of community health report cards were found to be achievable within the relatively short life of the foundation grant. However, many sites experienced significant delays in the production of report cards and implementing care coordination plans because the sites largely did not benefit from the successful models already in existence. Little clear progress was made in implementing the decategorization component of the project. Sites experienced difficulties due to lack of previous experience with this new undertaking, the inability to secure active cooperation from local, state, and federal agencies, the relatively short duration of the project, and other factors. A number of lessons were learned from this project that may be useful in future decategorization experiments, including (1) a clear understanding of the concept and its applications among all parties is essential, (2) high-level political commitments to the effort are needed between all levels of

  16. Researchers' experience with project management in health and medical research: Results from a post-project review

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Project management is widely used to deliver projects on time, within budget and of defined quality. However, there is little published information describing its use in managing health and medical research projects. We used project management in the Alcohol and Pregnancy Project (2006-2008) http://www.ichr.uwa.edu.au/alcoholandpregnancy and in this paper report researchers' opinions on project management and whether it made a difference to the project. Methods A national interdisciplinary group of 20 researchers, one of whom was the project manager, formed the Steering Committee for the project. We used project management to ensure project outputs and outcomes were achieved and all aspects of the project were planned, implemented, monitored and controlled. Sixteen of the researchers were asked to complete a self administered questionnaire for a post-project review. Results The project was delivered according to the project protocol within the allocated budget and time frame. Fifteen researchers (93.8%) completed a questionnaire. They reported that project management increased the effectiveness of the project, communication, teamwork, and application of the interdisciplinary group of researchers' expertise. They would recommend this type of project management for future projects. Conclusions Our post-project review showed that researchers comprehensively endorsed project management in the Alcohol and Pregnancy Project and agreed that project management had contributed substantially to the research. In future, we will project manage new projects and conduct post-project reviews. The results will be used to encourage continuous learning and continuous improvement of project management, and provide greater transparency and accountability of health and medical research. The use of project management can benefit both management and scientific outcomes of health and medical research projects. PMID:21635721

  17. Lessons Learned from the Uniontown Community Health Project.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Littleton, Mary Ann; Cornell, Carol E.; Dignan, Mark; Brownstein, J. Nell; Raczynski, James M.; Stalker, Varena G.; McDuffie, Kathleen Y.; Greene, Paul G.; Sanderson, Bonnie; Struempler, Barbara Jo.

    2002-01-01

    Examines lessons learned from a 5-year project designed to develop, implement, and evaluate a multifaceted community health advisor-based intervention to reduce the risk of cardiovascular disease among older, rural, African American women. Data from observations surveys, and discussion groups highlight six lessons (e.g., establish personal working…

  18. Dairy Health. Youth Training Scheme. Core Exemplar Work Based Project.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Further Education Staff Coll., Blagdon (England).

    This trainer's guide is intended to assist supervisors of work-based career training projects in helping students learn about dairy herd health, as well as how to gather, record, and interpret information. The guide is one in a series of core curriculum modules that is intended for use in combination on- and off-the-job programs to familiarize…

  19. Health. Nevada Competency-Based Adult High School Diploma Project.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nevada Univ., Las Vegas. Coll. of Education.

    This document is one of ten curriculum guides developed by the Nevada Competency-Based Adult High School Diploma (CBAHSD) Project. This curriculum guide on health is divided into ten topics. The topics included are Nutrition, Reproduction, Menstruation, Contraception, Alcohol Abuse, Tobacco, Immunization, Disease, Accident Prevention, and…

  20. Project 4-Health Develops Program to Curb Youth Tobacco Use.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Braverman, Marc T.; And Others

    1994-01-01

    Describes the development of Project 4-Health, a California program that recruits and trains teenagers to deliver a tobacco education program to children ages 9-12. The program was based on studies involving the social context of tobacco use, a survey of 4-H members, and randomized field trials of the prevention curriculum. (LP)

  1. School-Based Health Education Project: Implementation Stage II.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Seffrin, John R.; And Others

    1979-01-01

    Two units of the School Based Health Education Project in Howard County, Indiana, have been revised. The Little Smoky unit on smoking for second graders stresses the effects of smoking on the body systems while the Counter Conscious unit examines the uses of over-the-counter substances. (JMF)

  2. Supplementing forest ecosystem health projects on the ground

    Treesearch

    Cathy Barbouletos; Lynette Z. Morelan

    1995-01-01

    Understanding the functions and processes of ecosystems is critical before implementing forest ecosystem health projects on the landscape. Silvicultural treatments such as thinning, prescribed fire, and reforestation can simulate disturbance regimes and landscape patterns that have regulated forest ecosystems for centuries. As land managers we need to understand these...

  3. The Supply of Health Manpower: 1970 Profiles and Projections to 1990. Health Manpower References.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Health Resources Administration (DHEW/PHS), Bethesda, MD. Bureau of Health Resources Development.

    The report provides descriptive profiles of the current and past supply of health manpower and projections. It also describes the methodology and techniques used to derive the profiles and projections, and provides interpretations and evaluations of the adequacy and comparability of existing statistics, with descriptions of the more conspicuous…

  4. The Lifetime Surveillance of Astronaut Health (LSAH) Project

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bopp, Eugenia; Wear, Mary L.; Lee, Lesley R.; VanBaalen, Mary

    2013-01-01

    From 1989-2010 NASA conducted a research study, the Longitudinal Study of Astronaut Health, to investigate the incidence of acute and chronic morbidity and mortality in astronauts and to determine whether their occupational exposures were associated with increased risk of death or disability. In 2004, the Institute of Medicine recommended that NASA convert the longitudinal study into an occupational health surveillance program and in 2010, NASA initiated the Lifetime Surveillance of Astronaut Health project. The new program collects data on astronaut workplace exposures, especially those occurring in the training and space flight environments, and conducts operational and health care analyses to look for trends in exposure and health outcomes. Astronaut selection and retention medical standards are rigorous, requiring an extensive clinical testing regimen. As a result, this employee population has contributed to a large set of health data available for analyses. Astronauts represent a special population with occupational exposures not typically experienced by other employee populations. Additionally, astronauts are different from the general population in terms of demographic and physiologic characteristics. The challenges and benefits of conducting health surveillance for an employee population with unique occupational exposures will be discussed. Several occupational surveillance projects currently underway to examine associations between astronaut workplace exposures and medical outcomes will be described.

  5. [Health effects of ambient ultrafine particles--the project UFIREG].

    PubMed

    Dostál, Miroslav; Pastorková, Anna; Lanzinger, Stefanie; Schneider, Alexandra; Bastian, Susanne; Senghaas, Monika; Erzen, Ziva; Novák, Jiří; Kolodnitska, Teťana; Šrám, Radim J; Peters, Annette

    2015-01-01

    The project "Ultrafine particles--an evidence based contribution to the development of regional and European environmental and health policy" (UFIREG) started in July 2011 and ended in December 2014. It was implemented through the Central Europe Programme and co-financed by the European Regional Development Fund. Five cities in four Central European countries participated in the study: Augsburg (Germany), Chernivtsi (Ukraine), Dresden (Germany), Ljubljana (Slovenia) and Prague (Czech Republic). The aim of the UFIREG project was to improve the knowledge base on possible health effects of ambient ultrafine particles (UFP) and to raise overall awareness of environmental and health care authorities and the population. Epidemiological studies in the frame of the UFIREG project have assessed the short-term effects of UFP on human mortality and morbidity, especially in relation to cardiovascular and respiratory diseases. Official statistics were used to determine the association between air pollution concentration and daily (cause-specific: respiratory and cardiovascular) hospital admissions and mortality. Associations of UFP levels and health effects were analysed for each city by use of Poisson regression models adjusting for a number of confounding factors. Results on morbidity and mortality effects of UFP were heterogeneous across the five European cities investigated. Overall, an increase in respiratory hospital admissions and mortality could be detected for increases in UFP concentrations. Results on cardiovascular health were less conclusive. Further multi-centre studies such as UFIREG are needed preferably investigating several years in order to produce powerful results.

  6. Residential health near major construction projects: unexplored hazards.

    PubMed

    Brugge, D; Dhar, A

    2008-01-01

    Few studies have been made of the impact of major construction on the health of nearby residents. We conducted a feasibility study in one zip code (02111; Chinatown, Boston, MA, USA) in which four large buildings (20-30 stories) were built between 1999 and 2004 and adjacent to which a major highway construction project was in progress. Information about major construction project start and end dates were obtained from a variety of sources. Three sets of health data--emergency department and mortality-were obtained from the Massachusetts Department of Public Health for the years of 1998 - 2004. We used ICD-9 and ICD-10 disease codes to aggregate selected pulmonary and cardiac-related categories that could reasonably be expected to be aggravated by air pollution released from construction sites, including diesel and dust, and noise and vibration. We propose that larger-scale studies are possible and needed using approaches similar to ours.

  7. Project lifestyle: developing positive health lifestyles for schoolchildren in Antigua.

    PubMed

    Sinha, D P

    1992-12-01

    Countries of the English-speaking Caribbean are in epidemiological transition. Following 30 years of socioeconomic change, obesity and chronic diseases have almost replaced malnutrition and infectious diseases as major health problems. Major risk factors for this modern epidemic are lifestyle-related. Project Lifestyle seeks to develop positive health lifestyles in schoolchildren gradually, sequentially, and systematically from grades 1-12 and throughout the school system on the island of Antigua. The four health habits addressed include weighing right, eating right, doing daily physical exercise, and having a positive self-concept. Since risk interventions with schoolchildren have produced positive results in several developed countries, this project developed an intervention methodology in the Caribbean context.

  8. Mapping competencies for the multiskilled health care professional: an allied health curriculum reform project.

    PubMed

    Sherrill, Windsor W; Keels-Williams, Frankie

    2005-01-01

    Health care organizations increasingly face the pressures of meeting the needs of patients while responding to the financial pressures of cost containment and quality optimization. One strategy that health care providers use to adapt to the changing environment is multiskilling. Multi-skilled health care technicians are trained to perform multiple tasks so that they can be deployed more efficiently within health care organizations. Multiskilling can provide numerous benefits to providers, organizations, and patients, but appropriate training for such individuals is critical. The Multiskilled Competencies Development Project was initiated to identify professional standards for entry-level multi-skilled health care technicians. The project was designed to meet the training needs of multiskilled workers through improved allied health curricula. The results of the DACUM (Developing a Curriculum) competency profile for multiskilled health care technicians are presented.

  9. Continued multidisciplinary project-based learning - implementation in health informatics.

    PubMed

    Wessel, C; Spreckelsen, C

    2009-01-01

    Problem- and project-based learning are approved methods to train students, graduates and post-graduates in scientific and other professional skills. The students are trained on realistic scenarios in a broader context. For students specializing in health informatics we introduced continued multidisciplinary project-based learning (CM-PBL) at a department of medical informatics. The training approach addresses both students of medicine and students of computer science. The students are full members of an ongoing research project and develop a project-related application or module, or explore or evaluate a sub-project. Two teachers guide and review the students' work. The training on scientific work follows a workflow with defined milestones. The team acts as peer group. By participating in the research team's work the students are trained on professional skills. A research project on a web-based information system on hospitals built the scenario for the realistic context. The research team consisted of up to 14 active members at a time, who were scientists and students of computer science and medicine. The well communicated educational approach and team policy fostered the participation of the students. Formative assessment and evaluation showed a considerable improvement of the students' skills and a high participant satisfaction. Alternative education approaches such as project-based learning empower students to acquire scientific knowledge and professional skills, especially the ability of life-long learning, multidisciplinary team work and social responsibility.

  10. Strengthening global health security capacity--Vietnam demonstration project, 2013.

    PubMed

    Tran, Phu Dac; Vu, Long Ngoc; Nguyen, Hien Tran; Phan, Lan Trong; Lowe, Wayne; McConnell, Michelle S; Iademarco, Michael F; Partridge, Jeffrey M; Kile, James C; Do, Trang; Nadol, Patrick J; Bui, Hien; Vu, Diep; Bond, Kyle; Nelson, David B; Anderson, Lauren; Hunt, Kenneth V; Smith, Nicole; Giannone, Paul; Klena, John; Beauvais, Denise; Becknell, Kristi; Tappero, Jordan W; Dowell, Scott F; Rzeszotarski, Peter; Chu, May; Kinkade, Carl

    2014-01-31

    Over the past decade, Vietnam has successfully responded to global health security (GHS) challenges, including domestic elimination of severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS) and rapid public health responses to human infections with influenza A(H5N1) virus. However, new threats such as Middle East respiratory syndrome coronavirus (MERS-CoV) and influenza A(H7N9) present continued challenges, reinforcing the need to improve the global capacity to prevent, detect, and respond to public health threats. In June 2012, Vietnam, along with many other nations, obtained a 2-year extension for meeting core surveillance and response requirements of the 2005 International Health Regulations (IHR). During March-September 2013, CDC and the Vietnamese Ministry of Health (MoH) collaborated on a GHS demonstration project to improve public health emergency detection and response capacity. The project aimed to demonstrate, in a short period, that enhancements to Vietnam's health system in surveillance and early detection of and response to diseases and outbreaks could contribute to meeting the IHR core capacities, consistent with the Asia Pacific Strategy for Emerging Diseases. Work focused on enhancements to three interrelated priority areas and included achievements in 1) establishing an emergency operations center (EOC) at the General Department of Preventive Medicine with training of personnel for public health emergency management; 2) improving the nationwide laboratory system, including enhanced testing capability for several priority pathogens (i.e., those in Vietnam most likely to contribute to public health emergencies of international concern); and 3) creating an emergency response information systems platform, including a demonstration of real-time reporting capability. Lessons learned included awareness that integrated functions within the health system for GHS require careful planning, stakeholder buy-in, and intradepartmental and interdepartmental coordination and

  11. Filling the gap. JICA Reproductive Health Project. Nghi Loe district.

    PubMed

    Luong Minh Dan

    1999-01-01

    Our district, which is composed of 33 communes, is economically poor with unacceptably low health conditions. Many health problems could not be adequately addressed due to the lack of needed resources and technology. But the Japan International Cooperation Agency project, which was started in 1997, has been effectively assisting us in improving the health situation, especially in reproductive health. We highly appreciate the support, which has helped us to disseminate health information to the general public, especially pregnant women. Health workers such as midwives and assistant doctors have been able to improve their skills after attending the training courses. The provision of equipment and instruments has been of great help. We would not have been able to procure them on our own budget, even over the next 10 years. One of our major concerns is the big gap in the health conditions among communes. The health conditions of people in the mountainous area are lower compared to the people in communes in and near the center of the district. The difference exists not only in the health field, but also education and economic fields. To fill the gap, we are encouraging the advanced communes to continue to develop their programs while giving much stronger assistance to the less advanced communes. full text

  12. A visible output. JICA Reproductive Health Project. Women's Union.

    PubMed

    Nguyen Thi Minh Chau

    1999-01-01

    This article presents the activities of the Women's Union of Nghe An Province, Vietnam, which include the promotion of maternal and child health (MCH) and family planning, poverty reduction, and prevention and reduction of social crimes. The main programs of the Women's Union of Nghe An Province, include 1) upgrading women's knowledge of MCH; 2) promotion, monitoring and following up of MCH and family planning activities; 3) giving funds and job opportunities to poor women; 4) building a good, strong women's union; and 5) staff development. As part of Japan International Cooperation Agency (JICA) project, the Women's Union has conducted prenatal and postnatal checkups; implemented information, education and communication activities; and conducted training activities. Meanwhile, in the non-JICA project districts, activities included community meetings to disseminate practical MCH knowledge to women and encourage them to avail themselves of the services at community health centers (CHCs). To fill the gap between the JICA project area and the non-JICA project area, several activities have also been organized. Overall, the JICA project has been producing a visible output. The most important, of which is the practical training of midwives and assistant doctors working in CHCs.

  13. The Early Childhood Mental Health Best Practices Project. Report on Project Activities, Year Two.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Multnomah County Dept. of Community and Family Services, Portland, OR. Behavioral Health Div.

    The goal of the Early Childhood Mental Health (ECMH) Best Practices Project in Multnomah County, Oregon, is to improve the ability of early childhood professionals and partners to support and strengthen the emotional and relational development of young children with their families and communities. This report presents the activities for Year 2 of…

  14. School Health Assessment: West Virginia School Health Development and Education Project.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    West Virginia State Dept. of Education, Charleston.

    This document is a final report of the West Virginia School Health Development and Education Project and consists of the results of five discrete studies and a summary of objectives and outcomes, findings and recommendations. The five studies, conducted over a period of sixteen months in grades 7-12, were: (1) Health Class Offering Study; (2)…

  15. Building a partnership to evaluate school-linked health services: the Cincinnati School Health Demonstration Project.

    PubMed

    Rose, Barbara L; Mansour, Mona; Kohake, Kelli

    2005-12-01

    The Cincinnati School Health Demonstration Project was a 3-year collaboration that evaluated school-linked health services in 6 urban elementary (kindergarten to eighth grade) schools. Partners from the Cincinnati Health Department, Cincinnati Public Schools, Cincinnati Children's Hospital Medical Center, and The Health Foundation of Greater Cincinnati wanted to determine if levels of school-linked care made a difference in student quality of life, school connectedness, attendance, emergency department use, and volume of referrals to health care specialists. School nurses, principals and school staff, parents and students, upper-level managers, and health service researchers worked together over a 2.5-year period to learn about and use new technology to collect information on student health, well-being, and outcome measures. Varying levels of school health care intervention models were instituted and evaluated. A standard model of care was compared with 2 models of enhanced care and service. The information collected from students, parents, nurses, and the school system provided a rich database on the health of urban children. School facilities, staffing, and computer technology, relationship building among stakeholders, extensive communication, and high student mobility were factors that influenced success and findings of the project. Funding for district-wide computerization and addition of school health staff was not secured by the end of the demonstration project; however, relationships among the partners endured and paved the way for future collaborations designed to better serve urban school children in Cincinnati.

  16. PROJECT-INDUCED DISPLACEMENT, SECONDARY STRESSORS, AND HEALTH

    PubMed Central

    Cao, Yue; Hwang, Sean-Shong; Xi, Juan

    2012-01-01

    It has been estimated that about 15 million people are displaced by development projects around the world each year. Despite the magnitude of people affected, research on the health and other impacts of project-induced displacement is rare. This study extends existing knowledge by exploring the short-term health impact of a large scale population displacement resulting from China’s Three Gorges Dam Project. The study is theoretically guided by the stress process model, but we supplement it with Cernea’s Impoverishment Risks and Reconstruction (IRR) model widely used in displacement literature. Our panel analysis indicates that the displacement is associated positively with relocatees’ depression level, and negatively with their self-rated health measured against a control group. In addition, a path analysis suggests that displacement also affects depression and self-rated health indirectly by changing social integration, socioeconomic status, and community resources. The importance of social integration as a protective mechanism, a factor that has been overlooked in past studies of population displacement, is highlighted in this study. PMID:22341203

  17. Project HealthDesign: enhancing action through information.

    PubMed

    Brennan, Patricia Flatley; Casper, Gail; Downs, Stephen; Aulahk, Veenu

    2009-01-01

    Project HealthDesign is a country-wide initiative in the United States designed to stimulate innovation in personal health records (PHRs). Nine grantee teams engaged in an 18-month long design and prototyping process. Two teams addressed the needs of children and adolescents; three created novel approaches to help adults prevent or manage metabolic syndrome; three groups employed interface innovations to assist patients with chronic care management and one team devised a novel calendaring system to assist patients undergoing complex medical/surgical treatments to integrate care processes into their daily lives. These projects not only included development and testing of novel personal health records applications, but also served as the starting point to specify and implement a common technical core platform. The project advanced PHR development in two key ways: intensive user-centered design and a development architecture that separates applications of PHRs from the infrastructure that supports them. The initiative also allowed systematic investigation of significant ethical, legal and social issues, including how privacy considerations are changed when information technology innovations are used in the home and the rebalancing of the authority structure of health care decision making when patient-centered approaches guide the design of PHRs.

  18. Validation Report for the Title IV-C Health Through Science Project, 1979-80.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McLean, James E.; And Others

    Three objectives were identified regarding the Health Through Science Project, a comprehensive K-12 health project designed to increase student knowledge and understanding of health topic. Topics composing the core curriculum of the project were nutrition, safety, family living skills, personal hygiene and health, and human reproduction. Upon full…

  19. Innovation in health service management: Adoption of project management offices to support major health care transformation.

    PubMed

    Lavoie-Tremblay, Mélanie; Aubry, Monique; Cyr, Guylaine; Richer, Marie-Claire; Fortin-Verreault, Jean-François; Fortin, Claude; Marchionni, Caroline

    2017-09-10

    To explore the characteristics that influence project management offices acceptance and adoption in healthcare sector. The creation of project management offices has been suggested as a promising avenue to promote successful organisational change and facilitate evidence-based practice. However, little is known about the characteristics that promote their initial adoption and acceptance in health care sector. This knowledge is important in the context where many organisations are considering implementing project management offices with nurse managers as leaders. A descriptive multiple case study design was used. The unit of analysis was the project management offices. The study was conducted in three university-affiliated teaching hospitals in 2013-14 (Canada). Individual interviews (n = 34) were conducted with senior managers. Results reveal that project management offices dedicated to project and change management constitute an innovation and an added value that addresses tangible needs in the field. Project management offices are an innovation highly compatible with health care managers and their approach has parallels to the process of clinical problem solving and reasoning well-known to adopters. This knowledge is important in a context where many nurses hold various roles in project management offices, such as Director, project manager, clinical expert and knowledge broker. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  20. eHealth for Remote Regions: Findings from Central Asia Health Systems Strengthening Project.

    PubMed

    Sajwani, Afroz; Qureshi, Kiran; Shaikh, Tehniat; Sayani, Saleem

    2015-01-01

    Isolated communities in remote regions of Afghanistan, Kyrgyz Republic, Pakistan and Tajikistan lack access to high-quality, low-cost health care services, forcing them to travel to distant parts of the country, bearing an unnecessary financial burden. The eHealth Programme under Central Asia Health Systems Strengthening (CAHSS) Project, a joint initiative between the Aga Khan Foundation, Canada and the Government of Canada, was initiated in 2013 with the aim to utilize Information and Communication Technologies to link health care institutions and providers with rural communities to provide comprehensive and coordinated care, helping minimize the barriers of distance and time. Under the CAHSS Project, access to low-cost, quality health care is provided through a regional hub and spoke teleconsultation network of government and non-government health facilities. In addition, capacity building initiatives are offered to health professionals. By 2017, the network is expected to connect seven Tier 1 tertiary care facilities with 14 Tier 2 secondary care facilities for teleconsultation and eLearning. From April 2013 to September 2014, 6140 teleconsultations have been provided across the project sites. Additionally, 52 new eLearning sessions have been developed and 2020 staff members have benefitted from eLearning sessions. Ethics and patient rights are respected during project implementation.

  1. Wisdom and eagerness to improve women's health. JICA Reproductive Health Project. Nghi Loc district.

    PubMed

    Nguyen Thi Hien

    1999-01-01

    This article concerns a report by Nguyen Thi Hien, chairperson of Nghi Loc District Women's Union on the contribution of the Japan International Cooperation Agency (JICA) project to their organization. She states that prior to the start of the JICA project, the women's union had a lot of campaigns for maternal and child health and family planning. However, the impact was not strongly felt. After the implementation of the JICA project, women in the district have become interested and excited about the various activities conducted under the project. Subsequently, more women understood the correct way to take care of their health and their children's health. Furthermore, more people in the district frequently use the services of commune health centers and district health centers. In the family planning field, contraceptive prevalence rate has increased and the number of abortions and menstrual regulations has been reduced. Despite the achievements of the campaign, the district still has a few big problems to address. These problems include: 1) a gap between commune health centers in remote areas and those near the district health centers; and 2) a low level of family planning acceptance in Catholic communes.

  2. Mapping the literature of allied health: project overview.

    PubMed Central

    Schloman, B F

    1997-01-01

    The Nursing and Allied Health Resources Section of the Medical Library Association (MLA) created the Task Force on Bibliographic Access for the Allied Health Literature to identify the core journals of various allied health fields and assess the coverage given these titles by the major indexing and abstracting services. The larger objective is to influence increased bibliographic access to the core literature. This paper introduces the Project for Mapping the Literature of Allied Health and the common bibliometric methodology used for the five specific studies reported in the accompanying papers. Findings relating to format used, age of citations, dispersion of literature, and indexing coverage for the different fields are compared. Journals are the most heavily cited format. Fields differ by the currency of cited material, with physical therapy and speech language pathology displaying use of the oldest citations. The set of core journals is small for each field, particularly in speech-language pathology. MEDLINE provided the strongest indexing coverage overall, followed by EMBASE. Information such as that reported by the project can help librarians in improving information transfer for the allied health professionals they serve. PMID:9285127

  3. [Restructuring and reorganization project in the public health area].

    PubMed

    Crosetto, M A; Caballero, G

    1999-01-01

    The objective of this project is to produce substantial change as regards the reorganization, reconstruction and normalization of the hospital data to extra hospital data recording system from the Ministry of Health in the Province of Córdoba (Argentina). In order to incorporate socio-demographic factors in the various data forms so asa to produce efficiency upon the politic implemented. To achieve such aim, colwork on the different levels of execution, training the health team with respect to the identification of the population problems, and attempting to change of a demographic basis the current sanitary policies into policies of populations.

  4. Human Sensing Fusion Project for Safety and Health Society

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maenaka, Kazusuke

    This paper introduces objectives and status of “Human sensing fusion project” in the Exploratory Research for Advanced Technology (ERATO) scheme produced by Japan Science and Technology Agency (JST). This project was started in December 2007 and the laboratory with 11 members opened on April 2008. The aim of this project is to realize a human activity-monitoring device with many kinds of sensors in ultimate small size so that the device can be pasted or patched to the human body, and to establish the algorism for understanding human condition including both physical and mental conditions from obtained data. This system can be used towards the prevention of the danger of accidents and the maintenance of health. The actual research has just begun and preparations for project are well under way.

  5. Disadvantaged persons' participation in health promotion projects: some structural dimensions.

    PubMed

    Boyce, W F

    2001-05-01

    A structural perspective was used in studying community participation of disadvantaged groups (poor women, street youth, and disabled persons) in health promotion projects. Five community projects in the Canadian Health Promotion Contribution Program were examined in a comparative case study utilizing in-depth interviews, documents, and secondary sources. Analysis revealed relatively low numbers and restricted range of participants, difficulties in recruiting and maintaining participants, declining rates of active participation over time, and limited target group influence and power. This paper reports on the relationship between various dimensions of structure (social-cultural, organizational, political-legal-economic) and the community participation process. Participation was influenced by structural factors such as bureaucratic rules and regulators, perceived minority group rights and relations, agency reputations and responsibilities, available resources, and organizational roles. Control of projects by target group members, rather than by service agencies, was an important overall organizational structural factor which allowed community members to achieve influence in projects. The study concludes that a conceptual model based on structural factors is useful in explaining how key factors from federal and local levels can restrict or facilitate the community participation process.

  6. Health economics in radiation oncology: introducing the ESTRO HERO project.

    PubMed

    Lievens, Yolande; Grau, Cai

    2012-04-01

    New evidence based regimens and novel high precision technology have reinforced the important role of radiotherapy in the management of cancer. Current data estimate that more than 50% of all cancer patients would benefit from radiotherapy during the course of their disease. Within recent years, the radiotherapy community has become more than conscious of the ever-increasing necessity to come up with objective data to endorse the crucial role and position of radiation therapy within the rapidly changing global oncology landscape. In an era of ever expanding health care costs, proven safety and effectiveness is not sufficient anymore to obtain funding, objective data about cost and cost-effectiveness are nowadays additionally requested. It is in this context that ESTRO is launching the HERO-project (Health Economics in Radiation Oncology), with the overall aim to develop a knowledge base and a model for health economic evaluation of radiation treatments at the European level. To accomplish these objectives, the HERO project will address needs, accessibility, cost and cost-effectiveness of radiotherapy. The results will raise the profile of radiotherapy in the European cancer management context and help countries prioritizing radiotherapy as a highly cost-effective treatment strategy. This article describes the different steps and aims within the HERO-project, starting from evidence on the role of radiotherapy within the global oncology landscape and highlighting weaknesses that may undermine this position. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Permanently effective in health development. JICA Reproductive Health Project. Nghi Loc district.

    PubMed

    Nguyen Huy Huyen

    1999-01-01

    The most common health problems in Nghi Trong in Vietnam include reproductive tract infections, children's diseases such as diarrhea, and acute bronchitis. Reproductive tract infections take place because of unsanitary water and acute bronchitis is rampant because of the cold weather. Although no HIV/AIDS cases have been reported in the commune, the Nghi Trong Commune Health Center (CHC) is making every effort to prevent HIV infection while providing other services. Under the Japan International Cooperation Agency (JICA) project, information, education and communication activities have been implemented in the district. These activities are important because they have been helping commune people identify and understand common health problems, how to prevent them, and how to get timely treatment. It is not only temporary, but it is permanently effective in health development. In addition, health staff workers at the CHCs are benefiting from the training program provided by the JICA project. More commune people are also visiting the CHCs for examination and treatment.

  8. The C8 Health Project: Design, Methods, and Participants

    PubMed Central

    Frisbee, Stephanie J.; Brooks, A. Paul; Maher, Arthur; Flensborg, Patsy; Arnold, Susan; Fletcher, Tony; Steenland, Kyle; Shankar, Anoop; Knox, Sarah S.; Pollard, Cecil; Halverson, Joel A.; Vieira, Verónica M.; Jin, Chuanfang; Leyden, Kevin M.; Ducatman, Alan M.

    2009-01-01

    Background The C8 Health Project was created, authorized, and funded as part of the settlement agreement reached in the case of Jack W. Leach, et al. v. E.I. du Pont de Nemours & Company (no. 01-C-608 W.Va., Wood County Circuit Court, filed 10 April 2002). The settlement stemmed from the perfluorooctanoic acid (PFOA, or C8) contamination of drinking water in six water districts in two states near the DuPont Washington Works facility near Parkersburg, West Virginia. Objectives This study reports on the methods and results from the C8 Health Project, a population study created to gather data that would allow class members to know their own PFOA levels and permit subsequent epidemiologic investigations. Methods Final study participation was 69,030, enrolled over a 13-month period in 2005–2006. Extensive data were collected, including demographic data, medical diagnoses (both self-report and medical records review), clinical laboratory testing, and determination of serum concentrations of 10 perfluorocarbons (PFCs). Here we describe the processes used to collect, validate, and store these health data. We also describe survey participants and their serum PFC levels. Results The population geometric mean for serum PFOA was 32.91 ng/mL, 500% higher than previously reported for a representative American population. Serum concentrations for perfluorohexane sulfonate and perfluorononanoic acid were elevated 39% and 73% respectively, whereas perfluorooctanesulfonate was present at levels similar to those in the U.S. population. Conclusions This largest known population study of community PFC exposure permits new evaluations of associations between PFOA, in particular, and a range of health parameters. These will contribute to understanding of the biology of PFC exposure. The C8 Health Project also represents an unprecedented effort to gather basic data on an exposed population; its achievements and limitations can inform future legal settlements for populations exposed to

  9. The C8 health project: design, methods, and participants.

    PubMed

    Frisbee, Stephanie J; Brooks, A Paul; Maher, Arthur; Flensborg, Patsy; Arnold, Susan; Fletcher, Tony; Steenland, Kyle; Shankar, Anoop; Knox, Sarah S; Pollard, Cecil; Halverson, Joel A; Vieira, Verónica M; Jin, Chuanfang; Leyden, Kevin M; Ducatman, Alan M

    2009-12-01

    The C8 Health Project was created, authorized, and funded as part of the settlement agreement reached in the case of Jack W. Leach, et al. v. E.I. du Pont de Nemours & Company (no. 01-C-608 W.Va., Wood County Circuit Court, filed 10 April 2002). The settlement stemmed from the perfluorooctanoic acid (PFOA, or C8) contamination of drinking water in six water districts in two states near the DuPont Washington Works facility near Parkersburg, West Virginia. This study reports on the methods and results from the C8 Health Project, a population study created to gather data that would allow class members to know their own PFOA levels and permit subsequent epidemiologic investigations. Final study participation was 69,030, enrolled over a 13-month period in 2005-2006. Extensive data were collected, including demographic data, medical diagnoses (both self-report and medical records review), clinical laboratory testing, and determination of serum concentrations of 10 perfluorocarbons (PFCs). Here we describe the processes used to collect, validate, and store these health data. We also describe survey participants and their serum PFC levels. The population geometric mean for serum PFOA was 32.91 ng/mL, 500% higher than previously reported for a representative American population. Serum concentrations for perfluorohexane sulfonate and perfluorononanoic acid were elevated 39% and 73% respectively, whereas perfluorooctanesulfonate was present at levels similar to those in the U.S. population. This largest known population study of community PFC exposure permits new evaluations of associations between PFOA, in particular, and a range of health parameters. These will contribute to understanding of the biology of PFC exposure. The C8 Health Project also represents an unprecedented effort to gather basic data on an exposed population; its achievements and limitations can inform future legal settlements for populations exposed to environmental contaminants.

  10. Cardiovascular Health Behavior and Health Factor Changes (1988 –2008) and Projections to 2020

    PubMed Central

    Huffman, Mark D.; Capewell, Simon; Ning, Hongyan; Shay, Christina M.; Ford, Earl S.; Lloyd-Jones, Donald M.

    2014-01-01

    Background The American Heart Association’s 2020 Strategic Impact Goals target a 20% relative improvement in overall cardiovascular health with the use of 4 health behavior (smoking, diet, physical activity, body mass) and 3 health factor (plasma glucose, cholesterol, blood pressure) metrics. We sought to define current trends and forward projections to 2020 in cardiovascular health. Methods and Results We included 35 059 cardiovascular disease–free adults (aged ≥20 years) from the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey 1988–1994 and subsequent 2-year cycles during 1999–2008. We calculated population prevalence of poor, intermediate, and ideal health behaviors and factors and also computed a composite, individual-level Cardiovascular Health Score for all 7 metrics (poor=0 points; intermediate=1 point; ideal=2 points; total range, 0–14 points). Prevalence of current and former smoking, hypercholesterolemia, and hypertension declined, whereas prevalence of obesity and dysglycemia increased through 2008. Physical activity levels and low diet quality scores changed minimally. Projections to 2020 suggest that obesity and impaired fasting glucose/diabetes mellitus could increase to affect 43% and 77% of US men and 42% and 53% of US women, respectively. Overall, population-level cardiovascular health is projected to improve by 6% overall by 2020 if current trends continue. Individual-level Cardiovascular Health Score projections to 2020 (men=7.4 [95% confidence interval, 5.7–9.1]; women=8.8 [95% confidence interval, 7.6–9.9]) fall well below the level needed to achieve a 20% improvement (men=9.4; women=10.1). Conclusions The American Heart Association 2020 target of improving cardiovascular health by 20% by 2020 will not be reached if current trends continue. PMID:22547667

  11. Cohort profile: the Amirkola Health and Ageing Project (AHAP).

    PubMed

    Hosseini, Seyed Reza; Cumming, Robert G; Kheirkhah, Farzan; Nooreddini, Hajighorban; Baiani, Mohammadali; Mikaniki, Ebrahim; Taghipour-darzi, Mohammad; Akhavan Niaki, Haleh; Rasolinejad, Seyed Ahmad; Mostafazadeh, Amrollah; Parsian, Hadi; Bijani, Ali

    2014-10-01

    This is the first comprehensive cohort study of the health of older people ever conducted in Iran. The aim of this project is to investigate the health status of older people in Amirkola in the northern part of Iran, near the Caspian Sea. The Amirkola Health and Ageing Project (AHAP) is mainly concerned with geriatric medical problems, such as falling, bone fragility and fractures, cognitive impairment and dementia, poor mobility and functional dependence. It is planned that all participants will be re-examined after 2 years. Data are collected via questionnaire, examinations and venepuncture. AHAP started in April 2011 and 1616 participants had been seen by 18 July 2012, the end of the baseline stage of this study. The participation rate was 72.3%. The prevalence of self-reported hypertension (41.2%) and diabetes mellitus (23.3%) are high. Only 14.4% of older people considered their health as excellent or good in comparison with others at this age. The prevalence of osteoporosis (T score≤-2.5) was 57.4% in women and 16.1% in men, and 38.2 % of older people were vitamin D deficient (<20 ng/ml). Researchers interested in using the information are invited to contact the principal investigator Seyed Reza Hosseini (hosseinim46@yahoo.com). Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the International Epidemiological Association © The Author 2013; all rights reserved.

  12. Building capacity in a health sciences library to support global health projects.

    PubMed

    Lackey, Mellanye; Swogger, Susan; McGraw, Kathleen A

    2014-04-01

    This paper describes how a large, academic health sciences library built capacity for supporting global health at its university and discusses related outcomes. Lean budgets require prioritization and organizational strategy. A committee, with leadership responsibilities assigned to one librarian, guided strategic planning and the pursuit of collaborative, global health outreach activities. A website features case studies and videos of user stories to promote how library partnerships successfully contributed to global health projects. Collaborative partnerships were formed through outreach activities and from follow-up to reference questions. The committee and a librarian's dedicated time established the library's commitment to help the university carry out its ambitious global agenda.

  13. Project HealthDesign: rethinking the power and potential of personal health records.

    PubMed

    Brennan, Patricia Flatley; Downs, Stephen; Casper, Gail

    2010-10-01

    Project HealthDesign, a multi-year, multi-site project sponsored by the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation with additional support from the California HealthCare Foundation, is designed to stimulate innovation in personal health records (PHRs). Project HealthDesign teams employed user-centered design processes to create designs and prototypes of computer-based applications to support and enhance human health for a wide range of patients, from children with chronic health conditions to elders transitioning from hospital to home. A program design philosophy encouraged designers to envision PHRs as a suite of personal health information management tools, or applications, separate from, but drawing upon, personal health data from a variety of sources. In addition to information contained in one's medical record, these personal health data included patient-supplied clinical parameters such as blood glucose and daily weights; as well as patient-generated observations of daily living (ODLs) - the unique, idiosyncratic cues, such as sleep adequacy or confidence in self care, that inform patients about their abilities to manage health challenges and take healthy action. A common technical platform provided infrastructure services such as data standards and identity-management protocols, and helped to demonstrate a scalable, efficient approach to user-centered design of personal health information management systems. The program's ethical, legal and social issues consultancy identified challenges to acceleration of action-focused PHRs: personal control of privacy choices, management of privacy in home conditions, and rebalancing power structures in shared decision making. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Office of Maternal and Child Health Active Projects FY 1989. An Annotated Listing.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Center for Education in Maternal and Child Health, Washington, DC.

    An annotated listing is presented of projects offering maternal and child health care services. These projects, referred to as special projects of regional and national significance (SPRANS), are supported by the Office of Maternal and Child Health of the Department of Health and Human Services. The first section provides information on services…

  15. [Anthropology and oral health projects in developing countries].

    PubMed

    Grasveld, A E

    2016-01-01

    The mouth and teeth play an important role in social interactions around the world. The way people deal with their teeth and mouth, however, is determined culturally. When oral healthcare projects are being carried out in developing countries, differing cultural worldviews can cause misunderstandings between oral healthcare providers and their patients. The oral healthcare volunteer often has to try to understand the local assumptions about teeth and oral hygiene first, before he or she can bring about a change of behaviour, increase therapy compliance and make the oral healthcare project sustainable. Anthropology can be helpful in this respect. In 2014, in a pilot project commissioned by the Dutch Dental Care Foundation, in which oral healthcare was provided in combination with anthropological research, an oral healthcare project in Kwale (Kenia) was evaluated. The study identified 6 primary themes that indicate the most important factors influencing the oral health of school children in Kwale. Research into the local culture by oral healthcare providers would appear to be an important prerequisite to meaningful work in developing countries.

  16. Dynamics of participation in a community health project.

    PubMed

    Kelly, K J; Van Vlaenderen, H

    1996-05-01

    Although the term 'participation' is widely used in discussing community development strategies, there has been relatively little said about the characteristics of 'participatory relationships', i.e. the interactions between community developers and those who stand to benefit from community development initiatives. There is seen to be a need for case studies which attempt to understand the relational and communicative processes involved in participatory development. The paper presents an analysis of the participatory dynamics of a community health development project. The principal source of data is interviews conducted with thirteen selected participants in the project. Analysis of interview data using a structured hermeneutic method led to a description of the meaning of participation for each of the participants interviewed. Further interpretation led to the identification of a number of modes of participation in the project as a whole. For each mode of participation descriptions were developed of how it was perceived by others not participating from that mode. An attempt was made to understand the dynamics of the project in terms of the relationship between the different modes of participation and in terms of the discrepancies between how participants saw themselves and how others saw them. Finally, these problems were discussed at a general theoretical level and suggestions were made about how such problems might be alleviated.

  17. Health education or a shared therapeutic project? Health care goes beyond the pedagogical dimension.

    PubMed

    Slomp Junior, Helvo; Feuerwerker, Laura Camargo Macruz; Land, Marcelo Gerardin Poirot

    2015-02-01

    The general objective of this research was to assess the possible contribution of homeopathy to the development of caregiving therapeutic projects in multidisciplinary workshops of permanent education in health, in the context of primary health care. The chosen points of analysis were the series of inconveniences expressed by health workers with respect to their work processes and it was the emergence of the theme of health education in the first meetings with the teams that led to the production of this article. This study discusses the existential territory of "being a health professional" as understood from a concept of education as a significant benchmark, and of a certain interventionist mission as a transcendent value. A progressive waning of the importance of health education was observed during the workshops, sometimes even disappearing from the discussions, as the caregiving therapeutic projects took shape. The conclusion reached is that this waning involved a process of moving towards a pact with the health system user, eventually considered to be a valid interlocutor; and that health care transcends any strictly pedagogical dimension.

  18. Health sciences library building projects, 1996-1997 survey.

    PubMed Central

    Bowden, V M

    1998-01-01

    Nine building projects are briefly described, including four new libraries, two renovations, and three combined renovations and additions. The libraries range in size from 657 square feet to 136,832 square feet, with seating varying from 14 to 635. Three hospital libraries and four academic health sciences libraries are described in more detail. In each case an important consideration was the provision for computer access. Two of the libraries expanded their space for historical collections. Three of the libraries added mobile shelving as a way of storing print materials while providing space for other activities. Images PMID:9549012

  19. TPS In-Flight Health Monitoring Project Progress Report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kostyk, Chris; Richards, Lance; Hudston, Larry; Prosser, William

    2007-01-01

    Progress in the development of new thermal protection systems (TPS) is reported. New approaches use embedded lightweight, sensitive, fiber optic strain and temperature sensors within the TPS. Goals of the program are to develop and demonstrate a prototype TPS health monitoring system, develop a thermal-based damage detection algorithm, characterize limits of sensor/system performance, and develop ea methodology transferable to new designs of TPS health monitoring systems. Tasks completed during the project helped establish confidence in understanding of both test setup and the model and validated system/sensor performance in a simple TPS structure. Other progress included complete initial system testing, commencement of the algorithm development effort, generation of a damaged thermal response characteristics database, initial development of a test plan for integration testing of proven FBG sensors in simple TPS structure, and development of partnerships to apply the technology.

  20. Orthographic projection capillary array fluorescent sensor for mHealth.

    PubMed

    Balsam, Joshua; Bruck, Hugh Alan; Rasooly, Avraham

    2013-10-01

    To overcome the limited sensitivity of phone cameras for mobile health (mHealth) fluorescent detection, we have previously developed a capillary array which enables a ∼100 × increase in detection sensitivity. However, for an effective detection platform, the optical configuration must allow for uniform measurement sensitivity between channels when using such a capillary array sensor. This is a challenge due to the parallax inherent in imaging long parallel capillary tubes with typical lens configurations. To enable effective detection, we have developed an orthographic projection system in this work which forms parallel light projection images from the capillaries using an object-space telecentric lens configuration. This optical configuration results in a significantly higher degree of uniformity in measurement between channels, as well as a significantly reduced focal distance, which enables a more compact sensor. A plano-convex lens (f=150 mm) was shown to produce a uniform orthographic projection when properly combined with the phone camera's built in lens (f=4mm), enabling measurements of long capillaries (125 mm) to be made from a distance of 160 mm. The number of parallel measurements which can be made is determined by the size of the secondary lens. Based on these results, a more compact configuration with shorter 32 mm capillaries and a plano-convex lens with a shorter focal length (f=10mm) was constructed. This optical system was used to measure serial dilutions of fluorescein with a limit of detection (LOD) of 10nM, similar to the LOD of a commercial plate reader. However, many plate readers based on standard 96 well plate requires sample volumes of 100 μl for measurement, while the capillary array requires a sample volume of less than 10 μl. This optical configuration allows for a device to make use of the ∼100 × increase in fluorescent detection sensitivity produced by capillary amplification while maintaining a compact size and capability to

  1. Project HealthDesign: stimulating the next generation of personal health records.

    PubMed

    Brennan, Patricia Flatley; Downs, Stephen; Casper, Gail; Kenron, Daniel

    2007-10-11

    Project HealthDesign is a national program designed to rethink the power and potential of personal health to rethink the power and potential of personal health records. It intends to stimulate development of new personal health management tools by harnessing the content of the personal health record and making advice, recommendations, and data-tracking tools available to lay people. The program goals include creating a set of prototype personal health records applications, deriving the core functions needed to support interoperable 'plug-and-play' resources for managing health challenges, and addressing the ethical, legal, and social issues that confront the development of computer tools to promote health actions. Response to the call for proposals was tremendous; from the over 160 groups who submitted proposals, 9 teams were selected to design and create prototypes of innovative personal health management tools. This paper summarizes the full set of proposals, their populations of interest, and the technical challenges that await full implementation of the PHR-based applications designed to promote health.

  2. Role of traditional birth attendants in improving reproductive health: lessons from the family health project, Sindh.

    PubMed

    Islam, A; Malik, F A

    2001-06-01

    Despite strenuous efforts, the maternal mortality rate in Pakistan remains high. The national figure of 340 maternal deaths per 100,000 live births tends to hide the fact that in some rural areas it is as high as 700 per 100,000 live births. Not surprisingly, in Pakistan only 20% of births are attended by a trained health professional. In most rural areas, home to almost 70% of the population, traditional birth attendants (TBAs) deliver 90% of the births. TBAs, therefore, play a crucial role in the delivery of maternal health care in Pakistan. Realizing the importance of TBAs, the Family Health Project (FHP) of the Department of Health Sindh, financed by the World Bank, tried to enhance their knowledge and skills through comprehensive training programs. FHP provided training to 650 TBAs in 10 districts. The training was provided by the Department of Community Health Sciences (CHS) of the Aga Khan University (AKU) who acted as technical consultant to the project. A community-based qualitative post-intervention survey. Post-intervention survey of this seven-year project (1992-1999) revealed that (a) the training enhanced the knowledge and skills of the TBAs, (b) the trained TBAs provide more broader health care services and (c) they enjoy greater community acceptance and provide greater consumer satisfaction. It also showed that the TBAs remain the most available and accessible health resource in most rural settings. It is imperative that TBAs and their continuing training should remain central to any reproductive health intervention along with an effective referral system linking them to well-equipped emergency obstetric care facilities. However, the assessment clearly demonstrated that an integrated referral system backed by effective emergency obstetric care is essential to the success of the TBA training program.

  3. Integrated System Health Management (ISHM) Technology Demonstration Project Final Report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mackey, Ryan; Iverson, David; Pisanich, Greg; Toberman, Mike; Hicks, Ken

    2006-01-01

    Integrated System Health Management (ISHM) is an essential capability that will be required to enable upcoming explorations mission systems such as the Crew Exploration Vehicle (CEV) and Crew Launch Vehicle (CLV), as well as NASA aeronautics missions. However, the lack of flight experience and available test platforms have held back the infusion by NASA Ames Research Center (ARC) and the Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) of ISHM technologies into future space and aeronautical missions. To address this problem, a pioneer project was conceived to use a high-performance aircraft as a low-cost proxy to develop, mature, and verify the effectiveness of candidate ISHM technologies. Given the similarities between spacecraft and aircraft, an F/A-18 currently stationed at Dryden Flight Research Center (DFRC) was chosen as a suitable host platform for the test bed. This report describes how the test bed was conceived, how the technologies were integrated on to the aircraft, and how these technologies were matured during the project. It also describes the lessons learned during the project and a forward path for continued work.

  4. Health Education Field Experience Stories: A Reflective, Digital, Performance-Based Project

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lyde, Adrian R.

    2012-01-01

    This article describes a reflective, systematic, performance-based project resulting in the development of a digital story about a community health education field experience. The project is designed for preservice health education students at the college/university level. The primary benefit of the project is that it challenges students to engage…

  5. Maternal and Child Health Research Program. Completed Projects 1989, 1990, and 1991.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Center for Education in Maternal and Child Health, Arlington, VA.

    This publication describes 33 research projects supported by the federal Maternal and Child Health Bureau and completed in 1989, 1990, and 1991. It is the third edition in a series of collected abstracts of completed maternal and child health research projects. Each project abstract contains the name of the grantee, name and address of the…

  6. Projected Allied Health and Nursing Training Needs for a Seven-County Area in West Virginia.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bertram, Charles L.; And Others

    This report describes a project that developed and field tested a model for projecting state-wide manpower needs in the allied health and nursing occupations in West Virginia and presents projections made for sixteen allied health and nursing occupations in the Charleston area. The content of the report is presented in three sections. The first…

  7. The Korean Social Life, Health and Aging Project-Health Examination Cohort

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Ju-Mi; Lee, Won Joon; Kim, Hyeon Chang; Choi, Wungrak; Lee, Jina; Sung, Kiho; Chu, Sang Hui; Park, Yeong-Ran; Youm, Yoosik

    2014-01-01

    The Korean Social Life, Health, and Aging Project (KSHAP) is a population-based longitudinal study of health determinants among elderly Koreans. The target population of the KSHAP are people aged 60 years or older and their spouses living in a rural community of Korea. A complete enumeration survey was conducted in the first wave of the KSHAP on 94.7% (814 of 860) of the target population between December 2011 and July 2012. The KSHAP-Health Examination (KSHAP-HE) cohort consists of 698 people who completed additional health examinations at a public health center (n=533) or at their home (n=165). Face-to-face questionnaires were used to interview participants on their demographics, social network characteristics, medical history, health behaviors, cognitive function, and depression symptoms. Health center examinations included anthropometric measures, body impedance analysis, resting blood pressure measurement, radial artery tonometry, bone densitometry, the timed up-and-go test, and fasting blood analysis. However, only anthropometric measures, blood pressure measurement, and non-fasting blood analysis were available for home health examinations. Collaboration is encouraged and access to the KSHAP baseline data will be available via the website of the Korean Social Science Data Archive (http://www.kossda.or.kr). PMID:24876995

  8. FLORIDA MIGRANT HEALTH PROJECT. FOURTH ANNUAL PROGRESS REPORT, 1966-1967.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Florida State Board of Health, Jacksonville.

    THE FOURTH ANNUAL PROGRESS REPORT OF THE FLORIDA MIGRANT HEALTH PROJECT INDICATES THAT IN 1966-67 THERE WAS AN APPRECIABLE INCREASE IN THE AMOUNT AND VARIETY OF MIGRANT HEALTH SERVICES RENDERED, THE NUMBER OF MIGRANTS CONTACTED, AND THE ACTIVITIES PERFORMED BY PROJECT PERSONNEL. MIGRANT HEALTH SERVICE REFERRALS INCREASED BY 1,222 OVER THE SAME…

  9. The role of the occupational hygienist in development-oriented public health engineering projects.

    PubMed

    Lacey, Steven

    2010-01-01

    Organizations dedicated to applying engineering solutions to improve health in developing countries may lack sufficient expertise in the public health aspects of these efforts to ensure successful project design and implementation. The occupational hygienist is a valuable complement to the efforts needed for development-oriented public health engineering projects.

  10. Guideline development process for the Health for Kids in the South East project.

    PubMed

    Harris, C; Turner, T; Mazza, D; Wilkinson, F

    2008-06-01

    Health for Kids in the South East (HFK) was a project funded by the Victorian Government Department of Human Services, Hospital Admission Risk Program. The project aimed to improve health outcomes for children in southeast Melbourne (Victoria) by building partnerships between child health clinicians and implementing best practice.

  11. Florida "State" Migrant Health Project. Third Annual Progress Report, 1965-1966.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Florida State Board of Health, Jacksonville.

    The Third Annual Report on the Florida Migrant Health Project covered migrant health activities engaged in by 14 counties for the period May 1, 1965, through April 30, 1966. The project was designed to develop a basic statewide program of health services for migrant farm workers and their dependents in Florida. Three of the 12 objectives included…

  12. [Community nutrition strategy project: an innovation in community health].

    PubMed

    Diallo, I; Ndiaye, B; Pouye, A; Gaye, I A; Sy, A; Sarr, R; Tall-Dia, A

    1998-01-01

    The strategy of the community nutrition project is based on the utilization of the community development structures to deliver the nutrition services. These structures, represented in Senegal by youth associations, women groups, GIEs and NGOs, are part of the decentralization process, and as such play an important role in health and health development activities in poor urban districts. The Community Nutrition Project (CNP), funded for five years by the World Bank, German Cooperation (KFW), World Food Program (WFP) and the Senegalese government aims to halt further deterioration in the nutrition status of the most vulnerable groups in the poorest urban districts of Senegal. All nutrition services and particularly the IEC services have been entirely contracted out the first year to 76 GIEs involving 323 unemployed persons, operating as micro-enterprises "MIC" and 17 "GIEs" of unemployed physicians, pharmacists, and social workers for a total of 34 persons, organized as "maître d'Oeuvre communautaires "MOC", in charge of the supervision tasks. Each community nutrition center recruits and monitors every six months 460 to 600 beneficiaries composed of women at six months of pregnancy, lactating mother of children under 6 months, and a group of children aged from 6 to 35 months old. An average of 87% of registered children in the nutrition centers are weekly or monthly weighted. Thus the proportion of malnourished children in cohort of children followed from January to July 1996 has decreased from 70% to 25% within six months. The malnutrition rate has been reduced up to 65% after six months.

  13. The integrated project: a promising promotional strategy for primary health care.

    PubMed

    Daniel, C; Mora, B

    1985-10-01

    The integrated project using parasite control and nutrition as entry points for family planning practice has shown considerable success in promoting health consciousness among health workers and project beneficiaries. This progress is evident in the Family Planning, Parasite Control and Nutrition (FAPPCAN) areas. The project has also mobilized technical and financial support from the local government as well as from private and civic organizations. The need for integration is underscored by the following considerations: parasite control has proved to be effective for preventive health care; the integrated project uses indigenous community health workers to accomplish its objectives; the primary health care (PHC) movement depends primarily on voluntary community participation and the integrated project has shown that it can elicit this participation. The major health problems in the Philippines are: a prevalence of communicable and other infectious diseases; poor evironmental sanitation; malnutrition; and a rapid population growth rate. The integrated program utilizes the existing village health workers in identifying problems related to family planning, parasite control and nutrition and integrates these activities into the health delivery system; educates family members on how to detect health and health-related problems; works out linkages with government agencies and the local primary health care committee in defining the scope of health-related problems; mobilizes community members to initiate their own projects; gets the commitment of village officials and committe members. The integrated project operates within the PHC. A health van with a built-in video playback system provides educational and logistical support to the village worker. The primary detection and treatment of health problems are part of the village health workers' responsibilities. Research determines the project's capability to reactivate the village primary health care committees and sustain

  14. [Globalization, the Camisea Project and the Matsigenkas health].

    PubMed

    Torres-Slimming, Paola

    2010-09-01

    Globalization has been the consequence of an important opening of the economies, achieved through the reduction in the obstacles to commerce, elimination of the capital controls and exchange restrictions. The impact of the Camisea Project in the Peruvian economy has aroused great interest and controversy with respect to the future social and economic national impact, and especially, in the Matsigenka population, located in the 88 and 56 lots, where gas extraction is being done. The area of Camisea gas exploitation offers the challenge of a complex sanitary problem, not only because of the impacts and risks produced by the hidrocarbon exploitation, but also due to a legacy of economical and sanitary precariousness that has accumulated from other times. At the same time, this area offers the opportunity to rethink the public health system according to the indigenous reality. It is necessary to take action in the social determinants of inequity and poverty in order to reach the positive effects the globalization can have in health, ensuring the interests of developing countries and vulnerable populations.

  15. "Peer" educator initiatives for adolescent reproductive health projects in Indonesia.

    PubMed

    Hull, Terence H; Hasmi, Eddy; Widyantoro, Ninuk

    2004-05-01

    Since the ICPD in 1994, the Government of Indonesia has struggled with the challenge of providing sexual and reproductive health education to adolescents. Following an attempt at a family-centred approach, a pilot project was carried out in Central and East Java to train peer educators, coordinated by the National Family Planning Coordinating Board (BKKBN). A total of 80 peer educators (male/female teams) carried out small-group information sessions in ten different districts. Over 1,300 adolescents attended in all. Forty peer counsellors in 20 teams then carried out five outreach sessions each in their communities, attended by nearly 4,000 adults and adolescents. Educators chosen were older in age, knowledge level, authority and communication skills than adolescents, but were well accepted as mentors. Adolescents wanted to know how to deal with sexual relationships and feelings, unwanted pregnancy and STDs. With 42 million Indonesian adolescents needing information, the government cannot produce enough manuals to satisfy demand. New strategies are required to put information in the public domain, e.g. via the media. The approach described in this paper would probably be beyond the staffing and resource capacity of most districts in Indonesia. Nonetheless, it shows that there was great enthusiasm across a variety of communities for efforts to educate young people on protecting their reproductive health.

  16. [Processes and strategies for developing public health nurse directed community health projects in municipalities of Japan--focusing on setting agendas and making project alternatives].

    PubMed

    Yoshioka, Kyoko; Asahara, Kiyomi; Murashima, Sachiyo

    2004-04-01

    The purpose of this study was to explore processes and strategies for developing community health projects directed by public health nurses (PHNs) in municipalities of Japan. Yin's case study design was adopted into the 5-step Policy Making Process Model as the theoretical framework. The first two steps involving agenda setting and project planning were the focus of this study. PHNs who had developed new community health projects in municipalities were interviewed as study participants. In order to maintain the quality of projects at a certain level, only these approved officially by municipalities with a program and budget were selected. Common strategies emerged for developing community health projects in the cases presented by the 5 PHNs. Out of 891 codes, twenty-six sub-categories were identified and integrated into 9 categories. When categories were analyzed in a time series, the following common processes were found: integration of related data, identification of the health problems in the community and recognition of project needs (Phase 1); refining the concept and characteristics of the project plan (Phase 2); and assuring that resources were available for the optimal implementation of the project by consolidating ideas (Phase 3). In Phase 1, PHNs integrated the information about previous experimental cases or social circumstances to identify community health problems needing solution. PHNs' thoughts were given to problems of existing projects and daily practices were grouped to make comprehensive plans for improvement. In Phase 2, PHNs discussed ideas for the project plans and considered resources and strategies that were necessary for putting new projects into place. In Phase 3, PHNs were attentive to the factors reviewed in Phase 2, kept account of necessary resources, and made certain of timing for immediate implementation of plans. The dual roles of PHNs, both as nurses and public servants, helped to clarify and solve the community health problems

  17. Social Determinants, Race, and Brain Health Outcomes: Findings from the Chicago Health and Aging Project.

    PubMed

    Aggarwal, Neelum T; Everson-Rose, Susan A; Evans, Denis A

    2015-01-01

    The broad spectrum of economic and cultural diversity in the U.S. population correlates with and affects the study of behavioral aspects of health. The purpose of this article is to provide a selective overview of research findings from the Chicago Health and Aging Project (CHAP), which covers a socio-demographically diverse population in Chicago, with a focus on role-related psychosocial factors and observed racial/ethnic differences in aging outcomes. CHAP is a longitudinal, epidemiological study of common chronic conditions of aging with an emphasis on medical, psychosocial, and environmental risk factors for the decline in cognitive function across the older adult lifespan. We briefly summarize the study design and methods used in the CHAP study and characterize the study population and describe the psychosocial data, noting black-white associations as they relate to three common brain health outcomes: cognitive function and Alzheimer's Disease, stroke, and subclinical vascular disease as noted on neuroimaging.

  18. Integrating collaborative population health projects into a medical student curriculum at Stanford.

    PubMed

    Chamberlain, Lisa J; Wang, N Ewen; Ho, Evelyn T; Banchoff, Ann W; Braddock, Clarence H; Gesundheit, Neil

    2008-04-01

    The authors describe the population health curriculum at the Stanford University School of Medicine from 2003 to 2007 that includes a requirement for first-year medical students to engage in community-based population health projects. The new curriculum in population health comprises classroom and experiential teaching methods. Population health projects, a key component of the curriculum, are described and classified by topic and topic area (e.g., health education; health services) and the intended outcome of the intervention (e.g., establishing new policies; advocacy). During the past four years, 344 students have entered the curriculum and have participated in 68 population health projects. The projects were determined both by students' interests and community needs, and they represented diverse topics: 51% of the 68 projects addressed topics in the area of disease prevention and health promotion; 28% addressed health care access; 15% addressed health services; 4% addressed emergency preparedness; and 1% addressed ethical issues in health. Each project had one of three targets for intervention: community capacity building, establishing policies and engaging in advocacy, and bringing about change or improvement in an aspect of the health care system. Projects represented diverse stages in the evolution of a community-campus partnership, from needs assessment to planning, implementation, and evaluation of project outcomes. Experience to date shows that classroom-based sessions and experiential learning in the area of population health can be successfully integrated in a medical school curriculum. When contextualized in a population health curriculum, population health projects can provide future physicians with an experiential counterpart to their classroom learning.

  19. Oral health manpower projection methods and their implications for developing countries: the case of Zimbabwe.

    PubMed Central

    Khan, A. A.; Sithole, W. D.

    1991-01-01

    Manpower projections for oral health are generally held to be more accurate than those for other health sectors since the diseases involved and their treatment times can be predicted more precisely. Nevertheless most oral health manpower projections are either overestimates or are not in line with the resources of individual countries, especially in developing countries. Zimbabwe was taken as the study case, and oral health manpower projections were made using two of the most commonly employed methods and one new approach. The projections obtained using the three methods were all different, and even the lowest projection is beyond the resources of the country. It is recommended that in making oral health manpower projections, the facilities available to accommodate these personnel should also be taken into account. PMID:1893510

  20. [A review of the Eye Health Care Project in Tajimi].

    PubMed

    Yamamoto, Tetsuya; Araie, Makoto; Iwase, Aiko; Kitazawa, Yoshiaki

    2009-05-01

    The results of the Eye Health Care Project in Tajimi, conducted concurrently with the Tajimi Study, a population-based prevalence survey of glaucoma by the Japan Glaucoma Society, are summarized. The project was carried out from September, 2000 to October, 2001. The target population was 50,165, out of which 14,779 citizens participated, which yielded a response rate of 29.5%. A study on the efficacy of the van Herick method showed that 65.9% of eyes with grade 1 or 2 had gonioscopically narrow angles with grade 2 or less of the Shaffer classification and that 17.9% of eyes with van Herick grade 1 were angle-closure suspects and 5.6% of grade 2 were also suspect. In a disc hemorrhage study, hemorrhage was found in 8.2% of glaucoma cases and 0.2% of non-glaucoma participants. Similarly, superior segmental optic hypoplasia was found in 0.3% of the participants studied. The central corneal thickness (CCT) averaged 517.5 +/- 29.8 microm (mean +/- standard deviation). True IOP was estimated by the equation: Estimated IOP (mmHg) = Measured IOP - 0.012 * (CCT (microm) - 520), which means that a 100 microm change in CCT may cause a 1.2 mmHg measurement error in IOP. The average IOP in ophthalmologically normal eyes was 14.1 +/- 2.3 mmHg. The IOP showed negative correlation with age, corneal radius of curvature, and refractive error, and it was positively correlated with CCT, systolic blood pressure, and body mass index. In addition, the points of discussion of the original papers are described.

  1. Using and Interpreting Mental Health Measures in the National Social Life, Health, and Aging Project

    PubMed Central

    Payne, Carolyn; Hedberg, E. C.; Kozloski, Michael; Dale, William

    2014-01-01

    Introduction. National Social Life, Health, and Aging Project (NSHAP) included five unique mental health measures in Waves 1 and 2 that researchers can use to measure the overall emotional health of participants: depressive symptoms, happiness–unhappiness, anxiety symptoms, perceived stress, and felt loneliness. For each, we detail the rationale for its development and explain how to score, analyze, and interpret results. Method. NSHAP developed its measures by modifying traditional short-form scales to improve response efficiency and reduce respondent burden. Scoring protocols and interpretations were developed for each measure. U.S. population estimates for older adults born between 1920 and 1947 were generated using age-eligible samples from Waves 1 and 2. Results. NSHAP’s protocols yielded U.S. prevalence rates similar to other nationally representative studies of older adults and comparable between waves. Higher estimates of anxiety symptoms and perceived stress in Wave 2 compared with Wave 1 were explained by age, administration mode, and time period. Analytic strategies for longitudinal analyses are provided. In Wave 2, mental health generally was worse at older ages, with women having more symptoms at younger ages than men. Women had fewer anxiety symptoms at the oldest ages. Discussion. NSHAP’s mental health measures were successfully integrated into the project’s survey and showed acceptable external reliability as well as moderately stable individual characteristics across the 5 years between Waves 1 and 2. Depressive symptoms and unhappiness may form a mental health cluster in the elderly, distinct from anxiety symptoms, perceived stress, and felt loneliness. Gender differences in age-specific patterns of mental health were evident using the exact age of participants rather than the traditional decade groupings. Administration mode and time period (between 2005–2006 and 2010–2011) were determined to be potential confounds that need to be

  2. National health spending projections: the estimated impact of reform through 2019.

    PubMed

    Sisko, Andrea M; Truffer, Christopher J; Keehan, Sean P; Poisal, John A; Clemens, M Kent; Madison, Andrew J

    2010-10-01

    This paper presents updated national health spending projections for 2009-2019 that take into account recent comprehensive health reform legislation and other relevant changes in law and regulations. Relative to our February 2010 projections under prior law, average annual growth in national health spending over the projection period is estimated to be 0.2 percentage point higher than our previous estimate. The health care share of gross domestic product (GDP) is expected to be 0.3 percentage point higher in 2019. Within these net overall impacts are larger differences for trends in spending and spending growth by payer, attributable to reform's many major changes to health care coverage and financing.

  3. Health Impact Assessment of Indira Sagar Project: a paramount to studies on Water Development Projects.

    PubMed

    Anushrita; Nagpal, B N; Kapoor, Neera; Srivastava, Aruna; Saxena, Rekha; Singh, Shailendra; Gupta, Sanjeev; Singh, Sompal; Vikram, Kumar; Valecha, Neena

    2017-01-26

    Very limited studies on Health Impact Assessment (HIA) of Water Development Projects (WDP) in relation to mosquito-borne diseases have been carried out in India. The current study focuses on using HIA as a tool for finding impact of Indira Sagar Project, Madhya Pradesh on human health in relation to mosquito borne diseases, and emphasizing its incorporation as an integral part of any WDP. Screening, scoping, assessment, recommendation, reporting, and evaluation were carried out in selected study areas. Entomological, epidemiological, socio-economic and knowledge, attitudes and practices data related to malaria transmission in three dam components: Submergence (SUB), Command (CMD) and Resettlement and Rehabilitation (RR) colonies were generated for the period of January 2013-December 2014. Statistical analysis was attempted to compare data among dam components and to identify risk factors. Component-specific mitigation measures were suggested based on observations. Anopheles culicifacies was the dominating species in all three dam components and its man-hour density in CMD areas was higher compared to SUB and RR. The odds of finding a positive malaria case was much higher in CMD compared to SUB (OR 1.24, CI 95% 0.71-2.43) and RR (OR 5.48, CI 95% 0.73-40.63). Respondents of CMD stated more previous episodes of malaria (81.8%) compared to RR (61.4%) and SUB (55.7%). The canonical discriminant analysis concluded that distance from reservoir/Indira Sagar canal had the highest discriminating ability of malaria cases in different components followed by treatment-seeking behaviour and malaria history. The analysis identified these risk factors with 70% accuracy. Engineering manipulations may be carried out in CMD areas to control seepage and RR colonies should be established beyond 3 km from reservoir/Indira Sagar canal considering the flight range of A. culicifacies. Strengthening of surveillance with early detection and complete treatment was recommended for CMD areas

  4. Stepped care for maternal mental health: a case study of the perinatal mental health project in South Africa.

    PubMed

    Honikman, Simone; van Heyningen, Thandi; Field, Sally; Baron, Emily; Tomlinson, Mark

    2012-01-01

    As one article in a series on Global Mental Health Practice, Simone Honikman and colleagues from South Africa provide a case study of the Perinatal Mental Health Project, which delivered mental health care to pregnant women in a collaborative, step-wise manner, making use of existing resources in primary care.

  5. Latin American special project: kidney health cooperation project between Uruguay and Bolivia.

    PubMed

    Sola, Laura; Plata-Cornejo, Raúl; Fernández-Cean, Juan

    2015-01-01

    Uruguay and Bolivia are two countries that show heterogenicity of the Latin American region, including the national income, the expenditure on health and the services for renal care. In Bolivia, there is manpower shortage for renal care with only 5 nephrologists per million people (pmp) and the prevalence of patients on dialysis is only 200 pmp. This is much lower than the mean prevalence rate of renal replacement therapy for Latin America as a whole. Uruguay on the other hand has more dedicated renal resources with 50 nephrologists pmp, and renal replacement therapy is provided to ~ 1,000 dialysis patients pmp. In November 2012, a collaborative project financed by the Uruguayan International Cooperation Agency was signed by both the Uruguay and Bolivia Ministries of Health, and the goal was to develop a comprehensive program for the prevention and management of all stages of chronic kidney disease (CKD) in Bolivia. The specific objectives were to: a) promote renal healthcare in the primary healthcare setting, b) identify kidney disease in populations at risk, and c) optimize patient care at all stages of CKD, including dialysis and transplantation supported with a national ESRD registry in Bolivia. As a first step, delegates from the Bolivian Health Ministry, visited Uruguay in April 2014, primarily to strengthen the development of tools required for developing and maintaining a national registry. In addition, during this visit, a meeting with the president of the Latin American Society of Nephrology and Hypertension (SLANH) culminated in designing a training program for peritoneal dialysis. This highly cooperative relationship is advancing the prevention and care of CKD in Bolivia and may serve as a model for international approaches to advance system level CKD care in countries with limited healthcare resources.

  6. Using and interpreting mental health measures in the National Social Life, Health, and Aging Project.

    PubMed

    Payne, Carolyn; Hedberg, E C; Kozloski, Michael; Dale, William; McClintock, Martha K

    2014-11-01

    National Social Life, Health, and Aging Project (NSHAP) included five unique mental health measures in Waves 1 and 2 that researchers can use to measure the overall emotional health of participants: depressive symptoms, happiness-unhappiness, anxiety symptoms, perceived stress, and felt loneliness. For each, we detail the rationale for its development and explain how to score, analyze, and interpret results. NSHAP developed its measures by modifying traditional short-form scales to improve response efficiency and reduce respondent burden. Scoring protocols and interpretations were developed for each measure. U.S. population estimates for older adults born between 1920 and 1947 were generated using age-eligible samples from Waves 1 and 2. NSHAP's protocols yielded U.S. prevalence rates similar to other nationally representative studies of older adults and comparable between waves. Higher estimates of anxiety symptoms and perceived stress in Wave 2 compared with Wave 1 were explained by age, administration mode, and time period. Analytic strategies for longitudinal analyses are provided. In Wave 2, mental health generally was worse at older ages, with women having more symptoms at younger ages than men. Women had fewer anxiety symptoms at the oldest ages. NSHAP's mental health measures were successfully integrated into the project's survey and showed acceptable external reliability as well as moderately stable individual characteristics across the 5 years between Waves 1 and 2. Depressive symptoms and unhappiness may form a mental health cluster in the elderly, distinct from anxiety symptoms, perceived stress, and felt loneliness. Gender differences in age-specific patterns of mental health were evident using the exact age of participants rather than the traditional decade groupings. Administration mode and time period (between 2005-2006 and 2010-2011) were determined to be potential confounds that need to be accommodated in longitudinal analyses of aging, whereas

  7. Ranking the Effects of Urban Development Projects on Social Determinants of Health: Health Impact Assessment

    PubMed Central

    Shojaei, Parisa; Karimlou, Masoud; Nouri, Jafar; Mohammadi, Farahnaz; Afzali, Hosein Malek; Forouzan, Ameneh Setareh

    2014-01-01

    Background and Objective: Health impact assessment (HIA) offer a very logical and interesting approach for those aiming to integrate health issues into planning processes. With a lot of works and plans waiting to be done (e.g., developing and updating plans, counseling planning commissions, cooperation with other organizations), planners find it difficult to prioritize health among a variety of possible issues and solutions they confront. Method: In the present article, first, the list of social determinants of health associated with Chitgar man-made lake was extracted out using a qualitative method and with content analysis approach, and then they were prioritized using analytic hierarchy process. Results: 28 social determinants of health including “intermediary” and “structural” determinants were extracted out. Regarding positive effects of lake on these determinants, “recreational services” and “traffic” received the highest and the lowest weights with 0.895 and 0.638 respectively among structural determinants and with consideration to “construction” option. Furthermore, among intermediary determinants for “construction” option, sub-criteria of both “physical activity” and “air quality” received the final highest weight (0.889) and “pathogenesis” indicated the lowest weight with 0.617. Moreover, lake demonstrated the highest negative effects on “housing” among “structural” determinants which it takes the highest weight (0.476) in “non-construction” option. Additionally, lake had the highest negative effects on “noise pollution” among “intermediary determinants” and it takes the highest weight (0.467) in “non-construction” option. Conclusion: It has been shown that urban development projects such as green spaces, man-made lakes … have a huge range of effects on community’s health, and having not considered these effects by urban planners and mangers is going to confront urban health with many

  8. Ranking the effects of urban development projects on social determinants of health: health impact assessment.

    PubMed

    Shojaei, Parisa; Karimlou, Masoud; Nouri, Jafar; Mohammadi, Farahnaz; Malek Afzali, Hosein; Forouzan, Ameneh Setareh

    2014-05-30

    Health impact assessment (HIA) offer a very logical and interesting approach for those aiming to integrate health issues into planning processes. With a lot of works and plans waiting to be done (e.g., developing and updating plans, counseling planning commissions, cooperation with other organizations), planners find it difficult to prioritize health among a variety of possible issues and solutions they confront. In the present article, first, the list of social determinants of health associated with Chitgar man-made lake was extracted out using a qualitative method and with content analysis approach, and then they were prioritized using analytic hierarchy process. 28 social determinants of health including "intermediary" and "structural" determinants were extracted out. Regarding positive effects of lake on these determinants, "recreational services" and "traffic" received the highest and the lowest weights with 0.895 and 0.638 respectively among structural determinants and with consideration to "construction" option. Furthermore, among intermediary determinants for "construction" option, sub-criteria of both "physical activity" and "air quality" received the final highest weight (0.889) and "pathogenesis" indicated the lowest weight with 0.617. Moreover, lake demonstrated the highest negative effects on "housing" among "structural" determinants which it takes the highest weight (0.476) in "non-construction" option. Additionally, lake had the highest negative effects on "noise pollution" among "intermediary determinants" and it takes the highest weight (0.467) in "non-construction" option. It has been shown that urban development projects such as green spaces, man-made lakes … have a huge range of effects on community's health, and having not considered these effects by urban planners and mangers is going to confront urban health with many challenges.

  9. Density equalizing map projections (cartograms) in public health applications

    SciTech Connect

    Merrill, D.W.

    1998-05-01

    In studying geographic disease distributions, one normally compares rates among arbitrarily defined geographic subareas (e.g. census tracts), thereby sacrificing some of the geographic detail of the original data. The sparser the data, the larger the subareas must be in order to calculate stable rates. This dilemma is avoided with the technique of Density Equalizing Map Projections (DEMP){copyright}. Boundaries of geographic subregions are adjusted to equalize population density over the entire study area. Case locations plotted on the transformed map should have a uniform distribution if the underlying disease risk is constant. On the transformed map, the statistical analysis of the observed distribution is greatly simplified. Even for sparse distributions, the statistical significance of a supposed disease cluster can be calculated with validity. The DEMP algorithm was applied to a data set previously analyzed with conventional techniques; namely, 401 childhood cancer cases in four counties of California. The distribution of cases on the transformed map was analyzed visually and statistically. To check the validity of the method, the identical analysis was performed on 401 artificial cases randomly generated under the assumption of uniform risk. No statistically significant evidence for geographic non-uniformity of rates was found, in agreement with the original analysis performed by the California Department of Health Services.

  10. Pakistan: moving ahead. NGOs pilot adolescent reproductive health projects.

    PubMed

    1998-12-01

    In a study focusing on the views of Pakistani adolescent girls on contraception and family planning reveals that the majority of girls between the ages of 15 and 19 years have no knowledge of contraceptives. Many favor immediate pregnancy right after marriage. Only 4.8% of the total adolescent population opted to delay pregnancy and 1.5% expressed a desire to gain access to family planning aids to limit number of births. Nongovernmental organizations (NGOs) have responded to this adolescent reproductive health problem. Activities such as the Girl Child Programme, the Youth Project, and training in skills development concerned with the issue are being piloted by NGOs. In addition, non-formal education programs by the NGOs and community-based organizations have been initiated in response to the need for appropriate family life, adolescence and population education. Moreover, significant changes have been observed, brought about mainly by cultural and socioeconomic changes. Among these are the rise in the age at marriage from 16.9 to 21 years and a discernable career orientation of the education pursued by some women.

  11. Disseminating relevant health information to underserved audiences: implications of the Digital Divide Pilot Projects*

    PubMed Central

    Kreps, Gary L.

    2005-01-01

    Objective: This paper examines the influence of the digital divide on disparities in health outcomes for vulnerable populations, identifying implications for medical and public libraries. Method: The paper describes the results of the Digital Divide Pilot Projects demonstration research programs funded by the National Cancer Institute to test new strategies for disseminating relevant health information to underserved and at-risk audiences. Results: The Digital Divide Pilot Projects field-tested innovative systemic strategies for helping underserved populations access and utilize relevant health information to make informed health-related decisions about seeking appropriate health care and support, resisting avoidable and significant health risks, and promoting their own health. Implications: The paper builds on the Digital Divide Pilot Projects by identifying implications for developing health communication strategies that libraries can adopt to provide digital health information to vulnerable populations. PMID:16239960

  12. Palm Beach County Health Department Migrant Project, Annual Progress Report, 1972-73.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Palm Beach County Health Dept., West Palm Beach, FL.

    Information about the Palm Beach County Health Department Migrant Project for 1972 is presented in this annual progress report. Information on services provided by the Project as prescribed by the Migrant Health Branch is included. Major topics include program objectives, relationships and contributions, staff orientation and training, a general…

  13. Yshareit: A Project Promoting the Use of E-Mental Health Resources among Young People

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Spiranovic, Caroline; Briggs, Kate; Kirkby, Kenneth; Mobsby, Caroline; Daniels, Brett

    2008-01-01

    The yshareit project aims to increase awareness of and access to reputable e-mental health resources among young people. This is achieved by developing peer support networks, supported by e-mental health resources including the triage website, http://www.yshareit.com. Young people involved in the evaluation of the project described in this paper…

  14. The Healthy Kindergarten: A Model Project of Health Promotion in the Kindergartens of the Czech Republic.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Havlinova, Miluse; Kopriva, Pavel

    Noting that the preschool period is important for the formation of individual habits and modes of behavior related to health, the Czech Republic initiated the Healthy Kindergarten (HK) Project, thereby expanding the Healthy School Project for primary schools introduced into the country by the World Health Organization. This report describes the HK…

  15. A Progress Assessment of the School Health Education Project of Appalachian Maryland.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Regional Education Service Agency of Appalachian Maryland, Cumberland.

    This document evaluates the effectiveness of a project on health education conducted in Appalachian Maryland. The emphasis of the project was on teaching children in the fifth grade about lung and respiratory system problems and their connection with smoking. This health education course was incorporated into their regular curriculum. Prior to…

  16. Yshareit: A Project Promoting the Use of E-Mental Health Resources among Young People

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Spiranovic, Caroline; Briggs, Kate; Kirkby, Kenneth; Mobsby, Caroline; Daniels, Brett

    2008-01-01

    The yshareit project aims to increase awareness of and access to reputable e-mental health resources among young people. This is achieved by developing peer support networks, supported by e-mental health resources including the triage website, http://www.yshareit.com. Young people involved in the evaluation of the project described in this paper…

  17. Project on School Staff Health Promotion in Poland: The First Experiences

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Woynarowska-Soldan, Magdalena

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to present the concept, methods of implementation, results and experiences from the first stage of the three-year project on school staff health promotion carried out within the framework of the health-promoting school (HPS) network in Poland. Design/methodology/approach: The project was implemented in 2012 in…

  18. Project on School Staff Health Promotion in Poland: The First Experiences

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Woynarowska-Soldan, Magdalena

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to present the concept, methods of implementation, results and experiences from the first stage of the three-year project on school staff health promotion carried out within the framework of the health-promoting school (HPS) network in Poland. Design/methodology/approach: The project was implemented in 2012 in…

  19. Western Kansas Migrant Health Project: 9th Annual Progress Report, 1972.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kansas State Dept. of Health, Topeka.

    Services provided by the Western Kansas Migrant Health Project include: (1) remedial schools and day care centers; (2) health education; (3) housing and sanitation; (4) nursing services; (5) medical and dental services; (6) hospital services; and (7) supplemental food programs. In September 1971, the Project's sponsoring of VISTA Volunteers in…

  20. Western Kansas Migrant Health Project: 11th Annual Progress Report, 1974.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kansas State Dept. of Health, Topeka.

    Information about the Western Kansas Migrant Health Project for 1974 is presented in this annual progress report. The Project provides: (1) migrant education programs; (2) health education; (3) nursing services; (4) medical and dental services; (5) hospital services; and (6) supplemental food programs. Since August 1974, the western Kansas VISTA…

  1. Western Kansas Migrant Health Project: 10th Annual Progress Report, 1973.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kansas State Dept. of Health, Topeka.

    Basic services provided by the Western Kansas Migrant Health Project for migrant families include: (1) remedial schools and migrant education programs; (2) health education; (3) housing and sanitation; (4) nursing services; (5) medical and dental services; (6) hospital services; and (7) supplemental food programs. Among the Project's services…

  2. "2+2" Articulated Health Occupations Project. Nursing Program. Second Year Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Paris Independent School District, TX.

    A project was conducted to develop a 2 + 2 articulated training program in health careers to link the last 2 years of secondary and the first 2 years of postsecondary training. During the second year of the secondary project, the first year of training was implemented and the model program was further developed and refined. Project tasks included…

  3. "2+2" Articulated Health Occupations Project. Nursing Program. Second Year Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Paris Independent School District, TX.

    A project was conducted to develop a 2 + 2 articulated training program in health careers to link the last 2 years of secondary and the first 2 years of postsecondary training. During the second year of the secondary project, the first year of training was implemented and the model program was further developed and refined. Project tasks included…

  4. Lawrence Children's Health Project/EPSDT. A Proposal to Integrate Health and Special Education Services for Children in a School-Based Demonstration Project. Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Merrimack Education Center, Chelmsford, MA.

    This final report describes the Lawrence Children's Health Project (LCHP), set up in Lawrence, Massachusetts in 1979, in order to demonstrate and evaluate the feasibility and cost-effectiveness of an interagency approach to providing health care to children through a school-based local resource network. The LCHP service delivery is said to have…

  5. Family health nurse project--an education program of the World Health Organization: the University of Stirling experience.

    PubMed

    Murray, Ian

    2008-11-01

    This article outlines the delivery of the Family Health Nurse Education Programme of the World Health Organization (WHO) at the University of Stirling, Scotland, from 2001 to 2005. The program was part of the WHO European Family Health Nurse pilot project. The curriculum outlined by the WHO Curriculum Planning Group detailed the broad thrust of the Family Health Nurse Education Programme and was modified to be responsive to the context in which it was delivered, while staying faithful to general principles and precepts. The Family Health Nurse Education Programme is described in its evolving format over the two phases of the project; the remote and rural context occurred from 2001 to 2003, and the modification of the program for the urban phase of the project occurred during 2004 and 2005. The conceptual framework that was foundational to the development of the curriculum to prepare family health nurses will be described.

  6. National health expenditure projections, 2012-22: slow growth until coverage expands and economy improves.

    PubMed

    Cuckler, Gigi A; Sisko, Andrea M; Keehan, Sean P; Smith, Sheila D; Madison, Andrew J; Poisal, John A; Wolfe, Christian J; Lizonitz, Joseph M; Stone, Devin A

    2013-10-01

    Health spending growth through 2013 is expected to remain slow because of the sluggish economic recovery, continued increases in cost-sharing requirements for the privately insured, and slow growth for public programs. These factors lead to projected growth rates of near 4 percent through 2013. However, improving economic conditions, combined with the coverage expansions in the Affordable Care Act and the aging of the population, drive faster projected growth in health spending in 2014 and beyond. Expected growth for 2014 is 6.1 percent, with an average projected growth of 6.2 percent per year thereafter. Over the 2012-22 period, national health spending is projected to grow at an average annual rate of 5.8 percent. By 2022 health spending financed by federal, state, and local governments is projected to account for 49 percent of national health spending and to reach a total of $2.4 trillion.

  7. Faculty development projects for international health professions educators: Vehicles for institutional change?

    PubMed

    Burdick, William P; Friedman, Stacey R; Diserens, Deborah

    2012-01-01

    Projects are an important tool in faculty development, and project emphasis may offer insights into perceived education priorities. Impact of projects has been focused on individuals, not institutions or health. Education innovation projects of Fellows in an international faculty development program were examined to better understand perceived needs in health professions education and institutional impact of projects. Four hundred and thirty-five projects were analyzed to identify focus areas. Fellows were asked to identify changes in their schools and communities resulting from their projects. New education methods and curriculum change were common project focus areas. Regional differences were evident with a higher percentage of education methods projects by Fellows residing in India (52%), compared with South Africa (25%) and Brazil (24%). Fifty-six percent of projects were incorporated into the curriculum and/or incorporated as institutional policy. One-third to two-thirds of respondents noted improved teaching quality, collaboration, education research interest, assessment, student performance, and curriculum alignment with community health needs. National differences in project focus may offer insight into local conditions and needs. High rates of diffusion of projects and impact on faculty, students, and curriculum suggest that faculty development projects may be a strategy for institutional change in resource limited environments.

  8. Index of Graduate Theses and Projects in Allied Health.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Journal of Allied Health, 1991

    1991-01-01

    Contains 1,073 entries from 91 institutions, giving author, institution, year, degree, emphasis, discipline, and title, arranged by topic: allied health, biocommunication arts, child development/care, clinical psychology, dentistry, environmental health, exercise science, food service, health education, health services, medical laboratories, nurse…

  9. Index of Graduate Theses and Projects in Allied Health.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Journal of Allied Health, 1991

    1991-01-01

    Contains 1,073 entries from 91 institutions, giving author, institution, year, degree, emphasis, discipline, and title, arranged by topic: allied health, biocommunication arts, child development/care, clinical psychology, dentistry, environmental health, exercise science, food service, health education, health services, medical laboratories, nurse…

  10. Missouri Community, Public Health, and Primary Care Linkage: 2011-2012 Pilot Project Results & Evaluation.

    PubMed

    Yun, Shumei; Ehrhardt, Ellen; Britt, Lisa; Brendel, Barbara; Wilson, Janet; Berwanger, Anita

    2015-01-01

    This pilot project worked to establish linkages among community-based organizations, health care providers, and public health systems. The partnerships were created to help ensure identification, referral, and follow-up for community members with uncontrolled high blood pressure or pre-hypertension to lay the groundwork for sustainable referral and health education support systems in rural communities. The evaluation shows the project helped some participants control their blood pressure and change their blood pressure management behaviors.

  11. Improving the performance of the health service delivery system? Lessons from the Towards Unity for Health projects.

    PubMed

    Groene, Oliver; Branda, Luis A

    2006-11-01

    The World Health Organization developed the Towards Unity for Health (TUFH) strategy in 2000 for the improvement of health system performance. Twelve projects worldwide were supported to put this strategy into practice. A standard evaluation and monitoring framework was developed on the basis of which project coordinators prepared technical progress reports. To review the utility and effectiveness of the evaluation criteria recommended by TUFH and their application in four of the original twelve projects. We reviewed status reports provided by European project coordinators and developed a standardized reporting template to extract information using original TUFH evaluation criteria. The original TUFH evaluation framework is very comprehensive and has only partly been followed by the field projects. The evaluation strategies employed by the projects were insufficient to demonstrate the connections between the intervention and the desired process improvements, and few of the evaluation measures address outcomes. The evaluation strategies employed by the projects are limited in allowing us to associate the intervention with the desired process improvements. Few measures address outcomes. The evaluation of complex community interventions poses many challenges, however, tools are available to assess impact on structures and process, and selected outcome indicators may be identified to monitor progress in future projects. Based on the review of evaluation status of the TUFH projects and resources available we recommend moving away from uniform evaluation and towards monitoring minimal, context-specific performance indicators criteria.

  12. Project HITE (health individualization and teacher education): a health curriculum for 3-, 4- and 5-year olds.

    PubMed

    Davis, A P

    1983-09-01

    South Carolina has been a national leader in such health problems as cardiovascular disease, syphillis and gonorrhea. Since many of the problems could be attributed to poor health habits, education of the state's residents seemed in order. The education/re-education of inaccessible adults with firmly established health habits--poor or otherwise--was not feasible, but the education of impressionable, readily accessible three-, four- and five-year olds was possible. Through a grant from the federal government, an individualized health curriculum that could accommodate the differences of the learners and include vital health content was developed. This project of developing and distributing the health curriculum to teachers of young children was called Project HITE (Health Individualization and Teacher Education).

  13. Public health and health services development in postconflict communities: a case study of a safe motherhood project in East Timor.

    PubMed

    Marlowe, Penny; Mahmood, Mohammad Afzal

    2009-10-01

    Armed conflict causes suffering in many countries; it contributes to poor health and hinders health services development. The effects of conflict are evidenced by weakened community structures and can make reconstruction efforts challenging. East Timor has a history of prolonged conflict and saw a resurgence of internal violence in 2006. This participant observation study discusses considerations for implementing public health and health systems development projects in postconflict settings using a case study of a maternal and child health project. It illustrates the importance of appreciating the historical context and community dynamics when implementing development projects. The sequelae of conflict are often characterized by reduced human resource development capacity, distrust of hierarchy, and limited capacity for resource mobilization. Working in such postconflict communities requires flexibility in program design, stronger efforts for community capacity building, and rebuilding trust between various stakeholders.

  14. Sustainability in Primary Care and Mental Health Integration Projects in Veterans Health Administration

    PubMed Central

    Ford, James H.; Krahn, Dean; Oliver, Karen Anderson; Kirchner, JoAnn

    2015-01-01

    Objective To explore staff perceptions about sustainability, commitment to change, participation in change process, and information received about the change project within the Veterans Administration Primary Care and Mental Health Integration (PC-MHI) initiative and to examine differences from the Veterans Health Administration Mental Health Systems Redesign (MHSR) initiative. Data Sources Surveys of change team members involved in the Veterans Affairs PC-MHI and MHSR initiatives. Study Design One-way analysis of variance examined the relationship between commitment, participation and information, and sustainability. Differences in PC-MHI sustainability were explored by location and job classification. Staff sustainability perceptions were compared with MHSR results. Principal Findings Sustainability differed by staff discipline. Difference between MHSR and PC-MHI existed by job function and perceptions about the change benefits. Participation in the change process and information received about the change process were positively correlated with sustainability. Staff commitment to change was positively associated with staff perceptions about the benefits of change and staff attitudes toward change. Conclusions Sustainability is an important part of organizational change efforts. Change complexity seems to influence perception about sustainability and impacts staff perceptions about the benefits of change. These perceptions seem to be driven by the information received and opportunities to participate in the change process. Further research is needed to understand how information and participation influence sustainability and affect employee commitment to change. PMID:23011071

  15. Sustainability in primary care and Mental Health Integration projects in Veterans Health Administration.

    PubMed

    Ford, James H; Krahn, Dean; Oliver, Karen Anderson; Kirchner, JoAnn

    2012-01-01

    To explore staff perceptions about sustainability, commitment to change, participation in change process, and information received about the change project within the Veterans Administration Primary Care and Mental Health Integration (PC-MHI) initiative and to examine differences from the Veterans Health Administration Mental Health Systems Redesign (MHSR) initiative. Surveys of change team members involved in the Veterans Affairs PC-MHI and MHSR initiatives. One-way analysis of variance examined the relationship between commitment, participation and information, and sustainability. Differences in PC-MHI sustainability were explored by location and job classification. Staff sustainability perceptions were compared with MHSR results. Sustainability differed by staff discipline. Difference between MHSR and PC-MHI existed by job function and perceptions about the change benefits. Participation in the change process and information received about the change process were positively correlated with sustainability. Staff commitment to change was positively associated with staff perceptions about the benefits of change and staff attitudes toward change. Sustainability is an important part of organizational change efforts. Change complexity seems to influence perception about sustainability and impacts staff perceptions about the benefits of change. These perceptions seem to be driven by the information received and opportunities to participate in the change process. Further research is needed to understand how information and participation influence sustainability and affect employee commitment to change.

  16. Working with Climate Projections to Estimate Disease Burden: Perspectives from Public Health

    PubMed Central

    Conlon, Kathryn C.; Kintziger, Kristina W.; Jagger, Meredith; Stefanova, Lydia; Uejio, Christopher K.; Konrad, Charles

    2016-01-01

    There is interest among agencies and public health practitioners in the United States (USA) to estimate the future burden of climate-related health outcomes. Calculating disease burden projections can be especially daunting, given the complexities of climate modeling and the multiple pathways by which climate influences public health. Interdisciplinary coordination between public health practitioners and climate scientists is necessary for scientifically derived estimates. We describe a unique partnership of state and regional climate scientists and public health practitioners assembled by the Florida Building Resilience Against Climate Effects (BRACE) program. We provide a background on climate modeling and projections that has been developed specifically for public health practitioners, describe methodologies for combining climate and health data to project disease burden, and demonstrate three examples of this process used in Florida. PMID:27517942

  17. Working with Climate Projections to Estimate Disease Burden: Perspectives from Public Health.

    PubMed

    Conlon, Kathryn C; Kintziger, Kristina W; Jagger, Meredith; Stefanova, Lydia; Uejio, Christopher K; Konrad, Charles

    2016-08-09

    There is interest among agencies and public health practitioners in the United States (USA) to estimate the future burden of climate-related health outcomes. Calculating disease burden projections can be especially daunting, given the complexities of climate modeling and the multiple pathways by which climate influences public health. Interdisciplinary coordination between public health practitioners and climate scientists is necessary for scientifically derived estimates. We describe a unique partnership of state and regional climate scientists and public health practitioners assembled by the Florida Building Resilience Against Climate Effects (BRACE) program. We provide a background on climate modeling and projections that has been developed specifically for public health practitioners, describe methodologies for combining climate and health data to project disease burden, and demonstrate three examples of this process used in Florida.

  18. Making mapping matter: a case study for short project international partnerships by global public health students

    PubMed Central

    Wyber, Rosemary; Potter, James R.; Weaver, Jennifer B.

    2014-01-01

    Background A large number of global public health students seek international experience as part of their academic curriculum. These placements are often short, given the constraints of cost and time available within the academic calendar. In contrast to international electives for clinical students there are few published guidelines on practical, ethical or feasible projects. This paper describes a ten-day sanitation mapping project in Mumbai, India and explores the broader implications for global public health student electives. Methods Three graduate public health students conducted a geographic review of sanitation facilities in Cheeta Camp informal settlement, Mumbai. Forty-six toilet blocks with 701 individual seats were identified. The project was reviewed ethically, educationally and logistically as a possible model for other short-term international projects. Conclusions Clearer guidelines are needed to support non-clinical placements by global public health students. Projects that are feasible, relevant and meaningful should be foster maximise benefit for learners and host communities. PMID:24964783

  19. Making mapping matter: a case study for short project international partnerships by global public health students.

    PubMed

    Wyber, Rosemary; Potter, James R; Weaver, Jennifer B

    2014-01-01

    A large number of global public health students seek international experience as part of their academic curriculum. These placements are often short, given the constraints of cost and time available within the academic calendar. In contrast to international electives for clinical students there are few published guidelines on practical, ethical or feasible projects. This paper describes a ten-day sanitation mapping project in Mumbai, India and explores the broader implications for global public health student electives. Three graduate public health students conducted a geographic review of sanitation facilities in Cheeta Camp informal settlement, Mumbai. Forty-six toilet blocks with 701 individual seats were identified. The project was reviewed ethically, educationally and logistically as a possible model for other short-term international projects. Clearer guidelines are needed to support non-clinical placements by global public health students. Projects that are feasible, relevant and meaningful should be foster maximise benefit for learners and host communities.

  20. The UCSD Student-Run Free Clinic Project: transdisciplinary health professional education.

    PubMed

    Beck, Ellen

    2005-05-01

    In the face of the serious problem of lack of access to health care in the United States, with over 45 million uninsured,1 there exist many models of collaborative local programs serving the uninsured. One such approach is the student-run free clinic, small projects managed by health professional students, supervised by licensed health professionals, offering free health services to those without health access. The purpose of this article is to describe the UCSD Student-Run Free Clinic Project, its history, mission, partners, clinical services, curriculum, funding, replicability, outcomes, elements of success, transdisciplinary nature, and hopes for the future.

  1. The state and profile of open source software projects in health and medical informatics.

    PubMed

    Janamanchi, Balaji; Katsamakas, Evangelos; Raghupathi, Wullianallur; Gao, Wei

    2009-07-01

    Little has been published about the application profiles and development patterns of open source software (OSS) in health and medical informatics. This study explores these issues with an analysis of health and medical informatics related OSS projects on SourceForge, a large repository of open source projects. A search was conducted on the SourceForge website during the period from May 1 to 15, 2007, to identify health and medical informatics OSS projects. This search resulted in a sample of 174 projects. A Java-based parser was written to extract data for several of the key variables of each project. Several visually descriptive statistics were generated to analyze the profiles of the OSS projects. Many of the projects have sponsors, implying a growing interest in OSS among organizations. Sponsorship, we discovered, has a significant impact on project success metrics. Nearly two-thirds of the projects have a restrictive license type. Restrictive licensing may indicate tighter control over the development process. Our sample includes a wide range of projects that are at various stages of development (status). Projects targeted towards the advanced end user are primarily focused on bio-informatics, data formats, database and medical science applications. We conclude that there exists an active and thriving OSS development community that is focusing on health and medical informatics. A wide range of OSS applications are in development, from bio-informatics to hospital information systems. A profile of OSS in health and medical informatics emerges that is distinct and unique to the health care field. Future research can focus on OSS acceptance and diffusion and impact on cost, efficiency and quality of health care.

  2. The Outreach Sourcebook, Volume 7: Rural Health Demonstration Projects, 1997 to 2000.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Health Resources and Services Administration (DHHS), Rockville, MD. Office of Rural Health Policy.

    In 1997, the federal Office of Rural Health Policy awarded 3-year outreach demonstration grants to 45 projects to provide direct primary and preventive health care services to rural residents in 28 states. The grant program allows recipients to test innovative ideas against the challenges of rural health care delivery, such as provider shortages,…

  3. The Outreach Sourcebook, Volume 5: Rural Health Demonstration Projects, 1995 to 1998.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Randall, Teri

    In 1995, the federal Office of Rural Health Policy awarded 3-year outreach demonstration grants to 25 projects to provide direct primary and preventive health care services to rural residents in 20 states. The grant program allows recipients to test innovative ideas against persistent problems of rural health care, such as provider shortages,…

  4. Strengthening rural Latinos' civic engagement for health: The Voceros de Salud project.

    PubMed

    López-Cevallos, Daniel; Dierwechter, Tatiana; Volkmann, Kelly; Patton-López, Megan

    2013-11-01

    This article describes the Latino Health Ambassadors Network (Voceros de Salud ) project created to support and mobilize Latino community leaders to address health inequalities in a rural Oregon county. Voceros de Salud is discussed as a model that other rural communities may implement towards strengthening Latino civic engagement for health.

  5. The Coronary Health Improvement Projects Impact on Lowering Eating, Sleep, Stress, and Depressive Disorders

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Merrill, Ray M.; Aldana, Stephen G.; Greenlaw, Roger L.; Diehl, Hans A.

    2008-01-01

    Background: The Coronary Health Improvement Project (CHIP) is designed to lower cardiovascular risk factors among a group of generally healthy individuals through health education. Purpose: This study will evaluate the efficacy of the CHIP intervention at improving eating, sleep, stress, and depressive disorders. Methods: A health education…

  6. Overview of the National Health Educator Competencies Update Project, 1998-2004

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gilmore, Gary David; Olsen, Larry K.; Taub, Alyson; Connell, David

    2005-01-01

    The National Health Educator Competencies Update Project (CUP), conducted during 1998-2004, addressed what health educators currently do in practice, the degree to which the role definition of the entry-level health educator is still up-to-date, and the validation of advanced-level competencies. A 19-page questionnaire was sent to a representative…

  7. Report of the School Health Assessment, Planning, and Evaluation Project (SHAPE).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    New York City Dept. of Health, NY.

    The School Health Assessment, Planning, and Evaluation Project (SHAPE) was a systematic survey to determine the health status of the New York City school population prior to a major reorganization of school health services planned for the 1984-85 school year. It comprised 6,282 pupils attending 12 public and non-public schools. Over 30 percent of…

  8. The Outreach Sourcebook, Volume 6: Rural Health Demonstration Projects, 1996 to 1999.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Health Resources and Services Administration (DHHS), Rockville, MD. Office of Rural Health Policy.

    In 1996, the federal Office of Rural Health Policy awarded 3-year outreach demonstration grants to 25 projects to provide direct primary and preventive health care services to rural residents in 20 states. The grant program allows recipients to test innovative ideas against the challenges of rural health care delivery, such as provider shortages,…

  9. A Survey of Practices in Hospital Pharmacies. The UCLA Allied Health Professions Project.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cullen, Thomas D.; Henrich, Robert R.

    A survey was conducted as part of the UCLA Allied Health Professions Project to determine what procedures are used in health care facility pharmacies for the performance of tasks previously selected for inclusion in a proposed curriculum for pharmacy technicians. Questionnaires were distributed to a national sample of 48 health care facilities,…

  10. Effects of an Interprofessional Project on Students' Perspectives on Interprofessional Education and Knowledge of Health Disciplines

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jutte, Lisa S.; Browne, Fredrick R.; Reynolds, Marie

    2016-01-01

    Context: Interprofessional education (IPE) is encouraged in health care education in the hope that it will improve communication among future health care professionals. In response, health professional education programs are developing IPE curricula. Objective: To determine if a multicourse interprofessional (IP) project impacted students'…

  11. Mental Health Services to Rural Consumers. Lessons Learned from a Four Year Iowa Farm Crisis Project.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Link, Emerson A.

    The Southwest Iowa Mental Health Center recently completed a 4-year project to increase use of mental health services by normally reluctant rural populations and to increase coping ability among persons affected by the farm crisis. During the first 2 years, program goals included aggressive outreach to potential patients, mental health education…

  12. Allied Health Education/Transfer of Credit: Recommendations of the North Carolina Articulation Project.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Boatman, Ralph H., Ed.; Huther, John W., Ed.

    The North Carolina Allied Health Articulation Project was launched to develop procedures which would enable an individual to transfer credit from an allied health education program in one setting to some program in higher education. In 1972-73, study committees were appointed to deal with the allied health professions of physical therapy,…

  13. Report of the School Health Assessment, Planning, and Evaluation Project (SHAPE).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    New York City Dept. of Health, NY.

    The School Health Assessment, Planning, and Evaluation Project (SHAPE) was a systematic survey to determine the health status of the New York City school population prior to a major reorganization of school health services planned for the 1984-85 school year. It comprised 6,282 pupils attending 12 public and non-public schools. Over 30 percent of…

  14. Effects of an Interprofessional Project on Students' Perspectives on Interprofessional Education and Knowledge of Health Disciplines

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jutte, Lisa S.; Browne, Fredrick R.; Reynolds, Marie

    2016-01-01

    Context: Interprofessional education (IPE) is encouraged in health care education in the hope that it will improve communication among future health care professionals. In response, health professional education programs are developing IPE curricula. Objective: To determine if a multicourse interprofessional (IP) project impacted students'…

  15. "Does Hope Change? Testing a Project-Based Health Intervention among Urban Students of Color"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zusevics, Kaija L.; Johnson, Sheri

    2014-01-01

    Hope is positively correlated with educational attainment and health. Interventions based on project-based learning (PBL) may increase youth hope. This study examined how a PBL intervention affected hope among urban students of color. Students in health classes were invited to participate. A PBL health class was implemented in four classrooms. The…

  16. Mental Health Services to Rural Consumers. Lessons Learned from a Four Year Iowa Farm Crisis Project.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Link, Emerson A.

    The Southwest Iowa Mental Health Center recently completed a 4-year project to increase use of mental health services by normally reluctant rural populations and to increase coping ability among persons affected by the farm crisis. During the first 2 years, program goals included aggressive outreach to potential patients, mental health education…

  17. FLORIDA "STATE" MIGRANT HEALTH PROJECT, ANNUAL PROGRESS REPORT 1964 - 1965.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Florida State Board of Health, Jacksonville.

    THE REPORT DISCUSSES THE HOUSING, HEALTH SERVICES, SANITATION, AND HEALTH EDUCATION PROGRAMS FOR MIGRANT AGRICULTURAL WORKERS IN FLORIDA. IT STATES THE OBJECTIVES OF EACH PROGRAM, PROGRAM ACCOMPLISHMENTS DURING THE YEAR, AND SUGGESTIONS FOR FUTURE PROGRAMS. (CL)

  18. Common ground: the HealthWeb project as a model for Internet collaboration.

    PubMed Central

    Redman, P M; Kelly, J A; Albright, E D; Anderson, P F; Mulder, C; Schnell, E H

    1997-01-01

    The establishment of the HealthWeb project by twelve health sciences libraries provides a collaborative means of organizing and enhancing access to Internet resources for the international health sciences community. The project is based on the idea that the Internet is common ground for all libraries and that through collaboration a more comprehensive, robust, and long-lasting information product can be maintained. The participants include more than seventy librarians from the health sciences libraries of the Committee on Institutional Cooperation (CIC), an academic consortium of twelve major research universities. The Greater Midwest Region of the National Network of Libraries of Medicine serves as a cosponsor. HealthWeb is an information resource that provides access to evaluated, annotated Internet resources via the World Wide Web. The project vision as well as the progress reported on its implementation may serve as a model for other collaborative Internet projects. PMID:9431420

  19. Generic project definitions for improvement of health care delivery: a case-based approach.

    PubMed

    Niemeijer, Gerard C; Does, Ronald J M M; de Mast, Jeroen; Trip, Albert; van den Heuvel, Jaap

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this article is to create actionable knowledge, making the definition of process improvement projects in health care delivery more effective. This study is a retrospective analysis of process improvement projects in hospitals, facilitating a case-based reasoning approach to project definition. Data sources were project documentation and hospital-performance statistics of 271 Lean Six Sigma health care projects from 2002 to 2009 of general, teaching, and academic hospitals in the Netherlands and Belgium. Objectives and operational definitions of improvement projects in the sample, analyzed and structured in a uniform format and terminology. Extraction of reusable elements of earlier project definitions, presented in the form of 9 templates called generic project definitions. These templates function as exemplars for future process improvement projects, making the selection, definition, and operationalization of similar projects more efficient. Each template includes an explicated rationale, an operationalization in the form of metrics, and a prototypical example. Thus, a process of incremental and sustained learning based on case-based reasoning is facilitated. The quality of project definitions is a crucial success factor in pursuits to improve health care delivery. We offer 9 tried and tested improvement themes related to patient safety, patient satisfaction, and business-economic performance of hospitals.

  20. Annual Medical Report of the Coastal Bend Migrant Council Health Project, San Patricio Migrant Health Center (Texas), 1973-1974.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Krebethe, William F.

    The primary goal of the migrant health project in San Patricio County, Texas was to establish out-patient family health care for migrant and seasonal farmworkers. Several accomplishments were made. By using a physician assistant, the clinic was able to add an additional work without the necessity of extending their hours. The dental services have…

  1. Improving the quality of workers' compensation health care delivery: the Washington State Occupational Health Services Project.

    PubMed

    Wickizer, T M; Franklin, G; Plaeger-Brockway, R; Mootz, R D

    2001-01-01

    This article has summarized research and policy activities undertaken in Washington State over the past several years to identify the key problems that result in poor quality and excessive disability among injured workers, and the types of system and delivery changes that could best address these problems in order to improve the quality of occupational health care provided through the workers' compensation system. Our investigations have consistently pointed to the lack of coordination and integration of occupational health services as having major adverse effects on quality and health outcomes for workers' compensation. The Managed Care Pilot Project, a delivery system intervention, focused on making changes in how care is organized and delivered to injured workers. That project demonstrated robust improvements in disability reduction; however, worker satisfaction suffered. Our current quality improvement initiative, developed through the Occupational Health Services Project, synthesizes what was learned from the MCP and other pilot studies to make delivery system improvements. This initiative seeks to develop provider incentives and clinical management processes that will improve outcomes and reduce the burden of disability on injured workers. Fundamental to this approach are simultaneously preserving workers' right to choose their own physician and maintaining flexibility in the provision of individualized care based on clinical need and progress. The OHS project then will be a "real world" test to determine if aligning provider incentives and giving physicians the tools they need to optimize occupational health delivery can demonstrate sustainable reduction in disability and improvements in patient and employer satisfaction. Critical to the success of this initiative will be our ability to: (1) enhance the occupational health care management skills and expertise of physicians who treat injured workers by establishing community-based Centers of Occupational

  2. International Comparisons in Underserved Health: Issues, Policies, Needs and Projections.

    PubMed

    Hutchinson, Paul; Morelli, Vincent

    2017-03-01

    Health care globally has made great strides; for example, there are lower rates of infant and maternal mortality. Increased incomes have led to lower rates of diseases accompanying poverty and hunger. There has been a shift away from the infectious diseases so deadly in developing nations toward first-world conditions. This article presents health care statistics across age groups and geographic areas to help the primary care physician understand these changes. There is a special focus on underserved populations. New technologies in health and health care spending internationally are addressed, emphasizing universal health care. The article concludes with recommendations for the future.

  3. Evaluating Project Connect: improving juvenile probationers' mental health and substance use service access.

    PubMed

    Wasserman, Gail A; McReynolds, Larkin S; Musabegovic, Hana; Whited, Andria L; Keating, Joseph M; Huo, Yanling

    2009-11-01

    Project Connect is a multilayered county-specific program aimed at linking juvenile probationers to needed mental health and substance use services. In four NY counties, the intervention included cooperative agreements between probation and mental health authorities, program materials to facilitate referral, in-service training for probation officers, and systematic screening for mental health needs. Charts for 583 Baseline youths were reviewed and compared with 594 youths undergoing intake under Project Connect. Compared to Baseline, under Project Connect, referred youths were 2.7 times as likely to access services, regardless of youth or county characteristics, service availability, or when the intervention took place.

  4. Survival of the project: a case study of ICT innovation in health care.

    PubMed

    Andreassen, Hege K; Kjekshus, Lars Erik; Tjora, Aksel

    2015-05-01

    From twenty years of information and communication technology (ICT) projects in the health sector, we have learned one thing: most projects remain projects. The problem of pilotism in e-health and telemedicine is a growing concern, both in medical literature and among policy makers, who now ask for large-scale implementation of ICT in routine health service delivery. In this article, we turn the question of failing projects upside down. Instead of investigating the obstacles to implementing ICT and realising permanent changes in health care routines, we ask what makes the temporary ICT project survive, despite an apparent lack of success. Our empirical material is based on Norwegian telemedicine. Through a case study, we take an in-depth look into the history of one particular telemedical initiative and highlight how ICT projects matter on a managerial level. Our analysis reveals how management tasks were delegated to the ICT project, which thus contributed to four processes of organisational control: allocating resources, generating and managing enthusiasm, system correction and aligning local practice and national policies. We argue that the innovation project in itself can be considered an innovation that has become normalised in health care, not in clinical, but in management work. In everyday management, the ICT project appears to be a convenient tool suited to ease the tensions between state regulatory practices and claims of professional autonomy that arise in the wake of new public management reforms. Separating project management and funding from routine practice handles the conceptualised heterogeneity between innovation and routine within contemporary health care delivery. Whilst this separation eases the execution of both normal routines and innovative projects, it also delays expected diffusion of technology.

  5. Integrating Public Health and Health Promotion Practice in the Medical Curriculum: A Self-Directed Team-Based Project Approach.

    PubMed

    Kershaw, Geraldine; Grivna, Michal; Elbarazi, Iffat; AliHassan, Souheila; Aziz, Faisal; Al Dhaheri, Aysha Ibrahim

    2017-01-01

    Preparing health professionals in health promotion (HP) and disease prevention is essential for improvement of population health, community HP, and better health care for individuals. The aim of this article is to describe an HP project in the form of a major self-directed project-based learning task integrated within the curriculum in the second year of the medical degree program at United Arab Emirates University. The project introduces students to public health and HP practice and develops students' literature searching, writing, presentation skills, and team work. Students learn the principles underlying behavioral change, and the design of HP programs and materials, through a lecture format. Small groups of students each choose a specific health topic for their project. Over 11 weeks, students obtain information about their topic from appropriate sources (library, PubMed, Google Scholar, credible health sources such as World Health Organization). Using the principles learned in the lectures, they develop appropriate materials for their target audience: for example, posters, a pamphlet, social media content, or a video or radio message. Students seek advice from specialist faculty as needed. In week 12, each team presents their project background, rationale, and materials to their colleagues in a seminar format open to all faculty. They then submit the materials they developed for assessment. Group marks are assigned for presentations and materials. Key concepts are assessed by multiple choice questions in comprehensive course examinations. By participation in the HP project, many students develop a solid background in prevention. The information retrieval, writing, and presentation skills, as well as experience of team work, are valuable both for the remaining years of their training and their future careers.

  6. Integrating Public Health and Health Promotion Practice in the Medical Curriculum: A Self-Directed Team-Based Project Approach

    PubMed Central

    Kershaw, Geraldine; Grivna, Michal; Elbarazi, Iffat; AliHassan, Souheila; Aziz, Faisal; Al Dhaheri, Aysha Ibrahim

    2017-01-01

    Preparing health professionals in health promotion (HP) and disease prevention is essential for improvement of population health, community HP, and better health care for individuals. The aim of this article is to describe an HP project in the form of a major self-directed project-based learning task integrated within the curriculum in the second year of the medical degree program at United Arab Emirates University. The project introduces students to public health and HP practice and develops students’ literature searching, writing, presentation skills, and team work. Students learn the principles underlying behavioral change, and the design of HP programs and materials, through a lecture format. Small groups of students each choose a specific health topic for their project. Over 11 weeks, students obtain information about their topic from appropriate sources (library, PubMed, Google Scholar, credible health sources such as World Health Organization). Using the principles learned in the lectures, they develop appropriate materials for their target audience: for example, posters, a pamphlet, social media content, or a video or radio message. Students seek advice from specialist faculty as needed. In week 12, each team presents their project background, rationale, and materials to their colleagues in a seminar format open to all faculty. They then submit the materials they developed for assessment. Group marks are assigned for presentations and materials. Key concepts are assessed by multiple choice questions in comprehensive course examinations. By participation in the HP project, many students develop a solid background in prevention. The information retrieval, writing, and presentation skills, as well as experience of team work, are valuable both for the remaining years of their training and their future careers. PMID:28879173

  7. Lay perspectives on lay health worker roles, boundaries and participation within three UK community-based health promotion projects.

    PubMed

    South, J; Kinsella, K; Meah, A

    2012-08-01

    This paper examines lay interpretations of lay health worker roles within three UK community-based health promotion projects. It argues that understanding lay health worker roles requires critical analysis of the complex interrelationships between professionals, lay workers and the communities receiving a programme. Findings are presented that are drawn from a qualitative study of lay engagement in public health programme delivery where a key objective was to examine the perspectives of community members with the experience of receiving services delivered by lay health workers. Interviews and focus groups were conducted with 46 programme recipients from three case study projects; a breastfeeding peer support service, a walking for health scheme and a neighbourhood health project. The results show how participants interpreted the function and responsibilities of lay health workers and how those roles provided personalized support and facilitated engagement in group activities. Further insights into community participation processes are provided revealing the potential for active engagement in both formal and informal roles. The paper concludes that social relationships are core to understanding lay health worker programmes and therefore analysis needs to take account of the capacity for community members to move within a spectrum of participation defined by increasing responsibility for others.

  8. Overview of recent trans-institutional health network projects in Japan and Germany.

    PubMed

    Juhr, Maren; Haux, Reinhold; Suzuki, Takahiro; Takabayashi, Katsuhiko

    2015-05-01

    Worldwide populations are aging and countries have to prepare for the effects of demographic change in health care. Health information exchange (HIE), which is the process of moving patient information across health care providers electronically, can help overcome health data fragmentation and open opportunities to improve patient care in terms of quality, economy and efficiency. Since Japan and Germany are among the first countries strongly impacted by demographic changes of aging populations, we report on current developments about health information systems carrying out HIE based on case studies in both countries. Four projects that address the improvement of HIE within a defined region have been selected and investigated: the German project of the Lower Saxony Bank of Health and the Japanese projects Chiba ITnet, Nagasaki AjisaiNet and the National Disaster and Backup System of Japan. The project descriptions are based on relevant English publications, on-site visits and interviews with developers and users. The projects are introduced in terms of their basic architecture and implementation, their present status and future objectives. The projects' developments are still in progress and all have to cope with significant challenges before they will be able to provide a fully working trans-institutional health network solution.

  9. Lawrence Children's Health Project. A Demonstration of a Collaborative Brokering Model and School-Based EPSDT. Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Himes, John H.; And Others

    The Lawrence (Massachusetts) Children's Health Project (LCHP) was a demonstration project consisting of an alternative approach to providing health care to children, many of whom were not receiving health services. The project was carried out by the Merrimack Education Center and focused on a school-based model for Early Periodic Screening,…

  10. Projections of national health expenditures through the year 2000

    PubMed Central

    Sonnefeld, Sally T.; Waldo, Daniel R.; Lemieux, Jeffrey A.; McKusick, David R.

    1991-01-01

    In this article, the authors present a scenario for health expenditures during the 1990s. Assuming that current laws and practices remain unchanged, the Nation will spend $1.6 trillion for health care in the year 2000, an amount equal to 16.4 percent of that year's gross national product. Medicare and Medicaid will foot an increasing share of the Nation's health bill, rising to more than one-third of the total. The factors accounting for growth in national health spending are described as well as the effects of those factors on spending by type of service and by source of funds. PMID:10114931

  11. Rapidly building global health security capacity--Uganda demonstration project, 2013.

    PubMed

    Borchert, Jeff N; Tappero, Jordan W; Downing, Robert; Shoemaker, Trevor; Behumbiize, Prosper; Aceng, Jane; Makumbi, Issa; Dahlke, Melissa; Jarrar, Bassam; Lozano, Briana; Kasozi, Sam; Austin, Mark; Phillippe, Dru; Watson, Ian D; Evans, Tom J; Stotish, Timothy; Dowell, Scott F; Iademarco, Michael F; Ransom, Raymond; Balajee, Arunmozhi; Becknell, Kristi; Beauvais, Dennis; Wuhib, Tadesse

    2014-01-31

    Increasingly, the need to strengthen global capacity to prevent, detect, and respond to public health threats around the globe is being recognized. CDC, in partnership with the World Health Organization (WHO), has committed to building capacity by assisting member states with strengthening their national capacity for integrated disease surveillance and response as required by International Health Regulations (IHR). CDC and other U.S. agencies have reinforced their pledge through creation of global health security (GHS) demonstration projects. One such project was conducted during March-September 2013, when the Uganda Ministry of Health (MoH) and CDC implemented upgrades in three areas: 1) strengthening the public health laboratory system by increasing the capacity of diagnostic and specimen referral networks, 2) enhancing the existing communications and information systems for outbreak response, and 3) developing a public health emergency operations center (EOC) (Figure 1). The GHS demonstration project outcomes included development of an outbreak response module that allowed reporting of suspected cases of illness caused by priority pathogens via short messaging service (SMS; i.e., text messaging) to the Uganda District Health Information System (DHIS-2) and expansion of the biologic specimen transport and laboratory reporting system supported by the President's Emergency Plan for AIDS Relief (PEPFAR). Other enhancements included strengthening laboratory management, establishing and equipping the EOC, and evaluating these enhancements during an outbreak exercise. In 6 months, the project demonstrated that targeted enhancements resulted in substantial improvements to the ability of Uganda's public health system to detect and respond to health threats.

  12. Self-perceived health status of hostel residents: use of the SF-36D health survey questionnaire. Hanover Project Team.

    PubMed

    Usherwood, T; Jones, N

    1993-12-01

    As part of a project to assess the health needs of homeless people in Sheffield, a survey of hostel residents was undertaken with the aim of measuring self-perceived health and health service use among respondents. The survey instrument incorporated the SF-36D short-form health survey questionnaire. One hundred and four (56 per cent) adult hostel residents responded. Respondents reported high levels of health service use, and poor average perceived health in comparison with the general population. Three-quarters of respondents were identified as being at risk of major depressive illness. There was a strong association between risk of major depression and recent hospital contact, current use of prescribed medication, and low scores on the social function, mental health, energy/vitality, pain and general health dimensions of the SF-36. The implications of these findings are discussed.

  13. Report: EPA Needs to Demonstrate Public Health Benefits of Drinking Water State Revolving Fund Projects

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Report #15-P-0032, December 5, 2014. The EPA needs to enforce grant requirements for collecting DWSRF project information to demonstrate the public health results of the $11.37 billion it has invested in drinking water infrastructure since 2009.

  14. EPA Awards $270K for Environmental and Health Projects in New England Communities

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    EPA has awarded 12 grants across New England under its 2016 Healthy Communities Grant Program, totaling approximately $270,566, to fund community projects addressing environmental and public health issues.

  15. An innovative program to fund health-oriented student projects and research.

    PubMed

    Bybee, Ronald F; Thompson, Sharon E

    2004-01-01

    The price of a university education has increased over the years. As a result, students often graduate with thousands of dollars of debt. Conducting research or developing class projects that require personal expenditures can be overwhelming, if not impossible. Participation in research and in developing projects can enhance a student's educational experience. In an effort to address cost issues and provide an optimal learning experience for all students through participation in projects and research, the College of Health Sciences at the University of Texas at El Paso (UTEP) collaborated with a regional foundation to fund health-oriented students' projects and research. Approximately 100 projects have been funded in amounts from 200 dollars to 10,000 dollars at UTEP. Similar programs can be replicated at other US universities. Establishing a general fund and identifying contributors may be a viable option, although finding a foundation or agency to fund the project poses a challenge.

  16. Introducing Health Education to Educare Projects: A Case Study.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Atmore, Eric, Ed.

    Grassroots Educare Trust is a training and service organization for community-controlled educare centers. Sharon Hostetler, a volunteer community health worker/trainer, helped launch a 6-day health program for educare workers in South Africa. In post-aparthied South Africa, the preschool field has been identified as an important target group for…

  17. TEXAS STATE DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH MIGRANT PROJECT. ANNUAL REPORT.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Texas State Dept. of Health Resources, Austin.

    IN THE STATE OF TEXAS APPROXIMATELY 167,000 AGRICULTURAL LABORERS MIGRATED DURING 1965, USUALLY FOLLOWING FOUR DESCRIBED MIGRATION PATTERNS. SEVEN PUBLIC HEALTH NURSES PROVIDED HEALTH SERVICES TO THESE MIGRANTS IN THE FORM OF IMMUNIZATION PROGRAMS, TUBERCULIN TESTING, AND FOLLOWUP SERVICES. SANITATION SERVICES IN THE VARIOUS COMMUNITIES INCLUDED…

  18. Analysis of central enterprise architecture elements in models of six eHealth projects.

    PubMed

    Virkanen, Hannu; Mykkänen, Juha

    2014-01-01

    Large-scale initiatives for eHealth services have been established in many countries on regional or national level. The use of Enterprise Architecture has been suggested as a methodology to govern and support the initiation, specification and implementation of large-scale initiatives including the governance of business changes as well as information technology. This study reports an analysis of six health IT projects in relation to Enterprise Architecture elements, focusing on central EA elements and viewpoints in different projects.

  19. Theory and action for health promotion illustrations from the North Karelia Project.

    PubMed Central

    McAlister, A; Puska, P; Salonen, J T; Tuomilehto, J; Koskela, K

    1982-01-01

    The North Karelia Project in Finland illustrates the fundamental goals of health promotion. Specific activities of the project serve as examples of how concepts from the social and behavioral sciences can be applied to achieve estimated reductions in predicted risk of disease. The results in North Karelia are not conclusive, but they are encouraging, and the investigations conducted there is an essential reference for future research in health promotion and disease prevention. PMID:7053618

  20. Engaging Media for Mental Health Applications: the EMMA project.

    PubMed

    Baños, R; Botella, C; Quero, S; García-Palacios, A; Alcañiz, M

    2011-01-01

    EMMA project has been focused on how the sense of presence in virtual environments mediates or generates emotional responses, and how to use presence and emotional responses in virtual environments effectively in clinical and non clinical settings. EMMA project has developed two different virtual environments. The first one acts as a 'mood device' and is aimed to induce and enhance several moods on clinical and non clinical subjects. The second one is a virtual environment that acts as an adaptive display to treat emotional disorders (Post-traumatic Stress Disorder, Adjustment Disorder and Pathological Grief). This virtual world varies the contents that are presented depending on the emotions of the patient at each moment. The goal of this paper is to outline the main goals achieved by this project.

  1. Pumped up prices? Advice on controlling scope creep in health care construction projects.

    PubMed

    Upchurch, J Kenneth; McLendon, Mary Huston

    2003-03-01

    Changes in the scope of any health care construction project are inevitable. They happen for a number of reasons, including pressure from doctors and staff. While some are justified by factors that influence space requirements, such as changing market needs, new physicians or new technology, others inflate the cost of a construction project without adding significant benefits.

  2. The UCSF AIDS Health Project Guide to Counseling: Perspectives on Psychotherapy, Prevention, and Therapeutic Practice.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dilley, James W., Ed.; Marks, Robert, Ed.

    The University of California San Francisco AIDS Health Project has more than 15 years' experience in working with thousands of people with AIDS. This guide, developed by the Project, provides practical, state-of-the-art resources in the field. Part 1, "Risk and Behavior: Helping Clients Remain Uninfected," covers the following topics:…

  3. Sexual health promotion on social networking sites: a process evaluation of The FaceSpace Project.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Phuong; Gold, Judy; Pedrana, Alisa; Chang, Shanton; Howard, Steve; Ilic, Olivia; Hellard, Margaret; Stoove, Mark

    2013-07-01

    This article reports findings from an evaluation of reach and engagement of The FaceSpace Project, a novel sexual health promotion project delivered through social networking sites that targeted young people aged 16-29 years. Multiple methods were used to evaluate project reach and engagement. The evaluation focussed on quantitative data (online usage statistics, online surveys), complemented by available qualitative data (project team meeting notes). The project reached 900 fans who were mostly between 18 and 34 years of age. The most successful ways of increasing audience reach were via Facebook advertisements and tagging photos of young people attending a music festival on the project Facebook page. Peaks in Facebook page interactions (comments and "likes") coincided with recruitment peaks and when videos were posted. However, video views varied greatly between postings. Feedback from the project team for increasing engagement in future social networking site interventions included having one centralized Facebook page and using episodic videos. This evaluation is among the first to assess the use of social networking sites for sexual health promotion and provides information to inform the implementation and evaluation of future projects using new media. Social networking sites offer great potential to reach and engage young people for sexual health promotion. However, further work is required to improve implementation and promote audience reach and engagement as well as to determine effectiveness of social networking sites in changing knowledge, attitudes, and behaviors. Copyright © 2013 Society for Adolescent Health and Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. The UCSF AIDS Health Project Guide to Counseling: Perspectives on Psychotherapy, Prevention, and Therapeutic Practice.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dilley, James W., Ed.; Marks, Robert, Ed.

    The University of California San Francisco AIDS Health Project has more than 15 years' experience in working with thousands of people with AIDS. This guide, developed by the Project, provides practical, state-of-the-art resources in the field. Part 1, "Risk and Behavior: Helping Clients Remain Uninfected," covers the following topics:…

  5. The Wallingford Wellness Project--An Innovative Health Promotion Program with Older Adults. Monograph No. 2.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    FallCreek, Stephanie, Ed.; Stam, Sue Bailey, Ed.

    This monograph discusses the Wallingford Wellness Project, a 3-year Administration on Aging model project designed to develop, demonstrate, and evaluate the effectiveness of health promotion and training with older adults. (The program in the Wallingford Senior Center offered classes focusing on exercise, nutrition, stress management, and…

  6. Maternal and Child Health Bureau Active Projects FY 1991: An Annotated Listing.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Center for Education in Maternal and Child Health, Washington, DC.

    This annotated listing provides brief descriptions of the 591 projects funded during 1991 by federal set-aside funds of the Maternal and Child Health (MCH) Services Block Grant and identified as special projects of regional and national significance (SPRANS). Preliminary information includes an introduction, an organization chart of the Maternal…

  7. 75 FR 8927 - Autism Services Demonstration Project for TRICARE Beneficiaries Under the Extended Care Health...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-02-26

    ... of the Secretary Autism Services Demonstration Project for TRICARE Beneficiaries Under the Extended...: This notice provides a 2-year extension of the Department of Defense Enhanced Access to Autism Services Demonstration Project under the Extended Care Health Option for beneficiaries diagnosed with an Autism...

  8. The National Program for Occupational Safety and Health in Agriculture. 1992 Project Facts.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Inst. for Occupational Safety and Health (DHHS/PHS), Cincinnati, OH.

    This book contains information about a project instituted in 1990 by the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH) to prevent work-related diseases and injuries among agricultural workers. Included are facts about 25 projects within NIOSH and 42 cooperative agreements between NIOSH and institutions in 25 states. These…

  9. Evaluation of the Rural South Australian Tri-Division Adolescent Health Project.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Naccarella, Lucio

    2003-01-01

    An Australian project aimed to strengthen relationships of general practitioners (GPs) with rural adolescents and school personnel through GP school visits, educational seminars on health topics for students, and student visits to GP clinics. Surveys of 5 project personnel, 6 GPs, 3 school counselors, and 30 secondary school students found…

  10. Evaluation of the Rural South Australian Tri-Division Adolescent Health Project.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Naccarella, Lucio

    2003-01-01

    An Australian project aimed to strengthen relationships of general practitioners (GPs) with rural adolescents and school personnel through GP school visits, educational seminars on health topics for students, and student visits to GP clinics. Surveys of 5 project personnel, 6 GPs, 3 school counselors, and 30 secondary school students found…

  11. The Supply of Health Manpower. 1970 Profiles and Projections to 1990.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Department of Health, Education, and Welfare, Washington, DC.

    This document provides descriptive profiles of the current and past supply of health manpower and projections of manpower supply to 1990. It presents detailed descriptions of the methodology and techniques used to derive the profiles and projections, and provides interpretations and evaluations of the adequacy and comparability of existing…

  12. Appalachian Adolescent Health Education Project (AAHEP): First-Year Evaluation Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    DuVall, Lloyd A.; And Others

    This report is a first year summative and formative evaluation of the Appalachian Adolescent Health Education Project (AAHEP), a program designed to reduce adolescent pregnancy and provide care for pregnant teenagers in East Tennessee. It attempts to determine the impact of the project on teenage pregnancy in the 15-county target area and the…

  13. Human genome project: New tools for tomorrow's health research

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1990-01-01

    The Human Genome Project is discussed within the context of the benefits that can be derived from human biological and biomedical research in the 21st century. Explanations are given about what chromosome mapping is and the different kinds that exist. Next, model organisms that were developed to better understand and interpret genetic information are discussed, as well as the database that the project will develop and the training opportunities that such a database will afford to emerging technologies. Finally, a review is given of the personal and social implications stemming from greater genetic knowledge.

  14. Effects of the Integrated Behavioral Health Project's Efforts to Promote Integrated Care Under Funding from the California Mental Health Services Authority

    PubMed Central

    Cerully, Jennifer L.; Collins, Rebecca L.; Wong, Eunice C.; Seelam, Rachana; Roth, Elizabeth; Yu, Jennifer

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Describes the methods and results of a RAND evaluation of the Integrated Behavioral Health Project's efforts to promote the integration of mental and physical health care among various health care stakeholders in California. PMID:28083420

  15. Teaching and addressing health disparities through the family medicine social and community context of care project.

    PubMed

    White, Jordan; Heney, Jessica; Esquibel, Angela Y; Dimock, Camia; Goldman, Roberta; Anthony, David

    2014-09-02

    By training future physicians to care for patients with backgrounds different from their own, medical schools can help reduce health disparities. To address the need for education in this area, the leaders of the Family Medicine Clerkship at the Warren Alpert Medical School of Brown University developed the Social and Community Context of Care project, required of all medical students rotating through this clerkship. Students develop a hypothetical intervention addressing a health issue seen at their preceptor site, and are assessed on their grasp of the social and contextual issues affecting that health issue in their particular community. Some interventions are actualized in later clerkships or independent study projects; one example, a health class for pregnant and parenting teens at Central Falls High School, is described here. If made a routine part of medical education, projects such as these may help medical students address the health disparities they will encounter in future practice.

  16. The Teen Photovoice Project: a pilot study to promote health through advocacy.

    PubMed

    Necheles, Jonathan W; Chung, Emily Q; Hawes-Dawson, Jennifer; Ryan, Gery Wayne; Williams, Shield B; Holmes, Heidi N; Wells, Kenneth B; Vaiana, Mary E; Schuster, Mark A

    2007-01-01

    Clinicians, public health practitioners, and policymakers would like to understand how youth perceive health issues and how they can become advocates for health promotion in their communities. Traditional research methods can be used to capture these perceptions, but are limited in their ability to activate (excite and engage) youth to participate in health promotion activities. To pilot the use of an adapted version of photovoice as a starting point to engage youth in identifying influences on their health behaviors in a process that encourages the development of health advocacy projects. Application of qualitative and quantitative methods to a participatory research project that teaches youth the photovoice method to identify and address health promotion issues relevant to their lives. Participants included 13 students serving on a Youth Advisory Board (YAB) of the UCLA/RAND Center for Adolescent Health Promotion working in four small groups of two to five participants. Students were from the Los Angeles, California, metropolitan area. Results were derived from photograph sorting activities, analysis of photograph narratives, and development of advocacy projects. Youth frequently discussed a variety of topics reflected in their pictures that included unhealthy food choices, inducers of stress, friends, emotions, environment, health, and positive aspects of family. The advocacy projects used social marketing strategies, focusing on unhealthy dietary practices and inducers of stress. The youths' focus on obesity-related issues have contributed to the center's success in partnering with the Los Angeles Unified School District on a new community-based participatory research (CBPR) project. Youth can engage in a process of identifying community-level health influences, leading to health promotion through advocacy. Participants focused their advocacy work on selected issues addressing the types of unhealthy food available in their communities and stress. This process

  17. The Teen Photovoice Project: A Pilot Study to Promote Health Through Advocacy

    PubMed Central

    Necheles, Jonathan W.; Chung, Emily Q.; Hawes-Dawson, Jennifer; Ryan, Gery W.; Williams, La’Shield B.; Holmes, Heidi N.; Wells, Kenneth B.; Vaiana, Mary E.; Schuster, Mark A.

    2009-01-01

    Background Clinicians, public health practitioners, and policymakers would like to understand how youth perceive health issues and how they can become advocates for health promotion in their communities. 1,2 Traditional research methods can be used to capture these perceptions, but are limited in their ability to activate (excite and engage) youth to participate in health promotion activities. Objectives To pilot the use of an adapted version of photovoice as a starting point to engage youth in identifying influences on their health behaviors in a process that encourages the development of health advocacy projects. Methods Application of qualitative and quantitative methods to a participatory research project that teaches youth the photovoice method to identify and address health promotion issues relevant to their lives. Participants included 13 students serving on a Youth Advisory Board (YAB) of the UCLA/RAND Center for Adolescent Health Promotion working in four small groups of two to five participants. Students were from the Los Angeles, California, metropolitan area. Results Results were derived from photograph sorting activities, analysis of photograph narratives, and development of advocacy projects. Youth frequently discussed a variety of topics reflected in their pictures that included unhealthy food choices, inducers of stress, friends, emotions, environment, health, and positive aspects of family. The advocacy projects used social marketing strategies, focusing on unhealthy dietary practices and inducers of stress. The youths’ focus on obesity-related issues have contributed to the center’s success in partnering with the Los Angeles Unified School District on a new community-based participatory research (CBPR) project. Conclusion Youth can engage in a process of identifying community-level health influences, leading to health promotion through advocacy. Participants focused their advocacy work on selected issues addressing the types of unhealthy food

  18. Te mahi niho hauora ki Ratana Pa: the dental health project at Ratana Pa.

    PubMed

    Broughton, J

    1995-09-01

    Following the success of a dental health project provided for Maori communities along the Wanganui River by the Royal New Zealand Dental Corps, the people of Ratana Pa, 20 km south of Wanganui, requested a similar service. Funding for a pilot project was provided by the Central Regional Health Authority through Good Health Wanganui. The project was a joint venture between the Health Committee of Ratana Pa and Dental Health of Good Health Wanganui. The dental health of the people at Ratana Pa was generally poor, featuring a high rate of decay and serious periodontal disease. Severe halitosis was common. As a result of poor oral health, many patients, especially young women, were whakama, a state of embarrassment and shame that caused them to keep their teeth hidden. An increase in self-esteem and greater interest in dental health occurred after treatment. A second treatment phase began in March 1995. This community-driven Maori health initiative, in partnership with a Regional Health Authority, fulfils obligations under the Treaty of Waitangi.

  19. Illinois Early Learning Project Tip Sheets: Physical Development and Health.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    2003

    The Illinois Early Learning Project (IEL) is funded by the Illinois State Board of Education to provide information resources on early learning and training related to implementing the Illinois Early Learning Standards for parents and for early childhood personnel in all settings. The IEL tip sheets offer suggestions to parents and early childhood…

  20. Project SAVE: Promoting Mental Health for Disadvantaged Rural Youth.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Walsh, Sandra M.; And Others

    1996-01-01

    Students Actively Valuing Education (SAVE) is a middle school peer facilitator program. Based on the philosophy that students share and identify needs and problems better with peers. Developed to give disadvantaged students leadership opportunities as peer facilitators. Active for three years, Project SAVE is described as a success. Outlines…

  1. Long-term health implications of the Chernobyl accident and relevant projects of the World Health Organization.

    PubMed

    Yamashita, Shunichi; Carr, Zhanat; Repacholi, Michael

    2007-11-01

    The past two decades have witnessed dramatic changes in public health governance and international cooperation on the Chernobyl Nuclear Power Plant accident, especially after the end of the Cold War. The World Health Organization (WHO) has committed itself deeply to the public health issues around Chernobyl and has participated in various health projects such as health monitoring and cancer screening. WHO has also been engaged in research activities such as the Chernobyl Tissue Bank, in close collaboration with the Ministries of Health in Belarus, Russia, and Ukraine. In addition to the official report of the Chernobyl Forum "Health Expert Groups" in 2005, the task of WHO is to not only analyze and clarify the global burden of Chernobyl-related illness, but also to promote the well-being of the local residents who suffered chronic low-level radiation exposure from radiation fallout.

  2. [Health management of Saipem workers with projects involving abroad activities].

    PubMed

    Nicosia, V; De Sanctis, S; Mika, F; Consentino, M; Mascheroni, G

    2007-01-01

    In remote areas and in developing countries, where adequate health-care structures are few and sparse, Occupational Medicine contributes to guaranteeing workers' health. Companies like Saipem, involved in activities that are carried out in remote, inhospitable areas must ensure the safety and guarantee the health conditions of workers in relation to the risk factors connected with the job as well as with the environment in which it is performed. In such situations, Occupational Medicine addresses both the health aspects of the workplace and of the community, and is the pivot around which revolves the health-care support of workers employed abroad in the sense of protection and enhancement of health. The risks connected with work abroad are of three main types: 1) job-related risks; 2) risks connected with the environment; 3) risks related to the organization of work and the changes in the worker's daily life. The job-related risks are similar to those connected with analogous jobs performed elsewhere. The risks connected with the environment are related to adverse climatic conditions, extreme temperatures and unknown and often dangerous flora and fauna. The occupational physician is called upon to assess the suitability of workers for jobs that are based in remote areas. The main clinical conditions that can prevent issue of the Medical Fitness Certificate to workers for long-stay jobs abroad are discussed.

  3. Health spending projections through 2017: the baby-boom generation is coming to Medicare.

    PubMed

    Keehan, Sean; Sisko, Andrea; Truffer, Christopher; Smith, Sheila; Cowan, Cathy; Poisal, John; Clemens, M Kent

    2008-01-01

    The outlook for national health spending calls for continued steady growth. Spending growth is projected to be 6.7 percent in 2007, similar to its rate in 2006. Average annual growth over the projection period is expected to be 6.7 percent. Slower growth in private spending toward the end of the period is expected to be offset by stronger growth in public spending. The health share of gross domestic product (GDP) is expected to increase to 16.3 percent in 2007 and then rise throughout the projection period, reaching 19.5 percent of GDP by 2017.

  4. Health impact assessment of industrial development projects: a spatio-temporal visualization.

    PubMed

    Winkler, Mirko S; Krieger, Gary R; Divall, Mark J; Singer, Burton H; Utzinger, Jürg

    2012-05-01

    Development and implementation of large-scale industrial projects in complex eco-epidemiological settings typically require combined environmental, social and health impact assessments. We present a generic, spatio-temporal health impact assessment (HIA) visualization, which can be readily adapted to specific projects and key stakeholders, including poorly literate communities that might be affected by consequences of a project. We illustrate how the occurrence of a variety of complex events can be utilized for stakeholder communication, awareness creation, interactive learning as well as formulating HIA research and implementation questions. Methodological features are highlighted in the context of an iron ore development in a rural part of Africa.

  5. Tuberculosis infection control in health facilities in Lithuania: lessons learnt from a capacity support project.

    PubMed

    Turusbekova, N; Ljungqvist, I; Davidavičiene, E; Mikaityte, J; van der Werf, M J

    2016-03-21

    Tuberculosis (TB) infection control (IC) is key in controlling TB transmission in health facilities in Lithuania. This article presents a project that aimed at supporting health care facilities in Lithuania in implementing TB-IC. The project consisted of 1) facility TB-IC assessments, 2) development of facility TB-IC plans, 3) TB-IC training and 4) site visits. We assessed the impact of these activities through a self-assessment questionnaire. The project resulted in limited improvements. Most progress was seen in administrative and managerial activities. Possible reasons for the limited improvements are challenges with funding and the lack of supportive legislation and a national TB-IC plan.

  6. Agile informatics: application of agile project management to the development of a personal health application.

    PubMed

    Chung, Jeanhee; Pankey, Evan; Norris, Ryan J

    2007-10-11

    We describe the application of the Agile method-- a short iteration cycle, user responsive, measurable software development approach-- to the project management of a modular personal health record, iHealthSpace, to be deployed to the patients and providers of a large academic primary care practice.

  7. Implementation of an ICT-Based Learning Environment in a Nutrition Health Project

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Raiha, Teija; Tossavainen, Kerttu; Enkenberg, Jorma; Turunen, Hannele

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to investigate the views of school staff on a nutrition health project implemented via an ICT-based learning environment in a secondary school (7th to 9th grades). Design/methodology/approach: The study was a part of the wider European Network for Health Promoting Schools programme (ENHPS; since 2008, Schools…

  8. Implementation of an ICT-Based Learning Environment in a Nutrition Health Project

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Raiha, Teija; Tossavainen, Kerttu; Enkenberg, Jorma; Turunen, Hannele

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to investigate the views of school staff on a nutrition health project implemented via an ICT-based learning environment in a secondary school (7th to 9th grades). Design/methodology/approach: The study was a part of the wider European Network for Health Promoting Schools programme (ENHPS; since 2008, Schools…

  9. The Highmark Pegasus Project report: characteristics of highly successful health plans.

    PubMed

    Barish, J; Breiner, K; Fetterolf, D; Heisler, K; Moise, J

    1997-01-01

    The Highmark Blue Cross/Blue Shield Pegasus Project was created in the fall of 1996 to benchmark best practices at health plans around the United States through extensive interviews, literature searches, and other measures. Characteristics of highly successful health plans across a number of major categories are summarized in the final recommendations presented by this report.

  10. Western Kansas Migrant Health Project: 8th Annual Progress Report, 1971.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kansas State Dept. of Health, Topeka.

    The Western Kansas Migrant Health Project provides migrant families with such services as: (1) remedial schools and day care centers; (2) health education; (3) housing and sanitation; (4) nursing services; (5) medical and dental services; (6) hospital services; and (7) supplemental food programs. This 1971 annual progress report covers the…

  11. Parent Partnerships Project for Children's Mental Health Training for Professionals. PHP-c87

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    PACER Center, 2004

    2004-01-01

    In the fall of 2003, PACER Center's Parent Partnership Project for Children's Mental Health conducted a survey to better understand what parents and families need from the children?s mental health system in Minnesota. The research team developed a survey questionnaire, a telephone interview, and a focus group session directed at learning what was…

  12. Parent Partnerships Project for Children's Mental Health "The Commitment of Financial Resources." PHP-c89

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    PACER Center, 2004

    2004-01-01

    In the fall of 2003, PACER Center's Parent Partnership Project for Children's Mental Health conducted a survey to better understand what parents and families need from the children's mental health system in Minnesota. The research team developed a survey questionnaire, a telephone interview, and a focus group session directed at learning what was…

  13. Parent Partnerships Project for Children's Mental Health Training for Professionals. PHP-c87

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    PACER Center, 2004

    2004-01-01

    In the fall of 2003, PACER Center's Parent Partnership Project for Children's Mental Health conducted a survey to better understand what parents and families need from the children?s mental health system in Minnesota. The research team developed a survey questionnaire, a telephone interview, and a focus group session directed at learning what was…

  14. Parent Partnerships Project for Children's Mental Health "Access to Services." PHP-c88

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    PACER Center, 2004

    2004-01-01

    In the fall of 2003, PACER Center's Parent Partnership Project for Children's Mental Health conducted a survey to better understand what parents and families need from the children's mental health system in Minnesota. The research team developed a survey questionnaire, a telephone interview, and a focus group session directed at learning what was…

  15. Project REACH: A Program to Train Community-Based Lay Health Educators.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hale, W. Daniel; Bennett, Richard G.; Oslos, Neil R.; Cochran, C. Dwaine; Burton, John R.

    1997-01-01

    Reports on a project that tested the feasibility of recruiting and training volunteers as lay health educators who could coordinate and reinforce the educational efforts of health care providers. The program proved successful in identifying, recruiting, and training volunteers from racially and religiously diverse institutions. Favorable outcomes…

  16. The Primary Mental Health Project: Seven Consecutive Years of Program Outcome Research.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Weissberg, Roger P.; And Others

    1983-01-01

    Evaluated the Primary Mental Health Project (PMHP), a school-based mental health program for the early detection and prevention of school-adjustment problems. Assessed the PMHP's effectiveness by evaluating seven consecutive annual cohorts of children. Results strongly and consistently showed that children seen through the PMHP were judged to have…

  17. The Teen Outreach Reproductive Challenge: Improving Adolescent Health Care Delivery through Peer Education Projects

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    DeMairo, Pauline; Dischell, Jackie; Jouthe, Sorahya A.; Horner, Andrea

    2008-01-01

    The Teen Outreach Reproductive CHallenge (TORCH) is a peer education program that provides information on various topics relevant to adolescent sexual health to a diverse audience, ranging from teens to health care providers. This information is disseminated through various projects by a group of New York City high-school students who are…

  18. National Health Expenditures: Short-Term Outlook and Long-Term Projections

    PubMed Central

    Freeland, Mark S.; Schendler, Carol Ellen

    1981-01-01

    This paper presents projections of national health expenditures by type of expenditure and source of funds for 1981, 1985, and 1990. Rapid growth in national health expenditures is projected to continue through 1990. National health expenditures increased 400 percent between 1965 and 1979, reaching $212 billion in 1979. As a proportion of the Gross National Product (GNP), health expenditures rose from 6.1 percent to 9.0 percent between 1965 and 1979. They are expected to continue to rise, reaching 10.8 percent by 1990. This study projects that, under current legislation, national health expenditures will reach $279 billion in 1981, $462 billion in 1985, and $821 billion in 1990. Sources of payments for these expenditures are shifting. From 1965 to 1979, the percentage of total health expenditures financed by public funds increased 17 percentage points—from 26 to 43 percent. The Federal share of public funds during this same period grew rapidly, from 51 percent in 1965 to 67 percent in 1979. This study projects that in 1985 approximately 45 percent of total health spending will be financed from public funds, of which 68 percent will be paid for by the Federal government. Public funds will account for 46 percent of total national health expenditures by 1990. PMID:10309366

  19. Rehabilitation Therapy Discipline Advisory Group Final Report. Kentucky Allied Health Project.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kentucky Council on Public Higher Education, Frankfort.

    Rehabilitation therapy education in Kentucky and articulation within the fields of physical therapy and occupational therapy are examined, based on the Kentucky Allied Health Project (KAHP). The KAHP's model system of allied health education promotes articulation in learning, planning, and resource utilization, and seeks to meet the needs of…

  20. Western Kansas Migrant Health Project: 7th Annual Progress Report, 1970.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kansas State Dept. of Health, Topeka.

    Basic services which the Western Kansas Migrant Health Project provides migrant families include: (1) remedial schools and day care centers; (2) health education; (3) housing and sanitation; (4) nursing services; (5) medical and dental services; (6) hospital services; (7) supplemental food programs; and (8) driver education. During 1970, the…

  1. Evaluating the impact of participatory art projects for people with mental health needs.

    PubMed

    Hacking, Sue; Secker, Jenny; Spandler, Helen; Kent, Lyn; Shenton, Jo

    2008-12-01

    Participatory art projects for people with mental health needs typically claim outcomes such as improvements in confidence, self-esteem, social participation and mental health. However, such claims have rarely been subjected to robust outcome research. This paper reports outcomes from a survey of 44 female and 18 male new art project participants attending 22 art projects in England, carried out as part of a national evaluation. Outcomes were quantified through self-completed questionnaires on first entry to the project, during January to March of 2006, and 6 months later. The questionnaires included three measures: empowerment, mental health [Clinical Outcomes in Routine Evaluation (CORE)] and social inclusion. Paired t-tests were used to compare overall change, and mixed model repeated measures analysis of variance to compare subgroups, including age, gender, educational level, mental health and level of participation. Results showed significant improvements in empowerment (P = 0.01), mental health (P = 0.03) and social inclusion (P = 0.01). Participants with higher CORE scores, no new stress in their lives and positive impressions of the impact of arts on their life benefited most over all three measures. Positive impressions of the impact of arts were significantly associated with improvement on all three measures, but the largest effect was for empowerment (P = 0.002) rather than mental health or social inclusion. This study suggests that arts participation positively benefits people with mental health difficulties. Arts participation increased levels of empowerment and had potential to impact on mental health and social inclusion.

  2. The Teen Outreach Reproductive Challenge: Improving Adolescent Health Care Delivery through Peer Education Projects

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    DeMairo, Pauline; Dischell, Jackie; Jouthe, Sorahya A.; Horner, Andrea

    2008-01-01

    The Teen Outreach Reproductive CHallenge (TORCH) is a peer education program that provides information on various topics relevant to adolescent sexual health to a diverse audience, ranging from teens to health care providers. This information is disseminated through various projects by a group of New York City high-school students who are…

  3. Motivation for Mental Health Careers. Career Motivation Study and Recruitment Project Report Number One.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kentucky Mental Health Manpower Commission, Louisville.

    The Manpower Commission's Career Motivation Study and Recruitment Project was designed to implement and evaluate some specific methods of exposing high school students to career opportunities in mental health. School areas chosen for the study were 23 rural-urban units in 11 Kentucky counties with access to mental health facilities. The study was…

  4. Student experiences with an international public health exchange project.

    PubMed

    Critchley, Kim A; Richardson, Eileen; Aarts, Clara; Campbell, Barbara; Hemmingway, Ann; Koskinen, Liisa; Mitchell, Maureen P; Nordstrom, Pam

    2009-01-01

    With growing interconnectivity of healthcare systems worldwide and increased immigration, inappropriate cultural and role assumptions are often seen when cultures clash within a country or when there is practice across country boundaries in times of disaster and during international travel. To increase students' multicultural awareness and work experiences abroad, the authors describe a 7-school, 5-country international student exchange project. The authors also share the students' evaluations of their experiences as they are challenged to erase boundaries and embrace nursing across countries. Participating faculty describe the process, challenges, and keys to success found in creating and living this international project. Students involved in the exchange process evaluate the learning opportunities and challenges and the joy of coming together as newfound colleagues and friends.

  5. Strengths and Weaknesses of the Young Black Men, Masculinities, and Mental Health (YBMen) Facebook Project.

    PubMed

    Watkins, Daphne C; Allen, Julie Ober; Goodwill, Janelle R; Noel, Blake

    2016-12-15

    The Young Black Men, Masculinities, and Mental Health (YBMen) project is a Facebook-based intervention that provides mental health education and social support to young Black men. The YBMen project was created to better understand and address the pressures and needs of young Black men, particularly with regard to issues related to their conceptualization of masculinity and mental health. Black men from a 2-year liberal arts college in the Midwest (United States) enrolled in the YBMen pilot project. The purpose of this study is to report what participants in the YBMen pilot project liked and disliked about the intervention, along with their suggestions for improvement. Qualitative results from the 8 Black men who actively participated in the YBMen Facebook intervention and completed the postintervention interview are reported. A systematic analysis identified 9 subthemes that described participants' reactions to different components and characteristics of the Facebook intervention. Results indicated that opportunities for relationship building and connectivity, coupled with engaging popular culture references used in the intervention encouraged young Black men to actively participate in the YBMen Facebook intervention. The YBMen project has potential to improve the health and well-being of young Black men by providing nontraditional resources that are easily accessible, culturally sensitive, and gender-specific. Implications of the YBMen project as an effective Internet-based program that promotes mental health and increases social support among young Black men are discussed. (PsycINFO Database Record

  6. Implementing a community-based social marketing project to improve agricultural worker health.

    PubMed

    Flocks, J; Clarke, L; Albrecht, S; Bryant, C; Monaghan, P; Baker, H

    2001-06-01

    The Together for Agricultural Safety project is a community-based social marketing project working to reduce the adverse health effects of pesticide exposure among fernery and nursery workers in Florida. In 3 years, the collaboration between university and community researchers has embodied many of the principles of community-based research while completing multiple stages of formative data collection required for a social marketing project. This hybrid approach to developing a health intervention for a minority community has been successful in its early stages because the community partners are organized, empowered, and motivated to execute research activities with the assistance of academic partners. However, this work has also been labor intensive and costly. This article describes the lessons learned by project partners and considers the limitations of this approach for agricultural health research.

  7. Implementing a community-based social marketing project to improve agricultural worker health.

    PubMed Central

    Flocks, J; Clarke, L; Albrecht, S; Bryant, C; Monaghan, P; Baker, H

    2001-01-01

    The Together for Agricultural Safety project is a community-based social marketing project working to reduce the adverse health effects of pesticide exposure among fernery and nursery workers in Florida. In 3 years, the collaboration between university and community researchers has embodied many of the principles of community-based research while completing multiple stages of formative data collection required for a social marketing project. This hybrid approach to developing a health intervention for a minority community has been successful in its early stages because the community partners are organized, empowered, and motivated to execute research activities with the assistance of academic partners. However, this work has also been labor intensive and costly. This article describes the lessons learned by project partners and considers the limitations of this approach for agricultural health research. PMID:11427397

  8. Integration models in health information systems: experiences from the PlugIT project.

    PubMed

    Mykkänen, Juha; Porrasmaa, Jari; Korpela, Mikko; Häkkinen, Heidi; Toivanen, Marika; Tuomainen, Mika; Häyrinen, Kristiina; Rannanheimo, Juha

    2004-01-01

    Different approaches are available for the integration of existing health information systems (HIS) in integration projects. Within the PlugIT project in Finland, we have found it necessary to design and implement integration in a collaborative, multidisciplinary and open way. In this paper, we use some generic integration models and relate them to the methods, solutions and experiences of the project. We summarize the results from nine integration teams, methods development and supporting surveys and studies, and discuss these experiences to provide some guidelines for the HIS integration projects in general.

  9. Multicultural mental health services: projects for minority ethnic communities in England.

    PubMed

    Fernando, Suman

    2005-09-01

    Black and minority ethnic (BME) communities form 7.8% of the total population of the U.K. Many of these communities face a variety of disadvantages when they access, or are forced to access, statutory mental health services under the National Health Service. Efforts have been made to address these problems by developing projects both within statutory mental health services and in the non-governmental ('voluntary') sector. This article describes some of these projects located in England, drawing out the themes and models that underlie their approaches, and discusses the lessons that can be learned from the U.K. experience.

  10. Retrospective: lessons learned from the Santa Barbara project and their implications for health information exchange.

    PubMed

    Frohlich, Jonah; Karp, Sam; Smith, Mark D; Sujansky, Walter

    2007-01-01

    Despite its closure in December 2006, the Santa Barbara County Care Data Exchange helped focus national attention on the value of health information exchange (HIE). This in turn led to the federal government's plan to establish regional health information organizations (RHIOs). During its existence, the project pioneered innovative approaches, including certification of health information technology vendors, a community-wide governance model, and deployment of a peer-to-peer technical model now in wider use. RHIO efforts will benefit from the project's lessons about the need for an incremental development approach, rigorous implementation processes, early attention to privacy and liability concerns, and planning for a sustainable business model.

  11. Framing Young Childrens Oral Health: A Participatory Action Research Project

    PubMed Central

    Collins, Chimere C.; Villa-Torres, Laura; Sams, Lattice D.; Zeldin, Leslie P.

    2016-01-01

    Background and Objectives Despite the widespread acknowledgement of the importance of childhood oral health, little progress has been made in preventing early childhood caries. Limited information exists regarding specific daily-life and community-related factors that impede optimal oral hygiene, diet, care, and ultimately oral health for children. We sought to understand what parents of young children consider important and potentially modifiable factors and resources influencing their children’s oral health, within the contexts of the family and the community. Methods This qualitative study employed Photovoice among 10 English-speaking parents of infants and toddlers who were clients of an urban WIC clinic in North Carolina. The primary research question was: “What do you consider as important behaviors, as well as family and community resources to prevent cavities among young children?” Five group sessions were conducted and they were recorded, transcribed verbatim and analyzed using qualitative research methodology. Inductive analyses were based on analytical summaries, double-coding, and summary matrices and were done using Atlas.ti.7.5.9 software. Findings Good oral health was associated with avoidance of problems or restorations for the participants. Financial constraints affected healthy food and beverage choices, as well as access to oral health care. Time constraints and occasional frustration related to children’s oral hygiene emerged as additional barriers. Establishment of rules/routines and commitment to them was a successful strategy to promote their children’s oral health, as well as modeling of older siblings, cooperation among caregivers and peer support. Community programs and organizations, social hubs including playgrounds, grocery stores and social media emerged as promising avenues for gaining support and sharing resources. Conclusions Low-income parents of young children are faced with daily life struggles that interfere with oral

  12. The Evaluation of SEPAS National Project Based on Electronic Health Record System (EHRS) Coordinates in Iran

    PubMed Central

    Asadi, Farkhondeh; Moghaddasi, Hamid; Rabiei, Reza; Rahimi, Forough; Mirshekarlou, Soheila Jahangiri

    2015-01-01

    Background: Electronic Health Records (EHRs) are secure private lifetime records that can be shared by using interoperability standards between different organizations and units. These records are created by the productive system that is called EHR system. Implementing EHR systems has a number of advantages such as facilitating access to medical records, supporting patient care, and improving the quality of care and health care decisions. The project of electronic health record system in Iran, which is the goal of this study, is called SEPAS. With respect to the importance of EHR and EHR systems the researchers investigated the project from two perspectives: determining the coordinates of the project and how it evolved, and incorporating the coordinates of EHR system in this project. Methods: In this study two evaluation tools, a checklist and a questionnaire, were developed based on texts and reliable documentation. The questionnaire and the checklist were validated using content validity by receiving the experts’ comments and the questionnaire’s reliability was estimated through Test-retest(r =87%). Data were collected through study, observation, and interviews with experts and specialists of SEPAS project. Results: This research showed that SEPAS project, like any other project, could be evaluated. It has some aims; steps, operational phases and certain start and end time, but all the resources and required facilities for the project have not been considered. Therefore it could not satisfy its specified objective and the useful and unique changes which are the other characteristics of any project have not been achieved. In addition, the findings of EHR system coordinates can be determined in 4 categories as Standards and rules, Telecommunication-Communication facilities, Computer equipment and facilities and Stakeholders. Conclusions: The findings indicated that SEPAS has the ability to use all standards of medical terminology and health classification

  13. The Evaluation of SEPAS National Project Based on Electronic Health Record System (EHRS) Coordinates in Iran.

    PubMed

    Asadi, Farkhondeh; Moghaddasi, Hamid; Rabiei, Reza; Rahimi, Forough; Mirshekarlou, Soheila Jahangiri

    2015-12-01

    Electronic Health Records (EHRs) are secure private lifetime records that can be shared by using interoperability standards between different organizations and units. These records are created by the productive system that is called EHR system. Implementing EHR systems has a number of advantages such as facilitating access to medical records, supporting patient care, and improving the quality of care and health care decisions. The project of electronic health record system in Iran, which is the goal of this study, is called SEPAS. With respect to the importance of EHR and EHR systems the researchers investigated the project from two perspectives: determining the coordinates of the project and how it evolved, and incorporating the coordinates of EHR system in this project. In this study two evaluation tools, a checklist and a questionnaire, were developed based on texts and reliable documentation. The questionnaire and the checklist were validated using content validity by receiving the experts' comments and the questionnaire's reliability was estimated through Test-retest(r =87%). Data were collected through study, observation, and interviews with experts and specialists of SEPAS project. This research showed that SEPAS project, like any other project, could be evaluated. It has some aims; steps, operational phases and certain start and end time, but all the resources and required facilities for the project have not been considered. Therefore it could not satisfy its specified objective and the useful and unique changes which are the other characteristics of any project have not been achieved. In addition, the findings of EHR system coordinates can be determined in 4 categories as Standards and rules, Telecommunication-Communication facilities, Computer equipment and facilities and Stakeholders. The findings indicated that SEPAS has the ability to use all standards of medical terminology and health classification systems in the case of Maksa approval (The reference

  14. The CHIPS project: a health information network to serve the consumer.

    PubMed

    Goodchild, E Y; Furman, J A; Addison, B L; Umbarger, H N

    1978-10-01

    CHIPS (Consumer Health Information Program and Services/Salud y Bienestar) is a Library Services and Construction Act Title I-funded project that has as its major goal the formation of a health information network to serve the consumer, the public library client, and the hospital patient. Funded for two years, 1976-1978, this bilingual project coordinates efforts of the Los Angeles County Harbor General Hospital Regional Medical Library and the Los Angeles County Carson Regional Public Library to provide health information resources and services to the public. The target population is over two million people of diverse ethnic backgrounds. This paper discusses the project's objectives and encourages an active role for all libraries in the consumer health education movement.

  15. The CHIPS project: a health information network to serve the consumer.

    PubMed Central

    Goodchild, E Y; Furman, J A; Addison, B L; Umbarger, H N

    1978-01-01

    CHIPS (Consumer Health Information Program and Services/Salud y Bienestar) is a Library Services and Construction Act Title I-funded project that has as its major goal the formation of a health information network to serve the consumer, the public library client, and the hospital patient. Funded for two years, 1976-1978, this bilingual project coordinates efforts of the Los Angeles County Harbor General Hospital Regional Medical Library and the Los Angeles County Carson Regional Public Library to provide health information resources and services to the public. The target population is over two million people of diverse ethnic backgrounds. This paper discusses the project's objectives and encourages an active role for all libraries in the consumer health education movement. PMID:708959

  16. A methodological and operative framework for the evaluation of an e-health project.

    PubMed

    Buccoliero, Luca; Calciolari, Stefano; Marsilio, Marta

    2008-01-01

    Assessing public sector ICT investments represents the premise for successful implementation of an e-health strategy. The recent literature stresses the importance of going beyond the mere financial and/or technical dimensions of the analysis. Consequently, the paper proposes an example of e-health project evaluation aiming to develop measures which get close to the notion of benefits to the different stakeholders involved: top management, patients, local community. The case study refers to an Italian health care organization that implemented a project of digitalization of its clinical reports production few years ago. Based on on-field research, different approaches are used to assess costs and benefits from different stakeholders' perspectives. The results of a multidimensional evaluation are reported to emphasize the need for different measures to assess the sustainability of an e-health project according to the financial convenience, the social role of the organization, and the contingent situation.

  17. The demonstration projects: creating the capacity for nursing health human resource planning in Ontario's healthcare organizations.

    PubMed

    Burkoski, Vanessa; Tepper, Joshua

    2010-05-01

    Timely access to healthcare services requires the right number, mix and distribution of appropriately educated nurses, physicians and other healthcare professionals. In Ontario, as in several other jurisdictions, changing demographics, patterns of health service utilization and an aging workforce have created challenges related to the supply of nurses available now and in the future to deliver quality patient care. From 2006 to 2009, the Nursing Secretariat (NS) of Ontario's Ministry of Health and Long-Term Care (the ministry) undertook a progressive and comprehensive approach to address the issue of nursing supply across the province through the introduction of 17 Nursing Health Human Resources Demonstration Projects (demonstration projects). The demonstration projects initiative has led to the creation of a unique collection of best practices, tools and resources aimed at improving organizational planning capacity. Evaluation of the initiative generated recommendations that may guide the ministry toward policy and program development to foster improved nursing health human resource planning capacity in Ontario healthcare organizations.

  18. Health Information System Simulation. Curriculum Improvement Project. Region II.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Anderson, Beth H.; Lacobie, Kevin

    This volume is one of three in a self-paced computer literacy course that gives allied health students a firm base of knowledge concerning computer usage in the hospital environment. It also develops skill in several applications software packages. This volume contains five self-paced modules that allow students to interact with a health…

  19. Insights from the Health OER Inter-Institutional Project

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harley, Ken

    2011-01-01

    Open educational resources (OER) are gaining ascendancy in education, particularly in higher education. Logic suggests that the potential benefits of OER are likely to be greatest in resource-poor contexts such as Africa. However, little is known about the feasibility and sustainability of their use in African institutions. In the Health OER…

  20. Inactive Health Personnel Project in New Hampshire. Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    New Hampshire Health Careers Council, Concord.

    With the goal of more efficient utilization of existing health manpowers in New Hampshire, data were gathered on inactive medical personnel, and the feasibility of various methods of refresher training was explored. Because of New Hampshire's intrinsic characteristics of climate and scattered population and the scarcity of qualified instructors,…

  1. Insights from the Health OER Inter-Institutional Project

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harley, Ken

    2011-01-01

    Open educational resources (OER) are gaining ascendancy in education, particularly in higher education. Logic suggests that the potential benefits of OER are likely to be greatest in resource-poor contexts such as Africa. However, little is known about the feasibility and sustainability of their use in African institutions. In the Health OER…

  2. Health Advocacy Project: Evaluating the Benefits of Service Learning to Nursing Students and Low Income Individuals Involved in a Community-Based Mental Health Promotion Project.

    PubMed

    Samuels-Dennis, Joan; Xia, Liudi; Secord, Sandra; Raiger, Amelia

    2016-10-08

    Poverty, along with other factors such as unemployment, work and life stressors, interpersonal violence, and lack of access to high quality health and/or social services all play a role in determining who develops a mental illness and for whom those symptoms persist or worsen. Senior nursing student preparing to enter the field and working in a service learning capacity may be able to influence early recovery and symptom abatement among those most vulnerable to mental illness. A consortium of community stakeholders and researchers collaboratively designed a 10-week mental health promotion project called the Health Advocacy Project (HAP). The project combines case management and system navigation support delivered by trained and highly supervised nursing students to individuals experiencing major depressive disorder (MDD) and/or post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD). In this article, we present the findings of a qualitative fidelity evaluation that examines the effectiveness of nursing students in delivering the health advocacy intervention at the level and with the intensity originally intended. The findings demonstrate how the services of senior nursing students may be optimized to benefit our healthcare system and populations most at risk for developing MDD and PTSD.

  3. Evaluation of the Florida coordinated school health program pilot schools project.

    PubMed

    Weiler, Robert M; Pigg, R Morgan; McDermott, Robert J

    2003-01-01

    The Florida Department of Education, with CDC funding, designed the Florida Coordinated School Health Program Pilot Schools Project (PSP) to encourage innovative approaches to promote coordinated school health programs (CSHP) in Florida schools. Each of eight pilot schools received $15,000 in project funding, three years of technical assistance including on-site and off-site assistance, a project office resource center, mailings of resource materials, needs assessment and evaluation assistance, and three PSP Summer Institutes. Project evaluators created a context evaluation, approaching each school independently as a "case study" to measure the school's progress in meeting goals established at baseline. Data were collected using the How Healthy is Your School? needs assessment instrument, a School Health Portfolio constructed by each school team, a Pilot Schools Project Team Member Survey instrument, midcourse team interviews, final team interviews, and performance indicator data obtained from pilot and control schools. The PSP posed two fundamental questions: "Can financial resources, professional training, and technical assistance enable individual schools to create and sustain a coordinated school health program?" and "What outcomes reasonably can one expect from a coordinated school health program, assuming programs receive adequate support over time?" First, activities at the eight schools confirmed that a coordinated school health programs can be established and sustained. Program strength and sustainability depend on long-term resources, qualified personnel, and administrative support. Second, though coordinated school health programs may improve school performance indicators, the PSP yielded insufficient evidence to support that belief. Future projects should include robust measurement and evaluation designs, thereby producing conclusive evidence about the influence of a coordinated school health program on such outcomes.

  4. Family planning through child health: a case study of El Kef project in Tunisia.

    PubMed

    Bouzidi, M; Jones, M

    1985-01-01

    In 1970, a Dutch medical team began work in the city of El Kef in Tunisia on a project designed to bring family planning into rural areas. The project aimed to persuade the rural people to use urban health centers, but this approach failed partly because of the remoteness of the communities and their reluctance to discuss personal matters with strangers. Funded by UNFPA, a new project began to recruit and train local girls as home health visitors or aides-familiales, an approach which became the central focus of the El Kef project. The International Planned Parenthood Federation (IPPF) took over the project and expanded it to include nutrition, health care, health education, family planning, disease prevention and domestic crafts. 4 goals were fixed for the project: total vaccination coverage for children; elimination of severe malnutrition; reduction of infant mortality; and use of family planning practice by at least 1/2 the women of childbearing age. An efficient recordkeeping system enabled the project to be carefully evaluated and provides much-needed data, showing where it has achieved its aims and where new efforts should be directed. The project resulted in large numbers of women receiving ante-natal advice, child care and family planning from their local health centers. 860 pregnant women were followed up during the 3-year study period. Some 57% of pregnant women went for advice; only 15% went for postnatal care, but 50% of the women under 50 attended child welfare sessions during the study period for weight checks, nutrition advice, vaccination and treatment for minor ailments. Over the 3 years, the number of contraceptive users more than trebled, from 14% to 54%. The IUD was the most popular method. The most successful aspect of the project was the emphasis on maternal and child health, and the home visits were the most motivating feature. Vaccination became more popular. A further aspect of the project was the training in home improvement skills, like

  5. [RIU project: perceived changes by health agents and professionals after a health intervention in an urban area of socioeconomic disadvantage].

    PubMed

    Aviñó, Dory; Paredes-Carbonell, Joan J; Peiró-Pérez, Rosana; La Parra Casado, Daniel; Álvarez-Dardet, Carlos

    2014-12-01

    To describe how health agents and professionals working in a community project perceive the changes related to the population health status and their use of health-care services after the RIU intervention in an urban area of socioeconomic disadvantage. A qualitative descriptive study based on individual and group interviews and participant observation conducted between October 2008-July 2009. Raval (Algemesí-Valencia) We selected by purposive sample 7 women health agents, all persons who completed the intervention, and 10 professionals for their involvement in the intervention. We conducted a group interview with the women at 6 months and a group and 7 individuals interviews both at 9 months of intervention. We realized a thematic descriptive analysis from health promotion framework. We used participant observation in a meeting with professionals at 9 months and analyzed field notes as: appraisal project, detected changes, challenges and recommendations. Women acquired information about health, contraception, pregnancy and heath services; they noted changes in self-care and social skills and leadership; they internalized the role of health worker disseminating what they learned and showed improvement in self-esteem and social recognition. They caused changes in the people related on health care and access to services. Professionals didn't incorporate at their work the community perspective; they valued positively the project; professionals and women agreed on improving access and use of services and closeness population-professionals. RIU increases the capabilities of the participants, their social recognition and improves access and use of health services. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  6. 25 CFR 1000.256 - Must the Secretary retain project funds to ensure proper health and safety standards in...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... SELF-GOVERNMENT ACT AMENDMENTS TO THE INDIAN SELF-DETERMINATION AND EDUCATION ACT Construction § 1000... health and safety standards in construction projects? 1000.256 Section 1000.256 Indians OFFICE OF THE... construction projects? Yes, the Secretary must retain project funds to ensure proper health and...

  7. Integrating Health and Transportation in Nashville, Tennessee, USA: From Policy to Projects.

    PubMed

    Meehan, Leslie A; Whitfield, Geoffrey P

    2017-03-01

    The Nashville Area Metropolitan Planning Organization (MPO) is among the first MPOs in the United States to recognize the interplay of transportation and public health, particularly regarding physical activity, air pollution, and traffic crashes. The Nashville MPO has taken a multifaceted approach to simultaneously improve the transportation system, quality of life, and health status of the region's population. The purpose of this paper is to describe the multiple programs and projects that the MPO has undertaken to this end, so that other cities might learn from Nashville's example. The MPO's strategy comprised six processes. First, the MPO conducted the Regional Bicycle and Pedestrian Study in 2009 and 2014 that established priority issues to be addressed by bicycle and pedestrian projects in Regional Transportation Plans. Second, the MPO responded to public opinion by adopting new transportation policies in the 2035 and 2040 Regional Transportation Plans, including increasing bicycle and pedestrian options and expanding public transit. Third, the MPO created scoring criteria for proposed roadway projects that prioritized health impacts. Fourth, the MPO reserved funding for projects selected under the new criteria and established a new funding program, the Active Transportation Program. Fifth, the MPO conducted the Middle Tennessee Transportation and Health Study, one of the first regional studies in the nation linking transportation and health. Finally, the MPO implemented the Integrated Transport and Health Impact Model which predicts and monetizes population-level health impacts of shifting the population towards active transportation modes. Recent inventories of bicycle and pedestrian infrastructure suggest these interrelated processes are increasing opportunities for walking, bicycling, and public transit use in the region. Further, each of these projects has contributed to a growing appreciation in the region of the links between transportation and health

  8. Building geographic information system capacity in local health departments: lessons from a North Carolina project.

    PubMed

    Miranda, Marie Lynn; Silva, Jennifer M; Overstreet Galeano, M Alicia; Brown, Jeffrey P; Campbell, Douglas S; Coley, Evelyn; Cowan, Christopher S; Harvell, Dianne; Lassiter, Jenny; Parks, Jerry L; Sandelé, Wanda

    2005-12-01

    State government, university, and local health department (LHD) partners collaborated to build the geographic information system (GIS) capacity of 5 LHDs in North Carolina. Project elements included procuring hardware and software, conducting individualized and group training, developing data layers, guiding the project development process, coordinating participation in technical conferences, providing ongoing project consultation, and evaluating project milestones. The project provided health department personnel with the skills and resources required to use sophisticated information management systems, particularly those that address spatial dimensions of public health practice. This capacity-building project helped LHDs incorporate GIS technology into daily operations, resulting in improved time and cost efficiency. Keys to success included (1) methods training rooted in problems specific to the LHD, (2) required project identification by LHD staff with associated timelines for development, (3) ongoing technical support as staff returned to home offices after training, (4) subgrants to LHDs to ease hardware and software resource constraints, (5) networks of relationships among LHDs and other professional GIS users, and (6) senior LHD leadership who supported the professional development activities being undertaken by staff.

  9. Factors of human capital related to project success in health care work units.

    PubMed

    Suhonen, Marjo; Paasivaara, Leena

    2011-03-01

    To explore factors of human capital related to project success that employees expect from nurse managers. Human capital refers to those resources that managers working with projects possess, such as abilities, knowledge and qualities of character. The data were collected by open interviews (n=14) with nurses, public health nurses and nurse managers working in primary health care and a hospital. Data analysis was carried out using qualitative content analysis. The main factors of human capital related to project success proved to be as follows: (1) management of enthusiastic project culture, (2) management of regeneration and (3) management of emotional intelligence. Future research is needed on the kind of means nurse managers use in human capital management in projects and how they see their possibilities in managing human capital. Human capital management skills should be underlined as an important competence area when recruiting a nurse manager. The success of health care projects cannot be improved only through education or by training of nurse managers; in addition, projects need nurse managers who understand workplace spirituality and have high emotional intelligence. © 2011 The Authors. Journal compilation © 2011 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  10. Building Geographic Information System Capacity in Local Health Departments: Lessons From a North Carolina Project

    PubMed Central

    Miranda, Marie Lynn; Silva, Jennifer M.; Overstreet Galeano, M. Alicia; Brown, Jeffrey P.; Campbell, Douglas S.; Coley, Evelyn; Cowan, Christopher S.; Harvell, Dianne; Lassiter, Jenny; Parks, Jerry L.; Sandelé, Wanda

    2005-01-01

    State government, university, and local health department (LHD) partners collaborated to build the geographic information system (GIS) capacity of 5 LHDs in North Carolina. Project elements included procuring hardware and software, conducting individualized and group training, developing data layers, guiding the project development process, coordinating participation in technical conferences, providing ongoing project consultation, and evaluating project milestones. The project provided health department personnel with the skills and resources required to use sophisticated information management systems, particularly those that address spatial dimensions of public health practice. This capacity-building project helped LHDs incorporate GIS technology into daily operations, resulting in improved time and cost efficiency. Keys to success included (1) methods training rooted in problems specific to the LHD, (2) required project identification by LHD staff with associated timelines for development, (3) ongoing technical support as staff returned to home offices after training, (4) subgrants to LHDs to ease hardware and software resource constraints, (5) networks of relationships among LHDs and other professional GIS users, and (6) senior LHD leadership who supported the professional development activities being undertaken by staff. PMID:16257950

  11. The Fresno County Refugee Health Volunteer Project: a case study in cross-cultural health care delivery.

    PubMed

    Rowe, D R; Spees, H P

    1987-01-01

    Beginning in 1979, Fresno County received a 2nd dramatic influx of Southeast Asian refugees. There are now approximately 20,000 of these refugees, including the largest population of Hmong in the US. This community includes about 2000 Cambodian, 14,000 Hmong, and 4000 Lowland Lao. Altogether, Southeast Asian refugees comprise nearly 10% of the population of Fresno. These demographics provide the backdrop for significant problems in health care service delivery. Some barriers include: 1) stress, loss, dislocation, poverty, illness, and unemployment that are part of the refugee experience; 2) language differences; 3) cultural isolation; and 4) cultural beliefs and practices whose spiritual, wholistic, and natural forms of care often run contrary to the West's scientific, specialized, and technological treatment modalities. The Health Department began to recognize some difficulties related to health services for refugees and developed a strategy to combat these. This strategy was named the Refugee Health Volunteer Project and its goal was to enable individuals, families, and community groups to better meet their own health care needs. Goals were to be met by 1st creating a community-based health promotion network to 1) identify health needs, 2) communicate health information, 3) train community health volunteers, and 4) build a greater capacity for self-care that would last beyond the end of the program. The program's goal would also be met by overcoming the access problems with the service system by 1) communicating community-identified needs, 2) identifying specific barriers in the service system, 3) initiating broad participation among service providers in designing more accessible approaches to service delivery, and 4) improving coordination between service providers. Significant progress has been made in a very short time. The Project demonstrates that a fairly common, bureaucratic organization can be responsive to extremely unique community needs. The project is

  12. Developing an action-based health and safety training project in southern China.

    PubMed

    Szudy, Betty; O'Rourke, Dara; Brown, Garrett D

    2003-01-01

    A project brought together international footwear manufacturers, labor rights groups, local contract factories, and occupational health professionals to strengthen factory health and safety programs in southern China. Steps involved in the two-year project, including needs assessment, interviews and focus groups with workers and supervisors; design and development of a participatory workshop; development of plant-wide health and safety committees in three footwear factories; and evaluation project impact, are discussed. The project significantly increased occupational safety and health knowledge, and hazards in the factories were identified and corrected. Successes and challenges faced by three functioning worker-management health and safety committees are discussed. Key elements to create effective programs with meaningful participation by workers include: 1) developing clear guidelines that enable multi-stakeholder groups to collaborate; 2) obtaining top-level management support; 3) building workers' knowledge and capacity to fully participate; 4) involving local labor rights groups and occupational professionals in support and technical assistance; and 5) connecting project goals to larger issues within a country and the global economy.

  13. Working towards Men's Health: Findings from the Sefton Men's Health Project

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Robinson, Mark; Robertson, Steve; McCullagh, Jo; Hacking, Sue

    2010-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate a health improvement initiative aimed at enhancing the health of men in deprived areas. Design: A healthy lifestyle programme was undertaken with men to increase their health knowledge, and encourage behaviour modification and access to health improvement services. A peer mentoring programme was implemented and a training…

  14. Working towards Men's Health: Findings from the Sefton Men's Health Project

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Robinson, Mark; Robertson, Steve; McCullagh, Jo; Hacking, Sue

    2010-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate a health improvement initiative aimed at enhancing the health of men in deprived areas. Design: A healthy lifestyle programme was undertaken with men to increase their health knowledge, and encourage behaviour modification and access to health improvement services. A peer mentoring programme was implemented and a training…

  15. The Italian Health Literacy Project: Insights from the assessment of health literacy skills in Italy.

    PubMed

    Palumbo, Rocco; Annarumma, Carmela; Adinolfi, Paola; Musella, Marco; Piscopo, Gabriella

    2016-09-01

    Inadequate health literacy, namely the problematic individual's ability to navigate the health care system, has been depicted as a silent epidemic affecting a large part of the world population. Inadequate health literacy has been variously found to be a predictor of patient disengagement, inappropriateness of care, increased health care costs, and higher mortality rates. However, to date the evidence on the prevalence of limited health literacy is heterogeneous; moreover, studies dealing with this topic show a pronounced geographical concentration. To contribute in filling these gaps, this paper investigates health literacy skills in Italy. Drawing on the European Health Literacy Survey (HLS-EU), a tool to measure self-perceived levels of health literacy was administered to a representative sample of Italian citizens. A stepwise regression analysis allowed to shed light on the determinants and consequences of limited health literacy. Findings suggested that inadequate health literacy is a prevailing problem in Italy, even though it has been overlooked by both policy makers and health care practitioners. Financial deprivation was found to be a significant predictor of inadequate health literacy. Low health literate patients reported higher hospitalization rates and greater use of health services. As compared with the European Countries, Italy showed some peculiarities in terms of health literacy levels and socio-demographic determinants of health literacy, which provide with intriguing insights for policy making.

  16. National health expenditure projections: modest annual growth until coverage expands and economic growth accelerates.

    PubMed

    Keehan, Sean P; Cuckler, Gigi A; Sisko, Andrea M; Madison, Andrew J; Smith, Sheila D; Lizonitz, Joseph M; Poisal, John A; Wolfe, Christian J

    2012-07-01

    For 2011-13, US health spending is projected to grow at 4.0 percent, on average--slightly above the historically low growth rate of 3.8 percent in 2009. Preliminary data suggest that growth in consumers' use of health services remained slow in 2011, and this pattern is expected to continue this year and next. In 2014, health spending growth is expected to accelerate to 7.4 percent as the major coverage expansions from the Affordable Care Act begin. For 2011 through 2021, national health spending is projected to grow at an average rate of 5.7 percent annually, which would be 0.9 percentage point faster than the expected annual increase in the gross domestic product during this period. By 2021, federal, state, and local government health care spending is projected to be nearly 50 percent of national health expenditures, up from 46 percent in 2011, with federal spending accounting for about two-thirds of the total government share. Rising government spending on health care is expected to be driven by faster growth in Medicare enrollment, expanded Medicaid coverage, and the introduction of premium and cost-sharing subsidies for health insurance exchange plans.

  17. Evaluation of community-based health projects: the healthy tomorrows experience.

    PubMed

    Ruch-Ross, Holly; Keller, David; Miller, Nicole; Bassewitz, Jane; Melinkovich, Paul

    2008-09-01

    To address the "millennial morbidities," pediatricians must partner with community-based organizations to develop interventions. Little is known about the capacity of the resulting programs for program evaluation or the importance of evaluation in project success and sustainability. The objective of this study was to examine the capacity of community-based health programs to conduct project evaluations and determine the impact of project evaluation on project outcome. Project directors from 149 community-based programs funded from 1989 to 2003 through the Healthy Tomorrows Partnership for Children Program were surveyed regarding their project experience with evaluation and documentation of project outcomes and the current status of their project. Program directors from 123 (83%) programs completed the survey. Despite barriers to the evaluation process, 83% of the respondents indicated that their evaluations produced useful information. Programs that were described by respondents as "well evaluated" were more likely to report that the evaluation was implemented as planned and that the evaluation included outcome measures. Projects were more likely to be sustained in their original form when at least 1 outcome was reported on the survey. Evaluation of community-based programs, although challenging, is beneficial to project success and sustainability. Policy makers and funding agencies should consider ways to encourage community partnerships to incorporate evaluation into their planning process.

  18. Nutrition and bone health projects funded by the UK Food Standards Agency: have they helped to inform public health policy?

    PubMed

    Ashwell, Margaret; Stone, Elaine; Mathers, John; Barnes, Stephen; Compston, Juliet; Francis, Roger M; Key, Tim; Cashman, Kevin D; Cooper, Cyrus; Khaw, Kay Tee; Lanham-New, Susan; Macdonald, Helen; Prentice, Ann; Shearer, Martin; Stephen, Alison

    2008-01-01

    The UK Food Standards Agency convened an international group of expert scientists to review the Agency-funded projects on diet and bone health in the context of developments in the field as a whole. The potential benefits of fruit and vegetables, vitamin K, early-life nutrition and vitamin D on bone health were presented and reviewed. The workshop reached two conclusions which have public health implications. First, that promoting a diet rich in fruit and vegetable intakes might be beneficial to bone health and would be very unlikely to produce adverse consequences on bone health. The mechanism(s) for any effect of fruit and vegetables remains unknown, but the results from these projects did not support the postulated acid-base balance hypothesis. Secondly, increased dietary consumption of vitamin K may contribute to bone health, possibly through its ability to increase the gamma-carboxylation status of bone proteins such as osteocalcin. A supplementation trial comparing vitamin K supplementation with Ca and vitamin D showed an additional effect of vitamin K against baseline levels of bone mineral density, but the benefit was only seen at one bone site. The major research gap identified was the need to investigate vitamin D status to define deficiency, insufficiency and depletion across age and ethnic groups in relation to bone health.

  19. Nutrition and bone health projects funded by the UK Food Standards Agency: have they helped to inform public health policy?

    PubMed Central

    Ashwell, Margaret; Stone, Elaine; Mathers, John; Barnes, Stephen; Compston, Juliet; Francis, Roger M.; Key, Tim; Cashman, Kevin D.; Cooper, Cyrus; Khaw, Kay Tee; Lanham-New, Susan; Macdonald, Helen; Prentice, Ann; Shearer, Martin; Stephen, Alison

    2009-01-01

    The UK Food Standards Agency convened an international group of expert scientists to review the Agency-funded projects on diet and bone health in the context of developments in the field as a whole. The potential benefits of fruit and vegetables, vitamin K, early-life nutrition and vitamin D on bone health were presented and reviewed. The workshop reached two conclusions which have public health implications. First, that promoting a diet rich in fruit and vegetable intakes might be beneficial to bone health and would be very unlikely to produce adverse consequences on bone health. The mechanism(s) for any effect of fruit and vegetables remains unknown, but the results from these projects did not support the postulated acid–base balance hypothesis. Secondly, increased dietary consumption of vitamin K may contribute to bone health, possibly through its ability to increase the γ-carboxylation status of bone proteins such as osteocalcin. A supplementation trial comparing vitamin K supplementation with Ca and vitamin D showed an additional effect of vitamin K against baseline levels of bone mineral density, but the benefit was only seen at one bone site. The major research gap identified was the need to investigate vitamin D status to define deficiency, insufficiency and depletion across age and ethnic groups in relation to bone health. PMID:18086331

  20. Incorporation of project-based learning into an occupational health course.

    PubMed

    Dehdashti, Alireza; Mehralizadeh, Semira; Kashani, Masoud Motalebi

    2013-01-01

    Use of an appropriate teaching approach is a major concern for faculty members who are involved in occupational health and safety academic education. The challenge is to explore teaching tools to equip students with knowledge and skills to prepare them for their practices, in which they will encounter occupational health and safety issues in various occupational settings. The current study presents the design and implementation of a team project-based learning approach for undergraduate occupational health students to examine the appropriateness and perceptions of students and educators with regard to such a learning experience. Steps were taken to guide the educators and students through the learning process based on projects completed in teams. The research tools for collecting data were a questionnaire and semi-structured interviews with participants. The results illustrated that use of the proposed teaching approach as part of occupational health education may have the potential to motivate and enhance the active roles of educators and students in the learning process, and improve students' technical and social skills that are crucial for practice in the occupational health field. The study findings showed that project-based learning may provide a promising teaching strategy in the education and training of occupational health students. In addition, academic institutions should encourage educators to plan, introduce and evaluate the effectiveness of project-based learning.

  1. Obesity and other health determinants across Europe: The EURALIM Project

    PubMed Central

    Beer-Borst, S; Morabia, A; Hercberg, S; Vitek, O; Bernstein, M; Galan, P; Galasso, R; Giampaoli, S; Houterman, S; McCrum, E; Panico, S; Pannozzo, F; Preziosi, P; Ribas, L; Serra-Majem, L; Verschuren, W; Yarnell, J; Northridge, M

    2000-01-01

    STUDY OBJECTIVE—EURALIM (EURope ALIMentation), a European collaborative study, aimed to determine and describe the extent to which European data on risk factor distributions from different populations could be pooled and harmonised in a common database for international comparisons.
SETTING—Seven independent population-based surveys from six European countries (France, Italy, Northern Ireland/United Kingdom, Spain, Switzerland, the Netherlands). 
METHODS—Data for 18 381 women and 12 908 men aged 40-59 were pooled in a common database. Central statistical analyses on major cardiovascular risk factors were conducted with careful consideration of methodological issues, including differences in study designs, data assessment tools, and analytic techniques used.
MAIN RESULTS—Because of the detected variability among methods used, direct comparisons of risk factor distributions and prevalences between studies were problematic. None the less, comparisons of within population contrasts by sex, age group, and other health determinants were considered to be meaningful and apt, as illustrated here for obesity. Results were targeted and disseminated to both the general public and public health professionals and framed in the context of a European information campaign.
CONCLUSIONS—International and national comparisons between existing locally run studies are feasible and useful, but harmonisation methods need improvement. Development of an international risk factor surveillance programme based on decentralised data collection is warranted. In the meantime, risk factor contrasts across populations can be used as a basis for targeting needed public health intervention programmes.


Keywords: comparative study; obesity; risk factor surveillance PMID:10818117

  2. Medicare: Issues Concerning the HealthChoice Demonstration Project

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1988-07-20

    ties and funded solely by HMOs. II(CFA’s internal controls are inadequate to assure that iI(’:. and future brokers follow Privacy Act rules governing...to educate beneficiaries about their lIMo options and, at the same time, marlet individual limos. Concerning our recommendation that iic v.x not fund...help assure compliance. Our recommendation addresses this need. For example, there was no internal procedure to Page 17 GAO /HRD-88-69 HealthChoice

  3. African refugee and immigrant health needs: report from a community-based house meeting project.

    PubMed

    Boise, Linda; Tuepker, Anais; Gipson, Teresa; Vigmenon, Yves; Soule, Isabelle; Onadeko, Sade

    2013-01-01

    As in other communities in the United States, information is lacking about the health needs of Africans refugees and immigrants living in Portland, Oregon. In 2008, the African Partnership for Health coalition (APH) was formed to carry out research, advocacy and education to improve the health and well-being of Africans in Oregon. This was APH's initial project. The purposes of this study were to gather data about the perceived health needs and barriers to health care Africans encounter, and lay the foundation for a program of action to guide APH's future work. Community-based participatory research (CBPR) methods were used to collect data on how to improve the health of the African community in the Portland area and define an agenda for future projects. Popular education principles guided the engagement and training of African community members, who conducted nine house meetings with 56 Africans from 14 countries. The results were analyzed by African community members and researchers and prioritized at a community meeting. Three themes emerged: The stressfulness of life in America, the challenges of gaining access to health care, and the pervasive feelings of disrespect and lack of understanding of Africans' health needs, culture, and life experiences by health providers and staff members. Using CBPR methods, we identified and prioritized the needs of the African community. This information provides a framework for future work of the African Partnership for Health and other service and advocacy groups.

  4. Translating health psychology into effective health communication: the american healthstyles audience segmentation project.

    PubMed

    Maibach, E W; Maxfield, A; Ladin, K; Slater, M

    1996-07-01

    This article presents a health lifestyle audience segmentation analysis based primarily on social cognitive theory. Two linked mail surveys were conducted among a representative group of US adults (N = 2967). Segmentation variables included data on five health behaviors (smoking, alcohol consumption, physical activity, nutrition and weight control), internal personal and social/ environmental variables associated with each of the health behaviors, as well as health value, sensation- seeking, life satisfaction and age. K-means classification analysis was employed; seven health lifestyles were identified. The majority of the health lifestyles are reliable, and as a whole, all demonstrate both discriminative, construct and predictive validity. The health-lifestyle audience segments are briefly profiled, and an argument is made that health- lifestyle segmentation, more than demographic or behavioral segmentation alone, can advance the goals of public health communication.

  5. An Assessment of Stream Health in Urban Creeks with Community Led Improvement Projects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sanchez, L.; Mercado, M.

    2016-12-01

    Small-scale restoration and improvement projects along urban creeks have become increasingly common and the need to assess their impact on stream health is necessary. Courtland and Peralta Creek have been subject to a variety of community, non-profit and city sponsored improvement projects. Assessment of nutrient contamination in the form of ammonia and nitrate indicate that these urban creeks have been impacted by human activity (Water Quality of Peralta and Courtland Creeks Oakland, CA, A. Ahumada). Continued assessment of the stream health through nitrate, ammonia and phosphate concentrations, benthic invertebrate derived biotic index and E. coli concentrations were used to assess site improvements. Youth and community site improvement project at Courtland Creek has resulted in the decline of nitrate contamination and an overall increase in benthic invertebrates species. Peralta Creek has a group of dedicated community volunteers that participate in clean up events but is just now implementing a planned restoration project increasing native plant diversity at the site.

  6. 75 FR 59237 - TRICARE Co-Pay Waiver at Captain James A. Lovell Federal Health Care Center Demonstration Project

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-09-27

    ... of the Secretary TRICARE Co-Pay Waiver at Captain James A. Lovell Federal Health Care Center... waiver at Captain James A. Lovell Federal Health Care Center demonstration project. SUMMARY: This notice... Captain James A. Lovell Federal Health Care (FHCC) Demonstration Project.'' Under this demonstration...

  7. Health coaching interventions with a heart-healthy lenoir project client.

    PubMed

    Tillman, Jim

    2013-05-01

    The Heart-Healthy Lenoir Project is a multi-study project designed to reduce the risk burden of heart disease in Lenoir County, North Carolina. This case report examines one client's experience in this project and the impact of health coaching interventions that were used. The client presented with unhealthy lifestyle behaviors and a systolic blood pressure (BP) of more than 200 mmHg. After 1 year of educational group meetings and personalized health coaching, the client was able to reduce her BP to an acceptable range and has adopted many new lifestyle behaviors. This case report demonstrates one way health coaching is being integrated into educational programs and in collaboration with primary care practices.

  8. [Re(thinking) nursing carative projects through the light of population health needs].

    PubMed

    Oliveira, Maria Amélia de Campos

    2012-01-01

    The concept of needs is central to the work of Nursing. The Basic Human Needs Theory, formulated by Wanda Horta, influenced several generations of Brazilian nurses and possibly still is the most widespread in education and nursing practice in Brazil. However, there are other conceptions of needs that can illuminate health work that is, in general, organized to meet health needs through standardized, vertical and prescriptive service offerings. Reframing health care, specially nursing carative projects, demands to adopt a concept of health and disease capable of linking individual and collective aspects.

  9. Reengineering and health physics within the project Hanford management contract

    SciTech Connect

    Atencio, E.M.

    1997-06-26

    The impending transition of the Hartford Site management and operations (M&O) contract to a management and integrating (M&I) contract format, together with weak radiological performance assessments by external organizations and reduced financial budgets prompted the `re-engineering` of the previous Hanford prime contractor Radiological Control (Rad Con) organization. This paper presents the methodology, identified areas of improvements, and results of the re-engineering process. The conversion from the M&O to the M&I contract concept resulted in multiple independent Rad Con organizations reporting to separate major contractors who are managed by an integrating contractor. This brought significant challenges when establishing minimum site standards for sitewide consistency, developing roles and responsibilities, and maintaining site Rad Con goals. Championed by the previous contractor`s Rad Con Director, Denny Newland, a five month planning effort was executed to address the challenges of the M&I and to address identified weaknesses. Fluor Daniel Hanford assumed the responsibility as integrator of the Project Hanford Management Contract on October 1, 1996. The Fluor Daniel Hanford Radiation Protection Director Jeff Foster presents the results of the re-engineering effort, including the significant cost savings, process improvements, field support improvements, and clarification of roles and responsibilities that have been achieved.

  10. A survey of oral health, Qalyub Project, Egypt*

    PubMed Central

    Wheatcroft, M. G.; Klimt, C. R.

    1959-01-01

    This report presents the results of an oral health survey of 4324 individuals in three villages near Cairo, Egypt. The results show that the incidence of dental decay (expressed as the number of carious teeth per individual) in this group of Egyptians was lower than that reported for the over-all population of the USA, and that the prevalence of periodontal disease in the group studied was about three times as high as that reported in the USA. There was a statistically significant relationship between the occurrence of asymptomatic enlargement of the parotid glands and the occurrence of angular cheilosis in the same individuals. Other forms of oral disease were observed infrequently. Water samples from the survey area were assayed for fluorides and were shown to contain fluoride levels below that considered to give protection against dental caries. PMID:13638795

  11. A survey of oral health, Qalyub project, Egypt.

    PubMed

    WHEATCROFT, M G; KLIMT, C R

    1959-01-01

    This report presents the results of an oral health survey of 4324 individuals in three villages near Cairo, Egypt.The results show that the incidence of dental decay (expressed as the number of carious teeth per individual) in this group of Egyptians was lower than that reported for the over-all population of the USA, and that the prevalence of periodontal disease in the group studied was about three times as high as that reported in the USA.There was a statistically significant relationship between the occurrence of asymptomatic enlargement of the parotid glands and the occurrence of angular cheilosis in the same individuals. Other forms of oral disease were observed infrequently.Water samples from the survey area were assayed for fluorides and were shown to contain fluoride levels below that considered to give protection against dental caries.

  12. Addressing Data Inequities in American Indian Communities Through an Environmental Public Health Tracking Pilot Project.

    PubMed

    Lucas-Pipkorn, Samantha; Tuomi, Ashley

    National and state surveillance systems identify American Indians/Alaska Natives inconsistently and often inaccurately within their data sets. Consequently, communities may not be represented with data at the level of geography needed. Collecting and presenting environmental and health-related data to the public are done by state Tracking Networks. Great Lakes Inter-Tribal Epidemiology Center (GLITEC) conducted a groundbreaking 2014 Tribal Environmental Health Tracking pilot project that engaged tribes, an urban Indian community, 3 state health departments, a Tribal Epidemiology Center (TEC), and a federal agency. Two other TECs-the Albuquerque Area Southwest Tribal Epidemiology Center (AASTEC) and Northwest Tribal Epidemiology Center (NW EpiCenter)-are now modeling GLITEC's project. They will forge active partnerships with at least one tribe and build relationships with state Tracking programs, explore environmental priorities, identify health outcomes of greatest concern for each community, and determine whether environmental or health inquiries can be addressed through state Tracking data. The Tribal Environmental Health Tracking pilot project provides an example of how state public health Tracking programs can be responsive to data inequities, build relationships between tribes/urban Indian communities, and increase their competency for working with indigenous communities.

  13. Collaboration Between Mental Health Services and Primary Care: The Bologna Project

    PubMed Central

    Berardi, Domenico; Leggieri, Giuseppe; Menchetti, Marco; Ferrari, Giuseppe

    1999-01-01

    Overview: Management of anxiety and depressive disorders within the community necessitates collaboration between mental health services and primary care. While cooperative projects do exist in many countries, Italy's National Health System does not have a program designed to address this issue. In Bologna, a cooperative project arose as a spontaneous undertaking between mental health professionals and primary care physicians. A model of collaboration was designed specifically for the Italian National Health System, consisting of a network of primary care liaison services (PCLSs) instituted within the community mental health services. PCLSs are managed by a staff of specially trained mental health care professionals and are designed to facilitate communication between physicians, and they provide continual and multifaceted support consisting of diagnostic assessment and focused clinical intervention. PCLSs also provide formal consultation-liaison meetings and a telephone consultation service designed to promote communication and enrich diagnostic assessment and treatment. Discussion: PCLSs are innovative, not only because they represent one of the first collaborative efforts in Italy to date, but also because of their innovative design, which is specific for the Italian National Health System. Overall, the project yielded a good result. Primary care physicians utilized the service extensively, and together with psychiatric personnel were satisfied with the outcome. These results, when compared with the traditional separation between the 2 services, are encouraging. Our model could be adapted for most communities in Italy, but must be preceded by shared recognition of local need. PMID:15014669

  14. Behavioral health care for children: the massachusetts child psychiatry access project.

    PubMed

    Straus, John H; Sarvet, Barry

    2014-12-01

    Access to behavioral health care for children is essential to achieving good health care outcomes. Pediatric primary care providers have an essential role to play in identifying and treating behavioral health problems in children. However, they lack adequate training and resources and thus have generally been unable to meet children's need for behavioral health care. The Massachusetts Child Psychiatry Access Project has addressed this problem by delivering telephone child psychiatry consultations and specialized care coordination support to over 95 percent of the pediatric primary care providers in Massachusetts. Established in 2004, the project consists of six regional hubs, each of which has one full-time-equivalent child psychiatrist, licensed therapist, and care coordinator. Collectively, the hubs are available to over 95 percent of the 1.5 million children in Massachusetts. In fiscal year 2013 the Massachusetts Child Psychiatry Access Project served 10,553 children. Pediatric primary care providers enrolled in the project reported a dramatic improvement in their ability to meet the psychiatric needs of their patients. Telephone child psychiatry consultation programs for pediatric primary care providers, many modeled after the Massachusetts project, have spread across the United States.

  15. [Health impact assessment methodology for urban planning projects in Andalusia (Spain)].

    PubMed

    Moya-Ruano, Luis A; Candau-Bejarano, Ana; Rodríguez-Rasero, Francisco J; Ruiz-Fernández, Josefa; Vela-Ríos, José

    To describe the tool developed in Andalusia (Spain) to conduct an analysis and prospective assessment of health impacts from urban planning projects as well as the process followed to design it. On the one hand, direct and indirect relationships between urban setting and health were identified in light of the best scientific evidence available; and, on the other hand, methods and tools in impact assessment were reviewed. After the design of the tool, it was tested via both internal and external validation processes (meetings, workshops and interviews with key informants). The tool consists of seven phases, structured in two stages. A first descriptive stage shows how to obtain information about goals, objectives and general points pertaining the project and also to characterise the potentially affected population. The second one indicates, in several phases, how to identify and sort out potential impacts from the project using different supporting tools. Both in the testing phase and through its implementation since the entry into force of Andalusian Decree 169/2014 (16 June 2015) and forced all urban planning projects to be subjected to an Health Impact Assessment, this methodology has proved responsive, identifying major potential health impacts from the measures included in those projects. However, the tool has been shaped as a living tool and will be adapted in line with the experience acquired in its use. Copyright © 2017. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U.

  16. The diffusion of health economics knowledge in Europe : The EURONHEED (European Network of Health Economics Evaluation Database) project.

    PubMed

    de Pouvourville, Gérard; Ulmann, Philippe; Nixon, John; Boulenger, Stéphanie; Glanville, Julie; Drummond, Michael

    2005-01-01

    This paper overviews the EURONHEED (EUROpean Network of Health Economics Evaluation Databases) project. Launched in 2003, this project is funded by the EU. Its aim is to create a network of national and international databases dedicated to health economic evaluation of health services and innovations. Seven centres (France, Germany, Italy, The Netherlands, Spain, Sweden and the UK) are involved covering 17 countries. The network is based on two existing databases, the French CODECS (COnnaissance et Decision en EConomie de la Sante) database, created in 2000 by the French Health Economists Association (College des Economistes de la Sante), and the UK NHS-EED (NHS Economic Electronic Database), run by the Centre for Reviews and Dissemination, University of York, York, England. The network will provide bibliographic records of published full health economic evaluation studies (cost-benefit, cost-utility and cost-effectiveness studies) as well as cost studies, methodological articles and review papers. Moreover, a structured abstract of full evaluation studies will be provided to users, allowing them access to a detailed description of each study and to a commentary stressing the implications and limits, for decision making, of the study. Access will be free of charge. The database features and its ease of access (via the internet: http://www.euronheed.org) should facilitate the diffusion of existing economic evidence on health services and the generalisation of common standards in the field at the European level, thereby improving the quality, generalisability and transferability of results across countries.

  17. The Perceived Benefits of an Arts Project for Health and Wellbeing of Older Offenders

    PubMed Central

    Wilkinson, Dean J.; Caulfield, Laura S.

    2017-01-01

    The increasing ageing prison population is becoming a pressing issue throughout the criminal justice system. Alongside the rising population, are a host of health and wellbeing issues that contribute to older offenders needs whilst in prison. It has been recommended that meaningful activities can have positive effects on this population and therefore this paper uniquely reviews older offenders accounts of taking part in an arts based project, Good Vibrations, whilst imprisoned. The Good Vibrations project engages individuals in Gamelan music making with an end of project performance. This study used independent in-depth interviews to capture the voices of older offenders who took part in an art based prison project. The interview data was analysed using thematic analysis, which highlighted themes that were consistent with other populations who have taken part in a Good Vibrations project, along with specific age relating issues of mobility, motivation, identity and wellbeing. PMID:28344672

  18. Catching Up on Health Outcomes: The Texas Medication Algorithm Project

    PubMed Central

    Kashner, T Michael; Carmody, Thomas J; Suppes, Trisha; Rush, A John; Crismon, M Lynn; Miller, Alexander L; Toprac, Marcia; Trivedi, Madhukar

    2003-01-01

    Objective To develop a statistic measuring the impact of algorithm-driven disease management programs on outcomes for patients with chronic mental illness that allowed for treatment-as-usual controls to “catch up” to early gains of treated patients. Data Sources/Study Setting Statistical power was estimated from simulated samples representing effect sizes that grew, remained constant, or declined following an initial improvement. Estimates were based on the Texas Medication Algorithm Project on adult patients (age≥18) with bipolar disorder (n=267) who received care between 1998 and 2000 at 1 of 11 clinics across Texas. Study Design Study patients were assessed at baseline and three-month follow-up for a minimum of one year. Program tracks were assigned by clinic. Data Collection/Extraction Methods Hierarchical linear modeling was modified to account for declining-effects. Outcomes were based on 30-item Inventory for Depression Symptomatology—Clinician Version. Principal Findings Declining-effect analyses had significantly greater power detecting program differences than traditional growth models in constant and declining-effects cases. Bipolar patients with severe depressive symptoms in an algorithm-driven, disease management program reported fewer symptoms after three months, with treatment-as-usual controls “catching up” within one year. Conclusions In addition to psychometric properties, data collection design, and power, investigators should consider how outcomes unfold over time when selecting an appropriate statistic to evaluate service interventions. Declining-effect analyses may be applicable to a wide range of treatment and intervention trials. PMID:12650393

  19. Intergenerational photovoice projects: optimizing this mechanism for influencing health promotion policies and strengthening relationships.

    PubMed

    Garcia, Carolyn M; Aguilera-Guzman, Rosa Maria; Lindgren, Sandi; Gutierrez, Rodolfo; Raniolo, Blanca; Genis, Therese; Vazquez-Benitez, Gabriela; Clausen, Lisa

    2013-09-01

    Intergenerational photovoice groups are promising for promoting health through the topic that is explored and through group dynamics that can foster healthy relationships and communication. To investigate the potential benefits of intergenerational photovoice projects, photovoice groups were conducted in urban Minnesota, United States, and in rural Morelos, Mexico, between 2009 and 2012 with Mexican-origin adults and their adolescent relatives. Seven photovoice groups of adult-adolescent dyads met for eight sessions and developed exhibits highlighting their views on health and migration and made policy recommendations, using messages conveyed through their words and photographs. Informal process evaluation and focus groups were used to elicit feedback about photovoice project participation. Photovoice project themes were descriptively analyzed. Focus group evaluation data were thematically summarized, and facilitator reflections were descriptively summarized to identify factors associated with intergenerational photovoice groups. Seventy-five participants were recruited. Photovoice themes represented effects of migration on health, family, and well-being. The following two evaluative themes were identified: (a) participant sentiments about the benefits of photovoice participation and (b) facilitator observations of intergenerational photovoice group benefits and challenges. Participants described opportunities to learn new things and barriers to healthy relationships that the project was eliminating by providing them with time to work together. Used in health promotion, photovoice is a valuable tool that contributes to understanding the complex underlying factors influencing behaviors and health.

  20. The New York State Office of Mental Health Positive Alternatives to Restraint and Seclusion (PARS) Project.

    PubMed

    Wisdom, Jennifer P; Wenger, David; Robertson, David; Van Bramer, Jayne; Sederer, Lloyd I

    2015-08-01

    The Positive Alternatives to Restraint and Seclusion (PARS) project of the New York State Office of Mental Health (OMH) was designed to build capacity to use alternatives to restraint and seclusion within state-operated and licensed inpatient and residential treatment programs serving children with severe emotional disturbances. Its long-term goal was to eliminate the use of these restrictive interventions throughout the state's mental health system of care by creating coercion- and violence-free treatment environments governed by a philosophy of recovery, resiliency, and wellness. The central feature of the PARS project was training in, implementation of, and engagement with the Six Core Strategies to Reduce the Use of Seclusion and Restraint, a comprehensive approach developed by the National Association of State Mental Health Program Directors. This report provides an overview of the project, results from January 2007 through December 2011, and lessons learned by OMH. The three participating mental health treatment facilities demonstrated significant decreases in restraint and seclusion episodes per 1,000 client-days. Each identified specific activities that contributed to success, including ways to facilitate open, respectful two-way communication between management and staff and between staff and youths and greater involvement of youths in program decision making. All three facilities continued to implement key components of the PARS initiative after termination of grant-funded activities, and OMH initiated multiple activities to disseminate lessons learned during the project to all inpatient and residential treatment programs throughout the state mental health system.

  1. [Experience in training in emergencies, Division of Special Projects in Health, Instituto Mexicano del Seguro Social].

    PubMed

    Cruz-Vega, Felipe; Loría-Castellanos, Jorge; Hernández-Olivas, Irma Patricia; Franco-Bey, Rubén; Ochoa-Avila, César; Sánchez-Badillo, Victoria

    2016-01-01

    There has been interest in the Division of Special Projects in Health to offer the Instituto Mexicano del Seguro Social personnel resources for training and quality thereby respond to potential contingencies. Presented here is their experience in this field. To describe and analyse the productivity in different training programs in emergencies and disasters developed by the Division of Special Projects in Health, Mexican Social Security Institute (IMSS). Observational study in which different training activities conducted by the Division of Special Projects in Health between 1989 and 2014 are described. Descriptive statistics were used. In these 25 years have trained 20,674 participants; 19.451 IMSS and 1,223 other health institutions. The most productive courses were life support (BLS/ACLS) (47.17%), distance courses "Hospital medical evacuation plans and units" (14.17%), the workshop-run "Evacuation of hospital units with an emphasis on critical areas" (5.93%) and course "Programme Evaluators of Hospital Insurance" (8.43%). Although the Special Projects Division Health has primarily operational functions, it nevertheless has neglected its responsibility to maintain constantly trained and updated institute staff that every day is in a position to face any type of emergency and disaster. This increases the chance that the answer to any contingency is more organised and of higher quality, always to the benefit of the population. Copyright © 2015 Academia Mexicana de Cirugía A.C. Published by Masson Doyma México S.A. All rights reserved.

  2. Pay For Success And Population Health: Early Results From Eleven Projects Reveal Challenges And Promise.

    PubMed

    Lantz, Paula M; Rosenbaum, Sara; Ku, Leighton; Iovan, Samantha

    2016-11-01

    Pay for success (PFS) is a type of social impact investing that uses private capital to finance proven prevention programs that help a government reduce public expenditures or achieve greater value. We conducted an analysis of the first eleven PFS projects in the United States to investigate the potential of PFS as a strategy for financing and disseminating interventions aimed at improving population health and health equity. The PFS approach has significant potential for bringing private-sector resources to interventions regarding social determinants of health. Nonetheless, a number of challenges remain, including structuring PFS initiatives so that optimal prevention benefits can be achieved and ensuring that PFS interventions and evaluation designs are based on rigorous research principles. In addition, increased policy attention regarding key PFS payout issues is needed, including the "wrong pockets" problem and legal barriers to using federal Medicaid funds as an investor payout source. Project HOPE—The People-to-People Health Foundation, Inc.

  3. The Quality Assurance Project: introducing quality improvement to primary health care in less developed countries.

    PubMed

    Nicholas, D D; Heiby, J R; Hatzell, T A

    1991-01-01

    Persistently excessive morbidity and mortality rates in less developed countries (LDCs) served by primary health care systems suggest that the quality of services is inadequate. The PRICOR project, sponsored by the United States Agency for International Development, has designed and implemented methods for quality assessment and problem solving in LDC health systems. After developing comprehensive lists of essential activities and tasks, similar to practice parameters, for seven child survival interventions, PRICOR supported comprehensive quality assessment studies in twelve LDC countries. The studies, yielding over 6000 observations of health worker-client encounters, indicated highly prevalent, serious program deficiencies in areas including diagnosis, treatment, patient education and supervision. To facilitate corrective action, PRICOR assisted managers in conducting operations research to resolve priority problems revealed by the assessments. The recently initiated Quality Assurance Project is building on PRICOR techniques in designing and implementing sustainable continuous quality improvement programs for LDC health systems.

  4. Spending more of our own resources. JICA Reproductive Health Project. Nghi Loc district.

    PubMed

    Nguyen Hai Duong

    1999-01-01

    The People's Committee of Nghi Truong, Vietnam is making efforts to improve the health status of the commune's people. High priority is given to preventive health activities, including arming people with practical knowledge on how to prevent infections with prevailing diseases and promotion of immunization that protects against several dangerous diseases. In addition, people are encouraged to change their ways and be hygienic and sanitary. The major concerns of the committee include: 1) preference for a big family; 2) high prevalence rate of gynecological diseases including reproductive tract infection; 3) high prevalence rate of goiter; and 4) poor levels of environmental sanitation. Timely assistance has been provided by the Japan International Cooperation Agency (JICA) Reproductive Health Project in addressing such issues. A significant contribution of the JICA project is the enhancement of the people's understanding of the causes and treatment of common reproductive health diseases.

  5. A nurse practitioner-led farmers' health service: setting up and evaluating a UK project.

    PubMed

    Walsh, M

    2000-08-01

    The farming community in the UK have significant unmet health-care needs that have traditionally remained invisible. The project that is the subject of this paper is an attempt to improve access to health care for farmers and make their needs visible. It is based in an upland area of England and involves two nurse practitioners (NPs) and two support workers who provide health care for the farming community. The main targets of the project are farm accidents, mental health and occupational diseases. The NPs visit farms, on request, for consultations and also attend auction marts, agricultural shows and other farmers' meetings. Evaluation is by a telephone follow-up interview with a sample of clients seen by the NP, who will be compared with a group from a similar area who do not receive the service. A farm accident survey is underway, case notes are being audited and the NPs are keeping a reflective diary as further sources of data.

  6. Individual Action and Community Context: The Health Intervention Project

    PubMed Central

    Sterk, Claire E.; Elifson, Kirk W.; Theall, Katherine P.

    2007-01-01

    Background HIV risk-reduction efforts have traditionally focused on the individual. The need for including the role of the social context and community addition is being recognized. Social capital provides social relationships and potential resources that may hinder or trigger risk or protective health behaviors, especially for individuals with limited economic means. Methods Sixty-five adult inner-city drug using women, who were included in a woman-focused HIV risk reduction intervention trial, participated in in-depth interviews in Atlanta, GA between 2002 and 2004. The interviews focused on the women's individual behavioral change during the six months since completion of the intervention as well as on the impact of community conditions. Topics discussed were sexual and drug use behaviors, social relationships, social capital, and community physical and social infrastructure. The data were analyzed using the constant comparison methods. Results The respondents indicated the poor physical and social infrastructure led to alienation and negatively impacted their behavioral change efforts. Social capital and social support mediated these negative influences. Drug related violence was an especially debilitating in their efforts to reduce HIV risk associated with crack cocaine or injection drug use and associated sexual behavior. Environmental conditions and opportunity structures played salient roles in the women's success. Conclusions Individual actions and community context must be considered simultaneously when facilitating and assessing behavioral interventions. PMID:17543709

  7. The World Health Organization European Health in Prisons Project After 10 Years: Persistent Barriers and Achievements

    PubMed Central

    Gatherer, Alex; Moller, Lars; Hayton, Paul

    2005-01-01

    The recognition that good prison health is important to general public health has led 28 countries in the European Region of the World Health Organization (WHO) to join a WHO network dedicated to improving health within prisons. Within the 10 years since that time, vital actions have been taken and important policy documents have been produced. A key factor in making progress is breaking down the isolation of prison health services and bringing them into closer collaboration with the country’s public health services. However, barriers to progress remain. A continuing challenge is how best to move from policy recommendations to implementation, so that the network’s fundamental aim of noticeable improvements in the health and care of prisoners is further achieved. PMID:16186449

  8. The World Health Organization European Health in Prisons Project after 10 years: persistent barriers and achievements.

    PubMed

    Gatherer, Alex; Moller, Lars; Hayton, Paul

    2005-10-01

    The recognition that good prison health is important to general public health has led 28 countries in the European Region of the World Health Organization (WHO) to join a WHO network dedicated to improving health within prisons. Within the 10 years since that time, vital actions have been taken and important policy documents have been produced. A key factor in making progress is breaking down the isolation of prison health services and bringing them into closer collaboration with the country's public health services.However, barriers to progress remain. A continuing challenge is how best to move from policy recommendations to implementation, so that the network's fundamental aim of noticeable improvements in the health and care of prisoners is further achieved.

  9. The effects of an urban renewal project on health and health inequalities: a quasi-experimental study in Barcelona.

    PubMed

    Mehdipanah, Roshanak; Rodríguez-Sanz, Maica; Malmusi, Davide; Muntaner, Carles; Díez, Elia; Bartoll, Xavier; Borrell, Carme

    2014-09-01

    In the last decade, the Neighbourhoods Law in Catalonia (Spain) funded municipalities that presented urban renewal projects within disadvantaged neighbourhoods focusing on physical, social and economic improvements. The objective of the study was to evaluate the effects of this law on the health and health inequalities of residents in the intervened neighbourhoods in the city of Barcelona. A quasi-experimental predesign and postdesign was used to compare adult residents in five intervened neighbourhoods with eight non-intervened comparison neighbourhoods with similar socioeconomic characteristics. The Barcelona Health Survey was used for studying self-rated and mental health in pre (2001, 2006) and post (2011) years. Poisson regression models stratified by sex were used to compute prevalence ratios comparing 2011 with 2006, and later stratified by social class, to study health inequalities. The intervened neighbourhoods had a significant decrease in poor self-rated health in both sexes while no significant changes occurred in the comparison group. When stratified by social class, a significant improvement was observed in poor self-rated health in the manual group of the intervened neighbourhoods in both sexes, resulting in a decrease in self-rated health inequalities. Similar results were observed in poor mental health of women, while in men, poor mental health worsens in both neighbourhood groups but mostly in the comparison group. The Neighbourhoods Law had a positive effect on self-rated health and seems to prevent poor mental health increases in both sexes and especially among manual social classes. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://group.bmj.com/group/rights-licensing/permissions.

  10. RETAIN--an ATM pilot project for applications in health care.

    PubMed

    Eichelberg, M; Hewett, A J; Jensch, P

    1996-01-01

    The availability of ATM-based broadband wide-area networks facilitates a range of new applications in health care, especially the performance of videoconferences combined with software for computer-supported cooperative discussion and diagnosis of digital medical images. This report about a research project for applications of the 'European ATM pilot network' in radiology describes the technical, economic and structural framework for the application of broadband technology in health care.

  11. Projections of health care expenditures as a share of the GDP: actuarial and macroeconomic approaches.

    PubMed Central

    Warshawsky, M J

    1994-01-01

    STUDY QUESTION. Can the steady increases in health care expenditures as a share of GDP projected by widely cited actuarial models be rationalized by a macroeconomic model with sensible parameters and specification? DATA SOURCES. National Income and Product Accounts, and Social Security and Health Care Financing Administration are the data sources used in parameters estimates. STUDY DESIGN. Health care expenditures as a share of gross domestic product (GDP) are projected using two methodological approaches--actuarial and macroeconomic--and under various assumptions. The general equilibrium macroeconomic approach has the advantage of allowing an investigation of the causes of growth in the health care sector and its consequences for the overall economy. DATA COLLECTION METHODS. Simulations are used. PRINCIPAL FINDINGS. Both models unanimously project a continued increase in the ratio of health care expenditures to GDP. Under the most conservative assumptions, that is, robust economic growth, improved demographic trends, or a significant moderation in the rate of health care price inflation, the health care sector will consume more than a quarter of national output by 2065. Under other (perhaps more realistic) assumptions, including a continuation of current trends, both approaches predict that health care expenditures will comprise between a third and a half of national output. In the macroeconomic model, the increasing use of capital goods in the health care sector explains the observed rise in relative prices. Moreover, this "capital deepening" implies that a relatively modest fraction of the labor force is employed in health care and that the rest of the economy is increasingly starved for capital, resulting in a declining standard of living. PMID:8063567

  12. Public library consumer health information pilot project: results of a National Library of Medicine evaluation

    PubMed Central

    Wood, Fred B.; Lyon, Becky; Schell, Mary Beth; Kitendaugh, Paula; Cid, Victor H.; Siegel, Elliot R.

    2000-01-01

    In October 1998, the National Library of Medicine (NLM) launched a pilot project to learn about the role of public libraries in providing health information to the public and to generate information that would assist NLM and the National Network of Libraries of Medicine (NN/LM) in learning how best to work with public libraries in the future. Three regional medical libraries (RMLs), eight resource libraries, and forty-one public libraries or library systems from nine states and the District of Columbia were selected for participation. The pilot project included an evaluation component that was carried out in parallel with project implementation. The evaluation ran through September 1999. The results of the evaluation indicated that participating public librarians were enthusiastic about the training and information materials provided as part of the project and that many public libraries used the materials and conducted their own outreach to local communities and groups. Most libraries applied the modest funds to purchase additional Internet-accessible computers and/or upgrade their health-reference materials. However, few of the participating public libraries had health information centers (although health information was perceived as a top-ten or top-five topic of interest to patrons). Also, the project generated only minimal usage of NLM's consumer health database, known as MEDLINEplus, from the premises of the monitored libraries (patron usage from home or office locations was not tracked). The evaluation results suggested a balanced follow-up by NLM and the NN/LM, with a few carefully selected national activities, complemented by a package of targeted activities that, as of January 2000, are being planned, developed, or implemented. The results also highlighted the importance of building an evaluation component into projects like this one from the outset, to assure that objectives were met and that evaluative information was available on a timely basis, as was

  13. The role of health professionals in informing cancer patients: findings from The Teamwork Project (phase one)

    PubMed Central

    Smith

    2001-01-01

    Background The Teamwork Project is managed by the National Cancer Alliance (NCA) and funded jointly by the National Lottery Charities Board and the Department of Health. The aim of the Project is to produce a Personal Information File to help people with cancer work in partnership with health professionals. Phase one was carried out between September 1998 and April 2000. The Teamwork Project arose as a direct result of the NCA report, ‘Patient‐Centred Cancer Services’? – What Patients Say, 1 one of a number of studies that found people with cancer want to be involved in decisions about their treatment and care. The study also found that, for this involvement to be successful, health professionals need to support patients in accessing information relevant to their individual needs and help them understand and apply that information. The focus of The Teamwork Project is to help provide a practical solution to meeting this information need. Approach The Teamwork Project has used a wide‐range of methods including literature appraisal; patient questionnaires; focus groups; semi‐structured interviews and a consultation exercise. Throughout the Project there has been on‐going involvement from both patients and professionals. Conclusions There may be a divergence of views among health professionals in cancer services regarding their role as providers of patient information. Consequently, there may also be a significant variance in how their patients are informed in practice. This finding needs to be validated and the reasons for this understood if the full potential of the forthcoming National Health Service (NHS) Cancer Information Strategy is to be realised. PMID:11281931

  14. Public library consumer health information pilot project: results of a National Library of Medicine evaluation.

    PubMed

    Wood, F B; Lyon, B; Schell, M B; Kitendaugh, P; Cid, V H; Siegel, E R

    2000-10-01

    In October 1998, the National Library of Medicine (NLM) launched a pilot project to learn about the role of public libraries in providing health information to the public and to generate information that would assist NLM and the National Network of Libraries of Medicine (NN/LM) in learning how best to work with public libraries in the future. Three regional medical libraries (RMLs), eight resource libraries, and forty-one public libraries or library systems from nine states and the District of Columbia were selected for participation. The pilot project included an evaluation component that was carried out in parallel with project implementation. The evaluation ran through September 1999. The results of the evaluation indicated that participating public librarians were enthusiastic about the training and information materials provided as part of the project and that many public libraries used the materials and conducted their own outreach to local communities and groups. Most libraries applied the modest funds to purchase additional Internet-accessible computers and/or upgrade their health-reference materials. However, few of the participating public libraries had health information centers (although health information was perceived as a top-ten or top-five topic of interest to patrons). Also, the project generated only minimal usage of NLM's consumer health database, known as MEDLINEplus, from the premises of the monitored libraries (patron usage from home or office locations was not tracked). The evaluation results suggested a balanced follow-up by NLM and the NN/LM, with a few carefully selected national activities, complemented by a package of targeted activities that, as of January 2000, are being planned, developed, or implemented. The results also highlighted the importance of building an evaluation component into projects like this one from the outset, to assure that objectives were met and that evaluative information was available on a timely basis, as was

  15. Health and safety management system audit reliability pilot project.

    PubMed

    Dyjack, D T; Redinger, C F; Ridge, R S

    2003-01-01

    This pilot study assessed occupational health and safety (OHS) management system audit finding reliability using a modified test-retest method. Two industrial hygienists with similar training and education conducted four, 1-day management system audits in four dissimilar organizational environments. The researchers examined four auditable sections (employee participation, training, controls, and communications) contained in a publicly available OHS management system assessment instrument. At each site, 102 auditable clauses were evaluated using a progressive 6-point scale. The team examined both the consistency of and agreement between the scores of the two auditors. Consistency was evaluated by calculating the Pearson r correlations for the two auditors' scores at each site and for each section within each site. Pearson correlations comparing overall scores for each site were all very low, ranging from 0.206 to 0.543. Training and communication system assessments correlated the highest, whereas employee participation and control system scores correlated the least. To measure agreement, t-tests were first calculated to determine whether the differences were statistically significant. Aggregate mean scores for two of the four sites were significantly different. Of the 16 total sections evaluated (i.e., 4 sections per site), seven scores were significantly different. Finally, the agreement of the scores between the two auditors for the four sites was evaluated by calculating two types of intraclass correlation coefficients, all of which failed to meet the minimum requirement for agreement. These findings suggest that opportunities for improving the reliability of the instrument and the audit process exist. Future research should include governmental and commercial OHS program assessments and related environmental management systems and their attendant audit protocols.

  16. Using public relations strategies to prompt populations at risk to seek health information: the Hanford Community Health Project.

    PubMed

    Thomas, Gregory D; Smith, Stephen M; Turcotte, Joseph A

    2009-01-01

    The Hanford Community Health Project (HCHP) addressed health concerns among "downwinders" exposed to releases of radioactive iodine (I-131) from the Hanford Nuclear Reservation in the 1940s and 1950s. After developing educational materials and conducting initial outreach, HCHP had to decide whether to apply its limited resources to an advertising or public relations approach. The decision to apply public relations strategies was effective in driving awareness of the risk communication message at the community level, reinvigorating the affected community, and ultimately increasing the number of people who sought information about their risk of exposure and related health issues. HCHP used a series of communication tools to reach out to local and regional media, medical and health professionals, and community organizations. The campaign was successful in increasing the number of unique visitors to HCHP Web site and educating and activating the medical community around the releases of I-131 and patient care choices.

  17. The construction of therapeutic projects in the mental health field: notes on new care technologies.

    PubMed

    Barros, Juliana de Oliveira; Mângia, Elisabete Ferreira

    2014-01-01

    Over the last three decades Brazil has developed a new community-based mental health policy. In this context it is important to reflect on the offers of care for users, and especially on how therapeutic projects are developed by professionals. This study was conducted with professionals working in community-based mental health services to investigate and understand their views on the construction of therapeutic projects and compare them with the concepts and theoretical proposals in Brazil's Mental Health Policy Guidelines and a review of the literature. Thirteen professionals who worked in mental health services located in three cities of the state of São Paulo, Brazil. Semi-structured interviews were conducted between September and November of 2009 to understand the views and mechanisms adopted by professionals in developing therapeutic projects. A bibliographical review laid the foundations for the theoretical research and for strengthening the basis of the data analysis. The professionals views are similar to those proposed in the relevant literature and Brazil's Mental Health Policy Guidelines. However, there is a need to invest in building new models to meet the needs of the population that requires mental health services. Clearer guidelines should be established to organize services and to provide adequate, sufficient training. The study suggests that attention and resources should be directed to strengthening training of professionals, and especially to qualifying the organization and administration of services in order to consolidate the new model.

  18. [Subtainable health promotion via organisational development--a model project for teachers in professional training schools].

    PubMed

    Schumacher, L; Nieskens, B; Bräuer, H; Sieland, B

    2005-02-01

    The goal of this project is the development, implementation and evaluation of a concept designed for sustainable health promotion among occupational and trade school teachers. We assume that for sustainable health promotion -- along with a behavioral prevention program -- a change is necessary in the structure, as well as, the working and communication processes within schools. The realization of early teacher participation and self regulated cooperative groups initiates comprehensive and goal-oriented developmental processes in the project schools. The organizational development process was accomplished in the following way: At the beginning we conducted a diagnosis of school-specific and individual health risks and the resources available to the project schools. The results were reported for both the individual and for the teacher group. This was intended to clarify the potential for improvement and, thus, strengthen the teachers' motivation toward processes of change. Following the diagnosis, the teachers chose areas of stress-related strain and then worked in groups to develop and implement behaviour and working condition-oriented intervention strategies for health promotion. The diagnosis results confirm the necessity of school-specific health promotion: the schools demonstrate very different demand and resource profiles. Furthermore, is has become evident that the central success factor for health promotion in schools is the teachers' willingness for change. The individual and group reports of the diagnosis results seem to have made clear how essential individual and organisational changes are.

  19. National health expenditure projections, 2013-23: faster growth expected with expanded coverage and improving economy.

    PubMed

    Sisko, Andrea M; Keehan, Sean P; Cuckler, Gigi A; Madison, Andrew J; Smith, Sheila D; Wolfe, Christian J; Stone, Devin A; Lizonitz, Joseph M; Poisal, John A

    2014-10-01

    In 2013 health spending growth is expected to have remained slow, at 3.6 percent, as a result of the sluggish economic recovery, the effects of sequestration, and continued increases in private health insurance cost-sharing requirements. The combined effects of the Affordable Care Act's coverage expansions, faster economic growth, and population aging are expected to fuel health spending growth this year and thereafter (5.6 percent in 2014 and 6.0 percent per year for 2015-23). However, the average rate of increase through 2023 is projected to be slower than the 7.2 percent average growth experienced during 1990-2008. Because health spending is projected to grow 1.1 percentage points faster than the average economic growth during 2013-23, the health share of the gross domestic product is expected to rise from 17.2 percent in 2012 to 19.3 percent in 2023. Project HOPE—The People-to-People Health Foundation, Inc.

  20. [Health education in St. Gall schools: experiences from a 6-year project].

    PubMed

    van der Linde, F; Zuberbühler, P

    1985-01-01

    In 1982 a general concept for comprehensive health education in schools worked out by an interdisciplinary project team was introduced by the Educational Council. Health education is postulated primarily as an educational principle, but in addition to this general principle 13 distinctive content areas are put forward. In a second phase special project teams for each type of school had to transform the general concept into their own specific needs for the age groups concerned. The most important experiences from this phase can be summarized as follows: Concepts for health education in schools have to be worked out by interdisciplinary teams coordinated by an expert belonging to the educational (not the medical) system. Planning and introduction of health education has to be accompanied by changes in attitudes on all levels; the need for time must therefore not be underestimated. The project team has to discuss its results repeatedly with local educational authorities and teachers in order to ensure practicability and acceptance of its proposals. The cross-curricular nature of health education has to be stressed and to be demonstrated by working out and applying practicable models. Teachers have to be carefully prepared for their task not only by providing them with adequate material but above all by including health education as a priority in the training period as well as in postgraduate courses.

  1. National health spending projections through 2020: economic recovery and reform drive faster spending growth.

    PubMed

    Keehan, Sean P; Sisko, Andrea M; Truffer, Christopher J; Poisal, John A; Cuckler, Gigi A; Madison, Andrew J; Lizonitz, Joseph M; Smith, Sheila D

    2011-08-01

    In 2010, US health spending is estimated to have grown at a historic low of 3.9 percent, due in part to the effects of the recently ended recession. In 2014, national health spending growth is expected to reach 8.3 percent when major coverage expansions from the Affordable Care Act of 2010 begin. The expanded Medicaid and private insurance coverage are expected to increase demand for health care significantly, particularly for prescription drugs and physician and clinical services. Robust growth in Medicare enrollment, expanded Medicaid coverage, and premium and cost-sharing subsidies for exchange plans are projected to increase the federal government share of health spending from 27 percent in 2009 to 31 percent by 2020. This article provides perspective on how the nation's health care dollar will be spent over the coming decade as the health sector moves quickly toward its new paradigm of expanded insurance coverage.

  2. Framework to Define Structure and Boundaries of Complex Health Intervention Systems: The ALERT Project.

    PubMed

    Boriani, Elena; Esposito, Roberto; Frazzoli, Chiara; Fantke, Peter; Hald, Tine; Rüegg, Simon R

    2017-01-01

    Health intervention systems are complex and subject to multiple variables in different phases of implementation. This constitutes a concrete challenge for the application of translational science in real life. Complex systems as health-oriented interventions call for interdisciplinary approaches with carefully defined system boundaries. Exploring individual components of such systems from different viewpoints gives a wide overview and helps to understand the elements and the relationships that drive actions and consequences within the system. In this study, we present an application and assessment of a framework with focus on systems and system boundaries of interdisciplinary projects. As an example on how to apply our framework, we analyzed ALERT [an integrated sensors and biosensors' system (BEST) aimed at monitoring the quality, health, and traceability of the chain of the bovine milk], a multidisciplinary and interdisciplinary project based on the application of measurable biomarkers at strategic points of the milk chain for improved food security (including safety), human, and ecosystem health (1). In fact, the European food safety framework calls for science-based support to the primary producers' mandate for legal, scientific, and ethical responsibility in food supply. Because of its multidisciplinary and interdisciplinary approach involving human, animal, and ecosystem health, ALERT can be considered as a One Health project. Within the ALERT context, we identified the need to take into account the main actors, interactions, and relationships of stakeholders to depict a simplified skeleton of the system. The framework can provide elements to highlight how and where to improve the project development when project evaluations are required.

  3. Framework to Define Structure and Boundaries of Complex Health Intervention Systems: The ALERT Project

    PubMed Central

    Boriani, Elena; Esposito, Roberto; Frazzoli, Chiara; Fantke, Peter; Hald, Tine; Rüegg, Simon R.

    2017-01-01

    Health intervention systems are complex and subject to multiple variables in different phases of implementation. This constitutes a concrete challenge for the application of translational science in real life. Complex systems as health-oriented interventions call for interdisciplinary approaches with carefully defined system boundaries. Exploring individual components of such systems from different viewpoints gives a wide overview and helps to understand the elements and the relationships that drive actions and consequences within the system. In this study, we present an application and assessment of a framework with focus on systems and system boundaries of interdisciplinary projects. As an example on how to apply our framework, we analyzed ALERT [an integrated sensors and biosensors’ system (BEST) aimed at monitoring the quality, health, and traceability of the chain of the bovine milk], a multidisciplinary and interdisciplinary project based on the application of measurable biomarkers at strategic points of the milk chain for improved food security (including safety), human, and ecosystem health (1). In fact, the European food safety framework calls for science-based support to the primary producers’ mandate for legal, scientific, and ethical responsibility in food supply. Because of its multidisciplinary and interdisciplinary approach involving human, animal, and ecosystem health, ALERT can be considered as a One Health project. Within the ALERT context, we identified the need to take into account the main actors, interactions, and relationships of stakeholders to depict a simplified skeleton of the system. The framework can provide elements to highlight how and where to improve the project development when project evaluations are required. PMID:28804707

  4. "Sitting in different chairs:" roles of the community health workers in the Poder es Salud/Power for Health Project.

    PubMed

    Farquhar, S A; Wiggins, N; Michael, Y L; Luhr, G; Jordan, J; Lopez, A

    2008-07-01

    Evaluations of Community Health Worker programs consistently document improvements in health, yet few articles clearly describe the roles of Community Health Workers (CHWs) from the CHWs' perspective. This article presents the CHWs' points of view regarding the various roles they played in a community-based participatory research (CBPR) project, Poder es Salud/Power for Health in Portland, Oregon, including their roles as community organizers and co-researchers. Authors draw from an analysis of transcript data from in-depth interviews conducted with CHWs to present a description of the strategies employed by the CHWs to build leadership skills and knowledge among community members. CHWs also discuss their own personal and professional development. The analysis of the interviews suggests that CHWs valued their multiple roles with Poder es Salud/Power for Health and their participation on the project's Steering Committee. Based on CHWs' descriptions of their work, this type of involvement appears to build the CHWs' leadership skills and sense of efficacy to create change in their communities. By serving as community organizers and participating as producers of research, rather than acting merely as a deliverer of the intervention activities, the CHWs were able to build skills that make them more successful as CHWs.

  5. The History of European Health Project: a history of health in Europe from the late Paleolithic era to the present.

    PubMed

    Steckel, Richard H; Larsen, Clark S; Sciulli, Paul W; Walker, Philip L

    2009-01-01

    The United States National Science Foundation has recently funded a large collaborative project on "A History of Health in Europe from the Late Paleolithic Era to the Present," whose goal is to measure and analyzes the evolution of skeletal health by combining data from human remains with information gathered from sources in archaeology, climate history, geography, and history. The goal of this international collaborative project is to create a series of database that will allow researchers to reinterpret the history of human health in Europe from the late Paleolithic era to the early twentieth century. During this period, human health and welfare were transformed enormously by the transition from foraging to farming; the rise of cities and complex forms of social and political organization; European colonization; and industrialization. With a trans-Atlantic network of collaborators, we will undertake large-scale comparative studies of the causes and health consequences of these and other dramatic changes in arrangements for work, living, and human interaction.

  6. Secondary Education Through Health -- environmental health curriculum: A Superfund science literacy outreach project

    SciTech Connect

    Sherman, L.R.

    1996-12-31

    Inner-city high school students are disproportionately affected by health problems that stem from environmental conditions. Also, they are not adequately prepared in Science -- especially in the concepts, methods, and procedures of environmental-health science research -- and are generally unaware of the career opportunities in this field. A Superfund program was developed to increase Science literacy and expand career knowledge in environmental health among a cohort of minority high school students from New York City. The year-round program features lectures, laboratory tours, seminars, investigations, and research taught by faculty and Superfund investigators at Mount Sinai`s Environmental Health Sciences Center. The students made remarkable progress in terms of gaining environmental health knowledge, laboratory and scientific research skills, and awareness of environmental health careers.

  7. Development of the National Healthy Sleep Awareness Project Sleep Health Surveillance Questions

    PubMed Central

    Morgenthaler, Timothy I.; Croft, Janet B.; Dort, Leslie C.; Loeding, Lauren D.; Mullington, Janet M.; Thomas, Sherene M.

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: For the first time ever, as emphasized by inclusion in the Healthy People 2020 goals, sleep health is an emphasis of national health aims. The National Healthy Sleep Awareness Project (NHSAP) was tasked to propose questions for inclusion in the next Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System (BRFSS), a survey that includes a number of questions that target behaviors thought to impact health, as a means to measure community sleep health. The total number of questions could not exceed five, and had to include an assessment of the risk for obstructive sleep apnea (OSA). Methods: An appointed workgroup met via teleconference and face-to-face venues to develop an inventory of published survey questions being used to identify sleep health, to develop a framework on which to analyze the strengths and weaknesses of current survey questions concerning sleep, and to develop recommendations for sleep health and disease surveillance questions going forward. Results: The recommendation was to focus on certain existing BRFSS questions pertaining to sleep duration, quality, satisfaction, daytime alertness, and to add to these other BRFSS existing questions to make a modified STOP-BANG questionnaire (minus the N for neck circumference) to assess for risk of OSA. Conclusions: Sleep health is an important dimension of health that has previously received less attention in national health surveys. We believe that 5 questions recommended for the upcoming BRFSS question banks will assist as important measures of sleep health, and may help to evaluate the effectiveness of interventions to improve sleep health in our nation. Citation: Morgenthaler TI, Croft JB, Dort LC, Loeding LD, Mullington JM, Thomas SM. Development of the National Healthy Sleep Awareness Project sleep health surveillance questions. J Clin Sleep Med 2015;11(9):1057–1062. PMID:26235156

  8. The Latino Mental Health Project: A Local Mental Health Needs Assessment

    PubMed Central

    Adams, Sara T.; Calista, Joanne L.; Connell, Joy; Encarnación, José; Esparza, Nancy K.; Frohock, Jeanne; Hicks, Ellen; Kim, Saeromi; Kokernak, Gerald; McGrenra, Michael; Mestre, Ray; Pérez, Maria; Pinedo, Tatiana M.; Quagan, Rosemary; Rivera, Christina; Taucer, Patsy; Wang, Ed

    2010-01-01

    In this article, we present the results of a local needs assessment of the mental health experiences, service needs, and barriers to treatment-seeking of the Latino population in Worcester, Massachusetts. Overall, participants reported relatively high rates of experiences with symptoms of mental health problems, they indicated using a range of both formal and alternative mental health services, and they noted a variety of instrumental, attitudinal, and culturally-specific barriers to seeking mental health services. Findings are discussed with regards to the role that community-driven research can play in advancing efforts to provide relevant services to underserved populations. PMID:17279338

  9. Cooperation and communication challenges in small-scale eHealth development projects.

    PubMed

    Petersen, Lone Stub; Bertelsen, Pernille; Bjørnes, Charlotte

    2013-12-01

    In eHealth development there is an increasing focus on user participation inspired by the information systems field of practice and research. There are, however, many other challenges in developing information systems that fit healthcare practices. One of these is the challenge of cooperation and communication in development projects that are initiated and managed by clinicians e.g. cooperating with IT professionals in 'bottom up' health informatics projects that have been initiated and are managed by healthcare professional project managers. The analysis and results are drawn from a qualitative case study on a systems development project that was managed by a local, non-technical, healthcare professional and the complex blend and interactions with the IT professionals in the phases of ideas, design, development, implementation, maintenance and distribution. We analyze the challenges of cooperation and communication using perspectives from information systems research and the concepts of 'language-games' and 'shared design spaces', and thereby exploring the boundaries between the different communication, practice and culture of the IT professionals and the healthcare professionals. There is a need to (a) develop a better understanding of the development process from the point of view of the 'user' and (b) tools for making technical knowledge explicit in the development process. Cooperative and communicative methods are needed that support and develop the shared design spaces between IT professionals and the clinical context in order to strengthen small-scale health information systems projects. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Strengthening emergency obstetric care in Nepal: The Women's Right to Life and Health Project (WRLHP).

    PubMed

    Rana, T G; Chataut, B D; Shakya, G; Nanda, G; Pratt, A; Sakai, S

    2007-09-01

    The Women's Right to Life and Health Project contributes to Nepal's National Safe Motherhood Program and maternal mortality reduction efforts by working to improve the availability, quality and utilization of emergency obstetric care services in public health facilities. The project upgraded 8 existing public health facilities through infrastructure, equipment, training, data collection, policy advocacy, and community information activities. The total cost of the project was approximately US$1.6 million. In 5 years, 3 comprehensive and 4 basic emergency obstetric care (EmOC) facilities were established in an area where adequate EmOC services were previously lacking. From 2000 to 2004, met need for EmOC improved from 1.9 to 16.9%; the proportion of births in EmOC project facilities increased from 3.8 to 8.3%; and the case fatality rate declined from 2.7 to 0.3%. While the use of maternity services is still low in Nepal, improving availability and quality of EmOC together with community empowerment can increase utilization by women with complications, even in low-resource settings. Partnerships with government and donors were key to the project's success. Similar efforts should be replicated throughout Nepal to expand the availability of essential life-saving services for pregnant women.

  11. Fall 2015 NASA Internship, and Space Radiation Health Project

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Patience, Luke

    2015-01-01

    This fall, I was fortunate enough to have been able to participate in an internship at NASA's Lyndon B. Johnson Space Center. I was placed into the Human Health & Performance Directorate, where I was specifically tasked to work with Dr. Zarana Patel, researching the impacts of cosmic level radiation on human cells. Using different laboratory techniques, we were able to examine the cells to see if any damage had been done due to radiation exposure, and if so, how much damage was done. Cell culture samples were exposed at different doses, and fixed at different time points so that we could accumulate a large pool of quantifiable data. After examining quantifiable results relative to the impacts of space radiation on the human body at the cellular and chromosomal level, researchers can defer to different areas of the space program that have to do with astronaut safety, and research and development (extravehicular mobility unit construction, vehicle design and construction, etc.). This experience has been very eye-opening, and I was able to learn quite a bit. I learned some new laboratory techniques, and I did my best to try and learn new ways to balance such a hectic work and school schedule. I also learned some very intimate thing about working at NASA; I learned that far more people want to watch you succeed, rather than watch you fail, and I also learned that this is a place that is alive with innovators and explorers - people who have a sole purpose of exploring space for the betterment of humanity, and not for any other reason. It's truly inspiring. All of these experiences during my internship have impacted me in a really profound way, so much that my educational and career goals are completely different than when I started. I started out as a biotechnology major, and I discovered recently toward the end of the internship, that I don't want to work in a lab, nor was I as enthralled by biological life sciences as a believed myself to be. Taking that all into

  12. Learning from the Innovative Open Practices of Three International Health Projects: IACAPAP, VCPH and Physiopedia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Coughlan, Tony; Perryman, Leigh-Anne

    2015-01-01

    Open educational resources and open educational practices are being increasingly used around the globe to train and support professionals in areas where funding and resources are scarce. This paper evaluates the open educational practices (OEP) of three global health projects operating outside academia--the International Association for Child and…

  13. Overcoming the Barriers to Uptake: A Study of 6 Danish Health-Based Serious Games Projects

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brown, Damian

    2013-01-01

    Serious gaming for health benefits is moving out of the realm of being potentially interesting, and the authors are starting to see a growing maturity in the field. This study of six serious gaming projects based either wholly or partly in Denmark investigates the changes taking place in the healthcare area based on experiences with serious gaming…

  14. The Orthodontist, Our Friend: World of Work Project: Fifth Grade: Health.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Anderson, Nancy

    The document is one of the teaching units developed by the Utah World of Work Project, designed to integrate career awareness into the regular curriculum at the elementary level. The fifth grade guide is tied to the health education area and focuses on the work of the orthodontist in terms of understanding what an orthodontist does, learning what…

  15. A Study of the Clinical Laboratory Occupations. The UCLA Allied Health Professions Project.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    California Univ., Los Angeles. Div. of Vocational Education.

    The objectives of this study which was conducted as part of the UCLA Allied Health Professions Project were: (1) to determine the percent of medical laboratory workers who perform a comprehensive list of tasks and procedures; (2) to evaluate this performance in terms of certification and specialty area; and (3) on the basis of these data, to make…

  16. Clinical Laboratory Sciences Discipline Advisory Group Final Report. Kentucky Allied Health Project.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kentucky Council on Public Higher Education, Frankfort.

    Education in the clinical laboratory sciences in Kentucky and articulation within the field are examined, based on the Kentucky Allied Health Project (KAHP), which designed an articulated statewide system to promote entry and exit of personnel at a variety of educational levels. The KAHP model promotes articulation in learning, planning, and…

  17. Exploring Contributions of Project-Based Learning to Health and Wellbeing in Secondary Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Allison, Pete; Gray, Shirley; Sproule, John; Nash, Christine; Martindale, Russell; Wang, John

    2015-01-01

    Regardless of the aims and purposes of education, recent trends in pedagogy suggest an increasing popularity of project-based learning (PBL) and a focus on interdisciplinary approaches to learning, however ill-defined they may be. Connections between PBL, curriculum trends and health and wellbeing are reviewed, as well as potential value of…

  18. 78 FR 38287 - Bitterroot National Forest, Darby Ranger District, Como Forest Health Project

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-06-26

    ... Forest Service Bitterroot National Forest, Darby Ranger District, Como Forest Health Project AGENCY: Forest Service. ACTION: Notice; Correction. SUMMARY: The Department of Agriculture (USDA), Forest Service, Bitterroot National Forest, Darby Ranger District published a document in the Federal Register of June 17...

  19. Proctor Creek's Boone Boulevard Green Street Project Health Impact Assessment (HIA)

    EPA Science Inventory

    The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) Office of Research and Development and Region 4 led a health impact assessment to evaluate a proposed green street demonstration project under consideration by the City of Atlanta Department of Watershed Management (DWM). The HIA id...

  20. Nutrition/Dietetics Discipline Advisory Group Final Report. Kentucky Allied Health Project.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kentucky Council on Public Higher Education, Frankfort.

    Education in nutrition/dietetics in Kentucky and articulation within the field are examined, based on the Kentucky Allied Health Project (KAHP), which designed an articulated statewide system to promote entry and exit of personnel at a variety of educational levels. The KAHP model promotes articulation in learning, planning, and resource…

  1. Guatemala Project: The Traditional Laundering Place as a Non-Formal Health Education Setting

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Colle, Royal D.

    1977-01-01

    Describes a nonformal adult education project designed to improve the health and nutrition of rural Guatemalan residents through the use of a traditional setting--the pila (an outdoor laundering place found throughout Guatemala), a modern medium (audio cassette and cassette player), and content which was a combination of modern and indigenous. (SH)

  2. Task Analysis for Curriculum Design and Validation. Allied Health Professions Project.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Byers, Bruce B.; And Others

    This report contains an outline of the method and the rationale for a project whose purpose is to develop training programs which are relevant to the specific requirements of technical occupations in nine allied health professions. The nine professions are in (a) nursing, (b) inhalation therapy, (c) radiology (technician level), (d) clinical…

  3. Dental Auxiliary Discipline Advisory Group Final Report. Kentucky Allied Health Project.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kentucky Council on Public Higher Education, Frankfort.

    Education for the dental auxiliary professions in Kentucky and articulation within the field are examined, based on the Kentucky Allied Health Project (KAHP), which designed an articulated statewide system to promote entry and exit of personnel at a variety of educational levels. The KAHP model promotes articulation in learning, planning, and…

  4. Clinical Laboratory Sciences Discipline Advisory Group Final Report. Kentucky Allied Health Project.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kentucky Council on Public Higher Education, Frankfort.

    Education in the clinical laboratory sciences in Kentucky and articulation within the field are examined, based on the Kentucky Allied Health Project (KAHP), which designed an articulated statewide system to promote entry and exit of personnel at a variety of educational levels. The KAHP model promotes articulation in learning, planning, and…

  5. Project #138. Coronary Care Education of Health Care Team. Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Saint Joseph Hospital, MO.

    The goal of this project was to develop, establish, and implement a system for the educational development of health care team members of the St. Joseph region in emergency and coronary care. Programs, curricula, and evaluation methodology were devised for four levels of critical care personnel: R.N.s emphasizing emergency and coronary care;…

  6. Occupational Analysis: Hospital Radiologic Technologist. The UCLA Allied Health Professions Project.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reeder, Glenn D.; And Others

    In an effort to meet the growing demand for skilled radiologic technologists and other supportive personnel educated through the associate degree level, a national survey was conducted as part of the UCLA Allied Health Professions Project to determine the tasks performed by personnel in the field and lay the groundwork for development of…

  7. Respiratory Therapy Discipline Advisory Group Final Report. Kentucky Allied Health Project.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kentucky Council on Public Higher Education, Frankfort.

    Respiratory therapy education in Kentucky and articulation within the field are examined, based on the Kentucky Allied Health Project (KAHP), which designed a statewide system to promote entry and exit of prepared personnel at a variety of educational levels. The KAHP model promotes articulation in learning, planning, and resource utilization. The…

  8. The Role of Social Relationships in Predicting Loneliness: The National Social Life, Health, and Aging Project

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shiovitz-Ezra, Sharon; Leitsch, Sara A.

    2010-01-01

    The authors explore associations between objective and subjective social network characteristics and loneliness in later life, using data from the National Social Life, Health, and Aging Project, a nationally representative sample of individuals ages 57 to 85 in the United States. Hierarchical linear regression was used to examine the associations…

  9. Proctor Creek's Boone Boulevard Green Street Project Health Impact Assessment (HIA)

    EPA Science Inventory

    The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) Office of Research and Development and Region 4 led a health impact assessment to evaluate a proposed green street demonstration project under consideration by the City of Atlanta Department of Watershed Management (DWM). The HIA id...

  10. A synthesis of evaluation monitoring projects by the forest health monitoring program (1998-2007)

    Treesearch

    William A. Bechtold; Michael J. Bohne; Barbara L. Conkling; Dana L. Friedman; Borys M. Tkacz

    2012-01-01

    The national Forest Health Monitoring Program of the Forest Service, U.S. Department of Agriculture, has funded over 200 Evaluation Monitoring projects. Evaluation Monitoring is designed to verify and define the extent of deterioration in forest ecosystems where potential problems have been identified. This report is a synthesis of results from over 150 Evaluation...

  11. COMMUNITY COLLEGE HEALTH CAREERS PROJECT PHASE II--TEACHER PREPARATION. FINAL REPORT.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    RATNER, MURIEL

    THE STATE UNIVERSITY OF NEW YORK AT BUFFALO AND CITY UNIVERSITY OF NEW YORK COOPERATED WITH THE COMMUNITY COLLEGE HEALTH CAREERS PROJECT BY ESTABLISHING PROGRAMS TO PREPARE PRACTITIONERS TO TEACH IN COMMUNITY COLLEGE PROGRAMS IN (1) OCCUPATIONAL THERAPY ASSISTING, (2) DENTAL ASSISTING, (3) OPHTHALMIC DISPENSING, AND (4) MEDICAL RECORD,…

  12. A Survey of Food Projects in the English NHS Regions and Health Action Zones in 2001

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Caraher, Martin; Cowburn, Gill

    2004-01-01

    Background and Objective: This article sets out the findings from an analysis of food projects, with a particular emphasis on fruit and vegetables, from the 26 Health Action Zones (HAZs) in England and those taking place within the former NHS regional areas in 2001. The objective was to gather information on the existing practice to inform future…

  13. Task Analysis for Curriculum Design and Validation. Allied Health Professions Project.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Byers, Bruce B.; And Others

    This report contains an outline of the method and the rationale for a project whose purpose is to develop training programs which are relevant to the specific requirements of technical occupations in nine allied health professions. The nine professions are in (a) nursing, (b) inhalation therapy, (c) radiology (technician level), (d) clinical…

  14. Overcoming the Barriers to Uptake: A Study of 6 Danish Health-Based Serious Games Projects

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brown, Damian

    2013-01-01

    Serious gaming for health benefits is moving out of the realm of being potentially interesting, and the authors are starting to see a growing maturity in the field. This study of six serious gaming projects based either wholly or partly in Denmark investigates the changes taking place in the healthcare area based on experiences with serious gaming…

  15. Dental Auxiliary Discipline Advisory Group Final Report. Kentucky Allied Health Project.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kentucky Council on Public Higher Education, Frankfort.

    Education for the dental auxiliary professions in Kentucky and articulation within the field are examined, based on the Kentucky Allied Health Project (KAHP), which designed an articulated statewide system to promote entry and exit of personnel at a variety of educational levels. The KAHP model promotes articulation in learning, planning, and…

  16. Radiological Sciences Discipline Advisory Group Final Report. Kentucky Allied Health Project.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kentucky Council on Public Higher Education, Frankfort.

    Radiological sciences education in Kentucky and articulation within this field are examined, based on the Kentucky Allied Health Project (KAHP), which designed an articulated statewide system to promote entry and exit of personnel at a variety of educational levels. The KAHP model promotes articulation in learning, planning, and resource…

  17. The Kentucky Homeplace Project: Family Health Care Advisers in Underserved Rural Communities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schoenberg, Nancy E.; Campbell, Karen A.; Garrity, John F.; Snider, Lyle B.; Main, Karen

    2001-01-01

    In the Kentucky Homeplace Project, specially trained paraprofessionals who live in medically underserved rural communities make home visits, facilitate access to health care, and provide case management and culturally appropriate prevention education for poor families. Strengths include local administration and staff and holistic and traditional…

  18. Radiological Sciences Discipline Advisory Group Final Report. Kentucky Allied Health Project.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kentucky Council on Public Higher Education, Frankfort.

    Radiological sciences education in Kentucky and articulation within this field are examined, based on the Kentucky Allied Health Project (KAHP), which designed an articulated statewide system to promote entry and exit of personnel at a variety of educational levels. The KAHP model promotes articulation in learning, planning, and resource…

  19. The Role of Social Relationships in Predicting Loneliness: The National Social Life, Health, and Aging Project

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shiovitz-Ezra, Sharon; Leitsch, Sara A.

    2010-01-01

    The authors explore associations between objective and subjective social network characteristics and loneliness in later life, using data from the National Social Life, Health, and Aging Project, a nationally representative sample of individuals ages 57 to 85 in the United States. Hierarchical linear regression was used to examine the associations…

  20. A Report of the School Health Education Curriculum Project, Wichita Model. 1974-75.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moore, Terry E.; Makalous, Don L.

    This report discusses the genesis, imblementation, and evaluation of the Wichita, Kansas, School Health Education Curriculum Project, instructinq fifth-, sixth-, seventh-, and eighth-grade public school students in units on the lung and respiratory system, the heart and circulatory system, and the brain and central nervous system. Developed from…

  1. Soros' new mission. Russian health project only the beginning, he says.

    PubMed

    Pallarito, K

    1997-11-03

    Since 1979 billionaire financier and philanthropist George Soros (left) has contributed millions of dollars of his personal wealth to some of the world's poorest nations. Now the Hungarian-born money manager is giving his largest gift ever. Soros will spend $500 million over three years in Russia, roughly $100 million of which will be invested in public health projects.

  2. Appalachian Adolescent Health Education Project (AAHEP): Second-Year Evaluation Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Achilles, Charles M.; And Others

    This report evaluates the second year of the Appalachian Adolescent Health Education Project (AAHEP), a program designed to reduce adolescent pregnancy rates and provide care for pregnant teenagers in East Tennessee. Changes in the program, including the reduction in target area from 15 counties to 3 primary counties and 6 target high schools, are…

  3. A Survey of Food Projects in the English NHS Regions and Health Action Zones in 2001

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Caraher, Martin; Cowburn, Gill

    2004-01-01

    Background and Objective: This article sets out the findings from an analysis of food projects, with a particular emphasis on fruit and vegetables, from the 26 Health Action Zones (HAZs) in England and those taking place within the former NHS regional areas in 2001. The objective was to gather information on the existing practice to inform future…

  4. Internal evaluation of the European network for health technology assessment project.

    PubMed

    Håheim, Lise Lund; Imaz, Iñaki; Loud, Marlène Läubli; Gasparetto, Teresa; González-Enriquez, Jesús; Dahlgren, Helena; Trofimovs, Igor; Berti, Elena; Mørland, Berit

    2009-12-01

    The internal evaluation studied the development of the European network for Health Technology Assessment (EUnetHTA) Project in achieving the general objective of establishing an effective and a sustainable network of health technology assessment (HTA) in Europe. The Work Package 3 group was dedicated to this task and performed the work. Information on activities during the project was collected from three sources. First, three yearly cross-sectional studies surveyed the participants' opinions. Responses were by individuals or by institutions. The last round included surveys to the Steering Committee, the Stakeholder Forum, and the Secretariat. Second, the Work Package Lead Partners were interviewed bi-annually, five times in total, to update the information on the Project's progress. Third, additional information was sought in available documents. The organizational structure remained stable. The Project succeeded in developing tools aimed at providing common methodology with intent to establish a standard of conducting and reporting HTA and to facilitate greater collaboration among agencies. The participants/agencies expressed their belief in a network and in maintaining local/national autonomy. The Work Package Leaders expressed a strong belief in the solid base of the Project for a future network on which to build, but were aware of the need for funding and governmental support. Participants and Work Package Leaders have expressed support for a future network that will improve national and international collaboration in HTA based on the experience from the EUnetHTA project.

  5. The development of an Alzheimer's disease channel for the Michigan Interactive Health Kiosk Project.

    PubMed

    Connell, Cathleen M; Shaw, Benjamin A; Holmes, Sara B; Hudson, Margaret L; Derry, Holly A; Strecher, Victor J

    2003-01-01

    The overall objective of this article is to describe the development and implementation of an Alzheimer's disease (AD) module for the Michigan Interactive Health Kiosk Project. This project provides access to health information via 100 kiosks located in public places throughout the state (e.g., churches, senior centers, schools, shopping malls, grocery stores, hospitals) using interactive multimedia software. Because the kiosk screen was designed to resemble a television set, program modules are referred to as "channels." The AD channel is designed to increase knowledge and awareness of the disease among the general public. After an overview of the overall project, the steps involved in developing the AD channel and strategies designed to monitor its use are described, including touch-screen usage data and an on-line user survey. Finally, marketing and promotion of the channel and the implications of this initiative for disseminating information about AD are discussed.

  6. The TwF project: promoting bilingualism for public health in Wales.

    PubMed

    Woodcock, Elizabeth

    2011-10-01

    The Twf project was established in Wales in 2001 with the overall aim to increase the transfer of the Welsh language within the family. The project has two main strategies, which are to work with midwives and health visitors in order that they can inform parents of the advantages of raising children bilingually, and to raise awareness among parents-to-be, parents and the general public of the advantages of raising children bilingually. The project is funded by the Welsh government through the Welsh Language Board, and its community workers provide health visitors, midwives and other partners within their areas with Twf resources and information about relevant research, and visit antenatal and postnatal clinics on a regular basis to talk to parents. Where a particular need is identified, the Twf worker runs groups for new parents and parents-to-be to help them to speak Welsh to the baby through interesting activities, such as baby massage, singing and stories.

  7. Recruiting and retaining older adults for health promotion research: the experience of the SENIOR Project.

    PubMed

    Greaney, Mary L; Lees, Faith D; Nigg, Claudio R; Saunders, Sandra D; Clark, Phillip G

    2006-01-01

    This paper examines recruitment and retention efforts utilized by a community-based health promotion intervention with older adults (N = 1,277). Recruitment strategies were classified as either involving or not involving personal interaction with project staff. There was no difference by recruitment method in demographic characteristics, but a greater proportion of participants recruited using strategies without personal interaction were in the earlier stage of change (SOC) for fruit and vegetable consumption compared with those recruited using strategies involving personal contact. Conversely, a greater proportion recruited without interaction with project staff was in action/maintenance SOC for exercise. Attrition was greater among individuals in the earlier SOC for exercise and among those who perceived their health to be fair/poor. As most participants were recruited using strategies involving interaction with project staffs, it may be best to emphasize techniques involving personal contact when recruiting older adults to participate in research studies.

  8. Health Care Reform Tracking Project: Tracking State Health Care Reforms as They Affect Children and Adolescents with Emotional Disorders and Their Families.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pires, Sheila A.; Stroul, Beth A.

    The Health Care Reform Tracking Project is a 5-year national project to track and analyze state health care reform initiatives as they affect children and adolescents with emotional/behavioral disorders and their families. The study's first phase was a baseline survey of all 50 states to describe current state reforms as of 1995. Among findings of…

  9. Can a quality improvement project impact maternal and child health outcomes at scale in northern Ghana?

    PubMed

    Singh, Kavita; Brodish, Paul; Speizer, Ilene; Barker, Pierre; Amenga-Etego, Issac; Dasoberi, Ireneous; Kanyoke, Ernest; Boadu, Eric A; Yabang, Elma; Sodzi-Tettey, Sodzi

    2016-06-16

    Quality improvement (QI) interventions are becoming more common in low- and middle-income countries, yet few studies have presented impact evaluations of these approaches. In this paper, we present an impact evaluation of a scale-up phase of 'Project Fives Alive!', a QI intervention in Ghana that aims to improve maternal and child health outcomes. 'Project Fives Alive!' employed a QI methodology to recognize barriers to care-seeking and care provision at the facility level and then to identify, test and implement simple and low-cost local solutions that address the barriers. A quasi-experimental design, multivariable interrupted time series analysis, with data coming from 744 health facilities and controlling for potential confounding factors, was used to study the effect of the project. The key independent variables were the change categories (interventions implemented) and implementation phase - Wave 2a (early phase) versus Wave 2b (later phase). The outcomes studied were early antenatal care (ANC), skilled delivery, facility-level under-five mortality and attendance of underweight infants at child welfare clinics. We stratified the analysis by facility type, namely health posts, health centres and hospitals. Several of the specific change categories were significantly associated with improved outcomes. For example, three of five change categories (early ANC, four or more ANC visits and skilled delivery/immediate postnatal care (PNC)) for health posts and two of five change categories (health education and triage) for hospitals were associated with increased skilled delivery. These change categories were associated with increases in skilled delivery varying from 28% to 58%. PNC changes for health posts and health centres were associated with greater attendance of underweight infants at child welfare clinics. The triage change category was associated with increased early antenatal care in hospitals. Intensity, the number of change categories tested, was associated

  10. Addressing the Need for Mental Health Screening of Newly Resettled Refugees: A Pilot Project.

    PubMed

    Polcher, Kelly; Calloway, Susan

    2016-07-01

    Refugees resettling to the United States are at increased risk for mental health disorders, which can lead to difficulty with adaptation and poor health outcomes. Standardized mental health screening of refugees is often neglected at primary care and community health clinics. A pilot project aimed to initiate early mental health screening for newly resettled adult refugees was implemented at a community health center in Fargo, North Dakota. Current refugee screening processes were evaluated to determine appropriate timing for refugee mental health screening. This took into consideration time, staffing, interpreter availability and the refugee "honeymoon" phase following resettlement. The Refugee Health Screener-15 (RHS-15) was identified as an efficient, valid, and reliable tool for assessing emotional distress in this population and was integrated into refugee health screening practices. The RHS-15 was administered to 178 adult refugees with arrival dates between August 1, 2013 and July 31, 2014. Of those screened, 51 (28.6%) screened positive for risk of emotional distress. Follow-up with primary care provider was completed with 30 (59%) of those who screened positive. Half (15) requested mental health treatment. Although the largest group of refugees during this period of time were resettling from Bhutan, refugees from Iraq had greater incidence of positive screening compared with those from Bhutan. Refugees from Iraq were also found to have significantly higher scores on the RHS-15. Although there are some challenges to implementing a standardized mental health screening for refugees, this pilot reiterates the need for standardized mental health screening of refugees. Routine mental health screening should be a part of the overall comprehensive health assessment provided to refugees nationwide. Considerations should be taken in regards to how refugees from Iraq have even greater risk of mental health disorders compared to other refugee groups. © The Author

  11. Steadily improving health conditions. JICA Reproductive Health Project. Nghe An province.

    PubMed

    Tran Thi Thien

    1999-01-01

    The maternal and child health and family planning (MCH/FP) level in Nghe An Province, Vietnam, has been substantially improved by campaigns for better health. For example, the contraceptive prevalence rate has sharply increased from 44% in 1993 to 76% in 1999. Such an achievement is attributed to the leaders' strong commitment to MCH/FP. They consistently directed the Health Department to develop challenging programs and campaigns. In addition, their commitment is translated into the allocation of the big amount for the health program, including MCH/FP. However, Tran Thi Thien, vice-director of the Health Department of Nghe An Province, states that such a level of MCH/FP is not satisfactory. One of the major reasons is the existence of a big gap in health services among the 19 districts. The mountainous districts are poorer compared to the plains districts. To fill this gap, strategies for MCH/FP development have been adopted. These include 1) training of health staff; 2) providing support to related agencies; 3) renovating health facilities; 4) providing medical equipment and instruments; and 5) development of special information, education and communication services for mountainous districts. Development of this alternative program has been greatly assisted by international donors such as the UN Population Fund, the Japan International Cooperation Agency and the World Bank.

  12. Investing in mental health and well-being: findings from the DataPrev project

    PubMed Central

    Mcdaid, David; Park, A-La

    2011-01-01

    A systematic review was conducted to determine the extent to which an economic case has been made in high-income countries for investment in interventions to promote mental health and well-being. We focused on areas of interest to the DataPrev project: early years and parenting interventions, actions set in schools and workplaces and measures targeted at older people. Economic evaluations had to have some focus on promotion of mental health and well-being and/or primary prevention of poor mental health through health-related means. Studies preventing exacerbations in existing mental health problems were excluded, with the exception of support for parents with mental health problems, which might indirectly affect the mental health of their children. Overall 47 studies were identified. There was considerable variability in their quality, with a variety of outcome measures and different perspectives: societal, public purse, employer or health system used, making policy comparisons difficult. Caution must therefore be exercised in interpreting results, but the case for investment in parenting and health visitor-related programmes appears most strong, especially when impacts beyond the health sector are taken into account. In the workplace an economic return on investment in a number of comprehensive workplace health promotion programmes and stress management projects (largely in the USA) was reported, while group-based exercise and psychosocial interventions are of potential benefit to older people. Many gaps remain; a key first step would be to make more use of the existence evidence base on effectiveness and model mid- to long-term costs and benefits of action in different contexts and settings. PMID:22079932

  13. [Health telematics projects in the perspective of the German federal states].

    PubMed

    Schug, S H; Redders, M

    2005-06-01

    Starting in autumn 2005 with pilot projects, the new German electronic health card (EHC) and electronic health professional cards (HPC) will be implemented in the German health system. These cards are constituents of the full coverage networking of more than 120,000 doctor's practices, 22,000 pharmacies, 2,200 hospitals and 300 health insurance companies. The functions of the EHC, for example electronic prescriptions, the digital medication recording and the European emergency database, need both the interactions with the HPCs and with a complex network of IT systems and telecommunication services, i. e. with a comprehensive health telematics infrastructure. Model regions for the construction of a telematics infrastructure have been established in numerous federal states, e. g. Baden- Wurttemberg, Bavaria, Bremen, Lower Saxony, North Rhine-Westphalia, Rhineland-Palatinate, Saxony and Schleswig-Holstein, and also recently in Mecklenburg-Vorpommern and Brandenburg. These model regions are designed in a way that allows smooth integration of the specifications of the so-called solution architecture of the EHC and also of electronic HPCs as soon as these are available. The implementation of first pilot trials in the model regions, each with 10,000 insured, is planned for the second half of 2005. A project task force was founded by a group from the German federal states in December 2004. The objective of these implementations is to establish a fully networked health system providing patients various e-Health applications which can be used any place and any time.

  14. MedlinePlus and the challenge of low health literacy: findings from the Colonias project.

    PubMed

    Olney, Cynthia A; Warner, Debra G; Reyna, Greysi; Wood, Fred B; Siegel, Elliot R

    2007-01-01

    To explore the potential of a community-based health information outreach project to overcome problems associated with health literacy in low-income Hispanic communities along the Texas-Mexico border. Using a train-the-trainer approach, community outreach workers known as promotoras were trained by a health information outreach team to search English and Spanish versions of MedlinePlus. These 15 promotoras submitted written examples on a weekly basis of the topics they helped residents explore on MedlinePlus and the ways in which the residents used the information. These weekly reports, along with verbal interviews with promotoras and others in the communities, allowed development of a database of 161 incidents ("stories") demonstrating how community residents used MedlinePlus. These stories were thematically analyzed to explore how the program benefited participants. The database of stories included examples of community residents becoming better informed about their illnesses, resolving to visit doctors, making decisions about recommended treatments, reducing their anxiety about health conditions, committing to healthy or preventive behavior, and assisting family members. With the help of paraprofessionals like promotoras, community-based health information outreach projects may improve the ability of community residents to understand their health conditions and to participate actively in their health care.

  15. Health status assessment of workers during construction phase of highway rehabilitation projects around lahore, Pakistan

    PubMed Central

    Abrar, Amina; Cheema, Kausar Jamal; Saif, Samia; Mahmood, Asim

    2016-01-01

    Objective: The study focused on assessment of the health status of workers during construction phase of highway rehabilitation projects at six selected sites of N5 around Lahore, including Kala Shah Kaku, Muridke, Kamuki, Bhaipheru, Pattoki, and Okara. Methods: The study was based on multi-methods approach involving hazard identification through survey and checklist as well as a questionnaire for health status assessment and measurements of health parameters including peak expiratory flow rate (PEFR) and audiometric screening of 300 subjects. Results: The study revealed non-congenial working conditions at the sites. Noise, vibrations, dust, asphalt fumes, poor work postures, and injuries were found to be major health hazards. PEFR of most of the workers was found to be significantly lower than the reference value. Average PEFR±SEM values were 187±5.1 l/min, 178±4.3 l/min, and 266±5.3 l/min in ground preparation workers, asphalt workers, and heavy vehicle drivers, respectively. The highest rate (29%) of hearing loss was recorded among heavy vehicle drivers. Musculoskeletal problems were found to be more common among ground preparation workers. Conclusion: Data revealed unsatisfactory health status of most of the workers. Direct relationship between health outcomes and the type of construction activities were observed. The current study focuses on the importance of including occupational health and safety plan in the execution phase of every developmental project that involves construction activities. PMID:27853055

  16. MedlinePlus and the challenge of low health literacy: findings from the Colonias project*

    PubMed Central

    Olney, Cynthia A.; Warner, Debra G.; Reyna, Greysi; Wood, Fred B.; Siegel, Elliot R.

    2007-01-01

    Objective: To explore the potential of a community-based health information outreach project to overcome problems associated with health literacy in low-income Hispanic communities along the Texas-Mexico border. Methods: Using a train-the-trainer approach, community outreach workers known as promotoras were trained by a health information outreach team to search English and Spanish versions of MedlinePlus. These 15 promotoras submitted written examples on a weekly basis of the topics they helped residents explore on MedlinePlus and the ways in which the residents used the information. These weekly reports, along with verbal interviews with promotoras and others in the communities, allowed development of a database of 161 incidents (“stories”) demonstrating how community residents used MedlinePlus. These stories were thematically analyzed to explore how the program benefited participants. Results: The database of stories included examples of community residents becoming better informed about their illnesses, resolving to visit doctors, making decisions about recommended treatments, reducing their anxiety about health conditions, committing to healthy or preventive behavior, and assisting family members. Conclusion: With the help of paraprofessionals like promotoras, community-based health information outreach projects may improve the ability of community residents to understand their health conditions and to participate actively in their health care. PMID:17252064

  17. Integrating community outreach into a quality improvement project to promote maternal and child health in Ghana

    PubMed Central

    Barrington, Clare; Akaligaung, Akalpa; Reid, Amy; Fried, Bruce; Singh, Kavita; Sodzi-Tettey, Sodzi; Barker, Pierre M.

    2015-01-01

    Quality improvement (QI) is used to promote and strengthen maternal and child health services in middle and low-income countries. Very little research has examined community-level factors beyond the confines of health facilities that create demand for health services and influence health outcomes. We examined the role of community outreach in the context of Project Fives Alive!, a QI project aimed at improving maternal and under-5 outcomes in Ghana. Qualitative case studies of QI teams across 6 regions of Ghana were conducted. We analyzed the data using narrative and thematic techniques. QI team members used two distinct outreach approaches: community-level outreach, including health promotion and education efforts through group activities and mass media communication; and direct outreach, including one-on-one interpersonal activities between health workers and pregnant women and/or mothers of children under-5. Specific barriers to community outreach included structural, cultural, and QI team-level factors. QI efforts in both rural and urban settings should consider including context-specific community outreach activities to develop ties with communities and address barriers to health services. Sustaining community outreach as part of QI efforts will require improving infrastructure, strengthening QI teams, and ongoing collaboration with community members. PMID:25204848

  18. Integrating community outreach into a quality improvement project to promote maternal and child health in Ghana.

    PubMed

    Cofie, Leslie E; Barrington, Clare; Akaligaung, Akalpa; Reid, Amy; Fried, Bruce; Singh, Kavita; Sodzi-Tettey, Sodzi; Barker, Pierre M

    2014-01-01

    Quality improvement (QI) is used to promote and strengthen maternal and child health services in middle- and low-income countries. Very little research has examined community-level factors beyond the confines of health facilities that create demand for health services and influence health outcomes. We examined the role of community outreach in the context of Project Fives Alive!, a QI project aimed at improving maternal and under-5 outcomes in Ghana. Qualitative case studies of QI teams across six regions of Ghana were conducted. We analysed the data using narrative and thematic techniques. QI team members used two distinct outreach approaches: community-level outreach, including health promotion and education efforts through group activities and mass media communication; and direct outreach, including one-on-one interpersonal activities between health workers, pregnant women and mothers of children under-5. Specific barriers to community outreach included structural, cultural, and QI team-level factors. QI efforts in both rural and urban settings should consider including context-specific community outreach activities to develop ties with communities and address barriers to health services. Sustaining community outreach as part of QI efforts will require improving infrastructure, strengthening QI teams, and ongoing collaboration with community members.

  19. A practical guideline for identifying research intent with projects that collect private, identifiable health information.

    PubMed

    Amdur, Robert J; Speers, Marjorie A

    2003-06-01

    Radiation oncologists frequently engage in activities that involve the collection and analysis of data from medical records. Access to health information is an ethical issue because, if not done according to appropriate guidelines, it constitutes an invasion of privacy or breach in confidentiality. To protect patients for the social harm that may result from medical record review, our society has established laws and regulations that apply to projects that require medical record review. A major branch point in the guidelines for such projects is whether private information will be collected for research or nonresearch purposes. However, a problem with discussing privacy protection in terms of a research versus nonresearch model is that it is difficult to make this distinction for many kinds of projects. The purpose of this paper is to establish a practical guideline that can be used to decide if a project that involves analysis of private, identifiable medical information should be considered research from the regulatory standpoint.

  20. Environmental health literacy within the Italian Asbestos Project: experience in Italy and Latin American contexts. Commentary.

    PubMed

    Marsili, Daniela; Comba, Pietro; De Castro, Paola

    2015-01-01

    The adoption of multidisciplinary approaches to foster scientific research in public health and strengthen its impact on society is nowadays unavoidable. Environmental health literacy (EHL) may be defined as the ability to search for, understand, evaluate, and use environmental health information to promote the adoption of informed choices, the reduction of health risks, the improvement of quality of life and the protection of the environment. Both public health and environmental health literacy involve access to and dissemination of scientific information (including research findings), individual and collective decision-making and critical thinking. Specific experiences in environmental health literacy have been developed within the Italian National Asbestos Project (Progetto Amianto) in Latin American countries where the use of asbestos is still permitted, and in Italy where a specific effort in EHL has been dedicated to the risks caused by the presence of fluoro-edenite fibers in the town of Biancavilla (Sicily). Taking into account the different geographical and socio-economic contexts, both public health and environmental health literacy were addressed to a wide range of stakeholders, within and outside the health domain.

  1. National health expenditure projections, 2014-24: spending growth faster than recent trends.

    PubMed

    Keehan, Sean P; Cuckler, Gigi A; Sisko, Andrea M; Madison, Andrew J; Smith, Sheila D; Stone, Devin A; Poisal, John A; Wolfe, Christian J; Lizonitz, Joseph M

    2015-08-01

    Health spending growth in the United States is projected to average 5.8 percent for 2014-24, reflecting the Affordable Care Act's coverage expansions, faster economic growth, and population aging. Recent historically low growth rates in the use of medical goods and services, as well as medical prices, are expected to gradually increase. However, in part because of the impact of continued cost-sharing increases that are anticipated among health plans, the acceleration of these growth rates is expected to be modest. The health share of US gross domestic product is projected to rise from 17.4 percent in 2013 to 19.6 percent in 2024.

  2. Overview of the National Health Educator Competencies Update Project, 1998-2004.

    PubMed

    Gilmore, Gary David; Olsen, Larry K; Taub, Alyson; Connell, David

    2005-12-01

    The National Health Educator Competencies Update Project (CUP), conducted during 1998-2004, addressed what health educators currently do in practice, the degree to which the role definition of the entry-level health educator is still up-to-date, and the validation of advanced-level competencies. A 19-page questionnaire was sent to a representative sample of health educators in recognized practice settings in all states and the District of Columbia. A total of 4,030 health educators participated in the research (70.6% adjusted response rate) resulting in the largest national data set of its kind, with 1.6 million data points. The model derived from the research was hierarchical (7 areas of responsibility, 35 competencies, and 163 subcompetencies), with three levels of practice (Entry, Advanced 1, and Advanced 2) differentiated by degrees earned and years of experience. The findings affect professional preparation, credentialing, and professional development.

  3. Bringing Researchers and Community Developers Together to Revitalize a Public Housing Project and Improve Health

    PubMed Central

    LeWinn, Kaja Z.; Hutson, Malo A.; Dare, Ramie; Falk, Janet

    2014-01-01

    Billions of dollars are invested annually to improve low-income neighborhoods, the health impacts of which are rarely studied prospectively. University of California researchers and Mercy Housing/The Related Companies formed a “Learning Community” with the dual goals of examining the health impacts of a large-scale San Francisco redevelopment project and informing the development team of best public health practices. Early experiences highlight challenges and opportunities, including differences in stakeholders, incentives, and funding, the strengths of local partnerships, and fresh insights from new analytic tools and perspectives. Research suggests interventions that ameliorate upstream causes of poor health would save health care dollars, but policy makers must incentivize collaboration in order to spread a Learning Community model. PMID:22068398

  4. Binational Health Care for Migrants: The Health Data Exchange Pilot Project and the Binational Health Data Transfer System.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Velasco Mondragon, Hector Eduardo; And Others

    As the economic integration of Mexico and the United States intensifies, so does the cross-migration of labor forces. Subsequently, when migrant workers or their families become ill, health care is often disjointed and suboptimal. Binational health data exchange among providers of health care becomes essential. GUAPA (incorporating the first three…

  5. Project-based faculty development by international health professions educators: practical strategies.

    PubMed

    Mennin, Stewart; Kalishman, Summers; Eklund, Mary Ann; Friedman, Stacey; Morahan, Page S; Burdick, William

    2013-01-01

    Project design and implementation, applied to real life situations, is emerging as an educational strategy for application of health professions faculty development learning within a supportive environment. We conducted a retrospective analysis of project evolution to identify common experiences, challenges, and successful strategies of 54 mid-career faculty members from 18 developing countries who attended the Foundation for the Advancement of International Medical Education and Research Institute between 2001 and 2006 and designed, conducted, and evaluated education innovations at their home institutions. Chronological analysis of the evolution of 54 projects over the initial 16-18 months of the 2-year Fellowship was based on an iterative qualitative analysis of 324 reports and individual interview transcripts collected over 6 years. Useful skill areas for project implementation included educational methods, leadership and management, and relationships/collaboration. Common challenges included competing responsibilities, lack of protected time, and limited resources. Themes identified with the evolution and success of education innovation projects included leadership and organization, collaboration, personal professional growth, and awareness of the relevant societal context. Common challenges and success factors in project-based faculty development were identified. Twelve practical strategies to promote successful project-based faculty development emerged that can be generalized for faculty development.

  6. [Health projects managed by Nursing Coordinators: an analysis of contents and degree of success].

    PubMed

    Palese, Alvisa; Bresciani, Federica; Brutti, Caterina; Chiari, Ileana; Fontana, Luciana; Fronza, Ornella; Gasperi, Giuseppina; Gheno, Oscar; Guarese, Olga; Leali, Anna; Mansueti, Nadia; Masieri, Enrico; Messina, Laura; Munaretto, Gabriella; Paoli, Claudia; Perusi, Chiara; Randon, Giulia; Rossi, Gloria; Solazzo, Pasquale; Telli, Debora; Trenti, Giuliano; Veronese, Elisabetta; Saiani, Luisa

    2012-01-01

    To describe the evolution and results of health projects run in hospitals and managed by Nursing Coordinators. A convenience sample of 13 north Italian hospital, and a sample of 56 Nursing Coordinators with a permanent position from at least 1 year, was contacted. The following information was collected with a structured interview: projects run in 2009, topic, if bottom up or top down, number of staff involved and state (ended, still running, stopped). In 2009 Nursing Coordinators started 114 projects (mean 1.8±1.2 each): 94 (82.5%) were improvement projects, 17 (14.9%) accreditation, and 3 (2.6%) research. The projects involved 2.732 staff members (73.7%; average commitment 84 hours); 55 (48.2%) projects were still running, 52 (45.6%) completed, for 5 (4.4%) there was no assessment and 2 (1.8%) had been stopped. Nurses are regularly involved in several projects. A systematic monitoring of the results obtained and stabilization strategies are scarce. Due to the large number of resources invested, a correct management and the choice of areas relevant for patients' problems and needs are pivotal.

  7. Project WEALTH (Water, Energy, Agriculture, Lighting, Training and Health): Harnessing the wealth of nations

    SciTech Connect

    Kashkari, C.

    1996-12-31

    Project WEALTH, hereafter referred to as WEALTH, is a global plan for the economic development of an estimated one million villages in the world, where one billion people live. The plan will focus on the provision of: Water, Energy, Agriculture, Lighting, Training and Health (WEALTH), by harnessing the natural resources of the villages and utilizing the technologies available in the industrialized countries. In the first phase of the project, one model village (WEALTH Center) will be established in every developing country of the world. The Center will serve as the training and demonstration center and promote the project in the country. WEALTH will provide economic opportunities for the industrialized and the developing countries. The Small Business Sector will play a major role in the implementation of the project. The project will be developed and implemented, not by governments, but by private sector, in cooperation with national governments. When fully operational, the project has the potential of generating business to the tune of billions of dollars every year. The Inner-cities of the US can participate in the project resulting in their own rapid development. WEALTH will spur global economic growth and lay the foundation for prosperity and peace in the twenty-first century.

  8. Possible illnesses: assessing the health impacts of the Chad Pipeline Project.

    PubMed Central

    Leonard, Lori

    2003-01-01

    Health impact assessments associated with large-scale infrastructure projects, such as the Chad-Cameroon Petroleum Development and Pipeline Project, monitor pre-existing conditions and new diseases associated with particular industries or changes in social organization. This paper suggests that illness self-reports constitute a complementary set of benchmarks to measure the health impacts of these projects, and presents data gathered in ongoing household and health service surveys in Ngalaba, a village near a major oilfield in Chad. In an initial 16-week period of weekly data collection, 363 people reported few of the clinically chronic or asymptomatic conditions expected according to health transition theory, and the overall level of illness reporting was low. Illnesses often were described by symptoms or lay diagnoses. Health care practitioners were consulted rarely; when they were, resources for diagnosis and treatment were limited. Clinically acute, short-duration illnesses (e.g. parasitic infections, toothaches, or hernias) were experienced as chronic conditions and were reported week after week. The low levels of illness reporting and lack of clinically chronic conditions are not taken to mean that rural Chadians are healthy. Rather, the patterns of morbidity reflect a particular local ecology in which health services are organized and care dispensed in ways that limit the possibilities for illness in terms of types of illnesses that can be diagnosed and reported, forms illnesses take, and ways in which illnesses are experienced. Illness self-reports are useful adjuncts to "harder" biological measures in HIAs, particularly in the context of large-scale infrastructure projects with explicit development goals. Rather than providing data on the extent to which harm has been mitigated by corporate, state, and donor activities, self-reports show the possibilities of illness in local contexts. PMID:12894327

  9. Skills Conversion Project, Chapter 4, Health Care and Health Services Industry.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Society of Professional Engineers, Washington, DC.

    The Skills Conversion Project conducted by the National Society of Professional Engineers sought to study the transition mechanisms required to transfer available technical manpower from aerospace and defense industries into other areas of employment in private industry and public service. Fourteen study teams assessed the likelihood of future…

  10. Biological and Health Sciences: Report of the Project 2061 Phase I Biological and Health Sciences Panel.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clark, Mary

    This is one of five panel reports that have been prepared as part of the first phase of Project 2061, a long-term, multipurpose undertaking of the American Association for the Advancement of Science designed to help reform science, mathematics, and technology education in the United States. Major sections included are: (1) "Rationale";…

  11. Information and Communications Technologies Health Projects in Panama: A Systematic Review and their Relation with Public Policies.

    PubMed

    Sánchez, Gema Anabel Castillo; Berbey, Aranzazu; de la Torre-Díez, Isabel; López-Coronado, Miguel

    2017-07-01

    This paper presents a review about Information and Communications Technologies (ICTs) health projects in Panama. The main contribution is to provide a vision of the situation in Panama, allowing an understanding of the dynamics of health policies and how they have affected the implementation of ICT's Projects to improve the health of Panamanians. We analyze the projects found with ICT's in health of Panama, which allow us to see a perspective of projects information is obtained from 2000 to 2016, however it is important to highlight that there may be other projects that we do not know because we did not find enough information or evidence of the same. That is why this review has interviews with key personnel, who have guided us with the search for information. 56% of technology projects are concentrated in the capital city and only 16% in the province of Chiriquí. 64% of these projects are focused on the development of information systems, mainly focused on electronic patient registration. And 60% refers to projects related to primary health care. The MINSA and CSS both with a 20% participation in ICT project, in addition we can notice the dispersion of projects for hospitals, where each one is developing programs per their needs or priorities. The national information about ICT projects of Health, it has been notorious the state of dispersion and segmented of public health information. We consider that it is a natural consequence of Policy in Panamanian Health System. This situation limits the information retrieval and knowledge of ICT in Health of Panama. To stakeholders, this information is directed so that health policies are designed towards a more effective and integral management, administering the ICT's as tools for the well-being of most the Panamanian population, including indigenous group.

  12. Health and Wellness Photovoice Project: Engaging Consumers With Serious Mental Illness in Health Care Interventions

    PubMed Central

    Cabassa, Leopoldo J.; Parcesepe, Angela; Nicasio, Andel; Baxter, Ellen; Tsemberis, Sam; Lewis-Fernández, Roberto

    2013-01-01

    People with serious mental illnesses (SMI) are at increased risk for cardiovascular disease and premature mortality. We used photovoice in two supportive housing agencies to engage consumers with SMI to inform the implementation of health care interventions. Sixteen consumers participated in six weekly sessions in which they took photographs about their health and discussed the meanings of these photographs in individual interviews and group sessions. We identified several implementation themes related to consumers’ preferences. Peer-based approaches were preferred more than clinician-driven models. Participants expressed a desire to learn practical skills through hands-on activities to modify health behaviors. Consumers expressed a desire to increase their physical activity. Participants revealed in their photographs and narratives the important role that communities’ food environments play in shaping eating habits. In this article, we show how photovoice can generate valuable community knowledge to inform the translation of health care interventions in supportive housing agencies. PMID:23258117

  13. [Application of the technique of analytical structure of project for the sub-project of websites catalog of the Virtual Health Library-Nursing].

    PubMed

    dos, Santos Luís Augusto; Marin, Heimar de Fátima; Marques, Isaac Rosa; Cunha, Isabel Cristina Kowal Olm

    2007-01-01

    This work intents, in a didactic form, to explain the benefits of use of a technique of project management, named Work Breakdown Structure: a graphical tool to identify the main results to be developed in a project. The real examples are applied to a sub-project of the Virtual Library in Health in Nursing (BVS-Enfermagem) to development of the Sites Catalogs. The benefits of graphical visualization for a major agreement between professionals of different expertise are presented.

  14. OA53 "dementia friendly pharmacies" a community based health promotion project.

    PubMed

    Heimerl, Katharina; Plunger, Petra; Tatzer, Verena; Reitinger, Elisabeth

    2015-04-01

    Inspired by the Ottawa Charter for Health Promotion, which is a major point of reference also for the "Compassionate Communities", we would like to propose that communities consolidate various settings like schools, workplaces, and health care organisations like community pharmacies, all of which might be included in a compassionate communities approach. We aim at enabling community pharmacies to offer informal consulting and support for people with dementia and their informal caregivers. Furthermore we want to support pharmacies to reach out in the community through various activities. By this means the project seeks to contribute to de-stigmatising dementia. The project is based on the approach "Participatory Health Research" (Hockley, Froggatt, Heimerl 2013; Wright et al . 2010). The core elements of the approach are participation, action and reflection. Approximately 40 staff (almost exclusively women) in 18 community pharmacies actively participates in the project, i.e. needs assessment, interactive workshops, practice projects and evaluation. People with dementia and their informal care givers are included in the needs assessment and in different steps of the programme. Community pharmacy staff raised several issues, closely related to communication, counselling and providing advice in a community pharmacy setting: They believe further development of professional practice to be important, since dementia care will become a more prominent issue for the community pharmacy. Moreover, a high frequency of contact with people living with dementia and their caregivers was reported by the majority of staff. Professional competencies related to dementia care are a key issue, and community pharmacy personnel viewed their practice with a critical eye: Communicating with disoriented persons poses some challenges, as does communicating with caregivers. In the still ongoing project the raised issues are being dealt with in practice projects that are performed by the

  15. Design, Implementation, and Lessons Learned from a Digital Storytelling Project in an Undergraduate Health Promotion Theory Course

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rimando, Marylen; Smalley, K. Bryant; Warren, Jacob C.

    2015-01-01

    This article describes the design, implementation and lessons learned from a digital storytelling project in a health promotion theory course. From 2011-2012, 195 health promotion majors completed a digital storytelling project at a Midwestern university. The instructor observed students' understanding of theories and models. This article adds to…

  16. Avoiding Failure for Australia's Digital Health Record: The Findings from a Rural E-Health Participatory Research Project.

    PubMed

    Almond, H; Cummings, E; Turner, P

    2016-01-01

    Low adoption and use of Australia's digital health record has driven the Australian Government to trial 'opt-out' registration from mid-June 2016. The assumption that automatic registration will increase use and thereby deliver benefit requires further investigation especially amongst those sections of the population in rural, regional, remote Australia living with complex chronic conditions. This paper reports on findings from a community based participatory e-health research project based on an initiative where people with complex chronic conditions and their carers attended a rural health promotion and lifestyle modification program. Through co-operative enquiry, health promotion officers and their clients were actively supported to adopt and use Australia's digital health record as an intervention. Simultaneously they were encouraged to reflect on its design and their perceptions of its overall impact on their individual ability to self-manage complex chronic conditions. The findings, ultimately contributing to a conceptual implementation and evaluation framework for Australia's digital health record that could directly avoid failure of the new 'opt-out' approach being adopted.

  17. Physical health assessment and medicines reconciliation on admission to an acute mental health unit: a quality improvement project.

    PubMed

    Vivekanantham, Arani; Sheikh, Abdur-Raoof; Omer, Hisham; Bescoby-Chambers, Nicholas

    2017-09-01

    Individuals with mental health disorders are at greater risk of physical health problems. Medicines reconciliation reduces medication errors on admission. The aim of this project was to improve compliance with the completion of physical health assessments and medicines reconciliation forms by using a set standard stating that all patients must have the above completed at the point of admission to an acute mental health unit. The notes for all inpatients were reviewed for evidence of completed physical assessments and medicines reconciliation forms. This was done at three different time points: baseline, 2 months after the introduction of recommendations (1st intervention) and 2 months later when an online system of record keeping was trialled (2nd intervention). At baseline (n=33), 16 (49%) had a physical examination, 15 (46%) had an ECG, 17 (52%) had baseline bloods and 4 (12%) had a completed medicine reconciliation form. After the 2nd intervention (n=31), 25 (81%) had a physical examination, 25 (81%) had an ECG, 23 (74%) had baseline bloods and 23 (74%) had a completed medicine reconciliation form. Physical health assessments and medicines reconciliation are important aspects of patient care. The interventions introduced have improved the quality of practice at an acute mental health unit.

  18. Tailoring disaster mental health services to diverse needs: an analysis of 36 crisis counseling projects.

    PubMed

    Rosen, Craig S; Greene, Carolyn J; Young, Helena E; Norris, Fran H

    2010-08-01

    The federal Crisis Counseling Program (CCP) funds states' delivery of mental health services after disasters. These services are provided by social workers, other mental health professionals, and paraprofessionals from the local community. The present study examined whether CCP grant recipients that reported more tailoring of their interventions to the needs of diverse community segments achieved greater community penetration. The study reviewed archival records from 36 crisis counseling projects ending between 1996 and 2001. Numbers of clients and client ethnicity were determined through service logs. Tailoring ofservices was determined by content coding of projects' reports. Community demographics were determined from census data. Fifty-six percent of the projects reported using three or more tailoring strategies, suggesting a "precompetence" or greater stage of cultural competence. The proportion of members of racial or ethnic minority groups among program clients closely matched the proportion in grantees' communities. Projects that reported more types of tailored activities reached more clients and served more members ofminority groups. These findings confirm that adapting crisis counseling services to diverse local needs is associated with greater community penetration of mental health services.

  19. [Methods for health impact assessment of policies for municipal solid waste management: the SESPIR Project].

    PubMed

    Parmagnani, Federica; Ranzi, Andrea; Ancona, Carla; Angelini, Paola; Chiusolo, Monica; Cadum, Ennio; Lauriola, Paolo; Forastiere, Francesco

    2014-01-01

    The Project Epidemiological Surveillance of Health Status of Resident Population Around the Waste Treatment Plants (SESPIR) included five Italian regions (Emilia-Romagna, Piedmont, Lazio, Campania, and Sicily) and the National Institute of Health in the period 2010-2013. SESPIR was funded by the Ministry of Health as part of the National centre for diseases prevention and control (CCM) programme of 2010 with the general objective to provide methods and operational tools for the implementation of surveillance systems for waste and health, aimed at assessing the impact of the municipal solid waste (MSW) treatment cycle on the health of the population. The specific objective was to assess health impacts resulting from the presence of disposal facilities related to different regional scenarios of waste management. Suitable tools for analysis of integrated assessment of environmental and health impact were developed and applied, using current demographic, environmental and health data. In this article, the methodology used for the quantitative estimation of the impact on the health of populations living nearby incinerators, landfills and mechanical biological treatment plants is showed, as well as the analysis of three different temporal scenarios: the first related to the existing plants in the period 2008-2009 (baseline), the second based on regional plans, the latter referring to MSW virtuous policy management based on reduction of produced waste and an intense recovery policy.

  20. Health and equity impacts of a large oil project in Africa.

    PubMed

    Jobin, William

    2003-01-01

    A system of external reviewers was established by the World Bank Group to promote a thorough environmental and health impact assessment for the 3.5 billion US dollars Chad Oil Export Project, based on a loan request from Chad, Cameroon and a consortium of oil companies. The environmental and health assessment process showed evidence of its ability to minimize the number of deaths from malaria, traffic accidents and construction accidents and the occurrence of minor sexually transmitted diseases, diarrhoeal diseases and respiratory diseases; it also probably limited adverse impacts on wildlife and tropical ecology along the pipeline route. However, the system was unable to deal with the larger issues, which included: the intrinsic unsustainability of this kind of extraction project; its eventual contribution to large amounts of greenhouse gases in the atmosphere; the lack of equity in sharing the risks, negative impacts, benefits and decision-making among the various participants in the project; and the possible acceleration of transmission of the AIDS virus into central Africa. Unfortunately, the international panel of experts appointed by the World Bank Group was largely ignored by the project proponents, and had little success in minimizing the most serious impacts or in improving the social equity of the project.

  1. Oral health promotion and education messages in Live.Learn.Laugh. projects.

    PubMed

    Horn, Virginie; Phantumvanit, Prathip

    2014-10-01

    The FDI-Unilever Live.Learn.Laugh. phase 2 partnership involved dissemination of the key oral health message of encouraging 'twice-daily toothbrushing with fluoride toothpaste' and education of people worldwide by FDI, National Dental Associations, the Unilever Oral Care global team and local brands. The dissemination and education process used different methodologies, each targeting specific groups, namely: mother and child (Project option A); schoolchildren (Project option B); dentists and patients (Project option C); and specific communities (Project option D). Altogether, the partnership implemented 29 projects in 27 countries. These consisted of educational interventions, evaluations including (in some cases) clinical assessment, together with communication activities at both global and local levels, to increase the reach of the message to a broader population worldwide. The phase 2 experience reveals the strength of such a public-private partnership approach in tackling global oral health issues by creating synergies between partners and optimising the promotion and education process. © 2014 FDI World Dental Federation.

  2. Health and equity impacts of a large oil project in Africa.

    PubMed Central

    Jobin, William

    2003-01-01

    A system of external reviewers was established by the World Bank Group to promote a thorough environmental and health impact assessment for the 3.5 billion US dollars Chad Oil Export Project, based on a loan request from Chad, Cameroon and a consortium of oil companies. The environmental and health assessment process showed evidence of its ability to minimize the number of deaths from malaria, traffic accidents and construction accidents and the occurrence of minor sexually transmitted diseases, diarrhoeal diseases and respiratory diseases; it also probably limited adverse impacts on wildlife and tropical ecology along the pipeline route. However, the system was unable to deal with the larger issues, which included: the intrinsic unsustainability of this kind of extraction project; its eventual contribution to large amounts of greenhouse gases in the atmosphere; the lack of equity in sharing the risks, negative impacts, benefits and decision-making among the various participants in the project; and the possible acceleration of transmission of the AIDS virus into central Africa. Unfortunately, the international panel of experts appointed by the World Bank Group was largely ignored by the project proponents, and had little success in minimizing the most serious impacts or in improving the social equity of the project. PMID:12894326

  3. A rural virtual health sciences library project: research findings with implications for next generation library services.

    PubMed

    Richwine, M P; McGowan, J J

    2001-01-01

    The Shared Hospital Electronic Library of Southern Indiana (SHELSI) research project was designed to determine whether access to a virtual health sciences library and training in its use would support medical decision making in rural southern Indiana and achieve the same level of impact seen by targeted information services provided by health sciences librarians in urban hospitals. Based on the results of a needs assessment, a virtual medical library was created; various levels of training were provided. Virtual library users were asked to complete a Likert-type survey, which included questions on intent of use and impact of use. At the conclusion of the project period, structured interviews were conducted. Impact of the virtual health sciences library showed a strong correlation with the impact of information provided by health sciences librarians. Both interventions resulted in avoidance of adverse health events. Data collected from the structured interviews confirmed the perceived value of the virtual library. While librarians continue to hold a strong position in supporting information access for health care providers, their roles in the information age must begin to move away from providing information toward selecting and organizing knowledge resources and instruction in their use.

  4. A rural virtual health sciences library project: research findings with implications for next generation library services*

    PubMed Central

    Richwine, Margaret (Peggy); McGowan, Julie J.

    2001-01-01

    Purpose: The Shared Hospital Electronic Library of Southern Indiana (SHELSI) research project was designed to determine whether access to a virtual health sciences library and training in its use would support medical decision making in rural southern Indiana and achieve the same level of impact seen by targeted information services provided by health sciences librarians in urban hospitals. Methods: Based on the results of a needs assessment, a virtual medical library was created; various levels of training were provided. Virtual library users were asked to complete a Likert-type survey, which included questions on intent of use and impact of use. At the conclusion of the project period, structured interviews were conducted. Results: Impact of the virtual health sciences library showed a strong correlation with the impact of information provided by health sciences librarians. Both interventions resulted in avoidance of adverse health events. Data collected from the structured interviews confirmed the perceived value of the virtual library. Conclusion: While librarians continue to hold a strong position in supporting information access for health care providers, their roles in the information age must begin to move away from providing information toward selecting and organizing knowledge resources and instruction in their use. PMID:11209799

  5. [Occupational health of immigrant workers in Spain [ITSAL Project]: key informants survey].

    PubMed

    García, Ana M; López-Jacob, María José; Agudelo-Suárez, Andrés Alonso; Ruiz-Frutos, Carlos; Ahonen, Emily Q; Porthé, Victoria

    2009-01-01

    To describe the characteristics, working conditions, and occupational health situation of immigrant workers in Spain through key informants. We performed a qualitative, exploratory and descriptive study using indepth interviews carried out in 2006. Organizations and associations working with immigrant collectives in Alicante, Barcelona, Huelva, Madrid and Valencia were identified and the most representative and accessible entities in each location were selected. Fortythree interviews were performed with key informants from 34 different organisms. A narrative content analysis was performed. Informants described difficulties in having health problems recognized as workrelated, due to irregular and precarious employment, employers' and insurance companies' reluctance, and immigrants' lack of knowledge. Informants coincided in reporting that the occupational risks for immigrant workers did not differ from those affecting Spanish workers in the same occupations and circumstances. However, exposure to occupational risks was exacerbated in immigrants because of their greater presence in unqualified jobs and their economic need to prolong working hours. Immigrants had little knowledge of their occupational health and safetyrelated rights, although some informants detected an increase in empowerment in this area, mostly through greater participation in trade unions. This first step allowed us to identify some of the general factors influencing the health and safety of immigrant workers in Spain. This information will be used in a longterm, ongoing research project [Project Immigration, Work and Health (Proyecto Inmigración, Trabajo y Salud [ITSAL]), which aims to evaluate occupational health problems in inmigrants working in Spain through both qualitative and quantitative methods.

  6. Canada's International Development Research Centre's eco-health projects with Latin Americans: origins, development and challenges.

    PubMed

    Cole, Donald C; Crissman, Charles C; Orozco, A Fadya

    2006-01-01

    Since its founding in 1970, Canada's International Development Research Centre (IDRC) has supported research by concerned Latin American researchers on environments and human health relationships. Framing of such relationships has changed through different periods. Participant observation, bibliographic searches, document review, and interviews with key IDRC staff. From the early years of multiple different projects, IDRC developed more focussed interest in tropical diseases, pesticides, agriculture and human health in the 1980s. The United Nations Conference on Sustainable Development in the early 1990s gave impetus to examination of links between ecosystems and human health or "EcoHealth". Projects in Latin America built on earlier work but extended it in methods (transdisciplinarity, community participation, gendered approach) and scope (broader land use and development paradigm issues tackled). A key IDRC-funded activity in Latin America was "EcoSalud", an Ecuadorian effort, which has worked with farming communities, agricultural researchers, health practitioners and local politicians to advance integrated pest management, better recognize and treat poisonings and improve pesticide-related policies. ONGOING CHALLENGES INCLUDE: mobilizing sufficient resources for the primary prevention focus of EcoHealth activities when primary care infrastructure remains stretched, promoting micro-level change in diverse communities and ecosystems, and addressing power structures at the global level that profoundly affect environmental change.

  7. Improving midwives' knowledge and skills. JICA Reproductive Health Project. MCH / FP Center.

    PubMed

    Do Thi Mui

    1999-01-01

    The Maternal and Child Health and Family Planning (MCH/FP) Center in Nghe An Province, Vietnam, has contributed to the promotion of family planning throughout the province. The institute's effective work has led to an increase in the contraceptive prevalence rate from 57.8% in 1995 to 76.3% in 1999. In addition, the law has designated the MCH/FP Center to 1) manage the MCH/FP program in Nghe An Province; 2) provide quality contraceptives required in Nghe An Province; 3) provide MCH/FP services in Vinh City; 4) instruct and supervise MCH/FP services rendered by District Health Centers and Commune Health Centers; 5) conduct training for health personnel; 6) conduct research, evaluation and monitoring; and 7) implement national programs. In June 1997, the MCH/FP Center executed a technical cooperation project on reproductive health funded by the Japan International Cooperation Agency. One of its major objectives has been the capacity building of the MCH/FP Center for training and service as a focal point of reproductive health promotion in Nghe An Province. Overall, the training programs provided by the project have been producing good results. Primary and secondary midwives and assistant doctors who participated in the JICA-training course are very pleased to be given the chance to review their knowledge and skills and to learn new techniques, and manage high-risk cases.

  8. Consumer Health Information for Asians (CHIA): a collaborative project*†

    PubMed Central

    Halsted, Deborah D.; Varman, Beatriz; Sullivan, Marsha; Nguyen, Lynne

    2002-01-01

    According to the 2000 United States Census, the Asian population in Houston, Texas, has increased more than 67% in the last ten years. To supplement an already active consumer health information program, the staff of the Houston Academy of Medicine-Texas Medical Center Library worked with community partners to bring health information to predominantly Asian neighborhoods. Brochures on health topics of concern to the Asian community were translated and placed in eight informational kiosks in Asian centers such as temples and an Asian grocery store. A press conference and a ribbon cutting ceremony were held to debut the kiosks and to introduce the Consumer Health Information for Asians (CHIA) program. Project goals for the future include digitizing the translated brochures, mounting them on the Houston HealthWays Website, and developing touch-screen kiosks. The CHIA group is investigating adding health resources in other Asian languages, as well as Spanish. Funding for this project has come from outside sources rather than from the regular library budget. PMID:12398246

  9. Evaluating the Motivations, Knowledge, and Efficacy of Participants in Environmental Health Citizen Science Projects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sandhaus, Shana

    Environmental research is increasingly using citizen scientists in many aspects of projects, such as data collection and question design. To date, only a limited number of co-created citizen science projects where community members are involved in most or all steps of the scientific process have been completed, and few comparing community engagement methods and efficacy and learning outcomes across demo- and geographic data. This study compares two citizen science programs, evaluating what motivates citizen scientists to participate in environmental health research and whether participation affects scientific knowledge and environmental behavior and efficacy. Participants in the Gardenroots: A Citizen Science Garden Project completed sample collection training and submitted soil, water, vegetable, and dust samples for analysis and received their environmental monitoring results. In the Facilitating Community Action to Address Climate Change and Build Resiliency in Southern Metropolitan Tucson project, Spanish speaking community members of South Tucson underwent training in climate change and environmental quality and sample collection, and worked with families in the South Tucson community, collecting soil and water samples and providing environmental health education. For both projects, participants completed a pre- and post-survey with a variety of qualitative and quantitative questions. These survey instruments were used to evaluate differences in environmental self-efficacy and motivations. In addition, select Gardenroots participants were involved in focus groups and semi-structured interviews to understand and gauge changes in knowledge and to further explore changes in motivation and self-efficacy. The participants were primarily internally motivated and saw increases in both efficacy and knowledge as a result of participation in the program. This information is critical to moving citizen science efforts forward and determining whether such projects: 1) co

  10. The Norwegian national project for ethics support in community health and care services.

    PubMed

    Magelssen, Morten; Gjerberg, Elisabeth; Pedersen, Reidar; Førde, Reidun; Lillemoen, Lillian

    2016-11-08

    Internationally, clinical ethics support has yet to be implemented systematically in community health and care services. A large-scale Norwegian project (2007-2015) attempted to increase ethical competence in community services through facilitating the implementation of ethics support activities in 241 Norwegian municipalities. The article describes the ethics project and the ethics activities that ensued. The article first gives an account of the Norwegian ethics project. Then the results of two online questionnaires are reported, characterizing the scope, activities and organization of the ethics activities in the Norwegian municipalities and the ethical topics addressed. One hundred and thirty-seven municipal contact persons answered the first survey (55 % response rate), whereas 217 ethics facilitators from 48 municipalities responded to the second (33 % response rate). The Norwegian ethics project is vast in scope, yet has focused on some institutions and professions (e.g., nursing homes, home-based care; nurses, nurses' aides, unskilled workers) whilst seldom reaching others (e.g., child and adolescent health care; physicians). Patients and next of kin were very seldom involved. Through the ethics project employees discussed many important ethical challenges, in particular related to patient autonomy, competence to consent, and cooperation with next of kin. The "ethics reflection group" was the most common venue for ethics deliberation. The Norwegian project is the first of its kind and scope, and other countries may learn from the Norwegian experiences. Professionals have discussed central ethical dilemmas, the handling of which arguably makes a difference for patients/users and service quality. The study indicates that large (national) scale implementation of CES structures for the municipal health and care services is complex, yet feasible.

  11. Championing mental health at work: emerging practice from innovative projects in the UK.

    PubMed

    Robinson, Mark; Tilford, Sylvia; Branney, Peter; Kinsella, Karina

    2014-09-01

    This paper examines the value of participatory approaches within interventions aimed at promoting mental health and wellbeing in the workplace. Specifically the paper explores data from the thematic evaluation of the Mental Health and Employment project strand within the Altogether Better programme being implemented in England in the Yorkshire and Humber region, which was funded through the BIG Lottery and aimed to empower people across the region to lead better lives. The evaluation combined a systematic evidence review with semi-structured interviews across mental health and employment projects. Drawing on both evaluation elements, the paper examines the potential of workplace-based 'business champions' to facilitate organizational culture change within enterprises within a deprived regional socio-economic environment. First, the paper identifies key policy drivers for interventions around mental health and employment, summarizes evidence review findings and describes the range of activities within three projects. The role of the 'business champion' emerged as crucial to these interventions and therefore, secondly, the paper examines how champions' potential to make a difference depends on the work settings and their existing roles, skills and motivation. In particular, champions can proactively coordinate project strands, embed the project, encourage participation, raise awareness, encourage changes to work procedures and strengthen networks and partnerships. The paper explores how these processes can facilitate changes in organizational culture. Challenges of implementation are identified, including achieving leverage with senior management, handover of ownership to fellow employees, assessing impact and sustainability. Finally, implications for policy and practice are discussed, and conclusions drawn concerning the roles of champions within different workplace environments. © The Author (2013). Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For

  12. [The Ineq-Cities research project on urban health inequalities: knowledge dissemination and transfer in Spain].

    PubMed

    Camprubí, Lluís; Díez, Èlia; Morrison, Joana; Borrell, Carme

    2014-01-01

    The Ineq-Cities project analyzed inequalities in mortality in small areas and described interventions to reduce inequalities in health in 16 European cities. This field note describes the dissemination of the project in Spain. In accordance with the recommendations of the project, the objective was to translate relevant results to key stakeholders - mainly technical staff, municipal officers and local social agents - and to provide an introduction to urban inequalities in health and strategies to address them. Twenty-four workshops were given, attended by more than 350 professionals from 92 municipalities. Knowledge dissemination consisted of the publication of a short book on inequalities in health and the approach to this problem in cities and three articles in nonspecialized media, a proposal for a municipal motion, and knowledge dissemination activities in social networks. Users rated these activities highly and stressed the need to systematize these products. This process may have contributed to the inclusion of health inequalities in the political agenda and to the training of officers to correct them. Copyright © 2013 SESPAS. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  13. Improving Health of At-Risk Rural Patients project: A collaborative care model.

    PubMed

    Matzke, Gary R; Czar, Michael J; Lee, William T; Moczygemba, Leticia R; Harlow, L David

    2016-11-01

    The design elements of the Improving Health of At-Risk Rural Patients (IHARP) care model are described. The IHARP project evaluated the clinical, economic, and humanistic outcomes associated with the collaborative care model relative to usual care in the community. The care model was initiated in 22 level 3- certified patient-centered medical homes. The primary outcomes are the absolute change in all relevant clinical and laboratory values of patients with hypertension, hyperlipidemia, and diabetes within and between the intervention and comparator groups; the change in the absolute number of emergency department visits and hospitalizations; and the change in the cost of care among the Medicare and Medicaid intervention patients. The lessons learned during the implementation and conduction of this project over the past three years are also presented. Patient enrollment ended in December 2014, final patient care visits were concluded in the fall of 2015, and results are expected in late 2016 or early 2017. This project will provide information from patients, physicians, and midlevel providers regarding their perceptions of clinical pharmacists as collaborative care team members. Data on health outcomes, health services utilization, and costs of care drawn from over 1600 Medicare beneficiaries will provide a robust assessment of the value of the IHARP care delivery model. Copyright © 2016 by the American Society of Health-System Pharmacists, Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Introduction of the World Health Organization project of the International Classification of Traditional Medicine.

    PubMed

    Gao, Peng-fei; Watanabe, Kenji

    2011-11-01

    The World Health Organization plans to incorporate "traditional medicine" into the next revision of its International Classification of Diseases-Version 11 (ICD-11). If traditional medicine is included in ICD-11, it is definitely an epoch-making issue. The expected result is the International Classification of Traditional Medicine, China, Japan and Korea Version (ICTM-CJK). The intention of the ICTM project is not only beneficial for traditional medical components, but also might be beneficial for Western biomedicine. For this shared purpose, China, Japan and Korea must understand the meaning of this project and collaborate to develop it.

  15. Harvard Community Health Plan's Mental Health Redesign Project: a managerial and clinical partnership.

    PubMed

    Abrams, H S

    1993-01-01

    Harvard Community Health Plan, founded in 1969 as a staff model HMO, is currently a staff and group model HMO with 521,000 members, 19 health centers and 12 independently owned group practices with 26 locations. In 1987, the Plan initiated a review of its mental health benefit and program because its costs were rising, member and clinician dissatisfaction was increasing and many believed the problem was the nature and scope of the benefit. After two years of study, surveys, interviews, cost and utilization analysis, the Plan identified its professional staff as its key asset but recognized many problem areas, including problems with access, variation from site to site, inconsistent service delivery, lack of consistent utilization management and the need for greater diversity along the spectrum of care available to members. From 1989 to 1990, more than 200 clinicians and support staff were engaged in the process of developing a variety of components to the "mental health redesign program." Three simultaneous efforts included developing a method of categorizing patients, restructuring the delivery system and redesigning the benefit. A Mental Health Patient Assessment Tool was created which assists clinicians in performing comprehensive evaluations, administers the benefit, measures progress and supports outcomes research. Delivery system changes included the implementation of self-referral, access standards, intake triage functions by non-clinical staff, program development and an outpatient utilization management function.

  16. The State of Open Source Electronic Health Record Projects: A Software Anthropology Study

    PubMed Central

    2017-01-01

    Background Electronic health records (EHR) are a key tool in managing and storing patients’ information. Currently, there are over 50 open source EHR systems available. Functionality and usability are important factors for determining the success of any system. These factors are often a direct reflection of the domain knowledge and developers’ motivations. However, few published studies have focused on the characteristics of free and open source software (F/OSS) EHR systems and none to date have discussed the motivation, knowledge background, and demographic characteristics of the developers involved in open source EHR projects. Objective This study analyzed the characteristics of prevailing F/OSS EHR systems and aimed to provide an understanding of the motivation, knowledge background, and characteristics of the developers. Methods This study identified F/OSS EHR projects on SourceForge and other websites from May to July 2014. Projects were classified and characterized by license type, downloads, programming languages, spoken languages, project age, development status, supporting materials, top downloads by country, and whether they were “certified” EHRs. Health care F/OSS developers were also surveyed using an online survey. Results At the time of the assessment, we uncovered 54 open source EHR projects, but only four of them had been successfully certified under the Office of the National Coordinator for Health Information Technology (ONC Health IT) Certification Program. In the majority of cases, the open source EHR software was downloaded by users in the United States (64.07%, 148,666/232,034), underscoring that there is a significant interest in EHR open source applications in the United States. A survey of EHR open source developers was conducted and a total of 103 developers responded to the online questionnaire. The majority of EHR F/OSS developers (65.3%, 66/101) are participating in F/OSS projects as part of a paid activity and only 25.7% (26

  17. The State of Open Source Electronic Health Record Projects: A Software Anthropology Study.

    PubMed

    Alsaffar, Mona; Yellowlees, Peter; Odor, Alberto; Hogarth, Michael

    2017-02-24

    Electronic health records (EHR) are a key tool in managing and storing patients' information. Currently, there are over 50 open source EHR systems available. Functionality and usability are important factors for determining the success of any system. These factors are often a direct reflection of the domain knowledge and developers' motivations. However, few published studies have focused on the characteristics of free and open source software (F/OSS) EHR systems and none to date have discussed the motivation, knowledge background, and demographic characteristics of the developers involved in open source EHR projects. This study analyzed the characteristics of prevailing F/OSS EHR systems and aimed to provide an understanding of the motivation, knowledge background, and characteristics of the developers. This study identified F/OSS EHR projects on SourceForge and other websites from May to July 2014. Projects were classified and characterized by license type, downloads, programming languages, spoken languages, project age, development status, supporting materials, top downloads by country, and whether they were "certified" EHRs. Health care F/OSS developers were also surveyed using an online survey. At the time of the assessment, we uncovered 54 open source EHR projects, but only four of them had been successfully certified under the Office of the National Coordinator for Health Information Technology (ONC Health IT) Certification Program. In the majority of cases, the open source EHR software was downloaded by users in the United States (64.07%, 148,666/232,034), underscoring that there is a significant interest in EHR open source applications in the United States. A survey of EHR open source developers was conducted and a total of 103 developers responded to the online questionnaire. The majority of EHR F/OSS developers (65.3%, 66/101) are participating in F/OSS projects as part of a paid activity and only 25.7% (26/101) of EHR F/OSS developers are, or have been

  18. Sharing MedlinePlus®/MEDLINE for Information Literacy Education (SMILE): A Dental Public Health Information Project

    PubMed Central

    Gaines, Julie K.; Levy, Linda S.; Cogdill, Keith W.

    2012-01-01

    The SMILE project represented a partnership among the University of Texas Health Science Center at San Antonio Libraries, the Gateway Clinic in Laredo, and the San Antonio Metropolitan Health District. The project focused on improving dental practitioners' access to reliable information resources and integrating the best evidence into public health dental practice. Through its training program, SMILE cultivated a set of “power information users” among the dentists, dental hygienists, and community health workers (promotores) who provide public health preventive care and oral health education. The dental public health practitioners gained information literacy skills and increased their knowledge about reliable sites such as blogs, PubMed®, and MedlinePlus®. This project fostered opportunities for expanded partnerships with public health personnel. PMID:22040242

  19. Sharing MedlinePlus®/MEDLINE® for information literacy education (SMILE): a dental public health information project.

    PubMed

    Gaines, Julie K; Levy, Linda S; Cogdill, Keith W

    2011-01-01

    The SMILE project represented a partnership among the University of Texas Health Science Center at San Antonio Libraries, the Gateway Clinic in Laredo, and the San Antonio Metropolitan Health District. The project focused on improving dental practitioners' access to reliable information resources and integrating the best evidence into public health dental practice. Through its training program, SMILE cultivated a set of "power information users" among the dentists, dental hygienists, and community health workers (promotores) who provided public health preventive care and oral health education. The dental public health practitioners gained information literacy skills and increased their knowledge about reliable sites such as blogs, PubMed®, and MedlinePlus®. This project fostered opportunities for expanded partnerships with public health personnel.

  20. Research priorities for public mental health in Europe: recommendations of the ROAMER project.

    PubMed

    Forsman, Anna K; Wahlbeck, Kristian; Aarø, Leif Edvard; Alonso, Jordi; Barry, Margaret M; Brunn, Matthias; Cardoso, Graça; Cattan, Mima; de Girolamo, Giovanni; Eberhard-Gran, Malin; Evans-Lacko, Sara; Fiorillo, Andrea; Hansson, Lars; Haro, Josep Maria; Hazo, Jean-Baptiste; Hegerl, Ulrich; Katschnig, Heinz; Knappe, Susanne; Luciano, Mario; Miret, Marta; Nordentoft, Merete; Obradors-Tarragó, Carla; Pilgrim, David; Ruud, Torleif; Salize, Hans Joachim; Stewart-Brown, Sarah L; Tómasson, Kristinn; van der Feltz-Cornelis, Christina M; Ventus, Daniel B J; Vuori, Jukka; Värnik, Airi

    2015-04-01

    The ROAdmap for MEntal health Research in Europe project aimed to create an integrated European roadmap for mental health research. Leading mental health research experts across Europe have formulated consensus-based recommendations for future research within the public mental health field. Experts were invited to compile and discuss research priorities in a series of topic-based scientific workshops. In addition, a Delphi process was carried out to reach consensus on the list of research priorities and their rank order. Three web-based surveys were conducted. Nearly 60 experts were involved in the priority setting process. Twenty priorities for public mental health research were identified through the consensus process. The research priorities were divided into summary principles-encompassing overall recommendations for future public mental health research in Europe-and thematic research priorities, including area-specific top priorities on research topics and methods. The priorities represent three overarching goals mirroring societal challenges, that is, to identify causes, risk and protective factors for mental health across the lifespan; to advance the implementation of effective public mental health interventions and to reduce disparities in mental health. The importance of strengthening research on the implementation and dissemination of promotion, prevention and service delivery interventions in the mental health field needs to be emphasized. The complexity of mental health and its broader conceptualisation requires complementary research approaches and interdisciplinary collaboration to better serve the needs of the European population. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the European Public Health Association. All rights reserved.

  1. Cost-effectiveness of the Health X Project for tuberculosis control in China.

    PubMed

    Wang, W-B; Zhang, H; Petzold, M; Zhao, Q; Xu, B; Zhao, G-M

    2014-08-01

    Between 2002 and 2008, China's National Tuberculosis Control Programme created the Health X Project, financed in part by a World Bank loan, with additional funding from the UK Department for International Development. To assess the cost-effectiveness of the Project and its impact from a financial point of view on tuberculosis (TB) control in China. A decision-analytic model was used to evaluate the cost-effectiveness of the Project. Sensitivity analysis was used to assess the impact of different scenarios and assumptions on results. The primary outcome of the study was cost per disability-adjusted life-year (DALY) saved and incremental DALYs saved. In comparison with alternative scenario 1, the Project detected 1.6 million additional cases, 44 000 deaths were prevented and a total of 18.4 million DALYs saved. The Project strategies cost approximately Chinese yuan (CNY) 953 per DALY saved (vs. CNY1140 in the control areas), and saved an estimated CNY17.5 billion in comparison with the unchanged alternative scenario (scenario 1) or CNY10.8 billion with the control scenario (scenario 2). The Project strategies were affordable and of comparable cost-effectiveness to those of other developing countries. The results also provide strong support for the existing policy of scaling up DOTS in China.

  2. Partners in projects: preparing for public involvement in health and social care research.

    PubMed

    Parkes, Jacqueline H; Pyer, Michelle; Wray, Paula; Taylor, Jane

    2014-09-01

    In recent years, several UK and, international funders of health and social care related research have adopted the policy of requiring explicit evidence of the 'public' voice in all aspects of project design. For many academic researchers engaged within research, evaluations or audit projects, this formal requirement to actively engage members of the public will present them with both benefits and challenges to securing knowledgeable, skilled, and confident lay representation onto project teams. This could potentially lead to the exploitation of those individuals who are available, appropriately informed, and adequately prepared for such activities. Currently, much of the preparation of patients or members of the public for research involvement tends to be aligned to specific projects; however, with the call for greater active and meaningful involvement of lay representatives in future national and international funding applications, there is clearly a growing need to 'train' sufficient numbers of confident and competent representatives to meet this growing demand. This paper describes the development of a specifically designed research awareness training programme and underpinning theoretical model, which has been specifically designed to support active and meaningful lay involvement in research, evaluations and audit projects. Developed over a four year period, the course is a culmination of learning extracted from a series of four completed research projects, which have incorporated an element of public and patient involvement (PPI) training in their overall design. Crown Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Lessons learnt from school-based health promotion projects in low- and middle-income countries.

    PubMed

    Skar, M; Kirstein, E; Kapur, A

    2015-11-01

    Non-communicable diseases (NCD) are now the leading cause of death worldwide. As habits and lifestyle are established in childhood and adolescence, targeting school children before they develop unhealthy habits offers a window of opportunity to halt and reverse the emerging NCD epidemic. However, few experiences from school interventions in low- and middle-income countries have been collected. Therefore, the aim of this study was to review experiences of implementing school-based health promotion interventions to identify barriers and recommendations for future interventions. A qualitative investigation of 17 school-based health promotion interventions in low- and middle-income countries was conducted. Data were collected through questionnaires (15 project leaders) and in-depth interviews with nine project leaders. The data from the questionnaires and interviews was triangulated and analysed using content analysis, where themes and categories emerging from the material were explored. Three key themes emerged from the data: 1) policy environment and stakeholder engagement, 2) health education sessions, and 3) practical health promotion activities. The themes explored the experiences and lessons learned from 17 school-based health promotion projects in low- and middle-income countries. Stakeholders at different administrative levels were important for the projects; however, stakeholders close to implementation were seen to be more engaged. Most projects conducted traditional health education lectures, which formed the basis of their intervention. Promotion of physical activity and healthy eating through participatory approaches were identified; however, barriers such as lack of areas suitable for physical activity and lack of healthy food alternatives in schools can obstruct the successful implementation of interventions. This study has documented experiences with school-based health promotion in low- and middle-income countries, and has shown that schools can play

  4. Realizing universal health coverage for maternal health services in the Republic of Guinea: the use of workforce projections to design health labor market interventions

    PubMed Central

    Jansen, Christel; Codjia, Laurence; Cometto, Giorgio; Yansané, Mohamed Lamine; Dieleman, Marjolein

    2014-01-01

    Background Universal health coverage requires a health workforce that is available, accessible, and well-performing. This article presents a critical analysis of the health workforce needs for the delivery of maternal and neonatal health services in Guinea, and of feasible and relevant interventions to improve the availability, accessibility, and performance of the health workforce in the country. Methods A needs-based approach was used to project human resources for health (HRH) requirements. This was combined with modeling of future health sector demand and supply. A baseline scenario with disaggregated need and supply data for the targeted health professionals per region and setting (urban or rural) informed the identification of challenges related to the availability and distribution of the workforce between 2014 and 2024. Subsequently, the health labor market framework was used to identify interventions to improve the availability and distribution of the health workforce. These interventions were included in the supply side modeling, in order to create a “policy rich” scenario B which allowed for analysis of their potential impact. Results In the Republic of Guinea, only 44% of the nurses and 18% of the midwives required for maternal and neonatal health services are currently available. If Guinea continues on its current path without scaling up recruitment efforts, the total stock of HRH employed by the public sector will decline by 15% between 2014 and 2024, while HRH needs will grow by 22% due to demographic trends. The high density of HRH in urban areas and the high number of auxiliary nurses who are currently employed pose an opportunity for improving the availability, accessibility, and performance of the health workforce for maternal and neonatal health in Guinea, especially in rural areas. Conclusion Guinea will need to scale up its recruitment efforts in order to improve health workforce availability. Targeted labor market interventions need to be

  5. Realizing universal health coverage for maternal health services in the Republic of Guinea: the use of workforce projections to design health labor market interventions.

    PubMed

    Jansen, Christel; Codjia, Laurence; Cometto, Giorgio; Yansané, Mohamed Lamine; Dieleman, Marjolein

    2014-01-01

    Universal health coverage requires a health workforce that is available, accessible, and well-performing. This article presents a critical analysis of the health workforce needs for the delivery of maternal and neonatal health services in Guinea, and of feasible and relevant interventions to improve the availability, accessibility, and performance of the health workforce in the country. A needs-based approach was used to project human resources for health (HRH) requirements. This was combined with modeling of future health sector demand and supply. A baseline scenario with disaggregated need and supply data for the targeted health professionals per region and setting (urban or rural) informed the identification of challenges related to the availability and distribution of the workforce between 2014 and 2024. Subsequently, the health labor market framework was used to identify interventions to improve the availability and distribution of the health workforce. These interventions were included in the supply side modeling, in order to create a "policy rich" scenario B which allowed for analysis of their potential impact. In the Republic of Guinea, only 44% of the nurses and 18% of the midwives required for maternal and neonatal health services are currently available. If Guinea continues on its current path without scaling up recruitment efforts, the total stock of HRH employed by the public sector will decline by 15% between 2014 and 2024, while HRH needs will grow by 22% due to demographic trends. The high density of HRH in urban areas and the high number of auxiliary nurses who are currently employed pose an opportunity for improving the availability, accessibility, and performance of the health workforce for maternal and neonatal health in Guinea, especially in rural areas. Guinea will need to scale up its recruitment efforts in order to improve health workforce availability. Targeted labor market interventions need to be planned and executed over several decades

  6. Child welfare caseworkers as brokers of mental health services: a pilot evaluation of Project Focus Colorado.

    PubMed

    Fitzgerald, Monica M; Torres, Marcela M; Shipman, Kimberly; Gorrono, Jessica; Kerns, Suzanne E U; Dorsey, Shannon

    2015-02-01

    Youth in the child welfare system (CWS) have substantially higher rates of mental health needs compared to the general population, yet they rarely receive targeted, evidence-based practices (EBPs). Caseworkers play the critically important role of "service broker" for CWS youth and families. This study examines preliminary caseworker-level outcomes of Project Focus Colorado (PF-C), a training and consultation program designed to improve access to EBPs for CWS youth. PF-C evaluation occurred in four child welfare offices (two intervention [n = 16 caseworkers] vs. two practice-as-usual, wait-list control [WLC; n = 12 caseworkers]). Receipt of PF-C was associated with significantly increased caseworker knowledge of (a) EBPs, (b) child mental health problems, (c) evidence-based treatment components targeting mental health problem areas, and (d) mental health screening instruments, compared to WLC. Dose of training and consultation was associated with greater ability to correctly classify mental health problems and match them to EBPs. These preliminary results suggest that targeted training and consultation help to improve caseworker knowledge of children's mental health needs, EBPs for mental health, and mental health screening instruments.

  7. Environmental Scanning as a Public Health Tool: Kentucky’s Human Papillomavirus Vaccination Project

    PubMed Central

    Wilburn, Amanda; Knight, Jennifer R.

    2016-01-01

    Borrowing from business, quality improvement programs, and strategic planning principles, environmental scanning is gaining popularity in public health practice and research and is advocated as an assessment and data collection tool by federal funding agencies and other health-related organizations. Applicable to a range of current and emerging health topics, environmental scans — through various methods — assess multiple facets of an issue by engaging stakeholders who can ask or answer research questions, exploring related policy, critiquing published and gray literature, collecting and analyzing qualitative and quantitative data in both primary and secondary forms, disseminating findings to internal and external stakeholders, and informing subsequent planning and decision making. To illustrate the environmental scanning process in a public health setting and showcase its value to practitioners in the field, we describe a federally funded environmental scan for a human papillomavirus vaccination project in Kentucky. PMID:27536901

  8. The Silver Song Club Project: singing to promote the health of older people.

    PubMed

    Skingley, Ann; Bungay, Hilary

    2010-03-01

    Attention has recently been drawn to the contribution of the arts, and of singing in particular, to health and wellbeing. This article describes a qualitative research project which aimed to gain participants' views of taking part in Silver Song Clubs--community-based singing groups for older people. Seventeen individuals aged 60-plus from six clubs were interviewed and a number of benefits were identified. These included: enjoyment; better mental health and wellbeing; increased social interaction; improvements in physical health; cognitive stimulation and learning; and improved memory and recall. It is suggested that such benefits sit well within a model of health relevant to older people themselves. Community nurses working with this age group might consider including an assessment for interest in musical and related activities, and also should be aware of any local initiatives into which individuals can be referred.

  9. Health Care Employee Perceptions of Patient-Centered Care: A Photovoice Project

    PubMed Central

    Balbale, Salva Najib; Turcios, Stephanie; LaVela, Sherri L.

    2015-01-01

    Given the importance of health care employees in the delivery of patient-centered care, understanding their unique perspective is essential for quality improvement. The purpose of this study was to use photovoice to evaluate perceptions and experiences around patient-centered care among Veterans Affairs (VA) health care employees. We asked participants to take photographs of salient features in their environment related to patient-centered care. We used the photographs to facilitate dialogue during follow-up interviews. Twelve VA health care employees across two VA sites participated in the project. Although most participants felt satisfied with their work environment and experiences at the VA, several areas for improvement were identified. These included a need for more employee health and wellness initiatives and a need for enhanced opportunities for training and professional growth. Application of photovoice enabled us to learn about employees' unique perspectives around patient-centered care while engaging them in an evaluation of care delivery. PMID:25274626

  10. A deployment and Research Roadmap for Semantic Interoperability: the EU semantic health project.

    PubMed

    Lewalle, Pierre; Rodrigues, Jean M; Zanstra, Pieter; Ustun, Bedirhan; Kalra, Dipak; Surjan, Gyorgy; Rector, Alan; Stroetmann, Veli; Virtanen, Martti

    2008-01-01

    The purpose of this EU funded project is to describe a short and medium term Research and Deployment Roadmap for Semantic Interoperability in e-health. It started by defining 4 levels and 3 dimensions for Semantic Interoperability. The vision is to reconcile the needs for the direct patient care safety, biomedical and clinical research and for public health by the reuse of direct care data: from gene to individuals and populations. The methodology is presented and preliminary results and milestones for the short and the long term are set. We conclude by statements on the main characteristics and needs of the roadmap to sustain better health for individual and populations in the changing EU health care systems.

  11. Field Testing Project to Pilot World Health Organization Eye Health Indicators in Latin America.

    PubMed

    Eckert, Kristen A; Lansingh, Van C; McLeod-Omawale, Joan; Furtado, João M; Martinez-Castro, Francisco; Carter, Marissa J

    2017-09-25

    To develop and implement mechanisms to collect, report, and assess the World Health Organization (WHO) core eye health indicators in Chile, Honduras, Mexico, Peru, and Uruguay. Simple templates for a situational analysis (of data collection and reporting processes), a national data collection strategy, and a national work plan to implement the core eye health indicators were developed. Public and private sector representatives from the ministries of health (MOHs), national vision committees, and national societies of ophthalmology of each country used these tools with 2013 baseline data to improve their data collection processes and collected 2015 data. Final analysis and cross-validation were performed using intraocular lens sales data and last observation carried forward imputation. Study tools were effectively implemented in all five countries and resulted in improved intersectoral stakeholder collaboration and communications, which improved the data collection and reporting processes. More complete and accurate data were reported by 2015 compared to the 2013 baseline. Multisectoral stakeholders, including national professional societies and national vision committees, should collaborate with MOHs to improve the quality of data that are reported to WHO. This study involved these stakeholders in the data collection processes to better understand the realities of indicator implementation, better manage their expectations, and improve data quality. WHO Member States across the globe can feasibly adapt the study tools and methodologies to strengthen their data collection processes. Overall, the reliability and validity of the indicators is hampered with limitations that prevent fully accurate data from being collected.

  12. The Gatehouse Project: a systematic approach to mental health promotion in secondary schools.

    PubMed

    Patton, G C; Glover, S; Bond, L; Butler, H; Godfrey, C; Di Pietro, G; Bowes, G

    2000-08-01

    The objective of this paper is to outline the conceptual background and strategy of intervention for a systematic and sustainable approach to mental health promotion in secondary schools. The conceptual origins of the Gatehouse Project are described in terms of the epidemiology of adolescent mental health problems, attachment theory, education reform research and health promotional theory and practice. The elements of health promotional work are described in terms of structural change and priority setting; implementation at multiple levels within the participating schools is described. The conceptual framework of the Gatehouse Project emphasises healthy attachments with peers and teachers through the promotion of a sense of security and trust, effective communication and a sense of positive self-regard based on participation in varied aspects of school and community life. A school social climate profile is derived from a questionnaire survey of students. An adolescent health team uses this information to set priorities for change within the school. Interventions may focus on the promotion of a positive social climate of the whole school or in the classroom. Curriculum-based health education is also used and based on materials that are relevant to the normal developmental experiences of teenagers. These are integrated into the mainstream curriculum and incorporate a strong component of teacher professional development. Lastly, the intervention promotes linkage between the school and broader community with a particular emphasis on the needs of young people at high risk of school drop-out. Educational environments are complex systems undergoing continuous and simultaneous changes. The Gatehouse Project will provide unique information on the relationship between the social environment and the emotional wellbeing of young people. More importantly it outlines a sustainable process for building the capacity of schools to promote the social and emotional development of

  13. Projections of global health outcomes from 2005 to 2060 using the International Futures integrated forecasting model.

    PubMed

    Hughes, Barry B; Kuhn, Randall; Peterson, Cecilia M; Rothman, Dale S; Solórzano, José R; Mathers, Colin D; Dickson, Janet R

    2011-07-01

    To develop an integrated health forecasting model as part of the International Futures (IFs) modelling system. The IFs model begins with the historical relationships between economic and social development and cause-specific mortality used by the Global Burden of Disease project but builds forecasts from endogenous projections of these drivers by incorporating forward linkages from health outcomes back to inputs like population and economic growth. The hybrid IFs system adds alternative structural formulations for causes not well served by regression models and accounts for changes in proximate health risk factors. Forecasts are made to 2100 but findings are reported to 2060. The base model projects that deaths from communicable diseases (CDs) will decline by 50%, whereas deaths from both non-communicable diseases (NCDs) and injuries will more than double. Considerable cross-national convergence in life expectancy will occur. Climate-induced fluctuations in agricultural yield will cause little excess childhood mortality from CDs, although other climate-health pathways were not explored. An optimistic scenario will produce 39 million fewer deaths in 2060 than a pessimistic one. Our forward linkage model suggests that an optimistic scenario would result in a 20% per cent increase in gross domestic product (GDP) per capita, despite one billion additional people. Southern Asia would experience the greatest relative mortality reduction and the largest resulting benefit in per capita GDP. Long-term, integrated health forecasting helps us understand the links between health and other markers of human progress and offers powerful insight into key points of leverage for future improvements.

  14. Projections of global health outcomes from 2005 to 2060 using the International Futures integrated forecasting model

    PubMed Central

    Hughes, Barry B; Peterson, Cecilia M; Rothman, Dale S; Solórzano, José R; Mathers, Colin D; Dickson, Janet R

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Objective To develop an integrated health forecasting model as part of the International Futures (IFs) modelling system. Methods The IFs model begins with the historical relationships between economic and social development and cause-specific mortality used by the Global Burden of Disease project but builds forecasts from endogenous projections of these drivers by incorporating forward linkages from health outcomes back to inputs like population and economic growth. The hybrid IFs system adds alternative structural formulations for causes not well served by regression models and accounts for changes in proximate health risk factors. Forecasts are made to 2100 but findings are reported to 2060. Findings The base model projects that deaths from communicable diseases (CDs) will decline by 50%, whereas deaths from both non-communicable diseases (NCDs) and injuries will more than double. Considerable cross-national convergence in life expectancy will occur. Climate-induced fluctuations in agricultural yield will cause little excess childhood mortality from CDs, although other climate−health pathways were not explored. An optimistic scenario will produce 39 million fewer deaths in 2060 than a pessimistic one. Our forward linkage model suggests that an optimistic scenario would result in a 20% per cent increase in gross domestic product (GDP) per capita, despite one billion additional people. Southern Asia would experience the greatest relative mortality reduction and the largest resulting benefit in per capita GDP. Conclusion Long-term, integrated health forecasting helps us understand the links between health and other markers of human progress and offers powerful insight into key points of leverage for future improvements. PMID:21734761

  15. Maintaining exercise and healthful eating in older adults: the SENIOR project II: study design and methodology.

    PubMed

    Clark, Phillip G; Blissmer, Bryan J; Greene, Geoffrey W; Lees, Faith D; Riebe, Deborah A; Stamm, Karen E

    2011-01-01

    The Study of Exercise and Nutrition in Older Rhode Islanders (SENIOR) Project II is an intervention study to promote the maintenance of both exercise and healthful eating in older adults. It is the second phase of an earlier study, SENIOR Project I, that originally recruited 1277 community-dwelling older adults to participate in behavior-specific interventions designed to increase exercise and/or fruit and vegetable consumption. The general theoretical framework for this research is the Transtheoretical Model (TTM) of Health Behavior Change. The current intervention occurs over a 48-month period, using a manual, newsletters, and phone coaching calls. Annual assessments collect standardized data on behavioral outcomes (exercise and diet), TTM variables (stage of change and self-efficacy), psychosocial variables (social support, depression, resilience, and life satisfaction), physical activity and functioning (SF-36, Up and Go, Senior Fitness Test, and disability assessment), cognitive functioning (Trail Making Test and Forward and Backward Digit Span), physical measures (height, weight, and waist circumference), and demographics. The SENIOR Project II is designed to answer the following question as its primary objective: (1) Does an individualized active-maintenance intervention with older adults maintain greater levels of healthful exercise and dietary behaviors for 4years, compared to a control condition? In addition, there are two secondary objectives: (2) What are the psychosocial factors associated with the maintenance of health-promoting behaviors in the very old? (3) What are the effects of the maintenance of health-promoting behaviors on reported health outcomes, psychosocial measures, anthropometrics, and cognitive status? Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Maintaining Exercise and Healthful Eating in Older Adults: The SENIOR Project II: Study Design and Methodology

    PubMed Central

    Clark, Phillip G.; Blissmer, Bryan J.; Greene, Geoffrey W.; Lees, Faith D.; Riebe, Deborah A.; Stamm, Karen E.

    2015-01-01

    The Study of Exercise and Nutrition in Older Rhode Islanders (SENIOR) Project II is an intervention study to promote the maintenance of both exercise and healthful eating in older adults. It is the second phase of an earlier study, SENIOR Project I, that originally recruited 1,277 community-dwelling older adults to participate in behavior-specific interventions designed to increase exercise and/or fruit and vegetable consumption. The general theoretical framework for this research is the Transtheoretical Model (TTM) of Health Behavior Change. The current intervention occurs over a 48-month period, using a manual, newsletters, and phone coaching calls. Annual assessments collect standardized data on behavioral outcomes (exercise and diet), TTM variables (stage of change and self-efficacy), psychosocial variables (social support, depression, resilience, and life satisfaction), physical activity and functioning (SF-36, Up and Go, Senior Fitness Test, and disability assessment), cognitive functioning (Trail Making Test and Forward and Backward Digit Span), physical measures (height, weight, and waist circumference), and demographics. The SENIOR Project II is designed to answer the following question as its primary objective: (1) Does an individualized active-maintenance intervention with older adults maintain greater levels of healthful exercise and dietary behaviors for four years, compared to a control condition? In addition, there are two secondary objectives: (2) What are the psychosocial factors associated with the maintenance of health-promoting behaviors in the very old? and (3) What are the effects of the maintenance of health-promoting behaviors on reported health outcomes, psychosocial measures, anthropometrics, and cognitive status? PMID:20955821

  17. Academic health center management of chronic diseases through knowledge networks: Project ECHO.

    PubMed

    Arora, Sanjeev; Geppert, Cynthia M A; Kalishman, Summers; Dion, Denise; Pullara, Frank; Bjeletich, Barbara; Simpson, Gary; Alverson, Dale C; Moore, Lori B; Kuhl, Dave; Scaletti, Joseph V

    2007-02-01

    The authors describe an innovative academic health center (AHC)-led program of health care delivery and clinical education for the management of complex, common, and chronic diseases in underserved areas, using hepatitis C virus (HCV) as a model. The program, based at the University of New Mexico School of Medicine, represents a paradigm shift in thinking and funding for the threefold mission of AHCs, moving from traditional fee-for-service models to public health funding of knowledge networks. This program, Project Extension for Community Health care Outcomes (ECHO), involves a partnership of academic medicine, public health offices, corrections departments, and rural community clinics dedicated to providing best practices and protocol-driven health care in rural areas. Telemedicine and Internet connections enable specialists in the program to comanage patients with complex diseases, using case-based knowledge networks and learning loops. Project ECHO partners (nurse practitioners, primary care physicians, physician assistants, and pharmacists) present HCV-positive patients during weekly two-hour telemedicine clinics using a standardized, case-based format that includes discussion of history, physical examination, test results, treatment complications, and psychiatric, medical, and substance abuse issues. In these case-based learning clinics, partners rapidly gain deep domain expertise in HCV as they collaborate with university specialists in hepatology, infectious disease, psychiatry, and substance abuse in comanaging their patients. Systematic monitoring of treatment outcomes is an integral aspect of the project. The authors believe this methodology will be generalizable to other complex and chronic conditions in a wide variety of underserved areas to improve disease outcomes, and it offers an opportunity for AHCs to enhance and expand their traditional mission of teaching, patient care, and research.

  18. A Nurse Leadership Project to Improve Health Literacy on a Maternal-Infant Unit.

    PubMed

    Stikes, Reetta; Arterberry, Katheryn; Logsdon, M Cynthia

    2015-01-01

    To describe how participation in the Sigma Theta Tau International Maternal-Child Health Nurse Leadership Academy positioned the authors to lead an interdisciplinary team through implementation and evaluation of a change project related to patient education based upon national health literacy standards. The project goal was to improve patient satisfaction with nurse communication and preparation for hospital discharge. Quality improvement. Mother/-baby unit of an academic medical center serving a high percentage of patients of a minority population and underserved clients. The five- step intervention included (a) review of current health literacy standards, (b) formation of an infrastructure for development and evaluation of existing patient education materials, (c) assessment of patient education materials currently in use, (d) assessment of literacy level and learning styles of new mothers, and (e) provision of continuing education to increase knowledge of nurses as patient teachers and of health literacy. Mean scores of Hospital Consumer Assessment of Healthcare Providers and Systems (HCAHPS) in the domains of patient satisfaction with nurse communication and discharge information were used to measure patient satisfaction with health communication. Patient satisfaction with nurse communication increased from 75.9% to 84.6%. Satisfaction with discharge information increased from 84.6% to 98.6%. The leadership academy successfully positioned the authors to guide an interdisciplinary team through development of a process to meet the education and communication needs of patients and improve their health literacy. As a result, a positive effect was noted on patient satisfaction with health communication. © 2015 AWHONN, the Association of Women's Health, Obstetric and Neonatal Nurses.

  19. Changing Patterns of Health in Communities Impacted by a Bioenergy Project in Northern Sierra Leone

    PubMed Central

    Knoblauch, Astrid M.; Hodges, Mary H.; Bah, Mohamed S.; Kamara, Habib I.; Kargbo, Anita; Paye, Jusufu; Turay, Hamid; Nyorkor, Emmanuel D.; Divall, Mark J.; Zhang, Yaobi; Utzinger, Jürg; Winkler, Mirko S.

    2014-01-01

    Large private sector investments in low- and middle-income countries are often critically evaluated with regards to their environmental, social, human rights, and health impacts. A health impact assessment, including a baseline health survey, was commissioned by the Addax Bioenergy Sierra Leone project in 2010. As part of the monitoring, a follow-up survey was conducted three years later. A set of health indicators was assessed at six impacted and two control sites. Most of these indices improved, particularly at the impacted sites. The prevalences of stunting, wasting, and Plasmodium falciparum in children under five years of age decreased significantly at impacted sites (all p < 0.05) and non-significantly at control sites. Anemia in children and in women of reproductive age (15–49 years) decreased significantly at impacted and control sites (p < 0.05 and p < 0.001, respectively). Health facility-based deliveries increased significantly at the impacted sites (p < 0.05). The prevalences of helminth infections in children aged 10–15 years remained approximately at the same levels, although focal increases at the impacted sites were noted. Access to improved sanitation decreased significantly (p < 0.05) at control and non-significantly at impacted sites. Water quality remained poor without significant changes. The epidemiologic monitoring of a bioenergy project provides a useful contribution for evidence-based decision-making. PMID:25514152

  20. Changing patterns of health in communities impacted by a bioenergy project in northern Sierra Leone.

    PubMed

    Knoblauch, Astrid M; Hodges, Mary H; Bah, Mohamed S; Kamara, Habib I; Kargbo, Anita; Paye, Jusufu; Turay, Hamid; Nyorkor, Emmanuel D; Divall, Mark J; Zhang, Yaobi; Utzinger, Jürg; Winkler, Mirko S

    2014-12-01

    Large private sector investments in low- and middle-income countries are often critically evaluated with regards to their environmental, social, human rights, and health impacts. A health impact assessment, including a baseline health survey, was commissioned by the Addax Bioenergy Sierra Leone project in 2010. As part of the monitoring, a follow-up survey was conducted three years later. A set of health indicators was assessed at six impacted and two control sites. Most of these indices improved, particularly at the impacted sites. The prevalences of stunting, wasting, and Plasmodium falciparum in children under five years of age decreased significantly at impacted sites (all p < 0.05) and non-significantly at control sites. Anemia in children and in women of reproductive age (15-49 years) decreased significantly at impacted and control sites (p < 0.05 and p < 0.001, respectively). Health facility-based deliveries increased significantly at the impacted sites (p < 0.05). The prevalences of helminth infections in children aged 10-15 years remained approximately at the same levels, although focal increases at the impacted sites were noted. Access to improved sanitation decreased significantly (p < 0.05) at control and non-significantly at impacted sites. Water quality remained poor without significant changes. The epidemiologic monitoring of a bioenergy project provides a useful contribution for evidence-based decision-making.