Science.gov

Sample records for chief launches pr

  1. Chief executives. Staying afloat.

    PubMed

    Spurgeon, P; Clark, J; Smith, C

    2001-09-27

    A study of chief executives identified the ability to prioritize, clear vision, resilence, and willingness to take decisions as key factors in success. Some wanted more active involvement from the regional director. Chief executives could be subject to 360-degree assessment. More work is needed to establish the compatibility of chief executives and chairs.

  2. Launch Vehicles

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2007-09-09

    Under the goals of the Vision for Space Exploration, Ares I is a chief component of the cost-effective space transportation infrastructure being developed by NASA's Constellation Program. This transportation system will safely and reliably carry human explorers back to the moon, and then onward to Mars and other destinations in the solar system. Launch Pad 39B of the Kennedy Space Flight Center (KSC), currently used for Space Shuttle launches, will be revised to host the Ares launch vehicles. The fixed and rotating service structures standing at the pad will be dismantled sometime after the Ares I-X test flight. A new launch tower for Ares I will be built onto a new mobile launch platform. The gantry for the shuttle doesn't reach much higher than the top of the four segments of the solid rocket booster. Pad access above the current shuttle launch pad structure will not be required for Ares I-X because the stages above the solid rocket booster are inert. For the test scheduled in 2012 or for the crewed flights, workers and astronauts will need access to the highest levels of the rocket and capsule. When the Ares I rocket rolls out to the launch pad on the back of the same crawler-transporters used now, its launch gantry will be with it. The mobile launchers will nestle under three lightning protection towers to be erected around the pad area. Ares time at the launch pad will be significantly less than the three weeks or more the shuttle requires. This “clean pad” approach minimizes equipment and servicing at the launch pad. It is the same plan NASA used with the Saturn V rockets and industry employs it with more modern launchers. The launch pad will also get a new emergency escape system for astronauts, one that looks very much like a roller coaster. Cars riding on a rail will replace the familiar baskets hanging from steel cables. This artist's concept illustrates the Ares I on launch pad 39B.

  3. Launch Vehicles

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2007-07-09

    Under the goals of the Vision for Space Exploration, Ares I is a chief component of the cost-effective space transportation infrastructure being developed by NASA's Constellation Program. This transportation system will safely and reliably carry human explorers back to the moon, and then onward to Mars and other destinations in the solar system. The Ares I effort includes multiple project element teams at NASA centers and contract organizations around the nation, and is managed by the Exploration Launch Projects Office at NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center (MFSC). ATK Launch Systems near Brigham City, Utah, is the prime contractor for the first stage booster. ATK's subcontractor, United Space Alliance of Houston, is designing, developing and testing the parachutes at its facilities at NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida. NASA's Johnson Space Center in Houston hosts the Constellation Program and Orion Crew Capsule Project Office and provides test instrumentation and support personnel. Together, these teams are developing vehicle hardware, evolving proven technologies, and testing components and systems. Their work builds on powerful, reliable space shuttle propulsion elements and nearly a half-century of NASA space flight experience and technological advances. Ares I is an inline, two-stage rocket configuration topped by the Crew Exploration Vehicle, its service module, and a launch abort system. In this HD video image, an Ares I x-test involves the upper stage separating from the first stage. This particular test was conducted at the NASA Langley Research Center in July 2007. (Highest resolution available)

  4. NASA chief scientist visit

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2011-07-19

    NASA Chief Scientist Dr. Waleed Abdalati visited Stennis Space Center on July 19, to learn about the extensive science capabilities onsite. Shown at right are: (seated, l to r), Stennis Center Director Patrick Scheuermann; Dr. Abdalati; U.S. Navy Rear Adm. Jonathan White; NOAA National Data Buoy Center Program Manager Shannon McArthur; (standing, l to r) Stennis Project Directorate Assistant Director Anne Peek; Stennis Applied Science & Technology Project Office Chief Duane Armstrong; and Stennis Project Directorate Director Keith Brock.

  5. STS-135 Launch Day

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2011-07-07

    NASA Chief, Astronaut Office, Johnson Space Center Peggy Whitson deals cards during a traditional game that is played at the NASA Kennedy Space Center Operations and Checkout Building with the shuttle crew prior to them leaving for the launch pad, on Friday, July 8, 2011 in Cape Canaveral, Fla. The point of the game is that the commander must use up all his or her bad luck before launch, so the crew can only leave for the pad after the commander loses. The launch of Atlantis, STS-135, is the final flight of the shuttle program, a 12-day mission to the International Space Station. Photo Credit: (NASA/Jerry Ross)

  6. Launch Vehicles

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2007-08-09

    Under the goals of the Vision for Space Exploration, Ares I is a chief component of the cost-effective space transportation infrastructure being developed by NASA's Constellation Program. This transportation system will safely and reliably carry human explorers back to the moon, and then onward to Mars and other destinations in the solar system. The Ares I effort includes multiple project element teams at NASA centers and contract organizations around the nation, and is managed by the Exploration Launch Projects Office at NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center (MFSC). ATK Launch Systems near Brigham City, Utah, is the prime contractor for the first stage booster. ATK's subcontractor, United Space Alliance of Houston, is designing, developing and testing the parachutes at its facilities at NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida. NASA's Johnson Space Center in Houston hosts the Constellation Program and Orion Crew Capsule Project Office and provides test instrumentation and support personnel. Together, these teams are developing vehicle hardware, evolving proven technologies, and testing components and systems. Their work builds on powerful, reliable space shuttle propulsion elements and nearly a half-century of NASA space flight experience and technological advances. Ares I is an inline, two-stage rocket configuration topped by the Crew Exploration Vehicle, its service module, and a launch abort system. This HD video image depicts the preparation and placement of a confidence ring for friction stir welding used in manufacturing aluminum panels that will fabricate the Ares I upper stage barrel. The aluminum panels are manufactured and subjected to confidence tests during which the bent aluminum is stressed to breaking point and thoroughly examined. The panels are manufactured by AMRO Manufacturing located in El Monte, California. (Highest resolution available)

  7. Launch Vehicles

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2006-09-09

    Under the goals of the Vision for Space Exploration, Ares I is a chief component of the cost-effective space transportation infrastructure being developed by NASA's Constellation Program. This transportation system will safely and reliably carry human explorers back to the moon, and then onward to Mars and other destinations in the solar system. The Ares I effort includes multiple project element teams at NASA centers and contract organizations around the nation, and is managed by the Exploration Launch Projects Office at NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center (MFSC). ATK Launch Systems near Brigham City, Utah, is the prime contractor for the first stage booster. ATK's subcontractor, United Space Alliance of Houston, is designing, developing and testing the parachutes at its facilities at NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida. NASA's Johnson Space Center in Houston hosts the Constellation Program and Orion Crew Capsule Project Office and provides test instrumentation and support personnel. Together, these teams are developing vehicle hardware, evolving proven technologies, and testing components and systems. Their work builds on powerful, reliable space shuttle propulsion elements and nearly a half-century of NASA space flight experience and technological advances. Ares I is an inline, two-stage rocket configuration topped by the Crew Exploration Vehicle, its service module, and a launch abort system. In this HD video image, the first stage reentry parachute drop test is conducted at the Yuma, Arizona proving ground. The parachute tests demonstrated a three-stage deployment sequence that included the use of an Orbiter drag chute to properly stage the unfurling of the main chute. The parachute recovery system for Orion will be similar to the system used for Apollo command module landings and include two drogue, three pilot, and three main parachutes. (Highest resolution available)

  8. Launch Vehicles

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2007-09-09

    Under the goals of the Vision for Space Exploration, Ares I is a chief component of the cost-effective space transportation infrastructure being developed by NASA's Constellation Program. This transportation system will safely and reliably carry human explorers back to the moon, and then onward to Mars and other destinations in the solar system. The Ares I effort includes multiple project element teams at NASA centers and contract organizations around the nation, and is managed by the Exploration Launch Projects Office at NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center (MFSC). ATK Launch Systems near Brigham City, Utah, is the prime contractor for the first stage booster. ATK's subcontractor, United Space Alliance of Houston, is designing, developing and testing the parachutes at its facilities at NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida. NASA's Johnson Space Center in Houston hosts the Constellation Program and Orion Crew Capsule Project Office and provides test instrumentation and support personnel. Together, these teams are developing vehicle hardware, evolving proven technologies, and testing components and systems. Their work builds on powerful, reliable space shuttle propulsion elements and nearly a half-century of NASA space flight experience and technological advances. Ares I is an inline, two-stage rocket configuration topped by the Crew Exploration Vehicle, its service module, and a launch abort system. In this HD video image, the first stage reentry parachute drop test is conducted at the Yuma, Arizona proving ground. The parachute tests demonstrated a three-stage deployment sequence that included the use of an Orbiter drag chute to properly stage the unfurling of the main chute. The parachute recovery system for Orion will be similar to the system used for Apollo command module landings and include two drogue, three pilot, and three main parachutes. (Highest resolution available)

  9. Launch Vehicles

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2007-08-09

    Under the goals of the Vision for Space Exploration, Ares I is a chief component of the cost-effective space transportation infrastructure being developed by NASA's Constellation Program. This transportation system will safely and reliably carry human explorers back to the moon, and then onward to Mars and other destinations in the solar system. The Ares I effort includes multiple project element teams at NASA centers and contract organizations around the nation, and is managed by the Exploration Launch Projects Office at NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center (MFSC). ATK Launch Systems near Brigham City, Utah, is the prime contractor for the first stage booster. ATK's subcontractor, United Space Alliance of Houston, is designing, developing and testing the parachutes at its facilities at NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida. NASA's Johnson Space Center in Houston hosts the Constellation Program and Orion Crew Capsule Project Office and provides test instrumentation and support personnel. Together, these teams are developing vehicle hardware, evolving proven technologies, and testing components and systems. Their work builds on powerful, reliable space shuttle propulsion elements and nearly a half-century of NASA space flight experience and technological advances. Ares I is an inline, two-stage rocket configuration topped by the Crew Exploration Vehicle, its service module, and a launch abort system. In this HD video image, processes for upper stage barrel fabrication are talking place. Aluminum panels are manufacturing process demonstration articles that will undergo testing until perfected. The panels are built by AMRO Manufacturing located in El Monte, California. (Largest resolution available)

  10. Launch Vehicles

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2007-08-09

    Under the goals of the Vision for Space Exploration, Ares I is a chief component of the cost-effective space transportation infrastructure being developed by NASA's Constellation Program. This transportation system will safely and reliably carry human explorers back to the moon, and then onward to Mars and other destinations in the solar system. The Ares I effort includes multiple project element teams at NASA centers and contract organizations around the nation, and is managed by the Exploration Launch Projects Office at NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center (MFSC). ATK Launch Systems near Brigham City, Utah, is the prime contractor for the first stage booster. ATK's subcontractor, United Space Alliance of Houston, is designing, developing and testing the parachutes at its facilities at NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida. NASA's Johnson Space Center in Houston hosts the Constellation Program and Orion Crew Capsule Project Office and provides test instrumentation and support personnel. Together, these teams are developing vehicle hardware, evolving proven technologies, and testing components and systems. Their work builds on powerful, reliable space shuttle propulsion elements and nearly a half-century of NASA space flight experience and technological advances. Ares I is an inline, two-stage rocket configuration topped by the Crew Exploration Vehicle, its service module, and a launch abort system. This HD video image depicts the manufacturing of aluminum panels that will be used to form the Ares I barrel. The panels are manufacturing process demonstration articles that will undergo testing until perfected. The panels are built by AMRO Manufacturing located in El Monte, California. (Highest resolution available)

  11. Launch Vehicles

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2007-08-09

    Under the goals of the Vision for Space Exploration, Ares I is a chief component of the cost-effective space transportation infrastructure being developed by NASA's Constellation Program. This transportation system will safely and reliably carry human explorers back to the moon, and then onward to Mars and other destinations in the solar system. The Ares I effort includes multiple project element teams at NASA centers and contract organizations around the nation, and is managed by the Exploration Launch Projects Office at NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center (MFSC). ATK Launch Systems near Brigham City, Utah, is the prime contractor for the first stage booster. ATK's subcontractor, United Space Alliance of Houston, is designing, developing and testing the parachutes at its facilities at NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida. NASA's Johnson Space Center in Houston hosts the Constellation Program and Orion Crew Capsule Project Office and provides test instrumentation and support personnel. Together, these teams are developing vehicle hardware, evolving proven technologies, and testing components and systems. Their work builds on powerful, reliable space shuttle propulsion elements and nearly a half-century of NASA space flight experience and technological advances. Ares I is an inline, two-stage rocket configuration topped by the Crew Exploration Vehicle, its service module, and a launch abort system. This HD video image depicts friction stir welding used in manufacturing aluminum panels that will fabricate the Ares I upper stage barrel. The panels are subjected to confidence tests in which the bent aluminum is stressed to breaking point and thoroughly examined. The panels are manufactured by AMRO Manufacturing located in El Monte, California. (Highest resolution available)

  12. Launch Vehicles

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2007-08-09

    Under the goals of the Vision for Space Exploration, Ares I is a chief component of the cost-effective space transportation infrastructure being developed by NASA's Constellation Program. This transportation system will safely and reliably carry human explorers back to the moon, and then onward to Mars and other destinations in the solar system. The Ares I effort includes multiple project element teams at NASA centers and contract organizations around the nation, and is managed by the Exploration Launch Projects Office at NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center (MFSC). ATK Launch Systems near Brigham City, Utah, is the prime contractor for the first stage booster. ATK's subcontractor, United Space Alliance of Houston, is designing, developing and testing the parachutes at its facilities at NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida. NASA's Johnson Space Center in Houston hosts the Constellation Program and Orion Crew Capsule Project Office and provides test instrumentation and support personnel. Together, these teams are developing vehicle hardware, evolving proven technologies, and testing components and systems. Their work builds on powerful, reliable space shuttle propulsion elements and nearly a half-century of NASA space flight experience and technological advances. Ares I is an inline, two-stage rocket configuration topped by the Crew Exploration Vehicle, its service module, and a launch abort system. This HD video image, depicts a manufactured aluminum panel, that will be used to fabricate the Ares I upper stage barrel, undergoing a confidence panel test. In this test, the bent aluminum is stressed to breaking point and thoroughly examined. The panels are manufactured by AMRO Manufacturing located in El Monte, California. (Highest resolution available)

  13. Launch Vehicles

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2006-08-08

    Under the goals of the Vision for Space Exploration, Ares I is a chief component of the cost-effective space transportation infrastructure being developed by NASA's Constellation Program. This transportation system will safely and reliably carry human explorers back to the moon, and then onward to Mars and other destinations in the solar system. The Ares I effort includes multiple project element teams at NASA centers and contract organizations around the nation, and is managed by the Exploration Launch Projects Office at NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center (MFSC). ATK Launch Systems near Brigham City, Utah, is the prime contractor for the first stage booster. ATK's subcontractor, United Space Alliance of Houston, is designing, developing and testing the parachutes at its facilities at NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida. NASA's Johnson Space Center in Houston hosts the Constellation Program and Orion Crew Capsule Project Office and provides test instrumentation and support personnel. Together, these teams are developing vehicle hardware, evolving proven technologies, and testing components and systems. Their work builds on powerful, reliable space shuttle propulsion elements and nearly a half-century of NASA space flight experience and technological advances. Ares I is an inline, two-stage rocket configuration topped by the Crew Exploration Vehicle, its service module, and a launch abort system. This HD video image depicts a manufactured aluminum panel that will be used to fabricate the Ares I upper stage barrel, undergoing a confidence panel test. In this test, the bent aluminum is stressed to breaking point and thoroughly examined. The panels are manufactured by AMRO Manufacturing located in El Monte, California. (Highest resolution available)

  14. Launch Vehicles

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2007-08-09

    Under the goals of the Vision for Space Exploration, Ares I is a chief component of the cost-effective space transportation infrastructure being developed by NASA's Constellation Program. This transportation system will safely and reliably carry human explorers back to the moon, and then onward to Mars and other destinations in the solar system. The Ares I effort includes multiple project element teams at NASA centers and contract organizations around the nation, and is managed by the Exploration Launch Projects Office at NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center (MFSC). ATK Launch Systems near Brigham City, Utah, is the prime contractor for the first stage booster. ATK's subcontractor, United Space Alliance of Houston, is designing, developing and testing the parachutes at its facilities at NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida. NASA's Johnson Space Center in Houston hosts the Constellation Program and Orion Crew Capsule Project Office and provides test instrumentation and support personnel. Together, these teams are developing vehicle hardware, evolving proven technologies, and testing components and systems. Their work builds on powerful, reliable space shuttle propulsion elements and nearly a half-century of NASA space flight experience and technological advances. Ares I is an inline, two-stage rocket configuration topped by the Crew Exploration Vehicle, its service module, and a launch abort system. This HD video image depicts confidence testing of a manufactured aluminum panel that will fabricate the Ares I upper stage barrel. In this test, bent aluminum is stressed to breaking point and thoroughly examined. The panels are manufactured by AMRO Manufacturing located in El Monte, California. (Highest resolution available)

  15. Launch Vehicles

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2006-08-09

    Under the goals of the Vision for Space Exploration, Ares I is a chief component of the cost-effective space transportation infrastructure being developed by NASA's Constellation Program. This transportation system will safely and reliably carry human explorers back to the moon, and then onward to Mars and other destinations in the solar system. The Ares I effort includes multiple project element teams at NASA centers and contract organizations around the nation, and is managed by the Exploration Launch Projects Office at NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center (MFSC). ATK Launch Systems near Brigham City, Utah, is the prime contractor for the first stage booster. ATK's subcontractor, United Space Alliance of Houston, is designing, developing and testing the parachutes at its facilities at NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida. NASA's Johnson Space Center in Houston hosts the Constellation Program and Orion Crew Capsule Project Office and provides test instrumentation and support personnel. Together, these teams are developing vehicle hardware, evolving proven technologies, and testing components and systems. Their work builds on powerful, reliable space shuttle propulsion elements and nearly a half-century of NASA space flight experience and technological advances. Ares I is an inline, two-stage rocket configuration topped by the Crew Exploration Vehicle, its service module, and a launch abort system. This HD video image depicts a manufactured aluminum panel, that will fabricate the Ares I upper stage barrel, undergoing a confidence panel test. In this test, bent aluminum is stressed to breaking point and thoroughly examined. The panels are manufactured by AMRO Manufacturing located in El Monte, California. (Highest resolution available)

  16. Launch Vehicles

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2007-08-09

    Under the goals of the Vision for Space Exploration, Ares I is a chief component of the cost-effective space transportation infrastructure being developed by NASA's Constellation Program. This transportation system will safely and reliably carry human explorers back to the moon, and then onward to Mars and other destinations in the solar system. The Ares I effort includes multiple project element teams at NASA centers and contract organizations around the nation, and is managed by the Exploration Launch Projects Office at NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center (MFSC). ATK Launch Systems near Brigham City, Utah, is the prime contractor for the first stage booster. ATK's subcontractor, United Space Alliance of Houston, is designing, developing and testing the parachutes at its facilities at NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida. NASA's Johnson Space Center in Houston hosts the Constellation Program and Orion Crew Capsule Project Office and provides test instrumentation and support personnel. Together, these teams are developing vehicle hardware, evolving proven technologies, and testing components and systems. Their work builds on powerful, reliable space shuttle propulsion elements and nearly a half-century of NASA space flight experience and technological advances. Ares I is an inline, two-stage rocket configuration topped by the Crew Exploration Vehicle, its service module, and a launch abort system. This HD video image depicts a manufactured aluminum panel, that will fabricate the Ares I upper stage barrel, undergoing a confidence panel test. In this test, the bent aluminum is stressed to breaking point and thoroughly examined. The panels are manufactured by AMRO Manufacturing located in El Monte, California. (Highest resolution available)

  17. Engineer Equipment Chief.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Marine Corps Inst., Washington, DC.

    This student guide, one of a series of correspondence training courses designed to improve the job performance of members of the Marine Corps, deals with the skills needed by engineer equipment chiefs. Addressed in the five individual units of the course are the following topics: construction management (planning, scheduling, and supervision);…

  18. The Chief Diversity Officer

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Williams, Damon; Wade-Golden, Katrina

    2007-01-01

    Numerous institutions are moving toward the chief diversity officer model of leading and managing diversity in higher education. These officers carry formal administrative titles and ranks that range from vice president for institutional diversity to associate vice chancellor for diversity and climate and dean of diversity and academic engagement.…

  19. Great Indian Chiefs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pastron, Allen

    Brief biographies and pen and ink portraits of over 40 chiefs and other distinguised American Indians comprise this book. Each page contains a full page portrait and a biography that notes tribal affiliation, important dates, geographical location, major accomplishments, and dealings with other tribes, white settlers, and the United States or…

  20. Evolutionary emergent: chief nurse executive as chief vision officer.

    PubMed

    Caroselli, Cynthia

    2010-01-01

    Barrett's power theory provides a theoretical framework that can be applied to the practice of nursing administration. From this perspective, the role of the system chief nurse executive can be seen as an evolutionary emergent, that of chief vision officer. Various organizational initiatives relevant to this role are discussed as exemplars of practice informed by the Barrett's power theory.

  1. STS-135 Launch Day

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2011-07-07

    NASA Chief, Astronaut Office, Johnson Space Center Peggy Whitson, center, STS-135 Astronauts, Rex Walheim, left, and Commander Chris Ferguson are seen as the entire crew plays a traditional card game at the NASA Kennedy Space Center Operations and Checkout Building prior to them leaving for the launch pad, on Friday, July 8, 2011 in Cape Canaveral, Fla. The point of the game is that the commander must use up all his or her bad luck before launch, so the crew can only leave for the pad after the commander loses. The launch of Atlantis, STS-135, is the final flight of the shuttle program, a 12-day mission to the International Space Station. Photo Credit: (NASA/Jerry Ross)

  2. Antares Rocket Test Launch

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2013-04-21

    NASA Deputy Administrator Lori Garver talks with CEO and President of Orbital Sciences Corporation David Thompson, left, Executive Vice President and Chief Technical Officer, Orbital Sciences Corporation Antonio Elias, second from left, and Executive Director, Va. Commercial Space Flight Authority Dale Nash, background, in the Range Control Center at the NASA Wallops Flight Facility after the successful launch of the Orbital Sciences Antares rocket from the Mid-Atlantic Regional Spaceport (MARS) in Virginia, Sunday, April 21, 2013. The test launch marked the first flight of Antares and the first rocket launch from Pad-0A. The Antares rocket delivered the equivalent mass of a spacecraft, a so-called mass simulated payload, into Earth's orbit. Photo Credit: (NASA/Bill Ingalls)

  3. East bay fire chiefs' consortium

    Treesearch

    Michael Bradley

    1995-01-01

    The traditional approach to planning for public fire protection has been based on independent actions by each fire department or district. The county fire chiefs’ associations, while providing interagency communication, were not adequate to deal with the regional nature of the wildland urban interface problem. The formation of the East Bay Fire Chiefs’ Consortium grew...

  4. Advice for my chief resident.

    PubMed

    Panush, Richard S

    2017-05-16

    I have been privileged to have served as a division of rheumatology chief and/or program director for 18 years and as a department of medicine chair and medicine residency program director for another 22 years. During the latter, I collected and codified advice for my chief residents. Selected highlights are presented as follows.

  5. Division Chief Meeting, April, 1929

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1929-01-01

    Caption: 'LMAL division chiefs confer with the engineer-in-charge in April 1929. Left to right: E.A. Myers, Personnel Division; Edward R. Sharp, Property and Clerical Division; Thomas Carroll, Flight Test Division; Henry J.E. Reid, engineer in chief; Carlton Kemper, Power Plants Division; Elton Miller, aerodynamics division.'

  6. The chief strategy officer.

    PubMed

    Breene, R Timothy S; Nunes, Paul F; Shill, Walter E

    2007-10-01

    They're nominally and ultimately responsible for strategy, but today's CEOs have less and less time to devote to it. As a result, CEOs are appointing "chief strategy officers"--executives specifically tasked with creating, communicating, executing, and sustaining a company's strategic initiatives. In this article, three authors from Accenture share the results of their research on this emerging organizational role. The typical CSO or top strategy executive is not a pure strategist, conducting long-range planning in relative isolation. Most CSOs consider themselves doers first, with the mandate, credentials, and desire to act as well as advise. They are seasoned executives with a strong strategy orientation who have usually worn many operations hats before taking on the role. Strategy executives are charged with three critical jobs that together form the very definition of strategy execution. First, they must clarify the company's strategy for themselves and for every business unit and function, ensuring that all employees understand the details of the strategic plan and how their work connects to corporate goals. Second, CSOs must drive immediate change. The focus of the job almost always quickly evolves from creating shared alignment around a vision to riding herd on the ensuing change effort. Finally, a CSO must drive decision making that sustains organizational change. He or she must be that person who, in the CEO's stead, can walk into any office and test whether the decisions being made are aligned with the strategy and are creating the desired results. When decisions below the executive suite aren't being made in accordance with strategy, much of the CSO's job involves learning why and quickly determining whether to stay the course or change tack.

  7. 46 CFR 15.820 - Chief engineer.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Chief engineer. 15.820 Section 15.820 Shipping COAST... Computations § 15.820 Chief engineer. (a) There must be an individual holding an MMC or license endorsed as chief engineer or other credential authorizing service as chief engineer employed on board the following...

  8. 46 CFR 15.820 - Chief engineer.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 1 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Chief engineer. 15.820 Section 15.820 Shipping COAST... Computations § 15.820 Chief engineer. (a) There must be an individual holding an MMC or license endorsed as chief engineer or other credential authorizing service as chief engineer employed onboard the following...

  9. 46 CFR 15.820 - Chief engineer.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 1 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Chief engineer. 15.820 Section 15.820 Shipping COAST... Computations § 15.820 Chief engineer. (a) There must be an individual holding an MMC or license endorsed as chief engineer or other credential authorizing service as chief engineer employed on board the following...

  10. 46 CFR 15.820 - Chief engineer.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 1 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Chief engineer. 15.820 Section 15.820 Shipping COAST... Computations § 15.820 Chief engineer. (a) There must be an individual holding an MMC or license endorsed as chief engineer or other credential authorizing service as chief engineer employed on board the following...

  11. 46 CFR 15.820 - Chief engineer.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 1 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Chief engineer. 15.820 Section 15.820 Shipping COAST... Computations § 15.820 Chief engineer. (a) There must be an individual holding an MMC or license endorsed as chief engineer or other credential authorizing service as chief engineer employed on board the following...

  12. 32 CFR 1800.43 - Determination(s) by Office Chief(s).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 6 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Determination(s) by Office Chief(s). 1800.43 Section 1800.43 National Defense Other Regulations Relating to National Defense NATIONAL... FOIA Administrative Appeals § 1800.43 Determination(s) by Office Chief(s). Each Office Chief in charge...

  13. 32 CFR 1800.43 - Determination(s) by Office Chief(s).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 6 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Determination(s) by Office Chief(s). 1800.43 Section 1800.43 National Defense Other Regulations Relating to National Defense NATIONAL... FOIA Administrative Appeals § 1800.43 Determination(s) by Office Chief(s). Each Office Chief in charge...

  14. NASA chief technologist visits Stennis

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2010-08-26

    NASA Chief Technologist Bobby Braun visited John C. Stennis Space Center on Aug. 26. While at Stennis, he spoke to employees and the media about innovation and technology in NASA's future and the important role Stennis will play in space exploration programs. Braun also toured facilities and received briefings on work under way at the nation's premier rocket engine test facility.

  15. Launch vehicle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rutledge, William S.

    1994-06-01

    Concentrated efforts by NASA and the DOD to begin development of a new large launch vehicle have been under way for over a decade. Options include the National Launch System, Advanced Launch System, a heavy lift vehicle, a Shuttle-derived vehicle, a Titan-derived vehicle, Single stage To Orbit, NASP and Spacelifter, to name a few. All initially promised low operations costs achieved at development costs in the $5 billion - $10 billion range. However, none has obtained approval for development, primarily because it became apparent that these cost goals could not realistically be met.

  16. NPP Launch

    NASA Image and Video Library

    NASA's National Polar-orbiting Operational Environmental Satellite System Preparatory Project (NPP) spacecraft was launched aboard a Delta II rocket at 5:48 a.m. EDT today, on a mission to measure ...

  17. Orion Launch

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2014-12-05

    A Delta IV Heavy rocket lifts off from Space Launch Complex 37 at Cape Canaveral Air Force Station in Florida carrying NASA's Orion spacecraft on an unpiloted flight test to Earth orbit. Liftoff was at 7:05 a.m. EST. During the two-orbit, four-and-a-half hour mission, engineers will evaluate the systems critical to crew safety, the launch abort system, the heat shield and the parachute system.

  18. Modeling strength data for CREW CHIEF

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcdaniel, Joe W.

    1990-01-01

    The Air Force has developed CREW CHIEF, a computer-aided design (CAD) tool for simulating and evaluating aircraft maintenance to determine if the required activities are feasible. CREW CHIEF gives the designer the ability to simulate maintenance activities with respect to reach, accessibility, strength, hand tool operation, and materials handling. While developing the CREW CHIEF, extensive research was performed to describe workers strength capabilities for using hand tools and manual handling of objects. More than 100,000 strength measures were collected and modeled for CREW CHIEF. These measures involved both male and female subjects in the 12 maintenance postures included in CREW CHIEF. The data collection and modeling effort are described.

  19. Launch Vehicles

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1961-01-01

    This is a comparison illustration of the Redstone, Jupiter-C, and Mercury Redstone launch vehicles. The Redstone ballistic missile was a high-accuracy, liquid-propelled, surface-to-surface missile. Originally developed as a nose cone re-entry test vehicle for the Jupiter intermediate range ballistic missile, the Jupiter-C was a modification of the Redstone missile and successfully launched the first American Satellite, Explorer-1, in orbit on January 31, 1958. The Mercury Redstone lifted off carrying the first American, astronaut Alan Shepard, in his Mercury spacecraft Freedom 7, on May 5, 1961.

  20. Launching "Dunno"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Inson, Peter

    2005-01-01

    This article, written in response to an invitation from "CLE," describes the origins and controversial content of "dunno," a first novel, self-published by Peter Inson, a former teacher and headmaster. Inson considers influences upon his writing, the thinking which led him towards self-publication and the process of personally launching and…

  1. 24. Launch Area, Missile Assembly Building, detail of original work ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    24. Launch Area, Missile Assembly Building, detail of original work cabinets VIEW NORTHWEST - NIKE Missile Battery PR-79, Launch Area, East Windsor Road south of State Route 101, Foster, Providence County, RI

  2. Launch vehicles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moss, J. B.

    The basic principles which determine launcher design and hence constrain the spacecraft payload are determined. Some key features of the principal launcher alternatives in Europe and the U.S., namely, the unmanned, expendable Ariane and the manned, substantially reusable, Space Shuttle, are outlined. The equations of motion of the rocket are specialized to the vertical plane, parallel and normal to the flight direction, and to the motion of the center of mass and the pitch rotation. A typical Ariane 2 flight profile for transfer into GTO is illustrated. Some representative mission requirements for spacecraft launches are reviewed. Launch vehicle burnout velocities for spacecraft emplacement are given. Geostationary orbit emplacement, orbital mission performance, and configuration interactions are discussed.

  3. NASA Social for the Launch of Orion

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2014-12-03

    At NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida, NASA leaders spoke to social media participants as the Orion spacecraft and its Delta IV Heavy rocket were being prepared for launch. Speakers included, from the left, NASA Associate Administrator Human Exploration and Operations Bill Gerstenmaier, Associate Administrator for the agency's Science Mission Directorate John Grunsfeld, Associate Administrator for the Space Technology Directorate Michael Gazaria, NASA Chief Scientist Ellen Stofan, and Chief Technologist David Miller. Moderator for the panel session was John Yembrick, with the microphone on the far right, who is NASA's social media lead at the agency's Headquarters in Washington.

  4. LADEE Launch

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2013-09-07

    NASA's Lunar Atmosphere and Dust Environment Explorer (LADEE) observatory launches aboard the Minotaur V rocket from the Mid-Atlantic Regional Spaceport (MARS) at NASA's Wallops Flight Facility, Friday, Sept. 6, 2013 in Virginia. LADEE is a robotic mission that will orbit the moon where it will provide unprecedented information about the environment around the moon and give scientists a better understanding of other planetary bodies in our solar system and beyond. Photo Credit: (NASA/Carla Cioffi)

  5. Launch Vehicles

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2004-04-15

    The Titan II liftoff. The Titan II launch vehicle was used for carrying astronauts on the Gemini mission. The Gemini Program was an intermediate step between the Project Mercury and the Apollo Program. The major objectives were to subject are two men and supporting equipment to long duration flights, to effect rendezvous and docking with other orbiting vehicle, and to perfect methods of reentry, and landing the spacecraft.

  6. "Chiefs for Change" Elbows into Policy Fight

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McNeil, Michele

    2012-01-01

    Amid the cacophony of special interests fighting to be heard in statehouses and on Capitol Hill, a cadre of current and former chief state school officers is elbowing its way into the nation's education debate at a time when states are taking more control of K-12 education. A little more than a year old, Chiefs for Change is an invitation-only…

  7. Mister Chief Justice. A Study Guide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kuehl, John W.

    Intended to accompany the film "Mister Chief Justice," this study guide introduces the life of John Marshall and early U.S. history through a fictional account of a dinner party at the home of the chief justice in March, 1801. The guide presents the historical characters who attended the dinner, including John Marshall, Mary Willis…

  8. Private security's challenge to police chiefs.

    PubMed

    Connolly, C P

    1992-01-01

    The author discusses why police chiefs who have not yet given thought to developing a security partnership agenda should begin now. Partnerships, he says, should be cultivated between public police and private security.

  9. Chief Knowledge Officers? Perceptions, Pitfalls, & Potential.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Corcoran, Mary; Jones, Rebecca

    1997-01-01

    Argues that few librarians possess the needed competencies to fill the role of "chief knowledge officer" or "knowledge executive." Outlines executive competencies required: communications, leadership, experience, financial management, customer focus, entrepreneurial insight, and information technology grounding; examines gaps…

  10. EDITORIAL: New Editor-in-Chief for Nanotechnology New Editor-in-Chief for Nanotechnology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Couzin, Nina

    2009-01-01

    Nanotechnology is proud to announce the appointment of Professor Mark Reed, Yale University, as the new Editor-in-Chief from January 2009. Mark Reed holds the Harold Hodgkinson Chair of Engineering and Applied Science at Yale University. He has made significant contributions in the areas of quantum dots, electronic transport in nanoscale and mesoscopic systems, artificially structured materials and devices, and molecular electronics. Professor Reed has been associated with the journal as an Editorial Board member for a number of years and we are delighted that he has agreed to take on the scientific leadership of the journal in its 20th year. We also take the opportunity to thank Professor Mark Welland, Cambridge University, for his work as Editor-in-Chief since 2001, and for presiding over the re-launch and remarkable growth of the journal since then. Nanotechnology is unique in that it was the first peer-reviewed journal in the area of nanoscience, the first issue appearing in 1990. Since then it has established a distinguished publication record and has become a leading journal covering all aspects of nanoscale science and technology, as well as specializing in in-depth, comprehensive articles not seen in letter format journals. Published weekly and featuring subject sections, the journal is truly multidisciplinary in nature and is an excellent medium to quickly deliver your research results to readers worldwide. Nanotechnology is proud to be offering some of the fastest publication times around (less than three months on average from receipt to online publication). We offer free online access to all published papers for 30 days, ensuring that anyone with access to the internet will be able to read your paper. We were also the first journal to give our authors the opportunity to communicate their research to a wider audience through nanotechweb.org and other IOP websites. See the journal's homepage at www.iop.org/Journals/nano for more details. We are looking

  11. 12 CFR 1710.17 - Certification of disclosures by chief executive officer and chief financial officer.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... ENTERPRISE OVERSIGHT, DEPARTMENT OF HOUSING AND URBAN DEVELOPMENT SAFETY AND SOUNDNESS CORPORATE GOVERNANCE Corporate Practices and Procedures § 1710.17 Certification of disclosures by chief executive officer...

  12. 12 CFR 1710.17 - Certification of disclosures by chief executive officer and chief financial officer.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... ENTERPRISE OVERSIGHT, DEPARTMENT OF HOUSING AND URBAN DEVELOPMENT SAFETY AND SOUNDNESS CORPORATE GOVERNANCE Corporate Practices and Procedures § 1710.17 Certification of disclosures by chief executive officer...

  13. 12 CFR 1710.17 - Certification of disclosures by chief executive officer and chief financial officer.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... ENTERPRISE OVERSIGHT, DEPARTMENT OF HOUSING AND URBAN DEVELOPMENT SAFETY AND SOUNDNESS CORPORATE GOVERNANCE Corporate Practices and Procedures § 1710.17 Certification of disclosures by chief executive officer...

  14. 12 CFR 1710.17 - Certification of disclosures by chief executive officer and chief financial officer.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... HOUSING ENTERPRISE OVERSIGHT, DEPARTMENT OF HOUSING AND URBAN DEVELOPMENT SAFETY AND SOUNDNESS CORPORATE GOVERNANCE Corporate Practices and Procedures § 1710.17 Certification of disclosures by chief...

  15. 22 CFR 501.7 - Appointment as Chief of Mission.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 22 Foreign Relations 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 true Appointment as Chief of Mission. 501.7 Section....7 Appointment as Chief of Mission. (a) Appointment by President. Chiefs of mission are appointed by... career members qualified for appointment as chiefs of mission. The names of these officers, together with...

  16. An Investigation of Chief Administrator Turnover in International Schools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Benson, John

    2011-01-01

    This article explores chief administrator turnover in international schools. Quantitative and qualitative data from the 83 chief administrators who participated in the study suggests that the average tenure of an international school chief administrator is 3.7 years and that the main reason chief administrators leave international schools is…

  17. 17 CFR 200.22 - The Chief Accountant.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 17 Commodity and Securities Exchanges 2 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false The Chief Accountant. 200.22... § 200.22 The Chief Accountant. The Chief Accountant of the Commission is the principal adviser to the... administration of the federal securities laws. The Chief Accountant oversees the accounting profession's...

  18. An Investigation of Chief Administrator Turnover in International Schools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Benson, John

    2011-01-01

    This article explores chief administrator turnover in international schools. Quantitative and qualitative data from the 83 chief administrators who participated in the study suggests that the average tenure of an international school chief administrator is 3.7 years and that the main reason chief administrators leave international schools is…

  19. 47 CFR 54.704 - The Administrator's Chief Executive Officer.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... SERVICES (CONTINUED) UNIVERSAL SERVICE Administration § 54.704 The Administrator's Chief Executive Officer. (a) Chief Executive Officer's functions. (1) The Chief Executive Officer shall have management... 47 Telecommunication 3 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false The Administrator's Chief Executive Officer....

  20. 47 CFR 54.704 - The Administrator's Chief Executive Officer.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... SERVICES (CONTINUED) UNIVERSAL SERVICE Administration § 54.704 The Administrator's Chief Executive Officer. (a) Chief Executive Officer's functions. (1) The Chief Executive Officer shall have management... 47 Telecommunication 3 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false The Administrator's Chief Executive Officer....

  1. 5 CFR 2421.10 - Chief Administrative Law Judge.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 5 Administrative Personnel 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Chief Administrative Law Judge. 2421.10 Section 2421.10 Administrative Personnel FEDERAL LABOR RELATIONS AUTHORITY, GENERAL COUNSEL OF THE FEDERAL... § 2421.10 Chief Administrative Law Judge. Chief Administrative Law Judge means the Chief...

  2. 29 CFR 457.18 - Chief Administrative Law Judge.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Chief Administrative Law Judge. 457.18 Section 457.18 Labor... GENERAL Meaning of Terms as Used in This Chapter § 457.18 Chief Administrative Law Judge. Chief Administrative Law Judge means the Chief Administrative Law Judge, U.S. Department of Labor, Washington, DC 20210....

  3. 22 CFR 1421.9 - Chief Administrative Law Judge.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 22 Foreign Relations 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 true Chief Administrative Law Judge. 1421.9 Section... OF TERMS AS USED IN THIS SUBCHAPTER § 1421.9 Chief Administrative Law Judge. Chief Administrative Law Judge means the Chief Administrative Law Judge of the Authority....

  4. 17 CFR 200.22 - The Chief Accountant.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 17 Commodity and Securities Exchanges 2 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false The Chief Accountant. 200.22... § 200.22 The Chief Accountant. The Chief Accountant of the Commission is the principal adviser to the... administration of the federal securities laws. The Chief Accountant oversees the accounting profession's standard...

  5. 17 CFR 200.22 - The Chief Accountant.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 17 Commodity and Securities Exchanges 3 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false The Chief Accountant. 200.22... § 200.22 The Chief Accountant. The Chief Accountant of the Commission is the principal adviser to the... administration of the federal securities laws. The Chief Accountant oversees the accounting profession's standard...

  6. 17 CFR 200.22 - The Chief Accountant.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 17 Commodity and Securities Exchanges 2 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false The Chief Accountant. 200.22... § 200.22 The Chief Accountant. The Chief Accountant of the Commission is the principal adviser to the... administration of the federal securities laws. The Chief Accountant oversees the accounting profession's standard...

  7. 29 CFR 457.18 - Chief Administrative Law Judge.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 2 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Chief Administrative Law Judge. 457.18 Section 457.18 Labor... GENERAL Meaning of Terms as Used in This Chapter § 457.18 Chief Administrative Law Judge. Chief Administrative Law Judge means the Chief Administrative Law Judge, U.S. Department of Labor, Washington, DC 20210....

  8. 5 CFR 2421.10 - Chief Administrative Law Judge.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 5 Administrative Personnel 3 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Chief Administrative Law Judge. 2421.10... § 2421.10 Chief Administrative Law Judge. Chief Administrative Law Judge means the Chief Administrative Law Judge of the Authority....

  9. 22 CFR 1421.9 - Chief Administrative Law Judge.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 22 Foreign Relations 2 2011-04-01 2009-04-01 true Chief Administrative Law Judge. 1421.9 Section... OF TERMS AS USED IN THIS SUBCHAPTER § 1421.9 Chief Administrative Law Judge. Chief Administrative Law Judge means the Chief Administrative Law Judge of the Authority....

  10. 32 CFR 1800.43 - Determination(s) by Office Chief(s).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 6 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Determination(s) by Office Chief(s). 1800.43 Section 1800.43 National Defense Other Regulations Relating to National Defense NATIONAL COUNTERINTELLIGENCE CENTER PUBLIC ACCESS TO NACIC RECORDS UNDER THE FREEDOM OF INFORMATION ACT (FOIA) NACIC Action...

  11. 32 CFR 1800.43 - Determination(s) by Office Chief(s).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 6 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Determination(s) by Office Chief(s). 1800.43 Section 1800.43 National Defense Other Regulations Relating to National Defense NATIONAL COUNTERINTELLIGENCE CENTER PUBLIC ACCESS TO NACIC RECORDS UNDER THE FREEDOM OF INFORMATION ACT (FOIA) NACIC Action...

  12. 32 CFR 1800.43 - Determination(s) by Office Chief(s).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 6 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Determination(s) by Office Chief(s). 1800.43 Section 1800.43 National Defense Other Regulations Relating to National Defense NATIONAL COUNTERINTELLIGENCE CENTER PUBLIC ACCESS TO NACIC RECORDS UNDER THE FREEDOM OF INFORMATION ACT (FOIA) NACIC Action On FOIA Administrative Appeals § 1800.43...

  13. Venture Class Launch Services

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wiese, Mark

    2016-01-01

    Provide an introduction to the Launch Services Program, and specifically the strategic initiative that drove the Venture Class Launch Services contracts. Provide information from the VCLS request for proposals, as well as the Agency's CubeSat Launch Initiative.

  14. Launch summary for 1978

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vostreys, R. W.

    1978-01-01

    Sounding rocket, satellite, and space probe launchings are presented. Time, date, and location of the launches are provided. The sponsoring countries and the institutions responsible for the launch are listed.

  15. Kashlev Named First Deputy Chief, GRCBL | Poster

    Cancer.gov

    By Nancy Parrish, Staff Writer Editor’s note: The text for this article was adapted from an e-mail announcement to the Center for Cancer Research community from Robert Wiltrout, Ph.D., on September 8, 2014. Robert Wiltrout, Ph.D., director, NCI Center for Cancer Research (CCR), recently announced the appointment of Mikhail Kashlev, Ph.D., to deputy chief of the Gene Regulation and Chromosome Biology Laboratory (GRCBL). The first deputy chief to be named in the GRCBL, Kashlev joins Jeff Strathern, Ph.D., GRCBL chief, in leading the laboratory in an active research environment that focuses on chromosome dynamics (recombination, chromosome segregation, and transposable elements) and regulation (transcription, silencing, and cell cycle control).

  16. Kashlev Named First Deputy Chief, GRCBL | Poster

    Cancer.gov

    By Nancy Parrish, Staff Writer Editor’s note: The text for this article was adapted from an e-mail announcement to the Center for Cancer Research community from Robert Wiltrout, Ph.D., on September 8, 2014. Robert Wiltrout, Ph.D., director, NCI Center for Cancer Research (CCR), recently announced the appointment of Mikhail Kashlev, Ph.D., to deputy chief of the Gene Regulation and Chromosome Biology Laboratory (GRCBL). The first deputy chief to be named in the GRCBL, Kashlev joins Jeff Strathern, Ph.D., GRCBL chief, in leading the laboratory in an active research environment that focuses on chromosome dynamics (recombination, chromosome segregation, and transposable elements) and regulation (transcription, silencing, and cell cycle control).

  17. Current Perspectives on Chief Residents in Psychiatry

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Warner, Christopher H.; Rachal, James; Breitbach, Jill; Higgins, Michael; Warner, Carolynn; Bobo, William

    2007-01-01

    Objective: The authors examine qualitative data from outgoing chief residents in psychiatry from the 2004-2005 academic year to 1) determine common characteristics between programs, 2) examine the residents' perspectives on their experiences, and 3) determine their common leadership qualities. Method: The authors sent out self-report surveys via…

  18. 75 FR 15430 - Chief Joseph Hatchery Program

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-03-29

    ... Chinook salmon and will help mitigate for the effects of the Federal Columbia River Power System on fish... Bonneville Power Administration Chief Joseph Hatchery Program AGENCY: Bonneville Power Administration (BPA....gov . FOR FURTHER INFORMATION, CONTACT: Mickey Carter, Bonneville Power Administration--KEC-4, P.O...

  19. Schools Chief Search off Schedule in Boston

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gewertz, Catherine

    2006-01-01

    The closely watched search for a new superintendent in Boston has taken such a rocky turn that the search committee's revised timeline now envisions January as the starting time for the new schools chief. The district's search committee had planned to select a group of finalists who would then go through public interviews before the school…

  20. Chief Executive Compensation and Benefits Survey, 1993.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    College and Univ. Personnel Association, Washington, DC.

    This report provides data on salaries, benefits, and perquisites commonly included in total compensation packages available to higher education chief executives, along with data on employment policies and practices, based on a survey of 1,012 institutions. An executive summary presents findings, observations, and historical trends. Data are then…

  1. About EPA's Acting Chief of Staff

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Matt Fritz is the Chief of Staff at EPA. His responsibilities include serving as a key advisor to Administrator Gina McCarthy, managing the day-to-day operations of the agency and developing strategic initiatives to guide programmatic activities.

  2. Waiver Given for New York Schools Chief

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Samuels, Christina A.

    2010-01-01

    The author reports on a promise to name a chief academic officer as second in charge of the New York City schools which paved the way for Cathleen P. Black to succeed Joel I. Klein as the district's next chancellor. The compromise plan, announced amid intensifying debate over her selection by Mayor Michael R. Bloomberg, won a state waiver…

  3. Salary Levels for Chief Financial Aid Administrators.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Redd, Kenneth E.

    2002-01-01

    The Survey of Undergraduate Financial Aid Policies, Practices, and Procedures gathered information on median annual salary levels for chief financial aid administrators in 1999-2000. Among detailed findings, the survey concluded that men still have higher salaries than women. (EV)

  4. Salary Levels for Chief Financial Aid Administrators.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Redd, Kenneth E.

    2002-01-01

    Provides information on the median annual salary levels for chief financial aid administrators in 1999-2000 based on results from the Survey of Undergraduate Financial Aid Policies, Practices, and Procedures. Findings indicate that men still have higher salaries than women. (EV)

  5. New Expectations Make State Chiefs Hot Commodities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Richard, Alan

    2004-01-01

    This article discusses Arkansas' new compensation package for its new education chief. One recent candidate for the state education director's job is said to have had discussions that included a salary of about $240,000, a substantial bonus for staying a certain number of years, and possibly even a professor's chair at a state university upon…

  6. My third year as chief of staff.

    PubMed

    Wooten, Marc D

    2007-01-01

    Passing a Joint Commission survey, dealing with a sexual harassment complaint and writing a performance pay plan are just a few of the issues that a chief of staff in the VA wrestled with during his third year on the job.

  7. Chief Executive Compensation and Benefits Survey, 1993.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    College and Univ. Personnel Association, Washington, DC.

    This report provides data on salaries, benefits, and perquisites commonly included in total compensation packages available to higher education chief executives, along with data on employment policies and practices, based on a survey of 1,012 institutions. An executive summary presents findings, observations, and historical trends. Data are then…

  8. Chief Executive Compensation and Benefits Survey 1995.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    College and Univ. Personnel Association, Washington, DC.

    This report provides data on salaries, benefits, and perquisites commonly included in the total compensation packages available to higher education chief executives, along with data on employment policies and practices. It is based on a survey of 916 institutions representing all segments of higher education. Data are presented in 141 tables under…

  9. Chief Business Officers' Functions: Responsibilities and Importance.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Calver, Richard A.; Vogler, Daniel E.

    1985-01-01

    Reports on a survey of 177 chief business officers of public community colleges regarding their responsibilities and the importance they assigned to various role functions. Highlights findings concerning the perceived importance of fiscal/financial duties; endowments as a job function; role in shared planning; and personal attention given to…

  10. Waiver Given for New York Schools Chief

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Samuels, Christina A.

    2010-01-01

    The author reports on a promise to name a chief academic officer as second in charge of the New York City schools which paved the way for Cathleen P. Black to succeed Joel I. Klein as the district's next chancellor. The compromise plan, announced amid intensifying debate over her selection by Mayor Michael R. Bloomberg, won a state waiver…

  11. STS-120 launch

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2007-10-23

    STS120-S-026 (23 Oct. 2007) --- In the firing room of the Kennedy Space Center in Florida, NASA Shuttle Launch Director Michael Leinbach (second right) and launch managers watch the 11:38 a.m. (EDT) launch of Space Shuttle Discovery. Discovery launched Oct. 23 on a 14-day construction mission to the International Space Station. Photo credit: NASA/Bill Ingalls

  12. The Chief Clinical Informatics Officer (CCIO)

    PubMed Central

    Sengstack, Patricia; Thyvalikakath, Thankam Paul; Poikonen, John; Middleton, Blackford; Payne, Thomas; Lehmann, Christoph U

    2016-01-01

    Summary Introduction The emerging operational role of the “Chief Clinical Informatics Officer” (CCIO) remains heterogeneous with individuals deriving from a variety of clinical settings and backgrounds. The CCIO is defined in title, responsibility, and scope of practice by local organizations. The term encompasses the more commonly used Chief Medical Informatics Officer (CMIO) and Chief Nursing Informatics Officer (CNIO) as well as the rarely used Chief Pharmacy Informatics Officer (CPIO) and Chief Dental Informatics Officer (CDIO). Background The American Medical Informatics Association (AMIA) identified a need to better delineate the knowledge, education, skillsets, and operational scope of the CCIO in an attempt to address the challenges surrounding the professional development and the hiring processes of CCIOs. Discussion An AMIA task force developed knowledge, education, and operational skillset recommendations for CCIOs focusing on the common core aspect and describing individual differences based on Clinical Informatics focus. The task force concluded that while the role of the CCIO currently is diverse, a growing body of Clinical Informatics and increasing certification efforts are resulting in increased homogeneity. The task force advised that 1.) To achieve a predictable and desirable skillset, the CCIO must complete clearly defined and specified Clinical Informatics education and training. 2.) Future education and training must reflect the changing body of knowledge and must be guided by changing day-to-day informatics challenges. Conclusion A better defined and specified education and skillset for all CCIO positions will motivate the CCIO workforce and empower them to perform the job of a 21st century CCIO. Formally educated and trained CCIOs will provide a competitive advantage to their respective enterprise by fully utilizing the power of Informatics science. PMID:27081413

  13. Space Shuttle Discovery Launch

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2008-05-31

    NASA Shuttle Launch Director Michael Leinbach, left, STS-124 Assistant Launch Director Ed Mango, center, and Flow Director for Space Shuttle Discovery Stephanie Stilson clap in the the Launch Control Center after the main engine cut off and successful launch of the Space Shuttle Discovery (STS-124) Saturday, May 31, 2008, at the Kennedy Space Center in Cape Canaveral, Fla. The Shuttle lifted off from launch pad 39A at 5:02 p.m. EDT. Photo Credit: (NASA/Bill Ingalls)

  14. 48. Quincy, MA, BO37, Launch Area, Underground Missile Storage Structure, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    48. Quincy, MA, BO-37, Launch Area, Underground Missile Storage Structure, interior detail of water and hydraulic pumps VIEW WEST - NIKE Missile Battery PR-79, Launch Area, East Windsor Road south of State Route 101, Foster, Providence County, RI

  15. 12 CFR 1710.17 - Certification of disclosures by chief executive officer and chief financial officer.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... ENTERPRISE OVERSIGHT, DEPARTMENT OF HOUSING AND URBAN DEVELOPMENT SAFETY AND SOUNDNESS CORPORATE GOVERNANCE Corporate Practices and Procedures § 1710.17 Certification of disclosures by chief executive officer and...

  16. Coleadership Among Chief Residents: Exploration of Experiences Across Specialties

    PubMed Central

    Pettit, Jeffrey E.

    2015-01-01

    Background Many departments have multiple chief residents. How these coleaders relate to each other could affect their performance, the residency program, and the department. Objective This article reports on how co-chiefs work together during the chief year, and what may allow them to be more effective coleaders. Methods A phenomenological research design was used to investigate experiences of outgoing chief residents from 13 specialties at the University of Iowa Hospitals and Clinics over a 2-year period from 2012 through 2013. Thematic analysis of semistructured interviews was conducted to investigate commonalities and recommendations. Results Face-to-face interviews with 19 chief residents from 13 different specialties identified experiences that helped co-chiefs work effectively with each other in orienting new co-chiefs, setting goals and expectations, making decisions, managing interpersonal conflict, leadership styles, communicating, working with program directors, and providing evaluations and feedback. Although the interviewed chief residents received guidance on how to be an effective chief resident, none had been given advice on how to effectively work with a co-chief, and 26% (5 of 19) of the respondents reported having an ineffective working relationship with their co-chief. Conclusions Chief residents often colead in carrying out their multiple functions. To successfully function in a multichief environment, chief residents may benefit from a formal co-orientation in which they discuss goals and expectations, agree on a decision-making process, understand each other's leadership style, and receive feedback on their efficacy as leaders. PMID:26221435

  17. Toward vocabulary control for chief complaint.

    PubMed

    Haas, Stephanie W; Travers, Debbie; Tintinalli, Judith E; Pollock, Daniel; Waller, Anna; Barthell, Edward; Burt, Catharine; Chapman, Wendy; Coonan, Kevin; Kamens, Donald; McClay, James

    2008-05-01

    The chief complaint (CC) is the data element that documents the patient's reason for visiting the emergency department (ED). The need for a CC vocabulary has been acknowledged at national meetings and in multiple publications, but to our knowledge no groups have specifically focused on the requirements and development plans for a CC vocabulary. The national consensus meeting "Towards Vocabulary Control for Chief Complaint" was convened to identify the potential uses for ED CC and to develop the framework for CC vocabulary control. The 10-point consensus recommendations for action were 1) begin to develop a controlled vocabulary for CC, 2) obtain funding, 3) establish an infrastructure, 4) work with standards organizations, 5) address CC vocabulary characteristics for all user communities, 6) create a collection of CC for research, 7) identify the best candidate vocabulary for ED CCs, 8) conduct vocabulary validation studies, 9) establish beta test sites, and 10) plan publicity and marketing for the vocabulary.

  18. Chief Nursing Officers' Experiences With Moral Distress.

    PubMed

    Prestia, Angela S; Sherman, Rose O; Demezier, Christopher

    2017-02-01

    This study explores if moral distress and its lingering residue were experienced by chief nursing officers (CNOs). Chief nursing officers, by virtue of their position and experience, are expected to uphold their professional values and act for the benefit of others. Exploration is needed to determine if the inability to do so contributes to the moral distress of these leaders. Twenty CNOs were interviewed to determine the lived experience related to moral distress and moral residue. An interpretive phenomenological analysis approach was used. Six themes emerged describing CNO experience of moral distress including lacking psychological safety, feeling a sense of powerlessness, seeking to maintain moral compass, drawing strength from networking, moral residue, and living with the consequences. Moral distress is a common experience for CNOs. Although CNOs act with moral courage, they still experience moral distress. Further research and professional discussion are needed to support nurse executive leaders.

  19. Fifth FLTSATCOM to be launched

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1981-01-01

    Launch of the FLTSATOOM-E, into an elliptical orbit by the Atlas Centaur launch vehicle is announced. The launch and relevant launch operations are described. A chart of the launch sequence for FLTSATCOM-E communication satellite is given.

  20. The Chief Resident in Psychiatry: Roles and Responsibilities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lim, Russell F.; Schwartz, Eric; Servis, Mark; Cox, Paul D.; Lai, Alan; Hales, Robert E.

    2009-01-01

    Objective: Psychiatric residency programs have had chief residents for many years, and several articles previously published describe the chief residents' unique role as both faculty and resident. This article describes chief resident roles and responsibilities and explores trends in academic psychiatry departments from 1995 to 2006. Methods: The…

  1. 76 FR 2805 - Delegation of Authority to the Chief Accountant

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-01-18

    ... COMMISSION 17 CFR Part 200 Delegation of Authority to the Chief Accountant AGENCY: Securities and Exchange... delegate authority to the Chief Accountant with respect to proposed rule changes of the Public Company... PCAOB. In addition, the Commission is amending its rules to delegate authority to the Chief...

  2. 14 CFR 1212.703 - NASA Chief Information Officer.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 5 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false NASA Chief Information Officer. 1212.703 Section 1212.703 Aeronautics and Space NATIONAL AERONAUTICS AND SPACE ADMINISTRATION PRIVACY ACT-NASA REGULATIONS NASA Authority and Responsibilities § 1212.703 NASA Chief Information Officer. (a) The NASA Chief...

  3. 14 CFR § 1212.703 - NASA Chief Information Officer.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 5 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false NASA Chief Information Officer. § 1212.703 Section § 1212.703 Aeronautics and Space NATIONAL AERONAUTICS AND SPACE ADMINISTRATION PRIVACY ACT-NASA REGULATIONS NASA Authority and Responsibilities § 1212.703 NASA Chief Information Officer. (a) The NASA Chief...

  4. 32 CFR 536.11 - Chief of Engineers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 3 2011-07-01 2009-07-01 true Chief of Engineers. 536.11 Section 536.11 National Defense Department of Defense (Continued) DEPARTMENT OF THE ARMY CLAIMS AND ACCOUNTS CLAIMS AGAINST THE UNITED STATES The Army Claims System § 536.11 Chief of Engineers. The Chief of Engineers...

  5. 46 CFR 2.20-40 - Chief engineer's reports.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Chief engineer's reports. 2.20-40 Section 2.20-40... INSPECTIONS Reports and Forms § 2.20-40 Chief engineer's reports. (a) Repairs to boilers and pressure vessels. The chief engineer is required to report any repairs to boilers or unfired pressure vessels in...

  6. 46 CFR 11.553 - Chief engineer (OSV).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 1 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Chief engineer (OSV). 11.553 Section 11.553 Shipping... OFFICER ENDORSEMENTS Professional Requirements for National Engineer Officer Endorsements § 11.553 Chief engineer (OSV). (a) The minimum service required to qualify an applicant for an endorsement as chief...

  7. 46 CFR 11.542 - Endorsement as chief engineer (MODU).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Endorsement as chief engineer (MODU). 11.542 Section 11... REQUIREMENTS FOR OFFICER ENDORSEMENTS Professional Requirements for Engineer Officer § 11.542 Endorsement as chief engineer (MODU). To qualify for an endorsement as chief engineer (MODU) an applicant must: (a...

  8. 32 CFR 536.11 - Chief of Engineers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 true Chief of Engineers. 536.11 Section 536.11 National Defense Department of Defense (Continued) DEPARTMENT OF THE ARMY CLAIMS AND ACCOUNTS CLAIMS AGAINST THE UNITED STATES The Army Claims System § 536.11 Chief of Engineers. The Chief of Engineers...

  9. 46 CFR 11.553 - Chief Engineer (OSV).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 1 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Chief Engineer (OSV). 11.553 Section 11.553 Shipping... OFFICER ENDORSEMENTS Professional Requirements for Engineer Officer § 11.553 Chief Engineer (OSV). (a) Except as provided by paragraph (b) of this section, to qualify for an endorsement as Chief engineer (OSV...

  10. 46 CFR 11.542 - Endorsement as chief engineer (MODU).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 1 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Endorsement as chief engineer (MODU). 11.542 Section 11... REQUIREMENTS FOR OFFICER ENDORSEMENTS Professional Requirements for Engineer Officer § 11.542 Endorsement as chief engineer (MODU). To qualify for an endorsement as chief engineer (MODU) an applicant must: (a...

  11. 46 CFR 11.542 - Endorsement as chief engineer (MODU).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 1 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Endorsement as chief engineer (MODU). 11.542 Section 11... REQUIREMENTS FOR OFFICER ENDORSEMENTS Professional Requirements for National Engineer Officer Endorsements § 11.542 Endorsement as chief engineer (MODU). (a) To qualify for an endorsement as chief engineer (MODU...

  12. 46 CFR 11.542 - Endorsement as chief engineer (MODU).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 1 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Endorsement as chief engineer (MODU). 11.542 Section 11... REQUIREMENTS FOR OFFICER ENDORSEMENTS Professional Requirements for Engineer Officer § 11.542 Endorsement as chief engineer (MODU). To qualify for an endorsement as chief engineer (MODU) an applicant must: (a...

  13. 46 CFR 11.553 - Chief Engineer (OSV).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Chief Engineer (OSV). 11.553 Section 11.553 Shipping... OFFICER ENDORSEMENTS Professional Requirements for Engineer Officer § 11.553 Chief Engineer (OSV). (a) Except as provided by paragraph (b) of this section, to qualify for an endorsement as Chief engineer (OSV...

  14. 46 CFR 2.20-40 - Chief engineer's reports.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 1 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Chief engineer's reports. 2.20-40 Section 2.20-40... INSPECTIONS Reports and Forms § 2.20-40 Chief engineer's reports. (a) Repairs to boilers and pressure vessels. The chief engineer is required to report any repairs to boilers or unfired pressure vessels in...

  15. 32 CFR 536.11 - Chief of Engineers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 3 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Chief of Engineers. 536.11 Section 536.11 National Defense Department of Defense (Continued) DEPARTMENT OF THE ARMY CLAIMS AND ACCOUNTS CLAIMS AGAINST THE UNITED STATES The Army Claims System § 536.11 Chief of Engineers. The Chief of Engineers...

  16. 46 CFR 11.553 - Chief Engineer (OSV).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 1 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Chief Engineer (OSV). 11.553 Section 11.553 Shipping... OFFICER ENDORSEMENTS Professional Requirements for Engineer Officer § 11.553 Chief Engineer (OSV). (a) Except as provided by paragraph (b) of this section, to qualify for an endorsement as Chief engineer (OSV...

  17. 28 CFR 0.117 - Office of Chief Immigration Judge.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 28 Judicial Administration 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Office of Chief Immigration Judge. 0.117... Executive Office for Immigration Review § 0.117 Office of Chief Immigration Judge. The Chief Immigration Judge shall provide general supervision to the Immigration Judges in performance of their duties...

  18. 28 CFR 0.117 - Office of Chief Immigration Judge.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 28 Judicial Administration 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Office of Chief Immigration Judge. 0.117... Executive Office for Immigration Review § 0.117 Office of Chief Immigration Judge. The Chief Immigration Judge shall provide general supervision to the Immigration Judges in performance of their duties...

  19. 28 CFR 0.117 - Office of Chief Immigration Judge.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 28 Judicial Administration 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Office of Chief Immigration Judge. 0.117... Executive Office for Immigration Review § 0.117 Office of Chief Immigration Judge. The Chief Immigration Judge shall provide general supervision to the Immigration Judges in performance of their duties...

  20. 28 CFR 0.117 - Office of Chief Immigration Judge.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 28 Judicial Administration 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Office of Chief Immigration Judge. 0.117... Executive Office for Immigration Review § 0.117 Office of Chief Immigration Judge. The Chief Immigration Judge shall provide general supervision to the Immigration Judges in performance of their duties...

  1. 28 CFR 0.117 - Office of Chief Immigration Judge.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 28 Judicial Administration 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Office of Chief Immigration Judge. 0.117... Executive Office for Immigration Review § 0.117 Office of Chief Immigration Judge. The Chief Immigration Judge shall provide general supervision to the Immigration Judges in performance of their duties...

  2. Judicial Management: The Achievements of Chief Justice William Howard Taft.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Post, Robert

    1998-01-01

    Illuminates the importance of Chief Justice William Howard Taft in creating the modern administrative role of the Chief Justice of the United States. Specifically, the article examines the Act of 14 September 1922 that Taft championed in Congress to give the Chief Justice better tools for managing the judiciary. (DSK)

  3. 46 CFR 11.553 - Chief Engineer (OSV).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 1 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Chief Engineer (OSV). 11.553 Section 11.553 Shipping... OFFICER ENDORSEMENTS Professional Requirements for Engineer Officer § 11.553 Chief Engineer (OSV). (a) Except as provided by paragraph (b) of this section, to qualify for an endorsement as Chief engineer (OSV...

  4. 46 CFR 11.542 - Endorsement as chief engineer (MODU).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 1 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Endorsement as chief engineer (MODU). 11.542 Section 11... REQUIREMENTS FOR OFFICER ENDORSEMENTS Professional Requirements for Engineer Officer § 11.542 Endorsement as chief engineer (MODU). To qualify for an endorsement as chief engineer (MODU) an applicant must: (a...

  5. 46 CFR 2.20-40 - Chief engineer's reports.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 1 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Chief engineer's reports. 2.20-40 Section 2.20-40... INSPECTIONS Reports and Forms § 2.20-40 Chief engineer's reports. (a) Repairs to boilers and pressure vessels. The chief engineer is required to report any repairs to boilers or unfired pressure vessels in...

  6. 46 CFR 2.20-40 - Chief engineer's reports.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 1 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Chief engineer's reports. 2.20-40 Section 2.20-40... INSPECTIONS Reports and Forms § 2.20-40 Chief engineer's reports. (a) Repairs to boilers and pressure vessels. The chief engineer is required to report any repairs to boilers or unfired pressure vessels in...

  7. 14 CFR 141.36 - Assistant chief instructor qualifications.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Assistant chief instructor qualifications... Facilities Requirements § 141.36 Assistant chief instructor qualifications. (a) To be eligible for designation as an assistant chief instructor for a course of training, a person must meet the following...

  8. The Chief Resident in Psychiatry: Roles and Responsibilities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lim, Russell F.; Schwartz, Eric; Servis, Mark; Cox, Paul D.; Lai, Alan; Hales, Robert E.

    2009-01-01

    Objective: Psychiatric residency programs have had chief residents for many years, and several articles previously published describe the chief residents' unique role as both faculty and resident. This article describes chief resident roles and responsibilities and explores trends in academic psychiatry departments from 1995 to 2006. Methods: The…

  9. 78 FR 50052 - Chief of Engineers Environmental Advisory Board; Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-08-16

    ... Department of the Army; Corps of Engineers Chief of Engineers Environmental Advisory Board; Meeting AGENCY... the forthcoming meeting. Name of Committee: Chief of Engineers Environmental Advisory Board (EAB... the Chief of Engineers on environmental policy, identification and resolution of environmental issues...

  10. 76 FR 81485 - Chief of Engineers Environmental Advisory Board; Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-12-28

    ... Department of the Army; Corps of Engineers Chief of Engineers Environmental Advisory Board; Meeting AGENCY... the forthcoming meeting. Name of Committee: Chief of Engineers Environmental Advisory Board (EAB... the Chief of Engineers on environmental policy, identification and resolution of environmental issues...

  11. IRIS Launch Animation

    NASA Image and Video Library

    This animation demonstrates the launch and deployment of NASA's Interface Region Imaging Spectrograph (IRIS) mission satellite via a Pegasus rocket. The launch is scheduled for June 26, 2013 from V...

  12. Shuttle Era: Launch Directors

    NASA Image and Video Library

    A space shuttle launch director is the leader of the complex choreography that goes into a shuttle liftoff. Ten people have served as shuttle launch directors, making the final decision whether the...

  13. Space Launch System Animation

    NASA Image and Video Library

    NASA is ready to move forward with the development of the Space Launch System -- an advanced heavy-lift launch vehicle that will provide an entirely new national capability for human exploration be...

  14. 30. Launch Area, Generator Building, interior view showing diesel fuel ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    30. Launch Area, Generator Building, interior view showing diesel fuel tank, fuel pump (foreground) and fuel lines leading to power-generating units (removed) VIEW NORTHWEST - NIKE Missile Battery PR-79, Launch Area, East Windsor Road south of State Route 101, Foster, Providence County, RI

  15. NASA's Launch Propulsion Systems Technology Roadmap

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McConnaughey, Paul K.; Femminineo, Mark G.; Koelfgen, Syri J.; Lepsch, Roger A; Ryan, Richard M.; Taylor, Steven A.

    2012-01-01

    Safe, reliable, and affordable access to low-Earth (LEO) orbit is necessary for all of the United States (US) space endeavors. In 2010, NASA s Office of the Chief Technologist commissioned 14 teams to develop technology roadmaps that could be used to guide the Agency s and US technology investment decisions for the next few decades. The Launch Propulsion Systems Technology Area (LPSTA) team was tasked to address the propulsion technology challenges for access to LEO. The developed LPSTA roadmap addresses technologies that enhance existing solid or liquid propulsion technologies and their related ancillary systems or significantly advance the technology readiness level (TRL) of less mature systems like airbreathing, unconventional, and other launch technologies. In developing this roadmap, the LPSTA team consulted previous NASA, military, and industry studies as well as subject matter experts to develop their assessment of this field, which has fundamental technological and strategic impacts for US space capabilities.

  16. STS-135 Atlantis Launch

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2011-07-07

    NASA Administrator Charles Bolden, right, participates in the post launch traditional beans and cornbread at the NASA Kennedy Space Center, Launch Control Center (LCC) shortly after the space shuttle Atlantis, STS-135, launched on Friday, July 8, 2011, in Cape Canaveral, Fla. The launch of Atlantis is the final flight of the shuttle program, a 12-day mission to the International Space Station. Photo Credit: (NASA/Bill Ingalls)

  17. Launch Vehicle Operations Simulator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blackledge, J. W.

    1974-01-01

    The Saturn Launch Vehicle Operations Simulator (LVOS) was developed for NASA at Kennedy Space Center. LVOS simulates the Saturn launch vehicle and its ground support equipment. The simulator was intended primarily to be used as a launch crew trainer but it is also being used for test procedure and software validation. A NASA/contractor team of engineers and programmers implemented the simulator after the Apollo XI lunar landing during the low activity periods between launches.

  18. STS-135 Atlantis Launch

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2011-07-07

    NASA Photographer Kim Shiflett, left, and Videographer Glenn Benson capture a group photo of the launch team in Firing Room Four of the NASA Kennedy Space Center Launch Control Center (LCC) shortly after the space shuttle Atlantis, STS-135, launched on Friday, July 8, 2011, in Cape Canaveral, Fla. The launch of Atlantis is the final flight of the shuttle program, a 12-day mission to the International Space Station. Photo Credit: (NASA/Bill Ingalls)

  19. STS-135 Atlantis Launch

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2011-07-07

    NASA Kennedy Space Center worker Dwayne Hutcheson sweeps the Launch Control Center (LCC) lobby floor in preparation for the post launch tradition of corn bread and beans after a successful launch of the space shuttle Atlantis from pad 39A on Friday, July 8, 2011, in Cape Canaveral, Fla. The launch of Atlantis, STS-135, is the final flight of the shuttle program, a 12-day mission to the International Space Station. Photo Credit: (NASA/Bill Ingalls)

  20. Launch Summary for 1979

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vostreys, R. W.

    1980-01-01

    Spacecraft launching for 1979 are identified and listed under the categories of (1) sounding rockets, and (2) artificial Earth satellites and space probes. The sounding rockets section includes a listing of the experiments, index of launch sites and tables of the meanings and codes used in the launch listing.

  1. LAUNCH Health Forum

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2010-10-30

    Tom Kalil, Deputy Director of the White House Office of Science and Technology Policy, opens the LAUNCH: Health forum at NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida on Saturday, Oct. 30, 2010. LAUNCH: Health provides a forum to discuss accelerating innovation for a sustainable future. LAUNCH: Health partners include NASA, USAID and Nike. Photo Credit: (NASA/Bill Ingalls)

  2. Coverage of STS-104 Launch Coverage of Flight Controllers in MCC.

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2001-07-12

    JSC2001-E-21323 (12 July 2001) --- From left to right, Robert Gest with United Space Alliance; Steven A. Hawley, deputy director of Flight Crew Operations; Alan L. (Lee) Briscoe, chief engineer for the Mission Operations Directorate (MOD); and J. Milton (Milt) Heflin, chief of the Flight Director's Office, watch the monitor at the MOD console during the pre-launch activity for the STS-104 mission in the shuttle flight control room (WFCR) of Houston's Mission Control Center (MCC).

  3. Launch summary for 1980

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vostreys, R. W.

    1981-01-01

    Sounding rockets, artificial Earth satellites, and space probes launched betweeen January 1 and December 31, 1980 are listed. Data tabulated for the rocket launchings show launching site, instruments carried, date of launch, agency rocket identification, sponsoring country, experiment discipline, peak altitude, and the experimenter or institution responsible. Tables for satellites and space probes show COSPAR designation, spacecraft name, country, launch date, epoch date, orbit type, apoapsis, periapsis and inclination period. The functions and responsibilities of the World Data Center and the areas of scientific interest at the seven subcenters are defined. An alphabetical listing of experimenters using the sounding rockets is also provided.

  4. The Rockot launch system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stamerjohanns, G.; Kinnersley, M.

    1999-09-01

    EUROCKOT Launch Services GmbH has been founded by Daimler-Benz Aerospace of Germany and Khrunichev State Research and Production Space Center of Russia to offer world-wide cost effective launch services on the Rockot launch system. The Rockot commercial program is described. Rockot can launch satellites weighing up to 1850 kg into polar and other low earth (LEO) orbits. The Rockot launch vehicle is based on the former Russian SS-19 strategic missile. The first and second stages are inherited from the SS-19, the third stage named Breeze is newly developed and has multiple ignition capability. The Rockot launch system is flight proven. In addition to the currently adapted Rockot launch site Plesetsk for high inclinations, EUROCKOT is in the process to also adapt the Baykonur cosmodrome as their complementary Rockot launch site for lower inclinations. The wide range of Rockot performance is provided. The first commercial launch is foreseen in the middle of 1999. The expected launch capacity for Plesetsk and Baykonur will exceed 10 launches per year. The complete Rockot system including performance is presented.

  5. Electron launching voltage monitor

    DOEpatents

    Mendel, Clifford W.; Savage, Mark E.

    1992-01-01

    An electron launching voltage monitor measures MITL voltage using a relationship between anode electric field and electron current launched from a cathode-mounted perturbation. An electron launching probe extends through and is spaced from the edge of an opening in a first MITL conductor, one end of the launching probe being in the gap between the MITL conductor, the other end being adjacent a first side of the first conductor away from the second conductor. A housing surrounds the launching probe and electrically connects the first side of the first conductor to the other end of the launching probe. A detector detects the current passing through the housing to the launching probe, the detected current being representative of the voltage between the conductors.

  6. Electron launching voltage monitor

    DOEpatents

    Mendel, C.W.; Savage, M.E.

    1992-03-17

    An electron launching voltage monitor measures MITL voltage using a relationship between anode electric field and electron current launched from a cathode-mounted perturbation. An electron launching probe extends through and is spaced from the edge of an opening in a first MITL conductor, one end of the launching probe being in the gap between the MITL conductor, the other end being adjacent a first side of the first conductor away from the second conductor. A housing surrounds the launching probe and electrically connects the first side of the first conductor to the other end of the launching probe. A detector detects the current passing through the housing to the launching probe, the detected current being representative of the voltage between the conductors. 5 figs.

  7. Using Chief Complaints for Syndromic Surveillance: A Review of Chief Complaint Based Classifiers in North America

    PubMed Central

    Conway, Mike; Dowling, John N.; Chapman, Wendy W.

    2013-01-01

    A major goal of Natural Language Processing in the public health informatics domain is the automatic extraction and encoding of data stored in free text patient records. This extracted data can then be utilized by computerized systems to perform syndromic surveillance. In particular, the chief complaint — a short string that describes a patient’s symptoms — has come to be a vital resource for syndromic surveillance in the North American context due to its near ubiquity. This paper reviews fifteen systems in North America — at the city, county, state and federal level — that use chief complaints for syndromic surveillance. PMID:23602781

  8. GRANITE CHIEF WILDERNESS STUDY AREA, CALIFORNIA.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Harwood, David S.; Federspiel, Francis E.

    1984-01-01

    The Granite Chief Wilderness study area encompasses 57 sq mi near the crest of the Sierra Nevada 6 mi west of Tahoe City, California. Geologic, geochemical, and mines and prospect studies were carried out to assess the mineral-resource potential of the area. On the basis of the mineral-resource survey, it is concluded that the area has little promise for the occurrence of precious or base metals, oil, gas, coal, or geothermal resources. Sand, gravel, and glacial till suitable for construction materials occur in the area, but inaccessability and remoteness from available markets preclude their being shown on the map as a potential resource.

  9. The medical librarian as chief information officer.

    PubMed Central

    Greer, M C

    1998-01-01

    The position of chief information officer (CIO) is gaining popularity, especially in the health care field. The results of an informal electronic and telephone survey indicate that few medical librarians have made a career move to CIO even though this might seem like a logical step. This paper examines the qualities required of an effective information management executive, the role CIOs play within organizations, and the career advancement strategies for librarians interested in becoming CIOs. Questionnaire responses are reported from three medical librarians who have made the transition to CIO-type positions, and a case study illustrates the responsibilities of CIOs in health care organizations. PMID:9549017

  10. COSMOS Launch Services

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kalnins, Indulis

    2002-01-01

    COSMOS-3M is a two stage launcher with liquid propellant rocket engines. Since 1960's COSMOS has launched satellites of up to 1.500kg in both circular low Earth and elliptical orbits with high inclination. The direct SSO ascent is available from Plesetsk launch site. The very high number of 759 launches and the achieved success rate of 97,4% makes this space transportation system one of the most reliable and successful launchers in the world. The German small satellite company OHB System co-operates since 1994 with the COSMOS manufacturer POLYOT, Omsk, in Russia. They have created the joint venture COSMOS International and successfully launched five German and Italian satellites in 1999 and 2000. The next commercial launches are contracted for 2002 and 2003. In 2005 -2007 COSMOS will be also used for the new German reconnaissance satellite launches. This paper provides an overview of COSMOS-3M launcher: its heritage and performance, examples of scientific and commercial primary and piggyback payload launches, the launch service organization and international cooperation. The COSMOS launch service business strategy main points are depicted. The current and future position of COSMOS in the worldwide market of launch services is outlined.

  11. Antares Rocket Test Launch

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2013-04-21

    The Orbital Sciences Corporation Antares rocket is seen as it launches from Pad-0A of the Mid-Atlantic Regional Spaceport (MARS) at the NASA Wallops Flight Facility in Virginia, Sunday, April 21, 2013. The test launch marked the first flight of Antares and the first rocket launch from Pad-0A. The Antares rocket delivered the equivalent mass of a spacecraft, a so-called mass simulated payload, into Earth's orbit. Photo Credit: (NASA/Bill Ingalls)

  12. STS-135 Atlantis Launch

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2011-07-07

    NASA Administrator Charles Bolden speaks to visitors at the NASA Kennedy Space Center Banana Creek viewing site prior to going to the Launch Control Center (LCC) for the planned launch of the space shuttle Atlantis from pad 39A on Friday, July 8, 2011, in Cape Canaveral, Fla. The launch of Atlantis, STS-135, is the final flight of the shuttle program, a 12-day mission to the International Space Station. Photo Credit: (NASA/Bill Ingalls)

  13. Launch the Litening Pod!

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-02-19

    Launch the LITENING Pod ! EWS Contemporary Issue Paper Submitted by Captain Fausett, Brian M. to Major G.A. Thiele, CG 2 19...TITLE AND SUBTITLE Launch the Litening Pod ! 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6. AUTHOR(S) 5d. PROJECT NUMBER 5e...ABSTRACT unclassified c. THIS PAGE unclassified Standard Form 298 (Rev. 8-98) Prescribed by ANSI Std Z39-18 2 “Launch the LITENING pod

  14. MAVEN Atlas V Launch

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2013-11-18

    The United Launch Alliance Atlas V rocket with NASA’s Mars Atmosphere and Volatile Evolution (MAVEN) spacecraft launches from the Cape Canaveral Air Force Station Space Launch Complex 41, Monday, Nov. 18, 2013, Cape Canaveral, Florida. NASA’s Mars-bound spacecraft, the Mars Atmosphere and Volatile EvolutionN, or MAVEN, is the first spacecraft devoted to exploring and understanding the Martian upper atmosphere. Photo Credit: (NASA/Bill Ingalls)

  15. LAUNCH - STS-4 - KSC

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1982-07-06

    S82-33288 (27 June 1982) --- This horizontal view of the space shuttle Columbia captures the flight of water birds disturbed by the activity at launch Pad 39A. Launch occurred at 10:59:59 a.m. (EDT), June 27, 1982. Astronauts Thomas K. Mattingly II and Henry W. Hartsfield Jr. are aboard for NASA's final orbital flight test before launching into a new space era with the first operational flight planned for fall of this year. Photo credit: NASA

  16. MAVEN Atlas V Launch

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2013-11-18

    The United Launch Alliance Atlas V rocket with NASA’s Mars Atmosphere and Volatile EvolutioN (MAVEN) spacecraft launches from the Cape Canaveral Air Force Station Space Launch Complex 41, Monday, Nov. 18, 2013, Cape Canaveral, Florida. NASA’s Mars-bound spacecraft, the Mars Atmosphere and Volatile EvolutioN, or MAVEN, is the first spacecraft devoted to exploring and understanding the Martian upper atmosphere. Photo Credit: (NASA/Bill Ingalls)

  17. Expedition 27 Launch

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2010-04-01

    The Soyuz TMA-21 launches from the Baikonur Cosmodrome in Kazakhstan on Tuesday, April 5, 2011 carrying Expedition 27 Soyuz Commander Alexander Samokutyaev, NASA Flight Engineer Ron Garan and Russian Flight Engineer Andrey Borisenko to the International Space Station. The Soyuz, which has been dubbed "Gagarin", is launching one week shy of the 50th anniversary of the launch of Yuri Gagarin from the same launch pad in Baikonur on April 12, 1961 to become the first human to fly in space. Photo Credit: (NASA/Victor Zelentsov)

  18. Expedition 27 Launch

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2011-04-04

    The Soyuz TMA-21 launches from the Baikonur Cosmodrome in Kazakhstan on Tuesday, April 5, 2011 carrying Expedition 27 Soyuz Commander Alexander Samokutyaev, NASA Flight Engineer Ron Garan and Russian Flight Engineer Andrey Borisenko to the International Space Station. The Soyuz, which has been dubbed "Gagarin", is launching one week shy of the 50th anniversary of the launch of Yuri Gagarin from the same launch pad in Baikonur on April 12, 1961 to become the first human to fly in space. Photo Credit: (NASA/Carla Cioffi)

  19. Launch Services Safety Overview

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Loftin, Charles E.

    2008-01-01

    NASA/KSC Launch Services Division Safety (SA-D) services include: (1) Assessing the safety of the launch vehicle (2) Assessing the safety of NASA ELV spacecraft (S/C) / launch vehicle (LV) interfaces (3) Assessing the safety of spacecraft processing to ensure resource protection of: - KSC facilities - KSC VAFB facilities - KSC controlled property - Other NASA assets (4) NASA personnel safety (5) Interfacing with payload organizations to review spacecraft for adequate safety implementation and compliance for integrated activities (6) Assisting in the integration of safety activities between the payload, launch vehicle, and processing facilities

  20. Antares Rocket Test Launch

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2013-04-21

    NASA Administrator Charles Bolden congratulates the Orbital Sciences Corporation launch team and management in the Range Control Center at the NASA Wallops Flight Facility after the successful launch of the Orbital Sciences Antares rocket from the Mid-Atlantic Regional Spaceport (MARS) in Virginia, Sunday, April 21, 2013. The test launch marked the first flight of Antares and the first rocket launch from Pad-0A. The Antares rocket delivered the equivalent mass of a spacecraft, a so-called mass simulated payload, into Earth's orbit. Photo Credit: (NASA/Bill Ingalls)

  1. GPM: Waiting for Launch

    NASA Image and Video Library

    The Global Precipitation Measurement mission's Core Observatory is poised for launch from the Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency's Tanegashima Space Center, scheduled for the afternoon of Feb. 27, ...

  2. Kestrel balloon launch system

    SciTech Connect

    Newman, M.J.

    1991-10-01

    Kestrel is a high-altitude, Helium-gas-filled-balloon system used to launch scientific payloads in winds up to 20 knots, from small platforms or ships, anywhere over land or water, with a minimal crew and be able to hold in standby conditions. Its major components consist of two balloons (a tow balloon and a main balloon), the main deployment system, helium measurement system, a parachute recovery unit, and the scientific payload package. The main scope of the launch system was to eliminate the problems of being dependent of launching on long airfield runways, low wind conditions, and long launch preparation time. These objectives were clearly met with Kestrel 3.

  3. STS-113 Commander Jim Wetherbee in White Room before launch

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - In the White Room on Launch Pad 39A, STS-113 Commander Jim Wetherbee is helped with his launch and entry suit before entering Space Shuttle Endeavour. Closeout Crew members helping are (left) Rick Welty, United Space Alliance Vehicle Closeout chief, and (right) Danny Wyatt, NASA Quality Assurance specialist. The launch will carry the Expedition 6 crew to the Station and return the Expedition 5 crew to Earth. The major objective of the mission is delivery of the Port 1 (P1) Integrated Truss Assembly, which will be attached to the port side of the S0 truss. Three spacewalks are planned to install and activate the truss and its associated equipment. Launch of Space Shuttle Endeavour on mission STS-113 is scheduled for Nov. 23 at 7:50 p.m. EST.

  4. EDITORIAL: Greetings from the new Editor-in-Chief

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garcia, Ephrahim

    2008-02-01

    I am Professor Ephrahim Garcia, an Associate Professor at Sibley School of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering at Cornell University in Ithaca, New York. I have been at Cornell University since 2002, spent four years as a Program Manager at the Defense Advanced Research Project Agency from 1998-2002, and before that seven years at the Department of Mechanical Engineering at Vanderbilt University in Nashville, Tennessee. I have served on the Editorial Advisory Board of Smart Materials and Structures (SMS) for the last six years. It is a humbling thing to be asked to take up the post of Editor-in-Chief in a field with so many talented researchers. I would like to say a heartfelt thanks to the members of the Editorial Board and IOP Publishing for their confidence in me. Most importantly, I would like to thank Professor Vijay Varadan of the University of Arkansas and Professor Richard Claus of Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University for their efforts in launching the journal 16 years ago. They have been stewards, promoters and, especially Vijay, key to the operation and function of SMS for all these years, and our research community is indebted to them. Professors Varadan and Claus have dedicated their careers to the area of smart materials and structures and we are very grateful for their leadership, mentoring and contribution. SMS is a thriving journal offering papers on all technical areas concerned with smart materials, systems and structures from the micro- and nanoscale to the macroscale. The journal is undergoing some major changes, including the recent transferal of papers to IOP Publishing's peer-review management system. With this new system authors can expect fast publication times of around 4 or 5 months from submission, and excellent author service. In this world of ever changing technology, the Editorial Board and I aim to reduce the time to publication for researchers in this exciting area of science and engineering. I am in the process of

  5. The General Surgery Chief Resident Operative Experience

    PubMed Central

    Drake, Frederick Thurston; Horvath, Karen D.; Goldin, Adam B.; Gow, Kenneth W.

    2014-01-01

    IMPORTANCE The chief resident (CR) year is a pivotal experience in surgical training. Changes in case volume and diversity may impact the educational quality of this important year. OBJECTIVE To evaluate changes in operative experience for general surgery CRs. DESIGN, SETTING, AND PARTICIPANTS Review of Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education case logs from 1989–1990 through 2011–2012 divided into 5 periods. Graduates in period 3 were the last to train with unrestricted work hours; those in period 4 were part of a transition period and trained under both systems; and those in period 5 trained fully under the 80-hour work week. Diversity of cases was assessed based on Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education defined categories. MAIN OUTCOMES AND MEASURES Total cases and defined categories were evaluated for changes over time. RESULTS The average total CR case numbers have fallen (271 in period 1 vs 242 in period 5, P < .001). Total CR cases dropped to their lowest following implementation of the 80-hour work week (236 cases), but rebounded in period 5. The percentage of residents’ 5-year operative experience performed as CRs has decreased (30% in period 1 vs 25.6% in period 5, P < .001). Regarding case mix: thoracic, trauma, and vascular cases declined steadily, while alimentary and intra-abdominal operations increased. Recent graduates averaged 80 alimentary and 78 intra-abdominal procedures during their CR years. Compared with period 1, in which these 2 categories represented 47.1% of CR experience, in period 5, they represented 65.2% (P < .001). Endocrine experience has been relatively unchanged. CONCLUSIONS AND RELEVANCE Total CR cases declined especially acutely following implementation of the 80-hour work week but have since rebounded. Chief resident cases contribute less to overall experience, although this proportion stabilized before the 80-hour work week. Case mix has narrowed, with significant increases in alimentary and

  6. Chief Nursing Officer Sustainment: A Phenomenological Inquiry.

    PubMed

    Prestia, Angela S

    2015-11-01

    The study explored factors leading to chief nursing officer (CNO) sustainment in the professional practice of nurse executive leadership. CNOs are expected to lead adaptations in care delivery in this current era of healthcare reform, requiring a multitude of new leadership skills. Exploration is needed to understand barriers to longevity, which prevent consistency of leadership and execution of vision. Twenty CNOs were interviewed to determine the lived experience related to the phenomena of role sustainment. An interpretative phenomenological analysis approach was used. Six themes emerged describing sustainment. These are as follows: loving the profession, having a broader impact, reflecting on one's own work, learning to manage conflict, maintaining work/life balance, and working with supportive leaders. The desire and passion for nurse executive leadership must be enhanced through education and competencies that emerged in this study and include strategic processing, mindful reflection, and resiliency training.

  7. Expedition 24 Launch Day

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2010-06-14

    Expedition 24 NASA Flight Engineer Shannon Walker has her Russian Sokol suit prepared for launch by technicians at the Baikonur Cosmodrome in Baikonur, Kazakhstan, Tuesday, June 15, 2010. Walker, Soyuz Commander Fyodor Yurchikhin and Flight Engineer Doug Wheelock launched in their Soyuz TMA-19 rocket from the Baikonur Cosmodrome in Kazakhstan on Wednesday, June 16, 2010. (Photo Credit: NASA/Carla Cioffi)

  8. Expedition 24 Launch Day

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2010-06-14

    Expedition 24 NASA Flight Engineer Doug Wheelock, center, has his Russian Sokol suit prepared for launch by a technician at the Baikonur Cosmodrome in Baikonur, Kazakhstan, Tuesday, June 15, 2010. Wheelock, Soyuz Commander Fyodor Yurchikhin and Flight Engineer Shannon Walker launched in their Soyuz TMA-19 rocket from the Baikonur Cosmodrome in Kazakhstan on Wednesday, June 16, 2010. (Photo Credit: NASA/Carla Cioffi)

  9. Expedition 24 Launch Day

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2010-06-14

    Expedition 24 NASA Flight Engineer Doug Wheelock has his Russian Sokol suit prepared for launch by a technician at the Baikonur Cosmodrome in Baikonur, Kazakhstan, Tuesday, June 15, 2010. Wheelock, Soyuz Commander Fyodor Yurchikhin and Flight Engineer Shannon Walker launched in their Soyuz TMA-19 rocket from the Baikonur Cosmodrome in Kazakhstan on Wednesday, June 16, 2010. (Photo Credit: NASA/Carla Cioffi)

  10. Saturn IB Launch

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1973-01-01

    The Saturn IB launch vehicle lifting off from Launch Complex 39B at 9:01 a.m. EST. The Skylab 4 astronauts Gerald P. Carr, Dr. Edward G. Gibson, and William R. Pogue, were onboard for the third and final mission to the orbiting space station.

  11. Saturn IB Launch Summary

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1973-01-01

    This chart provides a launch summary of the Saturn IB launch vehicle as of 1973. Developed by the Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) as an interim vehicle in MSFC's 'building block' approach to the Saturn rocket development, the Saturn IB utilized Saturn I technology to further develop and refine the larger boosters and the Apollo spacecraft capabilities required for the marned lunar missions.

  12. Expedition 8 Launch Briefing

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2003-10-15

    Expedition 8 Soyuz Commander and Flight Engineer Alexander Kaleri and European Space Agency astronaut Pedro Duque of Spain are briefed on launch procedures from a Russian trainer at their crew quarters in Baikonur, Kazakhstan, Wednesday, Oct. 15, 2003 as they prepare for launch Oct. 18 in a Soyuz TMA-3 vehicle to the International Space Station. Photo Credit (NASA/Bill Ingalls)

  13. Launch Collision Probability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bollenbacher, Gary; Guptill, James D.

    1999-01-01

    This report analyzes the probability of a launch vehicle colliding with one of the nearly 10,000 tracked objects orbiting the Earth, given that an object on a near-collision course with the launch vehicle has been identified. Knowledge of the probability of collision throughout the launch window can be used to avoid launching at times when the probability of collision is unacceptably high. The analysis in this report assumes that the positions of the orbiting objects and the launch vehicle can be predicted as a function of time and therefore that any tracked object which comes close to the launch vehicle can be identified. The analysis further assumes that the position uncertainty of the launch vehicle and the approaching space object can be described with position covariance matrices. With these and some additional simplifying assumptions, a closed-form solution is developed using two approaches. The solution shows that the probability of collision is a function of position uncertainties, the size of the two potentially colliding objects, and the nominal separation distance at the point of closest approach. ne impact of the simplifying assumptions on the accuracy of the final result is assessed and the application of the results to the Cassini mission, launched in October 1997, is described. Other factors that affect the probability of collision are also discussed. Finally, the report offers alternative approaches that can be used to evaluate the probability of collision.

  14. STS-135 Atlantis Launch

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2011-07-08

    Space shuttle Atlantis is seen as it launches from pad 39A on Friday, July 8, 2011, at NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Cape Canaveral, Fla. The launch of Atlantis, STS-135, is the final flight of the shuttle program, a 12-day mission to the International Space Station. Photo Credit: (NASA/Bill Ingalls)

  15. 65. DETAIL OF ASSISTANT LAUNCH CONTROLLER AND LAUNCH CONTROLLER PANELS ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    65. DETAIL OF ASSISTANT LAUNCH CONTROLLER AND LAUNCH CONTROLLER PANELS LOCATED NEAR CENTER OF SLC-3E CONTROL ROOM. NOTE 30-CHANNEL COMMUNICATIONS PANELS. PAYLOAD ENVIRONMENTAL CONTROL AND MONITORING PANELS (LEFT) AND LAUNCH OPERATORS PANEL (RIGHT) IN BACKGROUND. - Vandenberg Air Force Base, Space Launch Complex 3, Launch Operations Building, Napa & Alden Roads, Lompoc, Santa Barbara County, CA

  16. Antares Rocket Test Launch

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2013-04-21

    NASA Deputy Administrator Lori Garver and other guests react after having watched the successful launch of the Orbital Sciences Corporation Antares rocket from the Mid-Atlantic Regional Spaceport (MARS) at the NASA Wallops Flight Facility in Virginia, Sunday, April 21, 2013. The test launch marked the first flight of Antares and the first rocket launch from Pad-0A. The Antares rocket delivered the equivalent mass of a spacecraft, a so-called mass simulated payload, into Earth's orbit. Photo Credit: (NASA/Bill Ingalls)

  17. Antares Rocket Test Launch

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2013-04-21

    NASA Administrator Charles Bolden and NASA Deputy Administrator Lori Garver and other guests react after having watched the successful launch of the Orbital Sciences Corporation Antares rocket from the Mid-Atlantic Regional Spaceport (MARS) at the NASA Wallops Flight Facility in Virginia, Sunday, April 21, 2013. The test launch marked the first flight of Antares and the first rocket launch from Pad-0A. The Antares rocket delivered the equivalent mass of a spacecraft, a so-called mass simulated payload, into Earth's orbit. Photo Credit: (NASA/Bill Ingalls)

  18. STS-135 Atlantis Launch

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2011-07-08

    Space shuttle Atlantis is seen through the window of a Shuttle Training Aircraft (STA) as it launches from launch pad 39A at Kennedy Space Center on the STS-135 mission, Friday, July 8, 2011 in Cape Canaveral, Fla. Atlantis launched on the final flight of the shuttle program on a 12-day mission to the International Space Station. The STS-135 crew will deliver the Raffaello multipurpose logistics module containing supplies and spare parts for the space station. Photo Credit: (NASA/Dick Clark)

  19. 46 CFR 2.20-40 - Chief engineer's reports.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 1 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Chief engineer's reports. 2.20-40 Section 2.20-40 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY PROCEDURES APPLICABLE TO THE PUBLIC VESSEL INSPECTIONS Reports and Forms § 2.20-40 Chief engineer's reports. (a) Repairs to boilers and pressure...

  20. 7 CFR 2.61 - Chief, Natural Resources Conservation Service.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Chief, Natural Resources Conservation Service. 2.61... for Natural Resources and Environment § 2.61 Chief, Natural Resources Conservation Service. (a... in § 2.20(b)(1), the following delegations of authority are made by the Under Secretary for Natural...

  1. 14 CFR 141.36 - Assistant chief instructor qualifications.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... of § 61.57 of this chapter; (3) Pass a knowledge test on— (i) Teaching methods; (ii) Applicable... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Assistant chief instructor qualifications... Facilities Requirements § 141.36 Assistant chief instructor qualifications. (a) To be eligible...

  2. 22 CFR 501.7 - Appointment as Chief of Mission.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ....7 Appointment as Chief of Mission. (a) Appointment by President. Chiefs of mission are appointed by the President, by and with the advice and consent of the Senate. They may be career members of the..., the Secretary of State from time to time furnishes the President with the names of Foreign Service...

  3. 22 CFR 501.7 - Appointment as Chief of Mission.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ....7 Appointment as Chief of Mission. (a) Appointment by President. Chiefs of mission are appointed by the President, by and with the advice and consent of the Senate. They may be career members of the..., the Secretary of State from time to time furnishes the President with the names of Foreign Service...

  4. 22 CFR 501.7 - Appointment as Chief of Mission.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ....7 Appointment as Chief of Mission. (a) Appointment by President. Chiefs of mission are appointed by the President, by and with the advice and consent of the Senate. They may be career members of the..., the Secretary of State from time to time furnishes the President with the names of Foreign Service...

  5. 22 CFR 501.7 - Appointment as Chief of Mission.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ....7 Appointment as Chief of Mission. (a) Appointment by President. Chiefs of mission are appointed by the President, by and with the advice and consent of the Senate. They may be career members of the..., the Secretary of State from time to time furnishes the President with the names of Foreign Service...

  6. 2016 National Profile of Higher Education Chief Business Officers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Association of College and University Business Officers, 2016

    2016-01-01

    The "2016 National Profile of Higher Education Chief Business Officers" is a triennial report that tracks changes in the demographic characteristics, job duties, and plans for career transitions and retirements of business office chief executives at colleges and universities in 2010, 2013, and 2016. The 2016 study also provides a…

  7. The changing role of the health care chief information officer.

    PubMed

    Wood, G M

    2000-09-01

    Information is the lifeblood of the health care organization. In the past, chief information officers were responsible for nothing else but assuring a constant flow of information. Today, they are being asked to do a great deal more. From E-business to E-health strategy, the chief information officer is the focal point of an organization's ability to leverage new technology.

  8. 17 CFR 37.1501 - Chief compliance officer.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 17 Commodity and Securities Exchanges 1 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Chief compliance officer. 37.1501 Section 37.1501 Commodity and Securities Exchanges COMMODITY FUTURES TRADING COMMISSION SWAP... quarterly. (iv) The chief compliance officer shall provide any information regarding the swap execution...

  9. 32 CFR 700.333 - The Chief of Naval Research.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... Naval Research, the Office of Naval Technology and assigned shore activities. (b) The Office of Naval... 32 National Defense 5 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false The Chief of Naval Research. 700.333 Section 700... The Office of the Secretary of the Navy/the Staff Assistants § 700.333 The Chief of Naval Research....

  10. 32 CFR 700.333 - The Chief of Naval Research.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... Naval Research, the Office of Naval Technology and assigned shore activities. (b) The Office of Naval... 32 National Defense 5 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false The Chief of Naval Research. 700.333 Section 700... The Office of the Secretary of the Navy/the Staff Assistants § 700.333 The Chief of Naval Research....

  11. 28 CFR 301.313 - Chief Operating Officer review.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 28 Judicial Administration 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Chief Operating Officer review. 301.313 Section 301.313 Judicial Administration FEDERAL PRISON INDUSTRIES, INC., DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE INMATE ACCIDENT COMPENSATION Compensation for Work-Related Physical Impairment or Death § 301.313 Chief Operating Officer review. Any claimant not satisfie...

  12. Select Higher Education Chief Diversity Officers: Roles, Realities, and Reflections

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pittard, Lesley-Anne

    2010-01-01

    This naturalistic inquiry sought to obtain the "essence" of select administrative chief diversity officers (CDOs), by exploring their participant profiles, organizational realities, and career reflections. Participants self-identified as their institution's senior most chief executive, were poised executively, and charged to facilitate an…

  13. Select Higher Education Chief Diversity Officers: Roles, Realities, and Reflections

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pittard, Lesley-Anne

    2010-01-01

    This naturalistic inquiry sought to obtain the "essence" of select administrative chief diversity officers (CDOs), by exploring their participant profiles, organizational realities, and career reflections. Participants self-identified as their institution's senior most chief executive, were poised executively, and charged to facilitate an…

  14. 11 CFR 9428.6 - Chief state election official.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 11 Federal Elections 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Chief state election official. 9428.6 Section 9428.6 Federal Elections ELECTION ASSISTANCE COMMISSION NATIONAL VOTER REGISTRATION ACT (42 U.S.C. 1973gg-1 et seq.) National Mail Voter Registration Form § 9428.6 Chief state election official. (a)...

  15. 11 CFR 9428.6 - Chief state election official.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 11 Federal Elections 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Chief state election official. 9428.6 Section 9428.6 Federal Elections ELECTION ASSISTANCE COMMISSION NATIONAL VOTER REGISTRATION ACT (42 U.S.C. 1973gg-1 et seq.) National Mail Voter Registration Form § 9428.6 Chief state election official. (a)...

  16. 11 CFR 9428.6 - Chief state election official.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 11 Federal Elections 1 2013-01-01 2012-01-01 true Chief state election official. 9428.6 Section 9428.6 Federal Elections ELECTION ASSISTANCE COMMISSION NATIONAL VOTER REGISTRATION ACT (42 U.S.C. 1973gg-1 et seq.) National Mail Voter Registration Form § 9428.6 Chief state election official. (a)...

  17. 11 CFR 9428.6 - Chief state election official.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 11 Federal Elections 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Chief state election official. 9428.6 Section 9428.6 Federal Elections ELECTION ASSISTANCE COMMISSION NATIONAL VOTER REGISTRATION ACT (42 U.S.C. 1973gg-1 et seq.) National Mail Voter Registration Form § 9428.6 Chief state election official. (a)...

  18. Leaving Office: Position Changes of Chief Academic Officers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cejda, Brent D.; McKenney, Cynthia B.; Fuller, Catherine W.

    2001-01-01

    Using responses from a national survey of chief academic officers in public community colleges, identifies previous position holders and the positions to which they moved. Presents findings, which indicated that the greatest percentage of former chief academic officers became president (30 percent), whereas the next largest percentage retired (27…

  19. 32 CFR 536.13 - Chief, National Guard Bureau.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... CLAIMS AGAINST THE UNITED STATES The Army Claims System § 536.13 Chief, National Guard Bureau. The Chief, National Guard Bureau (NGB), shall: (a) Ensure the designation of a point of contact for claims matters in each State Adjutant General's office. (b) Provide the name, address, and telephone number of these...

  20. The Role of the Chief Executive Officer in Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Farquhar, Robin H.

    The primary loyalty of the chief executive officer is to the board of education, a group of lay people elected to represent the school's clients. Because accountability is to laymen rather than to senior professionals, chief executive officers must play a heavy role in educating them about education and in generating policy recommendations for…

  1. March 2017 Letters to the Editor-in-Chief.

    PubMed

    2017-03-01

    Letters to the Editor-in-Chief of JOSPT as follows: "Regarding 'Unraveling the Complexity of Low Back Pain'" with Authors' Response "Beall's List Has Vanished: What Next?" with Editor-in-Chief Response J Orthop Sports Phys Ther 2017;47(3):219-223. doi:10.2519/jospt.2017.0202.

  2. 77 FR 46428 - Chief of Engineers Environmental Advisory Board; Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-08-03

    ... Department of the Army; Corps of Engineers Chief of Engineers Environmental Advisory Board; Meeting AGENCY... forthcoming meeting. Name of Committee: Chief of Engineers Environmental Advisory Board (EAB). Date: August 28... environmental policy, identification and resolution of environmental issues and missions, and addressing...

  3. 78 FR 4138 - Chief of Engineers Environmental Advisory Board; Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-01-18

    ..., identification and resolution of environmental issues and missions, and addressing challenges, problems and... Department of the Army; Corps of Engineers Chief of Engineers Environmental Advisory Board; Meeting AGENCY... forthcoming meeting. Name of Committee: Chief of Engineers Environmental Advisory Board (EAB). Date: February...

  4. Launch of Juno!

    NASA Image and Video Library

    An Atlas V rocket lofted the Juno spacecraft toward Jupiter from Space Launch Complex-41. The 4-ton Juno spacecraft will take five years to reach Jupiter on a mission to study its structure and dec...

  5. Anchor Trial Launch

    Cancer.gov

    NCI has launched a multicenter phase III clinical trial called the ANCHOR Study -- Anal Cancer HSIL (High-grade Squamous Intraepithelial Lesion) Outcomes Research Study -- to determine if treatment of HSIL in HIV-infected individuals can prevent anal canc

  6. Genomic Data Commons launches

    Cancer.gov

    The Genomic Data Commons (GDC), a unified data system that promotes sharing of genomic and clinical data between researchers, launched today with a visit from Vice President Joe Biden to the operations center at the University of Chicago.

  7. Hi-C Launch

    NASA Image and Video Library

    The High resolution Coronal Imager (Hi-C) was launched on a NASA Black Brant IX two-stage rocket from White Sands Missile Range in New Mexico July 11, 2012. The experiment reached a maximum velocit...

  8. Launch - STS-6 - KSC

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1983-04-12

    S83-30222 (4 April 1983) --- The second reusable spacecraft in history successfully launches from Launch Pad 39A at 1:30:00:88 p.m. (EST) on April 4, 1983, and heads for its history making five-day mission in Earth orbit. The space shuttle Challenger, its two solid rocket boosters (SRB), and a new lightweight?external fuel tank were captured on film by an automatically-tripped camera in a protected station nearer to the launch pad than human beings are able to be at launch time. Onboard the spacecraft are astronauts Paul J. Wietz, Karol J. Bobko, Dr. Story Musgrave and Donald H. Peterson. Photo credit: NASA

  9. First Accessible Boat Launch

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    This is a story about how the Northwest Indiana urban waters partnership location supported the process to create and open the first handicap accessible canoe and kayak launch in the state of Indiana.

  10. IRVE 3 Launch

    NASA Image and Video Library

    The Inflatable Reentry Vehicle Experiment, or IRVE-3, launched on July 23, 2012, from NASA's Wallops Flight Facility. The purpose of the IRVE-3 test was to show that a space capsule can use an infl...

  11. GPM Launch Coverage

    NASA Image and Video Library

    A Japanese H-IIA rocket with the NASA-Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency (JAXA) Global Precipitation Measurement (GPM) Core Observatory aboard, launched from the Tanegashima Space Center in Japan o...

  12. NASA Now: Glory Launch

    NASA Image and Video Library

    In this episode of NASA Now, Dr. Hal Maring joins us to explain why the upcoming launch of the Glory satellite is so important to further our understanding of climate change. He also will speak on ...

  13. Vertical Launch Alignment Transfer Apparatus.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    A launch mechanism for vertically launching missiles carried in launch tubes disposed in a pod . The launch mechanism includes apparatus for... pod and v-groove elements are secured in the launch tubes and oriented to the northfinder. Rods are secured on opposite sides of each missile and are

  14. 33. Launch Control Center, close view of launch key inserted ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    33. Launch Control Center, close view of launch key inserted in the launch panel. Lyon - Whiteman Air Force Base, Oscar O-1 Minuteman Missile Alert Facility, Southeast corner of Twelfth & Vendenberg Avenues, Knob Noster, Johnson County, MO

  15. Experiences with Launch Vehicles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dumbacher, Daniel L.

    2006-01-01

    The presentation "NASA Experience with Launch Vehicles" is a compilation of Mr. Dumbacher's career experiences with the Space Shuttle Program, the Delta - Clipper Experimental flight test project, the X-33 demonstrator project, and recent experiences with the Orbital Spaceplane Program agd the current NASA effort on Exploration Launch Systems. Mr. Dumbacher will discuss his personal experiences and provide lessons learned from each program. The accounts provided by Mr. Dumbacher are his own and do not necessarily represent the official NASA position.

  16. STS-130 Launch Attempt

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2010-02-07

    NASA Associate Administrator for Space Operations Bill Gerstenmaier, center, reacts to an updated weather report during the countdown of the launch of the space shuttle Endeavour and the start of the STS-130 mission at NASA Kennedy Space Center in Cape Canaveral, Fla. on Sunday Feb. 7, 2010. Space shuttle Endeavour's launch attempt was scrubbed due to a low cloud ceiling over Kennedy Space Center. Photo Credit: (NASA/Bill Ingalls)

  17. STS-132 Launch Tweetup

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2010-05-12

    Jon Cowart @Rocky_Sci, orbiter engineering manager, Space Shuttle Program, interacts with Tweetup participant, Jen Vargas, @jenvargus, as he speaks to participants at the two-day STS-132 Launch Tweetup at Kennedy Space Center, Thursday, May 13, 2010, in Cape Canaveral, Fla. NASA Twitter followers in attendance will have the opportunity to take a tour of NASA's Kennedy Space Center, view the space shuttle launch and speak with shuttle technicians, engineers, astronauts and managers. Photo Credit: (NASA/Paul E. Alers)

  18. Expedition 23 Launch Day

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2010-04-01

    Expedition 23 Flight Engineer Mikhail Kornienko of the Russia has his Russian Sokol suit prepared for launch by a technician at the Baikonur Cosmodrome in Baikonur, Kazakhstan, Friday, April 2, 2010. Kornienko and fellow Expedition 23 crewmembers Soyuz Commander Alexander Skvortsov and NASA Flight Engineer Tracy Caldwell Dyson of the U.S. launched in their Soyuz TMA-18 rocket from the Baikonur Cosmodrome in Kazakhstan on Friday, April 2, 2010. Photo Credit: (NASA/Carla Cioffi)

  19. Expedition 23 Launch Day

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2010-04-01

    Expedition 23 Soyuz Commander Alexander Skvortsov has his Russian Sokol suit prepared for launch by a technician at the Baikonur Cosmodrome in Baikonur, Kazakhstan, Friday, April 2, 2010. Skvortsov and fellow Expedition 23 crewmembers Flight Engineer Mikhail Kornienko of the Russia and NASA Flight Engineer Tracy Caldwell Dyson of the U.S. launched in their Soyuz TMA-18 rocket from the Baikonur Cosmodrome in Kazakhstan on Friday, April 2, 2010. Photo Credit: (NASA/Carla Cioffi)

  20. Expedition 22 Launch Day

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2009-12-20

    Expedition 22 Flight Engineer Soichi Noguchi of Japan has his Russian Sokol suit prepared for launch by a technician at the Baikonur Cosmodrome in Baikonur, Kazakhstan, Sunday, Dec. 20, 2009. Soichi and fellow Expedition 22 crew members NASA Flight Engineer Timothy J. Creamer of the U.S., Soyuz Commander Oleg Kotov of Russia launched in their Soyuz TMA-17 rocket from the Baikonur Cosmodrome in Kazakhstan on Monday, Dec. 21, 2009. (Photo Credit: NASA/Bill Ingalls)

  1. Expedition 23 Launch Day

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2010-04-01

    Expedition 23 NASA Flight Engineer Tracy Caldwell Dyson, left, talks with Soyuz Commander Alexander Skvortsov of Russia, while Flight Engineer Mikhail Kornienko of Russia has his Russian Sokol suit prepared for launch at the Baikonur Cosmodrome in Baikonur, Kazakhstan, Friday, April 2, 2010. The Expedition 23 crew members launched in their Soyuz TMA-18 rocket from the Baikonur Cosmodrome in Kazakhstan on Friday, April 2, 2010. (Photo Credit: NASA/Bill Ingalls)

  2. Expedition 23 Launch Day

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2010-04-01

    Expedition 23 NASA Flight Engineer Tracy Caldwell Dyson of the U.S. has her Russian Sokol suit prepared for launch by a technician at the Baikonur Cosmodrome in Baikonur, Kazakhstan, Friday, April 2, 2010. Caldwell Dyson and fellow Expedition 23 crew members Soyuz Commander Alexander Skvortsov and Flight Engineer Mikhail Kornienko of Russia launched in their Soyuz TMA-18 rocket from the Baikonur Cosmodrome in Kazakhstan on Friday, April 2, 2010. Photo Credit: (NASA/Carla Cioffi)

  3. Expedition 25 Launch

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2010-10-07

    Expedition 25 NASA Flight Engineer Scott Kelly of the U.S. has his Russian Sokol suit prepared for launch by a technician at the Baikonur Cosmodrome in Baikonur, Kazakhstan, Friday, Oct. 8, 2010. Kelly and fellow Expedition 25 crew members Soyuz Commander Alexander Kaleri and Flight Engineer Oleg Skripochka launched in their Soyuz TMA-01M at 5:10 a.m. Friday morning. (Photo Credit: NASA/Carla Cioffi)

  4. Expedition 25 Launch

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2010-10-07

    The Soyuz TMA-01M rocket launches from the Baikonur Cosmodrome in Kazakhstan on Friday, October 8, 2010 carrying Expedition 25 Soyuz Commander Alexander Kaleri of Russia, NASA Flight Engineer Scott J. Kelly and Russian Flight Engineer Oleg Skripochka to the International Space Station. Their Soyuz TMA-01M rocket launched at 5:10 a.m Kazakhstan time. (Photo Credit: NASA/Carla Cioffi)

  5. Expedition 25 Launch

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2010-10-07

    Expedition 25 NASA Flight Engineer Scott Kelly of the U.S. has his Russian Sokol suit prepared for launch by a technician at the Baikonur Cosmodrome in Kazakhstan, Friday, Oct. 8, 2010. Kelly and fellow Expedition 25 crew members Soyuz Commander Alexander Kaleri and Flight Engineer Oleg Skripochka launched in their Soyuz TMA-01M at 5:10 a.m. Friday morning. (Photo Credit: NASA/Carla Cioffi)

  6. STS-64 launch view

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1994-01-01

    Passing through some of the trailer clouds of an overcast sky which temporarily postponed its launch, the Space Shuttle Discovery heads for its 19th Earth orbital flight. Several kilometers away, astronaut John H. Casper, Jr., who took this picture, was piloting the Shuttle Training Aircraft (STA) from which the launch and landing area weather was being monitored. Onboard Discovery were astronauts Richard N. Richards, L. Blaine Hammond, Jr., Mark C. Lee, Carl J. Meade, Susan J. Helms, and Jerry M. Linenger.

  7. Orion EFT-1 Launch

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2014-12-05

    A Delta IV Heavy rocket lifts off from Space Launch Complex 37 at Cape Canaveral Air Force Station in Florida carrying NASA's Orion spacecraft on an unpiloted flight test to Earth orbit. Liftoff was at 7:05 a.m. EST. During the two-orbit, four-and-a-half hour mission, engineers will evaluate the systems critical to crew safety, the launch abort system, the heat shield and the parachute system.

  8. Expedition 22 Launch Day

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2009-12-21

    Expedition 22 Soyuz Commander Oleg Kotov of Russia, left, NASA Flight Engineer Timothy J. Creamer of the U.S., back center, and Flight Engineer Soichi Noguchi of Japan are walked from their bus to the soyuz rocket at the launch pad at the Baikonur Cosmodrome in Baikonur, Kazakhstan, Monday, Dec. 21, 2009. Kotov, Creamer and Noguchi launched in their Soyuz TMA-17 rocket from the Baikonur Cosmodrome in Kazakhstan on Monday, Dec. 21, 2009. (Photo Credit: NASA/Bill Ingalls)

  9. Expedition 22 Launch Day

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2009-12-20

    Expedition 22 Soyuz Commander Oleg Kotov of Russia, center, has his Russian Sokol suit prepared for launch while NASA Flight Engineer Timothy J. Creamer of the U.S., left, and Flight Engineer Soichi Noguchi of Japan wait at the Baikonur Cosmodrome in Baikonur, Kazakhstan, Sunday, Dec. 20, 2009. The Expedition 22 crew members launched in their Soyuz TMA-17 rocket from the Baikonur Cosmodrome in Kazakhstan on Monday, Dec. 21, 2009. (Photo Credit: NASA/Bill Ingalls)

  10. Expedition 22 Launch Day

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2009-12-20

    Expedition 22 NASA Flight Engineer Timothy J. Creamer of the U.S. has his Russian Sokol suit prepared for launch by a technician at the Baikonur Cosmodrome in Baikonur, Kazakhstan, Sunday, Dec. 20, 2009. Creamer and fellow Expedition 22 crew members, Soyuz Commander Oleg Kotov of Russia, Flight Engineer Soichi Noguchi of Japan launched in their Soyuz TMA-17 rocket from the Baikonur Cosmodrome in Kazakhstan on Monday, Dec. 21, 2009. (Photo Credit: NASA/Bill Ingalls)

  11. Expedition 22 Launch Day

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2009-12-20

    Expedition 22 NASA Flight Engineer Timothy J. Creamer of the U.S., left, talks with Soyuz Commander Oleg Kotov of Russia, right, while Flight Engineer Soichi Noguchi of Japan has his Russian Sokol suit prepared for launch at the Baikonur Cosmodrome in Baikonur, Kazakhstan, Sunday, Dec. 20, 2009. The Expedition 22 crew members launched in their Soyuz TMA-17 rocket from the Baikonur Cosmodrome in Kazakhstan on Monday, Dec. 21, 2009. (Photo Credit: NASA/Bill Ingalls)

  12. Magnetic Launch Assist

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Perez, Jose

    2000-01-01

    The objectives of this program are to: (1) To develop a safe, reliable, inexpensive, and minimum operation launch assist system for sending payloads into orbit using ground powered, magnetic suspension and propulsion technologies; (2) Improve safety, reliability, operability for third generation Reusable Launch Vehicles (RLV); (3) Reduce vehicle weight and increase payload capacity; and (4) Support operational testing of Rocket Based Combine Cycle (RBCC) engines.

  13. STS-132 Launch Tweetup

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2010-05-12

    Kendal Van Dyke, a database professional that is followed on Twitter @twitter.com/sqldba, takes part in the two-day STS-132 Launch Tweetup at Kennedy Space Center, Thursday, May 13, 2010, in Cape Canaveral, Fla. NASA Twitter followers in attendance will have the opportunity to take a tour of NASA's Kennedy Space Center, view the space shuttle launch and speak with shuttle technicians, engineers, astronauts and managers. Photo Credit: (NASA/Paul E. Alers)

  14. Expedition 8 Launch Day

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2003-10-18

    Technicians conduct a leak check on the spacesuit of Expedition 8 Soyuz Commander Alexander Kaleri at the Baikonur Cosmodrome, Saturday, Oct. 18, 2003, prior to his departure for the launch pad with Expedition 8 Commander and NASA Science Officer Mike Foale and European Space Agency astronaut Pedro Duque of Spain. The trio were launched on a Soyuz TMA-3 vehicle to the International Space Station, arriving on Oct. 20. Photo Credit (NASA/Bill Ingalls)

  15. Expedition 8 Launch Day

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2003-10-18

    Technicians conduct a leak check on the spacesuit of European Space Agency astronaut Pedro Duque of Spain at the Baikonur Cosmodrome, Saturday, Oct. 18, 2003, prior to his departure for the launch pad with Expedition 8 Commander and NASA Science Officer Mike Foale and Soyuz Commander Alexander Kaleri. The trio were launched on a Soyuz TMA-3 vehicle to the International Space Station, arriving on Oct. 20. Photo Credit (NASA/Bill Ingalls)

  16. Expedition 8 Launch Day

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2003-10-18

    Expedition 8 Commander and NASA Science Officer Michael Foale completes suiting up at the Baikonur Cosmodrome in Kazakhstan, Saturday, Oct. 18, 2003, prior to departing for the launch pad with Expedition 8 Soyuz Commander Alexander Kaleri and European Space Agency astronaut Pedro Duque of Spain. The trio were launched on the Soyuz TMA-3 vehicle to the International Space Station, arriving on Oct. 20. Photo Credit (NASA/Bill Ingalls)

  17. Launch Vehicle Communications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Welch, Bryan; Greenfeld, Israel

    2005-01-01

    As the National Aeronautics and Space Administration's (NASA) planning for updated launch vehicle operations progresses, there is a need to consider improved methods. This study considers the use of phased array antennas mounted on launch vehicles and transmitting data to either NASA's Tracking and Data Relay Satellite System (TDRSS) satellites or to the commercial Iridium, Intelsat, or Inmarsat communications satellites. Different data rate requirements are analyzed to determine size and weight of resulting antennas.

  18. STS-135 Atlantis Launch

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2011-07-08

    Guests look on from the terrace of Operations Support Building II as space shuttle Atlantis launches from launch pad 39A on the STS-135 mission Friday, July 8, 2011, at Kennedy Space Center in Cape Canaveral, Fla. Atlantis and its crew will deliver to the International Space Station the Raffaello multipurpose logistics module containing supplies and spare parts for the space station. Photo Credit: (NASA/Carla Cioffi)

  19. STS-135 Atlantis Launch

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2011-07-08

    Space shuttle Atlantis, STS-135, launches skyward on a 12-day mission to the International Space Station (ISS), Friday, July 8, 2011, at NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Cape Canaveral, Fla. The launch of Atlantis is the final flight of the shuttle program and will carry the Raffaello multipurpose logistics module containing supplies and spare parts for the space station. Photo Credit: (NASA/Paul E. Alers)

  20. Orion EFT-1 Launch

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2014-12-05

    A Delta IV Heavy rocket roars to life at Space Launch Complex 37 at Cape Canaveral Air Force Station in Florida. The launch vehicle is carrying NASA's Orion spacecraft on an unpiloted flight test to Earth orbit. Liftoff was at 7:05 a.m. EST. The flight will send Orion 3,600 miles in altitude beyond the Earth's surface on a four-and-a-half hour mission.

  1. STS-132 Launch Tweetup

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2010-05-12

    Ron Woods, an equipment specialist, who has been a space suit designer from Mercury to now speaks to participants at the two-day STS-132 Launch Tweetup at Kennedy Space Center, Thursday, May 13, 2010, in Cape Canaveral, Fla. NASA Twitter followers in attendance will have the opportunity to take a tour of NASA's Kennedy Space Center, view the space shuttle launch and speak with shuttle technicians, engineers, astronauts and managers. Photo Credit: (NASA/Paul E. Alers)

  2. Electromagnetic Launch to Space

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McNab, I. R.

    Many advances in electromagnetic (EM) propulsion technology have occurred in recent years. Linear motor technology for low-velocity and high-mass applications is being developed for naval catapults. Such technology could serve as the basis for a first-stage booster launch--as suggested by the US National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) in the Maglifter concept. Using railguns, laboratory experiments have demonstrated launch velocities of 2-3 km/s and muzzle energies > 8 MJ. The extension of this technology to the muzzle velocities ( 7500 m/s) and energies ( 10 GJ) needed for the direct launch of payloads into orbit is very challenging but may not be impossible. For launch to orbit, even long launchers (> 1000 m) would need to operate at accelerations > 1000 G to reach the required velocities, so it would only be possible to launch rugged payloads, such as fuel, water, and materiel. Interest is being shown in such concepts by US, European, Russian, and Chinese researchers. An intermediate step proposed in France could be to launch payloads to sounding rocket altitudes for ionospheric research.

  3. Apollo 14 crew arrive at White Room atop Pad A, Launch Complex 39

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1971-01-01

    The three Apollo 14 astronauts arrive at the White Room atop Pad A, Launch Complex 39, during the Apollo 14 prelaunch countdown. Note identifying red bands on the sleeve and leg of Shepard. Standing in the center background is Astronaut Thomas P. Stafford, Chief of the Manned Spacecraft Center Astronaut Office.

  4. GPM Core Observatory Launch Animation

    NASA Image and Video Library

    This animation depicts the launch of the Global Precipitation Measurement (GPM) Core Observatory satellite from Tanegashima Space Center, Japan. The launch is currently scheduled for Feb. 27, 2014....

  5. Ares Launch Vehicles Overview

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vanhooser, Teresa

    2009-01-01

    Since 2005, the Ares Projects have been building the nation s next generation of crew and cargo launch vehicles. As part of the Constellation Program, the Ares vehicles will enable astronauts in the Orion crew exploration vehicle and Altair lunar lander to reach the Moon and beyond. These vehicles draw upon hardware and experienced developed over 50 years of exploration, while also incorporating technology and management practices from today. Ares is concentrating on building the Ares I crew launch vehicle to ensure America s continued ability to send crews to the International Space Station. Progress has been made on design, fabrication, and testing for the first stage, upper stage, upper stage engine, and integrated vehicle. This presentation will provide an overview of the Ares launch vehicles architecture, milestone progress, and top project risks.

  6. STS-133 launch

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2011-02-24

    STS133-S-067 (24 Feb. 2011) --- In Firing Room 4 of the Launch Control Center at NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida, NASA's Discovery Flow Director Stephanie Stilson, left, STS-133 Assistant Shuttle Launch Director and lead NASA Test Director Charlie Blackwell-Thompson and Shuttle Launch Director Mike Leinbach watch space shuttle Discovery head toward Earth orbit on the STS-133 mission to the International Space Station. Discovery and its six-member crew are on a mission to deliver the Permanent Multipurpose Module, packed with supplies and critical spare parts, as well as Robonaut 2, the dexterous humanoid astronaut helper, to the orbiting outpost. Discovery is making its 39th mission and is scheduled to be retired following STS-133. This is the 133rd Space Shuttle Program mission and the 35th shuttle voyage to the space station. Photo credit: NASA or National Aeronautics and Space Administration

  7. AXONOMETRIC, LAUNCH DOOR AND DOOR CYLINDER, LAUNCH PLATFORM ROLLER GUIDE, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    AXONOMETRIC, LAUNCH DOOR AND DOOR CYLINDER, LAUNCH PLATFORM ROLLER GUIDE, CRIB SUSPENSION SHOCK STRUT, LAUNCH PLATFORM - Dyess Air Force Base, Atlas F Missle Site S-8, Launch Facility, Approximately 3 miles east of Winters, 500 feet southwest of Highway 1770, center of complex, Winters, Runnels County, TX

  8. 76 FR 67472 - Order of Succession for the Office of the Chief Information Officer

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-11-01

    ... Cyber Security and Privacy, Office of the Chief Information Officer, Department of Housing and Urban... Operations; (3) Deputy Chief Information Officer, for Cyber Security and Privacy; (4) Deputy Chief...

  9. Launch of Vanguard

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1955-01-01

    Launch of a three-stage Vanguard (SLV-7) from Cape Canaveral, Florida, September 18, 1959. Designated Vanguard III, the 100-pound satellite was used to study the magnetic field and radiation belt. In September 1955, the Department of Defense recommended and authorized the new program, known as Project Vanguard, to launch Vanguard booster to carry an upper atmosphere research satellite in orbit. The Vanguard vehicles were used in conjunction with later booster vehicle such as the Thor and Atlas, and the technique of gimbaled (movable) engines for directional control was adapted to other rockets.

  10. Expedition 18 Launch Day

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2008-10-11

    Expedition 18 Flight Engineer Yuri V. Lonchakov, bottom, Expedition 18 Commander Michael Fincke and American spaceflight participant Richard Garriott, top, wave farewell from the steps of the Soyuz launch pad prior to their launch in the Soyuz TMA-13 spacecraft, Sunday, Oct. 12, 2008 from the Baikonur Cosmodrome in Kazakhstan. The three crew members are scheduled to dock with the International Space Station on Oct. 14. Fincke and Lonchakov will spend six months on the station, while Garriott will return to Earth Oct. 24 with two of the Expedition 17 crew members currently on the International Space Station. Photo Credit: (NASA/Bill Ingalls)

  11. LAUNCH - APOLLO 9 - CAPE

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1969-03-03

    S69-25862 (3 March 1969) --- Framed by palm trees in the foreground, the Apollo 9 (Spacecraft 104/Lunar Module 3/ Saturn 504) space vehicle is launched from Pad A, Launch Complex 39, Kennedy Space Center (KSC) at 11 a.m. (EST), March 3, 1969. Aboard the spacecraft are astronauts James A. McDivitt, commander; David R. Scott, command module pilot; and Russell L. Schweickart, lunar module pilot. The Apollo 9 mission will evaluate spacecraft lunar module systems performance during manned Earth-orbital flight. Apollo 9 is the second manned Saturn V mission.

  12. APOLLO VII - LAUNCH - KSC

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1968-10-11

    S68-48662 (11 Oct. 1968) --- The Apollo 7/Saturn IB space vehicle is launched from the Kennedy Space Center's Launch Complex 34 at 11:03 a.m. (EDT), Oct. 11, 1968. Apollo 7 (Spacecraft 101/Saturn 205) is the first of several manned flights aimed at qualifying the spacecraft for the half-million mile round trip to the moon. Aboard the Apollo spacecraft are astronauts Walter M. Schirra Jr., commander; Donn F. Eisele, command module pilot; and Walter Cunningham, lunar module pilot. (This view is framed by palm trees on either side).

  13. NPP Satellite Launch

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2011-10-28

    The Satellite Operations Facility of the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) is seen here minutes before the launch of the National Polar-orbiting Operational Environmental Satellite System Preparatory Project (NPP) on Friday, Oct. 28, 2011 in Suitland, Md. NPP is a joint venture between NASA and NOAA, and is the nation's newest Earth-observing satellite, which will provide data on climate change science, allow for accurate weather forecasts and advance warning for severe weather. NPP was launched from Vandenberg Air Force Base in California. Photo Credit: (NASA/Carla Cioffi)

  14. NPP Satellite Launch

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2011-10-28

    Dr. Kathy Sullivan, center, Deputy Administrator of the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) and former NASA astronaut is interviewed by a local television network at NOAA's Satellite Operations Facility in Suitland, Md. after the successful launch of the National Polar-orbiting Operational Environmental Satellite System Preparatory Project (NPP) on Friday, Oct. 28, 2011. NPP is a joint venture between NASA and NOAA, and is the nation's newest Earth-observing satellite, which will provide data on climate change science, allow for accurate weather forecasts and advance warning for severe weather. NPP was launched from Vandenberg Air Force Base in California. Photo Credit: (NASA/Carla Cioffi)

  15. NPP Satellite Launch

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2011-10-28

    NASA Deputy Administrator Lori Garver, left, watches the launch of the National Polar-orbiting Operational Environmental Satellite System Preparatory Project (NPP) at the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) Satellite Operations Center on Friday, Oct. 28, 2011 in Suitland, Md. U.S Congresswoman Donna Edwards, D-Md., is seen next to Garver. NPP is a joint venture between NASA and NOAA, and is the nation's newest Earth-observing satellite, which will provide data on climate change science, allow for accurate weather forecasts and advance warning for severe weather. NPP was launched from Vandenberg Air Force Base in California. Photo Credit: (NASA/Carla Cioffi)

  16. Expedition 8 Launch Day

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2003-10-18

    With a throng of reporters looking on, the prime and backup crews for the Expedition 8 mission to the International Space Station and the prime and backup European Space Agency Astronauts receive final well-wishes from Russian and U.S. space officials at the Baikonur Cosmodrome in Kazakhstan, Saturday, Oct. 18, 2003, before heading to the launch pad. Expedition 8 Commander and NASA Science Officer Michael Foale, Expedition 8 Soyuz Commander Alexander Kaleri and ESA's Pedro Duque of Spain were launched on a Soyuz TMA-3 vehicle, arriving at the ISS on Oct. 20. Photo Credit (NASA/Bill Ingalls)

  17. LDSD Ready for Launch

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2015-06-05

    NASA's Low-Density Supersonic Decelerator (LDSD) hangs from a launch tower at U.S. Navy's Pacific Missile Range Facility in Kauai, Hawaii. The saucer-shaped vehicle will test two devices for landing heavy payloads on Mars: an inflatable donut-shaped device and a supersonic parachute. The launch tower helps link the vehicle to a balloon; once the balloon floats up, the vehicle is released from the tower and the balloon carries it to high altitudes. The vehicle's rocket takes it to even higher altitudes, to the top of the stratosphere, where the supersonic test begins. http://photojournal.jpl.nasa.gov/catalog/PIA19342

  18. STS-64 launch view

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1994-01-01

    With a crew of six NASA astronauts aboard, the Space Shuttle Discovery heads for its nineteenth Earth-orbital mission. Launch was delayed because of weather, but all systems were 'go,' and the spacecraft left the launch pad at 6:23 p.m. (EDT) on September 9, 1994. Onboard were astronauts Richard N. Richards, L. Blaine Hammond, Carl J. Meade, Mark C. Lee, Susan J. Helms, and Jerry M. Linenger (051-2); Making a bright reflection in nearby marsh waters, the Space Shuttle Discovery heads for its 19th mission in earth orbit (053).

  19. STS-64 launch view

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1994-01-01

    With a crew of six NASA astronauts aboard, the Space Shuttle Discovery heads for its nineteenth Earth-orbital mission. Launch was delayed because of weather, but all systems were 'go,' and the spacecraft left the launch pad at 6:23 p.m. (EDT) on September 9, 1994. Onboard were astronauts Richard N. Richards, L. Blaine Hammond, Carl J. Meade, Mark C. Lee, Susan J. Helms, and Jerry M. Linenger (051-2); Making a bright reflection in nearby marsh waters, the Space Shuttle Discovery heads for its 19th mission in earth orbit (053).

  20. Expedition 22 Launch Day

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2009-12-20

    Expedition 22 Flight Engineer Soichi Noguchi of Japan has his Russian Sokol suit prepared for launch by a technician while space agency photographers document the process at the Baikonur Cosmodrome in Baikonur, Kazakhstan, Sunday, Dec. 20, 2009. Soichi and fellow Expedition 22 crew members NASA Flight Engineer Timothy J. Creamer of the U.S., Soyuz Commander Oleg Kotov of Russia launched in their Soyuz TMA-17 rocket from the Baikonur Cosmodrome in Kazakhstan on Monday, Dec. 21, 2009. (Photo Credit: NASA/Bill Ingalls)

  1. Launch - STS-6 - KSC

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1983-04-06

    S83-30134 (7 April 1983) --- Flare from the first launch of the space shuttle Challenger is reflected in the Atlantic Ocean?s Cape Canaveral beach waters shortly after 1:30 p.m. (EST) on April 7, 1983. Only the tips of the orbiter?s wings are visible in this south looking view, as the manned portion of the launch cluster is obscured by its new lightweight external fuel tank (ET) and two solid rocket boosters (SRB). Onboard the spacecraft are astronauts Paul J. Weitz, Karol J. Bobko, Dr. F. Story Musgrave and Donald H. Peterson. Photo credit: NASA

  2. STS-56 Launch

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1993-01-01

    The second try works like a charm as the Space Shuttle Discovery lifts off from Launch Pad 39B on Mission STS-56 at 1:29:00 a.m., EDT, April 8. First attempt to launch Discovery on its 16th space voyage was halted at T-11 seconds on April 6. Aboard for the second Space Shuttle mission of 1993 are a crew of five and the Atmospheric Laboratory for Applications and Science 2 (ATLAS 2), the second in a series of missions to study the sun's energy output and Earth's middle atmosphere chemical makeup, and how these factors affect levels of ozone.

  3. 14 CFR 141.35 - Chief instructor qualifications.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... gliders, balloons, or airships, the chief instructor must meet the applicable requirements in paragraphs..., balloons or airships is only required to have 40 percent of the hours required in paragraphs (b) and (d)...

  4. 14 CFR 141.35 - Chief instructor qualifications.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... gliders, balloons, or airships, the chief instructor must meet the applicable requirements in paragraphs..., balloons or airships is only required to have 40 percent of the hours required in paragraphs (b) and (d)...

  5. 14 CFR 141.35 - Chief instructor qualifications.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... gliders, balloons, or airships, the chief instructor must meet the applicable requirements in paragraphs..., balloons or airships is only required to have 40 percent of the hours required in paragraphs (b) and (d)...

  6. 14 CFR 141.35 - Chief instructor qualifications.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... gliders, balloons, or airships, the chief instructor must meet the applicable requirements in paragraphs..., balloons or airships is only required to have 40 percent of the hours required in paragraphs (b) and (d)...

  7. 14 CFR 141.35 - Chief instructor qualifications.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... gliders, balloons, or airships, the chief instructor must meet the applicable requirements in paragraphs..., balloons or airships is only required to have 40 percent of the hours required in paragraphs (b) and (d)...

  8. Office of the Chief Financial Officer Annual Report 2009

    SciTech Connect

    Fernandez, Jeffrey

    2009-12-15

    Presented is the 2009 Chief Financial Officer's Annual Report. The data included in this report has been compiled from the Budget Office, the Controller, Procurement and Property Management and the Sponsored Projects Office.

  9. 70. CHIEF PETTY OFFICERS' GALLEY PORT LOOKING TO STARBOARD ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    70. CHIEF PETTY OFFICERS' GALLEY - PORT LOOKING TO STARBOARD SHOWING SERVING LINE, STEAM KETTLES, GRIDDLES, CUTTING TABLE, DISHWASHER, MIXING TABLE AND REACH-IN REFRIGERATOR. - U.S.S. HORNET, Puget Sound Naval Shipyard, Sinclair Inlet, Bremerton, Kitsap County, WA

  10. 4. View from chief clerk's office into clerk room. Vault ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    4. View from chief clerk's office into clerk room. Vault at center in background. View to south. - Duluth & Iron Range Rail Road Company Shops, Office, Southwest of downtown Two Harbors, northwest of Agate Bay, Two Harbors, Lake County, MN

  11. 71. CHIEF PETTY OFFICERS' LOUNGE AFT LOOKING FORWARD PORT ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    71. CHIEF PETTY OFFICERS' LOUNGE - AFT LOOKING FORWARD PORT TO STARBOARD SHOWING COFFEE MESS, ICE CREAM COOLER, ICE MACHINE AND SCUTTLEBUTT. - U.S.S. HORNET, Puget Sound Naval Shipyard, Sinclair Inlet, Bremerton, Kitsap County, WA

  12. 11 CFR 9428.6 - Chief state election official.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 11 CFR 9428.4(a)(2), requires the applicant's full social security number, the chief state election... Commission, in writing, within 30 days of any change to the state's voter eligibility requirements or other...

  13. 7 CFR 2.37 - Chief Information Officer.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... respect to information technology acquisition strategy and policy. (8) The Chief Information Officer is... management. (ii) Developing strategies and specific plans for hiring, training, and professional development... aspects of information technology, including feasibility studies; economic analyses; systems design...

  14. Interior, second floor, northeast corner, office of chief of optometry, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Interior, second floor, northeast corner, office of chief of optometry, looking south. - Fitzsimons General Hospital, Administration Building, Southeast Corner of West McAfee Avenue & South Eighth Street, Aurora, Adams County, CO

  15. NASA Launch Services Program Overview

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Higginbotham, Scott

    2016-01-01

    The National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) has need to procure a variety of launch vehicles and services for its unmanned spacecraft. The Launch Services Program (LSP) provides the Agency with a single focus for the acquisition and management of Expendable Launch Vehicle (ELV) launch services. This presentation will provide an overview of the LSP and its organization, approach, and activities.

  16. Voyager 1's Launch Vehicle

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1977-09-05

    The Titan/Centaur-6 launch vehicle was moved to Launch Complex 41 at Kennedy Space Center in Florida to complete checkout procedures in preparation for launch. The photo is dated January 1977. This launch vehicle carried Voyager 1 into space on September 5, 1977. https://photojournal.jpl.nasa.gov/catalog/PIA21739

  17. SPIDER Readied for Launch

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2015-01-22

    Prior to launch, the team laid out the parachute and hang lines in front of SPIDER, seen in the distance. The long-duration balloon that would carry SPIDER into the sky is attached to the end of the parachute shown here in the foreground. http://photojournal.jpl.nasa.gov/catalog/PIA19177

  18. NanoLaunch

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, Jonathan; Harris, Lawanna

    2015-01-01

    NASA's NanoLaunch effort will provide the framework to mature both Earth-to-orbit and on-orbit propulsion and avionics technologies while also providing affordable, dedicated access to low-Earth orbit for CubeSat-class payloads. The project will also serve as an early career personnel training opportunity with mentors to gain hands-on project experience.

  19. Expedition 23 Launch Day

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2010-04-01

    Expedition 23 Flight Engineer Tracy Caldwell Dyson performs the traditional door signing Friday, April 2, 2010 at the Cosmonaut Hotel in Baikonur, Kazakhstan. Caldwell Dyson was launched onboard the Soyuz rocket later that day with Expedition 23 Soyuz Commander Alexander Skvortsov and Flight Engineer Mikhail Kornienko on a mission to the International Space Station (ISS). Photo Credit: (NASA/Carla Cioffi)

  20. STS-120 launch

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2007-10-23

    STS120-S-025 (23 Oct. 2007) --- In the firing room at NASA's Kennedy Space Center, NASA Associate Administrator Chris Scolese and other managers watch the Space Shuttle Discovery launch of the STS-120 mission at 11:38 a.m. (EDT), Oct. 23, 2007. William Gerstenmaier is in right foreground. Photo credit: NASA/Bill Ingalls

  1. Expedition 8 Launch Briefing

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2003-10-12

    Backup Expedition 8 Commander Bill McArthur, left, and prime Expedition 8 Commander Michael Foale practice procedures with a satellite phone during final training at their crew quarters in Baikonur, Kazakhstan, Wednesday, Oct. 15, 2003, for launch on a Soyuz TMA-3 vehicle Oct. 18 to the International Space Station. Photo Credit (NASA/Bill Ingalls)

  2. Expedition 25 Launch

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2010-10-07

    Expedition 25 NASA Flight Engineer Scott Kelly of the U.S., left, Soyuz Commander Alexander Kaleri and Flight Engineer Oleg Skripochka, right, have their Russian Sokol suits prepared for launch by technicians at the Baikonur Cosmodrome in Kazakhstan, Friday, Oct. 8, 2010. (Photo Credit: NASA/Carla Cioffi)

  3. Expedition 25 Launch

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2010-10-07

    Expedition 25 crew members prepare to have their Russian Sokol Suits pressure checked at the Baikonur Cosmodrome in Kazakhstan on Friday, Oct. 8, 2010. Soyuz Commander Alexander Kaleri, NASA Flight Engineer Scott Kelly and Flight Engineer Oleg Skripochka launched in their Soyuz TMA-01M at 5:10 a.m. Friday morning. (Photo Credit: NASA/Carla Cioffi)

  4. Expedition 25 Launch

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2010-10-07

    Expedition 25 Soyuz Commander Alexander Kaleri awaits to have his Russian Sokol Suit pressure checked at the Baikonur Cosmodrome on Friday, Oct. 8, 2010 in Kazakhstan. Kaleri and fellow Expedition 25 crew members Flight Engineers Scott Kelly and Oleg Skripochka launched in their Soyuz TMA-01M at 5:10 a.m. Friday morning. (Photo Credit: NASA/Carla Cioffi)

  5. Expedition 25 Launch

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2010-10-07

    Expedition 25 Soyuz Commander Alexander Kaleri awaits to have his Russian Sokol Suit pressure checked at the Baikonur Cosmodrome on Friday, Oct. 8, 2010 in Baikonur, Kazakhstan. Kaleri and fellow Expedition 25 crew members Flight Engineers Scott Kelly and Oleg Skripochka launched in their Soyuz TMA-01M at 5:10 a.m. Friday morning. (Photo Credit: NASA/Carla Cioffi)

  6. Expedition 25 Launch

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2010-10-07

    Expedition 25 NASA Flight Engineer Scott Kelly of the U.S., left, and Soyuz Commander Alexander Kaleri have their Russian Sokol suits prepared for launch by technicians at the Baikonur Cosmodrome in Kazakhstan, Friday, Oct. 8, 2010. (Photo Credit: NASA/Carla Cioffi)

  7. Expedition 25 Launch

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2010-10-07

    Expedition 25 Flight Engineer Oleg Skripochka awaits to have his Russian Sokol Suit pressure checked at the Baikonur Cosmodrome on Friday, Oct. 8, 2010 in Kazakhstan. Skripochka, Soyuz Commander Alexander Kaleri and NASA Flight Engineer Scott Kelly launched in their Soyuz TMA-01M at 5:10 a.m. Friday morning. (Photo Credit: NASA/Carla Cioffi)

  8. Expedition 22 Launch Day

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2009-12-20

    Expedition 22 Soyuz Commander Oleg Kotov of Russia smiles for photographers after performing the traditional door signing at the Cosmonaut Hotel in Baikonur, Kazakhstan before departing with fellow crew members, NASA Flight Engineer Timothy J. Creamer of the U.S., and Flight Engineer Soichi Noguchi of Japan to suit up for their launch, Sunday, Dec. 20, 2009. Photo Credit: (NASA/Bill Ingalls)

  9. Expedition 22 Launch Day

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2009-12-20

    Expedition 22 Flight Engineer Soichi Noguchi of Japan smiles for photographers after performing the traditional door signing at the Cosmonaut Hotel in Baikonur, Kazakhstan before departing with fellow crew members, Soyuz Commander Oleg Kotov of Russia, and NASA Flight Engineer Timothy J. Creamer of the U.S. to suit up for their launch, Sunday, Dec. 20, 2009. Photo Credit: (NASA/Bill Ingalls)

  10. Expedition 22 Launch Day

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2009-12-20

    Expedition 22 NASA Flight Engineer Timothy J. Creamer of the U.S. smiles for photographers after performing the traditional door signing at the Cosmonaut Hotel in Baikonur, Kazakhstan before departing with fellow crew members, Soyuz Commander Oleg Kotov of Russia, and Flight Engineer Soichi Noguchi of Japan to suit up for their launch, Sunday, Dec. 20, 2009. Photo Credit: (NASA/Bill Ingalls)

  11. The Personnel Launch System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Piland, William M.; Talay, Theodore A.; Stone, Howard W.

    1990-01-01

    NASA has begun to study candidate vehicles for manned access to space in support of the Space Station or other future missions requiring on-demand transportation of people to and from earth orbit. One such system, which would be used to complement the present Shuttle or an upgraded version, is the Personnel Launch System (PLS), which is envisioned as a reusable priority vehicle to place people and small payloads into orbit using an experimental launch vehicle. The design of the PLS is based on a Space Station crew changeout requirement whereby eight passengers and two crew members are flown to the station and a like number are returned within a 72 hour mission duration. Experimental and computational aerothermodynamic heating studies have been conducted using a new two-color thermographic technique that involved coating the model with a phosphor that radiates at varying color intensities as a function of temperature when illuminated with UV light. A full-scale model, the HL-20, has been produced and will be used for man-machine research. Three launch vehicle concepts are being considered, a Titan IV, the Advanced Launch System, and a Shuttle equipped with liquid rocket boosters.

  12. Expedition 8 Launch Day

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2003-10-18

    Expedition 8 Commander and NASA Science Officer Michael Foale smiles for the camera during the short bus ride to the launch pad for liftoff in a Soyuz TMA-3 vehicle to the International Space Station, Saturday, Oct. 18, 2003, at the Baikonur Cosmodrome, Kazakhstan. Photo Credit (NASA/Bill Ingalls)

  13. Expedition 8 Launch Briefing

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2003-10-12

    European Space Agency astronaut Pedro Duque of Spain listens to a briefing on mission activities from a Russian trainer at his crew quarters in Baikonur, Kazakhstan, Wednesday, Oct. 15, 2003 as he prepares for his launch to the International Space Station Oct. 18 in a Soyuz TMA-3 vehicle. Photo Credit (NASA/Bill Ingalls)

  14. AST Launch Vehicle Acoustics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Houston, Janice; Counter, D.; Giacomoni, D.

    2015-01-01

    The liftoff phase induces acoustic loading over a broad frequency range for a launch vehicle. These external acoustic environments are then used in the prediction of internal vibration responses of the vehicle and components which result in the qualification levels. Thus, predicting these liftoff acoustic (LOA) environments is critical to the design requirements of any launch vehicle. If there is a significant amount of uncertainty in the predictions or if acoustic mitigation options must be implemented, a subscale acoustic test is a feasible pre-launch test option to verify the LOA environments. The NASA Space Launch System (SLS) program initiated the Scale Model Acoustic Test (SMAT) to verify the predicted SLS LOA environments and to determine the acoustic reduction with an above deck water sound suppression system. The SMAT was conducted at Marshall Space Flight Center and the test article included a 5% scale SLS vehicle model, tower and Mobile Launcher. Acoustic and pressure data were measured by approximately 250 instruments. The SMAT liftoff acoustic results are presented, findings are discussed and a comparison is shown to the Ares I Scale Model Acoustic Test (ASMAT) results.

  15. Successful launch of SOHO

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1995-12-01

    "Understanding how the Sun behaves is of crucial importance to all of us on Earth. It affects our everyday lives" said Roger Bonnet, Director of Science at ESA, who witnessed SOHO's spectacular nighttime launch from Cape Canaveral. "When SOHO begins work in four months time, scientists will, for the first time, be able to study this star 24 hours a day, 365 days a year". The 12 instruments on SOHO will probe the Sun inside out, from the star's very centre to the solar wind that blasts its way through the solar system. It will even listen to sounds, like musical notes, deep within the star by recording their vibrations when they reach the surface. SOHO was launched from Cape Canaveral Air Station, Florida, atop an Atlas IIAS rocket, at 09:08 CET on Saturday 2 December 1995. The 1.6 tonne observatory was released into its transfer orbit from the rocket's Centaur upper stage about two hours after launch. It will take four months for the satellite to reach its final position, a unique vantage point, located 1.5 million kilometres from Earth, where the gravitational pull of the Earth and Sun are equal. From here, the Lagrange point, SOHO will have an unobstructed view of the Sun all year round. SOHO's launch was delayed from 23 November because a flaw was discovered in a precision regulator, which throttles the power of the booster engine on the Atlas rocket. The system was replaced and retested before the launch. SOHO is a project of international cooperation between ESA and NASA. The spacecraft was designed and built in Europe, NASA provided the launch and will operate the satellite from its Goddard Space Flight Center, Maryland. European scientists provided eight of the observatory's instruments and US scientists a further three. The spacecraft is part of the international Solar-Terrestrial Science Programme, the next member of which is Cluster, a flotilla of four spacecraft that will study how the Sun affects Earth and surrounding space. Cluster is scheduled for

  16. NLS Advanced Development - Launch operations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parrish, Carrie L.

    1992-01-01

    Attention is given to Autonomous Launch Operations (ALO), one of a number of the USAF's National Launch System (NLS) Launch Operations projects whose aim is to research, develop and apply new technologies and more efficient approaches toward launch operations. The goal of the ALO project is to develop generic control and monitor software for launch operation subsystems. The result is enhanced reliability of system design, and reduced software development and retention of expert knowledge throughout the life-cycle of the system.

  17. Contracting and launching small satellites with the Rockot launch vehicle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kinnersley, M.; Zorina, A.; Leclerc, J.

    2004-11-01

    Arranging secondary payload 'rides' with launch vehicles can be a lengthy and often frustrating process, especially with a shared or cluster launch with a multitude of customers that need to be coordinated. Eurockot's point of view on what can be done to improve this process is given. The objective is to initiate discussions within the community on how to improve access to launch services whilst mutually benefiting both the provider and end user. Eurockot is one of the most active launch service companies in the world for providing small satellite launch services. In 2003, Eurockot placed nine payloads into three different orbits during one launch, including the first Cubesats to be orbited. In particular the results of the most recent launches will be reported. The flexibility and capabilities of the Rockot launch vehicle for launching small satellites especially in the secondary or shared payloads sector will also be shown.

  18. 1. Photocopy of photograph showing unidentified launch area with personnel ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    1. Photocopy of photograph showing unidentified launch area with personnel door, decontamination shower and Ajax missiles from photo archives at U. S. Institute for Military History, Carlisle Barracks, Carlisle, PA, no date - NIKE Missile Battery PR-79, East Windsor Road south of State Route 101, Foster, Providence County, RI

  19. 7. Photocopy of photograph showing four Ajax missiles in launch ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    7. Photocopy of photograph showing four Ajax missiles in launch position from ARADCOM Argus pg. 14, from Institute for Military History, Carlisle Barracks, Carlisle, PA, October 1, 1963 - NIKE Missile Battery PR-79, East Windsor Road south of State Route 101, Foster, Providence County, RI

  20. Cassini launch contingency effort

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, Yale; O'Neil, John M.; McGrath, Brian E.; Heyler, Gene A.; Brenza, Pete T.

    2002-01-01

    On 15 October 1997 at 4:43 AM EDT, the Cassini spacecraft was successfully launched on a Titan IVB/Centaur on a mission to explore the Saturnian system. It carried three Radioisotope Thermoelectric Generators (RTGs) and 117 Light Weight Radioisotope Heater Units (LWRHUs). As part of the joint National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA)/U.S. Department of Energy (DoE) safety effort, a contingency plan was prepared to address the unlikely events of an accidental suborbital reentry or out-of-orbital reentry. The objective of the plan was to develop procedures to predict, within hours, the Earth impact footprints (EIFs) for the nuclear heat sources released during the atmospheric reentry. The footprint predictions would be used in subsequent notification and recovery efforts. As part of a multi-agency team, The Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory (JHU/APL) had the responsibility to predict the EIFs of the heat sources after a reentry, given the heat sources' release conditions from the main spacecraft. (No ablation burn-through of the heat sources' aeroshells was expected, as a result of earlier testing.) JHU/APL's other role was to predict the time of reentry from a potential orbital decay. The tools used were a three degree-of-freedom trajectory code, a database of aerodynamic coefficients for the heat sources, secure links to obtain tracking data, and a high fidelity special perturbation orbit integrator code to predict time of spacecraft reentry from orbital decay. In the weeks and days prior to launch, all the codes and procedures were exercised. Notional EIFs were derived from hypothetical reentry conditions. EIFs predicted by JHU/APL were compared to those by JPL and US SPACECOM, and were found to be in good agreement. The reentry time from orbital decay for a booster rocket for the Russian Progress M-36 freighter, a cargo ship for the Mir space station, was predicted to within 5 minutes more than two hours before reentry. For the

  1. A perfect launch

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    Billows of smoke and steam spread across Launch Pad 39A as Space Shuttle Discovery lifts off on mission STS-92 to the International Space Station. The perfect on-time liftoff occurred at 7:17 p.m. EDT, sending a crew of seven on the 100th launch in the history of the Shuttle program. Discovery carries a payload that includes the Integrated Truss Structure Z-1, first of 10 trusses that will form the backbone of the Space Station, and the third Pressurized Mating Adapter that will provide a Shuttle docking port for solar array installation on the sixth Station flight and Lab installation on the seventh Station flight. Discovery's landing is expected Oct. 22 at 2:10 p.m. EDT.

  2. STS-133 launch

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2011-02-24

    STS133-S-066 (24 Feb. 2011) --- In Firing Room 4 of the Launch Control Center at NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida, Shuttle Launch Director Mike Leinbach watches space shuttle Discovery head toward Earth orbit on the STS-133 mission to the International Space Station. Discovery and its six-member crew are on a mission to deliver the Permanent Multipurpose Module, packed with supplies and critical spare parts, as well as Robonaut 2, the dexterous humanoid astronaut helper, to the orbiting outpost. Discovery is making its 39th mission and is scheduled to be retired following STS-133. This is the 133rd Space Shuttle Program mission and the 35th shuttle voyage to the space station. Photo credit: NASA or National Aeronautics and Space Administration

  3. LAUNCH - STS-7 - KSC

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1983-06-18

    S83-35620 (18 June 1983) --- The space shuttle Challenger, its two solid rocket boosters and an external fuel tank carry the five-member STS-7 astronaut crew toward a six-day mission in Earth orbit. This high-angle view of the liftoff, a lengthy stretch of Florida Atlantic coastline and a number of large cumulus clouds was photographed with a handheld 70mm camera by astronaut John W. Young. Young usually pilots the Shuttle Training Aircraft (STA) for weather monitoring at launch and landing sites for STS missions. The Challenger?s second launch occurred at 7:33 a.m. (EDT) on 18 June 1983. Photo credit: NASA

  4. STS-121 Launch

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2006-01-01

    Space Shuttle Discovery and its seven-member crew launched at 2:38 p.m. (EDT) to begin the two-day journey to the International Space Station (ISS) on the historic Return to Flight STS-121 mission. The shuttle made history as it was the first human-occupying spacecraft to launch on Independence Day. During its 12-day mission, this utilization and logistics flight delivered a multipurpose logistics module (MPLM) to the ISS with several thousand pounds of new supplies and experiments. In addition, some new orbital replacement units (ORUs) were delivered and stowed externally on the ISS on a special pallet. These ORUs are spares for critical machinery located on the outside of the ISS. During this mission the crew also carried out testing of Shuttle inspection and repair hardware, as well as evaluated operational techniques and concepts for conducting on-orbit inspection and repair.

  5. STS-116 Launch

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2006-12-09

    STS116-S-021 (9 Dec. 2006) --- Against a black night sky, the Space Shuttle Discovery and its seven-member crew head toward Earth-orbit and a scheduled link-up with the International Space Station. Liftoff from the Kennedy Space Center's launch pad 39B occurred at 8:47 p.m. (EST) on Dec. 9, 2006 in what was the first evening shuttle launch since 2002. The STS-116 crew will link up with the station on Monday, Dec. 11, to begin a complex, week-long stay that will rewire the outpost and increase its power supply. During three spacewalks and intricate choreography with ground controllers, the astronauts will bring electrical power on line generated by a giant solar array wing delivered to the station in September.

  6. STS-116 Launch

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2006-12-09

    STS116-S-009 (9 Dec. 2006) --- Against a black night sky, the Space Shuttle Discovery and its seven-member crew head toward Earth-orbit and a scheduled link-up with the International Space Station. Liftoff from the Kennedy Space Center's launch pad 39B occurred at 8:47 p.m. (EST) on Dec. 9, 2006 in what was the first evening shuttle launch since 2002. The STS-116 crew will link up with the station on Monday, Dec. 11, to begin a complex, week-long stay that will rewire the outpost and increase its power supply. During three spacewalks and intricate choreography with ground controllers, the astronauts will bring electrical power on line generated by a giant solar array wing delivered to the station in September.

  7. STS-116 Launch

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2006-12-09

    STS116-S-008 (9 Dec. 2006) --- Against a black night sky, the Space Shuttle Discovery and its seven-member crew head toward Earth-orbit and a scheduled link-up with the International Space Station. Liftoff from the Kennedy Space Center's launch pad 39B occurred at 8:47 p.m. (EST) on Dec. 9, 2006 in what was the first evening shuttle launch since 2002. The STS-116 crew will link up with the station on Monday, Dec. 11, to begin a complex, week-long stay that will rewire the outpost and increase its power supply. During three spacewalks and intricate choreography with ground controllers, the astronauts will bring electrical power on line generated by a giant solar array wing delivered to the station in September.

  8. STS-116 Launch

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2006-12-09

    STS116-S-011 (9 Dec. 2006) --- Against a black night sky, the Space Shuttle Discovery and its seven-member crew head toward Earth-orbit and a scheduled link-up with the International Space Station. Liftoff from the Kennedy Space Center's launch pad 39B occurred at 8:47 p.m. (EST) on Dec. 9, 2006 in what was the first evening shuttle launch since 2002. The STS-116 crew will link up with the station on Monday, Dec. 11, to begin a complex, week-long stay that will rewire the outpost and increase its power supply. During three spacewalks and intricate choreography with ground controllers, the astronauts will bring electrical power on line generated by a giant solar array wing delivered to the station in September.

  9. STS-116 Launch

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2006-12-09

    STS116-S-016 (9 Dec. 2006) --- Against a black night sky, the Space Shuttle Discovery and its seven-member crew head toward Earth-orbit and a scheduled link-up with the International Space Station. Liftoff from the Kennedy Space Center's launch pad 39B occurred at 8:47 p.m. (EST) on Dec. 9, 2006 in what was the first evening shuttle launch since 2002. The STS-116 crew will link up with the station on Monday, Dec. 11, to begin a complex, week-long stay that will rewire the outpost and increase its power supply. During three spacewalks and intricate choreography with ground controllers, the astronauts will bring electrical power on line generated by a giant solar array wing delivered to the station in September.

  10. STS-116 Launch

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2006-12-09

    STS116-S-014 (9 Dec. 2006) --- Against a black night sky, the Space Shuttle Discovery and its seven-member crew head toward Earth-orbit and a scheduled link-up with the International Space Station. Liftoff from the Kennedy Space Center's launch pad 39B occurred at 8:47 p.m. (EST) on Dec. 9, 2006 in what was the first evening shuttle launch since 2002. The STS-116 crew will link up with the station on Monday, Dec. 11, to begin a complex, week-long stay that will rewire the outpost and increase its power supply. During three spacewalks and intricate choreography with ground controllers, the astronauts will bring electrical power on line generated by a giant solar array wing delivered to the station in September.

  11. STS-116 Launch

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2006-12-09

    STS116-S-018 (9 Dec. 2006) --- Against a black night sky, the Space Shuttle Discovery and its seven-member crew head toward Earth-orbit and a scheduled link-up with the International Space Station. Liftoff from the Kennedy Space Center's launch pad 39B occurred at 8:47 p.m. (EST) on Dec. 9, 2006 in what was the first evening shuttle launch since 2002. The STS-116 crew will link up with the station on Monday, Dec. 11, to begin a complex, week-long stay that will rewire the outpost and increase its power supply. During three spacewalks and intricate choreography with ground controllers, the astronauts will bring electrical power on line generated by a giant solar array wing delivered to the station in September.

  12. STS-116 Launch

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2006-12-09

    STS116-S-010 (9 Dec. 2006) --- Against a black night sky, the Space Shuttle Discovery and its seven-member crew head toward Earth-orbit and a scheduled link-up with the International Space Station. Liftoff from the Kennedy Space Center's launch pad 39B occurred at 8:47 p.m. (EST) on Dec. 9, 2006 in what was the first evening shuttle launch since 2002. The STS-116 crew will link up with the station on Monday, Dec. 11, to begin a complex, week-long stay that will rewire the outpost and increase its power supply. During three spacewalks and intricate choreography with ground controllers, the astronauts will bring electrical power on line generated by a giant solar array wing delivered to the station in September.

  13. Expedition 11 Launch Day

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2005-04-15

    Unidentified family members of NASA astronaut John Phillips waves offers up best wishes for a safe mission and a happy birthday prior to launch, Friday, April 15, 2005, aboard the Soyuz TMA-6 spacecraft from the Baikonur Cosmodrome in Kazakhstan for a two-day trip to the International Space Station where he will spend six months living in space. Photo Credit: (NASA/Bill Ingalls)

  14. Space Shuttle Discovery Launch

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2011-02-24

    NASA Administrator Charles Bolden and other NASA management watch the launch of space shuttle Discovery (STS-133) from the firing room at Kennedy Space Center, Thursday, Feb. 24, 2011, in Cape Canaveral, Fla. Discovery, on its 39th and final flight, is carrying the Italian-built Permanent Multipurpose Module (PMM), Express Logistics Carrier 4 (ELC4) and Robonaut 2, the first humanoid robot in space to the International Space Station. Photo Credit: (NASA/Bill Ingalls)

  15. Space Shuttle Discovery Launch

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2011-02-24

    NASA management watch the launch of space shuttle Discovery (STS-133) from the firing room at Kennedy Space Center, Thursday, Feb. 24, 2011, in Cape Canaveral, Fla. Discovery, on its 39th and final flight, is carrying the Italian-built Permanent Multipurpose Module (PMM), Express Logistics Carrier 4 (ELC4) and Robonaut 2, the first humanoid robot in space to the International Space Station. Photo Credit: (NASA/Bill Ingalls)

  16. Expendable launch vehicle propulsion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fuller, Paul N.

    1991-01-01

    The current status is reviewed of the U.S. Expendable Launch Vehicle (ELV) fleet, the international competition, and the propulsion technology of both domestic and foreign ELVs. The ELV propulsion technology areas where research, development, and demonstration are most needed are identified. These propulsion technology recommendations are based on the work performed by the Commercial Space Transportation Advisory Committee (COMSTAC), an industry panel established by the Dept. of Transportation.

  17. Launch of Zoological Letters.

    PubMed

    Fukatsu, Takema; Kuratani, Shigeru

    2016-02-01

    A new open-access journal, Zoological Letters, was launched as a sister journal to Zoological Science, in January 2015. The new journal aims at publishing topical papers of high quality from a wide range of basic zoological research fields. This review highlights the notable reviews and research articles that have been published in the first year of Zoological Letters, providing an overview on the current achievements and future directions of the journal.

  18. Expedition 22 Launch Day

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2009-12-21

    Expedition 22 NASA Flight Engineer Timothy J. Creamer of the U.S. prepares to have his Russian Sokol suit pressure checked at the Baikonur Cosmodrome in Baikonur, Kazakhstan, Monday, Dec. 21, 2009. Creamer and fellow Expedition 22 crew members, Soyuz Commander Oleg Kotov of Russia, and Flight Engineer Soichi Noguchi of Japan launched in their Soyuz TMA-17 rocket from the Baikonur Cosmodrome in Kazakhstan on Monday, Dec. 21, 2009. (Photo Credit: NASA/Bill Ingalls)

  19. Expedition 24 Launch Day

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2010-06-14

    Expedition 24 Flight Engineer Doug Wheelock has his Russian Sokol suit pressure checked at the Baikonur Cosmodrome in Baikonur, Kazakhstan, Tuesday, June 15, 2010. Wheelock and fellow Expedition 24 crew members Flight Engineer Shannon Walker and Soyuz Commander Fyodor Yurchikhin launched in their Soyuz TMA-19 rocket from the Baikonur Cosmodrome in Kazakhstan on Wednesday, June 16, 2010 at 3:35 a.m. Kazakhstan time. (Photo Credit: NASA/Carla Cioffi)

  20. Expedition 23 Launch Day

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2010-04-01

    Expedition 23 NASA Flight Engineer Tracy Caldwell Dyson of the U.S. prepares to have her Russian Sokol suit pressure checked at the Baikonur Cosmodrome in Baikonur, Kazakhstan, Friday, April 2, 2010. Caldwell Dyson and fellow Expedition 23 crewmembers Soyuz Commander Alexander Skvortsov and Flight Engineer Mikhail Kornienko of Russia launched in their Soyuz TMA-18 rocket from the Baikonur Cosmodrome in Kazakhstan on Friday, April 2, 2010. Photo Credit: (NASA/Carla Cioffi)

  1. Expedition 22 Launch Day

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2009-12-21

    Expedition 22 NASA Flight Engineer Timothy J. Creamer of the U.S. waves after having his Russian Sokol suit pressure checked at the Baikonur Cosmodrome in Baikonur, Kazakhstan, Monday, Dec. 21, 2009. Creamer and fellow Expedition 22 crew members, Soyuz Commander Oleg Kotov of Russia, and Flight Engineer Soichi Noguchi of Japan launched in their Soyuz TMA-17 rocket from the Baikonur Cosmodrome in Kazakhstan on Monday, Dec. 21, 2009. (Photo Credit: NASA/Bill Ingalls)

  2. Expedition 22 Launch Day

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2009-12-21

    Expedition 22 NASA Flight Engineer Timothy J. Creamer of the U.S. has his Russian Sokol suit pressure checked at the Baikonur Cosmodrome in Baikonur, Kazakhstan, Monday, Dec. 21, 2009. Creamer and fellow Expedition 22 crew members, Soyuz Commander Oleg Kotov of Russia, and Flight Engineer Soichi Noguchi of Japan launched in their Soyuz TMA-17 rocket from the Baikonur Cosmodrome in Kazakhstan on Monday, Dec. 21, 2009. (Photo Credit: NASA/Bill Ingalls)

  3. Expedition 23 Launch Day

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2010-04-01

    Expedition 23 Soyuz Commander Alexander Skvortsov has his Russian Sokol suit pressure checked at the Baikonur Cosmodrome in Baikonur, Kazakhstan, Friday, April 2, 2010. Skvortsov and fellow Expedition 23 crew members Flight Engineer Mikhail Kornienko of Russia and NASA Flight Engineer Tracy Caldwell Dyson launched in their Soyuz TMA-18 rocket from the Baikonur Cosmodrome in Kazakhstan on Friday, April 2, 2010. Photo Credit: (NASA/Carla Cioffi)

  4. Expedition 23 Launch Day

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2010-04-01

    Expedition 23 Flight Engineer Mikhail Kornienko of Russia prepares to have his Russian Sokol suit pressure checked at the Baikonur Cosmodrome in Baikonur, Kazakhstan, Friday, April 2, 2010. Kornienko and fellow Expedition 23 crewmembers Soyuz Commander Alexander Skvortsov and NASA Flight Engineer Tracy Caldwell Dyson launched in their Soyuz TMA-18 rocket from the Baikonur Cosmodrome in Kazakhstan on Friday, April 2, 2010. Photo Credit: (NASA/Carla Cioffi)

  5. Expedition 24 Launch Day

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2010-06-14

    Expedition 24 Flight Engineer Shannon Walker has her Russian Sokol suit pressure checked at the Baikonur Cosmodrome in Baikonur, Kazakhstan, Tuesday, June 15, 2010. Walker and fellow Expedition 24 crew members Flight Engineers Doug Wheelock and Soyuz Commander Fyodor Yurchikhin launched in their Soyuz TMA-19 rocket from the Baikonur Cosmodrome in Kazakhstan on Wednesday, June 16, 2010 at 3:35 a.m. Kazakhstan time. (Photo Credit: NASA/Carla Cioffi)

  6. Expedition 23 Launch Day

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2010-04-01

    Expedition 23 Flight Engineer Mikhail Kornienko of Russia has his Russian Sokol suit pressure checked at the Baikonur Cosmodrome in Baikonur, Kazakhstan, Friday, April 2, 2010. Kornienko and fellow Expedition 23 crewmembers Soyuz Commander Alexander Skvortsov and NASA Flight Engineer Tracy Caldwell Dyson launched in their Soyuz TMA-18 rocket from the Baikonur Cosmodrome in Kazakhstan on Friday, April 2, 2010. Photo Credit: (NASA/Bill Ingalls)

  7. Expedition 19 Launch Day

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2009-03-25

    The prime and backup crew buses drive under police escort to building 254 of the Baikonur Cosmodrome where Expedition 19 Commander Gennady I. Padalka, Flight Engineer Michael R. Barratt and Spaceflight Participant Charles Simonyi will don their Russian Sokol suits in preparation for their Soyuz launch to the International Space Station on Thursday, March 26, 2009 in Baikonur, Kazakhstan. (Photo Credit: NASA/Bill Ingalls)

  8. Space Probe Launch

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1970-01-01

    Managed by Marshall Space Flight Center, the Space Tug was a reusable multipurpose space vehicle designed to transport payloads to different orbital inclinations. Utilizing mission-specific combinations of its three primary modules (crew, propulsion, and cargo) and a variety of supplementary kits, the Space Tug was capable of numerous space applications. This 1970 artist's concept depicts the Tug's propulsion module launching a space probe into lunar orbit.

  9. Space Shuttle Endeavour launch

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1992-01-01

    A smooth countdown culminated in a picture-perfect launch as the Space Shuttle Endeavour (STS-47) climbed skyward atop a ladder of billowing smoke. Primary payload for the plarned seven-day flight was Spacelab-J science laboratory. The second flight of Endeavour marks a number of historic firsts: the first space flight of an African-American woman, the first Japanese citizen to fly on a Space Shuttle, and the first married couple to fly in space.

  10. Expedition 22 Launch Day

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2009-12-21

    Expedition 22 Soyuz Commander Oleg Kotov of Russia, bottom, NASA Flight Engineer Timothy J. Creamer of the U.S., center, and Flight Engineer Soichi Noguchi of Japan wave farewell from the bottom of the soyuz rocket at the Baikonur Cosmodrome in Baikonur, Kazakhstan, Monday, Dec. 21, 2009. Kotov, Creamer and Noguchi launched in their Soyuz TMA-17 rocket from the Baikonur Cosmodrome in Kazakhstan on Monday, Dec. 21, 2009. (Photo Credit: NASA/Bill Ingalls)

  11. Expedition 22 Launch Day

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2009-12-21

    The Soyuz TMA-17 rocket is seen moments after Expedition 22 Soyuz Commander Oleg Kotov of Russia, NASA Flight Engineer Timothy J. Creamer of the U.S., and Flight Engineer Soichi Noguchi of Japan boarded the spacecraft at the Baikonur Cosmodrome in Kazakhstan on Monday, Dec. 21, 2009. Kotov, Creamer and Noguchi launched in their Soyuz TMA-17 rocket from the Baikonur Cosmodrome in Kazakhstan on Monday, Dec. 21, 2009. (Photo Credit: NASA/Bill Ingalls)

  12. Expedition 22 Launch Day

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2009-12-20

    Expedition 22 Flight Engineer Soichi Noguchi of Japan prepares to have his Russian Sokol suit pressure checked at the Baikonur Cosmodrome in Baikonur, Kazakhstan, Sunday, Dec. 20, 2009. Soichi and fellow Expedition 22 crew members NASA Flight Engineer Timothy J. Creamer of the U.S., Soyuz Commander Oleg Kotov of Russia launched in their Soyuz TMA-17 rocket from the Baikonur Cosmodrome in Kazakhstan on Monday, Dec. 21, 2009. (Photo Credit: NASA/Bill Ingalls)

  13. Expedition 22 Launch Day

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2009-12-21

    The Soyuz TMA-17 rocket is seen several hours before its launch from the Baikonur Cosmodrome in Kazakhstan on Monday, Dec. 21, 2009. The Soyuz rocket will carry Expedition 22 NASA Flight Engineer Timothy J. Creamer of the U.S., Soyuz Commander Oleg Kotov of Russia and Flight Engineer Soichi Noguchi of Japan to the International Space Station. (Photo Credit: NASA/Bill Ingalls)

  14. Expedition 22 Launch Day

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2009-12-20

    Expedition 22 Soyuz Commander Oleg Kotov of Russia, seated left, dons his Russian Sokol as Flight Engineer Soichi Noguchi of Japan, seated right, looks on at the Baikonur Cosmodrome in Baikonur, Kazakhstan, Sunday, Dec. 20, 2009. Kotov, Noguchi and NASA Flight Engineer Timothy J. Creamer of the U.S. launched in their Soyuz TMA-17 rocket from the Baikonur Cosmodrome in Kazakhstan on Monday, Dec. 21, 2009. (Photo Credit: NASA/Bill Ingalls)

  15. Reflexive Launch Strategies.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1980-06-01

    ballistic-missile submarines, would cause 16.3 million fatalities.... 15 The problem of analyzing the potential vulnerability of U.S. land-based ICBMs...problems, are the main deficiencies of the system. Among the princi- pal advantages of standard ICBMs are autonomy after launch and relative simplicity...have looked at this problem agree that once we make it an accepted or standard procedure to fire ICBMs on warning, it begins to get very easy to write

  16. Space Logistics: Launch Capabilities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Furnas, Randall B.

    1989-01-01

    The current maximum launch capability for the United States are shown. The predicted Earth-to-orbit requirements for the United States are presented. Contrasting the two indicates the strong National need for a major increase in Earth-to-orbit lift capability. Approximate weights for planned payloads are shown. NASA is studying the following options to meet the need for a new heavy-lift capability by mid to late 1990's: (1) Shuttle-C for near term (include growth versions); and (2) the Advanced Lauching System (ALS) for the long term. The current baseline two-engine Shuttle-C has a 15 x 82 ft payload bay and an expected lift capability of 82,000 lb to Low Earth Orbit. Several options are being considered which have expanded diameter payload bays. A three-engine Shuttle-C with an expected lift of 145,000 lb to LEO is being evaluated as well. The Advanced Launch System (ALS) is a potential joint development between the Air Force and NASA. This program is focused toward long-term launch requirements, specifically beyond the year 2000. The basic approach is to develop a family of vehicles with the same high reliability as the Shuttle system, yet offering a much greater lift capability at a greatly reduced cost (per pound of payload). The ALS unmanned family of vehicles will provide a low end lift capability equivalent to Titan IV, and a high end lift capability greater than the Soviet Energia if requirements for such a high-end vehicle are defined.In conclusion, the planning of the next generation space telescope should not be constrained to the current launch vehicles. New vehicle designs will be driven by the needs of anticipated heavy users.

  17. Expedition 22 Launch Day

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2009-12-20

    Expedition 22 Soyuz Commander Oleg Kotov of Russia listens to an audio check on his headset after donning his Russian Sokol suit at the Baikonur Cosmodrome in Baikonur, Kazakhstan, Sunday, Dec. 20, 2009. Kotov and fellow Expedition 22 crew members, NASA Flight Engineer Timothy J. Creamer of the U.S., and Flight Engineer Soichi Noguchi of Japan launched in their Soyuz TMA-17 rocket from the Baikonur Cosmodrome in Kazakhstan on Monday, Dec. 21, 2009. (Photo Credit: NASA/Bill Ingalls)

  18. Expedition 8 Launch Day

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2003-10-18

    Expedition 8 Soyuz Commander Alexander Kaleri, left foreground, European Space Agency astronaut Pedro Duque of Spain and Expedition 8 Commander and NASA Science Officer Michael Foale walk to a bus at the Baikonur Cosmodrome in Kazakhstan, Saturday, Oct. 18, 2003, for transportation to the launch pad to liftoff in a Soyuz TMA-3 vehicle to the International Space Station. The trio arrived at the ISS Oct. 20. Photo Credit (NASA/Bill Ingalls)

  19. Expedition 8 Launch Day

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2003-10-18

    Expedition 8 Soyuz Commander Alexander Kaleri, left, European Space Agency astronaut Pedro Duque of Spain and Expedition 8 Commander and NASA Science Officer Michael Foale, right, prepare to board a bus at the Baikonur Cosmodrome in Kazakhstan, Saturday, Oct. 18, 2003, for transportation to the launch pad to liftoff in a Soyuz TMA-3 vehicle to the International Space Station. The trio arrived at the ISS Oct. 20. Photo Credit (NASA/Bill Ingalls)

  20. Expedition 8 Launch Day

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2003-10-18

    European Space Agency astronaut Pedro Duque of Spain, bottom, Expedition 8 Soyuz Commander Alexander Kaleri, top and Expedition 8 Commander and NASA Science Officer Michael Foale, receive final well wishes from Russian and U.S. officials at the base of the Soyuz rocket at the Baikonur Cosmodrome in Kazakhstan, Saturday, Oct. 18, 2003. The trio were launched on a Soyuz TMA-3 vehicle to the International Space Station, arriving on Oct. 20. Photo Credit (NASA/Bill Ingalls)

  1. Expedition 8 Launch Briefing

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2003-10-12

    Expedition 8 Commander and NASA Science Officer Michael Foale talks to a colleague on his cell phone from his crew quarters at the Cosmonaut Hotel in Baikonur, Kazakhstan, Wednesday, Oct. 15, 2003. Foale along with Expedition 8 Soyuz Commander Alexander Kaleri and European Space Agency astronaut Pedro Duuque of Spain, launched on a Soyuz TMA-3 vehicle to the International Space Station. Photo Credit (NASA/Bill Ingalls)

  2. Space Logistics: Launch Capabilities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Furnas, Randall B.

    1989-01-01

    The current maximum launch capability for the United States are shown. The predicted Earth-to-orbit requirements for the United States are presented. Contrasting the two indicates the strong National need for a major increase in Earth-to-orbit lift capability. Approximate weights for planned payloads are shown. NASA is studying the following options to meet the need for a new heavy-lift capability by mid to late 1990's: (1) Shuttle-C for near term (include growth versions); and (2) the Advanced Lauching System (ALS) for the long term. The current baseline two-engine Shuttle-C has a 15 x 82 ft payload bay and an expected lift capability of 82,000 lb to Low Earth Orbit. Several options are being considered which have expanded diameter payload bays. A three-engine Shuttle-C with an expected lift of 145,000 lb to LEO is being evaluated as well. The Advanced Launch System (ALS) is a potential joint development between the Air Force and NASA. This program is focused toward long-term launch requirements, specifically beyond the year 2000. The basic approach is to develop a family of vehicles with the same high reliability as the Shuttle system, yet offering a much greater lift capability at a greatly reduced cost (per pound of payload). The ALS unmanned family of vehicles will provide a low end lift capability equivalent to Titan IV, and a high end lift capability greater than the Soviet Energia if requirements for such a high-end vehicle are defined.In conclusion, the planning of the next generation space telescope should not be constrained to the current launch vehicles. New vehicle designs will be driven by the needs of anticipated heavy users.

  3. Expedition 50 Soyuz Launch

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2016-11-18

    nhq201611180002 (Nov. 18, 2016) --- In this one second exposure photograph, the Soyuz MS-03 spacecraft is seen launching from the Baikonur Cosmodrome with Expedition 50 crewmembers NASA astronaut Peggy Whitson, Russian cosmonaut Oleg Novitskiy of Roscosmos, and ESA astronaut Thomas Pesquet from the Baikonur Cosmodrome in Kazakhstan, Friday, Nov. 18, 2016, (Kazakh time) (Nov 17 Eastern time). Whitson, Novitskiy, and Pesquet will spend approximately six months on the orbital complex. Photo Credit: (NASA/Bill Ingalls)

  4. STS-129 Atlantis Launch

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2009-11-16

    Guests at NASA's Kennedy Space Center view the launch of space shuttle Atlantis in Cape Canaveral, Fla., on Monday, Nov. 16, 2009. Space shuttle Atlantis and its six-member crew began the 11-day STS-129 mission to the International Space Station. The shuttle will transport spare hardware to the outpost and return a station crew member who spent more than two months in space. Photo Credit: (NASA/Carla Cioffi)

  5. Launch Control Network Engineer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Medeiros, Samantha

    2017-01-01

    The Spaceport Command and Control System (SCCS) is being built at the Kennedy Space Center in order to successfully launch NASA’s revolutionary vehicle that allows humans to explore further into space than ever before. During my internship, I worked with the Network, Firewall, and Hardware teams that are all contributing to the huge SCCS network project effort. I learned the SCCS network design and the several concepts that are running in the background. I also updated and designed documentation for physical networks that are part of SCCS. This includes being able to assist and build physical installations as well as configurations. I worked with the network design for vehicle telemetry interfaces to the Launch Control System (LCS); this allows the interface to interact with other systems at other NASA locations. This network design includes the Space Launch System (SLS), Interim Cryogenic Propulsion Stage (ICPS), and the Orion Multipurpose Crew Vehicle (MPCV). I worked on the network design and implementation in the Customer Avionics Interface Development and Analysis (CAIDA) lab.

  6. EDITORIAL: Incoming Editor-in-Chief

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lidström, Suzanne

    2012-04-01

    , in his hands, the expansion continued and the transition to electronic production took place. In 2005, an agreement was signed with IOP Publishing and the bustling production work of the in-house team moved abroad to Bristol, leaving just the Editor-in-Chief to man the ship at the Royal Swedish Academy of Sciences. In 2011, however, as Roger prepared to step down, submissions had reached astounding levels as is evident from figure 1: that year, almost 1500 manuscripts were received by Physica Scripta, now acknowledged to be amongst the fastest growing journals in IOP Publishing, when measured in these terms. The year on year increase stands at 20% and, once again, of the extensive range of topics covered, condensed matter physics had been identified as the subject area in most need of attention because the burden of reviewing had become too great for one editor to oversee alone. Thus, when I joined Physica Scripta in January of this year, securing new External Editors for this field was perceived to be the most urgent task. It is, therefore, with the greatest of pleasure that I am able to announce the arrival of two new editors for this section: Professors David Keen and Tapio Rantala. Physica Scripta statistics Figure 1. The annual submissions made to Physica Scripta in recent years have rocketed and the rejection rate (given as a percentage) has increased rapidly. The modest increase in the number of articles accepted (shaded in blue) reflects a deliberate policy to augment the scientific quality. Professor Rantala has been selected by the Finnish Physical Society to replace Professor Matti Manninen, who is stepping down as the Finnish representative on the journal's Editorial Board. Professor Rantala is a prominent theorist and has been engaged in active research in a number of fields. In his early work, he was interested in surface science and molecular physics, however his expertise is predominantly in the domain of solid or materials physics related to

  7. 32. Launch Control Center, commander's console. Note launch key at ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    32. Launch Control Center, commander's console. Note launch key at right. Lyon - Whiteman Air Force Base, Oscar O-1 Minuteman Missile Alert Facility, Southeast corner of Twelfth & Vendenberg Avenues, Knob Noster, Johnson County, MO

  8. Launch window extensions and launch opportunities for Navstar GPS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vaughan, Scott H.; Mullikin, Thomas L.

    The original nine minute launch window for Navstar Global Positioning System vehicles allowed a very limited capability to overcome problems late in the countdown sequence. A longer launch window was desired in order to minimize the chance of an aborted launch attempt. However, the methods used to determine the original launch window could not provide an extended window without producing a conflict with the tight tolerances required for the final orbit plane. By taking full advantage of the dynamics and geometry of the plane change maneuver, we have developed a launch window definition that will provide as much as a 32 minute window. This definition maintains tight orbit plane tolerances and identifies all possible launch opportunities. The extended launch window has been in use since the eighth Navstar launch and has been highly successful.

  9. Russian Soyuz in Launch Position

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    The Soyuz TM-31 launch vehicle is shown in the vertical position for its launch from Baikonur, carrying the first resident crew to the International Space Station. The Russian Soyuz launch vehicle is an expendable spacecraft that evolved out of the original Class A (Sputnik). From the early 1960s until today, the Soyuz launch vehicle has been the backbone of Russia's marned and unmanned space launch fleet. Today, the Soyuz launch vehicle is marketed internationally by a joint Russian/French consortium called STARSEM. As of August 2001, there have been ten Soyuz missions under the STARSEM banner.

  10. 73. VIEW OF LAUNCH OPERATOR AND LAUNCH ANAYLST PANELS LOCATED ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    73. VIEW OF LAUNCH OPERATOR AND LAUNCH ANAYLST PANELS LOCATED NEAR CENTER OF SOUTH WALL OF SLC-3E CONTROL ROOM. FROM LEFT TO RIGHT ON WALL IN BACKGROUND: COMMUNICATIONS HEADSET AND FOOT PEDAL IN FORGROUND. ACCIDENT REPORTING EMERGENCY NOTIFICATION SYSTEM TELEPHONE, ATLAS H FUEL COUNTER, AND DIGITAL COUNTDOWN CLOCK. - Vandenberg Air Force Base, Space Launch Complex 3, Launch Operations Building, Napa & Alden Roads, Lompoc, Santa Barbara County, CA

  11. René Marcelle (December 30, 1931-December 18, 2011), the first editor-in-chief of Photosynthesis Research.

    PubMed

    Govindjee; Marcelle, Dominique

    2016-07-01

    This tribute honors the first editor-in-chief of Photosynthesis Research, René Marcelle the Belgian plant physiologist who, with publishers in The Netherlands, launched the journal in 1980. Here, we present a glimpse of René Marcelle's early life, his education and research, as well as his editorial work for the journal and other conferences in plant physiology. He worked on control of photosynthesis, both the biological and environmental aspects, as well as on crassulacean acid metabolism. He is best remembered as a kind-hearted and humane editor.

  12. 25. Corridor between the Launch Control Center and the Launch ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    25. Corridor between the Launch Control Center and the Launch Control Equipment Room, view from Launch Control Center. Thalheimer - Whiteman Air Force Base, Oscar O-1 Minuteman Missile Alert Facility, Southeast corner of Twelfth & Vendenberg Avenues, Knob Noster, Johnson County, MO

  13. The chief resident in psychiatry: roles and responsibilities.

    PubMed

    Lim, Russell F; Schwartz, Eric; Servis, Mark; Cox, Paul D; Lai, Alan; Hales, Robert E

    2009-01-01

    Psychiatric residency programs have had chief residents for many years, and several articles previously published describe the chief residents' unique role as both faculty and resident. This article describes chief resident roles and responsibilities and explores trends in academic psychiatry departments from 1995 to 2006. The authors mailed a survey about the roles and responsibilities of chief resident positions to psychiatric residency training directors using the American Association of Directors of Psychiatric Residency Training (AADPRT) mailing list in 1995 and e-mailed the AADPRT e-mail list in 2006. Data were collected by mail in 1995 and collected in 2006 by a web-based survey similar to the instrument used in 1995. Joint selection of chief resident by faculty and residents, 12-month terms, protected time for administrative duties, and written job descriptions were helpful features common to most programs. Our results demonstrate that the majority of general psychiatry residency programs use the joint selection method with a negotiated job description, as well as a 12-month term.

  14. Ethical dilemmas facing chief nurses in Japan: A Pilot study.

    PubMed

    Ito, Chiharu; Natsume, Mikiko

    2016-06-01

    Chief nurses are most likely to take the lead in discussing and working to resolve ethical dilemmas, creating an ethical culture within their organization that results in effective ethics training. As the first step in this process, there is a need to define the kinds of ethical dilemmas that chief nurses grapple with on a regular basis as a target for future study. Anonymous written questionnaires and semi-structured interviews. All research procedures were approved by the Chubu University Ethics Review Board, the research institution to which the authors belong (authorization no. 250016). Responses from four chief nurses indicated that ethical dilemmas could be categorized as either those related to patient dignity or those related to management (unique to their roles as administrators). It was also learned that chief nurses struggle with the fact that although they consult with their superiors and others, these efforts do not lead to resolution. The expectation is that going forward, chief nurses will play a central role in acting as coordinators with physicians to promote better communication as well as lead group discussions aimed at providing care that respects patient dignity. © The Author(s) 2015.

  15. 76 FR 69031 - Order of Succession for the Office of the Chief Human Capital Officer

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-11-07

    ... Succession for the Office of the Chief Human Capital Officer AGENCY: Office of the Chief Human Capital Officer, HUD. ACTION: Notice of order of succession. SUMMARY: In this notice, the Chief Human Capital... Office of the Chief Human Capital Officer. DATES: Effective Date: October 20, 2011. FOR...

  16. EDITORIAL: Incoming Editor-in-Chief

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Webb, Steve

    2006-01-01

    editor signals change and in turn this induces in some people expectation, hope of improvement and maybe radical revolution. Others cower and hope for stability, continuation of the same and as little outward sign of change as possible. So I should like to signal that I hope to satisfy both camps. The Editor-in-Chief is primarily a guardian of the journal and should change nothing that does not need changing. Maintaining a standard at the same level is a valuable achievement in itself. This is no different from taking on any other leadership role such as in a team or department. One has to lead by consensus and with respect for the position. Conversely there are things I would like to see improved (otherwise I should not have been hired) and I commit to attempting these but in a spirit of cooperation with the Board, the publisher (IOP), IPEM and the readership. Any other approach would be doomed anyway. So, what would I like to see changed? Dare I say anything too strongly upfront? Like Alun six years ago I would like there to be more debate via correspondence but this depends on the readers to do more writing along these lines. Personally I feel PMB, like many journals, has developed to the point where most readers sadly can understand only a small fraction of its contents. I have talked to older readers who said they regularly used to read all or half of the journal. Now many of us can manage only the papers in our specialty. Yet this is somewhat inevitable as medical physics has progressed from a fledgling science to the vast activity it is today, topics have become deeply complicated and we cannot and should not reverse the clock. To address this, I would like to see authors provide some form of `intelligible lay-scientific summary' of their paper as a condition of its publication. I think readers would then enjoy reading all, not just some, of these and maybe become attracted to other areas than the ones in which they currently work. I would like to see the

  17. The Eighth Stage of Information Management: Information Resources Management (IRM) vs. Knowledge Management (KM), and the Chief Information Officer (CIO) vs. the Chief Knowledge Officer (CKO).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chen, Rui

    1998-01-01

    Describes the characteristics of the transfer point of information management to knowledge management (KM), what information resources management (IRM) does, and compares information and knowledge management and the roles of chief information officer (CIO) and chief knowledge officer (CKO). (PEN)

  18. Launch Services Program EMC Issues

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    trout, Dawn

    2004-01-01

    Presentation covers these issues: (1) Vehicles of the Launch Services Program, (2) RF Environment, (3) Common EMC Launch Vehicle Payload Integration Issues, (4) RF Sensitive Missions and (5) Lightning Monitoring,

  19. Launch Vehicle Control Center Architectures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Watson, Michael D.; Epps, Amy; Woodruff, Van; Vachon, Michael Jacob; Monreal, Julio; Williams, Randall; McLaughlin, Tom

    2014-01-01

    This analysis is a survey of control center architectures of the NASA Space Launch System (SLS), United Launch Alliance (ULA) Atlas V and Delta IV, and the European Space Agency (ESA) Ariane 5. Each of these control center architectures have similarities in basic structure, and differences in functional distribution of responsibilities for the phases of operations: (a) Launch vehicles in the international community vary greatly in configuration and process; (b) Each launch site has a unique processing flow based on the specific configurations; (c) Launch and flight operations are managed through a set of control centers associated with each launch site, however the flight operations may be a different control center than the launch center; and (d) The engineering support centers are primarily located at the design center with a small engineering support team at the launch site.

  20. Launching Garbage-Bag Balloons.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kim, Hy

    1997-01-01

    Presents a modification of a procedure for making and launching hot air balloons made out of garbage bags. Student instructions for balloon construction, launching instructions, and scale diagrams are included. (DDR)

  1. SMAP Launch and Deployment Sequence

    NASA Image and Video Library

    This video combines file footage of a Delta II rocket and computer animation to depict the launch and deployment of NASA's Soil Moisture Active Passive satellite. SMAP is scheduled to launch on Nov...

  2. 46. Quincy, MA, BO37, Launch Area, Underground Missile Storage Structure, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    46. Quincy, MA, BO-37, Launch Area, Underground Missile Storage Structure, interior view of elevator system with overhead doors in open position and hydraulic shaft in left foreground VIEW WEST - NIKE Missile Battery PR-79, Launch Area, East Windsor Road south of State Route 101, Foster, Providence County, RI

  3. Intelsat satellite scheduled for launch

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1981-01-01

    The launch schedule for Intelsat 5-B, the prime Intelsat satellite to provide communications services between the Americas, Europe, the Middle East, and Africa, is presented. The planned placement of the satellite into an elliptical transfer orbit, and circularization of the orbit at geosynchronous altitude over the equator are described. Characteristics of the Atlas Centaur launch vehicle, AC-56, are given. The launch operation is summarized and the launch sequence presented. The Intelsat team and contractors are listed.

  4. Official launching of FRIPON

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Colas, François

    2016-02-01

    Tuesday May 31st, 2016 marks the official launch of FRIPON, a unique interconnected network to search for meteorites. Eventually comprising 100 cameras spread out all over France, FRIPON introduces a night and day 360° watch of the sky. Born from the joint scientific expertise of Observatoire de Paris, of Muséum national d’Histoire naturelle, of Université Paris-Sud, of Université Aix-Marseille and of CNRS, this network aims to detect meteorite falls, measure their trajectories and estimate their strewnfields so that field search campaigns can be organized.

  5. Launch team training system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Webb, J. T.

    1988-01-01

    A new approach to the training, certification, recertification, and proficiency maintenance of the Shuttle launch team is proposed. Previous training approaches are first reviewed. Short term program goals include expanding current training methods, improving the existing simulation capability, and scheduling training exercises with the same priority as hardware tests. Long-term goals include developing user requirements which would take advantage of state-of-the-art tools and techniques. Training requirements for the different groups of people to be trained are identified, and future goals are outlined.

  6. Expedition 18 Launch Day

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2008-10-11

    Expedition 18 Commander Michael Fincke waves goodbye to family and friends from the bus that will take him and fellow crew members Flight Engineer Yuri V. Lonchakov and American spaceflight participant Richard Garriott to the Soyuz TMA-13 spacecraft for launch, Sunday, Oct. 12, 2008 from the Baikonur Cosmodrome in Kazakhstan. The three crew members are scheduled to dock with the International Space Station on Oct. 14. Fincke and Lonchakov will spend six months on the station, while Garriott will return to Earth Oct. 24 with two of the Expedition 17 crew members currently on the International Space Station. Photo Credit: (NASA/Victor Zelentsov)

  7. Expedition 18 Launch Day

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2008-10-11

    Expedition 18 Flight Engineer Yuri V. Lonchakov walks from the crew bus to the Soyuz rocket with Expedition 18 Commander Michael Fincke, not pictured, and American spaceflight participant Richard Garriott, background left, prior to their launch in the Soyuz TMA-13 spacecraft, Sunday, Oct. 12, 2008 from the Baikonur Cosmodrome in Kazakhstan. The three crew members are scheduled to dock with the International Space Station on Oct. 14. Fincke and Lonchakov will spend six months on the station, while Garriott will return to Earth Oct. 24 with two of the Expedition 17 crew members currently on the International Space Station. Photo Credit: (NASA/Bill Ingalls)

  8. Expedition 18 Launch Day

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2008-10-11

    Expedition 18 Commander Michael Fincke waves farewell from the crew bus as he and Flight Engineer Yuri V. Lonchakov and American spaceflight participant Richard Garriott depart the Cosmonaut Hotel to building 254 were they will don their flight suits prior to their launch, Sunday, Oct. 12, 2008, from the Baikonur Cosmodrome in Kazakhstan. The three crew members are scheduled to dock with the International Space Station on Oct. 14. Fincke and Lonchakov will spend six months on the station, while Garriott will return to Earth Oct. 24 with two of the Expedition 17 crew members currently on the International Space Station. Photo Credit: (NASA/Bill Ingalls)

  9. Expedition 18 Launch Day

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2008-10-11

    American spaceflight participant Richard Garriott, left, Expedition 18 Flight Engineer Yuri V. Lonchakov and Expedition 18 Commander Michael Fincke, right, depart building 254 where the crew donned their spacesuits prior to launch in the Soyuz TMA-13 spacecraft, Sunday Oct. 12, 2008 from the Baikonur Cosmodrome in Kazakhstan. The crew is scheduled to dock to the International Space Station on Oct. 14. Fincke and Lonchakov will spend six months on the station, while Garriott will return to Earth Oct. 24 with two of the Expedition 17 crewmembers currently on the International Space Station. Photo Credit: (NASA/Victor Zelentsov)

  10. Expedition 18 Launch Day

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2008-10-11

    Expedition 18 Flight Engineer Yuri V. Lonchakov, bottom, Expedition 18 Commander Michael Fincke and American spaceflight participant Richard Garriott, top, board the Soyuz rocket prior to their launch in the Soyuz TMA-13 spacecraft, Sunday, Oct. 12, 2008 from the Baikonur Cosmodrome in Kazakhstan. The three crew members are scheduled to dock with the International Space Station on Oct. 14. Fincke and Lonchakov will spend six months on the station, while Garriott will return to Earth Oct. 24 with two of the Expedition 17 crew members currently on the International Space Station. Photo Credit: (NASA/Bill Ingalls)

  11. Expedition 18 Launch Day

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2008-10-11

    American spaceflight participant Richard Garriott, left, Expedition 18 Flight Engineer Yuri V. Lonchakov and Expedition 18 Commander Michael Fincke, right, prepare to salute officials prior to launch in the Soyuz TMA-13 spacecraft, Sunday Oct. 12, 2008 from the Baikonur Cosmodrome in Kazakhstan. The crew is scheduled to dock to the International Space Station on Oct. 14. Fincke and Lonchakov will spend six months on the station, while Garriott will return to Earth Oct. 24 with two of the Expedition 17 crewmembers currently on the International Space Station. Photo Credit: (NASA/Victor Zelentsov)

  12. STS-127 Launch HD

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2009-11-16

    Space shuttle Atlantis and its six-member crew began an 11-day delivery flight to the International Space Station on Monday with a 2:28 p.m. EST launch from NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida. The shuttle will transport spare hardware to the outpost and return a station crew member who spent more than two months in space. Atlantis is carrying about 30,000 pounds of replacement parts for systems that provide power to the station, keep it from overheating, and maintain a proper orientation in space. The large equipment can best be transported using the shuttle's unique capabilities

  13. STS-69 launch views

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1996-09-07

    STS069-S-023 (7 September 1995) --- Liftoff of the Space Shuttle Endeavour from Launch Pad 39A occurred at 11:09:00:52 a.m. (EDT), September 7, 1995. The crew of five NASA astronauts was embarking on an 11-day multifaceted mission featuring two free-flying scientific research spacecraft, a spacewalk and a host of experiments in both the cargo bay and the middeck. Onboard were astronauts David M. Walker, Kenneth D. Cockrell, James S. Voss, James H. Newman and Michael L. Gernhardt.

  14. STS-69 launch views

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1996-09-07

    STS069-S-024 (7 September 1995) --- Trees and shrubs frame the liftoff phase of the Space Shuttle Endeavour as it begins the STS-69 mission. Liftoff from Launch Pad 39A occurred at 11:09:00:52 a.m. (EDT), September 7, 1995. The crew of five NASA astronauts is embarking on an 11-day multifaceted mission featuring two free-flying scientific research spacecraft, a spacewalk and a host of experiments in both the cargo bay and the middeck. Onboard were astronauts David M. Walker, Kenneth D. Cockrell, James S. Voss, James H. Newman and Michael L. Gernhardt.

  15. STS-69 launch views

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1996-09-07

    STS069-S-019 (7 September 1995) --- Florida shrubbery frames the liftoff phase of the Space Shuttle Endeavour as it begins the STS-69 mission. Liftoff from Launch Pad 39A occurred at 11:09:00:52 a.m. (EDT), September 7, 1995. The crew of five NASA astronauts is embarking on an 11-day multifaceted mission featuring two free-flying scientific research spacecraft, a spacewalk and a host of experiments in both the cargo bay and the middeck. Onboard were astronauts David M. Walker, Kenneth D. Cockrell, James S. Voss, James H. Newman and Michael L. Gernhardt.

  16. STS-69 launch views

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1996-09-07

    STS069-S-022 (7 September 1995) --- Marsh driftwood and Florida shrubbery frame the liftoff phase of the Space Shuttle Endeavour as it begins the STS-69 mission. Liftoff from Launch Pad 39A occurred at 11:09:00:52 a.m. (EDT), September 7, 1995. The crew of five NASA astronauts is embarking on an 11-day multifaceted mission featuring two free-flying scientific research spacecraft, a spacewalk and a host of experiments in both the cargo bay and the middeck. Onboard were astronauts David M. Walker, Kenneth D. Cockrell, James S. Voss, James H. Newman and Michael L. Gernhardt.

  17. Expedition 12 Launch

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2005-10-01

    JSC2005-E-40271 (1 Oct. 2005) --- A Soyuz rocket launches from the Baikonur Cosmodrome, Kazakhstan with astronaut William S. (Bill) McArthur, Jr., Expedition 12 commander; cosmonaut Valery I. Tokarev, flight engineer and Soyuz commander; and U.S. spaceflight participant Gregory Olsen aboard. The trio is on a mission to the International Space Station lasting six months for McArthur and Tokarev. Olsen will return with the current station crew, Expedition 11, after ten days in space under a commercial contract with the Russian Federal Space Agency. Photo Credit: NASA/Victor Zelentsov

  18. Expedition 22 Launch Day

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2009-12-20

    Expedition 22 NASA Flight Engineer Timothy J. Creamer of the U.S., left, and Flight Engineer Soichi Noguchi of Japan pose for a photograph with NASA Flight Surgeon Pete Bauer, standing left, and NASA Expedition 22 backup Astronaut Doug Wheelock at the Baikonur Cosmodrome in Baikonur, Kazakhstan, Sunday, Dec. 20, 2009. Creamer, Noguchi and fellow Expedition 22 crew member, Soyuz Commander Oleg Kotov of Russia, launched in their Soyuz TMA-17 rocket from the Baikonur Cosmodrome in Kazakhstan on Monday, Dec. 21, 2009. (Photo Credit: NASA/Bill Ingalls)

  19. LAUNCH - STS-8 - KSC

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1983-09-01

    S83-39513 (30 Aug. 1983) --- NASA's eighth space shuttle launch lights up the Florida sky at 2:32 a.m. (EDT), Aug. 30, 1983. The Challenger's third flight is the first to have its beginnings in darkness. Five astronauts and an assortment of experiments are aboard the reusable vehicle. Crew members are astronauts Richard H. Truly, STS-8 commander; Daniel C. Brandenstein, pilot; and Dale A. Gardner, Guion S. Bluford and William E. Thornton, all mission specialists. Photo credit: NASA

  20. LAUNCH - STS-8 - KSC

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1983-09-01

    S83-39512 (30 Aug. 1983) --- NASA's eighth space shuttle launch lights up the Florida sky at 2:32 a.m. (EDT), Aug. 30, 1983. The space shuttle Challenger's third flight is the first to have its beginnings in darkness. Five astronauts and an assortment of experiments are aboard the reusable vehicle. Crew members are astronauts Richard H. Truly, STS-8 commander; Daniel C. Brandenstein, pilot; and Dale A. Gardner, Guion S. Bluford and William E. Thornton, all mission specialists. Photo credit: NASA

  1. Apollo 13 Launch

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1970-01-01

    The third marned lunar landing mission, Apollo 13 (SA-508), with three astronauts: Mission commander James A. Lovell Jr., Lunar Module pilot Fred W. Haise Jr., and Command Module pilot John L. Swigert Jr., lifted off from the Kennedy Space Center launch complex 39A on April 11, 1970. The mission was aborted after 56 hours of flight, 205,000 miles from Earth, when an oxygen tank in the service module exploded. The Command Module, Odyssey, carrying the three astronauts, safely splashed down in the Pacific Ocean at 1:08 p.m. EST, April 17, 1970.

  2. STS-115 Launch

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2005-01-01

    The Space Shuttle Atlantis and its six-member crew launched at 11:15 a.m. (EDT) on September 9, 2006 to begin the two-day journey to the International Space Station (ISS) on the STS-115 mission. During the 11-day mission, the STS-115 crew of six, along with station crews and ground teams, resumed construction of the ISS with the installation of a girder-like structure, known as the P3/P4 truss. The 35,000-pound piece includes a set of giant solar arrays, batteries and associated electronics. The arrays eventually will double the power capability of the Station.

  3. STS-39 Launch

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1991-01-01

    Launched aboard the Space Shuttle Discovery on April 28, 1991 at 7:33:14 am (EDT), STS-39 was a Department of Defense (DOD) mission. The crew included seven astronauts: Michael L. Coats, commander; L. Blaine Hammond, pilot; Guion S. Buford, Jr., mission specialist 1; Gregory J. Harbaugh, mission specialist 2; Richard J. Hieb, mission specialist 3; Donald R. McMonagle, mission specialist 4; and Charles L. Veach, mission specialist 5. The primary unclassified payload included the Air Force Program 675 (AFP-675), the Infrared Background Signature Survey (IBSS), and the Shuttle Pallet Satellite II (SPAS II).

  4. Launch summary for 1978 - 1982

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hills, H. K.

    1984-01-01

    Data pertinent to the launching of space probes, soundings rockets, and satellites presented in tables include launch date, time, and site; agency rocket identification; sponsoring country or countries; instruments carried for experiments; the peak altitude achieved by the rockets; and the apoapsis and periapsis for satellites. The experimenter or institution involved in the launching is also cited.

  5. Launch Vehicle Control Center Architectures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Watson, Michael D.; Epps, Amy; Woodruff, Van; Vachon, Michael Jacob; Monreal, Julio; Levesque, Marl; Williams, Randall; Mclaughlin, Tom

    2014-01-01

    Launch vehicles within the international community vary greatly in their configuration and processing. Each launch site has a unique processing flow based on the specific launch vehicle configuration. Launch and flight operations are managed through a set of control centers associated with each launch site. Each launch site has a control center for launch operations; however flight operations support varies from being co-located with the launch site to being shared with the space vehicle control center. There is also a nuance of some having an engineering support center which may be co-located with either the launch or flight control center, or in a separate geographical location altogether. A survey of control center architectures is presented for various launch vehicles including the NASA Space Launch System (SLS), United Launch Alliance (ULA) Atlas V and Delta IV, and the European Space Agency (ESA) Ariane 5. Each of these control center architectures shares some similarities in basic structure while differences in functional distribution also exist. The driving functions which lead to these factors are considered and a model of control center architectures is proposed which supports these commonalities and variations.

  6. Retirement of J. Gary Eden as Editor-in-Chief

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jagadish, Chennupati; Jelinkova, Helena; Fainman, Yeshaiahu; Dawson, Martin; Ermers, Ysabel

    2016-01-01

    After nine years of dedicated service as Editor-in-Chief of Progress in Quantum Electronics (PQE), J. Gary Eden has retired at the end of December 2015. During his term as the Editor-in-Chief, PQE has grown significantly in size and quality and he has given generously of his time in advising authors, referees, editors, and the journal staff. Gary is an exceptional scientist and a generous individual who has given so much to the community. He is always very positive in every situation, and has created positive environment and supported people with utmost enthusiasm.

  7. Magnetic Launch Assist

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jacobs, W. A.

    2000-01-01

    With the ever-increasing cost of getting to space and the need for safe, reliable, and inexpensive ways to access space, NASA is taking a look at technologies that will get us there. One of these technologies is Magnetic Launch Assist (MagLev). This is the concept of using both magnetic levitation and magnetic propulsion to provide an initial velocity by using electrical power from ground sources. The use of ground based power can significantly reduce operational costs over the consumables necessary to attain the same velocity. The technologies to accomplish this are both old and new. The concept of MagLev has been around for a long time and several MagLev Trains have already been made. Where NASA's MagLev diverges from the traditional train is in the immense power required to propel this vehicle to 600 feet per second in less than 10 seconds. New technologies or the upgrade of existing technologies will need to be investigated in areas of energy storage and power switching. Plus the separation of a very large mass (the space vehicle) and the aerodynamics of that vehicle while on the carrier are also of great concern and require considerable study and testing. NASA's plan is to mature these technologies in the next 10 years to achieve our goal of launching a full sized space vehicle off a MagLev rail.

  8. New Product Launching Ideas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kiruthika, E.

    2012-09-01

    Launching a new product can be a tense time for a small or large business. There are those moments when you wonder if all of the work done to develop the product will pay off in revenue, but there are many things are can do to help increase the likelihood of a successful product launch. An open-minded consumer-oriented approach is imperative in todayís diverse global marketplace so a firm can identify and serve its target market, minimize dissatisfaction, and stay ahead of competitors. Final consumers purchase for personal, family, or household use. Finally, the kind of information that the marketing team needs to provide customers in different buying situations. In high-involvement decisions, the marketer needs to provide a good deal of information about the positive consequences of buying. The sales force may need to stress the important attributes of the product, the advantages compared with the competition; and maybe even encourage ìtrialî or ìsamplingî of the product in the hope of securing the sale. The final stage is the post-purchase evaluation of the decision. It is common for customers to experience concerns after making a purchase decision. This arises from a concept that is known as ìcognitive dissonance

  9. Magnetic Launch Assist System Demonstration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    This Quick Time movie demonstrates the Magnetic Launch Assist system, previously referred to as the Magnetic Levitation (Maglev) system, for space launch using a 5 foot model of a reusable Bantam Class launch vehicle on a 50 foot track that provided 6-g acceleration and 6-g de-acceleration. Overcoming the grip of Earth's gravity is a supreme challenge for engineers who design rockets that leave the planet. Engineers at the Marshall Space Flight Center have developed and tested Magnetic Launch Assist technologies that could levitate and accelerate a launch vehicle along a track at high speeds before it leaves the ground. Using electricity and magnetic fields, a Magnetic Launch Assist system would drive a spacecraft along a horizontal track until it reaches desired speeds. A full-scale, operational track would be about 1.5-miles long and capable of accelerating a vehicle to 600 mph in 9.5 seconds. The major advantages of launch assist for NASA launch vehicles is that it reduces the weight of the takeoff, the landing gear, the wing size, and less propellant resulting in significant cost savings. The US Navy and the British MOD (Ministry of Defense) are planning to use magnetic launch assist for their next generation aircraft carriers as the aircraft launch system. The US Army is considering using this technology for launching target drones for anti-aircraft training.

  10. Magnetic Launch Assist System Demonstration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    This Quick Time movie demonstrates the Magnetic Launch Assist system, previously referred to as the Magnetic Levitation (Maglev) system, for space launch using a 5 foot model of a reusable Bantam Class launch vehicle on a 50 foot track that provided 6-g acceleration and 6-g de-acceleration. Overcoming the grip of Earth's gravity is a supreme challenge for engineers who design rockets that leave the planet. Engineers at the Marshall Space Flight Center have developed and tested Magnetic Launch Assist technologies that could levitate and accelerate a launch vehicle along a track at high speeds before it leaves the ground. Using electricity and magnetic fields, a Magnetic Launch Assist system would drive a spacecraft along a horizontal track until it reaches desired speeds. A full-scale, operational track would be about 1.5-miles long and capable of accelerating a vehicle to 600 mph in 9.5 seconds. The major advantages of launch assist for NASA launch vehicles is that it reduces the weight of the takeoff, the landing gear, the wing size, and less propellant resulting in significant cost savings. The US Navy and the British MOD (Ministry of Defense) are planning to use magnetic launch assist for their next generation aircraft carriers as the aircraft launch system. The US Army is considering using this technology for launching target drones for anti-aircraft training.

  11. Launch vehicle selection model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Montoya, Alex J.

    1990-01-01

    Over the next 50 years, humans will be heading for the Moon and Mars to build scientific bases to gain further knowledge about the universe and to develop rewarding space activities. These large scale projects will last many years and will require large amounts of mass to be delivered to Low Earth Orbit (LEO). It will take a great deal of planning to complete these missions in an efficient manner. The planning of a future Heavy Lift Launch Vehicle (HLLV) will significantly impact the overall multi-year launching cost for the vehicle fleet depending upon when the HLLV will be ready for use. It is desirable to develop a model in which many trade studies can be performed. In one sample multi-year space program analysis, the total launch vehicle cost of implementing the program reduced from 50 percent to 25 percent. This indicates how critical it is to reduce space logistics costs. A linear programming model has been developed to answer such questions. The model is now in its second phase of development, and this paper will address the capabilities of the model and its intended uses. The main emphasis over the past year was to make the model user friendly and to incorporate additional realistic constraints that are difficult to represent mathematically. We have developed a methodology in which the user has to be knowledgeable about the mission model and the requirements of the payloads. We have found a representation that will cut down the solution space of the problem by inserting some preliminary tests to eliminate some infeasible vehicle solutions. The paper will address the handling of these additional constraints and the methodology for incorporating new costing information utilizing learning curve theory. The paper will review several test cases that will explore the preferred vehicle characteristics and the preferred period of construction, i.e., within the next decade, or in the first decade of the next century. Finally, the paper will explore the interaction

  12. Launch vehicle selection model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Montoya, Alex J.

    1990-01-01

    Over the next 50 years, humans will be heading for the Moon and Mars to build scientific bases to gain further knowledge about the universe and to develop rewarding space activities. These large scale projects will last many years and will require large amounts of mass to be delivered to Low Earth Orbit (LEO). It will take a great deal of planning to complete these missions in an efficient manner. The planning of a future Heavy Lift Launch Vehicle (HLLV) will significantly impact the overall multi-year launching cost for the vehicle fleet depending upon when the HLLV will be ready for use. It is desirable to develop a model in which many trade studies can be performed. In one sample multi-year space program analysis, the total launch vehicle cost of implementing the program reduced from 50 percent to 25 percent. This indicates how critical it is to reduce space logistics costs. A linear programming model has been developed to answer such questions. The model is now in its second phase of development, and this paper will address the capabilities of the model and its intended uses. The main emphasis over the past year was to make the model user friendly and to incorporate additional realistic constraints that are difficult to represent mathematically. We have developed a methodology in which the user has to be knowledgeable about the mission model and the requirements of the payloads. We have found a representation that will cut down the solution space of the problem by inserting some preliminary tests to eliminate some infeasible vehicle solutions. The paper will address the handling of these additional constraints and the methodology for incorporating new costing information utilizing learning curve theory. The paper will review several test cases that will explore the preferred vehicle characteristics and the preferred period of construction, i.e., within the next decade, or in the first decade of the next century. Finally, the paper will explore the interaction

  13. EDITORIAL: Outgoing Editor-in-Chief Outgoing Editor-in-Chief

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hauptmann, Peter

    2012-01-01

    I started in 2002 as Editor-in-Chief of a well established journal—MST (Measurement Science and Technology). It was a time when modern means of communication offered new opportunities for the scientific community—for all scientists and engineers whether at universities, in industry or at other institutions—to access better quality information in a shorter time. This development helped us to be more efficient in our daily scientific work and to anticipate new trends faster than before. A flood of information was created by different search engines. A few online journals or journals published in emerging countries with a similar profile to MST appeared on the market. MST had to provide new answers in response to these developments. In 2002 I postulated two requirements to the journal. Firstly, the publisher has to be up to date. My impression over the years has been that IOPP is excellently organized. That has made it easier for the board members and all our reviewers to concentrate on the scientific aspects of our input to the journal. During all my visits to Bristol or my contacts with the IOPP staff I always met very professional and enthusiastic staff members. They have not only supported and encouraged the ideas and initiatives of the Editorial Board members, but they have also worked hard on establishing one of the most effective journal operations in the field of measurement science and technology. Many authors are well aware of this. Thus I am able to declare that the first requirement for a successful journal has been met. Secondly, the scientific level has to be high and the journal should attract readers from all over the world. This task was the responsibility of the Editorial Board members and of myself. Our strategy was on the one hand to ensure continuity in MST but on the other hand to be open to new trends and developments. Examples of these new aspects of the journal are fields like micro- and nanometrology, measurement techniques for

  14. STS-92 Discovery Launch

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    Viewed from across the waters of Banana Creek, clouds of smoke and steam are illuminated by the flames from Space Shuttle Discovery'''s perfect on-time launch at 7:17 p.m. EDT. Discovery carries a crew of seven on a construction flight to the International Space Station. Discovery also carries a payload that includes the Integrated Truss Structure Z-1, first of 10 trusses that will form the backbone of the Space Station, and the third Pressurized Mating Adapter that will provide a Shuttle docking port for solar array installation on the sixth Station flight and Lab installation on the seventh Station flight. Discovery'''s landing is expected Oct. 22 at 2:10 p.m. EDT.

  15. STS-118 Launch

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2007-01-01

    Enroute to the International Space Station (ISS), Space Shuttle Endeavor and its seven member STS-118 crew, blasted off from the launch pad at Kennedy Space Center on August 8, 2007. Construction resumed on the ISS as STS-118 mission specialists and the Expedition 15 crew completed installation of the third Starboard 5 (S-5) truss segment, removed a faulty Control Moment Gyroscope (CMG-3), installed a new CMG into the Z1 truss, relocated the S-band Antenna Sub-Assembly from the Port 6 (P6) to Port 1 (P1) truss, installed a new transponder on P1, retrieved the P6 transponder, and delivered roughly 5,000 pounds of equipment and supplies.

  16. STS-115 Launch view

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2006-09-09

    STS115-S-032 (9 Sept. 2006) --- The Space Shuttle Atlantis and its six-member crew launch at 11:15 a.m. (EDT) to begin the two-day journey to the International Space Station on the STS-115 mission. Atlantis is slated to dock with the station on Monday Sept. 11, 2006. During the 11-day mission, the STS-115 crew of six will resume construction of the station. The shuttle and station crews will work with ground teams to install a girder-like structure, known as the P3/P4 truss aboard the station. The 35,000-pound piece includes a set of giant solar arrays, batteries and associated electronics. The arrays eventually will double the station's power capability.

  17. STS-115 Launch view

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2006-09-09

    STS115-S-034 (9 Sept. 2006) --- The Space Shuttle Atlantis and its six-member crew launch at 11:15 a.m. (EDT) to begin the two-day journey to the International Space Station on the STS-115 mission. Atlantis is slated to dock with the station on Monday Sept. 11, 2006. During the 11-day mission, the STS-115 crew of six will resume construction of the station. The shuttle and station crews will work with ground teams to install a girder-like structure, known as the P3/P4 truss aboard the station. The 35,000-pound piece includes a set of giant solar arrays, batteries and associated electronics. The arrays eventually will double the station's power capability.

  18. STS-115 Launch view

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2006-09-09

    STS115-S-040 (9 Sept. 2006) --- The Space Shuttle Atlantis and its six-member crew launch at 11:15 a.m. (EDT) to begin the two-day journey to the International Space Station on the STS-115 mission. Atlantis is slated to dock with the station on Monday Sept. 11, 2006. During the 11-day mission, the STS-115 crew of six will resume construction of the station. The shuttle and station crews will work with ground teams to install a girder-like structure, known as the P3/P4 truss aboard the station. The 35,000-pound piece includes a set of giant solar arrays, batteries and associated electronics. The arrays eventually will double the station's power capability.

  19. STS-115 Launch view

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2006-09-09

    STS115-S-037 (9 Sept. 2006) --- The Space Shuttle Atlantis and its six-member crew launch at 11:15 a.m. (EDT) to begin the two-day journey to the International Space Station on the STS-115 mission. Atlantis is slated to dock with the station on Monday Sept. 11, 2006. During the 11-day mission, the STS-115 crew of six will resume construction of the station. The shuttle and station crews will work with ground teams to install a girder-like structure, known as the P3/P4 truss aboard the station. The 35,000-pound piece includes a set of giant solar arrays, batteries and associated electronics. The arrays eventually will double the station's power capability.

  20. STS-120 Launch

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2007-01-01

    The Space Shuttle Discovery and its seven-member STS-120 crew headed toward Earth-orbit and a scheduled linkup with the International Space Station (ISS). Liftoff from Kennedy Space Center's launch pad 39A occurred at 11:38:19 a.m. (EDT) on October 23, 2007. Onboard were astronauts Pam Melroy, commander; George Zamka, pilot; Scott Parazynski, Stephanie Wilson, Doug Wheelock, European Space Agency's (ESA) Paolo Nespoli and Daniel Tani, all mission specialists. Discovery linked up with the station for a joint mission of continued construction, The mission delivered the Italian-built U.S. Node 2, named Harmony. During the 14-day mission, the crew installed Harmony, and moved and deployed the P6 solar arrays to their permanent position.

  1. STS-120 Launch

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2007-01-01

    The Space Shuttle Discovery and its seven-member STS-120 crew headed toward Earth-orbit and a scheduled linkup with the International Space Station (ISS). Liftoff from Kennedy Space Center's launch pad 39A occurred at 11:38:19 a.m. (EDT) on October 23, 2007. Onboard were astronauts Pam Melroy, commander; George Zamka, pilot; Scott Parazynski, Stephanie Wilson, Doug Wheelock, European Space Agency's (ESA) Paolo Nespoli, and Daniel Tani, all mission specialists. Discovery linked up with the station for a joint mission of continued construction. The mission delivered the Italian-built U.S. Node 2, named Harmony. During the 14-day mission, the crew installed Harmony, and moved and deployed the P6 solar arrays to their permanent position.

  2. STS-120 Launch

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2007-01-01

    The Space Shuttle Discovery and its seven-member STS-120 crew headed toward Earth-orbit and a scheduled linkup with the International Space Station (ISS). Liftoff from Kennedy Space Center's launch pad 39A occurred at 11:38:19 a.m. (EDT) on October 23, 2007. Onboard were astronauts Pam Melroy, commander; George Zamka, pilot; Scott Parazynski, Stephanie Wilson, Doug Wheelock, European Space Agency's (ESA) Paolo Nespoli and Daniel Tani, all mission specialists. Discovery linked up with the station for a joint mission of continued construction, The mission delivered the Italian-built U.S. Node 2, named Harmony. During the 14-day mission, the crew installed Harmony, and moved and deployed the P6 solar arrays to their permanent position.

  3. STS-120 Launch

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2007-01-01

    The Space Shuttle Discovery and its seven-member STS-120 crew headed toward Earth-orbit and a scheduled linkup with the International Space Station (ISS). Liftoff from Kennedy Space Center's launch pad 39A occurred at 11:38:19 a.m. (EDT) on October 23, 2007. Onboard were astronauts Pam Melroy, commander; George Zamka, pilot; Scott Parazynski, Stephanie Wilson, Doug Wheelock, European Space Agency's (ESA) Paolo Nespoli and Daniel Tani, all mission specialists. Discovery linked up with the station for a joint mission of continued construction. The mission delivered the Italian-built U.S. Node 2, named Harmony. During the 14-day mission, the crew installed Harmony, moved and deployed the P6 solar arrays to their permanent position.

  4. STS-112 Launch

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    Space Shuttle Orbiter Atlantis hurdles toward space from Launch Pad 39B at Kennedy Space Center in Florida for the STS-112 mission. Liftoff occurred at 3:46pm EDT, October 7, 2002. Atlantis carried the Starboard-1 (S1) Integrated Truss Structure and the Crew and Equipment Translation Aid (CETA) Cart A. The S1 was the second truss structure installed on the International Space Station (ISS). It was attached to the S0 truss which was previously installed by the STS-110 mission. The CETA is the first of two human-powered carts that ride along the ISS railway, providing mobile work platforms for future space walking astronauts. The 11 day mission performed three space walks to attach the S1 truss.

  5. Personnel Launch System definition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Piland, William M.; Talay, Theodore A.; Stone, Howard W.

    1990-10-01

    A lifting-body Personnel Launch System (PLS) is defined for assured manned access to space for future U.S. space missions. The reusable craft described is configured for reliable and safe operations, maintainability, affordability, and improved operability, and could reduce life-cycle costs associated with placing personnel into orbit. Flight simulations show the PLS to be a very flyable vehicle with very little control and propellant expenditure required during entry. The attention to crew safety has resulted in the design of a system that provides protection for the crew throughout the mission profile. However, a new operations philosophy for manned space vehicles must be adopted to fully achieve low-cost, manned earth-to-orbit transportation.

  6. STS-112 Launch

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    Space Shuttle Orbiter Atlantis hurdles toward space from Launch Pad 39B at Kennedy Space Center in Florida for the STS-112 mission. Liftoff occurred at 3:46pm EDT, October 7, 2002. Atlantis carried the Starboard-1 (S1) Integrated Truss Structure and the Crew and Equipment Translation Aid (CETA) Cart A. The S1 was the second truss structure installed on the International Space Station (ISS). It was attached to the S0 truss which was previously installed by the STS-110 mission. The CETA is the first of two human-powered carts that ride along the ISS railway, providing mobile work platforms for future space walking astronauts. The 11 day mission performed three space walks to attach the S1 truss.

  7. STS-51 Discovery launch

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1993-09-12

    STS051-S-108 (12 Sept. 1993) --- The Space Shuttle Discovery soars toward a nine-day stay in Earth-orbit to support the mission. Launch occurred at 7:45 a.m. (EDT) September 12, 1993. Note the diamond shock effect coming from the thrust of the three main engines. Onboard the shuttle were astronauts Frank L. Culbertson, Jr., William F. Readdy, Daniel W. Bursch, James H. Newman and Carl E. Walz, along with a number of payloads. The payloads included the Advanced Communications Technology Satellite (ACTS) with its Transfer Orbit Stage (TOS), the Orbiting Retrievable Far and Extreme Ultraviolet Spectrometer (ORFEUS) and its Shuttle Pallet Satellite (SPAS) carrier. This photograph was taken with a 35mm camera.

  8. Personnel Launch System definition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Piland, William M.; Talay, Theodore A.; Stone, Howard W.

    1990-01-01

    A lifting-body Personnel Launch System (PLS) is defined for assured manned access to space for future U.S. space missions. The reusable craft described is configured for reliable and safe operations, maintainability, affordability, and improved operability, and could reduce life-cycle costs associated with placing personnel into orbit. Flight simulations show the PLS to be a very flyable vehicle with very little control and propellant expenditure required during entry. The attention to crew safety has resulted in the design of a system that provides protection for the crew throughout the mission profile. However, a new operations philosophy for manned space vehicles must be adopted to fully achieve low-cost, manned earth-to-orbit transportation.

  9. Payload Launch Lock Mechanism

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Young, Ken (Inventor); Hindle, Timothy (Inventor)

    2014-01-01

    A payload launch lock mechanism includes a base, a preload clamp, a fastener, and a shape memory alloy (SMA) actuator. The preload clamp is configured to releasibly restrain a payload. The fastener extends, along an axis, through the preload clamp and into the base, and supplies a force to the preload clamp sufficient to restrain the payload. The SMA actuator is disposed between the base and the clamp. The SMA actuator is adapted to receive electrical current and is configured, upon receipt of the electrical current, to supply a force that causes the fastener to elongate without fracturing. The preload clamp, in response to the fastener elongation, either rotates or pivots to thereby release the payload.

  10. Launch area theodolite system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bradley, Lester M.; Corriveau, John P.; Tindal, Nan E.

    1991-08-01

    White Sands Missile Range has developed a Launch Area Theodolite (LAT) optical tracking system that provides improved Time-Space-Position-Information (TSPI) for the new class of hyper-velocity missiles being developed by the Army. The LAT system consists of a high- performance optical tracking mount equipped with an 8-12 micrometers Forward Looking Infrared (FLIR) sensor, a newly designed full-frame pin-registered 35-mm film camera, and an auto- focused 50-in. focal length lens. The FLIR has been integrated with the WSMR in-house developed statistical based automatic video tracker to yield a powerful system for the automatic tracking of missiles from a short standoff distance. The LAT has been designed to replace large fixed-camera arrays for test programs on short-range anti-tank missiles. New tracking techniques have been developed to deal with angular tracking rates that exceed one radian in both velocity and acceleration. Special techniques have been developed to shock the tracking mount at the missile launch to match the target motion. An adaptive servo control technique allows a Type III servo to be used to compensate for the high angular accelerations that are generated by the placement of the LAT mounts along the missile flight path. An automated mode selection adjustment is employed as the missile passes a point perpendicular to the tracking mount to compensate for the requirement to rapidly decelerate the tracking mount and keep the target in the field-of-view of the data camera. This paper covers the design concept for a network of eight LAT mounts, the techniques of automatic video tracking using a FLIR sensor, and the architecture of the servo control algorithms that have allowed the LAT system to produce results to a degree never before achieved at White Sands Missile Range.

  11. 32 CFR 552.37 - Acquisition by Chief of Engineers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 true Acquisition by Chief of Engineers. 552.37 Section 552.37 National Defense Department of Defense (Continued) DEPARTMENT OF THE ARMY MILITARY RESERVATIONS AND NATIONAL CEMETERIES REGULATIONS AFFECTING MILITARY RESERVATIONS Acquisition of Real Estate...

  12. Hail to the Chief: A Survivor's Guide to Presidential Egos

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Riehl, Richard J.

    2010-01-01

    The author once was a student in a graduate seminar taught by the president of the university where he was a mid-level administrator. The course focused on what it takes to be the chief executive of a university. The university president was the only one of the ten presidents under whom the author served who embraced the role of a college…

  13. Chief Diversity Officers and the Wonderful World of Academe

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harvey, William B.

    2014-01-01

    The chief diversity officer (CDO) position is new in the realm of higher education administration. Charged with helping their institutions become more diverse and inclusive, the people who occupy these positions face a variety of challenges as they attempt to modify change-resistant institutional cultures. Still, the emergence of the CDO position…

  14. 17 CFR 200.17 - Chief Management Analyst.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ...) Organizational structures and delegations of authority; (d) Management information systems and concepts; and (e...; CONDUCT AND ETHICS; AND INFORMATION AND REQUESTS Organization and Program Management General Organization... 17 Commodity and Securities Exchanges 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Chief Management Analyst....

  15. Emotional intelligence and selection to administrative chief residency.

    PubMed

    Kilpatrick, Charlie C; Doyle, Peter D; Reichman, Eric F; Chohan, Lubna; Uthman, Margaret O; Orejuela, Francisco J

    2012-09-01

    The authors sought to determine whether emotional intelligence, as measured by the BarOn emotional quotient inventory (EQ-i), is associated with selection to administrative chief resident. Authors invited senior-year residents at the University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston to participate in an observational cross-sectional study using the BarOn EQ-i. In October 2009 they sent an invitation e-mail to 66 senior residents, with a reminder e-mail 1 month later. The study was designed to detect a 15-point difference in EQ-i scores with 80% power. Of the 66 invited residents, 69.6% participated in the study. Average total EQ-I score was 104.9. Among senior-year residents, there were no statistically significant differences in EQ-i scores between administrative chief residents (at 109) and non-administrative chief residents (at 103.2). Administrative chief residents do not demonstrate higher Emotional Intelligence, as measured by the EQ-i, than other senior-year residents.

  16. Emotional Intelligence and Selection to Administrative Chief Residency

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kilpatrick, Charlie C.; Doyle, Peter D.; Reichman, Eric F.; Chohan, Lubna; Uthman, Margaret O.; Orejuela, Francisco J.

    2012-01-01

    Objective: The authors sought to determine whether emotional intelligence, as measured by the BarOn Emotional Quotient Inventory (EQ-i), is associated with selection to administrative chief resident. Method: Authors invited senior-year residents at the University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston to participate in an observational…

  17. Chief of Naval Air Training Resource Planning System (RPS).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hodak, Gary W.; And Others

    The Resource Planning System (RPS) provides the Chief of Naval Air Training (CNATRA) with the capability to determine the resources required to produce a specified number of Naval Aviators and Naval Flight Officers (NAs/NFOs) quickly and efficiently. The training of NAs and NFOs is extremely time consuming and complex. It requires extensive…

  18. Governors Face Political Hurdles in Seeking Power to Appoint Chiefs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McNeil, Michele

    2008-01-01

    Convinced of the connection between the quality of their schools and the future of their states--not to mention their own political reputations--some governors are seeking a bigger role in shaping education policy by grabbing for more control over their state schools chiefs. Governors note that they are responsible for managing state budgets, of…

  19. College Chief Executive Officers' Contracts, Salaries, and Compensation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Parnell, Dale; Rivera, Margaret

    Designed as a resource for the development of an employment contract between a community college board of trustees and its chief executive officer (CEO), this "idea book" addresses diverse contractual concerns, such as liability and due process, and discusses the benefits of the contract for both the board and CEO. Drawing on comparative…

  20. New Concepts for the Administrative Training of Psychiatric Chief Residents

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Griffith, Ezra; And Others

    1978-01-01

    In 1976 a new organizational structure was established in the Lincoln Psychiatric Residency Program of the Albert Einstein College of Medicine in which the chief resident was given responsibility for the residents in all years of training. Problems and benefits of this broad area of control are addressed. (LBH)

  1. 17 CFR 200.17 - Chief Management Analyst.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... utilization; (c) Organizational structures and delegations of authority; (d) Management information systems...; CONDUCT AND ETHICS; AND INFORMATION AND REQUESTS Organization and Program Management General Organization... 17 Commodity and Securities Exchanges 3 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Chief Management Analyst. 200...

  2. 17 CFR 200.17 - Chief Management Analyst.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... utilization; (c) Organizational structures and delegations of authority; (d) Management information systems...; CONDUCT AND ETHICS; AND INFORMATION AND REQUESTS Organization and Program Management General Organization... 17 Commodity and Securities Exchanges 2 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Chief Management Analyst. 200...

  3. 17 CFR 200.17 - Chief Management Analyst.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... utilization; (c) Organizational structures and delegations of authority; (d) Management information systems...; CONDUCT AND ETHICS; AND INFORMATION AND REQUESTS Organization and Program Management General Organization... 17 Commodity and Securities Exchanges 2 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Chief Management Analyst. 200...

  4. 17 CFR 200.17 - Chief Management Analyst.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ...) Organizational structures and delegations of authority; (d) Management information systems and concepts; and (e...; CONDUCT AND ETHICS; AND INFORMATION AND REQUESTS Organization and Program Management General Organization... 17 Commodity and Securities Exchanges 2 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Chief Management Analyst. 200...

  5. August 2017 Letters to the Editor-in-Chief.

    PubMed

    2017-08-01

    Letter to the Editor-in-Chief of JOSPT as follows: "Manual Therapy: More Than Elaborate Swordplay" with Authors' Response "Comparing Dry Needling to Corticosteroid Injection for Greater Trochanteric Pain Syndrome" with Authors' Response J Orthop Sports Phys Ther 2017;47(8):580-585. doi:10.2519/jospt.2017.0204.

  6. September 2017 Letter to the Editor-in-Chief.

    PubMed

    2017-09-01

    Letter to the Editor-in-Chief of JOSPT as follows: "Clinically Meaningful Outcome Measures in Patients With Shoulder Problems" with Authors' Response J Orthop Sports Phys Ther 2017;47(9):693-695. doi:10.2519/jospt.2017.0205.

  7. The Role of the Chief Administrator in Development.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gnirk, Lloyd A.

    Catholic education is a ministry of the Catholic Church and a primary means of evangelization. The ministry of development, an integral part of Catholic education, is basically one of developing people and helping them to grow. The chief administrator is pivotal in this ministry and is responsible for quality Catholic education, sound business…

  8. Annual Report 2008 -- Office of the Chief Financial Officer (OCFO)

    SciTech Connect

    Fernandez, Jeffrey

    2008-12-22

    It is with great pleasure that I present to you the 2008 Chief Financial Officer's Annual Report. The data included in this report has been compiled from the Budget Office, the Controller, Procurement and Property Management and the Sponsored Projects Office. Also included are some financial comparisons with other DOE Laboratories and a glossary of commonly used acronyms.

  9. 33 CFR 211.3 - Function of Chief of Engineers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 3 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Function of Chief of Engineers. 211.3 Section 211.3 Navigation and Navigable Waters CORPS OF ENGINEERS, DEPARTMENT OF THE ARMY, DEPARTMENT OF DEFENSE REAL ESTATE ACTIVITIES OF THE CORPS OF ENGINEERS IN CONNECTION WITH CIVIL WORKS...

  10. 33 CFR 211.3 - Function of Chief of Engineers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Function of Chief of Engineers. 211.3 Section 211.3 Navigation and Navigable Waters CORPS OF ENGINEERS, DEPARTMENT OF THE ARMY, DEPARTMENT OF DEFENSE REAL ESTATE ACTIVITIES OF THE CORPS OF ENGINEERS IN CONNECTION WITH CIVIL WORKS...

  11. 33 CFR 211.3 - Function of Chief of Engineers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 3 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Function of Chief of Engineers. 211.3 Section 211.3 Navigation and Navigable Waters CORPS OF ENGINEERS, DEPARTMENT OF THE ARMY, DEPARTMENT OF DEFENSE REAL ESTATE ACTIVITIES OF THE CORPS OF ENGINEERS IN CONNECTION WITH CIVIL WORKS...

  12. 33 CFR 211.3 - Function of Chief of Engineers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 3 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Function of Chief of Engineers. 211.3 Section 211.3 Navigation and Navigable Waters CORPS OF ENGINEERS, DEPARTMENT OF THE ARMY, DEPARTMENT OF DEFENSE REAL ESTATE ACTIVITIES OF THE CORPS OF ENGINEERS IN CONNECTION WITH CIVIL WORKS...

  13. The Managerial Roles of Community College Chief Academic Officers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Anderson, Philip Wayne

    This study utilized Mintzberg's taxonomy of managerial roles to examine the roles performed by community college chief academic officers (CAOs). Mintzberg's taxonomy defines managerial roles as a set of behaviors and identifies 10 distinct roles: (1) figurehead; (2) leader; (3) liaison; (4) monitor; (5) disseminator; (6) spokesperson; (7)…

  14. 17 CFR 200.13 - Chief Operating Officer.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ....). (3) Government Printing and Binding Regulations, U.S. Congress Joint Committee on Printing (1977). (4... Officer also designates certifying officers for agency payments. (d) The Chief Operating Officer shall be... Commission; (2) Providing overall organizational management to improve agency performance; (3) Assisting the...

  15. New Concepts for the Administrative Training of Psychiatric Chief Residents

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Griffith, Ezra; And Others

    1978-01-01

    In 1976 a new organizational structure was established in the Lincoln Psychiatric Residency Program of the Albert Einstein College of Medicine in which the chief resident was given responsibility for the residents in all years of training. Problems and benefits of this broad area of control are addressed. (LBH)

  16. Leader of State Chiefs' Group to Step down in August

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hoff, David J.

    2006-01-01

    The top executive of the Council of Chief State School Officers (CCSSO) has announced that he will leave his post in 2006 at the end of the summer, giving the group time to plan a lobbying strategy for the reauthorization of the No Child Left Behind Act with a new director. G. Thomas Houlihan, the CCSSO's executive director since 2001, said that…

  17. 18 CFR 154.308 - Representation of chief accounting officer.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 18 Conservation of Power and Water Resources 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Representation of chief accounting officer. 154.308 Section 154.308 Conservation of Power and Water Resources FEDERAL ENERGY... purport to reflect the books of the company do, in fact, set forth the results shown by such books....

  18. The Temporal Logic of the Tower Chief System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hazelton, Lyman R., Jr.

    1990-01-01

    The purpose is to describe the logic used in the reasoning scheme employed in the Tower Chief system, a runway configuration management system. First, a review of classical logic is given. Defensible logics, truth maintenance, default logic, temporally dependent propositions, and resource allocation and planning are discussed.

  19. 17 CFR 3.3 - Chief compliance officer.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 17 Commodity and Securities Exchanges 1 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Chief compliance officer. 3.3 Section 3.3 Commodity and Securities Exchanges COMMODITY FUTURES TRADING COMMISSION REGISTRATION... assessment as to the effectiveness of these policies and procedures; and (iii) Discuss areas for improvement...

  20. Emotional Intelligence and Selection to Administrative Chief Residency

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kilpatrick, Charlie C.; Doyle, Peter D.; Reichman, Eric F.; Chohan, Lubna; Uthman, Margaret O.; Orejuela, Francisco J.

    2012-01-01

    Objective: The authors sought to determine whether emotional intelligence, as measured by the BarOn Emotional Quotient Inventory (EQ-i), is associated with selection to administrative chief resident. Method: Authors invited senior-year residents at the University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston to participate in an observational…

  1. 17 CFR 200.22 - The Chief Accountant.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... auditing rules, regulations, opinions and policy, and interprets Commission accounting policy and positions... Commission on, and is responsible to the Commission for, all accounting and auditing matters arising in the administration of the federal securities laws. The Chief Accountant oversees the accounting profession's...

  2. NASA Chief Scientist Sharnon Lucid at STS-107 outreach event

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    NASA Chief Scientist Shannon Lucid, a former astronaut, introduces Northern Virginia students to the research that will be conducted on the STS-107 mission. The activity was part of the Space Research and You education event held by NASA's Office of Biological and Physical Research on June 25, 2002, in Arlington, VA, to highlight the research that will be conducted on STS-107.

  3. The right stuff nurses who become chief executives.

    PubMed

    Moore, Alison

    2016-09-07

    When Helen Greatorex took up her new job as chief executive of Kent and Medway NHS and Social Care Partnership Trust, one of her first acts was to concentrate on out-of-area placements for mental health patients. At the time - early June - the trust had 76 patients in beds outside the area, costing £1million a month.

  4. Reclaiming the Educational Role of Chief Admission Officers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McDonough, Patricia; Robertson, Larry

    1995-01-01

    Describes changes that have occurred in high schools, colleges, and the entrepreneurial admission sector. Relates the evolution of the admission officer's job since the early 1960s and the profession's rapid growth. Details the hybrid role of marketer and educator for chief admissions officers, and issues a call for professional standards. (RJM)

  5. Chief Diversity Officers and the Wonderful World of Academe

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harvey, William B.

    2014-01-01

    The chief diversity officer (CDO) position is new in the realm of higher education administration. Charged with helping their institutions become more diverse and inclusive, the people who occupy these positions face a variety of challenges as they attempt to modify change-resistant institutional cultures. Still, the emergence of the CDO position…

  6. The Critical Task of Hiring a New Chief

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Oishi, Lindsay

    2012-01-01

    For most of the more than 14,000 districts nationwide, the critical task of hiring a new chief executive is entrusted to the school board. There are a few exceptions, such as when there are mayoral takeovers of districts and the mayor appoints a CEO. As board members rarely have the requisite experience or time to search, they often turn to…

  7. NASA Chief Scientist Sharnon Lucid at STS-107 outreach event

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    NASA Chief Scientist Shannon Lucid, a former astronaut, introduces Northern Virginia students to the research that will be conducted on the STS-107 mission. The activity was part of the Space Research and You education event held by NASA's Office of Biological and Physical Research on June 25, 2002, in Arlington, VA, to highlight the research that will be conducted on STS-107.

  8. Wanted: Schools Chiefs for Big-Name Districts

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zubrzycki, Jaclyn

    2013-01-01

    Districts across the country, including some of the nation's largest, are facing a spate of superintendent vacancies. Schools chiefs or interim superintendents will be leaving this year or next in at least 17 well-known districts, including Baltimore, Maryland; Boston, Massachusetts; Clark County, Nevada; Indianapolis, Indiana; and Wake County,…

  9. The Ethics of Chief School Administrators: A Study of Accommodation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dexheimer, Roy

    To investigate a possible gap between the outward acceptance of the AASA Code of Ethics and the individual members' internal or even public adherence to the Code, questionnaires containing 15 anecdotal situations which might face any typical school administrator were sent to 444 chief school administrators. A separate sheet solicited…

  10. Wanted: Schools Chiefs for Big-Name Districts

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zubrzycki, Jaclyn

    2013-01-01

    Districts across the country, including some of the nation's largest, are facing a spate of superintendent vacancies. Schools chiefs or interim superintendents will be leaving this year or next in at least 17 well-known districts, including Baltimore, Maryland; Boston, Massachusetts; Clark County, Nevada; Indianapolis, Indiana; and Wake County,…

  11. 46 CFR 11.495 - Chief Mate (OSV).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Chief Mate (OSV). 11.495 Section 11.495 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY MERCHANT MARINE OFFICERS AND SEAMEN REQUIREMENTS FOR OFFICER... of Article IX of STCW. ...

  12. BP chief scientist nominated for senior energy role

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gwynne, Peter

    2014-01-01

    The Obama administration has nominated BP's chief scientist Ellen Williams to be director of the Advanced Research Projects Agency-Energy (ARPA-E), which was created in 2007 to fund "high-risk, high-reward" research into novel energy technologies that are too early for investment by the private sector.

  13. 17 CFR 49.22 - Chief compliance officer.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... registered swap data repository's management and members of the board of directors; (3) Establishing and...) Establishing and following appropriate procedures for the handling, management response, remediation, retesting... certification by the chief compliance officer that, to the best of his or her knowledge and reasonable...

  14. Hail to the Chief: A Survivor's Guide to Presidential Egos

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Riehl, Richard J.

    2010-01-01

    The author once was a student in a graduate seminar taught by the president of the university where he was a mid-level administrator. The course focused on what it takes to be the chief executive of a university. The university president was the only one of the ten presidents under whom the author served who embraced the role of a college…

  15. 32 CFR 1803.33 - Determination by NACIC Office Chiefs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 6 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Determination by NACIC Office Chiefs. 1803.33 Section 1803.33 National Defense Other Regulations Relating to National Defense NATIONAL COUNTERINTELLIGENCE CENTER PUBLIC REQUESTS FOR MANDATORY DECLASSIFICATION REVIEW OF CLASSIFIED INFORMATION PURSUANT TO SECTION 3.6 OF EXECUTIVE ORDER 12958 NACIC...

  16. 32 CFR 1803.33 - Determination by NACIC Office Chiefs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 6 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Determination by NACIC Office Chiefs. 1803.33 Section 1803.33 National Defense Other Regulations Relating to National Defense NATIONAL COUNTERINTELLIGENCE CENTER PUBLIC REQUESTS FOR MANDATORY DECLASSIFICATION REVIEW OF CLASSIFIED INFORMATION PURSUANT TO SECTION 3.6 OF EXECUTIVE ORDER 12958 NACIC...

  17. 32 CFR 1803.33 - Determination by NACIC Office Chiefs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 6 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Determination by NACIC Office Chiefs. 1803.33 Section 1803.33 National Defense Other Regulations Relating to National Defense NATIONAL COUNTERINTELLIGENCE CENTER PUBLIC REQUESTS FOR MANDATORY DECLASSIFICATION REVIEW OF CLASSIFIED INFORMATION PURSUANT TO SECTION 3.6 OF EXECUTIVE ORDER 12958 NACIC...

  18. eLaunch Hypersonics: An Advanced Launch System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Starr, Stanley

    2010-01-01

    This presentation describes a new space launch system that NASA can and should develop. This approach can significantly reduce ground processing and launch costs, improve reliability, and broaden the scope of what we do in near earth orbit. The concept (not new) is to launch a re-usable air-breathing hypersonic vehicle from a ground based electric track. This vehicle launches a final rocket stage at high altitude/velocity for the final leg to orbit. The proposal here differs from past studies in that we will launch above Mach 1.5 (above transonic pinch point) which further improves the efficiency of air breathing, horizontal take-off launch systems. The approach described here significantly reduces cost per kilogram to orbit, increases safety and reliability of the boost systems, and reduces ground costs due to horizontal-processing. Finally, this approach provides significant technology transfer benefits for our national infrastructure.

  19. Canadian Space Launch: Exploiting Northern Latitudes For Efficient Space Launch

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-04-01

    an orbit directly over the North Pole. Is it more efficient to launch HIOs from higher latitudes ? In order to proceed with an investigation into... North American launch capacity with similar 15 latitudes to Russian facilities would be a welcomed alternative for commercial space companies...northern Manitoba. The high latitude of this site of approximately 59 o and remote location Figure 6 19 would allow for efficient polar launches

  20. The Launch of an Atlas/Centaur Launch Vehicle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1978-01-01

    The launch of an Atlas/Centaur launch vehicle is shown in this photograph. The Atlas/Centaur, launched on November 13, 1978, carried the High Energy Astronomy Observatory (HEAO)-2 into the required orbit. The second observatory, the HEAO-2 (nicknamed the Einstein Observatory in honor of the centernial of the birth of Albert Einstein) carried the first telescope capable of producing actual photographs of x-ray objects.

  1. KSC Vertical Launch Site Evaluation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Phillips, Lynne V.

    2007-01-01

    RS&H was tasked to evaluate the potential available launch sites for a combined two user launch pad. The Launch sites were to be contained entirely within current Kennedy Space Center property lines. The user launch vehicles to be used for evaluation are in the one million pounds of first stage thrust range. Additionally a second evaluation criterion was added early on in the study. A single user launch site was to be evaluated for a two million pound first stage thrust vehicle. Both scenarios were to be included in the report. To provide fidelity to the study criteria, a specific launch vehicle in the one million pound thrust range was chosen as a guide post or straw-man launch vehicle. The RpK K-1 vehicle is a current Commercial Orbital Transportation System (COTS), contract awardee along with the SpaceX Falcon 9 vehicle. SpaceX, at the time of writing, is planning to launch COTS and possibly other payloads from Cx-40 on Cape Canaveral Air Force Station property. RpK has yet to declare a specific launch site as their east coast US launch location. As such it was deemed appropriate that RpK's vehicle requirements be used as conceptual criteria. For the purposes of this study those criteria were marginally generalized to make them less specifiC.

  2. History of the Joint Chiefs of Staff. The Joint Chiefs of Staff and National Policy. Volume 8, 1961 - 1964

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-01-01

    reviewed Harriman’s instructions for his mission to Mos- cow . General Taylor noted that the Chiefs, individually, had taken the position that a limited...The western powers would need 34 active and 22 reserve divisions to defend the Rhine River line and hold Schleswig- Holstein . They had only 23 ready

  3. EDITORIAL: Farewell from the outgoing Editor-in-Chief Farewell from the outgoing Editor-in-Chief

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rost, Jan Michael

    2011-01-01

    I am very pleased to announce that Professor Paul Corkum will be taking on the position of Editor-in-Chief at Journal of Physics B: Atomic, Molecular and Optical Physics (J. Phys. B) from the beginning of January 2011. During my term as Editor-in-Chief atomic, molecular and optical science has continued to change rapidly: we have seen ultracold physics widening its original emphasis on Bose-Einstein condensates to the entanglement of light and matter in the most general sense towards a science of information. At the same time attosecond science and interaction of matter with short x-ray pulses develops rapidly. I am very happy that J. Phys. B with Paul Corkum as Editor-in-Chief will play a central role in publishing exciting results from this field. I would like to thank the publishing team at J. Phys. B for their fantastic job, in particular for the quality of the refereeing system the team has been able to maintain while at the same time bringing down the publication times considerably. I thank them all for the help and support they have given me in the role of Editor-in-Chief and wish them the very best for the future. Last and certainly not least I would like to thank you, the authors, referees and readers, for the support of J. Phys. B.

  4. Coverage of STS-104 Launch Coverage of Flight Controllers in MCC.

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2001-07-12

    JSC2001-E-21338 (12 July 2001) --- Robert Gest (left), with United Space Alliance (USA); Steven A. Hawley, deputy director of flight crew operations; and Alan L. (Lee) Briscoe, chief engineer for the Mission Operations Directorate, watch their monitors at the MOD console in the shuttle flight control room (WFCR) as the external tank oxygen vent hood is raised and retracted minutes prior to the launch of the Space Shuttle Atlantis.

  5. Advanced small launch vehicle study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reins, G. E.; Alvis, J. F.

    1972-01-01

    A conceptual design study was conducted to determine the most economical (lowest cost/launch) approach for the development of an advanced small launch vehicle (ASLV) for use over the next decade. The ASLV design objective was to place a 340 kg (750 lb) payload into a 556 km (300 n.mi.) circular orbit when launched due east from Wallops Island, Virginia. The investigation encompassed improvements to the current Scout launch vehicle; use of existing military and NASA launch vehicle stages; and new, optionally staged vehicles. Staging analyses included use of liquid, solid, and hybrid propellants. Improvements in guidance, controls, interstages, telemetry, and payload shroud were also considered. It was concluded that the most economical approach is to progressively improve the Scout launch vehicle in three phased steps which are discussed.

  6. Peer Review of Launch Environments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, Timmy R.

    2011-01-01

    Catastrophic failures of launch vehicles during launch and ascent are currently modeled using equivalent trinitrotoluene (TNT) estimates. This approach tends to over-predict the blast effect with subsequent impact to launch vehicle and crew escape requirements. Bangham Engineering, located in Huntsville, Alabama, assembled a less-conservative model based on historical failure and test data coupled with physical models and estimates. This white paper summarizes NESC's peer review of the Bangham analytical work completed to date.

  7. Launch of STS-63 Discovery

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1995-01-01

    This wide lux image of the Space Shuttle Discovery as it began its race to catch up with Russia's Mir Space Station shows the base of the launch pad as well as the orbiter just clearing the gantry. Liftoff from Launch Pad 39B, Kennedy Space Center (KSC) occurred at 12:22:04 (EST) February 3, 1995. Discovery is the first in the current fleet of four space shuttle vehicles to make 20 launches.

  8. Launch of STS-63 Discovery

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1995-01-01

    This wide lux image of the Space Shuttle Discovery as it began its race to catch up with Russia's Mir Space Station shows the base of the launch pad as well as the orbiter just clearing the gantry. Liftoff from Launch Pad 39B, Kennedy Space Center (KSC) occurred at 12:22:04 (EST) February 3, 1995. Discovery is the first in the current fleet of four space shuttle vehicles to make 20 launches.

  9. Launch of STS-63 Discovery

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1995-01-01

    A 35mm camera was used to expose this image of the Space Shuttle Discovery as it began its race to catch up with Russia's Mir Space Station. Liftoff from Launch Pad 39B, Kennedy Space Center (KSC) occurred at 12:22:04 (EST) February 3, 1995. Discovery is the first in the current fleet of four space shuttle vehicles to make 20 launches. The launch pad and orbiter can be seen reflected in the water directly in front of it.

  10. Launch of STS-63 Discovery

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1995-01-01

    A 70mm camera was used to expose this image of the Space Shuttle Discovery as it began its race to catch up with Russia's Mir Space Station. Liftoff from Launch Pad 39B, Kennedy Space Center (KSC) occurred at 12:22:04 (EST) February 3, 1995. Discovery is the first in the current fleet of four space shuttle vehicles to make 20 launches. The launch pad and orbiter can be seen reflected in the water directly in front of it.

  11. The Titan Space Launch System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keeley, J. T.

    1981-04-01

    The Titan III Space Launch Vehicle (SLV) System providing reliable fast response booster capability is discussed. Early Titans, including Titans I and II and the Gemini launch vehicle are described, and the elements of the Titan III, including the upper stages, payload fairings, and launch facilities are presented. The liquid boost module for STS performance augmentation and the Titan 34D SLV System are also discussed. The Titan III SLV System demonstrates excellent versatility while maintaining a high reliability record during thirteen years of operational flights, and provides optional use of solid thrust augmentation and launch sites on both Coasts.

  12. ARES I-X Launch

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2009-10-27

    NASA Ares I-X Launch Director Ed Mango, left, laughs as NASA Ares I-X Assistant Launch Director Pete Nickolenko looks out the window of Firing Room One of the Launch Control Center (LCC) at the Kennedy Space Center prior to the launch of the Ares I-X rocket from pad 39b at the Kennedy Space Center in Cape Canaveral, Fla., Wednesday, Oct. 28, 2009. The flight test of Ares I-X will provide NASA with an early opportunity to test and prove flight characteristics, hardware, facilities and ground operations associated with the Ares I. Photo Credit: (NASA/Bill Ingalls)

  13. Rocket Launch Trajectory Simulations Mechanism

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Margasahayam, Ravi; Caimi, Raoul E.; Hauss, Sharon; Voska, N. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    The design and development of a Trajectory Simulation Mechanism (TSM) for the Launch Systems Testbed (LST) is outlined. In addition to being one-of-a-kind facility in the world, TSM serves as a platform to study the interaction of rocket launch-induced environments and subsequent dynamic effects on the equipment and structures in the close vicinity of the launch pad. For the first time, researchers and academicians alike will be able to perform tests in a laboratory environment and assess the impact of vibroacoustic behavior of structures in a moving rocket scenario on ground equipment, launch vehicle, and its valuable payload or spacecraft.

  14. STS-113 M.S. Michael Lopez-Alegriain White Room before launch

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- In the White Room on Launch Pad 39A, STS-113 Mission Specialist Michael Lopez-Alegria is helped with his launch and entry suit before entering Space Shuttle Endeavour. Closeout Crew members helping are (from left) Rick Welty, United Space Alliance Vehicle Closeout chief, Bobby Wright, USA mechanical technician, and Danny Wyatt, NASA Quality Assurance specialist. The launch will carry the Expedition 6 crew to the Station and return the Expedition 5 crew to Earth. The major objective of the mission is delivery of the Port 1 (P1) Integrated Truss Assembly, which will be attached to the port side of the S0 truss. Three spacewalks are planned to install and activate the truss and its associated equipment. Launch of Space Shuttle Endeavour on mission STS-113 is scheduled for Nov. 23 at 7:50 p.m. EST.

  15. STS-113 Mission Specialist John Herrington in White Room before launch

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- In the White Room on Launch Pad 39A, STS-113 Mission Specialist John Herrington is helped with his launch and entry suit by Rick Welty, United Space Alliance Vehicle Closeout chief. The launch will carry the Expedition 6 crew to the Station and return the Expedition 5 crew to Earth. The major objective of the mission is delivery of the Port 1 (P1) Integrated Truss Assembly, which will be attached to the port side of the S0 truss. Three spacewalks are planned to install and activate the truss and its associated equipment. Launch of Space Shuttle Endeavour on mission STS-113 is scheduled for Nov. 23 at 7:50 p.m. EST.

  16. Expedition 6 flight engineer Nikolai Budarin in White Room before launch

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- In the White Room on Launch Pad 39A, Expedition 6 flight engineer Nikolai Budarin is helped with his launch and entry suit before entering Space Shuttle Endeavour. Closeout Crew members helping are (left) Rene Arriens, United Space Alliance mechanical technician, (right) Danny Wyatt, NASA Quality Assurance specialist, and (background) Rick Welty, United Space Alliance Vehicle Closeout chief. The launch will carry the Expedition 6 crew to the Station and return the Expedition 5 crew to Earth. The major objective of the mission is delivery of the Port 1 (P1) Integrated Truss Assembly, which will be attached to the port side of the S0 truss. Three spacewalks are planned to install and activate the truss and its associated equipment. Launch of Space Shuttle Endeavour on mission STS-113 is scheduled for Nov. 23 at 7:50 p.m. EST.

  17. STS-113 Mission Specialist John Herrington in White Room before launch

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- In the White Room on Launch Pad 39A, STS-113 Mission Specialist John Herrington is helped with his launch and entry suit by Rick Welty, United Space Alliance Vehicle Closeout chief. The launch will carry the Expedition 6 crew to the Station and return the Expedition 5 crew to Earth. The major objective of the mission is delivery of the Port 1 (P1) Integrated Truss Assembly, which will be attached to the port side of the S0 truss. Three spacewalks are planned to install and activate the truss and its associated equipment. Launch of Space Shuttle Endeavour on mission STS-113 is scheduled for Nov. 23 at 7:50 p.m. EST.

  18. Expedition 6 flight engineer Nikolai Budarin in White Room before launch

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- In the White Room on Launch Pad 39A, Expedition 6 flight engineer Nikolai Budarin is helped with his launch and entry suit before entering Space Shuttle Endeavour. Closeout Crew members helping are (left) Rene Arriens, United Space Alliance mechanical technician, (right) Danny Wyatt, NASA Quality Assurance specialist, and (background) Rick Welty, United Space Alliance Vehicle Closeout chief. The launch will carry the Expedition 6 crew to the Station and return the Expedition 5 crew to Earth. The major objective of the mission is delivery of the Port 1 (P1) Integrated Truss Assembly, which will be attached to the port side of the S0 truss. Three spacewalks are planned to install and activate the truss and its associated equipment. Launch of Space Shuttle Endeavour on mission STS-113 is scheduled for Nov. 23 at 7:50 p.m. EST.

  19. Launch Support Video Site

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    OFarrell, Zachary L.

    2013-01-01

    The goal of this project is to create a website that displays video, countdown clock, and event times to customers during launches, without needing to be connected to the internal operations network. The requirements of this project are to also minimize the delay in the clock and events to be less than two seconds. The two parts of this are the webpage, which will display the data and videos to the user, and a server to send clock and event data to the webpage. The webpage is written in HTML with CSS and JavaScript. The JavaScript is responsible for connecting to the server, receiving new clock data, and updating the webpage. JavaScript is used for this because it can send custom HTTP requests from the webpage, and provides the ability to update parts of the webpage without having to refresh the entire page. The server application will act as a relay between the operations network, and the open internet. On the operations network side, the application receives multicast packets that contain countdown clock and events data. It will then parse the data into current countdown times and events, and create a packet with that information that can be sent to webpages. The other part will accept HTTP requests from the webpage, and respond to them with current data. The server is written in C# with some C++ files used to define the structure of data packets. The videos for the webpage will be shown in an embedded player from UStream.

  20. STS-110 Atlantis Launch

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    The Space Shuttle Orbiter Atlantis STS-110, embarking on its 25th flight, lifts off from launch pad 39B at Kennedy Space Center at 3:44 p.m. CDT April 8, 2002. The STS-110 mission prepared the International Space Station (ISS) for future space walks by installing and outfitting a 43-foot-long Starboard side S0 truss and preparing the Mobile Transporter. The 27,000 pound S0 truss was the first of 9 segments that will make up the Station's external framework that will eventually stretch 356 feet (109 meters), or approximately the length of a football field. This central truss segment also includes a flatcar called the Mobile Transporter and rails that will become the first 'space railroad,' which will allow the Station's robotic arm to travel up and down the finished truss for future assembly and maintenance. The completed truss structure will hold solar arrays and radiators to provide power and cooling for additional international research laboratories from Japan and Europe that will be attached to the Station. Milestones of the S-110 mission included the first time the ISS robotic arm was used to maneuver space walkers around the Station and marked the first time all space walks were based out of the Station's Quest Airlock. It was also the first Shuttle to use three Block II Main Engines.

  1. STS-110 Atlantis Launch

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    The Space Shuttle Orbiter Atlantis STS-110, embarking on its 25th flight, lifts off from launch pad 39B at Kennedy Space Center at 3:44 p.m. CDT April 8, 2002. The STS-110 mission prepared the International Space Station (ISS) for future space walks by installing and outfitting a 43-foot-long Starboard side S0 truss and preparing the Mobile Transporter. The 27,000 pound S0 Truss was the first of 9 segments that will make up the Station's external framework that will eventually stretch 356 feet (109 meters), or approximately the length of a football field. This central truss segment also includes a flatcar called the Mobile Transporter and rails that will become the first 'space railroad,' which will allow the Station's robotic arm to travel up and down the finished truss for future assembly and maintenance. The completed truss structure will hold solar arrays and radiators to provide power and cooling for additional international research laboratories from Japan and Europe that will be attached to the Station. Milestones of the S-110 mission included the first time the ISS robotic arm was used to maneuver space walkers around the Station and marked the first time all space walks were based out of the Station's Quest Airlock. It was also the first Shuttle to use three Block II Main Engines.

  2. Two perspectives on the educational and administrative roles of the pediatric chief resident.

    PubMed

    Dabrow, Sharon M; Harris, Elizabeth J; Maldonado, Luis A; Gereige, Rani S

    2011-03-01

    To investigate pediatric chief residents' responsibilities and determine how chief residents and program directors view the scope of the chief resident's role. We distributed a 20-item survey to program directors and chief residents at all US pediatric residency programs. Questions pertained to activities performed and the level of importance of administrative, clinical, and educational activities. The survey also investigated motivating factors to become chief resident, future career plans, and level of job satisfaction. We received responses from 127 program directors and 101 chief residents. Of the chief residents, 98% (99/101) felt administrative tasks were very/somewhat important, followed by education, service, and research. Significantly more program directors than chief residents felt chiefs' overall workload was well balanced. Program directors gave higher ratings than chief residents on chief's ability to develop clinical skills (79% [95/121] versus 61% [61/100]) and manage stress and burnout (86% [104/121] versus 72% [72/100]). Future career plans for chief residents in decreasing order included fellowship, outpatient practice, academic practice, and working as a hospitalist. The most significant problems reported by the chief residents were lack of administrative support and lack of time spent in educational/clinical activities. The chief resident role is primarily administrative, but program directors and chiefs feel teaching and clinical responsibilities also are important. Although the 2 groups agreed in many areas, program directors underestimated the administrative demands placed on the chief residents, and our findings suggest the chief resident role may be more fulfilling if the balance was shifted somewhat toward teaching and clinical responsibilities.

  3. 7. OVERALL VIEW OF LAUNCH PAD, SHOWING HELIPAD AT LAUNCH ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    7. OVERALL VIEW OF LAUNCH PAD, SHOWING HELIPAD AT LAUNCH AREA, WHEN VIEWED WITH NEGATIVE NO. CA-57-8(BELOW), LOOKING NORTH. BASKETBALL COURT IN BACKGROUND Everett Weinreb, photographer, March 1988 - Mount Gleason Nike Missile Site, Angeles National Forest, South of Soledad Canyon, Sylmar, Los Angeles County, CA

  4. 14 CFR 415.121 - Launch schedule.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 4 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Launch schedule. 415.121 Section 415.121... TRANSPORTATION LICENSING LAUNCH LICENSE Safety Review and Approval for Launch of an Expendable Launch Vehicle From a Non-Federal Launch Site § 415.121 Launch schedule. An applicant's safety review document...

  5. 14 CFR 415.121 - Launch schedule.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 4 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Launch schedule. 415.121 Section 415.121... TRANSPORTATION LICENSING LAUNCH LICENSE Safety Review and Approval for Launch of an Expendable Launch Vehicle From a Non-Federal Launch Site § 415.121 Launch schedule. An applicant's safety review document...

  6. EDITORIAL: Incoming Editor-in-Chief Incoming Editor-in-Chief

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Birch, David

    2012-01-01

    It is a pleasure and an honour for me to be taking over as Editor-in-Chief of Measurement Science and Technology. MST is well known across research communities worldwide as a leading journal in which to publish new techniques and instrumentation. It has gained this enviable position largely because of the excellent guidance of its Editorial Board and dedicated staff at Institute of Physics Publishing over many years. I want to highlight in particular the contribution of the outgoing Editor Peter Hauptmann, and other Editors before him, in making the journal truly international. We thank Peter immensely for all his hard work in leading the journal, having exceptionally served two terms, each of five years. I come into the post of Editor at a very interesting and challenging time for research. The global recession is leading to cuts in research funding in many countries, researchers and their outputs are coming under closer scrutiny than ever before, and more is being expected of them. Journals play a critical role in monitoring and maintaining research standards, but we should be careful not to assume that journal Impact Factor is the sole measure of research quality. Although expediency may sometimes demand it, Impact Factor, as practitioners know, is subject dependent. One of the great things about science and technology for me is its level playing field. The key point is still innovation no matter where the work is done or where it is published. MST has a long pedigree of being the natural home of the highest quality papers from leading researchers wishing to report novel instrumentation and techniques. 2013 will mark the 90th anniversary of MST and we look forward to celebrating in style its sustained success. I recall with pride the first paper I published in Journal of Physics E: Scientific Instruments (as MST was previously titled) back in 1977. The paper reported the design and application of an early fluorescence lifetime spectrometer that I had constructed

  7. 46 CFR 97.45-1 - Master and chief engineer responsible.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... VESSELS OPERATIONS Carrying of Excess Steam § 97.45-1 Master and chief engineer responsible. It shall be the duty of the master and the chief engineer of any vessel to require that a steam pressure is...

  8. 46 CFR 97.45-1 - Master and chief engineer responsible.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... VESSELS OPERATIONS Carrying of Excess Steam § 97.45-1 Master and chief engineer responsible. It shall be the duty of the master and the chief engineer of any vessel to require that a steam pressure is...

  9. 46 CFR 97.45-1 - Master and chief engineer responsible.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... VESSELS OPERATIONS Carrying of Excess Steam § 97.45-1 Master and chief engineer responsible. It shall be the duty of the master and the chief engineer of any vessel to require that a steam pressure is...

  10. Editors-in-Chief of Medical Journals: Are They Experts, Authorities, Both, or Neither?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zsindely, Sandor; Schubert, Andras

    1989-01-01

    Uses citation analysis to study the professional status and influence of the editors-in-chief of 769 medical journals. Finds that these editors-in-chief are, at least in their own specialties, not necessarily experts but authorities. (SR)

  11. 41 CFR 102-173.40 - Who is my Chief Information Officer (CIO)?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ...-INTERNET GOV DOMAIN Registration § 102-173.40 Who is my Chief Information Officer (CIO)? Your Chief... General Services Administration (GSA) recognizes the cabinet level CIOs listed at http://www.cio.gov. For...

  12. STS-51 Launch

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1993-01-01

    The Space Shuttle Discovery takes off from Launch Pad 39B at the Kennedy Space Center, Florida, to begin Mission STS-51 on 12 September 1993. The 57th shuttle mission began at 7:45 a.m. EDT, and lasted 9 days, 20 hours, 11 minutes, 11 seconds, while traveling a total distance of 4,106,411 miles. The Advanced Communications Technology Satellite (ACTS) was one of the projects deployed. This satellite serves as a test bed for advanced experimental communications satellite concepts and technology. Another payload on this mission was the Orbiting Retrievable Far and Extreme Ultraviolet Spectrometer (ORFEUS) telescope mounted on the Shuttle Pallet Satellite (SPAS) payload carrier. ORFEUS was designed to investigate very hot and very cold matter in the universe. Space Shuttles are the main element of America's Space Transportation System and are used for space research and other space applications. The shuttles are the first vehicles capable of being launched into space and returning to Earth on a routine basis. Space Shuttles are used as orbiting laboratories in which scientists and mission specialists conduct a wide variety of scientific experiments. Crews aboard shuttles place satellites in orbit, rendezvous with satellites to carry out repair missions and return them to space, and retrieve satellites and return them to Earth for refurbishment and reuse. Space Shuttles are true aerospace vehicles. They leave Earth and its atmosphere under rocket power provided by three liquid-propellant main engines with two solid-propellant boosters attached plus an external liquid-fuel tank. After their orbital missions, they streak back through the atmosphere and land like airplanes. The returning shuttles, however, land like gliders, without power and on runways. Other rockets can place heavy payloads into orbit, but, they can only be used once. Space Shuttles are designed to be continually reused. When Space Shuttles are used to transport complete scientific laboratories into

  13. STS-51 Launch

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1993-01-01

    The Space Shuttle Discovery takes off from Launch Pad 39B at the Kennedy Space Center, Florida, to begin Mission STS-51 on 12 September 1993. The 57th shuttle mission began at 7:45 a.m. EDT, and lasted 9 days, 20 hours, 11 minutes, 11 seconds, while traveling a total distance of 4,106,411 miles. The Advanced Communications Technology Satellite (ACTS) was one of the projects deployed. This satellite serves as a test bed for advanced experimental communications satellite concepts and technology. Another payload on this mission was the Orbiting Retrievable Far and Extreme Ultraviolet Spectrometer (ORFEUS) telescope mounted on the Shuttle Pallet Satellite (SPAS) payload carrier. ORFEUS was designed to investigate very hot and very cold matter in the universe. Space Shuttles are the main element of America's Space Transportation System and are used for space research and other space applications. The shuttles are the first vehicles capable of being launched into space and returning to Earth on a routine basis. Space Shuttles are used as orbiting laboratories in which scientists and mission specialists conduct a wide variety of scientific experiments. Crews aboard shuttles place satellites in orbit, rendezvous with satellites to carry out repair missions and return them to space, and retrieve satellites and return them to Earth for refurbishment and reuse. Space Shuttles are true aerospace vehicles. They leave Earth and its atmosphere under rocket power provided by three liquid-propellant main engines with two solid-propellant boosters attached plus an external liquid-fuel tank. After their orbital missions, they streak back through the atmosphere and land like airplanes. The returning shuttles, however, land like gliders, without power and on runways. Other rockets can place heavy payloads into orbit, but, they can only be used once. Space Shuttles are designed to be continually reused. When Space Shuttles are used to transport complete scientific laboratories into

  14. Chief Joseph Dam, Columbia River, Washington, Community Impact Reports,

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1980-05-01

    Corps of Engineers. . e . .. . UNCLASSIFIED SECURITY CLASSIFICATION OF THIS PAGE (Wh.n Data Entered) REPORT DOCUMENTATION PAGE READ INSTRUCTIONS R PEFORE... CLASSIFICATION OF THIS PAGE (WIhwnt ata Ent .rd) CHIEF JOSEPH DAM COMMUNITY IMPACT REPORTS TABLE OF CONTENTS PRE-CONSTRUCTION ANALYSIS PUBLISHED...pool 10 feet to elevation 956 feet. Planned construction will temporarily occur in three stages : (1) phasing- in of construction activities in late 1974

  15. Succession planning: perspectives of chief executive officers in US hospitals.

    PubMed

    Collins, Sandra K

    2009-01-01

    A study was conducted to explore the perceptions of chief executive officers in US hospitals regarding the origins of leadership and how they felt about internally developed successors versus externally recruited successors. Furthermore, the study examined how this group of executives utilizes the succession planning process, what factors impact successor identification, what positions are applicable for succession planning activities, and who is ultimately held responsible for leadership continuity within the hospital industry.

  16. Department of Defense Implementation of the Chief Financial Officer Act

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1992-06-01

    AD-A255 166 NAVAL POSTGRADUATE SCHOOL Monterey, California DTICEL, E CT F::SEP 111 992. S AuA THESIS DEPARTMENT OF DEFENSE IMPLEMENTATION OF THE...unlimited. 2b. DECLASSIFICATION/DOWNGRADING SCHEDULE 4. PERFORMING ORGANIZATION REPORT NUMBER( S ) 5. MONITORING ORGANIZATION REPORT NUMBER( S ) 6a. NAME...DEFENSE IMPLEMENTATION OF THE CHIEF FINANCIAL OFFICER ACT 12. PERSONAL AUTHOR( S ) Shields, James L. 13a. TYPE OF REPORT 13b. TIME COVERED 14. DATE OF

  17. Expanding Chief of Mission Authority to Produce Unity of Effort

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-05-01

    interagency integration problem can be rectified by expanding the President’s power to delegate a modified “chief of mission” authority similar to that...functional division of labor among powerful departments and agencies with authorities and prerogatives codified in law and protected by corresponding...of national importance for fear of losing their powers , prerogatives, and budgets. Presidents have the authority to compel integrated efforts but

  18. Care and Feeding of the Chief Academic Officer

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Holyer, Robert

    2010-01-01

    There is an adage common among deans and provosts: The board is concerned with the care and feeding of the president; the faculty is concerned with the care and feeding of the faculty. The implication--and why it brings a knowing smile to any chief academic officer's face--is that no one seems concerned with the care and feeding of the CAO. Small…

  19. Care and Feeding of the Chief Academic Officer

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Holyer, Robert

    2010-01-01

    There is an adage common among deans and provosts: The board is concerned with the care and feeding of the president; the faculty is concerned with the care and feeding of the faculty. The implication--and why it brings a knowing smile to any chief academic officer's face--is that no one seems concerned with the care and feeding of the CAO. Small…

  20. The Chief Software Architect in U.S. Army Acquisition

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-11-01

    workforce. the chief Software Architect in u.S. Army Acquisition Stephen Blanchette, Jr. and John Bergey Software Engineering Institute Report...Norwich University. E-mail: sblanche@sei.cmu.edu John Bergey is a senior member of the technical staff at SEI, specializing in transitioning SEI...across the Armed Services. Prior to joining SEI, he served over 25 years as a software division manager with the U.S. Navy. Mr. Bergey is a