Science.gov

Sample records for childhood bacterial meningitis

  1. Cerebral infarction in childhood bacterial meningitis.

    PubMed

    Snyder, R D; Stovring, J; Cushing, A H; Davis, L E; Hardy, T L

    1981-07-01

    Forty-nine children with complicated bacterial meningitis were studied. Thirteen had abnormalities on computed tomography compatible with the diagnosis of brain infarction; one had a brain biopsy with the histological appearance of infarction. Factors exist in childhood bacterial meningitis which are associated with the development of brain infraction.

  2. Diagnosis and outcome of acute bacterial meningitis in early childhood.

    PubMed

    Chinchankar, Nandita; Mane, Meenakshi; Bhave, Sheila; Bapat, Swatee; Bavdekar, Ashish; Pandit, Anand; Niphadkar, K B; Dutta, Anil; Leboulleux, Didier

    2002-10-01

    To estimate frequency of acute bacterial meningitis (ABM) in early childhood in hospital admissions, to describe clinical and diagnostic features, and to analyze mortality, complications and long term sequelae. Prospective study. Pediatric wards and Rehabilitation Center of KEM Hospital, Pune. Study subjects between the ages of 1 months to 5 years with ABM were recruited. Clinical details were recorded. CSF was analysed by routine biochemical methods, antigen detection tests (Latex agglutination LAT) and microbiological studies on special media. Management was as per standard protocols. Survivors were followed up long term with neurodevelopmental studies and rehabilitation programmes. In a study period of 2 years, 54 children (1.5% of all admissions) satisfied the criteria of ABM in early childhood; 78% were below one year and 52% were under the age of six months. Chief presentation was high fever, refusal of feeds, altered sensorium and seizures. Meningeal signs were present in only 26%. CSF C-reactive protein was positive in 41%, gram stain was positive in 67% LAT in 78% and cultures grew causative organisms in 50% of the cases. The final etiological diagnosis (as per LAT and/or cultures) were Streptococcus pneumoniae 39% Hemophilus influenzae type b 26% and others in 35% The others included one case of Neisseria meningitidis and 10 who were LAT negative and culture sterile. 39% patients developed acute neurological complications during the hospital course. 31% children with ABM died in hospital or at home soon after discharge. Six were lost to follow up. Of the 31 children, available for long term follow up (1-3 years), 14 (45%) had no sequelae. The remaining had significant neurodevelopmental handicaps ranging from isolated hearing loss to severe mental retardation with multiple disabilities. ABM in early childhood has a considerable mortality, morbidity and serious long term sequelae. Neurodevelopmental follow up and therapy should begin early. Etiological

  3. Long-Term Effects from Bacterial Meningitis in Childhood and Adolescence on Postural Control

    PubMed Central

    Petersen, Hannes; Patel, Mitesh; Ingason, Einar F.; Einarsson, Einar J.; Haraldsson, Ásgeir; Fransson, Per-Anders

    2014-01-01

    Bacterial meningitis in childhood is associated with cognitive deficiencies, sensorimotor impairments and motor dysfunction later in life. However, the long-term effects on postural control is largely unknown, e.g., whether meningitis subjects as adults fully can utilize visual information and adaptation to enhance stability. Thirty-six subjects (20 women, mean age 19.3 years) treated in childhood or adolescence for bacterial meningitis, and 25 controls (13 women, mean age 25.1 years) performed posturography with eyes open and closed under unperturbed and perturbed standing. The meningitis subjects were screened for subjective vertigo symptoms using a questionnaire, clinically tested with headshake and head thrust test, as well as their hearing was evaluated. Meningitis subjects were significantly more unstable than controls during unperturbed (p≤0.014) and perturbed standing, though while perturbed only with eyes open in anteroposterior direction (p = 0.034) whereas in lateral direction both with eyes open and closed (p<0.001). Meningitis subjects had poorer adaption ability to balance perturbations especially with eyes open, and they frequently reported symptoms of unsteadiness (88% of the subjects) and dizziness (81%), which was found significantly correlated to objectively decreased stability. Out of the 36 subjects only 3 had unilateral hearing impairment. Hence, survivors of childhood bacterial meningitis may suffer long-term disorders affecting postural control, and would greatly benefit if these common late effects became generally known so treatments can be developed and applied. PMID:25405756

  4. Epidemiological, clinical and prognostic profile of childhood acute bacterial meningitis in a resource poor setting

    PubMed Central

    Kuti, Bankole Peter; Bello, Emmanuel Olasehinde; Jegede, Tolulope Opeoluwa; Olubosede, Omolayo

    2015-01-01

    Background: Childhood bacterial meningitis is a neurologic emergency that continues to kill and maims children particularly in developing countries with poor immunization coverage. Objective: This study set out to assess the hospital incidence, pattern of presentation, etiologic agents, outcome and determinants of mortality among the children admitted with bacterial meningitis at the Wesley Guild Hospital (WGH), Ilesa. Patients and Methods: We carried out a retrospective review of admitted cases of bacterial meningitis in children aged one month to 15 years at the WGH, Ilesa over a three year period by looking at the hospital records. Factors in the history and examinations were compared among survivors and those that died to determine factors significantly associated with mortality in these children. Results: Eighty-one (5.5%) of the 1470 childhood admissions during the study period had bacterial meningitis. Male preponderance was observed and two-thirds of the children were infants. More cases were admitted during the wet rainy season than during the dry harmattan season. Haemophilus influenzae type B and Streptococcus pneumoniae were the leading etiologic agents and ciprofloxacin and ceftriaxone adequately cover for these organisms. Twenty-two (27.2%) of the 81 children died, while 34 (42.0%) survived with neurologic deficits. Children with multiple seizures, coma, neck retraction, hyponatremia, hypoglycorrhachia, turbid CSF as well as Gram positive meningitis at presentation were found to more likely to die (P < 0.05). None of these factors however independently predict mortality. Conclusion: Childhood bacterial meningitis often results in death and neurologic deficit among infants and young children admitted at the WGH, Ilesa. Children diagnosed with meningitis who in addition had multiple seizures, neck retraction and coma at presentation are at increased risk of dying. PMID:26752902

  5. [Childhood bacterial meningitis trends in Japan from 2009 to 2010].

    PubMed

    Shinjoh, Masayoshi; Iwata, Satoshi; Sato, Yoshitake; Akita, Hironobu; Sunakawa, Keisuke

    2012-09-01

    We conducted a pediatric survey of bacterial meningitis epidemiology from January 2009 to December 2010 in Japan, and obtained the following results for 314 cases (186 boys, 124 girls, and 4 with gender not reported). Children younger than one year old accounted for the majority of cases (51.2%, 161/314), and the incidence decreased with increasing age. Haemophilus influenzae (in children aged 1 month to 5 years old) was the most common cause of infection (53.2%), followed by Streptococcus pneumoniae (1 month to 12 years, 24.2%), Streptococcus agalactiae (0-4 months, 7.6%), and Escherichia coli (0-3 months, 3.2%). Susceptibility tests showed that 50.1% (78/153) of the H. influenzae isolates and 63.0% (46/73) of the S. pneumoniae isolates were drug-resistant. Combinations of ampicillin and cephem or carbapenem and other beta-lactams were mainly used as the initial antibiotics for patients under 4 months of age (77.8%, 42/54), and a carbapenem and other beta-lactam combination was used for patients aged 4 months and older (76.4%, 198/259). The final antibiotics for H. influenzae and S. pneumoniae were mainly cefotaxime (CTX) or ceftriaxone (CTRX) and carbapenem, respectively. The overall fatality rate was 2.0% (6/305). Since the Haemophilus influenzae type b vaccine (Hib vaccine) and the 7 valent pneumococcal conjugate vaccine (PCV7) are not widely used in Japan, only 5 patients in our cohort (all with meningitis not caused by H. influenzae) had been immunized with the Hib vaccine, and none had been immunized with the PCV7 vaccine. No remarkable changes in the characteristics of pediatric meningitis have been observed for several years in Japan.

  6. Educational achievement and economic self-sufficiency in adults after childhood bacterial meningitis.

    PubMed

    Roed, Casper; Omland, Lars Haukali; Skinhoj, Peter; Rothman, Kenneth J; Sorensen, Henrik Toft; Obel, Niels

    2013-04-24

    To our knowledge, no previous study has examined functioning in adult life among persons who had bacterial meningitis in childhood. To study educational achievement and economic self-sufficiency in adults diagnosed as having bacterial meningitis in childhood. Nationwide population-based cohort study using national registries of Danish-born children diagnosed as having meningococcal, pneumococcal, or Haemophilus influenzae meningitis in the period 1977-2007 (n=2784 patients). Comparison cohorts from the same population individually matched on age and sex were identified, as were siblings of all study participants. End of study period was 2010. Cumulative incidences of completed vocational education, high school education, higher education, time to first full year of economic self-sufficiency, and receipt of disability pension and differences in these outcomes at age 35 years among meningitis patients, comparison cohorts, and siblings. By age 35 years, among persons who had a history of childhood meningococcal (n=1338), pneumococcal (n=455), and H. influenzae (n=991) meningitis, an estimated 11.0% (41.5% vs 52.5%; 95% CI, 7.3%-14.7%), 10.2% (42.6% vs 52.8%; 95% CI, 3.8%-16.6%), and 5.5% (47.7% vs 53.2%; 95% CI, 1.9%-9.1%) fewer persons, respectively, had completed high school and 7.9% (29.3% vs 37.2%; 95% CI, 1.6%-14.2%), 8.9% (28.1% vs 37.0%; 95% CI, 0.6%-17.2%), and 6.5% (33.5% vs 40.0%; 95% CI, 1.4%-11.6%) fewer had attained a higher education compared with individuals from the comparison cohort. Siblings of meningococcal meningitis patients also had lower educational achievements, while educational achievements of siblings of pneumococcal and H. influenzae meningitis patients did not differ substantially from those in the general population. At end of follow-up, 3.8% (90.3% vs 94.1%; 95% CI, 1.1%-6.5%), 10.6% (84.0% vs 94.6%; 95% CI, 5.1%-16.1%), and 4.3% (90.6% vs 94.9%; 95% CI, 2.0%-6.6%) fewer meningococcal, pneumococcal, and H. influenzae meningitis patients

  7. Hearing impairment in childhood bacterial meningitis is little relieved by dexamethasone or glycerol.

    PubMed

    Peltola, Heikki; Roine, Irmeli; Fernández, Josefina; González Mata, Antonio; Zavala, Inés; Gonzalez Ayala, Silvia; Arbo, Antonio; Bologna, Rosa; Goyo, José; López, Eduardo; Miño, Greta; Dourado de Andrade, Solange; Sarna, Seppo; Jauhiainen, Tapani

    2010-01-01

    Several studies have evaluated dexamethasone for prevention of hearing loss in childhood bacterial meningitis, but results have varied. We compared dexamethasone and/or glycerol recipients with placebo recipients, and measured hearing at 3 threshold levels. Children aged 2 months to 16 years with meningitis were treated with ceftriaxone but were double-blindly randomly assigned to receive adjuvant dexamethasone intravenously, glycerol orally, both agents, or neither agent. We used the Glasgow coma scale to grade the presenting status. The end points were the better ear's ability to detect sounds of >40 dB, >or=60 dB, and >or=80 dB, with these thresholds indicating any, moderate-to-severe, or severe impairment, respectively. All tests were interpreted by an external audiologist. Influence of covariates in the treatment groups was examined by binary logistic regression. Of the 383 children, mostly with meningitis caused by Haemophilus influenzae type b or Streptococcus pneumoniae, 101 received dexamethasone, 95 received dexamethasone and glycerol, 92 received glycerol, and 95 received placebo. Only the presenting condition and young age predicted impairment independently through all threshold levels. Each lowering point in the Glasgow scale increased the risk by 15% to 21% (odds ratio: 1.20, 1.21, and 1.15 [95% confidence interval: 1.06-1.35, 1.07-1.37, and 1.01-1.31]; P = .005, .003, and .039) for any, moderate-to-severe, or severe impairment, respectively. Each increasing month of age decreased the risk by 2% to 6% (P = .0001, .0007, and .041, respectively). Neither dexamethasone nor glycerol prevented hearing loss at these levels regardless of the causative agent or timing of antimicrobial agent. With bacterial meningitis, the child's presenting status and young age are the most important predictors of hearing impairment. Little relief is obtained from current adjuvant medications.

  8. Predicting Outcome of Childhood Bacterial Meningitis With a Single Measurement of C-Reactive Protein

    PubMed Central

    Peltola, Heikki; Roine, Irmeli; Cruzeiro, Manuel Leite; Bernardino, Luis

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: C-reactive protein (CRP), a marker of inflammation, shows high serum levels in invasive bacterial infections. We investigated the potential of a single CRP measurement at different phases of acute childhood bacterial meningitis to predict outcomes. Methods: Using whole-blood finger-prick samples with no centrifugation, CRP was measured quantitatively on arrival and on day 3 or 4 in children participating in 2 prospective, randomized, double-blind treatment studies conducted in Latin America or Angola. The results were compared with patient outcomes. Results: Although initial CRP values from 669 children gave useful prognostic information, the 3rd or 4th day measurements taken from 275 children associated significantly with seizures, slow recovery and low scores on the Glasgow Outcome Scale, with odds ratios for CRP values above the median (62 mg/L) ranging from 2 to 6, 2 to 5, and 3 to 5 (Latin America–Angola), respectively. Hearing impairment, although not full deafness, was 3 to 7 times more likely if CRP was above the median soon after hospitalization. Conclusions: Especially in resource-poor settings, clinicians have few simple-enough tools to identify the child with meningitis who requires maximum attention. CRP is a worthy addition. PMID:26986770

  9. Ataxia and Its Association with Hearing Impairment in Childhood Bacterial Meningitis.

    PubMed

    Roine, Irmeli; Pelkonen, Tuula; Bernardino, Luis; Leite Cruzeiro, Manuel; Peltola, Heikki; Pitkäranta, Anne

    2015-08-01

    Ataxia, deemed usually a minor sequela, follows childhood bacterial meningitis (BM) in up to 18% of cases. Although mostly transient and benign, it can predict permanent hearing loss and vestibular dysfunction. We explored the clinical meaning of ataxia by following its course in a large number of BM patients and examining its relation with hearing loss. The presence, degree (no, mild, moderate and severe) and course (transient, prolonged and late) of ataxia in BM were registered prospectively by predefined criteria. These data were compared with several patient, disease, and outcome variables including hearing loss (none, moderate, severe and profound) on day 7 of treatment and at a follow-up visit 1 month after discharge. Ataxia was present in 243 of 361 (67%) patients on day 7, being slight in 21%, moderate in 38% and severe in 41%. Its course was transient in 41%, prolonged in 24% and late in 5%, whereas 30% of the patients did not present ataxia at any time. Ataxia associated most significantly not only with several measures of BM severity and suboptimal outcome (P < 0.0001), but also specifically, albeit not consistently, with hearing loss (P = 0.001). The degree of ataxia correlated with the extent of hearing loss (rho, 0.37; P < 0.0001). Ataxia is more frequent and lasts longer after BM than learned from previous studies. The presence and intensity of ataxia associate with hearing loss and its magnitude.

  10. Hearing impairment after childhood bacterial meningitis dependent on etiology in Luanda, Angola.

    PubMed

    Karppinen, Mariia; Pelkonen, Tuula; Roine, Irmeli; Cruzeiro, Manuel Leite; Peltola, Heikki; Pitkäranta, Anne

    2015-11-01

    Childhood bacterial meningitis (BM) damages hearing, but the potential of different agents to cause impairment in developing countries is poorly understood. We compared the extent of hearing impairment in BM caused by Haemophilus influenzae type b (Hib), Streptococcus pneumoniae or Neisseria meningitidis among children aged 2 months to 13 years in Luanda, Angola. Hearing of 685 ears of 351 (78%) survivors among 723 enrolled patients was tested by brainstem-evoked response audiometry on day 7 of hospitalization. The causative agent was sought by cerebrospinal fluid culture, PCR or the latex-agglutination test. Altogether, 45 (12%) of the survivors were deaf (threshold >80 dB), and 20 (6%) had a threshold of 80 dB. The incidence of any kind of hearing loss, with ≥60 dB, was 34% with Hib, 30% with S. pneumoniae, 19% with N. meningitidis and 33% with other bacteria. Examining all ears combined and using the ≥60 dB threshold, the agents showed dissimilar harm (P=0.005), Hib being the most frequent and N. meningitidis the most infrequent cause. Compared to other agents, S. pneumoniae more often caused deafness (P=0.025) and hearing impairment at ≥60 dB (P=0.017) in infants, whereas this level of hearing loss in older survivors was most commonly caused by Hib (P=0.031). BM among children in Angola is often followed by hearing impairment, but the risk depends on the agent. S. pneumoniae is a major problem among infants, whereas Hib is mainly a risk beyond 12 months. N. meningitidis impairs hearing less frequently. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Clinical Characteristics and Prognostic Factors in Childhood Bacterial Meningitis: A Multicenter Study

    PubMed Central

    Türel, Özden; Yıldırım, Canan; Yılmaz, Yüksel; Külekçi, Sezer; Akdaş, Ferda; Bakır, Mustafa

    2013-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate clinical features and sequela in children with acute bacterial meningitis (ABM). Study Design: Multicenter retrospective study. Material and Methods: Study includes retrospective chart review of children hospitalised with ABM at 11 hospitals in İstanbul during 2005. Follow up visits were conducted for neurologic examination, hearing evaluation and neurodevelopmental tests. Results: Two hundred and eighty three children were included in the study. Median age was 12 months and 68.6% of patients were male. Almost all patients had fever at presentation (97%). Patients younger than 6 months tended to present with feeding difficulties (84%), while patients older than 24 months were more likely to present with vomitting (93%) and meningeal signs (84%). Seizures were present in 65 (23%) patients. 26% of patients were determined to have at least one major sequela. The most common sequelae were speech or language problems (14.5%). 6 patients were severely disabled because of meningitis. Presence of focal neurologic signs at presentation and turbid cerebrospinal fluid appearance increased sequelae significantly. Childen under 24 months of age developed neurologic sequelae more commonly than older children. Conclusion: Symptoms and signs were largely depending on the age of the patient. Speech or language problems were the most common sequelae following meningitis. PMID:25207074

  12. Epidemiology of childhood meningitis in Kuwait.

    PubMed

    Husain, Entesar H; Al-Shawaf, Faisal; Bahbahani, Esmaeel; El-Nabi, Mamdooh Hasab; Al-Fotooh, Kamal Abo; Shafiq, Magdi Hilmi; Al-Ateeqi, Nahid; Abo Talib, Mohamed Atef

    2007-05-01

    Haemophilus influenzae type b (Hib) conjugate vaccine was introduced as part of childhood routine immunization in Kuwait in 1996. The aim of this study is to describe the epidemiological, microbiological, and clinical features of meningitis among children in Kuwait from 2001 to 2003. A multicenter retrospective review of clinical records of otherwise healthy children hospitalized with a diagnosis of meningitis. A total of 172 children had a diagnosis of meningitis and had lumbar puncture during the study period. The median age was 8 months. The majority (67%) of the patients were less than 5 yeas of age. Eighty-six (50%) of the patients had aseptic meningitis and 19 (11%) had partially treated meningitis. The remaining 67 (39%) were diagnosed with bacterial meningitis. The underlying organisms were: Neisseria meningitidis (49%), group B streptococci (18%), Streptococcus pneumoniae (18%), Mycobacterium tuberculosis (6%), Gram-negative organisms (6%), and Haemophilus species (1.5%). Twelve percent required admission to the intensive care unit. At the time of discharge from the hospital, 9% had neurological sequelae, the majority of which were in patients who had S. pneumoniae meningitis. Two patients died during the study period. N. meningitidis is the leading bacterial agent of bacterial meningitis in Kuwait. S. pneumoniae is responsible for the majority of neurological sequelae of bacterial meningitis in infants and young children. The results of this study can be used in future public health planning in the context of the newly available vaccines.

  13. From the microbiome to the central nervous system, an update on the epidemiology and pathogenesis of bacterial meningitis in childhood

    PubMed Central

    Janowski, Andrew B; Newland, Jason G

    2017-01-01

    In the past century, advances in antibiotics and vaccination have dramatically altered the incidence and clinical outcomes of bacterial meningitis. We review the shifting epidemiology of meningitis in children, including after the implementation of vaccines that target common meningitic pathogens and the introduction of intrapartum antibiotic prophylaxis offered to mothers colonized with Streptococcus agalactiae. We also discuss what is currently known about the pathogenesis of meningitis. Recent studies of the human microbiome have illustrated dynamic relationships of bacterial and viral populations with the host, which may potentiate the risk of bacterial meningitis. PMID:28184287

  14. Bacterial meningitis in Washington state.

    PubMed

    Ostroy, P R

    1979-10-01

    During 1977 the state of Washington maintained a surveillance system for reporting cases of bacterial meningitis. Hemophilus influenzae meningitis was the most common etiologic agent causing bacterial meningitis. A high incidence rate for H. influenzae meningitis was found among American Indians less than five years ago. A focus of ampicillin-resistant H. influenzae meningitis was found in Pierce County among military dependents or persons who had family members or relatives working or attending school with Fort Lewis Army Base personnel. Although relationships between the individual cases were not detected, the surveillance system continues to seek some association.

  15. Bacterial Meningitis in Washington State

    PubMed Central

    Ostroy, Paul R.

    1979-01-01

    During 1977 the state of Washington maintained a surveillance system for reporting cases of bacterial meningitis. Hemophilus influenzae meningitis was the most common etiologic agent causing bacterial meningitis. A high incidence rate for H. influenzae meningitis was found among American Indians less than five years ago. A focus of ampicillin-resistant H. influenzae meningitis was found in Pierce County among military dependents or persons who had family members or relatives working or attending school with Fort Lewis Army Base personnel. Although relationships between the individual cases were not detected, the surveillance system continues to seek some association. PMID:506227

  16. Unsuccessful validation of 2004 model for predicting academic or behavioural limitations after childhood bacterial meningitis.

    PubMed

    de Jonge, R C J; Sanders, M S; Terwee, C B; Heymans, M W; Gemke, R J B J; Koomen, I; Spanjaard, L; van Furth, A M

    2013-12-01

    In 2004, a model identifying children at risk of academic or behavioural limitations after bacterial meningitis (BM) was presented. Risk factors were male gender, low birthweight, lower educational level of the father, Streptococcus pneumoniae, lower cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) leucocyte count, delay between admission and start of antibiotics, dexamethasone <2 days, seizures and prolonged fever. The aim of this study was to validate that prediction model in an independent cohort. Academic or behavioural limitations were determined in 93 Dutch school-age BM survivors. Risk factors for limitations were obtained from medical files. Validation was performed by applying the model in the cohort, then assessing discrimination and goodness of fit. Multiple imputation techniques were used to deal with missing values. Although fit of the model appeared good when it came to similarity of expected and observed cases (p-value of the Hosmer-Lemeshow test 0.24-0.57), discrimination was poor. Area under the curve (AUC) of the receiver operated characteristics (ROC) curve of the model was 0.83 (95% CI: 0.77-0.89) in the development cohort and 0.53 (95% CI: 0.41-0.65) in the validation cohort. External validation of the model was unsuccessful. It is not suitable for implementation in practice. ©2013 Foundation Acta Paediatrica. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  17. Community-acquired bacterial meningitis.

    PubMed

    van de Beek, Diederik; Brouwer, Matthijs; Hasbun, Rodrigo; Koedel, Uwe; Whitney, Cynthia G; Wijdicks, Eelco

    2016-11-03

    Meningitis is an inflammation of the meninges and subarachnoid space that can also involve the brain cortex and parenchyma. It can be acquired spontaneously in the community - community-acquired bacterial meningitis - or in the hospital as a complication of invasive procedures or head trauma (nosocomial bacterial meningitis). Despite advances in treatment and vaccinations, community-acquired bacterial meningitis remains one of the most important infectious diseases worldwide. Streptococcus pneumoniae and Neisseria meningitidis are the most common causative bacteria and are associated with high mortality and morbidity; vaccines targeting these organisms, which have designs similar to the successful vaccine that targets Haemophilus influenzae type b meningitis, are now being used in many routine vaccination programmes. Experimental and genetic association studies have increased our knowledge about the pathogenesis of bacterial meningitis. Early antibiotic treatment improves the outcome, but the growing emergence of drug resistance as well as shifts in the distribution of serotypes and groups are fuelling further development of new vaccines and treatment strategies. Corticosteroids were found to be beneficial in high-income countries depending on the bacterial species. Further improvements in the outcome are likely to come from dampening the host inflammatory response and implementing preventive measures, especially the development of new vaccines.

  18. Laboratory diagnosis of bacterial meningitis.

    PubMed Central

    Gray, L D; Fedorko, D P

    1992-01-01

    Bacterial meningitis is relatively common, can progress rapidly, and can result in death or permanent debilitation. This infection justifiably elicits strong emotional reactions and, hopefully, immediate medical intervention. This review is a brief presentation of the pathogenesis of bacterial meningitis and a review of current knowledge, literature, and recommendations on the subject of laboratory diagnosis of bacterial meningitis. Those who work in clinical microbiology laboratories should be familiar with the tests used in detecting bacteria and bacterial antigens in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) and should always have the utmost appreciation for the fact that results of such tests must always be reported immediately. Academic and practical aspects of the laboratory diagnosis of bacterial meningitis presented in this review include the following: anatomy of the meninges; pathogenesis; changes in the composition of CSF; etiological agents; processing CSF; microscopic examination of CSF; culturing CSF; methods of detecting bacterial antigens and bacterial components in CSF (counter-immunoelectrophoresis, coagglutination, latex agglutination, enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, Limulus amebocyte lysate assay, and gas-liquid chromatography); use of the polymerase chain reaction; and practical considerations for testing CSF for bacterial antigens. PMID:1576585

  19. Meningococcal Disease (Bacterial Meningitis) Vaccine and Pregnancy

    MedlinePlus

    Meningococcal Disease (Bacterial Meningitis) Vaccine In every pregnancy, a woman starts out with a 3-5% chance of having a baby with a ... advice from your health care provider. What is meningitis? Meningitis is an infection of the lining around ...

  20. Surgical management of bacterial meningitis.

    PubMed Central

    Humphreys, R. P.

    1975-01-01

    A variety of associated lesions may require the neurosurgeon's assistance in the management of bacterial meningitis. As treatment of this infection of the central nervous system proceeds, the surgeon will have to decide about the concurrent or subsequent operative treatment of congenital dysraphic states, paraneural infections, compound fractures or penetrating wounds of thecranium or spine, or infected bypass shunts for cerebrospinal fluid (CSF). In patients with intractable meningitic infections the surgeon may have to insert a ventricular drainage-irrigation system to permit adequate perfusion of the CSF pathways with antibiotic. Hydrocephalus or subdural effusions complicating meningitis may bring the patient to the surgeon long after the infection has been cured. This paper examines these problems and outlines the current principles of management. Images FIG. 1 FIG. 2 PMID:1098760

  1. Endocarditis in adults with bacterial meningitis.

    PubMed

    Lucas, Marjolein J; Brouwer, Matthijs C; van der Ende, Arie; van de Beek, Diederik

    2013-05-21

    Endocarditis may precede or complicate bacterial meningitis, but the incidence and impact of endocarditis in bacterial meningitis are unknown. We assessed the incidence and clinical characteristics of patients with meningitis and endocarditis from a nationwide cohort study of adults with community-acquired bacterial meningitis in the Netherlands from 2006 to 2012. Endocarditis was identified in 24 of 1025 episodes (2%) of bacterial meningitis. Cultures yielded Streptococcus pneumoniae in 13 patients, Staphylococcus aureus in 8 patients, and Streptococcus agalactiae, Streptococcus pyogenes, and Streptococcus salivarius in 1 patient each. Clues leading to the diagnosis of endocarditis were cardiac murmurs, persistent or recurrent fever, a history of heart valve disease, and S aureus as the causative pathogen of bacterial meningitis. Treatment consisted of prolonged antibiotic therapy in all patients and surgical valve replacement in 10 patients (42%). Two patients were treated with oral anticoagulants, and both developed life-threatening intracerebral hemorrhage. Systemic (70%) and neurological (54%) complications occurred frequently, leading to a high proportion of patients with unfavorable outcome (63%). Seven of 24 patients (29%) with meningitis and endocarditis died. Endocarditis is an uncommon coexisting condition in bacterial meningitis but is associated with a high rate of unfavorable outcome.

  2. Pediatric bacterial meningitis in French Guiana.

    PubMed

    Elenga, N; Sicard, S; Cuadro-Alvarez, E; Long, L; Njuieyon, F; Martin, E; Kom-Tchameni, R; Balcaen, J; Moreau, B; Boukhari, R

    2015-01-01

    Controlling vaccine-preventable infectious diseases is a public health priority in French Guiana but there is currently no epidemiological data on pediatric bacterial meningitis in this overseas department. Our aim was to describe data related to pediatric bacterial meningitis in French Guiana and compare it with that of metropolitan France. We conducted a multicenter retrospective study from 2000 to 2010 to describe the clinical picture, biological data, epidemiology, and outcome of pediatric bacterial meningitis case patients in French Guiana. The median age of bacterial meningitis patients was 6months [0-15] and the sex ratio 1.06. We observed a total of 60 bacterial meningitis case patients. Most presented with pneumococcal meningitis (24 patients; 40%); 11 with Haemophilus influenzae type b meningitis (23%), five with group B streptococcal meningitis (8.5%), and five others (8.5%) with staphylococcal meningitis (three patients presented with coagulase-negative staphylococci and two with Staphylococcus aureus). Only one patient presented with group B meningococcal meningitis, an 18-month-old infant. We recorded 14 deaths (overall case fatality: 23%); eight were due to Streptococcus pneumoniae (case fatality: 33%). The overall sequelae rate was 28%. It was 32% for patients presenting with pneumococcal meningitis. We observed that 38% of children who had never been vaccinated were infected by a vaccine-preventable bacterium. We observed many differences in the distribution of the bacteria and in the patients' prognosis when comparing the French Guiana data with that of metropolitan France. Improving vaccination coverage would decrease the incidence of H. influenzae meningitis. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  3. The epidemiology of bacterial meningitis in Kosovo.

    PubMed

    Namani, Sadie A; Koci, Remzie A; Qehaja-Buçaj, Emine; Ajazaj-Berisha, Lindita; Mehmeti, Murat

    2014-07-14

    The purpose of this study was to present the epidemiologic features of bacterial meningitis in the developing country of Kosovo. Data were collected from active surveillance of bacterial meningitis cases treated at the University Clinical Center of Kosovo in the years 2000 (first post-war year) and 2010. Meningitis cases in 2000 compared with 2010 showed a 35.5% decline in incidence (from 4.8 to 3.1 cases per 100,000 population) and a decrease in the case fatality rate from 10% to 5%. In children, there was a lower mortality rate (5% versus 2%) and a lower incidence of neurological complications (13% versus 16%) as compared to adults (32% versus 10% and 16% versus 35%, respectively). Neisseria meningitidis was the most common pathogen of bacterial meningitis in both study periods. Bacterial meningitis was most prevalent in the pediatric population, and showed an increase in the median age, from three years in 2000 to seven years in 2010. A steady number of bacterial meningitis cases in adults throughout last decade (around 20 cases per year) was recorded. During the last decade, gradual changes have been observed in the epidemiology of bacterial meningitis that are unrelated to the introduction of new vaccines, but are partly due to the improvement of living conditions.

  4. Meningitis

    MedlinePlus

    ... One kind of bacterial meningitis is related to Lyme disease . Lyme meningitis is generally less severe than other forms ... to spend the full time in a hospital. Lyme meningitis is also treated with IV antibiotics. Doctors ...

  5. Approaches to prevent acute bacterial meningitis in developing countries.

    PubMed Central

    Wright, P. F.

    1989-01-01

    Endemic acute bacterial meningitis of childhood appears to be neglected as a cause of morbidity and mortality in developing countries, probably because it has been overshadowed by the dramatic epidemics of meningococcal disease in sub-Saharan Africa. The available data based on reviews of hospitalized patients suggest that endemic meningitis is mostly a disease of young infants, Streptococcus pneumoniae and Haemophilus influenzae type b being the most important etiologic agents. The epidemiological pattern appears to be different in developing countries, compared with northern Europe or the USA, and closely resembles the early age of onset and high incidence of meningitis observed among the native American populations in Alaska. The mortality from meningitis appears to be much higher in developing countries than in industrialized countries. The availability of vaccines against the pneumococcus and haemophilus, particularly those in which the bacterial polysaccharide is conjugated to a protein, promises protection against systemic bacterial infection from these organisms. The assessment of the efficacy of such vaccines will have to include a close examination of meningitis as an outcome. It is suggested that before such vaccines become available careful clinical and epidemiological studies of meningitis will help both to define the impact of this disease and how to design an intervention strategy. PMID:2611973

  6. Pathogenesis and pathophysiology of bacterial meningitis.

    PubMed Central

    Tunkel, A R; Scheld, W M

    1993-01-01

    Bacterial meningitis remains a disease with associated unacceptable morbidity and mortality rates despite the availability of effective bactericidal antimicrobial therapy. Through the use of experimental animal models of infection, a great deal of information has been gleaned concerning the pathogenic and pathophysiologic mechanisms operable in bacterial meningitis. Most cases of bacterial meningitis begin with host acquisition of a new organism by nasopharyngeal colonization followed by systemic invasion and development of a high-grade bacteremia. Bacterial encapsulation contributes to this bacteremia by inhibiting neutrophil phagocytosis and resisting classic complement-mediated bactericidal activity. Central nervous system invasion then occurs, although the exact site of bacterial traversal into the central nervous system is unknown. By production and/or release of virulence factors into and stimulation of formation of inflammatory cytokines within the central nervous system, meningeal pathogens increase permeability of the blood-brain barrier, thus allowing protein and neutrophils to move into the subarachnoid space. There is then an intense subarachnoid space inflammatory response, which leads to many of the pathophysiologic consequences of bacterial meningitis, including cerebral edema and increased intracranial pressure. Attenuation of this inflammatory response with adjunctive dexamethasone therapy is associated with reduced concentrations of tumor necrosis factor in the cerebrospinal fluid, with diminished cerebrospinal fluid leukocytosis, and perhaps with improvement of morbidity, as demonstrated in recent clinical trials. Further information on the pathogenesis and pathophysiology of bacterial meningitis should lead to the development of more innovative treatment and/or preventive strategies for this disorder. Images PMID:8472245

  7. [Fahr syndrome discovered following a bacterial meningitis].

    PubMed

    Sbai, H; Smail, L; Hamdani, S; Essatara, Y; Harrandou, M; Khatouf, M; Kanjaa, N

    2008-05-01

    Fahr's disease refers to a rare syndrome characterized by symmetrical and bilateral intracranial calcifications. The basal ganglia and dentate nucleus are the most common site of involvement and most cases present extrapyramidal symptoms. This disease is mostly associated with a phosphocalcic metabolism disorder, especially to hypoparathyroidism. The authors report a case of Fahr syndrome (FS) discovered when a young patient with hypocalcemia and bacterial meningitis had a cerebral CT scan disclosing intracerebral calcifications. She fully recovered after both meningitis and hypocalcemia were treated.

  8. Cerebrospinal fluid lactic acidosis in bacterial meningitis.

    PubMed Central

    Eross, J; Silink, M; Dorman, D

    1981-01-01

    A rapid, microenzymatic method was used to measure cerebrospinal fluid lactate levels in 205 children with suspected bacterial meningitis. Fifty children with normal CSF containing fewer than 0.005 X 10(9)/l WBC, no segmented neutrophils, glucose 3.4 +/- 0.8 mmol/l (61.2 +/- 14.4 mg/100 ml), and a protein of less than 0.30 g/l had CSF lactate levels below 2.0 mmol/l (18 mg/100 ml) (mean and standard deviation 1.3 +/- 0.3 mmol/l (11.8 +/- 2.7 mg/100 ml)). In 31 cases of proved viral meningitis as with 58 cases of clinically diagnosed viral meningitis, levels were below 3.8 mmol/l (34.5 mg/100 ml), being 2.3 +/- 0.6 mmol/l (20.9 +/- 5.4 mg/100 ml), and 2.1 +/- 0.7 mmol/l (19.1 +/- 6.4 mg/100 ml) respectively. Sixty-six cases of bacterial meningitis had CSF lactate levels ranging from 3.9 mmol/l (35.4 mg/100 ml) to greater than 10.0 mmol/l (90.0 mg/100 ml). Longitudinal studies in 7 children with bacterial meningitis showed that cerebrospinal fluid lactate levels differentiated bacterial from viral meningitis up to 4 days after starting treatment with antibiotics. Use of CSF lactate measurement for monitoring the efficacy of treatment is illustrated in a case of bacterial meningitis due to Pseudomonas aeruginosa. The origin of the cerebrospinal fluid lactate acidosis and the role of lactate in the pathophysiological cycle leading to intensification of brain tissue hypoxia and cellular damage is discussed with respect to the short-term prognosis and the long-term neurological sequelae. PMID:7294872

  9. [Cerebral salt wasting syndrome in bacterial meningitis].

    PubMed

    Attout, H; Guez, S; Seriès, C

    2007-10-01

    Subarachnoid hemorrhage is the most common cause of cerebral salt wasting syndrome. There are few reports of this condition in infectious meningitis. We describe a patient with hyponatremia and bacterial meningitis. Hyponatremia rapidly improved after administration of sodium chloride. The purpose of this report is to alert clinicians to the fact that hyponatremic patients with central nervous system disease do not necessarily have a syndrome of inappropriate secretion of antidiuretic hormone (SIADH), but may have cerebral salt wasting syndrome. By contrast with SIADH, the treatment requires saline administration.

  10. Sequelae due to bacterial meningitis among African children: a systematic literature review

    PubMed Central

    Ramakrishnan, Meenakshi; Ulland, Aaron J; Steinhardt, Laura C; Moïsi, Jennifer C; Were, Fred; Levine, Orin S

    2009-01-01

    children and cause clinically evident sequelae in a quarter of survivors prior to hospital discharge. The three leading causes of bacterial meningitis are vaccine preventable, and routine use of conjugate vaccines could provide substantial health and economic benefits through the prevention of childhood meningitis cases, deaths and disability. PMID:19751516

  11. [Duration of antibiotic therapy in bacterial meningitis].

    PubMed

    Pereira, P Ricardo; Borges, Fernando; Mansinho, Kamal

    2013-01-01

    The duration of antibiotic therapy in bacterial meningitis is a controversial issue. Antibiotic regimens have changed over time along with the criteria used to determine the ideal antibiotic therapy duration. The authors aim to make an historical overview on this matter and simultaneously add the evidence of recent studies, pointing out some issues in results interpretation, namely, their design and the associated demographic and epidemiological questions. Clinical assays on this subject, with statistically significant results, are quite recent. Most of the scientific knowledge has been acquired empirically through the times. The actual investigation paradigm, in what concerns to antibiotic therapy in bacterial meningitis, lays on the dichotomy: "short versus long duration regimens". Nevertheless, so far, the existing studies have not completely cleared this doubt. Thus, despite some evidence suggests that short duration antibiotic regimens are effective for some patients, in patients with severe disease presentations or with other morbidities its use may be questioned.

  12. Utility of cerebrospinal fluid cortisol level in acute bacterial meningitis

    PubMed Central

    Mehta, Anish; Mahale, Rohan R.; Sudhir, Uchil; Javali, Mahendra; Srinivasa, Rangasetty

    2015-01-01

    Background: Meningitis remains a serious clinical problem in developing as well as developed countries. Delay in diagnosis and treatment results in significant morbidity and mortality. The role and levels of intrathecal endogenous cortisol is not known. Objective: To study the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) cortisol levels and to evaluate its role as a diagnostic and therapeutic marker in acute bacterial meningitis. Materials and Methods: Thirty patients with acute bacterial meningitis with no prior treatment were evaluated. Cortisol levels were compared with 20 patients with aseptic (viral) meningitis and 25 control subjects. Results: Mean CSF cortisol level was 13.85, 3.47, and 1.05 in bacterial meningitis, aseptic meningitis, and controls, respectively. Mean CSF cortisol level in bacterial meningitis was significantly higher as compared to controls (P < 0.001). There was significant difference in CSFcortisol levels in bacterial and aseptic meningitis (P < 0.001). Conclusions: Cortisol levels in CSF are highly elevated in patients with acute bacterial meningitis. This suggests that intrathecalcortisol may serve as a valuable, rapid, relatively inexpensive diagnostic marker in discriminatingbetween bacterial and aseptic meningitis. This helps in earlier institution of appropriate treatment and thereby decreasing morbidity and mortality. PMID:26019421

  13. Seizures in adults with bacterial meningitis.

    PubMed

    Zoons, E; Weisfelt, M; de Gans, J; Spanjaard, L; Koelman, J H T M; Reitsma, J B; van de Beek, D

    2008-05-27

    To evaluate the occurrence and prognostic relevance of seizures in adults with community-acquired bacterial meningitis. An observational cross-sectional study, in which patients with seizures are selected from a prospective nationwide cohort of 696 episodes of community-acquired bacterial meningitis, confirmed by culture of CSF in patients aged >16 years. We retrospectively collected data on EEGs. Seizures occurred in 121 of 696 episodes (17%). Death occurred in 41% of patients with seizures compared to 16% of patients without seizures (p < 0.001). The median number of seizures was 2 (interquartile range [IQR] 1 to 4). The median time between admission and the first seizure was 1 day (IQR 0 to 3). Patients with in-hospital seizures were more likely to have a CSF leukocyte count below 1,000 cells/mm(3) (36% vs 25%; p = 0.01), had higher median CSF protein levels (4.8 g/L [IQR 3.4 to 7.6] vs 4.1 g/L [IQR 2.1 to 6.8]), and higher median erythrocyte sedimentation rate (46 mm/hour [IQR 31 to 72] vs 36 mm/hour [IQR 18 to 69]; p = 0.02) than patients without in-hospital seizures. Focal cerebral abnormalities developed more often in patients with in-hospital seizures than in those without (41% vs 14%; p < 0.001). In a multivariate analysis, seizures were significantly more likely in patients with predisposing conditions, tachycardia, a low Glasgow Coma Scale score on admission, infection with Streptococcus pneumoniae, and focal cerebral abnormalities. Neuroimaging was performed on admission in 70% of episodes with prehospital seizures, with CT revealing a focal lesion in 32% of those episodes. Antiepileptic drugs were administered in 82% of patients with seizures and EEG was performed in 31% of episodes; a status epilepticus was recorded in five patients. Seizures occur frequently in adults with community-acquired bacterial meningitis. Seizures are associated with severe CNS and systemic inflammation, structural CNS lesions, pneumococcal meningitis, and predisposing

  14. Fluid therapy for acute bacterial meningitis.

    PubMed

    Maconochie, Ian K; Bhaumik, Soumyadeep

    2016-11-04

    Acute bacterial meningitis remains a disease with high mortality and morbidity rates. However, with prompt and adequate antimicrobial and supportive treatment, the chances for survival have improved, especially among infants and children. Careful management of fluid and electrolyte balance is an important supportive therapy. Both over- and under-hydration are associated with adverse outcomes. This is the latest update of a review first published in 2005 and updated in 2008 and 2014. To evaluate treatment of acute bacterial meningitis with differing volumes of initial fluid administration (up to 72 hours after first presentation) and the effects on death and neurological sequelae. For this 2016 update we searched the following databases up to March 2016: the Cochrane Acute Respiratory Infections Group's Specialised Register, CENTRAL, MEDLINE, CINAHL, Global Health, and Web of Science. Randomised controlled trials (RCTs) of differing volumes of fluid given in the initial management of bacterial meningitis were eligible for inclusion. All four of the original review authors extracted data and assessed trials for quality in the first publication of this review (one author, ROW, has passed away since the original review; see Acknowledgements). The current authors combined data for meta-analysis using risk ratios (RRs) for dichotomous data or mean difference (MD) for continuous data. We used a fixed-effect statistical model. We assessed the overall quality of evidence using the GRADE approach. We included three trials with a total of 420 children; there were no trials in adult populations. The largest of the three trials was conducted in settings with high mortality rates and was judged to have low risk of bias for all domains, except performance bias which was high risk. The other two smaller trials were not of high quality.The meta-analysis found no significant difference between the maintenance-fluid and restricted-fluid groups in number of deaths (RR 0.82, 95

  15. Fluid therapy for acute bacterial meningitis.

    PubMed

    Maconochie, Ian K; Bhaumik, Soumyadeep

    2014-05-05

    Acute bacterial meningitis remains a disease with high mortality and morbidity rates. However, with prompt and adequate antimicrobial and supportive treatment, the chances for survival have improved, especially among infants and children. Careful management of fluid and electrolyte balance is an important supportive therapy. Both over- and under-hydration are associated with adverse outcomes. To evaluate treatment of acute bacterial meningitis with differing volumes of initial fluid administration (up to 72 hours after first presentation) and the effects on death and neurological sequelae. We searched the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL) (2013, Issue 10), MEDLINE (1966 to October week 5, 2013), EMBASE (1980 to November 2013), CINAHL (1981 to November 2013), LILACS (1982 to November 2013) and Web of Science (2010 to 2013). Randomised controlled trials (RCTs) of differing volumes of fluid given in the initial management of bacterial meningitis were eligible for inclusion. For this update we identified two abstracts, but after obtaining full texts we excluded them. Previous searches had identified six trials; on careful inspection three trials (415 children) met the inclusion criteria. All four of the original review authors extracted data and assessed trials for quality (one author, ROW, has died since the original review; see Acknowledgements). We combined data for meta-analysis using risk ratios (RRs) for dichotomous data or mean difference (MD) for continuous data. We used a fixed-effect statistical model. We assessed overall evidence quality using the GRADE approach. There were no trials in adult populations. All included trials were on paediatric patient groups. The largest of the three trials was conducted in settings with high mortality rates. The meta-analysis found no significant difference between the maintenance-fluid and restricted-fluid groups in number of deaths (RR 0.82, 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.53 to 1.27; 407

  16. [Acute bacterial meningitis as an occupational disease].

    PubMed

    Seixas, Diana; Lebre, Ana; Crespo, Pedro; Ferreira, Eugénia; Serra, José Eduardo; Saraiva da Cunha, José Gabriel

    2014-01-01

    Streptococcus suis is a zoonotic pathogen with worldwide distribution, responsible for more than 700 human cases globally reported. This infection affects mostly men, exposed to pig or pork, which leads to its usual classification as an occupational disease. We report a case of acute bacterial meningitis in a 44 years old male. According to his past medical history, the patient had chronic alcoholism and worked in a restaurant as a piglet roaster. Microbiological examination of blood and CSF revealed S. suis. After 14 days of ceftriaxone the patient fully recovered. The authors review the clinical reports previously described in Portugal. In all of them was possible to identify risk exposition to pork. We alert to this microorganism's importance in Portugal where it is probably underdiagnosed.

  17. Rarity of bacterial and viral meningitis in areas of Western Greece with fewer than 2,000 inhabitants.

    PubMed

    Giannakopoulos, Ioannis; Leotsinidis, Michael; Diamantopoulos, Stavros; Makrakis, Konstantinos; Ellina, Aikaterini; Giannakopoulos, Agelos; Papanastasiou, Dimitris A

    2008-01-01

    The purpose of the present study was to compare the incidence of childhood meningitis in regions with fewer than 2,000 inhabitants (rural regions) and regions with more than 2,000 inhabitants (urban regions) in the prefecture of Achaia in Western Greece during 1991-2005. Included were all 555 children hospitalized for meningitis. The criteria for bacterial meningitis were (i) positive blood/cerebralspinal fluid (CSF) culture, Gram stain, or latex agglutination and/or (ii) increased beta-glucuronidase in CSF. In case of suspected bacterial meningitis, the following findings were considered: compatible clinical and laboratory findings, and whether or not a cure was achieved with antibiotic treatment and finally resulted in negative cultures. In cases of suspected viral meningitis, compatible clinical and laboratory findings were considered, together with observation of a cure without antibiotic treatment. Only 28 of 555 meningitis patients were from rural regions. The incidence per 10,000 children in rural and urban regions, respectively, was as follows: meningitis, 1.13 and 8.99; bacterial meningitis, 0.16 and 2.40; suspected bacterial meningitis, 0.52 and 3.00; and viral meningitis, 0.44 and 3.58. The incidence ratio for bacterial, suspected bacterial, and viral meningitis in urban versus rural regions was 14.85, 5.72, and 8.10, respectively. Only 2 of the 79 cases with a confirmed causative pathogen came from rural regions. In conclusion, compared to those living in urban regions, children living in rural regions are relatively spared from bacterial and viral meningitis.

  18. Etiology of Acute Bacterial Meningitis in Iran: a Systematic Review.

    PubMed

    Ghotaslou, Reza; Yeganeh-Sefidan, Fatemeh; Salahi-Eshlaqi, Behnaz; Ebrahimzadeh-Leylabadlo, Hamed

    2015-08-01

    Acute bacterial meningitis (ABM) is one of the most severe infectious diseases, causing neurologic sequel, and a case fatality rate of 20-30%. The aim of this paper was to summarize the main causes of ABM in Iran. We searched the data for relevant articles using meningitis, etiology, and Iran as search terms. We found 23 papers for inclusion in the review that focused specifically on the ABM, addressing etiology and acute meningitis. Finally, during the 23 years, a total of 18163 cases were recorded, and 1074 cases of which met the criteria for bacterial meningitis. The most common agent associated with bacterial meningitis was S. pneumoniae, followed by H. influenzae, Enterobacter spp., N. meningitidis, and group B streptococcus. The total incidence of ABM during 1991 to 2002 was higher than during 2003-2013. S. pneumoniae still remains a main cause of bacterial meningitis. For improved outcomes, studies are needed to further clarify the etiology of meningitis in Iran, explore simple, accurate, and practical diagnostic tools as PCR, and investigate the most appropriate specific and supportive interventions to manage and prevent meningitis as vaccination.

  19. Epidemiology, Diagnosis, and Antimicrobial Treatment of Acute Bacterial Meningitis

    PubMed Central

    Brouwer, Matthijs C.; Tunkel, Allan R.; van de Beek, Diederik

    2010-01-01

    Summary: The epidemiology of bacterial meningitis has changed as a result of the widespread use of conjugate vaccines and preventive antimicrobial treatment of pregnant women. Given the significant morbidity and mortality associated with bacterial meningitis, accurate information is necessary regarding the important etiological agents and populations at risk to ascertain public health measures and ensure appropriate management. In this review, we describe the changing epidemiology of bacterial meningitis in the United States and throughout the world by reviewing the global changes in etiological agents followed by specific microorganism data on the impact of the development and widespread use of conjugate vaccines. We provide recommendations for empirical antimicrobial and adjunctive treatments for clinical subgroups and review available laboratory methods in making the etiological diagnosis of bacterial meningitis. Finally, we summarize risk factors, clinical features, and microbiological diagnostics for the specific bacteria causing this disease. PMID:20610819

  20. Epidemiology of bacterial meningitis in Niamey, Niger, 1981-96.

    PubMed Central

    Campagne, G.; Schuchat, A.; Djibo, S.; Ousséini, A.; Cissé, L.; Chippaux, J. P.

    1999-01-01

    In the African meningitis belt the importance of endemic meningitis is not as well recognized as that of epidemics of meningococcal meningitis that occur from time to time. Using retrospective surveillance, we identified a total of 7078 cases of laboratory-diagnosed bacterial meningitis in Niamey, Niger, from 1981 to 1996. The majority (57.7%) were caused by Neisseria meningitidis, followed by Streptococcus pneumoniae (13.2%) and Haemophilus influenzae b (Hib) (9.5%). The mean annual incidence of bacterial meningitis was 101 per 100,000 population (70 per 100,000 during 11 non-epidemic years) and the average annual mortality rate was 17 deaths per 100,000. Over a 7-year period (including one major epidemic year) for which data were available, S. pneumoniae and Hib together caused more meningitis deaths than N. meningitidis. Meningitis cases were more common among males and occurred mostly during the dry season. Serogroup A caused 85.6% of meningococcal meningitis cases during the period investigated; three-quarters of these occurred among children aged < 15 years, and over 40% among under-5-year-olds. Both incidence and mortality rates were highest among infants aged < 1 year. In this age group, Hib was the leading cause of bacterial meningitis, followed by S. pneumoniae. The predominant cause of meningitis in persons aged 1-40 years was N. meningitidis. Use of the available vaccines against meningitis due to N. meningitidis, S. pneumoniae, and Hib could prevent substantial endemic illness and deaths in sub-Saharan Africa, and potentially prevent recurrent meningococcal epidemics. PMID:10427935

  1. Concomitant Bacterial Meningitis in Infants With Urinary Tract Infection.

    PubMed

    Thomson, Joanna; Cruz, Andrea T; Nigrovic, Lise E; Freedman, Stephen B; Garro, Aris C; Ishimine, Paul T; Kulik, Dina M; Uspal, Neil G; Grether-Jones, Kendra L; Miller, Aaron S; Schnadower, David; Shah, Samir S; Aronson, Paul L; Balamuth, Fran

    2017-09-01

    To determine age-stratified prevalence of concomitant bacterial meningitis in infants ≤60 days with a urinary tract infection, we performed a 23-center, retrospective study of 1737 infants with urinary tract infection. Concomitant bacterial meningitis was rare, but more common in infants 0-28 days of age [0.9%; 95% confidence interval (CI): 0.4%-1.9%) compared with infants 29-60 days of age (0.2%; 95% CI: 0%-0.8%).

  2. The effect of Haemophilus influenzae type B and pneumococcal conjugate vaccines on childhood meningitis mortality: a systematic review

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Two of the most prevalent causes of severe bacterial meningitis in children, Haemophilus influenzae type B (Hib) and Streptococcus pneumoniae, are preventable by existing vaccines increasingly available in developing countries. Our objective was to estimate the dose-specific effect of Hib and pneumococcal conjugate vaccines (PCV) on childhood meningitis mortality in low-income countries for use in the Lives Saved Tool (LiST). Methods We systematically searched and reviewed published vaccine efficacy trials and observational studies reporting the effect of Hib or PCV vaccines on organism-specific meningitis, bacterial meningitis and all-cause meningitis incidence and mortality among children less than five years old in low- and middle-income countries. Data collection and quality assessments were performed using standardized guidelines. For outcomes available across multiple studies (≥2) and approximating meningitis mortality, we pooled estimates reporting dose-specific effects using random effects meta-analytic methods, then combined these with meningitis etiology data to determine the preventable fraction of childhood meningitis mortality for inclusion in LiST. Results We identified 18 studies of Hib conjugate vaccines reporting relevant meningitis morbidity and mortality outcomes (2 randomized controlled trials [RCTs], 16 observational studies) but few provided dose-specific effects. A meta-analysis of four case-control studies examined the dose-specific effect of Hib conjugate vaccines on Hib meningitis morbidity (1 dose: RR=0.64, 95% CI 0.38-1.06; 2 doses: RR=0.09, 95% CI 0.03-0.27; 3 doses: RR=0.06, 95% CI 0.02-0.22), consistent with results from single RCTs. Pooled estimates of two RCTs provided evidence for the effect of three doses of PCV on vaccine-serotype meningitis morbidity (RR=0.16, 95% CI 0.02-1.20). We considered these outcomes of severe disease as proxy estimates for meningitis mortality and combined the estimates of protective effects

  3. [Congenital skull base defect causing recurrent bacterial meningitis].

    PubMed

    Berliner, Elihay; Bar Meir, Maskit; Megged, Orli

    2012-08-01

    Bacterial meningitis is a life threatening disease. Most patients will experience only one episode throughout life. Children who experience bacterial meningitis more than once, require further immunologic or anatomic evaluation. We report a 9 year old child with five episodes of bacterial meningitis due to a congenital defect of the skull base. A two and a half year old boy first presented to our medical center with pneumococcal meningitis. He was treated with antibiotics and fully recovered. Two months later he presented again with a similar clinical picture. Streptococcus pneumoniae grew in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) culture. CT scan and later MRI of the brain revealed a defect in the anterior middle fossa floor, with protrusion of brain tissue into the sphenoidal sinus. Corrective surgery was recommended but the parents refused. Three months later, a third episode of pneumococcal meningitis occurred. The child again recovered with antibiotics and this time corrective surgery was performed. Five years later, the boy presented once again with clinical signs and symptoms consistent with bacterial meningitis. CSF culture was positive, but the final identification of the bacteria was conducted by broad spectrum 16S ribosomal RNA PCR (16S rRNA PCR) which revealed a sequence of Neisseria lactamica. CT and MRI showed recurrence of the skull base defect with encephalocele in the sphenoid sinus. The parents again refused neurosurgical intervention. A year later the patient presented with bacterial meningitis. CSF culture obtained after initiation of antibiotics was negative, but actinobacillus was identified in the CSF by 16S rRNA PCR. The patient is scheduled for neurosurgical intervention. In patients with recurrent bacterial meningitis caused by organisms colonizing the oropharynx or nasopharynx, an anatomical defect should be carefully sought and surgically repaired.

  4. Clinical decision rules to distinguish between bacterial and aseptic meningitis

    PubMed Central

    Dubos, F; Lamotte, B; Bibi‐Triki, F; Moulin, F; Raymond, J; Gendrel, D; Bréart, G; Chalumeau, M

    2006-01-01

    Background Clinical decision rules have been derived to distinguish between bacterial and aseptic meningitis in the emergency room to avoid unnecessary antibiotic treatments and hospitalisations. Aims To evaluate the reproducibility and to compare the diagnostic performance of five clinical decision rules. Methods All children hospitalised for bacterial meningitis between 1995 and 2004 or aseptic meningitis between 2000 and 2004 have been included in a retrospective cohort study. Sensitivity and specificity were calculated by applying each rule to the patients. The best rule was a priori defined as the one yielding 100% sensitivity for bacterial meningitis, the highest specificity, and the greatest simplicity for a bedside application. Results Among the 166 patients included, 20 had bacterial meningitis and 146 had aseptic meningitis. Although three rules achieved 100% sensitivity (95% CI 84–100), one had a significantly lower specificity (13%, 95% CI 8–19) than those of the other two rules (57%, 95% CI 48–65; and 66%, 95% CI 57–73), which were not statistically different. The ease of manual computation of the rule developed by Nigrovic et al (a simple list of five items: seizure, blood neutrophil count, cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) Gram stain, CSF protein, CSF neutrophil count) was higher than the one developed by Bonsu and Harper. Conclusion On our population, the rule derived by Nigrovic et al had the best balance between accuracy and simplicity of manual computation and could help to avoid two thirds of unnecessary antibiotic treatments and hospitalisations. PMID:16595647

  5. Prevalence and antimicrobial resistance pattern of bacterial meningitis in Egypt

    PubMed Central

    Shaban, Lamyaa; Siam, Rania

    2009-01-01

    Infectious diseases are the leading cause of morbidity and mortality in the developing world. In Egypt bacterial diseases constitute a great burden, with several particular bacteria sustaining the leading role of multiple serious infections. This article addresses profound bacterial agents causing a wide array of infections including but not limited to pneumonia and meningitis. The epidemiology of such infectious diseases and the prevalence of Streptococcus pneumoniae, Neisseria meningitidis and Haemophilus influenzae are reviewed in the context of bacterial meningitis. We address prevalent serotypes in Egypt, antimicrobial resistance patterns and efficacy of vaccines to emphasize the importance of periodic surveillance for appropriate preventive and treatment strategies. PMID:19778428

  6. Clinical features and course of bacterial meningitis in children.

    PubMed

    Juganariu, Gabriela; Miftode, Egidia; Teodor, Danuţ; Leca, Daniela; Dorobăţ, Carmen-Mihaela

    2012-01-01

    To analyze the clinical features and course of and to define the risk factors for bacterial meningitis in children. Retrospective study of 100 cases of bacterial meningitis in patients aged 0-18 years admitted to the Iasi Infectious Diseases Hospital between 2005 and 2010. We found a clear prevalence in male children (58%) from rural area (67%), with the highest incidence in the age group 2-5 years. A significant percentage of patients (43%) had previous hospitalization, condition which is known as predisposing factor for bacterial meningitis, the most common being ear infections (20%) and height and weight deficit (9%). 71% of patients were admitted within the first 48 h. The most common onset clinical manifestations were fever (84%), vomiting (70%), signs of meningeal irritation (59%), somnolence (23%), loss of appetite (19%), and coma in 5% of patients. In 36% of cases CSF was opalescent with moderate pleocytosis (35%); in 29% of patients CSF albumin level ranged between 0.7-1.0 g, the majority presenting normal glycorahia (71%). In only 21% of cases the microbial agent was identified (pneumococcal and meningococcal etiology, 8% and 6%, respectively). The course was generally favorable, and mortality rate was low (5%). Complications occurred in 3% of patients consisting in hydrocephalus and brain abscess. Bacterial meningitis remains a disease with potentially severe course. Clinical onset, most commonly atypical in children, requires differential diagnosis at the time of admission in order to initiate the most appropriate antibiotic therapy.

  7. Community-Acquired Bacterial Meningitis in Alcoholic Patients

    PubMed Central

    Weisfelt, Martijn; de Gans, Jan; van der Ende, Arie; van de Beek, Diederik

    2010-01-01

    Background Alcoholism is associated with susceptibility to infectious disease, particularly bacterial pneumonia. In the present study we described characteristics in alcoholic patients with bacterial meningitis and delineate the differences with findings in non-alcoholic adults with bacterial meningitis. Methods/Principal Findings This was a prospective nationwide observational cohort study including patients aged >16 years who had bacterial meningitis confirmed by culture of cerebrospinal fluid (696 episodes of bacterial meningitis occurring in 671 patients). Alcoholism was present in 27 of 686 recorded episodes of bacterial meningitis (4%) and alcoholics were more often male than non-alcoholics (82% vs 48%, P = 0.001). A higher proportion of alcoholics had underlying pneumonia (41% vs 11% P<0.001). Alcoholics were more likely to have meningitis due to infection with Streptococcus pneumoniae (70% vs 50%, P = 0.01) and Listeria monocytogenes (19% vs 4%, P = 0.005), whereas Neisseria meningitidis was more common in non-alcoholic patients (39% vs 4%, P = 0.01). A large proportion of alcoholics developed complications during clinical course (82% vs 62%, as compared with non-alcoholics; P = 0.04), often cardiorespiratory failure (52% vs 28%, as compared with non-alcoholics; P = 0.01). Alcoholic patients were at risk for unfavourable outcome (67% vs 33%, as compared with non-alcoholics; P<0.001). Conclusions/Significance Alcoholic patients are at high risk for complications resulting in high morbidity and mortality. They are especially at risk for cardiorespiratory failure due to underlying pneumonia, and therefore, aggressive supportive care may be crucial in the treatment of these patients. PMID:20161709

  8. Seasonal dynamics of bacterial meningitis: a time-series analysis.

    PubMed

    Paireau, Juliette; Chen, Angelica; Broutin, Helene; Grenfell, Bryan; Basta, Nicole E

    2016-06-01

    Bacterial meningitis, which is caused mainly by Neisseria meningitidis, Haemophilus influenzae, and Streptococcus pneumoniae, inflicts a substantial burden of disease worldwide. Yet, the temporal dynamics of this disease are poorly characterised and many questions remain about the ecology of the disease. We aimed to comprehensively assess seasonal trends in bacterial meningitis on a global scale. We developed the first bacterial meningitis global database by compiling monthly incidence data as reported by country-level surveillance systems. Using country-level wavelet analysis, we identified whether a 12 month periodic component (annual seasonality) was detected in time-series that had at least 5 years of data with at least 40 cases reported per year. We estimated the mean timing of disease activity by computing the centre of gravity of the distribution of cases and investigated whether synchrony exists between the three pathogens responsible for most cases of bacterial meningitis. We used country-level data from 66 countries, including from 47 countries outside the meningitis belt in sub-Saharan Africa. A persistent seasonality was detected in 49 (96%) of the 51 time-series from 38 countries eligible for inclusion in the wavelet analyses. The mean timing of disease activity had a latitudinal trend, with bacterial meningitis seasons peaking during the winter months in countries in both the northern and southern hemispheres. The three pathogens shared similar seasonality, but time-shifts differed slightly by country. Our findings provide key insight into the seasonal dynamics of bacterial meningitis and add to knowledge about the global epidemiology of meningitis and the host, environment, and pathogen characteristics driving these patterns. Comprehensive understanding of global seasonal trends in meningitis could be used to design more effective prevention and control strategies. Princeton University Health Grand Challenge, US National Institutes of Health (NIH

  9. Antibiotic prophylaxis for bacterial meningitis: overuse and uncertain efficacy.

    PubMed

    Pearson, N; Gunnell, D J; Dunn, C; Beswick, T; Hill, A; Ley, B

    1995-12-01

    There is little evidence supporting the efficacy of prophylactic antibiotics in preventing secondary cases of bacterial meningitis, and recent guidance extended the use of prophylactic antibiotics amongst children who attend pre-school groups. We examined the volume of rifampicin prescribed, and that recommended to contacts of cases of meningococcal and Hib meningitis in Somerset over a three-year period using case note records of the Consultant for Communicable Disease Control (CCDC) and PACT data. There was evidence of excessive prescribing over and above that recommended by the CCDC. Excessive prescribing increases the chance of serious drug side effects and the development of antibiotic resistance. It is suggested that both meningitis contacts and information about early symptoms of meningitis, as well as an explanation of the rationale behind the prescribing of antibiotic prophylaxis to contacts. This may reduce the likelihood of unnecessary prescribing and subsequent complications.

  10. [Community acquired bacterial meningitis in patients over 60].

    PubMed

    Mora Mora, Luis A; Arco Espinosa, Micke E de; Plumet, Javier; Micheli, Federico

    2015-01-01

    Acute bacterial meningitis has a global mortality rate of 135000 cases per year. In Argentina over the last 12 years, the annual incidence rate has been 5.5/100 000. About 20% of patients present neurological sequelae, which are more common in patients aged 60 or older. Our objective here is to determine the clinical characteristics, the most common causes and to measure evolution in patients over 60 years old diagnosed with meningitis and treated at the Hospital de Clinicas José de San Martín. This is a retrospective study based on a review of medical records from 2003 to 2013 that takes into account patients older than 60 who were diagnosed with acute bacterial meningitis acquired in the community by a microbiological diagnosis of CSF or those included due to a high suspicion of bacterial meningitis (pleocitosis > 2000 cells/mm3, proteins > 220 mg/dl, glycorrhachia < 34 mg/dl, glycorrhachia/glucose index < 0.23). Cases of TB meningitis, nosocomial, postoperative and other nonbacterial meningitis were excluded. Sixty nine patients were included, 45 (65%) were women with an average age of 78 ± 10.6 years. Only 40% had the triad of classical meningitis symptoms (stiff neck, fever and altered mental status). In 52% of the patients germs developed in the CSF, the most frequent being Streptococcus pneumoniae present in 47% of cases. Lethality rate was 41%, all of them by methicillin-sensitive Staphylococcus aureus. Only 24 (35%) cases were admitted into intensive care. The main sequelae present were motor disorders (12%) and hearing loss (5%).

  11. Cranial computed tomography in purulent meningitis of childhood.

    PubMed

    Tuncer, Oguz; Caksen, Hüseyin; Arslan, Sükrü; Atas, Bülent; Uner, Abdurrahman; Oner, Ahmet Faik; Odabas, Dursun

    2004-02-01

    The cranial computed tomography (CT) findings of 48 children with purulent meningitis were examined, prospectively, to determine the importance of cranial CT findings on the prognosis of childhood meningitis, in a developing country. The age of children ranged from 2 months to 13 years. Of 48 patients, 29 (60.5%) survived without sequelae, 13 (27%) survived with sequelae, and six (12.5%) died. Cranial CT was normal in 21 (43%) patients of 48 children with meningitis at admission. Abnormal CT findings were detected in 10, 11, and 6 children in the groups of survived without sequelae, survived with sequelae, and deaths, respectively, at admission (p <.05) We found that CT scan results were correlated with neurological signs (p <.05). At least one or more cranial CTs were was re-taken in children in whom the first CT revealed abnormal findings; we did not find a statistically significant difference for the follow-up CT findings between the groups (p >.05). Hydrocephalus and subdural effusion were the commonest abnormal CT findings. In conclusion, our findings showed that cranial CT may safely be used to detect intracranial complications of meningitis in childhood and the ratio of sequelae and death were more common in children with abnormal cranial CT than those of normal cranial CT findings. Additionally, there was a positive correlation between CT scan results and neurological signs.

  12. Comparison of enterovirus detection in cerebrospinal fluid with Bacterial Meningitis Score in children

    PubMed Central

    Pires, Frederico Ribeiro; Franco, Andréia Christine Bonotto Farias; Gilio, Alfredo Elias; Troster, Eduardo Juan

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT Objective To measure the role of enterovirus detection in cerebrospinal fluid compared with the Bacterial Meningitis Score in children with meningitis. Methods A retrospective cohort based on analysis of medical records of pediatric patients diagnosed as meningitis, seen at a private and tertiary hospital in São Paulo, Brazil, between 2011 and 2014. Excluded were patients with critical illness, purpura, ventricular shunt or recent neurosurgery, immunosuppression, concomitant bacterial infection requiring parenteral antibiotic therapy, and those who received antibiotics 72 hours before lumbar puncture. Results The study included 503 patients. Sixty-four patients were excluded and 94 were not submitted to all tests for analysis. Of the remaining 345 patients, 7 were in the Bacterial Meningitis Group and 338 in the Aseptic Meningitis Group. There was no statistical difference between the groups. In the Bacterial Meningitis Score analysis, of the 338 patients with possible aseptic meningitis (negative cultures), 121 of them had one or more points in the Bacterial Meningitis Score, with sensitivity of 100%, specificity of 64.2%, and negative predictive value of 100%. Of the 121 patients with positive Bacterial Meningitis Score, 71% (86 patients) had a positive enterovirus detection in cerebrospinal fluid. Conclusion Enterovirus detection in cerebrospinal fluid was effective to differentiate bacterial from viral meningitis. When the test was analyzed together with the Bacterial Meningitis Score, specificity was higher when compared to Bacterial Meningitis Score alone. PMID:28767914

  13. Meningitis

    MedlinePlus

    Meningitis Overview By Mayo Clinic Staff Meningitis is an inflammation of the membranes (meninges) surrounding your brain and spinal cord. The swelling from meningitis typically triggers symptoms such as ...

  14. Antibiotic therapy for bacterial meningitis in children in developing countries.

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, P.; Verma, I. C.

    1993-01-01

    We carried out a study to investigate the effectiveness of chloramphenicol alone as a treatment for bacterial meningitis. A total of 70 consecutive children aged > 3 months with bacterial meningitis, who had been admitted to the paediatric hospital of the All India Institute of Medical Sciences, were randomized to receive chloramphenicol alone or chloramphenicol + penicillin. The two groups were matched with each other. Treatment failure occurred with three (9%) patients in the chloramphenicol-alone group and with four (12.1%) patients in the combination therapy group (P > 0.05). The mean duration of intravenous therapy, the number of intravenous cannulae used per patient, and the incidence of thrombophlebitis were significantly higher for the group that received the combination therapy. Also, the cost of using chloramphenicol + penicillin was four times higher than that of chloramphenicol alone. Hence, chloramphenicol alone was as effective as chloramphenicol + penicillin and much cheaper and more convenient to use. PMID:8490981

  15. Cerebrospinal fluid lactate dehydrogenase isoenzymes in children with bacterial and aseptic meningitis.

    PubMed

    Nussinovitch, Moshe; Finkelstein, Yaron; Elishkevitz, Keren Politi; Volovitz, Benjamin; Harel, Daniella; Klinger, Gil; Razon, Yaron; Nussinovitch, Udi; Nussinovitch, Naomi

    2009-10-01

    Differentiation of bacterial from aseptic meningitis may be difficult. Our aim was to determine the pattern of distribution of lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) isoenzymes in the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) of patients with bacterial and aseptic meningitis. One hundred and fifty-seven patients with suspected meningitis were enrolled in the study. They were divided into 3 groups according to the culture- or bacterial antigen assay-proven diagnosis and CSF findings: bacterial meningitis (n = 31), aseptic meningitis (n = 65), and non-meningitis (n = 61). Total LDH level and percentages of LDH isoenzymes in the CSF were measured in each patient. Each group showed a distinct LDH isoenzyme distribution pattern, with a statistically significant difference among the groups in the percentages of the various isoenzymes. Compared with the non-meningitis group, total LDH activity in the CSF was high in the aseptic meningitis group (49.82+/-35.59 U/L, P < 0.001) and exaggerated in the bacterial meningitis group (944.53+/-112.3 U/L, P < 0.001). Low LDH-2 levels were unique to bacterial meningitis (P < 0.01), whereas high LDH-3 levels were characteristic of aseptic meningitis (P < 0.05). Both groups had low levels of LDH-1 and high levels of LDH-4 and LDH-5. In conclusion, the LDH isoenzyme pattern may be of clinical diagnostic value in meningitis, particularly when culture results are pending.

  16. Meningitis

    MedlinePlus

    ... system, infecting the meninges and causing meningitis. continue Bacteria and Viruses Many viruses can cause viral meningitis. ... examined under a microscope to see if any bacteria, cells, or substances that indicate inflammation or infection ...

  17. Evaluation of hypothalamic-pituitary function in children following acute bacterial meningitis.

    PubMed

    Karadag-Oncel, Eda; Cakir, Meltem; Kara, Ates; Gonc, Nazli; Cengiz, Ali Bulent; Ozon, Alev; Ciftci, Ergin; Alikasifoglu, Ayfer; Ceyhan, Mehmet; Kandemir, Nurgun

    2015-02-01

    Previous studies in adults and case reports in children have shown increased frequency of hypothalamo-pituitary dysfunction after infectious diseases of the central nervous system. The aim of this study was to evaluate the function of hypothalamo-pituitary axis in children with a history of bacterial meningitis. Patients diagnosed with bacterial meningitis between April 2000 and June 2011 was included. Baseline and stimulated hormonal tests were performed as required for hormonal evaluations following a diagnosis of meningitis. Pituitary function was assessed following a period of 8-135 months (mean 53 months) after bacterial meningitis. Thirty-seven cases (27 male, 15 pubertal) with mean age of 11.1 ± 4.4 years were included. Mean height SDS was 0.01 ± 1.07 and mean BMI SDS was 0.54 ± 1.15 all patients had a SDS above -2 SD. Baseline cortisol and low dose ACTH stimulation revealed normal adrenal functions in all patients. Gonadotropin deficiency was not detected in any of the pubertal cases. Four cases (10.8%) had low IGF1 and IGFBP3 z-scores (<-2 SD) according to age, sex and Tanner stage, but peak GH response in clonidin test was >10 ng/ml in three of them suggesting neurosecretary dysfunction of GH in these cases. The fourth case has died before the test. No one had TSH deficiency and diabetes insipidus, only one case had mild hyperprolactinemia. Our findings suggest that hypothalamo-pituitary dysfunction is not as common in childhood as in adulthood. The most remarkable finding was neurosecretary dysfunction of GH in some cases.

  18. Differentiating acute bacterial meningitis from acute viral meningitis among children with cerebrospinal fluid pleocytosis: a multivariable regression model.

    PubMed

    Bonsu, Bema K; Harper, Marvin B

    2004-06-01

    Although accurate models for predicting acute bacterial meningitis exist, most have narrow application because of the specific variables selected for them. In this study, we estimate the accuracy of a simple new model with potentially broader applicability. On the basis of previous reports, we created a reduced multivariable logistic regression model for predicting bacterial meningitis that relies on age (years) (AGE), cerebrospinal fluid (CSF), total protein (TP) and total neutrophil count (TNC) alone. Data were from children ages 1 month-18 years diagnosed with acute enteroviral or bacterial meningitis whose initial CSF revealed >7 white blood cells/mm. A fractional polynomial model was specified and validated internally by the bootstrap procedure. The area under the receiver operating characteristic curve (discrimination: criterion standard, >0.7), the Hosmer-Lemeshow deciles-of-risk statistic (calibration: criterion standard, P > 0.05) and sensitivity-specificity pairs at prespecified probability thresholds of the model were computed. We identified 60 children with bacterial meningitis and 82 with enteroviral meningitis. At an area under the receiver operating characteristic curve of 0.97, our model represented by the equation: log odds of bacterial meningitis = 0.343 - 0.003 TNC - 34.802 TP + 21.991 TP - 0.345 AGE, was highly accurate when differentiating between bacterial and enteroviral meningitis. The model fit the data well (Hosmer-Lemeshow statistic; P =[r] 0.53). At probability cutoffs between 0.1 and 0.4, the model had sensitivity values between 98 and 92% and specificity values between 62 and 94%. Among children with CSF pleocytosis, a prediction model based exclusively on age, CSF total protein and CSF neutrophils differentiates accurately between acute bacterial and viral meningitis.

  19. Osmotic therapies added to antibiotics for acute bacterial meningitis.

    PubMed

    Wall, Emma C B; Ajdukiewicz, Katherine M B; Heyderman, Robert S; Garner, Paul

    2013-03-28

    Every day children and adults throughout the world die from acute community-acquired bacterial meningitis, particularly in low-income countries. Survivors are at risk of deafness, epilepsy and neurological disabilities. Osmotic therapies have been proposed as an adjunct to improve mortality and morbidity from bacterial meningitis. The theory is that they will attract extra-vascular fluid by osmosis and thus reduce cerebral oedema by moving excess water from the brain into the blood. The intention is to thus reduce death and improve neurological outcomes. To evaluate the effects on mortality, deafness and neurological disability of osmotic therapies added to antibiotics for acute bacterial meningitis in children and adults. We searched CENTRAL 2012, Issue 11, MEDLINE (1950 to November week 3, 2012), EMBASE (1974 to November 2012), CINAHL (1981 to November 2012), LILACS (1982 to November 2012) and registers of ongoing clinical trials (April 2012). We also searched conference abstracts and contacted researchers in the field. Randomised controlled trials testing any osmotic therapy in adults or children with acute bacterial meningitis. Two review authors independently screened the search results and selected trials for inclusion. We collected data from each study for mortality, deafness, seizures and neurological disabilities. Results are presented using risk ratios (RR) and 95% confidence intervals (CI) and grouped according to whether the participants received steroids or not. Four trials were included comprising 1091 participants. All compared glycerol (a water-soluble sugar alcohol) with a control; in three trials this was a placebo, and in one a small amount of 50% dextrose. Three trials included comparators of dexamethasone alone or in combination with glycerol. As dexamethasone appeared to have no modifying effect, we aggregated results across arms where both treatment and control groups received corticosteroids and where both treatment and control groups did

  20. Osmotic therapies added to antibiotics for acute bacterial meningitis

    PubMed Central

    Wall, Emma CB; Ajdukiewicz, Katherine MB; Heyderman, Robert S; Garner, Paul

    2014-01-01

    Background Every day children and adults throughout the world die from acute community-acquired bacterial meningitis, particularly in low-income countries. Survivors are at risk of deafness, epilepsy and neurological disabilities. Osmotic therapies have been proposed as an adjunct to improve mortality and morbidity from bacterial meningitis. The theory is that they will attract extra-vascular fluid by osmosis and thus reduce cerebral oedema by moving excess water from the brain into the blood. The intention is to thus reduce death and improve neurological outcomes. Objectives To evaluate the effects on mortality, deafness and neurological disability of osmotic therapies added to antibiotics for acute bacterial meningitis in children and adults. Search methods We searched CENTRAL 2012, Issue 11, MEDLINE (1950 to November week 3, 2012), EMBASE (1974 to November 2012), CINAHL (1981 to November 2012), LILACS (1982 to November 2012) and registers of ongoing clinical trials (April 2012). We also searched conference abstracts and contacted researchers in the field. Selection criteria Randomised controlled trials testing any osmotic therapy in adults or children with acute bacterial meningitis. Data collection and analysis Two review authors independently screened the search results and selected trials for inclusion. We collected data from each study for mortality, deafness, seizures and neurological disabilities. Results are presented using risk ratios (RR) and 95% confidence intervals (CI) and grouped according to whether the participants received steroids or not. Main results Four trials were included comprising 1091 participants. All compared glycerol (a water-soluble sugar alcohol) with a control; in three trials this was a placebo, and in one a small amount of 50% dextrose. Three trials included comparators of dexamethasone alone or in combination with glycerol. As dexamethasone appeared to have no modifying effect, we aggregated results across arms where both

  1. Pasteurella multocida bacterial meningitis caused by contact with pigs

    PubMed Central

    López, C.; Sanchez-Rubio, P.; Betrán, A.; Terré, R.

    2013-01-01

    Pasteurella multocida belongs to the normal flora of the respiratory and digestive tract of many animals. Animal exposure is a considerable risk factor for Pasteurella infection. P. multocida is the most common cause of local infection after an animal bite but is an unusual cause of meningitis. We present a case of bacterial meningitis by P. multocida in a 37-year-old man who worked in a pig farm and was bitten by a pig. The patient had a defect located in the lamina cribosa and this lesion could be the gateway of the infection, although in this case the infection could also be acquired through the pig bite. The bacteria was identified as P. multocida with the biochemical test API 20E (bioMérieux). In agreement with findings in the literature, the strain was susceptible in vitro to penicillin, ampicillin, cefotaxime, ceftriaxone ciprofloxacin, levofloxacin, imipenem and tetracycline. PMID:24294240

  2. Evaluation of pituitary function after infectious meningitis in childhood.

    PubMed

    Giavoli, Claudia; Tagliabue, Claudia; Profka, Eriselda; Senatore, Laura; Bergamaschi, Silvia; Rodari, Giulia; Spada, Anna; Beck-Peccoz, Paolo; Esposito, Susanna

    2014-10-06

    A number of studies of adults have shown that pituitary deficiencies can develop in a considerable proportion of subjects during the acute phase of meningitis or years after the infection has disappeared. The results of the very few studies of the impact of pediatric meningitis on hypothalamic-pituitary function are conflicting. In order to determine the incidence of pituitary dysfunction in children with central nervous system infection, we evaluated pituitary function and anthropometric parameters in 19 children with meningitis of different etiologies (15 males; mean age ± standard deviation [SD] at pituitary evaluation, 5.9 ± 4.0 years; mean time from the acute event ± SD, 18 ± 10 months). All of the subjects had a normal stature and growth velocity for their age and gender, and none of them was obese. On the basis of Tanner's reference charts, 17 subjects (13 boys and all four girls) were pre-pubertal; two boys were in Tanner stage 2. None of the subjects had central hypothyroidism. All of the patients had normal serum of insulin growth factor (IGF)-I and prolactin. Their sex steroid and gonadotropin levels were concordant with their age and pubertal status. Early morning urine osmolality and serum electrolyte levels showed no signs of diabetes insipidus. All of the patients had normal plasma adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH) levels. Peak cortisol responses to the standard dose Synacthen test (SDST) were normal in all cases. The results showed that hypopituitarism following infectious meningitis appears to be infrequent in childhood and children's pituitary glands seem to be less vulnerable to damage than those of adults.

  3. [Emergency antibiotherapy and adjuvant treatments for acute bacterial meningitis].

    PubMed

    Mourvillier, B

    2009-01-01

    The management of bacterial meningitis is based on the combination of several components. The objective of this review is to give an overview of the literature concerning both the arguments for urgent antibiotic treatment associated with a particular focus on the place of corticosteroids. Among other treatments, glycerol seems the best rated but symptomatic measures, which may not be achieved by randomized studies, should not be overlooked. Many animal studies explore other treatment options, but none can be translated into clinical practice. The neuroimaging has been little evaluated despite recent technological advances but remains important in monitoring of patients whose evolution is considered unfavorable.

  4. Occult invasive pituitary adenoma predisposing to fatal bacterial meningitis.

    PubMed

    Laszewski, M J; Moore, S A

    1990-01-01

    Pituitary adenomata are benign neoplasms which usually grow slowly and present with manifestations relating to an associated endocrinopathy or visual disturbance. Rarely these neoplasms will demonstrate a more aggressive behavior with extracranial extension and symptoms of upper airway obstruction or anosmia. Several reported cases suggest that although these neoplasms behave aggressively the overall survival and prognosis for these patients remains good. We present the clinical and postmortem findings of an occult invasive pituitary adenoma leading to the development of bacterial meningitis, coma and death. This communication stresses the necessity for the early diagnosis and treatment of the invasive adenomata to prevent the development of potentially fatal infectious sequelae.

  5. [Validation of a clinical prediction rule to distinguish bacterial from aseptic meningitis].

    PubMed

    Agüero, Gonzalo; Davenport, María C; Del Valle, María de la P; Gallegos, Paulina; Kannemann, Ana L; Bokser, Vivian; Ferrero, Fernando

    2010-02-01

    Despite most meningitis are not bacterial, antibiotics are usually administered on admission because bacterial meningitis is difficult to be rule-out. Distinguishing bacterial from aseptic meningitis on admission could avoid inappropriate antibiotic use and hospitalization. We aimed to validate a clinical prediction rule to distinguish bacterial from aseptic meningitis in children, on arriving to the emergency room. This prospective study included patients aged < 19 years with meningitis. Cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) and peripheral blood neutrophil count were obtained from all patients. The BMS (Bacterial Meningitis Score) described by Nigrovic (Pediatrics 2002; 110: 712), was calculated: positive CSF Gram stain= 2 points, CSF absolute neutrophil count > or = 1000 cells/mm(3), CSF protein > or = 80 mg/dl, peripheral blood absolute neutrophil count > or = 10.000/mm(3), seizure = 1 point each. Sensitivity (S), specificity (E), positive and negative predictive values (PPV and NPV), positive and negative likelihood ratios (PLR and NLR) of the BMS to predict bacterial meningitis were calculated. Seventy patients with meningitis were included (14 bacterial meningitis). When BMS was calculated, 25 patients showed a BMS= 0 points, 11 BMS= 1 point, and 34 BMS > or = 2 points. A BMS = 0 showed S: 100%, E: 44%, VPP: 31%, VPN: 100%, RVP: 1,81 RVN: 0. A BMS > or = 2 predicted bacterial meningitis with S: 100%, E: 64%, VPP: 41%, VPN: 100%, PLR: 2.8, NLR:0. Using BMS was simple, and allowed identifying children with very low risk of bacterial meningitis. It could be a useful tool to assist clinical decision making.

  6. Acute bacterial meningitis in Iran: Systematic review and meta-analysis

    PubMed Central

    Riahi, Seyed Mohammad; Nasiri, Mohammad Javad; Fallah, Fatemeh; Dabiri, Hossein; Pouriran, Ramin

    2017-01-01

    Introduction Bacterial meningitis persists in being a substantial cause of high mortality and severe neurological morbidity, despite the advances in antimicrobial therapy. Accurate data has not been available regarding the epidemiology of bacterial meningitis particularly in developing countries, yet. Indeed, the present systematic review provides a comprehensive data analysis on the prevalence and epidemiology of bacterial meningitis in Iran. Methods We systematically reviewed articles from 1994 to 2015. The reports which contained the prevalence and etiology of acute bacterial meningitis by valid clinical and laboratory diagnosis were comprised in the present study. Results Our analysis indicated that Streptococcus pneumoniae (30% [I2 = 56% p < 0.01]), Haemophilus influenza type b (15% [I2 = 82.75% p < 0.001]), coagulase negative staphylococci (CoNS) (14% [I2 = 60.5% p < 0.06]), and Neisseria meningitidis (13% [I2 = 74.16% p < 0.001]) were the most common cause of acute bacterial meningitis among meningitis cases in Iran. Notably, high frequency rates of nosocomial meningitis pathogens were detected in the present analysis. Conclusions It was magnificently attained that the majority of cases for bacterial meningitis in Iran could be avertable by public immunization schemes and by preventive care to inhibit the broadening of hospital acquired pathogens. PMID:28170400

  7. Diagnostic accuracy of cerebrospinal fluid gram stain in children with suspected bacterial meningitis.

    PubMed

    Brizzi, Kate; Hines, Elizabeth M; McGowan, Karin L; Shah, Samir S

    2012-02-01

    This cross-sectional study included 1938 children undergoing lumbar puncture; 21 (1.1%) cases were classified as definite (n = 17) or probable (n = 4) bacterial meningitis. Gram stain sensitivity was 94.1% (95% confidence interval, 71.3%-99.9%) for those with definite meningitis; the positive predictive value was 47.1% (95% confidence interval, 29.8%-64.9%). The sensitivity was 95.2% for those with definite or probable meningitis. Antibiotic pretreatment did not affect results.

  8. Population-based surveillance for bacterial meningitis in the Dominican Republic: implications for control by vaccination.

    PubMed Central

    Gomez, E.; Peguero, M.; Sanchez, J.; Castellanos, P. L.; Feris, J.; Peña, C.; Brudzinski-LaClaire, L.; Levine, O. S.

    2000-01-01

    Quantifying the local burden of disease is an important step towards the introduction of new vaccines, such as Haemophilus influenzae type b (Hib) conjugate vaccine. We adapted a generic protocol developed by the World Health Organization for population-based surveillance of bacterial meningitis. All hospitals that admit paediatric patients with meningitis in the National District, Dominican Republic were included in the system and standard laboratory methods were used. The system identified 111 cases of confirmed bacterial meningitis. Hib was the leading cause of bacterial meningitis, followed by group B streptococcus, S. pneumoniae, and N. meningitidis. Unlike hospital-based case series, this population-based system was able to calculate incidence rates. The incidence of Hib meningitis was 13 cases per 100,000 children < 5 years old. The data from this study were used by the Ministry of Health to support the introduction of routine Hib vaccination and will be used to monitor its effectiveness. PMID:11218205

  9. Population-based surveillance for bacterial meningitis in the Dominican Republic: implications for control by vaccination.

    PubMed

    Gomez, E; Peguero, M; Sanchez, J; Castellanos, P L; Feris, J; Peña, C; Brudzinski-LaClaire, L; Levine, O S

    2000-12-01

    Quantifying the local burden of disease is an important step towards the introduction of new vaccines, such as Haemophilus influenzae type b (Hib) conjugate vaccine. We adapted a generic protocol developed by the World Health Organization for population-based surveillance of bacterial meningitis. All hospitals that admit paediatric patients with meningitis in the National District, Dominican Republic were included in the system and standard laboratory methods were used. The system identified 111 cases of confirmed bacterial meningitis. Hib was the leading cause of bacterial meningitis, followed by group B streptococcus, S. pneumoniae, and N. meningitidis. Unlike hospital-based case series, this population-based system was able to calculate incidence rates. The incidence of Hib meningitis was 13 cases per 100,000 children < 5 years old. The data from this study were used by the Ministry of Health to support the introduction of routine Hib vaccination and will be used to monitor its effectiveness.

  10. [Bacterial meningitis as a complication of Fusobacterium necroforum infection in adults].

    PubMed

    Spitzer, C; Foltys, H; Lemmen, S W; Block, F

    2003-12-01

    Fusobacterium necrophorum, an anaerobic, gram-negative rod, belongs to the physiological flora of the oropharynx. It causes Lemierre's syndrome characterized by oropharyngeal infection, septic thrombophlebitis of the neck, in particular of the internal jugular vein, and metastatic abscesses, predominantly in the lungs. Rarely, and mainly in children, it causes meningitis. Here we report the clinical course of a 25-year-old woman with F. necrophorum meningitis. She presented with incomplete, right third nerve palsy. Within a few days, she developed fever, meningism and progressive reduction of vigilance. Cerebrospinal fluid analysis showed typical signs of bacterial meningitis. After the identification of F. necrophorum, the antibiotic treatment was changed to meropenem, which led to continuous improvement of the clinical symptoms. Due to persistent signs of inflammation in the CSF, metronidazole was added to the antibiotic regime. This case report demonstrates that F. necrophorum should always be considered in the diagnostic workup of bacterial meningitis in adults.

  11. Encasement of the Cauda Equina After Early Childhood Meningitis: Case Report and Review of the Literature.

    PubMed

    Gubian, Arthur; Rosahl, Steffen K

    2016-12-01

    Arachnopathy following meningitis has been described in the setting of chronic spinal arachnoiditis and more recently as shunt-related progressive myelopathy due to meningeal thickening. We describe an atypical case of a patient who presented with chronic arachnopathy 5 decades after an episode of meningitis. We also review the literature concerning arachnopathies occurring in the context of early childhood meningitis. Although our case bore clinical and radiologic similarities to chronic spinal arachnoiditis and shunt-related progressive myelopathy, time to symptom onset, intraoperative findings, pathophysiology, and surgical outcome set it apart from both conditions. It is challenging but worthwhile to recognize this separate entity because, in contrast to both shunt-related progressive myelopathy due to meningeal thickening and adhesive arachnoiditis, surgery involving microsurgical dissection of the thick arachnoid encasement of the cauda equina may be curative in medically refractory cases. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Bacterial meningitis in diabetes patients: a population-based prospective study

    PubMed Central

    van Veen, Kiril E. B.; Brouwer, Matthijs C.; van der Ende, Arie; van de Beek, Diederik

    2016-01-01

    Diabetes mellitus is associated with increased infection rates. We studied clinical features and outcome of community-acquired bacterial meningitis in diabetes patients. Patients were selected from a nationwide, prospective cohort on community-acquired bacterial meningitis performed from March 2006 to October 2014. Data on patient history, symptoms and signs on admission, treatment, and outcome were prospectively collected. A total of 183 of 1447 episodes (13%) occurred in diabetes patients. The incidence of bacterial meningitis in diabetes patients was 3.15 per 100,000 patients per year and the risk of acquiring bacterial meningitis was 2.2-fold higher for diabetes patients. S. pneumoniae was the causative organism in 139 of 183 episodes (76%) and L. monocytogenes in 11 of 183 episodes (6%). Outcome was unfavourable in 82 of 183 episodes (45%) and in 43 of 183 episodes (23%) the patient died. Diabetes was associated with death with an odds ratio of 1.63 (95% CI 1.12–2.37, P = 0.011), which remained after adjusting for known predictors of death in a multivariable analysis (OR 1.98 [95% CI 1.13–3.48], P = 0.017). In conclusion, diabetes is associated with a 2-fold higher risk of acquiring bacterial meningitis. Diabetes is a strong independent risk factor for death in community-acquired adult bacterial meningitis. PMID:27845429

  13. Accuracy of universal polymerase chain reaction (PCR) for detection of bacterial meningitis among suspected patients.

    PubMed

    Moayedi, Ali Reza; Nejatizadeh, Abdolazim; Mohammadian, Maryam; Rahmati, Mohammad Bagher; Namardizadeh, Vahideh

    2015-12-01

    Central nervous system (CNS) infections are life-threatening diseases caused by viral, bacterial, parasitic and fungal microorganisms. The aim of this study was to determine the accuracy of universal polymerase chain reaction (PCR) for the detection of bacterial meningitis among patients who were referred to Koodakan Hospital in Bandar Abbas because they were suspected of having the disease. This study was conducted in 2013 on the patients who were admitted to Bandar Abbas' Koodakan Hospital because they were suspected of having meningitis. A questionnaire, including demographic data, was completed for each patient. Universal PCR, Cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) analysis, and gram staining and cultures were done for all the patients. The data were analyzed using SPSS software. Among the 100 patients studied 59 (59%) were male and 41 (41%) were female. No patient in our study had a positive smear and culture for meningitis. Among the patients with negative smears and cultures six (6%) had positive universal PCR, and 94 (94%) had negative universal PCR. Based on these results, PCR had 95% specificity and 100% negative predictive value for the prediction of meningitis. In 30 patients (30%), the biochemical analysis of CSF were in favor of meningitis. Among the 30 patients, six patients (20%) had positive universal PCR and 24 patients (80%) had negative universal PCR. Based on our results, the universal PCR test is useful in the diagnosis of bacterial meningitis in children. We recommend using it in combination with other tests, such as CSF analysis, for diagnosis of bacterial meningitis.

  14. Cerebrospinal fluid lactate: a differential biomarker for bacterial and viral meningitis in children.

    PubMed

    Nazir, Mudasir; Wani, Wasim Ahmad; Malik, Muzaffar Ahmad; Mir, Mohd Rafiq; Ashraf, Younis; Kawoosa, Khalid; Ali, Syed Wajid

    2017-08-30

    To assess the performance of cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) lactate as a biomarker to differentiate bacterial meningitis from viral meningitis in children, and to define an optimal CSF lactate concentration that can be called significant for the differentiation. Children with clinical findings compatible with meningitis were studied. CSF lactate and other conventional CSF parameters were recorded. At a cut-off value of 3mmol/L, CSF lactate had a sensitivity of 0.90, specificity of 1.0, positive predictive value of 1.0, and negative predictive value of 0.963, with an accuracy of 0.972. The positive and negative likelihood ratios were 23.6 and 0.1, respectively. When comparing between bacterial and viral meningitis, the area under the curve for CSF lactate was 0.979. The authors concluded that CSF lactate has high sensitivity and specificity in differentiating bacterial from viral meningitis. While at a cut-off value of 3mmol/L, CSF lactate has high diagnostic accuracy for bacterial meningitis, mean levels in viral meningitis remain essentially below 2mmol/L. Copyright © 2017 Sociedade Brasileira de Pediatria. Published by Elsevier Editora Ltda. All rights reserved.

  15. Meningitis

    MedlinePlus

    ... be caused by: Chemical irritation Drug allergies Fungi Parasites Tumors Many types of viruses can cause meningitis: Enteroviruses: These are viruses that also can cause intestinal illness. Herpes viruses: These are the same viruses ...

  16. Meningitis

    MedlinePlus

    ... type of meningitis because it's not caused by bacteria). The doctor will recommend as much rest as possible to help the recovery, and also may also recommend medication to help relieve any ... For Teens For Kids ...

  17. Latex particle agglutination test as an adjunct to the diagnosis of bacterial meningitis.

    PubMed

    Surinder, K; Bineeta, K; Megha, M

    2007-10-01

    The present study aimed to review the results of microscopic examination, routine culture and antigen detection by latex particle agglutination test (LPAT), in order to evaluate the diagnostic value of the LPAT in establishing the aetiological diagnosis of bacterial meningitis. LPAT was done in 65 clinically suspected meningitis cases ranging from 5 days to 60 years of age and was compared with culture and Gram stain. Using LPAT, an aetiological diagnosis could be done in 10 out of 65 (15.4%) cases of bacterial meningitis. In contrast, Gram stain and culture showed 16.9 and 23.1% positivity, respectively. LPAT correlated well with Gram stain and culture and can be recommended as an adjunct laboratory test for rapid aetiological diagnosis of bacterial meningitis for prompt institution of proper antibiotics.

  18. Epidemiology of Bacterial Meningitis in the North American Arctic, 2000–2010

    PubMed Central

    Gounder, Prabhu P.; Zulz, Tammy; Desai, Shalini; Stenz, Flemming; Rudolph, Karen; Tsang, Raymond; Tyrrell, Gregory J.; Bruce, Michael G.

    2015-01-01

    Summary Objective To determine the incidence of meningitis caused by Haemophilus influenzae, Neisseria meningitidis, and Streptococcus pneumoniae in the North American Arctic during 2000–2010. Methods Surveillance data were obtained from the International Circumpolar Surveillance network. We defined a case of bacterial meningitis caused by H. influenzae, N. meningitidis, or S. pneumoniae as a culture-positive isolate obtained from a normally sterile site in a resident with a meningitis diagnosis. Results The annual incidence/100,000 persons for meningitis caused by H. influenzae, N. meningitidis, and S. pneumoniae among all North American Arctic residents was: 0.6, 0.5, and 1.5, respectively; the meningitis incidence among indigenous persons in Alaska and Canada (indigenous status not recorded in Greenland) for those three bacteria was: 2.1, 0.8, and 2.4, respectively. The percentage of pneumococcal isolates belonging to a 7-valent pneumococcal conjugate vaccine serotype declined from 2000–2004 to 2005–2010 (31% to 2%, p-value <0.01). During 2005–2010, serotype a caused 55% of H. influenzae meningitis and serogroup B caused 86% of meningococcal meningitis. Conclusions Compared with all North American Arctic residents, indigenous people suffer disproportionately from bacterial meningitis. Arctic residents could benefit from the development of a H. influenzae serotype a vaccine and implementation of a meningococcal serogroup B vaccine. PMID:25864638

  19. [Intracranial pressure targeted treatment in acute bacterial meningitis increased survival].

    PubMed

    Glimåker, Martin; Johansson, Bibi; Halldorsdottir, Halla; Wanecek, Michael; Elmi-Terander, Adrian; Bellander, Bo-Michael

    2014-12-16

    To evaluate the efficacy of intracranial pressure (ICP)-targeted treatment, compared to standard intensive care, in adults with community acquired acute bacterial meningitis (ABM) and severely impaired consciousness, a prospectively designed intervention-control comparison study was performed. Included were patients with confirmed ABM and severely impaired mental status on admission. Fifty-two patients, given ICP-targeted treatment at a neuro-intensive care unit, and 53 control cases, treated with conventional intensive care, were included. All patients received intensive care with me-chanical ventilation, sedation, antibiotics and corticosteroids according to current guidelines. ICP-targeted treatment was performed in the intervention group, aiming at ICP 50 mmHg. The mortality was significantly lower in the intervention group compared to controls, 5/52 (10%) versus 16/53 (30%). Furthermore, only 17 patients (32%) in the control group fully recovered, compared to 28 (54%) in the intervention group. Early neuro-intensive care using ICP-targeted therapy reduces mortality and improves the overall outcome in adult patients with ABM and severely impaired mental status on admission.

  20. Surgical treatment for bacterial meningitis after spinal surgery

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Li-Min; Ren, Liang; Zhao, Zhen-Qi; Zhao, Yan-Rui; Zheng, Yin-Feng; Zhou, Jun-Lin

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Rationale: Bacterial meningitis (BM) has been recognized as a rare complication of spinal surgery. However, there are few reports on the management of postoperative BM in patients who have undergone spinal surgery. The initial approach to the treatment of patients suspected with acute BM depends on the stage at which the syndrome is recognized, the speed of the diagnostic evaluation, and the need for antimicrobial and adjunctive therapy. Patient concerns: Here, we report the case of a patient with lumbar spinal stenosis and underwent a transforaminal lumbar interbody fusion at L4–L5. The dura mater was damaged intraoperatively. After the surgery, the patient displayed dizziness and vomiting. A CSF culture revealed Pseudomonas aeruginosa infection. Diagnoses: The patient was diagnosed with postoperative BM. Interventions: Antibiotic was administered intravenously depends on the organism isolated. Nevertheless, the patient's clinical condition continued to deteriorate. The patient underwent 2 open revision surgeries for dural lacerations and cyst debridement repair. Outcomes: The patient's mental status returned to normal and her headaches diminished. The patient did not have fever and the infection healed. Lessons: Surgical intervention is an effective method to treat BM after spinal operation in cases where conservative treatments have failed. Further, early surgical repair of dural lacerations and cyst debridement can be a treatment option for selected BM patients with complications including pseudomeningocele, wound infection, or cerebrospinal fluid leakage. PMID:28296723

  1. Ability of procalcitonin to predict bacterial meningitis in the emergency department.

    PubMed

    Morales Casado, M I; Moreno Alonso, F; Juárez Belaunde, A L; Heredero Gálvez, E; Talavera Encinas, O; Julián-Jiménez, A

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to analyse and compare procalcitonin (PCT) and C-reactive protein (CRP) as tools for detecting bacterial meningitis and predicting bacteraemia. Prospective, observational, and descriptive analytical study of 98 consecutive patients aged ≥15 years and diagnosed with acute meningitis in an emergency department between August 2009 and July 2013. We analysed 98 patients with AM (66 males [67%]); mean age was 44±21 years. The diagnosis was bacterial meningitis in 38 patients (20 with bacteraemia); viral meningitis in 33; probable viral meningitis in 15; and presumptively diagnosed partially treated acute meningitis in 12. PCT had the highest area under the ROC curve (AUC) (0.996; 95% CI, 0.987-1; p<0.001). With a cutoff of ≥ 0.74 ng/ml, PCT achieved 94.7% sensitivity, 100% specificity, negative predictive value (NPV) of 93.9%, and positive predictive value (PPV) of 100%. The mean levels for PCT were11.47±7.76 ng/ml in bacterial meningitis vs. 0.10±0.15 ng/ml in viral meningitis (p <0.001). The AUC for CRP was 0.916 and a cutoff of ≥ 90 mg/L achieved 67.5% sensitivity, 86.3% specificity, PPV of 89.2%, and NPV of 90.4%. As a predictor of bacteraemia in bacterial meningitis, only PCT delivered a significant difference (14.7±7.1 ng/mL vs. 4.68±3.54 ng/mL, p<0.001). A cutoff of ≥ 1.1 ng/mL achieved 94.6% sensitivity, 72.4% specificity, NPV of 95.4%, and PPV of 69.2%; the AUC was 0.965 (95% CI, 0.921-1; p<0.001). PCT has a high diagnostic power for acute meningitis in emergency department patients. PCT outperforms CRP in the detection of bacterial aetiology and is a good predictor of bacteraemia in bacterial meningitis. Copyright © 2014 Sociedad Española de Neurología. Published by Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  2. Bacterial meningitis in the absence of cerebrospinal fluid pleocytosis: A case report and review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Hase, Ryota; Hosokawa, Naoto; Yaegashi, Makito; Muranaka, Kiyoharu

    2014-09-01

    Elevation of cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) cell count is a key sign in the diagnosis of bacterial meningitis. However, there have been reports of bacterial meningitis with no abnormalities in initial CSF testing. This type of presentation is extremely rare in adult patients. Here, a case involving an 83-year-old woman who was later diagnosed with bacterial meningitis caused by Neisseria meningitidis is described, in whom CSF at initial and second lumbar puncture did not show elevation of cell counts. Twenty-six non-neutropenic adult cases of bacterial meningitis in the absence of CSF pleocytosis were reviewed. The frequent causative organisms were Streptococcus pneumoniae and N meningitidis. Nineteen cases had bacteremia and seven died. The authors conclude that normal CSF at lumbar puncture at an early stage cannot rule out bacterial meningitis. Therefore, repeat CSF analysis should be considered, and antimicrobial therapy must be started immediately if there are any signs of sepsis or meningitis.

  3. Addition of host genetic variants in a prediction rule for post meningitis hearing loss in childhood: a model updating study.

    PubMed

    Sanders, Marieke S; de Jonge, Rogier C J; Terwee, Caroline B; Heymans, Martijn W; Koomen, Irene; Ouburg, Sander; Spanjaard, Lodewijk; Morré, Servaas A; van Furth, A Marceline

    2013-07-23

    Sensorineural hearing loss is the most common sequela in survivors of bacterial meningitis (BM). In the past we developed a validated prediction model to identify children at risk for post-meningitis hearing loss. It is known that host genetic variations, besides clinical factors, contribute to severity and outcome of BM. In this study it was determined whether host genetic risk factors improve the predictive abilities of an existing model regarding hearing loss after childhood BM. Four hundred and seventy-one Dutch Caucasian childhood BM were genotyped for 11 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in seven different genes involved in pathogen recognition. Genetic data were added to the original clinical prediction model and performance of new models was compared to the original model by likelihood ratio tests and the area under the curve (AUC) of the receiver operating characteristic curves. Addition of TLR9-1237 SNPs and the combination of TLR2 + 2477 and TLR4 + 896 SNPs improved the clinical prediction model, but not significantly (increase of AUC's from 0.856 to 0.861 and from 0.856 to 0.875 (p = 0.570 and 0.335, respectively). Other SNPs analysed were not linked to hearing loss. Although addition of genetic risk factors did not significantly improve the clinical prediction model for post-meningitis hearing loss, AUC's of the pre-existing model remain high after addition of genetic factors. Future studies should evaluate whether more combinations of SNPs in larger cohorts has an additional value to the existing prediction model for post meningitis hearing loss.

  4. Challenges of bacterial meningitis case management in low income settings: an experience from Ethiopia.

    PubMed

    Gudina, Esayas Kebede; Tesfaye, Markos; Adane, Aynishet; Lemma, Kinfe; Shibiru, Tamiru; Pfister, Hans-Walter; Klein, Matthias

    2016-07-01

    To investigate the current diagnostic and therapeutic strategies used in the care of patients with suspected bacterial meningitis at teaching hospitals in Ethiopia. This was a hospital-based retrospective study conducted at four teaching hospitals in different regions of Ethiopia. Participants were patients aged 14 years and older treated for suspected bacterial meningitis. Presenting complaints, diagnostic strategies used and treatments given were obtained from clinical records. A total of 425 patients were included in the study; 52.7% were men and 83.8% were younger than 50 years. Fever, headache, neck stiffness and impaired consciousness were the most common clinical presentations; 55.5% underwent lumbar puncture. Overall, only 96 (22.6%) patients had cerebrospinal fluid abnormalities compatible with bacterial meningitis. A causative bacterium was identified in only 14 cases. Ceftriaxone was used as the empiric treatment of choice, either alone or in combination with other antibiotics; 17.6% of patients were also given vancomycin. Adjunctive dexamethasone was given to 50.4%. Most patients treated as bacterial meningitis did not receive a proper diagnostic workup. The choice of antibiotic was not tailored to the specific clinical condition of the patient. Such an approach may result in poor treatment outcomes and lead to antibiotic resistance. Management of patients with suspected bacterial meningitis should be supported by analysis of cerebrospinal fluid, and treatment should be tailored to local evidence and current evidence-based recommendations. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  5. Prevalence of hearing loss in children following bacterial meningitis in a tertiary referral hospital.

    PubMed

    Karanja, Benson Wahome; Oburra, Herbert Ouma; Masinde, Peter; Wamalwa, Dalton

    2014-03-11

    This study aimed to examine hearing function in a group of children aged between the ages of six months and twelve years admitted with bacterial meningitis so as to determine the prevalence and degree of sensorineural hearing loss in them. This prospective study was conducted in the audiology unit and paediatric wards of Kenyatta National Hospital, KNH. The study involved 83 children (49 males and 34 females) between the ages of six months and twelve years admitted with bacterial meningitis. The median age for the children examined was 14 months (range from 5 to 120 months). They were sequentially recruited and at discharge following treatment, underwent age-appropriate hearing testing to evaluate presence and degree of hearing loss which was analyzed. The study was limited by the absence of otoacoustic emission and auditory brainstem responses testing by excluding the significant numbers of children below six months of age admitted with bacterial meningitis. Thirty six of the 83 children (44.4%) were found to have at least a unilateral mild sensorineural hearing loss during initial audiologic testing. Of the children with hearing loss, 22 (26.5%) had mild or moderate sensorineural hearing loss and 14 (16.9%) had severe or profound sensorineural hearing loss. Sensorineural hearing loss was shown to be highly prevalent in children treated for bacterial meningitis. There is therefore a need for objective hearing assessment in infants and young children following bacterial meningitis and further studies involving larger population sizes.

  6. Uniform research case definition criteria differentiate tuberculous and bacterial meningitis in children.

    PubMed

    Solomons, Regan S; Wessels, Marie; Visser, Douwe H; Donald, Peter R; Marais, Ben J; Schoeman, Johan F; van Furth, Anne M

    2014-12-01

    Tuberculous meningitis (TBM) research is hampered by low numbers of microbiologically confirmed TBM cases and the fact that they may represent a select part of the disease spectrum. A uniform TBM research case definition was developed to address these limitations, but its ability to differentiate TBM from bacterial meningitis has not been evaluated. We assessed all children treated for TBM from 1985 to 2005 at Tygerberg Children's Hospital, Cape Town, South Africa. For comparative purposes, a group of children with culture-confirmed bacterial meningitis, diagnosed between 2003 and 2009, was identified from the National Health Laboratory Service database. The performance of the proposed case definition was evaluated in culture-confirmed TBM and bacterial meningitis cases. Of 554 children treated for TBM, 66 (11.9%) were classified as "definite TBM," 408 (73.6%) as "probable TBM," and 72 (13.0%) as "possible TBM." "Probable TBM" criteria identified culture-confirmed TBM with a sensitivity of 86% and specificity of 100%; sensitivity was increased but specificity reduced when using "possible TBM" criteria (sensitivity 100%, specificity 56%). "Probable TBM" criteria accurately differentiated TBM from bacterial meningitis and could be considered for use in clinical trials; reduced sensitivity in children with early TBM (stage 1 disease) remains a concern. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Infectious Diseases Society of America. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  7. Predictive factors of bacterial meningitis in the patients seen in emergency departments.

    PubMed

    Morales-Casado, María Isabel; Julián-Jiménez, Agustín; Lobato-Casado, Paula; Cámara-Marín, Belén; Pérez-Matos, Julio Alberto; Martínez-Maroto, Tamara

    2017-04-01

    To analyse and compare predictive factors of bacterial meningitis in the patients seen in the Emergency Departments (ED) due to an episode of acute meningitis (AM). A prospective, observational study was carried out in patients aged 15 years and older seen in ED due to AM between August 2009 and November 2015. Thirty-two variables for predicting bacterial meningitis were assessed. They covered epidemiological, comorbidity, clinical and analytical factors. Multivariate logistic regression analysis was performed. The study included 154 patients. The diagnosis was bacterial meningitis in 53 (34.4%) patients. Four variables were significantly associated with bacterial aetiology: cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) lactate concentration ≥33mg/dl (odds ratio [OR] 50.84; 95% confidence interval [CI]: 21.63-119.47, P<.001), serum procalcitonin (PCT) ≥0.8ng/ml (OR 46.34; 95%CI: 19.71-108.89; P<.001), CSF glucose <60% of blood value (OR 20.82; 95%CI: 8.86-48.96; P=.001), CSF polymorphonuclears greater than 50% (OR 20.19; 95%CI: 8.31-49.09; P=.002]. The area under the curve for the model serum PCT≥0.8ng/ml plus CSF lactate ≥33mg/dl was 0.992 (95%CI: 0.979-1; P<.001), and achieved 99% sensitivity and 98% specificity for predicting bacterial meningitis. Serum PCT with CSF lactate, CSF glucose and CSF polymorphonuclears evaluated in an initial assessment in the ED for patients with AM, achieved an excellent diagnostic usefulness for predicting bacterial meningitis. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier España, S.L.U. and Sociedad Española de Enfermedades Infecciosas y Microbiología Clínica. All rights reserved.

  8. [Chemoprophylaxis and vaccine for prevention of bacterial meningitis in children].

    PubMed

    Bourrillon, Antoine; Bingen, Edouard

    2004-05-15

    Given the devastating nature of Neisseria meningitidis disease and emergence of resistant strains prevention through chemoprophylaxis and meningococcal vaccine remains the best approach to control this serious infection. Chemoprophylaxis may limited strictly to the contact subjects. Polysaccharide meningococcal serogroups A, C, Y and W135 should be given less than 10 days to patients with prolonged contact with the index case. Meningococcal C conjugate vaccine constitutes an additional advantage in the prevention of meningococcal meningitis in children < 2 years. High Haemophilus serotype B coverage level led to near-disappearance of H. influenzae serotype b meningitis but chemoprophylaxis remains indicated.

  9. Comparison of enterovirus detection in cerebrospinal fluid with Bacterial Meningitis Score in children.

    PubMed

    Pires, Frederico Ribeiro; Franco, Andréia Christine Bonotto Farias; Gilio, Alfredo Elias; Troster, Eduardo Juan

    2017-01-01

    To measure the role of enterovirus detection in cerebrospinal fluid compared with the Bacterial Meningitis Score in children with meningitis. A retrospective cohort based on analysis of medical records of pediatric patients diagnosed as meningitis, seen at a private and tertiary hospital in São Paulo, Brazil, between 2011 and 2014. Excluded were patients with critical illness, purpura, ventricular shunt or recent neurosurgery, immunosuppression, concomitant bacterial infection requiring parenteral antibiotic therapy, and those who received antibiotics 72 hours before lumbar puncture. The study included 503 patients. Sixty-four patients were excluded and 94 were not submitted to all tests for analysis. Of the remaining 345 patients, 7 were in the Bacterial Meningitis Group and 338 in the Aseptic Meningitis Group. There was no statistical difference between the groups. In the Bacterial Meningitis Score analysis, of the 338 patients with possible aseptic meningitis (negative cultures), 121 of them had one or more points in the Bacterial Meningitis Score, with sensitivity of 100%, specificity of 64.2%, and negative predictive value of 100%. Of the 121 patients with positive Bacterial Meningitis Score, 71% (86 patients) had a positive enterovirus detection in cerebrospinal fluid. Enterovirus detection in cerebrospinal fluid was effective to differentiate bacterial from viral meningitis. When the test was analyzed together with the Bacterial Meningitis Score, specificity was higher when compared to Bacterial Meningitis Score alone. Avaliar o papel da pesquisa de enterovírus no líquido cefalorraquidiano em comparação com o Escore de Meningite Bacteriana em crianças com meningite. Coorte retrospectiva, realizada pela análise de prontuários, incluindo pacientes pediátricos, com diagnóstico de meningite e atendidos em um hospital privado e terciário, localizado em São Paulo, entre 2011 e 2014. Foram excluídos os pacientes com doença crítica, púrpura, deriva

  10. [Degree of emergency for antibiotherapy in patients with presumed bacterial meningitis: experimental and clinical data].

    PubMed

    Wolff, M; Decazes, J-M

    2009-01-01

    No prospective randomized clinical studies are available to determine exactly how much time should be spent on investigation before initiating antibiotherapy in a patient with presumed bacterial meningitis. Experimental models show that antibiotics should be administered before the inflammatory response, but at this time the patient's symptoms are often unspecific. Models also demonstrate that a gain of time is beneficial at any time, in terms of inflammation, magnitude of bacteremia, or loss of hearing. Very few clinical studies address the acceptable delay between admission and administration of antibiotics and two of these show a correlation with outcome in adult meningitis. The available data supports the recommendation that hospital investigation of a patient with presumed bacterial meningitis should be conducted in such a way that efficient antimicrobial chemotherapy will be initiated within one hour after arrival.

  11. Evaluation of bacterial meningitis surveillance data of the northern region, Ghana, 2010-2015.

    PubMed

    Kaburi, Basil Benduri; Kubio, Chrysantus; Kenu, Ernest; Ameme, Donne Kofi; Mahama, Jacob Yakubu; Sackey, Samuel Oko; Afari, Edwin Andrew

    2017-01-01

    Bacterial meningitis is a disease of major public health importance especially for countries such as Ghana; whose northern part lies within the meningitis belt. The Northern region of Ghana has been recording cases with outbreaks over the years. In order to generate evidence to improve surveillance, we described the epidemiology of bacterial meningitis using surveillance data of the northern region. Bacterial meningitis datasets from January 2010 to December 2015 for all the 26 districts of the Northern region were retrieved from line lists. Data were analyzed in terms of person, place, time, and identity of causative organisms using descriptive statistics. The results were presented as proportions, rates, tables and graphs. A total of 1,176 cases were reported. Of these, 53.5% (629/1,176) were males. The proportion of cases aged 0 to 29 years was 77.4%. The Overall Case Fatality Rate (CFR) was 9.7% (114/1,176). About 65% of all cases were recorded from January to April. Only 23.7% (279/1,176) of cases were laboratory-confirmed. Neisseria meningitides and Streptococcus pneumonia accounted for 91.4% of confirmed cases. Over the period, the incidence reduced from 9.0/100,000 population to 3.8/100,000 population and CFR reduced from 16.6% to 5.7%. Most cases of bacterial meningitis were recorded in the dry season and in persons younger than 30 years. Less than a quarter of cases were laboratory confirmed, and no new bacteria species were identified. Both morbidity and mortality rates were on the decline. There is the need to consolidate these gains by intensifying meningitis surveillance and improving on the rate of laboratory case confirmation.

  12. Comparison of culture and PCR methods in the diagnosis of bacterial meningitis.

    PubMed

    Başpınar, Emel Ödemiş; Dayan, Saim; Bekçibaşı, Muhammed; Tekin, Recep; Ayaz, Celal; Deveci, Özcan; Hoşoğlu, Salih

    Our aim in this study is to compare the standard culture method with the multiplex PCR and the Speed-Oligo(®) Bacterial Meningitis Test (SO-BMT) - a hybridization-based molecular test method - during the CSF examination of the patients with the pre-diagnosis of acute bacterial meningitis. For the purposes of this study, patients with acute bacterial meningitis treated at the Dicle University Medical Faculty Hospital, Infectious Diseases and Clinical Microbiology Clinic between December 2009 and April 2012 were retrospectively evaluated. The diagnosis of bacterial meningitis was made based on the clinical findings, laboratory test anomalies, CSF analysis results, and the radiological images. Growth was observed in the CSF cultures of 10 out of the 57 patients included in the study (17.5%) and Streptococcus pneumoniae was isolated in all of them. The CSF samples of 34 patients (59.6%) were positive according to the SO-BMT and S. pneumoniae was detected in 33 of the samples (97.05%), while Neisseria meningitidis was found in 1 sample (2.95%). In a total of 10 patients, S. pneumoniae was both isolated in the CSF culture and detected in the SO-BMT. The culture and the SO-BMT were negative in 23 of the CSF samples. There was no sample in which the CSF culture was positive although the SO-BMT was negative. While SO-BMT seems to be a more efficient method than bacterial culturing to determine the pathogens that most commonly cause bacterial meningitis in adults, further studies conducted on larger populations are needed in order to assess its efficiency and uses. Copyright © 2016 Sociedade Brasileira de Microbiologia. Published by Elsevier Editora Ltda. All rights reserved.

  13. Intracerebral Hemorrhages in Adults with Community Associated Bacterial Meningitis in Adults: Should We Reconsider Anticoagulant Therapy?

    PubMed Central

    Mook-Kanamori, Barry B.; Fritz, Daan; Brouwer, Matthijs C.; van der Ende, Arie; van de Beek, Diederik

    2012-01-01

    Objective To study the incidence, clinical presentation and outcome of intracranial hemorrhagic complications in adult patients with community associated bacterial meningitis. Methods Nationwide prospective cohort study from all hospitals in the Netherlands, from 1 March 2006, through 31 December 2010. Results Of the 860 episodes of bacterial meningitis that were included, 24 were diagnosed with intracranial hemorrhagic complications: 8 upon presentation and 16 during clinical course. Clinical presentation between patients with or without intracranial hemorrhage was similar. Causative bacteria were Streptococcus pneumoniae in 16 patients (67%), Staphylococcus aureus in 5 (21%), Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Listeria monocytogenes both in 1 patient (4%). Occurrence of intracranial hemorrhage was associated with death (63% vs. 15%, P<0.001) and unfavorable outcome (94% vs. 34%, P<0.001). The use of anticoagulants on admission was associated with a higher incidence of intracranial hemorrhages (odds ratio 5.84, 95% confidence interval 2.17–15.76). Conclusion Intracranial hemorrhage is a rare but devastating complication in patients with community-associated bacterial meningitis. Since anticoagulant therapy use is associated with increased risk for intracranial hemorrhage, physicians may consider reversing or temporarily discontinuing anticoagulation in patients with bacterial meningitis. PMID:23028898

  14. Acute bacterial meningitis with coincident methamphetamine use: a case report and review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Heninger, Michael; Collins, Kim A

    2013-07-01

    Methamphetamine is a synthetic stimulant that can adversely affect the central nervous system and the immune system. Through various mechanisms, methamphetamine is toxic to neurons, endothelial cells, lymphocytes, granulocytes, and macrophages resulting in systemic damage. Reported is the sudden demise of an otherwise healthy 31-year-old woman with a history of stimulant abuse. At autopsy, acute bacterial meningitis was identified. Microbiology cultures grew a single isolate of Streptococcus pneumoniae. Toxicology was positive for amphetamine (0.13 mg/L) and methamphetamine (0.8 mg/L). The cause of death was classified as acute bacterial meningitis with methamphetamine use. Either the acute bacterial meningitis or the methamphetamine toxicity would have been sufficient to result in death; however, the concurrent pathophysiology of the two entities must be understood. A review of the current literature assesses the mechanisms of injury attributed to acute and chronic methamphetamine use, bacterial meningitis, and the synergy between the two. © 2013 American Academy of Forensic Sciences.

  15. Acute Bacterial Meningitis in Qatar: A Hospital-Based Study from 2009 to 2013.

    PubMed

    Khan, Fahmi Yousef; Abu-Khattab, Mohammed; Almaslamani, Eman Abdulrahman; Hassan, Abubaker Ahmed; Mohamed, Shehab Fareed; Elbuzdi, Abdurrahman Ali; Elmaki, Nada Yagoub; Anand, Deshmukh; Sanjay, Doiphode

    2017-01-01

    Bacterial meningitis is a common medical condition in Qatar. The aim of this study was to describe the clinical characteristics of bacterial meningitis, the frequency of each pathogen, and its sensitivity to antibiotics and risk factors for death. This retrospective study was conducted at Hamad General Hospital between January 1, 2009, and December 31, 2013. We identified 117 episodes of acute bacterial meningitis in 110 patients. Their mean age was 26.4 ± 22.3 years (range: 2-74) and 81 (69.2%) of them were male patients. Fifty-nine episodes (50.4%) were community-acquired infection and fever was the most frequent symptom (94%), whereas neurosurgery is the most common underlying condition. Coagulase-negative staphylococci were the most common causative agent, of which 95% were oxacillin-resistant, while 63.3% of Acinetobacter spp. showed resistance to meropenem. The in-hospital mortality was 14 (12%). Only the presence of underlying diseases, hypotension, and inappropriate treatment were found to be independent predictors of mortality. Acute bacterial meningitis predominantly affected adults and coagulase-negative staphylococci species were the common causative agent in Qatar with majority of infections occurring nosocomially. More than 90% of all implicated coagulase-negative staphylococci strains were oxacillin-resistant.

  16. Acute Bacterial Meningitis in Qatar: A Hospital-Based Study from 2009 to 2013

    PubMed Central

    Abu-Khattab, Mohammed; Almaslamani, Eman Abdulrahman; Hassan, Abubaker Ahmed; Mohamed, Shehab Fareed; Elbuzdi, Abdurrahman Ali; Elmaki, Nada Yagoub; Anand, Deshmukh; Sanjay, Doiphode

    2017-01-01

    Background and Objectives Bacterial meningitis is a common medical condition in Qatar. The aim of this study was to describe the clinical characteristics of bacterial meningitis, the frequency of each pathogen, and its sensitivity to antibiotics and risk factors for death. Patients and Methods This retrospective study was conducted at Hamad General Hospital between January 1, 2009, and December 31, 2013. Results We identified 117 episodes of acute bacterial meningitis in 110 patients. Their mean age was 26.4 ± 22.3 years (range: 2–74) and 81 (69.2%) of them were male patients. Fifty-nine episodes (50.4%) were community-acquired infection and fever was the most frequent symptom (94%), whereas neurosurgery is the most common underlying condition. Coagulase-negative staphylococci were the most common causative agent, of which 95% were oxacillin-resistant, while 63.3% of Acinetobacter spp. showed resistance to meropenem. The in-hospital mortality was 14 (12%). Only the presence of underlying diseases, hypotension, and inappropriate treatment were found to be independent predictors of mortality. Conclusion Acute bacterial meningitis predominantly affected adults and coagulase-negative staphylococci species were the common causative agent in Qatar with majority of infections occurring nosocomially. More than 90% of all implicated coagulase-negative staphylococci strains were oxacillin-resistant. PMID:28785577

  17. A hemorrhagic pineal cyst with a bacterial meningitis-like manifestation and benign outcome.

    PubMed

    Yamamoto, Kanji; Omodaka, Toshikazu; Watanabe, Rie; Kodaira, Minori

    2013-01-01

    Pineal cysts are a common incidental finding in imaging studies, and the majority of such cysts are asymptomatic. However, hemorrhaging pineal cysts, which are considered to be rare, are often associated with severe symptoms. We herein describe the case of a 58-year-old patient with the novel manifestation of a bleeding pineal cyst, who had a benign outcome without any surgical treatment. Although the clinical manifestations resembled those of bacterial meningitis, magnetic resonance images suggested chemical meningitis caused by an intracystic hemorrhage and rupture of the pineal cyst.

  18. Cerebrospinal Fluid and Serum Ampicillin Levels in Bacterial Meningitis Patients after Intravenous and Intramuscular Administration

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1981-01-01

    MEDICAL RESEARCH UNIT No. 3 L(CAIRO, ARAB REPUBLIC OF.IYPT) FPO NEW YORK 09527 1 ;,, ,.w oo o~ ) •8 ,S. . Best Available Copy Scand J Infect Dis 13: 237-238...service at large. Scand J Infect Ii PIT1 238 1. A. Mlikhail et al. Table 1. Bacterial meningitis patients included in Table 1I. (’erehrospiiuil fluid...with Staph . aureus meningitis was given staph - I h 6 0.3 1-2.50 1.09 10.00-28.50 17.83 cillin IM after 2 days of ampicillin therapy 4 h 4 0.22-2.90 1.02

  19. Bacterial Meningitis: A Density-Equalizing Mapping Analysis of the Global Research Architecture

    PubMed Central

    Pleger, Niklas; Kloft, Beatrix; Quarcoo, David; Zitnik, Simona; Mache, Stefanie; Klingelhoefer, Doris; Groneberg, David A

    2014-01-01

    Bacterial meningitis is caused by a variety of pathogens and displays an important public health threat all over the world. Despite the necessity to develop customized public health-related research projects, a thorough study of global meningitis research is not present, so far. Therefore, the aim of this study was a combined density-equalizing and scientometric study. To evaluate the scientific efforts of bibliometric methods, density-equalizing algorithms and large-scale data analysis of the Web of Science were applied in the period between 1900 and 2007. From this, 7998 publications on bacterial meningitis have been found. With a number of 2698, most publications have been written by U.S. authors, followed by the UK (912), Germany (749) and France (620). This dominance can also be shown in the international cooperation. The specific citation analyses reveal that the nation with the highest average citation rate (citations per publications) was Norway (26.36), followed by Finland (24.16) and the U.S. (24.06). This study illustrates the architecture of global research on bacterial meningitis and points to the need for customized research programs with a focus on local public health issues in countries with a low development index, but high incidences, to target this global public health problem. PMID:25272079

  20. Diagnostic value of latex agglutination test in diagnosis of acute bacterial meningitis.

    PubMed

    Mohammadi, Syeda Fasiha; Patil, Asha B; Nadagir, Shobha D; Nandihal, Namrata; Lakshminarayana, S A

    2013-10-01

    To know the incidence of bacterial meningitis in children below five years of age. To compare conventional culture and antigen detection methods (Latex agglutination test). 100 CSF samples of clinically suspected meningitis cases in children below 5 years of age were included. The samples were subjected to cell count, Gram stain, culture and LAT. The organisms isolated in the study were characterized according to standard procedures. Of the 100 cases studied, 31 cases were diagnosed as ABM by Gram stain, culture and latex agglutination test as per WHO criteria. The hospital frequency of ABM was 1.7%. 15 (48.38) cases were culture positive. Gram stain was positive in 22(70.96) cases and LAT in 17(54.83) cases. Haemophilus influenzae was the most common causative agent of acute bacterial meningitis followed by S.pneumoniae. Case fatality rate was 45.16%. The sensitivity and specificity of LAT was 66.66% and 87.91% respectively. Bacterial meningitis is a medical emergency and early diagnosis and treatment is life saving and reduces chronic morbidity. LAT was more sensitive compared to conventional Gram stain and Culture technique in identifying the fastidious organisms like H.influenzae, S.pneumoniae and Group B Streptococcus. However, the combination of Gram stain, Culture and LAT proved to be more productive than any of the single tests alone.

  1. Nested PCR Assay for Eight Pathogens: A Rapid Tool for Diagnosis of Bacterial Meningitis.

    PubMed

    Bhagchandani, Sharda P; Kubade, Sushant; Nikhare, Priyanka P; Manke, Sonali; Chandak, Nitin H; Kabra, Dinesh; Baheti, Neeraj N; Agrawal, Vijay S; Sarda, Pankaj; Mahajan, Parikshit; Ganjre, Ashish; Purohit, Hemant J; Singh, Lokendra; Taori, Girdhar M; Daginawala, Hatim F; Kashyap, Rajpal S

    2016-02-01

    Bacterial meningitis is a dreadful infectious disease with a high mortality and morbidity if remained undiagnosed. Traditional diagnostic methods for bacterial meningitis pose a challenge in accurate identification of pathogen, making prognosis difficult. The present study is therefore aimed to design and evaluate a specific and sensitive nested 16S rDNA genus-based polymerase chain reaction (PCR) assay using clinical cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) for rapid diagnosis of eight pathogens causing the disease. The present work was dedicated to development of an in-house genus specific 16S rDNA nested PCR covering pathogens of eight genera responsible for causing bacterial meningitis using newly designed as well as literature based primers for respective genus. A total 150 suspected meningitis CSF obtained from the patients admitted to Central India Institute of Medical Sciences (CIIMS), India during the period from August 2011 to May 2014, were used to evaluate clinical sensitivity and clinical specificity of optimized PCR assays. The analytical sensitivity and specificity of our newly designed genus-specific 16S rDNA PCR were found to be ≥92%. With such a high sensitivity and specificity, our in-house nested PCR was able to give 100% sensitivity in clinically confirmed positive cases and 100% specificity in clinically confirmed negative cases indicating its applicability in clinical diagnosis. Our in-house nested PCR system therefore can diagnose the accurate pathogen causing bacterial meningitis and therefore be useful in selecting a specific treatment line to minimize morbidity. Results are obtained within 24 h and high sensitivity makes this nested PCR assay a rapid and accurate diagnostic tool compared to traditional culture-based methods.

  2. Bacterial meningitis in Finland, 1995-2014: a population-based observational study.

    PubMed

    Polkowska, Aleksandra; Toropainen, Maija; Ollgren, Jukka; Lyytikäinen, Outi; Nuorti, J Pekka

    2017-06-06

    Bacterial meningitis remains an important cause of morbidity and mortality worldwide. Its epidemiological characteristics, however, are changing due to new vaccines and secular trends. Conjugate vaccines against Haemophilus influenzae type b and Streptococcus pneumoniae (10-valent) were introduced in 1986 and 2010 in Finland. We assessed the disease burden and long-term trends of five common causes of bacterial meningitis in a population-based observational study. A case was defined as isolation of S. pneumoniae, Neisseria meningitidis, Streptococcus agalactiae, Listeria monocytogenes or H. influenzae from cerebrospinal fluid and reported to national, population-based laboratory surveillance system during 1995-2014. We evaluated changes in incidence rates (Poisson or negative binomial regression), case fatality proportions (χ(2)) and age distribution of cases (Wilcoxon rank-sum). During 1995-2014, S. pneumoniae and N. meningitidis accounted for 78% of the total 1361 reported bacterial meningitis cases. H. influenzae accounted for 4% of cases (92% of isolates were non-type b). During the study period, the overall rate of bacterial meningitis per 1 00 000 person-years decreased from 1.88 cases in 1995 to 0.70 cases in 2014 (4% annual decline (95% CI 3% to 5%). This was primarily due to a 9% annual reduction in rates of N. meningitidis (95% CI 7% to 10%) and 2% decrease in S. pneumoniae (95% CI 1% to 4%). The median age of cases increased from 31 years in 1995-2004 to 43 years in 2005-2014 (p=0.0004). Overall case fatality proportion (10%) did not change from 2004 to 2009 to 2010-2014. Substantial decreases in bacterial meningitis were associated with infant conjugate vaccination against pneumococcal meningitis and secular trend in meningococcal meningitis in the absence of vaccination programme. Ongoing epidemiological surveillance is needed to identify trends, evaluate serotype distribution, assess vaccine impact and develop future vaccination strategies.

  3. Omp85 genosensor for detection of human brain bacterial meningitis.

    PubMed

    Dash, Sandip Kumar; Sharma, Minakshi; Khare, Shashi; Kumar, Ashok

    2013-06-01

    The 5'-thiolated DNA probe based on specific virulence gene, Omp85, was immobilized onto a screen-printed gold electrode followed by hybridization with 6-100 ng/6 μl (5.9 × 10(5)-9.3 × 10(6 )c.f.u.) of Neisseria meningitidis single stranded genomic DNA (ssG-DNA) for 10 min at 25 °C from the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) of a meningitis patient. The Omp85 genosensor can detect as little as 6 ng ssG-DNA in 6 μl CSF of a human brain meningitis patient in 30 min including a response time of 1 min by cyclic voltammetry, differential pulse voltammetry (DPV) and electrochemical impedance. The sensitivity of the genosensor electrode was 2.6(μA/cm(2))/ng using DPV with regression coefficient (R(2)) 0.954. The genosensor was characterized using Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy and atomic force microscopy. Omp85 genosensor was stable for 12 months at 4 °C with 12 % loss in DPV current.

  4. [Meningeal sarcoma in childhood. Experiences with 17 cases].

    PubMed

    Martínez-Avalos, A; Rivera-Luna, R; Altamirano-Alvarez, E; Martínez-Guerra, G; Ayón-Cárdenas, A E; Cárdenas-Cardos, R

    1989-01-01

    A total of 17 patients with meningeal sarcoma were diagnosed and treated at the National Institute of Pediatrics in Mexico City in a period of 15 years. Among the diagnostic methodology used in this group we found that angiography is still the best to be used so far. On the other hand, the chemotherapy protocol employed did not improve the survival obtained with surgery and radiotherapy. Therefore we suggest that a new chemotherapy protocol has to be designed in order to obtain better results. Of particular interest, we found in this group of patients that the time elapsed between the first sign of disease to the moment of diagnosis varied from 2 months to 10 years without any prognostic significance.

  5. Bacterial meningitis after sinus surgery in five adult horses.

    PubMed

    Bach, Fabienne S; Bodo, Gabor; Kuemmerle, Jan M; Bienert-Zeit, Astrid; Hainisch, Edmund K; Simhofer, Hubert

    2014-08-01

    To report meningoencephalitis as a complication after paranasal sinus surgery in 5 horses. Case series. Adult horses (n = 5). Medical records (2005-2010) of 5 horses that developed neurologic signs after sinus surgery were reviewed to identify potential risk factors, cause(s), or common pathways for infection. Underlying diseases were primary (n = 1) and secondary sinusitis (4) because of apical dental infection (1), sinus cyst (2), or masses in the ethmoturbinate region (2). Horses were treated by conventional surgical approaches and aftercare including repeated sinus lavage. Four horses had undulating pyrexia postoperatively despite antimicrobial therapy. All horses developed neurologic signs, eventually unresponsive to treatment. Suppurative meningoencephalitis was diagnosed macro- and/or microscopically on necropsy in all horses. Meningitis is a rare but fatal complication after sinus surgery in horses. © Copyright 2014 by The American College of Veterinary Surgeons.

  6. The latex agglutination test versus counterimmunoelectrophoresis for rapid diagnosis of bacterial meningitis

    PubMed Central

    Bortolussi, Robert; Wort, Arthur J.; Casey, Stephanie

    1982-01-01

    A modified latex agglutination (LA) test was compared with Gram-staining and counterimmunoelectrophoresis (CIE) for the rapid detection in the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) of antigen to Haemophilus influenzae type b, Neisseria meningitidis groups A, B and C, Escherichia coli K1, Streptococcus pneumoniae and group B streptococci, seven frequent causes of bacterial meningitis in children. Of 50 CSF samples from patients with culture-proven bacterial meningitis 90% were correctly shown by the LA test to contain antigen of the responsible organism. Gram-staining revealed organisms in 80% of 45 of these samples. In 75% of the 40 samples that were of sufficient volume for CIE, positive results for the appropriate antigen were obtained. The concentration of antigen detected in the CSF by the LA test varied from undetectable to 800 000 ng/ml. Patients with a high concentration (more than 2000 ng/ml or a positive result at dilutions of CSF over 1/8) were significantly more likely to have a poor response to therapy (two died and two had persistent pleocytosis or bacteria in the CSF) than patients with a lower concentration (4/16 v. 0/18, P < 0.05). After appropriate therapy was begun the concentration of antigen fell dramatically, but measurable amounts of antigen persisted in the CSF for up to 6 days. The LA test detected bacterial antigen at concentrations 2 to 70 times below the lower limit detected by CIE. In seven additional patients who had received antibiotics before lumbar puncture was performed the LA test detected antigen from meningitis-causing bacteria even though cultures of the CSF were sterile. In another 145 patients who did not have meningitis the results of the LA test were negative. The LA test, done as described in this article, is easier to perform than CIE and should be a useful addition to the diagnostic tests carried out on the CSF of any patient suspected of having meningitis. PMID:6749272

  7. The Sequelae of Acute Purulent Meningitis in Childhood

    PubMed Central

    Hutchison, Patricia A.; Kovacs, Michael C.

    1963-01-01

    Of a series of 122 children suffering from acute purulent meningitis at the Children's Hospital, Winnipeg, in the years 1952-56, 12 (9.8%) succumbed, all deaths occurring in those 12 months of age or less. Fortyone of the survivors were re-studied 2.5 to 7.5 years after their acute illness to assess the nature and incidence of sequelae, the relationship of sequelae to the severity of the acute illness, and the correlation between the various methods of identifying sequelae. Five children exhibited psychiatric evidence of organic brain damage; seven, neurological abnormality; 11, electroencephalographic abnormality. Three had defective intelligence and nine psychological test evidence of organic brain damage. Children with sequelae tended to have several abnormal test results, the total number with neuropsychiatric and/or psychological sequelae being 11 (26%). There was a positive correlation between the severity of the acute illness and the presence of neuropsychiatric sequelae; also between neuropsychiatric sequelae, defective intelligence and psychological evidence of brain damage. No correlation existed between the electroencephalographic abnormality and neuropsychiatric defect. PMID:13955939

  8. "Bacterial Meningitis in children and adolescents: an observational study based on the national surveillance system"

    PubMed Central

    Dickinson, Félix O; Pérez, Antonio E

    2005-01-01

    Background Bacterial meningitis is a group of life threatening infections that mostly affect children and adolescents, and may be the cause of severe neurological sequelae. Cuba has implemented massive vaccination programmes against both Neisseria meningitidis (serogroup C in 1979 and B in 1987), and Haemophilus influenzae type b (1999), two of the main causal pathogens. We described and discussed some epidemiological aspects of the current status of bacterial meningitis to learn from the Cuban experience. Methods A nationwide observational study on children and adolescents from 1 to 18 years old was carried out from 1998 to 2003, estimating the incidence and case-fatality rate by age group and causal pathogens, as well as the seasonality and frequency of overcrowded dormitories. The association between disease and attendance to day care centres or boarding schools was estimated by using relative risk (Chi-squared test and Fisher Exact Test). Results The overall number of cases was 1023; the incidence ranged from 3.4 to 8.5 per 100 000 population, with the higher figures in children 1–5 years old (16.8 per 100 000 population). Streptococcus pneumoniae, Haemophilus influenzae type b and Neisseria meningitidis serogroup B were the main identified agents. The average case-fatality rate was 10.5% and the most lethal agents were Streptococcus pneumoniae (27%) and Haemophilus influenzae type b (10.7%). Overall percentage of cases who slept in overcrowded dormitories was 15%, reaching 30.6% in adolescents. Seasonality was only evident among meningococcal meningitis cases between September–October. The attendance to boarding high school showed an association with disease only in 1998 and 1999 (RR = 2.1; p > 0.05). Conclusion The highest incidence of bacterial meningitis was observed among children from 1–5 years old. Pneumococcus was both the leading causal and the most lethal agent. Sleeping in overcrowded dormitories was more frequent among adolescents. No strong

  9. Brillouin spectroscopy as a new method of screening for increased CSF total protein during bacterial meningitis.

    PubMed

    Steelman, Zachary; Meng, Zhaokai; Traverso, Andrew J; Yakovlev, Vladislav V

    2015-05-01

    Bacterial meningitis is a disease of pronounced clinical significance, especially in the developing world. Immediate treatment with antibiotics is essential, and no single test can provide a conclusive diagnosis. It is well established that elevated total protein in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) is associated with bacterial meningitis. Brillouin spectroscopy is a widely used optical technique for noninvasive determination of the elastic moduli of materials. We found that elevated protein levels in CSF alter the fluid elasticity sufficiently to be measurable by Brillouin spectroscopy, with model healthy and diseased fluids distinguishable to marked significance (P = 0.014), which increases with sample concentration by dialysis. Typical raw output of a 2-stage VIPA Brillouin spectrometer: inelastically scattered Brillouin peaks (arrows) and elastically scattered incident radiation (center cross).

  10. Prospective randomized comparison of cefepime and cefotaxime for treatment of bacterial meningitis in infants and children.

    PubMed Central

    Sáez-Llorens, X; Castaño, E; García, R; Báez, C; Pérez, M; Tejeira, F; McCracken, G H

    1995-01-01

    Ninety infants and children were prospectively randomized to receive cefepime (n = 43) or cefotaxime (n = 47) for therapy of bacterial meningitis. The two treatment groups were comparable in terms of age, duration of illness before enrollment, history of seizures, clinical status on admission, and etiology. Six (7%) patients died--two treated with cefepime and four treated with cefotaxime. Clinical response, cerebrospinal fluid sterilization, development of complications, antibiotic toxicity, and hospital stay were similar for the two treatment regimens. Concentrations of cefepime in cerebrospinal fluid varied from 55 to 95 times greater than the maximal MIC required by the causative pathogens. Audiologic and/or neurologic sequelae were found in 16% of the cefepime-treated patients and 15% of the cefotaxime-treated patients examined 2 to 6 months after discharge. We conclude that cefepime is safe and therapeutically equivalent to cefotaxime for management of bacterial meningitis in infants and children. PMID:7785999

  11. Prospective randomized comparison of cefepime and cefotaxime for treatment of bacterial meningitis in infants and children.

    PubMed

    Sáez-Llorens, X; Castaño, E; García, R; Báez, C; Pérez, M; Tejeira, F; McCracken, G H

    1995-04-01

    Ninety infants and children were prospectively randomized to receive cefepime (n = 43) or cefotaxime (n = 47) for therapy of bacterial meningitis. The two treatment groups were comparable in terms of age, duration of illness before enrollment, history of seizures, clinical status on admission, and etiology. Six (7%) patients died--two treated with cefepime and four treated with cefotaxime. Clinical response, cerebrospinal fluid sterilization, development of complications, antibiotic toxicity, and hospital stay were similar for the two treatment regimens. Concentrations of cefepime in cerebrospinal fluid varied from 55 to 95 times greater than the maximal MIC required by the causative pathogens. Audiologic and/or neurologic sequelae were found in 16% of the cefepime-treated patients and 15% of the cefotaxime-treated patients examined 2 to 6 months after discharge. We conclude that cefepime is safe and therapeutically equivalent to cefotaxime for management of bacterial meningitis in infants and children.

  12. [Autochthonous acute viral and bacterial infections of the central nervous system (meningitis and encephalitis)].

    PubMed

    Pérez-Ruiz, Mercedes; Vicente, Diego; Navarro-Marí, José María

    2008-07-01

    Rapid diagnosis of acute viral and bacterial infections of the central nervous system (meningitis and encephalitis) is highly important for the clinical management of the patient and helps to establish early therapy that may solve life-threatening situations, to avoid unnecessary empirical treatments, to reduce hospital stay, and to facilitate appropriate interventions in the context of public health. Molecular techniques, especially real-time polymerase chain reaction, have become the fastest and most sensitive diagnostic procedures for autochthonous viral meningitis and encephalitis, and their role is becoming increasingly important for the diagnosis and control of most frequent acute bacterial meningitides. Automatic and closed systems may encourage the widespread and systematic use of molecular techniques for the diagnosis of these neurological syndromes in most laboratories.

  13. Brain sarcoma of meningeal origin after cranial irradiation in childhood acute lymphocytic leukemia. Case report

    SciTech Connect

    Tiberin, P.; Maor, E.; Zaizov, R.; Cohen, I.J.; Hirsch, M.; Yosefovich, T.; Ronen, J.; Goldstein, J.

    1984-10-01

    The authors report their experience with an unusual case of intracerebral sarcoma of meningeal cell origin in an 8 1/2-year-old girl. This tumor occurred 6 1/2 years after cranial irradiation at relatively low dosage (2200 rads) had been delivered to the head in the course of a multimodality treatment for acute lymphocytic leukemia. The tumor recurred approximately 10 months after the first surgical intervention. Macroscopic total excision of the recurrent growth followed by whole-brain irradiation (4500 rads) failed to eradicate it completely and local recurrence prompted reoperation 18 months later. This complication of treatment in long-term childhood leukemia survivors is briefly discussed, as well as the pathology of meningeal sarcomas.

  14. Prevalence and predictors of bacterial meningitis in young infants with fever without a source.

    PubMed

    Martinez, Elena; Mintegi, Santiago; Vilar, Begoña; Martinez, Maria Jesus; Lopez, Amaia; Catediano, Estibaliz; Gomez, Borja

    2015-05-01

    Classical criteria differ when performing cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) analysis in infants younger than 90 days with fever without a source (FWS). Our objectives were to analyze the prevalence and microbiology of bacterial meningitis in this group and its prevalence in relation to clinical and laboratory risk factors. This is a substudy of a prospective registry including all infants of this age with FWS seen between September 2003 and August 2013 in a Pediatric Emergency Department of a Tertiary Teaching Hospital. Lumbar puncture was performed in 639 (27.0%) of the 2362 infants with FWS seen, the rate being higher in not well-appearing infants [60.9% vs. 25.7%; odds ratio (OR), 4.49] and in those ≤21 days old (70.1% vs. 20.4%; OR, 9.14). Eleven infants were diagnosed with bacterial meningitis: 9 were ≤21 days old (prevalence 2.8% vs. 0.1%; OR, 30.42) and 5 were not well-appearing infants (5.7% vs. 0.2%; OR, 23.06). Bacteria isolated were Streptococcus agalactiae (3), Escherichia coli (3), Listeria monocytogenes (3), Streptococcus pneumoniae (1) and Neisseria meningitidis (1). None of the 1975 well-appearing infants >21 days old were diagnosed with bacterial meningitis, regardless of whether biomarkers were altered. In infants younger than 90 days with FWS, performing CSF analysis for ruling out bacterial meningitis must be strongly considered in not well-appearing infants and in those ≤21 days old. The recommendation of systematically performing CSF analysis in well-appearing infants 22-90 days of age on the basis of analytical criteria alone must be reevaluated.

  15. Factors influencing neurological outcome of children with bacterial meningitis at the emergency department.

    PubMed

    Bargui, Fatiha; D'Agostino, Irene; Mariani-Kurkdjian, Patricia; Alberti, Corinne; Doit, Catherine; Bellier, Nathalie; Morin, Laurence; Galli Gibertini, Giuliano; Smail, Assia; Zanin, Anna; Lorrot, Mathie; Dauger, Stéphane; Neve, Mathieu; Faye, Albert; Armoogum, Priscilla; Bourrillon, Antoine; Bingen, Edouard; Mercier, Jean-Christophe; Bonacorsi, Stéphane; Nigrovic, Lise E; Titomanlio, Luigi

    2012-09-01

    We performed a cohort study of children who survived bacterial meningitis after the neonatal period at a single pediatric center in France over a 10-year period (1995-2004) to identify predictors of death and long-term neurological deficits in children with bacterial meningitis. We performed multivariate regression to determine independent predictors of death and neurologic deficits. We identified 101 children with bacterial meningitis of which 19 died during initial hospitalization. Need for mechanical ventilation [hazard ratio (HR) 11.5, 95 % confidence interval (CI) 2.4-55.5)] and thrombocytopenia defined as a platelet count <150 × 10(9) per liter (HR 0.6, 95 % CI 0.4-0.9) at presentation were associated with death during initial hospitalization. At final assessment, 42 of the 70 survivors had no neurologic deficits identified; 20 had a single deficit, and eight had multiple deficits. A delay in initiation of antibiotics (HR 1.3, 95 % CI 1.1-1.7) and hydrocephalus on computed tomographic scan (HR 2.6, 95 % CI 1.1-6.0) were associated with having one or more long-term neurologic deficits. Identification of children at risk of death or long-term neurologic sequelae may allow therapeutic interventions to be directed to children at the highest risk.

  16. Broad-range real time PCR and DNA sequencing for the diagnosis of bacterial meningitis.

    PubMed

    Deutch, Susanna; Pedersen, Lisbeth N; Pødenphant, Lone; Olesen, Rikke; Schmidt, Michael B; Møller, Jens K; Ostergaard, Lars

    2006-01-01

    Rapid aetiological diagnosis of bacterial meningitis is crucial for the early targeting of antimicrobial and adjuvant therapy. Broad-range polymerase chain reaction (PCR) targeting the 16S rRNA gene allows aetiological diagnosis of bacterial meningitis when applied to cerebrospinal fluid (CSF). We assessed the additional diagnostic effect of applying a novel broad-range real time PCR and subsequent DNA sequencing to culture, microscopy, and broad-range conventional PCR on CSF in patients with suspected bacterial meningitis. Broad-range conventional PCR and broad-range real time PCR with subsequent DNA sequencing were applied to 206 CSF specimens collected consecutively from 203 patients aged 6 d to 86 y. Patients' charts were reviewed for clinical information. 17 pathogens were identified by PCR and DNA sequencing or culture. Three specimens were negative by culture but positive by broad-range real time PCR. Three specimens were positive by culture but negative by broad-range real time PCR. Compared with culture, the sensitivity of broad-range real time PCR was 86%, and the specificity 98%. Conventional PCR resulted in a sensitivity of 64% and specificity of 98%. Broad-range real time PCR was generally comparable to culture of CSF and may be a useful supplement, particularly when antimicrobial therapy has been administered. Broad-range real time PCR was more sensitive than broad-range conventional PCR and microscopy.

  17. Cochlear ossification in patients with profound hearing loss following bacterial meningitis.

    PubMed

    Caye-Thomasen, Per; Dam, Mikkel Seidelin; Omland, Silje Haukali; Mantoni, Margit

    2012-07-01

    Cochlear ossification following bacterial meningitis is related to causative pathogen, but not age at disease or time point of evaluation. However, progression may occur over time, especially in case of primary signs of ossification. To investigate the occurrence and degree of cochlear ossification on CT and MRI in patients with bilateral profound hearing loss following bacterial meningitis, in relation to causative pathogen, age at disease, and time point of evaluation. Progression of ossification in cases that underwent more than one scan was evaluated. In the period 1982-2008, 47 cochlear implantations were performed in 34 consecutive candidates suffering from bilateral profound hearing loss following bacterial meningitis. A retrospective review of patient files and preoperative CT and MR images was performed. Cochlear ossification was observed in 35% of patients and 26% of ears on CT. The corresponding values for MRI were 44 and 30% (difference not significant). Streptococcus pneumoniae infection caused ossification more frequently than Neisseria meningitidis. No difference was found between pediatric and adult cases, and the occurrence of ossification was not related to the time point of evaluation. Signs of progressive ossification were found in cases with two CT scans, especially if ossification was present at the first scan.

  18. Investigation of the Selection and Timing of Pharmacological Therapy in Community-Acquired Bacterial Meningitis

    PubMed Central

    Sheley, Jared; Willman, Dave; Downen, Julie; Bergman, Scott

    2016-01-01

    Background: Bacterial meningitis is responsible for significant morbidity and mortality, but early appropriate therapy is expected to improve outcomes. National treatment guidelines were published in 2004, but no assessment of their utilization in the U.S. has been reported. Objectives: To measure adherence to meningitis treatment guidelines and describe patient outcomes in relation to recommended antibiotic and dexamethasone use. Methods: Retrospective chart reviews were performed on patients with bacterial meningitis who presented to emergency departments at two community teaching hospitals. Timing and appropriateness of antibiotic and dexamethasone use were assessed according to national guidelines. Patient outcomes of mortality, length of hospitalization, and neurological complications were analyzed based on therapies received. Results: A total of 161 cases were identified; 38 met inclusion criteria. Recommended antibiotic regimens were administered to 52.6% of patients, while 26.3% received that regimen within eight hours. Dexamethasone was used in 44.7% of patients, but was administered prior to antibiotics in only 10.5% of cases. Mortality was numerically lower with recommended antibiotic therapy but did not reach statistical significance (5.0% versus 16.7%; P = 0.33). Median length of stay was eight days for patients who received recommended antibiotics and 11 days for those who did not (P = 0.69). One patient who received dexamethasone had a neurological complication at discharge compared with four patients not receiving dexamethasone (5.9% versus 19.0%, P = 0.35). Conclusion: Current treatment guidelines provide clinicians with direction on optimal care for patients with bacterial meningitis, and an opportunity exists to improve implementation of these recommendations, which could improve patient outcomes. PMID:27408520

  19. Bacterial Meningitis in Brazil: Baseline Epidemiologic Assessment of the Decade Prior to the Introduction of Pneumococcal and Meningococcal Vaccines

    PubMed Central

    Azevedo, Luciano Cesar Pontes; Toscano, Cristiana M.; Bierrenbach, Ana Luiza

    2013-01-01

    Background Bacterial meningitis is associated with significant burden in Brazil. In 2010, both 10-valent pneumococcal conjugate vaccine and meningococcal capsular group C conjugate vaccine were introduced into the routine vaccination schedule. Haemophilus influenzae type b vaccine was previously introduced in 1999. This study presents trends in demographics, microbiological characteristics and seasonality patterns of bacterial meningitis cases in Brazil from 2000 to 2010. Methods and Findings All meningitis cases confirmed by clinical and/or laboratory criteria notified to the national information system for notifiable diseases between 2000 and 2010 were analyzed. Proportions of bacterial meningitis cases by demographic characteristics, criteria used for confirmation and etiology were calculated. We estimated disease rates per 100,000 population and trends for the study period, with emphasis on H. influenzae, N. meningitidis and S. pneumoniae cases. In the decade, 341,805 cases of meningitis were notified in Brazil. Of the 251,853 cases with defined etiology, 110,264 (43.8%) were due to bacterial meningitis (excluding tuberculosis). Of these, 34,997 (31.7%) were due to meningococcal disease. The incidence of bacterial meningitis significantly decreased from 3.1/100,000 population in 2000–2002 to 2.14/100,000 in 2009–2010 (p<0.01). Among cases of meningococcal disease, the proportion of those associated with group C increased from 41% in 2007 to 61.7% in 2010, while the proportion of group B disease progressively declined. Throughout the study period, an increased number of cases occurred during winter. Conclusions Despite the reduction in bacterial meningitis incidence during the last decade, it remains a significant healthcare issue in Brazil. Meningococcal disease is responsible for the majority of the cases with group C the most common capsular type. Our study demonstrates the appropriateness of introduction of meningococcal vaccination in Brazil

  20. [A visualization study of research papers on childhood tuberculous meningitis in China and abroad over the past decade].

    PubMed

    Gan, Jing; Ye, Shao-Lin; Luo, Rong; Mu, De-Zhi; Wan, Chao-Min

    2016-05-01

    To introduce co-word analysis into the analysis of the current research status of childhood tuberculous meningitis, to compare the similarities and differences in research topics of the field in China and abroad over the past decade, and to discover the advantages and weak links in the study field in China. PubMed, CNKI, VIP, and Wanfang Data were searched for the articles which met the inclusion criteria. Ucinet 6.0 and Netdraw were used for co-occurrence analysis, and the co-article relationship between high-frequency key words was visualized. A total of 226 articles abroad and 186 Chinese articles on childhood tuberculous meningitis were obtained. The figures for co-occurrence analysis of high-frequency key words in research articles on childhood tuberculous meningitis in China and abroad were successfully plotted. Compared with the studies in China, the studies abroad were more sophisticated and well-developed, with more studies on drug-resistant tuberculosis, the relationship between tuberculosis and AIDS, and the epidemiology of tuberculosis. The key words listed in the studies abroad were more standard. The studies in China on childhood tuberculous meningitis concentrated on vaccination and nursing. In general, the studies on childhood tuberculous meningitis in China and abroad have the same directions. The studies abroad have a complicated network and use more standard key words. The studies on childhood tuberculous meningitis are well conducted in China. However, more studies are needed for drug-resistant tuberculosis, the relationship between tuberculosis and AIDS, and the epidemiology of tuberculosis in future.

  1. Clinical Prognosis in Neonatal Bacterial Meningitis: The Role of Cerebrospinal Fluid Protein

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Dongying; Ren, Fang; Luo, Zhongcheng; Zhang, Yongjun

    2015-01-01

    Neonates are at high risk of meningitis and of resulting neurologic complications. Early recognition of neonates at risk of poor prognosis would be helpful in providing timely management. From January 2008 to June 2014, we enrolled 232 term neonates with bacterial meningitis admitted to 3 neonatology departments in Shanghai, China. The clinical status on the day of discharge from these hospitals or at a postnatal age of 2.5 to 3 months was evaluated using the Glasgow Outcome Scale (GOS). Patients were classified into two outcome groups: good (167 cases, 72.0%, GOS = 5) or poor (65 cases, 28.0%, GOS = 1–4). Neonates with good outcome had less frequent apnea, drowsiness, poor feeding, bulging fontanelle, irritability and more severe jaundice compared to neonates with poor outcome. The good outcome group also had less pneumonia than the poor outcome group. Besides, there were statistically significant differences in hemoglobin, mean platelet volume, platelet distribution width, C-reaction protein, procalcitonin, cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) glucose and CSF protein. Multivariate logistic regression analyses suggested that poor feeding, pneumonia and CSF protein were the predictors of poor outcome. CSF protein content was significantly higher in patients with poor outcome. The best cut-offs for predicting poor outcome were 1,880 mg/L in CSF protein concentration (sensitivity 70.8%, specificity 86.2%). After 2 weeks of treatment, CSF protein remained higher in the poor outcome group. High CSF protein concentration may prognosticate poor outcome in neonates with bacterial meningitis. PMID:26509880

  2. The role of adjunctive dexamethasone in the treatment of bacterial meningitis: an updated systematic meta-analysis

    PubMed Central

    Shao, Mei; Xu, Peng; Liu, Jun; Liu, Wenyun; Wu, Xiujie

    2016-01-01

    Background Bacterial meningitis is a serious infection in children and adults worldwide, with considerable morbidity, mortality, and severe neurological sequelae. Dexamethasone is often used before antibiotics in cases of this disease, and improves outcomes. Objective Although several studies have identified the role of adjunctive dexamethasone therapy in the treatment of bacterial meningitis, the results are still inconclusive. The aim of this study was to systematically evaluate the therapeutic and adverse effect of adjunctive dexa-methasone in patients with bacterial meningitis. Materials and methods Relevant randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trials of dexamethasone in bacterial meningitis published between 2000 and 2016 were retrieved from the common electronic databases. The odds ratio (OR) and risk ratio (RR) with their 95% confidence interval (CI) were employed to calculate the effect. Results A total of ten articles including 2,459 bacterial meningitis patients (1,245 in the dex-amethasone group and 1,214 in the placebo group) were included in this meta-analysis. Our result found that dexamethasone was not associated with a significant reduction in follow-up mortality (292 of 1,245 on dexamethasone versus 314 of 1,214 on placebo; OR =0.91, 95% CI =0.80–1.03, P=0.14) and severe neurological sequelae (22.4% versus 24.1%, OR =0.84, 95% CI =0.54–1.29, P=0.42). However, dexamethasone seemed to reduce hearing loss among survivors (21.2% versus 26.1%; OR =0.76, 95% CI =0.59–0.98, P=0.03). No significant difference was found between these two groups in adverse events. Conclusion Our results suggested that adjunctive dexamethasone might not be beneficial in the treatment of bacterial meningitis. Future studies with more data are needed to further prove the role of dexamethasone in bacterial meningitis. PMID:27478366

  3. Acute phase proteins in serum and cerebrospinal fluid in the course of bacterial meningitis.

    PubMed

    Paradowski, M; Lobos, M; Kuydowicz, J; Krakowiak, M; Kubasiewicz-Ujma, B

    1995-08-01

    We carried out estimations of the following acute phase proteins: C-reactive protein (CRP), alpha-1-antitrypsin (AAT), alpha-1-acid glycoprotein (AAG), alpha-2-ceruloplasmin (CER), and alpha-2-haptoglobin (HPT) in serum and in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) in patients with bacterial meningitis (BM, n = 30) and viral meningitis (VM, n = 30). We have shown that determinations of concentrations of AAG and CRP in serum and CER in CSF are useful in differentiation between BM and VM. The diagnostic power of these three tests (the areas under their ROC curves equal 0.942, 0.929, and 0.931, respectively) is bigger, though statistically not significantly, than that of traditional parameters of BM in CSF, i.e., total protein concentration and white blood cell count. Determination of AAG, CRP, and AAT in serum is a valuable monitoring marker in the course of BM treatment. Convenience of serum sampling constitutes an advantage over traditional BM parameters in CSF.

  4. Evaluation of cerebrospinal fluid lactic acid levels as an aid in differential diagnosis of bacterial and viral meningitis in adults.

    PubMed Central

    Lannigan, R; MacDonald, M A; Marrie, T J; Haldane, E V

    1980-01-01

    The level of lactic acid in cerebrospinal fluid has been suggested as a useful diagnostic parameter to differentiate between bacterial and viral meningitis, especially in patients partially treated before admission to hospital. A concentration of greater than or equal to 35 mg/dl, determined by either gas-liquid chromatography or an enzymatic method, has been considered in several studies to provide definite evidence of meningitis of bacterial origin, whereas a lower level indicates no bacterial involvement. Over the past 18 months, we have analyzed by the enzymatic method the lactate level in 493 spinal fluids submitted from 434 adult patients with various conditions involving the central nervous system. Fifty fluids had a lactate level of greater than 35 mg/dl, of which 19 were cases of infective meningitis of varying etiology. The 435 specimens with lactate levels within the range considered normal included three cases of infective meningitis, of which two were cryptococcal and one was bacterial. In this adult study, the lactate level in the cerebrospinal fluid did not provide unequivocal evidence of bacterial infection and did not provide assistance to any greater degree than the standard parameters of leukocyte count, protein, and glucose contents in the differential diagnosis of bacterial meningitis from that of any other etiology. PMID:7372796

  5. Clinical Value of Assessing Cytokine Levels for the Differential Diagnosis of Bacterial Meningitis in a Pediatric Population.

    PubMed

    Ye, Qing; Shao, Wen-Xia; Shang, Shi-Qiang; Shen, Hong-Qiang; Chen, Xue-Jun; Tang, Yong-Min; Yu, Yong-Lin; Mao, Jian-Hua

    2016-03-01

    We performed a prospective observational study to evaluate the utility of measuring inflammatory cytokine levels to discriminate bacterial meningitis from similar common pediatric diseases. Inflammatory cytokine levels and other cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) physicochemical indicators were evaluated in 140 patients who were diagnosed with bacterial meningitis via microbiological culture or PCR assay. The CSF concentrations of interleukin (IL)-6 and IL-10, CSF/blood IL-6 and IL-10 ratios, CSF white blood cell count, and CSF micro total protein were significantly elevated in bacterial meningitis patients compared with healthy children or patients with viral encephalitis, epilepsy, or febrile convulsions (P < 0.001). The area under the curve values for CSF concentrations of IL-6 and IL-10, CSF/blood IL-6 and IL-10 ratios, CSF white blood cell count, and CSF micro total protein to identify bacterial meningitis episodes by receiver-operating characteristic analysis were 0.988, 0.949, 0.995, 0.924, 0.945, and 0.928, respectively. The area under the curve for the combination of CSF IL-6 and CSF/blood IL-6 ratio was larger than that for either parameter alone, and the combination exhibited enhanced specificity and positive predictive value. After effective meningitis treatment, CSF IL-6 levels dropped significantly. These results suggest that CSF IL-6 and CSF/blood IL-6 ratio are good biomarkers in discriminating bacterial meningitis. Evaluating CSF IL-6 and CSF/blood IL-6 ratio in combination can improve diagnostic efficiency. Additionally, CSF IL-6 levels can be used to monitor the effects of bacterial meningitis treatment.

  6. Genetic Variation in the β2-Adrenocepter Gene Is Associated with Susceptibility to Bacterial Meningitis in Adults

    PubMed Central

    Adriani, Kirsten S.; Brouwer, Matthijs C.; Baas, Frank; Zwinderman, Aeilko H.; van der Ende, Arie; van de Beek, Diederik

    2012-01-01

    Recently, the biased β2-adrenoceptor/β-arrestin pathway was shown to play a pivotal role in crossing of the blood brain barrier by Neisseria meningitidis. We hypothesized that genetic variation in the β2-adrenoceptor gene (ADRB2) may influence susceptibility to bacterial meningitis. In a prospective genetic association study we genotyped 542 patients with CSF culture proven community acquired bacterial meningitis and 376 matched controls for 2 functional single nucleotide polymorphisms in the β2-adrenoceptor gene (ADRB2). Furthermore, we analyzed if the use of non-selective beta-blockers, which bind to the β2-adrenoceptor, influenced the risk of bacterial meningitis. We identified a functional polymorphism in ADRB2 (rs1042714) to be associated with an increased risk for bacterial meningitis (Odds ratio [OR] 1.35, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.04–1.76; p = 0.026). The association remained significant after correction for age and was more prominent in patients with pneumococcal meningitis (OR 1.52, 95% CI 1.12–2.07; p = 0.007). For meningococcal meningitis the difference in genotype frequencies between patients and controls was similar to that in pneumococcal meningitis, but this was not statistically significant (OR 1.43, 95% CI 0.60–3.38; p = 0.72). Patients with bacterial meningitis had a lower frequency of non-selective beta-blockers use compared to the age matched population (0.9% vs. 1.8%), although this did not reach statistical significance (OR 1.96 [95% CI 0.88–4.39]; p = 0.09). In conclusion, we identified an association between a genetic variant in the β2-adrenoceptor and increased susceptibility to bacterial meningitis. The potential benefit of pharmacological treatment targeting the β2-adrenoceptor to prevent bacterial meningitis in the general population or patients with bacteraemia should be further studied in both experimental studies and observational cohorts. PMID:22624056

  7. Corticosteroid Administration and Outcome of Adolescents and Adults With Acute Bacterial Meningitis: A Meta-analysis

    PubMed Central

    Assiri, Abdullah M.; Alasmari, Faisal A.; Zimmerman, Valerie A.; Baddour, Larry M.; Erwin, Patricia J.; Tleyjeh, Imad M.

    2009-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To systematically assess the effect of the adjunctive administration of corticosteroids in the treatment of acute bacterial meningitis. METHODS: We performed a systematic review and meta-analysis by searching several databases for reports (published from January 1966 through February 2008) of placebo-controlled randomized trials of corticosteroid use in the treatment of adolescents and adults with acute bacterial meningitis. We used random-effects models. Sources of heterogeneity were explored by preplanned subgroup analyses. RESULTS: The 4 eligible trials (published between 1999 and 2007) were of high methodological quality and included 1261 adult patients. Overall, the short-term mortality rate associated with corticosteroid administration was not significantly lower than that associated with placebo (relative risk [RR], 0.81; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.54-1.20; I2=54%). A significant interaction was found between the effect of corticosteroids and the income status of the country (P=.02) and the prevalence of infection with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) among study populations (P=.03). The administration of corticosteroids resulted in a lower short-term mortality rate than did the administration of placebo in high-income countries (pooled RR, 0.5; 95% CI, 0.27-0.92; I2=0%) and in the studies with a low prevalence of infection with HIV (RR, 0.66; 95% CI, 0.44-0.99; I2=0%). In studies from high-income countries, the number needed to treat with corticosteriods to prevent 1 death and 1 neurologic sequela was 12.5 (95% CI, 7.1-100.0) and 11.0 (95% CI, 5.6-100.0), respectively. CONCLUSION: Our meta-analysis suggests that the adjunctive administration of corticosteroids is beneficial in the treatment of adolescents and adults with bacterial meningitis in patient populations similar to those seen in high-income countries and in areas with a low prevalence of HIV infection. PMID:19411436

  8. Clinical characteristics and therapeutic outcomes of nosocomial super-infection in adult bacterial meningitis.

    PubMed

    Huang, Chi-Ren; Chen, Shu-Fang; Lu, Cheng-Hsien; Chuang, Yao-Chung; Tsai, Nai-Wen; Chang, Chiung-Chih; Wang, Hung-Chen; Chien, Chun-Chih; Chang, Wen-Neng

    2011-05-18

    Super-infection in adult bacterial meningitis (ABM) is a condition wherein the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) grows new pathogen(s) during the therapeutic course of meningitis. It is an uncommon but clinically important condition rarely examined in literature. Twenty-seven episodes of super-infection states in 21 ABM patients collected in a 9.5-year study period (January 2001 to June 2010) were evaluated. The clinical characteristics, implicated pathogens, results of antimicrobial susceptibility tests, and therapeutic outcomes were analyzed. Twenty-one patients (13 men, 8 women) aged 25-73 years (median, 45 years) had post-neurosurgical state as the preceding event and nosocomial infection. The post-neurosurgical states included spontaneous intracranial hemorrhage (ICH) with craniectomy or craniotomy with extra-ventricular drainage (EVD) or ventriculo-peritoneal shunt (VPS) in 10 patients, traumatic ICH with craniectomy or craniotomy with EVD or VPS in 6 patients, hydrocephalus s/p VPS in 2 patients, and one patient each with cerebral infarct s/p craniectomy with EVD, meningeal metastasis s/p Omaya implant, and head injury. All 21 patients had EVD and/or VP shunt and/or Omaya implant during the whole course of ABM. Recurrent fever was the most common presentation and the implicated bacterial pathogens were protean, many of which were antibiotic resistant. Most patients required adjustment of antibiotics after the pathogens were identified but even with antimicrobial therapy, 33.3% (7/21) died. Morbidity was also high among survivors. Super-infection in ABM is usually seen in patients with preceding neurosurgical event, especially insertion of an external drainage device. Repeat CSF culture is mandatory for diagnostic confirmation because most of the implicated bacterial strains are non-susceptible to common antibiotics used. Unusual pathogens like anaerobic bacteria and fungi may also appear. Despite antimicrobial therapy, prognosis remains poor.

  9. Large scale genomic analysis shows no evidence for pathogen adaptation between the blood and cerebrospinal fluid niches during bacterial meningitis

    PubMed Central

    Lees, John A.; Kremer, Philip H. C.; Manso, Ana S.; Croucher, Nicholas J.; Ferwerda, Bart; Serón, Mercedes Valls; Oggioni, Marco R.; Parkhill, Julian; Brouwer, Matthijs C.; van der Ende, Arie; van de Beek, Diederik

    2017-01-01

    Recent studies have provided evidence for rapid pathogen genome diversification, some of which could potentially affect the course of disease. We have previously described such variation seen between isolates infecting the blood and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) of a single patient during a case of bacterial meningitis. Here, we performed whole-genome sequencing of paired isolates from the blood and CSF of 869 meningitis patients to determine whether such variation frequently occurs between these two niches in cases of bacterial meningitis. Using a combination of reference-free variant calling approaches, we show that no genetic adaptation occurs in either invaded niche during bacterial meningitis for two major pathogen species, Streptococcus pneumoniae and Neisseria meningitidis. This study therefore shows that the bacteria capable of causing meningitis are already able to do this upon entering the blood, and no further sequence change is necessary to cross the blood–brain barrier. Our findings place the focus back on bacterial evolution between nasopharyngeal carriage and invasion, or diversity of the host, as likely mechanisms for determining invasiveness. PMID:28348877

  10. Increased expression of BDNF and proliferation of dentate granule cells after bacterial meningitis.

    PubMed

    Tauber, Simone C; Stadelmann, Christine; Spreer, Annette; Brück, Wolfgang; Nau, Roland; Gerber, Joachim

    2005-09-01

    Proliferation and differentiation of neural progenitor cells is increased after bacterial meningitis. To identify endogenous factors involved in neurogenesis, expression of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF), TrkB, nerve growth factor (NGF), and glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor (GDNF) was investigated. C57BL/6 mice were infected by intracerebral injection of Streptococcus pneumoniae. Mice were killed 30 hours later or treated with ceftriaxone and killed 4 days after infection. Hippocampal BDNF mRNA levels were increased 2.4-fold 4 days after infection (p = 0.026). Similarly, BDNF protein levels in the hippocampal formation were higher in infected mice than in control animals (p = 0.0003). This was accompanied by an elevated proliferation of dentate granule cells (p = 0.0002). BDNF protein was located predominantly in the hippocampal CA3/4 area and the hilus of the dentate gyrus. The density of dentate granule cells expressing the BDNF receptor TrkB as well as mRNA levels of TrkB in the hippocampal formation were increased 4 days after infection (p = 0.027 and 0.0048, respectively). Conversely, NGF mRNA levels at 30 hours after infection were reduced by approximately 50% (p = 0.004). No significant changes in GDNF expression were observed. In conclusion, increased synthesis of BDNF and TrkB suggests a contribution of this neurotrophic factor to neurogenesis after bacterial meningitis.

  11. Characteristics of neonatal bacterial meningitis in a teaching hospital in Taiwan from 1984-1997.

    PubMed

    Chang Chien, H Y; Chiu, N C; Li, W C; Huang, F Y

    2000-06-01

    During the period from 1984 to 1997, 85 bacterial meningitis neonates with positive cerebrospinal fluid cultures were treated. The ages of these patients ranged from 1 to 28 days. The male to female ratio was 1.7 to 1. The most common causative agent was group B beta-hemolytic streptococci (GBS, 31.8%), followed by Escherichia coli (20%), Proteus mirabilis (7.1%), Enterobacter cloacae (5.9%), other streptococci excluding Streptococcus pneumoniae (5.9%), Chryseobacterium meningosepticum (5.9%), enterococci (4.7%), and Klebsiella pneumoniae (3.5%). Among the 85 patients treated, 51 (60%) were younger than 7 days old. Among them, dyspnea was the most common clinical manifestation. In contrast, fever and diarrhea were seen more frequently in neonates with late onset of disease (after seven days of age). Ampicillin and cefotaxime were the most commonly used antibiotics. The most frequently encountered complications were hydrocephalus and seizures. Since 1991, GBS has overtaken E. coli as the leading cause of neonatal bacterial meningitis. This was accompanied by a fall in the mortality rate, but a sustained high incidence of complications and sequelae. The results of this study highlight the importance of developing strategies to prevent group B streptococcal infection.

  12. Fatal Bacterial Meningitis Possibly Associated with Substandard Ceftriaxone--Uganda, 2013.

    PubMed

    Nickerson, Jason W; Attaran, Amir; Westerberg, Brian D; Curtis, Sharon; Overton, Sean; Mayer, Paul

    2016-01-01

    The burden of disease from bacterial meningitis is highest in low-income countries (1). Early initiation of antibiotic therapy is important in reducing the risk for mortality. Current treatment guidelines recommend the use of an expanded-spectrum cephalosporin (cefotaxime or ceftriaxone) (2), but these therapies increasingly are limited by drug resistance, and are threatened by the proliferation of substandard and falsified medicines (3,4). In February 2013, a case of bacterial meningitis following a middle ear infection was diagnosed in an adolescent at the Mulago National Referral Hospital in Kampala, Uganda. Once-daily treatment with 2 g of intravenous ceftriaxone administered according to guidelines failed, and the patient died. To determine whether the patient's treatment failure and subsequent death might be related to the ceftriaxone product administered, a sealed vial similar to the one administered to the patient was analyzed at the University of Ottawa, Canada, and was found to contain only 0.455 g of the drug, not 1 g as stated by the manufacturer. This would have resulted in subtherapeutic dosing. Substandard medicines are a global problem that disproportionately affects low-income countries, leading to fatal consequences and promoting the emergence of drug resistance (4).

  13. Bacterial Meningitis

    MedlinePlus

    ... Pregnant women are at increased risk of developing listeriosis , an infection caused by the bacteria Listeria monocytogenes . Pregnant women with listeriosis typically experience only fever and other flu-like ...

  14. Serum cleaved Tau protein and neurobehavioral battery of tests as markers of brain injury in experimental bacterial meningitis.

    PubMed

    Irazuzta, J E; de Courten-Myers, G; Zemlan, F P; Bekkedal, M Y; Rossi, J

    2001-09-14

    Brain injury due to bacterial meningitis affects multiple areas of the brain with a heterogeneous distribution generating a challenge to assess severity. Tau proteins are microtubular binding proteins localized in the axonal compartment of neurons. Brain injury releases cleaved Tau proteins (C-tau) into the extracellular space where they are transported to the cerebral spinal fluid. We hypothesized that C-tau crosses the blood-brain barrier during inflammation and that it can be detected in serum. The correlation between serum C-tau levels and the extent of the meningitic insult was examined. Furthermore, we studied whether the use of a subset of neurobehavioral tasks can assess the extent of brain injury after meningitis. The tests were chosen primarily for their ability to detect deficits in the acoustic system, low brain, reflexive responding, as well as for impaired motor coordination and the higher brain functions of learning and memory. A rat model of group B streptococcal meningitis with variable severity was utilized. At five days after bacterial inoculation followed by antibiotic therapy neurobehavioral tests were performed and serum C-tau and histologic samples of the brain were obtained. Our study shows that during meningitis C-tau appears in serum and reflects the extent of neurologic damage. Neurobehavioral performance was altered after bacterial meningitis and could be correlated with histologic and biochemical markers of neurologic sequelae. We conclude that serum C-tau and a composite of neurobehavioral tests could become useful markers for assessing the severity of neurological damage in experimental bacterial meningitis.

  15. Diagnostic Accuracy of Cerebrospinal Fluid Procalcitonin in Bacterial Meningitis Patients with Empiric Antibiotic Pretreatment.

    PubMed

    Li, Wen; Sun, Xiaolong; Yuan, Fang; Gao, Qiong; Ma, Yue; Jiang, Yongli; Yang, Xiai; Yang, Fang; Ma, Lei; Jiang, Wen

    2017-04-01

    Accurate diagnosis of bacterial meningitis (BM) relies on cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) Gram staining and bacterial culture, which often present high false-negative rates because of antibiotic abuse. Thus, a novel and reliable diagnostic biomarker is required. Procalcitonin (PCT) has been well demonstrated to be specifically produced from peripheral tissues by bacterial infection, which makes it a potential diagnostic biomarker candidate. Here, we performed a prospective clinical study comprising a total of 143 patients to investigate the diagnostic value of CSF PCT, serum PCT, and other conventional biomarkers for BM. Patients were assigned to the BM (n = 49), tuberculous meningitis (TBM) (n = 25), viral meningitis/encephalitis (VM/E) (n = 34), autoimmune encephalitis (AIE) (n = 15), or noninflammatory nervous system diseases (NINSD) group (n = 20). Empirical antibiotic pretreatment was not an exclusion criterion. Our results show that the CSF PCT level was significantly (P < 0.01) higher in patients with BM (median, 0.22 ng/ml; range, 0.13 to 0.54 ng/ml) than in those with TBM (median, 0.12 ng/ml; range, 0.07 to 0.16 ng/ml), VM/E (median, 0.09 ng/ml; range, 0.07 to 0.11 ng/ml), AIE (median, 0.06 ng/ml; range, 0.05 to 0.10 ng/ml), or NINSD (median, 0.07 ng/ml; range, 0.06 to 0.08 ng/ml). Among the assessed biomarkers, CSF PCT exhibited the largest area under the receiver operating characteristic curve (0.881; 95% confidence interval, 0.810 to 0.932; cutoff value, 0.15 ng/ml; sensitivity, 69.39%; specificity, 91.49%). Our study sheds light upon the diagnostic dilemma of BM due to antibiotic abuse. (This study has been registered at ClinicalTrials.gov under registration no. NCT02278016.). Copyright © 2017 American Society for Microbiology.

  16. A case of generalized lymphatic anomaly causing skull-base leakage and bacterial meningitis.

    PubMed

    Suga, Kenichi; Goji, Aya; Inoue, Miki; Kawahito, Masami; Taki, Masako; Mori, Kazuhiro

    2017-01-13

    Generalized lymphatic anomaly is a multifocal lymphatic malformation that affects the skin, thoracic viscera, and bones. A 3year-old Japanese boy presented with right facial palsy due to cystic tumors in the ipsilateral petrous bone. Pericardial effusion had been found incidentally and generalized lymphatic anomaly had been diagnosed by pericardial biopsy. Petrous bone tumor had been followed up without surgery. At the age of seven he presented with fever and disturbance of consciousness, and bacterial meningitis due to Streptococcus pneumoniae was diagnosed. Computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging revealed middle skull-base leakage due to lymphatic malformation. He achieved complete recovery under intensive care with antibiotics and mechanical ventilation. One year later, he presented with multiple cystic formations in bilateral femora. At the 3-year follow-up, the patient was healthy with no recurrence of meningitis and osteolytic lesions in the femora were non-progressive. Computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging are useful for demonstration of skull-base leakage by generalized lymphatic anomaly. We should consider generalized lymphatic anomaly among the differential diagnoses for skull-base leakage.

  17. [Neonatal bacterial meningitis: prospective study of the long-term outcome of 55 children].

    PubMed

    Jornada Krebs, V L; De Albuquerque Diniz, E M; Costa Vaz, F A; Marques Dias, M J; Takiguti, C; Araújo Ramos, J L

    1996-03-01

    Fifty-five infants who presented bacterial neonatal meningitis were prospectively studied to analyze the frequency and the type of sequelae. All the infants were full term newborns. There were 38 boys and 17 girls; the age of disease onset varied from 3 to 28 days. The causative organism was represented mainly by enterobacteriae. The median time of follow-up was 5 years. The frequency of neurologic sequelae was 63.7%, represented mainly by neuropsychomotor development delay (58.2%), hydrocephaly (45.5%) and convulsions (34.5%). Severe motor abnormalities ocurred in 23.6% of children (quadriplegia, diplegia, hemiparesia and ataxia). Convulsions in the acute phase of the disease and the positive cerebrospinal fluid culture were highly associated to sequelae. The school performance, obtained in 25 children, showed presence of disabilities in 48% of cases, which were significantly associated to mental retardation.

  18. Usefulness of blood and cerebrospinal fluid laboratory testing to predict bacterial meningitis in the emergency department.

    PubMed

    Julián-Jiménez, A; Morales-Casado, M I

    2016-07-25

    The classic clinical presentation of bacterial meningitis (BM) is observed in less than half of the cases in adults, and symptoms are less specific in children, the elderly or immunocompromised, and other chronic patients. The usual signs and symptoms do not provide optimal sensitivity and specificity for distinguishing possible BM from viral meningitis (VM), which may lead to a delay in the appropriate antimicrobial therapy. Society therefore stands to benefit from the development of effective, objective, and rapid tools able to predict and identify patients with BM. These tools include laboratory tests for blood and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF). The aim of this review is to summarise recently published scientific evidence in order to clarify existing controversies and compare the usefulness and diagnostic ability of the different parameters used to predict BM. Systematic search of the main bibliographic databases and platforms to identify articles published between January 2000 and January 2016. We selected 59 articles that meet the objectives of this review. CSF lactate, proportion of polymorphonuclear leukocytes, and CSF glucose, as well as serum procalcitonin (PCT), are the independent factors most predictive of bacterial aetiology. The model that combines serum PCT and CSF lactate achieves the highest predictive power for BM, with a sensitivity and specificity exceeding 99%. We should consider BM when CSF lactate >33 md/dL and/or PCT>0.25ng/mL. Copyright © 2016 Sociedad Española de Neurología. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  19. Dexamethasone for adult community-acquired bacterial meningitis: 20 years of experience in daily practice.

    PubMed

    Peterković, Vjerislav; Trkulja, Vladimir; Kutleša, Marko; Krajinović, Vladimir; Lepur, Dragan

    2012-02-01

    The aim of the study was to assess adjunctive intravenous dexamethasone in adult community-acquired bacterial meningitis (BM) in daily practice. Analysis of consecutive patients (1990-2009) with acute community-acquired bacterial meningitis in a single centre in Zagreb, Croatia, N = 304. Adjusted relative risks [RR, dexamethasone vs. no dexamethasone (control)] of Glasgow Outcome Scale (GOS) = 1 (death) and GOS = 5 (full recovery) at discharge/end of specific treatment were estimated considering demographics; co-morbidity; BM pathogenesis and on-admission characteristics, and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) inflammation markers; causative agent and antibiotic use. Two hundred forty (79%) patients had proven BM (43.1% Streptococcus pneumoniae, any other agent ≤ 8.2%). No independent effects of dexamethasone on GOS = 1 or GOS = 5 were observed in the entire cohort (dexamethasone n = 119, control n = 185; RR = 1.06, 95% CI 0.77-1.45 and RR = 0.99, CI 0.83-1.20, respectively), microbiologically proven disease (dexamethasone n = 104, control n = 136; RR = 0.97, CI 0.69-1.38 and RR = 1.03, CI 0.82-1.28), pneumococcal disease (dexamethasone n = 71, control n = 60; RR = 0.95, CI 0.53-1.70 and RR = 0.82, CI 0.57-1.18), and also in other BM, subgroups based on consciousness disturbance, CSF markers, prior use of antibiotics and timing of appropriate antibiotic treatment. CSF markers did not predict the outcomes. Our experience does not substantiate the reported benefits of adjunctive dexamethasone in adult BM. Socio-economic and methodological factors do not seem to explain this discrepancy. Empirical use of dexamethasone in this setting appears controversial.

  20. Diagnostic value of lactate, procalcitonin, ferritin, serum-C-reactive protein, and other biomarkers in bacterial and viral meningitis: A cross-sectional study.

    PubMed

    Sanaei Dashti, Anahita; Alizadeh, Shekoofan; Karimi, Abdullah; Khalifeh, Masoomeh; Shoja, Seyed Abdolmajid

    2017-09-01

    There are many difficulties distinguishing bacterial from viral meningitis that could be reasonably solved using biomarkers. The aim of this study was to evaluate lactate, procalcitonin (PCT), ferritin, serum-CRP (C-reactive protein), and other known biomarkers in differentiating bacterial meningitis from viral meningitis in children.All children aged 28 days to 14 years with suspected meningitis who were admitted to Mofid Children's Hospital, Tehran, between October 2012 and November 2013, were enrolled in this prospective cross-sectional study. Children were divided into 2 groups of bacterial and viral meningitis, based on the results of cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) culture, polymerase chain reaction, and cytochemical profile. Diagnostic values of CSF parameters (ferritin, PCT, absolute neutrophil count [ANC], white blood cell count, and lactate) and serum parameters (PCT, ferritin, CRP, and erythrocyte sedimentation rate [ESR]) were evaluated.Among 50 patients with meningitis, 12 were diagnosed with bacterial meningitis. Concentrations of all markers were significantly different between bacterial and viral meningitis, except for serum (P = .389) and CSF (P = .136) PCT. The best rates of area under the receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve (AUC) were achieved by lactate (AUC = 0.923) and serum-CRP (AUC = 0.889). The best negative predictive values (NPV) for bacterial meningitis were attained by ANC (100%) and lactate (97.1%).The results of our study suggest that ferritin and PCT are not strong predictive biomarkers. A combination of low CSF lactate, ANC, ESR, and serum-CRP could reasonably rule out the bacterial meningitis.

  1. Burden of bacterial meningitis: a retrospective review on laboratory parameters and factors associated with death in meningitis, kelantan malaysia.

    PubMed

    Basri, Rehana; Zueter, Abdel Rahman; Mohamed, Zeehaida; Alam, Mohammad Khursheed; Norsa'adah, Bachok; Hasan, Siti Asma; Hasan, Habsah; Ahmad, Fadzilah

    2015-02-01

    To describe the clinical characteristics and the risk factors associated with mortality in patients with meningitis. This is a retrospective review of patients diagnosed to have meningitis with positive culture of the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) specimen. All cases aged 19 > years who were admitted to Hospital USM between January 2004 and December 2011 were included in the study. The CSF results database were obtained from the Department of Medical Microbiology and Parasitology, Hospital USM, Kelantan. A checklist was used to record the clinical characteristics. A total of 125 cases met the inclusion criteria. The age of patients ranged between newborn and 19 years old (Mean±SD, 74.5±80.6 months). The majority of them were males (65.6%). Fever was the most common presentation (73.6%) followed by poor oral intake (48.0%), seizure (36.0%) and headache (24.8%). The mortality rate was 31.2%. Coagulase negative staphylococcus was the most frequent pathogens isolated (21.6%), followed by Acinetobacter spp. (17.6%), Staphylococcus aureus (13.6%), Streptococcus spp. (11.2%) and Klebsiella pneumoniae (6.4%). There were significant association of in-hospital death with age (p=0.020) and conscious level (p=0.001). Infectious meningitis is a big health concern, especially among children. We found that coagulase negative staphylococcus, Acinetobacter species, S. aureus, Streptococcus spp and K. pneumoniae were prevalent in our hospital. These microorganisms were hospital associated pathogens. The 31% mortality linked to hospital acquired meningitis specifies the need for focused physician attention especially among younger aged patients.

  2. BURDEN OF BACTERIAL MENINGITIS: A RETROSPECTIVE REVIEW ON LABORATORY PARAMETERS AND FACTORS ASSOCIATED WITH DEATH IN MENINGITIS, KELANTAN MALAYSIA

    PubMed Central

    BASRI, REHANA; ZUETER, ABDEL RAHMAN; MOHAMED, ZEEHAIDA; ALAM, MOHAMMAD KHURSHEED; NORSA’ADAH, BACHOK; HASAN, SITI ASMA; HASAN, HABSAH; AHMAD, FADZILAH

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT To describe the clinical characteristics and the risk factors associated with mortality in patients with meningitis. This is a retrospective review of patients diagnosed to have meningitis with positive culture of the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) specimen. All cases aged 19 > years who were admitted to Hospital USM between January 2004 and December 2011 were included in the study. The CSF results database were obtained from the Department of Medical Microbiology and Parasitology, Hospital USM, Kelantan. A checklist was used to record the clinical characteristics. A total of 125 cases met the inclusion criteria. The age of patients ranged between newborn and 19 years old (Mean±SD, 74.5±80.6 months). The majority of them were males (65.6%). Fever was the most common presentation (73.6%) followed by poor oral intake (48.0%), seizure (36.0%) and headache (24.8%). The mortality rate was 31.2%. Coagulase negative staphylococcus was the most frequent pathogens isolated (21.6%), followed by Acinetobacter spp. (17.6%), Staphylococcus aureus (13.6%), Streptococcus spp. (11.2%) and Klebsiella pneumoniae (6.4%). There were significant association of in-hospital death with age (p=0.020) and conscious level (p=0.001). Infectious meningitis is a big health concern, especially among children. We found that coagulase negative staphylococcus, Acinetobacter species, S. aureus, Streptococcus spp and K. pneumoniae were prevalent in our hospital. These microorganisms were hospital associated pathogens. The 31% mortality linked to hospital acquired meningitis specifies the need for focused physician attention especially among younger aged patients. PMID:25797971

  3. Nationwide Trends in Bacterial Meningitis before the Introduction of 13-Valent Pneumococcal Conjugate Vaccine-Burkina Faso, 2011-2013.

    PubMed

    Kambiré, Dinanibè; Soeters, Heidi M; Ouédraogo-Traoré, Rasmata; Medah, Isaïe; Sangare, Lassana; Yaméogo, Issaka; Sawadogo, Guetawendé; Ouédraogo, Abdoul-Salam; Hema-Ouangraoua, Soumeya; McGee, Lesley; Srinivasan, Velusamy; Aké, Flavien; Congo-Ouédraogo, Malika; Sanou, Soufian; Ba, Absatou Ky; Novak, Ryan T; Van Beneden, Chris

    2016-01-01

    Following introduction of Haemophilus influenzae type b vaccine in 2006 and serogroup A meningococcal conjugate vaccine in 2010, Streptococcus pneumoniae (Sp) became the leading cause of bacterial meningitis in Burkina Faso. We describe bacterial meningitis epidemiology, focusing on pneumococcal meningitis, before 13-valent pneumococcal conjugate vaccine (PCV13) introduction in the pediatric routine immunization program in October 2013. Nationwide population-based meningitis surveillance collects case-level demographic and clinical information and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) laboratory results. Sp infections are confirmed by culture, real-time polymerase chain reaction (rt-PCR), or latex agglutination, and CSF serotyped using real-time and conventional PCR. We calculated incidence rates in cases per 100,000 persons, adjusting for age and proportion of cases with CSF tested at national reference laboratories, and case fatality ratios (CFR). During 2011-2013, 1,528 pneumococcal meningitis cases were reported. Average annual adjusted incidence rates were 26.9 (<1 year), 5.4 (1-4 years), 7.2 (5-14 years), and 3.0 (≥15 years). Overall CFR was 23% and highest among children aged <1 year (32%) and adults ≥30 years (30%). Of 1,528 cases, 1,036 (68%) were serotyped: 71% were PCV13-associated serotypes, 14% were non-PCV13-associated serotypes, and 15% were non-typeable by PCR. Serotypes 1 (45%) and 12F/12A/12B/44/46 (8%) were most common. Among children aged <1 year, serotypes 5 (15%), 6A/6B (13%) and 1 (12%) predominated. In Burkina Faso, the highest morbidity and mortality due to pneumococcal meningitis occurred among children aged <1 year. The majority of cases were due to PCV13-associated serotypes; introduction of PCV13 should substantially decrease this burden.

  4. Nationwide Trends in Bacterial Meningitis before the Introduction of 13-Valent Pneumococcal Conjugate Vaccine—Burkina Faso, 2011–2013

    PubMed Central

    Ouédraogo-Traoré, Rasmata; Medah, Isaïe; Sangare, Lassana; Yaméogo, Issaka; Sawadogo, Guetawendé; Ouédraogo, Abdoul-Salam; Hema-Ouangraoua, Soumeya; McGee, Lesley; Srinivasan, Velusamy; Aké, Flavien; Congo-Ouédraogo, Malika; Sanou, Soufian; Ba, Absatou Ky; Novak, Ryan T.; Van Beneden, Chris

    2016-01-01

    Background Following introduction of Haemophilus influenzae type b vaccine in 2006 and serogroup A meningococcal conjugate vaccine in 2010, Streptococcus pneumoniae (Sp) became the leading cause of bacterial meningitis in Burkina Faso. We describe bacterial meningitis epidemiology, focusing on pneumococcal meningitis, before 13-valent pneumococcal conjugate vaccine (PCV13) introduction in the pediatric routine immunization program in October 2013. Methods Nationwide population-based meningitis surveillance collects case-level demographic and clinical information and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) laboratory results. Sp infections are confirmed by culture, real-time polymerase chain reaction (rt-PCR), or latex agglutination, and CSF serotyped using real-time and conventional PCR. We calculated incidence rates in cases per 100,000 persons, adjusting for age and proportion of cases with CSF tested at national reference laboratories, and case fatality ratios (CFR). Results During 2011–2013, 1,528 pneumococcal meningitis cases were reported. Average annual adjusted incidence rates were 26.9 (<1 year), 5.4 (1–4 years), 7.2 (5–14 years), and 3.0 (≥15 years). Overall CFR was 23% and highest among children aged <1 year (32%) and adults ≥30 years (30%). Of 1,528 cases, 1,036 (68%) were serotyped: 71% were PCV13-associated serotypes, 14% were non-PCV13-associated serotypes, and 15% were non-typeable by PCR. Serotypes 1 (45%) and 12F/12A/12B/44/46 (8%) were most common. Among children aged <1 year, serotypes 5 (15%), 6A/6B (13%) and 1 (12%) predominated. Conclusions In Burkina Faso, the highest morbidity and mortality due to pneumococcal meningitis occurred among children aged <1 year. The majority of cases were due to PCV13-associated serotypes; introduction of PCV13 should substantially decrease this burden. PMID:27832151

  5. Cochlear implants and bacterial meningitis: A speech recognition study in paired samples

    PubMed Central

    de Brito, Rubens; Bittencourt, Aline Gomes; Goffi-Gomez, Maria Valéria; Magalhães, Ana Tereza; Samuel, Paola; Tsuji, Robinson Koji; Bento, Ricardo Ferreira

    2013-01-01

    Summary Introduction: Cochlear implants may guarantee sound perception and the ability to detect speech at a close-to-normal hearing intensity; however, differences have been observed among implantees in terms of performance on discrimination tests and speech recognition. Objective: To identify whether patients with post-meningitis deafness perform similarly to patients with hearing loss due to other causes. Method: A retrospective clinical study involving post-lingual patients who had been using Nucleus-22 or Nucleus-24 cochlear implants for at least 1 year. These patients were matched with respect to age (± 2 years), time since the onset of deafness (± 1 year), and the duration of implant use with implant users who had hearing loss due to other causes. Speech perception was assessed using the Portuguese version of the Latin-American Protocol for the Evaluation of Cochlear Implants. Results: The sample consisted of 52 individuals (26 in each of the 2 groups). The post-meningitic group had a median of 18.5 active electrodes. The group with hearing loss due to other causes had a median of 21, but no significant statistical difference was observed (p = 0.07). The results of closed- and open-set speech recognition tests showed great variability in speech recognition between the studied groups. These differences were more pronounced for the most difficult listening tasks, such as the medial consonant task (in the vowel-consonant-vowel format). Conclusion: Cochlear implant recipients with hearing loss due to bacterial meningitis, who had been using the device for 1 year performed more poorly on closed- and open-set speech recognition tests than did implant recipients with hearing loss due to other causes. PMID:25991995

  6. Cerebral blood flow and carbon dioxide reactivity in children with bacterial meningitis

    SciTech Connect

    Ashwal, S.; Stringer, W.; Tomasi, L.; Schneider, S.; Thompson, J.; Perkin, R. )

    1990-10-01

    We examined total and regional cerebral blood flow (CBF) by stable xenon computed tomography in 20 seriously ill children with acute bacterial meningitis to determine whether CBF was reduced and to examine the changes in CBF during hyperventilation. In 13 children, total CBF was normal (62 +/- 20 ml/min/100 gm) but marked local variability of flow was seen. In five other children, total CBF was significantly reduced (26 +/- 10 ml/min/100 gm; p less than 0.05), with flow reduced more in white matter (8 +/- 5 ml/min/100 gm) than in gray matter (30 +/- 15 ml/min/100 gm). Autoregulation of CBF appeared to be present in these 18 children within a range of mean arterial blood pressure from 56 to 102 mm Hg. In the remaining two infants, brain dead within the first 24 hours, total flow was uniformly absent, averaging 3 +/- 3 ml/min/100 gm. In seven children, CBF was determined at two carbon dioxide tension (PCO2) levels: 40 (+/- 3) mm Hg and 29 (+/- 3) mm Hg. In six children, total CBF decreased 33%, from 52 (+/- 25) to 35 (+/- 15) ml/min/100 gm; the mean percentage of change in CBF per millimeter of mercury of PCO2 was 3.0%. Regional variability of perfusion to changes in PCO2 was marked in all six children. The percentage of change in CBF per millimeter of mercury of PCO2 was similar in frontal gray matter (3.1%) but higher in white matter (4.5%). In the seventh patient a paradoxical response was observed; total and regional CBF increased 25% after hyperventilation. Our findings demonstrate that (1) CBF in children with bacterial meningitis may be substantially decreased globally, with even more variability noted regionally, (2) autoregulation of CBF is preserved, (3) CBF/CO2 responsitivity varies among patients and in different regions of the brain in the same patient, and (4) hyperventilation can reduce CBF below ischemic thresholds.

  7. Community acquired bacterial meningitis in Cuba: a follow up of a decade

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Community acquired Bacterial Meningitis (BM) remains a serious threat to global health. Cuban surveillance system for BM allowed to characterize the main epidemiological features of this group of diseases, as well as to assess the association of some variables with mortality. Results of the BM surveillance in Cuba are presented in this paper. Methods A follow up of BM cases reported to the Institute "Pedro Kourí" by the National Bacterial Meningitis Surveillance System from 1998 to 2007 was completed. Incidence and case-fatality rate (CFR) were calculated. Univariate analysis and logistic regression were used to elucidate associated factors to mortality comparing death versus survival. Relative Risk (RR) or odds ratio and its 95% confidence interval (CI 95%) were estimated, using either a Chi-squared Test or Fisher's Exact Test as appropriate. A Holt-Winters model was used to assess seasonality. Results 4 798 cases of BM (4.3 per 100 000 population) were reported, with a decreasing trend of the incidence. Highest incidence was observed in infants and elderly. Overall CFR reached 24.1% affecting mostly older adults. S. pneumoniae (23.6%), N. meningitidis(8.2%) and H. influenzaetype b (6.0%) were the main causative agents. Males predominate in the incidence. Highest incidence and CFR were mainly clustered in the centre of the island. The univariate analysis did not show association between delayed medical consultation (RR = 1.20; CI = 1.07-1.35) or delayed hospitalization (RR = 0.98; CI = 0.87-1.11) and the fatal outcome. Logistic regression model showed association of categories housewife, pensioned, imprisoned, unemployed, S. peumoniae and other bacteria with mortality. Seasonality during September, January and March was observed. Conclusions The results of the National Program for Control and Prevention of the Neurological Infectious Syndrome evidenced a reduction of the BM incidence, but not the CFR. Multivariate analysis identified an association of

  8. Recognising and Treatment Seeking for Acute Bacterial Meningitis in Adults and Children in Resource-Poor Settings: A Qualitative Study

    PubMed Central

    Desmond, Nicola A.; Nyirenda, Deborah; Dube, Queen; Mallewa, MacPherson; Molyneux, Elizabeth; Lalloo, David G.; Heyderman, Robert S.

    2013-01-01

    Objective High mortality burden from Acute Bacterial Meningitis (ABM) in resource-poor settings has been frequently blamed on delays in treatment seeking. We explored treatment-seeking pathways from household to primary health care and referral for ABM in Malawi. Design A cross-sectional qualitative study using narrative in-depth interviews, semi-structured interviews and focus group discussions. Participants Adults and children with proven and probable acute bacterial meningitis and/or their carers; adults from urban and peri-urban communities; and primary health care workers (HCW). Setting Queen Elizabeth Central Hospital (QECH), urban and peri-urban private and government primary health centres and communities in Blantyre District, Malawi. Results Whilst communities associated meningitis with a stiff neck, in practice responses focused on ability to recognise severe illness. Misdiagnosis of meningitis as malaria was common. Subsequent action by families depended on the extent to which normal social life was disrupted by the illness and depended on the age and social position of the sufferer. Seizures and convulsions were considered severe symptoms but were often thought to be malaria. Presumptive malaria treatment at home often delayed formal treatment seeking. Further delays in treatment seeking were caused by economic barriers and perceptions of inefficient or inadequate primary health services. Conclusions Given the difficulties in diagnosis of meningitis where malaria is common, any intervention for ABM at primary level must focus on recognising severe illness, and encouraging action at the household, community and primary health levels. Overcoming barriers to recognition and social constraints at community level require broad community-based strategies and may provide a route to addressing poor clinical outcomes. PMID:23861864

  9. [Case of an elderly patient with community acquired bacterial meningitis due to extended spectrum β lactamase producing Escherichia coli].

    PubMed

    Gon, Yasufumi; Otsubo, Ryoichi; Murase, Syo; Park, Kwiyounn; Nakazawa, Kenichiro; Hara, Hitoshi

    2012-01-01

    Community acquired bacterial meningitis due to extended spectrum β lactamase-producing Escherichia coli is very rare. We report the case of a 72-year-old woman being treated for longstanding diabetes mellitus. She developed lower back pain accompanied by elevated body temperature, and was transported to the emergency unit in our hospital five days later because of impaired consciousness. An abdominal plane CT showed acute pyelonephritis and a brain MRI showed inflammatory exudate in the posterior horn of her bilateral ventricles. A lumbar puncture was performed, and examination of the cerebrospinal fluid revealed a marked elevation in her cell count (polymorphonuclear leukocytes dominant) that we diagnosed as bacterial meningitis. Initially, she was treated with intravenous meropenem, ceftriaxon, and vancomycin. Extended spectrum β lactamase-producing Escherichia coli were then detected in her urinary and blood cultures, and the antibiotics were changed to intravenous meropenem, gentamicin, and intrathecal gentamicin. Her clinical symptoms improved, but her inflammatory reaction was prolonged and we detected spondylitis. She was then treated with levofloxacin, and the inflammatory reaction improved. Extended spectrum β lactamase-producing Escherichia coli should be taken into consideration as a cause of community acquired bacterial meningitis.

  10. A Population-based Prospective Birth Cohort Study of Childhood Neurocognitive and Psychological Functioning in Healthy Survivors of Early-life Meningitis

    PubMed Central

    Khandaker, Golam M.; Stochl, Jan; Zammit, Stanley; Lewis, Glyn; Jones, Peter B.

    2015-01-01

    PURPOSE To determine neurocognitive, educational and psychological functioning during childhood and early-adolescence among survivors of early-life meningitis who are apparently healthy. METHODS In the general population-based Avon Longitudinal Study of Parents and Children birth cohort, meningitis exposure was determined at age 18 months. The outcomes of IQ, short-term memory, working memory, reading and spelling abilities, psychological and behavioural problems, depressive and anxiety symptoms, and psychotic experiences at ages 9 to 13 years were compared between those exposed and unexposed to meningitis. Individuals with special educational needs were excluded. RESULTS By age 18 months, 67 out of 11,035 children were reported to have suffered from meningitis (0.61%). These children, compared with the unexposed, performed worse on all neurocognitive and educational measures; mean difference in total IQ 7.36 (95% CI 1.60-13.11). Meningitis was associated with higher depressive and anxiety symptoms (p=0.02), psychological and behavioural problems (p=0.09), and increased risk of psychotic experiences; risk ratio 2.22 (95% CI 1.12-4.38). CONCLUSIONS Exposure to meningitis in the early-life is associated with neurocognitive, educational and psychological difficulties during childhood and early-adolescence among survivors who are apparently healthy. Therefore, focusing only on serious neurologic disabilities may underestimate the true impact of early-life meningitis. PMID:25794764

  11. A population-based prospective birth cohort study of childhood neurocognitive and psychological functioning in healthy survivors of early life meningitis.

    PubMed

    Khandaker, Golam M; Stochl, Jan; Zammit, Stanley; Lewis, Glyn; Jones, Peter B

    2015-04-01

    To determine neurocognitive, educational, and psychological functioning during childhood and early adolescence among survivors of early life meningitis who are apparently healthy. In the general population-based Avon Longitudinal Study of Parents and Children birth cohort, meningitis exposure was determined at age of 18 months. The outcomes of intelligence quotient, short-term memory, working memory, reading and spelling abilities, psychological and behavioral problems, depressive and anxiety symptoms, and psychotic experiences at ages 9 to 13 years were compared between those exposed and unexposed to meningitis. Individuals with special educational needs were excluded. By age of 18 months, 67 of 11,035 children were reported to have suffered from meningitis (0.61%). These children, compared with the unexposed, performed worse on all neurocognitive and educational measures; mean difference in total intelligence quotient 7.36 (95% confidence interval, 1.60-13.11). Meningitis was associated with higher depressive and anxiety symptoms (P = .02), psychological and behavioral problems (P = .09), and increased risk of psychotic experiences; risk ratio 2.22 (95% confidence interval, 1.12-4.38). Exposure to meningitis in the early life is associated with neurocognitive, educational, and psychological difficulties during childhood and early adolescence among survivors who are apparently healthy. Therefore, focusing only on serious neurologic disabilities may underestimate the true impact of early life meningitis. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Streptococcus suis, an Important Cause of Adult Bacterial Meningitis in Northern Vietnam

    PubMed Central

    Wertheim, Heiman F. L.; Nguyen, Huyen Nguyen; Taylor, Walter; Lien, Trinh Thi Minh; Ngo, Hoa Thi; Nguyen, Thai Quoc; Nguyen, Bich Ngoc Thi; Nguyen, Ha Hong; Nguyen, Ha Minh; Nguyen, Cap Trung; Dao, Trinh Tuyet; Nguyen, Trung Vu; Fox, Annette; Farrar, Jeremy; Schultsz, Constance; Nguyen, Hien Duc; Nguyen, Kinh Van; Horby, Peter

    2009-01-01

    Background Streptococcus suis can cause severe systemic infection in adults exposed to infected pigs or after consumption of undercooked pig products. S. suis is often misdiagnosed, due to lack of awareness and improper testing. Here we report the first fifty cases diagnosed with S. suis infection in northern Viet Nam. Methodology/Principal Findings In 2007, diagnostics for S. suis were set up at a national hospital in Hanoi. That year there were 43 S. suis positive cerebrospinal fluid samples, of which S. suis could be cultured in 32 cases and 11 cases were only positive by PCR. Seven patients were blood culture positive for S. suis but CSF culture and PCR negative; making a total of 50 patients with laboratory confirmed S. suis infection in 2007. The number of S. suis cases peaked during the warmer months. Conclusions/Significance S. suis was commonly diagnosed as a cause of bacterial meningitis in adults in northern Viet Nam. In countries where there is intense and widespread exposure of humans to pigs, S. suis can be an important human pathogen. PMID:19543404

  13. Cerebral vasculature is the major target of oxidative protein alterations in bacterial meningitis.

    PubMed

    Schaper, Manuela; Gergely, Suzanne; Lykkesfeldt, Jens; Zbären, Jakob; Leib, Stephen L; Täuber, Martin G; Christen, Stephan

    2002-07-01

    We have previously shown that antioxidants such as a-phenyl-tert-butyl nitrone or N-acetylcysteine attenuate cortical neuronal injury in infant rats with bacterial meningitis, suggesting that oxidative alterations play an important role in this disease. However, the precise mechanism(s) by which antioxidants inhibit this injury remain(s) unclear. We therefore studied the extent and location of protein oxidation in the brain using various biochemical and immunochemical methods. In cortical parenchyma, a trend for increased protein carbonyls was not evident until 21 hours after infection and the activity of glutamine synthetase (another index of protein oxidation) remained unchanged. Consistent with these results, there was no evidence for oxidative alterations in the cortex by various immunohistochemical methods even in cortical lesions. In contrast, there was a marked increase in carbonyls, 4-hydroxynonenal protein adducts and manganese superoxide dismutase in the cerebral vasculature. Elevated lipid peroxidation was also observed in cerebrospinal fluid and occasionally in the hippocampus. All of these oxidative alterations were inhibited by treatment of infected animals with N-acetylcysteine or alpha-phenyl-tert-butyl nitrone. Because N-acetylcysteine does not readily cross the blood-brain barrier and has no effect on the loss of endogenous brain antioxidants, its neuroprotective effect is likely based on extraparenchymal action such as inhibition of vascular oxidative alterations.

  14. Neisseria meningitidis and Streptococcus pneumoniae as leading causes of pediatric bacterial meningitis in nine Mexican hospitals following 3 years of active surveillance

    PubMed Central

    Chacon-Cruz, Enrique; Martinez-Longoria, Cesar Adrian; Llausas-Magana, Eduardo; Luevanos-Velazquez, Antonio; Vazquez-Narvaez, Jorge Alejandro; Beltran, Sandra; Limon-Rojas, Ana Elena; Urtiz-Jeronimo, Fernando; Castaneda-Narvaez, Jose Luis; Otero-Mendoza, Francisco; Aguilar-Del Real, Fernando; Rodriguez-Chagoyan, Jesus; Rivas-Landeros, Rosa Maria; Volker-Soberanes, Maria Luisa; Hinojosa-Robles, Rosa Maria; Arzate-Barbosa, Patricia; Aviles-Benitez, Laura Karina; Elenes-Zamora, Fernando Ivan; Becka, Chandra M.; Ruttimann, Ricardo

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: Meningococcal meningitis is reported as a rare condition in Mexico. There are no internationally published studies on bacterial causes of meningitis in the country based on active surveillance. This study focuses on finding the etiology of bacterial meningitis in children from nine Mexican Hospitals. Methods: From January 2010 to February 2013, we conducted a three years of active surveillance for meningitis in nine hospitals throughout Mexico. Active surveillance started at the emergency department for every suspected case, and microbiological studies confirmed/ruled out all potentially bacterial pathogens. We diagnosed based on routine cultures from blood and cerebrospinal fluid (not polymerase chain reaction or other molecular diagnostic tests), and both pneumococcal serotyping and meningococcal serogrouping by using standard methods. Results: Neisseria meningitidis was the leading cause, although 75% of cases occurred in the northwest of the country in Tijuana on the US border. Serogroup C was predominant. Streptococcus pneumoniae followed Neisseria meningitides, but was uniformly distributed throughout the country. Serotype 19A was the most incident but before universal implementation of the 13-valent pneumococcal conjugate vaccine. Other bacteria were much less common, including Enterobacteriaceae and Streptococcus agalactiae (these two affecting mostly young infants). Conclusions: Meningococcal meningitis is endemic in Tijuana, Mexico, and vaccination should be seriously considered in that region. Continuous universal vaccination with the 13-valent pneumococcal conjugate vaccine should be nationally performed, and polymerase chain reaction should be included for bacterial detection in all cultures – negative but presumably bacterial meningitis cases. PMID:27551428

  15. Transmission of Seasonal Outbreak of Childhood Enteroviral Aseptic Meningitis and Hand-foot-mouth Disease

    PubMed Central

    Park, Sue K.; Park, Boyoung; Ki, Moran; Kim, Ho; Lee, Kwan; Jung, Cheoll; Sohn, Young Mo; Choi, Sung-Min; Kim, Doo-Kwun; Lee, Dong Seok; Ko, Joon Tae; Kim, Moon Kyu

    2010-01-01

    This study was conducted to evaluate the modes of transmission of aseptic meningitis (AM) and hand-foot-mouth disease (HFMD) using a case-control and a case-crossover design. We recruited 205 childhood AM and 116 HFMD cases and 170 non-enteroviral disease controls from three general hospitals in Gyeongju, Pohang, and Seoul between May and August in both 2002 and 2003. For the case-crossover design, we established the hazard and non-hazard periods as week one and week four before admission, respectively. In the case-control design, drinking water that had not been boiled, not using a water purifier, changes in water quality, and contact with AM patients were significantly associated with the risk of AM (odds ratio [OR]=2.8, 2.9, 4.6, and 10.9, respectively), while drinking water that had not been boiled, having a non-water closet toilet, changes in water quality, and contact with HFMD patients were associated with risk of HFMD (OR=3.3, 2.8, 6.9, and 5.0, respectively). In the case-crossover design, many life-style variables such as contact with AM or HFMD patients, visiting a hospital, changes in water quality, presence of a skin wound, eating out, and going shopping were significantly associated with the risk of AM (OR=18.0, 7.0, 8.0, 2.2, 22.3, and 3.0, respectively) and HFMD (OR=9.0, 37.0, 11.0, 12.0, 37.0, and 5.0, respectively). Our findings suggest that person-to-person contact and contaminated water could be the principal modes of transmission of AM and HFMD. PMID:20436701

  16. Transmission of seasonal outbreak of childhood enteroviral aseptic meningitis and hand-foot-mouth disease.

    PubMed

    Park, Sue K; Park, Boyoung; Ki, Moran; Kim, Ho; Lee, Kwan; Jung, Cheoll; Sohn, Young Mo; Choi, Sung-Min; Kim, Doo-Kwun; Lee, Dong Seok; Ko, Joon Tae; Kim, Moon Kyu; Cheong, Hae-Kwan

    2010-05-01

    This study was conducted to evaluate the modes of transmission of aseptic meningitis (AM) and hand-foot-mouth disease (HFMD) using a case-control and a case-crossover design. We recruited 205 childhood AM and 116 HFMD cases and 170 non-enteroviral disease controls from three general hospitals in Gyeongju, Pohang, and Seoul between May and August in both 2002 and 2003. For the case-crossover design, we established the hazard and non-hazard periods as week one and week four before admission, respectively. In the case-control design, drinking water that had not been boiled, not using a water purifier, changes in water quality, and contact with AM patients were significantly associated with the risk of AM (odds ratio [OR]=2.8, 2.9, 4.6, and 10.9, respectively), while drinking water that had not been boiled, having a non-water closet toilet, changes in water quality, and contact with HFMD patients were associated with risk of HFMD (OR=3.3, 2.8, 6.9, and 5.0, respectively). In the case-crossover design, many life-style variables such as contact with AM or HFMD patients, visiting a hospital, changes in water quality, presence of a skin wound, eating out, and going shopping were significantly associated with the risk of AM (OR=18.0, 7.0, 8.0, 2.2, 22.3, and 3.0, respectively) and HFMD (OR=9.0, 37.0, 11.0, 12.0, 37.0, and 5.0, respectively). Our findings suggest that person-to-person contact and contaminated water could be the principal modes of transmission of AM and HFMD.

  17. Polymerase Chain Reaction Assay and Bacterial Meningitis Surveillance in Remote Areas, Niger

    PubMed Central

    Sidikou, Fati; Djibo, Saacou; Taha, Muhamed Kheir; Alonso, Jean Michel; Djibo, Ali; Kairo, Kiari Kaka; Chanteau, Suzanne

    2003-01-01

    To compensate for the lack of laboratories in remote areas, the national reference laboratory for meningitis in Niger used polymerase chain reaction (PCR) to enhance the surveillance of meningitis caused by Neisseria meningitidis, Streptococcus pneumoniae, and Haemophilus influenzae. PCR effectively documented the wide geographic spread of N. meningitidis serogroup W135. PMID:14718100

  18. [Diagnostic usefulness of procalcitonin and C-reactive protein in the Emergency Department for predicting bacterial meningitis in the elderly].

    PubMed

    Morales-Casado, María Isabel; Julián-Jiménez, Agustín; Moreno-Alonso, Fernando; Valente-Rodríguez, Eder; López-Muñoz, Diego; Saura-Montalbán, José; Cuena-Boy, Rafael

    2016-01-01

    To analyse and compare procalcitonin (PCT) and C-reactive protein (CRP) as tools for detecting bacterial meningitis (BM) in the elderly (>74 years of age). A prospective, observational, descriptive, analytical study of 220 consecutive patients aged ≥1year and diagnosed with acute meningitis in an emergency department between September 2009 and July 2014. A total of 220 patients (136 [62%] male) were studied. The mean age was 30±26years, with BM being diagnosed in 17/83 patients from 1 to 14years of age, 32/111 from 15 to 74years of age, and 17/26 patients ≥75years of age. PCT had the highest area under the receiver operating characteristic curve (AUC) (0.972; 95%CI, 0.946-0,998; P<.001) to predict bacterial meningitis. With a cut-off of ≥0.52ng/mL, PCT achieved 93% sensitivity and 86% specificity, and for patients over 75years of age 96% sensitivity and 75% specificity, with the same AUC (0.972). The AUC for CRP was 0.888, and a ≥54,4mg/L cut-off achieved 91% sensitivity and 78% specificity, and for patients over 75years of age an AUC of only 0.514 achieved with 97% sensitivity and 43% specificity. For all patients with acute meningitis in the emergency department, PCT has a high diagnostic power, outperforming CRP and Leukocytes for detection of bacterial etiology, but CPR is of not useful in the elderly. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier España, S.L.U. y Sociedad Española de Enfermedades Infecciosas y Microbiología Clínica. All rights reserved.

  19. Protecting the herd: the remarkable effectiveness of the bacterial meningitis polysaccharide-protein conjugate vaccines in altering transmission dynamics.

    PubMed

    Stephens, David S

    2011-01-01

    Interrupting human-to-human transmission of the agents (Neisseria meningitidis, Haemophilus influenzae, and Streptococcus pneumoniae) of bacterial meningitis by new capsular polysaccharide-protein conjugate vaccines (PPCVs) has proven to be a remarkable (and unanticipated) contributor to vaccine effectiveness. Herd immunity accounts for ∼50% of the protection by meningococcal serogroup C PPCVs, pneumococcal PPCV7, and H. influenzae b PPCVs. Nasopharyngeal carriage can be reduced ≥75% for vaccine serotypes; the decrease in carriage is correlated with disease reduction in unvaccinated individuals, and the impact of herd immunity lasts for years. Based on these data, models for using herd immunity in vaccine-based prevention strategies are underway for control of meningitis in sub-Saharan Africa. Although the immunologic basis of herd immunity and impact on microbial biology need more study, protecting the unvaccinated by altering pathogen transmission dynamics is a powerful effect of PPCVs and increasingly important in vaccine introduction, implementation, and evaluation strategies.

  20. Diagnostic accuracy of routine blood examinations and CSF lactate level for post-neurosurgical bacterial meningitis.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yang; Xiao, Xiong; Zhang, Junting; Gao, Zhixian; Ji, Nan; Zhang, Liwei

    2017-06-01

    To evaluate the diagnostic accuracy of routine blood examinations and Cerebrospinal Fluid (CSF) lactate level for Post-neurosurgical Bacterial Meningitis (PBM) at a large sample-size of post-neurosurgical patients. The diagnostic accuracies of routine blood examinations and CSF lactate level to distinguish between PAM and PBM were evaluated with the values of the Area Under the Curve of the Receiver Operating Characteristic (AUC-ROC) by retrospectively analyzing the datasets of post-neurosurgical patients in the clinical information databases. The diagnostic accuracy of routine blood examinations was relatively low (AUC-ROC<0.7). The CSF lactate level achieved rather high diagnostic accuracy (AUC-ROC=0.891; CI 95%, 0.852-0.922). The variables of patient age, operation duration, surgical diagnosis and postoperative days (the interval days between the neurosurgery and examinations) were shown to affect the diagnostic accuracy of these examinations. The variables were integrated with routine blood examinations and CSF lactate level by Fisher discriminant analysis to improve their diagnostic accuracy. As a result, the diagnostic accuracy of blood examinations and CSF lactate level was significantly improved with an AUC-ROC value=0.760 (CI 95%, 0.737-0.782) and 0.921 (CI 95%, 0.887-0.948) respectively. The PBM diagnostic accuracy of routine blood examinations was relatively low, whereas the accuracy of CSF lactate level was high. Some variables that are involved in the incidence of PBM can also affect the diagnostic accuracy for PBM. Taking into account the effects of these variables significantly improves the diagnostic accuracies of routine blood examinations and CSF lactate level. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  1. [Meningitis after spinal anesthesia].

    PubMed

    Mouchrif, Issam; Berdaii, Adnane; Labib, Ismail; Harrandou, Moustapha

    2016-01-01

    Meningitis is a rare but serious complication of epidural and spinal anesthesia. Bacterial meningitis is mainly caused by Gram-positive cocci, implying an exogenous contamination which suggests a lack of asepsis. The evolution is usually favorable after treatment, but at the expense of increased health care costs and, sometimes, of significant neurological sequelae. We report a case of bacterial meningitis after spinal anesthesia for caesarean section.

  2. Prevalence of MDR pathogens of bacterial meningitis in Egypt and new synergistic antibiotic combinations.

    PubMed

    Abdelkader, Mona M; Aboshanab, Khaled M; El-Ashry, Marwa A; Aboulwafa, Mohammad M

    2017-01-01

    The aim of this study was identifying bacterial pathogens involved in meningitis, studying their antibiotic resistance profiles, investigating the antibiotic resistance genes as well as evaluating the use of various antibiotic combinations. Antibiotic susceptibility tests were evaluated according to CLSI guidelines. Antibiotic combinations were evaluated by calculating the Fractional Inhibitory Concentration (FIC) index. A total of 71 bacterial isolates were recovered from 68 culture positive CSF specimens. Sixty five of these isolates (91.5%) were recovered from single infection specimens, while 6 isolates (8.4%) were recovered from mixed infection specimens. Out of the 71 recovered isolates, 48 (67.6%) were Gram-positive, and 23 (32.4%) were Gram-negative. Thirty one of the Gram positive isolates were S. pneumoniae (64.6%, n = 48). Out of the recovered 71 isolates; 26 (36.6%) were multidrug-resistant (MDR) isolates of which, 18 (69.2%) were Gram-negative and 8 (30.8%) were Gram-positive. All MDR isolates (100%) showed resistance to penicillin and ampicillin, however, they showed lower resistance to meropenem (50%), levofloxacin (50%), amikacin (48%), pipercillin-tazobactam (45.8%). Most common antibiotic resistance genes were investigated including: tem (21.1%), shv (15.8%), ctx-m (15.8%) coding for TEM-, SHV, CTX-M extended-spectrum beta-lactamases (ESBLs), respectively; aac(6')-I b(26.3%) coding for aminoglycoside 6'-N-acetyltransferase type Ib ciprofloxacin resistant variant; and qnrA (5.3%) gene coding for quinolone resistance. The DNA sequences of the respective resistance genes of some selected isolates were PCR amplified, analyzed and submitted to the GenBank database under the accession numbers, KX214665, KX214664, KX214663, KX214662, respectively. The FIC values for ampicillin/sulbactam plus cefepime showed either additive or synergistic effect against ten tested Gram-negative MDR isolates, while doxycycline plus levofloxacin combination revealed

  3. Prevalence of MDR pathogens of bacterial meningitis in Egypt and new synergistic antibiotic combinations

    PubMed Central

    Abdelkader, Mona M.; Aboshanab, Khaled M.; El-Ashry, Marwa A.; Aboulwafa, Mohammad M.

    2017-01-01

    The aim of this study was identifying bacterial pathogens involved in meningitis, studying their antibiotic resistance profiles, investigating the antibiotic resistance genes as well as evaluating the use of various antibiotic combinations. Antibiotic susceptibility tests were evaluated according to CLSI guidelines. Antibiotic combinations were evaluated by calculating the Fractional Inhibitory Concentration (FIC) index. A total of 71 bacterial isolates were recovered from 68 culture positive CSF specimens. Sixty five of these isolates (91.5%) were recovered from single infection specimens, while 6 isolates (8.4%) were recovered from mixed infection specimens. Out of the 71 recovered isolates, 48 (67.6%) were Gram-positive, and 23 (32.4%) were Gram-negative. Thirty one of the Gram positive isolates were S. pneumoniae (64.6%, n = 48). Out of the recovered 71 isolates; 26 (36.6%) were multidrug-resistant (MDR) isolates of which, 18 (69.2%) were Gram-negative and 8 (30.8%) were Gram-positive. All MDR isolates (100%) showed resistance to penicillin and ampicillin, however, they showed lower resistance to meropenem (50%), levofloxacin (50%), amikacin (48%), pipercillin-tazobactam (45.8%). Most common antibiotic resistance genes were investigated including: tem (21.1%), shv (15.8%), ctx-m (15.8%) coding for TEM-, SHV, CTX-M extended-spectrum beta-lactamases (ESBLs), respectively; aac(6')-I b(26.3%) coding for aminoglycoside 6’-N-acetyltransferase type Ib ciprofloxacin resistant variant; and qnrA (5.3%) gene coding for quinolone resistance. The DNA sequences of the respective resistance genes of some selected isolates were PCR amplified, analyzed and submitted to the GenBank database under the accession numbers, KX214665, KX214664, KX214663, KX214662, respectively. The FIC values for ampicillin/sulbactam plus cefepime showed either additive or synergistic effect against ten tested Gram-negative MDR isolates, while doxycycline plus levofloxacin combination revealed

  4. Arterial spin-labeling perfusion imaging of childhood meningitis: a case series.

    PubMed

    Wong, Alex Mun-Ching; Yeh, Chih-Hua; Liu, Ho-Ling; Lin, Kuang-Lin; Wang, Huei-Shyong; Toh, Cheng-Hong

    2016-03-01

    Conventional magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), which is mainly used to detect complications, is ineffective in determining the neurological status of patients with meningitis. Hemodynamic change in the brain may be more indicative of the neurological status but few imaging studies have verified this. Arterial spin-labeling (ASL) perfusion, a noninvasive MR method requiring no contrast agent injection, can be used to measure cerebral blood flow (CBF). We describe three pediatric patients with meningitis, who all showed regions of increased CBF on perfusion imaging. One patient, presenting with headache and conscious disturbance, had CBF changes in the frontal, temporal, and occipital regions. The other two patients, presenting with hallucinations, memory deficits, and seizures, had CBF changes in the frontal and temporal regions. ASL perfusion imaging may be helpful in assessing patients with meningitis, demonstrating CBF changes more strongly correlating with the neurological status, and detecting active brain abnormalities.

  5. Identification of Common Bacterial Pathogens Causing Meningitis in Culture-Negative Cerebrospinal Fluid Samples Using Real-Time Polymerase Chain Reaction

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Background. Meningitis is a serious communicable disease with high morbidity and mortality rates. It is an endemic disease in Egypt caused mainly by Streptococcus pneumoniae, Neisseria meningitidis, and Haemophilus influenzae. In some settings, bacterial meningitis is documented depending mainly on positive cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) culture results or CSF positive latex agglutination test, missing the important role of prior antimicrobial intake which can yield negative culture and latex agglutination test results. This study aimed to utilize molecular technology in order to diagnose bacterial meningitis in culture-negative CSF samples. Materials and Methods. Forty culture-negative CSF samples from suspected cases of bacterial meningitis were examined by real-time polymerase chain reaction (real-time PCR) for the presence of lytA, bexA, and ctrA genes specific for Streptococcus pneumoniae, Haemophilus influenzae, and Neisseria meningitidis, respectively. Results. Positive real-time PCR results for Streptococcus pneumoniae were detected in 36 (90%) of culture-negative CSF samples while no positive results for Haemophilus influenzae or Neisseria meningitidis were detected. Four (10%) samples were negative by real-time PCR for all tested organisms. Conclusion. The use of molecular techniques as real-time PCR can provide a valuable addition to the proportion of diagnosed cases of bacterial meningitis especially in settings with high rates of culture-negative results. PMID:27563310

  6. Peripheral blood RNA gene expression profiling in patients with bacterial meningitis

    PubMed Central

    Lill, Margit; Kõks, Sulev; Soomets, Ursel; Schalkwyk, Leonard C.; Fernandes, Cathy; Lutsar, Irja; Taba, Pille

    2013-01-01

    Objectives: The aim of present study was to find genetic pathways activated during infection with bacterial meningitis (BM) and potentially influencing the course of the infection using genome-wide RNA expression profiling combined with pathway analysis and functional annotation of the differential transcription. Methods: We analyzed 21 patients with BM hospitalized in 2008. The control group consisted of 18 healthy subjects. The RNA was extracted from whole blood, globin mRNA was depleted and gene expression profiling was performed using GeneChip Human Gene 1.0 ST Arrays which can assess the transcription of 28,869 genes. Gene expression profile data were analyzed using Bioconductor packages and Bayesian modeling. Functional annotation of the enriched gene sets was used to define the altered genetic networks. We also analyzed whether gene expression profiles depend on the clinical course and outcome. In order to verify the microarray results, the expression levels of ten functionally relevant genes with high statistical significance (CD177, IL1R2, IL18R1, IL18RAP, OLFM4, TLR5, CPA3, FCER1A, IL5RA, and IL7R) were confirmed by quantitative real-time (qRT) PCR. Results: There were 8569 genes displaying differential expression at a significance level of p < 0.05. Following False Discovery Rate (FDR) correction, a total of 5500 genes remained significant at a p-value of < 0.01. Quantitative RT-PCR confirmed the differential expression in 10 selected genes. Functional annotation and network analysis indicated that most of the genes were related to activation of humoral and cellular immune responses (enrichment score 43). Those changes were found in both adults and in children with BM compared to the healthy controls. The gene expression profiles did not significantly depend on the clinical outcome, but there was a strong influence of the specific type of pathogen underlying BM. Conclusion: This study demonstrates that there is a very strong activation of immune response

  7. Recent trends in pediatric bacterial meningitis in Japan--a country where Haemophilus influenzae type b and Streptococcus pneumoniae conjugated vaccines have just been introduced.

    PubMed

    Shinjoh, Masayoshi; Iwata, Satoshi; Yagihashi, Tatsuhiko; Sato, Yoshitake; Akita, Hironobu; Takahashi, Takao; Sunakawa, Keisuke

    2014-08-01

    To investigate the trends in incidence and the characteristics of bacterial meningitis in Japan where Haemophilus influenzae type b (Hib) vaccine and 7-valent pneumococcal conjugated vaccine (PCV7) were introduced in 2008 and 2010, respectively, which was 5-20 years after their introduction in western countries. The nationwide Japanese survey of pediatric and neonatal bacterial meningitis was performed in 2011 and 2012. We analyzed the epidemiological and clinical data, and compared the information obtained in the previous nationwide survey database. We also investigated the risk factors for disease outcome. In the 2011-2012 surveys, 357 patients were evaluated. H. influenzae, Streptococcus pneumoniae, Streptococcus agalactiae and Escherichia coli were the main organisms. The number of patients hospitalized with bacterial meningitis per 1000 admissions decreased from 1.31 in 2009 to 0.43 in 2012 (p < 0.001). The incidence of H. influenzae and S. pneumoniae meningitis also decreased from 0.66 to 0.08 (p < 0.001), and 0.30 to 0.06 (p < 0.001), respectively. Only 0-2 cases with Neisseria meningitidis were reported each year throughout 2001-2012. The median patient age was 10-12 months in 2001-2011, and became lower in 2012 (2 month old) (p < 0.001). The fatality rate for S. agalactiae is the highest (5.9% (11/187)) throughout 2001-2012 among the four organisms. Risk factors for death and sequelae were convulsions at onset, low CSF glucose, S. agalactiae etiology, and persistent positive CSF culture. Hib vaccine and PCV7 decreased the rate of bacterial meningitis. Earlier introduction of these vaccines may have prevented bacterial meningitis among Japanese children.

  8. With a little help from a computer: discriminating between bacterial and viral meningitis based on dominance-based rough set approach analysis

    PubMed Central

    Gowin, Ewelina; Januszkiewicz-Lewandowska, Danuta; Słowiński, Roman; Błaszczyński, Jerzy; Michalak, Michał; Wysocki, Jacek

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Differential Diagnosis of bacterial and viral meningitis remains an important clinical problem. A number of methods to assist in the diagnoses of meningitis have been developed, but none of them have been found to have high specificity with 100% sensitivity. We conducted a retrospective analysis of the medical records of 148 children hospitalized in St. Joseph Children's Hospital in Poznań. In this study, we applied for the first time the original methodology of dominance-based rough set approach (DRSA) to diagnostic patterns of meningitis data and represented them by decision rules useful in discriminating between bacterial and viral meningitis. The induction algorithm is called VC-DomLEM; it has been implemented as software package called jMAF (http://www.cs.put.poznan.pl/jblaszczynski/Site/jRS.html), based on java Rough Set (jRS) library. In the studied group, there were 148 patients (78 boys and 70 girls), and the mean age was 85 months. We analyzed 14 attributes, of which only 4 were used to generate the 6 rules, with C-reactive protein (CRP) being the most valuable. Factors associated with bacterial meningitis were: CRP level ≥86 mg/L, number of leukocytes in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) ≥4481 μL−1, symptoms duration no longer than 2 days, or age less than 1 month. Factors associated with viral meningitis were CRP level not higher than 19 mg/L, or CRP level not higher than 84 mg/L in a patient older than 11 months with no more than 1100 μL−1 leukocytes in CSF. We established the minimum set of attributes significant for classification of patients with meningitis. This is new set of rules, which, although intuitively anticipated by some clinicians, has not been formally demonstrated until now. PMID:28796045

  9. Polymorphisms of toll-like receptors 2 and 9 and severity and prognosis of bacterial meningitis in Chinese children

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Pingping; Zhang, Nan; Liu, Linlin; Zheng, Kai; Zhu, Liang; Zhu, Junping; Cao, Lina; Jiang, Yiyuan; Liu, Gang; He, Qiushui

    2017-01-01

    Toll-like receptors (TLRs) play a crucial role in innate immunity, protecting the host from bacterial pathogens. We investigated whether bacterial meningitis (BM) in children was associated with gene polymorphisms in TLR2 (rs3804099), TLR3 (rs3775291 and rs3775290) and TLR9 (rs352139 and rs352140). Blood samples were taken from 218 child patients with confirmed BM and 330 healthy adult controls (HC) and polymorphisms of these genes were analyzed by PCR-based sequencing. For TLR2 rs3804099, frequencies of the minor allele C were markedly higher in patients with severe BM (defined as CSF glucose concentration ≤ 1.5 mmol/L and seizures) than those without (43.5% and 40.1% vs. 30.1% and 29.1%, p = 0.008 and p = 0.016, respectively). For TLR9 rs352139, patients who carried genotype AA and minor allele A developed seizures less often than those without (OR = 0.289, p = 0.003 and OR = 0.568, p = 0.004, respectively). However, for TLR9 rs352140, patients who carried genotype TT and minor allele T developed seizures more often than those without (OR = 3.385, p = 0.004 and OR = 1.767, p = 0.004, respectively). Our finding suggested that genetic variations in TLR2 and TLR9 are associated with severity and prognosis of bacterial meningitis in Chinese children. However, the results should be interpreted with caution since the number of subjects included was limited. PMID:28202935

  10. Polymorphisms of toll-like receptors 2 and 9 and severity and prognosis of bacterial meningitis in Chinese children.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Pingping; Zhang, Nan; Liu, Linlin; Zheng, Kai; Zhu, Liang; Zhu, Junping; Cao, Lina; Jiang, Yiyuan; Liu, Gang; He, Qiushui

    2017-02-16

    Toll-like receptors (TLRs) play a crucial role in innate immunity, protecting the host from bacterial pathogens. We investigated whether bacterial meningitis (BM) in children was associated with gene polymorphisms in TLR2 (rs3804099), TLR3 (rs3775291 and rs3775290) and TLR9 (rs352139 and rs352140). Blood samples were taken from 218 child patients with confirmed BM and 330 healthy adult controls (HC) and polymorphisms of these genes were analyzed by PCR-based sequencing. For TLR2 rs3804099, frequencies of the minor allele C were markedly higher in patients with severe BM (defined as CSF glucose concentration ≤ 1.5 mmol/L and seizures) than those without (43.5% and 40.1% vs. 30.1% and 29.1%, p = 0.008 and p = 0.016, respectively). For TLR9 rs352139, patients who carried genotype AA and minor allele A developed seizures less often than those without (OR = 0.289, p = 0.003 and OR = 0.568, p = 0.004, respectively). However, for TLR9 rs352140, patients who carried genotype TT and minor allele T developed seizures more often than those without (OR = 3.385, p = 0.004 and OR = 1.767, p = 0.004, respectively). Our finding suggested that genetic variations in TLR2 and TLR9 are associated with severity and prognosis of bacterial meningitis in Chinese children. However, the results should be interpreted with caution since the number of subjects included was limited.

  11. Reactive oxygen intermediates contribute to necrotic and apoptotic neuronal injury in an infant rat model of bacterial meningitis due to group B streptococci.

    PubMed Central

    Leib, S L; Kim, Y S; Chow, L L; Sheldon, R A; Täuber, M G

    1996-01-01

    Reactive oxygen intermediates (ROI) contribute to neuronal injury in cerebral ischemia and trauma. In this study we explored the role of ROI in bacterial meningitis. Meningitis caused by group B streptococci in infant rats led to two distinct forms of neuronal injury, areas of necrosis in the cortex and neuronal loss in the dentate gyrus of the hippocampus, the latter showing evidence for apoptosis. Staining of brain sections with diaminobenzidine after perfusion with manganese buffer and measurement of lipid peroxidation products in brain homogenates both provided evidence that meningitis led to the generation of ROI. Treatment with the radical scavenger alpha-phenyl-tert-butyl nitrone (PBN) (100 mg/kg q8h i.p.) beginning at the time of infection completely abolished ROI detection and the increase in lipidperoxidation. Cerebral cortical perfusion was reduced in animals with meningitis to 37.5+/-21.0% of uninfected controls (P < 0.05), and PBN restored cortical perfusion to 72.0+/-8.1% of controls (P < 0.05 vs meningitis). PBN also completely prevented neuronal injury in the cortex and hippocampus, when started at the time of infection (P < 0.02), and significantly reduced both forms of injury, when started 18 h after infection together with antibiotics (P < 0.004 for cortex and P < 0.001 for hippocampus). These data indicate that the generation of ROI is a major contributor to cerebral ischemia and necrotic and apoptotic neuronal injury in this model of neonatal meningitis. PMID:8958228

  12. Caulobacter species as a cause of postneurosurgical bacterial meningitis in a pediatric patient

    PubMed Central

    Bridger, Natalie; Walkty, Andrew; Crockett, Maryanne; Fanella, Sergio; Nichol, Kim; Karlowsky, James A

    2012-01-01

    Caulobacter species have been rarely found to be a cause of human infection. A case of probable Caulobacter species meningitis occurring postneurosurgery in a pediatric patient is reported in the present article. Gram stain and colony morphology of the isolate were not consistent with the identification provided by commercial phenotypic identification systems. The present case illustrates the need to reconcile conflicting phenotypic test results using 16S ribosomal DNA sequencing. PMID:23449318

  13. Effects of dexamethasone on aquaporin-4 expression in brain tissue of rat with bacterial meningitis

    PubMed Central

    Du, Kai-Xian; Dong, Yan; Zhang, Yan; Hou, Li-Wei; Fan, Dong-Xia; Luo, Yu; Zhang, Xiao-Li; Jia, Tian-Ming; Lou, Ji-Yu

    2015-01-01

    Aquaporin-4 (AQP4) is the most popular water channel protein expressed in brain tissue and plays a very important role in regulating the water balance in and outside of brain parenchyma. To investigate the expression of aquaporin-4 in the rat brain tissue after dexamethasone therapy of meningitis induced by Streptococcus pneumonia, total 40 of 3-week old Sprague-Dawley rats were divided into infection group (n=30) and normal control group (n=10). The meningitis groups were infected with 1×107 cfu/ml of Streptococcus pneumoniae and then randomized into no treatment (untreated group, n=10), treatment with ceftriaxone (CTRX group, n=10) and treatment with dexamethasone combined ceftriaxone (CTRX + DEXA group, n=10). The normal control group was established by using saline. The rats were euthanized when they reached terminal illness or five days after infection, followed by detection of AQP4 through using immunohistochemistry and Western blot methods. Data has showed that expression of AQP4 in model group remained higher than the control and treatment group (P<0.05). AQP4 expression in CTRX + DEXA group was lower than that in CTRX group (P<0.05). There was no statistical difference between CTRX + DEXA group and the control group (P>0.05). These data suggested that Dexamethasone could down-regulate the expression of AQP4 in the brain tissue of rats with meningitis and provides evidence for the mechanism of protective effect of Dexamethasone on central neurosystem. PMID:26045822

  14. Real-time qPCR improves meningitis pathogen detection in invasive bacterial-vaccine preventable disease surveillance in Fiji.

    PubMed

    Dunne, Eileen M; Mantanitobua, Silivia; Singh, Shalini P; Reyburn, Rita; Tuivaga, Evelyn; Rafai, Eric; Tikoduadua, Lisi; Porter, Barbara; Satzke, Catherine; Strachan, Janet E; Fox, Kimberly K; Jenkins, Kylie M; Jenney, Adam; Baro, Silo; Mulholland, E Kim; Kama, Mike; Russell, Fiona M

    2016-12-23

    As part of the World Health Organization Invasive Bacterial-Vaccine Preventable Diseases (IB-VPD) surveillance in Suva, Fiji, cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) samples from suspected meningitis patients of all ages were examined by traditional methods (culture, Gram stain, and latex agglutination for bacterial antigen) and qPCR for Streptococcus pneumoniae, Neisseria meningitidis, and Haemophilus influenzae. Of 266 samples tested, pathogens were identified in 47 (17.7%). S. pneumoniae was the most common pathogen detected (n = 17) followed by N. meningitidis (n = 13). The use of qPCR significantly increased detection of IB-VPD pathogens (P = 0.0001): of 35 samples that were qPCR positive for S. pneumoniae, N. meningitidis, and H. influenzae, only 10 were culture positive. This was particularly relevant for N. meningitidis, as only 1/13 cases was culture positive. Molecular serotyping by microarray was used to determine pneumococcal serotypes from 9 of 16 (56%) of samples using DNA directly extracted from CSF specimens. Results indicate that qPCR significantly increases detection of S. pneumoniae, N. meningitidis, and H. influenzae in CSF, and that application of molecular diagnostics is a feasible way to enhance local and global surveillance for IB-VPD.

  15. Real-time qPCR improves meningitis pathogen detection in invasive bacterial-vaccine preventable disease surveillance in Fiji

    PubMed Central

    Dunne, Eileen M.; Mantanitobua, Silivia; Singh, Shalini P.; Reyburn, Rita; Tuivaga, Evelyn; Rafai, Eric; Tikoduadua, Lisi; Porter, Barbara; Satzke, Catherine; Strachan, Janet E.; Fox, Kimberly K.; Jenkins, Kylie M.; Jenney, Adam; Baro, Silo; Mulholland, E. Kim; Kama, Mike; Russell, Fiona M.

    2016-01-01

    As part of the World Health Organization Invasive Bacterial-Vaccine Preventable Diseases (IB-VPD) surveillance in Suva, Fiji, cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) samples from suspected meningitis patients of all ages were examined by traditional methods (culture, Gram stain, and latex agglutination for bacterial antigen) and qPCR for Streptococcus pneumoniae, Neisseria meningitidis, and Haemophilus influenzae. Of 266 samples tested, pathogens were identified in 47 (17.7%). S. pneumoniae was the most common pathogen detected (n = 17) followed by N. meningitidis (n = 13). The use of qPCR significantly increased detection of IB-VPD pathogens (P = 0.0001): of 35 samples that were qPCR positive for S. pneumoniae, N. meningitidis, and H. influenzae, only 10 were culture positive. This was particularly relevant for N. meningitidis, as only 1/13 cases was culture positive. Molecular serotyping by microarray was used to determine pneumococcal serotypes from 9 of 16 (56%) of samples using DNA directly extracted from CSF specimens. Results indicate that qPCR significantly increases detection of S. pneumoniae, N. meningitidis, and H. influenzae in CSF, and that application of molecular diagnostics is a feasible way to enhance local and global surveillance for IB-VPD. PMID:28009001

  16. The characteristics of post-neurosurgical bacterial meningitis in elective neurosurgery in 2012: A single institute study.

    PubMed

    Tian, Runfa; Hao, Shuyu; Hou, Zonggang; Gao, Zhixian; Liu, Baiyun

    2015-12-01

    Most post-neurosurgical meningitis research has been focused on large cohorts with numerous cases followed over several years. However, the characteristics of post-neurosurgical meningitis in an entire single year are still unclear, and knowledge of these characteristics might influence the selection of appropriate antibiotics and therapeutic strategies for the successful management of this disease. Our aim is to obtain a better understanding of post-neurosurgical meningitis over a single entire year. Patients with positive meningitis cultures after neurosurgical operations in our hospital during the entire year of 2012 were included in the analysis. We report demographic characteristics, morbidity during different seasons, clinical and bacteriological profiles, sensitivity to antibiotics and causes of the post-neurosurgical meningitis infections in our cohort. Of the 6407 patients who underwent neurosurgical procedures during the study period, 146 developed post-neurosurgical meningitis and the overall incidence of meningitis was 2.28%. The incidence of meningitis was significantly higher in patients who underwent surgery in the autumn and winter than spring or summer (p=0.000). The most common organisms causing meningitis were Gram-positive bacteria, followed by the Klebsiella and Baumannii species. Compound sulfamethoxazole (52.6%) and vancomycin (10.5%) were the most active antibiotics against Gram-positive bacteria strains, whereas meropenem (43.8%) and polymyxin (18.8%) were active against Gram-negative bacillus strains. Post-neurosurgical meningitis usually occurs in the autumn and winter of the year in our hospital. Gram-positive organisms, which are sensitive to compound sulfamethoxazole and vancomycin, are the most common causative pathogens of post-neurosurgical meningitis in the northern mainland of China. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Clinical Validation of Multiplex Real-Time PCR Assays for Detection of Bacterial Meningitis Pathogens

    PubMed Central

    Theodore, M. Jordan; Mair, Raydel; Trujillo-Lopez, Elizabeth; du Plessis, Mignon; Wolter, Nicole; Baughman, Andrew L.; Hatcher, Cynthia; Vuong, Jeni; Lott, Lisa; von Gottberg, Anne; Sacchi, Claudio; McDonald, J. Matthew; Messonnier, Nancy E.; Mayer, Leonard W.

    2012-01-01

    Neisseria meningitidis, Haemophilus influenzae, and Streptococcus pneumoniae are important causes of meningitis and other infections, and rapid, sensitive, and specific laboratory assays are critical for effective public health interventions. Singleplex real-time PCR assays have been developed to detect N. meningitidis ctrA, H. influenzae hpd, and S. pneumoniae lytA and serogroup-specific genes in the cap locus for N. meningitidis serogroups A, B, C, W135, X, and Y. However, the assay sensitivity for serogroups B, W135, and Y is low. We aimed to improve assay sensitivity and develop multiplex assays to reduce time and cost. New singleplex real-time PCR assays for serogroup B synD, W135 synG, and Y synF showed 100% specificity for detecting N. meningitidis species, with high sensitivity (serogroup B synD, 99% [75/76]; W135 synG, 97% [38/39]; and Y synF, 100% [66/66]). The lower limits of detection (LLD) were 9, 43, and 10 copies/reaction for serogroup B synD, W135 synG, and Y synF assays, respectively, a significant improvement compared to results for the previous singleplex assays. We developed three multiplex real-time PCR assays for detection of (i) N. meningitidis ctrA, H. influenzae hpd, and S. pneumoniae lytA (NHS assay); (ii) N. meningitidis serogroups A, W135, and X (AWX assay); and (iii) N. meningitidis serogroups B, C, and Y (BCY assay). Each multiplex assay was 100% specific for detecting its target organisms or serogroups, and the LLD was similar to that for the singleplex assay. Pairwise comparison of real-time PCR between multiplex and singleplex assays showed that cycle threshold values of the multiplex assay were similar to those for the singleplex assay. There were no substantial differences in sensitivity and specificity between these multiplex and singleplex real-time PCR assays. PMID:22170919

  18. Resveratrol suppresses calcium-mediated microglial activation and rescues hippocampal neurons of adult rats following acute bacterial meningitis.

    PubMed

    Sheu, Ji-Nan; Liao, Wen-Chieh; Wu, Un-In; Shyu, Ling-Yuh; Mai, Fu-Der; Chen, Li-You; Chen, Mei-Jung; Youn, Su-Chung; Chang, Hung-Ming

    2013-03-01

    Acute bacterial meningitis (ABM) is a serious disease with severe neurological sequelae. The intense calcium-mediated microglial activation and subsequently pro-inflammatory cytokine release plays an important role in eliciting ABM-related oxidative damage. Considering resveratrol possesses significant anti-inflammatory and anti-oxidative properties, the present study aims to determine whether resveratrol would exert beneficial effects on hippocampal neurons following ABM. ABM was induced by inoculating Klebsiella pneumoniae into adult rats intraventricularly. The time-of-flight secondary ion mass spectrometry (TOF-SIMS), Griffonia simplicifolia isolectin-B4 (GSA-IB4) and ionized calcium binding adaptor molecule 1 (Iba1) immunohistochemistry, enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay as well as malondialdehyde (MDA) measurement were used to examine the calcium expression, microglial activation, pro-inflammatory cytokine level, and extent of oxidative stress, respectively. In ABM rats, strong calcium signaling associated with enhanced microglial activation was observed in hippocampus. Increased microglial expression was coincided with intense production of pro-inflammatory cytokines and oxidative damage. However, in rats receiving resveratrol after ABM, the calcium intensity, microglial activation, pro-inflammatory cytokine and MDA levels were all significantly decreased. Quantitative data showed that much more hippocampal neurons were survived in resveratrol-treated rats following ABM. As resveratrol successfully rescues hippocampal neurons from ABM by suppressing the calcium-mediated microglial activation, therapeutic use of resveratrol may act as a promising strategy to counteract the ABM-induced neurological damage.

  19. Development of internally controlled duplex real-time NASBA diagnostics assays for the detection of microorganisms associated with bacterial meningitis.

    PubMed

    Clancy, Eoin; Coughlan, Helena; Higgins, Owen; Boo, Teck Wee; Cormican, Martin; Barrett, Louise; Smith, Terry J; Reddington, Kate; Barry, Thomas

    2016-08-01

    Three duplex molecular beacon based real-time Nucleic Acid Sequence Based Amplification (NASBA) assays have been designed and experimentally validated targeting RNA transcripts for the detection and identification of Haemophilus influenzae, Neisseria meningitidis and Streptococcus pneumoniae respectively. Each real-time NASBA diagnostics assay includes an endogenous non-competitive Internal Amplification Control (IAC) to amplify the splice variant 1 mRNA of the Homo sapiens TBP gene from human total RNA. All three duplex real-time NASBA diagnostics assays were determined to be 100% specific for the target species tested for. Also the Limits of Detection (LODs) for the H. influenzae, N. meningitidis and S. pneumoniae duplex real-time NASBA assays were 55.36, 0.99, and 57.24 Cell Equivalents (CE) respectively. These robust duplex real-time NASBA diagnostics assays have the potential to be used in a clinical setting for the rapid (<60min) specific detection and identification of the most prominent microorganisms associated with bacterial meningitis in humans.

  20. Patterns of Local and Systemic Cytokines in Bacterial Meningitis and its Relation with Severity and Long-Term Sequelae

    PubMed Central

    Perdomo-Celis, Federico; Torres, Miguel A.; Ostos, Henry; Gutierrez-Achury, Javier; Molano, Víctor; Durán, Luis F.; González, Guillermo; Narváez, Carlos F.

    2015-01-01

    Bacterial meningitis (BM) is a pyogenic infection present in the subarachnoid space, potentially fatal and frequently associated with neurological sequelae. During BM, cytokines (CTs) are locally produced. We sought to determine the CTs’ clinical role as disease severity predictors in adults, which is not completely clear. Using a bead-based flow cytometric assay, levels of six CTs were determined in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) and plasma from 18 adult BM patients and 19 uninfected controls. Long-term neurological sequelae were evaluated using the Glasgow Outcome Scale (GOS). All evaluated CTs were higher in CSF than in plasma, and the levels of CSF interleukin (IL)-6, IL-8, IL-10, IL-1β, and tumor necrosis factor-α and plasma IL-10 and IL-12p70 were significantly higher in patients with severe sepsis than with sepsis, suggesting an association with clinical severity. There was a strong negative correlation between CSF IL-6 and plasma IL-12p70 with GOS score, supporting the possible role of these CTs in the development of neurological long-term sequelae. These findings could be helpful to identify candidates to receive neuroprotective treatments and early physiotherapy schemes. PMID:26715831

  1. Development of Real-Time PCR Methods for the Detection of Bacterial Meningitis Pathogens without DNA Extraction

    PubMed Central

    Vuong, Jeni; Collard, Jean-Marc; Whaley, Melissa J.; Bassira, Issaka; Seidou, Issaka; Diarra, Seydou; Ouédraogo, Rasmata T.; Kambiré, Dinanibè; Taylor, Thomas H.; Sacchi, Claudio; Mayer, Leonard W.; Wang, Xin

    2016-01-01

    Neisseria meningitidis (Nm), Haemophilus influenzae (Hi), and Streptococcus pneumoniae (Sp) are the lead causes of bacterial meningitis. Detection of these pathogens from clinical specimens using traditional real-time PCR (rt-PCR) requires DNA extraction to remove the PCR inhibitors prior to testing, which is time consuming and labor intensive. In this study, five species-specific (Nm-sodC and -ctrA, Hi-hpd#1 and -hpd#3 and Sp-lytA) and six serogroup-specific rt-PCR tests (A, B, C, W, X, Y) targeting Nm capsular genes were evaluated in the two direct rt-PCR methods using PerfeCTa and 5x Omni that do not require DNA extraction. The sensitivity and specify of the two direct rt-PCR methods were compared to TaqMan traditional rt-PCR, the current standard rt-PCR method for the detection of meningitis pathogens. The LLD for all 11 rt-PCR tests ranged from 6,227 to 272,229 CFU/ml for TaqMan, 1,824–135,982 for 5x Omni, and 168–6,836 CFU/ml for PerfeCTa. The diagnostic sensitivity using TaqMan ranged from 89.2%-99.6%, except for NmB-csb, which was 69.7%. For 5x Omni, the sensitivity varied from 67.1% to 99.8%, with three tests below 90%. The sensitivity of these tests using PerfeCTa varied from 89.4% to 99.8%. The specificity ranges of the 11 tests were 98.0–99.9%, 97.5–99.9%, and 92.9–99.9% for TaqMan, 5x Omni, and PerfeCTa, respectively. PerfeCTa direct rt-PCR demonstrated similar or better sensitivity compared to 5x Omni direct rt-PCR or TaqMan traditional rt-PCR. Since the direct rt-PCR method does not require DNA extraction, it reduces the time and cost for processing CSF specimens, increases testing throughput, decreases the risk of cross-contamination, and conserves precious CSF. The direct rt-PCR method will be beneficial to laboratories with high testing volume. PMID:26829233

  2. Betamethasone and dexamethasone in adult community-acquired bacterial meningitis: a quality registry study from 1995 to 2014.

    PubMed

    Glimåker, M; Brink, M; Naucler, P; Sjölin, J

    2016-09-01

    Acute bacterial meningitis (ABM) is a highly lethal disease. Available data support the use of corticosteroids in high-income countries, but the effect on mortality is still controversial. The effects of corticosteroids on mortality and sequelae were evaluated in the national Swedish quality registry. In total, during 1995-2014 1746 adults with ABM were included, of whom 989 were treated with corticosteroids (betamethasone, n = 766; dexamethasone, n = 248; methylprednisolone, n = 2), 498 were not given corticosteroids and in 259 patients data for corticosteroids were missing. Fatal outcome was observed in 8.9% of the patients in the corticosteroid-treated group vs. 17.9% in the non-corticosteroid-treated group (p <0.001), resulting in an odds ratio (OR) of 0.57 with a 95% confidence interval (CI) of 0.40-0.81 adjusted for age, sex, mental status, and door-to-antibiotic time. In patients with meningitis caused by S. pneumoniae, mortality was 10.2% in the corticosteroid-treated group and 21.3% in the non-corticosteroid-treated group (p <0.001) with an adjusted OR of 0.50 (95% CI 0.31-0.80). In ABM patients with non-pneumococcal aetiology the adjusted OR was 0.71 (95% CI 0.40-1.26). Lower mortality was observed in the corticosteroid-treated group with impaired mental status, whereas no significant difference was found in patients with unaffected mental status. The adjusted ORs for betamethasone and dexamethasone were 0.49 (95% CI 0.28-0.84) and 0.61 (95% CI 0.37-1.01), respectively. Corticosteroid treatment decreases mortality in ABM and should be administered initially with antibiotics in adult ABM patients with impaired mental status regardless of presumed aetiology. Betamethasone seems to be at least as effective as dexamethasone. Copyright © 2016 European Society of Clinical Microbiology and Infectious Diseases. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Childhood very severe pneumonia and meningitis-related hospitalization and death in Yemen, before and after introduction of H. influenzae type b (Hib) vaccine.

    PubMed

    Banajeh, S M; Ashoor, O; Al-Magramy, A S

    2014-07-08

    Haemophilus influenzae type b (Hib) vaccine was included in the Yemen immunization programme in 2005. This study compared the rates of very severe pneumonia and all-cause meningitis hospitalization and death, before and after introduction of conjugate Hib vaccine, and reports the results of the 2010 bacterial meningitis surveillance. A retrospective analysis was made of data collected for 2000-2010 for all children aged 2-60 months in the main children's hospital in Sana'a. Compared with the pre-Hib vaccination period, the post-Hib period showed significant and impressive reductions in the rates of hospitalization and death for all-cause meningitis. However, hospitalization and death for very severe pneumonia improved only modestly, and there was evidence of a decreasing but non-significant trend indicting that very severe pneumonia was a non-specific endpoint with multi-etiologies (both viral and bacterial). Very severe pneumonia remains the leading cause of severe morbidity and death for young children, particularly those aged < 12 months.

  4. The use of dried cerebrospinal fluid filter paper spots as a substrate for PCR diagnosis of the aetiology of bacterial meningitis in the Lao PDR.

    PubMed

    Elliott, I; Dittrich, S; Paris, D; Sengduanphachanh, A; Phoumin, P; Newton, P N

    2013-10-01

    We investigated whether dried cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) conserved on filter paper can be used as a substrate for accurate PCR diagnosis of important causes of bacterial meningitis in the Lao PDR. Using mock CSF, we investigated and optimized filter paper varieties, paper punch sizes, elution volumes and quantities of DNA template to achieve sensitive and reliable detection of bacterial DNA from filter paper specimens. FTA Elute Micro Card™ (Whatman, Maidstone, UK) was the most sensitive, consistent and practical variety of filter paper. Following optimization, the lower limit of detection for Streptococcus pneumoniae from dried mock CSF spots was 14 genomic equivalents (GE)/μL (interquartile range 5.5 GE/μL) or 230 (IQR 65) colony forming units/mL. A prospective clinical evaluation for S. pneumoniae, S. suis and Neisseria meningitidis was performed. Culture and PCR performed on fresh liquid CSF from patients admitted with a clinical diagnosis of meningitis (n = 73) were compared with results derived from dried CSF spots. Four of five fresh PCR-positive CSF samples also tested PCR positive from dried CSF spots, with one patient under the limit of detection. In a retrospective study of S. pneumoniae samples (n = 20), the median (IQR; range) CSF S. pneumoniae bacterial load was 1.1 × 10(4) GE/μL (1.2 × 10(5) ; 1 to 6.1 × 10(6) DNA GE/μL). Utilizing the optimized methodology, we estimate an extrapolated sensitivity of 90%, based on the range of CSF genome counts found in Laos. Dried CSF filter paper spots could potentially help us to better understand the epidemiology of bacterial meningitis in resource-poor settings and guide empirical treatments and vaccination policies.

  5. Neuro-Intensive Treatment Targeting Intracranial Hypertension Improves Outcome in Severe Bacterial Meningitis: An Intervention-Control Study

    PubMed Central

    Glimåker, Martin; Johansson, Bibi; Halldorsdottir, Halla; Wanecek, Michael; Elmi-Terander, Adrian; Ghatan, Per Hamid; Lindquist, Lars; Bellander, Bo Michael

    2014-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the efficacy of early intracranial pressure (ICP)-targeted treatment, compared to standard intensive care, in adults with community acquired acute bacterial meningitis (ABM) and severely impaired consciousness. Design A prospectively designed intervention-control comparison study of adult cases from September 2004 to January 2012. Patients Included patients were confirmed ABM-cases, aged 16–75 years, with severely impaired mental status on admission. Fifty-two patients, given ICP-targeted treatment at the neuro-intensive care unit, and 53 control cases, treated with conventional intensive care, were included. All the patients received intensive care with mechanical ventilation, sedation, antibiotics and corticosteroids according to current guidelines. Additional ICP-treatment in the intervention group included cerebrospinal fluid drainage using external ventricular catheters (n = 48), osmotherapy (n = 21), hyperventilation (n = 13), external cooling (n = 9), gram-doses of methylprednisolone (n = 3) and deep barbiturate sedation (n = 2) aiming at ICP <20 mmHg and a cerebral perfusion pressure of >50 mmHg. Measurements The primary endpoint was mortality at two months and secondary endpoint was Glasgow outcome score and hearing ability at follow-up at 2–6 months. Outcomes The mortality was significantly lower in the intervention group compared to controls, 5/52 (10%) versus 16/53 (30%; relative risk reduction 68%; p<0.05). Furthermore, only 17 patients (32%) in the control group fully recovered compared to 28 (54%) in the intervention group (relative risk reduction 40%; p<0.05). Conclusions Early neuro-intensive care using ICP-targeted therapy, mainly cerebrospinal fluid drainage, reduces mortality and improves the overall outcome in adult patients with ABM and severely impaired mental status on admission. PMID:24667767

  6. Frequency of Pathogenic Paediatric Bacterial Meningitis in Mozambique: The Critical Role of Multiplex Real-Time Polymerase Chain Reaction to Estimate the Burden of Disease

    PubMed Central

    Nhantumbo, Aquino Albino; Cantarelli, Vlademir Vicente; Caireão, Juliana; Munguambe, Alcides Moniz; Comé, Charlotte Elizabeth; Pinto, Gabriela do Carmo; Zimba, Tomás Francisco; Mandomando, Inácio; Semá, Cynthia Baltazar; Dias, Cícero; Moraes, Milton Ozório; Gudo, Eduardo Samo

    2015-01-01

    Background In Sub-Saharan Africa, including Mozambique, acute bacterial meningitis (ABM) represents a main cause of childhood mortality. The burden of ABM is seriously underestimated because of the poor performance of culture sampling, the primary method of ABM surveillance in the region. Low quality cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) samples and frequent consumption of antibiotics prior to sample collection lead to a high rate of false-negative results. To our knowledge, this study is the first to determine the frequency of ABM in Mozambique using real-time polymerase chain reaction (qPCR) and to compare results to those of culture sampling. Method Between March 2013 and March 2014, CSF samples were collected at 3 regional hospitals from patients under 5 years of age, who met World Health Organization case definition criteria for ABM. Macroscopic examination, cytochemical study, culture, and qPCR were performed on all samples. Results A total of 369 CSF samples were collected from children clinically suspected of ABM. qPCR showed a significantly higher detection rate of ABM-causing pathogens when compared to culture (52.3% [193/369] versus 7.3% [27/369], p = 0.000). The frequency of Streptococcus pneumoniae, Haemophilus influenzae, group B Streptococci, and Neisseria meningitidis were 32.8% (121⁄369), 12.2%, (45⁄369), 3.0% (16⁄369) and 4.3% (11⁄369), respectively, significantly higher compared to that obtained on culture (p < 0.001 for each). Conclusion Our findings demonstrate that culture is less effective for the diagnosis of ABM than qPCR. The common use of culture rather than qPCR to identify ABM results in serious underestimation of the burden of the disease, and our findings strongly suggest that qPCR should be incorporated into surveillance activities for ABM. In addition, our data showed that S. pneumoniae represents the most common cause of ABM in children under 5 years of age. PMID:26393933

  7. Lamotrigine and aseptic meningitis.

    PubMed

    Simms, Kelley M; Kortepeter, Cindy; Avigan, Mark

    2012-03-20

    The purpose of this case series is to characterize a recently identified association of the antiepileptic drug (AED) lamotrigine with aseptic meningitis based on cases reported to the Food and Drug Administration (FDA)'s Adverse Event Reporting System (AERS) database. We performed a data mining analysis of 9 AEDs from the FDA's AERS database. We applied the multi-item gamma Poisson shrinker (MGPS) algorithm to the entire AERS database through November 2, 2009, to generate empirical Bayes geometric mean (EBGM) values with corresponding confidence intervals for 9 AEDs and the adverse event code "meningitis aseptic." The AERS database was also searched for postmarketing reports of aseptic meningitis associated with lamotrigine and a detailed review of each case was performed. Forty AERS cases were identified in this review. Findings from the AERS reports revealed CSF profiles with features of both bacterial as well as viral meningitis. Fifteen cases documented a positive rechallenge; the median time to onset of symptoms upon rechallenge was only 60 minutes. Data mining analysis of several anticonvulsants resulted in disproportionate reporting solely for lamotrigine. There appears to be an association between lamotrigine use and aseptic meningitis. It is notable that nearly 40% of cases in this case series reported a positive rechallenge. Lamotrigine-associated aseptic meningitis should be considered in the differential diagnosis of culture-negative meningitis. This case series highlights the need for continued pharmacovigilance and the importance of systematic monitoring of patients treated with antiepileptic medications.

  8. Meningitis - pneumococcal

    MedlinePlus

    ... causes meningitis. Causes Pneumococcal meningitis is caused by Streptococcus pneumoniae bacteria (also called pneumococcus, or S pneumoniae ). This type ... Saunders; 2015:chap 89. Wood JB, Peters TR. Streptococcus pneumoniae (pneumococcus). In: Kliegman RM, Stanton BF, St. Geme ...

  9. Childhood pneumonia and meningitis in the Eastern Highlands Province, Papua New Guinea in the era of conjugate vaccines: study methods and challenges.

    PubMed

    Blyth, Christopher C; Ford, Rebecca; Sapura, Joycelyn; Kumani, Tonny; Masiria, Geraldine; Kave, John; Yuasi, Lapule; Greenhill, Andrew; Hwaihwanje, Ilomo; Lang, Amanda; Lehmann, Deborah; Pomat, William

    2017-01-01

    Pneumonia and meningitis are common causes of severe childhood illness in Papua New Guinea (PNG). The etiology of both clinical conditions in PNG has not been recently assessed. Changes in lifestyle, provision and access to healthcare, antimicrobial utilization and resistance, and the national childhood vaccination schedule necessitate reassessment. A prospective case-control study was undertaken, enrolling children <5 years of age to determine the contemporary etiology of clinically defined moderate or severe pneumonia or suspected meningitis. Cases were identified following presentation for inpatient or outpatient care in Goroka town, the major population centre in the Eastern Highlands Province. Following enrolment, routine diagnostic specimens including blood, nasopharyngeal swabs, urine and (if required) cerebrospinal fluid, were obtained. Cases residing within one hour's drive of Goroka were followed up, and recruitment of healthy contemporaneous controls was undertaken in the cases' communities. 998 cases and 978 controls were enrolled over 3 years. This included 784 cases (78.6%) with moderate pneumonia, 187 (18.7%) with severe pneumonia and 75 (7.5%) with suspected meningitis, of whom 48 (4.8%) had concurrent pneumonia. The median age of cases was 7.8 months (Interquartile range [IQR] 3.9-14.3), significantly lower than community controls, which was 20.8 months (IQR 8.2-36.4). Half the cases were admitted to hospital (500/998; 50.1%). Recruitment of cases and controls and successful collection of diagnostic specimens improved throughout the study, with blood volume increasing and rates of blood culture contamination decreasing. The overall case fatality rate was 18/998 (1.8%). Of cases eligible for follow-up, outcome data was available from 76.7%. Low but increasing coverage of Haemophilus influenzae type B conjugate vaccines on the national schedule was observed during the study period: three dose DTPw-HepB-Hib coverage in children >3

  10. Meningitis - H. influenzae

    MedlinePlus

    ... influenzae meningitis; H. flu meningitis; Haemophilus influenzae type b meningitis ... influenzae meningitis is caused by Haemophilus influenzae type b bacteria. This illness is not the same as ...

  11. [Impact of a conjugated anti meningococcal A vaccine on notification of bacterial meningitis in West Burkina Faso (2009-2012)].

    PubMed

    Ouangraoua, S; Schlumberger, M; Yaro, S; Ouédraogo, A S; Sanou, S; Drabo, A; Yaméogo, T M; Ouedraogo, R

    2014-02-01

    Burkina Faso is a sub-saharan African country completely included in the meningococcal meningitis belt. The western part of the country suffered from many meningococcal A epidemics, in spite of reactive collective campaigns with polysaccharide A vaccine. On 6th December 2010, Burkina Faso was the first African country to conduct a collective vaccination campaign of all the 1-29 years old population with a new conjugated meningococcal Avaccine (MenAfriVac™). Before this campaign, in Western Burkina (4,064,928 inhabitants, 27.5% of total population), a rehearsal of the staff of all peripheral medical laboratories has been conducted, with delivery of laboratory equipment, reactants, and possibility to transfer CSF specimens at the central level to confirm bacteriologic species in cause by latex, culture and PCR analysis. For this campaign, an administrative coverage of 100.3% was reached. A nearly complete disappearance of meningitis due to meningococcus A was recorded, but an increase of cases due to meningococcus X, W135. With the increase of quality of surveillance, and MenAfriVac™ vaccination showed its beneficial effect on meningococcus A meningitis. If we want however to impact on the number of recorded acute bacteriological meningitis, we will have to use multi-antigenic, if possible conjugated, meningococcal vaccines against locally circulating meningococcal species, the number of pneumococcal meningitis being contained by the recent inclusion in EPI of a 13-valent conjugated pneumococcal vaccine.

  12. Reversible hearing loss following cryptococcal meningitis: case study.

    PubMed

    Neo, W L; Durisala, N; Ho, E C

    2016-07-01

    Sensorineural hearing loss is a recognised complication of cryptococcal meningitis. The mechanism of hearing loss in patients with cryptococcal meningitis is different from that in bacterial meningitis. An immune-competent man with cryptococcal meningitis presented with sudden onset, bilateral, severe to profound sensorineural hearing loss and vestibular dysfunction. He was initially evaluated for cochlear implantation. However, he had a significant recovery; he no longer required surgery and was able to cope without a hearing aid. Typically, cochlear implantation is performed with some urgency in patients with hearing loss post-bacterial meningitis, because of the risk of labyrinthitis ossificans. However, this process has not been described in patients with cryptococcal meningitis. Furthermore, patients with hearing loss associated with cryptococcal meningitis have shown varying degrees of reversibility. In this case report, hearing loss from cryptococcal meningitis is compared with that from bacterial meningitis, and the need for cochlear implantation in patients with cryptococcal meningitis is discussed.

  13. Diagnostic accuracy of a 16S ribosomal DNA gene-based molecular technique (RT-PCR, microarray, and sequencing) for bacterial meningitis, early-onset neonatal sepsis, and spontaneous bacterial peritonitis.

    PubMed

    Esparcia, Oscar; Montemayor, Michel; Ginovart, Gemma; Pomar, Virginia; Soriano, Germán; Pericas, Roser; Gurgui, Mercedes; Sulleiro, Elena; Prats, Guillem; Navarro, Ferran; Coll, Pere

    2011-02-01

    The diagnostic accuracy of a 16S ribosomal DNA (rDNA) gene-based molecular technique for bacterial meningitis (BM), early-onset neonatal sepsis (EONS), and spontaneous bacterial peritonitis (SBP) is evaluated. The molecular approach gave better results for BM diagnosis: sensitivity (S) was 90.6% compared to 78.1% for the bacterial culture. Percentages of cases correctly diagnosed (CCD) were 91.7% and 80.6%, respectively. For EONS diagnosis, S was 60.0% for the molecular approach and 70.0% for the bacterial culture; and CCD was 95.2% and 96.4%, respectively. For SPB diagnosis, the molecular approach gave notably poorer results than the bacterial cultures. S and CCD were 48.4% and 56.4% for the molecular approach and 80.6% and 89.1% for bacterial cultures. Nevertheless, bacterial DNA was detected in 53.3% of culture-negative samples. Accuracy of the 16S rDNA PCR approach differs depending on the sample, the microorganisms involved, the expected bacterial load, and the presence of bacterial DNA other than that from the pathogen implied in the infectious disease.

  14. Rapid differentiation of the major causative agents of bacterial meningitis by use of frequency-pulsed electron capture gas-liquid chromatography: analysis of amines.

    PubMed

    Brooks, J B; Kellogg, D S; Shepherd, M E; Alley, C C

    1980-01-01

    The major causative agents of bacterial meningitis (Haemophilus influenzae serogroup B, Neisseria meningitidis serogroups B and C, Klebsiella pneumoniae, Steptococcus pneumoniae, and two types of Escherichia coli) were cultured in a chemically defined medium, and selected strains were further studied in Todd-Hewitt medium. After acidic extraction of the spent media with chloroform, a basic extraction was made with chloroform to obtain amines. A third extraction was performed on re-acidified Todd-Hewitt medium with ethyl ether to obtain hydroxyacids. The extracts were derivatized with heptafluorobutyric anhydride-ethanol to form electron-capturing derivatives, and the derivatives were analyzed on a frequency-pulsed electron capture gas-liquid chromatograph (FPEC-GLC) equipped with a PEP-2 computer. The data obtained from the study showed that amines were produced by these organisms that formed characteristic patterns. Different serotypes of K. pneumoniae and the two serogroups of N. meningitidis produced different types of FPEC-GLC profiles within serotypes. E. coli produced several hydroxy acids on Todd-Hewitt medium that made it unique among the organisms studied. The methods used are practical and the techniques have potential for use in clinical laboratories and hospitals as a valuable aid for the rapid identification of the major causative agents of bacterial meningitis.

  15. A broad range assay for rapid detection and etiologic characterization of bacterial meningitis: performance testing in samples from sub-Sahara☆, ☆☆,★

    PubMed Central

    Won, Helen; Yang, Samuel; Gaydos, Charlotte; Hardick, Justin; Ramachandran, Padmini; Hsieh, Yu-Hsiang; Kecojevic, Alexander; Njanpop-Lafourcade, Berthe-Marie; Mueller, Judith E.; Tameklo, Tsidi Agbeko; Badziklou, Kossi; Gessner, Bradford D.; Rothman, Richard E.

    2012-01-01

    This study aimed to conduct a pilot evaluation of broad-based multiprobe polymerase chain reaction (PCR) in clinical cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) samples compared to local conventional PCR/culture methods used for bacterial meningitis surveillance. A previously described PCR consisting of initial broad-based detection of Eubacteriales by a universal probe, followed by Gram typing, and pathogen-specific probes was designed targeting variable regions of the 16S rRNA gene. The diagnostic performance of the 16S rRNA assay in “”127 CSF samples was evaluated in samples from patients from Togo, Africa, by comparison to conventional PCR/culture methods. Our probes detected Neisseria meningitidis, Streptococcus pneumoniae, and Haemophilus influenzae. Uniprobe sensitivity and specificity versus conventional PCR were 100% and 54.6%, respectively. Sensitivity and specificity of uniprobe versus culture methods were 96.5% and 52.5%, respectively. Gram-typing probes correctly typed 98.8% (82/83) and pathogen-specific probes identified 96.4% (80/83) of the positives. This broad-based PCR algorithm successfully detected and provided species level information for multiple bacterial meningitis agents in clinical samples. PMID:22809694

  16. Accuracy of cerebrospinal leucocyte count, protein and culture for the diagnosis of acute bacterial meningitis: a comparative study using Bayesian latent class analysis.

    PubMed

    Manning, Laurens; Laman, Moses; Mare, Trevor; Hwaiwhanje, Ilomo; Siba, Peter; Davis, Timothy M E

    2014-12-01

    To examine the utility of laboratory methods other than bacterial culture in diagnosing acute bacterial meningitis (ABM). Bayesian latent class analysis was used to estimate diagnostic precision of cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) culture, leucocyte counts and protein concentrations for ABM in Melanesian children. With a cut-off of ≥20 leucocytes/mm(3) , the area under the receiver operating characteristic curve (AUC ROC) was >97.5% for leucocyte counts. A lower (93%) AUC ROC was observed for CSF protein concentrations ≥1 g/l. CSF culture had poor sensitivity and high specificity. Leucocyte counts provide sufficient diagnostic precision to aid clinical decision-making in ABM. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  17. Campylobacter Fetus Meningitis in Adults

    PubMed Central

    van Samkar, Anusha; Brouwer, Matthijs C.; van der Ende, Arie; van de Beek, Diederik

    2016-01-01

    Abstract The zoonotic pathogen Campylobacter fetus is a rare cause of bacterial meningitis. Little is known about the clinical characteristics, predisposing factors and outcome of C fetus meningitis in adults. We report cases of C fetus meningitis in a nationwide cohort study of adult bacterial meningitis patients in the Netherlands and performed a review of the literature. Two patients with C fetus meningitis were identified from January 2006 through May 2015. The calculated annual incidence was 0.02 per million adults. Combined with the literature, we identified 22 patients with a median age of 48 years. An immunocompromised state was present in 16 patients (73%), mostly due to alcoholism (41%) and diabetes mellitus (27%). The source of infection was identified in 13 out of 19 patients (68%), consisting of regular contact with domestic animals in 5 and working on a farm in 4. Recurrent fever and illness was reported in 4 patients (18%), requiring prolonged antibiotic treatment. Two patients died (9%) and 3 survivors (15%) had neurological sequelae. C fetus is a rare cause of bacterial meningitis and is associated with an immunocompromised state. Based on the apparent slow clinical response seen in this limited number of cases, the authors of this study recommend a prolonged course of antimicrobial therapy when C fetus is identified as a causative agent of bacterial meningitis. Cases appeared to do best with carbapenem therapy. PMID:26937916

  18. Prevalence and antibiotic resistance profiles of cerebrospinal fluid pathogens in children with acute bacterial meningitis in Yunnan province, China, 2012-2015.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Hongchao; Su, Min; Kui, Liyue; Huang, Hailin; Qiu, Lijuan; Li, Li; Ma, Jing; Du, Tingyi; Fan, Mao; Sun, Qiangming; Liu, Xiaomei

    2017-01-01

    Acute bacterial meningitis is still considered one of the most dangerous infectious diseases in children. To investigate the prevalence and antibiotic resistance profiles of cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) pathogens in children with acute bacterial meningitis in Southwest China, CSF samples from 179 meningitis patients (3 days to 12 years old) with positive culture results were collected from 2012 to 2015. Isolated pathogens were identified using the Vitek-32 system. Gram stain results were used to guide subcultures and susceptibility testing. The antimicrobial susceptibility of isolates was determined using the disc diffusion method. Of the isolates, 50.8% were Gram-positive bacteria, and 49.2% were Gram-negative bacteria. The most prevalent pathogens were E. coli (28.5%), Streptococcus pneumoniae (17.8%), Staphylococcus epidermidis (10.0%), Haemophilus influenzae type b (9.5%), and group B streptococcus (7.2%). In young infants aged ≤3 months, E. coli was the organism most frequently isolated from CSF (39/76; 51.3%), followed by group B streptococcus (13/76; 17.1%) and Streptococcus pneumoniae (8/76; 10.5%). However, in young infants aged >3 months, the most frequently isolated organism was Streptococcus pneumoniae (24/103; 23.3%), followed by Staphylococcus epidermidis (18/103; 17.5%) and Haemophilus influenzae type b (16/103; 15.5%). Antimicrobial susceptibility tests indicated that for E. coli isolates, the susceptibility rates to aminoglycosides ranged from 56.8% to 100.0%, among them, amikacin was identified as the most effective against E. coli. As for cephalosporins, the susceptibility rates ranged from 29.4% to 78.4%, and cefoxitin was identified as the most effective cephalosporin. In addition, the susceptibility rates of piperacillin/tazobactam and imipenem against E. coli were 86.3% and 100%. Meanwhile, the susceptibility rates of Streptococcus pneumoniae isolates to penicillin G, erythromycin, chloramphenicol, ceftriaxone and tetracycline were 68.8%, 0

  19. Incorporation of real-time PCR into routine public health surveillance of culture negative bacterial meningitis in São Paulo, Brazil.

    PubMed

    Sacchi, Claudio T; Fukasawa, Lucila O; Gonçalves, Maria G; Salgado, Maristela M; Shutt, Kathleen A; Carvalhanas, Telma R; Ribeiro, Ana F; Kemp, Brigina; Gorla, Maria C O; Albernaz, Ricardo K; Marques, Eneida G L; Cruciano, Angela; Waldman, Eliseu A; Brandileone, M Cristina C; Harrison, Lee H

    2011-01-01

    Real-time (RT)-PCR increases diagnostic yield for bacterial meningitis and is ideal for incorporation into routine surveillance in a developing country. We validated a multiplex RT-PCR assay for Streptococcus pneumoniae, Neisseria meningitidis, and Haemophilus influenzae in Brazil. Risk factors for being culture-negative, RT-PCR positive were determined. The sensitivity of RT-PCR in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) was 100% (95% confidence limits, 96.0%-100%) for N. meningitidis, 97.8% (85.5%-99.9%) for S. pneumoniae, and 66.7% (9.4%-99.2%) for H. influenzae. Specificity ranged from 98.9% to 100%. Addition of RT-PCR to routine microbiologic methods increased the yield for detection of S. pneumoniae, N. meningitidis, and H. influenzae cases by 52%, 85%, and 20%, respectively. The main risk factor for being culture negative and RT-PCR positive was presence of antibiotic in CSF (odds ratio 12.2, 95% CI 5.9-25.0). RT-PCR using CSF was highly sensitive and specific and substantially added to measures of meningitis disease burden when incorporated into routine public health surveillance in Brazil.

  20. Incorporation of Real-Time PCR into Routine Public Health Surveillance of Culture Negative Bacterial Meningitis in São Paulo, Brazil

    PubMed Central

    Sacchi, Claudio T.; Fukasawa, Lucila O.; Gonçalves, Maria G.; Salgado, Maristela M.; Shutt, Kathleen A.; Carvalhanas, Telma R.; Ribeiro, Ana F.; Kemp, Brigina; Gorla, Maria C. O.; Albernaz, Ricardo K.; Marques, Eneida G. L.; Cruciano, Angela; Waldman, Eliseu A.; Brandileone, M. Cristina C; Harrison, Lee H.

    2011-01-01

    Real-time (RT)-PCR increases diagnostic yield for bacterial meningitis and is ideal for incorporation into routine surveillance in a developing country. We validated a multiplex RT-PCR assay for Streptococcus pneumoniae, Neisseria meningitidis, and Haemophilus influenzae in Brazil. Risk factors for being culture-negative, RT-PCR positive were determined. The sensitivity of RT-PCR in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) was 100% (95% confidence limits, 96.0%–100%) for N. meningitidis, 97.8% (85.5%–99.9%) for S. pneumoniae, and 66.7% (9.4%–99.2%) for H. influenzae. Specificity ranged from 98.9% to 100%. Addition of RT-PCR to routine microbiologic methods increased the yield for detection of S. pneumoniae, N. meningitidis, and H. influenzae cases by 52%, 85%, and 20%, respectively. The main risk factor for being culture negative and RT-PCR positive was presence of antibiotic in CSF (odds ratio 12.2, 95% CI 5.9-25.0). RT-PCR using CSF was highly sensitive and specific and substantially added to measures of meningitis disease burden when incorporated into routine public health surveillance in Brazil. PMID:21731621

  1. Listeria monocytogenes meningitis preceded by acute cholangitis.

    PubMed

    Luthe, Sarah Kyuragi; Sato, Ryota; Maeda, Tetsuro; Takahashi, Kuniko

    2017-03-20

    Listeria monocytogenes is a well-known cause of meningitis in immunocompromised patients. This organism has a growing significance for community-acquired meningitis, which should have ampicillin added to the usual regimen. We describe a case of L. monocytogenes meningitis preceded by cholangitis. This case suggests gastrointestinal symptoms preceding meningitis may be a clue of listeriosis. It is important for physicians to consider L. monocytogenes as a cause of bacterial meningitis in patients with altered mental status preceded by gastrointestinal symptoms, especially in the immunocompromised population.

  2. Expansion of syndromic vaccine preventable disease surveillance to include bacterial meningitis and Japanese encephalitis: Evaluation of adapting polio and measles laboratory networks in Bangladesh, China and India, 2007–2008

    PubMed Central

    Cavallaro, Kathleen F.; Sandhu, Hardeep S.; Hyde, Terri B.; Johnson, Barbara W.; Fischer, Marc; Mayer, Leonard W.; Clark, Thomas A.; Pallansch, Mark A.; Yin, Zundong; Zuo, Shuyan; Hadler, Stephen C.; Diorditsa, Serguey; Hasan, A.S.M. Mainul; Bose, Anindya S.; Dietz, Vance

    2016-01-01

    Background Surveillance for acute flaccid paralysis with laboratory confirmation has been a key strategy in the global polio eradication initiative, and the laboratory platform established for polio testing has been expanded in many countries to include surveillance for cases of febrile rash illness to identify measles and rubella cases. Vaccine-preventable disease surveillance is essential to detect outbreaks, define disease burden, guide vaccination strategies and assess immunization impact. Vaccines now exist to prevent Japanese encephalitis (JE) and some etiologies of bacterial meningitis. Methods We evaluated the feasibility of expanding polio–measles surveillance and laboratory networks to detect bacterial meningitis and JE, using surveillance for acute meningitis-encephalitis syndrome in Bangladesh and China and acute encephalitis syndrome in India. We developed nine syndromic surveillance performance indicators based on international surveillance guidelines and calculated scores using supervisory visit reports, annual reports, and case-based surveillance data. Results Scores, variable by country and targeted disease, were highest for the presence of national guidelines, sustainability, training, availability of JE laboratory resources, and effectiveness of using polio–measles networks for JE surveillance. Scores for effectiveness of building on polio–measles networks for bacterial meningitis surveillance and specimen referral were the lowest, because of differences in specimens and techniques. Conclusions Polio–measles surveillance and laboratory networks provided useful infrastructure for establishing syndromic surveillance and building capacity for JE diagnosis, but were less applicable for bacterial meningitis. Laboratory-supported surveillance for vaccine-preventable bacterial diseases will require substantial technical and financial support to enhance local diagnostic capacity. PMID:25597940

  3. Expansion of syndromic vaccine preventable disease surveillance to include bacterial meningitis and Japanese encephalitis: evaluation of adapting polio and measles laboratory networks in Bangladesh, China and India, 2007-2008.

    PubMed

    Cavallaro, Kathleen F; Sandhu, Hardeep S; Hyde, Terri B; Johnson, Barbara W; Fischer, Marc; Mayer, Leonard W; Clark, Thomas A; Pallansch, Mark A; Yin, Zundong; Zuo, Shuyan; Hadler, Stephen C; Diorditsa, Serguey; Hasan, A S M Mainul; Bose, Anindya S; Dietz, Vance

    2015-02-25

    Surveillance for acute flaccid paralysis with laboratory confirmation has been a key strategy in the global polio eradication initiative, and the laboratory platform established for polio testing has been expanded in many countries to include surveillance for cases of febrile rash illness to identify measles and rubella cases. Vaccine-preventable disease surveillance is essential to detect outbreaks, define disease burden, guide vaccination strategies and assess immunization impact. Vaccines now exist to prevent Japanese encephalitis (JE) and some etiologies of bacterial meningitis. We evaluated the feasibility of expanding polio-measles surveillance and laboratory networks to detect bacterial meningitis and JE, using surveillance for acute meningitis-encephalitis syndrome in Bangladesh and China and acute encephalitis syndrome in India. We developed nine syndromic surveillance performance indicators based on international surveillance guidelines and calculated scores using supervisory visit reports, annual reports, and case-based surveillance data. Scores, variable by country and targeted disease, were highest for the presence of national guidelines, sustainability, training, availability of JE laboratory resources, and effectiveness of using polio-measles networks for JE surveillance. Scores for effectiveness of building on polio-measles networks for bacterial meningitis surveillance and specimen referral were the lowest, because of differences in specimens and techniques. Polio-measles surveillance and laboratory networks provided useful infrastructure for establishing syndromic surveillance and building capacity for JE diagnosis, but were less applicable for bacterial meningitis. Laboratory-supported surveillance for vaccine-preventable bacterial diseases will require substantial technical and financial support to enhance local diagnostic capacity. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  4. Association of Healthy Eating, Juice Consumption, and Bacterial Counts with Early Childhood Caries.

    PubMed

    AbdelAziz, Wafaa E; Dowidar, Karin M L; El Tantawi, Maha M A

    2015-01-01

    To investigate the association of healthy diet, snacking, and bacterial count with early childhood caries in a group of preschool children in Alexandria, Egypt. Sixty preschoolers were divided into three groups: (1) caries-free children; (2) children with early childhood caries (ECC); and (3) children with severe early childhood caries (S-ECC). Saliva was cultured to determine bacterial counts. A questionnaire collected information about background, oral health practices, and snacking habits. A 24-hour food recall form assessed dietary intake and was analyzed using the Health Eating Index 2005. Compared to caries-free children, children with ECC and S-ECC had significantly lower odds of drinking juices (odds ratio equals 0.10 and 0.02). Caries-free children had significantly higher Healthy Eating Index values than children with ECC and S-ECC (P=0.003 and P<0.0001). Total streptococci and Streptococcus mutans counts were significantly higher in children with ECC and S-ECC (P<0.0001 for all), whereas Streptococcus sanguis counts were lower (P=0.04 and P=0.01). Drinking juices was associated with less early childhood caries and severe early childhood caries among preschoolers. Snacking on sweets was associated with more S-ECC. Healthy eating, brushing, and bacterial counts were not significantly associated with ECC or S-ECC in multivariate regression.

  5. Rapid differentiation of the major causative agents of bacterial meningitis by use of frequency-pulsed electron capture gas-liquid chromatograph: analysis of acids.

    PubMed

    Brooks, J B; Kellogg, D S; Shepherd, M E; Alley, C C

    1980-01-01

    The major causative agents of bacterial meningitis, Haemophilus influenzae serogroup B, Neisseria meningitidis serogroups B and C, Klebsiella pneumoniae, Streptococcus pneumoniae, and two types of Escherichia coli, were cultured in a modified chemically defined Catlin medium and in a commercial version of the unmodified Catlin medium. The spent media were extracted under acidic conditions, and electron-capturing derivatives were prepared by derivatization with trichloroethanol or haptafluorobutyric anhydride. The derivatives were analyzed on a gas chromatograph equipped with a frequency-pulsed electron capture detector and a PEP-2 computer. The data obtained from the study show that these organisms can be easily distinguished from each other on the basis of metabolic products detected in either type of medium. Three different metabolic groups were detected within two serogroups of N. meningitidis. The methods are practical, and the new technique should offer clinical laboratories and hospitals a better method for rapid identification of this important group of pathogens.

  6. High-throughput sequencing of 16S rDNA amplicons characterizes bacterial composition in cerebrospinal fluid samples from patients with purulent meningitis.

    PubMed

    Liu, Aicui; Wang, Chao; Liang, Zhijuan; Zhou, Zhi-Wei; Wang, Lin; Ma, Qiaoli; Wang, Guowei; Zhou, Shu-Feng; Wang, Zhenhai

    2015-01-01

    Purulent meningitis (PM) is a severe infectious disease that is associated with high rates of morbidity and mortality. It has been recognized that bacterial infection is a major contributing factor to the pathogenesis of PM. However, there is a lack of information on the bacterial composition in PM, due to the low positive rate of cerebrospinal fluid bacterial culture. Herein, we aimed to discriminate and identify the main pathogens and bacterial composition in cerebrospinal fluid sample from PM patients using high-throughput sequencing approach. The cerebrospinal fluid samples were collected from 26 PM patients, and were determined as culture-negative samples. The polymerase chain reaction products of the hypervariable regions of 16S rDNA gene in these 26 samples of PM were sequenced using the 454 GS FLX system. The results showed that there were 71,440 pyrosequencing reads, of which, the predominant phyla were Proteobacteria and Firmicutes; and the predominant genera were Streptococcus, Acinetobacter, Pseudomonas, and Neisseria. The bacterial species in the cerebrospinal fluid were complex, with 61.5% of the samples presenting with mixed pathogens. A significant number of bacteria belonging to a known pathogenic potential was observed. The number of operational taxonomic units for individual samples ranged from six to 75 and there was a comparable difference in the species diversity that was calculated through alpha and beta diversity analysis. Collectively, the data show that high-throughput sequencing approach facilitates the characterization of the pathogens in cerebrospinal fluid and determine the abundance and the composition of bacteria in the cerebrospinal fluid samples of the PM patients, which may provide a better understanding of pathogens in PM and assist clinicians to make rational and effective therapeutic decisions.

  7. High-throughput sequencing of 16S rDNA amplicons characterizes bacterial composition in cerebrospinal fluid samples from patients with purulent meningitis

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Aicui; Wang, Chao; Liang, Zhijuan; Zhou, Zhi-Wei; Wang, Lin; Ma, Qiaoli; Wang, Guowei; Zhou, Shu-Feng; Wang, Zhenhai

    2015-01-01

    Purulent meningitis (PM) is a severe infectious disease that is associated with high rates of morbidity and mortality. It has been recognized that bacterial infection is a major contributing factor to the pathogenesis of PM. However, there is a lack of information on the bacterial composition in PM, due to the low positive rate of cerebrospinal fluid bacterial culture. Herein, we aimed to discriminate and identify the main pathogens and bacterial composition in cerebrospinal fluid sample from PM patients using high-throughput sequencing approach. The cerebrospinal fluid samples were collected from 26 PM patients, and were determined as culture-negative samples. The polymerase chain reaction products of the hypervariable regions of 16S rDNA gene in these 26 samples of PM were sequenced using the 454 GS FLX system. The results showed that there were 71,440 pyrosequencing reads, of which, the predominant phyla were Proteobacteria and Firmicutes; and the predominant genera were Streptococcus, Acinetobacter, Pseudomonas, and Neisseria. The bacterial species in the cerebrospinal fluid were complex, with 61.5% of the samples presenting with mixed pathogens. A significant number of bacteria belonging to a known pathogenic potential was observed. The number of operational taxonomic units for individual samples ranged from six to 75 and there was a comparable difference in the species diversity that was calculated through alpha and beta diversity analysis. Collectively, the data show that high-throughput sequencing approach facilitates the characterization of the pathogens in cerebrospinal fluid and determine the abundance and the composition of bacteria in the cerebrospinal fluid samples of the PM patients, which may provide a better understanding of pathogens in PM and assist clinicians to make rational and effective therapeutic decisions. PMID:26300628

  8. Bacterial microbiota of the upper respiratory tract and childhood asthma.

    PubMed

    Depner, Martin; Ege, Markus J; Cox, Michael J; Dwyer, Sarah; Walker, Alan W; Birzele, Lena T; Genuneit, Jon; Horak, Elisabeth; Braun-Fahrländer, Charlotte; Danielewicz, Hanna; Maier, Raina M; Moffatt, Miriam F; Cookson, William O; Heederik, Dick; von Mutius, Erika; Legatzki, Antje

    2017-03-01

    Patients with asthma and healthy controls differ in bacterial colonization of the respiratory tract. The upper airways have been shown to reflect colonization of the lower airways, the actual site of inflammation in asthma, which is hardly accessible in population studies. We sought to characterize the bacterial communities at 2 sites of the upper respiratory tract obtained from children from a rural area and to relate these to asthma. The microbiota of 327 throat and 68 nasal samples from school-age farm and nonfarm children were analyzed by 454-pyrosequencing of the bacterial 16S ribosomal RNA gene. Alterations in nasal microbiota but not of throat microbiota were associated with asthma. Children with asthma had lower α- and β-diversity of the nasal microbiota as compared with healthy control children. Furthermore, asthma presence was positively associated with a specific operational taxonomic unit from the genus Moraxella in children not exposed to farming, whereas in farm children Moraxella colonization was unrelated to asthma. In nonfarm children, Moraxella colonization explained the association between bacterial diversity and asthma to a large extent. Asthma was mainly associated with an altered nasal microbiota characterized by lower diversity and Moraxella abundance. Children living on farms might not be susceptible to the disadvantageous effect of Moraxella. Prospective studies may clarify whether Moraxella outgrowth is a cause or a consequence of loss in diversity. Copyright © 2016 American Academy of Allergy, Asthma & Immunology. All rights reserved.

  9. Fungal Meningitis

    MedlinePlus

    ... to the spinal cord. Unlike the fungi above, Candida , which can also cause meningitis, is usually acquired ... weights are also at increased risk for getting Candida blood stream infection, which may spread to the ...

  10. Meningococcal Meningitis

    MedlinePlus

    ... consultations Fact sheets Fact files Questions & answers Features Multimedia Contacts Meningococcal meningitis Fact sheet N°141 Updated ... result in brain damage, hearing loss or a learning disability in 10% to 20% of survivors. A ...

  11. [Cryptococcal meningitis].

    PubMed

    van Spil, W E Erwin; Nooijen, Suzan; de Jong, Peter Y P; Aliredjo, Riena P; de Sévaux, Ruud G L; Verhave, Jacobien C

    2015-01-01

    Immunocompromised patients are at increased risk of disseminated cryptococcal infection, often presenting as a primary respiratory infection with yeast cells originating from bird excreta. Because Cryptococcus neoformans has a tropism for cerebrospinal fluid, most patients suffer from meningitis or meningoencephalitis. Symptoms of cryptococcal meningitis are non-specific: headache, fever, nausea, or altered mental state and behaviour. Case descriptions of a renal transplant recipient and an HIV patient illustrate the non-specific presentation of cryptococcal meningitis. Lumbar puncture seemed to be critical in establishing the diagnosis. Cerebrospinal fluid, blood and other tissues were tested for C. neoformans by microscopy, culture and antigen tests. The patients were successfully treated with amphotericin B or liposomal amphotericin B intravenously and flucytosine intravenously or orally, followed by long-term fluconazole. The mortality rate for cryptococcal meningitis is 41% among renal transplant recipients and 20% in HIV patients.

  12. Viral Meningitis

    MedlinePlus

    ... Resources for Healthcare Professionals Related Links Vaccine Schedules Preteen & Teen Vaccines Meningococcal Disease Sepsis Viral Meningitis Language: ... Arboviruses Lymphocytic Choriomeningitis Virus Related Links Vaccine Schedules Preteen & Teen ... Disease Sepsis Language: English Spanish ...

  13. Procalcitonin as a Diagnostic and Prognostic Factor for Tuberculosis Meningitis

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Jinseung; Kim, Si Eun; Park, Bong Soo; Shin, Kyong Jin; Ha, Sam Yeol; Park, JinSe; Kim, Sung Eun

    2016-01-01

    Background and Purpose We investigated the potential role of serum procalcitonin in differentiating tuberculosis meningitis from bacterial and viral meningitis, and in predicting the prognosis of tuberculosis meningitis. Methods This was a retrospective study of 26 patients with tuberculosis meningitis. In addition, 70 patients with bacterial meningitis and 49 patients with viral meningitis were included as the disease control groups for comparison. The serum procalcitonin level was measured in all patients at admission. Differences in demographic and laboratory data, including the procalcitonin level, were analyzed among the three groups. In addition, we analyzed the predictive factors for a prognosis of tuberculosis meningitis using the Glasgow Coma Scale (GCS) at discharge, and the correlation between the level of procalcitonin and the GCS score at discharge. Results Multiple logistic regression analysis showed that a low level of procalcitonin (≤1.27 ng/mL) independently distinguished tuberculosis meningitis from bacterial meningitis. The sensitivity and specificity for distinguishing tuberculosis meningitis from bacterial meningitis were 96.2% and 62.9%, respectively. However, the level of procalcitonin in patients with tuberculosis meningitis did not differ significantly from that in patients with viral meningitis. In patients with tuberculosis meningitis, a high level of procalcitonin (>0.4 ng/mL) was a predictor of a poor prognosis, and the level of procalcitonin was negatively correlated with the GCS score at discharge (r=-0.437, p=0.026). Conclusions We found that serum procalcitonin is a useful marker for differentiating tuberculosis meningitis from bacterial meningitis and is also valuable for predicting the prognosis of tuberculosis meningitis. PMID:27165424

  14. Peracute Bacterial Meningitis due to Infection with Klebsiella pneumoniae in Captive-bred Ruffed Lemurs (Varecia variegate).

    PubMed

    Sasaki, E; Tokiwa, T; Tsugo, K; Higashi, Y; Hori, H; Une, Y

    We describe the development of neurological signs in four juvenile black-and-white ruffed lemurs (Varecia variegate), housed at a petting zoo in Japan. The clinical course was severe, with three lemurs dying within 1 day of the appearance of clinical signs. The other lemur was treated and survived. Pathological analyses demonstrated meningitis and the presence of gram-negative bacilli in the cerebrum, cerebellum, palatine tonsil and liver. Klebsiella pneumoniae was isolated from the brain of all of the dead lemurs. Multilocus sequence typing analysis showed that all the isolates were sequence type 86 (ST86). To our knowledge, this is the first determination of K. pneumoniae infection in ruffed lemurs of this genus. K. pneumoniae infection may represent a risk to lemurs and people who come into contact with infected animals. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Focal bacterial meningitis following ascending bite wound infection leading to paraparesis in a captive California sea lion (Zalophus californianus).

    PubMed

    Braun, Veronika; Eskens, Ulrich; Hartmann, Antje; Lang, Barbara; Kramer, Martin; Schmidt, Martin J

    2015-03-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging was performed on a 15-yr-old captive female California sea lion (Zalophus californianus) with a 2-wk history of progressive paraparesis and a 9-mo history of exudative skin lesion on the left thoracic wall. Magnetic resonance images showed a well-defined muscle infiltrating lesion ventrolateral to the seventh cervical to the third thoracic vertebra on the left side, which extended through the left intervertebral foramina C7 to T3 into the vertebral canal, causing spinal cord compression and displacement as well as inflammation of the spinal cord and nerves. This lesion surprisingly caused no forelimb deficits. Differential diagnoses included abscess formation or neoplasia. Pathologic examination revealed chronic focal purulent meningitis associated with widespread paraspinal fistulous inflammation originating from a chronic dermal ulcer. Mainly Escherichia coli var. haemolytica and Clostridium perfringens were identified as the underlying agents.

  16. The Epidemiology of Meningitis among Adults in a South African Province with a High HIV Prevalence, 2009-2012

    PubMed Central

    Britz, Erika; Perovic, Olga; von Mollendorf, Claire; von Gottberg, Anne; Iyaloo, Samantha; Quan, Vanessa; Chetty, Verushka; Sriruttan, Charlotte; Ismail, Nazir A.; Nanoo, Ananta; Musekiwa, Alfred; Reddy, Carl; Viljoen, Karien; Cohen, Cheryl; Govender, Nelesh P.

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Meningitis is a major cause of mortality in southern Africa. We aimed to describe the aetiologies and frequencies of laboratory-confirmed fungal and bacterial meningitis among adults in a South African province with an 11% HIV prevalence, over 4 years. Methods We conducted a retrospective, observational study of secondary laboratory data, extracted on all cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) specimens submitted to public-sector laboratories in Gauteng province from 2009 through 2012. We calculated cause-specific incidence rates in the general and HIV-infected populations and used Poisson regression to determine if trends were significant. Results We identified 11,891 (10.7%) incident cases of meningitis from 110,885 CSF specimens. Cryptococcal meningitis, tuberculous meningitis and pneumococcal meningitis accounted for 62.3% (n = 7,406), 24.6% (n = 2,928) and 10.1% (n = 1,197) of cases over the four-year period. The overall incidence (cases per 100,000 persons) of cryptococcal meningitis declined by 23% from 24.4 in 2009 to 18.7 in 2012 (p <0.001) and decreased by 19% among HIV-infected persons from 178.2 to 144.7 (p <0.001). Tuberculous meningitis decreased by 40% from 11.3 in 2009 to 6.8 in 2012 (p <0.001) and decreased by 36% among HIV-infected persons from 54.4 to 34.9 (p <0.001). Pneumococcal meningitis decreased by 41% from 4.2 in 2009 to 2.5 in 2012 (p <0.001) and decreased by 38% among HIV-infected persons from 28.0 to 17.5 (p <0.001). Among cases of other bacterial meningitis (248/11,891, 2.1%), Neisseria meningitidis (n = 93), Escherichia coli (n = 72) and Haemophilus influenzae (n = 20) were the most common organisms identified. Conclusions In this high HIV-prevalence province, cryptococcal meningitis was the leading cause of laboratory-confirmed meningitis among adults. Over a 4-year period, there was a significant decrease in incidence of cryptococcal, tuberculous and pneumococcal meningitis. This coincided with expansion of the national

  17. Changes in the incidence of pneumonia, bacterial meningitis, and infant mortality 5 years following introduction of the 13-valent pneumococcal conjugate vaccine in a "3+0" schedule

    PubMed Central

    Blette, Bryan; Briceño, Rafaela; Alemán, Jorge; Hudgens, Michael G.; Moreno, Gilberto; Ordoñez, Ana; Rocha, Julio; Weber, David J.; Amaya, Erick

    2017-01-01

    Background Streptococcus pneumoniae causes about 826,000 deaths of children in the world each year and many health facility visits. To reduce the burden of pneumococcal disease, many nations have added pneumococcal conjugate vaccines to their national immunization schedules. Nicaragua was the first country eligible for GAVI Alliance funding to introduce the 13-valent pneumococcal conjugate vaccine (PCV13) in 2010, provided to infants at 2, 4, and 6 months of age. The goal of this study was to evaluate the population impact of the first five years of the program. Methods Numbers of visits for pneumonia, pneumonia-related deaths, and bacterial meningitis in both children and adults, and infant deaths between 2008 and 2015 were collected from all 107 public health facilities in León Department. Vital statistics data provided additional counts of pneumonia-related deaths that occurred outside health facilities. Adjusted incidence rates and incidence rate ratios (IRRa) in the vaccine (2011–2015) and pre-vaccine periods (2008–2010) were estimated retrospectively using official population estimates as exposure time. Results The IRRa for pneumonia hospitalizations was 0.70 (95% confidence interval [CI]: 0.66, 0.75) for infants, and 0.92 (95% CI: 0.85, 0.99) for one year-olds. The IRRa for post-neonatal infant mortality was 0.56 (95% CI: 0.41, 0.77). In the population as a whole, ambulatory visits and hospitalizations for pneumonia, as well as pneumonia-related mortality and rates of bacterial meningitis were lower in the vaccine period. Conclusions During the first five years of program implementation, reductions were observed in health facility visits for pneumonia in immunized age groups and infant mortality, which would be hard to achieve with any other single public health intervention. Future study is warranted to understand whether the lack of a booster dose (e.g., at 12 months) may be responsible for the small reductions in pneumonia hospitalizations observed

  18. [Characteristics of group A streptococcal meningitis in children].

    PubMed

    Levy, C; Bidet, Ph; Bonacorsi, S; Béchet, S; Cohen, R

    2014-11-01

    Group A streptococcal (GAS) meningitis in children are rare. The aim of this study was to analyze the clinical, biological and outcome data on GAS meningitis recorded in the Bacterial Meningitis (BM) French Surveillance Network (GPIP/ACTIV). From 2001 through 2012, 4,564 children suffering from proven bacterial meningitis were recorded in the data base. Among them, 0.7 % were GAS infections. The median age was 5.6 years. A history of community acquired infection before the onset of GAS meningitis was frequent. Apart from the identification of the bacterial species, GAS meningitis were clinically and biologically indistinguishable from meningitis caused by other pathogens notably S. pneumoniae. Case fatality rate was 8 %.

  19. [Bacterial bone and joint infections in childhood--a review. 3. Bacterial arthritis].

    PubMed

    Handrick, W; Borte, M; Herrmann, E; Spencker, F B; Tischer, W; Bennek, J

    1991-01-01

    This overview presents the most important topics of etiology, pathogenesis, diagnostics, differential diagnostics and treatment of septic arthritis in children. A child with bacterial arthritis is always a case of emergency. Only immediate and adequate treatment can avoid permanent sequelae. Medical care for these patients should be done always in close cooperation of pediatricians, pediatric surgeons, radiologists, and sometimes orthopedists.

  20. Expressions of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) in cerebrospinal fluid and plasma of children with meningitis and encephalitis/encephalopathy.

    PubMed

    Morichi, Shinichiro; Kashiwagi, Yasuyo; Takekuma, Koji; Hoshika, Akinori; Kawashima, Hisashi

    2013-01-01

    Many reports in the field of childhood brain disorders have documented that brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) affects central nervous system (CNS) functions. In this clinical study, BDNF levels were evaluated in association with pediatric CNS infections. BDNF levels in the serum and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) of 42 patients admitted during 5-year period, due to CNS infections, were measured by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays (ELISAs). Control samples were collected from 108 patients with non-CNS infections (urinary tract infection, acute upper respiratory infection, acute gastroenteritis, etc.). Mean values of BDNF levels, at various ages, were determined and compared. BDNF levels were below the sensitivity of the ELISA in most CSF samples from the control group, but were significantly elevated in the patients with bacterial meningitis. The serum BDNF levels were elevated in all subgroups of patients with CNS infections, and the elevation was particularly notable in those with bacterial meningitis. BDNF expression in the CSF was correlated with CSF interleukin (IL)-6 levels as well as with blood platelet counts and neurological prognoses in those with bacterial meningitis. No correlation was found between BDNF levels and serum leukocyte numbers or C-reactive protein (CRP) levels. BDNF levels were found to be elevated in the serum and CSF of pediatric patients with CNS infections, particularly those with bacterial meningitis. Monitoring the changes in serum and CSF levels of BDNF may facilitate the diagnosis of acute meningitis and acute encephalopathy and allow the differential diagnosis of specific CNS infections.

  1. Treating Meningitis

    MedlinePlus

    ... tis cause death in up to 90% of people. For most kinds of meningitis, the risk of dying is about 30%. Neurologic problems can also occur from the men- ingitis. For instance, some people have hearing prob- lems or trouble thinking, which ...

  2. Enteroviral Meningitis in Neonates and Children of Mashhad, Iran

    PubMed Central

    Ghabouli Shahroodi, Mohammad Javad; Ghazvini, Kiarash; Sadeghi, Reza; Sasan, Mohammad Saeed

    2016-01-01

    Background The highest incidence of meningitis occurs during the neonatal period and (then) infancy. Although Bacterial agents are the most dangerous cause of neonatal and childhood meningitis yet viruses especially, enteroviruses (EV), are by far the most common cause of meningitis in this age group. Objectives The aim of the current study was to evaluate the role of EVs in neonatal and childhood meningitis in the Mashhad city of Iran. Materials and Methods This was a descriptive study that was performed at Imam Reza hospital in a period of six months (March to September 2007), during which all of the cerebral spinal fluid (CSF) samples from the neonatal intensive care unit (NICU) and pediatrics ward were collected and real time-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) for EVs was done on these samples. Clinical data were collected retrospectively from hospital files. Results We collected 58 CSF samples (35 neonates and 23 children) during six months. Pleocytosis of CSF was seen in 51.1% of the subjects (28% of neonates, and 66.6% of infants and children). Enteroviruses PCR was positive in 37.1% (13) of neonates and 34.7% (8) of children. Pleocytosis of CSF was seen in 23% and 75% of EV positive neonates and children, respectively. Polymorphonuclear (PMN) dominance (PMN > 50%) of CSF was seen in 50% and 33% of EV positive neonates and children, respectively. There were three cases of bacterial meningitis in our group; EV PCR result was positive for one of these subjects. Concomitant bacterial infection (meningitis and sepsis) was seen in 9.5% (two cases) of EV positive CSFs in our study. Almost half of the available neonates (four of nine) with pure enteroviral meningitis (EVM) were discharged (in good condition) with final diagnosis of culture negative sepsis (CNS) and mean length of hospital stay (MLOS) of 4.3 days. One (12.5%) of the neonates with EVM, who had a very low birth weight (< 1500 mg), was expired, and two (25%) cases were discharged with brain damage and

  3. Meningitis and encephalitis in Poland in 2014

    PubMed

    Paradowska-Stankiewicz, Iwona; Piotrowska, Anna

    The aim of this study was to assess the epidemiology of meningitis and/or encephalitis in Poland in 2014. In the last three years in Poland, about 3000 cases of meningitis and/or encephalitis of viral or bacterial etiology were recorded annually. Assessment of the epidemiological situation of meningitis and/or encephalitis in Poland in 2014, was based on the results of the analysis of epidemiological reports sent to the NIZP-PZH by the Regional Sanitary-Epidemiological Stations published in the annual bulletin “Infectious diseases and poisonings in Poland in 2014” and “Preventive immunizations in Poland in 2014”. In 2014 in Poland 3488 cases of bacterial meningitis and/or encephalitis were recorded. Almost 61.3% of these were viral infections. In 2014, in comparison to 2013, a 1.1% increase in the number of cases of meningitis and/or encephalitis was observed and 91% with viral etiology.

  4. Meningitis and encephalitis in Poland in 2013.

    PubMed

    Paradowska-Stankiewicz, Iwona; Piotrowska, Anna

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the epidemiology of meningitis and/or encephalitis in Poland in 2013. In the last three years in Poland, about 3000 cases of meningitis and/or encephalitis of viral or bacterial etiology were recorded annually. Assessment of the epidemiological situation of meningitis and/or encephalitis in Poland in 2013, was based on the results of the analysis of epidemiological reports sent to the NIZP-PZH by the Regional Sanitary-Epidemiological Stations published in the annual bulletin "Infectious diseases and poisonings in Poland in 2013" and "Preventive immunizations in Poland in 2013". In 2013 in Poland 3,116 cases of bacterial meningitis and/or encephalitis were recorded. Almost 50% of these were viral infections. The epidemiological situation of meningitis and/or encephalitis in Poland in 2013 compared to 2012 did not change significantly.

  5. Haemophilus influenzae meningitis in Manitoba and the Keewatin District, NWT: potential for mass vaccination.

    PubMed Central

    Hammond, G W; Rutherford, B E; Malazdrewicz, R; MacFarlane, N; Pillay, N; Tate, R B; Nicolle, L E; Postl, B D; Stiver, H G

    1988-01-01

    A community-based surveillance study of all central nervous system infections was carried out in Manitoba and the Keewatin District, NWT, between Apr. 1, 1981, and Mar. 31, 1984. There were 201 cases of bacterial meningitis in Manitoba over the study period, 81 (40%) caused by Haemophilus influenzae; all but one isolate tested were type b (Hib). There were nine cases of H. influenzae meningitis in the Keewatin District. The overall annual incidence rate of H. influenzae meningitis in Manitoba was 2.5/100,000; for children under 5 years the rate was 32.1/100,000. For the Keewatin District the corresponding rates were 69.6/100,000 and 530/100,000. A total of 85% and 100% of the cases of H. influenzae meningitis occurred by 24 months of age in Manitoba and the Keewatin District respectively. The age at onset was earlier in native Indian children (22 cases) and Inuit children (9 cases) than in non-native children (59 cases) (p less than 0.005); thus, vaccine prevention of Hib meningitis will likely be more difficult in native Indian and Métis children. Without evaluating the increased potential of H. influenzae vaccines to prevent nonmeningitic forms of disease, we concluded that mass childhood vaccination with polyribosylribitolphosphate (PRP) vaccine is not warranted in Manitoba or the Keewatin District. Immunogenicity studies suggest that administration of conjugated Hib vaccines such as PRP-D in infancy may prevent approximately one-third to two-thirds of cases of H. influenzae meningitis; these vaccines warrant consideration for use in mass childhood vaccination programs. PMID:3262404

  6. Subacute and Chronic Meningitis

    MedlinePlus

    ... spinal cord (meninges) and of the fluid-filled space between the meninges (subarachnoid space) that develops over days to a few weeks. ... three layers of tissue called meninges. The subarachnoid space is located between the middle layer and the ...

  7. Neonatal group B streptococcal meningitis.

    PubMed Central

    Mulder, C J; Zanen, H C

    1984-01-01

    Bacteriological and clinical data on 68 children with neonatal group B streptococcal meningitis were analysed as part of a wider study of bacterial meningitis undertaken between 1976 and 1982. Twenty five per cent of patients died and there was no difference in the mortality rate between early and late onset disease. Sixteen per cent of the infants weighed less than 2500 g at birth but in 50% no predisposing aetiological factor was found. Streptococcus agalactiae type III was isolated in 57% of the patients. PMID:6375583

  8. Risk of Bacterial Meningitis in Young Children with a First Seizure in the Context of Fever: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Najaf-Zadeh, Abolfazl; Dubos, François; Hue, Valérie; Pruvost, Isabelle; Bennour, Ania; Martinot, Alain

    2013-01-01

    Background Of major concern in any febrile child presenting with a seizure is the possibility of bacterial meningitis (BM). We did a systematic review to estimate the risk of BM among various subgroups of young children with a first seizure in the context of fever, and to assess the utility of routine lumbar puncture (LP) in children with an apparent first FS. Methods/Principal Findings MEDLINE, INIST, and the COCHRANE Library databases were searched from inception to December 2011 for published studies, supplemented by manual searches of bibliographies of potentially relevant articles and review articles. Studies reporting the prevalence of BM in young children presenting to emergency care with a first: i) “seizure and fever”, ii) apparent simple FS, and iii) apparent complex FS were included. Fourteen studies met the inclusion criteria. In children with a first “seizure and fever”, the pooled prevalence of BM was 2.6% (95% CI 0.9–5.1); the diagnosis of BM might be suspected from clinical examination in 95% of children >6 months. In children with an apparent simple FS, the average prevalence of BM was 0.2% (range 0 to 1%). The pooled prevalence of BM among children with an apparent complex FS was 0.6% (95% CI 0.2–1.4). The utility of routine LP for diagnosis of CNS infections requiring immediate treatment in children with an apparent first FS was low: the number of patients needed to test to identify one case of such infections was 1109 in children with an apparent first simple FS, and 180 in those with an apparent first complex FS. Conclusion The values provided from this study provide a basis for an evidence-based approach to the management of different subgroups of children presenting to emergency care with a first seizure in the context of fever. PMID:23383133

  9. Serotype distribution and antimicrobial resistance of Streptococcus pneumoniae in children with acute bacterial meningitis in Mozambique: implications for a national immunization strategy.

    PubMed

    Nhantumbo, Aquino Albino; Gudo, Eduardo Samo; Caierão, Juliana; Munguambe, Alcides Moniz; Comé, Charlotte Elizabeth; Zimba, Tomás Francisco; Moraes, Milton Ozório; Dias, Cícero; Cantarelli, Vlademir Vicente

    2016-06-29

    S. pneumoniae is the leading cause of acute bacterial meningitis (ABM) in children. Vaccination using the 10-valent conjugate vaccine (PCV-10) was recently introduced into the National Immunization Program in Mozambique, but data on serotype coverage of this vaccine formulation are scarce. In this study, we investigated the serotype distribution and antimicrobial resistance of isolates of S. pneumoniae causing ABM in children < 5 years at the two largest hospitals in Mozambique. Between March 2013 and March 2014, a total of 352 cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) samples were collected from eligible children, of which 119 (33.8 %) were positive for S. pneumoniae. Of these, only 50 samples met the criteria for serotyping and were subsequently serotyped using sequential multiplex PCR (SM-PCR), but 15 samples were non-typable. The most common serotypes of S. pneumoniae were 1 (18.2 %), 5 (15.2 %), 14 (12.1 %), 9 V (12.1 %), 23 F (9.1 %), 6A (9.1 %), 4 (9.1 %) and 6B (6.1 %). Serotypes 1, 5, 9 V, 6A and 12 were mostly prevalent in Northern Mozambique, while serotypes 23 F, 4, 6B, 3 and 15B were predominant in Southern. Serotype coverage of PCV-10 and PCV-13 vaccine formulations were 81.8 % and 93.9 %, respectively. Serotypes 1, 3, 4, 6B, 14, 23 F were resistant to penicillin and sensitive to ceftriaxone. Our findings shows that changing the current in use PCV-10 vaccine formulation to PCV-13 formulation might increase substantially the protection against invasive strains of S. pneumoniae as the PCV-10 vaccine formulation does not cover the serotypes 3 and 6A, which are prevalent in Mozambique.

  10. An unusual case of meningitis

    PubMed Central

    Pond, Eric DR; El-Bailey, Sameh; Webster, Duncan

    2015-01-01

    Pasteurella multocida is a rare cause of bacterial meningitis. A 56-year-old man with several pets developed a profoundly decreased level of consciousness following left tympanomastoidectomy. Lumbar puncture produced cerebrospinal fluid with the typical findings of meningitis (low glucose, high protein, high leukocytes). Cultures from the cerebrospinal fluid and a swab of the left ear revealed Gram-negative coccobacillus identified as P multocida. The organism was sensitive to ceftriaxone, ampicillin and penicillin, and a 14-day course of intravenous penicillin was used as definitive treatment, resulting in full recovery. Although rare, P multocida should be considered as a potential cause of meningitis in patients with animal exposure, particularly in the setting of recent cranial surgery. PMID:26236360

  11. An unusual case of meningitis.

    PubMed

    Pond, Eric Dr; El-Bailey, Sameh; Webster, Duncan

    2015-01-01

    Pasteurella multocida is a rare cause of bacterial meningitis. A 56-year-old man with several pets developed a profoundly decreased level of consciousness following left tympanomastoidectomy. Lumbar puncture produced cerebrospinal fluid with the typical findings of meningitis (low glucose, high protein, high leukocytes). Cultures from the cerebrospinal fluid and a swab of the left ear revealed Gram-negative coccobacillus identified as P multocida. The organism was sensitive to ceftriaxone, ampicillin and penicillin, and a 14-day course of intravenous penicillin was used as definitive treatment, resulting in full recovery. Although rare, P multocida should be considered as a potential cause of meningitis in patients with animal exposure, particularly in the setting of recent cranial surgery.

  12. Cryptococcal meningitis with malaria. A case report.

    PubMed

    Ashiru, J O; Akang, E E

    1994-07-01

    Cryptococcal meningitis is an uncommon infection globally, including Nigeria. This systemic fungal infection often is associated with immunodeficiency. The most common causes of meningitis in Nigeria in the 2-3 year age group are the malaria parasites and bacteria. The concomitant infections of Cryptococcal neoformans and Plasmodium falciparum are uncommon. We present here the report of a case of fatal cryptococcal meningitis with malaria infection in a 2 year old child from Nigeria (one of the malaria endemic regions of the world). This case emphasizes the importance of doing a combination of fungal and bacterial cultures as well as looking for malarial parasites in the determination of etiological agents of meningitis in any hospital in Africa. We suggest that cerebrospinal fluid from meningitis cases must be cultured using Sabouraud dextrose agar and any growth on the agar must be examined using Indian ink.

  13. Epidemiology of paediatric meningitis in central Côte d'Ivoire after the implementation of Haemophilus influenzae type b vaccination.

    PubMed

    Touré, Fidèle S; Kouame, Samson; Tia, Honoré; Monemo, Pacôme; Cissé, Amadou; Diané, Bamourou; Becker, Sören L; Akoua-Koffi, Chantal

    2017-05-17

    Infectious meningitis accounts for enormous morbidity worldwide, but there is a paucity of data on its regional epidemiology in resource-constrained settings of sub-Saharan Africa. Here, we present a study on the aetiology of paediatric meningitis in central Côte d'Ivoire. Between June 2012 and December 2013, all cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) samples drawn at the University Teaching Hospital Bouaké were examined for the presence of bacterial and fungal pathogens. A causative agent was detected in 31 out of 833 CSF specimens (3.7%), with the most prevalent pathogens being Streptococcus pneumoniae (n=15) and Neisseria meningitidis (n=5). With the exception of neonates, these two bacteria were the most common agents in all age groups. Of note, only a single case of Haemophilus influenzae meningitis was detected. Hence, this study reports a considerable shift in the epidemiology of paediatric meningitis in central Côte d'Ivoire. Following the implementation of a nation-wide childhood vaccination programme against H. influenzae type b, this pathogen was much less frequently reported than in previous studies. The integration of specific vaccines against S. pneumoniae and N. meningitidis into the childhood vaccination programme in Côte d'Ivoire holds promise to further reduce the burden due to infectious meningitis.

  14. Characterization of chemical meningitis after neurological surgery.

    PubMed

    Forgacs, P; Geyer, C A; Freidberg, S R

    2001-01-15

    We reviewed the records of 70 consecutive adult patients with meningitis after a neurosurgical procedure, to determine the characteristics that might help to distinguish a sterile postoperative chemical meningitis from bacterial infection. The spinal fluid profiles in bacterial and chemical meningitis are similar. The exceptions are that a spinal fluid white blood cell count > 7500/microL (7500 x 10(6)/L) and a glucose level of < 10 mg/dL were not found in any case of chemical meningitis. The clinical setting and clinical manifestations were distinct enough that no antibiotic was administered after lumbar puncture to 30 (43%) of the 70 patients with postoperative meningitis. Chemical meningitis was infrequent after surgery involving the spine and sinuses. Patients with chemical meningitis did not have purulent wound drainage or significant wound erythema or tenderness, coma, new focal neurological findings, or onset of a new seizure disorder. They rarely had temperatures > 39.4 degrees C or cerebrospinal fluid rhinorrhea or otorrhea.

  15. Erythema dyschromicum perstans in a child following an enteroviral meningitis*

    PubMed Central

    de Melo, Cláudia Raquel Ferrão; de Sá, Mário Correia; Carvalho, Sónia

    2017-01-01

    A healthy 6-year-old boy presented with an erythematous macular exanthema, meningeal signs and fever, initially diagnosed with probable bacterial meningitis and treated with antibiotic and anti-inflammatory drugs. Enteroviral meningitis was confirmed, but the skin lesions continued to evolve and the patient was ultimately diagnosed with erythema dyschromicum perstans. The boy was followed during three years until the spontaneous resolution of the dermatosis. PMID:28225976

  16. Chickenpox complicated by pneumococcal meningitis: a rare coinfection.

    PubMed

    Rebahi, H; Mouaffak, Y; Soraa, N; Younous, S

    2014-11-01

    Bacterial complications, particularly skin superinfections, are common during chickenpox. However, reports of acute bacterial meningitis associated with chickenpox are unusual and amount to only a very few observations. For the most part, they are caused by Neisseria meningitidis or Streptococcus pyogenes. We report an infrequent occurrence of pneumococcal meningitis 2 days after the onset of a chickenpox rash in a 7-year-old previously healthy boy. Based on data from the literature, we attempt to understand the possible mechanisms resulting in bacterial complications, particularly meningitis, during chickenpox and to determine the means to prevent it. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  17. Bacteremic meningitis caused by Parvimonas micra in an immunocompetent host.

    PubMed

    Ko, Jae-Hoon; Baek, Jin Yang; Kang, Cheol-In; Lee, Woo Joo; Lee, Ji Yong; Cho, Sun Young; Ha, Young Eun; Kim, So Hyun; Chung, Doo Ryeon; Peck, Kyong Ran; Lee, Nam Yong; Song, Jae-Hoon

    2015-08-01

    A 61-year-old man with chronic hepatitis B and dyslipidemia visited the emergency department with a fever and severe headache. He was diagnosed with bacterial meningitis after a lumbar puncture, and blood culture revealed Parvimonas micra bacteremia. Although he had a history of extraction of a molar two weeks before symptom onset, there was no evidence of abscess formation on physical examination or imaging studies. He was successfully treated with oral metronidazole for 12 days after 9 days of treatment with IV ceftriaxone and vancomcycin. This is the first report of primary bacterial meningitis caused by this organism, which indicates that this organism is capable of being a bacterial meningitis pathogen.

  18. Meningitis Myths and Facts

    MedlinePlus

    ... May 2014) 14 Adult Vaccine-Preventable Diseases Infographic Meningitis Myths and Facts Myth: Meningococcal disease is easy ... infected person, such as shaking hands. Fact: Meningococcal meningitis is spread through air droplets and direct contact ...

  19. Staphylococcal meningitis can present as an abscess of a single lateral ventricle.

    PubMed

    Robinson, E N

    1993-03-01

    Ventricular obstruction and hydrocephalus are recognized complications of neurosurgical procedures and meningitis that has been previously treated. The confinement of bacterial meningitis solely to a lateral ventricle in an otherwise healthy individual, however, is rare. I describe a case in which a ventricular abscess occurred as the presenting manifestation of staphylococcal meningitis in a man who had no history of head trauma or neurosurgery.

  20. [Clinical, epidemiological and etiological studies of adult aseptic meningitis: Report of 13 cases with mumps meningitis].

    PubMed

    Takeshima, Shinichi; Yoshimoto, Takeshi; Shiga, Yuji; Kanaya, Yuhei; Neshige, Shuichiro; Himeno, Takahiro; Kono, Ryuhei; Takamatsu, Kazuhiro; Shimoe, Yutaka; Kuriyama, Masaru

    2015-01-01

    We experienced 13 cases (29.8 ± 7.0 years) of mumps meningitis and 365 cases of adult aseptic meningitis during 11 years from 2004 to 2014. A small epidemic of mumps occurred for 3-4 years, and the incidence rate of adult mumps meningitis coincided with the epidemic without seasonal fluctuation. Parotitis was observed in 8 of the 13 mumps meningitis patients (61.5%) and orchitis in 2 of 7 male patients (28.6%). There were no differences in clinical manifestations, laboratory findings, and outcome between patients with adult mumps meningitis and those with echovirus 9 meningitis (9 patients), except for the low frequency of nausea/vomiting and a high percentage of mononuclear cells of the cerebrospinal fluid in those with mumps. Eight patients had contact with persons with mumps before the symptomatic stage of meningitis. Only one patient had received mumps vaccination in childhood. On the basis of the values of the anti-mumps IgM and IgG antibodies, we speculated primary infection and the re-infection of mumps in 6 and 2 patients, respectively. Moreover, second vaccine failure was suggested in the vaccinated patient.

  1. Recurrent meningitis in a child with IgG3 subclass deficiency.

    PubMed

    Vehapoglu, Aysel; Ozgurhan, Gamze; Demir, Aysegul Dogan; Uzuner, Selcuk; Nursoy, Mustafa Atilla; Turkmen, Serdar

    2014-08-01

    Recurrent meningitis is an uncommon life-threatening condition. Here, the case of a 6-year-old boy is reported who had two episodes of meningitis with an IgG3 subclass deficiency. The boy had aseptic meningitis at the age of 3 years, followed by bacterial meningitis at the age of 4 years. Primary immunoglobulin deficiencies are a group of disorders associated with an increased incidence and/or severity of infection. Recurrent infections, sinusitis, bronchitis, and pneumonia are the most frequently observed illnesses in patients with IgG subclass deficiencies, of which an IgG3 subclass deficiency is the most common, especially in adults. Although cases of recurrent viral or bacterial meningitis have been reported, herein a patient is presented with recurrence of aseptic and bacterial meningitis 1 year after the initial episode. Some researchers recommend that all children with episodes of recurrent meningitis should be screened for primary immunoglobulin or complement deficiencies.

  2. Emergency Neurologic Life Support: Meningitis and Encephalitis.

    PubMed

    Gaieski, David F; Nathan, Barnett R; O'Brien, Nicole F

    2015-12-01

    Bacterial meningitis and viral encephalitis, particularly herpes simplex encephalitis, are severe neurological infections that, if not treated promptly and effectively, lead to poor neurological outcome or death. Because treatment is more effective if given early, the topic of meningitis and encephalitis was chosen as an Emergency Neurological Life Support protocol. This protocol provides a practical approach to recognition and urgent treatment of bacterial meningitis and encephalitis. Appropriate imaging, spinal fluid analysis, and early empiric treatment is discussed. Though uncommon in its full form, the typical clinical triad of headache, fever, and neck stiffness should alert the clinical practitioner to the possibility of a central nervous system infection. Early attention to the airway and maintaining normotension is crucial in treatment of these patients, as is rapid treatment with anti-infectives and, in some cases, corticosteroids.

  3. Emergency Neurologic Life Support: Meningitis and Encephalitis.

    PubMed

    Gaieski, David F; O'Brien, Nicole F; Hernandez, Ricardo

    2017-09-15

    Bacterial meningitis and viral encephalitis, particularly herpes simplex encephalitis, are severe neurological infections that, if not treated promptly and effectively, lead to poor neurological outcome or death. Because of the value of early recognition and treatment, meningitis and encephalitis was chosen as an Emergency Neurological Life Support protocol. This protocol provides a practical approach to recognition and urgent treatment of bacterial meningitis and encephalitis. Appropriate imaging, spinal fluid analysis, and early empiric treatment are discussed. Though uncommon in its full form, the typical clinical triad of headache, fever, and neck stiffness should alert the clinical practitioner to the possibility of a central nervous system infection. Early attention to the airway and maintaining normotension are crucial steps in the treatment of these patients, as is rapid treatment with anti-infectives and, in some cases, corticosteroids.

  4. Chronic and subacute meningitis.

    PubMed

    Zunt, Joseph R; Baldwin, Kelly J

    2012-12-01

    This article describes the background, clinical presentation, diagnosis, and treatment of selected etiologies of subacute and chronic meningitis. Key diagnostic considerations when evaluating a patient presenting with chronic inflammation of the CNS are discussed, and several specific infectious, neoplastic, and autoimmune etiologies are reviewed in detail. With recent advancement in serologic and CSF diagnostic testing, specific infectious, neoplastic, or autoimmune etiologies of chronic meningitis can be identified. Eliminating previous diagnostic uncertainty of chronic inflammation in the CNS has led to rapid and specific treatment regimens that ultimately improve patient outcomes. Recent advances in imaging have also aided clinicians in both their diagnostic approach and the detection of inflammatory complications such as hydrocephalus, hemorrhage, and ischemic stroke. Meningitis is defined as inflammation involving the meninges of the brain and spinal cord. Meningitis can be categorized as acute, subacute, or chronic based on duration of inflammation. This article focuses on the most common causes of subacute and chronic meningitis. Chronic meningitis is commonly defined as inflammation evolving during weeks to months without resolution of CSF abnormalities. Determining the time course of meningitis is important for creating a differential diagnosis. Most organisms causing acute meningitis rarely persist more than a few weeks. Although numerous etiologies of subacute and chronic meningitis have been identified, this article focuses on the most common etiologies: (1) infectious, (2) autoimmune, and (3) neoplastic.

  5. Meningitis Caused by Salmonella Newport in a Five-Year-Old Child

    PubMed Central

    De Malet, Ana; Ingerto, Sheila

    2016-01-01

    Salmonella Newport is a Gram-negative bacillus belonging to the Enterobacteria family and the nontyphi Salmonella (NTS), usually related to gastroenteritis. Main difference between NTS and Salmonella typhi is that the last one evolves to an invasive disease easier than NTS. These can progress to bacteremias in around 5% of cases and secondary focuses can appear occasionally, as in meningitis. An infection of the central nervous system is uncommon, considering its incidence in 0.6–8% of the cases; most of them are described in developing countries and mainly in childhood, especially neonates. Bacterial meningitis by NTS mostly affects immunosuppressed people in Europe. Prognosis is adverse, with a 50% mortality rate, mainly due to complications of infection: hydrocephalus, ventriculitis, abscesses, subdural empyema, or stroke. Choice antibiotic treatments are cefotaxime, ceftriaxone, or ceftazidime. The aim of this paper is to present a case of meningitis caused by Salmonella Newport diagnosed in a five-year-old girl living in a rural area of the province of Ourense (Spain), with favorable evolution and without neurological disorders. PMID:28058121

  6. Aseptic Meningitis with Craniopharyngioma Resection: Consideration after Endoscopic Surgery.

    PubMed

    Chen, Jenny X; Alkire, Blake C; Lam, Allen C; Curry, William T; Holbrook, Eric H

    2016-10-01

    Objectives While bacterial meningitis is a concerning complication after endoscopic skull base surgery, the diagnosis can be made without consideration for aseptic meningitis. This article aims to (1) present a patient with recurrent craniopharyngioma and multiple postoperative episodes of aseptic meningitis and (2) discuss the diagnosis and management of aseptic meningitis. Design Case report and literature review. Results A 65-year-old female patient with a symptomatic craniopharyngioma underwent transsphenoidal resection. She returned postoperatively with symptoms concerning for cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) leak and bacterial meningitis. Lumbar puncture demonstrated mildly elevated leukocytes with normal glucose levels. Cultures were sterile and she was discharged on antibiotics. She returned 18 days postoperatively with altered mental status and fever. Again, negative CSF cultures suggested aseptic meningitis. Radiological and intraoperative findings were now concerning for widespread cerebrovascular vasospasm due to leaked craniopharyngioma fluids. In the following months, her craniopharyngioma recurred and required multiple surgical resections. Days after her last operation, she returned with mental status changes and a sterile CSF culture. She was diagnosed with recurrent aseptic meningitis and antibiotics were discontinued. The patient experienced near complete resolution of symptoms. Conclusions Consideration of aseptic meningitis following craniopharyngioma resection is critical to avoid unnecessary surgical re-exploration and prolonged courses of antibiotics.

  7. Aseptic Meningitis with Craniopharyngioma Resection: Consideration after Endoscopic Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Jenny X.; Alkire, Blake C.; Lam, Allen C.; Curry, William T.; Holbrook, Eric H.

    2016-01-01

    Objectives While bacterial meningitis is a concerning complication after endoscopic skull base surgery, the diagnosis can be made without consideration for aseptic meningitis. This article aims to (1) present a patient with recurrent craniopharyngioma and multiple postoperative episodes of aseptic meningitis and (2) discuss the diagnosis and management of aseptic meningitis. Design Case report and literature review. Results A 65-year-old female patient with a symptomatic craniopharyngioma underwent transsphenoidal resection. She returned postoperatively with symptoms concerning for cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) leak and bacterial meningitis. Lumbar puncture demonstrated mildly elevated leukocytes with normal glucose levels. Cultures were sterile and she was discharged on antibiotics. She returned 18 days postoperatively with altered mental status and fever. Again, negative CSF cultures suggested aseptic meningitis. Radiological and intraoperative findings were now concerning for widespread cerebrovascular vasospasm due to leaked craniopharyngioma fluids. In the following months, her craniopharyngioma recurred and required multiple surgical resections. Days after her last operation, she returned with mental status changes and a sterile CSF culture. She was diagnosed with recurrent aseptic meningitis and antibiotics were discontinued. The patient experienced near complete resolution of symptoms. Conclusions Consideration of aseptic meningitis following craniopharyngioma resection is critical to avoid unnecessary surgical re-exploration and prolonged courses of antibiotics. PMID:27722072

  8. Modulation of nuclear factor-kappaB activation and decreased markers of neurological injury associated with hypothermic therapy in experimental bacterial meningitis.

    PubMed

    Irazuzta, Jose E; Pretzlaff, Robert K; Zingarelli, Basilia; Xue, Vivian; Zemlan, Frank

    2002-11-01

    This study was designed to evaluate the use of moderate hypothermia in a model of meningitis-induced brain injury and its effect on the activation of nuclear factor-kappaB, biological markers of neuronal injury, and neurobehavioral performance. Randomized, prospective animal study. University research laboratory. Male Wistar rats. Animals underwent a basilar cistern tap receiving either sterile saline as a placebo or an equivalent volume of a group B streptococcal suspension. Sixteen hours after inoculation, animals were stratified by their clinical severity score, were randomized to either hypothermic (32-34 degrees C) or normothermic (37-39 degrees C) conditions, and received antibiotics. Hypothermic animals were kept under these temperature conditions for 6 hrs before rewarming. Two protocols were used. For the first protocol, changes in nuclear factor-kappaB activation and heat shock protein induction at 24 hrs and 48 hrs after inoculation were evaluated. In the second protocol, serum C-tau concentrations at 5 days and neurobehavioral performances at 3 wks were assessed. Meningitis triggered a >50% increase in cerebral nuclear factor-kappaB activation. The addition of a 6-hr period of hypothermia reduced nuclear factor-kappaB activation by 32% when measured at the end of the hypothermic period. At 48 hrs, this decrease in nuclear factor-kappaB activation was no longer apparent, but there was a significant decrease in the heat shock response. Serum C-tau concentrations at 5 days postinjury, a biomarker of brain injury, were reduced by 69% in hypothermic treated animals. Furthermore, hypothermia reduced the brain water content of infected animals. However, hypothermia did not improve the animals' neurobehavioral performance. The findings from this study suggest that hypothermia produces a transitory attenuation of nuclear factor-kappaB activation in meningitic brain injury and improvement in some biomarkers of neuronal injury. The consequence of intermittent

  9. [First documented case of Chryseobacterium meningosepticum meningitis in Central African Republic].

    PubMed

    Bobossi-Serengbe, G; Gody, J C; Beyam, N E; Bercion, R

    2006-04-01

    Chryseobacterium meningosepdcum is a rare but well-known causative agent of bacterial meningitis and can be the source of epidemic outbreak in neonatal facilities. It has rarely been documented in Africa. The purpose of this report is to describe the first case of C. meningosepticum meningitis in Central African Republic. The case that remained isolated occurred after dystocic delivery with resuscitation in a neonatal unit. Despite intensive care and appropriate antibiotic treatment, the newborn died on day 19. Identification of this rare cause of meningitis underlines the important role of the bacteriologic laboratory in managing bacterial meningitis in Africa. The strain of C. meningosepticum involved in this case was resistant to the main antibiotics used for first-intention treatment of neonatal bacterial meningitis, i.e., third-generation cefalosporins, chioramphenicol, and aminosides. This case also underlines the importance of familiarizing the medical staff with the dangers of nosocomial meningitis and reinforcing hospital hygiene measures.

  10. Targets for adjunctive therapy in pneumococcal meningitis.

    PubMed

    Barichello, Tatiana; Collodel, Allan; Generoso, Jaqueline S; Simões, Lutiana R; Moreira, Ana Paula; Ceretta, Renan A; Petronilho, Fabrícia; Quevedo, João

    2015-01-15

    Pneumococcal meningitis is a severe infectious disease of the central nervous system (CNS) and a significant cause of morbidity and mortality worldwide. The inflammatory reaction to the disease contributes to neuronal injury and involves the meninges, the subarachnoid space and the brain parenchymal vessels. Bacterial pathogens may reach the blood-brain barrier and be recognized by antigen-presenting cells through the binding of Toll-like receptors, triggering an inflammatory cascade. This in turn produces cytokines and chemokines, increases adhesion molecule expression and attracts leukocytes from the blood. This cascade leads to lipid peroxidation, mitochondrial damage and blood-brain barrier permeability. In spite of effective antibacterial treatments, approximately one third of survivors suffer from long-term sequelae, such as hearing loss, cerebral palsy, seizures, hydrocephaly or cognitive impairment. This review summarizes the information on targets of adjuvant treatments of acute pneumococcal meningitis. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Corticosteroids for managing tuberculous meningitis

    PubMed Central

    Prasad, Kameshwar; Singh, Mamta B; Ryan, Hannah

    2016-01-01

    effect on this outcome (RR 0.92, 95% CI 0.71 to 1.20; eight trials, 1314 participants, low quality evidence). There was no difference between groups in the incidence of adverse events, which included gastrointestinal bleeding, invasive bacterial infections, hyperglycaemia, and liver dysfunction. One trial followed up participants for five years. The effect on death was no longer apparent at this time-point (RR 0.93, 95% CI 0.78 to 1.12; one trial, 545 participants, moderate quality evidence); and there was no difference in disabling neurological deficit detected (RR 0.91, 95% CI 0.49 to 1.69; one trial, 545 participants, low quality evidence). One trial included human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-positive people. The stratified analysis by HIV status in this trial showed no heterogeneity, with point estimates for death (RR 0.90, 95% CI 0.67 to 1.20; one trial, 98 participants) and disability (RR 1.23, 95% CI 0.08 to 19.07; one trial, 98 participants) similar to HIV-negative participants in the same trial. Authors' conclusions Corticosteroids reduce mortality from tuberculous meningitis, at least in the short term. Corticosteroids may have no effect on the number of people who survive tuberculous meningitis with disabling neurological deficit, but this outcome is less common than death, and the CI for the relative effect includes possible harm. However, this small possible harm is unlikely to be quantitatively important when compared to the reduction in mortality. The number of HIV-positive people included in the review is small, so we are not sure if the benefits in terms of reduced mortality are preserved in this group of patients. PLAIN LANGUAGE SUMMARY Corticosteroids for managing people with tuberculous meningitis What is tuberculous meningitis and how might corticosteroids work? Tuberculous meningitis is a serious form of tuberculosis that affects the meninges that cover the brain and spinal cord, causing headache, coma and death. The clinical outcome is often poor

  12. Epidemiology of Meningitis in an HIV-Infected Ugandan Cohort

    PubMed Central

    Rajasingham, Radha; Rhein, Joshua; Klammer, Kate; Musubire, Abdu; Nabeta, Henry; Akampurira, Andrew; Mossel, Eric C.; Williams, Darlisha A.; Boxrud, Dave J.; Crabtree, Mary B.; Miller, Barry R.; Rolfes, Melissa A.; Tengsupakul, Supatida; Andama, Alfred O.; Meya, David B.; Boulware, David R.

    2015-01-01

    There is limited understanding of the epidemiology of meningitis among human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-infected populations in sub-Saharan Africa. We conducted a prospective cohort study of HIV-infected adults with suspected meningitis in Uganda, to comprehensively evaluate the etiologies of meningitis. Intensive cerebrospiral fluid (CSF) testing was performed to evaluate for bacterial, viral, fungal, and mycobacterial etiologies, including neurosyphilis,16s ribosomal DNA (rDNA) polymerase chain reaction (PCR) for bacteria, Plex-ID broad viral assay, quantitative-PCR for HSV-1/2, cytomegalovirus (CMV), Epstein–Barr virus (EBV), and Toxoplasma gondii; reverse transcription-PCR (RT-PCR) for Enteroviruses and arboviruses, and Xpert MTB/RIF assay. Cryptococcal meningitis accounted for 60% (188 of 314) of all causes of meningitis. Of 117 samples sent for viral PCR, 36% were EBV positive. Among cryptococcal antigen negative patients, the yield of Xpert MTB/RIF assay was 22% (8 of 36). After exclusion of cryptococcosis and bacterial meningitis, 61% (43 of 71) with an abnormal CSF profile had no definitive diagnosis. Exploration of new TB diagnostics and diagnostic algorithms for evaluation of meningitis in resource-limited settings remains needed, and implementation of cryptococcal diagnostics is critical. PMID:25385864

  13. Epidemiology of meningitis in an HIV-infected Ugandan cohort.

    PubMed

    Rajasingham, Radha; Rhein, Joshua; Klammer, Kate; Musubire, Abdu; Nabeta, Henry; Akampurira, Andrew; Mossel, Eric C; Williams, Darlisha A; Boxrud, Dave J; Crabtree, Mary B; Miller, Barry R; Rolfes, Melissa A; Tengsupakul, Supatida; Andama, Alfred O; Meya, David B; Boulware, David R

    2015-02-01

    There is limited understanding of the epidemiology of meningitis among human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-infected populations in sub-Saharan Africa. We conducted a prospective cohort study of HIV-infected adults with suspected meningitis in Uganda, to comprehensively evaluate the etiologies of meningitis. Intensive cerebrospiral fluid (CSF) testing was performed to evaluate for bacterial, viral, fungal, and mycobacterial etiologies, including neurosyphilis,16s ribosomal DNA (rDNA) polymerase chain reaction (PCR) for bacteria, Plex-ID broad viral assay, quantitative-PCR for HSV-1/2, cytomegalovirus (CMV), Epstein-Barr virus (EBV), and Toxoplasma gondii; reverse transcription-PCR (RT-PCR) for Enteroviruses and arboviruses, and Xpert MTB/RIF assay. Cryptococcal meningitis accounted for 60% (188 of 314) of all causes of meningitis. Of 117 samples sent for viral PCR, 36% were EBV positive. Among cryptococcal antigen negative patients, the yield of Xpert MTB/RIF assay was 22% (8 of 36). After exclusion of cryptococcosis and bacterial meningitis, 61% (43 of 71) with an abnormal CSF profile had no definitive diagnosis. Exploration of new TB diagnostics and diagnostic algorithms for evaluation of meningitis in resource-limited settings remains needed, and implementation of cryptococcal diagnostics is critical. © The American Society of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene.

  14. Serum procalcitonin in Egyptian patients with acute meningitis and a negative direct cerebrospinal fluid examination.

    PubMed

    Abdelkader, Nadia A; Mahmoud, Waheed A; Saber, Sally Mohamed

    2014-01-01

    To reduce the morbidity and mortality related to bacterial meningitis, it is important to discriminate bacterial meningitis from aseptic meningitis during the acute phase of the disease, when the clinical symptoms are often similar. To test the reliability of serum procalcitonin (PCT) to discriminate bacterial meningitis from aseptic meningitis in patients who have a negative direct cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) examination, and to evaluate the role of serum PCT to assess treatment efficacy compared with the total leukocyte count (TLC), erythrocyte sedimentation rate (ESR) and C-reactive protein (CRP). Forty patients with suspected acute meningitis and negative gram stains were included, and ten healthy persons were included as controls. According to the clinical examination and the CSF cytochemical analysis and cultures, the patients were divided into bacterial and aseptic groups. The measurements of serum PCT, ESR, CRP and TLC were performed. Patients in the bacterial group had a higher value of serum PCT at admission and at 3 days post-treatment than those in the aseptic group, with a highly significant difference between them. Serum PCT and, to a lesser extent, TLC had prognostic value in patients with acute meningitis, and PCT is more useful because it can be frequently measured for the diagnosis and follow-up of bacterial meningitis. Copyright © 2013 King Saud Bin Abdulaziz University for Health Sciences. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Rare Elizabethkingia meningosepticum meningitis case in an immunocompetent adult

    PubMed Central

    Hayek, Salim S; Abd, Thura T; Cribbs, Sushma K; Anderson, Albert M; Melendez, Andre; Kobayashi, Miwako; Polito, Carmen; (Wayne) Wang, Yun F

    2013-01-01

    Though Elizabethkingia meningosepticum typically causes meningitis in neonates, its occurrence in adult is rare, with sixteen cases described worldwide. We report a case of E. meningosepticum meningitis in an immunocompetent adult. Bacterial identification was made a day earlier than conventional method by using matrix assisted laser desorption ionization time-of-flight (MALDI-TOF) Vitek mass spectrometry RUO (VMS), which resulted in successful treatment with rifampin, trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole, levofloxacin and minocycline. PMID:26038458

  16. Pituitary Apoplexy Mimicking Meningitis

    PubMed Central

    Oh, Keun; Kim, Jang-Hee; Choi, Jin-Wook; Kang, Jae-Kyu

    2013-01-01

    Pituitary apoplexy is a rare but life-threatening disorder. Clinical presentation of this condition includes severe headaches, impaired consciousness, fever, visual disturbance, and variable ocular paresis. The clinical presentation of meningeal irritation is very rare. Nonetheless, if present and associated with fever, pituitary apoplexy may be misdiagnosed as a meningitis. We experienced a case of pituitary apoplexy masquerading as a meningitis. A 42-year-old man presented with meningitis associated symptoms and initial imaging studies did not show evidence of intra-lesional hemorrhage in the pituitary mass. However, a follow-up imaging after neurological deterioration revealed pituitary apoplexy. Hereby, we report our case with a review of literatures. PMID:24904903

  17. Meningeal carcinomatosis and blindness

    PubMed Central

    Altrocchi, Paul H.; Eckman, Paul B.

    1973-01-01

    The clinical syndrome of meningeal carcinomatosis includes headache, dementia, radiculopathy, and cranial nerve palsies. Blindness may be the first, or most prominent, symptom. When blindness occurs in adult life, meningeal carcinomatosis should be included in the differential diagnosis, even in the absence of other symptoms and in the absence of known malignancy. Although all pathophysiological mechanisms of the blindness in meningeal carcinomatosis have not yet been elucidated, optic nerve involvement by meningeal tumour-cuffing, by chronic papilloedema, and by direct tumour infiltration represent the likeliest causes. In the neuropathological analysis of such cases, the importance of analysing the intra-orbital portion of the optic nerves, in addition to the portions of the optic nerve and chiasm usually examined at routine necropsy, is emphasized. A case is described to illustrate this point, with the only pathological abnormality in the optic nerves being found within 6 mm of the retina. Images PMID:4708455

  18. Non-Infectious Meningitis

    MedlinePlus

    ... Resources for Healthcare Professionals Related Links Vaccine Schedules Preteen & Teen Vaccines Meningococcal Disease Sepsis Non-Infectious Meningitis ... confusion) Top of Page Related Links Vaccine Schedules Preteen & Teen Vaccines Meningococcal Disease Sepsis File Formats Help: ...

  19. DISCUSSION ON MENINGITIS

    PubMed Central

    1929-01-01

    (1) Meningitis: two groups of cases. (2) A method of washing out the subarachnoid space in cases of septic meningitis secondary to infection of the ear. (3) Discussion on the value of maintaining a positive pressure of the cerebrospinal fluid when operating on a septic region communicating with the subarachnoid space. (4) Leaking cerebrospinal fluid from the region of the ear: operative treatment. PMID:19986899

  20. Chronic meningitis caused by Erysipelothrix rhusiopathiae.

    PubMed

    Kim, Suk Ran; Kwon, Min Jung; Lee, Jang Ho; Lee, Nam Yong

    2007-10-01

    A 47-year-old man presented with headache, nausea, vomiting and fever. Laboratory findings including analysis of cerebrospinal fluid suggested bacterial meningitis. Erysipelothrix rhusiopathiae was identified in cultures of cerebrospinal fluid. The patient recovered without any neurological sequelae after antimicrobial treatment. It is interesting that intracranial infection by E. rhusiopathiae reappeared after scores of years and that it presented with absence of an underlying cause or bacteraemia.

  1. [Neonatal meningitis. Study of 26 cases and a review of its sequelae after 5 years].

    PubMed

    Cervantes Pardo, A; Tauler Girona, M C; López Soler, C; Puche Mira, A; Casas Fernández, C; Rodríguez Costa, T

    1988-06-01

    Twenty-six cases of neonatal meningitis in term newborns are studied. Incidence, etiological features, treatment, clinical and biochemical evolution and mortality are analysed. Lief motif of this paper is the search for deficits in psychomotor growth in propositi of four and six years old, finding an important relation between neonatal bacterial meningitis and neuropsychological deficits (hyperkinesia, perceptive area impairment, reading-writing disorders, etc.) in contrast to the good evolution of lymphocytic meningitis.

  2. Viral bacterial co-infection of the respiratory tract during early childhood.

    PubMed

    Brealey, Jaelle C; Sly, Peter D; Young, Paul R; Chappell, Keith J

    2015-05-01

    Acute respiratory infection (ARI) is an important cause of morbidity in children. Mixed aetiology is frequent, with pathogenic viruses and bacteria co-detected in respiratory secretions. However, the clinical significance of these viral/bacterial co-infections has long been a controversial topic. While severe bacterial pneumonia following influenza infection has been well described, associations are less clear among infections caused by viruses that are more common in young children, such as respiratory syncytial virus. Although assessing the overall contribution of bacteria to disease severity is complicated by the presence of many confounding factors in clinical studies, understanding the role of viral/bacterial co-infections in defining the outcome of paediatric ARI will potentially reveal novel treatment and prevention strategies, improving patient outcomes. This review summarizes current evidence for the clinical significance of respiratory viral/bacterial co-infections in young children, discusses possible mechanisms of cooperative interaction between these pathogens and highlights areas that require further investigation.

  3. Vaccine preventable meningitis in Malaysia: epidemiology and management.

    PubMed

    McNeil, Hannah C; Jefferies, Johanna M C; Clarke, Stuart C

    2015-06-01

    Worldwide bacterial meningitis accounts for more than one million cases and 135,000 deaths annually. Profound, lasting neurological complications occur in 9-25% of cases. This review confirms the greatest risk from bacterial meningitis is in early life in Malaysia. Much of the disease burden can be avoided by immunization, particularly against Haemophilus influenzae type b (Hib) and Streptococcus pneumoniae. Despite inclusion of the Hib vaccine in the National Immunisation Programme and the licensure of pneumococcal vaccines, these two species are the main contributors to bacterial meningitis in Malaysia, with Neisseria meningitidis and Mycobacterium tuberculosis, causing a smaller proportion of disease. The high Hib prevalence may partly be due to dated, small-scale studies limiting the understanding of the current epidemiological situation. This highlights the need for larger, better quality surveillance from Malaysia to evaluate the success of Hib immunization and to help guide immunization policy for vaccines against S. pneumoniae and N. meningitidis.

  4. Cryptococcal meningitis complicating sarcoidosis

    PubMed Central

    Leonhard, Sonja E.; Fritz, Daan; van de Beek, Diederik; Brouwer, Matthijs C.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Background: Cryptococcal meningitis is an uncommon but severe complication of sarcoidosis. Methods: We present 2 patients with cryptococcal meningitis complicating sarcoidosis and compared findings with 38 cases reported in the literature. Results: When analyzing our patients and 38 cases reported in the literature, we found that median age of sarcoidosis patients with cryptococcal meningitis was 39 years (range 30–48); 27 of 33 reported cases (82%) had a history of sarcoidosis. Only 16 of 40 patients (40%) received immunomodulating therapy at the time of diagnosis of cryptococcal meningitis. The diagnosis of cryptococcal meningitis was delayed in 17 of 40 patients (43%), mainly because of the initial suspicion of neurosarcoidosis. Cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) examination showed mildly elevated white blood cell count (range 23–129/mm3). Twenty-nine of 32 cases (91%) had a positive CSF culture for Cryptococcus neoformans and 25 of 27 cases (93%) had a positive CSF C neoformans antigen test. CD4 counts were low in all patients in whom counts were performed (84–228/mL). Twelve patients had an unfavorable outcome (32%), of which 7 died (19%) and 24 patients (65%) had a favorable outcome. The rate of unfavorable outcome in patients with a delayed diagnosis was 7 of 17 (41%) compared to 5 of 28 (21%) in patients in whom diagnosis was not delayed. Conclusion: Cryptococcal meningitis is a rare but life-threatening complication of sarcoidosis. Patients were often initially misdiagnosed as neurosarcoidosis, which resulted in considerable treatment delay and worse outcome. CSF cryptococcal antigen tests are advised in patients with sarcoidosis and meningitis. PMID:27583871

  5. Cryptococcal meningitis complicating sarcoidosis.

    PubMed

    Leonhard, Sonja E; Fritz, Daan; van de Beek, Diederik; Brouwer, Matthijs C

    2016-08-01

    Cryptococcal meningitis is an uncommon but severe complication of sarcoidosis. We present 2 patients with cryptococcal meningitis complicating sarcoidosis and compared findings with 38 cases reported in the literature. When analyzing our patients and 38 cases reported in the literature, we found that median age of sarcoidosis patients with cryptococcal meningitis was 39 years (range 30-48); 27 of 33 reported cases (82%) had a history of sarcoidosis. Only 16 of 40 patients (40%) received immunomodulating therapy at the time of diagnosis of cryptococcal meningitis. The diagnosis of cryptococcal meningitis was delayed in 17 of 40 patients (43%), mainly because of the initial suspicion of neurosarcoidosis. Cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) examination showed mildly elevated white blood cell count (range 23-129/mm). Twenty-nine of 32 cases (91%) had a positive CSF culture for Cryptococcus neoformans and 25 of 27 cases (93%) had a positive CSF C neoformans antigen test. CD4 counts were low in all patients in whom counts were performed (84-228/mL). Twelve patients had an unfavorable outcome (32%), of which 7 died (19%) and 24 patients (65%) had a favorable outcome. The rate of unfavorable outcome in patients with a delayed diagnosis was 7 of 17 (41%) compared to 5 of 28 (21%) in patients in whom diagnosis was not delayed. Cryptococcal meningitis is a rare but life-threatening complication of sarcoidosis. Patients were often initially misdiagnosed as neurosarcoidosis, which resulted in considerable treatment delay and worse outcome. CSF cryptococcal antigen tests are advised in patients with sarcoidosis and meningitis.

  6. Pathogenesis and Pathophysiology of Pneumococcal Meningitis

    PubMed Central

    Mook-Kanamori, Barry B.; Geldhoff, Madelijn; van der Poll, Tom; van de Beek, Diederik

    2011-01-01

    Summary: Pneumococcal meningitis continues to be associated with high rates of mortality and long-term neurological sequelae. The most common route of infection starts by nasopharyngeal colonization by Streptococcus pneumoniae, which must avoid mucosal entrapment and evade the host immune system after local activation. During invasive disease, pneumococcal epithelial adhesion is followed by bloodstream invasion and activation of the complement and coagulation systems. The release of inflammatory mediators facilitates pneumococcal crossing of the blood-brain barrier into the brain, where the bacteria multiply freely and trigger activation of circulating antigen-presenting cells and resident microglial cells. The resulting massive inflammation leads to further neutrophil recruitment and inflammation, resulting in the well-known features of bacterial meningitis, including cerebrospinal fluid pleocytosis, cochlear damage, cerebral edema, hydrocephalus, and cerebrovascular complications. Experimental animal models continue to further our understanding of the pathophysiology of pneumococcal meningitis and provide the platform for the development of new adjuvant treatments and antimicrobial therapy. This review discusses the most recent views on the pathophysiology of pneumococcal meningitis, as well as potential targets for (adjunctive) therapy. PMID:21734248

  7. Bacterial Meningitis Caused by Hypervirulent Klebsiella pneumoniae Capsular Genotype K54 with Development of Granuloma-like Nodal Enhancement in the Brain during the Subacute Phase

    PubMed Central

    Iwasaki, Yudai; Inokuchi, Ryota; Harada, Sohei; Aoki, Kotaro; Ishii, Yoshikazu; Shinohara, Kazuaki

    2017-01-01

    A 72-year-old man was admitted to the emergency department due to coma. The cerebrospinal fluid cell count was 40,080 cells/μL, and Klebsiella pneumoniae was detected on culture. Stretching the bacterial colonies on an agar plate showed the formation of a viscous string with a length exceeding 5 mm, indicating hypervirulent K. pneumoniae (hv-KP). A genome analysis suggested hv-KP capsular genotype K54 with sequence type 29. Although no brain abscess was detected on contrast-enhanced computed tomography on Day 4 or on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) on Day 7, contrast-enhanced MRI on Day 23 showed granuloma-like nodal enhancement on the surface of the left insula. Antibacterial therapy was continued until the enhancement disappeared on Day 40. MRI may help determine the duration required for antibacterial therapy. After six months, the patient was discharged and remained free from recurrence. PMID:28154286

  8. Interleukin-6 in cerebrospinal fluid as a biomarker of acute meningitis.

    PubMed

    García-Hernández, Pablo; Prieto, Belén; Martínez-Morillo, Eduardo; Rodríguez, Verónica; Álvarez, Francisco V

    2016-01-01

    Microbiological culture of cerebrospinal fluid is the gold standard to differentiate between aseptic and bacterial meningitis, but this method has low sensitivity. A fast and reliable new marker would be of interest in clinical practice. Interleukin-6, secreted by T cells in response to meningeal pathogens and quickly delivered into cerebrospinal fluid, was evaluated as a marker of acute meningitis. A total of 150 cerebrospinal fluid samples were analysed by an electrochemiluminescence method, selected according to patient diagnosis: (a) bacterial meningitis confirmed by positive culture (n = 26); (b) bacterial meningitis with negative culture or not performed (n = 15); (c) viral meningitis confirmed by polymerase chain reaction or immunoglobulin G determination (n = 23); (d) viral meningitis with polymerase chain reaction negative or not performed (n = 42); and (e) controls (n = 44). Cerebrospinal fluid interleukin-6 concentration showed significant differences between all pathologic groups and the control group (P < 0.001). As a diagnostic tool for bacterial meningitis, interleukin-6 showed an area under the curve of 0.937 (95% confidence intervals: 0.895-0.978), significantly higher than those of classical biomarkers. An interleukin-6 cutoff of 1418 pg/mL showed 95.5% sensitivity and 77.5% specificity, whereas a value of 15,060 pg/mL showed 63.6% sensitivity and 96.7% specificity, for diagnosis of bacterial meningitis. Interleukin-6 measured by electrochemiluminescence method is a promising marker for early differentiation between aseptic and bacterial meningitis. More studies are needed to validate clinical implications for future practice in an emergency laboratory. © The Author(s) 2015.

  9. Hemophilus influenzae meningitis at the Children's Hospital Medical Center in Boston, 1958 to 1973.

    PubMed

    Peter, G; Smith, D H

    1975-04-01

    Three hundred ninety-seven children were admitted to the Children's Hospital Medical Center, Boston between 1958 and 1973 with H. influenzae meningitis. The annual rate of admission and the percent of all cases of bacterial meningitis were not changed from that of the preceding decade. The age incidence was strikingly similar to that reported from this hospital for 1920 to 1932.

  10. Primary Meningeal Rhabdomyosarcoma

    PubMed Central

    Palta, Manisha; Riedel, Richard F.; Vredenburgh, James J.; Cummings, Thomas J.; Green, Scott; Chang, Zheng; Kirkpatrick, John P.

    2011-01-01

    Primary meningeal rhabdomyosarcoma is a rare primary brain malignancy, with scant case reports. While most reports of primary intracranial rhabdomyosarcoma occur in pediatric patients, a handful of cases in adult patients have been reported in the medical literature. We report the case of a 44-year-old male who developed primary meningeal rhabdomyosarcoma. After developing episodes of right lower extremity weakness, word finding difficulty, and headaches, a brain magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) demonstrated a vertex lesion with radiographic appearance of a meningeal-derived tumor. Subtotal surgical resection was performed due to sagittal sinus invasion and initial pathology was interpreted as an anaplastic meningioma. Re-review of pathology demonstrated rhabdomyosarcoma negative for alveolar translocation t(2;13). Staging studies revealed no evidence of disseminated disease. He was treated with stereotactic radiotherapy with concurrent temozolamide to be followed by vincristine, actinomycin-D, and cyclophosphamide (VAC) systemic therapy. PMID:21772793

  11. [A case of Mycobacterium fortuitum meningitis following surgery for meningioma].

    PubMed

    Fujikawa, Keita; Suenaga, Akihito; Motomura, Masakatsu; Fukuda, Taku; Ooe, Nobuharu; Eguchi, Katsumi

    2006-07-01

    A 57-year-old woman had undergone surgery for meningioma. After the surgery, she suffered from repeated fever and headache. One year after surgery, she was admitted to our hospital for further examination. Cerebro-spinal fluid (CSF) findings indicated bacterial meningitis infection. Germ culture, acid-fast bacterium culture, PCR for mycobacteriosis and cryptococcus antigens as well as cytological examination of CSF were checked repeatedly. However, all examinations were negative and etiology was unknown. We treated with many anti-bacterial, anti-fungal and anti-tubercular drugs, but CSF findings were not improved. We repeated CSF examination and finally Mycobacterium fortuitum (M. fortuitum) was isolated. Clarithromycin (CAM) was started for M. fortuitum meningitis. After drug sensitivity testing, levofloxacin (LVFX), which was effective against M. fortuitum, was added to CAM, after which clinical and CSF findings improved dramatically. M. fortuitum rarely causes CNS infection. Several English literatures on M. fortuitum meningitis after traumatic injury and surgery have been published. Its CSF findings distinctly resemble those of bacterial meningitis, but are resistant to the usual antituberculosis drugs. We reported a case of M. fortuitum meningitis associated with surgery for meningioma.

  12. Complement component 5 contributes to poor disease outcome in humans and mice with pneumococcal meningitis.

    PubMed

    Woehrl, Bianca; Brouwer, Matthijs C; Murr, Carmen; Heckenberg, Sebastiaan G B; Baas, Frank; Pfister, Hans W; Zwinderman, Aeilko H; Morgan, B Paul; Barnum, Scott R; van der Ende, Arie; Koedel, Uwe; van de Beek, Diederik

    2011-10-01

    Pneumococcal meningitis is the most common and severe form of bacterial meningitis. Fatality rates are substantial, and long-term sequelae develop in about half of survivors. Disease outcome has been related to the severity of the proinflammatory response in the subarachnoid space. The complement system, which mediates key inflammatory processes, has been implicated as a modulator of pneumococcal meningitis disease severity in animal studies. Additionally, SNPs in genes encoding complement pathway proteins have been linked to susceptibility to pneumococcal infection, although no associations with disease severity or outcome have been established. Here, we have performed a robust prospective nationwide genetic association study in patients with bacterial meningitis and found that a common nonsynonymous complement component 5 (C5) SNP (rs17611) is associated with unfavorable disease outcome. C5 fragment levels in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) of patients with bacterial meningitis correlated with several clinical indicators of poor prognosis. Consistent with these human data, C5a receptor-deficient mice with pneumococcal meningitis had lower CSF wbc counts and decreased brain damage compared with WT mice. Adjuvant treatment with C5-specific monoclonal antibodies prevented death in all mice with pneumococcal meningitis. Thus, our results suggest C5-specific monoclonal antibodies could be a promising new antiinflammatory adjuvant therapy for pneumococcal meningitis.

  13. Complement component 5 contributes to poor disease outcome in humans and mice with pneumococcal meningitis

    PubMed Central

    Woehrl, Bianca; Brouwer, Matthijs C.; Murr, Carmen; Heckenberg, Sebastiaan G.B.; Baas, Frank; Pfister, Hans W.; Zwinderman, Aeilko H.; Morgan, B. Paul; Barnum, Scott R.; van der Ende, Arie; Koedel, Uwe; van de Beek, Diederik

    2011-01-01

    Pneumococcal meningitis is the most common and severe form of bacterial meningitis. Fatality rates are substantial, and long-term sequelae develop in about half of survivors. Disease outcome has been related to the severity of the proinflammatory response in the subarachnoid space. The complement system, which mediates key inflammatory processes, has been implicated as a modulator of pneumococcal meningitis disease severity in animal studies. Additionally, SNPs in genes encoding complement pathway proteins have been linked to susceptibility to pneumococcal infection, although no associations with disease severity or outcome have been established. Here, we have performed a robust prospective nationwide genetic association study in patients with bacterial meningitis and found that a common nonsynonymous complement component 5 (C5) SNP (rs17611) is associated with unfavorable disease outcome. C5 fragment levels in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) of patients with bacterial meningitis correlated with several clinical indicators of poor prognosis. Consistent with these human data, C5a receptor–deficient mice with pneumococcal meningitis had lower CSF wbc counts and decreased brain damage compared with WT mice. Adjuvant treatment with C5-specific monoclonal antibodies prevented death in all mice with pneumococcal meningitis. Thus, our results suggest C5-specific monoclonal antibodies could be a promising new antiinflammatory adjuvant therapy for pneumococcal meningitis. PMID:21926466

  14. Scrub typhus meningitis or meningoencephalitis.

    PubMed

    Kim, Dong-Min; Chung, Jong-Hoon; Yun, Na-Ra; Kim, Seok Won; Lee, Jun-Young; Han, Mi Ah; Lee, Yong-Bok

    2013-12-01

    Orientia tsutsugamushi induces vasculitis leading to symptoms of systemic organ invasion including meningitis and meningoencephalitis. We conducted a retrospective case-control study of scrub typhus patients to investigate the clinical and laboratory features of patients with scrub typhus meningitis or meningoencephalitis, and the therapeutic outcomes, and to determine the predictor factors. Cases were 22 patients with scrub typhus meningitis or meningoencephalitis, and controls were 303 patients without meningitis or meningoencephalitis. Multivariate analysis showed that the presence of pneumonitis was associated with the occurrence of scrub typhus meningitis and meningoencephalitis (odds ratio [OR] 8.9; P < 0.001; confidence interval [CI] 2.9-27.2). Although appropriate antimicrobials such as doxycycline agents were administered at an early stage, meningitis or meningoencephalitis still occurred in some cases. Physicians should be aware that meningitis or meningoencephalitis may develop during appropriate drug therapy such as doxycycline. Close observation and great care are essential for patients with risk factors, particularly pneumonitis.

  15. Neisseria lactamica meningitis.

    PubMed

    Lauer, B A; Fisher, C E

    1976-02-01

    Neisseria lactamica was recovered from the blood and cerebrospinal fluid of a 7-month-old girl with acute purulent meningitis. The isolate was identified initially as N meningitidis. However, additional biochemical testing at the Center for Disease Control showed that the organism fermented lactose and produced beta-D-galactosidase, thereby confirming its identity as N lactamica.

  16. Cost-utility analysis of patient care in children with meningeal signs.

    PubMed

    Oostenbrink, Rianne; Oostenbrink, Jan B; Moons, Karel G M; Derksen-Lubsen, Gerarda; Essink-Bot, Marie-Louise; Grobbee, Diederick E; Redekop, W Ken; Moll, Henriëtte A

    2002-01-01

    We designed a model of diagnostic and therapeutic interventions applied in children with meningeal signs. Using this model, we determined in a cost-utility analysis the consequences for society of different diagnostic strategies in terms of quality-adjusted life-years (QALYs) and costs. Data were used from 360 children (0.1-15 years) visiting the pediatric emergency department of the Sophia Children's Hospital Rotterdam, The Netherlands (1988-98) with meningeal signs. Model inputs included probabilities of meningitis and adverse outcome, QALYs for years lived with long-term sequelae, and costs of tests and treatments. Mean outcome measures were costs and effects of diagnostic and therapeutic interventions in children suspected of bacterial meningitis, key determinants of the model outcomes, and evaluation of alternative diagnostic strategies and two vaccination programs in an analysis. The population comprised 99 children with bacterial meningitis (adverse outcome in 10), 36 with serious other bacterial infections, and 225 with self-limiting diseases. Key determinants were the risk of bacterial meningitis or sequelae, costs of treatment, and long-term morbidity. Minimizing lumbar punctures and empirical treatments using a diagnostic decision rule, without missing a single case of meningitis, was a dominant strategy to actual practice. Vaccination strategies of Streptococcus pneumoniae and Neisseria meningitidis resulted in our model in incremental cost-utility ratios of 401,965 Euro dollar ([symbol: see text])/QALY and [symbol: see text]22,635/QALY, respectively. Costs of long-term morbidity of bacterial meningitis largely outweigh diagnostic and treatment costs. Modeling interventions in children at risk of bacterial meningitis should include long-term consequences in terms of costs and QALYs.

  17. Shunting in cryptococcal meningitis.

    PubMed

    Cherian, Jacob; Atmar, Robert L; Gopinath, Shankar P

    2016-07-01

    OBJECT Patients with cryptococcal meningitis often develop symptomatic intracranial hypertension. The need for permanent CSF diversion in these cases remains unclear. METHODS Cases of cryptococcal meningitis over a 5-year period were reviewed from a single, large teaching hospital. Sources of identification included ICD-9 codes, operative logs, and microscopy laboratory records. RESULTS Fifty cases of cryptococcal meningitis were identified. Ninety-eight percent (49/50) of patients were HIV positive. Opening pressure on initial lumbar puncture diagnosing cryptococcal meningitis was elevated (> 25 cm H2O) in 33 cases and normal (≤ 25 cm H2O) in 17 cases. Thirty-eight patients ultimately developed elevated opening pressure over a follow-up period ranging from weeks to years. Serial lumbar punctures for relief of intracranial hypertension were performed in 29 cases. Thirteen of these patients ultimately had shunting procedures performed after failing to improve clinically. Two factors were significantly associated with the need for shunting: patients undergoing shunt placement were more likely to be women (5/13 vs 0/16; p = 0.01) and to have a pattern of increasing CSF cryptococcal antigen (10/13 vs 3/16 cases; p = 0.003). All patients re-presenting with mycological relapse either underwent or were offered shunt placement. CONCLUSIONS Neurosurgeons are often asked to consider CSF diversion in cases of cryptococcal meningitis complicated by intracranial hypertension. Most patients do well with serial lumbar punctures combined with antifungal therapy. When required, shunting generally provided sustained relief from intracranial hypertension symptoms. Ventriculoperitoneal shunts are the favored method of diversion. To the authors' knowledge, the present study is the largest series on diversionary shunts in primarily HIV-positive patients with this problem.

  18. Spontaneous gram-negative bacillary meningitis in adult patients: characteristics and outcome

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Spontaneous meningitis caused by gram-negative bacilli in adult patients is uncommon and poorly characterized. Our objective is to describe and compare the characteristics and the outcome of adult patients with spontaneous gram-negative bacilli meningitis (GNBM) and spontaneous meningitis due to other pathogens. Methods Prospective single hospital-based observational cohort study conducted between 1982 and 2006 in a university tertiary hospital in Barcelona (Spain). The Main Outcome Measure: In-hospital mortality. Results Gram-negative bacilli meningitis was diagnosed in 40 (7%) of 544 episodes of spontaneous acute bacterial meningitis. The most common pathogens were Escherichia coli and Pseudomonas species. On admission, characteristics associated with spontaneous gram-negative bacilli meningitis by multivariate modeling were advanced age, history of cancer, nosocomial acquisition of infection, urinary tract infection as distant focus of infection, absence of rash, hypotension, and a high cerebrospinal fluid white-cell count. Nine (23%) episodes were acquired in the hospital and they were most commonly caused by Pseudomonas. The in-hospital mortality rate was 53%. The mortality rate was higher among patients with Gram-negative bacillary meningitis than among those with other bacterial meningitis and their risk of death was twenty times higher than among patients infected with Neisseria meningitidis (odds ratio 20.47; 95% confidence interval 4.03-103.93; p<0.001). Conclusions Gram-negative bacilli cause 9% of spontaneous bacterial meningitis of known etiology in adults. Characteristics associated with GNBM include advanced age, history of cancer, nosocomial acquisition, and urinary tract infection as distant focus of infection. The mortality rate is higher among patients with gram-negative bacillary meningitis than among those with other bacterial meningitides. PMID:24079517

  19. Listeria monocytogenes Meningitis in Adults: The Czech Republic Experience

    PubMed Central

    Rozsypal, Hanus; Smiskova, Dita; Benes, Jiri

    2013-01-01

    Background. Listeria monocytogenes (LM) is currently the third most frequent pathogen of bacterial meningitis in adults. Methods. A prospective study of patients with LM meningitis in a Czech tertiary care hospital, carried out from 1997 to 2012. Results. Thirty-one patients were diagnosed with LM meningitis, which was 7% of a total of 440 adult patients with acute bacterial meningitis (ABM) over a 16-year period. Their median age was 63 years, range 26–80 years. Nineteen patients (61%) had underlying immunocompromising comorbidity; 15 patients (48%) were older than 65 years. Fourteen patients (45%) had arterial hypertension. The typical triad of fever, neck stiffness, and altered mental status was present in 21 patients (68%). The median count of cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) leukocytes was 680/μL, protein level 2.6 g/L, and glucose ratio 0.28. Four patients (13%) died, and nine (29%) survived with moderate to severe sequelae. Conclusion. LM meningitis is known to affect immunosuppressed and elderly patients. Arterial hypertension seems to be another important predisposing factor. Clinical symptoms, CSF findings, and disease outcomes, did not significantly differ from other community-acquired ABM in our study, although the CSF leukocyte count was lower. Ampicillin showed good clinical and bacteriological efficacy in the majority of patients. PMID:24106719

  20. A Rare Case of Pediatric Lumbar Spinal Ependymoma Mimicking Meningitis.

    PubMed

    Ekuma, Ezeali Mike; Ito, Kiyoshi; Chiba, Akihiro; Hara, Yosuke; Kanaya, Kohei; Horiuchi, Tetsuyoshi; Ohaegbulam, Samuel; Hongo, Kazuhiro

    2017-04-01

    Spontaneous acute subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) from lumbar ependymoma in children is rare. We report a case of a 14-year-old boy who developed sudden radicular low back pain while playing baseball. He was initially managed conservatively in a local hospital for suspected lumbar disc herniation, but he later developed meningeal symptoms and fever before being referred to our hospital. He underwent a diagnostic lumbar puncture in the emergency department; his cerebrospinal fluid suggested an SAH. Physical examination showed meningeal signs and cauda equina features. Cerebrospinal fluid analysis was negative for bacterial meningitis. Lumbar magnetic resonance imaging revealed a mass characterized as a hemorrhagic lesion. The patient had an emergent evacuation of the mass through the posterior approach. Postoperatively, his symptoms resolved completely. The histologic diagnosis was, surprisingly, an ependymoma (World Health Organization grade II). This case is particularly interesting because of its rarity in children, and its pattern of presentation. Although bacterial or viral meningitis is the most frequent cause of meningeal features in children, SAH from a hemorrhagic spinal tumor should be considered. Ultimately, a high index of suspicion is needed for prompt diagnosis. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Early diagnosis model for meningitis supports public health decision making.

    PubMed

    Close, Rebecca M; Ejidokun, Oluwatoyin O; Verlander, Neville Q; Fraser, Graham; Meltzer, Margie; Rehman, Yasmin; Muir, Peter; Ninis, Nelly; Stuart, James M

    2011-07-01

    To develop a predictive model for rapid differential diagnosis of meningitis and meningococcal septicaemia to support public health decisions on chemoprophylaxis for contacts. Prospective study of suspected cases of acute meningitis and meningococcal septicaemia admitted to hospitals in the South West, West Midlands and London Regions of England from July 2008 to June 2009. Epidemiological, clinical and laboratory variables on admission were recorded. Logistic regression was used to derive a predictive model. Of the 719 suspect cases reported, 385 confirmed cases were included in analysis. Peripheral blood polymorphonuclear count of >16 × 10(9)/l, serum C-reactive protein of >100 mg/l and haemorrhagic rash were strongly and independently associated with diagnosis of bacterial meningitis and meningococcal septicaemia. Using a simple scoring system, the presence of any one of these factors gave a probability of >95% in predicting the final diagnosis. We have developed a model using laboratory and clinical factors, but not dependent on availability of CSF, for differentiating acute bacterial from viral meningitis within a few hours of admission to hospital. This scoring system is recommended in public health management of suspected cases of meningitis and meningococcal septicaemia to inform decisions on chemoprophylaxis. Copyright © 2011 The British Infection Association. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Meningitis and meningoencephalomyelitis in horses: 28 cases (1985-2010).

    PubMed

    Toth, Balazs; Aleman, Monica; Nogradi, Nora; Madigan, John E

    2012-03-01

    To describe clinical and clinicopathologic findings and outcome of horses with meningitis and meningoencephalomyelitis. Retrospective case series. 28 horses. Medical records of horses admitted to the hospital during a 25-year period were reviewed. Horses with a definitive diagnosis of meningitis or meningoencephalomyelitis were included in this study. Information extracted from the medical records included signalment, history, reason for admission, clinical signs, results of clinicopathologic testing and diagnostic procedures, treatment, outcome, and necropsy findings. 22 horses had confirmed infectious disease (19 bacterial, 2 parasitic, and 1 fungal), 4 had suspected infectious disease on the basis of CSF cytologic examination findings, and 2 had noninfectious meningitis or meningoencephalomyelitis. Trauma of the head and vertebral column with disruption of the blood-brain barrier and local ascending or hematogenous spread were the most common routes of infection. Common neurologic signs included abnormal mental status, cranial nerve deficits, vestibular dysfunction, ataxia, tetraparesis, and apparent neck pain. Common hematologic abnormalities included leukocytosis, neutrophilia, lymphopenia, and hyperfibrinogenemia. Cytologic examination of CSF samples revealed moderate to marked suppurative inflammation. Mortality rate was 96.4%. Microbial culture of CSF yielded bacterial growth in 15 of 23 horses (before death [2 horses], after death [11], and both [2]). Results suggested that meningitis and meningoencephalomyelitis are uncommon disorders in horses. Infectious disease was more common than noninfectious disease. Local trauma, ascending infection, or hematogenous spread of infection were the most common causes of meningitis or meningoencephalomyelitis. Neurologic deficits, neutrophilia, lymphopenia, hyperfibrinogenemia, and CSF with neutrophilic pleocytosis were common findings in affected horses.

  3. Molecular mechanisms of cryptococcal meningitis.

    PubMed

    Liu, Tong-Bao; Perlin, David S; Xue, Chaoyang

    2012-01-01

    Fungal meningitis is a serious disease caused by a fungal infection of the central nervous system (CNS) mostly in individuals with immune system deficiencies. Fungal meningitis is often fatal without proper treatment, and the mortality rate remains unacceptably high even with antifungal drug interventions. Currently, cryptococcal meningitis is the most common fungal meningitis in HIV-1/AIDS, and its disease mechanism has been extensively studied. The key steps for fungi to infect brain and cause meningitis after establishment of local infection are the dissemination of fungal cells to the bloodstream and invasion through the blood brain barrier to reach the CNS. In this review, we use cryptococcal CNS infection as an example to describe the current molecular understanding of fungal meningitis, including the establishment of the infection, dissemination, and brain invasion. Host and microbial factors that contribute to these infection steps are also discussed.

  4. Testing for Meningitis in Children with Bronchiolitis

    PubMed Central

    Stefanski, Michael; Williams, Ronald; McSherry, George; Geskey, Joseph

    2014-01-01

    Viral bronchiolitis accounts for almost 20% of all-cause hospitalizations of infants (ie, children younger than age 1 year). The annual incidence of fever in viral bronchiolitis has been documented at 23% to 31%. However the incidence of concurrent serious bacterial infections is low (1%–7%), with meningitis occurring in less than 1% to 2% of cases, but lumbar puncture is performed in up to 9% of viral bronchiolitis cases. To our knowledge, no study has examined clinical factors that influence a physician’s decision to perform a lumbar puncture in the setting of viral bronchiolitis. We present a retrospective, case-control study of hospitalized infants younger than one year diagnosed with viral bronchiolitis who underwent lumbar puncture as part of an evaluation for meningitis. The objective of the study was to determine clinical factors that influence a physician’s decision to perform a lumbar puncture in the setting of viral bronchiolitis. Although the presence of apnea, cyanosis, meningeal signs, positive urine culture results, and young age were factors found to be preliminarily associated with the performance of a lumbar puncture in the setting of bronchiolitis, young age was the only significant clinical factor found after multivariable regression; no other demographic, clinical, laboratory, or radiologic variables were found to be significant. PMID:25662522

  5. Caspases inhibition decreases neurological sequelae in meningitis.

    PubMed

    Irazuzta, Jose; Pretzlaff, Robert K; Zingarelli, Basilia

    2008-05-01

    To evaluate the effects of sustained caspase inhibition during the acute phase of meningitis-induced brain injury. Changes in neurobehavioral performance were the primary outcome variables. Randomized prospective animal study. University research laboratory. Male Wistar rats. Animals underwent a basilar cistern inoculation of group B Streptococci to induce meningitis. Sixteen hours later animals were randomized to receive Bocaspartyl (OMe)-fluoromethyketone (BAF) for 4 days or placebo in addition to antibiotic therapy. The assessment of neurobehavioral performance was started 7 days after initiation of treatment and continued for the following 3 wks. A subgroup underwent early kill, at 5 days, to evaluate caspase 3 activity in brain tissue. There was a group of Sham instrumented animals. BAF decreased caspase 3 activation in meningitic animals. There were no significant motor deficit differences between the infected groups. Cognitive performance was significantly improved in the BAF group. These findings demonstrate that sustained systemic administration of BAF inhibits caspase 3 activation and decreases neurologic sequelae in a rat model of bacterial meningitis.

  6. Meningococcal Disease (Bacterial Meningitis) Vaccine and Pregnancy

    MedlinePlus

    ... 335 women who received the older MPSV type vaccines during pregnancy found no related harmful effects. Most of these women were vaccinated after the first trimester. Voluntary reports to a vaccine database also found no unusual pattern of outcomes ...

  7. Aseptic meningitis associated with rofecoxib.

    PubMed

    Bonnel, Renan A; Villalba, Maria L; Karwoski, Claudia B; Beitz, Julie

    2002-03-25

    Rofecoxib is a nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug that is reported to act by selectively inhibiting cyclooxygenase-2. A review and analysis of reports sent to the Spontaneous Reporting System of the Food and Drug Administration, Rockville, Md, suggest that aseptic meningitis is associated with rofecoxib use. To our knowledge, there have been no published reports of aseptic meningitis occurring in association with rofecoxib use to date. We report 5 serious cases of aseptic meningitis associated with rofecoxib use.

  8. Management of neoplastic meningitis.

    PubMed

    Roth, Patrick; Weller, Michael

    2015-06-01

    Leptomeningeal dissemination of tumor cells, also referred to as neoplastic meningitis, is most frequently seen in patients with late-stage cancer and mostly associated with a poor prognosis. Basically, neoplastic meningitis may affect all patients with a malignant tumor but is most common in patients affected by lung cancer, breast carcinoma, melanoma or hematologic neoplasms such as lymphoma and leukemia. Controlled clinical trials are largely lacking which results in various non-standardized treatment regimens. The presence of solid tumor manifestations in the CNS as well as the extracranial tumor load defines the most appropriate treatment approach. Radiation therapy, systemic chemotherapy and intrathecal treatment must be considered. For each patient, the individual situation needs to be carefully evaluated to determine the potential benefit as well as putative side effects associated with any therapy. A moderate survival benefit and particularly relief from pain and neurological deficits are the main treatment goals. Here, we summarize the management of patients with neoplastic meningitis and review the available treatment options.

  9. Epidemiology and diagnostic testing for meningitis in adults as the meningococcal epidemic declined at Middlemore Hospital.

    PubMed

    McBride, Stephen; Fulke, Jennifer; Giles, Hannah; Hobbs, Mark; Suh, Jun; Sathyendran, Vani; Thompson, Emily; Taylor, Susan; Holland, David

    2015-03-13

    To describe changes in epidemiology and diagnostic techniques for adult meningitis at Middlemore Hospital following the decline of the meningococcal epidemic. Retrospective audit of cases of meningitis from 2000 to 2009. Microbiologically-confirmed diagnosis (MCD) was established in 296 of 743 episodes (40%), most commonly enterovirus (123/296, 42%), Neisseria meningitidis (43/296, 15%) and Streptococcus pneumoniae (34/296, 11%). N. meningitidis meningitis declined and herpes viruses increased over time, without significant change in overall meningitis case numbers. By 2009, S. pneumoniae constituted a greater proportion of cases than N. meningitidis. Cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and pneumococcal immunochromatographic testing (PICT) increased over time as did the proportion of cases with MCD. CSF Gram stain was positive in 45% (53/118) and CSF culture made MCD in 37% (44/118) of confirmed bacterial episodes (CBE). PCR provided MCD in 59% (26/54) of CBE and 99% (168/170) of viral episodes. CSF PICT was tested in 76% (26/34) of S. pneumoniae meningitis (positive in 92% (24/26). As the epidemic waned, local incidence of meningococcal meningitis decreased without significant decreasing meningitis overall. Empiric treatment for meningitis in New Zealand adults should routinely include pneumococcal cover. Increased PCR testing increases MCD in meningitis.

  10. Outbreak of meningitis due to Serratia marcescens after spinal anaesthesia.

    PubMed

    Ersoz, G; Uguz, M; Aslan, G; Horasan, E S; Kaya, A

    2014-06-01

    This article describes an outbreak of meningitis caused by Serratia marcescens in patients who had undergone spinal anaesthesia for caesarean section. Bacterial meningitis was diagnosed in 12 of the 46 patients who underwent a caesarean section under spinal anaesthesia in a 75-bed private hospital between 6(th) and 14(th) March 2011. S. marcescens was isolated from samples taken from four prefilled syringes and one bag containing 5% dextrose with norepinephrine, suggesting that medications used in spinal anaesthesia were contaminated extrinsically. Strategies for prevention of anaesthesia-associated infections in operating theatres are discussed. Copyright © 2014 The Healthcare Infection Society. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Meningitis Due to Mixed Infection with Penicillin-Resistant and Penicillin-Susceptible Strains of Streptococcus pneumoniae

    PubMed Central

    Chaves, Fernando; Campelo, Carolina; Sanz, Francisca; Otero, Joaquin R.

    2003-01-01

    Streptococcus pneumoniae is the major cause of bacterial meningitis. We report a case of meningitis due to a mixed infection with two distinct strains of S. pneumoniae: one penicillin-resistant strain of serotype 9V and one penicillin-susceptible strain of serotype 7. The two strains exhibited different pulsed-field gel electrophoresis profiles. PMID:12517910

  12. Childhood acute non-traumatic coma: aetiology and challenges in management in resource-poor countries of Africa and Asia.

    PubMed

    Gwer, Samson; Chacha, Clifford; Newton, Charles R; Idro, Richard

    2013-08-01

    This review examines the best available evidence on the aetiology of childhood acute non-traumatic coma in resource-poor countries (RPCs), discusses the challenges associated with management, and explores strategies to address them. Publications in English and French which reported on studies on the aetiology of childhood non-traumatic coma in RPCs are reviewed. Primarily, the MEDLINE database was searched using the keywords coma, unconsciousness, causality, aetiology, child, malaria cerebral, meningitis, encephalitis, Africa, Asia, and developing countries. 14 records were identified for inclusion in the review. Cerebral malaria (CM) was the commonest cause of childhood coma in most of the studies conducted in Africa. Acute bacterial meningitis (ABM) was the second most common known cause of coma in seven of the African studies. Of the studies in Asia, encephalitides were the commonest cause of coma in two studies in India, and ABM was the commonest cause of coma in Pakistan. Streptococcus pneumoniae was the most commonly isolated organism in ABM. Japanese encephalitis, dengue fever and enteroviruses were the viral agents most commonly isolated. Accurate diagnosis of the aetiology of childhood coma in RPCs is complicated by overlap in clinical presentation, limited diagnostic resources, disease endemicity and co-morbidity. For improved outcomes, studies are needed to further elucidate the aetiology of childhood coma in RPCs, explore simple and practical diagnostic tools, and investigate the most appropriate specific and supportive interventions to manage and prevent infectious encephalopathies.

  13. Severe cochlear dysplasia causing recurrent meningitis: a surgical lesson.

    PubMed

    Stevenson, D S; Proops, D W; Phelps, P D

    1993-08-01

    Meningitis may be the sole presenting sign of a cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) fistula of the temporal bone. An eight-year-old boy suffering from recurrent meningitis was found to have bilateral severe cochlear dysplasia. Bilateral tympanotomies were performed, planning to obliterate each vestibule. In the right ear a stapedectomy was performed, resulting in a torrential 'CSF gusher' and difficulty in packing the vestibule. CSF rhinorrhoea requiring revision surgery and two episodes of gram-negative bacterial meningitis complicated the post-operative management, resulting in a prolonged hospital stay. Subsequently, the left ear was managed in a different fashion, leaving the stapes in situ, with grafts placed to seal the oval window niche. We would recommend this alternative procedure in cases of severe cochlear dysplasia, where abnormalities of the vestibule and basal turn of the cochlea mean that performing a stapedectomy to pack the vestibule may result in a severe 'CSF gusher', by opening directly into the subarachnoid space.

  14. Cryptococcal meningitis in African children.

    PubMed

    Subramanyam, V R; Mtitimila, E; Hart, C A; Broadhead, R L

    1997-06-01

    Three cases of cryptococcal meningitis in Malawian children aged 6 weeks, 3 years and 9 years are described. Only 23 cases of cryptococcal meningitis in children have been described previously, but in children from Europe and the USA. These are therefore the first cases of cryptococcosis to be described in African children.

  15. [Actual problem of meningitis and other intracranial complications in cases of otitis media and sinusitis in children].

    PubMed

    Zieliński, Rafał; Zakrzewska, Anna

    2012-01-01

    The most frequent primary infections causing purulent meningitis in older children are both acute and chronic otitis media and sinusitis or upper and lower airways infections. In these cases sometimes purulent meningitis is accompanied with other intracranial complications. Pharmacological treatment of intracranial complications without surgical intervention concerning primary source of infection increases risk of complications including death of a patient and also recurrences of bacterial meningitis. In the paper authors present two uncommon cases of children with purulent meningitis and other intracranial complications of otitis media and sinusitis diagnosed by pediatricians.

  16. Lymphocytes Modulate Innate Immune Responses and Neuronal Damage in Experimental Meningitis

    PubMed Central

    Rung, Olga; Held, Josephin; Boettcher, Chotima; Prokop, Stefan; Stenzel, Werner; Priller, Josef

    2014-01-01

    In bacterial meningitis, excessive immune responses carry significant potential for damage to brain tissue even after successful antibiotic therapy. Bacterial meningitis is regarded primarily as the domain of innate immunity, and the role of lymphocytes remains unclear. We studied the contribution of lymphocytes to acute inflammation and neurodegeneration in experimental Toll-like receptor 2-driven meningitis, comparing wild-type mice with RAG-1-deficient mice that have no mature T and B lymphocytes. At 24 h after intrathecal challenge with the synthetic bacterial lipopeptide Pam3CysSK4, RAG-1-deficient mice displayed more pronounced clinical impairment and an increased concentration of neutrophils, reduced expression of interleukin-10 (IL-10) mRNA, and increased expression of CXCL1 mRNA in the cerebrospinal fluid. Conversely, neuronal loss in the dentate gyrus was reduced in RAG-1-deficient mice, and expression of IL-10, transforming growth factor β and CCL2 mRNA by microglia was increased compared to wild-type mice. Adoptive transfer of wild-type lymphocytes reversed the enhanced meningeal inflammation and functional impairment observed in RAG-1-deficient mice. Our findings suggest compartment-specific effects of lymphocytes during acute bacterial meningitis, including attenuation of meningeal inflammation and shifting of microglial activation toward a more neurotoxic phenotype. PMID:25348636

  17. Leukocyte Attraction by CCL20 and Its Receptor CCR6 in Humans and Mice with Pneumococcal Meningitis

    PubMed Central

    Angele, Barbara; Geldhoff, Madelijn; Marquez, Gabriel; Varona, Rosa; Häcker, Georg; Schmetzer, Helga; Häcker, Hans; Hammerschmidt, Sven; van der Ende, Arie; Pfister, Hans-Walter

    2014-01-01

    We previously identified CCL20 as an early chemokine in the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) of patients with pneumococcal meningitis but its functional relevance was unknown. Here we studied the role of CCL20 and its receptor CCR6 in pneumococcal meningitis. In a prospective nationwide study, CCL20 levels were significantly elevated in the CSF of patients with pneumococcal meningitis and correlated with CSF leukocyte counts. CCR6-deficient mice with pneumococcal meningitis and WT mice with pneumococcal meningitis treated with anti-CCL20 antibodies both had reduced CSF white blood cell counts. The reduction in CSF pleocytosis was also accompanied by an increase in brain bacterial titers. Additional in vitro experiments showed direct chemoattractant activity of CCL20 for granulocytes. In summary, our results identify the CCL20-CCR6 axis as an essential component of the innate immune defense against pneumococcal meningitis, controlling granulocyte recruitment. PMID:24699535

  18. Comparative proteomics of cerebrospinal fluid reveals a predictive model for differential diagnosis of pneumococcal, meningococcal, and enteroviral meningitis, and novel putative therapeutic targets

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Background Meningitis is the inflammation of the meninges in response to infection or chemical agents. While aseptic meningitis, most frequently caused by enteroviruses, is usually benign with a self-limiting course, bacterial meningitis remains associated with high morbidity and mortality rates, despite advances in antimicrobial therapy and intensive care. Fast and accurate differential diagnosis is crucial for assertive choice of the appropriate therapeutic approach for each form of meningitis. Methods We used 2D-PAGE and mass spectrometry to identify the cerebrospinal fluid proteome specifically related to the host response to pneumococcal, meningococcal, and enteroviral meningitis. The disease-specific proteome signatures were inspected by pathway analysis. Results Unique cerebrospinal fluid proteome signatures were found to the three aetiological forms of meningitis investigated, and a qualitative predictive model with four protein markers was developed for the differential diagnosis of these diseases. Nevertheless, pathway analysis of the disease-specific proteomes unveiled that Kallikrein-kinin system may play a crucial role in the pathophysiological mechanisms leading to brain damage in bacterial meningitis. Proteins taking part in this cellular process are proposed as putative targets to novel adjunctive therapies. Conclusions Comparative proteomics of cerebrospinal fluid disclosed candidate biomarkers, which were combined in a qualitative and sequential predictive model with potential to improve the differential diagnosis of pneumococcal, meningococcal and enteroviral meningitis. Moreover, we present the first evidence of the possible implication of Kallikrein-kinin system in the pathophysiology of bacterial meningitis. PMID:26040285

  19. Methods of rapid diagnosis for the etiology of meningitis in adults

    PubMed Central

    Bahr, Nathan C; Boulware, David R

    2014-01-01

    Infectious meningitis may be due to bacterial, mycobacterial, fungal or viral agents. Diagnosis of meningitis must take into account numerous items of patient history and symptomatology along with regional epidemiology and basic cerebrospinal fluid testing (protein, etc.) to allow the clinician to stratify the likelihood of etiology possibilities and rationally select additional diagnostic tests. Culture is the mainstay for diagnosis in many cases, but technology is evolving to provide more rapid, reliable diagnosis. The cryptococcal antigen lateral flow assay (Immuno-Mycologics) has revolutionized diagnosis of cryptococcosis and automated nucleic acid amplification assays hold promise for improving diagnosis of bacterial and mycobacterial meningitis. This review will focus on a holistic approach to diagnosis of meningitis as well as recent technological advances. PMID:25402579

  20. Detection of single bacteria - causative agents of meningitis using raman microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baikova, T. V.; Minaeva, S. A.; Sundukov, A. V.; Svistunova, T. S.; Bagratashvili, V. N.; Alushin, M. V.; Gonchukov, S. A.

    2015-03-01

    Early diagnostics of meningitis is a very topical problem as it is a fulminant disease with a high level of mortality. The progress of this disease is, as a rule, accompanied by the appearance of bacteria in the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) composition. The examination of the CSF is well known to be the only reliable approach to the identification of meningitis. However, the traditional biochemical analyses are time consuming and not always reliable, simple, and inexpensive, whereas the optical methods are poorly developed. This work is devoted to the study of Raman spectra of several bacterial cultures which are mainly present during meningitis. Raman microscopy is a prompt and noninvasive technique capable of providing reliable information about molecular-level alterations of biological objects at their minimal quantity and size. It was shown that there are characteristic lines in Raman spectra which can be the reliable markers for determination of bacterial form of meningitis at a level of a single bacterium.

  1. Neonatal Pasteurella multocida subsp. septica Meningitis Traced to Household Cats: Molecular Linkage Analysis Using Repetitive-Sequence-Based PCR

    PubMed Central

    Freij, Bishara J.; Robinson-Dunn, Barbara; Makin, Jacob; Runge, Jessica K.; Luna, Ruth Ann

    2015-01-01

    Pasteurella multocida is a rare cause of neonatal bacterial meningitis. We describe such a case and verify two household cats as the source of infection using repetitive-element PCR (rep-PCR) molecular fingering. PMID:26491173

  2. Haemophilus type B meningitis in Saudi children under 5 years old.

    PubMed

    Al-Mazrou, Yagob Y; Al-Jeffri, Mohamed H; Al-Haggar, Sami H; Musa, Elgeili K; Mohamed, Omer M; Abdalla, Mohamed N

    2004-06-01

    This study was designed to determine the magnitude of bacterial meningitis in general and Hib meningitis in particular among children below the age of 5 years. A population-based, prospective descriptive and analytical study was conducted in five regions, one each in northern, southern, eastern, western, and central parts of Saudi Arabia. Active surveillance for cases of bacterial meningitis among the study population, which comprised 171,818 children under 5 years of age, was implemented. A total of 208 cases of meningitis were identified, of which 141 (67.8 per cent) were identified with a definite causative organism. The remaining 67 cases (32 per cent) were labeled as aseptic meningitis. The overall incidence of meningitis was 60.53/10(5) in under-fives with a disease spectrum similar to that reported in studies conducted in other countries. The three leading causes of meningitis were Hib (Haemophilus influenzae type B), MCM (Neisseria menigitides) and SPN (Streptococcus pneumoniae). Hib meningitis constituted 28 per cent of cases with an incidence rate of 16.88/10(5) children. There was a marked regional variation in Hib incidence. MCM was the second leading cause (18 per cent) of meningitis with an incidence of 10.77/10(5) while SPN comprised 11 per cent of cases and its incidence was 9.69/10(5). Almost all MCM cases were related to meningitis outbreaks that occurred in Saudi Arabia during two successive Hajj seasons (2000-2001). Hib cases showed a bimodal seasonality, one peak during March-May, the other during September-November. The fact that this study is the first national base-line data on meningitis in general and Hib incidence in particular, has augmented further justification for introducing Hib vaccine within the national Expanded Program on Immunization (EPI). Based on the experience gained during this study regarding surveillance of meningitis disease, optimal methods to strengthen meningitis surveillance were identified. A model of Meningitis

  3. Clinical and laboratory features of Streptococcus salivarius meningitis: a case report and literature review.

    PubMed

    Wilson, Megan; Martin, Ryan; Walk, Seth T; Young, Carol; Grossman, Sylvia; McKean, Erin Lin; Aronoff, David M

    2012-02-01

    Streptococcus salivarius is a normal member of the human oral microbiome that is an uncommon cause of invasive infections. Meningitis is a rare but increasingly reported infection caused by S. salivarius. Despite the growing number of reported cases, a comprehensive review of the literature on S. salivarius meningitis is lacking. We sought to gain a better understanding of the clinical presentation, evaluation, management, and outcome of S. salivarius meningitis by analyzing previously reported cases. In addition to a single case reported here, 64 previously published cases of meningitis were identified for this review. The collected data confirm that most patients presented with classical signs and symptoms of bacterial meningitis with a predominance of neutrophils in the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) and hypoglycorrhachia. The majority of cases followed iatrogenic or traumatic CSF contamination. Most cases were diagnosed by CSF culture within one day of symptom onset. There was no clear evidence of predisposing co-morbid conditions in patients with meningitis, although in most case reports, limited information was given on the medical history of each patient. Outcomes were generally favorable with antibiotic management. Clinicians should suspect S. salivarius meningitis in patients presenting acutely after medical or surgical procedures involving the meninges.

  4. Clinical and Laboratory Features of Streptococcus salivarius Meningitis: A Case Report and Literature Review

    PubMed Central

    Wilson, Megan; Martin, Ryan; Walk, Seth T.; Young, Carol; Grossman, Sylvia; McKean, Erin Lin; Aronoff, David M.

    2012-01-01

    Streptococcus salivarius is a normal member of the human oral microbiome that is an uncommon cause of invasive infections. Meningitis is a rare but increasingly reported infection caused by S. salivarius. Despite the growing number of reported cases, a comprehensive review of the literature on S. salivarius meningitis is lacking. We sought to gain a better understanding of the clinical presentation, evaluation, management, and outcome of S. salivarius meningitis by analyzing previously reported cases. In addition to a single case reported here, 64 previously published cases of meningitis were identified for this review. The collected data confirm that most patients presented with classical signs and symptoms of bacterial meningitis with a predominance of neutrophils in the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) and hypoglycorrhachia. The majority of cases followed iatrogenic or traumatic CSF contamination. Most cases were diagnosed by CSF culture within one day of symptom onset. There was no clear evidence of predisposing co-morbid conditions in patients with meningitis, although in most case reports, limited information was given on the medical history of each patient. Outcomes were generally favorable with antibiotic management. Clinicians should suspect S. salivarius meningitis in patients presenting acutely after medical or surgical procedures involving the meninges. PMID:21817122

  5. Absence of jolt accentuation of headache cannot accurately rule out meningitis in adults.

    PubMed

    Tamune, Hidetaka; Takeya, Hiroaki; Suzuki, Wakako; Tagashira, Yasuaki; Kuki, Takaie; Nakamura, Mitsuhiro

    2013-11-01

    Meningitis is a common emergency disease. Signs and symptoms easily observed at the bedside are needed because early recognition of the possibility of meningitis is necessary for the decision to perform lumbar puncture. Jolt accentuation of headache has been reported to be the most sensitive diagnostic test; however, limited articles have reproduced its sensitivity. This is a single-center retrospective medical record review between 2007 and 2012. We diagnosed meningitis based on the criterion standard that cerebrospinal fluid total cells is more than 5/mm(3), in accordance with previous studies. All diagnostic and management decisions including Kernig sign, nuchal rigidity, and jolt accentuation of headache were at the physician's discretion. We calculated the sensitivity and specificity of well-known signs and symptoms of meningitis and, especially, compared the efficacy of jolt accentuation of headache with previous studies. We investigated 531 adult patients who were suspected of meningitis and had lumbar puncture performed. Of these patients, 139 had meningitis. Background characteristics and vital signs were not clinically different between the 2 groups, although classic tetralogy of bacterial meningitis (fever, nuchal rigidity, mental disturbance, and headache) was worth investigated. The sensitivity and specificity of jolt accentuation of headache were 63.9% (95% confidence interval, 51.9%-76.0%) and 43.2% (34.7%-51.6%), respectively. The absence of jolt accentuation of headache test cannot, on its own, accurately rule out meningitis in adults. Further studies are warranted to reproduce this result and to discover better bedside diagnostic tests. © 2013.

  6. A review of tuberculous meningitis at Auckland City Hospital, New Zealand.

    PubMed

    Anderson, N E; Somaratne, J; Mason, D F; Holland, D; Thomas, M G

    2010-08-01

    The clinical features, investigations, treatment and outcome were studied in 104 patients with definite or probable tuberculous meningitis. The diagnosis of definite tuberculous meningitis required the growth of Mycobacterium tuberculosis from cultures, or a positive polymerase chain reaction (PCR) assay for M. tuberculosis. In probable tuberculous meningitis, cultures and the PCR assay were negative, but other causes of meningitis were excluded and there was a response to anti-tuberculosis treatment. Of the 104 patients, 36% had a poor outcome (severe disability, persistent vegetative state or death), 12% moderate disability and 52% good recovery. A diagnosis of definite tuberculous meningitis, the severity of the symptoms at presentation and the occurrence of a stroke were significant predictors of a poor outcome. The most common reasons for a delayed diagnosis were presentation with mild symptoms wrongly attributed to a systemic infection, incorrectly attributing CSF abnormalities to non-tuberculous bacterial meningitis and failure to diagnose extraneural tuberculosis associated with meningitis. Recognition of the difficulties in making a diagnosis of tuberculous meningitis may facilitate earlier diagnosis in the future.

  7. Threshold shift: effects of cochlear implantation on the risk of pneumococcal meningitis

    PubMed Central

    Wei, Benjamin P.C.; Shepherd, Robert K.; Robins-Browne, Roy M.; Clark, Graeme M.; O'Leary, Stephen J.

    2007-01-01

    Objectives To examine whether cochlear implantation increases the risk of meningitis in the absence of other risk factors, and to understand the pathogenesis of pneumococcal meningitis post cochlear implantation. Study Design and Setting A quantitative threshold model in rats was established to examine how the presence of a cochlear implant and surgical insertion trauma alter the risk of pneumococcal meningitis post implantation from all potential routes of infection from the upper respiratory mucosa to the meninges. Results The presence of a cochlear implant reduced the threshold of bacteria required to cause pneumococcal meningitis from all routes of infection (hematogenous, the middle ear and inner ear) in healthy animals. Mild electrode insertion trauma did not alter the threshold of infection. Conclusion Our animal model has demonstrated that cochlear implantation is an independent risk factor for pneumococcal meningitis. The presence of a foreign body such as a cochlear implant increases the risk of pneumococcal meningitis regardless of the routes of bacterial infection. Significance Early detection and treatment of pneumococcal infection such as otitis media may be required in implant recipients as the experimental data suggest that the cochlear implantation leads to a reduction of threshold for meningitis. PMID:17418257

  8. Effects of inner ear trauma on the risk of pneumococcal meningitis

    PubMed Central

    Wei, Benjamin P.C.; Shepherd, Robert K.; Robins-Browne, Roy M.; Clark, Graeme M.; O'Leary, Stephen J.

    2007-01-01

    Objectives To examine the risk of pneumococcal meningitis in healthy rats that received either a severe surgical trauma to the modiolus and osseous spiral lamina or the standard insertion technique for acute cochlear implantation. Designs Interventional animal studies. Subjects 54 otologically normal, adult, Hooded Wistar rats. Interventions 54 rats (18 which received a cochleostomy alone, 18 which received a cochleostomy and acute cochlear implantation using standard surgical techniques, and 18 which received a cochleostomy followed by severe inner ear trauma) were infected four weeks following surgery with S. pneumoniae via three different routes (hematogenous, middle ear and inner ear) to represent all potential routes of bacterial infection from the upper respiratory tract to the meninges in cochlear implant recipients with meningitis. Results Severe trauma to the osseous spiral lamina and modiolus increased the risk of pneumococcal meningitis when the bacteria were given via the middle or inner ear (Fisher’s exact test P<0.05). However, the risk of meningitis did not change when the bacteria were given via the hematogenous route. Acute electrode insertion did not alter the risk of subsequent pneumococcal meningitis for any route of infection. Conclusion Severe inner ear surgical trauma to the osseous spiral lamina and modiolus can increase the risk of pneumococcal meningitis. Therefore every effort should be made to ensure that cochlear implant design and insertion technique cause minimal trauma to the bony structures of the inner ear in order to reduce the risk of pneumococcal meningitis. PMID:17372082

  9. [Etiologic diagnosis in meningitis and encephalitis molecular biology techniques].

    PubMed

    Conca, Natalia; Santolaya, María Elena; Farfan, Mauricio J; Cofré, Fernanda; Vergara, Alejandra; Salazar, Liliana; Torres, Juan Pablo

    2016-01-01

    The aetiological study of infections of the central nervous system has traditionally been performed using bacterial cultures and, more recently, using polymerase chain reaction (PCR) for herpes simplex virus (HSV). Bacterial cultures may not have good performance, especially in the context of patients who have received antibiotics prior to sampling, and a request for HSV only by PCR reduces the information to only one aetiological agent. The aim of this study is to determine the infectious causes of meningitis and encephalitis, using traditional microbiology and molecular biology to improve the aetiological diagnosis of these diseases. A prospective study was conducted on 19 patients with suspected meningitis, admitted to the Luis Calvo Mackenna Hospital in Santiago, Chile, from March 1, 2011 to March 30, 2012. After obtaining informed consent, the CSF samples underwent cytochemical study, conventional culture, multiplex PCR for the major producing bacterial meningitis (N. meningitidis, S. pneumoniae, H. influenzae), real-time single PCR for HSV-1 and 2, VZV, EBV, CMV, HHV-6 and enterovirus. Clinical and epidemiological data were also collected from the clinical records. Of the 19 patients analysed, 2 were diagnosed by conventional methods and 7 by adding molecular biology (increase to 37%). Three patients had meningitis due to S. pneumoniae, one due to Enterobacter cloacae, 2 patients meningoencephalitis HSV-1, and one VZV meningitis. The addition of PCR to conventional diagnostic methods in CNS infections increases the probability of finding the causal agent. This allows a more adequate, timely and rational management of the disease. Copyright © 2014. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U.

  10. Scrub Typhus Meningitis or Meningoencephalitis

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Dong-Min; Chung, Jong-Hoon; Yun, Na-Ra; Kim, Seok Won; Lee, Jun-Young; Han, Mi Ah; Lee, Yong-Bok

    2013-01-01

    Orientia tsutsugamushi induces vasculitis leading to symptoms of systemic organ invasion including meningitis and meningoencephalitis. We conducted a retrospective case-control study of scrub typhus patients to investigate the clinical and laboratory features of patients with scrub typhus meningitis or meningoencephalitis, and the therapeutic outcomes, and to determine the predictor factors. Cases were 22 patients with scrub typhus meningitis or meningoencephalitis, and controls were 303 patients without meningitis or meningoencephalitis. Multivariate analysis showed that the presence of pneumonitis was associated with the occurrence of scrub typhus meningitis and meningoencephalitis (odds ratio [OR] 8.9; P < 0.001; confidence interval [CI] 2.9–27.2). Although appropriate antimicrobials such as doxycycline agents were administered at an early stage, meningitis or meningoencephalitis still occurred in some cases. Physicians should be aware that meningitis or meningoencephalitis may develop during appropriate drug therapy such as doxycycline. Close observation and great care are essential for patients with risk factors, particularly pneumonitis. PMID:24166036

  11. Drug-resistant tuberculous meningitis.

    PubMed

    Garg, Ravindra K; Jain, Amita; Malhotra, Hardeep S; Agrawal, Avinash; Garg, Rajiv

    2013-06-01

    Drug-resistant tuberculosis, including drug-resistant tuberculous meningitis, is an emerging health problem in many countries. An association with Beijing strains and drug resistance-related mutations, such as mutations in katG and rpoB genes, has been found. The pathology, clinical features and neuroimaging characteristics of drug-resistant tuberculous meningitis are similar to drug-responsive tuberculous meningitis. Detection of mycobacteria in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) by conventional methods (smear examination or culture) is often difficult. Nucleic acid amplification assays are better methods owing to their rapidity and high sensitivity. The Xpert MTB/RIF assay (Cepheid, CA, USA) is a fully-automated test that has also been found to be effective for CSF samples. Treatment of multidrug-resistant tuberculous meningitis depends on the drug susceptibility pattern of the isolate and/or the previous treatment history of the patient. Second-line drugs with good penetration of the CSF should be preferred. Isoniazid monoresistant disease requires addition of another drug with better CSF penetration. Drug-resistant tuberculous meningitis is associated with a high mortality. HIV infected patients with drug-resistant tuberculous meningitis have severe clinical manifestations with exceptionally high mortality. Prevention of tuberculosis is the key to reduce drug-resistant tuberculous meningitis.

  12. Analysis of clinical information and reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction for early diagnosis of enteroviral meningitis

    PubMed Central

    Jin, Dahee; Heo, Tae Hoon; Byeon, Jung Hye; Kim, Gun-Ha; Kim, Mi Kyung; Eun, So-Hee

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Meningitis is among the most common infections affecting the central nervous system. It can be difficult to determine the exact pathogen responsible for the infection and patients are often treated with empiric antibiotics. This study was conducted to identify the most common clinical characteristics of enteroviral meningitis in children and evaluate the diagnostic efficacy of reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) for early detection of an enterovirus. Methods We analyzed the medical records of children admitted to Korea University Medical Center and diagnosed with meningitis on the basis of cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) analysis and RT-PCR from CSF and other samples from January 2010 to August 2013. Results A total of 333 patients were enrolled and classified into four groups based on diagnosis: enteroviral meningitis (n=110), bacterial meningitis (n=23), other viral meningitis (n=36), and unknown etiology (n=164). Patients with bacterial meningitis were younger than those in the other groups (P<0.001). Pleocytosis in CSF was similar across all groups. Of patients in the enteroviral meningitis group, 92.7% were diagnosed based on RT-PCR findings. Mean length of hospital stay for patients with enteroviral meningitis was 6.08 days, which was significantly shorter than that for patients with meningitis of bacterial etiology (19.73 days, P<0.001). Conclusion Diagnosis of enteroviral meningitis before viral culture results are available is possible using RT-PCR. Accurate diagnosis reduces the length of hospital stay and helps to avoid unnecessary empiric antibiotic treatment. PMID:26692881

  13. Comparative evaluation of the FilmArray meningitis/encephalitis molecular panel in a pediatric population.

    PubMed

    Graf, Erin H; Farquharson, Maria Victoria; Cárdenas, Ana María

    2017-01-01

    We compared an FDA cleared molecular meningitis/encephalitis panel to lab developed viral PCRs and bacterial culture. Of the 67 viral PCR or bacterial culture-positive samples, 92.5% were positive for the same target by the panel. Of the 66 negative samples tested, no targets were detected by the panel, for an agreement of 96.2%.

  14. Outcome of meningitis caused by Streptococcus pneumoniae and Haemophilus influenzae type b in children in The Gambia.

    PubMed

    Goetghebuer, T; West, T E; Wermenbol, V; Cadbury, A L; Milligan, P; Lloyd-Evans, N; Adegbola, R A; Mulholland, E K; Greenwood, B M; Weber, M W

    2000-03-01

    In developing countries, endemic childhood meningitis is a severe disease caused most commonly by Streptococcus pneumoniae or Haemophilus influenzae type b (Hib). Although many studies have shown that fatality rates associated with meningitis caused by these organisms are high in developing countries, little is known about the long-term outcome of survivors. The purpose of this study was to assess the importance of disabilities following pneumococcal and Hib meningitis in The Gambia. 257 children aged 0-12 years hospitalized between 1990 and 1995 with culture-proven S. pneumoniae (n = 134) or Hib (n = 123) meningitis were included retrospectively in the study. 48% of children with pneumococcal meningitis and 27% of children with Hib meningitis died whilst in hospital. Of the 160 survivors, 89 (55%) were followed up between September 1996 and October 1997. Of the children with pneumococcal meningitis that were traced, 58% had clinical sequelae; half of them had major disabilities preventing normal adaptation to social life. 38% of survivors of Hib meningitis had clinical sequelae, a quarter of whom had major disabilities. Major handicaps found were hearing loss, mental retardation, motor abnormalities and seizures. These data show that despite treatment with effective antibiotics, pneumococcal and Hib meningitis kill many Gambian children and leave many survivors with severe sequelae. Hib vaccination is now given routinely in The Gambia; an effective pneumococcal vaccine is needed.

  15. Possibility of diagnosing meningitis by gas chromatography: cryptococcal meningitis.

    PubMed Central

    Schlossberg, D; Brooks, J B; Shulman, J

    1976-01-01

    Cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) from eight patients with cryptococcal meningitis, from ten patients with viral meningitis, and from four control patients without meningitis were analyzed by electron-capture gas-liquid chromatography (EC-GLC). All cryptococcal specimens had similar EC-GLC profiles, and these differed from those of the controls. Viral EC-GLC patterns were different from those obtained with specimens from the patients with cryptococcal infection and from the controls. In addition, specimens from patients with various types of viral infections gave profiles that differed from each other. Two normal CSFs were inoculated with Cryptococcus neoformans; aliquots of these cultures showed an EC-GLC pattern very similar to that seen in CSF of patients with cryptococcal meningitis. The EC-GLC procedure is rapid, reproducible, and easy to perform and may hold promise as an additional aid in the diagnosis of cryptococcal infection. PMID:773956

  16. Diagnostic Accuracy of Intracellular Mycobacterium tuberculosis Detection for Tuberculous Meningitis

    PubMed Central

    Feng, Guo-dong; Shi, Ming; Ma, Lei; Chen, Ping; Wang, Bing-ju; Zhang, Min; Chang, Xiao-lin; Su, Xiu-chu; Yang, Yi-ning; Fan, Xin-hong; Dai, Wen; Liu, Ting-ting; He, Ying; Bian, Ting; Duan, Li-xin; Li, Jin-ge; Hao, Xiao-ke; Liu, Jia-yun; Xue, Xin; Song, Yun-zhang; Wu, Hai-qin; Niu, Guo-qiang; Zhang, Li; Han, Cui-juan; Lin, Hong; Lin, Zhi-hui; Liu, Jian-jun; Jian, Qian; Zhang, Jin-she; Tian, Ye; Zhou, Bai-yu; Wang, Jing; Xue, Chang-hu; Han, Xiao-fang; Wang, Jian-feng; Wang, Shou-lian

    2014-01-01

    Rationale: Early diagnosis and treatment of tuberculous meningitis saves lives, but current laboratory diagnostic tests lack sensitivity. Objectives: We investigated whether the detection of intracellular bacteria by a modified Ziehl-Neelsen stain and early secretory antigen target (ESAT)-6 in cerebrospinal fluid leukocytes improves tuberculous meningitis diagnosis. Methods: Cerebrospinal fluid specimens from patients with suspected tuberculous meningitis were stained by conventional Ziehl-Neelsen stain, a modified Ziehl-Neelsen stain involving cytospin slides with Triton processing, and an ESAT-6 immunocytochemical stain. Acid-fast bacteria and ESAT-6–expressing leukocytes were detected by microscopy. All tests were performed prospectively in a central laboratory by experienced technicians masked to the patients’ final diagnosis. Measurements and Main Results: Two hundred and eighty patients with suspected tuberculous meningitis were enrolled. Thirty-seven had Mycobacterium tuberculosis cultured from cerebrospinal fluid; 40 had a microbiologically confirmed alternative diagnosis; the rest had probable or possible tuberculous meningitis according to published criteria. Against a clinical diagnostic gold standard the sensitivity of conventional Ziehl-Neelsen stain was 3.3% (95% confidence interval, 1.6–6.7%), compared with 82.9% (95% confidence interval, 77.4–87.3%) for modified Ziehl-Neelsen stain and 75.1% (95% confidence interval, 68.8–80.6%) for ESAT-6 immunostain. Intracellular bacteria were seen in 87.8% of the slides positive by the modified Ziehl-Neelsen stain. The specificity of modified Ziehl-Neelsen and ESAT-6 stain was 85.0% (95% confidence interval, 69.4–93.8%) and 90.0% (95% confidence interval, 75.4–96.7%), respectively. Conclusions: Enhanced bacterial detection by simple modification of the Ziehl-Neelsen stain and an ESAT-6 intracellular stain improve the laboratory diagnosis of tuberculous meningitis. PMID:24450377

  17. Exome Array Analysis of Susceptibility to Pneumococcal Meningitis

    PubMed Central

    Kloek, Anne T.; van Setten, Jessica; van der Ende, Arie; Bots, Michiel L.; Asselbergs, Folkert W.; Serón, Mercedes Valls; Brouwer, Matthijs C.; van de Beek, Diederik; Ferwerda, Bart

    2016-01-01

    Host genetic variability may contribute to susceptibility of bacterial meningitis, but which genes contribute to the susceptibility to this complex disease remains undefined. We performed a genetic association study in 469 community-acquired pneumococcal meningitis cases and 2072 population-based controls from the Utrecht Health Project in order to find genetic variants associated with pneumococcal meningitis susceptibility. A HumanExome BeadChip was used to genotype 102,097 SNPs in the collected DNA samples. Associations were tested with the Fisher exact test. None of the genetic variants tested reached Bonferroni corrected significance (p-value <5 × 10−7). Our strongest signals associated with susceptibility to pneumococcal meningitis were rs139064549 on chromosome 1 in the COL11A1 gene (p = 1.51 × 10−6; G allele OR 3.21 [95% CI 2.05–5.02]) and rs9309464 in the EXOC6B gene on chromosome 2 (p = 6.01 × 10−5; G allele OR 0.66 [95% CI 0.54–0.81]). The sequence kernel association test (SKAT) tests for associations between multiple variants in a gene region and pneumococcal meningitis susceptibility yielded one significant associated gene namely COL11A1 (p = 1.03 × 10−7). Replication studies are needed to validate these results. If replicated, the functionality of these genetic variations should be further studied to identify by which means they influence the pathophysiology of pneumococcal meningitis. PMID:27389768

  18. Spinal perineurial and meningeal cysts

    PubMed Central

    Tarlov, I. M.

    1970-01-01

    Perineurial cysts may be responsible for clinical symptoms and a cure effected by their removal. They do not fill on initial myelography but may fill with Pantopaque some time, days or weeks, after Pantopaque has been instilled into the subarachnoid space. Perineurial cysts arise at the site of the posterior root ganglion. The cyst wall is composed of neural tissue. When initial myelography fails to reveal an adequate cause for the patient's symptoms and signs referable to the caudal nerve roots, then about a millilitre of Pantopaque should be left in the canal for delayed myelography which may later reveal a sacral perineurial cyst or, occasionally, a meningeal cyst. Meningeal diverticula occur proximal to the posterior root ganglia and usually fill on initial myelography. They are in free communication with the subarachnoid space and are rarely in my experience responsible for clinical symptoms. Meningeal diverticula and meningeal cysts appear to represent a continuum. Pantopaque left in the subarachnoid space may convert a meningeal diverticulum into an expanding symptomatic meningeal cyst, as in the case described. Many cases described as perineurial cysts represent abnormally long arachnoidal prolongations over nerve roots or meningeal diverticula. In general, neither of the latter is of pathological significance. Perineurial, like meningeal cysts and diverticula, may be asymptomatic. They should be operated upon only if they produce progressive or disabling symptoms or signs clearly attributable to them. When myelography must be done, and this should be done only as a preliminary to a probable necessary operation, then patient effort should be made to remove the Pantopaque. Images PMID:5531903

  19. Severe Cysticercal Meningitis: Clinical and Imaging Characteristics

    PubMed Central

    Cárdenas, Graciela; Jung, Helgi; Ríos, Camilo; Fleury, Agnes; Soto-Hernández, José Luís

    2010-01-01

    In disease-endemic areas, severe cysticercal meningitis (SCM) is characterized by intense inflammatory cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) and negative bacterial and fungal cultures. There have been no systematic studies of SCM. We characterized patients with SCM and compare them with neurocysticercosis (NC) patients with mild CSF abnormalities by conducting a nine-year retrospective review at a neurological referral center. Two groups of patients were compared: group A, those with severe CSF pleocytosis > 1,000 cells/mm3 (n = 12), and group B, those with CSF pleocytosis ≤ 1,000 cells/mm3 (n = 126). All patients had positive CSF results in an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay for cysticercal antigens and negative CSF cultures for bacteria, fungi, and mycobacteria. Intracranial hypertension, meningeal signs, CSF hypoglycorrachia, and a longer clinical course of NC were more frequently seen in group A. It is likely that SCM often goes unrecognized. Its correct identification may reduce morbidity and risks of unnecessary surgery in patients with chronic NC and CSF shunts. PMID:20065006

  20. Gemifloxacin Is Effective in Experimental Pneumococcal Meningitis

    PubMed Central

    Smirnov, A.; Wellmer, A.; Gerber, J.; Maier, K.; Henne, S.; Nau, R.

    2000-01-01

    In a rabbit model of Streptococcus pneumoniae meningitis, 5 mg of gemifloxacin mesylate (SB-265805) per kg/h reduced the bacterial titers in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) almost as rapidly as 10 mg of ceftriaxone per kg/h (Δlog CFU/ml/h ± standard deviation [SD], −0.25 ± 0.09 versus −0.38 ± 0.11; serum and CSF concentrations of gemifloxacin were 2.1 ± 1.4 mg/liter and 0.59 ± 0.38 mg/liter, respectively, at 24 h). Coadministration of 1 mg of dexamethasone per kg did not affect gemifloxacin serum and CSF levels (2.7 ± 1.4 mg/liter and 0.75 ± 0.34 mg/liter, respectively, at 24 h) or activity (Δlog CFU/ml/h ± SD, −0.26 ± 0.11). PMID:10681354

  1. Cerebrospinal fluid outflow resistance in rabbits with experimental meningitis. Alterations with penicillin and methylprednisolone.

    PubMed Central

    Scheld, W M; Dacey, R G; Winn, H R; Welsh, J E; Jane, J A; Sande, M A

    1980-01-01

    Acute bacterial meningitis may be associated with increased intracranial pressure, neurological sequelae such as communicating hydrocephalus, and a slow response to antibiotic therapy. Alterations in cerebrospinal hydrodynamics are at least partially responsible for these complications. Constant, low-flow short-duration manometric infusion studies through a hollow-bore pressure monitoring device in direct continuity with the supracortical subarachnoid space were performed in rabbits with experimental meningitis. Maximal resistance to cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) outflow from the subarachnoid to vascular space was markedly increaed in acute pneumococcal meningitis when compared to control, uninfected animals (6.77 +/- 3.52 vs. 0.26 +/- 0.04 mm Hg/microliter per min, P less than 0.001). Similar elevations (8.93 +/- 4.15 mm Hg/microliter per min were found in experimental Escherichia coli meningitis. Despite eradication of viable bacteria from the CSF by penicillin therapy during the acute stage of pneumococcal meningitis, resistance remained elevated (6.07 +/- 4.68 mm Hg/microliter per min) and had not returned to normal up to 15 d later. Administration of methylprednisolone during the early stages of acute pneumococcal meningitis reduced mean peak outflow resistance towards control values (0.59 mm Hg/microliter per min) and no "rebound" effect was apparent 24 h later. These hydrodynamic alterations in experimental meningitis prevent normal CSF absorption and decrease the ability of the bran to compensate for changes in intracranial volume and pressure. PMID:6995482

  2. [Hemangiopericytoma of the meninges].

    PubMed

    Ito, H; Hasegawa, T; Kawano, H; Shoin, K; Yamamoto, S; Matsubara, F

    1983-09-01

    A 44-year-old farmer complained blurred vision and disturbance of recent memory. During his driving car traffic accident happened due to his right homonymous hemianopsia. On the 1st admission, neurological examination revealed choked disc(1 D.), hemianopsia, memory disturbance, dyscalculia, dyslexia and dysgraphia. The angiograms showed feeding arteries from left middle cerebral artery and posterior cerebral artery. Tumor vessels looked like cork-screw in the arterial phase and homogeneous tumor shadow was depicted in late venous phase. Contrast enhancement CT scan revealed a nodular homogeneous high dense lesion on the occipital region. Hemorrhage during every craniotomy was too much to remove and at last metastasized to left II rib and right VIII rib and right radius. Their histological examination reveals numerous endothelial-lined vascular channels and atypia of tumor cells with mitoses. Silver impregnation demonstrates networks of reticulum fibers surrounding the capillaries and tumor cells. Hemangiopericytoma in meninges forms entity and our case reports the WHO classification. Total removal should have to be done once for all by means of LASER (light amplification by stimulated emission of radiation).

  3. [Normal and abnormal meningeal enhancement: MRI features].

    PubMed

    Dietemann, J L; Correia Bernardo, R; Bogorin, A; Abu Eid, M; Koob, M; Nogueira, Th; Vargas, M I; Fakhoury, W; Zöllner, G

    2005-11-01

    The authors describe normal imaging of the meninges and meningeal spaces and MR (magnetic resonance) imaging findings in tumoral and nontumoral diseases. Dural or/and pial enhancement may be related to tumoral, infectious or granulomatous diseases.

  4. Pneumococcal meningitis post cochlear implantation: development of an animal model in the guinea pig.

    PubMed

    Niedermeier, Katharina; Braun, Susanne; Fauser, Claudius; Straubinger, Reinhard K; Stark, Thomas

    2012-07-01

    In 2002 an increased number of cochlear implant related meningitis cases was reported by the U. S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA). The most commonly identified causative agent was Streptococcus pneumoniae. Although most cases of meningitis were related to a special electrode design, the risk for post-operative pneumococcal meningitis might nonetheless be enhanced by opening of the cochlea during implantation. In the present study, a threshold model for middle ear inoculation of S. pneumoniae was established in the guinea pig after cochlear implantation to assess the post-operative risk of meningitis. Guinea pigs were implanted unilaterally with a silicone cochlear implant electrode dummy. Five weeks after implantation, animals were challenged via the middle ear with a clinically relevant strain of S. pneumoniae and monitored over a period of five days for signs of meningitis. Meningitis was confirmed by clinical outcome in the animals, histological investigation of brains, as well as by pleocytosis and presence of bacteria in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF). By inoculation of varying numbers of bacteria (between 1 × 10(4) and 1 × 10(9) CFU/ml in 10 μl), a threshold model was established. The attack rate, pattern and onset of meningitis depended on number of inoculated bacteria. An increased meningitis rate in different experimental groups shows that greater bacterial burden leads to an increased attack rate after intratympanal inoculation. The established animal model provides a potential tool to assess the meningitis risk after cochlear implantation. Its implementation in future studies will allow the investigation of existing and newly developed prostheses for postoperatively infection risk.

  5. Early onset neonatal meningitis in Australia and New Zealand, 1992–2002

    PubMed Central

    May, M; Daley, A; Donath, S; Isaacs, D; on, b

    2005-01-01

    Objectives: To study the epidemiology of early onset neonatal bacterial meningitis (EONBM) in Australasia. Design: Prospective surveillance study, 1992–2002, in 20 neonatal units in Australia and New Zealand. EONBM was defined as meningitis occurring within 48 hours of delivery. Results: There were 852 babies with early onset sepsis, of whom 78 (9.2%) had EONBM. The incidence of early onset group B streptococcal meningitis fell significantly from a peak of 0.24/1000 live births in 1993 to 0.03/1000 in 2002 (p trend = 0.002). There was no significant change over time in the incidence of Escherichia coli meningitis. The rate of EONBM in very low birthweight babies was 1.09/1000 compared with the rate in all infants of 0.11/1000. The overall rate of EONBM was 0.41/1000 in 1992 and 0.06 in 2001, but this trend was not significant (p trend = 0.07). Case-fatality rates for EONBM did not change significantly with time. Birth weight <1500 g (odds ratio (OR) 7.2 (95% confidence interval (CI) 4.8 to 10.9)) and Gram negative bacillary meningitis (OR 3.3 (95% CI 2.2 to 4.9)) were significant risk factors for mortality. Sixty two percent of the 129 babies who died from early onset sepsis or suspected sepsis did not have a lumbar puncture performed. Conclusion: The incidence of early onset group B streptococcal meningitis has fallen, probably because of maternal intrapartum antibiotic prophylaxis, without a corresponding change in E coli meningitis. Gram negative bacillary meningitis still carries a worse prognosis than meningitis with a Gram positive organism. PMID:15878934

  6. The impact of protein-conjugate polysaccharide vaccines: an endgame for meningitis?

    PubMed Central

    Maiden, Martin C. J.

    2013-01-01

    The development and implementation of conjugate polysaccharide vaccines against invasive bacterial diseases, specifically those caused by the encapsulated bacteria Neisseria meningitidis, Haemophilus influenzae and Streptococcus pneumoniae, has been one of the most effective public health innovations of the last 25 years. These vaccines have resulted in significant reductions in childhood morbidity and mortality worldwide, with their effectiveness due in large part to their ability to induce long-lasting immunity in a range of age groups. At the population level this immunity reduces carriage and interrupts transmission resulting in herd immunity; however, these beneficial effects can be counterbalanced by the selection pressures that immunity against carriage can impose, potentially promoting the emergence and spread of virulent vaccine escape variants. Studies following the implementation of meningococcal serogroup C vaccines improved our understanding of these effects in relation to the biology of accidental pathogens such as the meningococcus. This understanding has enabled the refinement of the implementation of conjugate polysaccharide vaccines against meningitis-associated bacteria, and will be crucial in maintaining and improving vaccine control of these infections. To date there is little evidence for the spread of virulent vaccine escape variants of the meningococcus and H. influenzae, although this has been reported in pneumococci. PMID:23798695

  7. Meningitis is a common cause of convulsive status epilepticus with fever

    PubMed Central

    Chin, R; Neville, B; Scott, R

    2005-01-01

    Aims: In children with convulsive status epilepticus (CSE) with fever, to determine the likelihood of acute bacterial meningitis (ABM), the proportion that are treated with antibiotics, and the proportion that have diagnostic CSF sampling. Methods: Patients with an incident episode of CSE with fever were identified as part of an ongoing prospective population based study of CSE in childhood. Results: There were 49 incident cases of CSE in the first six months. Ascertainment was 96%. Twenty four had CSE with fever, 16 had early parenteral antibiotics, nine had diagnostic CSF sampling, and four had ABM. The population risk of ABM in CSE with fever was significantly higher than that of short seizures with fever (17% v 1.2%). Conclusions: The classical symptoms and signs of ABM may be absent in CSE with fever. A high index of suspicion for ABM in the child with CSE with fever is paramount. The most appropriate management is suggested to be early parenteral antibiotics and a lumbar puncture when there are no contraindications. PMID:15613516

  8. Listeria monocytogenes Meningitis Complicating Rotavirus Gastroenteritis in an Immunocompetent Child.

    PubMed

    Ohnishi, Takuma; Kawano, Akiko; Araki, Mayumi; Hamahata, Yuko; Usui, Machiko; Shimoyamada, Motoko; Tamame, Takuya; Akashi, Masayuki; Sato, Seiji

    2017-04-07

    Listeria monocytogenes only occasionally causes bacterial meningitis in immunocompetent children. We report a case of L. monocytogenes meningitis associated with rotavirus gastroenteritis. The patient was a previously healthy 20-month-old girl who was admitted because of sustained fever and lethargy after suffering from gastroenteritis for 6 days. The patient's peripheral white blood cell count was 18,600/µL and the C-reactive protein level was 2.44 mg/dL. A stool sample tested positive for rotavirus antigen. A cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) sample showed pleocytosis. Cultures of the CSF and stool samples revealed the presence of L. monocytogenes. The patient was successfully treated with ampicillin and gentamicin. We speculate that translocation of enteric flora across the intestinal epithelium that had been damaged by rotavirus gastroenteritis might have caused bacteremia that disseminated into the CSF. Both listeriosis and secondary systemic infection after rotavirus gastroenteritis are rare but not unknown. Initiation of appropriate treatment as soon as possible is important for all types of bacterial meningitis. This rare but serious complication should be taken into consideration even if the patient does not have any medical history of immune-related problems.

  9. Streptococcus gallolyticus meningitis in adults: report of five cases and review of the literature.

    PubMed

    van Samkar, A; Brouwer, M C; Pannekoek, Y; van der Ende, A; van de Beek, D

    2015-12-01

    We describe the incidence and patient characteristics of Streptococcus gallolyticus meningitis. We identified S. gallolyticus meningitis in a nationwide cohort of patients with community-acquired bacterial meningitis, and performed a systematic review and meta-analysis of all reported adult cases in the literature. Five cases were identified (0.3%) in a cohort of 1561 episodes of bacterial meningitis. In one patient, bowel disease (colon polyps) was identified as a predisposing condition for S. gallolyticus infection, whereas no patients were diagnosed with endocarditis. In a combined analysis of our patients and 37 reported in the literature, we found that the median age was 59 years. Predisposing factors were present in 21 of 42 patients (50%), and mainly consisted of immunosuppressive therapy (seven patients), cancer (four patients), and alcoholism (four patients). Colon disease was identified in 15 of 24 patients (63%) and endocarditis in five of 27 patients (18%). Co-infection with Strongyloides stercoralis was identified in 14 of 34 patients (41%), ten of whom were infected with human immunodeficiency virus or human T-lymphotropic virus. Outcomes were described for 37 patients; eight died (22%) and one (3%) had neurological sequelae. S. gallolyticus is an uncommon cause of bacterial meningitis, with specific predisposing conditions. When it is identified, consultation with a cardiologist and gastroenterologist is warranted to rule out underlying endocarditis or colon disease. Stool examinations for Strongyloides stercoralis should be performed in patients who have travelled to or originate from endemic areas.

  10. Using Relative Humidity Forecasts to Manage Meningitis in the Sahel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pandya, R. E.; Adams-Forgor, A.; Akweogno, P.; Awine, T.; Dalaba, M.; Dukic, V.; Dumont, A.; Hayden, M.; Hodgson, A.; Hopson, T. M.; Hugonnet, S.; Yoksas, T. C.

    2012-12-01

    Meningitis epidemics in the Sahel occur quasi-regularly and with devastating impact. In 2008, for example, eighty-eight thousand people contracted meningitis and over five thousand died. Until very recently, the protection provided by the only available vaccine was so limited and short-lived that the only practical strategy for vaccination was reactive: waiting until an epidemic occurred in the region and then vaccinating in that region to prevent the epidemic's further growth. Even with that strategy, there were still times when demand outpaced available vaccine. While a new vaccine has recently been developed that is effective and inexpensive enough to be used more broadly and proactively, it is only effective against the strain of bacteria that causes the most common kind of bacterial meningitis. As a result, there will likely be continued need for reactive vaccination strategies. It is widely known that meningitis epidemics in the Sahel occur only in the dry season. Our project investigated this relationship, and several independent lines of evidence demonstrate a robust relationship between the onset of the rainy season, as marked by weekly average relative humidity above 40%, and the end of meningitis epidemics. These lines of evidence include statistical analysis of two years of weekly meningitis and weather data across the Sahel, cross-correlation of ten years of meningitis and weather data in the Upper East region of northern Ghana, and high-resolution weather simulations of past meningitis seasons to interpolate available weather data. We also adapted two techniques that have been successfully used in public health studies: generalized additive models, which have been used to relate air quality and health, and a linearized version of the compartmental epidemics model that has been used to understand MRSA. Based on these multiple lines of evidence, average weekly relative humidity forecast two weeks in advance appears consistently and strongly related to

  11. Bacteroides fragilis septicaemia and meningitis in early infancy.

    PubMed Central

    Cooke, R W

    1975-01-01

    A case of recurrent Bacteroides fragilis septicaemia leading eventually to meningitis in a 6-week-old infant is reported. Perforation of the small bowel at the constriction ring of a strangulated inguinal hernia caused a faecal peritonitis and was the primary source of infection. Erythromycin, to which the isolate was fully sensitive in vitro, was only temporarily an effective treatment; the infection was finally eradicated with chloramphenicol, and the baby made a full recovery. Bacteroides infections in infancy and childhood are briefly reviewed. PMID:1147659

  12. Mannose-binding lectin-associated serine protease 2 (MASP-2) contributes to poor disease outcome in humans and mice with pneumococcal meningitis.

    PubMed

    Kasanmoentalib, E Soemirien; Valls Seron, Mercedes; Ferwerda, Bart; Tanck, Michael W; Zwinderman, Aeilko H; Baas, Frank; van der Ende, Arie; Brouwer, Matthijs C; van de Beek, Diederik

    2017-01-03

    Pneumococcal meningitis is the most common and severe form of bacterial meningitis. Fatality rates are substantial, and long-term sequelae develop in about half of survivors. Disease outcome has been related to the severity of the pro-inflammatory response in the subarachnoid space. The complement system, which mediates key inflammatory processes, has been implicated as a modulator of pneumococcal meningitis disease severity in animal studies. We investigated mannose-binding lectin-associated serine protease (MASP-2) levels in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) samples derived from the diagnostic lumbar puncture, which was available for 307 of 792 pneumococcal meningitis episodes included in our prospective nationwide cohort study (39%), and the association between these levels and clinical outcome. Subsequently, we studied the role of MASP-2 in our experimental pneumococcal meningitis mouse model using Masp2 (-/-) mice and evaluated the potential of adjuvant treatment with MASP-2-specific monoclonal antibodies in wild-type (WT) mice. MASP-2 levels in cerebrospinal fluid of patients with bacterial meningitis were correlated with poor functional outcome. Consistent with these human data, Masp2-deficient mice with pneumococcal meningitis had lower cytokine levels and increased survival compared to WT mice. Adjuvant treatment with MASP-2-specific monoclonal antibodies led to reduced complement activation and decreased disease severity. MASP-2 contributes to poor disease outcome in human and mice with pneumococcal meningitis. MASP-2-specific monoclonal antibodies can be used to attenuate the inflammatory response in pneumococcal meningitis.

  13. Epidemiology of meningitis due to Haemophilus influenzae type b in children in Bulgaria: a prospective, population-based surveillance study.

    PubMed Central

    Kojouharova, Mira; Gatcheva, Nina; Setchanova, Lena; Robertson, Susan E.; Wenger, Jay D.

    2002-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To assess the incidence of meningitis caused by Haemophilus influenzae type b (Hib) among children in Bulgaria and to provide evidence for an informed decision on the use of Hib vaccines in Bulgaria. METHODS: From 1 July 1997 to 31 December 1999, active surveillance for meningitis was conducted in six regions. For children with suspected meningitis, a cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) specimen was sent for cytology, chemistry, latex agglutination testing, culture and sensitivity. FINDINGS: During the 2.5-year study period, surveillance was conducted among 138 249 children aged <5 years - a sample representing 40% of all Bulgarian children in this age group. Overall, 285 children with suspected meningitis were identified. In eight children, clinical symptoms of meningitis resolved rapidly before a CSF specimen could be obtained. Of the remaining 277 children, 121 (44%) were classified as having probable bacterial meningitis on the basis of a CSF examination. An organism was identified for 88 (73%) of the 121 cases with probable bacterial meningitis. There were 21 cases of Hib, giving a mean annual incidence of 6.1 Hib meningitis cases per 100 000 children <5 years; the case-fatality rate was 10%. Nearly 60% of Hib isolates were resistant to one or more antibiotics, but they were not resistant to third-generation cephalosporins. CONCLUSION: On the basis of these findings, Hib conjugate vaccines have been included in the list of vaccines recommended for children by the Bulgarian Ministry of Health. The recommended initial treatment for paediatric bacterial meningitis has been changed to third-generation cephalosporins. PMID:12378285

  14. African meningitis belt pneumococcal disease epidemiology indicates a need for an effective serotype 1 containing vaccine, including for older children and adults

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    meningitis belt, Sp is as important a cause of meningitis as Neisseria meningitidis, particularly among older children and working age adults. The meningitis belt population needs an effective serotype 1 containing vaccine and policy discussions should consider vaccine use outside of early childhood. PMID:20146815

  15. Aseptic meningitis in a patient taking etanercept for rheumatoid arthritis: a case report

    PubMed Central

    Booker, Matthew J; Flint, Julia; Saravana, Shanmugam

    2008-01-01

    Background We report a case of a 53 year old lady recently commenced on etanercept, an anti-TNF (tumour necrosis factor) therapy for rheumatoid arthritis presenting with confusion, pyrexia and an erythematous rash. Case presentation A lumbar puncture was highly suggestive of bacterial meningitis, but CSF cultures produced no growth, and polymerase chain reactions (PCR) for all previously reported bacterial, fungal and viral causes of meningitis were negative. Conclusion This case report describes aseptic meningitis as a previously unreported complication of etanercept therapy, and serves as a reminder of the rare but potentially life-threatening risk of serious infections in patients taking anti-TNF therapy for a variety of conditions. PMID:19046446

  16. Cryptococcal meningitis in immunocompetent children.

    PubMed

    Yuanjie, Zhu; Jianghan, Chen; Nan, Xu; Xiaojun, Wang; Hai, Wen; Wanqing, Liao; Julin, Gu

    2012-03-01

    To describe clinical characteristics, treatment and outcome of cryptococcal meningitis in immunocompetent children. Immunocompetent children with cryptococcal meningitis who attended Changzheng Hospital between 1998 and 2007 were retrospectively reviewed. During the 10 years reviewed, 11 children with cryptococcal meningitis were admitted to Changzheng hospital and identified as immunocompetent. The 11 children had a median age of 7.25 years. Headache (100%), fever (81.8%), nausea or vomiting (63.6%) and visual or hearing damage or loss (36.4%) were the most common symptoms before treatment. There is no evidence for other site infection of cryptococcus although all the cryptococcal antigen titre is high in blood. All the patients received amphotericin B or AmB liposome with 5-flucytosine for at least 6 weeks followed by fluconazole or itraconazole as consolidation treatment for at least 12 weeks. Nine patients were cured mycologically; however, sequela of visual damage was showed in one patient. Cryptococcal meningitis seems to be uncharacteristic of symptoms, and central nervous system may be the only common site for infection. Amphotericin B with 5-flucytosine should be the choice of induction treatment in this group of patients.

  17. [Laboratory diagnosis of lymphocytic meningitis].

    PubMed

    Marí, José María Navarro; Ruiz, Mercedes Pérez; Anza, Diego Vicente

    2010-01-01

    Lymphocytic meningitis, mainly those with an acute and benign course, are caused by viruses. In our area, the most commonly involved agents are enteroviruses, herpes simplex, varicella zoster and Toscana viruses. Nucleic acids amplification techniques (NAAT) are the methods of choice to diagnose viral meningitis from cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) samples. They are more rapid and sensitive, and indeed, they are not influenced by the viability of the virus in the clinical specimen as traditional methods are. The development of commercial equipments, the degree of automation, and the use of real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR) systems are the most important premises to choose the molecular method in each laboratory. Recently, commercial kits of real-time PCR are available for the detection of enteroviruses and herpesviruses, which are the most frequently viruses involved in meningitis. Although NAAT from the clinical sample have replaced cell culture for diagnostic purposes, the combination of both methods remain useful. When the detection of the causal agent from the CSF sample is not possible, other specimens (pharyngeal exudates, stools) or serological methods can be used. Serology is the reference method for meningitis caused by West Nile virus and lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus, which are less frequently detected in our area.

  18. Kluyvera meningitis in a newborn.

    PubMed

    Rosso, Marisa; Rojas, Pilar; Garcia, Elisa; Marquez, Javier; Losada, Antonio; Muñoz, Miguel

    2007-11-01

    Kluyvera is described infrequently in association with clinically significant infections in humans. It can produce a wide range of clinically significant manifestations. We describe a newborn with ventriculoperitoneal shunt, who was successfully treated for Kluyvera meningitis. We believe that this is the first case of Kluyvera central nervous system infection reported in a child.

  19. Eosinophilic meningitis: what's the "diff"?

    PubMed

    Miller, Michael A; Menowsky, Michael; Leeson, Kimberly; Leeson, Ben

    2014-01-01

    We report a case of a 22-year-old man who presented to the emergency department (ED) with altered mental status and was diagnosed with eosinophilic meningitis due to Angiostrongylus cantonensis (AC) acquired in the United States after exposure to snails.

  20. Persistent Strongyloidiasis Complicated by Recurrent Meningitis in an HTLV Seropositive Peruvian Migrant Resettled in Italy

    PubMed Central

    Zammarchi, Lorenzo; Montagnani, Francesca; Tordini, Giacinta; Gotuzzo, Eduardo; Bisoffi, Zeno; Bartoloni, Alessandro; De Luca, Andrea

    2015-01-01

    We describe a case of persistent strongyloidiasis complicated by recurrent meningitis, in a human T cell lymphotropic virus type 1 (HTLV-1) seropositive Peruvian migrant adult resettled in Italy. He was admitted with signs and symptoms of acute bacterial meningitis, reporting four other meningitis episodes in the past 6 years, with an etiological diagnosis of Escherichia coli and Enterococcus faecium in two cases. He had been previously treated with several antihelmintic regimens not including ivermectin, without eradication of strongyloidiasis, and he had never been tested for HTLV before. During the described episode, the patient was treated for meningitis with broad-spectrum antibiotic therapy and 200 μg/kg/dose oral ivermectin once daily on day 1, 2, 15 and 16 with full recovery and no further episodes of meningitis. The presented case underlines several critical points concerning the management of poorly known neglected diseases such as strongyloidiasis and HTLV infection in low-endemic areas. Despite several admissions for meningitis and strongyloidiasis, the parasitic infection was not adequately treated and the patient was not previously tested for HTLV. The supply of ivermectin and the choice of treatment scheme was challenging since ivermectin is not approved in Italy and there are no standardized guidelines for the treatment of severe strongyloidiasis in HTLV seropositive subjects. PMID:25846292

  1. Review of meningitis surveillance data, upper West Region, Ghana 2009-2013

    PubMed Central

    Nuoh, Robert Domo; Nyarko, Kofi Mensah; Nortey, Priscilla; Sackey, Samuel Oko; Lwanga, Noora Charles; Ameme, Donne Kofi; Nuolabong, Culbert; Abdulai, Marijanatu; Wurapa, Fredrick; Afari, Edwin

    2016-01-01

    Introduction The Upper West region of Ghana is within the meningitis belt. Analysis of long term surveillance data is necessary for understanding changes in the disease occurrence. We analyzed five years of surveillance data to describe by person, place and time and to determine trends in meningitis. Methods Meningitis surveillance data from Ghana Health Service in the Upper West Region, from 2009 to 2013 were reviewed. Data was obtained from District-Health Information Management System and line list from the Disease Control Unit. Population figures (denominators) and rainfall data were also analyzed. Results Within the period 980 cases of meningitis were reported in the region, 507(52%) females and 473(48%) males. The mean age of cases was 20.1years and standard deviation 18.8 years with, 77.6 %( 761/980) cases occurring in persons aged under 30 years. Children under five years were 19.3% (190/980). Attack rates ranged from 6.1/100,000 population in the Daffiama-bussei-Issa-district to 47.5/100,000 in Jirapa. Overall case fatality rate of meningitis was 12.2% with 14deaths/100,000 population. Bacterial agents were isolated from 35% (245/702) of CSF. Majority were Streptococcus pneumonia 48.2 % ( 122/258), and N. meningitides Y/W 135 40.3% (102/258). Meningitis was found to be seasonal with peaks in the dry season. Conclusion Meningitis in the region is seasonal, and showed a decreasing trend. Jirapa, Lawra, Nadowli and Wa West districts had the highest burden. Control effort of the disease should focus on vaccination against streptococcus pneumonia and N. meningitis W135 especially within crowded settlements such as boarding schools. PMID:28210377

  2. Review of meningitis surveillance data, upper West Region, Ghana 2009-2013.

    PubMed

    Nuoh, Robert Domo; Nyarko, Kofi Mensah; Nortey, Priscilla; Sackey, Samuel Oko; Lwanga, Noora Charles; Ameme, Donne Kofi; Nuolabong, Culbert; Abdulai, Marijanatu; Wurapa, Fredrick; Afari, Edwin

    2016-01-01

    The Upper West region of Ghana is within the meningitis belt. Analysis of long term surveillance data is necessary for understanding changes in the disease occurrence. We analyzed five years of surveillance data to describe by person, place and time and to determine trends in meningitis. Meningitis surveillance data from Ghana Health Service in the Upper West Region, from 2009 to 2013 were reviewed. Data was obtained from District-Health Information Management System and line list from the Disease Control Unit. Population figures (denominators) and rainfall data were also analyzed. Within the period 980 cases of meningitis were reported in the region, 507(52%) females and 473(48%) males. The mean age of cases was 20.1years and standard deviation 18.8 years with, 77.6 %( 761/980) cases occurring in persons aged under 30 years. Children under five years were 19.3% (190/980). Attack rates ranged from 6.1/100,000 population in the Daffiama-bussei-Issa-district to 47.5/100,000 in Jirapa. Overall case fatality rate of meningitis was 12.2% with 14deaths/100,000 population. Bacterial agents were isolated from 35% (245/702) of CSF. Majority were Streptococcus pneumonia 48.2 % ( 122/258), and N. meningitides Y/W 135 40.3% (102/258). Meningitis was found to be seasonal with peaks in the dry season. Meningitis in the region is seasonal, and showed a decreasing trend. Jirapa, Lawra, Nadowli and Wa West districts had the highest burden. Control effort of the disease should focus on vaccination against streptococcus pneumonia and N. meningitis W135 especially within crowded settlements such as boarding schools.

  3. Computational modeling of tuberculous meningitis reveals an important role for tumor necrosis factor-α

    PubMed Central

    El-Kebir, M.; van der Kuip, M.; van Furth, A.M.; Kirschner, D.E.

    2013-01-01

    Tuberculosis is a global health issue with annually about 1.5 million deaths and 2 billion infected people worldwide. Extra pulmonary tuberculosis comprises 13% of all cases of which tuberculous meningitis is the most severe. It has a high mortality and is often diagnosed once irreversible neurological damage has already occurred. Development of diagnostic and treatment strategies requires a thorough understanding of the pathogenesis of tuberculous meningitis. This disease is characterized by the formation of a cerebral granuloma, which is a collection of immune cells that attempt to immunologically restrain, and physically contain bacteria. The cytokine tumor necrosis factor-α is known for its important role in granuloma formation. Because traditional experimental animal studies exploring tuberculous meningitis are difficult and expensive, another approach is needed to begin to address this important and significant disease outcome. Here, we present an in silico model capturing the unique immunological environment of the brain that allows us to study the key mechanisms driving granuloma formation in time. Uncertainty and sensitivity analysis reveal a dose-dependent effect of tumor necrosis factor-α on bacterial load and immune cell numbers thereby influencing the onset of tuberculous meningitis. Insufficient levels result in bacterial overgrowth, whereas high levels lead to uncontrolled inflammation being detrimental to the host. These findings have important implications for the development of immuno-modulating treatment strategies for tuberculous meningitis. PMID:23542051

  4. Seasonality of meningitis in Africa and climate forcing: aerosols stand out.

    PubMed

    Agier, L; Deroubaix, A; Martiny, N; Yaka, P; Djibo, A; Broutin, H

    2013-02-01

    Bacterial meningitis is an ongoing threat for the population of the African Meningitis Belt, a region characterized by the highest incidence rates worldwide. The determinants of the disease dynamics are still poorly understood; nevertheless, it is often advocated that climate and mineral dust have a large impact. Over the last decade, several studies have investigated this relationship at a large scale. In this analysis, we scaled down to the district-level weekly scale (which is used for in-year response to emerging epidemics), and used wavelet and phase analysis methods to define and compare the time-varying periodicities of meningitis, climate and dust in Niger. We mostly focused on detecting time-lags between the signals that were consistent across districts. Results highlighted the special case of dust in comparison to wind, humidity or temperature: a strong similarity between districts is noticed in the evolution of the time-lags between the seasonal component of dust and meningitis. This result, together with the assumption of dust damaging the pharyngeal mucosa and easing bacterial invasion, reinforces our confidence in dust forcing on meningitis seasonality. Dust data should now be integrated in epidemiological and forecasting models to make them more realistic and usable in a public health perspective.

  5. Seasonality of meningitis in Africa and climate forcing: aerosols stand out

    PubMed Central

    Agier, L.; Deroubaix, A.; Martiny, N.; Yaka, P.; Djibo, A.; Broutin, H.

    2013-01-01

    Bacterial meningitis is an ongoing threat for the population of the African Meningitis Belt, a region characterized by the highest incidence rates worldwide. The determinants of the disease dynamics are still poorly understood; nevertheless, it is often advocated that climate and mineral dust have a large impact. Over the last decade, several studies have investigated this relationship at a large scale. In this analysis, we scaled down to the district-level weekly scale (which is used for in-year response to emerging epidemics), and used wavelet and phase analysis methods to define and compare the time-varying periodicities of meningitis, climate and dust in Niger. We mostly focused on detecting time-lags between the signals that were consistent across districts. Results highlighted the special case of dust in comparison to wind, humidity or temperature: a strong similarity between districts is noticed in the evolution of the time-lags between the seasonal component of dust and meningitis. This result, together with the assumption of dust damaging the pharyngeal mucosa and easing bacterial invasion, reinforces our confidence in dust forcing on meningitis seasonality. Dust data should now be integrated in epidemiological and forecasting models to make them more realistic and usable in a public health perspective. PMID:23221989

  6. Computational modeling of tuberculous meningitis reveals an important role for tumor necrosis factor-α.

    PubMed

    El-Kebir, M; van der Kuip, M; van Furth, A M; Kirschner, D E

    2013-07-07

    Tuberculosis is a global health issue with annually about 1.5 million deaths and 2 billion infected people worldwide. Extra-pulmonary tuberculosis comprises 13% of all cases of which tuberculous meningitis is the most severe. It has a high mortality and is often diagnosed once irreversible neurological damage has already occurred. Development of diagnostic and treatment strategies requires a thorough understanding of the pathogenesis of tuberculous meningitis. This disease is characterized by the formation of a cerebral granuloma, which is a collection of immune cells that attempt to immunologically restrain, and physically contain bacteria. The cytokine tumor necrosis factor-α is known for its important role in granuloma formation. Because traditional experimental animal studies exploring tuberculous meningitis are difficult and expensive, another approach is needed to begin to address this important and significant disease outcome. Here, we present an in silico model capturing the unique immunological environment of the brain that allows us to study the key mechanisms driving granuloma formation in time. Uncertainty and sensitivity analysis reveals a dose-dependent effect of tumor necrosis factor-α on bacterial load and immune cell numbers thereby influencing the onset of tuberculous meningitis. Insufficient levels result in bacterial overgrowth, whereas high levels lead to uncontrolled inflammation being detrimental to the host. These findings have important implications for the development of immuno-modulating treatment strategies for tuberculous meningitis.

  7. Pneumococcal meningitis threshold model: a potential tool to assess infectious risk of new or existing inner ear surgical interventions

    PubMed Central

    Wei, Benjamin P.C.; Shepherd, Robert K.; Robins-Browne, Roy M.; Clark, Graeme M.; O'Leary, Stephen J.

    2007-01-01

    Hypothesis A minimal threshold of S. pneumoniae is required to induce meningitis in healthy animals for intraperitoneal (hematogenous), middle ear and inner ear inoculations and this threshold may be altered by recent inner ear surgery. Background There has been an increase in the number of reported cases of cochlear implant-related pneumococcal meningitis since 2002. The pathogenesis of pneumococcal meningitis is complex and not completely understood. The bacteria can reach the central nervous system (CNS) from the upper respiratory tract mucosa via either hematogenous route or via the inner ear. The establishment of a threshold model for all potential routes of infection to the CNS in animals without cochlear implantation is an important first step to help us understand the pathogenesis of the disease in animals with cochlear implantation. Methods 54 otologically normal, adult Hooded Wistar rats (27 receiving cochleostomy and 27 controls) were inoculated with different amounts of bacterial counts via three different routes (intraperitoneal, middle ear and inner ear). Rats were monitored over 5 days for signs of meningitis. Blood, CSF and middle ear swabs were taken for bacterial culture and brains and cochleae were examined for signs of infection. Results The threshold of bacterial counts required to induce meningitis is lowest in rats receiving direct inner ear inoculation compared to both intraperitoneal and middle ear inoculation. There is no change in threshold between the group of rats with cochleostomy and the control (Fisher exact test; p < 0.05). Conclusion A minimal threshold of bacteria is required to induce meningitis in healthy animals and is different for three different routes of infection (intraperitoneal, middle ear and inner ear). Cochleostomy performed 4 weeks prior to the inoculation did not reduce the threshold of bacteria required for meningitis in all three infectious routes. This threshold model will also serve as a valuable tool, assisting

  8. Etiologies and Management of Aseptic Meningitis in Patients Admitted to an Internal Medicine Department.

    PubMed

    Jarrin, Irène; Sellier, Pierre; Lopes, Amanda; Morgand, Marjolaine; Makovec, Tamara; Delcey, Veronique; Champion, Karine; Simoneau, Guy; Green, Andrew; Mouly, Stéphane; Bergmann, Jean-François; Lloret-Linares, Célia

    2016-01-01

    Several studies have focused on the clinical and biological characteristics of meningitis in order to distinguish between bacterial and viral meningitis in the emergency setting. However, little is known about the etiologies and outcomes of aseptic meningitis in patients admitted to Internal Medicine.The aim of the study is to describe the etiologies, characteristics, and outcomes of aseptic meningitis with or without encephalitis in adults admitted to an Internal Medicine Department.A retrospective cohort study was conducted in the Internal Medicine Department of the Lariboisière Hospital in Paris, France, from January 2009 to December 2011. Clinical and biological characteristics of aseptic meningitis were recorded. These included cerebrospinal fluid analysis, results of polymerase chain reaction testing, final diagnoses, and therapeutic management.The cohort included 180 patients fulfilling the criteria for aseptic meningitis with (n = 56) or without (n = 124) encephalitis. A definitive etiological diagnosis was established in 83 of the 180 cases. Of the cases with a definitive diagnosis, 73 were due to infectious agents, mainly enteroviruses, Herpes Simplex Virus 2, and Varicella Zoster Virus (43.4%, 16.8%, and 14.5% respectively). Inflammatory diseases were diagnosed in 7 cases. Among the 97 cases without definitive diagnoses, 26 (26.8%) remained free of treatment throughout their management whereas antiviral or antibiotic therapy was initiated in the emergency department for the remaining 71 patients. The treatment was discontinued in only 10 patients deemed to have viral meningitis upon admission to Internal Medicine.The prevalence of inflammatory diseases among patients admitted to internal medicine for aseptic meningitis is not rare (4% of overall aseptic meningitis). The PCR upon admission to the emergency department is obviously of major importance for the prompt optimization of therapy and management. However, meningitis due to viral agents or

  9. Etiologies and Management of Aseptic Meningitis in Patients Admitted to an Internal Medicine Department

    PubMed Central

    Jarrin, Irène; Sellier, Pierre; Lopes, Amanda; Morgand, Marjolaine; Makovec, Tamara; Delcey, Veronique; Champion, Karine; Simoneau, Guy; Green, Andrew; Mouly, Stéphane; Bergmann, Jean-François; Lloret-Linares, Célia

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Several studies have focused on the clinical and biological characteristics of meningitis in order to distinguish between bacterial and viral meningitis in the emergency setting. However, little is known about the etiologies and outcomes of aseptic meningitis in patients admitted to Internal Medicine. The aim of the study is to describe the etiologies, characteristics, and outcomes of aseptic meningitis with or without encephalitis in adults admitted to an Internal Medicine Department. A retrospective cohort study was conducted in the Internal Medicine Department of the Lariboisière Hospital in Paris, France, from January 2009 to December 2011. Clinical and biological characteristics of aseptic meningitis were recorded. These included cerebrospinal fluid analysis, results of polymerase chain reaction testing, final diagnoses, and therapeutic management. The cohort included 180 patients fulfilling the criteria for aseptic meningitis with (n = 56) or without (n = 124) encephalitis. A definitive etiological diagnosis was established in 83 of the 180 cases. Of the cases with a definitive diagnosis, 73 were due to infectious agents, mainly enteroviruses, Herpes Simplex Virus 2, and Varicella Zoster Virus (43.4%, 16.8%, and 14.5% respectively). Inflammatory diseases were diagnosed in 7 cases. Among the 97 cases without definitive diagnoses, 26 (26.8%) remained free of treatment throughout their management whereas antiviral or antibiotic therapy was initiated in the emergency department for the remaining 71 patients. The treatment was discontinued in only 10 patients deemed to have viral meningitis upon admission to Internal Medicine. The prevalence of inflammatory diseases among patients admitted to internal medicine for aseptic meningitis is not rare (4% of overall aseptic meningitis). The PCR upon admission to the emergency department is obviously of major importance for the prompt optimization of therapy and management. However, meningitis due to

  10. Salmonella Meningitis Associated with Monocyte Infiltration in Mice.

    PubMed

    Bauler, Timothy J; Starr, Tregei; Nagy, Toni A; Sridhar, Sushmita; Scott, Dana; Winkler, Clayton W; Steele-Mortimer, Olivia; Detweiler, Corrella S; Peterson, Karin E

    2017-01-01

    In the current study, we examined the ability of Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium to infect the central nervous system and cause meningitis following the natural route of infection in mice. C57BL/6J mice are extremely susceptible to systemic infection by Salmonella Typhimurium because of loss-of-function mutations in Nramp1 (SLC11A1), a phagosomal membrane protein that controls iron export from vacuoles and inhibits Salmonella growth in macrophages. Therefore, we assessed the ability of Salmonella to disseminate to the central nervous system (CNS) after oral infection in C57BL/6J mice expressing either wild-type (resistant) or mutant (susceptible) alleles of Nramp1. In both strains, oral infection resulted in focal meningitis and ventriculitis with recruitment of inflammatory monocytes to the CNS. In susceptible Nramp1(-/-) mice, there was a direct correlation between bacteremia and the number of bacteria in the brain, which was not observed in resistant Nramp1(+/+) mice. A small percentage of Nramp1(+/+) mice developed severe ataxia, which was associated with high bacterial loads in the CNS as well as clear histopathology of necrotizing vasculitis and hemorrhage in the brain. Thus, Nramp1 is not essential for Salmonella entry into the CNS or neuroinflammation, but may influence the mechanisms of CNS entry as well as the severity of meningitis. Copyright © 2017 American Society for Investigative Pathology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Inflammasome activation mediates inflammation and outcome in humans and mice with pneumococcal meningitis

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Inflammasomes are multi-protein intracellular signaling complexes that have recently been hypothesized to play a role in the regulation of the inflammation response. We studied associations between inflammasome-associated cytokines IL-1β and IL-18 in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) of patients with bacterial meningitis and clinical outcome, and pneumococcal serotype. In a murine model of pneumococcal meningitis we examined the pathophysiological roles of two inflammasome proteins, NLRP3 (Nod-like receptor protein-3) and adaptor protein ASC (apoptosis-associated speck-like protein). Methods In a nationwide prospective cohort study, CSF cytokine levels were measured and related to clinical outcome and pneumococcal serotype. In a murine model of pneumococcal meningitis using Streptococcus pneumoniae serotype 3, we examined bacterial titers, cytokine profiles and brain histology at 6 and 30 hours after inoculation in wild-type (WT), Asc and Nlrp3 deficient mice. Results In patients with bacterial meningitis, CSF levels of inflammasome associated cytokines IL-1β and IL-18 were related to complications, and unfavorable disease outcome. CSF levels of IL-1β were associated with pneumococcal serotype (p<0.001). In our animal model, Asc and Nlrp3 deficient mice had decreased systemic inflammatory responses and bacterial outgrowth as compared to WT mice. Differences between Asc−/− and WT mice appeared sooner after bacterial inoculation and were more widespread (lower pro-inflammatory cytokine levels in both blood and brain homogenate) than in Nlrp3-/-mice. Nlrp3 deficiency was associated with an increase of cerebral neutrophil infiltration and cerebral hemorrhages when compared to WT controls. Conclusions Our results implicate an important role for inflammasome proteins NLRP3 and ASC in the regulation of the systemic inflammatory response and the development of cerebral damage during pneumococcal meningitis, which may dependent on the pneumococcal serotype. PMID

  12. Recurrent meningitis secondary to idiopathic oval window CSF leak.

    PubMed

    Parisier, S C; Birken, E A

    1976-10-01

    Bacterial meningitis remains a life-threatening infection even in the present antibiotic era; thus, any abnormality which predisposes a patient to a recurrence of this serious disease, must be identified and corrected. This report describes the histroy of a 12-year old boy with a profound neurosensory hearing loss, a related absence of vestibular function and a Mondini-type of temporal bone dysplasia who developed recurrent episodes of meningitis which were due to an idiopathic cerebrospinal fluid otorrhea. Even though the meningitis was labyrinthogenic in origin, the patient did not experience the associated symptoms of hearing loss and/or vertigo since the affected inner ear was clinically unreactive. By surgically exploring the middle ear, the presence of a cerebrospinal fluid otorrhea was confirmed. The leak was observed to be coming from a defect in the stapes footplate, and it was controlled by firmly packing the inner ear vestibule with muscle. A remarkable similarity exists between the patient described above and the 15 previously reported cases of meningitis due to a spontaneous cerebrospinal fluid otorrhea. Generally, the problem occurred in young children, the average age being 6.4 years; male and female were equally afflicted. All 15 previously reported cases had a severe neurosensory hearing loss which was unilateral in 10 individuals and bilateral in the other five. In 11 of the case reports, the vestibular function was evaluated, and the labyrinth was noted to be unreactive in the affected ear. An associated congenital abnormality of the inner ear was described in 11 of the patients reviewed. Anatomically, in 13 cases, the leak was observed to be coming from the oval window area. Other affected sites included one report of a fissure of the promontory and one report of a defect in the roof of the eustachian tube. Multiple surgical procedures were required in 11 of the 15 patients in order to identify the exact source of the otorrhea and to seal it

  13. Functional polymorphisms of macrophage migration inhibitory factor as predictors of morbidity and mortality of pneumococcal meningitis.

    PubMed

    Savva, Athina; Brouwer, Matthijs C; Roger, Thierry; Valls Serón, Mercedes; Le Roy, Didier; Ferwerda, Bart; van der Ende, Arie; Bochud, Pierre-Yves; van de Beek, Diederik; Calandra, Thierry

    2016-03-29

    Pneumococcal meningitis is the most frequent and critical type of bacterial meningitis. Because cytokines play an important role in the pathogenesis of bacterial meningitis, we examined whether functional polymorphisms of the proinflammatory cytokine macrophage migration inhibitory factor (MIF) were associated with morbidity and mortality of pneumococcal meningitis. Two functional MIF promoter polymorphisms, a microsatellite (-794 CATT5-8; rs5844572) and a single-nucleotide polymorphism (-173 G/C; rs755622) were genotyped in a prospective, nationwide cohort of 405 patients with pneumococcal meningitis and in 329 controls matched for age, gender, and ethnicity. Carriages of the CATT7 and -173 C high-expression MIF alleles were associated with unfavorable outcome (P= 0.005 and 0.003) and death (P= 0.03 and 0.01). In a multivariate logistic regression model, shock [odds ratio (OR) 26.0, P= 0.02] and carriage of the CATT7 allele (OR 5.12,P= 0.04) were the main predictors of mortality. MIF levels in the cerebrospinal fluid were associated with systemic complications and death (P= 0.0002). Streptococcus pneumoniae strongly up-regulated MIF production in whole blood and transcription activity of high-expression MIF promoter Luciferase reporter constructs in THP-1 monocytes. Consistent with these findings, treatment with anti-MIF immunoglogulin G (IgG) antibodies reduced bacterial loads and improved survival in a mouse model of pneumococcal pneumonia and sepsis. The present study provides strong evidence that carriage of high-expression MIF alleles is a genetic marker of morbidity and mortality of pneumococcal meningitis and also suggests a potential role for MIF as a target of immune-modulating adjunctive therapy.

  14. Functional polymorphisms of macrophage migration inhibitory factor as predictors of morbidity and mortality of pneumococcal meningitis

    PubMed Central

    Savva, Athina; Brouwer, Matthijs C.; Valls Serón, Mercedes; Le Roy, Didier; Ferwerda, Bart; van der Ende, Arie; Bochud, Pierre-Yves; van de Beek, Diederik; Calandra, Thierry

    2016-01-01

    Pneumococcal meningitis is the most frequent and critical type of bacterial meningitis. Because cytokines play an important role in the pathogenesis of bacterial meningitis, we examined whether functional polymorphisms of the proinflammatory cytokine macrophage migration inhibitory factor (MIF) were associated with morbidity and mortality of pneumococcal meningitis. Two functional MIF promoter polymorphisms, a microsatellite (−794 CATT5–8; rs5844572) and a single-nucleotide polymorphism (−173 G/C; rs755622) were genotyped in a prospective, nationwide cohort of 405 patients with pneumococcal meningitis and in 329 controls matched for age, gender, and ethnicity. Carriages of the CATT7 and −173 C high-expression MIF alleles were associated with unfavorable outcome (P = 0.005 and 0.003) and death (P = 0.03 and 0.01). In a multivariate logistic regression model, shock [odds ratio (OR) 26.0, P = 0.02] and carriage of the CATT7 allele (OR 5.12, P = 0.04) were the main predictors of mortality. MIF levels in the cerebrospinal fluid were associated with systemic complications and death (P = 0.0002). Streptococcus pneumoniae strongly up-regulated MIF production in whole blood and transcription activity of high-expression MIF promoter Luciferase reporter constructs in THP-1 monocytes. Consistent with these findings, treatment with anti-MIF immunoglogulin G (IgG) antibodies reduced bacterial loads and improved survival in a mouse model of pneumococcal pneumonia and sepsis. The present study provides strong evidence that carriage of high-expression MIF alleles is a genetic marker of morbidity and mortality of pneumococcal meningitis and also suggests a potential role for MIF as a target of immune-modulating adjunctive therapy. PMID:26976591

  15. Disseminated tuberculosis and tuberculous meningitis in Australian-born children; case reports and review of current epidemiology and management.

    PubMed

    Smith, Benjamin B; Hazelton, Briony J; Heywood, Anita E; Snelling, Thomas L; Peacock, Kenneth M; Macartney, Kristine K

    2013-03-01

    We present two cases of tuberculous meningitis in Australian-born children. We review the current literature surrounding management of paediatric tuberculosis and disseminated disease, emphasising the importance of prompt diagnosis and intervention. We discuss the epidemiology of tuberculosis in the Australian paediatric population and highlight the sentinel role of childhood infection in public health surveillance.

  16. Association of the use of bacterial cell wall synthesis Inhibitor drugs in early childhood with the Developmental Defects of Enamel

    PubMed Central

    Tariq, Amna; Alam Ansari, Munawar; Owais Ismail, Muhammad; Memon, Zahida

    2014-01-01

    Objective: Our objective of the study was to determine the association between frequent use of Penicillins and Cephalosporins with developmental defects of enamel in pediatric age group. Methods: This is a cross sectional study, conducted at Ziauddin University. A total of 367 children, having the history of either Penicillin or Cephalosporin exposure were included. The parents of children were asked to complete a questionnaire related to disease and drug history. Dental examination was carried out to assess the hypomineralization in tooth enamel based on modified Developmental Defects of Enamel (DDE) index. Results: Out of 367 children, 124 (34%) were males and females were 243(66%). In the study group 22.6% (n= 83) of children were found to be hypomineralized. The maximum type of teeth defects were diffused opacities that was 12.0% (n=44). The statistically significant association (p-value < 0.05) was found between frequency of antibiotic use and hypomineralization for most teeth. Children who were exposed to either Penicillins or Cephalosporin in early childhood showed significant (p-value < 0.002) hypomineralized enamel. Conclusion: This study concludes that frequent use of antibiotics such as penicillins and cephalosporins has positive association with enamel hypomineralization in developing tooth structure. PMID:24772150

  17. Association of the use of bacterial cell wall synthesis Inhibitor drugs in early childhood with the Developmental Defects of Enamel.

    PubMed

    Tariq, Amna; Alam Ansari, Munawar; Owais Ismail, Muhammad; Memon, Zahida

    2014-03-01

    Our objective of the study was to determine the association between frequent use of Penicillins and Cephalosporins with developmental defects of enamel in pediatric age group. This is a cross sectional study, conducted at Ziauddin University. A total of 367 children, having the history of either Penicillin or Cephalosporin exposure were included. The parents of children were asked to complete a questionnaire related to disease and drug history. Dental examination was carried out to assess the hypomineralization in tooth enamel based on modified Developmental Defects of Enamel (DDE) index. Out of 367 children, 124 (34%) were males and females were 243(66%). In the study group 22.6% (n= 83) of children were found to be hypomineralized. The maximum type of teeth defects were diffused opacities that was 12.0% (n=44). The statistically significant association (p-value < 0.05) was found between frequency of antibiotic use and hypomineralization for most teeth. Children who were exposed to either Penicillins or Cephalosporin in early childhood showed significant (p-value < 0.002) hypomineralized enamel. This study concludes that frequent use of antibiotics such as penicillins and cephalosporins has positive association with enamel hypomineralization in developing tooth structure.

  18. Visual pathway abnormalities in tuberculous meningitis.

    PubMed

    Maurya, Pradeep Kumar; Singh, Ajai Kumar; Sharma, Lalit; Kulshreshtha, Dinkar; Thacker, Anup Kumar

    2016-11-01

    Ophthalmological complications are common and disabling in patients with tuberculous meningitis. We aimed to study the visual pathway abnormalities in patients with tuberculous meningitis. Forty-three patients with tuberculous meningitis were subjected to visual evoked responses (VER) and neuroophthalmologic assessment. Neuroophthalmologic assessment revealed abnormalities in 22 (51.3%) patients. VER were found to be abnormal in 27 (62.8%) patients. The VER abnormalities included prolonged P100 latencies with relatively normal amplitude and significant interocular latency differences. Visual pathways abnormalities are common in patients with tuberculous meningitis and are often subclinical. Pathophysiologic explanations for electrophysiological abnormalities on VER in these patients are incompletely understood and needs further exploration.

  19. Rheumatoid Meningitis Occurring during Etanercept Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Nakamura, Takashi; Okumura, Hiroyuki; Tachibana, Naoko; Hamano, Toshiaki

    2017-01-01

    We report a 65-year-old man who had repetitive seizures 6 months after receiving etanercept, methotrexate, and prednisolone for rheumatoid arthritis. Mononuclear cells were mildly increased in the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF). Brain magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) showed high intensity along sulci of the frontal and parietal lobes. Brain biopsy revealed lymphocyte and plasma cell infiltration in the meninges, confirming the diagnosis of rheumatoid meningitis. After steroid pulse therapy, seizures resolved and clinical findings improved. When etanercept was replaced by tocilizumab, rheumatoid meningitis did not recur. Although TNF-α inhibitors can control joint symptoms of rheumatoid arthritis, they may induce rheumatoid meningitis. PMID:28286682

  20. [Simultaneous meningitis caused by Candida and tuberculosis as manifestation of AIDS].

    PubMed

    Arias Gómez, M; Requena Caballero, I; Lema Devesa, C; Suárez Dono, J; Llovo Martínez, J; Martino, V

    2001-09-01

    Opportunistic germs meningoencephalitis plays an important role within neurologic pathology in aids. Treponema pallidum and Mycobacterium tuberculosis among bacteries, Cryptococcus neoformans in fungus group, Toxoplasma gondii in protozoos group and Papovavirus JC in virus one are the most frequently implicated germs. Sometimes infections are mixed. We present a simultaneous meningitis case produced by Candida albicans and Mycobacterium tuberculosis that coursed with neutrophilic pleocytosis in CSF and normal glucose CSF levels, consisting the clinical debut of aids. Repeated CSF examinations are the diagnostic clue owing, as in our case, instauration of early treatment. Present case of simultaneous tuberculous and candidiasic meningitis is the first one described in a HIV positive patient.

  1. Recurrent meningitis due to Salmonella enteritidis: a case report from Kashmir India.

    PubMed

    Fomda, B A; Charoo, B A; Bhat, J A; Reyaz, N; Maroof, P; Naik, M I

    2012-01-01

    Recurrent bacterial meningitis in children is potentially life-threatening and induces psychological trauma to the patients through repeated hospitalization. Here we report a case of recurrent meningitis in a one month old baby. The CSF and blood culture grew Salmonella enteritidis. Injection ciprofloxacin and ceftriaxone were given for 3 weeks. Baby became symptomatically better and was afebrile at discharge. Twenty eight days after discharge baby got readmitted with complaints of fever and refusal of feeds. Blood and CSF culture again showed growth of Salmonella enteritidis. Physicians should be educated about the possibility of recurrence which may occur days or even weeks after apparent successful antibiotic treatment.

  2. Successful Treatment of Cryptococcal Meningitis with Amphotericin B in a Patient with Systemic Lupus Erythematosus.

    PubMed

    Jiang, S; Lei, T-C; Xu, S-Z

    2015-12-01

    Patients with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) have an increased susceptibility to bacterial, viral, fungal and parasitic infections. Cryptococcal infection of the central nervous system (CNS) is a rare but often fatal complication of SLE. Here, we describe a case of cryptococcal meningitis in a female patient with active SLE, who was successfully treated with amphotericin B. This case suggests that the clinical findings of SLE patients with cryptococcal meningitis are non-specific and misleading, and early use of amphotericin B has a good response.

  3. Successful Treatment of Cryptococcal Meningitis with Amphotericin B in a Patient with Systemic Lupus Erythmatosus.

    PubMed

    Jiang, S; Lei, T-C; Xu, S-Z

    2015-12-01

    Patients with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) have an increased susceptibility to bacterial, viral, fungal and parasitic infections. Cryptococcal infection of the central nervous system (CNS) is a rare but often fatal complication of SLE. Here we describe a case of cryptococcal meningitis in a female patient with active SLE, who was successfully treated with amphotericin B. This case suggests that the clinical findings of SLE patients with cryptococcal meningitis are non-specific and misleading, and early use of amphotericin B has a good response.

  4. Gene expression in cortex and hippocampus during acute pneumococcal meningitis

    PubMed Central

    Coimbra, Roney S; Voisin, Veronique; de Saizieu, Antoine B; Lindberg, Raija LP; Wittwer, Matthias; Leppert, David; Leib, Stephen L

    2006-01-01

    Background Pneumococcal meningitis is associated with high mortality (~30%) and morbidity. Up to 50% of survivors are affected by neurological sequelae due to a wide spectrum of brain injury mainly affecting the cortex and hippocampus. Despite this significant disease burden, the genetic program that regulates the host response leading to brain damage as a consequence of bacterial meningitis is largely unknown. We used an infant rat model of pneumococcal meningitis to assess gene expression profiles in cortex and hippocampus at 22 and 44 hours after infection and in controls at 22 h after mock-infection with saline. To analyze the biological significance of the data generated by Affymetrix DNA microarrays, a bioinformatics pipeline was used combining (i) a literature-profiling algorithm to cluster genes based on the vocabulary of abstracts indexed in MEDLINE (NCBI) and (ii) the self-organizing map (SOM), a clustering technique based on covariance in gene expression kinetics. Results Among 598 genes differentially regulated (change factor ≥ 1.5; p ≤ 0.05), 77% were automatically assigned to one of 11 functional groups with 94% accuracy. SOM disclosed six patterns of expression kinetics. Genes associated with growth control/neuroplasticity, signal transduction, cell death/survival, cytoskeleton, and immunity were generally upregulated. In contrast, genes related to neurotransmission and lipid metabolism were transiently downregulated on the whole. The majority of the genes associated with ionic homeostasis, neurotransmission, signal transduction and lipid metabolism were differentially regulated specifically in the hippocampus. Of the cell death/survival genes found to be continuously upregulated only in hippocampus, the majority are pro-apoptotic, while those continuously upregulated only in cortex are anti-apoptotic. Conclusion Temporal and spatial analysis of gene expression in experimental pneumococcal meningitis identified potential targets for therapy. PMID

  5. Benzalkonium tolerance genes and outcome in Listeria monocytogenes meningitis.

    PubMed

    Kremer, P H C; Lees, J A; Koopmans, M M; Ferwerda, B; Arends, A W M; Feller, M M; Schipper, K; Valls Seron, M; van der Ende, A; Brouwer, M C; van de Beek, D; Bentley, S D

    2017-04-01

    Listeria monocytogenes is a food-borne pathogen that can cause meningitis. The listerial genotype ST6 has been linked to increasing rates of unfavourable outcome over time. We investigated listerial genetic variation and the relation with clinical outcome in meningitis. We sequenced 96 isolates from adults with listerial meningitis included in two prospective nationwide cohort studies by whole genome sequencing, and evaluated associations between bacterial genetic variation and clinical outcome. We validated these results by screening listerial genotypes of 445 cerebrospinal fluid and blood isolates from patients over a 30-year period from the Dutch national surveillance cohort. We identified a bacteriophage, phiLMST6 co-occurring with a novel plasmid, pLMST6, in ST6 isolates to be associated with unfavourable outcome in patients (p 2.83e-05). The plasmid carries a benzalkonium chloride tolerance gene, emrC, conferring decreased susceptibility to disinfectants used in the food-processing industry. Isolates harbouring emrC were growth inhibited at higher levels of benzalkonium chloride (median 60 mg/L versus 15 mg/L; p <0.001), and had higher MICs for amoxicillin and gentamicin compared with isolates without emrC (both p <0.001). Transformation of pLMST6 into naive strains led to benzalkonium chloride tolerance and higher MICs for gentamicin. These results show that a novel plasmid, carrying the efflux transporter emrC, is associated with increased incidence of ST6 listerial meningitis in the Netherlands. Suggesting increased disease severity, our findings warrant consideration of disinfectants used in the food-processing industry that select for resistance mechanisms and may, inadvertently, lead to increased risk of poor disease outcome. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  6. Extrapulmonary tuberculosis: tuberculous meningitis new developments.

    PubMed

    Galimi, R

    2011-04-01

    Tuberculosis (TB) can involve any organ system in the body. Extrapulmonary involvement can occur in isolation or along with a pulmonary focus as in the case of patients with disseminated tuberculosis. Tuberculosis meningitis (TBM) is the most severe form of extrapulmonary tuberculosis. TBM a medical emergency, is still a major cause of serious illness in many parts of the world. TBM remains difficult to diagnose, and it is usually due to hematogenous dissemination of the tubercle bacillus. The exact incidence and prevalence are not known. The clinical spectrum is broad and may be non-specific making early diagnosis difficult. Improved outcome requires early recognition and treatment of these conditions. Clinical features included fever for more than 7 days, headache, or neck stiffness. While TBM is a disease of childhood, tuberculomas and spinal tuberculosis are invariably an adult manifestation. In HIV infection, TB is often atypical in presentation, frequently causing extrapulmonary disease, and patients have a high incidence of TBM. Clinical response to antituberculous therapy in all forms of neurotuberculosis is excellent if the diagnosis is made early before irreversible neurological deficit is established. Diagnosis is based on the characteristic clinical picture, neuroimaging abnormalities, cerebrospinal fluid changes and the response to anti-tuberculosis drugs. Diagnosis is best made with lumbar puncture and examination of the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF). Suspect TBM if there is a CSF leucocytosis (predominantly lymphocytes), the CSF protein is raised, and the CSF plasma glucose is <50%. Rapid techniques based on nucleic acid amplification such as PCR are more sensitive and specific as they attempt to detect specific DNA sequences of the organism. The hallmark pathological processes are meningeal inflammation, basal exudates, vasculitis and hydrocephalus. Treatment delay is strongly associated with death and empirical anti-tuberculosis therapy should be

  7. Development of hematogenous pneumococcal meningitis in adult mice: the role of TNF-alpha.

    PubMed

    Tsao, N; Chang, W W; Liu, C C; Lei, H Y

    2002-01-14

    Bacterial penetration across the blood-brain barrier (BBB) into the central nervous system is the first step in development of meningitis. The role of tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha) in the penetration process was examined with peripheral infection of Streptococcus pneumoniae type 6. After intraperitoneal infection of S. pneumoniae type 6, the BBB opening was increased continuously from 6 h and the mice died of septic shock within 36 h due to bacterial overgrowth. The bacteria crossed the BBB and began to deposit in brain at 6 h post infection. There was strong staining of TNF-alpha on blood vessels of brain from 6 h to 24 h post infection. Anti-TNF-alpha antibody blocked both the BBB opening and the entrance of circulatory S. pneumoniae type 6 into brain, indicating that TNF-alpha played an important role in controlling the opening of BBB. Furthermore, an adult murine model of hematogenous pneumococcal meningitis was developed that is based on opening of the BBB by TNF-alpha and controlling the degree of bacteremia by cefazolin antibiotic. In conclusion, hematogenous meningitis developed as TNF-alpha initiated BBB opening, peripheral bacteria entered into the brain and formed bacterial emboli, and then progressed to meningitis.

  8. Types, Risk Factors, Clinical symptoms and Diagnostic Tests of Acute Adult Meningitis in Northern Iran During 2006-2012

    PubMed Central

    Bagheri-Nesami, Masoumeh; Babamahmoodi, Farhang

    2015-01-01

    Background Acute bacterial meningitis is a medical emergency condition that requires prompt diagnosis and treatment and otherwise associated with serious morbidity and mortality. Aim The aim of this study was to assess types, risk factors, clinical symptoms and diagnostic tests of meningitis in hospitalized patients of Mazandaran University of medical sciences hospitals during 2006-2012. Matherials and Methods This is a retrospective descriptive study. Following approval of the ethics committee of Mazandaran University of Medical Sciences, records of adult patients diagnosed with acute meningitis from 2006 to 2012 were extracted from Mazandaran Provincial Health Center and patients attending hospitals affiliated to Mazandaran University of Medical Sciences. Statistical Analysis Data were analyzed with SPSS-16 using descriptive statistics (frequency, mean, standard deviation, and median). Results In this study, of the 137 patients with meningitis, 73 (53.9%) were viral, 61 (46%) bacterial, 1 (0.7%) fungal, and 2 (1.4%) unknown. The majority of risk factors in patients were head trauma, upper respiratory infection, and drug addiction. The most common clinical signs were headache, fever, nausea and vomiting, and stiff neck. Conclusion In this study, the incidence of meningitis was much lower than any other country. It could be due to geographic variation or incomplete recording of patient's data. It is recommended to perform a longitudinal study during the coming years on patients with meningitis. PMID:26155497

  9. Three Cases of Escherichia coli Meningitis in Chicks Imported to Japan.

    PubMed

    Kasuya, Kazufumi; Shimokubo, Natsumi; Kosuge, Chieko; Takayama, Kou; Yoshida, Eiji; Osaka, Hiroyuki

    2017-03-01

    Three outbreaks of colibacillosis have occurred in chicks during the quarantine period after importation to Japan. All three were derived from three different countries without epidemiologic relevance. Some birds from each infected flock were examined pathologically and bacteriologically. The characteristic histologic finding common to all three cases was severe bacterial meningitis in the central nervous system. Pericarditis, perihepatitis, and omphalitis with bacterial colonies were also observed. The bacterial colonies observed histologically were immunohistochemically positive for Escherichia coli antigens. Escherichia coli was isolated from the organ samples from each outbreak. At least two E. coli isolates were serotyped as O18 and O161, which differed from the popular serotypes in Japan. These results suggest that avian pathogenic E. coli of uncommon serotypes can be imported from outside countries by infected chicks. Colibacillosis should be included in the differential diagnosis when meningitis is histologically observed in chicks.

  10. Aeromonas hydrophila meningitis and fulminant sepsis in preterm newborn: A case report and review of literature.

    PubMed

    Kali, A; Kalaivani, R; Charles, Pmv; Seetha, K S

    2016-01-01

    Neonatal meningitis is a lethal infection occurring in the 1st month of life. The risk of developing permanent neurological sequels is high among the neonates who survive. Bacterial pathogens are commonly associated with this condition. Aeromonas is a Gram-negative bacteria of aquatic habitat. Although isolation of Aeromonas species from neonates with blood stream infection is infrequently reported, neonatal meningitis caused by Aeromonas is exceedingly rare. We present a case of fulminant sepsis and meningitis caused by Aeromonas hydrophila in a preterm newborn male. The bacteria was isolated in culture from blood and cerebrospinal fluid. In spite of targeted antibiotics and supportive therapy, the baby failed to respond and died on the 12th day of life.

  11. Full recovery from Baylisascaris procyonis eosinophilic meningitis.

    PubMed

    Pai, Poulomi J; Blackburn, Brian G; Kazacos, Kevin R; Warrier, Rajasekharan P; Bégué, Rodolfo E

    2007-06-01

    Infection by Baylisascaris procyonis is an uncommon but devastating cause of eosinophilic meningitis. We report the first case-patient, to our knowledge, who recovered from B. procyonis eosinophilic meningitis without any recognizable neurologic deficits. The spectrum of illness for this organism may be wider than previously recognized.

  12. Vitamin B6 reduces hippocampal apoptosis in experimental pneumococcal meningitis

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Bacterial meningitis caused by Streptococcus pneumoniae leads to death in up to 30% of patients and leaves up to half of the survivors with neurological sequelae. The inflammatory host reaction initiates the induction of the kynurenine pathway and contributes to hippocampal apoptosis, a form of brain damage that is associated with learning and memory deficits in experimental paradigms. Vitamin B6 is an enzymatic cofactor in the kynurenine pathway and may thus limit the accumulation of neurotoxic metabolites and preserve the cellular energy status. The aim of this study in a pneumococcal meningitis model was to investigate the effect of vitamin B6 on hippocampal apoptosis by histomorphology, by transcriptomics and by measurement of cellular nicotine amide adenine dinucleotide content. Methods and results Eleven day old Wistar rats were infected with 1x106 cfu/ml of S. pneumoniae and randomized for treatment with vitamin B6 or saline as controls. Vitamin B6 led to a significant (p > 0.02) reduction of hippocampal apoptosis. According to functional annotation based clustering, vitamin B6 led to down-regulation of genes involved in processes of inflammatory response, while genes encoding for processes related to circadian rhythm, neuronal signaling and apoptotic cell death were mostly up-regulated. Conclusions Our results provide evidence that attenuation of apoptosis by vitamin B6 is multi-factorial including down-modulation of inflammation, up-regulation of the neuroprotective brain-derived neurotrophic factor and prevention of the exhaustion of cellular energy stores. The neuroprotective effect identifies vitamin B6 as a potential target for the development of strategies to attenuate brain injury in bacterial meningitis. PMID:23977941

  13. Tuberculosis versus pyogenic meningitis in a Pakistani population.

    PubMed

    Khan, Shujah Saleem; Ali, Zawar

    2017-10-01

    Research has been going on to formulate diagnostic criteria for TBM. Two criteria that have been studied and validated in high TB prevalence areas are the Youssef criteria (Rule 1) and Thwaites criteria (Rule 2). In our study we aimed to compare the different features of TBM and acute bacterial meningitis. This retrospective study was done at Northwest General Hospital & Research Centre (NWGH&RC), Peshawar, Pakistan. Patients who were clinically diagnosed with TB meningitis or bacterial meningitis at the time of presentation were included in the study. Lab parameters for both groups were compared using independent sample T tests. We plotted ROC curves for Rule 1 and Rule 2. For Rule 1, at cut off value 2 it has a sensitivity of 97.5% and a specificity of 47.2%. For Rule 2, area at cut off value 3.5, sensitivity was 95% and specificity was 23.5%. We also plotted CSF protein to glucose ratio of our sample on an ROC curve and looked for measures of sensitivity and specificity. At cut off point 2 the sensitivity was 93% and specificity was 66.66%. It should be noted that although sensitivity for all three indices were high, specificity of all three tests was not very encouraging. We would like to emphasize that these indices can be useful in screening for patients with suspected TBM but they do not have the specificity to act as the sole test for initiation and continuance of therapy. Copyright © 2017 Tuberculosis Association of India. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Meteorological influences on the interannual variability of meningitis incidence in northwest Nigeria.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abdussalam, Auwal; Monaghan, Andrew; Dukic, Vanja; Hayden, Mary; Hopson, Thomas; Leckebusch, Gregor

    2013-04-01

    Northwest Nigeria is a region with high risk of bacterial meningitis. Since the first documented epidemic of meningitis in Nigeria in 1905, the disease has been endemic in the northern part of the country, with epidemics occurring regularly. In this study we examine the influence of climate on the interannual variability of meningitis incidence and epidemics. Monthly aggregate counts of clinically confirmed hospital-reported cases of meningitis were collected in northwest Nigeria for the 22-year period spanning 1990-2011. Several generalized linear statistical models were fit to the monthly meningitis counts, including generalized additive models. Explanatory variables included monthly records of temperatures, humidity, rainfall, wind speed, sunshine and dustiness from weather stations nearest to the hospitals, and a time series of polysaccharide vaccination efficacy. The effects of other confounding factors -- i.e., mainly non-climatic factors for which records were not available -- were estimated as a smooth, monthly-varying function of time in the generalized additive models. Results reveal that the most important explanatory climatic variables are mean maximum monthly temperature, relative humidity and dustiness. Accounting for confounding factors (e.g., social processes) in the generalized additive models explains more of the year-to-year variation of meningococcal disease compared to those generalized linear models that do not account for such factors. Promising results from several models that included only explanatory variables that preceded the meningitis case data by 1-month suggest there may be potential for prediction of meningitis in northwest Nigeria to aid decision makers on this time scale.

  15. Estimating costs of care for meningitis infections in low- and middle-income countries.

    PubMed

    Portnoy, Allison; Jit, Mark; Lauer, Jeremy; Blommaert, Adriaan; Ozawa, Sachiko; Stack, Meghan; Murray, Jillian; Hutubessy, Raymond

    2015-05-07

    Meningitis infections are often associated with high mortality and risk of sequelae. The costs of treatment and care for meningitis are a great burden on health care systems, particularly in resource-limited settings. The objective of this study is to review data on the costs of care for meningitis in low- and middle-income countries, as well as to show how results could be extrapolated to countries without sound data. We conducted a systematic review of the literature from six databases to identify studies examining the cost of care in low- and middle-income countries for all age groups with suspected, probable, or confirmed meningitis. We extracted data on treatment costs and sequelae by infectious agent and/or pathogen, where possible. Using multiple regression analysis, a relationship between hospital costs and associated determinants was investigated in order to predict costs in countries with missing data. This relationship was used to predict treatment costs for all 144 low- and middle-income countries. The methodology of conducting a systematic review, extrapolating, and setting up a standard database can be used as a tool to inform cost-effectiveness analyses in situations where cost of care data are poor. Both acute and long-term costs of meningitis could be extrapolated to countries without reliable data. Although only bacterial causes of meningitis can be vaccine-preventable, a better understanding of the treatment costs for meningitis is crucial for low- and middle-income countries to assess the cost-effectiveness of proposed interventions in their country. This cost information will be important as inputs in future cost-effectiveness studies, particularly for vaccines. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. The effect of HIV infection on adult meningitis in Indonesia: a prospective cohort study.

    PubMed

    Ganiem, A Rizal; Parwati, Ida; Wisaksana, Rudi; van der Zanden, Adri; van de Beek, Diederik; Sturm, Patrick; van der Ven, Andre; Alisjahbana, Bachti; Brouwer, Anne-Marie; Kurniani, Nani; de Gans, Jan; van Crevel, Reinout

    2009-11-13

    Indonesia has a concentrated but rapidly growing HIV epidemic. We examined the effect of HIV on causative organisms, clinical features and prognosis of adult meningitis. A prospective cohort study. All adult patients at a referral hospital who underwent cerebrospinal fluid examination for suspected meningitis were examined for HIV and included in a prospective cohort study. Microbiological testing was done for common bacterial pathogens, mycobacteria and fungi. Patients were followed for at least 6 months, and logistic regression models were used to identify risk factors for mortality. Among 185 patients who mostly presented with subacute meningitis, 60% were male and the median age was 30 years. HIV infection was present in 25% of the patients; almost two-thirds were newly confirmed, and all presented with severe immunosuppression (median CD4 cell count 13/microl, range 2-98). One-third of HIV-infected patients had cryptococcal meningitis whereas two-thirds suffered from tuberculosis. After 1 month, 41% of patients had died. HIV infection was strongly associated with 1-month mortality (adjusted odds ratio 12.15; 95% confidence interval 3.04-15.72) and death during extended follow-up (hazard ratio 2.48; 95% confidence interval 1.97-5.74). Although HIV is still uncommon in the general population in Indonesia, its prevalence among adult meningitis cases already seems high. Mycobacterium tuberculosis and Cryptococcus neoformans are the main causes of meningitis in this setting, and mortality is very high, especially in HIV-infected patients. Our data suggest that adult meningitis cases in Indonesia should be screened routinely for HIV infection. Further studies are needed to address the high mortality.

  17. [Recurrent meningitis due to anatomical defects: The bacteria indicates its origin].

    PubMed

    Morgenstern Isaak, A; Bach Faig, A; Martínez, S; Martín-Nalda, A; Vázquez Méndez, E; Pumarola Segura, F; Soler-Palacín, P

    2015-06-01

    Recurrent meningitis is a rare disease. Anatomical abnormalities and immunodeficiency states are predisposing factors. Four cases, in which immunodeficiency was excluded, are presented. The causal microorganism led to the detection of the anatomical defect responsible for the recurrences. Retrospective review of 4 cases with clinical diagnosis of recurrent bacterial meningitis. Case 1: a thirty month-old boy with unilateral hearing loss, diagnosed with Mondini abnormality by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) after 2 episodes of Haemophilus influenzae meningitis. Surgical repair after third recurrence. Case 2: fourteen year-old girl diagnosed by MRI with cribriform plate defect after 3 episodes of meningitis due to Streptococcus pneumoniae. Ventriculoperitoneal shunt was placed. Case 3: girl with meningitis due to Staphylococcus aureus at 2 and 7 months. MRI shows occipital dermal sinus requiring excision. Complication with cerebellar abscesses because of a coexisting dermoid cyst. Case 4: child with meningitis due to Streptococcus bovis at 9 days and Enterococcus faecium, Klebsiella pneumoniae and Escherichia coli at 7 months, with positive cultures to Citrobacter freundii and E. faecium later on. Spinal MRI led to the diagnosis of Currarino syndrome with CSF fistula, which was surgically repaired. The 4 patients had undergone image studies reported as normal during the first episodes. In patients with recurrent meningitis the possibility of an anatomical defect should be considered. The isolated microorganism should help to locate it. It is essential to know the normal flora of the different anatomical sites. The definitive treatment is usually surgical. Copyright © 2014 Asociación Española de Pediatría. Published by Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  18. Case of Mycobacterium tuberculosis meningitis: Gram staining as a useful initial diagnostic clue for tuberculous meningitis.

    PubMed

    Kawakami, Sayoko; Kawamura, Yasuyosi; Nishiyama, Kyouhei; Hatanaka, Hiroki; Fujisaki, Ryuichi; Ono, Yasuo; Miyazawa, Yukihisa; Nishiya, Hajime

    2012-12-01

    A 32-year-old man was admitted to our hospital because of fever, headache, and loss of consciousness. Four days before admission, he had had difficulty speaking. On the day of admission, his colleague had found him to be unconscious and lying on his back. He was admitted to our hospital. The temperature at the eardrum was 35.2°C. Neurologic evaluation was negative. Computed tomography (CT) scan of the brain showed slight ventricular enlargement bilaterally. An X-ray film of the chest showed no abnormality. On the second hospital day, neck stiffness was noted. The cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) contained 870 white cells/μl, most of which were neutrophils; the glucose level in the CSF was 10 mg/dl, and the protein level was 140 mg/dl. Stained smears of the CSF, including Gram staining and India-ink preparations, disclosed no microorganisms. Capsular antigen tests for several bacteria were negative. Antimicrobial agents were started. However, by changing the microscope focus slightly while viewing Gram stains of the CSF, we could see brightened and Gram-positive bacilli that had been phagocytosed by neutrophils. This finding suggested the presence of Mycobacterium tuberculosis. Ziehl-Neelsen staining of the CSF and gastric juice revealed anti-acid bacilli. Polymerase chain reaction for M. tuberculosis in the gastric juice was positive. This case showed that Gram staining could be useful as an initial adjunct for the diagnosis of tuberculous meningitis, particularly when the CSF shows predominantly neutrocytic pleocytosis, but no other evidence of bacterial meningitis.

  19. An Acute Ibuprofen Overdose Masking a Severe Staphylococcus aureus Meningitis: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Picard, Katy; Boehm, Kevin M.

    2013-01-01

    Acute bacterial meningitis has a low incidence (3/100,000 in the United States) and yet high fatality rate (approximately 14–16%) and classically presents as a triad of fever, neck stiffness, and altered mental status. However, less than half of patients with meningitis present with this classic triad. We present the clinical course of a patient who initially presented to the emergency department after overdosing on ibuprofen for what he described as back pain secondary to mechanical injury. However, the patient's condition quickly deteriorated: he developed tachycardia, mental status changes, was intubated due to respiratory distress, and then suffered an 8-minute PEA arrest before return of spontaneous circulation was achieved. After the patient was stabilized, in addition to the nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID) overdose Staphylococcus aureus meningitis, bacteremia, and pneumonia were diagnosed. We report this case to illustrate that the initial presentation of meningitis may be extremely unusual especially in the setting of NSAID overdose and the acutely decompensating patient. As the risk of adverse clinical outcomes increases with delays in appropriate antibiotic therapy, it is therefore crucial to recognize the many signs and symptoms of meningitis, typical and atypical, and quickly begin appropriate treatment. PMID:23840977

  20. [Evaluation of the polymerase chain reaction technique for the diagnosis of meningitis caused by Neisseria meningitidis and Haemophilus influenzae].

    PubMed

    Margall, N; Majó, M; Sánchez, F; Roig, C; Latorre, C; Fontanals, D; Domínguez, A; Lobera, E; Sanfeliu, I; Prats, G

    1999-01-01

    Bacterial meningitis is a severe infection of the central nervous system (CNS), most frequently caused by Neisseria meningitidis in our setting. Microbiologic diagnosis of bacterial meningitis is not enough sensitive because its efficiency can be affected by the therapeutic regimen given to the patient. Polymerase chain reaction (PCR) can provide a more sensitive diagnosis and allow us to get an earlier result. To assess the sensitivity and specificity of a PCR technique for the diagnosis of meningitis caused by N. meningitidis and Haemophilus influenzae. Ninety-six patients who were attended because of suspected bacterial meningitis on the Hospital de Sant Joan de Déu, Corporació Sanitària Parc Taulí and Hospital de la Santa Creu i Sant Pau, and had negative results by conventional laboratory methods, were selected for the study. A total of 99 cerebrospinal fluid samples (CSF) were obtained and evaluated for PCR. DNA extracts of the CSF samples were amplified by universal primers. Amplification products were hybridized with specific probes for Haemophilus genus and N. meningitidis. Positive and negative controls were included to asses the reliability of PCR. Eight of the 99 CSF samples (8%) were positive by PCR and subsequent hybridization with the specific probe of N. meningitidis. None of the amplicons hybridized with the probe of Haemophilus genus. Thirteen percent of the patients (8/59) with clinical suspicious of non-neonatal sepsis or meningitis were diagnosed by PCR, amongst them, 36% of the cases (4/11) with initial diagnosis of meningococcal sepsis or meningitis. The sensitivity and the specificity of the PCR technique afford a complementary method to conventional ones, in special for the diagnosis of meningococcal meningitis in the group of pediatric patients.

  1. Two cases of rheumatoid meningitis.

    PubMed

    Magaki, Shino; Chang, Edward; Hammond, Robert R; Yang, Isaac; Mackenzie, Ian R A; Chou, Benedict T; Choi, Soo I; Jen, Joanna C; Pope, Whitney B; Bell, David A; Vinters, Harry V

    2016-02-01

    Central nervous system (CNS) involvement by rheumatoid arthritis (RA) in the form of rheumatoid meningitis (RM) is rare and most commonly occurs in the setting of longstanding severe RA. Due to a wide range of clinical presentations and nonspecific laboratory findings, it presents a diagnostic challenge often requiring brain biopsy. Only a few histopathologically confirmed cases have been described in the literature. Our aim is to describe two cases of RM and review the literature. The first case is of a previously healthy 37-year-old man who presented with severe headaches and focal neurologic deficits. Magnetic resonance imaging demonstrated abnormal leptomeningeal enhancement in the left frontal and parietal sulci. The second case is of a 62-year-old woman with a history of mild chronic joint pain who presented with confusion, personality changes and seizures. Both patients ultimately underwent brain biopsy which demonstrated RM on pathologic examination. Administration of corticosteroids resulted in significant clinical improvement in both cases. To our knowledge, our unusual case of RM in the young man is the fifth reported case of rheumatoid meningitis in a patient with no prior history of RA. Such an atypical presentation makes diagnosis even more difficult and highlights the need for awareness of this entity in the diagnostic consideration of a patient presenting with unexplained neurologic symptoms. Our literature review underscores the clinical and pathologic heterogeneity of CNS involvement in RA. © 2015 Japanese Society of Neuropathology.

  2. In Brief: Forecasting meningitis threats

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Showstack, Randy

    2008-12-01

    The University Corporation for Atmospheric Research (UCAR), in conjunction with a team of health and weather organizations, has launched a project to provide weather forecasts to medical officials in Africa to help reduce outbreaks of meningitis. The forecasts will enable local health care providers to target vaccination programs more effectively. In 2009, meteorologists with the National Center for Atmospheric Research, which is managed by UCAR, will begin issuing 14-day forecasts of atmospheric conditions in Ghana. Later, UCAR plans to work closely with health experts from several African countries to design and test a decision support system to provide health officials with useful meteorological information. ``By targeting forecasts in regions where meningitis is a threat, we may be able to help vulnerable populations. Ultimately, we hope to build on this project and provide information to public health programs battling weather-related diseases in other parts of the world,'' said Rajul Pandya, director of UCAR's Community Building Program. Funding for the project comes from a $900,000 grant from Google.org, the philanthropic arm of the Internet search company.

  3. Climate Change and Cerebrospinal Meningitis in the Ghanaian Meningitis Belt

    PubMed Central

    Codjoe, Samuel Nii Ardey; Nabie, Vivian Adams

    2014-01-01

    Cerebrospinal meningitis (CSM) is one of the infectious diseases likely to be affected by climate change. Although there are a few studies on the climate change-CSM nexus, none has considered perceptions of community members. However, understanding public perception in relation to a phenomenon is very significant for the design of effective communication and mitigation strategies as well as coping and adaptation strategies. This paper uses focus group discussions (FGDs) to fill this knowledge lacuna. Results show that although a few elderly participants ascribed fatal causes (disobedience to gods, ancestors, and evil spirits) to CSM infections during FGDs, majority of participants rightly linked CSM infections to dry, very hot and dusty conditions experienced during the dry season. Finally, community members use a suite of adaptation options to curb future CSM epidemics. PMID:25003550

  4. Chronic Meningitis: Simplifying a Diagnostic Challenge.

    PubMed

    Baldwin, Kelly; Whiting, Chris

    2016-03-01

    Chronic meningitis can be a diagnostic dilemma for even the most experienced clinician. Many times, the differential diagnosis is broad and encompasses autoimmune, neoplastic, and infectious etiologies. This review will focus on a general approach to chronic meningitis to simplify the diagnostic challenges many clinicians face. The article will also review the most common etiologies of chronic meningitis in some detail including clinical presentation, diagnostic testing, treatment, and outcomes. By using a case-based approach, we will focus on the key elements of clinical presentation and laboratory analysis that will yield the most rapid and accurate diagnosis in these complicated cases.

  5. Meningitis Caused by Candida Dubliniensis in a Patient with Cirrhosis: A Case Report and Review of the Literature.

    PubMed

    Yamahiro, Atsuko; Lau, K H Vincent; Peaper, David R; Villanueva, Merceditas

    2016-08-01

    Candida species, including Candida dubliniensis, are a rare cause of meningitis. Herein, we report the second case of C. dubliniensis meningitis in a 49-year-old man with a history of hepatitis C virus-related cirrhosis, substance use disorder, and recent exposure to intravenous antibiotic therapy, presenting with confusion, abnormal gait, and urinary incontinence. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the brain showed marked hydrocephalus and leptomeningeal enhancement. Initial cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) studies were concerning for bacterial meningitis, although cultures were negative. Despite empiric treatment with broad-spectrum antibiotics, the patient's mental status declined. The diagnosis of C. dubliniensis meningitis was not made until the third lumbar puncture. The patient was treated with liposomal amphotericin B and flucytosine. Despite improvement of hydrocephalus on MRI of the brain and sterilization of CSF, the patient's mental status declined and he expired. This case highlights the difficulty in the diagnosis of C. dubliniensis meningitis as multiple lumbar punctures may be necessary. C. dubliniensis meningitis should be considered in the differential diagnosis for a patient with risk factors such as end-stage liver disease, human immunodeficiency virus infection, recent chemotherapy, substance use disorders, and recent broad-spectrum antibiotic use. A high index of suspicion is necessary as delay in initiation of therapy is associated with high mortality. The optimal treatment strategy has not been determined.

  6. Meningitis caused by Neisseria Meningitidis, Hemophilus Influenzae Type B and Streptococcus Pneumoniae during 2005–2012 in Turkey

    PubMed Central

    Ceyhan, Mehmet; Gürler, Nezahat; Ozsurekci, Yasemin; Keser, Melike; Aycan, Ahmet Emre; Gurbuz, Venhar; Salman, Nuran; Camcioglu, Yildiz; Dinleyici, Ener Cagri; Ozkan, Sengul; Sensoy, Gulnar; Belet, Nursen; Alhan, Emre; Hacimustafaoglu, Mustafa; Celebi, Solmaz; Uzun, Hakan; Faik Oner, Ahmet; Kurugol, Zafer; Ali Tas, Mehmet; Aygun, Denizmen; Oncel, Eda Karadag; Celik, Melda; Yasa, Olcay; Akin, Fatih; Coşkun, Yavuz

    2014-01-01

    Successful vaccination policies for protection from bacterial meningitis are dependent on determination of the etiology of bacterial meningitis. Cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) samples were obtained prospectively from children from 1 month to ≤ 18 years of age hospitalized with suspected meningitis, in order to determine the etiology of meningitis in Turkey. DNA evidence of Neisseria meningitidis (N. meningitidis), Streptococcus pneumoniae (S. pneumoniae), and Hemophilus influenzae type b (Hib) was detected using multiplex polymerase chain reaction (PCR). In total, 1452 CSF samples were evaluated and bacterial etiology was determined in 645 (44.4%) cases between 2005 and 2012; N. meningitidis was detected in 333 (51.6%), S. pneumoniae in 195 (30.2%), and Hib in 117 (18.1%) of the PCR positive samples. Of the 333 N. meningitidis positive samples 127 (38.1%) were identified as serogroup W-135, 87 (26.1%) serogroup B, 28 (8.4%) serogroup A and 3 (0.9%) serogroup Y; 88 (26.4%) were non-groupable. As vaccines against the most frequent bacterial isolates in this study are available and licensed, these results highlight the need for broad based protection against meningococcal disease in Turkey. PMID:25483487

  7. McArdle Disease Misdiagnosed as Meningitis

    PubMed Central

    Scalco, Renata Siciliani; Chatfield, Sherryl; Junejo, Muhammad Hyder; Booth, Suzanne; Pattni, Jatin; Godfrey, Richard; Quinlivan, Ros

    2016-01-01

    Patient: Female, 44 Final Diagnosis: McArdle disease Symptoms: Exercise intolerance • muscle contracture • myalgia • myoglobinuria • recurrent rhabdomyolysis Medication: — Clinical Procedure: — Specialty: Neurology Objective: Rare disease Background: McArdle disease is a glycogen storage disorder mainly characterized by exercise intolerance. Prolonged muscle contracture is also a feature of this condition and may lead to rhabdomyolysis (RM), which is a serious event characterized by acute skeletal muscle damage. Case Report: A 44-year-old female patient presented with an acute contracture of the posterior neck muscles, causing severe nuchal rigidity. The contracture was induced during a dental extraction as she held her mouth open for a prolonged period, with her neck in a rigid position. She presented with severe pain in her ear and head, as well as fever, vomiting, and confusion. Based on her symptoms, she was initially misdiagnosed with bacterial meningitis and experienced an acute allergic reaction to the systemic penicillin she was subsequently administered. Lumbar puncture results were normal. High serum creatine kinase (CK) levels, recurrent exercise-related muscle symptoms, and a previous history of recurrent myoglobinuria raised the suspicion of an underlying neuromuscular condition. McArdle disease was confirmed by muscle biopsy and a genetic test, which revealed that the patient was homozygous for the R50X mutation in the PYGM gene. Conclusions: This case illustrates that even seemingly innocuous movements, if rapid isotonic or prolonged isometric in nature, can elicit a muscle contracture in McArdle disease patients. Here, we highlight the need for careful management in this patient population even during routine healthcare procedures. The allergic reaction to antibiotics emphasises that misdiagnoses may result in iatrogenic harm. PMID:27899787

  8. [Meningitis and brain abscess caused by Streptococcus intermedius in a patient infected with HIV-1].

    PubMed

    Vallalta Morales, M; Solaz Moreno, E; Lacruz Rodrigo, J; Salavert Lletí, M; Silla Burdalo, G; Pérez-Bellés, C

    2005-06-01

    Streptococcus milleri group have been recognized as an important pathogens for abscess formation in various organs. Streptococci other than Streptococcus pneumoniae are a rare cause of bacterial meningitis in adults and can be associated with the presence of an undiagnosed brain abscess. Brain abscess is a focal collection within the brain parenchyma which can arise as a complication of a variety of infections. The most common etiologic organisms in clinical series have been microaerophilic streptococci and anaerobic bacteria. Although intracranial mass lesions that occur as a result of infection have commonly been reported in patients infected with the human immunodeficiency virus, brain abscess due to the common bacterial pathogens are rarely described in HIV infected patients and Toxoplasma gondii is the organism most frequently isolated from stereotactic brain biopsy in these patients. We report a patient with both HIV-1 infection and streptococcal meningitis secondary to brain abscess caused by S. intermedius.

  9. Enterobacter Meningitis and Challenges in Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Noor, Jawad; Yegneswaran, Balaji; Kodali, Hanish

    2016-01-01

    Neurosurgical interventions are rarely associated with meningitis with a very low incidence rate ranging from 1.1% to 2.5%. Gram negative bacillary meningitis first described in the 1940’s, previously uncommon has been increasing in the recent past associated with advanced age, immunosuppression and neurosurgery. Enterobacter meningitis though relatively uncommon is recently increasing in incidence and treatment is frequently complicated due to resistance to antibiotics making this a challenging, difficult to treat infection that may be associated with adverse clinical outcomes. Here, we describe a case of a 27-year-old patient diagnosed with brain sarcoma at the age of four years, who presented with Enterobacter meningitis following a neurosurgical intervention for resection of a recurrent brain tumor (meningioma on pathology) and had a prolonged hospital stay with a difficult to treat infection. PMID:28208914

  10. Amoxicillin-induced acute aseptic meningitis.

    PubMed

    Prieto-González, Sergio; Escoda, Rosa; Coloma, Emmanuel; Grau, Josep M

    2011-03-01

    A 58-year-old man presented to the hospital with fever and headache after amoxicillin intake. Physical examination, laboratory, and a cranial CT scan were unremarkable. Cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) testing revealed lymphocytic pleocytosis. After discontinuation of amoxicillin and symptomatic care, the patient quickly improved. Interestingly, he had had two prior episodes of aseptic meningitis that were probably also related to the administration of amoxicillin. Aseptic meningitis can be caused by multiple non-infectious conditions including drugs, malignancy, and autoimmune diseases. We report a case associated with amoxicillin that meets the criteria of drug-induced aseptic meningitis. Considering the wide utilization of amoxicillin, healthcare providers should be aware of it as a possible cause of drug-induced aseptic meningitis.

  11. A Practical Approach to Meningitis and Encephalitis.

    PubMed

    Richie, Megan B; Josephson, S Andrew

    2015-12-01

    Meningitis is an inflammatory syndrome involving the meninges that classically manifests with headache and nuchal rigidity and is diagnosed by cerebrospinal fluid examination. In contrast, encephalitis refers to inflammation of the brain parenchyma itself and often results in focal neurologic deficits or seizures. In this article, the authors review the differential diagnosis of meningitis and encephalitis, with an emphasis on infectious etiologies. The recommended practical clinical approach focuses on early high-yield diagnostic testing and empiric antimicrobial administration, given the high morbidity associated with these diseases and the time-sensitive nature of treatment initiation. If the initial workup does not yield a diagnosis, further etiology-specific testing based upon risk factors and clinical characteristics should be pursued. Effective treatment is available for many causes of meningitis and encephalitis, and when possible should address both the primary disease process as well as potential complications.

  12. Colibactin Contributes to the Hypervirulence of pks+ K1 CC23 Klebsiella pneumoniae in Mouse Meningitis Infections

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Min-Chi; Chen, Ying-Tsong; Chiang, Ming-Ko; Wang, Yao-Chen; Hsiao, Pei-Yi; Huang, Yi-Jhen; Lin, Ching-Ting; Cheng, Ching-Chang; Liang, Chih-Lung; Lai, Yi-Chyi

    2017-01-01

    Klebsiella pneumoniae is the most common pathogen of community-acquired meningitis in Taiwan. However, the lack of a physiologically relevant meningitis model for K. pneumoniae has impeded research into its pathogenesis mechanism. Based on the core genome MLST analyses, the hypervirulent K1 K. pneumoniae strains, which are etiologically implicated in adult meningitis, mostly belong to a single clonal complex, CC23. Some K1 CC23 K. pneumoniae strains carry a gene cluster responsible for colibactin production. Colibactin is a small genotoxic molecule biosynthesized by an NRPS-PKS complex, which is encoded by genes located on the pks island. Compared to other hypervirulent K. pneumoniae which primarily infect the liver, the colibactin-producing (pks+) K1 CC23 strains had significant tropism toward the brain of BALB/c mice. We aimed in this study to develop a physiologically relevant meningitis model with the use of pks+ K1 CC23 K. pneumoniae. Acute meningitis was successfully induced in adult BALB/c male mice through orogastric, intranasal, and intravenous inoculation of pks+ K1 CC23 K. pneumoniae. Besides the typical symptoms of bacterial meningitis, severe DNA damages, and caspase 3-independent cell death were elicited by the colibactin-producing K1 CC23 K. pneumoniae strain. The deletion of clbA, which abolished the production of colibactin, substantially hindered K. pneumoniae hypervirulence in the key pathogenic steps toward the development of meningitis. Our findings collectively demonstrated that colibactin was necessary but not sufficient for the meningeal tropism of pks+ K1 CC23 K. pneumoniae, and the mouse model established in this study can be applied to identify other virulence factors participating in the development of this life-threatening disease. PMID:28409125

  13. Temporal changes of oxidative stress markers in Escherichia coli K1-induced experimental meningitis in a neonatal rat model.

    PubMed

    Giridharan, Vijayasree V; Simões, Lutiana R; Dagostin, Valdemira S; Generoso, Jaqueline S; Rezin, Gislaine T; Florentino, Drielly; Muniz, Jhonata P; Collodel, Allan; Petronilho, Fabricia; Quevedo, Joao; Barichello, Tatiana

    2017-07-13

    Despite advances in antimicrobial therapy and advanced critical care neonatal bacterial meningitis has a mortality rate of over 10% and induces neurological sequelae in 20-50% of cases. Escherichia coli K1 (E. coli K1) is the most common gram-negative organism causing neonatal meningitis and is the second most common cause behind group B streptococcus. We previously reported that an E. coli K1 experimental meningitis infection in neonatal rats resulted in habituation and aversive memory impairment and a significant increase in cytokine levels in adulthood. In this present study, we investigated the oxidative stress profile including malondialdehyde (MDA) levels, carbonyl protein formation, myeloperoxidase activity (MPO) activity, superoxide dismutase (SOD) activity and catalase (CAT) activity 6, 12, 24, 48, 72 and 96h after E. coli K1 experimental meningitis infection. In addition, sulfhydryl groups, nitrite and nitrate levels and activity of the mitochondrial respiratory chain enzymes were also measured in the frontal cortex and hippocampus of neonatal rats. The results from this study demonstrated a significant increase in MDA, protein carbonyls and MPO activity and a simultaneous decrease in SOD activity in the hippocampus of the neonatal meningitis survivors but the same was not observed in frontal cortex. In addition, we also observed a significant increase in complex IV activity in the hippocampus and frontal cortex of meningitis survivor rats. Thus, the results from this study reaffirmed the possible role of oxidative stress, nitric oxide and its related compounds in the complex pathophysiology of E. coli K1-induced bacterial meningitis. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Acute versus subacute community-acquired meningitis: Analysis of 611 patients.

    PubMed

    Sulaiman, Tarek; Salazar, Lucrecia; Hasbun, Rodrigo

    2017-09-01

    Community-acquired meningitis can be classified into acute and subacute presentations by the duration of illness of ≤ or >5 days, respectively. There are currently no studies comparing the clinical features, management decisions, etiologies, and outcomes between acute and subacute presentations.It is a retrospective study of adults with community-acquired meningitis hospitalized in Houston, TX between January 2005 and January 2010. An adverse clinical outcome was defined as a Glasgow Outcome Scale score of ≤4.A total of 611 patients were identified, of which 458 (75%) were acute and 153 subacute (25%). The most common etiologies were unknown in 418 (68.4%), viral in 94 (15.4%), bacterial in 47 (7.7%), fungal in 42 patients (6.9%), and other noninfectious etiologies in 6 (1%). Patients with subacute meningitis were more likely to be immunosuppressed or have comorbidities, had fungal etiologies, and had higher rates of hypoglycorrachia and abnormal neurological findings (P <.05). Patients with an acute presentation were more likely to be treated empirically with intravenous antibiotics and had higher cerebrospinal fluid pleocytosis and serum white blood cell counts (P <.05). On logistic regression, age >65 years and abnormal neurological findings were predictive of an adverse clinical outcome in both acute and subacute meningitis, whereas fever was also a significant prognostic factor in acute meningitis. (P <.05).Acute and subacute meningitis differ in regards to clinical presentations, etiologies, laboratory findings, and management decisions, but did not differ in rates of adverse clinical outcomes. Future studies including thoroughly investigated patients with new diagnostic molecular methods may show different results and outcomes.

  15. A Comparison of Hospital Versus Outpatient Parenteral Antibiotic Therapy at Home for Pyelonephritis and Meningitis.

    PubMed

    Hensey, Conor C; Sett, Arun; Connell, Tom G; Bryant, Penelope A

    2017-09-01

    Despite the benefits of home treatment with outpatient parenteral antimicrobial therapy (OPAT), children with pyelonephritis and meningitis are rarely included. We aimed to compare clinical characteristics and outcomes between hospital and home treatment for these conditions and to identify factors influencing home treatment. Children admitted to the hospital with pyelonephritis or proven and presumed bacterial meningitis from January 1, 2012, to December 31, 2013 were identified retrospectively. Patients who received any OPAT (home group) received daily visits via our Hospital-in-the-Home (HITH) program; inpatients (hospital group) received standard care. Clinical and demographic features, length of stay, readmission rate and cost were compared between hospital and home groups. One hundred thirty-nine children with pyelonephritis and 70 with meningitis were identified, of which 127 and 44 were potentially suitable for OPAT, respectively. Of these, 12 (9%) with pyelonephritis received OPAT, contrasting with 29 (66%) with meningitis. Clinical features did not differ between hospital- and home-treated patients for either condition. Patients with meningitis in the hospital group were younger than those transferred to HITH (1 vs. 2 months; P = 0.01). All patients were afebrile before transfer to HITH. Admissions for pyelonephritis were brief with inpatients having a shorter length of stay than home patients (median: 3 vs. 4.5 days; P = 0.002). Unplanned readmission rates were comparable across all groups. Transfer to HITH resulted in a saving of AU$178,180. Children with pyelonephritis and meningitis can feasibly receive OPAT. Age, treatment duration and fever influence this decision. None of these should be barriers to OPAT, and the cost savings support change in practice.

  16. Diffuse pneumocephalus in neonatal Citrobacter meningitis.

    PubMed

    Alviedo, Joseph N; Sood, Beena G; Aranda, Jacob V; Becker, Cristie

    2006-11-01

    Pneumocephalus, intracranial air or gas collection, associated with neonatal meningitis is extremely rare. We report the first case in the United States and the second case in the world of intracranial gas accumulation in a neonate with Citrobacter koseri meningitis. The clinical presentation was acute with pneumocephalus demonstrated by cranial sonography and computed tomography. The clinical course was fatal despite the prompt administration of antibiotics.

  17. Environmental Risk and Meningitis Epidemics in Africa

    PubMed Central

    Molesworth, Anna M.; Cuevas, Luis E.; Connor, Stephen J.; Morse, Andrew P.

    2003-01-01

    Epidemics of meningococcal meningitis occur in areas with particular environmental characteristics. We present evidence that the relationship between the environment and the location of these epidemics is quantifiable and propose a model based on environmental variables to identify regions at risk for meningitis epidemics. These findings, which have substantial implications for directing surveillance activities and health policy, provide a basis for monitoring the impact of climate variability and environmental change on epidemic occurrence in Africa. PMID:14609465

  18. Multidrug-resistant Acinetobacter meningitis in children

    PubMed Central

    Shah, Ira; Kapdi, Muznah

    2016-01-01

    Acinetobacter species have emerged as one of the most troublesome pathogens for healthcare institutions globally. In more recent times, nosocomial infections involving the central nervous system, skin and soft tissue, and bone have emerged as highly problematic. Acinetobacter species infection is common in intensive care units; however, Acinetobacter baumannii meningitis is rarely reported. Here, we report two cases of Acinetobacter baumannii meningitis which was multidrug resistance and ultimately required the carbapenem group of drugs for the treatment.

  19. Mollaret's meningitis associated with cerebrospinal fluid leak.

    PubMed

    Plit, M L; Miller, G B; Berkowitz, F E; Gear, J H

    1982-10-23

    Mollaret's meningitis or the benign recurrent meningitis syndrome is a rare disorder not previously described in Africa. The syndrome has a characteristic clinical presentation with spinal fluid pleocytosis, often with unusual 'epithelial' cells. With contemporary techniques no causative organism has been incriminated. The aetiology remains speculative, but we report on a patient found to have a cerebrospinal fluid leak, which may represent a factor in the pathogenesis of this disorder.

  20. Contribution of lethal toxin and edema toxin to the pathogenesis of anthrax meningitis.

    PubMed

    Ebrahimi, Celia M; Sheen, Tamsin R; Renken, Christian W; Gottlieb, Roberta A; Doran, Kelly S

    2011-07-01

    Bacillus anthracis is a Gram-positive spore-forming bacterium that causes anthrax disease in humans and animals. Systemic infection is characterized by septicemia, toxemia, and meningitis, the main neurological complication associated with high mortality. We have shown previously that B. anthracis Sterne is capable of blood-brain barrier (BBB) penetration, establishing the classic signs of meningitis, and that infection is dependent on the expression of both major anthrax toxins, lethal toxin (LT) and edema toxin (ET). Here we further investigate the contribution of the individual toxins to BBB disruption using isogenic toxin mutants deficient in lethal factor, ΔLF, and edema factor, ΔEF. Acute infection with B. anthracis Sterne and the ΔLF mutant resulted in disruption of human brain microvascular endothelial cell (hBMEC) monolayer integrity and tight junction protein zona occludens-1, while the result for cells infected with the ΔEF mutant was similar to that for the noninfected control. A significant decrease in bacterial invasion of BBB endothelium in vitro was observed during infection with the ΔLF strain, suggesting a prominent role for LT in promoting BBB interaction. Further, treatment of hBMECs with purified LT or chemicals that mimic LT action on host signaling pathways rescued the hypoinvasive phenotype of the ΔLF mutant and resulted in increased bacterial uptake. We also observed that toxin expression reduced bacterial intracellular survival by inducing the bulk degradative autophagy pathway in host cells. Finally, in a murine model of anthrax meningitis, mice infected with the ΔLF mutant exhibited no mortality, brain bacterial load, or evidence of meningitis compared to mice infected with the parental or ΔEF strains.

  1. Treatment complications in children with lyme meningitis.

    PubMed

    Thompson, Amy D; Cohn, Keri A; Shah, Samir S; Lyons, Todd; Welsh, Elizabeth J; Hines, Elizabeth M; Nigrovic, Lise E

    2012-10-01

    The rate and type of treatment complications in children treated for Lyme meningitis have not been described. We performed a retrospective cohort study of children with Lyme meningitis who presented to 1 of 3 emergency departments located in Lyme disease endemic areas between 1997 and 2010. We defined a case of Lyme meningitis as a child with cerebrospinal fluid pleocytosis and either positive Lyme serology or an erythema migrans rash. We identified prescribed treatment and reasons for all return visits. Our primary outcome was the presence of any treatment complication within 30 days of diagnosis. We identified 157 patients with Lyme meningitis with a median age of 10 years (interquartile range: 7-13 years). Of the 149 children with Lyme meningitis and available follow-up records, 39 (26%) had 1 or more complications, and 21 (14%) required a change in prescribed antibiotic therapy. The median time for developing the first complication was 11 days (interquartile range: 9-14 days). Ten percent of the patients had an adverse drug reaction. Of the 144 children who had a peripherally inserted central catheter placed, 25 (17%) had at least 1 peripherally inserted central catheter-associated complication: 14 (10%) had a mechanical problem, 11 (8%) had an infectious complication and 1 (1%) had a venous thromboembolism. As current Lyme meningitis treatment regimens have substantial associated morbidity, future research should investigate the efficacy of alternate regimens.

  2. Factors associated with the occurrence of hearing loss after pneumococcal meningitis.

    PubMed

    Worsøe, Lise; Cayé-Thomasen, Per; Brandt, Christian Thomas; Thomsen, Jens; Østergaard, Christian

    2010-10-15

    On the basis of a nationwide registration during a 5-year period (1999-2003), the frequency and severity of hearing loss was investigated retrospectively in 343 consecutive Danish patients who survived pneumococcal meningitis, to identify important risk factors (including the pneumococcal serotype) for development of hearing loss. Results of blood and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) biochemistry, bacterial serotyping, follow-up audiological examinations, and medical records were collected, and disease-related risk factors for hearing loss were identified. The mean pure-tone hearing threshold levels were compared with normative data. Of 240 patients examined by use of audiometry, 129 (54%) had a hearing deficit, and 50 (39%) of these 129 patients were not suspected of hearing loss at discharge from hospital. Of the 240 patients, 16 (7%) had profound unilateral hearing loss, and another 16 (7%) had bilateral profound hearing loss. Significant risk factors for hearing loss were advanced age, the presence of comorbidity, severity of meningitis, a low CSF glucose level, a high CSF protein level, and a certain pneumococcal serotype (P < .05). By applying multivariate logistic regression analysis, we found that advanced age, female sex, and a certain serotype were significant risk factors, because fewer patients with serotype 6B had hearing loss than did patients with serotype 12F (P = .03), which was the most commonly occurring serotype. Hearing loss is common after pneumococcal meningitis, and audiometry should be performed on all those who survive pneumococcal meningitis. Important risk factors for hearing loss are advanced age, female sex, severity of meningitis, and bacterial serotype.

  3. Microscopic morphology and histology of the human meninges.

    PubMed

    Weller, R O

    2005-03-01

    The meninges comprise the dura mater and the leptomeninges (arachnoid and pia mater). Dura forms an outer endosteal layer related to the bones of the skull and spine and an inner layer closely applied to the arachnoid mater. Leptomeninges have multiple functions and anatomical relationships. The outer parietal layer of arachnoid is impermeable to CSF due to tight intercellular junctions; elsewhere leptomeningeal cells form demosomes and gap junctions. Trabeculae of leptomeninges compartmentalize the subarachnoid space and join the pia to arachnoid mater. In bacterial meningitis leptomeningeal cells secrete cytokines. Pia mater is reflected from the surface of the brain and spinal cord onto arteries and veins, thus separating the subarachnoid space from the brain and cord. A sheath of leptomeninges accompanies arteries into the brain and is related to the pathways for the drainage of interstitial fluid that play a role in inflammatory responses in the brain and appear to be blocked by amyloid-beta in Alzheimer's disease. Specialised leptomeningeal cells in the stroma of the choroid plexus form collagen whorls that become calcified with age. Leptomeningeal cells also form channels in the core and apical cap of arachnoid granulations for the drainage of CSF into venous sinuses. In the spine, leptomeninges form highly perforated intermediate sheets of arachnoid and delicate ligaments that compartmentalize the subarachnoid space; dentate ligaments anchor subpial collagen to the dura mater and stabilize the spinal cord. Despite the multiple anatomical arrangements and physiological functions, leptomeningeal cells retain many histological features that are similar from site to site.

  4. Diagnostic accuracy of two multiplex real-time polymerase chain reaction assays for the diagnosis of meningitis in children in a resource-limited setting

    PubMed Central

    Khumalo, Jermaine; Nicol, Mark; Hardie, Diana; Muloiwa, Rudzani; Mteshana, Phindile

    2017-01-01

    Introduction Accurate etiological diagnosis of meningitis is important, but difficult in resource-limited settings due to prior administration of antibiotics and lack of viral diagnostics. We aimed to develop and validate 2 real-time multiplex PCR (RT-PCR) assays for the detection of common causes of community-acquired bacterial and viral meningitis in South African children. Methods We developed 2 multiplex RT- PCRs for detection of S. pneumoniae, N. meningitidis, H. influenzae, enteroviruses, mumps virus and herpes simplex virus. We tested residual CSF samples from children presenting to a local paediatric hospital over a one-year period, whose CSF showed an abnormal cell count. Results were compared with routine diagnostic tests and the final discharge diagnosis. We calculated accuracy of the bacterial RT-PCR assay compared to CSF culture and using World Health Organisation definitions of laboratory-confirmed bacterial meningitis. Results From 292 samples, bacterial DNA was detected in 12 (4.1%) and viral nucleic acids in 94 (32%). Compared to CSF culture, the sensitivity and specificity of the bacterial RT-PCR was 100% and 97.2% with complete agreement in organism identification. None of the cases positive by viral RT-PCR had a bacterial cause confirmed on CSF culture. Only 9/90 (10%) of patients diagnosed clinically as bacterial meningitis or partially treated bacterial meningitis tested positive with the bacterial RT-PCR. Discussion In this population the use of 2 multiplex RT-PCRs targeting 6 common pathogens gave promising results. If introduced into routine diagnostic testing, these multiplex RT-PCR assays would supplement other diagnostic tests, and have the potential to limit unnecessary antibiotic therapy and hospitalisation. PMID:28346504

  5. Meningitis and Climate: From Science to Practice

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Perez Garcia-Pando, Carlos; Thomson, Madeleine C.; Stanton, Michelle C.; Diggle, Peter J.; Hopson, Thomas; Pandya, Rajul; Miller, Ron L.; Hugonnet, Stephane

    2014-01-01

    Meningococcal meningitis is a climate sensitive infectious disease. The regional extent of the Meningitis Belt in Africa, where the majority of epidemics occur, was originally defined by Lapeysonnie in the 1960s. A combination of climatic and environmental conditions and biological and social factors have been associated to the spatial and temporal patterns of epidemics observed since the disease first emerged in West Africa over a century ago. However, there is still a lack of knowledge and data that would allow disentangling the relative effects of the diverse risk factors upon epidemics. The Meningitis Environmental Risk Information Technologies Initiative (MERIT), a collaborative research-to-practice consortium, seeks to inform national and regional prevention and control strategies across the African Meningitis Belt through the provision of new data and tools that better determine risk factors. In particular MERIT seeks to consolidate a body of knowledge that provides evidence of the contribution of climatic and environmental factors to seasonal and year-to-year variations in meningococcal meningitis incidence at both district and national scales. Here we review recent research and practice seeking to provide useful information for the epidemic response strategy of National Ministries of Health in the Meningitis Belt of Africa. In particular the research and derived tools described in this paper have focused at "getting science into policy and practice" by engaging with practitioner communities under the umbrella of MERIT to ensure the relevance of their work to operational decision-making. We limit our focus to that of reactive vaccination for meningococcal meningitis. Important but external to our discussion is the development and implementation of the new conjugate vaccine, which specifically targets meningococcus A

  6. Risk of Bacterial Meningitis in Children with Cochlear Implants

    MedlinePlus

    ... 5 Chapter 6 EHDI-IS Functional Standards EHDI Electronic Health Records EHDI Data Analysis and Statistical Hub (DASH) Articles & Key Findings Research & Tracking EHDI Funded Projects EHDI State Programs Public Health Cycle Recommendations & Guidelines ...

  7. Interaction of fibrinogen and muramidase-released protein promotes the development of Streptococcus suis meningitis

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Junping; Kong, Decong; Zhang, Shengwei; Jiang, Hua; Zheng, Yuling; Zang, Yating; Hao, Huaijie; Jiang, Yongqiang

    2015-01-01

    Muramidase-released protein (MRP) is as an important virulence marker of Streptococcus suis (S. suis) serotype 2. Our previous works have shown that MRP can bind human fibrinogen (hFg); however, the function of this interaction in S. suis meningitis is not known. In this study, we found that the deletion of mrp significantly impairs the hFg-mediated adherence and traversal ability of S. suis across human cerebral microvascular endothelial cells (hCMEC/D3). Measurement of the permeability to Lucifer yellow in vitro and Evans blue extravasation in vivo show that the MRP-hFg interaction significantly increases the permeability of the blood–brain barrier (BBB). In the mouse meningitis model, wild type S. suis caused higher bacterial loads in the brain and more severe histopathological signs of meningitis than the mrp mutant at day 3 post-infection. Western blot analysis and immunofluorescence observations reveal that the MRP-hFg interaction can destroy the cell adherens junction protein p120-catenin of hCMEC/D3. These results indicate that the MRP-hFg interaction is important in the development of S. suis meningitis. PMID:26441928

  8. Cerebrospinal fluid otorrhea and pseudomonal meningitis in a child with Mondini dysplasia: case report.

    PubMed

    Hernandez, R Nick; Changa, Abhinav R; Bassani, Luigi; Jyung, Robert W; Liu, James K

    2015-09-01

    Mondini dysplasia is a rare congenital inner ear malformation that presents with abnormal cochlear development with accompanied vestibular dilation and vestibular aqueduct enlargement. This dysfunctional anatomy provides the potential for sensorineural hearing deficits, cerebrospinal fluid leaks, and severe cases of recurrent meningitis. We present the case of a child with Mondini dysplasia who presented with unilateral hearing loss and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) otorrhea that was surgically repaired through a combined middle fossa/transmeatal middle ear approach to alleviate any recurrence of infection and cerebrospinal fluid otorrhea. Postoperatively, the patient remained neurologically stable without any further CSF leakage. CSF cultures revealed a Pseudomonas aeruginosa infection, a rare occurrence within the context of Mondini dysplasia. Retrograde bacterial spread from the external ear canal into the CSF space has been theorized as the possible pathogenesis of the resulting meningitis. The patient was successfully treated with intravenous antibiotics without any neurologic complications. Although Mondini dysplasia is a rare malformation, the life-threatening sequelae of meningitis that can result from the dysfunctional anatomy makes it a condition that requires elevated clinical vigilance, especially when considering children with hearing loss associated with recurrent meningitis, otorrhea, or rhinorrhea.

  9. Current meningitis outbreak in Ghana: Historical perspectives and the importance of diagnostics.

    PubMed

    Kwarteng, Alexander; Amuasi, John; Annan, Augustina; Ahuno, Samuel; Opare, David; Nagel, Michael; Vinnemeier, Christof; May, Jürgen; Owusu-Dabo, Ellis

    2017-05-01

    Bacterial meningitis continues to be one of the most dreaded infections in sub-Saharan Africa and other countries that fall in the "meningitis belt" due to recurrent nature of the infection and the sequel of deliberating effects among survivors even after treatment. Ghana has had recurrent epidemics in the past but has been free from high mortality levels. Whereas reasons for the low reported number of deaths in the past are unclear, we hypothesize that it may be due to increased vaccination from expanded program on immunization (EPI) and consequent herd immunity of the general population. As at the end of February, 2016, 100 individuals were reported to have died out of 500 recorded cases. The infection may cause severe brain damage and kills at least 1 out of 10 individuals if quick interventions are not provided. The Ghana Health Service (GHS) and the Ministry of Health (MoH), together with other local and international stakeholders are working intensely to control the spread of the infection in affected communities with treatment and other health management programmes. This review presents a quick overview of meningitis in Ghana with emphasis on S. pneumoniae (responsible for about 70% of cases in the recent epidemic) together with some recommendations aimed at ensuring a "meningitis-free Ghana". Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. [Acute cerebrovascular accident associated with drepanocytosis complicated by pneumococcal meningitis in two children].

    PubMed

    Mateos, M E; López-Laso, E; Simón, R; Mateos, F

    Between 6% and 17% of the patients with drepanocytosis will have an acute cerebrovascular accident (ACVA). Precipitating factors have been described including bacterial meningitis, upper respiratory tract obstruction, dehydration, intense exercise, postoperatively, and hypoxia due to altitude. We report two Negro children with drepanocytosis who, at the ages of 8 and 20 months, had pneumococcal meningitis complicated by an ACVA. The 20 month old boy had been previously diagnosed as having drepanocytosis; the 8 month old girl was diagnosed when she was admitted to hospital with meningitis. In both cases the clinical features of the ACVA were focal epileptic seizures followed by hemiplegia. On cranial CT and MR regions of focal ischaemia of the hemisphere were observed. The boy of 20 months made an excellent recovery with no long term sequelae. The 8 month old girl had severe permanent sequelae: hemiparesia, blindness, mental deficiency and epileptic encephalopathy. We present two Negro children with drepanocytosis who had ischemic ACVAs, a common complication of the disease, during the course of pneumococcal meningitis but with very different clinical courses. Recent increases in immigration will mean that previously rare illnesses will be more commonly seen in our environment, and should be considered in the differential diagnosis.

  11. A multi-target real-time PCR assay for rapid identification of meningitis-associated microorganisms.

    PubMed

    Favaro, Marco; Savini, Vincenzo; Favalli, Cartesio; Fontana, Carla

    2013-01-01

    A central nervous system (CNS) infection, such as meningitis, is a serious and life-threatening condition. Bacterial meningitis can be severe and may result in brain damage, disability or even death. Rapid diagnosis of CNS infections and identification of the pathogenic microorganisms are needed to improve the patient outcome. Bacterial culture of a patient's cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) is currently considered the "gold standard" for diagnosing bacterial meningitis. From the CSF cultures researchers can assess the in vitro susceptibility of the causative microorganism to determine the best antibiotic treatment. However, many of the culture assays, such as microscopy and the latex agglutination test are not sensitive. To enhance pathogen detection in CSF samples we developed a multi-target real-time PCR assay that can rapidly identify six different microorganisms: Streptococcus pneumoniae, Neisseria meningitidis, Haemophilus influenzae, Streptococcus agalactiae, Listeria monocytogenes and Cryptococcus neoformans. In this study we applied this PCR analysis to 296 CSF samples from patients who were suspected of having meningitis. Of the 296 samples that were examined, 59 samples were positive according to the CSF culture and/or molecular assays. Forty-six CSF samples were positive for both the CSF culture and our real-time PCR assay, while 13 samples were positive for the real-time PCR but negative for the traditional assays. This discrepancy may have been caused by the fact that these samples were collected from 23 patients who were treated with antimicrobials before CSF sampling.

  12. V-akt murine thymoma viral oncogene homolog 3 (AKT3) contributes to poor disease outcome in humans and mice with pneumococcal meningitis.

    PubMed

    Valls Serón, Mercedes; Ferwerda, Bart; Engelen-Lee, JooYeon; Geldhoff, Madelijn; Jaspers, Valery; Zwinderman, Aeilko H; Tanck, Michael W; Baas, Frank; van der Ende, Arie; Brouwer, Matthijs C; van de Beek, Diederik

    2016-05-18

    Pneumococcal meningitis is the most common and severe form of bacterial meningitis. Fatality rates are substantial, and long-term sequelae develop in about half of survivors. Here, we have performed a prospective nationwide genetic association study using the Human Exome BeadChip and identified gene variants in encoding dynactin 4 (DCTN4), retinoic acid early transcript 1E (RAET1E), and V-akt murine thymoma viral oncogene homolog 3 (AKT3) to be associated with unfavourable outcome in patients with pneumococcal meningitis. No clinical replication cohort is available, so we validated the role of one of these targets, AKT3, in a pneumococcal meningitis mouse model. Akt3 deficient mice had worse survival and increased histopathology scores for parenchymal damage (infiltration) and vascular infiltration (large meningeal artery inflammation) but similar bacterial loads, cytokine responses, compared to wild-type mice. We found no differences in cerebrospinal fluid cytokine levels between patients with risk or non-risk alleles. Patients with the risk genotype (rs10157763, AA) presented with low scores on the Glasgow Coma Scale and high rate of epileptic seizures. Thus, our results show that AKT3 influences outcome of pneumococcal meningitis.

  13. Staphylococcus aureus meningitis from osteomyelitis of the spine.

    PubMed Central

    Markus, H. S.; Allison, S. P.

    1989-01-01

    Two cases of vertebral osteomyelitis presenting with secondary Staphylococcus aureus meningitis are described. In staphylococcal meningitis a search for a primary source should include the lower vertebral spine. PMID:2616438

  14. Monitoring of Intracranial Pressure in Meningitis.

    PubMed

    Depreitere, Bart; Bruyninckx, Dominike; Güiza, Fabian

    2016-01-01

    The literature on intracranial pressure (ICP) monitoring in meningitis is limited to case reports and a handful of descriptive series. The aim of this study is to investigate relationships among ICP, cerebral perfusion pressure (CPP), and outcome in meningitis and to identify whether ICP affected clinical decisions. Between 1999 and 2011, a total of 17 patients with meningitis underwent ICP monitoring at the University Hospitals Leuven. Charts were reviewed for clinical history, ICP/CPP data, imaging findings, and Glasgow Outcome Scale score. Univariate correlations were computed for outcome and ICP/CPP variables, computed tomography characteristics, and Corticosteroid Randomization After Significant Head Injury outcome model variables. Treatment decisions were assessed regarding whether or not they were based on ICP. At drain placement, Glasgow Coma Scale scores showed a median of 8 (range 3-12). Six of 17 patients had either one or two nonreactive pupils. Significant correlations with outcome were found for the highest documented ICP value (r = -0.70), the number of episodes when CPP <50 mmHg (r =-0.50), the lowest documented CPP value (r = 0.61), and pupil reactivity (r = 0.57). Treatment was influenced by ICP in all patients. The results support the notion that in meningitis high ICP and low CPP represent secondary insults. The poor condition of the patients illustrates that the level of suspicion for increased ICP in meningitis may not be high enough.

  15. Human Meningitis-Associated Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    KIM, KWANG SIK

    2016-01-01

    E. coli is the most common Gram-negative bacillary organism causing meningitis and E. coli meningitis continues to be an important cause of mortality and morbidity throughout the world. Our incomplete knowledge of its pathogenesis contributes to such mortality and morbidity. Recent reports of E. coli strains producing CTX-M-type or TEM-type extended-spectrum β-lactamases create a challenge. Studies using in vitro and in vivo models of the blood-brain barrier have shown that E. coli meningitis follows a high-degree of bacteremia and invasion of the blood-brain barrier. E. coli invasion of the blood-brain barrier, the essentials step in the development of E. coli meningitis, requires specific microbial and host factors as well as microbe- and host-specific signaling molecules. Blockade of such microbial and host factors contributing to E. coli invasion of the blood-brain barrier is shown to be efficient in preventing E. coli penetration into the brain. The basis for requiring a high-degree of bacteremia for E. coli penetration of the blood-brain barrier, however, remains unclear. Continued investigation on the microbial and host factors contributing to a high-degree of bacteremia and E. coli invasion of the blood-brain barrier is likely to identify new targets for prevention and therapy of E. coli meningitis. PMID:27223820

  16. Meningitis associated with strongyloidiasis in an area endemic for strongyloidiasis and human T-lymphotropic virus-1: a single-center experience in Japan between 1990 and 2010.

    PubMed

    Sasaki, Y; Taniguchi, T; Kinjo, M; McGill, R L; McGill, A T; Tsuha, S; Shiiki, S

    2013-12-01

    Meningitis caused by enteric flora is a known complication of strongyloidiasis, and human T-lymphotropic virus-1 (HTLV-1) predisposes individuals to severe strongyloidiasis. We reviewed the clinical features of bacterial meningitis associated with strongyloidiasis seen at a single center in subtropical Japan, in an area endemic for both strongyloidiasis and HTLV-1. We found 33 episodes in 21 patients between 1990 and 2010. The results were remarkable for the high incidence of meningitis due to Gram-positive cocci (27.3 %), especially Streptococcus bovis, and culture-negative cases (42.4 %). Given the high incidence of Gram-positive meningitis, a modified approach to corticosteroid use would be advisable in areas where strongyloidiasis is endemic, due to the potentially adverse consequences of glucocorticoid therapy.

  17. Benign recurrent lymphocytic meningitis from herpes simplex virus type 2 during a summer outbreak of aseptic meningitis.

    PubMed

    McDaniel, Edward L; Ferguson, Tomas M; Kwon, Herbert P; Thompson, Jennifer C

    2004-06-01

    Meningitis from herpes simplex virus (HSV) may have a clinical presentation similar to other forms of viral meningitis. However, subtle facets of the history and use of the polymerase chain reaction (PCR) can differentiate HSV from other etiologies. During an outbreak of meningitis from enterovirus, a 32-year-old woman presented to the hospital with clinical meningitis, a history of genital HSV infection, and two previous bouts of viral meningitis. Her signs and symptoms as well as lumbar puncture results were similar to patients meeting our case definition for patients with presumed enteroviral meningitis. The cerebral spinal fluid was positive for HSV by PCR, and she was ultimately diagnosed with recurrent meningitis from HSV. We compared her presentation with patients who met our case definition for enteroviral meningitis. A thorough history and use of PCR may assist in differentiating these clinically similar presentations.

  18. Enterococcal meningitis in association with Strongyloides hyperinfection syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Sukhwani, Kalpesh S; Bansal, Nitin; Soni, Mamta; Ramamurthy, Anand; Gopalakrishnan, Ram

    2017-01-01

    Introduction Strongyloidiasis can cause hyperinfection or disseminated infection in an immunocompromised host, and is an important factor linked to enterococcal bacteremia and meningitis. Case reports We report two cases highlighting the importance of suspecting Strongyloides hyperinfection syndrome in patients with enterococcal meningitis. Conclusion Our cases highlight the importance of suspecting Strongyloides hyperinfection syndrome in cases of community acquired enterococcal bacteremia and meningitis. PMID:28331839

  19. Meningitis after cochlear implantation in Mondini malformation.

    PubMed

    Page, E L; Eby, T L

    1997-01-01

    Although the potential for CSF leakage and subsequent meningitis after cochlear implantation in the malformed cochlea has been recognized, this complication has not been previously reported. We report a case of CSF otorhinorrhea and meningitis after minor head trauma developing 2 years after cochlear implantation in a child with Mondini malformation. Leakage of CSF was identified from the cochleostomy around the electrode of the implant, and this leak was sealed with a temporalis fascia and muscle plug. Although this complication appears to be rare, care must be taken to seal the cochleostomy in children with inner ear malformations at the initial surgery, and any episode of meningitis after surgery must be thoroughly investigated to rule out CSF leakage from the labyrinth.

  20. Use of radiologic modalities in coccidioidal meningitis

    SciTech Connect

    Stadalnik, R.C.; Goldstein, E.; Hoeprich, P.D.; McGahan, J.P.

    1981-01-01

    The diagnostic utility of pentetate indium trisodium CSF studies, technetium Tc 99m brain scans, and computerized tomographic (CT) scans was evaluated in eight patients in whom coccidioidal meningitis developed following a dust storm in the Central Valley of California. The 111In flow studies and the CT scans demonstrated hydrocephalus in five patients with clinical findings suggesting this complication. Ventriculitis has not previously been diagnosed before death in patients with coccidioidal meningitis; however, it was demonstrated in two patients by the technetium Tc 99m brain scan. The finding that communicating hydrocephalus occurs early in meningitis and interferes with CSF flow into infected basilar regions has important therapeutic implications in that antifungal agents injected into the lumbar subarachnoid space may not reach these regions.

  1. Treatment of fungal meningitis with miconazole.

    PubMed

    Deresinski, S C; Lilly, R B; Levine, H B; Galgiani, J N; Stevens, D A

    1977-09-01

    Twelve patients with fungal meningitis (ten cases were due to Coccidioides immitis, two were from Cryptococcus neoformans) were treated with brief courses of intravenous (IV) miconazole. Eleven patients, including patients with severe, chronic disease, had been treated unsuccessfully with amphotericin B. Four patients also received miconazole injected directly into the CSF. The drug was well tolerated by any route, with mild reversible side effects. After IV administration the miconazole concentration in the CSF rarely exceeded the minimal inhibitory concentration (MIC) of the infecting organism. Intra-CSF administration of 20 mg generally produced levels above the MIC for 24 hours. Five of ten patients with coccidiodial meningitis responded clinically. Of these five, four received only IV miconazole; three relapsed after therapy was stopped. Miconazole appears promising as a treatment of fungal meningitis, but trials of longer duration might prevent relapse.

  2. Evaluation and treatment of chronic meningitis.

    PubMed

    Baldwin, Kelly J; Zunt, Joseph R

    2014-10-01

    Chronic meningitis is defined as an inflammatory cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) profile that persists for at least 1 month. The presentation often includes headache, nausea, vomiting, cranial neuropathies, symptoms of elevated intracranial pressure, or focal neurologic deficits. The most common etiologies of chronic meningitis fall into 3 broad categories: infectious, autoimmune, and neoplastic. Evaluation of the patient with suspected chronic meningitis should include a detailed history and physical examination as well as repeated CSF diagnostics, serologic studies, and biopsy of the brain or other abnormal tissue (eg, lymph node or lung), when indicated. Early identification of the etiology and rapid treatment are crucial for improving morbidity and mortality, but potential infectious and neoplastic conditions should be excluded prior to empirically starting steroids or immunosuppressive medications.

  3. Evaluation and Treatment of Chronic Meningitis

    PubMed Central

    Zunt, Joseph R.

    2014-01-01

    Chronic meningitis is defined as an inflammatory cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) profile that persists for at least 1 month. The presentation often includes headache, nausea, vomiting, cranial neuropathies, symptoms of elevated intracranial pressure, or focal neurologic deficits. The most common etiologies of chronic meningitis fall into 3 broad categories: infectious, autoimmune, and neoplastic. Evaluation of the patient with suspected chronic meningitis should include a detailed history and physical examination as well as repeated CSF diagnostics, serologic studies, and biopsy of the brain or other abnormal tissue (eg, lymph node or lung), when indicated. Early identification of the etiology and rapid treatment are crucial for improving morbidity and mortality, but potential infectious and neoplastic conditions should be excluded prior to empirically starting steroids or immunosuppressive medications. PMID:25360204

  4. Successful treatment of a patient with ventriculoperitoneal shunt-associated meningitis caused by extended-spectrum β-lactamase-producing Klebsiella pneumoniae.

    PubMed

    Tseng, Yu-Chen; Kan, Li-Ping; Huang, Li-Yueh; Yin, Ti; Yang, Ya-Sung; Lin, Jung-Chung; Siu, L Kristopher

    2014-08-01

    Bacterial meningitis is responsible for significant morbidity and mortality worldwide, despite that modern antibiotics effectively penetrate cerebrospinal fluid to eradicate bacteria. A clinical suspicion of bacterial meningitis should be recognized early for the rapid diagnostic workup. Bacterial meningitis associated with ventriculoperitoneal shunt (VPS) is not uncommon and infrequently presents as abdominal symptoms and signs. Infections of the central nervous system caused by extended-spectrum β-lactamase-producing Klebsiella pneumoniae (ESBL-KP) are extremely rare, and such multiple drug-resistant pathogens frequently cause inappropriate treatments and mortality. β-Lactamases are bacterial enzymes that inactivate β-lactam antimicrobial agents. The increased prevalence of ESBL-producing organism infections has become a worldwide problem. Timely and appropriate treatment is important to reduce mortality and morbidity of infections caused by ESBL-producing organisms. Here, we report a 61-year-old male patient who underwent VPS implantation for consequent hydrocephalus following spontaneous intracranial hemorrhage six months before this presentation. He was admitted for intermittent fever and right lower quadrant abdominal pain, and he was initially managed as acute appendicitis with its typical presentation. Finally, he was diagnosed VPS-associated meningitis caused by ESBL-KP. This patient was successfully treated with the combination of meropenem, a carbapenem antibiotic that is the drug of choice for treating ESBL-producing organisms, and high-dose fosfomycin, a phosphonic acid derivative antibiotic that is effective in treating some drug-resistant pathogens. In the present report, we emphasize the clinical presentations of catheter-related meningitis and risk factors for infections caused by ESBL-producing pathogens. Antibiotic combination therapy can provide synergistic effect and maximize anti-bacterial activity in ESBL-KP meningitis.

  5. Recurrent Streptococcus Pneumoniae Meningitis in a Child with Split Hand and Foot Malformation and Undiagnosed Mondini Dysplasia.

    PubMed

    Katarzyna, Mazur-Melewska; Jarosław, Szydłowski; Katarzyna, Jończyk-Potoczna; Wojciech, Służewski; Magdalena, Figlerowicz

    Recurrent bacterial meningitis is a life-threatening infection of the central nervous system that is mostly connected with anatomical abnormalities of the skull, chronic parameningeal infections and immunodeficiencies. It's rarely seen, but when it occurs an extensive investigation should be carried out to discover the responsible factor, so that further episodes can be prevented. We report on a child with split hand and foot (SHFM), confirmed incorrect karyotype 46, XY, t(7:12)(q21.2;q21.3) and a fourth episode of fulminant meningitis caused by penicillin-resistant Streptococcus pneumoniae. After a broad evaluation of factors predisposing to recurrent meningitis, the undiagnosed malformation of his inner and middle ears - Mondini dysplasia was found. We suggest examining all children with SHFM for hearing impairment before they develop recurrent meningitis. The time when the radiological procedure for searching for inner ear dysplasia should be performed could be a controversial issue: before or after the first episode of meningitis. From the epidemiological point of view, high-resolution computer tomography scanning of the temporal bones should be considered after the diagnosis of deafness in a child with SHFM related to 7q21 deletion.

  6. Systemic Neutralization of Interleukin-8 Markedly Reduces Neutrophilic Pleocytosis during Experimental Lipopolysaccharide-Induced Meningitis in Rabbits

    PubMed Central

    Dumont, Rachel A.; Car, Bruce D.; Voitenok, Nikolai N.; Junker, Ursula; Moser, Bernhard; Zak, Oto; O'Reilly, Terence

    2000-01-01

    Interleukin-8 (IL-8) is elevated in the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) of patients with meningitis and is proposed to participate in subarachnoid-space pleocytosis. However, intracisternal injection of IL-8 into rabbits failed to induce indices typical of meningitis (leukocyte, tumor necrosis factor, or protein accumulation in the CSF or histopathological changes), indicating that merely increasing the CSF level of this chemokine is insufficient to induce inflammation in this anatomical site. IL-8 treatment did not affect inflammatory responses to subsequently intracisternally administered lipopolysaccharide (LPS). IL-8 was chemotactic for rabbit neutrophils in vitro, and subcutaneous injection of IL-8 (diluted in buffer or CSF) proved the in vivo activity of this peptide and suggested the absence of an IL-8 inhibitor in normal rabbit CSF. LPS-dependent pleocytosis was only slightly diminished by intracisternally administered murine anti-rabbit IL-8 monoclonal antibody (MAb) WS-4 but was dramatically reduced by intravenously administered MAb. Therefore, elevated CSF IL-8 levels may contribute to, but cannot solely account for, neutrophil influx into the subarachnoid space during meningitis. However, inhibition of IL-8 activity of the bloodstream side of the blood-brain barrier effectively reduces pleocytosis, indicating a central role of IL-8 in neutrophil influx into CSF during bacterial meningitis. Thus, inhibition of IL-8 is a possible therapeutic target for adjunct treatment of meningitis. PMID:10992482

  7. Evidence for intrathecal synthesis of alternative pathway complement activation proteins in experimental meningitis.

    PubMed Central

    Stahel, P. F.; Frei, K.; Fontana, A.; Eugster, H. P.; Ault, B. H.; Barnum, S. R.

    1997-01-01

    Complement has been shown to contribute to intrathecal inflammation in bacterial meningitis. However, the cellular source of complement in the infected central nervous system has not been determined. In this study, we analyzed protein and mRNA expression of two alternative pathway complement activation proteins, C3 and factor B, in the brains of mice with Listeria monocytogenes meningitis. Complement protein levels were found elevated in the cerebrospinal fluid of infected mice, compared with mock-infected animals. In the course of the disease, enhanced C3 and factor B mRNA expression was detected on pyramidal neurons and Purkinje cells within 6 hours, peaking at 12 hours and then gradually decreasing by 72 hours after infection. In addition, leukocytes infiltrating the subarachnoid space, within 12 to 24 hours, expressed mRNA for C3 and factor B. The cellular infiltration increased dramatically up to 72 hours. Intraperitoneal injection of tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-alpha up-regulated C3 and factor B mRNA expression on neurons in normal mice, suggesting that TNF-alpha may represent one cytokine regulating complement expression in this model of bacterial meningitis. However, additional mediators may be involved in regulation of intrathecal complement expression, as infected mice deficient of TNF/lymphotoxin-alpha genes did not demonstrate attenuated complement expression in the brain. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 PMID:9327721

  8. Neisseria lactamica meningitis following skull trauma.

    PubMed

    Denning, D W; Gill, S S

    1991-01-01

    A woman developed meningitis due to Neisseria lactamica in association with a cribriform plate fracture. Cerebrospinal fluid antigen tests for Neisseria meningitidis were negative. The patient recovered with intravenous penicillin therapy. N. lactamica can be rapidly distinguished from N. meningitidis by the hydrolysis of ONPG (o-nitrophenyl-beta-D-galactopyranoside). In contrast to N. meningitidis and Neisseria gonorrhoeae, N. lactamica lacks virulence properties. As 100% of N. lactamica strains are susceptible to penicillin and all three previously described patients with N. lactamica meningitis have recovered with penicillin treatment, the reason for distinguishing the organisms in this context is primarily to prevent unnecessary anxiety and prophylaxis among contacts.

  9. Cost-effective Diagnostic Checklists for Meningitis in Resource Limited Settings

    PubMed Central

    Durski, Kara N.; Kuntz, Karen M.; Yasukawa, Kosuke; Virnig, Beth A.; Meya, David B.; Boulware, David R.

    2013-01-01

    Background Checklists can standardize patient care, reduce errors, and improve health outcomes. For meningitis in resource-limited settings, with high patient loads and limited financial resources, CNS diagnostic algorithms may be useful to guide diagnosis and treatment. However, the cost-effectiveness of such algorithms is unknown. Methods We used decision analysis methodology to evaluate the costs, diagnostic yield, and cost-effectiveness of diagnostic strategies for adults with suspected meningitis in resource limited settings with moderate/high HIV prevalence. We considered three strategies: 1) comprehensive “shotgun” approach of utilizing all routine tests; 2) “stepwise” strategy with tests performed in a specific order with additional TB diagnostics; 3) “minimalist” strategy of sequential ordering of high-yield tests only. Each strategy resulted in one of four meningitis diagnoses: bacterial (4%), cryptococcal (59%), TB (8%), or other (aseptic) meningitis (29%). In model development, we utilized prevalence data from two Ugandan sites and published data on test performance. We validated the strategies with data from Malawi, South Africa, and Zimbabwe. Results The current comprehensive testing strategy resulted in 93.3% correct meningitis diagnoses costing $32.00/patient. A stepwise strategy had 93.8% correct diagnoses costing an average of $9.72/patient, and a minimalist strategy had 91.1% correct diagnoses costing an average of $6.17/patient. The incremental cost effectiveness ratio was $133 per additional correct diagnosis for the stepwise over minimalist strategy. Conclusions Through strategically choosing the order and type of testing coupled with disease prevalence rates, algorithms can deliver more care more efficiently. The algorithms presented herein are generalizable to East Africa and Southern Africa. PMID:23466647

  10. Cost-effective diagnostic checklists for meningitis in resource-limited settings.

    PubMed

    Durski, Kara N; Kuntz, Karen M; Yasukawa, Kosuke; Virnig, Beth A; Meya, David B; Boulware, David R

    2013-07-01

    Checklists can standardize patient care, reduce errors, and improve health outcomes. For meningitis in resource-limited settings, with high patient loads and limited financial resources, central nervous system diagnostic algorithms may be useful to guide diagnosis and treatment. However, the cost effectiveness of such algorithms is unknown. We used decision analysis methodology to evaluate the costs, diagnostic yield, and cost effectiveness of diagnostic strategies for adults with suspected meningitis in resource-limited settings with moderate/high HIV prevalence. We considered 3 strategies: (1) comprehensive "shotgun" approach of utilizing all routine tests; (2) "stepwise" strategy with tests performed in a specific order with additional tuberculosis (TB) diagnostics; (3) "minimalist" strategy of sequential ordering of high-yield tests only. Each strategy resulted in 1 of 4 meningitis diagnoses: bacterial (4%), cryptococcal (59%), TB (8%), or other (aseptic) meningitis (29%). In model development, we utilized prevalence data from 2 Ugandan sites and published data on test performance. We validated the strategies with data from Malawi, South Africa, and Zimbabwe. The current comprehensive testing strategy resulted in 93.3% correct meningitis diagnoses costing $32.00 per patient. A stepwise strategy had 93.8% correct diagnoses costing an average of $9.72 per patient, and a minimalist strategy had 91.1% correct diagnoses costing an average of $6.17 per patient. The incremental cost-effectiveness ratio was $133 per additional correct diagnosis for the stepwise over minimalist strategy. Through strategically choosing the order and type of testing coupled with disease prevalence rates, algorithms can deliver more care more efficiently. The algorithms presented herein are generalizable to East Africa and Southern Africa.

  11. Comparison of Scrub Typhus With and Without Meningitis.

    PubMed

    Rose, Winsley; Ghosh, Urmi; Punnen, Anu; Sarkar, Rajiv; Prakash, John Jude Antony; Verghese, Valsan Philip

    2017-07-04

    To compare the children admitted with scrub typhus with and without meningitis. All children admitted with scrub typhus over a 62 mo period were reviewed. Statistical analysis was performed to compare those with and without meningitis for demographic, clinical, investigations and outcome parameters. Four hundred twenty seven children were admitted with scrub typhus and 63 (14.8%) had meningitis. The mean cerebrospinal fluid white blood cell (CSF WBC) count was 71 cells/cu.mm. with mean lymphocyte proportion of 92%. The mean CSF protein was 67 mg/dl and mean CSF glucose, 55 mg/dl. Of those who had meningitis, 24 (38.1%) had seizures, 17 (27%) had altered sensorium and 37 (58.7%) had nuchal rigidity. Finding an eschar, being male, breathing difficulty, and hepatomegaly were significantly more common in those without meningitis. Children with meningitis also had shorter duration of fever at presentation (median [IQR] 7 [3] days vs. 10 [4] days; p = 0.028). Headache and vomiting were significantly more common in those with meningitis. Hemoglobin and platelet were significantly lower in those without meningitis. Duration of hospitalization was significantly longer in those with meningitis, whereas acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) was significantly more common in those without meningitis. There was no neurological deficit in both the groups. There was no mortality in the meningitis group compared to 3.6% mortality in the non-meningitis group (p = 0.213). Meningitis occurs in 15% of those with scrub typhus; those with meningitis have good neurological outcome with little mortality; those without meningitis have more complications and poorer outcome.

  12. Lack of formyl peptide receptor 1 and 2 leads to more severe inflammation and higher mortality in mice with of pneumococcal meningitis

    PubMed Central

    Oldekamp, Sandra; Pscheidl, Sebastian; Kress, Eugenia; Soehnlein, Oliver; Jansen, Sandra; Pufe, Thomas; Wang, Ji Ming; Tauber, Simone C; Brandenburg, Lars-Ove

    2014-01-01

    Bacterial meningitis is, despite progress in research and the development of new treatment strategies, still a cause of severe neuronal sequelae. The brain is protected from penetrating pathogens by both the blood–brain barrier and the innate immune system. The invading pathogens are recognized by pattern recognition receptors including the G-protein coupled formyl peptide receptors (FPRs), which are expressed by immune cells of the central nervous system. The expression of FPRs is up-regulated during bacterial meningitis, but the consequence on the progression of inflammation and impact on mortality are far from clear. Therefore, we used mFPR1 and mFPR2-deficient mice to investigate the effects on inflammation, bacterial growth and mortality in a mouse model of pneumococcal meningitis. Our results revealed increased bacterial burden, increased neutrophil infiltration and higher mortality in mFPR1/2-deficient mice in comparison to wild-type mice. The mFPR1- or mFPR2-deficient mice also showed significantly increased glial cell density, whereas the immune responses including the expression of anti-inflammatory cytokines and antimicrobial peptides were decreased in bacterial meningitis. Taken together, the results suggest that FPR1 and FPR2 play an important role in the innate immune responses against Streptococcus pneumoniae within the central nervous system and the lack of the receptors leads to a dysregulation of the inflammatory response compared with wild-type mice. PMID:24863484

  13. Lack of formyl peptide receptor 1 and 2 leads to more severe inflammation and higher mortality in mice with of pneumococcal meningitis.

    PubMed

    Oldekamp, Sandra; Pscheidl, Sebastian; Kress, Eugenia; Soehnlein, Oliver; Jansen, Sandra; Pufe, Thomas; Wang, Ji Ming; Tauber, Simone C; Brandenburg, Lars-Ove

    2014-11-01

    Bacterial meningitis is, despite progress in research and the development of new treatment strategies, still a cause of severe neuronal sequelae. The brain is protected from penetrating pathogens by both the blood-brain barrier and the innate immune system. The invading pathogens are recognized by pattern recognition receptors including the G-protein coupled formyl peptide receptors (FPRs), which are expressed by immune cells of the central nervous system. The expression of FPRs is up-regulated during bacterial meningitis, but the consequence on the progression of inflammation and impact on mortality are far from clear. Therefore, we used mFPR1 and mFPR2-deficient mice to investigate the effects on inflammation, bacterial growth and mortality in a mouse model of pneumococcal meningitis. Our results revealed increased bacterial burden, increased neutrophil infiltration and higher mortality in mFPR1/2-deficient mice in comparison to wild-type mice. The mFPR1- or mFPR2-deficient mice also showed significantly increased glial cell density, whereas the immune responses including the expression of anti-inflammatory cytokines and antimicrobial peptides were decreased in bacterial meningitis. Taken together, the results suggest that FPR1 and FPR2 play an important role in the innate immune responses against Streptococcus pneumoniae within the central nervous system and the lack of the receptors leads to a dysregulation of the inflammatory response compared with wild-type mice. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  14. Meningitis and subdural empyema as complication of pterygomandibular space abscess upon tooth extraction

    PubMed Central

    Cabello-Serrano, Almudena; Monsalve-Iglesias, Fernando; Roman-Ramos, Maria; Garcia-Medina, Blas

    2016-01-01

    Complication of dental infections might be various and heterogeneous. The most common complications are represented by maxilar celulitis, canine space celulitis, infratemporal space celulitis, temporal celulitis and bacteremia. Among rarest complications we found: sepsis, bacterial endocarditis, mediastinitis, intracranial complications, osteomyelitis, etc. Although dental infections are often considered trivial entities, sometimes they can reach an impressive gravity. In this regard, the present study describes a case of dental infection complicated by meningitis, subdural empiema and cerebral vasculitis. Furthermore, we observed other neurological complications, like thalamic ischemic infarction, during the disease evolution. Noteworthy, these entities were not presented when the patient was admitted to hospital. Therefore, the main aim of this report is to highlight the serious consequences that an infection of dental origin could cause. Key words:Meningitis, subdural empyema, odontogenic infections. PMID:27703619

  15. Meningitis caused by Alcaligenes xylosoxidans in a patient with HIV/AIDS.

    PubMed

    Espinoza-Gómez, F; Newton-Sánchez, O A; Melnikov, V; Virgen-González, O; Unrau, J

    2007-12-01

    The purpose of the present work was to inform about the first case of meningitis associated to the bacteria Alcaligenes xylosoxidans in a patient with HIV/AIDS. The patient was a 46-year-old male, with the antecedent of have been diagnosed for HIV/ AIDS, who attended in the Hospital Universitario de Colima, Mexico, with fever, shock and meningismus. The study of the cerebrospinal fluid showed pleocytosis, elevated protein levels and hypoglycorrhachia. The culture yielded the presence of Alcaligenes xylosoxidans with sensitivity to ciprofloxacin. After 14 days of treatment with this antibiotic, the patient showed neurologic improvement and was able to continue with his outpatient antiretroviral treatment. The present case shows the importance of the inclusion of this bacterium in the differential diagnosis of the neurological infections in HIV/AIDS patients and emphasizes the importance of considering the bacterial meningitis in this population.

  16. Meningitis and subdural empyema as complication of pterygomandibular space abscess upon tooth extraction.

    PubMed

    Cariati, Paolo; Cabello-Serrano, Almudena; Monsalve-Iglesias, Fernando; Roman-Ramos, Maria; Garcia-Medina, Blas

    2016-10-01

    Complication of dental infections might be various and heterogeneous. The most common complications are represented by maxilar celulitis, canine space celulitis, infratemporal space celulitis, temporal celulitis and bacteremia. Among rarest complications we found: sepsis, bacterial endocarditis, mediastinitis, intracranial complications, osteomyelitis, etc. Although dental infections are often considered trivial entities, sometimes they can reach an impressive gravity. In this regard, the present study describes a case of dental infection complicated by meningitis, subdural empiema and cerebral vasculitis. Furthermore, we observed other neurological complications, like thalamic ischemic infarction, during the disease evolution. Noteworthy, these entities were not presented when the patient was admitted to hospital. Therefore, the main aim of this report is to highlight the serious consequences that an infection of dental origin could cause. Key words:Meningitis, subdural empyema, odontogenic infections.

  17. Meningococcal meningitis and carriage in western Zaire: a hypoendemic zone related to climate?

    PubMed Central

    Cheesbrough, J. S.; Morse, A. P.; Green, S. D.

    1995-01-01

    An analysis of bacteria recovered from cerebrospinal fluid over a 16-year period at a rural hospital in western Zaire showed that Neisseria meningitidis accounted for only five (2.2%) isolates. A survey of naso-pharyngeal colonisation with N. meningitidis in 378 healthy children was undertaken to distinguish whether this low frequency was due to lack of carriage or, by inference, lack of the co-factors necessary to permit invasive disease. N. meningitidis was recovered from only three (0.78%) of the children. All isolates were non-typable strains of low pathogenicity. A review of studies examining the aetiology of bacterial meningitis and the geographical location of epidemics of meningococcal meningitis in and around Zaire reveals a 'hypoendemic zone', the limits of which correlate well with the area in which mean absolute humidity remains above 10 g m-3 of air throughout the year. Continuous high absolute humidity appears to reduce the transmission of meningococci. PMID:7867746

  18. Endocarditis and meningitis associated to nape piercing in a young female: a case report.

    PubMed

    Mariano, Andrea; Pisapia, Raffaella; Abdeddaim, Amina; Taibi, Chiara; Rianda, Alessia; Vincenzi, Laura; D'Offizi, Gianpiero

    2015-09-01

    Body piercing is a social phenomenon on the rise especially among young people. This procedure may be complicated by serious bacterial and viral infections. We report a case of Staphylococcus aureus infective endocarditis and meningitis arising from the site of a nape piercing, after its removal. A 21-year-old Italian female was admitted to hospital with neurological impairment and sepsis. A diagnosis of endocarditis associated with meningitis by S. aureus, complicated by septic emboli in the brain, retina, skin and kidney, was formulated on the basis of modified Duke's criteria. The likely port-of-entry was the site of a nape piercing, removed two months before. In view of the widespread practice of body piercing, provision of correct and timely information concerning the associated serious risks is now imperative. Such information should emphasise the option for antibiotic prophylaxis, and the importance of careful local hygiene, even after piercing removal.

  19. Three-year multicenter surveillance of community-acquired listeria monocytogenes meningitis in adults

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Listeria monocytogenes is the third most frequent cause of bacterial meningitis. The aim of this study is to know the incidence and risk factors associated with development of acute community-acquired Lm meningitis in adult patients and to evaluate the clinical features, management, and outcome in this prospective case series. Methods A descriptive, prospective, and multicentric study carried out in 9 hospitals in the Spanish Network for Research in Infectious Diseases (REIPI) over a 39-month period. All adults patients admitted to the participating hospitals with the diagnosis of acute community-acquired bacterial meningitis (Ac-ABM) were included in this study. All these cases were diagnosed on the basis of a compatible clinical picture and a positive cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) culture or blood culture. The patients were followed up until death or discharge from hospital. Results Two hundred and seventy-eight patients with Ac-ABM were included. Forty-six episodes of Lm meningitis were identified in 46 adult patients. In the multivariate analysis only age (OR 1.026; 95% CI 1.00-1.05; p = 0.042), immunosupression (OR 2.520; 95% CI 1.05-6.00; p = 0.037), and CSF/blood glucose ratio (OR 39.42; 95% CI 4.01-387.50; p = 0.002) were independently associated with a Lm meningitis. The classic triad of fever, neck stiffness and altered mental status was present in 21 (49%) patients, 32% had focal neurological findings at presentation, 12% presented cerebellum dysfunction, and 9% had seizures. Twenty-nine (68%) patients were immunocompromised. Empirical antimicrobial therapy was intravenous ampicillin for 34 (79%) of 43 patients, in 11 (32%) of them associated to aminoglycosides. Definitive ampicillin plus gentamicin therapy was significantly associated with unfavourable outcome (67% vs 28%; p = 0.024) and a higher mortality (67% vs 32%; p = 0.040).The mortality rate was 28% (12 of 43 patients) and 5 of 31 (16.1%) surviving patients developed adverse clinical

  20. Cerebrospinal fluid white cell count: discriminatory or otherwise for enteroviral meningitis in infants and young children?

    PubMed

    Tan, Natalie Woon Hui; Lee, Elis Yuexian; Khoo, Gloria Mei Chin; Tee, Nancy Wen Sim; Krishnamoorthy, Subramania; Choong, Chew Thye

    2016-04-01

    Non-polio enteroviruses (EV) are the most common viruses causing aseptic meningitis in children. We aim to evaluate the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) characteristics of neonates and children with EV meningitis with a view to determine whether it could be discriminatory or otherwise in making a positive diagnosis. We performed a 3-year (July 2008-July 2011) retrospective study of children ≤16 years, treated at a tertiary children's hospital, with positive CSF EV polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and negative blood and CSF bacterial cultures. A total of 206 children were studied. The median CSF white cell count was 79 cells/mm(3) (range 0-4608 cells/mm(3)). CSF pleocytosis was observed in 99/150 (66%) aged ≤90 days, 3/4 (75%) aged 90 days-1 year, and 49/52 (94%) children ≥3 years. There was a huge variability in CSF pleocytosis in infants ≤90 days, where 34% of them had no pleocytosis, while in 66%, a wide range of pleocytosis that might even suggest bacterial meningitis was noted. CSF red cells were low, and protein or sugar values were not discriminatory. CSF pleocytosis in relation to increasing age was found to be statistically significant (p < 0.001). Early lumbar puncture within 48 h of symptoms and absence of CSF pleocytosis was also statistically significant (p = 0.039). CSF pleocytosis in EV meningitis is commoner in older children. As there was a huge variability in CSF pleocytosis in infants ≤90 days particularly, CSF analysis including EV PCR could avoid unnecessary antibiotic therapy.

  1. Epidemiological changes in meningococcal meningitis in Niger from 2008 to 2011 and the impact of vaccination

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The epidemiology of bacterial meningitis in the African ‘meningitis belt’ changes periodically. In order to design an effective vaccination strategy, we have examined the epidemiological and microbiological patterns of bacterial meningitis, and especially that of meningococcal meningitis, in Niger during the period 2008–2011. During this period a mass vaccination campaign with the newly developed meningococcal A conjugate vaccine (MenAfriVac®) was undertaken. Method Cerebrospinal fluid samples were collected from health facilities throughout Niger and analysed by culture, seroagglutination and/or speciation polymerase chain reaction, followed by genogrouping PCR for Neisseria meningitidis infections. A sample of strains were analysed by multi-locus sequence typing. Results N. meningitidis serogroup A cases were prevalent in 2008 and 2009 [98.6% and 97.5% of all N. meningitidis cases respectively]. The prevalence of serogroup A declined in 2010 [26.4%], with the emergence of serogroup W Sequence Type (ST) 11 [72.2% of cases], and the serogroup A meningococcus finally disappeared in 2011. The geographical distribution of cases N. meningitidis serogroups A and W within Niger is described. Conclusion The substantial decline of serogroup A cases that has been observed from 2010 onwards in Niger seems to be due to several factors including a major polysaccharide A/C vaccination campaign in 2009, the introduction of MenAfriVac® in 10 districts at risk in December 2010, the natural dynamics of meningococcal infection and the persistence of serogroup A sequence-type 7 for about 10 years. The emergence of serogroup W strains suggests that there may be a need for serogroup W containing vaccines in Niger in the coming years. PMID:24313998

  2. Recombinant outer membrane protein A fragments protect against Escherichia coli meningitis.

    PubMed

    Hsieh, Wen-Shyang; Yang, Yi-Yuan; Yang, Hsin-Yi; Huang, Yu-Shan; Wu, Hsueh-Hsia

    2016-06-01

    Although the mortality rates have decreased over the past few decades, neonatal meningitis is still a severe disease with high morbidity. Moreover, approximately 40% of survivors exhibit neurological sequelae. Escherichia coli is the major Gram-negative bacterial pathogen in neonatal meningitis. The N-terminal β-barrel domain of the outer membrane protein A (OmpA) of E. coli is essential for effective protein conformation and function and contains four surface-exposed hydrophilic loops. In this study, we expressed different fragments of the four ring structures of the N-terminal domain, and investigated whether these recombinant OmpA fragments can protect mice from death after E. coli infection. We expressed the recombinant proteins of the following OmpA fragments by using molecular cloning of Loop 1-2, Loop 1-3, Loop 1-4, Loop 2-3, Loop 2-4, and Loop 3-4. Animal experiments were subsequently performed to investigate the effects of these recombinant OmpA fragments on the survival of C57BL/6 mice after intracerebral E. coli RS218 administration. This study demonstrated that the recombinant Loop 1-3, Loop 2-3, and Loop 2-4 fragments of OmpA can protect mice from intracerebral E. coli infection. In bacterial meningitis, although antibiotic therapy is the first choice for management, neurological complications can seldom be averted. Based on the results of the present study, we intend to establish an effective therapeutic application for E. coli meningitis. Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  3. Globicatella sanguinis Meningitis Associated with Human Carriage▿

    PubMed Central

    Héry-Arnaud, Geneviève; Doloy, Alexandra; Ansart, Séverine; Le Lay, Geneviève; Le Flèche-Matéos, Anne; Seizeur, Romuald; Garré, Michel; Payan, Christopher; Bouvet, Anne

    2010-01-01

    Globicatella sanguinis is a rare cause of acute meningitis. We demonstrated human carriage of Globicatella by identifying cefotaxime-resistant strains in groin and rectal specimens 9 months after invasive infection. The pathogenic strain isolated from the cerebrospinal fluid and the carriage strains were accurately identified by sodA gene sequence analysis. PMID:20147641

  4. Globicatella sanguinis meningitis associated with human carriage.

    PubMed

    Héry-Arnaud, Geneviève; Doloy, Alexandra; Ansart, Séverine; Le Lay, Geneviève; Le Flèche-Matéos, Anne; Seizeur, Romuald; Garré, Michel; Payan, Christopher; Bouvet, Anne

    2010-04-01

    Globicatella sanguinis is a rare cause of acute meningitis. We demonstrated human carriage of Globicatella by identifying cefotaxime-resistant strains in groin and rectal specimens 9 months after invasive infection. The pathogenic strain isolated from the cerebrospinal fluid and the carriage strains were accurately identified by sodA gene sequence analysis.

  5. Citrobacter koseri meningitis: another freediving risk?

    PubMed

    Pollara, Gabriele; Savy, Lloyd; Cropley, Ian; Hopkins, Susan

    2011-01-01

    We present a rare case of meningitis caused by Citrobacter koseri in an immunocompetent adult who had recently been freediving. Middle ear pressure changes from this recreational activity, and the subsequent inflammatory response, are likely to have provided this environmental organism access to the central nervous system, and thus the ability to cause clinically significant infection.

  6. Recurrent ibuprofen-induced aseptic meningitis.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Huy T V; Juurlink, David N

    2004-03-01

    To report a case of recurrent aseptic meningitis temporally associated with the use of ibuprofen. A previously well 51-year-old white man presented with acute confusion and aphasia 7 days after taking a variety of nonprescription medications, including ibuprofen. Imaging of the brain was unremarkable, and lumbar puncture revealed lymphocytic pleocytosis with an elevated protein level. The symptoms improved shortly after admission, and no infectious cause was identified. Two weeks later, the patient was readmitted with similar symptoms beginning immediately after resumption of ibuprofen. His symptoms resolved promptly after ibuprofen was discontinued. Drug-induced aseptic meningitis is an unusual complication of drug therapy. Nonsteroidal antiinflammatory drugs (NSAIDs), particularly ibuprofen, are among the most commonly implicated agents, but rechallenge with the suspected agent is uncommon. Use of an objective causality tool indicated a probable relationship between ibuprofen and development of aseptic meningitis in our patient. Clinicians should consider NSAIDs as potential causes of aseptic meningitis, especially in patients with recurrent illness and no obvious infectious cause. A detailed drug history is invaluable in the assessment of such patients, with particular attention to nonprescription medications such as ibuprofen.

  7. New guinea pig model of Cryptococcal meningitis.

    PubMed

    Kirkpatrick, William R; Najvar, Laura K; Bocanegra, Rosie; Patterson, Thomas F; Graybill, John R

    2007-08-01

    We developed a guinea pig model of cryptococcal meningitis to evaluate antifungal agents. Immunosuppressed animals challenged intracranially with Cryptococcus neoformans responded to fluconazole and voriconazole. Disease was monitored by serial cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) cultures and quantitative organ cultures. Our model produces disseminating central nervous system disease and responds to antifungal therapy.

  8. Primary diffuse leptomeningeal gliomatosis mimicking meningeal tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Ruiz-Ares, Gerardo; Collantes-Bellido, Elena; Rodriguez de Rivera, Francisco; Medina-Báez, Josmarlin; Palomo-Ferrer, Farnando; Morales-Bastos, Carmen; Arpa, Javier

    2011-05-01

    Primary diffuse leptomeningeal gliomatosis (PDLG) is a rare condition, with only 45 cases recorded to date, characterized by infiltration of the meninges by glial cells without evidence of primary tumor in the brain or spinal cord parenchyma. Here, we describe a patient with PDLG who was managed with tuberculostatic drugs owing to multiple findings that were suggestive of tuberculous meningitis. A 19-year-old woman presented with headaches and behavioral changes. A sudden decrease in visual acuity with papilledema, bilateral sixth nerve palsies, and neck stiffness developed. Lumbar puncture showed elevated opening pressure (50 cm H2O). Cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) analysis showed glucose 30 mg/dL, protein 26.5 mg/dL, white blood cell count 150 (60% lymphocytes, 40% neutrophils). The second sample of CSF provided adenosine deaminase activity 21.9 U/L. Polymerase chain reaction for Koch's bacillus was positive in the third CSF sample. Magnetic resonance imaging revealed meningeal thickening of the quadrigeminal cistern, tentorium cerebelli, cerebral convexity, and spinal cord, with gadolinium enhancement in nodular lesions. The patient died 22 weeks after symptom onset owing to brainstem infarction. Postmortem pathologic studies revealed PDLG. This entity should be included in the differential diagnosis of tuberculous meningitis that does not respond to treatment with antituberculous drugs. Surgical biopsy should be considered in contrast-enhanced areas in magnetic resonance imaging.

  9. Autoregulation in the middle meningeal artery.

    PubMed

    Michalicek, J; Gordon, V; Lambert, G

    1996-05-01

    In cats anesthetized with alpha-chloralose, autoregulation of blood flow (F) in the middle meningeal and common carotid arteries was assessed by bleeding and subsequently reinfusing the animals to achieve a 25% step reduction in mean arterial blood pressure (P), while maintaining the systolic blood pressure >80 mmHg. The integrity of autoregulation was assessed by calculating the gain factor Gf = 1 - [(deltaF/F)/(deltaP/P)]. Cats were examined intact, after hexamethonium (10 mg/kg), and after papaverine (6 mg/kg). Reduction of blood pressure of 25 to 60 mmHg produced equivalent drops in carotid blood flow (Gf = 0.041 +/- 0.34; mean +/- standard deviation, n = 12). There were only small changes in flow in the middle meningeal artery during this procedure (Gf = 0.91 +/- 0.29). Hexamethonium did not block autoregulation in the middle meningeal artery (Gf = 0.92 +/- 0.13, n = 4). However, papaverine almost completely abolished the ability of the artery to autoregulate (Gf = 0.10 +/- 0.16, n = 7). The results suggest that the middle meningeal artery possesses an ability similar to that of the cortical circulation to autoregulate its blood flow through intrinsic, non-neuronal mechanisms. This will have important implications for the study of disturbances of dural arterial control in migraine and other headaches.

  10. Lymphomatous meningitis: early diagnosis and treatment.

    PubMed

    Van Horn, Alixis

    2009-02-01

    The incidence of central nervous system (CNS) metastases has increased steadily since 1999, likely because of the use of drugs with poor access to the CNS as well as the successful treatment of extraneural cancers, resulting in longer survival.Lymphomatous meningitis is a profoundly morbid and often fatal CNS metastasis that develops in at least 4%-8% of patients with non-Hodgkin lymphoma.Risk factors for lymphomatous meningitis include uncontrolled systemic and extranodal disease, testicular and parasinus tumors, and being younger than age 60. A high index of suspicion for the condition may result in earlier detection and improved outcome.Lymphomatous meningitis diagnostic methods include a thorough neurologic examination, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), and multiple samplings of cerebrospinal fluid (CSF). Treatment regimens typically include radiation to areas of bulky disease or intrathecal chemotherapy.Available chemotherapeutic agents include methotrexate, cytarabine, and liposomal cytarabine.In addition to follow-up CSF and MRI monitoring, questioning patients and caregivers can provide insight into treatment response in terms of quality of life.Special care to avoid a nihilistic outlook in patients and clinicians is essential in treating patients with lymphomatous meningitis.

  11. Streptococcus equi subsp. zooepidemicus meningitis in Peru.

    PubMed

    Mori, Nicanor; Guevara, Jose M; Tilley, Drake H; Briceno, Jesus A; Zunt, Joseph R; Montano, Silvia M

    2013-02-01

    A 59-year-old man with a history of fever, unsteadiness, hemiparesis, motor aphasia and consciousness disturbance was hospitalized for Streptococcus equi subsp. zooepidemicus meningitis. He denied contact with farm animals, but had a practice of consuming unpasteurized goats' cheese from an uncertain source.

  12. Streptococcus equi subsp. zooepidemicus meningitis in Peru

    PubMed Central

    Guevara, Jose M.; Tilley, Drake H.; Briceno, Jesus A.; Zunt, Joseph R.; Montano, Silvia M.

    2013-01-01

    A 59-year-old man with a history of fever, unsteadiness, hemiparesis, motor aphasia and consciousness disturbance was hospitalized for Streptococcus equi subsp. zooepidemicus meningitis. He denied contact with farm animals, but had a practice of consuming unpasteurized goats’ cheese from an uncertain source. PMID:23105024

  13. Meninges: from protective membrane to stem cell niche

    PubMed Central

    Decimo, Ilaria; Fumagalli, Guido; Berton, Valeria; Krampera, Mauro; Bifari, Francesco

    2012-01-01

    Meninges are a three tissue membrane primarily known as coverings of the brain. More in depth studies on meningeal function and ultrastructure have recently changed the view of meninges as a merely protective membrane. Accurate evaluation of the anatomical distribution in the CNS reveals that meninges largely penetrate inside the neural tissue. Meninges enter the CNS by projecting between structures, in the stroma of choroid plexus and form the perivascular space (Virchow-Robin) of every parenchymal vessel. Thus, meninges may modulate most of the physiological and pathological events of the CNS throughout the life. Meninges are present since the very early embryonic stages of cortical development and appear to be necessary for normal corticogenesis and brain structures formation. In adulthood meninges contribute to neural tissue homeostasis by secreting several trophic factors including FGF2 and SDF-1. Recently, for the first time, we have identified the presence of a stem cell population with neural differentiation potential in meninges. In addition, we and other groups have further described the presence in meninges of injury responsive neural precursors. In this review we will give a comprehensive view of meninges and their multiple roles in the context of a functional network with the neural tissue. We will highlight the current literature on the developmental feature of meninges and their role in cortical development. Moreover, we will elucidate the anatomical distribution of the meninges and their trophic properties in adult CNS. Finally, we will emphasize recent evidences suggesting the potential role of meninges as stem cell niche harbouring endogenous precursors that can be activated by injury and are able to contribute to CNS parenchymal reaction. PMID:23671802

  14. Childhood fever.

    PubMed

    Chong, C Y; Allen, D M

    1996-02-01

    Childhood fever is a common symptom, reflective of multiple causes. As the child is often unable to express himself, the physician must rely on parents' observations and the physical examination. The majority of febrile children have non-bacterial upper respiratory tract infection and indiscriminate use of antibiotics is inappropriate, ineffective and leads to drug-resistance such as the emergence of Penicillin-resistant Streptococcus pneumoniae. In this article, we attempt to identify the possible causes of fever by a simple approach using the presence or absence of associated or localising symptoms. Infants less than 3 months constitute a unique group as the fever may be related to perinatal events and as serious bacterial infections can still occur despite unremarkable physical findings. Management of fever needs to take into account the toxicity, immune status and age of the patients as well as the source of the infection. Zealous overprescription of antipyretics needs to be avoided with attention directed to the cause of the fever, the child's capacity to cope with the illness and parental education.

  15. "Childhood" in Early Childhood Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hymes, James L., Jr.

    1973-01-01

    Whether the irreversible, inevitable movement toward group living for young children becomes a boon to childhood or the bane of childhood depends on whether we remember or whether we forget childhood. (Author)

  16. Suppurative meningitis: A life-threatening complication in male macroprolactinomas.

    PubMed

    Chentli, Farida; Akkache, Lina; Daffeur, Katia; Haddad, Meriem; Azzoug, Said

    2013-10-01

    Suppurative meningitis (SM) or bacterial meningitis is a life-threatening condition, which is exceptionally due to pituitary tumors (PT). Our aim was to analyze its frequency among male macroprolactinomas (MPRL) deemed to be aggressive, to report the cases we observed in our practice and describe the circumstances under which SM appeared. We retrospectively analyzed 82 male MPRL in order to look for a history of well proved SM and the circumstances under which SM appeared. We also took into account the possibility of SM relapsing. Four out of 82 male MPRL had SM = 4.87%. Three consulted for SM symptoms. SM was confirmed in Infectious Diseases department, but only one had rhinorrhea. Hormonal assessment and cerebral magnetic resonance imaging pleaded for aggressive prolactinomas. After antibiotics, SM was sterilized. Then, MPRL were treated with bromocriptine, which normalized prolactin and reduced PT. SM never relapsed. The 4(th) case was hospitalized for a large multidirectional prolactinoma invading and/or arising from the skull base. He was operated on 3 times and then he was given Bromocriptine. After 3 months, he had rhinorrhea and then SM which was successfully treated by antibiotics. SM never relapsed after tumor reduction. SM was demonstrated in 4.87%. SM has revealed MPRL in 3 cases and appeared after bromocriptine intake in the 4(th) one. Endocrinologists should be aware of this severe condition, which can be avoided by repairing as soon as possible the bony defect secondary to aggressive tumors, unless it is clogged by fibrosis: What probably happened in our cases.

  17. Hospital admission rates for meningitis and septicaemia caused by Haemophilus influenzae, Neisseria meningitidis, and Streptococcus pneumoniae in children in England over five decades: a population-based observational study.

    PubMed

    Martin, Natalie G; Sadarangani, Manish; Pollard, Andrew J; Goldacre, Michael J

    2014-05-01

    Infection with Haemophilus influenzae, Neisseria meningitidis, and Streptococcus pneumoniae causes substantial mortality and long-term morbidity in children. We know of no study to assess the long-term trends in hospital admission rates for meningitis and septicaemia caused by these pathogens in children in England. We aimed to do such a study using routinely reported data in England. In this population-based observational study, we used datasets that include routinely collected administrative statistics for hospital care: the Hospital In-Patient Enquiry (data for England from 1968 to 1985), the Hospital Episode Statistics dataset (data for England from 1989 onwards), and the Oxford record linkage study (data for Oxfordshire and surrounding areas from 1963 to 2011). We analysed annual age-specific and age-standardised admission rates in children younger than 15 years with H influenzae, meningococcal and pneumococcal meningitis, and septicaemia. We saw a reduction in hospital admission rates for childhood invasive bacterial disease after the introduction of conjugate vaccines against H influenzae, N meningitidis, and S pneumoniae in England. Annual incidence of H influenzae meningitis per 100,000 children decreased from 6·72 admissions (95% CI 6·18-7·26) in 1992 to 0·39 admissions (0·26-0·52) in 1994, after the introduction of routine H influenzae type b vaccination. We saw a small rise in admissions in the early 2000s, peaking at 1·24 admissions per 100,000 children (0·99-1·48) in 2003, which decreased to 0·28 per 100,000 children (0·17-0·39) by 2008 after the introduction of catch-up (2003) and routine (2006) booster programmes for young children. Meningococcal disease increased during the 1990s, reaching a peak in 1999, with 34·54 admissions (33·30-35·78) per 100,000 children. Hospital admissions decreased after the meningococcal serogroup C vaccine was introduced in 1999 and was 12·40 admissions (11·68-13·12) per 100,000 in 2011. Admissions for

  18. Neoplastic Meningitis Due to Lung, Breast, and Melanoma Metastases.

    PubMed

    Le Rhun, Emilie; Taillibert, Sophie; Chamberlain, Marc C

    2017-01-01

    Neoplastic meningitis, a central nervous system (CNS) complication of cancer metastatic to the meninges and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF), is relevant to oncologists due to the impact of the disease on patient quality of life and survival rates. A review of the literature of articles published in English was conducted with regard to neoplastic meningitis. The incidence of neoplastic meningitis is increasing because patients with cancer are surviving longer in part because of the use of novel therapies with poor CNS penetration. Up to 5% of patients with solid tumors develop neoplastic meningitis during the disease course (breast cancer, lung cancer, and melanoma being the predominantly causative cancers). The rate of median survival in patients with untreated neoplastic meningitis is 1 to 2 months, although it can be as long as 5 months in some cases. Therapeutic options for the treatment of neoplastic meningitis include systemic therapy (cancer-specific, CNS-penetrating chemotherapy or targeted therapies), intra-CSF administration of chemotherapy (methotrexate, cytarabine, thiotepa) and CNS site-specific radiotherapy. Determining whom to treat with neoplastic meningitis remains challenging and, in part, relates to the extent of systemic disease, the neurological burden of disease, the available systemic therapies, and estimated rates of survival. The prognosis of neoplastic meningitis remains poor. The increasing use of novel, targeted therapies and immunotherapy in solid tumors and its impact on neoplastic meningitis remains to be determined and is an area of active research. Thus, well conducted trials are needed.

  19. Tuberculous meningitis in patients infected with human immunodeficiency virus.

    PubMed

    Garg, Ravindra Kumar; Sinha, Manish Kumar

    2011-01-01

    Tuberculosis is the most common opportunistic infection in human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infected persons. HIV-infected patients have a high incidence of tuberculous meningitis as well. The exact incidence and prevalence of tuberculous meningitis in HIV-infected patients are not known. HIV infection does not significantly alter the clinical manifestations, laboratory, radiographic findings, or the response to therapy. Still, some differences have been noted. For example, the histopathological examination of exudates in HIV-infected patients shows fewer lymphocytes, epithelioid cells, and Langhan's type of giant cells. Larger numbers of acid-fast bacilli may be seen in the cerebral parenchyma and meninges. The chest radiograph is abnormal in up to 46% of patients with tuberculous meningitis. Tuberculous meningitis is likely to present with cerebral infarcts and mass lesions. Cryptococcal meningitis is important in differential diagnosis. The recommended duration of treatment in HIV-infected patients is 9-12 months. The benefit of adjunctive corticosteroids is uncertain. Antiretroviral therapy and antituberculosis treatment should be initiated at the same time, regardless of CD4 cell counts. Tuberculous meningitis may be a manifestation of paradoxical tuberculosis-associated immune reconstitution inflammatory syndrome. Some studies have demonstrated a significant impact of HIV co-infection on mortality from tuberculous meningitis. HIV-infected patients with multidrug-resistant tuberculous meningitis have significantly higher mortality. The best way to prevent HIV-associated tuberculous meningitis is to diagnose and isolate infectious cases of tuberculosis promptly and administer appropriate treatment.

  20. Real-time PCR for detection of Streptococcus suis serotype 2 in cerebrospinal fluid of human patients with meningitis

    PubMed Central

    Nga, Tran Vu Thieu; Nghia, Ho Dang Trung; Tu, Le Thi Phuong; Diep, To Song; Mai, Nguyen Thi Hoang; Chau, Tran Thi Hong; Sinh, Dinh Xuan; Phu, Nguyen Hoan; Nga, Tran Thi Thu; Chau, Nguyen Van Vinh; Campbell, James; Hoa, Ngo Thi; Chinh, Nguyen Tran; Hien, Tran Tinh; Farrar, Jeremy; Schultsz, Constance

    2011-01-01

    Streptococcus suis serotype 2 is an emerging zoonotic pathogen and is the main cause of acute bacterial meningitis in adult patients in Vietnam. We developed an internally controlled real-time PCR for detection of S. suis serotype 2 in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) samples targeted at the cps2J gene. Sensitivity and specificity in culture-confirmed clinical samples were 100%. The PCR detected S. suis serotype 2 infection in 101 of 238 (42.4%) prospectively collected CSF samples, of which 55 (23%) were culture positive. Culture-negative but PCR-positive CSF samples were significantly associated with the use of antimicrobial agents before admission. S. suis serotype 2 infection was more common than infections with Streptococcus pneumoniae and Neisseria meningitidis combined. Our results strikingly illustrate the additional diagnostic value of PCR in patients who are pretreated with antimicrobial agents and demonstrate the extremely high prevalence of S. suis infections among Vietnamese adult patients with bacterial meningitis. PMID:21767702

  1. Streptococcus pneumoniae and Haemophilus influenzae in paediatric meningitis patients at Goroka General Hospital, Papua New Guinea: serotype distribution and antimicrobial susceptibility in the pre-vaccine era.

    PubMed

    Greenhill, Andrew R; Phuanukoonnon, Suparat; Michael, Audrey; Yoannes, Mition; Orami, Tilda; Smith, Helen; Murphy, Denise; Blyth, Christopher; Reeder, John; Siba, Peter; Pomat, William; Lehmann, Deborah

    2015-10-27

    Bacterial meningitis remains an important infection globally, with the greatest burden in children in low-income settings, including Papua New Guinea (PNG). We present serotype, antimicrobial susceptibility and outcome data from paediatric meningitis patients prior to introduction of Haemophilus influenzae type b (Hib) and pneumococcal conjugate vaccines (PCVs) in PNG, providing a baseline for evaluation of immunisation programs. Cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) was collected from children admitted to Goroka General Hospital with suspected meningitis between 1996 and 2005. Culture and sensitivity was conducted, and pneumococci and H. influenzae were serotyped. Laboratory findings were linked to clinical outcomes. We enrolled 1884 children. A recognised pathogen was identified in 375 children (19.9%). Streptococcus pneumoniae (n = 180) and Hib (n = 153) accounted for 88.8% of pathogens isolated. 24 different pneumococcal serogroups were identified; non-PCV types 2, 24 and 46 accounted for 31.6% of pneumococcal meningitis. 10- and 13-valent PCVs would cover 44.1% and 45.4% of pneumococcal meningitis respectively. Pneumococcal isolates were commonly resistant to penicillin (21.5%) and 23% of Hib isolates were simultaneously resistant to ampicillin, co-trimoxazole and chloramphenicol. The case fatality rate in patients with a recognised bacterial pathogen was 13.4% compared to 8.5% in culture-negative patients. If implemented in routine expanded programme of immunisation (EPI) with high coverage, current PCVs could prevent almost half of pneumococcal meningitis cases. Given the diversity of circulating serotypes in PNG serotype replacement is of concern. Ongoing surveillance is imperative to monitor the impact of vaccines. In the longer term vaccines providing broader protection against pneumococcal meningitis will be needed.

  2. Haemophilus influenzae type B meningitis: Is there a re-emergence? 24 years of experience in a children's hospital.

    PubMed

    Gentile, Angela; Martínez, Ana C; Juarez, María Del V; Lución, María F; Burgo, Candela; Della Latta, María P; Rapapor, Solana; Romanin, Viviana; Turco, Marisa

    2017-06-01

    Haemophilus influenzae type B (Hib) used to be the main cause of bacterial meningitis in children younger than 5 years old. Following the introduction of the Hib vaccine in the immunization schedule (1998), its incidence reduced significantly but it has increased over the last years. The objectives of this study included describing the characteristics and analyzing the epidemic curve of Haemophilus influenzae type B (Hib) meningitis by comparing the pre- and postimmunization periods. Time-series study. All patients hospitalized with Hib meningitis at Hospital de Niños "R. Gutiérrez" (January 1992-May 2016). Hospitalization rates were compared before (pre-immunization) and after (post-immunization) the introduction of the Hib vaccine. The post-immunization period was divided into three similar periods. Eighty-five patients with Hib meningitis were admitted (73.3% in the pre-immunization period). No differences were observed in relation to the clinical and sociodemographic characteristics of cases in both periods. Pre-immunization: 10.5 cases/year; postimmunization: 0.7 cases/year. As of 2014, the rate has increased. Lethality rate: 4.8% (all preimmunization). Post-immunization data (n= 15): 40% had completed their primary immunization schedule, 40% were delayed on the immunization schedule for their age. Overall reduction in the hospital rate of Hib meningitis by 89.8% (95% confidence interval: -82.79-93.96%, p < 0.001) in the post-immunization period. The analysis of the different post-immunization periods shows a decline in reduction over time. A very significant reduction in hospitalizations due to Hib meningitis was observed after the Hib vaccine was introduced; however, over the past years, the number of cases has increased although no changes have been observed in patient characteristics.

  3. Effect of dexamethasone on the efficacy of daptomycin in the therapy of experimental pneumococcal meningitis.

    PubMed

    Vivas, M; Force, E; Tubau, F; El Haj, C; Ariza, J; Cabellos, C

    2015-07-01

    This study aimed to determine the effect of dexamethasone in combination with low-dose or high-dose daptomycin for the treatment of penicillin- and cephalosporin-resistant pneumococcal meningitis. Efficacy (ΔCFU/mL) and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) levels of daptomycin at 15mg/kg and 25mg/kg were studied in a rabbit model of pneumococcal meningitis, comparing them with the same doses in com