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Sample records for chest-wall impedance algorithms

  1. Algorithm of chest wall keloid treatment

    PubMed Central

    Long, Xiao; Zhang, Mingzi; Wang, Yang; Zhao, Ru; Wang, Youbin; Wang, Xiaojun

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Keloids are common in the Asian population. Multiple or huge keloids can appear on the chest wall because of its tendency to develop acne, sebaceous cyst, etc. It is difficult to find an ideal treatment for keloids in this area due to the limit of local soft tissues and higher recurrence rate. This study aims at establishing an individualized protocol that could be easily applied according to the size and number of chest wall keloids. A total of 445 patients received various methods (4 protocols) of treatment in our department from September 2006 to September 2012 according to the size and number of their chest wall keloids. All of the patients received adjuvant radiotherapy in our hospital. Patient and Observer Scar Assessment Scale (POSAS) was used to assess the treatment effect by both doctors and patients. With mean follow-up time of 13 months (range: 6–18 months), 362 patients participated in the assessment of POSAS with doctors. Both the doctors and the patients themselves used POSAS to evaluate the treatment effect. The recurrence rate was 0.83%. There was an obvious significant difference (P < 0.001) between the before-surgery score and the after-surgery score from both doctors and patients, indicating that both doctors and patients were satisfied with the treatment effect. Our preliminary clinical result indicates that good clinical results could be achieved by choosing the proper method in this algorithm for Chinese patients with chest wall keloids. This algorithm could play a guiding role for surgeons when dealing with chest wall keloid treatment. PMID:27583896

  2. Poland syndrome: an algorithm to select the appropriate chest wall surgical reconstructive treatment.

    PubMed

    Chiummariello, Stefano; Pica, Alessandra; Guarro, Giuseppe; Arleo, Sergio; Alfano, Carmine

    2014-01-01

    Poland syndrome is a constellation of rare congenital anomalies of the chest wall, with or without alterations to the ipsilateral superior extremity. Actually Foucras' classification is commonly used to choose the most appropriate surgical treatment, but often only a radiological classification proves unsatisfactory in order to achieve the best aesthetic result. Since November 2006 in our institute have been treated 6 patients (3 M, 3 F) with Poland Syndrome affected by only chest wall and/or breast deformities. We treated 6 patients opting for different surgical procedures, depending on the deformity detected. We experienced only one procedural complication, a fat necrosis with superior migration of the prosthesis, successfully managed. Surgical alternative treatments of the Poland's abnormalities of the chest wall are independent from the corrective surgery of the ipsilateral affected forearm ad hand. Surgeons should be able to develop an operative plan to address aesthetic goals while preserving muscular functionality. Indeed surgical techniques should be minimally invasive and possible available in every hospital structure. This study has been designed to review a series of surgical options of breast reconstruction in patients with Poland Syndrome in order to develop a new flow chart to plan the best surgical choice analyzing only breast/chest wall deformities according to Blondeel's point of view about reconstruction of the new breast and thoracic wall. Breast reconstruction, Poland syndrome.

  3. Chest Wall Trauma.

    PubMed

    Majercik, Sarah; Pieracci, Fredric M

    2017-05-01

    Chest wall trauma is common, and contributes significantly to morbidity and mortality of trauma patients. Early identification of major chest wall and concomitant intrathoracic injuries is critical. Generalized management of multiple rib fractures and flail chest consists of adequate pain control (including locoregional modalities); management of pulmonary dysfunction by invasive and noninvasive means; and, in some cases, surgical fixation. Multiple studies have shown that patients with flail chest have substantial benefit (decreased ventilator and intensive care unit days, improved pulmonary function, and improved long-term functional outcome) when they undergo surgery compared with nonoperative management. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Musculoskeletal chest wall pain

    PubMed Central

    Fam, Adel G.; Smythe, Hugh A.

    1985-01-01

    The musculoskeletal structures of the thoracic wall and the neck are a relatively common source of chest pain. Pain arising from these structures is often mistaken for angina pectoris, pleurisy or other serious disorders. In this article the clinical features, pathogenesis and management of the various musculoskeletal chest wall disorders are discussed. The more common causes are costochondritis, traumatic muscle pain, trauma to the chest wall, “fibrositis” syndrome, referred pain, psychogenic regional pain syndrome, and arthritis involving articulations of the sternum, ribs and thoracic spine. Careful analysis of the history, physical findings and results of investigation is essential for precise diagnosis and effective treatment. ImagesFig. 3Fig. 4Fig. 5 PMID:4027804

  5. Restrictive chest wall disorders.

    PubMed

    Donath, Joseph; Miller, Albert

    2009-06-01

    Hypoventilation can be caused by diseases of the chest wall. Any anatomical or functional abnormality of the bony thorax increases dead space ventilation and the work of breathing, whether congenital or acquired, acute or chronic, and whether its cause is infectious, traumatic, environmental, iatrogenic, or unknown. In this article, we discuss these heterogeneous disorders from the viewpoint of the practicing nonpediatric pulmonary physician, only briefly touching on surgical, pediatric, rheumatologic, and other nonpulmonary ramifications. Emphasis is on the most common and the best researched forms of chest wall restriction, including kyphoscoliosis, fibrothorax, thoracoplasty, flail chest, and ankylosing spondylitis. Other diseases such as osteoporosis with its less well known pulmonary effects, and some rarely seen entities, are briefly discussed.

  6. Reconstruction of chest wall defects.

    PubMed

    Hasse, J

    1991-12-01

    A series of 61 consecutive procedures of chest wall resection and reconstruction in 58 patients during the period between August, 1986 and December, 1990 is reported. The ages ranged between 6-77 years. The chest wall resection was indicated for malignant affections in 54 cases. Among these, there were 24 patients with bronchial carcinoma invading the chest wall, 17 patients with primary or metastatic sarcoma, 11 patients with recurrent breast cancer and 3 with cancer metastases of varying origin. Pulmonary resection included pneumonectomy in 8 cases, lobectomy in 19, segmental and wedge resections in 26. In the majority of resections, the reconstruction was accomplished without implants. In cases with full thickness removal of the chest wall, the plane of the rib cage and/or the sternum was reconstructed using Vicryl mesh (n = 7), PTFE soft tissue patch (n = 11), marlex-mesh (n = 1), or methyl-methacrylate (n = 3). There was one case of hospital mortality, 6 weeks postoperatively, due to neurological failure from an independent preoperatively undiagnosed brain tumor. There were 4 reoperations: one early and one late (4 months) infection, one case of limited superficial necrosis of a flap and one with chronic lymphous drainage from a large myocutaneous flap. In no instance was primary postoperative ventilation therapy necessary. Mechanical ventilation was instituted only on day 8 in the patient who accounts for the mortality in this series. In the presence of primary infection, the greater omentum was used for the restoration of the integument.

  7. Management of Congenital Chest Wall Deformities

    PubMed Central

    Blanco, Felix C.; Elliott, Steven T.; Sandler, Anthony D.

    2011-01-01

    Congenital chest wall deformities are considered to be anomalies in chest wall growth. These can be categorized as either rib cage overgrowth or deformities related to inadequate growth (aplasia or dysplasia). Rib cage overgrowth leads to depression of the sternum (pectus excavatum) or protuberance of the sternum (pectus carinatum) and accounts for greater than 90% of congenital chest wall deformities. The remaining deformities are a result of inadequate growth. Evolution in the management of congenital chest wall deformities has made significant progress over the past 25 years. This article will review chest wall deformities and the current management strategies of these interesting anomalies. PMID:22294949

  8. Chest wall reconstruction after extended resection

    PubMed Central

    Seder, Christopher W.

    2016-01-01

    Extensive chest wall resection and reconstruction is a challenging procedure that requires a multidisciplinary approach, including input from thoracic surgeons, plastic surgeons, neurosurgeons, and radiation oncologists. The primary goals of any chest wall reconstruction is to obliterate dead space, restore chest wall rigidity, preserve pulmonary mechanics, protect intrathoracic organs, provide soft tissue coverage, minimize deformity, and allow patients to receive adjuvant radiotherapy. Successful chest wall reconstruction requires the re-establishment of skeletal stability to prevent chest wall hernias, avoids thoracoplasty-like contraction of the operated side, protects underlying viscera, and maintain a cosmetically-acceptable appearance. After skeletal stability is established, full tissue coverage can be achieved using direct closure, skin grafts, local advancement flaps, pedicled myocutaneous flaps, or free flaps. This review examines the indications for chest wall reconstruction and describes techniques for establishment of chest wall rigidity and soft tissue coverage. PMID:27942408

  9. Relevant surgical anatomy of the chest wall.

    PubMed

    Naidu, Babu V; Rajesh, Pala B

    2010-11-01

    The chest wall, like other regional anatomy, is a remarkable fusion of form and function. Principal functions are the protection of internal viscera and an expandable cylinder facilitating variable gas flow into the lungs. Knowledge of the anatomy of the whole cylinder (ribs, sternum, vertebra, diaphragm, intercostal spaces, and extrathoracic muscles) is therefore not only important in the local environment of a specific chest wall resection but also in its relation to overall function. An understanding of chest wall kinematics might help define the loss of function after resection and the effects of various chest wall substitutes. Therefore, this article is not an exhaustive anatomic description but a focused summary and discussion.

  10. Chest wall hypoplasia--principles and treatment.

    PubMed

    Mayer, Oscar Henry

    2015-01-01

    The chest is a dynamic structure. For normal movement it relies on a coordinated movement of the multiple bones, joints and muscles of the respiratory system. While muscle weakness can have clear impact on respiration by decreasing respiratory motion, so can conditions that cause chest wall hypoplasia and produce an immobile chest wall. These conditions, such as Jarcho-Levin and Jeune syndrome, present significantly different challenges than those faced with early onset scoliosis in which chest wall mechanics and thoracic volume may be much closer to normal. Because of this difference more aggressive approaches to clinical and surgical management are necessary.

  11. Outcomes of surgery for chest wall sarcomas.

    PubMed

    Putnam, Joe B

    2010-11-01

    Chest wall resection requires wide local excision, negative margins, and adequate reconstruction. Outcomes are generally good to excellent with wide local excision and negative margins. Mortality is nearly 0% to 1% with mild morbidity. Multispecialty surgical teams may be required for more complex situations. Early diagnosis of chest wall sarcomas, confirmation by an experienced sarcoma pathologist, and multidisciplinary discussion before treatment initiation, are all required for optimal and successful therapy.

  12. Prephonatory chest wall posturing in stutterers.

    PubMed

    Baken, R J; McManus, D A; Cavallo, S A

    1983-09-01

    The possibility that prephonatory chest wall posturing is abnormal in stutterers was explored by observing rib cage and abdominal hemicircumference changes during the interval between the presentation of a stimulus and the production of/alpha/by a group of stutterers (N = 5). It was found that the patterns of chest wall adjustment for phonation were qualitatively identical in the stutterers and in a comparable group of normal men studied previously. There was, however, a significant difference in the way in which lung volume changed during the execution of the chest wall adjustment. This was considered to be indicative of delayed glottal closure among the stutterers rather than representative of a primary ventilatory disturbance.

  13. [Chest wall mesenchymal hamartoma: a case report].

    PubMed

    Morales, Olga Lucía; Valencia, María de la Luz; Gómez, Carolina; Pérez, María del Pilar; Sanín, Emilio; Vásquez, Luz Marina

    2010-01-01

    Chest wall mesenchymal hamartoma is an extremely rare benign tumor. Approximately 80 cases have been reported in the literature. Most tumors are manifested at birth with a painless palpable mass of the chest wall, usually unilateral. Respiratory symptoms result from extrinsic compression of the pulmonary parenchyma, and the severity of the symptoms will depend on the size and location of the lesion. Imaging features are characteristic, but definitive diagnosis is histological. Herein, a case is described of a four month old infant with diagnosis of chest wall mesenchymal hamartoma, manifested at birth. Different treatment options are described, including expectations from tumor management, the possibility of spontaneous regression, and the morbidity associated with the surgical option.

  14. Salmonella typhimurium abscess of the chest wall

    PubMed Central

    Tonziello, Gilda; Valentinotti, Romina; Arbore, Enrico; Cassetti, Paolo; Luzzati, Roberto

    2013-01-01

    Patient: Male, 73 Final Diagnosis: Salmonella typhimurium abscess of the chest wall Symptoms: — Medication: Ciprofloxacin Clinical Procedure:— Specialty: Infectious Diseases Objective: Unusual clinical course Background: Non-typhoid Salmonella extra-intestinal infections usually develop in infants and in adult patients with pre-existing predisposing conditions. Blood stream infections and urinary tract infections are the most common clinical presentations, but other sites of infection may be involved as well. Case Report: We describe a case of invasive salmonellosis caused by Salmonella typhimurium involving the chest wall in a 73-year-old man. The patient had suffered from gastroenteritis followed by left basal pneumonia with pleural effusion 7 weeks before. The CT scan of the chest wall showed a pericostal abscess with shirt-stud morphology near the left last cartilaginous arch. The abscess was surgically drained and patient was cured after a 40-day ciprofloxacin treatment. Conclusions: A review of the literature on extra-intestinal non-typhoid salmonellosis shows that pleuropulmonary and soft-tissue infections are uncommon. We argue that non-typhoid Salmonella might be considered as a possible cause of chest wall abscess in individuals with recent history of gastroenteritis complicated by pneumonia and pleural effusion. PMID:24298305

  15. Hypoventilation: neuromuscular and chest wall disorders.

    PubMed

    Goldstein, R S

    1992-09-01

    Patients with neuromuscular and chest wall disorders are vulnerable at night when alterations in ventilatory mechanics and control associated with their disease are imposed on the changes in mechanics and control associated with sleep. The physiologic and clinical consequences of these events may be reversed by nocturnal mechanical ventilatory support.

  16. [Chest Wall Reconstruction Using Titanium Plates Sandwiched Between Sheets after Resection of Chest Wall Chondrosarcoma].

    PubMed

    Endoh, Makoto; Oizumi, Hiroyuki; Kato, Hirohisa; Suzuki, Jun; Watarai, Hikaru; Hamada, Akira; Suzuki, Katsuyuki; Takahashi, Ai; Nakahashi, Kenta; Sugawara, Masato; Tsuchiya, Takashi; Sadahiro, Mitsuaki

    2016-07-01

    Extensive chest wall resection carries the risk of difficult reconstruction and surgical complications. We report our experience on chest wall reconstruction using titanium plates for a wide thoracic defect after tumor resection. A 74-year-old man was diagnosed with chondrosarcoma of the 6th rib on the right. He needed extensive chest wall resection because of skip lesions on 4th rib noted on operative inspection, leaving a defect measuring 33 × 20 cm. Reconstruction using 5 transverse titanium plates sandwiched between an expanded polytetrafluoroethylene patch and a polypropylene mesh sheet stabilized the chest wall. This reconstruction allowed successful separation from ventilatory support after operation. The postoperative course was uneventful, and he was discharged on postoperative day 20. The advantages of this form of reconstruction over conventional prostheses are rigidity, and stability and usability.

  17. Normalized mean shapes and reference index values for computerized quantitative assessment indices of chest wall deformities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Ho Chul; Park, Man Sik; Lee, Seong Keon; Nam, Ki Chang; Park, Hyung Joo; Kim, Min Gi; Song, Jae-Jun; Choi, Hyuk

    2015-11-01

    We previously proposed a computerized index (eccentricity index [EI]) for chest-wall deformity measurements, such as pectus excavatum. We sought to define mean shapes based on normal chest walls and to propose for computerized index reference values of that are used in the quantitative analysis of the severity of chest-wall deformities. A total of 584 patients were classified into 18 groups, and a database of their chest-wall computed tomography (CT) scan images was constructed. The boundaries of the chest wall were extracted by using a segmentation algorithm, and the mean shapes were subsequently developed. The reference index values were calculated from the developed mean shapes. Reference index values for the EI were compared with a conventional index, the Haller index (HI). A close association has been shown between the two indices in multiple subjects (r = 0.974, P < 0.001). The newly developed mean shapes and reference index values supply both reliability and objectivity to the diagnosis, analysis, and treatment of chest-wall deformities. They promise to be highly useful in clinical settings.

  18. Proportionality between chest wall resistance and elastance.

    PubMed

    Barnas, G M; Stamenović, D; Fredberg, J J

    1991-02-01

    Fredberg and Stamenovic (J. Appl. Physiol. 67: 2408-2419, 1989) demonstrated a relatively robust phenomenological relationship between resistance (R) and elastance (E) of lung tissue during external forcing. The relationship can be expressed as omega R = eta E, where omega = 2 pi times forcing frequency and eta is hysteresivity; they found eta to be remarkably invariant under a wide range of circumstances. From data gathered in previous experiments, we have tested the adequacy and utility of this phenomenological description for the chest wall (eta w) and its major compartments, the rib cage (eta rc), diaphragm-abdomen (eta d-a), and belly wall (eta bw+). For forcing frequencies and tidal volumes within the normal range of breathing, we found that eta w remained in a relatively narrow range (0.27-0.37) and that neither eta w nor the compartmental eta's changed much with frequency or tidal volume. Compared with eta w, eta rc tended to be slightly low, whereas eta d-a tended to be slightly higher than eta w. However, at higher frequencies (greater than 1 Hz) all eta's increased appreciably with frequency. During various static nonrespiratory maneuvers involving use of respiratory muscles, eta w increased up to twofold. We conclude that in the normal ranges of breathing frequency and tidal volume 1) elastic and dissipative processes within the chest wall appear to be coupled, 2) eta's of the various component parts of the chest wall are well matched, 3) respiratory muscle contraction increases the ratio of cyclic dissipative losses to energy storage, and 4) R of the relaxed chest wall can be estimated from E.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  19. Dosimetry for tangential chest wall irradiation.

    PubMed

    Fessenden, P; Palos, B B; Karzmark, C J

    1978-08-01

    The skin-sparing effect of megavoltage photons is lost to a varying extent when tangential beams are used to irradiate the chest wall. The skin dose for this technique, with and without a bolus, was investigated for 4- and 6-MV photons using film, thermoluminescent dosimeters, and an ionization chamber. Metal/tissue interface effects were observed when a flexible brass fabric material was used as a bolus.

  20. Quiescent Volcano-Chest Wall Hemangioma.

    PubMed

    Saldanha, Elroy; Martis, John J S; Kumar, B Vinod; D'Cunha, Rithesh J; Vijin, V

    2017-08-01

    Chest wall hemangiomas are rare tumors that may originate within the soft tissue or from the ribs. Intramuscular hemangioma is infrequent, representing less than 1 % of all hemangiomas, and the localization in the chest wall is even less frequent. They are typically cutaneous in location, large, and poorly circumscribed and can be locally destructive. We present a case of a 34-year-old lady presented with firm lump 3 × 3 cm in left upper and inner quadrant of left breast well defined borders, non-pulsatile and restricted mobility. Sono-mammogram was suggestive of ill-defined lesion at 10 o'clock position. CT chest was conclusive of chest wall hemangioma. The patient underwent excision of the lump. HPE was suggestive of cavernous hemangioma. Cavernous hemangioma typically manifest at birth or before the age of 30 years. CT is more sensitive than plain radiography in detecting phleboliths, which are present in approximately 30 % of cavernous hemangiomas. Surgical excision would be treatment of choice. In this case, the site of the lesion was in the breast clinically mimicking that of a fibroadenoma which warrants hemangioma as a differential diagnosis.

  1. Electrochemotherapy of chest wall breast cancer recurrence.

    PubMed

    Sersa, Gregor; Cufer, Tanja; Paulin, Snezna Marija; Cemazar, Maja; Snoj, Marko

    2012-08-01

    Chest wall breast cancer recurrence after mastectomy is a disease difficult to treat. Its incidence varies between 5% and 30% in different subset of patients. When possible, radical surgical therapy represents the main treatment approach, however when the disease progresses and/or treatments are not successful, ulceration, bleeding, lymphedema and psychological distress of progressive disease significantly decrease the quality of the remaining life of a patient. When surgical excision of chest wall recurrence is not possible, other local treatments such as radiotherapy, radiotherapy with hyperthermia, topical chemotherapy and electrochemotherapy might be taken into account. Electrochemotherapy provides safe, efficient and non-invasive locoregional treatment approach for chest wall breast cancer recurrence. Several clinical studies have demonstrated high efficacy and a good safety profile of electrochemotherapy applied in single or multiple consecutive sessions, till clinical response was reached. Electrochemotherapy can be performed either with cisplatin injected intratumorally or with bleomycin given intratumorally or intravenously. Furthermore, it can be effectively used in heavily pre-treated areas, after surgery, radiotherapy or systemic chemotherapy. These are the advantages that might demand its use especially in patients with pre-treated extensive disease and in frail elderly patients. With development of the technology electrochemotherapy could even be suggested as a primary local therapy in patients not suitable for surgical removal of the primary tumor. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Fetal tissue engineering: chest wall reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Fuchs, Julie R; Terada, Shinichi; Hannouche, Didier; Ochoa, Erin R; Vacanti, Joseph P; Fauza, Dario O

    2003-08-01

    This study was aimed at applying fetal tissue engineering to chest wall reconstruction. Fetal lambs underwent harvest of elastic and hyaline cartilage specimens. Once expanded in vitro, fetal chondrocytes were seeded onto synthetic scaffolds, which then were placed in a bioreactor. After birth, fetal cartilage constructs (n = 10) were implanted in autologous fashion into the ribs of all lambs (n = 6) along with identical, but acellular scaffolds, as controls (n = 6). Engineered and acellular specimens were harvested for analysis at 4 to 12 weeks postimplantation. Standard histology and matrix-specific staining were performed both before implantation and after harvest on all constructs. Regardless of the source of chondrocytes, all fetal constructs resembled hyaline cartilage, both grossly and histologically, in vitro. In vivo, engineered implants retained hyaline characteristics for up to 10 weeks after implantation but remodeled into fibrocartilage by 12 weeks postoperatively. Mononuclear inflammatory infiltrates surrounding residual PGA/PLLA polymer fibers were noted in all specimens but most prominently in the acellular controls. Engineered fetal cartilage can provide structural replacement for at least up to 10 weeks after autologous, postnatal implantation in the chest wall. Fetal tissue engineering may prove useful for the treatment of severe congenital chest wall defects at birth.

  3. Important considerations in chest wall reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Momeni, Arash; Kovach, Stephen J

    2016-06-01

    Chest wall reconstruction represents one of the most challenging tasks in plastic surgery. Over the past several decades, a more profound understanding of surgical anatomy and physiology along with tremendous advances in surgical technique have resulted in substantial improvements in postoperative outcomes. Conceptually, the reconstructive goals include dead space obliteration, restoration of skeletal stability with protection of intrathoracic structures, and stable soft tissue coverage. Ideally, these goals are achieved with minimal aesthetic deformity. J. Surg. Oncol. 2016;113:913-922. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  4. Necrobiotic xanthogranuloma of the chest wall.

    PubMed

    Smith, H Garth; Sargent, Larry A; Lundgrin, Daryl B

    2006-01-27

    Necrobiotic xanthogranuloma is a rare disease that usually presents with indurated yellow red nodules or plaques in the dermis or subdermal tissues. The pathogenesis of this disease is unknown and the limited number of cases has made long-term studies difficult. We report the case of a 61-year-old woman seen in our office for a 5 x 5-cm lesion of her chest wall. Biopsies established a diagnosis of necrobiotic xanthogranuloma. The patient received 4 months of intralesional steroid injections without change in the lesion. The patient was also treated with colchicine for several months without improvement. Therefore, the lesion was surgically excised and the area was reconstructed with local advancement skin flaps. The patient has been followed for 2 years with no evidence of recurrence.

  5. Multidisciplinary Oncoplastic Approach Reduces Infection in Chest Wall Resection and Reconstruction for Malignant Chest Wall Tumors.

    PubMed

    Khalil, Haitham H; Malahias, Marco N; Balasubramanian, Balapathiran; Djearaman, Madava G; Naidu, Babu; Grainger, Melvin F; Kalkat, Maninder

    2016-07-01

    Management of complex thoracic defects post tumor extipiration is challenging because of the nature of pathology, the radical approach, and the insertion of prosthetic material required for biomechanical stability. Wound complications pose a significant problem that can have detrimental effect on patient outcome. The authors outline an institutional experience of a multidisciplinary thoracic oncoplastic approach to improve outcomes. Prospectively collected data from 71 consecutive patients treated with chest wall resection and reconstruction were analyzed (2009-2015). The demographic data, comorbidities, operative details, and outcomes with special focus on wound infection were recorded. All patients were managed in a multidisciplinary approach to optimize perioperative surgical planning. Pathology included sarcoma (78%), locally advanced breast cancer (15%), and desmoids (6%), with age ranging from 17 to 82 years (median, 42 years) and preponderance of female patients (n = 44). Chest wall defects were located anterior and anterolateral (77.5%), posterior (8.4%), and apical axillary (10%) with skeletal defect size ranging from 56 to 600 cm(2) (mean, 154 cm(2)). Bony reconstruction was performed using polyprolene mesh, methyl methacrylate prosthesis, and titanium plates. Soft tissue reconstructions depended on size, location, and flap availability and were achieved using regional, distant, and free tissue flaps. The postoperative follow-up ranged from 5 to 70 months (median, 32 months). All flaps survived with good functional and aesthetic outcome, whereas 2 patients experienced surgical site infection (2.8%). Multidisciplinary thoracic oncoplastic maximizes outcome for patients with large resection of chest wall tumors with reduction in surgical site infection and wound complications particularly in association with rigid skeletal chest wall reconstruction.

  6. Multidisciplinary Oncoplastic Approach Reduces Infection in Chest Wall Resection and Reconstruction for Malignant Chest Wall Tumors

    PubMed Central

    Malahias, Marco N.; Balasubramanian, Balapathiran; Djearaman, Madava G.; Naidu, Babu; Grainger, Melvin F.; Kalkat, Maninder

    2016-01-01

    Background: Management of complex thoracic defects post tumor extipiration is challenging because of the nature of pathology, the radical approach, and the insertion of prosthetic material required for biomechanical stability. Wound complications pose a significant problem that can have detrimental effect on patient outcome. The authors outline an institutional experience of a multidisciplinary thoracic oncoplastic approach to improve outcomes. Methods: Prospectively collected data from 71 consecutive patients treated with chest wall resection and reconstruction were analyzed (2009–2015). The demographic data, comorbidities, operative details, and outcomes with special focus on wound infection were recorded. All patients were managed in a multidisciplinary approach to optimize perioperative surgical planning. Results: Pathology included sarcoma (78%), locally advanced breast cancer (15%), and desmoids (6%), with age ranging from 17 to 82 years (median, 42 years) and preponderance of female patients (n = 44). Chest wall defects were located anterior and anterolateral (77.5%), posterior (8.4%), and apical axillary (10%) with skeletal defect size ranging from 56 to 600 cm2 (mean, 154 cm2). Bony reconstruction was performed using polyprolene mesh, methyl methacrylate prosthesis, and titanium plates. Soft tissue reconstructions depended on size, location, and flap availability and were achieved using regional, distant, and free tissue flaps. The postoperative follow-up ranged from 5 to 70 months (median, 32 months). All flaps survived with good functional and aesthetic outcome, whereas 2 patients experienced surgical site infection (2.8%). Conclusions: Multidisciplinary thoracic oncoplastic maximizes outcome for patients with large resection of chest wall tumors with reduction in surgical site infection and wound complications particularly in association with rigid skeletal chest wall reconstruction. PMID:27536488

  7. Diffuse optical tomography in the presence of a chest wall

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ban, Han Y.; Busch, David R.; Pathak, Saurav; Moscatelli, Frank A.; Machida, Manabu; Schotland, John C.; Markel, Vadim A.; Yodh, Arjun G.

    2013-02-01

    Diffuse optical tomography (DOT) has been employed to derive spatial maps of physiologically important chromophores in the human breast, but the fidelity of these images is often compromised by boundary effects such as those due to the chest wall. We explore the image quality in fast, data-intensive analytic and algebraic linear DOT reconstructions of phantoms with subcentimeter target features and large absorptive regions mimicking the chest wall. Experiments demonstrate that the chest wall phantom can introduce severe image artifacts. We then show how these artifacts can be mitigated by exclusion of data affected by the chest wall. We also introduce and demonstrate a linear algebraic reconstruction method well suited for very large data sets in the presence of a chest wall.

  8. Chest wall reconstruction in a pediatric patient with ectopia cordis.

    PubMed

    Mohan, Raja; Peralta, Mat; Perez, Ramiro; Rosenkranz, Eliot R; Panthaki, Zubin J

    2010-08-01

    Ectopia cordis is defined as a congenital malposition of the heart outside of the thoracic cavity. It is a rare condition, and complete ectopia cordis can be a fatal condition. Successful surgical reconstruction of this defect has been reported but is uncommon. The general approach to reconstructing the chest wall involves repositioning the heart and providing adequate coverage of the chest wall defect. We describe our experience with a patient who had complete thoracic ectopia cordis treated with staged chest wall reconstruction. The first stage involved temporary closure with synthetic material, and the second stage involved definitive reconstruction with autologous bone and cartilage grafts supported with plates. The patient has been active and without complaints since the second stage and is awaiting tracheal decannulation. There have been a few descriptions of how to approach chest wall reconstruction in patients with ectopia cordis. The 2 stage method described can be considered to repair the chest wall defect in complete thoracic ectopia cordis.

  9. Diffuse optical tomography in the presence of a chest wall

    PubMed Central

    Busch, David R.; Pathak, Saurav; Moscatelli, Frank A.; Machida, Manabu; Schotland, John C.; Markel, Vadim A.; Yodh, Arjun G.

    2013-01-01

    Abstract. Diffuse optical tomography (DOT) has been employed to derive spatial maps of physiologically important chromophores in the human breast, but the fidelity of these images is often compromised by boundary effects such as those due to the chest wall. We explore the image quality in fast, data-intensive analytic and algebraic linear DOT reconstructions of phantoms with subcentimeter target features and large absorptive regions mimicking the chest wall. Experiments demonstrate that the chest wall phantom can introduce severe image artifacts. We then show how these artifacts can be mitigated by exclusion of data affected by the chest wall. We also introduce and demonstrate a linear algebraic reconstruction method well suited for very large data sets in the presence of a chest wall. PMID:23392384

  10. Surgical management of the radiated chest wall

    SciTech Connect

    Arnold, P.G.; Pairolero, P.C.

    1986-04-01

    Fifty consecutive patients with radiation-related problems of the chest wall were treated between 1976 and 1984. There were 40 women and 10 men with an average age of 54 years (range 26 to 78 years). Twenty-three patients had radiation ulcers alone, 20 had recurrent cancer, and 7 had infected median sternotomy wounds. Thirty-six had skeletal resections and 44 had soft-tissue resections. The skeleton was reconstructed with Prolene mesh in 12 patients and with autogenous rib in 3. Sixty-three muscles were transposed in 43 patients. Twelve omental transpositions were performed (8 for primary treatment and 4 for salvage of a failed muscle flap). Hospitalization averaged 20.2 days. There was one operative death (at 29 days). Partial flap necrosis occurred in 10 patients. Mesh was removed in three patients. There were 14 late deaths, most from recurrent tumor. The remaining patients had well-healed wounds and a generally improved quality of life. We conclude that aggressive resection and reliable reconstruction are critical considerations in the surgical management of this perplexing clinical problem.

  11. Chest wall mechanics in sustained microgravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wantier, M.; Estenne, M.; Verbanck, S.; Prisk, G. K.; Paiva, M.; West, J. B. (Principal Investigator)

    1998-01-01

    We assessed the effects of sustained weightlessness on chest wall mechanics in five astronauts who were studied before, during, and after the 10-day Spacelab D-2 mission (n = 3) and the 180-day Euromir-95 mission (n = 2). We measured flow and pressure at the mouth and rib cage and abdominal volumes during resting breathing and during a relaxation maneuver from midinspiratory capacity to functional residual capacity. Microgravity produced marked and consistent changes (Delta) in the contribution of the abdomen to tidal volume [DeltaVab/(DeltaVab + DeltaVrc), where Vab is abdominal volume and Vrc is rib cage volume], which increased from 30.7 +/- 3. 5 (SE)% at 1 G head-to-foot acceleration to 58.3 +/- 5.7% at 0 G head-to-foot acceleration (P < 0.005). Values of DeltaVab/(DeltaVab + DeltaVrc) did not change significantly during the 180 days of the Euromir mission, but in the two subjects DeltaVab/(DeltaVab + DeltaVrc) was greater on postflight day 1 than on subsequent postflight days or preflight. In the two subjects who produced satisfactory relaxation maneuvers, the slope of the Konno-Mead plot decreased in microgravity; this decrease was entirely accounted for by an increase in abdominal compliance because rib cage compliance did not change. These alterations are similar to those previously reported during short periods of weightlessness inside aircrafts flying parabolic trajectories. They are also qualitatively similar to those observed on going from upright to supine posture; however, in contrast to microgravity, such postural change reduces rib cage compliance.

  12. Chest wall mechanics in sustained microgravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wantier, M.; Estenne, M.; Verbanck, S.; Prisk, G. K.; Paiva, M.; West, J. B. (Principal Investigator)

    1998-01-01

    We assessed the effects of sustained weightlessness on chest wall mechanics in five astronauts who were studied before, during, and after the 10-day Spacelab D-2 mission (n = 3) and the 180-day Euromir-95 mission (n = 2). We measured flow and pressure at the mouth and rib cage and abdominal volumes during resting breathing and during a relaxation maneuver from midinspiratory capacity to functional residual capacity. Microgravity produced marked and consistent changes (Delta) in the contribution of the abdomen to tidal volume [DeltaVab/(DeltaVab + DeltaVrc), where Vab is abdominal volume and Vrc is rib cage volume], which increased from 30.7 +/- 3. 5 (SE)% at 1 G head-to-foot acceleration to 58.3 +/- 5.7% at 0 G head-to-foot acceleration (P < 0.005). Values of DeltaVab/(DeltaVab + DeltaVrc) did not change significantly during the 180 days of the Euromir mission, but in the two subjects DeltaVab/(DeltaVab + DeltaVrc) was greater on postflight day 1 than on subsequent postflight days or preflight. In the two subjects who produced satisfactory relaxation maneuvers, the slope of the Konno-Mead plot decreased in microgravity; this decrease was entirely accounted for by an increase in abdominal compliance because rib cage compliance did not change. These alterations are similar to those previously reported during short periods of weightlessness inside aircrafts flying parabolic trajectories. They are also qualitatively similar to those observed on going from upright to supine posture; however, in contrast to microgravity, such postural change reduces rib cage compliance.

  13. Infections and radiation injuries involving the chest wall.

    PubMed

    Blasberg, Justin D; Donington, Jessica S

    2010-11-01

    Soft tissue necrosis secondary to infection and radiation injury account for the majority of chest wall resections performed today that are unrelated to malignancy. Principles of treatment for chest wall infection and necrosis rely partially on the underlying cause and overall health of the patient but, in general, are based on wide resection of devitalized tissue and subsequent reconstruction with soft tissue coverage. Unlike resection for malignancy, fibrosis of underlying tissues often precludes skeletal reconstruction without concurrent loss of chest wall integrity or pulmonary function. Although the surgical intervention of these processes is similar, the underlying pathology differs significantly. This article addresses the risk factors, pathophysiology, clinical presentation, and management of chest wall and sternoclavicular joint infections, necrotizing processes, and radiation injury.

  14. Surgical Management of Lung Cancer Involving the Chest Wall.

    PubMed

    Lanuti, Michael

    2017-05-01

    The prevalence of chest wall invasion by non-small cell lung cancer is < 10% in published surgical series. The role of radiation or chemotherapy around the complete resection of lung cancer invading the chest wall, excluding the superior sulcus of the chest, is poorly defined. Survival of patients with lung cancer invading the chest wall is dependent on lymph node involvement and completeness of en-bloc resection. In some patients harboring T3N0 disease, 5-year survival in excess of 50% can be achieved. Offering en-bloc resection of lung cancer invading chest wall to patients with T3N1 or T3N2 disease is controversial. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Role of Cross Sectional Imaging in Isolated Chest Wall Tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Sanyal, Shantiranjan; Sharma, Barun K.; Prakash, Arjun; Dhingani, Dhabal D.; Bora, Karobi

    2017-01-01

    Introduction Isolated chest wall tuberculosis though a rare entity, the incidence of it has been on rise among immunocompromised population making it an important challenging diagnosis for the physicians. Its clinical presentation may resemble pyogenic chest wall abscess or chest wall soft tissue tumour. Sometimes it is difficult to detect clinically or on plain radiograph. Aim The present study was conducted with an aim to evaluate the common sites and varying appearances of isolated chest wall tuberculosis. Materials and Methods A hospital based cross-sectional retrospective study was conducted in Assam Medical College and Hospital, a tertiary care centre in North East India. The study group comprise of 21 patients (n=15 male and n=6 females) with isolated chest wall tuberculosis without associated pulmonary or spinal involvement who were subjected to Computed Tomography/Magnetic Resonance Imaging (CT/MRI) of the thorax following initial Ultrasonogram (USG) evaluation of the local site. Pathological correlation was done from imaging guided sampling of the aspirate or surgery. Results Variable sites of involvement were seen in the chest wall in our patients (n=21), with chest wall abscess formation being the most common presentation and rib being the most common bony site affected in the thoracic cage. Bony sclerosis was noted in 11 patients (52.4%), periosteal reaction in 10 patients (47.6%) and sequestration in five patients (23.8%). CT/MRI not only localized the exact site and extent of the abscesses which facilitated guided aspirations, but also helped in detecting typical bony lesions thereby, differentiating from pyogenic osteomyelitis besides ruling out associated pulmonary or pleural involvement in such patients. Conclusion Cross-sectional imaging plays an important role by giving a wholesome picture of both soft tissue and bony pathology. It is important to have adequate understanding of the radiologic manifestations of the chest wall involvement and

  16. Chest Wall Dissemination of Nocardiosis after Percutaneous Transthoracic Needle Biopsy

    SciTech Connect

    Shimamoto, Hiroshi Inaba, Yoshitaka; Yamaura, Hidekazu; Sato, Yozo; Kamiya, Mika; Miyazaki, Masaya; Arai, Yasuaki; Horio, Yoshitsugu

    2007-07-15

    We described a case of chest wall dissemination after percutaneous transthoracic needle biopsy. A 65-year-old man had a lung nodule which was suspected to be lung carcinoma. He underwent percutaneous transthoracic needle biopsy using an 18G semiautomated biopsy needle and pathologic diagnosis showed organizing pneumonia. Two months after the biopsy, chest wall dissemination occurred. Implantation of carcinoma along the biopsy route was suspected, but the mass was actually due to pulmonary nocardiosis.

  17. Measurement of chest wall displacement based on terahertz wave

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Hui; Lv, Hao; Jiao, Teng; Lu, Guohua; Li, Sheng; Li, Zhao; Liu, Miao; Jing, Xijing; Wang, Jianqi

    2015-02-01

    Measurement of chest wall displacement is an important approach for measuring mechanics of chest wall, which has considerable significance for assessing respiratory system and diagnosing pulmonary diseases. However, existing optical methods for measuring chest wall displacement are inconvenient for some specific patients such as the female patients and the patients with bandaged chest. In this letter, we proposed a method for measuring chest wall displacement based on terahertz wave and established corresponding mathematic model and set up a terahertz measurement system. The main advantages of this method are that it can measure the chest wall displacement of the subjects without taking off clothes or arranging any markers. To validate this method and assess the performance of the terahertz system, in vitro, the displacement of a water module driven by a linear guide rail was measured by the terahertz system and compared with the actual displacement of the water module. The results showed that the waveforms measured with two methods have a good agreement, and the relative error is less than 5% and sufficiently good for measurement demands. In vivo, the synchronous experiment was performed on five human volunteers with the terahertz system and a respiratory belt transducer. The results demonstrate that this method has good performance and promising prospects for measuring chest wall displacement.

  18. Chest wall segmentation in automated 3D breast ultrasound scans.

    PubMed

    Tan, Tao; Platel, Bram; Mann, Ritse M; Huisman, Henkjan; Karssemeijer, Nico

    2013-12-01

    In this paper, we present an automatic method to segment the chest wall in automated 3D breast ultrasound images. Determining the location of the chest wall in automated 3D breast ultrasound images is necessary in computer-aided detection systems to remove automatically detected cancer candidates beyond the chest wall and it can be of great help for inter- and intra-modal image registration. We show that the visible part of the chest wall in an automated 3D breast ultrasound image can be accurately modeled by a cylinder. We fit the surface of our cylinder model to a set of automatically detected rib-surface points. The detection of the rib-surface points is done by a classifier using features representing local image intensity patterns and presence of rib shadows. Due to attenuation of the ultrasound signal, a clear shadow is visible behind the ribs. Evaluation of our segmentation method is done by computing the distance of manually annotated rib points to the surface of the automatically detected chest wall. We examined the performance on images obtained with the two most common 3D breast ultrasound devices in the market. In a dataset of 142 images, the average mean distance of the annotated points to the segmented chest wall was 5.59 ± 3.08 mm. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Chest wall volumes during inspiratory loaded breathing in COPD patients.

    PubMed

    Coutinho Myrrha, Mariana Alves; Vieira, Danielle Soares Rocha; Moraes, Karoline Simões; Lage, Susan Martins; Parreira, Verônica Franco; Britto, Raquel Rodrigues

    2013-08-01

    Chest wall volumes and breathing patterns of 13 male COPD patients were evaluated at rest and during inspiratory loaded breathing (ILB). The sternocleidomastoid (SMM) and abdominal muscle activity was also evaluated. The main compartment responsible for the tidal volume at rest and during ILB was the abdomen. During ILB patients exhibited, in addition to increases in the ratio of inspiratory time to total time of the respiratory cycle and minute ventilation, increases (p<0.05) in the chest wall tidal volume by an increase in abdomen tidal volume as a result of improvement of end chest wall inspiratory volume without changing on end chest wall expiratory volume. The SMM and abdominal muscle activity increased 63.84% and 1.94% during ILB. Overall, to overcome the load imposed by ILB, COPD patients improve the tidal volume by changing the inspiratory chest wall volume without modifying the predominant mobility of the abdomen at rest and without affecting the end chest wall expiratory volume. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Development of a Chest Wall Protector Effective in Preventing Sudden Cardiac Death by Chest Wall Impact (Commotio Cordis)

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Kartik; Mandleywala, Swati N.; Gannon, Michael P.; Estes, Nathan Anthony Mark; Weinstock, Jonathan

    2017-01-01

    Objective: Commotio cordis, sudden death with chest impact, occurs clinically despite chest wall protectors worn in sports. In an experimental model of commotio cordis, commercially available chest wall protectors failed to prevent ventricular fibrillation (VF). The goal of the current investigation was to develop a chest wall protector effective in the prevention of commotio cordis. Design: In the Tufts experimental model of commotio cordis the ability of chest protectors to prevent VF was assessed. Impacts were delivered with a 40-mph lacrosse ball, timed to the vulnerable period for VF. Intervention: A chest wall protector or no chest wall protector (control) was randomly assigned to be placed over the chest. Four iterative series of 2 to 4 different chest wall material combinations were assessed. Materials included 3 different foams (Accelleron [Unequal Technologies, Glen Mills, PA], closed cell high density foam; Airilon [Unequal Technologies, Glen Mills, PA], closed cell low density soft foam; and an open cell memory foam) that were adhered to a layer of TriDur (Unequal Technologies, Glen Mills, PA), a flexible elastomeric coated aramid that was bonded to a semirigid polypropylene polymer (ImpacShield, Unequal Technologies, Glen Mills, PA). Main Outcome Measure: Induction of VF by chest wall impact was the primary outcome. Results: Of 80 impacts without chest protectors, 43 (54%) resulted in VF. Ventricular fibrillation with chest protectors ranged from a high of 60% to a low of 5%. Of 12 chest protectors assessed, only 3 significantly lowered the risk of VF compared with impacts without chest protectors. These 3 chest protectors were combinations of Accelleron, Airilon, TriDur, and ImpacShield of different thicknesses. Protection increased linearly with the thicker combinations. Conclusions: Effective protection against VF with chest wall protection can be achieved in an experimental model of commotio cordis. Clinical Relevance: Chest protector designs

  1. Use of the omentum in chest-wall reconstruction

    SciTech Connect

    Fix, R.J.; Vasconez, L.O. )

    1989-10-01

    Increased use of the omentum in chest-wall reconstruction has paralleled the refinement of anatomic knowledge and the development of safe mobilization techniques. Important anatomic points are the omental attachments to surrounding structures, the major blood supply from the left and right gastroepiploic vessels, and the collateral circulation via the gastroepiploic arch and Barkow's marginal artery. Mobilization of the omentum to the thorax involves division of its attachments to the transverse colon and separation from the greater curvature to fabricate a bipedicled flap. Most anterior chest wounds and virtually all mediastinal wounds can be covered with the omentum based on both sets of gastroepiploic vessels. The arc of transposition is increased when the omentum is based on a single pedicle, allowing coverage of virtually all chest-wall defects. The final method of increasing flap length involves division of the gastroepiploic arch and reliance on Barkow's marginal artery as collateral circulation to maintain flap viability. With regard to chest-wall reconstruction, we have included the omentum in the armamentarium of flaps used to cover mediastinal wounds. The omentum is our flap of choice for the reconstruction of most radiation injuries of the chest wall. The omentum may also be used to provide protection to visceral anastomoses, vascular conduits, and damaged structures in the chest, as well as to cover defects secondary to tumor excision or trauma. In brief, the omentum has proved to be a most dependable and versatile flap, particularly applicable to chest-wall reconstruction.

  2. Effect of the chest wall on breast lesion reconstruction

    PubMed Central

    Ardeshirpour, Yasaman; Huang, Minming; Zhu, Quing

    2009-01-01

    The chest wall underneath the breast tissue affects near-infrared (NIR) diffusive waves measured with reflection geometry. With the assistance of a co-registered ultrasound, the depth and the tilting angle of the chest wall can be determined and are used to model the breast as a two-layer medium. Finite element method (FEM) is suitable for modeling complex boundary conditions and is adapted to model the breast tissue and chest wall. Four parameters of bulk absorption and reduced scattering coefficients of these two layers are estimated and used for imaging reconstruction. Using a two-layer model, we have systematically investigated the effect of the chest wall on breast lesion reconstruction. Results have shown that chest-wall depth, titling angle, and difference between optical properties of two layers of lesion and reference sites affect the lesion reconstruction differently. Our analysis will be valuable and informative to researchers who are using reflectance geometry for breast imaging. The analysis can also provide guidelines for imaging operators to minimize image artifacts and to produce the best reconstruction results. PMID:19725717

  3. Ventilation distribution and chest wall mechanics in microgravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Paiva, M.; Wantier, M.; Verbanck, S.; Engel, L. A.; Prisk, G. K.; Guy, H. J. B.; West, J. B.

    1997-01-01

    The effect of gravity on lung ventilation distribution and the mechanisms of the chest wall were investigated. The following tests were performed with the respiratory monitoring system of the Anthorack, flown onboard Spacelab D2 mission: single breath washout (SBW), multiple breath washout (MBW) and argon rebreathing (ARB). In order to study chest wall mechanisms in microgravity, a respiratory inductive plethysmograph was used. The SBW tests did not reach statistical significance, while the ARB tests showed that gravity independent inhomogeneity of specific ventilation is larger than gravity dependent inhomogeneity. In which concerns the chest wall mechanisms, the analysis on the four astronauts during the normal respirations of the relaxation maneuver showed a 40 percent increase on the abdominal contribution to respiration.

  4. Ventilation distribution and chest wall mechanics in microgravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Paiva, M.; Wantier, M.; Verbanck, S.; Engel, L. A.; Prisk, G. K.; Guy, H. J. B.; West, J. B.

    1997-01-01

    The effect of gravity on lung ventilation distribution and the mechanisms of the chest wall were investigated. The following tests were performed with the respiratory monitoring system of the Anthorack, flown onboard Spacelab D2 mission: single breath washout (SBW), multiple breath washout (MBW) and argon rebreathing (ARB). In order to study chest wall mechanisms in microgravity, a respiratory inductive plethysmograph was used. The SBW tests did not reach statistical significance, while the ARB tests showed that gravity independent inhomogeneity of specific ventilation is larger than gravity dependent inhomogeneity. In which concerns the chest wall mechanisms, the analysis on the four astronauts during the normal respirations of the relaxation maneuver showed a 40 percent increase on the abdominal contribution to respiration.

  5. Primary Tumors of the Osseous Chest Wall and Their Management.

    PubMed

    Thomas, Mathew; Shen, K Robert

    2017-05-01

    Primary osseous tumors of the chest wall are uncommon neoplasms. They occur in a wide variety of pathologic forms, most of which can be distinguished by unique radiologic appearance. Management of these tumors depends on the diagnosis and stage. Adequate surgical resection is critical in achieving the best outcomes for most of these tumors. Chemotherapy and radiation may have an adjuvant role. Surgeons considering resection of any chest wall tumor should have a sound knowledge of the principles of resection and reconstruction. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Primitive chest wall neuroectodermal tumor in a pediatric patient.

    PubMed

    Liu, Zhengcheng; Zou, Wei; Ma, Guodong; Pan, Yanqing

    2011-10-01

    A 13-year-old boy with a primitive neuroectodermal tumor of the chest wall is presented. After four cycles of chemotherapy, a computed tomography scan of his chest showed a larger mass invading the left upper lobe of the lung. He underwent resection of the left chest wall from the left fourth to sixth ribs, including the tumor, combined with left upper lobectomy and lymph node dissection. A diagnosis of primitive neuroectodermal tumor was confirmed histopathologically and immunohistochemically. After surgery, four cycles of chemotherapy with ifosfamide and etoposide were given. One year after treatment, the patient is currently doing well without evidence of recurrence.

  7. Galactorrhea and hyperprolactinemia associated with chest wall injury.

    PubMed

    Morley, J E; Dawson, M; Hodgkinson, H; Kalk, W J

    1977-11-01

    A 48 year old premenopausal woman presented with galactorrhea and amenorrhea associated with chest wall burns. Basal serum prolactin levels were raised, and were further elevated by the administration of L-dopa, chlorpromazine and TRH. Intercostal nerve block and bromocryptine treatment reduced prolactin levels to normal, but did not noticably reduce milk secretion.

  8. Giant intramuscular haemangioma of the chest wall with osteolytic change.

    PubMed

    Matsuoka, Katsunari; Ueda, Mitsuhiro; Miyamoto, Yoshihiro

    2012-05-01

    Intramuscular haemangioma of the chest wall is very rare, and only few cases associated with rib destruction has been reported. Here, we describe a 37-year old woman with a giant intramuscular haemangioma arising in the left back and associated with rib destruction.

  9. Recent and Future Developments in Chest Wall Reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Ng, Calvin S H

    2015-01-01

    Reconstruction following major chest wall resection can be challenging. Conventional methods of using mesh with or without incorporation of methyl methacrylate are slowly being replaced by chest wall reconstruction prosthetic systems that use titanium plates or bars. The most popular systems in use are the titanium STRATOS bars and MatrixRIB plates, which have different systems for securing to the chest wall. In general, these new approaches are user friendly, are more ergonomic, and may avoid certain complications associated with the more conventional methods of reconstruction. However, the successful implantation of these titanium prosthetic systems requires the operator to be familiar with the limitations and potential pitfalls of the process. Follow-up data are only just emerging on the risk factors for implant failure of these prosthetic systems, as well as certain device-specific complications, with fracture failure being increasingly recognized as a significant problem. In the future, emerging intraoperative real-time imaging and 3-dimensional printing technology, as well as development in biomaterials, will allow chest wall reconstruction to become increasingly personalized.

  10. Mechanically induced sudden death in chest wall impact (commotio cordis).

    PubMed

    Link, Mark S

    2003-01-01

    Sudden death due to nonpenetrating chest wall impact in the absence of injury to the ribs, sternum and heart is known as commotio cordis. Although once thought rare, an increasing number of these events have been reported. Indeed, a significant percentage of deaths on the athletic field are due to chest wall impact. Commotio cordis is most frequently observed in young individuals (age 4-18 years), but may also occur in adults. Sudden death is instantaneous or preceded by several seconds of lightheadedness after the chest wall blow. Victims are most often found in ventricular fibrillation, and successful resuscitation is more difficult than expected given the young age, excellent health of the victims, and the absence of structural heart disease. Autopsy examination is notable for the lack of any significant cardiac or thoracic abnormalities. In an experimental model of commotio cordis utilizing anesthetized juvenile swine, ventricular fibrillation can be produced by a 30 mph baseball strike if the strike occurred during the vulnerable period of repolarization, on the upslope of the T-wave. Energy of the impact object was also found to be a critical variable with 40 mph baseballs more likely to cause ventricular fibrillation than velocities less or greater than 40 mph. In addition, more rigid impact objects and blows directly over the center of the chest were more likely to cause ventricular fibrillation. Peak left ventricular pressure generated by the chest wall blow correlated with the risk of ventricular fibrillation. Activation of the K(+)(ATP) channel is a likely cause of the ventricular fibrillation produced by chest wall blows. Successful resuscitation is attainable with early defibrillation.

  11. Electron arc therapy: chest wall irradiation of breast cancer patients

    SciTech Connect

    McNeely, L.K.; Jacobson, G.M.; Leavitt, D.D.; Stewart, J.R.

    1988-06-01

    From 1980 to October 1985 we treated 45 breast cancer patients with electron arc therapy. This technique was used in situations where optimal treatment with fixed photon or electron beams was technically difficult: long scars, recurrent tumor extending across midline or to the posterior thorax, or marked variation in depth of target tissue. Forty-four patients were treated following mastectomy: 35 electively because of high risk of local failure, and 9 following local recurrence. One patient with advanced local regional disease was treated primarily. The target volume boundaries on the chest wall were defined by a foam lined cerrobend cast which rested on the patient during treatment, functioning as a tertiary collimator. A variable width secondary collimator was used to account for changes in the radius of the thorax from superior to inferior border. All patients had computerized tomography performed to determine Internal Mammary Chain depth and chest wall thickness. Electron energies were selected based on these thicknesses and often variable energies over different segments of the arc were used. The chest wall and regional node areas were irradiated to 45 Gy-50 Gy in 5-6 weeks by this technique. The supraclavicular and upper axillary nodes were treated by a direct anterior photon field abutted to the superior edge of the electron arc field. Follow-up is from 10-73 months with a median of 50 months. No major complications were observed. Acute and late effects and local control are comparable to standard chest wall irradiation. The disadvantages of this technique are that the preparation of the tertiary field defining cast and CT treatment planning are labor intensive and expensive. The advantage is that for specific clinical situations large areas of chest wall with marked topographical variation can be optimally, homogeneously irradiated while sparing normal uninvolved tissues.

  12. Ewing Sarcoma/Primitive Neuroectodermal Tumor of the Chest Wall

    PubMed Central

    Shamberger, Robert C.; LaQuaglia, Michael P.; Gebhardt, Mark C.; Neff, James R.; Tarbell, Nancy J.; Marcus, Karen C.; Sailer, Scott L.; Womer, Richard B.; Miser, James S.; Dickman, Paul S.; Perlman, Elizabeth J.; Devidas, Meenakshi; Linda, Stephen B.; Krailo, Mark D.; Grier, Holcombe E.; Granowetter, Linda

    2003-01-01

    Objective: To establish outcome and optimal timing of local control for patients with nonmetastatic Ewing sarcoma/primitive neuroectodermal tumor (ES/PNET) of the chest wall. Methods: Patients ≤30 years of age with ES/PNET of the chest wall were entered in 2 consecutive protocols. Therapy included multiagent chemotherapy; local control was achieved by resection, radiotherapy, or both. We compared completeness of resection and disease-free survival in patients undergoing initial surgical resection versus those treated with neoadjuvant chemotherapy followed by resection, radiotherapy, or both. Patients with a positive surgical margin received radiotherapy. Results: Ninety-eight (11.3%) of 869 patients had primary tumors of the chest wall. Median follow-up was 3.47 years and 5-year event-free survival was 56% for the chest wall lesions. Ten of 20 (50%) initial resections resulted in negative margins compared with 41 of 53 (77%) negative margins with delayed resections after chemotherapy (P = 0.043). Event-free survival did not differ by timing of surgery (P = 0.69) or type of local control (P = 0.17). Initial chemotherapy decreased the percentage of patients needing radiation therapy. Seventeen of 24 patients (70.8%) with initial surgery received radiotherapy compared with 34 of 71 patients (47.9%) who started with chemotherapy (P = 0.061). If a delayed operation was performed, excluding those patients who received only radiotherapy for local control, only 25 of 62 patients needed radiotherapy (40.3%; P = 0.016). Conclusion: The likelihood of complete tumor resection with a negative microscopic margin and consequent avoidance of external beam radiation and its potential complications is increased with neoadjuvant chemotherapy and delayed resection of chest wall ES/PNET. PMID:14530727

  13. Chest wall reconstruction with methacrylate prosthesis in Poland syndrome.

    PubMed

    Arango Tomás, Elisabet; Baamonde Laborda, Carlos; Algar Algar, Javier; Salvatierra Velázquez, Angel

    2013-10-01

    Poland syndrome is a rare congenital malformation. This syndrome was described in 1841 by Alfred Poland at Guy's Hospital in London. It is characterized by hypoplasia of the breast and nipple, subcutaneous tissue shortages, lack of the costosternal portion of the pectoralis major muscle and associated alterations of the fingers on the same side. Corrective treatment of the chest and soft tissue abnormalities in Poland syndrome varies according to different authors. We report the case of a 17-year-old adolescent who underwent chest wall reconstruction with a methyl methacrylate prosthesis. This surgical procedure is recommended for large anterior chest wall defects, and it prevents paradoxical movement. Moreover it provides for individual remodeling of the defect depending on the shape of the patient's chest.

  14. High-frequency oscillation of the airway and chest wall.

    PubMed

    Fink, James B; Mahlmeister, Michael J

    2002-07-01

    High-frequency oscillation (HFO), applied to either the airway or chest wall, has been associated with changes in sputum attributes and clearance. The evolution of evidence, both in vitro and in vivo, supporting the use of HFO is reviewed. Devices that apply HFO to the airway range from the relatively simple mechanical Flutter and Acapella devices to the more complex Percussionaire Intrapercussive Ventilators. and the Hayek Oscillator are designed to provide high-frequency chest wall compression. Operation and use of these devices are described with examples of differentiation of device types by characterization of flows, and airway and esophageal pressures. Although HFO devices span a broad range of costs, they provide a reasonable therapeutic option to support secretion clearance for patients with cystic fibrosis.

  15. Chest Wall Pain as the Presenting Symptom of Leptomeningeal Carcinomatosis

    PubMed Central

    Sim, Kyoung Bo; Lee, Ho Jun; Park, Jin-Woo; Ryu, Gi Hyeong; Chang, Jihea; Kwon, Bum Sun

    2014-01-01

    Leptomeningeal metastasis (LMM), also referred to as leptomeningeal carcinomatosis, results from diffuse infiltration of the leptomeninges by malignant cells originating from extra-meningeal primary tumors. It occurs in approximately 5%-10% of patients with solid tumor. Among solid tumors, the most common types leading to infiltration of the leptomeninges are breast cancer, lung cancer, and melanoma. Patients with LMM may present various signs and symptoms. Herein, we report a rare case with initial presentation of isolated chest wall pain. Computed tomography of the chest with contrast revealed a 2.5-cm nodule over the left upper lung. Biopsy confirmed the diagnosis of adenocarcinoma. Later, cerebrospinal fluid cytology exam also confirmed leptomeningeal seeding. It is rare for leptomeningeal carcinomatosis patients to present with chest wall pain. Therefore, a high index of suspicion is mandatory for accurate and prompt diagnosis. PMID:25566489

  16. Chest wall thickness measurements for enriched uranium: An alternative approach

    SciTech Connect

    Kramer, G.H.; Puscalau, M.

    1994-05-01

    Human Monitoring Laboratory has developed a technique to determine the chest wall thickness of an individual using information from the spectrum produced by internally deposited radionuclides. The technique has been investigated both theoretically and practically using phoswich detectors and the Lawrence Livermore Torso Phantom. The phantom was used with lung sets containing homogeneously distributed 93% enriched uranium, 20% enriched uranium, natural uranium, and {sup 241}Am. It was found that a 3-cm chest wall thickness can be estimated to within 9% when measuring 93% enriched uranium. The technique does not work for the latter two radionuclides because of an insufficient separation in the photon energies and poor resolution of the phoswich detectors. The technique is only of value for activity levels limit. 5 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab.

  17. A magnetostrictive acceleration sensor for registration of chest wall displacements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaniusas, E.; Mehnen, L.; Krell, C.; Pfützner, H.

    2000-06-01

    The present study concerns a novel acceleration sensor built up using a bimetallic strip with one freely oscillating end. The strip consists of a magnetostrictive amorphous ribbon glued on a nonmagnetic metal ribbon. The sensor's effectiveness is demonstrated for the case of chest wall displacements as resulting from cardiorespiratory activity. The cheap and easy-to-handle novel sensor offers multiple information on the so-called sleep apnea syndrome.

  18. [Electron arc therapy: application of chest wall irradiation after mastectomy].

    PubMed

    Wang, Xiu-Shen; Liu, Meng-Zhong; Hu, Yong-Hong

    2004-03-01

    With the development of multidisciplinary treatment for cancer, great changes have taken place in the therapeutic strategy of breast cancer. However, radiotherapy as a method of local management, still plays an important role in the combined treatment of breast cancer. The recurrence in the chest wall ranks the first, accounting for 44-69% of the total local-regional relapse, therefore, the chest wall is commonly regarded as the most important target of radiotherapy after mastectomy. The traditional irradiation techniques cannot reach an ideal dose distribution due to the irregular shape of the chest wall. Electron arc therapy, by using the electron characteristics of dose distribution, combining the shape of thorax and the depth of target volume, make the dose distribution of target volume more reasonable, decreases the dose of heart or lung and has more clinical benefit than traditional techniques. On the other hand, it had been demonstrated by some clinical research that irradiation with electron arc could provide a high rate of local control and generally acceptable acute and long-term toxicity, comparing with the traditional irradiation techniques.

  19. Radiation-induced sarcomas of the chest wall

    SciTech Connect

    Souba, W.W.; McKenna, R.J. Jr.; Meis, J.; Benjamin, R.; Raymond, A.K.; Mountain, C.F.

    1986-02-01

    Sixteen patients are presented who had sarcomas of the chest wall at a site where a prior malignancy had been irradiated. The first malignancies included breast cancer (ten cases), Hodgkin's disease (four cases), and others (two cases). Radiation doses varied from 4200 to 5500 R (mean, 4900 R). The latency period ranged from 5 to 28 years (mean, 13 years). The histologic types of the radiation-induced sarcomas were as follows: malignant fibrous histiocytoma, nine cases; osteosarcoma, six cases; and malignant mesenchymoma, one case. The only long-term survivor is alive and well 12 years after resection of a clavicular chondroblastic osteosarcoma. Three cases were recently diagnosed. Despite aggressive multimodality treatment, the remaining 13 patients have all died from their sarcomas (mean survival, 13.5 months). All patients have apparently been cured of their first malignancies. Chemotherapy was ineffective. No treatment, including forequarter amputation, appeared to palliate the patients with supraclavicular soft tissue sarcomas. Major chest wall resection offered good palliation for seven of eight patients with sarcomas arising in the sternum or lateral chest wall. Close follow-up is needed to detect signs of these sarcomas in the ever-increasing number of patients receiving therapeutic irradiation.

  20. Oscillation of the lung by chest-wall vibration.

    PubMed

    Binks, A P; Bloch-Salisbury, E; Banzett, R B; Schwartzstein, R M

    2001-07-01

    Vibration of the thoracic surface has been shown to modify the drive to breathe and the sensation of dyspnea. It has been suggested that respiratory muscle afferents generate these effects. The possibility that the consequences of chest-wall vibration also involve intra-pulmonary afferents led us to investigate whether such vibration reaches the airways. Two vibratory stimuli were independently applied to four chest-wall sites and two control sites on eight healthy subjects. During separate breath holds, the vibrator was held on each site while subjects periodically opened and closed the pharynx. Airway pressure (P(AW)) was measured at the mouth. Spectral analysis of P(AW) showed pressure oscillations occurred at the same frequency as that of the vibrators when the pharynx was open; oscillation amplitude was vastly reduced when the pharynx was closed. Oscillation amplitude was also significantly larger during vibration at greater amplitude. These data demonstrate that vibration over the chest-wall vibrates the lung and could potentially excite intrapulmonary receptors.

  1. Electron arc irradiation of the postmastectomy chest wall: clinical results.

    PubMed

    Gaffney, D K; Prows, J; Leavitt, D D; Egger, M J; Morgan, J G; Stewart, J R

    1997-01-01

    Since 1980 electron arc irradiation of the postmastectomy chest wall has been the preferred technique for patients with advanced breast cancer at our institution. Here we report the results of this technique in 140 consecutive patients treated from 1980 to 1993. Thoracic computerized tomography was used to determine internal mammary lymph node depth and chest wall thickness, and for computerized dosimetry calculations. Total doses of 45-50 Gy in 5 to 5 1/2 weeks were delivered to the chest wall and internal mammary lymph nodes via electron arc and, in most cases, supraclavicular and axillary nodes were treated with a matching photon field. Patients were assessed for acute and late radiation changes, local and distant control of disease, and survival. Patients had a minimum follow-up of 1 year after completion of radiation treatment, and a mean follow up interval of 49 months and a median of 33 months. All patients had advanced disease: T stages 1, 2, 3, and 4 represented 21%, 39%, 21% and 19% of the study population, with a mean number of positive axillary lymph nodes of 6.5 (range, 0-29). Analysis was performed according to adjuvant status (no residual disease, n = 90), residual disease (positive margin, n = 15, and primary radiation, n = 2), or recurrent disease (n = 33). Acute radiation reactions were generally mild and self limiting. A total of 26% of patients developed moist desquamation, and 32% had brisk erythema. Actuarial 5 year local-regional control, freedom from distant failure, and cause-specific survival was 91%, 64%, and 75% in the adjuvant group; 84%, 50%, and 53% in the residual disease group; and 63%, 34%, and 32% in the recurrent disease group, respectively. In univariate Cox regressions, the number of positive lymph nodes was predictive for local failure in the adjuvant group (P = 0.037). Chronic complications were minimal with 11% of patients having arm edema, 17% hyperpigmentation, and 13% telangectasia formation. These data demonstrate that

  2. Algorithmic Error Correction of Impedance Measuring Sensors

    PubMed Central

    Starostenko, Oleg; Alarcon-Aquino, Vicente; Hernandez, Wilmar; Sergiyenko, Oleg; Tyrsa, Vira

    2009-01-01

    This paper describes novel design concepts and some advanced techniques proposed for increasing the accuracy of low cost impedance measuring devices without reduction of operational speed. The proposed structural method for algorithmic error correction and iterating correction method provide linearization of transfer functions of the measuring sensor and signal conditioning converter, which contribute the principal additive and relative measurement errors. Some measuring systems have been implemented in order to estimate in practice the performance of the proposed methods. Particularly, a measuring system for analysis of C-V, G-V characteristics has been designed and constructed. It has been tested during technological process control of charge-coupled device CCD manufacturing. The obtained results are discussed in order to define a reasonable range of applied methods, their utility, and performance. PMID:22303177

  3. Accuracy of transthoracic ultrasound for the prediction of chest wall infiltration by lung cancer and of lung infiltration by chest wall tumours.

    PubMed

    Caroli, Guido; Dell'Amore, Andrea; Cassanelli, Nicola; Dolci, Giampiero; Pipitone, Emanuela; Asadi, Nizar; Stella, Franco; Bini, Alessandro

    2015-10-01

    We wanted to determine the accuracy of transthoracic ultrasound in the prediction of chest wall infiltration by lung cancer or lung infiltration by chest wall tumours. Patients having preoperative CT-scan suspect for lung/chest wall infiltration were prospectively enrolled. Inclusion criteria for lung cancer were: obliteration of extrapleural fat, obtuse angle between tumour and chest wall, associated pleural thickening. The criteria for chest wall tumours were: rib destruction and intercostal muscles infiltration with extrapleural fat obliteration and intrathoracic extension. Lung cancer patients with evident chest wall infiltration were excluded. Transthoracic ultrasound was preoperatively performed. Predictions were checked during surgical intervention. Twenty-three patients were preoperatively examined. Sensitivity, specificity, positive and negative predictive values of transthoracic ultrasound were 88.89%, 100%, 100% and 93.3%, respectively. Youden index was used to determine the best cut-off for tumour size in predicting lung/chest wall infiltration: 4.5cm. At univariate logistic regression, tumour size (<4.5 vs ≥ 4.5cm) (p=0.0072) was significantly associated with infiltration. Transthoracic ultrasound is a useful instrument for predicting neoplastic lung or chest wall infiltration in cases of suspect CT-scans and could be used as part of the preoperative workup to assess tumour staging and to plan the best surgical approach. Copyright © 2015 Australian and New Zealand Society of Cardiac and Thoracic Surgeons (ANZSCTS) and the Cardiac Society of Australia and New Zealand (CSANZ). Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. [Primary hydatidosis of the chest wall. Report of 5 cases].

    PubMed

    Braham, Emna; Ayadi-Kaddour, Aïda; Abid, Leïla; Ismail, Olfa; Smati, Belhassen; Fénniche, Sourraya; Djilani, Habiba; Megdiche, Lamine; Kilani, Tarek; El Mezni, Faouzi

    2007-08-01

    Hydatidosis is an endemic affection in Tunisia. Bone echinococcosis is a relatively rare entity accounting for only 0.5-2% of all hydatid cysts in humans and chest wall is an uncommon site for the disease. Report of a new case We report about this talk 5 cases concerning 2 men and 3 women (mean of age 35.4 years) explored for parietal mass (4 cases), or chest pain (1 case). Diagnosis was suspected on radiologic findings in all cases. All patients underwent surgery. Medical treatment was associated in 2 cases. Histopathology of resected specimen confirmed diagnosis of echinococcosis. No recurrence was observed during follow-up period.

  5. Pneumocephalus Following Thoracic Surgery with Posterior Chest Wall Resection.

    PubMed

    Müller, Ina; Tönnies, Mario; Pfannschmidt, Joachim; Kaiser, Dirk

    2015-12-01

    Pneumocephalus can be seen after head injury with fracture of the skull-base or in cerebral neoplasm, infection, or after intracranial or spinal surgery. We report on a 69-year-old male patient with pneumocephalus after right-sided lobectomy and en bloc resection of the chest wall for non-small-cell lung cancer. Postoperatively, the patient showed a reduced vigilance level with no response to pain stimuli and anisocoria. The CCT scan revealed an extensive pneumocephalus; following which, the patient underwent neurosurgery with laminectomy and ligature of the transected nerve roots. After operation the patient returned to his baseline mental status.

  6. Congenital primitive neuroectodermal tumor (neuroepithelioma) of the chest wall.

    PubMed

    Das, L; Chang, C H; Cushing, B; Jewell, P

    1982-01-01

    Primitive neuroectodermal tumor (neuroepithelioma) is a relatively common central nervous system tumor in children. Those arising from a peripheral nerve are extremely rare in childhood. There is only one reported case in 6-year-old where the tumor arose from the sciatic nerve. A case of neuroectodermal tumor of the chest wall, arising from the intercostal nerve, in a newborn is presented. The tumor metastasized to the brain. Prominent Homer-Wright rosettes, with central eosinophilic fibrillar substance similar to that seen in neuroepithelioma of the central nervous system, were present in the primary tumor and brain metastases. Ultrastructure, as revealed by transmission electron microscopy, is also described.

  7. Necrotising fasciitis of the neck and anterior chest wall.

    PubMed

    Khadakkar, Sonali Prabhakar; Harkare, Vivek V; Deosthale, Nitin V; Gupta, Ashish

    2011-07-01

    Necrotising fasciitis is a rare but rapidly progressive and potentially life threatening infection of the soft tissue, involving subcutaneous tissue and deep fascial layer. It may affect any part of the body, but the extremities, abdominal wall, and perineum are most commonly affected. Here we present a case of necrotising fasciitis of the neck and anterior chest wall which is a rare presentation. The risk factor of the disease was uncontrolled diabetes mellitus. We could treat this patient successfully by early recognition, aggressive surgical debridement, intravenous antibiotics, fractional doses of insulin to control diabetes and other supportive measures.

  8. Improving breast cancer diagnosis by reducing chest wall effect in diffuse optical tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Feifei; Mostafa, Atahar; Zhu, Quing

    2017-02-01

    We have developed ultrasound (US)-guided diffuse optical tomography (DOT) technique to assist US diagnosis of breast cancer and to predict neoadjuvant chemotherapy response of breast cancer patients. The technique was implemented using a hand-held hybrid probe consisting co-registered US transducer and optical source and detector fibers which couple the light illumination from laser diodes and photon detection to PMT detectors. With the US guidance, diffused light measurements were made at the breast lesion site and the normal contralateral reference site which was used to estimate the background tissue optical properties for imaging reconstruction. However, background optical properties were affected by the chest wall underneath the breast tissue. In this study, we have analyzed data from 297 female patients and results have shown statistical significant correlation between fitted optical properties (μa and μs') and the chest wall depth detected by a boundary detection algorithm applied to co-registered US images (r < 0.27, p < 1.0 x 10-4). After subtracting the background total hemoglobin (tHb) computed with μa at each wavelength, the difference between malignant and benign lesion groups has improved. The Area-under-the- ROC curve (AUC) has improved from 88.5% to 91.5% (sensitivity improved from 85.0% to 87.5% and specificity from 90.2% to 92.6%). Statistical test has revealed significant difference of the AUC improvements after subtracting background tHb values.

  9. Necrotizing Fasciitis of the Chest Wall: Report of Pediatric Cases.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Monica; Meeks, Andrew; Kearl, Liza

    2015-09-01

    Necrotizing fasciitis is a soft tissue infection uncommonly described in children and is associated with significant morbidity and mortality if not treated early and aggressively. Reports of cases involving the upper torso are rare in general. In adults, necrotizing fasciitis is most commonly described in the abdomen, perineum, and extremities. For children, particularly neonates, necrotizing fasciitis most commonly involves the trunk presenting as omphalitis. In this report, we describe 2 pediatric cases of necrotizing fasciitis of the chest wall that presented within 6 months from each other at Los Angeles County Hospital/University of Southern California Pediatric Emergency Department. Both cases involved previously healthy children with above normal body mass indices of 36 and 25.6, respectively. These cases are noteworthy because of the rarity of necrotizing fasciitis among children especially in the chest wall, atypical presentation with nonspecific symptoms which made the diagnosis challenging, and suggestion that obesity may be a potential risk factor. Despite the rarity of this disease, the information presented in these cases may aid in raising the index of suspicion for diagnosis of necrotizing fasciitis.

  10. [Malignant fibrous histiocytoma of the chest wall in a nonagenarian].

    PubMed

    Kodama, K; Igase, M; Kazatani, Y; Matsuzaki, K; Murakami, E; Kokubu, T

    1995-01-01

    We report a case of malignant fibrous histiocytoma of the chest wall observed in a 94-year-old woman. She noticed appetite loss and general edema a week before admission. The patient was diagnosed as having congestive heart failure due to valvular heart disease on the basis of echocardiographic findings and became symptom-free by treatment with vasodilators and diuretics. However, chest roentgenogram disclosed a extrapleural mass in the left mid-lateral chest. About 2 months after admission, she experienced left lateral chest pain for the first time. The chest CT scan revealed a 5 x 5 x 2 cm mass, adjacent to the lateral-posterior chest wall and projecting into the thoracic cavity and rib osteolysis. Gallium-67 citrate scintigram showed abnormal isotope accumulation in the left middle chest. Biopsy was not done. The therapeutic approach was mainly pain relief, and no tumor resection, chemotherapy, or radiotherapy was performed. The mass increased in size, and increasingly extended into the thoracic cavity on follow-up CT scans. Furthermore, marked invasion of the tumor to subcutis and subscapula was found. She died of cachexia and respiratory failure 34 weeks after admission. Histologic examination revealed malignant fibrous histiocytoma.

  11. Polylactide bioabsorbable struts for chest wall reconstruction in a pediatric patient.

    PubMed

    Makarawo, Tafadzwa P; Reynolds, Richard A; Cullen, Marc L

    2015-02-01

    Chest wall reconstruction after pediatric tumor resection is challenging. Children have unique characteristics related to growth and prosthetic material for reconstruction must be chosen carefully. Poly-L-Lactide (PLA), a bioabsorbable prosthetic material, has been used in the plate form for reconstruction after tumor resection in children. Recently developed PLA struts have been successfully used to reconstruct pediatric chest wall deformities. This is the first description of the use of PLA rib struts to reconstruct chest wall defects after a pediatric chest wall tumor resection. Copyright © 2015 The Society of Thoracic Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Predicting Chest Wall Pain From Lung Stereotactic Body Radiotherapy for Different Fractionation Schemes

    SciTech Connect

    Woody, Neil M.; Videtic, Gregory M.M.; Stephans, Kevin L.; Djemil, Toufik; Kim, Yongbok; Xia Ping

    2012-05-01

    Purpose: Recent studies with two fractionation schemes predicted that the volume of chest wall receiving >30 Gy (V30) correlated with chest wall pain after stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) to the lung. This study developed a predictive model of chest wall pain incorporating radiobiologic effects, using clinical data from four distinct SBRT fractionation schemes. Methods and Materials: 102 SBRT patients were treated with four different fractionations: 60 Gy in three fractions, 50 Gy in five fractions, 48 Gy in four fractions, and 50 Gy in 10 fractions. To account for radiobiologic effects, a modified equivalent uniform dose (mEUD) model calculated the dose to the chest wall with volume weighting. For comparison, V30 and maximum point dose were also reported. Using univariable logistic regression, the association of radiation dose and clinical variables with chest wall pain was assessed by uncertainty coefficient (U) and C statistic (C) of receiver operator curve. The significant associations from the univariable model were verified with a multivariable model. Results: 106 lesions in 102 patients with a mean age of 72 were included, with a mean of 25.5 (range, 12-55) months of follow-up. Twenty patients reported chest wall pain at a mean time of 8.1 (95% confidence interval, 6.3-9.8) months after treatment. The mEUD models, V30, and maximum point dose were significant predictors of chest wall pain (p < 0.0005). mEUD improved prediction of chest wall pain compared with V30 (C = 0.79 vs. 0.77 and U = 0.16 vs. 0.11). The mEUD with moderate weighting (a = 5) better predicted chest wall pain than did mEUD without weighting (a = 1) (C = 0.79 vs. 0.77 and U = 0.16 vs. 0.14). Body mass index (BMI) was significantly associated with chest wall pain (p = 0.008). On multivariable analysis, mEUD and BMI remained significant predictors of chest wall pain (p = 0.0003 and 0.03, respectively). Conclusion: mEUD with moderate weighting better predicted chest wall pain than

  13. A Rare Case of Hamartoma Chest Wall Following Trauma in a 42-year-old Man

    PubMed Central

    Ahmadinejad, Mojtaba; Pour, Asghar Alie; Hosseini, Peyman Khadem; Hashemian, Amir Masoud; Ahmadi, Koorosh

    2016-01-01

    Background: Chest wall mesenchymal hamartoma (CWH) is a distinct and extremely rare tumor-like lesion of the thorax. It usually presents in the neonatal period or in infancy. The common presentation is in the form of a visible chest wall mass with or without respiratory distress. Case presentation: A 42-year-old man with a history of chest wall trauma since 5 years ago was admitted with a swelling of the anterior of the chest wall and during this period has grown slowly. Physical examination showed a left anterior chest wall deformity. Chest radiographs and chest CT showed a left anterolateral chest wall mass involving the fourth and fifth ribs. Thoracotomy was performed. The tumor and involved ribs were resected with a 5cm safe margin. The histopathologic examination showed hamartoma. The patient has been fallowed up since 60 month ago, and has not had any complaints in this time. Result: Despite the rarity of chest wall hematoma, this side effect must always be taken into consideration while studying the chest wall injuries especially in the case of trauma history due to other differential diagnosis and her side effects such as respiratory problems. Conclusion: Although rare, this condition ought to be kept in mind while dealing with hamartoma Chest wall following trauma in order to avoid its complications such as respiratory problems. Surgical excision is usually curative in combination with conservative therapy if possible. PMID:27994306

  14. Galactorrhoea following surgical procedures to the chest wall: the role of prolactin.

    PubMed Central

    MacFarlane, I. A.; Rosin, M. D.

    1980-01-01

    Normal prolactin levels were found in two cases of galactorrhoea following surgical procedures to the chest wall and one was treated successfully with bromocriptine. Studies were then carried out to test the claim that chest-wall injury is one of the common causes of hyperprolactinaemia. Serum prolactin levels were measured before and after thoracotomy in 7 patients, following traumatic rib fractures in 8 patients and after burns to the chest in one patient. No evidence was found to suggest that sustained hyperprolactinaemia follows chest wall surgery or injury, and the role of prolactin in the condition 'chest wall injury' galactorrhoea is discussed. PMID:7189882

  15. Chest wall reconstruction using iliac bone allografts and muscle flaps.

    PubMed

    Garcia-Tutor, Emilio; Yeste, Luis; Murillo, Julio; Aubá, Cristina; Sanjulian, Mikel; Torre, Wenceslao

    2004-01-01

    Technically we can divide full-thickness thoracic reconstruction into 2 parts: providing a rigid support and ensuring well-vascularized coverage. Since 1986, the authors' center has had ample experience with bone banks and the use of cryopreserved bone grafts, which led them to consider the possibility of using these grafts for full-thickness chest wall reconstruction. They describe 3 patients in whom resection of the tumor and reconstruction of the thorax were carried out using iliac bone allografts covered with muscle flaps (1 pectoralis major and 2 rectus abdominis). None of the patients experienced breathing difficulties, pain, or instability after 14 months, 18 months, and 11 years of follow-up. The result of the reconstruction was excellent in all 3 patients in terms of function and aesthetics. The advantage of allografts compared with synthetic materials is their potential integration; they can become part of the host patient's living tissue.

  16. Chest wall dynamics and muscle recruitment during professional flute playing.

    PubMed

    Cossette, Isabelle; Monaco, Pierpaolo; Aliverti, Andrea; Macklem, Peter T

    2008-02-01

    Respiratory parameters and sound were recorded during professional flute playing in order to assess what physiological processes were associated with the control of sound production that results in 'breath support' which in turn is associated with high quality playing. Four standing young professional flautists played flute excerpts with and without breath support. Recordings included optoelectronic plethysmographic measurements of chest wall volume (V(cw)) and its compartments, surface electromyography of the scalene, lateral abdominal, rectus abdominus, parasternal and sternocleidomastoid muscles, mouth pressure, and sound. Flow was estimated from differentiating V(cw) during playing. Results showed that flute support entails antagonistic contraction of non-diaphragmatic inspiratory muscles that tends to hold the rib cage at higher lung volume. This relieves the expiratory muscles from the task of producing the right mouth pressure, especially at the end of the phrases, so they can contribute more to the finer control of mouth pressure modulations required for high quality playing.

  17. Measurements of ultrasonic pulse distortion produced by human chest wall.

    PubMed

    Hinkelman, L M; Szabo, T L; Waag, R C

    1997-04-01

    Ultrasonic wavefront distortion produced by transmission through human chest wall specimens was measured over a two-dimensional aperture. Measured pulse wavefronts were sometimes disrupted by secondary wavefronts produced by interaction between the transmitted pulses and the bone and cartilage structures of the rib cage. The secondary wavefronts produced large distortions in the received waveforms and interfered with the determination of the wavefront distortion caused by soft-tissue inhomogeneities. The effects of secondary wavefronts were minimized by reducing the region of analysis. Differences in arrival time and energy level between these restricted regions and references that account for geometric delay and spreading were computed. Spectral changes were assessed by calculating a waveform similarity factor that is decreased from 1.0 by changes in waveform shape. For 16 different intercostal spaces, the arrival time fluctuations of the measured waveforms had an average (+/-s.d.) rms value of 21.3 (+/-8.4) ns and an average correlation length of 2.50 (+/-0.62) mm. The energy level fluctuations had an average rms value of 1.57 (+/-0.45) dB and an average correlation length of 1.98 (+/-0.33) mm, and the average waveform similarity factor was 0.964 (+/-0.012). For soft-tissue inhomogeneities in chest wall specimens, the average rms arrival time and energy level fluctuations were less than half those measured for the abdominal wall. However, although the average correlation length of the arrival time fluctuations was less than half that found for the abdominal wall, the average correlation length of the energy level fluctuations was similar to that of the abdominal wall.

  18. Musculoskeletal problems of the chest wall in athletes.

    PubMed

    Gregory, Peter L; Biswas, Anita C; Batt, Mark E

    2002-01-01

    Chest pain in the athlete has a wide differential diagnosis. Pain may originate from structures within the thorax, such as the heart, lungs or oesophagus. However, musculoskeletal causes of chest pain must be considered. The aim of this review is to help the clinician to diagnose chest wall pain in athletes by identifying the possible causes, as reported in the literature. Musculoskeletal problems of the chest wall can occur in the ribs, sternum, articulations or myofascial structures. The cause is usually evident in the case of direct trauma. Additionally, athletes' bodies may be subjected to sudden large indirect forces or overuse, and stress fractures of the ribs caused by sporting activity have been extensively reported. These have been associated with golf, rowing and baseball pitching in particular. Stress fractures of the sternum reported in wrestlers cause pain and tenderness of the sternum, as expected. Diagnosis is by bone scan and limitation of activity usually allows healing to occur. The slipping rib syndrome causes intermittent costal margin pain related to posture or movement, and may be diagnosed by the 'hooking manoeuvre', which reproduces pain and sometimes a click. If reassurance and postural advice fail, good results are possible with resection of the mobile rib. The painful xiphoid syndrome is a rare condition that causes pain and tenderness of the xiphoid and is self-limiting. Costochondritis is a self-limiting condition of unknown aetiology that typically presents with pain around the second to fifth costochondral joints. It can be differentiated from Tietze's syndrome in which there is swelling and pain of the articulation. Both conditions eventually settle spontaneously although a corticosteroid injection may be useful in particularly troublesome cases. The intercostal muscles may be injured causing tenderness between the ribs. Other conditions that should be considered include epidemic myalgia, precordial catch syndrome and referred pain

  19. Modulation of chest wall intermuscular coherence: effects of lung volume excursion and transcranial direct current stimulation.

    PubMed

    Tomczak, Corey R; Greidanus, Krista R; Boliek, Carol A

    2013-08-01

    Chest wall muscle recruitment varies as a function of the breathing task performed. However, the cortical control of the chest wall muscles during different breathing tasks is not known. We studied chest wall intermuscular coherence during various task-related lung volume excursions in 10 healthy adults (34 ± 15 yr; 2 men, 8 women) and determined if transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS) could modulate chest wall intermuscular coherence during these tasks. Simultaneous assessment of regional intercostal and oblique electromyographic activity was measured while participants performed standardized tidal breathing, speech, maximum phonation, and vital capacity tasks. Lung volume and chest wall kinematics were determined using variable inductance plethysmography. We found that chest wall area of intermuscular coherence was greater during tidal and speech breathing compared with phonation and vital capacity (all P < 0.05) and between tidal breathing compared with speech breathing (P < 0.05). Anodal tDCS increased chest wall area of intermuscular coherence from 0.04 ± 0.09 prestimulation to 0.18 ± 0.19 poststimulation for vital capacity (P < 0.05). Sham tDCS and cathodal tDCS had no effect on coherence during lung volume excursions. Chest wall kinematics were not affected by tDCS. Our findings indicate that lung volume excursions about the midrange of vital capacity elicit a greater area of chest wall intermuscular coherence compared with lung volume excursions spanning the entire range of vital capacity in healthy adults. Our findings also demonstrate that brief tDCS may modulate the cortical control of the chest wall muscles in a stimulation- and lung volume excursion task-dependent manner but does not affect chest wall kinematics in healthy adults.

  20. RLC model of visco-elastic properties of the chest wall

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aliverti, Andrea; Ferrigno, Giancarlo

    1996-04-01

    The quantification of the visco-elastic properties (resistance (R), inertia (L) and compliance (C)) of the different chest wall compartments (pulmonary rib cage,diaphragmatic rib cage and abdomen) is important to study the status of the passive components of the respiratory system, particularly in selected pathologies. Applying the viscoelastic-electrical analogy to the chest wall, we used an identification method in order to estimate the R, L and C parameters of the different parts of the chest, basing on different models; the input and output measured data were constituted by the volume variations of the different chest wall compartments and by the nasal pressure during controlled intermittent positive pressure ventilation by nasal mask, while the parameters of the system (R, L and C of the different compartments) were to be estimated. Volumes were measured with a new method, recently validated, based on an opto-electronic motion analyzer, able to compute with high accuracy and null invasivity the absolute values and the time variations of the volumes of each of the three compartments. The estimation of the R, L and C parameters has been based on a least-squared criterion, and the minimization has been based on a robustified iterative Gauss-Newton algorithm. The validation of the estimation procedure (fitting) has ben performed computing the percentage root mean square value of the error between the output real data and the output estimated data. The method has been applied to 2 healthy subjects. Also preliminary results have been obtained from 20 subjects affected by neuromuscular diseases (Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy (DMD) and Spinal Muscle Atrophy (SMA)). The results show that: (a) the best-fitting electrical models of the respiratory system are made up by one or three parallel RLC branches supplied by a voltage generator (so considering inertial properties, particularly in the abdominal compartment, and not considering patient/machine connection); (b) there

  1. Chest Wall Motion during Speech Production in Patients with Advanced Ankylosing Spondylitis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kalliakosta, Georgia; Mandros, Charalampos; Tzelepis, George E.

    2007-01-01

    Purpose: To test the hypothesis that ankylosing spondylitis (AS) alters the pattern of chest wall motion during speech production. Method: The pattern of chest wall motion during speech was measured with respiratory inductive plethysmography in 6 participants with advanced AS (5 men, 1 woman, age 45 plus or minus 8 years, Schober test 1.45 plus or…

  2. Chest Wall Reconstruction Using a Methyl Methacrylate Neo-Rib and Mesh.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, Kei; Park, Bernard J; Adusumilli, Prasad S; Rizk, Nabil P; Huang, James; Jones, David R; Bains, Manjit S

    2015-08-01

    Prosthetic reconstruction of the chest wall after oncologic resection is performed by means of various techniques using different materials. We describe a new technique of chest wall reconstruction that includes the use of Marlex mesh and the creation of a neo-rib from a Steinmann pin and methyl methacrylate.

  3. Fibrous dysplasia of the rib presenting as a huge chest wall tumor: report of a case.

    PubMed

    Chang, B S; Lee, S C; Harn, H J

    1994-07-01

    Fibrous dysplasia of the rib is not uncommon, but is rarely demonstrated as a huge chest wall mass with severe clinical symptoms. A 59-year-old patient, presenting with a huge, rapidly expanding chest wall tumor compressing the lung, liver and heart accompanied by chest pain and dyspnea, is reported. The tumor was success-fully excised by local radical resection.

  4. Chest Wall Motion during Speech Production in Patients with Advanced Ankylosing Spondylitis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kalliakosta, Georgia; Mandros, Charalampos; Tzelepis, George E.

    2007-01-01

    Purpose: To test the hypothesis that ankylosing spondylitis (AS) alters the pattern of chest wall motion during speech production. Method: The pattern of chest wall motion during speech was measured with respiratory inductive plethysmography in 6 participants with advanced AS (5 men, 1 woman, age 45 plus or minus 8 years, Schober test 1.45 plus or…

  5. Reconstruction of chest wall using a two-layer prolene mesh and bone cement sandwich.

    PubMed

    Aghajanzadeh, Manouchehr; Alavi, Ali; Aghajanzadeh, Gilda; Ebrahimi, Hannan; Jahromi, Sina Khajeh; Massahnia, Sara

    2015-02-01

    Wide surgical resection is the most effective treatment for the vast majority of chest wall tumors. This study evaluated the clinical success of chest wall reconstruction using a Prolene mesh and bone cement prosthetic sandwich. The records of all patients undergoing chest wall resection and reconstruction were reviewed. Surgical indications, the location and size of the chest wall defect, diaphragm resection, pulmonary performance, postoperative complications, and survival of each patient were recorded. From 1998 to 2008, 43 patients (27 male, 16 female; mean age of 48 years) underwent surgery in our department to treat malignant chest wall tumors: chondrosarcoma (23), osteosarcoma (8), spindle cell sarcoma (6), Ewing's sarcoma (2), and others (4). Nine sternectomies and 34 antero-lateral and postero-lateral chest wall resections were performed. Postoperatively, nine patients experienced respiratory complications, and one patient died because of respiratory failure. The overall 4-year survival rate was 60 %. Chest wall reconstruction using a Prolene mesh and bone cement prosthetic sandwich is a safe and effective surgical procedure for major chest wall defects.

  6. A triceps musculocutaneous flap for chest-wall defects

    SciTech Connect

    Hartrampf, C.R. Jr.; Elliott, L.F.; Feldman, S. )

    1990-09-01

    A posterior upper arm flap based on the profunda brachii vessels has been described to cover soft-tissue defects in the upper anterolateral chest. In our series, the posterior upper arm skin is elevated with the long head of the triceps muscle to cover seven chest-wall defects resulting from indolent postradiation open wounds following partial TRAM flap failure (n = 2), soft-tissue deficiencies following partial TRAM flap loss (n = 3), and primarily as an ancillary flap in TRAM flap breast reconstruction (n = 2). This flap also may be used to supply well-vascularized tissue in the regions of the shoulder, axilla, and posterolateral back. A prerequisite for this operation is redundant tissue of the upper arm often present in middle-aged women and in patients with lymphedema following mastectomy. In our series of seven patients, all donor sites were closed primarily, and there was no subjective functional deficit following transfer of the long head of the triceps muscle.

  7. [Desmoid tumor of the chest wall foiling surgery].

    PubMed

    Fimmanò, Antonio; Coppola Bottazzi, Enrico; Cirillo, Claudia; Tammaro, Pasquale; Casazza, Dino

    2006-01-01

    The Authors report on a patient personally observed owing to a tumefaction, mimicking a pomelo, located on the posterior chest wall, in the same site of another past surgical operation dating back to four years ago. This tumefaction was clear at the inspection, not aching and hard-elastic at the palpation, mobile synchronously with respiratory movements, but unable to alter respiratory mechanics. The patient was subjected to laboratory tests, which showed nothing pathological, and to instrumental tests (RX and TAC of the chest, bony scintigraphy) which showed a roundish solid tumefaction, with no "secondary" interest of bony tissue. In this case, it was executed a posterior-lateral thoracothomy, at the VI intercostal space, in the area circumscribing the past surgical scar. The careful removal of the adhesions between the mass and the costal plane, not without the sacrifice of the periosteum, permitted us the total exeresis. The anatomo-pathological test showed a desmoid fibromatosis (desmoid tumor) extra-abdominal (12.5 x 9 x 5 cm). About this kind of neoplastic masses, the risk of post-surgical relapse is very high; so many Authors consider opportune a radio-chemical adjuvant therapy. In this case, the radical excision allowed the Authors to avoid the post surgery pharmacological treatment and to get no relapses after two years from the operation.

  8. Bodybuilding-induced Mondor's disease of the chest wall.

    PubMed

    Tröbinger, Christian; Wiedermann, Christian J

    2017-01-01

    To describe the association of bodybuilding abdominal exercise with the development of superficial sclerosing thrombophlebitis of the anterolateral thoracoabdominal wall. A single case study. University-affiliated regional community hospital. A 54-year-old man presented with an otherwise unremarkable past medical history 4 weeks after the start of left-sided chest discomfort. He had undergone orthopedic surgery of the right shoulder three months earlier. Two months after surgery, he had re-started bodybuilding with thoracoabdominal training. Soon thereafter, he noted a painful induration at the left side of his trunk. Doppler and duplex sonography revealed complete venous occlusion compatible with sclerosing thrombophlebitis leading to a palpable, subcutaneous, cord-like lesion on the left side of his trunk. Physical examination and routine laboratory findings were normal. The lesion spontaneously resolved over a course of 3 months. Mondor's disease of the subcutaneous veins of the chest wall which has been associated with breast or axillary surgery, malignant and systemic diseases can also appear in subjects performing intense thoracoabdominal exercise training. Although it requires only symptomatic therapy, physicians and therapists must be aware of the existence of this disease because, although benign and self-limiting, malignant and systemic diseases need to be ruled out. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Chest wall reconstruction with two types of biodegradable polymer prostheses in dogs.

    PubMed

    Qin, Xiong; Tang, Hua; Xu, Zhifei; Zhao, Xuewei; Sun, Yaochang; Gong, Zhiyun; Duan, Liang

    2008-10-01

    Currently, the choice of chest wall prosthesis remains a challenging problem for thoracic and reconstructive surgeons. The purpose of this study is to investigate the feasibility of newly developed biodegradable prostheses. Two types of chest wall prostheses made from degradable polymer, collagen coated polydioxanone (CCP) mesh and chitin fiber reinforced polycaprolactone (CFRP) strut, were developed and studied. Adult mongrel dogs were subjected to extensive resection and reconstruction of anterior-lateral chest wall, CCP mesh was used in six dogs, the combination of CCP mesh and CFRP strut was used in four dogs, and polypropylene (PP) mesh in two dogs, as contrast. With good integration with tissue, CCP meshes maintained strength in the chest wall for more than 8 weeks and were completely resorbed within 24 weeks, and satisfactory short-term and long-term chest wall stabilization was achieved. The combined use of CCP mesh with CFRP strut provided a firmer chest wall in the early postoperative course. A mild wound infection developed in one animal with CCP mesh but resolved without sequelae, and no added complications were observed with the additional use of CFRP strut. Our experimental study shows that the CCP mesh and CFRP prosthesis were favorable for chest wall repair. The advantages of biodegradable copolymer give them promise as an excellent addition to the available reconstructive techniques currently in use.

  10. Energy dependent chest wall thickness equations for male lung monitoring with germanium detectors.

    PubMed

    Broggio, D; Lechaftois, X; Abline, O; Fleury, B; Vial, A; Corrèze, P; Franck, D; Merzoug, V

    2014-03-01

    The thickness and fat fraction of the chest wall are important parameters for in vivo lung monitoring. They have been measured from ultrasonic images on 374 male workers of the French nuclear industry using four measurement locations, as dictated by the size and position of the germanium detectors used for monitoring. The plastic muscle equivalent chest wall thickness (PMECWT) and the plastic 50% muscle-50% adipose equivalent chest wall thickness (X5050) have been calculated for each worker at 17, 59.5, and 185.7 keV, respectively. Multi-linear regression models have been tested to predict PMECWT and X5050 as a function of anthropometric measurements. Finally, it was considered whether the average chest wall thickness could be used instead of the material equivalent chest wall thickness. It was found that the mean chest wall thickness was (27 ± 5) mm and the mean fat fraction was (25 ± 8)%. The best and more convenient model for material equivalent chest wall thickness is a linear function of the body mass index. Depending on the energy, the standard errors of estimate for this model range between 3.2-3.4 mm for PMECWT and between 3.2-3.7 mm for X5050. At 59.5 and 185.7 keV, it was determined, to an excellent approximation, that the fat fraction and consideration of an equivalent material are unnecessary, contrary to the case at 17 keV.

  11. Poland syndrome: evaluation and treatment of the chest wall in 63 patients.

    PubMed

    Seyfer, Alan E; Fox, Justin P; Hamilton, Conrad G

    2010-09-01

    Poland syndrome is a sporadic, congenital unilateral absence of the sternocostal head of the pectoralis major muscle that can occur with other ipsilateral chest wall and limb derangements. The chest wall deficiency is primarily cosmetic, its incidence is unknown, male patients may be affected more than female patients, the right side is affected more than the left, and associated comorbidities may exist. Chest wall repair depends on anatomical type and gender. Sixty-three patients with Poland syndrome were divided into two treatment groups by chest wall anatomy and gender. Surgical repair was based on this division. Seventy-six operations were performed by the senior author (A.E.S.) during a 30-year period, and long-term outcomes are presented. Corrective methods included use of custom-made chest wall prostheses, mammary prostheses, latissimus dorsi muscle transfers, transverse rectus abdominis musculocutaneous flaps, sternal/rib reconstruction, or a combination of methods. Follow-up ranged from 1 to 21 years. Two anatomical forms of the disorder are described, each with unique surgical requirements. The simple deformity was effectively repaired with a latissimus dorsi muscle transfer plus, in female patients, a sublatissimus mammary prosthesis. Repair of the complex deformity, in addition to the latissimus transfer, selectively included musculoskeletal chest wall realignment. Custom-made chest wall prostheses carried a higher risk of complications. Poland syndrome of the chest wall exists in two forms: the more common simple variety and a complex form (as originally described by Poland). Repair of the chest wall can be effectively tailored to these anatomical types, gender, and patient preference.

  12. Implementation of the TRL Algorithm for Improved Impedance Measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Mane, Vibha; Shea, Tom

    1993-05-03

    The thru-reflect-line algorithm for deembedding the scattering parameters and hence the impedance of a device under test has been implemented in LabVIEW. This algorithm helps obtain the correct impedance of a device placed between mismatched ports. The nonideal por at each end of the two-port DUT is modeled by an ideal port in cascade with an error box. The scattering parameters are measured for three known conditions between the measurement planes M1 and M2, using the Network Analyzer.

  13. A single plan solution to chest wall radiotherapy with bolus?

    PubMed Central

    Ordonez-Sanz, C; Bowles, S; Hirst, A

    2014-01-01

    Objective: Radiotherapy treatments of post-mastectomy chest walls are complex, requiring treatment close to skin, necessitating bolus use. Commonly used 5- and 10-mm-thick boluses develop full skin dose, needing removal for the latter half of treatment and requiring two treatment plans to be generated. Can a thinner bolus be used for all treatment fractions, requiring only one plan? Methods: Investigation of doses received using (A) a half-time 10-mm-thick Vaseline® bolus (current situation); (B) a brass mesh (Whiting & Davis, Attleboro Falls, MA) and (C) 3- and 5-mm Superflab™ (Mick Radio-Nuclear Instruments, Mount Vernon, NY) for 6 and 15 MV. Dosimetric measurements in Barts WT1 solid water and an anthropomorphic phantom, using ionization chambers and thermoluminescent dosemeters, were used to study the effect of different bolus regimes on the photon depth–dose curves (DDCs) and skin doses. Results: Measured skin doses for the current 10-mm-thick Vaseline bolus, brass mesh and 3-mm bolus were compared (5 mm bolus has been rejected). The brass mesh has the least effect on the DDC, with changes <0.7% for depths greater than dmax. Brass mesh conforms superiorly to skin surfaces. Measurements on an anthropomorphic phantom demonstrate an increased skin dose compared with our current treatment protocol. Conclusion: Brass mesh has the smallest effect on the DDC, whilst sufficiently increasing surface dose. It can be removed at any fraction, based on a clinical decision, without the need for generating a new plan. Treating with one plan significantly reduces planning times. Advances in knowledge: Quantification of skin doses required and achieved from wax-on/wax-off treatment compared with alternative available breast boluses. PMID:24646288

  14. Human chest wall function while awake and during halothane anesthesia. II. Carbon dioxide rebreathing.

    PubMed

    Warner, D O; Warner, M A

    1995-01-01

    Changes in the distribution of respiratory drive to different respiratory muscles may contribute to respiratory depression produced by halothane. The aim of this study was to examine factors that are responsible for halothane-induced depression of the ventilatory response to carbon dioxide rebreathing. In six human subjects, respiratory muscle activity in the parasternal intercostal, abdominal, and diaphragm muscles was measured using fine-wire electromyography electrodes. Chest wall motion was determined by respiratory impedance plethysmography. Electromyography activities and chest wall motion were measured during hyperpnea produced by carbon dioxide rebreathing while the subjects were awake and during 1 MAC halothane anesthesia. Halothane anesthesia significantly reduced the slope of the response of expiratory minute ventilation to carbon dioxide (from 2.88 +/- 0.73 (mean +/- SE) to 2.01 +/- 0.45 l.min-1.mmHg-1). During the rebreathing period, breathing frequency significantly increased while awake (from 10.3 +/- 1.4 to 19.7 +/- 2.6 min-1, P < 0.05) and significantly decreased while anesthetized (from 28.8 +/- 3.9 to 21.7 +/- 1.9 min-1, P < 0.05). Increases in respiratory drive to the phrenic motoneurons produced by rebreathing, as estimated by the diaphragm electromyogram, were enhanced by anesthesia. Anesthesia attenuated the response of parasternal electromyography and accentuated the response of the transversus abdominis electromyography to rebreathing. The compartmental response of the ribcage to rebreathing was significantly decreased by anesthesia (from 1.83 +/- 0.58 to 0.48 +/- 0.13 l.min-1.mmHg-1), and marked phase shifts between ribcage and abdominal motion developed in some subjects. However, at comparable tidal volumes, the ribcage contribution to ventilation was similar while awake and anesthetized in four of the six subjects. Halothane anesthesia enhances the rebreathing response of neural drive to the primary respiratory muscle, the diaphragm

  15. [A case of huge abscess extended from anterior neck to left lung and lateral chest wall].

    PubMed

    Ikeya, T; Tsuda, M; Hara, H; Koyama, S; Sugiyama, S; Misaki, T

    1997-11-01

    62-year-old woman admitted our hospital with pain of left upper extremity from the left chest and dysphasia. Chest X-ray showed the huge mass shadow in the left lung field. Diabetes mellitus and inflammatory reaction such as high fervor, leukocytosis, CRP and ESR accentuation were recognized. Conservative therapy was done at first, but mass shadow on X-ray increased, and swelling appeared from the neck to the left lateral chest wall. And the same site appeared like subcutaneous emphysema. Computed Tomography showed mass shadow which was enlarged and spread in lung parenchyma and left chest wall with bubble image. Incision and open drainage was performed for the left chest wall but origin bacteria was detected in neither anaerobic nor aerobic culture of pus. Inflammation and mass shadow of left upper lung field have decreased gradually. The patient discharged without bronchoalveolar fistula. Abscess extending from the neck or chest wall with diabetes mellitus is very rare.

  16. A note on the MUSIC algorithm for impedance tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hanke, Martin

    2017-02-01

    We investigate the MUSIC algorithm for the reconstruction of small (infinitesimal) inclusions inside a planar homogeneous object from discrete impedance tomography data within the framework of the gap electrode model. We provide a justification of the method whenever the number of electrodes exceeds 2(J  +  1) where J is the number of the inclusions to be found.

  17. Prediction of Chest Wall Toxicity From Lung Stereotactic Body Radiotherapy (SBRT)

    SciTech Connect

    Stephans, Kevin L.; Djemil, Toufik; Tendulkar, Rahul D.; Robinson, Cliff G.; Reddy, Chandana A.; Videtic, Gregory M.M.

    2012-02-01

    Purpose: To determine patient, tumor, and treatment factors related to the development of late chest wall toxicity after lung stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT). Methods and Materials: We reviewed a registry of 134 patients treated with lung SBRT to 60 Gy in 3 fractions who had greater than 1 year of clinical follow-up and no history of multiple treatments to the same lobe (n = 48). Patients were treated as per Radiation Therapy Oncology Group Protocol 0236 without specific chest wall avoidance criteria. The chest wall was retrospectively contoured. Thirty-two lesions measured less than 3 cm, and sixteen measured 3 to 5 cm. The median planning target volume was 29 cm{sup 3}. Results: With a median follow-up of 18.8 months, 10 patients had late symptomatic chest wall toxicity (4 Grade 1 and 6 Grade 2) at a median of 8.8 months after SBRT. No patient characteristics (age, diabetes, hypertension, peripheral vascular disease, or body mass index) were predictive for toxicity, whereas there was a trend for continued smoking (p = 0.066; odds ratio [OR], 4.4). Greatest single tumor dimension (p = 0.047; OR, 2.63) and planning target volume (p = 0.040; OR, 1.04) were correlated with toxicity, whereas distance from tumor edge to chest wall and gross tumor volume did not reach statistical significance. Volumes of chest wall receiving 30 Gy (V30) through 70 Gy (V70) were all highly significant, although this correlation weakened for V65 and V70 and maximum chest wall point dose only trended to significance (p = 0.06). On multivariate analysis, tumor volume was no longer correlated with toxicity and only V30 through V60 remained statistically significant. Conclusions: Tumor size and chest wall dosimetry are correlated to late chest wall toxicity. Only chest wall V30 through V60 remained significant on multivariate analysis. Restricting V30 to 30 cm{sup 3} or less and V60 to 3 cm{sup 3} or less should result in a 10% to 15% risk of late chest wall toxicity or lower.

  18. Chest Wall Strapping. An Old Physiology Experiment with New Relevance to Small Airways Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Schmidt, Gregory A.; Brower, Roy G.

    2014-01-01

    Chest wall strapping (CWS) induces breathing at low lung volumes. Mild to moderate obesity can lead to similar changes in lung volumes, due to chest wall and abdominal restriction. Chest wall strapping is also conceptually similar to a mismatch between significantly oversized donor lungs transplanted into a recipient with a smaller chest cavity. Chest wall strapping increases lung elastic recoil, reduces pulmonary compliance, and substantially increases maximal expiratory flows. The interactions between elastic properties of the lung parenchyma and small airways are critical for pulmonary function. Chest wall strapping lowers residual volume and closing volume, likely from the interdependence between increased elastic recoil and airways, leading to greater radial distending forces on small airways and small airway dilation. Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) and chronic rejection of the transplanted lung, bronchiolitis obliterans syndrome (BOS), are primarily diseases of the small airways, and are characterized by progressive obstruction and subsequent loss of small airways. In COPD, higher body mass index (BMI) (conceptually like being more tightly strapped) is associated with lower lung volumes, increased airway conductance, and lower risk of progression to emphysema or death. Likewise, in lung transplantation, oversized donor lungs have been linked to higher expiratory airflows, lower risk of bronchiolitis obliterans syndrome, and improved survival. This article reviews the physiology of chest wall strapping and explores how it could enhance the understanding or even the treatment of small airway diseases, such as COPD and bronchiolitis obliterans syndrome. PMID:25172621

  19. Effects of paralysis with pancuronium on chest wall statics in awake humans.

    PubMed

    Kimball, W R; Loring, S H; Basta, S J; De Troyer, A; Mead, J

    1985-05-01

    The influence of tonic inspiratory muscle activity on the relaxation characteristics of the chest wall, rib cage (RC), and abdominal wall (ABW) has been investigated in four highly trained subjects. Chest wall shape and volume were estimated with magnetometers. Pleural pressure (Pes) and abdominal pressure were measured with esophageal and gastric balloons, respectively. Subjects were seated reclining 30 degrees from upright, and respiratory muscle weakness was produced by pancuronium bromide until RC inspiratory capacity was decreased to 60% of control. Only minor changes were observed for Konno-Mead relaxation characteristics (RC vs. ABW) between control and paralysis. Similarly, although RC relaxation curves (RC vs. Pes) during paralysis were significantly different from control (P less than 0.05), the changes were small and not consistent. The differences between paralysis-induced changes in resting end-expiratory position of the chest wall and helium-dilution functional residual capacity (FRC) suggested changes in volume of blood within the chest wall. We conclude that 1) although tonic inspiratory activity of chest wall muscles exists, it does not significantly affect the chest wall relaxation characteristics in trained subjects; 2) submaximal paralysis produced by pancuronium bromide is likely to modify either spinal attitude or the distribution of blood between extremities and the thorax; these effects may account for the changes in FRC in other studies.

  20. [Image reconstruction in electrical impedance tomography based on genetic algorithm].

    PubMed

    Hou, Weidong; Mo, Yulong

    2003-03-01

    Image reconstruction in electrical impedance tomography (EIT) is a highly ill-posed, non-linear inverse problem. The modified Newton-Raphson (MNR) iteration algorithm is deduced from the strictest theoretic analysis. It is an optimization algorithm based on minimizing the object function. The MNR algorithm with regularization technique is usually not stable, due to the serious image reconstruction model error and measurement noise. So the reconstruction precision is not high when used in static EIT. A new static image reconstruction method for EIT based on genetic algorithm (GA-EIT) is proposed in this paper. The experimental results indicate that the performance (including stability, the precision and space resolution in reconstructing the static EIT image) of the GA-EIT algorithm is better than that of the MNR algorithm.

  1. Acoustic Impedance Inversion of Seismic Data Using Genetic Algorithm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eladj, Said; Djarfour, Noureddine; Ferahtia, Djalal; Ouadfeul, Sid-Ali

    2013-04-01

    The inversion of seismic data can be used to constrain estimates of the Earth's acoustic impedance structure. This kind of problem is usually known to be non-linear, high-dimensional, with a complex search space which may be riddled with many local minima, and results in irregular objective functions. We investigate here the performance and the application of a genetic algorithm, in the inversion of seismic data. The proposed algorithm has the advantage of being easily implemented without getting stuck in local minima. The effects of population size, Elitism strategy, uniform cross-over and lower mutation are examined. The optimum solution parameters and performance were decided as a function of the testing error convergence with respect to the generation number. To calculate the fitness function, we used L2 norm of the sample-to-sample difference between the reference and the inverted trace. The cross-over probability is of 0.9-0.95 and mutation has been tested at 0.01 probability. The application of such a genetic algorithm to synthetic data shows that the inverted acoustic impedance section was efficient. Keywords: Seismic, Inversion, acoustic impedance, genetic algorithm, fitness functions, cross-over, mutation.

  2. Obesity Increases the Risk of Chest Wall Pain From Thoracic Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Welsh, James; Thomas, Jimmy; Shah, Deep; Allen, Pamela K.; Wei, Xiong; Mitchell, Kevin; Gao, Song; Balter, Peter; Komaki, Ritsuko; Chang, Joe Y.

    2011-09-01

    Purpose: Stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) is increasingly being used to treat thoracic tumors. We attempted here to identify dose-volume parameters that predict chest wall toxicity (pain and skin reactions) in patients receiving thoracic SBRT. Patients and Methods: We screened a database of patients treated with SBRT between August 2004 and August 2008 to find patients with pulmonary tumors within 2.5 cm of the chest wall. All patients received a total dose of 50 Gy in four daily 12.5-Gy fractions. Toxicity was scored according to the NCI-CTCAE V3.0. Results: Of 360 patients in the database, 265 (268 tumors) had tumors within <2.5 cm of the chest wall; 104 (39%) developed skin toxicity (any grade); 14 (5%) developed acute pain (any grade), and 45 (17%) developed chronic pain (Grade 1 in 22 cases [49%] and Grade 2 or 3 in 23 cases [51%]). Both skin toxicity and chest wall pain were associated with the V{sub 30}, or volume of the chest wall receiving 30 Gy. Body mass index (BMI) was also strongly associated with the development of chest pain: patients with BMI {>=}29 had almost twice the risk of chronic pain (p = 0.03). Among patients with BMI >29, diabetes mellitus was a significant contributing factor to the development of chest pain. Conclusion: Safe use of SBRT with 50 Gy in four fractions for lesions close to the chest wall requires consideration of the chest wall volume receiving 30 Gy and the patient's BMI and diabetic state.

  3. Chest wall thickness measurements of the LLNL and JAERI torso phantoms for germanium detector counting

    SciTech Connect

    Kramer, G.H.; Hauck, B.M.

    1997-11-01

    The Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory and Japanese Atomic Energy Research Institute torso phantoms were developed to calibrate lung counting systems that are used to estimate plutonium and other radionuclides deposited in the lung. Originally, low energy photon counting systems consisted of phoswich detectors. The average chest wall thicknesses and individual measurement points of the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory phantom and its overlay plates in the regions covered by these detectors were provided by the manufacturer. Germanium detectors are of a different size and are placed in different locations on the phantom so that the manufacturer`s data are no longer applicable for the locations of the germanium detectors on the phantom. The Human Monitoring Laboratory has re-evaluated the chest wall thickness of both the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory and Japanese Atomic Energy Research Institute phantoms and their overlay plates for its germanium lung counting system. The measurements were made in the upper right, lower right, upper left, and lower left positions on the phantom`s torso plate above the lungs. The effective chest wall thicknesses (17 keV) for the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory torso plate are 1.46 cm, 1.43 cm, 1.66 cm, 1.48 cm, respectively. The manufacturer`s quoted average effective chest wall thickness for a pair of phoswich detectors is 1.63 cm. The measured effective chest wall thicknesses (17 keV) for the JAERI`s torso plate are 1.76 cm, 2.15 cm, 1.79 cm, 2.15 cm, respectively. The manufacturer`s quoted average chest wall thickness for an unspecified region of the chest is 1.50 cm. This paper presents effective chest wall thickness data for the phantoms with and without their overlay plates at 17 keV, 60 keV, 200 keV and 1,500 keV. 13 refs., 2 figs., 4 tabs.

  4. Assessment of the chest wall thickness of the lawrence livermore torso phantom using a voxel image.

    PubMed

    Ahmed, A S M Sabbir; Capello, Kevin; Kramer, Gary H

    2011-06-01

    This paper describes the methodology of measuring the chest wall thickness using the voxel image of the Lawrence Livermore National Lab (LLNL) torso phantom. The LLNL phantom is used as a standard to calibrate a lung counter consisting of a 2 × 2 array of germanium detectors. In general, an average thickness estimated from four counting positions is used as the chest wall thickness for a given overlay plate. For a given overlay, the outer chest surface differs from that of inner one, and the chest wall thickness varies from one position to other. The LLNL phantom with chest plate and C4 overlay plate installed was scanned with a CT (computed tomography) scanner. The image data, collected in DICOM (Digital Imaging and Communication) format, were converted to the MCNP input file by using the Scan2Mcnp program. The MCNP file was visualized and analyzed with the Moritz visual editor. An analytic expression was formulated and solved to calculate the chest wall thickness by using the point detector responses (F 5 tally of MCNP). To map the chest thickness, the entire chest wall was meshed into virtual grids of 1 cm width. A source and detector pair was moved along the inner and outer surface of the chest wall from right to left at different heights from neck to abdomen. For each height (z(k)), (x(i), y(j)) coordinates for the detector source pair were calculated from the visual editor and were scaled on-screen. For each (x(i), y(j), z(k)) position, a mesh thickness was measured from on-screen measurement and by solving the detector responses. The chest wall thicknesses at different positions on the outer surface of the chest were compared and verified using two methods.

  5. Some stable reconstruction algorithms for electrical impedance tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berryman, J. G.

    1991-07-01

    An impedance camera or what is now more commonly called electrical impedance tomography -- attempts to image the electrical impedance (or just the conductivity) distribution inside a body using electrical measurements on its boundary. The method has been used successfully in both biomedical and geophysical applications but the analysis of optimal reconstruction algorithms is still progressing. The most common application is monitoring the influx or efflux of a highly conducting fluid (such as brine in a porous rock or blood in the human body) through the volume being imaged. For biomedical applications, this method does not have the resolution of radiological methods, but is is comparatively safe and inexpensive and therefore provides a valuable alternative when continuous monitoring of a patient or process is desired. The following discussion is intended first to summarize the physics of electrical impedance tomography, then to provide a few details of the data analysis and forward modeling requirements, and finally to outline some of the reconstruction algorithms that have proven to be most useful in practice. Pointers to the literature are provided throughout this brief narrative and the reader is encouraged to explore the references for more complete discussions of the variations issues raised here.

  6. Anterior chest wall resection and reconstruction for locally advanced breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Wee, Hide Elfrida; Akbar, Fazuludeen Ali; Rajapaksha, Keerthi; Aneez, Dokev Basheer Ahmed

    2015-01-01

    With breast cancer awareness, the incidence of large invasive tumours is rare. We present a video of locally advanced breast cancer invading the anterior chest wall requiring en bloc resection that resulted in a large chest wall defect with exposed pleural and pericardial surface. Skeletal reconstruction and provision of adequate soft tissue coverage in order to avoid respiratory failure was challenging. A 58-year-old female presented with a 3-year history of locally invasive breast carcinoma with contiguous spread to sternum, clavicles, sternoclavicular joints and bilateral second to fifth ribs. She underwent total sternectomy, bilateral second to fifth ribs and chest wall resection resulting in a 21 × 18 cm chest wall defect. Reconstruction of her sternum was with methyl-methacrylate cement prosthesis. Ribs were reconstructed with titanium plates. Soft tissue coverage was achieved with left vertical rectus abdominis pedicle flap, right external oblique transposition flap and a right latissimus dorsi free flap. Flap failure necessitated a right vastus lateralis free flap. She was discharged ambulant without respiratory compromise. Resection and reconstruction of large chest wall defects is possible due to new bioprosthetic materials and is possible with acceptable morbidity and mortality. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the European Association for Cardio-Thoracic Surgery. All rights reserved.

  7. Chest wall resection and reconstruction for locally advanced primary breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Hille, Ursula; Soergel, Philipp; Zardo, Patrick; Pertschy, Stefanie; Busch, Kai; Fischer, Stefan

    2013-06-01

    We sought to evaluate clinical and oncologic outcomes of selected patients with locally advanced breast cancer undergoing full thickness chest wall resection (FTCWR) and reconstruction in a multidisciplinary setting. Between 2008 and 2010, five women underwent FTCWR followed by chest wall repair for locally advanced primary breast cancer. In all cases, chest wall repair was performed with a Peri-Guard Repair Patch (Synovis, St. Paul, MN, USA). At follow-up (7-12 months) quality of life, respiratory function and oncologic status were assessed. Successful chest wall resection and repair were achieved in all patients. Plastic reconstruction of post-mastectomy tissue defects was necessary in one case. One patient was treated by breast conserving therapy. Chest ultrasound imaging confirmed absence of adhesions, haematoma or seroma and normal expansion and respiratory movement of the underlying lung in all patients. On follow-up all patients reported good quality of life. Multidisciplinary surgical approaches to chest wall resection and reconstruction in selected patients with locally advanced primary breast cancer are feasible, safe, associated with short operation time and hospital stay and negligible morbidity.

  8. Effects of posture on chest-wall configuration and motion during tidal breathing in normal men

    PubMed Central

    Takashima, Sachie; Nozoe, Masafumi; Mase, Kyoshi; Kouyama, Yusuke; Matsushita, Kazuhiro; Ando, Hiroshi

    2017-01-01

    [Purpose] The purpose of this study was to clarify the impact of postural changes during tidal breathing on the configuration and motion of chest-wall in order to further breathing motion evaluation. [Subjects and Methods] Chest-wall configuration and motion in the supine, right lateral, and sitting positions were measured using optoelectronic plethysmography in 15 healthy adult men. [Results] The anteroposterior diameters of the chest wall were significantly lower in the supine position for the pulmonary and abdominal rib cages, whereas the mediolateral diameters in the lateral position were lowest for the abdominal rib cage. Regarding chest-wall motion, both craniocaudal and anteroposterior motions of the anterior surface of the pulmonary and abdominal rib cages were significantly greater in the sitting position. Regarding motion of the left lateral abdominal rib cage, lateral motion was greatest in the lateral position. [Conclusion] Chest-wall configuration and motion changed according to posture in healthy men, particularly in the pulmonary and abdominal rib cages. PMID:28210033

  9. Optical tomography method that accounts for tilted chest wall in breast imaging

    PubMed Central

    Ardeshirpour, Yasaman; Zhu, Quing

    2010-01-01

    The chest wall underneath breast tissue distorts light reflection measurements, especially measurements obtained from distant source-detector pairs. For patients with a chest wall located at a shallower depth, the chest-wall effect needs to be considered in the image reconstruction procedure. Following our previous studies, this work systemically evaluates the performance of a two-layer model-based reconstruction using the finite element method, and compares it with the performance of the semi-infinite model. The results obtained from simulations and phantom experiments show that the two-layer model improves the light quantification of the targets. The improvements are attributed to improved background estimation and more accurate weight matrix calculation using a two-layer model compared to the semi-infinite model. Fitted two-layer background optical properties obtained from a group of ten patients with chest walls located less than 2 cm deep are more representative of breast tissue and chest-wall optical properties. PMID:20799793

  10. A Community-acquired Lung Abscess Attributable to Streptococcus pneumoniae which Extended Directly into the Chest Wall

    PubMed Central

    Ko, Yuki; Tobino, Kazunori; Yasuda, Yuichiro; Sueyasu, Takuto; Nishizawa, Saori; Yoshimine, Kouhei; Munechika, Miyuki; Asaji, Mina; Yamaji, Yoshikazu; Tsuruno, Kosuke; Miyajima, Hiroyuki; Mukasa, Yosuke; Ebi, Noriyuki

    2017-01-01

    We herein report the case of 75-year-old Japanese female with a community-acquired lung abscess attributable to Streptococcus pneumoniae (S. penumoniae) which extended into the chest wall. The patient was admitted to our hospital with a painful mass on the left anterior chest wall. A contrast-enhanced chest computed tomography scan showed a lung abscess in the left upper lobe which extended into the chest wall. Surgical debridement of the chest wall abscess and percutaneous transthoracic tube drainage of the lung abscess were performed. A culture of the drainage specimen yielded S. pneumoniae. The patient showed a remarkable improvement after the initiation of intravenous antibiotic therapy. PMID:28049987

  11. Dramatic Response of an Aggressive Chest Wall Recurrence to Hyperthermia, Radiation, and Chemotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Rice, Stephanie; Diwanji, Tejan; Feigenberg, Steven J; Vujaskovic, Zeljko

    2017-01-01

    Hyperthermia has been demonstrated to be an effective adjuvant oncological treatment modality in combination with chemotherapy and/or radiation. Published data have demonstrated that the addition of hyperthermia can improve local control for breast cancer chest wall recurrences. We present a patient with a very aggressive estrogen receptor-negative, progesterone receptor-negative, HER2/neu receptor-negative chest wall recurrence status-post a right modified radical mastectomy. Despite having metastatic disease, in an attempt to achieve local control and provide palliation, she was treated with hyperthermia, radiation, and chemotherapy. A near complete resolution of her chest wall recurrence in a very short time period was seen with a significant improvement in her symptoms. While she unfortunately succumbed to her disease shortly thereafter, the local control that our treatment offered her allowed her quality of life to improve significantly near the end of her life. PMID:28944118

  12. Free gracilis flap for chest wall reconstruction in male patient with Poland syndrome after implant failure.

    PubMed

    Cherubino, Mario; Maggiulli, Francesca; Pellegatta, Igor; Valdatta, Luigi

    2016-01-01

    Poland's syndrome (PS) is a congenital monolateral deformity that may involve breast, chest wall, and upper limb with different degrees of clinical expressions. In some cases, the problem is mainly cosmetic, and the reconstruction should be performed to achieve minimal scarring and donor site morbidity. The authors describe a case report of a male patient with PS who developed a severe capsular contraction after 25 years implant reconstruction, who was treated after explantation using free gracilis flap (FGF). In this patient, only the pectoralis major muscle was missing. An FGF was performed to reconstruct the anterior axillary fold and the soft tissue defect. There was no flap loss, the patient had a clearly improved appearance of the chest wall, and the pain syndrome was solved. In this case report, we demonstrate our experience with the use of an FGF for chest wall reconstruction in male patients with PS after prosthesis explantation.

  13. Breast and chest wall reconstruction with the transverse musculocutaneous gracilis flap in Poland syndrome.

    PubMed

    Huemer, George M; Puelzl, Petra; Schoeller, Thomas

    2012-10-01

    Poland syndrome is a complex chest wall deformity with unilateral hypoplasia of the breast and pectoralis muscle, with a missing anterior axillary fold in its most common form. The authors report their combined experience and technique with the transverse myocutaneous gracilis flap to reconstruct the chest wall and breast either alone or simultaneously. Between June of 2004 and July of 2010, 11 patients (two male patients) were operated on and 14 flaps were transplanted. The authors found that the transverse myocutaneous gracilis flap proved to be a very valuable microsurgical alternative for reconstructing the chest wall and female breast in Poland syndrome with autologous tissue. The flap provides the surgeon maximal freedom of flap insetting for optimal symmetry together with a very inconspicuous donor site regardless of unilateral or bilateral harvesting.

  14. Dramatic Response of an Aggressive Chest Wall Recurrence to Hyperthermia, Radiation, and Chemotherapy.

    PubMed

    Cohen, Justin; Rice, Stephanie; Diwanji, Tejan; Feigenberg, Steven J; Vujaskovic, Zeljko

    2017-07-16

    Hyperthermia has been demonstrated to be an effective adjuvant oncological treatment modality in combination with chemotherapy and/or radiation. Published data have demonstrated that the addition of hyperthermia can improve local control for breast cancer chest wall recurrences. We present a patient with a very aggressive estrogen receptor-negative, progesterone receptor-negative, HER2/neu receptor-negative chest wall recurrence status-post a right modified radical mastectomy. Despite having metastatic disease, in an attempt to achieve local control and provide palliation, she was treated with hyperthermia, radiation, and chemotherapy. A near complete resolution of her chest wall recurrence in a very short time period was seen with a significant improvement in her symptoms. While she unfortunately succumbed to her disease shortly thereafter, the local control that our treatment offered her allowed her quality of life to improve significantly near the end of her life.

  15. Chest wall thickness measurements: The alternative approach extended for {sup 241}Am

    SciTech Connect

    Kramer, G.H.; Burns, L.C.

    1997-02-01

    The Human Monitoring Laboratory has extended the technique of determining the chest wall thickness of an individual using information from the spectrum produced by internally deposited radionuclides. The technique has been investigated both theoretically and practically using germanium detectors and the Lawrence Livermore Torso Phantom. The phantom was used with a lung set containing homogeneously distributed {sup 241}Am. Chest wall thicknesses were varied by using a series of muscle equivalent overlay plates that gave a range of 1.6 cm to 3.9 cm thickness. It was found that a 3-cm chest wall thickness can be estimated to within 18%. Using a spectral addition technique 1 kBq was estimated to be the {open_quotes}practical{close_quotes} lower limit of activity for this method. 7 refs., 2 figs., 3 tabs.

  16. Free gracilis flap for chest wall reconstruction in male patient with Poland syndrome after implant failure

    PubMed Central

    Cherubino, Mario; Maggiulli, Francesca; Pellegatta, Igor; Valdatta, Luigi

    2016-01-01

    Poland's syndrome (PS) is a congenital monolateral deformity that may involve breast, chest wall, and upper limb with different degrees of clinical expressions. In some cases, the problem is mainly cosmetic, and the reconstruction should be performed to achieve minimal scarring and donor site morbidity. The authors describe a case report of a male patient with PS who developed a severe capsular contraction after 25 years implant reconstruction, who was treated after explantation using free gracilis flap (FGF). In this patient, only the pectoralis major muscle was missing. An FGF was performed to reconstruct the anterior axillary fold and the soft tissue defect. There was no flap loss, the patient had a clearly improved appearance of the chest wall, and the pain syndrome was solved. In this case report, we demonstrate our experience with the use of an FGF for chest wall reconstruction in male patients with PS after prosthesis explantation. PMID:27833290

  17. Functional Chest Wall Reconstruction With a Biomechanical Three-Dimensionally Printed Implant.

    PubMed

    Moradiellos, Javier; Amor, Sergio; Córdoba, Mar; Rocco, Gaetano; Vidal, Mercedes; Varela, Andrés

    2017-04-01

    Chest wall resection and reconstruction for neoplastic diseases has unique oncologic, structural, and functional challenges. In a young and fit patient with a mediastinal mass and extensive anterior chest wall invasion, purely structural solutions were deemed insufficient. We hereby present a novel three-dimensionally printed patient-specific titanium implant of sternum and ribs. This osteointegrable implant was designed with biomechanical capabilities using a unique "Greek wave" folding pattern. Postoperative dynamic computed tomography showed that the implant allowed for controlled flexing during the respiratory cycle. Three-dimensional printing with biocompatible materials could enable a new generation of chest wall implants strongly focused on functional reconstruction. Copyright © 2017 The Society of Thoracic Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Herniation of unruptured tuberculous lung abscess into chest wall without pleural or bronchial spillage

    PubMed Central

    Magazine, Rahul; Mohapatra, Aswini K.; Manu, Mohan K.; Srivastava, Rajendra K.

    2011-01-01

    A 22-year-old unmarried man presented to the chest outpatient department with a history of productive cough of two-month duration. He also complained of pain and swelling on the anterior aspect of right side of chest of one-month duration. Imaging studies of the thorax, including chest roentgenography and computerized tomography, revealed an unruptured lung abscess which had herniated into the chest wall. Culture of pus aspirated from the chest wall swelling grew Mycobacterium tuberculosis. He was diagnosed to have a tuberculous lung abscess which had extended into the chest wall, without spillage into the pleural cavity or the bronchial tree. Antituberculosis drugs were prescribed, and he responded to the treatment with complete resolution of the lesion. PMID:22084547

  19. Giant Anterior Chest Wall Basal Cell Carcinoma: An Approach to Palliative Reconstruction

    PubMed Central

    Prendergast, Christina; Leis, Amber

    2016-01-01

    Anterior chest wall giant basal cell carcinoma (GBCC) is a rare skin malignancy that requires a multidisciplinary treatment approach. This case report demonstrates the challenges of anterior chest wall GBCC reconstruction for the purpose of palliative therapy in a 72-year-old female. Surgical resection of the lesion included the manubrium and upper four ribs. The defect was closed with bilateral pectoral advancement flaps, FlexHD, and pedicled VRAM. The palliative nature of this case made hybrid reconstruction more appropriate than rigid sternal reconstruction. In advanced metastatic cancers, the ultimate goals should be to avoid risk for infection and provide adequate coverage for the defect. PMID:28083152

  20. Reconstruction of Chest Wall by Cryopreserved Sternal Allograft after Resection of Aneurysmal Bone Cyst of Sternum

    PubMed Central

    Sheikhy, Kambiz; Abbasi Dezfouli, Azizollah

    2017-01-01

    A 20-year-old female was referred to our hospital due to deformity and bulging in anterior aspect of chest wall in sternal area. Chest X-ray and CT scan confirmed a large mass with destruction of sternum. Pathologic diagnosis after incisional biopsy was compatible with aneurysmal bone cyst. We resected sternum completely and reconstructed large anterior defect by a cryopreserved sternal allograft. In follow-up of patient there was no unstability of chest wall with good cosmetic result. PMID:28299230

  1. Resection and debridement of chest-wall tumors and general aspects of reconstruction

    SciTech Connect

    el-Tamer, M.; Chaglassian, T.; Martini, N. )

    1989-10-01

    The main criterion for adequate local control of a chest-wall malignancy remains wide excision. With the available techniques of skeletal and soft-tissue reconstruction, even large lesions can be resected with safe margins. The primary purpose is to achieve a curative resection, although a significant number of symptomatic patients can benefit from palliative resection provided by such procedures. A key element in the success in treating chest-wall tumors is a multidisciplinary approach by all participating physicians, namely the thoracic surgeon, the plastic and reconstructive surgeon, the radiotherapist, and the medical oncologist. 70 references.

  2. Microsurgical Reconstruction of Large Oncologic Chest Wall Defects for Locally Advanced Breast Cancer or Osteoradionecrosis: A Retrospective Review of 26 Cases over a 5-Year Period.

    PubMed

    Arya, Reza; Chow, Whitney T; Rozen, Warren Matthew; Patel, Nakul G; Griffiths, Matthew; Shah, Samir; Ramakrishnan, Venkat V

    2016-02-01

    Locally advanced breast cancer (LABC) and chest wall osteoradionecrosis (ORN) often require extensive and composite tissue resection, including muscles, ribs, pleura, and lung parenchyma. As such, these cases necessitate complex reconstructive procedures for skeletal chest wall reconstruction and soft tissue resurfacing of extensive defects. Traditional local and regional flaps are often inadequate, and many such cases are prospectively labeled "unresectable." We report a single-center experience with the microsurgical reconstruction of such defects over a 5-year period. Between 2007 and 2011, 1,077 microvascular reconstructive cases following breast cancer resection were performed, of which 26 cases comprised LABC or ORN requiring reconstruction. Surgical indications, defect parameters, choice of reconstruction, and outcomes were assessed. Thirty free flap microsurgical reconstructions were undertaken in 26 cases, with a 96.2% flap survival rate. Complications were low, and mean hospital stay was 8.7 days. An algorithmic approach to management is presented. Wide resection and microvascular free tissue transfer provide versatile solutions for the reconstruction of extensive chest wall defects. With good reported perioperative outcomes even in advanced cases, surgical resection of LABC may offer a useful approach in difficult and/or palliative cases. Thieme Medical Publishers 333 Seventh Avenue, New York, NY 10001, USA.

  3. Effects of Air Stacking Maneuver on Cough Peak Flow and Chest Wall Compartmental Volumes of Subjects With Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Sarmento, Antonio; Resqueti, Vanessa; Dourado-Júnior, Mario; Saturnino, Lailane; Aliverti, Andrea; Fregonezi, Guilherme; de Andrade, Armele Dornelas

    2017-05-17

    To assess the acute effects of air stacking on cough peak flow (CPF) and chest wall compartmental volumes of persons with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) versus healthy subjects positioned at 45° body inclination. Cross-sectional study with a matched-pair design. University hospital. Persons (N=24) with ALS (n=12) and age-matched healthy subjects (n=12). CPF, chest wall compartmental inspiratory capacity, chest wall vital capacity, chest wall tidal volume and operational volumes, breathing pattern, and percentage of contribution of the compartments to the inspired volume were measured by optoelectronic plethysmography. Compared with healthy subjects, significantly lower CPF (P=.007), chest wall compartmental inspiratory capacity (P<.001), chest wall vital capacity (P<.001), and chest wall tidal volume (P<.001) were found in subjects with ALS. Immediately after air stacking, CPF (P<.001) and chest wall compartmental inspiratory capacity (P<.001) significantly increased in both groups, with values returning to basal only in healthy subjects. After air stacking, the abdominal compartment (P=.004) was determined to be responsible for the inspired volume in subjects with ALS. Significantly higher chest wall vital capacity (P=.05) was observed in subjects with ALS 5 minutes after air stacking, with the rib cage compartment (P=.049) being responsible for volume change. No differences were found in chest wall vital capacity and compartmental volumes of healthy subjects. Chest wall tidal volume (P<.001) significantly increased during the protocol in the healthy subjects, mainly because of end-inspiratory (P<.001) and abdominal volumes (P=.008). No significant differences were observed in percentage of contribution of the compartments to the inspired volume and end-expiratory volume of both groups. No significant differences were found in chest wall tidal volume, operational volume, and breathing pattern in persons with ALS. Air stacking is effective in increasing CPF

  4. [Optoelectronic plethysmography -- a new technic to measure changes of chest wall volume].

    PubMed

    Skoczylas, Agnieszka; Sliwiński, Paweł

    2007-01-01

    Optoelectronic plethysmography (OEP) is a new, noninvasive diagnostic tool that allows to measure changes of chest wall volume and its three compartments. Mathematical basis of the method, elements of the system and possibilities of combining OEP with other recording techniques used in pneumonology were discussed in details. OEP applications, results of the latest investigations and development perspectives were briefly presented.

  5. Evaluation of a Thermoplastic Immobilization System for Breast and Chest Wall Radiation Therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Strydhorst, Jared H.; Caudrelier, Jean-Michel; Clark, Brenda G.; Montgomery, Lynn A.; Fox, Greg; MacPherson, Miller S.

    2011-04-01

    We report on the impact of a thermoplastic immobilization system on intra- and interfraction motion for patients undergoing breast or chest wall radiation therapy. Patients for this study were treated using helical tomotherapy. All patients were immobilized using a thermoplastic shell extending from the shoulders to the ribcage. Intrafraction motion was assessed by measuring maximum displacement of the skin, heart, and chest wall on a pretreatment 4D computed tomography, while inter-fraction motion was inferred from patient shift data arising from daily image guidance procedures on tomotherapy. Using thermoplastic immobilization, the average maximum motion of the external contour was 1.3 {+-} 1.6 mm, whereas the chest wall was found to be 1.6 {+-} 1.9 mm. The day-to-day setup variation was found to be large, with random errors of 4.0, 12.0, and 4.5 mm in the left-right, superior-inferior, and anterior-posterior directions, respectively, and the standard deviations of the systematic errors were found to be 2.7, 9.8, and 4.1 mm. These errors would be expected to dominate any respiratory motion but can be mitigated by daily online image guidance. Using thermoplastic immobilization can effectively reduce respiratory motion of the chest wall and external contour, but these gains can only be realized if daily image guidance is used.

  6. Inspiratory flow rate, not type of incentive spirometry device, influences chest wall motion in healthy individuals.

    PubMed

    Chang, Angela T; Palmer, Kerry R; McNaught, Jessie; Thomas, Peter J

    2010-08-01

    This study investigated the effect of flow rates and spirometer type on chest wall motion in healthy individuals. Twenty-one healthy volunteers completed breathing trials to either two times tidal volume (2xV(T)) or inspiratory capacity (IC) at high, low, or natural flow rates, using a volume- or flow-oriented spirometer. The proportions of rib cage movement to tidal volume (%RC/V(T)), chest wall diameters, and perceived level of exertion (RPE) were compared. Low and natural flow rates resulted in significantly lower %RC/V(T) compared to high flow rate trials (p=0.001) at 2xV(T). Low flow trials also resulted in significantly less chest wall motion in the upper anteroposterior direction than high and natural flow rates (p<0.001). At IC, significantly greater movement occurred in the abdominal lateral direction during low flow compared to high and natural flow trials (both p<0.003). RPE was lower for the low flow trials compared to high flow trials at IC and 2xV(T) (p<0.01). In healthy individuals, inspiratory flow (not device type) during incentive spirometry determines the resultant breathing pattern. High flow rates result in greater chest wall motion than low flow rates.

  7. Three-Dimensional Custom-Made Titanium Ribs for Reconstruction of a Large Chest Wall Defect.

    PubMed

    Simal, Isabel; García-Casillas, Maria Antonia; Cerdá, Julio Arturo; Riquelme, Óscar; Lorca-García, Concepción; Pérez-Egido, Laura; Fernández-Bautista, Beatriz; Torre, Manuel de la; de Agustín, Juan Carlos

    2016-12-01

    Reconstruction of large chest wall defects always demand surgeons of having lots of means available (both materials and resourceful) to apply a cover to chest wall defects which can range from a few centimeters to the lack of a few entire ribs. In this study, we present the case of a teenager who suffered from a complete resection of three ribs because of Ewing sarcoma dependent on the sixth rib. Given the size of the defect, a multidisciplinary approach was chosen to provide rigid and soft tissue coverage and minimal functional and aesthetic impact. Custom-made titanium implants were designed based on three-dimensional computed tomography scan reconstruction. The surgical specimen via a left lateral thoracotomy (fifth, sixth, and seventh entire ribs) was resected, leaving a defect of 35 × 12 × 6 cm. A Gore-Tex patch (W. L. Gore & Associates, Arizona, United States) was placed and, after that, the implants were anchored to the posterior fragment of the healthy ribs and to the costal cartilage anteriorly. Finally, the surgical site was covered with a latissimus dorsi flap. The postoperative course was uneventful. After 9 months of follow-up, the patient has full mobility. This case shows that the implant of custom-made ribs, combined with other techniques, is a good surgical choice for reconstruction of large chest wall defects. The implant of custom-made ribs, combined with other techniques, is a good surgical choice for reconstruction of large chest wall defects.

  8. Interaction of Anti-G Measures and Chest Wall Mechanics in Determining Gas Exchange.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1983-05-01

    transition between a relatively non-compliant upper rib cage and the more compliant lower chest wall. Lupi -Herrera et al. (1976) exposed dogs to...Patterson, Jr. Elevation gradient of intrathoracic pressure. J. Appl. Physiol. 16: 465-468, 1961. 17. Lupi -Herrera, E., C. Prefaut, A.E. Grassino and N.R

  9. Effect of shape and size of lung and chest wall on stresses in the lung

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vawter, D. L.; Matthews, F. L.; West, J. B.

    1975-01-01

    To understand better the effect of shape and size of lung and chest wall on the distribution of stresses, strains, and surface pressures, we analyzed a theoretical model using the technique of finite elements. First we investigated the effects of changing the chest wall shape during expansion, and second we studied lungs of a variety of inherent shapes and sizes. We found that, in general, the distributions of alveolar size, mechanical stresses, and surface pressures in the lungs were dominated by the weight of the lung and that changing the shape of the lung or chest wall had relatively little effect. Only at high states of expansion where the lung was very stiff did changing the shape of the chest wall cause substantial changes. Altering the inherent shape of the lung generally had little effect but the topographical differences in stresses and surface pressures were approximately proportional to lung height. The results are generally consistent with those found in the dog by Hoppin et al (1969).

  10. Aspiration cytology of mesenchymal hamartoma of the chest wall: a case report and literature review.

    PubMed

    Taweevisit, Mana; Trinavarat, Panruethai; Thorner, Paul Scott

    2014-10-01

    Mesenchymal hamartoma of the chest wall is a rare tumor-like lesion of infancy and childhood. The few available descriptions of the findings on fine needle aspiration list spindle-shaped cells and cartilage or chondromyxoid material as essential features for this diagnosis. An aggressive appearance on imaging studies and a lack of familiarity with this lesion, can lead the pathologist to misdiagnose the cytologic findings as malignancy. We reported a 5-month-old male presenting with a mass of the right chest wall progressively for 2 months. Radiologic studies showed a mixed solid and cystic mass originating from the third, fourth and fifth ribs, and a diagnosis of malignancy was favored. Fine needle aspiration recovered only spindle-shaped cells and a few multinucleated giant cells of osteoclast type. After a review of the imaging, a diagnosis of mesenchymal hamartoma of the chest wall was raised. This diagnosis was confirmed by pathologic examination of the subsequently resected mass. This is the sixth report of a mesenchymal hamartoma of the chest wall diagnosed by fine needle aspiration. This case illustrates that this diagnosis can be suspected in the absence of cartilage or chondromyxoid material, given appropriate clinical and radiologic findings.

  11. The expanded role of extracellular matrix patch in malignant and non-malignant chest wall reconstruction in thoracic surgery†

    PubMed Central

    George, Robert S.; Kostopanagiotou, Kostas; Papagiannopoulos, Kostas

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVES The extracellular matrix (XCM Biologic Tissue Matrix) is a non-cross-linked 3D patch derived from porcine dermis. Once implanted, it is infiltrated by recipient's cells and becomes incorporated in the repair. Here, we report the first series of using this device for chest wall reconstruction. METHODS The XCM Biologic Tissue Matrix was utilized to provide the restoration of chest wall defects. It was used either alone or in conjunction with the Synthes titanium system to provide additional support. The decision was made intraoperatively. RESULTS Since April 2010, 21 (12 females) patients received the device. Average age at operation was 47 ± 17 years. Eleven (52%) patients had the patch inserted alone, while the remaining 10 received it in combination with another implantable medical device. The biological tissue matrix was used to reconstruct chest wall defects in cancer involving chest wall (n = 9), chest wall deformity (n = 6), chest wall hernia (n = 5) and chest wall repair following empyema drainage (n = 1). Complications were witnessed in 3 patients receiving the combined XCM and Synthes bar mechanisms; infection (n = 2) and bar displacement and infection (n = 1). CONCLUSIONS The XCM patch can be safely used to provide the strength required for chest wall reconstruction and to replace previously infected reconstructions. PMID:24263580

  12. Automated chest wall line detection for whole-breast segmentation in sagittal breast MR images.

    PubMed

    Wu, Shandong; Weinstein, Susan P; Conant, Emily F; Schnall, Mitchell D; Kontos, Despina

    2013-04-01

    Breast magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) plays an important role in the clinical management of breast cancer. Computerized analysis is increasingly used to quantify breast MRI features in applications such as computer-aided lesion detection and fibroglandular tissue estimation for breast cancer risk assessment. Automated segmentation of the whole-breast as an organ from the other parts imaged is an important step in aiding lesion localization and fibroglandular tissue quantification. For this task, identifying the chest wall line (CWL) is most challenging due to image contrast variations, intensity discontinuity, and bias field. In this work, the authors develop and validate a fully automated image processing algorithm for accurate delineation of the CWL in sagittal breast MRI. The CWL detection is based on an integrated scheme of edge extraction and CWL candidate evaluation. The edge extraction consists of applying edge-enhancing filters and an edge linking algorithm. Increased accuracy is achieved by the synergistic use of multiple image inputs for edge extraction, where multiple CWL candidates are evaluated by the dynamic time warping algorithm coupled with the construction of a CWL reference. Their method is quantitatively validated by a dataset of 60 3D bilateral sagittal breast MRI scans (in total 3360 2D MR slices) that span the full American College of Radiology Breast Imaging Reporting and Data System (BI-RADS) breast density range. Agreement with manual segmentation obtained by an experienced breast imaging radiologist is assessed by both volumetric and boundary-based metrics, including four quantitative measures. In terms of breast volume agreement with manual segmentation, the overlay percentage expressed by the Dice's similarity coefficient is 95.0% and the difference percentage is 10.1%. More specifically, for the segmentation accuracy of the CWL boundary, the CWL overlay percentage is 92.7% and averaged deviation distance is 2.3 mm. Their method

  13. Respiratory kinematics by optoelectronic analysis of chest-wall motion and ultrasonic imaging of the diaphragm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aliverti, Andrea; Pedotti, Antonio; Ferrigno, Giancarlo; Macklem, P. T.

    1998-07-01

    Although from a respiratory point of view, compartmental volume change or lack of it is the most crucial variable, it has not been possible to measure the volume of chest wall compartments directly. Recently we developed a new method based on a optoelectronic motion analyzer that can give the three-dimensional location of many markers with the temporal and spatial accuracy required for respiratory measurements. Marker's configuration has been designed specifically to measure the volume of three chest wall compartments, the pulmonary and abdominal rib cage compartments and the abdomen, directly. However, it can not track the exact border between the two rib cage compartments (pulmonary and abdominal) which is determined by the cephalic extremity of the area of apposition of the diaphragm to the inner surface of the rib cage, and which can change systematically as a result of disease processes. The diaphragm displacement can be detected by ultrasonography. In the present study, we propose an integrated system able to investigate the relationships between external (chest wall) and internal (diaphragm) movements of the different respiratory structures by simultaneous external imaging with the optoelectronic system combined with internal kinematic imaging using ultrasounds. 2D digitized points belonging to the lower lung margin, taken from ultrasonographic views, are mapped into the 3D space, where chest wall markers are acquired. Results are shown in terms of accuracy of 3D probe location, relative movement between the probe and the body landmarks, dynamic relationships between chest wall volume and position of the diaphragm during quiet breathing, slow inspirations, relaxations and exercise.

  14. Comparison of total variation algorithms for electrical impedance tomography.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Zhou; Sato dos Santos, Gustavo; Dowrick, Thomas; Avery, James; Sun, Zhaolin; Xu, Hui; Holder, David S

    2015-06-01

    The applications of total variation (TV) algorithms for electrical impedance tomography (EIT) have been investigated. The use of the TV regularisation technique helps to preserve discontinuities in reconstruction, such as the boundaries of perturbations and sharp changes in conductivity, which are unintentionally smoothed by traditional l2 norm regularisation. However, the non-differentiability of TV regularisation has led to the use of different algorithms. Recent advances in TV algorithms such as the primal dual interior point method (PDIPM), the linearised alternating direction method of multipliers (LADMM) and the spilt Bregman (SB) method have all been demonstrated successful EIT applications, but no direct comparison of the techniques has been made. Their noise performance, spatial resolution and convergence rate applied to time difference EIT were studied in simulations on 2D cylindrical meshes with different noise levels, 2D cylindrical tank and 3D anatomically head-shaped phantoms containing vegetable material with complex conductivity. LADMM had the fastest calculation speed but worst resolution due to the exclusion of the second-derivative; PDIPM reconstructed the sharpest change in conductivity but with lower contrast than SB; SB had a faster convergence rate than PDIPM and the lowest image errors.

  15. Extraocular Sebaceous Carcinoma on the Chest Wall – A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    SR, Diwakar; Thulasi, Vasudevaiah; Shenoy, K Manjunath

    2014-01-01

    Sebaceous carcinoma is a rare aggressive skin cancer derived from the epithelium of sebaceous glands. Sebaceous carcinomas are generally divided as ocular or extraocular locations. Very few cases of extra ocular sebaceous carcinomas have been reported till date. Among them only six cases were reported which were on the chest wall. We are hereby reporting the seventh case of sebaceous carcinoma on the chest wall. The disease exhibits diverse clinical presentations and histologic patterns, often resulting in a delay in an accurate diagnosis as it may mimic many other cutaneous malignancies like Dermatofibrosarcoma protuberance Basal Cell Carcinoma or Squamous Cell Carcinoma. High degree of suspicion is required and sebaceous carcinoma should be considered as one of the differential diagnosis for an ulceroproliferative growth on the skin. PMID:25121026

  16. Bilateral superior epigastric pedicle perforator flaps for total chest wall coverage.

    PubMed

    Oni, Georgette; Sharma, Rohit; Rao, Roshni; Unger, Jacob; Saint-Cyr, Michel

    2011-08-01

    The superior epigastric artery (SEA), a terminal branch of the internal mammary artery, is analogous to the deep inferior epigastric artery (DIEA) in that it supplies a large number of perforators that are clustered together. This allows tissue from the superior abdomen to be used as a pedicled flap for reconstruction. A reliable and well-perfused pedicled flap can be based on this cluster of perforators, hence the term 'pedicle cluster perforator flap'. We present a case of a patient with recurrent angiosarcoma, who required total anterior chest wall reconstruction. This was achieved using bilateral pedicled SEA perforator flaps for complete coverage. To our knowledge, this is the first documented case of bilateral pedicled perforator flap reconstruction for complete chest wall reconstruction. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  17. Chest wall abscesses due to continuous application of silicone gel sheets for keloid management

    PubMed Central

    Tang, Hon-Lok; Lau, Keith K; Sam, Ramin; Ing, Todd S

    2015-01-01

    A patient with three episodes of chest wall abscesses as a result of 6 years of round-the-clock, uninterrupted (except during bathing) application of silicone gel sheets to a chest wall keloid is described. Two of the episodes occurred during hot weather. It is suggested that, in the space beneath the silicone sheet, the higher humidity and temperature, both generated as a result of prolonged sheeting, especially during hot weather, might have caused the keloid and its neighbouring skin to become soggy. This sogginess might have facilitated bacterial invasion. It is suggested that some sheeting-free time during a 24 h period might be indicated so that a keloid and its adjacent skin have the time to recover from their sheeting-induced sogginess. A sheeting-free period might especially be needed in the face of sweat accumulation beneath the silicone sheet. PMID:25920733

  18. Tissue-engineered ribs for chest wall reconstruction: a case with 12-year follow-up.

    PubMed

    Xie, Hui-Qi; Huang, Fu-Guo; Zhao, Yong-Fan; Qin, Ting-Wu; Li, Xiu-Qun; Liu, Chang; Li-Ling, Jesse; Yang, Zhi-Ming

    2014-01-01

    We hereby report on a case in which a huge chest wall defect generated by resection of a massive aggressive tumor (desmoplastic fibroma) was repaired with osteogenic-induced mesenchymal stem cells embedded in a bone-derived biomaterial. In this case, there were three challenges to overcome: reconstruction of the soft tissue, repair of the skeletal defect of the thoracic wall and repair of the defect in the pleural cavity. The defects of soft tissue and pleural cavity were reconstructed, respectively, with an ipsilateral abdominal flap and a diaphragm muscular flap. The huge defect in the chest wall was successfully repaired with the tissue-engineered ribs, which was confirmed by long-term follow-up with computerized tomography and histological and immunohistochemical evaluations. In view of its effectiveness and safety, tissue-engineered bones may have a broad application for the repair of large skeletal defects and bone regeneration.

  19. Chronic cutaneous chest wall fistula and gallstone empyema due to retained gallstones.

    PubMed

    Gaster, Richard S; Berger, Aaron J; Ahmadi-Kashani, Mastaneh; Shrager, Joseph B; Lee, Gordon K

    2014-08-14

    We report a case of a 72-year-old man who presented with a persistent pleural effusion and painful abscess in the right lower chest wall 6 months following a laparoscopic cholecystectomy. The patient subsequently developed a chronic cutaneous chest wall fistula requiring a large resection and complex closure. The complication was likely secondary to intraoperative spillage of gallstones. While previous reports describe gallstone spillage in the abdominal cavity as benign, this case illustrates that stones left in the abdominal cavity can potentially lead to significant morbidity. Therefore, stones should be diligently removed from the abdominal cavity when spillage occurs. In addition, it is important that operative notes reflect the occurrence of stone spillage so stones may be suspected when a patient presents with an abdominal or thoracic infection following a cholecystectomy.

  20. Matching Electron Beams Without Secondary Collimation for Treatment of Extensive Recurrent Chest-Wall Carcinoma

    SciTech Connect

    Feygelman, Vladimir; Mandelzweig, Yuri; Baral, Ed

    2015-01-15

    Matching electron beams without secondary collimators (applicators) were used for treatment of extensive, recurrent chest-wall carcinoma. Due to the wide penumbra of such beams, the homogeneity of the dose distribution at and around the junction point is clinically acceptable and relatively insensitive to positional errors. Specifically, dose around the junction point is homogeneous to within ±4% as calculated from beam profiles, while the positional error of 1 cm leaves this number essentially unchanged. The experimental isodose distribution in an anthropomorphic phantom supports this conclusion. Two electron beams with wide penumbra were used to cover the desired treatment area with satisfactory dose homogeneity. The technique is relatively simple yet clinically useful and can be considered a viable alternative for treatment of extensive chest-wall disease. The steps are suggested to make this technique more universal.

  1. Reconstruction of full-thickness chest wall defects using rectus abdominis musculocutaneous flap: A report of fifteen cases

    SciTech Connect

    Miyamoto, Y.; Hattori, T.; Niimoto, M.; Toge, T. )

    1986-02-01

    In 15 patients chest walls were excised because of recurrent breast cancer, radiation ulcer, or rib tumor. In most cases the full-thickness defect of the chest wall was about 10 x 10 cm. Reconstruction was performed using only a rectus abdominis musculocutaneous flap. No patient developed circulation problems in the flap or severe flail chest, and we had successful results in all our cases. These results show that the rectus abdominis musculocutaneous flap is quite effective and safe to use in the reconstruction of chest wall defects.

  2. Parallel hybrid algorithm for solution in electrical impedance equation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ponomaryov, Volodymyr; Robles-Gonzalez, Marco; Bucio-Ramirez, Ariana; Ramirez-Tachiquin, Marco; Ramos-Diaz, Eduardo

    2015-02-01

    This work is dedicated to the analysis of the forward and the inverse problem to obtain a better approximation to the Electrical Impedance Tomography equation. In this case, we employ for the forward problem the numerical method based on the Taylor series in formal power and for the inverse problem the Finite Element Method. For the analysis of the forward problem, we proposed a novel algorithm, which employs a regularization technique for the stability, additionally the parallel computing is used to obtain the solution faster; this modification permits to obtain an efficient solution of the forward problem. Then, the found solution is used in the inverse problem for the approximation employing the Finite Element Method. The algorithms employed in this work are developed in structural programming paradigm in C++, including parallel processing; the time run analysis is performed only in the forward problem because the Finite Element Method due to their high recursive does not accept parallelism. Some examples are performed for this analysis, in which several conductivity functions are employed for two different cases: for the analytical cases: the exponential and sinusoidal functions are used, and for the geometrical cases the circle at center and five disk structure are revised as conductivity functions. The Lebesgue measure is used as metric for error estimation in the forward problem, meanwhile, in the inverse problem PSNR, SSIM, MSE criteria are applied, to determine the convergence of both methods.

  3. [Research on biocompatibility and in vivo degradation of biodegradable chest wall prosthesis materials in experimental animals].

    PubMed

    Gong, Zhiyun; Xu, Zhifei; Qin, Xiong

    2007-08-01

    To evaluate the biocompatibility and in vivo degradation of novel chest wall prosthesis materials and provide some data for their clinical application. According to the standard for the biological evaluation of the medical devices, several tests were performed to evaluate the tissue toxic effects induced by polydioxanone (Group A), chitosan (Group B), and hydroxyapitite/collagen (Group C), which were tested as component materials of the chest wall prosthesis. In the hemolysis test, 0.2 ml of the anticoagulant rabbit blood was added to the component materials and the normal saline (negative control) and to the distilled water (positive control). Five samples were made in each group. Absorbency was measured and the hemolysis rate was determined. In the acute systemic toxicity test, 20 mice were randomly divided into 4 groups (Groups A, B and C, and the normal saline group, n=5). The leaching liquid (50 ml/kg) was injected through the caudal vein, which was observed at 24, 48 and 72 hours. In the pyrogen test, 12 rabbits were randomly divided into 4 groups (Groups A, B, C and the normal saline group, n=3) the leaching liquid(10 ml/kg) was injected through the ear vein, and the body temperature was recorded within 3 hours. In the in vivo degradable test, the component materials (10 mm x 10 mm) were implanted in 12 rabbits at 2, 4, 8, 12, 16 and 24 weeks, respectively, after operation. Two rabbits were sacrificed for the macroscopic and the microscopic examinations. The chest wall component materials had no hemolytic reaction, no acute systemic toxicity, and no pyrogen reaction. The results demonstrated that the implanted materials had only a mild inflammatory reaction during the early days of the grafting, which subsided gradually. There was no tissue denaturation, necrosis or pathological hyperplasia when the prosthesis materials were degraded. The degradable materials of the chest wall prosthesis have a good biocompatibility and a great biological safety though their

  4. Surgical treatment of a huge kaposiform hemangioendothelioma in the chest wall: A case study

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Xiaonan; Gong, Yubin; Dong, Changxian

    2016-01-01

    Kaposiform hemangioendothelioma, a rare vascular pediatric tumor often associated with Kasabach–Merritt phenomenon, is characterized by severe thrombocytopenia and consumptive coagulopathy. Kaposiform hemangioendothelioma is a severe disease and may progress quickly, resulting in a high mortality. However, standard treatment regimens for Kasabach–Merritt phenomenon have not yet been established. We reported here an infant with a large congenital kaposiform hemangioendothelioma in his chest wall who responded extremely well to surgical excision. PMID:28228957

  5. SU-E-T-437: Dosimetric Assessment of Brass Mesh Bolus for Postmastectomy Chest Wall Irradiation

    SciTech Connect

    Manger, R; Paxton, A; Cervino, L

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: It has been suggested that the use of a brass mesh bolus for chest wall irradiation sufficiently increases surface dose while having little effect on the dose at depth. This work quantified the increase in surface dose when using a brass mesh bolus in postmastectomy chest wall radiotherapy compared to tissue-equivalent bolus and assessed its effect on dose at depth. Methods: Percent depth doses with brass bolus, 5mm tissue-equivalent bolus, and no bolus were determined for a 6 MV photon beam in a solid water phantom using a parallel plate ionization chamber. Gafchromic film was used to determine the surface dose for the same three experimental setups. For comparison to a realistic treatment setup, gafchromic film and OSLDs were used to determine the surface dose over the irradiated area of a 6 MV chest wall plan with tangential beams delivered to a heterogeneous thorax phantom. The plan was generated using a CT of the phantom and delivered using brass mesh bolus, 5mm tissue-equivalent bolus, and no bolus. Results: For the en face beam, the central surface dose increased to 90% of maximum with the tissue-equivalent bolus, but to only 62% of maximum with the brass mesh. Using tangential beams on the thorax phantom, the surface dose increased from 40–72% to 75–110% of prescribed dose, with the brass mesh, and to 85–109% with the tissue-equivalent bolus. At depths beyond dmax in the plastic water phantom, the dose with and without brass mesh bolus differed by less than 0.5%. Conclusion: A brass mesh may be considered as a substitute for tissue-equivalent bolus to increase the superficial dose of 6 MV chest wall tangent plans. The brass mesh does not significantly change the dose at depth, so a non-bolus plan could be used for bolus and non-bolus treatments.

  6. Late results following flap reconstruction for chest wall recurrent breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Lindford, A J; Jahkola, T A; Tukiainen, E

    2013-02-01

    Locally extensive recurrent breast cancer usually portends a poor prognosis but certain cases can be treated surgically by wide soft-tissue resection as well as full-thickness chest wall resection (FTCWR). The resulting defect usually necessitates immediate flap coverage. The aim of this study was to assess local control, morbidity, choice of flap reconstruction, patient selection and overall long-term survival following surgical salvage of patients with chest wall recurrent breast cancer. Forty patients were treated with wide soft-tissue resection and immediate flap reconstruction from 1984 to 2011 in a single institution. Demographic, treatment and mortality data were obtained from patients' files. Mean age at surgery was 54 years. FTCWR was performed in 19 cases including three extended forequarter amputations. Chest wall stabilisation involved a synthetic mesh in 12 patients, fascia lata in two patients, free rib grafts in one patient and synthetic mesh and free rib graft in one patient. Soft-tissue reconstruction consisted of microvascular free flaps in seven patients and pedicled flaps in 33 patients. In-hospital mortality was 0%, 30-day mortality was 5%; there were two re-operations, six minor wound complications and one pulmonary embolism. There were no flap losses. In patients operated on with curative intent (n=31) median disease-free interval was 31 months and median survival was 52 months. In selected cases wide resections for extensive chest wall recurrent breast cancer can result in reasonable local control and survival. Several flap options exist for soft-tissue reconstruction. Copyright © 2012 British Association of Plastic, Reconstructive and Aesthetic Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Three-Dimensional Custom-Made Titanium Ribs for Reconstruction of a Large Chest Wall Defect

    PubMed Central

    Simal, Isabel; García-Casillas, Maria Antonia; Cerdá, Julio Arturo; Riquelme, Óscar; Lorca-García, Concepción; Pérez-Egido, Laura; Fernández-Bautista, Beatriz; Torre, Manuel de la; de Agustín, Juan Carlos

    2016-01-01

    Reconstruction of large chest wall defects always demand surgeons of having lots of means available (both materials and resourceful) to apply a cover to chest wall defects which can range from a few centimeters to the lack of a few entire ribs. In this study, we present the case of a teenager who suffered from a complete resection of three ribs because of Ewing sarcoma dependent on the sixth rib. Given the size of the defect, a multidisciplinary approach was chosen to provide rigid and soft tissue coverage and minimal functional and aesthetic impact. Custom-made titanium implants were designed based on three-dimensional computed tomography scan reconstruction. The surgical specimen via a left lateral thoracotomy (fifth, sixth, and seventh entire ribs) was resected, leaving a defect of 35 × 12 × 6 cm. A Gore-Tex patch (W. L. Gore & Associates, Arizona, United States) was placed and, after that, the implants were anchored to the posterior fragment of the healthy ribs and to the costal cartilage anteriorly. Finally, the surgical site was covered with a latissimus dorsi flap. The postoperative course was uneventful. After 9 months of follow-up, the patient has full mobility. This case shows that the implant of custom-made ribs, combined with other techniques, is a good surgical choice for reconstruction of large chest wall defects. The implant of custom-made ribs, combined with other techniques, is a good surgical choice for reconstruction of large chest wall defects. PMID:28018805

  8. The thoracoplastic approach to chest wall reconstruction: preliminary results of a multidisciplinary approach to minimize morbidity.

    PubMed

    Basta, Marten N; Fischer, John P; Lotano, Vincent E; Kovach, Stephen J

    2014-12-01

    Chest wall reconstruction remains challenging because of the variable nature of the defect. Muscle-sparing approaches have been described but are not widely applied today. The authors reviewed an institutional experience with chest wall reconstruction and describe the thoracoplastic approach, which aims to optimize flap selection. A retrospective review was conducted identifying all patients undergoing chest wall reconstruction performed by the senior author. Demographic information and operative characteristics were detailed and factors were analyzed for association with postoperative outcomes. Outcomes were also compared for conventional versus thoracoplastic groups. Forty-five patients underwent chest wall reconstruction at an average age of 54.2 ± 16.3 years. Sarcomas were most common (51 percent), followed by breast (16 percent) and lung (11 percent). The average number of ribs resected was 3.2 ± 1.4, with an average defect size of 212 ± 185 cm2. The most commonly used flaps included the latissimus dorsi and pectoralis major (72 percent). Mesh was incorporated in 58 percent of repairs and operative time was 6.2 ± 2.5 hours. The incidence of surgical complications was 23 percent, most commonly wound infection and nonhealing wound (20 percent). The thoracoplastic approach, used in 14 patients, demonstrated no differences in outcomes with follow-up of 14 months. Operative time was nearly identical, and the thoracoplastic group required significantly less blood products when transfused. Latissimus dorsi and pectoralis major flaps were used more frequently in the thoracoplastic group, although this did not reach significance (78.6 percent versus 69.2 percent). The thoracoplastic approach appears to be safe and effective when compared with conventional methods. Although definitive conclusions cannot be drawn, the authors' early experience is promising. The authors believe applying these principles improves aesthetic and functional outcomes and preserves the

  9. Computerized wheeze detection in young infants: comparison of signals from tracheal and chest wall sensors.

    PubMed

    Puder, Lia C; Wilitzki, Silke; Bührer, Christoph; Fischer, Hendrik S; Schmalisch, Gerd

    2016-12-01

    Computerized wheeze detection is an established method for objective assessment of respiratory sounds. In infants, this method has been used to detect subclinical airway obstruction and to monitor treatment effects. The optimal location for the acoustic sensors, however, is unknown. The aim of this study was to evaluate the quality of respiratory sound recordings in young infants, and to determine whether the position of the sensor affected computerized wheeze detection. Respiratory sounds were recorded over the left lateral chest wall and the trachea in 112 sleeping infants (median postmenstrual age: 49 weeks) on 129 test occasions using an automatic wheeze detection device (PulmoTrack(®)). Each recording lasted 10 min and the recordings were stored. A trained clinician retrospectively evaluated the recordings to determine sound quality and disturbances. The wheeze rates of all undisturbed tracheal and chest wall signals were compared using Bland-Altman plots. Comparison of wheeze rates measured over the trachea and the chest wall indicated strong correlation (r  ⩾  0.93, p  <  0.001), with a bias of 1% or less and limits of agreement of within 3% for the inspiratory wheeze rate and within 6% for the expiratory wheeze rate. However, sounds from the chest wall were more often affected by disturbances than sounds from the trachea (23% versus 6%, p  <  0.001). The study suggests that in young infants, a better quality of lung sound recordings can be obtained with the tracheal sensor.

  10. Durable palliation of breast cancer chest wall recurrence with radiation therapy, hyperthermia, and chemotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Zagar, Timothy M.; Higgins, Kristin A.; Miles, Edward F.; Vujaskovic, Zeljko; Dewhirst, Mark W.; Clough, Robert W.; Prosnitz, Leonard R.; Jones, Ellen L.

    2011-01-01

    Background and purpose Chest wall recurrences of breast cancer are a therapeutic challenge and durable local control is difficult to achieve. Our objective was to determine the local progression free survival (LPFS) and toxicity of thermochemoradiotherapy (ThChRT) for chest wall recurrence. Methods Twenty-seven patients received ThChRT for chest wall failure from 2/1995 to 6/2007 and make up this retrospective series. All received concurrent superficial hyperthermia twice weekly (median 8 sessions), chemotherapy (capecitabine in 21, vinorelbine in 2, and paclitaxel in 4), and radiation (median 45 Gy). Patients were followed up every 1.5–3 months and responses were graded with RECIST criteria and toxicities with the NCI CTC v4.0. Results Twenty-three (85%) patients were previously irradiated (median 60.4 Gy) and 22 (81%) patients received prior chemotherapy. Median follow-up was 11 months. Complete response (CR) was achieved in 16/20 (80%) of patients with follow-up data, and 1 year LPFS was 76%. Overall survival was 23 months for patients with CR, and 5.4 months in patients achieving a partial response (PR) (p = 0.01). Twenty-two patients experienced acute grade 1/2 treatment related toxicities, primarily moist desquamation. Two patients experienced 3rd degree burns; all resolved with conservative measures. Conclusions ThChRT offers durable palliation and prolonged LPFS with tolerable acute toxicity, especially if CR is achieved. PMID:21074876

  11. Durable palliation of breast cancer chest wall recurrence with radiation therapy, hyperthermia, and chemotherapy.

    PubMed

    Zagar, Timothy M; Higgins, Kristin A; Miles, Edward F; Vujaskovic, Zeljko; Dewhirst, Mark W; Clough, Robert W; Prosnitz, Leonard R; Jones, Ellen L

    2010-12-01

    Chest wall recurrences of breast cancer are a therapeutic challenge and durable local control is difficult to achieve. Our objective was to determine the local progression free survival (LPFS) and toxicity of thermochemoradiotherapy (ThChRT) for chest wall recurrence. Twenty-seven patients received ThChRT for chest wall failure from 2/1995 to 6/2007 and make up this retrospective series. All received concurrent superficial hyperthermia twice weekly (median 8 sessions), chemotherapy (capecitabine in 21, vinorelbine in 2, and paclitaxel in 4), and radiation (median 45 Gy). Patients were followed up every 1.5-3 months and responses were graded with RECIST criteria and toxicities with the NCI CTC v4.0. Twenty-three (85%) patients were previously irradiated (median 60.4 Gy) and 22 (81%) patients received prior chemotherapy. Median follow-up was 11 months. Complete response (CR) was achieved in 16/20 (80%) of patients with follow-up data, and 1 year LPFS was 76%. Overall survival was 23 months for patients with CR, and 5.4 months in patients achieving a partial response (PR) (p=0.01). Twenty-two patients experienced acute grade 1/2 treatment related toxicities, primarily moist desquamation. Two patients experienced 3rd degree burns; all resolved with conservative measures. ThChRT offers durable palliation and prolonged LPFS with tolerable acute toxicity, especially if CR is achieved. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Chest wall repair with engineered fetal bone grafts: an efficacy analysis in an autologous leporine model.

    PubMed

    Klein, Justin D; Turner, Christopher G B; Ahmed, Azra; Steigman, Shaun A; Zurakowski, David; Fauza, Dario O

    2010-06-01

    We sought to compare the efficacy of engineered fetal bone grafts with acellular constructs in an autologous model of chest wall repair. Rabbits (n = 10) with a full-thickness sternal defect were equally divided in 2 groups based on how the defect was repaired, namely, either with an autologous bone construct engineered with amniotic mesenchymal stem cells on a nanofibrous scaffold or a size-matched identical scaffold with no cells. Animals were killed at comparable time-points 18 to 20 weeks postimplantation for multiple analyses. Gross evidence of nonunion confirmed by micro-computed tomography scanning was present in 3 (60%) of 5 of the acellular implants but in no engineered grafts. Histology confirmed the presence of bone in both types of repair, albeit seemingly less robust in the acellular grafts. Mineral density in vivo was significantly higher in engineered grafts than in acellular ones, with more variability among the latter. There was no difference in alkaline phosphatase activity between the groups. Chest wall repair with an autologous osseous graft engineered with amniotic mesenchymal stem cells leads to improved and more consistent outcomes in the midterm when compared with an equivalent acellular prosthetic repair in a leporine model. Amniotic fluid-derived engineered bone may become a practical alternative for perinatal chest wall reconstruction. Copyright 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Method for anchoring biomechanical implants to muscle tendon and chest wall.

    PubMed

    Trumble, Dennis R; Melvin, David B; Magovern, James A

    2002-01-01

    Reliable tissue fixation is of fundamental importance to the successful development of muscle powered motor prostheses. This report describes a series of canine implant trials used to develop stable tissue-device interface mechanisms. Muscle pumps were fitted with prototype tendon and chest wall anchoring schemes and secured to the ribs and humeral insertion of latissimus dorsi (LD) muscles. LD stimulation was initiated 1 week postimplantation and continued throughout the implant period to stress these fixation sites. Design modification and implant testing were continued until both muscle and chest wall attachment points were found to be stable. Chest wall fixation was best achieved using perforated metallic plates wired to the ribs, as opposed to bone screws or wire mesh, which were subject to degradation. Direct attachment of the native tendon by means of spiked clamping plates proved ineffective. Stable muscle attachment was ultimately achieved by replacing the humeral tendon with an artificial substitute formed from fine polyester fibers gathered into 6-8 bundles and sewn into the LD insertion. Braided into a single cord, these fibers were fixed to the device by means of spiked clamping plates. Based on these findings, we conclude that perforated anchor plates and multifibrous artificial tendons can function as effective tissue-device interface mechanisms.

  14. Long-term survival after chest-wall reconstruction with musculocutaneous flaps

    SciTech Connect

    Kroll, S.S.; Schusterman, M.A.; Larson, D.L.; Fender, A. )

    1990-10-01

    Reconstruction of chest-wall defects with musculocutaneous flaps permits resection of advanced chest-wall tumors and of tissues severely damaged by radiotherapy in patients who in a previous era were not surgically treatable. To determine the long-term outcome from this surgery, the records of 96 patients who had undergone chest-wall resection with musculocutaneous flap reconstruction were reviewed. Median survival for the entire group was 20.5 months, but a more accurate prediction of outcome could be obtained by dividing the patients into three groups. In group I, patients free of known malignancy and undergoing resection of radionecrotic tissues, median survival was 60.0 months. In group II, patients with resectable disease and free of tumor following surgery, median survival was 31.1 months. In group III, patients incompletely resected or known to have metastatic disease following surgery, median survival was only 12.5 months. Even in group III, however, some individuals achieved prolonged survival and lasting benefits from the surgery, so these data should not be used to exclude patients from undergoing necessary palliative procedures.

  15. Unusual chest wall pain caused by thoracic disc herniation in a professional baseball pitcher

    PubMed Central

    Kato, Kinshi; Yabuki, Shoji; Otani, Koji; Nikaido, Takuya; Otoshi, Ken-ichi; Watanabe, Kazuyuki; Kikuchi, Shin-ichi; Konno, Shin-ichi

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Symptomatic thoracic disc herniation is clinically rare. There are few cases of disc herniation of the thoracic spine in top athletes described in the literature. We herein present a rare case of chest wall pain due to thoracic disc herniation in a professional baseball pitcher. A 30-year-old, left-handed pitcher complained of left-sided chest wall pain in the region of his lower ribs during a game. Neurological examination revealed hypoesthesia of the left side of the chest at the level of the lower thoracic spine. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the thoracic spine showed a left-sided paramedian disc herniation at the T9-T10 level. The player was initially prescribed rest, administration of pregabalin (150 mg twice a day), and subsequent physical rehabilitation. He was able to resume full training and pitching without medication 6 months after the onset. A follow-up MRI of the thoracic spine showed a reduction in the size of the herniated disc compared to the initial findings. Though relatively rare, thoracic disc herniation should be considered in cases of chest wall pain in athletes. PMID:26983590

  16. Color structured light system of chest wall motion measurement for respiratory volume evaluation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Huijun; Cheng, Yuan; Liu, Dongdong; Zhang, Xiaodong; Zhang, Jue; Que, Chengli; Wang, Guangfa; Fang, Jing

    2010-03-01

    We present a structured light system to dynamically measure human chest wall motion for respiratory volume estimation. Based on a projection of an encoded color pattern and a few active markers attached to the trunk, respiratory volumes are obtained by evaluating the 3-D topographic changes of the chest wall in an anatomically consistent measuring region during respiration. Three measuring setups are established: a single-sided illuminating-recording setup for standing posture, an inclined single-sided setup for supine posture, and a double-sided setup for standing posture. Results are compared with the pneumotachography and show good agreement in volume estimations [correlation coefficient: R>0.99 (P<0.001) for all setups]. The isovolume tests present small variations of the obtained volume during the isovolume maneuver (standard deviation<0.085 L for all setups). After validation by the isovolume test, an investigation of a patient with pleural effusion using the proposed method shows pulmonary functional differences between the diseased and the contralateral sides of the thorax, and subsequent improvement of this imbalance after drainage. These results demonstrate the proposed optical method is capable of not only whole respiratory volume evaluation with high accuracy, but also regional pulmonary function assessment in different chest wall behaviors, with the advantage of whole-field measurement.

  17. Post mastectomy chest wall irradiation using mixed electron-photon beams with or without isocentric technique.

    PubMed

    Hamdy, H K; Zikry, M S

    2008-01-01

    To describe our technique in delivering post mastectomy radiotherapy to chest wall using electron-photon mixed beam with or without isocentric application of the tangential photon portals, and to evaluate the associated acute and delayed morbidities. Twenty-two females with invasive breast cancer were subjected to modified radical mastectomy with adequate axillary dissection. All the patients have either tumour > or = 5 cm and/ or positive axillary nodes > 3. Chest wall was irradiated by a mixed beam of 6-Mev electrons (10Gy) and opposed tangential fields using 6 Mev-photons (36 Gy) followed by 6-Mev electrons boost to the scar of mastectomy for 4 Gy/2 fractions. We randomly allocated our patients to receive the photon beam with or without the isocentric technique. The mean dose to the planned target volume (PTV) by mixed beam was 44 Gy (96%) with a mean dose of 42 Gy (91%) to the overlying skin for the whole study group. In cases with right breast disease (17 cases), the mean right lung tissue volume within the PTV was 220 ml (15%). It was relatively higher with the non-iscocentric technique, 281 ml (19%), compared to the isocentric technique of 159 ml (10.5%). In cases with left breast disease (5 cases), the mean left lung volume within the PTV was 175 ml (14%). Larger volume of the lung tissue was included with the non-isocentric technique, 197 ml (16%) compared to the isocentric technique of 153 ml (12%). The mean scattered doses to the rest of the lung tissue, the rest of the heart in left breast cases, and the contra-lateral breast for the whole study group were 2.8 Gy, 1.8 Gy, and 1.4 Gy respectively and was comparable in both treatment arms. None of the cases developed any element of acute radiation related pneumonitis. Delayed radiation induced pneumonitis was seen in 2 cases (18%), with the chest wall treated with radiation with the non-isocentric technique. This study clearly demonstrated the utility of mixed beam in irradiating the chest wall after

  18. The use of Permacol® for chest wall reconstruction in a case of desmoid tumour resection.

    PubMed

    Mirzabeigi, Michael N; Moore, John H; Tuma, Gary A

    2011-03-01

    Desmoid tumour resection is a known, albeit rare, cause for chest wall reconstruction. Traditionally, musculocutaneous flaps and synthetic mesh materials have been employed for coverage over these potentially large thoracic defects. More recently, biologic mesh materials have become increasingly more prevalent in a multitude of surgical reconstructions. To date, the current literature describes the usage of select biologic materials, such as human cadaveric acellular dermal matrix, in chest wall reconstruction. One variation of the biologic materials, Permacol(®), has not been well described in the literature for chest wall reconstruction. Permacol(®) is a porcine lyophilised acellular dermal collagen. We report the successful use of Permacol(®) in a complex chest wall reconstruction following the resection of a large desmoid tumour.

  19. Estimating adipose tissue in the chest wall using ultrasonic and alternate /sup 40/K and biometric measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, A.L.; Campbell, G.W.

    1982-01-22

    The percentage of adipose (fat) tissue in the chest wall must be known to accurately measure Pu in the human lung. Correction factors of 100% or more in x-ray detection efficiency are common. Methods using simple /sup 40/K and biometric measurement techniques were investigated to determine the adipose content in the human chest wall. These methods predict adipose content to within 15% of the absolute ultrasonic value. These new methods are discussed and compared with conventional ultrasonic measurement techniques. (ERB)

  20. Multi-Institutional Review of Repeat Irradiation of Chest Wall and Breast for Recurrent Breast Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Wahl, Andrew O.; Rademaker, Alfred; Kiel, Krystyna D.; Jones, Ellen L.; Marks, Lawrence B.; Croog, Victoria; McCormick, Beryl M.; Hirsch, Arica; Karkar, Ami; Motwani, Sabin B.; Tereffe, Welela; Yu, T.-K.; Sher, David; Silverstein, Joshua; Kachnic, Lisa A.; Kesslering, Christy; Freedman, Gary M.; Small, William

    2008-02-01

    Purpose: To review the toxicity and clinical outcomes for patients who underwent repeat chest wall or breast irradiation (RT) after local recurrence. Methods and Materials: Between 1993 and 2005, 81 patients underwent repeat RT of the breast or chest wall for locally recurrent breast cancer at eight institutions. The median dose of the first course of RT was 60 Gy and was 48 Gy for the second course. The median total radiation dose was 106 Gy (range, 74.4-137.5 Gy). At the second RT course, 20% received twice-daily RT, 54% were treated with concurrent hyperthermia, and 54% received concurrent chemotherapy. Results: The median follow-up from the second RT course was 12 months (range, 1-144 months). Four patients developed late Grade 3 or 4 toxicity. However, 25 patients had follow-up >20 months, and no late Grade 3 or 4 toxicities were noted. No treatment-related deaths occurred. The development of Grade 3 or 4 late toxicity was not associated with any repeat RT variables. The overall complete response rate was 57%. No repeat RT parameters were associated with an improved complete response rate, although a trend was noted for an improved complete response with the addition of hyperthermia that was close to reaching statistical significance (67% vs. 39%, p = 0.08). The 1-year local disease-free survival rate for patients with gross disease was 53% compared with 100% for those without gross disease (p < 0.0001). Conclusions: The results of our study have shown that repeat RT of the chest wall for patients with locally recurrent breast cancer is feasible, because it is associated with acceptable acute and late morbidity and encouraging local response rates.

  1. Conformal microwave array (CMA) applicators for hyperthermia of diffuse chest wall recurrence.

    PubMed

    Stauffer, Paul R; Maccarini, Paolo; Arunachalam, Kavitha; Craciunescu, Oana; Diederich, Chris; Juang, Titania; Rossetto, Francesca; Schlorff, Jaime; Milligan, Andrew; Hsu, Joe; Sneed, Penny; Vujaskovic, Zeljko

    2010-01-01

    This article summarises the evolution of microwave array applicators for heating large area chest wall disease as an adjuvant to external beam radiation, systemic chemotherapy, and potentially simultaneous brachytherapy. Current devices used for thermotherapy of chest wall recurrence are reviewed. The largest conformal array applicator to date is evaluated in four studies: (1) ability to conform to the torso is demonstrated with a CT scan of a torso phantom and MR scan of the conformal water bolus component on a mastectomy patient; (2) specific absorption rate (SAR) and temperature distributions are calculated with electromagnetic and thermal simulation software for a mastectomy patient; (3) SAR patterns are measured with a scanning SAR probe in liquid muscle phantom for a buried coplanar waveguide CMA; and (4) heating patterns and patient tolerance of CMA applicators are characterised in a clinical pilot study with 13 patients. CT and MR scans demonstrate excellent conformity of CMA applicators to contoured anatomy. Simulations demonstrate effective control of heating over contoured anatomy. Measurements confirm effective coverage of large treatment areas with no gaps. In 42 hyperthermia treatments, CMA applicators provided well-tolerated effective heating of up to 500 cm(2) regions, achieving target temperatures of T(min) = 41.4 ± 0.7°C, T(90) = 42.1 ± 0.6°C, T(ave) = 42.8 ± 0.6°C, and T(max) = 44.3 ± 0.8°C as measured in an average of 90 points per treatment. The CMA applicator is an effective thermal therapy device for heating large-area superficial disease such as diffuse chest wall recurrence. It is able to cover over three times the treatment area of conventional hyperthermia devices while conforming to typical body contours.

  2. Multi-institutional review of repeat irradiation of chest wall and breast for recurrent breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Wahl, Andrew O; Rademaker, Alfred; Kiel, Krystyna D; Jones, Ellen L; Marks, Lawrence B; Croog, Victoria; McCormick, Beryl M; Hirsch, Arica; Karkar, Ami; Motwani, Sabin B; Tereffe, Welela; Yu, Tse-Kuan; Sher, David; Silverstein, Joshua; Kachnic, Lisa A; Kesslering, Christy; Freedman, Gary M; Small, William

    2008-02-01

    To review the toxicity and clinical outcomes for patients who underwent repeat chest wall or breast irradiation (RT) after local recurrence. Between 1993 and 2005, 81 patients underwent repeat RT of the breast or chest wall for locally recurrent breast cancer at eight institutions. The median dose of the first course of RT was 60 Gy and was 48 Gy for the second course. The median total radiation dose was 106 Gy (range, 74.4-137.5 Gy). At the second RT course, 20% received twice-daily RT, 54% were treated with concurrent hyperthermia, and 54% received concurrent chemotherapy. The median follow-up from the second RT course was 12 months (range, 1-144 months). Four patients developed late Grade 3 or 4 toxicity. However, 25 patients had follow-up >20 months, and no late Grade 3 or 4 toxicities were noted. No treatment-related deaths occurred. The development of Grade 3 or 4 late toxicity was not associated with any repeat RT variables. The overall complete response rate was 57%. No repeat RT parameters were associated with an improved complete response rate, although a trend was noted for an improved complete response with the addition of hyperthermia that was close to reaching statistical significance (67% vs. 39%, p = 0.08). The 1-year local disease-free survival rate for patients with gross disease was 53% compared with 100% for those without gross disease (p < 0.0001). The results of our study have shown that repeat RT of the chest wall for patients with locally recurrent breast cancer is feasible, because it is associated with acceptable acute and late morbidity and encouraging local response rates.

  3. Pectoralis Muscle Flap Repair Reduces Paradoxical Motion of the Chest Wall in Complex Sternal Wound Dehiscence

    PubMed Central

    Zeitani, Jacob; Russo, Marco; Pompeo, Eugenio; Sergiacomi, Gian Luigi; Chiariello, Luigi

    2016-01-01

    Background The aim of the study was to test the hypothesis that in patients with chronic complex sternum dehiscence, the use of muscle flap repair minimizes the occurrence of paradoxical motion of the chest wall (CWPM) when compared to sternal rewiring, eventually leading to better respiratory function and clinical outcomes during follow-up. Methods In a propensity score matching analysis, out of 94 patients who underwent sternal reconstruction, 20 patients were selected: 10 patients underwent sternal reconstruction with bilateral pectoralis muscle flaps (group 1) and 10 underwent sternal rewiring (group 2). Eligibility criteria included the presence of hemisternum diastases associated with multiple (≥3) bone fractures and radiologic evidence of synchronous chest wall motion (CWSM). We compared radiologically assessed (volumetric computed tomography) ventilatory mechanic indices such as single lung and global vital capacity (VC), diaphragm excursion, synchronous and paradoxical chest wall motion. Results Follow-up was 100% complete (mean 85±24 months). CWPM was inversely correlated with single lung VC (Spearman R=−0.72, p=0.0003), global VC (R=−0.51, p=0.02) and diaphragm excursion (R=−0.80, p=0.0003), whereas it proved directly correlated with dyspnea grade (Spearman R=0.51, p=0.02) and pain (R=0.59, p=0.005). Mean CWPM and single lung VC were both better in group 1, whereas there was no difference in CWSM, diaphragm excursion and global VC. Conclusion Our study suggests that in patients with complex chronic sternal dehiscence, pectoralis muscle flap reconstruction guarantees lower CWPM and greater single-lung VC when compared with sternal rewiring and it is associated with better clinical outcomes with less pain and dyspnea. PMID:27733997

  4. [Castleman's Disease of the Chest Wall Successfully Resected by Thoracoscopic Surgery;Report of a Case].

    PubMed

    Naomi, Akira; Kuroda, Hiroaki; Seto, Katsutoshi; Iiduka, Shuhei; Dejima, Hitoshi; Mizuno, Tetsuya; Sakakura, Noriaki; Sakao, Yukinori

    2015-12-01

    A 61-year-old woman without a significant past medical history was pointed out the abnormal shadow on the annual medical checkup. Chest computed tomography (CT) revealed a well-defined paravertebral chest wall tumor of 20 mm in maxmum size. Furthermore, diffusion weighted image on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) showed high intensity, and standardized uptake value (SUV) max on positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT) was 13.4. Schwanoma, solitary fibrous tumor (SFT) or malignant lymphoma was suggested. Complete resection was performed with thoracoscopic surgery. The histological diagnosis was Castleman's disease with hyalineized type.

  5. Spectral characteristics of airway opening and chest wall tidal flows in spontaneously breathing preterm infants.

    PubMed

    Habib, Robert H; Pyon, Kee H; Courtney, Sherry E; Aghai, Zubair H

    2003-05-01

    We compared the harmonic content of tidal flows measured simultaneously at the mouth and chest wall in spontaneously breathing very low birth weight infants (n = 16, 1,114 +/- 230 g, gestation age: 28 +/- 2 wk). Airway opening flows were measured via face mask-pneumotachograph (P-tach), whereas chest wall flows were derived from respiratory inductance plethysmography (RIP) excursions. Next, for each, we computed two spectral shape indexes: 1) harmonic distortion (k(d); k(d,P-tach) and k(d,RIP), respectively) defines the extent to which flows deviated from a single sine wave, and 2) the exponent of the power law (s; s(P-tach) and s(RIP), respectively), describing the spectral energy vs. frequency. P-tach and RIP flow spectra exhibited similar power law functional forms consistently in all infants. Also, mouth [s(P-tach) = 3.73 +/- 0.23% (95% confidence interval), k(d,P-tach) = 38.8 +/- 4.6%] and chest wall (s(RIP) = 3.51 +/- 0.30%, k(d,RIP) = 42.8 +/- 4.8%) indexes were similar and highly correlated (s(RIP) = 1.17 x s(P-tach) + 0.85; r(2) = 0.81; k(d,RIP) = 0.90 x k(d,P-tach) + 8.0; r(2) = 0.76). The corresponding time to peak tidal expiratory flow-to-expiratory time ratio (0.62 +/- 0.08) was higher than reported in older infants. The obtained s and k(d) values are similar to those reported in older and/or larger chronic lung disease infants, yet appreciably lower than for 1-mo-old healthy infants of closer age and/or size; this indicated increased complexity of tidal flows in very low birth weight babies. Importantly, we found equivalent flow spectral data from mouth and chest wall tidal flows. The latter are desirable because they avoid face mask artificial effects, including leaks around it, they do not interfere with ventilatory support delivery, and they may facilitate longer measurements that are useful in control of breathing assessment.

  6. Transcatheter Arterial Embolization for Tumor Seeding in the Chest Wall After Radiofrequency Ablation for Hepatocellular Carcinoma

    SciTech Connect

    Shibata, Toshiya Shibata, Toyomichi; Maetani, Yoji; Kubo, Takeshi; Nishida, Naoshi; Itoh, Kyo

    2006-06-15

    Tumor seeding in the chest wall was depicted at follow-up CT obtained 9 months after radiofrequency ablation for hepatocellular carcinoma. Transcatheter arterial embolization was successfully performed, injecting emulsion of 10 mg of epirubicin and 1 ml of iodized oil followed by gelatin sponge particles via the microcatheter placed in the right eleventh intercostal artery. The patient died of tumor growth in the liver one year after the embolization, but no progression of the tumor seeding was noted during the follow-up period. We conclude that transcatheter arterial embolization was effective for the control of tumor seeding after radiofrequency ablation for hepatocellular carcinoma.

  7. Giant congenital intercostal arteriovenous malformation with extensive involvement of chest wall and ribs: surgical experience.

    PubMed

    Parashi, Hrishikesh Sukhadeo; Bhosle, Krishnarao Narayan; Thakare, Nitin Dashrath; Sharma, Ajay; Potwar, Sushrut Suhas

    2013-06-01

    Intercostal arteriovenous malformations (AVMs) are rare lesions. Review of literature shows that most reported cases are secondary to trauma or iatrogenic in origin. Congenital intercostal AVMs are extremely rare. We believe that only 1 case report of congenital intercostal arteriovenous malformation has been reported previously in the literature. We present an exceedingly rare case of giant congenital intercostal AVM in a young patient diagnosed on contrast-enhanced computed tomography of the thorax and treated by surgical resection of the involved chest wall and ribs with reconstruction of the surgical defect. Copyright © 2013 The Society of Thoracic Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. [Early thoracotomy and chest wall stabilization with elastic rib clamps (author's transl)].

    PubMed

    Labitzke, R

    1981-01-01

    In patients with chest injuries, serial rib fractures and intrathoracic lacerations the indication for primary thoracotomy is usually limited to life-threatening organ ruptures. In our own experience with 18 patients primary thoracotomy offers the chance of immediate closure of lung lacerations, suture of pleural and pericardial tears, ligature of torn intercostal vessels and stabilization of the chest wall by elastic rib clamps "Essener Model". Postoperative respiration, freedom of pain, is restored immediately and therefore complications and duration of high-risk respirator treatment can be reduced.

  9. Acute Chest Wall Infections: Surgical Site Infections, Necrotizing Soft Tissue Infections, and Sternoclavicular Joint Infection.

    PubMed

    Schipper, Paul; Tieu, Brandon H

    2017-05-01

    Acute chest wall infections are uncommon and share similar risk factors for infection at other surgical sites. Smoking cessation has been shown to decrease the risk of surgical site infection. Depending on the depth of infection and/or involvement of the organ space, adequate therapy involves antibiotics and drainage. Early diagnosis and debridement of necrotizing soft tissue infections is essential to reduce mortality. Sternoclavicular joint infections require surgical debridement, en bloc resection, and antibiotic therapy. A standard approach to wound closure after resection has yet to be established. Vacuum-assisted closure is a valuable adjunct to standard therapy. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Fireworks-induced chest wall granulomatous disease: 18F-FDG PET/CT imaging.

    PubMed

    Le, Stephanie T; Nguyen, Ba Duong

    2014-04-01

    The authors present a case of 18F-FDG-avid granulomatous reaction induced by fireworks injury of the chest wall in a patient with esophageal adenocarcinoma. This hypermetabolic lesion, involving the right pectoralis muscles, appeared slightly more prominent on restaging PET/CT imaging following chemotherapy and radiation therapy. Excisional biopsy of the lesion established the diagnosis of foreign-body granulomatous-type inflammation with surrounding foci of non-polarizable black foreign material and ruled out malignancy. The patient recalled accidentally shooting himself in the chest with a Roman candle at the age of 3.

  11. The Etiologies of Chest Wall and Breast Asymmetry and Improvement in Breast Augmentation.

    PubMed

    Glicksman, Caroline A; Ferenz, Sarah E

    2015-10-01

    Patients presenting for correction of breast and chest wall asymmetries may have undergone numerous thoracic procedures in early childhood and may have suffered profound psychosocial effects. Complex congenital syndromes as well as mild breast asymmetries should be carefully documented using objective measurements, photography, and 3-dimensional simulations when available. Shaped highly cohesive breast implants offer plastic surgeons more possibilities and precision by fine-tuning the gel distribution and specific volumes required to correct the hypoplastic elements. Long-lasting correction of asymmetry can be obtained when patients are not oversized, and care is taken to avoid visibility, palpability, and malposition problems. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Could chest wall rigidity be a factor in rapid death from illicit fentanyl abuse?

    PubMed

    Burns, Glenn; DeRienz, Rebecca T; Baker, Daniel D; Casavant, Marcel; Spiller, Henry A

    2016-06-01

    There has been a significant spike in fentanyl-related deaths from illicit fentanyl supplied via the heroin trade. Past fentanyl access was primarily oral or dermal via prescription fentanyl patch diversion. One factor potentially driving this increase in fatalities is the change in route of administration. Rapid intravenous (IV) fentanyl can produce chest wall rigidity. We evaluated post-mortem fentanyl and norfentanyl concentrations in a recent surge of lethal fentanyl intoxications. Fentanyl related deaths from the Franklin County coroner's office from January to September 2015 were identified. Presumptive positive fentanyl results were confirmed by quantitative analysis using liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry (LC/MS/MS) and were able to quantify fentanyl, norfentanyl, alfentanyl, and sufentanyl. 48 fentanyl deaths were identified. Mean fentanyl concentrations were 12.5 ng/ml, (range 0.5 ng/ml to >40 ng/ml). Mean norfentanyl concentrations were 1.9 ng/ml (range none detected to 8.3 ng/ml). No appreciable concentrations of norfentanyl could be detected in 20 of 48 cases (42%) and were less than 1 ng/ml in 25 cases (52%). Elevated fentanyl concentrations did not correlate with rises in norfentanyl levels. In several cases fentanyl concentrations were strikingly high (22 ng/ml and 20 ng/ml) with no norfentanyl detected. The lack of any measurable norfentanyl in half of our cases suggests a very rapid death, consistent with acute chest rigidity. An alternate explanation could be a dose-related rapid onset of respiratory arrest. Deaths occurred with low levels of fentanyl in the therapeutic range (1-2 ng/ml) in apparent non-naïve opiate abusers. Acute chest wall rigidity is a well-recognized complication in the medical community but unknown within the drug abuse community. The average abuser of illicit opioids may be unaware of the increasing fentanyl content of their illicit opioid purchase. In summary we believe sudden onset chest

  13. Multidetector computed tomography-spectrum of blunt chest wall and lung injuries in polytraumatized patients.

    PubMed

    Peters, S; Nicolas, V; Heyer, C M

    2010-04-01

    Accidental injuries are the leading cause of death in the 15 to 44-year-old age group. Blunt chest trauma is often encountered in these patients and is associated with a mortality of up to 25%. Although conventional radiography still plays an important role in the initial emergency room setting, for follow-up in the intensive care unit, multidetector computed tomography has established itself as the standard imaging method for the evaluation of chest trauma patients. The following review presents salient radiological findings of the chest wall and shoulder girdle, thoracic spine, pleural space, and lung in polytraumatized patients.

  14. Dosimetric evaluation of integrated IMRT treatment of the chest wall and supraclavicular region for breast cancer after modified radical mastectomy

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, Bo; Wei, Xian-ding; Zhao, Yu-tian; Ma, Chang-Ming

    2014-07-01

    To investigate the dosimetric characteristics of irradiation of the chest wall and supraclavicular region as an integrated volume with intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) after modified radical mastectomy. This study included 246 patients who received modified radical mastectomy. The patients were scanned with computed tomography, and the chest wall (with or without the internal mammary lymph nodes) and supraclavicular region were delineated. For 143 patients, the chest wall and supraclavicular region were combined as an integrated planning volume and treated with IMRT. For 103 patients, conventional treatments were employed with 2 tangential fields for the chest wall, abutting a mixed field of 6-MV x-rays (16 Gy) and 9-MeV electrons (34 Gy) for the upper supraclavicular region. The common prescription dose was 50 Gy/25 Fx/5 W to 90% of the target volume. The dosimetric characteristics of the chest wall, the supraclavicular region, and normal organs were compared. For the chest wall target, compared with conventional treatments, the integrated IMRT plans lowered the maximum dose, increased the minimum dose, and resulted in better conformity and uniformity of the target volume. There was an increase in minimum, average, and 95% prescription dose for the integrated IMRT plans in the supraclavicular region, and conformity and uniformity were improved. The V{sub 30} of the ipsilateral lung and V{sub 10}, V{sub 30}, and mean dose of the heart on the integrated IMRT plans were lower than those of the conventional plans. The V{sub 5} and V{sub 10} of the ipsilateral lung and V{sub 5} of the heart were higher on the integrated IMRT plans (p < 0.05) than on conventional plans. Without an increase in the radiation dose to organs at risk, the integrated IMRT treatment plans improved the dose distribution of the supraclavicular region and showed better dose conformity and uniformity of the integrated target volume of the chest wall and supraclavicular region.

  15. Dosimetric evaluation of integrated IMRT treatment of the chest wall and supraclavicular region for breast cancer after modified radical mastectomy.

    PubMed

    Yang, Bo; Wei, Xian-Ding; Zhao, Yu-Tian; Ma, Chang-Ming

    2014-01-01

    To investigate the dosimetric characteristics of irradiation of the chest wall and supraclavicular region as an integrated volume with intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) after modified radical mastectomy. This study included 246 patients who received modified radical mastectomy. The patients were scanned with computed tomography, and the chest wall (with or without the internal mammary lymph nodes) and supraclavicular region were delineated. For 143 patients, the chest wall and supraclavicular region were combined as an integrated planning volume and treated with IMRT. For 103 patients, conventional treatments were employed with 2 tangential fields for the chest wall, abutting a mixed field of 6-MV x-rays (16Gy) and 9-MeV electrons (34Gy) for the upper supraclavicular region. The common prescription dose was 50Gy/25Fx/5W to 90% of the target volume. The dosimetric characteristics of the chest wall, the supraclavicular region, and normal organs were compared. For the chest wall target, compared with conventional treatments, the integrated IMRT plans lowered the maximum dose, increased the minimum dose, and resulted in better conformity and uniformity of the target volume. There was an increase in minimum, average, and 95% prescription dose for the integrated IMRT plans in the supraclavicular region, and conformity and uniformity were improved. The V30 of the ipsilateral lung and V10, V30, and mean dose of the heart on the integrated IMRT plans were lower than those of the conventional plans. The V5 and V10 of the ipsilateral lung and V5 of the heart were higher on the integrated IMRT plans (p < 0.05) than on conventional plans. Without an increase in the radiation dose to organs at risk, the integrated IMRT treatment plans improved the dose distribution of the supraclavicular region and showed better dose conformity and uniformity of the integrated target volume of the chest wall and supraclavicular region. Copyright © 2014 American Association of Medical

  16. Number of Ribs Resected is Associated with Respiratory Complications Following Lobectomy with en bloc Chest Wall Resection.

    PubMed

    Geissen, Nicole M; Medairos, Robert; Davila, Edgar; Basu, Sanjib; Warren, William H; Chmielewski, Gary W; Liptay, Michael J; Arndt, Andrew T; Seder, Christopher W

    2016-08-01

    Pulmonary lobectomy with en bloc chest wall resection is a common strategy for treating lung cancers invading the chest wall. We hypothesized a direct relationship exists between number of ribs resected and postoperative respiratory complications. An institutional database was queried for patients with non-small cell lung cancer that underwent lobectomy with en bloc chest wall resection between 2003 and 2014. Propensity matching was used to identify a cohort of patients who underwent lobectomy via thoracotomy without chest wall resection. Patients were propensity matched on age, gender, smoking history, FEV1, and DLCO. The relationship between number of ribs resected and postoperative respiratory complications (bronchoscopy, re-intubation, pneumonia, or tracheostomy) was examined. Sixty-eight patients (34 chest wall resections; 34 without chest wall resection) were divided into 3 cohorts: cohort A = 0 ribs resected (n = 34), cohort B = 1-3 ribs resected (n = 24), and cohort C = 4-6 ribs resected (n = 10). Patient demographics were similar between cohorts. The 90-day mortality rate was 2.9 % (2/68) and did not vary between cohorts. On multivariate analysis, having 1-3 ribs resected (OR 19.29, 95 % CI (1.33, 280.72); p = 0.03), 4-6 ribs resected [OR 26.66, (1.48, 481.86); p = 0.03), and a lower DLCO (OR 0.91, (0.84, 0.99); p = 0.02) were associated with postoperative respiratory complications. In patients undergoing lobectomy with en bloc chest wall resection for non-small cell lung cancer, the number of ribs resected is directly associated with incidence of postoperative respiratory complications.

  17. Factors Associated With Chest Wall Toxicity After Accelerated Partial Breast Irradiation Using High-Dose-Rate Brachytherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, Sheree; Vicini, Frank; Vanapalli, Jyotsna R.; Whitaker, Thomas J.; Pope, D. Keith; Lyden, Maureen; Bruggeman, Lisa; Haile, Kenneth L.; McLaughlin, Mark P.

    2012-07-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this analysis was to evaluate dose-volume relationships associated with a higher probability for developing chest wall toxicity (pain) after accelerated partial breast irradiation (APBI) by using both single-lumen and multilumen brachytherapy. Methods and Materials: Rib dose data were available for 89 patients treated with APBI and were correlated with the development of chest wall/rib pain at any point after treatment. Ribs were contoured on computed tomography planning scans, and rib dose-volume histograms (DVH) along with histograms for other structures were constructed. Rib DVH data for all patients were sampled at all volumes {>=}0.008 cubic centimeter (cc) (for maximum dose related to pain) and at volumes of 0.5, 1, 2, and 3 cc for analysis. Rib pain was evaluated at each follow-up visit. Patient responses were marked as yes or no. No attempt was made to grade responses. Eighty-nine responses were available for this analysis. Results: Nineteen patients (21.3%) complained of transient chest wall/rib pain at any point in follow-up. Analysis showed a direct correlation between total dose received and volume of rib irradiated with the probability of developing rib/chest wall pain at any point after follow-up. The median maximum dose at volumes {>=}0.008 cc of rib in patients who experienced chest wall pain was 132% of the prescribed dose versus 95% of the prescribed dose in those patients who did not experience pain (p = 0.0035). Conclusions: Although the incidence of chest wall/rib pain is quite low with APBI brachytherapy, attempts should be made to keep the volume of rib irradiated at a minimum and the maximum dose received by the chest wall as low as reasonably achievable.

  18. A novel approach to simulate chest wall micro-motion for bio-radar life detection purpose

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    An, Qiang; Li, Zhao; Liang, Fulai; Chen, Fuming; Wang, Jianqi

    2016-10-01

    Volunteers are often recruited to serve as the detection targets during the research process of bio-radar life detection technology, in which the experiment results are highly susceptible to the physical status of different individuals (shape, posture, etc.). In order to objectively evaluate the radar system performance and life detection algorithms, a standard detection target is urgently needed. The paper first proposed a parameter quantitatively controllable system to simulate the chest wall micro-motion caused mainly by breathing and heart beating. Then, the paper continued to analyze the material and size selection of the scattering body mounted on the simulation system from the perspective of back scattering energy. The computational electromagnetic method was employed to determine the exact scattering body. Finally, on-site experiments were carried out to verify the reliability of the simulation platform utilizing an IR UWB bioradar. Experimental result shows that the proposed system can simulate a real human target from three aspects: respiration frequency, amplitude and body surface scattering energy. Thus, it can be utilized as a substitute for a human target in radar based non-contact life detection research in various scenarios.

  19. Improving breast cancer diagnosis by reducing chest wall effect in diffuse optical tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Feifei; Mostafa, Atahar; Zhu, Quing

    2017-03-01

    We have developed the ultrasound (US)-guided diffuse optical tomography technique to assist US diagnosis of breast cancer and to predict neoadjuvant chemotherapy response of patients with breast cancer. The technique was implemented using a hand-held hybrid probe consisting of a coregistered US transducer and optical source and detector fibers which couple the light illumination from laser diodes and photon detection to the photomultiplier tube detectors. With the US guidance, diffused light measurements were made at the breast lesion site and the normal contralateral reference site which was used to estimate the background tissue optical properties for imaging reconstruction. However, background optical properties were affected by the chest wall underneath the breast tissue. We have analyzed data from 297 female patients, and results have shown statistically significant correlation between the fitted optical properties (μa and μs‧) and the chest wall depth. After subtracting the background μa at each wavelength, the difference of computed total hemoglobin (tHb) between malignant and benign lesion groups has improved. For early stage malignant lesions, the area-under-the-receiver operator characteristic curve (AUC) has improved from 88.5% to 91.5%. For all malignant lesions, the AUC has improved from 85.3% to 88.1%. Statistical test has revealed the significant difference of the AUC improvements after subtracting background tHb values.

  20. EVALUATION AND TREATMENT OF MUSCULOSKELETAL CHEST WALL PAIN IN A MILITARY ATHLETE

    PubMed Central

    Zylstra, Edo; Issa, Tamer; Miller, Joseph M.; Gerber, J. Parry

    2012-01-01

    Background and Purpose: Athletes reporting chest pain are challenging to diagnose and equally challenging to treat. The majority of chest pain is musculoskeletal in origin, yet differentiating these from other more serious conditions should be the initial primary focus. The ability to reproduce the patient's symptoms aids in the differential diagnostic process. The purpose of this case report is to illustrate the use of dry needling (DN) to aid in the diagnosis and treatment of focal chest wall pain. Case Descriptions: A 22 year-old male military athlete with anterior chest pain, refractory to traditional physical therapy, was evaluated and treated with dry needling. Outcomes: Favorable results were achieved as demonstrated by clinically meaningful improvements in the Patient Specific Functional Scale, the Global Rating of Change score, and his physical performance which allowed this athlete to return to competition and military training. Conclusion: Dry needling in the hands of properly trained providers may aid in diagnosis and treatment of focal chest wall syndromes. Level of Evidence: Therapy, Level 4 PMID:22666647

  1. Ventilation asymmetry after transplantation for emphysema: role of chest wall and mediastinum.

    PubMed

    De Groote, Anne; Van Muylem, Alain; Scillia, Pietro; Cheron, Guy; Verleden, Geert; Paiva, Manuel; Estenne, Marc

    2004-12-01

    After single-lung transplantation for emphysema, the hyperinflated native lung and the graft have different extents and rates of inflation and emptying. This requires that breathing produces asymmetrical expansion of the chest wall, displacement of the mediastinum, or both. In a first study in four seated transplant recipients, we measured the volumes of the two hemithoraces with optoelectronic plethysmography. Functional residual capacity and total lung capacity were identical on the native and transplanted sides, and changes in chest wall volume during CO(2)-induced hyperpnea and FVC maneuvers were similar on both sides. Studies with computerized tomography in three of these patients and in four additional patients in supine posture indicated that the mediastinum was shifted toward the graft at functional residual capacity and total lung capacity. The mediastinum moved toward the native lung during tidal and full inspiration and toward the graft during tidal and forced expiration; additional studies with fluoroscopy showed qualitatively similar changes in upright posture. In summary, the two hemithoraces assume identical static volumes and show similar volume changes during CO(2)-induced hyperpnea and FVC maneuvers in patients with single-lung transplantation for emphysema; displacement of the mediastinum accommodates part, if not all, of the unequal lung volumes and asymmetrical ventilation.

  2. A digital measurement of earth fault loop; Impedence using a parameter estimation algorithm

    SciTech Connect

    Soliman, S.A. ); Christiansen, G.S.; El-Naggar, K.M. . Dept. of Electrical Engineering)

    1992-12-01

    In electrical low voltage power system, a neutral earthing is used for protection against electrical shock hazards. Testing of the effectiveness of the earthing system could be achieved by measuring the system fault loop impedance Z. This paper presents a new application of least error squares (LES) parameter estimation algorithm for measurement of earth fault impedance, the proposed method uses the digitized samples of the instantaneous voltage across the fault loop impedance, effects of data window size, sampling rate and the voltage frequency drift on the accuracy of the impedance measurements are studied. Simulated test results are reported in this paper, which form the basis of our conclusion.

  3. Chest wall and rib irradiation and toxicities of early-stage lung cancer patients treated with CyberKnife stereotactic body radiotherapy.

    PubMed

    Podder, Tarun; Biswas, Tithi; Yao, Min; Zhang, Yuxia; Kim, Ellen; Ellis, Rodney J; Lo, Simon S; Machtay, Mitchell

    2014-12-01

    The aim of the study is to evaluate the chest wall and rib toxicities in primary lung cancer patients treated with CyberKnife-based stereotactic body radiotherapy. In this study, data were collected from the 118 patients, of which 25 patients who had longer follow-up (mean: 21.9 months) were considered. Studied parameters were maximum point dose, doses to 1-100 cm(3) of chest wall and 1-10 cm(3) of ribs. Three patients developed chest wall pain (grade I). 25 studied patients, on average, received 27.7 Gy to 30 cm(3) of chest wall and 50.4 Gy to 1 cm(3) of rib. Nine patients had more than 30 Gy dose to 30 cm(3) of chest wall. No rib bone fracture was found. No correlations of chest wall pain and volume of irradiation were found.

  4. Periodic appearance and disappearance of a chest wall (serratus anterior development) cavernous hemangioma that was finally resected in a child.

    PubMed

    Nakagawa, Tomoki; Watanabe, Hajime; Nakazato, Kenei; Masuda, Daisuke; Ogura, Go; Masuda, Ryota; Nakamura, Naoya; Iwazaki, Masayuki

    2013-08-01

    Primary chest wall tumors occur infrequently; in particular, cavernous hemangioma of the chest wall is an extremely rare disease. We report a case of child with cavernous hemangioma of the chest wall, which was successfully resected. Obvious enlargement of the tumor and the appearance of pain were observed during a 2-year follow-up. In the present case, transcutaneous ultrasonography showed the appearance and disappearance of the mass. This was considered to be caused by the transfer of contents between the shallow and deep parts of the tumor. This may have resulted from serratus anterior muscle movement between the two-layered tumor. Transcutaneous ultrasonography, as well as magnetic resonance imaging, was therefore extremely effective for preoperative diagnosis. Transcutaneous ultrasonography is easily performed, even in children, such as in the present case. Because of its simplicity and usefulness, transcutaneous ultrasonography may be considered as the first-line imaging modality for diagnosis.

  5. Negative-pressure wound therapy and early pedicle flap reconstruction of the chest wall after epirubicin extravasation.

    PubMed

    Papadakis, Marios; Rahmanian-Schwarz, Afshin; Bednarek, Marzena; Arafkas, Mohamed; Holschneider, Philipp; Hübner, Gunnar

    2017-05-15

    Accidental extravasation is a serious iatrogenic injury among patients receiving anthracycline-containing chemotherapy. The aim of this work is to present a combination therapy for chest wall reconstruction following epirubicin extravasation. Herein, we report a 68-year-old woman with massive soft tissue necrosis of the anterolateral chest wall after epirubicin extravasation from a port implanted in the subclavicular area. The necrotic tissue was resected, the port was removed, and negative-pressure wound therapy was applied. Three weeks later, a latissimus dorsi pedicle flap was successfully used to cover the defect. To the best of the authors' knowledge, this is the first report of a strategy comprising the combination of negative-pressure wound therapy and a latissimus pedicle flap for reconstruction of the chest wall after soft tissue necrosis following epirubicin extravasation.

  6. Human chest wall function while awake and during halothane anesthesia. I. Quiet breathing.

    PubMed

    Warner, D O; Warner, M A; Ritman, E L

    1995-01-01

    Data concerning chest wall configuration and the activities of the major respiratory muscles that determine this configuration during anesthesia in humans are limited. The aim of this study was to determine the effects of halothane anesthesia on respiratory muscle activity and chest wall shape and motion during spontaneous breathing. Six human subjects were studied while awake and during 1 MAC halothane anesthesia. Respiratory muscle activity was measured using fine-wire electromyography electrodes. Chest wall configuration was determined using images of the thorax obtained by three-dimensional fast computed tomography. Tidal changes in gas volume were measured by integrating respiratory gas flow, and the functional residual capacity was measured by a nitrogen dilution technique. While awake, ribcage expansion was responsible for 25 +/- 4% (mean +/- SE) of the total change in thoracic volume (delta Vth) during inspiration. Phasic inspiratory activity was regularly present in the diaphragm and parasternal intercostal muscles. Halothane anesthesia (1 MAC) abolished activity in the parasternal intercostal muscles and increased phasic expiratory activity in the abdominal muscles and lateral ribcage muscles. However, halothane did not significantly change the ribcage contribution to delta Vth (18 +/- 4%). Intrathoracic blood volume, measured by comparing changes in total thoracic volume and gas volume, increased significantly during inspiration both while awake and while anesthetized (by approximately 20% of delta Vth, P < 0.05). Halothane anesthesia significantly reduced the functional residual capacity (by 258 +/- 78 ml), primarily via an inward motion of the end-expiratory position of the ribcage. Although the diaphragm consistently changed shape, with a cephalad displacement of posterior regions and a caudad displacement of anterior regions, the diaphragm did not consistently contribute to the reduction in the functional residual capacity. Halothane anesthesia

  7. Proportional assist ventilation decreases thoracoabdominal asynchrony and chest wall distortion in preterm infants.

    PubMed

    Musante, G; Schulze, A; Gerhardt, T; Everett, R; Claure, N; Schaller, P; Bancalari, E

    2001-02-01

    Thoracoabdominal asynchrony (TAA) and chest wall distortion (CWD) are commonly seen in preterm infants secondary to a highly compliant rib cage and poor compensation of distorting forces by inspiratory rib cage muscles. Continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) reduces TAA and CWD by stenting the chest wall. We hypothesized that application of positive airway pressure only during inspiration and in proportion to an infant's inspiratory effort should have a similar but more pronounced effect than CPAP alone. A ventilator providing airway pressure changes in proportion to flow and volume generated by an infant (proportional assist ventilation) was used to unload the respiratory pump during inspiration. Ten preterm infants were studied [birth weight, 745 (635-1175) g; gestational age, 26.5 (24-31) wk; postnatal age 3 (1-7) d; medium (range)]. TAA and CWD were determined by respiratory inductive plethysmography. TAA was expressed as the phase angle between the rib cage and abdominal motion and CWD as the total compartmental displacement ratio. In addition, we measured tidal volume with a pneumotachograph and esophageal and airway pressure deflections with pressure transducers. Measurements were obtained during alternating periods of CPAP and two different degrees of support (Gain 1 = 1.09 +/- 0.68, Gain 2 = 1.84 +/- 0.84 cm H(2)O/mL) that were provided by a proportional assist ventilator. Phase angle and the total compartmental displacement ratio decreased with increasing gain compared with CPAP alone. Peak airway pressure increased from 0.6 to 3.8 to 7.6 cm H(2)O above positive end-expiratory pressure (PEEP) with CPAP, Gain 1, and Gain 2, respectively, as tidal volume increased from 2.8 to 4.1 to 4.7 mL/kg. Esophageal pressure changes decreased only little with increasing gain. Chest wall excursion increased and abdominal movement decreased, indicating a redistribution of tidal volume between chest and abdomen. We conclude that proportional assist ventilation reduces

  8. Low Incidence of Chest Wall Pain with a Risk-Adapted Lung Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy Approach Using Three or Five Fractions Based on Chest Wall Dosimetry

    PubMed Central

    Lewis, John H.; Baldini, Elizabeth H.; Chen, Aileen B.; Colson, Yolonda L.; Hacker, Fred L.; Hermann, Gretchen; Kozono, David; Mannarino, Edward; Molodowitch, Christina; Wee, Jon O.; Sher, David J.; Killoran, Joseph H.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose To examine the frequency and potential of dose-volume predictors for chest wall (CW) toxicity (pain and/or rib fracture) for patients receiving lung stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) using treatment planning methods to minimize CW dose and a risk-adapted fractionation scheme. Methods We reviewed data from 72 treatment plans, from 69 lung SBRT patients with at least one year of follow-up or CW toxicity, who were treated at our center between 2010 and 2013. Treatment plans were optimized to reduce CW dose and patients received a risk-adapted fractionation of 18 Gy×3 fractions (54 Gy total) if the CW V30 was less than 30 mL or 10–12 Gy×5 fractions (50–60 Gy total) otherwise. The association between CW toxicity and patient characteristics, treatment parameters and dose metrics, including biologically equivalent dose, were analyzed using logistic regression. Results With a median follow-up of 20 months, 6 (8.3%) patients developed CW pain including three (4.2%) grade 1, two (2.8%) grade 2 and one (1.4%) grade 3. Five (6.9%) patients developed rib fractures, one of which was symptomatic. No significant associations between CW toxicity and patient and dosimetric variables were identified on univariate nor multivariate analysis. Conclusions Optimization of treatment plans to reduce CW dose and a risk-adapted fractionation strategy of three or five fractions based on the CW V30 resulted in a low incidence of CW toxicity. Under these conditions, none of the patient characteristics or dose metrics we examined appeared to be predictive of CW pain. PMID:24728448

  9. Workhorse Flaps in Chest Wall Reconstruction: The Pectoralis Major, Latissimus Dorsi, and Rectus Abdominis Flaps

    PubMed Central

    Bakri, Karim; Mardini, Samir; Evans, Karen K.; Carlsen, Brian T.; Arnold, Phillip G.

    2011-01-01

    Large and life-threatening thoracic cage defects can result from the treatment of traumatic injuries, tumors, infection, congenital anomalies, and radiation injury and require prompt reconstruction to restore respiratory function and soft tissue closure. Important factors for consideration are coverage with healthy tissue to heal a wound, the potential alteration in respiratory mechanics created by large extirpations or nonhealing thoracic wounds, and the need for immediate coverage for vital structures. The choice of technique depends on the size and extent of the defect, its location, and donor site availability with consideration to previous thoracic or abdominal operations. The focus of this article is specifically to describe the use of the pectoralis major, latissimus dorsi, and rectus abdominis muscle flaps for reconstruction of thoracic defects, as these are the workhorse flaps commonly used for chest wall reconstruction. PMID:22294942

  10. [Fulminant isolated necrotizing fasciitis of the chest wall, complicating thoracic empyema].

    PubMed

    Kovács, Ottó; Szántó, Zoltán; Krasznai, Géza

    2016-03-01

    Authors introduce the case of a 64-year-old male patient with fulminant isolated necrotizing fasciitis of the chest wall, complicating empyema thoracis of unknown origin. The patient's co-morbidities were hypertension, ischaemic heart disease, atrial fibrillation with oral anticoagulation. The real etiology was revealed post mortem, due to the rapid progression. The autopsy demonstrated that the fasciitis was caused by a small blunt thoracic trauma (haematoma), not emerged from patient's history and was not visible during physical examination. Authors review diagnostic pitfalls, leading to delayed recognition in addition to this very case. After quick diagnosis surgical debridement, targeted wide spectrum antibiotics and maximal intensive care are the basic pillars of the management of necrotizing fasciitis.

  11. Late-onset chest wall abscess due to a biodegradable rib pin infection after lung transplantation.

    PubMed

    Goda, Yasufumi; Chen-Yoshikawa, Toyofumi F; Kusunose, Masaaki; Hamaji, Masatsugu; Motoyama, Hideki; Hijiya, Kyoko; Aoyama, Akihiro; Date, Hiroshi

    2017-03-17

    A 55-year-old man with end-stage emphysema underwent a right single-lung transplantation through a posterolateral thoracotomy. The fifth rib was divided and fused back using a biodegradable pin made of polylactide acid and hydroxyapatite. Two weeks postoperatively, he suffered from central vein catheter-related sepsis due to methicillin-sensitive Staphylococcus aureus. After being successfully treated for sepsis, he was discharged. However, 3 months later, computed tomography revealed multiple loculated abscesses in the chest wall and the right pleural space. Reoperative thoracotomy revealed abscesses mainly located around the fifth rib, where the pin was inserted. Both cultures of the abscess and the fifth rib were positive for methicillin-sensitive S. aureus, which suggested that the rib pin was the cause of the secondary infection. This case suggests the rib pins, even if they are biodegradable, could have a risk of infections side effect especially for the immunosuppressed patients.

  12. Lung and chest wall mechanics during exercise: effects of expiratory flow limitation.

    PubMed

    Aliverti, Andrea

    2008-11-30

    This short review summarizes how lung and chest wall mechanics can be modelled and which are the mechanical constraints imposed on the ventilatory system and its components during exercise. In healthy humans the structural and functional characteristics of the ventilator pump are able to meet the increased demands of ventilation during exercise and it is rare that arterial blood gas is significantly altered up to maximal exercise. In contrast, exercise is frequently limited by the ventilator system in disease, especially when altered mechanical properties of the airway and lung make expiratory flow limitation (EFL) a common feature. EFL is a phenomenon that can be understood in terms of the viscous effects of gas flowing from the alveoli to the airway opening along a collapsible airway which leads during exercise to dynamic hyperflation and several abnormalities of the ventilatory pump. These, in turn, determine a series of secondary manifestations, namely dyspnoea, exercise limitation and hypercapnia that can cause serious morbidity.

  13. Extensive Chest Wall Tissue Loss and its Management by Vertical Rectus Abdominis Myocutaneous Flap

    PubMed Central

    Basu, Sandip Kanti; Bain, Jayanta; Chattopadhyay, Debarati; Majumdar, Bijay Kumar

    2017-01-01

    Extensive electric burn around the chest in children is rare and this type of injury always poses a great challenge for its management. A 12-year-old male child with extensive electric burn of the chest wall was admitted to hospital. It was a neglected case of 9 days old burn; the young boy was in critical condition having systemic features of toxemia with widespread necrosis of the skin, subcutaneous tissues, and muscles along with exposed bones (ribs and sternum) with the risk of impending rupture of pleura through the exposed intercostal spaces. After initial resuscitation, a thorough debridement of all necrotic tissues was done. Thereafter, a superiorly based vertical rectus abdominis myocutaneous flap was harvested to cover the exposed bones and intercostal spaces. The remaining raw areas were skin grafted. The child made an excellent recovery with good outcome. PMID:28082777

  14. Chest wall reconstruction in thoracoabdominal ectopia cordis: using the pedicled osteomuscular latissimus dorsi composite flap.

    PubMed

    Lampert, Joshua A; Harmaty, Marco; Thompson, Elizabeth Chabner; Sett, Suvro; Koch, R Michael

    2010-11-01

    Ectopia cordis is a rare congenital defect characterized by complete or partial displacement of the heart outside the thoracic cavity. Repair of ectopia cordis can present a reconstructive challenge often requiring a staged approach. Ideally, structural integrity and protection of the heart are restored using autologous tissues capable of growth. In addition, reconstruction of the thorax must proceed without compromise to pulmonary or cardiovascular stability. The following article describes repair of thoracoabdominal ectopia cordis in a patient with pentalogy of Cantrell. Reconstruction of the chest wall was accomplished using a musculoosseus composite flap involving segments of the 9th and 10th ribs and overlying pedicled latissimus dorsi muscle. This is the first report known to the authors of such a repair.

  15. [Pulmonary cryptococcoma with involvement of the chest wall in an immunocompetent patient].

    PubMed

    Pisarevsky, Ana Andrea; Larriera, Alejandro; Cean, Pilar; Petrucci, Enrique A

    2010-01-01

    The pulmonary cryptococcosis in immunocompetent patients is unusual, and its presentation as large masses with involvement of the chest wall and the neighboring soft tissues has not been found in our bibliographic research. The variety gattii (serotype B/C) is limited geographically to tropical and subtropical regions and appears to affect particularly immunocompetent individuals. We describe the case of a 51-year-old man from the Northeast of Argentina, with a history of smoking 10 pack/year. He presented an increased volume of the left shoulder and reported that for the last six months he had been unable to move it due to the pain. A percutaneous biopsy of the mass provided a diagnosis of Cryptococcus neoformans, variety gattii. The patient was treated with antifungal therapy showing a favourable outcome with a progressive decrease of the mass.

  16. Desmoid Tumor of the Chest Wall Mimicking Recurrent Breast Cancer: Multimodality Imaging Findings

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Kyeong A; An, Yeong Yi

    2016-01-01

    Desmoid tumor of breast is a rare benign, locally aggressive tumor with a high recurrence rate. It has been associated with scar from previous breast surgery or trauma. Especially in breast cancer patients with previous operation history, it may simulate recurrent breast cancer clinically and radiologically. We presented multimodality imaging findings (ultrasound, computed tomography, magnetic resonance imaging and positron emission tomography/computed tomography) of chest wall desmoid tumor mimicking recurrent breast cancer in a 38-year-old patient with a history of left modified mastectomy. The desmoid tumor is a rare benign tumor that should be considered in the differential diagnosis of malignant local tumor recurrence after breast cancer operation. Biopsy was required for accurate diagnosis and wide local excision was its appropriate surgical management. PMID:27895871

  17. Chest Wall Ewing Sarcoma Family of Tumors: Long-Term Outcomes

    SciTech Connect

    Indelicato, Daniel J.; Keole, Sameer R.; Lagmay, Joanne P.; Morris, Christopher G.; Gibbs, C. Parker; Scarborough, Mark T.; Islam, Saleem; Marcus, Robert B.

    2011-09-01

    Purpose: To review the 40-year University of Florida experience treating Ewing sarcoma family of tumors of the chest wall. Methods and Materials: Thirty-nine patients were treated from 1966 to 2006. Of the patients, 22 were treated with radiotherapy (RT) alone, and 17 patients were treated with surgery with or without RT. Of 9 patients with metastatic disease, 8 were treated with RT alone. The risk profiles of each group were otherwise similar. The median age was 16.6 years, and the most frequent primary site was the rib (n = 17). The median potential follow-up was 19.2 years. Results: The 5-year actuarial overall survival (OS), cause-specific survival (CSS), and local control (LC) rates were 34%, 34%, and 72%, respectively. For the nonmetastatic subset (n = 30), the 5-year OS, CSS, and LC rates were 44%, 44%, and 79%, respectively. LC was not statistically significantly different between patients treated with RT alone (61%) vs. surgery + RT (75%). None of the 4 patients treated with surgery alone experienced local failure. No patient or treatment variable was significantly associated with local failure. Of the patients, 26% experienced Common Toxicity Criteria (CTC) Grade 3+ toxicity, including 2 pulmonary deaths. Modern intensive systemic therapy helped increase the 5-year CSS from 7% to 49% in patients treated after 1984 (p = 0.03). Conclusions: This is the largest single-institution series describing the treatment of chest wall Ewing tumors. Despite improvements in survival, obtaining local control is challenging and often accompanied by morbidity. Effort should be focused on identifying tumors amenable to combined-modality local therapy and to improving RT techniques.

  18. Measuring changes in chest wall motion after lung resection using structured light plethysmography: a feasibility study.

    PubMed

    Elshafie, Ghazi; Kumar, Prem; Motamedi-Fakhr, Shayan; Iles, Richard; Wilson, Rachel C; Naidu, Babu

    2016-10-01

    We describe the use of structured light plethysmography (SLP)-a novel, non-contact, light-based technique for measuring tidal breathing-among a cohort of patients undergoing lung resection. In this feasibility study, we examined whether changes in chest wall motion or in asynchrony between regions of the thoraco-abdominal wall could be identified after surgery. Fifteen patients underwent wedge resection (n = 8) or lobectomy (n = 7). All patients underwent two SLP assessments (before surgery and on Day 1 post-surgery). Each assessment captured data during 5 min of quiet (tidal) breathing. When data were averaged across all patients, motion on the operated side of the thorax was significantly reduced after surgery (mean change from presurgery ± standard deviation: -14.7 ± 16.5%, P = 0.01), while motion on the non-operated side increased (15.9 ± 18.5%, P = 0.01). Thoraco-abdominal asynchrony also increased (mean change ± standard deviation: 43.4 ± 55.1%, P = 0.01), but no significant difference was observed in right-left hemi-thoracic asynchrony (163.7 ± 230.3%, P = 0.08). When analysed by resection type, lobectomy was associated with reduced and increased motion on the operated and non-operated side, respectively, and with an increase in both right-left hemi-thoracic and thoraco-abdominal asynchrony. No significant changes in motion or asynchrony were identified in patients who underwent wedge resection. SLP was able to detect changes in chest wall motion and asynchrony after thoracic surgery. Changes in this small group of patients were consistent with the side of the incision and were most apparent in patients undergoing lobectomy. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the European Association for Cardio-Thoracic Surgery. All rights reserved.

  19. Treatment of chest wall tuberculosis with transdermal ultrasound-mediated drug delivery

    PubMed Central

    HAN, YI; ZHAO, QIUYUE; YU, DAPING; LIU, ZHIDONG

    2015-01-01

    Chest wall tuberculosis (TB) is an endemic disease with a large number of variants. The condition affects numerous parts of the body and can penetrate the skin to form chronic open ulcers. Current treatment methods include oral anti-TB drugs and surgery. However, conventional drug treatments are not effective due to the difficulty in achieving an effective local concentration, and certain patients are unable to tolerate surgery. The recurrence rate for chest wall TB is high following surgery, and may result in the prolonged healing of wounds in certain patients, as well as chronic sinusitis and fistula formation. To identify a safe, simple, less invasive and more clinically effective treatment method, the present study investigated transdermal ultrasound-mediated anti-TB drug delivery. A total of 186 patients were selected and randomly divided into transdermal ultrasound, surgery and oral anti-TB drug only groups. Rifampicin was the drug delivered by transdermal ultrasound. The cure and efficiency rates were shown to be 87.10 and 93.55%, respectively, in the ultrasound treatment group. No statistically significant difference was observed in the cure rates between the transdermal ultrasound and surgery groups; however, a statistically significant difference was identified in the cure rates between the transdermal ultrasound and oral anti-TB drug only groups. Therefore, transdermal ultrasound technology was shown to deliver anti-TB drugs quickly and directly, which resulted in a high local concentration of the drug, overcoming the problem of obtaining an effective local drug concentration. The observations demonstrated that transdermal ultrasound-mediated drug delivery is an effective method by which to control TB, particularly when compared with traditional oral anti-TB therapy and surgery. PMID:25780447

  20. Laser based method for real-time three-dimensional monitoring of chest wall movement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jezeršek, Matija; Povšič, Klemen; Topole, Eva; Fležar, Matjaž; Možina, Janez

    2010-05-01

    Novel method for monitoring the entire three-dimensional shape of the chest wall in real time is presented. The system is based on the multiple-line laser triangulation principle. The laser projector generates a light pattern of 33 equally inclined light planes directed toward the measured surface. The camera records the illuminated surface from a different viewpoint, and consequently, the light pattern is distorted by the shape of the surface. The acquired images are transferred in the personal computer, where contour detection, three-dimensional surface reconstruction, shape analysis, and displaying are performed in real time. Surface displacements are calculated by subtraction of the current measured surface from the reference one. Differences are displayed with color palette, where the blue represent the inward (negative) and the red represent the outward (positive) movement. The accuracy of the calibrated apparatus is +/-0.5 mm, which is calculated as a standard deviation between points of the measured and nominal reference surface. The measuring range is approximately 400×600×500 mm in width, height and depth. The intention of this study was to evaluate the system by means of its ability to distinguish between different breathing patterns and to verify the accuracy of measuring chest wall deformation volumes during breathing. The results demonstrate that the presented 3-d measuring system has a great potential as a diagnostic and training tool in case of monitoring the breathing pattern. We believe that exact graphical communication with the patient is much more simple and easy to understand than verbal and/or numerical.

  1. Operative Stabilization of Flail Chest Injuries Reduces Mortality to that of Stable Chest Wall Injuries.

    PubMed

    Dehghan, Niloofar; Mah, Jeffrey M; Schemitsch, Emil H; Nauth, Aaron; Vicente, Milena; McKee, Michael D

    2017-08-29

    To determine the prevalence, management and outcomes of patients with flail chest injuries, compared to patients without flail chest injuries (single rib fractures and multiple rib fractures without a flail segment). Retrospective cohort study SETTING:: Ontario, Canada PARTICIPANTS:: Ontario residents over the age of 16 who had been admitted to hospital with a chest wall injury from 2004 to 2015 were identified using administrative health care databases. Outcomes included treatment modalities such as rate of surgical repair, days on mechanical ventilation, days in the intensive care unit (ICU), days in hospital, rate of chest tube placement; and rates of complication, including pneumonia, tracheostomy, readmission, and death. In total 117,204 patients with fractures of the chest wall were identified. Of the entire cohort, 1.5% of had a flail chest injury, 41% had multiple rib fractures and 58% had single rib fractures. Flail chest patients had significantly worst outcomes compared to multiple rib fracture patients in all categories (p<0.0001). Similarly, multiple rib fracture patients had significantly worst outcomes compared to single rib fracture patients (p<0.0001). Only 4.5% of flail chest patients were treated surgically, however the number increased from 1% prior to 2010 to 10% after 2010 (p<0.0001). After adjustment for potential confounders, patients with flail chest injuries treated surgically had a reduced risk of early mortality compared to those treated non-operatively (OR 0.16, p=0.019). Surgical stabilization of flail chest has increased significantly in recent years. The results of this study provide preliminary evidence that the increasing rate of surgical intervention may be warranted by reducing mortality. Level III.

  2. Postmastectomy chest wall radiation with electron-beam therapy: outcomes and complications at the University of Louisville.

    PubMed

    Amin-Zimmerman, F; Paris, K; Minor, G I; Spanos, W

    2005-01-01

    Postmastectomy chest wall radiation therapy using electron-beam therapy has been reported to increase lung radiation dose and the potential for pneumonitis. These reports describe treatment with varying energy electron beams prescribed to the breast/chest wall junction. Because the tissue at risk includes dermal lymphatics and subcutaneous tissues, low-energy electron beams may reduce lung radiation dose and the incidence of pneumonitis yet preserve good local control. At the University of Louisville, patients who have undergone mastectomy are treated with 6-MeV electron beam and bolus. From 1985 through 1998, 273 patients underwent postmastectomy radiation therapy at the University of Louisville. The chest wall was treated using 6-MeV electron beam with 5-mm bolus prescribed to the 90% isodose-line, ensuring adequate dermal lymphatic dose. Internal mammary nodes were treated with electron-beam energy sufficient to treat to depth (approximately 15 MeV). Supraclavicular nodes were treated using 6-MV photon beam. Patients' charts were reviewed with respect to complications and outcome. Radiation pneumonitis was confirmed in one case (0.4%). The pneumonitis resolved with prednisone treatment. Twenty patients experienced locoregional failure (7.3%), 14 of whom failed in the chest wall (5.1%). Local control in our study is excellent and comparable to results expected for postmastectomy radiation therapy as reported in the literature. We conclude that postmastectomy patients can be treated with low-energy electron beam radiation therapy, protecting underlying lung without sacrificing local disease control.

  3. An increase in the threshold of citric acid-induced cough during chest wall vibration in healthy humans.

    PubMed

    Kondo, T; Kobayashi, I; Hayama, N; Ohta, Y

    1998-10-01

    This study tested the hypothesis that the afferent input from the respiratory muscles may be involved in the neural mechanisms inducing cough responses. Coughing was evoked in conscious healthy humans by the inhalation of citric acid aerosol of several concentrations either during or not during chest wall vibration (100 Hz) at the right second intercostal space or during vibration of the right thigh. The mean threshold citric acid concentration to induce coughing was significantly higher during chest wall vibration (geometric mean, 131.8 mg/ml) than without vibration (75.9 mg/ml). Vibration after topical anesthesia of the chest wall skin did not significantly change the threshold concentration of citric acid. The threshold citric acid concentration during vibration of the right thigh did not significantly differ from that without vibration. We concluded that inputs from the chest wall afferent, presumably from the intercostal muscle or costovertebral joint, may have an inhibitory effect on the initiation of coughing at the higher neural structure in conscious humans.

  4. Volume rather than flow incentive spirometry is effective in improving chest wall expansion and abdominal displacement using optoelectronic plethysmography.

    PubMed

    Paisani, Denise de Moraes; Lunardi, Adriana Claudia; da Silva, Cibele Cristine Berto Marques; Porras, Desiderio Cano; Tanaka, Clarice; Carvalho, Celso Ricardo Fernandes

    2013-08-01

    Incentive spirometers are widely used in clinical practice and classified as flow-oriented (FIS) and volume-oriented (VIS). Until recently the respiratory inductive plethysmography used to evaluate the effects of incentive spirometry on chest wall mechanics presented limitations, which may explain why the impact of VIS and FIS remains poorly known. To compare the effects of VIS and FIS on thoracoabdominal mechanics and respiratory muscle activity in healthy volunteers. This cross-sectional trial assessed 20 subjects (12 female, ages 20-40 years, body mass index 20-30 kg/m(2)). All subjects performed 8 quiet breaths and 8 deep breaths with FIS and VIS, in a randomized order. We measured thoracoabdominal chest wall, upper and lower rib-cage, and abdominal volumes with optoelectronic plethysmography, and the muscle activity of the sternocleidomastoid and superior and inferior intercostal muscles with electromyography. VIS increased chest wall volume more than did FIS (P = .007) and induced a larger increase in the upper and lower rib-cages and abdomen (156%, 91%, and 151%, respectively, P < .001). By contrast, FIS induced more activity in the accessory muscles of respiration than did VIS (P < .001). VIS promotes a greater increase in chest wall volume, with a larger abdominal contribution and lower respiratory muscle activity, than does FIS in healthy adults.

  5. Biosynthetic Nanostructured Cellulose Patch for Chest Wall Reconstruction: Five-Month Follow-up in a Porcine Model.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Ruoyu; Mägel, Lavinia; Jonigk, Danny; Länger, Florian; Lippmann, Torsten; Zardo, Patrick; Pölzing, Frank

    2017-10-01

    Ideal approaches and materials for reconstruction of large chest wall defects remain a topic of debate. We sought to explore the suitability of a reinforced nanostructured cellulose (NC) patch for chest wall reconstruction in an animal model. In four domestic pigs, a standardized 10 × 10 cm chest wall defect was created by resecting three rib segments. Subsequently the defect was reconstructed via a biosynthetic NC patch (16 × 12 cm) reinforced by polytetrafluoroethylene mesh. After 1, 2, 4, and 5 months respectively, gross examination of NC patches was performed following sacrifice of the animals. Specimens of NC patches and surrounding connective tissue underwent histological examinations after staining with Hematoxylin-eosin and Elastica van Gieson. All animals survived their observation period without encountering major adverse events. On gross examination all NC patches were intact and well integrated into the surrounding tissue. Histological examination showed clearly demarked zones of foreign body reaction at the patch/host-tissue interface. After 5 months a slight increase in foreign body reaction, fibrous capsule formation and cellular infiltration were observed. No signs of fibroblast proliferation or neovascularization were seen within NC patches at any point. Our findings suggest a quick healing process and good overall biocompatibility following NC patch implantation.NC might prove an efficient and suitable biomaterial for complex chest wall reconstruction.

  6. Biometric estimation of chest wall thickness of female radiation workers as an aid in in-vivo detection of the actinides

    SciTech Connect

    Lane, B.H.; Berger, C.D.

    1983-01-01

    An equation was derived to estimate female chest wall thickness from a series of biometric measurements. This technique will result in improved performance for actinide detection in females by accounting for variations in chest wall thickness in derivation of calibration factors.

  7. A new alternative for bony chest wall reconstruction using biomaterial artificial rib and pleura: animal experiment and clinical application.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Lan-jun; Wang, Wu-ping; Li, Wei-yang; Hao, Chong-li; Li, Zhe; Wu, Qiu-liang; Wu, Rao-pan; Rong, Tie-hua

    2011-10-01

    To evaluate a new method for chest wall reconstruction using porcine-derived artificial rib and pleura in an animal experiment. Further, the clinical application was performed in five patients with large defects in the chest wall as a preliminary observation. In animal experiments, a full-thickness chest wall defect of 7 cm × 8 cm was created in 12 adult mongrel dogs. Six dogs underwent reconstruction with porcine-derived artificial ribs and pleura (test group), and six with methylmethacrylate and double polyester mesh in the form of traditional Marlex sandwich technique (control group). At follow-up of each for 3, 6, and 12 months postoperatively, a general performance assessment and thoracic radiography were performed. Gross and histopathological examinations were carried out following humane euthanasia at the time of last follow-up. In clinical application, five patients with wide tumor resection in the chest wall underwent reconstruction with porcine-derived artificial ribs and pleura as well. In animal experiment, no perioperative death or hyperpyrexia occurred and no difference in either infection or dyspnea was noted between the two groups. Postoperative radiography revealed good thoracic integrity with no evidence of collapse, deformation, or abnormal movement in the test group. In the control group, similar results were observed, except that two dogs had abnormal movement in the chest wall associated with respiration. Severe adhesions between the 'sandwich' complex and the host tissues were identified in the control group, but by contrast, only mild adhesions were noted in the test group. The non-degradable polyester mesh induced fibrous proliferation and rejection, whereas the artificial pleura was absorbed with mild fibrous hyperplasia after 12 months. In clinical application, no thoracic deformity, chronic pain, or respiratory discomfort were observed at 1 or 12 postoperative months. Porcine-derived ribs and pleura can be employed safely to create an

  8. Air Stacking: A Detailed Look Into Physiological Acute Effects on Cough Peak Flow and Chest Wall Volumes of Healthy Subjects.

    PubMed

    Sarmento, Antonio; de Andrade, Armèle F Dornelas; Lima, Íllia Nadinne Df; Aliverti, Andrea; de Freitas Fregonezi, Guilherme Augusto; Resqueti, Vanessa R

    2017-04-01

    Air stacking (AS) is a lung insufflation method that requires the use of a manual insufflator to provide air volumes higher than inspiratory capacity. Neuromuscular patients benefit the most from the maneuver; however, the acute effects of AS in healthy subjects are still unclear. Twenty healthy subjects (8 males) were studied by optoelectronic plethysmography to investigate the immediate effects of AS on cough peak flow, operational volume variations, distribution of these volumes in the chest wall compartments (pulmonary rib cage, abdominal rib cage, and abdominal), breathing pattern, and shortening velocity of the respiratory muscles during a protocol that included vital capacity maneuvers and spontaneous coughs before and after AS. Statistically significant increases in cough peak flow (P < .03) and inspiratory capacity (P < .001) were found immediately after AS. During its application, the pulmonary rib cage compartment was the largest contributor (P = .002) to chest wall volume displacement. A significant increase in chest wall tidal volume (P < .001), mainly in the pulmonary rib cage (P < .001), was observed. Significant increases (P < .001) in end-inspiratory chest wall volume were observed with main distribution in pulmonary (P < .001) and abdominal rib cage (P = .01). Significant increases in shortening velocity index of inspiratory muscles (P < .001), expiratory muscles (P < .001), and diaphragm (P < .001) were also observed. In addition, significant decreases in expiratory time (P < .001) and increases in duty cycle (P = .02), breathing frequency (P = .02), minute ventilation (P < .001), maximum inspiratory (P < .001), and expiratory flow (P < .001) were observed. In healthy subjects, cough peak flow and chest wall volumes can be increased immediately after the application of the AS maneuver. Copyright © 2017 by Daedalus Enterprises.

  9. Etonogestrel implant migration to the vasculature, chest wall, and distant body sites: cases from a pharmacovigilance database.

    PubMed

    Kang, Sarah; Niak, Ali; Gada, Neha; Brinker, Allen; Jones, S Christopher

    2017-09-01

    To describe clinical outcomes of etonogestrel implant patients with migration to the vasculature, chest wall and other distant body sites spontaneously reported to the US Food and Drug Administration Adverse Event Reporting System (FAERS) database. We performed a standardized Medical Dictionary for Regulatory Activities (MedDRA) query in the FAERS database (through November 15, 2015), with reports coded with one or more MedDRA preferred terms that indicate complications with device placement or migration of the device from the original site of insertion to the vasculature, chest wall and other distant body sites. We excluded any cases previously described in the medical literature. We identified 38 cases of pronounced etonogestrel implant migration. Migration locations included the lung/pulmonary artery (n=9), chest wall (n=1), vasculature at locations other than the lung/pulmonary artery (n=14) and extravascular migrations (n=14) to other body sites (e.g., the axilla and clavicle/neck line/shoulder). The majority of cases were asymptomatic and detected when the patient desired implant removal; however, seven cases reported symptoms such as pain, discomfort and dyspnea in association with implant migration. Three cases also describe pulmonary fibrosis and skin reactions as a result of implant migration to the vasculature, chest wall and other distant body sites. Sixteen cases reported surgical removal in an operating room setting. Our FAERS case series demonstrates etonogestrel implant migration to the vasculature, chest wall and other body sites distant from the site of original insertion. As noted by the sponsor in current prescribing information, a key determinant in the risk for etonogestrel contraceptive implant migration appears to be improper insertion technique. Although migration of etonogestrel implants to the vasculature is rare, awareness of migration and education on proper insertion technique may reduce the risk. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  10. Comparison of conventional inserts and an add-on electron MLC for chest wall irradiation of left-sided breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Vatanen, Tero; Traneus, Erik; Lahtinen, Tapani

    2009-01-01

    Collimation of irregularly shaped clinical electron beams is currently based on electron inserts made of low melting point alloys. The present investigation compares a conventional electron applicator with insert and add-on eMLC-based dose distributions in the postoperative chest wall irradiation of left-sided breast cancer. Voxel Monte Carlo++ (VMC++) calculated dose distributions related to electron fields were compared with 10 left-sided breast cancer patients after radical mastectomy. The prescription dose was 50 Gy at a build-up maximum. The same dose was prescribed for the ipsilateral axillary, parasternal and supraclavicular lymph nodes that were treated with photons and calculated with a pencil beam algorithm. The insert beams were shaped with 1.5 cm thick Wood's metal electron inserts in an electron applicator of a Varian 2100 C/D linac. Doses for the eMLC-shaped beams were calculated for an eMLC prototype with 2 cm thick and 5 mm wide steel leaves. The same collimator-to-surface distance (CSD) of 5.8 cm was used for both collimators. The mean PTV dose was slightly higher for the eMLC plans (50.7 vs 49.5 Gy, p<0.001, respectively). The maximum doses assessed by D5% for the eMLC and insert were 60.9 and 59.1 Gy (p<0.001). The difference was due to the slightly higher doses near the field edges for the eMLC. The left lung V20 volumes were 34.5% and 34.0% (p<0.001). There was only a marginal difference in heart doses. Despite a slight increase of maximum dose in PTV the add-on electron MLC for chest wall irradiation results in practically no differences in dose distributions compared with the present insert-based collimation.

  11. Measurement of radiotherapy x-ray skin dose on a chest wall phantom.

    PubMed

    Quach, K Y; Morales, J; Butson, M J; Rosenfeld, A B; Metcalfe, P E

    2000-07-01

    Sufficient skin dose needs to be delivered by a radiotherapy chest wall treatment regimen to ensure the probability of a near surface tumor recurrence is minimized. To simulate a chest wall treatment a hemicylindrical solid water phantom of 7.5 cm radius was irradiated with 6 MV x-rays using 20x20 cm2 and 10x20 cm2 fields at 100 cm source surface distance (SSD) to the base of the phantom. A surface dose profile was obtained from 0 to 180 degrees, in 10 degrees increments around the circumference of the phantom. Dosimetry results obtained from radiochromic film (effective depth of 0.17 mm) were used in the investigation, the superficial doses were found to be 28% (of Dmax) at the 0 degrees beam entry position and 58% at the 90 degrees oblique beam position. Superficial dose results were also obtained using extra thin thermoluminescent dosimeters (TLD) (effective depth 0.14 mm) of 30% at 0 degrees, 57% at 90 degrees, and a metal oxide semiconductor field effect transistor (MOSFET) detector (effective depth 0.5 mm) of 43% at 0 degrees, 62% at 90 degrees. Because the differences in measured superficial doses were significant and beyond those related to experimental error, these differences are assumed to be mostly attributable to the effective depth of measurement of each detector. We numerically simulated a bolus on/bolus off technique and found we could increase the coverage to the skin. Using an alternate "bolus on," "bolus off" regimen, the skin would receive 36.8 Gy at 0 degrees incidence and 46.4 Gy at 90 degrees incidence for a prescribed midpoint dose of 50 Gy. From this work it is evident that, as the circumference of the phantom is traversed the SSD increases and hence there is an inverse square fluence fall-off, this is more than offset by the increase in skin dose due to surface curvature to a plateau at about 90 degrees. Beyond this angle it is assumed that beam attenuation through the phantom and inverse square fall-off is causing the surface dose to

  12. Effects of chest wall compression on expiratory flow rates in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease

    PubMed Central

    Nozoe, Masafumi; Mase, Kyoshi; Ogino, Tomoyuki; Murakami, Shigefumi; Takashima, Sachie; Domen, Kazuhisa

    2016-01-01

    Background: Manual chest wall compression (CWC) during expiration is a technique for removing airway secretions in patients with respiratory disorders. However, there have been no reports about the physiological effects of CWC in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). Objective: To compare the effects of CWC on expiratory flow rates in patients with COPD and asymptomatic controls. Method: Fourteen subjects were recruited from among patients with COPD who were receiving pulmonary rehabilitation at the University Hospital (COPD group). Fourteen age-matched healthy subjects were also consecutively recruited from the local community (Healthy control group). Airflow and lung volume changes were measured continuously with the subjects lying in supine position during 1 minute of quiet breathing (QB) and during 1 minute of CWC by a physical therapist. Results: During CWC, both the COPD group and the healthy control group showed significantly higher peak expiratory flow rates (PEFRs) than during QB (mean difference for COPD group 0.14 L/sec, 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.04 to 0.24, p<0.01, mean difference for healthy control group 0.39 L/sec, 95% CI 0.25 to 0.57, p<0.01). In the between-group comparisons, PEFR was significantly higher in the healthy control group than in the COPD group (-0.25 L/sec, 95% CI -0.43 to -0.07, p<0.01). However, the expiratory flow rates at the lung volume at the PEFR during QB and at 50% and 25% of tidal volume during QB increased in the healthy control group (mean difference for healthy control group 0.31 L/sec, 95% CI 0.15 to 0.47, p<0.01: 0.31 L/sec, 95% CI 0.15 to 0.47, p<0.01: 0.27 L/sec, 95% CI 0.13 to 0.41, p<0.01, respectively) but not in the COPD group (0.05 L/sec, 95% CI -0.01 to 0.12: -0.01 L/sec, 95% CI -0.11 to 0.08: 0.02 L/sec, 95% CI -0.05 to 0.90) with the application of CWC. Conclusion: The effects of chest wall compression on expiratory flow rates was different between COPD patients and asymptomatic

  13. Impedance learning for robotic contact tasks using natural actor-critic algorithm.

    PubMed

    Kim, Byungchan; Park, Jooyoung; Park, Shinsuk; Kang, Sungchul

    2010-04-01

    Compared with their robotic counterparts, humans excel at various tasks by using their ability to adaptively modulate arm impedance parameters. This ability allows us to successfully perform contact tasks even in uncertain environments. This paper considers a learning strategy of motor skill for robotic contact tasks based on a human motor control theory and machine learning schemes. Our robot learning method employs impedance control based on the equilibrium point control theory and reinforcement learning to determine the impedance parameters for contact tasks. A recursive least-square filter-based episodic natural actor-critic algorithm is used to find the optimal impedance parameters. The effectiveness of the proposed method was tested through dynamic simulations of various contact tasks. The simulation results demonstrated that the proposed method optimizes the performance of the contact tasks in uncertain conditions of the environment.

  14. A Simple and Robust Event-Detection Algorithm for Single-Cell Impedance Cytometry.

    PubMed

    Caselli, Federica; Bisegna, Paolo

    2016-02-01

    Microfluidic impedance cytometry is emerging as a powerful label-free technique for the characterization of single biological cells. In order to increase the sensitivity and the specificity of the technique, suited digital signal processing methods are required to extract meaningful information from measured impedance data. In this study, a simple and robust event-detection algorithm for impedance cytometry is presented. Since a differential measuring scheme is generally adopted, the signal recorded when a cell passes through the sensing region of the device exhibits a typical odd-symmetric pattern. This feature is exploited twice by the proposed algorithm: first, a preliminary segmentation, based on the correlation of the data stream with the simplest odd-symmetric template, is performed; then, the quality of detected events is established by evaluating their E2O index, that is, a measure of the ratio between their even and odd parts. A thorough performance analysis is reported, showing the robustness of the algorithm with respect to parameter choice and noise level. In terms of sensitivity and positive predictive value, an overall performance of 94.9% and 98.5%, respectively, was achieved on two datasets relevant to microfluidic chips with very different characteristics, considering three noise levels. The present algorithm can foster the role of impedance cytometry in single-cell analysis, which is the new frontier in "Omics."

  15. [Sudden death caused by a less lethal weapon chest-wall injury (Commotio cordis)].

    PubMed

    Contargyris, C; Peytel, E

    2012-05-01

    Less lethal weapons, like Flashball, are more and more used since 1995 in law enforcement, even by the local police to neutralize combative individuals and to disperse riot crowds. This gun fires large rubber bullets and has been incriminated many times in cases of face injuries with functional consequences. In this case report, we mention a case of sudden death from cardiac arrest due to low energy chest wall impact of a rubber bullet shot with the Flashball. Commotio cordis is potentialized by a lethal set of three including, a certain impact velocity, an exact location of the hit over the cardiac silhouette, and a precise timing 15 m/s prior to the peak of the T-wave. This case report highlights the fact that such impacts can cause significant injury to internal organs, in particular circonstances, implying the necessity of a raising awareness of the medical staff, in ordre to not underestimate the severity of such injuries. Copyright © 2012 Société française d’anesthésie et de réanimation (Sfar). Published by Elsevier SAS. All rights reserved.

  16. Recurrent tumors of the head and neck, pelvis, and chest wall: Treatment with hyperthermia and brachytherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Rafla, S.; Parikh, K.; Tchelebi, M.; Youssef, E.; Selim, H.; Bishay, S. )

    1989-09-01

    Cancer that recurs after surgery and radiation therapy remains a major problem. The claimed effectiveness of thermobrachytherapy in patients with this problem prompted the present study. Forty-six lesions (20 head and neck, 18 pelvic, seven chest wall, and one limb sarcoma) in 38 patients were treated with interstitial hyperthermia that sandwiched the use of Ir-192 with the aim of delivering 2,000-6,000 cGy, depending on prior dose and tissue tolerance. Complete regression occurred in 19 (54%) of 35 evaluable cases. More than 58,000 measured temperature points were analyzed to develop a representative quantitative measure, the modal thermal dose, that represented the temperature reported most often during heating sessions. The pattern was plotted in each case. No significant relation was found between heating patterns and tumor response. Of all the prognostic factors studied, the radiation dose was the most significant, with a complete response rate being 78% when the total radiation dose exceeded 6,000 cGy, compared with 8% when the dose was lower than 5,000 cGy (P less than .005). The tumor volume also was important, with smaller lesions responding much better than larger ones (P = .1).

  17. Melioidosis with a Pericardial Effusion, which Relapsed as a Chest Wall Abscess: A Rare Presentation

    PubMed Central

    Mathai K., Rashmi Teresa; Bhat, K. Sundara; Ashraf, Mohammed; Sarawag, Mayank; K.P., Kumar

    2013-01-01

    Melioidosis, which is caused by a soil saprophyte, Burkholderia pseudomallei, is most prevalent in the south–west coast of India. Although it is frequently seen in immunocompromised patients, melioidosis can occur in apparently normal individuals. Melioidosis can involve almost any organ. A relapse of melioidosis is usually associated with a poor adherence to the eradication therapy, a multifocal involvement and bacteraemia. A relapsing melioidosis is usually known to follow a similar pattern of organ involvement in the first and second episodes of the infection. We are discussing here, a rare case of melioidosis in a 38-year-old construction-worker, with no risk factors, who presented initially with a pericardial effusion. It relapsed 6 months after he completed the prescribed eradication therapy for 3 months, as an anterior chest wall abscess. The author recommends a high index of suspicion for the relapsed melioidosis cases, inspite of the primary episode being non-bacteraemic and compliant with the recommended therapy, in order to avoid further complications. PMID:23730667

  18. Chest-wall segmentation in automated 3D breast ultrasound images using thoracic volume classification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tan, Tao; van Zelst, Jan; Zhang, Wei; Mann, Ritse M.; Platel, Bram; Karssemeijer, Nico

    2014-03-01

    Computer-aided detection (CAD) systems are expected to improve effectiveness and efficiency of radiologists in reading automated 3D breast ultrasound (ABUS) images. One challenging task on developing CAD is to reduce a large number of false positives. A large amount of false positives originate from acoustic shadowing caused by ribs. Therefore determining the location of the chestwall in ABUS is necessary in CAD systems to remove these false positives. Additionally it can be used as an anatomical landmark for inter- and intra-modal image registration. In this work, we extended our previous developed chestwall segmentation method that fits a cylinder to automated detected rib-surface points and we fit the cylinder model by minimizing a cost function which adopted a term of region cost computed from a thoracic volume classifier to improve segmentation accuracy. We examined the performance on a dataset of 52 images where our previous developed method fails. Using region-based cost, the average mean distance of the annotated points to the segmented chest wall decreased from 7.57±2.76 mm to 6.22±2.86 mm.art.

  19. Dynamic 3D printed titanium copy prosthesis: a novel design for large chest wall resection and reconstruction

    PubMed Central

    Pérez Méndez, Itzell

    2016-01-01

    Due to high rates of complications, chest wall resection and reconstruction is a high risk procedure when large size of resection is required. Many different prosthetic materials have been used with similar results. Recently, thanks to the new advances in technology, personalized reconstruction have been possible with specific custom-made prosthesis. Nevertheless, they all generate certain amount of stiffness in thoracic motion because of his rigidity. In this report, we present a forward step in prosthesis design based on tridimensional titanium-printed technology. An exact copy of the resected chest wall was made, even endowing simulated sternochondral articulations, to achieve the most exact adaptation and best functional results, with a view to minimize postoperative complications. This novel design, may constitute an important step towards the improvement of the functional postoperative outcomes compared to the other prosthesis, on the hope, to reduce postoperative complications. PMID:27293863

  20. [Reconstruction of the anterior chest wall by a sandwich-type combination of a synthetic support and a muscle flap from the latissimus dorsi. Apropos of a case].

    PubMed

    Lanfrey, E; Grolleau, J L; Glock, Y; Chavoin, J P; Costagliola, M

    1996-04-01

    Reconstruction of the chest wall after balistic or other trauma requires good and muscle cover and creation of a new, stable and airtight wall. The authors present a case of balistic trauma of the right anterolateral chest wall which was urgently debrided and subsequently reconstructed by sandwich combination of a latissimus dorsi muscle flap and synthetic material composed of a sheet of PTFE and creation of two methylmethylacrylate ribs. The advantage of this technique is that it avoids the use of autologous tissue from an already weakened chest wall and confers a new chest stability in several sites corresponding to the wall defect with easily available and easy-to-use materials.

  1. Postmastectomy Electron Beam Chest Wall Irradiation in Women With Breast Cancer: A Clinical Step Toward Conformal Electron Therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Kirova, Youlia M. Campana, Francois; Fournier-Bidoz, Nathalie; Stilhart, Anne; Dendale, Remi; Bollet, Marc A.; Fourquet, Alain

    2007-11-15

    Purpose: Electron beam radiotherapy of the chest wall with or without lymph node irradiation has been used at the Institut Curie for >20 years. The purpose of this report was to show the latest improvements of our technique developed to avoid hot spots and improve the homogeneity. Methods and Materials: The study was split into two parts. A new electron irradiation technique was designed and compared with the standard one (dosimetric study). The dose distributions were calculated using our treatment planning software ISIS (Technologie Diffusion). The dose calculation was performed using the same calculation parameters for the new and standard techniques. Next, the early skin toxicity of our new technique was evaluated prospectively in the first 25 patients using Radiation Therapy Oncology Group criteria (clinical study). Results: The maximal dose found on the five slices was 53.4 {+-} 1.1 Gy for the new technique and 59.1 {+-} 2.3 Gy for the standard technique. The hot spots of the standard technique plans were situated at the overlap between the internal mammary chain and chest wall fields. The use of one unique field that included both chest wall and internal mammary chain volumes solved the problem of junction. To date, 25 patients have been treated with the new technique. Of these patients, 12% developed Grade 0, 48% Grade 1, 32% Grade 2, and 8% Grade 3 toxicity. Conclusions: This report describes an improvement in the standard postmastectomy electron beam technique of the chest wall. This new technique provides improved target homogeneity and conformality compared with the standard technique. This treatment was well tolerated, with a low rate of early toxicity events.

  2. SU-E-T-18: A Comparison of Planning Techniques for Bilateral Reconstructed Chest Wall Patients Undergoing Whole Breast Irradiation

    SciTech Connect

    Volpe, T; Margiasso, R; Saleh, Z; Kuo, L; Hong, L; Ballangrud, A; Gelblum, D; Zinovoy, M; Deasy, J; Tang, X

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: As we continuously see more bilateral reconstructed chest wall cases, new challenges are being presented to deliver left-sided breast irradiation. We herein compare three Deep Inspiration Breath Hold (DIBH) planning techniques (tangents, VMAT, and IMRT) and two free breathing techniques (VMAT and IMRT). Methods: Three left-sided chest wall patients with bilateral implants were studied. Tangents, VMAT, and IMRT plans were created for DIBH scans. VMAT and IMRT plans were created for free breathing scans. All plans were normalized so that 95% of the prescription dose was delivered to 95% of the planning target volume (PTV). The maximum point dose was constrained to less than 120% of the prescription dose. Since the success of DIBH delivery largely depends on patient’s ability to perform consistent breath hold during beam on time, smaller number of Monitor Units (MU) is in general desired. For each patient, the following information was collected to compare the planning techniques: heart mean dose, left and right lung V20 Gy, contra-lateral (right) breast mean dose, cord max dose, and MU. Results: The average heart mean dose over all patients are 1561, 692, 985, 1245, and 1121 cGy, for DIBH tangents, VMAT, IMRT, free breathing VMAT and IMRT, respectively. For left lung V20 are 60%, 28%, 26%, 30%, and 29%. For contra-lateral breast mean dose are 244, 687, 616, 783, 438 cGy. MU are 253, 853, 2048, 1035, and 1874 MUs. Conclusion: In the setting of bilateral chest wall reconstruction, opposed tangent beams cannot consistently achieve desired heart and left lung sparing. DIBH consistently achieves better healthy tissue sparing. VMAT appears to be preferential to IMRT for planning and delivering radiation to patients with bilaterally reconstructed chest walls being treated with DIBH.

  3. The role of FDG PET/CT in evaluation of mediastinal masses and neurogenic tumors of chest wall

    PubMed Central

    Tatci, Ebru; Ozmen, Ozlem; Dadali, Yeliz; Biner, Inci Uslu; Gokcek, Atila; Demirag, Funda; Incekara, Funda; Arslan, Nuri

    2015-01-01

    We evaluated the efficiency of FDG PET/CT for the differentiation of malignant from benign mediastinal masses and neurogenic tumors of chest-wall. Methods: The 88 patients with chest wall-mediastinal masses who underwent examination before operation were retrospectively reviewed. Size, CT density (HU mean) and SUVmax of mediastinal and chest wall lesions were determined. Statistical differences of these parameters were compared between groups by Mann-Whitney U test. Receiver-operating characteristic curve (ROC) analysis with respect to SUVmax was performed to determine the best cutoff value for differentiating benign from malignant masses. Results: The overall sensitivity, specificity, accuracy, positive predictive value (PPV) and negative predictive value (NPV) of PET/CT in detection of malignancy were 90%, 55.17%, 67%, 50.94% and 91.43%, respectively. The SUVmax, HU mean and size were higher in malignant cases (P < 0.05). To distinguish benign and malignant lesions, the cut off value of SUVmax was 4.67. The lesion SUVmax was significantly associated with the lesion size and lesion HU mean values (P < 0.05). The value of SUVmax and HU mean were higher in solid benign lesions than those of cystic benign lesions (P < 0.05). The lesion size was higher in cystic lesions (P = 0.000). The mean SUVmax was significantly higher in invasive thymomas than those of non-invasive forms (P = 0.029). Conclusion: FDG PET/CT may be complementary to conventional imaging methods for the evaluation of mediastinal and chest wall masses. PET/CT may reduce unnecessary invasive investigations for diagnosis in patients with nonavid or low avid FDG lesions. However confirmatory tissue sampling is required to confirm PET positive findings for the definite diagnosis. PMID:26379916

  4. Neurilemmoma showing a unique growth pattern in the lateral chest wall: both inside and outside the thoracic cavity.

    PubMed

    Jun Ahn, Sun; Joo Park, Kyung; Sung Sun, Joo; Choi, Ho; Hee Lee, Yong

    2014-01-01

    We report the first case of the intercostal neurilemmoma showing a unique growth pattern in the lateral chest wall (both inside and outside the thoracic cavity). Usually, intrathoracic neurilemmoma is found in the posterior mediastinum and bulge from the inner surface of the bony thorax toward the thoracic cavity. This unique growing pattern of neurilemmoma arising from intercostal nerve was clearly demonstrated by computed tomography and ultrasonography.

  5. [Thoracodorsal pedicled perforator flap for chest wall and breast reconstruction in children: Illustration with two clinical cases].

    PubMed

    Minetti, C; Colson, T; Gisquet, H; Pujo, J; Brix, M; Simon, E

    2014-02-01

    Perforator flaps represent a new approach in reconstructive surgery including the thoracodorsal perforator flap. It can be used as a free or pedicled tissue transfer. By exposing two clinical cases, we demonstrate that this flap is an interesting option for children and adolescents chest wall skin coverage with less morbidity compared to myocutaneous latissimus dorsi flap. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  6. Poland’s Anomaly: Natural History and Long-Term-Results of Chest Wall Reconstruction in 33 Patients

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1988-12-01

    five patients had partial or complete absence of the ipsilateral latissimus dorsi muscle, and nine patients had absence of the serratus anterior muscle...defect has changed consid- to the anterior chest wall while preserving the neurovascular erably over the past decade, and although newer tech- pedicle...dorsi, serratus an- inations, muscle testing, and standard photography were terior, and other nearby structures.3-7 Renal hypoplasia, performed on

  7. Chest-wall thickness and percent thoracic fat estimation by B-mode ultrasound: system and procedure review

    SciTech Connect

    Berger, C.D.; Lane, B.H.; Dunsmore, M.R.

    1983-02-01

    Accurate measurement of chest wall thickness is necessary for estimation of lung burden of transuranic elements in humans. To achieve tis capability, the ORNL Whole Body Counter has acquired a B-mode ultrasonic imaging system for defining the structure within the thorax of the body. This report contains a review of the ultrasound system in use at the ORNL Whole Body Counter, including its theory of operation, and te procedure for use of the system. Future developmental plans are also presented.

  8. Translucent poly(vinyl alcohol) cryogel dosimeters for simultaneous dose buildup and monitoring during chest wall radiation therapy.

    PubMed

    Eyadeh, Molham M; Weston, Mark A; Juhasz, Janos; Diamond, Kevin R

    2016-09-01

    Chest wall radiation therapy treatment delivery was monitored using a 5 mm thick radiochromic poly(vinyl alcohol) cryogel that also provided buildup material. The cryogels were used to detect positioning errors and measure the impact of shifts for a chest wall treatment that was delivered to a RANDO phantom. The phantom was shifted by ±2,±3, and ±5 mm from the planned position in the anterior/posterior (A/P) direction; these shifts represent setup errors and the uncertainty associated with lung filling during breath-hold. The two-dimensional absolute dose distributions measured in the cryogel at the planned position were compared with the distributions at all shifts from this position using gamma analysis (3%/3 mm, 10% threshold). For shifts of ±2,±3, and ±5 mm the passing rates ranged from 94.3% to 95.6%, 74.0% to 78.8%, and 17.5% to 22.5%, respectively. These results are consistent with the same gamma analysis performed on dose planes calculated in the middle of the cryogel and on the phantom surface using our treatment planning system, which ranged from 94.3% to 95.0%, 76.8% to 77.9%, and 23.5% to 24.3%, respectively. The Pinnacle dose planes were then scaled empirically and compared to the cryogel measurements. Using the same gamma metric, the pass rates ranged from 97.0% to 98.4%. The results of this study suggest that cryogels may be used as both a buildup material and to evaluate errors in chest wall treatment positioning during deep-inspiration breath-hold delivery. The cryogels are sensitive to A/P chest wall shifts of less than 3 mm, which potentially allows for the detection of clinically relevant errors. PACS number(s): 87.55.km, 87.57.uq.

  9. Translucent poly(vinyl alcohol) cryogel dosimeters for simultaneous dose buildup and monitoring during chest wall radiation therapy.

    PubMed

    Eyadeh, Molham M; Weston, Mark A; Juhasz, Janos; Diamond, Kevin R

    2016-09-08

    Chest wall radiation therapy treatment delivery was monitored using a 5 mm thick radiochromic poly(vinyl alcohol) cryogel that also provided buildup material. The cryogels were used to detect positioning errors and measure the impact of shifts for a chest wall treatment that was delivered to a RANDO phantom. The phantom was shifted by ± 2, ± 3, and ± 5 mm from the planned position in the anterior/posterior (A/P) direction; these shifts represent setup errors and the uncertainty associated with lung filling during breath-hold. The two-dimensional absolute dose distributions measured in the cryogel at the planned position were compared with the distributions at all shifts from this position using gamma analysis (3%/3 mm, 10% threshold). For shifts of ± 2, ± 3, and ± 5 mm the passing rates ranged from 94.3% to 95.6%, 74.0% to 78.8%, and 17.5% to 22.5%, respectively. These results are consistent with the same gamma analysis performed on dose planes calculated in the middle of the cryogel and on the phantom surface using our treatment plan-ning system, which ranged from 94.3% to 95.0%, 76.8% to 77.9%, and 23.5% to 24.3%, respectively. The Pinnacle dose planes were then scaled empirically and compared to the cryogel measurements. Using the same gamma metric, the pass rates ranged from 97.0% to 98.4%. The results of this study suggest that cryogels may be used as both a buildup material and to evaluate errors in chest wall treat-ment positioning during deep-inspiration breath-hold delivery. The cryogels are sensitive to A/P chest wall shifts of less than 3 mm, which potentially allows for the detection of clinically relevant errors.

  10. Tuberculosis of the manubriosternal joint and concurrent asymptomatic active pulmonary tuberculosis in a patient presenting with a chest wall mass.

    PubMed

    Gorospe, Luis; Ayala-Carbonero, Ana María; Rodríguez-Díaz, Ricardo; García Latorre, Raquel; Muñoz-Molina, Gemma María; Cabañero-Sánchez, Alberto

    2015-01-01

    A 62-year-old woman presented to our hospital with an anterior chest wall swelling. Computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance imaging showed findings consistent with an infectious arthritis of the manubriosternal joint, and CT images also demonstrated multiple centrilobular nodules in both lungs, suggesting an infectious bronchiolitis. A CT-guided fine needle aspiration of a presternal mass yielded growth of Mycobacterium tuberculosis. Bronchoalveolar lavage confirmed an active pulmonary tuberculosis. Septic arthritis of the manubriosternal joint is exceedingly rare.

  11. Development Of A Bio-Inspired Mechatronic Chest Wall Simulator For Evaluating The Performances Of Opto-Electronic Plethysmography

    PubMed Central

    C, Massaroni; E, Schena; F, Bastianini; A, Scorza; P, Saccomandi; G, Lupi; F, Botta; S. A, Sciuto; S, Silvestri

    2014-01-01

    Instrumented gait analysis based on optoelectronic systems is an expensive technique used to objectively measure the human movement features and it is generally considered as the gold standard. Opto-electronic plethysmography (OEP) is a particular motion analysis system able to: (i) determine chest wall kinematic via the evaluation of marker displacements placed on the thorax and (ii) compute respiratory volumes during breathing. The aim of this work is to describe the performances of a custom made, bio-inspired, mechatronic chest wall simulator (CWS), specifically designed to assess the metrological performances of the OEP system. The design of the simulator is based on the chest wall kinematic analysis of three healthy subjects previously determined. Two sets of experiments were carried out: (i) to investigate the CWS dynamic response using different target displacements (1 - 12 mm), and (ii) to assess the CWS accuracy and precision in simulating quite breathing, covering the physiological range of respiratory frequency and tidal volume. Results show that the CWS allows simulating respiratory frequency up to ~ 60 bpm. The difference between the actual displacement and the set one is always < 9 μm. The precision error, expressed as the ratio between measurement uncertainty and the actual displacement, is lower than 0.32 %. The observed good performances permit to consider the CWS prototype feasible to be employed for assessing the performances of OEP system in periodical validation routines. PMID:25624954

  12. Development of a bio-inspired mechatronic chest wall simulator for evaluating the performances of opto-electronic plethysmography.

    PubMed

    C, Massaroni; E, Schena; F, Bastianini; A, Scorza; P, Saccomandi; G, Lupi; F, Botta; S A, Sciuto; S, Silvestri

    2014-01-01

    Instrumented gait analysis based on optoelectronic systems is an expensive technique used to objectively measure the human movement features and it is generally considered as the gold standard. Opto-electronic plethysmography (OEP) is a particular motion analysis system able to: (i) determine chest wall kinematic via the evaluation of marker displacements placed on the thorax and (ii) compute respiratory volumes during breathing. The aim of this work is to describe the performances of a custom made, bio-inspired, mechatronic chest wall simulator (CWS), specifically designed to assess the metrological performances of the OEP system. The design of the simulator is based on the chest wall kinematic analysis of three healthy subjects previously determined. Two sets of experiments were carried out: (i) to investigate the CWS dynamic response using different target displacements (1 - 12 mm), and (ii) to assess the CWS accuracy and precision in simulating quite breathing, covering the physiological range of respiratory frequency and tidal volume. Results show that the CWS allows simulating respiratory frequency up to ~ 60 bpm. The difference between the actual displacement and the set one is always < 9 μm. The precision error, expressed as the ratio between measurement uncertainty and the actual displacement, is lower than 0.32 %. The observed good performances permit to consider the CWS prototype feasible to be employed for assessing the performances of OEP system in periodical validation routines.

  13. Asymptomatic Mesenchymal Hamartoma of the Chest Wall in Child With Fluorodeoxyglucose Uptake on PET/CT-Report of a Case.

    PubMed

    Okamoto, Kentaro; Tani, Yukiko; Yamaguchi, Takeshi; Ogino, Kei; Tsuchioka, Takashi; Nakajima, Masanobu; Yamaguchi, Satoru; Sasaki, Kinro; Kato, Hiroyuki; Ohya, Toshiki

    2015-05-01

    We had experience with a case of mesenchymal hamartoma of the chest wall (MHCW) with fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) uptake on positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT). We reported the first case of asymptomatic MHCW in a child with preoperative PET/CT. Mesenchymal hamartoma of the chest wall is a rare benign tumor that usually presents as a visible chest wall mass or respiratory problems secondary to compression of the lung in early infancy. It is often reported that malignant transformation is extraordinarily rare. Positron emission tomography/CT is useful for diagnosis of malignancy. There is no report of MHCW in a child with preoperative PET/CT before. We examined an asymptomatic 1-year-old girl with an incidental finding on a chest x-ray. Scans of CT and PET/CT were performed before surgical resection. After surgery, the resected tumor was examined histologically. Chest x-ray and CT scan of the chest confirmed a 25- × 20-mm round shaped intrapleural mass containing calcification and destructing the rib, arising from the third rib. Scan of PET/CT demonstrated the mass with light FDG accumulation. Histologically, the mass was homogenous, with thick funicular of hyaline cartilage interdigitating with scattered fiber. There were no malignant cells. No malignant MHCW was demonstrated in the mass, with light FDG accumulation by PET/CT. PET/CT might be a useful tool to distinguish malignant MHCW in children.

  14. Transient decrease in PaCO(2) and asymmetric chest wall dynamics in early progressing pneumothorax.

    PubMed

    Waisman, Dan; Faingersh, Anna; Levy, Carmit; Colman-Klotzman, Ifat; Rotschild, Avi; Lichtenstein, Oscar; Landesberg, Amir

    2013-01-01

    Diagnosis of pneumothorax (PTX) in newborn infants has been reported as late. To explore diagnostic indices for early detection of progressing PTX, and offer explanations for delayed diagnoses. Progressing PTX was created in rabbits (2.3 ± 0.5 kg, n = 7) by injecting 1 ml/min of air into the pleural space. Hemodynamic parameters, tidal volume, EtCO(2), SpO(2), blood gas analyses and chest wall tidal displacements (TDi) on both sides of the chest were recorded. (Mean ± SD): A decrease in SpO(2) below 90 % was detected only after 46.6 ± 11.3 min in six experiments. In contrary to the expected gradual increase of CO(2), there was a prolonged transient decrease of 14.2 ± 4.5 % in EtCO(2) (p < 0.01), and a similar decrease in PaCO(2) (p < 0.025). EtCO(2) returned back to baseline only after 55.2 ± 24.7 min, and continued to rise thereafter. The decrease in CO(2) was a mirror image of the 14.6 ± 5.3 % increase in tidal volume. The analysis of endotracheal flow and pressure dynamics revealed a paradoxical transient increase in the apparent compliance. Significant decrease in mean arterial blood pressure was observed after 46.2 ± 40.1 min. TDi provided the most sensitive and earliest sign of PTX, decreasing on the PTX side after 16.1 ± 7.2 min. The TDi progressively decreased faster and lower on the PTX side, thus enabling detection of asymmetric ventilation. The counterintuitive transient prolonged decrease in CO(2) without changes in SpO(2) may explain the delay in diagnosis of PTX encountered in the clinical environment. An earlier indication of asymmetrically decreased ventilation on the affected side was achieved by monitoring the TDi.

  15. Chest Wall Toxicity After Stereotactic Body Radiotherapy for Malignant Lesions of the Lung and Liver

    SciTech Connect

    Andolino, David L.; Forquer, Jeffrey A.; Henderson, Mark A.; Barriger, Robert B.; Shapiro, Ronald H.; Brabham, Jeffrey G.; Johnstone, Peter A.S.; Cardenes, Higinia R.; Fakiris, Achilles J.

    2011-07-01

    Purpose: To quantify the frequency of rib fracture and chest wall (CW) pain and identify the dose-volume parameters that predict CW toxicity after stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT). Methods and Materials: The records of patients treated with SBRT between 2000 and 2008 were reviewed, and toxicity was scored according to Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events v3.0 for pain and rib fracture. Dosimetric data for CW and rib were analyzed and related to the frequency of toxicity. The risks of CW toxicity were then further characterized according to the median effective concentration (EC{sub 50}) dose-response model. Results: A total of 347 lesions were treated with a median follow-up of 19 months. Frequency of Grade I and higher CW pain and/or fracture for CW vs. non-CW lesions was 21% vs. 4%, respectively (p < 0.0001). A dose of 50 Gy was the cutoff for maximum dose (Dmax) to CW and rib above which there was a significant increase in the frequency of any grade pain and fracture (p = 0.03 and p = 0.025, respectively). Volume of CW receiving 15 Gy - 40 Gy was highly predictive of toxicity (R{sup 2} > 0.9). According to the EC{sub 50} model, 5 cc and 15 cc of CW receiving 40 Gy predict a 10% and 30% risk of CW toxicity, respectively. Conclusion: Adequate tumor coverage remains the primary objective when treating lung or liver lesions with SBRT. To minimize toxicity when treating lesions in close proximity to the CW, Dmax of the CW and/or ribs should remain <50 Gy, and <5 cc of CW should receive {>=}40 Gy.

  16. Thermoradiotherapy of the chest wall in locally advanced or recurrent breast cancer with marginal resection.

    PubMed

    Welz, S; Hehr, T; Lamprecht, U; Scheithauer, H; Budach, W; Bamberg, M

    2005-03-01

    Evaluation of the efficacy of combined hyperthermia and radiotherapy (TRT) in high-risk breast cancer patients with microscopic involved margins (R1) after mastectomy or with resected locoregional, early recurrence with close margins or R1-resection. Main endpoint was local tumour control (LC); secondary endpoints were overall survival (OS), disease free survival (DFS) and acute toxicity. Between 1997-2001, 50 patients were treated with TRT. Thirteen patients (group 1) received a post-operative TRT in a high-risk situation (free margin <1 cm or R1, N+), 37 patients (group 2) received TRT after close/R1 resection of a locoregional recurrence. Thirteen out of 37 patients in group 2 already had had two-to-seven recurrences prior to TRT. Median radiation dose was 60 Gy (range: 44-66.4 Gy), the additional local hyperthermia (>41 degrees C, 60 min) was given twice a week. Median follow-up for patients at risk was 28 months. All statistical tests were done using Statistica software. Actuarial OS for all patients at 3 years accounted for 89%, DFS for 68% and LC for 80%. Actuarial OS was 90% for group 1 and 89% for group 2, with four patients having died so far. DFS at 3 years was 64% in group 1 and 69% in group 2, actuarial 3 year LC was 75% and 81%, respectively. For patients with recurrent chest wall disease, there was no difference concerning local control between patients who underwent TRT with or without prior radiation. No prognostic factors could be detected due to the small number of patients investigated. The combined modality treatment was well tolerated. Grade IV toxicity, according to the Common Toxicity Criteria, did not occur. The results concerning local tumour control and overall survival in these high-risk patients are promising, especially for TRT for the treatment of local recurrences. A longer follow-up is needed to estimate late toxicity.

  17. CNE article: pain after lung transplant: high-frequency chest wall oscillation vs chest physiotherapy.

    PubMed

    Esguerra-Gonzalez, Angeli; Ilagan-Honorio, Monina; Fraschilla, Stephanie; Kehoe, Priscilla; Lee, Ai Jin; Marcarian, Taline; Mayol-Ngo, Kristina; Miller, Pamela S; Onga, Jay; Rodman, Betty; Ross, David; Sommer, Susan; Takayanagi, Sumiko; Toyama, Joy; Villamor, Filma; Weigt, S Samuel; Gawlinski, Anna

    2013-03-01

    Background Chest physiotherapy and high-frequency chest wall oscillation (HFCWO) are routinely used after lung transplant to facilitate removal of secretions. To date, no studies have been done to investigate which therapy is more comfortable and preferred by lung transplant recipients. Patients who have less pain may mobilize secretions, heal, and recover faster. Objectives To compare effects of HFCWO versus chest physiotherapy on pain and preference in lung transplant recipients. Methods In a 2-group experimental, repeated-measures design, 45 lung transplant recipients (27 single lung, 18 bilateral) were randomized to chest physiotherapy (10 AM, 2 PM) followed by HFCWO (6 PM, 10 PM; group 1, n=22) or vice versa (group 2, n=23) on postoperative day 3. A verbal numeric rating scale was used to measure pain before and after treatment. At the end of the treatment sequence, a 4-item patient survey was administered to assess treatment preference, pain, and effectiveness. Data were analyzed with χ(2) and t tests and repeated-measures analysis of variance. Results A significant interaction was found between mean difference in pain scores from before to after treatment and treatment method; pain scores decreased more when HFCWO was done at 10 AM and 6 PM (P =.04). Bilateral transplant recipients showed a significant preference for HFCWO over chest physiotherapy (11 [85%] vs 2 [15%], P=.01). However, single lung recipients showed no significant difference in preference between the 2 treatments (11 [42%] vs 14 [54%]). Conclusions HFCWO seems to provide greater decreases in pain scores than does chest physiotherapy. Bilateral lung transplant recipients preferred HFCWO to chest physiotherapy. HFCWO may be an effective, feasible alternative to chest physiotherapy. (American Journal of Critical Care. 2013;22:115-125).

  18. Comparison of Chest Wall and Lymphatic Radiotherapy Techniques in Patients with Left Breast Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Gültekin, Melis; Karabuğa, Mehmet; Yıldız, Ferah; Özyiğit, Gökhan; Cengiz, Mustafa; Zorlu, Faruk; Akyol, Fadıl; Gürkaynak, Murat

    2014-01-01

    Objective The aim of this study was to find the most appropriate technique for postmastectomy chest wall (CW) and lymphatic irradiation. Materials and Methods Partially wide tangent, 30/70 photon/electron mix, 20/80 photon/electron mix and CW and internal mammary en face electron field, were studied on computerized tomography (CT) scans of 10 left breast carcinoma patients and dosimetric calculations have been studied. Dose volume histograms (DVH) obtained from treatment planning system (TPS) were used for minimal, maximal and mean doses received by the clinical target volumes and critical structures. Results Partially wide tangent field resulted in the most homogeneous dose distribution for the CW and a significantly lower lung and heart doses compared with all other techniques. However, right breast dose was significantly higher for partially wide tangent technique than that each of the other techniques. Approximately 0.6–7.9% differences were found between thermoluminescent dosimeter (TLD) and treatment planning system (TPS). The daily surface doses calculating using Gafchromic® external beam therapy (EBT) dosimetry films were 161.8±2.7 cGy for the naked, 241.0±1.5 cGy when 0.5 cm bolus was used and 255.3±2.7 cGy when 1 cm bolus was used. Conclusion As a result of this study, partially wide tangent field was found to be the most appropriate technique in terms of the dose distribution, treatment planning and set-up procedure. The main disadvantage of this technique was the higher dose to the contralateral breast comparing the other techniques.

  19. Chest wall tumors and prosthetic reconstruction: A comparative analysis on functional outcome

    PubMed Central

    Leuzzi, Giovanni; Nachira, Dania; Cesario, Alfredo; Novellis, Pierluigi; Petracca Ciavarella, Leonardo; Lococo, Filippo; Facciolo, Francesco; Granone, Pierluigi; Margaritora, Stefano

    2015-01-01

    Background To address the question of how much chest-wall (CW) resections and prosthetic reconstructions influence functional outcome. Methods We retrospectively reviewed 175 patients who underwent surgery for CW tumors. The clinical, histological, surgical, oncological, and functional factors were analyzed. Results We performed: 75 rib resections; 20 sternal resections; 15 combined resections; and 27 lung resections. In 39 cases (22.2%) CW was stabilized with non-rigid prosthesis (Vicryl-mesh: 8 patients; Goretex-mesh: 31 patients). Postoperative complications occurred in 22 cases (12.6%): a correlation with lung resection was evidenced by multivariate analysis (P = 0.025). Five-year survival for primary and secondary tumors was 50% and 36%, respectively: multivariate analysis (P = 0.048) showed a worse survival in men only. In the prosthesis subset, pulmonary function tested as percentage of forced expiratory volume in one second (%FEV1) (pre: 87.1 ± 18.9%; post: 82.3 ± 23.0%, P = ns), percentage of forced vital capacity (pre: 94.1 ± 19.3%; post: 82.0 ± 21.6%, P = ns), diffusing capacity of the lungs for carbon monoxide (pre: 15.7 ± 7.4; post: 12.1 ± 4.1, P = ns) and paO2 (pre: 82.6 ± 10.9 mmHg; post: 83.9 ± 7.3 mmHg, P = ns) was slightly modified from pre to postoperative. Interestingly, the decline of FEV1% was lower in the prosthesis-subset (4.1 ± 15.9%) compared with the subgroup who did not undergo prosthetic stabilization (17.5 ± 16.2%), but this difference was not statistically significant (P = ns). Conclusion Because of the low decrease of lung parameters, CW prosthetic reconstruction could be helpful for avoiding postoperative worsening of functional outcome, mostly in patients with pre-existing pulmonary diseases. PMID:26273369

  20. Continuous on-line measurements of respiratory system, lung and chest wall mechanics during mechanic ventilation.

    PubMed

    Kárason, S; Søndergaard, S; Lundin, S; Stenqvist, O

    2001-08-01

    We present a concept of on-line, manoeuvre-free monitoring of respiratory mechanics during dynamic conditions, displaying calculated alveolar pressure/volume curves continuously and separating lung and chest wall mechanics. Prospective observational study. Intensive care unit of a university hospital. Ten ventilator-treated patients with acute lung injury. Different positive end-expiratory pressure (PEEP) and tidal volumes, low flow inflation. Previously validated methods were used to present a single-value dynostatic compliance for the whole breath and a dynostatic volume-dependent initial, middle and final compliance within the breath. A high individual variation of respiratory mechanics was observed. Reproducibility of repeated measurements was satisfactory (coefficients of variations for dynostatic volume-dependent compliance: < or =9.2% for total respiratory system, < or =18% for lung). Volume-dependent compliance showed a statistically significant pattern of successively decreasing compliance from the initial segment through the middle and final parts within each breath at all respiratory settings. This pattern became more prominent with increasing PEEP and tidal volume, indicating a greater distension of alveoli. No lower inflection point (LIP) was seen in patients with respiratory rate 20/min and PEEP at 4 cmH2O. A trial with low flow inflation in four of the patients showed formation of a LIP in three of them and an upper inflection in one. The monitoring concept revealed a constant pattern of successively decreasing compliance within each breath, which became more prominent with increasing PEEP and tidal volume. The monitoring concept offers a simple and reliable method of monitoring respiratory mechanics during ongoing ventilator treatment.

  1. Response of the canine inspiratory intercostal muscles to chest wall vibration.

    PubMed

    Leduc, D; Brunko, E; De Troyer, A

    2000-02-01

    High-frequency mechanical vibration of the rib cage reduces dyspnea, but the effect of this procedure on the respiratory muscles is largely unknown. In the present studies, we have initially assessed the electrical and mechanical response to vibration (40 Hz) of the canine parasternal and external intercostal muscles (third interspace) during hyperventilation-induced apnea. When the vibrator was applied to the segment investigated, prominent external intercostal activity was recorded in the seven animals studied, whereas low-amplitude parasternal intercostal activity was recorded in only four animals. Similarly, when the vibrator was applied to more rostral and more caudal interspaces, activity was recorded commonly from the external intercostal but only occasionally from the parasternal. The two muscles, however, showed similar changes in length. We next examined the response to vibration of the muscles in seven spontaneously breathing animals. Vibrating the rib cage during inspiration (in-phase) had no effect on parasternal intercostal inspiratory activity but induced a marked increase in neural drive to the external intercostals. For the animal group, peak external intercostal activity during the control, nonvibrated breaths averaged (mean +/- SE) 43.1 +/- 3.7% of the activity recorded during the vibrated breaths (p < 0.001). External intercostal activity during vibration also occurred earlier at the onset of inspiration and commonly carried on after the cessation of parasternal intercostal activity. Yet tidal volume was unchanged. Vibrating the rib cage during expiration (out-of-phase) did not elicit any parasternal or external intercostal activity in six animals. These observations thus indicate that the external intercostals, with their larger spindle density, are much more sensitive to chest wall vibration than the parasternal intercostals. They also suggest that the impact of this procedure on the mechanical behavior of the respiratory system is relatively

  2. Does a minimal invasive approach reduce anterior chest wall numbness and postoperative pain in plate fixation of clavicle fractures?

    PubMed

    Beirer, Marc; Postl, Lukas; Crönlein, Moritz; Siebenlist, Sebastian; Huber-Wagner, Stefan; Braun, Karl F; Biberthaler, Peter; Kirchhoff, Chlodwig

    2015-05-28

    Fractures of the clavicle present very common injuries with a peak of incidence in young active patients. Recently published randomized clinical trials demonstrated an improved functional outcome and a lower rate of nonunions in comparison to non-operative treatment. Anterior chest wall numbness due to injury of the supraclavicular nerve and postoperative pain constitute common surgery related complications in plate fixation of displaced clavicle fractures. We recently developed a technique for mini open plating (MOP) of the clavicle to reduce postoperative numbness and pain. The purpose of this study was to analyze the size of anterior chest wall numbness and the intensity of postoperative pain in MOP in comparison to conventional open plating (COP) of clavicle fractures. 24 patients (mean age 38.2 ± 14.2 yrs.) with a displaced fracture of the clavicle (Orthopaedic Trauma Association B1.2-C1.2) surgically treated using a locking compression plate (LCP) were enrolled. 12 patients underwent MOP and another 12 patients COP. Anterior chest wall numbness was measured with a transparency grid on the second postoperative day and at the six months follow-up. Postoperative pain was evaluated using the Visual Analog Scale (VAS). Mean ratio of skin incision length to plate length was 0.61 ± 0.04 in the MOP group and 0.85 ± 0.06 in the COP group (p < 0.05). Mean ratio of the area of anterior chest wall numbness to plate length was postoperative 7.6 ± 5.9 (six months follow-up 4.7 ± 3.9) in the MOP group and 22.1 ± 19.1 (16.9 ± 14.1) in the COP group (p < 0.05). Mean VAS was 2.6 ± 1.4 points in the MOP group and 3.4 ± 1.6 points in the COP group (p = 0.20). In our study, MOP significantly reduced anterior chest wall numbness in comparison to a conventional open approach postoperative as well as at the six months follow-up. Postoperative pain tended to be lower in the MOP group, however this difference was not statistically significant. ClinicalTrials.gov NCT02247778

  3. Revision breast and chest wall reconstruction in Poland and pectus excavatum following implant complication using free deep inferior epigastric perforator flap.

    PubMed

    Dionyssiou, Dimitrios; Demiri, Efterpi; Batsis, Georgios; Pavlidis, Leonidas

    2015-01-01

    This study aims to present the case of a female patient with Poland's syndrome and pectus excavatum deformity who underwent breast and chest wall reconstruction with a pre-shaped free deep inferior epigastric perforator flap. A 57-year-old female patient with Poland's syndrome and pectus excavatum presented with a Baker III capsular contracture following a previously performed implant-based right breast reconstruction. After a chest and abdominal CT angiography, she was staged as 2A1 chest wall deformity according to Park's classification and underwent implant removal and capsulectomy, followed by a pre-shaped free abdominal flap transfer, providing both breast reconstruction and chest wall deformity correction in a single stage operation. Post-operative course was uneventful, and the aesthetic result remains highly satisfactory 24 months after surgery. Deep inferior epigastric free flap represents an interesting reconstructive solution when treating Poland's syndrome female patients with chest wall and breast deformities.

  4. Evaluating proton stereotactic body radiotherapy to reduce chest wall dose in the treatment of lung cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Welsh, James; Amini, Arya; Ciura, Katherine; Nguyen, Ngoc; Palmer, Matt; Soh, Hendrick; Allen, Pamela K.; Paolini, Michael; Liao, Zhongxing; Bluett, Jaques; Mohan, Radhe; Gomez, Daniel; Cox, James D.; Komaki, Ritsuko; Chang, Joe Y.

    2013-01-01

    Stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) can produce excellent local control of several types of solid tumor; however, toxicity to nearby critical structures is a concern. We found previously that in SBRT for lung cancer, the chest wall (CW) volume receiving 20, 30, or 40 Gy (V{sub 20}, V{sub 30}, or V{sub 40}) was linked with the development of neuropathy. Here we sought to determine whether the dosimetric advantages of protons could produce lower CW doses than traditional photon-based SBRT. We searched an institutional database to identify patients treated with photon SBRT for lung cancer with tumors within < 2.5 cm of the CW. We found 260 cases; of these, chronic grade ≥ 2 CW pain was identified in 23 patients. We then selected 10 representative patients from this group and generated proton SBRT treatment plans, using the identical dose of 50 Gy in 4 fractions, and assessed potential differences in CW dose between the 2 plans. The proton SBRT plans reduced the CW doses at all dose levels measured. The median CW V{sub 20} was 364.0 cm{sup 3} and 160.0 cm{sup 3} (p < 0.0001), V{sub 30} was 144.6 cm{sup 3}vs 77.0 cm{sup 3} (p = 0.0012), V{sub 35} was 93.9 cm{sup 3}vs 57.9 cm{sup 3} (p = 0.005), V{sub 40} was 66.5 cm{sup 3}vs 45.4 cm{sup 3} (p = 0.0112), and mean lung dose was 5.9 Gy vs 3.8 Gy (p = 0.0001) for photons and protons, respectively. Coverage of the planning target volume (PTV) was comparable between the 2 sets of plans (96.4% for photons and 97% for protons). From a dosimetric standpoint, proton SBRT can achieve the same coverage of the PTV while significantly reducing the dose to the CW and lung relative to photon SBRT and therefore may be beneficial for the treatment of lesions closer to critical structures.

  5. Development and validation of a clinical prediction rule for chest wall syndrome in primary care.

    PubMed

    Ronga, Alexandre; Vaucher, Paul; Haasenritter, Jörg; Donner-Banzhoff, Norbert; Bösner, Stefan; Verdon, François; Bischoff, Thomas; Burnand, Bernard; Favrat, Bernard; Herzig, Lilli

    2012-08-06

    Chest wall syndrome (CWS), the main cause of chest pain in primary care practice, is most often an exclusion diagnosis. We developed and evaluated a clinical prediction rule for CWS. Data from a multicenter clinical cohort of consecutive primary care patients with chest pain were used (59 general practitioners, 672 patients). A final diagnosis was determined after 12 months of follow-up. We used the literature and bivariate analyses to identify candidate predictors, and multivariate logistic regression was used to develop a clinical prediction rule for CWS. We used data from a German cohort (n = 1212) for external validation. From bivariate analyses, we identified six variables characterizing CWS: thoracic pain (neither retrosternal nor oppressive), stabbing, well localized pain, no history of coronary heart disease, absence of general practitioner's concern, and pain reproducible by palpation. This last variable accounted for 2 points in the clinical prediction rule, the others for 1 point each; the total score ranged from 0 to 7 points. The area under the receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve was 0.80 (95% confidence interval 0.76-0.83) in the derivation cohort (specificity: 89%; sensitivity: 45%; cut-off set at 6 points). Among all patients presenting CWS (n = 284), 71% (n = 201) had a pain reproducible by palpation and 45% (n = 127) were correctly diagnosed. For a subset (n = 43) of these correctly classified CWS patients, 65 additional investigations (30 electrocardiograms, 16 thoracic radiographies, 10 laboratory tests, eight specialist referrals, one thoracic computed tomography) had been performed to achieve diagnosis. False positives (n = 41) included three patients with stable angina (1.8% of all positives). External validation revealed the ROC curve to be 0.76 (95% confidence interval 0.73-0.79) with a sensitivity of 22% and a specificity of 93%. This CWS score offers a useful complement to the usual CWS exclusion

  6. Higher Chest Wall Dose Results in Improved Locoregional Outcome in Patients Receiving Postmastectomy Radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Panoff, Joseph E.; Takita, Cristiane; Hurley, Judith; Reis, Isildinha M.; Zhao, Wei; Rodgers, Steven E.; Gunaseelan, Vijayalakshmi; Wright, Jean L.

    2012-03-01

    Purpose: Randomized trials demonstrating decreased locoregional recurrence (LRR) and improved overall survival (OS) in women receiving postmastectomy radiation therapy (PMRT) used up to 50 Gy to the chest wall (CW), but in practice, many centers boost the CW dose to {>=}60 Gy, despite lack of data supporting this approach. We evaluated the relationship between CW dose and clinical outcome. Methods and Materials: We retrospectively reviewed medical records of 582 consecutively treated patients who received PMRT between January 1999 and December 2009. We collected data on patient, disease, treatment characteristics, and outcomes of LRR, progression-free survival (PFS) and OS. Results: Median follow-up from the date of diagnosis was 44.7 months. The cumulative 5-year incidence of LRR as first site of failure was 6.2%. CW dose for 7% (43 patients) was {<=}50.4 Gy (range, 41.4-50.4 Gy) and 93% received >50.4 Gy (range, 52.4-74.4 Gy). A CW dose of >50.4 Gy vs. {<=}50.4 Gy was associated with lower incidence of LRR, a 60-month rate of 5.7% (95% confidence interval [CI], 3.7-8.2) vs. 12.7% (95% CI, 4.5-25.3; p = 0.054). Multivariate hazard ratio (HR) for LRR controlling for race, receptor status, and stage was 2.62 (95% CI, 1.02-7.13; p = 0.042). All LRR in the low-dose group occurred in patients receiving 50 to 50.4 Gy. Lower CW dose was associated with worse PFS (multivariate HR, 2.73; 95% CI, 1.64-4.56; p < 0.001) and OS (multivariate HR, 3.88; 95% CI, 2.16-6.99; p < 0.001). Conclusions: The addition of a CW boost above 50.4 Gy resulted in improved locoregional control and survival in this cohort patients treated with PMRT for stage II-III breast cancer. The addition of a CW boost to standard-dose PMRT is likely to benefit selected high-risk patients. The optimal technique, target volume, and patient selection criteria are unknown. The use of a CW boost should be studied prospectively, as has been done in the setting of breast conservation.

  7. Thermal characteristics of thermobrachytherapy surface applicators for treating chest wall recurrence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arunachalam, K.; Maccarini, P. F.; Craciunescu, O. I.; Schlorff, J. L.; Stauffer, P. R.

    2010-04-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate temperature and thermal dose distributions of thermobrachytherapy surface applicators (TBSAs) developed for concurrent or sequential high dose rate (HDR) brachytherapy and microwave hyperthermia treatment of chest wall recurrence and other superficial diseases. A steady-state thermodynamics model coupled with the fluid dynamics of a water bolus and electromagnetic radiation of the hyperthermia applicator is used to characterize the temperature distributions achievable with TBSAs in an elliptical phantom model of the human torso. Power deposited by 915 MHz conformal microwave array (CMA) applicators is used to assess the specific absorption rate (SAR) distributions of rectangular (500 cm2) and L-shaped (875 cm2) TBSAs. The SAR distribution in tissue and fluid flow distribution inside the dual-input dual-output (DIDO) water bolus are coupled to solve the steady-state temperature and thermal dose distributions of the rectangular TBSA (R-TBSA) for superficial tumor targets extending 10-15 mm beneath the skin surface. Thermal simulations are carried out for a range of bolus inlet temperature (Tb = 38-43 °C), water flow rate (Qb = 2-4 L min-1) and tumor blood perfusion (ωb = 2-5 kg m-3 s-1) to characterize their influence on thermal dosimetry. Steady-state SAR patterns of the R- and L-TBSA demonstrate the ability to produce conformal and localized power deposition inside the tumor target sparing surrounding normal tissues and nearby critical organs. Acceptably low variation in tissue surface cooling and surface temperature homogeneity was observed for the new DIDO bolus at a 2 L min-1 water flow rate. Temperature depth profiles and thermal dose volume histograms indicate bolus inlet temperature (Tb) to be the most influential factor on thermal dosimetry. A 42 °C water bolus was observed to be the optimal choice for superficial tumors extending 10-15 mm from the surface even under significant blood perfusion. Lower bolus

  8. Thermal characteristics of thermobrachytherapy surface applicators for treating chest wall recurrence.

    PubMed

    Arunachalam, K; Maccarini, P F; Craciunescu, O I; Schlorff, J L; Stauffer, P R

    2010-04-07

    The aim of this study was to investigate temperature and thermal dose distributions of thermobrachytherapy surface applicators (TBSAs) developed for concurrent or sequential high dose rate (HDR) brachytherapy and microwave hyperthermia treatment of chest wall recurrence and other superficial diseases. A steady-state thermodynamics model coupled with the fluid dynamics of a water bolus and electromagnetic radiation of the hyperthermia applicator is used to characterize the temperature distributions achievable with TBSAs in an elliptical phantom model of the human torso. Power deposited by 915 MHz conformal microwave array (CMA) applicators is used to assess the specific absorption rate (SAR) distributions of rectangular (500 cm(2)) and L-shaped (875 cm(2)) TBSAs. The SAR distribution in tissue and fluid flow distribution inside the dual-input dual-output (DIDO) water bolus are coupled to solve the steady-state temperature and thermal dose distributions of the rectangular TBSA (R-TBSA) for superficial tumor targets extending 10-15 mm beneath the skin surface. Thermal simulations are carried out for a range of bolus inlet temperature (T(b) = 38-43 degrees C), water flow rate (Q(b) = 2-4 L min(-1)) and tumor blood perfusion (omega(b) = 2-5 kg m(-3) s(-1)) to characterize their influence on thermal dosimetry. Steady-state SAR patterns of the R- and L-TBSA demonstrate the ability to produce conformal and localized power deposition inside the tumor target sparing surrounding normal tissues and nearby critical organs. Acceptably low variation in tissue surface cooling and surface temperature homogeneity was observed for the new DIDO bolus at a 2 L min(-1) water flow rate. Temperature depth profiles and thermal dose volume histograms indicate bolus inlet temperature (T(b)) to be the most influential factor on thermal dosimetry. A 42 degrees C water bolus was observed to be the optimal choice for superficial tumors extending 10-15 mm from the surface even under significant

  9. Error correction algorithm for high accuracy bio-impedance measurement in wearable healthcare applications.

    PubMed

    Kubendran, Rajkumar; Lee, Seulki; Mitra, Srinjoy; Yazicioglu, Refet Firat

    2014-04-01

    Implantable and ambulatory measurement of physiological signals such as Bio-impedance using miniature biomedical devices needs careful tradeoff between limited power budget, measurement accuracy and complexity of implementation. This paper addresses this tradeoff through an extensive analysis of different stimulation and demodulation techniques for accurate Bio-impedance measurement. Three cases are considered for rigorous analysis of a generic impedance model, with multiple poles, which is stimulated using a square/sinusoidal current and demodulated using square/sinusoidal clock. For each case, the error in determining pole parameters (resistance and capacitance) is derived and compared. An error correction algorithm is proposed for square wave demodulation which reduces the peak estimation error from 9.3% to 1.3% for a simple tissue model. Simulation results in Matlab using ideal RC values show an average accuracy of for single pole and for two pole RC networks. Measurements using ideal components for a single pole model gives an overall and readings from saline phantom solution (primarily resistive) gives an . A Figure of Merit is derived based on ability to accurately resolve multiple poles in unknown impedance with minimal measurement points per decade, for given frequency range and supply current budget. This analysis is used to arrive at an optimal tradeoff between accuracy and power. Results indicate that the algorithm is generic and can be used for any application that involves resolving poles of an unknown impedance. It can be implemented as a post-processing technique for error correction or even incorporated into wearable signal monitoring ICs.

  10. Re-irradiation of the chest wall for local breast cancer recurrence : Results of salvage brachytherapy with hyperthermia.

    PubMed

    Auoragh, A; Strnad, V; Ott, O J; Beckmann, M W; Fietkau, R

    2016-09-01

    Following mastectomy and adjuvant external beam radiation therapy in patients with breast cancer, the incidence of local or locoregional recurrence is approximately 9 % (2-20 %). Alongside the often limited possibilities of surgical treatment, radiation therapy combined with superficial hyperthermia is the most effective local therapy. In the present work, a retrospective analysis of salvage brachytherapy combined with superficial hyperthermia for chest wall recurrences is presented. Between 2004 and 2011, 18 patients with a total of 23 target volumes resulting from chest wall recurrences after previously mastectomy and external beam radiation therapy (median 56 Gy, range 50-68 Gy) were treated with superficial brachytherapy as salvage treatment: 8 patients (44 %) had macroscopic tumor, 3 (17 %) had microscopic tumor (R1), and 7 (39 %) had undergone R0 resection and were treated due to risk factors. A dose of 50 Gy was given (high-dose rate [HDR] and pulsed-dose rate [PDR] procedures). In all, 5 of 23 patients (22 %) received additional concurrent chemotherapy, and in 20 of 23 (87 %) target volumes additional superficial hyperthermia was carried out twice weekly. The 5‑year local recurrence-free survival was 56 %, the disease-free survival was 28 %, and a 5-year overall survival was 22 %. Late side effects Common Toxicity Criteria (CTC) grade 3 were reported in 17 % of the patients: 2 of 18 (11 %) had CTC grade 3 fibrosis, and 1 of 18 (6 %) had a chronic wound healing disorder. Re-irradiation as salvage brachytherapy with superficial hyperthermia for chest wall recurrences is a feasible and safe treatment with good local control results and acceptable late side effects.

  11. Chest Wall Resection for Recurrent Breast Cancer in the Modern Era: A Systematic Review and Meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Wakeam, Elliot; Acuna, Sergio A; Keshavjee, Shaf

    2017-06-26

    To review the literature on chest wall resection for recurrent breast cancer and evaluate overall survival (OS) and quality-of-life (QOL) outcomes. Full-thickness chest wall resection for recurrent breast cancer is controversial, as historically these recurrences have been thought as a harbinger of systemic disease. A systematic search in MEDLINE, EMBASE, and Cochrane CENTRAL identified 48 eligible studies, all retrospective, accounting for 1305 patients. The review is reported following Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analyses guidelines. Primary end points were patient-centered QOL outcomes and OS; secondary outcomes included disease-free survival (DFS) and 30-day morbidity. Risk of bias was assessed using the Methodological Index for Non-Randomized Studies instrument and the Oxford Centre for Evidence-Based Medicine's levels of evidence tool. Random-effects meta-analysis was used to create pooled estimates. Meta-regressions and sensitivity analyses were used to explore study heterogeneity by age, year of publication, risk of bias, and surgical intent (curative vs palliative). Studies consistently reported excellent OS and DFS in properly selected patients. Pooled estimates for 5-year OS in all studies and those from the past 15 years were 40.8% [95% confidence interval (CI) 35.2-46.7) and 43.1% (95% CI 35.8-50.7), whereas pooled 5-year DFS was 27.1% (95% CI 16.6-41.0). Eight studies reported excellent outcomes related to QOL. Mortality was consistently low (<1%) and 30-day pooled morbidity was 20.2% (95% CI 15.3%-26.3%). Study quality varied, and risk of selection bias in included studies was high. Full-thickness chest wall resection can be performed with excellent survival and low morbidity. Few studies report on QOL; prospective studies should focus on patient-centered outcomes in this population.

  12. A Comparison of Skin and Chest Wall Dose Delivered With Multicatheter, Contura Multilumen Balloon, and MammoSite Breast Brachytherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Cuttino, Laurie W.; Todor, Dorin; Rosu, Mihaela; Arthur, Douglas W.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: Skin and chest wall doses have been correlated with toxicity in patients treated with breast brachytherapy . This investigation compared the ability to control skin and chest wall doses between patients treated with multicatheter (MC), Contura multilumen balloon (CMLB), and MammoSite (MS) brachytherapy. Methods and Materials: 43 patients treated with the MC technique, 45 patients treated with the CMLB, and 83 patients treated with the MS were reviewed. The maximum doses delivered to the skin and chest wall were calculated for all patients. Results: The mean maximum skin doses for the MC, CMLB, and MS were 2.3 Gy (67% of prescription dose), 2.8 Gy (82% of prescription dose), and 3.2 Gy per fraction (94% of prescription dose), respectively. Although the skin distances were similar (p = 0.23) for the two balloon techniques, the mean skin dose with the CMLB was significantly lower than with the MS (p = 0.05). The mean maximum rib doses for the MC, CMLB, and MS were 2.3 Gy (67% of prescription dose), 2.8 Gy (82% of prescription dose), and 3.6 Gy per fraction (105% of prescription dose), respectively. Again, the mean rib dose with the CMLB was significantly lower than with the MS (p = 0.002). Conclusion: The MC and CMLB techniques are associated with significantly lower mean skin and rib doses than is the MS. Treatment with the MS was associated with significantly more patients receiving doses to the skin or rib in excess of 125% of the prescription. Treatment with the CMLB may prove to yield less normal tissue toxicity than treatment with the MS.

  13. Hypofractionated breast and chest wall irradiation using simultaneous in-field boost IMRT delivered via helical tomotherapy.

    PubMed

    Rong, Y; Fahner, T; Welsh, J S

    2008-12-01

    Although helical tomotherapy has been described as a means of administering accelerated partial breast irradiation, its practicality in routine whole breast irradiation as part of breast conserving therapy or chest wall irradiation has been questioned. In this technical note we describe our method of whole breast or chest wall irradiation using helical tomotherapy based image-guided, hypofractionated, simultaneous in-field boost intensity modulated radiation therapy. We have observed that excellent dose-distributions can be achieved with helical tomotherapy through a careful selection of treatment planning parameters. Dose homogeneity to the whole breast and simultaneously targeted lumpectomy region appears superior to conventional "tangents" with minimal hot or cold spots. Dose-volume histogram analysis documents effective reduction of high dose to critical sensitive structures (heart and lung) although a greater volume of these non-target organs receives low dose compared to what is typical with tangential beams. Treatment planning is efficient and is usually completed within one to two hours, although physician contouring requires more time and attention than non-IMRT approaches. Pretreatment megavoltage CT (MVCT) imaging has proved invaluable in aiding set-up and engenders greater confidence that the planned IMRT dose distributions are truly being delivered. In some situations, MVCT can provide visual feedback when a seroma or overall breast volume has changed significantly since simulation, thereby identifying cases where replanning might be prudent. Treatment is brief, typically completed in 6 to 9 minutes. Initial clinical application has confirmed the feasibility and practicality of helical tomotherapy as an efficient means of administering radiation therapy for routine breast-conserving therapy and post-mastectomy chest wall irradiation. A simultaneous in-field boost technique reduces the length of the overall course by about a week thereby adding

  14. High-dose melphalan followed by radical radiotherapy for the treatment of massive plasmacytoma of the chest wall.

    PubMed

    Das-Gupta, E P; Sidra, G M; Bessell, E M; Lush, R J; Byrne, J L; Russell, N H

    2003-10-01

    We report three cases of massive chest wall plasmacytoma, each greater than 10 cm in diameter, without evidence of overt myeloma, whom we treated with a combination of VAD chemotherapy consolidated by high-dose melphalan and autologous peripheral blood stem cell transplantation and radical radiotherapy. All three patients completed all components of their therapy without experiencing any major side effects and one patient has had a durable remission. The other two patients have had disease progression but at sites other than the original tumour.

  15. Rapidly Growing Chest Wall Mass in a Case of Sporadic Metastatic Paraganglioma: Imaging With 4 Different PET Radiopharmaceuticals.

    PubMed

    Janssen, Ingo; Xekouki, Paraskevi; Nambuba, Joan; Chen, Clara C; Herscovitch, Peter; Millo, Corina M; Schrump, David S; Pacak, Karel

    2016-05-01

    Pheochromocytomas/paragangliomas (PGLs) are rare tumors and mostly benign. We report on a 32-year-old woman with metastatic PGL who was first diagnosed with an abdominal PGL at the age of 12 years. She soon developed metastatic disease and received several treatments including external beam radiation and chemotherapy. When she was referred to our institution in 2014, her major complaint was a rapidly growing chest wall mass on the left side. The patient was imaged at our institution with 4 different PET radiopharmaceuticals.

  16. Antracyclin toxicity in a child with primitive neuroectodermal tumor of the chest wall with and brain metastasis.

    PubMed

    Atas, Erman; Kesik, Vural

    2015-01-01

    Chemotherapy regimens, including doxorubicin used in primitive neuroectodermal tumor's (PNET) treatment can cause life-threatening disorders in cardiac functions. Follow-up of cardiac functions in the clinical course is very important during treatment with ejection fraction (EF) and shortening fraction (SF). However, sometimes the detection of cardiac failure with EF and SF cannot be possible. In this condition, we may need new evaluation test. Herein, we wanted to present a child with PNET of the chest wall suffered from antracycline toxicity and indicate that close monitoring of cardiac function could be important.

  17. Effectiveness of treatment with high-frequency chest wall oscillation in patients with bronchiectasis.

    PubMed

    Nicolini, Antonello; Cardini, Federica; Landucci, Norma; Lanata, Sergio; Ferrari-Bravo, Maura; Barlascini, Cornelius

    2013-04-04

    High-frequency airway clearance (HFCWC) assist devices generate either positive or negative trans-respiratory pressure excursions to produce high-frequency, small-volume oscillations in the airways.HFCWC can lead to changes in volume of 15-57 ml and in flow up to 1.6 L/s, which generate minimal coughing to mobilize secretions. The typical treatment lasts 20-30 minutes, and consists of short periods of compression at different frequencies, separated by coughing.The aim of this study was to find the more efficacious treatment in patients with bronchiectasis: traditional techniques of chest physiotherapy (CPT) versus high frequency oscillation of the chest wall in patients with bronchiectasis. 37 patients were enrolled. Seven of them were excluded. Computer randomization divided the patients into three groups: - 10 patients treated with HFCWO by using the Vest® Airway Clearance System; - 10 patients treated with traditional techniques of air way clearance (PEP bottle, PEP mask, ELTGOL, vibratory positive expiratory pressure); - 10 patients received medical therapy only (control group). To be eligible for enrollment, participants had to be between 18 and 85 years old and have a diagnosis of bronchiectasis, confirmed on high resolution computed tomography. lack of informed consent, signs of exacerbation, cystic fibrosis. Before the treatment, each patient had blood tests, sputum volume and cell count, pulmonary function tests and on the quality of life inventories (MMRC, CAT, BCSS). The results were processed through the covariance analysis, performed with the R-Project statistical program. It has been considered a positive result p <005. Both treatments (traditional CPT and HFCWO) showed a significant improvement in some biochemical and functional respiratory tests as well as in the quality of life compared to the control group. The use of HFCWO compared to CPT also produced a significant improvement in blood inflammation parameter C-RP (p ≤0.019), parameters of

  18. Effectiveness of treatment with high-frequency chest wall oscillation in patients with bronchiectasis

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background High-frequency airway clearance (HFCWC) assist devices generate either positive or negative trans-respiratory pressure excursions to produce high-frequency, small-volume oscillations in the airways. HFCWC can lead to changes in volume of 15–57 ml and in flow up to 1.6 L/s, which generate minimal coughing to mobilize secretions. The typical treatment lasts 20–30 minutes, and consists of short periods of compression at different frequencies, separated by coughing. The aim of this study was to find the more efficacious treatment in patients with bronchiectasis: traditional techniques of chest physiotherapy (CPT) versus high frequency oscillation of the chest wall in patients with bronchiectasis. Methods 37 patients were enrolled. Seven of them were excluded. Computer randomization divided the patients into three groups: – 10 patients treated with HFCWO by using the Vest® Airway Clearance System; – 10 patients treated with traditional techniques of air way clearance (PEP bottle, PEP mask, ELTGOL, vibratory positive expiratory pressure); – 10 patients received medical therapy only (control group). To be eligible for enrollment, participants had to be between 18 and 85 years old and have a diagnosis of bronchiectasis, confirmed on high resolution computed tomography. Exclusion criteria: lack of informed consent, signs of exacerbation, cystic fibrosis. Before the treatment, each patient had blood tests, sputum volume and cell count, pulmonary function tests and on the quality of life inventories (MMRC, CAT, BCSS). The results were processed through the covariance analysis, performed with the R-Project statistical program. It has been considered a positive result p <005. Results Both treatments (traditional CPT and HFCWO) showed a significant improvement in some biochemical and functional respiratory tests as well as in the quality of life compared to the control group. The use of HFCWO compared to CPT also produced a significant improvement in blood

  19. Third generation anthropomorphic physical phantom for mammography and DBT: incorporating voxelized 3D printing and uniform chest wall QC region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Christine; Solomon, Justin; Sturgeon, Gregory M.; Gehm, Michael E.; Catenacci, Matthew; Wiley, Benjamin J.; Samei, Ehsan; Lo, Joseph Y.

    2017-03-01

    Physical breast phantoms provide a standard method to test, optimize, and develop clinical mammography systems, including new digital breast tomosynthesis (DBT) systems. In previous work, we produced an anthropomorphic phantom based on 500x500x500 μm breast CT data using commercial 3D printing. We now introduce an improved phantom based on a new cohort of virtual models with 155x155x155 μm voxels and fabricated through voxelized 3D printing and dithering, which confer higher resolution and greater control over contrast. This new generation includes a uniform chest wall extension for evaluating conventional QC metrics. The uniform region contains a grayscale step wedge, chest wall coverage markers, fiducial markers, spheres, and metal ink stickers of line pairs and edges to assess contrast, resolution, artifact spread function, MTF, and other criteria. We also experimented with doping photopolymer material with calcium, iodine, and zinc to increase our current contrast. In particular, zinc was discovered to significantly increase attenuation beyond 100% breast density with a linear relationship between zinc concentration and attenuation or breast density. This linear relationship was retained when the zinc-doped material was applied in conjunction with 3D printing. As we move towards our long term goal of phantoms that are indistinguishable from patients, this new generation of anthropomorphic physical breast phantom validates our voxelized printing process, demonstrates the utility of a uniform QC region with features from 3D printing and metal ink stickers, and shows potential for improved contrast via doping.

  20. A study of the first heart sound spectra in normal anesthetized cats: possible origins and chest wall influences.

    PubMed

    Fazzalari, N L; Mazumdar, J; Ghista, D N; Allen, D G; de Bruin, H

    1984-01-01

    Heart sound recordings were taken from cats. The heart sounds were recorded directly from the chest wall and through an esophageal tube. The phono transducer and the esophageal tube were both placed over the base of the heart. Ultrasound M-mode, or motion-mode, recordings were taken to study the mitral valve dynamics. After analogue to digital conversion, electrocardiogram gated first heart sounds of each phono record were analyzed by the fast Fourier transform to obtain a frequency spectrum. Relative energies in 15 Hz bandwidths up to 150 Hz were correlated with the mitral valve closing velocity of the anterior mitral leaflet, obtained from the M-mode echocardiograms. The closing velocity correlated best with the energy in the 30-45 Hz bandwidth and 60-75 Hz bandwidth for the externally and internally monitored phonocardiogram respectively. The chest wall acted as a low pass filter, that is, the wall favoured the transmission of low frequencies and the energy transmitted decreased as wall thickness increased.

  1. Statistical methods for analysis of coordination of chest wall motion using optical reflectance imaging of multiple markers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kenyon, C. M.; Ghezzo, R. H.; Cala, S. J.; Ferrigno, Giancarlo; Pedotti, Antonio; Macklem, P. T.; Rochester, D. F.

    1994-07-01

    To analyze coordination of chest wall motion we have used principle component analysis (PCA) and multiple regression analysis (MRA) with respect to spirometry on the displacements of 93 optical reflective markers placed upon the chest wall (CW). Each marker is tracked at 10 Hz with an accuracy of 0.2 mm in each spatial dimension using the ELITE system (IEEE Trans. Biomed. Eng. 11:943-949, 1985). PCA enables the degree of linear coordination between all of the markers to be assessed using the eigenvectors and eigenvalues of the covariance of the matrix of marker displacements in each dimension against time. Thus the number of linear degrees of freedom (DOF) which contribute more than a particular amount to the total variance can be determined and analyzed. MRA with respect to spirometrically measured lung volume changes enables identification of the CW points whose movement correlates best with lung volume. We have used this analysis to compare a quiet breathing sequence with one where tidal volume was increased fourfold involuntarily and show that the number of DOF with eigenvalues accounting for >5% of the covariance increased from 2 to 3. Also the point whose movement correlated best with lung volume changed from halfway down the lower costal margin to a more lateral point at the level of the bottom of the sternum. This quantification of CW coordination may be useful in analysis and staging of many respiratory disorders and is applicable to any nonrigid body motion where points can be tracked.

  2. Use of the titanium vertical ribs osteosynthesis system for reconstruction of large posterolateral chest wall defect in lung cancer.

    PubMed

    Berthet, Jean-Philippe; D'Annoville, Thomas; Canaud, Ludovic; Marty-Ané, Charles-Henri

    2011-08-01

    We report a case of reconstruction of a large full-thickness posterolateral defect of the chest wall after resection of a stage III non-small cell lung carcinoma (NSCLC) using the combination of a vertical expandable prosthetic titanium device and a polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE) mesh. A 40-year-old female presented with a NSCLC classified as type IIIA and required both neoadjuvant radiotherapy and chemotherapy. An en bloc resection including the left upper lobe, posterolateral segments of five ribs (K3-K7) and vertebral bodies (T3-T6) was performed through a posterior J-shaped approach. A vertical rib osteosynthesis system was used to ensure thoracic wall stability and mechanical organ protection, prevent ventilatory impairment, avoid incarceration of the tip of the scapula, and maintain an acceptable cosmetic aspect. The device was locked onto the middle arch of the second and eighth ribs. We hung the PTFE mesh from the titanium bars with multiple non-absorbable sutures under maximal tension. Final pathological classification was T4N0M0 with an R0 final resection status. After an uneventful course, the patient was discharged on postoperative day 10. This first experience indicates that vertical rib osteosynthesis combined with a PTFE mesh can be used safely and easily in a one-stage procedure for major posterior chest wall defects.

  3. The influence of supine posture on chest wall volume changes is higher in obese than in normal weight children.

    PubMed

    Silva, Letícia; Barcelar, Jacqueline de Melo; Rattes, Catarina Souza; Sayão, Larissa Bouwman; Reinaux, Cyda Albuquerque; Campos, Shirley L; Brandão, Daniella Cunha; Fregonezi, Guilherme; Aliverti, Andrea; Dornelas de Andrade, Armèle

    2015-02-01

    The objective of this study was to analyze thoraco-abdominal kinematics in obese children in seated and supine positions during spontaneous quiet breathing. An observational study of pulmonary function and chest wall volume assessed by optoelectronic plethysmography was conducted on 35 children aged 8-12 years that were divided into 2 groups according to weight/height ratio percentiles: there were 18 obese children with percentiles greater than 95 and 17 normal weight children with percentiles of 5-85. Pulmonary function (forced expiratory volume in 1 s (FEV1); forced vital capacity (FVC); and FEV1/FVC ratio), ventilatory pattern, total and compartment chest wall volume variations, and thoraco-abdominal asynchronies were evaluated. Tidal volume was greater in seated position. Pulmonary and abdominal rib cage tidal volume and their percentage contribution to tidal volume were smaller in supine position in both obese and control children, while abdominal tidal volume and its percentage contribution was greater in the supine position only in obese children and not in controls. No statistically significant differences were found between obese and control children and between supine and seated positions regarding thoraco-abdominal asynchronies. We conclude that in obese children thoraco-abdominal kinematics is influenced by supine posture, with an increase of the abdominal and a decreased rib cage contribution to ventilation, suggesting that in this posture areas of hypoventilation can occur in the lung.

  4. Static conductivity imaging using variational gradient Bz algorithm in magnetic resonance electrical impedance tomography.

    PubMed

    Park, Chunjae; Park, Eun-Jae; Woo, Eung Je; Kwon, Ohin; Seo, Jin Keun

    2004-02-01

    A new image reconstruction algorithm is proposed to visualize static conductivity images of a subject in magnetic resonance electrical impedance tomography (MREIT). Injecting electrical current into the subject through surface electrodes, we can measure the induced internal magnetic flux density B = (Bx, By, Bz) using an MRI scanner. In this paper, we assume that only the z-component Bz is measurable due to a practical limitation of the measurement technique in MREIT. Under this circumstance, a constructive MREIT imaging technique called the harmonic Bz algorithm was recently developed to produce high-resolution conductivity images. The algorithm is based on the relation between inverted delta2Bz and the conductivity requiring the computation of inverted delta2Bz. Since twice differentiations of noisy Bz data tend to amplify the noise, the performance of the harmonic Bz algorithm is deteriorated when the signal-to-noise ratio in measured Bz data is not high enough. Therefore, it is highly desirable to develop a new algorithm reducing the number of differentiations. In this work, we propose the variational gradient Bz algorithm where Bz is differentiated only once. Numerical simulations with added random noise confirmed its ability to reconstruct static conductivity images in MREIT. We also found that it outperforms the harmonic Bz algorithm in terms of noise tolerance. From a careful analysis of the performance of the variational gradient Bz algorithm, we suggest several methods to further improve the image quality including a better choice of basis functions, regularization technique and multilevel approach. The proposed variational framework utilizing only Bz will lead to different versions of improved algorithms.

  5. Uncertainty induced by chest wall thickness assessment methods on lung activity estimation for plutonium and americium: a large population-based study.

    PubMed

    Broggio, D; Lechaftois, X; Franck, D

    2015-03-01

    In vivo lung counting aims at assessing the retained activity in the lungs. The calibration factor relating the measured counts to the worker's specific retained lung activity can be obtained by several means and strongly depends on the chest wall thickness. Here we compare, for 374 male nuclear workers, the activity assessed with a reference protocol, where the material equivalent chest wall thickness is known from ultrasound measurements, with two other protocols. The counting system is an array of four germanium detectors.It is found that non site-specific equations for the assessment of the chest wall thickness induce large biases in the assessment of activity. For plutonium isotopes or (241)Am the proportion of workers for whom the retained activity is within ± 10% of the reference one is smaller than 10%.The use of site-specific equations raises this proportion to 20% and 58% for plutonium and (241)Am, respectively.Finally, for the studied population, when site-specific equations are used for the chest wall thickness, the standard uncertainties for the lung activity are 42% and 12.5%, for plutonium and (241)Am, respectively. Due to the relatively large size of the studied population, these values are a relatively robust estimate of the uncertainties due to the assessment of the chest wall thickness for the current practice at this site.

  6. A new algorithm for impedance imaging of two-phase flows

    SciTech Connect

    Lemonnier, H.; Peytraud, J.F.

    1995-12-31

    This paper describes an original reconstruction procedure for impedance imaging of two-phase flows. It is a two-dimensional algorithm based on the calculation of the electrical potential distribution by the Boundary Element Method (BEM). The use of the BEM to solve the direct problem yields an integral equation to be solved on the domain boundary only. Compared to the Finite Element approach (FEM), it corresponds to the explicit elimination of internal domains (inclusions) and internal elements of the domain. It is therefore much faster for a given spatial resolution. Moreover, the overall reconstruction consists in solving an inverse problem iteratively which requires the knowledge of the sensitivity of the electrical response of the domain to its variations. It is shown that the BEM provides these sensitivities with very little extra effort when the direct problem is already solved. The very good capabilities of the algorithm are shown by various examples.

  7. A partially reflecting random walk on spheres algorithm for electrical impedance tomography

    SciTech Connect

    Maire, Sylvain; Simon, Martin

    2015-12-15

    In this work, we develop a probabilistic estimator for the voltage-to-current map arising in electrical impedance tomography. This novel so-called partially reflecting random walk on spheres estimator enables Monte Carlo methods to compute the voltage-to-current map in an embarrassingly parallel manner, which is an important issue with regard to the corresponding inverse problem. Our method uses the well-known random walk on spheres algorithm inside subdomains where the diffusion coefficient is constant and employs replacement techniques motivated by finite difference discretization to deal with both mixed boundary conditions and interface transmission conditions. We analyze the global bias and the variance of the new estimator both theoretically and experimentally. Subsequently, the variance of the new estimator is considerably reduced via a novel control variate conditional sampling technique which yields a highly efficient hybrid forward solver coupling probabilistic and deterministic algorithms.

  8. Effects of positive expiratory pressure on chest wall volumes in subjects with stroke compared to healthy controls: a case-control study.

    PubMed

    Cabral, Elis E A; Resqueti, Vanessa R; Lima, Illia N D F; Gualdi, Lucien P; Aliverti, Andrea; Fregonezi, Guilherme A F

    2017-07-08

    Alterations in respiratory system kinematics in stroke lead to restrictive pattern associated with decreased lung volumes. Chest physical therapy, such as positive expiratory pressure, may be useful in the treatment of these patients; however, the optimum intensity to promote volume and motion changes of the chest wall remains unclear. To assess the effect of different intensities of positive expiratory pressure on chest wall kinematics in subjects with stroke compared to healthy controls. 16 subjects with chronic stroke and 16 healthy controls matched for age, gender, and body mass index were recruited. Chest wall volumes were assessed using optoelectronic plethysmography during quiet breathing, 5 minutes, and recovery. Three different intensities of positive expiratory pressure (10, 15, and 20cmH2O) were administered in a random order with a 30 minutes rest interval between intensities. During positive expiratory pressure, tidal chest wall expansion increased in both groups compared to quiet breathing; however, this increase was not significant in the subjects with stroke (0.41 vs. 1.32L, 0.56 vs. 1.54L, 0.52 vs. 1.8L, at 10, 15, 20cmH2O positive expiratory pressure, for stroke and control groups; p<0.001). End-expiratory chest wall volume decreased in controls, mainly due to the abdomen, and increased in the stroke group, mainly due the pulmonary rib cage. Positive expiratory pressure administration facilitates acute lung expansion of the chest wall and its compartments in restricted subjects with stroke. Positive expiratory pressure intensities above 10cmH2O should be used with caution as the increase in end-expiratory volume led to hyperinflation in subjects with stroke. Copyright © 2017 Associação Brasileira de Pesquisa e Pós-Graduação em Fisioterapia. Publicado por Elsevier Editora Ltda. All rights reserved.

  9. Effect of the chest wall on the measurement of hemoglobin concentrations by near-infrared time-resolved spectroscopy in normal breast and cancer.

    PubMed

    Yoshizawa, Nobuko; Ueda, Yukio; Nasu, Hatsuko; Ogura, Hiroyuki; Ohmae, Etsuko; Yoshimoto, Kenji; Takehara, Yasuo; Yamashita, Yutaka; Sakahara, Harumi

    2016-11-01

    Optical imaging and spectroscopy using near-infrared light have great potential in the assessment of tumor vasculature. We previously measured hemoglobin concentrations in breast cancer using a near-infrared time-resolved spectroscopy system. The purpose of the present study was to evaluate the effect of the chest wall on the measurement of hemoglobin concentrations in normal breast tissue and cancer. We measured total hemoglobin (tHb) concentration in both cancer and contralateral normal breast using a near-infrared time-resolved spectroscopy system in 24 female patients with breast cancer. Patients were divided into two groups based on menopausal state. The skin-to-chest wall distance was determined using ultrasound images obtained with an ultrasound probe attached to the spectroscopy probe. The apparent tHb concentration of normal breast increased when the skin-to-chest wall distance was less than 20 mm. The tHb concentration in pre-menopausal patients was higher than that in post-menopausal patients. Although the concentration of tHb in cancer tissue was statistically higher than that in normal breast, the contralateral normal breast showed higher tHb concentration than cancer in 9 of 46 datasets. When the curves of tHb concentrations as a function of the skin-to-chest wall distance in normal breast were applied for pre- and post-menopausal patients separately, all the cancer lesions plotted above the curves. The skin-to-chest wall distance affected the measurement of tHb concentration of breast tissue by near-infrared time-resolved spectroscopy. The tHb concentration of breast cancer tissue was more precisely evaluated by considering the skin-to-chest wall distance.

  10. [Wide resection of chest wall for intramuscular lipoma in serratus anterior muscle reconstructed by autologous tissue;report of a case].

    PubMed

    Mizuno, Kiyomichi; Urabe, Norikazu; Nakatsuka, Kazuhiko; Ishikawa, Kayoko; Eguchi, Masanobu

    2015-02-01

    A 60-years-old man with a right lateral chest wall mass visited our hospital. There was a mass of 50×45 mm on the 5th rib. The mild atypical cells were detected by the percutaneous needle biopsy, and the tumor was resected with the chest wall of which detect was reconstructed with fascia lata and latissimus dorsi muscle cutaneous flap. Pathological diagnosis was lipoma in the serratus anterior muscle. The postoperative course was uneventful without paradoxical respiration and surgical site infection. Since intramuscular lipoma is very rare and is reported to have a risk of recurrence, careful observation is necessary.

  11. Quantitative evaluation of correlation of dose and FDG-PET uptake value with clinical chest wall complications in patients with lung cancer treated with stereotactic body radiation therapy.

    PubMed

    Algan, O; Confer, M; Algan, S; Matthiesen, C; Herman, T; Ahmad, S; Ali, I

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate quantitatively the dosimetric factors that increase the risk of clinical complications of rib fractures or chest wall pain after stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) to the lung. The correlations of clinical complications with standard-uptake values (SUV) and FDG-PET activity distributions from post-treatment PET-imaging were studied. Mean and maximum doses from treatment plans, FDG-PET activity values on post-SBRT PET scans and the presence of clinical complications were determined in fifteen patients undergoing 16 SBRT treatments for lung cancer. SBRT treatments were delivered in 3 to 5 fractions using 5 to 7 fields to prescription doses in the range from 39.0 to 60.0 Gy. The dose and FDG-PET activity values were extracted from regions of interest in the chest wall that matched anatomically. Quantitative evaluation of the correlation between dose deposition and FDG-PET activity was performed by calculating the Pearson correlation coefficient using pixel-by-pixel analysis of dose and FDG-PET activity maps in selected regions of interest associated with clinical complications. Overall, three of fifteen patients developed rib fractures with chest wall pain, and two patients developed pain symptoms without fracture. The mean dose to the rib cage in patients with fractures was 37.53 Gy compared to 33.35 Gy in patients without fractures. Increased chest wall activity as determined by FDG-uptake was noted in patients who developed rib fractures. Enhanced activity from PET-images correlated strongly with high doses deposited to the chest wall which could be predicted by a linear relationship. The local enhanced activity was associated with the development of clinical complications such as chest wall inflammation and rib fracture. This study demonstrates that rib fractures and chest wall pain can occur after SBRT treatments to the lung and is associated with increased activity on subsequent PET scans. The FDG-PET activity

  12. Tissue heterogeneity in the anterior chest wall and its influence on radiation therapy of the internal mammary lymph nodes.

    PubMed

    Lindskoug, B; Hultborn, A

    1976-04-01

    The density (g cm-3) and electron density (cm-3) of material from the anterior chest wall was determined. On the average, the difference in density between rib bone and intercostal soft tissue amounted to 17 per cent, while the difference in electron density was 7 per cent. The attenuation of high-energy electrons in specimens of rib bone, costal cartilage and sternum was determined by an experimental technique, using dosimeters of TLD material. The results of determinations of attenuation of 10 and 13 MeV electrons in fresh specimens are presented. It is concluded that electron radiation in the energy range of 10 to 13 MeV can be utilized for irradiation of lymph glands along the internal thoracic vessels without risk of underdosage.

  13. Intrathoracic tumor of the chest wall: A case of Castleman's disease mimicking myositis of the lower extremities.

    PubMed

    Tampakis, Athanasios; Tampaki, Ekaterini Christina; Daikeler, Thomas; Lardinois, Didier

    2017-01-10

    Castleman's disease refers to a group of uncommon lymphoproliferative disorders which exhibit common lymph-node histological features. A 72-year-old male patient presented with signs of lower limb myositis. Detailed work-up focused initially on evaluating hematological malignancies, the presence of a solid tumor, autoimmune diseases and degenerative disorders of the peripheral nerves. Finally, a PET-CT scan was performed to exclude paraneoplastic manifestations of a primary tumor, revealing  however a tumor of the thoracic wall. The definite histological diagnosis confirmed the presence of unicentric Castleman's disease of the chest wall. The manifestations of the present case suggest that a systemic inflammation might occur in the unicentric form of the disease possibly due to cytokine hypersecretion. The unicentric manifestation of the disease should be well distinguished from the multicentric appearance. Unicentric disease is a surgical condition and warrants a follow-up based on the systemic inflammation that might occur.

  14. Dynamics of chest wall volume regulation during constant work rate exercise in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease

    PubMed Central

    Takara, L.S.; Cunha, T.M.; Barbosa, P.; Rodrigues, M.K.; Oliveira, M.F.; Nery, L.E.; Neder, J.A.

    2012-01-01

    This study evaluated the dynamic behavior of total and compartmental chest wall volumes [(VCW) = rib cage (VRC) + abdomen (VAB)] as measured breath-by-breath by optoelectronic plethysmography during constant-load exercise in patients with stable chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. Thirty males (GOLD stages II-III) underwent a cardiopulmonary exercise test to the limit of tolerance (Tlim) at 75% of peak work rate on an electronically braked cycle ergometer. Exercise-induced dynamic hyperinflation was considered to be present when end-expiratory (EE) VCW increased in relation to resting values. There was a noticeable heterogeneity in the patterns of VCW regulation as EEVCW increased non-linearly in 17/30 “hyperinflators” and decreased in 13/30 “non-hyperinflators” (P < 0.05). EEVAB decreased slightly in 8 of the “hyperinflators”, thereby reducing and slowing the rate of increase in end-inspiratory (EI) VCW (P < 0.05). In contrast, decreases in EEVCW in the “non-hyperinflators” were due to the combination of stable EEVRC with marked reductions in EEVAB. These patients showed lower EIVCW and end-exercise dyspnea scores but longer Tlim than their counterparts (P < 0.05). Dyspnea increased and Tlim decreased non-linearly with a faster rate of increase in EIVCW regardless of the presence or absence of dynamic hyperinflation (P < 0.001). However, no significant between-group differences were observed in metabolic, pulmonary gas exchange and cardiovascular responses to exercise. Chest wall volumes are continuously regulated during exercise in order to postpone (or even avoid) their migration to higher operating volumes in patients with COPD, a dynamic process that is strongly dependent on the behavior of the abdominal compartment. PMID:23250012

  15. Different approaches to the completion of the back-projection algorithm in image monitoring by electrical impedance tomography.

    PubMed

    Wanjun, Shuai; Xiuzhen, Dong; Feng, Fu; Fusheng, You; Xiaodong, Liu; Canhua, Xu

    2005-01-01

    It is found that Electrical Impedance Tomography(EIT) is promising in its application to the clinical image monitoring and that the Back-Projection algorithm of EIT can meet the preliminary requirements of the real-time monitoring through our work. In order to improve the computed speed and the imaged resolution, different ways of completing the algorithm were tried in this paper. Moreover, it is shown that the impedance change due to physiological saline with the concentration of not more than 50 milliliter 0.9% can be detected and imaged by our system. The above result is helpful for our further work of image monitoring by EIT.

  16. Assessment of Optimized Electrode Configuration for Electrical Impedance Myography Using Genetic Algorithm via Finite Element Model

    PubMed Central

    Baidya, Somen

    2016-01-01

    Electrical Impedance Myography (EIM) is a noninvasive neurophysiologic technique to diagnose muscle health. Besides muscle properties, the EIM measurements vary significantly with the change of some other anatomic and nonanatomic factors such as skin fat thickness, shape and thickness of muscle, and electrode size and spacing due to its noninvasive nature of measurement. In this study, genetic algorithm was applied along with finite element model of EIM as an optimization tool in order to figure out an optimized EIM electrode setup, which is less affected by these factors, specifically muscle thickness variation, but does not compromise EIM's ability to detect muscle diseases. The results obtained suggest that a particular arrangement of electrodes and minimization of electrode surface area to its practical limit can overcome the effect of undesired factors on EIM parameters to a larger extent. PMID:27843937

  17. Magnetic Resonance Imaging Appearances in the Postoperative Breast: The Clinical Target Volume-Tumor and Its Relationship to the Chest Wall

    SciTech Connect

    Whipp, Elisabeth C. Halliwell, Michael

    2008-09-01

    Purpose: To describe and measure the postoperative complexes and their relationship to the chest wall in 100 randomly chosen MRI breast scans, to attempt a better understanding of the changes taking place in the postoperative breast. Methods and Materials: Appearances and measurements of MRI postoperative cavities were analyzed in a cohort of 100 randomly selected patients who underwent a single open MRI scan in the conventional breast radiotherapy treatment position before routine two-dimensional simulation. Results: Magnetic resonance imaging appearances of postoperative cavities seem to differ qualitatively from descriptions of CT and ultrasound cavities in the literature. Rather than being principally homogeneous, heterogeneous cavities were seen in 85%, irregular in 51%. The size of cavity was inversely related to the time elapsed since surgery. Cavities directly touched the chest wall in 53% of cases; 89% lay within 10 mm of the chest wall. Regular, annular concentric rings of differing signal were seen in 32% of cases; such appearances have not been previously described. These patterns suggest that seromas may not shrink entirely as a result of simple serous fluid absorption; instead, new tissue may be being laid down. Because large, regular spheroidal/ellipsoidal cavities with crisp margins may be seromas under pressure, greater target shifts during radiation may need to be anticipated in such cases. Conclusions: Postsurgical cavities in the conserved breast on MRI are commonly heterogeneous, irregular, and lie close to the chest wall. Magnetic resonance imaging studies may help in better understanding the natural history of postoperative cavities.

  18. Management of a chest-wall soft-tissue tumor caused by an infection with the larval tapeworm pathogen Taenia crassiceps.

    PubMed

    Roesel, Christian; Welter, Stefan; Stamatis, Georgios; Theegarten, Dirk; Tappe, Dennis

    2014-09-01

    A chest-wall lesion of an immunocompetent patient was initially suspicious for a malignant tumor. Histopathological and polymerase chain reaction examinations revealed an infection with the larval stage of the tapeworm Taenia crassiceps. Curative resection of the tumorous lesion was performed. Treatment options for immunocompromised patients and patients without known immune defect are discussed, because most of the infections occur in immunocompromised individuals.

  19. Three-dimensional surgical simulation-guided navigation in thoracic surgery: a new approach to improve results in chest wall resection and reconstruction for malignant diseases

    PubMed Central

    Stella, Franco; Dolci, Giampiero; Dell’Amore, Andrea; Badiali, Giovanni; De Matteis, Massimo; Asadi, Nizar; Marchetti, Claudio; Bini, Alessandro

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVES Oncological surgery of the chest wall should be performed to achieve free margins of at least 2 cm for metastasis or 4 cm for primary tumours. When the lesion is not visible or palpable, difficulty in identification may lead to a larger incision and a resection wider than is necessary. METHODS We report three cases of non-palpable metastatic chest wall lesions in which the preoperative surgical planning and the intraoperative identification of the tumour, and thus the subsequent chest wall reconstruction, was supported using computer-based surgery. RESULTS The application of high-resolution three-dimensional imaging technology and navigational systems is used in preoperative surgical planning to provide virtual simulations of a patient's skeletal changes and new soft tissue profile. Intraoperatively, a mobile navigation probe was used to identify the lesion, matching surgical landmarks and the preoperative computed tomography imaging, achieving the radical resection of the tumour with correct but not excessive surgical margins. Two patients underwent partial sternectomy followed by sternal allograft reconstruction. The third patient underwent chest wall resection followed by reconstruction using titanium bars and vicryl mesh. In all cases, the postoperative period was uneventful. After a follow-up period of 13.9 and 8 months, respectively, all patients are disease free, without complications. CONCLUSIONS Application of navigation technology in thoracic surgery should be encouraged because it is easy to use and requires a limited learning curve. PMID:24144806

  20. A Case of “en bloc” Excision of a Chest Wall Leiomyosarcoma and Closure of the Defect with Non-Cross-Linked Collagen Matrix (Egis®)

    PubMed Central

    Rastrelli, Marco; Tropea, Saveria; Spina, Romina; Costa, Alessandra; Stramare, Roberto; Mocellin, Simone; Bonavina, Maria Giuseppina; Rossi, Carlo Riccardo

    2016-01-01

    Sarcomas arising from the chest wall account for less than 20% of all soft tissue sarcomas, and at this site, primitive tumors are the most frequent to occur. Leiomyosarcoma is a malignant smooth muscle tumor and the best outcomes are achieved with wide surgical excision. Although advancements have been made in treatment protocols, leiomyosarcoma remains one of the more difficult soft tissue sarcoma to treat. Currently, general local control is obtained with surgical treatment with wide negative margins. We describe the case of a 50-year-old man who underwent a chest wall resection involving a wide portion of the pectoralis major and minor muscle, the serratus and part of the second, third and fourth ribs of the left side. The full-thickness chest wall defect of 10 × 8 cm was closed using a non-cross-linked acellular dermal matrix (Egis®) placed in two layers, beneath the rib plane and over it. A successful repair was achieved with no incisional herniation and with complete tissue regeneration, allowing natural respiratory movements. No complications were observed in the postoperative course. Biological non-cross-linked matrix, derived from porcine dermis, behaves like a scaffold supporting tissue regeneration; it can be successfully used as an alternative to synthetic mesh for chest wall reconstruction. PMID:27920698

  1. A case report on a full-thickness chest wall reconstruction with polypropylene mesh and stainless steel mesh concurrently using a transverse rectus abdominis myocutaneous flap.

    PubMed

    Yoshino, Naoyuki; Yamauchi, Shigeo; Akimoto, Masataka; Hisayoshi, Takao; Koizumi, Kiyoshi; Shimizu, Kazuo

    2006-12-01

    A full-thickness chest wall resection requires subsequent chest wall reconstruction. A chest wall resection and reconstruction was performed using a transverse rectus abdominis myocutaneous (TRAM) flap, together with polypropylene mesh (Marlex mesh) and stainless steel mesh (SSM). A 71-year-old man was diagnosed as having recurrent lung cancer in the chest wall, and underwent surgical resection. Marlex mesh was sutured to the posterior wall of the surgical defect. A portion of the SSM was adjusted to the size of the defect and cut out. Its edges were folded to make the portion into a plate. This SSM plate was placed anteriorly to the Marlex mesh and sutured to the ribs. The Marlex mesh was folded back on the SSM plate by 2 cm and fixed. After the above procedures, a left-sided TRAM flap was raised through a subcutaneous tunnel up to the defect and sutured to the region. The patient was discharged from hospital 19 days postoperatively. The wound was fine and he had no flail chest or dyspnea, and carcinomatous pain resolved.

  2. Effects of non-invasive ventilation and posture on chest wall volumes and motion in patients with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis: a case series

    PubMed Central

    Magalhães, Cristiana M.; Fregonezi, Guilherme A.; Vidigal-Lopes, Mauro; Vieira, Bruna S. P. P.; Vieira, Danielle S. R.; Parreira, Verônica F.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Background The effects of non-invasive ventilation (NIV) on the breathing pattern and thoracoabdominal motion of patients with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) are unknown. Objectives 1) To analyze the influence of NIV on chest wall volumes and motion assessed by optoelectronic plethysmography in ALS patients and 2) to compare these parameters in the supine and sitting positions to those of healthy individuals (without NIV). Method Nine ALS patients were evaluated in the supine position using NIV. In addition, the ALS patients and nine healthy individuals were evaluated in both sitting and supine positions. Statistical analysis was performed using the paired Student t-test or Wilcoxon test and the Student t-test for independent samples or Mann-Whitney U test. Results Chest wall volume increased significantly with NIV, mean volume=0.43 (SD=0.16)L versus 0.57 (SD=0.19)L (p=0.04). No significant changes were observed for the pulmonary rib cage, abdominal rib cage, or abdominal contribution. The index of the shortening velocity of the diaphragmatic muscle, mean=0.15 (SD=0.05)L/s versus 0.21 (SD=0.05)L/s (p<0.01), and abdominal muscles, mean=0.09 (SD=0.02)L/s versus 0.14 (SD=0.06)L/s (p<0.01), increased during NIV. Comparisons between the supine and sitting positions showed similar changes in chest wall motion in both groups. However, the ALS patients presented a significantly lower contribution of the abdomen in the supine position compared with the controls, mean=56 (SD=13) versus 69 (SD=10) (p=0.02). Conclusions NIV improved chest wall volumes without changing the contribution of the chest wall compartment in ALS patients. In the supine position, ALS patients had a lower contribution of the abdomen, which may indicate early diaphragmatic dysfunction. PMID:27556390

  3. Targeted photo-chemo therapy of malignancy on the chest wall while cardiopulmonary avoidance based on Fe3O4@ZnO nanocomposites

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Haijun; Guo, Liting; Ding, Shuang; Xiong, Jian; Chen, Baoan

    2016-01-01

    Treatment of malignancies on the chest wall, like chest wall recurrence of tumor, advanced cutaneous neoplasm and lymphoma, is still a challenge due to the involvement of the critical structures of heart and lung by the conventional strategy. The aim of the current study was to investigate targeted photo-chemo therapy mediated by Fe3O4@ZnO nanocomposites for malignancy on the chest wall while cardiopulmonary avoidance. Fe3O4@ZnO/Dox nanocomposites, the synthesis of the core-shell Fe3O4@ZnO nanocomposites followed by loading doxorubicin (Dox), were prepared to act as multifunctional drug delivery system (DDS). The synergistic anticancer effects on tumor on the chest wall and protection performance of heart and lung were evaluated in vitro and in vivo using cell viability assay, apoptosis detection, histopathologic examination, and serum biochemistry tests. Our observations demonstrated that Fe3O4@ZnO/Dox nanocomposites, could play the role of magnetic drug targeting to deliver Dox into tumor tissues and cells to enhance its chemotherapeutic efficiency. Besides, with ultraviolet (UV) illumination, Fe3O4@ZnO showed the excellent property of photosensitizer, further attacking the cancer cells by photodynamic therapy (PDT). Thus, apoptosis was synergistically induced by the photo-chemo therapy, resulting in a distinct improvement in anticancer activity. Since UV has a limited penetration distance in tissue, causing PDT to fail in the critical structures of heart and lung, cardiopulmonary hurt could be avoided during the treatment. Therefore, targeted photo-chemo therapy mediated by Fe3O4@ZnO nanocomposites may have promise as a potent treatment option for superficial malignancies on the chest wall while cardiopulmonary avoidance. PMID:27153557

  4. Effects of non-invasive ventilation and posture on chest wall volumes and motion in patients with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis: a case series.

    PubMed

    Magalhães, Cristiana M; Fregonezi, Guilherme A; Vidigal-Lopes, Mauro; Vieira, Bruna S P P; Vieira, Danielle S R; Parreira, Verônica F

    2016-01-01

    The effects of non-invasive ventilation (NIV) on the breathing pattern and thoracoabdominal motion of patients with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) are unknown. 1) To analyze the influence of NIV on chest wall volumes and motion assessed by optoelectronic plethysmography in ALS patients and 2) to compare these parameters in the supine and sitting positions to those of healthy individuals (without NIV). Nine ALS patients were evaluated in the supine position using NIV. In addition, the ALS patients and nine healthy individuals were evaluated in both sitting and supine positions. Statistical analysis was performed using the paired Student t-test or Wilcoxon test and the Student t-test for independent samples or Mann-Whitney U test. Chest wall volume increased significantly with NIV, mean volume=0.43 (SD=0.16)L versus 0.57 (SD=0.19)L (p=0.04). No significant changes were observed for the pulmonary rib cage, abdominal rib cage, or abdominal contribution. The index of the shortening velocity of the diaphragmatic muscle, mean=0.15 (SD=0.05)L/s versus 0.21 (SD=0.05)L/s (p<0.01), and abdominal muscles, mean=0.09 (SD=0.02)L/s versus 0.14 (SD=0.06)L/s (p<0.01), increased during NIV. Comparisons between the supine and sitting positions showed similar changes in chest wall motion in both groups. However, the ALS patients presented a significantly lower contribution of the abdomen in the supine position compared with the controls, mean=56 (SD=13) versus 69 (SD=10) (p=0.02). NIV improved chest wall volumes without changing the contribution of the chest wall compartment in ALS patients. In the supine position, ALS patients had a lower contribution of the abdomen, which may indicate early diaphragmatic dysfunction.

  5. Effects of non-invasive ventilation and posture on chest wall volumes and motion in patients with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis: a case series.

    PubMed

    Magalhães, Cristiana M; Fregonezi, Guilherme A; Vidigal-Lopes, Mauro; Vieira, Bruna S P P; Vieira, Danielle S R; Parreira, Verônica F

    2016-06-16

    The effects of non-invasive ventilation (NIV) on the breathing pattern and thoracoabdominal motion of patients with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) are unknown. 1) To analyze the influence of NIV on chest wall volumes and motion assessed by optoelectronic plethysmography in ALS patients and 2) to compare these parameters in the supine and sitting positions to those of healthy individuals (without NIV). Nine ALS patients were evaluated in the supine position using NIV. In addition, the ALS patients and nine healthy individuals were evaluated in both sitting and supine positions. Statistical analysis was performed using the paired Student t-test or Wilcoxon test and the Student t-test for independent samples or Mann-Whitney U test. Chest wall volume increased significantly with NIV, mean volume=0.43 (SD=0.16)L versus 0.57 (SD=0.19)L (p=0.04). No significant changes were observed for the pulmonary rib cage, abdominal rib cage, or abdominal contribution. The index of the shortening velocity of the diaphragmatic muscle, mean=0.15 (SD=0.05)L/s versus 0.21 (SD=0.05)L/s (p<0.01), and abdominal muscles, mean=0.09 (SD=0.02)L/s versus 0.14 (SD=0.06)L/s (p<0.01), increased during NIV. Comparisons between the supine and sitting positions showed similar changes in chest wall motion in both groups. However, the ALS patients presented a significantly lower contribution of the abdomen in the supine position compared with the controls, mean=56 (SD=13) versus 69 (SD=10) (p=0.02). NIV improved chest wall volumes without changing the contribution of the chest wall compartment in ALS patients. In the supine position, ALS patients had a lower contribution of the abdomen, which may indicate early diaphragmatic dysfunction.

  6. Ewing sarcoma/primitive neuroectodermal tumor of the chest wall: impact of initial versus delayed resection on tumor margins, survival, and use of radiation therapy.

    PubMed

    Shamberger, Robert C; LaQuaglia, Michael P; Gebhardt, Mark C; Neff, James R; Tarbell, Nancy J; Marcus, Karen C; Sailer, Scott L; Womer, Richard B; Miser, James S; Dickman, Paul S; Perlman, Elizabeth J; Devidas, Meenakshi; Linda, Stephen B; Krailo, Mark D; Grier, Holcombe E; Granowetter, Linda

    2003-10-01

    To establish outcome and optimal timing of local control for patients with nonmetastatic Ewing sarcoma/primitive neuroectodermal tumor (ES/PNET) of the chest wall. Patients < or =30 years of age with ES/PNET of the chest wall were entered in 2 consecutive protocols. Therapy included multiagent chemotherapy; local control was achieved by resection, radiotherapy, or both. We compared completeness of resection and disease-free survival in patients undergoing initial surgical resection versus those treated with neoadjuvant chemotherapy followed by resection, radiotherapy, or both. Patients with a positive surgical margin received radiotherapy. Ninety-eight (11.3%) of 869 patients had primary tumors of the chest wall. Median follow-up was 3.47 years and 5-year event-free survival was 56% for the chest wall lesions. Ten of 20 (50%) initial resections resulted in negative margins compared with 41 of 53 (77%) negative margins with delayed resections after chemotherapy (P = 0.043). Event-free survival did not differ by timing of surgery (P = 0.69) or type of local control (P = 0.17). Initial chemotherapy decreased the percentage of patients needing radiation therapy. Seventeen of 24 patients (70.8%) with initial surgery received radiotherapy compared with 34 of 71 patients (47.9%) who started with chemotherapy (P = 0.061). If a delayed operation was performed, excluding those patients who received only radiotherapy for local control, only 25 of 62 patients needed radiotherapy (40.3%; P = 0.016). The likelihood of complete tumor resection with a negative microscopic margin and consequent avoidance of external beam radiation and its potential complications is increased with neoadjuvant chemotherapy and delayed resection of chest wall ES/PNET.

  7. Protocol for PIT: a phase III trial of prophylactic irradiation of tracts in patients with malignant pleural mesothelioma following invasive chest wall intervention

    PubMed Central

    Bayman, N; Ardron, D; Ashcroft, L; Baldwin, D R; Booton, R; Darlison, L; Edwards, J G; Lang-Lazdunski, L; Lester, J F; Peake, M; Rintoul, R C; Snee, M; Taylor, P; Lunt, C

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Histological diagnosis of malignant mesothelioma requires an invasive procedure such as CT-guided needle biopsy, thoracoscopy, video-assisted thorascopic surgery (VATs) or thoracotomy. These invasive procedures encourage tumour cell seeding at the intervention site and patients can develop tumour nodules within the chest wall. In an effort to prevent nodules developing, it has been widespread practice across Europe to irradiate intervention sites postprocedure—a practice known as prophylactic irradiation of tracts (PIT). To date there has not been a suitably powered randomised trial to determine whether PIT is effective at reducing the risk of chest wall nodule development. Methods and analysis In this multicentre phase III randomised controlled superiority trial, 374 patients who can receive radiotherapy within 42 days of a chest wall intervention will be randomised to receive PIT or no PIT. Patients will be randomised on a 1:1 basis. Radiotherapy in the PIT arm will be 21 Gy in three fractions. Subsequent chemotherapy is given at the clinicians’ discretion. A reduction in the incidence of chest wall nodules from 15% to 5% in favour of radiotherapy 6 months after randomisation would be clinically significant. All patients will be followed up for up to 2 years with monthly telephone contact and at least four outpatient visits in the first year. Ethics and dissemination PIT was approved by NRES Committee North West—Greater Manchester West (REC reference 12/NW/0249) and recruitment is currently on-going, the last patient is expected to be randomised by the end of 2015. The analysis of the primary end point, incidence of chest wall nodules 6 months after randomisation, is expected to be published in 2016 in a peer reviewed journal and results will also be presented at scientific meetings and summary results published online. A follow-up analysis is expected to be published in 2018. Trial registration number ISRCTN04240319; NCT01604005; Pre

  8. Algorithm for calculating synthetic seismograms in a layered half-space with application of matrix impedance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pavlov, V. M.

    2013-01-01

    A new algorithm is proposed for calculating the complete synthetic seismograms from a point source in the form of the sum of a single force and a dipole with an arbitrary seismic moment tensor in a plane layered medium composed of homogenous elastic isotropic layers. Following the idea of (Alekseev and Mikhailenko, 1978), an artificial cylindrical boundary is introduced, on which the boundary conditions are specified. For this modified problem, the exact solution (in terms of the displacements and stresses on the horizontal plane areal element) in the frequency domain is derived and substantiated. The unknown depth-dependent coefficients form the motion-stress vector, whose components satisfy the known system of ordinary differential equations. This system is solved by the method that involves the matrix impedance and propagator for the vector of motion, as previously suggested by the author in (Pavlov, 2009). In relation to the initial problem, the reflections from the artificial boundary are noise, which, to a certain degree, can be suppressed by selecting a long enough distance to this boundary and owing to the presence of a purely imaginary addition to the frequency. The algorithm is not constrained by the thickness of the layers, is applicable for any frequency range, and is suitable for computing the static offset.

  9. Conductivity and current density image reconstruction using harmonic Bz algorithm in magnetic resonance electrical impedance tomography.

    PubMed

    Oh, Suk Hoon; Lee, Byung Il; Woo, Eung Je; Lee, Soo Yeol; Cho, Min Hyoung; Kwon, Ohin; Seo, Jin Keun

    2003-10-07

    Magnetic resonance electrical impedance tomography (MREIT) is to provide cross-sectional images of the conductivity distribution sigma of a subject. While injecting current into the subject, we measure one component Bz of the induced magnetic flux density B = (Bx, By, Bz) using an MRI scanner. Based on the relation between (inverted delta)2 Bz and inverted delta sigma, the harmonic Bz algorithm reconstructs an image of sigma using the measured Bz data from multiple imaging slices. After we obtain sigma, we can reconstruct images of current density distributions for any given current injection method. Following the description of the harmonic Bz algorithm, this paper presents reconstructed conductivity and current density images from computer simulations and phantom experiments using four recessed electrodes injecting six different currents of 26 mA. For experimental results, we used a three-dimensional saline phantom with two polyacrylamide objects inside. We used our 0.3 T (tesla) experimental MRI scanner to measure the induced Bz. Using the harmonic Bz algorithm, we could reconstruct conductivity and current density images with 82 x 82 pixels. The pixel size was 0.6 x 0.6 mm2. The relative L2 errors of the reconstructed images were between 13.8 and 21.5% when the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) of the corresponding MR magnitude images was about 30. The results suggest that in vitro and in vivo experimental studies with animal subjects are feasible. Further studies are requested to reduce the amount of injection current down to less than 1 mA for human subjects.

  10. Exertional dyspnea associated with chest wall strapping is reduced when external dead space substitutes for part of the exercise stimulus to ventilation.

    PubMed

    Garske, Luke A; Lal, Ravin; Stewart, Ian B; Morris, Norman R; Cross, Troy J; Adams, Lewis

    2017-05-01

    Chest wall strapping has been used to assess mechanisms of dyspnea with restrictive lung disease. This study examined the hypothesis that dyspnea with restriction depends principally on the degree of reflex ventilatory stimulation. We compared dyspnea at the same (iso)ventilation when added dead space provided a component of the ventilatory stimulus during exercise. Eleven healthy men undertook a randomized controlled crossover trial that compared four constant work exercise conditions: 1) control (CTRL): unrestricted breathing at 90% gas exchange threshold (GET); 2) CTRL+dead space (DS): unrestricted breathing with 0.6-l dead space, at isoventilation to CTRL due to reduced exercise intensity; 3) CWS: chest wall strapping at 90% GET; and 4) CWS+DS: chest strapping with 0.6-l dead space, at isoventilation to CWS with reduced exercise intensity. Chest strapping reduced forced vital capacity by 30.4 ± 2.2% (mean ± SE). Dyspnea at isoventilation was unchanged with CTRL+DS compared with CTRL (1.93 ± 0.49 and 2.17 ± 0.43, 0-10 numeric rating scale, respectively; P = 0.244). Dyspnea was lower with CWS+DS compared with CWS (3.40 ± 0.52 and 4.51 ± 0.53, respectively; P = 0.003). Perceived leg fatigue was reduced with CTRL+DS compared with CTRL (2.36 ± 0.48 and 2.86 ± 0.59, respectively; P = 0.049) and lower with CWS+DS compared with CWS (1.86 ± 0.30 and 4.00 ± 0.79, respectively; P = 0.006). With unrestricted breathing, dead space did not change dyspnea at isoventilation, suggesting that dyspnea does not depend on the mode of reflex ventilatory stimulation in healthy individuals. With chest strapping, dead space presented a less potent stimulus to dyspnea, raising the possibility that leg muscle work contributes to dyspnea perception independent of the ventilatory stimulus.NEW & NOTEWORTHY Chest wall strapping was applied to healthy humans to simulate restrictive lung disease. With chest wall strapping, dyspnea was reduced

  11. Treatment techniques for 3D conformal radiation to breast and chest wall including the internal mammary chain

    SciTech Connect

    Sonnik, Deborah; Selvaraj, Raj N. . E-mail: selvarajrn@upmc.edu; Faul, Clare; Gerszten, Kristina; Heron, Dwight E.; King, Gwendolyn C.

    2007-04-01

    Breast, chest wall, and regional nodal irradiation have been associated with an improved outcome in high-risk breast cancer patients. Complex treatment planning is often utilized to ensure complete coverage of the target volume while minimizing the dose to surrounding normal tissues. The 2 techniques evaluated in this report are the partially wide tangent fields (PWTFs) and the 4-field photon/electron combination (the modified 'Kuske Technique'). These 2 techniques were evaluated in 10 consecutive breast cancer patients. All patients had computerized tomographic (CT) scans for 3D planning supine on a breast board. The breast was defined clinically by the physician and confirmed radiographically with radiopaque bebes. The resulting dose-volume histograms (DVHs) of normal and target tissues were then compared. The deep tangent field with blocks resulted in optimal coverage of the target and the upper internal mammary chain (IMC) while sparing of critical and nontarget tissues. The wide tangent technique required less treatment planning and delivery time. We compared the 2 techniques and their resultant DVHs and feasibility in a busy clinic.

  12. Chest Wall Radiotherapy: Middle Ground for Treatment of Patients With One to Three Positive Lymph Nodes After Mastectomy

    SciTech Connect

    MacDonald, Shannon M.; Abi-Raad, Rita F.; Alm El-Din, Mohamed A.; Niemierko, Andrzej; Kobayashi, Wendy; McGrath, John J.; Goldberg, Saveli I.; Powell, Simon; Smith, Barbara; Taghian, Alphonse G.

    2009-12-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the outcomes for patients with Stage II breast cancer and one to three positive lymph nodes after mastectomy who were treated with observation or adjuvant radiotherapy to the chest wall (CW) with or without the regional lymphatics. Methods and Materials: We retrospectively analyzed 238 patients with Stage II breast cancer (one to three positive lymph nodes) treated with mastectomy at the Massachusetts General Hospital between 1990 and 2004. The estimates of locoregional recurrence (LRR), disease-free survival (DFS), and overall survival were analyzed according to the delivery of radiotherapy and multiple prognostic factors. Results: LRR and DFS were significantly improved by postmastectomy radiotherapy (PMRT), with a 5- and 10-year LRR rate without PMRT of 6% and 11%, respectively and, with PMRT, of 0% at both 5 and 10 years (p = .02). The 5- and 10-year DFS rate without PMRT was 85% and 75%, respectively, and, with PMRT, was 93% at both 5 and 10 years (p = .03). A similar benefit was found for patients treated with RT to the CW alone. The LRR, DFS, and overall survival rate for patients treated to the CW only was 0%, 96%, and 95% at 10 years, respectively. Conclusion: Our data suggest that adjuvant PMRT to the CW alone provides excellent disease control for patients with breast cancer <5 cm with one to three positive lymph nodes.

  13. Hyperthermia combined with radiation therapy for superficial breast cancer and chest wall recurrence: a review of the randomised data.

    PubMed

    Zagar, Timothy M; Oleson, James R; Vujaskovic, Zeljko; Dewhirst, Mark W; Craciunescu, Oana I; Blackwell, Kimberly L; Prosnitz, Leonard R; Jones, Ellen L

    2010-01-01

    Hyperthermia has long been used in combination with radiation for the treatment of superficial malignancies, in part due to its radiosensitising capabilities. Patients who suffer superficial recurrences of breast cancer, be it in their chest wall following mastectomy, or in their breast after breast conservation, typically have poor clinical outcomes. They often develop distant metastatic disease, but one must not overlook the problems associated with an uncontrolled local failure. Morbidity is enormous, and can significantly impair quality of life. There is no accepted standard of care in treating superficial recurrences of breast cancer, particularly in patients that have previously been irradiated. There is a substantial literature regarding the combined use of hyperthermia and radiotherapy for these superficial recurrences. Most of it is retrospective in nature, but there are several larger phase III randomised trials that show an improved rate of clinical complete response in patients treated with both modalities. In this review article, we will highlight the important prospective data that has been published regarding the combined use of hyperthermia and radiation.

  14. Hyperthermia combined with radiation therapy for superficial breast cancer and chest wall recurrence: A review of the randomised data

    PubMed Central

    ZAGAR, TIMOTHY M.; OLESON, JAMES R.; VUJASKOVIC, ZELJKO; DEWHIRST, MARK W.; CRACIUNESCU, OANA I.; BLACKWELL, KIMBERLY L.; PROSNITZ, LEONARD R.; JONES, ELLEN L.

    2010-01-01

    Hyperthermia has long been used in combination with radiation for the treatment of superficial malignancies, in part due to its radiosensitising capabilities. Patients who suffer superficial recurrences of breast cancer, be it in their chest wall following mastectomy, or in their breast after breast conservation, typically have poor clinical outcomes. They often develop distant metastatic disease, but one must not overlook the problems associated with an uncontrolled local failure. Morbidity is enormous, and can significantly impair quality of life. There is no accepted standard of care in treating superficial recurrences of breast cancer, particularly in patients that have previously been irradiated. There is a substantial literature regarding the combined use of hyperthermia and radiotherapy for these superficial recurrences. Most of it is retrospective in nature, but there are several larger phase III randomised trials that show an improved rate of clinical complete response in patients treated with both modalities. In this review article, we will highlight the important prospective data that has been published regarding the combined use of hyperthermia and radiation. PMID:20849256

  15. Immediate chest wall reconstruction during pregnancy: surgical management after extended surgical resection due to primary sarcoma of the breast.

    PubMed

    Arruda, Eduardo Gustavo; Munhoz, Alexandre Mendonça; Montag, Eduardo; Filassi, José Roberto; Gemperli, Rolf

    2014-01-01

    Breast sarcoma during pregnancy is an extremely rare event and represents a complex problem because of a more advanced stage at presentation. This report presents the first case of a 24-year-old woman with a gestational age of 20 weeks with a fast growing tumour in her left breast (29 × 19 × 15 cm) and infiltrating the skin/pectoralis muscles. Radical mastectomy was performed with a gestational age of 22 weeks and a different design was planned for the latissimus dorsi musculocutaneous flap (LDMF) with primary closure in the V-Y pattern. Satisfactory chest wall coverage and contour were achieved. Final histopathological findings allowed a diagnosis of undifferentiated sarcoma. With a gestational age of 37 weeks, a healthy infant was delivered by means of a caesarean section. The patient is currently in the second postoperative year and no recurrence has been observed. Management of a large breast sarcoma in a pregnant patient presents unique challenges in consideration of the potential risks to the foetus and the possible maternal benefit. The results of this study demonstrate that the VY-LDMF is a reliable technique and should be considered in cases of immediate large thoracic wound reconstruction. Copyright © 2013 British Association of Plastic, Reconstructive and Aesthetic Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. An unusual case of isolated, serial metastases of gallbladder carcinoma involving the chest wall, axilla, breast and lung parenchyma

    PubMed Central

    Jeyaraj, Pamela; Sio, Terence T.; Iott, Matthew J.

    2013-01-01

    In the English literature, only 9 cases of adenocarcinoma of the gallbladder with cutaneous metastasis have been reported so far. One case of multiple cutaneous metastases along with deposits in the breast tissue has been reported. We present a case of incidental metastatic gallbladder carcinoma with no intra-abdominal disease presenting as a series of four isolated cutaneous right chest wall, axillary nodal, breast, and pulmonary metastases following resection and adjuvant chemoradiation for her primary tumor. In spite of the metastatic disease coupled with the aggressive nature of the cancer, this patient reported that her energy level had returned to baseline with a good appetite and a stable weight indicating a good performance status and now is alive at 25 months since diagnosis. Her serially-presented, oligometastatic diseases were well-controlled by concurrent chemoradiotherapy and stereotactic radiation therapy. We report this case study because of its rarity and for the purpose of complementing current literature with an additional example of cutaneous metastasis from adenocarcinoma of the gallbladder. PMID:23772306

  17. Effect of high-frequency chest wall oscillation versus chest physiotherapy on lung function after lung transplant.

    PubMed

    Esguerra-Gonzales, Angeli; Ilagan-Honorio, Monina; Kehoe, Priscilla; Fraschilla, Stephanie; Lee, Ai Jin; Madsen, Ashley; Marcarian, Taline; Mayol-Ngo, Kristina; Miller, Pamela S; Onga, Jay; Rodman, Betty; Ross, David; Shameem, Zeba; Nandy, Karabi; Toyama, Joy; Sommer, Susan; Tamonang, Cheryl; Villamor, Filma; Weigt, S Samuel; Gawlinski, Anna

    2014-02-01

    The aim of this study is to compare the effects of chest physiotherapy (CPT) and high-frequency chest wall oscillation (HFCWO) on lung function in lung transplant recipients. Chest physiotherapy and HFCWO are routinely used after lung transplant to attenuate dyspnea, increase expiratory flow, and improve secretion clearance. In a two-group experimental, crossover design with repeated-measures, 45 lung transplant recipients (27 single, 18 bilateral; 64% male; mean age, 57 years) were randomized to receive CPT at 10:00 AM and 2:00 PM followed by HFCWO at 6:00 PM and 10:00 PM (n=22) or vice versa (n=23) on postoperative day 3. Dyspnea (modified Borg score), Spo2/FiO2, and peak expiratory flow (PEF) were measured pre-treatment and post-treatment. Data were analyzed using chi-square tests, t tests, and linear mixed effects models. There was no statistically significant treatment effect for dyspnea or PEF in patients who received HFCWO versus CPT. However, there was a significant treatment effect on the Spo2/FiO2 ratio (p<0.0001). Preliminary results suggest that lung function (measured by Spo2/FiO2) improves with HFWCO after lung transplantation. Although dyspnea and PEF did not differ significantly between treatment types, HFCWO may be an effective, feasible alternative to CPT. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Reliability of the diaphragmatic compound muscle action potential evoked by cervical magnetic stimulation and recorded via chest wall surface EMG.

    PubMed

    Welch, Joseph F; Mildren, Robyn L; Zaback, Martin; Archiza, Bruno; Allen, Grayson P; Sheel, A William

    2017-09-01

    Stimulation of the phrenic nerve via cervical magnetic stimulation (CMS) elicits a compound muscle action potential (CMAP) that allows for assessment of diaphragm activation. The reliability of CMS to evoke the CMAP recorded by chest wall surface EMG has yet to be comprehensively examined. CMS was performed on healthy young males (n=10) and females (n=10). Surface EMG electrodes were placed on the right and left hemi-diaphragm between the 6-8th intercostal spaces. CMAPs were analysed for: latency, duration, peak-to-peak amplitude, and area. Reliability within and between experimental sessions was assessed using intraclass correlation coefficients (ICC). Bilateral (right-left) and sex-based (male-female) comparisons were also made (independent samples t-test). All CMAP characteristics demonstrated high reproducibility within (ICCs>0.96) and between (ICCs>0.89) experimental sessions. No statistically significant bilateral or sex-based differences were found (p>0.05). CMS is a reliable and non-invasive method to evaluate phrenic nerve conduction. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Vanishing bone disease of chest wall and spine with kyphoscoliosis and neurological deficit: A case report and review of literature

    PubMed Central

    Srivastava, Sudhir Kumar; Aggarwal, Rishi Anil; Nemade, Pradip Sharad; Bhoale, Sunil Krishna

    2017-01-01

    Vanishing bone disease is an extremely rare disorder of unknown etiology characterized by idiopathic osteolysis of bone. We describe a case of vanishing bone disease of chest wall and spine with kyphoscoliosis and neurological deficit. A 17-year-old male presented with gradually progressive deformity of back and dorsal compressive myelopathy with nonambulatory power in lower limbs. Radiographs revealed absent 4th–7th ribs on the right side with dorsal kyphoscoliosis and severe canal narrowing at the apex. The patient was given localized radiotherapy and started on a monthly infusion of 4 mg zoledronic acid. Posterior instrumented fusion with anterior reconstruction via posterolateral approach was performed. The patient had a complete neurological recovery at 5 weeks following surgery. At 1 year, anterior nonunion was noted for which transthoracic tricortical bone grafting was done. Bone graft from the patient's mother was used both times. At 7 months following anterior grafting, the alignment was maintained and the patient was asymptomatic; however, fusion at graft-host interface was not achieved. Bisphosphonates and radiotherapy were successful in halting the progress of osteolysis. PMID:28216760

  20. Treatment techniques for 3D conformal radiation to breast and chest wall including the internal mammary chain.

    PubMed

    Sonnik, Deborah; Selvaraj, Raj N; Faul, Clare; Gerszten, Kristina; Heron, Dwight E; King, Gwendolyn C

    2007-01-01

    Breast, chest wall, and regional nodal irradiation have been associated with an improved outcome in high-risk breast cancer patients. Complex treatment planning is often utilized to ensure complete coverage of the target volume while minimizing the dose to surrounding normal tissues. The 2 techniques evaluated in this report are the partially wide tangent fields (PWTFs) and the 4-field photon/electron combination (the modified "Kuske Technique"). These 2 techniques were evaluated in 10 consecutive breast cancer patients. All patients had computerized tomographic (CT) scans for 3D planning supine on a breast board. The breast was defined clinically by the physician and confirmed radiographically with radiopaque bebes. The resulting dose-volume histograms (DVHs) of normal and target tissues were then compared. The deep tangent field with blocks resulted in optimal coverage of the target and the upper internal mammary chain (IMC) while sparing of critical and nontarget tissues. The wide tangent technique required less treatment planning and delivery time. We compared the 2 techniques and their resultant DVHs and feasibility in a busy clinic.

  1. Experimental study of ASCs combined with POC-PLA patch for the reconstruction of full-thickness chest wall defects.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yuanzheng; Fang, Shuo; Dai, Jiezhi; Zhu, Lei; Fan, Hao; Tang, Weiya; Fan, Yongjie; Dai, Haiying; Zhang, Peipei; Wang, Ying; Xing, Xin; Yang, Chao

    2017-01-01

    To explore the repairing effect of combination of adipose stem cells (ASCs) and composite scaffolds on CWR, the electrospun Poly 1, 8-octanediol-co-citric acid (POC)-poly-L-lactide acid (PLA) composite scaffolds were prepared, followed by in vitro and in vivo biocompatibility evaluation of the scaffolds. Afterwards, ASCs were seeded on POC-PLA to construct the POC-PLA-ASCs scaffolds, and the POC-PLA, POC-PLA-ASCs, and traditional materials expanded polytetrafluoroethylene (ePTFE) were adopt for CWR in New Zealand white (NZW) rabbit models. As results, the POC-PLA-ASCs patches possessed good biocompatibility as the high proliferation ability of cells surrounding the patches. Rabbits in POC-PLA-ASCs groups showed better pulmonary function, less pleural adhesion, higher degradation rate and more neovascularization when compared with that in other two groups. The results of western blot indicated that POC-PLA-ASCs patches accelerated the expression of VEGF and Collagen I in rabbit models. From the above, our present study demonstrated that POC-PLA material was applied for CWR successfully, and ASCs seeded on the sheets could improve the pleural adhesions and promote the reparation of chest wall defects.

  2. Occurrence of Breast Cancer After Chest Wall Irradiation for Pediatric Cancer, as Detected by a Multimodal Screening Program

    SciTech Connect

    Terenziani, Monica; Casalini, Patrizia; Scaperrotta, Gianfranco; Gandola, Lorenza; Trecate, Giovanna; Catania, Serena; Cefalo, Graziella; Conti, Alberto; Massimino, Maura; Meazza, Cristina; Podda, Marta; Spreafico, Filippo; Suman, Laura; Gennaro, Massimiliano

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: To assess the occurrence of breast cancer (BC) after exposure to ionizing radiation for pediatric cancer, by means of a multimodal screening program. Patients and Methods: We identified 86 patients who had received chest wall radiation therapy for pediatric cancer. Clinical breast examination (CBE), ultrasound (US), and mammography (MX) were performed yearly. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) was added as of October 2007. We calculated the risk of developing BC by radiation therapy dose, patient age, and menarche before or after primary treatment. Results: Eleven women developed a BC from July 2002-February 2010. The sensitivity of the screening methods was 36% for CBE, 73% for MX, 55% for US, and 100% for MRI; the specificity was 91%, 99%, 95%, and 80% for CBE, MX, US, and MRI, respectively. The annual BC detection rate was 2.9%. The median age at BC diagnosis was 33 years. Although age had no influence, menarche before as opposed to after radiation therapy correlated significantly with BC (P=.027): the annual BC detection rate in the former subgroup was 5.3%. Conclusions: Mammography proved more sensitive and specific in our cohort of young women than CBE or US. Magnetic resonance imaging proved 100% sensitive (but this preliminary finding needs to be confirmed). Our cohort of patients carries a 10-fold BC risk at an age more than 20 years younger than in the general population.

  3. An Adaptive Impedance Matching Network with Closed Loop Control Algorithm for Inductive Wireless Power Transfer.

    PubMed

    Miao, Zhidong; Liu, Dake; Gong, Chen

    2017-08-01

    For an inductive wireless power transfer (IWPT) system, maintaining a reasonable power transfer efficiency and a stable output power are two most challenging design issues, especially when coil distance varies. To solve these issues, this paper presents a novel adaptive impedance matching network (IMN) for IWPT system. In our adaptive IMN IWPT system, the IMN is automatically reconfigured to keep matching with the coils and to adjust the output power adapting to coil distance variation. A closed loop control algorithm is used to change the capacitors continually, which can compensate mismatches and adjust output power simultaneously. The proposed adaptive IMN IWPT system is working at 125 kHz for 2 W power delivered to load. Comparing with the series resonant IWPT system and fixed IMN IWPT system, the power transfer efficiency of our system increases up to 31.79% and 60% when the coupling coefficient varies in a large range from 0.05 to 0.8 for 2 W output power.

  4. An Adaptive Impedance Matching Network with Closed Loop Control Algorithm for Inductive Wireless Power Transfer

    PubMed Central

    Miao, Zhidong; Liu, Dake

    2017-01-01

    For an inductive wireless power transfer (IWPT) system, maintaining a reasonable power transfer efficiency and a stable output power are two most challenging design issues, especially when coil distance varies. To solve these issues, this paper presents a novel adaptive impedance matching network (IMN) for IWPT system. In our adaptive IMN IWPT system, the IMN is automatically reconfigured to keep matching with the coils and to adjust the output power adapting to coil distance variation. A closed loop control algorithm is used to change the capacitors continually, which can compensate mismatches and adjust output power simultaneously. The proposed adaptive IMN IWPT system is working at 125 kHz for 2 W power delivered to load. Comparing with the series resonant IWPT system and fixed IMN IWPT system, the power transfer efficiency of our system increases up to 31.79% and 60% when the coupling coefficient varies in a large range from 0.05 to 0.8 for 2 W output power. PMID:28763011

  5. The MUSIC algorithm for impedance tomography of small inclusions from discrete data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lechleiter, A.

    2015-09-01

    We consider a point-electrode model for electrical impedance tomography and show that current-to-voltage measurements from finitely many electrodes are sufficient to characterize the positions of a finite number of point-like inclusions. More precisely, we consider an asymptotic expansion with respect to the size of the small inclusions of the relative Neumann-to-Dirichlet operator in the framework of the point electrode model. This operator is naturally finite-dimensional and models difference measurements by finitely many small electrodes of the electric potential with and without the small inclusions. Moreover, its leading-order term explicitly characterizes the centers of the small inclusions if the (finite) number of point electrodes is large enough. This characterization is based on finite-dimensional test vectors and leads naturally to a MUSIC algorithm for imaging the inclusion centers. We show both the feasibility and limitations of this imaging technique via two-dimensional numerical experiments, considering in particular the influence of the number of point electrodes on the algorithm’s images.

  6. Pedicled full-thickness abdominal flap combined with skin grafting for the reconstruction of anterior chest wall defect following major electrical burn.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Jing-Chun; Xian, Chun-Jing; Yu, Jia-Ao; Shi, Kai

    2015-02-01

    Successful reconstruction of extensive anterior chest wall defect following major electrical burn represents a very challenging surgery. Herein we report the first case using pedicled full-thickness abdominal flap combined with skin grafting to treat this injury with severe infection and exposure of pericardium and ribs in a Chinese patient. Following the performance of chest debridement to remove necrotic and infected tissues and the injection of broad-spectrum antibiotics to reduce infection, a pedicled full-thickness abdominal flap was used to cover the exposed pericardium and ribs, and skin grafting from the right leg of the patient was done to cover the exposed vital tissues. The patient was followed up for a total of 3·5 years, and satisfactory cosmetic and functional outcomes were obtained without complications. This report provides an effective method for the surgeons who encounter similar cases where reconstruction of extensive anterior chest wall is required.

  7. Radiologic images of an aggressive implant-associated fibromatosis of the breast and chest wall: case report and review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Alanis, Lourdes; Roth, Robyn; Lerman, Nati; Barroeta, Julieta E; Germaine, Pauline

    2017-09-01

    Fibromatosis of the breast is a rare benign disease compromising <0.2% of all primary breast tumors. Although the chest wall is a common location, occurrences of implant-associated fibromatosis of the breast are extremely rare; only 33 cases have been reported. We present a case of a 42-year-old female who underwent breast augmentation with silicone breast implants, and 2 years later developed an aggressive implant-associated fibromatosis of the breast and chest wall. On imaging studies, the tumor mimicked breast carcinoma, and despite chemotherapy, the fibromatosis rapidly enlarged and was locally invasive requiring wide surgical excision. Unlike previously reported imaging findings, magnetic resonance imaging revealed an oval circumscribed mass with fringe-like internal architecture. We provide a review of the literature and discuss the imaging features of implant-associated fibromatosis of the breast.

  8. Chest wall segmentation in automated 3D breast ultrasound using rib shadow enhancement and multi-plane cumulative probability enhanced map

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Hyeonjin; Kim, Hannah; Hong, Helen

    2015-03-01

    We propose an automatic segmentation method of chest wall in 3D ABUS images using rib shadow enhancement and multi-planar cumulative probability enhanced map. For the identification of individual dark rib shadows, each rib shadow is enhanced using intensity transfer function and 3D sheet-like enhancement filtering. Then, wrongly enhanced intercostal regions and small fatty tissues are removed using coronal and sagittal cumulative probability enhanced maps. The large fatty tissues with globular and sheet-like shapes at the top of rib shadow are removed using shape and orientation analysis based on moment matrix. Detected chest walls are connected with cubic B-spline interpolation. Experimental results show that the Dice similarity coefficient of proposed method as comparison with two manually outlining results provides over 90% in average.

  9. Management of a Chest-Wall Soft-Tissue Tumor Caused by an Infection with the Larval Tapeworm Pathogen Taenia crassiceps

    PubMed Central

    Roesel, Christian; Welter, Stefan; Stamatis, Georgios; Theegarten, Dirk; Tappe, Dennis

    2014-01-01

    A chest-wall lesion of an immunocompetent patient was initially suspicious for a malignant tumor. Histopathological and polymerase chain reaction examinations revealed an infection with the larval stage of the tapeworm Taenia crassiceps. Curative resection of the tumorous lesion was performed. Treatment options for immunocompromised patients and patients without known immune defect are discussed, because most of the infections occur in immunocompromised individuals. PMID:24914004

  10. Mathematical detection of aortic valve opening (B point) in impedance cardiography: A comparison of three popular algorithms.

    PubMed

    Árbol, Javier Rodríguez; Perakakis, Pandelis; Garrido, Alba; Mata, José Luis; Fernández-Santaella, M Carmen; Vila, Jaime

    2017-03-01

    The preejection period (PEP) is an index of left ventricle contractility widely used in psychophysiological research. Its computation requires detecting the moment when the aortic valve opens, which coincides with the B point in the first derivative of impedance cardiogram (ICG). Although this operation has been traditionally made via visual inspection, several algorithms based on derivative calculations have been developed to enable an automatic performance of the task. However, despite their popularity, data about their empirical validation are not always available. The present study analyzes the performance in the estimation of the aortic valve opening of three popular algorithms, by comparing their performance with the visual detection of the B point made by two independent scorers. Algorithm 1 is based on the first derivative of the ICG, Algorithm 2 on the second derivative, and Algorithm 3 on the third derivative. Algorithm 3 showed the highest accuracy rate (78.77%), followed by Algorithm 1 (24.57%) and Algorithm 2 (13.82%). In the automatic computation of PEP, Algorithm 2 resulted in significantly more missed cycles (48.57%) than Algorithm 1 (6.3%) and Algorithm 3 (3.5%). Algorithm 2 also estimated a significantly lower average PEP (70 ms), compared with the values obtained by Algorithm 1 (119 ms) and Algorithm 3 (113 ms). Our findings indicate that the algorithm based on the third derivative of the ICG performs significantly better. Nevertheless, a visual inspection of the signal proves indispensable, and this article provides a novel visual guide to facilitate the manual detection of the B point. © 2016 Society for Psychophysiological Research.

  11. Low-dose Photofrin-induced PDT offers excellent clinical response with minimal morbidity in chest wall recurrence of breast cancer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Allison, Ron; Mang, Thomas S.

    2000-03-01

    Limited therapeutic options exist when chest wall recurrence form breast cancer progresses despite standard salvage treatment. As photodynamic therapy offers excellent response for cutaneous lesions this may be a possible indication for PDT. A total of 102 treatment fields were illuminated on 9 women with biopsy proven chest wall recurrence of breast cancer which was progressing despite salvage surgery, radiation, and chemi-hormonal therapy. PDT consisted of outpatient IV infusion of Photofrin at 0.8 mg/kg followed 48 hours laser by illumination at 140-170 J/cm2 via a KTP Yag laser coupled to a dye unit. No patient was lost to follow up. At 6 months post PDT; complete response, defined as total lesion elimination was 89 percent, partial response 8 percent, and no response 3 percent. No photosensitivity was seen and no patient developed scarring, fibrosis, or healing difficulties. Low dose Photofrin induced PDT is very active against chest wall lesions. Despite fragile and heavily pre-treated tissues, excellent clinical and cosmetic outcome was obtained. PDT is an underutilized modality for this indication.

  12. Low-dose Photofrin-induced PDT offers excellent clinical response with minimal morbidity in chest wall recurrence of breast cancer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Allison, Ron; Mang, Thomas S.

    2000-03-01

    Limited therapeutic options exist when chest wall recurrence form breast cancer progresses despite standard salvage treatment. As photodynamic therapy offers excellent response for cutaneous lesions this may be a possible indication for PDT. A total of 102 treatment fields were illuminated on 9 women with biopsy proven chest wall recurrence of breast cancer which was progressing despite salvage surgery, radiation, and chemi-hormonal therapy. PDT consisted of outpatient IV infusion of Photofrin at 0.8 mg/kg followed 48 hours laser by illumination at 140-170 J/cm2 via a KTP Yag laser coupled to a dye unit. No patient was lost to follow up. At 6 months post PDT; complete response, defined as total lesion elimination was 89 percent, partial response 8 percent, and no response 3 percent. No photosensitivity was seen and no patient developed scarring, fibrosis, or healing difficulties. Low dose Photofrin induced PDT is very active against chest wall lesions. Despite fragile and heavily pre-treated tissues, excellent clinical and cosmetic outcome was obtained. PDT is an underutilized modality for this indication.

  13. [Correction of the congenital malformations of the front chest wall by the modelling technique of sternochondroplasty: technique and results on a series of 14 cases].

    PubMed

    Duhamel, P; Brunel, C; Le Pimpec, F; Pons, F; Jancovici, R

    2003-04-01

    In the congenital malformations of the front chest wall showing depression or protrusion, the cardiorespiratory disorders are inconstant and often not linked with the distortion. On the other hand psychoaffective repercussions are major in adolescents and young adults justifying recourse to surgery with morphological and aesthetic aiming. The authors present the technique of modelling sternochondroplasty by raising with osteosynthesis by slide fastener-handle of Martin-Borrelly, applied to the correction of congenital malformation of the front chest wall in young adult, both of protrusion (pectus carinatum), of thoraxes in funnel (pectus excavatum) types or of mixed types (pectus arcuatum). This surgical replanning intervention is carried out by under-mammary way and aims at reestablishing a normal anatomy of the front chest wall. It leads to a genuine wide sternochondrocostal volet, which is stabilised by a specific, multipurpose, adaptable and reliable osteosynthesis equipment. The results obtained on a series of 14 cases are good or excellent in 86% of the cases and stable over time in the absence of major complications. A good cooperation of the patient is essential to obtain a good result in particular via the continuation of musculation exercises after assembly consolidation, possibly associated with remote mammary plastic surgery in the event of hypoplasia or of associated mammary agenesia.

  14. Hybrid video-assisted thoracoscopic surgery lobectomy and en-bloc chest wall resection for non-small cell lung cancer

    PubMed Central

    Solli, Pierogiorgio; Coonar, Aman S.

    2016-01-01

    Chest wall invasion is seen in 5% to 8% of patients presenting with lung cancer. We report a case of complete resection of a 14 cm × 9 cm pT3N0M0 squamous cell carcinoma arising from the right lower lobe and invading the lower chest wall posteriorly, in a 75 years old male, via a hybrid thoracoscopic [video-assisted thoracoscopic surgery (VATS)] approach. Following conventional VATS lobectomy, a targeted 10 cm incision was performed to allow wide resection of the 7th to 10th ribs and 6th to 9th transverse processes, with the defect being subsequently reconstructed with a composite rigid prosthesis. The patient made an uneventful recovery, and was discharged on the 3rd postoperative day; with later adjuvant chemotherapy. Thoracoscopic surgery is not currently widely adopted in patients with chest wall invasion, likely due to the technical difficulties. We briefly review the various techniques described in the current literature, whilst emphasising a role for such an approach in highly selected cases. PMID:27747030

  15. A clinical pilot study: high frequency chest wall oscillation airway clearance in patients with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Chaisson, Kathleen Marya; Walsh, Susan; Simmons, Zachary; Vender, Robert L

    2006-06-01

    Respiratory complications are common in patients with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) with respiratory failure representing the most common cause of death. Ineffective airway clearance resultant from deficient cough frequently contributes to these abnormalities. We sought to evaluate the effectiveness of high frequency chest wall oscillation (HFCWO) administered through the Vest Airway Clearance System when added to standard care in preventing pulmonary complications and prolonging the time to death in patients with ALS. This is a single center study performed at the Penn State Milton S. Hershey Medical Center (HMC). Nine patients with a diagnosis of ALS and concurrently receiving non-invasive ventilatory support with bi-level positive airway pressure (BiPAP) were recruited from the outpatient clinic at HMC. Four patients were randomized to receive standard care and five patients to receive standard care plus the addition of HFCWO administered twice-daily for 15 min duration. Longitudinal assessments of oxyhemoglobin saturation, forced vital capacity (FVC), and adverse events were obtained until time of death. Pulmonary complications of atelectasis, pneumonia, hospitalization for a respiratory-related abnormality, and tracheostomy with mechanical ventilation were monitored throughout the study duration. No differences were observed between treatment groups in relation to the rate of decline in FVC. The addition of HFCWO airway clearance failed to improve time to death compared to standard treatment alone (340 days +/- 247 vs. 470 days +/- 241; p = 0.26). The random allocation of HFCWO airway clearance to patients with ALS concomitantly receiving BiPAP failed to attain any significant clinical benefits in relation to either loss of lung function or mortality. This study does not exclude the potential benefit of HFCWO in select patients with ALS who have coexistent pulmonary diseases, pre-existent mucus-related pulmonary complications, or less severe levels of

  16. Highly sensitive monitoring of chest wall dynamics and acoustics provides diverse valuable information for evaluating ventilation and diagnosing pneumothorax.

    PubMed

    Pesin, Jimy; Faingersh, Anna; Waisman, Dan; Landesberg, Amir

    2014-06-15

    Current practice of monitoring lung ventilation in neonatal intensive care units, utilizing endotracheal tube pressure and flow, end-tidal CO2, arterial O2 saturation from pulse oximetry, and hemodynamic indexes, fails to account for asymmetric pathologies and to allow for early detection of deteriorating ventilation. This study investigated the utility of bilateral measurements of chest wall dynamics and sounds, in providing early detection of changes in the mechanics and distribution of lung ventilation. Nine healthy New Zealand rabbits were ventilated at a constant pressure, while miniature accelerometers were attached to each side of the chest. Slowly progressing pneumothorax was induced by injecting 1 ml/min air into the pleural space on either side of the chest. The end of the experiment (tPTX) was defined when arterial O2 saturation from pulse oximetry dropped <90% or when vigorous spontaneous breathing began, since it represents the time of clinical detection using common methods. Consistent and significant changes were observed in 15 of the chest dynamics parameters. The most meaningful temporal changes were noted for features extracted from subsonic dynamics (<10 Hz), e.g., tidal amplitude, energy, and autoregressive poles. Features from the high-frequency band (10-200 Hz), e.g., energy and entropy, exhibited smaller but significant changes. At 70% tPTX, identification of asymmetric ventilation was attained for all animals. Side identification of the pneumothorax was achieved at 50% tPTX, within a 95% confidence interval. Diagnosis was, on average, 34.1 ± 18.8 min before tPTX. In conclusion, bilateral monitoring of the chest dynamics and acoustics provide novel information that is sensitive to asymmetric changes in ventilation, enabling early detection and localization of pneumothorax.

  17. Superficial hyperthermia and irradiation for recurrent breast carcinoma of the chest wall: prognostic factors in 196 tumors.

    PubMed

    Lee, H K; Antell, A G; Perez, C A; Straube, W L; Ramachandran, G; Myerson, R J; Emami, B; Molmenti, E P; Buckner, A; Lockett, M A

    1998-01-15

    To correlate patient-, tumor-, and treatment-related factors with subsequent local tumor control. From 1977 to 1990, 196 subcutaneous/superficial lesions (179 measurable, 17 microscopic) in 151 patients with recurrent breast carcinoma of the chest wall were treated with superficial 915-MHz microwave hyperthermia and irradiation. The definition of min t43 > or = 10 min is that all monitored tumor catheters had a minimum of 1 hyperthermia session with temperatures > 43 degrees C for at least 10 min. Factors correlating with local control on univariate analysis included length of survival (> or = 1 year vs. < 1 year) (p < 0.0001), specific absorption rate (SAR) (> or = 25% vs. < 25%) (p = 0.0001), minimum t43 > 10 min (p < 0.0001), tumor volume (p < 0.0001), tumor surface area (p < 0.0001), tumor depth (p = 0.0002), number of hyperthermia sessions (p = 0.0003), and current radiation dose (p = 0.0012). On multivariate analysis, the factors best correlated with ultimate local control were SAR (p < 0.001) and number of hyperthermia sessions (p = 0.003). Multivariate analysis supports the importance of adequate specific absorption rate (SAR) coverage as a better predictor of local control than tumor volume, surface area, or depth. The explanation is that SAR can be correlated with the tumor surface area and depth, depending on the hyperthermia applicator characteristics. It is recommended that future clinical trials stratify study lesions into either SAR > or = 25% or < 25% because this can be readily estimated prior to initiating treatment. It is also recommended that future clinical trials attempt to have adequate lengths of follow-up after therapy to assess the results in long-term survivors.

  18. Instantaneous responses to high-frequency chest wall oscillation in patients with acute pneumonic respiratory failure receiving mechanical ventilation

    PubMed Central

    Chuang, Ming-Lung; Chou, Yi-Ling; Lee, Chai-Yuan; Huang, Shih-Feng

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Background: Endotracheal intubation and prolonged immobilization of patients receiving mechanical ventilation may reduce expectoration function. High-frequency chest wall oscillation (HFCWO) may ameliorate airway secretion movement; however, the instantaneous changes in patients’ cardiopulmonary responses are unknown. Moreover, HFCWO may influence ventilator settings by the vigorous oscillation. The aim of this study was to investigate these issues. Methods: Seventy-three patients (52 men) aged 71.5 ± 13.4 years who were intubated with mechanical ventilation for pneumonic respiratory failure were recruited and randomly classified into 2 groups (HFCWO group, n = 36; and control group who received conventional chest physical therapy (CCPT, n = 37). HFCWO was applied with a fixed protocol, whereas CCPT was conducted using standard protocols. Both groups received sputum suction after the procedure. Changes in ventilator settings and the subjects’ responses were measured at preset intervals and compared within groups and between groups. Results: Oscillation did not affect the ventilator settings (all P > 0.05). The mean airway pressure, breathing frequency, and rapid shallow breathing index increased, and the tidal volume and SpO2 decreased (all P < 0.05). After sputum suction, the peak airway pressure (Ppeak) and minute ventilation decreased (all P < 0.05). The HFCWO group had a lower tidal volume and SpO2 at the end of oscillation, and lower Ppeak and tidal volume after sputum suction than the CCPT group. Conclusions: HFCWO affects breathing pattern and SpO2 but not ventilator settings, whereas CCPT maintains a steadier condition. After sputum suction, HFCWO slightly improved Ppeak compared to CCPT, suggesting that the study extends the indications of HFCWO for these patients in intensive care unit. (ClinicalTrials.gov number NCT02758106, retrospectively registered.) PMID:28248854

  19. Chest wall thickness and decompression failure: A systematic review and meta-analysis comparing anatomic locations in needle thoracostomy.

    PubMed

    Laan, Danuel V; Vu, Trang Diem N; Thiels, Cornelius A; Pandian, T K; Schiller, Henry J; Murad, M Hassan; Aho, Johnathon M

    2016-04-01

    Current Advanced Trauma Life Support guidelines recommend decompression for thoracic tension physiology using a 5-cm angiocatheter at the second intercostal space (ICS) on the midclavicular line (MCL). High failure rates occur. Through systematic review and meta-analysis, we aimed to determine the chest wall thickness (CWT) of the 2nd ICS-MCL, the 4th/5th ICS at the anterior axillary line (AAL), the 4th/5th ICS mid axillary line (MAL) and needle thoracostomy failure rates using the currently recommended 5-cm angiocatheter. A comprehensive search of several databases from their inception to July 24, 2014 was conducted. The search was limited to the English language, and all study populations were included. Studies were appraised by two independent reviewers according to a priori defined PRISMA inclusion and exclusion criteria. Continuous outcomes (CWT) were evaluated using weighted mean difference and binary outcomes (failure with 5-cm needle) were assessed using incidence rate. Outcomes were pooled using the random-effects model. The search resulted in 34,652 studies of which 15 were included for CWT analysis, 13 for NT effectiveness. Mean CWT was 42.79 mm (95% CI, 38.78-46.81) at 2nd ICS-MCL, 39.85 mm (95% CI, 28.70-51.00) at MAL, and 34.33 mm (95% CI, 28.20-40.47) at AAL (P=.08). Mean failure rate was 38% (95% CI, 24-54) at 2nd ICS-MCL, 31% (95% CI, 10-64) at MAL, and 13% (95% CI, 8-22) at AAL (P=.01). Evidence from observational studies suggests that the 4th/5th ICS-AAL has the lowest predicted failure rate of needle decompression in multiple populations. Level 3 SR/MA with up to two negative criteria. Therapeutic. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Chest Wall Thickness and Decompression Failure: A Systematic Review and Meta-analysis Comparing Anatomic Locations in Needle Thoracostomy

    PubMed Central

    Laan, Danuel V.; Vu, Trang Diem N.; Thiels, Cornelius A.; Pandian, T. K.; Schiller, Henry J.; Murad, M. Hassan; Aho, Johnathon M.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Current Advanced Trauma Life Support guidelines recommend decompression for thoracic tension physiology using a 5-cm angiocatheter at the second intercostal space (ICS) on the midclavicular line (MCL). High failure rates occur. Through systematic review and meta-analysis, we aimed to determine the chest wall thickness (CWT) of the 2nd ICS-MCL, the 4th/5th ICS at the anterior axillary line (AAL), the 4th/5th ICS mid axillary line (MAL) and needle thoracostomy failure rates using the currently recommended 5-cm angiocatheter. Methods A comprehensive search of several databases from their inception to July 24, 2014 was conducted. The search was limited to the English language, and all study populations were included. Studies were appraised by two independent reviewers according to a priori defined PRISMA inclusion and exclusion criteria. Continuous outcomes (CWT) were evaluated using weighted mean difference and binary outcomes (failure with 5-cm needle) were assessed using incidence rate. Outcomes were pooled using the random-effects model. Results The search resulted in 34,652 studies of which 15 were included for CWT analysis, 13 for NT effectiveness. Mean CWT was 42.79 mm (95% CI, 38.78–46.81) at 2nd ICS-MCL, 39.85 mm (95% CI, 28.70–51.00) at MAL, and 34.33 mm (95% CI, 28.20–40.47) at AAL (P=0.08). Mean failure rate was 38% (95% CI, 24–54) at 2nd ICS-MCL, 31% (95% CI, 10–64) at MAL, and 13% (95% CI, 8–22) at AAL (P=0.01). Conclusion Evidence from observational studies suggests that the 4th/5th ICS-AAL has the lowest predicted failure rate of needle decompression in multiple populations. PMID:26724173

  1. High frequency chest wall oscillation for asthma and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease exacerbations: a randomized sham-controlled clinical trial.

    PubMed

    Mahajan, Amit K; Diette, Gregory B; Hatipoğlu, Umur; Bilderback, Andrew; Ridge, Alana; Harris, Vanessa Walker; Dalapathi, Vijay; Badlani, Sameer; Lewis, Stephanie; Charbeneau, Jeff T; Naureckas, Edward T; Krishnan, Jerry A

    2011-09-10

    High frequency chest wall oscillation (HFCWO) is used for airway mucus clearance. The objective of this study was to evaluate the use of HFCWO early in the treatment of adults hospitalized for acute asthma or chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). Randomized, multi-center, double-masked phase II clinical trial of active or sham treatment initiated within 24 hours of hospital admission for acute asthma or COPD at four academic medical centers. Patients received active or sham treatment for 15 minutes three times a day for four treatments. Medical management was standardized across groups. The primary outcomes were patient adherence to therapy after four treatments (minutes used/60 minutes prescribed) and satisfaction. Secondary outcomes included change in Borg dyspnea score (≥ 1 unit indicates a clinically significant change), spontaneously expectorated sputum volume, and forced expired volume in 1 second. Fifty-two participants were randomized to active (n = 25) or sham (n = 27) treatment. Patient adherence was similarly high in both groups (91% vs. 93%; p = 0.70). Patient satisfaction was also similarly high in both groups. After four treatments, a higher proportion of patients in the active treatment group had a clinically significant improvement in dyspnea (70.8% vs. 42.3%, p = 0.04). There were no significant differences in other secondary outcomes. HFCWO is well tolerated in adults hospitalized for acute asthma or COPD and significantly improves dyspnea. The high levels of patient satisfaction in both treatment groups justify the need for sham controls when evaluating the use of HFCWO on patient-reported outcomes. Additional studies are needed to more fully evaluate the role of HFCWO in improving in-hospital and post-discharge outcomes in this population. ClinicalTrials.gov: NCT00181285.

  2. Dose-Volume Parameters Predict for the Development of Chest Wall Pain After Stereotactic Body Radiation for Lung Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Mutter, Robert W.; Liu Fan; Abreu, Andres; Yorke, Ellen; Jackson, Andrew; Rosenzweig, Kenneth E.

    2012-04-01

    Purpose: Chest wall (CW) pain has recently been recognized as an important adverse effect of stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) for non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC). We developed a dose-volume model to predict the development of this toxicity. Methods and Materials: A total of 126 patients with primary, clinically node-negative NSCLC received three to five fractions of SBRT to doses of 40-60 Gy and were prospectively followed. The dose-absolute volume histograms of two different definitions of the CW as an organ at risk (CW3cm and CW2cm) were examined for all 126 patients. Results: With a median follow-up of 16 months, the 2-year estimated actuarial incidence of Grade {>=} 2 CW pain was 39%. The median time to onset of Grade {>=} 2 CW pain (National Cancer Institute Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events, Version 3.0) was 9 months. There was no predictive advantage for biologically corrected dose over physical dose. Neither fraction number (p = 0.07) nor prescription dose (p = 0.07) were significantly correlated with the development of Grade {>=} 2 CW pain. Cox Proportional Hazards analysis identified significant correlation with a broad range of dose-volume combinations, with the CW volume receiving 30 Gy (V30) as one of the strongest predictors (p < 0.001). CW2cm consistently enabled better prediction of CW toxicity. When a physical dose of 30 Gy was received by more than 70 cm{sup 3} of CW2cm, there was a significant correlation with Grade {>=} 2 CW pain (p = 0.004). Conclusions: CW toxicity after SBRT is common and long-term follow-up is needed to identify affected patients. A volume of CW {>=} 70 cm{sup 3} receiving 30 Gy is significantly correlated with Grade {>=} 2 CW pain. We are currently applying this constraint at our institution for patients receiving thoracic SBRT. An actuarial atlas of our data is provided as an electronic supplement to facilitate data-sharing and meta-analysis relating to CW pain.

  3. Lung cancer with chest wall invasion: retrospective analysis comparing en-bloc resection and ‘resection in bird cage’

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Invasion of the chest wall per se is not a contraindication for tumor resection in non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC), provided there is no mediastinal lymph node or vital structure involvement. Although widely known to Brazilian surgeons, the ‘resection in bird cage’ technique has never been widely studied in terms of patient survival. Thus, the objective of this study was to evaluate the postoperative consequences and overall survival of extra-musculoperiosteal resection compared with en-bloc resection in NSCLC patients with invasion of the endothoracic fascia. Methods Between January 1990 and December 2009, 33 NSCLC patients with invasion of the thoracic wall who underwent pulmonary resection were retrospectively analyzed. Of the 33 patients evaluated, 20 patients underwent en-bloc resection and 13 underwent ‘resection in bird cage.’ For each patient, a retrospective case note review was made. Results The median age at surgery, gender, indication, rate of comorbidities, tumor size and the degree of uptake in the costal margin were similar for both groups. The rate of postoperative complications and the duration of hospitalization did not differ between the groups. Regarding the outcome variables, the disease-free interval, rate of local recurrence, metastasis-free time after surgery, overall mortality rate, mortality rate related to metastatic disease, duration following surgery in which deaths occurred, and overall survival were also similar between groups. The cumulative survival curves between the ‘resection in bird cage’ and en-bloc resection and between stages Ia + Ib and IIb + IIIa + IV were not significantly different (p = 0.68 and p = 0.64, respectively). The cumulative metastasis-free survival curves were not significantly different between the two types of surgery (p = 0.38). Conclusions In NSCLC patients with invasion of the endothoracic fascia, ‘resection in bird cage’ is a less aggressive procedure

  4. Computed tomography (CT)-guided interstitial permanent implantation of (125)I seeds for refractory chest wall metastasis or recurrence.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Ping; Liu, Chen; Wang, Junjie; Yang, Ruijie; Jiang, Yuliang; Tian, Suqing

    2015-02-01

    To evaluate the efficacy and safety of 125I seeds implantation for refractory chest wall (CW) metastasis or recurrence under CT guidance. In addition we assessed initial data obtained on the therapeutic response for refractory CW metastasis or recurrence. Twenty consecutive patients underwent permanent implantation of 125I seeds (from Jul. 2004 to Jan. 2011) under computed tomography (CT) guidance. Postoperative dosimetry was routinely performed for all patients. The actuarial D90 of the implanted 125I seeds ranged from 100 Gy to 160 Gy (median: 130 Gy). The activity of 125I seeds ranged from 0.5 mCi to 0.78 mCi (median: 0.71 mCi). The total number of seeds implanted ranged from 8 to 269 (median: 53). The follow-up period ranged from 3 to 54 months (median: 11.5 months). The survival and local control probabilities were calculated by the Kaplan-Meier method. Among all the 20 patients, 3 patients had complete remission CR (15%), 12 patients had partial remission PR (60%), 5 patients had stable disease SD. The 1-, 2-, 3- and 4-year tumor control rates were all 88.7% respectively. The 1- and 2-, 3-, 4-year cancer specific survival rates were 56.5% and 47.1%, 47.1%, 47.1% respectively. The 1- and 2-, 3-, 4-year overall survival rates were 53.3% and 35.6%, 35.6%, 35.6% respectively, with a median survival of 15 months (95% CI, 7.0-22.9). Mild brachial plexus injury was seen in one patient; grade 1 or 2 skin reactions were seen in 6 patients (30%) who had received external beam radiation therapy (EBRT) before. No grade 3 and 4 skin side effects were found. Rib fracture, ulceration, pneumothorax or hemopneumothorax were not seen. Interstitial permanent implantation of 125I seeds under CT guidance is feasible, efficacious and safe for refractory CW metastasis or recurrence. © The Author(s) 2014.

  5. Design of a broadband electrical impedance matching network for piezoelectric ultrasound transducers based on a genetic algorithm.

    PubMed

    An, Jianfei; Song, Kezhu; Zhang, Shuangxi; Yang, Junfeng; Cao, Ping

    2014-04-16

    An improved method based on a genetic algorithm (GA) is developed to design a broadband electrical impedance matching network for piezoelectric ultrasound transducer. A key feature of the new method is that it can optimize both the topology of the matching network and perform optimization on the components. The main idea of this method is to find the optimal matching network in a set of candidate topologies. Some successful experiences of classical algorithms are absorbed to limit the size of the set of candidate topologies and greatly simplify the calculation process. Both binary-coded GA and real-coded GA are used for topology optimization and components optimization, respectively. Some calculation strategies, such as elitist strategy and clearing niche method, are adopted to make sure that the algorithm can converge to the global optimal result. Simulation and experimental results prove that matching networks with better performance might be achieved by this improved method.

  6. Design of a Broadband Electrical Impedance Matching Network for Piezoelectric Ultrasound Transducers Based on a Genetic Algorithm

    PubMed Central

    An, Jianfei; Song, Kezhu; Zhang, Shuangxi; Yang, Junfeng; Cao, Ping

    2014-01-01

    An improved method based on a genetic algorithm (GA) is developed to design a broadband electrical impedance matching network for piezoelectric ultrasound transducer. A key feature of the new method is that it can optimize both the topology of the matching network and perform optimization on the components. The main idea of this method is to find the optimal matching network in a set of candidate topologies. Some successful experiences of classical algorithms are absorbed to limit the size of the set of candidate topologies and greatly simplify the calculation process. Both binary-coded GA and real-coded GA are used for topology optimization and components optimization, respectively. Some calculation strategies, such as elitist strategy and clearing niche method, are adopted to make sure that the algorithm can converge to the global optimal result. Simulation and experimental results prove that matching networks with better performance might be achieved by this improved method. PMID:24743156

  7. Antagonistic role of vertebral translation against vertebral rotation in the spontaneous postoperative modulation of the anterior chest wall contour in thoracic idiopathic scoliosis.

    PubMed

    Qian, Bang-ping; Mao, Sai-hu; Zhu, Ze-zhang; Zhu, Feng; Liu, Zhen; Xu, Lei-lei; Wang, Bing; Yu, Yang; Qiu, Yong

    2013-09-01

    A computed tomography study. To identify the best scoliotic deformity components that show impact upon the spontaneous postoperative modulation of the deformed anterior chest wall contour in right convex thoracic adolescent idiopathic scoliosis. Spontaneous postoperative aggravation of the anterior concave costal projection was a common occurrence in adolescent idiopathic scoliosis, yet the risk factors that effectively bridged the gap between what the surgeons did in the interior and how the rib cages reacted on the exterior were still open to debate. Pre- and postoperative computed tomographic scans of 77 patients with right convex thoracic adolescent idiopathic scoliosis were retrieved and analyzed. According to the postoperative variation of anterior chest wall angle (CWA), the patients were divided into 2 groups with either aggravated or improved CWA. Multiple scoliotic deformity parameters and their surgical correction rates were evaluated, correlated, and then compared between the 2 groups. Moreover, patients with apex located at T9 were isolated and evaluated independently. A logistic regression analysis was used to determine the independent predictors of the spontaneous postoperative modulation of the anterior chest wall contour. The surgical correction rate of Cobb angle (supine), the rotational angle with respect to the sagittal plane (RAsag angle), the rotational angle with respect to the anterior midline of the body (RAml angle), the angle of lateral deviation of the apical vertebrae from the midline (MLdev angle), the posterior hemithorax ratio, the vertebral translation (VT), and the thoracic rotation averaged 64.6%, 19.5%, 30.8%, 39.2%, 15.0%, 41.2%, and 28.7%, respectively. Ratio of aggravated anterior chest wall contour was the highest at the T7 apex group (84.6%) as compared with T8 apex group (47.1%), T9 apex group (19.5%), and T10 apex group (0.0%). The preoperative CWA was significantly lower in the aggravated CWA group when compared with the

  8. J-substitution algorithm in magnetic resonance electrical impedance tomography (MREIT): phantom experiments for static resistivity images.

    PubMed

    Khang, Hyun Soo; Lee, Byung Il; Oh, Suk Hoon; Woo, Eung Je; Lee, Soo Yeol; Cho, Min Hyoung; Kwon, Ohin; Yoon, Jeong Rock; Seo, Jin Keun

    2002-06-01

    Recently, a new static resistivity image reconstruction algorithm is proposed utilizing internal current density data obtained by magnetic resonance current density imaging technique. This new imaging method is called magnetic resonance electrical impedance tomography (MREIT). The derivation and performance of J-substitution algorithm in MREIT have been reported as a new accurate and high-resolution static impedance imaging technique via computer simulation methods. In this paper, we present experimental procedures, denoising techniques, and image reconstructions using a 0.3-tesla (T) experimental MREIT system and saline phantoms. MREIT using J-substitution algorithm effectively utilizes the internal current density information resolving the problem inherent in a conventional EIT, that is, the low sensitivity of boundary measurements to any changes of internal tissue resistivity values. Resistivity images of saline phantoms show an accuracy of 6.8%-47.2% and spatial resolution of 64 x 64. Both of them can be significantly improved by using an MRI system with a better signal-to-noise ratio.

  9. Reproducibility of The Abdominal and Chest Wall Position by Voluntary Breath-Hold Technique Using a Laser-Based Monitoring and Visual Feedback System

    SciTech Connect

    Nakamura, Katsumasa . E-mail: nakam@radiol.med.kyushu-u.ac.jp; Shioyama, Yoshiyuki; Nomoto, Satoru; Ohga, Saiji; Toba, Takashi; Yoshitake, Tadamasa; Anai, Shigeo; Terashima, Hiromi; Honda, Hiroshi

    2007-05-01

    Purpose: The voluntary breath-hold (BH) technique is a simple method to control the respiration-related motion of a tumor during irradiation. However, the abdominal and chest wall position may not be accurately reproduced using the BH technique. The purpose of this study was to examine whether visual feedback can reduce the fluctuation in wall motion during BH using a new respiratory monitoring device. Methods and Materials: We developed a laser-based BH monitoring and visual feedback system. For this study, five healthy volunteers were enrolled. The volunteers, practicing abdominal breathing, performed shallow end-expiration BH (SEBH), shallow end-inspiration BH (SIBH), and deep end-inspiration BH (DIBH) with or without visual feedback. The abdominal and chest wall positions were measured at 80-ms intervals during BHs. Results: The fluctuation in the chest wall position was smaller than that of the abdominal wall position. The reproducibility of the wall position was improved by visual feedback. With a monitoring device, visual feedback reduced the mean deviation of the abdominal wall from 2.1 {+-} 1.3 mm to 1.5 {+-} 0.5 mm, 2.5 {+-} 1.9 mm to 1.1 {+-} 0.4 mm, and 6.6 {+-} 2.4 mm to 2.6 {+-} 1.4 mm in SEBH, SIBH, and DIBH, respectively. Conclusions: Volunteers can perform the BH maneuver in a highly reproducible fashion when informed about the position of the wall, although in the case of DIBH, the deviation in the wall position remained substantial.

  10. Three-Dimensional Computed Tomography (3–D CT) for Evaluation and Management of Children with Complex Chest Wall Anomalies: Useful Information or Just Pretty Pictures?

    PubMed Central

    Calloway, E. Hollin; Chhotani, Ali N.; Lee, Yueh Z.; Phillips, J. Duncan

    2013-01-01

    Purpose Shaded Surface Display (SSD) technology, with 3-D CT reconstruction, has been reported in a few small series of patients with congenital or acquired chest wall deformities. SSD images are visually attractive and educational, but many institutions are hesitant to utilize these secondary to cost and image data storage concerns. This study was designed to assess the true value of SSD to the patient, family, and operating surgeon, in the evaluation and management of these children. Methods Following IRB approval, we performed a retrospective review of records of 82 patients with chest wall deformities, evaluated with SSD, from 2002 to 2009. SSD usefulness, when compared with routine 2-D CT, was graded on a strict numerical scale from 0 (added no value besides education for the patient/family) to 3 (critical for surgical planning and patient management). Results There were 56 males and 26 females. Median age was 15.3 years (range: 0.6–41.1). Deformities included 56 pectus excavatum, 19 pectus carinatum, and 8 other/mixed deformities. 6 patients also had acquired asphyxiating thoracic dystrophy (AATD). Eleven (13%) had previous chest wall reconstructive surgery. In 25 (30%) patients, SSD was useful or critical. Findings underappreciated on 2-D images included: sternal abnormalities (29), rib abnormalities (28), and heterotopic calcifications (7). SSD changed or influenced operation choice (4), clarified bone versus soft tissue (3), helped clarify AATD (3), and aided in rib graft evaluation (2). Point biserial correlation coefficient analysis (Rpb) displayed significance for SSD usefulness in patients with previous chest repair surgery (Rpb=0.48, p≤0.001), AATD (Rpb=0.34, p=0.001), pectus carinatum (Rpb=0.27, p=0.008), and females (Rpb=0.19, p=0.044). Conclusions Shaded Surface Display, when used to evaluate children and young adults with congenital or acquired chest wall deformities, provides useful or critical information for surgical planning and patient

  11. Sternal Cleft and Pectus Excavatum: A Combined Approach for the Correction of a Complex Anterior Chest Wall Malformation in a Teenager.

    PubMed

    Tocchioni, Francesca; Ghionzoli, Marco; Lo Piccolo, Roberto; Deaconu, Diana E; Facchini, Flavio; Milanez De Campos, Jose R; Messineo, Antonio

    2015-06-01

    Congenital sternal cleft is a rare chest wall malformation. Because of the flexibility of the chest in infants, surgical repair should be performed by primary closure in the neonatal period. In adolescents and adults, different techniques have been suggested to overcome the lack of sternal bone tissue. We describe a very rare case of an 18-year-old woman with a complete bifid sternum associated with pectus excavatum for whom a satisfactory cosmetic and functional result was obtained by adequate surgical planning, which entailed a combination of two standardized surgical techniques.

  12. Chest wall reconstruction after en bloc Pancoast tumour resection with the use of MatrixRib and SILC fixation systems: technical note.

    PubMed

    Czyz, Marcin; Addae-Boateng, Emmanuel; Boszczyk, Bronek M

    2015-10-01

    Technical note. In cases in which partial resection of the rib cage is accomplished with vertebrectomy, reconstruction of the chest wall may be challenging. That is because of lack of the anchor point which normally would be a proximal end of a rib or transverse process. We report a straightforward technique for chest wall reconstruction with the novel use of two systems of fixation commonly applied in spinal practice. The operation of a squamous cell carcinoma (Pancoast tumour) of the right lung infiltrating T2, T3 and T4 vertebrae was performed though T4 lateral thoracotomy. Posterior instrumentation with transpedicular screws T1-3-5 on the left and T1-5 on the right side was followed with the right upper lobectomy and hemivertebrectomy. The laminae and facet joints of T2-T4 vertebrae were removed on the side of the tumour. An osteotomy was performed medial to the pedicle at the lateral aspect of the dural sac on the side of the tumour. Proximal parts of four adjacent ribs were removed allowing radical en bloc resection with tumour-free margins. The distal end of each of four rib plates used (MatrixRib Precontoured Plate system) was attached to the proximal end of the rib. The proximal end of the plate was then attached to the rod of posterior fixation construct with the use of a flexible polyethylene terephthalate (PeT) band of the SILC™ fixation system. The other end of the PeT band was then passed through the top-loading clamp subsequently attached to the rod of the posterior fixation. The patient did not require additional procedures for chest wall reconstruction. On the 7-month follow-up, in chest CT he was found with satisfactory expansion of the remaining lung tissue with proper spinal alignment and anatomical shape of the rib cage. The reported technique can be applied for chest wall reconstruction in cases of total or subtotal vertebrectomy accomplished with the resection extending towards rib cage. It appears to be straightforward, safe and effective

  13. Efficacy and safety of continuous low-irradiance photodynamic therapy in the treatment of chest wall progression of breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Morrison, Sara A; Hill, Sam L; Rogers, Gary S; Graham, Roger A

    2014-12-01

    Photodynamic therapy (PDT) is a binary therapy using a drug and high-energy light source. PDT is approved for several premalignant and malignant conditions. Recent in-vitro and animal data suggest that enhanced tumor-specific cytotoxicity can be achieved with far less collateral damage to normal surrounding tissues if PDT is administered continuously at a lower dose rate for extended periods of time. Based on these promising preclinical data, we conducted a Phase I clinical trial of continuous low-irradiance photodynamic therapy (CLIPT) using 630 nm laser energy and intravenously administered porforin sodium as the photosensitizer. We determined the maximum tolerated dose (MTD) of CLIPT on skin and tumor response in subjects with cutaneous and subcutaneous metastatic nodules who had failed radiation and surgery. Patients with cutaneous and/or subcutaneous metastatic nodules that had failed radiation and surgery were offered enrollment into the trial. The initial study design planned for sequential cohorts of six subjects to be treated at increasing laser intensity, starting at 100 J/cm(2) administered continuously over 24 h (10(-2) dose rate compared with standard PDT). Dose-limiting toxicity was defined as partial or full-thickness necrosis of the surrounding tumor-free, previously irradiated skin. The MTD was defined as the highest laser energy at which ≤33% of subjects experienced the dose-limiting toxicity. Subjects received intravenous porfirmer sodium 0.8 mg/kg 48 h before commencing CLIPT. Response rates and quality of life measures were assessed. Nine subjects were enrolled with chest wall progression of breast cancer following mastectomy. All had failed prior surgery and electron-beam radiation therapy. The initial two subjects were treated at 100 J/cm(2) and developed partial thickness skin necrosis. Dose reduction was therefore instituted, and the next cohort was treated at 50 J/cm(2). None of the subsequent seven subjects suffered partial or full

  14. A Nationwide Survey of UK Oncologists' Views on the Choice of Radiotherapy Regime for the Reconstructed Chest Wall in Breast Cancer Patients

    PubMed Central

    Jyothirmayi, Rema

    2017-01-01

    Aims. This paper describes a UK survey of the choice of radiotherapy regime for the reconstructed chest wall in breast cancer patients. Questions focused on which fractionation regime consultants choose, their reasons for this, whether the type of reconstruction influences their choice, and whether bolus is used in patients who have undergone immediate reconstructive surgery. Materials and Methods. Between July 2014 and July 2015 a survey was sent by email to UK consultant radiation oncologists treating breast cancer. Results. The response rate was 73%. 67% of respondents use 40 Gray (Gy) in 15 fractions, with 22% using 50 Gy in 25 fractions and 7% using other regimes. For 90% of consultants the type of reconstruction did not influence their decision regarding choice of fractionation. 83% of respondents do not usually use a bolus for chest wall radiotherapy in patients who have had immediate reconstructive surgery. Conclusions. This survey illustrates there is variation in practice in the management of patients with breast cancer who have undergone immediate reconstructive surgery in the UK. There is a need for further research to determine which fractionation regime is optimal, whether the type of surgery is relevant, and whether bolus should be added. PMID:28116166

  15. Radiofrequency ablation and percutaneous permanent iodine-125 implantation as salvage therapy for giant recurrent sclerosing epithelioid fibrosarcoma of the chest wall: A case report

    PubMed Central

    KE, SHAN; DING, XUE-MEI; GAO, JUN; WANG, SHAO-HONG; ZHANG, JUN; KONG, JIAN; SUN, WEN-BING

    2015-01-01

    Sclerosing epithelioid fibrosarcoma (SEF) is a rare soft-tissue sarcoma for which there is no standardized treatment regimen available. The current treatment options for SEF are resection, radiation and chemotherapy. Surgical resection remains the mainstay of therapy for SEF. However, SEF is an aggressive tumor that is prone to repeated local recurrence if not widely excised. Radiation and chemotherapy are less commonly used due to the insensitivity of SEF to these therapies. The treatment of recurrent SEF is even more challenging. The present study describes a patient who presented with a giant recurrent SEF arising from the chest wall that was accompanied by emergent bleeding. The patient was a 70-year-old male who had multiple comorbid diseases, including hypertension and chronic cardiac dysfunction. A computed tomography (CT) scan indicated the involvement of the sternum and anterior mediastinum. However, the patient refused any further surgery. Subsequent to careful discussion and consideration, radiofrequency (RF) ablation and percutaneous iodine-125 implantation was administered. The emergent bleeding was successfully stopped and the tumor was eliminated using RF ablation. Percutaneous iodine-125 implantation under CT guidance established effective control on the growth of the tumor involving the mediastinum. Despite this, the tumor recurred 6 months after treatment. The patient refused any further treatment and was discharged. In conclusion, RF ablation and percutaneous permanent iodine-125 implantation is a feasible and safe salvage therapy for patients with recurrent SEF of the chest wall. PMID:26137032

  16. Chest wall stabilization and reconstruction: short and long-term results 5 years after the introduction of a new titanium plates system.

    PubMed

    De Palma, Angela; Sollitto, Francesco; Loizzi, Domenico; Di Gennaro, Francesco; Scarascia, Daniele; Carlucci, Annalisa; Giudice, Giuseppe; Armenio, Andrea; Ludovico, Rossana; Loizzi, Michele

    2016-03-01

    We report short and long-term results with the dedicated Synthes(®) titanium plates system, introduced 5 years ago, for chest wall stabilization and reconstruction. We retrospectively analyzed (January 2010 to December 2014) 27 consecutive patients (22 males, 5 females; range 16-83 years, median age 60 years), treated with this system: primary [3] and secondary [8] chest wall tumor; flail chest [5]; multiple ribs fractures [5]; sternal dehiscence-diastasis [3]; sternal fracture [1]; sternoclavicular joint dislocation [1]; Poland syndrome [1]. Short-term results were evaluated as: operating time, post-operative morbidity, mortality, hospital stay; long-term results as: survival, plates-related morbidity, spirometric values, chest pain [measured with Verbal Rating Scale (VRS) and SF12 standard V1 questionnaire]. Each patient received from 1 to 10 (median 2) titanium plates/splints; median operating time was 150 min (range: 115-430 min). Post-operative course: 15 patients (55.6%) uneventful, 10 (37%) minor complications, 2 (7.4%) major complications; no post-operative mortality. Median post-operative hospital stay was 13 days (range: 5-129 days). At a median follow-up of 20 months (range: 1-59 months), 21 patients (78%) were alive, 6 (22%) died. Three patients presented long-term plates-related morbidity: plates rupture [2], pin plate dislodgment [1]; two required a second surgical look. One-year from surgery median spirometric values were: FVC 3.31 L (90%), FEV1 2.46 L (78%), DLCO 20.9 mL/mmHg/min (76%). On 21 alive patients, 7 (33.3%) reported no pain (VRS score 0), 10 (47.6%) mild (score 2), 4 (19.1%) moderate (score 4), no-one severe (score >4); 15 (71.5%) reported none or mild, 6 (28.5%) moderate pain influencing quality of life. An optimal chest wall stabilization and reconstruction was achieved with the Synthes(®) titanium plates system, with minimal morbidity, no post-operative mortality, acceptable operating time and post-operative hospital stay. Long

  17. Solitary metastatic adenocarcinoma of the sternum treated by total sternectomy and chest wall reconstruction using a Gore-Tex patch and myocutaneous flap: a case report

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Introduction The consequences of bone metastasis are often devastating. Although the exact incidence of bone metastasis is unknown, it is estimated that 350,000 people die of bone metastasis annually in the United States. The incidence of local recurrences after mastectomy and breast-conserving therapy varies between 5% and 40% depending on the risk factors and primary therapy utilized. So far, a standard therapy of local recurrence has not been defined, while indications of resection and reconstruction considerations have been infrequently described. This case report reviews the use of sternectomy for breast cancer recurrence, highlights the need for thorough clinical and radiologic evaluation to ensure the absence of other systemic diseases, and suggests the use of serratus anterior muscle flap as a pedicle graft to cover full-thickness defects of the anterior chest wall. Case presentation We report the case of a 70-year-old Caucasian woman who was referred to our hospital for the management of a retrosternal mediastinal mass. She had undergone radical mastectomy in 1999. Computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging revealed a 74.23 × 37.7 × 133.6-mm mass in the anterior mediastinum adjacent to the main pulmonary artery, the right ventricle and the ascending aorta. We performed total sternectomy at all layers encompassing the skin, the subcutaneous tissues, the right pectoralis major muscle, all the costal cartilages, and the anterior part of the pericardium. The defect was immediately closed using a 0.6 mm Gore-Tex cardiovascular patch combined with a serratus anterior muscle flap. Our patient had remained asymptomatic during her follow-up examination after 18 months. Conclusion Chest wall resection has become a critical component of the thoracic surgeon's armamentarium. It may be performed to treat either benign conditions (osteoradionecrosis, osteomyelitis) or malignant diseases. There are, however, very few reports on the results of full

  18. Solitary metastatic adenocarcinoma of the sternum treated by total sternectomy and chest wall reconstruction using a Gore-Tex patch and myocutaneous flap: a case report.

    PubMed

    Daliakopoulos, Stavros I; Klimatsidas, Michael N; Korfer, Reiner

    2010-03-01

    The consequences of bone metastasis are often devastating. Although the exact incidence of bone metastasis is unknown, it is estimated that 350,000 people die of bone metastasis annually in the United States. The incidence of local recurrences after mastectomy and breast-conserving therapy varies between 5% and 40% depending on the risk factors and primary therapy utilized. So far, a standard therapy of local recurrence has not been defined, while indications of resection and reconstruction considerations have been infrequently described. This case report reviews the use of sternectomy for breast cancer recurrence, highlights the need for thorough clinical and radiologic evaluation to ensure the absence of other systemic diseases, and suggests the use of serratus anterior muscle flap as a pedicle graft to cover full-thickness defects of the anterior chest wall. We report the case of a 70-year-old Caucasian woman who was referred to our hospital for the management of a retrosternal mediastinal mass. She had undergone radical mastectomy in 1999. Computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging revealed a 74.23 x 37.7 x 133.6-mm mass in the anterior mediastinum adjacent to the main pulmonary artery, the right ventricle and the ascending aorta. We performed total sternectomy at all layers encompassing the skin, the subcutaneous tissues, the right pectoralis major muscle, all the costal cartilages, and the anterior part of the pericardium. The defect was immediately closed using a 0.6 mm Gore-Tex cardiovascular patch combined with a serratus anterior muscle flap. Our patient had remained asymptomatic during her follow-up examination after 18 months. Chest wall resection has become a critical component of the thoracic surgeon's armamentarium. It may be performed to treat either benign conditions (osteoradionecrosis, osteomyelitis) or malignant diseases. There are, however, very few reports on the results of full-thickness complete chest wall resections for locally

  19. Maintaining end-expiratory transpulmonary pressure prevents worsening of ventilator-induced lung injury caused by chest wall constriction in surfactant-depleted rats

    PubMed Central

    Loring, Stephen H.; Pecchiari, Matteo; Valle, Patrizia Della; Monaco, Ario; Gentile, Guendalina; D'Angelo, Edgardo

    2014-01-01

    Objective To see whether in acute lung injury (ALI) 1) compression of the lungs caused by thoracoabdominal constriction degrades lung function and worsens ventilator-induced lung injury (VILI), and 2) maintaining end-expiratory transpulmonary pressure (Pl) by increasing positive end-expiratory pressure (PEEP) reduces the deleterious effects of chest wall constriction. Design Experimental study in rats. Setting Physiology laboratory. Interventions ALI was induced in 3 groups of 9 rats by saline lavage. Nine animals immediately sacrificed served as control group. Group L had lavage only, group LC had the chest wall constricted with an elastic binder, and group LCP had the same chest constriction but with PEEP raised to maintain end-expiratory Pl. After lavage, all groups were ventilated with the same pattern for 1½ hr. Measurements and Main Results Pl, measured with an esophageal balloon-catheter, lung volume changes, arterial blood gasses and pH were assessed during mechanical ventilation (MV). Lung wet-to-dry ratio (W/D), albumin, TNF-α, IL-1β, IL-6, IL-10, and MIP-2 in serum and bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF), and serum E-selectin and von Willebrand Factor (vWF) were measured at the end of MV. Lavage caused hypoxemia and acidemia, increased lung resistance and elastance, and decreased end-expiratory lung volume. With prolonged MV, lung mechanics, hypoxemia, and W/D were significantly worse in group LC. Pro-inflammatory cytokines except E-selectin were elevated in serum and BALF in all groups, with significantly greater levels of TNF-α, IL-1β, and IL-6 in group LC, which also exhibited significantly worse bronchiolar injury and greater heterogeneity of airspace expansion at a fixed Pl than other groups. Conclusions Chest wall constriction in ALI reduces lung volume, worsens hypoxemia, and increases pulmonary edema, mechanical abnormalities, pro-inflammatory mediator release, and histological signs of VILI. Maintaining end-expiratory Pl at preconstriction

  20. Chest wall desmoid tumours treated with definitive radiotherapy: a plan comparison of 3D conformal radiotherapy, intensity-modulated radiotherapy and volumetric-modulated arc radiotherapy.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jia; Ng, Diana; Lee, James; Stalley, Paul; Hong, Angela

    2016-03-02

    Definitive radiotherapy is often used for chest wall desmoid tumours due to size or anatomical location. The delivery of radiotherapy is challenging due to the large size and constraints of normal surrounding structures. We compared the dosimetry of 3D conformal radiotherapy (3DCRT), intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) and volumetric-modulated arc radiotherapy (VMAT) to evaluate the best treatment option. Ten consecutive patients with inoperable chest wall desmoid tumours (PTV range 416-4549 cm(3)) were selected. For each patient, 3DCRT, IMRT and VMAT plans were generated and the Conformity Index (CI), organ at risk (OAR) doses and monitor unit (MU) were evaluated. The Wilcoxon signed-rank test was used to compare dose delivered to both target and OARs. The mean number of fields for 3DCRT and IMRT were 6.3 ± 2.1, 7.2 ± 1.8. The mean number of arcs for VMAT was 3.7 ± 1.1. The mean conformity index of VMAT (0.98 ± 0.14) was similar to that of IMRT (1.03 ± 0.13), both of which were significantly better than 3DCRT (1.35 ± 0.20; p = 0.005). The mean dose to lung was significantly higher for 3DCRT (11.9Gy ± 7.9) compared to IMRT (9.4Gy ± 5.4, p = 0.014) and VMAT (8.9Gy ± 4.5, p = 0.017). For the 3 females, the low dose regions in the ipsilateral breast for VMAT were generally less with VMAT. IMRT plans required 1427 ± 532 MU per fraction which was almost 4-fold higher than 3DCRT (313 ± 112, P = 0.005). Compared to IMRT, VMAT plans required 60 % less MU (570 ± 285, P = 0.005). For inoperable chest wall desmoid tumours, VMAT delivered equivalent target coverage when compared to IMRT but required 60 % less MU. Both VMAT and IMRT were superior to 3DCRT in terms of better PTV coverage and sparing of lung tissue.

  1. Optimal design of a standing-wave accelerating tube with a high shunt impedance based on a genetic algorithm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, Zhenxing; Pei, Yuanji; Pang, Jian

    2015-08-01

    In this paper, we present an optimal design based on a genetic algorithm for a compact standing-wave (SW) accelerating tube with an operating frequency of 2998 MHz for industrial and medical applications. It consists of bi-periodic structures with a nose cone whose inter-cavity coupling is achieved through electric coupling rather than magnetic coupling. A mathematical model is established to optimize the arc at the cavity wall to reduce the microwave power loss and to optimize the nose cone to increase the electric field along the axis to achieve a high shunt impedance. The simulation results indicate that with the proper nose cone and arc, the shunt impedance of the cavity can be as high as 114 MΩ / m. Afterward, we present the tuning of the tube using SUPERFISH and the calculation of the beam dynamics using ASTRA and Parmela. The total length of the optimal tube is only 30.175 cm. Finally, a coupler is designed with a small-aperture coupling using CST MICROWAVE STUDIO.

  2. EM algorithm applied for estimating non-stationary region boundaries using electrical impedance tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khambampati, A. K.; Rashid, A.; Kim, B. S.; Liu, Dong; Kim, S.; Kim, K. Y.

    2010-04-01

    EIT has been used for the dynamic estimation of organ boundaries. One specific application in this context is the estimation of lung boundaries during pulmonary circulation. This would help track the size and shape of lungs of the patients suffering from diseases like pulmonary edema and acute respiratory failure (ARF). The dynamic boundary estimation of the lungs can also be utilized to set and control the air volume and pressure delivered to the patients during artificial ventilation. In this paper, the expectation-maximization (EM) algorithm is used as an inverse algorithm to estimate the non-stationary lung boundary. The uncertainties caused in Kalman-type filters due to inaccurate selection of model parameters are overcome using EM algorithm. Numerical experiments using chest shaped geometry are carried out with proposed method and the performance is compared with extended Kalman filter (EKF). Results show superior performance of EM in estimation of the lung boundary.

  3. Radio-guided occult lesion localisation using iodine 125 Seeds “ROLLIS” to guide surgical removal of an impalpable posterior chest wall melanoma metastasis

    SciTech Connect

    Dissanayake, Shashini; Dissanayake, Deepthi; Taylor, Donna B

    2015-09-15

    Cancer screening and surveillance programmes and the use of sophisticated imaging tools such as positron emission tomography-computed tomography (PET-CT) have increased the detection of impalpable lesions requiring imaging guidance for excision. A new technique involves intra-lesional insertion of a low-activity iodine-125 ({sup 125}I) seed and detection of the radioactive signal in theatre using a hand-held gamma probe to guide surgery. Whilst several studies describe using this method to guide the removal of impalpable breast lesions, only a handful of publications report its use to guide excision of lesions outside the breast. We describe a case in which radio-guided occult lesion localisation using an iodine 125 seed was used to guide excision of an impalpable posterior chest wall metastasis detected on PET-CT.

  4. Isolated implant metastasis in chest wall due to seeding of transpleurally placed PTBD catheter tract in a case of hilar cholangiocarcinoma.

    PubMed

    Talukder, Shibojit; Behera, Arunanshu; Tandup, Cherring; Mitra, Suvradeep

    2017-04-18

    Percutaneous transhepatic biliary drainage (PTBD) catheter site metastasis in cases of cholangiocarcinoma is reported sporadically. But it is unusual to see left-sided tumour metastasising to the right PTBD catheter site. Metastasis, in general, has a poor prognosis, but recurrence along the catheter tract in the absence of other systemic diseases can be a different scenario altogether. To date, there is no consensus on the management of this form of metastasis. But carefully selected patients can benefit from aggressive surgical resection. We report a case of a young patient with isolated chest wall metastasis 1 year after resection of left-sided hilar cholangiocarcinoma. The metastasis was resected and, on pathological analysis, was confirmed to be due to implantation of malignant cells along the tract of the PTBD catheter placed via a transpleural route. © BMJ Publishing Group Ltd (unless otherwise stated in the text of the article) 2017. All rights reserved. No commercial use is permitted unless otherwise expressly granted.

  5. Randomised controlled trial of non-invasive ventilation (NIV) for nocturnal hypoventilation in neuromuscular and chest wall disease patients with daytime normocapnia

    PubMed Central

    Ward, S; Chatwin, M; Heather, S; Simonds, A

    2005-01-01

    Background: Long term non-invasive ventilation (NIV) reduces morbidity and mortality in patients with neuromuscular and chest wall disease with hypercapnic ventilatory failure, but preventive use has not produced benefit in normocapnic patients with Duchenne muscular dystrophy. Individuals with nocturnal hypercapnia but daytime normocapnia were randomised to a control group or nocturnal NIV to examine whether nocturnal hypoventilation is a valid indication for NIV. Methods: Forty eight patients with congenital neuromuscular or chest wall disease aged 7–51 years and vital capacity <50% predicted underwent overnight respiratory monitoring. Twenty six with daytime normocapnia and nocturnal hypercapnia were randomised to either nocturnal NIV or to a control group without ventilatory support. NIV was started in the control group if patients fulfilled preset safety criteria. Results: Peak nocturnal transcutaneous carbon dioxide tension (TcCO2) did not differ between the groups, but the mean (SD) percentage of the night during which TcCO2 was >6.5 kPa decreased in the NIV group (–57.7 (26.1)%) but not in controls (–11.75 (46.1)%; p = 0.049, 95% CI –91.5 to –0.35). Mean (SD) arterial oxygen saturation increased in the NIV group (+2.97 (2.57)%) but not in controls (–1.12 (2.02)%; p = 0.024, 95% CI 0.69 to 7.5). Nine of the 10 controls failed non-intervention by fulfilling criteria to initiate NIV after a mean (SD) of 8.3 (7.3) months. Conclusion: Patients with neuromuscular disease with nocturnal hypoventilation are likely to deteriorate with the development of daytime hypercapnia and/or progressive symptoms within 2 years and may benefit from the introduction of nocturnal NIV before daytime hypercapnia ensues. PMID:16299118

  6. Poster — Thur Eve — 09: Evaluation of electrical impedance and computed tomography fusion algorithms using an anthropomorphic phantom

    SciTech Connect

    Chugh, Brige Paul; Krishnan, Kalpagam; Liu, Jeff; Kohli, Kirpal

    2014-08-15

    Integration of biological conductivity information provided by Electrical Impedance Tomography (EIT) with anatomical information provided by Computed Tomography (CT) imaging could improve the ability to characterize tissues in clinical applications. In this paper, we report results of our study which compared the fusion of EIT with CT using three different image fusion algorithms, namely: weighted averaging, wavelet fusion, and ROI indexing. The ROI indexing method of fusion involves segmenting the regions of interest from the CT image and replacing the pixels with the pixels of the EIT image. The three algorithms were applied to a CT and EIT image of an anthropomorphic phantom, constructed out of five acrylic contrast targets with varying diameter embedded in a base of gelatin bolus. The imaging performance was assessed using Detectability and Structural Similarity Index Measure (SSIM). Wavelet fusion and ROI-indexing resulted in lower Detectability (by 35% and 47%, respectively) yet higher SSIM (by 66% and 73%, respectively) than weighted averaging. Our results suggest that wavelet fusion and ROI-indexing yielded more consistent and optimal fusion performance than weighted averaging.

  7. Early Indication of Decompensated Heart Failure in Patients on Home-Telemonitoring: A Comparison of Prediction Algorithms Based on Daily Weight and Noninvasive Transthoracic Bio-impedance

    PubMed Central

    Bonomi, Alberto G; Goode, Kevin M; Reiter, Harald; Habetha, Joerg; Amft, Oliver; Cleland, John GF

    2016-01-01

    Background Heart Failure (HF) is a common reason for hospitalization. Admissions might be prevented by early detection of and intervention for decompensation. Conventionally, changes in weight, a possible measure of fluid accumulation, have been used to detect deterioration. Transthoracic impedance may be a more sensitive and accurate measure of fluid accumulation. Objective In this study, we review previously proposed predictive algorithms using body weight and noninvasive transthoracic bio-impedance (NITTI) to predict HF decompensations. Methods We monitored 91 patients with chronic HF for an average of 10 months using a weight scale and a wearable bio-impedance vest. Three algorithms were tested using either simple rule-of-thumb differences (RoT), moving averages (MACD), or cumulative sums (CUSUM). Results Algorithms using NITTI in the 2 weeks preceding decompensation predicted events (P<.001); however, using weight alone did not. Cross-validation showed that NITTI improved sensitivity of all algorithms tested and that trend algorithms provided the best performance for either measurement (Weight-MACD: 33%, NITTI-CUSUM: 60%) in contrast to the simpler rules-of-thumb (Weight-RoT: 20%, NITTI-RoT: 33%) as proposed in HF guidelines. Conclusions NITTI measurements decrease before decompensations, and combined with trend algorithms, improve the detection of HF decompensation over current guideline rules; however, many alerts are not associated with clinically overt decompensation. PMID:26892844

  8. Use of an inspiratory impedance threshold valve during cardiopulmonary resuscitation: a progress report.

    PubMed

    Lurie, K; Voelckel, W; Plaisance, P; Zielinski, T; McKnite, S; Kor, D; Sugiyama, A; Sukhum, P

    2000-05-01

    Building upon studies on the mechanism of active compression-decompression (ACD) cardiopulmonary resuscitation, a new inspiratory impedance threshold valve has been developed to enhance the return of blood to the thorax during the decompression phase of CPR. Use of this device results in a greater negative intrathoracic pressure during chest wall decompression. This leads to improved vital organ perfusion during both standard and ACD CPR. Animal and human studies suggest that this simple device increases cardiopulmonary circulation by harnessing more efficiently the kinetic energy of the outward movement of the chest wall during standard CPR or active chest wall decompression. When used in conjunction with ACD CPR during clinical evaluation, addition of the impedance valve resulted in sustained systolic pressures of greater than 100 mmHg and diastolic pressures of greater than 55 mmHg. The new valve may be beneficial in patients in asystole or shock refractory ventricular fibrillation, when enhanced return of blood flow to the chest is needed to 'prime the pump'. The potential long-term benefits of this new valve remain under investigation.

  9. Experimental validation of a novel reconstruction algorithm for electrical impedance tomography based on backprojection of Lagrange multipliers.

    PubMed

    Bayford, R; Hanquan, Y; Boone, K; Holder, D S

    1995-08-01

    A novel approach to image reconstruction for electrical impedance tomography (EIT) has been developed. It is based on a constrained optimization technique for the reconstruction of difference resistivity images without finite-element modelling. It solves the inverse problem by optimizing a cost function under constraints, in the form of normalized boundary potentials. Its application to the neighboring data collection method is presented here. Mathematical models are developed according to specified criteria. These express the reconstructed image in terms of one-dimensional Lagrange multiplier functions. The reconstruction problem becomes one of estimating these functions from normalized boundary potentials. This model is based on a cost criterion of the minimization of the variance between the reconstructed and the true resistivity distributions. The algorithm was tested on data collected in a cylindrical saline-filled tank. A polyacrylamide rod was placed in various positions with or without a peripheral plaster of Paris ring in place. This was intended to resemble the conditions during EIT of epileptic seizures recorded with scalp or cortical electrodes in the human head. One advantage of this approach is that compensation for non-uniform initial conditions may be made, as this is a significant problem in imaging cerebral activity through the skull.

  10. The effectiveness of noninvasive interventions for musculoskeletal thoracic spine and chest wall pain: a systematic review by the Ontario Protocol for Traffic Injury Management (OPTIMa) collaboration.

    PubMed

    Southerst, Danielle; Marchand, Andrée-Anne; Côté, Pierre; Shearer, Heather M; Wong, Jessica J; Varatharajan, Sharanya; Randhawa, Kristi; Sutton, Deborah; Yu, Hainan; Gross, Douglas P; Jacobs, Craig; Goldgrub, Rachel; Stupar, Maja; Mior, Silvano; Carroll, Linda J; Taylor-Vaisey, Anne

    2015-09-01

    The purpose of this study was to critically appraise and synthesize evidence on the effectiveness of noninvasive interventions, excluding pharmacological treatments, for musculoskeletal thoracic pain. Randomized controlled trials (RCTs), cohort studies, and case-control studies evaluating the effectiveness of noninvasive interventions were eligible. We searched MEDLINE, EMBASE, PsycINFO, and the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials accessed through Ovid Technologies, Inc, and CINAHL Plus with Full Text accessed through EBSCOhost from 1990 to 2015. Our search strategies combined controlled vocabulary relevant to each database (eg, MeSH for MEDLINE) and text words relevant to our research question and the inclusion criteria. Random pairs of independent reviewers screened studies for relevance and critically appraised relevant studies using the Scottish Intercollegiate Guidelines Network criteria. Studies with a low risk of bias were synthesized following best evidence synthesis principles. We screened 6988 articles and critically appraised 2 studies. Both studies had a low risk of bias and were included in our synthesis. One RCT compared thoracic spinal manipulation, needle acupuncture, and placebo electrotherapy for recent thoracic spine pain. There were statistically significant but clinically nonimportant short-term reductions in pain favoring manipulation. There were no differences between acupuncture and placebo electrotherapy. Another RCT compared a multimodal program of care and a session of education for recent musculoskeletal chest wall pain. The multimodal care resulted in statistically significant but clinically nonimportant short-term reductions in pain over education. However, participants receiving multimodal care were more likely to report important improvements in chest pain. Quality evidence on the management of musculoskeletal thoracic pain is sparse. The current evidence suggests that compared to placebo, spinal manipulation is associated

  11. Chest-wall contouring surgery in female-to-male transgender patients: A one-center retrospective analysis of applied surgical techniques and results.

    PubMed

    Kääriäinen, M; Salonen, K; Helminen, M; Karhunen-Enckell, U

    2017-03-01

    Chest-wall contouring surgery is an important part of the gender reassignment process that contributes to strengthening the self-image and facilitating living in the new gender role. Here, we analyze the surgical techniques used in our clinic and report the results. Female-to-male transgender patients (n = 57) undergoing chest-wall contouring surgery at Tampere University Hospital between January 2003 and April 2015 were enrolled in the study. Breast appearance was evaluated and either a concentric circular approach or a transverse incision technique was used for mastectomy. Patient characteristics and data regarding the technique and postoperative results were collected and analyzed retrospectively. In addition to the transgender diagnosis, 40.4% of the patients had another psychiatric diagnosis. For mastectomy, a concentric circular approach was used in 50.9% and a transverse incision approach in 49.1% of the patients. In the transverse incision group, 21.4% of the patients underwent pedicled mammaplasty and 78.6% mastectomy with a free nipple-areola complex graft. Compared with the transverse incision group, breasts were smaller (p < 0.001) and body mass index value was lower in the concentric circular group (p = 0.001). One-third of the patients had complications (hematoma, infection, seroma, fistula, or partial necrosis of nipple-areola complex) and the reoperation rate was 8.8%. Hematoma was the most frequent reason for reoperation. Corrections were required for the scar in 14.0% of the patients, the contour in 28.0%, the areola in 15.8%, and the nipple in 5.3%. Secondary corrections were needed more often in the concentric circular (55.2%) than in the transverse incision group (25.0%; p = 0.031). The larger the breast, poorer the skin quality, and greater the amount of excess skin, the longer the required incision and resulting scar is for mastectomy of female-to-male patients. Hematoma is the most common reason for acute reoperation and

  12. Radical chest wall resection and hyperfractionated accelerated radiotherapy for radiation-associated angiosarcoma of the breast: A safe and effective treatment strategy.

    PubMed

    Donovan, Elysia K; Corbett, Thomas; Vansantvoort, Jasmin; Kak, Ipshita; Popvic, Snezana; Heller, Barbara

    2017-08-27

    Radiation-associated angiosarcomas (RAS) of the breast are vascular tumors arising in a previous radiation field for primary breast cancer. They occur rarely but confer a high probability of local recurrence (LR) and poor prognosis. A wide range of treatment strategies exists due to limited evidence, and although resection is the definitive treatment, LR rates remain high. It has been suggested hyperfractionated accelerated radiotherapy (HART) has the potential to prevent LR. The sarcoma group at the Juravinski Cancer Centre (JCC) reports our experience of nine patients treated with radical resection and adjuvant HART. This is one of the largest reported cohorts we are aware of to receive this treatment. The JCC pathologic data base was reviewed between the year 2006-2015 for patients with RAS. Patients who received radical surgery and immediate HART were eligible. Patients underwent radical chest wall resection and en bloc mastectomy. Radiotherapy was then delivered to 4500 cGy in 45 fractions three times daily using parallel opposed photon beams and electron patching, or volumetric modulated arc therapy. Primary outcome was recurrence-free survival in months, and records were reviewed for descriptive reports of toxicity. We compared our results to other institutions experience with surgery alone or other adjuvant therapies. Median follow-up was 19 months (range 3-41 months). One of nine patients developed LR and developed metastasis, one died of other causes, and seven are alive with no recurrent disease. There were seven reports of mild skin toxicity during treatment. One patient developed chronic wound healing complications which eventually resolved and one patient developed asymptomatic radiation osteitis of a rib. On the basis of our experience at the JCC, we recommend treatment with radical chest wall resection and adjuvant HART to prevent recurrence in RAS patients. As demonstrated in our patients, the large normal tissue volume irradiated is tolerable with

  13. Determination of acoustic impedances of multi matching layers for narrowband ultrasonic airborne transducers at frequencies <2.5 MHz - Application of a genetic algorithm.

    PubMed

    Saffar, Saber; Abdullah, Amir

    2012-01-01

    The effective ultrasonic energy radiation into the air of piezoelectric transducers requires using multilayer matching systems with accurately selected acoustic impedances and the thickness of particular layers. One major problem of ultrasonic transducers, radiating acoustic energy into air, is to find the proper acoustic impedances of one or more matching layers. This work aims at developing an original solution to the acoustic impedance mismatch between transducer and air. If the acoustic impedance defences between transducer and air be more, then finding best matching layer(s) is harder. Therefore we consider PZT (lead zirconate titanate piezo electric) transducer and air that has huge acoustic impedance deference. The vibration source energy (PZT), which is used to generate the incident wave, consumes a part of the mechanical energy and converts it to an electrical one in theoretical calculation. After calculating matching layers, we consider the energy source as layer to design a transducer. However, this part of the mechanical energy will be neglected during the mathematical work. This approximation is correct only if the transducer is open-circuit. Since the possibilities of choosing material with required acoustic impedance are limited (the counted values cannot always be realized and applied in practice) it is necessary to correct the differences between theoretical values and the possibilities of practical application of given acoustic impedances. Such a correction can be done by manipulating other parameters of matching layers (e.g. by changing their thickness). The efficiency of the energy transmission from the piezoceramic transducer through different layers with different thickness and different attenuation enabling a compensation of non-ideal real values by changing their thickness was computer analyzed (base on genetic algorithm). Firstly, three theoretical solutions were investigated. Namely, Chebyshev, Desilets and Souquet theories. However, the

  14. Long-term multicentre randomised controlled study of high frequency chest wall oscillation versus positive expiratory pressure mask in cystic fibrosis.

    PubMed

    McIlwaine, Maggie Patricia; Alarie, Nancy; Davidson, George F; Lands, Larry C; Ratjen, Felix; Milner, Ruth; Owen, Blythe; Agnew, Jennifer L

    2013-08-01

    Positive expiratory pressure (PEP) is the most commonly used method of airway clearance (AC) in Canada for patients with cystic fibrosis (CF) whereas, in some countries, high frequency chest wall oscillation (HFCWO) is the preferred form of AC. There have been no long-term studies comparing the efficacy of HFCWO and PEP in the CF population. To determine the long-term efficacy of HFCWO compared with PEP mask therapy in the treatment of CF as measured by the number of pulmonary exacerbations (PEs). A randomised controlled study was performed in 12 CF centres in Canada. After a 2-month washout period, subjects were randomised to perform either HFCWO or PEP mask therapy for 1 year. 107 subjects were enrolled in the study; 51 were randomised to PEP and 56 to HFCWO. There were 19 dropouts within the study period, of which 16 occurred prior to or at the time of randomisation. There were significant differences between the groups in the mean number of PEs (1.14 for PEP vs 2.0 for HFCWO) and time to first PE (220 days for PEP vs 115 days for HFCWO, p=0.02). There was no significant difference in lung function, health-related quality of life scores or patient satisfaction scores between the two groups. PEP mask therapy required a shorter treatment time. The results of this study favour PEP and do not support the use of HFCWO as the primary form of AC in patients with CF. NCT00817180.

  15. SU-E-T-632: A Dosimetric Comparison of the 3D-CRT Planning of Chest Wall in Post-Mastectomy Breast Cancer Patients, with and Without Breast Board Setup

    SciTech Connect

    Muzaffar, Ambreen; Masood, Asif; Ullah, Haseeb; Mehmood, Kashif; Qasim, Uzma; Afridi, M. Ali; Khan, Salim; Hameed, Abdul

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: Breast boards are used in breast radiation which increases normal lung and heart doses, when supraclavicular field is included. Therefore, in this study through dose volume histogram (DVHs), lung and heart doses comparison was done between two different setups i.e. with and without breast board, for the treatment of left chest wall and supraclavicular fossa in postmastectomy left breast cancer. Methods: In this study, CT-Simulation scans of ten breast cancer patients were done with and without breast board, at Shifa International Hospitals Islamabad, to investigate the differences between the two different setups of the irradiation of left chest wall in terms of lung and heart doses. For immobilization, support under the neck, shoulders and arms was used. Precise PLAN 2.15 treatment planning system (TPS) was used for 3D-CRT planning. The total prescribed dose for both the plans was 5000 cGy/25 fractions. The chest wall was treated with a pair of tangential photon fields and the upper supraclavicular nodal regions were treated with an anterior photon field. A mono-isocentric technique was used to match the tangential fields with the anterior field at the isocentre. The dose volume histogram was used to compare the doses of heart and ipsilateral lung. Results: Both the plans of each patient were generated and compared. DVH results showed that for the same PTV dose coverage, plans without breast board resulted in a reduction of lung and heart doses compared with the plans with breast board. There was significant reductions in V20, V<25 and mean doses for lung and V<9 and mean doses for heart. Conclusion: In comparison of both the plans, setup without breast board significantly reduced the dose-volume of the ipsilateral lung and heart in left chest wall patients. Waived registration request has been submitted.

  16. SU-E-T-583: Operated Left Breast and Chest Wall Radiotherapy: A Dosimetric Comparison Between 3DCRT, IMRT and VMAT

    SciTech Connect

    Sarkar, B; Roy, S; Munshi, A; Pradhan, A

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: To evaluate the comparative dosimetric efficacy between field and field 3DCRT(FnF), multiple field Intensity modulated radiotherapy (SnS IMRT) and, partial arc volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT) in case of post operative left side breast and chest wall irradiation. Methods: CT study set of fifteen post-operative left breast and chest wall patient was tested for a treatment plan of 50Gy in 25 fraction using partial arc VMAT, SnSIMRT and tangential beam 3DCRT . 3DCRT FnF gantry angle was ranging for left medial tangential 290±17{sup 0} and Lt lateral tangential l14°±12{sup 0}. For IMRT four fixed beam at gantry angle G130{sup 0} G110{sup 0} G300{sup 0} and G330{sup 0} was used, in case of insufficient dose another beam G150{sup 0} was added. In case of partial arc VMAT, lateral tangential arc G130{sup 0}-G100{sup 0} and medial tangential arc G280{sup 0}-G310{sup 0}. Inverse optimization was opted to cover at least 95%PTV by 95% prescription dose (RxD) and a strong weightage on reduction of heart and lung dose. PTV coverage was evaluated for it’s clinically acceptability depending on the tumor spatial location and its quadrant. Out of the three plans, any one was used for the actual patient treatment. Results: Dosimetric analysis done for breast PTV, left lung, heart and the opposite breast. PTV mean dose and maximum dose was 5129.8±214.8cGy, 4749.0±329.7cGy, 5024.6±73.4cGy and 5855.2±510.7cGy, 5340.7±146.1cGy, 5347.2±196.8cGy for FnF, VMAT and IMRT respectively. Ipsilateral lung volume receiving 20Gy and 5Gy was 23.6±9.5cGy and 32.7±10.3cGy for FnF, 18.6±8.7cGy and 38.8±15.2cGy for VMAT and 25.7±9.6cGy and 50.7±8.4cGy for IMRT respectively. Heart mean and 2cc dose was 867.9±456.7cGy and 5038.5±184.3cGy for FnF, 532.6±263cGy and 3632.1±990.6 for VMAT, 711±229.9cGy and 4421±463.7cGy for IMRT respectively. VMAT shows minimum contralateral breast dose 168±113.8cGy. Conclusion: VMAT shows a better tumor conformity, minimum heart

  17. Comparison of high-frequency chest wall oscillation and oscillating positive expiratory pressure in the home management of cystic fibrosis: a pilot study.

    PubMed

    Oermann, C M; Sockrider, M M; Giles, D; Sontag, M K; Accurso, F J; Castile, R G

    2001-11-01

    Enhanced airway clearance is thought to result in better-maintained pulmonary function in cystic fibrosis (CF). Postural drainage, percussion, and vibration (PDPV) have been the primary airway clearance technique (ACT) employed in CF for over 40 years. Two new airway clearance modalities are high-frequency chest wall oscillation (HFCWO) and oscillating positive expiratory pressure (OPEP). This pilot study was undertaken to evaluate the efficacy of these techniques during home use, assess patient satisfaction with them as compared to PDPV, and assess the feasibility of performing a definitive comparative trial. The prospective, randomized, multicenter crossover trial was conducted at three urban academic CF Care Centers. Twenty-nine CF patients, 9-39 years of age, participated. Subjects performed 4 weeks each of HFCWO and OPEP following 2-week lead-in/washout periods. Spirometry, lung volumes, National Institutes of Health and Petty Scores, and a satisfaction survey were performed at baseline and after each treatment period. An ACT preference survey was completed at the conclusion of the study. Twenty-four subjects completed both therapies. There were no statistically significant differences between therapies for spirometry, lung volumes, or clinical scores. No significant safety issues arose during the study period. Compliance between therapies was similar. Significant differences among therapies existed in patient satisfaction. Given a choice of therapy, 50% of subjects chose HFCWO, 37% OPEP, and 13% PDPV. This study suggests that HFCWO and OPEP are safe and as effective as patients' routine therapies when used for airway clearance in a home setting. Patient satisfaction and preference differ among ACTs and should be considered when prescribing home therapy. A definitive, multi-center, comparative study evaluating long-term efficacy of these techniques is feasible.

  18. A randomized trial of conventional chest physical therapy versus high frequency chest wall compressions in intubated and non-intubated adults.

    PubMed

    Clinkscale, Darnetta; Spihlman, Kathleen; Watts, Peggy; Rosenbluth, Daniel; Kollef, Marin H

    2012-02-01

    Conventional chest physical therapy (CCPT), applied by therapists using cupped hands to perform percussion, is commonly used in hospitalized adults. However, increased work load demands and occupational health concerns (eg, carpal tunnel syndrome) limit the overall utilization of this therapy. Therefore, we conducted a study to compare the overall effectiveness of CCPT to high-frequency chest wall compressions (HFCWC) applied via a vibratory vest. A single-center, randomized trial among hospitalized intubated and non-intubated adult patients requiring chest physical therapy comparing CCPT and HFCWC. The primary outcome measure was hospital stay. A total of 280 per-protocol patients (out of an a priori estimated 320 patients required to demonstrate a 20% relative reduction in hospital stay) were randomly assigned to receive CCPT (no. = 146, 52.1%) or HFCWC (no. = 134, 47.9%). The hospital stay was 12.5 ± 8.8 days for patients randomized to CCPT and 13.0 ± 8.9 days for patients randomized to HFCWC (P = .62). Patient comfort was assessed using a visual analog scale (increasing score reflects greater discomfort) and was statistically greater for patients randomized to CCPT compared to HFCWC (2.2 ± 0.8 vs 1.9 ± 0.8, P = .009). The duration of time until radiographic resolution of lobar atelectasis trended less for CCPT compared to HFCWC (5.2 ± 4.3 d vs 6.5 ± 5.2 d, P = .051). All other secondary outcomes, including hospital mortality and nosocomial pneumonia, were similar for both treatment groups. This study was inadequately powered for the primary outcome of interest and hence we cannot make recommendations on the preferential use of HFCWC or CCPT for intubated and non-intubated adult patients. HFCWC was associated with statistically better comfort scores. (ClinicalTrials.gov registration NCT00717873.).

  19. Deep inspiration breath hold with electromagnetic confirmation of chest wall position for adjuvant therapy of left-sided breast cancer: Technique and accuracy.

    PubMed

    Kathpal, Madeera; Tinnel, Brent; Sun, Kelly; Ninneman, Stephanie; Malmer, Cynthia; Wendt, Stacie; Buff, Sheena; Valentich, David; Gossweiler, Marisa; Macdonald, Dusten

    2016-01-01

    With most patients now living long after their breast cancer diagnosis, minimizing long-term side effects of breast cancer treatment, such as reducing late cardiac and pulmonary side effects of radiation therapy (RT), is particularly important. It is now possible to use an electromagnetic tracking system to allow real-time tracking of chest wall (CW) position during the delivery of RT. Here, we report our experience using electromagnetic surface transponders as an added measure of CW position during deep inspiration breath hold (DIBH). We conducted a single-institution institutional review board-approved retrospective review of 15 female left-sided breast cancer patients treated between July 2012 and June 2013 with conventional whole breast radiation. We compared daily port films with treatment planning digitally reconstructed radiographs to establish daily setup accuracy, then used Calypso tracings to compare the position of the CW during the daily port film with the position of the CW during that day's treatment to determine the reproducibility of the breath hold position. Finally, we created competing treatment plans not using DIBH and used a paired t test to compare mean heart (MH) and left anterior descending (LAD) coronary artery dose between the 2 techniques. Mean total error (inter- and intrafraction) was dominated by interfraction error and was greatest in the longitudinal direction with a mean of 2.13 mm and 2 standard deviations of 8.2 mm. DIBH significantly reduced MH and LAD dose versus free breathing plans (MH, 1.26 Gy vs 2.84 Gy, P ≤ .001; LAD, 5.49 Gy vs 18.15 Gy, P ≤ .001). This study demonstrates that DIBH with electromagnetic confirmation of CW position is feasible, and allows potential improvement in the accurate delivery of adjuvant RT therapy for breast cancer. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  20. SPECT Analysis of Cardiac Perfusion Changes After Whole-Breast/Chest Wall Radiation Therapy With or Without Active Breathing Coordinator: Results of a Randomized Phase 3 Trial

    SciTech Connect

    Zellars, Richard; Bravo, Paco E.; Tryggestad, Erik; Hopfer, Kari; Myers, Lee; Tahari, Abdel; Asrari, Fariba; Ziessman, Harvey; Garrett-Mayer, Elizabeth

    2014-03-15

    Purpose: Cardiac muscle perfusion, as determined by single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT), decreases after breast and/or chest wall (BCW) irradiation. The active breathing coordinator (ABC) enables radiation delivery when the BCW is farther from the heart, thereby decreasing cardiac exposure. We hypothesized that ABC would prevent radiation-induced cardiac toxicity and conducted a randomized controlled trial evaluating myocardial perfusion changes after radiation for left-sided breast cancer with or without ABC. Methods and Materials: Stages I to III left breast cancer patients requiring adjuvant radiation therapy (XRT) were randomized to ABC or No-ABC. Myocardial perfusion was evaluated by SPECT scans (before and 6 months after BCW radiation) using 2 methods: (1) fully automated quantitative polar mapping; and (2) semiquantitative visual assessment. The left ventricle was divided into 20 segments for the polar map and 17 segments for the visual method. Segments were grouped by anatomical rings (apical, mid, basal) or by coronary artery distribution. For the visual method, 2 nuclear medicine physicians, blinded to treatment groups, scored each segment's perfusion. Scores were analyzed with nonparametric tests and linear regression. Results: Between 2006 and 2010, 57 patients were enrolled and 43 were available for analysis. The cohorts were well matched. The apical and left anterior descending coronary artery segments had significant decreases in perfusion on SPECT scans in both ABC and No-ABC cohorts. In unadjusted and adjusted analyses, controlling for pretreatment perfusion score, age, and chemotherapy, ABC was not significantly associated with prevention of perfusion deficits. Conclusions: In this randomized controlled trial, ABC does not appear to prevent radiation-induced cardiac perfusion deficits.

  1. A pilot study of the impact of high-frequency chest wall oscillation in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease patients with mucus hypersecretion.

    PubMed

    Chakravorty, Indranil; Chahal, Kamaljit; Austin, Gillian

    2011-01-01

    Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) patients with mucus hypersecretion tend to demonstrate increased frequency of infective exacerbations and a steeper slope of decline in lung function. Enhanced mucociliary clearance with high-frequency chest wall oscillation (HFCWO) devices previously used in cystic fibrosis and bronchiectasis patients may offer the opportunity for community-based, self-managed therapy to improve quality of life and lung function. A randomized controlled crossover pilot study of HFCWO compared with conventional treatment was conducted in 22 patients with moderate to severe COPD and mucus hypersecretion. Patients spent 4 weeks using an HFCWO (SmartVest(®)) device and 4 weeks in a conventional phase with a 2-week washout. Eleven patients started with HFCWO and changed to conventional treatment, whereas the other eleven patients started conventional treatment and crossed over to HFCWO. The patients were elderly with a mean age of 71 (standard deviation [SD] 10) years and were at the upper end of the normal range of body mass index (25 [SD 4.2] kg/m(2)). The majority of patients had moderate to severe COPD with a mean percentage predicted forced expiratory volume in 1 second of 41 (SD 15.6) and percentage predicted forced vital capacity of 73 (SD 17.7). Baseline sputum production was negatively correlated to lung function and positively to St George's Respiratory Questionnaire. Symptom scores and St George's Respiratory Questionnaire symptom dimension improved significantly (-8, P < 0.05). Sputum production showed a declining trend in the HFCWO phase, although not reaching statistical significance. The HFCWO device was well tolerated with good reported compliance. This pilot study demonstrated that patients with advanced COPD and mucus hypersecretion at increased risk of declining lung function tolerated the HFCWO treatment well, leading to improvement in quality of life and reduced symptoms.

  2. Chest wall volume receiving >30 Gy predicts risk of severe pain and/or rib fracture after lung stereotactic body radiotherapy.

    PubMed

    Dunlap, Neal E; Cai, Jing; Biedermann, Gregory B; Yang, Wensha; Benedict, Stanley H; Sheng, Ke; Schefter, Tracey E; Kavanagh, Brian D; Larner, James M

    2010-03-01

    To identify the dose-volume parameters that predict the risk of chest wall (CW) pain and/or rib fracture after lung stereotactic body radiotherapy. From a combined, larger multi-institution experience, 60 consecutive patients treated with three to five fractions of stereotactic body radiotherapy for primary or metastatic peripheral lung lesions were reviewed. CW pain was assessed using the Common Toxicity Criteria for pain. Peripheral lung lesions were defined as those located within 2.5 cm of the CW. A minimal point dose of 20 Gy to the CW was required. The CW volume receiving >or=20, >or=30, >or=40, >or=50, and >or=60 Gy was determined and related to the risk of CW toxicity. Of the 60 patients, 17 experienced Grade 3 CW pain and five rib fractures. The median interval to the onset of severe pain and/or fracture was 7.1 months. The risk of CW toxicity was fitted to the median effective concentration dose-response model. The CW volume receiving 30 Gy best predicted the risk of severe CW pain and/or rib fracture (R(2) = 0.9552). A volume threshold of 30 cm(3) was observed before severe pain and/or rib fracture was reported. A 30% risk of developing severe CW toxicity correlated with a CW volume of 35 cm(3) receiving 30 Gy. The development of CW toxicity is clinically relevant, and the CW should be considered an organ at risk in treatment planning. The CW volume receiving 30 Gy in three to five fractions should be limited to <30 cm(3), if possible, to reduce the risk of toxicity without compromising tumor coverage. Copyright (c) 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Chest Wall Volume Receiving >30 Gy Predicts Risk of Severe Pain and/or Rib Fracture After Lung Stereotactic Body Radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Dunlap, Neal E.; Cai, Jing; Biedermann, Gregory B.; Yang, Wensha; Benedict, Stanley H.; Sheng Ke; Schefter, Tracey E.; Kavanagh, Brian D.; Larner, James M.

    2010-03-01

    Purpose: To identify the dose-volume parameters that predict the risk of chest wall (CW) pain and/or rib fracture after lung stereotactic body radiotherapy. Methods and Materials: From a combined, larger multi-institution experience, 60 consecutive patients treated with three to five fractions of stereotactic body radiotherapy for primary or metastatic peripheral lung lesions were reviewed. CW pain was assessed using the Common Toxicity Criteria for pain. Peripheral lung lesions were defined as those located within 2.5 cm of the CW. A minimal point dose of 20 Gy to the CW was required. The CW volume receiving >=20, >=30, >=40, >=50, and >=60 Gy was determined and related to the risk of CW toxicity. Results: Of the 60 patients, 17 experienced Grade 3 CW pain and five rib fractures. The median interval to the onset of severe pain and/or fracture was 7.1 months. The risk of CW toxicity was fitted to the median effective concentration dose-response model. The CW volume receiving 30 Gy best predicted the risk of severe CW pain and/or rib fracture (R{sup 2} = 0.9552). A volume threshold of 30 cm{sup 3} was observed before severe pain and/or rib fracture was reported. A 30% risk of developing severe CW toxicity correlated with a CW volume of 35 cm{sup 3} receiving 30 Gy. Conclusion: The development of CW toxicity is clinically relevant, and the CW should be considered an organ at risk in treatment planning. The CW volume receiving 30 Gy in three to five fractions should be limited to <30 cm{sup 3}, if possible, to reduce the risk of toxicity without compromising tumor coverage.

  4. Effect of a combined surgery, re-irradiation and hyperthermia therapy on local control rate in radio-induced angiosarcoma of the chest wall.

    PubMed

    Linthorst, M; van Geel, A N; Baartman, E A; Oei, S B; Ghidey, W; van Rhoon, G C; van der Zee, J

    2013-05-01

    Radiation-induced angiosarcoma (RAS) of the chest wall/breast has a poor prognosis due to the high percentage of local failures. The efficacy and side effects of re-irradiation plus hyperthermia (reRT + HT) treatment alone or in combination with surgery were assessed in RAS patients. RAS was diagnosed in 23 breast cancer patients and 1 patient with melanoma. These patients had previously undergone breast conserving therapy (BCT, n = 18), mastectomy with irradiation (n=5) or axillary lymph node dissection with irradiation (n = 1). Treatment consisted of surgery followed by reRT + HT (n = 8), reRT + HT followed by surgery (n = 3) or reRT + HT alone (n = 13). Patients received a mean radiation dose of 35 Gy (32-54 Gy) and 3-6 hyperthermia treatments (mean 4). Hyperthermia was given once or twice a week following radiotherapy (RT). The median latency interval between previous radiation and diagnosis of RAS was 106 months (range 45-212 months). Following reRT + HT, the complete response (CR) rate was 56 %. In the subgroup of patients receiving surgery, the 3-month, 1- and 3-year actuarial local control (LC) rates were 91, 46 and 46 %, respectively. In the subgroup of patients without surgery, the rates were 54, 32 and 22 %, respectively. Late grade 4 RT toxicity was seen in 2 patients. The present study shows that reRT + HT treatment--either alone or combined with surgery--improves LC rates in patients with RAS.

  5. Antiangiogenic therapy in recurrent breast cancer with lymphangitic spread to the chest wall: A randomized phase II trial of bevacizumab with sequential or concurrent oral vinorelbine and capecitabine.

    PubMed

    Curigliano, Giuseppe; Bagnardi, Vincenzo; Bertolini, Francesco; Alcalay, Myriam; Locatelli, Marzia Adelia; Fumagalli, Luca; Rabascio, Cristina; Calleri, Angelica; Adamoli, Laura; Criscitiello, Carmen; Viale, Giuseppe; Goldhirsch, Aron

    2015-06-01

    To assess efficacy of bevacizumab in combination with oral chemotherapy in patients with breast cancer with lymphangitic spread to the chest wall (LBC). To identify surrogate biomarkers of response to bevacizumab. We randomly assigned patients to receive bevacizumab plus either sequential or concurrent oral vinorelbine and capecitabine every 3 weeks. The primary endpoint was time to ultimate progression (TTP); the response rate and overall survival (OS) were secondary endpoints. We performed gene expression profiling on baseline tissue samples collected from triple negative LBC. We assessed circulating endothelial cells (CEC), circulating endothelial progenitors (CEP) and circulating pericyte progenitors (CPP). A total of 66 patients were enrolled. There was no difference in TTP (median TTP 5.3 vs. 4.8 months, p = 0.21) and in OS (median OS 15.8 vs 11.9 months; p = 0.25) when comparing concurrent vs sequential treatment, respectively. Response rate was 25% vs 28% in the concurrent vs sequential arm (p = 1.00), respectively. A set of 16 genes predictive of response to bevacizumab was identified. The counts of CEPs and viable CECs below the median value were associated with an improved overall survival: 26.6 vs 9.5 months for CEPs and 22.6 vs 11.0 months for viable CECs, respectively (p = 0.02). Oral chemotherapy and bevacizumab (BEVIX) is an active regimen in patients with LBC. We support the importance of using LBC as a biological model for investigating angiogenesis inhibitors. CECs and CEPs biomarkers have been identified as predictive markers of outcome and warrant further investigation. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Immediate locally advanced breast cancer and chest wall reconstruction: surgical planning and reconstruction strategies with extended V-Y latissimus dorsi myocutaneous flap.

    PubMed

    Munhoz, Alexandre Mendonça; Montag, Eduardo; Arruda, Eduardo; Okada, Alberto; Brasil, José Augusto; Gemperli, Rolf; Filassi, José Roberto; Ferreira, Marcus Castro

    2011-06-01

    Surgical resection in locally advanced breast cancer produces large defects that may not be suitable for primary closure. Immediate reconstruction is controversial and presents a complicated scenario for breast surgeons and plastic surgeons. In this study, a different design was planned for the latissimus dorsi musculocutaneous flap with primary closure in V-Y for the correction of major lesions in the anterior chest wall. Twenty-five patients underwent immediate locally advanced breast cancer reconstruction with a V-Y latissimus dorsi musculocutaneous flap. This flap was raised from adjacent tissue located on the lateral and posterior thoracic region and presented a triangular shape whose base was the lateral aspect of the mastectomy wound. The technique was indicated in patients with large thoracic wounds. Mean follow-up time was 16 months. Closure was obtained in the donor and recipient sites without the use of skin grafts or other more major procedures. Complications occurred in nine patients (36 percent), including dorsal wound dehiscence in five patients and seroma in three. All cases except one were treated by a conservative approach with a good result. No total flap loss was reported. All patients achieved a satisfactory thoracic reconstruction and adequate wound care. The V-Y latissimus dorsi musculocutaneous flap is a reliable technique for immediate locally advanced breast cancer reconstruction. The technique is advantageous because the V-Y design allows primary closure of the chest wound and donor defect. Success depends on patient selection, coordinated planning with the breast cancer surgeon, and careful intraoperative management.

  7. Objective Measurement of Adherence to Out-Patient Airway Clearance Therapy by High-Frequency Chest Wall Compression in Cystic Fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Mikesell, Christina L; Kempainen, Robert R; Laguna, Theresa A; Menk, Jeremiah S; Wey, Andrew R; Gaillard, Philippe R; Regelmann, Warren E

    2017-07-01

    Objective measures of adherence to high-frequency chest wall compression (HFCWC), a form of airway clearance therapy for patients with cystic fibrosis, are lacking. We used a novel electronic monitoring device integrated into an HFCWC vest to measure adherence compared with self-reported adherence. We determined factors that influenced adherence and how adherence correlated with baseline pulmonary function and pulmonary exacerbations. Data were collected by direct measurement of date, time of day, and duration of HFCWC use to determine the number of daily treatments and daily duration of treatments. Chart review provided prescribed airway clearance therapy treatment and demographic and clinical information. Subject and caregiver report of the daily number of airway clearance therapy treatments was obtained by telephone interviews. Analysis used 2-sample and paired t test, analysis of variance, and linear regression. Average adherence was 69%. Adherence was highest in children (82%, P = .02) and those receiving assistance with treatment (82%, P < .001). Subjects overestimated therapy duration from a mean ± SD of 127 ± 169% by adults to 19.2 ± 26.3% by parents or guardians of children. Average adherence decreased with increasing prescribed therapy time (P = .02). Average daily therapy time and adherence had significant positive associations with baseline FEV1 percent of predicted (P = .02 and P = .02, respectively) and negative associations with pulmonary exacerbations during the pre-study period and at baseline (P = .044 and P = .02, respectively). Greater adherence to HFCWC measured directly by a novel recorder was associated with better baseline pulmonary function and fewer exacerbations in the pre-study and baseline period. Adherence decreased with age and prescribed therapy time and increased with therapy assistance. Self-report overestimation is large and thus not an accurate measure of adherence. Copyright © 2017 by Daedalus Enterprises.

  8. Short-term comparative study of high frequency chest wall oscillation and European airway clearance techniques in patients with cystic fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Osman, Leyla P; Roughton, Michael; Hodson, Margaret E; Pryor, Jennifer A

    2010-03-01

    High frequency chest wall oscillation (HFCWO) is standard treatment for airway clearance in the USA and has recently been introduced in the UK and Europe. There is little published research comparing HFCWO with airway clearance techniques (ACTs) frequently used in the UK and Europe. The aim of this study was to compare the short-term effects of HFCWO with usual ACTs in patients with cystic fibrosis hospitalised with an infective pulmonary exacerbation. A 4-day randomised crossover design was used. Patients received either HFCWO on days 1 and 3 and usual ACTs on days 2 and 4 or vice versa. Wet weight of sputum, spirometry and oxygen saturation were measured. Perceived efficacy, comfort, incidence of urinary leakage and preference were assessed. Data were analysed by mixed model analysis. 29 patients (72% male) of mean (SD) age 29.4 (8.4) years and mean (SD) forced expiratory volume in 1 s (FEV(1)) percentage predicted (FEV(1)%) 38 (16.7) completed the study. Significantly more sputum was expectorated during a single treatment session and over a 24 h period (mean difference 4.4 g and 6.9 g, respectively) with usual ACTs than with HFCWO (p<0.001). No statistically significant change in FEV(1)% or oxygen saturation was observed after either HFCWO or usual ACTs compared with baseline. 17 patients (55%) expressed a preference for their usual ACT. During both a finite treatment period and over 24 h, less sputum was cleared using HFCWO than usual ACT. HFCWO does not appear to cause any adverse physiological effects and may influence adherence.

  9. Effects of noninvasive ventilation on treadmill 6-min walk distance and regional chest wall volumes in cystic fibrosis: randomized controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Lima, Cibelle Andrade; Andrade, Armèle de Fátima Dornelas de; Campos, Shirley Lima; Brandão, Daniella Cunha; Fregonezi, Guilherme; Mourato, Ianny Pereira; Aliverti, Andrea; Britto, Murilo Carlos Amorim de

    2014-10-01

    Dyspnea and exercise intolerance are the symptoms that most affect the quality of life of children and adolescents with respiratory disorders resulting from cystic fibrosis (CF). To evaluate the effect of noninvasive ventilation (NIV) on treadmill 6-min walk distance and regional chest wall volumes in cystic fibrosis patients. Crossover clinical trial, randomized, controlled and open with 13 children and adolescents with CF, aged 7-16 years, with pulmonary impairment (NTC01987271). The patients performed a treadmill walking test (TWT) during 6 min, with and without NIV on a BiLEVEL mode, an interval of 24-48 h between tests. Before and after each test, patients were assessed by spirometry and optoelectronic plethysmography. Walking distance in TWT with NIV was significantly higher that without ventilatory support (mean ± sd: 0.41 ± 0.08 vs. 0.39 ± 0.85 km, p = 0.039). TWT with NIV increase forced expiratory volume on 1 s (FEV1; p = 0.036), tidal volume (Vt; p = 0.005), minute ventilation (MV; p = 0.013), pulmonary rib cage volume (Vrcp; p = 0.011), and decrease the abdominal volume (Vab; p = 0.013) after test. There was a significant reduction in oxygen saturation (p = 0.018) and permanent increase in respiratory rate after 5 min (p = 0.021) after the end test without NIV. During the walking test on the treadmill, the NIV change thoracoabdominal kinematics and lung function in order to optimized ventilation and tissue oxygenation, with improvement of walk distance. Consequently, NIV is an effective tool to increase functional capacity in children and adolescents with cystic fibrosis. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Postmastectomy Chest Wall Radiation to a Temporary Tissue Expander or Permanent Breast Implant-Is There a Difference in Complication Rates?

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, Penny R. Freedman, Gary; Nicolaou, Nicos; Sharma, Navesh; Li Tianyu; Topham, Neal; Morrow, Monica

    2009-05-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to evaluate the likelihood of complications and cosmetic results among breast cancer patients who underwent modified radical mastectomy (MRM) and breast reconstruction followed by radiation therapy (RT) to either a temporary tissue expander (TTE) or permanent breast implant (PI). Methods and Materials: Records were reviewed of 74 patients with breast cancer who underwent MRM followed by breast reconstruction and RT. Reconstruction consisted of a TTE usually followed by exchange to a PI. RT was delivered to the TTE in 62 patients and to the PI in 12 patients. Dose to the reconstructed chest wall was 50 Gy. Median follow-up was 48 months. The primary end point was the incidence of complications involving the reconstruction. Results: There was no significant difference in the rate of major complications in the PI group (0%) vs. 4.8% in the TTE group. No patients lost the reconstruction in the PI group. Three patients lost the reconstruction in the TTE group. There were excellent/good cosmetic scores in 90% of the TTE group and 80% of the PI group (p = 0.22). On multivariate regression models, the type of reconstruction irradiated had no statistically significant impact on complication rates. Conclusions: Patients treated with breast reconstruction and RT can experience low rates of major complications. We demonstrate no significant difference in the overall rate of major or minor complications between the TTE and PI groups. Postmastectomy RT to either the TTE or the PI should be considered as acceptable treatment options in all eligible patients.

  11. Short-term comparative study of high frequency chest wall oscillation and European airway clearance techniques in patients with cystic fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    Roughton, Michael; Hodson, Margaret E; Pryor, Jennifer A

    2009-01-01

    Background High frequency chest wall oscillation (HFCWO) is standard treatment for airway clearance in the USA and has recently been introduced in the UK and Europe. There is little published research comparing HFCWO with airway clearance techniques (ACTs) frequently used in the UK and Europe. The aim of this study was to compare the short-term effects of HFCWO with usual ACTs in patients with cystic fibrosis hospitalised with an infective pulmonary exacerbation. Methods A 4-day randomised crossover design was used. Patients received either HFCWO on days 1 and 3 and usual ACTs on days 2 and 4 or vice versa. Wet weight of sputum, spirometry and oxygen saturation were measured. Perceived efficacy, comfort, incidence of urinary leakage and preference were assessed. Data were analysed by mixed model analysis. Results 29 patients (72% male) of mean (SD) age 29.4 (8.4) years and mean (SD) forced expiratory volume in 1 s (FEV1) percentage predicted (FEV1%) 38 (16.7) completed the study. Significantly more sputum was expectorated during a single treatment session and over a 24 h period (mean difference 4.4 g and 6.9 g, respectively) with usual ACTs than with HFCWO (p<0.001). No statistically significant change in FEV1% or oxygen saturation was observed after either HFCWO or usual ACTs compared with baseline. 17 patients (55%) expressed a preference for their usual ACT. Conclusions During both a finite treatment period and over 24 h, less sputum was cleared using HFCWO than usual ACT. HFCWO does not appear to cause any adverse physiological effects and may influence adherence. PMID:19703826

  12. Recording triggered EMG thresholds from axillary chest wall electrodes: a new refined technique for accurate upper thoracic (T2-T6) pedicle screw placement.

    PubMed

    Regidor, Ignacio; de Blas, Gema; Barrios, Carlos; Burgos, Jesús; Montes, Elena; García-Urquiza, Sergio; Hevia, Edurado

    2011-10-01

    This study was aimed at evaluating the sensitivity and safety of a new technique to record triggered EMG thresholds from axillary chest wall electrodes when inserting pedicle screws in the upper thoracic spine (T2-T6). A total of 248 (36.6%) of a total of 677 thoracic screws were placed at the T2-T6 levels in 92 patients with adolescent idiopathic scoliosis. A single electrode placed at the axillary midline was able to record potentials during surgery from all T2-T6 myotomes at each side. Eleven screws were removed during surgery because of malposition according to intraoperative fluoroscopic views. Screw position was evaluated after surgery in the remaining 237 screws using a CT scan. Malposition was detected in 35 pedicle screws (14.7%). Pedicle medial cortex was breached in 24 (10.1%). Six screws (2.5%) were located inside the spinal canal. Mean EMG threshold was 24.44 ± 11.30 mA in well-positioned screws, 17.98 ± 8.24 mA (p < 0.01) in screws violating the pedicle medial cortex, and 10.38 ± 3.33 mA (p < 0.005) in screws located inside the spinal canal. Below a threshold of 12 mA, 33.4% of the screws (10/30) were malpositioned. Furthermore, 36% of the pedicle screws with t-EMG stimulation thresholds within the range 6-12 mA were malpositioned. In conclusion, assessment of upper thoracic pedicle screw placement by recording tEMG at a single axillary electrode was highly reliable. Thresholds below 12 mA should alert surgeons to suspect screw malposition. This technique simplifies tEMG potential recording to facilitate safe placement of pedicle screws at upper thoracic levels.

  13. Early Detection of Cervical Intraepitelial Neoplasia in a Heterogeneos Group of Colombian Women Using Electrical Impedance Spectroscopy and the Miranda-López Algorithm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miranda, David A.; Corzo, Sandra P.; González-Correa, Carlos-A.

    2012-12-01

    Electrical Impedance Spectroscopy (EIS) allows the study of the electrical properties of materials and structures such as biological tissues. EIS can be used as a diagnostic tool for the identification of pathological conditions such as cervical cancer. We used EIS in combination with genetic algorithms to characterize cervical epithelial squamous tissue in a heterogeneous sample of 56 Colombian women. All volunteers had a cytology taken for Papanicolau test and biopsy taken for histopathological analysis from those with a positive result (9 subjects). ROC analysis of the results suggest a sensitivity and specificity in the order of 0.73 and 0.86, respectively.

  14. Determination of the chest wall thicknesses and needle thoracostomy success rates at second and fifth intercostal spaces: a cadaver-based study.

    PubMed

    Ozen, Can; Akoglu, Haldun; Ozdemirel, Rifat Ozgur; Omeroglu, Elif; Ozpolat, Cigdem Ulubay; Onur, Ozge; Buyuk, Yalcin; Denizbasi, Arzu

    2016-12-01

    The purposes of this study were to measure the chest wall thicknesses (CWTs) at second intercostal space (ICS) mid-clavicular line (MCL) and fifth ICS MAL directly, and compare the actual success rates of needle thoracostomies (NTs) by inserting a 5-cm-long syringe needle. Predictive values of weight, body mass index (BMI) and CWT were also analyzed. This study included 199 measurements of 50 adult fresh cadavers from both hemithoraces. Five-centimeter-long syringe needles were inserted and secured. Penetration into the pleural cavity was assessed, and CWTs at 4 locations were measured. Achieved power of this study for the primary aim of CWT comparison from 2(nd) and 5(th) ICSs was .94. Overall mean CWTs at 2(nd) ICS MCL and 5(th) ICS MAL were measured as 2.46 ± 0.78 and 2.89 ± 1.09, respectively, and 5(th) ICS MAL was found to be statistically thicker (P = .002). The success rate of NT at 2(nd) ICS MCL was 87% (95% CI, 80-94), and that at 5(th) ICS MAL was 78% (95% CI, 70-86; P = .3570). Only 6 (17.1%) of 35 failed NTs had a CWT greater than 5-cm. Needle thoracostomy has failed in 29 (14.9%) of 194 locations, despite a CWT less than 5-cm. Below a weight of 72 kg, BMI of 23 kg/m(2), or CWT of 2.4 cm, all NTs were successful. In this report, we present the largest cadaver-based cohort to date to the best of our knowledge, and we observed a statistically nonsignificant 9% more NT success rate at 2(nd) ICS at a power of 88% and statistically significant more success rate in males at 5(th) ICS was (47.7%). We also observed thinner CWTs and higher success rates than previous imaging-based studies. A BMI of 23 kg/m(2) or less and weight of 72 kg or less seem to accurately rule-out NT failure in cadavers, and they seem to be better predictors at the bedside. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. The treatment of spine and chest wall deformities with fused ribs by expansion thoracostomy and insertion of vertical expandable prosthetic titanium rib: growth of thoracic spine and improvement of lung volumes.

    PubMed

    Emans, John B; Caubet, Jean François; Ordonez, Claudia L; Lee, Edward Y; Ciarlo, Michelle

    2005-09-01

    Prospective clinical trial of vertical expandable prosthetic titanium rib (VEPTR) in patients with combined spine and chest wall deformity with scoliosis and fused ribs. Report the efficacy and safety of expansion thoracostomy and VEPTR surgery in the treatment of thoracic insufficiency syndrome (TIS) associated with fused ribs. Traditional attitudes toward early-onset combined chest and spine deformity assume that thoracic deformity is best controlled by treatment directed at spine deformity, often involving early spinal arthrodesis. Campbell and others have heightened awareness of the interrelationship between lung, chest, and spine development during growth and characterized TIS as the inability of the thorax to support normal respiration or lung growth. Expansion thoracostomy and VEPTR insertion was developed to directly control both spine and chest wall deformity during growth, while permitting continued vertebral column and chest growth at an early stage. Multidisciplinary evaluation of children with combined spine and chest wall deformity included pediatric pulmonologist, thoracic, and orthopedic surgeon evaluations. One or more opening wedge expansion thoracostomies and placement of VEPTR devices were performed as described by Campbell, with repeated device lengthenings during growth. Parameters measured included Cobb angle, length of thoracic spine, CT-derived lung volumes, and in older children pulmonary function tests. Thirty-one patients with fused ribs and TIS were treated, 4 of whom had undergone prior spinal arthrodesis at other institutions with continued progression of deformity. In 30 patients, the spinal deformity was controlled and growth continued in the thoracic spine during treatment at rates similar to normals. Increased volume of the constricted hemithorax and total lung volumes obtained during expansion thoracostomy were maintained at follow-up. Complications included device migration, infection, and brachial plexus palsy. Expansion

  16. Dermatologic surgery on the chest wall in patients with a cardiac surgery history: a review of material that may be encountered intraoperatively, including potential complications and suggestions for proceeding safely.

    PubMed

    Bucher, Elizabeth Foley; Kim, Andrew; Givan, Jason; Maloney, Mary E

    2016-03-01

    Thoracic surgical procedures and the use of cardiac devices such as pacemakers are becoming increasingly prevalent in the population. As such, dermatologists may have a greater likelihood of encountering previously implanted or abandoned surgical material in the course of dermatologic surgery on the chest wall. A basic understanding of the wire types and the tunneling paths utilized in such procedures is important in accurately anticipating the presence of these wires to effectively manage any chance encounters. We present a review on temporary epicardial pacing wires, temporary transvenous pacing wires, pacemaker leads, and surgical steel sutures in the context of dermatologic surgery. A literature review was performed on frequently used wire material in patients with a history of cardiac surgery as well as related dermatologic complications from these materials. Dermatologic surgeons should particularly be aware that temporary epicardial pacing wires and pacemaker leads are not uncommonly abandoned in the chest wall of many patients. All patients with a cardiac surgery history should be questioned about possible retained wires. If wire material is encountered intraoperatively, immediately stop the procedure and do not attempt further manipulation of the wire until suggested steps are taken to ascertain the wire type.

  17. Electron Impedances

    SciTech Connect

    P Cameron

    2011-12-31

    It is only recently, and particularly with the quantum Hall effect and the development of nanoelectronics, that impedances on the scale of molecules, atoms and single electrons have gained attention. In what follows the possibility that characteristic impedances might be defined for the photon and the single free electron is explored is some detail, the premise being that the concepts of electrical and mechanical impedances are relevant to the elementary particle. The scale invariant quantum Hall impedance is pivotal in this exploration, as is the two body problem and Mach's principle.

  18. (18)F-FDG PET/CT in a cardiac metastasis in a patient with history of malignant neuroectodermal tumour of the chest wall: Case report and review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Marroquín, J A; Hernández, A C; Pilkington, J P; Saviatto, A; Tabuenca, M J; Estenoz, J M

    2017-06-22

    The case presented is a 25-year-old male with a malignant neuroectodermal tumour on the left chest wall (Askin tumour), treated with surgery after neoadyuvant chemotherapy and followed by consolidation chemotherapy. After 9 years of disease free survival, the patient developed an acute pulmonary embolism. The echocardiogram, thoracic CT, and cardiac MRI scans revealed a mass in the right atrium. Recurrence of an Askin tumour versus an atrium myxoma was suspected. (18)F-FDG PET/CT showed an intense hypermetabolic right atrium mass with extension to the right ventricle highly suggestive of malignancy. The result of the histopathology examination after biopsy and subsequently exeresis of the right atrium mass was consistent with a metastasis of the primary tumour. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier España, S.L.U. y SEMNIM. All rights reserved.

  19. Electromagnetic scattering by impedance structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Balanis, Constantine A.; Griesser, Timothy

    1987-01-01

    The scattering of electromagnetic waves from impedance structures is investigated, and current work on antenna pattern calculation is presented. A general algorithm for determining radiation patterns from antennas mounted near or on polygonal plates is presented. These plates are assumed to be of a material which satisfies the Leontovich (or surface impedance) boundary condition. Calculated patterns including reflection and diffraction terms are presented for numerious geometries, and refinements are included for antennas mounted directly on impedance surfaces. For the case of a monopole mounted on a surface impedance ground plane, computed patterns are compared with experimental measurements. This work in antenna pattern prediction forms the basis of understanding of the complex scattering mechanisms from impedance surfaces. It provides the foundation for the analysis of backscattering patterns which, in general, are more problematic than calculation of antenna patterns. Further proposed study of related topics, including surface waves, corner diffractions, and multiple diffractions, is outlined.

  20. Acute clinical benefits of chest wall-stretching exercise on expired tidal volume, dyspnea and chest expansion in a patient with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease: a single case study.

    PubMed

    Leelarungrayub, Donrawee; Pothongsunun, Prapas; Yankai, Araya; Pratanaphon, Sainatee

    2009-10-01

    Chest physical therapy (CPT) has an important role in a medical team to assist in resolving the critical problems deriving from chronic lung disease. These critical problems include increased secretion volume, difficult breathing or dyspnea, ineffective coughing, inability to be weaned off a ventilator, and physical deterioration resulting from low aerobic capacity and endurance after prolonged bed rest. The inability to be weaned off a ventilator does not only result from secretion production or muscle weakness, but other conditions including chest stiffness or immobility. The procedure to increase chest mobility includes specific chest stretching and mobilization. Chest wall-stretching exercises were composed of thoracic rotation and anterior compression with stretching in sitting position, trunk extension and rib torsion in supine lying, and lateral stretching in side lying. These exercises were given to the patient as a regular daily program along with postural drainage, percussion, breathing exercise and limb exercises. The expired tidal volume, dyspnea level, and chest expansion were evaluated and clinical efficiency was analyzed during CPT, compared to Pre-CPT and Post-CPT with Bloom table. The results showed a significant clinical improvement of expired tidal volume, reduction in dyspnea level, and increase in chest expansion.

  1. SU-E-T-95: An Alternative Option for Reducing Lung Dose for Electron Scar Boost Irradiation in Post-Mastectomy Breast Cancer Patients with a Thin Chest Wall

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Y; Kumar, P; Mitchell, M

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: Breast cancer patients who undergo a mastectomy often require post-mastectomy radiation therapy (PMRT) due to high risk disease characteristics. PMRT usually accompanies scar boost irradiation (10–16Gy in 5–8 fractions) using en face electrons, which often results in increased dose to the underlying lungs, thereby potentially increasing the risk of radiation pneumonitis. Hence, this study evaluated water-equivalent phantoms as energy degraders and as an alternative to a bolus to reduce radiation dose to the underlying lungs for electron scar boost irradiation. Methods: Percent depth dose (PDD) profiles of 6 MeV (the lowest electron energy available in most clinics) were obtained without and with commercial solid water phantoms (1 to 5mm by 1mm increments) placed on top of electron cones. Phantom attenuation was measured by taking a ratio of outputs with to without the phantoms in 10×10cm2 cone size for monitor unit (MU) calculation. In addition, scatter dose to contralateral breast was measured on a human-like phantom using two selected scar (short and long) boost patient setups. Results: The PDD plots showed that the solid water phantoms and the bolus had similar dosimetric effects for the same thickness. Lower skin dose (up to 3%) to ipsilateral breast was observed with a 5mm phantom compared with a 5mm bolus (up to 10%) for all electron cones. Phantom attenuation was increased by 50% with about a 4.5mm phantom. Also, the energy degraders caused scatter dose to contralateral breast by a factor of 3 with a 5mm phantom. Conclusion: Our results demonstrate the feasibility of using water-equivalent phantoms to reduce lung dose using en face electrons in patients with a thin chest wall undergoing PMRT. The disadvantages of this treatment approach (i.e., the increase in MUs and treatment time, and clinically insignificant scatter dose to the contralateral breast given usually 10Gy) are outweighed by its above clinical benefits.

  2. A comparison of the therapeutic effectiveness of and preference for postural drainage and percussion, intrapulmonary percussive ventilation, and high-frequency chest wall compression in hospitalized cystic fibrosis patients.

    PubMed

    Varekojis, Sarah M; Douce, F Herbert; Flucke, Robert L; Filbrun, David A; Tice, Jill S; McCoy, Karen S; Castile, Robert G

    2003-01-01

    Cystic fibrosis (CF) patients have abnormally viscid bronchial secretions that cause airway obstruction, inflammation, and infection that leads to lung damage. To enhance airway clearance and reduce airway obstruction, daily bronchopulmonary hygiene therapy is considered essential. Compare the effectiveness of and patient preferences regarding 3 airway clearance methods: postural drainage and percussion (PD&P), intrapulmonary percussive ventilation (IPV), and high-frequency chest wall compression (HFCWC). The participants were hospitalized CF patients >or= 12 years old. Effectiveness was evaluated by measuring the wet and dry weights of sputum obtained with each method. In random order, each patient received 2 consecutive days of each therapy, delivered 3 times daily for 30 minutes. Sputum was collected during and for 15 minutes after each treatment, weighed wet, then dried and weighed again. Participants rated their preferences using a Likert-type scale. Mean weights and preferences were compared using analysis of variance with repeated measures. Patient preferences were compared using Freidman's test. Twenty-four patients were studied. The mean +/- SD wet sputum weights were 5.53 +/- 5.69 g with PD&P, 6.84 +/- 5.41 g with IPV, and 4.77 +/- 3.29 g with HFCWC. The mean wet sputum weights differed significantly (p = 0.035). Wet sputum weights from IPV were significantly greater than those from HFCWC (p < 0.05). The mean dry sputum weights were not significantly different. With regard to overall preference and to the subcomponents of preference, none of the 3 methods was preferred over the others. HFCWC and IPV are at least as effective as vigorous, professionally administered PD&P for hospitalized CF patients, and the 3 modalities were equally acceptable to them. A hospitalized CF patient should try each therapy and choose his or her preferred modality.

  3. Age and Chest-wall Physiology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferenc, Kovats

    1986-07-01

    The mechanisme of the breathing pump-system changes with age. Morphometrical informations are presented by means of Photogrammetry.The effectiveness of the diaphragm contraction in relation to the ribcage was observed with trunc-surface deforrnations.The thorax-wall of new-borns and sucklings are pliable:the diaphragm action sipps the ribcage. Growing childrens thorax can resist against this sipping effect, but practically they have no thoracal, only abdominal breathing.Later in childhood the thoracal breathing type developps individually. Introduction Since 1974 I have the honour to participate with my papers on several Biostereometrics Session. At that time I had 15 years of Photogrammetry study of the breathing movements behind me. Based on Photogrammetrical documentations I worked with manual geometry, constructing my designes,hoping, that I can elaborate a model-method and to grope around the photogrammetrical possibilities in the study of the mechanism of the human breathing pump-system. Using a ruler and a pair of compasses, with steady obstinacy I arrived to realise three abstractions:Spatial; spatiotemporal analysis informations and the velocity or the acceleration factors, this last one being the most sensitive. Recently I made the-first steps to study four dimensional information, with two time factors.

  4. Dosimetric comparison for volumetric modulated arc therapy and intensity-modulated radiotherapy on the left-sided chest wall and internal mammary nodes irradiation in treating post-mastectomy breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Qian; Yu, Xiao Li; Hu, Wei Gang; Chen, Jia Yi; Wang, Jia Zhou; Ye, Jin Song; Guo, Xiao Mao

    2015-01-01

    Background The aim of the study was to evaluate the dosimetric benefit of applying volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT) on the post-mastectomy left-sided breast cancer patients, with the involvement of internal mammary nodes (IMN). Patients and methods The prescription dose was 50 Gy delivered in 25 fractions, and the clinical target volume included the left chest wall (CW) and IMN. VMAT plans were created and compared with intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) plans on Pinnacle treatment planning system. Comparative endpoints were dose homogeneity within planning target volume (PTV), target dose coverage, doses to the critical structures including heart, lungs and the contralateral breast, number of monitor units and treatment delivery time. Results VMAT and IMRT plans showed similar PTV dose homogeneity, but, VMAT provided a better dose coverage for IMN than IMRT (p = 0.017). The mean dose (Gy), V30 (%) and V10 (%) for the heart were 13.5 ± 5.0 Gy, 9.9% ± 5.9% and 50.2% ± 29.0% by VMAT, and 14.0 ± 5.4 Gy, 10.6% ± 5.8% and 55.7% ± 29.6% by IMRT, respectively. The left lung mean dose (Gy), V20 (%), V10 (%) and the right lung V5 (%) were significantly reduced from 14.1 ± 2.3 Gy, 24.2% ± 5.9%, 42.4% ± 11.9% and 41.2% ± 12.3% with IMRT to 12.8 ± 1.9 Gy, 21.0% ± 3.8%, 37.1% ± 8.4% and 32.1% ± 18.2% with VMAT, respectively. The mean dose to the contralateral breast was 1.7 ± 1.2 Gy with VMAT and 2.3 ± 1.6 Gy with IMRT. Finally, VMAT reduced the number of monitor units by 24% and the treatment time by 53%, as compared to IMRT. Conclusions Compared to 5-be am step-and-shot IMRT, VMAT achieves similar or superior target coverage and a better normal tissue sparing, with fewer monitor units and shorter delivery time. PMID:25810708

  5. ADVANCES IN IMPEDANCE THEORY

    SciTech Connect

    Stupakov, G.; /SLAC

    2009-06-05

    We review recent progress in the following areas of the impedance theory: calculation of impedance of tapers and small angle collimators; optical approximation and parabolic equation for the high-frequency impedance; impedance due to resistive inserts in a perfectly conducting pipe.

  6. Is the Deep Inspiration Breath-Hold Technique Superior to the Free Breathing Technique in Cardiac and Lung Sparing while Treating both Left-Sided Post-Mastectomy Chest Wall and Supraclavicular Regions?

    PubMed Central

    Darapu, Anupama; Balakrishnan, Rajesh; Sebastian, Patricia; Hussain, Mohamathu Rafic Kather; Ravindran, Paul; John, Subhashini

    2017-01-01

    Aims To evaluate the efficacy of the deep inspirational breath-hold (DIBH) technique and its dosimetric advantages over the free breathing (FB) technique in cardiac (heart and left anterior descending artery [LAD]) and ipsilateral lung sparing in left-sided post-mastectomy field-in-field conformal radiotherapy. DIBH is highly reproducible, and this study aims to find out its dosimetric benefits over FB. Materials and Methods Nineteen left-sided mastectomy patients were immobilized using breast boards with both arms positioned above the head. All patients had 2 sets of planning CT images (one in FB and another in DIBH) with a Biograph TruePoint HD CT scanner in the same setup. DIBH was performed by tracking the respiratory cycles using a Varian Real-Time Position Management system. The target (chest wall and supraclavicular region), organs at risk (OARs; ipsilateral lung, contralateral lung, heart, LAD, and contralateral breast), and other organs of interests were delineated as per the RTOG (Radiation Therapy Oncology Group) contouring guidelines. The single-isocenter conformal fields in the field treatment plans were generated with the Eclipse Treatment Planning System (Varian Medical Systems) for both FB and DIBH images, and the doses to the target and OARs were compared. The standard fractionation regimen of 50 Gy in 25 fractions over a period of 5 weeks was used for all patients in this study. Results and Discussion The target coverage parameters (V95, V105, V107, and Dmean) were found to be 97.8 ± 0.9, 6.1 ± 3.4, 0.2 ± 0.3, and 101.9 ± 0.5% in the FB plans and 98.1 ± 0.8, 6.1 ± 3.2, 0.2 ± 0.3, and 101.9 ± 0.4% in the DIBH plans, respectively. The plan quality indices (conformity index and homogeneity index) also showed 1.3 ± 0.2 and 0.1 for the FB plans and 1.2 ± 0.3 and 0.1 for the DIBH plans, respectively. There was a significant reduction in dose to the heart in the DIBH plans compared to the FB plans, with p values of nearly 0 for the V

  7. Anisotropic Artificial Impedance Surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Quarfoth, Ryan Gordon

    Anisotropic artificial impedance surfaces are a group of planar materials that can be modeled by the tensor impedance boundary condition. This boundary condition relates the electric and magnetic field components on a surface using a 2x2 tensor. The advantage of using the tensor impedance boundary condition, and by extension anisotropic artificial impedance surfaces, is that the method allows large and complex structures to be modeled quickly and accurately using a planar boundary condition. This thesis presents the theory of anisotropic impedance surfaces and multiple applications. Anisotropic impedance surfaces are a generalization of scalar impedance surfaces. Unlike the scalar version, anisotropic impedance surfaces have material properties that are dependent on the polarization and wave vector of electromagnetic radiation that interacts with the surface. This allows anisotropic impedance surfaces to be used for applications that scalar surfaces cannot achieve. Three of these applications are presented in this thesis. The first is an anisotropic surface wave waveguide which allows propagation in one direction, but passes radiation in the orthogonal direction without reflection. The second application is a surface wave beam shifter which splits a surface wave beam in two directions and reduces the scattering from an object placed on the surface. The third application is a patterned surface which can alter the scattered radiation pattern of a rectangular shape. For each application, anisotropic impedance surfaces are constructed using periodic unit cells. These unit cells are designed to give the desired surface impedance characteristics by modifying a patterned metallic patch on a grounded dielectric substrate. Multiple unit cell geometries are analyzed in order to find the setup with the best performance in terms of impedance characteristics and frequency bandwidth.

  8. Adaptive impedance control of redundant manipulators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Colbaugh, R.; Glass, K.; Seraji, H.

    1990-01-01

    A scheme for controlling the mechanical impedance of the end-effector of a kinematically redundant manipulator is presented. The proposed control system consists of two subsystems: an adaptive impedance controller which generates the Cartesian-space control input F (is a member of Rm) required to provide the desired end-effector impedance characteristics, and an algorithm that maps this control input to the joint torque T (is a member of Rn). The F to T map is constructed so that the robot redundancy is utilized to improve either the kinematic or dynamic performance of the robot. The impedance controller does not require knowledge of the complex robot dynamic model or parameter values for the robot, the payload, or the environment, and is implemented without calculation of the robot inverse kinematic transformation. As a result, the scheme is very general and is computationally efficient for on-line implementation.

  9. Robust impedance shaping telemanipulation

    SciTech Connect

    Colgate, J.E.

    1993-08-01

    When a human operator performs a task via a bilateral manipulator, the feel of the task is embodied in the mechanical impedance of the manipulator. Traditionally, a bilateral manipulator is designed for transparency; i.e., so that the impedance reflected through the manipulator closely approximates that of the task. Impedance shaping bilateral control, introduced here, differs in that it treats the bilateral manipulator as a means of constructively altering the impedance of a task. This concept is particularly valuable if the characteristic dimensions (e.g., force, length, time) of the task impedance are very different from those of the human limb. It is shown that a general form of impedance shaping control consists of a conventional power-scaling bilateral controller augmented with a real-time interactive task simulation (i.e., a virtual environment). An approach to impedance shaping based on kinematic similarity between tasks of different scale is introduced and illustrated with an example. It is shown that an important consideration in impedance shaping controller design is robustness; i.e., guaranteeing the stability of the operator/manipulator/task system. A general condition for the robustness of a bilateral manipulator is derived. This condition is based on the structured singular value ({mu}). An example of robust impedance shaping bilateral control is presented and discussed.

  10. Three-dimensional electrical impedance tomography of human brain activity.

    PubMed

    Tidswell, T; Gibson, A; Bayford, R H; Holder, D S

    2001-02-01

    Regional cerebral blood flow and blood volume changes that occur during human brain activity will change the local impedance of that cortical area, as blood has a lower impedance than that of brain. Theoretically, such impedance changes could be measured from scalp electrodes and reconstructed into images of the internal impedance of the head. Electrical Impedance Tomography (EIT) is a newly developed technique by which impedance measurements from the surface of an object are reconstructed into impedance images. It is fast, portable, inexpensive, and noninvasive, but has a relatively low spatial resolution. EIT images were recorded with scalp electrodes and an EIT system, specially optimized for recording brain function, in 39 adult human subjects during visual, somatosensory, or motor activity. Reproducible impedance changes of about 0.5% occurred in 51/52 recordings, which lasted from 6 s after the stimulus onset to 41 s after stimulus cessation. When these changes were reconstructed into impedance images, using a novel 3-D reconstruction algorithm, 19 data sets demonstrated significant impedance changes in the appropriate cortical region. This demonstrates, for the first time, that significant impedance changes, which could form the basis for a novel neuroimaging technology, may be recorded in human subjects with scalp electrodes. The final images contained spatial noise and strategies to reduce this in future work are presented.

  11. Overview Of Impedance Sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abele, John E.

    1989-08-01

    Electrical impedance has been one of the many "tools of great promise" that physicians have employed in their quest to measure and/or monitor body function or physiologic events. So far, the expectations for its success have always exceeded its performance. In simplistic terms, physiologic impedance is a measure of the resistance in the volume between electrodes which changes as a function of changes in that volume, the relative impedance of that volume, or a combination of these two. The history and principles of electrical impedance are very nicely reviewed by Geddes and Baker in their textbook "Principles of Applied Biomedical Instrumentation". It is humbling, however, to note that Cremer recorded variations in electrical impedance in frog hearts as early as 1907. The list of potential applications includes the measurement of thyroid function, estrogen activity, galvanic skin reflex, respiration, blood flow by conductivity dilution, nervous activity and eye movement. Commercial devices employing impedance have been and are being used to measure respiration (pneumographs and apneamonitors), pulse volume (impedance phlebographs) and even noninvasive cardiac output.

  12. Microfabricated AC impedance sensor

    DOEpatents

    Krulevitch, Peter; Ackler, Harold D.; Becker, Frederick; Boser, Bernhard E.; Eldredge, Adam B.; Fuller, Christopher K.; Gascoyne, Peter R. C.; Hamilton, Julie K.; Swierkowski, Stefan P.; Wang, Xiao-Bo

    2002-01-01

    A microfabricated instrument for detecting and identifying cells and other particles based on alternating current (AC) impedance measurements. The microfabricated AC impedance sensor includes two critical elements: 1) a microfluidic chip, preferably of glass substrates, having at least one microchannel therein and with electrodes patterned on both substrates, and 2) electrical circuits that connect to the electrodes on the microfluidic chip and detect signals associated with particles traveling down the microchannels. These circuits enable multiple AC impedance measurements of individual particles at high throughput rates with sufficient resolution to identify different particle and cell types as appropriate for environmental detection and clinical diagnostic applications.

  13. Calculating impedance vibrator antennas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eminov, S. I.

    2017-07-01

    The technique of analytical reversal of a hypersingular equation is used to solve the equation of an impedance vibrator antenna. A numerical method for solving the equation is developed, and its efficiency is demonstrated.

  14. Surface Roughness Impedance

    SciTech Connect

    Stupakov, Gennady

    2000-12-21

    The next generation of linac-based free electron lasers will use very short bunches with a large peak current. For such beams, the impedance caused by submicron imperfections in the vacuum beam tube may generate an additional energy spread within the bunch. A review of two mechanisms of the roughness impedance is given with the emphasis on the importance of the high-aspect ratio property of the real surface roughness.

  15. Wavelet analysis of the impedance cardiogram waveforms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Podtaev, S.; Stepanov, R.; Dumler, A.; Chugainov, S.; Tziberkin, K.

    2012-12-01

    Impedance cardiography has been used for diagnosing atrial and ventricular dysfunctions, valve disorders, aortic stenosis, and vascular diseases. Almost all the applications of impedance cardiography require determination of some of the characteristic points of the ICG waveform. The ICG waveform has a set of characteristic points known as A, B, E ((dZ/dt)max) X, Y, O and Z. These points are related to distinct physiological events in the cardiac cycle. Objective of this work is an approbation of a new method of processing and interpretation of the impedance cardiogram waveforms using wavelet analysis. A method of computer thoracic tetrapolar polyrheocardiography is used for hemodynamic registrations. Use of original wavelet differentiation algorithm allows combining filtration and calculation of the derivatives of rheocardiogram. The proposed approach can be used in clinical practice for early diagnostics of cardiovascular system remodelling in the course of different pathologies.

  16. Direct adaptive impedance control of manipulators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Colbaugh, R.; Seraji, H.; Glass, K.

    1991-01-01

    An adaptive scheme for controlling the end-effector impedance of robot manipulators is presented. The proposed control system consists of three subsystems: a simple filter which characterizes the desired dynamic relationship between the end-effector position error and the end-effector/environment contact force, an adaptive controller which produces the Cartesian-space control input required to provide this desired dynamic relationship, and an algorithm for mapping the Cartesian-space control input to a physically realizable joint-space control torque. The controller does not require knowledge of either the structure or the parameter values of the robot dynamics, and it is implemented without calculation of the robot inverse kinematic transformation. As a result, the scheme represents a very general and computationally efficient approach to controlling the impedance of both nonredundant and redundant manipulators. Furthermore, the method can be applied directly to trajectory tracking in free-space motion by removing the impedance filter.

  17. Impeded Dark Matter

    SciTech Connect

    Kopp, Joachim; Liu, Jia; Slatyer, Tracy; Wang, Xiao-Ping; Xue, Wei

    2016-12-12

    Here, we consider dark matter models in which the mass splitting between the dark matter particles and their annihilation products is tiny. Compared to the previously proposed Forbidden Dark Matter scenario, the mass splittings we consider are much smaller, and are allowed to be either positive or negative. To emphasize this modification, we dub our scenario \\Impeded Dark Matter". We also demonstrate that Impeded Dark Matter can be easily realized without requiring tuning of model parameters. For negative mass splitting, we demonstrate that the annihilation cross-section for Impeded Dark Matter depends linearly on the dark matter velocity or may even be kinematically forbidden, making this scenario almost insensitive to constraints from the cosmic microwave background and from observations of dwarf galaxies. Accordingly, it may be possible for Impeded Dark Matter to yield observable signals in clusters or the Galactic center, with no corresponding signal in dwarfs. Furthermore, for positive mass splitting, we show that the annihilation cross-section is suppressed by the small mass splitting, which helps light dark matter to survive increasingly stringent constraints from indirect searches. As specific realizations for Impeded Dark Matter, we introduce a model of vector dark matter from a hidden SU(2) sector, and a composite dark matter scenario based on a QCD-like dark sector.

  18. Impeded Dark Matter

    DOE PAGES

    Kopp, Joachim; Liu, Jia; Slatyer, Tracy; ...

    2016-12-12

    Here, we consider dark matter models in which the mass splitting between the dark matter particles and their annihilation products is tiny. Compared to the previously proposed Forbidden Dark Matter scenario, the mass splittings we consider are much smaller, and are allowed to be either positive or negative. To emphasize this modification, we dub our scenario \\Impeded Dark Matter". We also demonstrate that Impeded Dark Matter can be easily realized without requiring tuning of model parameters. For negative mass splitting, we demonstrate that the annihilation cross-section for Impeded Dark Matter depends linearly on the dark matter velocity or may evenmore » be kinematically forbidden, making this scenario almost insensitive to constraints from the cosmic microwave background and from observations of dwarf galaxies. Accordingly, it may be possible for Impeded Dark Matter to yield observable signals in clusters or the Galactic center, with no corresponding signal in dwarfs. Furthermore, for positive mass splitting, we show that the annihilation cross-section is suppressed by the small mass splitting, which helps light dark matter to survive increasingly stringent constraints from indirect searches. As specific realizations for Impeded Dark Matter, we introduce a model of vector dark matter from a hidden SU(2) sector, and a composite dark matter scenario based on a QCD-like dark sector.« less

  19. Impeded Dark Matter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kopp, Joachim; Liu, Jia; Slatyer, Tracy R.; Wang, Xiao-Ping; Xue, Wei

    2016-12-01

    We consider dark matter models in which the mass splitting between the dark matter particles and their annihilation products is tiny. Compared to the previously proposed Forbidden Dark Matter scenario, the mass splittings we consider are much smaller, and are allowed to be either positive or negative. To emphasize this modification, we dub our scenario "Impeded Dark Matter". We demonstrate that Impeded Dark Matter can be easily realized without requiring tuning of model parameters. For negative mass splitting, we demonstrate that the annihilation cross-section for Impeded Dark Matter depends linearly on the dark matter velocity or may even be kinematically forbidden, making this scenario almost insensitive to constraints from the cosmic microwave background and from observations of dwarf galaxies. Accordingly, it may be possible for Impeded Dark Matter to yield observable signals in clusters or the Galactic center, with no corresponding signal in dwarfs. For positive mass splitting, we show that the annihilation cross-section is suppressed by the small mass splitting, which helps light dark matter to survive increasingly stringent constraints from indirect searches. As specific realizations for Impeded Dark Matter, we introduce a model of vector dark matter from a hidden SU(2) sector, and a composite dark matter scenario based on a QCD-like dark sector.

  20. Contact impedance of grounded and capacitive electrodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hördt, Andreas; Weidelt, Peter; Przyklenk, Anita

    2013-04-01

    The contact impedance of electrodes determines how much current can be injected into the ground for a given voltage. If the ground is very resistive, capacitive electrodes may be an alternative to galvanic coupling. The impedance of capacitive electrodes is often estimated with the assumption that the halfspace is an ideal conductor. Over resistive ground at high frequencies, however, the contact impedance will depend on the electrical properties, i.e. electrical conductivity and permittivity, of the subsurface. Here, we review existing equations for the resistance of a galvanically coupled, spherical electrode in a fullspace, and extend the theory to the general case of a sphere in a spherically layered fullspace. We then develop a method to calculate the impedance of a spherical disc over a homogeneous halfspace. We carry out modelling studies to demonstrate the consistency of the algorithms and to assess under which conditions the determination of the electrical parameters from the impedance may be feasible. For a capacitively coupled electrode, the common assumption of an ideally conducting fullspace (or halfspace) breaks down if the displacement currents in the fullspace become as large as the conduction currents. For a moderately resistive medium with 1000 Ωm this is the case for frequencies larger than 100 kHz. The transition from a galvanically coupled disc to a disc in the air is continuous as function of distance. However, depending on the electrical parameters and frequency, the impedance may vary by several orders of magnitude within a few nanometers distance or less. We derive a simple equation to assess under which conditions the impedance is independent of the electrode height, which may be important for determining subsurface permittivity and conductivity in cases where control on the exact geometry is difficult. Our theory is consistent with measured data obtained in a sandbox in the laboratory.

  1. Multifrequency electrical impedance tomography using spectral constraints.

    PubMed

    Malone, Emma; Sato Dos Santos, Gustavo; Holder, David; Arridge, Simon

    2014-02-01

    Multifrequency electrical impedance tomography (MFEIT) exploits the dependence of tissue impedance on frequency to recover an image of conductivity. MFEIT could provide emergency diagnosis of pathologies such as acute stroke, brain injury and breast cancer. We present a method for performing MFEIT using spectral constraints. Boundary voltage data is employed directly to reconstruct the volume fraction distribution of component tissues using a nonlinear method. Given that the reconstructed parameter is frequency independent, this approach allows for the simultaneous use of all multifrequency data, thus reducing the degrees of freedom of the reconstruction problem. Furthermore, this method allows for the use of frequency difference data in a nonlinear reconstruction algorithm. Results from empirical phantom measurements suggest that our fraction reconstruction method points to a new direction for the development of multifrequency EIT algorithms in the case that the spectral constraints are known, and may provide a unifying framework for static EIT imaging.

  2. Superconducting active impedance converter

    DOEpatents

    Ginley, D.S.; Hietala, V.M.; Martens, J.S.

    1993-11-16

    A transimpedance amplifier for use with high temperature superconducting, other superconducting, and conventional semiconductors allows for appropriate signal amplification and impedance matching to processing electronics. The amplifier incorporates the superconducting flux flow transistor into a differential amplifier configuration which allows for operation over a wide temperature range, and is characterized by high gain, relatively low noise, and response times less than 200 picoseconds over at least a 10-80 K. temperature range. The invention is particularly useful when a signal derived from either far-IR focal plane detectors or from Josephson junctions is to be processed by higher signal/higher impedance electronics, such as conventional semiconductor technology. 12 figures.

  3. Superconducting active impedance converter

    DOEpatents

    Ginley, David S.; Hietala, Vincent M.; Martens, Jon S.

    1993-01-01

    A transimpedance amplifier for use with high temperature superconducting, other superconducting, and conventional semiconductor allows for appropriate signal amplification and impedance matching to processing electronics. The amplifier incorporates the superconducting flux flow transistor into a differential amplifier configuration which allows for operation over a wide temperature range, and is characterized by high gain, relatively low noise, and response times less than 200 picoseconds over at least a 10-80 K. temperature range. The invention is particularly useful when a signal derived from either far-IR focal plane detectors or from Josephson junctions is to be processed by higher signal/higher impedance electronics, such as conventional semiconductor technology.

  4. Validation of an Impedance Education Method in Flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Watson, Willie R.; Jones, Michael G.; Parrott, Tony L.

    2004-01-01

    This paper reports results of a research effort to validate a method for educing the normal incidence impedance of a locally reacting liner, located in a grazing incidence, nonprogressive acoustic wave environment with flow. The results presented in this paper test the ability of the method to reproduce the measured normal incidence impedance of a solid steel plate and two soft test liners in a uniform flow. The test liners are known to be locally react- ing and exhibit no measurable amplitude-dependent impedance nonlinearities or flow effects. Baseline impedance spectra for these liners were therefore established from measurements in a conventional normal incidence impedance tube. A key feature of the method is the expansion of the unknown impedance function as a piecewise continuous polynomial with undetermined coefficients. Stewart's adaptation of the Davidon-Fletcher-Powell optimization algorithm is used to educe the normal incidence impedance at each Mach number by optimizing an objective function. The method is shown to reproduce the measured normal incidence impedance spectrum for each of the test liners, thus validating its usefulness for determining the normal incidence impedance of test liners for a broad range of source frequencies and flow Mach numbers. Nomenclature

  5. Longitudinal impedance of RHIC

    SciTech Connect

    Blaskiewicz, M.; Brennan, J. M.; Mernick, K.

    2015-05-03

    The longitudinal impedance of the two RHIC rings has been measured using the effect of potential well distortion on longitudinal Schottky measurements. For the blue RHIC ring Im(Z/n) = 1.5±0.2Ω. For the yellow ring Im(Z/n) = 5.4±1Ω.

  6. Impedances of Tevatron separators

    SciTech Connect

    K. Y. Ng

    2003-05-28

    The impedances of the Tevatron separators are revisited and are found to be negligibly small in the few hundred MHz region, except for resonances at 22.5 MHz. The later are contributions from the power cables which may drive head-tail instabilities if the bunch is long enough.

  7. Implantable Impedance Plethysmography

    PubMed Central

    Theodor, Michael; Ruh, Dominic; Ocker, Martin; Spether, Dominik; Förster, Katharina; Heilmann, Claudia; Beyersdorf, Friedhelm; Manoli, Yiannos; Zappe, Hans; Seifert, Andreas

    2014-01-01

    We demonstrate by theory, as well as by ex vivo and in vivo measurements that impedance plethysmography, applied extravascularly directly on large arteries, is a viable method for monitoring various cardiovascular parameters, such as blood pressure, with high accuracy. The sensor is designed as an implant to monitor cardiac events and arteriosclerotic progression over the long term. PMID:25123467

  8. Recycler short kicker beam impedance

    SciTech Connect

    Crisp, Jim; Fellenz, Brian; /Fermilab

    2009-07-01

    Measured longitudinal and calculated transverse beam impedance is presented for the short kicker magnets being installed in the Fermilab Recycler. Fermi drawing number ME-457159. The longitudinal impedance was measured with a stretched wire and the Panofsky equation was used to estimate the transverse impedance. The impedance of 3319 meters (the Recycler circumference) of stainless vacuum pipe is provided for comparison. Although measurements where done to 3GHz, impedance was negligible above 30MHz. The beam power lost to the kicker impedance is shown for a range of bunch lengths. The measurements are for one kicker assuming a rotation frequency of 90KHz. Seven of these kickers are being installed.

  9. Impedance calculation for ferrite inserts

    SciTech Connect

    Breitzmann, S.C.; Lee, S.Y.; Ng, K.Y.; /Fermilab

    2005-01-01

    Passive ferrite inserts were used to compensate the space charge impedance in high intensity space charge dominated accelerators. They study the narrowband longitudinal impedance of these ferrite inserts. they find that the shunt impedance and the quality factor for ferrite inserts are inversely proportional to the imaginary part of the permeability of ferrite materials. They also provide a recipe for attaining a truly passive space charge impedance compensation and avoiding narrowband microwave instabilities.

  10. Impedance Measurement Box

    ScienceCinema

    Christophersen, Jon

    2016-07-12

    Energy storage devices, primarily batteries, are now more important to consumers, industries and the military. With increasing technical complexity and higher user expectations, there is also a demand for highly accurate state-of-health battery assessment techniques. IMB incorporates patented, proprietary, and tested capabilities using control software and hardware that can be part of an embedded monitoring system. IMB directly measures the wideband impedance spectrum in seconds during battery operation with no significant impact on service life. It also can be applied to batteries prior to installation, confirming health before entering active service, as well as during regular maintenance. For more information about this project, visit http://www.inl.gov/rd100/2011/impedance-measurement-box/

  11. Impedance Measurement Box

    SciTech Connect

    Christophersen, Jon

    2011-01-01

    Energy storage devices, primarily batteries, are now more important to consumers, industries and the military. With increasing technical complexity and higher user expectations, there is also a demand for highly accurate state-of-health battery assessment techniques. IMB incorporates patented, proprietary, and tested capabilities using control software and hardware that can be part of an embedded monitoring system. IMB directly measures the wideband impedance spectrum in seconds during battery operation with no significant impact on service life. It also can be applied to batteries prior to installation, confirming health before entering active service, as well as during regular maintenance. For more information about this project, visit http://www.inl.gov/rd100/2011/impedance-measurement-box/

  12. Impedance Measurement Box

    SciTech Connect

    Morrison, William

    2014-11-20

    The IMB 50V software provides functionality for design of impedance measurement tests or sequences of tests, execution of these tests or sequences, processing measured responses and displaying and saving of the results. The software consists of a Graphical User Interface that allows configuration of measurement parameters and test sequencing, a core engine that controls test sequencing, execution of measurements, processing and storage of results and a hardware/software data acquisition interface with the IMB hardware system.

  13. Acoustic ground impedance meter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zuckerwar, A. J.

    1981-12-01

    A compact, portable instrument was developed to measure the acoustic impedance of the ground, or other surfaces, by direct pressure-volume velocity measurement. A Helmholz resonator, constructed of heavy-walled stainless steel but open at the bottom, is positioned over the surface having the unknown impedance. The sound source, a cam-driven piston of known stroke and thus known volume velocity, is located in the neck of the resonator. The cam speed is a variable up to a maximum 3600 rpm. The sound pressure at the test surface is measured by means of a microphone flush-mounted in the wall of the chamber. An optical monitor of the piston displacement permits measurement of the phase angle between the volume velocity and the sound pressure, from which the real and imaginary parts of the impedance can be evaluated. Measurements using a 5-lobed cam can be made up to 300 Hz. Detailed design criteria and results on a soil sample are presented.

  14. Acoustic ground impedance meter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zuckerwar, A. J.

    1983-01-01

    A compact, portable instrument was developed to measure the acoustic impedance of the ground, or other surfaces, by direct pressure-volume velocity measurement. A Helmholtz resonator, constructed of heavy-walled stainless steel but open at the bottom, is positioned over the surface having the unknown impedance. The sound source, a cam-driven piston of known stroke and thus known volume velocity, is located in the neck of the resonator. The cam speed is a variable up to a maximum 3600 rpm. The sound pressure at the test surface is measured by means of a microphone flush-mounted in the wall of the chamber. An optical monitor of the piston displacement permits measurement of the phase angle between the volume velocity and the sound pressure, from which the real and imaginary parts of the impedance can be evaluated. Measurements using a 5-lobed cam can be made up to 300 Hz. Detailed design criteria and results on a soil sample are presented. Previously announced in STAR as N82-17476

  15. High input impedance amplifier

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kleinberg, Leonard L.

    1995-01-01

    High input impedance amplifiers are provided which reduce the input impedance solely to a capacitive reactance, or, in a somewhat more complex design, provide an extremely high essentially infinite, capacitive reactance. In one embodiment, where the input impedance is reduced in essence, to solely a capacitive reactance, an operational amplifier in a follower configuration is driven at its non-inverting input and a resistor with a predetermined magnitude is connected between the inverting and non-inverting inputs. A second embodiment eliminates the capacitance from the input by adding a second stage to the first embodiment. The second stage is a second operational amplifier in a non-inverting gain-stage configuration where the output of the first follower stage drives the non-inverting input of the second stage and the output of the second stage is fed back to the non-inverting input of the first stage through a capacitor of a predetermined magnitude. These amplifiers, while generally useful, are very useful as sensor buffer amplifiers that may eliminate significant sources of error.

  16. Acoustic ground impedance meter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zuckerwar, A. J.

    1981-01-01

    A compact, portable instrument was developed to measure the acoustic impedance of the ground, or other surfaces, by direct pressure-volume velocity measurement. A Helmholz resonator, constructed of heavy-walled stainless steel but open at the bottom, is positioned over the surface having the unknown impedance. The sound source, a cam-driven piston of known stroke and thus known volume velocity, is located in the neck of the resonator. The cam speed is a variable up to a maximum 3600 rpm. The sound pressure at the test surface is measured by means of a microphone flush-mounted in the wall of the chamber. An optical monitor of the piston displacement permits measurement of the phase angle between the volume velocity and the sound pressure, from which the real and imaginary parts of the impedance can be evaluated. Measurements using a 5-lobed cam can be made up to 300 Hz. Detailed design criteria and results on a soil sample are presented.

  17. Gynecologic electrical impedance tomograph

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Korjenevsky, A.; Cherepenin, V.; Trokhanova, O.; Tuykin, T.

    2010-04-01

    Electrical impedance tomography extends to the new and new areas of the medical diagnostics: lungs, breast, prostate, etc. The feedback from the doctors who use our breast EIT diagnostic system has induced us to develop the 3D electrical impedance imaging device for diagnostics of the cervix of the uterus - gynecologic impedance tomograph (GIT). The device uses the same measuring approach as the breast imaging system: 2D flat array of the electrodes arranged on the probe with handle is placed against the body. Each of the 32 electrodes of the array is connected in turn to the current source while the rest electrodes acquire the potentials on the surface. The current flows through the electrode of the array and returns through the remote electrode placed on the patient's limb. The voltages are measured relative to another remote electrode. The 3D backprojection along equipotential surfaces is used to reconstruct conductivity distribution up to approximately 1 cm in depth. Small number of electrodes enables us to implement real time imaging with a few frames per sec. rate. The device is under initial testing and evaluation of the imaging capabilities and suitability of usage.

  18. Management of thoracic trauma and chest wall reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Spackman, C J; Caywood, D D

    1987-03-01

    This article reviews common causes and types of thoracic trauma in the dog. A triage approach for the diagnosis and immediate treatment of thoracic trauma is presented. Reconstructive procedures of the thoracic wall, which may be necessary following trauma or surgical resection of diseased tissue, are described.

  19. Counterpoint: Hyperthermia with radiation therapy for chest wall recurrences.

    PubMed

    McCormick, Beryl

    2007-03-01

    The 2007 National Comprehensive Cancer Network Breast Cancer Clinical Practice Guidelines in Oncology include a consideration for hyperthermia (HT) and radiation for women with recurrent locoregional advanced breast cancers after first-line surgery or radiation failed. Although HT in this setting has been used for several decades, recent reports are few. This article reviews the data from several recent studies, selected because they included at least 100 patients. Unresolved issues of radiation dose, optimal temperature and timing of HT, and quality assurance problems with thermometry are apparent from these studies. Although clearly an effective treatment option in this clinical scenario, more research on HT and radiation is needed before this treatment combination can be considered standard care.

  20. Point: Hyperthermia with radiation for chest wall recurrences.

    PubMed

    Jones, Ellen L; Marks, Lawrence B; Prosnitz, Leonard R

    2007-03-01

    Treatment of a locoregional recurrence of breast cancer after mastectomy remains a clinically challenging problem. Often these patients have undergone prior radiotherapy and chemotherapy. Therapeutic options usually include resection or additional radiation; however, the long-term control rates are often suboptimal with these approaches. Data from several randomized trials suggest that the addition of hyperthermia to radiation can increase the response rate for such local recurrences. Therefore, in settings where the available therapies are unlikely to yield local control (e.g., local/ regional recurrence after prior radiation), a reasonable option to consider is radiation with hyperthermia as a radiation sensitizer. This article reviews the rationale and supporting literature for this recommendation.

  1. Penetrating cardiac injuries in blunt chest wall trauma.

    PubMed

    Kanchan, Tanuj; Menezes, Ritesh G; Sirohi, Parmendra

    2012-08-01

    The present photocase illustrates the possible mechanism of direct cardiac injuries from broken sharp jagged fractured ends of ribs in blunt force trauma to the chest in run over traffic mishaps. We propose that the projecting fractured ends of the ribs penetrate the underlying thoracic organs due to the transient phenomenon of deformation of chest cavity under pressure in run over traffic mishaps.

  2. RF impedance measurement calibration

    SciTech Connect

    Matthews, P.J.; Song, J.J.

    1993-02-12

    The intent of this note is not to explain all of the available calibration methods in detail. Instead, we will focus on the calibration methods of interest for RF impedance coupling measurements and attempt to explain: (1). The standards and measurements necessary for the various calibration techniques. (2). The advantages and disadvantages of each technique. (3). The mathematical manipulations that need to be applied to the measured standards and devices. (4). An outline of the steps needed for writing a calibration routine that operated from a remote computer. For further details of the various techniques presented in this note, the reader should consult the references.

  3. Introduction to Electrochemical Impedance

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1994-02-24

    in polar coordinates and Z’ and Z" in Cartesian coordinates. Algebra has a special way of expressing "two-component numbers" as complex numbers. This...test is a small batch file that invokes a BASICA program and loads P STAT.BAS program in it. By replacing test with atwill, the program at-will will be...SYSTEM. This will end the BASICA program, return the computer to DOS and consequently, return to Z-PLOT. Petr Vantsek Introduction to impedance 55 23

  4. Outdoor ground impedance models.

    PubMed

    Attenborough, Keith; Bashir, Imran; Taherzadeh, Shahram

    2011-05-01

    Many models for the acoustical properties of rigid-porous media require knowledge of parameter values that are not available for outdoor ground surfaces. The relationship used between tortuosity and porosity for stacked spheres results in five characteristic impedance models that require not more than two adjustable parameters. These models and hard-backed-layer versions are considered further through numerical fitting of 42 short range level difference spectra measured over various ground surfaces. For all but eight sites, slit-pore, phenomenological and variable porosity models yield lower fitting errors than those given by the widely used one-parameter semi-empirical model. Data for 12 of 26 grassland sites and for three beech wood sites are fitted better by hard-backed-layer models. Parameter values obtained by fitting slit-pore and phenomenological models to data for relatively low flow resistivity grounds, such as forest floors, porous asphalt, and gravel, are consistent with values that have been obtained non-acoustically. Three impedance models yield reasonable fits to a narrow band excess attenuation spectrum measured at short range over railway ballast but, if extended reaction is taken into account, the hard-backed-layer version of the slit-pore model gives the most reasonable parameter values.

  5. Impedance Study for BEPC Separator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Feng; Tang, Chuanxiang

    1997-05-01

    This paper focuses on the impedance studies for the separator. The impedance measurement results show that the shunt impedances of trapped modes in the separator are very small, and find that the load connected to the plates can damp some modes. The field distributions of these modes are also presented. Its wake is also calculated by using 3-D MAFIA. The relations between its wake with separator length, separator width, and etc are studied in detail.

  6. Ionospheric effects to antenna impedance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bethke, K. H.

    1986-01-01

    The reciprocity between high power satellite antennas and the surrounding plasma are examined. The relevant plasma states for antenna impedance calculations are presented and plasma models, and hydrodynamic and kinetic theory, are discussed. A theory from which a variation in antenna impedance with regard to the radiated power can be calculated for a frequency range well above the plasma resonance frequency is give. The theory can include photo and secondary emission effects in antenna impedance calculations.

  7. Optically stimulated differential impedance spectroscopy

    DOEpatents

    Maxey, Lonnie C; Parks, II, James E; Lewis, Sr., Samuel A; Partridge, Jr., William P

    2014-02-18

    Methods and apparatuses for evaluating a material are described. Embodiments typically involve use of an impedance measurement sensor to measure the impedance of a sample of the material under at least two different states of illumination. The states of illumination may include (a) substantially no optical stimulation, (b) substantial optical stimulation, (c) optical stimulation at a first wavelength of light, (d) optical stimulation at a second wavelength of light, (e) a first level of light intensity, and (f) a second level of light intensity. Typically a difference in impedance between the impedance of the sample at the two states of illumination is measured to determine a characteristic of the material.

  8. Some boundary problems in electrical impedance tomography.

    PubMed

    Pidcock, M; Ciulli, S; Ispas, S

    1996-11-01

    Accurate mathematical modelling is important in the development of iterative image reconstruction algorithms for electrical impedance tomography (EIT). In such schemes the forward problem of calculating the electric potential from Neumann boundary data is solved many times. One aspect of this problem which has received some attention is the mathematical modelling of the electrodes used in the technique. In this paper we describe an integral equation formulation of a boundary value problem associated with this tissue and we indicate some of the ways in which this formulation can be used to obtain numerical and analytic results.

  9. Monolithically compatible impedance measurement

    DOEpatents

    Ericson, Milton Nance; Holcomb, David Eugene

    2002-01-01

    A monolithic sensor includes a reference channel and at least one sensing channel. Each sensing channel has an oscillator and a counter driven by the oscillator. The reference channel and the at least one sensing channel being formed integrally with a substrate and intimately nested with one another on the substrate. Thus, the oscillator and the counter have matched component values and temperature coefficients. A frequency determining component of the sensing oscillator is formed integrally with the substrate and has an impedance parameter which varies with an environmental parameter to be measured by the sensor. A gating control is responsive to an output signal generated by the reference channel, for terminating counting in the at least one sensing channel at an output count, whereby the output count is indicative of the environmental parameter, and successive ones of the output counts are indicative of changes in the environmental parameter.

  10. Antenna pattern control using impedance surfaces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Balanis, Constantine A.; Liu, Kefeng

    1992-01-01

    During this research period, we have effectively transferred existing computer codes from CRAY supercomputer to work station based systems. The work station based version of our code preserved the accuracy of the numerical computations while giving a much better turn-around time than the CRAY supercomputer. Such a task relieved us of the heavy dependence of the supercomputer account budget and made codes developed in this research project more feasible for applications. The analysis of pyramidal horns with impedance surfaces was our major focus during this research period. Three different modeling algorithms in analyzing lossy impedance surfaces were investigated and compared with measured data. Through this investigation, we discovered that a hybrid Fourier transform technique, which uses the eigen mode in the stepped waveguide section and the Fourier transformed field distributions across the stepped discontinuities for lossy impedances coating, gives a better accuracy in analyzing lossy coatings. After a further refinement of the present technique, we will perform an accurate radiation pattern synthesis in the coming reporting period.

  11. Ultra-wideband impedance sensor

    DOEpatents

    McEwan, T.E.

    1999-03-16

    The ultra-wideband impedance sensor (UWBZ sensor, or Z-sensor) is implemented in differential and single-ended configurations. The differential UWBZ sensor employs a sub-nanosecond impulse to determine the balance of an impedance bridge. The bridge is configured as a differential sample-and-hold circuit that has a reference impedance side and an unknown impedance side. The unknown impedance side includes a short transmission line whose impedance is a function of the near proximity of objects. The single-ended UWBZ sensor eliminates the reference side of the bridge and is formed of a sample and hold circuit having a transmission line whose impedance is a function of the near proximity of objects. The sensing range of the transmission line is bounded by the two-way travel time of the impulse, thereby eliminating spurious Doppler modes from large distant objects that would occur in a microwave CW impedance bridge. Thus, the UWBZ sensor is a range-gated proximity sensor. The Z-sensor senses the near proximity of various materials such as metal, plastic, wood, petroleum products, and living tissue. It is much like a capacitance sensor, yet it is impervious to moisture. One broad application area is the general replacement of magnetic sensors, particularly where nonferrous materials need to be sensed. Another broad application area is sensing full/empty levels in tanks, vats and silos, e.g., a full/empty switch in water or petroleum tanks. 2 figs.

  12. Ultra-wideband impedance sensor

    DOEpatents

    McEwan, Thomas E.

    1999-01-01

    The ultra-wideband impedance sensor (UWBZ sensor, or Z-sensor) is implemented in differential and single-ended configurations. The differential UWBZ sensor employs a sub-nanosecond impulse to determine the balance of an impedance bridge. The bridge is configured as a differential sample-and-hold circuit that has a reference impedance side and an unknown impedance side. The unknown impedance side includes a short transmission line whose impedance is a function of the near proximity of objects. The single-ended UWBZ sensor eliminates the reference side of the bridge and is formed of a sample and hold circuit having a transmission line whose impedance is a function of the near proximity of objects. The sensing range of the transmission line is bounded by the two-way travel time of the impulse, thereby eliminating spurious Doppler modes from large distant objects that would occur in a microwave CW impedance bridge. Thus, the UWBZ sensor is a range-gated proximity sensor. The Z-sensor senses the near proximity of various materials such as metal, plastic, wood, petroleum products, and living tissue. It is much like a capacitance sensor, yet it is impervious to moisture. One broad application area is the general replacement of magnetic sensors, particularly where nonferrous materials need to be sensed. Another broad application area is sensing full/empty levels in tanks, vats and silos, e.g., a full/empty switch in water or petroleum tanks.

  13. Impedance in School Screening Programs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Robarts, John T.

    1985-01-01

    This paper examines the controversy over use of impedance screening in public schools to identify students with hearing problems, including otitis media, a common ear condition in infants and young children. It cites research that questions the value of pure tone screening as a single test and raises critics' objections to the use of impedance,…

  14. Impedance in School Screening Programs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Robarts, John T.

    1985-01-01

    This paper examines the controversy over use of impedance screening in public schools to identify students with hearing problems, including otitis media, a common ear condition in infants and young children. It cites research that questions the value of pure tone screening as a single test and raises critics' objections to the use of impedance,…

  15. Electrochemical Impedance Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Retter, Utz; Lohse, Heinz

    Non-steady-state measuring techniques are known to be extremely suitable for the investigation of the electrode kinetics of more complex electrochemical systems. Perturbation of the electrochemical system leads to a shift of the steady state. The rate at which it proceeds to a new steady state depends on characteristic parameters (reaction rate constants, diffusion coefficients, charge transfer resistance, double-layer capacity). Due to non-linearities caused by the electron transfer, low-amplitude perturbation signals are necessary. The small perturbation of the electrode state has the advantage that the solutions of relevant mathematical equations used are transformed in limiting forms that are normally linear. Impedance spectroscopy represents a powerful method for investigation of electrical properties of materials and interfaces of conducting electrodes. Relevant fields of application are the kinetics of charges in bulk or interfacial regions, the charge transfer of ionic or mixed ionic-ionic conductors, semiconducting electrodes, the corrosion inhibition of electrode processes, investigation of coatings on metals, characterisation of materials and solid electrolyte as well as solid-state devices.

  16. Impedance-estimation methods, modeling methods, articles of manufacture, impedance-modeling devices, and estimated-impedance monitoring systems

    SciTech Connect

    Richardson, John G

    2009-11-17

    An impedance estimation method includes measuring three or more impedances of an object having a periphery using three or more probes coupled to the periphery. The three or more impedance measurements are made at a first frequency. Three or more additional impedance measurements of the object are made using the three or more probes. The three or more additional impedance measurements are made at a second frequency different from the first frequency. An impedance of the object at a point within the periphery is estimated based on the impedance measurements and the additional impedance measurements.

  17. I/O impedance controller

    DOEpatents

    Ruesch, Rodney; Jenkins, Philip N.; Ma, Nan

    2004-03-09

    There is disclosed apparatus and apparatus for impedance control to provide for controlling the impedance of a communication circuit using an all-digital impedance control circuit wherein one or more control bits are used to tune the output impedance. In one example embodiment, the impedance control circuit is fabricated using circuit components found in a standard macro library of a computer aided design system. According to another example embodiment, there is provided a control for an output driver on an integrated circuit ("IC") device to provide for forming a resistor divider network with the output driver and a resistor off the IC device so that the divider network produces an output voltage, comparing the output voltage of the divider network with a reference voltage, and adjusting the output impedance of the output driver to attempt to match the output voltage of the divider network and the reference voltage. Also disclosed is over-sampling the divider network voltage, storing the results of the over sampling, repeating the over-sampling and storing, averaging the results of multiple over sampling operations, controlling the impedance with a plurality of bits forming a word, and updating the value of the word by only one least significant bit at a time.

  18. Scattering patterns of dihedral corner reflectors with impedance surface impedances

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balanis, Constantine A.; Griesser, Timothy; Liu, Kefeng

    The radar cross section patterns of lossy dihedral corner reflectors are calculated using a uniform geometrical theory of diffraction for impedance surfaces. All terms of up to third order reflections are considered for patterns in the principal plane. The surface waves are included whenever they exist for reactive surface impedances. The dihedral corner reflectors examined have right, obtuse, and acute interior angles, and patterns over the entire 360 deg azimuthal plane are calculated. The surface impedances can be different on the four faces of the dihedral corner reflector; however, the surface impedance must be uniform over each face. Computed cross sections are compared with a moment method technique for a dielectric/ferrite absorber coating on a metallic corner reflector. The analysis of the dihedral corner reflector is important because it demonstrates many of the important scattering contributors of complex targets including both interior and exterior wedge diffraction, half-plane diffraction, and dominant multiple reflections and diffractions.

  19. Scattering patterns of dihedral corner reflectors with impedance surface impedances

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Balanis, Constantine A.; Griesser, Timothy; Liu, Kefeng

    1988-01-01

    The radar cross section patterns of lossy dihedral corner reflectors are calculated using a uniform geometrical theory of diffraction for impedance surfaces. All terms of up to third order reflections are considered for patterns in the principal plane. The surface waves are included whenever they exist for reactive surface impedances. The dihedral corner reflectors examined have right, obtuse, and acute interior angles, and patterns over the entire 360 deg azimuthal plane are calculated. The surface impedances can be different on the four faces of the dihedral corner reflector; however, the surface impedance must be uniform over each face. Computed cross sections are compared with a moment method technique for a dielectric/ferrite absorber coating on a metallic corner reflector. The analysis of the dihedral corner reflector is important because it demonstrates many of the important scattering contributors of complex targets including both interior and exterior wedge diffraction, half-plane diffraction, and dominant multiple reflections and diffractions.

  20. Reactanceless synthesized impedance bandpass amplifier

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kleinberg, L. L. (Inventor)

    1985-01-01

    An active R bandpass filter network is formed by four operational amplifier stages interconnected by discrete resistances. One pair of stages synthesize an equivalent input impedance of an inductance (L sub eq) in parallel with a discrete resistance (R sub o) while the second pair of stages synthesizes an equivalent input impedance of a capacitance (C sub eq) serially coupled to another discrete resistance (R sub i) coupled in parallel with the first two stages. The equivalent input impedances aggregately define a tuned resonant bandpass filter in the roll-off regions of the operational amplifiers.

  1. Three-dimensional electrical impedance tomography: a topology optimization approach.

    PubMed

    Mello, Luís Augusto Motta; de Lima, Cícero Ribeiro; Amato, Marcelo Britto Passos; Lima, Raul Gonzalez; Silva, Emílio Carlos Nelli

    2008-02-01

    Electrical impedance tomography is a technique to estimate the impedance distribution within a domain, based on measurements on its boundary. In other words, given the mathematical model of the domain, its geometry and boundary conditions, a nonlinear inverse problem of estimating the electric impedance distribution can be solved. Several impedance estimation algorithms have been proposed to solve this problem. In this paper, we present a three-dimensional algorithm, based on the topology optimization method, as an alternative. A sequence of linear programming problems, allowing for constraints, is solved utilizing this method. In each iteration, the finite element method provides the electric potential field within the model of the domain. An electrode model is also proposed (thus, increasing the accuracy of the finite element results). The algorithm is tested using numerically simulated data and also experimental data, and absolute resistivity values are obtained. These results, corresponding to phantoms with two different conductive materials, exhibit relatively well-defined boundaries between them, and show that this is a practical and potentially useful technique to be applied to monitor lung aeration, including the possibility of imaging a pneumothorax.

  2. Fuzzy variable impedance control based on stiffness identification for human-robot cooperation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mao, Dachao; Yang, Wenlong; Du, Zhijiang

    2017-06-01

    This paper presents a dynamic fuzzy variable impedance control algorithm for human-robot cooperation. In order to estimate the intention of human for co-manipulation, a fuzzy inference system is set up to adjust the impedance parameter. Aiming at regulating the output fuzzy universe based on the human arm’s stiffness, an online stiffness identification method is developed. A drag interaction task is conducted on a 5-DOF robot with variable impedance control. Experimental results demonstrate that the proposed algorithm is superior.

  3. Prestress-force monitoring of PSC girder bridges using wireless impedance sensor nodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Jae-Hyung; Lee, So-Young; Hong, Dong-Soo; Kim, Jeong-Tae

    2010-04-01

    In this study, a technique using wireless impedance sensor node and interface washer is proposed to monitor prestressforce in PSC girder bridges. In order to achieve the goal, the following approaches are implemented. Firstly, a wireless impedance sensor node is designed for automated and cost-efficient prestress-force monitoring. Secondly, an impedance-based algorithm is embedded in the wireless impedance sensor node for autonomous prestress-force monitoring. Thirdly, a prestress-force monitoring technique using an interface washer is proposed to overcome limitations of the wireless impedance sensor node such as measureable frequency ranges with narrow band. Finally, the feasibility and applicability of the proposed technique are evaluated in a lab-scaled PSC girder model for which several prestress-loss scenarios are experimentally monitored by the wireless impedance sensor node.

  4. Bayesian identification of acoustic impedance in treated ducts.

    PubMed

    Buot de l'Épine, Y; Chazot, J-D; Ville, J-M

    2015-07-01

    The noise reduction of a liner placed in the nacelle of a turbofan engine is still difficult to predict due to the lack of knowledge of its acoustic impedance that depends on grazing flow profile, mode order, and sound pressure level. An eduction method, based on a Bayesian approach, is presented here to adjust an impedance model of the liner from sound pressures measured in a rectangular treated duct under multimodal propagation and flow. The cost function is regularized with prior information provided by Guess's [J. Sound Vib. 40, 119-137 (1975)] impedance of a perforated plate. The multi-parameter optimization is achieved with an Evolutionary-Markov-Chain-Monte-Carlo algorithm.

  5. Efficient Simultaneous Reconstruction of Time-Varying Images and Electrode Contact Impedances in Electrical Impedance Tomography

    PubMed Central

    Boverman, Gregory; Isaacson, David; Newell, Jonathan C.; Saulnier, Gary J.; Kao, Tzu-Jen; Amm, Bruce C.; Wang, Xin; Davenport, David M.; Chong, David H.; Sahni, Rakesh; Ashe, Jeffrey M.

    2016-01-01

    In Electrical Impedance Tomography (EIT), we apply patterns of currents on a set of electrodes at the external boundary of an object, measure the resulting potentials at the electrodes, and, given the aggregate data set, reconstruct the complex conductivity and permittivity within the object. It is possible to maximize sensitivity to internal conductivity changes by simultaneously applying currents and measuring potentials on all electrodes but this approach also maximizes sensitivity to changes in impedance at the interface. We have therefore developed algorithms to assess contact impedance changes at the interface as well as to efficiently and simultaneously reconstruct internal conductivity/permittivity changes within the body. We use simple linear algebraic manipulations, the generalized SVD, and a dual-mesh finite-element-based framework to reconstruct images in real time. We are also able to efficiently compute the linearized reconstruction for a wide range of regularization parameters and to compute both the Generalized Cross-Validation (GCV) parameter as well as the L-curve, objective approaches to determining the optimal regularization parameter, in a similarly efficient manner. Results are shown using data from a normal subject and from a clinical ICU patient, both acquired with the GE GENESIS prototype EIT system, demonstrating significantly reduced boundary artifacts due to electrode drift and motion artifact. PMID:27295649

  6. Impedance studies - Part 4: The APS impedance budget

    SciTech Connect

    1988-07-01

    This note will wrap up the numerical results that were obtained in our calculations of the wake potentials, the loss factors, and the impedances for a variety of structures in the APS storage ring. It consists of five sections and one appendix. Section 1 is an introduction. Section 2 summarizes the hand calculations. The computer calculations are the subject 1 of Section 3. Section 4 discusses several tests in our numerical methods. Section 5 presents the APS impedance budget, along with some discussion. The appendix contains the figures of the structures, the longitudinal/transverse wake potentials and the real/imaginary part of the impedances of various sorts of geometries that have been included in the budget.

  7. Arts of electrical impedance tomographic sensing

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Mi; Wang, Qiang; Karki, Bishal

    2016-01-01

    This paper reviews governing theorems in electrical impedance sensing for analysing the relationships of boundary voltages obtained from different sensing strategies. It reports that both the boundary voltage values and the associated sensitivity matrix of an alternative sensing strategy can be derived from a set of full independent measurements and sensitivity matrix obtained from other sensing strategy. A new sensing method for regional imaging with limited measurements is reported. It also proves that the sensitivity coefficient back-projection algorithm does not always work for all sensing strategies, unless the diagonal elements of the transformed matrix, ATA, have significant values and can be approximate to a diagonal matrix. Imaging capabilities of few sensing strategies were verified with static set-ups, which suggest the adjacent electrode pair sensing strategy displays better performance compared with the diametrically opposite protocol, with both the back-projection and multi-step image reconstruction methods. An application of electrical impedance tomography for sensing gas in water two-phase flows is demonstrated. This article is part of the themed issue ‘Supersensing through industrial process tomography’. PMID:27185968

  8. [Monitoring cervical dilatation by impedance].

    PubMed

    Salvat, J; Lassen, M; Sauze, C; Baud, S; Salvat, F

    1992-01-01

    Several different physics procedures have been tried to mechanize the recording of partograms. Can a measure of impedance of tissue Z using potential difference V, according to Ohm's law V = Z1, and 1 is a constant, be correlated with a measure of cervical dilatation using vaginal examination? This was our hypothesis. The tissue impedance meter was made to our design and applied according to a bipolar procedure. Our work was carried out on 28 patients. 10 patients were registered before labour started in order to test the apparatus and to record the impedance variations without labour taking place, and 18 patients were registered in labour to see whether there was any correlation. The level of impedance in the cervix without labour was 302.7 Ohms with a deviation of 8.2. Using student's t tests it was found that there was a significant correlation (p less than 0.001) in four measurements between the impedance measure and measures obtained by extrapolating the degrees of dilatation calculated from vaginal examination. This is a preliminary study in which we have defined the conditions that are necessary to confirm these first results and to further develop the method.

  9. Uncertainties in Transfer Impedance Calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schippers, H.; Verpoorte, J.

    2016-05-01

    The shielding effectiveness of metal braids of cables is governed by the geometry and the materials of the braid. The shielding effectiveness can be characterised by the transfer impedance of the metal braid. Analytical models for the transfer impedance contain in general two components, one representing diffusion of electromagnetic energy through the metal braid, and a second part representing leakage of magnetic fields through the braid. Possible sources of uncertainties in the modelling are inaccurate input data (for instance, the exact size of the braid diameter or wire diameter are not known) and imperfections in the computational model. The aim of the present paper is to estimate effects of variations of input data on the calculated transfer impedance.

  10. Impedance spectra classification for determining the state of charge on a lithium iron phosphate cell using a support vector machine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jansen, P.; Vergossen, D.; Renner, D.; John, W.; Götze, J.

    2015-11-01

    An alternative method for determining the state of charge (SOC) on lithium iron phosphate cells by impedance spectra classification is given. Methods based on the electric equivalent circuit diagram (ECD), such as the Kalman Filter, the extended Kalman Filter and the state space observer, for instance, have reached their limits for this cell chemistry. The new method resigns on the open circuit voltage curve and the parameters for the electric ECD. Impedance spectra classification is implemented by a Support Vector Machine (SVM). The classes for the SVM-algorithm are represented by all the impedance spectra that correspond to the SOC (the SOC classes) for defined temperature and aging states. A divide and conquer based search algorithm on a binary search tree makes it possible to grade measured impedances using the SVM method. Statistical analysis is used to verify the concept by grading every single impedance from each impedance spectrum corresponding to the SOC by class with different magnitudes of charged error.

  11. Intracardiac impedance response during acute AF internal cardioversion using novel rectilinear and capacitor-discharge waveforms.

    PubMed

    Rababah, A S; Walsh, S J; Manoharan, G; Walsh, P R; Escalona, O J

    2016-07-01

    Intracardiac impedance (ICI) is a major determinant of success during internal cardioversion of atrial fibrillation (AF). However, there have been few studies that have examined the dynamic behaviour of atrial impedance during internal cardioversion in relation to clinical outcome. In this study, voltage and current waveforms captured during internal cardioversion of acute AF in ovine models using novel radiofrequency (RF) generated low-tilt rectilinear and conventional capacitor-discharge based shock waveforms were retrospectively analysed using a digital signal processing algorithm to investigate the dynamic behaviour of atrial impedance during cardioversion. The algorithm was specifically designed to facilitate the simultaneous analysis of multiple impedance parameters, including: mean intracardiac impedance (Z M), intracardiac impedance variance (ICIV) and impedance amplitude spectrum area (IAMSA) for each cardioversion event. A significant reduction in ICI was observed when comparing two successive shocks of increasing energy where cardioversion outcome was successful. In addition, ICIV and IAMSA variables were found to inversely correlate to the magnitude of energy delivered; with a stronger correlation found to the former parameter. In conclusion, ICIV and IAMSA have been evidenced as two key dynamic intracardiac impedance variables that may prove useful in better understanding of the cardioversion process and that could potentially act as prognostic markers with respect to clinical outcome.

  12. Neural Network-Based Learning Impedance Control for a Robot

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiao, Nan-Feng; Todo, Isao

    In this paper, a neural network-based learning approach for robot impedance control is presented to accomplish a contact task. Firstly, a discrete-time impedance control algorithm is obtained to control the contact task of the robot. Secondly, on-line learning algorithms based on a new evaluation function are developed for the neural networks which adjust the inertia, damping and stiffness parameters of the robot in order to adapt it to the unknown contact environment. Thirdly, experiments are carried out and the effecttiveness of the present approach is verified by pressing a spring using a 6 degrees of freedom robot. The adaptiveness, stability and flexibility of the present approach are also confirmed by the experimental ersults.

  13. Microfabricated thin film impedance sensor & AC impedance measurements.

    PubMed

    Yu, Jinsong; Liu, Chung-Chiun

    2010-01-01

    Thin film microfabrication technique was employed to fabricate a platinum based parallel-electrode structured impedance sensor. Electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) and equivalent circuit analysis of the small amplitude (±5 mV) AC impedance measurements (frequency range: 1 MHz to 0.1 Hz) at ambient temperature were carried out. Testing media include 0.001 M, 0.01 M, 0.1 M NaCl and KCl solutions, and alumina (∼3 μm) and sand (∼300 μm) particulate layers saturated with NaCl solutions with the thicknesses ranging from 0.6 mm to 8 mm in a testing cell, and the results were used to assess the effect of the thickness of the particulate layer on the conductivity of the testing solution. The calculated resistances were approximately around 20 MΩ, 4 MΩ, and 0.5 MΩ for 0.001 M, 0.01 M, and 0.1 M NaCl solutions, respectively. The presence of the sand particulates increased the impedance dramatically (6 times and 3 times for 0.001 M and 0.1 M NaCl solutions, respectively). A cell constant methodology was also developed to assess the measurement of the bulk conductivity of the electrolyte solution. The cell constant ranged from 1.2 to 0.8 and it decreased with the increase of the solution thickness.

  14. Microfabricated Thin Film Impedance Sensor & AC Impedance Measurements

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Jinsong; Liu, Chung-Chiun

    2010-01-01

    Thin film microfabrication technique was employed to fabricate a platinum based parallel-electrode structured impedance sensor. Electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) and equivalent circuit analysis of the small amplitude (±5 mV) AC impedance measurements (frequency range: 1 MHz to 0.1 Hz) at ambient temperature were carried out. Testing media include 0.001 M, 0.01 M, 0.1 M NaCl and KCl solutions, and alumina (∼3 μm) and sand (∼300 μm) particulate layers saturated with NaCl solutions with the thicknesses ranging from 0.6 mm to 8 mm in a testing cell, and the results were used to assess the effect of the thickness of the particulate layer on the conductivity of the testing solution. The calculated resistances were approximately around 20 MΩ, 4 MΩ, and 0.5 MΩ for 0.001 M, 0.01 M, and 0.1 M NaCl solutions, respectively. The presence of the sand particulates increased the impedance dramatically (6 times and 3 times for 0.001 M and 0.1 M NaCl solutions, respectively). A cell constant methodology was also developed to assess the measurement of the bulk conductivity of the electrolyte solution. The cell constant ranged from 1.2 to 0.8 and it decreased with the increase of the solution thickness. PMID:22219690

  15. Detection of high impedance arcing faults using a multi-layer perceptron

    SciTech Connect

    Sultan, F.F.; Swift, G.W. ); Fedirchuk, D.J. )

    1992-10-01

    A feed-forward three-layer perceptron was trained by high impedance fault, fault-like load, and normal load current patterns, using the back-propagation training algorithm. This paper reports that the neural network parameters were embodied in a high impedance arcing faults detection algorithm, which uses a simple preprocessing technique to prepare the information input to the network. The algorithm was tested by traces of normal load current disturbed by currents of faults on dry and wet soil, an arc welder, computers, and fluorescent lights.

  16. Acoustic Ground-Impedance Meter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zuckerwar, A. J.

    1983-01-01

    Helmoltz resonator used in compact, portable meter measures acoustic impedance of ground or other surfaces. Earth's surface is subject of increasing acoustical investigations because of its importance in aircraft noise prediction and measurment. Meter offers several advantages. Is compact and portable and set up at any test site, irrespective of landscape features, weather or other environmental condition.

  17. The Aberdeen Impedance Imaging System.

    PubMed

    Kulkarni, V; Hutchison, J M; Mallard, J R

    1989-01-01

    The Aberdeen Impedance Imaging System is designed to reconstruct 2 dimensional images of the average distribution of the amplitude and phase of the complex impedance within a 3 dimensional region. The system uses the four electrode technique in a 16 electrode split-array. The system hardware consists of task-orientated electronic modules for: driving a constant current, multiplexing the current drive, demultiplexing peripheral voltages, differential amplification, phase sensitive detection and low-pass filtration, digitisation with a 14 bit analog to digital converter (ADC), and -control logic for the ADC and multiplexors. A BBC microprocessor (Master series), initiates a controlled sequence for the collection of a number of data sets which are averaged and stored on disk. Image reconstruction is by a process of convolution-backprojection similar to the fan-beam reconstruction of computerised tomography and is also known as Equipotential Backprojection. In imaging impedance changes associated with fracture healing the changes may be large enough to allow retrieval of both the amplitude and phase of the complex impedance. Sequential imaging of these changes would necessitate monitoring electronic and electrode drift by imaging an equivalent region of the contralateral limb. Differential images could be retrieved when the image of the normal limb is the image template. Better characterisation of tissues would necessitate a cleaner retrieval of the quadrature signal.

  18. Characteristic impedance of microstrip lines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bailey, M. C.; Deshpande, M. D.

    1989-01-01

    The dyadic Green's function for a current embedded in a grounded dielectric slab is used to analyze microstrip lines at millimeter wave frequencies. The dyadic Green's function accounts accurately for fringing fields and dielectric cover over the microstrip line. Using Rumsey's reaction concept, an expression for the characteristic impedance is obtained. The numerical results are compared with other reported results.

  19. Calibration of electrical impedance tomography

    SciTech Connect

    Daily, W; Ramirez, A

    2000-05-01

    Over the past 10 years we have developed methods for imaging the electrical resistivity of soil and rock formations. These technologies have been called electrical resistance tomography of ERT (e.g. Daily and Owen, 1991). Recently we have been striving to extend this capability to include images of electric impedance--with a new nomenclature of electrical impedance tomography or EIT (Ramirez et al., 1999). Electrical impedance is simply a generalization of resistance. Whereas resistance is the zero frequency ratio of voltage and current, impedance includes both the magnitude and phase relationship between voltage and current at frequency. This phase and its frequency behavior is closely related to what in geophysics is called induced polarization or (Sumner, 1976). Why is this phase or IP important? IP is known to be related to many physical phenomena of importance so that image of IP will be maps of such things as mineralization and cation exchange IP (Marshall and Madden, 1959). Also, it is likely that IP, used in conjunction with resistivity, will yield information about the subsurface that can not be obtained by either piece of information separately. In order to define the accuracy of our technologies to image impedance we have constructed a physical model of known impedance that can be used as a calibration standard. It consists of 616 resistors, along with some capacitors to provide the reactive response, arranged in a three dimensional structure as in figure 1. Figure 2 shows the construction of the network and defines the coordinate system used to describe it. This network of components is a bounded and discrete version of the unbounded and continuous medium with which we normally work (the subsurface). The network has several desirable qualities: (1) The impedance values are known (to the accuracy of the component values). (2) The component values and their 3D distribution is easily controlled. (3) Error associated with electrode noise is eliminated. (4

  20. Respiratory rate detection algorithm based on RGB-D camera: theoretical background and experimental results.

    PubMed

    Benetazzo, Flavia; Freddi, Alessandro; Monteriù, Andrea; Longhi, Sauro

    2014-09-01

    Both the theoretical background and the experimental results of an algorithm developed to perform human respiratory rate measurements without any physical contact are presented. Based on depth image sensing techniques, the respiratory rate is derived by measuring morphological changes of the chest wall. The algorithm identifies the human chest, computes its distance from the camera and compares this value with the instantaneous distance, discerning if it is due to the respiratory act or due to a limited movement of the person being monitored. To experimentally validate the proposed algorithm, the respiratory rate measurements coming from a spirometer were taken as a benchmark and compared with those estimated by the algorithm. Five tests were performed, with five different persons sat in front of the camera. The first test aimed to choose the suitable sampling frequency. The second test was conducted to compare the performances of the proposed system with respect to the gold standard in ideal conditions of light, orientation and clothing. The third, fourth and fifth tests evaluated the algorithm performances under different operating conditions. The experimental results showed that the system can correctly measure the respiratory rate, and it is a viable alternative to monitor the respiratory activity of a person without using invasive sensors.

  1. Respiratory rate detection algorithm based on RGB-D camera: theoretical background and experimental results

    PubMed Central

    Freddi, Alessandro; Monteriù, Andrea; Longhi, Sauro

    2014-01-01

    Both the theoretical background and the experimental results of an algorithm developed to perform human respiratory rate measurements without any physical contact are presented. Based on depth image sensing techniques, the respiratory rate is derived by measuring morphological changes of the chest wall. The algorithm identifies the human chest, computes its distance from the camera and compares this value with the instantaneous distance, discerning if it is due to the respiratory act or due to a limited movement of the person being monitored. To experimentally validate the proposed algorithm, the respiratory rate measurements coming from a spirometer were taken as a benchmark and compared with those estimated by the algorithm. Five tests were performed, with five different persons sat in front of the camera. The first test aimed to choose the suitable sampling frequency. The second test was conducted to compare the performances of the proposed system with respect to the gold standard in ideal conditions of light, orientation and clothing. The third, fourth and fifth tests evaluated the algorithm performances under different operating conditions. The experimental results showed that the system can correctly measure the respiratory rate, and it is a viable alternative to monitor the respiratory activity of a person without using invasive sensors. PMID:26609383

  2. Journal and Wave Bearing Impedance Calculation Software

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hanford, Amanda; Campbell, Robert

    2012-01-01

    The wave bearing software suite is a MALTA application that computes bearing properties for user-specified wave bearing conditions, as well as plain journal bearings. Wave bearings are fluid film journal bearings with multi-lobed wave patterns around the circumference of the bearing surface. In this software suite, the dynamic coefficients are outputted in a way for easy implementation in a finite element model used in rotor dynamics analysis. The software has a graphical user interface (GUI) for inputting bearing geometry parameters, and uses MATLAB s structure interface for ease of interpreting data. This innovation was developed to provide the stiffness and damping components of wave bearing impedances. The computational method for computing bearing coefficients was originally designed for plain journal bearings and tilting pad bearings. Modifications to include a wave bearing profile consisted of changing the film thickness profile given by an equation, and writing an algorithm to locate the integration limits for each fluid region. Careful consideration was needed to implement the correct integration limits while computing the dynamic coefficients, depending on the form of the input/output variables specified in the algorithm.

  3. Development of an electrical impedance tomography system for an air-water vertical bubble column

    SciTech Connect

    O`Hern, T.J.; Torczynski, J.R.; Ceccio, S.L.; Tassin, A.L.; Chahine, G.L.; Duraiswami, R.; Sarkar, K.

    1995-09-01

    Because the components of a multiphase flow often exhibit different electrical properties, a variety of probes have been developed to study such flows by measuring impedance in the region of interest. Researchers are now using electric fields to reconstruct the impedance distribution within a measurement volume via Electrical Impedance Tomography (EIT). EIT systems employ voltage and current measurements on the boundary of a domain to create a representation of the impedance distribution within the domain. The development of the Sandia EIT system (S-EIT) is reviewed The construction of the projection acquisition system is discussed and two specific EIT inversion algorithms are detailed. The first reconstruction algorithm employs boundary element methods, and the second utilizes finite elements. The benefits and limitations of EIT systems are also discussed. Preliminary results are provided.

  4. Tapping mode microwave impedance microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Lai, K.

    2010-02-24

    We report tapping mode microwave impedance imaging based on atomic force microscope platforms. The shielded cantilever probe is critical to localize the tip-sample interaction near the tip apex. The modulated tip-sample impedance can be accurately simulated by the finite-element analysis and the result agrees quantitatively to the experimental data on a series of thin-film dielectric samples. The tapping mode microwave imaging is also superior to the contact mode in that the thermal drift in a long time scale is totally eliminated and an absolute measurement on the dielectric properties is possible. We demonstrated tapping images on working nanodevices, and the data are consistent with the transport results.

  5. Impedance analysis of acupuncture points and pathways

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Teplan, Michal; Kukučka, Marek; Ondrejkovičová, Alena

    2011-12-01

    Investigation of impedance characteristics of acupuncture points from acoustic to radio frequency range is addressed. Discernment and localization of acupuncture points in initial single subject study was unsuccessfully attempted by impedance map technique. Vector impedance analyses determined possible resonant zones in MHz region.

  6. 21 CFR 870.2770 - Impedance plethysmograph.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Impedance plethysmograph. 870.2770 Section 870...) MEDICAL DEVICES CARDIOVASCULAR DEVICES Cardiovascular Monitoring Devices § 870.2770 Impedance plethysmograph. (a) Identification. An impedance plethysmograph is a device used to estimate peripheral blood...

  7. 21 CFR 870.2770 - Impedance plethysmograph.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Impedance plethysmograph. 870.2770 Section 870...) MEDICAL DEVICES CARDIOVASCULAR DEVICES Cardiovascular Monitoring Devices § 870.2770 Impedance plethysmograph. (a) Identification. An impedance plethysmograph is a device used to estimate peripheral blood...

  8. 21 CFR 870.2750 - Impedance phlebograph.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Impedance phlebograph. 870.2750 Section 870.2750...) MEDICAL DEVICES CARDIOVASCULAR DEVICES Cardiovascular Monitoring Devices § 870.2750 Impedance phlebograph. (a) Identification. An impedance phlebograph is a device used to provide a visual display of the...

  9. 21 CFR 870.2770 - Impedance plethysmograph.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Impedance plethysmograph. 870.2770 Section 870...) MEDICAL DEVICES CARDIOVASCULAR DEVICES Cardiovascular Monitoring Devices § 870.2770 Impedance plethysmograph. (a) Identification. An impedance plethysmograph is a device used to estimate peripheral blood...

  10. 21 CFR 870.2770 - Impedance plethysmograph.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Impedance plethysmograph. 870.2770 Section 870...) MEDICAL DEVICES CARDIOVASCULAR DEVICES Cardiovascular Monitoring Devices § 870.2770 Impedance plethysmograph. (a) Identification. An impedance plethysmograph is a device used to estimate peripheral blood...

  11. 21 CFR 870.2770 - Impedance plethysmograph.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Impedance plethysmograph. 870.2770 Section 870...) MEDICAL DEVICES CARDIOVASCULAR DEVICES Cardiovascular Monitoring Devices § 870.2770 Impedance plethysmograph. (a) Identification. An impedance plethysmograph is a device used to estimate peripheral blood...

  12. 21 CFR 870.2750 - Impedance phlebograph.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Impedance phlebograph. 870.2750 Section 870.2750...) MEDICAL DEVICES CARDIOVASCULAR DEVICES Cardiovascular Monitoring Devices § 870.2750 Impedance phlebograph. (a) Identification. An impedance phlebograph is a device used to provide a visual display of the...

  13. 21 CFR 870.2750 - Impedance phlebograph.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Impedance phlebograph. 870.2750 Section 870.2750...) MEDICAL DEVICES CARDIOVASCULAR DEVICES Cardiovascular Monitoring Devices § 870.2750 Impedance phlebograph. (a) Identification. An impedance phlebograph is a device used to provide a visual display of the...

  14. 21 CFR 870.2750 - Impedance phlebograph.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Impedance phlebograph. 870.2750 Section 870.2750...) MEDICAL DEVICES CARDIOVASCULAR DEVICES Cardiovascular Monitoring Devices § 870.2750 Impedance phlebograph. (a) Identification. An impedance phlebograph is a device used to provide a visual display of the...

  15. 21 CFR 870.2750 - Impedance phlebograph.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Impedance phlebograph. 870.2750 Section 870.2750...) MEDICAL DEVICES CARDIOVASCULAR DEVICES Cardiovascular Monitoring Devices § 870.2750 Impedance phlebograph. (a) Identification. An impedance phlebograph is a device used to provide a visual display of the...

  16. Impedance-matched Marx generators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stygar, W. A.; LeChien, K. R.; Mazarakis, M. G.; Savage, M. E.; Stoltzfus, B. S.; Austin, K. N.; Breden, E. W.; Cuneo, M. E.; Hutsel, B. T.; Lewis, S. A.; McKee, G. R.; Moore, J. K.; Mulville, T. D.; Muron, D. J.; Reisman, D. B.; Sceiford, M. E.; Wisher, M. L.

    2017-04-01

    We have conceived a new class of prime-power sources for pulsed-power accelerators: impedance-matched Marx generators (IMGs). The fundamental building block of an IMG is a brick, which consists of two capacitors connected electrically in series with a single switch. An IMG comprises a single stage or several stages distributed axially and connected in series. Each stage is powered by a single brick or several bricks distributed azimuthally within the stage and connected in parallel. The stages of a multistage IMG drive an impedance-matched coaxial transmission line with a conical center conductor. When the stages are triggered sequentially to launch a coherent traveling wave along the coaxial line, the IMG achieves electromagnetic-power amplification by triggered emission of radiation. Hence a multistage IMG is a pulsed-power analogue of a laser. To illustrate the IMG approach to prime power, we have developed conceptual designs of two ten-stage IMGs with L C time constants on the order of 100 ns. One design includes 20 bricks per stage, and delivers a peak electrical power of 1.05 TW to a matched-impedance 1.22 -Ω load. The design generates 113 kV per stage and has a maximum energy efficiency of 89%. The other design includes a single brick per stage, delivers 68 GW to a matched-impedance 19 -Ω load, generates 113 kV per stage, and has a maximum energy efficiency of 90%. For a given electrical-power-output time history, an IMG is less expensive and slightly more efficient than a linear transformer driver, since an IMG does not use ferromagnetic cores.

  17. Constant current loop impedance measuring system that is immune to the effects of parasitic impedances

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anderson, Karl F. (Inventor)

    1994-01-01

    A constant current loop measuring system is provided for measuring a characteristic of an environment. The system comprises a first impedance positionable in the environment, a second impedance coupled in series with said first impedance and a parasitic impedance electrically coupled to the first and second impedances. A current generating device, electrically coupled in series with the first and second impedances, provides a constant current through the first and second impedances to produce first and second voltages across the first and second impedances, respectively, and a parasitic voltage across the parasitic impedance. A high impedance voltage measuring device measures a voltage difference between the first and second voltages independent of the parasitic voltage to produce a characteristic voltage representative of the characteristic of the environment.

  18. Analysis of different device-based intrathoracic impedance vectors for detection of heart failure events (from the Detect Fluid Early from Intrathoracic Impedance Monitoring study).

    PubMed

    Heist, E Kevin; Herre, John M; Binkley, Philip F; Van Bakel, Adrian B; Porterfield, James G; Porterfield, Linda M; Qu, Fujian; Turkel, Melanie; Pavri, Behzad B

    2014-10-15

    Detect Fluid Early from Intrathoracic Impedance Monitoring (DEFEAT-PE) is a prospective, multicenter study of multiple intrathoracic impedance vectors to detect pulmonary congestion (PC) events. Changes in intrathoracic impedance between the right ventricular (RV) coil and device can (RVcoil→Can) of implantable cardioverter-defibrillators (ICDs) and cardiac resynchronization therapy ICDs (CRT-Ds) are used clinically for the detection of PC events, but other impedance vectors and algorithms have not been studied prospectively. An initial 75-patient study was used to derive optimal impedance vectors to detect PC events, with 2 vector combinations selected for prospective analysis in DEFEAT-PE (ICD vectors: RVring→Can + RVcoil→Can, detection threshold 13 days; CRT-D vectors: left ventricular ring→Can + RVcoil→Can, detection threshold 14 days). Impedance changes were considered true positive if detected <30 days before an adjudicated PC event. One hundred sixty-two patients were enrolled (80 with ICDs and 82 with CRT-Ds), all with ≥1 previous PC event. One hundred forty-four patients provided study data, with 214 patient-years of follow-up and 139 PC events. Sensitivity for PC events of the prespecified algorithms was as follows: ICD: sensitivity 32.3%, false-positive rate 1.28 per patient-year; CRT-D: sensitivity 32.4%, false-positive rate 1.66 per patient-year. An alternative algorithm, ultimately approved by the US Food and Drug Administration (RVring→Can + RVcoil→Can, detection threshold 14 days), resulted in (for all patients) sensitivity of 21.6% and a false-positive rate of 0.9 per patient-year. The CRT-D thoracic impedance vector algorithm selected in the derivation study was not superior to the ICD algorithm RVring→Can + RVcoil→Can when studied prospectively. In conclusion, to achieve an acceptably low false-positive rate, the intrathoracic impedance algorithms studied in DEFEAT-PE resulted in low sensitivity for the prediction of heart

  19. Integrated algorithm for reconstruction of complex forms of Poland syndrome: 20-year outcomes.

    PubMed

    Majdak-Paredes, E J; Shafighi, M; Fatah, F

    2015-10-01

    The extent of breast and chest-wall deformity varies widely in Poland syndrome, and a variety of techniques are required to correct them. The aim of this study is to analyse our experience and long-term follow-up, and to propose an algorithmic approach to this complex deformity. Retrospective case-note review from a prospectively maintained database was carried out on 37 patients. All patients treated between 1993 and 2013 were reviewed, and long-term outcome was assessed by an objective photographic documentation. The patients were invited to a photographic documentation, and the correlation between the subjective judgement and objective results in the late course was analysed. Based on our experience, we propose an algorithmic approach to this complex skeletal and soft-tissue deformity. Medical photographs were obtained from 32 patients (22 females and 10 males). The age range was 11-44 years. Significant reduction in asymmetry was possible in all patients. The mean follow-up time was 8.5 years (range, 2.2-20). The complex developmental defect involved the skin, subcutaneous tissue, breast, muscle, ribs and other skeletal abnormalities. The following treatments were applied alone or in combination: lipomodelling, liposuction, tissue expansion and implants, custom-made prosthesis, islanded pedicled latissimus dorsi muscle flaps, pedicled and free muscle-sparing transverse rectus abdominis flaps, prosthetic chest-wall reconstruction and various combinations including multistage procedures. Surgery on the contralateral breast in female and male patients was necessary in 22 patients (20 female and two male). Assessment of the late result by four non-professionals (two females and two males) and one male plastic surgeon showed that the objective aesthetic results of the authors' reconstructions according to the proposed algorithm were sufficient. Poland syndrome is a complex developmental deformity in which several tissues are involved. It is crucial to have an

  20. Performance of two commercial electron beam algorithms over regions close to the lung-mediastinum interface, against Monte Carlo simulation and point dosimetry in virtual and anthropomorphic phantoms.

    PubMed

    Ojala, J; Hyödynmaa, S; Barańczyk, R; Góra, E; Waligórski, M P R

    2014-03-01

    Electron radiotherapy is applied to treat the chest wall close to the mediastinum. The performance of the GGPB and eMC algorithms implemented in the Varian Eclipse treatment planning system (TPS) was studied in this region for 9 and 16 MeV beams, against Monte Carlo (MC) simulations, point dosimetry in a water phantom and dose distributions calculated in virtual phantoms. For the 16 MeV beam, the accuracy of these algorithms was also compared over the lung-mediastinum interface region of an anthropomorphic phantom, against MC calculations and thermoluminescence dosimetry (TLD). In the phantom with a lung-equivalent slab the results were generally congruent, the eMC results for the 9 MeV beam slightly overestimating the lung dose, and the GGPB results for the 16 MeV beam underestimating the lung dose. Over the lung-mediastinum interface, for 9 and 16 MeV beams, the GGPB code underestimated the lung dose and overestimated the dose in water close to the lung, compared to the congruent eMC and MC results. In the anthropomorphic phantom, results of TLD measurements and MC and eMC calculations agreed, while the GGPB code underestimated the lung dose. Good agreement between TLD measurements and MC calculations attests to the accuracy of "full" MC simulations as a reference for benchmarking TPS codes. Application of the GGPB code in chest wall radiotherapy may result in significant underestimation of the lung dose and overestimation of dose to the mediastinum, affecting plan optimization over volumes close to the lung-mediastinum interface, such as the lung or heart.