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Sample records for childhood immune thrombocytopenic

  1. Comparison of intravenous immune globulin and high dose anti-D immune globulin as initial therapy for childhood immune thrombocytopenic purpura.

    PubMed

    Kane, Ian; Ragucci, Dominic; Shatat, Ibrahim F; Bussel, James; Kalpatthi, Ram

    2010-04-01

    This report documents our experience with intravenous immune globulin (IVIG) (1 g/kg, iv) and high-dose, anti-D immune globulin (anti-D) (75 microg/kg) as initial treatment for childhood immune thrombocytopenic purpura (ITP). The medical records of children diagnosed with ITP at a single institution between January 2003 and May 2008 were retrospectively reviewed. Participants received either IVIG or high-dose anti-D immune globulin as their initial treatment for ITP. For the 53 patients included for analysis, there was no statistical difference in efficacy between each group; however, patients who received anti-D experienced a higher rate of adverse drug reactions (ADRs), particularly chills and rigours, and 2 of 24 patients in the anti-D group developed severe anaemia requiring medical intervention. Patients who presented with mucosal bleeding had higher rates of treatment failure (32%) compared to those who presented with dry purpura (6%), regardless of treatment. Both IVIG and high-dose anti-D are effective first-line therapies for childhood ITP. However, we observed increased ADRs in the high-dose anti-D group in contrast to previously published reports. Further studies are needed to evaluate safety and premedications for high-dose anti-D and to determine the utility of using the presence of mucosal bleeding to predict treatment failure.

  2. Association of CD4+CD25+FoxP3+ regulatory T cells with natural course of childhood chronic immune thrombocytopenic purpura

    PubMed Central

    Son, Bo Ra

    2015-01-01

    Purpose The purpose of this study was to determine the frequency of CD4+CD25+FoxP3+ regulatory T cells (Treg) in the peripheral blood of patients with childhood chronic immune thrombocytopenic purpura (ITP) exhibiting thrombocytopenia and spontaneous remission. The findings of this study indicate the possibility of predicting spontaneous recovery and pathogenesis of childhood chronic ITP. Methods Eleven children with chronic ITP (seven thrombocytopenic and four spontaneous remission cases; mean age, 8.8 years; range, 1.7-14.9 years) were enrolled in this study. Five healthy children and eight healthy adults were included as controls. The frequency of Treg was evaluated by flow cytometry in the peripheral blood. Results In this study, four patients (36%) achieved spontaneous remission within 2.8 years (mean year; range, 1.0-4.4 years). The frequency of Treg was significantly lower in patients with persisting thrombocytopenia (0.13%±0.09%, P<0.05), than that in the patients with spontaneous remission (0.30%±0.02%), healthy adults controls (0.55%±0.44%), and healthy children controls (0.46%±0.26%). A significantly positive correlation was found between the frequency of Treg and the platelet count in children. Conclusion These data suggest that a lower frequency of Treg contributes to the breakdown of self-tolerance, and may form the basis for future development of specific immunomodulatory therapies. Furthermore, Treg frequency has prognostic implication toward the natural course and long-term outcomes of childhood chronic ITP. PMID:26124848

  3. Association of interleukin-(IL)10 haplotypes and serum IL-10 levels in the progression of childhood immune thrombocytopenic purpura.

    PubMed

    Tesse, Riccardina; Del Vecchio, Giovanni Carlo; De Mattia, Domenico; Sangerardi, Maria; Valente, Federica; Giordano, Paola

    2012-08-15

    Derangement of genetic and immunological factors seems to have a pivotal role in the pathophysiology of immune thrombocytopenic purpura (ITP). We investigated interleukin(IL)-10 genetically determined expression in children with an acute progression of ITP (n=41) compared to young patients with chronic ITP (n=44) and healthy controls (n=60), and attempted to correlate IL-10 production with the course of the disease. We genotyped our study population for three single nucleotide polymorphisms at positions -1082 (A/G), -819 (C/T) and -592 (C/A) in the promoter region of the IL-10 gene. IL-10 levels were measured by enzyme-linked immunoassay. The IL-10 production in our study population was significantly higher in patients carrying the GCC haplotype than those bearing ACC and ATA haplotypes (6.9 ± 1.5 vs 3.6 ± 0.8 vs 3.3 ± 0.3, p=0.03). The serum concentration of IL-10 was significantly higher in patients with an acute course of their disease, who mainly carried the GCC haplotype (92%), compared to chronic subjects, bearing the non-GCC haplotypes, and controls [17 pg/mL (1.7-18) vs 3.5 pg/mL (0.6-11) vs 3 pg/mL (1-7), p<0.01)]. Our findings show that patients carrying the GCC-high producer IL-10 haplotype have an acute development of ITP and that IL-10 levels might represent a useful predictive biomarker of the disease course.

  4. Autoimmune Hepatitis Associated with Immune Thrombocytopenic Purpura

    PubMed Central

    Ito, Akihiro; Yoshizawa, Kaname; Fujimori, Kazuya; Morita, Susumu; Shigeno, Takashi; Maejima, Toshitaka

    2017-01-01

    Although autoimmune hepatitis (AIH) is frequently complicated with chronic thyroiditis or other autoimmune disorders, reports on its association with immune thrombocytopenic purpura (ITP) are scarce. We herein describe a case of AIH associated with ITP. A 75-year-old Japanese woman was admitted to our hospital due to increased aminotransferase levels and severe thrombocytopenia. Elevated serum immunoglobulin G (IgG) was detected, and tests for platelet-associated IgG and anti-nuclear antibody were positive. Following the diagnosis of AIH-associated ITP, prednisolone treatment of 0.6 mg/kg/day resulted in a decrease in the aminotransferase levels and an increased platelet count. PMID:28090042

  5. Therapeutic splenectomy in immune thrombocytopenic purpura.

    PubMed

    Wani, N A; Parray, F Q

    2000-01-01

    The effects of splenectomy in 41 patients managed from 1982 to 1995 at Sher-i-Kashmir Institute of Medical Sciences, Srinagar (Jammu and Kashmir), India, were studied. Immune thrombocytopenic purpura (ITP) was the main indication for therapeutic splenectomy among all the hematologic disorders. The mean age was 30 years (range 7-64), and the male to female ratio was 1.05:1. The mean platelet count in the preoperative period was 31,751/mm(3) (range 4000-85,000). All patients presented with thrombocytopenia, i.e., platelet count of <100,000/mm(3). In addition, 5 patients presented with anemia, i.e., Hb <10 g%. Among the patients with thrombocytopenia, 30 patients presented with counts <50,000/mm(3) and 11 patients presented with counts between 50,000-100,000/mm(3). None of the patients presented with leukopenia. The morbidity observed was 15% and mortality was 2%. The response to splenectomy was complete for thrombocytopenia in 3 patients and partial in 5 patients; 4 patients failed to show any response. In anemic patients, 4 patients showed complete response and 1 patient showed no response. The prognosis was excellent in patients with platelet count >50,000/mm(3), age <50 years, no concomitant disease, and disease of shorter duration.

  6. Pulmonary Endarterectomy in a Patient with Immune Thrombocytopenic Purpura

    PubMed Central

    Yıldızeli, Bedrettin; Yanartaş, Mehmed; Keskin, Sibel; Atagündüz, Işık; Altınay, Ece

    2015-01-01

    Immune thrombocytopenic purpura (ITP) patients are at high risk for bleeding complications regarding surgeries involving cardiopulmonary bypass. We report an ITP patient with chronic thromboembolic pulmonary hypertension who underwent uncomplicated pulmonary endarterectomy with receiving postoperative intravenous immunoglobulin (IVIG) therapy. The positive outcome of this case may suggest that pulmonary endarterectomy surgery is performed safely for ITP patients. PMID:26090264

  7. Platelet antibody in prolonged remission of childhood idiopathic thrombocytopenic purpura

    SciTech Connect

    Ware, R.; Kinney, T.R.; Rosse, W.

    1985-11-01

    Evaluations were performed in 20 patients with childhood idiopathic thrombocytopenic purpura (ITP) who remained in remission longer than 12 months. The mean duration of follow-up from diagnosis was 39 months (range 17 to 87 months). Eleven patients (four girls) in group 1 had an acute course of ITP, defined as platelet count greater than 150 X 10(9)/L within 6 months of diagnosis. Nine patients (five girls) in group 2 had a chronic course, defined as platelet count less than 150 X 10(9)/L for greater than or equal to 1 year or requiring splenectomy in an attempt to control hemorrhagic symptoms. Platelet count and serum (indirect) platelet-associated IgG (PAIgG) levels were normal in all 20 patients at follow-up. Both direct and indirect PAIgG levels were measured using a SVI-monoclonal anti-IgG antiglobulin assay. All had normal direct PAIgG levels, except for one patient in group 1 who had a borderline elevated value of 1209 molecules per platelet. These data suggest that the prevalence of elevated platelet antibodies is low during sustained remission without medication in patients with a history of childhood ITP. These data may be relevant for pregnant women with a history of childhood ITP, with regard to the risk of delivering an infant with thrombocytopenia secondary to transplacental passage of maternal platelet antibody.

  8. Cerebral venous thrombosis after immune thrombocytopenic purpura and anti-D immune globulin therapy.

    PubMed

    Kayyali, Husam R; Abdelmoity, Ahmed T; Morriss, M Craig; Graf, William D

    2008-03-01

    Cerebral venous thrombosis has multiple etiologies and a wide variety of clinical manifestations. This article reports on a young girl who developed cerebral venous thrombosis after intravenous anti-D immune globulin therapy for immune thrombocytopenic purpura. In this case, venous infarction was manifested by an unusual pattern of restricted diffusion limited to the corpus callosum. The cause of cerebral venous thrombosis in this patient may be related to both immune thrombocytopenia and immunoglobulin therapy.

  9. A Case of Immune Thrombocytopenic Purpura Secondary to Pulmonary Tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Meher, Lalit Kumar; Dalai, Siba Prasad; Nayak, Sachidananda; Tripathy, Sujit Kumar

    2016-01-01

    The haematological abnormalities associated with active pulmonary tuberculosis were known to human beings since decades but Immune Thrombocytopenic Purpura (ITP) secondary to pulmonary tuberculosis have been reported only in a couple of instances. We report a 27 year-old male patient who was admitted to our hospital with fever, shortness of breath, haematuria, epistaxis and generalized petechiae. The sputum positivity for Acid Fast Bacilli (AFB) and chest X-ray reports were suggestive of active pulmonary tuberculosis in our patient. Clinical and laboratory parameters including bone marrow aspiration cytology diagnosed the case to be ITP. Patient was put on Directly Observed Treatment and Short course (DOTS) category-1 Anti-Tuberculosis Therapy (ATT) and prednisone following which thrombocytopenia was corrected and there was complete recovery of the patient without recurrence of thrombocytopenia. PMID:27891382

  10. Immune thrombocytopenic purpura might be an early hematologic manifestation of undiagnosed human immunodeficiency virus infection.

    PubMed

    Lai, Shih-Wei; Lin, Hsien-Feng; Lin, Cheng-Li; Liao, Kuan-Fu

    2017-03-01

    Little research focuses on the association between immune thrombocytopenic purpura and human immunodeficiency virus infection in Taiwan. This study investigated whether immune thrombocytopenic purpura might be an early hematologic manifestation of undiagnosed human immunodeficiency virus infection in Taiwan. We conducted a retrospective population-based cohort study using data of individuals enrolled in Taiwan National Health Insurance Program. There were 5472 subjects aged 1-84 years with a new diagnosis of immune thrombocytopenic purpura as the purpura group since 1998-2010 and 21,887 sex-matched and age-matched, randomly selected subjects without immune thrombocytopenic purpura as the non-purpura group. The incidence of human immunodeficiency virus infection at the end of 2011 was measured in both groups. We used the multivariable Cox proportional hazards regression model to measure the hazard ratio and 95 % confidence interval (CI) for the association between immune thrombocytopenic purpura and human immunodeficiency virus infection. The overall incidence of human immunodeficiency virus infection was 6.47-fold higher in the purpura group than that in the non-purpura group (3.78 vs. 0.58 per 10,000 person-years, 95 % CI 5.83-7.18). After controlling for potential confounding factors, the adjusted HR of human immunodeficiency virus infection was 6.3 (95 % CI 2.58-15.4) for the purpura group, as compared with the non-purpura group. We conclude that individuals with immune thrombocytopenic purpura are 6.47-fold more likely to have human immunodeficiency virus infection than those without immune thrombocytopenic purpura. We suggest not all patients, but only those who have risk factors for human immunodeficiency virus infection should receive testing for undiagnosed human immunodeficiency virus infection when they develop immune thrombocytopenic purpura.

  11. Instant Childhood Immunization Schedule

    MedlinePlus

    ... Recommendations Why Immunize? Vaccines: The Basics Instant Childhood Immunization Schedule Recommend on Facebook Tweet Share Compartir Get ... date. See Disclaimer for additional details. Based on Immunization Schedule for Children 0 through 6 Years of ...

  12. Rapid encephalopathy associated with anti-D immune globulin treatment for idiopathic thrombocytopenic purpura.

    PubMed

    Golla, Sunitha; Horkan, Clare; Dogaru, Grigore; Teske, Thomas E; Christopher, Kenneth

    2008-01-01

    Rho (D) immune globulin intravenous (IV RhIG, WinRho SDF) has been shown to be a safe treatment for idiopathic thrombocytopenic purpura. Common side effects of IV RhIG include mild hemolysis, febrile reaction and headache. Significant hemolysis with renal impairment is infrequently noted. A single case of irreversible encephalopathy following IV RhIG has been reported. We report a second case of encephalopathy following an infusion of IV RhIG for treatment of idiopathic thrombocytopenic purpura.

  13. Platelet-associated complement C3 in immune thrombocytopenic purpura

    SciTech Connect

    Myers, T.J.; Kim, B.K.; Steiner, M.; Baldini, M.G.

    1982-05-01

    Platelet-associated C3 (PA-C3) was measured with a quantitative immunofluorescence assay. With this assay, PA-C3 levels were determined for 78 normal volunteers, 30 patients with immune thrombocytopenic purpura (ITP), and 20 patients with nonimmune thrombocytopenias. Platelet-associatd IgG (PA-lgG) levels were also measured with our standard quantitative immunofluorescence assay. All patients with nonimmune thrombocytopenias and ITP in remission had normal PA-C3 levels. Twenty-four patients with active ITP wre classified into 3 groups: 9 (38%) with increased PA-IgG and normal PA-C3 levels, 10 (42%) with elevated PA-C3 and PA-IgG levels, and 5 (20%) with increased PA-C3 values only. A direct correlation was found between PA-C3 and PA-IgG levels. PA-IgG levels were higher in the group of patients with elevated PA-C3 levels than in those with normal values. Platelet survival studies showed reduced survival times of 1.5-2.5 days for the 5 patients with elevated PA-C3 levels only. Elevated PA-C3 levels returned to normal in 7 ITP patients whose platelet counts increased in response to corticosteriod therapy or to splenectomy. Therefore, PA-C3 and PA-IgG assays can be used to identify patients with ITP, to follow their response to therapy, and to classify them into immunologic subgroups similar to red cell classifiation by Coombs' testing in immune hemolytic anemia.

  14. DNMT3B promoter polymorphism and risk of immune thrombocytopenic purpura in pediatric Egyptians.

    PubMed

    Shaheen, Iman A; Abukhalil, Reham E; Ali, Dina K; Afifi, Rasha A

    2012-10-01

    Idiopathic (immune) thrombocytopenic purpura (ITP) is a heterogeneous clinical disorder characterized by immune-mediated platelet destruction. Epigenetic changes in gene expression, including DNA methylation and histone modifications, might contribute to autoimmunity. Polymorphisms of the DNA methyltransferase 3B (DNMT3B) gene may influence DNMT3B activity on DNA methylation and increase the susceptibility to several diseases. The current study investigated the association between a single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) in the promoter of DNMT3B gene and the risk for ITP in pediatric Egyptians. DNMT3B SNP was genotyped by PCR-restriction fragment length polymorphism in 71 pediatric ITP patients and 82 healthy controls matched for age and sex. The C/C wild genotype was not detected in ITP patients or in the controls. The frequencies of the T/T and C/T genotypes were 93.9 and 6.1% in the controls and 91.5 and 6.1% in ITP patients, respectively. There was no significant difference in either genotypes or allelic distribution between ITP patients and the controls. In conclusion, this polymorphism was almost equally distributed between ITP patients and the controls. These results demonstrated that this SNP may not be used as a stratification marker to predict the susceptibility to childhood ITP in Egypt.

  15. [Protocol for the study and treatment of immune thrombocytopenic purpura (ITP). ITP-2010].

    PubMed

    Monteagudo, E; Fernández-Delgado, R; Sastre, A; Toll, T; Llort, A; Molina, J; Astigarraga, I; Dasí, M A; Cervera, A

    2011-06-01

    Primary immune thrombocytopenia (ITP), formerly known as immune thrombocytopenic purpura, is a disease in which clinical and therapeutic management has always been controversial. The ITP working group of the Spanish Society of Paediatric Haematology and Oncology has updated its guidelines for diagnosis and treatment of ITP in children based on current guidelines, literature review, clinical trials and member consensus. The primary objective was to lessen clinical variability in diagnostic and therapeutic procedures in order to obtain best clinical results with minimal adverse events and good quality of life.

  16. Immune Thrombocytopenic Purpura and Gastritis by H. pylori Associated With Type 1 Diabetes Mellitus

    PubMed Central

    Correa, Ricardo; Flores-Guevara, Igor; Espinoza Morales, Frank; Mejia, Christian R

    2016-01-01

    We present the 15th case reported worldwide and 3rd case reported in Latin America of immune thrombocytopenic purpura associated with Type 1 diabetes mellitus in Scopus, MEDLINE, and SciELO. An 11-year-old male patient of mixed ethnicity with immune thrombocytopenic purpura, Type 1 diabetes mellitus, and gastritis due to H. pylori presented to the emergency room with petechiae, ecchymosis, and gingival and conjunctival bleeding that had been worsening for the past three months. The patient had a body mass index of 18.85 kg/m2 (P75). A biochemical analysis showed 1×109 platelets/L, increased prothrombin time, increased partial thromboplastin time, and an HbA1C of 7.84% on admission. He was prescribed a single dose of intravenous methylprednisolone 750 mg in 100 mL of NaCl and daily oral 50 mg prednisolone, with intravenous 250 mg tranexamic acid every eight hours. The patient’s glycemic control was continued with the administration of insulin glargine (30 units every 24 hours) and prandial insulin glulisine (five to eight units per meal). Before admission, the patient was on a prescribed treatment of sitagliptin 50 mg and metformin 850 mg, but this was suspended in the emergency room. For the eradication of H. pylori he was prescribed amoxicillin 500 mg every eight hours, oral clarithromycin 335 mg every 12 hours, and IV omeprazole 40 mg. After 15 days, he showed disease resolution and he was discharged to his home with orders to follow-up with pediatrics, hematology, and endocrinology services. The first-line treatment for immune thrombocytopenic purpura patients with active bleeding and a platelet count < 30,000 platelets/μl is the administration of corticosteroids and inmunoglobulin. PMID:27026836

  17. Immune Thrombocytopenic Purpura and Gastritis by H. pylori Associated With Type 1 Diabetes Mellitus.

    PubMed

    Culquichicón-Sánchez, Carlos; Correa, Ricardo; Flores-Guevara, Igor; Espinoza Morales, Frank; Mejia, Christian R

    2016-02-24

    We present the 15th case reported worldwide and 3rd case reported in Latin America of immune thrombocytopenic purpura associated with Type 1 diabetes mellitus in Scopus, MEDLINE, and SciELO. An 11-year-old male patient of mixed ethnicity with immune thrombocytopenic purpura, Type 1 diabetes mellitus, and gastritis due to H. pylori presented to the emergency room with petechiae, ecchymosis, and gingival and conjunctival bleeding that had been worsening for the past three months. The patient had a body mass index of 18.85 kg/m(2) (P75). A biochemical analysis showed 1×10(9) platelets/L, increased prothrombin time, increased partial thromboplastin time, and an HbA1C of 7.84% on admission. He was prescribed a single dose of intravenous methylprednisolone 750 mg in 100 mL of NaCl and daily oral 50 mg prednisolone, with intravenous 250 mg tranexamic acid every eight hours. The patient's glycemic control was continued with the administration of insulin glargine (30 units every 24 hours) and prandial insulin glulisine (five to eight units per meal). Before admission, the patient was on a prescribed treatment of sitagliptin 50 mg and metformin 850 mg, but this was suspended in the emergency room. For the eradication of H. pylori he was prescribed amoxicillin 500 mg every eight hours, oral clarithromycin 335 mg every 12 hours, and IV omeprazole 40 mg. After 15 days, he showed disease resolution and he was discharged to his home with orders to follow-up with pediatrics, hematology, and endocrinology services. The first-line treatment for immune thrombocytopenic purpura patients with active bleeding and a platelet count < 30,000 platelets/μl is the administration of corticosteroids and inmunoglobulin.

  18. Plateletpheresis for postsplenectomy rebound thrombocytosis in a patient with chronic immune thrombocytopenic purpura on romiplostim.

    PubMed

    Raval, Jay S; Redner, Robert L; Kiss, Joseph E

    2013-08-01

    Immune thrombocytopenic purpura (ITP) is an autoimmune disease in which IgG-coated platelets are removed from circulation by the spleen, and platelet production is impaired due to increased thrombopoietin (TPO) clearance. Romiplostim, a novel TPO-mimetic agent, is approved for patients with ITP that are unresponsive to traditional treatments. However, there is little experience when using this drug before splenectomy. We describe herein the case of a young female with chronic ITP who was treated with romiplostim, underwent splenectomy shortly thereafter, and required plateletpheresis for postoperative rebound thrombocytosis with concomitant neurologic symptoms.

  19. Safety and Efficacy Study of Romiplostim to Treat Immune Thrombocytopenia (ITP) in Pediatric Patients

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-02-07

    Idiopathic Thrombocytopenic Purpura; Thrombocytopenia; Thrombocytopenia in Pediatric Subjects With Immune (Idiopathic) Thrombocytopenic Purpura (ITP); Thrombocytopenia in Subjects With Immune (Idiopathic) Thrombocytopenic Purpura (ITP); Thrombocytopenic Purpura; Immune Thrombocytopenia

  20. High-dose intravenous therapy with immune globulin before delivery for idiopathic thrombocytopenic purpura.

    PubMed Central

    Adderley, R. J.; Rogers, P. C.; Shaw, D.; Wadsworth, L. D.

    1984-01-01

    A 15-year-old girl with a 9-year history of idiopathic thrombocytopenic purpura resistant to high-dose steroid therapy and to splenectomy was admitted to hospital at 35 weeks' gestation with a platelet count of 10 X 10(9)/L. The bleeding time was normal, and measures of platelet aggregation were nearly so. Treatment with high intravenous doses of polyvalent immune globulin led to a rise in the platelet count to more than 110 X 10(9)/L within 5 days. An elective cesarean section was performed through the lower uterine segment with good hemostasis. After delivery the platelet count fell to its former level, but no postpartum bleeding occurred. There was a brief episode of thrombocytopenia in the infant, with some petechiae but no other hemorrhagic manifestations. No untoward effects of the immune globulin infusion were observed in either mother or daughter. PMID:6423252

  1. Role of Helicobacter pylori Eradication Therapy on Platelet Recovery in Chronic Immune Thrombocytopenic Purpura

    PubMed Central

    Sheema, Khan; Arshi, Naz; Farah, Naz; Imran, Sheikh

    2017-01-01

    Background. Idiopathic thrombocytopenic purpura (ITP) is a bleeding disorder in which the immune system destroys native platelets. In this condition an autoantibody is generated against a platelet antigen. ITP affects women more often than men and is more common in children than adults. Objective. To assess the effect of Helicobacter pylori eradication therapy (HPET) on platelet count in Helicobacter pylori associated chronic immune thrombocytopenic purpura (chronic ITP) in adult. Materials and Methods. It is an interventional prospective study conducted at Liaquat University of Medical and Health Sciences, Jamshoro, from 2014 to 2015. A set of 85 patients diagnosed with chronic ITP were included in the study via convenient sampling. Patients with platelets count < 100 × 109/L for >3 months were selected. They were posed to first-line investigations which comprised complete blood count (CBC) and peripheral blood smear examination followed by second-line tests including bone marrow examination and Helicobacter pylori stool specific antigen (HpSA-EIA). Standard H. pylori eradication therapy was offered and the patients were assessed at regular intervals for 6 months. Results. Of the 85 study patients, 32 (37.6%) were male and 53 (62.3%) were female. Mean ages of H. pylori positive and negative subjects were 43.89 ± 7.06 and 44.75 ± 7.91 years, respectively. Bone marrow examination confirmed the diagnosis and excluded other related BM disorders. H. pylori stool antigen (HpSA) was detected in 34 (40%) patients and hence regarded as H. pylori positive; the rest were negative. Treatment with eradication therapy significantly improved the mean platelet counts from 48.56 ± 21.7 × 109/l to 94.2 ± 26.8 × 109/l. Conclusion. We concluded that the anti-H. pylori eradication therapy improves blood platelet counts in chronic immune thrombocytopenia. PMID:28194178

  2. Rotavirus-associated immune thrombocytopenic purpura in children: A retrospective study.

    PubMed

    Ai, Qi; Yin, Jing; Chen, Sen; Qiao, Lijin; Luo, Na

    2016-10-01

    Certain studies have previously indicated that an association may exist between rotavirus infection and primary immune thrombocytopenic purpura (ITP). The present retrospective study aimed to investigate whether rotavirus may cause ITP in children. Firstly, the incidence of ITP in children with or without rotavirus diarrhea was compared. A 14.58% incident rate was observed in children with rotavirus diarrhea compared with a 7.22% incident rate in children without rotavirus diarrhea. Subsequently, the clinical features of ITP children with or without rotavirus infection were compared. The results indicated that ITP children with rotavirus infection were significantly younger, showed significantly decreased mean platelet volume (MPV) levels and presented a significantly higher frequency of bleeding score of 3 against ITP children without rotavirus infection. In conclusion, these findings suggest that rotavirus serves a causative role in ITP.

  3. Serum thrombopoietin levels in relation to disease status in patients with immune thrombocytopenic purpura.

    PubMed

    Kappers-Klunne, M C; de Haan, M; Struijk, P C; van Vliet, H H

    2001-12-01

    Pre- and post-treatment serum thrombopoietin (TPO) concentration was measured in 35 patients with immune thrombocytopenic purpura (ITP). Mean post-treatment levels were significantly lower (P = 0.02) than pretreatment and not different for treatment modality. No significant correlation between pre- or post-treatment TPO and platelet counts was demonstrable (R = -0.325, P = 0.056 and R = -0.227, P = 0.190 respectively). In patients with very low platelet counts (< or =20 x 10(9)/l), pretreatment serum TPO was significantly higher than in patients with higher counts (P = 0.033). The logarithm of the platelet turnover rate, measured in 15 patients, correlated with pretreatment TPO levels (R = 0.64). These findings suggest a contributory role for TPO in the mechanism of ITP.

  4. Autoimmune hepatitis-primary biliary cirrhosis overlap syndrome concomitant with immune hemolytic anemia and immune thrombocytopenic purpura (Evans syndrome).

    PubMed

    Korkmaz, Huseyin; Bugdaci, Mehmet Sait; Temel, Tuncer; Dagli, Mehmet; Karabagli, Pinar

    2013-04-01

    Autoimmune hepatitis (AIH) and primary biliary cirrhosis (PBC) associated with Evans syndrome; combination of autoimmune hemolytic anemia (AIHA) and immune thrombocytopenic purpura (ITP) has rarely been reported. We report the case of a 53-year-old patient who presented with weakness, myalgia, arthralgia, shortness of breath and purpura. Initial laboratory investigations revealed liver dysfunction, anemia and thrombocytopenia. Anti-nuclear (ANA) and antimitochondrial M2 (AMA M2) antibodies were positive. Diagnose of PBC-AIH overlap was made by clinical, serological and histological investigations. AIHA and ITP was identified with clinical-laboratory findings and bone marrow puncture. She was treated with IVIG followed by prednisolone and ursodeoxycholic acid. Hemoglobin-thrombocytes increased rapidly and transaminases improved at day 8. We have reported the first case in the literature with AIH-PBC overlap syndrome concurrent by ITP and AIHA which suggest the presence of shared genetic susceptibility factors in multiple autoimmune conditions including AIH, PBC, ITP and AIHA.

  5. Ribosomal and immune transcripts associate with relapse in acquired ADAMTS13-deficient thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura.

    PubMed

    Edgar, Contessa E; Terrell, Deirdra R; Vesely, Sara K; Wren, Jonathan D; Dozmorov, Igor M; Niewold, Timothy B; Brown, Michael; Zhou, Fang; Frank, Mark Barton; Merrill, Joan T; Kremer Hovinga, Johanna A; Lämmle, Bernhard; James, Judith A; George, James N; Farris, A Darise

    2015-01-01

    Approximately 40% of patients who survive acute episodes of thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura (TTP) associated with severe acquired ADAMTS13 deficiency experience one or more relapses. Risk factors for relapse other than severe ADAMTS13 deficiency and ADAMTS13 autoantibodies are unknown. ADAMTS13 autoantibodies, TTP episodes following infection or type I interferon treatment and reported ensuing systemic lupus erythematosus in some patients suggest immune dysregulation. This cross-sectional study asked whether autoantibodies against RNA-binding proteins or peripheral blood gene expression profiles measured during remission are associated with history of prior relapse in acquired ADAMTS13-deficient TTP. Peripheral blood from 38 well-characterized patients with autoimmune ADAMTS13-deficient TTP in remission was examined for autoantibodies and global gene expression. A subset of TTP patients (9 patients, 24%) exhibited a peripheral blood gene signature composed of elevated ribosomal transcripts that associated with prior relapse. A non-overlapping subset of TTP patients (9 patients, 24%) displayed a peripheral blood type I interferon gene signature that associated with autoantibodies to RNA-binding proteins but not with history of relapse. Patients who had relapsed bimodally expressed higher HLA transcript levels independently of ribosomal transcripts. Presence of any one potential risk factor (ribosomal gene signature, elevated HLA-DRB1, elevated HLA-DRB5) associated with relapse (OR = 38.4; p = 0.0002) more closely than any factor alone or all factors together. Levels of immune transcripts typical of natural killer (NK) and T lymphocytes positively correlated with ribosomal gene expression and number of prior episodes but not with time since the most recent episode. Flow cytometry confirmed elevated expression of cell surface markers encoded by these transcripts on T and/or NK cell subsets of patients who had relapsed. These data associate elevated ribosomal and

  6. [Treatment of immune thrombocytopenic purpura in Pediatrics. Therapeutic efficacy of a regional intravenous immunoglobulin G].

    PubMed

    Buteler, C; Colombo, H; Gabosi, G; Manfredi, M J; Montero, S; Pasquali, M A; Rougier, C; Sisti, A M

    2001-01-01

    Immune thrombocytopenic purpura (ITP) is a bleeding disorder characterized by accelerated splenic removal of platelets opsonized with autoantibodies. Several different treatments have been tried in acute ITP patients, including intravenous immunoglobulin (IVIG) therapy. The aim of this paper was to assess the therapeutic efficacy, clinical tolerance and viral safety of Inmunoglobulina G Endovenosa-UNC, manufactured by Laboratorio de Hemoderivados, Cordoba National University, in the treatment of acute ITP patients. A prospective longitudinal study was carried out on 8 children, who were admitted to the Hospital de Niños de Córdoba, from July 1998 to June 1999. A dose of 1 g/Kg/day of Inmunoglobulina G Endovenosa-UNC was administered to those children whose platelet values remained < or = 20,000/mm3, 21 days after the first IVIG cycle. The observed results led us to conclude that Inmunoglobulina G Endovenosa-UNC is well tolerated and therapeutically effective in the treatment of acute ITP in children, with platelet values recovery, similar to those obtained with other IVIG. Moreover, it proved to be virally safe since the 8 patients were non reactive for viral markers of hepatitis B, hepatitis C and human immunodeficiency, 12 months after ending the treatment.

  7. Bleeding tendency and platelet function during treatment with romiplostim in children with severe immune thrombocytopenic purpura.

    PubMed

    Suntsova, Elena V; Demina, Irina M; Ignatova, Anastasia A; Ershov, Nikolay M; Trubina, Natalia M; Dobrynina, Juliya; Serkova, Irina V; Supik, Zhanna S; Orekhova, Ekaterina V; Hachatryan, Lili A; Kotskaya, Natalia N; Pshonkin, Aleksey V; Maschan, Aleksey A; Novichkova, Galina A; Panteleev, Mikhail A

    2017-03-07

    It has been suggested that platelet function in chronic immune thrombocytopenic purpura (ITP) may be abnormal. Thrombopoietin mimetics used for treatment can affect it, but the data remain limited. We investigated platelet function of 20 children diagnosed with severe ITP (aged 1-16 years, 12 females and eight males). Platelet functional activity in whole blood was characterized by flow cytometry before and after stimulation with SFLLRN plus collagen-related peptide. Levels of CD42b, PAC1, and CD62P, but not CD61 or annexin V, were significantly increased (P < 0.05) in resting platelets of patients before treatment compared with healthy donors. On average, PAC1 and CD62P in patients after activation were also significantly elevated, although some patients failed to activate integrins. Romiplostim (1-15 μg/kg/week s.c.) was prescribed to seven patients, with clinical improvement in six. Interestingly, one patient had clinical improvement without platelet count increase. Eltrombopag (25-75 mg/day p.o.) was given to four patients, with positive response in one. Others switched to romiplostim, with one stable positive response, one unstable positive response, and one non-responding. Platelet quality improved with romiplostim treatment, and their parameters approached the normal values. Our results suggest that platelets in children with severe ITP are pre-activated and abnormal, but improve with treatment.

  8. Importance of immature platelet fraction as predictor of immune thrombocytopenic purpura

    PubMed Central

    Naz, Arshi; Mukry, Samina Naz; Shaikh, Mahwish Rauf; Bukhari, Ali Raza; Shamsi, Tahir Sultan

    2016-01-01

    Background and Objective: Immune thrombocytopenic purpura (ITP) is a clinical syndrome in which a decreased number of circulating platelets (thrombocytopenia) manifests as a bleeding tendency, easy bruising (purpura) or extravasation of blood from capillaries into skin and mucous membranes (petechiae). The diagnosis of ITP can be made clinically on the basis of symptoms, we need to see if ITP can be confirmed in patients by quantification of residual RNA containing immature platelets (megakaryocytic mass) or immature platelets fraction (IPF) using automated hematology analyzers (Sysmex XE-2100). Methods: In order to check the efficacy of IPF% parameter of Sysmex XE-2100 a total of 231 patients of thrombocytopenia were included in this study. Complete blood count (CBC) was estimated. The data was statistically analyzed by SPSS version 17. Results: About 62 patients were diagnosed as ITP and 169 patients were diagnosed as non ITP on the basis of clinical history. The mean IPF % value of ITP patients was 16.39% and the IPF % value of Non ITP patients was ~7.69% respectively. There was no significant difference in IPF% values with respect to time between sampling and acquisition of complete blood count. The diagnostic sensitivity of IPF% as biomarker for ITP and non-ITP was 85.71% (95%CI: 84.04% to 85.96%) and 41.76% (95% CI: 39.87% to 43.65%). Conclusion: The mean IPF % value by Sysmex XE-2100 can be used to predict ITP. PMID:27375692

  9. Defective circulating CD25 regulatory T cells in patients with chronic immune thrombocytopenic purpura

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Jin; Heck, Susanne; Patel, Vivek; Levan, Jared; Yu, Yu; Bussel, James B.

    2008-01-01

    Immune thrombocytopenic purpura (ITP) is characterized by the presence of antiplatelet autoantibodies as a result of loss of tolerance. CD4+CD25+ regulatory T cells (Tregs) are important for maintenance of peripheral tolerance. Decreased levels of peripheral Tregs in patients with ITP have been reported. To test whether inefficient production or reduced immunosuppressive activity of Tregs contributes to loss of tolerance in patients with chronic ITP, we investigated the frequency and function of their circulating CD4+CD25hi Tregs. We found a com-parable frequency of circulating CD4+CD25hiFoxp3+ Tregs in patients and controls (n = 16, P > .05). However, sorted CD4+CD25hi cells from patients with chronic ITP (n = 13) had a 2-fold reduction of in vitro immunosuppressive activity compared with controls (n = 10, P < .05). The impaired suppression was specific to Tregs as shown by cross-mixing experiments with T cells from controls. These data suggest that functional defects in Tregs contribute to breakdown of self-tolerance in patients with chronic ITP. PMID:18420827

  10. Platelet antibodies of the IgM class in immune thrombocytopenic purpura

    SciTech Connect

    Cines, D.B.; Wilson, S.B.; Tomaski, A.; Schreiber, A.D.

    1985-04-01

    The clinical course and response to therapy of patients with immune thrombocytopenic purpura (ITP) are not completely determined by the level of IgG present on the platelet surface. It is possible that antibodies of other immunoglobulin classes also play a role in platelet destruction in some of these patients. Therefore, the authors studied 175 patients with ITP for the presence of IgM anti-platelet antibodies using radiolabeled polyclonal or monoclonal anti-IgM. They observed that 57% of patients with clinical ITP had increased levels of IgM on their platelets, compared with normal controls and patients with thrombocytopenia who did not have ITP. They obtained similar results using either radiolabeled polyclonal or monoclonal anti-IgM, reagents whose integrity was first characterized using erythrocytes coated with defined amounts of IgM antibody. Among patients with increased platelet-IgM there was a significant correlation both with the presence of increased platelet-C3 as well as the amount of platelet-C3. The authors demonstrated the presence of warm-reacting IgM anti-platelet antibodies in the plasma of two of these patients who were further studied. These studies demonstrate the presence of warm-reacting IgM anti-platelet antibodies in some patients with ITP. They suggest that the binding of complement to platelets by IgM antibodies may initiate platelet clearance as well as enhance the effect of IgG antibodies in ITP.

  11. Detection of expression of IL-18 and its binding protein in Egyptian pediatric immune thrombocytopenic purpura.

    PubMed

    Shaheen, Iman A; Botros, Shahira K A; Morgan, Dalia S

    2014-01-01

    Immune thrombocytopenic purpura (ITP) is an autoimmune disorder, characterized by dysfunctional cellular immunity including the presence of activated platelet specific autoreactive T cells that recognize and respond to autologous platelet antigens. Autoreactive T cells drive the generation of platelet reactive autoantibodies by B cells as well as T-cytotoxic cell-mediated lysis of platelets. Interleukin-18 (IL-18) is a mediator of T helper type 1 cell responses synergistically with IL-12 that initiate and promote host defense and inflammation. IL-18 has a specific binding protein (IL-18BP) which belongs to the immunoglobulin superfamily. In the present study, serum level and messenger RNA( mRNA) expression of IL-18 as well as IL-18BP mRNA expression were measured in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMNCs) of 100 Egyptian pediatric patients with ITP (70 acute and 30 chronic). In addition to this, we recruited 80 healthy volunteers in order to investigate the possible association between the imbalance of IL-18 and IL-18 BP expressions and the pathogenesis of ITP. IL-18 serum level and mRNA expression were not elevated in cases more than in the control group, but IL-18 mRNA was higher in chronic cases when compared to the acute ones (p=0.031) and there was a good negative correlation between the platelet count and serum IL-18. IL-18 BP m-RNA was slightly elevated in cases more than in the control group (95% Confidence interval=1.15-2.01). Our results were not supportive for previous findings of elevated IL18/BP mRNA ratio in ITP patients. This could be referred to the fact that autoimmune diseases are complex genetic disorders, therefore further studies on polymorphisms affecting IL-18 gene expression as well as kinetics of IL-18 expression are required to evaluate the role of interleukin 18 and its binding protein in the pathogenesis of ITP.

  12. Immune thrombocytopenic purpura (ITP) associated with vaccinations: a review of reported cases.

    PubMed

    Perricone, Carlo; Ceccarelli, Fulvia; Nesher, Gideon; Borella, Elisabetta; Odeh, Qasim; Conti, Fabrizio; Shoenfeld, Yehuda; Valesini, Guido

    2014-12-01

    Immune thrombocytopenic purpura (ITP) is an autoimmune condition characterized by low platelet count with mucocutaneous and other bleedings. Clinical manifestations may range from spontaneous formation of purpura and petechiae, especially on the extremities, to epistaxis, bleeding at the gums or menorrhagia, any of which occur usually if the platelet count is below 20,000 per μl. A very low count may result in the spontaneous formation of hematomas in the mouth or on other mucous membranes. Fatal complications, including subarachnoid or intracerebral, lower gastrointestinal or other internal bleeding can arise due to an extremely low count. Vaccines may induce ITP by several mechanisms. Vaccine-associated autoimmunity may stem not only from the antigen-mediated responses but also from other constituents of the vaccine, such as yeast proteins, adjuvants, and preservatives diluents. The most likely is through virally induced molecular mimicry. The binding of pathogenic autoantibodies to platelet and megakaryocytes may cause thrombocytopenia by different mechanisms, such as opsonization, direct activation of complement, or apoptotic pathways. The autoantibodies hypothesis is not sufficient to explain all ITP cases: In the anti-platelet antibody-negative cases, a complementary mechanism based on T cell immune-mediated mechanism has been suggested. In particular, T cell subsets seem dysregulated with an increased production of pro-inflammatory cytokines, as IFN-γ and TNF, and chemokines, as CXCL10. Vaccines are one of the most striking discoveries in human history that changed dramatically life expectancy. Nonetheless, the occurrence of adverse events and autoimmune phenomena has been described following vaccination, and ITP may represent one of this.

  13. Balancing Therapy with Thrombopoietin Receptor Agonists and Splenectomy in Refractory Immune Thrombocytopenic Purpura: A Case of Postsplenectomy Thrombocytosis Requiring Plateletpheresis.

    PubMed

    Zimmerman, Jacquelyn; Norsworthy, Kelly J; Brodsky, Robert

    2016-01-01

    Immune thrombocytopenic purpura (ITP) causes thrombocytopenia through the autoimmune destruction of platelets. Corticosteroids remain the first line of therapy, and traditionally splenectomy has been the second. While the availability of thrombopoietin receptor agonists (TPO-RAs) has expanded treatment options, there is little data for the ideal management of these agents in preparation for splenectomy. Thrombocytosis has been reported after splenectomy in patients treated with TPO-RA preoperatively, with one prior case requiring plateletpheresis for symptomatic thrombocytosis. We present a case report and review of the literature pertaining to this complication and provide recommendations for preventing postsplenectomy thrombocytosis in ITP patients on TPO-RAs.

  14. Balancing Therapy with Thrombopoietin Receptor Agonists and Splenectomy in Refractory Immune Thrombocytopenic Purpura: A Case of Postsplenectomy Thrombocytosis Requiring Plateletpheresis

    PubMed Central

    Zimmerman, Jacquelyn; Norsworthy, Kelly J.

    2016-01-01

    Immune thrombocytopenic purpura (ITP) causes thrombocytopenia through the autoimmune destruction of platelets. Corticosteroids remain the first line of therapy, and traditionally splenectomy has been the second. While the availability of thrombopoietin receptor agonists (TPO-RAs) has expanded treatment options, there is little data for the ideal management of these agents in preparation for splenectomy. Thrombocytosis has been reported after splenectomy in patients treated with TPO-RA preoperatively, with one prior case requiring plateletpheresis for symptomatic thrombocytosis. We present a case report and review of the literature pertaining to this complication and provide recommendations for preventing postsplenectomy thrombocytosis in ITP patients on TPO-RAs. PMID:27812394

  15. The Changing World of Childhood Immunizations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Graville, Iris

    2010-01-01

    Theories and practices in early childhood education continually evolve, and the same is true in the health field. Such change is especially apparent in the area of childhood immunizations. Since vaccination to prevent smallpox was first started in the late 1700s, recommendations for which immunizations to give and when to give them have been…

  16. New developments in idiopathic thrombocytopenic purpura (ITP): cooperative, prospective studies by the Intercontinental Childhood ITP Study Group.

    PubMed

    Imbach, Paul; Kühne, Thomas; Zimmerman, Sherri

    2003-12-01

    Based on 6 years of experience with worldwide cooperation of investigators in the field of hematology, the International Childhood ITP Study Group (ICIS) has provided a long-term concept for prospective studies and new, evidence-based definitions of idiopathic thrombocytopenic purpura (ITP). Structured interactions between the cooperating investigators, the ICIS board, the writing committees, an expert panel, and the central operative office are summarized in the Rules of the ICIS. Preliminary experience shows high acceptance of the activities of the ICIS by participants from many countries. There is good cooperation, resulting in analyses and publication of results. New areas of focus for ICIS include the formation of an expert panel, regular meetings, and publication of results from current studies. Long-term financial resources must be found. ICIS is looking back on 6 constructive years of international cooperation resulting in new or confirmatory evidence regarding the demographics, diagnosis, natural history, and management of childhood ITP. New structures and cooperation must be identified to continue this productive endeavor.

  17. Does Helicobacter pylori play a role in the pathogenesis of childhood chronic idiopathic thrombocytopenic purpura?

    PubMed

    Maghbool, Maryam; Maghbool, Masood; Shahriari, Mehdi; Karimi, Mehran

    2009-06-08

    Idiopathic thrombocytopenic purpura (ITP) is an acute self-limited bleeding disorder that can progress to chronic form in 10-15% of the cases. Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) infection is a possible cause of chronic ITP. We studied 30 children with resistant chronic ITP for H. pylori infection based on the detection of H. pylori fecal antigen. This retrospective study was based on data obtained from medical records of 30 children aged between five and 17 years (median age at ITP diagnosis was ten years). A specially-designed data sheet was used to record information on age, sex, duration of disease, family history of bleeding disorders, previous treatments and median platelet count. In patients with H. pylori infection, antimicrobial treatment consisted of amoxicillin, metronidazol and omeprazol. Response was assessed every month for one year and defined as complete (platelet count >150×10(9)/L) or partial (platelet count between 50 and 150×10(9)/L). We detected H. pylori infection in 5 patients. In 4 of them increased platelet count was seen during one year of follow-up and in one patient the platelet count was acceptable during six months. Although the pathological mechanism of H. pylori-induced thrombocytopenia was unclear in our patient sample, the assessment of H. pylori infection and use of eradication therapy should be attempted in chronic and resistant ITP patients.

  18. Complement activation on platelets correlates with a decrease in circulating immature platelets in patients with immune thrombocytopenic purpura.

    PubMed

    Peerschke, Ellinor I B; Andemariam, Biree; Yin, Wei; Bussel, James B

    2010-02-01

    The role of the complement system in immune thrombocytopenic purpura (ITP) is not well defined. We examined plasma from 79 patients with ITP, 50 healthy volunteers, and 25 patients with non-immune mediated thrombocytopenia, to investigate their complement activation/fixation capacity (CAC) on immobilized heterologous platelets. Enhanced CAC was found in 46 plasma samples (59%) from patients with ITP, but no samples from patients with non-immune mediated thrombocytopenia. Plasma from healthy volunteers was used for comparison. In patients with ITP, an enhanced plasma CAC was associated with a decreased circulating absolute immature platelet fraction (A-IPF) (<15 x 10(9)/l) (P = 0.027) and thrombocytopenia (platelet count < 100 x 10(9)/l) (P = 0.024). The positive predictive value of an enhanced CAC for a low A-IPF was 93%, with a specificity of 77%. The specificity and positive predictive values increased to 100% when plasma CAC was defined strictly by enhanced C1q and/or C4d deposition on test platelets. Although no statistically significant correlation emerged between CAC and response to different pharmacological therapies, an enhanced response to splenectomy was noted (P < 0.063). Thus, complement fixation may contribute to the thrombocytopenia of ITP by enhancing clearance of opsonized platelets from the circulation, and/or directly damaging platelets and megakaryocytes.

  19. Level of IL-16 and Reticulated Platelets Percentage during the Clinical Course of Immune Thrombocytopenic Purpura in Children.

    PubMed

    Abd El-Glil, Reem R; Assar, Effat H

    2015-01-01

    Immune thrombocytopenic purpura (ITP) is an immune-mediated acquired disease with transient or persistent decrease of thrombocytes number in the blood. Cytokines play important roles in the immune regulation and are known to be deregulated in autoimmune diseases. This study aimed to investigate serum IL-16 levels in relation to reticulated platelets in children with ITP and platelet count. Twenty six children with ITP (11 with newly diagnosed ITP, 9 with persistent ITP and 6 with chronic ITP) and 12 age-matched healthy children controls were studied. Serum level of IL-16 and reticulated platelets count were assessed by Enzyme Linked Immunosorbent Assay (ELISA) and flow cytometry respectively. Serum IL-16 levels were significantly higher in patients as compared to controls (P < 0.001). Within patients, the levels were higher in newly diagnosed compared to persistent and chronic ITP (P < 0.01) and (P < 0.001) respectively. IL-16 levels were also significantly higher in persistent ITP compared to chronic ITP (P < 0.001). Reticulated platelets were also elevated in patients compared to controls and the increase was significant in newly diagnosed group (P < 0.05). Negative correlation was found between IL-16 level and reticulated platelets and platelets counts (r = -0.284, P = 0.028, r = 0.274 P = 0.25) respectively. It is concluded that IL-16 may be valuable in predicting the clinical course of pediatrics ITP. Measurement of reticulated platelets may provide significant information about thrombopoietic activity during the clinical course of ITP in children.

  20. Parents' Guide to Childhood Immunization.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Center for Disease Control (DHEW/PHS), Atlanta, GA.

    This booklet addressed to parents provides information on seven serious childhood diseases and the vaccines that can provide protection for each. A description of the causes, symptoms, natural course and possible complications of each of the seven diseases--measles, polio, rubella or German measles, mumps, diptheria, pertussis or whooping cough,…

  1. Clinical Features and Treatment Outcomes of Primary Immune Thrombocytopenic Purpura in Hospitalized Children Under 2-Years Old

    PubMed Central

    Farhangi, H; Ghasemi, A; Banihashem, A; Badiei, Z; Jarahi, L; Eslami, G; Langaee, T

    2016-01-01

    Background Immune thrombocytopenic purpura (ITP) is the most prevalent cause of thrombocytopenia in children. Despite the importance of ITP in children under 2-years old, only a few publications are available in the literature.ITP usually presents itself as isolated thrombocytopenia and mucocutaneous bleeding. Materials and Methods This study was conducted on 187 under 2-year-old children diagnosed with ITP and treated at Dr. Sheikh Hospital from 2004 to 2011.In this retrospective study, clinical symptoms, laboratory findings, history of viral infections, vaccination history, and treatment efficacy in children under 2-years old with ITP were investigated.Patients were followed for one year after being discharged from the hospital. Results The risk of the disease developing into chronic form was higher in older children (0.001). ITP in children under 3-months old was significantly associated with vaccination (p=0.007). There was no significant differences between male and female patients in regards to newly diagnosed ITP, persistent, and chronic disease status (p = 0.21). No significant difference in bleeding symptoms was observed between patients under 3-months old and 3 to 24-months old (p=0.18). Conclusion Infantile ITP respond favorably to treatment. The risk of the disease developing into chronic form is higher in 3-to-24-month-old children compared to under-three-month olds. PMID:27222699

  2. Plain Talk about Childhood Immunizations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alaska State Dept. of Health and Social Services, Juneau. Div. of Family and Youth Services.

    This booklet provides parents with information about immunizations and vaccine-preventable diseases, balances the benefits and risk of vaccination, and responds to inaccuracies or misinformation about immunizations and vaccine-preventable diseases. Section 1 presents a message to parents about vaccination. Section 2 offers facts about…

  3. Use of Recombinant Factor VIIa in a Pediatric Patient With Initial Presentation of Refractory Acute Immune Thrombocytopenic Purpura and Severe Bleeding

    PubMed Central

    Gurion, Reut; Siu, Anita; Weiss, Aaron R.; Masterson, Margaret

    2012-01-01

    Severe bleeding in acute immune thrombocytopenic purpura (ITP) is rare but can cause significant complications to the patient. Here we report the case of a pediatric patient with acute ITP and hematuria refractory to anti-D immune globulin, high dose intravenous immunoglobulin G, and high dose steroids. Her hematuria was successfully treated with recombinant factor VIIa (rFVIIa). While further investigation on the use of rFVIIa in ITP is warranted, this case report contributes to the pediatric literature for its use during the course of an initial presentation of ITP with hemorrhagic complications. PMID:23258971

  4. Helicobacter pylori Eradication in Patients with Immune Thrombocytopenic Purpura: A Review and the Role of Biogeography.

    PubMed

    Frydman, Galit H; Davis, Nick; Beck, Paul L; Fox, James G

    2015-08-01

    Idiopathic thrombocytopenic purpura (ITP) is typically a diagnosis of exclusion, assigned by clinicians after ruling out other identifiable etiologies. Since a report by Gasbarrini et al. in 1998, an accumulating body of evidence has proposed a pathophysiological link between ITP and chronic Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) infection. Clinical reports have described a spontaneous resolution of ITP symptoms in about 50% of chronic ITP patients following empirical treatment of H. pylori infection, but response appears to be geography dependent. Studies have also documented that ITP patients in East Asian countries are more likely to express positive antibody titers against H. pylori-specific cytotoxic-associated gene A (CagA), a virulence factor that is associated with an increased risk for gastric diseases including carcinoma. While a definitive mechanism by which H. pylori may induce thrombocytopenia remains elusive, proposed pathways include molecular mimicry of CagA by host autoantibodies against platelet surface glycoproteins, as well as perturbations in the phagocytic activity of monocytes. Traditional treatments of ITP have been largely empirical, involving the use of immunosuppressive agents and immunoglobulin therapy. However, based on the findings of clinical reports emerging over the past 20 years, health organizations around the world increasingly suggest the detection and eradication of H. pylori as a treatment for ITP. Elucidating the exact molecular mechanisms of platelet activation in H. pylori-positive ITP patients, while considering biogeographical differences in response rates, could offer insight into how best to use clinical H. pylori eradication to treat ITP, but will require well-designed studies to confirm the suggested causative relationship between bacterial infection and an autoimmune disease state.

  5. Rituximab therapy for chonic and refractory immune thrombocytopenic purpura: a long-term follow-up analysis

    PubMed Central

    Garcia-Chavez, Jaime; Montiel-Cervantes, Laura; Esparza, Miriam García-Ruiz; Vela-Ojeda, Jorge

    2007-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the long-term response to rituximab in patients with chronic and refractory immune thrombocytopenic purpura (ITP). Adults with ITP fail to respond to conventional therapies in almost 30% of cases, developing a refractory disease. Rituximab has been successfully used in these patients. We used rituximab at 375 mg/m2, IV, weekly for a total of four doses in 18 adult patients. Complete remission (CR) was considered if the platelet count was >100 × 109/l, partial remission (PR) if platelets were >50 × 109/l, minimal response (MR) if the platelet count was >30 × 109/l and <50 × 109/l, and no response if platelet count remained unchanged. Response was classified as sustained (SR) when it was stable for a minimum of 6 months. Median age was 43.5 years (range, 17 to 70). Median platelet count at baseline was 12.5 × 109/l (range, 3.0 to 26.3). CR was achieved in five patients (28%), PR in five (28%), MR in four (22%), and two patients were classified as therapeutic failures (11%). Two additional patients were lost to follow-up. The median time between rituximab therapy and response was 14 weeks (range, 4 to 32). SR was achieved in 12 patients (67%). There were no severe adverse events during rituximab therapy. During follow-up (median, 26 months; range, 12 to 59), no other immunosuppressive drugs were used. In conclusion, rituximab therapy is effective and safe in adult patients with chronic and refractory ITP. Overall response rate achieved is high, long term, and with no risk of adverse events. PMID:17874322

  6. Treatment with liposome-encapsulated clodronate as a new strategic approach in the management of immune thrombocytopenic purpura in a mouse model.

    PubMed

    Alves-Rosa, F; Stanganelli, C; Cabrera, J; van Rooijen, N; Palermo, M S; Isturiz, M A

    2000-10-15

    Immune thrombocytopenic purpura (ITP) is an autoimmune disease related to the presence of elevated levels of platelet-associated immunoglobulin, or autoantibodies. In recent years the importance of macrophage Fc gamma receptors in the uptake of platelets in ITP has been confirmed. Although in patients with ITP the platelet destruction occurs in liver and spleen, in this present experimental mouse model the liver was the principal organ of sequestration of sensitized platelets. The uptake in the spleen, bone marrow, lung, and kidneys was negligible and not different from that in control animals. In addition, the trapped platelets did not return to circulation, and new cells derived from the platelet-storage pool or new thrombocytogenesis were necessary to restore the platelet count. The depletion of splenic and hepatic murine macrophages by liposome-encapsulated clodronate (lip-clod) was studied as a new strategy for ITP treatment. Lip-clod inhibits, in a dose-dependent manner, the antibody-induced thrombocytopenia. Moreover, lip-clod treatment rapidly restored (24 hours) the platelet count in thrombocytopenic animals to hematologic safe values, and despite additional antiplatelet antiserum treatment, mice were able to maintain this level of platelets at least up to 48 hours. The bleeding times in lip-clod-treated animals was not different from those in controls, demonstrating that the hemostasis was well controlled in these animals. The results presented in this study demonstrate that lip-clod treatment can be effective in the management of experimental ITP. (Blood. 2000;96:2834-2840)

  7. Thrombocytopenic syndromes in pregnancy

    PubMed Central

    Yan, Matthew; Malinowski, Ann K

    2015-01-01

    The physiological changes in pregnancy result in platelet counts that are lower than in nonpregnant women. Consequently, thrombocytopenia is a common finding occurring in 7–12% of pregnant women. Gestational thrombocytopenia, the most common cause of low platelet counts, tends to be mild in most women and does not affect maternal, fetal or neonatal outcomes. Gestational thrombocytopenia needs to be distinguished from other less common causes of isolated thrombocytopenia, such as immune thrombocytopenia, which affects approximately 3% of thrombocytopenic pregnant women and can lead to neonatal thrombocytopenia. Hypertensive disorders of pregnancy and thrombotic microangiopathies are both associated with thrombocytopenia. They share a considerable number of similar characteristics and are associated with significant maternal and neonatal morbidity and rarely mortality. Accurate identification of the aetiology of thrombocytopenia and appropriate management are integral to optimizing the pregnancy, delivery and neonatal outcomes of this population. Clinical cases are described to illustrate the various aetiologies of thrombocytopenia in pregnancy and their treatment. PMID:27512485

  8. Progress and Focus of the National Childhood Immunization Campaign.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Paskert, Catherine J.

    1983-01-01

    A nationwide campaign to improve and maintain immunization levels for selected preventable childhood diseases was instituted in 1977, and another program, whose goal was to eliminate indigenous measles by 1982, was instituted in 1978. Immunization levels have improved so much that attention is now focused on ways to maintain these high levels.…

  9. Effect of immunoglobulin G (IgG) interchain disulfide bond cleavage on efficacy of intravenous immunoglobulin for immune thrombocytopenic purpura (ITP).

    PubMed

    Machino, Y; Ohta, H; Suzuki, E; Higurashi, S; Tezuka, T; Nagashima, H; Kohroki, J; Masuho, Y

    2010-12-01

    Intravenous immunoglobulin (IVIG) has been used widely to treat immune thrombocytopenic purpura (ITP), but the mechanisms of its action remain unclear. We investigated the affinity for Fcγ receptors (FcγRs) and the thrombocytopenia-ameliorating effect of S-sulfonated gammaglobulin (SGG) and S-alkylated gammaglobulin (AGG), in comparison with unmodified gammaglobulin (GG), in a mouse ITP model. Cleavage of immunoglobulin (Ig)G interchain disulfide bonds by either S-sulfonation or S-alkylation did not decrease the affinity for FcγRIIA (CD32A) and FcγRIIB (CD32B), but did decrease the affinity for FcγRIA (CD64A) and FcγRIIIA (CD16A), presumably because of changes in H-chain configuration. The interchain disulfide bond cleavage decreased the affinity much more for mouse FcγRIV than for mouse FcγRIIB. The ability of AGG to ameliorate ITP was greatly diminished, while SGG, whose disulfide bonds are reconstituted in vivo, was as effective as GG. These results suggest that the interchain disulfide bonds are important for therapeutic effect. It is also suggested that the interaction of IVIG with the inhibitory receptor FcγRIIB is insufficient for effective amelioration of ITP and that, at least in this model, direct binding of IVIG to FcγRIIIA is also required.

  10. Standardization of terminology, definitions and outcome criteria in immune thrombocytopenic purpura of adults and children: report from an international working group.

    PubMed

    Rodeghiero, Francesco; Stasi, Roberto; Gernsheimer, Terry; Michel, Marc; Provan, Drew; Arnold, Donald M; Bussel, James B; Cines, Douglas B; Chong, Beng H; Cooper, Nichola; Godeau, Bertrand; Lechner, Klaus; Mazzucconi, Maria Gabriella; McMillan, Robert; Sanz, Miguel A; Imbach, Paul; Blanchette, Victor; Kühne, Thomas; Ruggeri, Marco; George, James N

    2009-03-12

    Diagnosis and management of immune thrombocytopenic purpura (ITP) remain largely dependent on clinical expertise and observations more than on evidence derived from clinical trials of high scientific quality. One major obstacle to the implementation of such studies and in producing reliable meta-analyses of existing data is a lack of consensus on standardized critical definitions, outcome criteria, and terminology. Moreover, the demand for comparative clinical trials has dramatically increased since the introduction of new classes of therapeutic agents, such as thrombopoietin receptor agonists, and innovative treatment modalities, such as anti-CD 20 antibodies. To overcome the present heterogeneity, an International Working Group of recognized expert clinicians convened a 2-day structured meeting (the Vicenza Consensus Conference) to define standard terminology and definitions for primary ITP and its different phases and criteria for the grading of severity, and clinically meaningful outcomes and response. These consensus criteria and definitions could be used by investigational clinical trials or cohort studies. Adoption of these recommendations would serve to improve communication among investigators, to enhance comparability among clinical trials, to facilitate meta-analyses and development of therapeutic guidelines, and to provide a standardized framework for regulatory agencies.

  11. Platelet turnover and kinetics in immune thrombocytopenic purpura: results with autologous 111In-labeled platelets and homologous 51Cr-labeled platelets differ

    SciTech Connect

    Heyns A du, P.; Badenhorst, P.N.; Loetter, M.G.P.; Pieters, H.; Wessels, P.; Kotze, H.F.

    1986-01-01

    Mean platelet survival and turnover were simultaneously determined with autologous 111In-labeled platelets (111In-AP) and homologous 51Cr-labeled platelets (51Cr-HP) in ten patients with chronic immune thrombocytopenic purpura (ITP). In vivo redistribution of the 111In-AP was quantitated with a scintillation camera and computer-assisted image analysis. The patients were divided into two groups: those with splenic platelet sequestration (spleen-liver 111In activity ratio greater than 1.4), and those with diffuse sequestration in the reticuloendothelial system. The latter patients had more severe ITP reflected by pronounced thrombocytopenia, decreased platelet turnover, and prominent early hepatic platelet sequestration. Mean platelet life span estimated with 51Cr-HP was consistently shorter than that of 111In-AP. Platelet turnover determined with 51Cr-HP was thus over-estimated. The difference in results with the two isotope labels was apparently due to greater in vivo elution of 51Cr. Although the limitations of the techniques should be taken into account, these findings indicate that platelet turnover is not always normal or increased in ITP, but is low in severe disease. We suggest that this may be ascribed to damage to megakaryocytes by antiplatelet antibody. The physical characteristics in 111In clearly make this radionuclide superior to 51Cr for the study of platelet kinetics in ITP.

  12. Utilizing peer academic detailing to improve childhood immunization coverage levels.

    PubMed

    Boom, Julie A; Nelson, Cynthia S; Kohrt, Alan E; Kozinetz, Claudia A

    2010-05-01

    Interventions that utilize academic detailing to improve childhood immunization have been implemented across the country. This study evaluates the effectiveness of an academic detailing intervention to increase childhood immunization rates in pediatric and family medicine practices in a major metropolitan area. Educational teams of one physician, nurse, and office manager delivered 83 peer education sessions at practices in the intervention group. Postintervention immunization rates for children 12-23 months of age increased 1% in the intervention group and decreased 3% in the control group. Postintervention coverage levels for children 12-23 months of age did not differ between the intervention and control groups. Results indicated this office-based intervention was not sufficient to effect measurable changes in immunization coverage levels after 1 year of participation. Future interventions need to provide initial feedback regarding practice immunization coverage levels prior to the educational interventions and include multiple encounters.

  13. Do Maternal Knowledge and Attitudes towards Childhood Immunizations in Rural Uganda Correlate with Complete Childhood Vaccination?

    PubMed Central

    Vonasek, Bryan J.; Bajunirwe, Francis; Jacobson, Laura E.; Twesigye, Leonidas; Dahm, James; Grant, Monica J.; Sethi, Ajay K.; Conway, James H.

    2016-01-01

    Improving childhood vaccination coverage and timeliness is a key health policy objective in many developing countries such as Uganda. Of the many factors known to influence uptake of childhood immunizations in under resourced settings, parents’ understanding and perception of childhood immunizations has largely been overlooked. The aims of this study were to survey mothers’ knowledge and attitudes towards childhood immunizations and then determine if these variables correlate with the timely vaccination coverage of their children. From September to December 2013, we conducted a cross-sectional survey of 1,000 parous women in rural Sheema district in southwest Uganda. The survey collected socio-demographic data and knowledge and attitudes towards childhood immunizations. For the women with at least one child between the age of one month and five years who also had a vaccination card available for the child (N = 302), the vaccination status of this child was assessed. 88% of these children received age-appropriate, on-time immunizations. 93.5% of the women were able to state that childhood immunizations protect children from diseases. The women not able to point this out were significantly more likely to have an under-vaccinated child (PR 1.354: 95% CI 1.018–1.802). When asked why vaccination rates may be low in their community, the two most common responses were “fearful of side effects” and “ignorance/disinterest/laziness” (44% each). The factors influencing caregivers’ demand for childhood immunizations vary widely between, and also within, developing countries. Research that elucidates local knowledge and attitudes, like this study, allows for decisions and policy pertaining to vaccination programs to be more effective at improving child vaccination rates. PMID:26918890

  14. Do Maternal Knowledge and Attitudes towards Childhood Immunizations in Rural Uganda Correlate with Complete Childhood Vaccination?

    PubMed

    Vonasek, Bryan J; Bajunirwe, Francis; Jacobson, Laura E; Twesigye, Leonidas; Dahm, James; Grant, Monica J; Sethi, Ajay K; Conway, James H

    2016-01-01

    Improving childhood vaccination coverage and timeliness is a key health policy objective in many developing countries such as Uganda. Of the many factors known to influence uptake of childhood immunizations in under resourced settings, parents' understanding and perception of childhood immunizations has largely been overlooked. The aims of this study were to survey mothers' knowledge and attitudes towards childhood immunizations and then determine if these variables correlate with the timely vaccination coverage of their children. From September to December 2013, we conducted a cross-sectional survey of 1,000 parous women in rural Sheema district in southwest Uganda. The survey collected socio-demographic data and knowledge and attitudes towards childhood immunizations. For the women with at least one child between the age of one month and five years who also had a vaccination card available for the child (N = 302), the vaccination status of this child was assessed. 88% of these children received age-appropriate, on-time immunizations. 93.5% of the women were able to state that childhood immunizations protect children from diseases. The women not able to point this out were significantly more likely to have an under-vaccinated child (PR 1.354: 95% CI 1.018-1.802). When asked why vaccination rates may be low in their community, the two most common responses were "fearful of side effects" and "ignorance/disinterest/laziness" (44% each). The factors influencing caregivers' demand for childhood immunizations vary widely between, and also within, developing countries. Research that elucidates local knowledge and attitudes, like this study, allows for decisions and policy pertaining to vaccination programs to be more effective at improving child vaccination rates.

  15. Medicaid and Childhood Immunizations: A National Study.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Liu, Joseph Tiang-Yau; Rosenbaum, Sara

    In recent years, falling immunization rates in the United States have resulted in an increased number of cases of preventable diseases. For example, the United States ranks behind 16 other nations in proportion of infants immunized against polio. Reasons for the decline of immunizations include skyrocketing vaccine costs, rising poverty rates,…

  16. Childhood Obesity: Immune Response and Nutritional Approaches

    PubMed Central

    Magrone, Thea; Jirillo, Emilio

    2015-01-01

    Childhood obesity is characterized by a low-grade inflammation status depending on the multicellular release of cytokines, adipokines, and reactive oxygen species. In particular, the imbalance between anti-inflammatory T regulatory cells and inflammatory T helper 17 cells seems to sustain such a phlogistic condition. Alterations of gut microbiota since childhood also contribute to the maintenance of inflammation. Therefore, besides preventive measures and caloric restrictions, dietary intake of natural products endowed with anti-oxidant and anti-inflammatory activities may represent a valid interventional approach for preventing and/or attenuating the pathological consequences of obesity. In this regard, the use of prebiotics, probiotics, polyphenols, polyunsaturated fatty acids, vitamins, and melatonin in human clinical trials will be described. PMID:25759691

  17. Childhood Immunization: MedlinePlus Health Topic

    MedlinePlus

    ... more than a dozen diseases such as measles, polio, tetanus, diphtheria, and pertussis (whooping cough). Most of ... Shot Haemophilus Infections Hepatitis B Immunization Measles Mumps Polio and Post-Polio Syndrome Tetanus Tetanus, Diphtheria, and ...

  18. Developmental immunotoxicity (DIT), postnatal immune dysfunction and childhood leukemia.

    PubMed

    Dietert, Rodney R

    2009-01-01

    The developing immune system is a sensitive target for environmentally-induced disruption producing postnatal immune dysfunction. Unique immune maturational events occur during critical windows of prenatal/perinatal development and environmentally-induced disruption of one-time events can have serious health consequences. Additionally, the specialized immunological conditions necessary to bring a semi-allogeneic fetus to term place restrictions on both the maternal and offspring immune systems. These features combine not only to increase the risk of early-life immune insult (ELII), which includes xenobiotically-induced developmental immunotoxicity (DIT), but also to influence the nature of DIT-associated diseases for the child. Exposure to certain toxicants as well as maternal infections and other pregnancy stressors is known to induce postnatal immune dysfunction. Because dysfunctional immune responses to childhood infections have been proposed to play a role in childhood leukemia, DIT is a potential risk factor for this disease. This review details the range of disease susceptibilities impacted by DIT and discusses the importance of effective DIT safety testing for drugs and chemicals as a preventative measure.

  19. Childhood Immunization and Access to Health Care: Evidence From Nepal.

    PubMed

    Devkota, Satis; Panda, Bibhudutta

    2016-03-01

    This article examines the effect of access to health care center, in terms of travel time, on childhood immunization in Nepal using the 2004 and 2011 waves of the Nepal Living Standards Measurement Surveys. We employ probit and instrumental variable probit estimation methods to estimate the causal effect of travel time on the probability of immunization. Results indicate that travel time to the nearest health center displays a significant negative association with the probability of immunization (coefficient = -0.015,P< .05). Furthermore, the effect of travel time tends to be stronger in rural and distant areas of Nepal's mountain and hill regions. The results suggest that policy interventions should increase the number of mobile clinics in rural villages and provide conditional cash transfer to incentivize immunization coverage at the household level. In addition, household income, parental education, ethnicity, and household location emerge as important determinants of immunization in Nepal.

  20. Genotype and Phenotype Correlation in Hereditary Thrombotic Thrombocytopenic Purpura (Upshaw-Schulman Syndrome)

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-09-01

    Thrombotic Thrombocytopenic Purpura; Congenital Thrombotic Thrombocytopenic Purpura; Familial Thrombotic Thrombocytopenic Purpura; Thrombotic Thrombocytopenic Purpura, Congenital; Upshaw-Schulman Syndrome

  1. Coverage and costs of childhood immunizations in Cameroon.

    PubMed Central

    Waters, Hugh R.; Dougherty, Leanne; Tegang, Simon-Pierre; Tran, Nhan; Wiysonge, Charles Shey; Long, Kanya; Wolfe, Nathan D.; Burke, Donald S.

    2004-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To quantify the association between household-level and provider-level determinants and childhood immunization rates in Cameroon while also calculating the cost of childhood immunizations. METHODS: This study uses multilevel regression analysis to calculate these relationships. The 1998 Cameroon Demographic and Health Survey and the 2000 Multiple Indicator Cluster Survey are the main sources of household-level data. These surveys are supplemented by data from a 2002 survey of health facilities conducted in three provinces. At the national level, immunization financing data were collected from the Ministry of Health and donors that support the national Expanded Programme on Immunization. FINDINGS: The 1998 survey found that nationally 37% of children were fully immunized; the 2000 survey found that nationally 34% were fully immunized. These results are strongly correlated with both the mother's level of education and the household's economic status. Multilevel logistic regression shows that maternal education level is a stronger predictor of positive immunization status than is relative economic status. Children of mothers with secondary education or higher education were 3 times more likely to be fully vaccinated than children whose mothers had not completed primary education. At the health-facility level, both having art immunization plan and regular supervisory visits from someone at the health-district level are strongly positively associated with immunization rates. The cost of routine vaccinations for each fully immunized child is 12.73 U.S. dollars when donors' contributions are included but not the costs of immunization campaigns. CONCLUSION: Studies conducted in the 1980s and 1990s found that costs per fully immunized child varied from 2.19 U.S. dollars to 26.59 U.S. dollars (not adjusted for inflation) in a range of low-income and middle-income countries. The relatively low rates of immunization coverage in Cameroon, and the strong influence of

  2. The European Medicines Agency review of eltrombopag (Revolade) for the treatment of adult chronic immune (idiopathic) thrombocytopenic purpura: summary of the scientific assessment of the Committee for Medicinal Products for Human Use

    PubMed Central

    Nieto, Maria; Calvo, Gonzalo; Hudson, Ian; Feldschreiber, Peter; Brown, David; Lee, Ching Cheng; Lay, Geoffrey; Valeri, Anna; Abadie, Eric; Thomas, Angela; Pignatti, Francesco

    2011-01-01

    On 11th March 2010, the European Commission issued a marketing authorization valid throughout the European Union for Revolade for the treatment of adult chronic immune (idiopathic) thrombocytopenic purpura. Revolade is an orphan medicinal product indicated for splenectomized patients with immune (idiopathic) thrombocytopenic purpura who are refractory to other treatments (e.g. corticosteroids, immunoglobulins) and as second-line treatment for non-splenectomized patients where surgery is contraindicated. The active substance of Revolade is eltrombopag (ATC code B02BX05). Eltrombopag increases platelet production through activation of the thrombopoietin receptor. The recommended oral dose is 50 mg once daily to achieve and maintain a platelet count of the 50×109/L or more necessary to reduce or prevent the risk of bleeding. The benefit of Revolade is a durable response in maintaining platelet levels. The most common side effects include headache, nausea, hepatobiliary toxicity, diarrhea, fatigue, paresthesia, constipation, rash, pruritus, cataract, arthralgia and myalgia. The decision to grant the marketing authorization was based on the favorable recommendation of the Committee for Medicinal Products for Human Use of the European Medicines Agency. The objective of this paper is to describe the data submitted to the European Medicines Agency and to summarize the scientific review of the application. The detailed scientific assessment report and product information, including the summary of product characteristics, are available on the European Medicines Agency website (www.ema.europa.eu). PMID:21712542

  3. Linkages between maternal education and childhood immunization in India.

    PubMed

    Vikram, Kriti; Vanneman, Reeve; Desai, Sonalde

    2012-07-01

    While correlations between maternal education and child health have been observed in diverse parts of the world, the causal pathways explaining how maternal education improves child health remain far from clear. Using data from the nationally representative India Human Development Survey of 2004-5, this analysis examines four possible pathways that may mediate the influence of maternal education on childhood immunization: greater human, social, and cultural capitals and more autonomy within the household. Data from 5287 households in India show the familiar positive relationship between maternal education and childhood immunization even after extensive controls for socio-demographic characteristics and village- and neighborhood-fixed effects. Two pathways are important: human capital (health knowledge) is an especially important advantage for mothers with primary education, and cultural capital (communication skills) is important for mothers with some secondary education and beyond.

  4. Length of stay, hospitalization cost, and in-hospital mortality in US adult inpatients with immune thrombocytopenic purpura, 2006–2012

    PubMed Central

    An, Ruopeng; Wang, Peizhong Peter

    2017-01-01

    Purpose In this study, we examined the length of stay, hospitalization cost, and risk of in-hospital mortality among US adult inpatients with immune thrombocytopenic purpura (ITP). Methods We analyzed nationally representative data obtained from Nationwide/National Inpatient Sample database of discharges from 2006 to 2012. Results In the US, there were an estimated 296,870 (95% confidence interval [CI]: 284,831–308,909) patient discharges recorded for ITP from 2006 to 2012, during which ITP-related hospitalizations had increased steadily by nearly 30%. The average length of stay for an ITP-related hospitalization was found to be 6.02 days (95% CI: 5.93–6.10), which is 28% higher than that of the overall US discharge population (4.70 days, 95% CI: 4.66–4.74). The average cost of ITP-related hospitalizations was found to be US$16,594 (95% CI: US$16,257–US$16,931), which is 48% higher than that of the overall US discharge population (US$11,200; 95% CI: US$11,033–US$11,368). Gender- and age-adjusted mortality risk in inpatients with ITP was 22% (95% CI: 19%–24%) higher than that of the overall US discharge population. Across diagnosis related groups, length of stay for ITP-related hospitalizations was longest for septicemia (7.97 days, 95% CI: 7.55–8.39) and splenectomy (7.40 days, 95% CI: 6.94–7.86). Splenectomy (US$25,262; 95% CI: US$24,044–US$26,481) and septicemia (US$18,430; 95% CI: US$17,353–US$19,507) were associated with the highest cost of hospitalization. The prevalence of mortality in ITP-related hospitalizations was highest for septicemia (11.11%, 95% CI: 9.60%–12.63%) and intracranial hemorrhage (9.71%, 95% CI: 7.65%–11.77%). Conclusion Inpatients with ITP had longer hospital stay, bore higher costs, and faced greater risk of mortality than the overall US discharge population. PMID:28176930

  5. Investigation of whether the acute hemolysis associated with Rho(D) immune globulin intravenous (human) administration for treatment of immune thrombocytopenic purpura is consistent with the acute hemolytic transfusion reaction model

    PubMed Central

    Gaines, Ann Reed; Lee-Stroka, Hallie; Byrne, Karen; Scott, Dorothy E.; Uhl, Lynne; Lazarus, Ellen; Stroncek, David F.

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND Immune thrombocytopenic purpura and secondary thrombocytopenia patients treated with Rho(D) immune globulin intravenous (human; anti-D IGIV) have experienced acute hemolysis, which is inconsistent with the typical presentation of extravascular hemolysis—the presumed mechanism of action of anti-D IGIV. Although the mechanism of anti-D-IGIV–associated acute hemolysis has not been established, the onset, signs/symptoms, and complications appear consistent with the intravascular hemolysis of acute hemolytic transfusion reactions (AHTRs). In transfusion medicine, the red blood cell (RBC) antigen-antibody incompatibility(-ies) that precipitate AHTRs can be detected in vitro with compatibility testing. Under the premise that anti-D-IGIV–associated acute hemolysis results from RBC antigen-antibody–mediated complement activation, this study evaluated whether the incompatibility(-ies) could be detected in vitro with a hemolysin assay, which would support the AHTR model as the hemolytic mechanism. STUDY DESIGN AND METHODS Seven anti-D IGIV lots were tested to determine the RBC antibody identities in those lots, including four lots that had been implicated in acute hemolytic episodes. Hemolysin assays were performed that tested each of 73 RBC specimens against each lot, including the RBCs of one patient who had experienced acute hemolysis after anti-D IGIV administration. RESULTS Only two anti-D IGIV lots contained RBC antibodies beyond those expected. No hemolysis endpoint was observed in any of the hemolysin assays. CONCLUSION Although the findings did not support the AHTR model, the results are reported to contribute knowledge about the mechanism of anti-D-IGIV–associated acute hemolysis and to prompt continued investigation into cause(s), prediction, and prevention of this potentially serious adverse event. PMID:19220820

  6. Immunization and the American way: 4 childhood vaccines.

    PubMed Central

    Baker, J P

    2000-01-01

    Childhood immunization constitutes one of the great success stories of American public health in the 20th century. This essay provides a historical examination of this topic through 4 particularly important examples: diphtheria, pertussis, polio, and measles. Each case study illustrates how new vaccines have posed unique challenges related to basic science, clinical trial methodology, medical ethics, and public acceptance. A brief comparison of each story to the experience of Great Britain, however, suggests an underlying unity connecting all 4 examples. Whereas the British led the way in introducing formal clinical trial methodology in the field of immunization development, the Americans excelled in the rapid translation of laboratory knowledge into strategies suitable for mass application. Although this distinction appears to have diminished in recent years, it offers insight into the sources of creativity underlying American vaccine development and the corresponding difficulties sometimes created for utilizing vaccines fruits rationally. PMID:10667180

  7. High dose Intravenous Anti-D Immune Globulin is More Effective and Safe in Indian Paediatric Patients of Immune Thrombocytopenic Purpura

    PubMed Central

    Jena, Rabindra Kumar; Swain, Kali Prasanna

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Immune Thrombocytopenia (ITP) is characterised by an autoimmune antibody-mediated destruction of platelets and impaired platelet production. Few controlled trials exist to guide management of patients with ITP in Indian scenario for which patients require an individualized approach. Anti-D (Rho (D) immune globulin) at a higher dose can prove to be a cost effective and safe alternative for Indian patients with ITP. Aim To compare the safety and efficacy of higher dose (75μg/kg) intravenous Anti-D immune globulin against the standard dose of 50μg/kg for the management of ITP in Indian patients. Materials and Methods One hundred and sixty four children with newly diagnosed ITP between 4-14 years were randomly selected for inclusion and were treated with 50μg/kg (standard dose) or 75μg /kg (higher dose) of Anti-D to compare the efficacy and safety of higher dose intravenous anti-D immune globulin. Efficacy of Anti-D was measured in terms of rate of response and median time to response for increase in platelet counts. Any adverse event was noted. A decrease in haemoglobin concentration suggested accompanying haemolysis. Results Seventy one out of 84 patients treated with Anti-D at 75μg/kg produced complete response (85%) with median time of response being 2.5 days. On the contrary, 45 patients (70%) patients treated with 50μg/kg had complete response. However, there was no significant increase in haemolysis with higher dose. A significant correlation was found between dose and peak increase in platelet count measured at 7th day following administration. However, there was no relationship between the decrease in haemoglobin and the dose given, or between the increase in platelet count and fall in haemoglobin. Conclusion A 75μg/kg dose of Anti-D is more effective with acceptable side effect in comparison to 50μg dose for treatment of newly diagnosed Indian patients of ITP. PMID:28208873

  8. Childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia and indicators of early immune stimulation: a Childhood Leukemia International Consortium study.

    PubMed

    Rudant, Jérémie; Lightfoot, Tracy; Urayama, Kevin Y; Petridou, Eleni; Dockerty, John D; Magnani, Corrado; Milne, Elizabeth; Spector, Logan G; Ashton, Lesley J; Dessypris, Nikolaos; Kang, Alice Y; Miller, Margaret; Rondelli, Roberto; Simpson, Jill; Stiakaki, Eftichia; Orsi, Laurent; Roman, Eve; Metayer, Catherine; Infante-Rivard, Claire; Clavel, Jacqueline

    2015-04-15

    The associations between childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) and several proxies of early stimulation of the immune system, that is, day-care center attendance, birth order, maternally reported common infections in infancy, and breastfeeding, were investigated by using data from 11 case-control studies participating in the Childhood Leukemia International Consortium (enrollment period: 1980-2010). The sample included 7,399 ALL cases and 11,181 controls aged 2-14 years. The data were collected by questionnaires administered to the parents. Pooled odds ratios and 95% confidence intervals were estimated by unconditional logistic regression adjusted for age, sex, study, maternal education, and maternal age. Day-care center attendance in the first year of life was associated with a reduced risk of ALL (odds ratio = 0.77, 95% confidence interval: 0.71, 0.84), with a marked inverse trend with earlier age at start (P < 0.0001). An inverse association was also observed with breastfeeding duration of 6 months or more (odds ratio = 0.86, 95% confidence interval: 0.79, 0.94). No significant relationship with a history of common infections in infancy was observed even though the odds ratio was less than 1 for more than 3 infections. The findings of this large pooled analysis reinforce the hypothesis that day-care center attendance in infancy and prolonged breastfeeding are associated with a decreased risk of ALL.

  9. Childhood immunization and atopic disease into middle-age--a prospective cohort study.

    PubMed

    Matheson, Melanie C; Haydn Walters, E; Burgess, John A; Jenkins, Mark A; Giles, Graham G; Hopper, John L; Abramson, Michael J; Dharmage, Shyamali C

    2010-03-01

    The association between childhood immunizations and risk of atopic diseases is unclear. No study has examined possible associations between childhood immunizations and such diseases in middle age. The Tasmanian Longitudinal Health Study (TAHS) is a population based cohort study of respiratory disease. The TAHS participants were followed from 7 to 44 yrs of age. Immunizations during childhood were examined for any association with asthma and atopic disease at age 44 yrs. Multivariable regression models were used to estimate relative risks while adjusting for confounders. Cox regression was used to estimate the association between childhood immunizations and asthma developing after the age of 7 yrs. We found no association between any childhood immunization (Diphtheria, Tetanus, Pertussis, Polio, Smallpox) and asthma (ORs ranged from 0.87 to 1.17 p > 0.05), eczema (ORs ranged from 0.99 to 1.07 p > 0.05), food allergy (ORs ranged from 0.97 to 1.11 p > 0.05), or hay fever (ORs ranged from 1.02 to 1.05 p > 0.05) at age 44. Nor did we find any association between childhood immunizations and an increased risk of incident asthma after the age of 7 yrs (Diphtheria HR = 1.06, 95% CI 0.82, 1.36; Tetanus HR = 1.13, 95% CI 0.88, 1.44; Pertussis HR = 1.03, 95% CI 0.81, 1.30; Polio HR = 1.15, 95% CI 0.86, 1.54; Smallpox HR = 1.21, 95% CI 0.99, 1.48; DTP HR = 1.05, 95% CI 0.85, 1.30). Our analysis does not support any association between common childhood immunizations and risk of asthma and atopic disease in middle-age. Our findings should provide reassurance that in terms of life time risk of asthma and atopic disease, childhood immunization is safe.

  10. Thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura preceding systemic lupus erythematosus.

    PubMed Central

    Simeon-Aznar, C P; Cuenca-Luque, R; Fonollosa-Pla, V; Bosch-Gil, J A

    1992-01-01

    The case of a patient admitted with thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura nine years after developing systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) is reported. Thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura associated with SLE has been described on other occasions, but in most patients the diagnosis of SLE precedes that of thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura. The unusual sequence and the chronological separation of the two diseases is emphasised. PMID:1575591

  11. [Pregnancy and labor in idiopathic thrombocytopenic purpura].

    PubMed

    Tampakoudis, P; Billi, H; Tantanassis, T; Kalachanis, I; Garipidou, B; Sinakos, Z; Mantalenakis, S

    1995-10-01

    Clinical data from eight pregnant women with idiopathic thrombocytopenic purpura (ITP) were retrospectively analyses. The mean age of the women was 28.2 years. Five women underwent splenectomy during childhood. The lowest maternal platelet count observed ranged from 8000 to 88000/mm3. Genital bleeding occurred in only one case. Treatment was based on administration of corticosteroids with or without human-pooled immunoglobulins. Caesarian section was performed in all cases. Six newborns were healthy and had a successful subsequent course. Two infants died, one in utero because of abruptio placentae and the other one 1 month post partum because of a cerebral haematoma. After a mean follow-up of eighteen months, thrombocytopenia is still present in two women, despite the continuous treatment. In conclusion, ITP rather rarely coincides with pregnancy. Treatment is usually successful for the mother but the risk for the fetus remains considerably high.

  12. Expression of the 60 kDa and 71 kDa heat shock proteins and presence of antibodies against the 71 kDa heat shock protein in pediatric patients with immune thrombocytopenic purpura

    PubMed Central

    Xiao, Chengfeng; Chen, Sheng; Yuan, Mingchun; Ding, Fuyue; Yang, Dongliang; Wang, Ruibo; Li, Jianxin; Tanguay, Robert M; Wu, Tangchun

    2004-01-01

    Background Immune thrombocytopenic purpura (ITP) is an autoimmune disease characterized by platelet destruction resulting from autoantibodies against platelet proteins, particularly platelet glycoprotein IIb/IIIa. Heat shock proteins (Hsp) have been shown to be major antigenic determinants in some autoimmune diseases. Antibodies to Hsps have also been reported to be associated with a number of pathological states. Methods Using western blot, we measured the levels of the 60 kDa heat shock protein (Hsp60) and of the inducible 71 kDa member of the Hsp70 family (Hsp71) in lymphocytes and the presence of antibodies against these hsps in plasma of 29 pediatric patients with ITP before the treatment and in 6 other patients before and after treatment. Results Interestingly only one out of 29 patients showed detectable Hsp60 in lymphocytes while this heat shock protein was detected in the 30 control children. Hsp71 levels were slightly lower in lymphocytes of patients with ITP than in controls (1567.8 ± 753.2 via 1763.2 ± 641.8 integrated optical density (IOD) units). There was a small increase of Hsp71 after recovery from ITP. The titers of plasma antibodies against Hsp60 and Hsp71 were also examined. Antibodies against Hsp71 were more common in ITP patients (15/29) than in control children (5/30). The titer of anti-Hsp71 was also higher in children patients with ITP. The prevalence of ITP children with antibodies against Hsp71 (51.7%) was as high as those with antibodies against platelet membrane glycoproteins (58.3%). Conclusions In summary, pediatric patients with ITP showed no detectable expression of Hsp60 in lymphocytes and a high prevalence of antibody against Hsp71 in plasma. These changes add to our understanding of the pathogenesis of ITP and may be important for the diagnosis, prognosis and treatment of ITP. PMID:15070425

  13. Negative regulation of human megakaryocytopoiesis by human platelet factor 4 and beta thromboglobulin: comparative analysis in bone marrow cultures from normal individuals and patients with essential thrombocythaemia and immune thrombocytopenic purpura.

    PubMed

    Han, Z C; Bellucci, S; Tenza, D; Caen, J P

    1990-04-01

    The effect of human platelet factor 4 (PF4) and beta-thromboglobulin (BTG) on megakaryocyte colony formation in normal subjects as well as in essential thrombocythaemia (ET) and in immune thrombocytopenic purpura (ITP) was studied. Both PF4 and BTG were found to be capable of inhibiting the development of isolated megakaryocytes and their colonies in normal marrow cultures in a dose-dependent fashion. A significant 50% inhibition was seen at a PF4 or BTG concentration of 1-2.5 micrograms/ml, and complete inhibition in the range of 5-10 micrograms PF4 or BTG/ml. The two platelet proteins had similar effects on megakaryocyte development. A combination of PF4 and BTG resulted in an additive effect. Antibodies against PF4 or BTG could effectively neutralize the inhibitory effect of PF4 or BTG respectively. In ET and ITP, in vitro megakaryocyte development was also inhibited by PF4 and BTG in a similar way to that seen in normal subjects, suggesting that the responsiveness of megakaryocyte progenitors to PF4 and BTG is normal in these two disorders. PF4 and BTG did not affect the growth of colony forming units granulocyte-macrophage (CFU-GM) except at very high concentration (greater than or equal to 10 micrograms/ml) but they did inhibit erythroid colony formation by normal and ET burst forming units erythroid (BFU-E). However, the inhibition of BFU-E by PF4 and BTG was dose-related, and a 50% inhibition required a PF4 or BTG dose ranging from 5 to 10 micrograms/ml. These results indicate that PF4 and BTG are involved in negative regulation of normal and pathologic megakaryocytopoiesis and that their inhibition acts predominantly on the megakaryocytic lineage.

  14. Multiple myeloma developing during long-term clinical course of refractory immune thrombocytopenic purpura: a case report and review of literature.

    PubMed

    Yao, Han; Zhang, Xi; Liu, Jia; Zhu, Lidan; Chen, Guo; Wu, Sha; Gao, Lei

    2015-01-01

    Immune thrombocytopenia (ITP) is an acquired, immune-mediated disease that is characterized by increased destruction of platelets by autoantibodies. Although the onset of the disease and clinical course are highly variable, the disease typically has a benign course. ITP associated with multiple myeloma (MM) has been rarely reported; it is even rarer for MM to develop during a long-term ITP (almost 20 years). Here, we first report on a case with a 20-year long clinical course of refractory ITP followed by newly diagnosed MM.

  15. [Childhood immunization schedule 2001-2002. Advisory Committee on Vaccines of the Spanish Association of Pediatrics].

    PubMed

    2001-07-01

    In 1994 the Spanish Association of Pediatrics founded the Advisory Committee on Vaccines with the aim of providing advice on matters related to childhood immunizations and of implementing vaccination schedules. The latest recommendations concern the immunization schedule for 2001-2002, in which indications for the inactivated poliovirus vaccine instead of the attenuated poliovirus vaccine are of prime importance. The advisability of including the vaccine against chicken pox in healthy children is stressed.

  16. Childhood malignancy and maternal diabetes or other auto-immune disease during pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Westbom, L; Aberg, A; Källén, B

    2002-04-08

    Among 4380 children born in 1987-1997 of women with a diagnosis of diabetes and alive at the age of one, 10 were registered in the Swedish Cancer Registry before the end of 1998. The odds ratio for having a childhood cancer after maternal diabetes, stratified for year of birth, maternal age, parity, multiple birth, and 500 g birth weight class was 2.25 (95%CI 1.22-4.15). Among 5842 children born during the period 1973-1997 whose mothers had other auto-immune diseases (SLE, rheumatoid arthritis, Crohn, ulcerous colitis, multiple sclerosis or thyroiditis), the number of observed childhood cancers (9) was close to that expected (8.5). Maternal diabetes but not other auto-immune diseases may be a risk factor for childhood cancer.

  17. Childhood adversity increases vulnerability for behavioral symptoms and immune dysregulation in women with breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Witek Janusek, Linda; Tell, Dina; Albuquerque, Kevin; Mathews, Herbert L

    2013-03-01

    Women respond differentially to the stress-associated with breast cancer diagnosis and treatment, with some women experiencing more intense and/or sustained behavioral symptoms and immune dysregulation than others. Childhood adversity has been identified to produce long-term dysregulation of stress response systems, increasing reactivity to stressors encountered during adulthood. This study determined whether childhood adversity increased vulnerability for more intense and sustained behavioral symptoms (fatigue, perceived stress, and depressive symptoms), poorer quality of life, and greater immune dysregulation in women (N=40) with breast cancer. Evaluation was after breast surgery and through early survivorship. Hierarchical linear modeling was used to examine intra-individual and inter-individual differences with respect to initial status and to the pattern of change (i.e. trajectory) of outcomes. At initial assessment, women exposed to childhood emotional neglect/abuse had greater perceived stress, fatigue, depressive symptoms and poorer quality of life, as well as lower natural killer cell activity (NKCA). Although these outcomes improved over time, women with greater childhood emotional neglect/abuse exhibited worse outcomes through early survivorship. No effect was observed on the pattern of change for these outcomes. In contrast, childhood physical neglect predicted sustained trajectories of greater perceived stress, worse quality of life, and elevated plasma IL-6; with no effect observed at initial assessment. Thus, childhood adversity leaves an enduring imprint, increasing vulnerability for behavioral symptoms, poor quality of life, and elevations in IL-6 in women with breast cancer. Further, childhood adversity predisposes to lower NKCA at a critical time when this immune-effector mechanism is most effective at halting nascent tumor seeding.

  18. Synchronous Occurrence of Diffuse Large B-cell Lymphoma of the Duodenum and Gastrointestinal Stromal Tumor of the Ileum in a Patient with Immune Thrombocytopenic Purpura

    PubMed Central

    Takahashi, Tohru; Maruyama, Yumiko; Saitoh, Mayuko; Itoh, Hideto; Yoshimoto, Mitsuru; Tsujisaki, Masayuki; Nakayama, Masato

    2016-01-01

    A 64 year-old woman with steroid-dependent immune thrombocytopenia developed anemia. Esophagogastroduodenoscopy revealed the presence of a tumor, which was diagnosed to be diffuse large B-cell lymphoma, in the second portion of the duodenum. 18F-fluorodeoxy glucose positron emission tomography showed an increased uptake mass in the pelvic cavity as well as in the duodenum. Though the duodenal tumor disappeared after 4 cycles of chemotherapy, the pelvic mass did not shrink in size. As a result, laparoscopic resection of the pelvic tumor was performed and the tumor was histologically diagnosed to be a gastrointestinal stromal tumor. Subsequently, the patient was treated with 2 more cycles of the chemotherapy. Eventually, thrombocytopenia completely resolved. PMID:27746431

  19. Childhood adversity and cell-mediated immunity in young adulthood: does type and timing matter?

    PubMed

    Slopen, Natalie; McLaughlin, Katie A; Dunn, Erin C; Koenen, Karestan C

    2013-02-01

    Childhood adversity can have powerful effects on health over the life course. Persistent changes in cell-mediated immune function may be one pathway linking adverse childhood experiences with later disease risk. However, limited research has examined childhood adversity in relation to cell-mediated immune function, and in particular, immune response to latent viruses in adulthood. The present study investigated the association of two types of childhood adversity, socioeconomic disadvantage during adolescence and abuse prior to age 18, with Epstein-Barr Virus (EBV) antibody titers in a large nationally representative sample of young adults aged 24-32years. Data were drawn from the National Longitudinal Study on Adolescent Health, Wave 4 (n=13,162). We examined the associations of three indicators of adolescent SES (parental education, household income, and occupational status) and frequency and timing of physical and sexual abuse with EBV antibodies, controlling for age, sex, race/ethnicity, and presence of a smoker in the household during adolescence. Lower parental occupational status and some categories of lower education were associated with elevated EBV antibodies (p<.05), and individuals who reported sexual abuse that occurred more than 10times had elevated EBV antibodies relative to individuals who were not sexually abused (p=0.03). Among individuals exposed to physical abuse, those who were first abused at age 3-5years had heightened EBV antibodies relative to those first abused during adolescence (p=0.004). This study extends prior research linking early adversity and immune function, and provides initial evidence that childhood adversity has a persistent influence on immune responses to latent infection in adulthood.

  20. Barriers to childhood immunization: findings from a needs assessment study.

    PubMed

    Thomas, M; Kohli, Vandana; King, Dixie

    2004-01-01

    This study examines the current status of immunization among 0-3 year old children in Bakersfield and identifies barriers that prevent families from immunizing their children. A survey research design using a stratified sampling method was employed to collect data from 207 randomly selected English and Spanish speaking households having at least one child between the ages of 0-3 in Bakersfield. The findings reveal that 49% of the parents had no shot cards regarding children's immunization status. However, a significant majority of them immunized their children despite having no records. The most commonly reported consumer related barrier for late immunization was having a sick child followed by lack of parental memory and fear of side effects. The major provider-related barriers included lack of an opening for an appointment with the health care provider, limited clinic hours, and long lines in clinics. Lack of transportation was the single most systemic barrier. These findings suggest that reminder calls, increased transportation, weekend clinics and better rapport with parents can improve the immunization rates in ethnically diverse rural communities.

  1. Helicobacter pylori eradication shifts monocyte Fcγ receptor balance toward inhibitory FcγRIIB in immune thrombocytopenic purpura patients

    PubMed Central

    Asahi, Atsuko; Nishimoto, Tetsuya; Okazaki, Yuka; Suzuki, Hidekazu; Masaoka, Tatsuhiro; Kawakami, Yutaka; Ikeda, Yasuo; Kuwana, Masataka

    2008-01-01

    Immune thrombocytopenia purpura (ITP) is a bleeding disorder in which platelet-specific autoantibodies cause a loss of platelets. In a subset of patients with ITP and infected with Helicobacter pylori, the number of platelets recovers after eradication of H. pylori. To examine the role of H. pylori infection in the pathogenesis of ITP, the response of 34 ITP patients to treatment with a standard H. pylori eradication regimen, irrespective of whether they were infected with H. pylori, was evaluated. Eradication of H. pylori was achieved in all H. pylori–positive patients, and a significant increase in platelets was observed in 61% of these patients. By contrast, none of the H. pylori–negative patients showed increased platelets. At baseline, monocytes from the H. pylori–positive patients exhibited an enhanced phagocytic capacity and low levels of the inhibitory Fcγ receptor IIB (FcγRIIB). One week after starting the H. pylori eradication regimen, this activated monocyte phenotype was suppressed and improvements in autoimmune and platelet kinetic parameters followed. Modulation of monocyte FcγR balance was also found in association with H. pylori infection in individuals who did not have ITP and in mice. Our findings strongly suggest that the recovery in platelet numbers observed in ITP patients after H. pylori eradication is mediated through a change in FcγR balance toward the inhibitory FcγRIIB. PMID:18654664

  2. Early childhood poverty, immune-mediated disease processes, and adult productivity.

    PubMed

    Ziol-Guest, Kathleen M; Duncan, Greg J; Kalil, Ariel; Boyce, W Thomas

    2012-10-16

    This study seeks to understand whether poverty very early in life is associated with early-onset adult conditions related to immune-mediated chronic diseases. It also tests the role that these immune-mediated chronic diseases may play in accounting for the associations between early poverty and adult productivity. Data (n = 1,070) come from the US Panel Study of Income Dynamics and include economic conditions in utero and throughout childhood and adolescence coupled with adult (age 30-41 y) self-reports of health and economic productivity. Results show that low income, particularly in very early childhood (between the prenatal and second year of life), is associated with increases in early-adult hypertension, arthritis, and limitations on activities of daily living. Moreover, these relationships and particularly arthritis partially account for the associations between early childhood poverty and adult productivity as measured by adult work hours and earnings. The results suggest that the associations between early childhood poverty and these adult disease states may be immune-mediated.

  3. Effectiveness of Individually Tailored Calendars in Promoting Childhood Immunization in Urban Public Health Centers

    PubMed Central

    Kreuter, Matthew W.; Caburnay, Charlene A.; Chen, John J.; Donlin, Maureen J.

    2004-01-01

    Objectives. We examined the effectiveness of tailored calendars in increasing childhood immunization rates. Methods. Parents of babies aged birth to 1 year (n = 321) received individually tailored calendars promoting immunization from 2 urban public health centers. For each baby, an age- and sex-matched control was selected from the same center. Immunization status was tracked through age 24 months. Results. A higher proportion of intervention than of control babies were up to date at the end of a 9-month enrollment period (82% vs 65%, P < .001) and at age 24 months (66% vs 47%, P < .001). The younger the baby’s age at enrollment in the program, the greater was the intervention effect. Conclusions. Tailored immunization calendars can help increase child immunization rates. PMID:14713709

  4. Polio inactivated vaccine costs into routine childhood immunization in Brazil

    PubMed Central

    Sartori, Ana Marli Christovam; Vicentine, Margarete Paganotti; Gryninger, Lígia Castelloni Figueiredo; de Soárez, Patricia Coelho; Novaes, Hillegonda Maria Dutilh

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To analyze the costs of vaccination regimens for introducing inactivated polio vaccine in routine immunization in Brazil. METHODS A cost analysis was conducted for vaccines in five vaccination regimens, including inactivated polio vaccine, compared with the oral polio vaccine-only regimen. The costs of the vaccines were estimated for routine use and for the “National Immunization Days”, during when the oral polio vaccine is administered to children aged less than five years, independent of their vaccine status, and the strategic stock of inactivated polio vaccine. The presented estimated costs are of 2011. RESULTS The annual costs of the oral vaccine-only program (routine and two National Immunization Days) were estimated at US$19,873,170. The incremental costs of inclusion of the inactivated vaccine depended on the number of vaccine doses, presentation of the vaccine (bottles with single dose or ten doses), and number of “National Immunization Days” carried out. The cost of the regimen adopted with two doses of inactivated vaccine followed by three doses of oral vaccine and one “National Immunization Day” was estimated at US$29,653,539. The concomitant replacement of the DTPw/Hib and HepB vaccines with the pentavalent vaccine enabled the introduction of the inactivated polio without increasing the number of injections or number of visits needed to complete the vaccination. CONCLUSIONS The introduction of the inactivated vaccine increased the annual costs of the polio vaccines by 49.2% compared with the oral vaccine-only regimen. This increase represented 1.13% of the expenditure of the National Immunization Program on the purchase of vaccines in 2011. PMID:25741645

  5. To Give or Not to Give: Approaches to Early Childhood Immunization Delivery in Oregon Rural Primary Care Practices

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fagnan, Lyle J.; Shipman, Scott A.; Gaudino, James A.; Mahler, Jo; Sussman, Andrew L.; Holub, Jennifer

    2011-01-01

    Context: Little is known about rural clinicians' perspectives regarding early childhood immunization delivery, their adherence to recommended best immunization practices, or the specific barriers they confront. Purpose: To examine immunization practices, beliefs, and barriers among rural primary care clinicians for children in Oregon and compare…

  6. [Childhood immunization schedule of the Spanish Association of Pediatrics 2003].

    PubMed

    2003-03-01

    In this document the Advisory Committee on Vaccines of the Spanish Association of Pediatrics provides recommendations for the immunization schedule for the 2003-2004 season. The use of inactivated poliovirus vaccine is again stressed for children of any age. Moreover, the introduction of the varicella vaccine and the pneumococcal conjugated vaccine, as well as the option of dTpa in adolescents, is highly recommended due to the availability of safe and effective products. Because of the increasing number of new vaccines in the immunization schedule, strategies with combined vaccines must be used.

  7. Determinants of Childhood Immunization Uptake among Socio-Economically Disadvantaged Migrants in East China

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Yu; Li, Qian; Chen, Enfu; Chen, Yaping; Qi, Xiaohua

    2013-01-01

    Objective: To determine the coverage of childhood immunization appropriate for age among socio-economically disadvantaged recent migrants living in East China and to identify the determinants of full immunization uptake among these migrant children. Methods: This is a cross-sectional survey of 1,426 migrant mothers with a child aged ≤24 months, who were interviewed with a pretested questionnaire. Various vaccines, migration history and some other social-demographic and income details were collected. Single-level logistic regression analyses were applied to identify the determinants of full immunization status. Results: Immunization coverage rates are lower among migrants and even lower among recent migrants. The likelihood of a child receiving full immunization rise with parents’ educational level and the frequency of mother’s utilization of health care. Higher household income also significantly increase the likelihood of full immunization, as dose post-natal visits by a health worker. Conclusions: Recent migrant status favours low immunization uptake, particularly in the vulnerability context of alienation and livelihood insecurity. Services must be delivered with a focus on recent migrants. Investments are needed in education, socio-economic development and secure livelihoods to improve and sustain equitable health care services. PMID:23839061

  8. Childhood asthma: causes, risks, and protective factors; a role of innate immunity.

    PubMed

    Noutsios, Georgios T; Floros, Joanna

    2014-01-01

    Childhood asthma is an umbrella of multifactorial diseases with similar clinical features such as mast cell and eosinophil infiltration causing airway hyper responsiveness, inflammation, and airway obstruction. There are various factors that are implicated in childhood asthma pathogenesis. A combined contribution of genetic predisposition, environmental insults, and epigenetic changes account for polarisation of the immune system towards T helper (Th) type 2 cell responses that include production of pro-inflammatory cytokines, IgE, and eosinophil infiltrates, shown to associate with asthma. Environmental cues in prenatal, perinatal, and early childhood seem to determine development of asthma incidence or protection against it. Mode of birth delivery, use of antibiotics, oxidative stress, exposure to tobacco smoke and an industrialised lifestyle are significant contributors to childhood asthma exacerbation. Environmental stimuli such as exposure to maternal antibodies through breast milk, and certain early infections favour Th1 cell responses, leading to the production of anti-inflammatory cytokines that protect from asthma. Aside from the Th cell responses the role of innate immunity in the context of alveolar macrophages, dendritic cells, and surfactant protein A (SP-A) and SP-D is discussed. SP-A and SP-D enhance pathogen phagocytosis and cytokine production by alveolar macrophages, bind and clear pathogens, and interact with dendritic cells to mediate adaptive immunity responses. Further study of the interactions between genetic variants of genes of interest (SP-A and SP-D) and the environment may provide valuable knowledge about the underlying mechanisms of various interactions that differentially affect asthma susceptibility, disease severity, and reveal potential points for therapeutic interventions.

  9. Hodgkin's disease presenting as idiopathic thrombocytopenic purpura.

    PubMed Central

    Murphy, W. G.; Allan, N. C.; Perry, D. J.; Stockdill, G.

    1984-01-01

    A case of Hodgkin's disease presenting as idiopathic thrombocytopenic purpura in a 23-year-old male is reported. This is a rare presentation of Hodgkin's disease having been previously described in only two cases. PMID:6541338

  10. Malnutrition and infectious disease morbidity among children missed by the childhood immunization program in Indonesia.

    PubMed

    Semba, Richard D; de Pee, Saskia; Berger, Sarah G; Martini, Elviyanti; Ricks, Michelle O; Bloem, Martin W

    2007-01-01

    Although it has been thought that child immunization programs may miss the children who are in greatest need, there are little published quantitative data to support this idea. We sought to characterize malnutrition and morbidity among children who are missed by the childhood immunization program in Indonesia. Vaccination and morbidity histories, anthropometry, and other data were collected for 286,500 children, aged 12-59 months, in rural Indonesia. Seventy-three point nine percent of children received complete immunizations (3 doses of diphtheria-pertussis-tetanus, 3 doses of oral poliovirus, and measles), 16.8% had partial coverage (1-6 of 7 vaccine doses), and 9.3% received no vaccines. Of children with complete, partial, and no immunization coverage, respectively, the prevalence of severe underweight (weight-for-age Z score < -3) was 5.4, 9.9, and 12.6%, severe stunting (height-for-age Z score < -3) was 10.2, 16.2, and 21.5%, and current diarrhea was 3.8, 7.3, and 8.6% (all p < 0.0001), respectively. In families where the child had complete, partial, and no immunizations, the history of infant mortality was 6.4, 11.4, and 16.5%, and under-five child mortality was 7.3, 13.4, and 19.2% (both p < 0.0001). Expanded programmatic coverage is needed to reach children who are missed by childhood immunizations in rural Indonesia, as missed children are at higher risk of morbidity and mortality.

  11. Socioeconomic Dynamics of Gender Disparity in Childhood Immunization in India, 1992–2006

    PubMed Central

    Prusty, Ranjan Kumar; Kumar, Abhishek

    2014-01-01

    Background Recent evidence indicated that gender disparity in child health is minimal and narrowed over time in India. However, considering the geographical and socio-cultural diversity in India, the gender gap may persist across disaggregated socioeconomic context which may be masked by average level. This study examines the dynamics of gender disparity in childhood immunization across regions, residence, wealth, caste and religion in India during 1992–2006. Method We used multi-waves of the cross-sectional data of National Family Health Survey conducted in India between 1992–93 and 2005–06. Gender disparity ratio was used to measure the gender gap in childhood immunization across the selected socioeconomic characteristics. Multinomial regression analysis was used to examine the gender gap after accounting for other covariates. Result Results indicate that, at aggregate level, gender disparity in full immunization is minimal and has stagnated during the study period. However, gender disparity – disfavouring female children – becomes apparent across the regions, poor households, and religion - particularly among Muslims. Adjusted gender disparity ratio indicates that, full immunization is lower among female than male children of the western region, poor household and among Muslims. Between 1992–93 and 2005–06, the disparity in full immunization had narrowed in the northern region whereas it had, astonishingly, increased in some of the western and southern states of the country. Conclusion Our findings emphasize the need to integrate gender issues in the ongoing immunization programme in India, with particular attention to urban areas, developed states, and to the Muslim community. PMID:25127396

  12. Using Text Reminder to Improve Childhood Immunization Adherence in the Philippines.

    PubMed

    Garcia-Dia, Mary Joy; Fitzpatrick, Joyce J; Madigan, Elizabeth A; Peabody, John W

    2017-04-01

    A comparative descriptive study was conducted to determine the effectiveness of text messages with pictures compared with plain text messages or verbal reminders in improving measles, mumps, and rubella immunization compliance in the rural areas of the Philippines. We found that text messaging with or without pictures is a feasible and useful tool in measles, mumps, rubella immunization compliance for childhood immunization. Texting with pictures (n = 23), however, was no more effective than plain text messaging (n = 19) or verbal reminder (n = 17) in improving measles, mumps, and rubella immunization compliance. Compared with parents who received verbal reminders alone, either type of text reminders was linked to parents bringing their child for measles, mumps, and rubella immunization on a timelier basis, as defined by the difference between the scheduled visit and the actual visit, although this was not statistically significant. Mobile technology that uses text reminders for immunization can potentially improve the communication process between parent, the public health nurse, and healthcare provider. Future studies can explore the application of plain text messages or text messages with pictures to improve compliance more broadly for maternal and child healthcare especially in rural areas of developing countries and may be a helpful tool for health promotion for this population.

  13. Allergies, atopy, immune-related factors and childhood rhabdomyosarcoma: a report from the Children's Oncology Group.

    PubMed

    Lupo, Philip J; Zhou, Renke; Skapek, Stephen X; Hawkins, Douglas S; Spector, Logan G; Scheurer, Michael E; Fatih Okcu, M; Melin, Beatrice; Papworth, Karin; Erhardt, Erik B; Grufferman, Seymour

    2014-01-15

    Rhabdomyosarcoma (RMS) is a highly malignant tumor of developing muscle that can occur anywhere in the body. Due to its rarity, relatively little is known about the epidemiology of RMS. Atopic disease is hypothesized to be protective against several malignancies; however, to our knowledge, there have been no assessments of atopy and childhood RMS. Therefore, we explored this association in a case-control study of 322 childhood RMS cases and 322 pair-matched controls. Cases were enrolled in a trial run by the Intergroup Rhabdomyosarcoma Study Group. Controls were matched to cases on race, sex and age. The following atopic conditions were assessed: allergies, asthma, eczema and hives; in addition, we examined other immune-related factors: birth order, day-care attendance and breastfeeding. Conditional logistic-regression models were used to calculate an odds ratio (OR) and 95% confidence interval (CI) for each exposure, adjusted for age, race, sex, household income and parental education. As the two most common histologic types of RMS are embryonal (n=215) and alveolar (n=66), we evaluated effect heterogeneity of these exposures. Allergies (OR=0.60, 95% CI: 0.41-0.87), hives (OR = 0.61, 95% CI: 0.38-0.97), day-care attendance (OR=0.48, 95% CI: 0.32-0.71) and breastfeeding for ≥ 12 months (OR=0.36, 95% CI: 0.18-0.70) were inversely associated with childhood RMS. These exposures did not display significant effect heterogeneity between histologic types (p>0.52 for all exposures). This is the first study indicating that atopic exposures may be protective against childhood RMS, suggesting additional studies are needed to evaluate the immune system's role in the development of this tumor.

  14. The Relationship Between Parent Attitudes About Childhood Vaccines Survey Scores and Future Child Immunization Status

    PubMed Central

    Opel, Douglas J.; Taylor, James A.; Zhou, Chuan; Catz, Sheryl; Myaing, Mon; Mangione-Smith, Rita

    2016-01-01

    IMPORTANCE Acceptance of childhood vaccinations is waning, amplifying interest in developing and testing interventions that address parental barriers to immunization acceptance. OBJECTIVE To determine the predictive validity and test-retest reliability of the Parent Attitudes About Childhood Vaccines survey (PACV), a recently developed measure of vaccine hesitancy. DESIGN, SETTING, AND PARTICIPANTS Prospective cohort of English-speaking parents of children aged 2 months and born from July 10 through December 10, 2010, who belonged to an integrated health care delivery system based in Seattle and who returned a completed baseline PACV. Parents who completed a follow-up survey 8 weeks later were included in the reliability analysis. Parents who remained continuous members in the delivery system until their child was 19 months old were included in the validity analysis. EXPOSURE The PACV, scored on a scale of 0 to 100 (100 indicates high vaccine hesitancy). MAIN OUTCOMES AND MEASURES Child’s immunization status as measured by the percentage of days underimmunized from birth to 19 months of age. RESULTS Four hundred thirty-seven parents completed the baseline PACV (response rate, 50.5%), and 220 (66.5%) completed the follow-up survey. Of the 437 parents who completed a baseline survey, 310 (70.9%) maintained continuous enrollment. Compared with parents who scored less than 50, parents who scored 50 to 69 on the survey had children who were underimmunized for 8.3% (95% CI, 3.6%–12.8%) more days from birth to 19 months of age; those who scored 70 to 100, 46.8% (40.3%–53.3%) more days. Baseline and 8-week follow-up PACV scores were highly concordant (ρ = 0.844). CONCLUSIONS AND RELEVANCE Scores on the PACV predict childhood immunization status and have high reliability. Our results should be validated in different geographic and demographic samples of parents. PMID:24061681

  15. Humoral Immunity to Primary Smallpox Vaccination: Impact of Childhood versus Adult Immunization on Vaccinia Vector Vaccine Development in Military Populations.

    PubMed

    Slike, Bonnie M; Creegan, Matthew; Marovich, Mary; Ngauy, Viseth

    2017-01-01

    Modified Vaccinia virus has been shown to be a safe and immunogenic vector platform for delivery of HIV vaccines. Use of this vector is of particular importance to the military, with the implementation of a large scale smallpox vaccination campaign in 2002 in active duty and key civilian personnel in response to potential bioterrorist activities. Humoral immunity to smallpox vaccination was previously shown to be long lasting (up to 75 years) and protective. However, using vaccinia-vectored vaccine delivery for other diseases on a background of anti-vector antibodies (i.e. pre-existing immunity) may limit their use as a vaccine platform, especially in the military. In this pilot study, we examined the durability of vaccinia antibody responses in adult primary vaccinees in a healthy military population using a standard ELISA assay and a novel dendritic cell neutralization assay. We found binding and neutralizing antibody (NAb) responses to vaccinia waned after 5-10 years in a group of 475 active duty military, born after 1972, who were vaccinated as adults with Dryvax®. These responses decreased from a geometric mean titer (GMT) of 250 to baseline (<20) after 10-20 years post vaccination. This contrasted with a comparator group of adults, ages 35-49, who were vaccinated with Dryvax® as children. In the childhood vaccinees, titers persisted for >30 years with a GMT of 210 (range 112-3234). This data suggests limited durability of antibody responses in adult vaccinees compared to those vaccinated in childhood and further that adult vaccinia recipients may benefit similarly from receipt of a vaccinia based vaccine as those who are vaccinia naïve. Our findings may have implications for the smallpox vaccination schedule and support the ongoing development of this promising viral vector in a military vaccination program.

  16. Humoral Immunity to Primary Smallpox Vaccination: Impact of Childhood versus Adult Immunization on Vaccinia Vector Vaccine Development in Military Populations

    PubMed Central

    Slike, Bonnie M.; Creegan, Matthew

    2017-01-01

    Modified Vaccinia virus has been shown to be a safe and immunogenic vector platform for delivery of HIV vaccines. Use of this vector is of particular importance to the military, with the implementation of a large scale smallpox vaccination campaign in 2002 in active duty and key civilian personnel in response to potential bioterrorist activities. Humoral immunity to smallpox vaccination was previously shown to be long lasting (up to 75 years) and protective. However, using vaccinia-vectored vaccine delivery for other diseases on a background of anti-vector antibodies (i.e. pre-existing immunity) may limit their use as a vaccine platform, especially in the military. In this pilot study, we examined the durability of vaccinia antibody responses in adult primary vaccinees in a healthy military population using a standard ELISA assay and a novel dendritic cell neutralization assay. We found binding and neutralizing antibody (NAb) responses to vaccinia waned after 5–10 years in a group of 475 active duty military, born after 1972, who were vaccinated as adults with Dryvax®. These responses decreased from a geometric mean titer (GMT) of 250 to baseline (<20) after 10–20 years post vaccination. This contrasted with a comparator group of adults, ages 35–49, who were vaccinated with Dryvax® as children. In the childhood vaccinees, titers persisted for >30 years with a GMT of 210 (range 112–3234). This data suggests limited durability of antibody responses in adult vaccinees compared to those vaccinated in childhood and further that adult vaccinia recipients may benefit similarly from receipt of a vaccinia based vaccine as those who are vaccinia naïve. Our findings may have implications for the smallpox vaccination schedule and support the ongoing development of this promising viral vector in a military vaccination program. PMID:28046039

  17. Digital epidemiology reveals global childhood disease seasonality and the effects of immunization

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Public health surveillance systems are important for tracking disease dynamics. In recent years, social and real-time digital data sources have provided new means of studying disease transmission. Such affordable and accessible data have the potential to offer new insights into disease epidemiology at national and international scales. We used the extensive information repository Google Trends to examine the digital epidemiology of a common childhood disease, chicken pox, caused by varicella zoster virus (VZV), over an 11-y period. We (i) report robust seasonal information-seeking behavior for chicken pox using Google data from 36 countries, (ii) validate Google data using clinical chicken pox cases, (iii) demonstrate that Google data can be used to identify recurrent seasonal outbreaks and forecast their magnitude and seasonal timing, and (iv) reveal that VZV immunization significantly dampened seasonal cycles in information-seeking behavior. Our findings provide strong evidence that VZV transmission is seasonal and that seasonal peaks show remarkable latitudinal variation. We attribute the dampened seasonal cycles in chicken pox information-seeking behavior to VZV vaccine-induced reduction of seasonal transmission. These data and the methodological approaches provide a way to track the global burden of childhood disease and illustrate population-level effects of immunization. The global latitudinal patterns in outbreak seasonality could direct future studies of environmental and physiological drivers of disease transmission. PMID:27247405

  18. Digital epidemiology reveals global childhood disease seasonality and the effects of immunization.

    PubMed

    Bakker, Kevin M; Martinez-Bakker, Micaela Elvira; Helm, Barbara; Stevenson, Tyler J

    2016-06-14

    Public health surveillance systems are important for tracking disease dynamics. In recent years, social and real-time digital data sources have provided new means of studying disease transmission. Such affordable and accessible data have the potential to offer new insights into disease epidemiology at national and international scales. We used the extensive information repository Google Trends to examine the digital epidemiology of a common childhood disease, chicken pox, caused by varicella zoster virus (VZV), over an 11-y period. We (i) report robust seasonal information-seeking behavior for chicken pox using Google data from 36 countries, (ii) validate Google data using clinical chicken pox cases, (iii) demonstrate that Google data can be used to identify recurrent seasonal outbreaks and forecast their magnitude and seasonal timing, and (iv) reveal that VZV immunization significantly dampened seasonal cycles in information-seeking behavior. Our findings provide strong evidence that VZV transmission is seasonal and that seasonal peaks show remarkable latitudinal variation. We attribute the dampened seasonal cycles in chicken pox information-seeking behavior to VZV vaccine-induced reduction of seasonal transmission. These data and the methodological approaches provide a way to track the global burden of childhood disease and illustrate population-level effects of immunization. The global latitudinal patterns in outbreak seasonality could direct future studies of environmental and physiological drivers of disease transmission.

  19. Hygiene and other early childhood influences on the subsequent function of the immune system.

    PubMed

    Rook, Graham A W; Lowry, Christopher A; Raison, Charles L

    2015-08-18

    The immune system influences brain development and function. Hygiene and other early childhood influences impact the subsequent function of the immune system during adulthood, with consequences for vulnerability to neurodevelopmental and psychiatric disorders. Inflammatory events during pregnancy can act directly to cause developmental problems in the central nervous system (CNS) that have been implicated in schizophrenia and autism. The immune system also acts indirectly by "farming" the intestinal microbiota, which then influences brain development and function via the multiple pathways that constitute the gut-brain axis. The gut microbiota also regulates the immune system. Regulation of the immune system is crucial because inflammatory states in pregnancy need to be limited, and throughout life inflammation needs to be terminated completely when not required; for example, persistently raised levels of background inflammation during adulthood (in the presence or absence of a clinically apparent inflammatory stimulus) correlate with an increased risk of depression. A number of factors in the perinatal period, notably immigration from rural low-income to rich developed settings, caesarean delivery, breastfeeding and antibiotic abuse have profound effects on the microbiota and on immunoregulation during early life that persist into adulthood. Many aspects of the modern western environment deprive the infant of the immunoregulatory organisms with which humans co-evolved, while encouraging exposure to non-immunoregulatory organisms, associated with more recently evolved "crowd" infections. Finally, there are complex interactions between perinatal psychosocial stressors, the microbiota, and the immune system that have significant additional effects on both physical and psychiatric wellbeing in subsequent adulthood. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled Neuroimmunology in Health And Disease.

  20. A bibliometric analysis of childhood immunization research productivity in Africa since the onset of the Expanded Program on Immunization in 1974

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The implementation of strategic immunization plans whose development is informed by available locally-relevant research evidence should improve immunization coverage and prevent disease, disability and death in Africa. In general, health research helps to answer questions, generate the evidence required to guide policy and identify new tools. However, factors that influence the publication of immunization research in Africa are not known. We, therefore, undertook this study to fill this research gap by providing insights into factors associated with childhood immunization research productivity on the continent. We postulated that research productivity influences immunization coverage. Methods We conducted a bibliometric analysis of childhood immunization research output from Africa, using research articles indexed in PubMed as a surrogate for total research productivity. We used zero-truncated negative binomial regression models to explore the factors associated with research productivity. Results We identified 1,641 articles on childhood immunization indexed in PubMed between 1974 and 2010 with authors from Africa, which represent only 8.9% of the global output. Five countries (South Africa, Nigeria, The Gambia, Egypt and Kenya) contributed 48% of the articles. After controlling for population and gross domestic product, The Gambia, Guinea-Bissau and Sao Tome and Principe were the most productive countries. In univariable analyses, the country's gross domestic product, total health expenditure, private health expenditure, and research and development expenditure had a significant positive association with increased research productivity. Immunization coverage, adult literacy rate, human development index and physician density had no significant association. In the multivarable model, only private health expenditure maintained significant statistical association with the number of immunization articles. Conclusions Immunization research productivity in

  1. Childhood immune thrombocytopenia: role of rituximab, recombinant thrombopoietin, and other new therapeutics.

    PubMed

    Journeycake, Janna M

    2012-01-01

    Childhood immune thrombocytopenia (ITP) is often considered a benign hematologic disorder. However, 30% of affected children will have a prolonged course and 5%-10% will develop chronic severe refractory disease. Until recently, the only proven therapeutic option for chronic severe ITP was splenectomy, but newer alternatives are now being studied. However, because immunosuppressive agents such as rituximab are not approved for use in ITP and the thrombopoietin receptor agonists are not yet approved in children, the decision to use alternatives to splenectomy needs to be considered carefully. This review describes the factors that should affect decisions to treat ITP at diagnosis and compares the options for the occasional child in whom ITP does not resolve within the first year.

  2. White Paper on studying the safety of the childhood immunization schedule in the Vaccine Safety Datalink.

    PubMed

    Glanz, Jason M; Newcomer, Sophia R; Jackson, Michael L; Omer, Saad B; Bednarczyk, Robert A; Shoup, Jo Ann; DeStefano, Frank; Daley, Matthew F

    2016-02-15

    While the large majority of parents in the U.S. vaccinate their children according to the recommended immunization schedule, some parents have refused or delayed vaccinating, often citing safety concerns. In response to public concern, the U.S. Institute of Medicine (IOM) evaluated existing research regarding the safety of the recommended immunization schedule. The IOM concluded that although available evidence strongly supported the safety of the currently recommended schedule as a whole, additional observational research was warranted to compare health outcomes between fully vaccinated children and those on a delayed or alternative schedule. In addition, the IOM identified the Vaccine Safety Datalink (VSD) as an important resource for conducting this research. Guided by the IOM findings, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) commissioned a White Paper to assess how the VSD could be used to study the safety of the childhood immunization schedule. Guided by subject matter expert engagement, the resulting White Paper outlines a 4 stage approach for identifying exposure groups of undervaccinated children, presents a list of health outcomes of highest priority to examine in this context, and describes various study designs and statistical methods that could be used to analyze the safety of the schedule. While it appears feasible to study the safety of the recommended immunization schedule in settings such as the VSD, these studies will be inherently complex, and as with all observational studies, will need to carefully address issues of confounding and bias. In light of these considerations, decisions about conducting studies of the safety of the schedule will also need to assess epidemiological evidence of potential adverse events that could be related to the schedule, the biological plausibility of an association between an adverse event and the schedule, and public concern about the safety of the schedule.

  3. Severe infectious diseases of childhood as monogenic inborn errors of immunity.

    PubMed

    Casanova, Jean-Laurent

    2015-12-22

    This paper reviews the developments that have occurred in the field of human genetics of infectious diseases from the second half of the 20th century onward. In particular, it stresses and explains the importance of the recently described monogenic inborn errors of immunity underlying resistance or susceptibility to specific infections. The monogenic component of the genetic theory provides a plausible explanation for the occurrence of severe infectious diseases during primary infection. Over the last 20 y, increasing numbers of life-threatening infectious diseases striking otherwise healthy children, adolescents, and even young adults have been attributed to single-gene inborn errors of immunity. These studies were inspired by seminal but neglected findings in plant and animal infections. Infectious diseases typically manifest as sporadic traits because human genotypes often display incomplete penetrance (most genetically predisposed individuals remain healthy) and variable expressivity (different infections can be allelic at the same locus). Infectious diseases of childhood, once thought to be archetypal environmental diseases, actually may be among the most genetically determined conditions of mankind. This nascent and testable notion has interesting medical and biological implications.

  4. Severe infectious diseases of childhood as monogenic inborn errors of immunity

    PubMed Central

    Casanova, Jean-Laurent

    2015-01-01

    This paper reviews the developments that have occurred in the field of human genetics of infectious diseases from the second half of the 20th century onward. In particular, it stresses and explains the importance of the recently described monogenic inborn errors of immunity underlying resistance or susceptibility to specific infections. The monogenic component of the genetic theory provides a plausible explanation for the occurrence of severe infectious diseases during primary infection. Over the last 20 y, increasing numbers of life-threatening infectious diseases striking otherwise healthy children, adolescents, and even young adults have been attributed to single-gene inborn errors of immunity. These studies were inspired by seminal but neglected findings in plant and animal infections. Infectious diseases typically manifest as sporadic traits because human genotypes often display incomplete penetrance (most genetically predisposed individuals remain healthy) and variable expressivity (different infections can be allelic at the same locus). Infectious diseases of childhood, once thought to be archetypal environmental diseases, actually may be among the most genetically determined conditions of mankind. This nascent and testable notion has interesting medical and biological implications. PMID:26621750

  5. Assessing the Contributions of Private Health Facilities in a Pioneer Private-Public Partnership in Childhood Immunization in Nigeria

    PubMed Central

    Oluoha, Chukwuemeka; Ahaneku, Hycienth

    2014-01-01

    The vision of Nigeria’s immunization program is to reach and sustain routine immunization coverage of greater than 90% for all vaccines by 2020. In order to achieve this, Abia state embarked on a unique private-public partnership (PPP) between private health facilities and the Abia state ministry of health. The aim of this partnership was to collaborate with private health facilities to provide free childhood immunization services in the state - the first of its kind in Nigeria. This is a retrospective study of the 2011 Abia state, Nigeria monthly immunization data. In the 4 local governments operating the PPP, 45% (79/175) of the health facilities that offered immunization services in 2011 were private health facilities and 55% (96/175) were public health facilities. However, 21% of the immunization services took place in private health facilities while 79% took place in public health facilities. Private health facilities were shown to have a modest contribution to immunization in the 4 local governments involved in the PPP. Efforts should be made to expand PPP in immunization nationally to improve immunization services in Nigeria. PMID:28299112

  6. District-level variations in childhood immunizations in India: The role of socio-economic factors and health infrastructure.

    PubMed

    Rammohan, Anu; Awofeso, Niyi

    2015-11-01

    Routine childhood immunizations against measles and DPT are part of the World Health Organization's (WHO) Expanded Program on Immunization (EPI) set up in 1974, with the aim of reducing childhood morbidity and mortality. Despite this, immunization rates are sub-optimal in developing countries such as India, with wide heterogeneity observed across districts and socio-economic characteristics. The aim of this paper is to examine district-level variations in the propensity to vaccinate a child in India for measles and DPT3, and analyse the extent to which these immunizations are given age-inappropriately, either prematurely or delayed. The present study uses data from the Indian District Level Household Survey (DLHS-3) collected in 2008, and the final sample contains detailed information on 42157 children aged between 12 and 60 months, across 549 Indian districts for whom we have complete information on immunization history. Our empirical study analyses: (i) the district-level average immunization rates for measles and DPT3, and (ii) the extent to which these immunizations have been given age-appropriately. A key contribution of this paper is that we link the household-level data at the district level to data on availability and proximity to health infrastructure and district-level socio-economic factors. Our results show that after controlling for an array of socio-economic characteristics, across all our models, the district's income per capita is a strong predictor of better immunization outcomes for children. Mother's education level at the district-level has a statistically significant and positive influence on immunization outcomes across all our models.

  7. Comparison of immune manifestations between refractory cytopenia of childhood and aplastic anemia in children: A single-center retrospective study.

    PubMed

    Wu, Jun; Cheng, Yifei; Zhang, Leping

    2015-12-01

    This retrospective single-center study assessed the incidence and clinical features of immune manifestations of refractory cytopenia of childhood (RCC) and childhood aplastic anemia (AA). We evaluated 72 children with RCC and 123 with AA between February 2008 and March 2013. RCC was associated with autoimmune disease in 4 children, including 1 case each with autoimmune hemolytic anemia, rheumatoid arthritis, systemic lupus erythematosus, and anaphylactoid purpura. No children with AA were diagnosed with autoimmune diseases. Immune abnormalities were common in both RCC and AA; the most significant reductions were in the relative numbers of CD3-CD56+ subsets found in RCC. Despite the many similar immunologic abnormalities in AA and RCC, the rate of autoimmune disease was significantly lower in childhood AA than RCC (p=0.008, χ2=6.976). The relative numbers of natural killer cells were significantly lower in RCC patients than AA patients. By month 6, there was no significant difference in autoimmune manifestations between RCC and AA in relation to the response to immunosuppressive therapy (p=0.907, χ2=0.014). The large overlap of analogous immunologic abnormalities indicates that RCC and childhood AA may share the same pathogenesis.

  8. Immune system development during early childhood in tropical Latin America: evidence for the age-dependent down regulation of the innate immune response.

    PubMed

    Teran, Rommy; Mitre, Edward; Vaca, Maritza; Erazo, Silvia; Oviedo, Gisela; Hübner, Marc P; Chico, Martha E; Mattapallil, Joseph J; Bickle, Quentin; Rodrigues, Laura C; Cooper, Philip J

    2011-03-01

    The immune response that develops in early childhood underlies the development of inflammatory diseases such as asthma and there are few data from tropical Latin America (LA). This study investigated the effects of age on the development of immunity during the first 5 years of life by comparing innate and adaptive immune responses in Ecuadorian children aged 6-9 months, 22-26 months, and 48-60 months. Percentages of naïve CD4+ T cells declined with age while those of memory CD4(+) and CD8(+) T cells increased indicating active development of the immune system throughout the first five years. Young infants had greater innate immune responses to TLR agonists compared to older children while regulatory responses including SEB-induced IL-10 and percentages of FoxP3(+) T-regulatory cells decreased with age. Enhanced innate immunity in early life may be important for host defense against pathogens but may increase the risk of immunopathology.

  9. Immune system development during early childhood in tropical Latin America: Evidence for the age-dependent down regulation of the innate immune response

    PubMed Central

    Teran, Rommy; Mitre, Edward; Vaca, Maritza; Erazo, Silvia; Oviedo, Gisela; Hübner, Marc P.; Chico, Martha E.; Mattapallil, Joseph J.; Bickle, Quentin; Rodrigues, Laura C.; Cooper, Philip J.

    2011-01-01

    The immune response that develops in early childhood underlies the development of inflammatory diseases such as asthma and there are few data from tropical Latin America (LA). This study investigated the effects of age on the development of immunity during the first 5 years of life by comparing innate and adaptive immune responses in Ecuadorian children aged 6–9 months, 22–26 months, and 48–60 months. Percentages of naïve CD4+ T cells declined with age while those of memory CD4+ and CD8+ T cells increased indicating active development of the immune system throughout the first five years. Young infants had greater innate immune responses to TLR agonists compared to older children while regulatory responses including SEB-induced IL-10 and percentages of FoxP3+ T-regulatory cells decreased with age. Enhanced innate immunity in early life may be important for host defense against pathogens but may increase the risk of immunopathology. PMID:21247809

  10. Knowledge, Perceptions, and Practice of Nurses on Surveillance of Adverse Events following Childhood Immunization in Nairobi, Kenya

    PubMed Central

    Atieli, Harrysone; Were, Tom

    2016-01-01

    Background. Although vaccines currently approved for routine childhood immunization are safe and effective, frequent adverse events following immunization often cause illnesses and sometimes loss of public trust in immunization programs. Nurses are essential in this surveillance system. Objective. To determine nurses' knowledge, perception, and practice towards surveillance of postimmunization adverse events within Nairobi County health centers, Kenya. Methods. This is a cross-sectional survey involving nurses (n = 274). Data were collected using self-administered questionnaires. Data analysis was performed using SPSS version 20. Differences in proportions of categorical variables were compared between groups using chi-square tests. Binary logistic regression model was used to compute independent predictors of outcome. Results. 29.2%, 32.1%, and 45.3% of the respondents had good knowledge, good practices, and good perceptions on AEFI surveillance, respectively. Respondents with diploma or degree nursing training level were 1.8 times and 2.5 times more likely to have good knowledge and good perception in AEFI surveillance, respectively. Nurses with previous AEFI training were 9.7 times and 1.8 times more likely to have good AEFI knowledge and practices, respectively. Conclusion. There is a need to train and mentor nurses on AEFI surveillance. Findings of this study will be valuable in informing policy review on childhood immunization programs. PMID:28078288

  11. Cord blood gene expression supports that prenatal exposure to perfluoroalkyl substances causes depressed immune functionality in early childhood.

    PubMed

    Pennings, Jeroen L A; Jennen, Danyel G J; Nygaard, Unni C; Namork, Ellen; Haug, Line S; van Loveren, Henk; Granum, Berit

    2016-01-01

    Perfluoroalkyl and polyfluoroalkyl substances (PFAS) are a class of synthetic compounds that have widespread use in consumer and industrial applications. PFAS are considered environmental pollutants that have various toxic properties, including effects on the immune system. Recent human studies indicate that prenatal exposure to PFAS leads to suppressed immune responses in early childhood. In this study, data from the Norwegian BraMat cohort was used to investigate transcriptomics profiles in neonatal cord blood and their association with maternal PFAS exposure, anti-rubella antibody levels at 3 years of age and the number of common cold episodes until 3 years. Genes associated with PFAS exposure showed enrichment for immunological and developmental functions. The analyses identified a toxicogenomics profile of 52 PFAS exposure-associated genes that were in common with genes associated with rubella titers and/or common cold episodes. This gene set contains several immunomodulatory genes (CYTL1, IL27) as well as other immune-associated genes (e.g. EMR4P, SHC4, ADORA2A). In addition, this study identified PPARD as a PFAS toxicogenomics marker. These markers can serve as the basis for further mechanistic or epidemiological studies. This study provides a transcriptomics connection between prenatal PFAS exposure and impaired immune function in early childhood and supports current views on PPAR- and NF-κB-mediated modes of action. The findings add to the available evidence that PFAS exposure is immunotoxic in humans and support regulatory policies to phase out these substances.

  12. Platelet antibody in idiopathic thrombocytopenic purpura and other thrombocytopenias

    SciTech Connect

    Sugiura, K.; Steiner, M.; Baldini, M.G.

    1980-10-01

    Platelet-associated immunoglobulin was measured by the use of fluorescent anti-1gG antibody. The method is simple, rapid, and sensitive and provides a precise quantitive assay of bound (direct) and free (indirect) 1gG with platelet specificity. We have evaluated this test in 30 normal volunteers and in 50 patients with immune and nonimmune, treated and untreated thrombocytopenias. All patients with immune thrombocytopenias (acute and chronic idiopathic thrombocytopenic purpura and systemic lupus erythematosus) having platelet counts < 100,000/..mu..l had elevated levels of platelet-bound 1gG and 86% had also positive results in the indirect assay. All patients with nonimmunological thrombocytopenias showed normal results in the direct and indirect assay of platelet-associated immunoglobulin. In patients studied repeatedly during the course of their illness, an inverse relation was found between platelet count and level of platelet-bound 1gG. Patients with systemic lupus erythematosus presented clear exceptions to this rule. Investigations of the absorbability of platelet autoantibodies and alloantibodies showed that this assay can readily differentiate between these two antibody species and can also identify specificities of alloantibodies.

  13. The use of an immunization information system to establish baseline childhood immunization rates and measure contract objectives.

    PubMed

    Schauer, Stephanie L; Maerz, Thomas R; Hurie, Marjorie B; Gabor, Gerald W; Flynn, John M; Davis, Jeffrey P

    2009-01-01

    Measuring progress toward national immunization objectives at the local level, although difficult, is becoming more feasible owing to statewide immunization information systems. This article describes how a state immunization program expanded the scope of immunization service contracts with local health departments (LHDs) to address the immunization rates among children living within their jurisdictions using the Wisconsin Immunization Registry (WIR) to measure achievement of population-based objectives. By contract year (CY) 2008, 99 percent of Wisconsin LHDs selected population-based contract objectives. In late 2008, the Wisconsin Immunization Program assessed all children at 24 months of age for completeness of the 4:3:1:3:3:1 (diphtheria, tetanus, pertussis/poliovirus/measles-containing vaccine/Haemophilus influenzae type b/hepatitis B/varicella) series by county for each of four CYs, using the WIR. From CY 2005 to CY 2008, LHDs in 61 (86%) of the 71 counties demonstrated increased series completeness rates for the series, and the overall statewide series completeness increased from 58 percent to 64 percent. However, the increases we observed cannot be attributed solely to LHDs' acceptance of population-based objectives because controlling for other factors known to influence immunization coverage levels was outside the scope of this case study. We found the WIR to be a powerful tool that can measure immunization coverage among local populations independent of the immunization provider, assess improvement toward contract objectives, and target resources toward pockets of need.

  14. Contribution of Immunization Weeks toward improving coverage, access to services, and completion of recommended childhood vaccinations in Assam, India.

    PubMed

    Ryman, Tove K; Trakroo, Ajay; Ekka, J B; Watkins, Margaret

    2012-03-28

    Recommended childhood vaccines have typically been provided through routine immunization programs. Recently, implementation of strategies that use campaign-like features for providing all the recommended childhood immunizations have been utilized to increase vaccination coverage. Between January 2006 and January 2008, Assam, India, conducted Immunization Weeks (IWs), a periodic campaign-like approach for providing the recommended childhood vaccines generally administered through the routine Universal Immunization Program (UIP). Using data from a household vaccination coverage survey conducted in 5 districts of Assam in late-2007/early-2008 among children 12-28 months of age, a secondary analysis was conducted for a subset of children with vaccination cards to assess the impacts of implementing the IW-strategy. Sixty-five percent of the 3310 surveyed children received at least one vaccine dose through an IW. Without IWs, coverage would likely have been lower for all vaccines (e.g., 75% measles vaccine coverage including IWs doses and an estimated 61% without IWs). The proportion of children receiving at least one IW dose was significantly different depending on the child's residence; 72% in hard-to-reach char areas, 66% in rural areas and 53% in urban areas (p=0.01). Overall, 2085 (63%) of children were fully vaccinated; of these 60% received a combination of IW and UIP doses, 35% received doses only through the UIP, and 5% received doses only through IWs. A delay in administration later than the recommended ages was found for both UIP doses and for IW doses (e.g., for measles vaccine, UIP doses were 6.9 weeks delayed and IW doses 13.6 weeks delayed). Among this sample of vaccinated children, IWs appeared to increase vaccination coverage and improve access to services in hard-to-reach areas. However, the UIP appeared to be a better system for ensuring that children received all doses in the recommended vaccination series.

  15. Thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura associated with metastatic gastric adenocarcinoma: successful management with plasmapheresis.

    PubMed

    Carr, D J; Kramer, B S; Dragonetti, D E

    1986-04-01

    A patient with metastatic gastric adenocarcinoma had progressive microangiopathic red blood cell changes, thrombocytopenia with increased marrow megakaryocytes, bleeding, altered mentation, and seizure. Coagulation parameters were inconsistent with disseminated intravascular coagulation; a clinical diagnosis of thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura (TTP) was made. Plasmapheresis resulted in improvement on two separate occasions. The diagnosis of tumor-associated TTP should be considered in cancer patients. Plasmapheresis may be more effective than plasma transfusion alone in this syndrome, perhaps via removal of tumor-induced immune complexes from the circulation. Aggressive management of this complication seems justified in cancer patients for whom effective chemotherapy exists.

  16. A rare combination of thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura and antiphospholipid syndrome.

    PubMed

    Viner, Maya; Murakhovskaya, Irina

    2016-11-24

    Thrombocytopenia, in the setting of microangiopathic hemolytic anemia and thrombotic events, is characteristic of both thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura and primary antiphospholipid syndrome. Clinically, it is difficult to distinguish between these two syndromes. We present a 41-year-old woman with chronic, relapsing thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura in the presence of antiphospholipid antibodies. She had clinical manifestations of antiphospholipid syndrome without meeting laboratory criteria of the Sydney classification system. In the literature, there have only been nine cases of thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura associated with primary antiphospholipid syndrome. Seven of the nine cases suffered from one or multiple strokes, a common feature in antiphospholipid syndrome, but an uncommon finding in thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura. We introduce the possibility of an association between thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura and the presence of antiphospholipid antibodies. Systematic testing of ADAMTS13 activity and anti-ADAMTS13 antibodies in patients who present with neurological symptoms and thrombocytopenia, in the presence of antiphospholipid antibodies, may help with the diagnosis of the rare thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura-antiphospholipid syndrome combination.

  17. Two novel heterozygote missense mutations of the ADAMTS13 gene in a child with recurrent thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura

    PubMed Central

    Rossio, Raffaella; Ferrari, Barbara; Cairo, Andrea; Mancini, Ilaria; Pisapia, Giovanni; Palazzo, Giulia; Peyvandi, Flora

    2013-01-01

    Background Thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura is a rare, life-threatening disease characterised by microangiopathic haemolytic anaemia, thrombocytopenia and symptoms related to organ ischaemia, mainly involving the brain and the kidney. It is associated with a deficiency of ADAMTS13, a plasma metalloprotease that cleaves von Willebrand factor. The congenital form (Upshaw-Schulman syndrome) is rare and is associated with mutations of the ADAMTS13 gene on chromosome 9q34. The clinical symptoms of congenital thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura are variable, with some patients developing their first episode during the neonatal period or childhood and others becoming symptomatic in adulthood. Materials and methods We describe a case of thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura, who presented to our attention with a relapsing form of the disease: the first episode occurred at the age of 13 months. Phenotype and genotype tests were performed in the patient and his family. Results The undetectable level of ADAMTS13 in the patient was caused by two novel heterozygote missense mutations on the ADAMTS13 gene: one mutation is c.788C > T (p.Ser263Phe) on exon 7 and the second is c.3251G > A (p.Cys1084Tyr) on exon 25 of the ADAMTS13 gene. All the relatives who have been investigated were found to carry one of these missense mutations in a heterozygous state. Discussion Although Upshaw-Schulman syndrome is a rare disease, it should be considered in all children with thrombocytopenia and jaundice in the neonatal period. In fact, once a child is confirmed to carry mutations of the ADAMTS13 gene causing early thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura, prophylactic treatment should be started to avoid recurrence of symptoms. Genotype tests of relatives would also be important for those women in the family who could be carriers of ADAMTS13 mutations, particularly during pregnancy. PMID:23058857

  18. Trends in anti-D immune globulin for childhood immune thrombocytopenia: usage, response rates, and adverse effects.

    PubMed

    Long, Michelle; Kalish, Leslie A; Neufeld, Ellis J; Grace, Rachael F

    2012-03-01

    In 2010, the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) added a black box warning to anti-D immune globulin (Rho(D) immune globulin, anti-D) for immune thrombocytopenia (ITP) to warn of the complications related to severe hemolysis. The objective of this retrospective medical record review was to examine recent trends in anti-D use to treat ITP and rates of adverse events in a single large pediatric hematology program. Over a 7-year period, 176 (35%) of 502 ITP patients at our center received anti-D. Anti-D was the second most commonly prescribed drug for ITP from 2003 to 2010 overall and was given first most frequently (41%). Sixty-four percent of patients responded to anti-D, but 36% had adverse effects, including five patients requiring hospitalization. From 2003 to 2010, the use of anti-D as an initial therapy for ITP significantly decreased (P < 0.001). This trend preceded the 2010 FDA black box warning. In our experience, anti-D was associated with a significant number of adverse effects when used as a treatment for ITP, although none were life-threatening. Despite recent guidelines suggesting anti-D therapy for initial treatment for ITP, anti-D therapy for ITP has significantly decreased over the past 7 years.

  19. Trends in anti-D immune globulin for childhood immune thrombocytopenia: Usage, response rates, and adverse effects

    PubMed Central

    Long, Michelle; Kalish, Leslie A.; Neufeld, Ellis J.; Grace, Rachael F.

    2013-01-01

    In 2010, the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) added a black box warning to anti-D immune globulin (Rho(D) immune globulin, anti-D) for immune thrombocytopenia (ITP) to warn of the complications related to severe hemolysis. The objective of this retrospective medical record review was to examine recent trends in anti-D use to treat ITP and rates of adverse events in a single large pediatric hematology program. Over a 7-year period, 176 (35%) of 502 ITP patients at our center received anti-D. Anti-D was the second most commonly prescribed drug for ITP from 2003 to 2010 overall and was given first most frequently (41%). Sixty-four percent of patients responded to anti-D, but 36% had adverse effects, including five patients requiring hospitalization. From 2003 to 2010, the use of anti-D as an initial therapy for ITP significantly decreased (P < 0.001). This trend preceded the 2010 FDA black box warning. In our experience, anti-D was associated with a significant number of adverse effects when used as a treatment for ITP, although none were life-threatening. Despite recent guidelines suggesting anti-D therapy for initial treatment for ITP, anti-D therapy for ITP has significantly decreased over the past 7 years. PMID:22190130

  20. /sup 111/In-oxine platelet survivals in thrombocytopenic infants

    SciTech Connect

    Castle, V.; Coates, G.; Kelton, J.G.; Andrew, M.

    1987-09-01

    Thrombocytopenia is a common occurrence (20%) in sick neonates, but the causes have not been well studied. In this report we demonstrate that thrombocytopenia in the neonate is characterized by increased platelet destruction as shown by shortened homologous /sup 111/In-oxine-labeled platelet life spans. Thirty-one prospectively studied thrombocytopenic neonates were investigated by measuring the /sup 111/In-labeled platelet life span, platelet-associated IgG (PAIgG), and coagulation screening tests. In every infant, the thrombocytopenia was shown to have a destructive component since the mean platelet life span was significantly shortened to 65 +/- 6 (mean +/- SEM) hours with a range of one to 128 hours compared with adult values (212 +/- 8; range, 140 to 260; gamma function analysis). The platelet survival was directly related to the lowest platelet count and inversely related to both the highest mean platelet volume and duration of the thrombocytopenia. In 22 infants the percent recovery of the radiolabeled platelets was less than 50%, which suggested that increased sequestration also contributed to the thrombocytopenia. Infants with laboratory evidence of disseminated intravascular coagulation (n = 8) or immune platelet destruction evidenced by elevated levels of PAIgG (n = 13) had even shorter platelet survivals and a more severe thrombocytopenia compared with the ten infants in whom an underlying cause for the thrombocytopenia was not apparent. Full-body scintigraphic images obtained in 11 infants showed an increased uptake in the spleen and liver, with a spleen-to-liver ratio of 3:1. This study indicates that thrombocytopenia in sick neonates is primarily destructive, with a subgroup having evidence of increased platelet sequestration.

  1. Platelet antibodies in idiopathic thrombocytopenic purpura.

    PubMed Central

    Veenhoven, W A; Van der Schans, G S; Nieweg, H O

    1980-01-01

    An immunofluorescence (IF) technique for the detection of antibodies was applied to idiopathic thrombocytopenic purpura (ITP). Serum platelet antibodies were found in thirteen out of twenty-two patients (59 percent) with active disease, but in only four out of fifteen patients (27 percent) who had attained remission. Direct tests for platelet-associated IgG were positive in 36 and 44 percent of these patients respectively. In two cases IgM was observed on the patients' platelet membranes. C3 was not detedted on patients' platelets. Platelet-associated IgG was also found in several other disorders and its occurrence is not therefore diagnostic of ITP. In addition, serum platelet antibodies do not indicate specifically ITP as they may also be due to previous isoimmunization. Antibodies in the sera of patients with ITP generally did not fix Clq and in most cases bound to platelets only in the presence of EDTA. In contrast, isoantibodies often fixed Clq and they had equal affinity for platelets suspended in ACD or EDTA plasma. This was confirmed by quantitative data on IgG binding by platelets obtained by measuring 125-I-labelled protein A uptake. The simplicity of the IF technique permits its routine application and the technique may give useful information with respect to the nature of the antibodies. It must, however, be considered of limited value in the diagnosis of ITP. PMID:6991171

  2. How I treat refractory thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura

    PubMed Central

    Sayani, Farzana A.

    2015-01-01

    Acquired thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura (TTP) is characterized by thrombocytopenia and microangiopathic hemolytic anemia (MAHA) without an obvious cause, and may include fever, mild renal failure, and neurologic deficits. It is characterized by a deficiency of the von Willebrand factor (VWF) cleaving enzyme, ADAMTS13 (a disintegrin and metalloproteinase, with a thrombospondin type 1 motif, member 13), resulting in formation of microthrombi in the high sheer environment of the microvasculature. This causes microvascular occlusion, MAHA, and organ ischemia. Diagnosis is based on the presence of clinical symptoms, laboratory aberrations consistent with MAHA, decreased ADAMTS13 activity, and possibly presence of anti-ADAMTS13 autoantibodies. Upfront treatment of acute TTP includes plasma exchange and corticosteroids. A significant number of patients are refractory to this treatment and will require further interventions. There are limited data and consensus on the management of the refractory TTP patient. Management involves simultaneously ruling out other causes of thrombocytopenia and MAHA, while also considering other treatments. In this article, we describe our management of the patient with refractory TTP, and discuss use of rituximab, increased plasma exchange, splenectomy, and immunosuppressive options, including cyclophosphamide, vincristine, and cyclosporine. We also review recent evidence for the potential roles of bortezomib and N-acetylcysteine, and explore new therapeutic approaches, including recombinant ADAMTS13 and anti-VWF therapy. PMID:25784681

  3. Early evaluation of immune reconstitution following allogeneic CD3/CD19-depleted grafts from alternative donors in childhood acute leukemia.

    PubMed

    Pérez-Martínez, A; González-Vicent, M; Valentín, J; Aleo, E; Lassaletta, A; Sevilla, J; Vicario, J L; Ramírez, M; Díaz, M A

    2012-11-01

    Graft engineering procedures for hematopoietic SCT (HSCT) may improve the chance of success in matched unrelated donor (MUD) and haploidentical donor transplantations. Successful donor immune reconstitution is important to mediate GVL effects in reduced-intensity conditioning (RIC) HSCT. We prospectively investigated early immune reconstitution and clinical outcome in 30 CD3/CD19-depleted MUD (n=15) or HP (n=15) HSCTs for high-risk childhood leukemia using a fludarabine-based RIC without serotherapy. The graft consisted of a mean of 10.5 × 10(6)/kg CD34+, 77 × 10(3)/kg CD3+ and 39 × 10(6)/kg CD56+ cells. After transplantation, 86% of the patients engrafted. In all, 13% of patients had >grade 3 acute GVHD. Natural killer (NK) cell, DC and T-cell recovery achieved normal values within the first 60 days after transplantation. DC recovery was dominated by the DC2(-) subset. NK-cell phenotype was altered and cytotoxicity was lower compared with their donors. EFS was 50±9% (73±11% for those in CR1 and 26±11% for those with advanced disease). Faster DC2(-) recovery was associated with better outcome, especially in the MUD setting. In summary, CD3/CD19-depleted HSCT with fludarabine-based RIC without serotherapy resulted in favorable patient survival, and rapid NK, DC and T-cell recovery.

  4. Childhood infections, the developing immune system, and the origins of asthma.

    PubMed

    Openshaw, Peter J M; Yamaguchi, Yuko; Tregoning, John S

    2004-12-01

    Asthma is an immune-mediated inflammatory condition characterized by increased responsiveness to bronchoconstrictive stimuli. Viruses have been shown to play an important role in asthma, with viral infection being present during about 85% of exacerbations. However, the role they play in the onset of asthma is more controversial. Some respiratory viral infections might be protective, but there is a strong association between respiratory syncytial virus-induced bronchiolitis in infancy and recurrent wheeze up to 12 years of age. Both the respiratory tract and the immune system undergo rapid maturation during the first year of life, and it seems that postnatal development is affected by and affects responses to viral infections. Understanding postnatal developmental changes in the immune system might help to explain the origins and pathogenesis of asthma and thus the effectiveness or ineffectiveness of specific asthma therapies.

  5. Sense and the science of childhood immunization: can we achieve more with less?

    PubMed

    Obaro, Stephen K; Ota, Martin O

    2006-10-30

    The threat of biological terrorism with small pox virus and a global influenza pandemic in the face of limited vaccine supply recently stimulated research into the evaluation of fractional dose vaccine regimens, with promising immunogenicity results. While this approach is not new, it has been less applied to vaccines for less sensational but nevertheless, significant killer diseases. This manuscript provides an overview of the basics of immunization as it applies to the current practice of immunization in children, comments on the untapped avenues for cost reduction of vaccine delivery, and the potential for saving more lives with currently available resources.

  6. A mathematical study of a model for childhood diseases with non-permanent immunity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moghadas, S. M.; Gumel, A. B.

    2003-08-01

    Protecting children from diseases that can be prevented by vaccination is a primary goal of health administrators. Since vaccination is considered to be the most effective strategy against childhood diseases, the development of a framework that would predict the optimal vaccine coverage level needed to prevent the spread of these diseases is crucial. This paper provides this framework via qualitative and quantitative analysis of a deterministic mathematical model for the transmission dynamics of a childhood disease in the presence of a preventive vaccine that may wane over time. Using global stability analysis of the model, based on constructing a Lyapunov function, it is shown that the disease can be eradicated from the population if the vaccination coverage level exceeds a certain threshold value. It is also shown that the disease will persist within the population if the coverage level is below this threshold. These results are verified numerically by constructing, and then simulating, a robust semi-explicit second-order finite-difference method.

  7. Combination vaccines for childhood immunization. Recommendations of the Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices (ACIP), the American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP), and the American Academy of Family Physicians (AAFP)

    PubMed

    1999-05-01

    An increasing number of new and improved vaccines to prevent childhood diseases are being introduced. Combination vaccines represent one solution to the problem of increased numbers of injections during single clinic visits. This statement provides general guidance on the use of combination vaccines and related issues and questions. To minimize the number of injections children receive, parenteral combination vaccines should be used, if licensed and indicated for the patient's age, instead of their equivalent component vaccines. Hepatitis A, hepatitis B, and Haemophilus influenzae type b vaccines, in either monovalent or combination formulations from the same or different manufacturers, are interchangeable for sequential doses in the vaccination series. However, using acellular pertussis vaccine product(s) from the same manufacturer is preferable for at least the first three doses, until studies demonstrate the interchangeability of these vaccines. Immunization providers should stock sufficient types of combination and monovalent vaccines needed to vaccinate children against all diseases for which vaccines are recommended, but they need not stock all available types or brand-name products. When patients have already received the recommended vaccinations for some of the components in a combination vaccine, administering the extra antigen(s) in the combination is often permissible if doing so will reduce the number of injections required. To overcome recording errors and ambiguities in the names of vaccine combinations, improved systems are needed to enhance the convenience and accuracy of transferring vaccine-identifying information into medical records and immunization registries. Further scientific and programmatic research is needed on specific questions related to the use of combination vaccines.

  8. Changes in Childhood Diarrhea Incidence in Nicaragua Following 3 Years of Universal Infant Rotavirus Immunization

    PubMed Central

    Becker-Dreps, Sylvia; Paniagua, Margarita; Dominik, Rosalie; Cao, Hongyuan; Shah, Naman K.; Morgan, Douglas R.; Moreno, Gilberto; Espinoza, Félix

    2011-01-01

    Background While the pentavalent rotavirus vaccine was highly efficacious against rotavirus diarrhea in clinical trials, the vaccine’s effectiveness under field conditions in the developing world is unclear. In October, 2006, Nicaragua became the first developing nation to implement universal infant immunization with the pentavalent rotavirus vaccine. To assess the impact of the immunization program, we examined the incidence of diarrhea episodes between 2003 and 2009 among children in the state of León, Nicaragua. Methods We extracted data on diarrhea episodes from health ministry records. We used scaled Poisson regression models to estimate diarrhea incidence rate ratios (IRR) for the period following the program’s implementation to the period before implementation. Results Following implementation of the immunization program, diarrhea episodes among infants were reduced (IRR 0.85, 95% confidence interval [CI] 0.71–1.02) during the rotavirus season, but appear to have increased during other months. Conclusions While the immunization program appears effective in reducing diarrhea episodes during the rotavirus season, a large burden of diarrhea persists during the remainder of the year. PMID:20881511

  9. Using Human Factors Techniques to Design Text Message Reminders for Childhood Immunization

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ahlers-Schmidt, Carolyn R.; Hart, Traci; Chesser, Amy; Williams, Katherine S.; Yaghmai, Beryl; Shah-Haque, Sapna; Wittler, Robert R.

    2012-01-01

    This study engaged parents to develop concise, informative, and comprehensible text messages for an immunization reminder system using Human Factors techniques. Fifty parents completed a structured interview including demographics, technology questions, willingness to receive texts from their child's doctor, and health literacy. Each participant…

  10. An exploratory qualitative assessment of factors influencing childhood vaccine providers' intention to recommend immunization in the Netherlands

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Under the Dutch national immunization program (NIP), childhood vaccination is not mandatory, but its recommendation by childhood vaccine providers (CVP) is important for maintaining high vaccination coverage. We therefore examined factors related to providers' intentions to recommend vaccinations to parents of young children. Methods We conducted four focus group discussions with nurses and physicians who provide vaccines to children 0-4 years old in diverse regions of the Netherlands. Three groups represented CVPs at child welfare centers (CWCs) serving the general population, with the fourth representing anthroposophical CWCs. Elements of the Theory of Planned Behaviour (TPB) were used to design the groups; thematic analysis was used to structure and analyze the dataset. Results Four main themes emerged, including 1) perceived responsibility: to promote vaccines and discuss pros and cons with parents (although this was usually not done if parents readily accepted the vaccination); 2) attitudes toward the NIP: mainly positive, but doubts as to NIP plans to vaccinate against diseases with a low perceived burden; 3) organizational factors: limited time and information can hamper discussions with parents; 4) relationship with parents: crucial and based mainly on communication to establish trust. Compared to CVPs at standard CWCs, the anthroposophical CWCs spent more time communicating and were more willing to adapt the NIP to individual cases. Conclusions Our qualitative assessment provides an overview of beliefs associated with providers' intention to recommend vaccinations. They were motivated to support the NIP, but their intentions to recommend vaccinations were affected by the perceived relevance of the vaccines, practical issues like limited time and by certain types of resistant parents. These results will inform future studies to test the magnitude and relative impact of these factors. PMID:22333837

  11. Using human factors techniques to design text message reminders for childhood immunization.

    PubMed

    Ahlers-Schmidt, Carolyn R; Hart, Traci; Chesser, Amy; Williams, Katherine S; Yaghmai, Beryl; Shah-Haque, Sapna; Wittler, Robert R

    2012-10-01

    This study engaged parents to develop concise, informative, and comprehensible text messages for an immunization reminder system using Human Factors techniques. Fifty parents completed a structured interview including demographics, technology questions, willingness to receive texts from their child's doctor, and health literacy. Each participant was assigned to one user-centered design test: card sort, needs analysis, or comprehension. The majority of respondents were female (90%), White non-Hispanic (62%), and averaged 29 years (SD = 5). Nearly all (96%) had "adequate" health literacy. The card sort, an activity in which end users organize information into categories, identified six pieces of critical information. These were compiled into eight example texts, which were ranked in the needs assessment. The top two were assessed for comprehension, with 100% of participants able to understand the content and describe intention to act. Using user-centered design methods, the authors developed concise, informative text messages that parents indicated would prompt them to schedule their child's immunization appointment.

  12. Risk of transmission of hepatitis B virus through childhood immunization in northwestern China.

    PubMed

    Murakami, Hitoshi; Kobayashi, Makoto; Zhu, Xu; Li, Yixing; Wakai, Susumu; Chiba, Yasuo

    2003-11-01

    Transmission of bloodborne pathogens by means of unsafe injection practices is a significant public health problem in developing countries. Although the overall proportion for immunization is low among injections, unsafe immunization practices affect mostly infants, a population with an increased likelihood of becoming hepatitis B virus carriers. This study estimated the prevalence of unsafe injection among vaccinators working at the peripheral level in northwestern China and the risk of HBV infections among infant vaccinees, and analyzed factors contributing to the most prevalent unsafe practice: the reuse of a non-sterilized reusable syringe among infants. A knowledge-attitude-practice survey was conducted in which 180 peripheral vaccinators selected by multi-stage cluster sampling in each of four provinces and one autonomous region completed a self-administered questionnaire. The lack of observational data for assessing the validity of the self-reported practices made the study prone to systematic respondent bias that may have skewed the results towards underestimation of unsafe practices. The minimum estimate of the percentage of peripheral vaccinators reusing a syringe and/or needle without sterilization between infants was 7.2-55.0%, whereas the percentage of those disposing of used disposable syringes and needles inappropriately was 8.9-23.3% by province. According to a model-based estimate, the annual number of HBV infections among 100,000 fully immunized children due to unsafe immunization injection was at least 135-3120. An insufficient supply of syringes and the attitude to justify reuse were significantly associated with the unsafe reuse of a reusable syringe in most part of the area studied. Introduction of auto-disable syringes may contribute to curb the unsafe practices, but the development of safe collection and disposal procedures for used syringes and needles is prerequisite. Sufficient supply of equipment as well as training, supervision, and

  13. Return On Investment From Childhood Immunization In Low- And Middle-Income Countries, 2011-20.

    PubMed

    Ozawa, Sachiko; Clark, Samantha; Portnoy, Allison; Grewal, Simrun; Brenzel, Logan; Walker, Damian G

    2016-02-01

    An analysis of return on investment can help policy makers support, optimize, and advocate for the expansion of immunization programs in the world's poorest countries. We assessed the return on investment associated with achieving projected coverage levels for vaccinations to prevent diseases related to ten antigens in ninety-four low- and middle-income countries during 2011-20, the Decade of Vaccines. We derived these estimates by using costs of vaccines, supply chains, and service delivery and their associated economic benefits. Based on the costs of illnesses averted, we estimated that projected immunizations will yield a net return about 16 times greater than costs over the decade (uncertainty range: 10-25). Using a full-income approach, which quantifies the value that people place on living longer and healthier lives, we found that net returns amounted to 44 times the costs (uncertainty range: 27-67). Across all antigens, net returns were greater than costs. But to realize the substantial positive return on investment from immunization programs, it is essential that governments and donors provide the requisite investments.

  14. The Role of Genetic and Immune Factors for the Pathogenesis of Primary Sclerosing Cholangitis in Childhood

    PubMed Central

    Campos Silva, Soraya Luiza; Marques de Miranda, Débora; Ferreira, Alexandre Rodrigues

    2016-01-01

    Primary sclerosing cholangitis (PSC) is a rare cholestatic liver disease characterized by chronic inflammation of the biliary tree resulting in liver fibrosis. PSC is more common in male less than 40 years of age. The diagnosis of PSC is based on clinical, laboratory, image, and histological findings. A biochemical profile of mild to severe chronic cholestasis can be observed. Endoscopic retrograde cholangiography is the golden standard method for diagnosis, but magnetic resonance cholangiography is currently also considered a first-line method of investigation. Differences in clinical and laboratory findings were observed in young patients, including higher incidence of overlap syndromes, mostly with autoimmune hepatitis, higher serum levels of aminotransferases and gamma-glutamyl transferase, and lower incidence of serious complications as cholangiocarcinoma. In spite of the detection of several HLA variants as associated factors in large multicenter cohorts of adult patients, the exact role and pathways of these susceptibility genes remain to be determined in pediatric population. In addition, the literature supports a role for an altered immune response to pathogens in the pathogenesis of PSC. This phenomenon contributes to abnormal immune system activation and perpetuation of the inflammatory process. In this article, we review the role of immune and genetic factors in the pathogenesis of PSC in pediatric patients. PMID:27882046

  15. Noncontaminated Dietary Oats May Hamper Normalization of the Intestinal Immune Status in Childhood Celiac Disease

    PubMed Central

    Sjöberg, Veronika; Hollén, Elisabet; Pietz, Grzegorz; Magnusson, Karl-Eric; Fälth-Magnusson, Karin; Sundström, Mia; Holmgren Peterson, Kajsa; Sandström, Olof; Hernell, Olle; Hammarström, Sten; Högberg, Lotta; Hammarström, Marie-Louise

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: Life-long, strict gluten-free diet (GFD) is the only treatment for celiac disease (CD). Because there is still uncertainty regarding the safety of oats for CD patients, the aim was to investigate whether dietary oats influence the immune status of their intestinal mucosa. METHODS: Paired small intestinal biopsies, before and after >11 months on a GFD, were collected from children with CD who were enrolled in a randomized, double-blind intervention trial to either of two diets: standard GFD (GFD-std; n=13) and noncontaminated oat-containing GFD (GFD-oats; n=15). Expression levels of mRNAs for 22 different immune effector molecules and tight junction proteins were determined by quantitative reverse transcriptase (RT)-PCR. RESULTS: The number of mRNAs that remained elevated was higher in the GFD-oats group (P=0.05). In particular, mRNAs for the regulatory T cell (Treg) signature molecules interleukin-10 (IL-10) and transforming growth factor-β1 (TGF-β1), the cytotoxicity-activating natural killer (NK) receptors KLRC2/NKG2C and KLRC3/NKG2E, and the tight junction protein claudin-4 remained elevated. Between the two groups, most significant differences were seen for claudin-4 (P=0.003) and KLRC3/NKG2E (P=0.04). CONCLUSIONS: A substantial fraction of pediatric CD patients seem to not tolerate oats. In these patients, dietary oats influence the immune status of the intestinal mucosa with an mRNA profile suggesting presence of activated cytotoxic lymphocytes and Tregs and a stressed epithelium with affected tight junctions. Assessment of changes in levels of mRNA for claudin-4 and KLC3/NKG2E from onset to after a year on oats containing GFD shows promise to identify these CD patients. PMID:24964993

  16. Immunizations

    MedlinePlus

    ... Get Weight Loss Surgery? A Week of Healthy Breakfasts Shyness Immunizations KidsHealth > For Teens > Immunizations Print A A A What's in this article? Why Are Vaccinations Important? Why Do I Need Shots? Which Vaccinations Do ...

  17. Autoimmune hepatitis in childhood: the role of genetic and immune factors.

    PubMed

    Ferri Liu, Priscila Menezes; de Miranda, Débora Marques; Fagundes, Eleonora Druve Tavares; Ferreira, Alexandre Rodrigues; Simões e Silva, Ana Cristina

    2013-07-28

    Autoimmune hepatitis (AIH) is a rare chronic inflammatory disease of the liver, which affects a group of patients who lost their immunological tolerance to antigens of the liver. It is clinically characterized by hypergammaglobulinemia, elevated liver enzymes, presence of autoantibodies and histological changes. Although being rare in children, it represents a serious cause of chronic hepatic disease that can lead to cirrhosis and hepatic failure. Clinical findings, exclusion of more common liver disorders and the detection of antibodies antinuclear antibodies, smooth muscle antibodies and anti-LKM1 are usually enough for diagnosis on clinical practice. The pathogenic mechanisms that lead to AIH remain obscure, but some research findings suggest the participation of immunologic and genetic factors. It is not yet knew the triggering factor or factors that stimulate inflammatory response. Several mechanisms proposed partially explain the immunologic findings of AIH. The knowledge of immune factors evolved might result in better markers of prognosis and response to treatment. In this review, we aim to evaluate the findings of research about genetic and immune markers and their perspectives of application in clinical practice especially in pediatric population.

  18. The influence of maternal prenatal and early childhood nutrition and maternal prenatal stress on offspring immune system development and neurodevelopmental disorders

    PubMed Central

    Marques, Andrea Horvath; O'Connor, Thomas G.; Roth, Christine; Susser, Ezra; Bjørke-Monsen, Anne-Lise

    2013-01-01

    The developing immune system and central nervous system in the fetus and child are extremely sensitive to both exogenous and endogenous signals. Early immune system programming, leading to changes that can persist over the life course, has been suggested, and other evidence suggests that immune dysregulation in the early developing brain may play a role in neurodevelopmental disorders such as autism spectrum disorder and schizophrenia. The timing of immune dysregulation with respect to gestational age and neurologic development of the fetus may shape the elicited response. This creates a possible sensitive window of programming or vulnerability. This review will explore the effects of maternal prenatal and infant nutritional status (from conception until early childhood) as well as maternal prenatal stress and anxiety on early programming of immune function, and how this might influence neurodevelopment. We will describe fetal immune system development and maternal-fetal immune interactions to provide a better context for understanding the influence of nutrition and stress on the immune system. Finally, we will discuss the implications for prevention of neurodevelopmental disorders, with a focus on nutrition. Although certain micronutrient supplements have shown to both reduce the risk of neurodevelopmental disorders and enhance fetal immune development, we do not know whether their impact on immune development contributes to the preventive effect on neurodevelopmental disorders. Future studies are needed to elucidate this relationship, which may contribute to a better understanding of preventative mechanisms. Integrating studies of neurodevelopmental disorders and prenatal exposures with the simultaneous evaluation of neural and immune systems will shed light on mechanisms that underlie individual vulnerability or resilience to neurodevelopmental disorders and ultimately contribute to the development of primary preventions and early interventions. PMID:23914151

  19. The influence of maternal prenatal and early childhood nutrition and maternal prenatal stress on offspring immune system development and neurodevelopmental disorders.

    PubMed

    Marques, Andrea Horvath; O'Connor, Thomas G; Roth, Christine; Susser, Ezra; Bjørke-Monsen, Anne-Lise

    2013-01-01

    The developing immune system and central nervous system in the fetus and child are extremely sensitive to both exogenous and endogenous signals. Early immune system programming, leading to changes that can persist over the life course, has been suggested, and other evidence suggests that immune dysregulation in the early developing brain may play a role in neurodevelopmental disorders such as autism spectrum disorder and schizophrenia. The timing of immune dysregulation with respect to gestational age and neurologic development of the fetus may shape the elicited response. This creates a possible sensitive window of programming or vulnerability. This review will explore the effects of maternal prenatal and infant nutritional status (from conception until early childhood) as well as maternal prenatal stress and anxiety on early programming of immune function, and how this might influence neurodevelopment. We will describe fetal immune system development and maternal-fetal immune interactions to provide a better context for understanding the influence of nutrition and stress on the immune system. Finally, we will discuss the implications for prevention of neurodevelopmental disorders, with a focus on nutrition. Although certain micronutrient supplements have shown to both reduce the risk of neurodevelopmental disorders and enhance fetal immune development, we do not know whether their impact on immune development contributes to the preventive effect on neurodevelopmental disorders. Future studies are needed to elucidate this relationship, which may contribute to a better understanding of preventative mechanisms. Integrating studies of neurodevelopmental disorders and prenatal exposures with the simultaneous evaluation of neural and immune systems will shed light on mechanisms that underlie individual vulnerability or resilience to neurodevelopmental disorders and ultimately contribute to the development of primary preventions and early interventions.

  20. Hygiene and other early childhood influences on the subsequent function of the immune system.

    PubMed

    Rook, Graham A W

    2011-01-01

    The current 'Darwinian' synthesis of the hygiene (or 'Old Friends') hypothesis suggests that the increase in chronic inflammatory disorders that started in Europe in the mid-19th century and progressed until the late 20th century is at least partly attributable to immunodysregulation resulting from lack of exposure to microorganisms that were tasked by co-evolutionary processes with establishing the 'normal' background levels of immunoregulation, a role that they perform in concert with the normal microbiota. This is an example of 'evolved dependence'. The relevant organisms co-evolved with mammals, already accompanied early hominids in the Paleolithic era and are associated with animals, mud and faeces. These organisms often establish stable carrier states, or are encountered continuously in primitive environments as 'pseudocommensals' from mud and water. These organisms were not lost during the first epidemiological transition, which might even have resulted in increased exposure to them. However, the crucial organisms are lost progressively as populations undergo the second epidemiological transition (modern urban environment). Recently evolved sporadic 'childhood infections' are not likely to have evolved immunoregulatory roles, and epidemiology supports this contention. The consequences of the loss of the Old Friends and distortion of the microbiota are aggravated by other modern environmental changes that also lead to enhanced inflammatory responses (obesity, vitamin D deficiency, pollution (dioxins), etc.). The range of chronic inflammatory disorders affected may be larger than had been assumed (allergies, autoimmunity, inflammatory bowel disease, but also coeliac disease, food allergy, vascular disease, some cancers, and depression/anxiety when accompanied by raised inflammatory cytokines).

  1. When, and how, should we introduce a combination measles-mumps-rubella (MMR) vaccine into the national childhood expanded immunization programme in South Africa?

    PubMed

    Cameron, Neil A

    2012-09-07

    This article briefly reviews the history and epidemiology of measles, mumps and rubella disease and the case for introducing combination measles-mumps-rubella (MMR) vaccine into the national childhood immunization schedule in South Africa. Despite adopting the World Health Organization's Measles Elimination strategy in 1996 and achieving a significant decrease the incidence of measles, added effort is needed in South and southern Africa to reach the goal to eliminate endogenous spread measles. Mumps is still common disease of childhood and while there are few sequelae, even the rare complications are important in large populations. Congenital rubella syndrome is seldom reported, but it is estimated that of the million or so children born every year in South Africa over 600 infants are affected to some degree by rubella infection. The naturally acquired immunity to rubella in women of childbearing age in South Africa has been estimated at over 90%, so that introducing a rubella containing vaccine in childhood may paradoxically increase the proportion of girls reaching puberty still susceptible to rubella. The elimination of endogenous measles and rubella is being achieved in many countries in South America, and despite the recent measles epidemic, must still be seriously considered for South and southern Africa. Current constraints and potential steps needed to reach the goal in South Africa are discussed.

  2. Evaluation of the immature platelet fraction in the diagnosis and prognosis of childhood immune thrombocytopenia.

    PubMed

    Adly, Amira Abdel Moneam; Ragab, Iman Ahmed; Ismail, Eman Abdel Rahman; Farahat, Mona Mohammed

    2015-01-01

    Rapid assessment of platelet production would distinguish between thrombocytopenia due to decreased platelet production or increased peripheral platelet destruction. We evaluated the value of immature platelet fraction (IPF) in differentiating immune thrombocytopenia (ITP) from thrombocytopenia secondary to bone marrow failure and its potential use as a prognostic marker. Forty-one young patients with ITP were compared with 14 patients with hematological malignancies under chemotherapy, representing a control group with thrombocytopenia due to bone marrow suppression and 30 age- and sex-matched healthy controls. Patients were studied stressing on bleeding manifestations, organomegaly/lymphadenopathy and therapy. Complete blood count including IPF was performed using Sysmex XE-2100. ITP patients were classified into two subgroups: acute ITP with spontaneous resolution within 3 months from diagnosis and chronic ITP that lasted ≥ 1 year from diagnosis. Median IPF was 11.8% in patients with ITP, 7% in those with hematological malignancy and 3% in the control group (p < 0.001). ITP patients had significantly higher mean platelet volume (MPV), platelet distribution width (PDW), platelet large cell ratio (P-LCR) and IPF compared with patients with malignancy or healthy controls, while plateletcrit (PCT) was significantly lower in ITP patients than other groups (p < 0.001). IPF was increased in patients with chronic ITP compared with acute ITP group (p < 0.001). Patients with active ITP had the highest IPF followed by those in partial remission, while ITP patients in remission had the lowest IPF. IPF was positively correlated to the number of lines of treatment used, MPV, PDW and P-LCR, while negatively correlated to platelet count and PCT among ITP patients (p < 0.001). Multiple regression analysis showed that platelet count and P-LCR were independently related to IPF. ROC curve analysis revealed that the cut-off value of IPF at 9.4% could be diagnostic for ITP patients

  3. Multivessel Coronary Thrombosis in a Patient with Idiopathic Thrombocytopenic Purpura

    PubMed Central

    Yagmur, Julide; Cansel, Mehmet; Acikgoz, Nusret; Yagmur, Murat; Eyupkoca, Ferhat; Ermis, Necip; Akturk, Erdal

    2012-01-01

    A 49-year-old woman who had idiopathic thrombocytopenic purpura was admitted to our hospital with severe chest pain. Electrocardiography revealed inferolateral myocardial infarction. The patient underwent immediate coronary angiography, which revealed thrombi in the left coronary system. Percutaneous intervention was not indicated, because the thrombi had occluded the distal segments of multiple coronary arteries. Administration of tirofiban satisfactorily dissolved the thrombi. PMID:23304046

  4. Endoscopy in neutropenic and/or thrombocytopenic patients

    PubMed Central

    Tong, Michelle C; Tadros, Micheal; Vaziri, Haleh

    2015-01-01

    AIM: To evaluate the safety of endoscopic procedures in neutropenic and/or thrombocytopenic cancer patients. METHODS: We performed a literature search for English language studies in which patients with neutropenia and/or thrombocytopenia underwent endoscopy. Studies were included if endoscopic procedures were used as part of the evaluation of neutropenic and/or thrombocytopenic patients, yielding 13 studies. Two studies in which endoscopy was not a primary evaluation tool were excluded. Eleven relevant studies were identified by two independent reviewers on PubMed, Scopus, and Ovid databases. RESULTS: Most of the studies had high diagnostic yield with relatively low complication rates. Therapeutic endoscopic interventions were performed in more than half the studies, including high-risk procedures, such as sclerotherapy. Platelet transfusion was given if counts were less than 50000/mm3 in four studies and less than 10000/mm3 in one study. Other thrombocytopenic precautions included withholding of biopsy if platelet count was less than 30000/mm3 in one study and less than 20000/mm3 in another study. Two of the ten studies which examined thrombocytopenic patient populations reported bleeding complications related to endoscopy, none of which caused major morbidity or mortality. All febrile neutropenic patients received prophylactic broad-spectrum antibiotics in the studies reviewed. Regarding afebrile neutropenic patients, prophylactic antibiotics were given if absolute neutrophil count was less than 1000/mm3 in one study, if the patient was undergoing colonoscopy and had a high inflammatory condition without clear definition of significance in another study, and if the patient was in an aplastic phase in a third study. Endoscopy was also withheld in one study for severe pancytopenia. CONCLUSION: Endoscopy can be safely performed in patients with thrombocytopenia/neutropenia. Prophylactic platelet transfusion and/or antibiotic administration prior to endoscopy may be

  5. Immunization

    MedlinePlus

    ... remembers" the germ and can fight it again. Vaccines contain germs that have been killed or weakened. When given to a healthy person, the vaccine triggers the immune system to respond and thus ...

  6. Immunization.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Guerin, Nicole; And Others

    1986-01-01

    Contents of this double journal issue concern immunization and primary health care of children. The issue decribes vaccine storage and sterilization techniques, giving particular emphasis to the role of the cold chain, i.e., the maintenance of a specific temperature range to assure potency of vaccines as they are moved from a national storage…

  7. The TGF-β/SMAD pathway is an important mechanism for NK cell immune evasion in childhood B-acute lymphoblastic leukemia.

    PubMed

    Rouce, R H; Shaim, H; Sekine, T; Weber, G; Ballard, B; Ku, S; Barese, C; Murali, V; Wu, M-F; Liu, H; Shpall, E J; Bollard, C M; Rabin, K R; Rezvani, K

    2016-04-01

    Natural killer (NK) cells are key components of the innate immune system, providing potent antitumor immunity. Here, we show that the tumor growth factor-β (TGF-β)/SMAD signaling pathway is an important mechanism for NK cell immune evasion in childhood B-acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL). We characterized NK cells in 50 consecutive children with B-ALL at diagnosis, end induction and during maintenance therapy compared with age-matched controls. ALL-NK cells at diagnosis had an inhibitory phenotype associated with impaired function, most notably interferon-γ production and cytotoxicity. By maintenance therapy, these phenotypic and functional abnormalities partially normalized; however, cytotoxicity against autologous blasts remained impaired. We identified ALL-derived TGF-β1 to be an important mediator of leukemia-induced NK cell dysfunction. The TGF-β/SMAD signaling pathway was constitutively activated in ALL-NK cells at diagnosis and end induction when compared with healthy controls and patients during maintenance therapy. Culture of ALL blasts with healthy NK cells induced NK dysfunction and an inhibitory phenotype, mediated by activation of the TGF-β/SMAD signaling pathway, and abrogated by blocking TGF-β. These data indicate that by regulating the TGF-β/SMAD pathway, ALL blasts induce changes in NK cells to evade innate immune surveillance, thus highlighting the importance of developing novel therapies to target this inhibitory pathway and restore antileukemic cytotoxicity.

  8. Helicobacter pylori-associated idiopathic thrombocytopenic purpura: a narrative review.

    PubMed

    Franchini, Massimo; Vescovi, Pier Paolo; Garofano, Massimo; Veneri, Dino

    2012-07-01

    The Gram-negative bacterium Helicobacter pylori has a well-demonstrated role in several gastroduodenal diseases, including peptic ulcer disease, chronic active gastritis, mucosa-associated lymphoid tissue lymphoma, and gastric adenocarcinoma. In addition, more recently, several studies have focused on the possible causal role of H. pylori in various extragastric disorders, such as cardiovascular, respiratory, neurological, skin, and autoimmune conditions. The current status of the research on the pathogenesis, clinical and therapeutic aspects of H. pylori-associated idiopathic thrombocytopenic purpura in adults and children will be addressed in this narrative review.

  9. Immunodeficiency-associated thrombocytopenic purpura (IDTP). Response to splenectomy.

    PubMed

    Schneider, P A; Abrams, D I; Rayner, A A; Hohn, D C

    1987-10-01

    Immunodeficiency-associated thrombocytopenic purpura (IDTP) is a feature of the acquired immunodeficiency syndrome--related complex. Current therapeutic modalities for IDTP include splenectomy and the administration of corticosteroids or other agents. Empiric treatment of IDTP has been analogous to that for immunologic thrombocytopenic purpura (ITP). The present report reviews 15 patients who underwent splenectomy for IDTP, demonstrates the successful use of surgical therapy, and defines our indications for splenectomy in the treatment of this disorder. Thirteen of 15 patients had initially failed to respond to steroid therapy. Fourteen patients (93%) initially responded to splenectomy, with platelet counts increasing to 150 X 10(9)/L (150,000/mm3) or greater. A continuing complete response was achieved in nine patients (60%) following splenectomy. After postsurgical adjunctive therapy, durable remission was achieved in 73% (11/15) of the patients. Complications occurred in three patients, and there were no deaths. The mean follow-up was 12.4 months. Splenectomy may be performed in the treatment of IDTP with acceptable morbidity and likelihood of response.

  10. ADAMTS13 and anti-ADAMTS13 autoantibodies in thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura - current perspectives and new treatment strategies.

    PubMed

    Tersteeg, Claudia; Verhenne, Sebastien; Roose, Elien; Schelpe, An-Sofie; Deckmyn, Hans; De Meyer, Simon F; Vanhoorelbeke, Karen

    2016-01-01

    A deficiency in ADAMTS13 (A Disintegrin And Metalloprotease with ThromboSpondin type-1 repeats, member 13) is associated with thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura (TTP). Congenital TTP is caused by a defect in the ADAMTS13 gene resulting in decreased or absent enzyme activity; acquired TTP results from autoantibodies that either inhibit the activity or increase the clearance of ADAMTS13. Despite major progress in recent years in our understanding of the disease, many aspects around the pathophysiology of TTP are still unclear. Newer studies expanded the TTP field from ADAMTS13 and inhibitory antibodies to immune complexes, cloned autoantibodies, and a possible involvement of other proteases. Additionally, several new treatment strategies supplementing plasma-exchange and infusion are under investigation for a better and more specific treatment of TTP patients. In this review, we discuss the recent insights in TTP pathophysiology and describe upcoming therapeutic opportunities.

  11. Life-Threatening Autoimmune Hemolytic Anemia and Idhiopatic Thrombocytopenic Purpura. Successful Selective Splenic Artery Embolization

    PubMed Central

    Molica, Matteo; Massaro, Fulvio; Annechini, Giorgia; Baldacci, Erminia; D’Elia, Gianna Maria; Rosati, Riccardo; Trisolini, Silvia Maria; Volpicelli, Paola; Foà, Robin; Capria, Saveria

    2016-01-01

    Selective splenic artery embolization (SSAE) is a nonsurgical intervention characterized by the transcatheter occlusion of the splenic artery and/or its branch vessels using metallic coils or other embolic devices. It has been applied for the management of splenic trauma, hypersplenism with portal hypertension, hereditary spherocytosis, thalassemia and splenic hemangioma. We hereby describe a case of a patient affected by idiopathic thrombocytopenic purpura (ITP) and warm auto-immune hemolytic anemia (AIHA) both resistant to immunosuppressive and biological therapies, not eligible for a surgical intervention because of her critical conditions. She underwent SSAE and achieved a hematologic complete response within a few days without complications. SSAE is a minimally invasive procedure to date not considered a standard option in the management of AIHA and ITP. However, following the progressive improvement of the techniques, its indications have been extended, with a reduction in morbidity and mortality compared to splenectomy in patients with critical clinical conditions. SSAE was a lifesaving therapeutic approach for our patient and it may represent a real alternative for the treatment of resistant AIHA and ITP patients not eligible for splenectomy. PMID:27158433

  12. Consensus on the standardization of terminology in thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura and related thrombotic microangiopathies.

    PubMed

    Scully, M; Cataland, S; Coppo, P; de la Rubia, J; Friedman, K D; Kremer Hovinga, J; Lämmle, B; Matsumoto, M; Pavenski, K; Sadler, E; Sarode, R; Wu, H

    2017-02-01

    Essentials An international collaboration provides a consensus for clinical definitions. This concerns thrombotic microangiopathies and thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura (TTP). The consensus defines diagnosis, disease monitoring and response to treatment. Requirements for ADAMTS-13 are given.

  13. DNMT3B 579G>T promoter polymorphism and the risk for idiopathic thrombocytopenic purpura in a Chinese population.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Haifeng; Du, Weiting; Gu, Dongsheng; Wang, Donghai; Xue, Feng; Ge, Jing; Sui, Tao; Yang, Renchi

    2009-01-01

    Epigenetics may influence the expression of numerous genes, which might contribute to autoimmune diseases. DNA methylation is mediated by DNA methyltransferases, especially DNA methyltransferase 3B (DNMT3B). Polymorphisms of the DNMT3B gene may influence DNMT3B activity on DNA methylation and increase the susceptibility to several diseases. The current study investigated the association between DNMT3B 579G>T and the risk for idiopathic thrombocytopenic purpura (ITP). The DNMT3B 579G>T polymorphisms were analyzed by PCR-RFLP. There was no significant difference in genotype and allele distribution between the ITP patient and the controls (p = 0.722 and 0.667, respectively). Similar results were observed between the 2 groups when stratified by age and disease course, including acute in childhood, chronic in childhood, acute in adult and chronic in adult. Importantly, this study showed a statistical difference in the distribution of SNP of DNMT3B between Chinese and Koreans or Americans. It is shown that the SNP of DNMT3B 579G>T may not be used on its own as a marker to predict the susceptibility to ITP in a Chinese population and that DNMT3B 579G>T promoter SNP varies from one ethnic population to another.

  14. Thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura: three peripartum cases and diagnostic challenges.

    PubMed

    Ab Rahman, Wan Suriana Wan; Abdullah, Wan Zaidah; Mustaffa, Rapiaah; Ahmed, Suhair Abbas; Hassan, Mohd Nazri; Husin, Azlan

    2013-01-01

    Thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura (TTP) is a medical emergency characterized by occlusive microangiopathy due to intravascular platelet aggregation. This event results in damage to the red blood cells (RBCs) known as microangiopathic hemolytic anemia (MAHA). Schistocytes are circulating fragments of damaged RBCs that have different morphological features including keratocytes, helmet cells, and spherocytes. It is critical to report even a small number of these abnormal RBCs in the peripheral blood and to be alert for the possible diagnosis of TTP, especially in unexplained anemia and thrombocytopenia. The application of pentad criteria in the diagnosis has been reviewed, and the challenges still remained on the hematologic evidence of this disorder. In the 3 cases discussed here, the red cell morphological diagnosis gave an impact on TTP diagnosis, but overdiagnosis might be encountered in obstetrical patients due to nonspecific diagnostic criteria.

  15. Thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura: a syndrome of intravascular platelet consumption.

    PubMed Central

    Neame, P. B.; Hirsh, J.; Browman, G.; Denburg, J.; D'Souza, T. J.; Gallus, A.; Brain, M. C.

    1976-01-01

    In four of five patients with thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura (TTP) in whom serial tests of hemostatic function were performed, severe thrombocytopenia, normal plasma fibrinogen concentrations and mildly increased concentrations of fibrinogen/fibrin degradation products were observed. Widespread platelet thrombi were found in arterioles and capillaries. Fibrin could be seen around some of the platelet clumps and was the main component in a small number of the thrombi in two patients. The observations show that TTP is a disorder in which intravascular platelet consumption results in disseminated platelet thrombosis. The coagulation system is apparently activated secondarily to platelet aggregation and variable quantities of fibrin are incorporated into the thrombi. Clinical improvement resulted from combined therapy with corticosteroids, heparin and drugs that suppress platelet function. Images FIG. 3 FIG. 4 FIG. 5 FIG. 6 PMID:1084215

  16. Thrombotic Thrombocytopenic Purpura: Three Peripartum Cases and Diagnostic Challenges

    PubMed Central

    Ab Rahman, Wan Suriana Wan; Abdullah, Wan Zaidah; Mustaffa, Rapiaah; Ahmed, Suhair Abbas; Hassan, Mohd Nazri; Husin, Azlan

    2013-01-01

    Thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura (TTP) is a medical emergency characterized by occlusive microangiopathy due to intravascular platelet aggregation. This event results in damage to the red blood cells (RBCs) known as microangiopathic hemolytic anemia (MAHA). Schistocytes are circulating fragments of damaged RBCs that have different morphological features including keratocytes, helmet cells, and spherocytes. It is critical to report even a small number of these abnormal RBCs in the peripheral blood and to be alert for the possible diagnosis of TTP, especially in unexplained anemia and thrombocytopenia. The application of pentad criteria in the diagnosis has been reviewed, and the challenges still remained on the hematologic evidence of this disorder. In the 3 cases discussed here, the red cell morphological diagnosis gave an impact on TTP diagnosis, but overdiagnosis might be encountered in obstetrical patients due to nonspecific diagnostic criteria. PMID:24093001

  17. Thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura: diagnosis, pathogenesis and modern therapy.

    PubMed

    Eldor, A

    1998-06-01

    Thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura (TTP) is an uncommon multisystem disorder, sometimes associated with predisposing conditions such as pregnancy, cancer, exposure to certain drugs, bone marrow transplantation and HIV-1 infection. An abnormal interaction between the vascular endothelium and platelets which occurs in certain organs leads to thrombosis, endothelial proliferation, minimal inflammation and micro-angiopathic haemolysis. Recent studies suggest that endothelial cell perturbation and apoptosis caused by an as yet unknown plasma factor(s) may lead to the release of abnormal von Willebrand factor which facilitates the deposition of platelet microthrombi. Exchange transfusions of plasma or plasma-cryosupernatant remain the cornerstone of the treatment of TTP along with corticosteroids, platelet inhibitor drugs, vincristine and splenectomy. In most cases remissions can be attained, and cures are now common-although approximately one-half of the patients will relapse. While relapses are usually milder, they still carry a significant mortality and preventive therapies are not always effective.

  18. [Thrombotic Thrombocytopenic Purpura --Pathophysiology and Assays of ADAMTS13 Activity].

    PubMed

    Kato, Seiji; Fujimura, Yoshihiro

    2015-10-01

    Thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura (TTP) is a life-threatening disorder classified with a type of thrombotic microangiopathy (TMA). TTP is caused by a deficiency of von Willebrand factor-cleaving protease called ADAMTS13 (a disintegrin-like and metalloprotease with a thrombospondin type1 motif 13). Low ADAMTS13 levels result in increased ultra-large von Willebrand factor multimers (UL-VWFM), which induce platelet adhesion and thrombosis. Congenital TTP (Upshaw-Schulman syndrome: USS) is an inherited disorder of ADAMTS13, and the other more commonly is an acquired TTP caused by autoantibodies against ADAMTS13. This article reviews the progress of ADAMTS13 activity measurement and the resulting changes in the diagnosis and treatment of TTP.

  19. ADAMTS13 and von Willebrand factor in thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura.

    PubMed

    Zheng, X Long

    2015-01-01

    Pathogenesis of thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura (TTP) was a mystery for over half a century until the discovery of ADAMTS13. ADAMTS13 is primarily synthesized in the liver, and its main function is to cleave von Willebrand factor (VWF) anchored on the endothelial surface, in circulation, and at the sites of vascular injury. Deficiency of plasma ADAMTS13 activity (<10%) resulting from mutations of the ADAMTS13 gene or autoantibodies against ADAMTS13 causes hereditary or acquired (idiopathic) TTP. ADAMTS13 activity is usually normal or modestly reduced (>20%) in other forms of thrombotic microangiopathy secondary to hematopoietic progenitor cell transplantation, infection, and disseminated malignancy or in hemolytic uremic syndrome. Plasma infusion or exchange remains the initial treatment of choice to date, but novel therapeutics such as recombinant ADAMTS13 and gene therapy are under development. Moreover, ADAMTS13 deficiency has been shown to be a risk factor for the development of myocardial infarction, stroke, cerebral malaria, and preeclampsia.

  20. Two Types of Renovascular Lesions in Lupus Nephritis with Clinical Thrombotic Thrombocytopenic Purpura.

    PubMed

    Sekine, Akinari; Hasegawa, Eiko; Hiramatsu, Rikako; Mise, Koki; Sumida, Keiichi; Ueno, Toshiharu; Yamanouchi, Masayuki; Hayami, Noriko; Suwabe, Tatsuya; Hoshino, Junichi; Sawa, Naoki; Takaichi, Kenmei; Ohashi, Kenichi; Fujii, Takeshi; Ubara, Yoshifumi

    2015-01-01

    Renovascular lesions of lupus nephritis (LN) were classified into five categories by D'Agati in Heptinstall's Pathology of the Kidney, with thrombotic microangiopathy (TMA) and clinical thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura (TTP) being combined. We encountered 2 cases with histological LN (class III and lass V), and they presented with clinical features of TTP, such as acute renal failure, microangiopathic hemolytic anemia, thrombocytopenia, fever, and central neurologic symptoms. Immunosuppressive therapy with plasmapheresis was performed in both patients. Case 1 progressed to end-stage renal failure requiring dialysis and died, while case 2 responded to treatment. In case 1, small renal arteries showed positive mural staining for IgG and C3, while intraluminal material was negative for IgG and C3 [although it was positive for phosphotungstic acid-hematoxylin (PTAH), indicating fibrin deposition]. In case 2, small renal arteries showed mural staining for IgG, C1q, and C3, with the intraluminal material also being positive for these immunoglobulins, but negative for PTAH. These cases suggest that immunosuppressive therapy with plasmapheresis can control LN when intravascular thrombosis is related to immune complexes associated with activation of the early complement components C1q and C3. In contrast, immunosuppressive therapy with plasmapheresis may not be effective when intravascular thrombosis is unrelated to these factors and involves fibrin deposition. Accordingly, in LN patients with clinical features of TTP, we report two types of renovascular lesions, in addition to typical vascular change of TMA with no immune deposits seen in nonlupus patients.

  1. [Psychoneuroimmunology of the life span: impact of childhood stress on immune dysregulation and inflammatory disease in later life].

    PubMed

    Schubert, Christian

    2014-05-01

    Studies have shown clearly that childhood mistreatment, abuse and neglect are associated with severe inflammatory disease in adulthood (e. g. cancer, heart disease, autoimmune disorder) and shortened life span. This review deals with the psychoneuroimmunological pathways of this connection. It shows that chronic stressors interfere very early in life with those protective mechanisms of the biological stress system that normally down-regulate potentially harmful inflammation. In the long term, serious inflammatory diseases, such as allergic asthma, can result. In this review, the pathogenetic connections between allergic asthma and early stress and stress system dysfunction are discussed. As our understanding of the dysfunctional psychophysiological mechanisms of inflammatory disease increases, psychodiagnostic and psychotherapeutic intervention in the treatment of physical disease will become more specific.

  2. [Adverse effects of the herd immunity or when childhood vaccination becomes deleterious for the epidemiology of infectious diseases in adults].

    PubMed

    Lang, Pierre-Olivier

    2011-03-01

    The irremediable ageing of the world population, the aged-related increasing in the prevalence of infectious diseases the fear of any influenza pandemic rife have recently led the European Union Geriatric Medicine Society (EUGMS) et the International Association of Geriatric and Gerontology European Regions (IAGG-ER) of establishing vaccine recommendations dedicated to individuals aged of 60 years or above and promoting a life-course vaccination programme. This approach is mainly motivated by the herd immunity-associated effect on the epidemiology of infectious diseases observed within the adult and old adult population. This review (1) after a presentation of the concept and its demonstrated beneficial effects; (2) will detail that herd immunity acts with adverse effects on the epidemiology of the infectious diseases in the adult and aged individual population; (3) in order to demonstrate that maintaining a vaccine pressure in every age groups is imperative.

  3. Determinants of infant and early childhood mortality in Cameroon: the role of socioeconomic factors, housing characteristics, and immunization status.

    PubMed

    Kuate Defo, B

    1994-01-01

    This study examines factors impinging on the survival of children in Cameroon using longitudinal data collected by the United Nations Demographic Training and Research Institute of Yaoundé, Cameroon. It deals especially with the role of socioeconomic factors (mother's education, employment, marital status, ethnicity, and household income), housing characteristics (construction materials, power source, source of water supply, extent of crowding), and immunization status on infant and child mortality. Two-state parametric and nonparametric hazards models for the risk of death at any time within the course of the study are used, with and without accounting for unmeasured heterogeneity. Overall, overcrowding has robust deleterious effects on infant and child survival. As regards the effects of socioeconomic variables, the robustness of the effects of household income and ethnic differentials are unchanged, even after controlling for unmeasured heterogeneity; the deleterious effects of marital status are also apparent, but these effects are largely explained by unmeasured covariates. The data also suggest that the protective effects of full immunization status are robust and not contaminated by confounding factors, at least in the first 16 months of life. These findings provide solid ground to support immunization programs and efforts as a means to reduce significantly infant and child mortality.

  4. [A case of thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura with systemic lupus erythematosus].

    PubMed

    Ogawa, Yayoi; Mukai, Masaya; Gotoh, Hideki; Tanaka, Satoshi; Takada, Akio; Takenouchi, Toshinao

    2006-10-01

    We described a case of thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura (TTP) with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). A-60-year old woman was admitted to our hospital because of fever, disconsciousness, and general fatigue. 32 years ago, she was diagnosed as SLE with Raynaud's phenomenon, rash, photosensitivity, arthritis, lymphocytopenia, and ANA. Her SLE was well controlled with 10 mg predonisolone as a maintance dose until several weeks ago. On admission, severe thrombocytopenia (0.7x10(4)/microl) and other laboratory data revealed microangiopathic hemolytic anemia and renal dysfunction, Immediately after diagnosed as TTP, plasma exchange and corticosteroid therapy started. In spite of the treatment, disconsciousness progressed and systemic convulsion occurred and died 4 days after admission. Autopsied examination revealed diffuse microvascular hyalinized thrombi in heart, kidney, liver, spleen, and pancreas. Some microvascular thrombi were detected in lymph nodes, bone marrow, intestine. Pathological diagnosis of TTP was made on microvascular hyalinized platelet thrombi in organs. Von Willebrand factor-cleaving protease (VWF-CP) activity in plasma on set is less than 0.5 percent of normal and inhibitor for VWF-CP was detected. We here report a valuable case for analysis of pathogenesis in SLE-TTP.

  5. Changes in splenic microcirculatory pathways in chronic idiopathic thrombocytopenic purpura.

    PubMed

    Schmidt, E E; MacDonald, I C; Groom, A C

    1991-09-15

    The spleen plays a central role in the pathogenesis of chronic idiopathic thrombocytopenic purpura (ITP); it produces massive quantities of antiplatelet antibodies, leading to accelerated phagocytosis of platelets. Lymphoid hyperplasia typically occurs in the spleen, characterized by large numbers of lymphatic nodules with active germinal centers. Whether changes in splenic microcirculatory pathways also occur is not known. We have studied this question by scanning electron microscopy of corrosion casts, comparing spleens removed from patients with ITP with normal spleens obtained from organ transplant donors. The casts demonstrate two major changes in microcirculatory pathways in ITP. Firstly, a striking proliferation of arterioles and capillaries is found in the white pulp and marginal zone (MZ), seen as extensive vascularization in 92.3% of lymphatic nodules (n = 191) versus 0.6% (n = 224) in normal spleens. Secondly, the marginal sinus, a series of flattened, anastomosing vascular spaces between the white pulp and MZ, is absent in 89.4% of lymphatic nodules versus 4.9% in normal spleens. The cause of these microcirculatory changes, which may not be exclusive to ITP, is presently unknown. Absence of the marginal sinus may affect distribution of blood flow through the MZ such that platelets spend increased amounts of time in the proximity of macrophages. In the presence of antiplatelet antibodies found in ITP spleens, this delayed transit would lead to greatly increased platelet destruction.

  6. Thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura: from platelet aggregates to plasma.

    PubMed

    Marques, Marisa B; Mayfield, Charles A; Blackall, Douglas P

    2004-06-01

    Thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura (TTP) is a syndrome of severe thrombocytopenia and microangiopathic hemolytic anemia without an alternative explanation. Although some patients also have a combination of fever and neurologic and/or renal manifestations, these are not required for the diagnosis. Thus, plasmapheresis should start as soon as TTP is placed high in the differential diagnosis to prevent significant mortality. Histopathologically, TTP is characterized by widespread platelet thrombi in the microcirculation. Ultralarge von Willebrand factor (vWf) multimers found in the patient's plasma are the basis for the platelet thrombi. Recent evidence has linked the abnormal fragments of vWf with deficiency of a plasma enzyme named vWf-cleaving protease, or ADAMTS-13. While a small percentage of patients with TTP have a constitutional defect in this enzyme, many with the acute idiopathic form have an antibody to ADAMTS-13, affecting its ability to cleave vWf. The determination of the enzyme activity and the presence of its inhibitor have emerged as a potential tool in the diagnosis and prognosis of TTP. Furthermore, it helps to differentiate TTP from the hemolytic uremic syndrome, in which the level of ADAMTS-13 is expected to be normal or only slightly decreased.

  7. Long-term anti-HBs antibody persistence and immune memory in children and adolescents who received routine childhood hepatitis B vaccination.

    PubMed

    Behre, Ulrich; Bleckmann, Gerhard; Crasta, Priya Diana; Leyssen, Maarten; Messier, Marc; Jacquet, Jeanne-Marie; Hardt, Karin

    2012-06-01

    This paper presents data from two studies that evaluated 5-y and 10-y persistence of antibodies against hepatitis B (HBV) surface antigen (anti-HBs) and immune response to an HBV vaccine challenge in children and adolescents who had received three doses of a HBV vaccine in infancy as part of routine clinical practice [NCT00519649/NCT00984139]. Anti-HBs antibody concentrations ≥ 10 mIU/ml persisted in 83.3% (95% confidence interval [CI]: 78.5–87.5) and 78.3% (95% CI: 73.1–83.0) of subjects aged 7–8 y and 12–13 y, respectively 5–10 y after infant vaccination. One month postchallenge dose, 98.2% (95% CI: 95.9–99.4) and 93.7% (95% CI: 90.2–96.2) of subjects in the two age groups, respectively had anti-HBs antibody concentrations ≥ 100 mIU/ml. Overall, 99.6% (95% CI: 98–100) and 97.2% (95% CI: 94.5–98.8) of subjects aged 7–8 y and 12–13 y mounted an anamnestic response to the HBV challenge dose, which was well-tolerated. Healthy children aged 7–8 y and adolescents aged 12–13 y received three doses of a monovalent pediatric HBV vaccine (10 μg of HBsAg) before 18 mo of age. Serum samples collected before and one month post-HBV vaccine challenge dose were tested for anti-HBs antibody concentrations. Safety assessments were made for the HBV vaccine challenge dose. A three-dose childhood HBV immunization regimen induced persistence of antibodies against HBV infection for 10 y, up to adolescence. This vaccination regimen also conferred long-term immune memory against HBV as evidenced by the strong anamnestic response to the HBV vaccine challenge, despite waning anti-HBs antibody levels.

  8. Takotsubo cardiomyopathy and thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura preceding a lupus diagnosis: a case report.

    PubMed

    Georgiades, F; Demosthenous, S; Braimi, M; Tsitskari, T; Psarelis, S

    2015-11-01

    Takotsubo cardiomyopathy, a rare stress-related cardiomyopathy, has been observed in a few cases secondary to systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). Herein, we report an unusual case where a postmenopausal woman presented initially with Takotsubo syndrome, later developed thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura and cerebrovascular events, initially without clinical or laboratory features of SLE. During the course of her illness, she was found to satisfy four of the Systemic Lupus International Collaborating Clinics classification criteria for a SLE diagnosis. This unique presentation of our patient, initially with Takotsubo cardiomyopathy, the development of thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura and cerebrovascular events preceding the diagnosis of SLE illustrates the importance of clinical observation and follow-up.

  9. Risk Factors for Autoimmune Diseases Development After Thrombotic Thrombocytopenic Purpura.

    PubMed

    Roriz, Mélanie; Landais, Mickael; Desprez, Jonathan; Barbet, Christelle; Azoulay, Elie; Galicier, Lionel; Wynckel, Alain; Baudel, Jean-Luc; Provôt, François; Pène, Frédéric; Mira, Jean-Paul; Presne, Claire; Poullin, Pascale; Delmas, Yahsou; Kanouni, Tarik; Seguin, Amélie; Mousson, Christiane; Servais, Aude; Bordessoule, Dominique; Perez, Pierre; Chauveau, Dominique; Veyradier, Agnès; Halimi, Jean-Michel; Hamidou, Mohamed; Coppo, Paul

    2015-10-01

    Autoimmune thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura (TTP) can be associated with other autoimmune disorders, but their prevalence following autoimmune TTP remains unknown. To assess the prevalence of autoimmune disorders associated with TTP and to determine risk factors for and the time course of the development of an autoimmune disorder after a TTP episode, we performed a cross sectional study. Two-hundred sixty-one cases of autoimmune TTP were included in the French Reference Center registry between October, 2000 and May, 2009. Clinical and laboratory data available at time of TTP diagnosis were recovered. Each center was contacted to collect the more recent data and diagnosis criteria for autoimmunity. Fifty-six patients presented an autoimmune disorder in association with TTP, 9 years before TTP (median; min: 2 yr, max: 32 yr) (26 cases), at the time of TTP diagnosis (17 cases) or during follow-up (17 cases), up to 12 years after TTP diagnosis (mean, 22 mo). The most frequent autoimmune disorder reported was systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) (26 cases) and Sjögren syndrome (8 cases). The presence of additional autoimmune disorders had no impact on outcomes of an acute TTP or the occurrence of relapse. Two factors evaluated at TTP diagnosis were significantly associated with the development of an autoimmune disorder during follow-up: the presence of antidouble stranded (ds)DNA antibodies (hazard ratio (HR): 4.98; 95% confidence interval (CI) [1.64-15.14]) and anti-SSA antibodies (HR: 9.98; 95% CI [3.59-27.76]). A follow-up across many years is necessary after an acute TTP, especially when anti-SSA or anti-dsDNA antibodies are present on TTP diagnosis, to detect autoimmune disorders early before immunologic events spread to prevent disabling complications.

  10. Risk Factors for Autoimmune Diseases Development After Thrombotic Thrombocytopenic Purpura

    PubMed Central

    Roriz, Mélanie; Landais, Mickael; Desprez, Jonathan; Barbet, Christelle; Azoulay, Elie; Galicier, Lionel; Wynckel, Alain; Baudel, Jean-Luc; Provôt, François; Pène, Frédéric; Mira, Jean-Paul; Presne, Claire; Poullin, Pascale; Delmas, Yahsou; Kanouni, Tarik; Seguin, Amélie; Mousson, Christiane; Servais, Aude; Bordessoule, Dominique; Perez, Pierre; Chauveau, Dominique; Veyradier, Agnès; Halimi, Jean-Michel; Hamidou, Mohamed; Coppo, Paul

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Autoimmune thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura (TTP) can be associated with other autoimmune disorders, but their prevalence following autoimmune TTP remains unknown. To assess the prevalence of autoimmune disorders associated with TTP and to determine risk factors for and the time course of the development of an autoimmune disorder after a TTP episode, we performed a cross sectional study. Two-hundred sixty-one cases of autoimmune TTP were included in the French Reference Center registry between October, 2000 and May, 2009. Clinical and laboratory data available at time of TTP diagnosis were recovered. Each center was contacted to collect the more recent data and diagnosis criteria for autoimmunity. Fifty-six patients presented an autoimmune disorder in association with TTP, 9 years before TTP (median; min: 2 yr, max: 32 yr) (26 cases), at the time of TTP diagnosis (17 cases) or during follow-up (17 cases), up to 12 years after TTP diagnosis (mean, 22 mo). The most frequent autoimmune disorder reported was systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) (26 cases) and Sjögren syndrome (8 cases). The presence of additional autoimmune disorders had no impact on outcomes of an acute TTP or the occurrence of relapse. Two factors evaluated at TTP diagnosis were significantly associated with the development of an autoimmune disorder during follow-up: the presence of antidouble stranded (ds)DNA antibodies (hazard ratio (HR): 4.98; 95% confidence interval (CI) [1.64–15.14]) and anti-SSA antibodies (HR: 9.98; 95% CI [3.59–27.76]). A follow-up across many years is necessary after an acute TTP, especially when anti-SSA or anti-dsDNA antibodies are present on TTP diagnosis, to detect autoimmune disorders early before immunologic events spread to prevent disabling complications. PMID:26496263

  11. Rx for a Balanced Childhood.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ungar, Manya; And Others

    1988-01-01

    Twelve articles present information on childhood health matters, covering such topics as Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome, obesity, lead, drug abuse, alcohol use, pesticides in schools, school bullies, and reading resources. (CB)

  12. Platelet count recovery after intravenous immunoglobulin predicts a favorable outcome in children with immune thrombocytopenia

    PubMed Central

    Ji, Mi Hong; Kim, Sung Jin; Ahn, Hyo Seop

    2016-01-01

    Background Childhood immune thrombocytopenic purpura (ITP) is a common acquired bleeding disorder. Even though most children recover, either spontaneously or with therapy, 10-20% of newly diagnosed ITP cases have a chronic course beyond 12 months. This study evaluated whether clinical and laboratory findings can predict the response to intravenous immunoglobulin (IVIG) and progression to persistent or chronic ITP in children. Methods During the period between March 2003 and June 2015, we retrospectively analyzed 72 children, newly diagnosed with ITP, who received IVIG treatment. Peripheral blood counts were obtained at diagnosis and at 1, 3, 6, and 12 months after IVIG treatment. Results After 6 months of IVIG treatment, 14 of 72 patients (19.4%) had persistent ITP, and after 12 months, 7 of 40 patients (17.5%) had chronic ITP. Age at diagnosis, gender, history of viral infection, or vaccination before disease onset were not statistically correlated with platelet recovery at 6 and 12 months. However, a platelet count recovery of ≥100×103/µL at 1 and 3 months was significantly correlated with platelet recovery at 6 (P<0.001 and P<0.001, respectively) and 12 (P=0.007 and P=0.004, respectively) months. Conclusion This study demonstrated that early platelet count recovery, at 1 and 3 months after IVIG treatment, predicts a short disease duration and a favorable outcome in children with newly diagnosed ITP. Further investigation in a larger group of patients is warranted to validate these findings. PMID:27382553

  13. Acute ST Elevation Myocardial Infarction in Patients With Immune Thrombocytopenia Purpura: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Dhillon, Sandeep K; Lee, Edwin; Fox, John; Rachko, Maurice

    2011-01-01

    Acute myocardial infarction (AMI) in patients with immune thrombocytopenic purpura (ITP) is rare. We describe a case of AMI in patient with ITP. An 81-year-old woman presented with acute inferoposterior MI with low platelet count on admission (34,000/µl). Coronary angiography revealed significant mid right coronary artery (RCA) stenosis with thrombus, subsequently underwent successful percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI). In some patients with immune thrombocytopenia purpura and acute myocardial infarction, percutaneous coronary intervention is a therapeutic option.

  14. Hand-assisted laparoscopic splenectomy for idiopathic thrombocytopenic purpura during pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Iwase, K; Higaki, J; Yoon, H E; Mikata, S; Tanaka, Y; Takahashi, T; Hatanaka, K; Tamaki, T; Hori, S; Mitsuda, N; Kamiike, W

    2001-02-01

    A successful case of a hand-assisted laparoscopic splenectomy with low-pressure pneumoperitoneum for autoimmune thrombocytopenic purpura in a patient at 23 weeks' gestation is reported. Preoperative splenic arterial embolization was performed on the same day as the operation using painless contour embolic material and super-absorbent polymer microspheres. The abdominal wall retraction method first was applied to avoid the effects of pneumoperitoneum on systemic hemodynamic alterations. However, a sufficient surgical view could not be obtained, as the intra-abdominal organs were elevated because of the enlarged uterus. A surgical view with 4 to 6-mm Hg pneumoperitoneum was available for the hand-assisted splenectomy. The postoperative course was uneventful, and the patient vaginally delivered a healthy infant. A hand-assisted laparoscopic splenectomy with low-pressure pneumoperitoneum after splenic arterial embolization would be feasible for patients with autoimmune thrombocytopenic purpura during a relatively advanced pregnancy.

  15. An Immunization Education Program for Childcare Providers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hayney, Mary S.; Bartell, Julie C.

    2005-01-01

    The childhood immunization schedule includes at least 17 scheduled immunizations prior to the age of 24 months. Immunization laws require childcare centers to maintain immunization records and enforce immunization standards for children who attend these centers. Childcare providers generally receive little formal education about infectious…

  16. Thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura and focal segmental glomerulosclerosis associated with the use of ecstasy

    PubMed Central

    Kayar, Yusuf; Kayar, Nuket Bayram; Gangarapu, Venkatanarayana

    2015-01-01

    Ecstasy is a drug, which causes serious side effects and sometimes it can be lethal. These effects are due to idiosyncratic reactions as a result of various stimulations in adrenergic receptors. Here we present a case of a 36-year-old male patient who was diagnosed with thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura associated with the use of ecstasy. Plasmapheresis along with methylprednisolone treatment restores patient condition to normal. PMID:25878432

  17. Differentiation between severe HELLP syndrome and thrombotic microangiopathy, thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura and other imitators.

    PubMed

    Pourrat, O; Coudroy, R; Pierre, F

    2015-06-01

    Pre-eclampsia complicated by severe HELLP (hemolysis, elevated liver enzymes and low platelet count) syndrome is a multi-organ disease, and can be difficult to differentiate from thrombotic microangiopathy (appearing as thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura or hemolytic uremic syndrome), acute fatty liver, systemic erythematous lupus, antiphospholipid syndrome and severe sepsis. Many papers have highlighted the risks of misdiagnosis resulting in severe consequences for maternal health, and this can be fatal when thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura is misdiagnosed as severe HELLP syndrome. The aim of this paper is to propose relevant markers to differentiate pre-eclampsia complicated by severe HELLP syndrome from its imitators, even in the worrying situation of apparently indistinguishable conditions, and thereby assist clinical decision-making regarding whether or not to commence plasma exchange. Relevant identifiers to establish the most accurate diagnosis include the frequency of each disease and anamnestic data. Frank hemolysis, need for dialysis, neurological involvement and absence of disseminated intravascular coagulation are indicative of thrombotic microangiopathy. The definitive marker for thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura is undetectable ADAMTS 13 activity.

  18. More Evidence on the Impact of India's Conditional Cash Transfer Program, Janani Suraksha Yojana: Quasi-Experimental Evaluation of the Effects on Childhood Immunization and Other Reproductive and Child Health Outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Carvalho, Natalie; Thacker, Naveen; Gupta, Subodh S.; Salomon, Joshua A.

    2014-01-01

    Background In 2005, India established a conditional cash transfer program called Janani Suraksha Yojana (JSY), to increase institutional delivery and encourage the use of reproductive and child health-related services. Objective To assess the effect of maternal receipt of financial assistance from JSY on childhood immunizations, post-partum care, breastfeeding practices, and care-seeking behaviors. Methods We use data from the latest district-level household survey (2007–2008) to conduct a propensity score matching analysis with logistic regression. We conduct the analyses at the national level as well as separately across groups of states classified as high-focus and non-high-focus. We carry out several sensitivity analyses including a subgroup analysis stratified by possession of an immunization card. Results Receipt of financial assistance from JSY led to an increase in immunization rates ranging from 3.1 (95%CI 2.2–4.0) percentage points for one dose of polio vaccine to 9.1 (95%CI 7.5–10.7) percentage points in the proportion of fully vaccinated children. Our findings also indicate JSY led to increased post-partum check-up rates and healthy early breastfeeding practices around the time of childbirth. No effect of JSY was found on exclusive breastfeeding practices and care-seeking behaviors. Effect sizes were consistently larger in states identified as being a key focus for the program. In an analysis stratified by possession of an immunization card, there was little to no effect of JSY among those with vaccination cards, while the effect size was much larger than the base case results for those missing vaccination cards, across nearly all immunization outcomes. Conclusions Early results suggest the JSY program led to a significant increase in childhood immunization rates and some healthy reproductive health behaviors, but the structuring of financial incentives to pregnant women and health workers warrants further review. Causal interpretation of our

  19. Childhood Emergencies

    MedlinePlus

    ... SUBSCRIBE Emergency 101 Share this! Home » Emergency 101 Childhood Emergencies Keeping children healthy and safe is every ... and tools to prevent, recognize and address a childhood emergency is the first step in keeping your ...

  20. Childhood Schizophrenia

    MedlinePlus

    Childhood schizophrenia Overview By Mayo Clinic Staff Childhood schizophrenia is an uncommon but severe mental disorder in which children interpret reality abnormally. Schizophrenia involves a range of problems with thinking (cognitive), ...

  1. Childhood Asthma

    MedlinePlus

    ... Library ▸ Asthma Library ▸ Childhood asthma TTR Share | Childhood Asthma Children with recurrent cough, wheezing, chest tightness or ... breath may have one or more forms of asthma. Left untreated, asthmatic children often have less stamina ...

  2. Analysis of clinical effects and mechanism of recombinant human interleukin-11 with glucocorticoids for treatment of idiopathic thrombocytopenic purpura

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Xifeng; Wang, Lijuan; Sun, Lin; Li, Tantan; Ran, Xuehong

    2017-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to evaluate the effectiveness and safety of recombinant human interleukin-11 (IL-11) with glucocorticoids for treatment of adult idiopathic thrombocytopenic purpura (ITP) and the regulatory effect on immune mechanisms. A total of 80 patients with initial diagnosis of ITP admitted to our hospital were selected. Patients were randomly divided into the control group and observation group, with 40 cases each. The control group received glucocorticoids treatment, and the observation group received IL-11 and glucocorticoids. The treatment effects were compared. The total effective rate and effective degree of the observation group was higher than in the control group and the difference was statistically significant (P<0.05); comparing the incidence of complications of the two groups, there was no statistical difference (P>0.05). In the observation group, onset time was reduced, platelet recovery level increased and platelet antibody positive rate decreased, and the differences were statistically significant (P<0.05). The total treatment course was shorter and recurrence rate was lower in the observation group compared with the control group, and the differences were statistically significant (P<0.05). The percentage of CD4+CD25+ regulatory T cells decreased in the two groups after treatment, and was more pronounced in the observation group. The difference was statistically significant (P<0.05). In conclusion, IL-11 with glucocorticoids for the treatment of adult ITP is safe and effective, and may be associated with decreased percentage of CD4+CD25+ regulatory T cells. PMID:28352325

  3. Safety and Efficacy Study of Romiplostim (AMG 531) to Treat ITP in Pediatric Subjects

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2014-07-18

    Idiopathic Thrombocytopenic Purpura; Thrombocytopenia in Pediatric Subjects With Immune (Idiopathic) Thrombocytopenic Purpura (ITP); Thrombocytopenia in Subjects With Immune (Idiopathic) Thrombocytopenic Purpura (ITP)

  4. Maternal anti-HLA class I antibodies are associated with reduced birth weight in thrombocytopenic neonates.

    PubMed

    Dahl, J; Husebekk, A; Acharya, G; Flo, K; Stuge, T B; Skogen, B; Straume, B; Tiller, H

    2016-02-01

    In this comparative cross-sectional study, possible associations between maternal anti-HLA class I antibodies and birth weight in neonatal thrombocytopenia are explored. Although commonly detected in pregnancies and generally regarded as harmless, it has been suggested that such antibodies might be associated with fetal and neonatal alloimmune thrombocytopenia (FNAIT). As a link between FNAIT due to human platelet antigen 1a-specific antibodies and reduced birth weight in boys has previously been demonstrated, we wanted to explore whether maternal anti-HLA class I antibodies might also affect birth weight. To examine this, suspected cases of FNAIT referred to the Norwegian National Unit for Platelet Immunology during the period 1998-2009 were identified. Pregnancies where the only finding was maternal anti-HLA class I antibodies were included. An unselected group of pregnant women participating in a prospective study investigating maternal-fetal hemodynamics at the University Hospital North Norway during the years 2006-2010 served as controls. Twenty-nine percent of controls had anti-HLA class I antibodies. The thrombocytopenic neonates had a significantly lower adjusted birth weight (linear regression, P=0.036) and significantly higher odds of being small for gestational age (OR=6.72, P<0.001) compared with controls. Increasing anti-HLA class I antibody levels in the mother were significantly associated with lower birth weight and placental weight among thrombocytopenic neonates, but not among controls. These results indicate that maternal anti-HLA class I antibodies in thrombocytopenic neonates are associated with reduced fetal growth. Further studies are needed to test if placental function is affected.

  5. Severe Thrombocytopenic Purpura in a Child with Brucellosis: Case Presentation and Review of the Literature

    PubMed Central

    Perogiannaki, Aikaterini; Chaliasos, Nikolaos

    2017-01-01

    Brucellosis is still endemic and a significant public health problem in many Mediterranean countries, including Greece. It is a multisystemic disease with a broad spectrum of clinical manifestations including hematological disorders, such as anemia, pancytopenia, leucopenia, and thrombocytopenia. Thrombocytopenia is usually moderate and attributed to bone marrow suppression or hypersplenism. Rarely, autoimmune stimulation can cause severe thrombocytopenia with clinically significant hemorrhagic manifestations. We present the case of a girl with severe thrombocytopenic purpura as one of the presenting symptoms of Brucella melitensis infection. Treatment with intravenous immunoglobulin and the appropriate antimicrobial agents promptly resolved the thrombocyte counts. A review of similar published cases is also presented. PMID:28127481

  6. Stroke due to typical thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura treated successfully with intravenous thrombolysis and therapeutic plasma exchange

    PubMed Central

    Boattini, Matteo; Procaccianti, Gaetano

    2013-01-01

    We report a case of a 39-year-old man with expressive aphasia due to occlusion of the temporal stem of the left middle cerebral artery. Laboratory tests showed microangiopathic haemolytic anaemia and thrombocytopenia. A thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura (TTP) was diagnosed, and thrombolytic therapy (TT) with alteplase followed by therapeutic plasma exchange (TPE) were performed with complete resolution of symptoms. The gold standard TTP treatment is TPE, and its delay can be lethal. The use of TT in TTP is controversial and has potential risks. This case shows a successful TT in a patient with typical TTP presenting as a stroke due to a large cerebral artery occlusion. PMID:23362068

  7. Clopidogrel-Associated Thrombotic Thrombocytopenic Purpura following Endovascular Treatment of Spontaneous Carotid Artery Dissection

    PubMed Central

    Rubano, Jerry A.; Chen, Kwan; Sullivan, Brianne; Vosswinkel, James A.; Jawa, Randeep S.

    2015-01-01

    Thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura (TTP) is a life-threatening multisystem disease secondary to platelet aggregation. We present a patient who developed profound thrombocytopenia and anemia 8 days following initiation of therapy with clopidogrel after stent placement for carotid artery dissection. She did not have a disintegrin and metalloproteinase with thrombospondin domain 13 (ADAMTS 13) deficiency. Management included steroids and therapeutic plasma exchange. Clopidogrel has rarely been associated with TTP. Unlike other causes of acquired TTP, the diagnosis of early clopidogrel-associated TTP is largely clinical given the infrequent reduction in ADAMTS 13 activity. PMID:26623244

  8. Hyperthyroidism and immune thrombocytopenia.

    PubMed Central

    Jacobs, P.; Majoos, F.; Perrotta, A.

    1984-01-01

    Hyperthyroidism and immune thrombocytopenia occurred concurrently in five patients; in a sixth, thyrotoxicosis developed after successful treatment of the thrombocytopenia. Correction of the hyperthyroidism was followed by a variable pattern of clinical response. In one case with mild asymptomatic thrombocytopenia spontaneous complete remission occurred. Two patients required adrenocorticosteroids to control severe thrombocytopenic purpura during the period of hyperthyroidism, after which complete remission occurred. Another patient with severe symptomatic thrombocytopenia remains with a partially compensated thrombocytolytic state but is without purpura and off all therapy. A fifth patient required splenectomy for drug-resistant thrombocytopenia and remains critically dependent on immunosuppressive therapy. The sixth patient had a relapse of immune thrombocytopenia with subsequent development of thyrotoxicosis but platelet count spontaneously returned to normal after correction of the hyperthyroidism. Pregnancy in two of these six patients was not associated with recurrence of either hyperthyroidism or thrombocytopenia. Management of symptomatic purpura in adults with co-existent hyperthyroidism may differ from that customarily employed since adrenocorticosteroid therapy may need to be extended until euthyroidism has been established before proceeding to splenectomy. When surgery is necessary, the risk of thyrotoxic storm should be anticipated, and the patient appropriately premedicated. PMID:6494085

  9. Breast feeding and childhood hematological malignancy.

    PubMed

    Tripathy, A K; Mishra, L; Bakhshi, Sameer; Arya, L S

    2004-05-01

    Breast milk is known to have anti-infective and immunomodulating effects on infants, but its association with childhood cancer has not been well studied. Artificial feeding may affect the immune response in carcinogenesis. In this communication the authors have reviewed different articles describing the association between breast feeding (BF) and subsequent development of childhood hematological malignancy. It appears that BF may have a protective effect on childhood cancer, both the duration of BF as well as the quantity of milk ingested is probably critical to the beneficial immunological effects of BF against childhood cancer if any.

  10. Childhood Memories.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Soto, Lourdes Diaz

    2001-01-01

    Describes how artwork can be a valuable catalyst for discussions in preservice education classes, allowing students to explore how their work as educators relates to their childhood memories and can be shaped by childhood experiences. Examines an art exhibition in which diverse artists depicted autobiographical text in their paintings. Discusses…

  11. The Mobile Solutions for Immunization (M-SIMU) Trial: A Protocol for a Cluster Randomized Controlled Trial That Assesses the Impact of Mobile Phone Delivered Reminders and Travel Subsidies to Improve Childhood Immunization Coverage Rates and Timeliness in Western Kenya

    PubMed Central

    Kagucia, E. Wangeci; Ochieng, Benard; Hariharan, Nisha; Obor, David; Moulton, Lawrence H; Winch, Peter J; Levine, Orin S; Odhiambo, Frank; O'Brien, Katherine L; Feikin, Daniel R

    2016-01-01

    Background Text message (short message service, SMS) reminders and incentives are two demand-side interventions that have been shown to improve health care–seeking behaviors by targeting participant characteristics such as forgetfulness, lack of knowledge, and transport costs. Applying these interventions to routine pediatric immunizations may improve vaccination coverage and timeliness. Objective The Mobile Solutions for Immunization (M-SIMU) trial aims to determine if text message reminders, either with or without mobile phone–based incentives, sent to infant’s parents can improve immunization coverage and timeliness of routine pediatric vaccines in rural western Kenya. Methods This is a four-arm, cluster, randomized controlled trial. Villages are randomized to one of four study arms prior to enrollment of participants. The study arms are: (1) no intervention (a general health-related text message will be texted to this group at the time of enrollment), (2) text message reminders only, (3) text message reminders and a 75 Kenyan Shilling (KES) incentive, or (4) text message reminders and a KES200 incentive. Participants assigned to study arms 2-4 will receive two text message reminders; sent 3 days before and one day before the scheduled immunization visit at 6, 10, and 14 weeks for polio and pentavalent (containing diphtheria, tetanus, pertussis, hepatitis B, and Haemophilus influenza type b antigens) type b antigens) vaccines, and at 9 months for measles vaccine. Participants in incentive arms will, in addition to text message reminders as above, receive mobile phone–based incentives after each timely vaccination, where timely is defined as vaccination within 2 weeks of the scheduled date for each of the four routine expanded program immunization (EPI) vaccination visits. Mother-infant pairs will be followed to 12 months of age where the primary outcome, a fully immunized child, will be ascertained. A fully immunized child is defined as a child receiving

  12. Macrophage migration inhibitory factor (MIF) is induced by cytotoxic drugs and is involved in immune escape and migration in childhood rhabdomyosarcoma.

    PubMed

    Johler, Sarah Maria; Fuchs, Jörg; Seitz, Guido; Armeanu-Ebinger, Sorin

    2016-12-01

    Macrophage migration inhibitory factor (MIF) is known to be involved in oncogenic transformation, tumour progression, and immunosuppression and is overexpressed in many solid tumours, including paediatric rhabdomyosarcoma (RMS). We investigated the function of MIF in RMS during treatment with cytotoxic drugs. RMS cell lines were analysed by flow cytometry, immunofluorescence staining, and ELISA. We demonstrated the overexpression of MIF in RMS cells and the enhanced expression and secretion after treatment with cytotoxic agents. Migration assays of RMS cells revealed that inhibitors of MIF (ISO-1, Ant.III 4-IPP, Ant.V, sulforaphane (SF)) and blocking antibodies caused reduced migration, indicating a role for MIF in metastatic invasion. Additionally, we investigated the function of MIF in immune escape. The development of a population containing immunosuppressive myeloid-derived suppressor cells was promoted by incubation in conditioned medium of RMS cells comprising MIF and was reversed by MIF inhibitors but not by antibodies. Although most inhibitors may restore immune activity, Ant.III and 10 µM SF disturbed T cell proliferation in a CFSE assay, whereas T cell proliferation was not reduced by 3 µM SF, ISO-1 or antibodies. However, the inhibition of MIF by blocking antibodies did not increase the killing activity of allogenic PBMCs co-cultured with RMS cells. Our results reveal that MIF may be involved in an immune escape mechanism and demonstrate the involvement of MIF in immunogenic cell death during treatment with cytotoxic drugs. Targeting MIF may contribute to the restoration of immune sensitivity and the control of migration and metastatic invasion.

  13. Immunizations: vaccinations in general.

    PubMed

    Wiley, Catherine C

    2015-06-01

    The childhood immunization schedule is complex and nuanced. Although serious adverse reactions to immunizations are uncommon, clinicians must be well-versed in these reactions as well as the contraindications and precautions to each vaccine. • Conjugate vaccine technology links polysaccharide antigens to carrier proteins, triggering T-cell-dependent immunity to polysaccharides, thereby strengthening immune memory. • On the basis of some research evidence and consensus, live vaccines are generally contraindicated in immunocompromised patients and in pregnancy. Most live vaccines can be administered to household contacts of immunocompromised patients. • On the basis of some research and consensus, modified administration of meningococcal, pneumococcal, and less commonly, other vaccines may be indicated to protect immunocompromised patients. • On the basis of disease epidemiology and consensus, international travelers should be up-to-date with all routine immunizations; depending on destination, additional vaccines or immune globulin may be required.

  14. CHILDHOOD OBESITY

    PubMed Central

    Lakshman, Rajalakshmi; Elks, Cathy E.; Ong, Ken K.

    2013-01-01

    Clinical summary Childhood obesity has important consequences for health and wellbeing both during childhood and also in later adult life. The rising prevalence of childhood obesity poses a major public health challenge in both developed and developing countries by increasing the burden of chronic non-communicable diseases. Despite the urgent need for effective preventative strategies, there remains disagreement over its definition due to a lack of evidence on the optimal cut-offs linking childhood BMI to disease risks, and limited evidence on the most effective components of interventions to prevent childhood obesity. This article reviews the trends in childhood obesity, its genetic, nutritional and other risk factors, and preventative and treatment strategies. Particular emphasis is given to early-onset obesity in pre-school children, which, as a precursor to later childhood and adult obesity, provides insights into the developmental and genetic origins of obesity and also offers the potential for early preventative approaches with long-lasting benefits. PMID:23027812

  15. [Treatment of a pregnant patient after multiple trauma: rare combination with thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura].

    PubMed

    Haffner, E; Pietsch, U; Fösel, T; Lindemann, W

    2013-02-01

    Multiple trauma during pregnancy is a relatively rare situation which poses a great challenge for the team in charge of treatment. A concomitant disease, such as thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura (TTP) with thrombocytic coagulopathy increases the complexity of the treatment problems. This article describes the case of a 36-year-old pregnant woman referred to this hospital suffering from multiple trauma with severe liver rupture. Stabilization was achieved after an emergency Caesarean section and packing of the liver. Recurrent massive bleeding from the liver occurred after depacking and was treated successfully with recombinant factor VIIa. The concomitant TTP was treated by transfusion of fresh frozen plasma and corticosteroids. Rapid initiation of therapy was the goal to achieve hemostasis and prevent aggravation of the coagulation disorder and an unfavourable outcome despite severe thrombocytopenia.

  16. Spontaneous bilateral peripapillary, subhyaloid and vitreous hemorrhage with only minor platelet deficit in idiopathic thrombocytopenic purpura.

    PubMed

    Wan-Wei, Loo; Tengku-Norina, Tuan-Jaffar; Azma-Azalina, Ahmad-Alwi; Zulkifli, Abdul-Ghani; Zunaina, Embong

    2014-01-01

    A 45-year-old female with underlying idiopathic thrombocytopenic purpura (ITP) complained of acute onset of reduced vision and floaters, in both eyes, for 3 weeks. Visual acuity was 6/36 and 6/60 in the right eye and left eye, respectively. Ophthalmoscopy showed bilateral peripapillary, subhyaloid and vitreous hemorrhage. Hematological evaluation revealed moderate anemia (hemoglobin: 93 g/L) and mild thrombocytopenia (platelets: 120×10(9)/L). She was co-managed by a hematologist and ophthalmologists; she was treated medically. Follow-up care during the next 6 weeks revealed spontaneous, partially resolving hemorrhage, with improvement of visual acuity. The purpose of this case report is to highlight ophthalmic involvement of ITP in this patient, despite her only-mild thrombocytopenia, and her spontaneous recovery, despite her receiving only medical treatment.

  17. Nocardia transvalensis Disseminated Infection in an Immunocompromised Patient with Idiopathic Thrombocytopenic Purpura.

    PubMed

    García-Méndez, Jorge; Carrillo-Casas, Erika M; Rangel-Cordero, Andrea; Leyva-Leyva, Margarita; Xicohtencatl-Cortes, Juan; Arenas, Roberto; Hernández-Castro, Rigoberto

    2016-01-01

    Nocardia transvalensis complex includes a wide range of microorganisms with specific antimicrobial resistance patterns. N. transvalensis is an unusual Nocardia species. However, it must be differentiated due to its natural resistance to aminoglycosides while other Nocardia species are susceptible. The present report describes a Nocardia species involved in an uncommon clinical case of a patient with idiopathic thrombocytopenic purpura and pulmonary nocardiosis. Microbiological and molecular techniques based on the sequencing of the 16S rRNA gene allowed diagnosis of Nocardia transvalensis sensu stricto. The successful treatment was based on trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole and other drugs. We conclude that molecular identification of Nocardia species is a valuable technique to guide good treatment and prognosis and recommend its use for daily bases diagnosis.

  18. Clopidogrel-induced refractory thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura successfully treated with rituximab.

    PubMed

    Khodor, Sara; Castro, Miguel; McNamara, Colin; Chaulagain, Chakra P

    2016-06-01

    Thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura (TTP) is a multisystem disorder characterized by microvascular aggregation of platelets and fibrin strands causing thrombocytopenia, microangiopathic hemolytic anemia, and organ dysfunction. TTP can develop as a result of a deficiency in ADAMTS13 enzyme activity due to either a genetic defect or, more commonly, the development of anti-ADAMTS13 autoantibodies. TTP can also be associated with pregnancy, organ transplant, lupus, infections, and drugs. Here, we present a case of TTP that developed shortly after the start of clopidogrel treatment for acute ischemic stroke and acute myocardial infarction, and describe the clinical presentation, refractory course of the disease, and successful induction of remission through the use of rituximab in a setting of pre-existing autoimmune diseases.

  19. Eculizumab refractory thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura secondary to post-endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography pancreatitis in a patient

    PubMed Central

    Malik, Faizan; Ali, Naveed; Ahsan, Irfan; Ghani, Ali Raza; Fidler, Christian

    2016-01-01

    Thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura (TTP) is a rare multisystem microvascular disorder, which is characterized by pentad of thrombocytopenia, microangiopathic hemolytic anemia, and organ dysfunction due to occlusive thrombi. The proposed pathophysiology involves an imbalance between unusually large von Willebrand factor multimers and the cleaving protease ADAMTS13. Acute pancreatitis is a well-described consequence of TTP, but TTP secondary to acute pancreatitis is a rare phenomenon. We present a patient who developed TTP due to post-ERCP pancreatitis with hematologic, cardiovascular, pulmonary, and renal complications and is the first case of this kind. Despite early initiation of therapy, the patient did not recover making it among the 10% of cases of TTP that prove fatal despite appropriate therapy. PMID:27987277

  20. Thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura as an initial presentation of systemic lupus erythematosus with acquired ADAMTS 13 antibody

    PubMed Central

    Changcharoen, Bhisit; Bolger, Dennis Thomas

    2015-01-01

    We report a female patient presenting with headache, fatigue, ecchymoses and recent, excessive vaginal bleeding. Prompt review of the peripheral blood smear showed evidence of microangiopathic haemolytic anaemia (MAHA) and thrombocytopenia. Thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura (TTP) was suspected. Plasma exchange and corticosteroids were started urgently. The patient responded favourably to the treatment. Subsequently, positive serological markers returned and were compatible with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). A disintegrin and metalloproteinase with thrombospondin type 1 motifs, member 13 (ADAMTS 13) activity was remarkably low with a positive inhibitory ADAMTS 13 antibody. Mycophenolate and hydroxychloroquine were started along with a prolonged course and taper of corticosteroids. These medications have been maintained with an excellent response in 14 months of follow-up. PMID:25701834

  1. Acquired thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura and atypical hemolytic uremic syndrome successfully treated with eculizumab

    PubMed Central

    Cottler-Fox, Michele; Motwani, Pooja

    2017-01-01

    Acquired idiopathic thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura is a life-threatening disease with a mortality of up to 90%, if not promptly recognized and treated. We report a 64-year-old woman with this condition who presented with left-sided weakness and seizure-like activity preceded by headache and easy bruising. She did not achieve optimal response to plasma exchange, corticosteroids, rituximab, and vincristine. We initiated treatment with eculizumab, following which she had durable remission that continued for 30 months after discontinuation of the drug. We later found that our patient has homozygous deletion in two closely related genes, complement factor H–related 1 and complement factor H–related 3.

  2. Nocardia transvalensis Disseminated Infection in an Immunocompromised Patient with Idiopathic Thrombocytopenic Purpura

    PubMed Central

    García-Méndez, Jorge; Carrillo-Casas, Erika M.; Rangel-Cordero, Andrea; Leyva-Leyva, Margarita; Xicohtencatl-Cortes, Juan; Arenas, Roberto; Hernández-Castro, Rigoberto

    2016-01-01

    Nocardia transvalensis complex includes a wide range of microorganisms with specific antimicrobial resistance patterns. N. transvalensis is an unusual Nocardia species. However, it must be differentiated due to its natural resistance to aminoglycosides while other Nocardia species are susceptible. The present report describes a Nocardia species involved in an uncommon clinical case of a patient with idiopathic thrombocytopenic purpura and pulmonary nocardiosis. Microbiological and molecular techniques based on the sequencing of the 16S rRNA gene allowed diagnosis of Nocardia transvalensis sensu stricto. The successful treatment was based on trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole and other drugs. We conclude that molecular identification of Nocardia species is a valuable technique to guide good treatment and prognosis and recommend its use for daily bases diagnosis. PMID:27313917

  3. Peliosis hepatis presenting with massive hepatomegaly in a patient with idiopathic thrombocytopenic purpura.

    PubMed

    Kim, Sun Bean; Kim, Do Kyung; Byun, Sun Jeong; Park, Ji Hye; Choi, Jin Young; Park, Young Nyun; Kim, Do Young

    2015-12-01

    Peliosis hepatis is a rare condition that can cause hepatic hemorrhage, rupture, and ultimately liver failure. Several authors have reported that peliosis hepatis develops in association with chronic wasting disease or prolonged use of anabolic steroids or oral contraceptives. In this report we describe a case in which discontinuation of steroid therapy improved the condition of a patient with peliosis hepatis. Our patient was a 64-year-old woman with a history of long-term steroid treatment for idiopathic thrombocytopenic purpura . Her symptoms included abdominal pain and weight loss; the only finding of a physical examination was hepatomegaly. We performed computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the liver and a liver biopsy. Based on these findings plus clinical observations, she was diagnosed with peliosis hepatis and her steroid treatment was terminated. The patient recovered completely 3 months after steroid discontinuation, and remained stable over the following 6 months.

  4. Childhood adversity and DNA methylation of genes involved in the hypothalamus-pituitary-adrenal axis and immune system: whole-genome and candidate-gene associations.

    PubMed

    Bick, Johanna; Naumova, Oksana; Hunter, Scott; Barbot, Baptiste; Lee, Maria; Luthar, Suniya S; Raefski, Adam; Grigorenko, Elena L

    2012-11-01

    In recent years, translational research involving humans and animals has uncovered biological and physiological pathways that explain associations between early adverse circumstances and long-term mental and physical health outcomes. In this article, we summarize the human and animal literature demonstrating that epigenetic alterations in key biological systems, the hypothalamus-pituitary-adrenal axis and immune system, may underlie such disparities. We review evidence suggesting that changes in DNA methylation profiles of the genome may be responsible for the alterations in hypothalamus-pituitary-adrenal axis and immune system trajectories. Using some preliminary data, we demonstrate how explorations of genome-wide and candidate-gene DNA methylation profiles may inform hypotheses and guide future research efforts in these areas. We conclude our article by discussing the many important future directions, merging perspectives from developmental psychology, molecular genetics, neuroendocrinology, and immunology, that are essential for furthering our understanding of how early adverse circumstances may shape developmental trajectories, particularly in the areas of stress reactivity and physical or mental health.

  5. Childhood Leukemia

    MedlinePlus

    Leukemia is cancer of the white blood cells. It is the most common type of childhood cancer. ... blood cells help your body fight infection. In leukemia, the bone marrow produces abnormal white blood cells. ...

  6. Effects of treatment on IgE responses against parasite allergen-like proteins and immunity to reinfection in childhood schistosome and hookworm coinfections.

    PubMed

    Pinot de Moira, Angela; Jones, Frances M; Wilson, Shona; Tukahebwa, Edridah; Fitzsimmons, Colin M; Mwatha, Joseph K; Bethony, Jeffrey M; Kabatereine, Narcis B; Dunne, David W

    2013-01-01

    Naturally occurring human immunity to both schistosomiasis and hookworm infection has been associated with IgE responses against parasite allergen-like proteins. Since the two helminths frequently coinfect the same individuals, there is growing advocacy for their concurrent treatment. However, both helminths are known to exert strong immunomodulatory effects; therefore, coinfected individuals could have immune responses different from those characteristically seen in monoinfected individuals. In this study, we measured changes in IgE, IgG1, and IgG4 responses to schistosome and hookworm antigens, including the allergen-like proteins Schistosoma mansoni tegumental-allergen-like 1 protein (SmTAL1), SmTAL2, and Necator americanus Ancylostoma-secreted protein-2 (Na-ASP-2), following concurrent treatment of schoolchildren coinfected with Schistosoma mansoni and hookworm. Antibody responses to schistosome egg (soluble egg antigen and SmTAL2) or somatic adult hookworm (AHW) antigens either decreased after treatment or were unchanged, whereas those to schistosome worm antigens (soluble worm antigen and SmTAL1) increased. The observed different effects of treatment likely reflect the different modes of drug action and sites of infection for these two helminths. Importantly, there was no evidence that the simultaneous treatment of coinfected children with praziquantel and albendazole affected schistosome- and hookworm-specific humoral responses differently from those characteristic of populations in which only one organism is endemic; schistosome- and hookworm-specific responses were not associated, and there was no evidence for cross-regulation. Posttreatment increases in the levels of IgE to schistosome worm antigens were associated with lower Schistosoma mansoni reinfection intensity, while no associations between humoral responses to AHW antigen and protection from hookworm reinfection were observed in this sample of school-aged children.

  7. Excessive naked megakaryocyte nuclei in myelodysplastic syndrome mimicking idiopathic thrombocytopenic purpura: a complicated pre- and post-transplantation course.

    PubMed

    Olcay, Lale; Tuncer, A Murat; Okur, Hamza; Erdemli, Esra; Uysal, Zumrut; Cetin, Mualla; Duru, Feride; Cetinkaya, Duygu Uckan

    2009-09-01

    A boy 3 years 7 months old with thrombocytopenia and history of intracranial hemorrhage who underwent bone marrow transplantation is presented. He was refractory to steroids, immunoglobulin G, vincristine, azathioprine, cyclosporine A, interleukin-11, chemotherapy, and splenectomy. Idiopathic thrombocytopenic purpura was excluded by light /electron microscopic and flow cytometric findings; the diagnosis of refractory cytopenia, a subgroup of pediatric myelodysplastic syndrome, was made. Naked megakaryocyte nuclei were 55.38 +/- 28.2% vs. 31.67 +/- 23.22% of all megakaryocytes in the patient and the control group of 9 patients with idiopathic thrombocytopenic purpura, respectively (p = .016). The posttransplatation course was complicated by delayed platelet engraftment, bronchiolitis obliterans associated with pneumocystis carinii pneumonia, which resolved completely.

  8. Vitamin B12 Deficiency and Hemoglobin H Disease Early Misdiagnosed as Thrombotic Thrombocytopenic Purpura: A Series of Unfortunate Events.

    PubMed

    Andreadis, Panagiotis; Theodoridou, Stamatia; Pasakiotou, Marily; Arapoglou, Stergios; Gigi, Eleni; Vetsiou, Evaggelia; Vlachaki, Efthymia

    2015-01-01

    We herein would like to report an interesting case of a patient who presented with anemia and thrombocytopenia combined with high serum Lactic Dehydrogenase where Thrombotic Thrombocytopenic Purpura was originally considered. As indicated a central venous catheter was inserted in his subclavian vein which led to mediastinal hematoma and finally intubation and Intensive Care Unit (ICU) hospitalization. After further examination patient was finally diagnosed with B12 deficiency in a setting of H hemoglobinopathy. There have been previous reports where pernicious anemia was originally diagnosed and treated as Thrombotic Thrombocytopenic Purpura but there has been none to our knowledge that was implicated with hemothorax and ICU hospitalization or correlated with thalassemia and we discuss the significance of accurate diagnosis in order to avoid adverse reactions and therapy implications.

  9. Vitamin B12 Deficiency and Hemoglobin H Disease Early Misdiagnosed as Thrombotic Thrombocytopenic Purpura: A Series of Unfortunate Events

    PubMed Central

    Andreadis, Panagiotis; Theodoridou, Stamatia; Pasakiotou, Marily; Arapoglou, Stergios; Gigi, Eleni; Vetsiou, Evaggelia; Vlachaki, Efthymia

    2015-01-01

    We herein would like to report an interesting case of a patient who presented with anemia and thrombocytopenia combined with high serum Lactic Dehydrogenase where Thrombotic Thrombocytopenic Purpura was originally considered. As indicated a central venous catheter was inserted in his subclavian vein which led to mediastinal hematoma and finally intubation and Intensive Care Unit (ICU) hospitalization. After further examination patient was finally diagnosed with B12 deficiency in a setting of H hemoglobinopathy. There have been previous reports where pernicious anemia was originally diagnosed and treated as Thrombotic Thrombocytopenic Purpura but there has been none to our knowledge that was implicated with hemothorax and ICU hospitalization or correlated with thalassemia and we discuss the significance of accurate diagnosis in order to avoid adverse reactions and therapy implications. PMID:26609455

  10. Pertussis immunization: an update

    PubMed Central

    Morgan, Lon G

    1997-01-01

    A segment of chiropractic has historically opposed the practice of immunization. This opposition has been based on historical and philosophical precedent, but with little support from the scientific literature. Pertussis immunization has successfully controlled a disease with a prior history of high childhood morbidity. An evaluation of the literature fails to find supporting evidence that whole-cell pertussis vaccine causes SIDS, asthma, or encephalopathy. Countries who discontinued pertussis immunization experienced a return of the disease, and in every case pertussis immunization has been reinstated. The recent successful clinical trials and subsequent approval of an acellular pertussis vaccine should reduce the local reactions and discomfort sometimes experienced with the whole-cell product. In view of the considerable scientific evidence for the desirability and efficacy of pertussis immunization, chiropractic should encourage patient participation in this worthwhile public health service.

  11. Case of twin pregnancy complicated by idiopathic thrombocytopenic purpura treated with intravenous immunoglobulin: Review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Zhao, W X; Yang, X F; Lin, J H

    2017-01-01

    Idiopathic thrombocytopenic purpura (ITP) is an acquired thrombocytopenia without other clear cause of thrombocytopenia. It is not common in a singleton pregnancy and less common in twin pregnancy. We report a 33-year-old ITP pluripara whose first pregnancy was uneventful. She carried twin pregnancy, complicated by recurrent very low platelets, and gave birth to preterm twins. This patient received multiple courses of intravenous immunoglobulin (IVIG) and showed a significant platelet count improvement with IVIG therapy.

  12. Refractory primary immune thrombocytopenia with subsequent del(5q) MDS: complete remission of both after lenalidomide.

    PubMed

    Mortensen, Thomas Bech; Frederiksen, Henrik; Marcher, Claus Werenberg; Preiss, Birgitte

    2017-01-04

    A patient with refractory primary immune thrombocytopenia (ITP) characterised by severe skin and mucosal bleedings was treated with several ITP-directed therapies including cyclophosphamide. He later developed therapy-related del(5q) myelodysplastic syndrome with no dysplastic morphological features in bone marrow. He remained severely thrombocytopenic, which suggests ongoing immune mediated platelet destruction. After two 3 week cycles of low-dose lenalidomide, complete cytogenetic remission and complete normalisation of platelet count were observed. This suggests that lenalidomide may be a viable treatment option for ITP in the presence of del(5q) not responding to standard treatments.

  13. Childhood Obesity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yuca, Sevil Ari, Ed.

    2012-01-01

    This book aims to provide readers with a general as well as an advanced overview of the key trends in childhood obesity. Obesity is an illness that occurs due to a combination of genetic, environmental, psychosocial, metabolic and hormonal factors. The prevalence of obesity has shown a great rise both in adults and children in the last 30 years.…

  14. Childhood Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... they demand more and more of the body's nutrition. Cancer takes a person's strength, destroys organs and bones, and weakens the body's defenses against other illnesses. Cancer is uncommon in children, but can happen. The most common childhood cancers are leukemia , lymphoma , and brain cancer . As ...

  15. Appalachian Childhood.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Arnow, Pat, Ed.; Cheek, Pauline, Ed.

    1987-01-01

    This magazine offers interviews, short stories and articles with a general focus on childhood in Appalachia. Two interviews include: "Creative Response to Life-Pauline Cheek," by Jane Harris Woodside, and "Insights and Experience: A Talk with Eliot Wigginton," by Pauline Binkley Cheek. Short stories include: "Thief in the…

  16. Second Childhood.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Arluke, Arnold; Levin, Jack

    1982-01-01

    Ageism (unfair stereotyping of older adults), deeply embedded in the culture of 20th-century America, is reinforced by television and newspapers. The media depict old people as rigid, meddlesome, sexless, conservative, unhealthy, and forgetful. Most pernicious of all old age stereotypes is that of second childhood. Popular culture portrays…

  17. Thrombotic Thrombocytopenic Purpura in Black People: Impact of Ethnicity on Survival and Genetic Risk Factors.

    PubMed

    Martino, Suella; Jamme, Mathieu; Deligny, Christophe; Busson, Marc; Loiseau, Pascale; Azoulay, Elie; Galicier, Lionel; Pène, Frédéric; Provôt, François; Dossier, Antoine; Saheb, Samir; Veyradier, Agnès; Coppo, Paul

    2016-01-01

    Black people are at increased risk of thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura (TTP). Whether clinical presentation of TTP in Black patients has specific features is unknown. We assessed here differences in TTP presentation and outcome between Black and White patients. Clinical presentation was comparable between both ethnic groups. However, prognosis differed with a lower death rate in Black patients than in White patients (2.7% versus 11.6%, respectively, P = .04). Ethnicity, increasing age and neurologic involvement were retained as risk factors for death in a multivariable model (P < .05 all). Sixty-day overall survival estimated by the Kaplan-Meier curves and compared with the Log-Rank test confirmed that Black patients had a better survival than White patients (P = .03). Salvage therapies were similarly performed between both groups, suggesting that disease severity was comparable. The comparison of HLA-DRB1*11, -DRB1*04 and -DQB1*03 allele frequencies between Black patients and healthy Black individuals revealed no significant difference. However, the protective allele against TTP, HLA-DRB1*04, was dramatically decreased in Black individuals in comparison with White individuals. Black people with TTP may have a better survival than White patients despite a comparable disease severity. A low natural frequency of HLA-DRB1*04 in Black ethnicity may account for the greater risk of TTP in this population.

  18. Thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura and other thrombotic microangiopathic hemolytic anemias: diagnosis and classification.

    PubMed

    Shenkman, Boris; Einav, Yulia

    2014-01-01

    Thrombotic microangiopathies (TMAs) include several diseases, most prominently are thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura (TTP) and hemolytic-uremic syndrome (HUS). TMAs are characterized by profound thrombocytopenia, microangiopathic hemolytic anemia and organ ischemia. In most cases TTP results from deficiency of ADAMTS13, the von Willebrand factor-cleaving protease leading to increase of ultra-large von Willebrand factor (ULVWF) multimers. Congenital TTP is due to mutations in the gene of ADAMTS13 whereas acquired TTP is due to production of autoantibodies against ADAMTS13. In both cases severe deficiency of ADAMTS13 exists. However, the presence of ADAMTS13 activity does not rule out TTP. Diagnostic criteria of TTP are based on clinical features of neurologic and renal disfunction along with anemia and thrombocytopenia, low ADAMTS13 activity, and the presence of ULVWF. The standard treatment of TTP includes plasma exchange, protein A immunoabsobtion, immunosuppressive drugs, CD20 antibodies against B cells, and splenectomy. HUS is commonly caused by infection with Shiga-toxin produced by Escherichia coli. HUS is characterized by thrombocytopenia, anemia, renal impairment and diarrhea. Rarely, atypical HUS appears as a consequence of mutations related to the alternative pathway for the compliment system. Plasmapheresis in HUS is not efficient. Alternatively, plasma therapy and in some cases dialysis are used. TMA diseases may be associated with other infections, bone marrow transplantation, pregnancy, systemic vasculitis, and certain drugs.

  19. Long-term salvage therapy with cyclosporin A in refractory idiopathic thrombocytopenic purpura.

    PubMed

    Emilia, Giovanni; Morselli, Monica; Luppi, Mario; Longo, Giuseppe; Marasca, Roberto; Gandini, Giovanna; Ferrara, Leonardo; D'Apollo, Nicola; Potenza, Leonardo; Bertesi, Marcello; Torelli, Giuseppe

    2002-02-15

    Treatment of severe, chronic idiopathic thrombocytopenic purpura (ITP) refractory to most usual therapies is a difficult challenge. Little information exists on the clinical use of cyclosporin A (CyA) in the treatment of ITP. This report describes long-term treatment with CyA (median, 40 months) and follow-up (median, 36.8 months) in 12 adult patients with resistant ITP. CyA used in relatively low doses (2.5-3 mg/kg of body weight per day) led to a clinical improvement in 10 patients (83.3%). Five had a complete response (41.1%), 4 a complete response to maintenance therapy (33.3%), and one a partial response (8.3%). Two patients had no response. Most patients with a response (60%) had a long-term remission (mean, 28.6 months) after discontinuation of CyA. One patient had a relapse of ITP 4 years after CyA therapy was stopped. Side effects were moderate and transient, even in patients dependent on continued CyA treatment. CyA seems to represent reasonable salvage treatment in severe, potentially life-threatening, refractory ITP.

  20. Thrombotic Thrombocytopenic Purpura in Black People: Impact of Ethnicity on Survival and Genetic Risk Factors

    PubMed Central

    Martino, Suella; Jamme, Mathieu; Deligny, Christophe; Busson, Marc; Loiseau, Pascale; Azoulay, Elie; Galicier, Lionel; Pène, Frédéric; Provôt, François; Dossier, Antoine; Saheb, Samir; Veyradier, Agnès; Coppo, Paul

    2016-01-01

    Black people are at increased risk of thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura (TTP). Whether clinical presentation of TTP in Black patients has specific features is unknown. We assessed here differences in TTP presentation and outcome between Black and White patients. Clinical presentation was comparable between both ethnic groups. However, prognosis differed with a lower death rate in Black patients than in White patients (2.7% versus 11.6%, respectively, P = .04). Ethnicity, increasing age and neurologic involvement were retained as risk factors for death in a multivariable model (P < .05 all). Sixty-day overall survival estimated by the Kaplan-Meier curves and compared with the Log-Rank test confirmed that Black patients had a better survival than White patients (P = .03). Salvage therapies were similarly performed between both groups, suggesting that disease severity was comparable. The comparison of HLA-DRB1*11, -DRB1*04 and -DQB1*03 allele frequencies between Black patients and healthy Black individuals revealed no significant difference. However, the protective allele against TTP, HLA-DRB1*04, was dramatically decreased in Black individuals in comparison with White individuals. Black people with TTP may have a better survival than White patients despite a comparable disease severity. A low natural frequency of HLA-DRB1*04 in Black ethnicity may account for the greater risk of TTP in this population. PMID:27383202

  1. Pregnancy-associated thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura with anti-centromere antibody-positive Raynaud's syndrome.

    PubMed

    Watanabe, Ryu; Shirai, Tsuyoshi; Tajima, Yumi; Ohguchi, Hiroto; Onishi, Yasushi; Fujii, Hiroshi; Takasawa, Naruhiko; Ishii, Tomonori; Harigae, Hideo

    2010-01-01

    Thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura (TTP), scleroderma renal crisis (SRC), and hemolysis, elevated liver enzyme levels, and a low platelet count (HELLP) syndrome display common symptoms that include microangiopathic hemolytic anemia, thrombocytopenia, and renal failure. Therefore, it is important to distinguish between them because their treatments vary: however, the differential diagnosis is sometimes difficult. We report a 32-year-old woman who was referred to our department for further examination of microangiopathic hemolytic anemia, thrombocytopenia, and a slightly elevated serum creatinine level with anti-centromere antibody-positive Raynaud's syndrome in the early puerperal period. TTP, SRC, and HELLP syndrome were considered in the differential diagnosis, but the measurement of a disintegrin-like metalloprotease with thrombospondin type 1 motifs 13 (ADAMTS 13) activity and its inhibitor level led to the diagnosis of TTP. She was successfully treated by plasma exchange and high-dose prednisolone and angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitor. If microangiopathic hemolytic anemia and thrombocytopenia are observed in perinatal women or patients with signs of systemic sclerosis, the measurement of ADAMTS13 activity and its inhibitor level are essential for diagnosis and therapeutic choice.

  2. [Successful rituximab treatment for acquired amegakaryocytic thrombocytopenic purpura complicated with Coombs-negative autoimmune hemolytic anemia].

    PubMed

    Hashimoto, Akari; Fujimi, Akihito; Kanisawa, Yuji; Matsuno, Teppei; Okuda, Toshinori; Minami, Shinya; Doi, Tadashi; Ishikawa, Kazuma; Uemura, Naoki; Tomaru, Utano

    2013-06-01

    Acquired amegakaryocytic thrombocytopenic purpura (AATP) is a rare disorder characterized by severe thrombocytopenia associated with total absence or a selective decrease in bone marrow megakaryocytes. A 67-year-old male presented with a 2-month bleeding tendency. He was referred to our hospital because of severe thrombocytopenia. Bone marrow biopsy showed complete absence of megakaryocytes without dysplasia in cells of the myeloid and erythroid lineages. AATP was diagnosed. In addition, mild normocytic normochromic anemia and reticulocytosis were also observed and haptoglobin was below the detectable level. Coombs-negative autoimmune hemolytic anemia (AIHA) was diagnosed based on the high titer of RBC-bound IgG and negative direct and indirect coombs test results. He was first treated with cyclosporine 200 mg per day and subsequently with prednisolone but only slight temporary improvement was achieved. Administration of eight doses of rituximab 375 mg/m(2) per week ameliorated both thrombocytopenia and anemia. AATP should be considered in the differential diagnosis of thrombocytopenia, and immunosuppressive therapy is a potential first-line treatment. This is the first case report of AATP accompanied by AIHA successfully treated with rituximab.

  3. Diffuse alveolar hemorrhage associated with thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura after allogeneic bone marrow transplantation.

    PubMed

    Kalayoğlu Beşışık, Sevgi; Yenerel, Mustafa; Diz Küçükkaya, Reyhan; Çalışkan, Yaşar; Sargın, Deniz

    2004-12-05

    Alveolar hemorrhage is an early complication after bone marrow transplantation (BMT) and often associated with inflammatory pulmonary processes. We present a case of diffuse alveolar hemorrhage associated with BMT associated thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura (BMT-TTP). An 18-years-old man with acute myeloid leukaemia (FAB; M5) underwent ABO incompatible BMT from his HLA-identical sister. On the 37th day of BMT, BMT-TTP was diagnosed with the occurrence of red cell fragmentation and rise in serum lactic dehydrogenase (LDH) level with severe sudden decrease in hemoglobin and platelet levels. Cyclosporine A (CsA) was ceased and plasma infusion with plasma exchange was started. On the 42nd day of BMT, the diagnosis of diffuse alveolar hemorrhage was made by the clinical, bronchoscopic and bronchoalveolar lavage fluid findings. Alveolar hemorrhage among patients with BMT-TTP has been scarce reported. These two complications may be regarded as related, as small vessel injury is a central feature in both and they may share aetiological and pathogenetic factors.

  4. Refractory thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura associated with primary Sjogren syndrome treated with rituximab: a case report.

    PubMed

    Toumeh, Anis; Josh, Navpreet; Narwal, Rawan; Assaly, Ragheb

    2014-01-01

    Thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura (TTP) is an uncommon, serious disease that involves multiple organs and is rapidly fatal if left untreated. TTP is associated with multisystem symptoms, such as thrombocytopenia, microangiopathic hemolytic anemia, renal impairment, central nervous system involvement, and fever. TTP is idiopathic in about 37% of the cases and can be associated with autoimmune diseases in 13% of the cases. Autoimmune disease-associated TTP can be refractory to plasma exchange and requires immunosuppressive therapy. We report a case of a previously healthy 55-year-old African American female who presented with shortness of breath, hemolytic anemia, renal impairment, and thrombocytopenia. The diagnosis of TTP was made, and plasmapheresis was initiated. However, recurrence happened 48 hours after plasmapheresis was stopped. Autoimmune workup for refractory TTP revealed positive antinuclear antibodies, Anti-SSA, and Anti-SSB. Lip biopsy revealed findings consistent with Sjogren syndrome. Treatment with Rituximab was started, and significant clinical and laboratory response was achieved. The patient remained asymptomatic thereafter. A high clinical suspicion of autoimmune diseases is important as TTP tends to be refractory to plasma exchange in these cases, and immunosuppressive therapy is a key.

  5. Interactions of von Willebrand factor and ADAMTS13 in von Willebrand disease and thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura.

    PubMed

    Budde, U; Schneppenheim, R

    2014-01-01

    The function of von Willebrand factor (VWF), a huge multimeric protein and a key factor in platelet dependent primary haemostasis, is regulated by its specific protease ADAMTS13. The ADAMTS13 dependent degradation of VWF to its proteolytic fragments can be visualized as a characteristic so-called triplet structure of individual VWF oligomers by multimer analysis. Lack of VWF high molecular weight multimers (VWF-HMWM) or their pathologically enhanced degradation underlies a particular type of von Willebrand disease, VWD type 2A with a significant bleeding tendency, and may also be observed in acquired von Willebrand syndrome due to cardiovascular disease. In these conditions multimer analysis is an obligatory and powerful tool for diagnosis of VWD. The opposite condition, the persistence of ultralarge VWF (UL-VWF) multimers may cause the microangiopathic life-threatening disorder thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura (TTP). During the course of active TTP, UL-VWF is consumed in the hyaline thrombi formed in the microvasculature which will ultimately result in the loss of UL-VWF and VWF-HMWM. Therefore, VWF multimer analysis is not a valid tool to diagnose TTP in the active phase of disease but may be helpful for the diagnosis of TTP patients in remission.

  6. Congenital thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura caused by new compound heterozygous mutations of the ADAMTS13 gene.

    PubMed

    Rank, Cecilie Utke; Kremer Hovinga, Johanna; Taleghani, Magnus Mansouri; Lämmle, Bernhard; Gøtze, Jens Peter; Nielsen, Ove Juul

    2014-02-01

    Upshaw-Schulman syndrome (USS) is due to severe congenital deficiency of von Willebrand factor (VWF)-cleaving protease ADAMTS13 (a disintegrin and metalloprotease with thrombospondin type 1 domains, nr 13) activity resulting in the presence of unusually large forms of VWF in the circulation, causing intravascular platelet clumping and thrombotic microangiopathy. Our patient, a 26-year-old man, had attacks of thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura (TTP) with thrombocytopenia and a urine dipstick positive for hemoglobin (4+), often as the only sign of hemolytic activity. He had ADAMTS13 activity of <1% of normal plasma without the presence of inhibitors of ADAMTS13. ADAMTS13 deficiency was caused by two new mutations of the ADAMTS13 gene: a deletion of a single nucleotide in exon17 (c. 2042 delA) leading to a frameshift (K681C fs X16), and a missense mutation in exon 25 (c.3368G>A) leading to p.R1123H. This case report confirms the importance of the analysis of the ADAMTS13 activity and its inhibitor in patients who have episodes of TTP, with a very low platelet count and sometimes without the classic biochemical signs of hemolysis.

  7. Platelet-delivered ADAMTS13 inhibits arterial thrombosis and prevents thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura in murine models.

    PubMed

    Pickens, Brandy; Mao, Yingying; Li, Dengju; Siegel, Don L; Poncz, Mortimer; Cines, Douglas B; Zheng, X Long

    2015-05-21

    ADAMTS13 metalloprotease cleaves von Willebrand factor (VWF), thereby inhibiting platelet aggregation and arterial thrombosis. An inability to cleave ultralarge VWF resulting from hereditary or acquired deficiency of plasma ADAMTS13 activity leads to a potentially fatal syndrome, thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura (TTP). Plasma exchange is the most effective initial therapy for TTP to date. Here, we report characterization of transgenic mice expressing recombinant human ADAMTS13 (rADAMTS13) in platelets and its efficacy in inhibiting arterial thrombosis and preventing hereditary and acquired antibody-mediated TTP in murine models. Western blotting and fluorescent resonance energy transfer assay detect full-length rADAMTS13 protein and its proteolytic activity, respectively, in transgenic (Adamts13(-/-)Plt(A13)), but not in wild-type and Adamts13(-/-), platelets. The expressed rADAMTS13 is released on stimulation with thrombin and collagen, but less with 2MesADP. Platelet-delivered rADAMTS13 is able to inhibit arterial thrombosis after vascular injury and prevent the onset and progression of Shigatoxin-2 or recombinant murine VWF-induced TTP syndrome in mice despite a lack of plasma ADAMTS13 activity resulting from the ADAMTS13 gene deletion or the antibody-mediated inhibition of plasma ADAMTS13 activity. These findings provide a proof of concept that platelet-delivered ADAMTS13 may be explored as a novel treatment of arterial thrombotic disorders, including hereditary and acquired TTP, in the presence of anti-ADAMTS13 autoantibodies.

  8. Hemorrhagic Stroke in an Adolescent Female with HIV-Associated Thrombotic Thrombocytopenic Purpura

    PubMed Central

    Rakhmanina, Natella; Wong, Edward CC; Davis, Jeremiah C; Ray, Patricio E

    2014-01-01

    HIV-1 infection can trigger acute episodes of Idiopathic Thrombocytoponic Purpura (ITP), and Thrombotic Thrombocytopenic Purpura (TTP), particularly in populations with advanced disease and poor adherence to antiretroviral therapy (ART). These diseases should be distinguished because they respond to different treatments. Previous studies done in adults with HIV-TTP have recommended the prompt initiation or re-initiation of ART in parallel with plasma exchange therapy to improve the clinical outcome of these patients. Here, we describe a case of HIV-TTP resulting in an acute hemorrhagic stroke in a 16 year old female with perinatally acquired HIV infection and non-adherence to ART, who presented with severe thrombocytopenia, microangiopathic hemolytic anemia, and a past medical history of HIV-ITP. Both differential diagnosis and treatments for HIV-ITP and HIV-TTP were considered simultaneously. A decrease in plasma ADAMTS13 activity (<5%) without detectable inhibitory antibodies confirmed the diagnosis of HIV-TTP. Re-initiation of ART and plasma exchange resulted in a marked decrease in the HIV-RNA viral load, recovery of the platelet count, and complete recovery was achieved with sustained virologic suppression. PMID:25429351

  9. Childhood Obesity

    PubMed Central

    Ahmad, Qazi Iqbal; Ahmad, Charoo Bashir; Ahmad, Sheikh Mushtaq

    2010-01-01

    Obesity is increasing at an alarming rate throughout the world. Today it is estimated that there are more than 300 million obese people world-wide. Obesity is a condition of excess body fat often associated with a large number of debilitating and life-threatening disorders. It is still a matter of debate as to how to define obesity in young people. Overweight children have an increased risk of being overweight as adults. Genetics, behavior, and family environment play a role in childhood overweight. Childhood overweight increases the risk for certain medical and psychological conditions. Encourage overweight children to expand high energy activity, minimize low energy activity (screen watching), and develop healthful eating habits. Breast feeding is protective against obesity. Diet restriction is not recommended in very young children. Children are to be watched for gain in height rather than reduction in weight. Weight reduction of less than 10% is a normal variation, not significant in obesity. PMID:21448410

  10. Childhood rhabdomyosarcoma.

    PubMed

    Córdoba Rovira, S M; Inarejos Clemente, E J

    Rhabdomyosarcoma is the most common soft-tissue sarcoma in children; it can appear in any part of the body. Its biological behavior varies widely, and despite the absence of specific clinical or radiological characteristics, rhabdomyosarcoma should be taken into account in the differential diagnosis of solid tumors in children. This review focuses primarily on the imaging findings and anatomical distribution of the histological subtypes of childhood rhabdomyosarcoma and secondarily on the differential findings in histological studies.

  11. Immune System

    MedlinePlus

    ... Loss Surgery? A Week of Healthy Breakfasts Shyness Immune System KidsHealth > For Teens > Immune System A A A ... could put us out of commission. What the Immune System Does The immune (pronounced: ih-MYOON) system, which ...

  12. We Must Immunize Every Child by Two.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carter, Rosalynn; Bumpers, Betty F.

    1992-01-01

    Discusses the development and initial implementation of the "Every Child by Two" project. The project is designed to immunize as many newborn through two-year-old children in the United States as possible against communicable childhood diseases, such as measles, and to create a program to systematically immunize this age group in the…

  13. Childhood tuberculosis and malnutrition.

    PubMed

    Jaganath, Devan; Mupere, Ezekiel

    2012-12-15

    Despite the burden of both malnutrition and tuberculosis in children worldwide, there are few studies on the mechanisms that underlie this relationship. From available research, it appears that malnutrition is a predictor of tuberculosis disease and is associated with worse outcomes. This is supported through several lines of evidence, including the role of vitamin D receptor genotypes, malnutrition's effects on immune development, respiratory infections among malnourished children, and limited work specifically on pediatric tuberculosis and malnutrition. Nutritional supplementation has yet to suggest significant benefits on the course of tuberculosis in children. There is a critical need for research on childhood tuberculosis, specifically on how nutritional status affects the risk and progression of tuberculosis and whether nutritional supplementation improves clinical outcomes or prevents disease.

  14. Adolescent Immunization: Challenges and Opportunities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Grace, Judith A.

    2006-01-01

    Immunization is one of the greatest public health achievements of the past century. Vaccines are responsible for the worldwide eradication of smallpox, the elimination of polio in the western hemisphere, and most recently the elimination of rubella as a public health threat in the United States. Childhood vaccination rates are at an all-time high,…

  15. Mycophenolate mofetil (MMF) for the treatment of steroid-resistant idiopathic thrombocytopenic purpura.

    PubMed

    Hou, Ming; Peng, Jun; Shi, Yan; Zhang, Chunqing; Qin, Ping; Zhao, Chuanli; Ji, Xuebin; Wang, Xueyong; Zhang, Maohong

    2003-06-01

    The treatment of chronic idiopathic thrombocytopenic purpura (ITP) is difficult in those unresponsive to corticosteroids and/or splenectomy. We attempted to induce durable response in 21 patients with refractory ITP by applying mycophenolate mofetil (MMF) (1.5-2.0 g/d), a novel immunosuppressive agent. Overall response rate was 62% (13 of 21), including 24% (five of 21) in complete response (CR), 29% (six of 21) in partial response (PR), and 10% (two of 21) in minor response (MR). The response rates for non-splenectomized and splenectomized ITP patients were 64% (nine of 14) and 57% (four of seven), respectively (P > 0.05). 39% (five of 13) responders relapsed as a result of dose reduction or withdraw of MMF, and 61% (eight of 13) responders maintained their effectiveness for a median of 24 wk. Sustained response was observed in three patients in whom MMF was withdrawn. MMF was well tolerated with only slight nausea and diarrhea recorded in 3 of 21 cases. No premature withdrawal was found in this study. CD3+ peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) and CD19+ PBMC were significantly reduced 12 wk after MMF administration in the responders. Platelet-associated antibodies against glycoproteins GPIIb/IIIa were detected in 13 of 21 (62%) patients before MMF treatment, and antibody levels were significantly decreased in responders 12 wk after MMF administration. This suggested that MMF might correct the immunologic abnormalities underlying the destruction of circulating platelets in ITP. We conclude that MMF could be used as a second-line agent for the treatment of steroid-resistant ITP before or after splenectomy and thereby is worth of further evaluation in randomized studies.

  16. Splenectomy: Does it still play a role in the management of thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura?

    PubMed Central

    Dubois, Luc; Gray, Daryl K.

    2010-01-01

    Background Plasma exchange is first-line therapy for patients with thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura (TTP). Splenectomy is often indicated for patients with relapsing or refractory disease. Concerns exist about its efficacy and safety in these patients. We describe a series of patients whose TTP was treated with laparoscopic splenectomy. We also reviewed the literature in order to describe the use and safety of splenectomy for refractory or relapsing TTP. Methods We reviewed the charts of consecutive patients with TTP referred for splenectomy and searched MEDLINE for studies describing outcomes following splenectomy for relapsing or refractory TTP. Results In all, 5 patients were referred for relapsing TTP and underwent uneventful laparoscopic splenectomy. All 5 were in remission after more than 40 months of follow-up. We found 18 studies (87 patients) reporting the results of splenectomy for relapsing TTP and 15 studies (74 patients) involving patients who underwent splenectomy for refractory TTP. The aggregate complication (6% v. 10%) and mortality rates (1.2% v. 5%) were lower for patients who received treatment for relapsing versus refractory TTP. The rate of postsplenectomy relapse among patients with relapsing disease was 17%, whereas the nonresponse rate was 8% for patients with refractory TTP. There were no complications among the 22 laparoscopic cases reported. Conclusion Although the data supporting splenectomy for treatment of TTP are limited to case series with no control groups, they suggest that splenectomy is an option for patients with refractory or relapsing disease. When performed laparoscopically in patients with relapsing disease, splenectomy is associated with minimal morbidity and mortality. PMID:20858382

  17. Childhood Immunization - Multiple Languages: MedlinePlus

    MedlinePlus

    ... التي يتلقاها طفلك - العربية Bilingual PDF Health Information Translations Chinese - Simplified (简体中文) Vaccines for Your Children 为孩子接种疫苗 - 简体中文 (Chinese - Simplified) Bilingual PDF Health Information Translations Chinese - Traditional (繁體中文) Vaccines for Your Children 為寶寶接種疫苗 - ...

  18. Overview of Childhood Schizophrenia.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bryan, Betsy

    Childhood schizophrenia is a rare but serious disorder with complex symptoms that affect children and their families. Childhood schizophrenia was once the term applied for all childhood psychoses, including autism and mood disorders, but more recently researchers have distinguished childhood schizophrenia from other disorders. There are differing…

  19. Myths of Childhood.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Paris, Joel

    This book calls into question the degree to which early childhood experiences affect psychological development, critiquing three related myths: (1) personality is formed by early childhood experiences; (2) mental disorders are caused by early childhood experiences; and (3) effective psychotherapy depends on reconstructing childhood experiences.…

  20. Inflammatory abdominal aortic aneurysm followed by disseminated intravascular coagulation and immune thrombocytopenia.

    PubMed

    Machida, Hisanori; Kobayashi, Makoto; Taguchi, Hirokuni

    2002-11-01

    A 71-year-old man was diagnosed as having an abdominal aortic aneurysm when he was treated for idiopathic interstitial pneumonia (IIP). Three years later, he developed severe thrombocytopenia and had disseminated intravascular coagulation (DIC) that was associated with the inflammatory abdominal aortic aneurysm (IAAA). The coagulation abnormalities were corrected by low-molecular weight heparin, however the platelet count remained low. Bone marrow showed normocellularity with an increase of immature and mature forms of megakaryocytes. Platelet-associated IgG level was high. These findings suggested that the patient had severe thrombocytopenia caused by unusual complications of immune thrombocytopenic purpura and IAAA-associated DIC.

  1. Innate Immune Cells Induce Hemorrhage in Tumors during Thrombocytopenia

    PubMed Central

    Ho-Tin-Noé, Benoit; Carbo, Carla; Demers, Mélanie; Cifuni, Stephen M.; Goerge, Tobias; Wagner, Denisa D.

    2009-01-01

    Platelets are crucial regulators of tumor vascular homeostasis and continuously prevent tumor hemorrhage through secretion of their granules. However, the reason for tumor bleeding in the absence of platelets remains unknown. Tumors are associated with inflammation, a cause of hemorrhage in thrombocytopenia. Here, we investigated the role of the inflamed tumor microenvironment in the induction of tumor vessel injury in thrombocytopenic mice. Using s.c. injections of vascular endothelial growth factor or tumor necrosis factor-α combined with depletion of neutrophils, we demonstrate that enhancing the opening of endothelial cell junctions was not sufficient to cause bleeding in the absence of platelets; instead, induction of tissue hemorrhage in thrombocytopenia required recruitment of leukocytes. Immunohistology revealed that thrombocytopenia-induced tumor hemorrhage occurs at sites of macrophage and neutrophil accumulation. Mice deficient in β2 or β3 integrins, which have decreased neutrophil and/or macrophage infiltration in their tumor stroma, were protected from thrombocytopenia-induced tumor hemorrhage, indicating that, in the absence of platelets, stroma-infiltrating leukocytes induced tumor vessel injury. This injury was independent of reactive oxygen species generation and of complement activation, as suggested by the persistence of tumor hemorrhage in C3- and nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate oxidase-deficient thrombocytopenic mice. Our results show that platelets counteract tumor-associated inflammation and that the absence of this platelet function elicits vascular injuries by tumor-infiltrating innate immune cells. PMID:19729481

  2. Immune Thrombocytopenia

    MedlinePlus

    ... from the NHLBI on Twitter. What Is Immune Thrombocytopenia? Immune thrombocytopenia (THROM-bo-si-toe-PE-ne- ... from one person to another. Types of Immune Thrombocytopenia The two types of ITP are acute (temporary ...

  3. [Childhood tuberculosis].

    PubMed

    Hamzaoui, A

    2015-01-01

    Childhood TB is an indication of failing TB control in the community. It allows disease persistence in the population. Mortality and morbidity due to TB is high in children. Moreover, HIV co-infection and multidrug-resistant diseases are as frequent in children as in adults. Infection is more frequent in younger children. Disease risk after primary infection is greatest in infants younger than 2 years. In case of exposure, evidence of infection can be obtained using the tuberculin skin test (TST) or an interferon-gamma assay (IGRA). There is no evidence to support the use of IGRA over TST in young children. TB suspicion should be confirmed whenever possible, using new available tools, particularly in case of pulmonary and lymph node TB. Induced sputum, nasopharyngeal aspiration and fine needle aspiration biopsy provide a rapid and definitive diagnosis of mycobacterial infection in a large proportion of patients. Analysis of paediatric samples revealed higher sensitivity and specificity values of molecular techniques in comparison with the ones originated from adults. Children require higher drugs dosages than adults. Short courses of steroids are associated with TB treatment in case of respiratory distress, bronchoscopic desobstruction is proposed for severe airways involvement and antiretroviral therapy is mandatory in case of HIV infection. Post-exposure prophylaxis in children is a highly effective strategy to reduce the risk of TB disease. The optimal therapy for treatment of latent infection with a presumably multidrug-resistant Mycobacterium tuberculosis strain is currently not known.

  4. Opana ER abuse and thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura (TTP)-like illness: a rising risk factor in illicit drug users.

    PubMed

    Kapila, Aaysha; Chhabra, Lovely; Chaubey, Vinod K; Summers, Jeffery

    2014-03-03

    We report the case of a 22 year-old-woman who presented with upper extremity cellulitis secondary to an infiltration of illicit intravenous drug use. She confessed to the intravenous use of Opana ER (an extended release oral formulation of oxymorphone) which is an opioid drug approved only for oral use. She was found to have clinical evidence of profound thrombotic microangiopathy which resulted due to the intravenous use of Opana ER. She showed full clinical improvement after withholding drug and supportive clinical care. Recent report of Opana ER intravenous abuse was published from Tennessee county and has now been increasingly recognised as one of the causes of thrombocytopenia which mimicks clinically as thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura. Physicians should be aware of this association as the lack of familiarity to this can pose serious management dilemmas for our patients (especially the polysubstance abusers).

  5. Multidrug resistance-1 in T lymphocytes and natural killer cells of adults with idiopathic thrombocytopenic purpura: effect of prednisone treatment.

    PubMed

    López-Karpovitch, Xavier; Graue, Gerardo; Crespo-Solís, Erick; Piedras, Josefa

    2008-07-01

    High P-glycoprotein-mediated multidrug resistance-1 (P-gp/MDR1) activity in lymphocytes from idiopathic thrombocytopenic purpura (ITP) patients may affect disease outcome. ITP treatment includes glucocorticoids that are substrates of P-gp; hence, P-gp functional activity and antigenic expression were assessed by flow cytometry in T and natural killer (NK) cells from ITP patients before and after prednisone therapy. Herein, patients' T and NK cells did not show increased MDR1 functional activity, whereas P-gp antigenic expression was significantly enhanced in both therapy-free and prednisone-treated patients. Prednisone treatment did not significantly modify the function and expression of MDR1 in T and NK cells of ITP patients.

  6. Thrombotic Thrombocytopenic Purpura with Reversible Neurological Features: Brain Diffusion MRI with ADC Map, Spect and EEG Findings. A Case Report.

    PubMed

    Yerdelen, D; Göksel, B K; Yıldırım, T; Karataş, M; Karaca, S; Reyhan, M; Ozdoğu, H

    2006-11-30

    Although nervous system involvement is common in thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura (TTP), abnormalities on computerized tomography, magnetic resonance imaging and electroencephalography are not encountered so frequently and if present, these abnormalities are often reversible. We describe a 39-year-old woman with recurring transient focal neurological findings found to have laboratory findings consistent with TTP. In cerebral diffusion weighted images (DWI), diffuse cortical hyperintensity was noted in right frontal lobe, but the ADC (apparent diffusion coefficient) map was normal. Electroencephalography demonstrated lateralized slowing and repeated DWI showed diffuse cortical hyperintensity in the right hemisphere. SPECT showed luxury perfusion in the right hemisphere areas. The patient's condition resolved with plasmapheresis. Our patient illustrates that diffuse hemispheric involvement can be seen in DWI and EEG, and SPECT may show luxury perfusion after resolution of neurological findings in TTP cases. To our knowledge, this is the first TTP case in which the ADC map was normal.

  7. Low-dose vincristine in the treatment of corticosteroid-refractory idiopathic thrombocytopenic purpura (ITP) in non-splenectomized patients.

    PubMed Central

    Cervantes, F.; Montserrat, E.; Rozman, C.; Diumenjo, C.; Feliu, E.; Grañena, A.

    1980-01-01

    Eight non-splenectomized patients with corticosteroid-refractory idiopathic thrombocytopenic purpura (ITP) were treated with low-dose vincristine (1 mg/week up to a total dose of 4 mg). Complete remission was achieved in 2 cases and partial remission in 3. Bleeding stopped in one patient who failed to remit. No statistical relationship was found between the response to vincristine and the duration of the disease or the corticosteroid-therapy. Side effects were only observed in one patient. By comparing these results with those reported in the literature, it can be inferred that low-dose vincristine may be useful in the management of corticosteroid-refractory ITP. PMID:7194478

  8. Simultaneous reactivation of herpes simplex virus and varicella-zoster virus in a patient with idiopathic thrombocytopenic purpura.

    PubMed

    Nikkels, A F; Frère, P; Rakic, L; Fassotte, M; Evrard, B; De Mol, P; Piérard, G E

    1999-01-01

    Simultaneous reactivation of distinct Herpesviridae with development of clinical manifestations is exceptional. We report a 48-year-old woman suffering from idiopathic thrombocytopenic purpura. As the disease remained refractory to corticosteroids, immunoglobulins and splenectomy, a cure of vinblastine was administered. An atypical stomatitis developed few days later. Immunohistochemistry on a Tzanck smear and a biopsy evidenced a Herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1) infection. The patient presented simultaneously a single necrotic lesion on the abdomen. Immunohistochemistry on a skin biopsy revealed the presence of the varicella-zoster virus (VZV) gE, gB and IE63 proteins. Intravenous aciclovir was initiated. The present case of simultaneous clinical infections by HSV-I and VZV underlines the importance of complementary viral identification testing in the event of unusual clinical presentations.

  9. Adult-onset congenital thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura caused by a novel compound heterozygous mutation of the ADAMTS13 gene.

    PubMed

    Krabbe, Johannes G; Kemna, Evelien W M; Strunk, Annuska L M; Jobse, Pieter A; Kramer, P A; Dikkeschei, L D; van den Heuvel, L P W J; Fijnheer, Rob; Verdonck, Leo F

    2015-10-01

    Thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura (TTP) is a life-threatening disease, characterized by microangiopathic hemolytic anaemia and thrombocytopenia, resulting in neurologic and/or renal abnormalities. We report a 49-year-old patient with a history of thrombotic events, renal failure, and thrombocytopenia. Blood analysis demonstrated no ADAMTS13 activity in the absence of antibodies against ADAMTS13. The complete ADAMTS13 gene was sequenced, and two mutations were identified: one mutation on exon 24 (Arg1060Asp), which had previously been described, and a mutation on exon 27 (Met1260IlefsX34), which has not been reported. For these mutations, compound heterozygosity appears to be necessary to cause TTP, as family members of the patient display only one of the mutations and all displayed normal ADAMTS13 activity.

  10. Thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura (TPP) successfully rescued by plasma exchange in the ICU: A report of two cases

    PubMed Central

    ZOU, XIULI; WU, TIEJUN; ZHANG, XIHONG; QU, AIJUN; TIAN, SUOCHEN

    2016-01-01

    Thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura (TTP) is a rare, life-threatening disorder, which is characterized by thrombus formation in small blood vessels. The present study retrospectively analyzed the clinical data from two patients with severe TTP, who were treated successfully in the intensive care unit (ICU) at the Liaocheng People's Hospital in 2013. Comprehensive therapies were administered to the patients, including plasma exchange (PE), mechanical ventilation (case 1 only), steroid therapy, blood transfusion and anti-inflammatory treatment (case 2 only). The two patients returned to a stable state and were transferred back to the hematology department following PE. The positive outcome achieved for these patients suggests that early intervention involving bedside PE in the ICU may reduce the mortality rate of patients with severe TTP who have concurrent respiratory or circulatory failure and cannot be treated in the dialysis unit. PMID:27347058

  11. Perspectives on the Causes of Childhood Leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Wiemels, Joseph

    2013-01-01

    Acute leukemia is the most common cancer in children but the causes of the disease in the majority of cases are not known. About 80% are precursor-B cell in origin (CD19+, CD10+), and this immunophenotype has increased in incidence over the past several decades in the Western world. Part of this increase may be due to the introduction of new chemical exposures into the child's environment including parental smoking, pesticides, traffic fumes, paint and household chemicals. However, much of the increase in leukemia rates is likely linked to altered patterns of infection during early childhood development, mirroring causal pathways responsible for a similarly increased incidence of other childhood-diagnosed immune-related illnesses including allergy, asthma, and type 1 diabetes. Factors linked to childhood leukemia that are likely surrogates for immune stimulation include exposure to childcare settings, parity status and birth order, vaccination history, and population mixing. In case-control studies, acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) is consistently inversely associated with greater exposure to infections, via daycare and later birth order. New evidence suggests also that children who contract leukemia may harbor a congenital defect in immune responder status, as indicated by lower levels of the immunosuppressive cytokine IL-10 at birth in children who grow up to contract leukemia, as well as higher need for clinical care for infections within the first year of life despite having lower levels of exposure to infections. One manifestation of this phenomenon may be leukemia clusters which tend to appear as a leukemia “outbreak” among populations with low herd immunity to a new infection. Critical answers to the etiology of childhood leukemia will require incorporating new tools into traditional epidemiologic approaches – including the classification of leukemia at a molecular scale, better exposure assessments at all points in a child's life, a comprehensive

  12. Child Immunization: Prevention Is the Best Medicine. Nutrition, Health and Safety.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Klein, Tanna

    1999-01-01

    Argues that immunizations are the most powerful and most effective way to prevent childhood infectious diseases. Presents immunization rates in Missouri and describes recent state legislation adding tetanus and pertussis to required immunizations for school attendance. Identifies factors contributing to Missouri's low preschool immunization level.…

  13. Integrated Immune

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Crucian, Brian; Mehta, Satish; Stowe, Raymond; Uchakin, Peter; Quiriarte, Heather; Pierson, Duane; Sams, Clarnece

    2010-01-01

    This slide presentation reviews the program to replace several recent studies about astronaut immune systems with one comprehensive study that will include in-flight sampling. The study will address lack of in-flight data to determine the inflight status of immune systems, physiological stress, viral immunity, to determine the clinical risk related to immune dysregulation for exploration class spaceflight, and to determine the appropriate monitoring strategy for spaceflight-associated immune dysfunction, that could be used for the evaluation of countermeasures.

  14. Childhood Brain Tumors

    MedlinePlus

    Brain tumors are abnormal growths inside the skull. They are among the most common types of childhood ... still be serious. Malignant tumors are cancerous. Childhood brain and spinal cord tumors can cause headaches and ...

  15. What Is Childhood Leukemia?

    MedlinePlus

    ... in Children About Childhood Leukemia What Is Childhood Leukemia? Cancer starts when cells start to grow out ... start making antibodies to fight them. Types of leukemia in children Leukemia is often described as being ...

  16. Reducing Childhood Obesity

    MedlinePlus

    ... Navigation Bar Home Current Issue Past Issues Reducing Childhood Obesity Past Issues / Summer 2007 Table of Contents For ... page please turn Javascript on. The We Can! childhood obesity-prevention program involves parents, caregivers, and community leaders ...

  17. Introduction to Childhood Studies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kehily, Mary Jane, Ed.

    2004-01-01

    Educationalists and social scientists are increasingly interested in childhood as a distinct social category, and Childhood Studies is now a recognized area of research and analysis. This book brings together the key themes of Childhood Studies in a broad and accessible introduction for students and practitioners working in this field.…

  18. [Epidemiology of childhood cancers].

    PubMed

    Clavel, Jacqueline

    2007-05-31

    In industrial countries, 1 child out of 500 develops a cancer before the age of 15 years, and before the age of 6 years for almost half of them. In France, incidence rates were stable over the 15 last years with around 1500 cases each year. A very small fraction of cases is attributable to known risk factors, including heritable cancers or cancers in children with heritable predisposing diseases, cancers induced by high doses of ionizing radiation of medical or accidental origin, by chemotherapeutic or immunosuppressive drugs. Responsibility of Epstein Barr virus in a fraction of Hodgkin's and Burkitt's lymphomas is also established, even though little is still known on the cofactors involved in industrial countries. Other virus could cause leukaemia, as suggested by localized increases in incidence in various conditions of population mixing. Conversely, there is some evidence that early common infections could be protective toward leukaemia risk, probably through their contribution to the maturation of the immune system. Several agents are suspected to induce chemical cancers, particularly pesticides, which are consistently reported in childhood leukaemia and brain tumours. It is more and more likely that genetic factors may modulate risk induced of environmental factors.

  19. Immunization Coverage

    MedlinePlus

    ... and afford to pay for them. World Immunization Week The last week of April each year is marked by WHO and partners as World Immunization Week. It aims to accelerate action to increase awareness ...

  20. Enduring psychobiological effects of childhood adversity.

    PubMed

    Ehlert, Ulrike

    2013-09-01

    This mini-review refers to recent findings on psychobiological long-term consequences of childhood trauma and adverse living conditions. The continuum of trauma-provoked aftermath reaches from healthy adaptation with high resilience, to severe maladjustment with co-occurring psychiatric and physical pathologies in children, adolescents and adults. There is increasing evidence of a strong interconnectivity between genetic dispositions, epigenetic processes, stress-related hormonal systems and immune parameters in all forms of (mal)-adjustment to adverse living conditions. Unfavorable constellations of these dispositions and systems, such as low cortisol levels and elevated markers of inflammation in maltreated children, seem to promote the (co)-occurrence of psychiatric and physical pathologies such as posttraumatic stress disorder, obesity, or diabetes. Although findings from prospective study designs support a deepened understanding of causal relations between adverse living conditions, including traumatic experiences, during childhood and its psychobiological effects, so far, little is known about the temporal coincidence of stress-sensitive developmental stages during childhood and adolescence and trauma consequences. Taken together, childhood adversity is a severe risk factor for the onset of psychobiological (mal)-adjustment, which has to be explained under consideration of diverse physiological systems and developmental stages of childhood and adolescence.

  1. The National Immunization Information Hotline.

    PubMed

    Gust, D A; Gangarosa, P; Hibbs, B; Wilkins, C; Ford, K; Stuart, M; Brown-Bryant, R; Wallach, G; Chen, R T

    2004-01-01

    The National Immunization Information Hotline (NIIH) has been providing information regarding immunizations to the public and to health care professionals since March 1997. We describe the operations of the NIIH, its experience over the first two and a half years of operation and lessons learned for other immunization hotlines. From 1998-2000, the hotline answered 246,859 calls. Calls concerning immunization information requests totaled 175,367; data about the calls were collected from 35,102. Approximately a third of the 35,102 calls were from health care providers. Of the remaining calls from the public, the greatest number of calls concerned childhood immunizations. Immunization schedule queries from the public increased 323.0% from 1998 to 2000. While the major goal of the NIIH is to provide accurate and reliable information to the public and to health care providers, data from the hotline can be used to monitor changes over time in calls concerning inquiries about the immunization schedule in addition to other variables of interest.

  2. Immunization Attitudes and Beliefs Among Parents: Beyond a Dichotomous Perspective

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gust, Deborah; Brown, Cedric; Sheedy, Kristine; Hibbs, Beth; Weaver, Donna; Nowak, Glen

    2005-01-01

    Objective: To better understand differences among parents in their attitudes, beliefs, and behaviors regarding childhood immunizations and health-related issues. Methods: Forty-four survey variables assessing attitudes and beliefs about immunizations and health were analyzed. The K-means clusters technique was used to identify homogeneous groups…

  3. Autoimmune thrombocytopenic purpura in partial DiGeorge syndrome: case presentation.

    PubMed

    Hernández-Nieto, Leticia; Yamazaki-Nakashimada, Marco Antonio; Lieberman-Hernández, Esther; Espinosa-Padilla, Sara Elva

    2011-08-01

    The absence of an appropriate central tolerance in primary immunodeficiencies favors proliferation of autoreactive lymphocyte clones, causing a greater incidence of autoimmunity. Del 22q11.2 syndrome presents an increased incidence of allergic and autoimmune diseases. One of the most relevant and frequent immune manifestations is autoimmune thrombocytopenia. We present the case of a pediatric patient with autoimmune thrombocytopenia due to the immunological dysregulation observed in partial DiGeorge syndrome.

  4. Talking with Concerned Parents about Immunization

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sturm, Lynne A.; Zimet, Gregory D.; Klausmeier, Thomas

    2010-01-01

    Clinical conversations between health professionals and parents can be frustrating for both parties when the topic is childhood immunization. Parents bring to the table personal models of decision making and experiences of risk that may differ from those of their health care providers. They may also feel confused by an explosion of information…

  5. Increasing immunization coverage.

    PubMed

    Hammer, Lawrence D; Curry, Edward S; Harlor, Allen D; Laughlin, James J; Leeds, Andrea J; Lessin, Herschel R; Rodgers, Chadwick T; Granado-Villar, Deise C; Brown, Jeffrey M; Cotton, William H; Gaines, Beverly Marie Madry; Gambon, Thresia B; Gitterman, Benjamin A; Gorski, Peter A; Kraft, Colleen A; Marino, Ronald Vincent; Paz-Soldan, Gonzalo J; Zind, Barbara

    2010-06-01

    Internet as well as standard media outlets to advance a position, wholly unsupported by any scientific evidence, linking vaccines with various childhood conditions, particularly autism. Much remains to be accomplished by physician organizations; vaccine manufacturers; third-party payers; the media; and local, state, and federal governments to ensure dependable vaccine supply and payments that are sufficient to continue to provide immunizations in public and private settings and to promote effective strategies to combat unjustified misstatements by the antivaccination movement. Pediatricians should work individually and collectively at the local, state, and national levels to ensure that all children without a valid contraindication receive all childhood immunizations on time. Pediatricians and pediatric organizations, in conjunction with government agencies such as the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, must communicate effectively with parents to maximize their understanding of the overall safety and efficacy of vaccines. Most parents and children have not experienced many of the vaccine-preventable diseases, and the general public is not well informed about the risks and sequelae of these conditions. A number of recommendations are included for pediatricians, individually and collectively, to support further progress toward the goal of universal immunization coverage of all children for whom vaccines are not contraindicated.

  6. Ethics and Childhood Vaccination Policy in the United States

    PubMed Central

    Sturm, Lynne A.; Zimet, Gregory D.; Meslin, Eric M.

    2016-01-01

    Childhood immunization involves a balance between parents’ autonomy in deciding whether to immunize their children and the benefits to public health from mandating vaccines. Ethical concerns about pediatric vaccination span several public health domains, including those of policymakers, clinicians, and other professionals. In light of ongoing developments and debates, we discuss several key ethical issues concerning childhood immunization in the United States and describe how they affect policy development and clinical practice. We focus on ethical considerations pertaining to herd immunity as a community good, vaccine communication, dismissal of vaccine-refusing families from practice, and vaccine mandates. Clinicians and policymakers need to consider the nature and timing of vaccine-related discussions and invoke deliberative approaches to policymaking. PMID:26691123

  7. Ethics and Childhood Vaccination Policy in the United States.

    PubMed

    Hendrix, Kristin S; Sturm, Lynne A; Zimet, Gregory D; Meslin, Eric M

    2016-02-01

    Childhood immunization involves a balance between parents' autonomy in deciding whether to immunize their children and the benefits to public health from mandating vaccines. Ethical concerns about pediatric vaccination span several public health domains, including those of policymakers, clinicians, and other professionals. In light of ongoing developments and debates, we discuss several key ethical issues concerning childhood immunization in the United States and describe how they affect policy development and clinical practice. We focus on ethical considerations pertaining to herd immunity as a community good, vaccine communication, dismissal of vaccine-refusing families from practice, and vaccine mandates. Clinicians and policymakers need to consider the nature and timing of vaccine-related discussions and invoke deliberative approaches to policy-making.

  8. Expressive Education in Early Childhood.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mori, Kimie

    1996-01-01

    Presents a concise overview of early childhood music education in Japan. Japanese early childhood education stresses the natural development of childhood, as well as cultivation of expressive activities. Discusses teaching methods, creative activities, and educational guidelines (MJP)

  9. Childhood Vitiligo: Treatment Paradigms

    PubMed Central

    Kanwar, Amrinder Jit; Kumaran, M Sendhil

    2012-01-01

    Childhood vitiligo differs from the adults by showing a higher incidence in females, segmental vitiligo being more common and less frequent association with other systemic autoimmune and endocrine disorders. Childhood vitiligo is often associated with a marked psychosocial and long lasting effect on the self-esteem of the affected children and their parents, hence an adequate treatment is very essential. Treatment of vitiligo is indeed a tough challenge for the dermatologists’ more so in the background of childhood vitiligo. Although multiple therapeutic modalities are available in the therapeutic armamentarium, not all can be used in children. This brief report updates regarding various therapies available in the treatment of childhood vitiligo. PMID:23248365

  10. Signs and Symptoms of Childhood Leukemia

    MedlinePlus

    ... Diagnosis, and Types Signs and Symptoms of Childhood Leukemia Many of the symptoms of childhood leukemia can ... Child’s Doctor About Childhood Leukemia? More In Childhood Leukemia About Childhood Leukemia Causes, Risk Factors, and Prevention ...

  11. Childhood nutrition and poverty.

    PubMed

    Nelson, M

    2000-05-01

    One in three children in Britain lives in poverty (households whose income was less than 50% average earnings). Low income is associated with poor nutrition at all stages of life, from lower rates of breast-feeding to higher intakes of saturated fatty acids and lower intakes of antioxidant nutrients. Moreover, there is increasing evidence that poor nutrition in childhood is associated with both short-term and long-term adverse consequences such as poorer immune status, higher caries rates and poorer cognitive function and learning ability. These problems arise primarily because parents do not have enough money to spend on food, not because money is being spent unwisely. Policy options to improve the dietary health of poor children include: giving more money to the parents by increasing Income Support (social security) payments, providing food stamps or vouchers, and using food budget standards to inform the levels of income needed to purchase an adequate diet; feeding children directly at school (not only at lunchtime but also at breakfast or homework clubs), by providing free fruit at school, and by increasing entitlement to free food amongst children living in households with low incomes; improving access to a healthy and affordable diet by first identifying 'food deserts' and then considering with retailers and local planners how best to provide food in an economical and sustainable way. The value of using food budget standards is illustrated with data relating expenditure on food to growth in children from 'at-risk' families (on low income, overcrowded, headed by a lone parent or with four or more children under 16 years of age) living in a poor area in London. Lower levels of expenditure are strongly associated with poorer growth and health, independent of factors such as birth weight, mother's height, or risk score. The present paper provides evidence that supports the need to review Government legislation in light of nutrition-related inequalities in the

  12. Thrombocytopenia in pregnancy: do the time of diagnosis and delivery route affect pregnancy outcome in parturients with idiopathic thrombocytopenic purpura?

    PubMed

    Yuce, T; Acar, D; Kalafat, E; Alkilic, A; Cetindag, E; Soylemez, F

    2014-12-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate the determining effects of diagnosis time on pregnancy outcomes in a population of pregnant women with idiopathic thrombocytopenic purpura (ITP). Records of all the pregnant women with thrombocytopenia were evaluated. Those with a confirmed diagnosis of ITP were included in the study. Main outcome measures were antenatal thrombocyte count, postpartum haemorrhage rate, and route of delivery. Foetal outcomes such as foetal thrombocyte count, haemorrhage, and birth weight were also reported as secondary outcome measures. Time of diagnosis either antenatal or preconception did not significantly alter the investigated parameters. Delivery route had no impact on complication rates. Time of diagnosis also did not affect treatment modality. ITP is rare disorder accounting for less than 5 % of all pregnant thrombocytopenias. Time of diagnosis does not affect maternal-foetal outcomes or treatment modality unless diagnosis is made during labour. Compared to gestational thrombocytopenia, treatment rates may differ but treatment modalities remain the same and the effort put into making the differential should be weighed against maternal stress factors for lengthy laboratory evaluation as long as the thrombocytopenia is of pure nature without any systemic involvement.

  13. Idiopathic Relapsing Thrombotic Thrombocytopenic Purpura with Persistent ADAMTS13 Inhibitor Activity Treated Sequentially with Plasmapheresis, Rituximab, Cyclophosphamide and Splenectomy.

    PubMed

    Musa, Faisal; Baidas, Said

    2015-01-01

    We here describe a patient with an idiopathic thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura (TTP) secondary to an ADAMTS13 inhibitor that continued to be dependent on plasmapheresis until the patient was treated with rituximab. TTP manifestations subsided with rituximab treatment in spite of a persistently low ADAMTS13 activity and continued a detectable inhibitor activity until the patient developed an intolerance to rituximab due to an allergic reaction when cyclophosphamide was added; this resulted in a normalization of ADAMTS13 activity and the disappearance of the inhibitor. Later, the patient developed an intolerance to rituximab due to a severe allergic reaction. Soon after stopping rituximab, the ADAMTS13 activity level dipped below 5% in addition to the appearance of the ADAMTS13 inhibitor. The patient had a splenectomy after rituximab and cyclophosphamide treatment; the medication was stopped based on several case reports of a complete remission of TTP after splenectomy. We believe that the reason TTP went into remission in our patient was because of rituximab treatment, in spite of both persistently low ADAMTS13 activity and a detectable inhibitor activity due to reducing the release of von Willebrand factor large multimers from the endothelial cells. We found that ADAMTS13 activity normalized and the inhibitor activity became undetectable when cyclophosphamide was added to rituximab. We suggest adding cyclophosphamide to rituximab for the treatment of patients with persistent ADAMTS13 inhibitors in order to prolong the remission period and lower the rate of relapse.

  14. The splenic autoimmune response to ADAMTS13 in thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura contains recurrent antigen-binding CDR3 motifs.

    PubMed

    Schaller, Monica; Vogel, Monique; Kentouche, Karim; Lämmle, Bernhard; Kremer Hovinga, Johanna A

    2014-11-27

    Acquired thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura (TTP) is the consequence of a severe ADAMTS13 deficiency resulting from autoantibodies inhibiting ADAMTS13 or accelerating its clearance. Despite the success of plasma exchange the risk of relapse is high. From 2 patients (A and B), splenectomized for recurrent episodes of acquired TTP, the splenic B-cell response against ADAMTS13 was characterized through generation of human monoclonal anti-ADAMTS13 autoantibodies (mAbs) by cloning an immunoglobulin G (IgG)4κ- and IgG4λ-Fab library using phage display technology and by Epstein-Barr virus transformation of switched memory B cells (CD19+/CD27+/IgG+). Sequence analysis of the anti-ADAMTS13 IgGs of both patients revealed that the VH gene use was limited in our patients to VH1-3 (55%), VH1-69 (17%), VH3-30 (7%), and VH4-28 (21%) and contained 8 unique and thus far not reported heavy-chain complementarity determining region 3 motifs, of which 4 were shared by the 2 patients. The discovery of several highly similar anti-ADAMTS13 autoantibodies in 2 unrelated TTP patients suggests that the autoimmune response is antigen driven, because the probability that such similar immunoglobulin rearrangements happen by chance is very low (< 10(-9)).

  15. Dysplastic changes in idiopathic thrombocytopenic purpura and the effect of corticosteroids to increase dysplasia and cause hyperdiploid macropolycytes.

    PubMed

    Olcay, L; Yetgin, S; Okur, H; Erekul, S; Tuncer, M

    2000-10-01

    This study evaluates the dysplastic hematological changes in nine patients with idiopathic thrombocytopenic purpura (ITP) in 11 attacks, before and after corticosteroid treatment. The pretreatment blood smears of patients with ITP, displayed more neutrophils with bizarre nuclei (P < 0.001), Döhle or Döhle-like inclusions (P < 0. 01), irregular distribution of granules (P < 0.05), hypo-agranulation (P < 0.05), pseudo-Pelger-Huet-like cells (P < 0. 01), and nuclei with chromatine clumping (P < 0.01) than the normal children. The eosinophils of ITP patients were also dysplastic, before treatment. The pretreatment diameter of the neutrophils and the percentage of macropolycytes were greater than those of the patients with viral infections and normal group (P < 0.05 for all). The percentage of neutrophils with bizarre nuclei and nuclei with chromatine clumping and the diameter of neutrophils and macropolycyte percentage increased with corticosteroid therapy (P < 0.01, < 0.01, < 0.01, and < 0.05, respectively). The neutrophil diameter, percentage of macropolycytes, and number of neutrophils with bizarre nuclei decreased within 1-4 weeks after the therapy was stopped. In the neutrophils of two patients, diploidy and hyperdiploidy were established before and on the last day of therapy, respectively, and diploidy reversed after therapy was stopped. In conclusion, ITP patients display dysplastic findings in both neutrophils and eosinophils before treatment and corticosteroids cause transient significant increase in some of the dysplastic changes in neutrophils.

  16. DNA Immunization

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Shixia; Lu, Shan

    2013-01-01

    DNA immunization was discovered in early 1990s and its use has been expanded from vaccine studies to a broader range of biomedical research, such as the generation of high quality polyclonal and monoclonal antibodies as research reagents. In this unit, three common DNA immunization methods are described: needle injection, electroporation and gene gun. In addition, several common considerations related to DNA immunization are discussed. PMID:24510291

  17. Review of fetal and neonatal immune cytopenias.

    PubMed

    Lewin, Sharon; Bussel, James B

    2015-01-01

    The fetoplacental interface plays a unique role in pathologies of the fetus and neonate, and is increasingly being recognized for effects on fetal and neonatal development that resonate into adulthood. In this review, we will use several exemplary disorders involving each of the 3 types of blood cells to explore the effect of perinatal insults on subsequent development of the affected cell line. We will present new data regarding outcomes of infants treated prenatally for fetal and neonatal alloimmune thrombocytopenia (FNAIT) and contrast these with outcomes of infants affected by hemolytic disease of the fetus and newborn. We also will explore the differences between FNAIT and passively transferred antibodies, as seen in maternal idiopathic thrombocytopenic purpura. Neonatal hemochromatosis is an example of a disease that previously was largely fatal, but whose newly discovered etiology as an immune-mediated perinatal disorder has resulted in development of highly effective treatment. Finally, we will examine the interplay between lymphopoiesis and the placenta in an effort to further explore the phenomenon of neutropenia in preeclampsia, whose etiology remains unknown.

  18. Kaposi Sarcoma of Childhood: Inborn or Acquired Immunodeficiency to Oncogenic HHV-8.

    PubMed

    Jackson, Carolyn C; Dickson, Mark A; Sadjadi, Mahan; Gessain, Antoine; Abel, Laurent; Jouanguy, Emmanuelle; Casanova, Jean-Laurent

    2016-03-01

    Kaposi sarcoma (KS) is an endothelial malignancy caused by human herpes virus-8 (HHV-8) infection. The epidemic and iatrogenic forms of childhood KS result from a profound and acquired T cell deficiency. Recent studies have shown that classic KS of childhood can result from rare single-gene inborn errors of immunity, with mutations in WAS, IFNGR1, STIM1, and TNFRSF4. The pathogenesis of the endemic form of childhood KS has remained elusive. We review childhood KS pathogenesis and its relationship to inherited and acquired immunodeficiency to oncogenic HHV-8.

  19. Kaposi Sarcoma of Childhood: Inborn or Acquired Immunodeficiency to Oncogenic HHV‐8

    PubMed Central

    Dickson, Mark A.; Sadjadi, Mahan; Gessain, Antoine; Abel, Laurent; Jouanguy, Emmanuelle; Casanova, Jean‐Laurent

    2015-01-01

    Kaposi sarcoma (KS) is an endothelial malignancy caused by human herpes virus‐8 (HHV‐8) infection. The epidemic and iatrogenic forms of childhood KS result from a profound and acquired T cell deficiency. Recent studies have shown that classic KS of childhood can result from rare single‐gene inborn errors of immunity, with mutations in WAS, IFNGR1, STIM1, and TNFRSF4. The pathogenesis of the endemic form of childhood KS has remained elusive. We review childhood KS pathogenesis and its relationship to inherited and acquired immunodeficiency to oncogenic HHV‐8. PMID:26469702

  20. Deafness in Childhood.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McConnell, Freeman, Ed.; Ward, Paul H., Ed.

    Twenty papers from the National Symposium on Deafness in Childhood held in May 1966 cover the fields of otology, audiology, and education of the deaf. An introductory lecture traces the history of deafness in children. The section on diagnosis discusses the testing of hearing in infancy and early childhood, pediatric evaluation, the otologist's…

  1. Early Childhood Centers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Butin, Dan; Woolums, Jennifer

    2009-01-01

    Early childhood centers have become a common and necessary part of millions of Americans' lives. More women in the workforce, longer workweeks, and educational research supporting the importance of early education have all contributed to the rise of early childhood centers throughout the United States. Today, more than 30 percent of children under…

  2. Early Childhood Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Elkind, David

    In five sections, this paper explores dimensions of early childhood education: schooling generally construed as nonparental instruction in knowledge, values, and skills. Section 1 looks at some of the factors which have contributed to the rapid growth of early childhood education in modern times. Section 2 briefly highlights the contributions of…

  3. Reframing Early Childhood Leadership

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stamopoulos, Elizabeth

    2012-01-01

    Rapid changes in Australian education have intensified the role of early childhood leaders and led to unprecedented challenges. The Australian Curriculum (ACARA, 2011), mandated Australian "National Quality Framework" (NQF) for Early Childhood Education & Care (DEEWR, 2010b) and the "National Early Years Learning Framework"…

  4. Historian's Discovery of Childhood

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Frijhoff, Willem

    2012-01-01

    The "discovery of childhood" is a tricky notion because childhood is as much a fact of a biological and psychological nature as a cultural notion that through the centuries has been the object of changing perceptions, definitions, and images. Children barely speak in history; virtually everything we know about them is mediated by adults. Then how…

  5. The Disappearance of Childhood.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Postman, Neil

    1985-01-01

    Describes the historical development of the conception and social manifestation of modern childhood, beginning in the Renaissance and spurred by the invention of the printing press and the need for literacy. Proposes that social pressures and especially the electronic media are leading to the end of childhood as a social institution. (CB)

  6. Childhood Interstitial Lung Disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... from the NHLBI on Twitter. What Is Childhood Interstitial Lung Disease? Childhood interstitial (in-ter-STISH-al) lung disease, or chILD, ... with similar symptoms—it's not a precise diagnosis. Interstitial lung disease (ILD) also occurs in adults. However, ...

  7. Childhood Obesity. ERIC Digest.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Summerfield, Liane M.

    In this discussion of childhood obesity, the medical and psychological problems associated with the condition are noted. Childhood obesity most likely results from an interaction of nutritional, psychological, familial, and physiological factors. Three factors--the family, low-energy expenditure, and heredity--are briefly examined. Early…

  8. Childhood Roots of Schizophrenia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Watt, Norman F.; Lubensky, Amy W.

    1976-01-01

    Earlier project reports compared childhood social behavior of nonmigratory schizophrenics and normal classmates by analyzing teachers' comments in school records. This article expands the sample to include migratory schizophrenics and analyzes childhood intellectual functioning. Behavioral differences indicated emotional immaturity and social…

  9. Marital status and mortality: Does family structure in childhood matter?

    PubMed

    Kang, Jeong-Han; Kim, Jibum; Lee, Min-Ah

    2016-06-01

    It is well known that marital status is significantly associated with mortality risk. Little is known, however, regarding whether and how the effects of marital status are moderated by one's own family structure in childhood. The purposes of this study are to examine whether marital status (i.e., family structure in adulthood) and living with both biological parents in childhood (i.e., family structure in childhood) are associated with mortality risk, and whether and how the effects of marital status vary depending on family structure in childhood and gender. We analyze the risk of death in five waves of the General Social Survey (GSS) from 1994 through 2002 after linking the GSS data to death certificate data from the National Death Index through 2008. The findings indicate that being widowed increases the risk of mortality, while living with both parents in childhood lowers it. Interestingly, analysis of the interaction between marital status and family structure in childhood reveals that the disadvantage of widowhood in terms of mortality is significantly stronger for those who lived with both parents in childhood than for those who did not. Subsample analysis by gender shows that the moderating effect of living with both parents is largely equal across men and women, though statistically more robust for men. These findings suggest that living with both parents during childhood may increase vulnerability to marital disruptions due to unwanted life events such as spousal loss. Childhood advantages, ironically, may form more stressful contexts of spousal loss by lowering one's adaptability or immunity to adulthood hardships, especially when the hardships in adulthood are characteristically opposite from the childhood advantages.

  10. Childhood Brain Tumor Epidemiology: A Brain Tumor Epidemiology Consortium Review

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, Kimberly J.; Cullen, Jennifer; Barnholtz-Sloan, Jill S.; Ostrom, Quinn T.; Langer, Chelsea E.; Turner, Michelle C.; McKean-Cowdin, Roberta; Fisher, James L.; Lupo, Philip J.; Partap, Sonia; Schwartzbaum, Judith A.; Scheurer, Michael E.

    2014-01-01

    Childhood brain tumors are the most common pediatric solid tumor and include several histological subtypes. Although progress has been made in improving survival rates for some subtypes, understanding of risk factors for childhood brain tumors remains limited to a few genetic syndromes and ionizing radiation to the head and neck. In this report, we review descriptive and analytical epidemiology childhood brain tumor studies from the past decade and highlight priority areas for future epidemiology investigations and methodological work that is needed to advance our understanding of childhood brain tumor causes. Specifically, we summarize the results of a review of studies published since 2004 that have analyzed incidence and survival in different international regions and that have examined potential genetic, immune system, developmental and birth characteristics, and environmental risk factors. PMID:25192704

  11. Immune System

    EPA Science Inventory

    A properly functioning immune system is essential to good health. It defends the body against infectious agents and in some cases tumor cells. Individuals with immune deficiencies resulting from genetic defects, diseases (e.g., AIDS, leukemia), or drug therapies are more suscepti...

  12. Innate immunity.

    PubMed

    Revillard, Jean-Pierre

    2002-01-01

    For more than half a century immunological research has been almost exclusively orientated towards the acquired immune response and the mechanisms of immune tolerance. Major discoveries have enabled us to better understand the functioning of the specific immune system: the structure of antibody molecules, the genetic mechanisms leading to the molecular diversity of B (BCR) and T (TCR) lymphocyte antigen receptors, the biological function of major histocompatibility complex (MHC) molecules in the presentation of peptides to alpha/beta receptor bearing T lymphocytes, the processes of positive and negative selection of lymphocytes during the course of their differentiation. The major role of specific or acquired immunity has been shown by the rapidly lethal character of severe combined immune deficiency diseases and various alterations in the mechanisms of tolerance have been proposed to explain the chronic inflammatory illnesses which are considered to be auto-immune. Natural or innate immunity has been known since the first description of an inflammatory reaction attributed to Cornelius Celsus. It entered into the scientific era at the end of the 19th century with the discovery of phagocytes by Metchnikoff and of the properties of the complement system by Bordet [1] but due to the vastness of the field and its lack of clear definition, it failed to excite the interest of researchers. The discovery of cytokines and progress in knowledge of the mechanisms of the inflammatory reaction have certainly helped to banish preconceived ideas about natural immunity, which was wrongly labelled as non-specific. This has led to the proposition of a wider role for immune functions beyond the level of the cell or the organism [2] and to a better understanding of the importance of the immediate defence mechanisms and their role in the later orientation of the acquired response.

  13. Vitamin D and Atopic Dermatitis in Childhood

    PubMed Central

    Vestita, Michelangelo; Filoni, Angela; Congedo, Maurizio; Foti, Caterina

    2015-01-01

    Vitamin D features immunomodulatory effects on both the innate and adaptive immune systems, which may explain the growing evidence connecting vitamin D to allergic diseases. A wealth of studies describing a beneficial effect of vitamin D on atopic dermatitis (AD) prevalence and severity are known. However, observations linking high vitamin D levels to an increased risk of developing AD have also been published, effectively creating a controversy. In this paper, we review the existing literature on the association between AD and vitamin D levels, focusing on childhood. As of today, the role of vitamin D in AD is far from clear; additional studies are particularly needed in order to confirm the promising therapeutic role of vitamin D supplementation in childhood AD. PMID:25973433

  14. Salvaging a Childhood Language

    PubMed Central

    Au, Terry Kit-fong; Oh, Janet S.; Knightly, Leah M.; Jun, Sun-Ah; Romo, Laura F.

    2008-01-01

    Childhood experience with a language seems to help adult learners speak it with a more native-like accent. Can analogous benefits be found beyond phonology? This study focused on adult learners of Spanish who had spoken Spanish as their native language before age 7 and only minimally, if at all, thereafter until they began to re-learn Spanish around age 14 years. They were compared with native speakers, childhood overhearers, and typical late-second-language (L2)-learners of Spanish. Both childhood speakers and overhearers spoke Spanish with a more native-like accent than typical late-L2-learners. On grammar measures, childhood speakers—although far from native-like—reliably outperformed childhood overhearers as well as typical late-L2-learners. These results suggest that while simply overhearing a language during childhood could help adult learners speak it with a more native-like phonology, speaking a language regularly during childhood could help re-learners use it with more native-like grammar as well as phonology. PMID:18496606

  15. Maternal Immunization

    PubMed Central

    Chu, Helen Y.; Englund, Janet A.

    2014-01-01

    Maternal immunization has the potential to protect the pregnant woman, fetus, and infant from vaccine-preventable diseases. Maternal immunoglobulin G is actively transported across the placenta, providing passive immunity to the neonate and infant prior to the infant's ability to respond to vaccines. Currently inactivated influenza, tetanus toxoid, and acellular pertussis vaccines are recommended during pregnancy. Several other vaccines have been studied in pregnancy and found to be safe and immunogenic and to provide antibody to infants. These include pneumococcus, group B Streptococcus, Haemophilus influenzae type b, and meningococcus vaccines. Other vaccines in development for potential maternal immunization include respiratory syncytial virus, herpes simplex virus, and cytomegalovirus vaccines. PMID:24799324

  16. FRETS-VWF73 rather than CBA assay reflects ADAMTS13 proteolytic activity in acquired thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura patients.

    PubMed

    Mancini, I; Valsecchi, C; Lotta, L A; Deforche, L; Pontiggia, S; Bajetta, M; Palla, R; Vanhoorelbeke, K; Peyvandi, F

    2014-08-01

    Collagen-binding activity (CBA) and FRETS-VWF73 assays are widely adopted methods for the measurement of the plasmatic activity of ADAMTS13, the von Willebrand factor (VWF) cleaving-protease. Accurately assessing the severe deficiency of ADAMTS13 is important in the management of thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura (TTP). However, non-concordant results between the two assays have been reported in a small but relevant percentage of TTP cases. We investigated whether CBA or FRETS-VWF73 assay reflects ADAMTS13 proteolytic activity in acquired TTP patients with non-concordant measurements. Twenty plasma samples with non-concordant ADAMTS13 activity results, <10% using FRETS-VWF73 and ≥20% using CBA, and 11 samples with concordant results, <10% using either FRETS-VWF73 and CBA assays, were analysed. FRETS-VWF73 was performed in the presence of 1.5 M urea. ADAMTS13 activities were also measured under flow conditions and the VWF multimer pattern was defined in order to verify the presence of ultra-large VWF due to ADAMTS13 deficiency. In FRETS-VWF73 assay with 1.5 M urea, ADAMTS13 activity significantly increased in roughly 50% of the samples with non-concordant results, whereas it remained undetectable in all samples with concordant measurements. Under flow conditions, all tested samples showed reduced ADAMTS13 activity. Finally, samples with non-concordant results showed a ratio of high molecular weight VWF multimers higher than normal. Our results support the use of FRETS-VWF73 over CBA assay for the assessment of ADAMTS13 severe deficiency and indicate urea as one cause of the observed differences.

  17. Erythrocyte dysplasia in peripheral blood smears from 5 thrombocytopenic dogs treated with vincristine sulfate.

    PubMed

    Collicutt, Nancy B; Garner, Bridget

    2013-12-01

    Secondary dyserythropoiesis has been associated with vincristine administration in dogs. Evaluation of bone marrow aspirates for the presence of morphologic abnormalities in the erythroid lineage aids in the diagnosis. However, morphologic features of circulating erythroid precursors in these cases have not been described previously. The purpose of this report was to describe the cytologic features of dyserythropoiesis in peripheral blood and also bone marrow smears in a case series of dogs with immune-mediated thrombocytopenia (IMT) treated with vincristine sulfate. Nineteen dogs receiving vincristine for treatment of IMT were identified by retrospectively searching a computerized medical record system. There were 5 dogs that had dysplastic erythroid precursors in peripheral blood smears within 7 days of vincristine treatment. Two of those 5 dogs also had evidence for erythrodysplasia in modified Wright's-stained bone marrow smears obtained postvincristine administration. Morphologic changes included bizarre or inappropriate mitotic figures, abnormal nuclear configurations (fragmentation, elongation, indentation, and binucleation), atypical nuclear remnants (Howell-Jolly bodies), or nuclear and cytoplasmic asynchrony within the erythroid precursors. A brief review of the literature with discussion of the etiologies for dyserythropoiesis is provided. The dyserythropoiesis was clinically insignificant in all 5 cases and resolved. However, pathologists and clinicians should be aware of these potential findings to prevent misdiagnosis of other conditions.

  18. Immune response

    MedlinePlus Videos and Cool Tools

    The immune system includes specialized white blood cells, called lymphocytes that adapt themselves to fight specific foreign invaders. These cells develop into two groups in the bone marrow. From the bone ...

  19. Childhood Vaccine Schedule

    MedlinePlus

    ... Navigation Bar Home Current Issue Past Issues Childhood Vaccine Schedule Past Issues / Spring 2008 Table of Contents ... please turn Javascript on. When to Vaccinate What Vaccine Why Birth (or any age if not previously ...

  20. Childhood Ependymoma Treatment

    MedlinePlus

    ... before the cancer is diagnosed and continue for months or years. Childhood brain and spinal cord tumors ... after treatment. Some cancer treatments cause side effects months or years after treatment has ended. These are ...

  1. Cardiovascular Conditions of Childhood

    MedlinePlus

    ... diagnosed, treated and even cured in younger children. Kawasaki Disease This childhood illness can result in long-term ... complications. Learn the symptoms, diagnosis and treatment for Kawasaki disease. Cholesterol Raised cholesterol levels early in life may ...

  2. A single-institution, 20-year prospective experience with an affordable Fc-receptor blockade method to treat patients with chronic, refractory autoimmune thrombocytopenic purpura.

    PubMed

    Estrada-Gómez, Roberto; Vargas-Castro, Olga; Oropeza-Borges, Mabel; González-Carrillo, Martha L; Pérez-Romano, Beatriz; Ruiz-Argüelles, Guillermo J

    2007-01-01

    In a 20-year period in a single institution, 34 patients with chronic, refractory autoimmune thrombocytopenic purpura were prospectively treated with ex vivo anti-D opsonized autologous red blood cells. All patients had received previous treatment with steroids and/or immunosuppressive agents, and 11 had been splenectomized. Twenty one patients had an increase in the platelet count; in five cases, the increase was more than 50 x 10(9)/L platelets and in 16 the increase was more than 100 x 10(9)/L platelets. Early responses were observed in 20 patients and late responses in seven, whereas seven patients (20%) did not respond at all. Nine of the 20 individuals who achieved an ER had a subsequent drop in the platelet count; however, only three had a drop below 50 x 10(9)/L. When last censored, of the 34 patients, 24 (70%) had a platelet count above 50 x 10(9)/L. The 84-month thrombocytopenia-free (over 50 x 10(9)/L platelets) status of the whole group is 70%, whereas the 84-month complete remission (over 100 x 10(9)/L platelets) status of the whole group is 50%. It is concluded that the use of ex vivo anti-D opsonized red blood cells may represent another, substantially cheaper treatment of patients with chronic, refractory, autoimmune thrombocytopenic purpura.

  3. Pesticides and childhood cancers.

    PubMed Central

    Daniels, J L; Olshan, A F; Savitz, D A

    1997-01-01

    To evaluate the possible association between pesticides and the risk of childhood cancers, epidemiologic studies published between 1970 and 1996 were critically reviewed. Thirty-one studies investigated whether occupational or residential exposure to pesticides by either parents or children was related to increased risk of childhood cancer. In general, the reported relative risk estimates were modest. Risk estimates appeared to be stronger when pesticide exposure was measured in more detail. Frequent occupational exposure to pesticides or home pesticide use was more strongly associated with both childhood leukemia and brain cancer than either professional exterminations or the use of garden pesticides. Occupational pesticide exposure was also associated with increased risk of Wilms' tumor, Ewing's sarcoma, and germ cell tumors. Residence on a farm, a proxy for pesticide exposure, was associated with increased risk of a number of childhood cancers. Although increased risk of some childhood cancers in association with pesticide exposure is suggested by multiple studies, methodological limitations common to many studies restrict conclusions; these include indirect exposure classification, small sample size, and potential biases in control selection. Opportunities for methodologic improvement in future studies of pesticides and childhood cancers are described. PMID:9349828

  4. Adverse childhood experience and asthma onset: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Exley, Daniel; Norman, Alyson; Hyland, Michael

    2015-06-01

    Adverse childhood experiences such as abuse and neglect are associated with subsequent immune dysregulation. Some studies show an association between adverse childhood experiences and asthma onset, although significant disparity in results exists in the published literature. We aimed to review available studies employing a prospective design that investigates associations between adverse childhood experience and asthma. A search protocol was developed and studies were drawn from four electronic journal databases. Studies were selected in accordance with pre-set inclusion criteria and relevant data were extracted. 12 studies, assessing data from a total of 31 524 individuals, were identified that investigate the impact of a range of adverse childhood experiences on the likelihood of developing asthma. Evidence suggests that chronic stress exposure and maternal distress in pregnancy operate synergistically with known triggers such as traffic-related air pollution to increase asthma risk. Chronic stress in early life is associated with an increased risk of asthma onset. There is evidence that adverse childhood experience increases the impact of traffic-related air pollution and inconsistent evidence that adverse childhood experience has an independent effect on asthma onset.

  5. Generation of Anti-Murine ADAMTS13 Antibodies and Their Application in a Mouse Model for Acquired Thrombotic Thrombocytopenic Purpura

    PubMed Central

    Deforche, Louis; Tersteeg, Claudia; Roose, Elien; Vandenbulcke, Aline; Vandeputte, Nele; Pareyn, Inge; De Cock, Elien; Rottensteiner, Hanspeter; Deckmyn, Hans; De Meyer, Simon F.; Vanhoorelbeke, Karen

    2016-01-01

    Thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura (TTP) is a life-threatening thrombotic microangiopathy linked to a deficiency in the metalloprotease ADAMTS13. In the current study, a novel mouse model for acquired TTP was generated to facilitate development and validation of new therapies for this disease. Therefore, a large panel (n = 19) of novel anti-mouse ADAMTS13 (mADAMTS13) monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) of mouse origin was generated. Inhibitory anti-mADAMTS13 mAbs were identified using the FRETS-VWF73 assay. Four mAbs strongly inhibited mADAMTS13 activity in vitro (∼68–90% inhibition). Injecting a combination of 2 inhibitory mAbs (13B4 and 14H7, 1.25 mg/kg each) in Adamts13+/+ mice resulted in full inhibition of plasma ADAMTS13 activity (96 ± 4% inhibition, day 1 post injection), leading to the appearance of ultra-large von Willebrand factor (UL-VWF) multimers. Interestingly, the inhibitory anti-mADAMTS13 mAbs 13B4 and 14H7 were ideally suited to induce long-term ADAMTS13 deficiency in Adamts13+/+ mice. A single bolus injection resulted in full ex vivo inhibition for more than 7 days. As expected, the mice with the acquired ADAMTS13 deficiency did not spontaneously develop TTP, despite the accumulation of UL-VWF multimers. In line with the Adamts13-/- mice, TTP-like symptoms could only be induced when an additional trigger (rVWF) was administered. On the other hand, the availability of our panel of anti-mADAMTS13 mAbs allowed us to further develop a sensitive ELISA to detect ADAMTS13 in mouse plasma. In conclusion, a novel acquired TTP mouse model was generated through the development of inhibitory anti-mADAMTS13 mAbs. Consequently, this model provides new opportunities for the development and validation of novel treatments for patients with TTP. In addition, these newly developed inhibitory anti-mADAMTS13 mAbs are of great value to specifically study the role of ADAMTS13 in mouse models of thrombo-inflammatory disease. PMID:27479501

  6. Generation of Anti-Murine ADAMTS13 Antibodies and Their Application in a Mouse Model for Acquired Thrombotic Thrombocytopenic Purpura.

    PubMed

    Deforche, Louis; Tersteeg, Claudia; Roose, Elien; Vandenbulcke, Aline; Vandeputte, Nele; Pareyn, Inge; De Cock, Elien; Rottensteiner, Hanspeter; Deckmyn, Hans; De Meyer, Simon F; Vanhoorelbeke, Karen

    2016-01-01

    Thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura (TTP) is a life-threatening thrombotic microangiopathy linked to a deficiency in the metalloprotease ADAMTS13. In the current study, a novel mouse model for acquired TTP was generated to facilitate development and validation of new therapies for this disease. Therefore, a large panel (n = 19) of novel anti-mouse ADAMTS13 (mADAMTS13) monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) of mouse origin was generated. Inhibitory anti-mADAMTS13 mAbs were identified using the FRETS-VWF73 assay. Four mAbs strongly inhibited mADAMTS13 activity in vitro (∼68-90% inhibition). Injecting a combination of 2 inhibitory mAbs (13B4 and 14H7, 1.25 mg/kg each) in Adamts13+/+ mice resulted in full inhibition of plasma ADAMTS13 activity (96 ± 4% inhibition, day 1 post injection), leading to the appearance of ultra-large von Willebrand factor (UL-VWF) multimers. Interestingly, the inhibitory anti-mADAMTS13 mAbs 13B4 and 14H7 were ideally suited to induce long-term ADAMTS13 deficiency in Adamts13+/+ mice. A single bolus injection resulted in full ex vivo inhibition for more than 7 days. As expected, the mice with the acquired ADAMTS13 deficiency did not spontaneously develop TTP, despite the accumulation of UL-VWF multimers. In line with the Adamts13-/- mice, TTP-like symptoms could only be induced when an additional trigger (rVWF) was administered. On the other hand, the availability of our panel of anti-mADAMTS13 mAbs allowed us to further develop a sensitive ELISA to detect ADAMTS13 in mouse plasma. In conclusion, a novel acquired TTP mouse model was generated through the development of inhibitory anti-mADAMTS13 mAbs. Consequently, this model provides new opportunities for the development and validation of novel treatments for patients with TTP. In addition, these newly developed inhibitory anti-mADAMTS13 mAbs are of great value to specifically study the role of ADAMTS13 in mouse models of thrombo-inflammatory disease.

  7. Single platelets seal neutrophil-induced vascular breaches via GPVI during immune-complex-mediated inflammation in mice.

    PubMed

    Gros, Angèle; Syvannarath, Varouna; Lamrani, Lamia; Ollivier, Véronique; Loyau, Stéphane; Goerge, Tobias; Nieswandt, Bernhard; Jandrot-Perrus, Martine; Ho-Tin-Noé, Benoît

    2015-08-20

    Platelets protect vascular integrity during inflammation. Recent evidence suggests that this action is independent of thrombus formation and requires the engagement of glycoprotein VI (GPVI), but it remains unclear how platelets prevent inflammatory bleeding. We investigated whether platelets and GPVI act primarily by preventing detrimental effects of neutrophils using models of immune complex (IC)-mediated inflammation in mice immunodepleted in platelets and/or neutrophils or deficient in GPVI. Depletion of neutrophils prevented bleeding in thrombocytopenic and GPVI(-/-) mice during IC-mediated dermatitis. GPVI deficiency did not modify neutrophil recruitment, which was reduced by thrombocytopenia. Neutrophil cytotoxic activities were reduced in thrombocytopenic and GPVI(-/-) mice during IC-mediated inflammation. Intravital microscopy revealed that in this setting, intravascular binding sites for platelets were exposed by neutrophils, and GPVI supported the recruitment of individual platelets to these spots. Furthermore, the platelet secretory response accompanying IC-mediated inflammation was partly mediated by GPVI, and blocking of GPVI signaling impaired the vasculoprotective action of platelets. Together, our results show that GPVI plays a dual role in inflammation by enhancing neutrophil-damaging activities while supporting the activation and hemostatic adhesion of single platelets to neutrophil-induced vascular breaches.

  8. Teachers Conceptualizing Childhood: Conversations around Fictional Childhood Texts

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chang-Kredl, Sandra

    2015-01-01

    This article offers a unique perspective on teacher thinking by connecting the study of early childhood teachers' beliefs with the field of childhood studies, and with film and literature studies. The purpose of the research is to examine (a) how films can be used to evoke responses in teachers about their implicit beliefs in childhood and (b) the…

  9. Good News About Childhood Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... Home Current Issue Past Issues Good News About Childhood Cancer Past Issues / Spring 2008 Table of Contents ... 85 percent for the most common form of childhood cancer (acute lymphoblastic leukemia or ALL). During the ...

  10. Childhood Cancer: Leukemia (For Parents)

    MedlinePlus

    ... acute. Acute childhood leukemias are also divided into acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) and acute myeloid leukemia (AML) , depending on ... Bone Marrow Childhood Cancer Neutropenia Stem Cell Transplants Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia (ALL) Chemotherapy Radiation Therapy Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia (CML) ...

  11. Stages of Childhood Liver Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... Liver Cancer Prevention Liver Cancer Screening Research Childhood Liver Cancer Treatment (PDQ®)–Patient Version General Information About Childhood Liver Cancer Go to Health Professional Version Key Points ...

  12. Plant Immunity

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Plants are faced with defending themselves against a multitude of pathogens, including bacteria, fungi, viruses, nematodes, etc. Immunity is multi-layered and complex. Plants can induce defenses when they recognize small peptides, proteins or double-stranded RNA associated with pathogens. Recognitio...

  13. Systemic Lupus Erythematosus Presenting as Refractory Thrombotic Thrombocytopenic Purpura: A Diagnostic and Management Challenge. A Case Report and Concise Review of the Literature

    PubMed Central

    Abu-Hishmeh, Mohammad; Sattar, Alamgir; Zarlasht, Fnu; Ramadan, Mohamed; Abdel-Rahman, Aisha; Hinson, Shante; Hwang, Caroline

    2016-01-01

    Patient: Female, 34 Final Diagnosis: Refractory thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura Symptoms: Fatigue Medication: — Clinical Procedure: Plasma exchange Specialty: Rheumatology • Hematology and Critical Care Objective: Rare co-existance of disease or pathology Background: Thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura (TTP) is one of the thrombotic microangiopathic (TMA) syndromes, caused by severely reduced activity of the vWF-cleaving protease ADAMTS13. Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE), on the other hand, is an autoimmune disease that affects various organs in the body, including the hematopoietic system. SLE can present with TMA, and differentiating between SLE and TTP in those cases can be very challenging, particularly in patients with no prior history of SLE. Furthermore, an association between these 2 diseases has been described in the literature, with most of the TTP cases occurring after the diagnosis of SLE. In rare cases, TTP may precede the diagnosis of SLE or occur concurrently. Case Report: We present a case of a previously healthy 34-year-old female who presented with dizziness and flu-like symptoms and was found to have thrombocytopenia, hemolytic anemia, and schistocytes in the peripheral smear. She was subsequently diagnosed with TTP and started on plasmapheresis and high-dose steroids, but without a sustained response. A diagnosis of refractory TTP was made, and she was transferred to our facility for further management. Initially, the patient was started on rituximab, but her condition continued to deteriorate, with worsening thrombocytopenia. Later, she also fulfilled the Systemic Lupus International Collaborating Clinics (SLICC) criteria for diagnosis of SLE. Treatment of TTP in SLE patients is generally similar to that in the general population, but in refractory cases there are few reports in the literature that show the efficacy of cyclophosphamide. We started our patient on cyclophosphamide and noticed a sustained improvement in the platelet

  14. Simultaneous Manifestation of Chronic Myelomonocytic Leukemia and Multiple Myeloma during Treatment by Prednisolone and Eltrombopag for Immune-Mediated Thrombocytopenic Purpura

    PubMed Central

    Inoue, Morihiro; Kodama, Kenichiro; Uchida, Tomoyuki; Hua, Jian

    2016-01-01

    An 80-year-old man was admitted to our hospital because of severe thrombocytopenia. He was diagnosed with idiopathic thrombocytopenia, and prednisolone together with eltrombopag was started, leading to significant improvement of platelet counts. Four years later, there was a prominent increase of peripheral blood monocytes, which was accompanied by recurrence of thrombocytopenia. Bone marrow aspirates and serum electrophoresis revealed coexistence of chronic myelomonocytic leukemia (CMML) and multiple myeloma (MM). The patient received lenalidomide plus dexamethasone therapy but died due to exacerbation of the disorder. It was supposed that thrombocytopenia was secondarily caused by CMML and MM developed at a later period. PMID:27597907

  15. Food allergy and probiotics in childhood.

    PubMed

    del Giudice, Michele Miraglia; Leonardi, Salvatore; Maiello, Nunzia; Brunese, Francesco Paolo

    2010-09-01

    Food allergy is a frequent problem in childhood and its prevalence is increasing. In most cases food allergy is an IgE-mediated hypersensitivity response that cause skin reactions as urticaria. Subacute or chronic disorders have generally a not IgE mediated mechanism. Milk is the most common food allergen in USA and UK followed by egg, peanut and walnuts. Sensitization to milk or egg in infancy is associated with an increased risk to develop house dust mite sensitization and asthma later in childhood. Commensal gut flora play a role in induction of oral tolerance and the importance of the intestinal microbiota in the development of food allergy is essential in early ages, when the mucosal barrier and immune system are still immature. Probiotics interact with the mucosal immune system by the same pathways as commensal bacteria. Recent study show that probiotic bacteria induced in vivo increased plasma levels IL-10 and total IgA in children with allergic predisposition. Many clinical studies reporting significant benefits by probiotics supplementation in food allergy prevention and management but not everyone agree on their effectiveness. These differences are probably related to differences in selected populations and in probiotic strains used.

  16. Developmental prosopagnosia in childhood

    PubMed Central

    Dalrymple, Kirsten A.; Corrow, Sherryse; Yonas, Albert; Duchaine, Brad

    2015-01-01

    Developmental prosopagnosia (DP) is defined by severe face recognition problems resulting from a failure to develop the necessary visual mechanisms for processing faces. While there is a growing literature on DP in adults, little has been done to study this disorder in children. The profound impact of abnormal face perception on social functioning and the general lack of awareness of childhood DP can result in severe social and psychological consequences for children. This review discusses possible etiologies of DP and summarizes the few cases of childhood DP that have been reported. It also outlines key objectives for the growth of this emerging research area and special considerations for studying DP in children. With clear goals and concerted efforts, the study of DP in childhood will be an exciting avenue for enhancing our understanding of normal and abnormal face perception for all age groups. PMID:23140142

  17. Developmental prosopagnosia in childhood.

    PubMed

    Dalrymple, Kirsten A; Corrow, Sherryse; Yonas, Albert; Duchaine, Brad

    2012-01-01

    Developmental prosopagnosia (DP) is defined by severe face recognition problems resulting from a failure to develop the necessary visual mechanisms for processing faces. While there is a growing literature on DP in adults, little has been done to study this disorder in children. The profound impact of abnormal face perception on social functioning and the general lack of awareness of childhood DP can result in severe social and psychological consequences for children. This review discusses possible aetiologies of DP and summarizes the few cases of childhood DP that have been reported. It also outlines key objectives for the growth of this emerging research area and special considerations for studying DP in children. With clear goals and concerted efforts, the study of DP in childhood will be an exciting avenue for enhancing our understanding of normal and abnormal face perception for all age groups.

  18. Reconceptualizing the "Nature" of Childhood

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Taylor, Affrica

    2011-01-01

    This interdisciplinary article draws upon human geography to bring fresh new perspectives to the relationship between two commonly conflated concepts: "childhood" and "nature". Childhood studies scholars have gone a long way towards retheorizing childhood beyond the "natural" and the "universal" by pointing to its historical and cultural…

  19. Ethnographic Knowledge for Early Childhood

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Adair, Jennifer Keys

    2010-01-01

    The policy brief "Ethnographic Knowledge for Early Childhood" details the contributions of current ethnographic research in the area of early childhood education. The brief's main purpose is to demonstrate how ethnography (as a methodology) helps us better understand the context of early childhood programs, the types of settings and…

  20. Discovering the Culture of Childhood

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Plank, Emily

    2016-01-01

    We often filter our interactions with children through the lens of adulthood. View the culture of childhood through a whole new lens. Identify age-based bias and expand your outlook on and understanding of early childhood as a culture. Examine various elements of childhood culture: language, the power of believing, artistic expressions, and social…

  1. Oral zinc and common childhood infections--An update.

    PubMed

    Basnet, Sudha; Mathisen, Maria; Strand, Tor A

    2015-01-01

    Zinc is an essential micronutrient important for growth and for normal function of the immune system. Many children in developing countries have inadequate zinc nutrition. Routine zinc supplementation reduces the risk of respiratory infections and diarrhea, the two leading causes of morbidity and mortality in young children worldwide. In childhood diarrhea oral zinc also reduces illness duration and risk of persistent episodes. Oral zinc is therefore recommended for the treatment of acute diarrhea in young children. The results from the studies that have measured the therapeutic effect of zinc on acute respiratory infections, however, are conflicting. Moreover, the results of therapeutic zinc for childhood malaria also are so far not promising.This paper gives a brief outline of the current evidence from clinical trials on therapeutic effect of oral zinc on childhood respiratory infections, pneumonia and malaria and also of new evidence of the effect on serious bacterial illness in young infants.

  2. The accuracy of platelet counting in thrombocytopenic blood samples distributed by the UK National External Quality Assessment Scheme for General Haematology.

    PubMed

    De la Salle, Barbara J; McTaggart, Paul N; Briggs, Carol; Harrison, Paul; Doré, Caroline J; Longair, Ian; Machin, Samuel J; Hyde, Keith

    2012-01-01

    A knowledge of the limitations of automated platelet counting is essential for the effective care of thrombocytopenic patients and management of platelet stocks for transfusion. For this study, 29 external quality assessment specimen pools with platelet counts between 5 and 64 × 10(9)/L were distributed to more than 1,100 users of 23 different hematology analyzer models. The same specimen pools were analyzed by the international reference method (IRM) for platelet counting at 3 reference centers. The IRM values were on average lower than the all-methods median values returned by the automated analyzers. The majority (~67%) of the automated analyzer results overestimated the platelet count compared with the IRM, with significant differences in 16.5% of cases. Performance differed between analyzer models. The observed differences may depend in part on the nature of the survey material and analyzer technology, but the findings have implications for the interpretation of platelet counts at levels of clinical decision making.

  3. The TITAN trial--assessing the efficacy and safety of an anti-von Willebrand factor Nanobody in patients with acquired thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura.

    PubMed

    Holz, Josefin-Beate

    2012-06-01

    The Phase II TITAN trial is designed to assess the efficacy and safety of an anti-von Willebrand factor (vWF) Nanobody in patients with acquired thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura (TTP). Nanobodies are a novel class of therapeutic proteins and are based on the smallest functional fragments of single-chain antibodies that occur naturally in the Camelidae family (Nanobody® and Nanobodies® are registered trademarks of Ablynx NV). With vWF implicated in the thrombotic process underlying TTP, an anti-vWF Nanobody may hold significant promise as adjunctive therapy to plasma exchange. Recruitment is currently ongoing, and aims to include a total of 110 patients from countries in Europe, the Middle East, Australia and Northern America.

  4. Renal thrombotic microangiopathies/thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura in a patient with primary Sjögren's syndrome complicated with IgM monoclonal gammopathy of undetermined significance.

    PubMed

    Koga, Tomohiro; Yamasaki, Satoshi; Nakamura, Hideki; Kawakami, Atsushi; Furusu, Akira; Taguchi, Takashi; Eguchi, Katsumi

    2013-01-01

    Thrombotic microangiopathy (TMA)/thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura (TTP) is a rare but potentially lethal condition requiring rapid recognition, diagnosis, and initiation of therapy. We experienced a case of a 61-year-old woman with primary Sjögren's syndrome (pSS) complicated with severe renal TMA/TTP following IgM monoclonal gammopathy of undetermined significance (MGUS). She was admitted to our hospital for further evaluation of hypergammaglobulinema, acute renal failure, and severe thrombocytopenia. She had been diagnosed with pSS 13 years prior to admission. Histological examination of her kidney revealed fibrin thrombi in the glomeruli and arterioles, a finding that is consistent with TMA/TTP. The patient was subsequently treated with plasma exchange, which resulted in a successful outcome without any complications. This rare case suggests that it is important to make a therapeutic decision based on appropriate and prompt pathological diagnosis.

  5. Acquired thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura due to antibody-mediated ADAMTS13 deficiency precipitated by a localized Castleman's disease: a case report.

    PubMed

    Benevides, Thais Celi Lopes; Orsi, Fernanda Andrade; Colella, Marina Pereira; Percout, Priscila de Oliveira; Moura, Muriel Silva; Dias, Maria Almeida; Lins, Betina Diniz; Paula, Erich Vinicius de; Vassallo, Jose; Annichino-Bizzachi, Joyce

    2015-01-01

    Acquired ADAMTS13 inhibitor causing thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura (TTP) may be precipitated by some infections, inflammatory diseases or neoplasia. We reported a case of refractory TTP precipitated by a newly diagnosed localized Castleman's disease (CD). TTP was initially treated with plasma exchange and immunosuppressive therapy with corticosteroids; however the treatment failed to promote sustained response. During hospitalization, an abdominal tumor was diagnosed and resected; the histological analysis revealed a CD of hyaline-vascular variant rich stroma. After tumor removal, the patient achieved a long-lasting clinical remission and normalized ADAMTS13 activity. This clinical case describes a novel association of acquired ADAMTS13 inhibitor and CD. The antibody to ADAMTS13 developed along with the systemic manifestation of CD and promptly disappeared after the resection of the tumor. There are reports of neoplasia-associated thrombotic microangiopathy however direct evidence of CD-dependent ADAMTS13 inhibitor had not yet been reported.

  6. Immunization Schedules for Adults

    MedlinePlus

    ... ACIP Vaccination Recommendations Why Immunize? Vaccines: The Basics Immunization Schedules for Adults in Easy-to-read Formats ... previous immunizations. View or Print a Schedule Recommended Immunizations for Adults (19 Years and Older) by Age ...

  7. Immune System (For Parents)

    MedlinePlus

    ... Old Feeding Your 1- to 2-Year-Old Immune System KidsHealth > For Parents > Immune System A A A ... can lead to illness and infection. About the Immune System The immune system is the body's defense against ...

  8. Citrate anticoagulation during plasma exchange in a patient with thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura: short heparin-free hemodialysis helps to attenuate citrate load.

    PubMed

    Buturović-Ponikvar, Jadranka; Pernat, Andreja Marn; Ponikvar, Rafael

    2005-06-01

    The treatment of thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura requires plasma exchange using fresh frozen plasma as a replacement solution once or even twice daily. If citrate anticoagulation is needed, the citrate load (both from fresh frozen plasma and citrate as an anticoagulant) can be significant, causing metabolic complications. The aim of our report is to present our experience with citrate anticoagulation in a patient with thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura treated with daily membrane plasma exchange. Twenty-six plasma exchange procedures were performed during 20 days of treatment in a 46-year-old female. The blood flow was 98 +/- 8 mL/min; 4% trisodium citrate was infused into the arterial line (134 +/- 11 mL/h) and 1 M CaCl2 into the venous line (11.4 +/- 1.8 mL/h). Fresh frozen plasma (first 7 procedures) or cryo-poor plasma (19 procedures) were used as a replacement solution, 3176 +/- 536 mL per procedure. A total of 88,930 mL of plasma was exchanged. No serious side-effects occurred. iCa before plasma exchange was significantly higher than afterwards (1.23 +/- 0.12 vs. 1.12 +/- 0.12, P = 0.0047). Significant alkalosis occurred after three plasma exchanges (pH 7.64, bicarbonate 36.2 mmol/L), and was corrected by 3-h heparin-free hemodialysis with dialysate as follows: K 4.0 mmol/L, calcium 1.5 mmol/L, and bicarbonate set to 24 mmol/L. After dialysis, pH was 7.45 and bicarbonate 29.4 mmol/L. Another (2-h) heparin-free hemodialysis procedure was repeated after six plasma exchanges. Citrate anticoagulation can be safely performed in patients treated with plasma exchange once or twice daily. Periodically performed short heparin-free hemodialysis can correct metabolic alkalosis and attenuate the citrate load.

  9. Immunization Milestones: A More Comprehensive Picture of Age-Appropriate Vaccination

    PubMed Central

    Robison, Steve G.; Kurosky, Samantha K.; Young, Collette M.; Gallia, Charles A.; Arbor, Susan A.

    2010-01-01

    A challenge facing immunization registries is developing measures of childhood immunization coverage that contain more information for setting policy than present vaccine series up-to-date (UTD) rates. This study combined milestone analysis with provider encounter data to determine when children either do not receive indicated immunizations during medical encounters or fail to visit providers. Milestone analysis measures immunization status at key times between birth and age 2, when recommended immunizations first become late. The immunization status of a large population of children in the Oregon ALERT immunization registry and in the Oregon Health Plan was tracked across milestone ages. Findings indicate that the majority of children went back and forth with regard to having complete age-appropriate immunizations over time. We also found that immunization UTD rates when used alone are biased towards relating non-UTD status to a lack of visits to providers, instead of to provider visits on which recommended immunizations are not given. PMID:20508852

  10. Psychoneuroimmunology of Early-Life Stress: The Hidden Wounds of Childhood Trauma?

    PubMed

    Danese, Andrea; J Lewis, Stephanie

    2017-01-01

    The brain and the immune system are not fully formed at birth, but rather continue to mature in response to the postnatal environment. The two-way interaction between the brain and the immune system makes it possible for childhood psychosocial stressors to affect immune system development, which in turn can affect brain development and its long-term functioning. Drawing from experimental animal models and observational human studies, we propose that the psychoneuroimmunology of early-life stress can offer an innovative framework to understand and treat psychopathology linked to childhood trauma. Early-life stress predicts later inflammation, and there are striking analogies between the neurobiological correlates of early-life stress and of inflammation. Furthermore, there are overlapping trans-diagnostic patterns of association of childhood trauma and inflammation with clinical outcomes. These findings suggest new strategies to remediate the effect of childhood trauma before the onset of clinical symptoms, such as anti-inflammatory interventions and potentiation of adaptive immunity. Similar strategies might be used to ameliorate the unfavorable treatment response described in psychiatric patients with a history of childhood trauma.

  11. Peer Relations in Childhood

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hay, Dale F.; Payne, Alexandra; Chadwick, Andrea

    2004-01-01

    We present a developmental model that describes normal peer relations and highlights processes that underlie the emergence of problems with peers in childhood. We propose that children's relationships with peers begin in the first years of life, with stable individual differences and preferences for particular peers emerging by three years of age.…

  12. Conscientiousness: Origins in Childhood?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Eisenberg, Nancy; Duckworth, Angela L.; Spinrad, Tracy L.; Valiente, Carlos

    2014-01-01

    In this review, we evaluate developmental and personality research with the aim of determining whether the personality trait of conscientiousness can be identified in children and adolescents. After concluding that conscientiousness does emerge in childhood, we discuss the developmental origins of conscientiousness with a specific focus on…

  13. Malignant tumors of childhood

    SciTech Connect

    Brooks, B.J.

    1986-01-01

    This book contains 34 papers about malignant tumors. some of the titles are: Invasive Cogenital Mesoblastic Nephroma, Leukemia Update, Unusual Perinatal Neoplasms, Lymphoma Update, Gonadal Germ Cell Tumors in Children, Nutritional Status and Cancer of Childhood, and Chemotherapy of Brain tumors in Children.

  14. Early Childhood: Psychomotor Skills.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Center on Educational Media and Materials for the Handicapped, Columbus, OH.

    Selected from the National Instructional Materials Information System (NIMIS)--a computer based on-line interactive retrieval system on special education materials--the bibliography covers 31 materials for teaching psychomotor skills at the early childhood level. Entries are presented in order of NIMIS accession number and include the following…

  15. Stress in childhood

    MedlinePlus

    ... or prevent stress. Be a role model. The child looks to you as a model for healthy behavior. Do your best to keep your own stress ... family Is unable to control his or her behavior or anger Alternative Names Fear in children; Anxiety - stress; Childhood stress References American Academy of ...

  16. Early Childhood Military Education?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pelo, Ann

    2011-01-01

    Does the country's national security rely on top-quality early childhood education? Yes, say the military leaders of Mission: Readiness, an organization led by retired military commanders that promotes investment in education, child health, and parenting support. Actually, the generals are right, but for all the wrong reasons. The generals' aim is…

  17. Early Childhood Kits.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Center on Educational Media and Materials for the Handicapped, Columbus, OH.

    Selected from the National Instructional Materials Information System (NIMIS)--a computer based on-line interactive retrieval system on special education materials, the bibliography covers 80 kits for developing skills at the early childhood level. Entries are presented in order of NIMIS accession number and include the following information:…

  18. Narrative Processes across Childhood

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mulvaney, Matthew Keefe

    2011-01-01

    According to the narrative perspective on personality development, personality is constructed largely by interpreting and representing experience in story format (scripts) over the course of the lifespan. The focus of this paper is to describe briefly the narrative perspective on personality development during childhood and adolescence, to discuss…

  19. Childhood environment and obesity

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    US children are at risk for developing childhood obesity. Currently, 23% of children ages 2–5 are overweight or obese, i.e., at or above the 85th percentile. This prevalence becomes even higher as children age, with 34% of children ages 6–11 being overweight or obese. Ethnic minority children are at...

  20. Treating childhood trauma.

    PubMed

    Terr, Lenore C

    2013-01-01

    This review begins with the question "What is childhood trauma?" Diagnosis is discussed next, and then the article focuses on treatment, using 3 basic principles-abreaction, context, and correction. Treatment modalities and complications are discussed, with case vignettes presented throughout to illustrate. Suggestions are provided for the psychiatrist to manage countertransference as trauma therapy proceeds.

  1. Early Childhood Trauma

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Child Traumatic Stress Network, 2010

    2010-01-01

    Early childhood trauma generally refers to the traumatic experiences that occur to children aged 0-6. Because infants' and young children's reactions may be different from older children's, and because they may not be able to verbalize their reactions to threatening or dangerous events, many people assume that young age protects children from the…

  2. Rethinking Early Childhood Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pelo, Ann, Ed.

    2008-01-01

    "Rethinking Early Childhood Education" is alive with the conviction that teaching young children involves values and vision. This anthology collects inspiring stories about social justice teaching with young children. Included here is outstanding writing from childcare teachers, early-grade public school teachers, scholars, and parents.…

  3. Lead Poisoning in Childhood.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pueschel, Siegfried M., Ed.; Linakis, James G., Ed.; Anderson, Angela C., Ed.

    The magnitude of childhood lead poisoning has been inexplicably neglected by modern medicine and by legislators. However, since the 1970s, increased attention has been focused on lead poisoning, and advances have been made in several areas, including understanding of the neurodevelopmental and behavioral ramifications of lead poisoning, and…

  4. Childhood Obesity: An Overview

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reilly, John J.

    2007-01-01

    This article reviews recent research evidence, largely from systematic reviews, on a number of aspects of childhood obesity: its definition and prevalence; consequences; causes and prevention. The basis of the body mass index (BMI) as a means of defining obesity in children and adolescents is discussed: a high BMI for age constitutes obesity. In…

  5. Music in Early Childhood.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Feierabend, John

    1990-01-01

    Argues that music activities in early childhood education foster a variety of developmental skills. Analyzes Howard Gardner's theory of multiple intelligences, contending that music intelligence is a separate intelligence. Provides ways to identify and promote musical intelligence. Suggests methods for encouraging musical development. Using songs…

  6. Career Adaptability in Childhood

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hartung, Paul J.; Porfeli, Erik J.; Vondracek, Fred W.

    2008-01-01

    Childhood marks the dawn of vocational development, involving developmental tasks, transitions, and change. Children must acquire the rudiments of career adaptability to envision a future, make educational and vocational decisions, explore self and occupations, and problem solve. The authors situate child vocational development within human life…

  7. Childhood disintegrative disorder

    PubMed Central

    Charan, Sri Hari

    2012-01-01

    We are presenting a case of a 10-year-old female child who presented with normal development till 5 years of age followed by deterioration in previously acquired language and social skills with stereotypic hand movements suggestive of childhood disintegrative disorder. This case is reported as this condition is very rare. PMID:22837782

  8. Constipation in Childhood

    PubMed Central

    Ebelt, Volker J.; Riddell, David

    1992-01-01

    Constipation is a common childhood problem, though parents are sometimes concerned where no problem exists. Early recognition through careful history and physical examination can prevent more serious problems. This article outlines assessment, differential diagnosis, and treatment. Extensive investigations are rarely necessary. Diet, stool softness, attention to routine, and much patience will resolve most cases. PMID:21221286

  9. The Teening of Childhood.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hymowitz, Kay S.

    2000-01-01

    The market and advertising media aimed at children has skyrocketed in recent years. Many new products targeting 8-12-year-olds appeal to their sense of teen fashion, image consciousness, and independence from adults. Describes the development of this market aimed at early adolescents and how it is changing childhood as Americans have known it. (SM)

  10. A difficult diagnosis of Hodgkin lymphoma due to immune thrombocytopenia

    PubMed Central

    Marino, Silvia; Di Cataldo, Andrea; Magro, Gaetano; D'Amico, Salvatore; La Spina, Milena; Di Benedetto, Vincenzo; Meli, Mariaclaudia; Moscheo, Carla; Russo, Giovanna

    2015-01-01

    Key Clinical Message We report a rare clinical presentation of childhood Hodgkin lymphoma with immune thrombocytopenia. Diagnostic biopsy of the abdominal mass was performed after administration of intravenous immunoglobulins, steroids, and platelet transfusion. Concomitant thrombocytopenia complicated the whole diagnosis work up and the initial management of neoplasia. PMID:25838909

  11. Day care, childhood infections, and risk of neuroblastoma

    PubMed Central

    Menegaux, Florence; Olshan, Andrew F.; Neglia, Joseph P.; Pollock, Brad H.; Bondy, Melissa L.

    2004-01-01

    Neuroblastoma is the most common cancer in infants worldwide but little is known about its etiology. Infectious etiologies involving the immune system have been hypothesized for some childhood cancers, especially leukemia, but the role of infectious agents in neuroblastoma has not been fully investigated. We used data from a large case-control study conducted by the Children’s Oncology Group over the period 1992–1994 in United States or Canada to investigate if there was any relation between day care attendance, childhood infections, allergies and neuroblastoma. We interviewed mothers of 538 case and 504 age-matched control children by telephone about several factors including pregnancy, medical history, lifestyle, and childhood medical conditions and exposures. Our results suggested decreased risks associated with day care attendance (odds ratio (OR) = 0.81; 95% confidence interval ([CI]: 0.56–1.17), childhood infectious diseases (chickenpox, mumps, red and German measles) (OR = 0.60;CI: 0.39–0.93) and allergies (OR = 0.68; CI: 0.44–1.07). We found reduced neuroblastoma risk associated with markers of potential childhood infections, which suggests a possible role of infectious agents in neuroblastoma etiology. Future epidemiologic studies should incorporate more direct infection data. PMID:15105177

  12. Idiopathic thrombocytopenic purpura (ITP)

    MedlinePlus

    Blood tests will be done to check your platelet count . A bone marrow aspiration or biopsy may also be done. ... the disease usually goes away without treatment. Some children ... the platelet count in about half of people. However, other drug ...

  13. Thrombotic Thrombocytopenic Purpura

    MedlinePlus

    ... make a normal ADAMTS13 enzyme. As a result, enzyme activity is lacking or changed. Acquired TTP is the ... the body makes antibodies (proteins) that block the activity of the ADAMTS13 enzyme. It's not clear what triggers inherited and acquired ...

  14. Thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura

    MedlinePlus

    ... level Mucus membrane biopsy Platelet count Urinalysis Von Willebrand factor assay Treatment You may have a treatment ... recover completely. But some people die of this disease, especially if it is not diagnosed right away. ...

  15. Rediscovering Morality through the Concept of Childhood

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Burdick-Shepherd, Stephanie

    2013-01-01

    This chapter looks at John Dewey's consideration of childhood as a platform which to view the significance of childhood in moral life. It argues that the concept of childhood is integral to our thinking in the teaching and learning relationship. When we consider childhood from Dewey's platform, we see that childhood is relevant to…

  16. Childhood depression: a systematic review

    PubMed Central

    Lima, Nádia Nara Rolim; do Nascimento, Vânia Barbosa; de Carvalho, Sionara Melo Figueiredo; de Abreu, Luiz Carlos; Neto, Modesto Leite Rolim; Brasil, Aline Quental; Junior, Francisco Telésforo Celestino; de Oliveira, Gislene Farias; Reis, Alberto Olavo Advíncula

    2013-01-01

    As an important public health issue, childhood depression deserves special attention, considering the serious and lasting consequences of the disease to child development. Taking this into consideration, the present study was based on the following question: what practical contributions to clinicians and researchers does the current literature on childhood depression have to offer? The objective of the present study was to conduct a systematic review of articles regarding childhood depression. To accomplish this purpose, a systematic review of articles on childhood depression, published from January 1, 2010 to November 24, 2012, on MEDLINE and SciELO databases was carried out. Search terms were “depression” (medical subject headings [MeSH]), “child” (MeSH), and “childhood depression” (keyword). Of the 180 retrieved studies, 25 met the eligibility criteria. Retrieved studies covered a wide range of aspects regarding childhood depression, such as diagnosis, treatment, prevention and prognosis. Recent scientific literature regarding childhood depression converge to, directly or indirectly, highlight the negative impacts of depressive disorders to the children’s quality of life. Unfortunately, the retrieved studies show that childhood depression commonly grows in a background of vulnerability and poverty, where individual and familiar needs concerning childhood depression are not always taken into consideration. In this context, this review demonstrated that childhood-onset depression commonly leads to other psychiatric disorders and co-morbidities. Many of the retrieved studies also confirmed the hypothesis that human resources (eg, health care team in general) are not yet adequately trained to address childhood depression. Thus, further research on the development of programs to prepare health care professionals to deal with childhood depression is needed, as well as complementary studies, with larger and more homogeneous samples, centered on prevention

  17. Reactions of the immune system in epilepsy

    PubMed Central

    COJOCARU, Inimioara Mihaela; COJOCARU, Manole

    2010-01-01

    ABSTRACT Epilepsy may present as a symptom of many neurological disorders and often an etiological explanation cannot be identified. There is growing evidence that autoimmune mechanisms might have a role in some patients. The evidence for immunological mechanisms in epilepsy can be examined within the following three main areas: the childhood epilepsy syndromes, epilepsy associated with other immunologically mediated diseases, and the more common unselected groups of patients with epilepsy. Autoimmunity was recently suspected to be involved in the pathology of certain human epilepsies. This includes numerous reports of the detection of theoretically relevant serum autoantibodies, experimental data showing that antibodies can be epileptogenic, and a response of some epilepsy syndromes to immunomodulation. The high prevalence of epilepsies in specific immune diseases suggests that immune system may play a role in the pathogenesis of epilepsy or might be associated with it. There is some evidence that immune mechanisms play a role in the pathogenesis of some epilepsy syndromes. PMID:21977153

  18. Zinc in innate and adaptive tumor immunity

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Zinc is important. It is the second most abundant trace metal with 2-4 grams in humans. It is an essential trace element, critical for cell growth, development and differentiation, DNA synthesis, RNA transcription, cell division, and cell activation. Zinc deficiency has adverse consequences during embryogenesis and early childhood development, particularly on immune functioning. It is essential in members of all enzyme classes, including over 300 signaling molecules and transcription factors. Free zinc in immune and tumor cells is regulated by 14 distinct zinc importers (ZIP) and transporters (ZNT1-8). Zinc depletion induces cell death via apoptosis (or necrosis if apoptotic pathways are blocked) while sufficient zinc levels allows maintenance of autophagy. Cancer cells have upregulated zinc importers, and frequently increased zinc levels, which allow them to survive. Based on this novel synthesis, approaches which locally regulate zinc levels to promote survival of immune cells and/or induce tumor apoptosis are in order. PMID:21087493

  19. Clinical characteristics of immune thrombocytopenia associated with autoimmune disease

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Yuan; Chen, Shiju; Sun, Yuechi; Lin, Qingyan; Liao, Xining; Zhang, Junhui; Luo, Jiao; Qian, Hongyan; Duan, Lihua; Shi, Guixiu

    2016-01-01

    Abstract To clarify clinical characteristics of immune thrombocytopenia (ITP) subsets associated with autoimmune diseases (AIDs). Five thousand five hundred twenty patients were reviewed retrospectively. One hundred four ITP patients were included for analysis. Clinical manifestations at first thrombocytopenic episode were recorded. Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) and primary Sjogren syndrome (pSS) accounted for a large part in AIDs associated with secondary ITP. SLE-ITP, pSS-ITP, and primary ITP (pITP) patients were different in several aspects in clinical and immunological characteristics. A subgroup of patients in pITP patients with some obvious autoimmune features (defined as AIF-ITP) such as positive ANA but failing to meet the diagnosis criteria now used for a specific kind of connective tissue diseases were also different with other pITP patients in some immunological features, indicating the difference in the pathogenesis mechanism of those autoimmune featured ITP patients. ITP patients were heterogeneous in clinical characteristics. Further study about the different pathogenesis of ITP subsets especially those AIF-ITP patients who only presented with thrombocytopenia will help us have a better understanding of pathogenesis of ITP and a better management of ITP patients. PMID:27977588

  20. Acquired TTP: ADAMTS13 meets the immune system.

    PubMed

    Verbij, Fabian C; Fijnheer, Rob; Voorberg, Jan; Sorvillo, Nicoletta

    2014-11-01

    The majority of the patients affected by acquired thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura (TTP) develop autoantibodies directed towards ADAMTS13 that interfere with its von Willebrand Factor (VWF) processing activity. B cell responses have been shown to primarily target the spacer domain of ADAMTS13 thereby prohibiting the binding of ADAMTS13 to the VWF A2 domain. In this review we summarize recent knowledge gained on the immune recognition and processing of ADAMTS13 by antigen-presenting cells (APCs). HLA-DRB1*11 has been identified as a risk factor for acquired TTP. Analysis of MHC class II/peptide complexes of ADAMTS13 pulsed dendritic cells have shown that the CUB2 domain derived peptide FINVAPHAR is preferentially presented on HLA-DRB1*11. Based on these findings we propose a model for the initiation of the autoimmune reactivity against ADAMTS13 in previously healthy individuals. We hypothesize that mimicry between a pathogen-derived peptide and the CUB2 derived FINVAPHAR-peptide might contribute to the onset of acquired TTP.

  1. Unintended events following immunization with MMR: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Jefferson, Tom; Price, Deirdre; Demicheli, Vittorio; Bianco, Elvira

    2003-09-08

    Public debate over the safety of the trivalent measles, mumps and rubella (MMR) vaccine and the drop in vaccination rates in several countries persists despite its almost universal use and accepted effectiveness. We carried out a systematic review to assess the evidence of unintended effects (beneficial or harmful) associated with MMR and the applicability of systematic reviewing methods to the field of safety evaluation. Eligible studies were comparative prospective or retrospective on healthy individuals up to 15 years of age, carried out or published by 2003. We identified 120 articles satisfying our inclusion criteria and included 22. MMR is associated with a lower incidence of upper respiratory tract infections, a higher incidence of irritability, similar incidence of other adverse effects compared to placebo and is likely to be associated with benign thrombocytopenic purpura (TP), parotitis, joint and limb complaints and aseptic meningitis (mumps Urabe strain-containing MMR). Exposure to MMR is unlikely to be associated with Crohn's disease, ulcerative colitis, autism or aseptic meningitis (mumps Jeryl-Lynn strain-containing MMR). The design and reporting of safety outcomes in MMR vaccine studies, both pre- and post-marketing, are largely inadequate. The evidence of adverse events following immunization with MMR cannot be separated from its role in preventing the target diseases.

  2. Integrated Circuit Immunity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sketoe, J. G.; Clark, Anthony

    2000-01-01

    This paper presents a DOD E3 program overview on integrated circuit immunity. The topics include: 1) EMI Immunity Testing; 2) Threshold Definition; 3) Bias Tee Function; 4) Bias Tee Calibration Set-Up; 5) EDM Test Figure; 6) EMI Immunity Levels; 7) NAND vs. and Gate Immunity; 8) TTL vs. LS Immunity Levels; 9) TP vs. OC Immunity Levels; 10) 7805 Volt Reg Immunity; and 11) Seventies Chip Set. This paper is presented in viewgraph form.

  3. Conscientiousness: Origins in Childhood?

    PubMed Central

    Eisenberg, Nancy; Duckworth, Angela L.; Spinrad, Tracy L.; Valiente, Carlos

    2012-01-01

    In this review, we evaluate developmental and personality research with the aim of determining if the personality trait of conscientiousness can be identified in children and adolescents. After concluding that conscientiousness does emerge in childhood, we discuss the developmental origins of conscientiousness with a specific focus on self-regulation, academic motivation, and internalized compliance/internalization of standards. Based on the accumulated body of evidence, we conclude that self-regulation fosters conscientiousness later in life, both directly and via academic motivation and internalized compliance with norms. We argue that elements of conscientiousness are evident by early childhood, self-regulation skills are likely a core developmental component of conscientiousness, and despite the contribution of heredity to the aforementioned aspects of functioning, environmental factors likely contribute to conscientiousness. PMID:23244405

  4. Parasomnias in childhood.

    PubMed

    Kotagal, Suresh

    2009-04-01

    Common childhood parasomnias, including those occurring at sleep onset and during rapid eye movement sleep or non-rapid eye movement sleep and their ontogeny are discussed. The events may be distressing to both the patient and family members. Stereotypic movements characteristic of some parasomnias most likely arise from disinhibition of subcortical central pattern generators. Genetic predisposition, an inherent instability of non-rapid eye movement sleep and underlying sleep disturbances such as obstructive sleep apnea may predispose to the activation of confusional arousals, sleep walking or sleep terrors. Many parasomnias can be recognized by history alone, but some require nocturnal polysomnography for appropriate diagnosis and management. A scheme to distinguish non-rapid eye movement sleep parasomnias from nocturnal seizures is provided. Behavioral therapy has a role in the management of many childhood parasomnias, but evidence based recommendations are as yet unavailable.

  5. Conscientiousness: origins in childhood?

    PubMed

    Eisenberg, Nancy; Duckworth, Angela L; Spinrad, Tracy L; Valiente, Carlos

    2014-05-01

    In this review, we evaluate developmental and personality research with the aim of determining whether the personality trait of conscientiousness can be identified in children and adolescents. After concluding that conscientiousness does emerge in childhood, we discuss the developmental origins of conscientiousness with a specific focus on self-regulation, academic motivation, and internalized compliance/internalization of standards. On the basis of the accumulated body of evidence, we conclude that self-regulation fosters conscientiousness later in life, both directly and via academic motivation and internalized compliance with norms. We argue that elements of conscientiousness are evident by early childhood; self-regulation skills are likely a core developmental component of conscientiousness; and despite the contribution of heredity to the aforementioned aspects of functioning, environmental factors likely contribute to conscientiousness.

  6. Thyroid cancer in childhood

    SciTech Connect

    Gorlin, J.B.; Sallan, S.E. )

    1990-09-01

    The incidence, clinical presentation, and types of thyroid cancers presenting in childhood are reviewed. The role of antecedent radiation in papillary and follicular thyroid cancers and genetics of medullary thyroid carcinoma are discussed. Unique aspects of therapy and prognosis for the pediatric patient with thyroid carcinoma are addressed as well as a diagnostic approach to the child who presents with a neck mass.59 references.

  7. Social Withdrawal in Childhood

    PubMed Central

    Rubin, Kenneth H.; Coplan, Robert J.; Bowker, Julie C.

    2013-01-01

    Socially withdrawn children frequently refrain from social activities in the presence of peers. The lack of social interaction in childhood may result from a variety of causes, including social fear and anxiety or a preference for solitude. From early childhood through to adolescence, socially withdrawn children are concurrently and predictively at risk for a wide range of negative adjustment outcomes, including socio-emotional difficulties (e.g., anxiety, low self-esteem, depressive symptoms, and internalizing problems), peer difficulties (e.g., rejection, victimization, poor friendship quality), and school difficulties (e.g., poor-quality teacher-child relationships, academic difficulties, school avoidance). The goals of the current review are to (a) provide some definitional, theoretical, and methodological clarity to the complex array of terms and constructs previously employed in the study of social withdrawal; (b) examine the predictors, correlates, and consequences of child and early-adolescent social withdrawal; and (c) present a developmental framework describing pathways to and from social withdrawal in childhood. PMID:18851686

  8. Gene Therapy for Childhood Neurofibromatosis

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-05-01

    AD_________________ Award Number: W81XWH-13-1-0101 TITLE: Gene Therapy for Childhood ...May 2014 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Gene Therapy for Childhood Neurofibromatosis 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER W81XWH-13-1-0101 5c...technology. This approach still represents a plausible and very different way to treat childhood neurofibromatosis, as well as other solid tumors

  9. Genetics Home Reference: alternating hemiplegia of childhood

    MedlinePlus

    ... Conditions alternating hemiplegia of childhood alternating hemiplegia of childhood Enable Javascript to view the expand/collapse boxes. ... Open All Close All Description Alternating hemiplegia of childhood is a neurological condition characterized by recurrent episodes ...

  10. Vaccination Strategies for Mucosal Immune Responses

    PubMed Central

    Ogra, Pearay L.; Faden, Howard; Welliver, Robert C.

    2001-01-01

    Mucosal administration of vaccines is an important approach to the induction of appropriate immune responses to microbial and other environmental antigens in systemic sites and peripheral blood as well as in most external mucosal surfaces. The development of specific antibody- or T-cell-mediated immunologic responses and the induction of mucosally induced systemic immunologic hyporesponsiveness (oral or mucosal tolerance) depend on complex sets of immunologic events, including the nature of the antigenic stimulation of specialized lymphoid structures in the host, antigen-induced activation of different populations of regulatory T cells (Th1 versus Th2), and the expression of proinflammatory and immunoregulatory cytokines. Availability of mucosal vaccines will provide a painless approach to deliver large numbers of vaccine antigens for human immunization. Currently, an average infant will receive 20 to 25 percutaneous injections for vaccination against different childhood infections by 18 months of age. It should be possible to develop for human use effective, nonliving, recombinant, replicating, transgenic, and microbial vector- or plant-based mucosal vaccines to prevent infections. Based on the experience with many dietary antigens, it is also possible to manipulate the mucosal immune system to induce systemic tolerance against environmental, dietary, and possibly other autoantigens associated with allergic and autoimmune disorders. Mucosal immunity offers new strategies to induce protective immune responses against a variety of infectious agents. Such immunization may also provide new prophylactic or therapeutic avenues in the control of autoimmune diseases in humans. PMID:11292646

  11. Immune system stimulation by probiotic microorganisms.

    PubMed

    Ashraf, Rabia; Shah, Nagendra P

    2014-01-01

    Probiotic organisms are claimed to offer several functional properties including stimulation of immune system. This review is presented to provide detailed informations about how probiotics stimulate our immune system. Lactobacillus rhamnosus GG, Lactobacillus casei Shirota, Bifidobacterium animalis Bb-12, Lactobacillus johnsonii La1, Bifidobacterium lactis DR10, and Saccharomyces cerevisiae boulardii are the most investigated probiotic cultures for their immunomodulation properties. Probiotics can enhance nonspecific cellular immune response characterized by activation of macrophages, natural killer (NK) cells, antigen-specific cytotoxic T-lymphocytes, and the release of various cytokines in strain-specific and dose-dependent manner. Mixture and type (gram-positive and gram-negative) of probiotic organisms may induce different cytokine responses. Supplementation of probiotic organisms in infancy could help prevent immune-mediated diseases in childhood, whereas their intervention in pregnancy could affect fetal immune parameters, such as cord blood interferon (IFN)-γ levels, transforming growth factor (TGF)-β1 levels, and breast milk immunoglobulin (Ig)A. Probiotics that can be delivered via fermented milk or yogurt could improve the gut mucosal immune system by increasing the number of IgA(+) cells and cytokine-producing cells in the effector site of the intestine.

  12. Does intravenous immune globulin have a role in HIV-infected patients?

    PubMed Central

    Yap, P L

    1994-01-01

    The main immunological abnormality in human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-infected patients, and particularly those with the acquired immune deficiency syndrome (AIDS), is a deficiency in cellular immunity. However, symptomatic HIV-infected children also have evidence of deficiency of specific antibody synthesis, and intravenous immune globulin (IVIG) preparations in doses of 0.2-0.4 g/kg every 2-4 weeks have been shown to reduce the incidence of respiratory infections. IVIG therapy may also reduce the mortality and incidence of bacterial infections in adults but further studies are required. In addition, high-dose IVIG therapy (1-2 g/kg over 2-5 days) produces increased platelet counts in patients with idiopathic thrombocytopenic purpura (ITP) associated with HIV infection. Finally, IVIG therapy may have a role in HIV-infected patients suffering from severe parvovirus B19 or measles infection, or in patients suffering from autoimmune disorders where high-dose IVIG therapy has been shown to be efficacious. PMID:8033437

  13. [Immune thrombocytopenia and HIV-1 infection. Response to splenectomy].

    PubMed

    Planells Roig, M V; Pallas Regueria, J A; Carbonell Tatay, F; Sancho Fornos, S

    1990-03-01

    We present a case of thrombocytopenic purpura associated to acquired immunodeficiency; this disease is very infrequently associated to AIDS; the clinical characteristics are similar to the classical Idiopathic Thrombocytopenic Purpura, including the response to splenectomy. We discuss the therapeutic approach of this condition and review the literature, adding this new case of a patient with AIDS, Walter and Reed's stage II, who responded to splenectomy.

  14. Adverse Childhood Experiences and Childhood Autobiographical Memory Disturbance

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brown, David W.; Anda, Robert F.; Edwards, Valerie J.; Felitti, Vincent J.; Dube, Shanta R.; Giles, Wayne H.

    2007-01-01

    Objective: To examine relationships between childhood autobiographical memory disturbance (CAMD) and adverse childhood experiences (ACEs) which are defined as common forms of child maltreatment and related traumatic stressors. Methods: We use the ACE score (an integer count of eight different categories of ACEs) as a measure of cumulative exposure…

  15. Immune System Quiz

    MedlinePlus

    ... Room? What Happens in the Operating Room? Quiz: Immune System KidsHealth > For Kids > Quiz: Immune System A A A How much do you know about your immune system? Find out by taking this quiz! About KidsHealth ...

  16. Systemic Lupus Erythematosus Presenting as Refractory Thrombotic Thrombocytopenic Purpura: A Diagnostic and Management Challenge. A Case Report and Concise Review of the Literature.

    PubMed

    Abu-Hishmeh, Mohammad; Sattar, Alamgir; Zarlasht, Fnu; Ramadan, Mohamed; Abdel-Rahman, Aisha; Hinson, Shante; Hwang, Caroline

    2016-10-25

    BACKGROUND Thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura (TTP) is one of the thrombotic microangiopathic (TMA) syndromes, caused by severely reduced activity of the vWF-cleaving protease ADAMTS13. Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE), on the other hand, is an autoimmune disease that affects various organs in the body, including the hematopoietic system. SLE can present with TMA, and differentiating between SLE and TTP in those cases can be very challenging, particularly in patients with no prior history of SLE. Furthermore, an association between these 2 diseases has been described in the literature, with most of the TTP cases occurring after the diagnosis of SLE. In rare cases, TTP may precede the diagnosis of SLE or occur concurrently. CASE REPORT We present a case of a previously healthy 34-year-old female who presented with dizziness and flu-like symptoms and was found to have thrombocytopenia, hemolytic anemia, and schistocytes in the peripheral smear. She was subsequently diagnosed with TTP and started on plasmapheresis and high-dose steroids, but without a sustained response. A diagnosis of refractory TTP was made, and she was transferred to our facility for further management. Initially, the patient was started on rituximab, but her condition continued to deteriorate, with worsening thrombocytopenia. Later, she also fulfilled the Systemic Lupus International Collaborating Clinics (SLICC) criteria for diagnosis of SLE. Treatment of TTP in SLE patients is generally similar to that in the general population, but in refractory cases there are few reports in the literature that show the efficacy of cyclophosphamide. We started our patient on cyclophosphamide and noticed a sustained improvement in the platelet count in the following weeks. CONCLUSIONS Thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura is a life-threatening hematological emergency which must be diagnosed and treated in a timely manner. Refractory cases of TTP have been described in the literature, but without clear evidence

  17. Immune responses and disease enhancement during respiratory syncytial virus infection.

    PubMed

    Openshaw, Peter J M; Tregoning, John S

    2005-07-01

    Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) is one of the commonest and most troublesome viruses of infancy. It causes most cases of bronchiolitis, which is associated with wheezing in later childhood. In primary infection, the peak of disease typically coincides with the development of specific T- and B-cell responses, which seem, in large part, to be responsible for disease. Animal models clearly show that a range of immune responses can enhance disease severity, particularly after vaccination with formalin-inactivated RSV. Prior immune sensitization leads to exuberant chemokine production, an excessive cellular influx, and an overabundance of cytokines during RSV challenge. Under different circumstances, specific mediators and T-cell subsets and antibody-antigen immune complex deposition are incriminated as major factors in disease. Animal models of immune enhancement permit a deep understanding of the role of specific immune responses in RSV disease, assist in vaccine design, and indicate which immunomodulatory therapy might be beneficial to children with bronchiolitis.

  18. Improving the Nation's Health. Step One: Reduce Toxic Stress in Early Childhood. Perspectives

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Louv, Richard

    2006-01-01

    To reduce risk factors for adult disease in our society, we must tackle the problem of toxic stress in early childhood. This condition is associated with the excessive release of a stream of hormones whose persistent elevation can disrupt the wiring of the developing brain and the functioning of the immune system. Children who experience toxic…

  19. Early Childhood Update, Fall 1995.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kimmerly, Lynn, Ed.

    1995-01-01

    This newsletter provides a periodic update on the activities of the Early Childhood Research Working Group (ECRWG), organized in early 1995 by the U.S. Department of Education and other federal government departments and agencies to promote interagency cooperation and public-private partnerships in early childhood research. This edition contains…

  20. Adverse Childhood Experiences and Hallucinations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Whitfield, C.L.; Dube, S.R.; Felitti, V.J.; Anda, R.F.

    2005-01-01

    Objective:: Little information is available about the contribution of multiple adverse childhood experiences (ACEs) to the likelihood of reporting hallucinations. We used data from the ACE study to assess this relationship. Methods:: We conducted a survey about childhood abuse and household dysfunction while growing up, with questions about health…

  1. Childhood Victimization and Lifetime Revictimization

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Widom, Cathy Spatz; Czaja, Sally J.; Dutton, Mary Ann

    2008-01-01

    Objective: To examine the fundamental hypothesis that childhood victimization leads to increased vulnerability for subsequent (re)victimization in adolescence and adulthood and, if so, whether there are differences in rates of experiencing traumas and victimizations by gender, race/ethnicity, and type of childhood abuse and/or neglect. Methods:…

  2. Markets and Childhood Obesity Policy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cawley, John

    2006-01-01

    In examining the childhood obesity epidemic from the perspective of economics, John Cawley looks at both possible causes and possible policy solutions that work through markets. The operation of markets, says Cawley, has contributed to the recent increase in childhood overweight in three main ways. First, the real price of food fell. In…

  3. Radionuclide evaluation in childhood injuries

    SciTech Connect

    Sty, J.R.; Starshak, R.J.; Hubbard, A.M.

    1983-07-01

    Radionuclide techniques serve an important role in evaluating childhood injuries. Frequently, they can be employed as the initial and definitive examination. At times they represent the only modality that will detect specific injuries such as the skeletal system. Familiarity with the advantages and limitations of tracer techniques will insure appropriate management of childhood injuries.

  4. Early Childhood Workforce Index, 2016

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Whitebook, Marcy; McLean, Caitlin; Austin, Lea J. E.

    2016-01-01

    The State of the Early Childhood Workforce (SECW) Initiative is a groundbreaking multi-year project to shine a steady spotlight on the nation's early childhood workforce. The SECW Initiative is designed to challenge entrenched ideas and policies that maintain an inequitable and inadequate status quo for early educators and for the children and…

  5. Childhood Sexual Abuse and Suicide

    MedlinePlus

    ... Abuse: Research, Treatment, & Program Innovations for Victims, Survivors, & Offenders, 14(4), 1-24. doi: 10.1300/J070v14n04_ ... 1996). Childhood sexual abuse and psychiatric disorder in young adulthood: Psychiatric outcomes of childhood sexual abuse. Journal ...

  6. Family Poverty--Childhood Poverty.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vanier Inst. of the Family, Ottawa (Ontario).

    Children comprise the largest group of poor Canadians. While childhood poverty is closely related to a number of factors pertaining to the structure and functioning of families, such as parental marital status and wage-earning patterns, the poverty of children is a consequence of the poverty of families. As such, childhood poverty can be reduced…

  7. Empirical Evidence for Childhood Depression.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lachar, David

    Although several theoretical positions deal with the concept of childhood depression, accurate measurement of depression can only occur if valid and reliable measures are available. Current efforts emphasize direct questioning of the child and quantification of parents' observations. One scale used to study childhood depression, the Personality…

  8. Early Childhood Inclusion in Spain

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Giné, Climent; Balcells-Balcells, Anna; Cañadas, Margarita; Paniagua, Gema

    2016-01-01

    This article describes early childhood inclusion in educational settings in Spain. First, we address the legislative framework of preschool education in Spain and offer a brief analysis of some relevant issues, including the current situation of early childhood education and inclusion at this stage. Second, current policies and practices relating…

  9. Wyoming Early Childhood Readiness Standards.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wyoming State Dept. of Education, Cheyenne.

    Because children entering kindergarten come with a variety of preschool and home experiences, and accordingly, with varying levels of school readiness, the Wyoming Early Childhood Readiness Standards have been developed to provide a more consistent definition of school readiness. The goal for the Standards is to provide early childhood educators…

  10. Siblings of Childhood Cancer Survivors.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gogan, Janis L.

    This paper reports on a long term follow up study of siblings of childhood cancer survivors. Seventy siblings of childhood cancer survivors in 37 families were interviewed using a semi-structured format which included both forced choice and open ended questions. The children discussed their memories of the sibling's cancer diagnosis and treatment…

  11. Teachers in Early Childhood Policy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kilderry, Anna

    2014-01-01

    This paper examines teacher accountability and authority in early childhood policy. It reports on data from a study that investigated the influences affecting early childhood teacher decision-making at the preschool level in Victoria, Australia. Using a question raised by Ball "Where are the teachers in all this [policy]?" provided a…

  12. Childhood Cerebellar Ataxia

    PubMed Central

    Fogel, Brent L.

    2012-01-01

    Childhood presentations of ataxia, an impairment of balance and coordination caused by damage to or dysfunction of the cerebellum, can often be challenging to diagnose. Presentations tend to be clinically heterogeneous but key considerations may vary based on the child's age at onset, the course of illness, and subtle differences in phenotype. Systematic investigation is recommended for efficient diagnosis. In this review, we outline common etiologies and describe a comprehensive approach to the evaluation of both acquired and genetic cerebellar ataxia in children. PMID:22764177

  13. [Obesity in childhood].

    PubMed

    Shcherbakova, M Iu; Poriagina, G I; Kovaleva, E A

    2010-01-01

    In this article presented modern data on the definition of obesity in childhood and its prevalence. Were reflected the basic diagnostic criteria for obesity and metabolic syndrome. Were analyzed genetic changes, hormonal factors, influence lifestyle of modern man as the reasons of the obesity. Are also was considered data on the relation of obesity and its complications such as cardiovascular, metabolic syndromes, nonalcoholic fatty liver disease. Was reflected the views of various specialists (cardiologists, endocrinologists, gastroenterologists, pediatricians) to the problem of overweight and obesity in children and adolescents. Were presented modern data on the approaches to the treatment of obesity in children.

  14. Striatal degeneration in childhood.

    PubMed Central

    Erdohazi, M; Marshall, P

    1979-01-01

    The clinical features, and the radiological and neuropathological findings of 3 unrelated children with striatal degeneration are presented. In one case the father had recently developed choreiform movements while in the other two the family history was negative for neurological disorders. Two patients had juvenile onset of psychiatric symptoms, seizures, and rigidity. The 3rd child presented with focal seizures at 9 weeks of age. The neuropathological findings are virtually identical in all 3 cases. The classification of striatal degeneration in childhood is discussed. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 3 Fig. 4 Fig. 5 Fig. 6 Fig. 7 Fig. 8 PMID:434899

  15. Evaluation of a Social Marketing Campaign to Increase Awareness of Immunizations for Urban Low-Income Children

    PubMed Central

    Ngui, Emmanuel M.; Hamilton, Chelsea; Nugent, Melodee; Simpson, Pippa; Willis, Earnestine

    2015-01-01

    Objective To assess community awareness of childhood immunizations and intent to immunize children after a social marketing immunization campaign. Methods We used 2 interviewer-assisted street-intercept surveys to evaluate awareness of childhood immunizations and intent to immunize low-income children. The “Take Control! Immunize” social marketing campaign was developed using a community-based participatory research approach and used billboards, flyers, and various “walking billboard” (eg, backpacks, pens) to deliver immunization messages in the community settings. Results Over 85% of community members recalled the “Take Control! Immunize” message. Almost half of those who saw the immunization message indicated that the message motivated them to act, including getting their children immunized or calling their physician to inquire about their children's immunizations status. All respondents indicated that immunizations were important for children and that they were likely or very likely to immunize their children. Respondents who reported that “Take Control!” messages motivated them to act in the first intercept survey were significantly more likely than those in the second intercept to report being likely or very likely to immunize their children. Conclusion Culturally appropriate social marketing immunization messages in targeted urban settings can increase parental awareness and behavioral intention to immunize children. PMID:25845130

  16. Inherited and acquired immunodeficiencies underlying tuberculosis in childhood

    PubMed Central

    Boisson-Dupuis, Stéphanie; Bustamante, Jacinta; El-Baghdadi, Jamila; Camcioglu, Yildiz; Parvaneh, Nima; Azbaoui, Safaa El; Agader, Aomar; Hassani, Amal; Hafidi, Naima El; Mrani, Nidal Alaoui; Jouhadi, Zineb; Ailal, Fatima; Najib, Jilali; Reisli, Ismail; Zamani, Adil; Yosunkaya, Sebnem; Gulle-Girit, Saniye; Yildiran, Alisan; Cipe, Funda Erol; Torun, Selda Hancerli; Metin, Ayse; Atikan, Basak Yildiz; Hatipoglu, Nevin; Aydogmus, Cigdem; Kilic, Sara Sebnem; Dogu, Figen; Karaca, Neslihan; Aksu, Guzide; Kutukculer, Necil; Keser-Emiroglu, Melike; Somer, Ayper; Tanir, Gonul; Aytekin, Caner; Adimi, Parisa; Mahdaviani, Seyed Alireza; Mamishi, Setareh; Bousfiha, Aziz; Sanal, Ozden; Mansouri, Davood; Casanova, Jean-Laurent; Abel, Laurent

    2015-01-01

    Summary Tuberculosis (TB), caused by Mycobacterium tuberculosis (M.tb) and a few related mycobacteria, is a devastating disease, killing more than a million individuals per year worldwide. However, its pathogenesis remains largely elusive, as only a small proportion of infected individuals develop clinical disease either during primary infection or during reactivation from latency or secondary infection. Subacute, hematogenous, and extrapulmonary disease tends to be more frequent in infants, children, and teenagers than in adults. Life-threatening primary TB of childhood can result from known acquired or inherited immunodeficiencies, although the vast majority of cases remain unexplained. We review here the conditions conferring a predisposition to childhood clinical diseases caused by mycobacteria, including not only M.tb but also weakly virulent mycobacteria, such as BCG vaccines and environmental mycobacteria. Infections with weakly virulent mycobacteria are much rarer than TB, but the inherited and acquired immunodeficiencies underlying these infections are much better known. Their study has also provided genetic and immunological insights into childhood TB, as illustrated by the discovery of single-gene inborn errors of IFN-γ immunity underlying severe cases of TB. Novel findings are expected from ongoing and future human genetic studies of childhood TB in countries that combine a high proportion of consanguineous marriages, a high incidence of TB, and an excellent clinical care, such as Iran, Morocco, and Turkey. PMID:25703555

  17. Childhood Malnutrition and the Intestinal Microbiome Malnutrition and the microbiome

    PubMed Central

    Kane, Anne V.; Dinh, Duy M.; Ward, Honorine D.

    2015-01-01

    Malnutrition contributes to almost half of all deaths in children under the age of 5 years, particularly those who live in resource-constrained areas. Those who survive frequently suffer from long-term sequelae including growth failure and neurodevelopmental impairment. Malnutrition is part of a vicious cycle of impaired immunity, recurrent infections and worsening malnutrition. Recently, alterations in the gut microbiome have also been strongly implicated in childhood malnutrition. It has been suggested that malnutrition may delay the normal development of the gut microbiota in early childhood or force it towards an altered composition that lacks the required functions for healthy growth and/or increases the risk for intestinal inflammation. This review addresses our current understanding of the beneficial contributions of gut microbiota to human nutrition (and conversely the potential role of changes in that community to malnutrition), the process of acquiring an intestinal microbiome, potential influences of malnutrition on the developing microbiota and the evidence directly linking alterations in the intestinal microbiome to childhood malnutrition. We review recent studies on the association between alterations in the intestinal microbiome and early childhood malnutrition and discuss them in the context of implications for intervention or prevention of the devastation caused by malnutrition. PMID:25356748

  18. Peer relations in childhood.

    PubMed

    Hay, Dale F; Payne, Alexandra; Chadwick, Andrea

    2004-01-01

    We present a developmental model that describes normal peer relations and highlights processes that underlie the emergence of problems with peers in childhood. We propose that children's relationships with peers begin in the first years of life, with stable individual differences and preferences for particular peers emerging by three years of age. Social skills that facilitate peer relationships consolidate in the preschool years, during which time peer groups become structured with respect to friendship groups, gender, and dominance relations; some children begin to be rejected by their peers. In later childhood some children develop entrenched problems with peer relationships, in terms of loneliness, bullying and victimisation. Underlying cognitive and emotional processes that facilitate successful peer relationships at all ages are identified, and the extent to which peer relations play a causal role in the genesis of disorder is evaluated. A review of the evidence suggests that, rather than a simple pathway from problematic peer relations to disorder, there is a reciprocal relationship between children's problems with peers and their psychological problems from infancy to adolescence.

  19. Gender dysphoria in childhood.

    PubMed

    Ristori, Jiska; Steensma, Thomas D

    2016-01-01

    Gender dysphoria (GD) in childhood is a complex phenomenon characterized by clinically significant distress due to the incongruence between assigned gender at birth and experienced gender. The clinical presentation of children who present with gender identity issues can be highly variable; the psychosexual development and future psychosexual outcome can be unclear, and consensus about the best clinical practice is currently under debate. In this paper a clinical picture is provided of children who are referred to gender identity clinics. The clinical criteria are described including what is known about the prevalence of childhood GD. In addition, an overview is presented of the literature on the psychological functioning of children with GD, the current knowledge on the psychosexual development and factors associated with the persistence of GD, and explanatory models for psychopathology in children with GD together with other co-existing problems that are characteristic for children referred for their gender. In light of this, currently used treatment and counselling approaches are summarized and discussed, including the integration of the literature detailed above.

  20. Management of childhood stuttering.

    PubMed

    Onslow, Mark; O'Brian, Sue

    2013-02-01

    Stuttering is a speech disorder that begins during the first years of life and is among the most prevalent of developmental disorders. It appears to be a problem with neural processing of speech involving genetics. Onset typically occurs during the first years of life, shortly after language development begins. Clinical presentation during childhood is interrupted and effortful speech production, often with rapid onset. If not corrected during early childhood, it becomes intractable and can cause psychological, social, educational and occupational problems. There is evidence from replicated clinical trials to support early intervention during the pre-school years. Meta-analysis of studies indicates that children who receive early intervention during the pre-school years are 7.7 times more likely to have resolution of their stuttering. Early intervention is recommended with a speech pathologist. Some children who begin to stutter will recover without such intervention. However, the number of such recoveries is currently not known, and it is not possible to predict which children are likely to recover naturally. Consequently, the current best practice is for speech pathologists to monitor children for signs of natural recovery for up to 1 year before beginning treatment.

  1. Efficacy of a rituximab regimen based on B cell depletion in thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura with suboptimal response to standard treatment: Results of a phase II, multicenter noncomparative study.

    PubMed

    Benhamou, Ygal; Paintaud, Gilles; Azoulay, Elie; Poullin, Pascale; Galicier, Lionel; Desvignes, Céline; Baudel, Jean-Luc; Peltier, Julie; Mira, Jean-Paul; Pène, Frédéric; Presne, Claire; Saheb, Samir; Deligny, Christophe; Rousseau, Alexandra; Féger, Frédéric; Veyradier, Agnès; Coppo, Paul

    2016-12-01

    The standard four-rituximab infusions treatment in acquired thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura (TTP) remains empirical. Peripheral B cell depletion is correlated with the decrease in serum concentrations of anti-ADAMTS13 and associated with clinical response. To assess the efficacy of a rituximab regimen based on B cell depletion, 24 TTP patients were enrolled in this prospective multicentre single arm phase II study and then compared to patients from a previous study. Patients with a suboptimal response to a plasma exchange-based regimen received two infusions of rituximab 375 mg m(-2) within 4 days, and a third dose at day +15 of the first infusion if peripheral B cells were still detectable. Primary endpoint was the assessment of the time required to platelet count recovery from the first plasma exchange. Three patients died after the first rituximab administration. In the remaining patients, the B cell-driven treatment hastened remission and ADAMTS13 activity recovery as a result of rapid anti-ADAMTS13 depletion in a similar manner to the standard four-rituximab infusions schedule. The 1-year relapse-free survival was also comparable between both groups. A rituximab regimen based on B cell depletion is feasible and provides comparable results than with the four-rituximab infusions schedule. This regimen could represent a new standard in TTP. This trial was registered at www.clinicaltrials.gov (NCT00907751). Am. J. Hematol. 91:1246-1251, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  2. Molecular mimicry by Helicobacter pylori CagA protein may be involved in the pathogenesis of H. pylori-associated chronic idiopathic thrombocytopenic purpura.

    PubMed

    Takahashi, Toru; Yujiri, Toshiaki; Shinohara, Kenji; Inoue, Yusuke; Sato, Yutaka; Fujii, Yasuhiko; Okubo, Masashi; Zaitsu, Yuzuru; Ariyoshi, Koichi; Nakamura, Yukinori; Nawata, Ryouhei; Oka, Yoshitomo; Shirai, Mutsunori; Tanizawa, Yukio

    2004-01-01

    The eradication of Helicobacter pylori often leads to platelet recovery in patients with chronic idiopathic thrombocytopenic purpura (cITP). Although this clinical observation suggests the involvement of H. pylori, little is known about the pathogenesis of cITP. We initially examined the effect of H. pylori eradication on platelet counts in 20 adult Japanese cITP patients. Then, using platelet eluates as the probe in immunoblot analyses, we examined the role of molecular mimicry in the pathogenesis of cITP. Helicobacter pylori infection was detected in 75% (15 of 20) of cITP patients. Eradication was achieved in 13 (87%) of the H. pylori-positive patients, seven (54%) of which showed increased platelet counts within the 4 months following treatment. Completely responsive patients also showed significant declines in platelet-associated immunoglobulin G (PAIgG) levels. Platelet eluates from 12 (nine H. pylori-positive and three H. pylori-negative) patients recognized H. pylori cytotoxin-associated gene A (CagA) protein, and in three completely responsive patients, levels of anti-CagA antibody in platelet eluates declined after eradication therapy. Cross-reactivity between PAIgG and H. pylori CagA protein suggests that molecular mimicry by CagA plays a key role in the pathogenesis of a subset of cITP patients.

  3. Micromegakaryocytes in a patient with partial deletion of the long arm of chromosome 11 [del(11)(q24.2qter)] and chronic thrombocytopenic purpura

    SciTech Connect

    Gangarossa, S.; Mattina, T.; Romano, V.; Milana, G.; Mollica, F.; Schiliro, G.

    1996-03-15

    Thrombocytopenia or pancytopenia is frequently reported in patients with partial 11q deletion but there are no reports on bone marrow morphology of these patients. We report on a patient with partial deletion of the long arm of chromosome 11 [del(11)(q24.2qter)] and its classical clinical manifestations including chronic thrombocytopenic purpura in whom micromegakaryocytes were found in the bone marrow aspirate. This is the first report of the presence of micromegakaryocytes in the bone marrow of a patient with 11q deletion. Accurate examination of the bone marrow of other patients with the 11q deletion may clarify whether the observation of micromegakaryocytes is common in these patients. Micromegakaryocytes may indicate a defect of development. Two genes for two DNA binding proteins that are likely to be involved in hematopoiesis map in the 11q region: Ets-1, that maps to 11q24, close to D11S912, and the nuclear-factor-related-kB gene that maps to 11q24-q25. It is possible that these genes, when present in only one copy, result in thrombocytopenia or pancytopenia as observed in this patient. 23 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab.

  4. Adult immunization in India: Importance and recommendations.

    PubMed

    Verma, Ramesh; Khanna, Pardeep; Chawla, Suraj

    2015-01-01

    Vaccination is recommended throughout life to prevent infectious diseases and their sequelae. Vaccines are crucial to prevent mortality in that >25% of deaths are due to infections. Vaccines are recommended for adults on the basis of a range of factors. Substantial improvement and increases in adult vaccination are needed to reduce the health consequences of vaccine-preventable diseases among adults. Incomplete and inadequate immunization in India against these communicable diseases results in substantial and unnecessary costs both in terms of hospitalization and treatment. The government of India as well as the World Health Organization (WHO) consider childhood vaccination as the first priority, but there is not yet focus on adult immunization. Adult immunization in India is the most ignored part of heath care services. The Expert Group recommended that data on infectious diseases in India should be updated, refined, and reviewed periodically and published regularly. This group suggested that the consensus guidelines about adult immunization should be reviewed every 3 years to incorporate new strategies from any emerging research from India. There is an immediate need to address the problem of adult immunization in India. Although many issues revolving around efficacy, safety, and cost of introducing vaccines for adults at the national level are yet to be resolved, there is an urgent need to sensitize the health planners as well as health care providers regarding this pertinent issue.

  5. A Study of the Relationship between Early Childhood Program Attributes and Early Childhood Reading Achievement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Washington, Novella M.

    2012-01-01

    This quantitative correlational study focuses on the relationship between early childhood program attributes and early childhood reading success. Data will be gathered from early childhood sites with grades prekindergarten through second grade in which early childhood program attributes exist and early childhood reading is measured by the…

  6. Guidelines on the use of intravenous immune globulin for hematologic conditions.

    PubMed

    Anderson, David; Ali, Kaiser; Blanchette, Victor; Brouwers, Melissa; Couban, Stephen; Radmoor, Paula; Huebsch, Lothar; Hume, Heather; McLeod, Anne; Meyer, Ralph; Moltzan, Catherine; Nahirniak, Susan; Nantel, Stephen; Pineo, Graham; Rock, Gail

    2007-04-01

    Canada's per capita use of intravenous immune globulin (IVIG) grew by approximately 115% between 1998 and 2006, making Canada one of the world's highest per capita users of IVIG. It is believed that most of this growth is attributable to off-label usage. To help ensure IVIG use is in keeping with an evidence-based approach to the practice of medicine, the National Advisory Committee on Blood and Blood Products of Canada (NAC) and Canadian Blood Services convened a panel of national experts to develop an evidence-based practice guideline on the use of IVIG for hematologic conditions. The mandate of the expert panel was to review evidence regarding use of IVIG for 18 hematologic conditions and formulate recommendations on IVIG use for each. A panel of 13 clinical experts and 1 expert in practice guideline development met to review the evidence and reach consensus on the recommendations for the use of IVIG. The primary sources used by the panel were 3 recent evidence-based reviews. Recommendations were based on interpretation of the available evidence and where evidence was lacking, consensus of expert clinical opinion. A draft of the practice guideline was circulated to hematologists in Canada for feedback. The results of this process were reviewed by the expert panel, and modifications to the draft guideline were made where appropriate. This practice guideline will provide the NAC with a basis for making recommendations to provincial and territorial health ministries regarding IVIG use management. Specific recommendations for routine use of IVIG were made for 7 conditions including acquired red cell aplasia; acquired hypogammaglobulinemia (secondary to malignancy); fetal-neonatal alloimmune thrombocytopenia; hemolytic disease of the newborn; HIV-associated thrombocytopenia; idiopathic thrombocytopenic purpura; and posttransfusion purpura. Intravenous immune globulin was not recommended for use, except under certain life-threatening circumstances, for 8 conditions

  7. Researching Early Childhood Education: European Perspectives.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    David, Tricia, Ed.

    At a time when crucial questions concerning the nature of early childhood and early childhood education are being increasingly examined worldwide, an exploration of the issues, priorities, and methodologies of research in early childhood education may provide valuable material for debate. This book focuses on research in early childhood education…

  8. Literacy Lessons from the Childhoods of Authors.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baghban, Marcia

    1997-01-01

    Opines that the retrospectives of authors' childhoods provide unique insights into the connections between childhood literacy experiences and adult literacy experiences. Cites the examples of Eudora Welty, Madeleine L'Engle, and Jack London and contrasts aspects of their childhoods with aspects of contemporary childhoods. (PA)

  9. Childhood Depression: Theories, Antecedents and Supportive Resources.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McLean, Laura L.

    Early detection and measurement of the intensity of childhood depression are important concerns for those treating depressed children. To examine issues of childhood depression, a review of the research was conducted which focused on: (1) childhood depression scales and their effectiveness; (2) correlates and antecedents of childhood depression;…

  10. Immunization for Women

    MedlinePlus

    ... nfid.org/#sthash.eZ72dCSP.dpuf Diseases & Vaccines Overview Immunization Schedules Talk to you doctor about your immunization ... years Immunization Schedule for Children, 7-18 years Immunization News July 8, 2016 HPV-related cancers on ...

  11. Epidemiological evidence of childhood leukaemia around nuclear power plants.

    PubMed

    Janiak, Marek K

    2014-07-01

    A few reports of increased numbers of leukaemia cases (clusters) in children living in the vicinity of nuclear power plants (NPP) and other nuclear installations have triggered a heated debate over the possible causes of the disease. In this review the most important cases of childhood leukaemia clusters around NPPs are described and analyzed with special emphasis on the relationship between the environmental exposure to ionizing radiation and the risk of leukaemia. Since, as indicated, a lifetime residency in the proximity of an NPP does not pose any specific health risk to people and the emitted ionizing radiation is too small to cause cancer, a number of hypotheses have been proposed to explain the childhood leukaemia clusters. The most likely explanation for the clusters is 'population mixing', i.e., the influx of outside workers to rural regions where nuclear installations are being set up and where local people are not immune to pathogens brought along with the incomers.

  12. Integrated management of childhood illness: a summary of first experiences.

    PubMed Central

    Lambrechts, T.; Bryce, J.; Orinda, V.

    1999-01-01

    The strategy of Integrated Management of Childhood Illness (IMCI) aims to reduce child mortality and morbidity in developing countries by combining improved management of common childhood illnesses with proper nutrition and immunization. The strategy includes interventions to improve the skills of health workers, the health system, and family and community practices. This article describes the experience of the first countries to adopt and implement the IMCI interventions, the clinical guidelines dealing with the major causes of morbidity and mortality in children, and the training package on these guidelines for health workers in first-level health facilities. The most relevant lessons learned and how these lessons have served as a basis for developing a broader IMCI strategy are described. PMID:10444882

  13. Holding on to childhood language memory.

    PubMed

    Oh, Janet S; Jun, Sun-Ah; Knightly, Leah M; Au, Terry Kit-fong

    2003-01-01

    While early language experience seems crucial for mastering phonology, it remains unclear whether there are lasting benefits of speaking a language regularly during childhood if the quantity and quality of speaking drop dramatically after childhood. This study explored the accessibility of early childhood language memory. Specifically, it compared perception and production of Korean speech sounds by childhood speakers who had spoken Korean regularly for a few years during childhood to those of two other groups: (1) childhood hearers who had heard Korean regularly during childhood but had spoken Korean minimally, if at all; and (2) novice learners. All three groups were enrolled in first-year college Korean language classes. Childhood speakers were also compared to native speakers of Korean to see how native-like they were. The results revealed measurable long-term benefits of childhood speaking experience, underscoring the importance of early language experience, even if such experience diminishes dramatically beyond childhood.

  14. Epigenetic Control of Immunity

    PubMed Central

    Busslinger, Meinrad; Tarakhovsky, Alexander

    2014-01-01

    Immunity relies on the heterogeneity of immune cells and their ability to respond to pathogen challenges. In the adaptive immune system, lymphocytes display a highly diverse antigen receptor repertoire that matches the vast diversity of pathogens. In the innate immune system, the cell's heterogeneity and phenotypic plasticity enable flexible responses to changes in tissue homeostasis caused by infection or damage. The immune responses are calibrated by the graded activity of immune cells that can vary from yeast-like proliferation to lifetime dormancy. This article describes key epigenetic processes that contribute to the function of immune cells during health and disease. PMID:24890513

  15. Integrated Immune Experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Crucian, Brian

    2009-01-01

    This viewgraph presentation reviews NASA's Integrated Immune Experiment. The objectives include: 1) Address significant lack of data regarding immune status during flight; 2) Replace several recent immune studies with one comprehensive study that will include in-flight sampling; 3) Determine the in-flight status of immunity, physiological stress, viral immunity/reactivation; 4) Determine the clinical risk related to immune dysregulation for exploration class spaceflight; and 5) Determine the appropriate monitoring strategy for spaceflight-associated immune dysfunction, that could be used for the evaluation of countermeasures.

  16. Understanding Herd Immunity.

    PubMed

    Metcalf, C J E; Ferrari, M; Graham, A L; Grenfell, B T

    2015-12-01

    Individual immunity is a powerful force affecting host health and pathogen evolution. Importantly, the effects of individual immunity also scale up to affect pathogen transmission dynamics and the success of vaccination campaigns for entire host populations. Population-scale immunity is often termed 'herd immunity'. Here we outline how individual immunity maps to population outcomes and discuss implications for control of infectious diseases. Particular immunological characteristics may be more or less likely to result in a population level signature of herd immunity; we detail this and also discuss other population-level outcomes that might emerge from individual-level immunity.

  17. [Childhood periodic syndromes].

    PubMed

    Cuvellier, J-C; Lépine, A

    2010-01-01

    This review focuses on the so-called "periodic syndromes of childhood that are precursors to migraine", as included in the Second Edition of the International Classification of Headache Disorders. Three periodic syndromes of childhood are included in the Second Edition of the International Classification of Headache Disorders: abdominal migraine, cyclic vomiting syndrome and benign paroxysmal vertigo, and a fourth, benign paroxysmal torticollis is presented in the Appendix. The key clinical features of this group of disorders are the episodic pattern and intervals of complete health. Episodes of benign paroxysmal torticollis begin between 2 and 8 months of age. Attacks are characterized by an abnormal inclination and/or rotation of the head to one side, due to cervical dystonia. They usually resolve by 5 years. Benign paroxysmal vertigo presents as sudden attacks of vertigo, accompanied by inability to stand without support, and lasting seconds to minutes. Age at onset is between 2 and 4 years, and the symptoms disappear by the age of 5. Cyclic vomiting syndrome is characterized in young infants and children by repeated stereotyped episodes of pernicious vomiting, at times to the point of dehydration, and impacting quality of life. Mean age of onset is 5 years. Abdominal migraine remains a controversial issue and presents in childhood with repeated stereotyped episodes of unexplained abdominal pain, nausea and vomiting occurring in the absence of headache. Mean age of onset is 7 years. Both cyclic vomiting syndrome and abdominal migraine are noted for the absence of pathognomonic clinical features but also for the large number of other conditions to be considered in their differential diagnoses. Diagnostic criteria, such as those of the Second Edition of the International Classification of Headache Disorders and the North American Society for Pediatric Gastroenterology, Hepatology and Nutrition, have made diagnostic approach and management easier. Their diagnosis

  18. Allergies and Disease Severity in Childhood Narcolepsy: Preliminary Findings

    PubMed Central

    Aydinoz, Secil; Huang, Yu-Shu; Gozal, David; Inocente, Clara O.; Franco, Patricia; Kheirandish-Gozal, Leila

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Narcolepsy frequently begins in childhood, and is characterized by excessive daytime sleepiness, with the presence of cataplexy reflecting a more severe phenotype. Narcolepsy may result from genetic predisposition involving deregulation of immune pathways, particularly involving T helper 2 cells (Th2). Increased activation of Th2 cells is usually manifested as allergic conditions such as rhinitis, atopic dermatitis, and asthma. We hypothesized that the presence of allergic conditions indicative of increased Th2 balance may dampen the severity of the phenotype in children with narcolepsy. Methods: A retrospective chart review of childhood narcolepsy patients was conducted at three major pediatric sleep centers. Patients were divided into those with narcolepsy without cataplexy (NC−) and narcolepsy with cataplexy (NC+). Demographics, polysomnographic and multiple sleep latency test data, and extraction of information on the presence of allergic diseases such allergic rhinitis, atopic dermatitis, and asthma was performed. Results: There were 468 children identified, with 193 children in NC− group and 275 patients in the NC+ group. Overall, NC+ children were significantly younger, had higher body mass index, and had shorter mean sleep latencies and increased sleep onset rapid eye movement events. The frequency of allergic conditions, particularly asthma and allergic rhinitis, was markedly lower in NC+ (58/275) compared to NC− patients (94/193; P < 0.0001). Conclusion: Involvement of the immune system plays an important role in the pathophysiology of narcolepsy. Current findings further suggest that an increased shift toward T helper 2 cells, as indicated by the presence of allergic conditions, may modulate the severity of the phenotype in childhood narcolepsy, and reduce the prevalence of cataplexy in these patients. Citation: Aydinoz S, Huang YS, Gozal D, Inocente CO, Franco P, Kheirandish-Gozal L. Allergies and disease severity in childhood

  19. [Childhood chronic fatigue syndrome].

    PubMed

    Miike, Teruhisa

    2007-06-01

    Chronic fatigue syndrome in childhood and adolescents(CCFS) is a complex and debilitation with severe morbidity and confusion. It is common condition with up to 3-5% of children and adolescents showing strange fatigue and confusion for more than 30 days. In this condition, four major symptoms are important: sleep disorders, easy fatigability, disturbed learning and memorization and immunological problems. Routine laboratory studies are similar to adult CFS, although abnormalities can be seen on serum pyruvic acid level, OGTT pattern, deep body temperature rhythm, hormonal secretion rhythm, and cerebral blood flow. For a diagnosis of CCFS, a research group supported by Japanese ministry of health, labor and welfare developed CCFS case definition on 2004. Treatment focused to correct disrupted circadian rhythms and supply of energy.

  20. Papular acrodermatitis of childhood

    PubMed Central

    Gianotti, Ferdinando

    1973-01-01

    Papular acrodermatitis (PAC) is a fairly widespread, probably slightly infectious, nonrelapsing disease of childhood characterized by (a) papular eruption on the face and limbs lasting 20 days or more, (b) reactive reticulohistiocytic lymphadenitis, and (c) acute hepatitis, usually anicteric, which commonly lasts about 2 months. Australia antigen is always present; it is detectable 10 or more days after the onset of the skin eruption and persists from 2 months to several years. The mother of some children with PAC are found to be carriers of Au antigen, as are some sibs when tested many years later. Whether the causative agent of PAC is the same as that causing serum hepatitis, or is different, remains to be established. ImagesFIG. 1FIG. 2 PMID:4749683

  1. [Food allergy in childhood].

    PubMed

    Beyer, Kirsten; Niggemann, Bodo

    2016-06-01

    IgE-mediated immediate type reactions are the most common form of food allergy in childhood. Primary (often in early childhood) and secondary (often pollen-associated) allergies can be distinguished by their level of severity. Hen's egg, cow's milk and peanut are the most common elicitors of primary food allergy. Tolerance development in hen's egg and cow's milk allergy happens frequently whereas peanut allergy tends toward a lifelong disease. For the diagnostic patient history, detection of sensitization and (in many cases) oral food challenges are necessary. Especially in peanut and hazelnut allergy component-resolves diagnostic (measurement of specific IgE to individual allergens, e. g. Ara h 2) seem to be helpful. In regard to therapy elimination diet is still the only approved approach. Patient education through dieticians is extremely helpful in this regard. Patients at risk for anaphylactic reactions need to carry emergency medications including an adrenaline auto-injector. Instruction on the usage of the adrenaline auto-injector should take place and a written management plan handed to the patient. Moreover, patients or caregivers should be encouraged to attending a structured educational intervention on knowledge and emergency management. In parallel, causal therapeutic options such as oral, sublingual or epicutaneous immunotherapies are currently under development. In regard to prevention of food allergy current guidelines no longer advise to avoid highly allergenic foods. Current intervention studies are investigating wether early introduction of highly allergic foods is effective and safe to prevent food allergy. It was recently shown that peanut introduction between 4 and 11  months of age in infants with severe atopic dermatitis and/or hen's egg allergy (if they are not already peanut allergic) prevents peanut allergy in a country with high prevalence.

  2. Trends in childhood disease.

    PubMed

    Pallapies, Dirk

    2006-09-28

    Child mortality has declined remarkably during the last decades. While neonatal disorders, diarrhoea, pneumonia, and malaria as well as being underweight account for most of the child deaths worldwide, children's health discussions in Europe and the USA focus on other issues such as asthma, neurodevelopmental disorders, male genital malformations, and childhood cancer. There is clear evidence of increasing rates of asthma in various countries during the last decades, although rates in some countries may now have stabilised or even decline as recent UK data indicate. Although an increase in the frequency of neurodevelopmental disorders such as autism and attention deficit disorder has frequently been discussed, the limited data in this field does not justify such a conclusion. While geographic heterogeneity regarding reproductive outcomes is apparent, global trends have not been identified. Interpretation of the available information on asthma, neurodevelopmental disorders and reproductive outcomes is hampered by inconstant diagnostic criteria over place and time and the lack of good and comprehensive population-based surveillance data, which makes it impossible to ascertain trends in actual disease frequency. Data indicate that developed countries have a gradually increasing incidence in leukaemia with a corresponding drop in the incidence of lymphoma. Increases in brain tumour frequency may be related to the development and wide application of new diagnostic capabilities, rather than a true change in the incidence of malignant disease. With a better prognosis for childhood cancer survival, secondary cancers following chemotherapy appear to be increasing. A wide range of environmental factors is thought to have an impact on children's health. These factors include nutrition (protein, vitamins, antioxidants), lifestyle and behaviour choices such as tobacco and alcohol use, parental health, socio-economic status, choice of living environment (urban versus rural, etc

  3. Addressing the immunization coverage paradox: A matter of children's rights and social justice.

    PubMed

    Durrheim, David N; Cashman, Patrick

    2010-08-01

    The Convention on the Rights of the Child and the principles of social justice demand that all children have equal access to effective childhood immunization. Although there has been substantial progress in increasing global childhood immunization coverage, routinely reported data conceal marked disparities between and within countries. As a global community we still fall substantially short of our moral obligation to guarantee all children equal access to effective vaccines. Governments of developed and less-developed nations must unite to ensure the leadership planning, governance, and human and financial resources necessary to deliver on this critical global equity agenda.

  4. Immunization of high-risk paediatric populations: Central European Vaccination Awareness Group recommendations.

    PubMed

    Richter, Darko; Anca, Ioana; André, Francis E; Bakir, Mustafa; Chlibek, Roman; Čižman, Milan; Mangarov, Atanas; Mészner, Zsófia; Pokorn, Marko; Prymula, Roman; Salman, Nuran; Simurka, Pavol; Tamm, Eda; Tešović, Goran; Urbančíková, Ingrid; Usonis, Vytautas; Wysocki, Jacek; Zavadska, Dace; Central European Vaccination Awareness Group

    2014-06-01

    Over the last decade, childhood immunization has substantially reduced morbidity and mortality from vaccine-preventable diseases. However, particular paediatric risk groups, such as those with comorbidities, may not be adequately vaccinated despite being more susceptible to complications and death from certain infectious diseases. This may be due to lack of immunization recommendations, lack of awareness, or incomplete adherence to existing guidelines. Furthermore, recommendations for immunization can be inconsistent across Europe. An expanded initiative from the Central European Vaccination Awareness Group aims to raise awareness of the different high-risk paediatric groups, differentiate them according to their specific risk, and formalise a guidance statement for the immunization of each population.

  5. How Is Childhood Leukemia Diagnosed?

    MedlinePlus

    ... Early Detection, Diagnosis, and Types How Is Childhood Leukemia Diagnosed? Most of the signs and symptoms of ... enlarged spleen or liver. Tests to look for leukemia in children If the doctor thinks your child ...

  6. Childhood Brain Stem Glioma Treatment

    MedlinePlus

    ... before the cancer is diagnosed and continue for months or years. Childhood brain stem gliomas may cause ... after treatment. Some cancer treatments cause side effects months or years after treatment has ended. These are ...

  7. Frailty in Childhood Cancer Survivors

    PubMed Central

    Ness, Kirsten K.; Armstrong, Gregory T.; Kundu, Mondira; Wilson, Carmen L.; Tchkonia, Tamara; Kirkland, James L.

    2015-01-01

    Young adult childhood cancer survivors are at increased risk for frailty, a physiologic phenotype typically found among older adults. This phenotype is associated with new onset chronic health conditions and mortality among both older adults and among childhood cancer survivors. Mounting evidence suggests that poor fitness, muscular weakness and cognitive decline are common among adults treated for childhood malignancies, and that risk factors for these outcomes are not limited to those treated with cranial radiation. Although the pathobiology of this phenotype is not known, early cellular senescence, sterile inflammation and mitochondrial dysfunction in response to initial cancer or treatment related insults are hypothesized to play a role. Interventions to prevent or remediate frailty among childhood cancer survivors have not been tested. Pharmaceutical, nutriceutical and lifestyle interventions show some promise. PMID:25529481

  8. Fiber Intake and Childhood Appendicitis.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brender, Jean D.; And Others

    1985-01-01

    Parents of 135 children with appendicitis and of 212 comparison children were interviewed about their children's diet. Results suggest that a liberal intake of whole-grain breads and cereals may decrease the risk of appendicitis during childhood. (KH)

  9. Recent advances in childhood vitiligo.

    PubMed

    Silverberg, Nanette B

    2014-01-01

    Vitiligo is an autoimmune depigmentation disorder that is estimated to affect about .5% of the worldwide population. Half of all cases begin in childhood. A variety of advances occurred in the past two decades that have enhanced the management of childhood vitiligo. This contribution reviews recent advances in vitiligo, including a better understanding of the pathogenesis and autoimmune comorbidities, description of the psychological comorbidities, a broader range of therapeutic options.

  10. Childhood undernutrition, the gut microbiota, and microbiota-directed therapeutics.

    PubMed

    Blanton, Laura V; Barratt, Michael J; Charbonneau, Mark R; Ahmed, Tahmeed; Gordon, Jeffrey I

    2016-06-24

    Childhood undernutrition is a major global health challenge. Although current therapeutic approaches have reduced mortality in individuals with severe disease, they have had limited efficacy in ameliorating long-term sequelae, notably stunting, immune dysfunction, and neurocognitive deficits. Recent work is providing insights about the role of impaired development of the human gut microbiota in disease pathogenesis, leading to new concepts for treatment and prevention. These findings raise intriguing basic questions about the mechanisms that direct normal gut microbial community assembly and functional maturation. Designing and implementing new microbiota-directed therapeutics for undernutrition highlights the need to simultaneously consider a variety of features of human biology as well as broader societal issues.

  11. Immune Disorders and Its Correlation with Gut Microbiome

    PubMed Central

    Hwang, Ji-Sun; Im, Chang-Rok

    2012-01-01

    Allergic disorders such as atopic dermatitis and asthma are common hyper-immune disorders in industrialized countries. Along with genetic association, environmental factors and gut microbiota have been suggested as major triggering factors for the development of atopic dermatitis. Numerous studies support the association of hygiene hypothesis in allergic immune disorders that a lack of early childhood exposure to diverse microorganism increases susceptibility to allergic diseases. Among the symbiotic microorganisms (e.g. gut flora or probiotics), probiotics confer health benefits through multiple action mechanisms including modification of immune response in gut associated lymphoid tissue (GALT). Although many human clinical trials and mouse studies demonstrated the beneficial effects of probiotics in diverse immune disorders, this effect is strain specific and needs to apply specific probiotics for specific allergic diseases. Herein, we briefly review the diverse functions and regulation mechanisms of probiotics in diverse disorders. PMID:23091436

  12. The immune system in human milk and the developing infant.

    PubMed

    Goldman, Armond S

    2007-12-01

    The concept of the immune system in human milk emerged in the 1970s from clinical and laboratory observations made between the late 18th through the mid-20th centuries. The discovery of living leukocytes in human milk in 1970 was the final link to the chain of evidence that culminated in the concept. The concept was later expanded to include not only antimicrobial but also anti-inflammatory and immunoregulatory agents. These agents evolved to compensate for developmental delays in the immune system during infancy. Indeed, that explains the defense by human milk against common infectious diseases in infancy, necrotizing enterocolitis in preterm infants, and immune-mediated disorders such as Crohn's disease in later childhood. These diverse evolutionary outcomes underscore the superiority of human milk for the nutrition of human infants. Finally, other components of the immune system in human milk and their fate and functions in the developing infant may well be discovered in the near future.

  13. Development of an immunization tracking system in a large health maintenance organization. Group Health Cooperative of Puget Sound.

    PubMed Central

    Payne, T.; Kanvik, S.; Seward, R.; Beeman, D.; Salazar, A.; Miller, Z.; Immanuel, V.; Thompson, R. S.

    1991-01-01

    We have successfully developed a mainframe system for tracking all immunizations administered to enrollees in a large HMO. This system will provide comprehensive immunization records on a population of over 350,000 patients. Data required by the National Childhood Vaccine Injury Act of 1986 are locally entered into terminals, and records of immunization are stored in a database. Preliminary results show that data entry times are practical, but that improvement in data quality is needed. This immunization tracking system will be used for research, and as the foundation of an immunization reminder system under development. PMID:1807572

  14. [Toward a New Immunization Schedule in Spain, 2016 (Part 2)].

    PubMed

    Navarro-Alonso, José Antonio; Taboada-Rodríguez, José Antonio; Limia-Sánchez, Aurora

    2016-03-08

    Immunization schedules are intrinsically dynamic in order to embed the immunologic and epidemiologic changes in any specific geographic Region. According to this, the current study addresses a proposal to modify the Childhood Immunization Schedule in Spain. In order to move from a three plus one schema to a two plus one, we undertake a review of the available literature to explore the immunological and clinical rationale behind this change, including an overview of the potential impact on this schedule of premature infants. Additionally, some recommendations are made regarding those Spanish regions which start hepatitis B vaccination at the newborn period.

  15. A role for plasma cell targeting agents in immune tolerance induction in autoimmune disease and antibody responses to therapeutic proteins.

    PubMed

    Rosenberg, A S; Pariser, A R; Diamond, B; Yao, L; Turka, L A; Lacana, E; Kishnani, P S

    2016-04-01

    Antibody responses to life saving therapeutic protein products, such as enzyme replacement therapies (ERT) in the setting of lysosomal storage diseases, have nullified product efficacy and caused clinical deterioration and death despite treatment with immune-suppressive therapies. Moreover, in some autoimmune diseases, pathology is mediated by a robust antibody response to endogenous proteins such as is the case in pulmonary alveolar proteinosis, mediated by antibodies to Granulocyte Macrophage-Colony Stimulating Factor (GM-CSF). In this work, we make the case that in such settings, when the antibody response is high titered, sustained, and refractory to immune suppressive treatments, the antibody response is mediated by long-lived plasma cells which are relatively unperturbed by immune suppressants including rituximab. However, long-lived plasma cells can be targeted by proteasome inhibitors such as bortezomib. Recent reports of successful reversal of antibody responses with bortezomib in the settings of ERT and Thrombotic Thrombocytopenic Purpura (TTP) argue that the safety and efficacy of such plasma cell targeting agents should be evaluated in larger scale clinical trials to delineate the risks and benefits of such therapies in the settings of antibody-mediated adverse effects to therapeutic proteins and autoantibody mediated pathology.

  16. Thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura - analysis of clinical features, laboratory characteristics and therapeutic outcome of 24 patients treated at a Tertiary Care Center in Saudi Arabia

    PubMed Central

    Iqbal, Shahid; Zaidi, Syed Z. A.; Motabi, Ibraheem H; Alshehry, Nawal Faiez; AlGhamdi, Mubarak S.; Tailor, Imran Khan

    2016-01-01

    Objective: Thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura (TTP) is a life-threatening disease. The primary aim was overall response rate (ORR) assessment in the treated patients Methods: This retrospective study included 24 patients treated during 2006-2015. TTP patients with microangiopathic hemolysis (MAHA) and thrombocytopenia were included. We analyzed clinical features, laboratory characteristics and treatment outcomes of 24 TTP patients treated at our tertiary care center (KFMC). Results: Twenty-four TTP patients (18 females; 6 males) had a mean age of 33.5±13.9 years; 22(91%) had neurologic features, 7(29%) fever, 10(42%) renal impairment; 4(20.83%) cardiac manifestations; 22(91.7%) had triad with additional neurologic abnormalities; only 2(8.2%) had pentad of TTP. Majority (54.16%) had idiopathic TTP. All patients received therapeutic plasma exchange (TPE); 23(95.8%) received adjunctive corticosteroids and 13(54.2%) received rituximab either due to refractoriness to TPE on ~day7, or earlier. Twenty-one out of 24 (87.5%) achieved complete remission (CR) without any subsequent relapse. At 22 months (median, range 1-113), 20 patients (83.3%) are alive at the time of report. Three patients died during acute episode because of sever disease or delayed treatment and one died in CR. Conclusion: TPE, steroids and or rituximab was very effective in preventing high risk of mortality and achieving durable CR in 87.5% of patients. More awareness is needed for early diagnosis and early referral to centers with appropriate tertiary care facilities.. PMID:28083052

  17. Thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura misdiagnosed as autoimmune cytopenia: Causes of diagnostic errors and consequence on outcome. Experience of the French thrombotic microangiopathies reference centre.

    PubMed

    Grall, Maximilien; Azoulay, Elie; Galicier, Lionel; Provôt, François; Wynckel, Alain; Poullin, Pascale; Grange, Steven; Halimi, Jean-Michel; Lautrette, Alexandre; Delmas, Yahsou; Presne, Claire; Hamidou, Mohamed; Girault, Stéphane; Pène, Frédéric; Perez, Pierre; Kanouni, Tarik; Seguin, Amélie; Mousson, Christiane; Chauveau, Dominique; Ojeda-Uribe, Mario; Barbay, Virginie; Veyradier, Agnès; Coppo, Paul; Benhamou, Ygal

    2017-04-01

    Thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura (TTP) has a devastating prognosis without adapted management. Sources of misdiagnosis need to be identified to avoid delayed treatment. We studied 84 patients with a final diagnosis of severe (<10%) acquired ADAMTS13 deficiency-associated TTP from our National database that included 423 patients, who had an initial misdiagnosis (20% of all TTP). Main diagnostic errors were attributed to autoimmune thrombocytopenia, associated (51%) or not (37%) with autoimmune hemolytic anemia. At admission, misdiagnosed patients were more frequently females (P = .034) with a history of autoimmune disorder (P = .017) and had organ involvement in 67% of cases; they had more frequently antinuclear antibodies (P = .035), a low/undetectable schistocyte count (P = .001), a less profound anemia (P = .008), and a positive direct antiglobulin test (DAT) (P = .008). In multivariate analysis, female gender (P = .022), hemoglobin level (P = .028), a positive DAT (P = .004), and a low schistocytes count on diagnosis (P < .001) were retained as risk factors of misdiagnosis. Platelet count recovery was significantly longer in the misdiagnosed group (P = .041) without consequence on mortality, exacerbation and relapse. However, patients in the misdiagnosed group had a less severe disease than those in the accurately diagnosed group, as evidenced by less organ involvement at TTP diagnosis (P = .006). TTP is frequently misdiagnosed with autoimmune cytopenias. A low schistocyte count and a positive DAT should not systematically rule out TTP, especially when associated with organ failure.

  18. The Relationship between Self-esteem and Quality of Life of Patients with Idiopathic Thrombocytopenic Purpura at Isfahan's Sayed Al-Shohada Hospital, Iran, in 2013

    PubMed Central

    Hemati, Zeinab; Kiani, Davood

    2016-01-01

    Background: Idiopathic thrombocytopenic purpura (ITP) is a chronic disease which is accompanied with hopelessness and loss of the sense of well-being due to its symptoms and treatment. It also affects patients' sense of social and spiritual well-being. This disorder decreases patients' self-esteem and their quality of life by changing their mental image and self-confidence. This study was performed to find the relationship between self-esteem and quality of life of patients with ITP. Subjects and Methods: This was a descriptive-analytical study on 64 patients with ITP who referred to Isfahan's Sayed Al-Shohada Hospital, Iran. In this study, patients with ITP were selected randomly using a random number chart. The data collection tools consisted of the World Health Organization Quality of Life (WHOQOL)-BREF and Coopersmith Self-esteem Inventory (CSEI). Data were analyzed using SPSS and chi-square and Mann-Whitney tests and the Pearson and Spearman’s rank correlation coefficients. Results: In total, 64 patients completed the questionnaires. Results showed that 32% of subjects were over 36 years of age and 59% were women. In addition, 29.7% of ITP patients had low self-esteem and quality of life. Chi-square test showed a significant relationship between self-esteem and quality of life of patients with ITP. Conclusions: The results of the present study showed that considerable attention must be paid to self-esteem, as one of the most important factors influencing the promotion of quality of life. Therefore, it is suggested that patient’s self-esteem be improved by the implementation of educational and psychological programs in order to decrease the consequences of poor quality of life. PMID:27252807

  19. Immune evasion strategies used by Helicobacter pylori.

    PubMed

    Lina, Taslima T; Alzahrani, Shatha; Gonzalez, Jazmin; Pinchuk, Irina V; Beswick, Ellen J; Reyes, Victor E

    2014-09-28

    Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) is perhaps the most ubiquitous and successful human pathogen, since it colonizes the stomach of more than half of humankind. Infection with this bacterium is commonly acquired during childhood. Once infected, people carry the bacteria for decades or even for life, if not treated. Persistent infection with this pathogen causes gastritis, peptic ulcer disease and is also strongly associated with the development of gastric cancer. Despite induction of innate and adaptive immune responses in the infected individual, the host is unable to clear the bacteria. One widely accepted hallmark of H. pylori is that it successfully and stealthily evades host defense mechanisms. Though the gastric mucosa is well protected against infection, H. pylori is able to reside under the mucus, attach to gastric epithelial cells and cause persistent infection by evading immune responses mediated by host. In this review, we discuss how H. pylori avoids innate and acquired immune response elements, uses gastric epithelial cells as mediators to manipulate host T cell responses and uses virulence factors to avoid adaptive immune responses by T cells to establish a persistent infection. We also discuss in this review how the genetic diversity of this pathogen helps for its survival.

  20. What Are the Key Statistics for Childhood Leukemia?

    MedlinePlus

    ... Leukemia What Are the Key Statistics for Childhood Leukemia? Leukemia is the most common cancer in children ... Childhood Leukemia Research and Treatment? More In Childhood Leukemia About Childhood Leukemia Causes, Risk Factors, and Prevention ...

  1. Imbalanced immune homeostasis in immune thrombocytopenia.

    PubMed

    Yazdanbakhsh, Karina

    2016-04-01

    Immune thrombocytopenia (ITP) is an autoimmune bleeding disorder resulting from low platelet counts caused by inadequate production as well as increased destruction by autoimmune mechanisms. As with other autoimmune disorders, chronic ITP is characterized by perturbations of immune homeostasis with hyperactivated effector cells as well as defective regulatory arm of the adaptive immune system, which will be reviewed here. Interestingly, some ITP treatments are associated with restoring the regulatory imbalance, although it remains unclear whether the immune system is redirected to a state of tolerance once treatment is discontinued. Understanding the mechanisms that result in breakdown of immune homeostasis in ITP will help to identify novel pathways for restoring tolerance and inhibiting effector cell responses. This information can then be translated into developing therapies for averting autoimmunity not only in ITP but also many autoimmune disorders.

  2. Imbalanced immune homeostasis in immune thrombocytopenia

    PubMed Central

    Yazdanbakhsh, Karina

    2017-01-01

    Immune thrombocytopenia (ITP) is an autoimmune bleeding disorder resulting from low platelet counts caused by inadequate production as well as increased destruction by autoimmune mechanisms. As with other autoimmune disorders, chronic ITP is characterized by perturbations of immune homeostasis with hyperactivated effector cells as well as defective regulatory arm of the adaptive immune system, which will be reviewed here. Interestingly, some ITP treatments are associated with restoring the regulatory imbalance, although it remains unclear whether the immune system is redirected to a state of tolerance once treatment is discontinued. Understanding the mechanisms that result in breakdown of immune homeostasis in ITP will help to identify novel pathways for restoring tolerance and inhibiting effector cell responses. This information can then be translated into developing therapies for averting autoimmunity not only in ITP but also many autoimmune disorders. PMID:27312156

  3. Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices Recommended Immunization Schedule for Children and Adolescents Aged 18 Years or Younger - United States, 2017.

    PubMed

    Robinson, Candice L; Romero, José R; Kempe, Allison; Pellegrini, Cynthia

    2017-02-10

    In October 2016, the Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices (ACIP) approved the Recommended Immunization Schedule for Children and Adolescents Aged 18 Years or Younger-United States, 2017. The 2017 child and adolescent immunization schedule summarizes ACIP recommendations, including several changes from the 2016 immunization schedules, in three figures, and footnotes for the figures. These documents can be found on the CDC immunization schedule website (https://www.cdc.gov/vaccines/schedules/index.html). These immunization schedules are approved by ACIP (https://www.cdc.gov/vaccines/acip/index.html), the American Academy of Pediatrics (https://www.aap.org), the American Academy of Family Physicians (https://www.aafp.org), and the American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists (http://www.acog.org). Health care providers are advised to use the figures and the combined footnotes together. The full ACIP recommendations for each vaccine, including contraindications and precautions, can be found at https://www.cdc.gov/vaccines/hcp/acip-recs/index.html. Providers should be aware that changes in recommendations for specific vaccines can occur between annual updates to the childhood/adolescent immunization schedules. If errors or omissions are discovered within the child and adolescent schedule, CDC posts revised versions on the CDC immunization schedule website.

  4. Serological immunity to diphtheria and tetanus in healthy adults in Delhi, India.

    PubMed

    Saxena, Sonal; Jais, Manoj; Dutta, Renu; Dutta, A K

    2009-07-01

    Widespread childhood immunization with DPT (diphtheria, pertussis and tetanus) has largely eradicated diphtheria and tetanus from many countries. The reduction in the circulation of toxigenic strains has resulted in less natural boosting of adult immunity. As a result, the adult population in countries with high childhood immunization coverage have become susceptible to the disease. The duration of immunity after primary immunization to diphtheria and tetanus is limited and a reduction in immunity is common in adults. With this perspective, the present study was carried out on a random serum sample of 255 healthy individuals aged 20-50 years. The serum samples were tested for immunoglobulin G levels against diphtheria and tetanus by enzyme immuno assays. Fifty-three per cent of adults were unprotected; 22 % were seen to have only a basic protection against diphtheria; 25% were protected against both diseases; and 47% were susceptible to tetanus. The susceptibility was seen to increase with age. To avoid epidemics in the future, immunity must be improved. It is important to treat even the most trivial wound with care and tetanus toxoid immunization. Also, it is necessary to monitor the community for immunity to diphtheria using standard techniques in order to undertake epidemiological surveillances of, and prevention from, these dreadful diseases.

  5. Efficacy of screening immune system function in at-risk newborns.

    PubMed

    Pavlovski, Christopher J

    2014-01-01

    This paper explores the introduction of a screening test to highlight impaired immune system status for newborn infants and its efficacy as a preventative clinical measure. Moreover, it is suggested that screening of the infantile immune system has the potential to highlight susceptibility to a range of infant and childhood diseases, bestowing an opportunity to introduce early intervention to reduce the incidence of these diseases. Development of the neonatal immune system is an important health issue, implicated in many childhood problems such as allergies, infection, and autoimmunity. The neonate has a limited immune system and ability to combat bacteria. Depleted levels of the tripeptide reduced glutathione (GSH) have been linked to numerous conditions and its intracellular level is acknowledged as an indicator of immune system function. Introduction of an immune system screening programme for infants is formally reviewed and assessed. Several benefits are reported in the treatment of impaired immune systems, a trial screening programme is proposed for at-risk infants to gather further evidence as to its efficacy. Infants at risk of impaired immune system function include cystic fibrosis, premature infants, and low birth weight infants. The interventions include breastfeeding, milk banks, and appropriate formula to support the immune system.

  6. Giant electron-dense chains, clusters and granules in megakaryocytes and platelets with normal dense bodies: an inherited thrombocytopenic disorder.

    PubMed

    White, James G

    2003-03-01

    A woman and her male child were referred because of life-long thrombocytopenia, moderately increased platelet size, and absence of laboratory findings suggesting immune thrombocytopenia or defective platelet function. Evaluation of their platelets in the electron microscope revealed the presence of large organelles never seen before in human platelets. Examination of bone marrow from the mother and her son in an earlier study revealed that the giant platelet organelles originated in megakaryocytes. The present study has focused on the continuing development of the aberrant organelles in circulating platelets. The smallest subunits were electron-dense fragments and hollow-cored bodies observed in the dense tubular system (DTS). The dense fragments formed chains that became thicker, resulting in clusters, and clusters formed the large electron opaque bodies. Hollow-cored, almost hexagonal subunits also formed chains that interacted with each other to form target-like organelles. The multi-layered target organelles tended to become completely electron dense and difficult to distinguish from the opaque bodies. How two different types of aberrant organelles can develop in the same megakaryocyte/platelet system and both originate from channels of the DTS is unknown. Partial clarification stemming from analytical electron microscopy and ultrastructural cytochemistry will be presented in a subsequent report.

  7. Immune Responses in Neonates

    PubMed Central

    Basha, Saleem; Surendran, Naveen; Pichichero, Michael

    2015-01-01

    Neonates have little immunological memory and a developing immune system, which increases their vulnerability to infectious agents. Recent advances in understanding of neonatal immunity indicate that both innate and adaptive responses are dependent on precursor frequency of lymphocytes, antigenic dose and mode of exposure. Studies in neonatal mouse models and human umbilical cord blood cells demonstrate the capability of neonatal immune cells to produce immune responses similar to adults in some aspects but not others. This review focuses mainly on the developmental and functional mechanisms of the human neonatal immune system. In particular, the mechanism of innate and adaptive immunity and the role of neutrophils, antigen presenting cells, differences in subclasses of T lymphocytes (Th1, Th2, Tregs) and B cells are discussed. In addition, we have included the recent developments in neonatal mouse immune system. Understanding neonatal immunity is essential to development of therapeutic vaccines to combat newly emerging infectious agents. PMID:25088080

  8. Aging changes in immunity

    MedlinePlus

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/004008.htm Aging changes in immunity To use the sharing features ... cells and antibodies that destroy these harmful substances. AGING CHANGES AND THEIR EFFECTS ON THE IMMUNE SYSTEM ...

  9. Immunity to cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Reif, A.E.; Mitchell, M.S.

    1985-01-01

    This book contains five sections, each containing several papers. The section titles are: Identification and Characterization of Tumor Antigens; Immune Responses to Tumor Antigens; Regulation of the Immune Response to Tumor Cells, Immunotherapy and Biomodulators, and Immunotherapy and Immunoprophylaxis.

  10. Immune System and Disorders

    MedlinePlus

    Your immune system is a complex network of cells, tissues, and organs that work together to defend against germs. It ... t, to find and destroy them. If your immune system cannot do its job, the results can be ...

  11. [Immune system and tumors].

    PubMed

    Terme, Magali; Tanchot, Corinne

    2017-02-01

    Despite having been much debated, it is now well established that the immune system plays an essential role in the fight against cancer. In this article, we will highlight the implication of the immune system in the control of tumor growth and describe the major components of the immune system involved in the antitumoral immune response. The immune system, while exerting pressure on tumor cells, also will play a pro-tumoral role by sculpting the immunogenicity of tumors cells as they develop. Finally, we will illustrate the numerous mechanisms of immune suppression that take place within the tumoral microenvironment which allow tumor cells to escape control from the immune system. The increasingly precise knowledge of the brakes to an effective antitumor immune response allows the development of immunotherapy strategies more and more innovating and promising of hope.

  12. Adverse childhood experiences and behavioral problems in middle childhood.

    PubMed

    Hunt, Tenah K A; Slack, Kristen S; Berger, Lawrence M

    2016-11-21

    Children who have been exposed to maltreatment and other adverse childhood experiences (ACEs) are at increased risk for various negative adult health outcomes, including cancer, liver disease, substance abuse, and depression. However, the proximal associations between ACEs and behavioral outcomes during the middle childhood years have been understudied. In addition, many of the ACE studies contain methodological limitations such as reliance on retrospective reports and limited generalizability to populations of lower socioeconomic advantage. The current study uses data from the Fragile Families and Child Wellbeing Study, a national urban birth cohort, to prospectively assess the adverse experiences and subsequent behavior problems of over 3000 children. Eight ACE categories to which a child was exposed by age 5 were investigated: childhood abuse (emotional and physical), neglect (emotional and physical), and parental domestic violence, anxiety or depression, substance abuse, or incarceration. Results from bivariate analyses indicated that Black children and children with mothers of low education were particularly likely to have been exposed to multiple ACE categories. Regression analyses showed that exposure to ACEs is strongly associated with externalizing and internalizing behaviors and likelihood of ADHD diagnosis in middle childhood. Variation in these associations by racial/ethnic, gender, and maternal education subgroups are examined. This study provides evidence that children as young as 9 begin to show behavioral problems after exposure to early childhood adversities.

  13. Childhood Leukemia and Primary Prevention

    PubMed Central

    Whitehead, Todd P.; Metayer, Catherine; Wiemels, Joseph L.; Singer, Amanda W.; Miller, Mark D.

    2016-01-01

    Leukemia is the most common pediatric cancer, affecting 3,800 children per year in the United States. Its annual incidence has increased over the last decades, especially among Latinos. Although most children diagnosed with leukemia are now cured, many suffer long-term complications, and primary prevention efforts are urgently needed. The early onset of leukemia – usually before age five – and the presence at birth of “pre-leukemic” genetic signatures indicate that pre- and postnatal events are critical to the development of the disease. In contrast to most pediatric cancers, there is a growing body of literature – in the United States and internationally – that has implicated several environmental, infectious, and dietary risk factors in the etiology of childhood leukemia, mainly for acute lymphoblastic leukemia, the most common subtype. For example, exposures to pesticides, tobacco smoke, solvents, and traffic emissions have consistently demonstrated positive associations with the risk of developing childhood leukemia. In contrast, intake of vitamins and folate supplementation during the pre-conception period or pregnancy, breastfeeding, and exposure to routine childhood infections have been shown to reduce the risk of childhood leukemia. Some children may be especially vulnerable to these risk factors, as demonstrated by a disproportionate burden of childhood leukemia in the Latino population of California. The evidence supporting the associations between childhood leukemia and its risk factors – including pooled analyses from around the world and systematic reviews – is strong; however, the dissemination of this knowledge to clinicians has been limited. To protect children’s health, it is prudent to initiate programs designed to alter exposure to well-established leukemia risk factors rather than to suspend judgement until no uncertainty remains. Primary prevention programs for childhood leukemia would also result in the significant co

  14. Update on childhood brucellosis.

    PubMed

    Roushan, Mohammad R H; Amiri, Mohammad J S

    2013-04-01

    In endemic regions of brucellosis, childhood brucellosis includes up to one-third of all cases of human brucellosis. The main source of infection in children is consumption of unpasteurized dairy products and traditional local foods containing dairy products. The older boys are more involved in animal care. Boys are more commonly infected than girls. Common symptoms and signs include fever, arthralgia, sweating, peripheral arthritis and splenomegaly. Peripheral arthritis especially monoarthritis is more common and the most commonly affected joints are hip and knee. All organs may involve during the course of the disease. Isolation of Brucella spp. from the blood, bone marrow or other tissue fluids is the hallmark of diagnosis. Serologic tests are the main tools of diagnosis of brucellosis in endemic regions. Standard agglutination test (SAT) with titers > 1:160 and the 2-mercaptoethanol (2ME) test ≥ 1:80 are suggestive of active infection. Children older than 8 years should be treated with doxycycline for 45 days or 8 weeks plus gentamicin for 7 or 5 days respectively or doxycycline for 45 days and streptomycin for 14 days. Also doxycycline plus rifampin or cotrimoxazole plus rifampin for 45 days may be alternative regimens. Cotrimoxazole plus rifampin for six weeks is the regimen of choice for the treatment of patients younger than 8 years old. Gentamicin for 5 days plus cotrimoxazole for six weeks may be a suitable alternative regimen. The article presented few of the patents associated with Brucellosis.

  15. [Chronic ataxia in childhood].

    PubMed

    Erazo Torricelli, Ricardo

    2013-01-01

    Chronic ataxias are an heterogeneous group of disorders that affect the child at different ages. Thus, the congenital forms, generally non progressive are observed from first months of life and are expressed by hypotonia and motor delay long before the ataxia became evident. The cerebral magnetic resonance images (MRI) may be diagnostic in some pictures like Joubert syndrome. The group of progressive hereditary ataxias, usually begin after the infant period. The clinical signs are gait instability and ocular apraxia that can be associated with oculocutaneous telangiectasias (ataxia-telangiesctasia) or with sensory neuropathy (Friedreich ataxia). In this review are briefly described congenital ataxias and in more detailed form the progressive hereditary ataxias autosomal recessive, autosomal dominants and mitochondrials. The importance of genetic study is emphasized, because it is the key to obtain the diagnosis in the majority of these diseases. Although now there are no treatments for the majority of progressive hereditary ataxias, some they have like Refsum disease, vitamine E deficiency, Coenzyme Q10 deficiency and others, thus the diagnosis in these cases is even more important. At present the diagnosis of childhood hereditary ataxia not yet treatable is fundamental to obtain suitable handling, determine a precise outcome and to give to the family an opportune genetic counseling.

  16. Completed suicide in childhood.

    PubMed

    Dervic, Kanita; Brent, David A; Oquendo, Maria A

    2008-06-01

    Suicide in children and young adolescents up to 14 years of age has increased in many countries, warranting research and clinical awareness. International reported suicide rates per 100,000 in this young population vary between 3.1 and 0 (mean rate worldwide, approximately 0.6/100.000; male-female ratio, 2:1). Suicide occurs only in vulnerable children; this vulnerability begins with parental mood disorder and impulsive aggression, and family history of suicide. Childhood affective and disruptive disorders and abuse are the most often reported psychiatric risk factors. Suicide becomes increasingly common after puberty, most probably because of pubertal onset of depression and substance abuse, which substantially aggravate suicide risk. Biologic findings are scarce; however, serotonergic dysfunction is assumed. The most common precipitants are school and family problems and may include actual/anticipated transitions in these environments. Suicides in children and young adolescents up to 14 years of age often follow a brief period of stress. Cognitive immaturity/misjudgment, age-related impulsivity, and availability of suicide methods play an important role. Psychologic autopsy studies that focus on suicides in this age group are needed.

  17. Pesticides and childhood cancer.

    PubMed Central

    Zahm, S H; Ward, M H

    1998-01-01

    Children are exposed to potentially carcinogenic pesticides from use in homes, schools, other buildings, lawns and gardens, through food and contaminated drinking water, from agricultural application drift, overspray, or off-gassing, and from carry-home exposure of parents occupationally exposed to pesticides. Parental exposure during the child's gestation or even preconception may also be important. Malignancies linked to pesticides in case reports or case-control studies include leukemia, neuroblastoma, Wilms' tumor, soft-tissue sarcoma, Ewing's sarcoma, non-Hodgkin's lymphoma, and cancers of the brain, colorectum, and testes. Although these studies have been limited by nonspecific pesticide exposure information, small numbers of exposed subjects, and the potential for case-response bias, it is noteworthy that many of the reported increased risks are of greater magnitude than those observed in studies of pesticide-exposed adults, suggesting that children may be particularly sensitive to the carcinogenic effects of pesticides. Future research should include improved exposure assessment, evaluation of risk by age at exposure, and investigation of possible genetic-environment interactions. There is potential to prevent at least some childhood cancer by reducing or eliminating pesticide exposure. PMID:9646054

  18. Alternating hemiplegia of childhood.

    PubMed

    Kansagra, Sujay; Mikati, Mohamad A; Vigevano, Federico

    2013-01-01

    Alternating hemiplegia of childhood (AHC) is a very rare disease characterized by recurrent attacks of loss of muscular tone resulting in hypomobility of one side of the body. The etiology of the disease due to ATP1A3 gene mutations in the majority of patients. Few familial cases have been described. AHC has an onset in the first few months of life. Hemiplegic episodes are often accompanied by other paroxysmal manifestations, such as lateral eyes and head deviation toward the hemiplegic side and a very peculiar monocular nystagmus. As the attack progresses, hemiplegia can shift to the other side of the body. Sometimes the attack can provoke bilateral paralysis, and these patients may have severe clinical impairment, with difficulty in swallowing and breathing. Hemiplegic attacks may be triggered by different stimuli, like bath in warm water, motor activity, or emotion. The frequency of attacks is high, usually several in a month or in a week. The duration is variable from a few minutes to several hours or even days. Sleep can stop the attack. Movement disorders such as dystonia and abnormal movements are frequent. Cognitive delay of variable degree is a common feature. Epilepsy has been reported in 50% of the cases, but seizure onset is usually during the third or fourth year of life. Many drugs have been used in AHC with very few results. Flunarizine has the most supportive anecdotal evidence regarding efficacy.

  19. Your Child's Immunization Record

    MedlinePlus

    Your Child’s Immunization Record It’s important to keep up-to-date records of all your child’s immunizations, beginning at birth and continuing through ... receives a vaccination by filling in the date. Record of Immunizations Date Given: Where Given: Reaction: Hepatitis ...

  20. The Immune System Game

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Work, Kirsten A.; Gibbs, Melissa A.; Friedman, Erich J.

    2015-01-01

    We describe a card game that helps introductory biology students understand the basics of the immune response to pathogens. Students simulate the steps of the immune response with cards that represent the pathogens and the cells and molecules mobilized by the immune system. In the process, they learn the similarities and differences between the…

  1. Immune System Quiz

    MedlinePlus

    ... los dientes Video: Getting an X-ray Quiz: Immune System KidsHealth > For Kids > Quiz: Immune System Print A A A How much do you know about your immune system? Find out by taking this quiz! About KidsHealth ...

  2. Immune Disorder HSCT Protocol

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-11-01

    Immune Deficiency Disorders; Severe Combined Immunodeficiency; Chronic Granulomatous Disease; X-linked Agammaglobulinemia; Wiskott-Aldrich Syndrome; Hyper-IgM; DiGeorge Syndrome; Chediak-Higashi Syndrome; Common Variable Immune Deficiency; Immune Dysregulatory Disorders; Hemophagocytic Lymphohistiocytosis; IPEX; Autoimmune Lymphoproliferative Syndrome; X-linked Lymphoproliferative Syndrome

  3. Recent Coverage of Early Childhood Education Approaches in Open Access Early Childhood Journals

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Keskin, Burhanettin

    2016-01-01

    A content analysis of the coverage of the major approaches to early childhood education in the early childhood research journals, published between 2010 and 2014, that are early childhood research oriented and have free online access were investigated. Among 21 journals in early childhood education, two journals were selected for the content…

  4. Preservice Teachers' Beliefs about Childhood: Challenges for a Participatory Early Childhood Education?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Avgitidou, Sofia; Pnevmatikos, Dimitris; Likomitrou, Sonia

    2013-01-01

    This study examines preservice teachers' beliefs about childhood in an attempt to see how they may support an active, participatory role for children in early childhood education (ECE). Three hundred sixteen early childhood preservice teachers described childhood characteristics and children's ability for decision-making in a written text. These…

  5. Epidemiology of childhood food allergy.

    PubMed

    Dyer, Ashley A; Gupta, Ruchi

    2013-06-01

    Food allergy is a public health problem that affects nearly 6 million children in the United States. The extent to which children, families, and communities live with food allergies varies as much as the range of clinical symptoms associated with the disease itself. Food allergy is defined as the reproducible adverse event that elicits a pathologic immunoglobulin E (IgE)-mediated or non-IgE-mediated reaction. Once an allergic child ingests a specific food allergen, the reaction can result in clinical symptoms ranging from mild hives to life-threatening anaphylaxis.Not surprisingly, food allergies have been shown to limit social interactions and impair children's quality of life due to the ubiquity of food where children live, learn, and play. To ensure the safety of our children, the development of sound policy, clinical practice, and health programs must be informed by current research characterizing childhood food allergy at the population level. To set the stage for understanding the current evidence base, this article reviews: 1) epidemiology of childhood food allergy; 2) severity of symptoms; 3) geographic distribution of childhood food allergy; 4) tolerance; 5) economic impact of childhood food allergy; and 6) future directions in childhood food allergy epidemiological research.

  6. Childhood linear IgA bullous dermatosis in Tunisia.

    PubMed

    Kenani, Nesrine; Mebazaa, Amel; Denguezli, Mohamed; Ghariani, Najet; Sriha, Badreddine; Belajouza, Colandane; Nouira, Rafia

    2009-01-01

    The objective was to determine the demographic characteristics, the clinical features, the immuno-histological findings and response to treatment of childhood linear IgA bullous dermatosis (LABD) in Tunisia. We collected all the cases of auto-immune bullous diseases of childhood, diagnosed from January 1987 to December 2006. Based on clinical, histological, and immunofluorescent features, we identified 25 cases of LABD. Sixteen male and nine female children with a mean age of 7.5 years were identified. Clinical manifestations were characterized by a vesiculo-bullous eruption in all cases associated with mucous membrane involvement in two cases. Dapsone was the main therapy in 19 cases, associated with systemic corticosteroids in eight cases. Exclusive antibiotic therapy was successful in five cases. Sixteen of those patients had resolution of disease after a mean period of 15 months and eight patients had severe clinical presentation and required a prolonged follow-up. Childhood LABD is the most frequent bullous dermatosis in Tunisia. The majority of our patients responded rapidly to dapsone treatment and were stabilized for long time. Our cases were characterized by a minimal mucosal involvement and favorable outcome. Treatment with antibiotherapy was interesting. Erythromycin and oxacillin may be considered as an alternative therapy.

  7. Recent advances in the diagnosis and treatment of childhood tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Mani Kant; Kumar, Prashant; Singh, Anjali

    2015-01-01

    Despite over 2.3 million (26% of global burden) cases of tuberculosis (TB) in India the accurate diagnosis of childhood TB remains a major challenge. Children with TB usually have paucibacillary disease and contribute little to disease transmission within the community. Consequently the treatment of children with TB is often not considered a priority by TB control programmes. Adequate and timely assessment of TB infection in childhood could diminish epidemiological burden as underdiagnosed pediatric patients can eventually evolve in to an active state and have the potential to disseminate the etiological agent Mycobacterium tuberculosis, notably increasing this worldwide public health problem. In this review we discuss the most important recent advances in the diagnosis of childhood TB: (1) Symptom-based approaches, (2) novel immune-based approaches, including in vitro interferon-γ IGRA release assays IGRA tests; and (3) bacteriological and molecular methods that are more rapid and/or less expensive than conventional culture techniques for TB diagnosis and/or drug-resistance testing. Recent advances have improved our ability to diagnose latent infection and active TB in children, nevertheless establishing a diagnosis of either latent infection or active disease in HIV-infected children remains a major challenge. PMID:26283820

  8. Childhood Diseases - What Parents Need to Know

    MedlinePlus

    Skip Navigation Bar Home Current Issue Past Issues Childhood Diseases - What Parents Need to Know Past Issues / ... centers is continuing to improve the outlook for childhood diseases every day. Photo: iStock When the Eunice ...

  9. Genetics Home Reference: childhood myocerebrohepatopathy spectrum

    MedlinePlus

    ... Help Me Understand Genetics Home Health Conditions MCHS childhood myocerebrohepatopathy spectrum Enable Javascript to view the expand/ ... boxes. Download PDF Open All Close All Description Childhood myocerebrohepatopathy spectrum , commonly called MCHS , is part of ...

  10. CDC Vital Signs: Progress on Childhood Obesity

    MedlinePlus

    ... 41MB] Read the MMWR Science Clips Progress on Childhood Obesity Many States Show Declines Language: English Español ( ... are more likely to be obese later in childhood and adolescence. In these older children and adolescents, ...

  11. Childhood Asthma: A Chance to HEAL

    MedlinePlus

    ... Bar Home Current Issue Past Issues Special Section Childhood Asthma: A Chance to HEAL Past Issues / Fall ... HEAL is seeking ways to reduce the nation's childhood asthma challenge. Even before Hurricane Katrina swept through ...

  12. General Information about Childhood Liver Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... Liver Cancer Prevention Liver Cancer Screening Research Childhood Liver Cancer Treatment (PDQ®)–Patient Version General Information About Childhood Liver Cancer Go to Health Professional Version Key Points ...

  13. How Is Childhood Interstitial Lung Disease Treated?

    MedlinePlus

    ... the NHLBI on Twitter. How Is Childhood Interstitial Lung Disease Treated? Childhood interstitial lung disease (chILD) is ... prevent acid reflux, which can lead to aspiration. Lung Transplant A lung transplant may be an option ...

  14. Human Adaptive Immunity Rescues an Inborn Error of Innate Immunity.

    PubMed

    Israel, Laura; Wang, Ying; Bulek, Katarzyna; Della Mina, Erika; Zhang, Zhao; Pedergnana, Vincent; Chrabieh, Maya; Lemmens, Nicole A; Sancho-Shimizu, Vanessa; Descatoire, Marc; Lasseau, Théo; Israelsson, Elisabeth; Lorenzo, Lazaro; Yun, Ling; Belkadi, Aziz; Moran, Andrew; Weisman, Leonard E; Vandenesch, François; Batteux, Frederic; Weller, Sandra; Levin, Michael; Herberg, Jethro; Abhyankar, Avinash; Prando, Carolina; Itan, Yuval; van Wamel, Willem J B; Picard, Capucine; Abel, Laurent; Chaussabel, Damien; Li, Xiaoxia; Beutler, Bruce; Arkwright, Peter D; Casanova, Jean-Laurent; Puel, Anne

    2017-02-23

    The molecular basis of the incomplete penetrance of monogenic disorders is unclear. We describe here eight related individuals with autosomal recessive TIRAP deficiency. Life-threatening staphylococcal disease occurred during childhood in the proband, but not in the other seven homozygotes. Responses to all Toll-like receptor 1/2 (TLR1/2), TLR2/6, and TLR4 agonists were impaired in the fibroblasts and leukocytes of all TIRAP-deficient individuals. However, the whole-blood response to the TLR2/6 agonist staphylococcal lipoteichoic acid (LTA) was abolished only in the index case individual, the only family member lacking LTA-specific antibodies (Abs). This defective response was reversed in the patient, but not in interleukin-1 receptor-associated kinase 4 (IRAK-4)-deficient individuals, by anti-LTA monoclonal antibody (mAb). Anti-LTA mAb also rescued the macrophage response in mice lacking TIRAP, but not TLR2 or MyD88. Thus, acquired anti-LTA Abs rescue TLR2-dependent immunity to staphylococcal LTA in individuals with inherited TIRAP deficiency, accounting for incomplete penetrance. Combined TIRAP and anti-LTA Ab deficiencies underlie staphylococcal disease in this patient.

  15. Integrated Management of Childhood Illness (IMCI): a robust strategy.

    PubMed

    Patwari, A K; Raina, Neena

    2002-01-01

    Integrated Management of Childhood Illness (IMCI), a strategy fostering holistic approach to child health and development, is built upon successful experiences gained from effective child health interventions like immunization, oral rehydration therapy, management of acute respiratory infections and improved infant feeding. The core intervention of IMCI is integrated management of the five most important causes of childhood deaths-acute respiratory infections, diarrheal diseases, measles, malaria and malnutrition. Using a set of interventions for the integrated treatment and prevention of major childhood illnesses, the IMCI strategy aims to reduce death as well as the frequency and severity of illness and disability, thus contributing to improved growth and development. In health facilities, the IMCI strategy promotes the accurate identification of childhood illness (es) in the outpatient settings, ensures appropriate combined treatment of all major illnesses, strengthens the counselling of caretakers and the provision of preventive services, and speeds up the referral of severely ill children. The strategy also aims to improve the quality of care of sick children at the referral level. It also creates a scientifically sound link between the management guidelines at the community level and the management approach in a referral centre. The strategy also envisages actual situations when referral is not possible and offers the best possible options in such circumstances. In the home setting, it promotes appropriate early home care and care-seeking, improved nutrition and prevention, and the correct implementation of prescribed care. In addition to its focus on treatment of illness in the health facility as well as at home, it also provides an opportunity for important preventive interventions such as immunization and improved infant and child nutrition including breastfeeding. The IMCI strategy reduces wastage of resources and avoids duplication of efforts that may

  16. Long-term immunogenicity of hepatitis A virus vaccine in Alaska 17 years after initial childhood series.

    PubMed

    Raczniak, Gregory A; Bulkow, Lisa R; Bruce, Michael G; Zanis, Carolyn L; Baum, Richard L; Snowball, Mary M; Byrd, Kathy K; Sharapov, Umid M; Hennessy, Thomas W; McMahon, Brian J

    2013-02-01

    The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention recommends hepatitis A virus (HAV) vaccination for all children at age 1 year and for high-risk adults. The vaccine is highly effective; however, protection duration is unknown. We report HAV antibody concentrations 17 years after childhood immunization, demonstrating that protective antibody levels remain and have stabilized over the past 7 years.

  17. [Obstructive uropathy in childhood].

    PubMed

    Balster, S; Schiborr, M; Brinkmann, O A; Hertle, L

    2005-08-01

    "Obstructive uropathy" is a generic term which combines different diseases in infants and childhood. Both the upper and lower urinary tract may be affected. Diseases of the urinary tract can cause an intrinsic obstruction. Sometimes tumours may cause a compression and as secondary effect an obstruction (extrinsic). Ultrasound is the key diagnostic tool and shows dilatation of the obstructed urinary tract. But for the functional exploration of babies and toddlers, renal scanning and X-ray examinations are necessary. These examinations lead to an exposure to radiation which necessitates careful indication. Some of the congenital diseases (for example ureteropelvic junction obstruction, megaureter) show a maturation without any intervention. So one has to decide whether to wait and see or to operate. A percutaneous nephrostomy or a DJ-catheter is not often used in the treatment of obstruction in general. These forms of drainage are more often used in the treatment of stones or of extrinsic obstruction. A pyelocutaneostomy or ureterocutaneostomy is a special surgical procedure in pediatric urology for transient drainage of the upper urinary tract (megaureter). The operation of a seriously ill new-born should be done in a centre for pediatric urology and pediatric nephrology. When the upper urinary tract is dilated, patients may need an antibiotic prophylaxis, because the dilatation of the upper urinary tract increases the risk of urinary tract infections (UTI). The indication for antibiotic prophylaxis should by guided by the criteria of the APN-Consensus Paper. Long-term follow-up is necessary and should comprise ultrasound, physical examination, controlling the blood pressure, urine analysis and blood tests. The aims of diagnostics, treatment and long-term follow-up are the preservation of renal function and to protect the children from UTI. This goal must be reached under conditions that are appropriate for children and their parents.

  18. Childhood lead poisoning.

    PubMed

    Linakis, J G

    1995-01-01

    Lead poisoning has been referred to as the most important environmental health hazard for children in New England. Medical professionals are in a unique position to perform a number of interventions that could make a lasting impact. First, physicians and nurses, particularly in the areas of pediatrics and family medicine, can provide anticipatory guidance to all families with young children. Lead poisoning, in contrast to long held beliefs, is an affliction that affects all socioeconomic groups. Parents should thus be informed regarding sources of lead, including occupational and hobby sources, and basic nutritional and abatement information should be provided. Second, health care workers should encourage lead screening in appropriately aged children at recommended intervals based on known risk factors. Once a blood lead concentration greater than 20[symbol: see text]g/dl has been obtained in a child, treatment or referral to an established lead clinic should be undertaken in a timely fashion. For children with low or moderate lead levels, many pediatricians or family physicians prefer to supervise their patients' treatment, including chelation therapy. For children with higher levels or in instances when the health care professional elects to refer, there are several lead clinics throughout New England whose clinicians are experienced in the treatment of childhood lead poisoning. Finally the medical profession needs to publicly recognize, as child advocates, that lead poisoning is one of the most common pediatric health problems in the United States and that it is entirely preventable. Fortunately, after many years and much hard work, Rhode Island finally has laws that start to deal with the lead problem in an appropriately aggressive fashion.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  19. Childhood functional gastrointestinal disorders

    PubMed Central

    Rasquin-Weber, A; Hyman, P; Cucchiara, S; Fleisher, D; Hyams, J; Milla, P; Staiano, A

    1999-01-01

    This is the first attempt at defining criteria for functional gastrointestinal disorders (FGIDs) in infancy, childhood, and adolescence. The decision-making process was as for adults and consisted of arriving at consensus, based on clinical experience. This paper is intended to be a quick reference. The classification system selected differs from the one used in the adult population in that it is organized according to main complaints instead of being organ-targeted. Because the child is still developing, some disorders such as toddler's diarrhea (or functional diarrhea) are linked to certain physiologic stages; others may result from behavioral responses to sphincter function acquisition such as fecal retention; others will only be recognizable after the child is cognitively mature enough to report the symptoms (e.g., dyspepsia). Infant regurgitation, rumination, and cyclic vomiting constitute the vomiting disorders. Abdominal pain disorders are classified as: functional dyspepsia, irritable bowel syndrome (IBS), functional abdominal pain, abdominal migraine, and aerophagia. Disorders of defecation include: infant dyschezia, functional constipation, functional fecal retention, and functional non-retentive fecal soiling. Some disorders, such as IBS and dyspepsia and functional abdominal pain, are exact replications of the adult criteria because there are enough data to confirm that they represent specific and similar disorders in pediatrics. Other disorders not included in the pediatric classification, such as functional biliary disorders, do occur in children; however, existing data are insufficient to warrant including them at the present time. For these disorders, it is suggested that, for the time being, clinicians refer to the criteria established for the adult population.


Keywords: infant vomiting; cyclic vomiting syndrome; functional dyspepsia in children; irritable bowel syndrome in children; functional abdominal pain in children; functional

  20. Kidney and innate immunity.

    PubMed

    Wang, Ying-Hui; Zhang, Yu-Gen

    2017-03-01

    Innate immune system is an important modulator of the inflammatory response during infection and tissue injury/repair. The kidney as a vital organ with high energy demand plays a key role in regulating the disease related metabolic process. Increasing research interest has focused on the immune pathogenesis of many kidney diseases. However, innate immune cells such as dendritic cells, macrophages, NK cells and a few innate lymphocytes, as well as the complement system are essential for renal immune homeostasis and ensure a coordinated balance between tissue injury and regeneration. The innate immune response provides the first line of host defense initiated by several classes of pattern recognition receptors (PRRs), such as membrane-bound Toll-like receptors (TLRs) and nucleotide-binding oligomerization domain (NOD)-like receptors (NLRs), together with inflammasomes responsible for early innate immune response. Although the innate immune system is well studied, the research on the detailed relationship between innate immunity and kidney is still very limited. In this review, we will focus on the innate immune sensing system in renal immune homeostasis, as well as the corresponding pathogenesis of many kidney diseases. The pivotal roles of innate immunity in renal injury and regeneration with special emphasis on kidney disease related immunoregulatory mechanism are also discussed.

  1. Chapter 2: Innate Immunity

    PubMed Central

    Turvey, Stuart E.; Broide, David H.

    2009-01-01

    Recent years have witnessed an explosion of interest in the innate immune system. Questions about how the innate immune system senses infection and empowers a protective immune response are being answered at the molecular level. These basic science discoveries are being translated into a more complete understanding of the central role innate immunity plays in the pathogenesis of many human infectious and inflammatory diseases. It is particularly exciting that we are already seeing a return on these scientific investments with the emergence of novel therapies to harness the power of the innate immune system. In this review we explore the defining characteristics of the innate immune system, and through more detailed examples, we highlight recent breakthroughs that have advanced our understanding of the role of innate immunity in human health and disease. PMID:19932920

  2. Epigenetic Alterations Associated with War Trauma and Childhood Maltreatment.

    PubMed

    Ramo-Fernández, Laura; Schneider, Anna; Wilker, Sarah; Kolassa, Iris-Tatjana

    2015-10-01

    Survivors of war trauma or childhood maltreatment are at increased risk for trauma-spectrum disorders such as post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD). In addition, traumatic stress has been associated with alterations in the neuroendocrine and the immune system, enhancing the risk for physical diseases. Traumatic experiences might even affect psychological as well as biological parameters in the next generation, i.e. traumatic stress might have transgenerational effects. This article outlines how epigenetic processes, which represent a pivotal biological mechanism for dynamic adaptation to environmental challenges, might contribute to the explanation of the long-lasting and transgenerational effects of trauma. In particular, epigenetic alterations in genes regulating the hypothalamus-pituitary-adrenal axis as well as the immune system have been observed in survivors of childhood and adult trauma. These changes could result in enduring alterations of the stress response as well as the physical health risk. Furthermore, the effects of parental trauma could be transmitted to the next generation by parental distress and the pre- and postnatal environment, as well as by epigenetic marks transmitted via the germline. While epigenetic research has a high potential of advancing our understanding of the consequences of trauma, the findings have to be interpreted with caution, as epigenetics only represent one piece of a complex puzzle of interacting biological and environmental factors. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  3. Treatment for dystonia in childhood.

    PubMed

    Roubertie, A; Mariani, L L; Fernandez-Alvarez, E; Doummar, D; Roze, E

    2012-10-01

    Management of childhood dystonia differs in certain respects from that of adult dystonia: (i) childhood dystonia is more often secondary than primary; (ii) mixed motor disorders are frequent; (iii) in children, the course of dystonia may be influenced by ongoing brain maturation and by the remarkable plasticity of the young brain; (iv) drug tolerability and effectiveness can be different in children; (v) the therapeutic strategy must be discussed with both the patient and his or her parents; and (vi) the child's education must be taken into account. Based on a systematic review of the literature through June 2011 and on our personal experience, we propose a therapeutic approach to childhood dystonia. After a detailed clinical evaluation and a comprehensive work-up to rule out a treatable cause of dystonia, symptomatic treatment may include various drugs, local botulinum toxin injections, and deep brain stimulation, in addition to rehabilitation.

  4. Immunotherapy of Childhood Sarcomas

    PubMed Central

    Roberts, Stephen S.; Chou, Alexander J.; Cheung, Nai-Kong V.

    2015-01-01

    Pediatric sarcomas are a heterogeneous group of malignant tumors of bone and soft tissue origin. Although more than 100 different histologic subtypes have been described, the majority of pediatric cases belong to the Ewing’s family of tumors, rhabdomyosarcoma and osteosarcoma. Most patients that present with localized stage are curable with surgery and/or chemotherapy; however, those with metastatic disease at diagnosis or those who experience a relapse continue to have a very poor prognosis. New therapies for these patients are urgently needed. Immunotherapy is an established treatment modality for both liquid and solid tumors, and in pediatrics, most notably for neuroblastoma and osteosarcoma. In the past, immunomodulatory agents such as interferon, interleukin-2, and liposomal-muramyl tripeptide phosphatidyl-ethanolamine have been tried, with some activity seen in subsets of patients; additionally, various cancer vaccines have been studied with possible benefit. Monoclonal antibody therapies against tumor antigens such as disialoganglioside GD2 or immune checkpoint targets such as CTLA-4 and PD-1 are being actively explored in pediatric sarcomas. Building on the success of adoptive T cell therapy for EBV-related lymphoma, strategies to redirect T cells using chimeric antigen receptors and bispecific antibodies are rapidly evolving with potential for the treatment of sarcomas. This review will focus on recent preclinical and clinical developments in targeted agents for pediatric sarcomas with emphasis on the immunobiology of immune checkpoints, immunoediting, tumor microenvironment, antibody engineering, cell engineering, and tumor vaccines. The future integration of antibody-based and cell-based therapies into an overall treatment strategy of sarcoma will be discussed. PMID:26301204

  5. An Introduction to Early Childhood Studies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Maynard, Trlsha, Ed.; Thomas, Nigel, Ed.

    2004-01-01

    The primary purpose of this book is to provide a core introductory text for the many undergraduate students who are now studying early childhood. Four key themes are emphasised throughout this book: The first is the social construction of childhood. This is the idea that childhood is not a naturally given phenomenon, but the result of social…

  6. Dispersing Waves: Innovation in Early Childhood Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Meade, Anne, Ed.

    2010-01-01

    Early childhood education Centres of Innovation (COI) were established in 2002 as part of the 10-year plan for early childhood education, "Pathways to the Future/Nga Huarahi Arataki." In COI projects, innovative early childhood teaching teams reflect on and investigate their practices through action research, and share their findings…

  7. Leadership in Early Childhood Special Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Arora, Samita Berry

    2013-01-01

    With the demands of high quality early childhood special education programs within public school settings, there is a need to place emphasis on research and training regarding early childhood leaders and managers in this complex and diverse field. The focus of this research is to examine what early childhood special education (ECSE) leadership…

  8. Exploring Disclosure in Childhood Sexual Abuse

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Whisnant, Roberta Ann

    2009-01-01

    Previous research involving adult survivors of CSA (childhood sexual abuse) indicates that approximately 77% of CSA victims did not report the abuse while in childhood. The purpose of this study was to examine CSA disclosure in childhood. Participants for this study were 137 children/adolescents ranging in ages from 2-16 interviewed at a child…

  9. Holding on to Childhood Language Memory.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Oh, Janet S.; Jun, Sun-Ah; Knightly, Leah M.; Au, Terry Kit-fong

    2003-01-01

    This study compared perception and production of Korean speech sounds by college students who had spoken Korean regularly for a few years during childhood to those of novice Korean learners and childhood hearers who had heard Korean regularly during childhood but had spoken Korean only minimally. Findings revealed long-term benefits of childhood…

  10. Early Childhood Education: The Case of Turkey

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Usakli, Hakan

    2010-01-01

    It is now widely recognized that early childhood education has paramount significance for the well-being of societies. In this study, the current situation of early childhood education in Turkey is discussed mainly in terms of its perception by the government, the school enrollment rate and the quality of early childhood education programs. The…

  11. Maternal Immune-Mediated Conditions, Autism Spectrum Disorders, and Developmental Delay

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lyall, Kristen; Ashwood, Paul; Van de Water, Judy; Hertz-Picciotto, Irva

    2014-01-01

    The maternal immune system may play a role in offspring neurodevelopment. We examined whether maternal autoimmune disease, asthma, and allergy were associated with child autism spectrum disorder (ASD) and developmental delay without autism (DD) using 560 ASD cases, 391 typically developing controls, and 168 DD cases from the CHildhood Autism Risk…

  12. Measuring polio immunity to plan immunization activities.

    PubMed

    Voorman, Arend; Lyons, Hil M

    2016-11-21

    The Global Polio Eradication Initiative is closer than ever to achieving a polio-free world. Immunization activities must still be carried out in non-endemic countries to maintain population immunity at levels which will stop poliovirus from spreading if it is re-introduced from still-infected areas. In areas where there is no active transmission of poliovirus, programs must rely on surrogate indicators of population immunity to determine the appropriate immunization activities, typically caregiver-reported vaccination history obtained from non-polio acute flaccid paralysis patients identified through polio surveillance. We used regression models to examine the relationship between polio vaccination campaigns and caregiver-reported polio vaccination history. We find that in many countries, vaccination campaigns have a surprisingly weak impact on these commonly used indicators. We conclude that alternative criteria and data, such as routine immunization indicators from vaccination records or household surveys, should be considered for planning polio vaccination campaigns, and that validation of such surrogate indicators is necessary if they are to be used as the basis for program planning and risk assessment. We recommend that the GPEI and similar organizations consider or continue devoting additional resources to rigorously study population immunity and campaign effectiveness in at-risk countries.

  13. How do plants achieve immunity? Defence without specialized immune cells.

    PubMed

    Spoel, Steven H; Dong, Xinnian

    2012-01-25

    Vertebrates have evolved a sophisticated adaptive immune system that relies on an almost infinite diversity of antigen receptors that are clonally expressed by specialized immune cells that roam the circulatory system. These immune cells provide vertebrates with extraordinary antigen-specific immune capacity and memory, while minimizing self-reactivity. Plants, however, lack specialized mobile immune cells. Instead, every plant cell is thought to be capable of launching an effective immune response. So how do plants achieve specific, self-tolerant immunity and establish immune memory? Recent developments point towards a multilayered plant innate immune system comprised of self-surveillance, systemic signalling and chromosomal changes that together establish effective immunity.

  14. Innate and adaptive immune traits are differentially affected by genetic and environmental factors

    PubMed Central

    Mangino, Massimo; Roederer, Mario; Beddall, Margaret H.; Nestle, Frank O.; Spector, Tim D.

    2017-01-01

    The diversity and activity of leukocytes is controlled by genetic and environmental influences to maintain balanced immune responses. However, the relative contribution of environmental compared with genetic factors that affect variations in immune traits is unknown. Here we analyse 23,394 immune phenotypes in 497 adult female twins. 76% of these traits show a predominantly heritable influence, whereas 24% are mostly influenced by environment. These data highlight the importance of shared childhood environmental influences such as diet, infections or microbes in shaping immune homeostasis for monocytes, B1 cells, γδ T cells and NKT cells, whereas dendritic cells, B2 cells, CD4+ T and CD8+ T cells are more influenced by genetics. Although leukocyte subsets are influenced by genetics and environment, adaptive immune traits are more affected by genetics, whereas innate immune traits are more affected by environment. PMID:28054551

  15. Financial challenges of immunization: a look at GAVI.

    PubMed Central

    Kaddar, Miloud; Lydon, Patrick; Levine, Ruth

    2004-01-01

    Securing reliable and adequate public funding for prevention services, even those that are considered highly cost effective, often presents a challenge. This has certainly been the case with childhood immunizations in developing countries. Although the traditional childhood vaccines cost relatively little, funding in poor countries is often at risk and subject to the political whims of donors and national governments. With the introduction of newer and more costly vaccines made possible under the Global Alliance for Vaccines and Immunization (GAVI), the future financial challenges have become even greater. Experience so far suggests that choosing to introduce new combination vaccines can significantly increase the costs of national immunization programmes. With this experience comes a growing concern about their affordability in the medium term and long term and a realization that, for many countries, shared financial responsibility between national governments and international donors may initially be required. This article focuses on how GAVI is addressing the challenge of sustaining adequate and reliable funding for immunizations in the poorest countries. PMID:15628208

  16. Microbes and mucosal immune responses in asthma.

    PubMed

    Hansel, Trevor T; Johnston, Sebastian L; Openshaw, Peter J

    2013-03-09

    The substantial increase in the worldwide prevalence of asthma and atopy has been attributed to lifestyle changes that reduce exposure to bacteria. A recent insight is that the largely bacterial microbiome maintains a state of basal immune homoeostasis, which modulates immune responses to microbial pathogens. However, some respiratory viral infections cause bronchiolitis of infancy and childhood wheeze, and can exacerbate established asthma; whereas allergens can partly mimic infectious agents. New insights into the host’s innate sensing systems, combined with recently developed methods that characterise commensal and pathogenic microbial exposure, now allow a unified theory for how microbes cause mucosal inflammation in asthma. The respiratory mucosa provides a key microbial interface where epithelial and dendritic cells interact with a range of functionally distinct lymphocytes. Lymphoid cells then control a range of pathways, both innate and specific, which organise the host mucosal immune response. Fundamental to innate immune responses to microbes are the interactions between pathogen-associated molecular patterns and pattern recognition receptors, which are associated with production of type I interferons, proinflammatory cytokines, and the T-helper-2 cell pathway in predisposed people. These coordinated, dynamic immune responses underlie the differing asthma phenotypes, which we delineate in terms of Seven Ages of Asthma. An understanding of the role of microbes in the atopic march towards asthma, and in causing exacerbations of established asthma, provides the rationale for new specific treatments that can be assessed in clinical trials. On the basis of these new ideas, specific host biomarkers might then allow personalised treatment to become a reality for patients with asthma.

  17. Food intolerances and eosinophilic esophagitis in childhood.

    PubMed

    Ozdemir, Oner; Mete, Emin; Catal, Ferhat; Ozol, Duygu

    2009-01-01

    Food intolerance is an adverse reaction to a particular food or ingredient that may or may not be related to the immune system. A deficiency in digestive enzymes can also cause some types of food intolerances like lactose and gluten intolerance. Food intolerances may cause unpleasant symptoms, including nausea, bloating, abdominal pain, and diarrhea, which usually begin about half an hour after eating or drinking the food in question, but sometimes symptoms may delayed up to 48 h. There is also a strong genetic pattern to food intolerances. Intolerance reactions to food chemicals are mostly dose-related, but also some people are more sensitive than others. Diagnosis can include elimination and challenge testing. Food intolerance can be managed simply by avoiding the particular food from entering the diet. Babies or younger children with lactose intolerance can be given soy milk or hypoallergenic milk formula instead of cow's milk. Adults may be able to tolerate small amounts of troublesome foods, so may need to experiment. Eosinophilic esophagitis (EE) is defined as isolated eosinophilic infiltration in patients with reflux-like symptoms and normal pH studies and whose symptoms are refractory to acid-inhibition therapy. Food allergy, abnormal immunologic response, and autoimmune mechanisms are suggested as possible etiological factors for EE. This article is intended to review the current literature and to present a practical approach for managing food intolerances and EE in childhood.

  18. Childhood serum sickness: a case report.

    PubMed

    Chao, Y K; Shyur, S D; Wu, C Y; Wang, C Y

    2001-09-01

    Childhood serum sickness is a rare allergic disease that follows the administration of a foreign antigenic material, most commonly caused by injecting a protein or haptenic drug. The disease is a type III hypersensitivity reaction mediated by deposits of circulating immune complexes in small vessels, which leads to complement activation and subsequent inflammation. The clinical features are fever, cutaneous eruptions, lymphadenopathy, arthralgias, albuminuria, and nephritis. Serum sickness is an acute self-limited disease. We report a 3-year-old child who presented with fever and a rash; an invasive bacterial infection was strongly suspected. He was therefore given penicillin and gentamicin and responded well. At day 4 after admission, he developed a serum sickness reaction and showed symptoms of arthralgias, generalized edema, purpura, and gross hematuria. The white blood cell count was 12 190/mm3 with 7% eosinophils. Urinalysis revealed red blood cell above 100 per high power field, white blood cell 10 to 15 per high power field, and proteinuria. The antibiotics were discontinued and hydrocortisone (20 mg/kg/d), diphenhydramine HCl (4 mg/kg/d), aspirin (66 mg/kg/d) was administered, plus 1 dose of epinephrine (0.01 mL/kg) administered intramuscularly. On day 7, the 3rd day after withholding antibiotics, his condition dramatically improved. The clinical symptoms resolved progressively and his urinalysis returned to normal.

  19. Childhood sarcoidosis: Louisiana experience.

    PubMed

    Gedalia, Abraham; Khan, Tahir A; Shetty, Avinash K; Dimitriades, Victoria R; Espinoza, Luis R

    2016-07-01

    A retrospective chart review was conducted to detect patients with sarcoidosis seen by pediatric rheumatology service from the period of 1992 to 2013 at Children's hospital of New Orleans. Twenty-seven patients were identified. The average duration of symptoms before diagnosis was 5 (range 1-120) months. Five patients had onset before the age of 5 years and were diagnosed with early-onset sarcoidosis. The most common manifestations at presentation were constitutional symptoms (62 %) followed by ocular (38 %). During the course of illness, 19/27 (70 %) had multiorgan involvement. Common manifestations included uveitis/iritis (77 %), fever (50 %), hilar adenopathy (42 %), arthritis (31 %), peripheral lympadenopathy (31 %), hepatosplenomegaly (31 %), parenchymal lung disease (27 %), and skin rash (19 %). Unusual manifestations included granulomatous bone marrow disease (3 cases), hypertension (2), abdominal aortic aneurysm (large vessel vasculitis; 1), granulomatous hepatitis (1), nephrocalcinosis (1), membranous nephropathy (1), refractory granulomatous interstitial nephritis with recurrence in transplanted kidney (1), CNS involvement (2), parotid gland enlargement (1), and sensorineural hearing loss (1). Biopsy specimen was obtained in 21/27 (77 %) patients, and demonstration of noncaseating granuloma associated with negative stains for mycobacteria and fungi was seen in 18 patients. Elevated angiotensin-converting enzyme level was seen in 74 % of patients. Treatment with oral prednisone was initiated in symptomatic patients with significant clinical improvement. Low-dose methotrexate (MTX) 10-15 mg/m(2)/week orally, as steroid-sparing agent, was administered in 14 patients. Other immunomodulators included cyclophosphamide (2 patients), etanercept (2), infliximab (2), mycophenolate mofetil (1), and tacrolimus (1). Childhood sarcoidosis is prevalent in Louisiana. Most of the affected children present with a multisystem disease associated with

  20. Immunization with a recombinant bacillus Calmette-Guerin strain confers protective Th1 immunity against the human metapneumovirus.

    PubMed

    Palavecino, Christian E; Céspedes, Pablo F; Gómez, Roberto S; Kalergis, Alexis M; Bueno, Susan M

    2014-01-01

    Along with the human respiratory syncytial virus (hRSV), the human metapneumovirus (hMPV) is one of the leading causes of childhood hospitalization and a major health burden worldwide. Unfortunately, owing to an inefficient immunological memory, hMPV infection provides limited immune protection against reinfection. Furthermore, hMPV can induce an inadequate Th2 type immune response that causes severe lung inflammation, leading to airway obstruction. Similar to hRSV, it is likely that an effective clearance of hMPV would require a balanced Th1 type immunity by the host, involving the activation of IFN-γ-secreting T cells. A recognized inducer of Th1 immunity is Mycobacterium bovis bacillus Calmette-Guérin (BCG), which has been used in newborns for many decades and in several countries as a tuberculosis vaccine. We have previously shown that immunization with BCG strains expressing hRSV Ags can induce an efficient immune response that protects against this virus. In this study, we show that immunization with rBCG strains expressing the phosphoprotein from hMPV also can induce protective Th1 immunity. Mice immunized with rBCG were protected against weight loss, airway inflammation, and viral replication in the lungs after hMPV infection. Our rBCG vaccine also induced the activation of hMPV-specific T cells producing IFN-γ and IL-2, which could protect from hMPV infection when transferred to recipient mice. These data strongly support the notion that rBCG induces protective Th1 immunity and could be considered as an efficient vaccine against hMPV.