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Sample records for child care centres

  1. The Child's Start in Day Care Centre.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thyssen, Sven

    2000-01-01

    Examined the transition of 10 children to day care. Found that separation from parent was difficult for one child and that a caring teacher, opportunities for exploration, and support in those activities assisted in overcoming separation difficulties. Identified the caregiver-child relationship as important for supporting children in their…

  2. Children's Preferences for Group Musical Activities in Child Care Centres: A Cross-Cultural Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yim, Hoi Yin Bonnie; Ebbeck, Marjory

    2009-01-01

    This paper reports on a cross-cultural research study of children's preferences for group musical activities in child care centres. A total of 228 young children aged 4-5 years in seven child care centres in Hong Kong and in the Adelaide City of South Australia participated in the study. Both qualitative and quantitative data were collected via a…

  3. Revitalization of Indigenous Culture in Child Care Centre

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kulhankova, Jana

    2011-01-01

    In this study, I address contemporary ways of looking after children and care giving roles women play in today's Aboriginal community in Brisbane, Australia. Data were collected through participant observation and interviews during field work in a family care centre managed by Indigenous women with the staff and their clients. My main contribution…

  4. Comparison of planned menus and centre characteristics with foods and beverages served in New York City child-care centres

    PubMed Central

    Breck, Andrew; Dixon, L Beth; Khan, Laura Kettel

    2016-01-01

    Objective The present study evaluated the extent to which child-care centre menus prepared in advance correspond with food and beverage items served to children. The authors identified centre and staff characteristics that were associated with matches between menus and what was served. Design Menus were collected from ninety-five centres in New York City (NYC). Direct observation of foods and beverages served to children were conducted during 524 meal and snack times at these centres between April and June 2010, as part of a larger study designed to determine compliance of child-care centres with city health department regulations for nutrition. Setting Child-care centres were located in low-income neighbourhoods in NYC. Results Overall, 87% of the foods and beverages listed on the menus or allowed as substitutions were served. Menu items matched with foods and beverages served for all major food groups by > 60%. Sweets and water had lower match percentages (40 and 32%, respectively), but water was served 68% of the time when it was not listed on the menu. The staff person making the food and purchasing decisions predicted the match between the planned or substituted items on the menus and the foods and beverages served. Conclusions In the present study, child-care centre menus included most foods and beverages served to children. Menus planned in advance have potential to be used to inform parents about which child-care centre to send their child or what foods and beverages their enrolled children will be offered throughout the day. PMID:27280341

  5. Parental Perceptions of Child Care Quality in Centre-Based and Home-Based Settings: Associations with External Quality Ratings

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lehrer, Joanne S.; Lemay, Lise; Bigras, Nathalie

    2015-01-01

    The current study examined how parental perceptions of child care quality were related to external quality ratings and considered how parental perceptions of quality varied according to child care context (home-based or centre-based settings). Parents of 179 4-year-old children who attended child care centres (n = 141) and home-based settings…

  6. Parental Perceptions of Child Care Quality in Centre-Based and Home-Based Settings: Associations with External Quality Ratings

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lehrer, Joanne S.; Lemay, Lise; Bigras, Nathalie

    2015-01-01

    The current study examined how parental perceptions of child care quality were related to external quality ratings and considered how parental perceptions of quality varied according to child care context (home-based or centre-based settings). Parents of 179 4-year-old children who attended child care centres (n = 141) and home-based settings…

  7. Comparing the nutrition environment and practices of home- and centre-based child-care facilities.

    PubMed

    Martyniuk, Olivia J M; Vanderloo, Leigh M; Irwin, Jennifer D; Burke, Shauna M; Tucker, Patricia

    2016-03-01

    To assess and compare the nutrition environment and practices (as they relate to pre-schoolers) of centre- and home-based child-care facilities. Using a cross-sectional study design, nineteen child-care facilities (ten centre-based, nine home-based) were assessed for one full day using the Environment and Policy Assessment and Observation (EPAO) tool (consisting of a day-long observation/review of the nutrition environment, practices and related documents). Specifically, eight nutrition-related subscales were considered. Child-care facilities in London, Ontario, Canada. Child-care facilities were recruited through directors at centre-based programmes and the providers of home-based programmes. The mean total nutrition environment EPAO scores for centre- and home-based facilities were 12·3 (sd 1·94) and 10·8 (sd 0·78) out of 20 (where a higher score indicates a more supportive environment with regard to nutrition), respectively. The difference between the total nutrition environment EPAO score for centre- and home-based facilities was approaching significance (P=0·055). For both types of facilities, the highest nutrition subscale score (out of 20) was achieved in the staff behaviours domain (centre mean=17·4; home mean=17·0) and the lowest was in the nutrition training and education domain (centre mean=3·6; home mean=2·0). Additional research is needed to confirm these findings. In order to better support child-care staff and enhance the overall nutrition environment in child care, modifications to food practices could be adopted. Specifically, the nutritional quality of foods/beverages provided to pre-schoolers could be improved, nutrition-related training for child-care staff could be provided, and a nutrition curriculum could be created to educate pre-schoolers about healthy food choices.

  8. Cultural Perspectives on Peer Conflicts in Multicultural Dutch Child Care Centres

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rourou, Amina; Singer, Elly; Bekkema, Nienke; De Haan, Dorian

    2006-01-01

    In this paper we discuss a study of cultural perspectives on peer conflicts in multicultural child care centres. On the level of child behaviour we did not find differences between native Dutch. Moroccan-Dutch and Antillean-Dutch children with regard to occurrence, duration and actions to solve peer conflicts. On the level of mother' opinions…

  9. Sudden infant death syndrome (SIDS) and child care centres (CCC).

    PubMed

    Kiechl-Kohlendorfer, U; Moon, R Y

    2008-07-01

    Our aim was to review the risk of sudden infant death syndrome (SIDS) when infants are in child care (CC), to discuss factors potentially responsible for SIDS in this setting and to describe the impact of previous information campaigns on SIDS in CC. There is a remarkably increased risk of SIDS in CC settings. Special education focussing on a safe sleeping environment has resulted in a decrease of practices known to be associated with SIDS. However, despite a safe sleep environment SIDS prevalence remains disproportionately high. Efforts must continue to ensure safe sleeping practices in CC facilities. The possibility of other explanations for the increased prevalence of SIDS in CC settings, such as changes in infant care or stress, must be considered as well.

  10. Caring and Learning Environments: Quality in Child Care Centres across Canada. You Bet I Care!

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goelman, Hillel; Doherty, Gillian; Lero, Donna S.; LaGrange, Annette; Tougas, Jocelyne

    Canadian experts in diverse fields as well as people concerned about social justice and cohesion have identified quality child care as a crucial component in addressing a variety of broad societal goals. This study explored the relationships between child care center quality and: center characteristics; teaching staff wages and working conditions;…

  11. Centre-Based Child Care Quality in Urban Australia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ishimine, Karin; Wilson, Rachel

    2009-01-01

    This study investigates the quality of childcare centres in urban Australian communities designated according to different bands of Centre Location Demographics (CLD). Childcare centres were assessed using the Early Childhood Environment Rating Scale- Revised Edition (ECERS-R) and the Early Childhood Environment Rating Scale-Extension (ECERS-E).…

  12. Centre-Based Child Care Quality in Urban Australia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ishimine, Karin; Wilson, Rachel

    2009-01-01

    This study investigates the quality of childcare centres in urban Australian communities designated according to different bands of Centre Location Demographics (CLD). Childcare centres were assessed using the Early Childhood Environment Rating Scale- Revised Edition (ECERS-R) and the Early Childhood Environment Rating Scale-Extension (ECERS-E).…

  13. Implementation of a radon measurement protocol and its communication plan by child care centre managers in Québec.

    PubMed

    Gagnon, Fabien; Poulin, Patrick; Leclerc, Jean-Marc; Dessau, Jean-Claude; Abab, Aryan; Arsenault, Pamela; El-Turaby, Fady; Lachance-Paquette, Guillaume; Vézina, Félix-Antoine

    2016-10-20

    To invite and support managers of child care centres to measure radon concentrations in their buildings. Their ability to carry out a measurement protocol and communication plan was also evaluated as well as the intention of parents and educators to test for radon at home. Managers, parents and educators of child care centres. 36 child care centres located in two priority investigation areas in Québec. A kit containing radon detectors with installation and recovery instructions was shipped by mail in addition to factsheets intended for parents and educators. Site visits and phone calls were also conducted with a sample of child care centres and participants. The instructions related to detector installation were generally well respected. Afterward, more than half (18) of the 34 parents and educators interviewed said that they had been directly informed of this radon testing by managers or other educators, and not by the factsheet provided. This radon measurement intervention was considered very relevant by 91% of them and a quarter (26%) expressed their intention to test for radon at home, while 6% had already done so. Two child care centres (5.5%) had at least one measurement above the Canadian guideline level of 200 Bq/m3. This intervention has demonstrated the ability of child care centre managers to carry out this type of autonomous procedure, which can be centralized to minimize costs. This type of intervention may influence parents to become more familiar with this contaminant and measure their family's exposure at home.

  14. Those Who Care: A Report on Child Caregivers in Alberta Daycare Centres.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    LaGrange, Annette; Read, Malcolm

    This study examines the characteristics and work environments of child care personnel employed by 80 day care centers throughout Alberta. Findings indicated that, on average, child care staff had higher levels of education than the general adult population in the province. Considerable mobility within the child care field was found. Staff with…

  15. Nutritional quality of foods and beverages on child-care centre menus in Mexico

    PubMed Central

    Benjamin Neelon, Sara E.; Reyes-Morales, Hortensia; Haines, Jess; Gillman, Matthew W.; Taveras, Elsie M.

    2013-01-01

    Objective The purpose of the present study was to assess the nutritional quality of foods and beverages listed on menus serving children in government-sponsored child-care centres throughout Mexico. Design For this cross-sectional menu assessment, we compared (i) food groups and portion sizes of foods and beverages on the menus with MyPlate recommendations and (ii) macronutrients, sugar and fibre with Daily Reference Intake standards. Setting Menus reflected foods and beverages served to children attending one of 142 government-sponsored child-care centres throughout Mexico. Subjects There were fifty-four distinct menus for children aged 4–6 months, 7–9 months, 10–12 months, 13–23 months, 24–47 months and 48–72 months. Results Menus included a variety of foods meeting minimum MyPlate recommendations for each food category except whole grains for children aged 48–72 months. Menus listed excessive amounts of high-energy beverages, including full-fat milk, fruit juice and sugar-sweetened beverages for children of all ages. The mean daily energy content of menu items yielded an average of 2·76 MJ for infants, 4·77 MJ for children aged 13–23 months, 5·36 MJ for children aged 24–47 months and 5·87 MJ for children aged 48–72 months. Foods and beverages on menus provided sufficient grams of carbohydrate and fat, but excessive protein. Conclusions Menus provided a variety of foods but excessive energy. Whole grains were limited, and high-energy beverages were prevalent. Both may be appropriate targets for nutrition intervention. Future studies should move beyond menus and assess what children actually consume in child care. PMID:23036360

  16. Macronutrient and micronutrient intakes of children in Oklahoma child-care centres, USA

    PubMed Central

    Rasbold, Andrea H; Adamiec, Ruth; Anderson, Michael P; Campbell, Janis E; Horm, Diane M; Sitton, Leslie K; Sisson, Susan B

    2016-01-01

    Objective To determine macronutrients and micronutrients in foods served to and consumed by children at child-care centres in Oklahoma, USA and compare them with Dietary Reference Intakes (DRI). Design Observed lunch nutrients compared with one-third of the age-based DRI (for 1–3 years-olds and 4–8-year-olds). Settings Oklahoma child-care centres (n 25), USA. Subjects Children aged 3–5 years (n 415). Results Regarding macronutrients, children were served 1782 (sd 686) kJ (426 (sd 164) kcal), 22·0 (sd 9·0) g protein, 51·5 (sd 20·4) g carbohydrate and 30·7 (sd 8·7) % total fat; they consumed 1305 (sd 669) kJ (312 (sd 160 kcal), 16·0 (sd 9·1) g protein, 37·6 (sd 18·5) g carbohydrate and 28·9 (sd 10·6) % total fat. For both age-based DRI: served energy (22–33 % of children), protein and carbohydrate exceeded; consumed energy (7–13% of children) and protein exceeded, while carbohydrate was inadequate. Regarding micronutrients, for both age-based DRI: served Mg (65·9 (sd 24·7) mg), Zn (3·8 (sd 11·8) mg), vitamin A (249·9 (sd 228·3) µg) and folate (71·9 (sd 40·1) µg) exceeded; vitamin E (1·4 (sd 2·1) mg) was inadequate; served Fe (2·8 (sd 1·8) mg) exceeded only in 1–3-year-olds. Consumed folate (48·3 (sd 38·4) µg) met; Ca (259·4 (sd 146·2) mg) and Zn (2·3 (sd 3·0) mg) exceeded for 1–3-year-olds, but were inadequate for 4–8-year-olds. For both age-based DRI: consumed Fe (1·9 (sd 1·2) mg) and vitamin E (1·0 (sd 1·7) mg) were inadequate; Mg (47·2 (sd 21·8) mg) and vitamin A (155·0 (sd 126·5) µg) exceeded. Conclusions Lunch at child-care centres was twice the age-based DRI for consumed protein, while energy and carbohydrate were inadequate. Areas of improvement for micronutrients pertain to Fe and vitamin E for all children; Ca, Zn, vitamin E and folate for older pre-schoolers. Adequate nutrients are essential for development and the study reveals where public health nutrition experts, policy makers and care providers

  17. Assessment and determinants of airborne bacterial and fungal concentrations in different indoor environments: Homes, child day-care centres, primary schools and elderly care centres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Madureira, Joana; Paciência, Inês; Rufo, João Cavaleiro; Pereira, Cristiana; Teixeira, João Paulo; de Oliveira Fernandes, Eduardo

    2015-05-01

    Until now the influence of risk factors resulting from exposure to biological agents in indoor air has been far less studied than outdoor pollution; therefore the uncertainty of health risks, and how to effectively prevent these, remains. This study aimed (i) to quantify airborne cultivable bacterial and fungal concentrations in four different types of indoor environment as well as to identify the recovered fungi; (ii) to assess the impact of outdoor bacterial and fungal concentrations on indoor air; (iii) to investigate the influence of carbon dioxide (CO2), temperature and relative humidity on bacterial and fungal concentrations; and (iv) to estimate bacterial and fungal dose rate for children (3-5 years old and 8-10 years old) in comparison with the elderly. Air samples were collected in 68 homes, 9 child day-care centres, 20 primary schools and 22 elderly care centres, in a total of 264 rooms with a microbiological air sampler and using tryptic soy agar and malt extract agar culture media for bacteria and fungi growth, respectively. For each building, one outdoor representative location were identified and simultaneously studied. The results showed that child day-care centres were the indoor microenvironment with the highest median bacterial and fungal concentrations (3870 CFU/m3 and 415 CFU/m3, respectively), whereas the lowest median concentrations were observed in elderly care centres (222 CFU/m3 and 180 CFU/m3, respectively). Indoor bacterial concentrations were significantly higher than outdoor concentrations (p < 0.05); whereas the indoor/outdoor ratios for the obtained fungal concentrations were approximately around the unit. Indoor CO2 levels were associated with the bacterial concentration, probably due to occupancy and insufficient ventilation. Penicillium and Cladosporium were the most frequently occurring fungi. Children's had two times higher dose rate to biological pollutants when compared to adult individuals. Thus, due to children

  18. Rethinking family-centred care for the child and family in hospital.

    PubMed

    Tallon, Mary M; Kendall, Garth E; Snider, Paul D

    2015-05-01

    This paper presents and discusses an alternative model of family-centred care (FCC) that focuses on optimising the health and developmental outcomes of children through the provision of appropriate support to the child's family. The relevance, meaning and effectiveness of FCC have been challenged recently. Studies show that parents in hospital often feel unsupported, judged by hospital staff and uncertain about what care they should give to their child. With no convincing evidence relating FCC to improved child health outcomes, it has been suggested that FCC should be replaced with a new improved model to guide the care of children in hospital. This integrative review discusses theory and evidence-based literature that supports the practice of an alternative model of FCC that is focused on the health and developmental outcomes of children who are seriously ill, rather than the organisational requirements of children's hospitals. Theories and research findings in a wide range of disciplines including epidemiology, psychology, sociology, anthropology and neuroscience were accessed for this discussion. Nursing literature regarding partnership building, communication and FCC was also accessed. This paper discusses the benefits of applying a bioecological model of human development, the family and community resource framework, the concepts of allostatic load and biological embedding, empowerment theory, and the nurse-family partnership model to FCC. While there is no direct evidence showing that the implementation of this alternative model of FCC in the hospital setting improves the health and developmental outcomes of children who are seriously ill, there is a great deal of evidence from community nursing practice that suggests it is very likely to do so. Application of these theoretical concepts to practice has the potential to underpin a theory of nursing that is relevant for all nurses irrespective of the age of those they care for and the settings within which they

  19. Comparison of children’s food and beverage intakes with national recommendations in New York City child-care centres

    PubMed Central

    Dixon, L Beth; Breck, Andrew; Khan, Laura Kettel

    2016-01-01

    Objective The present study compared foods and beverages provided to and consumed by children at child-care centres in New York City (NYC) with national nutrition recommendations. Design The study used survey, observational and centre record data collected from child-care centres. Food and beverage intakes from two days of observation and amounts of energy and nutrients were estimated using the US National Cancer Institute’s Automated Self-Administered 24 h Recall system. Setting Meal and snack time at 108 child-care centres in low-income communities in NYC. Subjects Children aged 3–4 years old in classrooms selected by the directors of the participating child-care centres. Results Foods and beverages provided to and consumed by children (n 630) met >50% of the Dietary Reference Intake (DRI) for most nutrients. Intakes of fibre and vitamins D and E were <30% of the DRI. Foods and beverages provided >50% of the recommended average daily intake amounts for total grains, fruits and fruit juices, and dairy, but <50% of the recommended amounts for whole grains, protein foods and vegetables. Intake of oils was below the allowance for energy levels, but foods and beverages with solid fats and added sugars exceeded the limits by 68%. Conclusions Providing more whole grains, vegetables and low-fat dairy and fewer foods with solid fats and added sugars may improve children’s diet quality when at child-care centres. Centre staff may need training, resources and strategies in order to meet the nutrition recommendations. PMID:27280552

  20. Poor Infant Feeding Practices and High Prevalence of Malnutrition in Urban Slum Child Care Centres in Nairobi: A Pilot Study.

    PubMed

    Mwase, Ivan; Mutoro, Antonina; Owino, Victor; Garcia, Ada L; Wright, Charlotte M

    2016-02-01

    Little is known about the style and quality of feeding and care provided in child day-care centres in slum areas. This study purposively sampled five day-care centres in Nairobi, Kenya, where anthropometric measurements were collected among 33 children aged 6-24 months. Mealtime interactions were further observed in 11 children from four centres, using a standardized data collection sheet. We recorded the child actions, such as mood, interest in food, distraction level, as well as caregiver actions, such as encouragement to eat, level of distraction and presence of neutral actions. Of the 33 children assessed, with a mean age of 15.9 ± 4.9 months, 14 (42%) were female. Undernutrition was found in 13 (39%) children with at least one Z score <-2 or oedema (2): height for age <-2 (11), weight for age <-2 (11), body mass index for age <-2 (4). Rates of undernutrition were highest (9 of 13; 69%) in children aged 18-24 months. Hand-washing before the meal was lacking in all centres. Caregivers were often distracted and rarely encouraged children to feed, with most children eating less than half of their served meal. Poor hygiene coupled with non-responsive care practices observed in the centres is a threat to child health, growth and development. © The Author [2015]. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  1. Poor Infant Feeding Practices and High Prevalence of Malnutrition in Urban Slum Child Care Centres in Nairobi: A Pilot Study

    PubMed Central

    Mutoro, Antonina; Owino, Victor; Garcia, Ada L.; Wright, Charlotte M.

    2016-01-01

    Little is known about the style and quality of feeding and care provided in child day-care centres in slum areas. This study purposively sampled five day-care centres in Nairobi, Kenya, where anthropometric measurements were collected among 33 children aged 6–24 months. Mealtime interactions were further observed in 11 children from four centres, using a standardized data collection sheet. We recorded the child actions, such as mood, interest in food, distraction level, as well as caregiver actions, such as encouragement to eat, level of distraction and presence of neutral actions. Of the 33 children assessed, with a mean age of 15.9 ± 4.9 months, 14 (42%) were female. Undernutrition was found in 13 (39%) children with at least one Z score <−2 or oedema (2): height for age <−2 (11), weight for age <−2 (11), body mass index for age <−2 (4). Rates of undernutrition were highest (9 of 13; 69%) in children aged 18–24 months. Hand-washing before the meal was lacking in all centres. Caregivers were often distracted and rarely encouraged children to feed, with most children eating less than half of their served meal. Poor hygiene coupled with non-responsive care practices observed in the centres is a threat to child health, growth and development. PMID:26507408

  2. Quality in Child Day Care Centres: How to Promote It? A Study of Six Day-Care Centres.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Singer, Elly; Miltenburg, Ruth

    1994-01-01

    Explored how research can be useful for improving day-care quality. Studied relationship of pedagogic content and parent policy to day-care center aims, finding a strong relationship between special goals and quality standards. Suggested that improvement requires context-bound theories and a stronger theoretical framework for working with groups…

  3. Advancing family-centred care in child and adolescent mental health: a critical review of the literature.

    PubMed

    MacKean, Gail; Spragins, Wendy; L'Heureux, Laura; Popp, Janice; Wilkes, Chris; Lipton, Harold

    2012-01-01

    Family-centred care (FCC) is a key factor in increasing health and related system responsiveness to the needs of children and families; unfortunately, it is an unfamiliar service model in children's mental health. This critical review of the literature addresses three key questions: What are the concepts, characteristics and principles of FCC in the context of delivering mental health services to children? What are the enablers, barriers and demonstrated benefits to using a family-centred approach to care in children's mental health? And how can we facilitate moving an FCC model forward in children's mental health? A range of databases was searched for the years 2000–2011, for children ages zero to 18 years. Articles were selected for inclusion if a family-centred approach to care was articulated and the context was the intervention and treatment side of the mental healthcare system. This literature review uncovered a multiplicity of terms and concepts, all closely related to FCC. Two of the most frequently used terms in children's mental health are family centred and family focused, which have important differences, particularly in regard to how the family is viewed. Initial benefits to FCC include improved child and family management skills and function, an increased stability of living situation, improved cost-effectiveness, increased consumer and family satisfaction and improved child and family health and well-being. Significant challenges exist in evaluating FCC because of varying interpretations of its core concepts and applications. Nonetheless, a shared understanding of FCC in a children's mental health context seems possible, and examples can be found of best practices, enablers and strategies, including opportunities for innovative policy change to overcome barriers.

  4. Preschool Teachers' Approaches to Care and Gender Differences within a Child-Centred Pedagogy: Findings from an Indonesian Kindergarten

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Adriany, Vina; Warin, Jo

    2014-01-01

    Globally, the child-centred approach to education has influenced practitioners' views of young children as having democratic rights. A key principle of this concept is the belief that each child is unique and can only be compared in relation to their own performance. Here we employ a feminist poststructuralist approach to critique the…

  5. Work-Related Child-Care Centres in Canada, 2001 = Les garderies en milieu de travail au Canada, 2001.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barbeau, Carole

    Noting that the number of work-related child care centers has nearly doubled in the past 10 years in Canada, this report, in both English and French, details a study examining the current practices pertaining to work-related child care in Canada. The report highlights the best examples in this area and discusses what has been learned from the…

  6. The (In)competent Child: Subject Positions of Deviance in Norwegian Day-Care Centres

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Franck, Karianne; Nilsen, Randi Dyblie

    2015-01-01

    In line with social studies of children and childhood, it is necessary to pay attention to local contextual understandings and practices in those places where constructions of children and childhood occur. The authors argue that the discourse of the competent child has become intertwined with a discourse of early intervention. In Norwegian…

  7. Office of Child Care

    MedlinePlus

    ... Early Head Start-Child Care Partnerships. Review the profiles. > What is the Office of Child Care (OCC)? The Office of Child Care supports low-income working families through child care financial assistance and ...

  8. Elderly Care Centre

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wagiman, Aliani; Haja Bava Mohidin, Hazrina; Ismail, Alice Sabrina

    2016-02-01

    The demand for elderly centre has increased tremendously abreast with the world demographic change as the number of senior citizens rose in the 21st century. This has become one of the most crucial problems of today's era. As the world progress into modernity, more and more people are occupied with daily work causing the senior citizens to lose the care that they actually need. This paper seeks to elucidate the best possible design of an elderly care centre with new approach in order to provide the best service for them by analysing their needs and suitable activities that could elevate their quality of life. All these findings will then be incorporated into design solutions so as to enhance the living environment for the elderly especially in Malaysian context.

  9. Look at Me! Does the Adult Truly See and Respond to the Child in Finnish Day-Care Centres?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kalliala, Marjatta

    2011-01-01

    The aim of the Kangaroo research project was to enhance the well-being of children under three years of age in Finnish day-care centres. In this experimental intervention study adults were encouraged to take a more sensitive and active role especially during "free play." In six Kangaroo groups and five control groups adults (N = 28) and…

  10. Look at Me! Does the Adult Truly See and Respond to the Child in Finnish Day-Care Centres?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kalliala, Marjatta

    2011-01-01

    The aim of the Kangaroo research project was to enhance the well-being of children under three years of age in Finnish day-care centres. In this experimental intervention study adults were encouraged to take a more sensitive and active role especially during "free play." In six Kangaroo groups and five control groups adults (N = 28) and…

  11. The role of probiotics and prebiotics in the prevention of infections in child day-care centres.

    PubMed

    Weizman, Z

    2015-01-01

    Infants and children attending day-care centres demonstrate a notably higher risk of gastrointestinal as well as of respiratory tract infections. The present short review evaluates various well-controlled clinical trials analysing the effect of probiotics and prebiotics in the prevention of such infections. In most of the 12 studies identified, probiotic supplementation was found to be a safe and effective therapeutic tool in preventing gastrointestinal and respiratory infection in this population.

  12. An implementation intervention to encourage healthy eating in centre-based child-care services: impact of the Good for Kids Good for Life programme.

    PubMed

    Bell, A Colin; Davies, Lynda; Finch, Meghan; Wolfenden, Luke; Francis, J Lynn; Sutherland, Rachel; Wiggers, John

    2015-06-01

    To determine the impact of an implementation intervention designed to introduce policies and practices supportive of healthy eating in centre-based child-care services. Intervention strategies included staff training, resources, incentives, follow-up support, and performance monitoring and feedback. A quasi-experimental design was used to assess change over 20 months in healthy eating policy and practice in intervention and comparison child-care services. The Hunter New England (HNE) region of New South Wales (NSW), Australia. All centre-based child-care services (n 287) in the intervention region (HNE) were invited and 240 (91% response rate) participated. Two hundred and ninety-six services in the rest of NSW were randomly selected as a comparison region and 191 participated (76% response rate). A sub-analysis was conducted on those services that provided children food (n 196 at baseline and n 190 at follow-up). Ninety-six provided menus for analysis at baseline (HNE, n 36; NSW, n 50) and 102 provided menus at follow-up (HNE, n 50; NSW, n 52). Services in the intervention region were significantly more likely to provide only plain milk and water for children (P = 0.018) and to engage parents in nutrition policy or programmes (P = 0.002). They were also more likely (P = 0.056) to have nutrition policy on home packed food. In addition, menus of services that provided lunch were significantly more likely to comply with healthy eating guidelines for sweetened drinks (P < 0.001), fruit (P < 0.001) and vegetables (P = 0.01). An implementation intervention was able to modify policy and practice in a large number of child-care services so that they were more supportive of healthy eating.

  13. Syllabus Outline on Child Care for Day Care Teachers at Family Life Teacher Training Centre in Somalia. African Studies in Curriculum Development and Evaluation No. 103.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ahmed, Mumina M.

    Five day care centers in Mogadiscio, the capital city of Somalia, were studied to (1) identify problems encountered in teaching a course in child care; (2) observe teaching methods and assess their effectiveness; (3) ascertain reasons for the lack of preservice training for day care teachers; and (4) develop a new syllabus for a course in child…

  14. Syllabus Outline on Child Care for Day Care Teachers at Family Life Teacher Training Centre in Somalia. African Studies in Curriculum Development and Evaluation No. 103.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ahmed, Mumina M.

    Five day care centers in Mogadiscio, the capital city of Somalia, were studied to (1) identify problems encountered in teaching a course in child care; (2) observe teaching methods and assess their effectiveness; (3) ascertain reasons for the lack of preservice training for day care teachers; and (4) develop a new syllabus for a course in child…

  15. Child Care and Child Nutrition

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Karolak, Eric

    2009-01-01

    The weak economy is challenging the child care program budget. Fluctuations in enrollment come up against rising costs making every penny count. So for many reasons a federal program that helps defray the costs of snacks and meals in child care programs is particularly important and timely. In this article, the author pushes for the…

  16. Child Care and Child Nutrition

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Karolak, Eric

    2009-01-01

    The weak economy is challenging the child care program budget. Fluctuations in enrollment come up against rising costs making every penny count. So for many reasons a federal program that helps defray the costs of snacks and meals in child care programs is particularly important and timely. In this article, the author pushes for the…

  17. Child Care Services Handbook.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Duval County School Board, Jacksonville, FL.

    A companion document to the curriculum guide for a secondary level child care services curriculum, this handbook contains a variety of administrative and program resources for the teacher: The vocational curriculum outline for child care services; a calendar of suggested public relations activities; procedures for building child care services…

  18. Child Care Update: 1987.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Levy, Vic; And Others

    This paper provides information on child care needs, existing services, and special topics related to child care in Dane County, Wisconsin. Section I describes and compares needs and services; indicates locations of current full-day services; and offers specific recommendations for expanding child care. Section II concerns cost and affordability…

  19. Child Care Design Guide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Olds, Anita Rui

    This book provides architects, interior designers, developers, and child-care professionals with detailed information on the planning and design of child care centers. Part 1 examines the current state of child care in the United States and offers an overall philosophical concert--the spirit of place--as the framework for all center design. Part 2…

  20. Child Care Bulletin, 1997.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McGhee, Marilyn, Ed.

    1997-01-01

    This document is comprised of six issues of the Child Care Bulletin, a bimonthly publication of the National Child Care Information Center. The January-February issue focuses on involving communities in child care planning. Topics discussed in this issue include: community mobilization strategies, assessing needs and establishing goals, and…

  1. Child Care Resource Materials.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Webb, Jeanne, Comp.; Pennington, Marnee, Comp.

    "Child Care Resource Materials" is an annotated bibliography of books, films, and filmstrips on various topics related to the education and development of young children. Categories include: learning activities for children; caring for children - infants through adolescents and children with special needs; parent-child relationships; day care -…

  2. Cultural Sensitive Care Provision in a Public Child and Adolescent Mental Health Centre: A Case Study from the Toulouse University Hospital Intercultural Consultation.

    PubMed

    Sturm, Gesine; Bonnet, Sylvie; Coussot, Yolaine; Journot, Katja; Raynaud, Jean-Philippe

    2017-05-02

    Child and adolescent mental health services in Europe are confronted with children with increasingly diverse socio-cultural backgrounds. Clinicians encounter cultural environments of hyperdiversity in terms of languages and countries of origin, growing diversity within groups, and accelerated change with regards to social and administrational situations (Hannah, in: DelVecchio Good et al. (eds) Shattering culture: American medicine responds to cultural diversity, Russel Sage Foundation, New York, 2011). Children and families who live in these complex constellations face multiple vulnerabilizing factors related to overlapping or intersecting social identities (Crenshaw in Univ Chic Leg Forum 140:139-167, 1989). Mobilizing existing resources in terms of social and family support, and encouraging creative strategies of interculturation in therapeutic work (Denoux, in: Blomart and Krewer (eds) Perspectives de l'interculturel, L'Harmattan, Paris, 1994) may be helpful in order to enhance resilience. Drawing from experiences in the context of French transcultural and intercultural psychiatry, and inspired by the Mc Gill Cultural Consultation in Child Psychiatry, we developed an innovative model, the Intercultural Consultation Service (ICS). This consultation proposes short term interventions to children and families with complex migration experiences. It has been implemented into a local public health care structure in Toulouse, the Medical and Psychological Centre la Grave. The innovation includes the creation of a specific setting for short term therapeutic interventions and team training via shared case discussions. Our objectives are (a) to improve outcomes of mental health care for the children through a better understanding of the child's family context (exploration of family dynamics and their relatedness to complex migration histories), (b) to enhance intercultural competencies in professionals via shared case discussions, and, (c) to improve the therapeutic

  3. Dateline Child Care.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Child Care Information Exchange, 1987

    1987-01-01

    Reports on developments and trends affecting child care programs. Considered are mass media coverage of the issues surrounding child care, notably the Galinsky-Belsky debate on television's TODAY show, and cover story articles in NATION'S BUSINESS and FORTUNE. (Author/BB)

  4. Child Care Project. Annual Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Broussard, Anne M.

    The Child Care Coalition has been monitoring the number of high-quality, safe, accessible, and affordable child care spaces in Pasadena, California, since 1989. In addition, the Coalition has worked to expand the availability of child care through such programs as the Northwest Child Care Trust Fund Loan Program, which offers loans to child care…

  5. Day-Care Centres: Risks and Prevention of Infection

    PubMed Central

    Herman, Dorli

    1988-01-01

    Children attending day-care centres are at increased risk of acquiring various infectious diseases, some with short- and long-term costs to individuals and society. Parents may approach their family physician for advice about placement of their child in day care. It is useful to have an understanding of the attributes of good day-care facilities and of the infections commonly acquired in this setting. In co-operation with day-care personnel and public health authorities, family physicians can help to implement strategies effective in reducing the incidence of infectious diseases in day-care centres. PMID:21253184

  6. Navy Child Care, 1980.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1982-12-01

    after-school and summer programs. 248 The outer band is composed of preschool care and preteen /teen programs. These programs are perceived by the...author as retention oriented because they do not directly assist in getting members to work. Preteen and teen programs, though not surveyed by the author...just those in Navy child-care centers. Teen and preteen programs, summer programs, family day-care programs, etc., are all child support services

  7. Investigation of an Escherichia coli O145 outbreak in a child day-care centre - extensive sampling and characterization of eae- and stx1-positive E. coli yields epidemiological and socioeconomic insight

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background On October 29th 2009 the health authorities in the city of Trondheim, Norway were alerted about a case of Shiga toxin-positive E. coli (STEC) O145 in a child with bloody diarrhoea attending a day-care centre. Symptomatic children in this day-care centre were sampled, thereby identifying three more cases. This initiated an outbreak investigation. Methods A case was defined as a child attending the day-care centre, in whom eae- and stx1- but not stx2-positive E. coli O145:H28 was diagnosed from a faecal sample, with multilocus variable number of tandem repeat analysis (MLVA) profile identical to the index isolate. All 61 children, a staff of 14 in the day-care centre, and 74 close contacts submitted faecal samples. Staff and parents were interviewed about cases' exposure to foods and animals. Faecal samples from 31 ewes from a sheep herd to which the children were exposed were analyzed for E. coli O145. Results Sixteen cases were identified, from which nine presented diarrhoea but not haemolytic uremic syndrome (HUS). The attack rate was 0.26, and varied between age groups (0.13-0.40) and between the three day-care centre departments (0.20-0.50), and was significantly higher amongst the youngest children. Median duration of shedding was 20 days (0-71 days). Children were excluded from the day-care centre during shedding, requiring parents to take compassionate leave, estimated to be a minimum total of 406 days for all cases. Atypical enteropathogenic E. coli (aEPEC) were detected among 14 children other than cases. These isolates were genotypically different from the outbreak strain. Children in the day-care centre were exposed to faecal pollution from a sheep herd, but E. coli O145 was not detected in the sheep. Conclusions We report an outbreak of stx1- and eae-positive STEC O145:H28 infection with mild symptoms among children in a day-care centre. Extensive sampling showed occurrence of the outbreak strain as well as other STEC and aEPEC strains in the

  8. Child Care in Canada

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Graham, Kathy

    2005-01-01

    In this article, the author describes early learning and care arrangements in Canada and how the country faced the challenges in the development of a National Child Care System. While the provincial/territorial governments are responsible for early learning and care, the federal government has formed health and social programs including some child…

  9. Child Care in Canada

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Graham, Kathy

    2005-01-01

    In this article, the author describes early learning and care arrangements in Canada and how the country faced the challenges in the development of a National Child Care System. While the provincial/territorial governments are responsible for early learning and care, the federal government has formed health and social programs including some child…

  10. Beginning Child Care Fact Sheets.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tweedie, Pat

    These six fact sheets from Child Care Aware are designed to help parents ease their children's transition to child care. The first fact sheet, "Before Your Child's First Day," discusses tips such as: (1) "prepare your child"; (2) read and look at picture books about child care; and (3) "prepare yourself." The second fact sheet, "First Day Tips,"…

  11. Child Care and the Family.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Friedman, David B.; And Others

    The booklet examines child care as a major resource for the prevention of child abuse, and is intended to bring child care and child abuse workers together. An introductory section on child abuse is followed by an update on the family, including historical perspectives and a case study illustrating cooperation of parents and day care staff. A…

  12. Trends in Family Child Care

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Neugebauer, Roger

    2011-01-01

    The author presents insights from various readers of "ExchangeEveryDay" regarding trends in the world of family child care. Kathleen Reticker of Acre Family Child Care in Lowell, Massachusetts thinks an increasing trend in Family Child Care is the pressure to emulate a Center, instead of seeing family child care as a different model. Over the…

  13. Trends in Family Child Care

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Neugebauer, Roger

    2011-01-01

    The author presents insights from various readers of "ExchangeEveryDay" regarding trends in the world of family child care. Kathleen Reticker of Acre Family Child Care in Lowell, Massachusetts thinks an increasing trend in Family Child Care is the pressure to emulate a Center, instead of seeing family child care as a different model. Over the…

  14. Child Care Center Regulations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nebraska State Dept. of Health and Human Services, Lincoln.

    This guide enumerates regulations for anyone caring for four or more children, from families other than their own, for compensation and on a regular basis, in the state of Nebraska. The purpose of the regulations is to protect and promote the health and safety of children in child care facilities. The first section of the guide lists specific…

  15. A Relational-Centred International Education Partnership: A Phenomenological Inquiry into the Lived Experiences of Child and Youth Care/Social Care Students and Faculty

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bellefeuille, Gerard; McGrath, Jenny

    2013-01-01

    This qualitative study examines both the process and effects of a relational-centred international education partnership between MacEwan University in Alberta, Canada, and Ireland's Athlone Institute of Technology. It also seeks to capture the meaning of and the transformative effects of the international education partnership on students and…

  16. [The Adamant, an unusual care centre].

    PubMed

    Khidichian, Frédéric

    2011-01-01

    The day care centre of the central Paris area has established itself in an unusual location--a 650 m2 floating building moored on the right bank of the Seine. Patients and caregivers were involved in the design of this original and ecological care centre, which places the emphasis on comfort and safety.

  17. Dateline Child Care: President Unveils Child Care Plan.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Child Care Information Exchange, 1989

    1989-01-01

    Discusses such topics as President Bush's proposed low-income tax credits for child care; the Act for Better Child Care Services; the coming Americanization of child care in Great Britain; and state courts' upholding of church day care licensing exemptions. (BB)

  18. Dateline Child Care: President Unveils Child Care Plan.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Child Care Information Exchange, 1989

    1989-01-01

    Discusses such topics as President Bush's proposed low-income tax credits for child care; the Act for Better Child Care Services; the coming Americanization of child care in Great Britain; and state courts' upholding of church day care licensing exemptions. (BB)

  19. Child care cost and quality.

    PubMed

    Helburn, S W; Howes, C

    1996-01-01

    This article summarizes what is known about the cost and quality of full-time child care in centers and family child care homes, and about parents' attention to quality in making child care choices. It relies primarily upon two recent studies which are among the first to collect detailed information about child care operating costs: the Cost, Quality, and Child Outcomes in Child Care Centers study and the Economics of Family Child Care study. Results indicate that mediocre quality is the rule and that parents often do not choose quality settings for their children. At the present time, child care quality is only modestly related to the cost of providing services. In part, the modesty of this relationship reflects the low wages of child care staff, the availability of in-kind donations in the nonprofit sector, and the altruistic motivations of many providers that depress direct costs and the fees charged for child care. The article concludes with recommendations of future: (1) launch consumer education efforts; (2) implement higher standards for child care at the state level; (3) avoid public policies that encourage people to become child care providers if they have no interest in such a career; (4) increase public and private investments in child care; and (5) develop the means to compensate child care workers as is appropriate for their levels of training, experience, and responsibility.

  20. Rediscovering the Teacher within Indian Child-Centred Pedagogy: Implications for the Global Child-Centred Approach

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smail, Amy

    2014-01-01

    The Child-Centred Approach (CCA) is increasingly promoted within India and internationally as a response to the challenge of delivering quality education. From identifying and examining Indian indigenous and global concepts of CCA within traditional and contemporary child-centred pedagogic discourse, this paper reveals the complexities of…

  1. Promoting Diversity in Early Child Care Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Perlman, Michal; Kankesan, Tharsni; Zhang, Jing

    2010-01-01

    Preschool-aged children are aware of differences in the race and abilities of the people around them. Given this awareness it is important to promote children's acceptance of diversity in the preschool period. The goals of this study were to assess the extent to which child care centres provide diversity instruction through classroom activities,…

  2. Child Care Subsidies and Child Development

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Herbst, Chris M.; Tekin, Erdal

    2010-01-01

    Child care subsidies are an important part of federal and state efforts to move welfare recipients into employment. One of the criticisms of the current subsidy system, however, is that it overemphasizes work and does little to encourage parents to purchase high-quality child care. Consequently, there are reasons to be concerned about the…

  3. Child Care Subsidies and Child Development

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Herbst, Chris M.; Tekin, Erdal

    2010-01-01

    Child care subsidies are an important part of federal and state efforts to move welfare recipients into employment. One of the criticisms of the current subsidy system, however, is that it overemphasizes work and does little to encourage parents to purchase high-quality child care. Consequently, there are reasons to be concerned about the…

  4. The Economics of Child Care.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Blau, David M., Ed.

    Economic issues are an important part of the debate over child care policy. This volume presents findings from economic analyses of research on child care issues surrounding recent policy decisions and scholarly debates. The book's introduction discusses four main issues; government involvement in child care policies, its effect on quality of…

  5. Child Care Health Connections, 2002.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Guralnick, Eva, Ed.; Zamani, Rahman, Ed.; Evinger, Sara, Ed.; Dailey, Lyn, Ed.; Sherman, Marsha, Ed.; Oku, Cheryl, Ed.; Kunitz, Judith, Ed.

    2002-01-01

    This document is comprised of the six 2002 issues of a bimonthly newsletter on children's health for California's child care professionals. The newsletter provides information on current and emerging health and safety issues relevant to child care providers and links the health, safety, and child care communities. Regular features include columns…

  6. Child Care and the Economy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Karolak, Eric

    2009-01-01

    Unemployment has topped 7% nationally and economists predict it will approach 10% by 2010. Child care programs experience a trickle-down effect: when businesses cut back hours or lay people off, parents cut back child care hours or pull children from programs. "We're seeing more and more families lose their child care assistance and have nowhere…

  7. The Economics of Child Care.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Blau, David M., Ed.

    Economic issues are an important part of the debate over child care policy. This volume presents findings from economic analyses of research on child care issues surrounding recent policy decisions and scholarly debates. The book's introduction discusses four main issues; government involvement in child care policies, its effect on quality of…

  8. Women, Work and Child Care.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mercer, Elizabeth

    This fact sheet provides an array of statistical data on working mothers, such as the need for child care, the child care providers, who supports child care, and work and family. Data sources include a number of federal government and private organizations. Among the statistics highlighted are the following: (1) in 1988, 65 percent of all women…

  9. Campus Child Care News, 1998.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Newton, Marion F., Ed.

    1998-01-01

    This document is comprised of the three 1998 issues of a newsletter disseminating information on the National Coalition for Campus Child Care Centers (NCCCC) and providing a forum for news, research, and information concerning campus child care centers. The February issue contains stories on the White House Conference on Child Care, registration…

  10. Child Care and the Economy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Karolak, Eric

    2009-01-01

    Unemployment has topped 7% nationally and economists predict it will approach 10% by 2010. Child care programs experience a trickle-down effect: when businesses cut back hours or lay people off, parents cut back child care hours or pull children from programs. "We're seeing more and more families lose their child care assistance and have nowhere…

  11. Measuring Children's Involvement as an Indicator of Curriculum Effectiveness: A Curriculum Evaluation of a Selected Child Study Centre in Singapore

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ebbeck, Marjory; Winter, Pam; Russo, Sharon; Yim, Hoi Yin Bonnie; Teo-Zuzarte, Geraldine Lian Choo; Goh, Mandy

    2012-01-01

    This paper presents one aspect of a research project evaluating a curriculum model of a selected child study centre in Singapore. An issue of worldwide interest and concern is the "quality of learning" debate as it relates to early childhood centres. In Singapore, the government is focusing on expansion in child care settings and…

  12. Measuring Children's Involvement as an Indicator of Curriculum Effectiveness: A Curriculum Evaluation of a Selected Child Study Centre in Singapore

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ebbeck, Marjory; Winter, Pam; Russo, Sharon; Yim, Hoi Yin Bonnie; Teo-Zuzarte, Geraldine Lian Choo; Goh, Mandy

    2012-01-01

    This paper presents one aspect of a research project evaluating a curriculum model of a selected child study centre in Singapore. An issue of worldwide interest and concern is the "quality of learning" debate as it relates to early childhood centres. In Singapore, the government is focusing on expansion in child care settings and…

  13. Emotional intelligence and patient-centred care

    PubMed Central

    Birks, Yvonne F; Watt, Ian S

    2007-01-01

    The principles of patient-centred care are increasingly stressed as part of health care policy and practice. Explanations for why some practitioners seem more successful in achieving patient-centred care vary, but a possible role for individual differences in personality has been postulated. One of these, emotional intelligence (EI), is increasingly referred to in health care literature. This paper reviews the literature on EI in health care and poses a series of questions about the links between EI and patient-centred outcomes. Papers concerning empirical examinations of EI in a variety of settings were identified to determine the evidence base for its increasing popularity. The review suggests that a substantial amount of further research is required before the value of EI as a useful concept can be substantiated. PMID:17682030

  14. Early Child Care in Hungary.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hermann, Alice; Komlosi, Sandor

    The theoretical conceptions of the child and the socialization processes involved in a socialist pedagogical theory are described in this monograph on early child care in Hungary. In emphasizing the partnership between family and state in the care of the young child, this book traces the central role played by government planning in the midst of…

  15. Improving person-centred care in dementia.

    PubMed

    Armstrong, Dorothy; Byrne, Grainne

    Failings in dementia care in acute hospitals have been reported to the Scottish Public Services Ombudsman and other scrutiny bodies in Scotland and the UK. This article sets out key knowledge and resources to help nurses provide compassionate and person-centred care.

  16. Working with Street Children: A Child-Centred Approach

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Veeran, Vasintha

    2004-01-01

    This paper reviews the theoretical approaches that espouse a child-centred approach in intervening with street children. It focuses on two major themes, namely the rights of the child and client self-determination as proposed by Adler (Corey, 2001). The discussion acknowledges that providing street children with opportunities to participate in…

  17. Multicultural Issues in Child Care.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gonzalez-Mena, Janet

    This volume focuses on cultural differences relevant to all child-care-giving settings, including day care, nursery, and preschool programs. Based on respect for cultural pluralism, this concise supplementary text is designed to increase caregiver sensitivity to different cultural child-care practices and values and to improve communication and…

  18. New Forces Shaping Child Care.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    1972

    In an address to local, state, regional, and national groups involved with child care, characteristics of some of the programs are explained in an effort to develop a broad based national coalition for a system of universally available child care. Head Start, Title IV-A of the Social Security Act (amended) day care, and church-related day care…

  19. Illinois: Child Care Collaboration Program

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Center for Law and Social Policy, Inc. (CLASP), 2012

    2012-01-01

    The Illinois Child Care Collaboration Program promotes collaboration between child care and other early care and education providers, including Early Head Start (EHS), by creating policies to ease blending of funds to extend the day or year of existing services. While no funding is provided through the initiative, participating programs may take…

  20. Subsidizing Success with Child Care.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Groginsky, Scott; McConnell, Laurie

    1998-01-01

    Examines how states are responding to the increased need for quality child care and the funding issues raised by the costs of such care. Includes sidebars discussing federal child-care proposals, differential reimbursement rates, and programs for families with a stay-at-home parent. (HTH)

  1. New Forces Shaping Child Care.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    1972

    In an address to local, state, regional, and national groups involved with child care, characteristics of some of the programs are explained in an effort to develop a broad based national coalition for a system of universally available child care. Head Start, Title IV-A of the Social Security Act (amended) day care, and church-related day care…

  2. Child Care: A Level III Review.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Florida State Board of Community Colleges, Tallahassee.

    This report describes the state-mandated review of Florida's child care programs. Florida's community colleges offer a total of six different degree or certificate programs in child care: Child Development and Education; Child Care Center Management; Child Development Early Intervention; Child Care Provider (discontinued in 98-99); Early Childhood…

  3. Can We Have an International Approach to Child-Centred Early Childhood Practice?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Georgeson, Jan; Campbell-Barr, Verity; Bakosi, Éva; Nemes, Magdolna; Pálfi, Sándor; Sorzio, Paolo

    2015-01-01

    Increasing interest in the provision of early childhood education and care services as a social investment strategy has been accompanied by worldwide concerns to identify appropriate pedagogical practices for working with young children. Here, we trace the developing interest in child-centred approaches, before considering whether there can be…

  4. Child Care-Who Needs It?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clyde, Margaret

    "Child care" is a phrase which has become inextricably linked with the political, economic, and social policies of Australian society. Antagonists and protagonists of child care have put forth arguments against and for child care, respectively, over the past two decades. Supporters of child care have variously viewed child care as a…

  5. Model Child Care Health Policies.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Aronson, Susan; Smith, Herberta

    Drawn from a review of policies at over 100 child care programs nationwide, the model health policies presented in this report are intended for adaptation and selective use by out-of-home child care facilities. Following an introduction, the report presents model policy forms with blanks for adding individualized information for the following…

  6. Managing Military Child Care Centers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Office of the Assistant Secretary of Defense for Manpower and Reserve Affairs (DOD), Washington, DC.

    Based on research as well as on the down-to-earth experiences which come from running a large military child care center, this director's manual provides guidelines for running an effective program. The guidebook, one in a series on the subject of military child care centers, presents advice on the following seven topics: becoming a center…

  7. Selecting Child Care Administrative Software.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kalinowski, Michael

    1998-01-01

    Offers advice on the selection of child care administrative software. Directors should consider needs, computer experience, budget, time, and temperament, and should also ask lots of questions and test demo versions. Choices range from custom programs and existing business products to child care administrative software packages. Includes directory…

  8. Infant Child Care. ERIC Digest.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Howes, Carollee

    This ERIC Digest briefly reviews studies of maternal employment, child care settings, and links between children's development and family and child care influences. Studies of maternal employment suggest that infants' positive relationships with caregivers may compensate for insecure attachments with mothers. If future research supports this…

  9. Valuing Your Child Care Business.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Linsmeier, Dave; Richards, Dick; Routzong, Ed

    2003-01-01

    Offers guidelines for putting a monetary value on a child care business. Discusses reasons for valuing the business, types of valuations (book, liquidation, and fair market), fair market valuation formulas, the corporate valuation, valuing assets included in a sale, and using experts. Also offers several tips for selling a child care business. (EV)

  10. Selecting Child Care Administrative Software.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kalinowski, Michael

    1998-01-01

    Offers advice on the selection of child care administrative software. Directors should consider needs, computer experience, budget, time, and temperament, and should also ask lots of questions and test demo versions. Choices range from custom programs and existing business products to child care administrative software packages. Includes directory…

  11. Child Care Licensing. NCEDL Spotlights.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Center for Early Development & Learning, Chapel Hill, NC.

    Noting that child care licensing is the first line of protection for children in out-of-home child care settings in the United States, this issue of NCEDL Spotlights summarizes research findings relating various program characteristics to program quality and provides recommendations for state licensing requirements and funding policies. The issue…

  12. Foster Care and Child Health.

    PubMed

    McDavid, Lolita M

    2015-10-01

    Children in foster care need more from health providers than routine well-child care. The changes in legislation that were designed to prevent children from languishing in foster care also necessitate a plan that works with the child, the biological family, and the foster family in ensuring the best outcome for the child. This approach acknowledges that most foster children will return to the biological family. Recent research on the effect of adverse childhood experiences across all socioeconomic categories points to the need for specifically designed, focused, and coordinated health and mental health services for children in foster care.

  13. Intra-Cultural Variation in Child Care Practices in Japan

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Toyama, Noriko

    2016-01-01

    This study, comprising three sub-studies, aims to examine how child-rearing practices vary according to different social circumstances in Japan. By comparing teacher-child interaction at mealtimes in day care centres both on an isolated small island located in Okinawa prefecture, Tarama, and in a large industrialised city, Tokyo, the following was…

  14. Intra-Cultural Variation in Child Care Practices in Japan

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Toyama, Noriko

    2016-01-01

    This study, comprising three sub-studies, aims to examine how child-rearing practices vary according to different social circumstances in Japan. By comparing teacher-child interaction at mealtimes in day care centres both on an isolated small island located in Okinawa prefecture, Tarama, and in a large industrialised city, Tokyo, the following was…

  15. Child Care in 1976: Goals and Reflections.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Provence, Sally

    Goals for future child care services are discussed in this address. It is stressed that social service agencies should consider the family as a unit in providing flexible child care services. Other goals include: (1) tailoring child care programs to parent development as well as child development, (2) insuring that child care workers are motivated…

  16. [Kinderpsychodrama in a child guidance centre].

    PubMed

    Müller, Ulrike; Brüggemann, Kai

    2013-01-01

    Kinderpsychodrama allows conflicts of children to become apparent in a specific sheltered environment. These conflicts often arise when children's needs for relationship, self esteem and self efficacy either are not sufficiently recognized by their caregivers and/or cannot be answered in a helpful way. This can lead to internalizing disorders like loss of self reliance, social fear, and depressive withdrawal on the one hand or to externalizing symptoms like oppositional, impulsive and aggressive behavior disorders on the other hand which endanger socio-emotional development. Kinderpsychodrama is seen to cushion children's dysfunctional conflict solutions and solve them with the therapists' help. Therapists realize the themes set on the scene during the play of the children's group; they mirror the scenes and encourage children to act in a different way making use of children's creativity during play as well as the support of the group. Children's chosen role serves as a secure base allowing them to find solutions for their conflicts. The development of each child as well as his/her themes becoming evident during the course of the group are made transparent to their parents during accompanying counseling sessions. We illustrate this therapeutic method by casuistics of our children therapy group.

  17. Early Child Care in Switzerland

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Luscher, Kurt K.; And Others

    1973-01-01

    This monograph provides a comprehensive description of the multiple, diverse, and complex systems of child care in Switzerland today. The following topics are discussed: prevailing conceptions of the child-rearing process, the relationship between family and society, socialization, training of personnel, information dissemination, mass media and…

  18. Child Care Aware: A Guide to Promoting Professional Development in Family Child Care. Lessons Learned from Child Care Aware Sites.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dombro, Amy Laura

    This guide is designed to help educators and community leaders plan and implement professional development initiatives for family child care providers at the community level, and is based on Dayton Hudson Corporation's 1992 Child Care Aware (CCA) campaign to educate child care consumers about quality family child care. Part 1 provides an overview…

  19. Patient-centred care is a way of doing things: How healthcare employees conceptualize patient-centred care.

    PubMed

    Fix, Gemmae M; VanDeusen Lukas, Carol; Bolton, Rendelle E; Hill, Jennifer N; Mueller, Nora; LaVela, Sherri L; Bokhour, Barbara G

    2017-08-25

    Patient-centred care is now ubiquitous in health services research, and healthcare systems are moving ahead with patient-centred care implementation. Yet, little is known about how healthcare employees, charged with implementing patient-centred care, conceptualize what they are implementing. To examine how hospital employees conceptualize patient-centred care. We conducted qualitative interviews about patient-centred care during site four visits, from January to April 2013. We interviewed 107 employees, including leadership, middle managers, front line providers and staff at four US Veteran Health Administration (VHA) medical centres leading VHA's patient-centred care transformation. Data were analysed using grounded thematic analysis. Findings were then mapped to established patient-centred care constructs identified in the literature: taking a biopsychosocial perspective; viewing the patient-as-person; sharing power and responsibility; establishing a therapeutic alliance; and viewing the doctor-as-person. We identified three distinct conceptualizations: (i) those that were well aligned with established patient-centred care constructs surrounding the clinical encounter; (ii) others that extended conceptualizations of patient-centred care into the organizational culture, encompassing the entire patient-experience; and (iii) still others that were poorly aligned with patient-centred care constructs, reflecting more traditional patient care practices. Patient-centred care ideals have permeated into healthcare systems. Additionally, patient-centred care has been expanded to encompass a cultural shift in care delivery, beginning with patients' experiences entering a facility. However, some healthcare employees, namely leadership, see patient-centred care so broadly, it encompasses on-going hospital initiatives, while others consider patient-centred care as inherent to specific positions. These latter conceptualizations risk undermining patient-centred care

  20. Child effects and child care: Implications for risk and adjustment.

    PubMed

    Snell, Emily K; Hindman, Annemarie H; Belsky, Jay

    2015-11-01

    Evocative effects of child characteristics on the quality and quantity of child care were assessed in two studies using longitudinal data from the NICHD Study of Early Child Care. We focus on the influence of child characteristics on two important aspects of the child care experience: language stimulation provided by caregivers and quantity of care. In Study 1, associations between the developmental status of children aged 15 to 54 months and the language stimulation provided by their caregivers were examined using path models, and longitudinal child effects were detected across the earliest time points of the study. In Study 2, the associations among child behavior, temperament, development, and time in care were examined. Little evidence was found for such child effects on time in care. The results are discussed in terms of the effects of child care on child development and implications for developmental processes, particularly for children at greatest risk for developmental delay or psychopathology.

  1. Pathways and Partnerships for Child Care Excellence

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Office of Child Care, 2011

    2011-01-01

    More than 12 million American children regularly rely on child care to support their healthy development and school success. Of these, over 1.6 million children receive a child care subsidy from the Child Care and Development Fund (CCDF) program each month. In addition, CCDF helps leverage child care investments from the Temporary Assistance for…

  2. Family Child Care Licensing Study, 2003.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hollestelle, Kay; Koch, Pauline D.

    This report presents the findings of the 2003 national survey of state child care regulatory agencies to update and expand family child care regulatory information published in the 2002 study. Data on small family child care homes and group or large family child care homes are organized into the following 23 categories: (1) number of regulated…

  3. Family Child Care Licensing Study, 2000.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kelly, Nia, Comp.

    This report presents the findings of the 2000 national survey of state child care regulatory agencies to update and expand family child care regulatory information published in the 1999 study. Data on small family child care homes and group or large family child care homes are organized in 23 categories: (1) number of regulated homes; (2)…

  4. Family Child Care Licensing Study, 2002.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Children's Foundation, Washington, DC.

    This report presents the findings of the 2002 national survey of state child care regulatory agencies to update and expand family child care regulatory information published in the 2001 study. Data on small family child care homes and group or large family child care homes are organized into the following 23 categories: (1) number of regulated…

  5. Family Child Care Licensing Study, 2003.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hollestelle, Kay; Koch, Pauline D.

    This report presents the findings of the 2003 national survey of state child care regulatory agencies to update and expand family child care regulatory information published in the 2002 study. Data on small family child care homes and group or large family child care homes are organized into the following 23 categories: (1) number of regulated…

  6. The Family Child Care Licensing Study, 1999.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Children's Foundation, Washington, DC.

    This report presents the findings of the 1999 national survey of state child care regulatory agencies to update and expand family child care regulatory information published in the 1998 study. Data on small family child care homes and group or large family child care homes are organized in 22 categories: (1) number of regulated homes; (2)…

  7. Family Child Care Licensing Study, 2001.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Children's Foundation, Washington, DC.

    This report presents the findings of the 2001 national survey of state child care regulatory agencies to update and expand family child care regulatory information published in the 2000 study. Data on small family child care homes and group or large family child care homes are organized into the following 23 categories: (1) number of regulated…

  8. Child Care Collaboration: Making A Difference.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Campbell, Wendell, Comp.

    The St. Louis (Missouri) Regional Child Care Partnership was created in 1990 to improve child care in the St. Louis and Metro East areas, where the quality, availability, and affordability of child care are community-wide problems. The partnership was formed by the Child Day Care Association of St. Louis and the St. Louis branches of the Junior…

  9. Family Child Care Licensing Study, 2000.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kelly, Nia, Comp.

    This report presents the findings of the 2000 national survey of state child care regulatory agencies to update and expand family child care regulatory information published in the 1999 study. Data on small family child care homes and group or large family child care homes are organized in 23 categories: (1) number of regulated homes; (2)…

  10. Guaranteeing Quality in Child Care.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Morgan, Gwen G.

    This paper presents a discussion of state and federal licensing and regulation of child care services. A hierarchy of the kinds of regulation is defined: (1) basic preventive/protective requirements (related to zoning, fire and safety, sanitation, and basic day care licensing); (2) administrative standards for publicly operated programs (equal to…

  11. Mothers' Transition Back to Work and Infants' Transition to Child Care: Does Work-Based Child Care Make a Difference?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Skouteris, Helen; McCaught, Simone; Dissanayake, Cheryl

    2007-01-01

    The overall aim in this study was twofold: to compare the use of work-based (WB) and non-work-based (NWB) child care on the transition back to the workplace for women after a period of maternity leave, and on the transition into child care for the infants of these women. Thirty-five mothers with infants in WB centres and 44 mothers with infants in…

  12. Mothers' Transition Back to Work and Infants' Transition to Child Care: Does Work-Based Child Care Make a Difference?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Skouteris, Helen; McCaught, Simone; Dissanayake, Cheryl

    2007-01-01

    The overall aim in this study was twofold: to compare the use of work-based (WB) and non-work-based (NWB) child care on the transition back to the workplace for women after a period of maternity leave, and on the transition into child care for the infants of these women. Thirty-five mothers with infants in WB centres and 44 mothers with infants in…

  13. Critiquing Child-Centred Pedagogy to Bring Children and Early Childhood Educators into the Centre of a Democratic Pedagogy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Langford, Rachel

    2010-01-01

    Child-centred pedagogy is both an enduring approach and a revered concept in Western-based teacher preparation. This article weaves together major critiques of child-centred pedagogy that draw on critical feminist, postmodernist and post-structural theories. These critiques have particular relevance for conceptualizing what it can mean to be, and…

  14. The Hidden Cost of Caring: Compensation and Child Care. [Videotape].

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Minnesota Child Care Resource and Referral Network, Rochester.

    Intended for audiences with an interest in child care, this video examines the low compensation characteristic of the child care field and the social factors contributing to the low status and wages of caregivers. The video first looks at the social history of child care, noting that the function served by child care differed by social class. The…

  15. Model Manual for the Child Care Worker.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shull, Jan

    This manual is designed to assist agencies in the development of a child care manual that will serve as an orientation tool for the new child care worker, and as an on-going reference tool. The manual is organized to orient the child care worker first to the agency objectives, functions, and organization, and then to specific child care…

  16. Child Care Licensing: Georgia Impact Study.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sibley, Annette; And Others

    The state of Georgia revised its child care licensing regulations to include more stringent staff-to-child ratios, limits on group sizes, and increases in staff training hours. This study examined the impact of these changes in child care licensing rules and regulations on the child care industry in Georgia. The sample consisted of all licensed…

  17. Employer Child Care Languishes--Awaiting Economic Upturn--Status Report #13 on Employer Child Care.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Neugebauer, Roger

    2003-01-01

    Considers economic factors in the development of employer child care, noting the expansion of two large child care provision corporations despite slow economic growth and changes for smaller child care providers. Quotes program administrators on trends in employer child care services and provides a list of the 14 largest employer child care…

  18. Parents as Consumers of Child Care.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fuqua, Robert W.; Labensohn, Dorothy

    1986-01-01

    Results of a survey of parents utilizing day care indicated that parents thought they were prepared to select child care, but they in reality did not have the skills or assistance available to them to function as wise consumers of child care. Findings also indicated a lack of diverse, affordable, and accessible child care arrangements. (Author/BL)

  19. Distant Operational Care Centre: Design Project Report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1996-01-01

    The goal of this project is to outline the design of the Distant Operational Care Centre (DOCC), a modular medical facility to maintain human health and performance in space, that is adaptable to a range of remote human habitats. The purpose of this project is to outline a design, not to go into a complete technical specification of a medical facility for space. This project involves a process to produce a concise set of requirements, addressing the fundamental problems and issues regarding all aspects of a space medical facility for the future. The ideas presented here are at a high level, based on existing, researched, and hypothetical technologies. Given the long development times for space exploration, the outlined concepts from this project embodies a collection of identified problems, and corresponding proposed solutions and ideas, ready to contribute to future space exploration efforts. In order to provide a solid extrapolation and speculation in the context of the future of space medicine, the extent of this project's vision is roughly within the next two decades. The Distant Operational Care Centre (DOCC) is a modular medical facility for space. That is, its function is to maintain human health and performance in space environments, through prevention, diagnosis, and treatment. Furthermore, the DOCC must be adaptable to meet the environmental requirements of different remote human habitats, and support a high quality of human performance. To meet a diverse range of remote human habitats, the DOCC concentrates on a core medical capability that can then be adapted. Adaptation would make use of the DOCC's functional modularity, providing the ability to replace, add, and modify core functions of the DOCC by updating hardware, operations, and procedures. Some of the challenges to be addressed by this project include what constitutes the core medical capability in terms of hardware, operations, and procedures, and how DOCC can be adapted to different remote

  20. [Music therapy and child care].

    PubMed

    Chang, Shu-Min; Sung, Huei-Chuan

    2005-12-01

    Music therapy was shown many years ago to have positive effects in various age groups of patients in the Western world. Music can produce physiological and psychological effects, including changes in the vital signs, reductions in anxiety, improvements in the immune system, decreases in cortisol levels, the reduction of stress and the promotion of well-being. Music therapy is an inexpensive and effective intervention for nurses to apply to patients. The application of such therapy to children, however, is different from that to adults due to their limited cognitive and language development. In Taiwan, nurses' knowledge of music therapy is limited, and it is rarely used in child care. This article introduces music therapy and its effects in child care, such as in premature infants, children in emergency care, handicapped children, and children receiving surgery. Music therapy is often used as an assisted intervention for patient care in clinical settings. Health care professionals can perform some of the music therapy activities for patients appropriately even if they have not been trained in music. This article aims to improve nurses' knowledge of music therapy and to provide a useful reference for those involved in child care.

  1. Child Development, Care, and Guidance.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Texas Education Agency, Austin. Dept. of Occupational Education and Technology.

    This teacher's guide on child development, care, and guidance is one of seven subject area guides developed for use in consumer and homemaking education in secondary schools in Texas. The guide is correlated with the "Conceptual Framework for Consumer and Homemaking Education in Texas." Content is based on the competencies needed by…

  2. Kindergarten Child Care Experiences and Child Achievement and Socioemotional Skills

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Claessens, Amy

    2012-01-01

    Young children's experiences outside of both home and school are important for their development. As women have entered the labor force, child care has become an increasingly important context for child development. Child care experiences prior to school entry have been well-documented as important influences on children's academic and…

  3. Kindergarten Child Care Experiences and Child Achievement and Socioemotional Skills

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Claessens, Amy

    2012-01-01

    Young children's experiences outside of both home and school are important for their development. As women have entered the labor force, child care has become an increasingly important context for child development. Child care experiences prior to school entry have been well-documented as important influences on children's academic and…

  4. Child Care Lead Poisoning Prevention. Training Curriculum.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    California Dept. of Health Services, Oakland. Childhood Lead Poisoning Prevention Branch.

    In an effort to address young children's substantial risk for exposure to lead in out-of-home child care programs, outreach and training were developed for child care providers. This workshop curriculum consists of training activities and materials appropriate for child care providers in centers or homes for the purpose of educating them about the…

  5. Child Care by Design: Resource Guide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schmidt, Lori, Ed.

    In Canada today, more than a million children spend a large portion of their preschool years in child care outside the immediate family. The design of a child care center's physical facility has a major impact on the quality of interactions that take place within it. Intended to assist design and child care professionals who are building a new…

  6. Professional Child and Youth Care. Second Edition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ferguson, Roy, Ed.; And Others

    This book provides a comprehensive analysis of the child and youth care field in Canada. It covers a spectrum of key concerns within the field of child and youth care, and presents an analysis that spans a variety of program areas. The 12 chapters in the book are: (1) "The Scope of Child and Youth Care in Canada" (Roy Ferguson and…

  7. Shared Heritage: An Intergenerational Child Care Program.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hawkeye Area Community Action Program, Cedar Rapids, IA.

    This report describes ways in which older persons may become involved in the field of home child care. It is intended to provide (1) detailed information on an intergenerational child care (IGCC) program; (2) general information relating to intergenerational contacts and home child care; and (3) "how-to" information for agencies planning…

  8. Family Child Care Licensing Study, 1998.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Children's Foundation, Washington, DC.

    This report details a survey of state child care regulatory agencies. Data on both small family child care homes (FCCH) and group or large family child care homes (LCCH or GCCH) are included and organized into 22 categories: (1) number of regulated homes; (2) definitions and regulatory requirements; (3) unannounced inspection procedure; (4)…

  9. Family Child Care Licensing Study, 1997.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Children's Foundation, Washington, DC.

    This report details the findings of an annual survey of state child care regulatory agencies. The survey gathered data on both small family child care homes and group or large family child care homes in each of the 50 states, the District of Columbia, Puerto Rico and the Virgin Islands. The report's introduction lists the survey categories and…

  10. Home Child Care: A Caregiver's Guide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dunster, Lee

    Intended for those already providing home child care or those considering becoming a caregiver in Canada, this book provides practical ideas and advice covering the many areas involved in home child care, from organization of the home to resources available to the provider. Chapter 1 describes how home child care can be provided, how to adapt to…

  11. Child Care in the News 1988.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Child Care Information Exchange, 1988

    1988-01-01

    Reports extensive 1988 print and television coverage of child care topics, demonstrating that child care is not a passing media fad, but a major social issue that demands ongoing coverage. Gives statistics on families, children, and changes in population age groups and predicts child and elder care needs for the next decade. (NH)

  12. Healthy Child Care Colorado, 2002: Outcome Evaluation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Eliot, Susan

    This report describes the impact of nurse consultant services to child care programs in Colorado on the children, parents, and staff of the centers they serve as part of the Healthy Child Care Colorado (HCCC) initiative. Study participants included 25 child care center directors and 24 nurse consultants, representing large and small centers in…

  13. Child Care Bulletin. Issue 33, Summer 2007

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shillady, Amy, Ed.

    2007-01-01

    The "Child Care Bulletin" is published quarterly and includes practical, informative articles based on current literature regarding topics important to policy-makers, child care providers, and parents. The Bulletin includes short articles, tips sheets, policy updates, interviews with leaders in the child care field, information from child…

  14. Improving Child Care Quality and Supply: The Impact of the Child Care and Development Block Grant.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Blank, Helen

    1993-01-01

    Surveys how states are investing new federal money in child care quality and supply. Examines several key areas: child care licensing and monitoring; resource and referral services; child care for infants, school-agers, and children with special needs; child care for low-income families; comprehensive and enriched services; provider training;…

  15. Employer Child Care Growth Slows with the Economy--Status Report #12 on Employer Child Care.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Neugebauer, Roger

    2002-01-01

    Examines reasons for slowed growth in employer child care over the past two years. Discusses the impact of the economic recession, organizational changes in the largest employer child care management organizations, international acquisitions of the Bright Horizons child care organization, flexible options for the child care benefit, and the…

  16. A Child Care WORKS Profile of Child Care in the Seven County Metropolitan Area, 1991.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Copeland, Tom

    This report provides a profile of child care in the seven county metropolitan area in Minnesota. Child Care WORKS is a statewide coalition of over 150 organizations that develops and promotes a state child care agenda. This report provides statistical data on child care from 1980 to 1990, and projections through the year 2000. A brief outline of…

  17. Grassroots Organizing: A Handbook for Child Care Teachers and Family Child Care Providers. Revised Second Edition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Center for the Child Care Workforce, Washington, DC.

    The Center for the Child Care Workforce (formerly the Child Care Employee Project), has provided leadership for a nationwide grassroots effort called the Worthy Wage Campaign, an activist initiative to increase public awareness and to press for a public investment of child care funds directly targeted to improving child care jobs. This handbook…

  18. Creating Environments for School-Age Child Care. Child Environment Series, Military Child Care Project.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Office of the Assistant Secretary of Defense for Manpower and Reserve Affairs (DOD), Washington, DC.

    This module provides guidelines for constructing appropriate day care center environments for school-age children 6 through 12 years of age. One of a series of staff development modules for child caregivers working in military child care centers, the document is divided into two parts. The first part indicates some ways environments affect…

  19. Evidence into practice: evaluating a child-centred intervention for diabetes medicine management The EPIC Project

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background There is a lack of high quality, child-centred and effective health information to support development of self-care practices and expertise in children with acute and long-term conditions. In type 1 diabetes, clinical guidelines indicate that high-quality, child-centred information underpins achievement of optimal glycaemic control with the aim of minimising acute readmissions and reducing the risk of complications in later life. This paper describes the development of a range of child-centred diabetes information resources and outlines the study design and protocol for a randomized controlled trial to evaluate the information resources in routine practice. The aim of the diabetes information intervention is to improve children and young people's quality of life by increasing self-efficacy in managing their type 1 diabetes. Methods/Design We used published evidence, undertook qualitative research and consulted with children, young people and key stakeholders to design and produce a range of child-centred, age-appropriate children's diabetes diaries, carbohydrate recording sheets, and assembled child-centred, age-appropriate diabetes information packs containing published information in a folder that can be personalized by children and young people with pens and stickers. Resources have been designed for children/young people 6-10; 11-15; and 16-18 years. To evaluate the information resources, we designed a pragmatic randomized controlled trial to assess the effectiveness, cost effectiveness, and implementation in routine practice of individually tailored, age-appropriate diabetes diaries and information packs for children and young people age 6-18years, compared with currently available standard practice. Children and young people will be stratified by gender, length of time since diagnosis (< 2years and > 2years) and age (6-10; 11-15; and 16-18 years). The following data will be collected at baseline, 3 and 6 months: PedsQL (generic, diabetes and parent

  20. Negotiation of parental roles within family-centred care: a review of the research.

    PubMed

    Corlett, Jo; Twycross, Alison

    2006-10-01

    To review research published in the past 15 years about how children's nurses' negotiate with parents in relation to family-centred care. Family-centred care is a basic tenet of children's nursing and requires a process of negotiation between health professionals and the family, which results in shared decision-making about what the child's care will be and who will provide this. The literature highlights inconsistencies in the degree to which nurses are willing to negotiate with parents and allow them to participate in decisions regarding care of their child. There is need to explore further the extent to which nurses communicate and negotiate shared care with children and their parents. Three themes emerged from this review of the literature relating to whether role negotiation occurred in practice, parental expectations of participation in their child's care and issues relating to power and control. Parents wanted to be involved in their child's care but found that nurses' lack of communication and limited negotiation meant that this did not always occur. Nurses appeared to have clear ideas about what nursing care parents could be involved with and did not routinely negotiate with parents in this context. For family-centred care to be a reality nurses need to negotiate and communicate with children and their families effectively. Parents need to be able to negotiate with health staff what this participation will involve and to negotiate new roles for themselves in sharing care of their sick child. Parents should be involved in the decision-making process. However, research suggests that a lack of effective communication, professional expectations and issues of power and control often inhibit open and mutual negotiation between families and nurses.

  1. Person-centred care: an overview of reviews.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Tanvi; Bamford, Megan; Dodman, Denise

    2015-01-01

    Existing evidence suggests that a person-centred approach can improve coordination and access to health care and services. This overview sought to: (1) identify and define components of person-centred care; (2) explore nursing and health-care provider behaviours that are person-centred; and (3) identify systems level supports required to enable person-centred care. An overview of reviews was conducted to locate synthesized literature published between June 2005 and April 2014. Two independent reviewers screened, extracted data and quality appraised the sources. Results were synthesized narratively. A total of 46 articles were deemed relevant to this overview. This paper synthesizes the results of 43 of the 46 articles. A universal definition of person-centred care was not found, however; common components, associated health-care provider behaviours and the organizational supports required for person-centred care are discussed. Key findings from this review outline that health-care providers and organizations need to promote person-centred care by engaging persons in partnerships, shared decision-making, and meaningful participation in health system improvement.

  2. Pennsylvania Child Care Training Needs Survey.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fiene, Richard; And Others

    This report presents findings of the Pennsylvania Child Care Training Needs Survey. The purpose of the survey was to determine statewide needs for child care training. A random sample of 500 day care centers was selected from the 2,127 day care centers in Pennsylvania. The sample was stratified in terms of the state's four regions--northeast,…

  3. Perspectives on Rural Child Care. ERIC Digest.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Beach, Betty A.

    This digest reviews findings about the nature of rural child care and suggests implications for practitioners and policymakers. Rural families experience child care differently from urban ones on a number of counts. Center-based care is less available to rural children, and rural day care centers tend to be of lower quality in terms of teacher…

  4. Who Cares for Kids? A Report on Child Care Providers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Benson, Carolyn

    This study offers a profile of child care workers in family day care homes and child care centers, reporting general statistics and examining their wages, benefits, training, working conditions, and turnover rates. In addition, it looks at government regulation and licensing, employer-sponsored programs, child abuse, insurance rates, and federal…

  5. Child Care Subsidy Use and Child Development: Potential Causal Mechanisms

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hawkinson, Laura E.

    2011-01-01

    Research using an experimental design is needed to provide firm causal evidence on the impacts of child care subsidy use on child development, and on underlying causal mechanisms since subsidies can affect child development only indirectly via changes they cause in children's early experiences. However, before costly experimental research is…

  6. The Creative Curriculum for Family Child Care.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dodge, Diane Trister; Colker, Laura J.

    Designed to provide practical and comprehensive assistance to family child care providers in a range of settings, this curriculum consists of two parts. Part 1, Setting the Stage, helps caregivers formulate a philosophy of child care, understand child development, prepare their homes, and plan their programs. It includes many ideas for making the…

  7. When Child Care Teachers Become Parents.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Claffey, Anne; And Others

    1995-01-01

    Discusses the conflicts arising from the child care teacher's dual role as employee and parent. Examines issues such as separation from the infant, return to work, child care arrangements, placement of the child in the same room as the parent, and nursing arrangements. Concludes that dual role must be respected. (BAC)

  8. Integrating Remedial Methods into Child Care Practice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Adler, Jack; Finkel, William

    1976-01-01

    This study describes an experimental program that involves the participation of child care counselors and remedial educators in planning and implementing a remediation program based on a comprehensive diagnostic assessment of a child's cognitive assets and deficits. (SB)

  9. Employer Child Care Growth and Consolidation Continues: Status Report #11 on Employer Child Care.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Neugebauer, Roger

    2001-01-01

    Delineates significant developments in the employer- sponsored child care arena. Highlights predictions from chief executive officers of the largest employer child care organizations for the most significant trends in employer child care: slowing growth, consolidation, increasing demands for back-up care, globalization, and multi-site strategies.…

  10. Director's Manual for the Child Guidance Series and Child Environment Series, Military Child Care Project.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Office of the Assistant Secretary of Defense for Manpower and Reserve Affairs (DOD), Washington, DC.

    One in a series of guidebooks, this manual was designed to help military child care center directors develop staff training plans. Two modules previously developed by the Military Child Care Project, the Child Guidance Series and the Child Environment Series, form the basis for suggestions. Section 1 of the manual provides detailed descriptions of…

  11. Health Update: Care of Ill Children in Child Care Programs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Aronson, Susan S.

    1987-01-01

    Discusses differing opinions about (1) exclusion of ill children from child care; (2) the meaning of fever; (3) appropriate care for ill children; (4) transfer of information about ill children in child care; and (5) written policies and procedures for care of ill children. (NH)

  12. Child Care in Scandinavia: An Informal Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hechinger, Grace; Hechinger, Fred M.

    1990-01-01

    Reports on a study of the way children are provided for in Scandinavia and explores those aspects of the child-care system which are potentially adaptable to American needs. Topics include prenatal and health care, parental leave, home child care, and the cost of education. (IAH)

  13. Next Steps for Federal Child Care Policy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Greenberg, Mark

    2007-01-01

    In Mark Greenberg's view, a national child care strategy should pursue four goals. Every parent who needs child care to get or keep work should be able to afford care without having to leave children in unhealthy or dangerous environments; all families should be able to place their children in settings that foster education and healthy…

  14. Corporate Sponsored Child Care: Options and Advantages.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sallee, Alvin L.

    To further understanding of the complex issues regarding the provision of day care services, this paper presents an historical overview of national child care policy in the United States, and discusses the dimensions of working families' need for child care; the central policy issue of the relationship between work and the family; and incentives,…

  15. Child Care and Other Support Programs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Floyd, Latosha; Phillips, Deborah A.

    2013-01-01

    The U.S. military has come to realize that providing reliable, high-quality child care for service members' children is a key component of combat readiness. As a result, the Department of Defense (DoD) has invested heavily in child care. The DoD now runs what is by far the nation's largest employer-sponsored child-care system, a sprawling network…

  16. Multiple Child Care Arrangements and Child Well Being: Early Care Experiences in Australia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Claessens, Amy; Chen, Jen-Hao

    2013-01-01

    Nearly one quarter of Australian children under the age of 5 experience multiple non-parental child care arrangements. Research focused on the relationship between multiple child care arrangements and child socioemotional development is limited, particularly in Australia. Evidence from the United States and Europe has linked multiple child care…

  17. Pertussis vaccination in child care workers: room for improvement in coverage, policy and practice.

    PubMed

    Hope, Kirsty; Butler, Michelle; Massey, Peter D; Cashman, Patrick; Durrheim, David N; Stephenson, Jody; Worley, April

    2012-07-13

    The "Staying Healthy in Child Care" Australian guidelines provide for illness and disease exclusions and encourage vaccination of staff in child care settings, however these requirements are not subject to accreditation and licensing, and their level of implementation is unknown. This study aimed to describe pertussis vaccination coverage in child care workers in a regional area of northern NSW during 2010; review current staff pertussis vaccination practices; and explore barriers to vaccination. A cross sectional survey of all child care centre directors in the Hunter New England (HNE) area of northern NSW was conducted in 2010 using a computer assisted telephone interviewing service. Ninety-eight percent (319/325) of child care centres identified within the HNE area participated in the survey. Thirty-five percent (113/319) of centres indicated that they had policies concerning respiratory illness in staff members. Sixty-three percent (202/319) of centres indicated that they kept a record of staff vaccination, however, of the 170 centre's who indicated they updated their records, 74% (125/170) only updated records if a staff member notified them. Of centres with records, 58% indicated that fewer than half of their staff were vaccinated. Many childcare workers have not had a recent pertussis immunisation. This potentially places young children at risk at an age when they are most vulnerable to severe disease. With increasing use of child care, national accreditation and licensing requirements need to monitor the implementation of policies on child care worker vaccination. Higher levels of vaccination would assist in reducing the risk of pertussis cases and subsequent outbreaks in child care centres.

  18. Screening for Autism Spectrum Disorders in Flemish Day-Care Centres with the Checklist for Early Signs of Developmental Disorders

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dereu, Mieke; Warreyn, Petra; Raymaekers, Ruth; Meirsschaut, Mieke; Pattyn, Griet; Schietecatte, Inge; Roeyers, Herbert

    2010-01-01

    A new screening instrument for ASD was developed that can be filled out by child care workers: the Checklist for Early Signs of Developmental Disorders (CESDD). The predictive validity of the CESDD was evaluated in a population of 6,808 children between 3 and 39 months attending day-care centres in Flanders. The CESDD had a sensitivity of 0.80 and…

  19. Iowa Child Care Quality Rating System: QRS Profile. The Child Care Quality Rating System (QRS) Assessment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Child Trends, 2010

    2010-01-01

    This paper presents a profile of Iowa's Child Care Quality Rating System prepared as part of the Child Care Quality Rating System (QRS) Assessment Study. The profile is divided into the following categories: (1) Program Information; (2) Rating Details; (3) Quality Indicators for Center-Based Programs; (4) Indicators for Family Child Care Programs;…

  20. Child-Care Subsidies and Child-Care Choices over Time

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnson, Anna D.; Martin, Anne; Ryan, Rebecca M.

    2014-01-01

    The evidence to date on the federal child-care subsidy program's effect on preschool child-care quality is mixed. However, an as-yet untested outcome of subsidy receipt is subsequent child-care choice. Specifically, it is possible that subsidy receipt in toddlerhood increases the likelihood of attending other publicly funded preschool…

  1. Iowa Child Care Quality Rating System: QRS Profile. The Child Care Quality Rating System (QRS) Assessment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Child Trends, 2010

    2010-01-01

    This paper presents a profile of Iowa's Child Care Quality Rating System prepared as part of the Child Care Quality Rating System (QRS) Assessment Study. The profile is divided into the following categories: (1) Program Information; (2) Rating Details; (3) Quality Indicators for Center-Based Programs; (4) Indicators for Family Child Care Programs;…

  2. The Journey from Babysitter to Child Care Professional: Military Family Child Care Providers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nielsen, Dianne Miller

    2002-01-01

    Describes the transformation of women from babysitters to child care professionals as a result of becoming a family child care provider in the U.S. military Family Child Care (FCC) program. Discusses application process, orientation training, the use of peer mentors, initial setup, inspections, enrollment, caregiver training, and accreditation.…

  3. Family Child Care Licensing Study, 1996. National Child Care Advocacy Project.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Children's Foundation, Washington, DC.

    This report presents the results of a nationwide survey of state agencies charged with regulating or licensing family child care. An introduction contains information on survey methodology, a summary of regulatory requirements for family child care homes and group (large) child care homes, and a survey question and answer summary. The body of the…

  4. Family Child Care Licensing Study, 1995: National Child Care Advocacy Project.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Children's Foundation, Washington, DC.

    This report presents the results of a nationwide survey of state agencies charged with regulating or licensing family child care. An introduction contains information on survey methodology, a summary of regulatory requirements for family child care homes and group (large) child care homes, and a survey question and answer summary. The body of the…

  5. Child Care Reacts to Hugo and the Quake. Dateline Child Care.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Child Care Information Exchange, 1990

    1990-01-01

    Describes the effects of Hurricane Hugo and the San Francisco earthquake on child care and child care centers and the responses of the centers to the disasters. Announces the openings of new child care centers and an expansion of Head Start.(RJC)

  6. Financing Child Care: Current Arrangements. Report of the Task Force on Child Care: Series 1.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Townson, Monica; And Others

    The five research studies in this volume focus on the financing of child care, and constitute part of a detailed analysis of issues relevant to child care and parental leave policies and the effects of such issues on the Canadian family. Paper 1 describes how child care is funded through the Canada Assistance Plan (CAP); points out the problems…

  7. Child Nutrition Programs: Child and Adult Care Food Program. Family Day Care Home Handbook.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Oklahoma State Dept. of Education, Oklahoma City.

    This handbook details requirements for family day care homes in Oklahoma for providing child nutrition through the Child and Adult Care Food Program. The handbook includes contact information for state consultants. The basic responsibilities for sponsors of family day care home child nutrition programs are outlined, and the sponsoring organization…

  8. The Impact of Child Care Subsidy Use on Child Care Quality

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ryan, Rebecca M.; Johnson, Anna; Rigby, Elizabeth; Brooks-Gunn, Jeanne

    2011-01-01

    In 2008, the federal government allotted $7 billion in child care subsidies to low-income families through the state-administered Child Care and Development Fund (CCDF), now the government's largest child care program (US DHHS, 2008). Although subsidies reduce costs for families and facilitate parental employment, it is unclear how they impact the…

  9. Financing Child Care: Current Arrangements. Report of the Task Force on Child Care: Series 1.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Townson, Monica; And Others

    The five research studies in this volume focus on the financing of child care, and constitute part of a detailed analysis of issues relevant to child care and parental leave policies and the effects of such issues on the Canadian family. Paper 1 describes how child care is funded through the Canada Assistance Plan (CAP); points out the problems…

  10. Employer Child Care Surviving and Thriving: Employer Child Care Trend Report #17

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Neugebauer, Roger

    2010-01-01

    Today employer child care is accepted as standard benefit for employees and nearly all Fortune 500 companies have gotten involved. The current recession threatened to halt the growth of employer child care as companies consolidated, cut back, and folded. However, in reviewing the status of employer child care for this trend report, it appears that…

  11. Infant Child Care and Attachment Security: Results of the NICHD Study of Early Child Care.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Inst. of Child Health and Human Development (NIH), Bethesda, MD. Early Child Care Network.

    A longitudinal study explored the effects of different aspects of child care on infants' attachment security. Child care variables examined included age of entry; the quality, amount, stability, and type of care; and mother's sensitivity to the child's needs. When the validity of the Strange Situation was tested by comparing children with low and…

  12. Employer Child Care Organizations Eye Changing Economics: Employer Child Care Status Report #16

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Neugebauer, Roger

    2008-01-01

    In the intervening years, the question of whether corporations should be in the child care business has been answered. Employers no longer question whether providing child care support for employees is a good idea; the key question now is whether they can afford it. This article reports that research for the employer child care status report finds…

  13. Child Care Reacts to Hugo and the Quake. Dateline Child Care.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Child Care Information Exchange, 1990

    1990-01-01

    Describes the effects of Hurricane Hugo and the San Francisco earthquake on child care and child care centers and the responses of the centers to the disasters. Announces the openings of new child care centers and an expansion of Head Start.(RJC)

  14. Do Child Care Regulations Affect the Child Care and Labor Markets?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Blau, David M.

    2003-01-01

    The effect of child care regulations on outcomes in the child care market and the labor market for mothers of young children is examined. The analysis uses a time series of cross sections and examines the robustness of previous cross-section findings to controls for state-level heterogeneity. Child care regulations as a group have statistically…

  15. Bridging the divide between families and health professionals’ perspectives on family‐centred care

    PubMed Central

    MacKean, Gail L.; Thurston, Wilfreda E.; Scott, Catherine M.

    2005-01-01

    Abstract Objectives  To describe and discuss key findings from a recent research project that challenge an increasingly prevalent theme, apparent in both family‐centred care research and practice, of conceptualizing family‐centred care as shifting care, care management, and advocacy responsibilities to families. The purpose of the research, from which these findings emerged, was to develop a conceptualization of family‐centred care grounded in the experiences of families and direct health‐care providers. Design  Qualitative research methods, following the grounded theory tradition, were used to develop a conceptual framework that described the dimensions of the concept of family‐centred care and their interrelationships, in the substantive area of children's developmental services. This article reports on and extends key findings from this grounded theory study, in light of current trends in the literature. Setting and participants  The substantive area that served as the setting for the research was developmental services at a children's hospital in Alberta, Canada. Data was collected through focus groups and individual interviews with 37 parents of children diagnosed with a developmental problem and 16 frontline health‐care providers. Findings  Key findings from this research project do not support the current emphasis in family‐centred care research and practice on conceptualizing family‐centred care as the shifting of care, care management, and advocacy responsibilities to families. Rather, what emerged was that parents want to work truly collaboratively with health‐care providers in making treatment decisions and on implementing a dynamic care plan that will work best for child and family. Discussion and conclusions  A definition of collaboration is provided, and the nature of collaborative relationships described. Contributing factors to the difficulty in establishing true collaborative relationships between families and health‐care

  16. Child Care: State Requirements for Background Checks.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fagnoni, Cynthia

    Background checks involve gathering information from state and federal databases to determine if child care providers have a history of child abuse or other criminal convictions that would make them unacceptable for working with children. Background checks include state criminal history checks, state child abuse registry checks, and Federal Bureau…

  17. Development and piloting the Woman Centred Care Scale (WCCS).

    PubMed

    Brady, Susannah; Bogossian, Fiona; Gibbons, Kristen

    2017-06-01

    In midwifery we espouse a woman centred care approach to practice, yet in midwifery education no valid instrument exists with which to measure the performance of these behaviours in midwifery students. To develop and validate an instrument to measure woman centred care behaviours in midwifery students. We identified four core concepts; woman's sphere, holism, self-determination and the shared power relationship. We mapped 18 individual descriptive care behaviours (from the Australian National Competency Standards for the Midwife) to these concepts to create an instrument to articulate and measure care behaviours that are specifically woman centred. Review by expert midwifery clinicians ensured face, content and construct validity of the scale and predictive validity and reliability were tested in a simulated learning environment. Midwifery students were video recorded performing a clinical skill and the videos were reviewed and rated by two expert clinicians who assessed the woman centred care behaviours demonstrated by the students (n=69). Test and re-test reliability of the instrument was high for each of the individual raters (Kappa 0.946 and 0.849 respectively p<0.001). However, when raters were compared there were differences between their scores suggesting variation in their expectations of woman centred care behaviours (Kappa 0.470, p<0.001). Midwifery students who had repeated exposures to higher levels of simulation fidelity demonstrated higher levels of woman centred care behaviours. The WCCS has implications for education and the wider midwifery profession in recognising and maintaining practice consistent with the underlying philosophy of woman centred care. Copyright © 2016 Australian College of Midwives. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. The Demand and Supply of Child Care in 1990: Joint Findings from the National Child Care Survey 1990 and a Profile of Child Care Settings.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Willer, Barbara; And Others

    This document reports the results of two coordinated studies of early education and care in the United States. Information on child care demand was provided through the National Child Care Survey 1990 (NCCS), which involved interviews with 4,392 parents. Information on child care supply was provided by A Profile of Child Care Settings (PCS), which…

  19. Child Care Is Good Business: An Agenda for Fort Wayne.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Van Leuven, Patricia O'Brien

    Background information and recommendations related to the support of child care services in Fort Wayne, Indiana is presented in six chapters. Chapter I discusses the feminization of the workforce and demographic data bearing on the need for child care, the child care workforce, and child care arrangements. Chapter II reviews child care services in…

  20. Child Care Quality in Different State Policy Contexts

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rigby, Elizabeth; Ryan, Rebecca M.; Brooks-Gunn, Jeanne

    2007-01-01

    Using data from the Child Care Supplement to the Fragile Families and Child Wellbeing Study, we test associations between the quality of child care and state child care policies. These data, which include observations of child care and interviews with care providers and mothers for 777 children across 14 states, allow for comparisons across a…

  1. The Child Care Connection: Reaching Children in Day Care.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dworkin, Judith Daniels

    1993-01-01

    Describes the Child Care Connection, a public library project serving preschool children by providing hard-to-reach home day-care providers with bags of children's materials. Details of planning, funding, delivery of materials, and evaluation are provided. A sample of the thematic book list for Child Care Connection Kits is appended. (KRN)

  2. Financial Health of Child Care Facilities Affects Quality of Care.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brower, Mary R.; Sull, Theresa M.

    2003-01-01

    Contends that child care facility owners, boards of directors, staff, and parents need to focus on financial management, as poor financial health compromises the quality of care for children. Specifically addresses the issues of: (1) concern for providing high quality child care; (2) the connection between quality and money; and (3) strengthening…

  3. Unionizing: A Guide for Child Care Workers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Whitebook, Marcy; And Others

    Including excerpts from contracts protecting unionized child care workers, this booklet explains basic terminology and facts about unionizing and addresses child care workers' concerns. Section 1 answers commonly asked questions about unions and offers advice about how to answer parents' questions about workers' attempts to organize. Section 2…

  4. Model Child Care Health Policies. Fourth Edition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Aronson, Susan S.

    Drawn from a review of policies at over 100 child care programs nationwide, this document compiles model health policies intended for adaptation and selective use by out-of-home child care facilities. Following an introduction, the document presents model policy forms with blanks for adding individualized information for the following areas: (1)…

  5. Assistant Child Care Teacher: A Teacher's Guide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Staaland, Elaine; Lader, Catherine

    This publication is a guide to Wisconsin's 40-hour high school course for assistant child care teachers. A total of 11 units describe: (1) the child care industry and the services it provides; (2) the arrangement of space and provision of equipment; (3) children's development from birth through 8 years of age; (4) techniques for interacting…

  6. Focus on Preschool Aquatics: Child Care Regulations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sayre, Nancy E.

    This paper proposes state regulations for the training of child care staff members in developmentally appropriate safe aquatic practices, outlines required features of any pools that children visit, and suggests safe practices for water-related activities at child care centers and swimming pools. The staff training regulation suggestions include…

  7. Reconceptualising Child Care in Rural Areas.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Morda, Romana; Kapsalakis, Anthoula; Clyde, Margaret

    A study examining child care services in rural and remote areas conducted focus group interviews and distributed questionnaires to parents living in 15 towns in the Mallee region of Western Victoria (Australia). Barriers to accessing child care in rural areas included limited availability of formal services, costs, stereotypes associated with life…

  8. Child and Youth Care To-Come

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kouri, Scott

    2012-01-01

    The intent of this article is to follow deconstruction as a way to think about the questions that are currently being asked in Child and Youth Care (CYC). As a graduate student in the School of Child and Youth Care at the University of Victoria (SCYC), I am challenged to think my position and identity in terms of my location within, or on the…

  9. Managerial Succession in Child Care Centers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lindeman, Toni D.

    Because a change in child care center directors is potentially so disruptive to both staff and children, factors which inhibit a smooth transition of leadership should be identified and, where possible, solutions proposed. Therefore, this paper (1) briefly describes (through five case studies) different managerial successions in child care centers…

  10. Licensed Child Care in Washington State: 1996.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Miller, Marna Geyer; Hu, James S.; Mayfield, Jim

    This study was the fifth survey of the Washington State licensed child care market, completed in 1996 by the Washington State Department of Social and Health Services (DSHS). Data were obtained through telephone interviews of approximately 2,700 child care providers. The major findings indicate that between 1994 and 1996, the monthly rate at…

  11. Licensed Child Care in Washington State: 1998.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Miller, Marna Geyer; Schrager, Laura

    This study is one of an ongoing series of biennial surveys of all child care centers and some licensed family home providers by Washington State's Department of Social and Health Services (DSHS). A total of 1,137 child care centers and 1,527 family home providers were interviewed in spring 1998. Major findings include: (1) Over the period 1990 to…

  12. Child Care Centers in Commercial Settings.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Giegerich & Associates, Inc., Rockville, MD.

    This study, which is part of a review of the child care elements of local zoning ordinances conducted in 1986 for the Montgomery County Board in Silver Spring, Maryland, addresses planning and site planning issues that arise from the locating of child day care facilities in commercial settings. Principal purposes of the study were to: (1) analyze…

  13. Child Care in the Year 2000.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Blank, Helen

    This paper envisions child care problems in the year 2000 and explores their relationship to policies of today. The population entering parenting age in the year 2000 will bear the scars of the inadequate child care policies of the 1980's. New poor and black parents--many of them born to adolescent mothers in the early 1980's--will have been…

  14. Choosing Child Care: Birth to Three

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Child Care, Inc., 2012

    2012-01-01

    Like all difficult decisions, choosing child care can seem overwhelming, and this is particularly true when choosing care for children under three. The better you understand what your child's and your own personal needs are, and what is available and affordable to you, the more confident you will become in your decision-making process. This…

  15. Child and Youth Care To-Come

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kouri, Scott

    2012-01-01

    The intent of this article is to follow deconstruction as a way to think about the questions that are currently being asked in Child and Youth Care (CYC). As a graduate student in the School of Child and Youth Care at the University of Victoria (SCYC), I am challenged to think my position and identity in terms of my location within, or on the…

  16. Literacy Instruction in Canadian Child Care Centers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Perlman, Michal; Fletcher, Brooke A.

    2008-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to describe literacy instruction in child care centers, examine aspects of child care center quality that may predict such instruction, and provide a limited analysis of whether literacy instruction impacts children's concurrent pre-academic functioning. Staff and children in 103 classrooms serving preschool-age…

  17. Child Care in Sweden: A Comparative Perspective.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jaffe, Kenneth

    This paper describes child care delivery in Sweden, compares aspects of the American and Swedish systems of child care, and identifies what each country can learn from the other. Focusing mainly on the Swedish system, the first section addresses such topics as (1) the role of the State and local districts in program planning and administration,…

  18. Putting the Spotlight on Child Care.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bancroft, John

    1998-01-01

    Describes the October 1997 White House Conference on Child Care, including points made by major speakers such as President Clinton, the First Lady, Treasury Secretary Robert Rubin, and Health and Human Services Secretary Donna Shalala. Discusses the sobering information about child care quality/availability presented at the conference and the…

  19. Child Care Services Provided by Hospitals.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Women's Bureau (DOL), Washington, DC.

    In an attempt to determine the extent to which hospitals had established child care services for their personnel, a survey was conducted of 3,000 hospitals with 100 beds or more. Out of nearly 2,000 hospitals which responded, 98 were operating child care centers, with about 500 more planning or at least showing interest in such a program. The…

  20. Model Child Care Health Policies. Fourth Edition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Aronson, Susan S.

    Drawn from a review of policies at over 100 child care programs nationwide, this document compiles model health policies intended for adaptation and selective use by out-of-home child care facilities. Following an introduction, the document presents model policy forms with blanks for adding individualized information for the following areas: (1)…

  1. Literacy Instruction in Canadian Child Care Centers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Perlman, Michal; Fletcher, Brooke A.

    2008-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to describe literacy instruction in child care centers, examine aspects of child care center quality that may predict such instruction, and provide a limited analysis of whether literacy instruction impacts children's concurrent pre-academic functioning. Staff and children in 103 classrooms serving preschool-age…

  2. Parental Decision Making about Child Care

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rose, Katherine Kensinger; Elicker, James

    2008-01-01

    In an effort to address how to best assess the importance of various characteristics of child care to parents, 355 employed mothers of children under 6 years of age completed a questionnaire exploring the importance of child care characteristics to their choice of arrangement, through ratings, rankings, and conjoint analysis. Results indicate that…

  3. Child care and other support programs.

    PubMed

    Floyd, Latosha; Phillips, Deborah A

    2013-01-01

    The U.S. military has come to realize that providing reliable, high-quality child care for service members' children is a key component of combat readiness. As a result, the Department of Defense (DoD) has invested heavily in child care. The DoD now runs what is by far the nation's largest employer-sponsored child-care system, a sprawling network with nearly 23,000 workers that directly serves or subsidizes care for 200,000 children every day. Child-care options available to civilians typically pale in comparison, and the military's system, embedded in a broader web of family support services, is widely considered to be a model for the nation. The military's child-care success rests on four pillars, write Major Latosha Floyd and Deborah A. Phillips. The first is certification by the military itself, including unannounced inspections to check on safety, sanitation, and general compliance with DoD rules. The second is accreditation by nationally recognized agencies, such as the National Association for the Education of Young Children. The third is a hiring policy that sets educational and other requirements for child-care workers, and the fourth is a pay scale that not only sets wages high enough to discourage the rapid turnover common in civilian child care but also rewards workers for completing additional training. Floyd and Phillips sound a few cautionary notes. For one, demand for military child care continues to outstrip the supply In particular, as National Guard and Reserve members have been activated during the wars in Iraq and Afghanistan, the DoD has sometimes struggled to provide child care for their children. And force reductions and budget cuts are likely to force the military to make difficult choices as it seeks to streamline its child-care services in the years ahead.

  4. CIDA funds AIDS counselling and care centre in Zambia.

    PubMed

    Meehan, S T

    1993-12-01

    In its fight against the spread of AIDS, which is inextricably linked to the issues of international development, the Canadian International Development Agency (CIDA) has focused support on strengthening existing health care systems, helping vulnerable groups gain control over their lives and health, promoting AIDS prevention measures, and building links to other related health services. Funding includes 1) a grant to Hope House in Zambia (counseling and support for persons with AIDS); 2) a contribution to the Canadian Public Health Association's $11 million Southern Africa AIDS Training Programme (helps regional organizations working in AIDS prevention and support through education, training, hospital outreach, peer education for vulnerable groups, assistance to women's shelters, and networking); 3) support for Laval University's Laval Centre for International Cooperation in Health and Development (runs a $22 million program in French-speaking West Africa that operates in over 10 countries and focuses on epidemiological surveillance, information, education, and communication, control of sexually transmitted diseases [STDs], and management of national AIDS programs); 4) support for the University of Manitoba's $3 million program with the University of Nairobi to slow the spread of HIV (strengthens local health care capabilities for STD/HIV diagnosis, treatment, and counseling, with special emphasis on training and education); 5) support in the past for a study of proposed AIDS legislation and its potential impact on the human rights of PLWHIV/AIDS in Thailand; 6) a contribution to help equip the office of the National Movement for Street Children, Rio de Janeiro (focuses on preventing the spread of AIDS among child prostitutes); and 7) long-term financial support to the Interagency Coalition on AIDS and Development, a coalition of Canadian development nongovernmental organizations responding to AIDS in developing countries. An address to obtain a pamphlet giving

  5. Development of the client-centred care questionnaire.

    PubMed

    de Witte, Luc; Schoot, Tineke; Proot, Ireen

    2006-10-01

    This paper reports the development and testing of the Client-Centred Care Questionnaire, aimed at evaluating the client-centredness of professional home nursing care from a client perspective. Client-centred care has become an important theme in health care. To evaluate the client-centredness of care and services from a client's perspective, there is a need for measurement instruments. The questionnaire was developed on the basis of a qualitative study into client perspectives on home nursing care. Items were formulated that closely followed the aspects clients mentioned as central to client-centred home care. A pilot study was conducted with a sample of 107 clients in three home care organizations in 2003 and 2004. These clients had chronic diseases and were expected to receive care for at least another 6 months. The questionnaire comprises 15 items. Principal components analysis and internal consistency analysis show strong internal consistency of the items. All items had strong factor loadings on one dimension, and Cronbach's alpha was 0.94. Clients tended to be most critical about their say in the practical arrangements and organization of care: which person came, how often and when? Clients of the three organizations differed in their perceptions of client-centredness, which may indicate that the questionnaire is capable of differentiating between respondents. The results of this pilot study are promising. The validity of the questionnaire needs further testing.

  6. Child Care and Importance of the Educator-Child Relationship: Policy Relevant Conclusions Based on a Brief Review of Literature. CBGS Working Document.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Van den Bergh, Bea

    At the request of the Family and Welfare Council of Belgium, the Centre for Population and Family Studies compiled a documentation file on child care. Part of the documentation file, this updated working paper discusses literature addressing child care, particularly the quality of relationships between children and caregivers and development of…

  7. European hospital managers' perceptions of patient-centred care.

    PubMed

    Taylor, Angelina; Groene, Oliver

    2015-01-01

    The spotlight has recently been placed on managers' responsibility for patient-centred care as a result of Mid Staffordshire NHS Foundation Trust failings. In previous research, clinicians reported that managers do not have an adequate structured plan for implementing patient-centred care. The purpose of this paper is to assess the perceptions of European hospital management with respect to factors affecting the implementation of a patient-centred approach. In total, 15 semi-structured interviews were conducted with hospital managers (n=10), expert country informants (n=2), patient organisations (n=2) and a user representative (n=1) from around Europe. Participants were purposively and snowball sampled. Interviews were analysed using framework analysis. Most participants felt that current levels of patient-centred care are inadequate, but accounted that there were a number of macro, meso and micro challenges they faced in implementing this approach. These included budget constraints, political and historical factors, the resistance of clinicians and other frontline staff. Organisational culture emerged as a central theme, shaped by these multi-level factors and influencing the way in which patient-centred care was borne out in the hospital. Participants proposed that the needs of patients might be better met through increasing advocacy by patient organisations and greater staff contact with patients. This study is the first of its kind to obtain management views from around Europe. It offers an insight into different models of how patient-centred care is realised by management. It indicates that managers see the value of a patient-centred approach but that they feel restricted by a number of factors at multiple levels.

  8. 7 CFR 226.17 - Child care center provisions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 4 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Child care center provisions. 226.17 Section 226.17... AGRICULTURE CHILD NUTRITION PROGRAMS CHILD AND ADULT CARE FOOD PROGRAM Operational Provisions § 226.17 Child care center provisions. (a) Child care centers may participate in the Program either as independent...

  9. American Child Care: Lessons from the First 100 Years.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Anderson, Susan D.

    Child care has been part of American culture for nearly a century. This paper takes a backward glance at the history of child care in the United States. During the industrial revolution, child care was disguised as child labor. As child labor laws were enacted, schooling became the focus of ideas about caring for groups of children. The idea of a…

  10. 7 CFR 226.17 - Child care center provisions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 4 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Child care center provisions. 226.17 Section 226.17... AGRICULTURE CHILD NUTRITION PROGRAMS CHILD AND ADULT CARE FOOD PROGRAM Operational Provisions § 226.17 Child care center provisions. (a) Child care centers may participate in the Program either as...

  11. 7 CFR 226.17 - Child care center provisions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 4 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Child care center provisions. 226.17 Section 226.17... AGRICULTURE CHILD NUTRITION PROGRAMS CHILD AND ADULT CARE FOOD PROGRAM Operational Provisions § 226.17 Child care center provisions. (a) Child care centers may participate in the Program either as...

  12. 7 CFR 226.17 - Child care center provisions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 4 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Child care center provisions. 226.17 Section 226.17... AGRICULTURE CHILD NUTRITION PROGRAMS CHILD AND ADULT CARE FOOD PROGRAM Operational Provisions § 226.17 Child care center provisions. (a) Child care centers may participate in the Program either as...

  13. 7 CFR 226.17 - Child care center provisions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 4 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Child care center provisions. 226.17 Section 226.17... AGRICULTURE CHILD NUTRITION PROGRAMS CHILD AND ADULT CARE FOOD PROGRAM Operational Provisions § 226.17 Child care center provisions. (a) Child care centers may participate in the Program either as...

  14. When Child Care Breaks down: Mothers' Experiences with Child Care Problems and Resulting Missed Work

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Usdansky, Margaret L.; Wolf, Douglas A.

    2008-01-01

    Qualitative research suggests that day-to-day problems with child care produce significant costs for low-income mothers. But the relevance of daily child care problems for mothers of all socioeconomic backgrounds has been largely overlooked. This article asks two interrelated questions: What factors shape how often mothers experience child care…

  15. The ABCs of Safe and Healthy Child Care: A Handbook for Child Care Providers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hale, Cynthia M.; Polder, Jacquelyn A.

    Recognizing the importance of maintaining a safe and healthy child care setting, this manual for home or center child care providers contains information and guidelines to help providers maintain child health and reduce sickness and injuries. Part 1, "Introduction," describes how diseases are spread and how to prevent and prepare for unintentional…

  16. Who Cares? State Commitment to Child Care and Early Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Adams, Gina; Poersch, Nicole Oxendine

    This report analyzes data gathered through surveys of state administrators of child care and early childhood programs. The report is in three sections: (1) the state of child care and early education in the mid-1990s; (2) the relative level of commitment of each state in 1994; and (3) the likely impact of 1996 U.S. welfare reform legislation. The…

  17. A Person-Centred Analysis of Teacher-Child Relationships in Early Childhood

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hughes, Kathleen; Bullock, Amanda; Coplan, Robert J.

    2014-01-01

    Background: Previously, the nature of teacher-child relationships (TCRs) has been explored through dimensions of close, conflicted, and dependent. However, this "variable-centred" approach is limited, as many relationships can be characterized by more than one characteristic or trait. A "person-centred" approach would allow for…

  18. Empowerment, patient centred care and self‐management

    PubMed Central

    Pulvirenti, Mariastella; McMillan, John; Lawn, Sharon

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Background  Patient or person centred care is widely accepted as the philosophy and practice that underpins quality care. An examination of the Australian National Chronic Disease Strategy and literature in the field highlights assumptions about the self‐manager as patient and a focus on clinical settings. Objective and Conclusion  This paper considers patient or person centred care in the light of empowerment as it is understood in the health promotion charters first established in Alma Ata in 1977. We argue that patient or person centred care can be reconfigured within a social justice and rights framework and that doing so supports the creation of conditions for well‐being in the broader context, one that impacts strongly on individuals. These arguments have broader implications for the practice of patient centred care as it occurs between patient and health professional and for creating shared responsibility for management of the self. It also has implications for those who manage their health outside of the health sector. PMID:22212306

  19. Child-Centred Inquiry Learning: How Mathematics Understanding Emerges

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Calder, Nigel; Brough, Chris

    2013-01-01

    This paper examines how mathematical understandings might emerge through student-centred inquiry. Data is drawn from a research project on student-centred curriculum integration that situated mathematics within authentic problem-solving contexts and involved students in collaboratively constructed curriculum. The project involved case studies in…

  20. Next steps for federal child care policy.

    PubMed

    Greenberg, Mark

    2007-01-01

    In Mark Greenberg's view, a national child care strategy should pursue four goals. Every parent who needs child care to get or keep work should be able to afford care without having to leave children in unhealthy or dangerous environments; all families should be able to place their children in settings that foster education and healthy development; parental choice should be respected; and a set of good choices should be available. Attaining these goals, says Greenberg, requires revamping both federal child care subsidy programs and federal tax policy related to child care. Today subsidies are principally provided through a block grant structure in which states must restrict eligibility, access, or the extent of assistance because both federal and state funds are limited. Tax policy principally involves a modest nonrefundable credit that provides little or no assistance to poor and low-income families. Greenberg would replace the block grant with a federal guarantee of assistance for all families with incomes under 200 percent of poverty that need child care to enter or sustain employment. States would administer the federal assistance program under a federal-state matching formula with the federal government paying most of the cost. States would develop and implement plans to improve the quality of child care, coordinate child care with other early education programs, and ensure that child care payment rates are sufficient to allow families to obtain care that fosters healthy child development. Greenberg would also make the federal dependent care tax credit refundable, with the credit set at 50 percent of covered child care costs for the lowest-income families and gradually phasing down to 20 percent as family income increases. The combined subsidy and tax changes would lead to a better-coordinated system of child care subsidies that would assure substantial financial help to families below 200 percent of poverty, while tax-based help would ensure continued, albeit

  1. Child Care and Development Fund (CCDF) Program. Final rule.

    PubMed

    2016-09-30

    This final rule makes regulatory changes to the Child Care and Development Fund (CCDF) based on the Child Care and Development Block Grant Act of 2014. These changes strengthen requirements to protect the health and safety of children in child care; help parents make informed consumer choices and access information to support child development; provide equal access to stable, high-quality child care for low-income children; and enhance the quality of child care and the early childhood workforce.

  2. Service quality perceptions in primary health care centres in Greece

    PubMed Central

    Papanikolaou, Vicky; Zygiaris, Sotiris

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Context  The paper refers to the increased competition between health care providers and the need for patient‐centred services in Greece. Using service quality methodology, this paper investigates service quality perceptions of patients in Greek public primary health centres. Objective  To test the internal consistency and applicability of SERVQUAL in primary health care centres in Greece. Strategy  SERVQUAL was used to examine whether patients have different expectations from health care providers and whether different groups of patients may consider some dimensions of care more important than others. Results  The analysis showed that there were gaps in all dimensions measured by SERVQUAL. The largest gap was detected in empathy. Further analysis showed that there were also differences depending on gender, age and education levels. A separate analysis of expectations and perceptions revealed that this gap was because of differences in patients’ perceptions rather than expectations. Discussion and conclusions  This paper raises a number of issues that concern the applicability of SERVQUAL in health care services and could enhance current discussions about SERVQUAL improvement. Quality of health care needs to be redefined by encompassing multiple dimensions. Beyond a simple expectations–perceptions gap, people may hold different understandings of health care that, in turn, influence their perception of the quality of services. PMID:22296402

  3. Service quality perceptions in primary health care centres in Greece.

    PubMed

    Papanikolaou, Vicky; Zygiaris, Sotiris

    2014-04-01

    The paper refers to the increased competition between health care providers and the need for patient-centred services in Greece. Using service quality methodology, this paper investigates service quality perceptions of patients in Greek public primary health centres. To test the internal consistency and applicability of SERVQUAL in primary health care centres in Greece. SERVQUAL was used to examine whether patients have different expectations from health care providers and whether different groups of patients may consider some dimensions of care more important than others. The analysis showed that there were gaps in all dimensions measured by SERVQUAL. The largest gap was detected in empathy. Further analysis showed that there were also differences depending on gender, age and education levels. A separate analysis of expectations and perceptions revealed that this gap was because of differences in patients' perceptions rather than expectations. THIS paper raises a number of issues that concern the applicability of SERVQUAL in health care services and could enhance current discussions about SERVQUAL improvement. Quality of health care needs to be redefined by encompassing multiple dimensions. Beyond a simple expectations-perceptions gap, people may hold different understandings of health care that, in turn, influence their perception of the quality of services. © 2012 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  4. Perspectives: A Progress Report on Child Care.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    North Carolina Univ., Chapel Hill. Frank Porter Graham Center.

    Described is the child care program at the Frank Porter Graham Center. Discussion of physical facilities focuses on creating a good environment, floor plan of cottage trailer, and choosing appropriate equipment. Selection of staff is said to be the most important part of establishing a day care center. The day care center is explained to serve the…

  5. Meeting Child Care Needs in Disasters.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Winter, Roy E.; Surr, John V.; Leaf, Beverly Joy

    2003-01-01

    Describes Disaster Child Care (DCC), a nonsectarian ministry, which trains and mobilizes volunteers to care for children of families suffering from a natural or man-made disaster. Specifically addresses: (1) comfort through familiarity; (2) behaviors and approaches to lessen anxiety; and (3) care and caregiver training. Provides examples of care…

  6. Preschools for Science: The Child Study Centre at the University of British Columbia, 1960-1997

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clark, Penney; Gleason, Mona; Petrina, Stephen

    2012-01-01

    The development of the Child Study Centre (CSC) at University of British Columbia (UBC) provides a unique perspective on the complex and often contradictory relationship between child study and preschool education in postwar Canada. In this article, the authors detail the development and eventual closure of the CSC at UBC, focusing on the uneasy…

  7. Informing Parents about Child Care Subsidies. Child Care Action Campaign Issue Brief #10.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Child Care Action Campaign, New York, NY.

    On December 11, 1997, the Child Care Action Campaign (CCAC) hosted an audioconference to explore the issue of how parents seeking to get off welfare can learn about subsidies available for child care in the transition from welfare to work. Presenters were Doug Baird, president of Associated Day Care Services in Boston, who discussed lessons of a…

  8. School-Based Child Care. Research Brief

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Muir, Mike

    2004-01-01

    Each year, half a million teenagers become mothers in the United States. School-based child care programs are a positive way for educational institutions to encourage young mothers to return to or stay in school, prepare for employment, and acquire accurate information about child development and appropriate parenting practices. Nationwide,…

  9. Who's Vulnerable in Infant Child Care Centers?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kendall, Earline D.; Moukaddem, Virginia E.

    1992-01-01

    Maintains that infants and toddlers, parents, and child caregivers are vulnerable to a variety of infectious diseases from infant-toddler child care centers. These diseases include infectious diarrhea; rubella; cytomeglovirus; hepatitis A, and haemophilus influenza type B. Suggests ways to prevent the spread of such diseases. (BB)

  10. Maryland Child Care Business Partnership Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Maryland State Dept. of Human Resources, Baltimore. Child Care Administration.

    Building on a pledge to support the state's job growth and successful transitions from welfare to work, the governor of Maryland issued an executive order in 1998 to establish the Maryland Child Care Business Partnership (MCCBP). This partnership, comprised of 23 members representing business, labor, state and local government, and the child care…

  11. Who's Vulnerable in Infant Child Care Centers?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kendall, Earline D.; Moukaddem, Virginia E.

    1992-01-01

    Maintains that infants and toddlers, parents, and child caregivers are vulnerable to a variety of infectious diseases from infant-toddler child care centers. These diseases include infectious diarrhea; rubella; cytomeglovirus; hepatitis A, and haemophilus influenza type B. Suggests ways to prevent the spread of such diseases. (BB)

  12. The Palliative Care Centre of Hôtel-Dieu Hospital.

    PubMed

    Lassaunière, J M; Zittoun, R

    1995-01-01

    In 1989, two affiliations of Centre de Soins Palliatifs were created by the Assistance Publique-Hôpitaux de Paris, the largest medical complex in Europe. At Hôtel-Dieu de Paris, a mobile team from Soins Palliatifs was formed. The members were recruited from hospital services in order to help the team in the care and support of patients with advanced diseases. A description of the service, team activities (care, formation, teaching and research) is proposed.

  13. Health Update: Chemical Hazards in Child Care.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Aronson, Susan S.

    1988-01-01

    Points out that children are uniquely susceptible to toxic substances. Describes the hazards that asbestos, pesticides, and art materials pose to children. Offers practical advice for dealing with common problems encountered in child care programs. (RJC)

  14. Stress in Live-In Child Care

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reed, Michael J.

    1977-01-01

    Examines the influence of the live-in environment on the child care worker through a study of certain basic stress indicators (life space, conflict-triggering situations, support, need congruence, opportunity, environmental mutability, vigilance, regimentation and crisis). (BF)

  15. Caring for a Seriously Ill Child

    MedlinePlus

    ... your child, you may refer to your religious, spiritual, and cultural beliefs about death. You might want ... Let them carpool siblings to soccer or theater practice. Let others — relatives, friends — share responsibilities of caring ...

  16. Aotearoa, New Zealand and the Centre for Human Care.

    PubMed

    Martin, M

    1997-01-01

    Aotearoa, New Zealand, is a small South Pacific nation in which the concept of the Centre for Human Care has been shared and explored through the writings and visits of Professor Jean Watson. This article expresses this experience personally and makes comments about the value universally of such a concept and vision.

  17. [The main missions of the National Palliative Care Resource Centre].

    PubMed

    Doré-Pautonnier, Delphine; Baussant-Crenn, Camille; Frattini, Marie-Odile; Mino, Jean-Christophe; Rennesson, Marina

    2011-09-01

    The French National Palliative Care Resource Centre (CNDR) provides people impacted by the end of life, death and bereavement with a range of constantly evolving services. Spreading the palliative approach in order to enable everyone to benefit from it and appropriate it constitutes the main mission of the CNDR.

  18. Person-centred care: Principle of Nursing Practice D.

    PubMed

    Manley, Kim; Hills, Val; Marriot, Sheila

    This is the fifth article in a nine-part series describing the Principles of Nursing Practice developed by the Royal College of Nursing (RCN) in collaboration with patient and service organisations, the Department of Health, the Nursing and Midwifery Council, nurses and other healthcare professionals. This article discusses Principle D, the provision of person-centred care.

  19. Child Care Teaching as Women's Work: Reflections on Experiences

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kim, Miai; Reifel, Stuart

    2010-01-01

    Child care teachers' experiences and their gendered understandings of their work were explored in this study. Two female child care teachers were interviewed individually and asked to describe their work as women's work. Analysis showed that teachers essentialized child care teaching, recognized the paradoxes of being a child care teacher,…

  20. State Child Care Policies for Limited English Proficient Families

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Firgens, Emily; Matthews, Hannah

    2012-01-01

    The Child Care and Development Block Grant (CCDBG), the largest source of federal funding for child care assistance available to states, provides low-income families with help paying for child care. Studies have shown that low-income LEP (limited English proficient), as well as immigrant families, are less likely to receive child care assistance.…

  1. 45 CFR 98.50 - Child care services.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 1 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Child care services. 98.50 Section 98.50 Public Welfare Department of Health and Human Services GENERAL ADMINISTRATION CHILD CARE AND DEVELOPMENT FUND Use of Child Care and Development Funds § 98.50 Child care services. (a) Of the funds remaining...

  2. 45 CFR 98.50 - Child care services.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 1 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Child care services. 98.50 Section 98.50 Public Welfare DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES GENERAL ADMINISTRATION CHILD CARE AND DEVELOPMENT FUND Use of Child Care and Development Funds § 98.50 Child care services. (a) Of the funds remaining...

  3. 45 CFR 98.50 - Child care services.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 1 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Child care services. 98.50 Section 98.50 Public Welfare DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES GENERAL ADMINISTRATION CHILD CARE AND DEVELOPMENT FUND Use of Child Care and Development Funds § 98.50 Child care services. (a) Of the funds remaining...

  4. 45 CFR 98.50 - Child care services.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 1 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Child care services. 98.50 Section 98.50 Public Welfare DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES GENERAL ADMINISTRATION CHILD CARE AND DEVELOPMENT FUND Use of Child Care and Development Funds § 98.50 Child care services. (a) Of the funds remaining...

  5. 45 CFR 98.50 - Child care services.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Child care services. 98.50 Section 98.50 Public Welfare DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES GENERAL ADMINISTRATION CHILD CARE AND DEVELOPMENT FUND Use of Child Care and Development Funds § 98.50 Child care services. (a) Of the funds remaining...

  6. Parents and the High Cost of Child Care: 2015 Report

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fraga, Lynette; Dobbins, Dionne; McCready, Michelle

    2015-01-01

    Eleven million children younger than age five are in some form of child care in the United States. The "Parents and the High Cost of Child Care: 2015 Report" summarizes the cost of child care across the country, examines the importance of child care as a workforce support and as an early learning program, and explores the effect of high…

  7. Parents and the High Cost of Child Care: 2014 Report

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wood, Stephen; Fraga, Lynette; McCready, Michelle

    2014-01-01

    Eleven million children younger than age five are in some form of child care in the United States. The "Parents and the High Cost of Child Care: 2014 Report" summarizes the cost of child care across the country, examines the importance of child care as a workforce support and as an early learning program, and explores the effect of high…

  8. Child Care during Nonstandard Work Hours: Research to Policy Resources

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ferguson, Daniel

    2016-01-01

    In November 2014, the Child Care and Development Block Grant (CCDBG) Act of 2014 was signed into law, reauthorizing the Child Care and Development Fund (CCDF)--the federal child care subsidy program--for the first time since 1996. In December 2015, the U.S. Office of Child Care issued a Notice of Proposed Rulemaking, which updated CCDF regulations…

  9. Child Care and Development Block Grant Participation in 2012

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Matthews, Hannah; Reeves, Rhiannon

    2014-01-01

    The Child Care and Development Block Grant (CCDBG) is the primary funding source for federal child care subsidies to low-income working families, as well as improving child care quality. Based on preliminary state-reported data from the federal Office of Child Care, this fact sheet provides a snapshot of CCDBG program participation in 2012, noting…

  10. Parents and the High Cost of Child Care: 2012 Report

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Child Care Aware of America, 2012

    2012-01-01

    "Parents and the High Cost of Child Care: 2012 Report" presents 2011 data reflecting what parents pay for full-time child care in America. It includes average fees for both child care centers and family child care homes. Information was collected through a survey conducted in January 2012 that asked for the average costs charged for…

  11. Everybody's Children: Child Care as a Public Problem.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gormley, William T., Jr.

    In the face of social changes that are increasing the demand for available, affordable, quality child care, it is difficult to continue to think of child care as a purely private issue. This book presents an analysis of the state of American child care. It evaluates child care policies and the national attention given to young children and their…

  12. Child Care Teaching as Women's Work: Reflections on Experiences

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kim, Miai; Reifel, Stuart

    2010-01-01

    Child care teachers' experiences and their gendered understandings of their work were explored in this study. Two female child care teachers were interviewed individually and asked to describe their work as women's work. Analysis showed that teachers essentialized child care teaching, recognized the paradoxes of being a child care teacher,…

  13. Child Care during Nonstandard Work Hours: Research to Policy Resources

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ferguson, Daniel

    2016-01-01

    In November 2014, the Child Care and Development Block Grant (CCDBG) Act of 2014 was signed into law, reauthorizing the Child Care and Development Fund (CCDF)--the federal child care subsidy program--for the first time since 1996. In December 2015, the U.S. Office of Child Care issued a Notice of Proposed Rulemaking, which updated CCDF regulations…

  14. 5 CFR 792.203 - Child care subsidy programs; eligibility.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 5 Administrative Personnel 2 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Child care subsidy programs; eligibility... of Appropriated Funds for Child Care Costs for Lower Income Employees § 792.203 Child care subsidy programs; eligibility. (a)(1) An Executive agency may establish a child care subsidy program in which...

  15. 5 CFR 792.203 - Child care subsidy programs; eligibility.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 5 Administrative Personnel 2 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Child care subsidy programs; eligibility... of Appropriated Funds for Child Care Costs for Lower Income Employees § 792.203 Child care subsidy programs; eligibility. (a)(1) An Executive agency may establish a child care subsidy program in which...

  16. Exploring Parental Preferences: Care or Education: What Do Greek Parents Aspire from Day Care Centres?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rentzou, Konstantina

    2013-01-01

    Early childhood education and care is a multifaceted institution. Based on children's age, a number of different settings operate, which have usually two distinct aims. Kindergartens provide mainly education whereas day care centres provide care. Yet, in recent years, the need to establish programmes which provide both education and care to…

  17. Developing a Collaborative Model of Child Care and Student Learning: Notes on Process and Outcome at the University of Guelph.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stuart, Barbara; Brophy, Kathleen; Lero, Donna; Callahan, Judy; deVoy, April

    1998-01-01

    Describes the development of the University of Guelph Child Care and Learning Centre, a collaborative program for integrating child care services with undergraduate learning opportunities and research. Summarizes the history, contextual factors, and guiding principles for the model, and the first-year evaluation results. Illustrates how contextual…

  18. Review of electroconvulsive therapy practice from a tertiary Child and Adolescent Psychiatry Centre.

    PubMed

    Jacob, Preeti; Gogi, Prabhu Kiran Vishwanath; Srinath, Shoba; Thirthalli, Jagadisha; Girimaji, Satish; Seshadri, Shekhar; Sagar, John Vijay

    2014-12-01

    The use of electroconvulsive therapy (ECT) in children and adolescents is a controversial issue. This study was done to examine the pattern and practice as well as the outcome of electroconvulsive therapy administered to children and adolescents admitted to a tertiary care centre. A 10 year retrospective chart review of all children and adolescents (up to 16 years of age) admitted in the Child and Adolescent Psychiatry Centre, National Institute of Mental Health and Neurosciences (NIMHANS) who had received at least 1 session of ECT was done. Information regarding diagnosis, reasons for prescribing electroconvulsive therapy, details regarding the procedure and outcome variables was collected from the records. Clinical Global Impressions (CGI) scale rating of the severity of illness and improvement seen were done by 2 trained psychiatrists independently. 22 children and adolescents received electroconvulsive therapy over 10 years. There were an equal number of boys and girls. All received modified ECT. Most patients who received electroconvulsive therapy were severely ill. Catatonic symptoms 54.5% (12) were the most common reason for prescribing electroconvulsive therapy. It was efficacious in 77.3% (17) of the patients. Electroconvulsive therapy was relatively safe, and most experienced no acute side effects. 68.2% (15) who were on follow up and did not experience any long term side effects due to the electroconvulsive therapy. Electroconvulsive therapy has a place in the acute management of severe childhood psychiatric disorders. Further long term prospective studies are required. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Opening a New Window on Child Care: A Report on the Status of Child Care in the Nation Today.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Council of Jewish Women, New York, NY.

    Despite improvements in child care regulations and in the availability of child care since the 1972 landmark study on the country's child care delivery system, the current child care system still fails working parents and their children even as families are becoming more reliant on it. This document synthesizes recent research showing the…

  20. Care demands on mothers caring for a child with Down syndrome: Malaysian (Sarawak) mothers' perspectives.

    PubMed

    Chan, Kim Geok; Lim, Khatijah Abdullah; Ling, How Kee

    2015-10-01

    This paper examines the experiences of mothers caring for a child with Down syndrome in the Malaysian (Sarawak) context. Qualitative interviews were conducted with 26 biological mothers of children with Down syndrome aged 18 years and below. They were accessed through selected child health clinics, community-based rehabilitation centres and schools using purposive sampling within two regions in Sarawak, one of the two Borneo States of Malaysia. Major themes emerging within the context of care demands were children's health, developmental delays, daily needs and behaviour issues. The insights obtained into the care demands experienced by mothers of children with Down syndrome have several implications for practice by care professionals. © 2014 Wiley Publishing Asia Pty Ltd.

  1. Infants and Child Care: The New Controversy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Phillips, Deborah A.

    1987-01-01

    Argues that research does not warrant Belsky's position that infant child care for more than 20 hours per week is a risk factor for infants' insecure-avoidant attachment and children's maladaptive social behavior. Suggests that quality of care and family characteristics are major influences. (NH)

  2. Examining the Cost of Military Child Care

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2002-01-01

    developmental outcomes ( Belsky , 1984; Bredekamp, 1986). 6 Examining the Cost of Military Child Care About half the states now offer some additional reimbursement...Marine Corps. BIBLIOGRAPHY Belkin, L., "Your Kids Are Their Problem," New York Times Magazine, July 23, 2000. Belsky , J., "Two Waves of Day Care Research

  3. Child Care Insurance Crisis: Strategies for Survival.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Koppelman, Jane

    Designed to help child care centers in their search for liability insurance, this report explores the controversy about insurance provision, and offers advice on how to combat high rates and locate policies offering the most protection. Chapter 1 reports on how insurers justify their treatment of day care centers as high risk enterprises.…

  4. Child Development: Day Care. 2. Serving Infants.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Huntington, Dorothy S., Ed.; And Others

    This volume is the first in a series of Handbooks dealing with the child development aspects of any good day care program. The Handbook is divided into five sections. Chapter One covers the principles of day care that must be the foundation of any program. It reviews the developmental needs of children from birth to age three, and outlines some of…

  5. Child Care Insurance Crisis: Strategies for Survival.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Koppelman, Jane

    Designed to help child care centers in their search for liability insurance, this report explores the controversy about insurance provision, and offers advice on how to combat high rates and locate policies offering the most protection. Chapter 1 reports on how insurers justify their treatment of day care centers as high risk enterprises.…

  6. How To Start a Child Care Center.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Benner, Phylis M., Comp.; Hollestelle, Kay, Comp.

    This paper is addressed to those who want to start their own child care center, and provides guidelines for doing so. It identifies the first things to be considered--planning and conducting a community needs assessment to analyze the competition in the area and make the decision of opening a day care center, and gathering information from a…

  7. Small Child Care Facilities in Residential Areas.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Giegerich & Associates, Inc., Rockville, MD.

    One part of a three-part investigation prepared for the Montgomery County Planning Board in Silver Spring, Maryland, this study addresses planning and site planning issues arising from the location of child care facilities in residential settings. The study, which emphasizes homes and centers which care for 7 to 20 children, provides a detailed…

  8. Child Care in Texas: A Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Larson, Erik

    This report examines a basic child care challenge confronting the state of Texas: the shortage of affordable, accessible, quality early care and education for Texas families with children, particularly those with limited incomes. The report notes that these three factors--affordability, accessibility, and good quality--are integral to a successful…

  9. Person-centred care dialectics-Inquired in the context of palliative care.

    PubMed

    Öhlén, Joakim; Reimer-Kirkham, Sheryl; Astle, Barbara; Håkanson, Cecilia; Lee, Joyce; Eriksson, Marjukka; Sawatzky, Richard

    2017-10-01

    Although a widely used concept in health care, person-centred care remains somewhat ambiguous. In the field of palliative care, person-centred care is considered a historically distinct ideal and yet there continues to be a dearth of conceptual clarity. Person-centred care is also challenged by the pull of standardization that characterizes much of health service delivery. The conceptual ambiguity becomes especially problematic in contemporary pluralistic societies, particularly in the light of continued inequities in healthcare access and disparities in health outcomes. Our aim was to explicate premises and underlying assumptions regarding person-centred care in the context of palliative care with an attempt to bridge the apparently competing agendas of individualization versus standardization, and individuals versus populations. By positioning person-centredness in relation to the hermeneutics of the self according to Paul Ricœur, dialectics between individualization and standardization, and between individuals and populations were constructed. The competing agendas were related in a dialectic manner in the way that population health is of importance for the individual, and standardization is of importance for the population. The analysis suggests that person-centred care is an ethical stance, which gives prominence to both suffering and capability of the individual as a person. The dialectic analysis points towards the importance of extending person-centred care to encompass population and societal perspectives and thereby avoiding a problematic tendency of affiliating person-centred care with exclusively individualistic perspectives. Considerations for person-centred palliative care on micro-, meso- and macrolevels conclude the paper. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  10. Child Care Health Consultation Improves Infant and Toddler Care.

    PubMed

    Johnston, Rosemary; DelConte, Beth A; Ungvary, Libby; Fiene, Richard; Aronson, Susan S

    2017-08-08

    Many families enroll their infants and toddlers in early education and child care programs. The Pennsylvania Chapter of the American Academy of Pediatrics recruited 32 child care centers that care for infants and toddlers to be linked with a child care health consultant (CCHC). Project staff assigned the centers alternately to an immediate intervention or a 1-year delayed intervention (contrast) group. At entry into the project, and then 1 and 2 years later, an evaluator assessed center compliance with 13 standards for infants and toddler care selected from Caring for Our Children: National Health and Safety Performance Standards (3rd ed.). Project staff linked the Immediate Intervention centers with a CCHC in Year 1. In Year 2, in a crossover comparison, project staff linked Contrast centers with a CCHC. Working with a CCHC effectively improved compliance with some selected health and safety standards. Copyright © 2017 National Association of Pediatric Nurse Practitioners. All rights reserved.

  11. Quality Child Care in Virginia. Critical Issues in Child Care. White Paper 1.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnson, Suzanne Clark; Baratka, Talley V.; Wood, Lisa

    This paper on child care is one of four to be published by the Action Alliance for Virginia's Children. The papers are based on the most comprehensive data available on child care in Virginia, recent scholarly research from both social science and neuroscience, and the best judgment of leading professionals in the fields of education and child…

  12. Child Care Health Connections, 2001: A Health and Safety Newsletter for California Child Care Professionals.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Walery, Nancy, Ed.; Evinger, Sara, Ed.; Dailey, Lyn, Ed.; Zamani, Rahman, Ed.; Guralnick, Eva, Ed.

    2001-01-01

    This document is comprised of the six 2001 issues of a bimonthly newsletter providing information on young children's health and safety for California's child care professionals. Regular features include a column on infant/toddler concerns, a question-answer column regarding medical and health issues, and resources for child care providers.…

  13. Oregon Child Care Quality Indicators Program: QRS Profile. The Child Care Quality Rating System (QRS) Assessment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Child Trends, 2010

    2010-01-01

    This paper presents a profile of Oregon's Child Care Quality Indicators Program prepared as part of the Child Care Quality Rating System (QRS) Assessment Study. The profile consists of several sections and their corresponding descriptions including: (1) Program Information; (2) Rating Details; (3) Quality Indicators for Center-Based Programs; (4)…

  14. Family Child Care Health and Safety Checklist: A Packet for Family Child Care Providers [with Videotape].

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kendrick, Abby Shapiro; Gravell, Joanne

    This checklist and accompanying video are designed to help family child care providers assess the health and safety of the child care home. The checklist includes suggestions for conducting the self-evaluation and for creating a safer, healthier home environment. The areas of the checklist are: your home, out of bounds areas, gates and guards,…

  15. Oregon Child Care Quality Indicators Program: QRS Profile. The Child Care Quality Rating System (QRS) Assessment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Child Trends, 2010

    2010-01-01

    This paper presents a profile of Oregon's Child Care Quality Indicators Program prepared as part of the Child Care Quality Rating System (QRS) Assessment Study. The profile consists of several sections and their corresponding descriptions including: (1) Program Information; (2) Rating Details; (3) Quality Indicators for Center-Based Programs; (4)…

  16. Employer Child Care Providers Stalled, but Optimistic: Fourteenth Annual Status Report on Employer Child Care

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Neugebauer, Roger

    2005-01-01

    The ten largest employer child care management organizations, as a group, reported a zero growth rate in 2004. This year of no growth follows two years in which the sector grew by only 4% per year. This contrasts dramatically with the fast expansion period for employer child care, 1996 through 2000, when the sector grew at an annual rate of 10%.…

  17. Evaluation of Child Care Subsidy Strategies: Massachusetts Family Child Care Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Collins, Ann; Goodson, Barbara; Luallen, Jeremy; Fountain, Alyssa Rulf; Checkoway, Amy

    2010-01-01

    This report presents findings from the Massachusetts Family Child Care study, a two-year evaluation of the impacts of an early childhood education program on providers and children in family child care. The program--"LearningGames"--is designed to train caregivers to stimulate children's cognitive, language, and social-emotional…

  18. Fact Sheets of Public-Private Partnerships for Child Care. The Child Care Partnership Project.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Finance Project, Washington, DC.

    These fact sheets were developed as part of the Child Care Partnership Project, a multi-year technical assistance effort. The Partnership Project provides a series of technical assistance resources and materials to support the development and strengthening of public-private partnerships to improve the quality and supply of child care. The fact…

  19. Making the Case for Public-Private Child Care Partnerships: Child Care Partnership Project. [Videotape].

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Finance Project, Washington, DC.

    The quality of child care in the United States has important implications for school preparedness, welfare reform, economic vitality, and the quality of family life. In this 8-minute videotape, business leaders describe why child care makes good business sense. Visuals explain the importance of early childhood for school and life success, and the…

  20. Family Child Care Health and Safety Checklist: A Packet for Family Child Care Providers [with Videotape].

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kendrick, Abby Shapiro; Gravell, Joanne

    This checklist and accompanying video are designed to help family child care providers assess the health and safety of the child care home. The checklist includes suggestions for conducting the self-evaluation and for creating a safer, healthier home environment. The areas of the checklist are: your home, out of bounds areas, gates and guards,…

  1. Child Care Teachers' Perspectives on Including Children with Challenging Behavior in Child Care Settings

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Quesenberry, Amanda C.; Hemmeter, Mary Louise; Ostrosky, Michaelene M.; Hamann, Kira

    2014-01-01

    In this study, 9 teachers from 5 child care centers were interviewed to examine their perceptions on including children with challenging behavior in their classrooms. The findings provide a firsthand view into how child care teachers support children's social and emotional development and address challenging behavior. Results confirm previous…

  2. Consideration of Career Time in Child Care Work: Observations on Child Care Work Experiences

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sutton, Beverly

    1977-01-01

    Comments on worker-selection process, cycle of involvement, and personal and professional concerns in child care work. Discusses intervention in the emotional fatigue cycle, young workers' development, administrative support, and promotion of commitment to child care work as a profession. (BF)

  3. Winning at Child Caring: Easier Ways with Young Children in Child Care Centers, Homes and Malls.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Simons, Bette

    This booklet is a compilation of articles from a column in the "Warner Center News" written by an experienced early childhood educator on various topics related to child care. The brief articles describe the problems and pleasures that preschool children bring to child care centers, homes, markets, and malls. The articles are grouped…

  4. Child Care Is Good Business: A Manual on Employer Supported Child Care.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Haas, Karen S.

    Many companies today consider employer-sponsored child care a viable solution to problems facing employees who are also parents. Companies can choose from many program options, each with particular benefits for employer and employees. This manual highlights what is presently happening in employer-supported child care, particularly the cost…

  5. Financing Child Care: Future Arrangements. Report of the Task Force on Child Care: Series 2.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chenier, Nancy Miller; And Others

    Future arrangements for financing child care in Canada is the subject of the five research studies in this volume. The studies were commissioned as part of an effort to provide detailed analyses of issues of special relevance to child care and parental leave policies and the effects of such issues on the changing Canadian family. Paper 1 provides…

  6. Maintaining Work: The Influence of Child Care Subsidies on Child Care-Related Work Disruptions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Forry, Nicole D.; Hofferth, Sandra L.

    2011-01-01

    With the passage of welfare reform, support for low-income parents to not only obtain but also maintain work has become imperative. The role of child care subsidies in supporting parents' job tenure has received little attention in the literature. This article examines the association between receiving a child care subsidy and experiencing a child…

  7. Making the Case for Public-Private Child Care Partnerships: Child Care Partnership Project. [Videotape].

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Finance Project, Washington, DC.

    The quality of child care in the United States has important implications for school preparedness, welfare reform, economic vitality, and the quality of family life. In this 8-minute videotape, business leaders describe why child care makes good business sense. Visuals explain the importance of early childhood for school and life success, and the…

  8. [Transition from paediatric to adult cystic fibrosis care centre].

    PubMed

    Durieu, I; Reynaud, Q; Nove-Josserand, R

    2016-02-01

    The number of adolescents and young adults with chronic diseases has increased dramatically over the last decade. This led paediatric teams to organize the transition to adult centres with the aim to ensure the quality of care and prognosis, adherence to survey and treatment. To promote a good work and family life is also a challenge. Several studies have shown the importance of a successful transition in cystic fibrosis (CF) in order to prevent complications and loss monitoring and to improve the perception of patients and their families. In France in 2003, cystic fibrosis centres (CRCM) have been identified and among them of adult CF centres. The regular increase of the adult centre's active file requires improving the transition process. It is necessary to improve the transition process and to prepare the young patient and their family early during adolescence. The process in place should concern the whole aspects of care, i.e., medical, psychological and educational. The transition to adulthood will be successful if it results in a stable state of the disease allowing family and career plans. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  9. Making Child Care Centers SAFER: A Non-Regulatory Approach to Improving Child Care Center Siting

    PubMed Central

    Somers, Tarah S; Harvey, Margaret L.; Rusnak, Sharee Major

    2011-01-01

    Licensed child care centers are generally considered to be safe because they are required to meet state licensing regulations. As part of their licensing requirements, many states inspect child care centers and include an assessment of the health and safety of the facility to look for hazardous conditions or practices that may harm children. However, most states do not require an environmental assessment of the child care center building or land to prevent a center from being placed on, next to, or inside contaminated buildings. Having worked on several sites where child care centers were affected by environmental contaminants, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention and the Agency for Toxic Substances and Disease Registry (ATSDR) endeavor to raise awareness of this issue. One of ATSDR's partner states, Connecticut, took a proactive, non-regulatory approach to the issue with the development its Child Day Care Screening Assessment for Environmental Risk Program. PMID:21563710

  10. Child Care Gifts to Bolster Astronomy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nemiroff, Robert J.; Allen, Alice

    2016-01-01

    Caring for children should not derail potentially excellent future astronomers. It is therefore suggested that a mechanism be created for established astronomers to voluntarily will 10 percent of their estate to a fund that helps aspiring astronomers reduce child care costs. Statistics indicate that many scientists delay child rearing until they have secure jobs. This delay appears to be based on the early relative cost of child care and the perception that time spent raising children negatively impacts job performance and future employability. Having even a portion of child care expenses covered may increase the efficiency of early-career education and productivity of early-career scientific research. It is hoped that some established astronomers may be inspired to contribute by remembering their own lives as aspiring astronomers, while also wishing to add to their legacy. Only an expression of interest is requested here, both from established astronomers who might be interested in taking such a donation pledge, and from aspiring astronomers who feel their careers would be helped by child care assistance.

  11. Flexible learning to support safe, person-centred care.

    PubMed

    Rae, Ann

    2012-02-01

    Effective Practitioner is an educational initiative that supports nurses, midwives and allied health professionals to deliver person-centred, safe and effective care. It offers access to flexible work-based learning and development resources. This article describes the progress of the initiative and sets out the expected effects on service delivery, as well as exploring the Scottish context and the initiative's relevance to the rest of the UK and abroad.

  12. Quality Child Care: A Comprehensive Guide for Administrators and Teachers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cromwell, Ellen S.

    This book is designed as a guide for implementing quality child care environments at preschool and school-age levels for children ages 1 through 10. Evolving from a child-centered philosophy, the book contains six integrated and interdependent sections that respectively, provide an overview of child care and discuss child care center design,…

  13. Child Care You Can Count On: Model Programs and Policies.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Annie E. Casey Foundation, Baltimore, MD.

    This document is composed of an overview of the 1998 Kids Count data book, a pocket guide summarizing findings, and information sheets on various aspects of child care. The overview discusses the need for child care, examines its cost, presents information on the quality of available child care, describes potential solutions to make child care…

  14. The Relationship between Child Care Subsidies and Children's Cognitive Development

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hawkinson, Laura E.; Griffen, Andrew S.; Dong, Nianbo; Maynard, Rebecca A.

    2013-01-01

    Child care subsidies help low-income families pay for child care while parents work or study. Few studies have examined the effects of child care subsidy use on child development, and no studies have done so controlling for prior cognitive skills. We use rich, longitudinal data from the ECLS-B data set to estimate the relationship between child…

  15. Child Care Assistance: Helping Parents Work and Children Succeed

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Matthews, Hannah; Walker, Christina

    2014-01-01

    Quality child care enables parents to work or go to school while also providing young children with the early childhood education experiences needed for healthy development. The Child Care and Development Block Grant (CCDBG) is the primary federal program that provides funding for child care assistance for low-income working parents. Child care…

  16. Exploring Alternative Approaches to Child Outcome Assessments in Children's Centres

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Campbell-Barr, Verity; Lavelle, Marie; Wickett, Karen

    2012-01-01

    In England, early years education services and the children and who attend them are the subject of increasing scrutiny and assessment. While these assessments offer a number of benefits in terms of tracking child development and ensuring the efficient use of public monies, they also impose restrictions to practice, limits to understandings of…

  17. 45 CFR 98.20 - A child's eligibility for child care services.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 1 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false A child's eligibility for child care services. 98.20 Section 98.20 Public Welfare DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES GENERAL ADMINISTRATION CHILD CARE AND DEVELOPMENT FUND Eligibility for Services § 98.20 A child's eligibility for child...

  18. 45 CFR 98.20 - A child's eligibility for child care services.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false A child's eligibility for child care services. 98.20 Section 98.20 Public Welfare DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES GENERAL ADMINISTRATION CHILD CARE AND DEVELOPMENT FUND Eligibility for Services § 98.20 A child's eligibility for child...

  19. 45 CFR 98.20 - A child's eligibility for child care services.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 1 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false A child's eligibility for child care services. 98.20 Section 98.20 Public Welfare DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES GENERAL ADMINISTRATION CHILD CARE AND DEVELOPMENT FUND Eligibility for Services § 98.20 A child's eligibility for child...

  20. 45 CFR 98.20 - A child's eligibility for child care services.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 1 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false A child's eligibility for child care services. 98.20 Section 98.20 Public Welfare DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES GENERAL ADMINISTRATION CHILD CARE AND DEVELOPMENT FUND Eligibility for Services § 98.20 A child's eligibility for child...

  1. 45 CFR 98.20 - A child's eligibility for child care services.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 1 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false A child's eligibility for child care services. 98.20 Section 98.20 Public Welfare Department of Health and Human Services GENERAL ADMINISTRATION CHILD CARE AND DEVELOPMENT FUND Eligibility for Services § 98.20 A child's eligibility for child...

  2. Highlights from the Technical Assistance and Child Care Resources Sponsored by the Office of Child Care. Office of Child Care Pathways and Partnerships Priorities. Issue Number 2

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Office of Child Care, 2010

    2010-01-01

    The Office of Child Care (OCC) administers the Child Care and Development Fund (CCDF) program, a multibillion-dollar Federal and State partnership to support access to high-quality child care for working families. OCC helps States, Territories, and Tribes administer their CCDF programs through program support, policy guidance, technical…

  3. Family factors in child care research.

    PubMed

    Hungerford, Anne; Cox, Martha J

    2006-10-01

    The purpose of this article is to review evidence concerning the joint impact of family characteristics and child care experiences in understanding children's development. Although child care experiences are related to children's development across a variety of domains, family characteristics, particularly socioeconomic status and parenting quality, are typically stronger predictors of children's outcomes. An important implication of these findings is that high-quality child care experiences are likely to have stronger effects on children who are at risk of poorer outcomes because of less optimal family environments; evidence from experimental and nonexperimental studies generally supports this conclusion. From a policy perspective, an important goal for future research is to identify subgroups of families within the heterogeneous low-income population that are in particular need of relatively more intensive services and to develop effective interventions that are tailored to their needs.

  4. California Early Care and Education Workforce Study: Licensed Child Care Centers and Family Child Care Providers. Statewide Highlights

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Center for the Study of Child Care Employment, University of California at Berkeley, 2006

    2006-01-01

    Recognizing the critical role that early childhood educators play in the lives of California's children and families, First 5 California commissioned in 2004 a statewide and regional study of the early care and education (ECE) workforce in licensed child care centers and licensed family child care homes. The overall goal of the study was to…

  5. Advocates Secure Funds to Improve Child Care Environment. Child Advocates Making a Difference

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Voices for America's Children, 2003

    2003-01-01

    In the ongoing struggle to provide low-income children with quality child care environments, National Association of Child Advocates (NACA) member Rhode Island KIDS COUNT has helped to establish the Rhode Island Child Care Facilities Fund (RICCFF). Helping child care providers to help themselves, the fund provides assistance in the form of…

  6. A Profile Approach to Child Care Quality, Quantity, and Type of Setting: Parent Selection of Infant Child Care Arrangements

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sosinsky, Laura Stout; Kim, Se-Kang

    2013-01-01

    Building on prior variable-oriented research which demonstrates the independence of the associations of child care quality, quantity, and type of setting with family factors and child outcomes, the current study identifies four profiles of child care dimensions from the NICHD Study of Early Child Care and Youth Development. Profiles accounted for…

  7. A Child Care Primer, 2000: Key Facts about Child Care and Early Education Services in New York City.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Letts, Kenea; Simpson, Kristen; Torres, Marlyn; Kolben, Nancy

    This Child Care Primer provides a detailed overview of child care funding, supply, and demand in New York City. The Primer utilizes data available from public agencies to create a picture of the availability of child care and early education services. The statistical portrait covers New York City demographics, enrollment in regulated child care…

  8. A Profile Approach to Child Care Quality, Quantity, and Type of Setting: Parent Selection of Infant Child Care Arrangements

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sosinsky, Laura Stout; Kim, Se-Kang

    2013-01-01

    Building on prior variable-oriented research which demonstrates the independence of the associations of child care quality, quantity, and type of setting with family factors and child outcomes, the current study identifies four profiles of child care dimensions from the NICHD Study of Early Child Care and Youth Development. Profiles accounted for…

  9. Caring for Infants. Staff Development Series, Military Child Care Project.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Scavo, Marlene; And Others

    This staff development module, written for the caregiver or teacher in a military child care center, provides discussions about caring for infants. The first section concerns fetal development, describing the changes occurring from conception until 6 weeks after birth. Three subsequent sections discuss, in order, the infant from 6 to 16 weeks,…

  10. Caring for Toddlers. Staff Development Series, Military Child Care Project.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Scavo, Marlene; And Others

    Self-paced instructional materials concerning day care for 2-year-old children are provided in this staff development module, intended for the caregiver or teacher in a military child care center. The module consists of several short discussions describing what toddlers are like and suggesting how they can be helped to handle their feelings, how…

  11. Child Care and Work Absences: Trade-Offs by Type of Care

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gordon, Rachel A.; Kaestner, Robert; Korenman, Sanders

    2008-01-01

    Parents face a trade-off in the effect of child-care problems on employment. Whereas large settings may increase problems because of child illness, small group care may relate to provider unavailability. Analyzing the NICHD Study of Early Child Care, we find that child-care centers and large family day care lead to mothers' greater work absences…

  12. Preventing the Spread of Illness in Child Care or School

    MedlinePlus

    ... cannot care for a sick child due to space or staff limitations, although in others, the child ... the child not to be moved to another space to prevent their illness from spreading throughout the ...

  13. What Do the Children Really Think about a Day-Care Centre--The 5-7-Year-Old Finnish Children Speak out

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kyronlampi-Kylmanen, Taina; Maatta, Kaarina

    2012-01-01

    A day-care centre is a place where a child spends most of his/her week nowadays. A day-care centre as an institution of early childhood education has often been studied from the early childhood educators' point of view or within a wider societal context. The children's voices have not been heard much. The purpose of this article is to describe, on…

  14. What Do the Children Really Think about a Day-Care Centre--The 5-7-Year-Old Finnish Children Speak out

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kyronlampi-Kylmanen, Taina; Maatta, Kaarina

    2012-01-01

    A day-care centre is a place where a child spends most of his/her week nowadays. A day-care centre as an institution of early childhood education has often been studied from the early childhood educators' point of view or within a wider societal context. The children's voices have not been heard much. The purpose of this article is to describe, on…

  15. Standards of care for obsessive-compulsive disorder centres.

    PubMed

    Menchón, José M; van Ameringen, Michael; Dell'Osso, Bernardo; Denys, Damiaan; Figee, Martijn; Grant, Jon E; Hollander, Eric; Marazziti, Donatella; Nicolini, Humberto; Pallanti, Stefano; Ruck, Christian; Shavitt, Roseli; Stein, Dan J; Andersson, Erik; Bipeta, Rajshekhar; Cath, Danielle C; Drummond, Lynne; Feusner, Jamie; Geller, Daniel A; Hranov, Georgi; Lochner, Christine; Matsunaga, Hisato; McCabe, Randy E; Mpavaenda, Davis; Nakamae, Takashi; O'Kearney, Richard; Pasquini, Massimo; Pérez Rivera, Ricardo; Poyurovsky, Michael; Real, Eva; do Rosário, Maria Conceição; Soreni, Noam; Swinson, Richard P; Vulink, Nienke; Zohar, Joseph; Fineberg, Naomi

    2016-09-01

    In recent years, many assessment and care units for obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD) have been set up in order to detect, diagnose and to properly manage this complex disorder, but there is no consensus regarding the key functions that these units should perform. The International College of Obsessive-Compulsive Spectrum Disorders (ICOCS) together with the Obsessive Compulsive and Related Disorders Network (OCRN) of the European College of Neuropsychopharmacology (ECNP) and the Anxiety and Obsessive Compulsive Disorders Section of the World Psychiaric Association (WPA) has developed a standards of care programme for OCD centres. The goals of this collaborative initiative are promoting basic standards, improving the quality of clinical care and enhance the validity and reliability of research results provided by different facilities and countries.

  16. Standards of care for obsessive–compulsive disorder centres

    PubMed Central

    Menchón, José M.; van Ameringen, Michael; Dell’Osso, Bernardo; Denys, Damiaan; Figee, Martijn; Grant, Jon E.; Hollander, Eric; Marazziti, Donatella; Nicolini, Humberto; Pallanti, Stefano; Ruck, Christian; Shavitt, Roseli; Stein, Dan J.; Andersson, Erik; Bipeta, Rajshekhar; Cath, Danielle C.; Drummond, Lynne; Feusner, Jamie; Geller, Daniel A.; Hranov, Georgi; Lochner, Christine; Matsunaga, Hisato; McCabe, Randy E.; Mpavaenda, Davis; Nakamae, Takashi; O'Kearney, Richard; Pasquini, Massimo; Pérez Rivera, Ricardo; Poyurovsky, Michael; Real, Eva; do Rosário, Maria Conceição; Soreni, Noam; Swinson, Richard P.; Vulink, Nienke; Zohar, Joseph; Fineberg, Naomi

    2016-01-01

    Abstract In recent years, many assessment and care units for obsessive–compulsive disorder (OCD) have been set up in order to detect, diagnose and to properly manage this complex disorder, but there is no consensus regarding the key functions that these units should perform. The International College of Obsessive-Compulsive Spectrum Disorders (ICOCS) together with the Obsessive Compulsive and Related Disorders Network (OCRN) of the European College of Neuropsychopharmacology (ECNP) and the Anxiety and Obsessive Compulsive Disorders Section of the World Psychiaric Association (WPA) has developed a standards of care programme for OCD centres. The goals of this collaborative initiative are promoting basic standards, improving the quality of clinical care and enhance the validity and reliability of research results provided by different facilities and countries. PMID:27359333

  17. Patient centred care - cultural safety in indigenous health.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Hung The

    2008-12-01

    The terms 'cultural safety' and 'cultural competence' are used widely in indigenous and culturally and linguistically diverse health contexts. They form the basis for effective patient centred care and the professional advocacy role of the general practitioner. This article discusses the concepts of cultural safety and cultural competence. A checklist of cultural competency practice is also provided for health practitioners. Cultural safety is the experience of the recipient of care. It is comparable to clinical safety, allowing the patient to feel safe in health care interactions and be involved in changes to health services. It has been suggested that cultural safety training may be one mechanism to reduce disparities in indigenous health status. Cultural competence is a broader term that focuses on the capacity of the health system to improve health and wellbeing by integrating culture into the delivery of health services.

  18. Child-Centred Education: Preschool Teachers' Beliefs and Self-Reported Practices

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sak, Ramazan; Erden, Feyza Tantekin; Morrison, George S.

    2016-01-01

    This study analyses the beliefs and self-reported practices of preschool teachers with regard to the concept of child-centred education, as well as the consistency between these beliefs and practices. Data were collected via interviews with 20 female teachers employed in public preschools in Ankara, Turkey. The results indicated that the…

  19. Child-Centred Education: Preschool Teachers' Beliefs and Self-Reported Practices

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sak, Ramazan; Erden, Feyza Tantekin; Morrison, George S.

    2016-01-01

    This study analyses the beliefs and self-reported practices of preschool teachers with regard to the concept of child-centred education, as well as the consistency between these beliefs and practices. Data were collected via interviews with 20 female teachers employed in public preschools in Ankara, Turkey. The results indicated that the…

  20. Teaching Reading and Writing in Local Language Using the Child-Centred Pedagogy in Uganda

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Akello, Dora Lucy; Timmerman, Greetje; Namusisi, Speranza

    2016-01-01

    Uganda introduced the use of mother tongue as medium of instruction in primary schools in 2007. This was meant to promote interaction and participation in the learning process and improve children's proficiency in reading and writing. Drawing elements of interaction and participation from the socio-cultural theory, the child-centred pedagogy was…

  1. Teaching Reading and Writing in Local Language Using the Child-Centred Pedagogy in Uganda

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Akello, Dora Lucy; Timmerman, Greetje; Namusisi, Speranza

    2016-01-01

    Uganda introduced the use of mother tongue as medium of instruction in primary schools in 2007. This was meant to promote interaction and participation in the learning process and improve children's proficiency in reading and writing. Drawing elements of interaction and participation from the socio-cultural theory, the child-centred pedagogy was…

  2. Evaluation of Child Care Subsidy Strategies: Massachusetts Family Child Care Study. Executive Summary

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Collins, Ann; Goodson, Barbara

    2010-01-01

    This report presents findings from the Massachusetts Family Child Care study, a two-year evaluation designed to examine the impacts on providers and children of an early childhood education program aimed at improving the development and learning opportunities in the care settings and, as a consequence, the outcomes for children in care. The early…

  3. Creditable Foods Guide for Child Care Centers on the Child Care Food Program.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Colorado State Dept. of Health, Denver.

    This manual provides information on creditable and noncreditable foods in child care centers, before-and-after-school centers, family day care homes, and adult day care centers. Creditable foods are foods that may be counted toward meeting the requirements for a reimbursable meal. Foods are determined to be creditable according to guidelines…

  4. Creditable Foods Guide for Child Care Centers on the Child Care Food Program.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Colorado State Dept. of Health, Denver.

    This manual provides information on creditable and noncreditable foods in child care centers, before-and-after-school centers, family day care homes, and adult day care centers. Creditable foods are foods that may be counted toward meeting the requirements for a reimbursable meal. Foods are determined to be creditable according to guidelines…

  5. Child and Youth Care Approaches to Management

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gharabaghi, Kiaras

    2008-01-01

    This article explores the themes and issues related to child and youth care approaches to management. The profession is significantly underrepresented at the management level. To some extent, this reflects the challenges of being recognized in the broader human services sector as a profession, but perhaps more so, it reflects an underdevelopment…

  6. Child Care Center Licensing Study, 2000.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Children's Foundation, Washington, DC.

    This report is an update of information initially compiled in 1991 through a survey of the child care regulatory offices of the 50 United States, the District of Columbia, Puerto Rico, and the Virgin Islands. The report begins with an introduction, definition of terms, and a question and answer summary. The bulk of the report is organized in…

  7. Child Care Center Licensing Study, 2003.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Children's Foundation, Washington, DC.

    This report is a yearly update of information initially compiled in 1991 through a survey of the child care regulatory offices of the 50 U.S. states, the District of Columbia, Puerto Rico, and the Virgin Islands. The report begins with an introduction, definition of terms, and a question and answer summary. The bulk of the report is organized in…

  8. Child Care Center Licensing Study, 2002.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Children's Foundation, Washington, DC.

    This report is an update of information initially compiled in 1991 through a survey of the child care regulatory offices of the 50 U.S. states, the District of Columbia, Puerto Rico, and the Virgin Islands. The report begins with an introduction, definition of terms, and a question and answer summary. The bulk of the report is organized in…

  9. Child Care Center Licensing Study, 2001.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Children's Foundation, Washington, DC.

    This report is an update of information initially compiled in 1991 through a survey of the child care regulatory offices of the 50 U.S. states, the District of Columbia, Puerto Rico, and the Virgin Islands. The report begins with an introduction, definition of terms, and a question and answer summary. The bulk of the report is organized in…

  10. The Child Care Center Licensing Study, 1999.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Children's Foundation, Washington, DC.

    This report compiles findings of a survey of the child care regulatory offices of the 50 United States, the District of Columbia, Puerto Rico, and the Virgin Islands. The report begins with an introduction, definition of terms, and a question and answer summary. The bulk of the report is organized in alphabetical order by state or territory, and…

  11. Playground Hazards in Atlanta Child Care Centers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sacks, Jeffrey J.; And Others

    1990-01-01

    Examines 71 of the 605 licensed child care centers in Atlanta for playground hazards and school accidents. Finds 684 hazards in 66 centers, including climbing equipment over 6 feet high with inadequate impact-absorbing undersurfacing that had over twice the rate of fall injuries as climbing equipment under 6 feet high. (FMW)

  12. Child Day Care Center Licensing Study, 1997.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Children's Foundation, Washington, DC.

    The 1997 Child Care Center Licensing Study contains an update of information compiled in 1991 by the Children's Foundation. The data was obtained from the central regulatory office of each of the 50 states, the District of Columbia, Puerto Rico, and the Virgin Islands. The study is organized in alphabetical order by states and territories. The…

  13. Child Care in the United States.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lazar, Irving

    This paper discusses present child care provision for children of preschool age in the United States. After a brief historical preface that points out deficits and needed improvements in public school and infant programs, the discussion focuses on several aspects of established programs for 3- to 5-year-old children. In particular, research…

  14. Child Care Center Licensing Study, 2003.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Children's Foundation, Washington, DC.

    This report is a yearly update of information initially compiled in 1991 through a survey of the child care regulatory offices of the 50 U.S. states, the District of Columbia, Puerto Rico, and the Virgin Islands. The report begins with an introduction, definition of terms, and a question and answer summary. The bulk of the report is organized in…

  15. Child Day Care Center Licensing Study, 1997.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Children's Foundation, Washington, DC.

    The 1997 Child Care Center Licensing Study contains an update of information compiled in 1991 by the Children's Foundation. The data was obtained from the central regulatory office of each of the 50 states, the District of Columbia, Puerto Rico, and the Virgin Islands. The study is organized in alphabetical order by states and territories. The…

  16. Child Care Center Licensing Study, 2001.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Children's Foundation, Washington, DC.

    This report is an update of information initially compiled in 1991 through a survey of the child care regulatory offices of the 50 U.S. states, the District of Columbia, Puerto Rico, and the Virgin Islands. The report begins with an introduction, definition of terms, and a question and answer summary. The bulk of the report is organized in…

  17. Child Care Center Licensing Study, 2002.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Children's Foundation, Washington, DC.

    This report is an update of information initially compiled in 1991 through a survey of the child care regulatory offices of the 50 U.S. states, the District of Columbia, Puerto Rico, and the Virgin Islands. The report begins with an introduction, definition of terms, and a question and answer summary. The bulk of the report is organized in…

  18. Child Care Center Licensing Study, 2000.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Children's Foundation, Washington, DC.

    This report is an update of information initially compiled in 1991 through a survey of the child care regulatory offices of the 50 United States, the District of Columbia, Puerto Rico, and the Virgin Islands. The report begins with an introduction, definition of terms, and a question and answer summary. The bulk of the report is organized in…

  19. The Child Care Center Licensing Study, 1999.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Children's Foundation, Washington, DC.

    This report compiles findings of a survey of the child care regulatory offices of the 50 United States, the District of Columbia, Puerto Rico, and the Virgin Islands. The report begins with an introduction, definition of terms, and a question and answer summary. The bulk of the report is organized in alphabetical order by state or territory, and…

  20. Health Instruction Packages: Consumer--Child Care.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wojcik, Bonnie; And Others

    Text, illustrations, and exercises are utilized in these four learning modules to instruct parents and nursing students in topics related to child care and development. The first module, "Growth and Development: Let's Test Your Baby's Reflexes" by Bonnie Wojcik, describes the behavioral signs that are indicative of eight normal primitive…

  1. Status Report on Hospital Affiliated Child Care.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Child Care Information Exchange, 1991

    1991-01-01

    Summarizes results of a survey concerning hospitals' involvement in child care. There are now over 900 hospital affiliated centers, and about 117,000 children are enrolled in them. A table provides information on populations served by centers affiliated with hospitals. (BB)

  2. Developing and Administering a Child Care Center.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sciarra, Dorothy June; Dorsey, Anne G.

    The purpose of this textbook is to provide students in early childhood education, who have had previous contact with a child care center, with the technical information needed to operate different kinds of viable programs. In 16 chapters, a director's responsibilities for starting and maintaining a center program are given. The role of the…

  3. Menu Variety in Mississippi Child Care Centers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Knight, Kathy B.; And Others

    1995-01-01

    Examined the variety of lunch menus in licensed child care centers in Mississippi. A total of 460 lunch menus were analyzed using nutrient analysis software, and a frequency analysis showed the most commonly used foods. Found that foods used most often included white bread, sliced ham, and sausage pizza. Results support the need for nutrition…

  4. Health Instruction Packages: Consumer--Child Care.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wojcik, Bonnie; And Others

    Text, illustrations, and exercises are utilized in these four learning modules to instruct parents and nursing students in topics related to child care and development. The first module, "Growth and Development: Let's Test Your Baby's Reflexes" by Bonnie Wojcik, describes the behavioral signs that are indicative of eight normal primitive…

  5. Employers Roundtable: Employer Supported Child Care.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Delaware Valley Child Care Council, Philadelphia, PA.

    This booklet outlines a number of options available to employers to enable them to better cope with child care issues that they and their employees face. Major options include: (1) flexible work policies, such as flexible scheduling, alternate work places, shorter work weeks, and the consolidating of sick leave, holidays, and vacation time into…

  6. Child and Youth Care Approaches to Management

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gharabaghi, Kiaras

    2008-01-01

    This article explores the themes and issues related to child and youth care approaches to management. The profession is significantly underrepresented at the management level. To some extent, this reflects the challenges of being recognized in the broader human services sector as a profession, but perhaps more so, it reflects an underdevelopment…

  7. Child and Youth Care as Psychotherapy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rayment, John

    2006-01-01

    Child and Youth Care (CYC) workers use the natural living and learning environment to create therapeutic experiences for young people with emotional and behavioral problems. Originally working in the therapeutic milieu of residential settings, CYC workers now operate in family, community, and school-based prevention and treatment programs. This…

  8. Journal of Child-Care Administration, 1999.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kalbaugh, Christine, Ed.

    1999-01-01

    This document is comprised of the two 1999 issues of a newsletter addressing the administrative concerns of child-care centers, learning centers, preschools, nursery schools, kindergartens, and intergenerational centers. Issue 218 features articles on problems with parents such as late pickups, constant complainers, complaints about other…

  9. Child Care Series. Duty Task List.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Oklahoma State Dept. of Vocational and Technical Education, Stillwater. Curriculum and Instructional Materials Center.

    This document contains the occupational duty/task lists for three occupations in the child care series. Each occupation is divided into 13 to 15 duties. A separate page for each duty in the occupation lists the tasks in that duty along with its code number and columns to indicate whether that particular duty has been taught and to provide space…

  10. Past and Present Child Care in Israel.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Corn, Sandra L.

    Providing an historical and current account of Israel's early childhood care and educational system, this report depicts a state-supported system that has emphasized, through both home and classroom techniques, early intervention for the Jewish disadvantaged and handicapped child and family. Focusing on the goals, methods, and realities of child…

  11. The Gendered Boundaries of Child-Centred Education: Elsie Ripley Clapp and the History of US Progressive Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moyer, Diana

    2009-01-01

    This paper analyses how historical narratives of the 1930s conflict between child-centred and social reconstructionist factions of US progressive education reinforce gendered constructions of education. The split between these two groups has been drawn along lines of gender with child-centred education associated with female educators focused on…

  12. A Registry Framework Enabling Patient-Centred Care.

    PubMed

    Bellgard, Matthew I; Napier, Kathryn; Render, Lee; Radochonski, Maciej; Lamont, Leanne; Graham, Caroline; Wilton, Steve D; Fletcher, Sue; Goldblatt, Jack; Hunter, Adam A; Weeramanthri, Tarun

    2015-01-01

    Clinical decisions rely on expert knowledge that draws on quality patient phenotypic and physiological data. In this regard, systems that can support patient-centric care are essential. Patient registries are a key component of patient-centre care and can come in many forms such as disease-specific, recruitment, clinical, contact, post market and surveillance. There are, however, a number of significant challenges to overcome in order to maximise the utility of these information management systems to facilitate improved patient-centred care. Registries need to be harmonised regionally, nationally and internationally. However, the majority are implemented as standalone systems without consideration for data standards or system interoperability. Hence the task of harmonisation can become daunting. Fortunately, there are strategies to address this. In this paper, a disease registry framework is outlined that enables efficient deployment of national and international registries that can be modified dynamically as registry requirements evolve. This framework provides a basis for the development and implementation of data standards and enables patients to seamlessly belong to multiple registries. Other significant advances include the ability for registry curators to create and manage registries themselves without the need to contract software developers, and the concept of a registry description language for ease of registry template sharing.

  13. 33 CFR 55.13 - Family child care providers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... PERSONNEL CHILD DEVELOPMENT SERVICES General § 55.13 Family child care providers. When appropriated funds... Guard child development centers. 33 CFR Ch. I (7-1-14 Edition) Coast Guard, DHS ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Family child care providers....

  14. 33 CFR 55.13 - Family child care providers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... PERSONNEL CHILD DEVELOPMENT SERVICES General § 55.13 Family child care providers. When appropriated funds... Guard child development centers. 33 CFR Ch. I (7-1-12 Edition) Coast Guard, DHS ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Family child care providers....

  15. 33 CFR 55.13 - Family child care providers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... PERSONNEL CHILD DEVELOPMENT SERVICES General § 55.13 Family child care providers. When appropriated funds... Guard child development centers. 33 CFR Ch. I (7-1-10 Edition) Coast Guard, DHS ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Family child care providers....

  16. 33 CFR 55.13 - Family child care providers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... PERSONNEL CHILD DEVELOPMENT SERVICES General § 55.13 Family child care providers. When appropriated funds... Guard child development centers. 33 CFR Ch. I (7-1-13 Edition) Coast Guard, DHS ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Family child care providers....

  17. 33 CFR 55.13 - Family child care providers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... PERSONNEL CHILD DEVELOPMENT SERVICES General § 55.13 Family child care providers. When appropriated funds... Guard child development centers. 33 CFR Ch. I (7-1-11 Edition) Coast Guard, DHS ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Family child care providers....

  18. Health Education in Child Care: Opportunities and Challenges.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nalle, Maureen A.

    1996-01-01

    This article addresses the health and safety risks associated with child care facilities, including injuries and infectious diseases. Related health education needs for child care providers, parents, and children are examined, and recommendations for health educators are provided. (SM)

  19. Caring for Ourselves: Wages and Benefits in Church Child Care. Policy Report #3.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mitchell, Jo Bennett, Ed.

    This policy report on compensation for child care providers is designed for use by directors, child care providers, clergy, board members, and other leaders in church-housed child care programs. Section I underscores the importance of securing fair compensation and reasonable benefits for child care providers in church-housed and non-church-housed…

  20. How children's rights are constructed in family-centred care: a review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Kelly, Margaret; Jones, Susan; Wilson, Val; Lewis, Peter

    2012-06-01

    It appears that the acceptance of children's rights within the acute care setting is treated as a given but such a given requires a more systematic analysis. This has been undertaken here in the form of a review of the literature. The purpose of the review is to explore how children's rights, defined by the United Nations Convention on the Rights of the Child (UNCRC) are recognized in family-centred care in the acute care paediatric setting as reported in the literature. Reports that were available from 1989 to 2010 were reviewed. Children's rights are not mentioned frequently in the literature of interest to children's nurses. What is revealed are the ethical tensions in the challenge to act at all times in children's best interests (in the spirit of Article 3) while giving due weight to their views (in the spirit of Article 12) (OHCHR, 1989). The continuing failure to address these tensions undermines the spirit and practice of family-centred care.

  1. Families and health-care professionals' perspectives and expectations of family-centred care: hidden expectations and unclear roles.

    PubMed

    Coyne, Imelda

    2015-10-01

    Family-centred care (FCC) is viewed as a pivotal concept in the provision of high-quality nursing care for children and their families, yet implementation continues to be problematic worldwide. This research investigated how FCC was enacted from families and nurses' perspectives. Descriptive qualitative approach using elements of analysis from grounded theory method. Data were collected though individual interviews with 18 children aged 7-16 years, their parents (n = 18) and 18 nurses from two children's hospital and one children's unit in a large general hospital in Ireland. Four key themes were identified: expectations; relying on parents' help; working out roles; and barriers to FCC. Nurses wholeheartedly endorsed FCC because of the benefits for families and their reliance on parents' contribution to the workload. There was minimal evidence of collaboration or negotiation of roles which resulted in parents feeling stressed or abandoned. Nurses cited busy workload, under-staffing and inappropriate documentation as key factors which resulted in over-reliance on parents and hindered their efforts to negotiate and work alongside parents. Families are willing to help in their child's care but they require clear guidance, information and support from nurses. Hidden expectations and unclear roles are stressful for families. Nurses need skills training, adequate resources and managerial support to meet families' needs appropriately, to establish true collaboration and to deliver optimal family-centred care. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  2. DAP in the 'Hood: Perceptions of Child Care Practices by African American Child Care Directors Caring for Children of Color

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sanders, Kay E.; Deihl, Amy; Kyler, Amy

    2007-01-01

    This paper presents a qualitative analysis concerning child care practices by six African American directors of subsidized child care centers located in a low-income, racial ethnic minority area of Los Angeles, California. These programs are traditionally African American programs that experienced an influx of Latino immigrant enrollment. Using…

  3. Who Cares for America's Children? Child Care Policy for the 1990s. Panel on Child Care Policy. Prepublication Copy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hayes, Cheryl D., Ed.; And Others

    A report by the Panel on Child Care Policy, an interdisciplinary panel established in 1987 to review and assess knowledge about the costs, effects, and feasibility of alternative child care policies and programs as a basis for future decision making 13 presented in this document. An executive summary and introductory first chapter are followed in…

  4. Child Care and Child Safety for Farm Children in Manitoba. RDI Report Series 1994-7.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brockman, Lois M.

    A Manitoba survey examined child care use, child safety concerns, and parents' on-farm and off-farm work to determine the needs of farm families for child care services. Of 972 questionnaires mailed to Manitoba farm residences, 121 were returned by respondents who were actively farming and living on a farm with at least one child younger than 16…

  5. The Child-care Food and Activity Practices Questionnaire (CFAPQ): development and first validation steps.

    PubMed

    Gubbels, Jessica S; Sleddens, Ester Fc; Raaijmakers, Lieke Ch; Gies, Judith M; Kremers, Stef Pj

    2016-08-01

    To develop and validate a questionnaire to measure food-related and activity-related practices of child-care staff, based on existing, validated parenting practices questionnaires. A selection of items from the Comprehensive Feeding Practices Questionnaire (CFPQ) and the Preschooler Physical Activity Parenting Practices (PPAPP) questionnaire was made to include items most suitable for the child-care setting. The converted questionnaire was pre-tested among child-care staff during cognitive interviews and pilot-tested among a larger sample of child-care staff. Factor analyses with Varimax rotation and internal consistencies were used to examine the scales. Spearman correlations, t tests and ANOVA were used to examine associations between the scales and staff's background characteristics (e.g. years of experience, gender). Child-care centres in the Netherlands. The qualitative pre-test included ten child-care staff members. The quantitative pilot test included 178 child-care staff members. The new questionnaire, the Child-care Food and Activity Practices Questionnaire (CFAPQ), consists of sixty-three items (forty food-related and twenty-three activity-related items), divided over twelve scales (seven food-related and five activity-related scales). The CFAPQ scales are to a large extent similar to the original CFPQ and PPAPP scales. The CFAPQ scales show sufficient internal consistency with Cronbach's α ranging between 0·53 and 0·96, and average corrected item-total correlations within acceptable ranges (0·30-0·89). Several of the scales were significantly associated with child-care staff's background characteristics. Scale psychometrics of the CFAPQ indicate it is a valid questionnaire that assesses child-care staff's practices related to both food and activities.

  6. Older Adults in Child Care: A Job-Training Model.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ward, Christopher R.; Smith, Thomas B.

    Recognizing the increasing demand for older adults to work as child care employees, this manual presents the Generations Together model for training older adults at the community college level to work in child care settings. The manual describes the steps necessary to implement a community-college-based, older-adult child care employment training…

  7. Rights in the Workplace: A Guide for Child Care Teachers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Owens, Christine; Stoken, Amy; Fritts, Jonathan; Magar, Michele; Bellm, Dan; Shukla, Renu; Vardell, Rosemarie; Wayne, Claudia; Whitebook, Marcy

    Research on child care quality and experience in the field shows that the quality of working conditions are linked to a caregiver's ability to provide quality care. Noting that legal rights that generally apply to most child care teachers are not upheld in every workplace, this guide provides information on federal legal rights of child care…

  8. America's Child Care Crisis: A Crime Prevention Tragedy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Newman, Sanford; Brazelton, T. Berry; Zigler, Edward; Sherman, Lawrence W.; Bratton, William; Sanders, Jerry; Christeson, William

    This report presents findings relating the reduction of crime and violence with access to good educational child care programs. The report discusses the affordability of such programs, suggests that federal and state governments are not adequately funding educational child care programs, and argues that investing in high-quality child care and…

  9. Rights in the Workplace: A Guide for Child Care Teachers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Owens, Christine; Stoken, Amy; Fritts, Jonathan; Magar, Michele; Bellm, Dan; Shukla, Renu; Vardell, Rosemarie; Wayne, Claudia; Whitebook, Marcy

    Research on child care quality and experience in the field shows that the quality of working conditions are linked to a caregiver's ability to provide quality care. Noting that legal rights that generally apply to most child care teachers are not upheld in every workplace, this guide provides information on federal legal rights of child care…

  10. Employer Support for Families with Child Care Needs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fischer, Jan Lockwood

    Present and past employer support for child care is reviewed in this paper. The first half of the discussion is devoted to a general and brief historical survey describing employer support for families needing child care and detailing working mothers' increasing demand for child care services. Also briefly mentioned are government programs…

  11. 45 CFR 98.44 - Priority for child care services.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 1 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Priority for child care services. 98.44 Section 98.44 Public Welfare DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES GENERAL ADMINISTRATION CHILD CARE AND DEVELOPMENT FUND Program Operations (Child Care Services)-Lead Agency and Provider Requirements §...

  12. 45 CFR 98.44 - Priority for child care services.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Priority for child care services. 98.44 Section 98.44 Public Welfare DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES GENERAL ADMINISTRATION CHILD CARE AND DEVELOPMENT FUND Program Operations (Child Care Services)-Lead Agency and Provider Requirements §...

  13. 45 CFR 98.44 - Priority for child care services.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 1 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Priority for child care services. 98.44 Section 98.44 Public Welfare DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES GENERAL ADMINISTRATION CHILD CARE AND DEVELOPMENT FUND Program Operations (Child Care Services)-Lead Agency and Provider Requirements §...

  14. 45 CFR 98.44 - Priority for child care services.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 1 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Priority for child care services. 98.44 Section 98.44 Public Welfare Department of Health and Human Services GENERAL ADMINISTRATION CHILD CARE AND DEVELOPMENT FUND Program Operations (Child Care Services)-Lead Agency and Provider Requirements §...

  15. 45 CFR 98.44 - Priority for child care services.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 1 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Priority for child care services. 98.44 Section 98.44 Public Welfare DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES GENERAL ADMINISTRATION CHILD CARE AND DEVELOPMENT FUND Program Operations (Child Care Services)-Lead Agency and Provider Requirements §...

  16. Employer-Sponsored Child Care Models and Related Issues.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Renfroe, Martha Lou

    This study was designed to describe the different models of Employer-Sponsored Child Care (ESCC) available to employers and child care professionals. Examples of specific child care programs sponsored by employers are described, and five ESCC models are identified: on-site and off-site centers for a single employer, off-site centers for multiple…

  17. State Developments in Child Care and Early Education, 1999.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Blank, Helen; Poersch, Nicole Oxendine

    This report provides highlights and updates regarding state actions on child care and early education issues during 1999. It is intended to serve as a supplement to "State Child Care and Early Education Development: Highlights and Updates for 1998" and "State Developments in Child Care and Early Education 1997." The information…

  18. Employer Support for Families with Child Care Needs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fischer, Jan Lockwood

    Present and past employer support for child care is reviewed in this paper. The first half of the discussion is devoted to a general and brief historical survey describing employer support for families needing child care and detailing working mothers' increasing demand for child care services. Also briefly mentioned are government programs…

  19. Texas Subsidized Child Care Utilization Patterns and Outcomes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schexnayder, Deanna T.; Schroeder, Daniel G.; Faliski, Katherine; McCoy, Jody

    To learn more about families and children who have been served by the Texas Child Care Management Services (CCMS) system, this study investigated four primary questions: (1) What are the demographic characteristics of Texas families and children who have received subsidized child care services? (2) What are the subsidized child care utilization…

  20. Conceptual Frameworks for Child Care Decision-Making. White Paper

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chaudry, Ajay; Henly, Julia; Meyers, Marcia

    2010-01-01

    This working paper is one in a series of projects initiated by the Administration for Children and Families (ACF) to improve knowledge for child care researchers and policy makers about parental child care decision making. In this paper, the authors identify three distinct conceptual frameworks for understanding child care decisions--a rational…

  1. Inter Association Child Care Conference. Conference Proceedings 1979.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Austin, David, Ed.

    This publication of the proceedings of the Inter Association Child Care Conference includes a debate for and against professionalization in the field of child care. A section on meeting the treatment needs of children through educational preparation of child care practitioners discusses background factors, levels of education for practitioners,…

  2. How To Start a Licensed Child Care Home.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Henry, Jeanie

    This booklet was designed as a resource for people applying for a license as a family child care home or a family child care group home under Alaska state licensing requirements. Following an introduction that explains the difference between the two types of child care homes, the booklet considers the following topics: (1) choosing family child…

  3. An Effective Training Approach for Child Day Care Providers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kaplan, Melissa G.; Smock, Sue Marx

    Controversy exists in the field of child day care concerning the training of child care workers. Becker (1979) states that trainers should be child care professionals who help to engage workers in an educational/developmental process, as opposed to "outside" trainers from other professions who view training as a mechanism to "add…

  4. Parents and the High Cost of Child Care: 2013 Report

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wood, Stephen; Kendall, Rosemary

    2013-01-01

    Every week in the United States, nearly 11 million children younger than age 5 are in some type of child care arrangement. On average, these children spend 36 hours a week in child care. While parents are children's first and most important teachers, child care programs provide early learning for millions of young children daily, having a profound…

  5. Child Care Helps America Work and Learn. Issue No. 1

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Child Care Bureau, 2010

    2010-01-01

    "Child Care Helps America Work and Learn" is a new publication produced by the Child Care Bureau. This new series will highlight some of the many Recovery Act-funded child care success stories from communities across the country that illustrate how the Bureau is working toward the shared goal of supporting children and families. This…

  6. Tribal Child Care and Development Fund: Guide for New Administrators

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Child Care Bureau, 2008

    2008-01-01

    Tribal Child Care and Development Fund administrators work each day to ensure that the children and families in tribal communities have the child care services that best meet their needs. The Child Care and Development Fund (CCDF), a federal block grant for States, Tribes, and Territories, is a key resource to help increase the availability,…

  7. Money, Accreditation, and Child Care Center Quality. Working Paper Series.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gormley, William T., Jr.; Lucas, Jessica K.

    In recent years, several states have offered financial incentives to encourage child care centers and homes to become accredited by a reputable national organization to improve child care quality. This report examines whether it is good policy to offer higher reimbursement rates to accredited child care facilities and assesses the relative merits…

  8. Pennsylvania Child Care/Early Childhood Development Training System.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pennsylvania State Dept. of Public Welfare, Harrisburg. Office of Children, Youth, and Families.

    The Pennsylvania Child Care/Early Childhood Development Training System offers comprehensive training opportunities to the Pennsylvania Department of Public Welfare's licensed and registered child care providers, including center-based staff, school-age child care staff, and home-based providers. This booklet outlines state-mandated training…

  9. Employer-Supported Child Care: Investing in Human Resources.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Burud, Sandra L.; And Others

    This book for employers interested in establishing child care programs is organized into five major topic areas. Part One provides an overview of employer-supported child care. Part Two discusses the processes of identifying and estimating benefits of child care to companies, and tax considerations. Part Three presents practical guidelines and a…

  10. Inter Association Child Care Conference. Conference Proceedings 1979.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Austin, David, Ed.

    This publication of the proceedings of the Inter Association Child Care Conference includes a debate for and against professionalization in the field of child care. A section on meeting the treatment needs of children through educational preparation of child care practitioners discusses background factors, levels of education for practitioners,…

  11. Toward Better Child Care Worker Compensation: Advocacy in Three States.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    De Vita, Carol J.; Twombly, Eric C.; Montilla, Maria D.

    Although the demand for child care in the United States has risen over the past 40 years, the supply of good quality child care remains both limited and costly, and the supply of well-trained and adequately compensated workers remains low. This study reviewed how advocates have moved the issue of child care worker compensation forward in the…

  12. The Shaping of Social Policy Agendas: Australian Child Care Policy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Davis, Lynne

    Two key periods in the history of Australian child care policies are examined and speculative comparisons with British policies are made. During World War II, perceptions of the need for organized child care in Australia were tied almost exclusively to the war-related need for women's labor. During 1942, the question of child care for children of…

  13. The National Economic Impacts of the Child Care Sector.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    2002

    Noting that child care has increasingly become a formal part of the American economy, this report examines the contribution of the child care industry to the national economy. The report presents evidence, based on an examination of the existing literature, that the child care sector contributes to the national economy in three ways: (1) quality…

  14. 20 CFR 638.542 - Child care services.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 3 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Child care services. 638.542 Section 638.542... TITLE IV-B OF THE JOB TRAINING PARTNERSHIP ACT Center Operations § 638.542 Child care services. (a) Job Corps centers shall, where practicable, arrange for the provision of child care for students...

  15. 20 CFR 638.542 - Child care services.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 3 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Child care services. 638.542 Section 638.542... TITLE IV-B OF THE JOB TRAINING PARTNERSHIP ACT Center Operations § 638.542 Child care services. (a) Job Corps centers shall, where practicable, arrange for the provision of child care for students...

  16. 20 CFR 638.542 - Child care services.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 3 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Child care services. 638.542 Section 638.542... TITLE IV-B OF THE JOB TRAINING PARTNERSHIP ACT Center Operations § 638.542 Child care services. (a) Job Corps centers shall, where practicable, arrange for the provision of child care for students...

  17. Hospitals as Child Care Providers. An Interview with Diane Schulz.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Child Care Information Exchange, 1999

    1999-01-01

    Interviews Diane Schulz, president of Child Care in Health Care, discussing the status of on-site or near-site child care for hospital employees. Considers the trend in hospital-based care, organization, support, customers, and challenges faced by these day care centers. (JPB)

  18. The Business of Child Care; Management and Financial Strategies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jack, Gail

    2004-01-01

    Unpleasant as it sounds, how providers care for the business aspects of child care can be as vital as how children are cared for. When your business runs smoothly it allows staff to focus on the most important task of all -- providing the best care for children. "The Business of Child Care" supplies guidance for successfully completing the…

  19. The Business of Child Care; Management and Financial Strategies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jack, Gail

    2004-01-01

    Unpleasant as it sounds, how providers care for the business aspects of child care can be as vital as how children are cared for. When your business runs smoothly it allows staff to focus on the most important task of all -- providing the best care for children. "The Business of Child Care" supplies guidance for successfully completing the…

  20. I Am Your Child. Quality Child Care: Making the Right Choice for You and Your Child. [Videotape].

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    I Am Your Child Foundation, Beverly Hills, CA.

    Finding the right child care is often challenging for parents, but it is one of the most important decisions a parent will ever make. This videotape is intended to help parents with the process of evaluating child care options. The 30-minute video is presented in seven parts. Part 1, "Choosing Child Care," discusses why quality child…

  1. The vital blend of clinical competence and compassion: How patients experience person-centred care.

    PubMed

    Sharp, Sandra; McAllister, Margaret; Broadbent, Marc

    2016-01-01

    Person-centred care is a policy priority for health services seeking to assure the public they provide safe, high-quality care, in keeping with rising consumer expectations. However, study of person-centred care rarely includes acute-care patients' perspectives. In 2013, semi-structured interviews were held with 10 former patients of an Australian regional health service and examined via thematic analysis to understand patients' experiences of nursing care, interpret findings in the context of person-centred care principles and identify ways to enhance and support compassionate, person-centred care in everyday nursing practice. Clinically competent care, delivered compassionately through a positive nurse-patient relationship, resulted in personal, emotional or spiritual responses that were the catalyst for patient empowerment and participation in care, and a positive outlook toward recovery. Nurses wishing to implement person-centred care need to recognise the importance of prioritising human connection and compassion in conjunction with clinical competence.

  2. Public Health Amendment (Vaccination of Children Attending Child Care Facilities) Act 2013: its impact in the Northern Rivers, NSW.

    PubMed

    Fraser, Alice C; Williams, Sarah E; Kong, Sarah X; Wells, Lucy E; Goodall, Louise S; Pit, Sabrina; Hansen, Vibeke; Trent, Marianne

    2016-04-15

    The objective of the study was to explore the impact of implementation of the Public Health Amendment (Vaccination of Children Attending Child Care Facilities) Act 2013 on child-care centres in the Northern Rivers region of New South Wales (NSW), from the perspective of child-care centre directors. Importance of study: Immunisation is an effective public health intervention, but more than 75 000 Australian children are not fully vaccinated. A recent amendment to the NSW Public Health Act 2010 asks child-care facilities to collect evidence of complete vaccination or approved exemption before allowing enrolment. Ten child-care centre directors participated in a semiscripted interview. Interviews were recorded, transcribed and analysed. Common themes included misinterpretation of the amendment before implementation, the importance of adequate notice for implementation, lack of understanding of assessment of compliance, increased administrative requirements, the importance of other public health efforts, and limited change in vaccination rates. Child-care centres differed in their experience of the resources provided by the government, interactions with Medicare, and ease of integration with existing record-keeping methods. Participants felt that the amendment was successfully implemented. The amendment was felt to have fulfilled its aim of prompting parents who had forgotten to vaccinate, but failed to significantly affect conscientious objectors. Overall, the amendment was perceived to be a positive step in improving vaccination rates, but its impact was largely complementary to other components of the multifaceted vaccination policy.

  3. Child care in India: emerging challenges.

    PubMed

    Gopalan, C

    1993-06-15

    The promotion of child development in India is gradually being viewed as a meaningful objective of national development policy. The government has invested in an impressive 2000 Primary Health Centers, 130,000 subcenters, 2000 community health centers, over 500,000 trained birth attendants, and 400,000 community health guides. However, there are also a great number of overlapping uncoordinated programs and an inadequate development policy. A meaningful policy on child development must address removal of all environmental constraints on child growth and development in the intrauterine phase, late infancy and early childhood, primary school ages, and adolescence. Child survival and safe motherhood are not enough; what is needed is optimal child health and nutrition and good motherhood. Each generation is becoming taller and healthier, but no significant secular trend was evident until almost 1990, with the exception of Kerala State. In the intrauterine phase of child development, critical factors are the physical state of the mother, her diet and nutritional status, her motivation and competence for effective use of health care resources, and the quality and outreach of prenatal care services. Even with an efficient prenatal care health system, women suffer under tremendous disadvantages and disabilities, undernourished and anemic, which needs to be addressed before pregnancy occurs. Imaginative programs are needed for adolescents in order to teach good motherhood and productive citizenship; the neglect of this critical stage has been responsible for the poor performance of maternal/child health and family planning. Extensive epidemiological evidence suggests that body weights under 38 kg at the beginning of pregnancy and heights under 145 cm place a woman at risk for complications during pregnancy or at delivery. Babies are likely to be low birth weight, die early in infancy, or have poor growth and development. Data from the National Nutritional Monitoring Bureau

  4. Caring for Pretoddlers. Staff Development Series, Military Child Care Project.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Scavo, Marlene; And Others

    Ideas for working with 1-year-old children are provided in this staff development module for the caregiver or teacher in a military child care center. Sections of the module describe what "pretoddlers" are like and provide guidelines for facilitating their physical, socioemotional, and language development. The final section discusses…

  5. Caring for Preschoolers. Staff Development Series, Military Child Care Project.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Scavo, Marlene; And Others

    Ideas and experiences to assist in working with 3-, 4-, and 5-year-old children are provided in this staff development module for the caregiver or teacher in a military child care center. The module consists of several short discussions describing characteristics of preschoolers, ways they can be helped to feel secure, and the manner in which…

  6. Family Child Care Programs within the Military System of Care

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stevens, Carolyn S.

    2011-01-01

    Military families face challenges not found in other work environments. Shifting work schedules that are often longer than the typical 8-hour day, as well as the ever-present possibility of being deployed anywhere in the world on a moment's notice, require a child care system that is flexible but maintains high-quality standards. The U.S.…

  7. Family Child Care Programs within the Military System of Care

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stevens, Carolyn S.

    2011-01-01

    Military families face challenges not found in other work environments. Shifting work schedules that are often longer than the typical 8-hour day, as well as the ever-present possibility of being deployed anywhere in the world on a moment's notice, require a child care system that is flexible but maintains high-quality standards. The U.S.…

  8. From Child Care to Family Care: The Parent Services Handbook.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    San Francisco Foundation, CA.

    This handbook for child care centers that are expanding their support to parents of children in their programs begins by describing the Parent Services Project (PSP). The next section explains the many services available to parents and the variety of ways these services are provided at the PSP centers. Services include fun family events; parenting…

  9. 5 CFR 792.224 - Are child care subsidies paid to the Federal employee using the child care?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... administer its program (see § 792.223), the organization pays the child care provider; (b) For overseas... 5 Administrative Personnel 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Are child care subsidies paid to the Federal employee using the child care? 792.224 Section 792.224 Administrative Personnel OFFICE...

  10. Creating New Child Care Slots in Mini Child Care Centers: Big Bang for the Buck in New Jersey.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Frankel, Arthur J.; And Others

    1992-01-01

    Small grants of $7,500 with technical assistance were offered to the child care community of New Jersey to either start or increase licensed capacity in mini-child care centers. Results of a subsequent analysis showed that 26 grantees created 481 new child care slots at an average cost of $561 per slot. (Author/SM)

  11. "I Want Child Care He's Gonna Be Happy in": A Case Study of a Father's Child Care Experiences

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ceglowski, Deborah; Shears, Jeffrey; Furman, Richard

    2010-01-01

    Research Findings: This in-depth single case study explores the experiences of a single father with finding and maintaining child care for his son. This American middle-income, Caucasian father lives and works in Minnesota. Findings include difficulty locating and maintaining child care, dissatisfaction with child care quality, concerns about…

  12. Creating New Child Care Slots in Mini Child Care Centers: Big Bang for the Buck in New Jersey.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Frankel, Arthur J.; And Others

    1992-01-01

    Small grants of $7,500 with technical assistance were offered to the child care community of New Jersey to either start or increase licensed capacity in mini-child care centers. Results of a subsequent analysis showed that 26 grantees created 481 new child care slots at an average cost of $561 per slot. (Author/SM)

  13. Our Families, Our Children: The Lesbian and Gay Child Care Task Force Report on Quality Child Care.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dispenza, Mary

    The Lesbian and Gay Child Care Task Force documented anecdotal evidence of homophobia in child care and school age communities, including: (1) refusal to accept children from lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender (LGBT) families into child care; (2) biased attitudes expressed to children when they speak about their families; and (3) demonstrated…

  14. Active Play Opportunities at Child Care

    PubMed Central

    Saelens, Brian E.; Christakis, Dimitri A.

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVES: Physical activity (PA) is important for children’s health and development, yet preschoolers are not meeting PA recommendations. The objective of this study was to examine different PA opportunities at child care and how variation in indoor versus outdoor and free versus teacher-led opportunities relate to children’s PA. METHODS: An observational study of 98 children (mean age 4.5 years, 49% girls) from 10 child care centers. Classrooms were observed for at least 4 full days per center (total 50 days) to categorize time into (1) not an active play opportunity (APO); (2) naptime; (3) APO, outdoor free play; (4) APO, outdoor teacher-led; (5) APO, indoor free play; and (6) APO, indoor teacher-led. Children wore accelerometers during observations. Linear regression models examined the influence of APO categories on moderate-vigorous physical activity (MVPA) and sedentary time. RESULTS: Children’s activity was 73% sedentary, 13% light, and 14% MVPA. For 88% of time children did not have APOs, including 26% time as naptime. On average, 48 minutes per day were APOs (41% sedentary, 18% light, and 41% MVPA), 33 minutes per day were outdoors. The most frequent APO was outdoor free play (8% of time); outdoor teacher-led time was <1%. Children were more active and less sedentary outdoors versus indoors and during the child-initiated APOs (indoors and outdoors) versus teacher-led APOs. CONCLUSIONS: Preschoolers were presented with significantly fewer than recommended opportunities for PA at child care. More APOs are needed for children to meet recommendations, particularly those that encourage more outdoor time, more teacher-led and child-initiated active play, and flexibility in naptime for preschoolers. PMID:25986016

  15. Dual-Military Couples, Child Care and Retention

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-04-01

    military child care provided in child development centers (CDCs) are subsidized by the government. In national surveys of state oversight and...Retain Dual-Military Members The Honorable Carter is already on a promising path with his assurance that the DoD would develop a plan to expand child ...Jowers, Karen, “Military Leaders Promise to Extend Child Care Hours, Shorten Wait Lists at Child Development Centers,” Military Times, http

  16. Child Care Providers' Experiences Caring for Sick Children: Implications for Public Policy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Heymann, S. Jody; Vo, Phuong Hong; Bergstrom, Cara A.

    2002-01-01

    Examined the experiences of preschool and school-age child care providers regarding sick child care. Found that providers repeatedly described sick children whose health problems made it impossible to provide adequate care for sick and well children in their care. Findings pose international public health policy implications for child care and…

  17. Diarrhea & Child Care: Controlling Diarrhea in Out-of-Home Child Care. NCEDL Spotlights, No. 4.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Churchill, Robin B.; Pickering, Larry K.

    This report, the fourth in the National Center for Early Development and Learning's (NCEDL) "Spotlights" series, is based on excerpts from a paper presented during a "Research into Practice in Infant/Toddler Care" synthesis conference in fall 1997. The report addresses controlling diarrhea in out-of-home child care. The report…

  18. Child Poverty and the Health Care System.

    PubMed

    Racine, Andrew D

    2016-04-01

    The persistence of child poverty in the United States and the pervasive health consequences it engenders present unique challenges to the health care system. Human capital theory and empirical observation suggest that the increased disease burden experienced by poor children originates from social conditions that provide suboptimal educational, nutritional, environmental, and parental inputs to good health. Faced with the resultant excess rates of pediatric morbidity, the US health care system has developed a variety of compensatory strategies. In the first instance, Medicaid, the federal-state governmental finance system designed to assure health insurance coverage for poor children, has increased its eligibility thresholds and expanded its benefits to allow greater access to health services for this vulnerable population. A second arm of response involves a gradual reengineering of health care delivery at the practice level, including the dissemination of patient-centered medical homes, the use of team-based approaches to care, and the expansion of care management beyond the practice to reach deep into the community. Third is a series of recent experiments involving the federal government and state Medicaid programs that includes payment reforms of various kinds, enhanced reporting, concentration on high-risk populations, and intensive case management. Fourth, pediatric practices have begun to make use of specific tools that permit the identification and referral of children facing social stresses arising from poverty. Finally, constituencies within the health care system participate in enhanced advocacy efforts to raise awareness of poverty as a distinct threat to child health and to press for public policy responses such as minimum wage increases, expansion of tax credits, paid family leave, universal preschool education, and other priorities focused on child poverty.

  19. Scaling up paediatric HIV care with an integrated, family-centred approach: an observational case study from Uganda.

    PubMed

    Luyirika, Emmanuel; Towle, Megan S; Achan, Joyce; Muhangi, Justus; Senyimba, Catherine; Lule, Frank; Muhe, Lulu

    2013-01-01

    Family-centred HIV care models have emerged as an approach to better target children and their caregivers for HIV testing and care, and further provide integrated health services for the family unit's range of care needs. While there is significant international interest in family-centred approaches, there is a dearth of research on operational experiences in implementation and scale-up. Our retrospective case study examined best practices and enabling factors during scale-up of family-centred care in ten health facilities and ten community clinics supported by a non-governmental organization, Mildmay, in Central Uganda. Methods included key informant interviews with programme management and families, and a desk review of hospital management information systems (HMIS) uptake data. In the 84 months following the scale-up of the family-centred approach in HIV care, Mildmay experienced a 50-fold increase of family units registered in HIV care, a 40-fold increase of children enrolled in HIV care, and nearly universal coverage of paediatric cotrimoxazole prophylaxis. The Mildmay experience emphasizes the importance of streamlining care to maximize paediatric capture. This includes integrated service provision, incentivizing care-seeking as a family, creating child-friendly service environments, and minimizing missed paediatric testing opportunities by institutionalizing early infant diagnosis and provider-initiated testing and counselling. Task-shifting towards nurse-led clinics with community outreach support enabled rapid scale-up, as did an active management structure that allowed for real-time review and corrective action. The Mildmay experience suggests that family-centred approaches are operationally feasible, produce strong coverage outcomes, and can be well-managed during rapid scale-up.

  20. [Health advocacy in child care: literature review].

    PubMed

    Andrade, Raquel Dully; Mello, Débora Falleiros; Silva, Marta Angélica Iossi; Ventura, Carla Aparecida Arena

    2011-01-01

    This narrative literature review aimed to identify the publications about health law, in the ambit of child health care. The databases LILACS and MEDLINE were searched, between 2004 and 2009. Thirteen articles were analyzed, and three themes were identified: Emphasis on knowledge, abilities and attitudes for the development of competencies; Partnerships as an imperative; Health and Law: intersectorial relationship. The studies about the practice of health law are relevant to our reality, especially in primary health care, pointing out for the possibilities of its applicability in the role of the nurses acting in the family health strategy, with families and children.

  1. The Russian Child Health Care System.

    PubMed

    Baranov, Alexander; Namazova-Baranova, Leyla; Albitskiy, Valeriy; Ustinova, Natalia; Terletskaya, Rimma; Komarova, Olga

    2016-10-01

    We present a historical and analytical overview of the Russian child health care system describing strengths and challenges of the system. Main indicators of social environment and children's health, general demographics, and socioeconomic factors of Russia are described. The Russian health care system has preserved positive elements of the former Soviet model of pediatric care. However, beginning in 1991, it has been altered greatly in its funding and management. The child health care system is composed of a special network of outpatient and inpatient facilities. The key element of pediatric community care is the pediatric polyclinic, staffed by district pediatricians and nurses. Undergraduate pediatric training is separate from adult medical training. From day one onward, future pediatricians are trained at separate pediatric faculties of universities. Thus, they qualify as general pediatricians after only 2 years of postgraduate training. It should be emphasized that the gap between the health status of children in developed countries and the Russian Federation is largely due to the influence of socioeconomic determinants, such as traffic accidents, poverty, pollution, and hazardous life styles, including binge drinking. Further improvements of children's health require protective measures by the state to address the underlying socioeconomic determinants.

  2. Establishment of primary care centre for University Malaysia Sabah.

    PubMed

    Viegas, C M

    2006-01-01

    University Malaysia Sabah campus moved to its present site in Kota Kinabalu, Sabah, Malaysia in 1999. A health centre was included in the development plans and a two-storey building was constructed to provide the facility for in-patient and out-patient care. Clinical catchments include 10,000 students, 1000 academic and support staff. The medical faculty was inaugurated in 2003, and it was given the responsibility to establish and run the facility for students and staff of the University. This paper describes the development of the facility from merely a physical structure to what is now a comprehensive, functional outpatient service catering for student healthcare, screening, preventive medicine and health promotional activities. Currently, these services are provided by the faculty members of the Medical School. The incorporation of the medical student teaching and collaborative research adds intangible value to the facility. Future plans for expansion include specialist medical services.

  3. National Child Care Regulatory, Monitoring and Evaluation Systems Model.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fiene, Richard

    The relation between compliance with child care regulations and the quality of day care programs is discussed, and predictors of child care compliance are identified. Substantial compliance (90-97 percent, but not a full 100 percent compliance with state day care regulations) positively affects children. Low compliance (below 85 percent…

  4. Meeting the Needs of the Youngest Infants in Child Care

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Perez, Amanda; Petersen, Sandy

    2009-01-01

    Children may enter group care at very young ages. Developmentally, newborns (from birth to 4 months old) offer unique opportunities and challenges for child care providers. Are child care programs ready? Little information is available on providing group care to children at this critical developmental stage. This article explores the challenges of…

  5. Meeting the Needs of the Youngest Infants in Child Care

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Perez, Amanda; Petersen, Sandy

    2009-01-01

    Children may enter group care at very young ages. Developmentally, newborns (from birth to 4 months old) offer unique opportunities and challenges for child care providers. Are child care programs ready? Little information is available on providing group care to children at this critical developmental stage. This article explores the challenges of…

  6. Staff Morale in Day Care Centres for Adults with Intellectual Disabilities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mascha, Katerina

    2007-01-01

    Background: Levels of burnout, job satisfaction and intended turnover of staff working in day care centres for adults with intellectual disabilities are investigated in relation to role clarity, staff support and supervision, and coping strategies used by staff. Materials and methods: Thirty six direct-care staff of four day care centres in the UK…

  7. Staff Morale in Day Care Centres for Adults with Intellectual Disabilities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mascha, Katerina

    2007-01-01

    Background: Levels of burnout, job satisfaction and intended turnover of staff working in day care centres for adults with intellectual disabilities are investigated in relation to role clarity, staff support and supervision, and coping strategies used by staff. Materials and methods: Thirty six direct-care staff of four day care centres in the UK…

  8. Lessons Learned from Participatory Design in Dementia Care: Placing Care Partners at the Centre.

    PubMed

    Hendriks, Niels; Slegers, Karin; Wilkinson, Andrea

    2017-01-01

    In this paper we analyze the participatory design (PD) process of a health information technology (HIT) project. This project, AToM was situated in dementia care and involved partners from academia, industry and care. The analysis specifically focuses on the role of the care partners in the PD process. We will show that the conditions to enable 'good participatory design' were not fully met and we present a set of actions to prevent this in future HIT projects. Central to our recommended approach is placing the care partners at the centre of the PD project.

  9. A person-centred segmentation study in elderly care: towards efficient demand-driven care.

    PubMed

    Eissens van der Laan, M R; van Offenbeek, M A G; Broekhuis, H; Slaets, J P J

    2014-07-01

    Providing patients with more person-centred care without increasing costs is a key challenge in healthcare. A relevant but often ignored hindrance to delivering person-centred care is that the current segmentation of the population and the associated organization of healthcare supply are based on diseases. A person-centred segmentation, i.e., based on persons' own experienced difficulties in fulfilling needs, is an elementary but often overlooked first step in developing efficient demand-driven care. This paper describes a person-centred segmentation study of elderly, a large and increasing target group confronted with heterogeneous and often interrelated difficulties in their functioning. In twenty-five diverse healthcare and welfare organizations as well as elderly associations in the Netherlands, data were collected on the difficulties in biopsychosocial functioning experienced by 2019 older adults. Data were collected between March 2010 and January 2011 and sampling took place based on their (temporarily) living conditions. Factor Mixture Model was conducted to categorize the respondents into segments with relatively similar experienced difficulties concerning their functioning. First, the analyses show that older adults can be empirically categorized into five meaningful segments: feeling vital; difficulties with psychosocial coping; physical and mobility complaints; difficulties experienced in multiple domains; and feeling extremely frail. The categorization seems robust as it was replicated in two population-based samples in the Netherlands. The segmentation's usefulness is discussed and illustrated through an evaluation of the alignment between a segment's unfulfilled biopsychosocial needs and current healthcare utilization. The set of person-centred segmentation variables provides healthcare providers the option to perform a more comprehensive first triage step than only a disease-based one. The outcomes of this first step could guide a focused and

  10. Boys, Girls, and "Two Cultures" of Child Care

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Winer, Abby C.; Phillips, Deborah A.

    2012-01-01

    This study examined differences in the quality of child care experienced by toddler boys and girls. Boys were more likely to be in lower-quality child care than girls, assessed with both setting-level measures and observations of caregiver-child interaction. A possible explanatory mechanism for the gender differences is suggested by evidence that…

  11. Child Care Use in Minnesota: 2009 Statewide Survey Summary

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chase, Richard; Valorose, Jennifer

    2010-01-01

    Nearly 500,000 households in Minnesota include a parent or parents with at least one child age 12 and under. About three-quarters use some type of child care. The strength of the economy depends on families having high-quality, affordable child care, so parents can work and children have the early learning opportunities they need to perform better…

  12. Boys, Girls, and "Two Cultures" of Child Care

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Winer, Abby C.; Phillips, Deborah A.

    2012-01-01

    This study examined differences in the quality of child care experienced by toddler boys and girls. Boys were more likely to be in lower-quality child care than girls, assessed with both setting-level measures and observations of caregiver-child interaction. A possible explanatory mechanism for the gender differences is suggested by evidence that…

  13. 76 FR 3143 - Office of Child Care; Delegation of Authority

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-01-19

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Administration for Children and Families Office of Child Care; Delegation of Authority Notice is hereby given that I have delegated to the Director, Office of Child Care, Administration for..., Pub. L. 104-193), as amended, as they pertain to the functions assigned to the Office of Child...

  14. Child Care Choices, Consumer Education, and Low-Income Families.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mitchell, Anne; And Others

    In 1991, the National Center for Children in Poverty undertook a study of low-income parents as child care consumers. The study involved a review of current research findings, interviews with staff of child resource and referral agencies, and an examination of child care consumer education provided in the Job Opportunities and Basic Skills (JOBS)…

  15. Classroom Level Effects of Children's Prior Participation in Child Care

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clarke-Stewart, K. Alison; Lucas-Thompson, Rachel; Weaver, Jennifer M.; Karsh, Andrea

    2013-01-01

    Previous research indicates that children who spend many hours in early child care exhibit more externalizing behavior problems than children who spend less time in child care. Concern has been expressed regarding the cumulative effect of these problem behaviors on elementary school classes. We collected information about children's child-care…

  16. Public Policy Report. Child Care: An Endangered Industry.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Daniel, Jerlean

    1990-01-01

    Presents testimony given at a Congressional briefing on findings of the National Child Care Staffing Study. The study concerned the staffing and budgeting crisis in the child care industry as a whole and the University of Pittsburgh Child Development Center in particular. (Author/BB)

  17. Child Care Choices, Consumer Education, and Low-Income Families.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mitchell, Anne; And Others

    In 1991, the National Center for Children in Poverty undertook a study of low-income parents as child care consumers. The study involved a review of current research findings, interviews with staff of child resource and referral agencies, and an examination of child care consumer education provided in the Job Opportunities and Basic Skills (JOBS)…

  18. Child Care and Welfare Reform: More Painful Choices.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ebb, Nancy

    This report discusses the impact of child care and welfare reform legislation under consideration by the Senate Republican leadership in the United States 104th Congress, based in part on a national survey of how states are coping, or not coping, with current child care needs and how prepared they are to cope with new demands for child care…

  19. Evaluating a Hygiene Education Program for Child Care Workers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Petri, Cynthia J.; Winnail, Scott D.; Geiger, Brian F.; Artz, Lynn M.; Mason, J. W.

    Children, parents, and child caregivers are vulnerable to several infectious diseases as a result of contact with child care centers. This pilot program, implemented in a rural county in a southeastern state, was designed to enhance knowledge and skills related to improved hygiene practices in a child care setting. The target audience for the…

  20. The Child Welfare Profession's Perception of Residential Care for Children

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Owens, Larry W.

    2008-01-01

    This research study explored the Child Welfare League of America's (CWLA) perception of residential care for children, as a reflection of the child welfare profession as a whole. A content analysis of CWLA's national conference programs and the journal "Child Welfare" from 1997 to 2006 found that the profession emphasizes family foster care and…

  1. Evil, Child Abuse and the Caring Professions.

    PubMed

    Humphrey, Caroline

    2015-10-01

    The aim of this paper is to explore the ways in which the concept of evil has been invoked in relation to child abuse. First, the scene is set by juxtaposing professional discourses which have eschewed the concept of evil and public opinion which is affronted by the evil of child abuse. Second, I will discuss the work of some therapists in the USA whose work with perpetrators and survivors has led them to frame the causes and consequences of child abuse in terms of moral evil. Third, I will draw upon case studies of Satanic abuse and spirit possession in the UK to illustrate that some social workers and religious communities have interpreted child abuse as an outcome of or as an antidote to metaphysical evil. Finally, there is a critical appraisal of the merits of referencing moral and metaphysical evil in the discourses of caring professionals, with a suggestion that a mythical-metaphorical conception of evil could be a more flexible and fruitful resource for therapeutic work.

  2. Caring and Learning Environments: Quality in Regulated Family Child Care across Canada. You Bet I Care!

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Doherty, Gillian; Lero, Donna S.; Goelman, Hillel; Tougas, Jocelyne; LaGrange, Annette

    Canadian experts in diverse fields as well as people concerned about social justice and cohesion have identified quality child care as a crucial component in addressing a variety of broad societal goals. This study explored the relationships between quality in Canadian family child care homes and: provider characteristics and attitudes about…

  3. Who Cares for the Children? Denmark's Unique Public Child-Care Model.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Polakow, Valerie

    1997-01-01

    U.S. working mothers wrestle daily with a child-care crisis characterized by unavailable infant care, high costs, and inadequate access and regulation. In Denmark, high-quality child care is a guaranteed entitlement for every child. Other benefits include paid parental leaves, single-parent allowances, housing subsidies, and universal health care.…

  4. Child Care in Rhode Island: Caring for Infants and Pre-School Children. Issue Brief.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harrington, Ann-Marie, Ed.; Walsh, Catherine Boisvert, Ed.; Bryant, Elizabeth Burke, Ed.

    1997-01-01

    This report of the Rhode Island Kids Count organization details the state's infant and preschool child care, components of quality care, and state policies to increase the supply of quality care. The report begins with a discussion of the importance of providing good quality child care to enhance healthy child development, especially brain…

  5. The "Caring" Role in a Child Care Center. Staff Development Series, Military Child Care Project. Part I: Orientation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Scavo, Marlene; And Others

    One in a series written for caregivers or teachers in military child care centers, this staff development module provides brief discussions of aspects of child caregiving, describes related situations which beginning caregivers are likely to find difficult, offers alternate ways of responding to the difficulty, and provides feedback on caregivers'…

  6. Planning for health promotion in low-income preschool child care settings: focus groups of parents and child care providers.

    PubMed

    Taveras, Elsie M; LaPelle, Nancy; Gupta, Ruchi S; Finkelstein, Jonathan A

    2006-01-01

    To identify potentially successful strategies, barriers, and facilitators for health promotion in preschool child care settings. We conducted 6 focus groups including each of the following: parents of children attending child care centers and home-based family child care (2 in English, 1 in Spanish) and directors of child care centers and family child care providers (2 in English, 1 in Spanish). Systematic thematic analysis was conducted to generate themes to address study questions. A total of 24 parents and 45 child care providers, serving predominantly urban, low-income children in Boston, participated. Parents and child care providers agreed that in-person group discussions would be the most effective strategy for providing health education information to parents. Several barriers that could affect implementation emerged. First, some providers expressed frustration toward parents' attitudes about child safety and health. Second, there was diversity of opinion among providers on whether conducting health promotion activities was consistent with their training and role. In addition, literacy, language, and cultural barriers were identified as potential barriers to health promotion in child care. In order to be successful, health promotion strategies in child care settings will need to overcome tensions between providers and parents, allow professional growth of child care providers to serve in a health promotion role, and better integrate external health resources and personnel. Group sessions and peer learning opportunities that are culturally and linguistically sensitive are potentially successful strategies for implementation of health promotion interventions for many parents.

  7. Reconciling evidence-based medicine and patient-centred care: defining evidence-based inputs to patient-centred decisions.

    PubMed

    Weaver, Robert R

    2015-12-01

    Evidence-based and patient-centred health care movements have each enhanced the discussion of how health care might best be delivered, yet the two have evolved separately and, in some views, remain at odds with each other. No clear model has emerged to enable practitioners to capitalize on the advantages of each so actual practice often becomes, to varying degrees, an undefined mishmash of each. When faced with clinical uncertainty, it becomes easy for practitioners to rely on formulas for care developed explicitly by expert panels, or on the tacit ones developed from experience or habit. Either way, these tendencies towards 'cookbook' medicine undermine the view of patients as unique particulars, and diminish what might be considered patient-centred care. The sequence in which evidence is applied in the care process, however, is critical for developing a model of care that is both evidence based and patient centred. This notion derives from a paradigm for knowledge delivery and patient care developed over decades by Dr. Lawrence Weed. Weed's vision enables us to view evidence-based and person-centred medicine as wholly complementary, using computer tools to more fully and reliably exploit the vast body of collective knowledge available to define patients' uniqueness and identify the options to guide patients. The transparency of the approach to knowledge delivery facilitates meaningful practitioner-patient dialogue in determining the appropriate course of action. Such a model for knowledge delivery and care is essential for integrating evidence-based and patient-centred approaches. © 2015 The Authors. Journal of Evaluation in Clinical Practice published by John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  8. Cost, Quality and Child Outcomes in Child Care Centers. Technical Report, Public Report, and Executive Summary.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Helburn, Suzanne W., Ed.

    Conducted at a time when increasing numbers of the nation's young children are in child care and when the American public is concerned about children's readiness for school, the Cost, Quality, and Child Outcomes Study provides the first comprehensive econometric and psychometric analysis of child care and children's outcomes. The study was…

  9. A Child at the Door: A Guidebook for Starting a Child Care Program in Your Church.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    North Carolina Rural Economic Development Center, Raleigh.

    This guidebook presents information for use by religious leaders to plan and implement financially sound, high quality child care programs. A foreword describes child care provision as a ministry within the mainstream of congregational activity. Chapter 1, "Assessing the Need," provides a statewide overview of the need for child care…

  10. Caregiver-Child Relationships as a Context for Continuity in Child Care

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Recchia, Susan L.

    2012-01-01

    This paper focuses on one aspect of continuity--the caregiver-child relationship--within a larger global study of continuity in child care based at a university-affiliated child care center. Case studies are presented of two toddler boys, followed as they transitioned from their infant classroom to the preschool classroom at the age of…

  11. Caregiver-Child Relationships as a Context for Continuity in Child Care

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Recchia, Susan L.

    2012-01-01

    This paper focuses on one aspect of continuity--the caregiver-child relationship--within a larger global study of continuity in child care based at a university-affiliated child care center. Case studies are presented of two toddler boys, followed as they transitioned from their infant classroom to the preschool classroom at the age of…

  12. Program Development in Military Child Care Settings: A Guidebook Based on the Experiences of the Fort Lewis Child Care Center.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Office of the Assistant Secretary of Defense for Manpower and Reserve Affairs (DOD), Washington, DC.

    This guidebook, one of a series on the subject of military child care centers, outlines five major principles for consideration when selecting, planning, and developing appropriate programs. These principles are understanding military families' needs for child care; deciding, based on the strengths and weaknesses of various existing child care…

  13. Maryland Child Care Choices Study: Changes in Child Care Arrangements of Young Children in Maryland. Publication #2014-57

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Krafft, Caroline; Davis, Elizabeth E.; Tout, Kathryn

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this series is to summarize key findings and implications from the Maryland Child Care Choices study, a longitudinal survey of parents who were applying for Temporary Assistance for Needy Families (TANF) in 2011. Families in the Maryland Child Care Choices study had at least one child age six or younger and lived in one of the…

  14. Maryland Child Care Choices Study: Changes in Child Care Arrangements of Young Children in Maryland. Publication #2014-57

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Krafft, Caroline; Davis, Elizabeth E.; Tout, Kathryn

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this series is to summarize key findings and implications from the Maryland Child Care Choices study, a longitudinal survey of parents who were applying for Temporary Assistance for Needy Families (TANF) in 2011. Families in the Maryland Child Care Choices study had at least one child age six or younger and lived in one of the…

  15. Infectious diarrhoea in children: controlling transmission in the child care setting.

    PubMed

    Thompson, S C

    1994-06-01

    An increase in the number of preschool children cared for within groups in child care centres has been associated with increasing numbers of women in the workforce. Children at this age are at high risk for gastrointestinal diseases caused by a large number of enteric pathogens, and the risk is increased by the greater potential for person-to-person transmission within group care. This report considers the pathogens that may cause diarrhoeal illness in children, with particular reference to those that have been reported in formal day care settings. The major risk factors for transmission of these agents and a high rate of diarrhoeal illness in the child care setting include attendance of non-toilet-trained children, staff combining nappy changing and food preparation duties, large enrollment, low staff-to-child ratio, and poor hygiene and child handling practices. Investigations undertaken during an outbreak of diarrhoea have frequently used limited diagnostic testing, often suitable for identifying only bacterial and protozoal agents. Such limited investigations have tended to incriminate agents that have prolonged carriage and are easily identifiable in standard microbiology laboratories. Finding a pathogen in these circumstances needs to be interpreted with caution. Prevention and control measures include training and education in good personal hygiene, emphasis on the need for frequent handwashing, separation of change areas from food handling and eating areas, routine cleaning and disinfection of environmental surfaces and personal items, and exclusion of any child or child care worker with diarrhoea.

  16. A Holistic, Person-Centred Care Model for Victims of Sexual Violence in Democratic Republic of Congo: The Panzi Hospital One-Stop Centre Model of Care.

    PubMed

    Mukwege, Denis; Berg, Marie

    2016-10-01

    Denis Mukwege and Marie Berg describe the One Stop Centre at Panzi Hospital in Eastern Democratic Republic of Congo that provides care for girls and women who have been raped in combination with extreme bodily harm.

  17. Interdisciplinary collaboration within Quebec Community Health Care Centres.

    PubMed

    Sicotte, Claude; D'Amour, Danielle; Moreault, Marie-Pierre

    2002-09-01

    Central to the success of many recent health system reforms is the implementation of new primary health care delivery models. The central characteristic common to these new models usually emphasises interdisciplinary collaboration. Using empirical research, this paper studies interdisciplinary collaboration among various groups of professionals within an original Canadian primary health care delivery model, the Quebec Community Health Care Centres (CCHCs). The entire population of more than 150 CHCCs have been surveyed. The goals of this study are (1) to measure the achieved intensity of inter-professional collaboration among Quebec CHCCs, and (2) to identify the organisational and professional factors fostering or limiting interdisciplinary collaboration. The results show that Quebec CHCCs have reached modest results in achieving interdisciplinary collaboration especially since interdisciplinary collaboration is a central objective that has been pursued for more than 25 years. This study demonstrates that the main factors associated with interdisciplinary collaboration are closely linked to work group internal dynamics. Interdisciplinary collaboration is linked to the simultaneous and antagonistic effect of some central intragroup process factors. Conflicting values and beliefs are present that both enhance and limit interdisciplinary collaboration. The presence of conflicting stimuli seriously undermines the strength of the CHCC work group's shared beliefs and strongly limits interdisciplinary collaboration. The results also stress the importance of administrative formalisation initiatives to enhance collaboration among different professions. The efficacy of formalisation in this context is based on its capacity to offer an articulated and operative interdisciplinary framework that can generate a counteractive effect to the traditional professional framework. It offers concrete rules that help align the work group beliefs with interdisciplinary values. The

  18. Hours in non-parental child care are related to language development in a longitudinal cohort study.

    PubMed

    Luijk, M P C M; Linting, M; Henrichs, J; Herba, C M; Verhage, M L; Schenk, J J; Arends, L R; Raat, H; Jaddoe, V W V; Hofman, A; Verhulst, F C; Tiemeier, H; van IJzendoorn, M H

    2015-11-01

    The effects of child care services on several domains of child development have been extensively investigated, but evidence regarding the effects of child care on language development remains inconclusive. Within a large-scale population-based study, we examined the longitudinal associations between non-parental child care and language development from 1 to 6 years (n = 5375). Results showed that more hours in non-parental child care were associated with better language abilities. However, more hours in care in the first year of life were associated with less language proficiency at ages 1 to 1.5. At later ages, this effect disappeared and language proficiency increased. Furthermore, children who spent more hours in centre-based care had better language scores than children in home-based care. Ethnicity, socio-economic status, gender or parity did not change these results. This large, multi-ethnic study demonstrates beneficial effects of non-parental child care, particularly centre-based care, on language proficiency later in childhood. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  19. "Who Cares for the Children?" Lessons from a Global Perspective of Child Care Policy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lokteff, Maegan; Piercy, Kathleen W.

    2012-01-01

    We present the argument that the meaning of child care and the policies that address it are explicitly linked with national ideologies, work force participation, economic success, and child outcomes. The relationship between family and child care policies is cyclical in nature, with a nation's ideology and vision of family often driving child care…

  20. Intestinal Parasites in Children from a Day Care Centre in Matanzas City, Cuba

    PubMed Central

    Cañete, Roberto; Díaz, Mariuska Morales; Avalos García, Roxana; Laúd Martinez, Pedro Miguel; Manuel Ponce, Félix

    2012-01-01

    Background Intestinal parasitic infections are widely distributed throughout the world and children are the most affected population. Day care centres are environments where children have proven to be more susceptible to acquiring IP. Methods and Principal Findings A cross-sectional study was carried to determine the prevalence of intestinal parasites in stool samples among children who attend to a day care centre in an urban area of Matanzas city, Cuba, from March to June 2012. 104 children under five years old were included on the study after informed consent form was signed by parents or legal guardians. Three fresh faecal samples were collected from each child in different days and were examined by direct wet mount, formalin-ether, and Kato- Katz techniques. Data relating to demography, socioeconomic status, source of drinking water, and personal hygiene habits were also collected using a standardized questionnaire. In total, 71.1% of children harbored at least one type of intestinal parasite and 47 (45.2%) were infected by more than one species. Giardia duodenalis and Blastocystis sp. were the most common parasites found, with prevalence rates of 54.8% and 38.5% respectively. Conclusions Despite public health campaigns, improvement in the level of education, and the availability of and access to medical services in Cuba infections by intestinal protozoan is high in this centre. Almost nothing is published regarding intestinal parasites in Matanzas province during the last 40 years so this work could also be the initial point to carry out other studies to clarify the IP status in this region. PMID:23236493

  1. Differential Susceptibility to Parenting and Quality Child Care

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pluess, Michael; Belsky, Jay

    2010-01-01

    Research on differential susceptibility to rearing suggests that infants with difficult temperaments are disproportionately affected by parenting and child care quality, but a major U.S. child care study raises questions as to whether quality of care influences social adjustment. One thousand three hundred sixty-four American children from…

  2. Differential Susceptibility to Parenting and Quality Child Care

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pluess, Michael; Belsky, Jay

    2010-01-01

    Research on differential susceptibility to rearing suggests that infants with difficult temperaments are disproportionately affected by parenting and child care quality, but a major U.S. child care study raises questions as to whether quality of care influences social adjustment. One thousand three hundred sixty-four American children from…

  3. Crediting Foods in the Child Care Food Program. [Revised].

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Food and Nutrition Service (USDA), Robbinsville, NJ. Mid-Atlantic Regional Office.

    This modified version of a previously published title provides additional information on foods for which reimbursement may be obtained from the United States Department of Agriculture (USDA) by child care centers and family day care homes participating in the Child Care Food Program. Such foods, called creditable foods, are those that may be…

  4. Regional Child Care Trends: Comparing Georgia to Its Neighbors.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Waits, Lauren; Monaco, Malina; Beck, Lisa; Edwards, Jennifer

    As child care becomes an increasingly important public policy issue on the national level, there is emerging concern about Georgia's readiness to meet the needs of its children in care. This study documented the state of child care in Georgia in comparison to other states, to national averages, and to national standards. A group of 12 comparison…

  5. Louisiana KIDS COUNT Special Report on Child Care, 2006

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Agenda for Children, 2006

    2006-01-01

    The "2006 Agenda for Children Louisiana Kids Count Special Report on Child Care" documents and describes the supply and affordability of child care and early education in each of Louisiana's 64 parishes. Seventy-eight percent (78%) of Louisiana's children under the age of five are cared for by someone other than a parent or guardian on a…

  6. Child Care: Volume II. Vocational Home Economics Education. Revised.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Benson, Ann; Kates, Donna

    Intended for use in a four-semester occupational child care program for 11th- or 12th-grade and adult students, this curriculum guide provides instructional materials covering basic information and skills for operating a child care center or a family day care home. It includes 4 sections and 23 instructional units. Each unit of instruction…

  7. Child Care Consumer Education on the Internet. ERIC Digest.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goldstein, Anne

    One of the most important decisions that parents make is choosing child care for their children. Child care consumer education provides parents with the information they need to help them assess their needs, locate services, evaluate quality, and choose the best possible care for their children. There are two broad strategies for disseminating…

  8. Profiles of Public-Private Partnerships for Child Care. The Child Care Partnership Project.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Finance Project, Washington, DC.

    The profiles of programs collected in this report were developed as part of the Child Care Partnership Project, a multi-year technical assistance effort. The Partnership Project provides a series of technical assistance resources and materials to support the development and strengthening of public-private partnerships to improve the quality and…

  9. Child Care: Almost Ours. An AFL-CIO Guide to Implementing Child Care Laws.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    American Federation of Labor and Congress of Industrial Organizations, Washington, DC.

    On October 27, 1990, Congress enacted comprehensive federal child care legislation targeted toward low-income workers and a broad expansion of assistance to parents through the earned income tax credit. This guide alerts union members to the benefits that are now available under the new law: the Omnibus Budget Reconciliation Act of 1990. The guide…

  10. Child Care: Almost Ours. An AFL-CIO Guide to Implementing Child Care Laws.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    American Federation of Labor and Congress of Industrial Organizations, Washington, DC.

    On October 27, 1990, Congress enacted comprehensive federal child care legislation targeted toward low-income workers and a broad expansion of assistance to parents through the earned income tax credit. This guide alerts union members to the benefits that are now available under the new law: the Omnibus Budget Reconciliation Act of 1990. The guide…

  11. Child Care Health Connections, 2000: A Health and Safety Newsletter for California Child Care Professionals.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Walery, Nancy, Ed.; Evinger, Sara, Ed.; Dailey, Lyn, Ed.; Sherman, Marsha, Ed.; Zamani, Rahman, Ed.

    2000-01-01

    This document is comprised of the six 2000 issues of a bimonthly newsletter providing information on young children's health and safety for California's child care professionals. Regular features include a column on infant/toddler concerns, a question-answer column regarding medical and health issues, a nutrition column, and resources for child…

  12. Child Care Services 1: The Child Care Aide, Home and Family Education: 6755.02.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ahrens, Thea

    The course is the first of a series of four courses which provide the student with the knowledge and skills necessary to become an effective child care aide. Planned for junior or senior high school students, the course focuses on employment requirements including appearance, attitudes, relationships with employer and co-workers, and the legal…

  13. Child Care Recipes: Food for Health and Fun. From USDA's Child and Adult Care Food Program.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Food and Nutrition Service (USDA), Washington, DC.

    Intended to help child care providers show young children how to make healthy food choices, this collection contains standardized recipes and kitchen tips to help providers put together great tasting, nutritious meals that will appeal to young children. The recipe instructions are geared for groups of 25 and 50, and have been tested for product…

  14. Moving the Goal Posts: The Shift from Child Care Supply to Child Care Quality

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dickman, Anneliese; Kovach, Melissa; Smith, Annemarie; Henken, Rob

    2010-01-01

    As policymakers in Madison redesign the state's child care subsidy program--known as Wisconsin Shares--it is important to understand the original vision for the program. This report investigates the development and implementation of Wisconsin Shares and its linkages to the state's landmark W-2 welfare reform initiative. In particular, the authors…

  15. Child Care Health Connections, 1999: A Health and Safety Newsletter for California Child Care Professionals.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Walery, Nancy, Ed.; Evinger, Sara, Ed.; Dailey, Lyn, Ed.; Sherman, Marsha, Ed.; Zamani, Rahman, Ed.

    1999-01-01

    This document is comprised of the six 1999 issues of a bimonthly newsletter providing information on young children's health and safety for California's child care professionals. Regular features include a column on infant/toddler concerns, a question-answer column regarding medical and health issues, a nutrition column, and resources for child…

  16. At the Heart of Child Care: Predictors of Teacher Sensitivity in Center-Based Child Care

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gerber, Emily B.; Whitebook, Marcy; Weinstein, Rhona S.

    2007-01-01

    This study examined the extent to which characteristics of early childhood teachers and settings predicted observed teacher sensitivity. Participants included 41 head teachers at child care centers located in Northern California. Accreditation status, center size, and program quality were uniquely associated with teacher sensitivity. Accreditation…

  17. Staying Healthy in Child Care: Preventing Infectious Diseases in Child Care.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thomson, Beth, Ed.

    This guide provides explanations of control methods for infection and diseases in child care with an emphasis on prevention and health. The guide consists of two parts. The first part covers the following topics on preventing illness in children: how infections spread; handwashing; separation into age groups; nappy changing and toileting; cleaning…

  18. Enhancing Social Competence and the Child-Teacher Relationship Using a Child-Centred Play Training Model in Hong Kong Preschools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Leung, Chi-hung

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine whether a child-centred play training model, filial play therapy, enhances child-teacher relationship and thereby reduces children's internalising problems (such as anxiety/depression and withdrawal) and externalising problems (such as aggressive and destructive behaviour). Sixty teachers (n = 60) and 60…

  19. Enhancing Social Competence and the Child-Teacher Relationship Using a Child-Centred Play Training Model in Hong Kong Preschools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Leung, Chi-hung

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine whether a child-centred play training model, filial play therapy, enhances child-teacher relationship and thereby reduces children's internalising problems (such as anxiety/depression and withdrawal) and externalising problems (such as aggressive and destructive behaviour). Sixty teachers (n = 60) and 60…

  20. Walk-in centres in primary care: a review of the international literature.

    PubMed Central

    Salisbury, Chris; Munro, James

    2003-01-01

    Nurse-led walk-in centres were first announced in April 1999. They represent a new development in unscheduled care provision in the United Kingdom (UK) National Health Service (NHS). By the end of 2000, 40 NHS walk-in centres had been opened, with further centres recently announced. This paper aims to review international experience with walk-in centres in primary and emergency care and identify relevant lessons for the UK. This study is a systematic review, with qualitative synthesis of relevant findings. Studies were identified from seven major bibliographic databases using a sensitive search strategy, and 244 relevant documents relating to walk-in or 'ambulatory care' centres were identified. Users of walk-in centres in other countries tend to be a relatively affluent population of working age, and a different population from those using conventional general practice services. Walk-in centres are used particularly when other health services are closed. The problems presented are mainly minor illnesses and minor injuries. People choose this form of care mainly for reasons of convenience, and satisfaction with the service is generally high. The very limited evidence available suggests that walk-in centres provide care of reasonable quality, but there is insufficient evidence to draw firm conclusions about the impact of walk-in centres on other healthcare services or the costs of such care. Although a number of countries have had a long experience of walk-in centres, the lack of reliable evidence on many of the most important issues is notable. In the NHS, walk-in centres represent a radically innovative attempt to improve access to health care, but the limited research available does little to inform their development. Important questions that need to be addressed include whether walk-in centres do improve access to care, for whom, and at what overall cost. PMID:12564280

  1. Facilitating organizational mergers: amalgamation of community care access centres.

    PubMed

    Mercer, Kevin

    2008-01-01

    The development of 14 Local Health Integration Networks (LHINs) in Ontario necessitated the re-organization of Community Care Access Centres (CCACs). The achievement of LHIN objectives was contingent upon the organizations responsible for home and long-term care placement being aligned within the LHIN geographic boundaries. This re-alignment required 42 provincial organizations to re-structure, integrate and reduce to 14. This project was focused on the amalgamation of two CCACs in the Waterloo Wellington LHIN. Both were distinctly different due to their organizational evolution, the composition of the region and leadership approach. The different organizational cultures, if not managed properly, could result in a derailing of several current projects that were underway and were also key to the overall health system transformation agenda. A literature search provided a plethora of critiques of organizational change approaches and practical suggestions. Of particular relevance was a report to the Royal Commission on Health Care in 2002 that authenticates the dismal success in health care to meet change objectives. The project included a joint planning day for the leadership teams of the two organizations followed by an Organizational Readiness Assessment conducted by the Canadian Council on Health Services Accreditation (CCHSA). Both activities brought the leadership and staff of Waterloo and Wellington together, started the integration process and solicited staff participation. A follow-up survey of the leadership teams revealed the effectiveness of the project in advancing integration between the two organizations and recognizing organizational cultural differences. The CCHSA Organizational Readiness Assessment process was viewed as an effective means for advancing the integration of the two organizations, particularly as it relates to allowing the staff groups to define for themselves the benefits of the merger. The lack of hard evidence on the benefits of a

  2. Professionalism--A Breeding Ground for Struggle. The Example of the Finnish Day-Care Centre

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kinos, Jarmo

    2008-01-01

    This article examines the Finnish day-care centre out of a neo-Weberian-Bourdieuan frame of reference. The leading idea is that the day-care centre field is continuously shaping as a result of both inner struggles and struggles with other fields. The state, the education system, and trade unions act as the dealers of professional playing cards.…

  3. Professionalism--A Breeding Ground for Struggle. The Example of the Finnish Day-Care Centre

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kinos, Jarmo

    2008-01-01

    This article examines the Finnish day-care centre out of a neo-Weberian-Bourdieuan frame of reference. The leading idea is that the day-care centre field is continuously shaping as a result of both inner struggles and struggles with other fields. The state, the education system, and trade unions act as the dealers of professional playing cards.…

  4. Mucormycosis at a tertiary care centre in Gujarat, India.

    PubMed

    Patel, Atul K; Patel, Ketan K; Patel, Kamlesh; Gohel, Swati; Chakrabarti, Arunaloke

    2017-06-01

    The prevalence of mucormycosis is reportedly high in India, although the studies are mainly from north and south India only. We analysed the mucormycosis cases at tertiary care centres of West India. We retrieved the clinical details of all the patients with probable and proven mucormycosis diagnosed at Sterling Hospital and ID clinic at Ahmedabad, Gujarat over the period from 1 January 2013 through 30 April 2015. The data were analysed to determine demography, risk factors, underlying diseases, site of infection and outcome of these patients. A total of 27 patients with the median age of 50 (16-65) years were diagnosed with mucormycosis during the period. Rhino-orbital-cerebral mucormycosis was the most common (51.9%) presentation. Majority (55.6%) of the patients had uncontrolled diabetes with or without ketoacidosis; 25.9% patients had no underlying disease and most of them (85.7%) had cutaneous mucormycosis. In this group, the mortality was 25.9% and an equal percentage of patients were lost to follow up; 14 (51.9%) patients could complete 6 weeks of amphotericin B therapy. All patients who completed antifungal therapy survived except one. Like other parts of India, uncontrolled diabetes was the predominant risk factor for mucormycosis in our group. Patients completing 6 weeks of amphotericin B treatment were likely to survive. © 2017 Blackwell Verlag GmbH.

  5. Organisational culture and change: implementing person-centred care.

    PubMed

    Carlström, Eric D; Ekman, Inger

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to explore the connection between organisational cultures and the employee's resistance to change at five hospital wards in Western Sweden. Staff had experienced extensive change during a research project implementing person-centred care (PCC) for patients with chronic heart failure. Surveys were sent out to 170 nurses. The survey included two instruments--the Organisational Values Questionnaire (OVQ) and the Resistance to Change Scale (RTC). The results indicate that a culture with a dominating focus on social competence decreases "routine seeking behaviour", i.e. tendencies to uphold stable routines and a reluctance to give up old habits. The results indicate that a culture of flexibility, cohesion and trust negatively covariate with the overall need for a stable and well-defined framework. An instrument that pinpoints the conditions of a particular healthcare setting can improve the results of a change project. Managers can use instruments such as the ones used in this study to investigate and plan for change processes. Earlier studies of organisational culture and its impact on the performance of healthcare organisations have often investigated culture at the highest level of the organisation. In this study, the culture of the production units--i.e. the health workers in different hospital wards--was described. Hospital wards develop their own culture and the cultures of different wards are mirrored in the hospital.

  6. Parent Involvement in the Lady Gowrie Child Centre, Adelaide, 1981: An Exploratory Study into Why Parents Become Involved to Differing Degrees in Their Children's Early Childhood Centre.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nicholls, V.; And Others

    Part of an exploratory project inquiring into causes and consequences of parent participation, a study was undertaken to identify possible reasons for differences in the extent parents become involved in their children's preschool. The study was conducted at the Lady Gowrie Child Centre in Adelaide, Australia, a center promoting optimum physical…

  7. The California Child Care Portfolio, 2001: A Compilation of Data about Child Care in California, County by County.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    California Child Care Resource and Referral Network, San Francisco.

    This report compiles standardized data on child care supply and requests for care in California. The report provides county and statewide information based on responses from about 42,000 child care providers and more than 55,000 parents over a 3-month period and on data from state and federal government agencies, including: (1) demographic…

  8. Family Child Care Providers' Perspectives regarding Effective Professional Development and Their Role in the Child Care System: A Qualitative Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lanigan, Jane D.

    2011-01-01

    This study examines family child care providers' perspectives regarding effective professional development and their role in the early learning and care system. Four focus groups were conducted annually for 3 years involving a total of 54 licensed family child care providers. Supportive social relationships emerged as an important dimension of…

  9. Creating Better Child Care Jobs: Model Work Standards for Teaching Staff in Center-Based Child Care.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Center for the Child Care Workforce, Washington, DC.

    This document presents model work standards articulating components of the child care center-based work environment that enable teachers to do their jobs well. These standards establish criteria to assess child care work environments and identify areas to improve in order to assure good jobs for adults and good care for children. The standards are…

  10. Creating Better Child Care Jobs: Model Work Standards for Teaching Staff in Center-Based Child Care.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Center for the Child Care Workforce, Washington, DC.

    This document presents model work standards articulating components of the child care center-based work environment that enable teachers to do their jobs well. These standards establish criteria to assess child care work environments and identify areas to improve in order to assure good jobs for adults and good care for children. The standards are…

  11. Supporting Nutrition in Early Care and Education Settings: The Child and Adult Care Food Program (CACFP)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stephens, Samuel A.

    2016-01-01

    Child care centers, Head Start programs, and family child care providers serving young children--as well as after school programs and homeless shelters that reach older children, adults, and families--are supported in providing healthy meals and snacks by reimbursements through the Child and Adult Care Food Program (CACFP). Administered by the…

  12. Where Child Care is above Average? Licensing, Legislation, and Indicators of Quality of Care in Minnesota

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ceglowski, Deborah A.; Davis, Elizabeth E.

    2004-01-01

    Despite Minnesota's reputation for quality child care, recent changes in legislation and the impact of changing needs have raised concerns about the quality of child care available in the state. This paper presents an overview of Minnesota's current child care system including structural indicators of program quality such as licensing standards,…

  13. Child Care and Mothers' Mental Health: Is High-Quality Care Associated with Fewer Depressive Symptoms?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gordon, Rachel A.; Usdansky, Margaret L.; Wang, Xue; Gluzman, Anna

    2011-01-01

    Finding high-quality child care may pose financial and logistical challenges and create ongoing emotional strains for some mothers. We use the Study of Early Child Care and Youth Development to ask (a) are child-care settings that mothers select on the basis of their own perceptions of quality rated more highly by independent observers (and more…

  14. Supporting Nutrition in Early Care and Education Settings: The Child and Adult Care Food Program (CACFP)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stephens, Samuel A.

    2016-01-01

    Child care centers, Head Start programs, and family child care providers serving young children--as well as after school programs and homeless shelters that reach older children, adults, and families--are supported in providing healthy meals and snacks by reimbursements through the Child and Adult Care Food Program (CACFP). Administered by the…

  15. The influence of individual and organizational factors on person-centred dementia care.

    PubMed

    Hunter, Paulette V; Hadjistavropoulos, Thomas; Thorpe, Lilian; Lix, Lisa M; Malloy, David C

    2016-07-01

    Although some individual and organizational contributors to person-centred care or quality of care have been studied, they have rarely been examined together. Our goal was to investigate the association of personal and organizational-environmental characteristics with self-reported person-centred behaviours in long-term residential care settings. We asked 109 long-term care staff from two Canadian long-term care homes to complete scales assessing self-reported person-centred care, organizational support for person-centred care, beliefs about personhood in dementia, and burnout. Independent variables included four employee background characteristics (age, gender, occupation, and years of education), beliefs about personhood in dementia, burnout, and three aspects of organizational support for person-centred care (the physical environment of residents, collaboration on care, and support from management). Dependent variables included five aspects of person-centred care: autonomy, personhood, knowing the person, comfort care, and support for relationships .We used multiple linear regression analysis and changes in R(2) to test variable associations. Including organizational variables in regression models resulted in statistically significant (p < .05) changes in R(2) for each of the five dependent variables. Including personal variables resulted in statistically significant changes in R(2) for some dependent variables, but not others. In particular, including employee background characteristics resulted in a statistically significant change in R(2) for comfort care, and including beliefs about personhood and burnout resulted in statistically significant changes in R(2) for personhood but not for other dependent variables. Organizational characteristics are associated with several aspects of person-centred dementia care. Individual characteristics, including gender, beliefs about personhood, and burnout, appear to be more important to some aspects of person-centred

  16. Nurse middle managers contributions to patient-centred care: A 'managerial work' analysis.

    PubMed

    Lalleman, Pcb; Smid, Gac; Dikken, J; Lagerwey, M D; Schuurmans, M J

    2017-03-21

    Nurse middle managers are in an ideal position to facilitate patient-centred care. However, their contribution is underexposed in literature due to difficulties to articulate this in practice. This paper explores how nurse middle managers contribute to patient-centred care in hospitals. A combination of time-use analysis and ethnographic work was used to disclose their contribution to patient-centred care at a micro level. Sixteen nurse managers were shadowed for over 560 hours in four hospitals. Some nurse middle managers seldom contribute to patient-centred care. Others are involved in direct patient care, but this does not result in patient-centred practices. At one hospital, the nurse middle managers did contribute to patient-centred care. Here balancing between "organizing work" and "caring work" is seen as a precondition for their patient-centeredness. Other important themes are feedback mechanisms; place matters; with whom to talk and how to frame the issues at stake; and behavioral style. Both "hands-on" and "heads-on" caring work of nurse middle managers enhances their patient-centeredness. This study is the first of its kind to obtain insight in the often difficult to articulate "doings" of nurse middle managers with regard to patient-centred care through combining time-use analysis with ethnographic work.

  17. Risk factors for gastroenteritis in child day care.

    PubMed

    Enserink, R; Mughini-Gras, L; Duizer, E; Kortbeek, T; Van Pelt, W

    2015-10-01

    The child day-care centre (DCC) is often considered as one risk factor for gastroenteritis (GE) rather than a complex setting in which the interplay of many factors may influence the epidemiology of GE. This study aimed to identify DCC-level risk factors for GE and major enteropathogen occurrence. A dynamic network of 100 and 43 DCCs participated in a syndromic and microbiological surveillance during 2010-2013. The weekly incidence of GE events and weekly prevalence of five major enteropathogens (rotavirus, norovirus, astrovirus, Giardia lamblia, Cryptosporidium hominis/parvum) were modelled per DCC using mixed-effects negative binomial/Poisson regression models. Sixteen hundred children were surveyed up to 3 years, during which 1829 GE episodes were reported and 5197 faecal samples were analysed. Identified risk factors were: large DCC capacity, crowding, having animals, nappy changing areas, sandpits, paddling pools, cleaning potties in normal sinks, cleaning vomit with paper towels (but without cleaner), mixing of staff between child groups, and staff members with multiple daily duties. Protective factors were: disinfecting fomites with chlorine, cleaning vomit with paper towels (and cleaner), daily cleaning of bed linen/toys, cohorting and exclusion policies for ill children and staff. Targeting these factors may reduce the burden of DCC-related GE.

  18. Quality indicators in headache care: an implementation study in six Italian specialist-care centres.

    PubMed

    Pellesi, L; Benemei, S; Favoni, V; Lupi, C; Mampreso, E; Negro, A; Paolucci, M; Steiner, T J; Ulivi, M; Cevoli, S; Guerzoni, S

    2017-12-01

    Headache disorders are highly prevalent, and have a substantial and negative impact on health worldwide. They are largely treatable, but differences in structure, objectives, organization and delivery affect the quality of headache care. In order to recognize and remedy deficiencies in care, the Global Campaign against Headache, in collaboration with the European Headache Federation, recently developed a set of quality indicators for headache services. These require further assessment to demonstrate fitness for purpose. This is their first implementation to evaluate quality in headache care as a multicentre national study. Between September and December 2016, we applied the quality indicators in six Italian specialist headache centres (Bologna, Firenze, Modena, Padova, Roma Campus Bio-Medico and Roma Sapienza). We used five previously developed assessment instruments, translated into Italian according to Lifting The Burden's translation protocol for hybrid documents. We took data from 360 consecutive patients (60 per centre) by questionnaire and from their medical records, and by different questionnaires from their health-care providers (HCPs), including physicians, nurses, psychologists and nursing assistants. The findings, comparable between centres, confirmed the feasibility and practicability of using the quality indicators in Italian specialist headache centres. The questionnaires were easily understood by HCPs and patients, and were not unduly time-consuming. Diagnoses were almost all (> 97%) according to ICHD criteria, and routinely (100%) reviewed during follow-up. Diagnostic diaries were regularly used by 96% of physicians. Referral pathways from primary to specialist care existed in five of the six clinics, as did urgent referral pathways. Instruments to assess disability and quality of life were not used regularly, a deficiency that needs to be addressed. This Italy-wide survey confirmed in six specialist centres that the headache service quality

  19. Organisational and environmental characteristics of residential aged care units providing highly person-centred care: a cross sectional study.

    PubMed

    Sjögren, Karin; Lindkvist, Marie; Sandman, Per-Olof; Zingmark, Karin; Edvardsson, David

    2017-01-01

    Few studies have empirically investigated factors that define residential aged care units that are perceived as being highly person-centred. The purpose of this study was to explore factors characterising residential aged care units perceived as being highly person-centred, with a focus on organisational and environmental variables, as well as residents' and staff' characteristics. A cross-sectional design was used. Residents (n = 1460) and staff (n = 1213) data from 151 residential care units were collected, as well as data relating to characteristics of the organisation and environment, and data measuring degree of person-centred care. Participating staff provided self-reported data and conducted proxy ratings on residents. Descriptive and comparative statistics, independent samples t-test, Chi(2) test, Eta Squared and Phi coefficient were used to analyse data. Highly person-centred residential aged care units were characterized by having a shared philosophy of care, a satisfactory leadership, interdisciplinary collaboration and social support from colleagues and leaders, a dementia-friendly physical environment, staff having time to spend with residents, and a smaller unit size. Residential aged care units with higher levels of person-centred care had a higher proportion of staff with continuing education in dementia care, and a higher proportion of staff receiving regular supervision, compared to units with lower levels of person-centred care. It is important to target organisational and environmental factors, such as a shared philosophy of care, staff use of time, the physical environment, interdisciplinary support, and support from leaders and colleagues, to improve person-centred care in residential care units. Managers and leaders seeking to facilitate person-centred care in daily practice need to consider their own role in supporting, encouraging, and supervising staff.

  20. Health and Safety Resources for Child Care Workers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Child Care Employee Project, Berkeley, CA.

    Organized into three sections, these resource materials provide basic information for child caregivers about occupational hazards associated with child care work; personnel policies, staff burnout and environmental stressors; and employee rights. Contents of the first section include a general discussion of health and safety hazards in child care…